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Sample records for gene mutation screening

  1. DHPLC screening of cystic fibrosis gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Ravnik-Glavac, Metka; Atkinson, Andrew; Glavac, Damjan; Dean, Michael

    2002-04-01

    Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) using ion-pairing reverse phase chromatography (IPRPC) columns is a technique for the screening of gene mutations. In order to evaluate the potential utility of this assay method in a clinical laboratory setting, we subjected the PCR products of 73 CF patients known to bear CFTR mutations to this analytic technique. We used thermal denaturation profile parameters specified by the MELT program tool, made available by Stanford University. Using this strategy, we determined an initial analytic sensitivity of 90.4% for any of 73 known CFTR mutations. Most of the mutations not detected by DHPLC under these conditions are alpha-substitutions. This information may eventually help to improve the MELT algorithm. Increasing column denaturation temperatures for one or two degrees above those recommended by the MELT program allowed 100% detection of CFTR mutations tested. By comparing DHPLC methodology used in this study with the recently reported study based on Wavemaker 3.4.4 software (Transgenomic, Omaha, NE) [Le Marechal et al., 2001) and with previous SSCP analysis of CFTR mutations [Ravnik-Glavac et al., 1994] we emphasized differences and similarities in order to refine the DHPLC system and discuss the relationship to the alternative approaches. We conclude that the DHPLC method, under optimized conditions, is highly accurate, rapid, and efficient in detecting mutations in the CFTR gene and may find high utility in screening individuals for CFTR mutations. Hum Mutat 19:374-383, 2002. Published 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Screening of Mutation in Amelogenin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Fernanda Veronese; Gurgel, Carla Vecchione; Kobayashi, Tatiana Yuriko; Dionísio, Thiago José; Neves, Lucimara Teixeira; Santos, Carlos Ferreira; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report the clinical findings and the screening of mutations of amelogenin gene of a 7-year-old boy with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). The genomic DNA was extracted from saliva of patient and his family, followed by PCR and direct DNA sequencing. The c.261C>T mutation was found in samples of mother, father, and brother, but the mutation was not found in the sequence of the patient. This mutation is a silent mutation and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs2106416). Thus, it is suggested that the mutation found was not related to the clinical presence of AI. Further research is necessary to examine larger number of patients and genes related to AI. PMID:25045544

  3. Novel strategies for comprehensive mutation screening of the APC gene.

    PubMed

    Wachsmannova, L; Mego, M; Stevurkova, V; Zajac, V; Ciernikova, S

    2017-03-03

    Colorectal cancer is the 4th most common cause of cancer related deaths worldwide and new possibilities in accurate diagnosis and targeted treatment are highly required. Mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene play a pivotal role in adenoma-carcinoma pathway of colorectal tumorigenesis. The quarter century from its´ first cloning, APC became one of the most frequently mutated, known driver genes in colorectal cancer. Intensive routine molecular testing of APC has brought the benefits for patients with family history of polyposis or colorectal cancer. Nevertheless, multiple mutational disease-causing mechanisms make the genetic testing still challenging. This minireview is focused on implementation of novel APC mutation screening diagnostic strategies for polyposis families according to the current findings. A further understanding and improved algorithms may help to increase the mutation detection rate. APC germline mutations achieve close to 100% penetrance, so more comprehensive approach followed by preventive and therapeutic strategies might reflect in decrease in burden of colorectal cancer.

  4. Screening for mutations in candidate genes for hypospadias.

    PubMed

    Nordenskjöld, A; Friedman, E; Tapper-Persson, M; Söderhäll, C; Leviav, A; Svensson, J; Anvret, M

    1999-01-01

    Hypospadias. a condition with a frontally placed urethral orifice on the penis, is the most common malformation in males. During fetal development several components are necessary for normal male genital development. Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone act via the androgen receptor but a defective receptor function results in different degrees of genital malformations. Testosterone-5alpha-reductase converts testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, which is crucial for normal differentiation, and a total lack of this enzyme results, in syndromes with hypospadias. The Wilms' tumour 1 (WT1) gene is expressed in the fetal gonad and genital malformations can occur due to WT1 gene mutations. These genes are therefore strong candidate genes for hypospadias. We have analysed 35 boys with hypopadias and one girl diagnosed as with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome, using exon by exon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the AR, WTI and 5alpha-reductase genes and screened for point mutations and performed subsequent DNA sequencing. No mutations in any of these genes were found in the 26 patients with isolated hypospadias. Two patients with severe hypospadias with cryptorchidism were found to carry mutations in the androgen receptor gene. Also the girl with clinically diagnosed complete androgen insensitivity was found to be homozygous for a splice mutation in the 5alpha-reductase gene. In summary, mutations in the WT1, AR and 5alpha-reductase genes are not common causes of isolated hypospadias.

  5. Mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients with retinoblastoma reveals 11 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Katia; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; Mari, Francesca; Speciale, Caterina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Cetta, Francesco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Giachino, Daniela; Pasini, Barbara; Acquaviva, Antonio; Caporossi, Aldo; Frezzotti, Renato; Renieri, Alessandra; Bruttini, Mirella

    2006-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB, OMIM#180200) is the most common intraocular tumour in infancy and early childhood. Constituent mutations in the RB1 gene predispose individuals to RB development. We performed a mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients affected by RB referred to the Medical Genetics of the University of Siena. In 35 unrelated patients, we identified germline RB1 mutations in 6 out of 9 familial cases (66%) and in 7 out of 26 with no family history of RB (27%). Using the single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique, 11 novel mutations were detected, including 3 nonsense, 5 frameshift and 4 splice-site mutations. Only two of these mutations (1 splice site and 1 missense) were previously reported. The mutation spectrum reflects the published literature, encompassing predominately nonsense or frameshift and splicing mutations. RB1 germline mutation was detected in 37% of our cases. Gross rearrangements outside the investigated region, altered DNA methylation, or mutations in non-coding regions, may be the cause of disease in the remainder of the patients. Some cases, e.g. a case of incomplete penetrance, or variable expressivity ranging from retinoma to multiple tumours, are discussed in detail. In addition, a case of pre-conception genetic counselling resolved by rescue of banked cordonal blood of the affected deceased child is described.

  6. Disposable sensors for rapid screening of mutated genes.

    PubMed

    García, T; Fernández-Barrena, M G; Revenga-Parra, M; Núñez, A; Casero, E; Pariente, F; Prieto, J; Lorenzo, E

    2010-10-01

    A screening method for rapid detection of gene mutations directly in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of genomic DNA is described. The method involves the development of a disposable screen-printed gold electrode modified with a thiolated capture probe directly obtained from denaturated PCR genomic DNA, which recognizes (by hybridization) its fully complementary sequence (wild type), giving a signal, whereas no signal is obtained for single-mismatched target (mutant). The detection of the hybridization event is achieved by changes in the metal redox center electroactivity of the complex [Ru(NH(3))(5) L](2+), where L is [3-(2-phenanthren-9-yl-vinyl)-pyridine], at -0.200 V. This complex binds to double-stranded DNA in a very selective form. The method allows discrimination between the wild type and the mutant of gene MRP3 directly in large PCR amplicons extracted from blood cells, without the need to use either synthetic probes or labeled targets. The mutation involves the presence of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at base 54 of a 145-base-pair sequence from exon 21 of gene MRP3. Since the presence of this SNP might lead to a variety of hereditary liver disorders, its identification in a rapid and easy form may provide novel therapeutic targets for the future. The screening method proposed has excellent signal reproducibility, with a relative standard deviation of 10%. In addition, with the method developed as little as 6.6 ng/muL PCR product can be detected.

  7. Molecular screening of pituitary adenomas for gene mutations and rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, V.; Drazin, N.Z.; Gonskey, R.; Melmed, S. )

    1993-07-01

    Although pituitary tumors arise as benign monoclonal neoplasms, genetic alterations have not readily been identified in these adenomas. The authors studied restriction fragment abnormalities involving the GH gene locus, and mutations in the p53 and H-, K-, and N-ras genes in 22 human GH cell adenomas. Twenty two nonsecretory adenomas were also examined for p53 and ras gene mutations. Seven prolactinoma DNA samples were tested for deletions in the multiple endocrine neoplasia-1 (MEN-1) locus, as well as for rearrangements in the hst gene, a member of the fibroblast growth factor family. In DNA from GH-cell adenomas, identical GH restriction patterns were detected in both pituitary and lymphocyte DNA in all patients and in one patient with a mixed GH-TSH cell adenoma. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single stranded conformation polymorphism analysis, no mutations were detected in exons 5, 6, 7 and 8 of the p53 gene in GH cell adenomas nor in 22 nonsecretory adenomas. Codons 12/13 and 61 of H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras genes were also intact on GH cell adenomas and in nonsecretory adenomas. Site-specific probes for chromosome 11q13 including, PYGM, D11S146, and INT2 were used in 7 sporadic PRL-secreting adenomas to detect deletions of the MEN-1 locus on chromosome 11. One patient was identified with a loss of 11p, and the remaining 6 patients did not demonstrate loss of heterozygosity in the pituitary 11q13 locus, compared to lymphocyte DNA. None of these patients demonstrated hst gene rearrangements which also maps to this locus. These results show that p53 and ras gene mutations are not common events in the pathogenesis of acromegaly and nonsecretory tumors. Although hst gene rearrangements and deletions of 11q13 are not associated with sporadic PRl-cell adenoma formation, a single patient was detected with a partial loss of chromosome 11, including the putative MEN-1 site. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Mutational screening in the LDLR gene among patients presenting familial hypercholesterolemia in the Southeast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Molfetta, G A; Zanette, D L; Santos, J E; Silva, W A

    2017-08-31

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a dominant, autosomal disease characterized by high LDL levels in blood plasma, and is caused by a defect in the gene encoding the LDL receptor (LDLR). The clinical diagnosis is based on personal and familial history, physical examination findings, and measures of high LDL cholesterol concentrations. LDLR is a cell-surface glycoprotein that controls the level of blood plasma cholesterol and triglyceride by LDLR-mediated endocytosis. Here we sequenced the entire LDLR gene-coding region to screen for mutations in 32 patients diagnosed with FH, and we have found 20 mutations including synonymous, missense, and intronic mutations. Six of them were characterized as pathogenic mutations (D178Y, C184Y, S326C, C681X, IVS7+10G>C, and IVS11-10G>A). We have also found one intronic mutation not described so far (IVS11-63C>A). Our study corroborates the broad spectrum of mutations distributed along the entire LDLR gene, and we suggest that the genes APOB and PCSK9 should also be screened for mutations when considering the diagnosis of FH. It is already known that different types of mutations are directly associated with the phenotype heterogeneity presented by patients. Considering that Brazilian population is highly admixed, it is important to determine the geographic spectrum of LDLR mutations to provide information on the prognosis and treatment of each FH patient.

  9. Mutational screening of LCA genes emphasizing RPE65 in South Indian cohort of patients.

    PubMed

    Verma, Anshuman; Perumalsamy, Vijayalakshmi; Shetty, Shashikant; Kulm, Maigi; Sundaresan, Periasamy

    2013-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the most severe form of inherited retinal visual impairment in children. So far, mutations in more than 20 genes have been known to cause LCA and among them, RPE65 is a suitable candidate for gene therapy. The mutational screenings of RPE65 and other LCA genes are requisite in support of emerging gene specific therapy for LCA. Therefore, we have carried out a comprehensive LCA genes screening using a combined approach of direct sequencing and DNA microarray based Asper chip analysis. Thirty clinically diagnosed index LCA cases from Southern India were screened for coding and flanking intronic regions of RPE65 through direct sequencing. Among thirty, 25 cases excluded from RPE65 mutations were subjected to Asper chip analysis, testing 784 known pathogenic variations in 15 major LCA genes. In RPE65 screening, four different pathogenic variations including two novel (c.361insT & c.939T>A) and two known (c.394G>A & c.361delT) mutations were identified in five index cases. In the chip analysis, seven known pathogenic mutations were identified in six index cases, involving genes GUCY2D, RPGRIP1, AIPL1, CRX and IQCB1. Overall, 11 out of 30 LCA cases (36.6%) revealed pathogenic variations with the involvement of RPE65 (16.6%), GUCY2D (10%), RPGRIP1 (3.3%), AIPL1 (3.3%) and CRX & IQCB1 (3.3%). Our study suggests that such combined screening approach is productive and cost-effective for mutation detection and can be applied in Indian LCA cohort for molecular diagnosis and genetic counselling.

  10. Mutational Screening of LCA Genes Emphasizing RPE65 in South Indian Cohort of Patients

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Anshuman; Perumalsamy, Vijayalakshmi; Shetty, Shashikant; Kulm, Maigi; Sundaresan, Periasamy

    2013-01-01

    Background Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the most severe form of inherited retinal visual impairment in children. So far, mutations in more than 20 genes have been known to cause LCA and among them, RPE65 is a suitable candidate for gene therapy. The mutational screenings of RPE65 and other LCA genes are requisite in support of emerging gene specific therapy for LCA. Therefore, we have carried out a comprehensive LCA genes screening using a combined approach of direct sequencing and DNA microarray based Asper chip analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings Thirty clinically diagnosed index LCA cases from Southern India were screened for coding and flanking intronic regions of RPE65 through direct sequencing. Among thirty, 25 cases excluded from RPE65 mutations were subjected to Asper chip analysis, testing 784 known pathogenic variations in 15 major LCA genes. In RPE65 screening, four different pathogenic variations including two novel (c.361insT & c.939T>A) and two known (c.394G>A & c.361delT) mutations were identified in five index cases. In the chip analysis, seven known pathogenic mutations were identified in six index cases, involving genes GUCY2D, RPGRIP1, AIPL1, CRX and IQCB1. Overall, 11 out of 30 LCA cases (36.6%) revealed pathogenic variations with the involvement of RPE65 (16.6%), GUCY2D (10%), RPGRIP1 (3.3%), AIPL1 (3.3%) and CRX & IQCB1 (3.3%). Conclusions/Significance Our study suggests that such combined screening approach is productive and cost-effective for mutation detection and can be applied in Indian LCA cohort for molecular diagnosis and genetic counselling. PMID:24066033

  11. Detection of biotinidase gene mutations in Turkish patients ascertained by newborn and family screening.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Mehmet; Özgül, Rıza Köksal; Ünal, Özlem; Yücel-Yılmaz, Didem; Kılıç, Mustafa; Hişmi, Burcu; Tokatlı, Ayşegül; Coşkun, Turgay; Dursun, Ali; Sivri, Hatice Serap

    2015-08-01

    The incidence of biotinidase deficiency in Turkey is currently one of the highest in the world. To expand upon the information about the biotinidase gene (BTD) variations in Turkish patients, we conducted a mutation screening in a large series (n = 210) of probands with biotinidase deficiency, using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct DNA sequencing. The putative effects of novel mutations were predicted by computational program. Twenty-six mutations, including six novels (p.C143F, p.T244I, c.1212-1222del11, c.1320delG, p.V457L, p.G480R) were identified. Nine of the patients were symptomatic at the initial clinical assessment with presentations of seizures, encephalopathy, and lactic acidemia. The most common mutation in this group of symptomatic patients was c.98-104 del7ins3. Among the screened patients, 72 have partial and 134 have profound biotinidase deficiency (BD) of which 106 are homozygous for BTD mutations. The common mutations (p.R157H, p.D444H, c.98-104del7ins3, p.T532M) cumulatively accounted for 72.3% of all the mutant alleles in the Turkish population. The identification of common mutations and hot spot regions of the BTD gene in Turkish patients is important for mutation screening in the Turkish population and helps to ascertain carriers, may have impact on genetic counseling and implementing prevention programs.

  12. Mutation screening of the PCDH15 gene in Spanish patients with Usher syndrome type I

    PubMed Central

    Jaijo, Teresa; Oshima, Aki; Aller, Elena; Carney, Carol; Usami, Shin-ichi; Kimberling, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose PCDH15 codes for protocadherin-15, a cell-cell adhesion protein essential in the morphogenesis and cohesion of stereocilia bundles and in the function or preservation of photoreceptor cells. Mutations in the PCDH15 gene are responsible for Usher syndrome type I (USH1F) and non-syndromic hearing loss (DFNB23). The purpose of this work was to perform PCDH15 mutation screening to identify the genetic cause of the disease in a cohort of Spanish patients with Usher syndrome type I and establish phenotype-genotype correlation. Methods Mutation analysis of PCDH15 included additional exons recently identified and was performed by direct sequencing. The screening was performed in 19 probands with USH already screened for mutations in the most prevalent USH1 genes, myosin VIIA (MYO7A) and cadherin-23 (CDH23), and for copy number variants in PCDH15. Results Seven different point mutations, five novel, were detected. Including the large PCDH15 rearrangements previously reported in our cohort of patients, a total of seven of 19 patients (36.8%) were carriers of at least one pathogenic allele. Thirteen out of the 38 screened alleles carried pathogenic PCDH15 variants (34.2%). Conclusions Five out of the seven point mutations reported in the present study are novel, supporting the idea that most PCDH15 mutations are private. Furthermore, no mutational hotspots have been identified. In most patients, detected mutations led to a truncated protein, reinforcing the hypothesis that severe mutations cause the Usher I phenotype and that missense variants are mainly responsible for non-syndromic hearing impairment. PMID:22815625

  13. Newborn Screening Quality Assurance Program for CFTR Mutation Detection and Gene Sequencing to Identify Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Miyono M.; Foster, Stephanie L.; Cordovado, Suzanne K.

    2016-01-01

    All newborn screening laboratories in the United States and many worldwide screen for cystic fibrosis. Most laboratories use a second-tier genotyping assay to identify a panel of mutations in the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Newborn Screening Quality Assurance Program houses a dried blood spot repository of samples containing CFTR mutations to assist newborn screening laboratories and ensure high-quality mutation detection in a high-throughput environment. Recently, CFTR mutation detection has increased in complexity with expanded genotyping panels and gene sequencing. To accommodate the growing quality assurance needs, the repository samples were characterized with several multiplex genotyping methods, Sanger sequencing, and 3 next-generation sequencing assays using a high-throughput, low-concentration DNA extraction method. The samples performed well in all of the assays, providing newborn screening laboratories with a resource for complex CFTR mutation detection and next-generation sequencing as they transition to new methods. PMID:28261631

  14. Screening of sarcomere gene mutations in young athletes with abnormal findings in electrocardiography: identification of a MYH7 mutation and MYBPC3 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Chika; Arimura, Takuro; Hayashi, Takeharu; Naruse, Taeko K; Kawai, Sachio; Kimura, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    There is an overlap between the physiological cardiac remodeling associated with training in athletes, the so-called athlete's heart, and mild forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common hereditary cardiac disease. HCM is often accompanied by unfavorable outcomes including a sudden cardiac death in the adolescents. Because one of the initial signs of HCM is abnormality in electrocardiogram (ECG), athletes may need to monitor for ECG findings to prevent any unfavorable outcomes. HCM is caused by mutations in genes for sarcomere proteins, but there is no report on the systematic screening of gene mutations in athletes. One hundred and two genetically unrelated young Japanese athletes with abnormal ECG findings were the subjects for the analysis of four sarcomere genes, MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2 and TNNI3. We found that 5 out of 102 (4.9%) athletes carried mutations: a heterozygous MYH7 Glu935Lys mutation, a heterozygous MYBPC3 Arg160Trp mutation and another heterozygous MYBPC3 Thr1046Met mutation, all of which had been reported as HCM-associated mutations, in 1, 2 and 2 subjects, respectively. This is the first study of systematic screening of sarcomere gene mutations in a cohort of athletes with abnormal ECG, demonstrating the presence of sarcomere gene mutations in the athlete's heart.

  15. [Combined hearing and deafness gene mutation screening of 11,046 Chinese newborns].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuejing; Xi, Zuoming; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Baoyan; Xing, Xinli; Huang, Xin; Zhao, Qing

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of combined newborn hearing screening and deafness-related mutation screening. Eleven thousand and forty-six newborn babies were screened with otoacoustic emission, automatic auditory brainstem response and genetic testing using a standard protocol. Common mutations of three deafness-related genes have included GJB2 (c.235delC, c.299-300delAT), mtDNA 12srRNA (c.1494C>T, c.1555A>G) and SLC26A4 (c.2168A>G, c.IVS7-2A>G). The detection rate for hearing loss in the first-step screening was 0.81% (90/11,046). 513 individuals were found to carry one or two mutant alleles, which gave a carrier rate of 4.64% (513/11,046). Five hundred and eighty-four newborns were positive for hearing screening and genetic screening. Among these, 19 have failed both tests, 71 have failed hearing screening, and 494 have failed genetic screening. The combined hearing and genetic screening has given a positive rate of 5.29%. Neither hearing screening nor genetic screening is sufficient to identify individuals susceptible to auditory disorders. Combined used of these methods can improve the rate of detection.

  16. Screening for germline mutations in the neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene in NF2 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Andermann, A.A.; Ruttledge, M.H.; Rangaratnam, A.

    1994-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant disease with over 95% penetrance which predisposes gene carriers to develop multiple tumors of the central nervous system. The NF2 gene is a putative tumor suppressor gene which was previously mapped to the long arm of chromosome 22, and has recently been identified, using positional cloning techniques. The gene encodes a protein, schwannomin (SCH), which is highly homologous to the band 4.1 protein family. In an attempt to identify and characterize mutations which lead to the manifestation of the disease, we have used single strand conformation analysis (SSCA) to screen for germline mutations in all 17 exons of the NF2 gene in 59 unrelated NF2 patients, representing both familial and new mutations. A total of 27 migration abnormalities was found in 26 patients. Using direct sequencing analysis, the majority of these variants were found to result in nonsense, splice-site or frameshift mutations. Mutations identified in familial NF2 patients segregate in the family, and may prove to be useful tools for a simple and direct SSCA-based technique of presymptomatic or prenatal diagnosis in relatives of patients with NF2. This may be of particular importance in children of patients who have new mutations in the NF2 gene, where linkage analysis may not be feasible.

  17. Screening for NOTCH3 gene mutations among 151 consecutive Korean patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jay Chol; Lee, Keun-Hwa; Song, Sook-Keun; Lee, Jung Seok; Kang, Sa-Yoon; Kang, Ji-Hoon

    2013-07-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a single-gene disorder of cerebral small blood vessels caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene. The initial detection of CADASIL may be more difficult among Asian populations because common clinical phenotypes and neuroimaging findings are not frequently found in these populations. The purpose of this study was to screen the NOTCH3 gene for mutations among consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke from our region in Korea. Between April 2008 and March 2009, 151 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke were screened for NOTCH3 mutations. All patients underwent a detailed clinical examination and structured interview for clinical symptoms and family history. We reviewed brain magnetic resonance imaging data from stroke patients to assess the severity of white-matter hyperintensity lesions, the number of cerebral microbleeds, and the number of lacunar infarctions. Polymerase chain reaction was used to screen exons 3, 4, 6, 11, and 18 of the NOTCH3 gene. Among 151 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, 6 patients (4.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.9-7.1) possessed a NOTCH3 gene mutation. All patients exhibited the same R544C mutation in exon 11. Four of these 6 patients presented with large artery atherosclerosis. The prevalence of CADASIL in patients with neuroimaging features consistent with advanced small-vessel disease was 36.0% (95% CI 8.0-64.8). In this region, NOTCH3 gene mutations are frequently found in acute stroke patients who present with neuroimaging features consistent with advanced small-vessel disease. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mutational screening of the USH2A gene in Spanish USH patients reveals 23 novel pathogenic mutations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Usher Syndrome type II (USH2) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by moderate to severe hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Among the three genes implicated, mutations in the USH2A gene account for 74-90% of the USH2 cases. Methods To identify the genetic cause of the disease and determine the frequency of USH2A mutations in a cohort of 88 unrelated USH Spanish patients, we carried out a mutation screening of the 72 coding exons of this gene by direct sequencing. Moreover, we performed functional minigene studies for those changes that were predicted to affect splicing. Results As a result, a total of 144 DNA sequence variants were identified. Based upon previous studies, allele frequencies, segregation analysis, bioinformatics' predictions and in vitro experiments, 37 variants (23 of them novel) were classified as pathogenic mutations. Conclusions This report provide a wide spectrum of USH2A mutations and clinical features, including atypical Usher syndrome phenotypes resembling Usher syndrome type I. Considering only the patients clearly diagnosed with Usher syndrome type II, and results obtained in this and previous studies, we can state that mutations in USH2A are responsible for 76.1% of USH2 disease in patients of Spanish origin. PMID:22004887

  19. Point mutation frequency in the FMR1 gene as revealed by fragile X syndrome screening.

    PubMed

    Handt, Maximilian; Epplen, Andrea; Hoffjan, Sabine; Mese, Kemal; Epplen, Jörg T; Dekomien, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a common cause of intellectual disability, developmental delay and autism spectrum disorders. This syndrome is due to a functional loss of the FMR1 gene product FMRP, and, in most cases, it is caused by CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 promoter. Yet, also other FMR1 mutations may cause a FXS-like phenotype. Since standard molecular testing does not include the analysis of the FMR1 coding region, the prevalence of point mutations causing FXS is not well known. Here, high resolution melting (HRM) was used to screen for FMR1 gene mutations in 508 males with clinical signs of mental retardation and developmental delay, but without CGG and GCC repeat expansions in the FMR1 gene and AFF2 genes, respectively. Sequence variations were identified by HRM analysis and verified by direct DNA sequencing. Two novel missense mutations (p.Gly482Ser in one patient and p.Arg534His in two unrelated patients), one intronic and two 3'-untranslated region (UTR) variations were identified in the FMR1 gene. Missense mutations in the FMR1 gene might account for a considerable proportion of cases in male patients with FXS-related symptoms, such as those linked to mental retardation and developmental delay.

  20. Specific mutation screening of TP53 gene by low-density DNA microarray

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-López, Angélica; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Beattie, Kenneth L; Maldonado, Rogelio; Mendoza, Patricia; Vázquez, Guelaguetza; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Sánchez, Martha; Navarro, Guillermo; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    TP53 is the most commonly mutated gene in human cancers. Approximately 90% of mutations in this gene are localized between domains encoding exons 5 to 8. The aim of this investigation was to examine the ability of the low density DNA microarray with the assistance of double tandem hybridization platform to characterize TP53 mutational hotspots in exons 5, 7, and 8 of the TP53. Nineteen capture probes specific to each potential mutation site were designed to hybridize to specific site. Virtual hybridization was used to predict the stability of hybridization of each capture probe with the target. Thirty-three DNA samples from different sources were analyzed for mutants in these exons. A total of 32 codon substitutions were found by DNA sequencing. 24 of them a showed a perfect correlation with the hybridization pattern system and DNA sequencing analysis of the regions scanned. Although in this work we directed our attention to some of the most representative mutations of the TP53 gene, the results suggest that this microarray system proved to be a rapid, reliable, and effective method for screening all the mutations in TP53 gene. PMID:24198462

  1. GeneChip{sup {trademark}} screening assay for cystic fibrosis mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Cronn, M.T.; Miyada, C.G.; Fucini, R.V.

    1994-09-01

    GeneChip{sup {trademark}} assays are based on high density, carefully designed arrays of short oligonucleotide probes (13-16 bases) built directly on derivatized silica substrates. DNA target sequence analysis is achieved by hybridizing fluorescently labeled amplification products to these arrays. Fluorescent hybridization signals located within the probe array are translated into target sequence information using the known probe sequence at each array feature. The mutation screening assay for cystic fibrosis includes sets of oligonucleotide probes designed to detect numerous different mutations that have been described in 14 exons and one intron of the CFTR gene. Each mutation site is addressed by a sub-array of at least 40 probe sequences, half designed to detect the wild type gene sequence and half designed to detect the reported mutant sequence. Hybridization with homozygous mutant, homozygous wild type or heterozygous targets results in distinctive hybridization patterns within a sub-array, permitting specific discrimination of each mutation. The GeneChip probe arrays are very small (approximately 1 cm{sup 2}). There miniature size coupled with their high information content make GeneChip probe arrays a useful and practical means for providing CF mutation analysis in a clinical setting.

  2. Mutation screening in the human epsilon-globin gene using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Papachatzopoulou, Adamantia; Menounos, Panagiotis G; Kolonelou, Christina; Patrinos, George P

    2006-02-01

    The human epsilon-globin gene is necessary for primitive human erythropoiesis in the yolk sac. Herein we report a non-radioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) approach to screen the human epsilon-globin gene and its regulatory regions for possible mutations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in normal adult subjects, in order to determine those genomic regions, which are not necessary for its proper regulation and function. We identified no sequence variations apart from the expected 5'epsilon /HincII polymorphism in the fragments analyzed, suggesting that genomic alterations in the epsilon-globin gene are most likely incompatible with normal erythropoiesis and proper embryonic development.

  3. [Application of gene capture technology on mutation screening of RB1 gene in retinoblastoma patients].

    PubMed

    Meng, Q Y; Huang, L Z; Wang, B; Li, X X; Liang, J H

    2017-06-11

    Objectives: To analyze RB1 gene mutation in retinoblastoma (RB) patients using gene capture technology. Methods: Experimental research. The clinical data of 17 RB patients were collected at Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University People's Hospital from June 2010 to Jun 2014. Peripheral blood samples of seventeen RB patients and their parents were collected and genomic DNA were extracted. DNA library from RB patients was mixed with designed gene capture probe of RB1 exons and its flanking sequences. The data were analyzed using bioinformatics software. To avoid the false positive, the abnormal sites were verified using the Sanger sequencing method. Results: Totally, there were 17 RB patients, including 12 males and 5 females, from 0.5 to 23 years old, average ages were (3.2±5.2) years old. Both eyes were involved in 6 patients. The other 11 cases were only one eye was attacked. Four RB patients were found to have germline mutations, among whom 2 had bilateral tumors and 2 had unilateral tumors. 2 novel missense mutations were identified, including 15(th) exon c.1408A>T (p. Ile470Phe) and c.1960G>C (p. Val654Leu) at 19(th) exon. No RB1 mutation was identified in any of their parents. We also identified 2 mutations reported previously. One is c.1030C>T termination mutation at 10(th) exon in a bilateral RB patients and his father, who was diagnosed with unilateral RB. The other is c.371-372delTA frame shift mutation at 3(rd) exon. No mutation was found in their parents. Conclusions: Two novel germline RB1 mutations were found using gene capture technology, which enriched RB1 mutations library.(Chin J Ophthalmol, 2017, 53: 455-459).

  4. Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of Autosomal Recessive Carrier Screening Gene Mutation Detection System. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-10-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has classified an autosomal recessive carrier screening gene mutation detection system into class II (special controls). The special controls that apply to this device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the autosomal recessive carrier screening gene mutation detection system classification. The Agency has classified the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  5. Linkage approach and direct COL4A5 gene mutation screening in Alport syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Turco, A.E.; Rossetti, S.; Biasi, O.

    1994-09-01

    Alport Syndrome (AS) is transmitted as an X-linked dominant trait in the majority of families, the defective gene being COL4A5 at Xq22. In the remaining cases AS appears to be autosomally inherited. Recently, mutations in COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes at 2q35-q37 were identified in families with autosomal recessive AS. Mutation detection screening is being performed by non-radioactive single stand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), heteroduplex analysis, and automated DNA sequencing in over 170 AS patients enrolled in the ongoing Italian Multicenter Study on AS. So far twenty-five different mutations have been found, including missense, splicing, and frameshifts. Moreover, by using six tightly linked COL4A5 informative makers, we have also typed two larger AS families, and have shown compatible sex-linked transmission in one other, suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance. In this latter three-generation COL4A5-unlinked family we are now looking for linkage and for mutations in the candidate COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes on chromosome 2q.

  6. Screening for mutations in kidney-related genes using SURVEYOR nuclease for cleavage at heteroduplex mismatches.

    PubMed

    Voskarides, Konstantinos; Deltas, Constantinos

    2009-07-01

    SURVEYOR is a new mismatch-specific plant DNA endonuclease that is very efficient for mutation scanning in heteroduplex DNA. It is much faster, cheaper, more sensitive, and easier to perform than other "traditional" mutation detection methods such as single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, heteroduplex analysis, and phage resolvases. This is the first comprehensive report on the use of SURVEYOR for screening genes implicated in a spectrum of inherited renal diseases. Of the 48.2 kb screened, 44 variations were identified, accounting for one variation per 1.1 kb. The re-sequencing of multiple samples did not reveal any variation that had not been identified by SURVEYOR, attesting to its high fidelity. Additionally, we tested this enzyme against 15 known variants, 14 of which it identified, thus showing a sensitivity of 93%. We showed that the genetic heterogeneity of renal diseases can be easily overcome using this enzyme with a high degree of confidence and no bias for any specific variations. We also showed for the first time that SURVEYOR does not demonstrate any preference regarding mismatch cleavage at specific positions. Disadvantages of using SURVEYOR include enhanced exonucleolytic activity for some polymerase chain reaction products and less than 100% sensitivity. We report that SURVEYOR can be used as a mutation detection method with a high degree of confidence, offering an excellent alternative for low-budget laboratories and for the rapid manipulation of multiple genes.

  7. Genome Screen to Identify Susceptibility Genes for Parkinson Disease in a Sample without parkin Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Pankratz, Nathan; Nichols, William C.; Uniacke, Sean K.; Halter, Cheryl; Rudolph, Alice; Shults, Cliff; Conneally, P. Michael; Foroud, Tatiana

    2002-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by bradykinesia, resting tremor, muscular rigidity, and postural instability, as well as by a clinically significant response to treatment with levodopa. Mutations in the α-synuclein gene have been found to result in autosomal dominant PD, and mutations in the parkin gene produce autosomal recessive juvenile-onset PD. We have studied 203 sibling pairs with PD who were evaluated by a rigorous neurological assessment based on (a) inclusion criteria consisting of clinical features highly associated with autopsy-confirmed PD and (b) exclusion criteria highly associated with other, non-PD pathological diagnoses. Families with positive LOD scores for a marker in an intron of the parkin gene were prioritized for parkin-gene testing, and mutations in the parkin gene were identified in 22 families. To reduce genetic heterogeneity, these families were not included in subsequent genome-screen analysis. Thus, a total of 160 multiplex families without evidence of a parkin mutation were used in multipoint nonparametric linkage analysis to identify PD-susceptibility genes. Two models of PD affection status were considered: model I included only those individuals with a more stringent diagnosis of verified PD (96 sibling pairs from 90 families), whereas model II included all examined individuals as affected, regardless of their final diagnostic classification (170 sibling pairs from 160 families). Under model I, the highest LOD scores were observed on chromosome X (LOD score 2.1) and on chromosome 2 (LOD score 1.9). Analyses performed with all available sibling pairs (model II) found even greater evidence of linkage to chromosome X (LOD score 2.7) and to chromosome 2 (LOD score 2.5). Evidence of linkage was also found to chromosomes 4, 5, and 13 (LOD scores >1.5). Our findings are consistent with those of other linkage studies that have reported linkage to chromosomes 5 and X. PMID:12058349

  8. Mutation screening and association analysis of six candidate genes for autism on chromosome 7q.

    PubMed

    Bonora, Elena; Lamb, Janine A; Barnby, Gabrielle; Sykes, Nuala; Moberly, Thomas; Beyer, Kim S; Klauck, Sabine M; Poustka, Firtz; Bacchelli, Elena; Blasi, Francesca; Maestrini, Elena; Battaglia, Agatino; Haracopos, Demetrios; Pedersen, Lennart; Isager, Torben; Eriksen, Gunna; Viskum, Birgitte; Sorensen, Ester-Ulsted; Brondum-Nielsen, Karen; Cotterill, Rodney; Engeland, Herman von; Jonge, Maretha de; Kemner, Chantal; Steggehuis, Karlijn; Scherpenisse, Margret; Rutter, Michael; Bolton, Patrick F; Parr, Jeremy R; Poustka, Annemarie; Bailey, Anthony J; Monaco, Anthony P

    2005-02-01

    Genetic studies have provided evidence for an autism susceptibility locus (AUTS1) on chromosome 7q. Screening for mutations in six genes mapping to 7q, CUTL1, SRPK2, SYPL, LAMB1, NRCAM and PTPRZ1 in 48 unrelated individuals with autism led to the identification of several new coding variants in the genes CUTL1, LAMB1 and PTPRZ1. Analysis of genetic variants provided evidence for association with autism for one of the new missense changes identified in LAMB1; this effect was stronger in a subgroup of affected male sibling pair families, implying a possible specific sex-related effect for this variant. Association was also detected for several polymorphisms in the promoter and untranslated region of NRCAM, suggesting that alterations in expression of this gene may be linked to autism susceptibility.

  9. A large-scale gene-trap screen for insertional mutations in developmentally regulated genes in mice.

    PubMed

    Wurst, W; Rossant, J; Prideaux, V; Kownacka, M; Joyner, A; Hill, D P; Guillemot, F; Gasca, S; Cado, D; Auerbach, A

    1995-02-01

    We have used a gene-trap vector and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells to screen for insertional mutations in genes developmentally regulated at 8.5 days of embryogenesis (dpc). From 38,730 cell lines with vector insertions, 393 clonal integrations had disrupted active transcription units, as assayed by beta-galactosidase reporter gene expression. From these lines, 290 clones were recovered and injected into blastocysts to assay for reporter gene expression in 8.5-dpc chimeric mouse embryos. Of these, 279 clones provided a sufficient number of chimeric embryos for analysis. Thirty-six (13%) showed restricted patterns of reporter-gene expression, 88 (32%) showed widespread expression and 155 (55%) failed to show detectable levels of expression. Further analysis showed that approximately one-third of the clones that did not express detectable levels of the reporter gene at 8.5 dpc displayed reporter gene activity at 12.5 dpc. Thus, a large proportion of the genes that are expressed in ES cells are either temporally or spatially regulated during embryogenesis. These results indicate that gene-trap mutageneses in embryonic stem cells provide an effective approach for isolating mutations in a large number of developmentally regulated genes.

  10. A Large-Scale Gene-Trap Screen for Insertional Mutations in Developmentally Regulated Genes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wurst, W.; Rossant, J.; Prideaux, V.; Kownacka, M.; Joyner, A.; Hill, D. P.; Guillemot, F.; Gasca, S.; Cado, D.; Auerbach, A.; Ang, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    We have used a gene-trap vector and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells to screen for insertional mutations in genes developmentally regulated at 8.5 days of embryogenesis (dpc). From 38,730 cell lines with vector insertions, 393 clonal integrations had disrupted active transcription units, as assayed by β-galactosidase reporter gene expression. From these lines, 290 clones were recovered and injected into blastocysts to assay for reporter gene expression in 8.5-dpc chimeric mouse embryos. Of these, 279 clones provided a sufficient number of chimeric embryos for analysis. Thirty-six (13%) showed restricted patterns of reporter-gene expression, 88 (32%) showed widespread expression and 155 (55%) failed to show detectable levels of expression. Further analysis showed that approximately one-third of the clones that did not express detectable levels of the reporter gene at 8.5 dpc displayed reporter gene activity at 12.5 dpc. Thus, a large proportion of the genes that are expressed in ES cells are either temporally or spatially regulated during embryogenesis. These results indicate that gene-trap mutageneses in embryonic stem cells provide an effective approach for isolating mutations in a large number of developmentally regulated genes. PMID:7713439

  11. Mutation Screening of Candidate Genes in Patients with Nonsyndromic Sagittal Craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaoqian; Guilmatre, Audrey; Reva, Boris; Peter, Inga; Heuzé, Yann; Richtsmeier, Joan T.; Fox, Deborah J.; Goedken, Rhinda J.; Jabs, Ethylin W; Romitti, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Craniosynostosis is a condition that includes the premature fusion of one or multiple cranial sutures. Among various craniosynostosis forms, midline sagittal nonsyndromic craniosynostosis (sNSC) is the most prevalent. Although different gene mutations have been identified in some craniosynostosis syndromes, the etiology of sNSC remains largely unknown. Methods To screen for candidate genes for sNSC, we performed Sanger sequencing on DNA from 93 sNSC patients from a population-based, case-control study conducted in Iowa and New York states. FGFR1-3 mutational hotspots known to be associated with sNSC, and the entire TWIST1, RAB23, BMP2 coding regions were screened because of their known roles in human nonsyndromic or syndromic sagittal craniosynostosis, expression patterns, and/or animal model studies. Results We identified two rare variants in our cohort. An insertion c.730_731insG in FGFR1, which led to a premature stop codon, was predicted to abolish the entire IgIII domain, including the ligand binding region. A c.439C>G variant was observed in TWIST1 at its highly conserved loop domain in another patient. The patient’s mother harbored the same variant and was reported to have jaw abnormalities. These two variants were not detected in 116 alleles from unaffected controls or seen in the several databases; however, TWIST1 variant was found in a low frequency of .000831 percent in ExAC database. Conclusions The low mutation detection rate indicates that these genes only account for a very small proportion of sNSC patients. Our results add to the perception that sNSC is a complex developmental defect with considerable genetic heterogeneity. PMID:26910679

  12. Mutation screening of the TPO gene in a cohort of 192 Chinese patients with congenital hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chunyun; Xie, Bobo; Zhang, Shujie; Wang, Jin; Luo, Shiyu; Zheng, Haiyang; Su, Jiasun; Hu, Xuyun; Chen, Rongyu; Fan, Xin; Luo, Jingsi; Gu, Xuefan; Chen, Shaoke

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Defects in the human thyroid peroxidase (TPO) gene are reported to be one of the causes of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) due to dyshormonogenesis. The aim of this study was to examine the TPO mutation spectrum and prevalence among patients with CH in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of China and to define the relationships between TPO genotypes and clinical phenotypes. Methods Blood samples were collected from 192 patients with CH in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China and genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leucocytes. All exons of the 10 common CH-associated genes including TPO together with their exon-intron boundaries were screened by next-generation sequencing (NGS). The effect of the novel TPO mutation was investigated by ‘in silico’ studies. Results NGS analysis of TPO in 192 patients with CH revealed 3 different variations in 2 individuals (2/192, 1%). Sequencing other CH candidate genes in the patients with TPO variants revealed that patient 1 was homozygous for c.2422delT TPO mutation combined with double heterozygous DUOX2 pathogenic variants (p.R683L/p.L1343F) and patient 2 was triallelic for TPO pathogenic variants (p.R648Q/p.T561M/p.T561M). The present study identified a novel TPO variation c.1682C>T/p.T561M; and four known mutations: c.2422delT/p.C808Afs×24 and c.1943C>T/p.R648Q in TPO, c.2048G>T/p.R683L and c.4027C>T/p.L1343F in DUOX2. Conclusions Our study indicated that the prevalence of TPO mutations was 1% among studied Chinese patients with CH. More than two variations in one or more CH-associated genes can be found in a single patient, and may, in combination, affect the phenotype of the individual. A novel TPO variation c.1682C>T/p.T561M was found, thereby expanding the mutational spectrum of the gene. PMID:27173810

  13. Family screening for a novel ATP7B gene mutation, c.2335T>G, in the South of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Manoochehri, J; Masoumi Dehshiri, R; Faraji, H; Mohammadi, S; Dastsooz, H; Moradi, T; Rezaei, E; Sadeghi, Kh; Fardaei, M

    2014-01-01

    Background Wilson disease (WD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, which leads to copper metabolism, due to mutations in ATP7B gene. The gene responsible for WD consists of 21 exons that span a genomic region of about 80 kb and encodes a copper transporting P-type ATPase (ATP7B), a protein consisting of 1465 amino acids. Identifying mutation in ATP7B gene is important to find carrier individuals for proper counseling. A novel mutation in exon 8 of ATP7B gene, c.2335T>G (p.Trp779Gly), with severe neuropsychiatric condition in the South of Iran, was recently identified. The aim of this study was to screen 120 individuals from a large family using a simple amplification refractory mutation system PCR (ARMS-PCR) for carrier screening in the South of Iran. Materials and Methods 120 individuals from family relatives of an index case in the Nasr Abad, south of Iran, were studied for screening of the c.2335T>G mutation. One patient with homozygous mutation and one homozygous normal individual were used as controls in this experiment. Results Altogether, 16 out of 120 (13.3%) individuals within this region had heterozygous mutation. One individual with homozygote mutation was also identified. Conclusion Identification of carriers in families with affected individuals is of great importance for counseling before marriage. The results of this study can be used for further counseling programs in this population. PMID:24734161

  14. Screening for somatic mutations of the neurofibromatosis genes in nervous system and other solid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rangaratnam, S.; Narod, S.; Ruttledge, M.

    1994-09-01

    Von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis (NF1) and neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) are autosomal dominant inherited disorders which predispose carriers to various benign and malignant tumors. Both genes are thought to act as tumor suppressors with inactivation of both alleles resulting in abnormal cell growth. By inference from other hereditary cancer syndromes, it has been hypothesized that somatic mutation at the NF1 and NF2 loci is involved in the development of sporadic tumors of the types found with increased prevalence in these disorders. In addition to other malignancies, individuals with NF1 are at increased risk to develop astrocytomas and rhabdomyosarcomas. We have therefore screened 40 astrocytomas for LOH using three NF1-derived cDNA probes, and have found no abnormalities. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of exons of the NF1 GAP-related domain has also failed to show any variants in a total of 70 astrocytomas and 14 rhabdomyosarcomas (7 each of embryonal and alveolar types). LOH of chromosome 22 markers is known to occur in meningioma, malignant melanoma, breast cancer, and ependymoma. SSCP of all 17 exons of the NF2 gene in 27 melanoma cell lines, 42 breast cancers, and 27 pendymomas revealed no alterations. In a screen of 151 menigiomas, 26 new variants have been found, bringing our total to 50 variants in this sample. These represent inactivating mutations (frameshift, splice-site, and nonsense), determined by direct sequencing. Since the majority of these changes occur in tumors previously shown to have LOH at chromosome 22 markers flanking NF2, our results support a tumor sequence role for this gene in meningiomas. In addition, given that 40% of our tumors do not show LOH over this region, we propose that other genes are involved in the development of this latter subset of meningiomas.

  15. High Resolution Melting Analysis for Rapid Mutation Screening in Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV Genes in Quinolone-Resistant Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Thong, Kwai Lin

    2014-01-01

    The increased Salmonella resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones is a public health concern in the Southeast Asian region. The objective of this study is to develop a high resolution melt curve (HRM) assay to rapidly screen for mutations in quinolone-resistant determining region (QRDR) of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes. DNA sequencing was performed on 62 Salmonella strains to identify mutations in the QRDR of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes. Mutations were detected in QRDR of gyrA (n = 52; S83F, S83Y, S83I, D87G, D87Y, and D87N) and parE (n = 1; M438I). Salmonella strains with mutations within QRDR of gyrA are generally more resistant to nalidixic acid (MIC 16 > 256 μg/mL). Mutations were uncommon within the QRDR of gyrB, parC, and parE genes. In the HRM assay, mutants can be distinguished from the wild-type strains based on the transition of melt curves, which is more prominent when the profiles are displayed in difference plot. In conclusion, HRM analysis allows for rapid screening for mutations at the QRDRs of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes in Salmonella. This assay markedly reduced the sequencing effort involved in mutational studies of quinolone-resistance genes. PMID:25371903

  16. High resolution melting analysis for rapid mutation screening in gyrase and Topoisomerase IV genes in quinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Ngoi, Soo Tein; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2014-01-01

    The increased Salmonella resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones is a public health concern in the Southeast Asian region. The objective of this study is to develop a high resolution melt curve (HRM) assay to rapidly screen for mutations in quinolone-resistant determining region (QRDR) of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes. DNA sequencing was performed on 62 Salmonella strains to identify mutations in the QRDR of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes. Mutations were detected in QRDR of gyrA (n = 52; S83F, S83Y, S83I, D87G, D87Y, and D87N) and parE (n = 1; M438I). Salmonella strains with mutations within QRDR of gyrA are generally more resistant to nalidixic acid (MIC 16 > 256 μg/mL). Mutations were uncommon within the QRDR of gyrB, parC, and parE genes. In the HRM assay, mutants can be distinguished from the wild-type strains based on the transition of melt curves, which is more prominent when the profiles are displayed in difference plot. In conclusion, HRM analysis allows for rapid screening for mutations at the QRDRs of gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes in Salmonella. This assay markedly reduced the sequencing effort involved in mutational studies of quinolone-resistance genes.

  17. [Mutation screening for the causative gene in a four-generation Chinese pedigree with progressive cardiac conduction defect].

    PubMed

    Tan, X J; Huang, H; He, F; Zhu, L; Li, H; Jiang, Y S; Li, H; Huang, X H; Sun, Z S; Li, Z H

    2016-05-24

    To define the potential causative gene mutation in a Chinese pedigree with progressive cardiac conduction defect (PCCD). Sanger sequencing was performed to define potential causative gene mutation in a four-generation family with 68 members including seven PCCD patients (5 male) from 2010 to 2015.No causative gene was detected by screening known candidate genes related to PCCD including SCN5A, NKX2.5 and LMNA.High-throughput sequencing technology on exon-enriched DNA was then used to search the causative genes in 2 patients and one normal family member. Eight new non-synonymous single nucleotide variants including AQP7 gene (exon5: c.T343C: p.Y115H), CACNA1B gene (NM_001243812: exon19: c.A2986G: p.T996A), CATSPERB gene (exon27: c.C3254G: p.P1085R), CLCA2 gene (exon11: c.G1725T: p.W575C), CLCA3P gene (ncRNA_intronic), MYLK-AS1 gene (ncRNA_intronic), TTN gene (ncRNA_UTR3), LMNA gene (LMNA: NM_170708: exon5: c.C922T: p.Q308X) were identified by comparing and filtering the results with known public databases.Then, more detailed biological analysis on these 8 genes was conducted.Traditional Sanger sequencing validated the exome sequencing results, and found that the mutation c. 1725G﹥T in gene CLCA2 segregated with the phenotype of this PCCD pedigree.The mutation c. 1725G﹥T in gene CLCA2 was thus be considered as the causative PCCD gene in this pedigree from the perspective of genetics and genomics. The heterozygote mutation c. 1725G﹥T in gene CLCA2 might be causative gene in this PCCD pedigree.This finding adds new gene mutation variant responsible for PCCD.

  18. Mutation Screening of Multiple Genes in Spanish Patients with Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa by Targeted Resequencing

    PubMed Central

    González-del Pozo, María; Borrego, Salud; Barragán, Isabel; Pieras, Juan I.; Santoyo, Javier; Matamala, Nerea; Naranjo, Belén; Dopazo, Joaquín; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal dystrophies characterised ultimately by the loss of photoreceptor cells. RP is the leading cause of visual loss in individuals younger than 60 years, with a prevalence of about 1 in 4000. The molecular genetic diagnosis of autosomal recessive RP (arRP) is challenging due to the large genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Traditional methods for sequencing arRP genes are often laborious and not easily available and a screening technique that enables the rapid detection of the genetic cause would be very helpful in the clinical practice. The goal of this study was to develop and apply microarray-based resequencing technology capable of detecting both known and novel mutations on a single high-throughput platform. Hence, the coding regions and exon/intron boundaries of 16 arRP genes were resequenced using microarrays in 102 Spanish patients with clinical diagnosis of arRP. All the detected variations were confirmed by direct sequencing and potential pathogenicity was assessed by functional predictions and frequency in controls. For validation purposes 4 positive controls for variants consisting of previously identified changes were hybridized on the array. As a result of the screening, we detected 44 variants, of which 15 are very likely pathogenic detected in 14 arRP families (14%). Finally, the design of this array can easily be transformed in an equivalent diagnostic system based on targeted enrichment followed by next generation sequencing. PMID:22164218

  19. Social Health Insurance-Based Simultaneous Screening for 154 Mutations in 19 Deafness Genes Efficiently Identified Causative Mutations in Japanese Hearing Loss Patients.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kentaro; Moteki, Hideaki; Miyagawa, Maiko; Nishio, Shin-Ya; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the most common neurosensory disorders in humans. The incidence of SNHL is estimated to be 1 in 500-1000 newborns. In more than half of these patients, the hearing loss is associated with genetic causes. In Japan, genetic testing for the patients with SNHL using the Invader assay to screen for 46 mutations in 13 deafness genes was approved by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for inclusion in social health insurance coverage in 2012. Furthermore, from August 2015, this genetic testing has been expanded to screen for 154 mutations in 19 deafness genes using targeted genomic enrichment with massively parallel DNA sequencing combined with the Invader assay and TaqMan genotyping. For this study we analyzed 717 unrelated Japanese hearing loss patients. The total allele frequency of 154 mutations in 19 deafness genes was 32.64% (468/1434) and the total numbers of cases associated with at least one mutation was 44.07% (316/717). Among these, we were able to diagnose 212 (30%) patients, indicating that the present screening could efficiently identify causative mutations in hearing loss patients. It is noteworthy that 27 patients (3.8%) had coexistent multiple mutations in different genes. Five of these 27 patients (0.7%, 5/717 overall) were diagnosed with genetic hearing loss affected by concomitant with responsible mutations in more than two different genes. For patients identified with multiple mutations in different genes, it is necessary to consider that several genes might have an impact on their phenotypes.

  20. Social Health Insurance-Based Simultaneous Screening for 154 Mutations in 19 Deafness Genes Efficiently Identified Causative Mutations in Japanese Hearing Loss Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kentaro; Moteki, Hideaki; Miyagawa, Maiko; Nishio, Shin-ya; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the most common neurosensory disorders in humans. The incidence of SNHL is estimated to be 1 in 500–1000 newborns. In more than half of these patients, the hearing loss is associated with genetic causes. In Japan, genetic testing for the patients with SNHL using the Invader assay to screen for 46 mutations in 13 deafness genes was approved by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for inclusion in social health insurance coverage in 2012. Furthermore, from August 2015, this genetic testing has been expanded to screen for 154 mutations in 19 deafness genes using targeted genomic enrichment with massively parallel DNA sequencing combined with the Invader assay and TaqMan genotyping. For this study we analyzed 717 unrelated Japanese hearing loss patients. The total allele frequency of 154 mutations in 19 deafness genes was 32.64% (468/1434) and the total numbers of cases associated with at least one mutation was 44.07% (316/717). Among these, we were able to diagnose 212 (30%) patients, indicating that the present screening could efficiently identify causative mutations in hearing loss patients. It is noteworthy that 27 patients (3.8%) had coexistent multiple mutations in different genes. Five of these 27 patients (0.7%, 5/717 overall) were diagnosed with genetic hearing loss affected by concomitant with responsible mutations in more than two different genes. For patients identified with multiple mutations in different genes, it is necessary to consider that several genes might have an impact on their phenotypes. PMID:27627659

  1. Screening of mutations in the CFTR gene in 1195 couples entering assisted reproduction technique programs.

    PubMed

    Stuppia, Liborio; Antonucci, Ivana; Binni, Francesco; Brandi, Alessandra; Grifone, Nicoletta; Colosimo, Alessia; De Santo, Mariella; Gatta, Valentina; Gelli, Gianfranco; Guida, Valentina; Majore, Silvia; Calabrese, Giuseppe; Palka, Chiara; Ravani, Anna; Rinaldi, Rosanna; Tiboni, Gian Mario; Ballone, Enzo; Venturoli, Anna; Ferlini, Alessandra; Torrente, Isabella; Grammatico, Paola; Calzolari, Elisa; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2005-08-01

    Genetic testing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance (CFTR) gene is currently performed in couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques (ART), because of the high prevalence of healthy carriers in the population and the pathogenic relationship with congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens (CBAVD). However, discordant data have been reported concerning the usefulness of this genetic test in couples with no family history of cystic fibrosis (CF). In this study, we report the results of CFTR molecular screening in 1195 couples entering ART. Genetic testing was initially carried out in a single partner of each couple. CFTR mutations were detected in 55 subjects (4.6%), a percentage that overlaps with the one reported in the general population. However, significantly higher frequencies of were found in CBAVD individuals (37.5%) and in males with nonobstructive azoospermia (6.6%). The 5T allele was found in 78 patients (6.5%). This figure was again significantly different in males with nonobstructive-azoospermia (9.9%) and in those with CBAVD (100%). All together, 139 subjects (11.6%) had either a CFTR mutation or the 5T allele. Subsequent molecular analysis of their partners disclosed a CFTR mutation or 5T allele in nine cases (6.5%). However, none of these couples had CFTR alterations in both members, a CFTR mutation being invariably present in one partner and the 5T allele in the other. In order to improve genetic counselling of these couples, the TG-M470V-5T association was analyzed, and a statistically significant relationship between 12TG-V470 and CBAVD was detected.

  2. Mutation screening of the HGD gene identifies a novel alkaptonuria mutation with significant founder effect and high prevalence.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Srinivasan; Zatkova, Andrea; Nemethova, Martina; Surovy, Milan; Kadasi, Ludevit; Saravanan, Madurai P

    2014-05-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder; caused by the mutations in the homogentisate 1, 2-dioxygenase (HGD) gene located on Chromosome 3q13.33. AKU is a rare disorder with an incidence of 1: 250,000 to 1: 1,000,000, but Slovakia and the Dominican Republic have a relatively higher incidence of 1: 19,000. Our study focused on studying the frequency of AKU and identification of HGD gene mutations in nomads. HGD gene sequencing was used to identify the mutations in alkaptonurics. For the past four years, from subjects suspected to be clinically affected, we found 16 positive cases among a randomly selected cohort of 41 Indian nomads (Narikuravar) settled in the specific area of Tamil Nadu, India. HGD gene mutation analysis showed that 11 of these patients carry the same homozygous splicing mutation c.87 + 1G > A; in five cases, this mutation was found to be heterozygous, while the second AKU-causing mutation was not identified in these patients. This result indicates that the founder effect and high degree of consanguineous marriages have contributed to AKU among nomads. Eleven positive samples were homozygous for a novel mutation c.87 + 1G > A, that abolishes an intron 2 donor splice site and most likely causes skipping of exon 2. The prevalence of AKU observed earlier seems to be highly increased in people of nomadic origin. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  3. Genetic screening of Alzheimer's disease genes in Iberian and African samples yields novel mutations in presenilins and APP.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Rita Joao; Baquero, Miquel; Blesa, Rafael; Boada, Mercè; Brás, Jose Miguel; Bullido, Maria J; Calado, Ana; Crook, Richard; Ferreira, Carla; Frank, Ana; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Hernández, Isabel; Lleó, Alberto; Machado, Alvaro; Martínez-Lage, Pablo; Masdeu, José; Molina-Porcel, Laura; Molinuevo, José L; Pastor, Pau; Pérez-Tur, Jordi; Relvas, Rute; Oliveira, Catarina Resende; Ribeiro, Maria Helena; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Sa, Alfredo; Samaranch, Lluís; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Santana, Isabel; Tàrraga, Lluís; Valdivieso, Fernando; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Clarimón, Jordi

    2010-05-01

    Mutations in three genes (PSEN1, PSEN2, and APP) have been identified in patients with early-onset (<65 years) Alzheimer's disease (AD). We performed a screening for mutations in the coding regions of presenilins, as well as exons 16 and 17 of the APP gene in a total of 231 patients from the Iberian peninsular with a clinical diagnosis of early-onset AD (mean age at onset of 52.9 years; range 31-64). We found three novel mutations in PSEN1, one novel mutation in PSEN2, and a novel mutation in the APP gene. Four previously described mutations in PSEN1 were also found. The same analysis was carried in 121 elderly healthy controls from the Iberian peninsular, and a set of 130 individuals from seven African populations belonging to the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain-Human Genome Diversity Panel (CEPH-HGDP), in order to determine the extent of normal variability in these genes. Interestingly, in the latter series, we found five new non-synonymous changes in all three genes and a presenilin 2 variant (R62H) that has been previously related to AD. In some of these mutations, the pathologic consequence is uncertain and needs further investigation. To address this question we propose and use a systematic algorithm to classify the putative pathology of AD mutations.

  4. Mutation screening of the RYR1 gene in malignant hyperthermia: Detection of a novel Tyr to ser mutation in a pedigree with associated centrl cores

    SciTech Connect

    Quane, K.A.; Keating, K.E.; Healy, J.M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The ryanodine receptor gene (RYR1) has been shown to be mutated in a small number of malignant hyperthermia (MH) predigrees. Missense mutations in this gene have also been identified in two families with central core disease (CCD), a rare myopathy closely associated with MH. In an effort to identify other RYR1 mutations responsible for MH and CCD, we used a SSCP approach to screen the RYR1 gene for mutations in a family exhibiting susceptibility to MH (MHS) where some of the MHS individuals display core regions in their muscle. Sequence analysis of a unique aberrant SSCP has allowed us to identify a point mutation cosegregating with MHS in the described family. The mutation changes a conserved tyrosine residue at position 522 to a serine residue. This mutation is positioned relatively close to five of the six MHS/CCD mutations known to date and provides further evidence that MHS/CCD mutations may cluster in the amino terminal region of the RYR1 protein.

  5. [Applications of microchip electrophoresis and capillary electrophoresis for screening FLT3-ITD gene mutation in acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Leng, Xin; Li, Ling-Di; Li, Jin-Lan; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Ruan, Guo-Rui

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the reliability of microchip electrophoresis and capillary electrophoresis for screening FLT3-ITD gene mutation in acute myeloid leukemia. The FLT3-ITD mutation in the genomic DNA samples from 214 untreated AML patients were separately detected by PCR-microchip electrophoresis and PCR-capillary electrophoresis, then the DNA direct sequencing analysis was carried out. The results from PCR-microchip electrophoresis showed that there were 151 FLT3-ITD mutation negative, 58 FLT3-ITD mutation positive (58/214, 27.1%) and 5 FLT3-ITD mutation doubtful positive (5/214, 2.3%), while the outcomes from PCR-capillary electrophoresis displayed that there were 147 FLT3-ITD mutation negative and 67 FLT3-ITD mutation positive (67/214, 31.3%) without doubtful positive. In the 67 FLT3-ITD mutation positive samples detected by using PCR-capillary electrophoresis, 4 samples were detected as the negative while 5 samples were measured as the doubtful positive by using PCR-microchip electrophoresis. The followed sequencing analysis demonstrated that the above 9 samples were all FLT3-ITD mutation positive, indicating that PCR-capillary electrophoresis was more accurate and sensitive in screening the FLT3-ITD mutation, although statistic analysis showed that there were no significant differences in the detected results between PCR-microchip electrophoresis and PCR-capillary electrophoresis groups (Pearson Chi-squared Test, P > 0.05). It is concluded that both PCR-microchip electrophoresis and PCR-capillary electrophoresis were convenient and fast for screening FLT3-ITD mutation, but the accuracy of PCR-microchip electrophoresis awaits further improvement.

  6. Mutation screening of C1 inhibitor gene in 108 unrelated families with hereditary angioedema: functional and structural correlates.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Emanuela; Caccia, Sonia; Suffritti, Chiara; Tordai, Attila; Zingale, Lorenza Chiara; Cicardi, Marco

    2008-08-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the deficiency of the inhibitor of the first component of complement system (C1-INH), which is due to mutations in its structural gene. There are two phenotypic variants: HAE type I, with reduced plasma antigen levels and HAE type II with normal antigen levels and reduced functional C1 inhibitor activity. The aim of this study was to determine the disease-causing mutations in 108 unrelated HAE families, followed at a single center in Italy, and in 50 normal controls by a genetic screening strategy of the C1-INH gene (SERPIN1G). To detect small mutations we either used fluorescence assisted mismatch analysis, followed by sequencing, or direct sequencing. Patients negative for mutations at this screening were further analyzed by long-range PCR to detect the presence of large deletions or insertions. Overall we identified 81 different mutations possibly responsible for the disease in 102 families, in the remaining 6 families no mutation was detected except for a synonymous substitution in a single probant. Sixty-seven of these mutations (23 missense, 22 frameshift, 8 splicing defects, 8 nonsense and 6 large insertion/deletions) had not been previously published. In addition, 4 rare variants, 2 synonymous alterations and 1 new polymorphism in the 3'UTR of the C1-INH gene were found. Mutations were distributed over all exons, at splice sites and in introns. Our study identified a large number of new mutations related to HAE providing additional evidence of the genetic heterogeneity of this disease. Our results also point toward particular amino acid residues important for protein function that may represent mutation hot spots.

  7. Screening for mutations in RPGR and RP2 genes in Jordanian families with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Haddad, M F; Khabour, O F; Abuzaideh, K A Y; Shihadeh, W

    2016-06-03

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease causing progressive degeneration of retinal photoreceptor cells. X-linked RP (XLRP), in which photoreceptor degeneration begins in early childhood and complete blindness often occurs by the fourth decade of life, constitutes the most severe form of this disease. Two genes commonly associated with XLRP have previously been cloned: retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) and retinitis pigmentosa 2 (RP2). We sought to identify mutations in these genes in Jordanian families suffering from this disease. Five unrelated Jordanian families with confirmed XLRP were screened for such mutations using direct sequencing. Three mutations were identified in the ORF15 exon of RPGR. The silent g.ORF15+470G>A substitution and the g.ORF15+1822insA insertion in the 3ꞌ-untranslated region were found in both normal and affected male family members at comparable frequencies, and thus were considered normal variants. The third mutation, g.ORF15+588G>A, in which alanine is substituted by threonine, was found in all affected men and one unaffected man in the two families harboring this variant. Thus, this mutation may be pathogenic, but with incomplete penetrance. No RP2 mutations were found among the examined families. Mutation screening of RP patients is essential to understand the mechanism behind this disease and develop treatments. A complete family history is required to identify its inheritance pattern and provide genetic counseling for patients and their families.

  8. Screening of RB1 gene mutations in Chinese patients with retinoblastoma and preliminary exploration of genotype–phenotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    He, Ming-yan; An, Yu; Qian, Xiao-wen; Li, Gang; Qian, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Retinoblastoma (RB) sets the paradigm for hereditary cancer syndromes, for which medical care can change depending on the results of genetic testing. In this study, we screened constitutional mutations in the RB1 gene via a method combining DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), and performed a preliminary exploration of genotype–phenotype correlations. Methods The peripheral blood of 85 retinoblastoma probands, including 39 bilateral and 46 unilateral, was collected, and genomic DNA was extracted. DNA sequencing was conducted first. MLPA analysis was applied for patients with bilateral RB with negative sequencing results and unilateral probands whose age at diagnosis was less than 1 year old. Results Thirty-four distinct mutations were identified in 40 (47.1%) of the 85 probands (36 bilateral and four unilateral), of which 20% (8/40) was identified by MLPA. The total detection rate in bilateral cases was 92.3% (36/39). Of the total mutations identified, 77.5% (31/40) probands with a mean age of 10.7 months at diagnosis had null mutations, and 22.5% (9/40) with a mean age of 13.5 months at diagnosis had in-frame mutations. Of the 31 probands with null mutations, bilateral RB accounted for 96.8% (30/31). Of the nine probands with in-frame mutations, 66.7% had bilateral RB. There were seven new mutations of RB1 identified in this report, including six null mutations and one missense mutation. Clinical staging of the tumor did not show obvious differences between patients with null mutations and in-frame mutations. Conclusions Our results confirm that the type of mutation is related to age of onset and the laterality, but not staging of the retinoblastoma tumor. MLPA is a reliable method for detecting gross deletion or duplication of the RB1 gene. The combination of sequencing and MLPA improves the clinical diagnosis of RB. PMID:24791139

  9. [Screening of FBN1 gene mutations in a family with Marfan syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hao, Peng; Tang, Xin; Song, Hui; Wang, Li-ming; Wang, Yu-chuan; Ying, Ming; Han, Rui-fang; Li, Ning-dong

    2010-11-01

    To identify FBN1 gene mutations in a Chinese family with Marfan syndrome. Four affected and two unaffected individuals in the family were recruited after informed consent. Five ml blood samples were drawn from each family member and genomic DNA was extracted. Mutations were detected by directly sequencing to the whole coding region and exon-intron boundaries of FBN1 gene. Polyphen program was used to predict the functional and structural changes of the mutant protein. We found all four affected individuals carried FBN1gene mutations, c.2261A > G (p.Y754C), in exon18 by sequence analysis, while two unaffected family members and 100 normal controls did not have this mutation. A PSIC score of 2.6 was acquired by Polyphen program analysis. Our study supports that FBN1 gene mutation, c.2261A > G (p.Y754C), is the underlying molecular pathogenesis of this family with Marfan syndrome. This mutation is identified for the first time in Chinese population.

  10. Screening for germline mutations in breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in high-risk families in Israel.

    PubMed

    Yablonski-Peretz, Tamar; Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Gutman, Lior Soussan; Kaplan, Yulia; Dvir, Addie; Barnes-Kedar, Inbal; Kadouri, Luna; Semenisty, Valeriya; Efrat, Noa; Neiman, Victoria; Glasser, Yafit; Michaelson-Cohen, Rachel; Katz, Lior; Kaufman, Bella; Golan, Talia; Reish, Orit; Hubert, Ayala; Safra, Tamar; Yaron, Yuval; Friedman, Eitan

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical utility of screening for mutations in 34 breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in high-risk families in Israel. Participants were recruited from 12, 2012 to 6, 2015 from 8 medical centers. All participants had high breast/ovarian cancer risk based on personal and family history. Genotyping was performed with the InVitae™ platform. The study was approved by the ethics committees of the participating centers; all participants gave a written informed consent before entering the study. Overall, 282 individuals participated in the study: 149 (53 %) of Ashkenazi descent, 80 (28 %) Jewish non-Ashkenazi descent, 22 (8 %) of mixed Ashkenazi/non-Ashkenazi origin, 21 (7 %) were non-Jewish Caucasians, and the remaining patients (n = 10-3.5 %) were of Christian Arabs/Druze/unknown ethnicity. For breast cancer patients (n = 165), the median (range) age at diagnosis was 46 (22-90) years and for ovarian cancer (n = 15) 54 (38-69) years. Overall, 30 cases (10.6 %) were found to carry a pathogenic actionable mutation in the tested genes: 10 BRCA1 (3 non-founder mutations), 9 BRCA2 (8 non-founder mutations), and one each in the RAD51C and CHEK2 genes. Furthermore, actionable mutations were detected in 9 more cases in 4 additional genes (MSH2, RET, MSH6, and APC). No pathogenic mutations were detected in the other genotyped genes. In this high-risk population, 10.6 % harbored an actionable pathogenic mutation, including non-founder mutations in BRCA1/2 and in additional cancer susceptibility genes, suggesting that high-risk families should be genotyped and be assigned a genotype-based cancer risk.

