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Sample records for gene network parameters

  1. Listening to the noise: random fluctuations reveal gene network parameters.

    PubMed

    Munsky, Brian; Trinh, Brooke; Khammash, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    The cellular environment is abuzz with noise originating from the inherent random motion of reacting molecules in the living cell. In this noisy environment, clonal cell populations show cell-to-cell variability that can manifest significant phenotypic differences. Noise-induced stochastic fluctuations in cellular constituents can be measured and their statistics quantified. We show that these random fluctuations carry within them valuable information about the underlying genetic network. Far from being a nuisance, the ever-present cellular noise acts as a rich source of excitation that, when processed through a gene network, carries its distinctive fingerprint that encodes a wealth of information about that network. We show that in some cases the analysis of these random fluctuations enables the full identification of network parameters, including those that may otherwise be difficult to measure. This establishes a potentially powerful approach for the identification of gene networks and offers a new window into the workings of these networks.

  2. Listening to the noise: random fluctuations reveal gene network parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Munsky, Brian; Khammash, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    The cellular environment is abuzz with noise. The origin of this noise is attributed to the inherent random motion of reacting molecules that take part in gene expression and post expression interactions. In this noisy environment, clonal populations of cells exhibit cell-to-cell variability that frequently manifests as significant phenotypic differences within the cellular population. The stochastic fluctuations in cellular constituents induced by noise can be measured and their statistics quantified. We show that these random fluctuations carry within them valuable information about the underlying genetic network. Far from being a nuisance, the ever-present cellular noise acts as a rich source of excitation that, when processed through a gene network, carries its distinctive fingerprint that encodes a wealth of information about that network. We demonstrate that in some cases the analysis of these random fluctuations enables the full identification of network parameters, including those that may otherwise be difficult to measure. This establishes a potentially powerful approach for the identification of gene networks and offers a new window into the workings of these networks.

  3. Listening to the Noise: Random Fluctuations Reveal Gene Network Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsky, Brian; Trinh, Brooke; Khammash, Mustafa

    2010-03-01

    The cellular environment is abuzz with noise originating from the inherent random motion of reacting molecules in the living cell. In this noisy environment, clonal cell populations exhibit cell-to-cell variability that can manifest significant prototypical differences. Noise induced stochastic fluctuations in cellular constituents can be measured and their statistics quantified using flow cytometry, single molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization, time lapse fluorescence microscopy and other single cell and single molecule measurement techniques. We show that these random fluctuations carry within them valuable information about the underlying genetic network. Far from being a nuisance, the ever-present cellular noise acts as a rich source of excitation that, when processed through a gene network, carries its distinctive fingerprint that encodes a wealth of information about that network. We demonstrate that in some cases the analysis of these random fluctuations enables the full identification of network parameters, including those that may otherwise be difficult to measure. We use theoretical investigations to establish experimental guidelines for the identification of gene regulatory networks, and we apply these guideline to experimentally identify predictive models for different regulatory mechanisms in bacteria and yeast.

  4. Network topology and parameter estimation: from experimental design methods to gene regulatory network kinetics using a community based approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate estimation of parameters of biochemical models is required to characterize the dynamics of molecular processes. This problem is intimately linked to identifying the most informative experiments for accomplishing such tasks. While significant progress has been made, effective experimental strategies for parameter identification and for distinguishing among alternative network topologies remain unclear. We approached these questions in an unbiased manner using a unique community-based approach in the context of the DREAM initiative (Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessment of Methods). We created an in silico test framework under which participants could probe a network with hidden parameters by requesting a range of experimental assays; results of these experiments were simulated according to a model of network dynamics only partially revealed to participants. Results We proposed two challenges; in the first, participants were given the topology and underlying biochemical structure of a 9-gene regulatory network and were asked to determine its parameter values. In the second challenge, participants were given an incomplete topology with 11 genes and asked to find three missing links in the model. In both challenges, a budget was provided to buy experimental data generated in silico with the model and mimicking the features of different common experimental techniques, such as microarrays and fluorescence microscopy. Data could be bought at any stage, allowing participants to implement an iterative loop of experiments and computation. Conclusions A total of 19 teams participated in this competition. The results suggest that the combination of state-of-the-art parameter estimation and a varied set of experimental methods using a few datasets, mostly fluorescence imaging data, can accurately determine parameters of biochemical models of gene regulation. However, the task is considerably more difficult if the gene network topology is not completely

  5. Parameter Estimation for Gene Regulatory Networks from Microarray Data: Cold Shock Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dahlquist, Kam D; Fitzpatrick, Ben G; Camacho, Erika T; Entzminger, Stephanie D; Wanner, Nathan C

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the dynamics of a gene regulatory network controlling the cold shock response in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The medium-scale network, derived from published genome-wide location data, consists of 21 transcription factors that regulate one another through 31 directed edges. The expression levels of the individual transcription factors were modeled using mass balance ordinary differential equations with a sigmoidal production function. Each equation includes a production rate, a degradation rate, weights that denote the magnitude and type of influence of the connected transcription factors (activation or repression), and a threshold of expression. The inverse problem of determining model parameters from observed data is our primary interest. We fit the differential equation model to published microarray data using a penalized nonlinear least squares approach. Model predictions fit the experimental data well, within the 95% confidence interval. Tests of the model using randomized initial guesses and model-generated data also lend confidence to the fit. The results have revealed activation and repression relationships between the transcription factors. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the model is most sensitive to changes in the production rate parameters, weights, and thresholds of Yap1, Rox1, and Yap6, which form a densely connected core in the network. The modeling results newly suggest that Rap1, Fhl1, Msn4, Rph1, and Hsf1 play an important role in regulating the early response to cold shock in yeast. Our results demonstrate that estimation for a large number of parameters can be successfully performed for nonlinear dynamic gene regulatory networks using sparse, noisy microarray data.

  6. Identification of robust adaptation gene regulatory network parameters using an improved particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Huang, X N; Ren, H P

    2016-05-13

    Robust adaptation is a critical ability of gene regulatory network (GRN) to survive in a fluctuating environment, which represents the system responding to an input stimulus rapidly and then returning to its pre-stimulus steady state timely. In this paper, the GRN is modeled using the Michaelis-Menten rate equations, which are highly nonlinear differential equations containing 12 undetermined parameters. The robust adaption is quantitatively described by two conflicting indices. To identify the parameter sets in order to confer the GRNs with robust adaptation is a multi-variable, multi-objective, and multi-peak optimization problem, which is difficult to acquire satisfactory solutions especially high-quality solutions. A new best-neighbor particle swarm optimization algorithm is proposed to implement this task. The proposed algorithm employs a Latin hypercube sampling method to generate the initial population. The particle crossover operation and elitist preservation strategy are also used in the proposed algorithm. The simulation results revealed that the proposed algorithm could identify multiple solutions in one time running. Moreover, it demonstrated a superior performance as compared to the previous methods in the sense of detecting more high-quality solutions within an acceptable time. The proposed methodology, owing to its universality and simplicity, is useful for providing the guidance to design GRN with superior robust adaptation.

  7. sgnesR: An R package for simulating gene expression data from an underlying real gene network structure considering delay parameters.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Shailesh; Lloyd-Price, Jason; Ribeiro, Andre; Yli-Harja, Olli; Dehmer, Matthias; Emmert-Streib, Frank

    2017-07-04

    sgnesR (Stochastic Gene Network Expression Simulator in R) is an R package that provides an interface to simulate gene expression data from a given gene network using the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA). The package allows various options for delay parameters and can easily included in reactions for promoter delay, RNA delay and Protein delay. A user can tune these parameters to model various types of reactions within a cell. As examples, we present two network models to generate expression profiles. We also demonstrated the inference of networks and the evaluation of association measure of edge and non-edge components from the generated expression profiles. The purpose of sgnesR is to enable an easy to use and a quick implementation for generating realistic gene expression data from biologically relevant networks that can be user selected. sgnesR is freely available for academic use. The R package has been tested for R 3.2.0 under Linux, Windows and Mac OS X.

  8. Continuous modeling of metabolic networks with gene regulation in yeast and in vivo determination of rate parameters.

    PubMed

    Moisset, P; Vaisman, D; Cintolesi, A; Urrutia, J; Rapaport, I; Andrews, B A; Asenjo, J A

    2012-09-01

    A continuous model of a metabolic network including gene regulation to simulate metabolic fluxes during batch cultivation of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was developed. The metabolic network includes reactions of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, glycerol and ethanol synthesis and consumption, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and protein synthesis. Carbon sources considered were glucose and then ethanol synthesized during growth on glucose. The metabolic network has 39 fluxes, which represent the action of 50 enzymes and 64 genes and it is coupled with a gene regulation network which defines enzyme synthesis (activities) and incorporates regulation by glucose (enzyme induction and repression), modeled using ordinary differential equations. The model includes enzyme kinetics, equations that follow both mass-action law and transport as well as inducible, repressible, and constitutive enzymes of metabolism. The model was able to simulate a fermentation of S. cerevisiae during the exponential growth phase on glucose and the exponential growth phase on ethanol using only one set of kinetic parameters. All fluxes in the continuous model followed the behavior shown by the metabolic flux analysis (MFA) obtained from experimental results. The differences obtained between the fluxes given by the model and the fluxes determined by the MFA do not exceed 25% in 75% of the cases during exponential growth on glucose, and 20% in 90% of the cases during exponential growth on ethanol. Furthermore, the adjustment of the fermentation profiles of biomass, glucose, and ethanol were 95%, 95%, and 79%, respectively. With these results the simulation was considered successful. A comparison between the simulation of the continuous model and the experimental data of the diauxic yeast fermentation for glucose, biomass, and ethanol, shows an extremely good match using the parameters found. The small discrepancies between the fluxes obtained through MFA and those predicted by the differential

  9. An Integrative Approach for Mapping Differentially Expressed Genes and Network Components Using Novel Parameters to Elucidate Key Regulatory Genes in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Manika; Gupta, Rajinder; Moussa, Ahmed; Singh, Tiratha Raj

    2015-01-01

    For examining the intricate biological processes concerned with colorectal cancer (CRC), a systems biology approach integrating several biological components and other influencing factors is essential to understand. We performed a comprehensive system level analysis for CRC which assisted in unravelling crucial network components and many regulatory elements through a coordinated view. Using this integrative approach, the perceptive of complexity hidden in a biological phenomenon is extensively simplified. The microarray analyses facilitated differential expression of 631 significant genes employed in the progression of disease and supplied interesting associated up and down regulated genes like jun, fos and mapk1. The transcriptional regulation of these genes was deliberated widely by examining transcription factors such as hnf4, nr2f1, znf219 and dr1 which directly influence the expression. Further, interactions of these genes/proteins were evaluated and crucial network motifs were detected to associate with the pathophysiology of CRC. The available standard statistical parameters such as z-score, p-value and significance profile were explored for the identification of key signatures from CRC pathway whereas a few novel parameters representing over-represented structures were also designed in the study. The applied approach revealed 5 key genes i.e. kras, araf, pik3r5, ralgds and akt3 via our novel designed parameters illustrating high statistical significance. These novel parameters can assist in scrutinizing candidate markers for diseases having known biological pathways. Further, investigating and targeting these proposed genes for experimental validations, instead being spellbound by the complicated pathway will certainly endow valuable insight in a well-timed systematic understanding of CRC.

  10. Buffering in cyclic gene networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyzin, S. D.; Kolesov, A. Yu.; Rozov, N. Kh.

    2016-06-01

    We consider cyclic chains of unidirectionally coupled delay differential-difference equations that are mathematical models of artificial oscillating gene networks. We establish that the buffering phenomenon is realized in these system for an appropriate choice of the parameters: any given finite number of stable periodic motions of a special type, the so-called traveling waves, coexist.

  11. Parameter estimation in tree graph metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Stigter, Hans; Gomez Roldan, Maria Victoria; van Eeuwijk, Fred; Hall, Robert D.; Groenenboom, Marian; Molenaar, Jaap J.

    2016-01-01

    We study the glycosylation processes that convert initially toxic substrates to nutritionally valuable metabolites in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) seedlings. To estimate the reaction rates we use ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to model the enzyme kinetics. A popular choice is to use a system of linear ODEs with constant kinetic rates or to use Michaelis–Menten kinetics. In reality, the catalytic rates, which are affected among other factors by kinetic constants and enzyme concentrations, are changing in time and with the approaches just mentioned, this phenomenon cannot be described. Another problem is that, in general these kinetic coefficients are not always identifiable. A third problem is that, it is not precisely known which enzymes are catalyzing the observed glycosylation processes. With several hundred potential gene candidates, experimental validation using purified target proteins is expensive and time consuming. We aim at reducing this task via mathematical modeling to allow for the pre-selection of most potential gene candidates. In this article we discuss a fast and relatively simple approach to estimate time varying kinetic rates, with three favorable properties: firstly, it allows for identifiable estimation of time dependent parameters in networks with a tree-like structure. Secondly, it is relatively fast compared to usually applied methods that estimate the model derivatives together with the network parameters. Thirdly, by combining the metabolite concentration data with a corresponding microarray data, it can help in detecting the genes related to the enzymatic processes. By comparing the estimated time dynamics of the catalytic rates with time series gene expression data we may assess potential candidate genes behind enzymatic reactions. As an example, we show how to apply this method to select prominent glycosyltransferase genes in tomato seedlings. PMID:27688960

  12. Introduction: Cancer Gene Networks.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Constructing, evaluating, and interpreting gene networks generally sits within the broader field of systems biology, which continues to emerge rapidly, particular with respect to its application to understanding the complexity of signaling in the context of cancer biology. For the purposes of this volume, we take a broad definition of systems biology. Considering an organism or disease within an organism as a system, systems biology is the study of the integrated and coordinated interactions of the network(s) of genes, their variants both natural and mutated (e.g., polymorphisms, rearrangements, alternate splicing, mutations), their proteins and isoforms, and the organic and inorganic molecules with which they interact, to execute the biochemical reactions (e.g., as enzymes, substrates, products) that reflect the function of that system. Central to systems biology, and perhaps the only approach that can effectively manage the complexity of such systems, is the building of quantitative multiscale predictive models. The predictions of the models can vary substantially depending on the nature of the model and its inputoutput relationships. For example, a model may predict the outcome of a specific molecular reaction(s), a cellular phenotype (e.g., alive, dead, growth arrest, proliferation, and motility), a change in the respective prevalence of cell or subpopulations, a patient or patient subgroup outcome(s). Such models necessarily require computers. Computational modeling can be thought of as using machine learning and related tools to integrate the very high dimensional data generated from modern, high throughput omics technologies including genomics (next generation sequencing), transcriptomics (gene expression microarrays; RNAseq), metabolomics and proteomics (ultra high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry), and "subomic" technologies to study the kinome, methylome, and others. Mathematical modeling can be thought of as the use of ordinary

  13. Analysis of cascading failure in gene networks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Longxiao; Wang, Shudong; Li, Kaikai; Meng, Dazhi

    2012-01-01

    It is an important subject to research the functional mechanism of cancer-related genes make in formation and development of cancers. The modern methodology of data analysis plays a very important role for deducing the relationship between cancers and cancer-related genes and analyzing functional mechanism of genome. In this research, we construct mutual information networks using gene expression profiles of glioblast and renal in normal condition and cancer conditions. We investigate the relationship between structure and robustness in gene networks of the two tissues using a cascading failure model based on betweenness centrality. Define some important parameters such as the percentage of failure nodes of the network, the average size-ratio of cascading failure, and the cumulative probability of size-ratio of cascading failure to measure the robustness of the networks. By comparing control group and experiment groups, we find that the networks of experiment groups are more robust than that of control group. The gene that can cause large scale failure is called structural key gene. Some of them have been confirmed to be closely related to the formation and development of glioma and renal cancer respectively. Most of them are predicted to play important roles during the formation of glioma and renal cancer, maybe the oncogenes, suppressor genes, and other cancer candidate genes in the glioma and renal cancer cells. However, these studies provide little information about the detailed roles of identified cancer genes.

  14. Functional Module Analysis for Gene Coexpression Networks with Network Integration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuqin; Zhao, Hongyu

    2015-01-01

    Network has been a general tool for studying the complex interactions between different genes, proteins and other small molecules. Module as a fundamental property of many biological networks has been widely studied and many computational methods have been proposed to identify the modules in an individual network. However, in many cases a single network is insufficient for module analysis due to the noise in the data or the tuning of parameters when building the biological network. The availability of a large amount of biological networks makes network integration study possible. By integrating such networks, more informative modules for some specific disease can be derived from the networks constructed from different tissues, and consistent factors for different diseases can be inferred. In this paper, we have developed an effective method for module identification from multiple networks under different conditions. The problem is formulated as an optimization model, which combines the module identification in each individual network and alignment of the modules from different networks together. An approximation algorithm based on eigenvector computation is proposed. Our method outperforms the existing methods, especially when the underlying modules in multiple networks are different in simulation studies. We also applied our method to two groups of gene coexpression networks for humans, which include one for three different cancers, and one for three tissues from the morbidly obese patients. We identified 13 modules with 3 complete subgraphs, and 11 modules with 2 complete subgraphs, respectively. The modules were validated through Gene Ontology enrichment and KEGG pathway enrichment analysis. We also showed that the main functions of most modules for the corresponding disease have been addressed by other researchers, which may provide the theoretical basis for further studying the modules experimentally. PMID:26451826

  15. Reverse engineering transcriptional gene networks.

    PubMed

    Belcastro, Vincenzo; di Bernardo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is a step-by-step guide on how to infer gene networks from gene expression profiles. The definition of a gene network is given in Subheading 1, where the different types of networks are discussed. The chapter then guides the readers through a data-gathering process in order to build a compendium of gene expression profiles from a public repository. Gene expression profiles are then discretized and a statistical relationship between genes, called mutual information (MI), is computed. Gene pairs with insignificant MI scores are then discarded by applying one of the described pruning steps. The retained relationships are then used to build up a Boolean adjacency matrix used as input for a clustering algorithm to divide the network into modules (or communities). The gene network can then be used as a hypothesis generator for discovering gene function and analyzing gene signatures. Some case studies are presented, and an online web-tool called Netview is described.

  16. Prebiotic network evolution: six key parameters.

    PubMed

    Nghe, Philippe; Hordijk, Wim; Kauffman, Stuart A; Walker, Sara I; Schmidt, Francis J; Kemble, Harry; Yeates, Jessica A M; Lehman, Niles

    2015-12-01

    The origins of life likely required the cooperation among a set of molecular species interacting in a network. If so, then the earliest modes of evolutionary change would have been governed by the manners and mechanisms by which networks change their compositions over time. For molecular events, especially those in a pre-biological setting, these mechanisms have rarely been considered. We are only recently learning to apply the results of mathematical analyses of network dynamics to prebiotic events. Here, we attempt to forge connections between such analyses and the current state of knowledge in prebiotic chemistry. Of the many possible influences that could direct primordial network, six parameters emerge as the most influential when one considers the molecular characteristics of the best candidates for the emergence of biological information: polypeptides, RNA-like polymers, and lipids. These parameters are viable cores, connectivity kinetics, information control, scalability, resource availability, and compartmentalization. These parameters, both individually and jointly, guide the aggregate evolution of collectively autocatalytic sets. We are now in a position to translate these conclusions into a laboratory setting and test empirically the dynamics of prebiotic network evolution.

  17. Parameter estimation methods for chaotic intercellular networks.

    PubMed

    Mariño, Inés P; Ullner, Ekkehard; Zaikin, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated simulation-based techniques for parameter estimation in chaotic intercellular networks. The proposed methodology combines a synchronization-based framework for parameter estimation in coupled chaotic systems with some state-of-the-art computational inference methods borrowed from the field of computational statistics. The first method is a stochastic optimization algorithm, known as accelerated random search method, and the other two techniques are based on approximate Bayesian computation. The latter is a general methodology for non-parametric inference that can be applied to practically any system of interest. The first method based on approximate Bayesian computation is a Markov Chain Monte Carlo scheme that generates a series of random parameter realizations for which a low synchronization error is guaranteed. We show that accurate parameter estimates can be obtained by averaging over these realizations. The second ABC-based technique is a Sequential Monte Carlo scheme. The algorithm generates a sequence of "populations", i.e., sets of randomly generated parameter values, where the members of a certain population attain a synchronization error that is lesser than the error attained by members of the previous population. Again, we show that accurate estimates can be obtained by averaging over the parameter values in the last population of the sequence. We have analysed how effective these methods are from a computational perspective. For the numerical simulations we have considered a network that consists of two modified repressilators with identical parameters, coupled by the fast diffusion of the autoinducer across the cell membranes.

  18. Reconstructing contact network parameters from viral phylogenies.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Rosemary M; Liang, Richard H; Poon, Art F Y

    2016-07-01

    Models of the spread of disease in a population often make the simplifying assumption that the population is homogeneously mixed, or is divided into homogeneously mixed compartments. However, human populations have complex structures formed by social contacts, which can have a significant influence on the rate of epidemic spread. Contact network models capture this structure by explicitly representing each contact which could possibly lead to a transmission. We developed a method based on approximate Bayesian computation (ABC), a likelihood-free inference strategy, for estimating structural parameters of the contact network underlying an observed viral phylogeny. The method combines adaptive sequential Monte Carlo for ABC, Gillespie simulation for propagating epidemics though networks, and a kernel-based tree similarity score. We used the method to fit the Barabási-Albert network model to simulated transmission trees, and also applied it to viral phylogenies estimated from ten published HIV sequence datasets. This model incorporates a feature called preferential attachment (PA), whereby individuals with more existing contacts accumulate new contacts at a higher rate. On simulated data, we found that the strength of PA and the number of infected nodes in the network can often be accurately estimated. On the other hand, the mean degree of the network, as well as the total number of nodes, was not estimable with ABC. We observed sub-linear PA power in all datasets, as well as higher PA power in networks of injection drug users. These results underscore the importance of considering contact structures when performing phylodynamic inference. Our method offers the potential to quantitatively investigate the contact network structure underlying viral epidemics.

  19. Reconstructing contact network parameters from viral phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    McCloskey, Rosemary M.; Liang, Richard H.; Poon, Art F.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Models of the spread of disease in a population often make the simplifying assumption that the population is homogeneously mixed, or is divided into homogeneously mixed compartments. However, human populations have complex structures formed by social contacts, which can have a significant influence on the rate of epidemic spread. Contact network models capture this structure by explicitly representing each contact which could possibly lead to a transmission. We developed a method based on approximate Bayesian computation (ABC), a likelihood-free inference strategy, for estimating structural parameters of the contact network underlying an observed viral phylogeny. The method combines adaptive sequential Monte Carlo for ABC, Gillespie simulation for propagating epidemics though networks, and a kernel-based tree similarity score. We used the method to fit the Barabási-Albert network model to simulated transmission trees, and also applied it to viral phylogenies estimated from ten published HIV sequence datasets. This model incorporates a feature called preferential attachment (PA), whereby individuals with more existing contacts accumulate new contacts at a higher rate. On simulated data, we found that the strength of PA and the number of infected nodes in the network can often be accurately estimated. On the other hand, the mean degree of the network, as well as the total number of nodes, was not estimable with ABC. We observed sub-linear PA power in all datasets, as well as higher PA power in networks of injection drug users. These results underscore the importance of considering contact structures when performing phylodynamic inference. Our method offers the potential to quantitatively investigate the contact network structure underlying viral epidemics. PMID:27818787

  20. Parameter Estimation Methods for Chaotic Intercellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mariño, Inés P.; Ullner, Ekkehard; Zaikin, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated simulation-based techniques for parameter estimation in chaotic intercellular networks. The proposed methodology combines a synchronization–based framework for parameter estimation in coupled chaotic systems with some state–of–the–art computational inference methods borrowed from the field of computational statistics. The first method is a stochastic optimization algorithm, known as accelerated random search method, and the other two techniques are based on approximate Bayesian computation. The latter is a general methodology for non–parametric inference that can be applied to practically any system of interest. The first method based on approximate Bayesian computation is a Markov Chain Monte Carlo scheme that generates a series of random parameter realizations for which a low synchronization error is guaranteed. We show that accurate parameter estimates can be obtained by averaging over these realizations. The second ABC–based technique is a Sequential Monte Carlo scheme. The algorithm generates a sequence of “populations”, i.e., sets of randomly generated parameter values, where the members of a certain population attain a synchronization error that is lesser than the error attained by members of the previous population. Again, we show that accurate estimates can be obtained by averaging over the parameter values in the last population of the sequence. We have analysed how effective these methods are from a computational perspective. For the numerical simulations we have considered a network that consists of two modified repressilators with identical parameters, coupled by the fast diffusion of the autoinducer across the cell membranes. PMID:24282513

  1. Gene networks controlling petal organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tengbo; Irish, Vivian F

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest unanswered questions in developmental biology is how growth is controlled. Petals are an excellent organ system for investigating growth control in plants: petals are dispensable, have a simple structure, and are largely refractory to environmental perturbations that can alter their size and shape. In recent studies, a number of genes controlling petal growth have been identified. The overall picture of how such genes function in petal organogenesis is beginning to be elucidated. This review will focus on studies using petals as a model system to explore the underlying gene networks that control organ initiation, growth, and final organ morphology.

  2. The Gene Network Underlying Hypodontia.

    PubMed

    Yin, W; Bian, Z

    2015-07-01

    Mammalian tooth development is a precise and complicated procedure. Several signaling pathways, such as nuclear factor (NF)-κB and WNT, are key regulators of tooth development. Any disturbance of these signaling pathways can potentially affect or block normal tooth development, and presently, there are more than 150 syndromes and 80 genes known to be related to tooth agenesis. Clarifying the interaction and crosstalk among these genes will provide important information regarding the mechanisms underlying missing teeth. In the current review, we summarize recently published findings on genes related to isolated and syndromic tooth agenesis; most of these genes function as positive regulators of cell proliferation or negative regulators of cell differentiation and apoptosis. Furthermore, we explore the corresponding networks involving these genes in addition to their implications for the clinical management of tooth agenesis. We conclude that this requires further study to improve patients' quality of life in the future. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  3. Order Parameters for Two-Dimensional Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatz, Forrest; Bultheel, Adhemar; Egami, Takeshi

    2007-10-01

    We derive methods that explain how to quantify the amount of order in ``ordered'' and ``highly ordered'' porous arrays. Ordered arrays from bee honeycomb and several from the general field of nanoscience are compared. Accurate measures of the order in porous arrays are made using the discrete pair distribution function (PDF) and the Debye-Waller Factor (DWF) from 2-D discrete Fourier transforms calculated from the real-space data using MATLAB routines. An order parameter, OP3, is defined from the PDF to evaluate the total order in a given array such that an ideal network has the value of 1. When we compare PDFs of man-made arrays with that of our honeycomb we find OP3=0.399 for the honeycomb and OP3=0.572 for man's best hexagonal array. The DWF also scales with this order parameter with the least disorder from a computer-generated hexagonal array and the most disorder from a random array. An ideal hexagonal array normalizes a two-dimensional Fourier transform from which a Debye-Waller parameter is derived which describes the disorder in the arrays. An order parameter S, defined by the DWF, takes values from [0, 1] and for the analyzed man-made array is 0.90, while for the honeycomb it is 0.65. This presentation describes methods to quantify the order found in these arrays.

  4. Plant Evolution: Evolving Antagonistic Gene Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Endymion D

    2016-06-20

    Developing a structurally complex phenotype requires a complex regulatory network. A new study shows how gene duplication provides a potential source of antagonistic interactions, an important component of gene regulatory networks.

  5. Gene networks and liar paradoxes.

    PubMed

    Isalan, Mark

    2009-10-01

    Network motifs are small patterns of connections, found over-represented in gene regulatory networks. An example is the negative feedback loop (e.g. factor A represses itself). This opposes its own state so that when 'on' it tends towards 'off' - and vice versa. Here, we argue that such self-opposition, if considered dimensionlessly, is analogous to the liar paradox: 'This statement is false'. When 'true' it implies 'false' - and vice versa. Such logical constructs have provided philosophical consternation for over 2000 years. Extending the analogy, other network topologies give strikingly varying outputs over different dimensions. For example, the motif 'A activates B and A. B inhibits A' can give switches or oscillators with time only, or can lead to Turing-type patterns with both space and time (spots, stripes or waves). It is argued here that the dimensionless form reduces to a variant of 'The following statement is true. The preceding statement is false'. Thus, merely having a static topological description of a gene network can lead to a liar paradox. Network diagrams are only snapshots of dynamic biological processes and apparent paradoxes can reveal important biological mechanisms that are far from paradoxical when considered explicitly in time and space.

  6. Gene networks and liar paradoxes

    PubMed Central

    Isalan, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Network motifs are small patterns of connections, found over-represented in gene regulatory networks. An example is the negative feedback loop (e.g. factor A represses itself). This opposes its own state so that when ‘on’ it tends towards ‘off’ – and vice versa. Here, we argue that such self-opposition, if considered dimensionlessly, is analogous to the liar paradox: ‘This statement is false’. When ‘true’ it implies ‘false’ – and vice versa. Such logical constructs have provided philosophical consternation for over 2000 years. Extending the analogy, other network topologies give strikingly varying outputs over different dimensions. For example, the motif ‘A activates B and A. B inhibits A’ can give switches or oscillators with time only, or can lead to Turing-type patterns with both space and time (spots, stripes or waves). It is argued here that the dimensionless form reduces to a variant of ‘The following statement is true. The preceding statement is false’. Thus, merely having a static topological description of a gene network can lead to a liar paradox. Network diagrams are only snapshots of dynamic biological processes and apparent paradoxes can reveal important biological mechanisms that are far from paradoxical when considered explicitly in time and space. PMID:19722183

  7. Estimated hydrogeological parameters by artificial neurons network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.; Chen, C.; Tan, Y.; Ke, K.

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, many approaches had been developed using artificial neurons network (ANN) model cooperated with Theis analytical solution to estimate the effective hydrological parameters for the homogenous and isotropic porous media, such as Lin and Chen approach [Lin and Chen, 2006] (or called the ANN approach hereafter), PC-ANN approach [Samani et al., 2008]. The above methods assumed a full superimposition of the type curve and the observed drawdown, and tried to use the first time-drawdown data as a match point to make a fine approximation of the effective parameters. However, using the first time-drawdown data or the early time-drawdown data is not always correct for the estimation of the hydrological parameters, especially for heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers. Therefore, this paper mainly corrected the concept of superimposed plot by modifying the ANN approach and PC-ANN approach, as well as cooperating with Papadopoulos analytical solution, to estimate the transmissivities and storage coefficient for anisotropic, heterogeneous aquifers. The ANN model is trained with 4000 training sets of the well function, and tested with 1000 sets and 300 sets of synthetic time-drawdown generated from homogonous and heterogonous parameters, respectively. In-situ observation data, the time-drawdown at station Shi-Chou of the Chihuahua River alluvial fan, Taiwan, is further adopted to test the applicability and reliability of proposed methods, as well as comparing with Straight-line method and Type-curve method. Results suggested that both of the modified methods had better performance than the original ones. Using late time drawdown to optimize the effective parameters is shown better than using early-time drawdown. Additionally, results indicated that the modified ANN approach is better than the modified PC-ANN approach in terms of precision, while the efficiency of the modified PC-ANN approach is approximately three times better than the modified ANN approach.

  8. Engineering stability in gene networks by autoregulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becskei, Attila; Serrano, Luis

    2000-06-01

    The genetic and biochemical networks which underlie such things as homeostasis in metabolism and the developmental programs of living cells, must withstand considerable variations and random perturbations of biochemical parameters. These occur as transient changes in, for example, transcription, translation, and RNA and protein degradation. The intensity and duration of these perturbations differ between cells in a population. The unique state of cells, and thus the diversity in a population, is owing to the different environmental stimuli the individual cells experience and the inherent stochastic nature of biochemical processes (for example, refs 5 and 6). It has been proposed, but not demonstrated, that autoregulatory, negative feedback loops in gene circuits provide stability, thereby limiting the range over which the concentrations of network components fluctuate. Here we have designed and constructed simple gene circuits consisting of a regulator and transcriptional repressor modules in Escherichia coli and we show the gain of stability produced by negative feedback.

  9. Exhaustive Search for Fuzzy Gene Networks from Microarray Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhansanj, B A; Fitch, J P; Quong, J N; Quong, A A

    2003-07-07

    Recent technological advances in high-throughput data collection allow for the study of increasingly complex systems on the scale of the whole cellular genome and proteome. Gene network models are required to interpret large and complex data sets. Rationally designed system perturbations (e.g. gene knock-outs, metabolite removal, etc) can be used to iteratively refine hypothetical models, leading to a modeling-experiment cycle for high-throughput biological system analysis. We use fuzzy logic gene network models because they have greater resolution than Boolean logic models and do not require the precise parameter measurement needed for chemical kinetics-based modeling. The fuzzy gene network approach is tested by exhaustive search for network models describing cyclin gene interactions in yeast cell cycle microarray data, with preliminary success in recovering interactions predicted by previous biological knowledge and other analysis techniques. Our goal is to further develop this method in combination with experiments we are performing on bacterial regulatory networks.

  10. GENIES: gene network inference engine based on supervised analysis.

    PubMed

    Kotera, Masaaki; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro; Moriya, Yuki; Kanehisa, Minoru; Goto, Susumu

    2012-07-01

    Gene network inference engine based on supervised analysis (GENIES) is a web server to predict unknown part of gene network from various types of genome-wide data in the framework of supervised network inference. The originality of GENIES lies in the construction of a predictive model using partially known network information and in the integration of heterogeneous data with kernel methods. The GENIES server accepts any 'profiles' of genes or proteins (e.g. gene expression profiles, protein subcellular localization profiles and phylogenetic profiles) or pre-calculated gene-gene similarity matrices (or 'kernels') in the tab-delimited file format. As a training data set to learn a predictive model, the users can choose either known molecular network information in the KEGG PATHWAY database or their own gene network data. The user can also select an algorithm of supervised network inference, choose various parameters in the method, and control the weights of heterogeneous data integration. The server provides the list of newly predicted gene pairs, maps the predicted gene pairs onto the associated pathway diagrams in KEGG PATHWAY and indicates candidate genes for missing enzymes in organism-specific metabolic pathways. GENIES (http://www.genome.jp/tools/genies/) is publicly available as one of the genome analysis tools in GenomeNet.

  11. EGAN: exploratory gene association networks

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Jesse; Tokuyasu, Taku

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Exploratory Gene Association Networks (EGAN) is a Java desktop application that provides a point-and-click environment for contextual graph visualization of high-throughput assay results. By loading the entire network of genes, pathways, interactions, annotation terms and literature references directly into memory, EGAN allows a biologist to repeatedly query and interpret multiple experimental results without incurring additional delays for data download/integration. Other compelling features of EGAN include: support for diverse -omics technologies, a simple and interactive graph display, sortable/searchable data tables, links to external web resources including ≥240 000 articles at PubMed, hypergeometric and GSEA-like enrichment statistics, pipeline-compatible automation via scripting and the ability to completely customize and/or supplement the network with new/proprietary data. Availability: Runs on most operating systems via Java; downloadable from http://akt.ucsf.edu/EGAN/ Contact: jesse.paquette@cc.ucsf.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19933825

  12. A new gene regulatory network model based on BP algorithm for interrogating differentially expressed genes of Sea Urchin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Longlong; Zhao, Tingting; Ma, Meng; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Computer science and mathematical theories are combined to analyze the complex interactions among genes, which are simplified to a network to establish a theoretical model for the analysis of the structure, module and dynamic properties. In contrast, traditional model of gene regulatory networks often lack an effective method for solving gene expression data because of high durational and spatial complexity. In this paper, we propose a new model for constructing gene regulatory networks using back propagation (BP) neural network based on predictive function and network topology. Combined with complex nonlinear mapping and self-learning, the BP neural network was mapped into a complex network. Network characteristics were obtained from the parameters of the average path length, average clustering coefficient, average degree, modularity, and map's density to simulate the real gene network by an artificial network. Through the statistical analysis and comparison of network parameters of Sea Urchin mRNA microarray data under different temperatures, the value of network parameters was observed. Differentially expressed Sea Urchin genes associated with temperature were determined by calculating the difference in the degree of each gene from different networks. The new model we developed is suitable to simulate gene regulatory network and has capability of determining differentially expressed genes.

  13. Network- and network-element-level parameters for configuration, fault, and performance management of optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drion, Christophe; Berthelon, Luc; Chambon, Olivier; Eilenberger, Gert; Peden, Francoise R.; Jourdan, Amaury

    1998-10-01

    With the high interest of network operators and manufacturers for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networking technology, the need for management systems adapted to this new technology keeps increasing. We investigated this topic and produced outputs through the specification of the functional architecture, network layered model, and through the development of new, TMN- based, information models for the management of optical networks and network elements. Based on these first outputs, defects in each layer together with parameters for performance management/monitoring have been identified for each type of optical network element, and each atomic function describing the element, including functions for both the transport of payload signals and of overhead information. The list of probable causes has been established for the identified defects. A second aspect consists in the definition of network-level parameters, if such photonic technology-related parameters are to be considered at this level. It is our conviction that some parameters can be taken into account at the network level for performance management, based on physical measurements within the network. Some parameters could possibly be used as criteria for configuration management, in the route calculation processes, including protection. The outputs of these specification activities are taken into account in the development of a manageable WDM network prototype which will be used as a test platform to demonstrate configuration, fault, protection and performance management in a real network, in the scope of the ACTS-MEPHISTO project. This network prototype will also be used in a larger size experiment in the context of the ACTS-PELICAN field trial (Pan-European Lightwave Core and Access Network).

  14. Differentially Coexpressed Disease Gene Identification Based on Gene Coexpression Network.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Zhang, Han; Quan, Xiongwen

    2016-01-01

    Screening disease-related genes by analyzing gene expression data has become a popular theme. Traditional disease-related gene selection methods always focus on identifying differentially expressed gene between case samples and a control group. These traditional methods may not fully consider the changes of interactions between genes at different cell states and the dynamic processes of gene expression levels during the disease progression. However, in order to understand the mechanism of disease, it is important to explore the dynamic changes of interactions between genes in biological networks at different cell states. In this study, we designed a novel framework to identify disease-related genes and developed a differentially coexpressed disease-related gene identification method based on gene coexpression network (DCGN) to screen differentially coexpressed genes. We firstly constructed phase-specific gene coexpression network using time-series gene expression data and defined the conception of differential coexpression of genes in coexpression network. Then, we designed two metrics to measure the value of gene differential coexpression according to the change of local topological structures between different phase-specific networks. Finally, we conducted meta-analysis of gene differential coexpression based on the rank-product method. Experimental results demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of DCGN and the superior performance of DCGN over other popular disease-related gene selection methods through real-world gene expression data sets.

  15. Differentially Coexpressed Disease Gene Identification Based on Gene Coexpression Network

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Xiongwen

    2016-01-01

    Screening disease-related genes by analyzing gene expression data has become a popular theme. Traditional disease-related gene selection methods always focus on identifying differentially expressed gene between case samples and a control group. These traditional methods may not fully consider the changes of interactions between genes at different cell states and the dynamic processes of gene expression levels during the disease progression. However, in order to understand the mechanism of disease, it is important to explore the dynamic changes of interactions between genes in biological networks at different cell states. In this study, we designed a novel framework to identify disease-related genes and developed a differentially coexpressed disease-related gene identification method based on gene coexpression network (DCGN) to screen differentially coexpressed genes. We firstly constructed phase-specific gene coexpression network using time-series gene expression data and defined the conception of differential coexpression of genes in coexpression network. Then, we designed two metrics to measure the value of gene differential coexpression according to the change of local topological structures between different phase-specific networks. Finally, we conducted meta-analysis of gene differential coexpression based on the rank-product method. Experimental results demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of DCGN and the superior performance of DCGN over other popular disease-related gene selection methods through real-world gene expression data sets. PMID:28042568

  16. Efficient Algorithms for Bayesian Network Parameter Learning from Incomplete Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Efficient Algorithms for Bayesian Network Parameter Learning from Incomplete Data Guy Van den Broeck∗ and Karthika Mohan∗ and Arthur Choi and Adnan...We propose a family of efficient algorithms for learning the parameters of a Bayesian network from incomplete data. Our approach is based on recent...algorithms like EM (which require inference). 1 INTRODUCTION When learning the parameters of a Bayesian network from data with missing values, the

  17. Evolving Robust Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Noman, Nasimul; Monjo, Taku; Moscato, Pablo; Iba, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Design and implementation of robust network modules is essential for construction of complex biological systems through hierarchical assembly of ‘parts’ and ‘devices’. The robustness of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) is ascribed chiefly to the underlying topology. The automatic designing capability of GRN topology that can exhibit robust behavior can dramatically change the current practice in synthetic biology. A recent study shows that Darwinian evolution can gradually develop higher topological robustness. Subsequently, this work presents an evolutionary algorithm that simulates natural evolution in silico, for identifying network topologies that are robust to perturbations. We present a Monte Carlo based method for quantifying topological robustness and designed a fitness approximation approach for efficient calculation of topological robustness which is computationally very intensive. The proposed framework was verified using two classic GRN behaviors: oscillation and bistability, although the framework is generalized for evolving other types of responses. The algorithm identified robust GRN architectures which were verified using different analysis and comparison. Analysis of the results also shed light on the relationship among robustness, cooperativity and complexity. This study also shows that nature has already evolved very robust architectures for its crucial systems; hence simulation of this natural process can be very valuable for designing robust biological systems. PMID:25616055

  18. Harnessing gene expression networks to prioritize candidate epileptic encephalopathy genes.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Karen L; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets.

  19. Harnessing Gene Expression Networks to Prioritize Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy Genes

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Karen L.; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets. PMID:25014031

  20. Inversion of surface parameters using fast learning neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, M. S.; Olvera, J.; Fung, A. K.; Manry, M. T.

    1992-01-01

    A neural network approach to the inversion of surface scattering parameters is presented. Simulated data sets based on a surface scattering model are used so that the data may be viewed as taken from a completely known randomly rough surface. The fast learning (FL) neural network and a multilayer perceptron (MLP) trained with backpropagation learning (BP network) are tested on the simulated backscattering data. The RMS error of training the FL network is found to be less than one half the error of the BP network while requiring one to two orders of magnitude less CPU time. When applied to inversion of parameters from a statistically rough surface, the FL method is successful at recovering the surface permittivity, the surface correlation length, and the RMS surface height in less time and with less error than the BP network. Further applications of the FL neural network to the inversion of parameters from backscatter measurements of an inhomogeneous layer above a half space are shown.

  1. Inversion of surface parameters using fast learning neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, M. S.; Olvera, J.; Fung, A. K.; Manry, M. T.

    1992-01-01

    A neural network approach to the inversion of surface scattering parameters is presented. Simulated data sets based on a surface scattering model are used so that the data may be viewed as taken from a completely known randomly rough surface. The fast learning (FL) neural network and a multilayer perceptron (MLP) trained with backpropagation learning (BP network) are tested on the simulated backscattering data. The RMS error of training the FL network is found to be less than one half the error of the BP network while requiring one to two orders of magnitude less CPU time. When applied to inversion of parameters from a statistically rough surface, the FL method is successful at recovering the surface permittivity, the surface correlation length, and the RMS surface height in less time and with less error than the BP network. Further applications of the FL neural network to the inversion of parameters from backscatter measurements of an inhomogeneous layer above a half space are shown.

  2. Inferring slowly-changing dynamic gene-regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic gene-regulatory networks are complex since the interaction patterns between their components mean that it is impossible to study parts of the network in separation. This holistic character of gene-regulatory networks poses a real challenge to any type of modelling. Graphical models are a class of models that connect the network with a conditional independence relationships between random variables. By interpreting these random variables as gene activities and the conditional independence relationships as functional non-relatedness, graphical models have been used to describe gene-regulatory networks. Whereas the literature has been focused on static networks, most time-course experiments are designed in order to tease out temporal changes in the underlying network. It is typically reasonable to assume that changes in genomic networks are few, because biological systems tend to be stable. We introduce a new model for estimating slow changes in dynamic gene-regulatory networks, which is suitable for high-dimensional data, e.g. time-course microarray data. Our aim is to estimate a dynamically changing genomic network based on temporal activity measurements of the genes in the network. Our method is based on the penalized likelihood with ℓ1-norm, that penalizes conditional dependencies between genes as well as differences between conditional independence elements across time points. We also present a heuristic search strategy to find optimal tuning parameters. We re-write the penalized maximum likelihood problem into a standard convex optimization problem subject to linear equality constraints. We show that our method performs well in simulation studies. Finally, we apply the proposed model to a time-course T-cell dataset. PMID:25917062

  3. Modular composition of gene transcription networks.

    PubMed

    Gyorgy, Andras; Del Vecchio, Domitilla

    2014-03-01

    Predicting the dynamic behavior of a large network from that of the composing modules is a central problem in systems and synthetic biology. Yet, this predictive ability is still largely missing because modules display context-dependent behavior. One cause of context-dependence is retroactivity, a phenomenon similar to loading that influences in non-trivial ways the dynamic performance of a module upon connection to other modules. Here, we establish an analysis framework for gene transcription networks that explicitly accounts for retroactivity. Specifically, a module's key properties are encoded by three retroactivity matrices: internal, scaling, and mixing retroactivity. All of them have a physical interpretation and can be computed from macroscopic parameters (dissociation constants and promoter concentrations) and from the modules' topology. The internal retroactivity quantifies the effect of intramodular connections on an isolated module's dynamics. The scaling and mixing retroactivity establish how intermodular connections change the dynamics of connected modules. Based on these matrices and on the dynamics of modules in isolation, we can accurately predict how loading will affect the behavior of an arbitrary interconnection of modules. We illustrate implications of internal, scaling, and mixing retroactivity on the performance of recurrent network motifs, including negative autoregulation, combinatorial regulation, two-gene clocks, the toggle switch, and the single-input motif. We further provide a quantitative metric that determines how robust the dynamic behavior of a module is to interconnection with other modules. This metric can be employed both to evaluate the extent of modularity of natural networks and to establish concrete design guidelines to minimize retroactivity between modules in synthetic systems.

  4. Gene regulatory network inference using out of equilibrium statistical mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Benecke, Arndt

    2008-01-01

    Spatiotemporal control of gene expression is fundamental to multicellular life. Despite prodigious efforts, the encoding of gene expression regulation in eukaryotes is not understood. Gene expression analyses nourish the hope to reverse engineer effector-target gene networks using inference techniques. Inference from noisy and circumstantial data relies on using robust models with few parameters for the underlying mechanisms. However, a systematic path to gene regulatory network reverse engineering from functional genomics data is still impeded by fundamental problems. Recently, Johannes Berg from the Theoretical Physics Institute of Cologne University has made two remarkable contributions that significantly advance the gene regulatory network inference problem. Berg, who uses gene expression data from yeast, has demonstrated a nonequilibrium regime for mRNA concentration dynamics and was able to map the gene regulatory process upon simple stochastic systems driven out of equilibrium. The impact of his demonstration is twofold, affecting both the understanding of the operational constraints under which transcription occurs and the capacity to extract relevant information from highly time-resolved expression data. Berg has used his observation to predict target genes of selected transcription factors, and thereby, in principle, demonstrated applicability of his out of equilibrium statistical mechanics approach to the gene network inference problem. PMID:19404429

  5. Gene regulatory network inference using out of equilibrium statistical mechanics.

    PubMed

    Benecke, Arndt

    2008-08-01

    Spatiotemporal control of gene expression is fundamental to multicellular life. Despite prodigious efforts, the encoding of gene expression regulation in eukaryotes is not understood. Gene expression analyses nourish the hope to reverse engineer effector-target gene networks using inference techniques. Inference from noisy and circumstantial data relies on using robust models with few parameters for the underlying mechanisms. However, a systematic path to gene regulatory network reverse engineering from functional genomics data is still impeded by fundamental problems. Recently, Johannes Berg from the Theoretical Physics Institute of Cologne University has made two remarkable contributions that significantly advance the gene regulatory network inference problem. Berg, who uses gene expression data from yeast, has demonstrated a nonequilibrium regime for mRNA concentration dynamics and was able to map the gene regulatory process upon simple stochastic systems driven out of equilibrium. The impact of his demonstration is twofold, affecting both the understanding of the operational constraints under which transcription occurs and the capacity to extract relevant information from highly time-resolved expression data. Berg has used his observation to predict target genes of selected transcription factors, and thereby, in principle, demonstrated applicability of his out of equilibrium statistical mechanics approach to the gene network inference problem.

  6. Inference of Gene Regulatory Network Based on Local Bayesian Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Guo, Wei-Feng; Wei, Ze-Gang; Chen, Luonan

    2016-08-01

    The inference of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) from expression data can mine the direct regulations among genes and gain deep insights into biological processes at a network level. During past decades, numerous computational approaches have been introduced for inferring the GRNs. However, many of them still suffer from various problems, e.g., Bayesian network (BN) methods cannot handle large-scale networks due to their high computational complexity, while information theory-based methods cannot identify the directions of regulatory interactions and also suffer from false positive/negative problems. To overcome the limitations, in this work we present a novel algorithm, namely local Bayesian network (LBN), to infer GRNs from gene expression data by using the network decomposition strategy and false-positive edge elimination scheme. Specifically, LBN algorithm first uses conditional mutual information (CMI) to construct an initial network or GRN, which is decomposed into a number of local networks or GRNs. Then, BN method is employed to generate a series of local BNs by selecting the k-nearest neighbors of each gene as its candidate regulatory genes, which significantly reduces the exponential search space from all possible GRN structures. Integrating these local BNs forms a tentative network or GRN by performing CMI, which reduces redundant regulations in the GRN and thus alleviates the false positive problem. The final network or GRN can be obtained by iteratively performing CMI and local BN on the tentative network. In the iterative process, the false or redundant regulations are gradually removed. When tested on the benchmark GRN datasets from DREAM challenge as well as the SOS DNA repair network in E.coli, our results suggest that LBN outperforms other state-of-the-art methods (ARACNE, GENIE3 and NARROMI) significantly, with more accurate and robust performance. In particular, the decomposition strategy with local Bayesian networks not only effectively reduce

  7. Modeling of hysteresis in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Hu, J; Qin, K R; Xiang, C; Lee, T H

    2012-08-01

    Hysteresis, observed in many gene regulatory networks, has a pivotal impact on biological systems, which enhances the robustness of cell functions. In this paper, a general model is proposed to describe the hysteretic gene regulatory network by combining the hysteresis component and the transient dynamics. The Bouc-Wen hysteresis model is modified to describe the hysteresis component in the mammalian gene regulatory networks. Rigorous mathematical analysis on the dynamical properties of the model is presented to ensure the bounded-input-bounded-output (BIBO) stability and demonstrates that the original Bouc-Wen model can only generate a clockwise hysteresis loop while the modified model can describe both clockwise and counter clockwise hysteresis loops. Simulation studies have shown that the hysteresis loops from our model are consistent with the experimental observations in three mammalian gene regulatory networks and two E.coli gene regulatory networks, which demonstrate the ability and accuracy of the mathematical model to emulate natural gene expression behavior with hysteresis. A comparison study has also been conducted to show that this model fits the experiment data significantly better than previous ones in the literature. The successful modeling of the hysteresis in all the five hysteretic gene regulatory networks suggests that the new model has the potential to be a unified framework for modeling hysteresis in gene regulatory networks and provide better understanding of the general mechanism that drives the hysteretic function.

  8. The Effect of Network Parameters on Pi-Sigma Neural Network for Temperature Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husaini, Noor Aida; Ghazali, Rozaida; Nawi, Nazri Mohd; Ismail, Lokman Hakim

    In this paper, we present the effect of network parameters to forecast temperature of a suburban area in Batu Pahat, Johor. The common ways of predicting the temperature using Neural Network has been applied for most meteorological parameters. However, researchers frequently neglected the network parameters which might affect the Neural Network's performance. Therefore, this study tends to explore the effect of network parameters by using Pi Sigma Neural Network (PSNN) with backpropagation algorithm. The network's performance is evaluated using the historical dataset of temperature in Batu Pahat for one step-ahead and benchmarked against Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) for comparison. We found out that, network parameters have significantly affected the performance of PSNN for temperature forecasting. Towards the end of this paper, we concluded the best forecasting model to predict the temperature based on the comparison of our study.

  9. EXAMINE: a computational approach to reconstructing gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xutao; Geng, Huimin; Ali, Hesham

    2005-08-01

    Reverse-engineering of gene networks using linear models often results in an underdetermined system because of excessive unknown parameters. In addition, the practical utility of linear models has remained unclear. We address these problems by developing an improved method, EXpression Array MINing Engine (EXAMINE), to infer gene regulatory networks from time-series gene expression data sets. EXAMINE takes advantage of sparse graph theory to overcome the excessive-parameter problem with an adaptive-connectivity model and fitting algorithm. EXAMINE also guarantees that the most parsimonious network structure will be found with its incremental adaptive fitting process. Compared to previous linear models, where a fully connected model is used, EXAMINE reduces the number of parameters by O(N), thereby increasing the chance of recovering the underlying regulatory network. The fitting algorithm increments the connectivity during the fitting process until a satisfactory fit is obtained. We performed a systematic study to explore the data mining ability of linear models. A guideline for using linear models is provided: If the system is small (3-20 elements), more than 90% of the regulation pathways can be determined correctly. For a large-scale system, either clustering is needed or it is necessary to integrate information in addition to expression profile. Coupled with the clustering method, we applied EXAMINE to rat central nervous system development (CNS) data with 112 genes. We were able to efficiently generate regulatory networks with statistically significant pathways that have been predicted previously.