  11. FMR1 gene mutation screening by TP-PCR in patients with premature ovarian failure and fragile-X.

    PubMed

    Tural, Sengul; Tekcan, Akın; Kara, Nurten; Elbistan, Mehmet; Güven, Davut; Ali Tasdemir, Haydar

    2015-03-01

    CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene is associated with fragile X syndrome, fragile X-associated tremor/ ataxia syndrome and fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency. In this study, FMR1 gene mutation screening was carried out in 50 patients. Among them, 12 (%24) were POF and 19 (%38) were Fragile-X. We also examined the parents of the Fragile-X patients. DNA was extracted from blood with kit procedure. To examine expansion of the fragile-X CGG repeat, TP-PCR assay was performed and all amplicons were evaluated on an ABI3130XL Genetic Analyzer System by Fragman analysis. The data were analyzed by Gene Mapper Program. As a result of this study, the patients were identified with the fragile-X whose FMR1 gene CGG alleles have been observed in normal range. However, in patients who were referred with premature ovarian failure, pre-mutation frequency was observed as 6.6%. Only limited study in Turkish population reported frequency of pre-mutation carrier in POF and Fragile-X. Detection of pre-mutation carrier is important for next generation to have healthy siblings. We emphasize that TP-PCR technique is clear, reliable, sensitive, easy and fast method to detect pre-mutation. However, full mutations have to be examined by the technique of Southern blot in the diagnosis of fragile-X.

  12. C677T mutation in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene and neural tube defects: should Japanese women undergo gene screening before pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Kondo, Atsuo; Fukuda, Hiromi; Matsuo, Takuya; Shinozaki, Keiko; Okai, Ikuyo

    2014-02-01

    We analyzed the role of maternal C677T mutation in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene on spina bifida development in newborns. A total of 115 mothers who had given birth to a spina bifida child (SB mothers) gave 10 mL of blood together with written informed consent. The genotype distribution of C677T mutation was assessed and compared with that of the 4517 control individuals. The prevalence of the homozygous genotype (TT) among SB mothers was not significantly different from that among the controls (odds ratio [OR] = 0.65; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.31-1.25; P = 0.182), suggesting that MTHFR 677TT genotype in Japan is not associated with spina bifida development in newborns. The T allele frequency was not increased in SB mothers (34.8%) as compared to that of the control individuals (38.2%). Further, the internationally reported association between the two groups was found to be similar in all 15 countries studied except the Netherlands, where the TT genotype was found to be a genetic risk factor for spina bifida. For the prevention of affected pregnancy every woman planning to conceive has to take folic acid supplements 400 μg a day and the government is asked to take action in implementing food fortification with folic acid in the near future. In conclusion, it is not necessary for Japanese women to undergo genetic screening C677T mutation of the MTHFR gene as a predictive marker for spina bifida prior to pregnancy, because the TT genotype is not a risk factor for having an affected infant.

  13. HNF1 alpha gene coding regions mutations screening, in a Caucasian population clinically characterized as MODY from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Ariel Pablo; Foscaldi, Sabrina Andrea; Perez, Maria Silvia; Rodriguez, Martín; Traversa, Mercedes; Puchulu, Félix Miguel; Bergada, Ignacio; Frechtel, Gustavo Daniel

    2011-02-01

    There are at least six subtypes of Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY) with distinctive genetic causes. MODY 3 is caused by mutations in HNF1A gene, an insulin transcription factor, so mutations in this gene are associated with impaired insulin secretion. MODY 3 prevalence differs according to the population analyzed, but it is one of the most frequent subtypes. Therefore, our aims in this work were to find mutations present in the HNF1A gene and provide information on their prevalence. Mutations screening was done in a group of 80 unrelated patients (average age 17.1 years) selected by clinical characterization of MODY, by SSCP electrophoresis followed by sequenciation. We found eight mutations, of which six were novel and four sequence variants, which were all novel. Therefore the prevalence of MODY 3 in this group was 10%. Compared clinical data between the non-MODY 3 patients and the MODY 3 diagnosed patients did not show any significant difference. Eight patients were diagnosed as MODY 3 and new data about the prevalence of that subtype is provided. Our results contribute to reveal novel mutations, providing new data about the prevalence of that subtype. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic screening of non-classic CAH females with hyperandrogenemia identifies a novel CYP11B1 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Shammas, Christos; Byrou, Stefania; Phelan, Marie M; Toumba, Meropi; Stylianou, Charilaos; Skordis, Nicos; Neocleous, Vassos; Phylactou, Leonidas A

    2016-04-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an endocrine autosomal recessive disorder with various symptoms of diverse severity. Mild hyperandrogenemia is the most commonclinical feature in non-classic CAH patients and 95% of the cases are identified by mutations in the CYP21A2 gene. In the present study, the second most common cause for non-classic CAH (NC-CAH), 11β-hydroxylase deficiency due to mutations in the CYP11B1 gene, is investigated. Screening of the CYP21A2 and CYP11B1 genes by direct sequencing was carried out for the detection of possible genetic defects in patients with suspected CAH. It wasobserved that CYP11B1 variants co-exist only in rare cases along with mutations in CYP21A2 in patients clinically diagnosed with CAH. A total of 23 NC-CAH female patients out of 75 were identified with only one mutation in the CYP21A2 gene. The novel CYP11B1 gene mutation, p.Val484Asp, was identified in a patient with CAH in the heterozygous state. The structural characterization of the novel p.Val484Asp was found to likely cause distortion of the surrounding beta sheet and indirect destabilization of the cavity that occurs on the opposite face of the structural elements, leading to partial impairment of the enzymatic activity. CYP21A2 gene mutations are the most frequent genetic defects in cases of NC-CAH even when these patients are in the heterozygous state. These mutations have a diverse phenotype giving rise to a variable extent of cortisol synthesis impairment; it is also clear that CYP11B1 mutants are a rare type of defects causing CAH.

  15. Mutational screening in genes related with porto-pulmonary hypertension: An analysis of 6 cases.

    PubMed

    Pousada, Guillermo; Baloira, Adolfo; Valverde, Diana

    2017-04-07

    Portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) is a rare disease with a low incidence and without a clearly-identified genetic component. The aim of this work was to check genes and genetic modifiers related to pulmonary arterial hypertension in patients with PPH in order to clarify the molecular basis of the pathology. We selected a total of 6 patients with PPH and amplified the exonic regions and intronic flanking regions of the relevant genes and regions of interest of the genetic modifiers. Six patients diagnosed with PPH were analyzed and compared to 55 healthy individuals. Potentially-pathogenic mutations were identified in the analyzed genes of 5 patients. None of these mutations, which are highly conserved throughout evolution, were detected in the control patients nor different databases analyzed (1000 Genomes, ExAC and DECIPHER). After analyzing for genetic modifiers, we found different variations that could favor the onset of the disease. The genetic analysis carried out in this small cohort of patients with PPH revealed a large number of mutations, with the ENG gene showing the greatest mutational frequency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. [Screening of common deafness gene mutations in 17 000 Chinese newborns from Chengdu based on microarray analysis].

    PubMed

    Lyu, Kangmo; Xiong, Yehua; Yu, Hao; Zou, Ling; Ran, Longrong; Liu, Deshun; Yin, Qin; Xu, Yingwen; Fang, Xue; Song, Zuling; Huang, Lijia; Tan, Dayong; Zhang, Zhiwei

    2014-10-01

    mutation rate of mitochondrial DNA 12S rRNA is 2.71‰, which may have deafness induced by aminoglycoside antibiotics. Newborn screening for mutation of genes related to hereditary deafness plays an important role in the early detection and proper management for neonatal deafness as well as genetic counseling for premarital, prenatal and postnatal diagnosis.

  17. Real time PCR assays to detect common mutations in the biotinidase gene and application of mutational analysis to newborn screening for biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Steven F; Angeletti, Janine; Banas, Richard A; Naylor, Edwin W

    2003-02-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of biotin metabolism caused by defects in the biotinidase gene. Symptoms of biotinidase deficiency are resolved or prevented with oral biotin supplementation and as such newborn screening is performed to prospectively identify affected individuals prior to the onset of symptoms. Biotinidase deficiency is detected by determining the activity of the biotinidase enzyme utilizing the newborn dried blood spot and colorimetric end point analysis. While newborn screening by enzyme analysis is effective, external factors may compromise results of the enzyme analysis and difficulty is encountered in distinguishing between complete and partial enzyme deficiencies. In the United States, the four mutations most commonly associated with complete biotinidase deficiency are c98:d7i3, Q456H, R538C, and the double mutation D444H:A171T. Partial biotinidase deficiency is almost universally attributed to the D444H mutation. To more effectively distinguish between profound and partial biotinidase deficiency, a panel of assays utilizing real time PCR and melting curve analysis using Light Cycler technology was developed. Employing DNA extracted from the original dried blood specimens from newborns identified through prospective newborn screening as presumptive positive for biotinidase deficiency, the specimens were analyzed for the presence of the five common mutations. Using this approach it was possible to separate newborns with partial and complete deficiency from each other as well as from many of those with false positive results. In most cases it was also possible to correlate the genotype with the degree of residual enzyme activity present. In newborn screening for biotinidase deficiency, we have shown that the analysis of common mutations is useful in distinguishing between partial and complete enzyme deficiency as well as improving specificity. Combining biotinidase enzyme analysis with genotypic data also increases the

  18. The MECP2 gene mutation screening in Rett syndrome patients from Croatia.

    PubMed

    Matijević, Tanja; Knezević, Jelena; Barisić, Ingeborg; Resić, Biserka; Culić, Vida; Pavelić, Jasminka

    2006-12-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder almost exclusively affecting females and is usually sporadic. Mutations in MECP2 gene have been found in more than 80% of females with typical features of RTT. In this study, we analyzed 15 sporadic cases of RTT. In 7 of 15 patients (47%), we detected pathogenic mutations in the coding parts of MECP2 fourth exon. We found two missense (T158M, R133C), two nonsense (R168X, R270X), two frameshift mutations (P217fs and a double deletion of 28-bp at 1132-1159 and 10-bp at 1167-1176), and one in-frame deletion (L383_E392del10). To our knowledge, the last two mutations have not been reported yet. We also detected one previously described polymorphism (S194S). In conclusion, these results show that the fourth exon should be the first one analyzed because it harbors most of the known mutations. Moreover, mutation-negative cases should be further analyzed for gross rearrangements. This is the first study of its kind in Croatia and it enabled us to give the patients an early confirmation of RTT diagnosis.

  19. [Mutation screening of MITF gene in patients with Waardenburg syndrome type 2].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Yang, Shu-Zhi; Liu, Jun; Han, Bing; Wang, Guo-Jian; Zhang, Xin; Kang, Dong-Yang; Dai, Pu; Young, Wie-Yen; Yuan, Hui-Jun

    2008-04-01

    Warrgenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2) is the most common autosomal dominantly-inherited syndrome with hearing loss. MITF (microphthalmia associated transcription factor)is a basic-helix-loop-helix-luecine zipper (bHLHZip) factor which regulates expression of tyrosinase, and is involved in melanocyte differentiation. Mutations in MITF associated with WS2 have been identified in some but not all affected families. Here, we report a three-generation Chinese family with a point mutation in the MITF gene causing WS2. The proband exhibits congenital severe sensorineural hearing loss, heterochromia iridis and facial freckles. One of family members manifests sensorineural deafness, and the other patients show premature greying or/and freckles. This mutation, heterozygous deletion c.639delA, creates a stop codon in exon 7 and is predicted to result in a truncated protein lacking normal interaction with its target DNA motif. This mutation is a novel mutation and the third case identified in exon 7 of MITF in WS2. Though there is only one base pair distance between this novel mutation and the other two documented cases and similar amino acids change, significant difference is seen in clinical phenotype, which suggests genetic background may play an important role.

  20. Novel mutations causing biotinidase deficiency in individuals identified by newborn screening in Michigan including an unique intronic mutation that alters mRNA expression of the biotinidase gene.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Spencer, L; Nahhas, F; Miller, J; Fribley, A; Feldman, G; Conway, R; Wolf, B

    2014-07-01

    Biotinidase deficiency (BD) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting in the inability to recycle the vitamin biotin. Individuals with biotinidase deficiency can develop neurological and cutaneous symptoms if they are not treated with biotin. To date, more than 165 mutations in the biotinidase gene (BTD) have been reported. Essentially all the mutations result in enzymatic activities with less than 10% of mean normal serum enzyme activity (profound biotinidase deficiency) with the exception of the c.1330G>C (p.D444H) mutation, which results in an enzyme having 50% of mean normal serum activity and causes partial biotinidase deficiency (10-30% of mean normal serum biotinidase activity) if there is a mutation for profound biotinidase deficiency on the second allele. We now reported eight novel mutations in ten children identified by newborn screening in Michigan from 1988 to the end of 2012. Interestingly, one intronic mutation, c.310-15delT, results in an approximately two-fold down-regulation of BTD mRNA expression by Quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). This is the first report of an intronic mutation in the BTD gene with demonstration of its effect on enzymatic activity by altering mRNA expression. This study identified three other mutations likely to cause partial biotinidase deficiency. These results emphasize the importance of full gene sequencing of BTD on patients with biotinidase deficiency to better understand the genotype and phenotype correlation in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Screening for germline mutations in mismatch repair genes in patients with Lynch syndrome by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Soares, Barbara Luísa; Brant, Ayslan Castro; Gomes, Renan; Pastor, Tatiane; Schneider, Naye Balzan; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea; de Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Achatz, Maria Isabel W; Ashton-Prolla, Patrícia; Moreira, Miguel Angelo Martins

    2017-09-20

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominant disorder, with high penetrance that affects approximately 3% of the cases of colorectal cancer. Affected individuals inherit germline mutations in genes responsible for DNA mismatch repair, mainly at MSH2, MLH1, MSH6 and PMS2. The molecular screening of these individuals is frequently costly and time consuming due to the large size of these genes. In addition, PMS2 mutation detection is often a challenge because there are 16 different pseudogenes identified until now. In the present work we evaluate a molecular screening strategy based in next generation sequencing (NGS) in order to optimize the mutation detection in LS patients. We established 16 multiplex PCRs for MSH2, MSH6 and MLH1 and 5 Long-Range PCRs for PMS2, coupled with NGS. The strategy was validated by screening 66 patients who filled Bethesda and Amsterdam criteria for LS from health institutions of Brazil. The mean depth of coverage for MSH2, MSH6, MLH1 and PMS2 genes was 7.988, 36.313, 11.899 and 4.772 times, respectively. Ninety-four variants were found in exons and flanking intron/exon regions for the four MMR genes. Twenty-five were pathogenic or VUS and found in 32 patients (7 in MSH2, 5 in MSH6, 12 in MLH1 e 1 in PMS2). All variants were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The strategy was efficient to reduce time consuming and costs to identify genetic changes at these MMR genes, reducing in three times the number of PCR reactions performed per patient and was efficient in identifying variants at PMS2 gene.

  2. Screening for mutations in the GJB3 gene in Brazilian patients with nonsyndromic deafness.

    PubMed

    Alexandrino, Fabiana; Oliveira, Camila A; Reis, Fernanda C; Maciel-Guerra, Andréa T; Sartorato, Edi L

    2004-01-01

    Deafness is a complex disorder that is affected by a high number of genes and environmental factors. Recently, enormous progress has been made in nonsyndromic deafness research, with the identification of 90 loci and 33 nuclear and 2 mitochondrial genes involved (http://dnalab-www.uia.ac.be/dnalab/hhh/). Mutations in the GJB3 gene, encoding the gap junction protein connexin 31 (Cx31), have been pathogenically linked to erythrokeratodermia variabilis and nonsyndromic autosomal recessive or dominant hereditary hearing impairment. To determine the contribution of the GJB3 gene to sporadic deafness, we analysed the GJB3 gene in 67 families with nonsyndromic hearing impairment. A single coding exon of the GJB3 gene was amplified from genomic DNA and then sequenced. Here we report on three amino acid changes: Y177D (c.529T > G), 49delK (c.1227C > T), and R32W (c.144-146delGAA). The latter substitution has been previously described, but its involvement in hearing impairment remains uncertain. We hypothesize that mutations in the GJB3 gene are an infrequent cause of nonsyndromic deafness.

  3. Comprehensive mutation screening for 10 genes in Chinese patients suffering very early onset inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yuan; Wang, Xin-Qiong; Yu, Yi; Guo, Yan; Xu, Xu; Gong, Ling; Zhou, Tong; Li, Xiao-Qin; Xu, Chun-Di

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To perform sequencing analysis in patients with very early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (VEO-IBD) to determine the genetic basis for VEO-IBD in Chinese pediatric patients. METHODS: A total of 13 Chinese pediatric patients with VEO-IBD were diagnosed from May 2012 and August 2014. The relevant clinical characteristics of these patients were analyzed. Then DNA in the peripheral blood from patients was extracted. Next generation sequencing (NGS) based on an Illumina-Miseq platform was used to analyze the exons in the coding regions of 10 candidate genes: IL-10, IL-10RA, IL-10RB, NOD2, FUT2, IL23R, GPR35, GPR65, TNFSF15, and ADAM30. The Sanger sequencing was used to verify the variations detected in NGS. RESULTS: Out of the 13 pediatric patients, ten were diagnosed with Crohn’s disease, and three diagnosed with ulcerative colitis. Mutations in IL-10RA and IL-10RB were detected in five patients. There were four patients who had single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with IBD. Two patients had IL-10RA and FUT2 polymorphisms, and two patients had IL-10RB and FUT2 polymorphisms. Gene variations were not found in the rest four patients. Children with mutations had lower percentile body weight (1.0% vs 27.5%, P = 0.002) and hemoglobin (87.4 g/L vs 108.5 g/L, P = 0.040) when compared with children without mutations. Although the age of onset was earlier, height was shorter, and the response to treatment was poorer in the mutation group, there was no significant difference in these factors between groups. CONCLUSION: IL-10RA and IL-10RB mutations are common in Chinese children with VEO-IBD. Patients with mutations have an earlier disease onset, lower body weight and hemoglobin, and poorer prognosis. PMID:27350736

  4. Mutation screening of the C1 inhibitor gene among Hungarian patients with hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Kalmár, Lajos; Bors, András; Farkas, Henriette; Vas, Szilvia; Fandl, Barbara; Varga, Lilian; Füst, György; Tordai, Attila

    2003-12-01

    Hereditary angioneurotic edema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by episodic local subcutaneous and submucosal edema caused by the deficiency of activated C1 esterase inhibitor protein (C1-INH, type I (C1NH): reduced serum antigen level, type II: reduced activity and normal serum antigen level). The aim of the present study was to determine the disease-causing mutations in the C1INH gene (SERPING1) among Hungarian HAE-patients. The estimated number of affected HAE-families in Hungary is 40-50, out of which 26 families (type I:23, type II:3) managed in a single center were enrolled in the current study. To detect large deletions/insertions, we used Southern-blotting analysis followed by real time PCR based gene dosage analysis. In the absence of large structural changes, we employed direct sequencing covering the whole coding region and splicing sites of the C1INH gene. Large deletions were detected in 4/23 (17.4%) type I families. We found the g.16788C>T (p.Arg444Cys) mutation in each 3, type II HAE-families. In the remaining type I families, 13 previously unreported mutations (g.638G>A, g.2238C>T, g.2534_2535delCT, g.2579_2620del42, g.2533G>A, g.2695G>A, g.2696_2697insT, g.4467C>T, g.14224A>T, g.14107delA, g.16749_;16775dup, g.16810T>A, g.16885C>G) were detected in 16 families affecting primarily exon 3 (6/13) of the C1INH gene. In the 3 remaining families, known mutations were identified affecting primarily exon 8 (2/3). Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Mutation screening of interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) as a candidate gene for asthma.

    PubMed

    Hayden, C; Pereira, E; Rye, P; Palmer, L; Gibson, N; Palenque, M; Hagel, I; Lynch, N; Goldblatt, J; Lesouëf, P

    1997-12-01

    Reduced levels of interferon gamma (IFNgamma) mRNA and protein have been detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of atopic asthmatics. IFNgamma is secreted by TH1 cells while IL-4 and IL-5 are secreted by TH2 cells and an imbalance in the TH1/TH2 response may be responsible for atopic asthma. The gene for IFNgamma is located on chromosome 12; a region of the genome which has been shown in linkage studies to be associated with asthma. To determine if there are any mutations present in the coding exons and 5' flanking region of the IFNgamma gene in atopic asthmatic subjects compared with controls to explain the lower levels of this cytokine as an inherited, rather than acquired, factor in the asthmatic subjects. The four exons and 5' flanking region of the IFNgamma gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from genomic DNA of 265 individuals from a Western Australian and a Venezuelan population. The PCR products were examined by single strand conformational polymorphism and heteroduplex analyses to see if there were any changes in the DNA migration patterns which would suggest the presence of a sequence variation. The four exons and the 5' flanking region of the IFNgamma gene were amplified from 265 individuals from two populations. Single strand conformational polymorphism and heteroduplex analyses did not reveal any mutations in the regions examined. The gene for IFNgamma appears to be highly conserved as no sequence variations were detected in 265 individuals. These results suggest that mutations of the IFNgamma gene are unlikely to be a significant cause of an inherited asthma diathesis.

  6. Screening of ARHSP-TCC patients expands the spectrum of SPG11 mutations and includes a large scale gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Denora, Paola S; Schlesinger, David; Casali, Carlo; Kok, Fernando; Tessa, Alessandra; Boukhris, Amir; Azzedine, Hamid; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Bruno, Claudio; Truchetto, Jeremy; Biancheri, Roberta; Fedirko, Estelle; Di Rocco, Maja; Bueno, Clarissa; Malandrini, Alessandro; Battini, Roberta; Sickl, Elisabeth; de Leva, Maria Fulvia; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Silvestri, Gabriella; Simonati, Alessandro; Said, Edith; Ferbert, Andreas; Criscuolo, Chiara; Heinimann, Karl; Modoni, Anna; Weber, Peter; Palmeri, Silvia; Plasilova, Martina; Pauri, Flavia; Cassandrini, Denise; Battisti, Carla; Pini, Antonella; Tosetti, Michela; Hauser, Erwin; Masciullo, Marcella; Di Fabio, Roberto; Piccolo, Francesca; Denis, Elodie; Cioni, Giovanni; Massa, Roberto; Della Giustina, Elvio; Calabrese, Olga; Melone, Marina A B; De Michele, Giuseppe; Federico, Antonio; Bertini, Enrico; Durr, Alexandra; Brockmann, Knut; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Zatz, Mayana; Filla, Alessandro; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Santorelli, Filippo M

    2009-03-01

    Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia with thinning of corpus callosum (ARHSP-TCC) is a complex form of HSP initially described in Japan but subsequently reported to have a worldwide distribution with a particular high frequency in multiple families from the Mediterranean basin. We recently showed that ARHSP-TCC is commonly associated with mutations in SPG11/KIAA1840 on chromosome 15q. We have now screened a collection of new patients mainly originating from Italy and Brazil, in order to further ascertain the spectrum of mutations in SPG11, enlarge the ethnic origin of SPG11 patients, determine the relative frequency at the level of single Countries (i.e., Italy), and establish whether there is one or more common mutation. In 25 index cases we identified 32 mutations; 22 are novel, including 9 nonsense, 3 small deletions, 4 insertions, 1 in/del, 1 small duplication, 1 missense, 2 splice-site, and for the first time a large genomic rearrangement. This brings the total number of SPG11 mutated patients in the SPATAX collection to 111 cases in 44 families and in 17 isolated cases, from 16 Countries, all assessed using homogeneous clinical criteria. While expanding the spectrum of mutations in SPG11, this larger series also corroborated the notion that even within apparently homogeneous population a molecular diagnosis cannot be achieved without full gene sequencing.

  7. Mutation Screening of BRCA Genes in 10 Iranian Males with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zorrieh Zahra, Atieh; Kadkhoda, Sepideh; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Aghakhani Moghaddam, Fatemeh; Badiei, Azadeh; Sirati, Fereidoon; Afshin Alavi, Hossein; Atri, Morteza; Omranipour, Ramesh; Keyhani, Elahe

    2016-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease with an increasing trend. Due to limited information especially about the genetic basis of the disease in Iran and the lower age of its onset, the disease requires more attention. The aim of this study was to screen the male patients with breast cancer for BRCA mutations as well as tissue markers of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER-2) and cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6). Ten Iranian males with breast cancer were selected regardless of their histologic subtypes, age and family history from patients referred to Mehrad, Day and Parsian hospitals in Tehran, Iran, during a two-year period. Paraffin blocks of the tumoral regions were tested for ER, PR, HER-2 and CK5/6 immunostaining. DNA extraction was carried out on the EDTA blood samples followed by Sanger sequencing. Immunohistochemistry results for ER, and PR were negative in 2 out of 10 patients, while the results of HER-2 and CK5/6 were negative in all the cases. A missense mutation in exon 18 of BRCA1 and a nonsense mutation in exon 25 of in BRCA2 were detected in one patient each. Both patients belonged to luminal A subtype. Despite the low number of patients in this study, it could be concluded that mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 occur in male breast cancer patients of luminal A subtype. The negative status of the tissue markers could not be used for the prediction of BRCA mutations. PMID:27478808

  8. Screening of point mutations by multiple SSCP analysis in the dystrophin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lasa, A.; Baiget, M.; Gallano, P.

    1994-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, X-linked neuromuscular disorder. The population frequency of DMD is one in approximately 3500 boys, of which one third is thought to be a new mutant. The DMD gene is the largest known to date, spanning over 2,3 Mb in band Xp21.2; 79 exons are transcribed into a 14 Kb mRNA coding for a protein of 427 kD which has been named dystrophin. It has been shown that about 65% of affected boys have a gene deletion with a wide variation in localization and size. The remaining affected individuals who have no detectable deletions or duplications would probably carry more subtle mutations that are difficult to detect. These mutations occur in several different exons and seem to be unique to single patients. Their identification represents a formidable goal because of the large size and complexity of the dystrophin gene. SSCP is a very efficient method for the detection of point mutations if the parameters that affect the separation of the strands are optimized for a particular DNA fragment. The multiple SSCP allows the simultaneous study of several exons, and implies the use of different conditions because no single set of conditions will be optimal for all fragments. Seventy-eight DMD patients with no deletion or duplication in the dystrophin gene were selected for the multiple SSCP analysis. Genomic DNA from these patients was amplified using the primers described for the diagnosis procedure (muscle promoter and exons 3, 8, 12, 16, 17, 19, 32, 45, 48 and 51). We have observed different mobility shifts in bands corresponding to exons 8, 12, 43 and 51. In exons 17 and 45, altered electrophoretic patterns were found in different samples identifying polymorphisms already described.

  9. Screening insertion libraries for mutations in many genes simultaneously using DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Ramamurthy; Fedoroff, Nina

    2001-01-01

    We describe a method to screen pools of DNA from multiple transposon lines for insertions in many genes simultaneously. We use thermal asymmetric interlaced–PCR, a hemispecific PCR amplification protocol that combines nested, insertion-specific primers with degenerate primers, to amplify DNA flanking the transposons. In reconstruction experiments with previously characterized Arabidopsis lines carrying insertions of the maize Dissociation (Ds) transposon, we show that fluorescently labeled, transposon-flanking fragments overlapping ORFs hybridize to cognate expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on a DNA microarray. We further show that insertions can be detected in DNA pools from as many as 100 plants representing different transposon lines and that all of the tested, transposon-disrupted genes whose flanking fragments can be amplified individually also can be detected when amplified from the pool. The ability of a transposon-flanking fragment to hybridize declines rapidly with decreasing homology to the spotted DNA fragment, so that only ESTs with >90% homology to the transposon-disrupted gene exhibit significant cross-hybridization. Because thermal asymmetric interlaced–PCR fragments tend to be short, use of the present method favors recovery of insertions in and near genes. We apply the technique to screening pools of new Ds lines using cDNA microarrays containing ESTs for ≈1,000 stress-induced and -repressed Arabidopsis genes. PMID:11416215

  10. Fast Screening Procedures for Random Transposon Libraries of Cloned Herpesvirus Genomes: Mutational Analysis of Human Cytomegalovirus Envelope Glycoprotein Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hobom, Urs; Brune, Wolfram; Messerle, Martin; Hahn, Gabriele; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.

    2000-01-01

    We have cloned the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) in Escherichia coli. Here, we have subjected the HCMV BAC to random transposon (Tn) mutagenesis using a Tn1721-derived insertion sequence and have provided the conditions for excision of the BAC cassette. We report on a fast and efficient screening procedure for a Tn insertion library. Bacterial clones containing randomly mutated full-length HCMV genomes were transferred into 96-well microtiter plates. A PCR screening method based on two Tn primers and one primer specific for the desired genomic position of the Tn insertion was established. Within three consecutive rounds of PCR a Tn insertion of interest can be assigned to a specific bacterial clone. We applied this method to retrieve mutants of HCMV envelope glycoprotein genes. To determine the infectivities of the mutant HCMV genomes, the DNA of the identified BACs was transfected into permissive fibroblasts. In contrast to BACs with mutations in the genes coding for gB, gH, gL, and gM, which did not yield infectious virus, BACs with disruptions of open reading frame UL4 (gp48) or UL74 (gO) were viable, although gO-deficient viruses showed a severe growth deficit. Thus, gO (UL74), a component of the glycoprotein complex III, is dispensable for viral growth. We conclude that our approach of PCR screening for Tn insertions will greatly facilitate the functional analysis of herpesvirus genomes. PMID:10933677

  11. Screening mutations in myosin binding protein C3 gene in a cohort of patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background MyBPC3 mutations are amongst the most frequent causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, however, its prevalence varies between populations. They have been associated with mild and late onset disease expression. Our objectives were to establish the prevalence of MyBPC3 mutations and determine their associated clinical characteristics in our patients. Methods Screening by Single Strand Conformation Polymorphisms (SSCP) and sequencing of the fragments with abnormal motility of the MyBPC3 gene in 130 unrelated consecutive HCM index cases. Genotype-Phenotype correlation studies were done in positive families. Results 16 mutations were found in 20 index cases (15%): 5 novel [D75N, V471E, Q327fs, IVS6+5G>A (homozygous), and IVS11-9G>A] and 11 previously described [A216T, R495W, R502Q (2 families), E542Q (3 families), T957S, R1022P (2 families), E1179K, K504del, K600fs, P955fs and IVS29+5G>A]. Maximum wall thickness and age at time of diagnosis were similar to patients with MYH7 mutations [25(7) vs. 27(8), p = 0.16], [46(16) vs. 44(19), p = 0.9]. Conclusions Mutations in MyBPC3 are present in 15% of our hypertrophic cardiomyopathy families. Severe hypertrophy and early expression are compatible with the presence of MyBPC3 mutations. The genetic diagnosis not only allows avoiding clinical follow up of non carriers but it opens new possibilities that includes: to take preventive clinical decisions in mutation carriers than have not developed the disease yet, the establishment of genotype-phenotype relationship, and to establish a genetic diagnosis routine in patients with familial HCM. PMID:20433692

  12. CITRIN DEFICIENCY: AN INFANT INCIDENTALLY DETECTED BY PHENYLKETONURIA SCREENING WITH A NOVEL MUTATION IN SLC25A13 GENE.

    PubMed

    Zeybek, A C Aktuglu; Kiykim, E; Zubarioglu, T; Cansever, M S; Ceylaner, S; Erkan, T

    2015-01-01

    We report the first Turkish patient with citrin deficiency detected incidentally by phenylketonuria screening. Mild cholestasis, increased α-fetoprotein level, aminoacidemia including citrulline and coagulation disorder suggested citrin deficiency. Screening the SLC25A13 gene revealed compound heterozygosity harboring a novel mutation, c.851-854delGTAT (p.M285Pfs*2)/ p.I290T (c.869T>C). Progression to type II citrullinemia was considered due to hyperammonemia episodes resulting from high carbohydrate/low protein diet. High protein/low carbohydrate diet resulted in cessation of hyperammonemia episodes, reversal of hepatic dysfunction and steatohepatitis. Our report illustrates the importance of awareness on citrin deficiency.

  13. High-Throughput Genetic Screening of 51 Pediatric Cataract Genes Identifies Causative Mutations in Inherited Pediatric Cataract in South Eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Javadiyan, Shari; Craig, Jamie E; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Sharma, Shiwani; Lower, Karen M; Mackey, David A; Staffieri, Sandra E; Elder, James E; Taranath, Deepa; Straga, Tania; Black, Joanna; Pater, John; Casey, Theresa; Hewitt, Alex W; Burdon, Kathryn P

    2017-10-05

    Pediatric cataract is a leading cause of childhood blindness. This study aimed to determine the genetic cause of pediatric cataract in Australian families by screening known disease-associated genes using massively parallel sequencing technology. We sequenced 51 previously reported pediatric cataract genes in 33 affected individuals with a family history (cases with previously known or published mutations were excluded) using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Variants were prioritized for validation if they were predicted to alter the protein sequence and were absent or rare with minor allele frequency <1% in public databases. Confirmed mutations were assessed for segregation with the phenotype in all available family members. All identified novel or previously reported cataract-causing mutations were screened in 326 unrelated Australian controls. We detected 11 novel mutations in GJA3, GJA8, CRYAA, CRYBB2, CRYGS, CRYGA, GCNT2, CRYGA, and MIP; and three previously reported cataract-causing mutations in GJA8, CRYAA, and CRYBB2 The most commonly mutated genes were those coding for gap junctions and crystallin proteins. Including previous reports of pediatric cataract-associated mutations in our Australian cohort, known genes account for >60% of familial pediatric cataract in Australia, indicating that still more causative genes remain to be identified. Copyright © 2017 Javadiyan et al.

  14. Screening for gap junction protein beta-2 gene mutations in Malays with autosomal recessive, non-syndromic hearing loss, using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Aishah, Z Siti; Khairi, M D Mohd; Normastura, A R; Zafarina, Z; Zilfalil, B A

    2008-12-01

    To determine the frequency and type of gap junction protein beta-2 gene mutations in Malay patients with autosomal recessive, non-syndromic hearing loss. A total of 33 Malay patients with autosomal recessive, non-syndromic hearing loss were screened for mutations in the Cx26 coding region. Deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted from buccal swab samples and subjected to polymerase chain reaction. Slow-reannealing was performed, followed by screening using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography. Eight of the samples (24.2 per cent) showed heterozygous peaks, and further sequencing of these samples revealed four patients (50.0 per cent) with the W24X mutation, two (25.0 per cent) with the V37I mutation and another two (25.0 per cent) with the G4D mutation. Analysis of buccal swab samples by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography is noninvasive and suitable for rapid and reliable screening of gap junction protein beta-2 gene mutations in patients with autosomal recessive, non-syndromic hearing loss. Malay patients with autosomal recessive, non-syndromic hearing loss have different kinds of gap junction protein beta-2 gene mutations which are rarely found in other populations.

  15. Systematic screening for mutations in the human serotonin 1F receptor gene in patients with bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Shimron-Abarbanell, D.; Harms, H.; Erdmann, J.; Propping, P.; Noethen, M.M.

    1996-04-09

    Using single strand conformational analysis we screened the complete coding sequence of the serotonin 1F (5-HT{sub 1F}) receptor gene for the presence of DNA sequence variation in a sample of 137 unrelated individuals including 45 schizophrenic patients, 46 bipolar patients, as well as 46 healthy controls. We detected only three rare sequence variants which are characterized by single base pair substitutions, namely a silent T{r_arrow}A transversion in the third position of codon 261 (encoding isoleucine), a silent C{r_arrow}T transition in the third position of codon 176 (encoding histidine), and a C{r_arrow}T transition in position -78 upstream from the start codon. The lack of significant mutations in patients suffering from schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder indicates that the 5-HT{sub 1F} receptor is not commonly involved in the etiology of these diseases. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. [The mutation spectrum of the GJB2 gene in Belarussian patients with hearing loss. Results of pilot genetic screening of hearing impairment in newborns].

    PubMed

    Bliznets, E A; Marcul', D N; Khorov, O G; Markova, T G; Poliakov, A V

    2014-02-01

    A total of 111 unrelated probands and their 8 sibs from Grodno oblast (Belarus) with bilateral isolated sensorineural hearing impairment were studied for the presence of mutations in the connexin 26--GJB2gene. Mutations were detected in 51 probands (46% of the sample). A significantly higher frequency of the GJB2gene mutations was observed in familial cases of the disease with the autosomal recessive type of inheritance (in 78% of families). Detected peculiarities of the GJB2 gene mutation spectrum demonstrated that use of the algorithm, which was developed for Russian patients, is optimal for the molecular study of patients from Be- larus. In the sample of patients with hearing loss, the highest (among other similar samples studied in the world) allele frequency of c.313_326de114 mutation (7% out of all pathological GJB2 alleles) was registered; Polish origin of this deletion was suggested. It was demonstrated that detection of the GJB2 gene mutation on only one patient's chromosome is insufficient to confirm a molecular genetic diagnosis of hearing loss of the DFNB1 genetic type (autosomal recessive hearing loss caused by the GJB2 gene mutations). Pilot screening in the presence of GJB2 gene mutations in newborns from Grodno oblast was conducted. The material from 235 children was studied during the screening; nine heterozygous carriers of the mutation were found. The c.35delG mutation was detected in a homozygous state in a single newborn (hearing loss of moderate severity was subsequently audiologically confirmed in this child).

  17. Gap-PCR Screening for Common Large Deletional Mutations of β-Globin Gene Cluster Revealed a Higher Prevalence of the Turkish Inversion/Deletion (δβ)0 Mutation in Antalya

    PubMed Central

    Bilgen, Türker; Altıok Clark, Özden; Öztürk, Zeynep; Yeşilipek, M. Akif; Keser, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Although the calculated carrier frequency for point mutations of the β-globin gene is around 10% for Antalya Province, nothing is known about the profile of large deletional mutations involving the β-globin gene. In this study, we aimed to screen common deletional mutations in the β-globin gene cluster in patients for whom direct DNA sequencing was not able to demonstrate the mutation(s) responsible for the disease phenotype. Materials and Methods: Thirty-one index cases selected with a series of selection events among 60 cases without detected β-globin gene mutation from 580 thalassemia-related cases tested by direct sequencing over the last 4 years in our diagnostic center were screened for the most common 8 different large deletional mutations of the β-globin gene cluster by gap-PCR. Results: We detected 1 homozygous and 9 heterozygous novel unrelated cases for the Turkish inversion/deletion (δβ)0 mutation in our series of 31 cases. Our study showed that the Turkish inversion/deletion (δβ)0 mutation per se accounts for 16.6% of the unidentified causative alleles and also accounts for 1.5% of all detected mutations over the last 4 years in our laboratory. Conclusion: Since molecular diagnosis of deletional mutations in the β-globin gene cluster warrants different approaches, it deserves special attention in order to provide prenatal diagnosis and prevention opportunities to the families involved. We conclude that the Turkish inversion/deletion (δβ)0, as the most prevalent deletional mutation detected so far, has to be routinely tested for in Antalya, and the gap-PCR approach has valuable diagnostic potential in the patients at risk. PMID:26377447

  18. Screening for MYO15A Gene Mutations in Autosomal Recessive Nonsyndromic, GJB2 Negative Iranian Deaf Population

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Zohreh; Shearer, A. Eliot; Babanejad, Mojgan; Bazazzadegan, Niloofar; Almadani, Seyed Navid; Nikzat, Nooshin; Jalalvand, Khadijeh; Arzhangi, Sanaz; Esteghamat, Fatemehsadat; Abtahi, Rezvan; Azadeh, Batool; Smith, Richard J.H.; Kahrizi, Kimia; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    MYO15A is located at the DFNB3 locus on chromosome 17p11.2, and encodes myosin-XV, an unconventional myosin critical for the formation of stereocilia in hair cells of cochlea. Recessive mutations in this gene lead to profound autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) in humans and the shaker2 (sh2) phenotype in mice. Here, we performed a study on 140 Iranian families in order to determine mutations causing ARNSHL. The families, who were negative for mutations in GJB2, were subjected to linkage analysis. Eight of these families showed linkage to the DFNB3 locus, suggesting a MYO15A mutation frequency of 5.71% in our cohort of Iranian population. Subsequent sequencing of the MYO15A gene led to identification of 7 previously unreported mutations, including 4 missense mutations, 1 nonsense mutation, and 2 deletions in different regions of the myosin-XV protein. PMID:22736430

  19. Screens for Extragenic Mutations That Fail to Complement Act1 Alleles Identify Genes That Are Important for Actin Function in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Welch, M. D.; Vinh, DBN.; Okamura, H. H.; Drubin, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    Null mutations in SAC6 and ABP1, genes that encode actin-binding proteins, failed to complement the temperature-sensitive phenotype caused by a mutation in the ACT1 gene. To identify novel genes whose protein products interact with actin, mutations that fail to complement act1-1 or act1-4, two temperature-sensitive alleles of ACT1, were isolated. A total of 14 extragenic noncomplementing mutations and 12 new alleles of ACT1 were identified in two independent screens. The 14 extragenic noncomplementing mutations represent alleles of at least four different genes, ANC1, ANC2, ANC3 and ANC4 (Actin NonComplementing). Mutations in the ANC1 gene were shown to cause osmosensitivity and defects in actin organization; phenotypes that are similar to those caused by act1 mutations. We conclude that the ANC1 gene product plays an important role in actin cytoskeletal function. The 12 new alleles of ACT1 will be useful for further elucidation of the functions of actin in yeast. PMID:8243992

  20. Mutation screen of the cone-specific gene, CLUL1, in 376 patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sturgill, Gwen M; Pauer, Gayle J T; Bala, Elisa; Simpson, Ellen; Yaniglos, Stacia S; Crabb, John W; Hollyfield, Joe G; Lewis, Hilel; Peachey, Neal S; Hagstrom, Stephanie A

    2006-12-01

    Clusterin is a secreted glycoprotein expressed ubiquitously in many tissues that appears to function as a molecular chaperone capable of protecting stressed proteins. It is upregulated in many different forms of neurodegeneration and is thought to represent a defense response against neuronal damage. Clusterin has been found to be a common protein identified in drusen preparations isolated from the retina of donor eyes of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly population of developed countries. A retina-specific clusterin-like protein (CLUL1) showing nearly 25% identity to clusterin at the protein level was recently cloned and shown to be expressed specifically in cone photoreceptor cells. For these reasons, we investigated CLUL1 as a candidate gene for AMD. A mutation screen of the entire coding region of the CLUL1 gene in 376 unrelated patients with AMD uncovered three sequence variations, one isocoding change and two intronic changes. One intronic change appears significantly less frequent in patients with the more severe forms of AMD than in control subjects, suggesting that this variant may reduce the risk for AMD or may be linked to a nearby variant that may reduce AMD risk. Variant alleles of the CLUL1 gene were found; however, none are considered pathogenic. None of the variants identified are predicted to create or destroy splice donor or acceptor sites based on splice-site prediction software.

  1. Screening for Mutations in the TBX1 Gene on Chromosome 22q11.2 in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Lieh-Yung; Chuang, Yang-An; Hsu, Shih-Hsin; Tsai, Hsin-Yao; Cheng, Min-Chih

    2016-01-01

    A higher-than-expected frequency of schizophrenia in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome suggests that chromosome 22q11.2 harbors the responsive genes related to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The TBX1 gene, which maps to the region on chromosome 22q11.2, plays a vital role in neuronal functions. Haploinsufficiency of the TBX1 gene is associated with schizophrenia endophenotype. This study aimed to investigate whether the TBX1 gene is associated with schizophrenia. We searched for mutations in the TBX1 gene in 652 patients with schizophrenia and 567 control subjects using a re-sequencing method and conducted a reporter gene assay. We identified six SNPs and 25 rare mutations with no association with schizophrenia from Taiwan. Notably, we identified two rare schizophrenia-specific mutations (c.-123G>C and c.-11delC) located at 5′ UTR of the TBX1 gene. The reporter gene assay showed that c.-123C significantly decreased promoter activity, while c.-11delC increased promoter activity compared with the wild-type. Our findings suggest that the TBX1 gene is unlikely a major susceptible gene for schizophrenia in an ethnic Chinese population for Taiwan, but a few rare mutations in the TBX1 gene may contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia in some patients. PMID:27879657

  2. Deletion/duplication mutation screening of TP53 gene in patients with transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification.

    PubMed

    Bazrafshani, Mohammad Reza R; Nowshadi, Pouriaali A; Shirian, Sadegh; Daneshbod, Yahya; Nabipour, Fatemeh; Mokhtari, Maral; Hosseini, Fatemehsadat; Dehghan, Somayeh; Saeedzadeh, Abolfazl; Mosayebi, Ziba

    2016-02-01

    Bladder cancer is a molecular disease driven by the accumulation of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. The aim of this study was to detect the deletions/duplication mutations in TP53 gene exons using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) method in the patients with transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). The achieved formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from 60 patients with TCC of bladder were screened for exonal deletions or duplications of every 12 TP53 gene exons using MLPA. The pathological sections were examined by three pathologists and categorized according to the WHO scoring guideline as 18 (30%) grade I, 22 (37%) grade II, 13 (22%) grade III, and 7 (11%) grade IV cases of TCC. None mutation changes of TP53 gene were detected in 24 (40%) of the patients. Furthermore, mutation changes including, 15 (25%) deletion, 17 (28%) duplication, and 4 (7%) both deletion and duplication cases were observed among 60 samples. From 12 exons of TP53 gene, exon 1 was more subjected to exonal deletion. Deletion of exon 1 of TP53 gene has occurred in 11 (35.4%) patients with TCC. In general, most mutations of TP53, either deletion or duplication, were found in exon 1, which was statistically significant. In addition, no relation between the TCC tumor grade and any type of mutation were observed in this research. MLPA is a simple and efficient method to analyze genomic deletions and duplications of all 12 exons of TP53 gene. The finding of this report that most of the mutations of TP53 occur in exon 1 is in contrast to that of the other reports suggesting that exons 5-8 are the most (frequently) mutated exons of TP53 gene. The mutations of exon 1 of TP53 gene may play an important role in the tumorogenesis of TCC.

  3. Gene mutation, quantitative mutagenesis, and mutagen screening in mammalian cells: study with the CHO/HGPRT system

    SciTech Connect

    Hsie, A.W.

    1980-01-01

    We have employed CHO cells to develop and define a set of stringent conditions for studying mutation induction to TG resistance. Several lines of evidence support the CHO/HGPRT system as a specific-locus mutational assay. The system permits quantification of mutation at the HGPRT locus induced by various physical and chemical mutagens. The quantitative nature of the system provides a basis for the study of structure-function relationships of various classes of chemical mutagens. The intra- and interlaboratory reproducibility of this system suggests its potential for screening environmental agents for mutagenic activity.

  4. Mutation screening and genotype phenotype correlation of α-crystallin, γ-crystallin and GJA8 gene in congenital cataract

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Tushar; Khokhar, Sudarshan; Kumar, Manoj; Kaur, Punit; Roy, Tara Sankar

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To screen α-crystallin (CRYAB), γ-crystallin (CRYGC and CRYGD), and Connexin 50 (Cx-50 or GJA8) genes in congenital cataract patients and controls. Methods Thirty clinically diagnosed congenital cataract cases below 3 years of age from northern India, presenting at Dr. R. P. Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences (AIIMS, New Delhi, India) were enrolled in this study. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood, all coding and exon/intron regions were amplified using PCR and direct sequencing was performed to detect any nucleotide variation. ProtScale and Discovery Studio programs were used for insilico and structural analysis of non-synonymous mutations. Results DNA sequencing analysis of CRYAB, CRYGC, CRYGD, and GJA8 showed a total of six variations of which two were novel (CRYGC:p.R48H and GJA8:p.L281C) and four have been previously reported (CRYAB: rs11603779T>G, GJA8: p.L268L, CRYGD: p.R95R, and c.T564C). Both the novel changes, in CRYGC and GJA8 were found in 16.6% of the patients. Previously reported nucleotide alterations (CRYGD:p.R95R and c.T564C) were found in 90% of the patients. Insilico and structural analysis data suggested that two novel non-synonymous mutations altered the stability and solvent accessibility of γC-crystallin and Cx-50 proteins which may lead to lens opacification. Conclusions We observed two novel nonsynonymous variations and four reported variations in CRYAB, CRYGC, CRYGD, and GJA8. The p.R48H variation in γC-crystallin may disrupt the normal structure of lens and can cause cataract. Cx50 is responsible for joining the lens cells into a functional syncytium and a mutation (p.L281C) in GJA8 may lead to lens opacification resulting in cataract formation. This study further expands the mutation spectrum of congenital cataract and help understanding how mutant proteins lead to opacification of lens. PMID:21423869

  5. Screening in silico predicted remotely acting NF1 gene regulatory elements for mutations in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Hamby, Stephen E; Reviriego, Pablo; Cooper, David N; Upadhyaya, Meena; Chuzhanova, Nadia

    2013-08-15

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a neuroectodermal disorder, is caused by germline mutations in the NF1 gene. NF1 affects approximately 1/3,000 individuals worldwide, with about 50% of cases representing de novo mutations. Although the NF1 gene was identified in 1990, the underlying gene mutations still remain undetected in a small but obdurate minority of NF1 patients. We postulated that in these patients, hitherto undetected pathogenic mutations might occur in regulatory elements far upstream of the NF1 gene. In an attempt to identify such remotely acting regulatory elements, we reasoned that some of them might reside within DNA sequences that (1) have the potential to interact at distance with the NF1 gene and (2) lie within a histone H3K27ac-enriched region, a characteristic of active enhancers. Combining Hi-C data, obtained by means of the chromosome conformation capture technique, with data on the location and level of histone H3K27ac enrichment upstream of the NF1 gene, we predicted in silico the presence of two remotely acting regulatory regions, located, respectively, approximately 600 kb and approximately 42 kb upstream of the NF1 gene. These regions were then sequenced in 47 NF1 patients in whom no mutations had been found in either the NF1 or SPRED1 gene regions. Five patients were found to harbour DNA sequence variants in the distal H3K27ac-enriched region. Although these variants are of uncertain pathological significance and still remain to be functionally characterized, this approach promises to be of general utility for the detection of mutations underlying other inherited disorders that may be caused by mutations in remotely acting regulatory elements.

  6. [Patients suffered from enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome in Chifeng deaf and dumb school detected by Pendred's syndrome gene hot spot mutation screening].

    PubMed

    Dai, Pu; Zhu, Xiu-Hui; Yuan, Yong-Yi; Zhu, Qing-Wen; Teng, Guo-Chun; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Li-Xian; Wang, Jia-Ling; Feng, Bo; Zhai, Suo-Qiang; Kang, Dong-Yang; Liu, Xin; Huang, De-Liang

    2006-07-01

    To investigate the incidence of hot spot mutation of PDS gene by genetic screening testing method in Chifeng City, Inner Mongolia. The feasibility and effectiveness of genetic screening method in finding enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome were confirmed by temporal bone CT scan. DNA were extracted from peripheral blood of 141 students of Chifeng Deaf and Dumb school. PDS IVS7-2 A-G mutation, the most common PDS mutation in Chinese population, was analyzed by direct sequencing for PDS exon 7, exon 8 with intron 7. The individuals found with homozygous or heterozygous PDS IVS7-2 A-G mutation were given further temporal CT scan, ultrasound scan of thyroid and thyroid hormone assays. The results of PDS genetic screening and temporal bone CT scan were compared with each other. The sequencing results revealed twenty cases carrying PDS IVS7-2 A-G mutation, of whom nine cases were homozygous mutation and eleven cases were heterozygous mutation. Eighteen cases underwent temporal bone CT scan except two cases that left the school due to other health problem. Sixteen cases were confirmed to be enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome (EVAS) by CT scan and the shape and function of thyroid were clinically normal by ultrasound scan of thyroid and thyroid hormone assays, respectively. The patients suffered from EVAS can be diagnosed by the screening for the PDS hot spot mutation which has unique advantage in epidemiologic study in large scale deaf population. The preliminary data of this study suggested relatively high incidence of EVAS in Chifeng area.

  7. Employment of single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis in screening for α-1,3 glucosyltransferase gene mutation A333V in Croatian population.

    PubMed

    Goreta, Sandra Supraha; Dabelic, Sanja; Dumic, Jerka

    2011-01-01

    Congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ic (CDG-Ic) is caused by mutations in hALG6 gene encoding α-1,3 glucosyltransferase (NP_037471.2), an enzyme that catalyzes the addition of the first glucose residue to the growing lipid-linked oligosaccharide precursor in N-glycosylation process. The most frequent mutation in hALG6 gene causing CDG-Ic is c.998C>T that results in p.A333V substitution. Up-to-date, no CDG-Ic patient has been detected in Croatia. However, as a part of the comprehensive project undertaken with the aim to estimate the frequencies of the carriers for specific mutations and polymorphisms related to particular CDGs in Croatian population, we screened genomic DNA samples obtained from 600 healthy nonconsanguineous Croatian residents to determine the frequency of the A333V mutation. For that purpose, we established the conditions for polymerase chain reaction-based single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis that is suitable for primary screening and in population studies, especially when the initial sample volume is small or DNA quantity is limited. None of the analyzed samples carried this mutation, indicating that the frequency of the patients carrying this homozygous mutation in Croatian population would be <1 in 1.4×10(6).

  8. Mutation screening of the EYA1, SIX1, and SIX5 genes in a large cohort of patients harboring branchio-oto-renal syndrome calls into question the pathogenic role of SIX5 mutations.

    PubMed

    Krug, Pauline; Morinière, Vincent; Marlin, Sandrine; Koubi, Valérie; Gabriel, Heinz D; Colin, Estelle; Bonneau, Dominique; Salomon, Rémi; Antignac, Corinne; Heidet, Laurence

    2011-02-01

    Branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by branchial, ear, and renal anomalies. Over 80 mutations in EYA1 have been reported in BOR. Mutations in SIX1, a DNA binding protein that associates with EYA1, have been reported less frequently. One group has recently described four missense mutations in SIX5 in five unrelated patients with BOR. Here, we report a screening of these three genes in a cohort of 140 patients from 124 families with BOR. We identified 36 EYA1 mutations in 42 unrelated patients, 2 mutations, and 1 change of unknown significance in SIX1 in 3 unrelated patients, but no mutation in SIX5. We did not find correlation between genotype and phenotype, and observed a high phenotypic variability between and within BOR families. We show the difficulty in establishing a molecular diagnosis strategy in BOR syndrome: the screening focusing on patients with typical BOR would detect a mutation rate of 76%, but would also miss mutations in 9% of patients with atypical BOR. We detected a deletion removing three EYA1 exons in a patient who was previously reported to carry the SIX5 Thr552Met mutation. This led us to reconsider the role of SIX5 in the development of BOR. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Mutation screening of NOS1AP gene in a large sample of psychiatric patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The gene encoding carboxyl-terminal PDZ ligand of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1AP) is located on chromosome 1q23.3, a candidate region for schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Previous genetic and functional studies explored the role of NOS1AP in these psychiatric conditions, but only a limited number explored the sequence variability of NOS1AP. Methods We analyzed the coding sequence of NOS1AP in a large population (n = 280), including patients with schizophrenia (n = 72), ASD (n = 81) or OCD (n = 34), and in healthy volunteers controlled for the absence of personal or familial history of psychiatric disorders (n = 93). Results Two non-synonymous variations, V37I and D423N were identified in two families, one with two siblings with OCD and the other with two brothers with ASD. These rare variations apparently segregate with the presence of psychiatric conditions. Conclusions Coding variations of NOS1AP are relatively rare in patients and controls. Nevertheless, we report the first non-synonymous variations within the human NOS1AP gene that warrant further genetic and functional investigations to ascertain their roles in the susceptibility to psychiatric disorders. PMID:20602773

  10. Comprehensive CFTR gene analysis of the French cystic fibrosis screened newborn cohort: implications for diagnosis, genetic counseling, and mutation-specific therapy.

    PubMed

    Audrézet, Marie Pierre; Munck, Anne; Scotet, Virginie; Claustres, Mireille; Roussey, Michel; Delmas, Dominique; Férec, Claude; Desgeorges, Marie

    2015-02-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) was implemented throughout France in 2002. It involves a four-tiered procedure: immunoreactive trypsin (IRT)/DNA/IRT/sweat test [corrected] was implemented throughout France in 2002. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of molecular CFTR gene analysis from the French NBS cohort, to evaluate CF incidence, mutation detection rate, and allelic heterogeneity. During the 8-year period, 5,947,148 newborns were screened for cystic fibrosis. The data were collected by the Association Française pour le Dépistage et la Prévention des Handicaps de l'Enfant. The mutations identified were classified into four groups based on their potential for causing disease, and a diagnostic algorithm was proposed. Combining the genetic and sweat test results, 1,160 neonates were diagnosed as having cystic fibrosis. The corresponding incidence, including both the meconium ileus (MI) and false-negative cases, was calculated at 1 in 4,726 live births. The CF30 kit, completed with a comprehensive CFTR gene analysis, provides an excellent detection rate of 99.77% for the mutated alleles, enabling the identification of a complete genotype in 99.55% of affected neonates. With more than 200 different mutations characterized, we confirmed the French allelic heterogeneity. The very good sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value obtained suggest that the four-tiered IRT/DNA/IRT/sweat test procedure may provide an effective strategy for newborn screening for cystic fibrosis.

  11. A rapid method for simultaneous screening of multi-gene mutations associated with hearing loss in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Sagong, Borum; Baek, Jeong-In; Oh, Se-Kyung; Na, Kyung Jin; Bae, Jae Woong; Choi, Soo Young; Jeong, Ji Yun; Choi, Jae Young; Lee, Sang-Heun; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Kim, Un-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Hearing loss (HL) is a congenital disease with a high prevalence, and patients with hearing loss need early diagnosis for treatment and prevention. The GJB2, MT-RNR1, and SLC26A4 genes have been reported as common causative genes of hearing loss in the Korean population and some mutations of these genes are the most common mutations associated with hearing loss. Accordingly, we developed a method for the simultaneous detection of seven mutations (c.235delC of GJB2, c.439A>G, c.919-2A>G, c.1149+3A>G, c.1229C>T, c.2168A>G of SLC26A4, and m.1555A>G of the MT-RNR1 gene) using multiplex SNaPshot minisequencing to enable rapid diagnosis of hereditary hearing loss. This method was confirmed in patients with hearing loss and used for genetic diagnosis of controls with normal hearing and neonates. We found that 4.06% of individuals with normal hearing and 4.32% of neonates were heterozygous carriers. In addition, we detected that an individual is heterozygous for two different mutations of GJB2 and SLC26A4 gene, respectively and one normal hearing showing the heteroplasmy of m.1555A>G. These genotypes corresponded to those determined by direct sequencing. Overall, we successfully developed a robust and cost-effective diagnosis method that detects common causative mutations of hearing loss in the Korean population. This method will be possible to detect up to 40% causative mutations associated with prelingual HL in the Korean population and serve as a useful genetic technique for diagnosis of hearing loss for patients, carriers, neonates, and fetuses.

  12. EGFR gene copy number alterations are not a useful screening tool for predicting EGFR mutation status in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Russell, Prudence A; Yu, Yong; Do, Hongdo; Clay, Timothy D; Moore, Melissa M; Wright, Gavin M; Conron, Matthew; Wainer, Zoe; Dobrovic, Alexander; McLachlan, Sue-Anne

    2014-01-01

    We investigated if gene copy number (GCN) alterations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), as detected by silver enhanced in situ hybridisation (SISH), could be used to select patients for EGFR mutation testing. Resected lung adenocarcinoma specimens with adequate tumour were identified. EGFR SISH was performed using the Ventana Benchmark Ultra platform. EGFR GCN was classified according to the Colorado Classification System. EGFR mutations were scanned by high resolution melting and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Thirty-four of 96 tumours were EGFR SISH positive (35%), and 31 of 96 tumours harboured one or more EGFR mutations (32%). Of 31 EGFR-mutant tumours, 18 were EGFR SISH positive (58%). There was a statistically significant relationship between the presence of an EGFR mutation and EGFR GCN (p = 0.003). Thirteen of 31 EGFR-mutant tumours were EGFR SISH negative (42%), and 16 of 65 EGFR-wild type tumours were EGFR SISH positive (24%). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 58%, 75%, 52.9% and 79%, respectively. Despite a significant relationship between EGFR GCN alterations and EGFR mutations, our results indicate that EGFR GCN as detected by SISH is not a suitable way to select patients for EGFR mutation testing.

  13. Exhaustive screening of the acid beta-glucosidase gene, by fluorescence-assisted mismatch analysis using universal primers: mutation profile and genotype/phenotype correlations in Gaucher disease.

    PubMed Central

    Germain, D P; Puech, J P; Caillaud, C; Kahn, A; Poenaru, L

    1998-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is one of the most prevalent lysosomal storage disorders and one of the rare genetic diseases now accessible to therapy. Outside the Ashkenazi Jewish community, a high molecular diversity is observed, leaving approximately 30% of alleles undetected. Nevertheless, very few exhaustive methods have been developed for extensive gene screening of a large series of patients. Our approach for a complete search of mutations was the association of fluorescent chemical cleavage of mismatches with a universal strand-specific labeling system. The glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene was scanned by use of a set of six amplicons, comprising 11 exons, all exon/intron boundaries, and the promoter region. By use of this screening strategy, the difficulties due to the existence of a highly homologous pseudogene were easily overcome, and both GD mutant alleles were identified in all 25 patients studied, thus attesting to a sensitivity that approaches 100%. A total of 18 different mutations and a new glucocerebrosidase haplotype were detected. The mutational spectrum included eight novel acid beta-glucosidase mutations: IVS2 G(+1)-->T, I119T, R170P, N188K, S237P, K303I, L324P, and A446P. These data further indicate the genetic heterogeneity of the lesions causing GD. Established genotype/phenotype correlations generally were confirmed, but notable disparities were disclosed in several cases, thus underlining the limitation in the prognostic value of genotyping. The observed influence of multifactorial control on this monogenic disease is discussed. PMID:9683600

  14. Mutation screen of GABRA1, GABRB2 and GABRG2 genes in Japanese patients with absence seizures.

    PubMed

    Ito, Minako; Ohmori, Iori; Nakahori, Tomoyuki; Ouchida, Mamoru; Ohtsuka, Yoko

    2005-08-05

    Absence seizures are classified into typical and atypical absences according to clinical and EEG characteristics. Although missense mutations in the GABA(A) receptor gamma2 subunits (GABRG2) gene have recently been detected in two families with typical absence seizures, no study has been carried out to clarify the relationship between atypical absence and GABA(A) receptors. We performed mutation analysis of all the coding exons of GABA(A) receptor alpha1, beta2 and gamma2 subunit (GABRA1, GABRB2 and GABRG2) genes by direct sequencing to clarify whether there was common molecular biological mechanism underlying both typical and atypical absences. We recruited 52 unrelated Japanese patients, thirty-eight with typical absences and 14 with atypical absences. They consisted of 38 with childhood absence epilepsy, three with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, two with epilepsy with myoclonic-astatic seizures and nine with epilepsy with continuous spike-waves during slow wave sleep. All of the subjects were idiopathic or cryptogenic cases without any organic brain lesions or underlying diseases. We detected five polymorphisms (T156C in GABRA1, C1194T in GABRB2, and C315T, T588C and C1230T in GABRG2), and they are silent mutations. In conclusion, mutations in GABRA1, GABRB2 and GABRG2 do not seem to be a major genetic cause of epilepsy with typical and atypical absences in Japanese subjects.

  15. Systematic screening for mutations in the promoter and the coding region of the 5-HT{sub 1A} gene

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, J.; Shimron-Abarbanell, D.; Cichon, S.

    1995-10-09

    In the present study we sought to identify genetic variation in the 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor gene which through alteration of protein function or level of expression might contribute to the genetic predisposition to neuropsychiatric diseases. Genomic DNA samples from 159 unrelated subjects (including 45 schizophrenic, 46 bipolar affective, and 43 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 25 healthy controls) were investigated by single-strand conformation analysis. Overlapping PCR (polymerase chain reaction) fragments covered the whole coding sequence as well as the 5{prime} untranslated region of the 5-HT{sub 1A} gene. The region upstream to the coding sequence we investigated contains a functional promoter. We found two rare nucleotide sequence variants. Both mutations are located in the coding region of the gene: a coding mutation (A{yields}G) in nucleotide position 82 which leads to an amino acid exchange (Ile{yields}Val) in position 28 of the receptor protein and a silent mutation (C{yields}T) in nucleotide position 549. The occurrence of the Ile-28-Val substitution was studied in an extended sample of patients (n = 352) and controls (n = 210) but was found in similar frequencies in all groups. Thus, this mutation is unlikely to play a significant role in the genetic predisposition to the diseases investigated. In conclusion, our study does not provide evidence that the 5-HT{sub 1A} gene plays either a major or a minor role in the genetic predisposition to schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, or Tourette`s syndrome. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Mutation screening in 86 known X-linked mental retardation genes by droplet-based multiplex PCR and massive parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Wrogemann, Klaus; Kalscheuer, Vera; Tzschach, Andreas; Richard, Hugues; Haas, Stefan A; Menzel, Corinna; Bienek, Melanie; Froyen, Guy; Raynaud, Martine; Van Bokhoven, Hans; Chelly, Jamel; Ropers, Hilger; Chen, Wei

    2009-12-01

    Massive parallel sequencing has revolutionized the search for pathogenic variants in the human genome, but for routine diagnosis, re-sequencing of the complete human genome in a large cohort of patients is still far too expensive. Recently, novel genome partitioning methods have been developed that allow to target re-sequencing to specific genomic compartments, but practical experience with these methods is still limited. In this study, we have combined a novel droplet-based multiplex PCR method and next generation sequencing to screen patients with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) for mutations in 86 previously identified XLMR genes. In total, affected males from 24 large XLMR families were analyzed, including three in whom the mutations were already known. Amplicons corresponding to functionally relevant regions of these genes were sequenced on an Illumina/Solexa Genome Analyzer II platform. Highly specific and uniform enrichment was achieved: on average, 67.9% unambiguously mapped reads were derived from amplicons, and for 88.5% of the targeted bases, the sequencing depth was sufficient to reliably detect variations. Potentially disease-causing sequence variants were identified in 10 out of 24 patients, including the three mutations that were already known, and all of these could be confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The robust performance of this approach demonstrates the general utility of droplet-based multiplex PCR for parallel mutation screening in hundreds of genes, which is a prerequisite for the diagnosis of mental retardation and other disorders that may be due to defects of a wide variety of genes. The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11568-010-9137-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  17. High throughput RNAi screening identifies ID1 as a synthetic sick/lethal gene interacting with the common TP53 mutation R175H

    PubMed Central

    IMAI, HIROO; KATO, SHUNSUKE; SAKAMOTO, YASUHIRO; KAKUDO, YUICHI; SHIMODAIRA, HIDEKI; ISHIOKA, CHIKASHI

    2014-01-01

    The TP53 mutation (R175H) is one of the most common mutations in human cancer. It is a highly attractive strategy for cancer therapy to find the genes that lead the R175H-expressing cancer cells. The aim of this study was to identify the synthetic sick/lethal gene interacting with R175H. Using lentiviral bar-coded comprehensive shRNA library and a tetracycline-inducible R175H expressed in the SF126 human glioblastoma cell line (SF126-tet-R175H), we conducted high-throughput screening to identify the candidate genes that induce synthetic sickness/lethality in R175H-expressing cells. We identified 906 candidate gene suppressions that may lead to accelerated cell growth inhibition in the presence of R175H. Inhibitor of differentiation 1 (ID1) was one of the candidate genes, and its suppression by siRNA resulted in the acceleration of growth inhibition in cell lines both transiently and endogenously expressing R175H but not in TP53-null cell lines or other common p53 mutants (such as R273H). Flow cytometry analysis showed that ID1 suppression resulted in G1 arrest, and the arrest was accelerated by the expression of R175H. ID1 is a synthetic sick/lethal gene that interacts with R175H and is considered to be a novel molecular target for cancer therapy in R175H-expressing cells. PMID:24378760

  18. [Audiologic and molecular screening for hearing loss by 35delG mutation in connexin 26 gene and congenital cytomegalovirus infection].

    PubMed

    Streitenberger, Edgardo Raúl; Suárez, Ariel Ignacio; Masciovecchio, María Verónica; Laurnagaray, Diana; Alda, Ernesto

    2011-12-01

    Hearing loss may be attributed to genetic and environmental factors. Mutations in the gene of the CX26 protein (connexin 26), are responsible for 30-80% of all cases of non-syndromic profound hearing loss. The 35delG is the most frequent variant in the caucasian population. As to environmental factors, the cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the main cause of congenital infection. To determine the prevalence of congenital CMV infection and the frequency of the 35delG mutation in newborns. To identify those at risk of suffering hearing loss in order to do an audiologic follow-up of detected cases. One thousand and twenty samples of dry blood spots corresponding to newborns were tested using conventional and real time PCR. Audiologic screening was performed to all newborns before hospital discharge. Fifteen out of 1020 subjects were heterozygous for the mutation. No homozygous patients were found. Six out of the samples tested positive for CMV (confirmed by a urine sample), out of which only one newborn was symptomatic. The auditory brainstem response was recorded in all these children. Hearing loss was found in three children with congenital CMV infection and two with 35delG mutation. The frecuency of 35delG mutation carriers in our population was 1.3% and the CMV congenital infection prevalence was 0.6%. Audiologic monitoring of these two populations allowed detection of hearing loss of late onset.