  10. Optimization of multilayer neural network parameters for speaker recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovarek, Jaromir; Partila, Pavol; Rozhon, Jan; Voznak, Miroslav; Skapa, Jan; Uhrin, Dominik; Chmelikova, Zdenka

    2016-05-01

    This article discusses the impact of multilayer neural network parameters for speaker identification. The main task of speaker identification is to find a specific person in the known set of speakers. It means that the voice of an unknown speaker (wanted person) belongs to a group of reference speakers from the voice database. One of the requests was to develop the text-independent system, which means to classify wanted person regardless of content and language. Multilayer neural network has been used for speaker identification in this research. Artificial neural network (ANN) needs to set parameters like activation function of neurons, steepness of activation functions, learning rate, the maximum number of iterations and a number of neurons in the hidden and output layers. ANN accuracy and validation time are directly influenced by the parameter settings. Different roles require different settings. Identification accuracy and ANN validation time were evaluated with the same input data but different parameter settings. The goal was to find parameters for the neural network with the highest precision and shortest validation time. Input data of neural networks are a Mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC). These parameters describe the properties of the vocal tract. Audio samples were recorded for all speakers in a laboratory environment. Training, testing and validation data set were split into 70, 15 and 15 %. The result of the research described in this article is different parameter setting for the multilayer neural network for four speakers.

  11. Influence of choice of null network on small-world parameters of structural correlation networks.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, S M Hadi; Kesler, Shelli R

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, coordinated variations in brain morphology (e.g., volume, thickness) have been employed as a measure of structural association between brain regions to infer large-scale structural correlation networks. Recent evidence suggests that brain networks constructed in this manner are inherently more clustered than random networks of the same size and degree. Thus, null networks constructed by randomizing topology are not a good choice for benchmarking small-world parameters of these networks. In the present report, we investigated the influence of choice of null networks on small-world parameters of gray matter correlation networks in healthy individuals and survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Three types of null networks were studied: 1) networks constructed by topology randomization (TOP), 2) networks matched to the distributional properties of the observed covariance matrix (HQS), and 3) networks generated from correlation of randomized input data (COR). The results revealed that the choice of null network not only influences the estimated small-world parameters, it also influences the results of between-group differences in small-world parameters. In addition, at higher network densities, the choice of null network influences the direction of group differences in network measures. Our data suggest that the choice of null network is quite crucial for interpretation of group differences in small-world parameters of structural correlation networks. We argue that none of the available null models is perfect for estimation of small-world parameters for correlation networks and the relative strengths and weaknesses of the selected model should be carefully considered with respect to obtained network measures.

  12. Influence of Choice of Null Network on Small-World Parameters of Structural Correlation Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, S. M. Hadi; Kesler, Shelli R.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, coordinated variations in brain morphology (e.g., volume, thickness) have been employed as a measure of structural association between brain regions to infer large-scale structural correlation networks. Recent evidence suggests that brain networks constructed in this manner are inherently more clustered than random networks of the same size and degree. Thus, null networks constructed by randomizing topology are not a good choice for benchmarking small-world parameters of these networks. In the present report, we investigated the influence of choice of null networks on small-world parameters of gray matter correlation networks in healthy individuals and survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Three types of null networks were studied: 1) networks constructed by topology randomization (TOP), 2) networks matched to the distributional properties of the observed covariance matrix (HQS), and 3) networks generated from correlation of randomized input data (COR). The results revealed that the choice of null network not only influences the estimated small-world parameters, it also influences the results of between-group differences in small-world parameters. In addition, at higher network densities, the choice of null network influences the direction of group differences in network measures. Our data suggest that the choice of null network is quite crucial for interpretation of group differences in small-world parameters of structural correlation networks. We argue that none of the available null models is perfect for estimation of small-world parameters for correlation networks and the relative strengths and weaknesses of the selected model should be carefully considered with respect to obtained network measures. PMID:23840672

  13. Network Topology Reveals Key Cardiovascular Disease Genes

    PubMed Central

    Stojković, Neda; Radak, Djordje; Pržulj, Nataša

    2013-01-01

    The structure of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has already been successfully used as a source of new biological information. Even though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a major global cause of death, many CVD genes still await discovery. We explore ways to utilize the structure of the human PPI network to find important genes for CVDs that should be targeted by drugs. The hope is to use the properties of such important genes to predict new ones, which would in turn improve a choice of therapy. We propose a methodology that examines the PPI network wiring around genes involved in CVDs. We use the methodology to identify a subset of CVD-related genes that are statistically significantly enriched in drug targets and “driver genes.” We seek such genes, since driver genes have been proposed to drive onset and progression of a disease. Our identified subset of CVD genes has a large overlap with the Core Diseasome, which has been postulated to be the key to disease formation and hence should be the primary object of therapeutic intervention. This indicates that our methodology identifies “key” genes responsible for CVDs. Thus, we use it to predict new CVD genes and we validate over 70% of our predictions in the literature. Finally, we show that our predicted genes are functionally similar to currently known CVD drug targets, which confirms a potential utility of our methodology towards improving therapy for CVDs. PMID:23977067

  14. Gene Regulation Networks for Modeling Drosophila Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mjolsness, E.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter will very briefly introduce and review some computational experiments in using trainable gene regulation network models to simulate and understand selected episodes in the development of the fruit fly, Drosophila Melanogaster.

  15. Geometry and topology of parameter space: investigating measures of robustness in regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Madalena; Sengupta, Anirvan; Sontag, Eduardo D.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of robustness of regulatory networks has been closely related to the nature of the interactions among genes, and the capability of pattern maintenance or reproducibility. Defining this robustness property is a challenging task, but mathematical models have often associated it to the volume of the space of admissible parameters. Not only the volume of the space but also its topology and geometry contain information on essential aspects of the network, including feasible pathways, switching between two parallel pathways or distinct/disconnected active regions of parameters. A method is presented here to characterize the space of admissible parameters, by writing it as a semi-algebraic set, and then theoretically analyzing its topology and geometry, as well as volume. This method provides a more objective and complete measure of the robustness of a developmental module. As a detailed case study, the segment polarity gene network is analyzed. PMID:18987858

  16. Autonomous Boolean modeling of gene regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socolar, Joshua; Sun, Mengyang; Cheng, Xianrui

    2014-03-01

    In cases where the dynamical properties of gene regulatory networks are important, a faithful model must include three key features: a network topology; a functional response of each element to its inputs; and timing information about the transmission of signals across network links. Autonomous Boolean network (ABN) models are efficient representations of these elements and are amenable to analysis. We present an ABN model of the gene regulatory network governing cell fate specification in the early sea urchin embryo, which must generate three bands of distinct tissue types after several cell divisions, beginning from an initial condition with only two distinct cell types. Analysis of the spatial patterning problem and the dynamics of a network constructed from available experimental results reveals that a simple mechanism is at work in this case. Supported by NSF Grant DMS-10-68602

  17. Using gene expression programming to infer gene regulatory networks from time-series data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongqing; Pu, Yifei; Zhang, Haisen; Su, Yabo; Zhang, Lifang; Zhou, Jiliu

    2013-12-01

    Gene regulatory networks inference is currently a topic under heavy research in the systems biology field. In this paper, gene regulatory networks are inferred via evolutionary model based on time-series microarray data. A non-linear differential equation model is adopted. Gene expression programming (GEP) is applied to identify the structure of the model and least mean square (LMS) is used to optimize the parameters in ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The proposed work has been first verified by synthetic data with noise-free and noisy time-series data, respectively, and then its effectiveness is confirmed by three real time-series expression datasets. Finally, a gene regulatory network was constructed with 12 Yeast genes. Experimental results demonstrate that our model can improve the prediction accuracy of microarray time-series data effectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An S-System Parameter Estimation Method (SPEM) for Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinyi; Dent, Jennifer E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Advances in experimental biology, coupled with advances in computational power, bring new challenges to the interdisciplinary field of computational biology. One such broad challenge lies in the reverse engineering of gene networks, and goes from determining the structure of static networks, to reconstructing the dynamics of interactions from time series data. Here, we focus our attention on the latter area, and in particular, on parameterizing a dynamic network of oriented interactions between genes. By basing the parameterizing approach on a known power-law relationship model between connected genes (S-system), we are able to account for non-linearity in the network, without compromising the ability to analyze network characteristics. In this article, we introduce the S-System Parameter Estimation Method (SPEM). SPEM, a freely available R software package (http://www.picb.ac.cn/ClinicalGenomicNTW/temp3.html), takes gene expression data in time series and returns the network of interactions as a set of differential equations. The methods, which are presented and tested here, are shown to provide accurate results not only on synthetic data, but more importantly on real and therefore noisy by nature, biological data. In summary, SPEM shows high sensitivity and positive predicted values, as well as free availability and expansibility (because based on open source software). We expect these characteristics to make it a useful and broadly applicable software in the challenging reconstruction of dynamic gene networks. PMID:22300319

  19. Resistance Genes in Global Crop Breeding Networks.

    PubMed

    Garrett, K A; Andersen, K F; Asche, F; Bowden, R L; Forbes, G A; Kulakow, P A; Zhou, B

    2017-08-31

    Resistance genes are a major tool for managing crop diseases. The networks of crop breeders who exchange resistance genes and deploy them in varieties help to determine the global landscape of resistance and epidemics, an important system for maintaining food security. These networks function as a complex adaptive system, with associated strengths and vulnerabilities, and implications for policies to support resistance gene deployment strategies. Extensions of epidemic network analysis can be used to evaluate the multilayer agricultural networks that support and influence crop breeding networks. Here, we evaluate the general structure of crop breeding networks for cassava, potato, rice, and wheat. All four are clustered due to phytosanitary and intellectual property regulations, and linked through CGIAR hubs. Cassava networks primarily include public breeding groups, whereas others are more mixed. These systems must adapt to global change in climate and land use, the emergence of new diseases, and disruptive breeding technologies. Research priorities to support policy include how best to maintain both diversity and redundancy in the roles played by individual crop breeding groups (public versus private and global versus local), and how best to manage connectivity to optimize resistance gene deployment while avoiding risks to the useful life of resistance genes. [Formula: see text] Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY 4.0 International license .

  20. Identifying genes of gene regulatory networks using formal concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Gebert, Jutta; Motameny, Susanne; Faigle, Ulrich; Forst, Christian V; Schrader, Rainer

    2008-03-01

    In order to understand the behavior of a gene regulatory network, it is essential to know the genes that belong to it. Identifying the correct members (e.g., in order to build a model) is a difficult task even for small subnetworks. Usually only few members of a network are known and one needs to guess the missing members based on experience or informed speculation. It is beneficial if one can additionally rely on experimental data to support this guess. In this work we present a new method based on formal concept analysis to detect unknown members of a gene regulatory network from gene expression time series data. We show that formal concept analysis is able to find a list of candidate genes for inclusion into a partially known basic network. This list can then be reduced by a statistical analysis so that the resulting genes interact strongly with the basic network and therefore should be included when modeling the network. The method has been applied to the DNA repair system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this application, our method produces comparable results to an already existing method of component selection while it is applicable to a broader range of problems.

  1. Automatic Parameter Learning for Multiple Local Network Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Antal; Do, Chuong B.; Srinivasan, Balaji S.; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We developed Græmlin 2.0, a new multiple network aligner with (1) a new multi-stage approach to local network alignment; (2) a novel scoring function that can use arbitrary features of a multiple network alignment, such as protein deletions, protein duplications, protein mutations, and interaction losses; (3) a parameter learning algorithm that uses a training set of known network alignments to learn parameters for our scoring function and thereby adapt it to any set of networks; and (4) an algorithm that uses our scoring function to find approximate multiple network alignments in linear time. We tested Græmlin 2.0's accuracy on protein interaction networks from IntAct, DIP, and the Stanford Network Database. We show that, on each of these datasets, Græmlin 2.0 has higher sensitivity and specificity than existing network aligners. Græmlin 2.0 is available under the GNU public license at http://graemlin.stanford.edu. PMID:19645599

  2. Parameter adaptation in a simplified pulse-coupled neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekely, Geza; Lindblad, Thomas

    1999-03-01

    In a general purpose pulse coupled neural network (PCNN) algorithm the following parameters are used: 2 weight matrices, 3 time constants, 3 normalization factors and 2 further parameters. In a given application, one has to determine the near optimal parameter set to achieve the desired goal. Here a simplified PCNN is described which contains a parameter fitting part, in the least squares sense. Given input and a desired output image, the program is able to determine the optimal value of a selected PCNN parameter. This method can be extended to more general PCNN algorithms, because partial derivatives are not required for the fitting. Only the sum of squares of the differences is used.

  3. Combinatorial explosion in model gene networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R.; Glass, L.

    2000-09-01

    The explosive growth in knowledge of the genome of humans and other organisms leaves open the question of how the functioning of genes in interacting networks is coordinated for orderly activity. One approach to this problem is to study mathematical properties of abstract network models that capture the logical structures of gene networks. The principal issue is to understand how particular patterns of activity can result from particular network structures, and what types of behavior are possible. We study idealized models in which the logical structure of the network is explicitly represented by Boolean functions that can be represented by directed graphs on n-cubes, but which are continuous in time and described by differential equations, rather than being updated synchronously via a discrete clock. The equations are piecewise linear, which allows significant analysis and facilitates rapid integration along trajectories. We first give a combinatorial solution to the question of how many distinct logical structures exist for n-dimensional networks, showing that the number increases very rapidly with n. We then outline analytic methods that can be used to establish the existence, stability and periods of periodic orbits corresponding to particular cycles on the n-cube. We use these methods to confirm the existence of limit cycles discovered in a sample of a million randomly generated structures of networks of 4 genes. Even with only 4 genes, at least several hundred different patterns of stable periodic behavior are possible, many of them surprisingly complex. We discuss ways of further classifying these periodic behaviors, showing that small mutations (reversal of one or a few edges on the n-cube) need not destroy the stability of a limit cycle. Although these networks are very simple as models of gene networks, their mathematical transparency reveals relationships between structure and behavior, they suggest that the possibilities for orderly dynamics in such

  4. Modeling Gene Networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Based on Gene Expression Profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yulin; Lv, Kebo; Wang, Shudong; Su, Jionglong; Meng, Dazhi

    2015-01-01

    Detailed and innovative analysis of gene regulatory network structures may reveal novel insights to biological mechanisms. Here we study how gene regulatory network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can differ under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To achieve this, we discretized the gene expression profiles and calculated the self-entropy of down- and upregulation of gene expression as well as joint entropy. Based on these quantities the uncertainty coefficient was calculated for each gene triplet, following which, separate gene logic networks were constructed for the aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Four structural parameters such as average degree, average clustering coefficient, average shortest path, and average betweenness were used to compare the structure of the corresponding aerobic and anaerobic logic networks. Five genes were identified to be putative key components of the two energy metabolisms. Furthermore, community analysis using the Newman fast algorithm revealed two significant communities for the aerobic but only one for the anaerobic network. David Gene Functional Classification suggests that, under aerobic conditions, one such community reflects the cell cycle and cell replication, while the other one is linked to the mitochondrial respiratory chain function.

  5. Tensor methods for parameter estimation and bifurcation analysis of stochastic reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shuohao; Vejchodský, Tomáš; Erban, Radek

    2015-07-06

    Stochastic modelling of gene regulatory networks provides an indispensable tool for understanding how random events at the molecular level influence cellular functions. A common challenge of stochastic models is to calibrate a large number of model parameters against the experimental data. Another difficulty is to study how the behaviour of a stochastic model depends on its parameters, i.e. whether a change in model parameters can lead to a significant qualitative change in model behaviour (bifurcation). In this paper, tensor-structured parametric analysis (TPA) is developed to address these computational challenges. It is based on recently proposed low-parametric tensor-structured representations of classical matrices and vectors. This approach enables simultaneous computation of the model properties for all parameter values within a parameter space. The TPA is illustrated by studying the parameter estimation, robustness, sensitivity and bifurcation structure in stochastic models of biochemical networks. A Matlab implementation of the TPA is available at http://www.stobifan.org.

  6. Modeling gene regulatory network motifs using statecharts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene regulatory networks are widely used by biologists to describe the interactions among genes, proteins and other components at the intra-cellular level. Recently, a great effort has been devoted to give gene regulatory networks a formal semantics based on existing computational frameworks. For this purpose, we consider Statecharts, which are a modular, hierarchical and executable formal model widely used to represent software systems. We use Statecharts for modeling small and recurring patterns of interactions in gene regulatory networks, called motifs. Results We present an improved method for modeling gene regulatory network motifs using Statecharts and we describe the successful modeling of several motifs, including those which could not be modeled or whose models could not be distinguished using the method of a previous proposal. We model motifs in an easy and intuitive way by taking advantage of the visual features of Statecharts. Our modeling approach is able to simulate some interesting temporal properties of gene regulatory network motifs: the delay in the activation and the deactivation of the "output" gene in the coherent type-1 feedforward loop, the pulse in the incoherent type-1 feedforward loop, the bistability nature of double positive and double negative feedback loops, the oscillatory behavior of the negative feedback loop, and the "lock-in" effect of positive autoregulation. Conclusions We present a Statecharts-based approach for the modeling of gene regulatory network motifs in biological systems. The basic motifs used to build more complex networks (that is, simple regulation, reciprocal regulation, feedback loop, feedforward loop, and autoregulation) can be faithfully described and their temporal dynamics can be analyzed. PMID:22536967

  7. Modeling gene regulatory networks: A network simplification algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Luiz Henrique O.; de Castro, Maria Clicia S.; da Silva, Fabricio A. B.

    2016-12-01

    Boolean networks have been used for some time to model Gene Regulatory Networks (GRNs), which describe cell functions. Those models can help biologists to make predictions, prognosis and even specialized treatment when some disturb on the GRN lead to a sick condition. However, the amount of information related to a GRN can be huge, making the task of inferring its boolean network representation quite a challenge. The method shown here takes into account information about the interactome to build a network, where each node represents a protein, and uses the entropy of each node as a key to reduce the size of the network, allowing the further inferring process to focus only on the main protein hubs, the ones with most potential to interfere in overall network behavior.

  8. Crowdsourcing the nodulation gene network discovery environment.

    PubMed

    Li, Yupeng; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-26

    The Legumes (Fabaceae) are an economically and ecologically important group of plant species with the conspicuous capacity for symbiotic nitrogen fixation in root nodules, specialized plant organs containing symbiotic microbes. With the aim of understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to nodulation, many efforts are underway to identify nodulation-related genes and determine how these genes interact with each other. In order to accurately and efficiently reconstruct nodulation gene network, a crowdsourcing platform, CrowdNodNet, was created. The platform implements the jQuery and vis.js JavaScript libraries, so that users are able to interactively visualize and edit the gene network, and easily access the information about the network, e.g. gene lists, gene interactions and gene functional annotations. In addition, all the gene information is written on MediaWiki pages, enabling users to edit and contribute to the network curation. Utilizing the continuously updated, collaboratively written, and community-reviewed Wikipedia model, the platform could, in a short time, become a comprehensive knowledge base of nodulation-related pathways. The platform could also be used for other biological processes, and thus has great potential for integrating and advancing our understanding of the functional genomics and systems biology of any process for any species. The platform is available at http://crowd.bioops.info/ , and the source code can be openly accessed at https://github.com/bioops/crowdnodnet under MIT License.

  9. Network analysis reveals crosstalk between autophagy genes and disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ji-Ye; Yao, Wei-Xuan; Wang, Yun; Fan, Yi-lei; Wu, Jian-Bing

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a protective and life-sustaining process in which cytoplasmic components are packaged into double-membrane vesicles and targeted to lysosomes for degradation. Accumulating evidence supports that autophagy is associated with several pathological conditions. However, research on the functional cross-links between autophagy and disease genes remains in its early stages. In this study, we constructed a disease-autophagy network (DAN) by integrating known disease genes, known autophagy genes and protein-protein interactions (PPI). Dissecting the topological properties of the DAN suggested that nodes that both autophagy and disease genes (inter-genes), are topologically important in the DAN structure. Next, a core network from the DAN was extracted to analyze the functional links between disease and autophagy genes. The genes in the core network were significantly enriched in multiple disease-related pathways, suggesting that autophagy genes may function in various disease processes. Of 17 disease classes, 11 significantly overlapped with autophagy genes, including cancer diseases, metabolic diseases and hematological diseases, a finding that is supported by the literatures. We also found that autophagy genes have a bridging role in the connections between pairs of disease classes. Altogether, our study provides a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human diseases and the autophagy process. PMID:28295050

  10. Phenotypic switching in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Philipp; Popović, Nikola; Grima, Ramon

    2014-05-13

    Noise in gene expression can lead to reversible phenotypic switching. Several experimental studies have shown that the abundance distributions of proteins in a population of isogenic cells may display multiple distinct maxima. Each of these maxima may be associated with a subpopulation of a particular phenotype, the quantification of which is important for understanding cellular decision-making. Here, we devise a methodology which allows us to quantify multimodal gene expression distributions and single-cell power spectra in gene regulatory networks. Extending the commonly used linear noise approximation, we rigorously show that, in the limit of slow promoter dynamics, these distributions can be systematically approximated as a mixture of Gaussian components in a wide class of networks. The resulting closed-form approximation provides a practical tool for studying complex nonlinear gene regulatory networks that have thus far been amenable only to stochastic simulation. We demonstrate the applicability of our approach in a number of genetic networks, uncovering previously unidentified dynamical characteristics associated with phenotypic switching. Specifically, we elucidate how the interplay of transcriptional and translational regulation can be exploited to control the multimodality of gene expression distributions in two-promoter networks. We demonstrate how phenotypic switching leads to birhythmical expression in a genetic oscillator, and to hysteresis in phenotypic induction, thus highlighting the ability of regulatory networks to retain memory.

  11. Optimal Parameter for the Training of Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks by Using Hierarchical Genetic Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco-Monteagudo, Maykel; Taboada-Crispi, Alberto; Gutierrez-Hernandez, Liliana

    2008-11-06

    This paper deals with the controversial topic of the selection of the parameters of a genetic algorithm, in this case hierarchical, used for training of multilayer perceptron neural networks for the binary classification. The parameters to select are the crossover and mutation probabilities of the control and parametric genes and the permanency percent. The results can be considered as a guide for using this kind of algorithm.

  12. Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters August 12, 2013 Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks Schizophrenia networks in the prefrontal ... Vasculitis Therapy as Effective as Standard Care Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks Connect with Us Subscribe to ...

  13. Asynchronous stochastic Boolean networks as gene network models.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peican; Han, Jie

    2014-10-01

    Logical models have widely been used to gain insights into the biological behavior of gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Most logical models assume a synchronous update of the genes' states in a GRN. However, this may not be appropriate, because each gene may require a different period of time for changing its state. In this article, asynchronous stochastic Boolean networks (ASBNs) are proposed for investigating various asynchronous state-updating strategies in a GRN. As in stochastic computation, ASBNs use randomly permutated stochastic sequences to encode probability. Investigated by several stochasticity models, a GRN is considered to be subject to noise and external perturbation. Hence, both stochasticity and asynchronicity are considered in the state evolution of a GRN. As a case study, ASBNs are utilized to investigate the dynamic behavior of a T helper network. It is shown that ASBNs are efficient in evaluating the steady-state distributions (SSDs) of the network with random gene perturbation. The SSDs found by using ASBNs show the robustness of the attractors of the T helper network, when various stochasticity and asynchronicity models are considered to investigate its dynamic behavior.

  14. Inferring gene regression networks with model trees

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Novel strategies are required in order to handle the huge amount of data produced by microarray technologies. To infer gene regulatory networks, the first step is to find direct regulatory relationships between genes building the so-called gene co-expression networks. They are typically generated using correlation statistics as pairwise similarity measures. Correlation-based methods are very useful in order to determine whether two genes have a strong global similarity but do not detect local similarities. Results We propose model trees as a method to identify gene interaction networks. While correlation-based methods analyze each pair of genes, in our approach we generate a single regression tree for each gene from the remaining genes. Finally, a graph from all the relationships among output and input genes is built taking into account whether the pair of genes is statistically significant. For this reason we apply a statistical procedure to control the false discovery rate. The performance of our approach, named REGNET, is experimentally tested on two well-known data sets: Saccharomyces Cerevisiae and E.coli data set. First, the biological coherence of the results are tested. Second the E.coli transcriptional network (in the Regulon database) is used as control to compare the results to that of a correlation-based method. This experiment shows that REGNET performs more accurately at detecting true gene associations than the Pearson and Spearman zeroth and first-order correlation-based methods. Conclusions REGNET generates gene association networks from gene expression data, and differs from correlation-based methods in that the relationship between one gene and others is calculated simultaneously. Model trees are very useful techniques to estimate the numerical values for the target genes by linear regression functions. They are very often more precise than linear regression models because they can add just different linear regressions to separate

  15. In Silico Evolution of Gene Cooption in Pattern-Forming Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Spirov, Alexander V.; Sabirov, Marat A.; Holloway, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Gene recruitment or cooption occurs when a gene, which may be part of an existing gene regulatory network (GRN), comes under the control of a new regulatory system. Such re-arrangement of pre-existing networks is likely more common for increasing genomic complexity than the creation of new genes. Using evolutionary computations (EC), we investigate how cooption affects the evolvability, outgrowth and robustness of GRNs. We use a data-driven model of insect segmentation, for the fruit fly Drosophila, and evaluate fitness by robustness to maternal variability—a major constraint in biological development. We compare two mechanisms of gene cooption: a simpler one with gene Introduction and Withdrawal operators; and one in which GRN elements can be altered by transposon infection. Starting from a minimal 2-gene network, insufficient for fitting the Drosophila gene expression patterns, we find a general trend of coopting available genes into the GRN, in order to better fit the data. With the transposon mechanism, we find co-evolutionary oscillations between genes and their transposons. These oscillations may offer a new technique in EC for overcoming premature convergence. Finally, we comment on how a differential equations (in contrast to Boolean) approach is necessary for addressing realistic continuous variation in biochemical parameters. PMID:23365523

  16. Identification of key player genes in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Nazarieh, Maryam; Wiese, Andreas; Will, Thorsten; Hamed, Mohamed; Helms, Volkhard

    2016-09-06

    Identifying the gene regulatory networks governing the workings and identity of cells is one of the main challenges in understanding processes such as cellular differentiation, reprogramming or cancerogenesis. One particular challenge is to identify the main drivers and master regulatory genes that control such cell fate transitions. In this work, we reformulate this problem as the optimization problems of computing a Minimum Dominating Set and a Minimum Connected Dominating Set for directed graphs. Both MDS and MCDS are applied to the well-studied gene regulatory networks of the model organisms E. coli and S. cerevisiae and to a pluripotency network for mouse embryonic stem cells. The results show that MCDS can capture most of the known key player genes identified so far in the model organisms. Moreover, this method suggests an additional small set of transcription factors as novel key players for governing the cell-specific gene regulatory network which can also be investigated with regard to diseases. To this aim, we investigated the ability of MCDS to define key drivers in breast cancer. The method identified many known drug targets as members of the MDS and MCDS. This paper proposes a new method to identify key player genes in gene regulatory networks. The Java implementation of the heuristic algorithm explained in this paper is available as a Cytoscape plugin at http://apps.cytoscape.org/apps/mcds . The SageMath programs for solving integer linear programming formulations used in the paper are available at https://github.com/maryamNazarieh/KeyRegulatoryGenes and as supplementary material.

  17. Inferring phylogenetic networks from gene order data.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Alexey Anatolievich; Galachyants, Yuri Pavlovich; Likhoshway, Yelena Valentinovna

    2013-01-01

    Existing algorithms allow us to infer phylogenetic networks from sequences (DNA, protein or binary), sets of trees, and distance matrices, but there are no methods to build them using the gene order data as an input. Here we describe several methods to build split networks from the gene order data, perform simulation studies, and use our methods for analyzing and interpreting different real gene order datasets. All proposed methods are based on intermediate data, which can be generated from genome structures under study and used as an input for network construction algorithms. Three intermediates are used: set of jackknife trees, distance matrix, and binary encoding. According to simulations and case studies, the best intermediates are jackknife trees and distance matrix (when used with Neighbor-Net algorithm). Binary encoding can also be useful, but only when the methods mentioned above cannot be used.

  18. Prediction of disease genes using tissue-specified gene-gene network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tissue specificity is an important aspect of many genetic diseases in the context of genetic disorders as the disorder affects only few tissues. Therefore tissue specificity is important in identifying disease-gene associations. Hence this paper seeks to discuss the impact of using tissue specificity in predicting new disease-gene associations and how to use tissue specificity along with phenotype information for a particular disease. Methods In order to find out the impact of using tissue specificity for predicting new disease-gene associations, this study proposes a novel method called tissue-specified genes to construct tissues-specific gene-gene networks for different tissue samples. Subsequently, these networks are used with phenotype details to predict disease genes by using Katz method. The proposed method was compared with three other tissue-specific network construction methods in order to check its effectiveness. Furthermore, to check the possibility of using tissue-specific gene-gene network instead of generic protein-protein network at all time, the results are compared with three other methods. Results In terms of leave-one-out cross validation, calculation of the mean enrichment and ROC curves indicate that the proposed approach outperforms existing network construction methods. Furthermore tissues-specific gene-gene networks make a more positive impact on predicting disease-gene associations than generic protein-protein interaction networks. Conclusions In conclusion by integrating tissue-specific data it enabled prediction of known and unknown disease-gene associations for a particular disease more effectively. Hence it is better to use tissue-specific gene-gene network whenever possible. In addition the proposed method is a better way of constructing tissue-specific gene-gene networks. PMID:25350876

  19. Prediction of disease genes using tissue-specified gene-gene network.

    PubMed

    Ganegoda, Gamage; Wang, JianXin; Wu, Fang-Xiang; Li, Min

    2014-01-01

    Tissue specificity is an important aspect of many genetic diseases in the context of genetic disorders as the disorder affects only few tissues. Therefore tissue specificity is important in identifying disease-gene associations. Hence this paper seeks to discuss the impact of using tissue specificity in predicting new disease-gene associations and how to use tissue specificity along with phenotype information for a particular disease. In order to find out the impact of using tissue specificity for predicting new disease-gene associations, this study proposes a novel method called tissue-specified genes to construct tissues-specific gene-gene networks for different tissue samples. Subsequently, these networks are used with phenotype details to predict disease genes by using Katz method. The proposed method was compared with three other tissue-specific network construction methods in order to check its effectiveness. Furthermore, to check the possibility of using tissue-specific gene-gene network instead of generic protein-protein network at all time, the results are compared with three other methods. In terms of leave-one-out cross validation, calculation of the mean enrichment and ROC curves indicate that the proposed approach outperforms existing network construction methods. Furthermore tissues-specific gene-gene networks make a more positive impact on predicting disease-gene associations than generic protein-protein interaction networks. In conclusion by integrating tissue-specific data it enabled prediction of known and unknown disease-gene associations for a particular disease more effectively. Hence it is better to use tissue-specific gene-gene network whenever possible. In addition the proposed method is a better way of constructing tissue-specific gene-gene networks.

  20. Gene Network Reconstruction using Global-Local Shrinkage Priors*

    PubMed Central

    Leday, Gwenaël G.R.; de Gunst, Mathisca C.M.; Kpogbezan, Gino B.; van der Vaart, Aad W.; van Wieringen, Wessel N.; van de Wiel, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing a gene network from high-throughput molecular data is an important but challenging task, as the number of parameters to estimate easily is much larger than the sample size. A conventional remedy is to regularize or penalize the model likelihood. In network models, this is often done locally in the neighbourhood of each node or gene. However, estimation of the many regularization parameters is often difficult and can result in large statistical uncertainties. In this paper we propose to combine local regularization with global shrinkage of the regularization parameters to borrow strength between genes and improve inference. We employ a simple Bayesian model with non-sparse, conjugate priors to facilitate the use of fast variational approximations to posteriors. We discuss empirical Bayes estimation of hyper-parameters of the priors, and propose a novel approach to rank-based posterior thresholding. Using extensive model- and data-based simulations, we demonstrate that the proposed inference strategy outperforms popular (sparse) methods, yields more stable edges, and is more reproducible. The proposed method, termed ShrinkNet, is then applied to Glioblastoma to investigate the interactions between genes associated with patient survival. PMID:28408966

  1. Parameter identifiability-based optimal observation remedy for biological networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulin; Miao, Hongyu

    2017-05-04

    To systematically understand the interactions between numerous biological components, a variety of biological networks on different levels and scales have been constructed and made available in public databases or knowledge repositories. Graphical models such as structural equation models have long been used to describe biological networks for various quantitative analysis tasks, especially key biological parameter estimation. However, limited by resources or technical capacities, partial observation is a common problem in experimental observations of biological networks, and it thus becomes an important problem how to select unobserved nodes for additional measurements such that all unknown model parameters become identifiable. To the best knowledge of our authors, a solution to this problem does not exist until this study. The identifiability-based observation problem for biological networks is mathematically formulated for the first time based on linear recursive structural equation models, and then a dynamic programming strategy is developed to obtain the optimal observation strategies. The efficiency of the dynamic programming algorithm is achieved by avoiding both symbolic computation and matrix operations as used in other studies. We also provided necessary theoretical justifications to the proposed method. Finally, we verified the algorithm using synthetic network structures and illustrated the application of the proposed method in practice using a real biological network related to influenza A virus infection. The proposed approach is the first solution to the structural identifiability-based optimal observation remedy problem. It is applicable to an arbitrary directed acyclic biological network (recursive SEMs) without bidirectional edges, and it is a computerizable method. Observation remedy is an important issue in experiment design for biological networks, and we believe that this study provides a solid basis for dealing with more challenging design

  2. From gene expressions to genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2009-03-01

    A method based on the principle of entropy maximization is used to identify the gene interaction network with the highest probability of giving rise to experimentally observed transcript profiles [1]. In its simplest form, the method yields the pairwise gene interaction network, but it can also be extended to deduce higher order correlations. Analysis of microarray data from genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae chemostat cultures exhibiting energy metabollic oscillations identifies a gene interaction network that reflects the intracellular communication pathways. These pathways adjust cellular metabolic activity and cell division to the limiting nutrient conditions that trigger metabolic oscillations. The success of the present approach in extracting meaningful genetic connections suggests that the maximum entropy principle is a useful concept for understanding living systems, as it is for other complex, nonequilibrium systems. The time-dependent behavior of the genetic network is found to involve only a few fundamental modes [2,3]. [4pt] REFERENCES:[0pt] [1] T. R. Lezon, J. R. Banavar, M. Cieplak, A. Maritan, and N. Fedoroff, Using the principle of entropy maximization to infer genetic interaction networks from gene expression patterns, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. (USA) 103, 19033-19038 (2006) [0pt] [2] N. S. Holter, M. Mitra, A. Maritan, M. Cieplak, J. R. Banavar, and N. V. Fedoroff, Fundamental patterns underlying gene expression profiles: simplicity from complexity, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97, 8409-8414 (2000) [0pt] [3] N. S. Holter, A. Maritan, M. Cieplak, N. V. Fedoroff, and J. R. Banavar, Dynamic modeling of gene expression data, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 1693-1698 (2001)

  3. Gene network biological validity based on gene-gene interaction relevance.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Vela, Francisco; Díaz-Díaz, Norberto

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, gene networks have become one of the most useful tools for modeling biological processes. Many inference gene network algorithms have been developed as techniques for extracting knowledge from gene expression data. Ensuring the reliability of the inferred gene relationships is a crucial task in any study in order to prove that the algorithms used are precise. Usually, this validation process can be carried out using prior biological knowledge. The metabolic pathways stored in KEGG are one of the most widely used knowledgeable sources for analyzing relationships between genes. This paper introduces a new methodology, GeneNetVal, to assess the biological validity of gene networks based on the relevance of the gene-gene interactions stored in KEGG metabolic pathways. Hence, a complete KEGG pathway conversion into a gene association network and a new matching distance based on gene-gene interaction relevance are proposed. The performance of GeneNetVal was established with three different experiments. Firstly, our proposal is tested in a comparative ROC analysis. Secondly, a randomness study is presented to show the behavior of GeneNetVal when the noise is increased in the input network. Finally, the ability of GeneNetVal to detect biological functionality of the network is shown.

  4. An extended Kalman filtering approach to modeling nonlinear dynamic gene regulatory networks via short gene expression time series.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zidong; Liu, Xiaohui; Liu, Yurong; Liang, Jinling; Vinciotti, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the extended Kalman filter (EKF) algorithm is applied to model the gene regulatory network from gene time series data. The gene regulatory network is considered as a nonlinear dynamic stochastic model that consists of the gene measurement equation and the gene regulation equation. After specifying the model structure, we apply the EKF algorithm for identifying both the model parameters and the actual value of gene expression levels. It is shown that the EKF algorithm is an online estimation algorithm that can identify a large number of parameters (including parameters of nonlinear functions) through iterative procedure by using a small number of observations. Four real-world gene expression data sets are employed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the EKF algorithm, and the obtained models are evaluated from the viewpoint of bioinformatics.

  5. Summing up the noise in gene networks.

    PubMed

    Paulsson, Johan

    2004-01-29

    Random fluctuations in genetic networks are inevitable as chemical reactions are probabilistic and many genes, RNAs and proteins are present in low numbers per cell. Such 'noise' affects all life processes and has recently been measured using green fluorescent protein (GFP). Two studies show that negative feedback suppresses noise, and three others identify the sources of noise in gene expression. Here I critically analyse these studies and present a simple equation that unifies and extends both the mathematical and biological perspectives.

  6. On Bayesian Network Classifiers with Reduced Precision Parameters.

    PubMed

    Tschiatschek, Sebastian; Pernkopf, Franz

    2015-04-01

    Bayesian network classifier (BNCs) are typically implemented on nowadays desktop computers. However, many real world applications require classifier implementation on embedded or low power systems. Aspects for this purpose have not been studied rigorously. We partly close this gap by analyzing reduced precision implementations of BNCs. In detail, we investigate the quantization of the parameters of BNCs with discrete valued nodes including the implications on the classification rate (CR). We derive worst-case and probabilistic bounds on the CR for different bit-widths. These bounds are evaluated on several benchmark datasets. Furthermore, we compare the classification performance and the robustness of BNCs with generatively and discriminatively optimized parameters, i.e. parameters optimized for high data likelihood and parameters optimized for classification, with respect to parameter quantization. Generatively optimized parameters are more robust for very low bit-widths, i.e. less classifications change because of quantization. However, classification performance is better for discriminatively optimized parameters for all but very low bit-widths. Additionally, we perform analysis for margin-optimized tree augmented network (TAN) structures which outperform generatively optimized TAN structures in terms of CR and robustness.

  7. Reverse engineering of gene regulatory network using restricted gene expression programming.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Liu, Sanrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Inference of gene regulatory networks has been becoming a major area of interest in the field of systems biology over the past decade. In this paper, we present a novel representation of S-system model, named restricted gene expression programming (RGEP), to infer gene regulatory network. A new hybrid evolutionary algorithm based on structure-based evolutionary algorithm and cuckoo search (CS) is proposed to optimize the architecture and corresponding parameters of model, respectively. Two synthetic benchmark datasets and one real biological dataset from SOS DNA repair network in E. coli are used to test the validity of our method. Experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method performs better than previously proposed popular methods.

  8. Autonomous Boolean modelling of developmental gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xianrui; Sun, Mengyang; Socolar, Joshua E. S.

    2013-01-01

    During early embryonic development, a network of regulatory interactions among genes dynamically determines a pattern of differentiated tissues. We show that important timing information associated with the interactions can be faithfully represented in autonomous Boolean models in which binary variables representing expression levels are updated in continuous time, and that such models can provide a direct insight into features that are difficult to extract from ordinary differential equation (ODE) models. As an application, we model the experimentally well-studied network controlling fly body segmentation. The Boolean model successfully generates the patterns formed in normal and genetically perturbed fly embryos, permits the derivation of constraints on the time delay parameters, clarifies the logic associated with different ODE parameter sets and provides a platform for studying connectivity and robustness in parameter space. By elucidating the role of regulatory time delays in pattern formation, the results suggest new types of experimental measurements in early embryonic development. PMID:23034351

  9. Identifying differentially expressed genes in cancer patients using a non-parameter Ising model.

    PubMed

    Li, Xumeng; Feltus, Frank A; Sun, Xiaoqian; Wang, James Z; Luo, Feng

    2011-10-01

    Identification of genes and pathways involved in diseases and physiological conditions is a major task in systems biology. In this study, we developed a novel non-parameter Ising model to integrate protein-protein interaction network and microarray data for identifying differentially expressed (DE) genes. We also proposed a simulated annealing algorithm to find the optimal configuration of the Ising model. The Ising model was applied to two breast cancer microarray data sets. The results showed that more cancer-related DE sub-networks and genes were identified by the Ising model than those by the Markov random field model. Furthermore, cross-validation experiments showed that DE genes identified by Ising model can improve classification performance compared with DE genes identified by Markov random field model.

  10. Tuning RED parameters in satellite networks using control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Mukundan; Durresi, Arjan; Chellappan, Sriram; Ozbay, Hitay; Jain, Raj

    2003-08-01

    Congestion in the Internet results in wasted bandwidth and also stands in the way of guaranteeing QoS. The effect of congestion is multiplied many fold in Satellite networks, where the resources are very expensive. Thus congestion control has a special significance in the performance of Satellite networks. In today's Internet, congestion control is implemented mostly using some form of the de facto standard, RED. But tuning of parameters in RED has been a major problem throughout. Achieving high throughput with corresponding low delays is the main goal in parameter setting. It is also desired to keep the oscillations in the queue low to reduce jitter, so that the QoS guarantees can be improved. In this paper, we use a previously linearized fluid flow model of TCP-RED to study the performance and stability of the Queue in the router. We use classical control tools like Tracking Error minimization and Delay Margin to study the performance, stability of the system. We use the above-mentioned tools to provide guidelines for setting the parameters in RED, such that the throughput, delay and jitter of the system are optimized. Thus we provide guidelines for optimizing satellite IP networks. We apply our results exclusively for optimizing the performance of satellite networks, where the effects of congestion are much pronounced and need for optimization is much important. We use ns simulator to validate our results to support our analysis.

  11. The Prediction of Laser Clad Parameters Based on Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jichang; Ni, Libin

    2011-06-01

    Because laser cladding is a multi-variable coupling process, the relation between clad bead and process parameters is non-linear with multi-objects and multi-variables. Moreover, it is very difficult to find out an exact analytic model to express this relation. In this study, a neural network model, which is often used for non-linear problems, is developed to explain the relationship between process variables and clad parameters (the width and height of cladding bead). Some samples obtained in experiments are used to train the network model to form the perfect map relation between input and output, and other samples are employed to test the network model. A normal BP algorithm and an amend BP one are trained, and it is found that the amend BP algorithm has advantages over the normal BP one. The experimental results agreed well with those calculated with the neural network model, which indicates that the developed BP neural network prediction model is feasible and valid in theory and in practice.

  12. Modularity-based credible prediction of disease genes and detection of disease subtypes on the phenotype-gene heterogeneous network.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xin; Hao, Han; Li, Yanda; Li, Shao

    2011-05-20

    Protein-protein interaction networks and phenotype similarity information have been synthesized together to discover novel disease-causing genes. Genetic or phenotypic similarities are manifested as certain modularity properties in a phenotype-gene heterogeneous network consisting of the phenotype-phenotype similarity network, protein-protein interaction network and gene-disease association network. However, the quantitative analysis of modularity in the heterogeneous network and its influence on disease-gene discovery are still unaddressed. Furthermore, the genetic correspondence of the disease subtypes can be identified by marking the genes and phenotypes in the phenotype-gene network. We present a novel network inference method to measure the network modularity, and in particular to suggest the subtypes of diseases based on the heterogeneous network. Based on a measure which is introduced to evaluate the closeness between two nodes in the phenotype-gene heterogeneous network, we developed a Hitting-Time-based method, CIPHER-HIT, for assessing the modularity of disease gene predictions and credibly prioritizing disease-causing genes, and then identifying the genetic modules corresponding to potential subtypes of the queried phenotype. The CIPHER-HIT is free to rely on any preset parameters. We found that when taking into account the modularity levels, the CIPHER-HIT method can significantly improve the performance of disease gene predictions, which demonstrates modularity is one of the key features for credible inference of disease genes on the phenotype-gene heterogeneous network. By applying the CIPHER-HIT to the subtype analysis of Breast cancer, we found that the prioritized genes can be divided into two sub-modules, one contains the members of the Fanconi anemia gene family, and the other contains a reported protein complex MRE11/RAD50/NBN. The phenotype-gene heterogeneous network contains abundant information for not only disease genes discovery but also

  13. Field measurements and neural network modeling of water quality parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qishlaqi, Afishin; Kordian, Sediqeh; Parsaie, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    Rivers are one of the main resources for water supplying the agricultural, industrial, and urban use; therefore, unremitting surveying the quality of them is necessary. Recently, artificial neural networks have been proposed as a powerful tool for modeling and predicting the water quality parameters in natural streams. In this paper, to predict water quality parameters of Tireh River located at South West of Iran, a multilayer neural network model (MLP) was developed. The T.D.S, Ec, pH, HCO3, Cl, Na, So4, Mg, and Ca as main parameters of water quality parameters were measured and predicted using the MLP model. The architecture of the proposed MLP model included two hidden layers that at the first and second hidden layers, eight and six neurons were considered. The tangent sigmoid and pure-line functions were selected as transfer function for the neurons in hidden and output layers, respectively. The results showed that the MLP model has suitable performance to predict water quality parameters of Tireh River. For assessing the performance of the MLP model in the water quality prediction along the studied area, in addition to existing sampling stations, another 14 stations along were considered by authors. Evaluating the performance of developed MLP model to map relation between the water quality parameters along the studied area showed that it has suitable accuracy and minimum correlation between the results of MLP model and measured data was 0.85.

  14. Additive Functions in Boolean Models of Gene Regulatory Network Modules

    PubMed Central

    Darabos, Christian; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Tomassini, Marco; Moore, Jason H.; Provero, Paolo; Giacobini, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Gene-on-gene regulations are key components of every living organism. Dynamical abstract models of genetic regulatory networks help explain the genome's evolvability and robustness. These properties can be attributed to the structural topology of the graph formed by genes, as vertices, and regulatory interactions, as edges. Moreover, the actual gene interaction of each gene is believed to play a key role in the stability of the structure. With advances in biology, some effort was deployed to develop update functions in Boolean models that include recent knowledge. We combine real-life gene interaction networks with novel update functions in a Boolean model. We use two sub-networks of biological organisms, the yeast cell-cycle and the mouse embryonic stem cell, as topological support for our system. On these structures, we substitute the original random update functions by a novel threshold-based dynamic function in which the promoting and repressing effect of each interaction is considered. We use a third real-life regulatory network, along with its inferred Boolean update functions to validate the proposed update function. Results of this validation hint to increased biological plausibility of the threshold-based function. To investigate the dynamical behavior of this new model, we visualized the phase transition between order and chaos into the critical regime using Derrida plots. We complement the qualitative nature of Derrida plots with an alternative measure, the criticality distance, that also allows to discriminate between regimes in a quantitative way. Simulation on both real-life genetic regulatory networks show that there exists a set of parameters that allows the systems to operate in the critical region. This new model includes experimentally derived biological information and recent discoveries, which makes it potentially useful to guide experimental research. The update function confers additional realism to the model, while reducing the complexity

  15. Additive functions in boolean models of gene regulatory network modules.

    PubMed

    Darabos, Christian; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Tomassini, Marco; Moore, Jason H; Provero, Paolo; Giacobini, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Gene-on-gene regulations are key components of every living organism. Dynamical abstract models of genetic regulatory networks help explain the genome's evolvability and robustness. These properties can be attributed to the structural topology of the graph formed by genes, as vertices, and regulatory interactions, as edges. Moreover, the actual gene interaction of each gene is believed to play a key role in the stability of the structure. With advances in biology, some effort was deployed to develop update functions in boolean models that include recent knowledge. We combine real-life gene interaction networks with novel update functions in a boolean model. We use two sub-networks of biological organisms, the yeast cell-cycle and the mouse embryonic stem cell, as topological support for our system. On these structures, we substitute the original random update functions by a novel threshold-based dynamic function in which the promoting and repressing effect of each interaction is considered. We use a third real-life regulatory network, along with its inferred boolean update functions to validate the proposed update function. Results of this validation hint to increased biological plausibility of the threshold-based function. To investigate the dynamical behavior of this new model, we visualized the phase transition between order and chaos into the critical regime using Derrida plots. We complement the qualitative nature of Derrida plots with an alternative measure, the criticality distance, that also allows to discriminate between regimes in a quantitative way. Simulation on both real-life genetic regulatory networks show that there exists a set of parameters that allows the systems to operate in the critical region. This new model includes experimentally derived biological information and recent discoveries, which makes it potentially useful to guide experimental research. The update function confers additional realism to the model, while reducing the complexity

  16. Generation of oscillating gene regulatory network motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dorp, M.; Lannoo, B.; Carlon, E.

    2013-07-01

    Using an improved version of an evolutionary algorithm originally proposed by François and Hakim [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USAPNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.0304532101 101, 580 (2004)], we generated small gene regulatory networks in which the concentration of a target protein oscillates in time. These networks may serve as candidates for oscillatory modules to be found in larger regulatory networks and protein interaction networks. The algorithm was run for 105 times to produce a large set of oscillating modules, which were systematically classified and analyzed. The robustness of the oscillations against variations of the kinetic rates was also determined, to filter out the least robust cases. Furthermore, we show that the set of evolved networks can serve as a database of models whose behavior can be compared to experimentally observed oscillations. The algorithm found three smallest (core) oscillators in which nonlinearities and number of components are minimal. Two of those are two-gene modules: the mixed feedback loop, already discussed in the literature, and an autorepressed gene coupled with a heterodimer. The third one is a single gene module which is competitively regulated by a monomer and a dimer. The evolutionary algorithm also generated larger oscillating networks, which are in part extensions of the three core modules and in part genuinely new modules. The latter includes oscillators which do not rely on feedback induced by transcription factors, but are purely of post-transcriptional type. Analysis of post-transcriptional mechanisms of oscillation may provide useful information for circadian clock research, as recent experiments showed that circadian rhythms are maintained even in the absence of transcription.

  17. GenePANDA—a novel network-based gene prioritizing tool for complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Tianshu; Chen, Shu; Wu, Xiaohui; Tian, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe GenePANDA, a novel network-based tool for prioritizing candidate disease genes. GenePANDA assesses whether a gene is likely a candidate disease gene based on its relative distance to known disease genes in a functional association network. A unique feature of GenePANDA is the introduction of adjusted network distance derived by normalizing the raw network distance between two genes with their respective mean raw network distance to all other genes in the network. The use of adjusted network distance significantly improves GenePANDA’s performance on prioritizing complex disease genes. GenePANDA achieves superior performance over five previously published algorithms for prioritizing disease genes. Finally, GenePANDA can assist in prioritizing functionally important SNPs identified by GWAS. PMID:28252032

  18. Extraction of exposure parameters by using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Kyoung-Ah; Kim, Hyoung-Hee; Yoo, Ji-Yong; Park, Jun-Taek; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2003-06-01

    Dill"s ABC parameters are key parameters for the simulation of photolithography patterning. The exposure parameters of each resist should be exactly known to simulate the desired pattern. In ordinary extracting methods of Dill"s ABC parameters, the changed refractive index and the absorption coefficient of photoresist are needed during exposure process. Generally, these methods are not easy to be applied in a normal fab because of a difficulty of in-situ measuring. An empirical E0 (dose-to-clear) swing curve is used to extract ABC exposure parameters previously by our group. Dill"s ABC parameters are not independent from each other and different values of them would cause the dose to clear swing curve variation. By using the known relationship of ABC parameters, the experimental swing curves are to be matched with the simulated ones in order to extract the parameters. But sometimes this method is not easy in matching the procedure and performing simulation. This procedure would take much time for matching between the experimental data and the simulation by the naked eyes, and also the simulations are performed over and over again for different conditions. In this paper, Dill"s ABC parameters were extracted by applying the values, which are quantitatively determined by measuring the mean value, period, slope, and amplitude of the swing curve, to the neural network algorithm. As a result, Dill"s ABC parameters were able to rapidly and accurately extracted with some of the quantified values of the swing curve. This method of extracting the exposure parameters can be used in a normal fab so that any engineer can easily obtain the exposure parameters and apply them to the simulation tools.

  19. Gene regulatory networks and the underlying biology of developmental toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Embryonic cells are specified by large-scale networks of functionally linked regulatory genes. Knowledge of the relevant gene regulatory networks is essential for understanding phenotypic heterogeneity that emerges from disruption of molecular functions, cellular processes or sig...

  20. Gene regulatory networks and the underlying biology of developmental toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Embryonic cells are specified by large-scale networks of functionally linked regulatory genes. Knowledge of the relevant gene regulatory networks is essential for understanding phenotypic heterogeneity that emerges from disruption of molecular functions, cellular processes or sig...

  1. Discovering Study-Specific Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Valeria; Curtis, Tanya; Lysenko, Artem; Saqi, Mansoor; Swift, Stephen; Tucker, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Microarrays are commonly used in biology because of their ability to simultaneously measure thousands of genes under different conditions. Due to their structure, typically containing a high amount of variables but far fewer samples, scalable network analysis techniques are often employed. In particular, consensus approaches have been recently used that combine multiple microarray studies in order to find networks that are more robust. The purpose of this paper, however, is to combine multiple microarray studies to automatically identify subnetworks that are distinctive to specific experimental conditions rather than common to them all. To better understand key regulatory mechanisms and how they change under different conditions, we derive unique networks from multiple independent networks built using glasso which goes beyond standard correlations. This involves calculating cluster prediction accuracies to detect the most predictive genes for a specific set of conditions. We differentiate between accuracies calculated using cross-validation within a selected cluster of studies (the intra prediction accuracy) and those calculated on a set of independent studies belonging to different study clusters (inter prediction accuracy). Finally, we compare our method's results to related state-of-the art techniques. We explore how the proposed pipeline performs on both synthetic data and real data (wheat and Fusarium). Our results show that subnetworks can be identified reliably that are specific to subsets of studies and that these networks reflect key mechanisms that are fundamental to the experimental conditions in each of those subsets. PMID:25191999

  2. Hybrid stochastic simplifications for multiscale gene networks

    PubMed Central

    Crudu, Alina; Debussche, Arnaud; Radulescu, Ovidiu

    2009-01-01

    Background Stochastic simulation of gene networks by Markov processes has important applications in molecular biology. The complexity of exact simulation algorithms scales with the number of discrete jumps to be performed. Approximate schemes reduce the computational time by reducing the number of simulated discrete events. Also, answering important questions about the relation between network topology and intrinsic noise generation and propagation should be based on general mathematical results. These general results are difficult to obtain for exact models. Results We propose a unified framework for hybrid simplifications of Markov models of multiscale stochastic gene networks dynamics. We discuss several possible hybrid simplifications, and provide algorithms to obtain them from pure jump processes. In hybrid simplifications, some components are discrete and evolve by jumps, while other components are continuous. Hybrid simplifications are obtained by partial Kramers-Moyal expansion [1-3] which is equivalent to the application of the central limit theorem to a sub-model. By averaging and variable aggregation we drastically reduce simulation time and eliminate non-critical reactions. Hybrid and averaged simplifications can be used for more effective simulation algorithms and for obtaining general design principles relating noise to topology and time scales. The simplified models reproduce with good accuracy the stochastic properties of the gene networks, including waiting times in intermittence phenomena, fluctuation amplitudes and stationary distributions. The methods are illustrated on several gene network examples. Conclusion Hybrid simplifications can be used for onion-like (multi-layered) approaches to multi-scale biochemical systems, in which various descriptions are used at various scales. Sets of discrete and continuous variables are treated with different methods and are coupled together in a physically justified approach. PMID:19735554

  3. Local network parameters can affect inter-network phase lags in central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Jones, S R; Kopell, N

    2006-01-01

    Weakly coupled phase oscillators and strongly coupled relaxation oscillators have different mechanisms for creating stable phase lags. Many oscillations in central pattern generators combine features of each type of coupling: local networks composed of strongly coupled relaxation oscillators are weakly coupled to similar local networks. This paper analyzes the phase lags produced by this combination of mechanisms and shows how the parameters of a local network, such as the decay time of inhibition, can affect the phase lags between the local networks. The analysis is motivated by the crayfish central pattern generator used for swimming, and uses techniques from geometrical singular perturbation theory.

  4. Construction of gene regulatory networks using biclustering and bayesian networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding gene interactions in complex living systems can be seen as the ultimate goal of the systems biology revolution. Hence, to elucidate disease ontology fully and to reduce the cost of drug development, gene regulatory networks (GRNs) have to be constructed. During the last decade, many GRN inference algorithms based on genome-wide data have been developed to unravel the complexity of gene regulation. Time series transcriptomic data measured by genome-wide DNA microarrays are traditionally used for GRN modelling. One of the major problems with microarrays is that a dataset consists of relatively few time points with respect to the large number of genes. Dimensionality is one of the interesting problems in GRN modelling. Results In this paper, we develop a biclustering function enrichment analysis toolbox (BicAT-plus) to study the effect of biclustering in reducing data dimensions. The network generated from our system was validated via available interaction databases and was compared with previous methods. The results revealed the performance of our proposed method. Conclusions Because of the sparse nature of GRNs, the results of biclustering techniques differ significantly from those of previous methods. PMID:22018164

  5. Coherent organization in gene regulation: a study on six networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aral, Neşe; Kabakçıoğlu, Alkan

    2016-04-01

    Structural and dynamical fingerprints of evolutionary optimization in biological networks are still unclear. Here we analyze the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks responsible for the regulation of cell cycle and cell differentiation in three organisms or cell types each, and show that they follow a version of Hebb's rule which we have termed coherence. More precisely, we find that simultaneously expressed genes with a common target are less likely to act antagonistically at the attractors of the regulatory dynamics. We then investigate the dependence of coherence on structural parameters, such as the mean number of inputs per node and the activatory/repressory interaction ratio, as well as on dynamically determined quantities, such as the basin size and the number of expressed genes.

  6. Coherent organization in gene regulation: a study on six networks.

    PubMed

    Aral, Neşe; Kabakçıoğlu, Alkan

    2016-05-12

    Structural and dynamical fingerprints of evolutionary optimization in biological networks are still unclear. Here we analyze the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks responsible for the regulation of cell cycle and cell differentiation in three organisms or cell types each, and show that they follow a version of Hebb's rule which we have termed coherence. More precisely, we find that simultaneously expressed genes with a common target are less likely to act antagonistically at the attractors of the regulatory dynamics. We then investigate the dependence of coherence on structural parameters, such as the mean number of inputs per node and the activatory/repressory interaction ratio, as well as on dynamically determined quantities, such as the basin size and the number of expressed genes.

  7. Scalable Parameter Estimation for Genome-Scale Biochemical Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbacher, Barbara; Hasenauer, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Mechanistic mathematical modeling of biochemical reaction networks using ordinary differential equation (ODE) models has improved our understanding of small- and medium-scale biological processes. While the same should in principle hold for large- and genome-scale processes, the computational methods for the analysis of ODE models which describe hundreds or thousands of biochemical species and reactions are missing so far. While individual simulations are feasible, the inference of the model parameters from experimental data is computationally too intensive. In this manuscript, we evaluate adjoint sensitivity analysis for parameter estimation in large scale biochemical reaction networks. We present the approach for time-discrete measurement and compare it to state-of-the-art methods used in systems and computational biology. Our comparison reveals a significantly improved computational efficiency and a superior scalability of adjoint sensitivity analysis. The computational complexity is effectively independent of the number of parameters, enabling the analysis of large- and genome-scale models. Our study of a comprehensive kinetic model of ErbB signaling shows that parameter estimation using adjoint sensitivity analysis requires a fraction of the computation time of established methods. The proposed method will facilitate mechanistic modeling of genome-scale cellular processes, as required in the age of omics. PMID:28114351

  8. Pathway network inference from gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The development of high-throughput omics technologies enabled genome-wide measurements of the activity of cellular elements and provides the analytical resources for the progress of the Systems Biology discipline. Analysis and interpretation of gene expression data has evolved from the gene to the pathway and interaction level, i.e. from the detection of differentially expressed genes, to the establishment of gene interaction networks and the identification of enriched functional categories. Still, the understanding of biological systems requires a further level of analysis that addresses the characterization of the interaction between functional modules. Results We present a novel computational methodology to study the functional interconnections among the molecular elements of a biological system. The PANA approach uses high-throughput genomics measurements and a functional annotation scheme to extract an activity profile from each functional block -or pathway- followed by machine-learning methods to infer the relationships between these functional profiles. The result is a global, interconnected network of pathways that represents the functional cross-talk within the molecular system. We have applied this approach to describe the functional transcriptional connections during the yeast cell cycle and to identify pathways that change their connectivity in a disease condition using an Alzheimer example. Conclusions PANA is a useful tool to deepen in our understanding of the functional interdependences that operate within complex biological systems. We show the approach is algorithmically consistent and the inferred network is well supported by the available functional data. The method allows the dissection of the molecular basis of the functional connections and we describe the different regulatory mechanisms that explain the network's topology obtained for the yeast cell cycle data. PMID:25032889

  9. Pathway network inference from gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Ponzoni, Ignacio; Nueda, María; Tarazona, Sonia; Götz, Stefan; Montaner, David; Dussaut, Julieta; Dopazo, Joaquín; Conesa, Ana

    2014-01-01

    The development of high-throughput omics technologies enabled genome-wide measurements of the activity of cellular elements and provides the analytical resources for the progress of the Systems Biology discipline. Analysis and interpretation of gene expression data has evolved from the gene to the pathway and interaction level, i.e. from the detection of differentially expressed genes, to the establishment of gene interaction networks and the identification of enriched functional categories. Still, the understanding of biological systems requires a further level of analysis that addresses the characterization of the interaction between functional modules. We present a novel computational methodology to study the functional interconnections among the molecular elements of a biological system. The PANA approach uses high-throughput genomics measurements and a functional annotation scheme to extract an activity profile from each functional block -or pathway- followed by machine-learning methods to infer the relationships between these functional profiles. The result is a global, interconnected network of pathways that represents the functional cross-talk within the molecular system. We have applied this approach to describe the functional transcriptional connections during the yeast cell cycle and to identify pathways that change their connectivity in a disease condition using an Alzheimer example. PANA is a useful tool to deepen in our understanding of the functional interdependences that operate within complex biological systems. We show the approach is algorithmically consistent and the inferred network is well supported by the available functional data. The method allows the dissection of the molecular basis of the functional connections and we describe the different regulatory mechanisms that explain the network's topology obtained for the yeast cell cycle data.

  10. Inferring gene regulatory networks via nonlinear state-space models and exploiting sparsity.

    PubMed

    Noor, Amina; Serpedin, Erchin; Nounou, Mohamed; Nounou, Hazem N

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of learning the structure of gene regulatory networks from gene expression time series data. A more realistic scenario when the state space model representing a gene network evolves nonlinearly is considered while a linear model is assumed for the microarray data. To capture the nonlinearity, a particle filter-based state estimation algorithm is considered instead of the contemporary linear approximation-based approaches. The parameters characterizing the regulatory relations among various genes are estimated online using a Kalman filter. Since a particular gene interacts with a few other genes only, the parameter vector is expected to be sparse. The state estimates delivered by the particle filter and the observed microarray data are then subjected to a LASSO-based least squares regression operation which yields a parsimonious and efficient description of the regulatory network by setting the irrelevant coefficients to zero. The performance of the aforementioned algorithm is compared with the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF) employing the Mean Square Error (MSE) as the fidelity criterion in recovering the parameters of gene regulatory networks from synthetic data and real biological data. Extensive computer simulations illustrate that the proposed particle filter-based network inference algorithm outperforms EKF and UKF, and therefore, it can serve as a natural framework for modeling gene regulatory networks with nonlinear and sparse structure.

  11. Gene regulatory networks elucidating huanglongbing disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Federico; Reagan, Russell L; Uratsu, Sandra L; Phu, My L; Albrecht, Ute; Zhao, Weixiang; Davis, Cristina E; Bowman, Kim D; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing was exploited to gain deeper insight into the response to infection by Candidatus liberibacter asiaticus (CaLas), especially the immune disregulation and metabolic dysfunction caused by source-sink disruption. Previous fruit transcriptome data were compared with additional RNA-Seq data in three tissues: immature fruit, and young and mature leaves. Four categories of orchard trees were studied: symptomatic, asymptomatic, apparently healthy, and healthy. Principal component analysis found distinct expression patterns between immature and mature fruits and leaf samples for all four categories of trees. A predicted protein - protein interaction network identified HLB-regulated genes for sugar transporters playing key roles in the overall plant responses. Gene set and pathway enrichment analyses highlight the role of sucrose and starch metabolism in disease symptom development in all tissues. HLB-regulated genes (glucose-phosphate-transporter, invertase, starch-related genes) would likely determine the source-sink relationship disruption. In infected leaves, transcriptomic changes were observed for light reactions genes (downregulation), sucrose metabolism (upregulation), and starch biosynthesis (upregulation). In parallel, symptomatic fruits over-expressed genes involved in photosynthesis, sucrose and raffinose metabolism, and downregulated starch biosynthesis. We visualized gene networks between tissues inducing a source-sink shift. CaLas alters the hormone crosstalk, resulting in weak and ineffective tissue-specific plant immune responses necessary for bacterial clearance. Accordingly, expression of WRKYs (including WRKY70) was higher in fruits than in leaves. Systemic acquired responses were inadequately activated in young leaves, generally considered the sites where most new infections occur.

  12. Improving gene regulatory network inference using network topology information.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ajay; Chetty, Madhu; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2015-09-01

    Inferring the gene regulatory network (GRN) structure from data is an important problem in computational biology. However, it is a computationally complex problem and approximate methods such as heuristic search techniques, restriction of the maximum-number-of-parents (maxP) for a gene, or an optimal search under special conditions are required. The limitations of a heuristic search are well known but literature on the detailed analysis of the widely used maxP technique is lacking. The optimal search methods require large computational time. We report the theoretical analysis and experimental results of the strengths and limitations of the maxP technique. Further, using an optimal search method, we combine the strengths of the maxP technique and the known GRN topology to propose two novel algorithms. These algorithms are implemented in a Bayesian network framework and tested on biological, realistic, and in silico networks of different sizes and topologies. They overcome the limitations of the maxP technique and show superior computational speed when compared to the current optimal search algorithms.

  13. Efficient parameter sensitivity computation for spatially extended reaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, C.; Yates, C. A.; Baker, R. E.

    2017-01-01

    Reaction-diffusion models are widely used to study spatially extended chemical reaction systems. In order to understand how the dynamics of a reaction-diffusion model are affected by changes in its input parameters, efficient methods for computing parametric sensitivities are required. In this work, we focus on the stochastic models of spatially extended chemical reaction systems that involve partitioning the computational domain into voxels. Parametric sensitivities are often calculated using Monte Carlo techniques that are typically computationally expensive; however, variance reduction techniques can decrease the number of Monte Carlo simulations required. By exploiting the characteristic dynamics of spatially extended reaction networks, we are able to adapt existing finite difference schemes to robustly estimate parametric sensitivities in a spatially extended network. We show that algorithmic performance depends on the dynamics of the given network and the choice of summary statistics. We then describe a hybrid technique that dynamically chooses the most appropriate simulation method for the network of interest. Our method is tested for functionality and accuracy in a range of different scenarios.

  14. Intersecting transcription networks constrain gene regulatory evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sorrells, Trevor R; Booth, Lauren N; Tuch, Brian B; Johnson, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Epistasis—the non-additive interactions between different genetic loci—constrains evolutionary pathways, blocking some and permitting others1–8. For biological networks such as transcription circuits, the nature of these constraints and their consequences are largely unknown. Here we describe the evolutionary pathways of a transcription network that controls the response to mating pheromone in yeasts9. A component of this network, the transcription regulator Ste12, has evolved two different modes of binding to a set of its target genes. In one group of species, Ste12 binds to specific DNA binding sites, while in another lineage it occupies DNA indirectly, relying on a second transcription regulator to recognize DNA. We show, through the construction of various possible evolutionary intermediates, that evolution of the direct mode of DNA binding was not directly accessible to the ancestor. Instead, it was contingent on a lineage-specific change to an overlapping transcription network with a different function, the specification of cell type. These results show that analyzing and predicting the evolution of cis-regulatory regions requires an understanding of their positions in overlapping networks, as this placement constrains the available evolutionary pathways. PMID:26153861

  15. Relationships between probabilistic Boolean networks and dynamic Bayesian networks as models of gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Lähdesmäki, Harri; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Shmulevich, Ilya; Yli-Harja, Olli

    2006-01-01

    A significant amount of attention has recently been focused on modeling of gene regulatory networks. Two frequently used large-scale modeling frameworks are Bayesian networks (BNs) and Boolean networks, the latter one being a special case of its recent stochastic extension, probabilistic Boolean networks (PBNs). PBN is a promising model class that generalizes the standard rule-based interactions of Boolean networks into the stochastic setting. Dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs) is a general and versatile model class that is able to represent complex temporal stochastic processes and has also been proposed as a model for gene regulatory systems. In this paper, we concentrate on these two model classes and demonstrate that PBNs and a certain subclass of DBNs can represent the same joint probability distribution over their common variables. The major benefit of introducing the relationships between the models is that it opens up the possibility of applying the standard tools of DBNs to PBNs and vice versa. Hence, the standard learning tools of DBNs can be applied in the context of PBNs, and the inference methods give a natural way of handling the missing values in PBNs which are often present in gene expression measurements. Conversely, the tools for controlling the stationary behavior of the networks, tools for projecting networks onto sub-networks, and efficient learning schemes can be used for DBNs. In other words, the introduced relationships between the models extend the collection of analysis tools for both model classes. PMID:17415411

  16. Parallel logic gates in synthetic gene networks induced by non-Gaussian noise.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong; Jin, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Huiqing

    2013-11-01

    The recent idea of logical stochastic resonance is verified in synthetic gene networks induced by non-Gaussian noise. We realize the switching between two kinds of logic gates under optimal moderate noise intensity by varying two different tunable parameters in a single gene network. Furthermore, in order to obtain more logic operations, thus providing additional information processing capacity, we obtain in a two-dimensional toggle switch model two complementary logic gates and realize the transformation between two logic gates via the methods of changing different parameters. These simulated results contribute to improve the computational power and functionality of the networks.

  17. Assigning numbers to the arrows: Parameterizing a gene regulation network by using accurate expression kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronen, Michal; Rosenberg, Revital; Shraiman, Boris I.; Alon, Uri

    2002-08-01

    A basic challenge in systems biology is to understand the dynamical behavior of gene regulation networks. Current approaches aim at determining the network structure based on genomic-scale data. However, the network connectivity alone is not sufficient to define its dynamics; one needs to also specify the kinetic parameters for the regulation reactions. Here, we ask whether effective kinetic parameters can be assigned to a transcriptional network based on expression data. We present a combined experimental and theoretical approach based on accurate high temporal-resolution measurement of promoter activities from living cells by using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter plasmids. We present algorithms that use these data to assign effective kinetic parameters within a mathematical model of the network. To demonstrate this, we employ a well defined network, the SOS DNA repair system of Escherichia coli. We find a strikingly detailed temporal program of expression that correlates with the functional role of the SOS genes and is driven by a hierarchy of effective kinetic parameter strengths for the various promoters. The calculated parameters can be used to determine the kinetics of all SOS genes given the expression profile of just one representative, allowing a significant reduction in complexity. The concentration profile of the master SOS transcriptional repressor can be calculated, demonstrating that relative protein levels may be determined from purely transcriptional data. This finding opens the possibility of assigning kinetic parameters to transcriptional networks on a genomic scale.

  18. Differential network analysis from cross-platform gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Ou-Yang, Le; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Yan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the structure of gene dependency network changes between two patient-specific groups is an important task for genomic research. Although many computational approaches have been proposed to undertake this task, most of them estimate correlation networks from group-specific gene expression data independently without considering the common structure shared between different groups. In addition, with the development of high-throughput technologies, we can collect gene expression profiles of same patients from multiple platforms. Therefore, inferring differential networks by considering cross-platform gene expression profiles will improve the reliability of network inference. We introduce a two dimensional joint graphical lasso (TDJGL) model to simultaneously estimate group-specific gene dependency networks from gene expression profiles collected from different platforms and infer differential networks. TDJGL can borrow strength across different patient groups and data platforms to improve the accuracy of estimated networks. Simulation studies demonstrate that TDJGL provides more accurate estimates of gene networks and differential networks than previous competing approaches. We apply TDJGL to the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in ovarian tumors to build differential networks associated with platinum resistance. The hub genes of our inferred differential networks are significantly enriched with known platinum resistance-related genes and include potential platinum resistance-related genes. PMID:27677586

  19. Knockdown of mental disorder susceptibility genes disrupts neuronal network physiology in vitro.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, Erik J; Charlesworth, Paul; Coba, Marcelo P; Grant, Seth G N

    2011-06-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are common diseases caused by multiple genes that disrupt brain circuits. While great progress has been made in identifying schizophrenia susceptibility genes, these studies have left two major unanswered mechanistic questions: is there a core biochemical mechanism that these genes regulate, and what are the electrophysiological consequences of the altered gene expression? Because clinical studies implicate abnormalities in neuronal networks, we developed a system for studying the neurophysiology of neuronal networks in vitro where the role of candidate disease genes can be rapidly assayed. Using this system we focused on three postsynaptic proteins DISC1, TNIK and PSD-93/DLG2 each of which is encoded by a schizophrenia susceptibility gene. We also examined the utility of this assay system in bipolar disorder (BD), which has a strong genetic overlap with schizophrenia, by examining the bipolar disorder susceptibility gene Dctn5. The global neuronal network firing behavior of primary cultures of mouse hippocampus neurons was examined on multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) and genes of interest were knocked down using RNAi interference. Measurement of multiple neural network parameters demonstrated phenotypes for these genes compared with controls. Moreover, the different genes disrupted network properties and showed distinct and overlapping effects. These data show multiple susceptibility genes for complex psychiatric disorders, regulate neural network physiology and demonstrate a new assay system with wide application. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Paper-based Synthetic Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pardee, Keith; Green, Alexander A.; Ferrante, Tom; Cameron, D. Ewen; DaleyKeyser, Ajay; Yin, Peng; Collins, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic gene networks have wide-ranging uses in reprogramming and rewiring organisms. To date, there has not been a way to harness the vast potential of these networks beyond the constraints of a laboratory or in vivo environment. Here, we present an in vitro paper-based platform that provides a new venue for synthetic biologists to operate, and a much-needed medium for the safe deployment of engineered gene circuits beyond the lab. Commercially available cell-free systems are freeze-dried onto paper, enabling the inexpensive, sterile and abiotic distribution of synthetic biology-based technologies for the clinic, global health, industry, research and education. For field use, we create circuits with colorimetric outputs for detection by eye, and fabricate a low-cost, electronic optical interface. We demonstrate this technology with small molecule and RNA actuation of genetic switches, rapid prototyping of complex gene circuits, and programmable in vitro diagnostics, including glucose sensors and strain-specific Ebola virus sensors. PMID:25417167

  1. Paper-based synthetic gene networks.

    PubMed

    Pardee, Keith; Green, Alexander A; Ferrante, Tom; Cameron, D Ewen; DaleyKeyser, Ajay; Yin, Peng; Collins, James J

    2014-11-06

    Synthetic gene networks have wide-ranging uses in reprogramming and rewiring organisms. To date, there has not been a way to harness the vast potential of these networks beyond the constraints of a laboratory or in vivo environment. Here, we present an in vitro paper-based platform that provides an alternate, versatile venue for synthetic biologists to operate and a much-needed medium for the safe deployment of engineered gene circuits beyond the lab. Commercially available cell-free systems are freeze dried onto paper, enabling the inexpensive, sterile, and abiotic distribution of synthetic-biology-based technologies for the clinic, global health, industry, research, and education. For field use, we create circuits with colorimetric outputs for detection by eye and fabricate a low-cost, electronic optical interface. We demonstrate this technology with small-molecule and RNA actuation of genetic switches, rapid prototyping of complex gene circuits, and programmable in vitro diagnostics, including glucose sensors and strain-specific Ebola virus sensors.

  2. Construction of Gene Regulatory Networks Using Recurrent Neural Networks and Swarm Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abhinandan; Mandal, Sudip; Pal, Rajat Kumar; Saha, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed a methodology for the reverse engineering of biologically plausible gene regulatory networks from temporal genetic expression data. We have used established information and the fundamental mathematical theory for this purpose. We have employed the Recurrent Neural Network formalism to extract the underlying dynamics present in the time series expression data accurately. We have introduced a new hybrid swarm intelligence framework for the accurate training of the model parameters. The proposed methodology has been first applied to a small artificial network, and the results obtained suggest that it can produce the best results available in the contemporary literature, to the best of our knowledge. Subsequently, we have implemented our proposed framework on experimental (in vivo) datasets. Finally, we have investigated two medium sized genetic networks (in silico) extracted from GeneNetWeaver, to understand how the proposed algorithm scales up with network size. Additionally, we have implemented our proposed algorithm with half the number of time points. The results indicate that a reduction of 50% in the number of time points does not have an effect on the accuracy of the proposed methodology significantly, with a maximum of just over 15% deterioration in the worst case.

  3. Construction of Gene Regulatory Networks Using Recurrent Neural Networks and Swarm Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abhinandan; Mandal, Sudip; Pal, Rajat Kumar; Saha, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed a methodology for the reverse engineering of biologically plausible gene regulatory networks from temporal genetic expression data. We have used established information and the fundamental mathematical theory for this purpose. We have employed the Recurrent Neural Network formalism to extract the underlying dynamics present in the time series expression data accurately. We have introduced a new hybrid swarm intelligence framework for the accurate training of the model parameters. The proposed methodology has been first applied to a small artificial network, and the results obtained suggest that it can produce the best results available in the contemporary literature, to the best of our knowledge. Subsequently, we have implemented our proposed framework on experimental (in vivo) datasets. Finally, we have investigated two medium sized genetic networks (in silico) extracted from GeneNetWeaver, to understand how the proposed algorithm scales up with network size. Additionally, we have implemented our proposed algorithm with half the number of time points. The results indicate that a reduction of 50% in the number of time points does not have an effect on the accuracy of the proposed methodology significantly, with a maximum of just over 15% deterioration in the worst case. PMID:27298752

  4. Chaotic Motifs in Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Ye, Weiming; Qian, Yu; Zheng, Zhigang; Huang, Xuhui; Hu, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Chaos should occur often in gene regulatory networks (GRNs) which have been widely described by nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, if their dimensions are no less than 3. It is therefore puzzling that chaos has never been reported in GRNs in nature and is also extremely rare in models of GRNs. On the other hand, the topic of motifs has attracted great attention in studying biological networks, and network motifs are suggested to be elementary building blocks that carry out some key functions in the network. In this paper, chaotic motifs (subnetworks with chaos) in GRNs are systematically investigated. The conclusion is that: (i) chaos can only appear through competitions between different oscillatory modes with rivaling intensities. Conditions required for chaotic GRNs are found to be very strict, which make chaotic GRNs extremely rare. (ii) Chaotic motifs are explored as the simplest few-node structures capable of producing chaos, and serve as the intrinsic source of chaos of random few-node GRNs. Several optimal motifs causing chaos with atypically high probability are figured out. (iii) Moreover, we discovered that a number of special oscillators can never produce chaos. These structures bring some advantages on rhythmic functions and may help us understand the robustness of diverse biological rhythms. (iv) The methods of dominant phase-advanced driving (DPAD) and DPAD time fraction are proposed to quantitatively identify chaotic motifs and to explain the origin of chaotic behaviors in GRNs. PMID:22792171

  5. Chaotic motifs in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Ye, Weiming; Qian, Yu; Zheng, Zhigang; Huang, Xuhui; Hu, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Chaos should occur often in gene regulatory networks (GRNs) which have been widely described by nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, if their dimensions are no less than 3. It is therefore puzzling that chaos has never been reported in GRNs in nature and is also extremely rare in models of GRNs. On the other hand, the topic of motifs has attracted great attention in studying biological networks, and network motifs are suggested to be elementary building blocks that carry out some key functions in the network. In this paper, chaotic motifs (subnetworks with chaos) in GRNs are systematically investigated. The conclusion is that: (i) chaos can only appear through competitions between different oscillatory modes with rivaling intensities. Conditions required for chaotic GRNs are found to be very strict, which make chaotic GRNs extremely rare. (ii) Chaotic motifs are explored as the simplest few-node structures capable of producing chaos, and serve as the intrinsic source of chaos of random few-node GRNs. Several optimal motifs causing chaos with atypically high probability are figured out. (iii) Moreover, we discovered that a number of special oscillators can never produce chaos. These structures bring some advantages on rhythmic functions and may help us understand the robustness of diverse biological rhythms. (iv) The methods of dominant phase-advanced driving (DPAD) and DPAD time fraction are proposed to quantitatively identify chaotic motifs and to explain the origin of chaotic behaviors in GRNs.

  6. Integration of biological networks and gene expression data using Cytoscape

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Melissa S; Smoot, Michael; Cerami, Ethan; Kuchinsky, Allan; Landys, Nerius; Workman, Chris; Christmas, Rowan; Avila-Campilo, Iliana; Creech, Michael; Gross, Benjamin; Hanspers, Kristina; Isserlin, Ruth; Kelley, Ryan; Killcoyne, Sarah; Lotia, Samad; Maere, Steven; Morris, John; Ono, Keiichiro; Pavlovic, Vuk; Pico, Alexander R; Vailaya, Aditya; Wang, Peng-Liang; Adler, Annette; Conklin, Bruce R; Hood, Leroy; Kuiper, Martin; Sander, Chris; Schmulevich, Ilya; Schwikowski, Benno; Warner, Guy J; Ideker, Trey; Bader, Gary D

    2013-01-01

    Cytoscape is a free software package for visualizing, modeling and analyzing molecular and genetic interaction networks. This protocol explains how to use Cytoscape to analyze the results of mRNA expression profiling, and other functional genomics and proteomics experiments, in the context of an interaction network obtained for genes of interest. Five major steps are described: (i) obtaining a gene or protein network, (ii) displaying the network using layout algorithms, (iii) integrating with gene expression and other functional attributes, (iv) identifying putative complexes and functional modules and (v) identifying enriched Gene Ontology annotations in the network. These steps provide a broad sample of the types of analyses performed by Cytoscape. PMID:17947979

  7. Tensor methods for parameter estimation and bifurcation analysis of stochastic reaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Shuohao; Vejchodský, Tomáš; Erban, Radek

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic modelling of gene regulatory networks provides an indispensable tool for understanding how random events at the molecular level influence cellular functions. A common challenge of stochastic models is to calibrate a large number of model parameters against the experimental data. Another difficulty is to study how the behaviour of a stochastic model depends on its parameters, i.e. whether a change in model parameters can lead to a significant qualitative change in model behaviour (bifurcation). In this paper, tensor-structured parametric analysis (TPA) is developed to address these computational challenges. It is based on recently proposed low-parametric tensor-structured representations of classical matrices and vectors. This approach enables simultaneous computation of the model properties for all parameter values within a parameter space. The TPA is illustrated by studying the parameter estimation, robustness, sensitivity and bifurcation structure in stochastic models of biochemical networks. A Matlab implementation of the TPA is available at http://www.stobifan.org. PMID:26063822

  8. Estimating Gene Regulatory Networks with pandaR.

    PubMed

    Schlauch, Daniel; Paulson, Joseph N; Young, Albert; Glass, Kimberly; Quackenbush, John

    2017-03-11

    PANDA (Passing Attributes betweenNetworks forData Assimilation) is a gene regulatory network inference method that begins with amodel of transcription factor-target gene interactions and usesmessage passing to update the network model given available transcriptomic and protein-protein interaction data. PANDA is used to estimate networks for each experimental group and the network models are then compared between groups to explore transcriptional processes that distinguish the groups. We present pandaR (bioconductor.org/packages/pandaR), a Bioconductor package that implements PANDA and provides a framework for exploratory data analysis on gene regulatory networks.

  9. Next-Generation Synthetic Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Timothy K.; Khalil, Ahmad S.; Collins, James J.

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic biology is focused on the rational construction of biological systems based on engineering principles. During the field’s first decade of development, significant progress has been made in designing biological parts and assembling them into genetic circuits to achieve basic functionalities. These circuits have been used to construct proof-of-principle systems with promising results in industrial and medical applications. However, advances in synthetic biology have been limited by a lack of interoperable parts, techniques for dynamically probing biological systems, and frameworks for the reliable construction and operation of complex, higher-order networks. Here, we highlight challenges and goals for next-generation synthetic gene networks, in the context of potential applications in medicine, biotechnology, bioremediation, and bioenergy. PMID:20010597

  10. Next-generation synthetic gene networks.

    PubMed

    Lu, Timothy K; Khalil, Ahmad S; Collins, James J

    2009-12-01

    Synthetic biology is focused on the rational construction of biological systems based on engineering principles. During the field's first decade of development, significant progress has been made in designing biological parts and assembling them into genetic circuits to achieve basic functionalities. These circuits have been used to construct proof-of-principle systems with promising results in industrial and medical applications. However, advances in synthetic biology have been limited by a lack of interoperable parts, techniques for dynamically probing biological systems and frameworks for the reliable construction and operation of complex, higher-order networks. As these challenges are addressed, synthetic biologists will be able to construct useful next-generation synthetic gene networks with real-world applications in medicine, biotechnology, bioremediation and bioenergy.

  11. Pathway-Dependent Effectiveness of Network Algorithms for Gene Prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jung Eun; Hwang, Sohyun; Lee, Insuk

    2015-01-01

    A network-based approach has proven useful for the identification of novel genes associated with complex phenotypes, including human diseases. Because network-based gene prioritization algorithms are based on propagating information of known phenotype-associated genes through networks, the pathway structure of each phenotype might significantly affect the effectiveness of algorithms. We systematically compared two popular network algorithms with distinct mechanisms – direct neighborhood which propagates information to only direct network neighbors, and network diffusion which diffuses information throughout the entire network – in prioritization of genes for worm and human phenotypes. Previous studies reported that network diffusion generally outperforms direct neighborhood for human diseases. Although prioritization power is generally measured for all ranked genes, only the top candidates are significant for subsequent functional analysis. We found that high prioritizing power of a network algorithm for all genes cannot guarantee successful prioritization of top ranked candidates for a given phenotype. Indeed, the majority of the phenotypes that were more efficiently prioritized by network diffusion showed higher prioritizing power for top candidates by direct neighborhood. We also found that connectivity among pathway genes for each phenotype largely determines which network algorithm is more effective, suggesting that the network algorithm used for each phenotype should be chosen with consideration of pathway gene connectivity. PMID:26091506

  12. NetDecoder: a network biology platform that decodes context-specific biological networks and gene activities.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Ung, Choong Yong; McGehee, Cordelia D; Correia, Cristina; Li, Hu

    2016-06-02

    The sequential chain of interactions altering the binary state of a biomolecule represents the 'information flow' within a cellular network that determines phenotypic properties. Given the lack of computational tools to dissect context-dependent networks and gene activities, we developed NetDecoder, a network biology platform that models context-dependent information flows using pairwise phenotypic comparative analyses of protein-protein interactions. Using breast cancer, dyslipidemia and Alzheimer's disease as case studies, we demonstrate NetDecoder dissects subnetworks to identify key players significantly impacting cell behaviour specific to a given disease context. We further show genes residing in disease-specific subnetworks are enriched in disease-related signalling pathways and information flow profiles, which drive the resulting disease phenotypes. We also devise a novel scoring scheme to quantify key genes-network routers, which influence many genes, key targets, which are influenced by many genes, and high impact genes, which experience a significant change in regulation. We show the robustness of our results against parameter changes. Our network biology platform includes freely available source code (http://www.NetDecoder.org) for researchers to explore genome-wide context-dependent information flow profiles and key genes, given a set of genes of particular interest and transcriptome data. More importantly, NetDecoder will enable researchers to uncover context-dependent drug targets. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Gene network dynamics controlling keratinocyte migration

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Hauke; Camacho-Trullio, David; Rogon, Zbigniew; Breuhahn, Kai; Angel, Peter; Eils, Roland; Szabowski, Axel

    2008-01-01

    Translation of large-scale data into a coherent model that allows one to simulate, predict and control cellular behavior is far from being resolved. Assuming that long-term cellular behavior is reflected in the gene expression kinetics, we infer a dynamic gene regulatory network from time-series measurements of DNA microarray data of hepatocyte growth factor-induced migration of primary human keratinocytes. Transferring the obtained interactions to the level of signaling pathways, we predict in silico and verify in vitro the necessary and sufficient time-ordered events that control migration. We show that pulse-like activation of the proto-oncogene receptor Met triggers a responsive state, whereas time sequential activation of EGF-R is required to initiate and maintain migration. Context information for enhancing, delaying or stopping migration is provided by the activity of the protein kinase A signaling pathway. Our study reveals the complex orchestration of multiple pathways controlling cell migration. PMID:18594517

  14. Biomarker Gene Signature Discovery Integrating Network Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Cun, Yupeng; Fröhlich, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Discovery of prognostic and diagnostic biomarker gene signatures for diseases, such as cancer, is seen as a major step towards a better personalized medicine. During the last decade various methods, mainly coming from the machine learning or statistical domain, have been proposed for that purpose. However, one important obstacle for making gene signatures a standard tool in clinical diagnosis is the typical low reproducibility of these signatures combined with the difficulty to achieve a clear biological interpretation. For that purpose in the last years there has been a growing interest in approaches that try to integrate information from molecular interaction networks. Here we review the current state of research in this field by giving an overview about so-far proposed approaches. PMID:24832044

  15. Statistical inference of transcriptional module-based gene networks from time course gene expression profiles by using state space models.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Osamu; Yoshida, Ryo; Imoto, Seiya; Yamaguchi, Rui; Higuchi, Tomoyuki; Charnock-Jones, D Stephen; Print, Cristin; Miyano, Satoru

    2008-04-01

    Statistical inference of gene networks by using time-course microarray gene expression profiles is an essential step towards understanding the temporal structure of gene regulatory mechanisms. Unfortunately, most of the current studies have been limited to analysing a small number of genes because the length of time-course gene expression profiles is fairly short. One promising approach to overcome such a limitation is to infer gene networks by exploring the potential transcriptional modules which are sets of genes sharing a common function or involved in the same pathway. In this article, we present a novel approach based on the state space model to identify the transcriptional modules and module-based gene networks simultaneously. The state space model has the potential to infer large-scale gene networks, e.g. of order 10(3), from time-course gene expression profiles. Particularly, we succeeded in the identification of a cell cycle system by using the gene expression profiles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which the length of the time-course and number of genes were 24 and 4382, respectively. However, when analysing shorter time-course data, e.g. of length 10 or less, the parameter estimations of the state space model often fail due to overfitting. To extend the applicability of the state space model, we provide an approach to use the technical replicates of gene expression profiles, which are often measured in duplicate or triplicate. The use of technical replicates is important for achieving highly-efficient inferences of gene networks with short time-course data. The potential of the proposed method has been demonstrated through the time-course analysis of the gene expression profiles of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) undergoing growth factor deprivation-induced apoptosis. Supplementary Information and the software (TRANS-MNET) are available at http://daweb.ism.ac.jp/~yoshidar/software/ssm/.

  16. Discovering Implicit Entity Relation with the Gene-Citation-Gene Network

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min; Han, Nam-Gi; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Ding, Ying; Chambers, Tamy

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we apply the entitymetrics model to our constructed Gene-Citation-Gene (GCG) network. Based on the premise there is a hidden, but plausible, relationship between an entity in one article and an entity in its citing article, we constructed a GCG network of gene pairs implicitly connected through citation. We compare the performance of this GCG network to a gene-gene (GG) network constructed over the same corpus but which uses gene pairs explicitly connected through traditional co-occurrence. Using 331,411 MEDLINE abstracts collected from 18,323 seed articles and their references, we identify 25 gene pairs. A comparison of these pairs with interactions found in BioGRID reveal that 96% of the gene pairs in the GCG network have known interactions. We measure network performance using degree, weighted degree, closeness, betweenness centrality and PageRank. Combining all measures, we find the GCG network has more gene pairs, but a lower matching rate than the GG network. However, combining top ranked genes in both networks produces a matching rate of 35.53%. By visualizing both the GG and GCG networks, we find that cancer is the most dominant disease associated with the genes in both networks. Overall, the study indicates that the GCG network can be useful for detecting gene interaction in an implicit manner. PMID:24358368

  17. Variability of multifractal parameters in an urban precipitation monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licznar, Paweł; De Michele, Carlo; Dżugaj, Dagmara; Niesobska, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Precipitation especially over urban areas is considered a highly non-linear process, with wide variability over a broad range of temporal and spatial scales. Despite obvious limitations of rainfall gauges location at urban sites, rainfall monitoring by gauge networks is a standard solution of urban hydrology. Often urban precipitation gauge networks are formed by modern electronic gauges and connected to control units of centralized urban drainage systems. Precipitation data, recorded online through these gauge networks, are used in so called Real-Time-Control (RTC) systems for the development of optimal strategies of urban drainage outflows management. As a matter of fact, the operation of RTC systems is motivated mainly by the urge of reducing the severity of urban floods and combined sewerage overflows, but at the same time, it creates new valuable precipitation data sources. The variability of precipitation process could be achieved by investigating multifractal behavior displayed by the temporal structure of precipitation data. There are multiply scientific communications concerning multifractal properties of point-rainfall data from different worldwide locations. However, very little is known about the close variability of multifractal parameters among closely located gauges, at the distances of single kilometers. Having this in mind, here we assess the variability of multifractal parameters among gauges of the urban precipitation monitoring network in Warsaw, Poland. We base our analysis on the set of 1-minute rainfall time series recorded in the period 2008-2011 by 25 electronic weighing type gauges deployed around the city by the Municipal Water Supply and Sewerage Company in Warsaw as a part of local RTC system. The presence of scale invariance and multifractal properties in the precipitation process was investigated with spectral analysis, functional box counting method and studying the probability distributions and statistical moments of the rainfall

  18. Brief isoflurane anaesthesia affects differential gene expression, gene ontology and gene networks in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lowes, Damon A; Galley, Helen F; Moura, Alessandro P S; Webster, Nigel R

    2017-01-15

    Much is still unknown about the mechanisms of effects of even brief anaesthesia on the brain and previous studies have simply compared differential expression profiles with and without anaesthesia. We hypothesised that network analysis, in addition to the traditional differential gene expression and ontology analysis, would enable identification of the effects of anaesthesia on interactions between genes. Rats (n=10 per group) were randomised to anaesthesia with isoflurane in oxygen or oxygen only for 15min, and 6h later brains were removed. Differential gene expression and gene ontology analysis of microarray data was performed. Standard clustering techniques and principal component analysis with Bayesian rules were used along with social network analysis methods, to quantitatively model and describe the gene networks. Anaesthesia had marked effects on genes in the brain with differential regulation of 416 probe sets by at least 2 fold. Gene ontology analysis showed 23 genes were functionally related to the anaesthesia and of these, 12 were involved with neurotransmitter release, transport and secretion. Gene network analysis revealed much greater connectivity in genes from brains from anaesthetised rats compared to controls. Other importance measures were also altered after anaesthesia; median [range] closeness centrality (shortest path) was lower in anaesthetized animals (0.07 [0-0.30]) than controls (0.39 [0.30-0.53], p<0.0001) and betweenness centrality was higher (53.85 [32.56-70.00]% compared to 5.93 [0-30.65]%, p<0.0001). Simply studying the actions of individual components does not fully describe dynamic and complex systems. Network analysis allows insight into the interactions between genes after anaesthesia and suggests future targets for investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A study of structural properties of gene network graphs for mathematical modeling of integrated mosaic gene networks.

    PubMed

    Petrovskaya, Olga V; Petrovskiy, Evgeny D; Lavrik, Inna N; Ivanisenko, Vladimir A

    2017-04-01

    Gene network modeling is one of the widely used approaches in systems biology. It allows for the study of complex genetic systems function, including so-called mosaic gene networks, which consist of functionally interacting subnetworks. We conducted a study of a mosaic gene networks modeling method based on integration of models of gene subnetworks by linear control functionals. An automatic modeling of 10,000 synthetic mosaic gene regulatory networks was carried out using computer experiments on gene knockdowns/knockouts. Structural analysis of graphs of generated mosaic gene regulatory networks has revealed that the most important factor for building accurate integrated mathematical models, among those analyzed in the study, is data on expression of genes corresponding to the vertices with high properties of centrality.

  20. NetDecoder: a network biology platform that decodes context-specific biological networks and gene activities

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Ung, Choong Yong; McGehee, Cordelia D.; Correia, Cristina; Li, Hu

    2016-01-01

    The sequential chain of interactions altering the binary state of a biomolecule represents the ‘information flow’ within a cellular network that determines phenotypic properties. Given the lack of computational tools to dissect context-dependent networks and gene activities, we developed NetDecoder, a network biology platform that models context-dependent information flows using pairwise phenotypic comparative analyses of protein–protein interactions. Using breast cancer, dyslipidemia and Alzheimer's disease as case studies, we demonstrate NetDecoder dissects subnetworks to identify key players significantly impacting cell behaviour specific to a given disease context. We further show genes residing in disease-specific subnetworks are enriched in disease-related signalling pathways and information flow profiles, which drive the resulting disease phenotypes. We also devise a novel scoring scheme to quantify key genes—network routers, which influence many genes, key targets, which are influenced by many genes, and high impact genes, which experience a significant change in regulation. We show the robustness of our results against parameter changes. Our network biology platform includes freely available source code (http://www.NetDecoder.org) for researchers to explore genome-wide context-dependent information flow profiles and key genes, given a set of genes of particular interest and transcriptome data. More importantly, NetDecoder will enable researchers to uncover context-dependent drug targets. PMID:26975659

  1. An efficient automated parameter tuning framework for spiking neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Kristofor D.; Nageswaran, Jayram Moorkanikara; Dutt, Nikil; Krichmar, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    As the desire for biologically realistic spiking neural networks (SNNs) increases, tuning the enormous number of open parameters in these models becomes a difficult challenge. SNNs have been used to successfully model complex neural circuits that explore various neural phenomena such as neural plasticity, vision systems, auditory systems, neural oscillations, and many other important topics of neural function. Additionally, SNNs are particularly well-adapted to run on neuromorphic hardware that will support biological brain-scale architectures. Although the inclusion of realistic plasticity equations, neural dynamics, and recurrent topologies has increased the descriptive power of SNNs, it has also made the task of tuning these biologically realistic SNNs difficult. To meet this challenge, we present an automated parameter tuning framework capable of tuning SNNs quickly and efficiently using evolutionary algorithms (EA) and inexpensive, readily accessible graphics processing units (GPUs). A sample SNN with 4104 neurons was tuned to give V1 simple cell-like tuning curve responses and produce self-organizing receptive fields (SORFs) when presented with a random sequence of counterphase sinusoidal grating stimuli. A performance analysis comparing the GPU-accelerated implementation to a single-threaded central processing unit (CPU) implementation was carried out and showed a speedup of 65× of the GPU implementation over the CPU implementation, or 0.35 h per generation for GPU vs. 23.5 h per generation for CPU. Additionally, the parameter value solutions found in the tuned SNN were studied and found to be stable and repeatable. The automated parameter tuning framework presented here will be of use to both the computational neuroscience and neuromorphic engineering communities, making the process of constructing and tuning large-scale SNNs much quicker and easier. PMID:24550771

  2. An efficient automated parameter tuning framework for spiking neural networks.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Kristofor D; Nageswaran, Jayram Moorkanikara; Dutt, Nikil; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    As the desire for biologically realistic spiking neural networks (SNNs) increases, tuning the enormous number of open parameters in these models becomes a difficult challenge. SNNs have been used to successfully model complex neural circuits that explore various neural phenomena such as neural plasticity, vision systems, auditory systems, neural oscillations, and many other important topics of neural function. Additionally, SNNs are particularly well-adapted to run on neuromorphic hardware that will support biological brain-scale architectures. Although the inclusion of realistic plasticity equations, neural dynamics, and recurrent topologies has increased the descriptive power of SNNs, it has also made the task of tuning these biologically realistic SNNs difficult. To meet this challenge, we present an automated parameter tuning framework capable of tuning SNNs quickly and efficiently using evolutionary algorithms (EA) and inexpensive, readily accessible graphics processing units (GPUs). A sample SNN with 4104 neurons was tuned to give V1 simple cell-like tuning curve responses and produce self-organizing receptive fields (SORFs) when presented with a random sequence of counterphase sinusoidal grating stimuli. A performance analysis comparing the GPU-accelerated implementation to a single-threaded central processing unit (CPU) implementation was carried out and showed a speedup of 65× of the GPU implementation over the CPU implementation, or 0.35 h per generation for GPU vs. 23.5 h per generation for CPU. Additionally, the parameter value solutions found in the tuned SNN were studied and found to be stable and repeatable. The automated parameter tuning framework presented here will be of use to both the computational neuroscience and neuromorphic engineering communities, making the process of constructing and tuning large-scale SNNs much quicker and easier.

  3. Mechanistically Consistent Reduced Models of Synthetic Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mier-y-Terán-Romero, Luis; Silber, Mary; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2013-01-01

    Designing genetic networks with desired functionalities requires an accurate mathematical framework that accounts for the essential mechanistic details of the system. Here, we formulate a time-delay model of protein translation and mRNA degradation by systematically reducing a detailed mechanistic model that explicitly accounts for the ribosomal dynamics and the cleaving of mRNA by endonucleases. We exploit various technical and conceptual advantages that our time-delay model offers over the mechanistic model to probe the behavior of a self-repressing gene over wide regions of parameter space. We show that a heuristic time-delay model of protein synthesis of a commonly used form yields a notably different prediction for the parameter region where sustained oscillations occur. This suggests that such heuristics can lead to erroneous results. The functional forms that arise from our systematic reduction can be used for every system that involves transcription and translation and they could replace the commonly used heuristic time-delay models for these processes. The results from our analysis have important implications for the design of synthetic gene networks and stress that such design must be guided by a combination of heuristic models and mechanistic models that include all relevant details of the process. PMID:23663853

  4. Netter: re-ranking gene network inference predictions using structural network properties.

    PubMed

    Ruyssinck, Joeri; Demeester, Piet; Dhaene, Tom; Saeys, Yvan

    2016-02-09

    Many algorithms have been developed to infer the topology of gene regulatory networks from gene expression data. These methods typically produce a ranking of links between genes with associated confidence scores, after which a certain threshold is chosen to produce the inferred topology. However, the structural properties of the predicted network do not resemble those typical for a gene regulatory network, as most algorithms only take into account connections found in the data and do not include known graph properties in their inference process. This lowers the prediction accuracy of these methods, limiting their usability in practice. We propose a post-processing algorithm which is applicable to any confidence ranking of regulatory interactions obtained from a network inference method which can use, inter alia, graphlets and several graph-invariant properties to re-rank the links into a more accurate prediction. To demonstrate the potential of our approach, we re-rank predictions of six different state-of-the-art algorithms using three simple network properties as optimization criteria and show that Netter can improve the predictions made on both artificially generated data as well as the DREAM4 and DREAM5 benchmarks. Additionally, the DREAM5 E.coli. community prediction inferred from real expression data is further improved. Furthermore, Netter compares favorably to other post-processing algorithms and is not restricted to correlation-like predictions. Lastly, we demonstrate that the performance increase is robust for a wide range of parameter settings. Netter is available at http://bioinformatics.intec.ugent.be. Network inference from high-throughput data is a long-standing challenge. In this work, we present Netter, which can further refine network predictions based on a set of user-defined graph properties. Netter is a flexible system which can be applied in unison with any method producing a ranking from omics data. It can be tailored to specific prior

  5. Estimating genome-wide gene networks using nonparametric Bayesian network models on massively parallel computers.

    PubMed

    Tamada, Yoshinori; Imoto, Seiya; Araki, Hiromitsu; Nagasaki, Masao; Print, Cristin; Charnock-Jones, D Stephen; Miyano, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm to estimate genome-wide gene networks consisting of more than 20,000 genes from gene expression data using nonparametric Bayesian networks. Due to the difficulty of learning Bayesian network structures, existing algorithms cannot be applied to more than a few thousand genes. Our algorithm overcomes this limitation by repeatedly estimating subnetworks in parallel for genes selected by neighbor node sampling. Through numerical simulation, we confirmed that our algorithm outperformed a heuristic algorithm in a shorter time. We applied our algorithm to microarray data from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with siRNAs, to construct a human genome-wide gene network, which we compared to a small gene network estimated for the genes extracted using a traditional bioinformatics method. The results showed that our genome-wide gene network contains many features of the small network, as well as others that could not be captured during the small network estimation. The results also revealed master-regulator genes that are not in the small network but that control many of the genes in the small network. These analyses were impossible to realize without our proposed algorithm.

  6. Computation intelligent for eukaryotic cell-cycle gene network.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shinq-Jen; Wu, Cheng-Tao; Lee, Tsu-Tian

    2006-01-01

    Computational intelligent approaches is adopted to construct the S-system of eukaryotic cell cycle for further analysis of genetic regulatory networks. A highly nonlinear power-law differential equation is constructed to describe the transcriptional regulation of gene network from the time-courses dataset. Global artificial algorithm, based on hybrid differential evolution, can achieve global optimization for the highly nonlinear differential gene network modeling. The constructed gene regulatory networks will be a reference for researchers to realize the inhibitory and activatory operator for genes synthesis and decomposition in Eukaryotic cell cycle.