  19. A new mutation in the AFP gene responsible for a total absence of alpha feto-protein on second trimester maternal serum screening for Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Petit, François M; Hébert, Marylise; Picone, Olivier; Brisset, Sophie; Maurin, Marie-Laure; Parisot, Frédéric; Capel, Liliane; Benattar, Clarisse; Sénat, Marie-Victoire; Tachdjian, Gérard; Labrune, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Alpha feto-protein (AFP) is a major plasma protein produced by the yolk sac and the liver during the fetal period. During the second trimester of pregnancy, APF and βhCG serum concentrations are commonly used for screening Down syndrome. AFP deficiency is rare (estimated to be 1/105 000 newborns) and only one sequence alteration has previously been reported in the AFP gene. We report a new mutation in exon 5 of the AFP gene, leading to a total absence of AFP on 2nd-trimester maternal serum screening for Down syndrome, confirmed on the amniotic fluid. Despite this, fetal development and birth were normal. After PCR-amplification, the whole AFP gene was sequenced. The new mutation was a guanine to adenine transition in position 543 creating a premature stop codon in position 181. In order to search for eventual modifications of the amniotic fluid profile, proteins were separated by electrophoresis and compared with 10 normal amniotic fluids sampled at the same developmental age (18 weeks). In the amniotic fluid of our patient albumin rate was reduced whereas alpha1 and beta protein fractions were increased, suggesting that AFP deficiency may modify the distribution of protein fractions. This observation emphasizes the complex molecular mechanisms of compensation of serum protein deficiency. Studies on other families with AFP deficiency are necessary to confirm this observation. PMID:18854864

  20. A new mutation in the AFP gene responsible for a total absence of alpha feto-protein on second trimester maternal serum screening for Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Petit, François M; Hébert, Marylise; Picone, Olivier; Brisset, Sophie; Maurin, Marie-Laure; Parisot, Frédéric; Capel, Liliane; Benattar, Clarisse; Sénat, Marie-Victoire; Tachdjian, Gérard; Labrune, Philippe

    2009-03-01

    Alpha feto-protein (AFP) is a major plasma protein produced by the yolk sac and the liver during the fetal period. During the second trimester of pregnancy, APF and betahCG serum concentrations are commonly used for screening Down syndrome. AFP deficiency is rare (estimated to be 1/105,000 newborns) and only one sequence alteration has previously been reported in the AFP gene. We report a new mutation in exon 5 of the AFP gene, leading to a total absence of AFP on 2nd-trimester maternal serum screening for Down syndrome, confirmed on the amniotic fluid. Despite this, fetal development and birth were normal. After PCR-amplification, the whole AFP gene was sequenced. The new mutation was a guanine to adenine transition in position 543 creating a premature stop codon in position 181. In order to search for eventual modifications of the amniotic fluid profile, proteins were separated by electrophoresis and compared with 10 normal amniotic fluids sampled at the same developmental age (18 weeks). In the amniotic fluid of our patient albumin rate was reduced whereas alpha1 and beta protein fractions were increased, suggesting that AFP deficiency may modify the distribution of protein fractions. This observation emphasizes the complex molecular mechanisms of compensation of serum protein deficiency. Studies on other families with AFP deficiency are necessary to confirm this observation.

  1. Mutation Screening of 1,237 Cancer Genes across Six Model Cell Lines of Basal-Like Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Eleonor; Winter, Christof; George, Anthony; Chen, Yilun; Törngren, Therese; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Borg, Åke; Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia K.; Saal, Lao H.

    2015-01-01

    Basal-like breast cancer is an aggressive subtype generally characterized as poor prognosis and lacking the expression of the three most important clinical biomarkers, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2. Cell lines serve as useful model systems to study cancer biology in vitro and in vivo. We performed mutational profiling of six basal-like breast cancer cell lines (HCC38, HCC1143, HCC1187, HCC1395, HCC1954, and HCC1937) and their matched normal lymphocyte DNA using targeted capture and next-generation sequencing of 1,237 cancer-associated genes, including all exons, UTRs and upstream flanking regions. In total, 658 somatic variants were identified, of which 378 were non-silent (average 63 per cell line, range 37–146) and 315 were novel (not present in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database; COSMIC). 125 novel mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing (59 exonic, 48 3’UTR and 10 5’UTR, 1 splicing), with a validation rate of 94% of high confidence variants. Of 36 mutations previously reported for these cell lines but not detected in our exome data, 36% could not be detected by Sanger sequencing. The base replacements C/G>A/T, C/G>G/C, C/G>T/A and A/T>G/C were significantly more frequent in the coding regions compared to the non-coding regions (OR 3.2, 95% CI 2.0–5.3, P<0.0001; OR 4.3, 95% CI 2.9–6.6, P<0.0001; OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.8–3.1, P<0.0001; OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2–2.7, P = 0.024, respectively). The single nucleotide variants within the context of T[C]T/A[G]A and T[C]A/T[G]A were more frequent in the coding than in the non-coding regions (OR 3.7, 95% CI 2.2–6.1, P<0.0001; OR 3.8, 95% CI 2.0–7.2, P = 0.001, respectively). Copy number estimations were derived from the targeted regions and correlated well to Affymetrix SNP array copy number data (Pearson correlation 0.82 to 0.96 for all compared cell lines; P<0.0001). These mutation calls across 1,237 cancer-associated genes and identification of novel variants will aid

  2. Mutation screening of the EYA1, SIX1, and SIX5 genes in an East Asian cohort with branchio-oto-renal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Hao; Wu, Chen-Chi; Lu, Ying-Chang; Lin, Yin-Hung; Su, Yi-Ning; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Yu, I-Shing; Hsu, Chuan-Jen

    2012-05-01

    To explore the genetic characteristics of branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome in an East Asian population. Prospective clinical genetic study. Twelve families (total of 18 patients) who fulfilled the criteria for BOR syndrome were enrolled in this study. Mutation screening of the EYA1, SIX1, and SIX5 genes was performed by direct sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and genotype-phenotype correlation was investigated. Two novel EYA1 variants, c.466C>T (p.Q156X) and c.1735delG (p.D579fs), were identified in two multiplex families. The c.466C>T variant resulted in a truncated EYA1 protein, whereas the c.1735delG variant was predicted to encode an EYA1 protein with an abnormal C terminal. Neither variant was identified in a panel of 100 normal controls, and both were cosegregated with the BOR phenotype in the pedigrees, indicating that they were pathogenic mutations. No SIX1 and SIX5 mutations were detected in members of the remaining 10 families. Analysis of the genotype-phenotype correlation revealed a high phenotypic variability between and within BOR families. Two novel EYA1 mutations (c.466C>T and c.1735delG) were identified in two families with BOR syndrome. SIX1 and SIX5 mutations were not detected in the present study. Further investigation is warranted regarding the contribution of SIX1 and SIX5 mutations to BOR syndrome in East Asian populations. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Screening for five prevalent mutations of SLC25A13 gene in Guangdong, China: a molecular epidemiologic survey of citrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhan-Hui; Yang, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Feng-Ping; Kikuchi, Atsuo; Liu, Zhen-Huan; Kuang, Li-Zhen; Li, Wei-Ming; Song, Yuan-Zong; Kure, Shigeo; Saheki, Takeyori

    2014-08-01

    Citrin is the liver-type aspartate/glutamate carrier isoform 2 (AGC2) encoded by SLC25A13 gene, playing important roles in the urea cycle and the malate-aspartate shuttle. Citrin deficiency (CD) has proven a disease entity with high prevalence in south China, including Guangdong with the largest population, but CD epidemiology in this province has not been well characterized. This study aims to screen for five prevalent SLC25A13 mutations, c.851_854del (p.R284fs286X), c.1638_1660dup (p.A554fs570X), c.615+5G>A (p.A206fs212X), IVS16ins3kb (p.A584fs585X) and c.1399C>T (p.R467X), to calculate the mutation carrier rate in Guangdong. A total of 2,428 used blood samples for health examination were collected as the research subjects, including 1,558 from 5 cities in the Pearl River Delta area and the remaining 870 from 4 peripheral cities, and the 5 mutations screened using High Resolution Melting Assay and HybProbe assay. A total of 52 carriers were detected, including 2 carriers of a novel c.1420G>A (p.V474M) mutation that impairs citrin function, as judged by the functional analysis in the yeast system. The carrier rate was higher in Pearl River Delta area than that in the peripheral cities (26/1,558 vs. 26/870, with χ(2) = 4.639 and P < 0.05). The carrier rate was around 1/47 (52/2,428), theoretically with the CD morbidity of 1/8,800 and the number of CD patients over 11,800 in Guangdong population. This study has provided primary epidemiologic data for the evaluation of CD effect in Guangdong province. Moreover, the newly identified c.1420G>A mutation that impairs AGC2 function has enriched the mutation spectrum of human SLC25A13 gene.

  4. Transcript annotation prioritization and screening system (TrAPSS) for mutation screening.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Brian M; Davis, Steven G; Smith, Michael F; Brown, Bartley; Kemp, Mathew B; Almabrazi, Hakeem; Grundstad, Jason A; Burns, Thomas; Leontiev, Vladimir; Andorf, Jeaneen; Clark, Abbot F; Sheffield, Val C; Casavant, Thomas L; Scheetz, Todd E; Stone, Edwin M; Braun, Terry A

    2007-12-01

    When searching for disease-causing mutations with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods, candidate genes are usually screened in their entirety, exon by exon. Genomic resources (i.e. www.ncbi.nih.gov, www.ensembl.org, and genome.ucsc.edu) largely support this paradigm for mutation screening by making it easy to view and access sequence data associated with genes in their genomic context. However, the administrative burden of conducting mutation screening in potentially hundreds of genes and thousands of exons in thousands of patients is significant, even with the use of public genome resources. For example, the manual design of oligonucleotide primers for all exons of the 10 Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) genes (149 exons) represents a significant information management challenge. The Transcript Annotation Prioritization and Screening System (TrAPSS) is designed to accelerate mutation screening by (1) providing a gene-based local cache of candidate disease genes in a genomic context, (2) automating tasks associated with optimizing candidate disease gene screening and information management, and (3) providing the implementation of an algorithmic technique to utilize large amounts of heterogeneous genome annotation (e.g. conserved protein functional domains) so as to prioritize candidate genes.

  5. Diagnosis of Niemann-Pick disease type C with 7-ketocholesterol screening followed by NPC1/NPC2 gene mutation confirmation in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been reported that oxidation product of cholesterol, 7-ketocholesterol, increases in plasma of patients with NP-C. Previously, we established a rapid test to determine the plasma 7-ketocholesterol level and found it elevated significantly in patients with acid sphingomyelinase deficient NPD and NP-C disease. Methods Individuals randomly referred to our outpatient clinics in the past two years for hepatosplenomegaly or isolated splenomegaly, who have been excluded as acid sphingomyelinase deficient NPD or Gaucher disease, and individuals with newborn cholestasis, psychomotor regression/retardation, were screened for plasma 7-ketocholesterol level. Individuals with high 7-ketocholesterol level were then analyzed for NPC1 and NPC2 gene mutation to confirm the accuracy of NP-C diagnosis. Results By screening the plasma 7-ketocholesterol of suspect individuals, 12 out of 302 (4%) had shown remarkable high levels compared with reference. All these twelve individuals were subsequently confirmed to be NP-C by DNA analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 genes, with the early infantile form (n = 7), the late infantile form (n = 1), the juvenile form (n = 1) and the adult form (n = 1). Furthermore, two NP-C patients without observable neuropsychiatric disability were picked up through this procedure. Only one patient had NP-C due to NPC2 gene mutations, with the rest due to NPC1 gene mutations. We found that in NP-C patients AST was usually mildly elevated and ALT was in a normal range when jaundice was not present. In total, 22 mutant alleles were identified in the NPC1 gene, including six novel small deletions/insertions, e.g., c.416_417insC, c.1030delT, c.1800delC, c.2230_2231delGT, c.2302_2303insG, and c.2795dupA; seven novel exonic point mutations, c.1502A>T (p.D501V), c.1553G>A (p.R518Q), c.1832A>G (p.D611G), c.2054T>C (p.I685T), c.2128C>T(p.Q710X), c.2177G>C (p.R726T), c.2366G>A (p.R789H), and one novel intronic mutation c.2912-3C>G. Small deletions

  6. Mutations of the GLA gene in young patients with stroke: the PORTYSTROKE study--screening genetic conditions in Portuguese young stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Miguel Viana; Ferreira, Susana; Pinho-E-Melo, Teresa; Carvalho, Marta; Cruz, Vítor T; Carmona, Cátia; Silva, Fernando A; Tuna, Assunção; Rodrigues, Miguel; Ferreira, Carla; Pinto, Ana A N; Leitão, André; Gabriel, João Paulo; Calado, Sofia; Oliveira, João Paulo; Ferro, José M

    2010-03-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked monogenic disorder caused by mutations in the GLA gene. Recent data suggest that stroke in young adults may be associated with Fabry disease. We aimed to ascertain the prevalence of this disorder among young adult patients with stroke in Portugal by GLA genotyping. During 1 year, all patients aged 18 to 55 years with first-ever stroke, who were admitted into any of 12 neurology hospital departments in Portugal, were prospectively enrolled (n=625). Ischemic stroke was classified according to Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria. Alpha-galactosidase activity was further assayed in all patients with GLA mutations. Four hundred ninety-three patients (mean age, 45.4 years; 61% male) underwent genetic analyses: 364 with ischemic stroke, 89 with intracerebral hemorrhage, 26 with subarachnoid hemorrhage, and 14 with cerebral venous thrombosis. Twelve patients had missense GLA mutations: 9 with ischemic stroke (p.R118C: n=4; p.D313Y: n=5), including 5 patients with an identified cause of stroke (cardiac embolism: n=2; small vessel disease: n=2; other cause: n=1), 2 with intracerebral hemorrhage (p.R118C: n=1; p.D313Y: n=1), and one with cerebral venous thrombosis (p.R118C: n=1). Leukocyte alpha-galactosidase activity was subnormal in the hemizygous males and subnormal or low-normal in the heterozygous females. Estimated prevalence of missense GLA mutations was 2.4% (95% CI, 1.3% to 4.1%). Despite a low diagnostic yield, screening for GLA mutations should probably be considered in different types of stroke. Restricting investigation to patients with cryptogenic stroke may underestimate the true prevalence of Fabry disease in young patients with stroke.

  7. Genes and mutations causing retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Daiger, SP; Sullivan, LS; Bowne, SJ

    2013-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous set of inherited retinopathies with many disease-causing genes, many known mutations, and highly varied clinical consequences. Progress in finding treatments is dependent on determining the genes and mutations causing these diseases, which includes both gene discovery and mutation screening in affected individuals and families. Despite the complexity, substantial progress has been made in finding RP genes and mutations. Depending on the type of RP, and the technology used, it is possible to detect mutations in 30–80% of cases. One of the most powerful approaches to genetic testing is high-throughput ‘deep sequencing’, that is, next-generation sequencing (NGS). NGS has identified several novel RP genes but a substantial fraction of previously unsolved cases have mutations in genes that are known causes of retinal disease but not necessarily RP. Apparent discrepancy between the molecular defect and clinical findings may warrant reevaluation of patients and families. In this review, we summarize the current approaches to gene discovery and mutation detection for RP, and indicate pitfalls and unsolved problems. Similar considerations apply to other forms of inherited retinal disease. PMID:23701314

  8. Mutation screen and association studies for the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) gene and early onset and adult obesity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The orexigenic effects of cannabinoids are limited by activation of the endocannabinoid degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). The aim of this study was to analyse whether FAAH alleles are associated with early and late onset obesity. Methods We initially assessed association of five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in FAAH with early onset extreme obesity in up to 521 German obese children and both parents. SNPs with nominal p-values ≤ 0.1 were subsequently analysed in 235 independent German obesity families. SNPs associated with childhood obesity (p-values ≤ 0.05) were further analysed in 8,491 adult individuals of a population-based cohort (KORA) for association with adult obesity. One SNP was further analysed in 985 German obese adults and 588 normal and underweight controls. In parallel, we screened the FAAH coding region for novel sequence variants in 92 extremely obese children using single-stranded-conformation-polymorphism-analysis and denaturing HPLC and assessed the implication of the identified new variants for childhood obesity. Results The trio analysis revealed some evidence for an association of three SNPs in FAAH (rs324420 rs324419 and rs873978) with childhood obesity (two-sided p-values between 0.06 and 0.10). Although analyses of these variants in 235 independent obesity families did not result in statistically significant effects (two-sided p-values between 0.14 and 0.75), the combined analysis of all 603 obesity families supported the idea of an association of two SNPs in FAAH (rs324420 and rs2295632) with early onset extreme obesity (p-values between 0.02 and 0.03). No association was, however, found between these variants and adult obesity. The mutation screen revealed four novel variants, which were not associated with early onset obesity (p > 0.05). Conclusions As we observed some evidence for an association of the FAAH variants rs2295632 rs324420 with early onset but not adult obesity, we conclude that the

  9. High resolution melting analysis facilitates mutation screening of ETFDH gene: applications in riboflavin-responsive multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Er, Tze-Kiong; Liang, Wen-Chen; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Jong, Yuh-Jyh

    2010-05-02

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) or gluaric aciduria type II is an autosomal recessive disease caused by defects in mitochondrial electron transfer system and metabolism of fatty acid. Recently, ETFDH mutations were reported to be major causes of riboflavin-responsive MADD. The present study is aimed at screening ETFDH mutations. High resolution melting (HRM) analysis was performed to screen ETFDH mutations. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples of the 9 patients with MADD and normal controls. Total 13 exons of ETFDH were screened by HRM analysis. The results were subsequently confirmed by direct DNA sequencing. This diagnostic strategy proved to be feasible in detecting 3 known (c.250G>A, c380T>A, c.524G>T) and 1 novel (c.1831G>A) ETFDH mutations. Each mutation could be readily and accurately identified in the difference plot curves. We estimated the carrier frequency of the hotspot mutation, c.250G>A, in the Taiwanese population to be 1:125 (0.8%). HRM analysis can be successfully applied to screen ETFDH mutations. Since riboflavin-responsive MADD is often treatable, especially with mutations in ETFDH, identifying ETFDH mutations is crucial for these patients. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular Screening of "MECP2" Gene in a Cohort of Lebanese Patients Suspected with Rett Syndrome: Report on a Mild Case with a Novel Indel Mutation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbani, S.; Chouery, E.; Fayyad, J.; Fawaz, A.; El Tourjuman, O.; Badens, C.; Lacoste, C.; Delague, V.; Megarbane, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked, dominant, neurodevelopment disorder represents 10% of female subjects with profound intellectual disability. Mutations in the "MECP2" gene are responsible for up to 95% of the classical RTT cases, and nearly 500 different mutations distributed throughout the gene have been reported. Methods:…

  11. Molecular Screening of "MECP2" Gene in a Cohort of Lebanese Patients Suspected with Rett Syndrome: Report on a Mild Case with a Novel Indel Mutation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbani, S.; Chouery, E.; Fayyad, J.; Fawaz, A.; El Tourjuman, O.; Badens, C.; Lacoste, C.; Delague, V.; Megarbane, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked, dominant, neurodevelopment disorder represents 10% of female subjects with profound intellectual disability. Mutations in the "MECP2" gene are responsible for up to 95% of the classical RTT cases, and nearly 500 different mutations distributed throughout the gene have been reported. Methods:…

  12. Screening for TARDBP mutations in Japanese familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Masaki; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Eiji; Morino, Hiroyuki; Wate, Reika; Ito, Hidefumi; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Kawano, Yuji; Miki, Tetsuro; Nodera, Hiroyuki; Izumi, Yuishin; Kaji, Ryuji; Kawakami, Hideshi

    2009-09-15

    TAR-DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), encoded by the TARDBP gene on chromosome 1p36.22, has been identified as the major pathological protein in abnormal inclusions in neurons and glial cells in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS), SOD1-negative familial ALS (FALS) and frontotemporal lobar dementia (FTLD). Twenty mutations of TARDBP in SOD1-negative FALS and SALS cases have been reported so far. To investigate the presence and frequency of TARDBP mutations in Japanese SOD1-negative FALS patients, we performed mutational screening of TARDBP in 30 SOD1-negative FALS patients. An N352S mutation was found in one case of FALS, but no TARDBP mutations were found in cases of SALS. It was thought that this mutation increases TDP-43 phosphorylation. This might lead to impaired nuclear cytoplasmic transport or protein-protein interaction, thereby leading to TDP-43 accumulation.

  13. The role of the prostate cancer gene 3 urine test in addition to serum prostate-specific antigen level in prostate cancer screening among breast cancer, early-onset gene mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Ruben G; Eeles, Rosalind A; Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Ringelberg-Borsboom, Janneke; Vasen, Hans F; Van Asperen, Christi J; Schalken, Jack A; Verhaegh, Gerald W; Kiemeney, Lambertus A

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the additive value of the prostate cancer gene 3 (PCA3) urine test to serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in prostate cancer (PC) screening among breast cancer, early-onset gene (BRCA) mutation carriers. This study was performed among the Dutch participants of IMPACT, a large international study on the effectiveness of PSA screening among BRCA mutation carriers. Urinary PCA3 was measured in 191 BRCA1 mutation carriers, 75 BRCA2 mutation carriers, and 308 noncarriers. The physicians and participants were blinded for the results. Serum PSA level ≥ 3.0 ng/ml was used to indicate prostate biopsies. PCA3 was evaluated (1) as an independent indicator for prostate b iopsies and (2) as an indicator for prostate biopsies among men with an elevated PSA level. PC detected up to the 2-year screening was used as gold standard as end-of-study biopsies were not performed. Overall, 23 PCs were diagnosed, 20 of which were in men who had an elevated PSA level in the initial screening round. (1) PCA3, successfully determined in 552 participants, was elevated in 188 (cutoff ≥ 25; 34%) or 134 (cutoff ≥ 35; 24%) participants, including 2 of the 3 PCs missed by PSA. PCA3 would have added 157 (≥ 25; 28%) or 109 (≥ 35; 20%) biopsy sessions to screening with PSA only. (2) Elevated PCA3 as a requirement for biopsies in addition to PSA would have saved 37 (cutoff ≥ 25) or 43 (cutoff ≥ 35) of the 68 biopsy sessions, and 7 or 11 PCs would have been missed, respectively, including multiple high-risk PCs. So far, PCA3 performed best among BRCA2 mutation carriers, but the numbers are still small. Because PCA3 was not used to indicate prostate biopsies, its true diagnostic value cannot be calculated. The results do not provide evidence for PCA3 as a useful additional indicator of prostate biopsies in BRCA mutation carriers, as many participants had an elevated PCA3 in the absence of PC. This must be interpreted with caution because PCA3 was not used to indicate biopsies

  14. A New IL-2RG Gene Mutation in an X-linked SCID Identified through TREC/KREC Screening: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nourizadeh, Maryam; Borte, Stephan; Fazlollahi, Mohammad Reza; Hammarström, Lennart; Pourpak, Zahra

    2015-08-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) represents a rare group of primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs), with known or unknown genetic alterations. Here, we report a new interleukin 2 receptor, gamma chain (IL-2RG) mutation in an Iranian SCID newborn. The patient was a 6-day old boy with a family history of PID. The child was screened using a molecular-based analysis for the assessment of T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) and kappa-deleting recombination excision circles (KRECs). Moreover, a complete immunological evaluation and gene sequencing was performed. Results showed undetectable TREC but a high level of KREC copy numbers. Flow cytometric data indicated low numbers of T and NK cells, but elevated number of B cells. A novel substitution in IL2RG: c.675 C>A, leading to p.225 Ser>Arg was found. Based on the functional analysis, the mutation is predicted to be damaging. The patient was diagnosed as a T B+ NK X-linked SCID.

  15. Co segregation of the m.1555A>G mutation in the MT-RNR1 gene and mutations in MT-ATP6 gene in a family with dilated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy and hearing loss: A whole mitochondrial genome screening.

    PubMed

    Alila-Fersi, Olfa; Chamkha, Imen; Majdoub, Imen; Gargouri, Lamia; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Tabebi, Mouna; Tlili, Abdelaziz; Keskes, Leila; Mahfoudh, Abdelmajid; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2017-02-26

    Mitochondrial disease refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting in defective cellular energy production due to dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which is responsible for the generation of most cellular energy. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies is one of the most frequent mitochondria disorders. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathy has been associated with several point mutations of mtDNA in both genes encoded mitochondrial proteins and mitochondrial tRNA and rRNA. We reported here the first description of mutations in MT-ATP6 gene in two patients with clinical features of dilated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy. The mutational analysis of the whole mitochondrial DNA revealed the presence of m.1555A>G mutation in MT-RNR1 gene associated to the m.8527A>G (p.M>V) and the m.8392C>T (p.136P>S) variations in the mitochondrial MT-ATP6 gene in patient1 and his family members with variable phenotype including hearing impairment. The second patient with isolated mitochondrial cardiomyopathy presented the m.8605C>T (p.27P>S) mutation in the MT-ATP6 gene. The three mutations p.M1V, p.P27S and p.P136S detected in MT-ATP6 affected well conserved residues of the mitochondrial protein ATPase 6. In addition, the substitution of proline residue at position 27 and 136 effect hydrophobicity and structure flexibility conformation of the protein.

  16. GJB2 gene mutations in childhood deafness.

    PubMed

    Angeli, S; Utrera, R; Dib, S; Chiossone, E; Naranjo, C; Henríquez, O; Porta, M

    2000-03-01

    The frequency of childhood deafness is estimated at 1:1,000 and at least half of these cases are genetic. Recently, mutations in the GJB2 gene have been found in a great number of familial and sporadic cases of congenital deafness in Caucasians. The most common mutation (70%) is the frameshift mutation of a single guanine in position 35 (35delG). More than 20 mutations in the GJB2 gene are associated with DFNB1, a prevalent type of autosomal recessive non-syndromic neurosensory deafness. Last year we initiated a systematic screening programme to evaluate the causes of deafness in the population of prelingually deaf children who are referred to our cochlear implant programme. All of the deaf children and their parents undergo a comprehensive medical review, directed to identify causes of acquired deafness and manifestations of syndromic hearing impairment. DNA is extracted from the blood of all of the children. The technique AS-PCR (allele-specific polymerase chain reaction) is used for the identification of the mutation 35delG. Screening for other GJB2 gene mutations is carried out by single-strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP). Our results on the identification of DFNB1 will be presented, as well as a discussion on the implications of an aetiological diagnosis in cochlear implantation.

  17. Unexpected finding of a whole HNF1B gene deletion during the screening of rare MODY types in a series of Brazilian patients negative for GCK and HNF1A mutations.

    PubMed

    Dotto, Renata P; Giuffrida, Fernando M A; Franco, Luciana; Mathez, Andreia L G; Weinert, Leticia S; Silveiro, Sandra P; Sa, Joao R; Reis, Andre F; Dias-da-Silva, Magnus R

    2016-06-01

    Thirty-two patients with diabetes negative for point mutations in GCK and HNF1A underwent further molecular screening of GCK, HNF1A, HNF4A, and HNF1B by MLPA analysis. We described the first Brazilian case of MODY5 due to a heterozygous whole-gene deletion in HNF1B, who developed rapidly progressive renal failure and death.

  18. Recurrent gene mutations in CLL.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Quesada, Víctor; Villamor, Neus; Puente, Xose S; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of whole genomes and exomes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has provided the first comprehensive view of somatic mutations in this disease. Subsequent studies have characterized the oncogenic pathways and clinical implications of a number of these mutations. The global number of somatic mutations per case is lower than those described in solid tumors but is in agreement with previous estimates of less than one mutation per megabase in hematological neoplasms. The number and pattern of somatic mutations differ in tumors with unmutated and mutated IGHV, extending at the genomic level the clinical differences observed in these two CLL subtypes. One of the striking conclusions of these studies has been the marked genetic heterogeneity of the disease, with a relatively large number of genes recurrently mutated at low frequency and only a few genes mutated in up to 10-15 % of the patients. The mutated genes tend to cluster in different pathways that include NOTCH1 signaling, RNA splicing and processing machinery, innate inflammatory response, Wnt signaling, and DNA damage and cell cycle control, among others. These results highlight the molecular heterogeneity of CLL and may provide new biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for the diagnosis and management of the disease.

  19. RNA-based mutation screening in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kohonen-Corish, M.; Ross, V.L.; Doe, W.F.

    1996-10-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a cancer syndrome inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. Four susceptibility genes are known, which code for DNA mismatch repair enzymes. The purpose of this study was to identify the HNPCC gene defects in a cohort of Australian HNPCC families and to evaluate the use of RNA-based screening methods. Six mutations were identified, four in the hMLH1 gene and two in hMSH2, by using a combination of DNA-based and RNA-based methods. One of the hMLH1 defects was a missense mutation, and the other five mutations would be expected to result in a shortened protein. These included a rare type of mRNA splicing mutation in hMLH1 exon 17. By use of reverse-transcriptase (RT) PCR, defective transcripts were detectable for three of the hMLH1 mutations but not for the fourth one, which was predicted to cause skipping of exon 15. Furthermore, many more alternative transcripts for the hMLH1 gene were found than previously described, and these were more abundant in the RNA samples prepared from whole blood than from lymphoblastoid cell lines. This confounded RNA-based screening for HNPCC mutations, because it was difficult to determine which aberrant RT-PCR fragment was the real hereditary defect. One of the splice-site mutations reported here causes skipping of exons 9 and 10, which also occurs as an alternative transcript. When the protein-truncation test was used, the results were indistinguishable between the patients in this family and controls. Other aberrant transcripts were also observed that varied in size between individuals but were unrelated to the hereditary defects. This study has important implications for the design of reliable diagnostic tests for HNPCC gene defects. 26 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Mutation screening of VHL gene in a family with malignant bilateral pheochromocytoma: from isolated familial pheochromocytoma to von Hippel-Lindau disease.

    PubMed

    Hasani-Ranjbar, Shirin; Amoli, Mahsa M; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Haghpanah, Vahid; Hejazi, Maryam; Soltani, Akbar; Larijani, Bagher

    2009-01-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (vHL) disease is an inherited, autosomal dominant syndrome manifested by a variety of benign and malignant tumors. More than 300 germline VHL mutations have been identified that are involved in VHL disease. A large family (four generations) was evaluated. In this paper we report the presence of a single nucleotide mutation in exon 3 of VHL gene c499 C>T causing substitution of Arginine by Tryptophan at position 167 (R 167 W). It was detected in a family with bilateral malignant pheochromocytoma who has been followed for at least 9 years as RET negative isolated familial pheochromocytoma, finally diagnosed as von Hipple-Lindau disease according to retinal angioma and VHL gene mutation. VHL type 2 presenting with both pheochromocytoma and retinal angioma in this family found to be associated with the new missense mutation (c499 C>T) of VHL gene.

  1. A third MRX family (MRX68) is the result of mutation in the long chain fatty acid-CoA ligase 4 (FACL4) gene: proposal of a rapid enzymatic assay for screening mentally retarded patients

    PubMed Central

    Longo, I; Frints, S; Fryns, J; Meloni, I; Pescucci, C; Ariani, F; Borghgraef, M; Raynaud, M; Marynen, P; Schwartz, C; Renieri, A; Froyen, G

    2003-01-01

    Background: The gene encoding fatty acid CoA ligase 4 (FACL4) is mutated in families with non-specific X linked mental retardation (MRX) and is responsible for cognitive impairment in the contiguous gene syndrome ATS-MR (Alport syndrome and mental retardation), mapped to Xq22.3. This finding makes this gene a good candidate for other mental retardation disorders mapping in this region. Methods: We have screened the FACL4 gene in eight families, two MRX and six syndromic X linked mental retardation (MRXS), mapping in a large interval encompassing Xq22.3. Results: We have found a missense mutation in MRX68. The mutation (c.1001C>T in the brain isoform) cosegregates with the disease and changes a highly conserved proline into a leucine (p.P375L) in the first luciferase domain, which markedly reduces the enzymatic activity. Furthermore, all heterozygous females showed completely skewed X inactivation in blood leucocytes, as happens in all reported females with other FACL4 point mutations or deletions. Conclusions: Since the FACL4 gene is highly expressed in brain, where it encodes a brain specific isoform, and is located in hippocampal and cerebellar neurones, a role for this gene in cognitive processes can be expected. Here we report the third MRX family with a FACL4 mutation and describe the development of a rapid enzymatic assay on peripheral blood that we propose as a sensitive, robust, and efficient diagnostic tool in mentally retarded males. PMID:12525535

  2. Characterization and mapping of the human rhodopsin kinase gene and screening of the gene for mutations in patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Khani, S.C.; Lin, D.; Magovcevic, I.

    1994-09-01

    Rhodopsin kinase (RK) is a cytosolic enzyme in rod photoreceptors that initiates the deactivation of the phototransductions cascade by phosphorylating photoactivated rhodopsin. Although the cDNA sequence of bovine RK has been determined previously, no human cDNA or genomic sequence has thus far been available for genetic studies. In order to investigate the possible role of this candidate gene in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and allied diseases, we have isolated and characterized human cDNA and genomic clones derived from the RK locus. The coding sequence of the human gene is 1692 nucleotides in length and is split into seven exons. The human and the bovine sequence show 84% identity at the nucleotide level and 92% identity at the amino acid level. Thus far, the intronic sequences flanking each exon except for one have been determined. We have also mapped the human RK gene to chromosome 13q34 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. To our knowledge, no RP gene has as yet been linked to this region. However, since the substrate for RK (rhodopsin) and other members of the phototransduction cascade have been implicated in the pathogenesis of RP, it is conceivable that defects in RK can also cause some forms of this disease. We are evaluating this possibility by screening DNA from 173 patients with autosomal recessive RP and 190 patients with autosomal dominant RP. So far, we have found 11 patients with variant bands. In one patient with autosomal dominant RP we discovered the missense change Ser536Leu. Cosegregation studies and further sequencing of the variant bands are currently underway.

  3. Screen of the IMPDH1 gene among patients with dominant retinitis pigmentosa and clinical features associated with the most common mutation, Asp226Asn.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yuko; Sandberg, Michael A; McGee, Terri L; Stillberger, Melissa A; Berson, Eliot L; Dryja, Thaddeus P

    2005-05-01

    To determine the frequency of mutations in IMPDH1 among patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP), to characterize the clinical features of patients with the Asp226Asn mutation in this gene, and to compare these features with those found among patients with selected dominant mutations in other RP genes. The coding sequence and the adjacent flanking intron sequences of all 14 coding exons were sequenced in 183 unrelated patients with dominant RP. The clinical findings evaluated included visual acuity, refractive error, visual field area measured with the Goldmann perimeter, final dark-adaptation threshold, full-field electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes, cataract, and funduscopic bone spicule pigmentation. The mutation Asp226Asn was identified in 6 of the 183 unrelated patients with RP. One patient carried the novel, possibly pathogenic, change Lys238Glu. There was approximately a 100-fold variation in ERG amplitudes among patients of similar age with the Asp226Asn mutation. Patients had similar reductions of rod-plus-cone 0.5-Hz ERG amplitude and cone 30-Hz ERG amplitude. For a given amount of remaining visual field, there was a larger ERG amplitude in IMPDH1-carrying patients (average 0.5-Hz ERG/visual field ratio = 9.5 nV/deg(2)) compared with groups of patients with the RP1 mutation Arg677End (2.8 nV/deg(2)), the rhodopsin (RHO) mutation Pro23His (5.1 nV/deg(2)), or the RHO mutation Pro347Leu (1.7 nV/deg(2)). IMPDH1 mutations account for approximately 2% of cases of dominant RP in North America. The most frequent mutation, Asp226Asn, appears to cause at least as much loss of rod function as cone function. Patients with this form of RP retain, on average, two to five times more ERG amplitude per unit of remaining visual area than patients with three other forms of dominant RP.

  4. Multiplex single-tube screening for mutations in the Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS1) gene in Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients of Slavic origin.

    PubMed

    Soucek, Pavel; Gut, Ivan; Trneny, Marek; Skovlund, Eva; Grenaker Alnaes, Grethe; Kristensen, Tom; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela N

    2003-05-01

    Patients with Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS) have a high risk to develop malignant diseases, most frequently B-cell lymphomas. It has been demonstrated that this chromosomal breakage syndrome results from mutations in the NBS1 gene that cause either a loss of full-length protein expression or expression of a variant protein. A large proportion of the known NBS patients are of Slavic origin who carry a major founder mutation 657del5 in exon 6 of the NBS1 gene. The prevalence of this mutation in Slav populations is reported to be high, possibly contributing to higher cancer risk in these populations. Therefore, if mutations in NBS1 are associated with higher risk of developing lymphoid cancers it would be most likely to be observed in these populations. A multiplex assay for four of the most frequent NBS1 mutations was designed and a series of 119 lymphoma patients from Slavic origin as well as 177 healthy controls were tested. One of the patients was a heterozygote carrier of the ACAAA deletion mutation in exon 6 (1/119). No mutation was observed in the control group, despite the reported high frequency (1/177). The power of this study was 30% to detect a relative risk of 2.0.

  5. Development of a high-resolution melting curve analysis screening test for SRSF2 splicing factor gene mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Garza, Eduardo; Fabiani, Emiliano; Noguera, Nelida; Panetta, Paola; Piredda, Maria L; Borgia, Loredana; Maurillo, Luca; Catalano, Gianfranco; Voso, Maria T; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations of the spliceosome machinery have been recently identified by whole genome analysis in hematologic diseases, such as myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, myeloproliferative neoplasms, acute myeloid leukemia, and advanced forms of mastocytosis, and also in nonhematologic conditions. SRSF2 is a member of the serine/arginine-rich family pre-mRNA splicing factors that plays a role in mRNA export from the nucleus and translation. We describe a high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis to screen for SRSF2 hotspot mutations in a fast, sensitive, and reliable way. Fifty bone marrow samples from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome were analyzed by the HRM assay and by direct sequencing. HRM screening identified four melting patterns corresponding to a negative (wild-type) group and three different mutated groups. Each mutated group was identified according to the positive control used: P95H, P95L, and P95R, respectively. An HRM mutated pattern was identified in seven patients. Positive and negative results from HRM were compared with direct sequencing results with a sensitivity and specificity of 100% (95% CI, 0.56-1, and 95% CI, 0.89-1, respectively). Analytical sensitivity analysis revealed a detection threshold of up to 1:9 (mutated/wild type) dilution. This rapid screening method may provide useful information for clinical decision making and be helpful to optimize laboratory resources and reduce turnaround time. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mutation Screening of Exons 7 and 13 of the TMC1 Gene in Autosomal Recessive Non-syndromic Hearing Loss (ARNSHL) in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moradipour, Negar; Ghasemi-Dehkordi, Payam; Heibati, Fatemeh; Parchami-Barjui, Shahrbanuo; Abolhasani, Marziyeh; Rashki, Ahmad; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL) is the most common birth defect and occurs in approximately 1/1,000 newborns. NSHL is a heterogeneous trait and can arise due to both genetic and environmental factors. Mutations of the transmembrane channel-like 1 (TMC1) gene cause non-syndromic deafness in humans and mice. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of TMC1 gene mutations of the locus DFNB7/11 in exons 7 and 13 in a cohort of 100 patients with hearing loss in Iran using polymerase chain reaction–single-stranded conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP), heteroduplex analysis (HA), and DNA sequencing. Patients and Methods: In this experimental study, the blood samples of 100 NSHL patients were collected from 10 provinces in Iran. These patients had a mean age of 16.5 ± 2.01 years and 74.15% of their parents had consanguinity. DNA was extracted from specimens and mutations of exons 7 and 13 of the TMC1 gene were investigated using PCR-SSCP. All samples were checked via HA reaction and suspected specimens with shift bands were subjected to DNA sequencing for investigation of any gene variation. Results: In this study, no mutation was found in the two exons of TMC1 gene. It was concluded from these results that mutations of the TMC1 gene’s special exons 7 and 13 have a low contribution in patients and are not great of clinical importance in these Iranian provinces. Conclusions: More studies are needed to investigate the relationship between other parts of this gene with hearing loss in different populations through the country. More research could clarify the role of this gene and its relation with deafness and provide essential information for the prevention and management of auditory disorders caused by genetic factors in the Iranian population. PMID:27247785

  7. Rapid screening for dominant negative mutations in the beet necrotic yellow vein virus triple gene block proteins P13 and P15 using a viral replicon.

    PubMed

    Lauber, E; Janssens, L; Weyens, G; Jonard, G; Richards, K E; Lefèbvre, M; Guilley, H

    2001-08-01

    Point mutations were introduced into the genes encoding the triple gene bock movement proteins P13 and P15 of beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV). Mutations which disabled viral cell-to-cell movement in Chenopodium quinoa were then tested for their ability to act as dominant negative inhibiters of movement of wild-type BNYVV when expressed from a co-inoculated BNYVV RNA 3-based replicon. For P13, three types of mutation inhibited the movement function: non-synomynous mutations in the N- and C-terminal hydrophobic domains, a mutation at the boundary between the N-terminal hydrophobic domain and the central hydrophilic domain (mutant P13-A12), and mutations in the conserved sequence motif in the central hydrophilic domain. However, only the 'boundary' mutant P13-A12 strongly inhibited movement of wild-type virus when expressed from the co-inoculated replicon. Similar experiments with P15 detected four movement-defective mutants which strongly inhibited cell-to-cell movement of wild-type BNYVV when the mutants were expressed from a co-inoculated replicon. Beta vulgaris transformed with two of these P15 mutants were highly resistant to fungus-mediated infection with BNYVV.

  8. A New Insertion/Deletion of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Gene Accounts for 3.4% of Cystic Fibrosis Mutations in Sardinia: Implications for Population Screening

    PubMed Central

    Faà, Valeria; Bettoli, Pietro Pellegrini; Demurtas, Maria; Zanda, Maurizio; Ferri, Vincenzina; Cao, Antonio; Rosatelli, Maria Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies performed on Sardinian patients affected by cystic fibrosis (CF) have led to the identification of molecular defects in 87 of 88 patients. Two mutations, the F508del and T338I, were quite prevalent and accounted for 50% and 20% of the molecular defects, respectively. T338I has been detected rarely in other populations, most likely because of the genetic isolation of Sardinians. In the present study, we have performed a molecular analysis of the CF gene in eight Sardinian patients in whom only a single mutation has been defined. Using DNA analyses (Southern blot, single nucleotide polymorphisms, microsatellite analyses, and Extra-Long polymerase chain reaction) selected to detect gross gene rearrangement and by using mRNA studies, we detected a novel mutation c.54-5811_164 + 2186del8108ins182 in six of the eight patients investigated. This mutation consists of a gross deletion of 8108 bp spanning exon 2 with an insertion of 182 bp at the deletion junction, between nucleotide 54-5811 of intron 1 (IVS1 nt16864) and nucleotide 164 + 2186 of intron 2 (IVS2 nt 2186). By including the novel mutation in our mutation panel we are now able to reach a 95% detection rate, thereby improving the process of carrier detection and genetic counseling in Sardinia. PMID:16931591

  9. Comprehensive screening for PRSS1, SPINK1, CFTR, CTRC and CLDN2 gene mutations in Chinese paediatric patients with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Xiao-Tian; Weng, Xiao-Ling; Zhou, Dai-Zhan; Sun, Chang; Xia, Tian; Hu, Liang-Hao; Lai, Xiao-Wei; Ye, Bo; Liu, Mu-Yun; Jiang, Fei; Gao, Jun; Bo, Lu-Min; Liu, Yun; Liao, Zhuan; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2013-01-01

    Objective Genetic alterations may contribute to chronic pancreatitis (CP) in Chinese young patients. This study was designed to investigate mutations of cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1), pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor or serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), chymotrypsin C (CTRC) and CLDN2 genes and the copy number variations (CNVs) of PRSS1 and asses associations with the development of idiopathic CP (ICP) in Chinese children. Design Retrospective. Setting A single center. Participants 75 ICP Chinese children (40 boys and 35 girls). Primary and secondary outcome measures Mutations of PRSS1, SPINK1, CFTR, CTRC and CLDN2 genes and CNVs. Results 7 patients had heterozygous mutations in PRSS1, that is, N29I (n=1), R122H or R122C (n=6). The CNVs of PRSS1 in five patients had abnormal copies (1 copy (n=4), five copies (n=1)). 43 patients had IVS3+2T>C (rs148954387) (10 homozygous and 33 heterozygous) in SPINK1. None of the PRSS1 mutation patients carried a SPINK1 mutation. Frequency of PRSS1 and SPINK1 mutations was 9.3% and 57.3%, respectively, with an overall frequency of 66.6% (50/75). In addition, one patient had a novel deletion of CFTR (GCTTCCTA from c.500 to c.508 leading to the shortened polypeptide molecule via a stop codon). Another patient had a novel missense in CLDN2 exon 2 (c.592A>C mutation). Clinically, patients with SPINK1 mutations had a higher rate of pancreatic duct stones, pancreatic pseudocyst and pancreatic calcification than those without SPINK1 mutations (p<0.05). Conclusions SPINK1 mutations were more commonly associated with Chinese children with ICP. SPINK1 IVS3+2T>C mutation may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Chinese paediatric ICP. However, further study is needed to confirm and to investigate the role of these genes in the development of Chinese ICP. PMID:24002981

  10. Screening of mutations in the additional sex combs like 1, transcriptional regulator, tumor protein p53, and KRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase/NRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase genes of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leite, Carolina; Delmonico, Lucas; Alves, Gilda; Gomes, Romario José; Martino, Mariana Rodrigues; da Silva, Aline Rodrigues; Moreira, Aline Dos Santos; Maioli, Maria Christina; Scherrer, Luciano Rios; Bastos, Elenice Ferreira; Irineu, Roberto; Ornellas, Maria Helena

    2017-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous group of clonal bone marrow disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, different degrees of cellular dysplasia, and increased risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. International Prognostic Scoring System is the gold standard for MDS classification; however, patients exhibiting different clinical behaviors often coexist in the same group, indicating that the currently available scoring systems are insufficient. The genes that have recently been identified as mutated in MDS, including additional sex combs like 1, transcriptional regulator (ASXL1), tumor protein p53 (TP53), and KRAS proto-oncogene and GTPase (KRAS)/NRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase (NRAS), may contribute to a more comprehensive classification, as well as to the prognosis and progression of the disease. In the present study, the mutations in the ASXL1, TP53 and NRAS/KRAS genes in 50 patients were evaluated by sequencing genomic bone marrow DNA. Nine patients (18%) presented with at least one type of mutation. Mutations in TP53 were the most frequent in six patients (12%), followed by ASXL1 in two patients (4%) and NRAS in one patient (2%). The nine mutations were detected in patients with low- and high-risk MDS. The screening of mutations in MDS cases contributes to the application of personalized medicine.

  11. Gene mutations in Cushing's disease

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qi; Ge, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) is a severe (and potentially fatal) disease caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting adenomas of the pituitary gland (often termed pituitary adenomas). The majority of ACTH-secreting corticotroph tumors are sporadic and CD rarely appears as a familial disorder, thus, the genetic mechanisms underlying CD are poorly understood. Studies have reported that various mutated genes are associated with CD, such as those in menin 1, aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein and the nuclear receptor subfamily 3 group C member 1. Recently it was identified that ubiquitin-specific protease 8 mutations contribute to CD, which was significant towards elucidating the genetic mechanisms of CD. The present study reviews the associated gene mutations in CD patients. PMID:27588171

  12. Secondary Variants in Individuals Undergoing Exome Sequencing: Screening of 572 Individuals Identifies High-Penetrance Mutations in Cancer-Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jennifer J.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Facio, Flavia M.; Ng, David; Singh, Larry N.; Teer, Jamie K.; Mullikin, James C.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2012-01-01

    Genome- and exome-sequencing costs are continuing to fall, and many individuals are undergoing these assessments as research participants and patients. The issue of secondary (so-called incidental) findings in exome analysis is controversial, and data are needed on methods of detection and their frequency. We piloted secondary variant detection by analyzing exomes for mutations in cancer-susceptibility syndromes in subjects ascertained for atherosclerosis phenotypes. We performed exome sequencing on 572 ClinSeq participants, and in 37 genes, we interpreted variants that cause high-penetrance cancer syndromes by using an algorithm that filtered results on the basis of mutation type, quality, and frequency and that filtered mutation-database entries on the basis of defined categories of causation. We identified 454 sequence variants that differed from the human reference. Exclusions were made on the basis of sequence quality (26 variants) and high frequency in the cohort (77 variants) or dbSNP (17 variants), leaving 334 variants of potential clinical importance. These were further filtered on the basis of curation of literature reports. Seven participants, four of whom were of Ashkenazi Jewish descent and three of whom did not meet family-history-based referral criteria, had deleterious BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. One participant had a deleterious SDHC mutation, which causes paragangliomas. Exome sequencing, coupled with multidisciplinary interpretation, detected clinically important mutations in cancer-susceptibility genes; four of such mutations were in individuals without a significant family history of disease. We conclude that secondary variants of high clinical importance will be detected at an appreciable frequency in exomes, and we suggest that priority be given to the development of more efficient modes of interpretation with trials in larger patient groups. PMID:22703879

  13. Mutation screening of patients with Leber Congenital Amaurosis or the enhanced S-Cone Syndrome reveals a lack of sequence variations in the NRL gene.

    PubMed

    Acar, Ceren; Mears, Alan J; Yashar, Beverly M; Maheshwary, Anjali S; Andreasson, Sten; Baldi, Alfonso; Sieving, Paul A; Iannaccone, Alessandro; Musarella, Maria A; Jacobson, Samuel G; Swaroop, Anand

    2003-01-24

    To determine if mutations in the retinal transcription factor gene NRL are associated with retinopathies other than autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). Genomic DNA was isolated from blood samples obtained from 50 patients with Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA), 17 patients with the Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome (ESCS), and a patient with an atypical retinal degeneration that causes photoreceptor rosettes with blue cone opsin. The 5' upstream region (putative promoter), untranslated exon 1, coding exons 2 and 3, and exon-intron boundaries of the NRL gene were analyzed by direct sequencing of the PCR-amplified products. Complete sequencing of the NRL gene in DNA samples from this cohort of patients revealed only one nucleotide change. The C->G transversion at nucleotide 711 of NRL exon 3 was detected in one LCA patient; however, this change did not alter the amino acid (L237L). No potential disease causing mutation was identified in the NRL gene in patients with LCA, ESCS, or the atypical retinal degeneration. Together with previous studies, our results demonstrate that mutations in the NRL gene are not a major cause of retinopathy. To date, only missense changes have been reported in adRP patients, and sequence variations are rare. It is possible that the loss of NRL function in humans is associated with a more complex clinical phenotype due to its expression in pineal gland in addition to rod photoreceptors.

  14. A Genetic Interaction Screen for Breast Cancer Progression Driver Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0082 TITLE: A Genetic Interaction Screen for Breast...COVERED 1 2012 - 3 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Genetic Interaction Screen for Breast Cancer Progression Driver Genes 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...analysis of genetic alterations in human breast cancers has revealed that individual tumors accumulate mutations in approximately ninety different genes

  15. Prospective mutation screening of three common deafness genes in a large Taiwanese Cohort with idiopathic bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment reveals a difference in the results between families from hospitals and those from rehabilitation facilities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Chi; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chiu, Yu-Hsun; Lu, Ying-Chang; Wu, Ming-Chueh; Hsu, Chuan-Jen

    2008-01-01

    Accurate epidemiological data on common deafness genes are essential to improve the efficiency and to reduce the cost of molecular diagnosis. They may depend on several factors, including a clear delineation of the source of patients being studied. In the present study, we hypothesize that patients with idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss recruited from different sources might reveal discrepancies in the epidemiological results of genetic screening, because patients from different sources might demonstrate distinct clinical or audiologic features and thus result in biased selection of subjects. To elucidate the relative importance of common deafness genes in Taiwanese and to verify our hypothesis, we conducted a prospective project screening mutations in GJB2, SLC26A4 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in a total of 420 Taiwanese families with idiopathic bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, of which 325 families were recruited from hospitals and 95 from hearing rehabilitation facilities. Allele frequencies of common mutations in these three genes and distributions of the corresponding genotypes were then compared between the two groups. The allele frequencies of mutations in SLC26A4, GJB2 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA in the probands of the 420 families were 14.4, 21.7 and 3.8%, respectively. The allele frequency of SLC26A4 mutations in the hospital group was significantly higher than that in the rehabilitation facility group (16.2 vs. 8.4%, chi(2)-test, p < 0.05), whereas no difference in the frequencies of GJB2 mutations and mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations was found between the two groups. Distributions of probands classified by SLC26A4 genotypes were also different between the two groups (chi(2)-test, p < 0.05). Accordingly, a discrepancy in the genetic screening results might exist between different sources of idiopathic hearing-impaired patients. Further analysis of audiological results and construction of a logistic regression model showed that different

  16. Incidence of cystic fibrosis in five different states of Brazil as determined by screening of p.F508del, mutation at the CFTR gene in newborns and patients.

    PubMed

    Raskin, Salmo; Pereira-Ferrari, Lilian; Reis, Francisco Caldeira; Abreu, Fernando; Marostica, Paulo; Rozov, Tatiana; Cardieri, Joselina; Ludwig, Norberto; Valentin, Lairton; Rosario-Filho, Nelson Augusto; Camargo Neto, Eurico; Lewis, Eduardo; Giugliani, Roberto; Diniz, Edna Maria Albuquerque; Culpi, Lodercio; Phillip, John Atlas; Chakraborty, Ranajit

    2008-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common single-gene defects in European descent populations with an incidence of about 1 in every 2500 live births and carrier frequency of approximately 1 in 25. The most common mutation at the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene is a deletion (p.F508del) of the phenylalanine codon 508; its frequency, however, is not the same throughout the world. The purpose of this paper is to document an application of a two-tier survey design in different states of Brazil, from which regional differences of the incidence of CF and frequency of CF-causing mutation(s) carriers can be for the first time estimated. We present data on genotype distributions in reference to p.F508del mutation in samples of newborns, adult controls and CF patients from five Brazilian states, in which a total of 2683 newborns born to Brazilian white parents and 500 African-Brazilians adult controls were screened, as well as 300 CF patients (262 European descents and 38 African descents) were genotyped. Our results suggest that the CF-incidence in different parts of Brazil may differ by almost 20-fold. For the five different states as a whole, nearly 48% of the CF-alleles carry the p.F508del mutation, which places the estimates of disease incidence and carrier frequencies for the Brazilian European descents as 1 in 7576 live births and 2.3%, respectively. The implications for prevention of CF and other rare Mendelian diseases through such surveys of mutation screening are discussed.

  17. Mutation analysis of the gene involved in adrenoleukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Oost, B.A. van; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Kemp, S.; Bolhuis, P.A.

    1994-09-01

    A gene responsible for the X-linked genetic disorder adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) that is characterized by demyelination of the nervous system and adrenocortical insufficiency has been identified by positional cloning. The gene encodes an ATP-binding transporter which is located in the peroxisomal membrane. Deficiency of the gene leads to accumulation of unsaturated very long chain fatty acids due to impaired peroxisomal {beta}-oxidation. A systematic analysis of the open reading frame of the ALD gene unraveled the mutations in 28 different families using reverse transcriptase-PCR followed by direct sequencing. No entire gene deletions or drastic promoter mutations have been detected. Only in one family did the mutation involved multiple exons. The remaining mutations were subtle alterations leading to missense (about 50%) or nonsense mutations, frameshifts or splice acceptor site defects. In one patient a single codon was missing. Mutations affecting a single amino acid were concentrated in the region between the third and fourth putative membrane spanning fragments and in the ATP-binding domain. This overview of mutations aids in the determination of structural and functional important regions and facilitates the screening for mutations in other ALD patients. The detection of mutations in virtually all ALD families tested indicates that the isolated gene is the only gene responsible for ALD located in Xq28.

  18. Systematic screening for mutations in the human N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 gene in schizophrenic patients from the German population.

    PubMed

    Paus, Sebastian; Rietschel, Marcella; Schulze, Thomas G; Ohlraun, Stephanie; Diaconu, Carmen C; Van Den Bogaert, Ann; Maier, Wolfgang; Propping, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M

    2004-12-01

    Evidence for a dysfunction of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type of ionotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenic patients, comes from neurochemical and clinical pharmacologic data. Therefore, the NMDAR1 gene can be regarded as an interesting candidate gene for schizophrenia. Several groups have tried to identify variants of this gene in schizophrenic patients in different, however not in German, populations. We sought to identify sequence changes of potential functional relevance in genomic DNA from 46 German unrelated schizophrenic patients by means of single-strand conformation analysis. No mutations of likely functional relevance were observed. We identified two synonymous coding Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (cSNPs) in exons 6 and 7, and two SNPs in exon-flanking intronic sequences. Genotype distribution of these four SNPs was not significantly different between schizophrenic patients and controls. Our results suggest that the NMDAR1 subunit is not frequently involved in the development of schizophrenia in the German population.

  19. Genetic screening of the G2019S mutation of the LRRK2 gene in Southwest European, North African, and Sephardic Jewish subjects.

    PubMed

    Change, Nathalie; Mercier, Géraldine; Lucotte, Gérard

    2008-09-01

    The G2019S mutation in exon 41 of the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene accounts for 3-6% of familial dominant Parkinson's disease (PD) and for 1-2% of sporadic PD. It seems that there is a north-south gradient of G2019S frequency in Europe in PD patients, and the frequency of the mutation is up to 41% in North African cases. To obtain a precise estimate of G2019S frequency in populations with relatively elevated incidence of mutation carriers, we have tested for the presence of the G2019S in the south Mediterranean countries. Three thousand one hundred healthy European subjects were compared for the G2019S incidence with 597 healthy Arab subjects originating from five populations in North Africa and with 361 healthy Sephardi Jews from five other populations. The main incidence of G2019S carriers is 1/46 in our sample of North African Arabs, the most elevated carrier incidence (1/30) being found in Moroccan Berbers. An elevated incidence (1/72) is also found in our sample of Sephardi Jews. These results contrast with the ones we found (1/1550) in a sample of 3100 healthy subjects originating from 15 populations of southern Europe. Six microsatellite markers were used in the 20 G2019S carriers we found, to conduct a haplotype analysis. Our finding on the elevated incidence of the G2019S mutation in North African Arabs and in Sephardi Jews, Berbers being the people where the mutation probably originates from, has some important consequences for future genetic diagnosis and counseling for PD in these populations.

  20. Screening of late-onset Pompe disease in a sample of Mexican patients with myopathies of unknown etiology: identification of a novel mutation in the acid alpha-glucosidase gene.

    PubMed

    Alcántara-Ortigoza, Miguel Angel; González-del Angel, Ariadna; Barrientos-Ríos, Rehotbevely; Cupples, Courtney; Garrido-García, Luis Martín; de León-Bojorge, Beatríz; Alva-Chaire, Adriana del Carmen

    2010-08-01

    Pompe disease or glycogen-storage disease type 2 (GSD2, OMIM 232300) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the acid alpha-glucosidase gene. Late-onset GSD2 resembles some limb-girdle and Becker muscular dystrophies. The screening of GSD2 through the measurement of acid alpha-glucosidase activity in dried blood spots was applied to a selected sample of 5 Mexican patients with proximal myopathies of unknown etiology. Only 1 male patient showed a low level of acid alpha-glucosidase activity and a compound heterozygote genotype for the c.-32-13T>G splicing mutation present in most white late-onset Pompe disease cases and the novel mutation p.C558S. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a Mexican patient with late-onset GSD2. The identification of c.-32-13T>G in our patient could reflect the genetic contribution of European ancestry to the Mexican population. The enzymatic screening of GSD2 could be justified in patients with myopathies of unknown etiology.

  1. Novel Mass Spectrometry Mutation Screening for Contaminant Impact Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Winston Chung-Hsuan; Lee, Kai-Lin

    2000-09-30

    present DNA analysis technology. Thus, our approach is to develop novel new DNA technologies which can potentially achieve rapid, reliable and inexpensive DNA analysis for environmental applications. The objective of this program is to develop innovative mass spectrometry technology to achieve fast mutation screening and to reveal the linkage between gene mutation and contaminants. Mass spectrometry has the potential to achieve very fast speed sample analysis.New innovative approaches for improving mass resolution and detection sensitivity were pursued to help to achieve rapid DNA screening. Allele specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR) coupled with mass spectrometry for DNA mutation detection was also pursued. This technology was applied to wildlife species such as fish for the genotoxic effect of hazardous waste to be assessed at DNA level.

  2. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M N; Hughes, I A; Gottlieb, B; Pinsky, L

    1994-09-01

    The androgen receptor gene mutations database is a comprehensive listing of mutations published in journals and meetings proceedings. The majority of mutations are point mutations identified in patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Information is included regarding the phenotype, the nature and location of the mutations, as well as the effects of the mutations on the androgen binding activity of the receptor. The current version of the database contains 149 entries, of which 114 are unique mutations. The database is available from EMBL (NetServ@EMBL-Heidelberg.DE) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (mc33001@musica.mcgill.ca).

  3. Human fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase gene (FBP1): Exon-intron organization, localization to chromosome bands 9q22.2-q22.3, and mutation screening in subjects with fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    El-Maghrabi, M.R.; Jiang, W.

    1995-06-10

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) is a key regulatory enzyme of gluconeogenesis that catalyzes the hydrolysis of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate to generate fructose-6-phosphate and inorganic phosphate. Deficiency of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase is associated with fasting hypoglycemia and metabolic acidosis because of impaired gluconeogenesis. We have cloned and characterized the human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase gene (FBP1). FBP1, localized to chromosome bands 9q22.2-q22.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization, consists of seven exons that span > 31 kb, and the six introns are in the same position as in the rat gene. FBP1 was screened for mutations in two subjects with fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency. Four nucleotide substitutions were identified, two of which were silent mutations in the codons for Ala-216 (GCT {yields} GCC) and Gly-319 (GGG {yields} GGA). The other substitutions were in intron 3, a C {yields} T substitution 7 nucleotides downstream from the splice donor site, and in the promoter region, an A {yields} T substitution 188 nucleotides upstream from the start of transcription. These nucleotide substitutions were also found in normal unaffected subjects and thus are not the cause of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency in the two subjects studied. The molecular basis of hepatic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency in these subjects remains undetermined but could result from unidentified mutations in the promoter that decrease expression or from mutations in another gene that indirectly lead to decreased fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activity. 18 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Mutability and mutational spectrum of chromosome transmission fidelity genes.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Peter C; Crisp, Matthew J; Basrai, Munira A; Tucker, Cheryl M; Dunham, Maitreya J; Spencer, Forrest A; Hieter, Philip

    2012-06-01

    It has been more than two decades since the original chromosome transmission fidelity (Ctf) screen of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was published. Since that time the spectrum of mutations known to cause Ctf and, more generally, chromosome instability (CIN) has expanded dramatically as a result of systematic screens across yeast mutant arrays. Here we describe a comprehensive summary of the original Ctf genetic screen and the cloning of the remaining complementation groups as efforts to expand our knowledge of the CIN gene repertoire and its mutability in a model eukaryote. At the time of the original screen, it was impossible to predict either the genes and processes that would be overrepresented in a pool of random mutants displaying a Ctf phenotype or what the entire set of genes potentially mutable to Ctf would be. We show that in a collection of 136 randomly selected Ctf mutants, >65% of mutants map to 13 genes, 12 of which are involved in sister chromatid cohesion and/or kinetochore function. Extensive screening of systematic mutant collections has shown that ~350 genes with functions as diverse as RNA processing and proteasomal activity mutate to cause a Ctf phenotype and at least 692 genes are required for faithful chromosome segregation. The enrichment of random Ctf alleles in only 13 of ~350 possible Ctf genes suggests that these genes are more easily mutable to cause genome instability than the others. These observations inform our understanding of recurring CIN mutations in human cancers where presumably random mutations are responsible for initiating the frequently observed CIN phenotype of tumors.

  5. Mutation in δ-Sg Gene in Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Marzieh; Foo, Roger; Salehi, Ahmad Reza; Salehi, Rasoul; Samienasab, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mutations in different genes including dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex caused familial dilated cardiomyopathy which is a genetically heterogeneous disease. The δ-SG gene contains nine exons spanning a 433-kb region of genomic DNA. It encodes a 35-kDa, singlepass, and type II transmembrane glycoprotein. Materials and Methods: In this study for the first time in Iran we screened 6 patients of a large family that they had positive family history of MI or sudden death by next generation sequencing method. Results: By employing NGS method we found missense mutation (p.R97Q) of δ-SG gene in 2 of 6 patients. Conclusions: The missense mutation (p.R97Q) in familial DCM patients is reported for the first time in Iranian patients with cardiac disease. Although this mutation is already known in other populations in Iran, it is not reported before. PMID:28401079

  6. Screening for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Eastern Finnish breast/ovarian cancer families.

    PubMed

    Hartikainen, J M; Kataja, V; Pirskanen, M; Arffman, A; Ristonmaa, U; Vahteristo, P; Ryynänen, M; Heinonen, S; Kosma, V-M; Mannermaa, A

    2007-10-01

    Familial aggregation is thought to account for 5-10% of all breast cancer cases, and high penetrance breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 explain < or =20% of these. Hundreds of mutations among breast/ovarian cancer families have been found in these two genes. The mutation spectrum and prevalence, however, varies widely among populations. Thirty-six breast/ovarian cancer families were identified from a population sample of breast and ovarian cancer cases among a relatively isolated population in Eastern Finland, and the frequency of BRCA1/BRCA2 germline mutations were screened using heteroduplex analysis, protein truncation test and sequencing. Five different mutations were detected in seven families (19.4%). Two mutations were found in BRCA1 and three in BRCA2. One of the mutations (BRCA2 4088insA) has not been detected elsewhere in Finland while the other four, 4216-2nt A-->G and 5370 C-->T in BRCA1 and 999del5 and 6503delTT in BRCA2, are recurrent Finnish founder mutations. These results add to the evidence of the geographical differences in distribution of Finnish BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations. This screen also provides further evidence for the presumption that the majority of Finnish BRCA1/BRCA2 founder mutations have been found and that the proportion of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in Finnish breast/ovarian cancer families is around 20%.

  7. Germline mutation screening and predictive testing in families with von Hippel-Lindau disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brauch, H.; Glavac, D.; Pausch, F.

    1994-09-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal inheritable disease that predisposes gene carriers to develop tumors in the eyes, central nervous system, kidney, adrenal gland, pancreas and epididymis. VHL type 1 is without phenochromocytoma (P); VHL type 2 is with P. Screening for germline mutations and preclinical diagnosis in families with VHL disease has become feasible since the VHL gene was isolated. We applied Southern blotting and hybridization with g7cDNA to detect rearrangements, PCR-SSCP and sequencing to detect missense, nonsense and splice mutations, and primer-specified restriction map modification to detect a P-specific missense mutation. In 48 apparently unrelated VHL families mainly from Germany, we identified 20/48 (42%) VHL mutations: 7 (14.5%) rearrangements, 9/48 (19%) missense mutations affecting nt505, 1/48 (2%) splice site mutation, 2/48 (4%) other missense mutations, and 1/48 (2%) nonsense mutation. The predominance of the nt505 mutation in 9 German families with VHL type 2 suggests that this genotype expresses the VHL/P disease pattern. Predictive testing for VHL gene carriers in families with specific mutations identified 7 asymptomatic gene carriers. VHL manifestations have been confirmed by clinical examination in two individuals. Early molecular diagnosis may result in a successful management of VHL disease and prolong survival of VHL patients.

  8. Gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Amin, Nisar A; Malek, Sami N

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of genes mutated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has stimulated new research into the role of these genes in CLL pathogenesis. CLL cases carry approximately 5-20 mutated genes per exome, a lower number than detected in many human tumors. Of the recurrently mutated genes in CLL, all are mutated in 10% or less of patients when assayed in unselected CLL cohorts at diagnosis. Mutations in TP53 are of major clinical relevance, are often associated with del17p and gain in frequency over time. TP53 mutated and associated del17p states substantially lower response rates, remission duration, and survival in CLL. Mutations in NOTCH1 and SF3B1 are recurrent, often associated with progressive CLL that is also IgVH unmutated and ZAP70-positive and are under investigation as targets for novel therapies and as factors influencing CLL outcome. There are an estimated 20-50 additional mutated genes with frequencies of 1%-5% in CLL; more work is needed to identify these and to study their significance. Finally, of the major biological aberration categories influencing CLL as a disease, gene mutations will need to be placed into context with regard to their ultimate role and importance. Such calibrated appreciation necessitates studies incorporating multiple CLL driver aberrations into biological and clinical analyses.

  9. Microarray-based mutation detection in the dystrophin gene.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Madhuri R; Chin, Ephrem L H; Mulle, Jennifer G; Okou, David T; Warren, Stephen T; Zwick, Michael E

    2008-09-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are X-linked recessive neuromuscular disorders caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 males. The human dystrophin gene spans>2,200 kb, or roughly 0.1% of the genome, and is composed of 79 exons. The mutational spectrum of disease-causing alleles, including exonic copy number variations (CNVs), is complex. Deletions account for approximately 65% of DMD mutations and 85% of BMD mutations. Duplications occur in approximately 6 to 10% of males with either DMD or BMD. The remaining 30 to 35% of mutations consist of small deletions, insertions, point mutations, or splicing mutations, most of which introduce a premature stop codon. Laboratory analysis of dystrophin can be used to confirm a clinical diagnosis of DMD, characterize the type of dystrophin mutation, and perform prenatal testing and carrier testing for females. Current dystrophin diagnostic assays involve a variety of methodologies, including multiplex PCR, Southern blot analysis, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), detection of virtually all mutations-SSCP (DOVAM-S), and single condition amplification/internal primer sequencing (SCAIP); however, these methods are time-consuming, laborious, and do not accurately detect duplication mutations in the dystrophin gene. Furthermore, carrier testing in females is often difficult when a related affected male is unavailable. Here we describe the development, design, validation, and implementation of a high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarray-based approach capable of accurately detecting both deletions and duplications in the dystrophin gene. This assay can be readily adopted by clinical molecular testing laboratories and represents a rapid, cost-effective approach for screening a large gene, such as dystrophin.