  7. Designing a parallel evolutionary algorithm for inferring gene networks on the cloud computing environment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To improve the tedious task of reconstructing gene networks through testing experimentally the possible interactions between genes, it becomes a trend to adopt the automated reverse engineering procedure instead. Some evolutionary algorithms have been suggested for deriving network parameters. However, to infer large networks by the evolutionary algorithm, it is necessary to address two important issues: premature convergence and high computational cost. To tackle the former problem and to enhance the performance of traditional evolutionary algorithms, it is advisable to use parallel model evolutionary algorithms. To overcome the latter and to speed up the computation, it is advocated to adopt the mechanism of cloud computing as a promising solution: most popular is the method of MapReduce programming model, a fault-tolerant framework to implement parallel algorithms for inferring large gene networks. Results This work presents a practical framework to infer large gene networks, by developing and parallelizing a hybrid GA-PSO optimization method. Our parallel method is extended to work with the Hadoop MapReduce programming model and is executed in different cloud computing environments. To evaluate the proposed approach, we use a well-known open-source software GeneNetWeaver to create several yeast S. cerevisiae sub-networks and use them to produce gene profiles. Experiments have been conducted and the results have been analyzed. They show that our parallel approach can be successfully used to infer networks with desired behaviors and the computation time can be largely reduced. Conclusions Parallel population-based algorithms can effectively determine network parameters and they perform better than the widely-used sequential algorithms in gene network inference. These parallel algorithms can be distributed to the cloud computing environment to speed up the computation. By coupling the parallel model population-based optimization method and the parallel

  8. Designing a parallel evolutionary algorithm for inferring gene networks on the cloud computing environment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Po; Hsiao, Yu-Ting; Hwang, Wei-Che

    2014-01-16

    To improve the tedious task of reconstructing gene networks through testing experimentally the possible interactions between genes, it becomes a trend to adopt the automated reverse engineering procedure instead. Some evolutionary algorithms have been suggested for deriving network parameters. However, to infer large networks by the evolutionary algorithm, it is necessary to address two important issues: premature convergence and high computational cost. To tackle the former problem and to enhance the performance of traditional evolutionary algorithms, it is advisable to use parallel model evolutionary algorithms. To overcome the latter and to speed up the computation, it is advocated to adopt the mechanism of cloud computing as a promising solution: most popular is the method of MapReduce programming model, a fault-tolerant framework to implement parallel algorithms for inferring large gene networks. This work presents a practical framework to infer large gene networks, by developing and parallelizing a hybrid GA-PSO optimization method. Our parallel method is extended to work with the Hadoop MapReduce programming model and is executed in different cloud computing environments. To evaluate the proposed approach, we use a well-known open-source software GeneNetWeaver to create several yeast S. cerevisiae sub-networks and use them to produce gene profiles. Experiments have been conducted and the results have been analyzed. They show that our parallel approach can be successfully used to infer networks with desired behaviors and the computation time can be largely reduced. Parallel population-based algorithms can effectively determine network parameters and they perform better than the widely-used sequential algorithms in gene network inference. These parallel algorithms can be distributed to the cloud computing environment to speed up the computation. By coupling the parallel model population-based optimization method and the parallel computational framework, high

  9. Network rewiring is an important mechanism of gene essentiality change

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinho; Kim, Inhae; Han, Seong Kyu; Bowie, James U.; Kim, Sanguk

    2012-01-01

    Gene essentiality changes are crucial for organismal evolution. However, it is unclear how essentiality of orthologs varies across species. We investigated the underlying mechanism of gene essentiality changes between yeast and mouse based on the framework of network evolution and comparative genomic analysis. We found that yeast nonessential genes become essential in mouse when their network connections rapidly increase through engagement in protein complexes. The increased interactions allowed the previously nonessential genes to become members of vital pathways. By accounting for changes in gene essentiality, we firmly reestablished the centrality-lethality rule, which proposed the relationship of essential genes and network hubs. Furthermore, we discovered that the number of connections associated with essential and non-essential genes depends on whether they were essential in ancestral species. Our study describes for the first time how network evolution occurs to change gene essentiality. PMID:23198090

  10. Gene Coexpression Network Analysis as a Source of Functional Annotation for Rice Genes

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Kevin L.; Davidson, Rebecca M.; Buell, C. Robin

    2011-01-01

    With the existence of large publicly available plant gene expression data sets, many groups have undertaken data analyses to construct gene coexpression networks and functionally annotate genes. Often, a large compendium of unrelated or condition-independent expression data is used to construct gene networks. Condition-dependent expression experiments consisting of well-defined conditions/treatments have also been used to create coexpression networks to help examine particular biological processes. Gene networks derived from either condition-dependent or condition-independent data can be difficult to interpret if a large number of genes and connections are present. However, algorithms exist to identify modules of highly connected and biologically relevant genes within coexpression networks. In this study, we have used publicly available rice (Oryza sativa) gene expression data to create gene coexpression networks using both condition-dependent and condition-independent data and have identified gene modules within these networks using the Weighted Gene Coexpression Network Analysis method. We compared the number of genes assigned to modules and the biological interpretability of gene coexpression modules to assess the utility of condition-dependent and condition-independent gene coexpression networks. For the purpose of providing functional annotation to rice genes, we found that gene modules identified by coexpression analysis of condition-dependent gene expression experiments to be more useful than gene modules identified by analysis of a condition-independent data set. We have incorporated our results into the MSU Rice Genome Annotation Project database as additional expression-based annotation for 13,537 genes, 2,980 of which lack a functional annotation description. These results provide two new types of functional annotation for our database. Genes in modules are now associated with groups of genes that constitute a collective functional annotation of those

  11. Reverse engineering gene networks: Integrating genetic perturbations with dynamical modeling

    PubMed Central

    Tegnér, Jesper; Yeung, M. K. Stephen; Hasty, Jeff; Collins, James J.

    2003-01-01

    While the fundamental building blocks of biology are being tabulated by the various genome projects, microarray technology is setting the stage for the task of deducing the connectivity of large-scale gene networks. We show how the perturbation of carefully chosen genes in a microarray experiment can be used in conjunction with a reverse engineering algorithm to reveal the architecture of an underlying gene regulatory network. Our iterative scheme identifies the network topology by analyzing the steady-state changes in gene expression resulting from the systematic perturbation of a particular node in the network. We highlight the validity of our reverse engineering approach through the successful deduction of the topology of a linear in numero gene network and a recently reported model for the segmentation polarity network in Drosophila melanogaster. Our method may prove useful in identifying and validating specific drug targets and in deconvolving the effects of chemical compounds. PMID:12730377

  12. Enhancing debris flow modeling parameters integrating Bayesian networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, C.; Stoffel, M.; Grêt-Regamey, A.

    2009-04-01

    Applied debris-flow modeling requires suitably constraint input parameter sets. Depending on the used model, there is a series of parameters to define before running the model. Normally, the data base describing the event, the initiation conditions, the flow behavior, the deposition process and mainly the potential range of possible debris flow events in a certain torrent is limited. There are only some scarce places in the world, where we fortunately can find valuable data sets describing event history of debris flow channels delivering information on spatial and temporal distribution of former flow paths and deposition zones. Tree-ring records in combination with detailed geomorphic mapping for instance provide such data sets over a long time span. Considering the significant loss potential associated with debris-flow disasters, it is crucial that decisions made in regard to hazard mitigation are based on a consistent assessment of the risks. This in turn necessitates a proper assessment of the uncertainties involved in the modeling of the debris-flow frequencies and intensities, the possible run out extent, as well as the estimations of the damage potential. In this study, we link a Bayesian network to a Geographic Information System in order to assess debris-flow risk. We identify the major sources of uncertainty and show the potential of Bayesian inference techniques to improve the debris-flow model. We model the flow paths and deposition zones of a highly active debris-flow channel in the Swiss Alps using the numerical 2-D model RAMMS. Because uncertainties in run-out areas cause large changes in risk estimations, we use the data of flow path and deposition zone information of reconstructed debris-flow events derived from dendrogeomorphological analysis covering more than 400 years to update the input parameters of the RAMMS model. The probabilistic model, which consistently incorporates this available information, can serve as a basis for spatial risk

  13. COXPRESdb: a database of coexpressed gene networks in mammals.

    PubMed

    Obayashi, Takeshi; Hayashi, Shinpei; Shibaoka, Masayuki; Saeki, Motoshi; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2008-01-01

    A database of coexpressed gene sets can provide valuable information for a wide variety of experimental designs, such as targeting of genes for functional identification, gene regulation and/or protein-protein interactions. Coexpressed gene databases derived from publicly available GeneChip data are widely used in Arabidopsis research, but platforms that examine coexpression for higher mammals are rather limited. Therefore, we have constructed a new database, COXPRESdb (coexpressed gene database) (http://coxpresdb.hgc.jp), for coexpressed gene lists and networks in human and mouse. Coexpression data could be calculated for 19 777 and 21 036 genes in human and mouse, respectively, by using the GeneChip data in NCBI GEO. COXPRESdb enables analysis of the four types of coexpression networks: (i) highly coexpressed genes for every gene, (ii) genes with the same GO annotation, (iii) genes expressed in the same tissue and (iv) user-defined gene sets. When the networks became too big for the static picture on the web in GO networks or in tissue networks, we used Google Maps API to visualize them interactively. COXPRESdb also provides a view to compare the human and mouse coexpression patterns to estimate the conservation between the two species.

  14. Network properties of human disease genes with pleiotropic effects

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The ability of a gene to cause a disease is known to be associated with the topological position of its protein product in the molecular interaction network. Pleiotropy, in human genetic diseases, refers to the ability of different mutations within the same gene to cause different pathological effects. Here, we hypothesized that the ability of human disease genes to cause pleiotropic effects would be associated with their network properties. Results Shared genes, with pleiotropic effects, were more central than specific genes that were associated with one disease, in the protein interaction network. Furthermore, shared genes associated with phenotypically divergent diseases (phenodiv genes) were more central than those associated with phenotypically similar diseases. Shared genes had a higher number of disease gene interactors compared to specific genes, implying higher likelihood of finding a novel disease gene in their network neighborhood. Shared genes had a relatively restricted tissue co-expression with interactors, contrary to specific genes. This could be a function of shared genes leading to pleiotropy. Essential and phenodiv genes had comparable connectivities and hence we investigated for differences in network attributes conferring lethality and pleiotropy, respectively. Essential and phenodiv genes were found to be intra-modular and inter-modular hubs with the former being highly co-expressed with their interactors contrary to the latter. Essential genes were predominantly nuclear proteins with transcriptional regulation activities while phenodiv genes were cytoplasmic proteins involved in signal transduction. Conclusion The properties of a disease gene in molecular interaction network determine its role in manifesting different and divergent diseases. PMID:20525321

  15. Hidden Markov induced Dynamic Bayesian Network for recovering time evolving gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shijia; Wang, Yadong

    2015-12-18

    Dynamic Bayesian Networks (DBN) have been widely used to recover gene regulatory relationships from time-series data in computational systems biology. Its standard assumption is 'stationarity', and therefore, several research efforts have been recently proposed to relax this restriction. However, those methods suffer from three challenges: long running time, low accuracy and reliance on parameter settings. To address these problems, we propose a novel non-stationary DBN model by extending each hidden node of Hidden Markov Model into a DBN (called HMDBN), which properly handles the underlying time-evolving networks. Correspondingly, an improved structural EM algorithm is proposed to learn the HMDBN. It dramatically reduces searching space, thereby substantially improving computational efficiency. Additionally, we derived a novel generalized Bayesian Information Criterion under the non-stationary assumption (called BWBIC), which can help significantly improve the reconstruction accuracy and largely reduce over-fitting. Moreover, the re-estimation formulas for all parameters of our model are derived, enabling us to avoid reliance on parameter settings. Compared to the state-of-the-art methods, the experimental evaluation of our proposed method on both synthetic and real biological data demonstrates more stably high prediction accuracy and significantly improved computation efficiency, even with no prior knowledge and parameter settings.

  16. Hidden Markov induced Dynamic Bayesian Network for recovering time evolving gene regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shijia; Wang, Yadong

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic Bayesian Networks (DBN) have been widely used to recover gene regulatory relationships from time-series data in computational systems biology. Its standard assumption is ‘stationarity’, and therefore, several research efforts have been recently proposed to relax this restriction. However, those methods suffer from three challenges: long running time, low accuracy and reliance on parameter settings. To address these problems, we propose a novel non-stationary DBN model by extending each hidden node of Hidden Markov Model into a DBN (called HMDBN), which properly handles the underlying time-evolving networks. Correspondingly, an improved structural EM algorithm is proposed to learn the HMDBN. It dramatically reduces searching space, thereby substantially improving computational efficiency. Additionally, we derived a novel generalized Bayesian Information Criterion under the non-stationary assumption (called BWBIC), which can help significantly improve the reconstruction accuracy and largely reduce over-fitting. Moreover, the re-estimation formulas for all parameters of our model are derived, enabling us to avoid reliance on parameter settings. Compared to the state-of-the-art methods, the experimental evaluation of our proposed method on both synthetic and real biological data demonstrates more stably high prediction accuracy and significantly improved computation efficiency, even with no prior knowledge and parameter settings.

  17. Gene Network Landscape of the Ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Lu, Xingyi; Chang, Yue; Liu, Yifan; Fu, Chengjie; Pearlman, Ronald E.; Miao, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Background Genome-wide expression data of gene microarrays can be used to infer gene networks. At a cellular level, a gene network provides a picture of the modules in which genes are densely connected, and of the hub genes, which are highly connected with other genes. A gene network is useful to identify the genes involved in the same pathway, in a protein complex or that are co-regulated. In this study, we used different methods to find gene networks in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, and describe some important properties of this network, such as modules and hubs. Methodology/Principal Findings Using 67 single channel microarrays, we constructed the Tetrahymena gene network (TGN) using three methods: the Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC), the Spearman correlation coefficient (SCC) and the context likelihood of relatedness (CLR) algorithm. The accuracy and coverage of the three networks were evaluated using four conserved protein complexes in yeast. The CLR network with a Z-score threshold 3.49 was determined to be the most robust. The TGN was partitioned, and 55 modules were found. In addition, analysis of the arbitrarily determined 1200 hubs showed that these hubs could be sorted into six groups according to their expression profiles. We also investigated human disease orthologs in Tetrahymena that are missing in yeast and provide evidence indicating that some of these are involved in the same process in Tetrahymena as in human. Conclusions/Significance This study constructed a Tetrahymena gene network, provided new insights to the properties of this biological network, and presents an important resource to study Tetrahymena genes at the pathway level. PMID:21637855

  18. A Comprehensive Evaluation of Disease Phenotype Networks for Gene Prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianhua; Lin, Xiaoyan; Teng, Yueyang; Qi, Shouliang; Xiao, Dayu; Zhang, Jianying; Kang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Identification of disease-causing genes is a fundamental challenge for human health studies. The phenotypic similarity among diseases may reflect the interactions at the molecular level, and phenotype comparison can be used to predict disease candidate genes. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a database of human genetic diseases and related genes that has become an authoritative source of disease phenotypes. However, disease phenotypes have been described by free text; thus, standardization of phenotypic descriptions is needed before diseases can be compared. Several disease phenotype networks have been established in OMIM using different standardization methods. Two of these networks are important for phenotypic similarity analysis: the first and most commonly used network (mimMiner) is standardized by medical subject heading, and the other network (resnikHPO) is the first to be standardized by human phenotype ontology. This paper comprehensively evaluates for the first time the accuracy of these two networks in gene prioritization based on protein–protein interactions using large-scale, leave-one-out cross-validation experiments. The results show that both networks can effectively prioritize disease-causing genes, and the approach that relates two diseases using a logistic function improves prioritization performance. Tanimoto, one of four methods for normalizing resnikHPO, generates a symmetric network and it performs similarly to mimMiner. Furthermore, an integration of these two networks outperforms either network alone in gene prioritization, indicating that these two disease networks are complementary. PMID:27415759

  19. The Max-Min High-Order Dynamic Bayesian Network for Learning Gene Regulatory Networks with Time-Delayed Regulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifeng; Chen, Haifen; Zheng, Jie; Ngom, Alioune

    2016-01-01

    Accurately reconstructing gene regulatory network (GRN) from gene expression data is a challenging task in systems biology. Although some progresses have been made, the performance of GRN reconstruction still has much room for improvement. Because many regulatory events are asynchronous, learning gene interactions with multiple time delays is an effective way to improve the accuracy of GRN reconstruction. Here, we propose a new approach, called Max-Min high-order dynamic Bayesian network (MMHO-DBN) by extending the Max-Min hill-climbing Bayesian network technique originally devised for learning a Bayesian network's structure from static data. Our MMHO-DBN can explicitly model the time lags between regulators and targets in an efficient manner. It first uses constraint-based ideas to limit the space of potential structures, and then applies search-and-score ideas to search for an optimal HO-DBN structure. The performance of MMHO-DBN to GRN reconstruction was evaluated using both synthetic and real gene expression time-series data. Results show that MMHO-DBN is more accurate than current time-delayed GRN learning methods, and has an intermediate computing performance. Furthermore, it is able to learn long time-delayed relationships between genes. We applied sensitivity analysis on our model to study the performance variation along different parameter settings. The result provides hints on the setting of parameters of MMHO-DBN.

  20. Trainable Gene Regulation Networks with Applications to Drosophila Pattern Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mjolsness, Eric

    2000-01-01

    This chapter will very briefly introduce and review some computational experiments in using trainable gene regulation network models to simulate and understand selected episodes in the development of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. For details the reader is referred to the papers introduced below. It will then introduce a new gene regulation network model which can describe promoter-level substructure in gene regulation. As described in chapter 2, gene regulation may be thought of as a combination of cis-acting regulation by the extended promoter of a gene (including all regulatory sequences) by way of the transcription complex, and of trans-acting regulation by the transcription factor products of other genes. If we simplify the cis-action by using a phenomenological model which can be tuned to data, such as a unit or other small portion of an artificial neural network, then the full transacting interaction between multiple genes during development can be modelled as a larger network which can again be tuned or trained to data. The larger network will in general need to have recurrent (feedback) connections since at least some real gene regulation networks do. This is the basic modeling approach taken, which describes how a set of recurrent neural networks can be used as a modeling language for multiple developmental processes including gene regulation within a single cell, cell-cell communication, and cell division. Such network models have been called "gene circuits", "gene regulation networks", or "genetic regulatory networks", sometimes without distinguishing the models from the actual modeled systems.

  1. Determination of the CMSSM parameters using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornhauser, Nicki; Drees, Manuel

    2013-10-01

    In most (weakly interacting) extensions of the Standard Model the relation mapping the parameter values onto experimentally measurable quantities can be computed (with some uncertainties), but the inverse relation is usually not known. In this paper we demonstrate the ability of artificial neural networks to find this unknown relation, by determining the unknown parameters of the constrained minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model from quantities that can be measured at the LHC. We expect that the method works also for many other new physics models. We compare its performance with the results of a straightforward χ2 minimization. We simulate LHC signals at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV at the hadron level. In this proof-of-concept study we do not explicitly simulate Standard Model backgrounds, but apply cuts that have been shown to enhance the signal-to-background ratio. We analyze four different benchmark points that lie just beyond current lower limits on superparticle masses, each of which leads to around 1000 events after cuts for an integrated luminosity of 10fb-1. We use up to 84 observables, most of which are counting observables; we do not attempt to directly reconstruct (differences of) masses from kinematic edges or kinks of distributions. We nevertheless find that m0 and m1/2 can be determined reliably, with errors as small as 1% in some cases. With 500fb-1 of data tan⁡β as well as A0 can also be determined quite accurately. For comparable computational effort the χ2 minimization yielded much worse results.

  2. Gene Coexpression Network Topology of Cardiac Development, Hypertrophy, and Failure

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, Frederick E.; Perez, Marco V.; Wheeler, Matthew T.; Watt, Clifton; Spin, Joshua; Langfelder, Peter; Horvath, Stephen; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Cappola, Thomas P.; Ashley, Euan A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Network analysis techniques allow a more accurate reflection of underlying systems biology to be realized than traditional unidimensional molecular biology approaches. Here, using gene coexpression network analysis, we define the gene expression network topology of cardiac hypertrophy and failure and the extent of recapitulation of fetal gene expression programs in failing and hypertrophied adult myocardium. Methods and Results We assembled all myocardial transcript data in the Gene Expression Omnibus (n = 1617). Since hierarchical analysis revealed species had primacy over disease clustering, we focused this analysis on the most complete (murine) dataset (n = 478). Using gene coexpression network analysis, we derived functional modules, regulatory mediators and higher order topological relationships between genes and identified 50 gene co-expression modules in developing myocardium that were not present in normal adult tissue. We found that known gene expression markers of myocardial adaptation were members of upregulated modules but not hub genes. We identified ZIC2 as a novel transcription factor associated with coexpression modules common to developing and failing myocardium. Of 50 fetal gene co-expression modules, three (6%) were reproduced in hypertrophied myocardium and seven (14%) were reproduced in failing myocardium. One fetal module was common to both failing and hypertrophied myocardium. Conclusions Network modeling allows systems analysis of cardiovascular development and disease. While we did not find evidence for a global coordinated program of fetal gene expression in adult myocardial adaptation, our analysis revealed specific gene expression modules active during both development and disease and specific candidates for their regulation. PMID:21127201

  3. On the robustness of complex heterogeneous gene expression networks.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Moreno, Yamir; Floría, Luis M

    2005-04-01

    We analyze a continuous gene expression model on the underlying topology of a complex heterogeneous network. Numerical simulations aimed at studying the chaotic and periodic dynamics of the model are performed. The results clearly indicate that there is a region in which the dynamical and structural complexity of the system avoid chaotic attractors. However, contrary to what has been reported for Random Boolean Networks, the chaotic phase cannot be completely suppressed, which has important bearings on network robustness and gene expression modeling.

  4. Efficient Reverse-Engineering of a Developmental Gene Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Cicin-Sain, Damjan; Ashyraliyev, Maksat; Jaeger, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the complex regulatory networks underlying development and evolution of multi-cellular organisms is a major problem in biology. Computational models can be used as tools to extract the regulatory structure and dynamics of such networks from gene expression data. This approach is called reverse engineering. It has been successfully applied to many gene networks in various biological systems. However, to reconstitute the structure and non-linear dynamics of a developmental gene network in its spatial context remains a considerable challenge. Here, we address this challenge using a case study: the gap gene network involved in segment determination during early development of Drosophila melanogaster. A major problem for reverse-engineering pattern-forming networks is the significant amount of time and effort required to acquire and quantify spatial gene expression data. We have developed a simplified data processing pipeline that considerably increases the throughput of the method, but results in data of reduced accuracy compared to those previously used for gap gene network inference. We demonstrate that we can infer the correct network structure using our reduced data set, and investigate minimal data requirements for successful reverse engineering. Our results show that timing and position of expression domain boundaries are the crucial features for determining regulatory network structure from data, while it is less important to precisely measure expression levels. Based on this, we define minimal data requirements for gap gene network inference. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of reverse-engineering with much reduced experimental effort. This enables more widespread use of the method in different developmental contexts and organisms. Such systematic application of data-driven models to real-world networks has enormous potential. Only the quantitative investigation of a large number of developmental gene regulatory networks will allow us to

  5. Efficient reverse-engineering of a developmental gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Crombach, Anton; Wotton, Karl R; Cicin-Sain, Damjan; Ashyraliyev, Maksat; Jaeger, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the complex regulatory networks underlying development and evolution of multi-cellular organisms is a major problem in biology. Computational models can be used as tools to extract the regulatory structure and dynamics of such networks from gene expression data. This approach is called reverse engineering. It has been successfully applied to many gene networks in various biological systems. However, to reconstitute the structure and non-linear dynamics of a developmental gene network in its spatial context remains a considerable challenge. Here, we address this challenge using a case study: the gap gene network involved in segment determination during early development of Drosophila melanogaster. A major problem for reverse-engineering pattern-forming networks is the significant amount of time and effort required to acquire and quantify spatial gene expression data. We have developed a simplified data processing pipeline that considerably increases the throughput of the method, but results in data of reduced accuracy compared to those previously used for gap gene network inference. We demonstrate that we can infer the correct network structure using our reduced data set, and investigate minimal data requirements for successful reverse engineering. Our results show that timing and position of expression domain boundaries are the crucial features for determining regulatory network structure from data, while it is less important to precisely measure expression levels. Based on this, we define minimal data requirements for gap gene network inference. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of reverse-engineering with much reduced experimental effort. This enables more widespread use of the method in different developmental contexts and organisms. Such systematic application of data-driven models to real-world networks has enormous potential. Only the quantitative investigation of a large number of developmental gene regulatory networks will allow us to

  6. Caenorhabditis elegans metabolic gene regulatory networks govern the cellular economy.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2014-10-01

    Diet greatly impacts metabolism in health and disease. In response to the presence or absence of specific nutrients, metabolic gene regulatory networks sense the metabolic state of the cell and regulate metabolic flux accordingly, for instance by the transcriptional control of metabolic enzymes. Here, we discuss recent insights regarding metazoan metabolic regulatory networks using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, including the modular organization of metabolic gene regulatory networks, the prominent impact of diet on the transcriptome and metabolome, specialized roles of nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) in responding to dietary conditions, regulation of metabolic genes and metabolic regulators by miRNAs, and feedback between metabolic genes and their regulators.

  7. Gene regulatory networks and their applications: understanding biological and medical problems in terms of networks

    PubMed Central

    Emmert-Streib, Frank; Dehmer, Matthias; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years gene regulatory networks (GRNs) have attracted a lot of interest and many methods have been introduced for their statistical inference from gene expression data. However, despite their popularity, GRNs are widely misunderstood. For this reason, we provide in this paper a general discussion and perspective of gene regulatory networks. Specifically, we discuss their meaning, the consistency among different network inference methods, ensemble methods, the assessment of GRNs, the estimated number of existing GRNs and their usage in different application domains. Furthermore, we discuss open questions and necessary steps in order to utilize gene regulatory networks in a clinical context and for personalized medicine. PMID:25364745

  8. A universal order parameter for synchrony in networks of limit cycle oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Malte; Timme, Marc; Witthaut, Dirk

    2017-07-01

    We analyze the properties of order parameters measuring synchronization and phase locking in complex oscillator networks. First, we review network order parameters previously introduced and reveal several shortcomings: none of the introduced order parameters capture all transitions from incoherence over phase locking to full synchrony for arbitrary, finite networks. We then introduce an alternative, universal order parameter that accurately tracks the degree of partial phase locking and synchronization, adapting the traditional definition to account for the network topology and its influence on the phase coherence of the oscillators. We rigorously prove that this order parameter is strictly monotonously increasing with the coupling strength in the phase locked state, directly reflecting the dynamic stability of the network. Furthermore, it indicates the onset of full phase locking by a diverging slope at the critical coupling strength. The order parameter may find applications across systems where different types of synchrony are possible, including biological networks and power grids.

  9. Parameter identification and synchronization for uncertain network group with different structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengren; Lü, Ling; Sun, Ying; Wang, Ying; Wang, Wenjun; Sun, Ao

    2016-09-01

    We design a novel synchronization technique to research the synchronization of network group constituted of uncertain networks with different structures. Based on Lyapunov theorem, the selection principles of the control inputs and the parameter identification laws of the networks are determined, and synchronization conditions of the network group are obtained. Some numerical simulations are provided to verify the correctness and effectiveness of the synchronization technique. We find that the network number, the number of network nodes and network connections indeed will not affect the stability of synchronization of network group.

  10. Selecting and Weighting Data for Building Consensus Gene Regulatory Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Emma; Tucker, Allan

    Microarrays are the major source of data for gene expression activity, allowing the expression of thousands of genes to be measured simultaneously. Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) describe how the expression level of genes affect the expression of the other genes. Modelling GRNs from expression data is a topic of great interest in current bioinformatics research. Previously, we took advantage of publicly available gene expression datasets generated by similar biological studies by drawing together a richer and/or broader collection of data in order to produce GRN models that are more robust, have greater confidence and place less reliance on a single dataset. In this paper a new approach, Weighted Consensus Bayesian Networks, introduces the use of weights in order to place more influence on certain input networks or remove the least reliable networks from the input with encouraging results on both synthetic data and real world yeast microarray datasets.

  11. Computational inference of gene regulatory networks: Approaches, limitations and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Banf, Michael; Rhee, Seung Y

    2017-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks lie at the core of cell function control. In E. coli and S. cerevisiae, the study of gene regulatory networks has led to the discovery of regulatory mechanisms responsible for the control of cell growth, differentiation and responses to environmental stimuli. In plants, computational rendering of gene regulatory networks is gaining momentum, thanks to the recent availability of high-quality genomes and transcriptomes and development of computational network inference approaches. Here, we review current techniques, challenges and trends in gene regulatory network inference and highlight challenges and opportunities for plant science. We provide plant-specific application examples to guide researchers in selecting methodologies that suit their particular research questions. Given the interdisciplinary nature of gene regulatory network inference, we tried to cater to both biologists and computer scientists to help them engage in a dialogue about concepts and caveats in network inference. Specifically, we discuss problems and opportunities in heterogeneous data integration for eukaryotic organisms and common caveats to be considered during network model evaluation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Gene Regulatory Mechanisms and Networks, edited by Dr. Erich Grotewold and Dr. Nathan Springer.

  12. Characterizing gene-gene interactions in a statistical epistasis network of twelve candidate genes for obesity.

    PubMed

    De, Rishika; Hu, Ting; Moore, Jason H; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings have reemphasized the importance of epistasis, or gene-gene interactions, as a contributing factor to the unexplained heritability of obesity. Network-based methods such as statistical epistasis networks (SEN), present an intuitive framework to address the computational challenge of studying pairwise interactions between thousands of genetic variants. In this study, we aimed to analyze pairwise interactions that are associated with Body Mass Index (BMI) between SNPs from twelve genes robustly associated with obesity (BDNF, ETV5, FAIM2, FTO, GNPDA2, KCTD15, MC4R, MTCH2, NEGR1, SEC16B, SH2B1, and TMEM18). We used information gain measures to identify all SNP-SNP interactions among and between these genes that were related to obesity (BMI > 30 kg/m(2)) within the Framingham Heart Study Cohort; interactions exceeding a certain threshold were used to build an SEN. We also quantified whether interactions tend to occur more between SNPs from the same gene (dyadicity) or between SNPs from different genes (heterophilicity). We identified a highly connected SEN of 709 SNPs and 1241 SNP-SNP interactions. Combining the SEN framework with dyadicity and heterophilicity analyses, we found 1 dyadic gene (TMEM18, P-value = 0.047) and 3 heterophilic genes (KCTD15, P-value = 0.045; SH2B1, P-value = 0.003; and TMEM18, P-value = 0.001). We also identified a lncRNA SNP (rs4358154) as a key node within the SEN using multiple network measures. This study presents an analytical framework to characterize the global landscape of genetic interactions from genome-wide arrays and also to discover nodes of potential biological significance within the identified network.

  13. Modified neural networks for rapid recovery of tokamak plasma parameters for real time control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, A.; Ranjan, P.

    2002-07-01

    Two modified neural network techniques are used for the identification of the equilibrium plasma parameters of the Superconducting Steady State Tokamak I from external magnetic measurements. This is expected to ultimately assist in a real time plasma control. As different from the conventional network structure where a single network with the optimum number of processing elements calculates the outputs, a multinetwork system connected in parallel does the calculations here in one of the methods. This network is called the double neural network. The accuracy of the recovered parameters is clearly more than the conventional network. The other type of neural network used here is based on the statistical function parametrization combined with a neural network. The principal component transformation removes linear dependences from the measurements and a dimensional reduction process reduces the dimensionality of the input space. This reduced and transformed input set, rather than the entire set, is fed into the neural network input. This is known as the principal component transformation-based neural network. The accuracy of the recovered parameters in the latter type of modified network is found to be a further improvement over the accuracy of the double neural network. This result differs from that obtained in an earlier work where the double neural network showed better performance. The conventional network and the function parametrization methods have also been used for comparison. The conventional network has been used for an optimization of the set of magnetic diagnostics. The effective set of sensors, as assessed by this network, are compared with the principal component based network. Fault tolerance of the neural networks has been tested. The double neural network showed the maximum resistance to faults in the diagnostics, while the principal component based network performed poorly. Finally the processing times of the methods have been compared. The double

  14. [Study on the automatic parameters identification of water pipe network model].

    PubMed

    Jia, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Qi-Feng

    2010-01-01

    Based on the problems analysis on development and application of water pipe network model, the model parameters automatic identification is regarded as a kernel bottleneck of model's application in water supply enterprise. The methodology of water pipe network model parameters automatic identification based on GIS and SCADA database is proposed. Then the kernel algorithm of model parameters automatic identification is studied, RSA (Regionalized Sensitivity Analysis) is used for automatic recognition of sensitive parameters, and MCS (Monte-Carlo Sampling) is used for automatic identification of parameters, the detail technical route based on RSA and MCS is presented. The module of water pipe network model parameters automatic identification is developed. At last, selected a typical water pipe network as a case, the case study on water pipe network model parameters automatic identification is conducted and the satisfied results are achieved.

  15. Hub-Centered Gene Network Reconstruction Using Automatic Relevance Determination

    PubMed Central

    Böck, Matthias; Ogishima, Soichi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Kramer, Stefan; Kaderali, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Network inference deals with the reconstruction of biological networks from experimental data. A variety of different reverse engineering techniques are available; they differ in the underlying assumptions and mathematical models used. One common problem for all approaches stems from the complexity of the task, due to the combinatorial explosion of different network topologies for increasing network size. To handle this problem, constraints are frequently used, for example on the node degree, number of edges, or constraints on regulation functions between network components. We propose to exploit topological considerations in the inference of gene regulatory networks. Such systems are often controlled by a small number of hub genes, while most other genes have only limited influence on the network's dynamic. We model gene regulation using a Bayesian network with discrete, Boolean nodes. A hierarchical prior is employed to identify hub genes. The first layer of the prior is used to regularize weights on edges emanating from one specific node. A second prior on hyperparameters controls the magnitude of the former regularization for different nodes. The net effect is that central nodes tend to form in reconstructed networks. Network reconstruction is then performed by maximization of or sampling from the posterior distribution. We evaluate our approach on simulated and real experimental data, indicating that we can reconstruct main regulatory interactions from the data. We furthermore compare our approach to other state-of-the art methods, showing superior performance in identifying hubs. Using a large publicly available dataset of over 800 cell cycle regulated genes, we are able to identify several main hub genes. Our method may thus provide a valuable tool to identify interesting candidate genes for further study. Furthermore, the approach presented may stimulate further developments in regularization methods for network reconstruction from data. PMID:22570688

  16. A flood-based information flow analysis and network minimization method for gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Pavlogiannis, Andreas; Mozhayskiy, Vadim; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2013-04-24

    Biological networks tend to have high interconnectivity, complex topologies and multiple types of interactions. This renders difficult the identification of sub-networks that are involved in condition- specific responses. In addition, we generally lack scalable methods that can reveal the information flow in gene regulatory and biochemical pathways. Doing so will help us to identify key participants and paths under specific environmental and cellular context. This paper introduces the theory of network flooding, which aims to address the problem of network minimization and regulatory information flow in gene regulatory networks. Given a regulatory biological network, a set of source (input) nodes and optionally a set of sink (output) nodes, our task is to find (a) the minimal sub-network that encodes the regulatory program involving all input and output nodes and (b) the information flow from the source to the sink nodes of the network. Here, we describe a novel, scalable, network traversal algorithm and we assess its potential to achieve significant network size reduction in both synthetic and E. coli networks. Scalability and sensitivity analysis show that the proposed method scales well with the size of the network, and is robust to noise and missing data. The method of network flooding proves to be a useful, practical approach towards information flow analysis in gene regulatory networks. Further extension of the proposed theory has the potential to lead in a unifying framework for the simultaneous network minimization and information flow analysis across various "omics" levels.

  17. Approaches for recognizing disease genes based on network.

    PubMed

    Zou, Quan; Li, Jinjin; Wang, Chunyu; Zeng, Xiangxiang

    2014-01-01

    Diseases are closely related to genes, thus indicating that genetic abnormalities may lead to certain diseases. The recognition of disease genes has long been a goal in biology, which may contribute to the improvement of health care and understanding gene functions, pathways, and interactions. However, few large-scale gene-gene association datasets, disease-disease association datasets, and gene-disease association datasets are available. A number of machine learning methods have been used to recognize disease genes based on networks. This paper states the relationship between disease and gene, summarizes the approaches used to recognize disease genes based on network, analyzes the core problems and challenges of the methods, and outlooks future research direction.

  18. Gene expression complex networks: synthesis, identification, and analysis.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Fabrício M; Cesar, Roberto M; Costa, Luciano Da F

    2011-10-01

    Thanks to recent advances in molecular biology, allied to an ever increasing amount of experimental data, the functional state of thousands of genes can now be extracted simultaneously by using methods such as cDNA microarrays and RNA-Seq. Particularly important related investigations are the modeling and identification of gene regulatory networks from expression data sets. Such a knowledge is fundamental for many applications, such as disease treatment, therapeutic intervention strategies and drugs design, as well as for planning high-throughput new experiments. Methods have been developed for gene networks modeling and identification from expression profiles. However, an important open problem regards how to validate such approaches and its results. This work presents an objective approach for validation of gene network modeling and identification which comprises the following three main aspects: (1) Artificial Gene Networks (AGNs) model generation through theoretical models of complex networks, which is used to simulate temporal expression data; (2) a computational method for gene network identification from the simulated data, which is founded on a feature selection approach where a target gene is fixed and the expression profile is observed for all other genes in order to identify a relevant subset of predictors; and (3) validation of the identified AGN-based network through comparison with the original network. The proposed framework allows several types of AGNs to be generated and used in order to simulate temporal expression data. The results of the network identification method can then be compared to the original network in order to estimate its properties and accuracy. Some of the most important theoretical models of complex networks have been assessed: the uniformly-random Erdös-Rényi (ER), the small-world Watts-Strogatz (WS), the scale-free Barabási-Albert (BA), and geographical networks (GG). The experimental results indicate that the inference

  19. Interactive Naive Bayesian network: A new approach of constructing gene-gene interaction network for cancer classification.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xue W; Lim, Joon S

    2015-01-01

    Naive Bayesian (NB) network classifier is a simple and well-known type of classifier, which can be easily induced from a DNA microarray data set. However, a strong conditional independence assumption of NB network sometimes can lead to weak classification performance. In this paper, we propose a new approach of interactive naive Bayesian (INB) network to weaken the conditional independence of NB network and classify cancers using DNA microarray data set. We selected the differently expressed genes (DEGs) to reduce the dimension of the microarray data set. Then, an interactive parent which has the biggest influence among all DEGs is searched for each DEG. And then we calculate a weight to represent the interactive relationship between a DEG and its parent. Finally, the gene-gene interaction network is constructed. We experimentally test the INB network in terms of classification accuracy using leukemia and colon DNA microarray data sets, then we compare it with the NB network. The INB network can get higher classification accuracies than NB network. And INB network can show the gene-gene interactions visually.

  20. Evolvability and hierarchy in rewired bacterial gene networks

    PubMed Central

    Isalan, Mark; Lemerle, Caroline; Michalodimitrakis, Konstantinos; Beltrao, Pedro; Horn, Carsten; Raineri, Emanuele; Garriga-Canut, Mireia; Serrano, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Sequencing DNA from several organisms has revealed that duplication and drift of existing genes have primarily molded the contents of a given genome. Though the effect of knocking out or over-expressing a particular gene has been studied in many organisms, no study has systematically explored the effect of adding new links in a biological network. To explore network evolvability, we constructed 598 recombinations of promoters (including regulatory regions) with different transcription or σ-factor genes in Escherichia coli, added over a wild-type genetic background. Here we show that ~95% of new networks are tolerated by the bacteria, that very few alter growth, and that expression level correlates with factor position in the wild-type network hierarchy. Most importantly, we find that certain networks consistently survive over the wild-type under various selection pressures. Therefore new links in the network are rarely a barrier for evolution and can even confer a fitness advantage. PMID:18421347

  1. Uncover disease genes by maximizing information flow in the phenome–interactome network

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Jiang, Tao; Jiang, Rui

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Pinpointing genes that underlie human inherited diseases among candidate genes in susceptibility genetic regions is the primary step towards the understanding of pathogenesis of diseases. Although several probabilistic models have been proposed to prioritize candidate genes using phenotype similarities and protein–protein interactions, no combinatorial approaches have been proposed in the literature. Results: We propose the first combinatorial approach for prioritizing candidate genes. We first construct a phenome–interactome network by integrating the given phenotype similarity profile, protein–protein interaction network and associations between diseases and genes. Then, we introduce a computational method called MAXIF to maximize the information flow in this network for uncovering genes that underlie diseases. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in prioritizing candidate genes through a series of cross-validation experiments, and we show the possibility of using this method to identify diseases with which a query gene may be associated. We demonstrate the competitive performance of our method through a comparison with two existing state-of-the-art methods, and we analyze the robustness of our method with respect to the parameters involved. As an example application, we apply our method to predict driver genes in 50 copy number aberration regions of melanoma. Our method is not only able to identify several driver genes that have been reported in the literature, it also shed some new biological insights on the understanding of the modular property and transcriptional regulation scheme of these driver genes. Contact: ruijiang@tsinghua.edu.cn PMID:21685067

  2. Uncover disease genes by maximizing information flow in the phenome-interactome network.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Jiang, Tao; Jiang, Rui

    2011-07-01

    Pinpointing genes that underlie human inherited diseases among candidate genes in susceptibility genetic regions is the primary step towards the understanding of pathogenesis of diseases. Although several probabilistic models have been proposed to prioritize candidate genes using phenotype similarities and protein-protein interactions, no combinatorial approaches have been proposed in the literature. We propose the first combinatorial approach for prioritizing candidate genes. We first construct a phenome-interactome network by integrating the given phenotype similarity profile, protein-protein interaction network and associations between diseases and genes. Then, we introduce a computational method called MAXIF to maximize the information flow in this network for uncovering genes that underlie diseases. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in prioritizing candidate genes through a series of cross-validation experiments, and we show the possibility of using this method to identify diseases with which a query gene may be associated. We demonstrate the competitive performance of our method through a comparison with two existing state-of-the-art methods, and we analyze the robustness of our method with respect to the parameters involved. As an example application, we apply our method to predict driver genes in 50 copy number aberration regions of melanoma. Our method is not only able to identify several driver genes that have been reported in the literature, it also shed some new biological insights on the understanding of the modular property and transcriptional regulation scheme of these driver genes. ruijiang@tsinghua.edu.cn.

  3. Construction and Optimization of a Large Gene Coexpression Network in Maize Using RNA-Seq Data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ji; Vendramin, Stefania; Shi, Lizhen; McGinnis, Karen M

    2017-09-01

    With the emergence of massively parallel sequencing, genomewide expression data production has reached an unprecedented level. This abundance of data has greatly facilitated maize research, but may not be amenable to traditional analysis techniques that were optimized for other data types. Using publicly available data, a gene coexpression network (GCN) can be constructed and used for gene function prediction, candidate gene selection, and improving understanding of regulatory pathways. Several GCN studies have been done in maize (Zea mays), mostly using microarray datasets. To build an optimal GCN from plant materials RNA-Seq data, parameters for expression data normalization and network inference were evaluated. A comprehensive evaluation of these two parameters and a ranked aggregation strategy on network performance, using libraries from 1266 maize samples, were conducted. Three normalization methods and 10 inference methods, including six correlation and four mutual information methods, were tested. The three normalization methods had very similar performance. For network inference, correlation methods performed better than mutual information methods at some genes. Increasing sample size also had a positive effect on GCN. Aggregating single networks together resulted in improved performance compared to single networks. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Functional Gene Networks: R/Bioc package to generate and analyse gene networks derived from functional enrichment and clustering

    PubMed Central

    Aibar, Sara; Fontanillo, Celia; Droste, Conrad; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Functional Gene Networks (FGNet) is an R/Bioconductor package that generates gene networks derived from the results of functional enrichment analysis (FEA) and annotation clustering. The sets of genes enriched with specific biological terms (obtained from a FEA platform) are transformed into a network by establishing links between genes based on common functional annotations and common clusters. The network provides a new view of FEA results revealing gene modules with similar functions and genes that are related to multiple functions. In addition to building the functional network, FGNet analyses the similarity between the groups of genes and provides a distance heatmap and a bipartite network of functionally overlapping genes. The application includes an interface to directly perform FEA queries using different external tools: DAVID, GeneTerm Linker, TopGO or GAGE; and a graphical interface to facilitate the use. Availability and implementation: FGNet is available in Bioconductor, including a tutorial. URL: http://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/FGNet.html Contact: jrivas@usal.es Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25600944

  5. Unravelling personalized dysfunctional gene network of complex diseases based on differential network model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiangtian; Zeng, Tao; Wang, Xiangdong; Li, Guojun; Chen, Luonan

    2015-06-13

    In the conventional analysis of complex diseases, the control and case samples are assumed to be of great purity. However, due to the heterogeneity of disease samples, many disease genes are even not always consistently up-/down-regulated, leading to be under-estimated. This problem will seriously influence effective personalized diagnosis or treatment. The expression variance and expression covariance can address such a problem in a network manner. But, these analyses always require multiple samples rather than one sample, which is generally not available in clinical practice for each individual. To extract the common and specific network characteristics for individual patients in this paper, a novel differential network model, e.g. personalized dysfunctional gene network, is proposed to integrate those genes with different features, such as genes with the differential gene expression (DEG), genes with the differential expression variance (DEVG) and gene-pairs with the differential expression covariance (DECG) simultaneously, to construct personalized dysfunctional networks. This model uses a new statistic-like measurement on differential information, i.e., a differential score (DEVC), to reconstruct the differential expression network between groups of normal and diseased samples; and further quantitatively evaluate different feature genes in the patient-specific network for each individual. This DEVC-based differential expression network (DEVC-net) has been applied to the study of complex diseases for prostate cancer and diabetes. (1) Characterizing the global expression change between normal and diseased samples, the differential gene networks of those diseases were found to have a new bi-coloured topological structure, where their non hub-centred sub-networks are mainly composed of genes/proteins controlling various biological processes. (2) The differential expression variance/covariance rather than differential expression is new informative sources, and can

  6. Reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Hache, Hendrik; Lehrach, Hans; Herwig, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks has been an intensively studied topic in bioinformatics since it constitutes an intermediate step from explorative to causative gene expression analysis. Many methods have been proposed through recent years leading to a wide range of mathematical approaches. In practice, different mathematical approaches will generate different resulting network structures, thus, it is very important for users to assess the performance of these algorithms. We have conducted a comparative study with six different reverse engineering methods, including relevance networks, neural networks, and Bayesian networks. Our approach consists of the generation of defined benchmark data, the analysis of these data with the different methods, and the assessment of algorithmic performances by statistical analyses. Performance was judged by network size and noise levels. The results of the comparative study highlight the neural network approach as best performing method among those under study.

  7. Analysis of bHLH coding genes using gene co-expression network approach.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Swati; Sanchita; Singh, Garima; Singh, Noopur; Srivastava, Gaurava; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-07-01

    Network analysis provides a powerful framework for the interpretation of data. It uses novel reference network-based metrices for module evolution. These could be used to identify module of highly connected genes showing variation in co-expression network. In this study, a co-expression network-based approach was used for analyzing the genes from microarray data. Our approach consists of a simple but robust rank-based network construction. The publicly available gene expression data of Solanum tuberosum under cold and heat stresses were considered to create and analyze a gene co-expression network. The analysis provide highly co-expressed module of bHLH coding genes based on correlation values. Our approach was to analyze the variation of genes expression, according to the time period of stress through co-expression network approach. As the result, the seed genes were identified showing multiple connections with other genes in the same cluster. Seed genes were found to be vary in different time periods of stress. These analyzed seed genes may be utilized further as marker genes for developing the stress tolerant plant species.

  8. Regulatory gene networks and the properties of the developmental process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Eric H.; McClay, David R.; Hood, Leroy

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instructions for development are encoded in arrays of regulatory DNA. These specify large networks of interactions among genes producing transcription factors and signaling components. The architecture of such networks both explains and predicts developmental phenomenology. Although network analysis is yet in its early stages, some fundamental commonalities are already emerging. Two such are the use of multigenic feedback loops to ensure the progressivity of developmental regulatory states and the prevalence of repressive regulatory interactions in spatial control processes. Gene regulatory networks make it possible to explain the process of development in causal terms and eventually will enable the redesign of developmental regulatory circuitry to achieve different outcomes.

  9. Variable neighborhood search for reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Charles; Goodwin, Leslie; Clark, Corey

    2017-01-01

    A new search heuristic, Divided Neighborhood Exploration Search, designed to be used with inference algorithms such as Bayesian networks to improve on the reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks is presented. The approach systematically moves through the search space to find topologies representative of gene regulatory networks that are more likely to explain microarray data. In empirical testing it is demonstrated that the novel method is superior to the widely employed greedy search techniques in both the quality of the inferred networks and computational time.

  10. Regulatory gene networks and the properties of the developmental process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Eric H.; McClay, David R.; Hood, Leroy

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instructions for development are encoded in arrays of regulatory DNA. These specify large networks of interactions among genes producing transcription factors and signaling components. The architecture of such networks both explains and predicts developmental phenomenology. Although network analysis is yet in its early stages, some fundamental commonalities are already emerging. Two such are the use of multigenic feedback loops to ensure the progressivity of developmental regulatory states and the prevalence of repressive regulatory interactions in spatial control processes. Gene regulatory networks make it possible to explain the process of development in causal terms and eventually will enable the redesign of developmental regulatory circuitry to achieve different outcomes.

  11. GINI: From ISH Images to Gene Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Puniyani, Kriti; Xing, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate inference of molecular and functional interactions among genes, especially in multicellular organisms such as Drosophila, often requires statistical analysis of correlations not only between the magnitudes of gene expressions, but also between their temporal-spatial patterns. The ISH (in-situ-hybridization)-based gene expression micro-imaging technology offers an effective approach to perform large-scale spatial-temporal profiling of whole-body mRNA abundance. However, analytical tools for discovering gene interactions from such data remain an open challenge due to various reasons, including difficulties in extracting canonical representations of gene activities from images, and in inference of statistically meaningful networks from such representations. In this paper, we present GINI, a machine learning system for inferring gene interaction networks from Drosophila embryonic ISH images. GINI builds on a computer-vision-inspired vector-space representation of the spatial pattern of gene expression in ISH images, enabled by our recently developed system; and a new multi-instance-kernel algorithm that learns a sparse Markov network model, in which, every gene (i.e., node) in the network is represented by a vector-valued spatial pattern rather than a scalar-valued gene intensity as in conventional approaches such as a Gaussian graphical model. By capturing the notion of spatial similarity of gene expression, and at the same time properly taking into account the presence of multiple images per gene via multi-instance kernels, GINI is well-positioned to infer statistically sound, and biologically meaningful gene interaction networks from image data. Using both synthetic data and a small manually curated data set, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in network building. Furthermore, we report results on a large publicly available collection of Drosophila embryonic ISH images from the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project, where GINI makes novel and

  12. Time-Delayed Models of Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, K.; Blyuss, K. B.; Kyrychko, Y. N.; Hogan, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss different mathematical models of gene regulatory networks as relevant to the onset and development of cancer. After discussion of alternative modelling approaches, we use a paradigmatic two-gene network to focus on the role played by time delays in the dynamics of gene regulatory networks. We contrast the dynamics of the reduced model arising in the limit of fast mRNA dynamics with that of the full model. The review concludes with the discussion of some open problems. PMID:26576197

  13. Analysis of Gene Sets Based on the Underlying Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Michailidis, George

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Networks are often used to represent the interactions among genes and proteins. These interactions are known to play an important role in vital cell functions and should be included in the analysis of genes that are differentially expressed. Methods of gene set analysis take advantage of external biological information and analyze a priori defined sets of genes. These methods can potentially preserve the correlation among genes; however, they do not directly incorporate the information about the gene network. In this paper, we propose a latent variable model that directly incorporates the network information. We then use the theory of mixed linear models to present a general inference framework for the problem of testing the significance of subnetworks. Several possible test procedures are introduced and a network based method for testing the changes in expression levels of genes as well as the structure of the network is presented. The performance of the proposed method is compared with methods of gene set analysis using both simulation studies, as well as real data on genes related to the galactose utilization pathway in yeast. PMID:19254181

  14. Phenotype accessibility and noise in random threshold gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Ricardo; Garcia, Victor; Feldman, Marcus W

    2014-01-01

    Evolution requires phenotypic variation in a population of organisms for selection to function. Gene regulatory processes involved in organismal development affect the phenotypic diversity of organisms. Since only a fraction of all possible phenotypes are predicted to be accessed by the end of development, organisms may evolve strategies to use environmental cues and noise-like fluctuations to produce additional phenotypic diversity, and hence to enhance the speed of adaptation. We used a generic model of organismal development --gene regulatory networks-- to investigate how different levels of noise on gene expression states (i.e. phenotypes) may affect access to new, unique phenotypes, thereby affecting phenotypic diversity. We studied additional strategies that organisms might adopt to attain larger phenotypic diversity: either by augmenting their genome or the number of gene expression states. This was done for different types of gene regulatory networks that allow for distinct levels of regulatory influence on gene expression or are more likely to give rise to stable phenotypes. We found that if gene expression is binary, increasing noise levels generally decreases phenotype accessibility for all network types studied. If more gene expression states are considered, noise can moderately enhance the speed of discovery if three or four gene expression states are allowed, and if there are enough distinct regulatory networks in the population. These results were independent of the network types analyzed, and were robust to different implementations of noise. Hence, for noise to increase the number of accessible phenotypes in gene regulatory networks, very specific conditions need to be satisfied. If the number of distinct regulatory networks involved in organismal development is large enough, and the acquisition of more genes or fine tuning of their expression states proves costly to the organism, noise can be useful in allowing access to more unique phenotypes.