  10. Screening of the CFTR gene in Indian patients.

    PubMed

    Deepak, Rani R; Ashavaid, Tester F

    2012-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) has been observed to be far more common in India, than was previously thought. Variability in CF clinical symptoms among individuals, results in diagnostic errors. Also, CF diagnostic facilities are not available at all diagnostic centers across India. Sweat test (gold standard for CF diagnosis) has some limitations. Mutation analysis, therefore, would be useful in detecting the mutant CF alleles in Indian patients. This study, aimed at identifying common CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations, to develop a molecular diagnostic test in Indian patients, and establish genotype-phenotype correlation. Mutation identification was performed by single stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) screening, followed by DNA sequencing of regions with an abnormal SSCP pattern. ∆F508 accounts for about 53% of CF alleles. A substantial proportion of these patients have rare and/or novel mutations. Eight novel and 12 known polymorphisms were also identified. Considering the high percentage of rare/novel mutations, along with ethnic history of Indian population, we can speculate that the remaining uncharacterized mutations might also not be prevalent mutations. The total number of CF disease-causing mutations in Indian patients is very large. Thus, DNA-based population screening will be complicated, and an indirect genetic diagnosis (screening entire gene) would be necessary to characterize all mutations.

  11. Prioritization of neurodevelopmental disease genes by discovery of new mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hoischen, Alexander; Krumm, Niklas; Eichler, Evan E.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in genome sequencing technologies have begun to revolutionize neurogenetics allowing the full spectrum of genetic variation to be better understood in relationship to disease. Exome sequencing of hundreds to thousands of samples from patients with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and schizophrenia provide strong evidence of the importance of de novo and gene-disruptive events. There are now several hundred new candidate genes and targeted resequencing technologies that allow screening of dozens of genes in tens of thousands of individuals with high specificity and sensitivity. The decision of which genes to pursue depends on numerous factors including recurrence, prior evidence of overlap with pathogenic copy number variants, the position of the mutation within the protein, the mutational burden among healthy individuals, and membership of the candidate gene within disease-implicated protein networks. We discuss these emerging criteria for gene prioritization and the potential impact on the field of neuroscience. PMID:24866042

  12. RAS gene hot-spot mutations in canine neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Richter, A; Murua Escobar, H; Günther, K; Soller, J T; Winkler, S; Nolte, I; Bullerdiek, J

    2005-01-01

    Point mutations in the cellular homologues HRAS, KRAS2, and NRAS of the viral Harvey and Kirsten rat sarcoma virus oncogenes are commonly involved in the onset of malignancies in humans and other species such as dog, mouse, and rat. Most often, three particular hot-spot codons are affected, with one amino acid exchange being sufficient for the induction of tumor growth. While RAS genes have been shown to play an important role in canine tumors such as non-small lung cell carcinomas, data about RAS mutations in canine fibrosarcomas as well as KRAS2 mutations in canine melanomas is sparse. To increase the number of tumors examined, we recently screened 13 canine fibrosarcomas and 11 canine melanomas for point mutations, particularly within the mutational hot spots. The results were compared to the already existing data from other studies about these tumors in dogs.

  13. Severe childhood SMA and axonal CMT due to anticodon binding domain mutations in the GARS gene.

    PubMed

    James, P A; Cader, M Z; Muntoni, F; Childs, A-M; Crow, Y J; Talbot, K

    2006-11-14

    We screened 100 patients with inherited and sporadic lower motor neuron degeneration and identified three novel missense mutations in the glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) gene. One mutation was in the anticodon binding domain and associated with onset in early childhood and predominant involvement of the lower limbs, thus extending the phenotype associated with GARS mutations.

  14. Mutation analysis of the FRAS1 gene demonstrates new mutations in a propositus with Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Slavotinek, A; Li, C; Sherr, E H; Chudley, A E

    2006-09-15

    Fraser syndrome (OMIM 219000) is a rare, autosomal recessive condition with classical features of cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, ambiguous genitalia, laryngeal, and genitourinary malformations, oral clefting and mental retardation. Mutations causing loss of function of the FRAS1 gene have been demonstrated in five patients with Fraser syndrome. However, no phenotype-genotype correlation was established and there was evidence for genetic heterogeneity. Fraser syndrome is rare and the FRAS1 gene has 75 exons, complicating mutation screening in affected patients. We have screened two patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for Fraser syndrome and three patients with related phenotypes (two patients with Manitoba oculotrichoanal syndrome and one patient with unilateral cryptophthalmos and labial fusion) for mutations in FRAS1 to increase the molecular genetic data in patients with Fraser syndrome and related conditions. We report two new mutations in a patient with Fraser syndrome, a frameshift mutation and a deletion of two amino acids that we consider pathogenic as both alter the NG2-like domain of the protein. Although we are still unable to clarify a phenotype-genotype relationship in Fraser syndrome, our data add to the list of mutations associated with this syndrome.

  15. Screening of nineteen unrelated families with generalized resistance to thyroid hormone for known point mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta gene and the detection of a new mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, K; Balzano, S; Sakurai, A; DeGroot, L J; Refetoff, S

    1991-01-01

    Generalized resistance to thyroid hormone (GRTH) is a syndrome characterized by impaired tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormone. Two distinct point mutations in the hormone binding domain of the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) beta have recently been identified in two unrelated families with GRTH. One, Mf, involves a replacement of the normal glycine-345 for arginine in exon 7 and another, Mh, replaces the normal proline-453 for histidine in exon 8. To probe for the presence of the Mf and Mh defect in 19 unrelated families with GRTH, we applied separate polymerase chain reactions using allele-specific oligonucleotide primers containing the normal and each of the two mutant nucleotides at the 3'-position. A total of 24 affected subjects and 13 normal family members were studied. The mode of inheritance was dominant in 13 families, was unknown in 5 families, and was clearly recessive in 1 family in which only the consanguineous subjects were affected. Primers containing the substitutions specific for Mf and Mh amplified exons 7 and 8, respectively, only in affected members of each of the two index families. Primers containing the normal sequences amplified exons 7 and 8 of the TR beta gene in all subjects except affected members of one family. In this family with recessively inherited GRTH, neither exon could be amplified using any combinations of primers and DNA blot revealed absence of all coding exons. These results indicate a major deletion of the TR beta gene, including both DNA and hormone binding domains. Since heterozygous members of this family are not affected, the presence of a single normal allele is sufficient for normal function of the TR beta. These data also support the hypothesis that in the dominant mode of GRTH inheritance the presence of an abnormal TR beta interferes with the function of the normal TR beta. Distinct mutations are probably responsible for GRTH in unrelated families. Images PMID:1991834

  16. Comprehensive mutational screening in a cohort of Danish families with hereditary congenital cataract.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lars; Mikkelsen, Annemette; Nürnberg, Peter; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Anjum, Iram; Eiberg, Hans; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Identification of the causal mutations in 28 unrelated families and individuals with hereditary congenital cataract identified from a national Danish register of hereditary eye diseases. Seven families have been published previously, and the data of the remaining 21 families are presented together with an overview of the results in all families. A combined screening approach of linkage analysis and sequencing of 17 cataract genes were applied to mutation analyses of total 28 families. The study revealed a disease locus in seven of eight families that were amenable to linkage analysis. All loci represented known genes, and subsequent sequencing identified the mutations. Mutations were found in eight genes, among them crystallins (36%), connexins (22%), and the transcription factors HSF4 and MAF (15%). One family carried a complex CRYBB2 allele of three DNA variants, and a gene conversion is the most likely mutational event causing this variant. Ten families had microcornea cataract, and a mutation was identified in eight of those. Most families displayed mixed phenotypes with nuclear, lamellar, and polar opacities and no apparent genotype-phenotype correlation emerged. In total, 28 families were analyzed, and mutations were identified in 20 (71%) of them. Despite considerable locus heterogeneity, a high mutation identification rate was achieved by sequencing a limited number of major cataract genes. Provided these results are representative of Western European populations, the applied sequencing strategy seems to be suitable for the exploration of the large group of isolated cataracts with unknown etiology.

  17. PFAPA and 12 Common MEFV Gene Mutations Our Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Salehzadeh, Farhad; Vahedi, Maryam; Hosseini-Asl, Saeid; Jahangiri, Sepideh; Habibzadeh, Shahram; Hosseini-Khotbesara, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Marshall Syndrome or PFAPA is an inflammatory periodic disease characterized by periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis. Although PFAPA is an auto inflammatory disease, it doesn't have genetic basis such as other periodic fevers. This study evaluates the 12 common MEFV gene mutations in patients with PFAPA syndrome. Methods: 21 patients with PFAPA syndrome who had diagnostic criteria were enrolled in this study and 12 common MEFV gene mutations i.e. P369S, F479L, M680I (G/C), M680I (G/A), I692del, M694V, M694I, K695R, V726A, A744S, R761H, E148Q evaluated. All the patients were screened for MEFV gene mutations by a reverse hybridization assay (FMF Strip Assay, Vienna lab, Vienna, Austria) according to the instructions provided by the manufacturer. Findings : The age of patients was between 6 months to 14 years, and 15 were males. Seven patients had heterozygote and one had compound heterozygote (K695R, V725A) mutation. There were 4 alleles M694V, 3 alleles V726A, 1 allele E148Q and 1 allele K694R. No significant difference existed between mutated patients with non-mutated in symptoms like aphthous and stomatitis, duration of attacks, episodes of fever and response to treatment. Gaslini score test was not helpful to predict the probability of gene mutations. Conclusion: About 30 percent of patients had MEFV gene mutations but these mutations did not play a main role in presentation of PFAPA symptoms. PMID:25793047

  18. Microarray-based mutation detection in the dystrophin gene

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Madhuri R.; Chin, Ephrem L.H.; Mulle, Jennifer G.; Okou, David T.; Warren, Stephen T.; Zwick, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are X-linked recessive neuromuscular disorders caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 males. The human dystrophin gene spans > 2,200 kb, or roughly 0.1% of the genome, and is composed of 79 exons. The mutational spectrum of disease-causing alleles, including exonic copy number variations (CNVs), is complex. Deletions account for approximately 65% of DMD mutations and 85% of BMD mutations. Duplications occur in approximately 6–10% of males with either DMD or BMD. The remaining 30–35% of mutations consist of small deletions, insertions, point mutations, or splicing mutations, most of which introduce a premature stop codon. Laboratory analysis of dystrophin can be used to confirm a clinical diagnosis of DMD, characterize the type of dystrophin mutation, and perform prenatal testing and carrier testing for females. Current dystrophin diagnostic assays involve a variety of methodologies, including multiplex PCR, Southern blot analysis, MLPA, DOVAM-S, and SCAIP; however, these methods are time-consuming, laborious, and do not accurately detect duplication mutations in the dystrophin gene. Furthermore, carrier testing in females is often difficult when a related affected male is unavailable. Here we describe the development, design, validation, and implementation of a high-resolution CGH microarray-based approach capable of accurately detecting both deletions and duplications in the dystrophin gene. This assay can be readily adopted by clinical molecular testing laboratories and represents a rapid, cost-effective approach for screening a large gene, such as dystrophin. PMID:18663755

  19. PFAPA and 12 Common MEFV Gene Mutations Our Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Salehzadeh, Farhad; Vahedi, Maryam; Hosseini-Asl, Saeid; Jahangiri, Sepideh; Habibzadeh, Shahram; Hosseini-Khotbesara, Mahsa

    2014-02-01

    Marshall Syndrome or PFAPA is an inflammatory periodic disease characterized by periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis. Although PFAPA is an auto inflammatory disease, it doesn't have genetic basis such as other periodic fevers. This study evaluates the 12 common MEFV gene mutations in patients with PFAPA syndrome. 21 patients with PFAPA syndrome who had diagnostic criteria were enrolled in this study and 12 common MEFV gene mutations i.e. P369S, F479L, M680I (G/C), M680I (G/A), I692del, M694V, M694I, K695R, V726A, A744S, R761H, E148Q evaluated. All the patients were screened for MEFV gene mutations by a reverse hybridization assay (FMF Strip Assay, Vienna lab, Vienna, Austria) according to the instructions provided by the manufacturer. Findings : The age of patients was between 6 months to 14 years, and 15 were males. Seven patients had heterozygote and one had compound heterozygote (K695R, V725A) mutation. There were 4 alleles M694V, 3 alleles V726A, 1 allele E148Q and 1 allele K694R. No significant difference existed between mutated patients with non-mutated in symptoms like aphthous and stomatitis, duration of attacks, episodes of fever and response to treatment. Gaslini score test was not helpful to predict the probability of gene mutations. About 30 percent of patients had MEFV gene mutations but these mutations did not play a main role in presentation of PFAPA symptoms.

  20. MYH Gene Status in Polish FAP Patients without APC Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) is an inheritable predisposition for the occurrence of numerous polyps in the large intestine. In about 50% of all patients, the occurrence of the disease is conditioned by heterozygotic mutations of the APC gene. Screening for genetic factors in persons without mutations in the APC gene led to the identification of homozygotic mutations of the MYH gene as the cause of the appearance of the polyposis form which is characterized by recessive heritability and a milder course than in the case of the classic form of the disease. The authors examined 90 persons from the DNA bank of patients with FAP from the Institute of Human Genetics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Poznań in whom no mutations in the APC gene were detected. Two of the most frequent mutations of the MYH gene (Y165C and G382D) were found to be heterozygous in 13% of patients and no other mutations in this gene coding sequence were observed. In the group with heterozygotic occurrence of the mutation in the MYH gene, the disease phenotype was not milder in comparison with the entire examined group and the mean age of the disease manifestation was even lower. This observation allows one to conclude that the employed methods of mutation screening were correct and, in the case of the examined group, the mutation ratio of the MYH gene does not precondition the occurrence of the disease, but it cannot be excluded that it may modify its phenotype. The obtained results indicate that the criteria applied during the process of FAP qualification are more rigorous than those applied in other countries. PMID:20223003

  1. [Mutations of MTHFR, MTR, MTRR genes as high risk factors for neural tube defects].

    PubMed

    Sliwerska, Elzbieta; Szpecht-Potocka, Agnieszka

    2002-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) have a polygenic background. There are numerous genes known to be high-risk genetic factors for NTDs. Ones of them are mutations of foliate metabolisms pathways genes. This paper shows the results of analysis of common mutations of MTHFR, MTR and MTRR genes. Results of screening mutations 2756A-->G and 66A-->G in MTR and MTRR genes respectively show that are might have an effect on NTDs incidence among the examined population. Analysis of data for the studied population does not prove the influence of mutations 677C-->T and 1298A-->C of MTHFR gene on NTDs.

  2. Mutation analysis of the Smad3 gene in human osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun-Yan; Wang, Yan; An, Jing; Mao, Chun-Ming; Hou, Ning; Lv, Ya-Xin; Wang, You-Liang; Cui, Fang; Huang, Min; Yang, Xiao

    2003-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease worldwide. Recent studies have shown that targeted disruption of Smad3 in mouse results in OA. To reveal the possible association between the Smad3 gene mutation and human OA, we employed polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism and sequencing to screen mutations in all nine exons of the Smad3 gene in 32 patients with knee OA and 50 patients with only bone fracture. A missense mutation of the Smad3 gene was found in one patient. The single base mutation located in the linker region of the SMAD3 protein was A --> T change in the position 2 of codon 197 and resulted in an asparagine to isoleucine amino-acid substitution. The expressions of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 in sera of the patient carrying the mutation were higher than other OA patients and controls. This is the first report showing that the Smad3 gene mutations could be associated with the pathogenesis of human OA.

  3. A genetic screen of the Drosophila X chromosome for mutations that modify Deformed function.

    PubMed Central

    Florence, B; McGinnis, W

    1998-01-01

    We have screened the Drosophila X chromosome for genes whose dosage affects the function of the homeotic gene Deformed. One of these genes, extradenticle, encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that heterodimerizes with Deformed and other homeotic Hox proteins. Mutations in the nejire gene, which encodes a transcriptional adaptor protein belonging to the CBP/p300 family, also interact with Deformed. The other previously characterized gene identified as a Deformed interactor is Notch, which encodes a transmembrane receptor. These three genes underscore the importance of transcriptional regulation and cell-cell signaling in Hox function. Four novel genes were also identified in the screen. One of these, rancor, is required for appropriate embryonic expression of Deformed and another homeotic gene, labial. Both Notch and nejire affect the function of another Hox gene, Ultrabithorax, indicating they may be required for homeotic activity in general. PMID:9832527

  4. Screening for TP53 mutations in osteosarcomas using constant denaturant gel electrophoresis (CDGE).

    PubMed

    Smith-Sørensen, B; Gebhardt, M C; Kloen, P; McIntyre, J; Aguilar, F; Cerutti, P; Børresen, A L

    1993-01-01

    We have previously developed conditions to screen for TP53 point mutations inside the conserved domains II-V of the gene by using constant denaturant gel electrophoresis (CDGE). The present study reports conditions for screening more of the codons in the frequently mutated region exon 5-8 and for detecting mutations in sequences encoding functional domains in the N- and C-terminal part of the protein. The ability of the CDGE technique to detect mutations was studied using controls with known sequence deviations. The resolution power of the technique to separate different types of mutations was tested by using seven different single base pair mutants all residing in a stretch of four base pairs. All mutants were separated from the wild type. The established CDGE screening strategy was then used to look for mutations in DNA from 28 osteosarcomas. Six (21.5%) of the samples were shown to have a TP53 mutation, and the exact characterization was performed by direct sequencing. All of these were within the frequently reported mutated region exon 5-8.

  5. Extended screening for major mitochondrial DNA point mutations in patients with hereditary hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tomofumi; Nishigaki, Yutaka; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Fuku, Noriyuki; Ito, Taku; Mikami, Eri; Kitamura, Ken; Tanaka, Masashi

    2012-12-01

    Hearing loss (HL) is the most common sensory disorder in humans. Many patients with mitochondrial diseases have sensorineural HL (SNHL). The HL of these patients manifests as a consequence of either syndromic or nonsyndromic mitochondrial diseases. Furthermore, the phenotypes vary among patients even if they are carrying the same mutation. Therefore, these features make it necessary to analyze every presumed mutation in patients with hereditary HL, but the extensive analysis of various mutations is laborious. We analyzed 373 patients with suspected hereditary HL by using an extended suspension-array screening system for major mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, which can detect 32 other mtDNA mutations in addition to the previously analyzed 29 mutations. In the present study, we detected 2 different mtDNA mutations among these 373 patients; m.7444G>A in the MT-CO1 gene and m.7472insC in the MT-TS1 gene in 1 patient (0.3%) for each. As these two patients had no clinical features other than HL, they had not been suspected of having mtDNA mutations. This extended screening system together with the previous one is useful for the genetic diagnosis and epidemiological study of both syndromic and nonsyndromic HL.

  6. A new mutation found in newborn screening for Fabry disease evaluated by plasma globotriaosylsphingosine levels

    PubMed Central

    Chinen, Yasutsugu; Nakamura, Sadao; Yoshida, Tomohide; Maruyama, Hiroki; Nakamura, Kimitoshi

    2017-01-01

    A pilot study of newborn screening for Fabry disease was performed in Okinawa, Japan. A total of 2,443 neonates were screened using dried blood spot samples over 7 years starting in 2007. Of 13 neonates determined to have low α-galactosidase A (GLA) activity, one boy had a new missense mutation, p.G144D of the GLA gene. This mutation was considered to be a late-onset type, as evaluated based on plasma globotriaosylsphingosine levels and family history. PMID:28224042

  7. A new mutation found in newborn screening for Fabry disease evaluated by plasma globotriaosylsphingosine levels.

    PubMed

    Chinen, Yasutsugu; Nakamura, Sadao; Yoshida, Tomohide; Maruyama, Hiroki; Nakamura, Kimitoshi

    2017-01-01

    A pilot study of newborn screening for Fabry disease was performed in Okinawa, Japan. A total of 2,443 neonates were screened using dried blood spot samples over 7 years starting in 2007. Of 13 neonates determined to have low α-galactosidase A (GLA) activity, one boy had a new missense mutation, p.G144D of the GLA gene. This mutation was considered to be a late-onset type, as evaluated based on plasma globotriaosylsphingosine levels and family history.

  8. Management of Individuals With a Mutation in the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Gene.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Suzanne M

    2016-01-01

    Advances in genetic testing have led to the identification of multiple genes associated with a hereditary risk for developing breast and other cancers. One such gene is the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, which is available on many genetic panels offered to individuals with suspected hereditary risk. Genetic testing can often lead to improved understanding and clarification of risk for developing cancer, as well as allow affected individuals to make informed choices about management, including the adoption of primary prevention strategies and more aggressive screening than typically recommended in the general population. This article provides an overview of the role of mutations in the ATM gene in developing malignancies, along with emerging research on treatment implications based on genetic testing results.
.

  9. Targeted pharmacotherapy after somatic cancer mutation screening

    PubMed Central

    Polasek, Thomas M.; Ambler, Karen; Scott, Hamish S.; Sorich, Michael J.; Kaub, Peter A.; Rowland, Andrew; Wiese, Michael D.; Kichenadasse, Ganessan

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with solid tumours are treated with targeted pharmacotherapy based on the results of genetic testing (‘precision medicine’). This study investigated the use of targeted drugs after OncoFOCUS™+ KIT screening in patients with malignant melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer, and then audited the results against the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. Patients who were not indicated for targeted pharmacotherapy did not receive such treatment (99%, 100/101). Of the patients indicated for targeted drugs, 79% (33/42) received treatment according to NCCN guidelines. In 48% (20/42) of these patients the results from OncoFOCUS™+ KIT screening were required for targeted drug selection, with the remaining 52% (22/42) prescribed drugs independent of the screening results for various reasons. This study highlights the growing importance of precision medicine approaches in directing pharmacotherapy in medical oncology. PMID:28163892

  10. Novel mass spectrometry mutation screening for contaminant impact analysis. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective is to develop innovative mass spectrometry technology to achieve fast mutation screening from contaminated area and to reveal the linkage between gene mutation and contaminants. In this program, the author will try innovative approaches to improve mass resolution and detection efficiency for large DNA ions. Allel specific polymerase chain reaction will be coupled with mass spectrometry for rapid DNA mutation detection. The ultimate goal is to lead to the risk analysis of hazardous wastes to be routinely assessed at DNA level at an affordable cost. This report is for the work after 7 months of a 3-year project.'

  11. Screening for stress-resistance mutations in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Chick, Wallace S.; Ludwig, Michael; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Kitzenberg, David; Williams, Kristina; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Longevity is correlated with stress resistance in many animal models. However, previous efforts through the boosting of the antioxidant defense system did not extend life span, suggesting that longevity related stress resistance is mediated by other uncharacterized pathways. We have developed a high-throughput platform for screening and rapid identification of novel genetic mutants in the mouse that are stress resistant. Selection for resistance to stressors occurs in mutagenized mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, which are carefully treated so as to maintain pluripotency for mouse production. Initial characterization of these mutant ES cells revealed mutations in Pigl, Tiam1, and Rffl, among others. These genes are implicated in glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis, NADPH oxidase function, and inflammation. These mutants: (1) are resistant to two different oxidative stressors, paraquat and the omission of 2-mercaptoethanol, (2) have reduced levels of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), (3) are capable of generating live mice, and (4) transmit the stress resistance phenotype to the mice. This strategy offers an efficient way to select for new mutants expressing a stress resistance phenotype, to rapidly identify the causative genes, and to develop mice for in vivo studies. PMID:25250048

  12. Analysis of gene mutations among South Indian patients with maple syrup urine disease: identification of four novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, M P; Menon, Krishnakumar N; Vasudevan, D M

    2013-10-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is predominantly caused by mutations in the BCKDHA, BCKDHB and DBT genes, which encode for the E1alpha, E1beta and E2 subunits of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex, respectively. Because disease causing mutations play a major role in the development of the disease, prenatal diagnosis at gestational level may have significance in making decisions by parents. Thus, this study was aimed to screen South Indian MSUD patients for mutations and assess the genotype-phenotype correlation. Thirteen patients diagnosed with MSUD by conventional biochemical screening such as urine analysis by DNPH test, thin layer chromatography for amino acids and blood amino acid quantification by HPLC were selected for mutation analysis. The entire coding regions of the BCKDHA, BCKDHB and DBT genes were analyzed for mutations by PCR-based direct DNA sequencing. BCKDHA and BCKDHB mutations were seen in 43% of the total ten patients, while disease-causing DBT gene mutation was observed only in 14%. Three patients displayed no mutations. Novel mutations were c.130C>T in BCKDHA gene, c. 599C>T and c.121_122delAC in BCKDHB gene and c.190G>A in DBT gene. Notably, patients harbouring these mutations were non-responsive to thiamine supplementation and other treatment regimens and might have a worse prognosis as compared to the patients not having such mutations. Thus, identification of these mutations may have a crucial role in the treatment as well as understanding the molecular mechanisms in MSUD.

  13. 3-Methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency: Mutational spectrum derived from comprehensive newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Helena; Azevedo, Luisa; Serrano, Catarina; Sousa, Carmen; Marcão, Ana; Vilarinho, Laura

    2016-12-15

    The deficiency of 3-methycrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (3-MCC; EC 6.4.1.4) is an autosomal recessive organic aciduria that is included in the newborn screening programs of several countries. This study reports data mainly obtained from the Portuguese newborn screening program collected over a ten-year period. Analysis of the MCCC1 and MCCC2 genes yielded 26 previously unreported mutations and a variant of clinically unknown significance. These mutations are discussed in the context of their likely impact on the function of the 3-MCC enzyme, with a view to exploring whether a phenotype-genotype correlation might be discerned. Further, these mutations were analysed in the context of what is known of the MCCC1 and MCCC2 mutational spectra, information that will be useful in both clinical and laboratory practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mutation analysis in F9 gene of 17 families with haemophilia B from Iran.

    PubMed

    Enayat, M S; Karimi, M; Chana, G; Farjadian, S; Theophilus, B D M; Hill, F G H

    2004-11-01

    Seventeen haemophilia B families from Iran were investigated to determine the causative mutation. All the essential regions of the F9 gene were initially screened by conformational sensitive gel electrophoresis and exons with band shift were sequenced. Seven of the 15 mutations identified in these families were novel mutations. The mutations were authenticated in nine families as other affected members or heterozygous female carriers were available for verification.

  15. Comparative screening of FMF mutations in various communities of the Israeli society.

    PubMed

    Sharkia, Rajech; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Zalan, Abdelnaser; Athamna, Muhammad; Azem, Abdussalam; Badarneh, Khader; Faris, Fuad

    2013-07-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease that is widely spread in the populations of the Mediterranean region. It is characterized by recurrent fever and inflammatory attacks. A total of 1700 suspected patients, belonging to various communities in Israel: Jews (Ashkenazi and non-Ashkenazi), Arabs (Muslims and Christians) and Druze, was subjected to examination for FMF mutation screening. The patients were screened for the most common six MEFV gene mutations namely, M680I, M694V, M694I, V726A, E148Q and K695R. Fifty-five percent of the cases were confirmed to have MEFV mutations. The most common mutations among all the cases studied were M694V, E148Q and V726A. The common mutations in the respective communities were: among the Jews M694V with a frequency of 69.9% (76.8% for non-Ashkenazi Jews and 43.6% for Ashkenazi Jews), among the Arabs V726A with a frequency of 32.7% (32.7% for Muslims and 32.1% for Christians) and among Druze it was E148Q with a frequency of 52.1%. The characteristic mutation present in Jews was K695R and the one in Arabs was M680I, while no characteristic mutation was found in Druze. On the other hand, mutation E148Q was observed to have a considerable occurrence in patients of all ethnic groups studied. Furthermore, our results revealed that homozygous mutations accounted for 168 cases (18%). The homozygote mutation M694V was the most prevalent among Jews and the E148Q mutation was the most common among Druze, while, among Arabs there were three homozygous mutations having maximum prevalence, namely, V726A, M694V and M694I. Our study comprehensively provided a spectrum of FMF mutations in various communities of Israeli society. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. An N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen for epigenetic mutations in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Percec, Ivona; Thorvaldsen, Joanne L; Plenge, Robert M; Krapp, Christopher J; Nadeau, Joseph H; Willard, Huntington F; Bartolomei, Marisa S

    2003-01-01

    The mammalian epigenetic phenomena of X inactivation and genomic imprinting are incompletely understood. X inactivation equalizes X-linked expression between males and females by silencing genes on one X chromosome during female embryogenesis. Genomic imprinting functionally distinguishes the parental genomes, resulting in parent-specific monoallelic expression of particular genes. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis was used in the mouse to screen for mutations in novel factors involved in X inactivation. Previously, we reported mutant pedigrees identified through this screen that segregate aberrant X-inactivation phenotypes and we mapped the mutation in one pedigree to chromosome 15. We now have mapped two additional mutations to the distal chromosome 5 and the proximal chromosome 10 in a second pedigree and show that each of the mutations is sufficient to induce the mutant phenotype. We further show that the roles of these factors are specific to embryonic X inactivation as neither genomic imprinting of multiple genes nor imprinted X inactivation is perturbed. Finally, we used mice bearing selected X-linked alleles that regulate X chromosome choice to demonstrate that the phenotypes of all three mutations are consistent with models in which the mutations have affected molecules involved specifically in the choice or the initiation of X inactivation. PMID:12930754

  17. Screening for mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.A.; Gannon, A.M.; Daiger, S.P.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in rhodopsin account for approximately 30% of all cases of autosomal dominant retinits pigmentosa (adRP) and mutations in peripherin/RDS account for an additional 5% of cases. Also, mutations in rhodopsin can cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and mutations in peripherin/RDS can cause dominant macular degeneration. Most disease-causing mutations in rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS are unique to one family or, at most, to a few families within a limited geographic region, though a few mutations are found in multiple, unrelated families. To further determine the spectrum of genetic variation in these genes, we screened DNA samples from 134 unrelated patients with retinitis pigmentosa for mutations in both rhodopsin and peripherin/RDS using SSCP followed by genomic sequencing. Of the 134 patients, 86 were from families with apparent adRP and 48 were either isolated cases or were from families with an equivocal mode of inheritance. Among these patients we found 14 distinct rhodopsin mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. Eleven of these mutations were found in one individual or one family only, whereas the Pro23His mutation was found in 14 {open_quotes}unrelated{close_quotes}individuals. The splice-site mutation produces dominant disease though with highly variable expression. Among the remaining patients were found 6 distinct peripherin/RDS mutations which are likely to cause retinal disease. These mutations were also found in one patient or family only, except the Gly266Asp mutation which was found in two unrelated patients. These results confirm the expected frequency and broad spectrum of mutations causing adRP.

  18. Distribution of mutations in the PEX gene in families with X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets (HYP).

    PubMed

    Rowe, P S; Oudet, C L; Francis, F; Sinding, C; Pannetier, S; Econs, M J; Strom, T M; Meitinger, T; Garabedian, M; David, A; Macher, M A; Questiaux, E; Popowska, E; Pronicka, E; Read, A P; Mokrzycki, A; Glorieux, F H; Drezner, M K; Hanauer, A; Lehrach, H; Goulding, J N; O'Riordan, J L

    1997-04-01

    Mutations in the PEX gene at Xp22.1 (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases, on the X-chromosome), are responsible for X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets (HYP). Homology of PEX to the M13 family of Zn2+ metallopeptidases which include neprilysin (NEP) as prototype, has raised important questions regarding PEX function at the molecular level. The aim of this study was to analyse 99 HYP families for PEX gene mutations, and to correlate predicted changes in the protein structure with Zn2+ metallopeptidase gene function. Primers flanking 22 characterised exons were used to amplify DNA by PCR, and SSCP was then used to screen for mutations. Deletions, insertions, nonsense mutations, stop codons and splice mutations occurred in 83% of families screened for in all 22 exons, and 51% of a separate set of families screened in 17 PEX gene exons. Missense mutations in four regions of the gene were informative regarding function, with one mutation in the Zn2+-binding site predicted to alter substrate enzyme interaction and catalysis. Computer analysis of the remaining mutations predicted changes in secondary structure, N-glycosylation, protein phosphorylation and catalytic site molecular structure. The wide range of mutations that align with regions required for protease activity in NEP suggests that PEX also functions as a protease, and may act by processing factor(s) involved in bone mineral metabolism.

  19. Adenomatous polyposis families that screen APC mutation-negative by conventional methods are genetically heterogeneous.

    PubMed

    Renkonen, Elise T; Nieminen, Pekka; Abdel-Rahman, Wael M; Moisio, Anu-Liisa; Järvelä, Irma; Arte, Sirpa; Järvinen, Heikki J; Peltomäki, Päivi

    2005-08-20

    One third of families with classical adenomatous polyposis (FAP), and a majority of those with attenuated FAP (AFAP), remain APC mutation-negative by conventional methods. Our purpose was to clarify the genetic basis of polyposis and genotype-phenotype correlations in such families. We studied a cohort of 29 adenomatous polyposis families that had screened APC mutation-negative by the protein truncation test, heteroduplex analysis, and exon-specific sequencing. The APC gene was investigated for large genomic rearrangements by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), and for allelic mRNA expression by single nucleotide primer extension (SNuPE). The AXIN2 gene was screened for mutations by sequencing. Four families (14%) showed a constitutional deletion of the entire APC gene (three families) or a single exon (one family). Seven families (24%) revealed reduced or extinct mRNA expression from one APC allele in blood, accompanied by loss of heterozygosity in the APC region in six (75%) of eight tumors. In 15 families (52%), possible APC involvement could be neither confirmed nor excluded. Finally, as detailed elsewhere, three families (10%) had germline mutations in genes other than APC, AXIN2 in one family, and MYH in two families. "APC mutation-negative" FAP is genetically heterogeneous, and a combination of MLPA and SNuPE is able to link a considerable proportion (38%) to APC. Significant differences were observed in clinical manifestations between subgroups, emphasizing the importance of accurate genetic and clinical characterization for the proper management of such families.

  20. Parkinson disease: α-synuclein mutational screening and new clinical insight into the p.E46K mutation.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Márcia M G; Rodrigues, Fabíola C; Leite, Marco Antônio A; Campos Júnior, Mário; Rosso, Ana Lucia; Nicaretta, Denise H; Pereira, João S; Silva, Delson José; Della Coletta, Marcus V; Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe R; Abreu, Gabriella M; Dos Santos, Jussara M; Santos-Rebouças, Cíntia B

    2015-06-01

    Amongst Parkinson's disease-causing genetic factors, missense mutations and genomic multiplications in the gene encoding α-synuclein are well established causes of the disease, although genetic data in populations with a high degree of admixture, such as the Brazilian one, are still scarce. In this study, we conducted a molecular screening of α-synuclein point mutations and copy number variation in the largest cohort of Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 549) and also in twelve Portuguese and one Bolivian immigrants. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes or saliva, and the mutational screening was performed by quantitative and qualitative real-time PCR. The only alteration identified was the p.E46K mutation in a 60-year-old man, born in Bolivia, with a familial history of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. This is the second family ever reported, in which this rare pathogenic mutation is segregating. The same mutation was firstly described ten years ago in a Spanish family with a neurodegenerative syndrome combining parkinsonism, dementia and visual hallucinations. The clinical condition of our proband reveals a less aggressive phenotype than previously described and reinforces that marked phenotypic heterogeneity is common among patients with Parkinson's disease, even among those carriers sharing the same mutation. Our findings add new insight into the preexisting information about α-synuclein p.E46K, improving our understanding about the endophenotypes associated to this mutation and corroborate that missense alterations and multiplications in α-synuclein are uncommon among Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. ATM gene mutations in sporadic breast cancer patients from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mangone, Flavia Rotea; Miracca, Elisabete C; Feilotter, Harriet E; Mulligan, Lois M; Nagai, Maria Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    The Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene encodes a multifunctional kinase, which is linked to important cellular functions. Women heterozygous for ATM mutations have an estimated relative risk of developing breast cancer of 3.8. However, the pattern of ATM mutations and their role in breast cancer etiology has been controversial and remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the frequency and spectrum of ATM mutations in a series of sporadic breast cancers and controls from the Brazilian population. Using PCR-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and direct DNA sequencing, we screened a panel of 100 consecutive, unselected sporadic breast tumors and 100 matched controls for all 62 coding exons and flanking introns of the ATM gene. Several polymorphisms were detected in 12 of the 62 coding exons of the ATM gene. These polymorphisms were observed in both breast cancer patients and the control population. In addition, evidence of potential ATM mutations was observed in 7 of the 100 breast cancer cases analyzed. These potential mutations included six missense variants found in exon 13 (p.L546V), exon 14 (p.P604S), exon 20 (p.T935R), exon 42 (p.G2023R), exon 49 (p.L2307F), and exon 50 (p.L2332P) and one nonsense mutation in exon 39 (p.R1882X), which was predicted to generate a truncated protein. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that sporadic breast tumors may occur in carriers of low penetrance ATM mutant alleles and these mutations confer different levels of breast cancer risk.

  2. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Vasiliou, D M; Pinsky, L

    1996-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. We have added (if available) data on the androgen binding phenotype of the mutant AR, the clinical phenotype of the affected persons, the family history and whether the pathogenicity of a mutation has been proven. Exonic mutations are now listed in 5'-->3' sequence regardless of type and single base pair changes are presented in codon context. Splice site and intronic mutations are listed separately. The database has allowed us to substantiate and amplify the observation of mutational hot spots within exons encoding the AR androgen binding domain. The database is available from EML (ftp://www.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  3. Improving Mutation Screening in Familial Hematuric Nephropathies through Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Morinière, Vincent; Dahan, Karin; Hilbert, Pascale; Lison, Marieline; Lebbah, Said; Topa, Alexandra; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Pruvost, Solenn; Nitschke, Patrick; Plaisier, Emmanuelle; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Macher, Marie-Alice; Noel, Laure-Hélène; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Heidet, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Alport syndrome is an inherited nephropathy associated with mutations in genes encoding type IV collagen chains present in the glomerular basement membrane. COL4A5 mutations are associated with the major X-linked form of the disease, and COL4A3 and COL4A4 mutations are associated with autosomal recessive and dominant forms (thought to be involved in 15% and 1%–5% of the families, respectively) and benign familial hematuria. Mutation screening of these three large genes is time-consuming and expensive. Here, we carried out a combination of multiplex PCR, amplicon quantification, and next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis of three genes in 101 unrelated patients. We identified 88 mutations and 6 variations of unknown significance on 116 alleles in 83 patients. Two additional indel mutations were found only by secondary Sanger sequencing, but they were easily identified retrospectively with the web-based sequence visualization tool Integrative Genomics Viewer. Altogether, 75 mutations were novel. Sequencing the three genes simultaneously was particularly advantageous as the mode of inheritance could not be determined with certainty in many instances. The proportion of mutations in COL4A3 and COL4A4 was notably high, and the autosomal dominant forms of Alport syndrome appear more frequently than reported previously. Finally, this approach allowed the identification of large COL4A3 and COL4A4 rearrangements not described previously. We conclude that NGS is efficient, reduces screening time and cost, and facilitates the provision of appropriate genetic counseling in Alport syndrome. PMID:24854265

  4. High frequency of additional gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with MLL partial tandem duplication: DNMT3A mutation is associated with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, D Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wu, Jin-Hou; Dunn, Po; Wang, Po-Nan; Lin, Tung-Liang; Shih, Yu-Shu; Liang, Sung-Tzu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Lai, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2015-10-20

    The mutational profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with partial tandem duplication of mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL-PTD) have not been comprehensively studied. We studied 19 gene mutations for 98 patients with MLL-PTD AML to determine the mutation frequency and clinical correlations. MLL-PTD was screened by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. The mutational analyses were performed with PCR-based assays followed by direct sequencing. Gene mutations of signaling pathways occurred in 63.3% of patients, with FLT3-ITD (44.9%) and FLT3-TKD (13.3%) being the most frequent. 66% of patients had gene mutations involving epigenetic regulation, and DNMT3A (32.7%), IDH2 (18.4%), TET2 (18.4%), and IDH1 (10.2%) mutations were most common. Genes of transcription pathways and tumor suppressors accounted for 23.5% and 10.2% of patients. RUNX1 mutation occurred in 23.5% of patients, while none had NPM1 or double CEBPA mutation. 90.8% of MLL-PTD AML patients had at least one additional gene mutation. Of 55 MLL-PTD AML patients who received standard chemotherapy, age older than 50 years and DNMT3A mutation were associated with inferior outcome. In conclusion, gene mutations involving DNA methylation and activated signaling pathway were common co-existed gene mutations. DNMT3A mutation was a poor prognostic factor in MLL-PTD AML.

  5. Extensive screening system using suspension array technology to detect mitochondrial DNA point mutations.

    PubMed

    Nishigaki, Yutaka; Ueno, Hitomi; Coku, Jorida; Koga, Yasutoshi; Fujii, Tatsuya; Sahashi, Ko; Nakano, Kazutoshi; Yoneda, Makoto; Nonaka, Michiko; Tang, Linya; Liou, Chia-Wei; Paquis-Flucklinger, Veronique; Harigaya, Yasuo; Ibi, Tohru; Goto, Yu-ichi; Hosoya, Hiroko; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio; Tanaka, Masashi

    2010-04-01

    We established an extensive and rapid system using suspension array to detect 61 representative mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmic or homoplasmic point mutations (29 for Series A and 32 for Series B) in 22 genes: 1 each in MT-RNR1, -TV, -ND1, -TQ, -TW, -TC, and -TH genes; 2 each in MT-TN, -TG, -ND4, -TL2, -TE, and -CYB genes; 3 each in MT-ATP6, -ND3, and -ND5 genes; 4 each in MT-CO1 and -TK genes; 5 each in MT-TI, -TS1, and -ND6 genes; and 10 in the MT-TL1 gene. We carefully selected 5'-biotinylated primers and pooled primers for use in two sets of multiplex-PCR amplifications. To detect both mutant and wild-type mtDNA, even when polymorphisms were present near the target mutation sites, we designed specific oligonucleotide probes. By using the mtDNA point mutation detection system of Series A (29 mutations) and Series B (32 mutations), we screened a total of 3103 mutant sites in 107 DNA samples for Series A and 13,101 mutant sites in 397 DNA samples for Series B. We succeeded in determining 99.4% (Series A) and 99.6% (Series B) of the targeted mutant sites by use of the system. The 22 samples with the m.3243A>G heteroplasmic mutation revealed positive signals with both mutant- and wild-type-specific probes in this detection system with a detection limit of approximately 2%. This genetic screening platform is useful to reach a definitive diagnosis for mitochondrial diseases. Copyright 2010 Mitochondria Research Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. IRF6 mutation screening in nonsyndromic orofacial clefting: analysis of 1521 families

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Kang, Chul Joo; Ma, Lian; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Wehby, George L.; Christensen, Kaare; Czeizel, Andrew E.; Deleyiannis, Frederic W.-B.; Fulton, Robert S.; Wilson, Richard K.; Beaty, Terri H.; Schutte, Brian C.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is an autosomal dominant malformation syndrome characterized by orofacial clefting (OFC) and lower lip pits. The clinical presentation of VWS is variable and can present as an isolated OFC, making it difficult to distinguish VWS cases from individuals with nonsyndromic OFCs. About 70% of causal VWS mutations occur in IRF6, a gene that is also associated with nonsyndromic OFCs. Screening for IRF6 mutations in apparently nonsyndromic cases has been performed in several modestly sized cohorts with mixed results. In the current study we screened 1521 trios with presumed nonsyndromic OFCs to determine the frequency of causal IRF6 mutations. We identified seven likely causal IRF6 mutations, although a posteriori review identified two misdiagnosed VWS families based on the presence of lip pits. We found no evidence for association between rare IRF6 polymorphisms and nonsyndromic OFCs. We combined our results with other similar studies (totaling 2,472 families) and conclude that causal IRF6 mutations are found in 0.24%-0.44% of apparently nonsyndromic OFC families. We suggest that clinical mutation screening for IRF6 be considered for certain family patterns such as families with mixed types of OFCs and/or autosomal dominant transmission. PMID:26346622

  7. IRF6 mutation screening in non-syndromic orofacial clefting: analysis of 1521 families.

    PubMed

    Leslie, E J; Koboldt, D C; Kang, C J; Ma, L; Hecht, J T; Wehby, G L; Christensen, K; Czeizel, A E; Deleyiannis, F W-B; Fulton, R S; Wilson, R K; Beaty, T H; Schutte, B C; Murray, J C; Marazita, M L

    2016-07-01

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is an autosomal dominant malformation syndrome characterized by orofacial clefting (OFC) and lower lip pits. The clinical presentation of VWS is variable and can present as an isolated OFC, making it difficult to distinguish VWS cases from individuals with non-syndromic OFCs. About 70% of causal VWS mutations occur in IRF6, a gene that is also associated with non-syndromic OFCs. Screening for IRF6 mutations in apparently non-syndromic cases has been performed in several modestly sized cohorts with mixed results. In this study, we screened 1521 trios with presumed non-syndromic OFCs to determine the frequency of causal IRF6 mutations. We identified seven likely causal IRF6 mutations, although a posteriori review identified two misdiagnosed VWS families based on the presence of lip pits. We found no evidence for association between rare IRF6 polymorphisms and non-syndromic OFCs. We combined our results with other similar studies (totaling 2472 families) and conclude that causal IRF6 mutations are found in 0.24-0.44% of apparently non-syndromic OFC families. We suggest that clinical mutation screening for IRF6 be considered for certain family patterns such as families with mixed types of OFCs and/or autosomal dominant transmission. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Novel progranulin mutation: screening for PGRN mutations in a Portuguese series of FTD/CBS cases.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Rita Joao; Santana, Isabel; Bras, Jose Miguel; Revesz, Tamas; Rebelo, Olinda; Ribeiro, Maria Helena; Santiago, Beatriz; Oliveira, Catarina Resende; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John

    2008-07-15

    Mutations in the progranulin (PGRN) gene were recently described as the cause of ubiquitin positive frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in many families. Different frequencies of these genetic changes have been reported in diverse populations leading us to determine if these mutations were a major cause of FTD in the Portuguese population. The entire coding sequence plus exon 0 of PGRN were sequenced in a consecutive series of 46 FTD/CBS Portuguese patients. Two mutations were found: a novel pathogenic insertion (p.Gln300GlnfsX61) and a previously described point variant (p.T182M) of unclear pathogenicity. Pathogenic mutations in the PGRN gene were found in one of the 36 probands studied (3% of the probands in our series) who had a corticobasal syndrome presentation, indicating that in the Portuguese population, mutations in this gene are not a major cause of FTD.

  9. Microfluidic screening and whole-genome sequencing identifies mutations associated with improved protein secretion by yeast.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingtao; Bai, Yunpeng; Sjostrom, Staffan L; Hallström, Björn M; Liu, Zihe; Petranovic, Dina; Uhlén, Mathias; Joensson, Haakan N; Andersson-Svahn, Helene; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-08-25

    There is an increasing demand for biotech-based production of recombinant proteins for use as pharmaceuticals in the food and feed industry and in industrial applications. Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is among preferred cell factories for recombinant protein production, and there is increasing interest in improving its protein secretion capacity. Due to the complexity of the secretory machinery in eukaryotic cells, it is difficult to apply rational engineering for construction of improved strains. Here we used high-throughput microfluidics for the screening of yeast libraries, generated by UV mutagenesis. Several screening and sorting rounds resulted in the selection of eight yeast clones with significantly improved secretion of recombinant α-amylase. Efficient secretion was genetically stable in the selected clones. We performed whole-genome sequencing of the eight clones and identified 330 mutations in total. Gene ontology analysis of mutated genes revealed many biological processes, including some that have not been identified before in the context of protein secretion. Mutated genes identified in this study can be potentially used for reverse metabolic engineering, with the objective to construct efficient cell factories for protein secretion. The combined use of microfluidics screening and whole-genome sequencing to map the mutations associated with the improved phenotype can easily be adapted for other products and cell types to identify novel engineering targets, and this approach could broadly facilitate design of novel cell factories.

  10. A high frequency of distinct ATM gene mutations in ataxia-telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Teraoka, S.; Concannon, P.

    1996-10-01

    The clinical features of the autosomal recessive disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) include a progressive cerebellar ataxia, hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation, and an increased susceptibility to malignancies. Epidemiological studies have suggested that AT heterozygotes may also be at increased risk for malignancy, possibly as a consequence of radiation exposure. A gene mutated in AT patients (ATM) has recently been isolated, making mutation screening in both patients and the general population possible. Because of the relatively large size of the ATM gene, the design of screening programs will depend on the types and distribution of mutations in the general population. In this report, we describe 30 mutations identified in a panel of unrelated AT patients and controls. Twenty-five of the 30 were distinct, and most patients were compound heterozygotes. The most frequently detected mutation was found in three different families and had previously been reported in five others. This corresponds to a frequency of 8% of all reported ATM mutations. Twenty-two of the alterations observed would be predicted to lead to protein truncation at sites scattered throughout the molecule. Two fibroblast cell lines, which displayed normal responses to ionizing radiation, also proved to be heterozygous for truncation mutations of ATM. These observations suggest that the carrier frequency of ATM mutations may be sufficiently high to make population screening practical. However, such screening may need to be done prospectively, that is, by searching for new mutations rather than by screening for just those already identified in AT families. 33 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ćwikła, Jarosław; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Kwiatek, Paweł; Szperl, Małgorzata; Michalski, Wojciech; Wyrwicz, Lucjan; Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Maciejczyk, Anna; Roszczynko, Marta; Pęczkowska, Mariola

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paragangliomas (PGLs) related to hereditary syndromes are rare mediastinal tumors. Paragangliomas are caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of succinate dehydrogenase enzyme (SDH). Aim To evaluate clinical, anatomical and functional characteristics of mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations. Material and methods Retrospective analysis of 75 patients with confirmed SDHx gene mutations (24 patients with SDHB, 5 SDHC, 46 with SDHD mutations) was performed. Patients underwent evaluation using computed tomography (CT), somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) (99mTc-[HYNIC,Tyr3]-octreotide), 123I mIBG scintigraphy and urinary excretion of total methoxycatecholamines. Results Out of 75 patients, 16 (21%) patients (1 SDHB, 15 SDHD mutations) had 17 PGLs localized in the mediastinum. Fourteen PGLs were localized in the middle mediastinum (intrapericardial) and 3 PGLs in the posterior mediastinum. The median diameter of paragangliomas measured on the axial slice was 24.3 mm (interquartile range (IQR): 14.7–36.6), and the median volume was 2.78 ml (IQR: 0.87–16.16). Twelve out of 16 patients (75%) underwent SRS, and 11 of them (92.3%) had pathological uptake of the radiotracer. Eleven (68.75%) out of 16 patients underwent 123 I mIBG, with only 3 positive results. Symptoms of catecholamine excretion were observed in 3 patients with PGLs localized in the posterior mediastinum. All PGLs were benign except in 1 patient with the SDHB mutation and PGL detected in the posterior mediastinum, who had a metastatic disease. Conclusions Most mediastinal paragangliomas were related to SDHD gene mutations. They were asymptomatic, localized in the medial mediastinum, intrapericardially. PMID:27785149

  12. Screening the SPO11 and EIF5A2 genes in a population of infertile men.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Greg L; Ivanov, Ivaylo P; Atkins, John F; Mielnik, Anna; Schlegel, Peter N; Carrell, Douglas T

    2005-09-01

    Populations of infertile and fertile men were screened for mutations in SPO11 and EIF5A2, two infertility candidate genes. Three heterozygous amino acid changes that might contribute to infertility were identified in the infertile group.

  13. Mutations of the p53 and PTCH gene in basal cell carcinomas: UV mutation signature and strand bias.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Yeon; Park, Hyun Jeong; Baek, Seung-Cheol; Byun, Dae Gyoo; Houh, Dong

    2002-05-01

    Mutations of p53 and PTCH gene, two candidate tumor suppressor genes for basal cell carcinoma (BCC), were screened in 15 cases of sporadic BCCs that developed in sun-exposed skin region in a Korean population. p53 and PTCH mutations were detected at a frequency of 33 and 40%, respectively, and the mutations were predominantly UV-signature transition, C-->T transitions at dipyrimidine sites and CC-->TT tandem mutations. In both genes, the most common mutations were missense mutations resulting in amino acid substitution, which is different than the results from Caucasian BCCs where mutations are frequently predicted to make truncated or absent proteins. All mutations, except for one, occurred on the nontranscribed strand where is little efficient removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers relative to the transcribed strand. Loss of heterozygocity (LOH) of 9q22 for PTCH loci was found in eight of 15 informative cases of BCCs (53%), but none of the cases were informative for LOH of 17p13 for p53 loci. Not only do our data indicate the key role played by p53 and PTCH in the development of BCCs, these findings also suggest that UVB may significantly contribute to BCC tumorigenesis. Moreover, molecular epidemiology composed of incidence of p53 and PTCH mutations, difference in the type of mutation and repair bias of UV-induced DNA lesions might affect the distinct features of BCCs between different racial population.

  14. PTCH gene mutations in odontogenic keratocysts.

    PubMed

    Barreto, D C; Gomez, R S; Bale, A E; Boson, W L; De Marco, L

    2000-06-01

    An odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a benign cystic lesion of the jaws that occurs sporadically or in association with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). Recently, the gene for NBCCS was cloned and shown to be the human homologue of the Drosophila segment polarity gene Patched (PTCH), a tumor suppressor gene. The PTCH gene encodes a transmembrane protein that acts in opposition to the Hedgehog signaling protein, controlling cell fates, patterning, and growth in numerous tissues, including tooth. We investigated three cases of sporadic odontogenic keratocysts and three other cases associated with NBCCS, looking for mutations of the PTCH gene. Non-radioactive single-strand conformational polymorphism and direct sequencing of PCR products revealed a deletion of 5 base pairs (bp) in exon 3 (518delAAGCG) in one sporadic cyst as well as mutations in two cysts associated with NBCCS, a nonsense (C2760A) and a missense (G3499A) alteration. This report is the first to describe a somatic mutation of PTCH in sporadic odontogenic keratocysts as well as two novel mutations in cysts associated with NBCCS, indicating a similar pathogenesis in a subset of sporadic keratocysts.

  15. A mutation screening platform for rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) and the detection of sinapine biosynthesis mutants.

    PubMed

    Harloff, Hans-Joachim; Lemcke, Susanne; Mittasch, Juliane; Frolov, Andrej; Wu, Jian Guo; Dreyer, Felix; Leckband, Gunhild; Jung, Christian

    2012-03-01

    We developed two mutant populations of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) using EMS (ethylmethanesulfonate) as a mutagen. The populations were derived from the spring type line YN01-429 and the winter type cultivar Express 617 encompassing 5,361 and 3,488 M(2) plants, respectively. A high-throughput screening protocol was established based on a two-dimensional 8× pooling strategy. Genes of the sinapine biosynthesis pathway were chosen for determining the mutation frequencies and for creating novel genetic variation for rapeseed breeding. The extraction meal of oilseed rape is a rich protein source containing about 40% protein. Its use as an animal feed or human food, however, is limited by antinutritive compounds like sinapine. The targeting-induced local lesions in genomes (TILLING) strategy was applied to identify mutations of major genes of the sinapine biosynthesis pathway. We constructed locus-specific primers for several TILLING amplicons of two sinapine synthesis genes, BnaX.SGT and BnaX.REF1, covering 80-90% of the coding sequences. Screening of both populations revealed 229 and 341 mutations within the BnaX.SGT sequences (135 missense and 13 nonsense mutations) and the BnaX.REF1 sequences (162 missense, 3 nonsense, 8 splice site mutations), respectively. These mutants provide a new resource for breeding low-sinapine oilseed rape. The frequencies of missense and nonsense mutations corresponded to the frequencies of the target codons. Mutation frequencies ranged from 1/12 to 1/22 kb for the Express 617 population and from 1/27 to 1/60 kb for the YN01-429 population. Our TILLING resource is publicly available. Due to the high mutation frequencies in combination with an 8× pooling strategy, mutants can be routinely identified in a cost-efficient manner. However, primers have to be carefully designed to amplify single sequences from the polyploid rapeseed genome.

  16. An F1 genetic screen for maternal-effect mutations affecting embryonic pattern formation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Luschnig, Stefan; Moussian, Bernard; Krauss, Jana; Desjeux, Isabelle; Perkovic, Josip; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2004-01-01

    Large-scale screens for female-sterile mutations have revealed genes required maternally for establishment of the body axes in the Drosophila embryo. Although it is likely that the majority of components involved in axis formation have been identified by this approach, certain genes have escaped detection. This may be due to (1) incomplete saturation of the screens for female-sterile mutations and (2) genes with essential functions in zygotic development that mutate to lethality, precluding their identification as female-sterile mutations. To overcome these limitations, we performed a genetic mosaic screen aimed at identifying new maternal genes required for early embryonic patterning, including zygotically required ones. Using the Flp-FRT technique and a visible germline clone marker, we developed a system that allows efficient screening for maternal-effect phenotypes after only one generation of breeding, rather than after the three generations required for classic female-sterile screens. We identified 232 mutants showing various defects in embryonic pattern or morphogenesis. The mutants were ordered into 10 different phenotypic classes. A total of 174 mutants were assigned to 86 complementation groups with two alleles on average. Mutations in 45 complementation groups represent most previously known maternal genes, while 41 complementation groups represent new loci, including several involved in dorsoventral, anterior-posterior, and terminal patterning. PMID:15166158

  17. Screening of DFNB3 in Iranian families with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss reveals a novel pathogenic mutation in the MyTh4 domain of the MYO15A gene in a linked family

    PubMed Central

    Reiisi, Somayeh; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Sanati, Mohammad Hosein; Chaleshtori, Morteza Hashemzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss (NSHL) is a common disorder affecting approximately 1 in 500 newborns. This type of hearing loss is extremely heterogeneous and includes over 100 loci. Mutations in the GJB2 gene have been implicated in about half of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) cases, making this the most common cause of ARNSHL. For the latter form of deafness, most frequent genes proposed include GJB2, SLC26A4, MYO15A, OTOF, and CDH23 worldwide. Materials and Methods: The aim of the present study was to define the role and frequency of MYO15A gene mutation in Iranian families. In this study 30 Iranian families were enrolled with over three deaf children and negative for GJB2. Then linkage analysis was performed by six DFNB3 short tandem repeat markers. Following that, mutation detection accomplished using DNA sequencing. Results: One family (3.33%) showed linkage to DFNB3 and a novel mutation was identified in the MYO15A gene (c.6442T>A): as the disease-causing mutation. Mutation co-segregated with hearing loss in the family but was not present in the 100 ethnicity-matched controls. Conclusion: Our results confirmed that the hearing loss of the linked Iranian family was caused by a novel missense mutation in the MYO15A gene. This mutation is the first to be reported in the world and affects the first MyTH4 domain of the protein. PMID:27635202

  18. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L

    1997-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 212 to 272. We have expanded the database: (i) by adding a large amount of new data on somatic mutations in prostatic cancer tissue; (ii) by defining a new constitutional phenotype, mild androgen insensitivity (MAI); (iii) by placing additional relevant information on an internet site (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/ ). The database has allowed us to examine the contribution of CpG sites to the multiplicity of reports of the same mutation in different families. The database is also available from EMBL (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker Pro or Word file (MC33@musica,mcgill.ca)

  19. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L

    1997-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 212 to 272. We have expanded the database: (i) by adding a large amount of new data on somatic mutations in prostatic cancer tissue; (ii) by defining a new constitutional phenotype, mild androgen insensitivity (MAI); (iii) by placing additional relevant information on an internet site (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/ ). The database has allowed us to examine the contribution of CpG sites to the multiplicity of reports of the same mutation in different families. The database is also available from EMBL (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker Pro or Word file (MC33@musica,mcgill.ca) PMID:9016528

  20. Newborn Screening and Cascade Testing for FMR1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, Page L.; Gane, Louise W.; Yarborough, Mark; Hagerman, Randi; Tassone, Flora

    2014-01-01

    We describe an ongoing pilot project in which newborn screening (NBS) for FMR1 mutations and subsequent cascade testing are performed by the MIND Institute at the University of California, Davis Medical Center (UCDMC). To date, out of 3042 newborns initially screened, 44 extended family members have been screened by cascade testing of extended family members once a newborn is identified. 14 newborns (7 males and 7 females) and 27 extended family members (5 males and 22 females) have been identified with FMR1 mutations. Three family histories are discussed in detail, each demonstrating some benefits and risks of NBS and cascade testing for FMR1 mutations in extended family members. While we acknowledge inherent risks, we propose that with genetic counseling, clinical follow-up of identified individuals and cascade testing, newborn screening (NBS) has significant benefits. Treatment for individuals in the extended family who would otherwise not have received treatment can be beneficial. In addition, knowledge of carrier status can lead to lifestyle changes and prophylactic interventions that are likely to reduce the risk of late onset neurological or psychiatric problems in carriers. Also with identification of carrier family members through NBS, reproductive choices become available to those who would not have known that they were at risk to have offspring with fragile X syndrome. PMID:23239591

  1. Myosin VIIA mutation screening in 189 Usher syndrome type 1 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, M.D.; Kelley, P.M.; Overbeck, L.D.

    1996-11-01

    Usher syndrome type 1b (USH1B) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital profound hearing loss, vestibular abnormalities, and retinitis pigmentosa. The disorder has recently been shown to be caused by mutations in the myosin VIIa gene (MYO7A) located on 11q14. In the current study, a panel of 189 genetically independent Usher I cases were screened for the presence of mutations in the N-terminal coding portion of the motor domain of MYO7A by heteroduplex analysis of 14 exons. Twenty-three mutations were found segregating with the disease in 20 families. Of the 23 mutations, 13 were unique, and 2 of the 13 unique mutations (Arg212His and Arg212Cys) accounted for the greatest percentage of observed mutant alleles (8/23, 31%). Six of the 13 mutations caused premature stop codons, 6 caused changes in the amino acid sequence of the myosin VIIa protein, and 1 resulted in a splicing defect. Three patients were homozygotes or compound heterozygotes for mutant alleles; these three cases were Tyr333Stop/Tyr333Stop, Arg212His-Arg302His/Arg212His-Arg302His, and IVS13nt-8c{r_arrow}g/ G1u450Gln. All the other USH1B mutations observed were simple heterozygotes, and it is presumed that the mutation on the other allele is present in the unscreened regions of the gene. None of the mutations reported here were observed in 96 unrelated control samples, although several polymorphisms were detected. These results add three patients to a single case reported previously where mutations have been found in both alleles and raises the total number of unique mutations in MYO7A to 16. 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Genomic organization of SLC3A1, a transporter gene mutated in cystinuria

    SciTech Connect

    Pras, E.; Sood, R.; Raben, N.

    1996-08-15

    The SLC3A1 gene encodes a transport protein for cystine and the dibasic amino acids. Recently mutations in this gene have been shown to cause cystinuria. We report the genomic structure and organization of SLC3A1, which is composed of 10 exons and spans nearly 45 kb. Until now screening for mutations in SLC3A1 has been based on RT-PCR amplification of illegitimate mRNA transcripts from white blood cells. In this report we provide primers for amplification of exons from genomic DNA, thus simplifying the process of screening for SLC3A1 mutations in cystinuria. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. PDCD10 gene mutations in multiple cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Cigoli, Maria Sole; Avemaria, Francesca; De Benedetti, Stefano; Gesu, Giovanni P; Accorsi, Lucio Giordano; Parmigiani, Stefano; Corona, Maria Franca; Capra, Valeria; Mosca, Andrea; Giovannini, Simona; Notturno, Francesca; Ciccocioppo, Fausta; Volpi, Lilia; Estienne, Margherita; De Michele, Giuseppe; Antenora, Antonella; Bilo, Leda; Tavoni, Antonietta; Zamponi, Nelia; Alfei, Enrico; Baranello, Giovanni; Riva, Daria; Penco, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular abnormalities that may cause seizures, intracerebral haemorrhages, and focal neurological deficits. Familial form shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression. Three genes have been identified causing familial CCM: KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3. Aim of this study is to report additional PDCD10/CCM3 families poorly described so far which account for 10-15% of hereditary cerebral cavernous malformations. Our group investigated 87 consecutive Italian affected individuals (i.e. positive Magnetic Resonance Imaging) with multiple/familial CCM through direct sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis. We identified mutations in over 97.7% of cases, and PDCD10/CCM3 accounts for 13.1%. PDCD10/CCM3 molecular screening revealed four already known mutations and four novel ones. The mutated patients show an earlier onset of clinical manifestations as compared to CCM1/CCM2 mutated patients. The study of further families carrying mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 may help define a possible correlation between genotype and phenotype; an accurate clinical follow up of the subjects would help define more precisely whether mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 lead to a characteristic phenotype.

  4. Correlation between germline mutations in MMR genes and microsatellite instability in ovarian cancer specimens.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mohammad R; Zhang, Shiyu; Cragun, Deborah; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Coppola, Domenico; McLaughlin, John; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Shaw, Patricia; Sellers, Thomas A; Schildkraut, Joellen; Narod, Steven A; Pal, Tuya

    2017-02-07

    A high proportion of ovarian cancers from women who carry germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes demonstrate microsatellite instability (MSI). The utility of pre-screening ovarian cancer specimens for MSI to identify potential patients for germline screening for MMR mutations is uncertain. 656 women with malignant ovarian cancer underwent both MSI testing and germline mutation testing for large rearrangements in three MMR genes, MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Germline DNA sequencing data for the same genes was available. Among the 656 women, only four (0.6%) carried a clearly pathogenic MMR mutation. All four cancers from patients with mutations had loss of two or more microsatellite markers (MSI-high). Eighty-four of 652 (13.0%) women without a mutation had MSI-high ovarian cancers. Using MSI-high as a prescreening criterion, the sensitivity of MSI testing to identify germline MMR gene mutations was 100% and the positive predictive value was 4.5%. Germline mutations in MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 are rare among unselected cases of ovarian cancer. Patients with germline mutations often will have MSI-positive cancers and pre-screening of ovarian cancer specimens may be an efficient way of identifying patients with Lynch syndrome.

  5. Multiplex screening for RB1 germline mutations in 106 patients with hereditary retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmann, D.R.; Brandt, B.; Passarge, E.

    1994-09-01

    The identification of germline mutations in the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene (RB1) is important for genetic counseling in hereditary retinoblastoma. Due to the complex genomic organization of this gene and the heterogeneity of mutations, efficient screening procedures are important for rapid mutation detection. We have developed methods based on simultaneous analysis of multiple regions of this gene in an ABI automated DNA fragment analyzer to examine 106 patients with hereditary retinoblastoma in which no alteration was identified by Southern blot hybridization. Primers for the amplification of all 27 exons of the RB1 gene as well as the promoter and poly(A) signal sequences were labelled with distinct fluorescent dyes (FAM, HEX, TAMRA) to enable simultaneous electrophoretic analysis of PCR products with similar mobility. PCR fragments distinguishable by size or color were co-amplified by multiplex PCR and analyzed for length by GENESCAN analysis. Using this approach, small deletions ranging from 1 bp to 22 bp were identified in 24 patients (23%). Short sequence repeats or polypyrimidine runs were present in the vicinity of most of these deletions. In 4 patients (4%), insertions from 1 bp to 4 bp were found. The majority of length mutations resulted in a truncated gene product due to frameshift and premature termination. No mutation was identified in exons 25 to 27 possibly indicating that the encoded protein domains have minor functional importance. In order to screen for base substitutions that are not detectable by fragment length analysis, we adapted heteroduplex analysis for the use in the DNA fragment analyzer. During the optimization of this method we detected 10 single base substitutions most of which generated stop codons. Intriguingly, two identical missense mutations were identified in two unrelated families with a low-penetrance phenotype.

  6. Single molecule targeted sequencing for cancer gene mutation detection

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Deng, Liwei; Yan, Qin; Gao, Yongqian; Wu, Zengding; Cai, Jinsen; Ji, Daorui; Li, Gailing; Wu, Ping; Jin, Huan; Zhao, Luyang; Liu, Song; Ge, Liangjin; Deem, Michael W.; He, Jiankui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid decline in cost of sequencing, it is now affordable to examine multiple genes in a single disease-targeted clinical test using next generation sequencing. Current targeted sequencing methods require a separate step of targeted capture enrichment during sample preparation before sequencing. Although there are fast sample preparation methods available in market, the library preparation process is still relatively complicated for physicians to use routinely. Here, we introduced an amplification-free Single Molecule Targeted Sequencing (SMTS) technology, which combined targeted capture and sequencing in one step. We demonstrated that this technology can detect low-frequency mutations using artificially synthesized DNA sample. SMTS has several potential advantages, including simple sample preparation thus no biases and errors are introduced by PCR reaction. SMTS has the potential to be an easy and quick sequencing technology for clinical diagnosis such as cancer gene mutation detection, infectious disease detection, inherited condition screening and noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27193446

  7. From Gene Mutation to Protein Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffet, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A seven-week "gene to protein" laboratory sequence is described for an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Student pairs were given the task of introducing a point mutation of their choosing into the well studied protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After conducting literature searches, each student group chose the…

  8. From Gene Mutation to Protein Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffet, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A seven-week "gene to protein" laboratory sequence is described for an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Student pairs were given the task of introducing a point mutation of their choosing into the well studied protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After conducting literature searches, each student group chose the…

  9. Screening of Two Neighboring CFTR Mutations in Iranian Infertile Men with Non-Obstructive Azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Somayeh; Hojati, Zohreh; Motovali-Bashi, Majid

    2017-01-01

    The genetic association between cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations and male infertility due to congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens (CBAVD) is well established. Mutant CFTR, however may also be involved in the etiology of male infertility in non-CBAVD cases. The present study was conducted to estimate the frequency of ∆I507 and ∆F508 CFTR gene mutations in Iranian infertile males. We undertook the first study of association between these CFTR mutations and non-obstructive azoospermia in Iran. In this case-control study, 100 fertile healthy fathers and 100 non-obstructive azoospermia’s men were recruited from Isfahan Infertility Center (IIC) and Sari Saint Mary’s Infertility Center, between 2008 and 2009. Screening of F508del and I507del mutations was carried out by the multiplex-ARMS-PCR. Significance of differences in mutation frequencies between the patient and control groups was assessed by Fisher’s exact test. The ΔF508 was detected in three patients. However there are no significant association was found between the presence of this mutated allele and infertility [OR=9.2 (allele-based) and 7.2 (individual-based), P=0.179]. None of the samples carried the ΔI507 mutation. Altogether, we show that neither ΔI507 nor ΔF508 is involved in this population of Iranian infertile males with non-obstructive azoospermia. PMID:28042420

  10. Multicentric origin of hemochromatosis gene (HFE) mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Rochette, J; Pointon, J J; Fisher, C A; Perera, G; Arambepola, M; Arichchi, D S; De Silva, S; Vandwalle, J L; Monti, J P; Old, J M; Merryweather-Clarke, A T; Weatherall, D J; Robson, K J

    1999-01-01

    Genetic hemochromatosis (GH) is believed to be a disease restricted to those of European ancestry. In northwestern Europe, >80% of GH patients are homozygous for one mutation, the substitution of tyrosine for cysteine at position 282 (C282Y) in the unprocessed protein. In a proportion of GH patients, two mutations are present, C282Y and H63D. The clinical significance of this second mutation is such that it appears to predispose 1%-2% of compound heterozygotes to expression of the disease. The distribution of the two mutations differ, C282Y being limited to those of northwestern European ancestry and H63D being found at allele frequencies>5%, in Europe, in countries bordering the Mediterranean, in the Middle East, and in the Indian subcontinent. The C282Y mutation occurs on a haplotype that extends mutation has arisen during the past 2,000 years. The H63D mutation is older and does not occur on such a large extended haplotype, the haplotype in this case extending mutations on new haplotypes. In Sri Lanka we have found H63D on three new haplotypes and have found C282Y on one new haplotype, demonstrating that these mutations have arisen independently on this island. These results suggest that the HFE gene has been the subject of selection pressure. These selection pressures could be due to infectious diseases, environmental conditions, or other genetic disorders such as anemia. PMID:10090890

  11. A Novel Functional Screen for New Breast Cancer Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    activity [25]. Transfection of a MED1 mutant lacking the methyl binding domain was associated with microsatellite instability. These findings...allow us to perform a more complete screen as mutator target genes may be uniquely expressed following reduction of estrogen levels and/or following... estrogen receptor. In addition, we isolated poly A+ RNA from breast tumor cell lines that have no wild-type BRCA1 expression, cell lines that have

  12. Profiling β Thalassemia Mutations in Consanguinity and Nonconsanguinity for Prenatal Screening and Awareness Programme

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravindra; Arya, Vandana; Agarwal, Sarita

    2015-01-01

    Mutation spectrum varies significantly in different parts and different ethnic groups of India. Social factors such as preference to marry within the community and among 1st degree relatives (consanguinity) play an important role in impeding the gene pool of the disease within the community and so in society by and large. The present paper discusses the role of consanguinity in profiling of beta thalassemia mutation, and thus the approach for prenatal screening and prevention based awareness programme. Clinically diagnosed 516 cases of beta thalassemia were screened at molecular level. A detailed clinical Proforma was recorded with the information of origin of the family, ethnicity, and consanguinity. The present study reports that subjects originating from Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Bihar, and Jharkhand have c.92+5G>C and c.124_127delTTCT mutation as the commonest mutation compared to the subjects hailing from Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh and Nepal where sickle mutation was found more common. In 40 consanguineous unions more common and specific beta mutations with higher rate of homozygosity have been reported. This consanguinity-based data helps not only in deciding target oriented prenatal diagnostic strategies but also in objective based awareness programmes in prevention of thalassemia major birth. PMID:26576156

  13. Novel mutation in VCP gene causes atypical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    González-Pérez, Paloma; Cirulli, Elizabeth T.; Drory, Vivian E.; Dabby, Ron; Nisipeanu, Puiu; Carasso, Ralph L.; Sadeh, Menachem; Fox, Andrew; Festoff, Barry W.; Sapp, Peter C.; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; Goldstein, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic variant that causes autosomal dominantly inherited motor neuron disease in a 4-generation Israeli-Arab family using genetic linkage and whole exome sequencing. Methods: Genetic linkage analysis was performed in this family using Illumina single nucleotide polymorphism chips. Whole exome sequencing was then undertaken on DNA samples from 2 affected family members using an Illumina 2000 HiSeq platform in pursuit of potentially pathogenic genetic variants that comigrate with the disease in this pedigree. Variants meeting these criteria were then screened in all affected individuals. Results: A novel mutation (p.R191G) in the valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene was identified in the index family. Direct sequencing of the VCP gene in a panel of DNA from 274 unrelated individuals with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) revealed 5 additional mutations. Among them, 2 were previously identified in pedigrees with a constellation of inclusion body myopathy with Paget disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) and in FALS, and 2 other mutations (p.R159C and p.R155C) in IBMPFD alone. We did not detect VCP gene mutations in DNA from 178 cases of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Conclusions: We report a novel VCP mutation identified in an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis family (p.R191G) with atypical clinical features. In our experience, VCP mutations arise in approximately 1.5% of FALS cases. Our study supports the view that motor neuron disease is part of the clinical spectrum of VCP-associated disease. PMID:23152587

  14. [A novel mutation of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein gene underlies multiple epiphyseal dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Xie, Jiansheng; Wu, Weiqing; Xu, Zhiyong; Luo, Fuwei; Geng, Qian

    2013-06-01

    To perform mutation analysis for a female with multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) and provide pre-symptomatic and prenatal diagnosis. Mutation screening of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) gene was carried out through targeted next-generation DNA sequencing and Sanger sequencing. A novel c.956 A>T resulting in substitution of Aspartic acid 319 for Valine (p.Asp319Val) has been identified in exon 9 of the COMP gene in the patient. As predicted by a SIFT software, above mutation can cause damage to the structure of COMP protein. A novel c.956 A>T substitution mutation has been identified in a patient featuring MED.

  15. INPPL1 gene mutations in opsismodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fradet, Anaïs; Fitzgerald, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    The INPPL1 (inositol polyphosphate phosphatase-like 1) gene encodes the inositol phosphatase, SHIP2 (for src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase 2). SHIP2 functions to dephosphorylate, and negatively regulate, the lipid second messenger phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)P3. SHIP2 has been well studied in the area of insulin resistance and obesity but has roles in cancer and other disorders. Recently, it was reported that mutations in INPPL1 cause opsismodysplasia, a rare, autosomal recessive severe skeletal dysplasia. This review focuses on the mutations associated with opsismodysplasia and explores the role of INPPL1/ SHIP2 in skeletal development. PMID:27708270

  16. INPPL1 gene mutations in opsismodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Fradet, Anaïs; Fitzgerald, Jamie

    2017-02-01

    The INPPL1 (inositol polyphosphate phosphatase-like 1) gene encodes the inositol phosphatase, SHIP2 (for src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase 2). SHIP2 functions to dephosphorylate, and negatively regulate, the lipid second messenger phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)P3. SHIP2 has been well studied in the area of insulin resistance and obesity but has roles in cancer and other disorders. Recently, it was reported that mutations in INPPL1 cause opsismodysplasia, a rare, autosomal recessive severe skeletal dysplasia. This review focuses on the mutations associated with opsismodysplasia and explores the role of INPPL1/ SHIP2 in skeletal development.

  17. Recurrent APC gene mutations in Polish FAP families

    PubMed Central

    Pławski, Andrzej; Podralska, Marta; Słomski, Ryszard

    2007-01-01

    The molecular diagnostics of genetically conditioned disorders is based on the identification of the mutations in the predisposing genes. Hereditary cancer disorders of the gastrointestinal tracts are caused by mutations of the tumour suppressor genes or the DNA repair genes. Occurrence of recurrent mutation allows improvement of molecular diagnostics. The mutation spectrum in the genes causing hereditary forms of colorectal cancers in the Polish population was previously described. In the present work an estimation of the frequency of the recurrent mutations of the APC gene was performed. Eight types of mutations occurred in 19.4% of our FAP families and these constitute 43% of all Polish diagnosed families. PMID:19725996

  18. Mutation analysis of CFTR gene in 70 Iranian cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Alibakhshi, Reza; Zamani, Mahdi

    2006-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common inherited disorder in Caucasian populations, with over 1400 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations. The type of mutations and their distributions varies widely between different countries and/or ethnic groups. Seventy Iranian cystic fibrosis patients were screened for the CFTR gene mutation using ARMS/PCR (amplification refractory mutation system) for the following mutations: deltaF508, N1303K, G542X, 1717-1G>A, R553X, W1282X, G551D, 621+1G>T, deltaI507 and R560T. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of exons 3, 7, 10, 11 and 17b, including both the exon/intron junctions, of the CFTR gene was performed in patients in whom no mutation could be identified on one or both CFTR genes. As a result of this screening, only three mutations were found: deltaF508 mutation was found in 25 (17.8%) alleles, N1303K in six (4.3%) alleles and G542X in five (3.6%) alleles. Thus, a total of 3 mutations cover 25.7% of CF alleles. These finding will be used for planning future screening and appropriate genetic counseling programs in Iranian CF patients.

  19. Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters August 12, 2013 Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks Schizophrenia networks in the prefrontal ... Vasculitis Therapy as Effective as Standard Care Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks Connect with Us Subscribe to ...

  20. A whole mitochondrial genome screening in a MELAS patient: A novel mitochondrial tRNA{sup Val} mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Mezghani, Najla; Mnif, Mouna; Kacem, Maha; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Hadj Salem, Ikhlass; Kallel, Nozha; Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} We report a young Tunisian patient with clinical features of MELAS syndrome. {yields} Reported mitochondrial mutations were absent after a mutational screening of the whole mtDNA. {yields} We described a novel m.1640A>G mutation in the tRNA{sup Val} gene which was absent in 150 controls. {yields} Mitochondrial deletions and POLG1 gene mutations were absent. {yields} The m.1640A>G mutation could be associated to MELAS syndrome. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by a wide variety of clinical presentations and a multisystemic organ involvement. In this study, we report a Tunisian girl with clinical features of MELAS syndrome who was negative for the common m.3243A>G mutation, but also for the reported mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations and deletions. Screening of the entire mtDNA genome showed several known mitochondrial variants besides to a novel transition m.1640A>G affecting a wobble adenine in the anticodon stem region of the tRNA{sup Val}. This nucleotide was conserved and it was absent in 150 controls suggesting its pathogenicity. In addition, no mutations were found in the nuclear polymerase gamma-1 gene (POLG1). These results suggest further investigation nuclear genes encoding proteins responsible for stability and structural components of the mtDNA or to the oxidative phosphorylation machinery to explain the phenotypic variability in the studied family.

  1. Genetic epidemiology of muscular dystrophies resulting from sarcoglycan gene mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Fanin, M; Duggan, D J; Mostacciuolo, M L; Martinello, F; Freda, M P; Sorarù, G; Trevisan, C P; Hoffman, E P; Angelini, C

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) are a group of genetically heterogeneous muscle diseases characterised by progressive proximal limb muscle weakness. Six different loci have been mapped and pathogenetic mutations in the genes encoding the sarcoglycan complex components (alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta-sarcoglycan) have been documented. LGMD patients affected with primary "sarcoglycanopathies" are classified as LGMD2D, 2E, 2C, and 2F, respectively. METHODS: A geographical area in north east Italy (2,319,147 inhabitants) was selected for a genetic epidemiological study on primary sarcoglycanopathies. Within the period 1982 to 1996, all patients living in this region and diagnosed with muscular dystrophy were seen at our centre. Immunohistochemical and immunoblot screening for alpha-sarcoglycan protein deficiency was performed on all muscle biopsies from patients with a progressive muscular dystrophy of unknown aetiology and normal dystrophin. Sarcoglycan mutation analyses were conducted on all patient muscle biopsies shown to have complete or partial absence of alpha-sarcoglycan immunostaining or a decreased quantity of alpha-sarcoglycan protein on immunoblotting. RESULTS: Two hundred and four patient muscle biopsies were screened for alpha-sarcoglycan protein deficiency and 18 biopsies showed a deficiency. Pathogenetic mutations involving one gene for sarcoglycan complex components were identified in 13 patients: alpha-sarcoglycan in seven, beta-sarcoglycan in two, gamma-sarcoglycan in four, and none in the delta-sarcoglycan gene. The overall prevalence of primary sarcoglycanopathies, as of 31 December 1996, was estimated to be 5.6 x 10(-6) inhabitants. CONCLUSION: The prevalence rate estimated in this study is the first to be obtained after biochemical and molecular genetic screening for sarcoglycan defects. PMID:9429136

  2. α-Globin gene mutations in Isfahan Province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Karamzade, Arezo; Mirzapour, Hadi; Hoseinzade, Majid; Asadi, Sara; Gholamrezapour, Tahere; Tavakoli, Parvaneh; Salehi, Mansoor; Selebi, Mansoor

    2014-01-01

    α-Thalassemia (α-thal) encompasses a spectrum of mutations including deletion and point mutations on the α-globin chains that is characterized by a reduction or complete absence of α-globin genes. Most of the α-thal cases are deletions involving one (α(+)) or both (α(0)) α-globin genes, although point mutations (α(T)α or αα(T)) are found as well. In this study, 314 individuals with low hematological values, normal Hb A2 who were not affected with β-thal or iron deficiency, were investigated for the presence of α-thal mutations. The most common deletion was -α(3.7) (rightward) with a frequency of 70.7%, followed by α(-5 nt) (-TGAGG) (8.7%), -α(4.2) (leftward) (4.7%), the polyadenylation signal (polyA2) site (AATAAA > AATGAA) (4.2%), -(α)(20.5) (3.8%), Hb Constant Spring [Hb CS, α142, Stop→Gln; HBA2: c.427T > C] (2.9%), polyA1 (AATAAA > AATAAG) and α(codon 19) (GCG > GC-, α2) (16%), and - -(MED) (0.9%). The results of this study may be valuable for designing a plan for carrier screening, premarital genetic counseling, prenatal diagnosis (PND) and reducing excessive health care costs to an affordable level in Isfahan Province, Iran.

  3. FUS GENE MUTATIONS IN FAMILIAL AND SPORADIC AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Rademakers, Rosa; Stewart, Heather; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Krieger, Charles; Graff-Radford, Neill; Fabros, Marife; Briemberg, Hannah; Cashman, Neil; Eisen, Andrew; Mackenzie, Ian R. A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Mutations in the fused in sarcoma (FUS) gene have recently been found to cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS). Methods We screened FUS in a cohort of 200 ALS patients [32 FALS and 168 sporadic ALS (SALS)]. Results In one FALS proband, we identified a mutation (p.R521C) that was also present in her affected daughter. Their clinical phenotype was remarkably similar and atypical of classic ALS, with symmetric proximal pelvic and pectoral weakness. Distal weakness and upper motor neuron features only developed late. Neuropathological examination demonstrated FUS-immunoreactive neuronal and glial inclusions in the spinal cord and many extramotor regions, but no TDP-43 pathology. We also identified a novel mutation (p.G187S) in one SALS patient. Overall, FUS mutations accounted for 3% of our non-SOD1, non-TARDBP FALS cases and 0.6% of SALS. Discussion This study demonstrates that the phenotype with FUS mutations extends beyond classical ALS. It suggests there are specific clinicogenetic correlations and provides the first detailed neuropathological description. PMID:20544928

  4. DHPLC screening for mutations in progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis patients.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Rivka; Anikster, Yair; Yardeni, Tal; Korem, Sigal; Hartman, Korina; Shamir, Raanan; Broide, Efrat; Levine, Arie; Bujanover, Yoram; Bercovich, Dani

    2010-05-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a group of rare heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorders characterized by metabolic defects in biliary proteins involved in the formation and transfer of bile acids in the liver. The genotype-phenotype correlation is not always clear. Mutations in the ATP8B1, BSEP and MDR3 genes have been associated with PFIC1, PFIC2 and PFIC3, respectively. This study sought to characterize the molecular genetic basis for PFIC subtypes in Israel. It was conducted on 14 children with PFIC and their families; 10 with a PFIC1 or PFIC2 phenotype and 4 with a PFIC3 phenotype. Using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), five different mutations were identified in four affected families: three novel mutations in BSEP (G19R-g181c, S226L-c803t and G877R-g2755a), one novel mutation in MDR3 (IVS14+6 t/c) and one heterozygous mutation in ATP8B1 (R600W, in a family with the PFIC1/PFIC2 phenotype). The cause of PFIC was identified in 20% of the families tested. These findings indicate the probable involvement of additional genes in PFIC and the need for further studies to determine whether the abnormality lies on the RNA or protein level. A better understanding of the phenotype-genotype correlation in PFIC will lead to improved diagnoses and treatments.

  5. Differences in gene mutations between Chinese and Caucasian cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Baoying

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cystic fibrosis (CF) is rarely seen in Asian populations. We diagnosed two CF cases. One of them had a novel mutation c.870‐1G>C in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. There have been 38 Chinese CF patients reported in literature from 1974 until the present (2016), 25 different mutations were identified. Only one of these mutations (R553X) is in the Caucasian CF screening panel. The mutations identified in Chinese CF patients are very different from the common Caucasian gene mutations. The CFTR gene mutation spectrum for the Chinese population requires further investigation. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2017;52:E11–E14. © 2016 The Authors. Pediatric Pulmonology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27717243

  6. Screening for mtDNA diabetes mutations in Pima Indians with NIDDM

    SciTech Connect

    Sepehrnia, B.; Prezant, T.R.; Rotter, J.I.

    1995-03-27

    More than half of the Pima Indians over age 35 years have non-insulin-dependent (type II) diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Extensive data indicate the importance of maternal diabetes in determining their risk for diabetes. Generally, the risk of having NIDDM is higher in patients with affected mothers than affected fathers. This has been attributed to intrauterine factors, but recently mitochondrial inheritance has been raised as an alternative hypothesis. In other populations, several families and individuals with diabetes due to a mitochondrial DNA point mutation at nucleotide 3243 in the tRNA{sup leu(UUR)} gene have been described, as has one family with a 10.4 kb mitochondrial DNA duplication/deletion. We tested whether these specific mitochondrial gene mutations could explain a portion of the excess maternal transmission seen in the Pima Indians. Mitochondrial DNA obtained from blood lymphocytes of 148 Pima Indians with NIDDM was screened both for the point mutation at nt 3243, and the 10.4 kb duplication/deletion. Neither of these mutations was detected, and although a small proportion of the excess maternal transmission in Pima Indians could still be due to yet undescribed mitochondrial mutations or imprinted nuclear genes, our data support the role of the intrauterine environment in this population. 32 refs, 21 figs.

  7. Screening for mtDNA diabetes mutations in Pima Indians with NIDDM.

    PubMed

    Sepehrnia, B; Prezant, T R; Rotter, J I; Pettitt, D J; Knowler, W C; Fischel-Ghodsian, N

    1995-03-27

    More than half of the Pima Indians over age 35 years have non-insulin-dependent (type II) diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Extensive data indicate the importance of maternal diabetes in determining their risk for diabetes. Generally, the risk of having NIDDM is higher in patients with affected mothers than affected fathers. This has been attributed to intrauterine factors, but recently mitochondrial inheritance has been raised as an alternative hypothesis. In other populations, several families and individuals with diabetes due to a mitochondrial DNA point mutation at nucleotide 3243 in the tRNA(leu(UUR)) gene have been described, as has one family with a 10.4 kb mitochondrial DNA duplication/deletion. We tested whether these specific mitochondrial gene mutations could explain a portion of the excess maternal transmission seen in the Pima Indians. Mitochondrial DNA obtained from blood lymphocytes of 148 Pima Indians with NIDDM was screened both for the point mutation at nt 3243, and the 10.4 kb duplication/deletion. Neither of these mutations was detected, and although a small proportion of the excess maternal transmission in Pima Indians could still be due to yet undescribed mitochondrial mutations or imprinted nuclear genes, our data support the role of the intrauterine environment in this population.

  8. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  9. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca). PMID:9399843

  10. [Gene mutation analysis of X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets].

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Ma, Hong-Wei; Li, Fang; Hu, Man; Ren, Shuang; Yu, Ya-Fen; Zhao, Gui-Jie

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the frequency and type of PHEX gene mutations in children with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH), the possible presence of mutational hot spots, and the relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype. Clinical data of 10 children with XLH was retrospectively reviewed. The relationship between gene mutation type and severity of XLH was evaluated. PHEX gene mutations were detected in all 10 children with XLH, including 6 cases of missense mutation, 2 cases of splice site mutation, 1 case of frameshift mutation, and 1 case of nonsense mutation. Two new mutations, c.2048T>C and IVS14+1delAG, were found. The type of PHEX gene mutation was not associated with the degree of short stature and leg deformity (P=0.571 and 0.467), and the mutation site was also not associated with the degree of short stature and leg deformity (P=0.400 and 1.000). Missense mutation is the most common type of PHEX gene mutation in children with XLH, and c.2048T>C and IVS14+1delAG are two new PHEX gene mutations. The type and site of PHEX gene mutation are not associated with the severity of XLH.

  11. High-Resolution Melt Curve Analysis in Cancer Mutation Screen.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Meenakshi; Patel, Keyur P

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis is a PCR-based assay that identifies sequence alterations based on subtle variations in the melting curves of mutated versus wild-type DNA sequences. HRM analysis is a high-throughput, sensitive, and efficient alternative to Sanger sequencing and is used to assess for mutations in clinically important genes involved in cancer diagnosis. The technique involves PCR amplification of a target sequence in the presence of a fluorescent double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding dye, melting of the fluorescent amplicons, and subsequent interpretation of melt curve profiles.

  12. Study on the Evolution of Genes Mutation Related With Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-01-05

    Full Gene Sequences of c-KIT、PDGFRA and DOG1 Are Analyzed With the Screening-sequencing Approach; Investigate the Characteristics and Variations Associated With the Different Gene Mutations of c-KIT、PDGFRA and DOG1 in GIST Patients

  13. RAS gene mutations in acute and chronic myelocytic leukemias, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, and myelodysplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, J.W.G.; Steenvoorden, A.C.M.; Lyons, J.; Anger, B.; Boehlke, J.U.; Bos, J.L.; Seliger, H.; Bartram, C.R.

    1987-12-01

    The authors report on investigations aimed at detecting mutated RAS genes in a variety of preleukemic disorders and leukemias of myeloid origin. DNA transfection analyses (tumorigenicity assay) and hybridization to mutation-specific oligonucleotide probes established NRAS mutations in codon 12 or 61 of 4/9 acute myelocytic leukemias (AML) and three AML lines. Leukemic cells of another AML patient showed HRAS gene activation. By using a rapid and sensitive dot-blot screening procedure based on the combination of in vitro amplification of RAS-specific sequences and oligonucleotide hybridization they additionally screened 15 myelodysplastic syndromes, 26 Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelocytic leukemias in chronic or acute phase, and 19 other chronic myeloproliferative disorders. A mutation within NRAS codon 12 could thus be demonstrated in a patient with idiopathic myelofibrosis and in another with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Moreover, mutated NRAS sequences were detected in lymphocytes, in granulocytes, as well as in monocytes/macrophages of the latter case.

  14. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia: pathophysiology and gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Harigae, Hideo; Furuyama, Kazumichi

    2010-10-01

    Sideroblastic anemia is characterized by anemia with the emergence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. Ring sideroblasts are erythroblasts characterized by iron accumulation in perinuclear mitochondria due to impaired iron utilization. There are two forms of sideroblastic anemia, i.e., inherited and acquired sideroblastic anemia. Inherited sideroblastic anemia is a rare and heterogeneous disease caused by mutations of genes involved in heme biosynthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or Fe-S cluster transport, and mitochondrial metabolism. The most common inherited sideroblastic anemia is X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) caused by mutations of the erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinate synthase gene (ALAS2), which is the first enzyme of heme biosynthesis in erythroid cells. Sideroblastic anemia due to SLC25A38 gene mutations, which is a mitochondrial transporter, is the next most common inherited sideroblastic anemia. Other forms of inherited sideroblastic anemia are very rare, and accompanied by impaired function of organs other than hematopoietic tissue, such as the nervous system, muscle, or exocrine glands due to impaired mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, there are still significant numbers of cases with genetically undefined inherited sideroblastic anemia. Molecular analysis of these cases will contribute not only to the development of effective treatment, but also to the understanding of mitochondrial iron metabolism.

  15. [Screening of A985 to G mutation of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) gene in Normandy. Evaluation of the role of MCAD deficiency in sudden infant death].

    PubMed

    Lecoq, I; Mallet, E; Bonté, J B; Laroche, D; Travert, G

    1995-01-01

    MCAD deficiency is recognized as the most common hereditary defect of hepatic fatty acid oxidation. Clinical signs are somnolence progressing to lethargy potentially leading to coma. Death is the outcome of the first attack in about 20% of cases, suggesting sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). A point mutation (adenine to guanine at position 985) in exon 11 of the MCAD gene represents 90% of alleles causing MCAD deficiency. The high prevalence of this mutation allows the estimation of the incidence of MCAD deficiency in the general population and in SIDS. The study was performed after PCR amplification from blood spots on filter paper in 1,432 randomly selected newborns (group I), in 225 SIDS (group II) and in 47 infants of SIDS family (group III). In group I, 10 newborns were found to have the G985 mutation in the heterozygous form. In group II, among 225 SIDS cases, the G985 MCAD mutation was found once in the heterozygote state. In group III, the mutation was not found. The estimated frequency of the mutation was 1/143 in the reference group and the incidence of MCAD deficiency was calculated as 1/67,000 in Normandy.

  16. [Screening of the delta-F508 mutation and analysis of two Single Nucleotide Polymorphism of the CFTR gene, in a sample of the general population of Valparaíso, Chile].

    PubMed

    Vera, Alejandra; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos F; González, Francisco J; Molina, Graciela

    2005-07-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis (CF) carrier rate in Chile was estimated to be 1/40. CF is caused by mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene. Delta F508 mutation is the most common in CF patients in Chile and worldwide. Delta F508 has linkage disequilibrium with two Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP), often used to define the haplotypic frameworks of CF mutations. To know the frequency of the delta F508 mutation and to establish the SNPs, M470V and T854T, haplotypic frequency, in a Valparaiso general population sample. Fifty subjects were studied. Genetic material was obtained from blood samples, amplified by PCR and analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Two of the 100 chromosomes analyzed, carried the delta F508 mutation. Therefore, the observed frequency carrier rate (0.02) was higher than the expected (0.01). Both carrier chromosomes had the same SNPs haplotypic framework (1-2). In normal chromosomes, the haplotype 2-1 was the most common. These results suggest that the chromosomes that bear delta F508 mutation have most likely a Mediterranean European origin, since this haplotypic framework has been reported in that region. We suggest that CF could be more common in Valparaiso than it was previously.

  17. Simultaneous screening of multiple mutations by invader assay improves molecular diagnosis of hereditary hearing loss: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Usami, Shin-ichi; Nishio, Shin-ya; Nagano, Makoto; Abe, Satoko; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu

    2012-01-01

    Although etiological studies have shown genetic disorders to be a common cause of congenital/early-onset sensorineural hearing loss, there have been no detailed multicenter studies based on genetic testing. In the present report, 264 Japanese patients with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss from 33 ENT departments nationwide participated. For these patients, we first applied the Invader assay for screening 47 known mutations of 13 known deafness genes, followed by direct sequencing as necessary. A total of 78 (29.5%) subjects had at least one deafness gene mutation. Mutations were more frequently found in the patients with congenital or early-onset hearing loss, i.e., in those with an awareness age of 0-6 years, mutations were significantly higher (41.8%) than in patients with an older age of awareness (16.0%). Among the 13 genes, mutations in GJB2 and SLC26A4 were mainly found in congenital or early-onset patients, in contrast with mitochondrial mutations (12S rRNA m.1555A>G, tRNA(Leu(UUR)) m.3243A>G), which were predominantly found in older-onset patients. The present method of simultaneous screening of multiple deafness mutations by Invader assay followed by direct sequencing will enable us to detect deafness mutations in an efficient and practical manner for clinical use.

  18. A de novo missense mutation of the FUS gene in a ‘true’ sporadic ALS case

    PubMed Central

    Chiò, Adriano; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Ossola, Irene; Brunetti, Maura; Sbaiz, Luca; Lai, Shiao-lin; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Traynor, Bryan J.; Restagno, Gabriella

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), transactive response (TAR)-DNA binding protein (TARDBP) and fused in sarcoma (FUS) genes account for approximately one third of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases. Mutations in these genes have been found in 1 to 2% of apparently sporadic cases. We present the first case of an ALS patient carrying a de novo missense mutation of the FUS gene (c.1561C>T, p.R521C). This report highlights the importance of screening ALS patients, both familial and sporadic, for FUS mutations and also suggests that de novo mutations is a relevant mechanism underlying sporadic neurodegenerative disease. PMID:20598774

  19. [Gene mutation analysis in four Chinese patients with multiple carboxylase deficiency].

    PubMed

    Li, Duan; Liu, Li; Li, Xiu-zhen; Cheng, Jing; Zhao, Xiao-yuan; Zhou, Rong

    2006-11-01

    Multiple carboxylase deficiency (MCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder. MCD is characterized by skin rash, metabolic acidosis, vomiting and psychomotor retardation. Depending on deficiency of the enzyme, MCD includes two different forms, biotinidase deficiency (BTD, OMIM 253260) and holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency (HLCSD, OMIM 253270). In this study, we analyzed gene mutations of four Chinese MCD patients and to explore the mutation spectrum and possibility of a molecular diagnosis. All exons and their flanking introns of biotinidase gene and HLCS gene were screened by polymerase chain reaction combined with DNA direct sequencing in four Chinese MCD patients. Genomic DNA was extracted using a kit from the peripheral blood leukocytes of each patient. PCR amplification products were checked by 2% agarose gel electrophoresis and were subsequently sequenced with both the forward and reverse primers. All patients showed mutations in HLCS gene, whereas no mutation was found in biotinidase gene, proving that all the four patients had HLCS deficiency. Four previously reported mutations in HLCS gene were detected (Y456C, R508W, D634N and 780delG). A missense mutation of 1522C > T in exon 11 of HLCS gene, which was a homozygotic mutation, was identified in patient 1; a mutation of 1522C > T in exon 11 combined with a mutation of 1367A > G in exon 9, which was a compound heterozygotic mutation, was identified in patient 2; a mutation of 1522C > T in exon 11 combined with a mutation of 1900G > A in exon 13, which was a compound heterozygotic mutation, was identified in patient 3; a mutation of 1522C > T in exon 11 combined with a mutation of 780delG in exon 7, which was a compound heterozygotic mutation, was identified in patient 4. All the parents were carriers of mutations. No additional carrier of this four mutations was identified from 50 samples of Chinese controls. The 1522C > T (R508W) mutation probably represents a mutational hot-spot in Chinese HLCS deficiency

  20. [Characteristics of DUOXA2 gene mutation in children with congenital hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Tan, Min-Yi; Huang, Yong-Lan; Li, Bei; Jiang, Xiang; Chen, Qian-Yu; Jia, Xue-Fang; Tang, Cheng-Fang; Liu, Li

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of DUOXA2 gene mutation and the genotype-phenotype relationship in children with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) in Guangzhou, China. A total of 20 CH patients with suspected thyroid dyshormonogenesis who had no DUOX2 gene mutation were enrolled. These patients who were born between 2011 and 2012 were screened and diagnosed with CH in the Guangzhou Newborn Screening Center. PCR and direct sequencing were used to analyze DUOXA2 gene mutation. Among the 20 patients, 2 had p.Y246X/p.Y246X homozygous mutation; 4 had monoallelic heterozygous mutation, among whom 2 carried the known pathogenic mutation c.413-414insA, 1 carried p.Y246X, and 1 carried a novel mutation, p.G79R. Reevaluation was performed at the age of 2-3 years, and the results showed that the two patients with p.Y246X/p.Y246X homozygous mutation were manifested as transient and mild permanent CH, respectively. Among the four patients with monoallelic heterozygous mutation, the one who carried p.Y246X mutation was manifested as typical permanent CH, and the other three were manifested as transient CH. DUOXA2 gene mutation is a common molecular pathogenic basis for CH children with suspected thyroid dyshormonogenesis in Guangzhou, and most of them are manifested as transient CH. There is no association between DUOXA2 genotypes and phenotypes. The novel mutation p.G79R is probably a pathogenic mutation.

  1. Mutations and a polymorphism in the factor VIII gene discovered by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, S.; Gitschier, J. )

    1990-03-01

    Hemophilia A results from mutations in the gene coding for coagulation factor VIII. The authors gradient gel electrophoresis to screen for mutations in the region of the factor VIII gene coding for the first acidic domain. Amplification primers were designed employing the MELTMAP computer program to optimize the ability to detect mutations. Screening of amplified DNA from 228 unselected hemophilia A patients revealed two mutations and one polymorphism. Rescreening the same population by making heteroduplexes between amplified patient and control samples prior to electrophoresis revealed one additional mutation. The mutations include two missense and one 4-base-pair deletion, and each mutation was found in patients with severe hemophilia. The polymorphism, located adjacent to the adenine branch site in intron 7, is useful for genetic prediction in some cases where the Bcl I and Xba I polymorphisms are uninformative. These results suggest that DNA amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis should be an excellent strategy for identifying mutations and polymorphisms in defined regions of the factor VIII gene and other large genes.

  2. Thyroglobulin gene mutations in Chinese patients with congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuyun; Chen, Rongyu; Fu, Chunyun; Fan, Xin; Wang, Jin; Qian, Jiale; Yi, Shang; Li, Chuan; Luo, Jingsi; Su, Jiasun; Zhang, Shujie; Xie, Bobo; Zheng, Haiyang; Lai, Yunli; Chen, Yun; Li, Hongdou; Gu, Xuefan; Chen, Shaoke; Shen, Yiping

    2016-03-05

    Mutations in Thyroglobulin (TG) are common genetic causes of congenital hypothyroidism (CH). But the TG mutation spectrum and its frequency in Chinese CH patients have not been investigated. Here we conducted a genetic screening of TG gene in a cohort of 382 Chinese CH patients. We identified 22 rare non-polymorphic variants including six truncating variants and 16 missense variants of unknown significance (VUS). Seven patients carried homozygous pathogenic variants, and three patients carried homozygous or compound heterozygous VUS. 48 out of 382 patients carried one of 18 heterozygous VUS which is significantly more often than their occurrences in control cohort (P < 0.0001). Unique to Asian population, the c.274+2T>G variant is the most common pathogenic variant with an allele frequency of 0.021. The prevalence of CH due to TG gene defect in Chinese population was estimated to be approximately 1/101,000. Our study uncovered ethnicity specific TG mutation spectrum and frequency.

  3. Association of PAX2 and Other Gene Mutations with the Clinical Manifestations of Renal Coloboma Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Higashide, Tomomi; Sakurai, Mayumi; Hashimoto, Shin-ichi; Shinozaki, Yasuyuki; Hara, Akinori; Iwata, Yasunori; Sakai, Norihiko; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa; Kaneko, Shuichi; Wada, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Background Renal coloboma syndrome (RCS) is characterized by renal anomalies and optic nerve colobomas. PAX2 mutations contribute to RCS. However, approximately half of the patients with RCS have no mutation in PAX2 gene. Methods To investigate the incidence and effects of mutations of PAX2 and 25 candidate genes, patient genes were screened using next-generation sequence analysis, and candidate mutations were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. The correlation between mutations and clinical manifestation was evaluated. Result Thirty patients, including 26 patients (two families of five and two, 19 sporadic cases) with RCS, and 4 optic nerve coloboma only control cases were evaluated in the present study. Six PAX2 mutations in 21 probands [28%; two in family cohorts (n = 5 and n = 2) and in 4 out of 19 patients with sporadic disease] including four novel mutations were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. Moreover, four other sequence variants (CHD7, SALL4, KIF26B, and SIX4) were also confirmed, including a potentially pathogenic novel KIF26B mutation. Kidney function and proteinuria were more severe in patients with PAX2 mutations than in those without the mutation. Moreover, the coloboma score was significantly higher in patients with PAX2 gene mutations. Three out of five patients with PAX2 mutations had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) diagnosed from kidney biopsies. Conclusion The results of this study identify several new mutations of PAX2, and sequence variants in four additional genes, including a novel potentially pathogenic mutation in KIF26B, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of RCS. PMID:26571382

  4. Frequencies of the Common MEFV Gene Mutations in Adiyaman, Southeast Anatolia, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, DT; Atak, PG; Çelik, Ç

    2014-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by fever and serosal inflammation. The reasons for the disorder are mutations in the Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene; the most common of which are M694V, M680I, M694I and V726A. In this study, we aimed to screen these common mutations of the MEFV gene and then determine the prevalence of FMF according to these mutations in Adıyaman, Southeast Anatolia, Turkey. Seven hundred and sixty-seven healthy individuals from the region of Adıyaman participated in the study. Polymerase chain reaction-amplification refractory mutation system (PCR-ARMS) methods were used to determine the common mutations of the MEFV gene. Twenty-six (3.9%) individuals had only one mutation in the MEFV gene, 25 individuals were heterozygous and one person was homozygous for the V726A mutation (0.15%). In the present study, the V726A mutation (50.0%) was the most frequent, followed by M694V (38.5%), M680I (7.7%) and M694I (3.8%). It was seen that the carrier rate was very low and the prevalence of FMF was 0.15%, according to the common mutations of the MEFV gene in Adıyaman, Southeast Anatolia, Turkey. PMID:25937800

  5. Novel recurrently mutated genes in African American colon cancers

    PubMed Central

    Guda, Kishore; Veigl, Martina L.; Varadan, Vinay; Nosrati, Arman; Ravi, Lakshmeswari; Lutterbaugh, James; Beard, Lydia; Willson, James K. V.; Sedwick, W. David; Wang, Zhenghe John; Molyneaux, Neil; Miron, Alexander; Adams, Mark D.; Elston, Robert C.; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Willis, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    We used whole-exome and targeted sequencing to characterize somatic mutations in 103 colorectal cancers (CRC) from African Americans, identifying 20 new genes as significantly mutated in CRC. Resequencing 129 Caucasian derived CRCs confirmed a 15-gene set as a preferential target for mutations in African American CRCs. Two predominant genes, ephrin type A receptor 6 (EPHA6) and folliculin (FLCN), with mutations exclusive to African American CRCs, are by genetic and biological criteria highly likely African American CRC driver genes. These previously unsuspected differences in the mutational landscapes of CRCs arising among individuals of different ethnicities have potential to impact on broader disparities in cancer behaviors. PMID:25583493

  6. Missense mutations in MLH1, MSH2, KRAS, and APC genes in colorectal cancer patients in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Abdul Murad, Nor Azian; Othman, Zulhabri; Khalid, Melati; Abdul Razak, Zuraini; Hussain, Rosniza; Nadesan, Sukumar; Sagap, Ismail; Mohamed Rose, Isa; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Jamal, Rahman

    2012-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide with approximately 1 million cases diagnosed annually. In Malaysia, CRC is the second most common cancer in women and ranked first in men. The underlying cause of CRC remains unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the mutations in genes involved in CRC including MLH1, MSH2, KRAS, and APC genes. A total of 76 patients were recruited. We used the polymerase chain reaction-denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography for the detection of mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) and APC genes and the PCR single-strand conformation polymorphism for screening of the KRAS gene mutations. We identified 17 types of missense mutations in 38 out of 76 patients in our patients. Nine mutations were identified in the APC gene, five mutations were detected in the KRAS gene, and two mutations were identified in the MSH2 gene. Only one mutation was identified in MLH1. Out of these 17 mutations, eight mutations (47 %) were predicted to be pathogenic. Seven patients were identified with multiple mutations (3: MSH2 and KRAS, 1: KRAS and APC, 1: MLH1 and APC, 2: APC and APC). We have established the PCR-DHPLC and PCR-SSCP for screening of mutations in CRC patients. This study has given a snapshot of the spectrum of mutations in the four genes that were analyzed. Mutation screening in patients and their family members will help in the early detection of CRC and hence will reduce mortality due to CRC.

  7. Genomics screens for metastasis genes

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jinchun; Huang, Qihong

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is responsible for most cancer mortality. The process of metastasis is complex, requiring the coordinated expression and fine regulation of many genes in multiple pathways in both the tumor and host tissues. Identification and characterization of the genetic programs that regulate metastasis is critical to understanding the metastatic process and discovering molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of metastasis. Genomic approaches and functional genomic analyses can systemically discover metastasis genes. In this review, we summarize the genetic tools and methods that have been used to identify and characterize the genes that play critical roles in metastasis. PMID:22684367

  8. Absence of BRAF gene mutation in non-melanoma skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Libra, Massimo; Malaponte, Grazia; Bevelacqua, Valentina; Siciliano, Roberta; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Fulvi, Alberto; Micali, Giuseppe; Ligresti, Giovanni; Mazzarino, Maria C; Stivala, Franca; Travali, Salvatore; McCubrey, James A

    2006-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer, and its incidence is increasing. It was proposed that the RAS oncogene significantly contributes to skin cancer development. Numerous BRAF mutations have been detected in melanoma biopsy specimens and cell lines. For the first time, in the present study, tumor biopsy specimens from 78 patients with BCC were screened for BRAF mutation within exons 11 and 15. Our results indicate that the BRAF gene does not appear to be frequently mutated in nonmelanoma skin tumors such as BCC. These data suggest that other gene alterations may cause tumor development.

  9. [Hyperuricemia and gene mutations: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tattoli, Fabio; Falconi, Daniela; De Prisco, Ornella; Maurizio, Gherzi; Marazzi, Federico; Marengo, Marita; Serra, Ilaria; Tamagnone, Michela; Cordero di Montezemolo, Luca; Pasini, Barbara; Formica, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Hyperuricemia is frequently found in nephrology. The case presented may be useful to clarify some pathogenetic aspects. It is a patient of 18 years, hyperuricaemic. Non-consanguineous parents, hyperuricemia in the paternal line, not neuropsychiatric disorders in the family. Delay in neuromotor acquisitions, average intellectual disabilities, anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive personality traits. Normal renal function and renal ultrasound. Evidence of hyperuricemia in 2015. Never gouty episodes and / or lithiasis, initiated allopurinol 100 mg on alternate days, with no side effects, urea in the control range, slightly below normal uricuria. Given the complex clinical, he carried out a genetic analysis of array-CGH. He showed a deletion on the short arm of chromosome 3 (3p12.3) and a duplication of the long arm of chromosome 1 (19q13-42). The deletion 3p12.3 (paternal inheritance), involves the ROBO2 gene. Duplication 19q13.42, (maternal inheritance), includes NLRP12, DPRX, ZNF331 genes. The ROBO2 gene with its mutation, is associated with vesicoureteral reflux. The NLRP12 gene encodes proteins called "Nalps", forming a subfamily of proteins "CATERPILLAR". Many "Nalps" as well as the "Nalps 12" have an N-terminal domain (DYP) with a purin. Since uric acid is a byproduct of purine metabolism, considered the familiarity, we believe that we can hypothesize that the mutations found. In particular those concerning the NLRP-12 gene, may have a role in the presence of hyperuricemia. We believe that in patients with hyperuricemia, associated with a particular impairment of neurological picture, it is likely that there is a subtended common genetic deficiency. Copyright by Società Italiana di Nefrologia SIN, Rome, Italy.

  10. Mutation analysis of the Fanconi Anemia Gene FACC

    SciTech Connect

    Verlander, P.C.; Lin, J.D.; Udono, M.U.; Zhang, Q.; Auerbach, A.D. ); Gibson, R.A.; Mathew, C.G. )

    1994-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a unique hypersensitivity of cells to DNA cross-linking agents; a gene for complementation group C (FACC) has recently been cloned. The authors have amplified FACC exons with their flanking intron sequences from genomic DNA from 174 racially and ethnically diverse families in the International Fanconi Anemia Registry and have screened for mutations by using SSCP analysis. They have identified eight different variants in 32 families; three were detected in exon 1, one in exon 4, one in intron 4, two in exon 6, and one in exon 14. Two of the eight variants, in seven families, did not segregate with the disease allele in multiplex families, suggesting that these variants represented benign polymorphisms. Disease-associated mutations in FACC were detected in a total of 25 (14.4%) of 174 families screened. The most frequent mutations were IVS4 + 4 A [yields] T (intron 4; 12 families) and 322delG (exon 1; 9 families). Other, less common mutations include Q13X in exon 1, R185X and D195V in exon 6, and L554P in exon 14. The polymorphisms were S26F in exon 1 and G139E in exon 4. All patients in the study with 322delG, Q13X, R185X, and D195V are of northern or eastern European or southern Italian ancestry, and 18 of 19 have a mild form of the disease, while the 2 patients with L554P, both from the same family, have a severe phenotype. All 19 patients with IVS4 + 4 A [yields] T have Jewish ancestry and have a severe phenotype. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. Prostate cancer screening characteristics in men with BRCA1/2 mutations attending a high-risk prevention clinic

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Richard; Louis, Alyssa; Berlin, Alejandro; Horsburgh, Sheri; Bristow, Robert G.; Trachtenberg, John

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) era and resultant early detection of prostate cancer has presented clinicians with the challenge of distinguishing indolent from aggressive tumours. Mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes have been associated with prostate cancer risk and prognosis. We describe the prostate cancer screening characteristics of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, who may be classified as genetically-defined high risk, as compared to another high-risk cohort of men with a family history of prostate cancer to evaluate the utility of a targeted screening approach for these men. Methods: We reviewed patient demographics, clinical screening characteristics, pathological features, and treatment outcomes between a group of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers and age-matched men with a family history of prostate cancer followed at our institutional Prostate Cancer Prevention Clinic from 1995 to 2012. Results: Screening characteristics were similar between the mutation carriers (n = 53) and the family history group (n = 53). Some cancers would be missed in both groups by using a PSA cut-off of >4 ug/L. While cancer detection was higher in the family history group (21% vs. 15%), the mutation carrier group was more likely to have intermediate- or high-risk disease (88% vs. 36%). BRCA2 mutation carriers were more likely to have aggressive disease, biological recurrence, and distant metastasis. Conclusions: In our cohort, regular screening appears justified for detecting prostate cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers and other high-risk populations. Lowering PSA cut-offs and defining monitoring of PSA velocity as part of the screening protocol may be useful. BRCA2 is associated with more aggressive disease, while the outcome for BRCA1 mutation carriers requires further study. Large multinational studies will be important to define screening techniques for this unique high-risk population. PMID:25485004

  12. High frequency of additional gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with MLL partial tandem duplication: DNMT3A mutation is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, Der-Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wu, Jin-Hou; Dunn, Po; Wang, Po-Nan; Lin, Tung-Liang; Shih, Yu-Shu; Liang, Sung-Tzu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Lai, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The mutational profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with partial tandem duplication of mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL-PTD) have not been comprehensively studied. We studied 19 gene mutations for 98 patients with MLL-PTD AML to determine the mutation frequency and clinical correlations. MLL-PTD was screened by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. The mutational analyses were performed with PCR-based assays followed by direct sequencing. Gene mutations of signaling pathways occurred in 63.3% of patients, with FLT3-ITD (44.9%) and FLT3-TKD (13.3%) being the most frequent. 66% of patients had gene mutations involving epigenetic regulation, and DNMT3A (32.7%), IDH2 (18.4%), TET2 (18.4%), and IDH1 (10.2%) mutations were most common. Genes of transcription pathways and tumor suppressors accounted for 23.5% and 10.2% of patients. RUNX1 mutation occurred in 23.5% of patients, while none had NPM1 or double CEBPA mutation. 90.8% of MLL-PTD AML patients had at least one additional gene mutation. Of 55 MLL-PTD AML patients who received standard chemotherapy, age older than 50 years and DNMT3A mutation were associated with inferior outcome. In conclusion, gene mutations involving DNA methylation and activated signaling pathway were common co-existed gene mutations. DNMT3A mutation was a poor prognostic factor in MLL-PTD AML. PMID:26375248

  13. Novel mutations in the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein gene causing abetalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, K; Ishibashi, S; Osuga, J; Tozawa, R; Harada, K; Yahagi, N; Shionoiri, F; Iizuka, Y; Tamura, Y; Nagai, R; Illingworth, D R; Gotoda, T; Yamada, N

    2000-08-01

    Abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) is an inherited disease characterized by the virtual absence of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins from plasma. Only limited numbers of families have been screened for mutations in the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) gene. To clarify the genetic basis of clinical diversity of ABL, mutations of the MTP gene have been screened in 4 unrelated patients with ABL. Three novel mutations have been identified: a frameshift mutation caused by a single adenine deletion at position 1389 of the cDNA, and a missense mutation, Asn780Tyr, each in homozygous forms; and a splice site mutation, 2218-2A-->G, in a compound heterozygous form. The frameshift and splice site mutations are predicted to encode truncated forms of MTP. When transiently expressed in Cos-1 cells, the Asn780Tyr mutant MTP bound protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) but displayed negligible MTP activity. It is of interest that the patient having the Asn780Tyr mutation, a 27-year-old male, has none of the manifestations characteristic of classic ABL even though his plasma apoB and vitamin E were virtually undetectable. These results indicated that defects of the MTP gene are the proximal cause of ABL.

  14. Mutational analysis of the human MAOA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tivol, E.A.; Shalish, C.; Schuback, D.E.; Breakefield, X.O.; Hsu, Yun-Pung

    1996-02-16

    The monoamine oxidases (MAO-A and MAO-B) are the enzymes primarily responsible for the degradation of amine neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. Wide variations in activity of these isozymes have been reported in control humans. The MAOA and MAOB genes are located next to each other in the p11.3-11.4 region of the human X chromosome. Our recent documentation of an MAO-A-deficiency state, apparently associated with impulsive aggressive behavior in males, has focused attention on genetic variations in the MAOA gene. In the present study, variations in the coding sequence of the MAOA gene were evaluated by RT-PCR, SSCP, and sequencing of mRNA or genomic DNA in 40 control males with >100-fold variations in MAOA activity, as measured in cultured skin fibroblasts. Remarkable conservation of the coding sequence was found, with only 5 polymorphisms observed. All but one of these were in the third codon position and thus did not alter the deduced amino acid sequence. The one amino acid alteration observed, lys{r_arrow}arg, was neutral and should not affect the structure of the protein. This study demonstrates high conservation of coding sequence in the human MAOA gene in control males, and provides primer sets which can be used to search genomic DNA for mutations in this gene in males with neuropsychiatric conditions. 47 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Mutations and a polymorphism in the tuberin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Northup, H.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Au, K.S.; Rodriguez, E.

    1994-09-01

    Two deletions and a polymorphism have been identified in the recently described tuberin gene. The tuberin gene (designated TSC2) when mutated causes tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Fifty-three affected individuals (30 from families with multiple affected and 23 isolated cases) were screened with the tuberin cDNA for gross deletions or rearrangements. Both deletions were found in families with multiple affected members (family designations: HOU-5 and HOU-22). The approximate size of the deletion in HOU-5 is ten kilobases and eliminates a BamHI restriction site. The deletion includes a portion of the 5{prime} half of the tuberin cDNA. The deletion in HOU-22 occurs in the 3{prime} half of the gene. The deletions are being further characterized. A HindIII restriction site polymorphism was detected by a 0.5 kilobase probe from the 5{prime} coding region of the tuberin gene in an individual from a family linked to chromosome 9 (posterior probability of linkage 93%). The polymorphism did not segregate with TSC in the family. The family had previously been shown to give negative results with multiple markers on chromosome 16. The polymorphism was also seen in one individual among a panel of 20 randomly selected unaffected individuals. Thirty-five additional affected probands (five from families and 30 isolated cases) are being tested with the tuberin cDNA. Testing for subtle mutations is our panel of 80 affected probands is underway utilizing SSCP. Additional mutations or polymorphisms detected will be reported. The tuberin cDNA was a kind gift of The European Chromosome 16 Tuberous Sclerosis Consortium.

  16. Mutations in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in elderly Chinese people.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuhua; Zhao, Jiandong; Feng, Bo; Su, Yu; Kang, Dongyang; Yuan, Huijun; Zhai, Suoqiang; Dai, Pu

    2015-01-01

    Our data indicate that the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene, and particularly the A827G mutation, may be associated with susceptibility to age-related hearing loss. Hearing loss associated with aging is common among elderly persons. In all genetic backgrounds, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations may be one of the most important factors contributing to aging and age-related hearing loss. The mitochondrial 12S rRNA is a hot spot for deafness-associated mutations in Chinese populations. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the relationship of 12S rRNA gene polymorphisms and age-related hearing loss. The 12S rRNA gene polymorphisms were detected by direct sequencing. Statistical analyses were performed to assess the associations between age-related hearing loss and 12S rRNA gene variants. We report here a systematic mutational screening of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in 662 elderly subjects from the general population with various hearing threshold levels (211 controls and 451 age-related hearing loss subjects). Mutational screening of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene identified 55 nucleotide changes, including 4 mutations localized at highly conserved sites and 51 known variants. Of the known deafness-associated mutations in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene, the incidence of the A1555G mutation was 0.15%, A827G was 4.38%, T1095C was 0.45%, and T1005C was 3.78%. The incidence of the other known variants was 0.15-99.85%. We found statistically significant differences in the proportions of subjects with the A827G mutation among the various age-related hearing loss groups and normal controls.

  17. Patterns of Somatic Mutations in Immunoglobulin Variable Genes

    PubMed Central

    Golding, G. Brian; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Glickman, Barry W.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for somatic mutation in the variable genes of antibodies is unknown and may differ from previously described mechanisms that produce mutation in DNA. We have analyzed 421 somatic mutations from the rearranged immunoglobulin variable genes of mice to determine (1) if the nucleotide substitutions differ from those generated during meiosis and (2) if the presence of nearby direct and inverted repeated sequences could template mutations around the variable gene. The results reveal a difference in the pattern of substitutions obtained from somatic mutations vs. meiotic mutations. An increased frequency of T:A to C:G transitions and a decreased frequency of mutations involving a G in the somatic mutants compared to the meiotic mutants is indicated. This suggests that the mutational processes responsible for somatic mutation in antibody genes differs from that responsible for mutation during meiosis. An analysis of the local DNA sequences revealed many direct repeats and palindromic sequences that were capable of templating some of the known mutations. Although additional factors may be involved in targeting mutations to the variable gene, mistemplating by nearby repeats may provide a mechanism for the enhancement of somatic mutation. PMID:3557109

  18. RAD51, XRCC3, and XRCC2 mutation screening in Finnish breast cancer families.

    PubMed

    Pelttari, Liisa M; Kiiski, Johanna I; Ranta, Salla; Vilske, Sara; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2015-01-01

    Majority of the known breast cancer susceptibility genes have a role in DNA repair and the most important high-risk genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are specifically involved in the homologous recombination repair (HRR) of DNA double-strand breaks. A central player in HRR is RAD51 that binds DNA at the damage site. The RAD51 paralogs RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, XRCC2, and XRCC3 facilitate the binding of RAD51 to DNA. While germline mutations in RAD51C and RAD51D are associated with high ovarian cancer risk and RAD51B polymorphisms with breast cancer, the contribution of RAD51, XRCC3, and XRCC2 is more unclear. To investigate the role of RAD51, XRCC3, and XRCC2 in breast cancer predisposition and to identify putative recurrent founder mutations in the Finnish population where such mutations have been observed in most of the currently known susceptibility genes, we screened 182 familial Finnish breast or ovarian cancer patients for germline variation in the RAD51and XRCC3 genes and 342 patients for variation in XRCC2, with a subset of the patients selected on the basis of decreased RAD51 protein expression on tumors. We also performed haplotype analyses for 1516 breast cancer cases and 1234 controls to assess the common variation in these genes. No pathogenic mutations were detected in any of the genes and the distribution of haplotypes was similar between cases and controls. Our results suggest that RAD51, XRCC3, and XRCC2 do not substantially contribute to breast cancer predisposition in the Finnish population.

  19. Sequence analysis of tyrosinase gene in ocular and oculocutaneous albinism patients: introducing three novel mutations

    PubMed Central

    Khordadpoor-Deilamani, Faravareh; Karimipoor, Morteza; Javadi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Albinism is a heterogeneous genetic disorder of melanin synthesis that results in hypopigmented eyes (in patients with ocular albinism) or hair, skin, and eyes (in individuals with oculocutaneous albinism). It is associated with decreased visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus, and photophobia. The tyrosinase gene is known to be involved in both oculocutaneous albinism and autosomal recessive ocular albinism. In this study, we aimed to screen the mutations in the TYR gene in the nonsyndromic OCA and autosomal recessive ocular albinism patients from Iran. Methods The tyrosinase gene was examined in 23 unrelated patients with autosomal recessive ocular albinism or nonsyndromic OCA using DNA sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. Results TYR gene mutations were identified in 14 (app. 60%) albinism patients. Conclusions We found 10 mutations, 3 of which were novel. No mutation was found in our ocular albinism patients, but one of them was heterozygous for the p.R402Q polymorphism. PMID:26167114

  20. Sequence analysis of tyrosinase gene in ocular and oculocutaneous albinism patients: introducing three novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Khordadpoor-Deilamani, Faravareh; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; Karimipoor, Morteza; Javadi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Albinism is a heterogeneous genetic disorder of melanin synthesis that results in hypopigmented eyes (in patients with ocular albinism) or hair, skin, and eyes (in individuals with oculocutaneous albinism). It is associated with decreased visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus, and photophobia. The tyrosinase gene is known to be involved in both oculocutaneous albinism and autosomal recessive ocular albinism. In this study, we aimed to screen the mutations in the TYR gene in the nonsyndromic OCA and autosomal recessive ocular albinism patients from Iran. The tyrosinase gene was examined in 23 unrelated patients with autosomal recessive ocular albinism or nonsyndromic OCA using DNA sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. TYR gene mutations were identified in 14 (app. 60%) albinism patients. We found 10 mutations, 3 of which were novel. No mutation was found in our ocular albinism patients, but one of them was heterozygous for the p.R402Q polymorphism.

  1. Mutations in the SLURP-1 gene underlie Mal de Meleda in three Pakistani families.

    PubMed

    Wajid, Muhammad; Kurban, Mazen; Shimomura, Yutaka; Christiano, Angela M

    2009-10-01

    Mal de Meleda (MDM) (MIM #248300) is an autosomal recessive palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK). It is characterized clinically by erythematous hyperkeratotic plaques over palms and soles that start early in life and progress later in life in a transgradiens form associated with pain, macerations, foul odor, pseudoainhum, brachydactyly, onychodystrophy and perioral erythema. To look for SLURP-1 gene mutations in patients with MDM. We collected peripheral blood samples from Pakistani family members affected with MDM and 100 population-matched unrelated healthy control individuals in EDTA-containing tubes. All exons of the SLURP-1 gene with adjacent sequences at exon-intron borders were amplified. The amplified PCR products were directly sequenced in an ABI Prism 310 Automated Sequencer. Screening assay, using the restriction enzyme HphI was performed. We determined three mutations in the SLURP-1 gene: one novel mutation, c.Ivs1+1G>A, and two recurrent mutations, p.R96X and p.G86R. Screening assays for the novel mutation excluded the possibility of polymorphism. In vivo transcription assays showed that the mutation c.Ivs1+1G>A leads to aberrant splicing events. Our results expand the spectrum of mutations in SLURP-1 gene.

  2. Update on Novel CCM Gene Mutations in Patients with Cerebral Cavernous Malformations.

    PubMed

    Scimone, Concetta; Bramanti, Placido; Alafaci, Concetta; Granata, Francesca; Piva, Francesco; Rinaldi, Carmela; Donato, Luigi; Greco, Federica; Sidoti, Antonina; D'Angelo, Rosalia

    2017-02-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are lesions affecting brain microvessels. The pathogenesis is not clearly understood. Conventional classification criterion is based on genetics, and thus, familial and sporadic forms can be distinguished; however, classification of sporadic cases with multiple lesions still remains uncertain. To date, three CCM causative genes have been identified: CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607 and CCM3/PDCD10. In our previous mutation screening, performed in a cohort of 95 Italian patients, with both sporadic and familial cases, we identified several mutations in CCM genes. This study represents further molecular screening in a cohort of 19 Italian patients enrolled by us in the few last years and classified into familial, sporadic and sporadic with multiple lesions cases. Direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis were performed to detect point mutations and large genomic rearrangements, respectively. Effects of detected mutations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were evaluated by an in silico approach and by western blot analysis. A novel nonsense mutation in CCM1 and a novel missense mutation in CCM2 were detected; moreover, several CCM2 gene polymorphisms in sporadic CCM patients were reported. We believe that these data enrich the mutation spectrum of CCM genes, which is useful for genetic counselling to identify both familial and sporadic CCM cases, as early as possible.

  3. Succinate dehydrogenase gene mutations in cardiac paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Victoria L; Emaminia, Abbas; del Rivero, Jaydira; Lechan, Ronald M; Magoon, Bindiya T; Galia, Analyza; Fojo, Tito; Leung, Steve; Lorusso, Roberto; Jimenez, Camilo; Shulkin, Barry L; Audibert, Jennifer L; Adams, Karen T; Rosing, Douglas R; Vaidya, Anand; Dluhy, Robert G; Horvath, Keith A; Pacak, Karel

    2015-06-15

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are chromaffin cell tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells. At least 1/3 of paragangliomas are related to germline mutations in 1 of 17 genes. Although these tumors can occur throughout the body, cardiac paragangliomas are very rare, accounting for <0.3% of mediastinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with cardiac paragangliomas, particularly focusing on their genetic backgrounds. A retrospective chart analysis of 15 patients with cardiac paragangliomas was performed to determine clinical presentation, genetic background, diagnostic workup, and outcomes. The average age at diagnosis was 41.9 years. Typical symptoms of paraganglioma (e.g., hypertension, sweating, palpitations, headache) were reported at initial presentation in 13 patients (86.7%); the remaining 2, as well as 4 symptomatic patients, initially presented with cardiac-specific symptoms (e.g., chest pain, dyspnea). Genetic testing was done in 13 patients (86.7%); 10 (76.9%) were positive for mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) subunits B, C, or D. Thirteen patients (86.7%) underwent surgery to remove the paraganglioma with no intraoperative morbidity or mortality; 1 additional patient underwent surgical resection but experienced intraoperative complications after removal of the tumor due to co-morbidities and did not survive. SDHx mutations are known to be associated with mediastinal locations and malignant behavior of paragangliomas. In this report, the investigators extend the locations of predominantly SDHx-related paragangliomas to cardiac tumors. In conclusion, cardiac paragangliomas are frequently associated with underlying SDHx germline mutations, suggesting a need for genetic testing of all patients with this rare tumor. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Succinate Dehydrogenase Gene Mutations in Cardiac Paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Martucci, Victoria L.; Emaminia, Abbas; del Rivero, Jaydira; Lechan, Ronald M.; Magoon, Bindiya T.; Galia, Analyza; Fojo, Tito; Leung, Steve; Lorusso, Roberto; Jimenez, Camilo; Shulkin, Barry L.; Audibert, Jennifer L.; Adams, Karen T.; Rosing, Douglas R.; Vaidya, Anand; Dluhy, Robert G.; Horvath, Keith A.; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are chromaffin cell tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells. At least one third of paragangliomas are related to germline mutations in one of 17 genes. While these tumors can occur throughout the body, cardiac paragangliomas are very rare, accounting for less than 0.3% of mediastinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with cardiac paragangliomas, particularly focusing on their genetic backgrounds. A retrospective chart analysis of fifteen patients with cardiac paraganglioma was performed to determine clinical presentation, genetic background, diagnostic work-up, and outcomes. The average age at diagnosis was 41.9 years. Typical symptoms of paraganglioma (e.g., hypertension, sweating, palpitations, headache) were reported at initial presentation in 13 patients (86.7%); the remaining 2, as well as 4 symptomatic patients, initially presented with cardiac-specific symptoms (e.g., chest pain, dyspnea). Genetic testing was done in 13 cases (86.7%); 10 (76.9%) were positive for mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) subunits B, C, or D. Thirteen cases (86.7%) underwent surgery to remove the paraganglioma with no intraoperative morbidity or mortality; one additional patient underwent surgical resection but experienced intraoperative complications after removal of the tumor due to comorbities and did not survive. SDHx mutations are known to be associated with mediastinal locations and malignant behavior of paragangliomas. In this report, we extend the locations of predominantly SDHx-related paragangliomas to cardiac tumors. In conclusion, cardiac paragangliomas are frequently associated with underlying SDHx germline mutations, suggesting a need for genetic testing of all patients with this rare tumor. PMID:25896150

  5. Expanding the Mutation Spectrum Affecting αIIbβ3 Integrin in Glanzmann Thrombasthenia: Screening of the ITGA2B and ITGB3 Genes in a Large International Cohort.

    PubMed

    Nurden, Alan T; Pillois, Xavier; Fiore, Mathieu; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Bonduel, Mariana; Dreyfus, Marie; Goudemand, Jenny; Gruel, Yves; Benabdallah-Guerida, Schéhérazade; Latger-Cannard, Véronique; Négrier, Claude; Nugent, Diane; Oiron, Roseline D; Rand, Margaret L; Sié, Pierre; Trossaert, Marc; Alberio, Lorenzo; Martins, Nathalie; Sirvain-Trukniewicz, Peggy; Couloux, Arnaud; Canault, Mathias; Fronthroth, Juan Pablo; Fretigny, Mathilde; Nurden, Paquita; Heilig, Roland; Vinciguerra, Christine

    2015-05-01

    We report the largest international study on Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT), an inherited bleeding disorder where defects of the ITGA2B and ITGB3 genes cause quantitative or qualitative defects of the αIIbβ3 integrin, a key mediator of platelet aggregation. Sequencing of the coding regions and splice sites of both genes in members of 76 affected families identified 78 genetic variants (55 novel) suspected to cause GT. Four large deletions or duplications were found by quantitative real-time PCR. Families with mutations in either gene were indistinguishable in terms of bleeding severity that varied even among siblings. Families were grouped into type I and the rarer type II or variant forms with residual αIIbβ3 expression. Variant forms helped identify genes encoding proteins mediating integrin activation. Splicing defects and stop codons were common for both ITGA2B and ITGB3 and essentially led to a reduced or absent αIIbβ3 expression; included was a heterozygous c.1440-13_c.1440-1del in intron 14 of ITGA2B causing exon skipping in seven unrelated families. Molecular modeling revealed how many missense mutations induced subtle changes in αIIb and β3 domain structure across both subunits, thereby interfering with integrin maturation and/or function. Our study extends knowledge of GT and the pathophysiology of an integrin. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  6. Screening for VHL

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduce the most harmful consequences of this gene mutation. It is important to diagnose and begin screening ... to determine if a child has a VHL mutation and needs to follow the recommended screening. The ...

  7. Mutational analysis for biotinidase deficiency of a Greek patients' cohort ascertained through expanded newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Thodi, Georgia; Molou, Elina; Georgiou, Vassiliki; Loukas, Yannis L; Dotsikas, Yannis; Biti, Sofia; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos; Konstantinou, Dimitris; Antoniadi, Marina; Doulgerakis, Emmanuel

    2011-12-01

    Late-onset multiple carboxylase deficiency, also known as biotinidase (BTD) deficiency, is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder of biotin metabolism. Its early diagnosis and treatment seems that it can even fully prevent its various clinical manifestations. Mutations in the BTD gene scattered throughout its coding region have been detected in patients ascertained either through newborn screening or clinically. From March 2010 up to June 2011, 18 954 Greek neonates were subjected to biochemical determination of BTD activity through a semiquantitative fluoroimmunoassay. Subsequently, the first cohort of our 'suspected' samples was further tested for the presence of aberrations associated either with partial or profound BTD deficiency through sequencing of the coding region of the BTD gene, including splice-site junctions. On the basis of the molecular data derived from the study of our first cohort of 'suspected' samples, a panel of four mutations, most frequently encountered in the Greek population, was created, and a rapid, reliable and cost-effective real-time-based genotyping assay for the detection of these mutations was developed. This is the first report about the BTD mutational spectrum in Greece, and it could be a beneficial utility in the differential clinical diagnosis of BTD deficiency.