  15. A Maize Gene Regulatory Network for Phenolic Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Li, Wei; Jiang, Nan; Yu, Haidong; Morohashi, Kengo; Ouma, Wilberforce Zachary; Morales-Mantilla, Daniel E; Gomez-Cano, Fabio Andres; Mukundi, Eric; Prada-Salcedo, Luis Daniel; Velazquez, Roberto Alers; Valentin, Jasmin; Mejía-Guerra, Maria Katherine; Gray, John; Doseff, Andrea I; Grotewold, Erich

    2017-03-06

    The translation of the genotype into phenotype, represented for example by the expression of genes encoding enzymes required for the biosynthesis of phytochemicals that are important for interaction of plants with the environment, is largely carried out by transcription factors (TFs) that recognize specific cis-regulatory elements in the genes that they control. TFs and their target genes are organized in gene regulatory networks (GRNs), and thus uncovering GRN architecture presents an important biological challenge necessary to explain gene regulation. Linking TFs to the genes they control, central to understanding GRNs, can be carried out using gene- or TF-centered approaches. In this study, we employed a gene-centered approach utilizing the yeast one-hybrid assay to generate a network of protein-DNA interactions that participate in the transcriptional control of genes involved in the biosynthesis of maize phenolic compounds including general phenylpropanoids, lignins, and flavonoids. We identified 1100 protein-DNA interactions involving 54 phenolic gene promoters and 568 TFs. A set of 11 TFs recognized 10 or more promoters, suggesting a role in coordinating pathway gene expression. The integration of the gene-centered network with information derived from TF-centered approaches provides a foundation for a phenolics GRN characterized by interlaced feed-forward loops that link developmental regulators with biosynthetic genes.

  16. A Latent Parameter Node-Centric Model for Spatial Networks

    PubMed Central

    Larusso, Nicholas D.; Ruttenberg, Brian E.; Singh, Ambuj

    2013-01-01

    Spatial networks, in which nodes and edges are embedded in space, play a vital role in the study of complex systems. For example, many social networks attach geo-location information to each user, allowing the study of not only topological interactions between users, but spatial interactions as well. The defining property of spatial networks is that edge distances are associated with a cost, which may subtly influence the topology of the network. However, the cost function over distance is rarely known, thus developing a model of connections in spatial networks is a difficult task. In this paper, we introduce a novel model for capturing the interaction between spatial effects and network structure. Our approach represents a unique combination of ideas from latent variable statistical models and spatial network modeling. In contrast to previous work, we view the ability to form long/short-distance connections to be dependent on the individual nodes involved. For example, a node's specific surroundings (e.g. network structure and node density) may make it more likely to form a long distance link than other nodes with the same degree. To capture this information, we attach a latent variable to each node which represents a node's spatial reach. These variables are inferred from the network structure using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We experimentally evaluate our proposed model on 4 different types of real-world spatial networks (e.g. transportation, biological, infrastructure, and social). We apply our model to the task of link prediction and achieve up to a 35% improvement over previous approaches in terms of the area under the ROC curve. Additionally, we show that our model is particularly helpful for predicting links between nodes with low degrees. In these cases, we see much larger improvements over previous models. PMID:24086251

  17. Evolutionary and Topological Properties of Genes and Community Structures in Human Gene Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Szedlak, Anthony; Smith, Nicholas; Liu, Li; Paternostro, Giovanni; Piermarocchi, Carlo

    2016-06-01

    The diverse, specialized genes present in today's lifeforms evolved from a common core of ancient, elementary genes. However, these genes did not evolve individually: gene expression is controlled by a complex network of interactions, and alterations in one gene may drive reciprocal changes in its proteins' binding partners. Like many complex networks, these gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are composed of communities, or clusters of genes with relatively high connectivity. A deep understanding of the relationship between the evolutionary history of single genes and the topological properties of the underlying GRN is integral to evolutionary genetics. Here, we show that the topological properties of an acute myeloid leukemia GRN and a general human GRN are strongly coupled with its genes' evolutionary properties. Slowly evolving ("cold"), old genes tend to interact with each other, as do rapidly evolving ("hot"), young genes. This naturally causes genes to segregate into community structures with relatively homogeneous evolutionary histories. We argue that gene duplication placed old, cold genes and communities at the center of the networks, and young, hot genes and communities at the periphery. We demonstrate this with single-node centrality measures and two new measures of efficiency, the set efficiency and the interset efficiency. We conclude that these methods for studying the relationships between a GRN's community structures and its genes' evolutionary properties provide new perspectives for understanding evolutionary genetics.

  18. Identifying gene regulatory network rewiring using latent differential graphical models

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Dechao; Gu, Quanquan; Ma, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are highly dynamic among different tissue types. Identifying tissue-specific gene regulation is critically important to understand gene function in a particular cellular context. Graphical models have been used to estimate GRN from gene expression data to distinguish direct interactions from indirect associations. However, most existing methods estimate GRN for a specific cell/tissue type or in a tissue-naive way, or do not specifically focus on network rewiring between different tissues. Here, we describe a new method called Latent Differential Graphical Model (LDGM). The motivation of our method is to estimate the differential network between two tissue types directly without inferring the network for individual tissues, which has the advantage of utilizing much smaller sample size to achieve reliable differential network estimation. Our simulation results demonstrated that LDGM consistently outperforms other Gaussian graphical model based methods. We further evaluated LDGM by applying to the brain and blood gene expression data from the GTEx consortium. We also applied LDGM to identify network rewiring between cancer subtypes using the TCGA breast cancer samples. Our results suggest that LDGM is an effective method to infer differential network using high-throughput gene expression data to identify GRN dynamics among different cellular conditions. PMID:27378774

  19. Gene duplication models for directed networks with limits on growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enemark, Jakob; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-11-01

    Background: Duplication of genes is important for evolution of molecular networks. Many authors have therefore considered gene duplication as a driving force in shaping the topology of molecular networks. In particular it has been noted that growth via duplication would act as an implicit means of preferential attachment, and thereby provide the observed broad degree distributions of molecular networks. Results: We extend current models of gene duplication and rewiring by including directions and the fact that molecular networks are not a result of unidirectional growth. We introduce upstream sites and downstream shapes to quantify potential links during duplication and rewiring. We find that this in itself generates the observed scaling of transcription factors for genome sites in prokaryotes. The dynamical model can generate a scale-free degree distribution, p(k)\\propto 1/k^{\\gamma } , with exponent γ = 1 in the non-growing case, and with γ>1 when the network is growing. Conclusions: We find that duplication of genes followed by substantial recombination of upstream regions could generate features of genetic regulatory networks. Our steady state degree distribution is however too broad to be consistent with data, thereby suggesting that selective pruning acts as a main additional constraint on duplicated genes. Our analysis shows that gene duplication can only be a main cause for the observed broad degree distributions if there are also substantial recombinations between upstream regions of genes.

  20. Reverse Engineering Sparse Gene Regulatory Networks Using Cubature Kalman Filter and Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Amina; Serpedin, Erchin; Nounou, Mohamed; Nounou, Hazem

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel algorithm for inferring gene regulatory networks which makes use of cubature Kalman filter (CKF) and Kalman filter (KF) techniques in conjunction with compressed sensing methods. The gene network is described using a state-space model. A nonlinear model for the evolution of gene expression is considered, while the gene expression data is assumed to follow a linear Gaussian model. The hidden states are estimated using CKF. The system parameters are modeled as a Gauss-Markov process and are estimated using compressed sensing-based KF. These parameters provide insight into the regulatory relations among the genes. The Cramér-Rao lower bound of the parameter estimates is calculated for the system model and used as a benchmark to assess the estimation accuracy. The proposed algorithm is evaluated rigorously using synthetic data in different scenarios which include different number of genes and varying number of sample points. In addition, the algorithm is tested on the DREAM4 in silico data sets as well as the in vivo data sets from IRMA network. The proposed algorithm shows superior performance in terms of accuracy, robustness, and scalability. PMID:23737768

  1. microRNA and gene networks in human laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengyu; Xu, Zhiwen; Wang, Kunhao; Sun, Linlin; Liu, Genghe; Han, Baixu

    2015-12-01

    Genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) are considered to be key biological factors in human carcinogenesis. To date, considerable data have been obtained regarding genes and miRNAs in cancer; however, the regulatory mechanisms associated with the genes and miRNAs in cancer have yet to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to use the key genes and miRNAs associated with laryngeal cancer (LC) to construct three regulatory networks (differentially expressed, LC-related and global). A network topology of the development of LC, involving 10 differentially expressed miRNAs and 55 differentially expressed genes, was obtained. These genes exhibited multiple identities, including target genes of miRNA, transcription factors (TFs) and host genes. The key regulatory interactions were determined by comparing the similarities and differences among the three networks. The nodes and pathways in LC, as well as the association between each pair of factors within the networks, such as TFs and miRNA, miRNA and target genes and miRNA and its host gene, were discussed. The mechanisms of LC involved certain key pathways featuring self-adaptation regulation and nodes without direct predecessors or successors. The findings of the present study have further elucidated the pathogenesis of LC and are likely to be beneficial for future research into LC.

  2. microRNA and gene networks in human laryngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, FENGYU; XU, ZHIWEN; WANG, KUNHAO; SUN, LINLIN; LIU, GENGHE; HAN, BAIXU

    2015-01-01

    Genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) are considered to be key biological factors in human carcinogenesis. To date, considerable data have been obtained regarding genes and miRNAs in cancer; however, the regulatory mechanisms associated with the genes and miRNAs in cancer have yet to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to use the key genes and miRNAs associated with laryngeal cancer (LC) to construct three regulatory networks (differentially expressed, LC-related and global). A network topology of the development of LC, involving 10 differentially expressed miRNAs and 55 differentially expressed genes, was obtained. These genes exhibited multiple identities, including target genes of miRNA, transcription factors (TFs) and host genes. The key regulatory interactions were determined by comparing the similarities and differences among the three networks. The nodes and pathways in LC, as well as the association between each pair of factors within the networks, such as TFs and miRNA, miRNA and target genes and miRNA and its host gene, were discussed. The mechanisms of LC involved certain key pathways featuring self-adaptation regulation and nodes without direct predecessors or successors. The findings of the present study have further elucidated the pathogenesis of LC and are likely to be beneficial for future research into LC. PMID:26668624

  3. Analyse multiple disease subtypes and build associated gene networks using genome-wide expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the large increase of transcriptomic studies that look for gene signatures on diseases, there is still a need for integrative approaches that obtain separation of multiple pathological states providing robust selection of gene markers for each disease subtype and information about the possible links or relations between those genes. Results We present a network-oriented and data-driven bioinformatic approach that searches for association of genes and diseases based on the analysis of genome-wide expression data derived from microarrays or RNA-Seq studies. The approach aims to (i) identify gene sets associated to different pathological states analysed together; (ii) identify a minimum subset within these genes that unequivocally differentiates and classifies the compared disease subtypes; (iii) provide a measurement of the discriminant power of these genes and (iv) identify links between the genes that characterise each of the disease subtypes. This bioinformatic approach is implemented in an R package, named geNetClassifier, available as an open access tool in Bioconductor. To illustrate the performance of the tool, we applied it to two independent datasets: 250 samples from patients with four major leukemia subtypes analysed using expression arrays; another leukemia dataset analysed with RNA-Seq that includes a subtype also present in the previous set. The results show the selection of key deregulated genes recently reported in the literature and assigned to the leukemia subtypes studied. We also show, using these independent datasets, the selection of similar genes in a network built for the same disease subtype. Conclusions The construction of gene networks related to specific disease subtypes that include parameters such as gene-to-gene association, gene disease specificity and gene discriminant power can be very useful to draw gene-disease maps and to unravel the molecular features that characterize specific pathological states. The

  4. Gene transcriptional networks integrate microenvironmental signals in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ren; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2011-04-01

    A significant amount of evidence shows that microenvironmental signals generated from extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, soluble factors, and cell-cell adhesion complexes cooperate at the extra- and intracellular level. This synergetic action of microenvironmental cues is crucial for normal mammary gland development and breast malignancy. To explore how the microenvironmental genes coordinate in human breast cancer at the genome level, we have performed gene co-expression network analysis in three independent microarray datasets and identified two microenvironment networks in human breast cancer tissues. Network I represents crosstalk and cooperation of ECM microenvironment and soluble factors during breast malignancy. The correlated expression of cytokines, chemokines, and cell adhesion proteins in Network II implicates the coordinated action of these molecules in modulating the immune response in breast cancer tissues. These results suggest that microenvironmental cues are integrated with gene transcriptional networks to promote breast cancer development.

  5. Importance of input perturbations and stochastic gene expression in the reverse engineering of genetic regulatory networks: insights from an identifiability analysis of an in silico network.

    PubMed

    Zak, Daniel E; Gonye, Gregory E; Schwaber, James S; Doyle, Francis J

    2003-11-01

    Gene expression profiles are an increasingly common data source that can yield insights into the functions of cells at a system-wide level. The present work considers the limitations in information content of gene expression data for reverse engineering regulatory networks. An in silico genetic regulatory network was constructed for this purpose. Using the in silico network, a formal identifiability analysis was performed that considered the accuracy with which the parameters in the network could be estimated using gene expression data and prior structural knowledge (which transcription factors regulate which genes) as a function of the input perturbation and stochastic gene expression. The analysis yielded experimentally relevant results. It was observed that, in addition to prior structural knowledge, prior knowledge of kinetic parameters, particularly mRNA degradation rate constants, was necessary for the network to be identifiable. Also, with the exception of cases where the noise due to stochastic gene expression was high, complex perturbations were more favorable for identifying the network than simple ones. Although the results may be specific to the network considered, the present study provides a framework for posing similar questions in other systems.

  6. Systems Approaches to Identifying Gene Regulatory Networks in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Long, Terri A.; Brady, Siobhan M.; Benfey, Philip N.

    2009-01-01

    Complex gene regulatory networks are composed of genes, noncoding RNAs, proteins, metabolites, and signaling components. The availability of genome-wide mutagenesis libraries; large-scale transcriptome, proteome, and metabalome data sets; and new high-throughput methods that uncover protein interactions underscores the need for mathematical modeling techniques that better enable scientists to synthesize these large amounts of information and to understand the properties of these biological systems. Systems biology approaches can allow researchers to move beyond a reductionist approach and to both integrate and comprehend the interactions of multiple components within these systems. Descriptive and mathematical models for gene regulatory networks can reveal emergent properties of these plant systems. This review highlights methods that researchers are using to obtain large-scale data sets, and examples of gene regulatory networks modeled with these data. Emergent properties revealed by the use of these network models and perspectives on the future of systems biology are discussed. PMID:18616425

  7. Gene Networks Underlying Chronic Sleep Deprivation in Drosophila

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-15

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Studies of the gene network affected by sleep deprivation and stress in the fruit fly Drosophila have revealed the...Chronic Sleep Deprivation in Drosophila Report Title Studies of the gene network affected by sleep deprivation and stress in the fruit fly Drosophila have...stressed flies , the involvement of axonogenesis as a process regulated by these stressors. This goes beyond the current hypothesis of sleep as functioning

  8. On-line Parameter Estimation of Time-varying Systems by Radial Basis Function Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhide; Tanaka, Shinichi; Okita, Tsuyoshi

    This paper proposes a new on-line parameter estimation method with radial basis function networks for time-varying linear discrete-time systems. The time-varying parameters of the system are expressed with the radial basis function networks. These parameters are estimated by the nonlinear optimization technique, and the setting rules of the initial values in the optimization are proposed. The system parameters are usually unknown because they are changed by the circumstance conditions. Then, it is reasonable that the structures of the radial basis function networks are regulated according to the change of parameters. The minimum description length criterion studied in the encoding theory is applied to select the network structures. It is demonstrated in digital simulation that the proposed on-line estimation method succeeded to reduce the computaion time extremely, for time-varying parameters system.

  9. Gene regulatory network inference: evaluation and application to ovarian cancer allows the prioritization of drug targets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Altered networks of gene regulation underlie many complex conditions, including cancer. Inferring gene regulatory networks from high-throughput microarray expression data is a fundamental but challenging task in computational systems biology and its translation to genomic medicine. Although diverse computational and statistical approaches have been brought to bear on the gene regulatory network inference problem, their relative strengths and disadvantages remain poorly understood, largely because comparative analyses usually consider only small subsets of methods, use only synthetic data, and/or fail to adopt a common measure of inference quality. Methods We report a comprehensive comparative evaluation of nine state-of-the art gene regulatory network inference methods encompassing the main algorithmic approaches (mutual information, correlation, partial correlation, random forests, support vector machines) using 38 simulated datasets and empirical serous papillary ovarian adenocarcinoma expression-microarray data. We then apply the best-performing method to infer normal and cancer networks. We assess the druggability of the proteins encoded by our predicted target genes using the CancerResource and PharmGKB webtools and databases. Results We observe large differences in the accuracy with which these methods predict the underlying gene regulatory network depending on features of the data, network size, topology, experiment type, and parameter settings. Applying the best-performing method (the supervised method SIRENE) to the serous papillary ovarian adenocarcinoma dataset, we infer and rank regulatory interactions, some previously reported and others novel. For selected novel interactions we propose testable mechanistic models linking gene regulation to cancer. Using network analysis and visualization, we uncover cross-regulation of angiogenesis-specific genes through three key transcription factors in normal and cancer conditions. Druggabilty analysis

  10. Fused Regression for Multi-source Gene Regulatory Network Inference

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Kari Y.; Westrick, Zachary M.; Müller, Christian L.; Christiaen, Lionel; Bonneau, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Understanding gene regulatory networks is critical to understanding cellular differentiation and response to external stimuli. Methods for global network inference have been developed and applied to a variety of species. Most approaches consider the problem of network inference independently in each species, despite evidence that gene regulation can be conserved even in distantly related species. Further, network inference is often confined to single data-types (single platforms) and single cell types. We introduce a method for multi-source network inference that allows simultaneous estimation of gene regulatory networks in multiple species or biological processes through the introduction of priors based on known gene relationships such as orthology incorporated using fused regression. This approach improves network inference performance even when orthology mapping and conservation are incomplete. We refine this method by presenting an algorithm that extracts the true conserved subnetwork from a larger set of potentially conserved interactions and demonstrate the utility of our method in cross species network inference. Last, we demonstrate our method’s utility in learning from data collected on different experimental platforms. PMID:27923054

  11. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Bokde, Arun L.W.; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F.; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W.; Smolka, Michael N.; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function. PMID:26068849

  12. Dynamics of gene regulatory networks with cell division cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Luonan; Wang, Ruiqi; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2004-07-01

    This paper focuses on modeling and analyzing the nonlinear dynamics of gene regulatory networks with the consideration of a cell division cycle with duplication process of DNA , in particular for switches and oscillators of synthetic networks. We derive two models that may correspond to the eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, respectively. A biologically plausible three-gene model ( lac,tetR , and cI ) and a repressilator as switch and oscillator examples are used to illustrate our theoretical results. We show that the cell cycle may play a significant role in gene regulation due to the nonlinear dynamics of a gene regulatory network although gene expressions are usually tightly controlled by transcriptional factors.

  13. Inferring gene correlation networks from transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Mahdevar, Ghasem; Nowzari-Dalini, Abbas; Sadeghi, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is a highly regulated biological process that is fundamental to the existence of phenotypes of any living organism. The regulatory relations are usually modeled as a network; simply, every gene is modeled as a node and relations are shown as edges between two related genes. This paper presents a novel method for inferring correlation networks, networks constructed by connecting co-expressed genes, through predicting co-expression level from genes promoter's sequences. According to the results, this method works well on biological data and its outcome is comparable to the methods that use microarray as input. The method is written in C++ language and is available upon request from the corresponding author.

  14. Impact of precision of Bayesian networks parameters on accuracy of medical diagnostic systems

    PubMed Central

    Oniśko, Agnieszka; Druzdzel, Marek J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective One of the hardest technical tasks in employing Bayesian network models in practice is obtaining their numerical parameters. In the light of this difficulty, a pressing question, one that has immediate implications on the knowledge engineering effort, is whether precision of these parameters is important. In this paper, we address experimentally the question whether medical diagnostic systems based on Bayesian networks are sensitive to precision of their parameters. Methods and Materials The test networks include Hepar II, a sizeable Bayesian network model for diagnosis of liver disorders and six other medical diagnostic networks constructed from medical data sets available through the Irvine Machine Learning Repository. Assuming that the original model parameters are perfectly accurate, we lower systematically their precision by rounding them to progressively courser scales and check the impact of this rounding on the models' accuracy. Results Our main result, consistent across all tested networks, is that imprecision in numerical parameters has minimal impact on the diagnostic accuracy of models, as long as we avoid zeroes among parameters. Conclusion The experiments' results provide evidence that as long as we avoid zeroes among model parameters, diagnostic accuracy of Bayesian network models does not suffer from decreased precision of their parameters. PMID:23466438

  15. Evolutionary and Topological Properties of Genes and Community Structures in Human Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Szedlak, Anthony; Smith, Nicholas; Liu, Li; Paternostro, Giovanni; Piermarocchi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The diverse, specialized genes present in today’s lifeforms evolved from a common core of ancient, elementary genes. However, these genes did not evolve individually: gene expression is controlled by a complex network of interactions, and alterations in one gene may drive reciprocal changes in its proteins’ binding partners. Like many complex networks, these gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are composed of communities, or clusters of genes with relatively high connectivity. A deep understanding of the relationship between the evolutionary history of single genes and the topological properties of the underlying GRN is integral to evolutionary genetics. Here, we show that the topological properties of an acute myeloid leukemia GRN and a general human GRN are strongly coupled with its genes’ evolutionary properties. Slowly evolving (“cold”), old genes tend to interact with each other, as do rapidly evolving (“hot”), young genes. This naturally causes genes to segregate into community structures with relatively homogeneous evolutionary histories. We argue that gene duplication placed old, cold genes and communities at the center of the networks, and young, hot genes and communities at the periphery. We demonstrate this with single-node centrality measures and two new measures of efficiency, the set efficiency and the interset efficiency. We conclude that these methods for studying the relationships between a GRN’s community structures and its genes’ evolutionary properties provide new perspectives for understanding evolutionary genetics. PMID:27359334

  16. A Computational Approach towards a Gene Regulatory Network for the Developing Nematostella vectensis Gut

    PubMed Central

    Botman, Daniel; Röttinger, Eric; Martindale, Mark Q.; de Jong, Johann; Kaandorp, Jaap A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis is a diploblastic cnidarian that expresses a set of conserved genes for gut formation during its early development. During the last decade, the spatial distribution of many of these genes has been visualized with RNA hybridization or protein immunolocalization techniques. However, due to N. vectensis' curved and changing morphology, quantification of these spatial data is problematic. A method is developed for two-dimensional gene expression quantification, which enables a numerical analysis and dynamic modeling of these spatial patterns. Methods/Result In this work, first standardized gene expression profiles are generated from publicly available N. vectensis embryo images that display mRNA and/or protein distributions. Then, genes expressed during gut formation are clustered based on their expression profiles, and further grouped based on temporal appearance of their gene products in embryonic development. Representative expression profiles are manually selected from these clusters, and used as input for a simulation-based optimization scheme. This scheme iteratively fits simulated profiles to the selected profiles, leading to an optimized estimation of the model parameters. Finally, a preliminary gene regulatory network is derived from the optimized model parameters. Outlook While the focus of this study is N. vectensis, the approach outlined here is suitable for inferring gene regulatory networks in the embryonic development of any animal, thus allowing to comparatively study gene regulation of gut formation in silico across various species. PMID:25076223

  17. Network of Cancer Genes (NCG 3.0): integration and analysis of genetic and network properties of cancer genes.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Matteo; Pendino, Vera; Sinha, Shruti; Ciccarelli, Francesca D

    2012-01-01

    The identification of a constantly increasing number of genes whose mutations are causally implicated in tumor initiation and progression (cancer genes) requires the development of tools to store and analyze them. The Network of Cancer Genes (NCG 3.0) collects information on 1494 cancer genes that have been found mutated in 16 different cancer types. These genes were collected from the Cancer Gene Census as well as from 18 whole exome and 11 whole-genome screenings of cancer samples. For each cancer gene, NCG 3.0 provides a summary of the gene features and the cross-reference to other databases. In addition, it describes duplicability, evolutionary origin, orthology, network properties, interaction partners, microRNA regulation and functional roles of cancer genes and of all genes that are related to them. This integrated network of information can be used to better characterize cancer genes in the context of the system in which they act. The data can also be used to identify novel candidates that share the same properties of known cancer genes and may therefore play a similar role in cancer. NCG 3.0 is freely available at http://bio.ifom-ieo-campus.it/ncg.

  18. Topological origin of global attractors in gene regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, YunJun; Ouyang, Qi; Geng, Zhi

    2015-02-01

    Fixed-point attractors with global stability manifest themselves in a number of gene regulatory networks. This property indicates the stability of regulatory networks against small state perturbations and is closely related to other complex dynamics. In this paper, we aim to reveal the core modules in regulatory networks that determine their global attractors and the relationship between these core modules and other motifs. This work has been done via three steps. Firstly, inspired by the signal transmission in the regulation process, we extract the model of chain-like network from regulation networks. We propose a module of "ideal transmission chain (ITC)", which is proved sufficient and necessary (under certain condition) to form a global fixed-point in the context of chain-like network. Secondly, by examining two well-studied regulatory networks (i.e., the cell-cycle regulatory networks of Budding yeast and Fission yeast), we identify the ideal modules in true regulation networks and demonstrate that the modules have a superior contribution to network stability (quantified by the relative size of the biggest attraction basin). Thirdly, in these two regulation networks, we find that the double negative feedback loops, which are the key motifs of forming bistability in regulation, are connected to these core modules with high network stability. These results have shed new light on the connection between the topological feature and the dynamic property of regulatory networks.

  19. Gene duplication and the properties of biological networks.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Austin L; Friedman, Robert

    2005-12-01

    Patterns of network connection of members of multigene families were examined for two biological networks: a genetic network from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a protein-protein interaction network from Caenorhabditis elegans. In both networks, genes belonging to gene families represented by a single member in the genome ("singletons") were disproportionately represented among the nodes having large numbers of connections. Of 68 single-member yeast families with 25 or more network connections, 28 (44.4%) were located in duplicated genomic segments believed to have originated from an ancient polyploidization event; thus, each of these 28 loci was thus presumably duplicated along with the genomic segment to which it belongs, but one of the two duplicates has subsequently been deleted. Nodes connected to major "hubs" with a large number of connections, tended to be relatively sparsely interconnected among themselves. Furthermore, duplicated genes, even those arising from recent duplication, rarely shared many network connections, suggesting that network connections are remarkably labile over evolutionary time. These factors serve to explain well-known general properties of biological networks, including their scale-free and modular nature.

  20. Parameter space exploration within dynamic simulations of signaling networks.

    PubMed

    De Ambrosi, Cristina; Barla, Annalisa; Tortolina, Lorenzo; Castagnino, Nicoletta; Pesenti, Raffaele; Verri, Alessandro; Ballestrero, Alberto; Patrone, Franco; Parodi, Silvio

    2013-02-01

    We started offering an introduction to very basic aspects of molecular biology, for the reader coming from computer sciences, information technology, mathematics. Similarly we offered a minimum of information about pathways and networks in graph theory, for a reader coming from the bio-medical sector. At the crossover about the two different types of expertise, we offered some definition about Systems Biology. The core of the article deals with a Molecular Interaction Map (MIM), a network of biochemical interactions involved in a small signaling-network sub-region relevant in breast cancer. We explored robustness/sensitivity to random perturbations. It turns out that our MIM is a non-isomorphic directed graph. For non physiological directions of propagation of the signal the network is quite resistant to perturbations. The opposite happens for biologically significant directions of signal propagation. In these cases we can have no signal attenuation, and even signal amplification. Signal propagation along a given pathway is highly unidirectional, with the exception of signal-feedbacks, that again have a specific biological role and significance. In conclusion, even a relatively small network like our present MIM reveals the preponderance of specific biological functions over unspecific isomorphic behaviors. This is perhaps the consequence of hundreds of millions of years of biological evolution.

  1. Two different modes of oscillation in a gene transcription regulatory network with interlinked positive and negative feedback loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Rajesh

    2016-12-01

    We study the oscillatory behavior of a gene regulatory network with interlinked positive and negative feedback loop. The frequency and amplitude are two important properties of oscillation. The studied network produces two different modes of oscillation. In one mode (mode-I), frequency of oscillation remains constant over a wide range of amplitude and in the other mode (mode-II) the amplitude of oscillation remains constant over a wide range of frequency. Our study reproduces both features of oscillations in a single gene regulatory network and shows that the negative plus positive feedback loops in gene regulatory network offer additional advantage. We identified the key parameters/variables responsible for different modes of oscillation. The network is flexible in switching between different modes by choosing appropriately the required parameters/variables.

  2. Evaluation of artificial time series microarray data for dynamic gene regulatory network inference.

    PubMed

    Xenitidis, P; Seimenis, I; Kakolyris, S; Adamopoulos, A

    2017-08-07

    High-throughput technology like microarrays is widely used in the inference of gene regulatory networks (GRNs). We focused on time series data since we are interested in the dynamics of GRNs and the identification of dynamic networks. We evaluated the amount of information that exists in artificial time series microarray data and the ability of an inference process to produce accurate models based on them. We used dynamic artificial gene regulatory networks in order to create artificial microarray data. Key features that characterize microarray data such as the time separation of directly triggered genes, the percentage of directly triggered genes and the triggering function type were altered in order to reveal the limits that are imposed by the nature of microarray data on the inference process. We examined the effect of various factors on the inference performance such as the network size, the presence of noise in microarray data, and the network sparseness. We used a system theory approach and examined the relationship between the pole placement of the inferred system and the inference performance. We examined the relationship between the inference performance in the time domain and the true system parameter identification. Simulation results indicated that time separation and the percentage of directly triggered genes are crucial factors. Also, network sparseness, the triggering function type and noise in input data affect the inference performance. When two factors were simultaneously varied, it was found that variation of one parameter significantly affects the dynamic response of the other. Crucial factors were also examined using a real GRN and acquired results confirmed simulation findings with artificial data. Different initial conditions were also used as an alternative triggering approach. Relevant results confirmed that the number of datasets constitutes the most significant parameter with regard to the inference performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  3. Analyzing and constraining signaling networks: parameter estimation for the user.

    PubMed

    Geier, Florian; Fengos, Georgios; Felizzi, Federico; Iber, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    The behavior of most dynamical models not only depends on the wiring but also on the kind and strength of interactions which are reflected in the parameter values of the model. The predictive value of mathematical models therefore critically hinges on the quality of the parameter estimates. Constraining a dynamical model by an appropriate parameterization follows a 3-step process. In an initial step, it is important to evaluate the sensitivity of the parameters of the model with respect to the model output of interest. This analysis points at the identifiability of model parameters and can guide the design of experiments. In the second step, the actual fitting needs to be carried out. This step requires special care as, on the one hand, noisy as well as partial observations can corrupt the identification of system parameters. On the other hand, the solution of the dynamical system usually depends in a highly nonlinear fashion on its parameters and, as a consequence, parameter estimation procedures get easily trapped in local optima. Therefore any useful parameter estimation procedure has to be robust and efficient with respect to both challenges. In the final step, it is important to access the validity of the optimized model. A number of reviews have been published on the subject. A good, nontechnical overview is provided by Jaqaman and Danuser (Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 7(11):813-819, 2006) and a classical introduction, focussing on the algorithmic side, is given in Press (Numerical recipes: The art of scientific computing, Cambridge University Press, 3rd edn., 2007, Chapters 10 and 15). We will focus on the practical issues related to parameter estimation and use a model of the TGFβ-signaling pathway as an educative example. Corresponding parameter estimation software and models based on MATLAB code can be downloaded from the authors's web page ( http://www.bsse.ethz.ch/cobi ).

  4. Noise-tolerant model selection and parameter estimation for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliakbary, Sadegh; Motallebi, Sadegh; Rashidian, Sina; Habibi, Jafar; Movaghar, Ali

    2015-06-01

    Real networks often exhibit nontrivial topological features that do not occur in random graphs. The need for synthesizing realistic networks has resulted in development of various network models. In this paper, we address the problem of selecting and calibrating the model that best fits a given target network. The existing model fitting approaches mostly suffer from sensitivity to network perturbations, lack of the parameter estimation component, dependency on the size of the networks, and low accuracy. To overcome these limitations, we considered a broad range of network features and employed machine learning techniques such as genetic algorithms, distance metric learning, nearest neighbor classification, and artificial neural networks. Our proposed method, which is named ModelFit, outperforms the state-of-the-art baselines with respect to accuracy and noise tolerance in different network datasets.

  5. Optimal finite horizon control in gene regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiuli

    2013-06-01

    As a paradigm for modeling gene regulatory networks, probabilistic Boolean networks (PBNs) form a subclass of Markov genetic regulatory networks. To date, many different stochastic optimal control approaches have been developed to find therapeutic intervention strategies for PBNs. A PBN is essentially a collection of constituent Boolean networks via a probability structure. Most of the existing works assume that the probability structure for Boolean networks selection is known. Such an assumption cannot be satisfied in practice since the presence of noise prevents the probability structure from being accurately determined. In this paper, we treat a case in which we lack the governing probability structure for Boolean network selection. Specifically, in the framework of PBNs, the theory of finite horizon Markov decision process is employed to find optimal constituent Boolean networks with respect to the defined objective functions. In order to illustrate the validity of our proposed approach, an example is also displayed.

  6. Inference of gene regulatory networks from genome-wide knockout fitness data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liming; Wang, Xiaodong; Arkin, Adam P.; Samoilov, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Genome-wide fitness is an emerging type of high-throughput biological data generated for individual organisms by creating libraries of knockouts, subjecting them to broad ranges of environmental conditions, and measuring the resulting clone-specific fitnesses. Since fitness is an organism-scale measure of gene regulatory network behaviour, it may offer certain advantages when insights into such phenotypical and functional features are of primary interest over individual gene expression. Previous works have shown that genome-wide fitness data can be used to uncover novel gene regulatory interactions, when compared with results of more conventional gene expression analysis. Yet, to date, few algorithms have been proposed for systematically using genome-wide mutant fitness data for gene regulatory network inference. Results: In this article, we describe a model and propose an inference algorithm for using fitness data from knockout libraries to identify underlying gene regulatory networks. Unlike most prior methods, the presented approach captures not only structural, but also dynamical and non-linear nature of biomolecular systems involved. A state–space model with non-linear basis is used for dynamically describing gene regulatory networks. Network structure is then elucidated by estimating unknown model parameters. Unscented Kalman filter is used to cope with the non-linearities introduced in the model, which also enables the algorithm to run in on-line mode for practical use. Here, we demonstrate that the algorithm provides satisfying results for both synthetic data as well as empirical measurements of GAL network in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and TyrR–LiuR network in bacteria Shewanella oneidensis. Availability: MATLAB code and datasets are available to download at http://www.duke.edu/∼lw174/Fitness.zip and http://genomics.lbl.gov/supplemental/fitness-bioinf/ Contact: wangx@ee.columbia.edu or mssamoilov@lbl.gov Supplementary information

  7. Reverse engineering gene regulatory network from microarray data using linear time-variant model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene regulatory network is an abstract mapping of gene regulations in living cells that can help to predict the system behavior of living organisms. Such prediction capability can potentially lead to the development of improved diagnostic tests and therapeutics. DNA microarrays, which measure the expression level of thousands of genes in parallel, constitute the numeric seed for the inference of gene regulatory networks. In this paper, we have proposed a new approach for inferring gene regulatory networks from time-series gene expression data using linear time-variant model. Here, Self-Adaptive Differential Evolution, a versatile and robust Evolutionary Algorithm, is used as the learning paradigm. Results To assess the potency of the proposed work, a well known nonlinear synthetic network has been used. The reconstruction method has inferred this synthetic network topology and the associated regulatory parameters with high accuracy from both the noise-free and noisy time-series data. For validation purposes, the proposed approach is also applied to the simulated expression dataset of cAMP oscillations in Dictyostelium discoideum and has proved it's strength in finding the correct regulations. The strength of this work has also been verified by analyzing the real expression dataset of SOS DNA repair system in Escherichia coli and it has succeeded in finding more correct and reasonable regulations as compared to various existing works. Conclusion By the proposed approach, the gene interaction networks have been inferred in an efficient manner from both the synthetic, simulated cAMP oscillation expression data and real expression data. The computational time of this approach is also considerably smaller, which makes it to be more suitable for larger network reconstruction. Thus the proposed approach can serve as an initiate for the future researches regarding the associated area. PMID:20122231

  8. Gene regulation: hacking the network on a sugar high.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Tom; Wang, Xiao; Collins, James J

    2008-04-11

    In a recent issue of Molecular Cell, Kaplan et al. (2008) determine the input functions for 19 E. coli sugar-utilization genes by using a two-dimensional high-throughput approach. The resulting input-function map reveals that gene network regulation follows non-Boolean, and often nonmonotonic, logic.

  9. Investigating the Effects of Imputation Methods for Modelling Gene Networks Using a Dynamic Bayesian Network from Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    CHAI, Lian En; LAW, Chow Kuan; MOHAMAD, Mohd Saberi; CHONG, Chuii Khim; CHOON, Yee Wen; DERIS, Safaai; ILLIAS, Rosli Md

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gene expression data often contain missing expression values. Therefore, several imputation methods have been applied to solve the missing values, which include k-nearest neighbour (kNN), local least squares (LLS), and Bayesian principal component analysis (BPCA). However, the effects of these imputation methods on the modelling of gene regulatory networks from gene expression data have rarely been investigated and analysed using a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN). Methods: In the present study, we separately imputed datasets of the Escherichia coli S.O.S. DNA repair pathway and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle pathway with kNN, LLS, and BPCA, and subsequently used these to generate gene regulatory networks (GRNs) using a discrete DBN. We made comparisons on the basis of previous studies in order to select the gene network with the least error. Results: We found that BPCA and LLS performed better on larger networks (based on the S. cerevisiae dataset), whereas kNN performed better on smaller networks (based on the E. coli dataset). Conclusion: The results suggest that the performance of each imputation method is dependent on the size of the dataset, and this subsequently affects the modelling of the resultant GRNs using a DBN. In addition, on the basis of these results, a DBN has the capacity to discover potential edges, as well as display interactions, between genes. PMID:24876803

  10. A non-homogeneous dynamic Bayesian network with sequentially coupled interaction parameters for applications in systems and synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Grzegorczyk, Marco; Husmeier, Dirk

    2012-07-12

    An important and challenging problem in systems biology is the inference of gene regulatory networks from short non-stationary time series of transcriptional profiles. A popular approach that has been widely applied to this end is based on dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs), although traditional homogeneous DBNs fail to model the non-stationarity and time-varying nature of the gene regulatory processes. Various authors have therefore recently proposed combining DBNs with multiple changepoint processes to obtain time varying dynamic Bayesian networks (TV-DBNs). However, TV-DBNs are not without problems. Gene expression time series are typically short, which leaves the model over-flexible, leading to over-fitting or inflated inference uncertainty. In the present paper, we introduce a Bayesian regularization scheme that addresses this difficulty. Our approach is based on the rationale that changes in gene regulatory processes appear gradually during an organism's life cycle or in response to a changing environment, and we have integrated this notion in the prior distribution of the TV-DBN parameters. We have extensively tested our regularized TV-DBN model on synthetic data, in which we have simulated short non-homogeneous time series produced from a system subject to gradual change. We have then applied our method to real-world gene expression time series, measured during the life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster, under artificially generated constant light condition in Arabidopsis thaliana, and from a synthetically designed strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to a changing environment.

  11. Linear control theory for gene network modeling.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Jun; Bleris, Leonidas

    2010-09-16

    Systems biology is an interdisciplinary field that aims at understanding complex interactions in cells. Here we demonstrate that linear control theory can provide valuable insight and practical tools for the characterization of complex biological networks. We provide the foundation for such analyses through the study of several case studies including cascade and parallel forms, feedback and feedforward loops. We reproduce experimental results and provide rational analysis of the observed behavior. We demonstrate that methods such as the transfer function (frequency domain) and linear state-space (time domain) can be used to predict reliably the properties and transient behavior of complex network topologies and point to specific design strategies for synthetic networks.

  12. Network-Based Inference Framework for Identifying Cancer Genes from Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Zhang, Junying; Yin, Yaling; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    Great efforts have been devoted to alleviate uncertainty of detected cancer genes as accurate identification of oncogenes is of tremendous significance and helps unravel the biological behavior of tumors. In this paper, we present a differential network-based framework to detect biologically meaningful cancer-related genes. Firstly, a gene regulatory network construction algorithm is proposed, in which a boosting regression based on likelihood score and informative prior is employed for improving accuracy of identification. Secondly, with the algorithm, two gene regulatory networks are constructed from case and control samples independently. Thirdly, by subtracting the two networks, a differential-network model is obtained and then used to rank differentially expressed hub genes for identification of cancer biomarkers. Compared with two existing gene-based methods (t-test and lasso), the method has a significant improvement in accuracy both on synthetic datasets and two real breast cancer datasets. Furthermore, identified six genes (TSPYL5, CD55, CCNE2, DCK, BBC3, and MUC1) susceptible to breast cancer were verified through the literature mining, GO analysis, and pathway functional enrichment analysis. Among these oncogenes, TSPYL5 and CCNE2 have been already known as prognostic biomarkers in breast cancer, CD55 has been suspected of playing an important role in breast cancer prognosis from literature evidence, and other three genes are newly discovered breast cancer biomarkers. More generally, the differential-network schema can be extended to other complex diseases for detection of disease associated-genes. PMID:24073403

  13. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d'Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-06-03

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting.

  14. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; D’Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting.

  15. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif

    PubMed Central

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d’Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting. PMID:27256916

  16. Gene-based and semantic structure of the Gene Ontology as a complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronnello, Claudia; Tumminello, Michele; Miccichè, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    The last decade has seen the advent and consolidation of ontology based tools for the identification and biological interpretation of classes of genes, such as the Gene Ontology. The Gene Ontology (GO) is constantly evolving over time. The information accumulated time-by-time and included in the GO is encoded in the definition of terms and in the setting up of semantic relations amongst terms. Here we investigate the Gene Ontology from a complex network perspective. We consider the semantic network of terms naturally associated with the semantic relationships provided by the Gene Ontology consortium. Moreover, the GO is a natural example of bipartite network of terms and genes. Here we are interested in studying the properties of the projected network of terms, i.e. a gene-based weighted network of GO terms, in which a link between any two terms is set if at least one gene is annotated in both terms. One aim of the present paper is to compare the structural properties of the semantic and the gene-based network. The relative importance of terms is very similar in the two networks, but the community structure changes. We show that in some cases GO terms that appear to be distinct from a semantic point of view are instead connected, and appear in the same community when considering their gene content. The identification of such gene-based communities of terms might therefore be the basis of a simple protocol aiming at improving the semantic structure of GO. Information about terms that share large gene content might also be important from a biomedical point of view, as it might reveal how genes over-expressed in a certain term also affect other biological processes, molecular functions and cellular components not directly linked according to GO semantics.

  17. Beyond Genomics: Studying Evolution with Gene Coexpression Networks.

    PubMed

    Ruprecht, Colin; Vaid, Neha; Proost, Sebastian; Persson, Staffan; Mutwil, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Understanding how genomes change as organisms become more complex is a central question in evolution. Molecular evolutionary studies typically correlate the appearance of genes and gene families with the emergence of biological pathways and morphological features. While such approaches are of great importance to understand how organisms evolve, they are also limited, as functionally related genes work together in contexts of dynamic gene networks. Since functionally related genes are often transcriptionally coregulated, gene coexpression networks present a resource to study the evolution of biological pathways. In this opinion article, we discuss recent developments in this field and how coexpression analyses can be merged with existing genomic approaches to transfer functional knowledge between species to study the appearance or extension of pathways.

  18. Replaying the evolutionary tape: biomimetic reverse engineering of gene networks.

    PubMed

    Marbach, Daniel; Mattiussi, Claudio; Floreano, Dario

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we suggest a new approach for reverse engineering gene regulatory networks, which consists of using a reconstruction process that is similar to the evolutionary process that created these networks. The aim is to integrate prior knowledge into the reverse-engineering procedure, thus biasing the search toward biologically plausible solutions. To this end, we propose an evolutionary method that abstracts and mimics the natural evolution of gene regulatory networks. Our method can be used with a wide range of nonlinear dynamical models. This allows us to explore novel model types such as the log-sigmoid model introduced here. We apply the biomimetic method to a gold-standard dataset from an in vivo gene network. The obtained results won a reverse engineering competition of the second DREAM conference (Dialogue on Reverse Engineering Assessments and Methods 2007, New York, NY).

  19. Gene regulatory network clustering for graph layout based on microarray gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kaname; Imoto, Seiya; Nagasaki, Masao; Miyano, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    We propose a statistical model realizing simultaneous estimation of gene regulatory network and gene module identification from time series gene expression data from microarray experiments. Under the assumption that genes in the same module are densely connected, the proposed method detects gene modules based on the variational Bayesian technique. The model can also incorporate existing biological prior knowledge such as protein subcellular localization. We apply the proposed model to the time series data from a synthetically generated network and verified the effectiveness of the proposed model. The proposed model is also applied the time series microarray data from HeLa cell. Detected gene module information gives the great help on drawing the estimated gene network.

  20. Network Diffusion-Based Prioritization of Autism Risk Genes Identifies Significantly Connected Gene Modules

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Ettore; Bersanelli, Matteo; Gnocchi, Matteo; Moscatelli, Marco; Castellani, Gastone; Milanesi, Luciano; Mezzelani, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is marked by a strong genetic heterogeneity, which is underlined by the low overlap between ASD risk gene lists proposed in different studies. In this context, molecular networks can be used to analyze the results of several genome-wide studies in order to underline those network regions harboring genetic variations associated with ASD, the so-called “disease modules.” In this work, we used a recent network diffusion-based approach to jointly analyze multiple ASD risk gene lists. We defined genome-scale prioritizations of human genes in relation to ASD genes from multiple studies, found significantly connected gene modules associated with ASD and predicted genes functionally related to ASD risk genes. Most of them play a role in synapsis and neuronal development and function; many are related to syndromes that can be in comorbidity with ASD and the remaining are involved in epigenetics, cell cycle, cell adhesion and cancer. PMID:28993790

  1. An extensive network of coupling among gene expression machines.

    PubMed

    Maniatis, Tom; Reed, Robin

    2002-04-04

    Gene expression in eukaryotes requires several multi-component cellular machines. Each machine carries out a separate step in the gene expression pathway, which includes transcription, several pre-messenger RNA processing steps and the export of mature mRNA to the cytoplasm. Recent studies lead to the view that, in contrast to a simple linear assembly line, a complex and extensively coupled network has evolved to coordinate the activities of the gene expression machines. The extensive coupling is consistent with a model in which the machines are tethered to each other to form 'gene expression factories' that maximize the efficiency and specificity of each step in gene expression.

  2. A complex network analysis of hypertension-related genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huan; Xu, Chuan-Yun; Hu, Jing-Bo; Cao, Ke-Fei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a network of hypertension-related genes is constructed by analyzing the correlations of gene expression data among the Dahl salt-sensitive rat and two consomic rat strains. The numerical calculations show that this sparse and assortative network has small-world and scale-free properties. Further, 16 key hub genes (Col4a1, Lcn2, Cdk4, etc.) are determined by introducing an integrated centrality and have been confirmed by biological/medical research to play important roles in hypertension.

  3. Gene network and pathway generation and analysis: Editorial

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhongming; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Huang, Kun

    2011-02-18

    The past decade has witnessed an exponential growth of biological data including genomic sequences, gene annotations, expression and regulation, and protein-protein interactions. A key aim in the post-genome era is to systematically catalogue gene networks and pathways in a dynamic living cell and apply them to study diseases and phenotypes. To promote the research in systems biology and its application to disease studies, we organized a workshop focusing on the reconstruction and analysis of gene networks and pathways in any organisms from high-throughput data collected through techniques such as microarray analysis and RNA-Seq.

  4. Identification of cancer-related genes and motifs in the human gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Carson, Matthew B; Gu, Jianlei; Yu, Guangjun; Lu, Hui

    2015-08-01

    The authors investigated the regulatory network motifs and corresponding motif positions of cancer-related genes. First, they mapped disease-related genes to a transcription factor regulatory network. Next, they calculated statistically significant motifs and subsequently identified positions within these motifs that were enriched in cancer-related genes. Potential mechanisms of these motifs and positions are discussed. These results could be used to identify other disease- and cancer-related genes and could also suggest mechanisms for how these genes relate to co-occurring diseases.

  5. Gene regulatory networks modelling using a dynamic evolutionary hybrid

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Inference of gene regulatory networks is a key goal in the quest for understanding fundamental cellular processes and revealing underlying relations among genes. With the availability of gene expression data, computational methods aiming at regulatory networks reconstruction are facing challenges posed by the data's high dimensionality, temporal dynamics or measurement noise. We propose an approach based on a novel multi-layer evolutionary trained neuro-fuzzy recurrent network (ENFRN) that is able to select potential regulators of target genes and describe their regulation type. Results The recurrent, self-organizing structure and evolutionary training of our network yield an optimized pool of regulatory relations, while its fuzzy nature avoids noise-related problems. Furthermore, we are able to assign scores for each regulation, highlighting the confidence in the retrieved relations. The approach was tested by applying it to several benchmark datasets of yeast, managing to acquire biologically validated relations among genes. Conclusions The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the ENFRN in retrieving biologically valid regulatory relations and providing meaningful insights for better understanding the dynamics of gene regulatory networks. The algorithms and methods described in this paper have been implemented in a Matlab toolbox and are available from: http://bioserver-1.bioacademy.gr/DataRepository/Project_ENFRN_GRN/. PMID:20298548

  6. Identification of marginal causal relationships in gene networks from observational and interventional expression data

    PubMed Central

    Monneret, Gilles; Jaffrézic, Florence; Rau, Andrea; Zerjal, Tatiana; Nuel, Grégory

    2017-01-01

    Causal network inference is an important methodological challenge in biology as well as other areas of application. Although several causal network inference methods have been proposed in recent years, they are typically applicable for only a small number of genes, due to the large number of parameters to be estimated and the limited number of biological replicates available. In this work, we consider the specific case of transcriptomic studies made up of both observational and interventional data in which a single gene of biological interest is knocked out. We focus on a marginal causal estimation approach, based on the framework of Gaussian directed acyclic graphs, to infer causal relationships between the knocked-out gene and a large set of other genes. In a simulation study, we found that our proposed method accurately differentiates between downstream causal relationships and those that are upstream or simply associative. It also enables an estimation of the total causal effects between the gene of interest and the remaining genes. Our method performed very similarly to a classical differential analysis for experiments with a relatively large number of biological replicates, but has the advantage of providing a formal causal interpretation. Our proposed marginal causal approach is computationally efficient and may be applied to several thousands of genes simultaneously. In addition, it may help highlight subsets of genes of interest for a more thorough subsequent causal network inference. The method is implemented in an R package called MarginalCausality (available on GitHub). PMID:28301504

  7. Identification of marginal causal relationships in gene networks from observational and interventional expression data.

    PubMed

    Monneret, Gilles; Jaffrézic, Florence; Rau, Andrea; Zerjal, Tatiana; Nuel, Grégory

    2017-01-01

    Causal network inference is an important methodological challenge in biology as well as other areas of application. Although several causal network inference methods have been proposed in recent years, they are typically applicable for only a small number of genes, due to the large number of parameters to be estimated and the limited number of biological replicates available. In this work, we consider the specific case of transcriptomic studies made up of both observational and interventional data in which a single gene of biological interest is knocked out. We focus on a marginal causal estimation approach, based on the framework of Gaussian directed acyclic graphs, to infer causal relationships between the knocked-out gene and a large set of other genes. In a simulation study, we found that our proposed method accurately differentiates between downstream causal relationships and those that are upstream or simply associative. It also enables an estimation of the total causal effects between the gene of interest and the remaining genes. Our method performed very similarly to a classical differential analysis for experiments with a relatively large number of biological replicates, but has the advantage of providing a formal causal interpretation. Our proposed marginal causal approach is computationally efficient and may be applied to several thousands of genes simultaneously. In addition, it may help highlight subsets of genes of interest for a more thorough subsequent causal network inference. The method is implemented in an R package called MarginalCausality (available on GitHub).