  8. TILLING by sequencing to identify induced mutations in stress resistance genes of peanut (Arachis hypogaea).

    PubMed

    Guo, Yufang; Abernathy, Brian; Zeng, Yajuan; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2015-03-07

    Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING) is a powerful reverse genetics approach for functional genomics studies. We used high-throughput sequencing, combined with a two-dimensional pooling strategy, with either minimum read percentage with non-reference nucleotide or minimum variance multiplier as mutation prediction parameters, to detect genes related to abiotic and biotic stress resistances. In peanut, lipoxygenase genes were reported to be highly induced in mature seeds infected with Aspergillus spp., indicating their importance in plant-fungus interactions. Recent studies showed that phospholipase D (PLD) expression was elevated more quickly in drought sensitive lines than in drought tolerant lines of peanut. A newly discovered lipoxygenase (LOX) gene in peanut, along with two peanut PLD genes from previous publications were selected for TILLING. Additionally, two major allergen genes Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, and fatty acid desaturase AhFAD2, a gene which controls the ratio of oleic to linoleic acid in the seed, were also used in our study. The objectives of this research were to develop a suitable TILLING by sequencing method for this allotetraploid, and use this method to identify mutations induced in stress related genes. We screened a peanut root cDNA library and identified three candidate LOX genes. The gene AhLOX7 was selected for TILLING due to its high expression in seeds and roots. By screening 768 M2 lines from the TILLING population, four missense mutations were identified for AhLOX7, three missense mutations were identified for AhPLD, one missense and two silent mutations were identified for Ara h 1.01, three silent and five missense mutations were identified for Ara h 1.02, one missense mutation was identified for AhFAD2B, and one silent mutation was identified for Ara h 2.02. The overall mutation frequency was 1 SNP/1,066 kb. The SNP detection frequency for single copy genes was 1 SNP/344 kb and 1 SNP/3,028 kb for multiple copy genes. Our

  9. Mutations in SOX9, the gene responsible for campomelic dysplasia and autosomal sex reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.; Weller, P.A.; Guioli, S.

    1995-11-01

    Campomelic dysplasia (CD) is a skeletal malformation syndrome frequently accompanied by 46,XY sex reversal. A mutation-screening strategy using SSCP was employed to identify mutations in SOX9, the chromosome 17q24 gene responsible for CD and autosomal sex reversal in man. We have screened seven CD patients with no cytologically detectable chromosomal aberrations and two CD patients with chromosome 17 rearrangements for mutations in the entire open reading frame of SOX9. Five different mutations have been identified in six CD patients: two missense mutations in the SOX9 putative DNA binding domain (high mobility group, or HMG, box); three frameshift mutations and a splice-acceptor mutation. An identical frameshift mutation is found in two unrelated 46,XY patients, one exhibiting a male phenotype and the other displaying a female phenotype (XY sex reversal). All mutations found affect a single allele, which is consistent with a dominant mode of inheritance. No mutations were found in the SOX9 open reading frame of two patients with chromosome 17q rearrangements, suggesting that the translocations affect SOX9 expression. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that CD results from haploinsufficiency of SOX9. 27 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Identification of two point mutations and a one base deletion in exon 19 of the dystrophin gene by heteroduplex formation.

    PubMed

    Prior, T W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Burghes, A H; Sedra, M S; Western, L M; Bartello, C; Mendell, J R

    1993-03-01

    Two thirds of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy population have either gene deletions or duplications. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of point mutations or small deletions and duplications that cannot be easily identified by current strategies. The major obstacle in identifying small mutations is due to the large size of the dystrophin gene. We selectively screened 5 DMD exons containing CpG dinucleotides in 110 DMD patients without detectable deletions or duplications. Nonsenses mutations are frequently due to a C- to -T transition within a CG dinucleotide pair. To screen for the nonsense mutations, we used the heteroduplex method. Utilizing this approach, we identified 2 different nonsense mutations and a single base deletion all occurring in exon 19. This is the first report of a clustering of small mutations in the dystrophin gene.

  11. Paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia is associated with mutations in the PRRT2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Rong; Huang, Dan; Wang, Jie; Wang, Yi-Fan; Sun, Hui; Tang, Bin; Li, Wen; Lai, Jin-Xing; He, Na; Wu, Mei; Su, Tao; Meng, Heng; Shi, Yi-Wu; Li, Bing-Mei; Tang, Bei-Sha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the potential causative genes of paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia (PHD), which was initially considered a subtype of paroxysmal dyskinesia and has been recently considered a form of nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE). Methods: Eleven patients with PHD were recruited. Mutations in proline-rich region transmembrane protein-2 (PRRT2), myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1), solute carrier family 2, member 1 (SLC2A1), calcium-activated potassium channel alpha subunit (KCNMA1), cholinergic receptor, nicotinic, alpha 4 (CHRNA4), cholinergic receptor, nicotinic, beta 2 (CHRNB2), cholinergic receptor, nicotinic, alpha 2 (CHRNA2), and potassium channel subfamily T member 1 (KCNT1) were screened by direct sequencing. Results: Two PRRT2 mutations were identified in patients with typical PHD. A mutation of c.649dupC (p.Arg217ProfsX8) was identified in a patient with PHD and his father who was diagnosed with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia. An additional mutation of c.640G>C (p.Ala214Pro) was identified in a sporadic patient and his asymptomatic mother. No mutations were found in the other screened genes. Conclusions: The present study identified PRRT2 mutations in PHD, extending the phenotypic spectrum of PRRT2 and supporting the classification of PHD as a subtype of paroxysmal dyskinesia but not NFLE. Based on the results of this study, screening for the PRRT2 mutation is recommended in patients with PHD. PMID:27123484

  12. Restriction endonuclease fingerprinting by SSCP (REF), an efficient method of screening for mutations in long contiguous segments of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, O.; Sommer, S.S.

    1994-09-01

    Dideoxy fingerprinting is an efficient method of screening for the presence of mutations in short exons ({le}250 bp). Long contiguous segments can be screened by sequential ddF reactions. To screen long contiguous segments in a more rapid manner, REF has been developed. REF will be described in the context of a model system in exon H of the factor IX gene. A 1 kb segment is PCR amplified and digested with each of five groups of restriction endonucleases. The endonucleases are chosen such that, in each group, the average size of the fragments is about 150 bp. After digestion, the products are mixed, 5{prime} end-labeled with T4 polynucleotide kinase, boiled, and electrophoresed under nondenaturing conditions. Each lane screens 1 kb and contains 70 segments (7 fragments per digestion x 5 digestions x 2 strands). The matrices tested were 5.6% polyacrylamide (PA) and 7.5% GeneAmp{sup {trademark}} (GA) at temperatures of either 23{degrees}C (RT) or 8{degrees}C (LT). Point mutations resulted in the gain or loss of a restriction site in 21% of 24 test mutations. In addition, mutations could be detected if any of 5 restriction fragments with the same mutation (producing 10 denatured segments) displayed abnormal mobility (SSCP component). The average sensitivity per segment of the SSCP component for the 24 point mutations ranged from 49% for PA at RT to 68% with GA at LT. REF detected 96% of the mutations with PA at RT and 100% with GA at RT or LT. These latter two conditions detected 100% of a subsequent blinded sample that contained normal controls and 27 different mutations. A blinded analysis is in progress to determine the sensitivity of REF when the segment size is 2 kb.

  13. Two novel mutations in the PPIB gene cause a rare pedigree of osteogenesis imperfecta type IX.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Pan, Jingxin; Guo, Dongwei; Zhang, Wei; Xie, Jie; Fang, Zishui; Guo, Chunmiao; Fang, Qun; Jiang, Weiying; Guo, Yibin

    2017-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare genetic skeletal disorder characterized by increased bone fragility and vulnerability to fractures. PPIB is identified as a candidate gene for OI-IX, here we detect two pathogenic mutations in PPIB and analyze the genotype-phenotype correlation in a Chinese family with OI. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to screen the whole exome of the parents of proband. Screening of variation frequency, evolutionary conservation comparisons, pathogenicity evaluation, and protein structure prediction were conducted to assess the pathogenicity of the novel mutations. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm the candidate variants. RTQ-PCR was used to analyze the PPIB gene expression. All mutant genes screened out by NGS were excluded except PPIB. Two novel heterozygous PPIB mutations (father, c.25A>G; mother, c.509G>A) were identified in relation to osteogenesis imperfecta type IX. Both mutations were predicted to be pathogenic by bioinformatics analysis and RTQ-PCR analysis revealed downregulated PPIB expression in the two carriers. We report a rare pedigree with an autosomal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta type IX (OI-IX) caused by two novel PPIB mutations identified for the first time in China. The current study expands our knowledge of PPIB mutations and their associated phenotypes, and provides new information on the genetic defects associated with this disease for clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mutations affecting the development of the peripheral nervous system in Drosophila: a molecular screen for novel proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Prokopenko, S N; He, Y; Lu, Y; Bellen, H J

    2000-01-01

    In our quest for novel genes required for the development of the embryonic peripheral nervous system (PNS), we have performed three genetic screens using MAb 22C10 as a marker of terminally differentiated neurons. A total of 66 essential genes required for normal PNS development were identified, including 49 novel genes. To obtain information about the molecular nature of these genes, we decided to complement our genetic screens with a molecular screen. From transposon-tagged mutations identified on the basis of their phenotype in the PNS we selected 31 P-element strains representing 26 complementation groups on the second and third chromosomes to clone and sequence the corresponding genes. We used plasmid rescue to isolate and sequence 51 genomic fragments flanking the sites of these P-element insertions. Database searches using sequences derived from the ends of plasmid rescues allowed us to assign genes to one of four classes: (1) previously characterized genes (11), (2) first mutations in cloned genes (1), (3) P-element insertions in genes that were identified, but not characterized molecularly (1), and (4) novel genes (13). Here, we report the cloning, sequence, Northern analysis, and the embryonic expression pattern of candidate cDNAs for 10 genes: astray, chrowded, dalmatian, gluon, hoi-polloi, melted, pebble, skittles, sticky ch1, and vegetable. This study allows us to draw conclusions about the identity of proteins required for the development of the nervous system in Drosophila and provides an example of a molecular approach to characterize en masse transposon-tagged mutations identified in genetic screens. PMID:11102367

  15. Mutations affecting the development of the peripheral nervous system in Drosophila: a molecular screen for novel proteins.

    PubMed

    Prokopenko, S N; He, Y; Lu, Y; Bellen, H J

    2000-12-01

    In our quest for novel genes required for the development of the embryonic peripheral nervous system (PNS), we have performed three genetic screens using MAb 22C10 as a marker of terminally differentiated neurons. A total of 66 essential genes required for normal PNS development were identified, including 49 novel genes. To obtain information about the molecular nature of these genes, we decided to complement our genetic screens with a molecular screen. From transposon-tagged mutations identified on the basis of their phenotype in the PNS we selected 31 P-element strains representing 26 complementation groups on the second and third chromosomes to clone and sequence the corresponding genes. We used plasmid rescue to isolate and sequence 51 genomic fragments flanking the sites of these P-element insertions. Database searches using sequences derived from the ends of plasmid rescues allowed us to assign genes to one of four classes: (1) previously characterized genes (11), (2) first mutations in cloned genes (1), (3) P-element insertions in genes that were identified, but not characterized molecularly (1), and (4) novel genes (13). Here, we report the cloning, sequence, Northern analysis, and the embryonic expression pattern of candidate cDNAs for 10 genes: astray, chrowded, dalmatian, gluon, hoi-polloi, melted, pebble, skittles, sticky ch1, and vegetable. This study allows us to draw conclusions about the identity of proteins required for the development of the nervous system in Drosophila and provides an example of a molecular approach to characterize en masse transposon-tagged mutations identified in genetic screens.

  16. A novel nonsense mutation in rhodopsin gene in two Indonesian families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Kartasasmita, Arief; Fujiki, Keiko; Iskandar, Erwin; Sovani, Iwan; Fujimaki, Takuro; Murakami, Akira

    2011-03-01

    To report a novel, identical nonsense mutation in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene in two Indonesian families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). Mutation screening for the RHO gene was performed in 38 unrelated patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) by direct sequencing. Clinical features were also characterized, through complete ophthalmologic examination. Family members of RP patients testing positive for the RHO gene were subjected to genetic and clinical examination. To assess the founder effect in the two families, haplotype analysis also was performed. A novel homozygous nonsense mutation was detected in two patients by a G to A transition at nucleotide position 482 in exon 2 of the RHO gene, resulting in substitution of a tryptophan-to-stop at codon 161 (c.482G>A, p.W161X). Examination of family members of these 2 patients showed that the affected members were homozygous and unaffected carriers were heterozygous for the p.W161X mutation. Haplotype analysis revealed that members of the two families carried the same disease-associated variants in markers (IVS1 RHO and D3S2322). No p.W161X mutations were detected in 45 normal Indonesian subjects, nor were any mutations detected in exons 1-5 of the RHO gene in the remaining 36 RP patients. We detected a novel, recessive nonsense mutation (p.W161X) in the RHO gene of two families through mutation screening of RHO in 38 Indonesian RP patients. Haplotype analysis suggested that p.W161X was the founder mutation.

  17. Parkinson disease (PARK) genes are somatically mutated in cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Yardena; Azizi, Esther; Qutob, Nouar; Inzelberg, Lilah; Domany, Eytan; Schechtman, Edna; Friedman, Eitan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether Parkinson disease (PD) genes are somatically mutated in cutaneous melanoma (CM) tissue, because CM occurs in patients with PD at higher rates than in the general population and PD is more common than expected in CM cohorts. Methods: We cross-referenced somatic mutations in metastatic CM detected by whole-exome sequencing with the 15 known PD (PARK) genes. We computed the empirical distribution of the sum of mutations in each gene (Smut) and of the number of tissue samples in which a given gene was mutated at least once (SSampl) for each of the analyzable genes, determined the 90th and 95th percentiles of the empirical distributions of these sums, and verified the location of PARK genes in these distributions. Identical analyses were applied to adenocarcinoma of lung (ADENOCA-LUNG) and squamous cell carcinoma of lung (SQUAMCA-LUNG). We also analyzed the distribution of the number of mutated PARK genes in CM samples vs the 2 lung cancers. Results: Somatic CM mutation analysis (n = 246) detected 315,914 mutations in 18,758 genes. Somatic CM mutations were found in 14 of 15 PARK genes. Forty-eight percent of CM samples carried ≥1 PARK mutation and 25% carried multiple PARK mutations. PARK8 mutations occurred above the 95th percentile of the empirical distribution for SMut and SSampl. Significantly more CM samples harbored multiple PARK gene mutations compared with SQUAMCA-LUNG (p = 0.0026) and with ADENOCA-LUNG (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The overrepresentation of somatic PARK mutations in CM suggests shared dysregulated pathways for CM and PD. PMID:27123489

  18. PSEN1 and PRNP gene mutations: co-occurrence makes onset very early in a family with FTD phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Livia; Anfossi, Maria; Gallo, Maura; Geracitano, Silvana; Cola, Rosanna; Puccio, Gianfranco; Curcio, Sabrina A M; Frangipane, Francesca; Mirabelli, Maria; Clodomiro, Alessandra; Di Lorenzo, Raffaele; Smirne, Nicoletta; Maletta, Raffaele; Iapaolo, David; Bruni, Amalia C

    2011-01-01

    Prion protein (PRNP) gene mutations have recently been associated with clinical pictures resembling Frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We describe a novel seven extra-repeat insertional mutation in the PRNP gene in a family affected by early-onset autosomal dominant FTD previously reported as caused by a PSEN1 mutation in which there was inconsistency between clinical picture and genotype. Both mutations were pathogenic and showed a variable penetrance when present separately; when occurring together, the onset was very early, within the third decade of life. Genetic screening of the PRNP gene becomes of major importance in early onset autosomal dominant dementia.

  19. Mutational Screening and Prenatal Diagnosis in Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dave, Usha; Shetty, Dhanlaxmi

    2014-02-01

    Phenotypic variability and the lack of a diagnostic marker have complicated the rapid diagnosis and genetic counseling for Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS). The clinical features of CdLS are striking and easily recognizable by characteristic facial dysmorphism, upper-extremity malformations, hirsutism, cardiac defects, growth and cognitive retardation, and gastrointestinal abnormalities with severe mental retardation. The molecular diagnosis is essential for predicting prognosis and genetic counseling in the affected family, especially while planning the next pregnancy. We report here from India six cases of CdLS and how precise mutational screening in two cases helped in prenatal diagnosis and proved significant in prevention of recurrence in the affected family.

  20. A rapid and effective method for screening, sequencing and reporter verification of engineered frameshift mutations in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Steele, Shelby L; Razaghi, Babak; Berman, Jason N

    2017-06-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas-based adaptive immunity against pathogens in bacteria has been adapted for genome editing and applied in zebrafish (Danio rerio) to generate frameshift mutations in protein-coding genes. Although there are methods to detect, quantify and sequence CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations, identifying mutations in F1 heterozygous fish remains challenging. Additionally, sequencing a mutation and assuming that it causes a frameshift does not prove causality because of possible alternative translation start sites and potential effects of mutations on splicing. This problem is compounded by the relatively few antibodies available for zebrafish proteins, limiting validation at the protein level. To address these issues, we developed a detailed protocol to screen F1 mutation carriers, and clone and sequence identified mutations. In order to verify that mutations actually cause frameshifts, we created a fluorescent reporter system that can detect frameshift efficiency based on the cloning of wild-type and mutant cDNA fragments and their expression levels. As proof of principle, we applied this strategy to three CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations in pycr1a, chd7 and hace1 genes. An insertion of seven nucleotides in pycr1a resulted in the first reported observation of exon skipping by CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations in zebrafish. However, of these three mutant genes, the fluorescent reporter revealed effective frameshifting exclusively in the case of a two-nucleotide deletion in chd7, suggesting activity of alternative translation sites in the other two mutants even though pycr1a exon-skipping deletion is likely to be deleterious. This article provides a protocol for characterizing frameshift mutations in zebrafish, and highlights the importance of checking mutations at the mRNA level and verifying their effects on translation by fluorescent reporters when antibody detection of protein loss is not possible. © 2017. Published by

  1. Detection of a novel mutation in exon 20 of the BRCA1 gene.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Abhijit; Katarkar, Atul; Chaudhuri, Keya; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis; Basak, Jayasri

    2013-12-01

    Hereditary breast cancer constitutes 5-10% of all breast cancer cases. Inherited mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumor-suppressor genes account for the majority of hereditary breast cancer cases. The BRCA1 C-terminal region (BRCT) has a functional duplicated globular domain, which helps with DNA damage repair and cell cycle checkpoint protein control. More than 100 distinct BRCA1 missense variants with structural and functional effects have been documented within the BRCT domain. Interpreting the results of mutation screening of tumor-suppressor genes that can have high-risk susceptibility mutations is increasingly important in clinical practice. This study includes a novel mutation, p.His1746 Pro (c.5237A>C), which was found in BRCA1 exon 20 of a breast cancer patient. In silico analysis suggests that this mutation could alter the stability and orientation of the BRCT domain and the differential binding of the BACH1 substrate.

  2. Characterization of six mutations in Exon 37 of neurofibromatosis type 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, M.; Osborn, M.; Maynard, J.; Harper, P.

    1996-07-26

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common inherited disorders, with an incidence of 1 in 3,000. We screened a total of 320 unrelated NF1 patients for mutations in exon 37 of the NF1 gene. Six independent mutations were identified, of which three are novel, and these include a recurrent nonsense mutation identified in 2 unrelated patients at codon 2281 (G2281X), a 1-bp insertion (6791 ins A) resulting in a change of TAG (tyrosine) to a TAA (stop codon), and a 3-bp deletion (6839 del TAC) which generated a frameshift. Another recurrent nonsense mutation, Y2264X, which was detected in 2 unrelated patients in this study, was also previously reported in 2 NF1 individuals. All the mutations were identified within a contiguous 49-bp sequence. Further studies are warranted to support the notion that this region of the gene contains highly mutable sequences. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Screening for Multiple Genes Influencing Dyslexia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Shelley D.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examines the "sib pair" method of linkage analysis designed to locate genes influencing dyslexia, which has several advantages over the "LOD" score method. Notes that the sib pair analysis was able to detect the same linkages as the LOD method, plus a possible third region. Confirms that the sib pair method is an effective means of screening. (RS)

  4. PCR-based screening for cystic fibrosis carrier mutations in an ethnically diverse pregnant population.

    PubMed Central

    Grody, W W; Dunkel-Schetter, C; Tatsugawa, Z H; Fox, M A; Fang, C Y; Cantor, R M; Novak, J M; Bass, H N; Crandall, B F

    1997-01-01

    As the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in North America, cystic fibrosis (CF) is an obvious candidate for general population carrier screening. Although the identification of the causative gene has made detection of asymptomatic carriers possible, the extreme heterogeneity of its mutations has limited the sensitivity of the available DNA screening tests and has called into question their utility when they are applied to patients with no family history of the disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the technical feasibility, patient acceptance and understanding, and psychosocial impact of large-scale CF carrier screening in an ethnically diverse pregnant population. A total of 4,739 pregnant women attending prenatal clinics located in both an academic medical center and a large HMO were invited in person to participate. Of this group, 3,543 received CF instruction and assessments of knowledge and mood, and 3,192 underwent DNA testing for the six most common CF mutations, by means of a noninvasive PCR-based reverse-dot-blot method. Overall participation rates (ranging from 53% at the HMO to 77% at the academic center) and consent rates for DNA testing after CF instruction (>98%) exceeded those of most other American studies. The PCR-based screening method worked efficiently on large numbers of samples, and 55 carriers and one at-risk couple were identified. Understanding of residual risk, anxiety levels, and overall satisfaction with the program were acceptable across all ethnic groups. Our strategy of approaching a motivated pregnant population in person with a rapid and noninvasive testing method may provide a practical model for developing a larger CF screening program targeting appropriate high-risk groups at the national level, and may also serve as a paradigm for population-based screening of other genetically heterogeneous disorders in the future. Images Figure 1 PMID:9106541

  5. Mutational analysis of the GLA gene in Mexican families with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Amavizca, Bianca Ethel; Gal, Andreas; Ortíz-Orozco, Rocío; Orth, Ulrich; Prado Montes De Oca, Ernesto; Gutiérrez-Amavizca, Jaime Paul; Figuera, Luis E

    2017-03-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder, which develops due to a deficiency in the hydrolytic enzyme, α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A). Alpha-Gal A hydrolyzes glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), and an α-Gal A deficiency leads to Gb3 accumulation in tissues and cells in the body. This pathology is likely to involve multiple systems, but it is generally considered to affect primarily vascular endothelium. In this study, we investigated mutations in the GLA gene, which encodes α-Gal A, in Mexican families with FD. We included seven probands with FD that carried known mutations. We analysed pedigrees of the probands, and performed molecular screening in 65 relatives with the potential of carrying a GLA mutation. Five mutations (P40S, IVS4(+4), G328V, R363H, R404del) were detected in seven unrelated Mexican families with the classic FD phenotype. Of the 65 relatives examined, 42 (64.6%) had a GLA gene mutation. In summary, among seven Mexican probands with FD, 65 relatives were at risk of carrying a known GLA mutation, and molecular screening identified 42 individuals with the mutation. Thus, our findings showed that it is important to perform molecular analysis in families with FD to detect mutations and to provide accurate diagnoses for individuals that could be affected.

  6. Mutation analysis of the ferritin L-chain gene in age-related cataract

    PubMed Central

    Assia, Nurit; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Rechavi, Gideon; Amariglio, Ninette

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether acquired somatic mutations in the iron response element of the ferritin L-chain gene account for the age-related cataract. Methods The 15 most prevalent point mutations causing hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome (HHCS) were screened in patients with age-related cataract using MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry. DNA samples were obtained from the lens capsules of patients following cataract surgery, and subjected to PCR amplification. Products were analyzed by a Sequenom® mass spectrometer, and classified as a mutation or wild type according to molecular weight. For a positive control, L-ferritin G32T mutation detected by direct sequencing in 3 members of an Israeli family known to be affected by HHCS was used. Results DNA samples were isolated from the lens capsules of 90 patients, mean age 73.86, and screened for L-ferritin mutations. While the G32T mutation was detected in all 3 positive control cases, all other patients were negative for the 15 mutations. Conclusions Somatic mutations in the iron response elements (IRE) of the L-ferritin gene are infrequent in the age-related cataract. The role of L-ferritin genetic variations in the pathogenesis of age-related cataract is yet to be explored. PMID:21139976

  7. The mutational spectrum of the NF1 gene in neurofibromatosis type I patients from UAE.

    PubMed

    Ben-Salem, Salma; Al-Shamsi, Aisha M; Ali, Bassam R; Al-Gazali, Lihadh

    2014-07-01

    Germline heterozygous mutations in the tumor suppresser NF1 gene cause a cancer predisposition syndrome known as neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). This disease is one of the most common multisystem disorders with an estimated incidence of 1 in 3,000 to 1 in 4,000 births. Clinically, NF1 patients are prone to develop "café au lait" spots, neurofibromas, Lisch nodules, freckling of the axillary, or inguinal region and optic nerve gliomas. In the present study, we report clinical and molecular findings of five unrelated patients and seven cases from four families with NF1 from UAE. To reveal the genetic defects underlying NF1 in our cohort of patients, we screened the whole coding and splice site regions of the NF1 gene. In addition, MLPA or CGH array has been used to screen for structural variations including deletions, indels, and complex rearrangements. This resulted in the identification of five distinct novel mutations and two previously reported ones. These variations included three missense and one nonsense mutations, one single base, one dinucleotide, and one large deletion. Four mutations were inherited, and the remaining were absent from both parents and therefore are "de novo" mutations. This analysis represents the spectrum of NF1 mutations in UAE and supports the premise of absence of hotspot mutations in the NF1 gene. Moreover, no obvious genotype-phenotype correlations were observed in our patients.

  8. Does congenital cytomegalovirus infection lead to hearing loss by inducing mutation of the GJB2 gene?

    PubMed

    Li, Lu-Quan; Tan, Jun-Jie; Zhou, Yuan; Yu, Jia-Lin

    2013-08-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and mutation of the gap junction β-2 (GJB2) gene are important causes of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). This study aims to determine if congenital CMV infection leads to deafness by inducing GJB2 mutation. GJB2 gene sequencing and auditory brainstem response testing were performed in 159 neonates (63 with and 96 without CMV infection) from August 2008 to August 2011. For neonates with GJB2 mutation, their parents were further screened for GJB2 sequence. The incidence of SNHL was 12.7% in CMV-infected but 0% in uninfected children aged 1-1.5 y (P = 0.000). Similar mutation rates of the GJB2 gene were observed in neonates with or without CMV infection (34.9 vs. 32.3%, respectively, P = 0.734). No significant difference in the mutation rate of GJB2 was found among neonates with CMV infection and SNHL, those with CMV infection and normal hearing, and uninfected newborns with normal hearing (P = 0.438). Mutations 79G>A, 109G>A, 341A>G, and 608T>C were found in neonates with and without CMV infection. All of the above mutations were also found in both or one of the corresponding parents. Congenital CMV infections may cause deafness in neonates, but this might be independent of GJB2 gene mutation.

  9. Low prevalence of glucokinase gene mutations in gestational diabetic patients with good glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Frigeri, H R; Santos, I C R; Réa, R R; Almeida, A C R; Fadel-Picheth, C M T; Pedrosa, F O; Souza, E M; Rego, F G M; Picheth, G

    2012-05-18

    Glucokinase (GCK) plays a key role in glucose homeostasis. Gestational diabetes mellitus increases the risk of gestational complications in pregnant women and fetuses. We screened for mutations in coding and flanking regions of the GCK gene in pregnant women with or without gestational diabetes in a Brazilian population. A sample of 200 pregnant women classified as healthy (control, N = 100) or with gestational diabetes (N = 100) was analyzed for mutations in the GCK gene. All gestational diabetes mellitus patients had good glycemic control maintained by diet alone and no complications during pregnancy. Mutations were detected by single-strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Thirteen of the 200 subjects had GCK gene mutations. The mutations detected were in intron 3 (c.43331A>G, new), intron 6 (c.47702T>C, rs2268574), intron 9 (c.48935C>T, rs2908274), and exon 10 (c.49620G>A, rs13306388). None of these GCK mutations were found to be significantly associated with gestational diabetes mellitus. In summary, we report a low frequency of GCK mutations in a pregnant Brazilian population and describe a new intronic variation (c.43331A>G, intron 3). We conclude that mutations in GCK introns and in non-translatable regions of the GCK gene do not affect glycemic control and are not correlated with gestational diabetes mellitus.

  10. Congenital long QT syndrome with compound mutations in the KCNH2 gene.

    PubMed

    Bando, Sachiko; Soeki, Takeshi; Matsuura, Tomomi; Niki, Toshiyuki; Ise, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Koji; Taketani, Yoshio; Iwase, Takashi; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Wakatsuki, Tetsuzo; Akaike, Masashi; Aiba, Takeshi; Shimizu, Wataru; Sata, Masataka

    2014-07-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome is a genetic disorder encompassing a family of mutations that can lead to aberrant ventricular electrical activity. We report on two brothers with long QT syndrome caused by compound mutations in the KCNH2 gene inherited from parents who had no prolonged QT interval on electrocardiography. The proband had syncope, and his elder brother suffered from ventricular fibrillation. Genetic testing revealed that both brothers had multiple mutations in the KCNH2 gene, including a missense mutation of C1474T (exon 6) as well as a frameshift/nonsense mutation, resulting from the insertion of 25 nucleotides, which caused an altered amino acid sequence beginning at codon 302 and a premature termination codon (i.e., TAG) at codon 339 (exon 4). Family genetic screening found that their father had the same frameshift mutation, and their mother and sister had the same missense mutation, in the KCNH2 gene. However, these other family members were asymptomatic, with normal QT intervals on electrocardiography. These results suggest that compound mutations in the KCNH2 gene inherited independently from the parents made the phenotypes of their sons more severe.

  11. A deleterious mutation in the LOXHD1 gene causes autosomal recessive hearing loss in Ashkenazi Jews.

    PubMed

    Edvardson, S; Jalas, C; Shaag, A; Zenvirt, S; Landau, C; Lerer, I; Elpeleg, O

    2011-05-01

    Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (ARNSHL) in Ashkenazi Jews, is mainly caused by mutations in the GJB2 and GJB6 genes. Here we describe a novel homozygous mutation of the LOXHD1 gene resulting in a premature stop codon (R1572X) in nine patients of Ashkenazi Jewish origin who had severe-profound congenital non-progressive ARNSHL and benefited from cochlear implants. Upon screening for the mutation among 719 anonymous Ashkenazi-Jews we detected four carriers, indicating a carrier rate of 1:180 Ashkenazi Jews. This is the second reported mutation in the LOXHD1 gene, and its homozygous presence in two of 39 Ashkenazi Jewish families with congenital ARNSHL suggest that it could account for some 5% of the familial cases in this community. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. BRCA Genetic Screening in Middle Eastern and North African: Mutational Spectrum and Founder BRCA1 Mutation (c.798_799delTT) in North African

    PubMed Central

    Laraqui, Abdelilah; Uhrhammer, Nancy; EL Rhaffouli, Hicham; Sekhsokh, Yassine; Lahlou-Amine, Idriss; Bajjou, Tahar; Hilali, Farida; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Al Bouzidi, Abderrahmane; Bakri, Youssef; Amzazi, Said; Bignon, Yves-Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background. The contribution of BRCA1 mutations to both hereditary and sporadic breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) has not yet been thoroughly investigated in MENA. Methods. To establish the knowledge about BRCA1 mutations and their correlation with the clinical aspect in diagnosed cases of HBOC in MENA populations. A systematic review of studies examining BRCA1 in BC women in Cyprus, Jordan, Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia was conducted. Results. Thirteen relevant references were identified, including ten studies which performed DNA sequencing of all BRCA1 exons. For the latter, 31 mutations were detected in 57 of the 547 patients ascertained. Familial history of BC was present in 388 (71%) patients, of whom 50 were mutation carriers. c.798_799delTT was identified in 11 North African families, accounting for 22% of total identified BRCA1 mutations, suggesting a founder allele. A broad spectrum of other mutations including c.68_69delAG, c.181T>G, c.5095C>T, and c.5266dupC, as well as sequence of unclassified variants and polymorphisms, was also detected. Conclusion. The knowledge of genetic structure of BRCA1 in MENA should contribute to the assessment of the necessity of preventive programs for mutation carriers and clinical management. The high prevalence of BC and the presence of frequent mutations of the BRCA1 gene emphasize the need for improving screening programs and individual testing/counseling. PMID:25814778

  13. [Determination of a BRCA1 gene mutation in a family with hereditary breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Marcela; Faúndez, Paola; Cruz, Adolfo; Rodríguez, Mario; Alvarez, Manuel; Carvallo, Pilar

    2004-02-01

    Breast cancer is the main cause of death among women between 40 and 55 years old, in whom the hereditary cases are common. Therefore, the molecular diagnosis of germ line mutations involved in breast cancer susceptibility is relevant. BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been described as the two major genes involved in familial breast/ovarian cancer. We are performing a screening of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, in a group of 50 high risk Chilean families for breast/ovarian cancer. We have detected a mutation, 3936 C>T, that leads to a truncated protein, in two affected women from one of the families in study. To report the results of the screening for 3936 C>T in healthy relatives of index women. The molecular diagnosis of this mutation was offered to the healthy members of this family, and 17 relatives accepted to be tested. The region of the BRCA1 gene that includes the 3936 C>T mutation, was analyzed through PCR amplification, digestion with restriction enzyme BstNI, and direct sequencing. 3936 C>T DNA mutation was present in 8 relatives. Considering the high risk of having a mutation in the BRCA1 gene, specially in pre-menopausal women, the molecular diagnosis, genetic and clinical counseling are highly relevant. In Chile the molecular diagnosis is still not widely applied.

  14. A "dose" effect of mutations in the GBA gene on Parkinson's disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Avner; Gurevich, Tanya; Bar Shira, Anat; Gana Weisz, Mali; Ash, Elissa; Shiner, Tamara; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Giladi, Nir; Mirelman, Anat

    2017-03-01

    Mutations in the GBA gene are associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). A definite description of the clinical characteristics of PD patients who are compound heterozygotes or homozygotes for mutations in the GBA gene (GD-PD) requires further elucidation. We assessed motor, cognitive, olfactory and autonomic functions as well as demographic data and medical history in a cohort of Ashkenazi Jewish PD patients who were screened for seven common mutations in the GBA gene. We then compared three groups of patients (matched for age and disease duration) who were distinguished by their GBA mutation status, idiopathic PD (iPD), GBA heterozygote PD (GBA-PD) and GD-PD. Out of a total of 1050 AJ PD patients screened, 12 were found to be either homozygotes or compound heterozygotes for mutations in the GBA gene. These patients had an earlier age of onset, more severe motor impairment, poorer cognition and lower olfactory scores. They also had a higher prevalence of REM sleep behavior disorder and higher frequencies of hallucinations compared to both GBA-PD and iPD. The severity of PD phenotype is related to the burden of GBA mutations with GD-PD patients manifesting a more severe phenotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Spectrum of MECP2 gene mutations in a cohort of Indian patients with Rett syndrome: report of two novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Das, Dhanjit Kumar; Raha, Sarbani; Sanghavi, Daksha; Maitra, Anurupa; Udani, Vrajesh

    2013-02-15

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder, primarily affecting females and characterized by developmental regression, epilepsy, stereotypical hand movements, and motor abnormalities. Its prevalence is about 1 in 10,000 female births. Rett syndrome is caused by mutations within methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Over 270 individual nucleotide changes which cause pathogenic mutations have been reported. However, eight most commonly occurring missense and nonsense mutations account for almost 70% of all patients. We screened 90 individuals with Rett syndrome phenotype. A total of 19 different MECP2 mutations and polymorphisms were identified in 27 patients. Of the 19 mutations, we identified 7 (37%) frameshift, 6 (31%) nonsense, 14 (74%) missense mutations and one duplication (5%). The most frequent pathogenic changes were: missense p.T158M (11%), p.R133C (7.4%), and p.R306C (7.4%) and nonsense p.R168X (11%), p.R255X (7.4%) mutations. We have identified two novel mutations namely p.385-388delPLPP present in atypical patients and p.Glu290AlafsX38 present in a classical patient of Rett syndrome. Sequence homology for p.385-388delPLPP mutation revealed that these 4 amino acids were conserved across mammalian species. This indicated the importance of these 4 amino acids in structure and function of the protein. A novel variant p.T479T has also been identified in a patient with atypical Rett syndrome. A total of 62 (69%) patients remained without molecular genetics diagnosis that necessitates further search for mutations in other genes like CDKL5 and FOXG1 that are known to cause Rett phenotype. The majority of mutations are detected in exon 4 and only one mutation was present in exon 3. Therefore, our study suggests the need for screening exon 4 of MECP2 as first line of diagnosis in these patients.

  16. High Resolution Melt analysis for mutation screening in PKD1 and PKD2.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Stanislas; Berland, Yvon; Fontes, Michel; Burtey, Stéphane

    2011-10-18

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary kidney disorder. It is characterized by focal development and progressive enlargement of renal cysts leading to end-stage renal disease. PKD1 and PKD2 have been implicated in ADPKD pathogenesis but genetic features and the size of PKD1 make genetic diagnosis tedious. We aim to prove that high resolution melt analysis (HRM), a recent technique in molecular biology, can facilitate molecular diagnosis of ADPKD. We screened for mutations in PKD1 and PKD2 with HRM in 37 unrelated patients with ADPKD. We identified 440 sequence variants in the 37 patients. One hundred and thirty eight were different. We found 28 pathogenic mutations (25 in PKD1 and 3 in PKD2 ) within 28 different patients, which is a diagnosis rate of 75% consistent with literature mean direct sequencing diagnosis rate. We describe 52 new sequence variants in PKD1 and two in PKD2. HRM analysis is a sensitive and specific method for molecular diagnosis of ADPKD. HRM analysis is also costless and time sparing. Thus, this method is efficient and might be used for mutation pre-screening in ADPKD genes.

  17. A Novel Method to Screen for Dominant Negative ATM Mutations in Familial Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    carry dominant negative mutation in ATM due to natural variation amongst LCLs. Microarrays have been performed to determine differences in gene expression... genes that are altered in their expression in ATMmutation carriers. The validation of this data in carriers of different ATM mutation indicated that the...heterozygous carriers of T727 1 G mutation display a gene expression phenotype that appears identical to carriers of protein truncating mutations in

  18. Multiple phenotypes resulting from a mutagenesis screen for pharynx muscle mutations in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, Andrew; Charron, Alexandra; Sadozai, Yama; Switaj, Lynn; Szutenbach, Anneliese; Smith, Pliny A

    2011-01-01

    We describe a novel screen to isolate pharyngeal cell morphology mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans using myo-2::GFP to rapidly identify abnormally shaped pharynxes in EMS (Ethyl Methanesulfonate) mutagenized worms. We observed over 83 C. elegans lines with distinctive pharyngeal phenotypes in worms surviving to the L1 larval stage, with phenotypes ranging from short pharynx, unattached pharynx, missing cells, asymmetric morphology, and non-adherent pharynx cells. Thirteen of these mutations have been chromosomally mapped using Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and deficiency strain complementation. Our studies have focused on genetically mapping and functionally testing two phenotypes, the short pharynx and the loss of muscle cohesion phenotypes. We have also identified new alleles of sma-1, and our screen suggests many genes directing pharynx assembly and structure may be either pharynx specific or less critical in other tissues.

  19. Multiple Phenotypes Resulting from a Mutagenesis Screen for Pharynx Muscle Mutations in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, Andrew; Charron, Alexandra; Sadozai, Yama; Switaj, Lynn; Szutenbach, Anneliese; Smith, Pliny A.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a novel screen to isolate pharyngeal cell morphology mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans using myo-2::GFP to rapidly identify abnormally shaped pharynxes in EMS (Ethyl Methanesulfonate) mutagenized worms. We observed over 83 C. elegans lines with distinctive pharyngeal phenotypes in worms surviving to the L1 larval stage, with phenotypes ranging from short pharynx, unattached pharynx, missing cells, asymmetric morphology, and non-adherent pharynx cells. Thirteen of these mutations have been chromosomally mapped using Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and deficiency strain complementation. Our studies have focused on genetically mapping and functionally testing two phenotypes, the short pharynx and the loss of muscle cohesion phenotypes. We have also identified new alleles of sma-1, and our screen suggests many genes directing pharynx assembly and structure may be either pharynx specific or less critical in other tissues. PMID:22073173

  20. Systematic screening for mutations in the 5{prime}-regulatory region of the human dopamine D{sub 1} receptor (DRD1) gene in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Cichon, S.; Noethen, M.M.; Stoeber, G.

    1996-07-26

    A possible dysregulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric diseases. In the present study we systematically searched for the presence of mutations in the 5{prime}-flanking region of the dopamine D{sub 1} receptor (DRD1) gene. This region has previously been shown to contain a functional promoter. We investigated 119 unrelated individuals (including 36 schizophrenic patients, 38 bipolar affective patients, and 45 healthy controls) using single-strand conformation analysis (SSCA). Eleven overlapping PCR fragments covered 2,189 bp of DNA sequence. We identified six single base substitutions: -2218T/C, -2102C/A, -2030T/C, -1992G/A, -1251G/C, and -800T/C. None of the mutations was found to be located in regions which have important influence on the level of transcriptional activity. Allele frequencies were similar in patients and controls, indicating that genetic variation in the 5{prime}-regulatory region of the DRD1 gene is unlikely to play a frequent, major role in the genetic predisposition to either schizophrenia or bipolar affective disorder. 31 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. [Study of novel mutation of OPTN gene in two primary open angle glaucoma families in northeast China].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hui-Ping; Xiao, Zheng; Xu, Na; Yang, Bin-Bin; Meng, Qing-Feng; Li, Yuan-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    To identify the mutation gene of two Chinese families with primary open angle glaucoma. It was a case control study. Clinical observation and pedigree analysis were undertaken in two families with primary open angle glaucoma. Venous blood were drawn from 6 affected and 6 unaffected subjects in family L, and from 4 affected and 4 unaffected subjects in family C. Genomic DNA was extracted. Linkage to OPTN gene locus was determined. Mutation of this gene was screened by PCR of OPTN gene exons and direct sequencing. A missense mutation A1274G in exon 10 of OPTN gene was identified in affected members of family L. The corresponding amino acid change was Lys322Glu. This mutation was not found in unaffected family members of family L, all members of family C and 87 unrelated normal controls. A novel mutation of OPTN gene with Lys322Glu change is responsible for the occurrence of primary open angle glaucoma in a Chinese family.

  2. Genetic Screening of Mutations Associated with Fabry Disease in a Nationwide Cohort of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Maria J.; Mourão, Ana F.; Martinho, António; Simões, Olívia; Melo-Gomes, José; Salgado, Manuel; Estanqueiro, Paula; Ribeiro, Célia; Brito, Iva; Fonseca, João E.; Canhão, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Fabry’s disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with an alpha-galactosidase A deficiency. The prevalence of FD among juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients with established diagnosis is unknown, but as musculoskeletal pain may be an important complaint at presentation, misdiagnosed cases are anticipated. With this study, we aim to calculate the frequency of FD-associated mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. Children with JIA from a national cohort were selected. Clinical and laboratorial information was recorded in the Portuguese rheumatic diseases register (http://Reuma.pt). Molecular genetic testing to detect GLA gene mutations was performed. After the multiplex polymerase chain reactions technique for DNA amplification, direct sequencing of the complete sequence of GLA gene was completed. From a cohort of 292 patients with JIA (188 females, 104 males), mutations were identified in 5 patients (all female). Four patients had the mutation D313Y, a rare GLA variant, which is associated with low enzymatic levels in plasma, but normal lysosomal levels. One patient presented the missense mutation R118C, which was previously described in Mediterranean patients with FD. This is the first screening of FD mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. No “classic” pathogenic FD mutations were reported. The late-onset FD-associated mutation, R118C, was found in a frequency of 0.34% (1/292). PMID:28299312

  3. Genetic Screening of Mutations Associated with Fabry Disease in a Nationwide Cohort of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Maria J; Mourão, Ana F; Martinho, António; Simões, Olívia; Melo-Gomes, José; Salgado, Manuel; Estanqueiro, Paula; Ribeiro, Célia; Brito, Iva; Fonseca, João E; Canhão, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Fabry's disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with an alpha-galactosidase A deficiency. The prevalence of FD among juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients with established diagnosis is unknown, but as musculoskeletal pain may be an important complaint at presentation, misdiagnosed cases are anticipated. With this study, we aim to calculate the frequency of FD-associated mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. Children with JIA from a national cohort were selected. Clinical and laboratorial information was recorded in the Portuguese rheumatic diseases register (http://Reuma.pt). Molecular genetic testing to detect GLA gene mutations was performed. After the multiplex polymerase chain reactions technique for DNA amplification, direct sequencing of the complete sequence of GLA gene was completed. From a cohort of 292 patients with JIA (188 females, 104 males), mutations were identified in 5 patients (all female). Four patients had the mutation D313Y, a rare GLA variant, which is associated with low enzymatic levels in plasma, but normal lysosomal levels. One patient presented the missense mutation R118C, which was previously described in Mediterranean patients with FD. This is the first screening of FD mutations in a cohort of JIA patients. No "classic" pathogenic FD mutations were reported. The late-onset FD-associated mutation, R118C, was found in a frequency of 0.34% (1/292).

  4. A genetic screen of the mutations in the Korean patients with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    An, Seong Soo; Park, Sun Ah; Bagyinszky, Eva; Bae, Sun Oh; Kim, Yoon-Jeong; Im, Ji Young; Park, Kyung Won; Park, Kee Hyung; Kim, Eun-Joo; Jeong, Jee Hyang; Kim, Jong Hun; Han, Hyun Jeong; Choi, Seong Hye; Kim, SangYun

    2016-01-01

    Early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) has distinct clinical characteristics in comparison to late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). The genetic contribution is suggested to be more potent in EOAD. However, the frequency of causative mutations in EOAD could be variable depending on studies. Moreover, no mutation screening study has been performed yet employing large population in Korea. Previously, we reported that the rate of family history of dementia in EOAD patients was 18.7% in a nationwide hospital-based cohort study, the Clinical Research Center for Dementia of South Korea (CREDOS) study. This rate is much lower than in other countries and is even comparable to the frequency of LOAD patients in our country. To understand the genetic characteristics of EOAD in Korea, we screened the common Alzheimer's disease (AD) mutations in the consecutive EOAD subjects from the CREDOS study from April 2012 to February 2014. We checked the sequence of APP (exons 16-17), PSEN1 (exons 3-12), and PSEN2 (exons 3-12) genes. We identified different causative or probable pathogenic AD mutations, PSEN1 T116I, PSEN1 L226F, and PSEN2 V214L, employing 24 EOAD subjects with a family history and 80 without a family history of dementia. PSEN1 T116I case demonstrated autosomal dominant trait of inheritance, with at least 11 affected individuals over 2 generations. However, there was no family history of dementia within first-degree relation in PSEN1 L226F and PSEN2 V214L cases. Approximately, 55.7% of the EOAD subjects had APOE ε4 allele, while none of the mutation-carrying subjects had the allele. The frequency of genetic mutation in this study is lower compared to the studies from other countries. The study design that was based on nationwide cohort, which minimizes selection bias, is thought to be one of the contributors to the lower frequency of genetic mutation. However, the possibility of the greater likeliness of earlier onset of sporadic AD in Korea cannot be excluded. We

  5. Malignancy of Cancers and Synthetic Lethal Interactions Associated With Mutations of Cancer Driver Genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Yue; Han, Ze-Guang; He, Kun-Yan

    2016-02-01

    The mutation status of cancer driver genes may correlate with different degrees of malignancy of cancers. The doubling time and multidrug resistance are 2 phenotypes that reflect the degree of malignancy of cancer cells. Because most of cancer driver genes are hard to target, identification of their synthetic lethal partners might be a viable approach to treatment of the cancers with the relevant mutations.The genome-wide screening for synthetic lethal partners is costly and labor intensive. Thus, a computational approach facilitating identification of candidate genes for a focus synthetic lethal RNAi screening will accelerate novel anticancer drug discovery.We used several publicly available cancer cell lines and tumor tissue genomic data in this study.We compared the doubling time and multidrug resistance between the NCI-60 cell lines with mutations in some cancer driver genes and those without the mutations. We identified some candidate synthetic lethal genes to the cancer driver genes APC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53 by comparison of their gene phenotype values in cancer cell lines with the relevant mutations and wild-type background. Further, we experimentally validated some of the synthetic lethal relationships we predicted.We reported that mutations in some cancer driver genes mutations in some cancer driver genes such as APC, KRAS, or PIK3CA might correlate with cancer proliferation or drug resistance. We identified 40, 21, 5, 43, and 18 potential synthetic lethal genes to APC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53, respectively. We found that some of the potential synthetic lethal genes show significantly higher expression in the cancers with mutations of their synthetic lethal partners and the wild-type counterparts. Further, our experiments confirmed several synthetic lethal relationships that are novel findings by our methods.We experimentally validated a part of the synthetic lethal relationships we predicted. We plan to perform further experiments to validate

  6. Malignancy of Cancers and Synthetic Lethal Interactions Associated With Mutations of Cancer Driver Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Yue; Han, Ze-Guang; He, Kun-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The mutation status of cancer driver genes may correlate with different degrees of malignancy of cancers. The doubling time and multidrug resistance are 2 phenotypes that reflect the degree of malignancy of cancer cells. Because most of cancer driver genes are hard to target, identification of their synthetic lethal partners might be a viable approach to treatment of the cancers with the relevant mutations. The genome-wide screening for synthetic lethal partners is costly and labor intensive. Thus, a computational approach facilitating identification of candidate genes for a focus synthetic lethal RNAi screening will accelerate novel anticancer drug discovery. We used several publicly available cancer cell lines and tumor tissue genomic data in this study. We compared the doubling time and multidrug resistance between the NCI-60 cell lines with mutations in some cancer driver genes and those without the mutations. We identified some candidate synthetic lethal genes to the cancer driver genes APC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53 by comparison of their gene phenotype values in cancer cell lines with the relevant mutations and wild-type background. Further, we experimentally validated some of the synthetic lethal relationships we predicted. We reported that mutations in some cancer driver genes mutations in some cancer driver genes such as APC, KRAS, or PIK3CA might correlate with cancer proliferation or drug resistance. We identified 40, 21, 5, 43, and 18 potential synthetic lethal genes to APC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and TP53, respectively. We found that some of the potential synthetic lethal genes show significantly higher expression in the cancers with mutations of their synthetic lethal partners and the wild-type counterparts. Further, our experiments confirmed several synthetic lethal relationships that are novel findings by our methods. We experimentally validated a part of the synthetic lethal relationships we predicted. We plan to perform further

  7. Functional genome-wide siRNA screen identifies KIAA0586 as mutated in Joubert syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Roosing, Susanne; Hofree, Matan; Kim, Sehyun; Scott, Eric; Copeland, Brett; Romani, Marta; Silhavy, Jennifer L; Rosti, Rasim O; Schroth, Jana; Mazza, Tommaso; Miccinilli, Elide; Zaki, Maha S; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Milisa-Drautz, Joanne; Dobyns, William B; Mikati, Mohamed A; İncecik, Faruk; Azam, Matloob; Borgatti, Renato; Romaniello, Romina; Boustany, Rose-Mary; Clericuzio, Carol L; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Strømme, Petter; Boltshauser, Eugen; Stanzial, Franco; Mirabelli-Badenier, Marisol; Moroni, Isabella; Bertini, Enrico; Emma, Francesco; Steinlin, Maja; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Johnson, Colin A; Freilinger, Michael; Vaux, Keith K; Gabriel, Stacey B; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Ideker, Trey; Dynlacht, Brian D; Lee, Ji Eun; Valente, Enza Maria; Kim, Joon; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2015-01-01

    Defective primary ciliogenesis or cilium stability forms the basis of human ciliopathies, including Joubert syndrome (JS), with defective cerebellar vermis development. We performed a high-content genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen to identify genes regulating ciliogenesis as candidates for JS. We analyzed results with a supervised-learning approach, using SYSCILIA gold standard, Cildb3.0, a centriole siRNA screen and the GTex project, identifying 591 likely candidates. Intersection of this data with whole exome results from 145 individuals with unexplained JS identified six families with predominantly compound heterozygous mutations in KIAA0586. A c.428del base deletion in 0.1% of the general population was found in trans with a second mutation in an additional set of 9 of 163 unexplained JS patients. KIAA0586 is an orthologue of chick Talpid3, required for ciliogenesis and Sonic hedgehog signaling. Our results uncover a relatively high frequency cause for JS and contribute a list of candidates for future gene discoveries in ciliopathies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06602.001 PMID:26026149

  8. Functional genome-wide siRNA screen identifies KIAA0586 as mutated in Joubert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roosing, Susanne; Hofree, Matan; Kim, Sehyun; Scott, Eric; Copeland, Brett; Romani, Marta; Silhavy, Jennifer L; Rosti, Rasim O; Schroth, Jana; Mazza, Tommaso; Miccinilli, Elide; Zaki, Maha S; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Milisa-Drautz, Joanne; Dobyns, William B; Mikati, Mohamed A; İncecik, Faruk; Azam, Matloob; Borgatti, Renato; Romaniello, Romina; Boustany, Rose-Mary; Clericuzio, Carol L; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Strømme, Petter; Boltshauser, Eugen; Stanzial, Franco; Mirabelli-Badenier, Marisol; Moroni, Isabella; Bertini, Enrico; Emma, Francesco; Steinlin, Maja; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Johnson, Colin A; Freilinger, Michael; Vaux, Keith K; Gabriel, Stacey B; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Ideker, Trey; Dynlacht, Brian D; Lee, Ji Eun; Valente, Enza Maria; Kim, Joon; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2015-05-30

    Defective primary ciliogenesis or cilium stability forms the basis of human ciliopathies, including Joubert syndrome (JS), with defective cerebellar vermis development. We performed a high-content genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen to identify genes regulating ciliogenesis as candidates for JS. We analyzed results with a supervised-learning approach, using SYSCILIA gold standard, Cildb3.0, a centriole siRNA screen and the GTex project, identifying 591 likely candidates. Intersection of this data with whole exome results from 145 individuals with unexplained JS identified six families with predominantly compound heterozygous mutations in KIAA0586. A c.428del base deletion in 0.1% of the general population was found in trans with a second mutation in an additional set of 9 of 163 unexplained JS patients. KIAA0586 is an orthologue of chick Talpid3, required for ciliogenesis and Sonic hedgehog signaling. Our results uncover a relatively high frequency cause for JS and contribute a list of candidates for future gene discoveries in ciliopathies.

  9. Mutations causing biotinidase deficiency in children ascertained by newborn screening in Western Hungary.

    PubMed

    Milánkovics, Ilona; Kámory, Eniko; Csókay, Béla; Fodor, Flóra; Somogyi, Csilla; Schuler, Agnes

    2007-03-01

    In Hungary the national newborn screening programme for the detection of biotinidase deficiency was launched in 1989. In this study, we determined the genotypes of all patients identified at the Budapest Screening Centre that covers half of the country. The incidence of the disorder in Western Hungary is about three times the worldwide incidence. Overall, 21 different mutations were identified in 49 patients, including four novel mutations. Ten mutations proved to be unique to the Hungarian population.

  10. Dictyostelium discoideum Ax2 as an Assay System for Screening of Pharmacological Chaperones for Phenylketonuria Mutations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Min; Yang, Yun Gyeong; Kim, Hye-Lim; Park, Young Shik

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we developed an assay system for missense mutations in human phenylalanine hydroxylases (hPAHs). To demonstrate the reliability of the system, eight mutant proteins (F39L, K42I, L48S, I65T, R252Q, L255V, S349L, and R408W) were expressed in a mutant strain (pah(-)) of Dictyostelium discoideum Ax2 disrupted in the indigenous gene encoding PAH. The transformed pah- cells grown in FM minimal medium were measured for growth rate and PAH activity to reveal a positive correlation between them. The protein level of hPAH was also determined by western blotting to show the impact of each mutation on protein stability and catalytic activity. The result was highly compatible with the previous ones obtained from other expression systems, suggesting that Dictyostelium is a dependable alternative to other expression systems. Furthermore, we found that both the protein level and activity of S349L and R408W, which were impaired severely in protein stability, were rescued in HL5 nutrient medium. Although the responsible component(s) remains unidentified, this unexpected finding showed an important advantage of our expression system for studying unstable proteins. As an economic and stable cell-based expression system, our development will contribute to mass-screening of pharmacological chaperones for missense PAH mutations as well as to the in-depth characterization of individual mutations.

  11. Chromatin accessibility contributes to simultaneous mutations of cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yi; Su, Xian-Bin; He, Kun-Yan; Wu, Bing-Hao; Zhang, Bo-Yu; Han, Ze-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations of many cancer genes tend to co-occur (termed co-mutations) in certain patterns during tumor initiation and progression. However, the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to the co-mutations of these cancer genes have yet to be explored. Here, we systematically investigated the association between the somatic co-mutations of cancer genes and high-order chromatin conformation. Significantly, somatic point co-mutations in protein-coding genes were closely associated with high-order spatial chromatin folding. We propose that these regions be termed Spatial Co-mutation Hotspots (SCHs) and report their occurrence in different cancer types. The conserved mutational signatures and DNA sequences flanking these point co-mutations, as well as CTCF-binding sites, are also enriched within the SCH regions. The genetic alterations that are harboured in the same SCHs tend to disrupt cancer driver genes involved in multiple signalling pathways. The present work demonstrates that high-order spatial chromatin organisation may contribute to the somatic co-mutations of certain cancer genes during tumor development. PMID:27762310

  12. Effect of Mutation to Streptomycin Resistance on Amber Suppressor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Otsuji, Nozomu; Aono, Hiroyuki

    1968-01-01

    Three classes of nonidentical streptomycin-resistant mutations were distinguished in Escherichia coli by their effect on the efficiency of suppression by an amber suppressor gene, sup E. The first class of mutation caused a strong restriction in efficiency of suppression of an amber codon in various cistrons of phage λ and in an alkaline phosphatase structural gene of E. coli. The second class caused weak restriction, and the third class caused no restriction. The restrictive effect of the streptomycin resistance mutation of the first class on the sup E gene was reduced by addition of streptomycin. This mutation had little effect on efficiencies of suppression by amber suppressor genes sup D and sup F. Analyses on the alkaline phosphatase formed in the suppressor strain indicated that mutation to restrictive streptomycin resistance causes a reduction in translation of the amber codon in the alkaline phosphatase structural gene. Images PMID:4874314

  13. [Research advances of IDH gene mutation and AML].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Dong; Zheng, Yong-Qin

    2014-10-01

    The isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutation has been recently found, which may be involved in the occurrence of leukemia. The incidence of IDH gene mutation in the patients with adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is high, especially in the AML patients with normal karyotype. Different subtype and molecular biology of IDH display a different effect on the AML prognosis. This gene mutation is related with treatment response, residual, recurrence of leukemia, and it could be a sign of test and a monitoring tool of minimal residual disease (MRD). The IDH gene mutation may be an index for predicting prognosis and guiding therapy. In this article, the research progress of IDH gene mutation and its correlation with acute myeloid leukemia, especially with the clinical characteristics,are reviewed.

  14. BRAFV600 mutations in solid tumors, other than metastatic melanoma and papillary thyroid cancer, or multiple myeloma: a screening study

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Allen L; Day, Bann-Mo; Abhyankar, Sarang; McKenna, Edward; Riehl, Todd; Puzanov, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Background Mutations in the BRAF gene have been implicated in several human cancers. The objective of this screening study was to identify patients with solid tumors (other than metastatic melanoma or papillary thyroid cancer) or multiple myeloma harboring activating BRAFV600 mutations for enrollment in a vemurafenib clinical study. Methods Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples were collected and sent to a central laboratory to identify activating BRAFV600 mutations by bidirectional direct Sanger sequencing. Results Overall incidence of BRAFV600E mutation in evaluable patients (n=548) was 3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7–4.7): 11% in colorectal tumors (n=75), 6% in biliary tract tumors (n=16), 3% in non-small cell lung cancers (n=71), 2% in other types of solid tumors (n=180), and 3% in multiple myeloma (n=31). There were no BRAFV600 mutations in this cohort of patients with ovarian tumors (n=68), breast cancer (n=86), or prostate cancer (n=21). Conclusion This multicenter, national screening study confirms previously reported incidences of BRAFV600 mutations from single-center studies. Patients identified with BRAFV600 mutations were potentially eligible for enrollment in the VE-BASKET study. PMID:28255242

  15. NGS-based reverse genetic screen for common embryonic lethal mutations compromising fertility in livestock

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Carole; Li, Wanbo; Harland, Chad; Littlejohn, Mathew; Coppieters, Wouter; Creagh, Frances; Davis, Steve; Druet, Tom; Faux, Pierre; Guillaume, François; Karim, Latifa; Keehan, Mike; Kadri, Naveen Kumar; Tamma, Nico; Spelman, Richard; Georges, Michel

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the result of a large-scale, next generation sequencing (NGS)-based screen for embryonic lethal (EL) mutations in Belgian beef and New Zealand dairy cattle. We estimated by simulation that cattle might carry, on average, ∼0.5 recessive EL mutations. We mined exome sequence data from >600 animals, and identified 1377 stop-gain, 3139 frame-shift, 1341 splice-site, 22,939 disruptive missense, 62,399 benign missense, and 92,163 synonymous variants. We show that cattle have a comparable load of loss-of-function (LoF) variants (defined as stop-gain, frame-shift, or splice-site variants) as humans despite having a more variable exome. We genotyped >40,000 animals for up to 296 LoF and 3483 disruptive missense, breed-specific variants. We identified candidate EL mutations based on the observation of a significant depletion in homozygotes. We estimated the proportion of EL mutations at 15% of tested LoF and 6% of tested disruptive missense variants. We confirmed the EL nature of nine candidate variants by genotyping 200 carrier × carrier trios, and demonstrating the absence of homozygous offspring. The nine identified EL mutations segregate at frequencies ranging from 1.2% to 6.6% in the studied populations and collectively account for the mortality of ∼0.6% of conceptuses. We show that EL mutations preferentially affect gene products fulfilling basic cellular functions. The resulting information will be useful to avoid at-risk matings, thereby improving fertility. PMID:27646536

  16. Succinate Dehydrogenase Gene Mutations are Strongly Associated with Paraganglioma of the Organ of Zuckerkandl

    PubMed Central

    Lodish, Maya B; Adams, Karen T; Huynh, Thanh T; Prodanov, Tamara; Ling, Alex; Chen, Clara; Shusterman, Suzanne; Jimenez, Camilo; Merino, Maria; Hughes, Marybeth; Cradic, Kendall W; Milosevic, Dragana; Singh, Ravinder J; Stratakis, Constantine A; Pacak, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Organ of Zuckerkandl paragangliomas (PGLs) are rare neuroendocrine tumors that are derived from chromaffin cells located around the origin of the inferior mesenteric artery extending to the level of the aortic bifurcation. Mutations in the genes encoding succinate dehydrogenase subunits (SDH) B, C, and D (SDHx) have been associated with PGLs, but their contribution to PGLs of the organ of Zuckerkandl PGLs is not known. We aimed to describe the clinical presentation of patients with PGLs of the organ of Zuckerkandl and investigate the prevalence of SDHx mutations and other genetic defects among them. The clinical characteristics of 14 patients with PGL of the organ of Zuckerkandl were analyzed retrospectively; their DNA was tested for SDHx mutations and deletions. Eleven out of 14 (79%) of patients with PGLs of the organ of Zuckerkandl were found to have mutations of the SDHB (9), or SDHD (2) genes; one patient was found to have the Carney-Stratakis syndrome (CSS) and his PGL was discovered during surgery for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Our results show that SDHx mutations are prevalent in pediatric and adult PGLs of the organ of Zuckerkandl. Patients with PGLs of the organ of Zuckerkandl should be screened for SDHx mutations and the CSS; in addition asymptomatic carriers of an SDHx mutation among the relatives of affected patients may benefit from tumor screening for early PGL detection. PMID:20418362

  17. Molecular basis of hereditary fructose intolerance: mutations and polymorphisms in the human aldolase B gene.

    PubMed

    Tolan, D R

    1995-01-01

    Mutations in the human aldolase B gene that result in hereditary fructose intolerance have been characterized extensively. Although the majority of subjects have been from northern Europe, subjects from other geographical regions and ethnic groups have been identified. At present 21 mutations have been reported; 15 of these are single base substitutions, resulting in nine amino acid replacements, four nonsense codons, and two putative splicing defects. Two large deletions, two four-base deletions, a single-base deletion, and a seven-base deletion/one-base insertion have been found. This last mutation leads to a defect in splicing and it is likely that one of the small deletions does as well. Regions of the enzyme where mutations have been observed recurrently are encoded by exons 5 and 9. Indeed, the three most common mutations are found in these exons. Two of these prevalent HFI mutations arose from a common ancestor and spread throughout the population by genetic drift. This finding was based on linkage to two sequence polymorphisms, which are among very few informative polymorphic markers that have been identified within the aldolase B gene. Because of the prevalence of a few HFI alleles, and the recent advances in molecular methods for identifying and screening for mutation, the diagnosis of HFI by molecular screening methods should become routine. These molecular diagnostic methods will be extremely beneficial for this often difficult to diagnose and sometimes fatal disease.

  18. Succinate dehydrogenase gene mutations are strongly associated with paraganglioma of the organ of Zuckerkandl.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Maya B; Adams, Karen T; Huynh, Thanh T; Prodanov, Tamara; Ling, Alex; Chen, Clara; Shusterman, Suzanne; Jimenez, Camilo; Merino, Maria; Hughes, Marybeth; Cradic, Kendall W; Milosevic, Dragana; Singh, Ravinder J; Stratakis, Constantine A; Pacak, Karel

    2010-09-01

    Organ of Zuckerkandl paragangliomas (PGLs) are rare neuroendocrine tumors that are derived from chromaffin cells located around the origin of the inferior mesenteric artery extending to the level of the aortic bifurcation. Mutations in the genes encoding succinate dehydrogenase subunits (SDH) B, C, and D (SDHx) have been associated with PGLs, but their contribution to PGLs of the organ of Zuckerkandl PGLs is not known. We aimed to describe the clinical presentation of patients with PGLs of the organ of Zuckerkandl and investigate the prevalence of SDHx mutations and other genetic defects among them. The clinical characteristics of 14 patients with PGL of the organ of Zuckerkandl were analyzed retrospectively; their DNA was tested for SDHx mutations and deletions. Eleven out of 14 (79%) patients with PGLs of the organ of Zuckerkandl were found to have mutations in the SDHB (9) or SDHD (2) genes; one patient was found to have the Carney-Stratakis syndrome (CSS), and his PGL was discovered during surgery for gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Our results show that SDHx mutations are prevalent in pediatric and adult PGLs of the organ of Zuckerkandl. Patients with PGLs of the organ of Zuckerkandl should be screened for SDHx mutations and the CSS; in addition, asymptomatic carriers of an SDHx mutation among the relatives of affected patients may benefit from tumor screening for early PGL detection.

  19. Investigation of tRNALys/Leu and ATPase 6/8 gene mutations in Iranian ataxia telangiectasia patients

    PubMed Central

    Houshmand, Massoud; Kasraie, Sadaf; Etemad Ahari, Solmaz; Moin, Mostafa; Bahar, Mohammadali; Zamani, Akram

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a rare human neurodegenerative autosomal recessive multisystem disease. AT is the result of mutations in the AT-mutated (ATM) gene. ATM protein is required for radiation-induced apoptosis and acts before mitochondrial collapse. The tRNA genes are considered one of the hot spots for mutations causing mitochondrial disorders. Due to the important role of ATM in apoptosis and its effect on the cell cycle it might be possible that it has a central role in mtDNA mutations. On the other hand, the tRNALys/Leu gene and also ATPase6 and ATPase8 genes are important for many mitochondrial diseases and many causative mutations have been reported from these genes. Material and methods In the present research, we performed mutation screening for these genes in 20 patients who were diagnosed with ataxia telangiectasia by a PCR sequencing method. Results The results showed a significant level of mtDNA variations in AT patients. Among 20 patients in this study, 12 patients (60%) were detected with point mutations, among which 8 mutations (40%) belonged to the MT-ATP6 gene. There was probably a second effect of mtDNA mutations in AT disease and mtDNA plays a main role in establishment of AT. Conclusions MtDNA mutations might be responsible for the decline of mitochondrial function in AT patients. Mitochondrial investigation can help to understand the mechanism of damage in AT disease. PMID:22295039

  20. Mutation survey of known LCA genes and loci in the Saudi Arabian population.

    PubMed

    Li, Yumei; Wang, Hui; Peng, Jianlan; Gibbs, Richard A; Lewis, Richard Alan; Lupski, James R; Mardon, Graeme; Chen, Rui

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a comprehensive survey of all known Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) genes and loci in a collection of 37 consanguineous LCA families from Saudi Arabia. Direct PCR and sequencing were used to screen 13 known LCA genes (GUCY2D, CRX, RPE65, TULP1, AIPL1, CRB1, RPGRIP1, LRAT, RDH12, IMPDH1, CEP290, RD3, LCA5). In addition, families without mutations identified were further screened with STR markers around these 13 known LCA genes and two loci. Disease-causing mutations were identified in nine of the 37 families: five in TULP1, two in CRB1, one in RPE65, and one in GUCY2D. Mutations in known genes only accounted for 24% of the Saudi families--much less than what has been observed in the European population (65%). Phenotype-genotype analysis was carried out to investigate the LCA disease penetrance for all families whose mutations identified. All identified mutations were found to segregate perfectly with the disease phenotype. On the other hand, severity of the disease varies for different patients carrying the same mutation and even within the same family. Furthermore, based on homozygosity mapping with both STR and SNP markers, one family is likely to map to the LCA3 locus. These results underscore the importance of studying LCA disease families from different ethnic backgrounds to identify additional novel LCA disease genes. Furthermore, perfect segregation between mutation and disease indicates that LCA is fully penetrant. However, phenotypic variations among patients carrying the same mutation suggest that at least some of the variations in the clinical phenotype is due to modification from the genetic background, environment, or other factors.

  1. A genetic pedigree analysis to identify gene mutations involved in femoral head necrosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Pan, Hehai; Zhu, Zhen-An

    2014-10-01

    The present study presents results from a linkage and mutation screening analysis aiming to identify the causative gene of femoral head necrosis, also known as osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH), in a Chinese pedigree. We collected clinical data on the osteonecrosis pedigree, and extracted blood and genomic DNA from the family members. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing allowed to identify a mutation in the COL2A1 gene of the proband; the clinical manifestations of the proband meet the criteria for osteonecrosis. The exons of COL2A1 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and mutation screening was conducted by direct sequencing in all the family members. The locus was also sequenced in 50 unrelated healthy controls. The c.3665G>A heterozygous mutation was detected in patients of the pedigree, but not in healthy individuals. We conclude that a mutation in the COL2A1 gene is the causative agent of ONFH in this family. Therefore, this mutation may be associated with osteonecrosis in Chinese populations.

  2. A Mutation in the Mitochondrial Fission Gene Dnm1l Leads to Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafian, Houman; Docherty, Louise; Leo, Vincenzo; Towlson, Christopher; Neilan, Monica; Steeples, Violetta; Lygate, Craig A.; Hough, Tertius; Townsend, Stuart; Williams, Debbie; Wells, Sara; Norris, Dominic; Glyn-Jones, Sarah; Land, John; Barbaric, Ivana; Lalanne, Zuzanne; Denny, Paul; Szumska, Dorota; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Griffin, Julian L.; Hargreaves, Iain; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Cheeseman, Michael; Watkins, Hugh; Dear, T. Neil

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in a number of genes have been linked to inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). However, such mutations account for only a small proportion of the clinical cases emphasising the need for alternative discovery approaches to uncovering novel pathogenic mutations in hitherto unidentified pathways. Accordingly, as part of a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen, we identified a mouse mutant, Python, which develops DCM. We demonstrate that the Python phenotype is attributable to a dominant fully penetrant mutation in the dynamin-1-like (Dnm1l) gene, which has been shown to be critical for mitochondrial fission. The C452F mutation is in a highly conserved region of the M domain of Dnm1l that alters protein interactions in a yeast two-hybrid system, suggesting that the mutation might alter intramolecular interactions within the Dnm1l monomer. Heterozygous Python fibroblasts exhibit abnormal mitochondria and peroxisomes. Homozygosity for the mutation results in the death of embryos midway though gestation. Heterozygous Python hearts show reduced levels of mitochondria enzyme complexes and suffer from cardiac ATP depletion. The resulting energy deficiency may contribute to cardiomyopathy. This is the first demonstration that a defect in a gene involved in mitochondrial remodelling can result in cardiomyopathy, showing that the function of this gene is needed for the maintenance of normal cellular function in a relatively tissue-specific manner. This disease model attests to the importance of mitochondrial remodelling in the heart; similar defects might underlie human heart muscle disease. PMID:20585624

  3. Factor 8 (F8) gene mutation profile of Turkish hemophilia A patients with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fidanci, Inanç D; Kavakli, Kaan; Uçar, Canan; Timur, Cetin; Meral, Adalet; Kilinç, Yurdanur; Sayilan, Hülya; Kazanci, Elif; Cağlayan, S Hande

    2008-07-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) replacement therapy is ineffective in hemophilia A patients who develop alloantibodies (inhibitors) against FVIII. The type of factor 8 (F8) gene mutation, genes in the major histocompatibility complex loci, and also polymorphisms in IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha are the major predisposing factors for inhibitor formation. The present study was initiated to reveal the F8 gene mutation profile of 30 severely affected high-responder patients with inhibitor levels of more than 5 Bethesda U (BU)/ml and four low-responder patients with inhibitors less than 5 BU/ml. Southern blot and PCR analysis were performed to detect intron 22 and intron 1 inversions, respectively. Point mutations were screened by DNA sequence analysis of all coding regions, intron/exon boundaries, promoter and 3' UTR regions of the F8 gene. The prevalent mutation was the intron 22 inversion among the high-responder patients followed by large deletions, small deletions, and nonsense mutations. Only one missense and one splicing error mutation was seen. Among the low-responder patients, three single nucleotide deletions and one intron 22 inversion were found. All mutation types detected were in agreement with the severe hemophilia A phenotype, most likely leading to a deficiency of and predisposition to the development of alloantibodies against FVIII. It is seen that Turkish hemophilia A patients with major molecular defects have a higher possibility of developing inhibitors.

  4. Low Prevalence of CHEK2 Gene Mutations in Multiethnic Cohorts of Breast Cancer Patients in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad, Suriati; Isa, Nurismah Md; Muhammad, Rohaizak; Emran, Nor Aina; Kitan, Nor Mayah; Kang, Peter; Kang, In Nee; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Teo, Soo Hwang; Akmal, Sharifah Noor

    2015-01-01

    CHEK2 is a protein kinase that is involved in cell-cycle checkpoint control after DNA damage. Germline mutations in CHEK2 gene have been associated with increase in breast cancer risk. The aim of this study is to identify the CHEK2 gene germline mutations among high-risk breast cancer patients and its contribution to the multiethnic population in Malaysia. We screened the entire coding region of CHEK2 gene on 59 high-risk breast cancer patients who tested negative for BRCA1/2 germline mutations from UKM Medical Centre (UKMMC), Hospital Kuala Lumpur (HKL) and Hospital Putrajaya (HPJ). Sequence variants identified were screened further in case-control cohorts consisting of 878 unselected invasive breast cancer patients (180 Malays, 526 Chinese and 172 Indian) and 270 healthy individuals (90 Malays, 90 Chinese and 90 Indian). By screening the entire coding region of the CHEK2 gene, two missense mutations, c.480A>G (p.I160M) and c.538C>T (p.R180C) were identified in two unrelated patients (3.4%). Further screening of these missense mutations on the case-control cohorts unveiled the variant p.I160M in 2/172 (1.1%) Indian cases and 1/90 (1.1%) Indian control, variant p.R180C in 2/526 (0.38%) Chinese cases and 0/90 Chinese control, and in 2/180 (1.1%) of Malay cases and 1/90 (1.1%) of Malay control. The results of this study suggest that CHEK2 mutations are rare among high-risk breast cancer patients and may play a minor contributing role in breast carcinogenesis among Malaysian population. PMID:25629968

  5. Immunohistochemical NF1 analysis does not predict NF1 gene mutation status in pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Stenman, Adam; Svahn, Fredrika; Welander, Jenny; Gustavson, Boel; Söderkvist, Peter; Gimm, Oliver; Juhlin, C Christofer

    2015-03-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PCCs) are tumors originating from the adrenal medulla displaying a diverse genetic background. While most PCCs are sporadic, about 40 % of the tumors have been associated with constitutional mutations in one of at least 14 known susceptibility genes. As 25 % of sporadic PCCs harbor somatic neurofibromin 1 gene (NF1) mutations, NF1 has been established as the most recurrently mutated gene in PCCs. To be able to pinpoint NF1-related pheochromocytoma (PCC) disease in clinical practice could facilitate the detection of familial cases, but the large size of the NF1 gene makes standard DNA sequencing methods cumbersome. The aim of this study was to examine whether mutations in the NF1 gene could be predicted by immunohistochemistry as a method to identify cases for further genetic characterization. Sixty-seven PCCs obtained from 67 unselected patients for which the somatic and constitutional mutational status of NF1 was known (49 NF1 wild type, 18 NF1 mutated) were investigated for NF1 protein immunoreactivity, and the results were correlated to clinical and genetic data. NF1 immunoreactivity was absent in the majority of the PCCs (44/67; 66 %), including 13 out of 18 cases (72 %) with a somatic or constitutional NF1 mutation. However, only a minority of the NF1 wild-type PCCs (18/49; 37 %) displayed retained NF1 immunoreactivity, thereby diminishing the specificity of the method. We conclude that NF1 immunohistochemistry alone is not a sufficient method to distinguish between NF1-mutated and non-mutated PCCs. In the clinical context, genetic screening therefore remains the most reliable tool to detect NF1-mutated PCCs.

  6. Targeted Prostate Cancer Screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from the Initial Screening Round of the IMPACT Study

    PubMed Central

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K.; Page, Elizabeth C.; Castro, Elena; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew; Sjoberg, Daniel; Assel, Melissa; Foster, Christopher S.; Mitchell, Gillian; Drew, Kate; Mæhle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Evans, D. Gareth; Bulman, Barbara; Eccles, Diana; McBride, Donna; van Asperen, Christi; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Selkirk, Christina; Hulick, Peter J.; Bojesen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Monica; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J.; Buys, Saundra; Conner, Tom; Ausems, Margreet G.; Ong, Kai-ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Maia, Sofia; Foulkes, William D.; Taherian, Nassim; Ruijs, Marielle; den Enden, Apollonia T. Helderman-van; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Adank, Muriel A.; Walker, Lisa; Schmutzler, Rita; Tucker, Kathy; Kirk, Judy; Hodgson, Shirley; Harris, Marion; Douglas, Fiona; Lindeman, Geoffrey J.; Zgajnar, Janez; Tischkowitz, Marc; Clowes, Virginia E.; Susman, Rachel; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Patcher, Nicholas; Gadea, Neus; Spigelman, Allan; van Os, Theo; Liljegren, Annelie; Side, Lucy; Brewer, Carole; Brady, Angela F.; Donaldson, Alan; Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Friedman, Eitan; Chen-Shtoyerman, Rakefet; Amor, David J.; Copakova, Lucia; Barwell, Julian; Giri, Veda N.; Murthy, Vedang; Nicolai, Nicola; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Strom, Sara; Henderson, Alex; McGrath, John; Gallagher, David; Aaronson, Neil; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Bangma, Chris; Dearnaley, David; Costello, Philandra; Eyfjord, Jorunn; Rothwell, Jeanette; Falconer, Alison; Gronberg, Henrik; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Johannsson, Oskar; Khoo, Vincent; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Lubinski, Jan; Axcrona, Ulrika; Melia, Jane; McKinley, Joanne; Mitra, Anita V.; Moynihan, Clare; Rennert, Gad; Suri, Mohnish; Wilson, Penny; Killick, Emma; Moss, Sue; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls) is an international consortium of 62 centres in 20 countries evaluating the use of targeted PCa screening in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Objective To report the first year's screening results for all men at enrolment in the study. Design, setting and participants We recruited men aged 40–69 yr with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and a control group of men who have tested negative for a pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation known to be present in their families. All men underwent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing at enrolment, and those men with PSA >3 ng/ml were offered prostate biopsy. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis PSA levels, PCa incidence, and tumour characteristics were evaluated. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the number of PCa cases among groups and the differences among disease types. Results and limitations We recruited 2481 men (791 BRCA1 carriers, 531 BRCA1 controls; 731 BRCA2 carriers, 428 BRCA2 controls). A total of 199 men (8%) presented with PSA >3.0 ng/ml, 162 biopsies were performed, and 59 PCas were diagnosed (18 BRCA1 carriers, 10 BRCA1 controls; 24 BRCA2 carriers, 7 BRCA2 controls); 66% of the tumours were classified as intermediate- or high-risk disease. The positive predictive value (PPV) for biopsy using a PSA threshold of 3.0 ng/ml in BRCA2 mutation carriers was 48%—double the PPV reported in population screening studies. A significant difference in detecting intermediate- or high-risk disease was observed in BRCA2 carriers. Ninety-five percent of the men were white, thus the results cannot be generalised to all ethnic groups. Conclusions The IMPACT screening network will be useful

  7. Targeted prostate cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the initial screening round of the IMPACT study.

    PubMed

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Page, Elizabeth C; Castro, Elena; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew; Sjoberg, Daniel; Assel, Melissa; Foster, Christopher S; Mitchell, Gillian; Drew, Kate; Mæhle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Evans, D Gareth; Bulman, Barbara; Eccles, Diana; McBride, Donna; van Asperen, Christi; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Selkirk, Christina; Hulick, Peter J; Bojesen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Monica; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J; Buys, Saundra; Conner, Tom; Ausems, Margreet G; Ong, Kai-ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Teixeira, Manuel R; Maia, Sofia; Foulkes, William D; Taherian, Nassim; Ruijs, Marielle; Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia T; Izatt, Louise; Davidson, Rosemarie; Adank, Muriel A; Walker, Lisa; Schmutzler, Rita; Tucker, Kathy; Kirk, Judy; Hodgson, Shirley; Harris, Marion; Douglas, Fiona; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Zgajnar, Janez; Tischkowitz, Marc; Clowes, Virginia E; Susman, Rachel; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Patcher, Nicholas; Gadea, Neus; Spigelman, Allan; van Os, Theo; Liljegren, Annelie; Side, Lucy; Brewer, Carole; Brady, Angela F; Donaldson, Alan; Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Friedman, Eitan; Chen-Shtoyerman, Rakefet; Amor, David J; Copakova, Lucia; Barwell, Julian; Giri, Veda N; Murthy, Vedang; Nicolai, Nicola; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Strom, Sara; Henderson, Alex; McGrath, John; Gallagher, David; Aaronson, Neil; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Bangma, Chris; Dearnaley, David; Costello, Philandra; Eyfjord, Jorunn; Rothwell, Jeanette; Falconer, Alison; Gronberg, Henrik; Hamdy, Freddie C; Johannsson, Oskar; Khoo, Vincent; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Lubinski, Jan; Axcrona, Ulrika; Melia, Jane; McKinley, Joanne; Mitra, Anita V; Moynihan, Clare; Rennert, Gad; Suri, Mohnish; Wilson, Penny; Killick, Emma; Moss, Sue; Eeles, Rosalind A

    2014-09-01

    Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls) is an international consortium of 62 centres in 20 countries evaluating the use of targeted PCa screening in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. To report the first year's screening results for all men at enrollment in the study. We recruited men aged 40-69 yr with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and a control group of men who have tested negative for a pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation known to be present in their families. All men underwent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing at enrollment, and those men with PSA >3 ng/ml were offered prostate biopsy. PSA levels, PCa incidence, and tumour characteristics were evaluated. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the number of PCa cases among groups and the differences among disease types. We recruited 2481 men (791 BRCA1 carriers, 531 BRCA1 controls; 731 BRCA2 carriers, 428 BRCA2 controls). A total of 199 men (8%) presented with PSA >3.0 ng/ml, 162 biopsies were performed, and 59 PCas were diagnosed (18 BRCA1 carriers, 10 BRCA1 controls; 24 BRCA2 carriers, 7 BRCA2 controls); 66% of the tumours were classified as intermediate- or high-risk disease. The positive predictive value (PPV) for biopsy using a PSA threshold of 3.0 ng/ml in BRCA2 mutation carriers was 48%-double the PPV reported in population screening studies. A significant difference in detecting intermediate- or high-risk disease was observed in BRCA2 carriers. Ninety-five percent of the men were white, thus the results cannot be generalised to all ethnic groups. The IMPACT screening network will be useful for targeted PCa screening studies in men with germline genetic risk variants as they are discovered. These preliminary results support the

  8. Molecular analysis of contiguous exons of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene: identification of a new PKU mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Dianzani, I; Camaschella, C; Saglio, G; Ferrero, G B; Ramus, S; Ponzone, A; Cotton, R G

    1993-01-01

    A modified application of the chemical cleavage of mismatch (CCM) method has been used to screen three contiguous exons (exons 9, 10, and 11) of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in 17 Italian PKU patients. A new nonsense heterozygous C-->G transversion within exon 11 (S359X) was identified in a single patient. Only one of the four mutations previously reported in this DNA region in Caucasians was found. This lesion, IVS X-546, was detected in five of the 34 PKU alleles examined. Our results underline the versatility of the CCM method for scanning a gene for multiple mutations. Images PMID:8097261

  9. Molecular analysis of contiguous exons of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene: identification of a new PKU mutation.

    PubMed

    Dianzani, I; Camaschella, C; Saglio, G; Ferrero, G B; Ramus, S; Ponzone, A; Cotton, R G

    1993-03-01

    A modified application of the chemical cleavage of mismatch (CCM) method has been used to screen three contiguous exons (exons 9, 10, and 11) of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in 17 Italian PKU patients. A new nonsense heterozygous C-->G transversion within exon 11 (S359X) was identified in a single patient. Only one of the four mutations previously reported in this DNA region in Caucasians was found. This lesion, IVS X-546, was detected in five of the 34 PKU alleles examined. Our results underline the versatility of the CCM method for scanning a gene for multiple mutations.

  10. Multiple de novo mutations in the MECP2 gene.

    PubMed

    Bunyan, David J; Robinson, David O

    2008-09-01

    Rett syndrome is an X-linked dominant disorder that usually arises following a single de novo mutation in the MECP2 gene. Point mutation testing and gene dosage analysis of a cohort of British Rett syndrome patients in our laboratory revealed four females who each had two different de novo causative mutations, presumed to be in cis because the patients showed no deviation from the classical Rett syndrome phenotype. Two of these cases had a point mutation and a small intraexonic deletion, a third had a whole exon deletion and a separate small intraexonic deletion, and a fourth case had a small intraexonic deletion and a large duplication. These findings highlight the necessity to perform both point mutation analysis and exon dosage analysis in such cases, particularly because of the possibility of undetected parental mosaicism and the implications for prenatal diagnosis in future pregnancies. These cases also suggest that the MECP2 gene may be particularly prone to multiple mutation events.

  11. Mutation analysis of tuberous sclerosis families using the chromosome 16 (TSC2) tuberin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, J.; Wolpert, C.; Kumar, A.

    1994-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder which affects numerous body systems, especially brain and kidneys. The estimated prevalence of TSC is 1 per 10,000 population and the disease occurs in all racial groups. TSC exhibits both incomplete penetrance and variable expression and it is estimated that approximately 50% of affected individuals are the result of new mutations. TSC is a heterogeneous disorder with at least two disease loci which linkage studies have mapped to chromosomes 9q34 (TSC1) and 16p13.3 (TSC2). The chromosome 16 TSC gene, a 5.5 kb transcript which has been named tuberin, has recently been isolated and the characterization of the gene and mutational analysis of chromosome 16 families are presently underway. Using cDNA clones which cover approximately 90%, including the 3{prime} end, of the tuberin gene, we have screened Southern blots of 44 confirmed familial and sporadic TSC cases using the restriction enzymes Bam HI, Hind III and Taq I. To date, we have detected no confirmed deletions in any of these cases. We are in the process of screening using Pvu II blots. In addition, our laboratory is beginning to screen the TSC cases for mutations using SSCP in conjunction with RT-PCR of lymphoblast RNA and PCR of lymphoblast DNA using primers prepared from the gene sequence. We have recently ascertained an additional 20 sproadic TSC cases which will be subjected to analysis and these results together with our mutation findings will be presented. Our results would indicate that the number of mutations detectable using Southern blotting is small, especially in the larger chromosome 16 TSC families as opposed to sporadic mutations, and that more detailed technical analysis will be necessary to determine the full range of mutations in the large majority of TSC cases.

  12. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy in the Agarwals: Utility of founder mutations in CAPN3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Khadilkar, Satish V.; Chaudhari, Chetan R.; Dastur, Rashna S.; Gaitonde, Pradnya S.; Yadav, Jayendra G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Diagnostic evaluation of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) involves specialized studies on muscle biopsy and mutation analysis. Mutation screening is the gold standard for diagnosis but is difficult as the gene is large and multiple mutations are known. This study evaluates the utility of two known founder mutations as a first-line diagnostic test for LGMD2A in the Agarwals. Materials and Methods: The Agarwals with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) phenotype were analyzed for two founder alleles (intron 18/exon 19 c.2051-1G>T and exon 22 c.2338G>C). Asymptomatic first-degree relatives of patients with genetically confirmed mutations and desirous of counseling were screened for founder mutations. Results: Founder alleles were detected in 26 out of 29 subjects with LGMD phenotype (89%). The most common genotype observed was homozygous for exon 22 c.2338 G>C mutation followed by compound heterozygosity. Single founder allele was identified in two. Single allele was detected in two of the five asymptomatic relatives. Conclusion: Eighty-nine percent of the Agarwals having LGMD phenotype have LGMD2A resulting from founder mutations. Founder allele analysis can be utilized as the initial noninvasive diagnostic step for index cases, carrier detection, and counseling. PMID:27011640

  13. Analysis of gene mutations in children with cholestasis of undefined etiology

    PubMed Central

    Miethke, Alexander; Liu, Cong; Kauffmann, Gregory; Moyer, Katie; Zhang, Kejian; Bezerra, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The discovery of genetic mutations in children with inherited syndromes of intrahepatic cholestasis allows for diagnostic specificity despite similar clinical phenotypes. Here, we aimed to determine whether mutation screening of target genes can assign a molecular diagnosis in children with idiopathic cholestasis. Methods DNA samples were obtained from 51 subjects with cholestasis of undefined etiology and surveyed for mutations in the genes SERPINA1, JAG1, ATP8B1, ABCB11, and ABCB4 by a high-throughput gene chip. Then, the sequence readouts for all five genes were analyzed for mutations and correlated with clinical phenotypes. Healthy subjects served as controls. Results Sequence analysis of the genes identified 14 (or 27%) subjects with missense, nonsense, deletion, and splice site variants associated with disease phenotypes based on the type of mutation and/or biallelic involvement in the JAG1, ATP8B1, ABCB11, or ABCB4 genes. These patients had no syndromic features and could not be differentiated by biochemical markers or histopathology. Among the remaining subjects, 10 (or ~20%) had sequence variants in ATP8B1 or ABCB11 that involved only one allele, 8 had variants not likely to be associated with disease phenotypes, and 19 had no variants that changed amino acid composition. Conclusion Gene sequence analysis assigned a molecular diagnosis in 27% of subjects with idiopathic cholestasis based on the presence of variants likely to cause disease phenotypes. PMID:20683201

  14. Analysis of GPR101 and AIP genes mutations in acromegaly: a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Ferraù, Francesco; Romeo, P D; Puglisi, S; Ragonese, M; Torre, M L; Scaroni, C; Occhi, G; De Menis, E; Arnaldi, G; Trimarchi, F; Cannavò, S

    2016-12-01

    This multicentric study aimed to investigate the prevalence of the G protein-coupled receptor 101 (GPR101) p.E308D variant and aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene mutations in a representative cohort of Italian patients with acromegaly. 215 patients with GH-secreting pituitary adenomas, referred to 4 Italian referral centres for pituitary diseases, have been included. Three cases of gigantism were present. Five cases were classified as FIPA. All the patients have been screened for germline AIP gene mutations and GPR101 gene p.E308D variant. Heterozygous AIP gene variants have been found in 7 patients (3.2 %). Five patients carried an AIP mutation (2.3 %; 4 females): 3 patients harboured the p.R3O4Q mutation, one had the p.R304* mutation and the last one the IVS3+1G>A mutation. The prevalence of AIP mutations was 3.3 % and 2.8 % when considering only the patients diagnosed when they were <30 or <40-year old, respectively. Furthermore, 2.0 % of the patients with a pituitary macroadenoma and 4.2 % of patients resistant to somatostatin analogues treatment were found to harbour an AIP gene mutation. None of the patients was found to carry the GPR101 p.E308D variant. The prevalence of AIP gene mutations among our sporadic and familial acromegaly cases was similar to that one reported in previous studies, but lower when considering only the cases diagnosed before 40 years of age. The GPR101 p.E308D change is unlikely to have a role in somatotroph adenomas tumorigenesis, since none of our sporadic or familial patients tested positive for this variant.

  15. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents. PMID:25045626

  16. Mutations and polymorphism in bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus, Montagu 1821) albumin gene: First identification of mutations responsible for inherited bisalbuminemia.

    PubMed

    Gili, Claudia; Bonsembiante, Federico; Beffagna, Giorgia; Mazzariol, Sandro; Gelain, Maria Elena

    2017-02-24

    Hereditary bisalbuminemia is an asymptomatic and heterozygous condition in a range of species characterized by the presence of two serum albumin fractions with different electrophoretic mobility resulting in a bicuspid pattern on serum electrophoresis. Bisalbuminemia has been diagnosed by electrophoresis in two bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) families, but causative mutations and the inheritance pattern have not been identified. The aims of this work are: to investigate polymorphisms of the bottlenose dolphin albumin gene and to identify mutations causative of bisalbuminemia; to identify the inheritance pattern in two bottlenose dolphin families. Coding regions of the albumin gene were screened for mutations in 15 bottlenose dolphins kept under human care from two distinct families. Eighteen albumin mutations (three synonymous and 15 non-synonymous) were identified. Two non-synonymous variations co-segregated with bisalbuminemic phenotype: p.Phe146Leu in exon 4 and p.Tyr163His in exon 5. The amino acid change in exon 5 was associated with the secondary and/or tertiary structure variation of the protein and has been reported as causative of bisalbuminemia in humans. Pedigree analysis of the dolphin families showed an autosomal codominant inheritance pattern. In this work, the mutations potentially responsible for bisalbuminemia were identified and confirmed the autosomal codominant trait in bottlenose dolphins.

  17. Motility defects in Campylobacter jejuni defined gene deletion mutants caused by second-site mutations

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Stefan P. W.; Gupta, Srishti; Baig, Abiyad; L'Heureux, Joanna; Pont, Elsa; Wolanska, Dominika P.; Maskell, Duncan J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation due to mutation and phase variation has a considerable impact on the commensal and pathogenic behaviours of Campylobacter jejuni. In this study, we provide an example of how second-site mutations can interfere with gene function analysis in C. jejuni. Deletion of the flagellin B gene (flaB) in C. jejuni M1 resulted in mutant clones with inconsistent motility phenotypes. From the flaB mutant clones picked for further analysis, two were motile, one showed intermediate motility and two displayed severely attenuated motility. To determine the molecular basis of this differential motility, a genome resequencing approach was used. Second-site mutations were identified in the severely attenuated and intermediate motility flaB mutant clones: a TA-dinucleotide deletion in fliW and an A deletion in flgD, respectively. Restoration of WT fliW, using a newly developed genetic complementation system, confirmed that the second-site fliW mutation caused the motility defect as opposed to the primary deletion of flaB. This study highlights the importance of (i) screening multiple defined gene deletion mutant clones, (ii) genetic complementation of the gene deletion and ideally (iii) screening for second-site mutations that might interfere with the pathways/mechanisms under study. PMID:26385289

  18. Analysis of TGFBI gene mutations in Chinese patients with corneal dystrophies and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Juhua; Han, Xiaoli; Huang, Dinggou; Yu, Lin; Zhu, Yihua; Tong, Yi; Zhu, Binliang; Li, Chuanbao; Weng, Mingshe

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To analyze human transforming growth factor b-induced (TGFBI) gene mutations in Chinese patients with corneal dystrophies (CDs). Methods Twenty-one families with corneal dystrophies were subjected to phenotypic and genotypic characterization. The corneal phenotypes of patients were documented by slit lamp photography. Mutation screening of the coding regions of TGFBI was performed by direct sequencing. An additional 43 families and 3 sporadic patients with TGFBI dystrophies from China reported in the literature were reviewed. Results Five mutations of TGFBI were identified in 21 families with CDs, including one novel small deletion mutation, c.△1838–1849 (p.Δ613–616VAEP), responsible for one variant lattice CD (LCD) family and 4 known mutations, R555W mutation for 10 granular cornea dystrophy type I (GCD1) families, R124H for 5 GCD type II (GCD2), R124C for 4 LCD1, and H626R for one variant LCD. In a cohort of Chinese patients (n=355) with TGFBI dystrophies from 64 families and 3 sporadic cases, 19 distinct mutations were found in several different CD subtypes. The 3 most common phenotypes were ranked as follows: GCD1, GCD2, and LCD1. Mutation hot spots at R124 and R555 occurred in >80% of these families. Conclusions Our findings extend the mutational spectrum of TFGBI, and this is also the first extensively delineated TGFBI mutation profile associated with the various corneal dystrophies in the Chinese population. PMID:20664689

  19. Novel mutations in natriuretic peptide receptor-2 gene underlie acromesomelic dysplasia, type maroteaux

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Natriuretic peptides (NPs) are peptide hormones that exert their biological actions by binding to three types of cell surface natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs). The receptor NPR-B binding C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) acts locally as a paracrine and/or autocrine regulator in a wide variety of tissues. Mutations in the gene NPR2 have been shown to cause acromesomelic dysplasia-type Maroteaux (AMDM), an autosomal recessive skeletal disproportionate dwarfism disorder in humans. Methods In the study, presented here, genotyping of six consanguineous families of Pakistani origin with AMDM was carried out using polymorphic microsatellite markers, which are closely linked to the gene NPR2 on chromosome 9p21-p12. To screen for mutations in the gene NPR2, all of its coding exons and splice junction sites were PCR amplified from genomic DNA of affected and unaffected individuals of the families and sequenced. Results Sequence analysis of the gene NPR2 identified a novel missence mutation (p.T907M) in five families, and a splice donor site mutation c.2986 + 2 T > G in the other family. Conclusion We have described two novel mutations in the gene NPR2. The presence of the same mutation (p.T907M) and haplotype in five families (A, B, C, D, E) is suggestive of a founder effect. PMID:22691581

  20. A Novel Missense Mutation of the DDHD1 Gene Associated with Juvenile Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chujun; Fan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (jALS) is a rare form of ALS with an onset age of less than 25 years and is frequently thought to be genetic in origin. DDHD1 gene mutations have been reported to be associated with the SPG28 subtype of autosomal recessive HSP but have never been reported in jALS patients. Methods: Gene screens for the causative genes of ALS, HSP and CMT using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies were performed on a jALS patient. Sanger sequencing was used to validate identified variants and perform segregation analysis. Results: We identified a novel c.1483A>G (p.Met495Val) homozygous missense mutation of the DDHD1 gene in the jALS patient. All of his parents and young bother were heterozygous for this mutation. The mutation was not found in 800 Chinese control subjects or the database of dbSNP, ExAC and 1000G. Conclusion: The novel c.1483A>G (p.Met495Val) missense mutation of the DDHD1 gene could be a causative mutation of autosomal recessive jALS. PMID:27999540

  1. New mutations in the ATM gene and clinical data of 25 AT patients.

    PubMed

    Demuth, Ilja; Dutrannoy, Véronique; Marques, Wilson; Neitzel, Heidemarie; Schindler, Detlev; Dimova, Petja S; Chrzanowska, Krystyna H; Bojinova, Veneta; Gregorek, Hanna; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; von Moers, Arpad; Schulze, Ilka; Nicke, Marion; Bora, Elcin; Cankaya, Tufan; Oláh, Éva; Kiss, Csongor; Bessenyei, Beáta; Szakszon, Katalin; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Kroisel, Peter Michael; Sodia, Sigrun; Goecke, Timm O; Dörk, Thilo; Digweed, Martin; Sperling, Karl; de Sá, Joaquim; Lourenco, Charles Marques; Varon, Raymonda

    2011-11-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar degeneration, immunodeficiency, oculocutaneous telangiectasias, chromosomal instability, radiosensitivity, and cancer predisposition. The gene mutated in the patients, ATM, encodes a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase family proteins. The ATM protein has a key role in the cellular response to DNA damage. Truncating and splice site mutations in ATM have been found in most patients with the classical AT phenotype. Here we report of our extensive ATM mutation screening on 25 AT patients from 19 families of different ethnic origin. Previously unknown mutations were identified in six patients including a new homozygous missense mutation, c.8110T>C (p.Cys2704Arg), in a severely affected patient. Comprehensive clinical data are presented for all patients described here along with data on ATM function generated by analysis of cell lines established from a subset of the patients.

  2. A Systematic Screen for Tube Morphogenesis and Branching Genes in the Drosophila Tracheal System

    PubMed Central

    Ghabrial, Amin S.; Levi, Boaz P.; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Many signaling proteins and transcription factors that induce and pattern organs have been identified, but relatively few of the downstream effectors that execute morphogenesis programs. Because such morphogenesis genes may function in many organs and developmental processes, mutations in them are expected to be pleiotropic and hence ignored or discarded in most standard genetic screens. Here we describe a systematic screen designed to identify all Drosophila third chromosome genes (∼40% of the genome) that function in development of the tracheal system, a tubular respiratory organ that provides a paradigm for branching morphogenesis. To identify potentially pleiotropic morphogenesis genes, the screen included analysis of marked clones of homozygous mutant tracheal cells in heterozygous animals, plus a secondary screen to exclude mutations in general “house-keeping” genes. From a collection including more than 5,000 lethal mutations, we identified 133 mutations representing ∼70 or more genes that subdivide the tracheal terminal branching program into six genetically separable steps, a previously established cell specification step plus five major morphogenesis and maturation steps: branching, growth, tubulogenesis, gas-filling, and maintenance. Molecular identification of 14 of the 70 genes demonstrates that they include six previously known tracheal genes, each with a novel function revealed by clonal analysis, and two well-known growth suppressors that establish an integral role for cell growth control in branching morphogenesis. The rest are new tracheal genes that function in morphogenesis and maturation, many through cytoskeletal and secretory pathways. The results suggest systematic genetic screens that include clonal analysis can elucidate the full organogenesis program and that over 200 patterning and morphogenesis genes are required to build even a relatively simple organ such as the Drosophila tracheal system. PMID:21750678

  3. Clinical features of MELAS and its relation with A3243G gene point mutation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Guo, Junhong; Fang, Wanghui; Jun, Qili; Shi, Kaili

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) mostly occur in children. The point mutation A3243G of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may work as a specific bio-marker for mitochondrial disorders. The related clinical features, however, may vary among individuals. This study therefore investigated the relation between MELAS clinical features and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA, in an attempt to provide further evidences for genetic diagnosis of MELAS. Children with MELAS-like syndromes were tested for both blood lactate level and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA. Further family study was performed by mtDNA mutation screening at the same loci for those who had positive gene mutation at A3243G loci. Those who were negative for A3243G point mutation were examined by muscle biopsy and genetic screening. Both clinical and genetic features were analyzed. In all 40 cases with positive A3243G mutation, 36 children fitted clinical diagnosis of MELAS. In other 484 cases with negative mutation, only 8 children were clinically diagnosed with MELAS. Blood lactate levels in both groups were all elevated (P>0.05). In a further genetic screening of 28 families, 10 biological mothers and 8 siblings of MELAS children had positive A3243G point mutations but without any clinical symptoms. Certain difference existed in the clinical manifestations between children who were positive and negative for A3243G mutation of mtDNA but without statistical significance. MELAS showed maternal inheritance under most circumstances.

  4. Clinical features of MELAS and its relation with A3243G gene point mutation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Guo, Junhong; Fang, Wanghui; Jun, Qili; Shi, Kaili

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) mostly occur in children. The point mutation A3243G of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may work as a specific bio-marker for mitochondrial disorders. The related clinical features, however, may vary among individuals. This study therefore investigated the relation between MELAS clinical features and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA, in an attempt to provide further evidences for genetic diagnosis of MELAS. Children with MELAS-like syndromes were tested for both blood lactate level and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA. Further family study was performed by mtDNA mutation screening at the same loci for those who had positive gene mutation at A3243G loci. Those who were negative for A3243G point mutation were examined by muscle biopsy and genetic screening. Both clinical and genetic features were analyzed. In all 40 cases with positive A3243G mutation, 36 children fitted clinical diagnosis of MELAS. In other 484 cases with negative mutation, only 8 children were clinically diagnosed with MELAS. Blood lactate levels in both groups were all elevated (P>0.05). In a further genetic screening of 28 families, 10 biological mothers and 8 silbings of MELAS children had positive A3243G point mutations but without any clinical symptoms. Certain difference existed in the clinical manifestations between children who were positive and negative for A3243G mutation of mtDNA but without statistical significance. MELAS showed maternal inheritance under most circumstances. PMID:26722549

  5. [Next generation sequencing technology for susceptible gene screening in familial non-medullary thyroid carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Dong, L; Yu, Y; Yu, J P; Hao, W J; Zheng, X Q; Cheng, Y N; Han, L; Zhao, J Z; Gao, M

    2017-01-23

    Objective: To screen genes related to familial non-medullary thyroid carcinoma (FNMTC) using next-generation sequencing (NGS). Methods: A panel of NGS was designed and sequencing was performed for DNA samples extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes of FNMTC patients and sporadic non-medullary thyroid carcinoma (SNMTC) cases, respectively, and gene mutations were screened. In addition, the clinicopathological characteristics, including tumor size, extension of surgery, lymph node metastasis and extra-thyroidal extension, were compared between patients with or without mutations. Results: In 63 NMTC samples, 45 mutations were detected on 13 genes. 37 germline mutations were detected in 47 FNMTC patients, while 8 germline mutations were detected in 16 SNMTC patients. In 8 FNMTC family lineages, the same mutations were carried by FNMTC patients from the same pedigree. The number of carriers of mutations was 29 in the 47 FNMTC patients and 6 in the 16 SNMTC patients, with a non-significant difference (P= 0.092). Among the FNMTC patients, there were 22 patients with central lymph node metastasis in the 29 mutation-positive patients, significantly more than 7 in the 16 mutation-negative cases (P= 0.031). As for the parentage, there were 3 patients with central lymph node involvement among the 7 patients of parent generation, while all the 9 patients of offspring generation had central lymph node metastasis (P=0.019). Conclusions: This panel of NGS can be used to screen mutant susceptibility gene of FNMTC patients, and the findings may be helpful for early detection of FNMTC patients and predicting the disease risk to familial members of FNMTC patients.

  6. Breast cancer screening of pregnant and breastfeeding women with BRCA mutations.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Harris; Matsen, Cindy; Freer, Phoebe; Kohlmann, Wendy; Stein, Matthew; Buys, Saundra S; Colonna, Sarah

    2017-04-01

    Screening recommendations for women with BRCA mutations include annual breast MRI starting at age 25, with annual mammogram added at age 30. The median age of childbearing in the US is age 28, therefore many BRCA mutation carriers will be pregnant or breastfeeding during the time when intensive screening is most important to manage their increased breast cancer risk. Despite this critical overlap, there is little evidence to guide clinicians on the appropriate screening for women with BRCA mutations during pregnancy or breastfeeding. Hormonal shifts that occur during pregnancy, the postpartum period, and breastfeeding result in changes to the breasts that may further complicate the sensitivity and specificity of screening modalities. We explore the safety and efficacy of available breast cancer screening modalities, including clinical breast exam, mammogram, breast MRI, and ultrasound among women with BRCA mutations who are pregnant or breastfeeding, providing recommendations from the most current published literature and expert opinion.

  7. Unusual multisystemic involvement and a novel BAG3 mutation revealed by NGS screening in a large cohort of myofibrillar myopathies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Myofibrillar myopathies (MFM) are a group of phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders, which are characterized by protein aggregations in muscle fibres and can be associated with multisystemic involvement. Methods We screened a large cohort of 38 index patients with MFM for mutations in the nine thus far known causative genes using Sanger and next generation sequencing (NGS). We studied the clinical and histopathological characteristics in 38 index patients and five additional relatives (n = 43) and particularly focused on the associated multisystemic symptoms. Results We identified 14 heterozygous mutations (diagnostic yield of 37%), among them the novel p.Pro209Gln mutation in the BAG3 gene, which was associated with onset in adulthood, a mild phenotype and an axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy, in the absence of giant axons at the nerve biopsy. We revealed several novel clinical phenotypes and unusual multisystemic presentations with previously described mutations: hearing impairment with a FLNC mutation, dysphonia with a mutation in DES and the first patient with a FLNC mutation presenting respiratory insufficiency as the initial symptom. Moreover, we described for the first time respiratory insufficiency occurring in a patient with the p.Gly154Ser mutation in CRYAB. Interestingly, we detected a polyneuropathy in 28% of the MFM patients, including a BAG3 and a MYOT case, and hearing impairment in 13%, including one patient with a FLNC mutation and two with mutations in the DES gene. In four index patients with a mutation in one of the MFM genes, typical histological findings were only identified at the ultrastructural level (29%). Conclusions We conclude that extraskeletal symptoms frequently occur in MFM, particularly cardiac and respiratory involvement, polyneuropathy and/or deafness. BAG3 mutations should be considered even in cases with a mild phenotype or an adult onset. We identified a genetic defect in one of

  8. Unusual multisystemic involvement and a novel BAG3 mutation revealed by NGS screening in a large cohort of myofibrillar myopathies.

    PubMed

    Semmler, Anna-Lena; Sacconi, Sabrina; Bach, J Elisa; Liebe, Claus; Bürmann, Jan; Kley, Rudolf A; Ferbert, Andreas; Anderheiden, Roland; Van den Bergh, Peter; Martin, Jean-Jacques; De Jonghe, Peter; Neuen-Jacob, Eva; Müller, Oliver; Deschauer, Marcus; Bergmann, Markus; Schröder, J Michael; Vorgerd, Matthias; Schulz, Jörg B; Weis, Joachim; Kress, Wolfram; Claeys, Kristl G

    2014-08-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies (MFM) are a group of phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders, which are characterized by protein aggregations in muscle fibres and can be associated with multisystemic involvement. We screened a large cohort of 38 index patients with MFM for mutations in the nine thus far known causative genes using Sanger and next generation sequencing (NGS). We studied the clinical and histopathological characteristics in 38 index patients and five additional relatives (n = 43) and particularly focused on the associated multisystemic symptoms. We identified 14 heterozygous mutations (diagnostic yield of 37%), among them the novel p.Pro209Gln mutation in the BAG3 gene, which was associated with onset in adulthood, a mild phenotype and an axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy, in the absence of giant axons at the nerve biopsy. We revealed several novel clinical phenotypes and unusual multisystemic presentations with previously described mutations: hearing impairment with a FLNC mutation, dysphonia with a mutation in DES and the first patient with a FLNC mutation presenting respiratory insufficiency as the initial symptom. Moreover, we described for the first time respiratory insufficiency occurring in a patient with the p.Gly154Ser mutation in CRYAB. Interestingly, we detected a polyneuropathy in 28% of the MFM patients, including a BAG3 and a MYOT case, and hearing impairment in 13%, including one patient with a FLNC mutation and two with mutations in the DES gene. In four index patients with a mutation in one of the MFM genes, typical histological findings were only identified at the ultrastructural level (29%). We conclude that extraskeletal symptoms frequently occur in MFM, particularly cardiac and respiratory involvement, polyneuropathy and/or deafness. BAG3 mutations should be considered even in cases with a mild phenotype or an adult onset. We identified a genetic defect in one of the known genes in less than half of the

  9. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html.

  10. Germline mutations of TP53 gene in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Damineni, Surekha; Rao, Vadlamudi Raghavendra; Kumar, Satish; Ravuri, Rajasekar Reddy; Kagitha, Sailaja; Dunna, Nageswara Rao; Digumarthi, Raghunadharao; Satti, Vishnupriya

    2014-09-01

    Germline alterations of the TP53 gene encoding the p53 protein have been observed in the majority of families with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, a rare dominantly inherited disorder with breast cancer. Genomic DNA samples of 182 breast cancer cases and 186 controls were sequenced for TP53 mutations in the exon 5-9 and intervening introns 5, 7-9. Direct sequencing was done using Applied Biosystem 3730 DNA analyzer. In the present study, we observed nine mutations in the sequenced region, of which five were novel. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was done for all the mutations; C14181T, T14201G, and G13203A have shown deviation from HWE. High linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed between C14181T (rs129547788) and T14201G (rs12951053) (r (2) = 0.98.3; D' = 1.00), whereas other observed mutations do not show strong LD with any of the other mutations. None of the intronic mutations has shown significant association with the breast cancer, two exonic mutations G13203A (rs28934578) and A14572G are significantly (P = 0.04, P = 0.007) associated with breast cancer. Germline mutations observed in DNA-binding domain of the gene showed significant association with breast cancer. This study reports five novel germline mutations in the TP53 gene out of which one mutation may confer significant risk to the breast cancer. Mutations in DNA-binding domain of TP53 gene may play role in the early onset and prognosis of breast cancer. The population-based studies of germline mutations in DNA-binding domain of TP53 gene helps in identification of individuals and families who are at risk of developing cancers.

  11. Mutations in the CLCN1 gene leading to myotonia congenita Thomsen and generalized myotonia Becker

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, M.C.; Meyer-Kline, C.; Otto, M.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant inherited myotonia congenita Thomsen (MC) and autosomal recessive generalized myotonia Becker (GM) are non-dystropic muscle disorders in which the symptom myotonia is based on an increased excitability of the muscle fiber membrane due to a reduced sarcolemmal chloride conductance. Affected individuals exhibit myotonic muscle stiffness in all skeletal muscles and a transient muscle weakness is particularly pronounced in the arms and hands of probands with the disorder GM. Recently we have shown linkage of the disorders MC and GM to the gene CLCN1 coding for the skeletal muscle chloride channel on chromosome 7 in German families. In addition we presented data supporting the hypothesis that GM is a genetically homogeneous disorder. Data are presented about an extended screen for mutations in the CLCN1 gene for our MC and GM population. We identified mainly missense mutations leading to altered amino acid codons. The previously described F413C mutation is by far the most common mutation for GM and is found in one family only (P480L, G482R, R496S). In addition we found 5{prime} donor and 3{prime} acceptor splice site mutations at various intron-exon boundaries, as well as a deletion mutation of 14 bp in exon 13. This deletion mutation is the second most common mutation in the GM population with a frequency of 8%. So far we have not determined sites of predominance of mutations in the CLCN1 gene, which could give us more insight into the regions critical for the function of the channel and the fact that the mutations in the gene may lead to dominant and recessive inheritance.

  12. The OPA1 Gene Mutations Are Frequent in Han Chinese Patients with Suspected Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A-Mei; Bi, Rui; Hu, Qiu-Xiang; Fan, Yu; Zhang, Qingjiong; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2017-04-01

    While many patients with hereditary optic neuropathies are caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a significant proportion of them does not have mtDNA mutation and is caused by mutations in genes of the nuclear genome. In this study, we investigated whether the OPA1 gene, which is a pathogenic gene for autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA), is frequently mutated in these patients. We sequenced all 29 exons of the OPA1 gene in 105 Han Chinese patients with suspected LHON. mtDNA copy number was quantified in blood samples from patients with and without OPA1 mutation and compared to healthy controls. In silico program-affiliated prediction, evolutionary conservation analysis, and in vitro cellular assays were performed to show the potential pathogenicity of the mutations. We identified nine OPA1 mutations in eight patients; six of them are located in exons and three are located in splicing sites. Mutation c.1172T > G has not been reported before. When we combined our data with 193 reported Han Chinese patients with optic neuropathy and compared to the available data of 4327 East Asians by the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC), we found a significant enrichment of potentially pathogenic OPA1 mutations in Chinese patients. Cellular assays for OPA1 mutants c.869G > A and c.2708_2711del showed abnormalities in OPA1 isoforms, mitochondrial morphology, and cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. Our results indicated that screening OPA1 mutation is needed for clinical diagnosis of patients with suspected optic neuropathy.

  13. CFTR gene mutations in isolated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatti, P.F.; Bombien, C.; Marigo, C.

    1994-09-01

    In order to identify a possible hereditary predisposition to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we have looked for the presence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene DNA sequence modifications in 28 unrelated patients with no signs of cystic fibrosis. The known mutations in Italian CF patients, as well as the most frequent worldwide CF mutations, were investigated. In addition, a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of about half of the coding sequence of the gene in 56 chromosomes from the patients and in 102 chromosomes from control individuals affected by other pulmonary diseases and from normal controls was performed. Nine different CFTR gene mutations and polymorphisms were found in seven patients, a highly significant increase over controls. Two of the patients were compound heterozygotes. Two frequent CF mutations were detected: deletion F508 and R117H; two rare CF mutations: R1066C and 3667ins4; and five CF sequence variants: R75Q (which was also described as a disease-causing mutation in male sterility cases due to the absence of the vasa deferentia), G576A, 2736 A{r_arrow}G, L997F, and 3271+18C{r_arrow}T. Seven (78%) of the mutations are localized in transmembrane domains. Six (86%) of the patients with defined mutations and polymorphisms had bronchiectasis. These results indicate that CFTR gene mutations and sequence alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of COPD.

  14. Somatic mutations of CASP3 gene in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Soung, Young Hwa; Lee, Jong Woo; Kim, Su Young; Park, Won Sang; Nam, Suk Woo; Lee, Jung Young; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2004-07-01

    Failure of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer. As an execution-phase caspase, caspase-3 plays a crucial role during apoptosis. To explore the possibility that the genetic alterations of CASP3, which encodes caspase-3, might be involved in the development of human tumors, we analyzed the entire coding region and all splice sites of human CASP3 gene for the detection of somatic mutations in a series of 944 human tumors, including 165 stomach carcinomas, 95 colon carcinomas, 76 breast carcinomas, 80 hepatocellular carcinomas, 181 non-small cell lung cancers, 45 acute leukemias, 28 multiple myelomas, 12 medulloblastomas, 15 Wilms' tumors, 12 renal cell carcinomas, 40 esophagus carcinomas, 33 urinary bladder carcinomas, 33 laryngeal carcinomas, and 129 non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Overall, we detected 14 somatic mutations of the CASP3 gene, including six missense and four silent mutations, two mutations in the introns, one mutation in the 5'-untranslated region, and one mutation in the 3'-untranslated region. The mutations were observed in four of 98 colon carcinomas (4.1%), four of 181 non-small cell lung cancers (2.2%), two of 129 non-Hodgkin lymphomas (1.6%), two of 165 stomach carcinomas (1.2%), one of 80 hepatocellular carcinomas (1.3%), and one of 28 multiple myelomas (3.6%). This is the first report on CASP3 gene mutations in human tumors; these data indicate that the CASP3 gene is occasionally mutated in human tumors.

  15. Mutation analysis of the CHK2 gene in breast carcinoma and other cancers.

    PubMed

    Ingvarsson, Sigurdur; Sigbjornsdottir, Bjarnveig I; Huiping, Chen; Hafsteinsdottir, Sigridur H; Ragnarsson, Gisli; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Arason, Adalgeir; Egilsson, Valgardur; Bergthorsson, Jon T H

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in the CHK2 gene at chromosome 22q12.1 have been reported in families with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Chk2 is an effector kinase that is activated in response to DNA damage and is involved in cell-cycle pathways and p53 pathways. We screened 139 breast tumors for loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 22q, using seven microsatellite markers, and screened 119 breast tumors with single-strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing for mutations in the CHK2 gene. Seventy-four of 139 sporadic breast tumors (53%) show loss of heterozygosity with at least one marker. These samples and 45 tumors from individuals carrying the BRCA2 999del5 mutation were screened for mutations in the CHK2 gene. In addition to putative polymorphic regions in short mononucleotide repeats in a non-coding exon and intron 2, a germ line variant (T59K) in the first coding exon was detected. On screening 1172 cancer patients for the T59K sequence variant, it was detected in a total of four breast-cancer patients, two colon-cancer patients, one stomach-cancer patient and one ovary-cancer patient, but not in 452 healthy individuals. A tumor-specific 5' splice site mutation at site +3 in intron 8 (TTgt [a --> c]atg) was also detected. We conclude that somatic CHK2 mutations are rare in breast cancer, but our results suggest a tumor suppressor function for CHK2 in a small proportion of breast tumors. Furthermore, our results suggest that the T59K CHK2 sequence variant is a low-penetrance allele with respect to tumor growth.

  16. Mutation analysis of the CHK2 gene in breast carcinoma and other cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ingvarsson, Sigurdur; Sigbjornsdottir, Bjarnveig I; Huiping, Chen; Hafsteinsdottir, Sigridur H; Ragnarsson, Gisli; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Arason, Adalgeir; Egilsson, Valgardur; Bergthorsson, Jon TH

    2002-01-01

    Background Mutations in the CHK2 gene at chromosome 22q12.1 have been reported in families with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Chk2 is an effector kinase that is activated in response to DNA damage and is involved in cell-cycle pathways and p53 pathways. Methods We screened 139 breast tumors for loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 22q, using seven microsatellite markers, and screened 119 breast tumors with single-strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing for mutations in the CHK2 gene. Results Seventy-four of 139 sporadic breast tumors (53%) show loss of heterozygosity with at least one marker. These samples and 45 tumors from individuals carrying the BRCA2 999del5 mutation were screened for mutations in the CHK2 gene. In addition to putative polymorphic regions in short mononucleotide repeats in a non-coding exon and intron 2, a germ line variant (T59K) in the first coding exon was detected. On screening 1172 cancer patients for the T59K sequence variant, it was detected in a total of four breast-cancer patients, two colon-cancer patients, one stomach-cancer patient and one ovary-cancer patient, but not in 452 healthy individuals. A tumor-specific 5' splice site mutation at site +3 in intron 8 (TTgt [a → c]atg) was also detected. Conclusion We conclude that somatic CHK2 mutations are rare in breast cancer, but our results suggest a tumor suppressor function for CHK2 in a small proportion of breast tumors. Furthermore, our results suggest that the T59K CHK2 sequence variant is a low-penetrance allele with respect to tumor growth. PMID:12052256

  17. Mutational specificity analysis: assay for mutations in the yeast SUP4-o gene.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Bernard A

    2014-01-01

    Mutational specificity analysis can yield valuable insights into processes that generate genetic change or maintain genetic stability. Powerful diagnostic tools for such analysis have been created by combining genetic assays for mutation with DNA sequencing. Here, steps for isolating spontaneous mutations in the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) suppressor tRNA gene SUP4-o as a prelude to sequence characterization are described (modifications of this protocol can be used to study induction of mutations by various physical or chemical agents). Mutations in SUP4-o are selected on drug-containing medium by virtue of their inactivation of suppressor activity. The small size, detailed knowledge of detectably mutable sites, and other features of the target gene facilitate subsequent analysis of these mutations.

  18. MicroRNA genes and their target 3'-untranslated regions are infrequently somatically mutated in ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Ryland, Georgina L; Bearfoot, Jennifer L; Doyle, Maria A; Boyle, Samantha E; Choong, David Y H; Rowley, Simone M; Tothill, Richard W; Gorringe, Kylie L; Campbell, Ian G

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs are key regulators of gene expression and have been shown to have altered expression in a variety of cancer types, including epithelial ovarian cancer. MiRNA function is most often achieved through binding to the 3'-untranslated region of the target protein coding gene. Mutation screening using massively-parallel sequencing of 712 miRNA genes in 86 ovarian cancer cases identified only 5 mutated miRNA genes, each in a different case. One mutation was located in the mature miRNA, and three mutations were predicted to alter the secondary structure of the miRNA transcript. Screening of the 3'-untranslated region of 18 candidate cancer genes identified one mutation in each of AKT2, EGFR, ERRB2 and CTNNB1. The functional effect of these mutations is unclear, as expression data available for AKT2 and EGFR showed no increase in gene transcript. Mutations in miRNA genes and 3'-untranslated regions are thus uncommon in ovarian cancer.

  19. MicroRNA Genes and Their Target 3′-Untranslated Regions Are Infrequently Somatically Mutated in Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Maria A.; Boyle, Samantha E.; Choong, David Y. H.; Rowley, Simone M.; Tothill, Richard W.; Gorringe, Kylie L.; Campbell, Ian G.

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs are key regulators of gene expression and have been shown to have altered expression in a variety of cancer types, including epithelial ovarian cancer. MiRNA function is most often achieved through binding to the 3′-untranslated region of the target protein coding gene. Mutation screening using massively-parallel sequencing of 712 miRNA genes in 86 ovarian cancer cases identified only 5 mutated miRNA genes, each in a different case. One mutation was located in the mature miRNA, and three mutations were predicted to alter the secondary structure of the miRNA transcript. Screening of the 3′-untranslated region of 18 candidate cancer genes identified one mutation in each of AKT2, EGFR, ERRB2 and CTNNB1. The functional effect of these mutations is unclear, as expression data available for AKT2 and EGFR showed no increase in gene transcript. Mutations in miRNA genes and 3′-untranslated regions are thus uncommon in ovarian cancer. PMID:22536442

  20. Hypomorphic mutations identified in candidate Leber congenital amaurosis disease gene CLUAP1

    PubMed Central

    Soens, Zachry T.; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Li; Eblimit, Aiden; Dharmat, Rachayata; Li, Yumei; Chen, Yiyun; Naqeeb, Mohammed; Fajardo, Norma; Lopez, Irma; Sun, Zhaoxia; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Chen, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is an early-onset form of retinal degeneration and six of the 22 known LCA disease genes encode photoreceptor ciliary proteins. Despite the identification of 22 LCA disease genes, the genetic basis of approximately 30% of LCA patients remains unknown. We sought to investigate the cause of disease in the remaining 30% by examining cilia-associated genes. Methods Whole-exome sequencing was performed on an LCA cohort of 212 unsolved probands previously screened for mutations in known retinal disease genes. Immunohistochemistry using mouse retinas was used to confirm protein localization and zebrafish were used to perform rescue experiments. Results A homozygous nonsynonymous mutation was found in a single proband in CLUAP1, a gene required for ciliogenesis and cilia maintenance. Cluap1 knockout zebrafish exhibit photoreceptor cell death as early as five days post fertilization and rescue experiments revealed that our proband’s mutation is significantly hypomorphic. Conclusion Consistent with the knowledge that CLUAP1 plays an important role in cilia function and that cilia are critical to photoreceptor function, our results indicate that hypomorphic mutations in CLUAP1 can result in dysfunctional photoreceptors without systemic abnormalities. This represents the first report linking mutations in CLUAP1 to human disease and establishes CLUAP1 as a candidate LCA gene. PMID:26820066

  1. Mutations in the consensus helicase domains of the Werner syndrome gene. Werner's Syndrome Collaborative Group.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, C E; Oshima, J; Wijsman, E M; Nakura, J; Miki, T; Piussan, C; Matthews, S; Fu, Y H; Mulligan, J; Martin, G M; Schellenberg, G D

    1997-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disease with a complex phenotype that is suggestive of accelerated aging. WS is caused by mutations in a gene, WRN, that encodes a predicted 1,432-amino-acid protein with homology to DNA and RNA helicases. Previous work identified four WS mutations in the 3' end of the gene, which resulted in predicted truncated protein products of 1,060-1,247 amino acids but did not disrupt the helicase domain region (amino acids 569-859). Here, additional WS subjects were screened for mutations, and the intron-exon structure of the gene was determined. A total of 35 exons were defined, with the coding sequences beginning in the second exon. Five new WS mutations were identified: two nonsense mutations at codons 369 and 889; a mutation at a splice-junction site, resulting in a predicted truncated protein of 760 amino acids; a 1-bp deletion causing a frameshift; and a predicted truncated protein of 391 amino acids. Another deletion is >15 kb of genomic DNA, including exons 19-23; the predicted protein is 1,186 amino acids long. Four of these new mutations either partially disrupt the helicase domain region or result in predicted protein products completely missing the helicase region. These results confirm that mutations in the WRN gene are responsible for WS. Also, the location of the mutations indicates that the presence or absence of the helicase domain does not influence the WS phenotype and suggests that WS is the result of complete loss of function of the WRN gene product. PMID:9012406

  2. Mutations in the consensus helicase domains of the Werner syndrome gene

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang-En; Oshima, Junko; Wijsman, E.M.

    1997-02-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disease with a complex phenotype that is suggestive of accelerated aging. WS is caused by mutations in a gene, WRN, that encodes a predicted 1,432-amino-acid protein with homology to DNA and RNA helicases. Previous work identified four WS mutations in the 3{prime} end of the gene, which resulted in predicted truncated protein products of 1,060-1,247 amino acids but did not disrupt the helicase domain region (amino acids 569-859). Here, additional WS subjects were screened for mutations, and the intron-exon structure of the gene was determined. A total of 35 exons were defined, with the coding sequences beginning in the second exon. Five new WS mutations were identified: two nonsense mutations at codons 369 and 889; a mutation at a splice-junction site, resulting in a predicted truncated protein of 760 amino acids; a 1-bp deletion causing a frameshift; and a predicted truncated protein of 391 amino acids. Another deletion is >15 kb of genomic DNA, including exons 19-23; the predicted protein is 1,186 amino acids long. Four of these new mutations either partially disrupt the helicase domain region or result in predicted protein products completely missing the helicase region. These results confirm that mutations in the WRN gene are responsible for WS. Also, the location of the mutations indicates that the presence or absence of the helicase domain does not influence the WS phenotype and suggests that WS is the result of complete loss of function of the WRN gene product. 63 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  3. Mismatch repair genes identified using genetic screens in Blm-deficient embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ge; Wang, Wei; Bradley, Allan

    2004-06-24

    Phenotype-driven recessive genetic screens in diploid organisms require a strategy to render the mutation homozygous. Although homozygous mutant mice can be generated by breeding, a reliable method to make homozygous mutations in cultured cells has not been available, limiting recessive screens in culture. Cultured embryonic stem (ES) cells provide access to all of the genes required to elaborate the fundamental components and physiological systems of a mammalian cell. Here we have exploited the high rate of mitotic recombination in Bloom's syndrome protein (Blm)-deficient ES cells to generate a genome-wide library of homozygous mutant cells from heterozygous mutations induced with a revertible gene trap retrovirus. We have screened this library for cells with defects in DNA mismatch repair (MMR), a system that detects and repairs base-base mismatches. We demonstrate the recovery of cells with homozygous mutations in known and novel MMR genes. We identified Dnmt1(ref. 5) as a novel MMR gene and confirmed that Dnmt1-deficient ES cells exhibit micro-satellite instability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the role of Dnmt1 in cancer. The combination of insertional mutagenesis in Blm-deficient ES cells establishes a new approach for phenotype-based recessive genetic screens in ES cells.

  4. Fumarate hydratase gene mutation in two young patients with sporadic uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Kubinova, Kristyna; Tesarova, Marketa; Hansikova, Hana; Vesela, Kamila; Kuzel, David; Mara, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Fumarate hydratase (FH) is a key enzyme of the Krebs cycle. Germline mutations in the FH gene encoding fumarate hydratase cause autosomal dominant syndromes multiple cutaneous and uterine leiomyomata and hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). Few data have been published on the role of FH gene mutation in development of uterine fibroids outside the context of multiple cutaneous and uterine leiomyomata /HLRCC. We report two FH gene mutations, one novel and one previously described, in two young patients with sporadic uterine fibroids and decreased fumarate hydratase activity in lymphocytes. In patient 1, a novel heterozygous mutation c.892G>C was found. In patient 2 we detected heterozygous mutation c.584T>C. Both the patients had a negative family history for renal cancer and cutaneous leiomyomatosis. None of the relatives, however, underwent renal imaging at the time of writing. FH mutation carriers may be easily identified by analysis of fumarate hydratase activity in blood lymphocytes. We suggest performing fumarate hydratase activity or FH mutation screening in women with onset of uterine fibroids in their 20s and family history of uterine fibroids or other HLRCC-associated malignancies.

  5. Identification of two poorly prognosed ovarian carcinoma subtypes associated with CHEK2 germ-line mutation and non-CHEK2 somatic mutation gene signatures.

    PubMed

    Ow, Ghim Siong; Ivshina, Anna V; Fuentes, Gloria; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A

    2014-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HG-SOC), a major histologic type of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), is a poorly-characterized, heterogeneous and lethal disease where somatic mutations of TP53 are common and inherited loss-of-function mutations in BRCA1/2 predispose to cancer in 9.5-13% of EOC patients. However, the overall burden of disease due to either inherited or sporadic mutations is not known. We performed bioinformatics analyses of mutational and clinical data of 334 HG-SOC tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas to identify novel tumor-driving mutations, survival-significant patient subgroups and tumor subtypes potentially driven by either hereditary or sporadic factors. We identified a sub-cluster of high-frequency mutations in 22 patients and 58 genes associated with DNA damage repair, apoptosis and cell cycle. Mutations of CHEK2, observed with the highest intensity, were associated with poor therapy response and overall survival (OS) of these patients (P = 8.00e-05), possibly due to detrimental effect of mutations at the nuclear localization signal. A 21-gene mutational prognostic signature significantly stratifies patients into relatively low or high-risk subgroups with 5-y OS of 37% or 6%, respectively (P = 7.31e-08). Further analysis of these genes and high-risk subgroup revealed 2 distinct classes of tumors characterized by either germline mutations of genes such as CHEK2, RPS6KA2 and MLL4, or somatic mutations of other genes in the signature. Our results could provide improvement in prediction and clinical management of HG-SOC, facilitate our understanding of this complex disease, guide the design of targeted therapeutics and improve screening efforts to identify women at high-risk of hereditary ovarian cancers distinct from those associated with BRCA1/2 mutations.

  6. Mutations in olfactory signal transduction genes are not a major cause of human congenital general anosmia.

    PubMed

    Feldmesser, Ester; Bercovich, Dani; Avidan, Nili; Halbertal, Shmuel; Haim, Liora; Gross-Isseroff, Ruth; Goshen, Sivan; Lancet, Doron

    2007-01-01

    Anosmia affects the western world population, mostly the elderly, reaching to 5% in subjects over the age of 45 years and strongly lowering their quality of life. A smaller minority (about 0.01%) is born without a sense of smell, afflicted with congenital general anosmia (CGA). No causative genes for human CGA have been identified yet, except for some syndromic cases such as Kallman syndrome. In mice, however, deletion of any of the 3 main olfactory transduction components (guanidine triphosphate binding protein, adenylyl cyclase, and the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-gated channel) causes profound reduction of physiological responses to odorants. In an attempt to identify human CGA-related mutations, we performed whole-genome linkage analysis in affected families, but no significant linkage signals were observed, probably due to the small size of families analyzed. We further carried out direct mutation screening in the 3 main olfactory transduction genes in 64 unrelated anosmic individuals. No potentially causative mutations were identified, indicating that transduction gene variations underlie human CGA rarely and that mutations in other genes have to be identified. The screened genes were found to be under purifying selection, suggesting that they play a crucial functional role not only in olfaction but also potentially in additional pathways.

  7. Application of automatic mutation-gene pair extraction to diseases.

    PubMed

    Erdogmus, Muge; Sezerman, Osman Ugur

    2007-12-01

    To have a better understanding of the mechanisms of disease development, knowledge of mutations and the genes on which the mutations occur is of crucial importance. Information on disease-related mutations can be accessed through public databases or biomedical literature sources. However, information retrieval from such resources can be problematic because of two reasons: manually created databases are usually incomplete and not up to date, and reading through a vast amount of publicly available biomedical documents is very time-consuming. In this paper, we describe an automated system, MuGeX (Mutation Gene eXtractor), that automatically extracts mutation-gene pairs from Medline abstracts for a disease query. Our system is tested on a corpus that consists of 231 Medline abstracts. While recall for mutation detection alone is 85.9%, precision is 95.9%. For extraction of mutation-gene pairs, we focus on Alzheimer's disease. The recall for mutation-gene pair identification is estimated at 91.3%, and precision is estimated at 88.9%. With automatic extraction techniques, MuGeX overcomes the problems of information retrieval from public resources and reduces the time required to access relevant information, while preserving the accuracy of retrieved information.

  8. Colorectal Adenomatous Polyposis: Heterogeneity of Susceptibility Gene Mutations and Phenotypes in a Cohort of Italian Patients.

    PubMed

    Marabelli, Monica; Molinaro, Valeria; Abou Khouzam, Raefa; Berrino, Enrico; Panero, Mara; Balsamo, Antonella; Venesio, Tiziana; Ranzani, Guglielmina Nadia

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal adenomatous polyposis entailing cancer predisposition is caused by constitutional mutations in different genes. APC is associated with the familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP/AFAP) and MUTYH with the MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), while POLE and POLD1 mutations cause the polymerase proofreading-associated polyposis (PPAP). We screened for mutations in patients with multiple adenomas/FAP: 121 patients were analyzed for APC and MUTYH mutations, and 36 patients were also evaluated for POLE and POLD1 gene mutations. We found 20 FAP/AFAP, 15 MAP, and no PPAP subjects: pathogenic mutations proved to be heterogeneous, and included 5 APC and 1 MUTYH novel mutations. The mutation detection rate was significantly different between patients with 5-100 polyps and those with >100 polyps (p = 8.154 × 10(-7)), with APC mutations being associated with an aggressive phenotype (p = 1.279 × 10(-9)). Mean age at diagnosis was lower in FAP/AFAP compared to MAP (p = 3.055 × 10(-4)). Mutation-negative probands showed a mean age at diagnosis that was significantly higher than FAP/AFAP (p = 3.46986 × 10(-7)) and included 45.3% of patients with <30 polyps and 70.9% of patients with no family history. This study enlarges the APC and MUTYH mutational spectra, and also evaluated variants of uncertain significance, including the MUTYH p.Gln338His mutation. Moreover this study underscores the phenotypic heterogeneity and genotype-phenotype correlations in a cohort of Italian patients.