  8. Functional and evolutionary inference in gene networks: does topology matter?

    PubMed

    Siegal, Mark L; Promislow, Daniel E L; Bergman, Aviv

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between the topology of a biological network and its functional or evolutionary properties has attracted much recent interest. It has been suggested that most, if not all, biological networks are 'scale free.' That is, their connections follow power-law distributions, such that there are very few nodes with very many connections and vice versa. The number of target genes of known transcriptional regulators in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, appears to follow such a distribution, as do other networks, such as the yeast network of protein-protein interactions. These findings have inspired attempts to draw biological inferences from general properties associated with scale-free network topology. One often cited general property is that, when compromised, highly connected nodes will tend to have a larger effect on network function than sparsely connected nodes. For example, more highly connected proteins are more likely to be lethal when knocked out. However, the correlation between lethality and connectivity is relatively weak, and some highly connected proteins can be removed without noticeable phenotypic effect. Similarly, network topology only weakly predicts the response of gene expression to environmental perturbations. Evolutionary simulations of gene-regulatory networks, presented here, suggest that such weak or non-existent correlations are to be expected, and are likely not due to inadequacy of experimental data. We argue that 'top-down' inferences of biological properties based on simple measures of network topology are of limited utility, and we present simulation results suggesting that much more detailed information about a gene's location in a regulatory network, as well as dynamic gene-expression data, are needed to make more meaningful functional and evolutionary predictions. Specifically, we find in our simulations that: (1) the relationship between a gene's connectivity and its fitness effect upon knockout depends on its

  9. The incorporation of epigenetics in artificial gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Turner, Alexander P; Lones, Michael A; Fuente, Luis A; Stepney, Susan; Caves, Leo S D; Tyrrell, Andy M

    2013-05-01

    Artificial gene regulatory networks are computational models that draw inspiration from biological networks of gene regulation. Since their inception they have been used to infer knowledge about gene regulation and as methods of computation. These computational models have been shown to possess properties typically found in the biological world, such as robustness and self organisation. Recently, it has become apparent that epigenetic mechanisms play an important role in gene regulation. This paper describes a new model, the Artificial Epigenetic Regulatory Network (AERN) which builds upon existing models by adding an epigenetic control layer. Our results demonstrate that AERNs are more adept at controlling multiple opposing trajectories when applied to a chaos control task within a conservative dynamical system, suggesting that AERNs are an interesting area for further investigation.

  10. A Synthesis Method of Gene Networks Having Cyclic Expression Pattern Sequences by Network Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yoshihiro; Kuroe, Yasuaki

    Recently, synthesis of gene networks having desired functions has become of interest to many researchers because it is a complementary approach to understanding gene networks, and it could be the first step in controlling living cells. There exist several periodic phenomena in cells, e.g. circadian rhythm. These phenomena are considered to be generated by gene networks. We have already proposed synthesis method of gene networks based on gene expression. The method is applicable to synthesizing gene networks possessing the desired cyclic expression pattern sequences. It ensures that realized expression pattern sequences are periodic, however, it does not ensure that their corresponding solution trajectories are periodic, which might bring that their oscillations are not persistent. In this paper, in order to resolve the problem we propose a synthesis method of gene networks possessing the desired cyclic expression pattern sequences together with their corresponding solution trajectories being periodic. In the proposed method the persistent oscillations of the solution trajectories are realized by specifying passing points of them.

  11. microRNA and gene networks in human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, MINGHUI; XU, ZHIWEN; WANG, KUNHAO; WANG, NING; LI, YANG

    2013-01-01

    To date, scientists have obtained a substantial amount of knowledge with regard to genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) in pancreatic cancer (PC). However, deciphering the regulatory mechanism of these genes and miRNAs remains difficult. In the present study, three regulatory networks consisting of a differentially-expressed network, a related network and a global network, were constructed in order to identify the mechanisms and certain key miRNA and gene pathways in PC. The interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and miRNAs, miRNAs and target genes and an miRNA and its host gene were investigated. The present study compared and analyzed the similarities and differences between the three networks in order to distinguish the key pathways. Certain pathways involving the differentially-expressed genes and miRNAs demonstrated specific features. TP53 and hsa-miR-125b were observed to form a self-adaptation association. A further 16 significant differentially-expressed miRNAs were obtained and it was observed that an miRNA and its host gene exhibit specific features in PC, for example, hsa-miR-196a-1 and its host gene, HOXB7, form a self-adaptation association. The differentially-expressed network partially illuminated the mechanism of PC. The present study provides comprehensive data that is associated with PC and may aid future studies in obtaining pertinent data results with regards to PC. In the future, an improved understanding of PC may be obtained through an increased knowledge of the occurrence, mechanism, improvement, metastasis and treatment of the disease. PMID:24137477

  12. Development of a synthetic gene network to modulate gene expression by mechanical forces

    PubMed Central

    Kis, Zoltán; Rodin, Tania; Zafar, Asma; Lai, Zhangxing; Freke, Grace; Fleck, Oliver; Del Rio Hernandez, Armando; Towhidi, Leila; Pedrigi, Ryan M.; Homma, Takayuki; Krams, Rob

    2016-01-01

    The majority of (mammalian) cells in our body are sensitive to mechanical forces, but little work has been done to develop assays to monitor mechanosensor activity. Furthermore, it is currently impossible to use mechanosensor activity to drive gene expression. To address these needs, we developed the first mammalian mechanosensitive synthetic gene network to monitor endothelial cell shear stress levels and directly modulate expression of an atheroprotective transcription factor by shear stress. The technique is highly modular, easily scalable and allows graded control of gene expression by mechanical stimuli in hard-to-transfect mammalian cells. We call this new approach mechanosyngenetics. To insert the gene network into a high proportion of cells, a hybrid transfection procedure was developed that involves electroporation, plasmids replication in mammalian cells, mammalian antibiotic selection, a second electroporation and gene network activation. This procedure takes 1 week and yielded over 60% of cells with a functional gene network. To test gene network functionality, we developed a flow setup that exposes cells to linearly increasing shear stress along the length of the flow channel floor. Activation of the gene network varied logarithmically as a function of shear stress magnitude. PMID:27404994

  13. Solution of the quasispecies model for an arbitrary gene network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2004-08-01

    In this paper, we study the equilibrium behavior of Eigen’s quasispecies equations for an arbitrary gene network. We consider a genome consisting of N genes, so that the full genome sequence σ may be written as σ=σ1σ2⋯σN , where σi are sequences of individual genes. We assume a single fitness peak model for each gene, so that gene i has some “master” sequence σi,0 for which it is functioning. The fitness landscape is then determined by which genes in the genome are functioning and which are not. The equilibrium behavior of this model may be solved in the limit of infinite sequence length. The central result is that, instead of a single error catastrophe, the model exhibits a series of localization to delocalization transitions, which we term an “error cascade.” As the mutation rate is increased, the selective advantage for maintaining functional copies of certain genes in the network disappears, and the population distribution delocalizes over the corresponding sequence spaces. The network goes through a series of such transitions, as more and more genes become inactivated, until eventually delocalization occurs over the entire genome space, resulting in a final error catastrophe. This model provides a criterion for determining the conditions under which certain genes in a genome will lose functionality due to genetic drift. It also provides insight into the response of gene networks to mutagens. In particular, it suggests an approach for determining the relative importance of various genes to the fitness of an organism, in a more accurate manner than the standard “deletion set” method. The results in this paper also have implications for mutational robustness and what C.O. Wilke termed “survival of the flattest.”

  14. Hidden hysteresis – population dynamics can obscure gene network dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Positive feedback is a common motif in gene regulatory networks. It can be used in synthetic networks as an amplifier to increase the level of gene expression, as well as a nonlinear module to create bistable gene networks that display hysteresis in response to a given stimulus. Using a synthetic positive feedback-based tetracycline sensor in E. coli, we show that the population dynamics of a cell culture has a profound effect on the observed hysteretic response of a population of cells with this synthetic gene circuit. Results The amount of observable hysteresis in a cell culture harboring the gene circuit depended on the initial concentration of cells within the culture. The magnitude of the hysteresis observed was inversely related to the dilution procedure used to inoculate the subcultures; the higher the dilution of the cell culture, lower was the observed hysteresis of that culture at steady state. Although the behavior of the gene circuit in individual cells did not change significantly in the different subcultures, the proportion of cells exhibiting high levels of steady-state gene expression did change. Although the interrelated kinetics of gene expression and cell growth are unpredictable at first sight, we were able to resolve the surprising dilution-dependent hysteresis as a result of two interrelated phenomena - the stochastic switching between the ON and OFF phenotypes that led to the cumulative failure of the gene circuit over time, and the nonlinear, logistic growth of the cell in the batch culture. Conclusions These findings reinforce the fact that population dynamics cannot be ignored in analyzing the dynamics of gene networks. Indeed population dynamics may play a significant role in the manifestation of bistability and hysteresis, and is an important consideration when designing synthetic gene circuits intended for long-term application. PMID:23800122

  15. Stability Depends on Positive Autoregulation in Boolean Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Ricardo; Garcia, Victor; Irimia, Manuel; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2014-01-01

    Network motifs have been identified as building blocks of regulatory networks, including gene regulatory networks (GRNs). The most basic motif, autoregulation, has been associated with bistability (when positive) and with homeostasis and robustness to noise (when negative), but its general importance in network behavior is poorly understood. Moreover, how specific autoregulatory motifs are selected during evolution and how this relates to robustness is largely unknown. Here, we used a class of GRN models, Boolean networks, to investigate the relationship between autoregulation and network stability and robustness under various conditions. We ran evolutionary simulation experiments for different models of selection, including mutation and recombination. Each generation simulated the development of a population of organisms modeled by GRNs. We found that stability and robustness positively correlate with autoregulation; in all investigated scenarios, stable networks had mostly positive autoregulation. Assuming biological networks correspond to stable networks, these results suggest that biological networks should often be dominated by positive autoregulatory loops. This seems to be the case for most studied eukaryotic transcription factor networks, including those in yeast, flies and mammals. PMID:25375153

  16. Modularity and evolutionary constraints in a baculovirus gene regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The structure of regulatory networks remains an open question in our understanding of complex biological systems. Interactions during complete viral life cycles present unique opportunities to understand how host-parasite network take shape and behave. The Anticarsia gemmatalis multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AgMNPV) is a large double-stranded DNA virus, whose genome may encode for 152 open reading frames (ORFs). Here we present the analysis of the ordered cascade of the AgMNPV gene expression. Results We observed an earlier onset of the expression than previously reported for other baculoviruses, especially for genes involved in DNA replication. Most ORFs were expressed at higher levels in a more permissive host cell line. Genes with more than one copy in the genome had distinct expression profiles, which could indicate the acquisition of new functionalities. The transcription gene regulatory network (GRN) for 149 ORFs had a modular topology comprising five communities of highly interconnected nodes that separated key genes that are functionally related on different communities, possibly maximizing redundancy and GRN robustness by compartmentalization of important functions. Core conserved functions showed expression synchronicity, distinct GRN features and significantly less genetic diversity, consistent with evolutionary constraints imposed in key elements of biological systems. This reduced genetic diversity also had a positive correlation with the importance of the gene in our estimated GRN, supporting a relationship between phylogenetic data of baculovirus genes and network features inferred from expression data. We also observed that gene arrangement in overlapping transcripts was conserved among related baculoviruses, suggesting a principle of genome organization. Conclusions Albeit with a reduced number of nodes (149), the AgMNPV GRN had a topology and key characteristics similar to those observed in complex cellular organisms, which indicates

  17. GENIUS: web server to predict local gene networks and key genes for biological functions.

    PubMed

    Puelma, Tomas; Araus, Viviana; Canales, Javier; Vidal, Elena A; Cabello, Juan M; Soto, Alvaro; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A

    2017-03-01

    GENIUS is a user-friendly web server that uses a novel machine learning algorithm to infer functional gene networks focused on specific genes and experimental conditions that are relevant to biological functions of interest. These functions may have different levels of complexity, from specific biological processes to complex traits that involve several interacting processes. GENIUS also enriches the network with new genes related to the biological function of interest, with accuracies comparable to highly discriminative Support Vector Machine methods. GENIUS currently supports eight model organisms and is freely available for public use at http://networks.bio.puc.cl/genius . genius.psbl@gmail.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  18. Inference of gene regulatory networks using S-system: a unified approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Qian, L; Dougherty, E

    2010-03-01

    With the increased availability of DNA microarray time-series data, it is possible to discover dynamic gene regulatory networks (GRNs). S-system is a promising model to capture the rich dynamics of GRNs. However, owing to the complexity of the inference problem and limited number of available data comparing to the number of unknown kinetic parameters, S-system can only be applied to a very small GRN with few parameters. This significantly limits its applications. A unified approach to infer GRNs using the S-system model is proposed. In order to discover the structure of large-scale GRNs, a simplified S-system model is proposed that enables fast parameter estimation to determine the major gene interactions. If a detailed S-system model is desirable for a subset of genes, a two-step method is proposed where the range of the parameters will be determined first using genetic programming and recursive least square estimation. Then the mean values of the parameters will be estimated using a multi-dimensional optimisation algorithm. Both the downhill simplex algorithm and modified Powell algorithm are tested for multi-dimensional optimisation. A 50-dimensional synthetic model with 51 parameters for each gene is tested for the applicability of the simplified S-system model. In addition, real measurement data pertaining to yeast protein synthesis are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed two-step method to identify the detailed interactions among genes in small GRNs.

  19. Synchronization-based parameter estimation of fractional-order neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yajuan; Yu, Yongguang; Wang, Hu

    2017-10-01

    This paper focuses on the parameter estimation problem of fractional-order neural network. By combining the adaptive control and parameter update law, we generalize the synchronization-based identification method that has been reported in several literatures on identifying unknown parameters of integer-order systems. With this method, parameter identification and synchronization can be achieved simultaneously. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  20. Gene-network inference by message passing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunstein, A.; Pagnani, A.; Weigt, M.; Zecchina, R.

    2008-01-01

    The inference of gene-regulatory processes from gene-expression data belongs to the major challenges of computational systems biology. Here we address the problem from a statistical-physics perspective and develop a message-passing algorithm which is able to infer sparse, directed and combinatorial regulatory mechanisms. Using the replica technique, the algorithmic performance can be characterized analytically for artificially generated data. The algorithm is applied to genome-wide expression data of baker's yeast under various environmental conditions. We find clear cases of combinatorial control, and enrichment in common functional annotations of regulated genes and their regulators.

  1. Multiscale Embedded Gene Co-expression Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Won-Min; Zhang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gene co-expression network analysis has been shown effective in identifying functional co-expressed gene modules associated with complex human diseases. However, existing techniques to construct co-expression networks require some critical prior information such as predefined number of clusters, numerical thresholds for defining co-expression/interaction, or do not naturally reproduce the hallmarks of complex systems such as the scale-free degree distribution of small-worldness. Previously, a graph filtering technique called Planar Maximally Filtered Graph (PMFG) has been applied to many real-world data sets such as financial stock prices and gene expression to extract meaningful and relevant interactions. However, PMFG is not suitable for large-scale genomic data due to several drawbacks, such as the high computation complexity O(|V|3), the presence of false-positives due to the maximal planarity constraint, and the inadequacy of the clustering framework. Here, we developed a new co-expression network analysis framework called Multiscale Embedded Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (MEGENA) by: i) introducing quality control of co-expression similarities, ii) parallelizing embedded network construction, and iii) developing a novel clustering technique to identify multi-scale clustering structures in Planar Filtered Networks (PFNs). We applied MEGENA to a series of simulated data and the gene expression data in breast carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). MEGENA showed improved performance over well-established clustering methods and co-expression network construction approaches. MEGENA revealed not only meaningful multi-scale organizations of co-expressed gene clusters but also novel targets in breast carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26618778

  2. Learning gene regulatory networks from next generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Jia, Bochao; Xu, Suwa; Xiao, Guanghua; Lamba, Vishal; Liang, Faming

    2017-03-10

    In recent years, next generation sequencing (NGS) has gradually replaced microarray as the major platform in measuring gene expressions. Compared to microarray, NGS has many advantages, such as less noise and higher throughput. However, the discreteness of NGS data also challenges the existing statistical methodology. In particular, there still lacks an appropriate statistical method for reconstructing gene regulatory networks using NGS data in the literature. The existing local Poisson graphical model method is not consistent and can only infer certain local structures of the network. In this article, we propose a random effect model-based transformation to continuize NGS data and then we transform the continuized data to Gaussian via a semiparametric transformation and apply an equivalent partial correlation selection method to reconstruct gene regulatory networks. The proposed method is consistent. The numerical results indicate that the proposed method can lead to much more accurate inference of gene regulatory networks than the local Poisson graphical model and other existing methods. The proposed data-continuized transformation fills the theoretical gap for how to transform discrete data to continuous data and facilitates NGS data analysis. The proposed data-continuized transformation also makes it feasible to integrate different types of data, such as microarray and RNA-seq data, in reconstruction of gene regulatory networks.

  3. Stochastic S-system modeling of gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Ahsan Raja; Chetty, Madhu; Evans, Rob

    2015-10-01

    Microarray gene expression data can provide insights into biological processes at a system-wide level and is commonly used for reverse engineering gene regulatory networks (GRN). Due to the amalgamation of noise from different sources, microarray expression profiles become inherently noisy leading to significant impact on the GRN reconstruction process. Microarray replicates (both biological and technical), generated to increase the reliability of data obtained under noisy conditions, have limited influence in enhancing the accuracy of reconstruction . Therefore, instead of the conventional GRN modeling approaches which are deterministic, stochastic techniques are becoming increasingly necessary for inferring GRN from noisy microarray data. In this paper, we propose a new stochastic GRN model by investigating incorporation of various standard noise measurements in the deterministic S-system model. Experimental evaluations performed for varying sizes of synthetic network, representing different stochastic processes, demonstrate the effect of noise on the accuracy of genetic network modeling and the significance of stochastic modeling for GRN reconstruction . The proposed stochastic model is subsequently applied to infer the regulations among genes in two real life networks: (1) the well-studied IRMA network, a real-life in-vivo synthetic network constructed within the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast, and (2) the SOS DNA repair network in Escherichia coli.

  4. Identifying gene networks underlying the neurobiology of ethanol and alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Wolen, Aaron R; Miles, Michael F

    2012-01-01

    For complex disorders such as alcoholism, identifying the genes linked to these diseases and their specific roles is difficult. Traditional genetic approaches, such as genetic association studies (including genome-wide association studies) and analyses of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in both humans and laboratory animals already have helped identify some candidate genes. However, because of technical obstacles, such as the small impact of any individual gene, these approaches only have limited effectiveness in identifying specific genes that contribute to complex diseases. The emerging field of systems biology, which allows for analyses of entire gene networks, may help researchers better elucidate the genetic basis of alcoholism, both in humans and in animal models. Such networks can be identified using approaches such as high-throughput molecular profiling (e.g., through microarray-based gene expression analyses) or strategies referred to as genetical genomics, such as the mapping of expression QTLs (eQTLs). Characterization of gene networks can shed light on the biological pathways underlying complex traits and provide the functional context for identifying those genes that contribute to disease development.

  5. BRAIN NETWORKS. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks.

    PubMed

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W; Smolka, Michael N; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-06-12

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function.

  6. Parameter estimates in binary black hole collisions using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, M.; Gracia-Linares, M.; González, J. A.; Guzmán, F. S.

    2016-10-01

    We present an algorithm based on artificial neural networks (ANNs), that estimates the mass ratio in a binary black hole collision out of given gravitational wave (GW) strains. In this analysis, the ANN is trained with a sample of GW signals generated with numerical simulations. The effectiveness of the algorithm is evaluated with GWs generated also with simulations for given mass ratios unknown to the ANN. We measure the accuracy of the algorithm in the interpolation and extrapolation regimes. We present the results for noise free signals and signals contaminated with Gaussian noise, in order to foresee the dependence of the method accuracy in terms of the signal to noise ratio.

  7. Estimating parameters and hidden variables in non-linear state-space models based on ODEs for biological networks inference.

    PubMed

    Quach, Minh; Brunel, Nicolas; d'Alché-Buc, Florence

    2007-12-01

    Statistical inference of biological networks such as gene regulatory networks, signaling pathways and metabolic networks can contribute to build a picture of complex interactions that take place in the cell. However, biological systems considered as dynamical, non-linear and generally partially observed processes may be difficult to estimate even if the structure of interactions is given. Using the same approach as Sitz et al. proposed in another context, we derive non-linear state-space models from ODEs describing biological networks. In this framework, we apply Unscented Kalman Filtering (UKF) to the estimation of both parameters and hidden variables of non-linear state-space models. We instantiate the method on a transcriptional regulatory model based on Hill kinetics and a signaling pathway model based on mass action kinetics. We successfully use synthetic data and experimental data to test our approach. This approach covers a large set of biological networks models and gives rise to simple and fast estimation algorithms. Moreover, the Bayesian tool used here directly provides uncertainty estimates on parameters and hidden states. Let us also emphasize that it can be coupled with structure inference methods used in Graphical Probabilistic Models. Matlab code available on demand.

  8. Inferring orthologous gene regulatory networks using interspecies data fusion

    PubMed Central

    Penfold, Christopher A.; Millar, Jonathan B. A.; Wild, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The ability to jointly learn gene regulatory networks (GRNs) in, or leverage GRNs between related species would allow the vast amount of legacy data obtained in model organisms to inform the GRNs of more complex, or economically or medically relevant counterparts. Examples include transferring information from Arabidopsis thaliana into related crop species for food security purposes, or from mice into humans for medical applications. Here we develop two related Bayesian approaches to network inference that allow GRNs to be jointly inferred in, or leveraged between, several related species: in one framework, network information is directly propagated between species; in the second hierarchical approach, network information is propagated via an unobserved ‘hypernetwork’. In both frameworks, information about network similarity is captured via graph kernels, with the networks additionally informed by species-specific time series gene expression data, when available, using Gaussian processes to model the dynamics of gene expression. Results: Results on in silico benchmarks demonstrate that joint inference, and leveraging of known networks between species, offers better accuracy than standalone inference. The direct propagation of network information via the non-hierarchical framework is more appropriate when there are relatively few species, while the hierarchical approach is better suited when there are many species. Both methods are robust to small amounts of mislabelling of orthologues. Finally, the use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae data and networks to inform inference of networks in the budding yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe predicts a novel role in cell cycle regulation for Gas1 (SPAC19B12.02c), a 1,3-beta-glucanosyltransferase. Availability and implementation: MATLAB code is available from http://go.warwick.ac.uk/systemsbiology/software/. Contact: d.l.wild@warwick.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics

  9. Gene expression patterns combined with network analysis identify hub genes associated with bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Bi, Dongbin; Ning, Hao; Liu, Shuai; Que, Xinxiang; Ding, Kejia

    2015-06-01

    To explore molecular mechanisms of bladder cancer (BC), network strategy was used to find biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between bladder carcinoma patients and normal subjects were screened using empirical Bayes method of the linear models for microarray data package. Co-expression networks were constructed by differentially co-expressed genes and links. Regulatory impact factors (RIF) metric was used to identify critical transcription factors (TFs). The protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks were constructed by the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins (STRING) and clusters were obtained through molecular complex detection (MCODE) algorithm. Centralities analyses for complex networks were performed based on degree, stress and betweenness. Enrichment analyses were performed based on Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases. Co-expression networks and TFs (based on expression data of global DEGs and DEGs in different stages and grades) were identified. Hub genes of complex networks, such as UBE2C, ACTA2, FABP4, CKS2, FN1 and TOP2A, were also obtained according to analysis of degree. In gene enrichment analyses of global DEGs, cell adhesion, proteinaceous extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix structural constituent were top three GO terms. ECM-receptor interaction, focal adhesion, and cell cycle were significant pathways. Our results provide some potential underlying biomarkers of BC. However, further validation is required and deep studies are needed to elucidate the pathogenesis of BC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The values of the parameters of some multilayer distributed RC null networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huelsman, L. P.; Raghunath, S.

    1974-01-01

    In this correspondence, the values of the parameters of some multilayer distributed RC notch networks are determined, and the usually accepted values are shown to be in error. The magnitude of the error is illustrated by graphs of the frequency response of the networks.

  11. Finding pathway-modulating genes from a novel Ontology Fingerprint-derived gene network.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tingting; Matmati, Nabil; Tsoi, Lam C; Mohanty, Bidyut K; Gao, Nan; Tang, Jijun; Lawson, Andrew B; Hannun, Yusuf A; Zheng, W Jim

    2014-10-01

    To enhance our knowledge regarding biological pathway regulation, we took an integrated approach, using the biomedical literature, ontologies, network analyses and experimental investigation to infer novel genes that could modulate biological pathways. We first constructed a novel gene network via a pairwise comparison of all yeast genes' Ontology Fingerprints--a set of Gene Ontology terms overrepresented in the PubMed abstracts linked to a gene along with those terms' corresponding enrichment P-values. The network was further refined using a Bayesian hierarchical model to identify novel genes that could potentially influence the pathway activities. We applied this method to the sphingolipid pathway in yeast and found that many top-ranked genes indeed displayed altered sphingolipid pathway functions, initially measured by their sensitivity to myriocin, an inhibitor of de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis. Further experiments confirmed the modulation of the sphingolipid pathway by one of these genes, PFA4, encoding a palmitoyl transferase. Comparative analysis showed that few of these novel genes could be discovered by other existing methods. Our novel gene network provides a unique and comprehensive resource to study pathway modulations and systems biology in general.

  12. Integration of gene chip and topological network techniques to screen a candidate biomarker gene (CBG) for predication of the source water carcinogenesis risks on mouse Mus musculus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Cheng, Shupei; Li, Aimin; Zhang, Rui; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xuxiang

    2011-07-01

    Screening of a candidate biomarker gene (CBG) to predicate the carcinogenesis risks in the Yangtze River source of drinking water in Nanjing area (YZR-SDW-NJ) on mouse (Mus musculus) was conducted in this research. The effects of YZR-SDW-NJ on the genomic transcriptional expression levels were measured by the GeneChip(®) Mouse Genome and data treated by the GO database analysis. The 298 genes discovered as the differently expressed genes (DEGs) were down-regulated and their values were ≤-1.5-fold. Of the 298 DEGs, 25 were cancer-related genes selected as the seed genes to build a topological network map with Genes2Networks software, only 7 of them occurred at the constructed map. Smad2 gene was at the constructed map center and could be identified as a candidate biomarker gene (CBG) primarily which involves the genesis and development of colorectal, leukemia, lung and prostate cancers directly. Analysis of the gene signal pathway further approved that smad2 gene had the relationships closely to other 16 cancer-related genes and could be used as a CBG to indicate the carcinogenic risks in YZR-SDW-NJ. The data suggest that integration of gene chip and network techniques may be a way effectively to screen a CBG. And the parameter values for further judgment of the CBG through signal pathway relationship analysis also will be discussed.

  13. A state space representation of VAR models with sparse learning for dynamic gene networks.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kaname; Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Yamauchi, Mai; Nagasaki, Masao; Yoshida, Ryo; Shimamura, Teppei; Ueno, Kazuko; Higuchi, Tomoyuki; Gotoh, Noriko; Miyano, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    We propose a state space representation of vector autoregressive model and its sparse learning based on L1 regularization to achieve efficient estimation of dynamic gene networks based on time course microarray data. The proposed method can overcome drawbacks of the vector autoregressive model and state space model; the assumption of equal time interval and lack of separation ability of observation and systems noises in the former method and the assumption of modularity of network structure in the latter method. However, in a simple implementation the proposed model requires the calculation of large inverse matrices in a large number of times during parameter estimation process based on EM algorithm. This limits the applicability of the proposed method to a relatively small gene set. We thus introduce a new calculation technique for EM algorithm that does not require the calculation of inverse matrices. The proposed method is applied to time course microarray data of lung cells treated by stimulating EGF receptors and dosing an anticancer drug, Gefitinib. By comparing the estimated network with the control network estimated using non-treated lung cells, perturbed genes by the anticancer drug could be found, whose up- and down-stream genes in the estimated networks may be related to side effects of the anticancer drug.

  14. Predicting glioblastoma prognosis networks using weighted gene co-expression network analysis on TCGA data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Using gene co-expression analysis, researchers were able to predict clusters of genes with consistent functions that are relevant to cancer development and prognosis. We applied a weighted gene co-expression network (WGCN) analysis algorithm on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) data obtained from the TCGA project and predicted a set of gene co-expression networks which are related to GBM prognosis. Methods We modified the Quasi-Clique Merger algorithm (QCM algorithm) into edge-covering Quasi-Clique Merger algorithm (eQCM) for mining weighted sub-network in WGCN. Each sub-network is considered a set of features to separate patients into two groups using K-means algorithm. Survival times of the two groups are compared using log-rank test and Kaplan-Meier curves. Simulations using random sets of genes are carried out to determine the thresholds for log-rank test p-values for network selection. Sub-networks with p-values less than their corresponding thresholds were further merged into clusters based on overlap ratios (>50%). The functions for each cluster are analyzed using gene ontology enrichment analysis. Results Using the eQCM algorithm, we identified 8,124 sub-networks in the WGCN, out of which 170 sub-networks show p-values less than their corresponding thresholds. They were then merged into 16 clusters. Conclusions We identified 16 gene clusters associated with GBM prognosis using the eQCM algorithm. Our results not only confirmed previous findings including the importance of cell cycle and immune response in GBM, but also suggested important epigenetic events in GBM development and prognosis. PMID:22536863

  15. Inference and validation of predictive gene networks from biomedical literature and gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Catharina; Fleming, Kathleen; Prendergast, Niall; Rubio, Renee; Emmert-Streib, Frank; Bontempi, Gianluca; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Quackenbush, John

    2014-01-01

    Although many methods have been developed for inference of biological networks, the validation of the resulting models has largely remained an unsolved problem. Here we present a framework for quantitative assessment of inferred gene interaction networks using knock-down data from cell line experiments. Using this framework we are able to show that network inference based on integration of prior knowledge derived from the biomedical literature with genomic data significantly improves the quality of inferred networks relative to other approaches. Our results also suggest that cell line experiments can be used to quantitatively assess the quality of networks inferred from tumor samples.

  16. Wisdom of crowds for robust gene network inference

    PubMed Central

    Marbach, Daniel; Costello, James C.; Küffner, Robert; Vega, Nicci; Prill, Robert J.; Camacho, Diogo M.; Allison, Kyle R.; Kellis, Manolis; Collins, James J.; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Reconstructing gene regulatory networks from high-throughput data is a long-standing problem. Through the DREAM project (Dialogue on Reverse Engineering Assessment and Methods), we performed a comprehensive blind assessment of over thirty network inference methods on Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in silico microarray data. We characterize performance, data requirements, and inherent biases of different inference approaches offering guidelines for both algorithm application and development. We observe that no single inference method performs optimally across all datasets. In contrast, integration of predictions from multiple inference methods shows robust and high performance across diverse datasets. Thereby, we construct high-confidence networks for E. coli and S. aureus, each comprising ~1700 transcriptional interactions at an estimated precision of 50%. We experimentally test 53 novel interactions in E. coli, of which 23 were supported (43%). Our results establish community-based methods as a powerful and robust tool for the inference of transcriptional gene regulatory networks. PMID:22796662

  17. Simultaneous Parameters Identifiability and Estimation of an E. coli Metabolic Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Alberton, André Luís; Di Maggio, Jimena Andrea; Estrada, Vanina Gisela; Díaz, María Soledad; Secchi, Argimiro Resende

    2015-01-01

    This work proposes a procedure for simultaneous parameters identifiability and estimation in metabolic networks in order to overcome difficulties associated with lack of experimental data and large number of parameters, a common scenario in the modeling of such systems. As case study, the complex real problem of parameters identifiability of the Escherichia coli K-12 W3110 dynamic model was investigated, composed by 18 differential ordinary equations and 35 kinetic rates, containing 125 parameters. With the procedure, model fit was improved for most of the measured metabolites, achieving 58 parameters estimated, including 5 unknown initial conditions. The results indicate that simultaneous parameters identifiability and estimation approach in metabolic networks is appealing, since model fit to the most of measured metabolites was possible even when important measures of intracellular metabolites and good initial estimates of parameters are not available. PMID:25654103

  18. Yin and Yang of disease genes and death genes between reciprocally scale-free biological networks

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyun Wook; Ohn, Jung Hun; Moon, Jisook; Kim, Ju Han

    2013-01-01

    Biological networks often show a scale-free topology with node degree following a power-law distribution. Lethal genes tend to form functional hubs, whereas non-lethal disease genes are located at the periphery. Uni-dimensional analyses, however, are flawed. We created and investigated two distinct scale-free networks; a protein–protein interaction (PPI) and a perturbation sensitivity network (PSN). The hubs of both networks exhibit a low molecular evolutionary rate (P < 8 × 10−12, P < 2 × 10−4) and a high codon adaptation index (P < 2 × 10−16, P < 2 × 10−8), indicating that both hubs have been shaped under high evolutionary selective pressure. Moreover, the topologies of PPI and PSN are inversely proportional: hubs of PPI tend to be located at the periphery of PSN and vice versa. PPI hubs are highly enriched with lethal genes but not with disease genes, whereas PSN hubs are highly enriched with disease genes and drug targets but not with lethal genes. PPI hub genes are enriched with essential cellular processes, but PSN hub genes are enriched with environmental interaction processes, having more TATA boxes and transcription factor binding sites. It is concluded that biological systems may balance internal growth signaling and external stress signaling by unifying the two opposite scale-free networks that are seemingly opposite to each other but work in concert between death and disease. PMID:23935122

  19. Yin and Yang of disease genes and death genes between reciprocally scale-free biological networks.

    PubMed

    Han, Hyun Wook; Ohn, Jung Hun; Moon, Jisook; Kim, Ju Han

    2013-11-01

    Biological networks often show a scale-free topology with node degree following a power-law distribution. Lethal genes tend to form functional hubs, whereas non-lethal disease genes are located at the periphery. Uni-dimensional analyses, however, are flawed. We created and investigated two distinct scale-free networks; a protein-protein interaction (PPI) and a perturbation sensitivity network (PSN). The hubs of both networks exhibit a low molecular evolutionary rate (P < 8 × 10(-12), P < 2 × 10(-4)) and a high codon adaptation index (P < 2 × 10(-16), P < 2 × 10(-8)), indicating that both hubs have been shaped under high evolutionary selective pressure. Moreover, the topologies of PPI and PSN are inversely proportional: hubs of PPI tend to be located at the periphery of PSN and vice versa. PPI hubs are highly enriched with lethal genes but not with disease genes, whereas PSN hubs are highly enriched with disease genes and drug targets but not with lethal genes. PPI hub genes are enriched with essential cellular processes, but PSN hub genes are enriched with environmental interaction processes, having more TATA boxes and transcription factor binding sites. It is concluded that biological systems may balance internal growth signaling and external stress signaling by unifying the two opposite scale-free networks that are seemingly opposite to each other but work in concert between death and disease.

  20. Portrait of Candida Species Biofilm Regulatory Network Genes.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Daniela; Henriques, Mariana; Silva, Sónia

    2017-01-01

    Most cases of candidiasis have been attributed to Candida albicans, but Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis, designated as non-C. albicans Candida (NCAC), have been identified as frequent human pathogens. Moreover, Candida biofilms are an escalating clinical problem associated with significant rates of mortality. Biofilms have distinct developmental phases, including adhesion/colonisation, maturation and dispersal, controlled by complex regulatory networks. This review discusses recent advances regarding Candida species biofilm regulatory network genes, which are key components for candidiasis.

  1. Identifying time-delayed gene regulatory networks via an evolvable hierarchical recurrent neural network.

    PubMed

    Kordmahalleh, Mina Moradi; Sefidmazgi, Mohammad Gorji; Harrison, Scott H; Homaifar, Abdollah

    2017-01-01

    The modeling of genetic interactions within a cell is crucial for a basic understanding of physiology and for applied areas such as drug design. Interactions in gene regulatory networks (GRNs) include effects of transcription factors, repressors, small metabolites, and microRNA species. In addition, the effects of regulatory interactions are not always simultaneous, but can occur after a finite time delay, or as a combined outcome of simultaneous and time delayed interactions. Powerful biotechnologies have been rapidly and successfully measuring levels of genetic expression to illuminate different states of biological systems. This has led to an ensuing challenge to improve the identification of specific regulatory mechanisms through regulatory network reconstructions. Solutions to this challenge will ultimately help to spur forward efforts based on the usage of regulatory network reconstructions in systems biology applications. We have developed a hierarchical recurrent neural network (HRNN) that identifies time-delayed gene interactions using time-course data. A customized genetic algorithm (GA) was used to optimize hierarchical connectivity of regulatory genes and a target gene. The proposed design provides a non-fully connected network with the flexibility of using recurrent connections inside the network. These features and the non-linearity of the HRNN facilitate the process of identifying temporal patterns of a GRN. Our HRNN method was implemented with the Python language. It was first evaluated on simulated data representing linear and nonlinear time-delayed gene-gene interaction models across a range of network sizes and variances of noise. We then further demonstrated the capability of our method in reconstructing GRNs of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae synthetic network for in vivo benchmarking of reverse-engineering and modeling approaches (IRMA). We compared the performance of our method to TD-ARACNE, HCC-CLINDE, TSNI and ebdbNet across different network

  2. Visualizing Gene - Interactions within the Rice and Maize Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampong, A.; Feltus, A.; Smith, M.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to design a simpler visualization tool for comparing or viewing gene interaction graphs in systems biology. This visualization tool makes it possible and easier for a researcher to visualize the biological metadata of a plant and interact with the graph on a webpage. Currently available visualization software like Cytoscape and Walrus are difficult to interact with and do not scale effectively for large data sets, limiting the ability to visualize interactions within a biological system. The visualization tool developed is useful for viewing and interpreting the dataset of a gene interaction network. The graph layout drawn by this visualization tool is an improvement from the previous method of comparing lines of genes in two separate data files to, now having the ability to visually see the layout of the gene networks and how the two systems are related. The graph layout presented by the visualization tool draws a graph of the sample rice and maize gene networks, linking the common genes found in both plants and highlighting the functions served by common genes from each plant. The success of this visualization tool will enable Dr. Feltus to continue his investigations and draw conclusions on the biological evolution of the sorghum plant as well. REU Funded by NSF ACI Award 1359223 Vetria L. Byrd, PI

  3. DNA-Binding Kinetics Determines the Mechanism of Noise-Induced Switching in Gene Networks.

    PubMed

    Tse, Margaret J; Chu, Brian K; Roy, Mahua; Read, Elizabeth L

    2015-10-20

    Gene regulatory networks are multistable dynamical systems in which attractor states represent cell phenotypes. Spontaneous, noise-induced transitions between these states are thought to underlie critical cellular processes, including cell developmental fate decisions, phenotypic plasticity in fluctuating environments, and carcinogenesis. As such, there is increasing interest in the development of theoretical and computational approaches that can shed light on the dynamics of these stochastic state transitions in multistable gene networks. We applied a numerical rare-event sampling algorithm to study transition paths of spontaneous noise-induced switching for a ubiquitous gene regulatory network motif, the bistable toggle switch, in which two mutually repressive genes compete for dominant expression. We find that the method can efficiently uncover detailed switching mechanisms that involve fluctuations both in occupancies of DNA regulatory sites and copy numbers of protein products. In addition, we show that the rate parameters governing binding and unbinding of regulatory proteins to DNA strongly influence the switching mechanism. In a regime of slow DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, spontaneous switching occurs relatively frequently and is driven primarily by fluctuations in DNA-site occupancies. In contrast, in a regime of fast DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, switching occurs rarely and is driven by fluctuations in levels of expressed protein. Our results demonstrate how spontaneous cell phenotype transitions involve collective behavior of both regulatory proteins and DNA. Computational approaches capable of simulating dynamics over many system variables are thus well suited to exploring dynamic mechanisms in gene networks.

  4. GeNESiS: gene network evolution simulation software.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Anton; Tomita, Masaru; Krishnan, Arun

    2008-12-16

    There has been a lot of interest in recent years focusing on the modeling and simulation of Gene Regulatory Networks (GRNs). However, the evolutionary mechanisms that give rise to GRNs in the first place are still largely unknown. In an earlier work, we developed a framework to analyze the effect of objective functions, input types and starting populations on the evolution of GRNs with a specific emphasis on the robustness of evolved GRNs. In this work, we present a parallel software package, GeNESiS for the modeling and simulation of the evolution of gene regulatory networks (GRNs). The software models the process of gene regulation through a combination of finite-state and stochastic models. The evolution of GRNs is then simulated by means of a genetic algorithm with the network connections represented as binary strings. The software allows users to simulate the evolution under varying selective pressures and starting conditions. We believe that the software provides a way for researchers to understand the evolutionary behavior of populations of GRNs. We believe that GeNESiS will serve as a useful tool for scientists interested in understanding the evolution of gene regulatory networks under a range of different conditions and selective pressures. Such modeling efforts can lead to a greater understanding of the network characteristics of GRNs.

  5. Boolean networks using the chi-square test for inferring large-scale gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haseong; Lee, Jae K; Park, Taesung

    2007-02-01

    Boolean network (BN) modeling is a commonly used method for constructing gene regulatory networks from time series microarray data. However, its major drawback is that its computation time is very high or often impractical to construct large-scale gene networks. We propose a variable selection method that are not only reduces BN computation times significantly but also obtains optimal network constructions by using chi-square statistics for testing the independence in contingency tables. Both the computation time and accuracy of the network structures estimated by the proposed method are compared with those of the original BN methods on simulated and real yeast cell cycle microarray gene expression data sets. Our results reveal that the proposed chi-square testing (CST)-based BN method significantly improves the computation time, while its ability to identify all the true network mechanisms was effectively the same as that of full-search BN methods. The proposed BN algorithm is approximately 70.8 and 7.6 times faster than the original BN algorithm when the error sizes of the Best-Fit Extension problem are 0 and 1, respectively. Further, the false positive error rate of the proposed CST-based BN algorithm tends to be less than that of the original BN. The CST-based BN method dramatically improves the computation time of the original BN algorithm. Therefore, it can efficiently infer large-scale gene regulatory network mechanisms.

  6. Linear fuzzy gene network models obtained from microarray data by exhaustive search

    PubMed Central

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Fitch, J Patrick; Quong, Judy N; Quong, Andrew A

    2004-01-01

    Background Recent technological advances in high-throughput data collection allow for experimental study of increasingly complex systems on the scale of the whole cellular genome and proteome. Gene network models are needed to interpret the resulting large and complex data sets. Rationally designed perturbations (e.g., gene knock-outs) can be used to iteratively refine hypothetical models, suggesting an approach for high-throughput biological system analysis. We introduce an approach to gene network modeling based on a scalable linear variant of fuzzy logic: a framework with greater resolution than Boolean logic models, but which, while still semi-quantitative, does not require the precise parameter measurement needed for chemical kinetics-based modeling. Results We demonstrated our approach with exhaustive search for fuzzy gene interaction models that best fit transcription measurements by microarray of twelve selected genes regulating the yeast cell cycle. Applying an efficient, universally applicable data normalization and fuzzification scheme, the search converged to a small number of models that individually predict experimental data within an error tolerance. Because only gene transcription levels are used to develop the models, they include both direct and indirect regulation of genes. Conclusion Biological relationships in the best-fitting fuzzy gene network models successfully recover direct and indirect interactions predicted from previous knowledge to result in transcriptional correlation. Fuzzy models fit on one yeast cell cycle data set robustly predict another experimental data set for the same system. Linear fuzzy gene networks and exhaustive rule search are the first steps towards a framework for an integrated modeling and experiment approach to high-throughput "reverse engineering" of complex biological systems. PMID:15304201

  7. Identifying key genes in rheumatoid arthritis by weighted gene co-expression network analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunhui; Lv, Qi; Teng, Songsong; Yu, Yinxian; Niu, Kerun; Yi, Chengqin

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to identify rheumatoid arthritis (RA) related genes based on microarray data using the WGCNA (weighted gene co-expression network analysis) method. Two gene expression profile datasets GSE55235 (10 RA samples and 10 healthy controls) and GSE77298 (16 RA samples and seven healthy controls) were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. Characteristic genes were identified using metaDE package. WGCNA was used to find disease-related networks based on gene expression correlation coefficients, and module significance was defined as the average gene significance of all genes used to assess the correlation between the module and RA status. Genes in the disease-related gene co-expression network were subject to functional annotation and pathway enrichment analysis using Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Characteristic genes were also mapped to the Connectivity Map to screen small molecules. A total of 599 characteristic genes were identified. For each dataset, characteristic genes in the green, red and turquoise modules were most closely associated with RA, with gene numbers of 54, 43 and 79, respectively. These genes were enriched in totally enriched in 17 Gene Ontology terms, mainly related to immune response (CD97, FYB, CXCL1, IKBKE, CCR1, etc.), inflammatory response (CD97, CXCL1, C3AR1, CCR1, LYZ, etc.) and homeostasis (C3AR1, CCR1, PLN, CCL19, PPT1, etc.). Two small-molecule drugs sanguinarine and papaverine were predicted to have a therapeutic effect against RA. Genes related to immune response, inflammatory response and homeostasis presumably have critical roles in RA pathogenesis. Sanguinarine and papaverine have a potential therapeutic effect against RA. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Informed walks: whispering hints to gene hunters inside networks' jungle.

    PubMed

    Bourdakou, Marilena M; Spyrou, George M

    2017-10-11

    Systemic approaches offer a different point of view on the analysis of several types of molecular associations as well as on the identification of specific gene communities in several cancer types. However, due to lack of sufficient data needed to construct networks based on experimental evidence, statistical gene co-expression networks are widely used instead. Many efforts have been made to exploit the information hidden in these networks. However, these approaches still need to capitalize comprehensively the prior knowledge encrypted into molecular pathway associations and improve their efficiency regarding the discovery of both exclusive subnetworks as candidate biomarkers and conserved subnetworks that may uncover common origins of several cancer types. In this study we present the development of the Informed Walks model based on random walks that incorporate information from molecular pathways to mine candidate genes and gene-gene links. The proposed model has been applied to TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) datasets from seven different cancer types, exploring the reconstructed co-expression networks of the whole set of genes and driving to highlighted sub-networks for each cancer type. In the sequel, we elucidated the impact of each subnetwork on the indication of underlying exclusive and common molecular mechanisms as well as on the short-listing of drugs that have the potential to suppress the corresponding cancer type through a drug-repurposing pipeline. We have developed a method of gene subnetwork highlighting based on prior knowledge, capable to give fruitful insights regarding the underlying molecular mechanisms and valuable input to drug-repurposing pipelines for a variety of cancer types.

  9. Finding pathway-modulating genes from a novel Ontology Fingerprint-derived gene network

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Tingting; Matmati, Nabil; Tsoi, Lam C.; Mohanty, Bidyut K.; Gao, Nan; Tang, Jijun; Lawson, Andrew B.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Zheng, W. Jim

    2014-01-01

    To enhance our knowledge regarding biological pathway regulation, we took an integrated approach, using the biomedical literature, ontologies, network analyses and experimental investigation to infer novel genes that could modulate biological pathways. We first constructed a novel gene network via a pairwise comparison of all yeast genes’ Ontology Fingerprints—a set of Gene Ontology terms overrepresented in the PubMed abstracts linked to a gene along with those terms’ corresponding enrichment P-values. The network was further refined using a Bayesian hierarchical model to identify novel genes that could potentially influence the pathway activities. We applied this method to the sphingolipid pathway in yeast and found that many top-ranked genes indeed displayed altered sphingolipid pathway functions, initially measured by their sensitivity to myriocin, an inhibitor of de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis. Further experiments confirmed the modulation of the sphingolipid pathway by one of these genes, PFA4, encoding a palmitoyl transferase. Comparative analysis showed that few of these novel genes could be discovered by other existing methods. Our novel gene network provides a unique and comprehensive resource to study pathway modulations and systems biology in general. PMID:25063300

  10. Network Analysis of Human Genes Influencing Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lipner, Ettie M.; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Strong, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections constitute a high burden of pulmonary disease in humans, resulting in over 1.5 million deaths per year. Building on the premise that genetic factors influence the instance, progression, and defense of infectious disease, we undertook a systems biology approach to investigate relationships among genetic factors that may play a role in increased susceptibility or control of mycobacterial infections. We combined literature and database mining with network analysis and pathway enrichment analysis to examine genes, pathways, and networks, involved in the human response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. This approach allowed us to examine functional relationships among reported genes, and to identify novel genes and enriched pathways that may play a role in mycobacterial susceptibility or control. Our findings suggest that the primary pathways and genes influencing mycobacterial infection control involve an interplay between innate and adaptive immune proteins and pathways. Signaling pathways involved in autoimmune disease were significantly enriched as revealed in our networks. Mycobacterial disease susceptibility networks were also examined within the context of gene-chemical relationships, in order to identify putative drugs and nutrients with potential beneficial immunomodulatory or anti-mycobacterial effects. PMID:26751573

  11. Using shRNA experiments to validate gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Catharina; Fleming, Kathleen; Prendergast, Niall; Rubio, Renee; Emmert-Streib, Frank; Bontempi, Gianluca; Quackenbush, John; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative validation of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) inferred from observational expression data is a difficult task usually involving time intensive and costly laboratory experiments. We were able to show that gene knock-down experiments can be used to quantitatively assess the quality of large-scale GRNs via a purely data-driven approach (Olsen et al. 2014). Our new validation framework also enables the statistical comparison of multiple network inference techniques, which was a long-standing challenge in the field. In this Data in Brief we detail the contents and quality controls for the gene expression data (available from NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus repository with accession number GSE53091) associated with our study published in Genomics (Olsen et al. 2014). We also provide R code to access the data and reproduce the analysis presented in this article.

  12. Random matrix analysis of localization properties of gene coexpression network.

    PubMed

    Jalan, Sarika; Solymosi, Norbert; Vattay, Gábor; Li, Baowen

    2010-04-01

    We analyze gene coexpression network under the random matrix theory framework. The nearest-neighbor spacing distribution of the adjacency matrix of this network follows Gaussian orthogonal statistics of random matrix theory (RMT). Spectral rigidity test follows random matrix prediction for a certain range and deviates afterwards. Eigenvector analysis of the network using inverse participation ratio suggests that the statistics of bulk of the eigenvalues of network is consistent with those of the real symmetric random matrix, whereas few eigenvalues are localized. Based on these IPR calculations, we can divide eigenvalues in three sets: (a) The nondegenerate part that follows RMT. (b) The nondegenerate part, at both ends and at intermediate eigenvalues, which deviates from RMT and expected to contain information about important nodes in the network. (c) The degenerate part with zero eigenvalue, which fluctuates around RMT-predicted value. We identify nodes corresponding to the dominant modes of the corresponding eigenvectors and analyze their structural properties.

  13. Automatic parameter estimation from well test data using artifical neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Athichanagorn, S.; Horne, R.N.

    1995-12-31

    We propose a robust way of achieving a well test interpretation by combining the sequential predictive probability method with an artificial neural network approach. The sequential predictive probability method considers all possible reservoir models and determines which candidate model or models best predict the well response. This method is dependent on obtaining good initial estimates for the parameters governing the candidate reservoir models, which is achieved by applying the artificial neural network approach. We use the neural network to identify the characteristic components of the pressure derivative curve corresponding to the flow regimes known to be in each candidate model. Reservoir parameters are then computed using the data in the identified range of the corresponding behavior. As a final step, the candidate models and their initial estimates are evaluated using the sequential probability method. The method discriminates between the candidate models and simultaneously performs nonlinear regression to compute the best estimates of reservoir parameters. The trained neural network was able to identify the characteristic components of the derivative curve in most cases. The algorithm written to interpret the neural network signals into flow regimes required special procedures to take care of the misclassification from the neural network. The initial estimates of reservoir parameters from the neural network were found to be reasonably close to the eventual estimates from the sequential predictive probability method.

  14. Study on feed forward neural network convex optimization for LiFePO4 battery parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuepeng; Zhao, Dongmei

    2017-08-01

    Based on the modern facility agriculture automatic walking equipment LiFePO4 Battery, the parameter identification of LiFePO4 Battery is analyzed. An improved method for the process model of li battery is proposed, and the on-line estimation algorithm is presented. The parameters of the battery are identified using feed forward network neural convex optimization algorithm.

  15. Geometry on the parameter space of the belief propagation algorithm on Bayesian networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yodai

    2006-01-01

    This Letter considers a geometrical structure on the parameter space of the belief propagation algorithm on Bayesian networks. The statistical manifold of posterior distributions is introduced, and the expression for the information metric on the manifold is derived. The expression is used to construct a cost function which can be regarded as a measure of the distance in the parameter space.

  16. A network of genes regulated by light in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Aurora, Rajeev; Hihara, Yukako; Singh, Abhay K; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2007-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms require light for their growth and development. However, exposure to high light is detrimental to them. Using time series microarray data from a model cyanobacterium, Synechocystis 6803 transferred from low to high light, we generated a gene co-expression network. The network has twelve sub-networks connected hierarchically, each consisting of an interconnected hub-and-spoke architecture. Within each sub-network, edges formed between genes that recapitulate known pathways. Analysis of the expression profiles shows that the cells undergo a phase transition 6-hours post-shift to high light, characterized by core sub-network. The core sub-network is enriched in proteins that (putatively) bind Fe-S clusters and proteins that mediate iron and sulfate homeostasis. At the center of this core is a sulfate permease, suggesting sulfate is rate limiting for cells grown in high light. To validate this novel finding, we demonstrate the limited ability of cell growth in sulfate-depleted medium in high light. This study highlights how understanding the organization of the networks can provide insights into the coordination of physiologic responses.

  17. PTHGRN: unraveling post-translational hierarchical gene regulatory networks using PPI, ChIP-seq and gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Guan, Daogang; Shao, Jiaofang; Zhao, Zhongying; Wang, Panwen; Qin, Jing; Deng, Youping; Boheler, Kenneth R; Wang, Junwen; Yan, Bin

    2014-07-01

    Interactions among transcriptional factors (TFs), cofactors and other proteins or enzymes can affect transcriptional regulatory capabilities of eukaryotic organisms. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) cooperate with TFs and epigenetic alterations to constitute a hierarchical complexity in transcriptional gene regulation. While clearly implicated in biological processes, our understanding of these complex regulatory mechanisms is still limited and incomplete. Various online software have been proposed for uncovering transcriptional and epigenetic regulatory networks, however, there is a lack of effective web-based software capable of constructing underlying interactive organizations between post-translational and transcriptional regulatory components. Here, we present an open web server, post-translational hierarchical gene regulatory network (PTHGRN) to unravel relationships among PTMs, TFs, epigenetic modifications and gene expression. PTHGRN utilizes a graphical Gaussian model with partial least squares regression-based methodology, and is able to integrate protein-protein interactions, ChIP-seq and gene expression data and to capture essential regulation features behind high-throughput data. The server provides an integrative platform for users to analyze ready-to-use public high-throughput Omics resources or upload their own data for systems biology study. Users can choose various parameters in the method, build network topologies of interests and dissect their associations with biological functions. Application of the software to stem cell and breast cancer demonstrates that it is an effective tool for understanding regulatory mechanisms in biological complex systems. PTHGRN web server is publically available at web site http://www.byanbioinfo.org/pthgrn.

  18. Appraisal of artificial neural network for forecasting of economic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordanuli, Bojana; Barjaktarović, Lidija; Jeremić, Ljiljana; Alizamir, Meysam

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of this research is to develop and apply artificial neural network (ANN) with extreme learning machine (ELM) and back propagation (BP) to forecast gross domestic product (GDP) and Hirschman-Herfindahl Index (HHI). GDP could be developed based on combination of different factors. In this investigation GDP forecasting based on the agriculture and industry added value in gross domestic product (GDP) was analysed separately. Other inputs are final consumption expenditure of general government, gross fixed capital formation (investments) and fertility rate. The relation between product market competition and corporate investment is contentious. On one hand, the relation can be positive, but on the other hand, the relation can be negative. Several methods have been proposed to monitor market power for the purpose of developing procedures to mitigate or eliminate the effects. The most widely used methods are based on indices such as the Hirschman-Herfindahl Index (HHI). The reliability of the ANN models were accessed based on simulation results and using several statistical indicators. Based upon simulation results, it was presented that ELM shows better performances than BP learning algorithm in applications of GDP and HHI forecasting.

  19. Optimal Parameter Determination for Tritiated Water Storage in Polyacrylic Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Postolache, C.; Matei, Lidia; Georgescu, Rodica; Ionita, Gh.

    2005-07-15

    Due to the remarkable capacity of water retaining, croslinked polyacrylic acids (PAA) represent an interesting alternative for tritiated water trapping. The study was developed on radiolytical processes in PAA:HTO systems derivated from irradiation of polymeric network by disintegration of tritium atoms from HTO. The aim of these studies is the identification of polymeric structures and optimal storage conditions.Sol and gel fractions were determinated by radiometrical methods using PAA labeled with 14-C at carboxylic groups and T at main chains of the polymer. Simulation of radiolytical processes was realized using {gamma} radiation field emitted by a irradiation source of 60-Co which ensures a maximum of absorbed dose rate of 3 kGy/h. Self-radiolytical effects were investigated using labeled PAA in HTO with great radioactive concentration (37-185 GBq/mL). The experiment suggests as optimum for HTO storage as tritium liquid wastes a 1:30 PAA:HTO swelling degree at 18.5-37 MBqL. HTO radioactive concentration.RES studies of radiolytical processes were also realized on dry polyacrylic acid (PAA) and polyacrylic based hydrogels irradiated and determined at 77 K. In the study we observed the effect of swelling capacity of hydrogel o the formation of free radicals.

  20. Beyond antioxidant genes in the ancient NRF2 regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    Lacher, Sarah E.; Lee, Joslynn S.; Wang, Xuting; Campbell, Michelle R.; Bell, Douglas A.; Slattery, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    NRF2, a basic leucine zipper transcription factor encoded by the gene NFE2L2, is a master regulator of the transcriptional response to oxidative stress. NRF2 is structurally and functionally conserved from insects to humans, and it heterodimerizes with the small MAF transcription factors to bind a consensus DNA sequence (the antioxidant response element, or ARE) and regulate gene expression. We have used genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq) and gene expression data to identify direct NRF2 target genes in Drosophila and humans. These data have allowed us to construct the deeply conserved ancient NRF2 regulatory network – target genes that are conserved from Drosophila to human. The ancient network consists of canonical antioxidant genes, as well as genes related to proteasomal pathways, metabolism, and a number of less expected genes. We have also used enhancer reporter assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to confirm NRF2-mediated regulation of ARE (antioxidant response element) activity at a number of these novel target genes. Interestingly, the ancient network also highlights a prominent negative feedback loop; this, combined with the finding that and NRF2-mediated regulatory output is tightly linked to the quality of the ARE it is targeting, suggests that precise regulation of nuclear NRF2 concentration is necessary to achieve proper quantitative regulation of distinct gene sets. Together, these findings highlight the importance of balance in the NRF2-ARE pathway, and indicate that NRF2-mediated regulation of xenobiotic metabolism, glucose metabolism, and proteostasis have been central to this pathway since its inception. PMID:26163000

  1. Gene regulatory networks in the early ascidian embryo.

    PubMed

    Satou, Yutaka; Satoh, Nori; Imai, Kaoru S

    2009-04-01

    Ascidians, or sea squirts, are tunicates that diverged from the vertebrate lineage early in the chordate evolution. The compact and simple organization of the ascidian genome makes this organism an ideal model system for analyzing gene regulatory networks in embryonic development. Embryos contain relatively few cells and gene activities by individual cells have been determined. Here we review and discuss advances in our understanding of the ascidian embryogenesis emerging from genomic expression studies and analyses at the single cell level.

  2. Landmine detection and classification with complex-valued hybrid neural network using scattering parameters dataset.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Chung; Bose, N K

    2005-05-01

    Neural networks have been applied to landmine detection from data generated by different kinds of sensors. Real-valued neural networks have been used for detecting landmines from scattering parameters measured by ground penetrating radar (GPR) after disregarding phase information. This paper presents results using complex-valued neural networks, capable of phase-sensitive detection followed by classification. A two-layer hybrid neural network structure incorporating both supervised and unsupervised learning is proposed to detect and then classify the types of landmines. Tests are also reported on a benchmark data.

  3. An algebra-based method for inferring gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Vera-Licona, Paola; Jarrah, Abdul; Garcia-Puente, Luis David; McGee, John; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2014-03-26

    The inference of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) from experimental observations is at the heart of systems biology. This includes the inference of both the network topology and its dynamics. While there are many algorithms available to infer the network topology from experimental data, less emphasis has been placed on methods that infer network dynamics. Furthermore, since the network inference problem is typically underdetermined, it is essential to have the option of incorporating into the inference process, prior knowledge about the network, along with an effective description of the search space of dynamic models. Finally, it is also important to have an understanding of how a given inference method is affected by experimental and other noise in the data used. This paper contains a novel inference algorithm using the algebraic framework of Boolean polynomial dynamical systems (BPDS), meeting all these requirements. The algorithm takes as input time series data, including those from network perturbations, such as knock-out mutant strains and RNAi experiments. It allows for the incorporation of prior biological knowledge while being robust to significant levels of noise in the data used for inference. It uses an evolutionary algorithm for local optimization with an encoding of the mathematical models as BPDS. The BPDS framework allows an effective representation of the search space for algebraic dynamic models that improves computational performance. The algorithm is validated with both simulated and experimental microarray expression profile data. Robustness to noise is tested using a published mathematical model of the segment polarity gene network in Drosophila melanogaster. Benchmarking of the algorithm is done by comparison with a spectrum of state-of-the-art network inference methods on data from the synthetic IRMA network to demonstrate that our method has good precision and recall for the network reconstruction task, while also predicting several of the

  4. An algebra-based method for inferring gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The inference of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) from experimental observations is at the heart of systems biology. This includes the inference of both the network topology and its dynamics. While there are many algorithms available to infer the network topology from experimental data, less emphasis has been placed on methods that infer network dynamics. Furthermore, since the network inference problem is typically underdetermined, it is essential to have the option of incorporating into the inference process, prior knowledge about the network, along with an effective description of the search space of dynamic models. Finally, it is also important to have an understanding of how a given inference method is affected by experimental and other noise in the data used. Results This paper contains a novel inference algorithm using the algebraic framework of Boolean polynomial dynamical systems (BPDS), meeting all these requirements. The algorithm takes as input time series data, including those from network perturbations, such as knock-out mutant strains and RNAi experiments. It allows for the incorporation of prior biological knowledge while being robust to significant levels of noise in the data used for inference. It uses an evolutionary algorithm for local optimization with an encoding of the mathematical models as BPDS. The BPDS framework allows an effective representation of the search space for algebraic dynamic models that improves computational performance. The algorithm is validated with both simulated and experimental microarray expression profile data. Robustness to noise is tested using a published mathematical model of the segment polarity gene network in Drosophila melanogaster. Benchmarking of the algorithm is done by comparison with a spectrum of state-of-the-art network inference methods on data from the synthetic IRMA network to demonstrate that our method has good precision and recall for the network reconstruction task, while also

  5. Prediction of compressibility parameters of the soils using artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Kurnaz, T Fikret; Dagdeviren, Ugur; Yildiz, Murat; Ozkan, Ozhan

    2016-01-01

    The compression index and recompression index are one of the important compressibility parameters to determine the settlement calculation for fine-grained soil layers. These parameters can be determined by carrying out laboratory oedometer test on undisturbed samples; however, the test is quite time-consuming and expensive. Therefore, many empirical formulas based on regression analysis have been presented to estimate the compressibility parameters using soil index properties. In this paper, an artificial neural network (ANN) model is suggested for prediction of compressibility parameters from basic soil properties. For this purpose, the input parameters are selected as the natural water content, initial void ratio, liquid limit and plasticity index. In this model, two output parameters, including compression index and recompression index, are predicted in a combined network structure. As the result of the study, proposed ANN model is successful for the prediction of the compression index, however the predicted recompression index values are not satisfying compared to the compression index.

  6. Sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation and injection scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başağaoğlu, Hakan; Succi, Sauro; Manepally, Chandrika; Fedors, Randall; Wyrick, Danielle Y.

    2009-09-01

    Active fractures refer to the portions of unsaturated, connected fractures that actively conduct water. The active fracture model parameter accounts for the reduction in the number of fractures carrying water and in the fracture-matrix interface area in field-scale simulations of flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rocks. One example includes the numerical analyses of the fault test results at the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada (USA). In such applications, the active fracture model parameter is commonly used as a calibration parameter without relating it to fracture network orientations and infiltration rates. A two-dimensional, multiphase lattice-Boltzmann model was used in this study to investigate the sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation and injection scenarios for an unsaturated, variable dipping, and geometrically simple fracture network. The active fracture model parameter differed by as much as 0.11-0.44 when the effects of fracture network orientation, injection rate, and injection mode were included in the simulations. Hence, the numerical results suggest that the sensitivity of the active fracture model parameter to fracture network orientation, injection rates, and injection modes should be explored at the field-scale to strengthen the technical basis and range of applicability of the active fracture model.

  7. A gene regulatory network controlling the embryonic specification of endoderm.

    PubMed

    Peter, Isabelle S; Davidson, Eric H

    2011-05-29

    Specification of endoderm is the prerequisite for gut formation in the embryogenesis of bilaterian organisms. Modern lineage labelling studies have shown that in the sea urchin embryo model system, descendants of the veg1 and veg2 cell lineages produce the endoderm, and that the veg2 lineage also gives rise to mesodermal cell types. It is known that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is required for endoderm specification and Delta/Notch signalling is required for mesoderm specification. Some direct cis-regulatory targets of these signals have been found and various phenomenological patterns of gene expression have been observed in the pre-gastrular endomesoderm. However, no comprehensive, causal explanation of endoderm specification has been conceived for sea urchins, nor for any other deuterostome. Here we propose a model, on the basis of the underlying genomic control system, that provides such an explanation, built at several levels of biological organization. The hardwired core of the control system consists of the cis-regulatory apparatus of endodermal regulatory genes, which determine the relationship between the inputs to which these genes are exposed and their outputs. The architecture of the network circuitry controlling the dynamic process of endoderm specification then explains, at the system level, a sequence of developmental logic operations, which generate the biological process. The control system initiates non-interacting endodermal and mesodermal gene regulatory networks in veg2-derived cells and extinguishes the endodermal gene regulatory network in mesodermal precursors. It also generates a cross-regulatory network that specifies future anterior endoderm in veg2 descendants and institutes a distinct network specifying posterior endoderm in veg1-derived cells. The network model provides an explanatory framework that relates endoderm specification to the genomic regulatory code.

  8. Identification of core gene networks and hub genes associated with progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease by RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Kikuko; Kikuchi, Masataka; Kitamoto, Takuya; Kitamoto, Aya; Ogawa, Yuji; Honda, Yasushi; Kessoku, Takaomi; Kobayashi, Kaori; Yoneda, Masato; Imajo, Kento; Tomeno, Wataru; Nakaya, Akihiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Saito, Satoru; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2017-02-20

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) progresses because of the interaction between numerous genes. Thus, we carried out a weighted gene coexpression network analysis to identify core gene networks and key genes associated with NAFLD progression. We enrolled 39 patients with mild NAFLD (fibrosis stages 0-2) and 21 with advanced NAFLD (fibrosis stages 3-4). Total RNA was extracted from frozen liver biopsies, and sequenced to capture a large dynamic range of expression levels. A total of 1777 genes differentially expressed between mild and advanced NAFLD (q-value <0.05) clustered into four modules. One module was enriched for genes that encode cell surface or extracellular matrix proteins, and are involved in cell adhesion, proliferation, and signaling. This module formed a scale-free network containing four hub genes (PAPLN, LBH, DPYSL3, and JAG1) overexpressed in advanced NAFLD. PAPLN is a component of the extracellular matrix, LBH and DPYSL3 are reported to be tumor suppressors, and JAG1 is tumorigenic. Another module formed a random network, and was enriched for genes that accumulate in the mitochondria. These genes were downregulated in advanced NAFLD, reflecting impaired mitochondrial function. However, the other two modules did not form unambiguous networks. KEGG analysis indicated that 71 differentially expressed genes were involved in "pathways in cancer". Strikingly, expression of half of all differentially expressed genes was inversely correlated with methylation of CpG sites (q-value <0.05). Among clinical parameters, serum type IV collagen 7 s was most strongly associated with the epigenetic status in NAFLD. Newly identified core gene networks suggest that the NAFLD liver undergoes mitochondrial dysfunction and fibrosis, and acquires tumorigenic potential epigenetically. Our data provide novel insights into the pathology and etiology of NAFLD progression, and identify potential targets for diagnosis and treatment. © 2017 The Japan Society of

  9. Genetics of gene expression responses to temperature stress in a sea urchin gene network

    PubMed Central

    Runcie, Daniel E.; Garfield, David A.; Babbitt, Courtney C.; Wygoda, Jennifer A.; Mukherjee, Sayan; Wray, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Stress responses play an important role in shaping species distributions and robustness to climate change. We investigated how stress responses alter the contribution of additive genetic variation to gene expression during development of the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, under increased temperatures that model realistic climate change scenarios. We first measured gene expression responses in the embryos by RNA-seq to characterize molecular signatures of mild, chronic temperature stress in an unbiased manner. We found that an increase from 12 to 18 °C caused widespread alterations in gene expression including in genes involved in protein folding, RNA processing and development. To understand the quantitative genetic architecture of this response, we then focused on a well-characterized gene network involved in endomesoderm and ectoderm specification. Using a breeding design with wild-caught individuals, we measured genetic and gene–environment interaction effects on 72 genes within this network. We found genetic or maternal effects in 33 of these genes and that the genetic effects were correlated in the network. Fourteen network genes also responded to higher temperatures, but we found no significant genotype–environment interactions in any of the genes. This absence may be owing to an effective buffering of the temperature perturbations within the network. In support of this hypothesis, perturbations to regulatory genes did not affect the expression of the genes that they regulate. Together, these results provide novel insights into the relationship between environmental change and developmental evolution and suggest that climate change may not expose large amounts of cryptic genetic variation to selection in this species. PMID:22856327

  10. Divergent evolutionary fates of major photosynthetic gene networks following gene and whole genome duplications.

    PubMed

    Coate, Jeremy E; Doyle, Jeff J

    2011-04-01

    Gene and genome duplication are recurring processes in flowering plants, and elucidating the mechanisms by which duplicated genes are lost or deployed is a key component of understanding plant evolution. Using gene ontologies (GO) or protein family (PFAM) domains, distinct patterns of duplicate retention and loss have been identified depending on gene functional properties and duplication mechanism, but little is known about how gene networks encoding interacting proteins (protein complexes or signaling cascades) evolve in response to duplication. We examined patterns of duplicate retention within four major gene networks involved in photosynthesis (the Calvin cycle, photosystem I, photosystem II, and the light harvesting complex) across three species and four whole genome duplications, as well as small-scale duplications, and showed that photosystem gene family evolution is governed largely by dosage sensitivity. ( 1) In contrast, Calvin cycle gene families are not dosage sensitive, but exhibit a greater capacity for functional differentiation. Here we review these findings, highlight how this study, by analyzing defined gene networks, is complementary to global studies using functional annotations such as GO and PFAM, and elaborate on one example of functional differentiation in the Calvin cycle gene family, transketolase.

  11. A Network Approach to Predict Pathogenic Genes for Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoping; Tang, Wei-Hua; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Chen, Luonan

    2010-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum is the pathogenic agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB), which is a destructive disease on wheat and barley, thereby causing huge economic loss and health problems to human by contaminating foods. Identifying pathogenic genes can shed light on pathogenesis underlying the interaction between F. graminearum and its plant host. However, it is difficult to detect pathogenic genes for this destructive pathogen by time-consuming and expensive molecular biological experiments in lab. On the other hand, computational methods provide an alternative way to solve this problem. Since pathogenesis is a complicated procedure that involves complex regulations and interactions, the molecular interaction network of F. graminearum can give clues to potential pathogenic genes. Furthermore, the gene expression data of F. graminearum before and after its invasion into plant host can also provide useful information. In this paper, a novel systems biology approach is presented to predict pathogenic genes of F. graminearum based on molecular interaction network and gene expression data. With a small number of known pathogenic genes as seed genes, a subnetwork that consists of potential pathogenic genes is identified from the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) of F. graminearum, where the genes in the subnetwork are further required to be differentially expressed before and after the invasion of the pathogenic fungus. Therefore, the candidate genes in the subnetwork are expected to be involved in the same biological processes as seed genes, which imply that they are potential pathogenic genes. The prediction results show that most of the pathogenic genes of F. graminearum are enriched in two important signal transduction pathways, including G protein coupled receptor pathway and MAPK signaling pathway, which are known related to pathogenesis in other fungi. In addition, several pathogenic genes predicted by our method are verified in other pathogenic fungi, which

  12. Gene network reconstruction reveals cell cycle and antiviral genes as major drivers of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mine, Karina L.; Shulzhenko, Natalia; Yambartsev, Anatoly; Rochman, Mark; Sanson, Gerdine F. O.; Lando, Malin; Varma, Sudhir; Skinner, Jeff; Volfovsky, Natalia; Deng, Tao; Brenna, Sylvia M. F.; Carvalho, Carmen R. N.; Ribalta, Julisa C. L.; Bustin, Michael; Matzinger, Polly; Silva, Ismael D. C. G.; Lyng, Heidi; Gerbase-DeLima, Maria; Morgun, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) was identified as an etiological factor in cervical cancer, the key human gene drivers of this disease remain unknown. Here we apply an unbiased approach integrating gene expression and chromosomal aberration data. In an independent group of patients, we reconstruct and validate a gene regulatory meta-network, and identify cell cycle and antiviral genes that constitute two major sub-networks up-regulated in tumour samples. These genes are located within the same regions as chromosomal amplifications, most frequently on 3q. We propose a model in which selected chromosomal gains drive activation of antiviral genes contributing to episomal virus elimination, which synergizes with cell cycle dysregulation. These findings may help to explain the paradox of episomal HPV decline in women with invasive cancer who were previously unable to clear the virus. PMID:23651994

  13. Graphlet Based Metrics for the Comparison of Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Alberto J. M.; Dominguez, Calixto; Contreras-Riquelme, Sebastián; Holmes, David S.; Perez-Acle, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the control of gene expression remains one of the main challenges in the post-genomic era. Accordingly, a plethora of methods exists to identify variations in gene expression levels. These variations underlay almost all relevant biological phenomena, including disease and adaptation to environmental conditions. However, computational tools to identify how regulation changes are scarce. Regulation of gene expression is usually depicted in the form of a gene regulatory network (GRN). Structural changes in a GRN over time and conditions represent variations in the regulation of gene expression. Like other biological networks, GRNs are composed of basic building blocks called graphlets. As a consequence, two new metrics based on graphlets are proposed in this work: REConstruction Rate (REC) and REC Graphlet Degree (RGD). REC determines the rate of graphlet similarity between different states of a network and RGD identifies the subset of nodes with the highest topological variation. In other words, RGD discerns how th GRN was rewired. REC and RGD were used to compare the local structure of nodes in condition-specific GRNs obtained from gene expression data of Escherichia coli, forming biofilms and cultured in suspension. According to our results, most of the network local structure remains unaltered in the two compared conditions. Nevertheless, changes reported by RGD necessarily imply that a different cohort of regulators (i.e. transcription factors (TFs)) appear on the scene, shedding light on how the regulation of gene expression occurs when E. coli transits from suspension to biofilm. Consequently, we propose that both metrics REC and RGD should be adopted as a quantitative approach to conduct differential analyses of GRNs. A tool that implements both metrics is available as an on-line web server (http://dlab.cl/loto). PMID:27695050

  14. Graphlet Based Metrics for the Comparison of Gene Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Martin, Alberto J M; Dominguez, Calixto; Contreras-Riquelme, Sebastián; Holmes, David S; Perez-Acle, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the control of gene expression remains one of the main challenges in the post-genomic era. Accordingly, a plethora of methods exists to identify variations in gene expression levels. These variations underlay almost all relevant biological phenomena, including disease and adaptation to environmental conditions. However, computational tools to identify how regulation changes are scarce. Regulation of gene expression is usually depicted in the form of a gene regulatory network (GRN). Structural changes in a GRN over time and conditions represent variations in the regulation of gene expression. Like other biological networks, GRNs are composed of basic building blocks called graphlets. As a consequence, two new metrics based on graphlets are proposed in this work: REConstruction Rate (REC) and REC Graphlet Degree (RGD). REC determines the rate of graphlet similarity between different states of a network and RGD identifies the subset of nodes with the highest topological variation. In other words, RGD discerns how th GRN was rewired. REC and RGD were used to compare the local structure of nodes in condition-specific GRNs obtained from gene expression data of Escherichia coli, forming biofilms and cultured in suspension. According to our results, most of the network local structure remains unaltered in the two compared conditions. Nevertheless, changes reported by RGD necessarily imply that a different cohort of regulators (i.e. transcription factors (TFs)) appear on the scene, shedding light on how the regulation of gene expression occurs when E. coli transits from suspension to biofilm. Consequently, we propose that both metrics REC and RGD should be adopted as a quantitative approach to conduct differential analyses of GRNs. A tool that implements both metrics is available as an on-line web server (http://dlab.cl/loto).

  15. A gene network engineering platform for lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wentao; Kapuganti, Venkata S.; Lu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in synthetic biology have positioned lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as a major class of cellular chassis for applications. To achieve the full potential of LAB, one fundamental prerequisite is the capacity for rapid engineering of complex gene networks, such as natural biosynthetic pathways and multicomponent synthetic circuits, into which cellular functions are encoded. Here, we present a synthetic biology platform for rapid construction and optimization of large-scale gene networks in LAB. The platform involves a copy-controlled shuttle for hosting target networks and two associated strategies that enable efficient genetic editing and phenotypic validation. By using a nisin biosynthesis pathway and its variants as examples, we demonstrated multiplex, continuous editing of small DNA parts, such as ribosome-binding sites, as well as efficient manipulation of large building blocks such as genes and operons. To showcase the platform, we applied it to expand the phenotypic diversity of the nisin pathway by quickly generating a library of 63 pathway variants. We further demonstrated its utility by altering the regulatory topology of the nisin pathway for constitutive bacteriocin biosynthesis. This work demonstrates the feasibility of rapid and advanced engineering of gene networks in LAB, fostering their applications in biomedicine and other areas. PMID:26503255

  16. Using SPEEDES to simulate the blue gene interconnect network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, P.; Upchurch, E.

    2003-01-01

    JPL and the Center for Advanced Computer Architecture (CACR) is conducting application and simulation analyses of BG/L in order to establish a range of effectiveness for the Blue Gene/L MPP architecture in performing important classes of computations and to determine the design sensitivity of the global interconnect network in support of real world ASCI application execution.

  17. Network analysis of genes and their association with diseases.

    PubMed

    Kontou, Panagiota I; Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Dimou, Niki L; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Bagos, Pantelis G

    2016-09-15

    A plethora of network-based approaches within the Systems Biology universe have been applied, to date, to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms of various human diseases. In the present study, we perform a bipartite, topological and clustering graph analysis in order to gain a better understanding of the relationships between human genetic diseases and the relationships between the genes that are implicated in them. For this purpose, disease-disease and gene-gene networks were constructed from combined gene-disease association networks. The latter, were created by collecting and integrating data from three diverse resources, each one with different content covering from rare monogenic disorders to common complex diseases. This data pluralism enabled us to uncover important associations between diseases with unrelated phenotypic manifestations but with common genetic origin. For our analysis, the topological attributes and the functional implications of the individual networks were taken into account and are shortly discussed. We believe that some observations of this study could advance our understanding regarding the etiology of a disease with distinct pathological manifestations, and simultaneously provide the springboard for the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies and its underlying genetic mechanisms.

  18. Linking chordate gene networks to cellular behavior in ascidians.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Brad; Christiaen, Lionel

    2006-01-27

    Embryos of simple chordates called ascidians (sea squirts) have few cells, develop rapidly, and are transparent, enabling the in vivo fluorescent imaging of labeled cell lineages. Ascidians are also simple genetically, with limited redundancy and compact regulatory regions. This cellular and genetic simplicity is now being exploited to link comprehensive gene networks to the cellular events underlying morphogenesis.

  19. Optimal Feedback Strength for Noise Suppression in Autoregulatory Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhyudai; Hespanha, Joao P.

    2009-01-01

    Autoregulatory feedback loops, where the protein expressed from a gene inhibits or activates its own expression are common gene network motifs within cells. In these networks, stochastic fluctuations in protein levels are attributed to two factors: intrinsic noise (i.e., the randomness associated with mRNA/protein expression and degradation) and extrinsic noise (i.e., the noise caused by fluctuations in cellular components such as enzyme levels and gene-copy numbers). We present results that predict the level of both intrinsic and extrinsic noise in protein numbers as a function of quantities that can be experimentally determined and/or manipulated, such as the response time of the protein and the level of feedback strength. In particular, we show that for a fixed average number of protein molecules, decreasing response times leads to attenuation of both protein intrinsic and extrinsic noise, with the extrinsic noise being more sensitive to changes in the response time. We further show that for autoregulatory networks with negative feedback, the protein noise levels can be minimal at an optimal level of feedback strength. For such cases, we provide an analytical expression for the highest level of noise suppression and the amount of feedback that achieves this minimal noise. These theoretical results are shown to be consistent and explain recent experimental observations. Finally, we illustrate how measuring changes in the protein noise levels as the feedback strength is manipulated can be used to determine the level of extrinsic noise in these gene networks. PMID:19450473

  20. A gene network engineering platform for lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wentao; Kapuganti, Venkata S; Lu, Ting

    2016-02-29

    Recent developments in synthetic biology have positioned lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as a major class of cellular chassis for applications. To achieve the full potential of LAB, one fundamental prerequisite is the capacity for rapid engineering of complex gene networks, such as natural biosynthetic pathways and multicomponent synthetic circuits, into which cellular functions are encoded. Here, we present a synthetic biology platform for rapid construction and optimization of large-scale gene networks in LAB. The platform involves a copy-controlled shuttle for hosting target networks and two associated strategies that enable efficient genetic editing and phenotypic validation. By using a nisin biosynthesis pathway and its variants as examples, we demonstrated multiplex, continuous editing of small DNA parts, such as ribosome-binding sites, as well as efficient manipulation of large building blocks such as genes and operons. To showcase the platform, we applied it to expand the phenotypic diversity of the nisin pathway by quickly generating a library of 63 pathway variants. We further demonstrated its utility by altering the regulatory topology of the nisin pathway for constitutive bacteriocin biosynthesis. This work demonstrates the feasibility of rapid and advanced engineering of gene networks in LAB, fostering their applications in biomedicine and other areas.

  1. Compartmentalized gene regulatory network of the pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Head blight caused by Fusarium graminearum (Fg) is a major limiting factor of wheat production with both yield loss and mycotoxin contamination. Here we report a model for global Fg gene regulatory networks (GRNs) inferred from a large collection of transcriptomic data using a machine-learning appro...

  2. Reshaping of global gene expression networks and sex-biased gene expression by integration of a young gene

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sidi; Ni, Xiaochun; Krinsky, Benjamin H; Zhang, Yong E; Vibranovski, Maria D; White, Kevin P; Long, Manyuan

    2012-01-01

    New genes originate frequently across diverse taxa. Given that genetic networks are typically comprised of robust, co-evolved interactions, the emergence of new genes raises an intriguing question: how do new genes interact with pre-existing genes? Here, we show that a recently originated gene rapidly evolved new gene networks and impacted sex-biased gene expression in Drosophila. This 4–6 million-year-old factor, named Zeus for its role in male fecundity, originated through retroposition of a highly conserved housekeeping gene, Caf40. Zeus acquired male reproductive organ expression patterns and phenotypes. Comparative expression profiling of mutants and closely related species revealed that Zeus has recruited a new set of downstream genes, and shaped the evolution of gene expression in germline. Comparative ChIP-chip revealed that the genomic binding profile of Zeus diverged rapidly from Caf40. These data demonstrate, for the first time, how a new gene quickly evolved novel networks governing essential biological processes at the genomic level. PMID:22543869

  3. Detecting Essential Proteins Based on Network Topology, Gene Expression Data and Gene Ontology Information.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jia; Li, Yuanyuan; Zou, Xiufen

    2016-10-07

    The identification of essential proteins in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks is of great significance for understanding cellular processes. With the increasing availability of large-scale PPI data, numerous centrality measures based on network topology have been proposed to detect essential proteins from PPI networks. However, most of the current approaches focus mainly on the topological structure of PPI networks, and largely ignore the gene ontology annotation information. In this paper, we propose a novel centrality measure, called TEO, for identifying essential proteins by combining network topology, gene expression profiles and GO information. To evaluate the performance of the TEO method, we compare it with five other methods (degree, betweenness, NC, Pec, CowEWC) in detecting essential proteins from two different yeast PPI datasets. The simulation results show that adding GO information can effectively improve the predicted precision and that our method outperforms the others in predicting essential proteins.

  4. Statistical ensemble of gene regulatory networks of macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Castiglione, Filippo; Tieri, Paolo; Palma, Alessandro; Jarrah, Abdul Salam

    2016-12-22

    Macrophages cover a major role in the immune system, being the most plastic cell yielding several key immune functions. Here we derived a minimalistic gene regulatory network model for the differentiation of macrophages into the two phenotypes M1 (pro-) and M2 (anti-inflammatory). To test the model, we simulated a large number of such networks as in a statistical ensemble. In other words, to enable the inter-cellular crosstalk required to obtain an immune activation in which the macrophage plays its role, the simulated networks are not taken in isolation but combined with other cellular agents, thus setting up a discrete minimalistic model of the immune system at the microscopic/intracellular (i.e., genetic regulation) and mesoscopic/intercellular scale. We show that within the mesoscopic level description of cellular interaction and cooperation, the gene regulatory logic is coherent and contributes to the overall dynamics of the ensembles that shows, statistically, the expected behaviour.

  5. Integration of molecular network data reconstructs Gene Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Gligorijević, Vladimir; Janjić, Vuk; Pržulj, Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Recently, a shift was made from using Gene Ontology (GO) to evaluate molecular network data to using these data to construct and evaluate GO. Dutkowski et al. provide the first evidence that a large part of GO can be reconstructed solely from topologies of molecular networks. Motivated by this work, we develop a novel data integration framework that integrates multiple types of molecular network data to reconstruct and update GO. We ask how much of GO can be recovered by integrating various molecular interaction data. Results: We introduce a computational framework for integration of various biological networks using penalized non-negative matrix tri-factorization (PNMTF). It takes all network data in a matrix form and performs simultaneous clustering of genes and GO terms, inducing new relations between genes and GO terms (annotations) and between GO terms themselves. To improve the accuracy of our predicted relations, we extend the integration methodology to include additional topological information represented as the similarity in wiring around non-interacting genes. Surprisingly, by integrating topologies of bakers’ yeasts protein–protein interaction, genetic interaction (GI) and co-expression networks, our method reports as related 96% of GO terms that are directly related in GO. The inclusion of the wiring similarity of non-interacting genes contributes 6% to this large GO term association capture. Furthermore, we use our method to infer new relationships between GO terms solely from the topologies of these networks and validate 44% of our predictions in the literature. In addition, our integration method reproduces 48% of cellular component, 41% of molecular function and 41% of biological process GO terms, outperforming the previous method in the former two domains of GO. Finally, we predict new GO annotations of yeast genes and validate our predictions through GIs profiling. Availability and implementation: Supplementary Tables of new GO

  6. Integration of molecular network data reconstructs Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Gligorijević, Vladimir; Janjić, Vuk; Pržulj, Nataša

    2014-09-01

    Recently, a shift was made from using Gene Ontology (GO) to evaluate molecular network data to using these data to construct and evaluate GO. Dutkowski et al. provide the first evidence that a large part of GO can be reconstructed solely from topologies of molecular networks. Motivated by this work, we develop a novel data integration framework that integrates multiple types of molecular network data to reconstruct and update GO. We ask how much of GO can be recovered by integrating various molecular interaction data. We introduce a computational framework for integration of various biological networks using penalized non-negative matrix tri-factorization (PNMTF). It takes all network data in a matrix form and performs simultaneous clustering of genes and GO terms, inducing new relations between genes and GO terms (annotations) and between GO terms themselves. To improve the accuracy of our predicted relations, we extend the integration methodology to include additional topological information represented as the similarity in wiring around non-interacting genes. Surprisingly, by integrating topologies of bakers' yeasts protein-protein interaction, genetic interaction (GI) and co-expression networks, our method reports as related 96% of GO terms that are directly related in GO. The inclusion of the wiring similarity of non-interacting genes contributes 6% to this large GO term association capture. Furthermore, we use our method to infer new relationships between GO terms solely from the topologies of these networks and validate 44% of our predictions in the literature. In addition, our integration method reproduces 48% of cellular component, 41% of molecular function and 41% of biological process GO terms, outperforming the previous method in the former two domains of GO. Finally, we predict new GO annotations of yeast genes and validate our predictions through GIs profiling. Supplementary Tables of new GO term associations and predicted gene annotations are

  7. A gene network simulator to assess reverse engineering algorithms.

    PubMed

    Di Camillo, Barbara; Toffolo, Gianna; Cobelli, Claudio

    2009-03-01

    In the context of reverse engineering of biological networks, simulators are helpful to test and compare the accuracy of different reverse-engineering approaches in a variety of experimental conditions. A novel gene-network simulator is presented that resembles some of the main features of transcriptional regulatory networks related to topology, interaction among regulators of transcription, and expression dynamics. The simulator generates network topology according to the current knowledge of biological network organization, including scale-free distribution of the connectivity and clustering coefficient independent of the number of nodes in the network. It uses fuzzy logic to represent interactions among the regulators of each gene, integrated with differential equations to generate continuous data, comparable to real data for variety and dynamic complexity. Finally, the simulator accounts for saturation in the response to regulation and transcription activation thresholds and shows robustness to perturbations. It therefore provides a reliable and versatile test bed for reverse engineering algorithms applied to microarray data. Since the simulator describes regulatory interactions and expression dynamics as two distinct, although interconnected aspects of regulation, it can also be used to test reverse engineering approaches that use both microarray and protein-protein interaction data in the process of learning. A first software release is available at http://www.dei.unipd.it/~dicamill/software/netsim as an R programming language package.

  8. TCP performance in ATM networks: ABR parameter tuning and ABR/UBR comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Chien Fang; Lin, A.

    1996-02-27

    This paper explores two issues on TOP performance over ATM networks: ABR parameter tuning and performance comparison of binary mode ABR with enhanced UBR services. Of the fifteen parameters defined for ABR, two parameters dominate binary mode ABR performance: Rate Increase Factor (RIF) and Rate Decrease Factor (RDF). Using simulations, we study the effects of these two parameters on TOP over ABR performance. We compare TOP performance with different ABR parameter settings in terms of through-puts and fairness. The effects of different buffer sizes and LAN/WAN distances are also examined. We then compare TOP performance with the best ABR parameter setting with corresponding UBR service enhanced with Early Packet Discard and also with a fair buffer allocation scheme. The results show that TOP performance over binary mode ABR is very sensitive to parameter value settings, and that a poor choice of parameters can result in ABR performance worse than that of the much less expensive UBR-EPD scheme.

  9. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-offs on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks. Part III: Synthetic Gene Networks in Synthetic Biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties that are observed in biological systems at many different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be large enough to confer: intrinsic robustness for tolerating intrinsic parameter fluctuations; genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations; and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. Network robustness is needed so phenotype stability of biological network can be maintained, guaranteeing phenotype robustness. Synthetic biology is foreseen to have important applications in biotechnology and medicine; it is expected to contribute significantly to a better understanding of functioning of complex biological systems. This paper presents a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation for synthetic gene networks in synthetic biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, we found that the phenotype robustness criterion for synthetic gene networks is the following: if intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness, then the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in synthetic biology can also be investigated through corresponding phenotype robustness criteria from the systematic point of view. Finally, a robust synthetic design that involves network evolution algorithms with desired behavior under intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental

  10. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-offs on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks. Part III: Synthetic Gene Networks in Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties that are observed in biological systems at many different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be large enough to confer: intrinsic robustness for tolerating intrinsic parameter fluctuations; genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations; and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. Network robustness is needed so phenotype stability of biological network can be maintained, guaranteeing phenotype robustness. Synthetic biology is foreseen to have important applications in biotechnology and medicine; it is expected to contribute significantly to a better understanding of functioning of complex biological systems. This paper presents a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation for synthetic gene networks in synthetic biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, we found that the phenotype robustness criterion for synthetic gene networks is the following: if intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness, then the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in synthetic biology can also be investigated through corresponding phenotype robustness criteria from the systematic point of view. Finally, a robust synthetic design that involves network evolution algorithms with desired behavior under intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental

  11. Mean field analysis of a spatial stochastic model of a gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Sturrock, M; Murray, P J; Matzavinos, A; Chaplain, M A J

    2015-10-01

    A gene regulatory network may be defined as a collection of DNA segments which interact with each other indirectly through their RNA and protein products. Such a network is said to contain a negative feedback loop if its products inhibit gene transcription, and a positive feedback loop if a gene product promotes its own production. Negative feedback loops can create oscillations in mRNA and protein levels while positive feedback loops are primarily responsible for signal amplification. It is often the case in real biological systems that both negative and positive feedback loops operate in parameter regimes that result in low copy numbers of gene products. In this paper we investigate the spatio-temporal dynamics of a single feedback loop in a eukaryotic cell. We first develop a simplified spatial stochastic model of a canonical feedback system (either positive or negative). Using a Gillespie's algorithm, we compute sample trajectories and analyse their corresponding statistics. We then derive a system of equations that describe the spatio-temporal evolution of the stochastic means. Subsequently, we examine the spatially homogeneous case and compare the results of numerical simulations with the spatially explicit case. Finally, using a combination of steady-state analysis and data clustering techniques, we explore model behaviour across a subregion of the parameter space that is difficult to access experimentally and compare the parameter landscape of our spatio-temporal and spatially-homogeneous models.

  12. Gap Gene Regulatory Dynamics Evolve along a Genotype Network

    PubMed Central

    Crombach, Anton; Wotton, Karl R.; Jiménez-Guri, Eva; Jaeger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Developmental gene networks implement the dynamic regulatory mechanisms that pattern and shape the organism. Over evolutionary time, the wiring of these networks changes, yet the patterning outcome is often preserved, a phenomenon known as “system drift.” System drift is illustrated by the gap gene network—involved in segmental patterning—in dipteran insects. In the classic model organism Drosophila melanogaster and the nonmodel scuttle fly Megaselia abdita, early activation and placement of gap gene expression domains show significant quantitative differences, yet the final patterning output of the system is essentially identical in both species. In this detailed modeling analysis of system drift, we use gene circuits which are fit to quantitative gap gene expression data in M. abdita and compare them with an equivalent set of models from D. melanogaster. The results of this comparative analysis show precisely how compensatory regulatory mechanisms achieve equivalent final patterns in both species. We discuss the larger implications of the work in terms of “genotype networks” and the ways in which the structure of regulatory networks can influence patterns of evolutionary change (evolvability). PMID:26796549

  13. Robustness and Accuracy in Sea Urchin Developmental Gene Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Ben-Tabou de-Leon, Smadar

    2016-01-01

    Developmental gene regulatory networks robustly control the timely activation of regulatory and differentiation genes. The structure of these networks underlies their capacity to buffer intrinsic and extrinsic noise and maintain embryonic morphology. Here I illustrate how the use of specific architectures by the sea urchin developmental regulatory networks enables the robust control of cell fate decisions. The Wnt-βcatenin signaling pathway patterns the primary embryonic axis while the BMP signaling pathway patterns the secondary embryonic axis in the sea urchin embryo and across bilateria. Interestingly, in the sea urchin in both cases, the signaling pathway that defines the axis controls directly the expression of a set of downstream regulatory genes. I propose that this direct activation of a set of regulatory genes enables a uniform regulatory response and a clear cut cell fate decision in the endoderm and in the dorsal ectoderm. The specification of the mesodermal pigment cell lineage is activated by Delta signaling that initiates a triple positive feedback loop that locks down the pigment specification state. I propose that the use of compound positive feedback circuitry provides the endodermal cells enough time to turn off mesodermal genes and ensures correct mesoderm vs. endoderm fate decision. Thus, I argue that understanding the control properties of repeatedly used regulatory architectures illuminates their role in embryogenesis and provides possible explanations to their resistance to evolutionary change.

  14. Floral Morphogenesis: Stochastic Explorations of a Gene Network Epigenetic Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Aldana, Maximino; Benítez, Mariana; Cortes-Poza, Yuriria; Espinosa-Soto, Carlos; Hartasánchez, Diego A.; Lotto, R. Beau; Malkin, David; Escalera Santos, Gerardo J.; Padilla-Longoria, Pablo

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to the classical view of development as a preprogrammed and deterministic process, recent studies have demonstrated that stochastic perturbations of highly non-linear systems may underlie the emergence and stability of biological patterns. Herein, we address the question of whether noise contributes to the generation of the stereotypical temporal pattern in gene expression during flower development. We modeled the regulatory network of organ identity genes in the Arabidopsis thaliana flower as a stochastic system. This network has previously been shown to converge to ten fixed-point attractors, each with gene expression arrays that characterize inflorescence cells and primordial cells of sepals, petals, stamens, and carpels. The network used is binary, and the logical rules that govern its dynamics are grounded in experimental evidence. We introduced different levels of uncertainty in the updating rules of the network. Interestingly, for a level of noise of around 0.5–10%, the system exhibited a sequence of transitions among attractors that mimics the sequence of gene activation configurations observed in real flowers. We also implemented the gene regulatory network as a continuous system using the Glass model of differential equations, that can be considered as a first approximation of kinetic-reaction equations, but which are not necessarily equivalent to the Boolean model. Interestingly, the Glass dynamics recover a temporal sequence of attractors, that is qualitatively similar, although not identical, to that obtained using the Boolean model. Thus, time ordering in the emergence of cell-fate patterns is not an artifact of synchronous updating in the Boolean model. Therefore, our model provides a novel explanation for the emergence and robustness of the ubiquitous temporal pattern of floral organ specification. It also constitutes a new approach to understanding morphogenesis, providing predictions on the population dynamics of cells with different

  15. Evaluating the Spatio-Temporal Factors that Structure Network Parameters of Plant-Herbivore Interactions

    PubMed Central

    López-Carretero, Antonio; Díaz-Castelazo, Cecilia; Boege, Karina; Rico-Gray, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    Despite the dynamic nature of ecological interactions, most studies on species networks offer static representations of their structure, constraining our understanding of the ecological mechanisms involved in their spatio-temporal stability. This is the first study to evaluate plant-herbivore interaction networks on a small spatio-temporal scale. Specifically, we simultaneously assessed the effect of host plant availability, habitat complexity and seasonality on the structure of plant-herbivore networks in a coastal tropical ecosystem. Our results revealed that changes in the host plant community resulting from seasonality and habitat structure are reflected not only in the herbivore community, but also in the emergent properties (network parameters) of the plant-herbivore interaction network such as connectance, selectiveness and modularity. Habitat conditions and periods that are most stressful favored the presence of less selective and susceptible herbivore species, resulting in increased connectance within networks. In contrast, the high degree of selectivennes (i.e. interaction specialization) and modularity of the networks under less stressful conditions was promoted by the diversification in resource use by herbivores. By analyzing networks at a small spatio-temporal scale we identified the ecological factors structuring this network such as habitat complexity and seasonality. Our research offers new evidence on the role of abiotic and biotic factors in the variation of the properties of species interaction networks. PMID:25340790

  16. Discovering the hidden sub-network component in a ranked list of genes or proteins derived from genomic experiments.

    PubMed

    García-Alonso, Luz; Alonso, Roberto; Vidal, Enrique; Amadoz, Alicia; de María, Alejandro; Minguez, Pablo; Medina, Ignacio; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2012-11-01

    Genomic experiments (e.g. differential gene expression, single-nucleotide polymorphism association) typically produce ranked list of genes. We present a simple but powerful approach which uses protein-protein interaction data to detect sub-networks within such ranked lists of genes or proteins. We performed an exhaustive study of network parameters that allowed us concluding that the average number of components and the average number of nodes per component are the parameters that best discriminate between real and random networks. A novel aspect that increases the efficiency of this strategy in finding sub-networks is that, in addition to direct connections, also connections mediated by intermediate nodes are considered to build up the sub-networks. The possibility of using of such intermediate nodes makes this approach more robust to noise. It also overcomes some limitations intrinsic to experimental designs based on differential expression, in which some nodes are invariant across conditions. The proposed approach can also be used for candidate disease-gene prioritization. Here, we demonstrate the usefulness of the approach by means of several case examples that include a differential expression analysis in Fanconi Anemia, a genome-wide association study of bipolar disorder and a genome-scale study of essentiality in cancer genes. An efficient and easy-to-use web interface (available at http://www.babelomics.org) based on HTML5 technologies is also provided to run the algorithm and represent the network.

  17. Discovering the hidden sub-network component in a ranked list of genes or proteins derived from genomic experiments

    PubMed Central

    García-Alonso, Luz; Alonso, Roberto; Vidal, Enrique; Amadoz, Alicia; de María, Alejandro; Minguez, Pablo; Medina, Ignacio; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2012-01-01

    Genomic experiments (e.g. differential gene expression, single-nucleotide polymorphism association) typically produce ranked list of genes. We present a simple but powerful approach which uses protein–protein interaction data to detect sub-networks within such ranked lists of genes or proteins. We performed an exhaustive study of network parameters that allowed us concluding that the average number of components and the average number of nodes per component are the parameters that best discriminate between real and random networks. A novel aspect that increases the efficiency of this strategy in finding sub-networks is that, in addition to direct connections, also connections mediated by intermediate nodes are considered to build up the sub-networks. The possibility of using of such intermediate nodes makes this approach more robust to noise. It also overcomes some limitations intrinsic to experimental designs based on differential expression, in which some nodes are invariant across conditions. The proposed approach can also be used for candidate disease-gene prioritization. Here, we demonstrate the usefulness of the approach by means of several case examples that include a differential expression analysis in Fanconi Anemia, a genome-wide association study of bipolar disorder and a genome-scale study of essentiality in cancer genes. An efficient and easy-to-use web interface (available at http://www.babelomics.org) based on HTML5 technologies is also provided to run the algorithm and represent the network. PMID:22844098

  18. Analysing gene regulatory networks by both constraint programming and model-checking.

    PubMed

    Fromentin, Jonathan; Comet, Jean-Paul; Le Gall, Pascale; Roux, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we propose a formal method to analyse gene regulatory networks (GRN). The dynamics of such systems is often described by an ordinary differential equation system, but has also been abstracted into a discrete transition system. This modeling depends on parameters for which different values are possible. Each instantiation of these parameters defines a possible dynamics and verification tools can be used to select the tuples of values which lead to dynamics consistent with known behaviours. GRN are so complex that their discrete modeling gives a number of possible dynamics exponential in function of the GRN's size (number of genes and interactions). In this paper, we propose to use constraint programming and CTL formal language to determine the set of all dynamics consistent with the known behavioral properties without enumerating all of them. This approach allows us therefore to minimize the computation time necessary for the research of these parameters.

  19. Stability-driven nonnegative matrix factorization to interpret spatial gene expression and build local gene networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Siqi; Joseph, Antony; Hammonds, Ann S; Celniker, Susan E; Yu, Bin; Frise, Erwin

    2016-04-19

    Spatial gene expression patterns enable the detection of local covariability and are extremely useful for identifying local gene interactions during normal development. The abundance of spatial expression data in recent years has led to the modeling and analysis of regulatory networks. The inherent complexity of such data makes it a challenge to extract biological information. We developed staNMF, a method that combines a scalable implementation of nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) with a new stability-driven model selection criterion. When applied to a set ofDrosophilaearly embryonic spatial gene expression images, one of the largest datasets of its kind, staNMF identified 21 principal patterns (PP). Providing a compact yet biologically interpretable representation ofDrosophilaexpression patterns, PP are comparable to a fate map generated experimentally by laser ablation and show exceptional promise as a data-driven alternative to manual annotations. Our analysis mapped genes to cell-fate programs and assigned putative biological roles to uncharacterized genes. Finally, we used the PP to generate local transcription factor regulatory networks. Spatially local correlation networks were constructed for six PP that span along the embryonic anterior-posterior axis. Using a two-tail 5% cutoff on correlation, we reproduced 10 of the 11 links in the well-studied gap gene network. The performance of PP with theDrosophiladata suggests that staNMF provides informative decompositions and constitutes a useful computational lens through which to extract biological insight from complex and often noisy gene expression data.

  20. Stability-driven nonnegative matrix factorization to interpret spatial gene expression and build local gene networks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Siqi; Joseph, Antony; Hammonds, Ann S.; Celniker, Susan E.; Yu, Bin; Frise, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Spatial gene expression patterns enable the detection of local covariability and are extremely useful for identifying local gene interactions during normal development. The abundance of spatial expression data in recent years has led to the modeling and analysis of regulatory networks. The inherent complexity of such data makes it a challenge to extract biological information. We developed staNMF, a method that combines a scalable implementation of nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) with a new stability-driven model selection criterion. When applied to a set of Drosophila early embryonic spatial gene expression images, one of the largest datasets of its kind, staNMF identified 21 principal patterns (PP). Providing a compact yet biologically interpretable representation of Drosophila expression patterns, PP are comparable to a fate map generated experimentally by laser ablation and show exceptional promise as a data-driven alternative to manual annotations. Our analysis mapped genes to cell-fate programs and assigned putative biological roles to uncharacterized genes. Finally, we used the PP to generate local transcription factor regulatory networks. Spatially local correlation networks were constructed for six PP that span along the embryonic anterior–posterior axis. Using a two-tail 5% cutoff on correlation, we reproduced 10 of the 11 links in the well-studied gap gene network. The performance of PP with the Drosophila data suggests that staNMF provides informative decompositions and constitutes a useful computational lens through which to extract biological insight from complex and often noisy gene expression data. PMID:27071099

  1. Stability-driven nonnegative matrix factorization to interpret spatial gene expression and build local gene networks

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Siqi; Joseph, Antony; Hammonds, Ann S.; Celniker, Susan E.; Yu, Bin; Frise, Erwin

    2016-04-06

    Spatial gene expression patterns enable the detection of local covariability and are extremely useful for identifying local gene interactions during normal development. The abundance of spatial expression data in recent years has led to the modeling and analysis of regulatory networks. The inherent complexity of such data makes it a challenge to extract biological information. We developed staNMF, a method that combines a scalable implementation of nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) with a new stability-driven model selection criterion. When applied to a set of Drosophila early embryonic spatial gene expression images, one of the largest datasets of its kind, staNMF identified 21 principal patterns (PP). Providing a compact yet biologically interpretable representation of Drosophila expression patterns, PP are comparable to a fate map generated experimentally by laser ablation and show exceptional promise as a data-driven alternative to manual annotations. Our analysis mapped genes to cell-fate programs and assigned putative biological roles to uncharacterized genes. Finally, we used the PP to generate local transcription factor regulatory networks. Spatially local correlation networks were constructed for six PP that span along the embryonic anterior-posterior axis. Using a two-tail 5% cutoff on correlation, we reproduced 10 of the 11 links in the well-studied gap gene network. In conclusion, the performance of PP with the Drosophila data suggests that staNMF provides informative decompositions and constitutes a useful computational lens through which to extract biological insight from complex and often noisy gene expression data.