  9. Association of CFTR gene mutation with bronchial asthma

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Nutan; Awasthi, Shally; Dixit, Pratibha

    2012-01-01

    Mutation on both the copies of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene results in cystic fibrosis (CF), which is a recessively transmitted genetic disorder. It is hypothesized that individuals heterozygous for CFTR gene mutation may develop obstructive pulmonary diseases like asthma. There is great heterogeneity in the phenotypic presentation and severity of CF lung disease. This could be due to genetic or environmental factors. Several modifier genes have been identified which may directly or indirectly interact with CFTR pathway and affect the severity of disease. This review article discusses the information related to the association of CFTR gene mutation with asthma. Association between CFTR gene mutation and asthma is still unclear. Report ranges from studies showing positive or protective association to those showing no association. Therefore, studies with sufficiently large sample size and detailed phenotype are required to define the potential contribution of CFTR in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:22664493

  10. Spectrum and prevalence of FP/TMEM127 gene mutations in pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Yao, Li; Schiavi, Francesca; Cascon, Alberto; Qin, Yuejuan; Inglada-Pérez, Lucia; King, Elizabeth E; Toledo, Rodrigo A; Ercolino, Tonino; Rapizzi, Elena; Ricketts, Christopher J; Mori, Luigi; Giacchè, Mara; Mendola, Antonella; Taschin, Elisa; Boaretto, Francesca; Loli, Paola; Iacobone, Maurizio; Rossi, Gian-Paolo; Biondi, Bernadette; Lima-Junior, José Viana; Kater, Claudio E; Bex, Marie; Vikkula, Miikka; Grossman, Ashley B; Gruber, Stephen B; Barontini, Marta; Persu, Alexandre; Castellano, Maurizio; Toledo, Sergio P A; Maher, Eamonn R; Mannelli, Massimo; Opocher, Giuseppe; Robledo, Mercedes; Dahia, Patricia L M

    2010-12-15

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are genetically heterogeneous neural crest-derived neoplasms. We recently identified germline mutations of the novel transmembrane-encoding gene FP/TMEM127 in familial and sporadic pheochromocytomas consistent with a tumor suppressor effect. To examine the prevalence and spectrum of FP/TMEM127 mutations in pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas and to test the effect of mutations in vitro. We sequenced the FP/TMEM127 gene in 990 individuals with pheochromocytomas and/or paragangliomas, including 898 previously unreported cases without mutations in other susceptibility genes from 8 independent worldwide referral centers between January 2009 and June 2010. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based method was developed to screen for large gene deletions in 545 of these samples. Confocal microscopy of 5 transfected mutant proteins was used to determine their subcellular localization. The frequency and type of FP/TMEM127 mutation or deletion was assessed and correlated with clinical variables; the subcellular localization of 5 overexpressed mutants was compared with wild-type FP/TMEM127 protein. We identified 19 potentially pathogenic FP/TMEM127 germline mutations in 20 independent families, but no large deletions were detected. All mutation carriers had adrenal tumors, including 7 bilateral (P = 2.7 × 10(-4)) and/or with familial disease (5 of 20 samples; P = .005). The median age at disease onset in the FP/TMEM127 mutation group was similar to that of patients without a mutation (41.5 vs 45 years, respectively; P = .54). The most common presentation was that of a single benign adrenal tumor in patients older than 40 years. Malignancy was seen in 1 mutation carrier (5%). Expression of 5 novel FP/TMEM127 mutations in cell lines revealed diffuse localization of the mutant proteins in contrast with the discrete multiorganelle distribution of wild-type TMEM127. Germline mutations of FP/TMEM127 were associated with pheochromocytoma but

  11. Cilia gene mutations cause atrioventricular septal defects by multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Burnicka-Turek, Ozanna; Steimle, Jeffrey D.; Huang, Wenhui; Felker, Lindsay; Kamp, Anna; Kweon, Junghun; Peterson, Michael; Reeves, Roger H.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Gruber, Peter J.; Yang, Xinan H.; Shendure, Jay; Moskowitz, Ivan P.

    2016-01-01

    Atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs) are a common severe form of congenital heart disease (CHD). In this study we identified deleterious non-synonymous mutations in two cilia genes, Dnah11 and Mks1, in independent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mouse mutant lines with heritable recessive AVSDs by whole-exome sequencing. Cilia are required for left/right body axis determination and second heart field (SHF) Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, and we find that cilia mutations affect these requirements differentially. Dnah11avc4 did not disrupt SHF Hh signaling and caused AVSDs only concurrently with heterotaxy, a left/right axis abnormality. In contrast, Mks1avc6 disrupted SHF Hh signaling and caused AVSDs without heterotaxy. We performed unbiased whole-genome SHF transcriptional profiling and found that cilia motility genes were not expressed in the SHF whereas cilia structural and signaling genes were highly expressed. SHF cilia gene expression predicted the phenotypic concordance between AVSDs and heterotaxy in mice and humans with cilia gene mutations. A two-step model of cilia action accurately predicted the AVSD/heterotaxyu phenotypic expression pattern caused by cilia gene mutations. We speculate that cilia gene mutations contribute to both syndromic and non-syndromic AVSDs in humans and provide a model that predicts the phenotypic consequences of specific cilia gene mutations. PMID:27340223

  12. Neoplasms Associated with Germline and Somatic NF1 Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sachin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Neurofibromatosis 1 is a tumor predisposition genetic syndrome with autosomal dominant inheritance and virtually 100% penetrance by the age of 5 years. NF1 results from a loss-of-function mutation in the NF1 gene, resulting in decreased levels of neurofibromin in the cell. Neurofibromin is a negative regulator of various intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cellular proliferation. Although the loss of heterozygosity in the NF1 gene may predispose NF1 patients to certain malignancies, additional genetic alterations are a prerequisite for their development. The precise nature of these additional genetic alterations is not well defined, and genetic testing of all malignancies in NF1 patients becomes an essential component of future research in this subset of patients. In addition to germline NF1 mutations, alteration of the somatic NF1 gene is associated with sporadic malignancies such as adenocarcinoma of the colon, myelodysplastic syndrome, and anaplastic astrocytoma. Materials and Methods. A comprehensive English and non-English language search for all articles pertinent to malignancies associated with NF1 was conducted using PubMed, a search engine provided by the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health. Key words searched included the following: “malignancies associated with NF1”, “tumors associated with NF1”, and “NF1 and malignancies”. A comprehensive analysis in terms age and mode of presentation, investigation and therapeutic modalities, and outcome of the published data was performed and compared with similar information on the sporadic cases. Results. Malignancies in NF1 patients typically occur at an earlier age and, with an exception of optic pathway gliomas, certain types of malignancies carry a poor prognosis compared with their sporadic counterparts. Malignancies are the leading cause of death in NF1 patients, resulting in a 10- to 15-year decreased life expectancy compared with the

  13. FBN1 mutation screening of patients with Marfan syndrome and related disorders: detection of 46 novel FBN1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Attanasio, M; Lapini, I; Evangelisti, L; Lucarini, L; Giusti, B; Porciani, Mc; Fattori, R; Anichini, C; Abbate, R; Gensini, Gf; Pepe, G

    2008-07-01

    Fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1) mutations cause Marfan syndrome (MFS), an inherited connective tissue disorder with autosomal dominant transmission. Major clinical manifestations affect cardiovascular and skeletal apparatuses and ocular and central nervous systems. We analyzed FBN1 gene in 99 patients referred to our Center for Marfan Syndrome and Related Disorders (University of Florence, Florence, Italy): 85 were affected by MFS and 14 by other fibrillinopathies type I. We identified mutations in 80 patients. Among the 77 different mutational events, 46 had not been previously reported. They are represented by 49 missense (61%), 1 silent (1%), 13 nonsense (16%), 6 donor splice site mutations (8%), 8 small deletions (10%), and 3 small duplications (4%). The majority of missense mutations were within the calcium-binding epidermal growth factor-like domains. We found preferential associations between The Cys-missense mutations and ectopia lentis and premature termination codon mutations and skeletal manifestations. In contrast to what reported in literature, the cardiovascular system is severely affected also in patients carrying mutations in exons 1-10 and 59-65. In conclusion, we were able to detect FBN1 mutations in 88% of patients with MFS and in 36% of patients with other fibrillinopathies type I, confirming that FBN1 mutations are good predictors of classic MFS.

  14. Novel missense mutation in the EDA1 gene identified in a family with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Pozo-Molina, Glustein; Reyes-Reali, Julia; Mendoza-Ramos, María Isabel; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; Garrido-Guerrero, Efraín; Méndez-Cruz, Adolfo René

    2015-07-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is a human genetic disorder that affects structures of ectodermal origin such as hair, teeth, and sweat glands. Although there are autosomal recessive and dominant forms, X-linked (XL) is the most frequent form of the disease. This XL-HED phenotype is associated with mutations in the gene encoding the transmembrane protein ectodysplasin-1 (EDA1). We report the clinical and molecular analysis of a novel mutation in exon 1 affecting the transmembrane domain of the protein. We have screened 20 members of a family from Yucatán, México, nine men and 11 women, searching clinical and histopathological signs of HED. We searched mutations in EDA1 gene from patients with XL-HED, carriers, and controls. We identified seven men with clinical characteristics of HED showing short toes and plantar hyperkeratosis not reported previously in patients with HED. A mutational study of the EDA1 gene showed that all seven patients with HED carry a novel missense mutation of the nucleotide 409 (c.409T>C) in exon 1, which changes p.Leu56-Pro in the protein amino acid sequence; five women are heterozygous compatible with carrier status. We found a novel missense mutation in exon 1 of the EDA1 gene in a putative Mayan family from México with XL-HED. We identified in this population some novel clinical signs of HED. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  15. Mismatch repair genes founder mutations and cancer susceptibility in Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ponti, G; Castellsagué, E; Ruini, C; Percesepe, A; Tomasi, A

    2015-06-01

    Founder mutations in specific populations are common in several Mendelian disorders. They are shared by apparently unrelated families that inherited them from a common ancestor that existed hundreds to thousands of years ago. They have been proven to impact in molecular diagnostics strategies in specific populations, where they can be assessed as the first screening step and, if positive, avoid further expensive gene scanning. In Lynch syndrome (LS), a dominantly inherited colorectal cancer disease, more than 50 founder pathogenic mutations have been described so far in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2). We here provide a comprehensive summary of the founder mutations found in the MMR genes and an overview of their main characteristics. At a time when high-throughput strategies are being introduced in the molecular diagnostics of cancer, genetic testing for founder mutations can complement next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to most efficiently identify MMR gene mutations in any given population. Additionally, special attention is paid to MMR founder mutations with interesting anthropological significance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Identification of FVIII gene mutations in patients with hemophilia A using new combinatorial sequencing by hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Chetta, M.; Drmanac, A.; Santacroce, R.; Grandone, E.; Surrey, S.; Fortina, P.; Margaglione, M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Standard methods of mutation detection are time consuming in Hemophilia A (HA) rendering their application unavailable in some analysis such as prenatal diagnosis. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the feasibility of combinatorial sequencing-by-hybridization (cSBH) as an alternative and reliable tool for mutation detection in FVIII gene. PATIENTS/METHODS: We have applied a new method of cSBH that uses two different colors for detection of multiple point mutations in the FVIII gene. The 26 exons encompassing the HA gene were analyzed in 7 newly diagnosed Italian patients and in 19 previously characterized individuals with FVIII deficiency. RESULTS: Data show that, when solution-phase TAMRA and QUASAR labeled 5-mer oligonucleotide sets mixed with unlabeled target PCR templates are co-hybridized in the presence of DNA ligase to universal 6-mer oligonucleotide probe-based arrays, a number of mutations can be successfully detected. The technique was reliable also in identifying a mutant FVIII allele in an obligate heterozygote. A novel missense mutation (Leu1843Thr) in exon 16 and three novel neutral polymorphisms are presented with an updated protocol for 2-color cSBH. CONCLUSIONS: cSBH is a reliable tool for mutation detection in FVIII gene and may represent a complementary method for the genetic screening of HA patients. PMID:20300295

  17. Mutations in the LMNA gene do not cause axonal CMT in Czech patients.

    PubMed

    Lassuthová, Petra; Baránková, Lucia; Haberlová, Jana; Mazanec, Radim; Wallace, Andrew; Huehne, Kathrin; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Seeman, Pavel

    2009-06-01

    The LMNA gene was sequenced in 98 Czech patients from 94 unrelated families with early-onset axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease consistent with both autosomal recessive inheritance and sporadic cases. Biallelic pathogenic mutations were not found in any patient in this group. One patient carried the c.1870C>T mutation that is predicted to result in the amino-acid substitution, p. Arg624Cys, on one allele, but the second causative mutation was not detected. LMNA mutation is not likely to be associated with the disease in this family. To exclude larger deletions/duplications in the LMNA gene not detectable by sequencing, 48 patients from this group were also analyzed with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. No rearrangements in the LMNA gene were detected. We conclude that mutations in the LMNA gene are absent from a large group of Czech patients with axonal autosomal recessive CMT disease. Consequently, LMNA mutation screening does not seem to be relevant for axonal CMT DNA diagnostics. A similar situation may apply to other European populations.

  18. Almost 2% of Spanish breast cancer families are associated to germline pathogenic mutations in the ATM gene.

    PubMed

    Tavera-Tapia, A; Pérez-Cabornero, L; Macías, J A; Ceballos, M I; Roncador, G; de la Hoya, M; Barroso, A; Felipe-Ponce, V; Serrano-Blanch, R; Hinojo, C; Miramar-Gallart, M D; Urioste, M; Caldés, T; Santillan-Garzón, S; Benitez, J; Osorio, A

    2017-02-01

    There is still a considerable percentage of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) cases not explained by BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. In this report, next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques were applied to identify novel variants and/or genes involved in HBOC susceptibility. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a novel germline mutation in the moderate-risk gene ATM (c.5441delT; p.Leu1814Trpfs*14) in a family negative for mutations in BRCA1/2 (BRCAX). A case-control association study was performed to establish its prevalence in Spanish population, in a series of 1477 BRCAX families and 589 controls further screened, and NGS panels were used for ATM mutational screening in a cohort of 392 HBOC Spanish BRCAX families and 350 patients affected with diseases not related to breast cancer. Although the interrogated mutation was not prevalent in case-control association study, a comprehensive mutational analysis of the ATM gene revealed 1.78% prevalence of mutations in the ATM gene in HBOC and 1.94% in breast cancer-only BRCAX families in Spanish population, where data about ATM mutations were very limited. ATM mutation prevalence in Spanish population highlights the importance of considering ATM pathogenic variants linked to breast cancer susceptibility.

  19. Delineation of the Marfan phenotype associated with mutations in exons 23-32 of the FBN1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, E.A.; Cho, M.; Milewicz, D.M.

    1996-03-29

    Marfan syndrome is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder with a wide range of phenotypic severity. The condition is the result of mutations in FBN1, a large gene composed of 65 exons encoding the fibrillin-1 protein. While mutations causing classic manifestations of Marfan syndrome have been identified throughout the FBN1 gene, the six previously characterized mutations resulting in the severe, perinatal lethal form of Marfan syndrome have clustered in exons 24-32 of the gene. We screened 8 patients with either neonatal Marfan syndrome or severe cardiovascular complications of Marfan syndrome for mutations in this region of the gene. Using intron-based exon-specific primers, we amplified exons 23-32 from genomic DNAs, screened these fragments by single-stranded conformational polymorphism analysis, and sequenced indicated exons. This analysis documented mutations in exons 25-27 of the FBN1 mutations in 6 of these patients. These results, taken together with previously published FBN1 mutations in this region, further define the phenotype associated with mutations in exons 24-32 of the FBN1 gene, information important for the development of possible diagnostic tests and genetic counseling. 49 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Identification of a Novel HADHB Gene Mutation in an Iranian Patient with Mitochondrial Trifunctional Protein Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shahrokhi, Mahdiyeh; Shafiei, Mohammad; Galehdari, Hamid; Shariati, Gholamreza

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP) is a hetero-octamer composed of eight parts (subunits): four α-subunits containing LCEH (long-chain 2,3-enoyl-CoA  hydratase) and LCHAD (long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase) activity, and four β-subunits that possess LCKT (long-chain  3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase) activity which catalyzes three out of four steps in β-oxidation spiral of long-chain fatty acid. Its deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes a clinical spectrum of diseases. A blood spot was collected from the patient's original newborn screening card with parental informed consent. A newborn screening test and quantity plasma acylcarnitine profile analysis by MS/MS were performed. After isolation of DNA and Amplification of all exons of the HADHA and HADHB, directly Sequence analyses of all exons and the flanking introns both of genes were performed. Here, we report a novel mutation in a patient with MTP deficiency diagnosed with newborn screening test and quantity plasma acylcarnitine profile analysis by MS/MS and then confirmed by enzyme analysis in cultured fibroblasts and direct sequencing of the HADHA and HADHB genes. Molecular analysis of causative genes showed a missense mutation (p.Q385P) c.1154A > C in exon 14 of HADHB gene. Since this mutation was not found in 50 normal control cases; so it was concluded that c.1154A > C mutation was a causative mutation. Phenotype analysis of this mutation predicted pathogenesis which reduces the stability of the MTP protein complex.

  1. Genetic etiology of Parkinson disease associated with mutations in the SNCA, PARK2, PINK1, PARK7, and LRRK2 genes: a mutation update.

    PubMed

    Nuytemans, Karen; Theuns, Jessie; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2010-07-01

    To date, molecular genetic analyses have identified over 500 distinct DNA variants in five disease genes associated with familial Parkinson disease; alpha-synuclein (SNCA), parkin (PARK2), PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), DJ-1 (PARK7), and Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2). These genetic variants include approximately 82% simple mutations and approximately 18% copy number variations. Some mutation subtypes are likely underestimated because only few studies reported extensive mutation analyses of all five genes, by both exonic sequencing and dosage analyses. Here we present an update of all mutations published to date in the literature, systematically organized in a novel mutation database (http://www.molgen.ua.ac.be/PDmutDB). In addition, we address the biological relevance of putative pathogenic mutations. This review emphasizes the need for comprehensive genetic screening of Parkinson patients followed by an insightful study of the functional relevance of observed genetic variants. Moreover, while capturing existing data from the literature it became apparent that several of the five Parkinson genes were also contributing to the genetic etiology of other Lewy Body Diseases and Parkinson-plus syndromes, indicating that mutation screening is recommendable in these patient groups. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Screening for hereditary fructose intolerance mutations by reverse dot-blot.

    PubMed

    Lau, J; Tolan, D R

    1999-02-01

    An assay is described which is useful for genetic screening of the two most prevalent mutations that cause hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). Both mutations lie within exon 5 of the aldolase B gene. Amplification of exon 5 from genomic DNA isolated from peripheral lymphocytes using biotinylated aldolase B-specific primers yields a biotin-tagged probe. This probe is hybridized to complementary poly(dT)-tailed allele specific oligonucleotides (ASOs) that are bound to a nylon membrane. The length of the ASOs, the amount bound to the membrane and the time of hybridization are optimized for discrimination of all four alleles under the same hybridization conditions. Detection of biotinylated amplified DNA is performed by creating an avidin-alkaline phosphatase complex and visualization by chemiluminescence. This assay can rapidly detect the two mutations, A149P and A174D, which cause >70% of HFI worldwide, and offers a rapid and sensitive assay that is much less invasive for the diagnosis of this often difficult to diagnose disorder.

  3. Missense mutations in the PCSK9 gene are associated with hypocholesterolemia and possibly increased response to statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Berge, Knut Erik; Ose, Leiv; Leren, Trond P

    2006-05-01

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) gene encodes a proprotein convertase that causes degradation of cell surface low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs). Mutations in the PCSK9 gene that disrupt the normal function of PCSK9 could therefore result in increased number of LDLRs and hypocholesterolemia. Also, the cholesterol-lowering effect of statins could be increased in subjects carrying mutations in the PCSK9 gene. We have screened 38 unrelated hypocholesterolemic subjects as well as 25 unrelated familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) heterozygotes who responded particularly well to statin therapy for mutations in the 12 exons of the PCSK9 gene by DNA sequencing. Six of the 38 (15.8%) hypocholesterolemic subjects were heterozygous for 1 of the 3 mutations R46L, G106R, or R237W in the PCSK9 gene. In the group of 25 FH heterozygotes who responded particularly well to statin therapy, 3 (8.8%) were heterozygous for mutations R46L or N157K in the PCSK9 gene. None of 441 hypercholesterolemic subjects without mutations in the LDLR gene or in the apolipoprotein B-100 gene possessed any of the 4 mutations. The 4 missense mutations R46L, G106R, N157K, and R237W are associated with hypocholesterolemia and possibly increased response to statin therapy.

  4. Closely spaced multiple mutations as potential signatures of transient hypermutability in human genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Min; Férec, Claude; Cooper, David N

    2009-10-01

    Data from diverse organisms suggests that transient hypermutability is a general mutational mechanism with the potential to generate multiple synchronous mutations, a phenomenon probably best exemplified by closely spaced multiple mutations (CSMMs). Here we have attempted to extend the concept of transient hypermutability from somatic cells to the germline, using human inherited disease-causing multiple mutations as a model system. Employing stringent criteria for data inclusion, we have retrospectively identified numerous potential examples of pathogenic CSMMs that exhibit marked similarities to the CSMMs reported in other systems. These examples include (1) eight multiple mutations, each comprising three or more components within a sequence tract of <100 bp; (2) three possible instances of "mutation showers"; and (3) numerous highly informative "homocoordinate" mutations. Using the proportion of CpG substitution as a crude indicator of the relative likelihood of transient hypermutability, we present evidence to suggest that CSMMs comprising at least one pair of mutations separated by < or =100 bp may constitute signatures of transient hypermutability in human genes. Although this analysis extends the generality of the concept of transient hypermutability and provides new insights into what may be considered a novel mechanism of mutagenesis underlying human inherited disease, it has raised serious concerns regarding current practices in mutation screening.

  5. Mutation analysis of PALB2 gene in French breast cancer families.

    PubMed

    Damiola, Francesca; Schultz, Inès; Barjhoux, Laure; Sornin, Valérie; Dondon, Marie-Gabrielle; Eon-Marchais, Séverine; Marcou, Morgane; Caron, Olivier; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; de Pauw, Antoine; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Bonadona, Valérie; Maugard, Christine; Pujol, Pascal; Lasset, Christine; Longy, Michel; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Andrieu, Nadine; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Muller, Danièle

    2015-12-01

    Several population-based and family-based studies have demonstrated that germline mutations of the PALB2 gene (Partner and Localizer of BRCA2) are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Distinct mutation frequencies and spectrums have been described depending on the population studied. Here we describe the first complete PALB2 coding sequence screening in the French population. We screened the complete coding sequence and intron-exon boundaries of PALB2, using the EMMA technique, to assess the contribution of pathogenic mutations in a set of 835 familial breast cancer cases and 662 unrelated controls from the French national study GENESIS and the Paul Strauss Cancer Centre, all previously tested negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2 pathogenic mutations. Our analysis revealed the presence of four novel deleterious mutations: c.1186insT, c.1857delT and c.2850delC in three cases, c.3418dupT in one control. In addition, we identified two in-frame insertion/deletion, 19 missense substitutions (two of them predicted as pathogenic), 9 synonymous variants, 28 variants located in introns and 2 in UTRs, as well as frequent variants. Truncating PALB2 mutations were found in 0.36% of familial breast cancer cases, a frequency lower than the one detected in comparable studies in other populations (0.73-3.40%). This suggests a small but significant contribution of PALB2 mutations to the breast cancer susceptibility in the French population.

  6. Mutation screening in patients with syndromic craniosynostoses indicates that a limited number of recurrent FGFR2 mutations accounts for severe forms of Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lajeunie, Elisabeth; Heuertz, Solange; El Ghouzzi, Vincent; Martinovic, Jelena; Renier, Dominique; Le Merrer, Martine; Bonaventure, Jacky

    2006-03-01

    Crouzon Syndrome (CS), Pfeiffer syndrome (PS) and the phenotypically related Jackson-Weiss (JW) variant are three craniosynostotic conditions caused by heterozygous mutations in Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) genes. Screening a large cohort of 84 patients with clinical features of CS, PS or JW by direct sequencing of genomic DNA, enabled FGFR1, 2 or 3 mutation detection in 79 cases. Mutations preferentially occurred in exons 8 and 10 of FGFR2 encoding the third Ig loop of the receptor. Among the 74 FGFR2 mutations that we identified, four were novel including three missense substitutions causing CS and a 2 bp deletion creating a premature stop codon and producing JW phenotype. Five FGFR2 mutations were found in one of the two tyrosine kinase subdomains and one in the Ig I loop. Interestingly, two FGFR2 mutations creating cysteine residues (W290C and Y340C) caused severe forms of PS while conversion of the same residues into another amino-acid (W290G/R, Y340H) resulted in Crouzon phenotype exclusively. Our data provide conclusive evidence that the mutational spectrum of FGFR2 mutations in CS and PS is wider than originally thought. Genotype-phenotype analyses based on our cohort and previous studies further indicate that in spite of some overlap, PS and CS are preferentially accounted for by two distinct sets of FGFR2 mutations. A limited number of recurrent amino-acid changes (W290C, Y340C, C342R and S351C) is commonly associated with the most severe Pfeiffer phenotypes of poor prognosis.

  7. Mutation Analysis Identifies GUCY2D as the Major Gene Responsible for Autosomal Dominant Progressive Cone Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kitiratschky, Veronique B. D.; Wilke, Robert; Renner, Agnes B.; Kellner, Ulrich; Vadalà, Maria; Birch, David G.; Wissinger, Bernd; Zrenner, Eberhart; Kohl, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Heterozygous mutations in the GUCY2D gene, which encodes the membrane-bound retinal guanylyl cyclase-1 protein (RetGC-1), have been shown to cause autosomal dominant inherited cone degeneration and cone–rod degeneration (adCD, adCRD). The present study was a comprehensive screening of the GUCY2D gene in 27 adCD and adCRD unrelated families of these rare disorders. Methods Mutation analysis was performed by direct sequencing as well as PCR and subsequent restriction length polymorphism analysis (PCR/RFLP). Haplotype analysis was performed in selected patients by using microsatellite markers. Results GUCY2D gene mutations were identified in 11 (40%) of 27 patients, and all mutations clustered to codon 838, including two known and one novel missense mutation: p.R838C, p.R838H, and p.R838G. Haplotype analysis showed that among the studied patients only two of the six analyzed p.R838C mutation carriers shared a common haplotype and that none of the p.R838H mutation carriers did. Conclusions GUCY2D is a major gene responsible for progressive autosomal dominant cone degeneration. All identified mutations localize to codon 838. Haplotype analysis indicates that in most cases these mutations arise independently. Thus, codon 838 is likely to be a mutation hotspot in the GUCY2D gene. PMID:18487367

  8. Bioinformatic Analysis of GJB2 Gene Missense Mutations.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Akin

    2015-04-01

    Gap junction beta 2 (GJB2) gene is the most commonly mutated connexin gene in patients with autosomal recessive and dominant hearing loss. According to Ensembl (release 74) database, 1347 sequence variations are reported in the GJB2 gene and about 13.5% of them are categorized as missense SNPs or nonsynonymous variant. Because of the high incidence of GJB2 mutations in hearing loss patients, revealing the molecular effect of GJB2 mutations on protein structure may also provide clear point of view regarding the molecular etiology of deafness. Hence, the aim of this study is to analyze structural and functional consequences of all known GJB2 missense variations to the Cx26 protein by applying multiple bioinformatics methods. Two-hundred and eleven nonsynonymous variants were collected from Ensembl release 74, Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD) and The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD). A number of bioinformatic tools were utilized for predicting the effect of GJB2 missense mutations at the sequence, structural, and functional levels. Some of the mutations were found to locate highly conserved regions and have structural and functional properties. Moreover, GJB2 mutations were also found to affect Cx26 protein at the molecular level via loss or gain of disorder, catalytic site, and post-translational modifications, including methylation, glycosylation, and ubiquitination. Findings, presented here, demonstrated the application of bioinformatic algorithms to predict the effects of mutations causing hearing impairment. I expect, this type of analysis will serve as a start point for future experimental evaluation of the GJB2 gene mutations and it will also be helpful in evaluating other deafness-related gene mutations.

  9. Founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    PubMed

    Ferla, R; Calò, V; Cascio, S; Rinaldi, G; Badalamenti, G; Carreca, I; Surmacz, E; Colucci, G; Bazan, V; Russo, A

    2007-06-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations contribute to a significant number of familial and hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. The proportion of high-risk families with breast and/or ovarian cancer cases due to mutations in these tumor suppressor genes varies widely among populations. In some population, a wide spectrum of different mutations in both genes are present, whereas in other groups specific mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported with high frequency. Most of these mutations are prevalent in restricted populations as consequence of a founder effect. The comparison of haplotypes between families with the same mutation can distinguish whether high-frequency alleles derive from an older or more recent single mutational event or whether they have arisen independently more than once. Here, we review some of the most well-known and significant examples of founder mutations in BRCA genes found in European and non-European populations. In conclusion, the identification of the ethnic group of families undergoing genetic counseling enables the geneticist and oncologist to make more specific choices, leading to simplify the clinical approach to genetic testing carried out on members of high-risk families. Futhermore, the high frequency of founder mutations, allowing to analyze a large number of cases, might provide accurate information regarding their penetrance.

  10. Comprehensive Screening of Eight Known Causative Genes in Congenital Hypothyroidism With Gland-in-Situ

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Adeline K.; Serra, Eva G.; Cangul, Hakan; Alyaarubi, Saif; Ullah, Irfan; Schoenmakers, Erik; Deeb, Asma; Habeb, Abdelhadi M.; Almaghamsi, Mohammad; Peters, Catherine; Nathwani, Nisha; Aycan, Zehra; Saglam, Halil; Bober, Ece; Dattani, Mehul; Shenoy, Savitha; Murray, Philip G.; Babiker, Amir; Willemsen, Ruben; Thankamony, Ajay; Lyons, Greta; Irwin, Rachael; Padidela, Raja; Tharian, Kavitha; Davies, Justin H.; Puthi, Vijith; Park, Soo-Mi; Massoud, Ahmed F.; Gregory, John W.; Albanese, Assunta; Pease-Gevers, Evelien; Martin, Howard; Brugger, Kim; Maher, Eamonn R.; Chatterjee, V. Krishna K.; Anderson, Carl A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Lower TSH screening cutoffs have doubled the ascertainment of congenital hypothyroidism (CH), particularly cases with a eutopically located gland-in-situ (GIS). Although mutations in known dyshormonogenesis genes or TSHR underlie some cases of CH with GIS, systematic screening of these eight genes has not previously been undertaken. Objective: Our objective was to evaluate the contribution and molecular spectrum of mutations in eight known causative genes (TG, TPO, DUOX2, DUOXA2, SLC5A5, SLC26A4, IYD, and TSHR) in CH cases with GIS. Patients, Design, and Setting: We screened 49 CH cases with GIS from 34 ethnically diverse families, using next-generation sequencing. Pathogenicity of novel mutations was assessed in silico. Results: Twenty-nine cases harbored likely disease-causing mutations. Monogenic defects (19 cases) most commonly involved TG (12), TPO (four), DUOX2 (two), and TSHR (one). Ten cases harbored triallelic (digenic) mutations: TG and TPO (one); SLC26A4 and TPO (three), and DUOX2 and TG (six cases). Novel variants overall included 15 TG, six TPO, and three DUOX2 mutations. Genetic basis was not ascertained in 20 patients, including 14 familial cases. Conclusions: The etiology of CH with GIS remains elusive, with only 59% attributable to mutations in TSHR or known dyshormonogenesis-associated genes in a cohort enriched for familial cases. Biallelic TG or TPO mutations most commonly underlie severe CH. Triallelic defects are frequent, mandating future segregation studies in larger kindreds to assess their contribution to variable phenotype. A high proportion (∼41%) of unsolved or ambiguous cases suggests novel genetic etiologies that remain to be elucidated. PMID:27525530

  11. Variable expressivity and mutation databases: The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Trifiro, M A

    2001-05-01

    For over 50 years genetics has presumed that variations in phenotypic expression have, for the most part, been the result of alterations in genotype. The importance and value of mutation databases has been based on the premise that the same gene or allelic variation in a specific gene that has been proven to determine a specific phenotype, will always produce the same phenotype. However, recent evidence has shown that so called "simple" Mendelian disorders or monogenic traits are often far from simple, exhibiting phenotypic variation (variable expressivity) that cannot be explained solely by a gene or allelic alteration. The AR gene mutations database now lists 25 cases where different degrees of androgen insensitivity are caused by identical mutations in the androgen receptor gene. In five of these cases the phenotypic variability is due to somatic mosaicism, that is, somatic mutations that occur in only certain cells of androgen-sensitive tissue. Recently, a number of other cases of variable expressivity have also been linked to somatic mosaicism. The impact of variable expressivity due to somatic mutations and mosaicism on mutation databases is discussed. In particular, the effect of an organism exhibiting genetic heterogeneity within its tissues, and the possibility of an organism's genotype changing over its lifetime, are considered to have important implications for mutation databases in the future. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Likelihood models of somatic mutation and codon substitution in cancer genes.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ziheng; Ro, Simon; Rannala, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    The role of somatic mutation in cancer is well established and several genes have been identified that are frequent targets. This has enabled large-scale screening studies of the spectrum of somatic mutations in cancers of particular organs. Cancer gene mutation databases compile the results of many studies and can provide insight into the importance of specific amino acid sequences and functional domains in cancer, as well as elucidate aspects of the mutation process. Past studies of the spectrum of cancer mutations (in particular genes) have examined overall frequencies of mutation (at specific nucleotides) and of missense, nonsense, and silent substitution (at specific codons) both in the sequence as a whole and in a specific functional domain. Existing methods ignore features of the genetic code that allow some codons to mutate to missense, or stop, codons more readily than others (i.e., by one nucleotide change, vs. two or three). A new codon-based method to estimate the relative rate of substitution (fixation of a somatic mutation in a cancer cell lineage) of nonsense vs. missense mutations in different functional domains and in different tumor tissues is presented. Models that account for several potential influences on rates of somatic mutation and substitution in cancer progenitor cells and allow biases of mutation rates for particular dinucleotide sequences (CGs and dipyrimidines), transition vs. transversion bias, and variable rates of silent substitution across functional domains (useful in detecting investigator sampling bias) are considered. Likelihood-ratio tests are used to choose among models, using cancer gene mutation data. The method is applied to analyze published data on the spectrum of p53 mutations in cancers. A novel finding is that the ratio of the probability of nonsense to missense substitution is much lower in the DNA-binding and transactivation domains (ratios near 1) than in structural domains such as the linker, tetramerization

  13. A BLOC-1 Mutation Screen Reveals a Novel BLOC1S3 Mutation in Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome Type 8 (HPS-8)

    PubMed Central

    Cullinane, Andrew R; Curry, James A; Golas, Gretchen; Pan, James; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Hess, Richard A; White, James G; Huizing, Marjan; Gahl, William A

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder of lysosome-related organelle biogenesis and is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism and a bleeding diathesis. Over the past decade, we screened 250 patients with HPS-like symptoms for mutations in the genes responsible for HPS subtypes 1–6. We identified 38 individuals with no functional mutations, and therefore, we analyzed all 8 genes encoding the Biogenesis of Lysosome-related Organelles Complex-1 (BLOC-1) proteins in these individuals. Here we describe the identification of a novel nonsense mutation in BLOC1S3 (HPS-8) in a 6 year-old Iranian boy. This mutation caused nonsense mediated decay of BLOC1S3 mRNA and destabilized the BLOC-1 complex. Our patient’s melanocytes showed aberrant localization of TYRP1, with increased plasma-membrane trafficking. These findings confirm a common cellular defect for HPS patients with defects in BLOC-1 subunits. We identified only 2 patients with BLOC-1 defects in our cohort, suggesting that other HPS genes remain to be identified. PMID:22709368

  14. Recessive truncating titin gene, TTN, mutations presenting as centronuclear myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Agrawal, Pankaj B.; Hidalgo, Carlos; Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; DeChene, Elizabeth T.; Swanson, Lindsay C.; Soemedi, Rachel; Vasli, Nasim; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Shieh, Perry B.; Shur, Natasha; Dennison, Jane M.; Lawlor, Michael W.; Laporte, Jocelyn; Markianos, Kyriacos; Fairbrother, William G.; Granzier, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify causative genes for centronuclear myopathies (CNM), a heterogeneous group of rare inherited muscle disorders that often present in infancy or early life with weakness and hypotonia, using next-generation sequencing of whole exomes and genomes. Methods: Whole-exome or -genome sequencing was performed in a cohort of 29 unrelated patients with clinicopathologic diagnoses of CNM or related myopathy depleted for cases with mutations of MTM1, DNM2, and BIN1. Immunofluorescence analyses on muscle biopsies, splicing assays, and gel electrophoresis of patient muscle proteins were performed to determine the molecular consequences of mutations of interest. Results: Autosomal recessive compound heterozygous truncating mutations of the titin gene, TTN, were identified in 5 individuals. Biochemical analyses demonstrated increased titin degradation and truncated titin proteins in patient muscles, establishing the impact of the mutations. Conclusions: Our study identifies truncating TTN mutations as a cause of congenital myopathy that is reported as CNM. Unlike the classic CNM genes that are all involved in excitation-contraction coupling at the triad, TTN encodes the giant sarcomeric protein titin, which forms a myofibrillar backbone for the components of the contractile machinery. This study expands the phenotypic spectrum associated with TTN mutations and indicates that TTN mutation analysis should be considered in cases of possible CNM without mutations in the classic CNM genes. PMID:23975875

  15. Simulation of gene evolution under directional mutational pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkiewicz, Małgorzata; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Kowalczuk, Maria; Mackiewicz, Dorota; Nowicka, Aleksandra; Polak, Natalia; Smolarczyk, Kamila; Banaszak, Joanna; R. Dudek, Mirosław; Cebrat, Stanisław

    2004-05-01

    The two main mechanisms generating the genetic diversity, mutation and recombination, have random character but they are biased which has an effect on the generation of asymmetry in the bacterial chromosome structure and in the protein coding sequences. Thus, like in a case of two chiral molecules-the two possible orientations of a gene in relation to the topology of a chromosome are not equivalent. Assuming that the sequence of a gene may oscillate only between certain limits of its structural composition means that the gene could be forced out of these limits by the directional mutation pressure, in the course of evolution. The probability of the event depends on the time the gene stays under the same mutation pressure. Inversion of the gene changes the directional mutational pressure to the reciprocal one and hence it changes the distance of the gene to its lower and upper bound of the structural tolerance. Using Monte Carlo methods we were able to simulate the evolution of genes under experimentally found mutational pressure, assuming simple mechanisms of selection. We found that the mutation and recombination should work in accordance to lower their negative effects on the function of the products of coding sequences.

  16. [Obesity based on mutation of genes involved in energy balance].

    PubMed

    Hainerová, I

    2007-01-01

    Within the last decade an intensive research led to an identification of several genes which are involved in a regulation of energy balance. In most cases, carriers of these gene mutations do not exhibit further characteristic phenotypic features except for a severe obesity. Obesity based on mutation of one gene product is called monogenic obesity. Mutations in genes for leptin, leptin receptor, proopiomelanocortin, prohormone convertase 1, melanocortin 4 and 3 receptor disrupt the physiological humoral signalization between peripheral signals and the hypothalamic centres of satiety and hunger. Defects of all above mentioned genes lead to phenotype of abnormal eating behaviour followed by a development of severe early-onset obesity. Mutations of melanocortin 4 receptor gene represent the most common cause of monogenic obesity because they are detected in almost 6 % children with early-onset severe obesity. Mutations of the other genes involved in energy homeostasis are very rare. Although these mutations are sporadic we assume that further research of monogenic forms of obesity might lead to our understanding of physiology and pathophysiology of regulation of the energy homeostasis and eating behaviour. Additionally, they may open new approach to the management of eating behaviour and to the treatment of obesity.

  17. The association between GJB2 mutation and GJB6 gene in non syndromic hearing loss school children.

    PubMed

    Asma, A; Ashwaq, A; Norzana, A G; Atmadini, A Maizaton; Ruszymah, B H I; Saim, L; Wahida, I Farah

    2011-06-01

    Recently, molecular testing for GJB2 mutations has become the standard of care for the diagnosis of patients with non syndromic hearing impairment of unknown cause. The aims of this study are to determine the association between GJB2 mutation and GJB6 and to report the variation of mutations in deaf students who have heterozygous GJB2. This retrospective study was conducted at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center (UKMMC). Data was collected from previous files and records from Tissue Engineering and Human Genetic Research Group Laboratory. Approval from Ethical Committee was obtained prior to the study. A total of 138 students have been screened in previous studies in UKMMC for the presence of GJB2 mutations as a cause for hearing loss. Thirty four of the 138 subjects have GJB2 mutations; 2 showed homozygous mutations whereas another 32 were heterozygous for GJB2 gene mutation. Only 31 DNA samples of students presented with sensorineural hearing loss with heterozygous mutation in GJB2 gene were included in this study. The sequencing results obtained were analyzed. The degree of hearing loss of those students with association between GJB2 mutation and GJB6 mutation will be discussed. Five out of 31 subjects (16.2%) have mutations in their GJB6 gene, suggesting a digenic inheritance of GJB2/GJB6 mutation. In total, four novel mutations were identified; E137D (n=1), R32Q (n=1), E101K (n=1) and Y156H (n=1) and one mutation deletion; 366delT (n=1). All students with association GJB2 mutation and GJB6 showed severe to profound hearing loss in both ears. Interestingly this study not detected the large deletion of 342 kb in GJB6 gene suggesting that the mutation is very rare in this region compared to certain parts of the world.

  18. Identification of new mutations in the NF2 tumor suppressor gene in schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Guida, M.; Welling, B.; Prior, T.W.

    1994-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a severe genetic disorder with an incidence of approximately 1 in 40,000 individuals and is characterized by the formation of multiple benign nervous system tumors. The clinical hallmark of NF2 is the bilateral occurrence of schwannomas on the eighth cranial nerve (vestibular schwannomas). Recently, it has been shown that loss or inactivation of a tumor suppressor gene located in chromosome band 22q12 is the molecular cause of NF2 tumorigenesis. Also, mutations in the NF2 gene have now been identified in patients with sporadic vestibular schwannomas (unilateral schwannomas). We have completed the screening of 80% of the NF2 coding sequence of DNA from 13 sporadic schwannomas and 2 schwannomas from NF2 patients. Using heteroduplex analysis and direct sequencing, we found 13 novel mutations located in 7 different exons with a small cluster (46% of the mutations) located in the central portion of the gene. All of the mutations were unique to single patients. In three tumors, both NF2 alleles were mutated. The types of mutations found include: small deletions ranging from 1 to 30 base pairs, nonsense mutations, a single missense mutation and a splice donor site alteration. It appears that small deletions are the most common type of NF2 gene mutation. We also have developed a dosage test based on quantitative PCR and hybridization with specific probes to detect the loss of heterozygosity. We found that 7 out of 15 schwannomas (47%) show loss of heterozygosity. We are currently extending the analysis to all of the NF2 exons and DNA from 60 additional schwannomas.

  19. Spectrum of mutations in the CFTR gene of patients with classical and atypical forms of cystic fibrosis from southwestern Sweden: identification of 12 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Strandvik, B; Björck, E; Fallström, M; Gronowitz, E; Thountzouris, J; Lindblad, A; Markiewicz, D; Wahlström, J; Tsui, L C; Zielenski, J

    2001-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CFTR gene. The spectrum of CFTR mutations varies between populations and depends on different factors, such as ethnic background and geographical location. The extensive CFTR mutation screening of 129 patients with classical or atypical CF from the south-western region of Sweden revealed the presence of 37 CFTR mutations, including 12 novel alleles. The overall mutation detection rate in this study population was 92%, the highest among all tested regions in Sweden. Eight mutations with a frequency above 1% (DeltaF508, 394delTT, R117C, 3659delC, E60X, 1112delT, R764X, and 621 + 1G --> T) accounted for 78% of CF chromosomes and have been recommended for inclusion in the CFTR mutation screening panel for molecular diagnosis of CF in this region. The multiple occurrence of specific CFTR alleles less common than the predominant DeltaF508 mutation (394delTT, R117C, 3659delC) allowed for genotype-phenotype comparisons and revealed consistent relationships between these mutations and disease severity.

  20. Genes involved in cell cycle G1 checkpoint control are frequently mutated in human melanoma metastases.

    PubMed Central

    Platz, A.; Sevigny, P.; Norberg, T.; Ring, P.; Lagerlöf, B.; Ringborg, U.

    1996-01-01

    A common characteristic of cancer cells is unrestrained cell division. This may be caused by mutational changes in genes coding for components of cell cycle-controlling networks. Alterations in genes involved in G1 checkpoint control have been registered in many human tumours, and investigations from several laboratories show that such alterations, taken together, are the most frequent changes detected in cancer cells. The present paper describes mutational analysis by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR/SSCP) and nucleotide sequence analysis of the genes coding for the p15, p53 and N-ras proteins in 26 metastases from 25 melanoma patients. The registered mutation frequencies add together with previously registered mutations in p16 in the same patient samples to a substantial total frequency of 44% of patients with mutation in at least one of the investigated genes. These results show the occurrence of heterogeneous defects among components of the cell cycle controlling machinery in a human melanoma tumour sample collection and demonstrate that the total frequency of detected alterations increases with the number of cell cycle controlling genes included in the screening panel. Images Figure 1 PMID:8826861

  1. [An overview of oculocutaneous albinism: TYR gene mutations in five Colombian individuals].

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Diana; Groot, Helena; Guzmán, Julio; Lattig, María Claudia

    2012-06-01

    Oculocutaneus albinism is a pigment-related inherited disorder characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eyes, foveal hypoplasia and low vision. To date, 230 mutations in the TYR gene have been reported as responsible for oculocutaneus albinism type 1 worldwide. TYR gene encodes the enzyme tyrosinase involved in the metabolic pathway of melanin synthesis. Mutations were identified in the TYR gene as responsible for oculocutaneous albinism type 1 in five Colombian individuals, and a new ophthalmic system was tested that corrected visual defects and symptoms in a patient with oculocutaneous albinism. Samples were taken from 5 individuals, four of whom belong to a single family, along with a fifth individual not related to the family. Five exons in the TYR gene were sequenced to search for the gene carriers in the family and in the non-related individual. In addition, clinical ophthalmological evaluation and implementation of an new oculo-visual system was undertaken. A G47D and 1379delTT mutation was identified in the family. The unrelated individual carried a compound heterozygote for the G47D and D42N mutations. The oculo-visual corrective system was able to increase visual acuity and to diminish the nystagmus and photophobia. This is the first study in Colombia where albinism mutations are reported. The methods developed will enable future molecular screening studies in Colombian populations.

  2. Molecular analysis of mutations in the human HPRT gene.

    PubMed

    Keohavong, Phouthone; Xi, Liqiang; Grant, Stephen G

    2014-01-01

    The HPRT assay uses incorporation of toxic nucleotide analogues to select for cells lacking the purine scavenger enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase. A major advantage of this assay is the ability to isolate mutant cells and determine the molecular basis for their functional deficiency. Many types of analyses have been performed at this locus: the current protocol involves generation of a cDNA and multiplex PCR of each exon, including the intron/exon junctions, followed by direct sequencing of the products. This analysis detects point mutations, small deletions and insertions within the gene, mutations affecting RNA splicing, and products of illegitimate V(D)J recombination within the gene. Establishment of and comparisons with mutational spectra hold the promise of identifying exposures to mutation-inducing genotoxicants from their distinctive pattern of gene-specific DNA damage at this easily analyzed reporter gene.

  3. [Gene Mutation Spectrum of β-Thalassemia in Dai Ethinic Population of Two Border Region in Chinese Yunnan Province].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; He, Jing; Zeng, Xiao-Hong; Su, Jie; Chen, Hong; Xu, Yong-Mei; Pu, Jian; Zhu, Bao-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the gene mutation spectrum of β-thalassemia in Dai ethnic population of 2 border region in Chinese Yunnan Province. The patients with β-thalassemia in Dai ethnic population of Dehong and Xishuangbanna autonamic prefecture were screened by using blood routine detection and capillary electrophoresis. The β-globin gene mutation in patients with β-thalassemia were detected by using PCR reverse dot-blot hybridization (PCR-RDB), the constitutive rate of gene mutation in patients with β-thalassemia of Dai ethnic population in two border regions was analyzed and compared. A total of 186 patients with gene mutation of β-thalassemia were confirmed. Among them, 10 gene mutation were found, and the 5 main gene mutations were CD26 (62.56%), CD41-42 (18.97%), CD17 (14.36%), CD71-72 (2.05%) and IVS-II-654 (1.54%). Among Dai ethinic population in Dehong region, 4 gene mutations were found including CD26 (80.31%), CD17 (11.02%), CD41-42 (6.30%) and CD71-72 (2.36%). Among Dai ethinic population in Xishuangbanna region, 6 gene mutations were found, out of them the more common gene mutations were CD41-42 (42.64%), CD26 (29.41%) and CD17 (20.59%). The gene mutations of β-thalassemia in Dai ethinic population of Yunnan province has been confirmed to be more genetic heterogenicity, the spectrums of β-thalassemia mutations in Dai ethinic population of different regions were significant different.

  4. Molecular and genomic studies of IMMP2L and mutation screening in autism and Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Petek, Erwin; Schwarzbraun, Thomas; Noor, Abdul; Patel, Megha; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Choufani, Sanaa; Windpassinger, Christian; Stamenkovic, Mara; Robertson, Mary M; Aschauer, Harald N; Gurling, Hugh M D; Kroisel, Peter M; Wagner, Klaus; Scherer, Stephen W; Vincent, John B

    2007-01-01

    We recently reported the disruption of the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (IMMP2L) gene by a chromosomal breakpoint in a patient with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS). In the present study we sought to identify genetic variation in IMMP2L, which, through alteration of protein function or level of expression might contribute to the manifestation of GTS. We screened 39 GTS patients, and, due to the localization of IMMP2L in the critical region for the autistic disorder (AD) locus on chromosome 7q (AUTS1), 95 multiplex AD families; however, no coding mutations were found in either GTS or AD patients. In addition, no parental-specific expression of IMMP2L was detected in somatic cell hybrids containing human chromosome 7 and human cell lines carrying a maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 7 (mUPD7). Despite the fact that no deleterious mutations in IMMPL2 (other than the inverted duplication identified previously) were identified in either GTS or AD, this gene cannot be excluded as a possible rare cause of either disorder.

  5. Adiposity is associated with p53 gene mutations in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ochs-Balcom, Heather M; Marian, Catalin; Nie, Jing; Brasky, Theodore M; Goerlitz, David S; Trevisan, Maurizio; Edge, Stephen B; Winston, Janet; Berry, Deborah L; Kallakury, Bhaskar V; Freudenheim, Jo L; Shields, Peter G

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the p53 gene are among the most frequent genetic events in human cancer and may be triggered by environmental and occupational exposures. We examined the association of clinical and pathological characteristics of breast tumors and breast cancer risk factors according to the prevalence and type of p53 mutations. Using tumor blocks from incident cases from a case-control study in western New York, we screened for p53 mutations in exons 2-11 using the Affymetrix p53 Gene Chip array and analyzed case-case comparisons using logistic regression. The p53 mutation frequency among cases was 28.1 %; 95 % were point mutations (13 % of which were silent) and the remainder were single base pair deletions. Sixty seven percent of all point mutations were transitions; 24 % of them are G:C>A:T at CpG sites. Positive p53 mutation status was associated with poorer differentiation (OR, 95 % CI 2.29, 1.21-4.32), higher nuclear grade (OR, 95 % CI 1.99, 1.22-3.25), and increased Ki-67 status (OR, 95 % CI 1.81, 1.10-2.98). Cases with P53 mutations were more likely to have a combined ER-positive and PR-negative status (OR, 95 % CI 1.65, 1.01-2.71), and a combined ER-negative and PR-negative status (OR, 95 % CI 2.18, 1.47-3.23). Body mass index >30 kg/m(2), waist circumference >79 cm, and waist-to-hip ratio >0.86 were also associated with p53 status; obese breast cancer cases are more likely to have p53 mutations (OR, 95 % CI 1.78, 1.19-2.68). We confirmed that p53 mutations are associated with less favorable tumor characteristics and identified an association of p53 mutation status and adiposity.

  6. Nonsense Mutations in the Shelterin Complex Genes ACD and TERF2IP in Familial Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Aoude, Lauren G.; Pritchard, Antonia L.; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela; Wadt, Karin; Harland, Mark; Choi, Jiyeon; Gartside, Michael; Quesada, Víctor; Johansson, Peter; Palmer, Jane M.; Ramsay, Andrew J.; Zhang, Xijun; Jones, Kristine; Symmons, Judith; Holland, Elizabeth A.; Schmid, Helen; Bonazzi, Vanessa; Woods, Susan; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Stark, Mitchell S.; Snowden, Helen; van Doorn, Remco; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Keane, Thomas M.; López-Otín, Carlos; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Olsson, Håkan; Ingvar, Christian; Borg, Åke; Gruis, Nelleke A.; Trent, Jeffrey M.; Jönsson, Göran; Bishop, D. Timothy; Mann, Graham J.; Newton-Bishop, Julia A.; Brown, Kevin M.; Adams, David J.; Hayward, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The shelterin complex protects chromosomal ends by regulating how the telomerase complex interacts with telomeres. Following the recent finding in familial melanoma of inactivating germline mutations in POT1, encoding a member of the shelterin complex, we searched for mutations in the other five components of the shelterin complex in melanoma families. Methods: Next-generation sequencing techniques were used to screen 510 melanoma families (with unknown genetic etiology) and control cohorts for mutations in shelterin complex encoding genes: ACD, TERF2IP, TERF1, TERF2, and TINF 2. Maximum likelihood and LOD [logarithm (base 10) of odds] analyses were used. Mutation clustering was assessed with χ2 and Fisher’s exact tests. P values under .05 were considered statistically significant (one-tailed with Yates’ correction). Results: Six families had mutations in ACD and four families carried TERF2IP variants, which included nonsense mutations in both genes (p.Q320X and p.R364X, respectively) and point mutations that cosegregated with melanoma. Of five distinct mutations in ACD, four clustered in the POT1 binding domain, including p.Q320X. This clustering of novel mutations in the POT1 binding domain of ACD was statistically higher (P = .005) in melanoma probands compared with population control individuals (n = 6785), as were all novel and rare variants in both ACD (P = .040) and TERF2IP (P = .022). Families carrying ACD and TERF2IP mutations were also enriched with other cancer types, suggesting that these variants also predispose to a broader spectrum of cancers than just melanoma. Novel mutations were also observed in TERF1, TERF2, and TINF2, but these were not convincingly associated with melanoma. Conclusions: Our findings add to the growing support for telomere dysregulation as a key process associated with melanoma susceptibility. PMID:25505254

  7. Correlation between phenotypic heterogeneity and gene mutational characteristics in familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL).

    PubMed

    Ueda, Ikuyo; Ishii, Eiichi; Morimoto, Akira; Ohga, Shouichi; Sako, Masahiro; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2006-04-01

    Classification of familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) into FHL2, FHL3, and other subtypes based on genetic abnormalities has recently become possible. We studied the phenotypic differences among these subtypes in Japan. Forty patients clinically diagnosed with FHL were analyzed. Perforin abnormality was screened by flow cytometric analysis and/or DNA sequencing in these patients, and those without perforin abnormalities were further examined for the presence of mutations in the Munc13-4 gene by DNA sequencing. The correlation between clinical features and genetic subtypes was investigated. Of the 40 HLH patients, 11 showed perforin gene mutations (classified as FHL2) and ten had Munc13-4 gene mutations (FHL3), but neither mutation was noted in 19 patients (non-FHL2/3). Although the majority of the patients developed the disease before the age of 1 year, the onset in three FHL2 patients with missense mutations was late (7, 11, and 12 years). Incidence of deficient natural killer cell activity was higher in FHL2 patients (9/9 FHL2, 4/9 FHL3, and 6/17 non-FHL2/3; P = 0.005). The serum levels of ferritin and soluble interleukin-2 receptor were significantly higher in FHL2 patients with nonsense perforin mutations compared to other subgroups (P < or = 0.05). Epstein-Barr virus infection was involved in 8 of the 40 HLH patients: one FHL2, one FHL3, and six non-FHL2/3. Although clinical features of FHL3 appear to be homogeneous, the heterogeneous clinical features of FHL2 depend upon the nature of perforin gene mutations. Characterization of the non-FHL2/3 group with regard to FHL1 or other novel gene mutations remains to be conducted.

  8. Gene mutations in chronic kidney disease patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism and Sagliker syndrome.

    PubMed

    Demirhan, Osman; Arslan, Ahmet; Sagliker, Yahya; Akbal, Eylul; Ergun, Sercan; Bayraktar, Recep; Sagliker, Hasan Sabit; Dogan, Ekrem; Gunesacar, Ramazan; Ozkaynak, Piril Sagliker

    2015-03-01

    Sagliker syndrome (SS) develops particularly before puberty while chronic kidney disease (CKD) reaches stage 3 with overt secondary hyperparathyroidism. We conducted screening for mutations in all the 13 exons of GNAS1 gene, all 3 exons of FGF23, and all 18 exons in FGFR3 genes in 23 patients. In 73.9% (17 of 23) patients, 17 genetic abnormalities in GNAS1 were detected. Seven (58.3%) of 12 nucleotide alterations comprised novel missense mutations and 3 nonsense. Mismutations were in different manner. There were also 6 heterozygous transversion polymorphisms in exons. Six were introngenic mutations (introns 65626, 70387, 70817). We found 10 mutations with different manner in FGF23 gene. Two were defined previously but remaining 8 were novel mutations. Three were in intronic region near exon 2. We sequenced all exons and intronic regions near exon-exon junction regions of FGFR3 gene. We found 22 mutations with different manner. Six were defined previously and remaining 16 were novel mutations. Eight of them were in intronic region near exon 11 and the last 2 were in noncoding exonic region of exons. One was in the exon-exon junction region between exon 11 and 12, therefore this mutation might be preventing splicing of this intron. Because the incidence of CKD late stage 3 is around 8% but the incidence of SS is around 0.5% in CKD, these gene mismutations might be responsible for bone deformities such as McCune-Albright syndrome and achondroplasias. Although our patients were not resembling any of them, they could be in between, and SS might be a combination-compulsion of bone dysplasias-hereditary osteodystrophies and CKD. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cancer Susceptibility Gene Mutations in Individuals With Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yurgelun, Matthew B; Kulke, Matthew H; Fuchs, Charles S; Allen, Brian A; Uno, Hajime; Hornick, Jason L; Ukaegbu, Chinedu I; Brais, Lauren K; McNamara, Philip G; Mayer, Robert J; Schrag, Deborah; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Ng, Kimmie; Kidd, John; Singh, Nanda; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Wenstrup, Richard J; Syngal, Sapna

    2017-04-01

    Purpose Hereditary factors play an important role in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, yet the prevalence of germline cancer susceptibility gene mutations in patients with CRC unselected for high-risk features (eg, early age at diagnosis, personal/family history of cancer or polyps, tumor microsatellite instability [MSI], mismatch repair [MMR] deficiency) is unknown. Patients and Methods We recruited 1,058 participants who received CRC care in a clinic-based setting without preselection for age at diagnosis, personal/family history, or MSI/MMR results. All participants underwent germline testing for mutations in 25 genes associated with inherited cancer risk. Each gene was categorized as high penetrance or moderate penetrance on the basis of published estimates of the lifetime cancer risks conferred by pathogenic germline mutations in that gene. Results One hundred five (9.9%; 95% CI, 8.2% to 11.9%) of 1,058 participants carried one or more pathogenic mutations, including 33 (3.1%) with Lynch syndrome (LS). Twenty-eight (96.6%) of 29 available LS CRCs demonstrated abnormal MSI/MMR results. Seventy-four (7.0%) of 1,058 participants carried non-LS gene mutations, including 23 (2.2%) with mutations in high-penetrance genes (five APC, three biallelic MUTYH, 11 BRCA1/2, two PALB2, one CDKN2A, and one TP53), 15 of whom lacked clinical histories suggestive of their underlying mutation. Thirty-eight (3.6%) participants had moderate-penetrance CRC risk gene mutations (19 monoallelic MUTYH, 17 APC*I1307K, two CHEK2). Neither proband age at CRC diagnosis, family history of CRC, nor personal history of other cancers significantly predicted the presence of pathogenic mutations in non-LS genes. Conclusion Germline cancer susceptibility gene mutations are carried by 9.9% of patients with CRC. MSI/MMR testing reliably identifies LS probands, although 7.0% of patients with CRC carry non-LS mutations, including 1.0% with BRCA1/2 mutations.

  10. Screening for Novel Germline Rare Mutations Associated with Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0348 TITLE: “Screening for Novel Germline Rare Mutations Associated with Aggressive Prostate Cancer ” PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE “Screening for Novel Germline Rare Mutations Associated with Aggressive Prostate Cancer ” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer in males in the U.S. While the major indolent form

  11. Pattern of mutation rates in the germline of Drosophila melanogaster males from a large-scale mutation screening experiment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian-Jun; Pan, Xue-Rong; Hu, Jing; Ma, Li; Wu, Jian-Min; Shao, Ye-Lin; Ai, Shi-Meng; Liu, Shu-Qun; Barton, Sara A; Woodruff, Ronny C; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Fu, Yun-Xin

    2014-06-11

    The sperm or eggs of sexual organisms go through a series of cell divisions from the fertilized egg; mutations can occur at each division. Mutations in the lineage of cells leading to the sperm or eggs are of particular importance because many such mutations may be shared by somatic tissues and also may be inherited, thus having a lasting consequence. For decades, little has been known about the pattern of the mutation rates along the germline development. Recently it was shown from a small portion of data that resulted from a large-scale mutation screening experiment that the rates of recessive lethal or nearly lethal mutations differ dramatically during the germline development of Drosophila melanogaster males. In this paper the full data set from the experiment and its analysis are reported by taking advantage of a recent methodologic advance. By analyzing the mutation patterns with different levels of recessive lethality, earlier published conclusions based on partial data are found to remain valid. Furthermore, it is found that for most nearly lethal mutations, the mutation rate at the first cell division is even greater than previous thought compared with those at other divisions. There is also some evidence that the mutation rate at the second division decreases rapidly but is still appreciably greater than those for the rest of the cleavage stage. The mutation rate at spermatogenesis is greater than late cleavage and stem-cell stages, but there is no evidence that rates are different among the five cell divisions of the spermatogenesis. We also found that a modestly biased sampling, leading to slightly more primordial germ cells after the eighth division than those reported in the literature, provides the best fit to the data. These findings provide conceptual and numerical basis for exploring the consequences of differential mutation rates during individual development.

  12. Diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and gene mutation analysis in four Chinese children with biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ye, J; Wang, T; Han, L S; Qiu, W J; Zhang, H W; Zhang, Y F; Gao, X L; Wang, Y; Gu, X F

    2009-12-01

    To report the clinical course and explore the gene mutation spectrum of four Chinese children with biotinidase deficiency. Four Chinese patients aged 4 months to 8 years were referred to this study. Tandem mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the determination of biotinidase activities were performed for selective screening of biotinidase deficiency. Four patients with biotinidase deficiency were diagnosed, treated with biotin and followed. (1) Four patients with biotinidase deficiency were diagnosed by characteristic metabolites, such as elevated blood levels of 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (6.22 +/- 3.1 mumol/L), elevated 3-methylcrontonylglycine, methylcitrate and 3-hydroxypropionate in urine and very low biotinidase activities. (2) These patients have been treated with biotin for 1-8 years; two of them still have mental retardation, and two have irreversible hearing or vision disability. (3) In the four patients, six different mutations in the biotinidase gene were identified: c.98G:del7ins3, c.1369G>A (p. V457M), c.1384delA, c.1493_1494insT, c.1284C>A (p.Y428X) and c.1157G>A (p.W386X). The latter four mutations are novel variations. Seven out of eight mutations are located on exon 4 of the biotinidase gene. Early recognition of biotinidase deficiency is crucial to avoid permanent damage. Determination of biotinidase activity should be included in neonatal screening in China. Exon 4 may be a hot-spot for biotinidase gene mutations in Chinese patients. Four novel gene variations may be disease-causing mutations and should be confirmed by expression studies.

  13. Convergence in pigmentation at multiple levels: mutations, genes and function

    PubMed Central

    Manceau, Marie; Domingues, Vera S.; Linnen, Catherine R.; Rosenblum, Erica Bree; Hoekstra, Hopi E.

    2010-01-01

    Convergence—the independent evolution of the same trait by two or more taxa—has long been of interest to evolutionary biologists, but only recently has the molecular basis of phenotypic convergence been identified. Here, we highlight studies of rapid evolution of cryptic coloration in vertebrates to demonstrate that phenotypic convergence can occur at multiple levels: mutations, genes and gene function. We first show that different genes can be responsible for convergent phenotypes even among closely related populations, for example, in the pale beach mice inhabiting Florida's Gulf and Atlantic coasts. By contrast, the exact same mutation can create similar phenotypes in distantly related species such as mice and mammoths. Next, we show that different mutations in the same gene need not be functionally equivalent to produce similar phenotypes. For example, separate mutations produce divergent protein function but convergent pale coloration in two lizard species. Similarly, mutations that alter the expression of a gene in different ways can, nevertheless, result in similar phenotypes, as demonstrated by sister species of deer mice. Together these studies underscore the importance of identifying not only the genes, but also the precise mutations and their effects on protein function, that contribute to adaptation and highlight how convergence can occur at different genetic levels. PMID:20643733

  14. Hereditary angioedema with a mutation in the plasminogen gene.

    PubMed

    Bork, K; Wulff, K; Steinmüller-Magin, L; Braenne, I; Staubach-Renz, P; Witzke, G; Hardt, J

    2017-08-10

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) with normal C1-INH (HAEnCI) may be linked to specific mutations in the coagulation factor 12 (FXII) gene (HAE-FXII) or functional mutations in other genes that are still unknown. We sought to identify and characterize a hitherto unknown type of HAE with normal C1-INH and without mutation in the F12 gene. The study comprised analysis of whole-exome sequencing, Sanger sequencing, and clinical data of patients. We detected a mutation in the plasminogen (PLG) gene in patients with HAEnCI. The mutation c.9886A>G was located in exon 9 leading to the missense mutation p.Lys330Glu (K330E) in the kringle 3 domain of the PLG protein. The mutation was identified by next-generation sequencing in 14 patients with HAEnCI belonging to 4 of 7 families. Family studies revealed that this type of HAE was transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. The PLG gene mutation was present in all studied symptomatic patients and was also found in 9 of 38 index patients from 38 further families with HAEnCI. Most patients had swelling of face/lips (78.3%) and tongue (78.3%). A total of 331 of all 3.795 tongue swellings (8.7%) were associated with dyspnea, voice changes, and imminent asphyxiation. Two women died by asphyxiation due to a tongue swelling. Hereditary angioedema with a mutation in the PLG gene is a novel type of HAE. It is associated with a high risk of tongue swellings. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  15. Results from screening over 9000 mutation-bearing mice for defects in the electroretinogram and appearance of the fundus

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Lawrence H.; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Siepka, Sanda M.; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Lumayag, Stephen; Baker, Matthew; Fenner, Deborah; Mullins, Robert F.; Sheffield, Val C.; Stone, Edwin M.; Heffron, Edward; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Random mutagenesis combined with phenotypic screening using carefully crafted functional tests has successfully led to the discovery of genes that are essential for a number of functions. This approach does not require prior knowledge of the identity of the genes that are involved and is a way to ascribe function to the nearly 6000 genes for which knowledge of the DNA sequence has been inadequate to determine the function of the gene product. In an effort to identify genes involved in the visual system via this approach, we have tested over 9000 first and third generation offspring of mice treated with the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) for visual defects, as evidenced by abnormalities in the electroretinogram and appearance of the fundus. We identified 61 putative mutations with this procedure and outline the steps needed to identify the affected genes. PMID:15536001

  16. Results from screening over 9000 mutation-bearing mice for defects in the electroretinogram and appearance of the fundus.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Lawrence H; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Siepka, Sanda M; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Lumayag, Stephen; Baker, Matthew; Fenner, Deborah; Mullins, Robert F; Sheffield, Val C; Stone, Edwin M; Heffron, Edward; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2004-12-01

    Random mutagenesis combined with phenotypic screening using carefully crafted functional tests has successfully led to the discovery of genes that are essential for a number of functions. This approach does not require prior knowledge of the identity of the genes that are involved and is a way to ascribe function to the nearly 6000 genes for which knowledge of the DNA sequence has been inadequate to determine the function of the gene product. In an effort to identify genes involved in the visual system via this approach, we have tested over 9000 first and third generation offspring of mice treated with the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) for visual defects, as evidenced by abnormalities in the electroretinogram and appearance of the fundus. We identified 61 putative mutations with this procedure and outline the steps needed to identify the affected genes.

  17. Genes associated with retinitis pigmentosa and allied diseases are frequently mutated in the general population.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Koji M; Rivolta, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa and other hereditary retinal degenerations (HRD) are rare genetic diseases leading to progressive blindness. Recessive HRD are caused by mutations in more than 100 different genes. Laws of population genetics predict that, on a purely theoretical ground, such a high number of genes should translate into an extremely elevated frequency of unaffected carriers of mutations. In this study we estimate the proportion of these individuals within the general population, via the analyses of data from whole-genome sequencing. We screened complete and high-quality genome sequences from 46 control individuals from various world populations for HRD mutations, using bioinformatic tools developed in-house. All mutations detected in silico were validated by Sanger sequencing. We identified clear-cut, null recessive HRD mutations in 10 out of the 46 unaffected individuals analyzed (∼22%). Based on our data, approximately one in 4-5 individuals from the general population may be a carrier of null mutations that are responsible for HRD. This would be the highest mutation carrier frequency so far measured for a class of Mendelian disorders, especially considering that missenses and other forms of pathogenic changes were not included in our assessment. Among other things, our results indicate that the risk for a consanguineous couple of generating a child with a blinding disease is particularly high, compared to other genetic conditions.

  18. Mutation analysis of the coding sequence of the MECP2 gene in infantile autism.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Kim S; Blasi, Francesca; Bacchelli, Elena; Klauck, Sabine M; Maestrini, Elena; Poustka, Annemarie

    2002-10-01

    Mutations in the coding region of the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 ( MECP2) gene cause Rett syndrome and have also been reported in a number of X-linked mental retardation syndromes. Furthermore, such mutations have recently been described in a few autistic patients. In this study, a large sample of individuals with autism was screened in order to elucidate systematically whether specific mutations in MECP2 play a role in autism. The mutation analysis of the coding sequence of the gene was performed by denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. Taken together, 14 sequence variants were identified in 152 autistic patients from 134 German families and 50 unrelated patients from the International Molecular Genetic Study of Autism Consortium affected relative-pair sample. Eleven of these variants were excluded for having an aetiological role as they were either silent mutations, did not cosegregate with autism in the pedigrees of the patients or represented known polymorphisms. The relevance of the three remaining mutations towards the aetiology of autism could not be ruled out, although they were not localised within functional domains of MeCP2 and may be rare polymorphisms. Taking into account the large size of our sample, we conclude that mutations in the coding region of MECP2 do not play a major role in autism su