  2. Construction of coffee transcriptome networks based on gene annotation semantics.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Luis F; Galeano, Narmer; Isaza, Gustavo A; Gaitán, Alvaro

    2012-07-24

    Gene annotation is a process that encompasses multiple approaches on the analysis of nucleic acids or protein sequences in order to assign structural and functional characteristics to gene models. When thousands of gene models are being described in an organism genome, construction and visualization of gene networks impose novel challenges in the understanding of complex expression patterns and the generation of new knowledge in genomics research. In order to take advantage of accumulated text data after conventional gene sequence analysis, this work applied semantics in combination with visualization tools to build transcriptome networks from a set of coffee gene annotations. A set of selected coffee transcriptome sequences, chosen by the quality of the sequence comparison reported by Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) and Interproscan, were filtered out by coverage, identity, length of the query, and e-values. Meanwhile, term descriptors for molecular biology and biochemistry were obtained along the Wordnet dictionary in order to construct a Resource Description Framework (RDF) using Ruby scripts and Methontology to find associations between concepts. Relationships between sequence annotations and semantic concepts were graphically represented through a total of 6845 oriented vectors, which were reduced to 745 non-redundant associations. A large gene network connecting transcripts by way of relational concepts was created where detailed connections remain to be validated for biological significance based on current biochemical and genetics frameworks. Besides reusing text information in the generation of gene connections and for data mining purposes, this tool development opens the possibility to visualize complex and abundant transcriptome data, and triggers the formulation of new hypotheses in metabolic pathways analysis.

  3. 3D visualization of gene clusters and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leishi; Sheng, Weiguo; Liu, Xiaohui

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, we try to provide a global view of DNA microarray gene expression data analysis and modeling process by combining novel and effective visualization techniques with data mining algorithms. An integrated framework has been proposed to model and visualize short, high-dimensional gene expression data. The framework reduces the dimensionality of variables before applying appropriate temporal modeling method. Prototype has been built using Java3D to visualize the framework. The prototype takes gene expression data as input, clusters the genes, displays the clustering results using a novel graph layout algorithm, models individual gene clusters using Dynamic Bayesian Network and then visualizes the modeling results using simple but effective visualization techniques.

  4. Online in-situ estimation of network parameters under intermittent excitation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Jason Ashley

    2008-10-01

    Online in-situ estimation of network parameters is a potential tool to evaluate electrical network and conductor health. The integration of the physics-based models with stochastic models can provide important diagnostic and prognostic information. Correct diagnoses and prognoses using the model-based techniques therefore depend on accurate estimations of the physical parameters. As artificial excitation of the modeled dynamics is not always possible for in-situ applications, the information necessary to make accurate estimations can be intermittent over time. Continuous online estimation and tracking of physics-based parameters using recursive least-squares with directional forgetting is proposed to account for the intermittency in the excitation. This method makes optimal use of the available information while still allowing the solution to following time-varying parameter changes. Computationally efficient statistical inference measures are also provided to gauge the confidence of each parameter estimate. Additionally, identification requirements of the methods and multiple network and conductor models are determined. Finally, the method is shown to be effective in estimating and tracking parameter changes in both the DC and AC networks as well as both time and frequency domain models.

  5. Identification of regulatory structure and kinetic parameters of biochemical networks via mixed-integer dynamic optimization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recovering the network topology and associated kinetic parameter values from time-series data are central topics in systems biology. Nevertheless, methods that simultaneously do both are few and lack generality. Results Here, we present a rigorous approach for simultaneously estimating the parameters and regulatory topology of biochemical networks from time-series data. The parameter estimation task is formulated as a mixed-integer dynamic optimization problem with: (i) binary variables, used to model the existence of regulatory interactions and kinetic effects of metabolites in the network processes; and (ii) continuous variables, denoting metabolites concentrations and kinetic parameters values. The approach simultaneously optimizes the Akaike criterion, which captures the trade-off between complexity (measured by the number of parameters), and accuracy of the fitting. This simultaneous optimization mitigates a possible overfitting that could result from addition of spurious regulatory interactions. Conclusion The capabilities of our approach were tested in one benchmark problem. Our algorithm is able to identify a set of plausible network topologies with their associated parameters. PMID:24176044

  6. Computational gene network study on antibiotic resistance genes of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Anitha, P; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2014-05-01

    Multi Drug Resistance (MDR) in Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the major threats for emerging nosocomial infections in hospital environment. Multidrug-resistance in A. baumannii may be due to the implementation of multi-combination resistance mechanisms such as β-lactamase synthesis, Penicillin-Binding Proteins (PBPs) changes, alteration in porin proteins and in efflux pumps against various existing classes of antibiotics. Multiple antibiotic resistance genes are involved in MDR. These resistance genes are transferred through plasmids, which are responsible for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. In addition, these resistance genes may also have a tendency to interact with each other or with their gene products. Therefore, it becomes necessary to understand the impact of these interactions in antibiotic resistance mechanism. Hence, our study focuses on protein and gene network analysis on various resistance genes, to elucidate the role of the interacting proteins and to study their functional contribution towards antibiotic resistance. From the search tool for the retrieval of interacting gene/protein (STRING), a total of 168 functional partners for 15 resistance genes were extracted based on the confidence scoring system. The network study was then followed up with functional clustering of associated partners using molecular complex detection (MCODE). Later, we selected eight efficient clusters based on score. Interestingly, the associated protein we identified from the network possessed greater functional similarity with known resistance genes. This network-based approach on resistance genes of A. baumannii could help in identifying new genes/proteins and provide clues on their association in antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A gene regulatory network armature for T-lymphocyte specification

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Elizabeth-sharon

    2008-01-01

    Choice of a T-lymphoid fate by hematopoietic progenitor cells depends on sustained Notch-Delta signaling combined with tightly-regulated activities of multiple transcription factors. To dissect the regulatory network connections that mediate this process, we have used high-resolution analysis of regulatory gene expression trajectories from the beginning to the end of specification; tests of the short-term Notchdependence of these gene expression changes; and perturbation analyses of the effects of overexpression of two essential transcription factors, namely PU.l and GATA-3. Quantitative expression measurements of >50 transcription factor and marker genes have been used to derive the principal components of regulatory change through which T-cell precursors progress from primitive multipotency to T-lineage commitment. Distinct parts of the path reveal separate contributions of Notch signaling, GATA-3 activity, and downregulation of PU.l. Using BioTapestry, the results have been assembled into a draft gene regulatory network for the specification of T-cell precursors and the choice of T as opposed to myeloid dendritic or mast-cell fates. This network also accommodates effects of E proteins and mutual repression circuits of Gfil against Egr-2 and of TCF-l against PU.l as proposed elsewhere, but requires additional functions that remain unidentified. Distinctive features of this network structure include the intense dose-dependence of GATA-3 effects; the gene-specific modulation of PU.l activity based on Notch activity; the lack of direct opposition between PU.l and GATA-3; and the need for a distinct, late-acting repressive function or functions to extinguish stem and progenitor-derived regulatory gene expression.

  8. Developing integrated crop knowledge networks to advance candidate gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Hassani-Pak, Keywan; Castellote, Martin; Esch, Maria; Hindle, Matthew; Lysenko, Artem; Taubert, Jan; Rawlings, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    The chances of raising crop productivity to enhance global food security would be greatly improved if we had a complete understanding of all the biological mechanisms that underpinned traits such as crop yield, disease resistance or nutrient and water use efficiency. With more crop genomes emerging all the time, we are nearer having the basic information, at the gene-level, to begin assembling crop gene catalogues and using data from other plant species to understand how the genes function and how their interactions govern crop development and physiology. Unfortunately, the task of creating such a complete knowledge base of gene functions, interaction networks and trait biology is technically challenging because the relevant data are dispersed in myriad databases in a variety of data formats with variable quality and coverage. In this paper we present a general approach for building genome-scale knowledge networks that provide a unified representation of heterogeneous but interconnected datasets to enable effective knowledge mining and gene discovery. We describe the datasets and outline the methods, workflows and tools that we have developed for creating and visualising these networks for the major crop species, wheat and barley. We present the global characteristics of such knowledge networks and with an example linking a seed size phenotype to a barley WRKY transcription factor orthologous to TTG2 from Arabidopsis, we illustrate the value of integrated data in biological knowledge discovery. The software we have developed (www.ondex.org) and the knowledge resources (http://knetminer.rothamsted.ac.uk) we have created are all open-source and provide a first step towards systematic and evidence-based gene discovery in order to facilitate crop improvement.

  9. Multi-edge gene set networks reveal novel insights into global relationships between biological themes.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Jignesh R; Xia, Yu; Marto, Jarrod A

    2012-01-01

    Curated gene sets from databases such as KEGG Pathway and Gene Ontology are often used to systematically organize lists of genes or proteins derived from high-throughput data. However, the information content inherent to some relationships between the interrogated gene sets, such as pathway crosstalk, is often underutilized. A gene set network, where nodes representing individual gene sets such as KEGG pathways are connected to indicate a functional dependency, is well suited to visualize and analyze global gene set relationships. Here we introduce a novel gene set network construction algorithm that integrates gene lists derived from high-throughput experiments with curated gene sets to construct co-enrichment gene set networks. Along with previously described co-membership and linkage algorithms, we apply the co-enrichment algorithm to eight gene set collections to construct integrated multi-evidence gene set networks with multiple edge types connecting gene sets. We demonstrate the utility of approach through examples of novel gene set networks such as the chromosome map co-differential expression gene set network. A total of twenty-four gene set networks are exposed via a web tool called MetaNet, where context-specific multi-edge gene set networks are constructed from enriched gene sets within user-defined gene lists. MetaNet is freely available at http://blaispathways.dfci.harvard.edu/metanet/.

  10. Outer synchronization and parameter identification approach to the resilient recovery of supply network with uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Liang; Xiao, Renbin

    2017-09-01

    The resilient recovery is of great necessity and importance to supply network with uncertainty. Outer synchronization helps the supply network restores the scheduled status. Also it has absorptive and adaptive capacity. This paper proposes a resilient recovery method based on outer synchronization. Different from previous schemes, a research on supply networks with time delay, unknown parameters and structural variation has been conducted. A dynamic model of the supply network is established, in which each node is represented as a Lorenz system. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, an impulsive pinning controller is designed for resilient recovery. Numerical simulations and related case study are used to verify the validity of the proposed model and the resilient recovery method. Experimental results show that, the proposed method can realize the parameter identification and effective recovery with various uncertain environments.

  11. Efficient parameter search for qualitative models of regulatory networks using symbolic model checking

    PubMed Central

    Batt, Gregory; Page, Michel; Cantone, Irene; Goessler, Gregor; Monteiro, Pedro; de Jong, Hidde

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Investigating the relation between the structure and behavior of complex biological networks often involves posing the question if the hypothesized structure of a regulatory network is consistent with the observed behavior, or if a proposed structure can generate a desired behavior. Results: The above questions can be cast into a parameter search problem for qualitative models of regulatory networks. We develop a method based on symbolic model checking that avoids enumerating all possible parametrizations, and show that this method performs well on real biological problems, using the IRMA synthetic network and benchmark datasets. We test the consistency between IRMA and time-series expression profiles, and search for parameter modifications that would make the external control of the system behavior more robust. Availability: GNA and the IRMA model are available at http://ibis.inrialpes.fr/ Contact: gregory.batt@inria.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20823328

  12. Multiple differential expression networks identify key genes in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ri-Heng; Zhang, Ai-Min; Li, Shuang; Li, Tian-Yang; Wang, Lian-Jing; Zhang, Hao-Ran; Li, Ping; Jia, Xiong-Jie; Zhang, Tao; Peng, Xin-Yu; Liu, Min-Di; Wang, Xu; Lang, Yan; Xue, Wei-Lan; Liu, Jing; Wang, Yan-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer is an important contributor to cancer mortality. The objective of this paper is to identify key genes across three phenotypes (fungating, polypoid and polypoid & small-ulcer) of rectal cancer based on multiple differential expression networks (DENs). Differential interactions and non-differential interactions were evaluated according to Spearman correlation coefficient (SCC) algorithm, and were selected to construct DENs. Topological analysis was performed for exploring hub genes in largest components of DENs. Key genes were denoted as intersections between nodes of DENs and rectal cancer associated genes from Genecards. Finally, we utilized hub genes to classify phenotypes of rectal cancer on the basis of support vector machines (SVM) methodology. We obtained 19 hub genes and total 12 common key genes of three largest components of DENs, and EGFR was the common element. The SVM results revealed that hub genes could classify phenotypes, and validated feasibility of DEN methods. We have successfully identified significant genes (such as EGFR and UBC) across fungating, polypoid and polypoid & small-ulcer phenotype of rectal cancer. They might be potential biomarkers for classification, detection and therapy of this cancer.

  13. Improved parameters metropolitan area network supported with all-optical network's technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradkowska, Magdalena; Kalita, Mariusz

    2006-03-01

    The advantages of all-optical network's technics make them one of main elements of the metropolitan area networks. They enable different applications in high quality mulitimedia services and guarantee a constant and reliable access to the Internet. As the growing expansion of the Internet continues in an unpredictable direction, many new solutions are expected. The major challenge is the increasing demand for flexible, transparent and customised bandwidth services for both private and business customers.

  14. Stochastic Boolean networks: An efficient approach to modeling gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Various computational models have been of interest due to their use in the modelling of gene regulatory networks (GRNs). As a logical model, probabilistic Boolean networks (PBNs) consider molecular and genetic noise, so the study of PBNs provides significant insights into the understanding of the dynamics of GRNs. This will ultimately lead to advances in developing therapeutic methods that intervene in the process of disease development and progression. The applications of PBNs, however, are hindered by the complexities involved in the computation of the state transition matrix and the steady-state distribution of a PBN. For a PBN with n genes and N Boolean networks, the complexity to compute the state transition matrix is O(nN22n) or O(nN2n) for a sparse matrix. Results This paper presents a novel implementation of PBNs based on the notions of stochastic logic and stochastic computation. This stochastic implementation of a PBN is referred to as a stochastic Boolean network (SBN). An SBN provides an accurate and efficient simulation of a PBN without and with random gene perturbation. The state transition matrix is computed in an SBN with a complexity of O(nL2n), where L is a factor related to the stochastic sequence length. Since the minimum sequence length required for obtaining an evaluation accuracy approximately increases in a polynomial order with the number of genes, n, and the number of Boolean networks, N, usually increases exponentially with n, L is typically smaller than N, especially in a network with a large number of genes. Hence, the computational efficiency of an SBN is primarily limited by the number of genes, but not directly by the total possible number of Boolean networks. Furthermore, a time-frame expanded SBN enables an efficient analysis of the steady-state distribution of a PBN. These findings are supported by the simulation results of a simplified p53 network, several randomly generated networks and a network inferred from a T

  15. Functional data analysis for identifying nonlinear models of gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A key problem in systems biology is estimating dynamical models of gene regulatory networks. Traditionally, this has been done using regression or other ad-hoc methods when the model is linear. More detailed, realistic modeling studies usually employ nonlinear dynamical models, which lead to computationally difficult parameter estimation problems. Functional data analysis methods, however, offer a means to simplify fitting by transforming the problem from one of matching modeled and observed dynamics to one of matching modeled and observed time derivatives–a regression problem, albeit a nonlinear one. Results We formulate a functional data analysis approach for estimating the parameters of nonlinear dynamical models and evaluate this approach on data from two real systems, the gap gene system of Drosophila melanogaster and the synthetic IRMA network, which was created expressly as a test case for genetic network inference. We also evaluate the approach on simulated data sets generated by the GeneNetWeaver program, the basis for the annual DREAM reverse engineering challenge. We assess the accuracy with which the correct regulatory relationships within the networks are extracted, and consider alternative methods of regularization for the purpose of overfitting avoidance. We also show that the computational efficiency of the functional data analysis approach, and the decomposability of the resulting regression problem, allow us to explicitly enumerate and evaluate all possible regulator combinations for every gene. This gives deeper insight into the the relevance of different regulators or regulator combinations, and lets one check for alternative regulatory explanations. Conclusions Functional data analysis is a powerful approach for estimating detailed nonlinear models of gene expression dynamics, allowing efficient and accurate estimation of regulatory architecture. PMID:21143801

  16. A review on the computational approaches for gene regulatory network construction.

    PubMed

    Chai, Lian En; Loh, Swee Kuan; Low, Swee Thing; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; Deris, Safaai; Zakaria, Zalmiyah

    2014-05-01

    Many biological research areas such as drug design require gene regulatory networks to provide clear insight and understanding of the cellular process in living cells. This is because interactions among the genes and their products play an important role in many molecular processes. A gene regulatory network can act as a blueprint for the researchers to observe the relationships among genes. Due to its importance, several computational approaches have been proposed to infer gene regulatory networks from gene expression data. In this review, six inference approaches are discussed: Boolean network, probabilistic Boolean network, ordinary differential equation, neural network, Bayesian network, and dynamic Bayesian network. These approaches are discussed in terms of introduction, methodology and recent applications of these approaches in gene regulatory network construction. These approaches are also compared in the discussion section. Furthermore, the strengths and weaknesses of these computational approaches are described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Learning a Markov Logic network for supervised gene regulatory network inference.

    PubMed

    Brouard, Céline; Vrain, Christel; Dubois, Julie; Castel, David; Debily, Marie-Anne; d'Alché-Buc, Florence

    2013-09-12

    Gene regulatory network inference remains a challenging problem in systems biology despite the numerous approaches that have been proposed. When substantial knowledge on a gene regulatory network is already available, supervised network inference is appropriate. Such a method builds a binary classifier able to assign a class (Regulation/No regulation) to an ordered pair of genes. Once learnt, the pairwise classifier can be used to predict new regulations. In this work, we explore the framework of Markov Logic Networks (MLN) that combine features of probabilistic graphical models with the expressivity of first-order logic rules. We propose to learn a Markov Logic network, e.g. a set of weighted rules that conclude on the predicate "regulates", starting from a known gene regulatory network involved in the switch proliferation/differentiation of keratinocyte cells, a set of experimental transcriptomic data and various descriptions of genes all encoded into first-order logic. As training data are unbalanced, we use asymmetric bagging to learn a set of MLNs. The prediction of a new regulation can then be obtained by averaging predictions of individual MLNs. As a side contribution, we propose three in silico tests to assess the performance of any pairwise classifier in various network inference tasks on real datasets. A first test consists of measuring the average performance on balanced edge prediction problem; a second one deals with the ability of the classifier, once enhanced by asymmetric bagging, to update a given network. Finally our main result concerns a third test that measures the ability of the method to predict regulations with a new set of genes. As expected, MLN, when provided with only numerical discretized gene expression data, does not perform as well as a pairwise SVM in terms of AUPR. However, when a more complete description of gene properties is provided by heterogeneous sources, MLN achieves the same performance as a black-box model such as a

  18. Periodic synchronization of community networks with non-identical nodes uncertain parameters and adaptive coupling strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yuan; Chen, Li-Qun

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for simultaneously identifying unknown parameters and synchronizing time-delayed complex community networks with nonidentical nodes. Based on the LaSalle's invariance principle, a criterion is established by constructing an effective control identification scheme and adjusting automatically the adaptive coupling strength. The proposed control law is applied to a complex community network which is periodically synchronized with different chaotic states. Numerical simulations are conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  19. Systematic prediction of gene function in Arabidopsis thaliana using a probabilistic functional gene network

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sohyun; Rhee, Seung Y; Marcotte, Edward M; Lee, Insuk

    2012-01-01

    AraNet is a functional gene network for the reference plant Arabidopsis and has been constructed in order to identify new genes associated with plant traits. It is highly predictive for diverse biological pathways and can be used to prioritize genes for functional screens. Moreover, AraNet provides a web-based tool with which plant biologists can efficiently discover novel functions of Arabidopsis genes (http://www.functionalnet.org/aranet/). This protocol explains how to conduct network-based prediction of gene functions using AraNet and how to interpret the prediction results. Functional discovery in plant biology is facilitated by combining candidate prioritization by AraNet with focused experimental tests. PMID:21886106

  20. Measuring semantic similarities by combining gene ontology annotations and gene co-function networks

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Jiajie; Uygun, Sahra; Kim, Taehyong; Wang, Yadong; Rhee, Seung Y.; Chen, Jin

    2015-02-14

    Background: Gene Ontology (GO) has been used widely to study functional relationships between genes. The current semantic similarity measures rely only on GO annotations and GO structure. This limits the power of GO-based similarity because of the limited proportion of genes that are annotated to GO in most organisms. Results: We introduce a novel approach called NETSIM (network-based similarity measure) that incorporates information from gene co-function networks in addition to using the GO structure and annotations. Using metabolic reaction maps of yeast, Arabidopsis, and human, we demonstrate that NETSIM can improve the accuracy of GO term similarities. We also demonstrate that NETSIM works well even for genomes with sparser gene annotation data. We applied NETSIM on large Arabidopsis gene families such as cytochrome P450 monooxygenases to group the members functionally and show that this grouping could facilitate functional characterization of genes in these families. Conclusions: Using NETSIM as an example, we demonstrated that the performance of a semantic similarity measure could be significantly improved after incorporating genome-specific information. NETSIM incorporates both GO annotations and gene co-function network data as a priori knowledge in the model. Therefore, functional similarities of GO terms that are not explicitly encoded in GO but are relevant in a taxon-specific manner become measurable when GO annotations are limited.

  1. Measuring semantic similarities by combining gene ontology annotations and gene co-function networks

    DOE PAGES

    Peng, Jiajie; Uygun, Sahra; Kim, Taehyong; ...

    2015-02-14

    Background: Gene Ontology (GO) has been used widely to study functional relationships between genes. The current semantic similarity measures rely only on GO annotations and GO structure. This limits the power of GO-based similarity because of the limited proportion of genes that are annotated to GO in most organisms. Results: We introduce a novel approach called NETSIM (network-based similarity measure) that incorporates information from gene co-function networks in addition to using the GO structure and annotations. Using metabolic reaction maps of yeast, Arabidopsis, and human, we demonstrate that NETSIM can improve the accuracy of GO term similarities. We also demonstratemore » that NETSIM works well even for genomes with sparser gene annotation data. We applied NETSIM on large Arabidopsis gene families such as cytochrome P450 monooxygenases to group the members functionally and show that this grouping could facilitate functional characterization of genes in these families. Conclusions: Using NETSIM as an example, we demonstrated that the performance of a semantic similarity measure could be significantly improved after incorporating genome-specific information. NETSIM incorporates both GO annotations and gene co-function network data as a priori knowledge in the model. Therefore, functional similarities of GO terms that are not explicitly encoded in GO but are relevant in a taxon-specific manner become measurable when GO annotations are limited.« less

  2. Selection for distinct gene expression properties favours the evolution of mutational robustness in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Soto, C

    2016-11-01

    Mutational robustness is a genotype's tendency to keep a phenotypic trait with little and few changes in the face of mutations. Mutational robustness is both ubiquitous and evolutionarily important as it affects in different ways the probability that new phenotypic variation arises. Understanding the origins of robustness is specially relevant for systems of development that are phylogenetically widespread and that construct phenotypic traits with a strong impact on fitness. Gene regulatory networks are examples of this class of systems. They comprise sets of genes that, through cross-regulation, build the gene activity patterns that define cellular responses, different tissues or distinct cell types. Several empirical observations, such as a greater robustness of wild-type phenotypes, suggest that stabilizing selection underlies the evolution of mutational robustness. However, the role of selection in the evolution of robustness is still under debate. Computer simulations of the dynamics and evolution of gene regulatory networks have shown that selection for any gene activity pattern that is steady and self-sustaining is sufficient to promote the evolution of mutational robustness. Here, I generalize this scenario using a computational model to show that selection for different aspects of a gene activity phenotype increases mutational robustness. Mutational robustness evolves even when selection favours properties that conflict with the stationarity of a gene activity pattern. The results that I present support an important role for stabilizing selection in the evolution of robustness in gene regulatory networks.

  3. Measuring semantic similarities by combining gene ontology annotations and gene co-function networks.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiajie; Uygun, Sahra; Kim, Taehyong; Wang, Yadong; Rhee, Seung Y; Chen, Jin

    2015-02-14

    Gene Ontology (GO) has been used widely to study functional relationships between genes. The current semantic similarity measures rely only on GO annotations and GO structure. This limits the power of GO-based similarity because of the limited proportion of genes that are annotated to GO in most organisms. We introduce a novel approach called NETSIM (network-based similarity measure) that incorporates information from gene co-function networks in addition to using the GO structure and annotations. Using metabolic reaction maps of yeast, Arabidopsis, and human, we demonstrate that NETSIM can improve the accuracy of GO term similarities. We also demonstrate that NETSIM works well even for genomes with sparser gene annotation data. We applied NETSIM on large Arabidopsis gene families such as cytochrome P450 monooxygenases to group the members functionally and show that this grouping could facilitate functional characterization of genes in these families. Using NETSIM as an example, we demonstrated that the performance of a semantic similarity measure could be significantly improved after incorporating genome-specific information. NETSIM incorporates both GO annotations and gene co-function network data as a priori knowledge in the model. Therefore, functional similarities of GO terms that are not explicitly encoded in GO but are relevant in a taxon-specific manner become measurable when GO annotations are limited. Supplementary information and software are available at http://www.msu.edu/~jinchen/NETSIM .

  4. Characterization of Genes for Beef Marbling Based on Applying Gene Coexpression Network

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Dajeong; Kim, Nam-Kuk; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Park, Hye-Sun; Cho, Yong-Min; Chai, Han-Ha; Kim, Heebal

    2014-01-01

    Marbling is an important trait in characterization beef quality and a major factor for determining the price of beef in the Korean beef market. In particular, marbling is a complex trait and needs a system-level approach for identifying candidate genes related to the trait. To find the candidate gene associated with marbling, we used a weighted gene coexpression network analysis from the expression value of bovine genes. Hub genes were identified; they were topologically centered with large degree and BC values in the global network. We performed gene expression analysis to detect candidate genes in M. longissimus with divergent marbling phenotype (marbling scores 2 to 7) using qRT-PCR. The results demonstrate that transmembrane protein 60 (TMEM60) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) are associated with increasing marbling fat. We suggest that the network-based approach in livestock may be an important method for analyzing the complex effects of candidate genes associated with complex traits like marbling or tenderness. PMID:24624372

  5. Automated Identification of Core Regulatory Genes in Human Gene Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Narang, Vipin; Ramli, Muhamad Azfar; Singhal, Amit; Kumar, Pavanish; de Libero, Gennaro; Poidinger, Michael; Monterola, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Human gene regulatory networks (GRN) can be difficult to interpret due to a tangle of edges interconnecting thousands of genes. We constructed a general human GRN from extensive transcription factor and microRNA target data obtained from public databases. In a subnetwork of this GRN that is active during estrogen stimulation of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, we benchmarked automated algorithms for identifying core regulatory genes (transcription factors and microRNAs). Among these algorithms, we identified K-core decomposition, pagerank and betweenness centrality algorithms as the most effective for discovering core regulatory genes in the network evaluated based on previously known roles of these genes in MCF-7 biology as well as in their ability to explain the up or down expression status of up to 70% of the remaining genes. Finally, we validated the use of K-core algorithm for organizing the GRN in an easier to interpret layered hierarchy where more influential regulatory genes percolate towards the inner layers. The integrated human gene and miRNA network and software used in this study are provided as supplementary materials (S1 Data) accompanying this manuscript.

  6. Automated Identification of Core Regulatory Genes in Human Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Amit; Kumar, Pavanish; de Libero, Gennaro; Poidinger, Michael; Monterola, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Human gene regulatory networks (GRN) can be difficult to interpret due to a tangle of edges interconnecting thousands of genes. We constructed a general human GRN from extensive transcription factor and microRNA target data obtained from public databases. In a subnetwork of this GRN that is active during estrogen stimulation of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, we benchmarked automated algorithms for identifying core regulatory genes (transcription factors and microRNAs). Among these algorithms, we identified K-core decomposition, pagerank and betweenness centrality algorithms as the most effective for discovering core regulatory genes in the network evaluated based on previously known roles of these genes in MCF-7 biology as well as in their ability to explain the up or down expression status of up to 70% of the remaining genes. Finally, we validated the use of K-core algorithm for organizing the GRN in an easier to interpret layered hierarchy where more influential regulatory genes percolate towards the inner layers. The integrated human gene and miRNA network and software used in this study are provided as supplementary materials (S1 Data) accompanying this manuscript. PMID:26393364

  7. Toxic Diatom Aldehydes Affect Defence Gene Networks in Sea Urchins.

    PubMed

    Varrella, Stefano; Romano, Giovanna; Costantini, Susan; Ruocco, Nadia; Ianora, Adrianna; Bentley, Matt G; Costantini, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Marine organisms possess a series of cellular strategies to counteract the negative effects of toxic compounds, including the massive reorganization of gene expression networks. Here we report the modulated dose-dependent response of activated genes by diatom polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. PUAs are secondary metabolites deriving from the oxidation of fatty acids, inducing deleterious effects on the reproduction and development of planktonic and benthic organisms that feed on these unicellular algae and with anti-cancer activity. Our previous results showed that PUAs target several genes, implicated in different functional processes in this sea urchin. Using interactomic Ingenuity Pathway Analysis we now show that the genes targeted by PUAs are correlated with four HUB genes, NF-κB, p53, δ-2-catenin and HIF1A, which have not been previously reported for P. lividus. We propose a working model describing hypothetical pathways potentially involved in toxic aldehyde stress response in sea urchins. This represents the first report on gene networks affected by PUAs, opening new perspectives in understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying the response of benthic organisms to diatom exposure.

  8. Toxic Diatom Aldehydes Affect Defence Gene Networks in Sea Urchins

    PubMed Central

    Varrella, Stefano; Ruocco, Nadia; Ianora, Adrianna; Bentley, Matt G.; Costantini, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Marine organisms possess a series of cellular strategies to counteract the negative effects of toxic compounds, including the massive reorganization of gene expression networks. Here we report the modulated dose-dependent response of activated genes by diatom polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. PUAs are secondary metabolites deriving from the oxidation of fatty acids, inducing deleterious effects on the reproduction and development of planktonic and benthic organisms that feed on these unicellular algae and with anti-cancer activity. Our previous results showed that PUAs target several genes, implicated in different functional processes in this sea urchin. Using interactomic Ingenuity Pathway Analysis we now show that the genes targeted by PUAs are correlated with four HUB genes, NF-κB, p53, δ-2-catenin and HIF1A, which have not been previously reported for P. lividus. We propose a working model describing hypothetical pathways potentially involved in toxic aldehyde stress response in sea urchins. This represents the first report on gene networks affected by PUAs, opening new perspectives in understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying the response of benthic organisms to diatom exposure. PMID:26914213

  9. Innovation and robustness in complex regulatory gene networks

    PubMed Central

    Ciliberti, S.; Martin, O. C.; Wagner, A.

    2007-01-01

    The history of life involves countless evolutionary innovations, a steady stream of ingenuity that has been flowing for more than 3 billion years. Very little is known about the principles of biological organization that allow such innovation. Here, we examine these principles for evolutionary innovation in gene expression patterns. To this end, we study a model for the transcriptional regulation networks that are at the heart of embryonic development. A genotype corresponds to a regulatory network of a given topology, and a phenotype corresponds to a steady-state gene expression pattern. Networks with the same phenotype form a connected graph in genotype space, where two networks are immediate neighbors if they differ by one regulatory interaction. We show that an evolutionary search on this graph can reach genotypes that are as different from each other as if they were chosen at random in genotype space, allowing evolutionary access to different kinds of innovation while staying close to a viable phenotype. Thus, although robustness to mutations may hinder innovation in the short term, we conclude that long-term innovation in gene expression patterns can only emerge in the presence of the robustness caused by connected genotype graphs. PMID:17690244

  10. Vitamin D and gene networks in human osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    van de Peppel, Jeroen; van Leeuwen, Johannes P. T. M.

    2014-01-01

    Bone formation is indirectly influenced by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) through the stimulation of calcium uptake in the intestine and re-absorption in the kidneys. Direct effects on osteoblasts and bone formation have also been established. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in osteoblasts and 1,25D3 modifies gene expression of various osteoblast differentiation and mineralization-related genes, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALPL), osteocalcin (BGLAP), and osteopontin (SPP1). 1,25D3 is known to stimulate mineralization of human osteoblasts in vitro, and recently it was shown that 1,25D3 induces mineralization via effects in the period preceding mineralization during the pre-mineralization period. For a full understanding of the action of 1,25D3 in osteoblasts it is important to get an integrated network view of the 1,25D3-regulated genes during osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. The current data will be presented and discussed alluding to future studies to fully delineate the 1,25D3 action in osteoblast. Describing and understanding the vitamin D regulatory networks and identifying the dominant players in these networks may help develop novel (personalized) vitamin D-based treatments. The following topics will be discussed in this overview: (1) Bone metabolism and osteoblasts, (2) Vitamin D, bone metabolism and osteoblast function, (3) Vitamin D induced transcriptional networks in the context of osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. PMID:24782782

  11. Toward an orofacial gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Kousa, Youssef A; Schutte, Brian C

    2016-03-01

    Orofacial clefting is a common birth defect with significant morbidity. A panoply of candidate genes have been discovered through synergy of animal models and human genetics. Among these, variants in interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) cause syndromic orofacial clefting and contribute risk toward isolated cleft lip and palate (1/700 live births). Rare variants in IRF6 can lead to Van der Woude syndrome (1/35,000 live births) and popliteal pterygium syndrome (1/300,000 live births). Furthermore, IRF6 regulates GRHL3 and rare variants in this downstream target can also lead to Van der Woude syndrome. In addition, a common variant (rs642961) in the IRF6 locus is found in 30% of the world's population and contributes risk for isolated orofacial clefting. Biochemical studies revealed that rs642961 abrogates one of four AP-2alpha binding sites. Like IRF6 and GRHL3, rare variants in TFAP2A can also lead to syndromic orofacial clefting with lip pits (branchio-oculo-facial syndrome). The literature suggests that AP-2alpha, IRF6 and GRHL3 are part of a pathway that is essential for lip and palate development. In addition to updating the pathways, players and pursuits, this review will highlight some of the current questions in the study of orofacial clefting.

  12. Parameter estimation in spiking neural networks: a reverse-engineering approach.

    PubMed

    Rostro-Gonzalez, H; Cessac, B; Vieville, T

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a reverse engineering approach for parameter estimation in spiking neural networks (SNNs). We consider the deterministic evolution of a time-discretized network with spiking neurons, where synaptic transmission has delays, modeled as a neural network of the generalized integrate and fire type. Our approach aims at by-passing the fact that the parameter estimation in SNN results in a non-deterministic polynomial-time hard problem when delays are to be considered. Here, this assumption has been reformulated as a linear programming (LP) problem in order to perform the solution in a polynomial time. Besides, the LP problem formulation makes the fact that the reverse engineering of a neural network can be performed from the observation of the spike times explicit. Furthermore, we point out how the LP adjustment mechanism is local to each neuron and has the same structure as a 'Hebbian' rule. Finally, we present a generalization of this approach to the design of input-output (I/O) transformations as a practical method to 'program' a spiking network, i.e. find a set of parameters allowing us to exactly reproduce the network output, given an input. Numerical verifications and illustrations are provided.

  13. Statistical material parameters identification based on artificial neural networks for stochastic computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Drahomír; Lehký, David

    2017-07-01

    A general methodology to obtain statistical material model parameters is presented. The procedure is based on the coupling of a stochastic simulation and an artificial neural network. The identification parameters play the role of basic random variables with a scatter reflecting the physical range of possible values. The efficient small-sample simulation method Latin Hypercube Sampling is used for the stochastic preparation of the training set utilized in training the neural network. Once the network has been trained, it represents an approximation consequently utilized in a following way: To provide the best possible set of model parameters for the given experimental data. The paper focuses the attention on the statistical inverse analysis of material model parameters where statistical moments (usually means and standard deviations) of input parameters have to be identified based on experimental data. A hierarchical statistical parameters database within the framework of reliability software is presented. The efficiency of the approach is verifiedusing numerical example of fracture-mechanical parameters determination of fiber reinforced and plain concretes.

  14. GeRNet: a gene regulatory network tool.

    PubMed

    Dussaut, J S; Gallo, C A; Cravero, F; Martínez, M J; Carballido, J A; Ponzoni, I

    2017-08-30

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are crucial in every process of life since they govern the majority of the molecular processes. Therefore, the task of assembling these networks is highly important. In particular, the so called model-free approaches have an advantage modeling the complexities of dynamic molecular networks, since most of the gene networks are hard to be mapped with accuracy by any other mathematical model. A highly abstract model-free approach, called rule-based approach, offers several advantages performing data-driven analysis; such as the requirement of the least amount of data. They also have an important ability to perform inferences: its simplicity allows the inference of large size models with a higher speed of analysis. However, regarding these techniques, the reconstruction of the relational structure of the network is partial, hence incomplete, for an effective biological analysis. This situation motivated us to explore the possibility of hybridizing with other approaches, such as biclustering techniques. This led to incorporate a biclustering tool that finds new relations between the nodes of the GRN. In this work we present a new software, called GeRNeT that integrates the algorithms of GRNCOP2 and BiHEA along a set of tools for interactive visualization, statistical analysis and ontological enrichment of the resulting GRNs. In this regard, results associated with Alzheimer disease datasets are presented that show the usefulness of integrating both bioinformatics tools. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evolution of the mammalian embryonic pluripotency gene regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Tresguerres, Beatriz; Cañon, Susana; Rayon, Teresa; Pernaute, Barbara; Crespo, Miguel; Torroja, Carlos; Manzanares, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic pluripotency in the mouse is established and maintained by a gene-regulatory network under the control of a core set of transcription factors that include octamer-binding protein 4 (Oct4; official name POU domain, class 5, transcription factor 1, Pou5f1), sex-determining region Y (SRY)-box containing gene 2 (Sox2), and homeobox protein Nanog. Although this network is largely conserved in eutherian mammals, very little information is available regarding its evolutionary conservation in other vertebrates. We have compared the embryonic pluripotency networks in mouse and chick by means of expression analysis in the pregastrulation chicken embryo, genomic comparisons, and functional assays of pluripotency-related regulatory elements in ES cells and blastocysts. We find that multiple components of the network are either novel to mammals or have acquired novel expression domains in early developmental stages of the mouse. We also find that the downstream action of the mouse core pluripotency factors is mediated largely by genomic sequence elements nonconserved with chick. In the case of Sox2 and Fgf4, we find that elements driving expression in embryonic pluripotent cells have evolved by a small number of nucleotide changes that create novel binding sites for core factors. Our results show that the network in charge of embryonic pluripotency is an evolutionary novelty of mammals that is related to the comparatively extended period during which mammalian embryonic cells need to be maintained in an undetermined state before engaging in early differentiation events. PMID:21048080

  16. Evolution of the mammalian embryonic pluripotency gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Tresguerres, Beatriz; Cañon, Susana; Rayon, Teresa; Pernaute, Barbara; Crespo, Miguel; Torroja, Carlos; Manzanares, Miguel

    2010-11-16

    Embryonic pluripotency in the mouse is established and maintained by a gene-regulatory network under the control of a core set of transcription factors that include octamer-binding protein 4 (Oct4; official name POU domain, class 5, transcription factor 1, Pou5f1), sex-determining region Y (SRY)-box containing gene 2 (Sox2), and homeobox protein Nanog. Although this network is largely conserved in eutherian mammals, very little information is available regarding its evolutionary conservation in other vertebrates. We have compared the embryonic pluripotency networks in mouse and chick by means of expression analysis in the pregastrulation chicken embryo, genomic comparisons, and functional assays of pluripotency-related regulatory elements in ES cells and blastocysts. We find that multiple components of the network are either novel to mammals or have acquired novel expression domains in early developmental stages of the mouse. We also find that the downstream action of the mouse core pluripotency factors is mediated largely by genomic sequence elements nonconserved with chick. In the case of Sox2 and Fgf4, we find that elements driving expression in embryonic pluripotent cells have evolved by a small number of nucleotide changes that create novel binding sites for core factors. Our results show that the network in charge of embryonic pluripotency is an evolutionary novelty of mammals that is related to the comparatively extended period during which mammalian embryonic cells need to be maintained in an undetermined state before engaging in early differentiation events.

  17. How difficult is inference of mammalian causal gene regulatory networks?

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Djordje; Yang, Andrian; Zadoorian, Armella; Rungrugeecharoen, Kevin; Ho, Joshua W K

    2014-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) play a central role in systems biology, especially in the study of mammalian organ development. One key question remains largely unanswered: Is it possible to infer mammalian causal GRNs using observable gene co-expression patterns alone? We assembled two mouse GRN datasets (embryonic tooth and heart) and matching microarray gene expression profiles to systematically investigate the difficulties of mammalian causal GRN inference. The GRNs were assembled based on > 2,000 pieces of experimental genetic perturbation evidence from manually reading > 150 primary research articles. Each piece of perturbation evidence records the qualitative change of the expression of one gene following knock-down or over-expression of another gene. Our data have thorough annotation of tissue types and embryonic stages, as well as the type of regulation (activation, inhibition and no effect), which uniquely allows us to estimate both sensitivity and specificity of the inference of tissue specific causal GRN edges. Using these unprecedented datasets, we found that gene co-expression does not reliably distinguish true positive from false positive interactions, making inference of GRN in mammalian development very difficult. Nonetheless, if we have expression profiling data from genetic or molecular perturbation experiments, such as gene knock-out or signalling stimulation, it is possible to use the set of differentially expressed genes to recover causal regulatory relationships with good sensitivity and specificity. Our result supports the importance of using perturbation experimental data in causal network reconstruction. Furthermore, we showed that causal gene regulatory relationship can be highly cell type or developmental stage specific, suggesting the importance of employing expression profiles from homogeneous cell populations. This study provides essential datasets and empirical evidence to guide the development of new GRN inference methods for

  18. Gene regulatory networks and the role of robustness and stochasticity in the control of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, Lesley T.; Walhout, Albertha J.M.

    2011-01-01

    In any given cell, thousands of genes are expressed and work in concert to ensure the cell's function, fitness, and survival. Each gene, in turn, must be expressed at the proper time and in the proper amounts to ensure the appropriate functional outcome. The regulation and expression of some genes are highly robust; their expression is controlled by invariable expression programs. For instance, developmental gene expression is extremely similar in a given cell type from one individual to another. The expression of other genes is more variable: Their levels are noisy and are different from cell to cell and from individual to individual. This can be highly beneficial in physiological responses to outside cues and stresses. Recent advances have enabled the analysis of differential gene expression at a systems level. Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) involving interactions between large numbers of genes and their regulators have been mapped onto graphic diagrams that are used to visualize the regulatory relationships. The further characterization of GRNs has already uncovered global principles of gene regulation. Together with synthetic network biology, such studies are starting to provide insights into the transcriptional mechanisms that cause robust versus stochastic gene expression and their relationships to phenotypic robustness and variability. Here, we discuss GRNs and their topological properties in relation to transcriptional and phenotypic outputs in development and organismal physiology. PMID:21324878

  19. Statistical mechanics of scale-free gene expression networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Eitan

    2012-12-01

    The gene co-expression networks of many organisms including bacteria, mice and man exhibit scale-free distribution. This heterogeneous distribution of connections decreases the vulnerability of the network to random attacks and thus may confer the genetic replication machinery an intrinsic resilience to such attacks, triggered by changing environmental conditions that the organism may be subject to during evolution. This resilience to random attacks comes at an energetic cost, however, reflected by the lower entropy of the scale-free distribution compared to the more homogenous, random network. In this study we found that the cell cycle-regulated gene expression pattern of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae obeys a power-law distribution with an exponent α = 2.1 and an entropy of 1.58. The latter is very close to the maximal value of 1.65 obtained from linear optimization of the entropy function under the constraint of a constant cost function, determined by the average degree connectivity . We further show that the yeast's gene expression network can achieve scale-free distribution in a process that does not involve growth but rather via re-wiring of the connections between nodes of an ordered network. Our results support the idea of an evolutionary selection, which acts at the level of the protein sequence, and is compatible with the notion of greater biological importance of highly connected nodes in the protein interaction network. Our constrained re-wiring model provides a theoretical framework for a putative thermodynamically driven evolutionary selection process.

  20. An evaluation of neural networks for identification of system parameters in reactor noise signals

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.F.

    1991-12-31

    Several backpropagation neural networks for identifying fundamental mode eigenvalues were evaluated. The networks were trained and tested on analytical data and on results from other numerical methods. They were then used to predict first mode break frequencies for noise data from several sources. These predictions were, in turn, compared with analytical values and with results from alternative methods. Comparisons of results for some data sets suggest that the accuracy of predictions from neural networks are essentially equivalent to results from conventional methods while other evaluations indicate that either method may be superior. Experience gained from these numerical experiments provide insight for improving the performance of neural networks relative to other methods for identifying parameters associated with experimental data. Neural networks may also be used in support of conventional algorithms by providing starting points for nonlinear minimization algorithms.

  1. An evaluation of neural networks for identification of system parameters in reactor noise signals

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.F.

    1991-01-01

    Several backpropagation neural networks for identifying fundamental mode eigenvalues were evaluated. The networks were trained and tested on analytical data and on results from other numerical methods. They were then used to predict first mode break frequencies for noise data from several sources. These predictions were, in turn, compared with analytical values and with results from alternative methods. Comparisons of results for some data sets suggest that the accuracy of predictions from neural networks are essentially equivalent to results from conventional methods while other evaluations indicate that either method may be superior. Experience gained from these numerical experiments provide insight for improving the performance of neural networks relative to other methods for identifying parameters associated with experimental data. Neural networks may also be used in support of conventional algorithms by providing starting points for nonlinear minimization algorithms.

  2. Modeling stochasticity and robustness in gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhishek; Mohanram, Kartik; Di Cara, Alessandro; De Micheli, Giovanni; Xenarios, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Understanding gene regulation in biological processes and modeling the robustness of underlying regulatory networks is an important problem that is currently being addressed by computational systems biologists. Lately, there has been a renewed interest in Boolean modeling techniques for gene regulatory networks (GRNs). However, due to their deterministic nature, it is often difficult to identify whether these modeling approaches are robust to the addition of stochastic noise that is widespread in gene regulatory processes. Stochasticity in Boolean models of GRNs has been addressed relatively sparingly in the past, mainly by flipping the expression of genes between different expression levels with a predefined probability. This stochasticity in nodes (SIN) model leads to over representation of noise in GRNs and hence non-correspondence with biological observations. Results: In this article, we introduce the stochasticity in functions (SIF) model for simulating stochasticity in Boolean models of GRNs. By providing biological motivation behind the use of the SIF model and applying it to the T-helper and T-cell activation networks, we show that the SIF model provides more biologically robust results than the existing SIN model of stochasticity in GRNs. Availability: Algorithms are made available under our Boolean modeling toolbox, GenYsis. The software binaries can be downloaded from http://si2.epfl.ch/∼garg/genysis.html. Contact: abhishek.garg@epfl.ch PMID:19477975

  3. Modeling stochasticity and robustness in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Garg, Abhishek; Mohanram, Kartik; Di Cara, Alessandro; De Micheli, Giovanni; Xenarios, Ioannis

    2009-06-15

    Understanding gene regulation in biological processes and modeling the robustness of underlying regulatory networks is an important problem that is currently being addressed by computational systems biologists. Lately, there has been a renewed interest in Boolean modeling techniques for gene regulatory networks (GRNs). However, due to their deterministic nature, it is often difficult to identify whether these modeling approaches are robust to the addition of stochastic noise that is widespread in gene regulatory processes. Stochasticity in Boolean models of GRNs has been addressed relatively sparingly in the past, mainly by flipping the expression of genes between different expression levels with a predefined probability. This stochasticity in nodes (SIN) model leads to over representation of noise in GRNs and hence non-correspondence with biological observations. In this article, we introduce the stochasticity in functions (SIF) model for simulating stochasticity in Boolean models of GRNs. By providing biological motivation behind the use of the SIF model and applying it to the T-helper and T-cell activation networks, we show that the SIF model provides more biologically robust results than the existing SIN model of stochasticity in GRNs. Algorithms are made available under our Boolean modeling toolbox, GenYsis. The software binaries can be downloaded from http://si2.epfl.ch/ approximately garg/genysis.html.

  4. Gene regulation networks generate diverse pigmentation patterns in plants.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nick; Davies, Kevin; Schwinn, Kathy

    2014-06-13

    The diversity of pigmentation patterns observed in plants occurs due to the spatial distribution and accumulation of colored compounds, which may also be associated with structural changes to the tissue. Anthocyanins are flavonoids that provide red/purple/blue coloration to plants, often forming complex patterns such as spots, stripes, and vein-associated pigmentation, particularly in flowers. These patterns are determined by the activity of MYB-bHLH-WDR (MBW) transcription factor complexes, which activate the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes, resulting in anthocyanin pigment accumulation. Recently, we established that the MBW complex controlling anthocyanin synthesis acts within a gene regulation network that is conserved within at least the Eudicots. This network involves hierarchy, reinforcement, and feedback mechanisms that allow for stringent and responsive regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes. The gene network and mobile nature of the WDR and R3-MYB proteins provide exciting new opportunities to explore the basis of pigmentation patterning, and to investigate the evolutionary history of the MBW components in land plants.

  5. Gene regulation networks generate diverse pigmentation patterns in plants

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Nick W; Davies, Kevin M; Schwinn, Kathy E

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of pigmentation patterns observed in plants occurs due to the spatial distribution and accumulation of colored compounds, which may also be associated with structural changes to the tissue. Anthocyanins are flavonoids that provide red/purple/blue coloration to plants, often forming complex patterns such as spots, stripes, and vein-associated pigmentation, particularly in flowers. These patterns are determined by the activity of MYB-bHLH-WDR (MBW) transcription factor complexes, which activate the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes, resulting in anthocyanin pigment accumulation. Recently, we established that the MBW complex controlling anthocyanin synthesis acts within a gene regulation network that is conserved within at least the Eudicots. This network involves hierarchy, reinforcement, and feedback mechanisms that allow for stringent and responsive regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes. The gene network and mobile nature of the WDR and R3-MYB proteins provide exciting new opportunities to explore the basis of pigmentation patterning, and to investigate the evolutionary history of the MBW components in land plants. PMID:25763693

  6. Dynamic Gene Regulatory Networks of Human Myeloid Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Ricardo N; El-Ali, Nicole C; Mager, Mikayla Anne; Wyman, Dana; Conesa, Ana; Mortazavi, Ali

    2017-03-27

    The reconstruction of gene regulatory networks underlying cell differentiation from high-throughput gene expression and chromatin data remains a challenge. Here, we derive dynamic gene regulatory networks for human myeloid differentiation using a 5-day time series of RNA-seq and ATAC-seq data. We profile HL-60 promyelocytes differentiating into macrophages, neutrophils, monocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. We find a rapid response in the expression of key transcription factors and lineage markers that only regulate a subset of their targets at a given time, which is followed by chromatin accessibility changes that occur later along with further gene expression changes. We observe differences between promyelocyte- and monocyte-derived macrophages at both the transcriptional and chromatin landscape level, despite using the same differentiation stimulus, which suggest that the path taken by cells in the differentiation landscape defines their end cell state. More generally, our approach of combining neighboring time points and replicates to achieve greater sequencing depth can efficiently infer footprint-based regulatory networks from long series data.

  7. Gene regulation networks generate diverse pigmentation patterns in plants.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nick W; Davies, Kevin M; Schwinn, Kathy E

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of pigmentation patterns observed in plants occurs due to the spatial distribution and accumulation of colored compounds, which may also be associated with structural changes to the tissue. Anthocyanins are flavonoids that provide red/purple/blue coloration to plants, often forming complex patterns such as spots, stripes, and vein-associated pigmentation, particularly in flowers. These patterns are determined by the activity of MYB-bHLH-WDR (MBW) transcription factor complexes, which activate the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes, resulting in anthocyanin pigment accumulation. Recently, we established that the MBW complex controlling anthocyanin synthesis acts within a gene regulation network that is conserved within at least the Eudicots. This network involves hierarchy, reinforcement, and feedback mechanisms that allow for stringent and responsive regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes. The gene network and mobile nature of the WDR and R3-MYB proteins provide exciting new opportunities to explore the basis of pigmentation patterning, and to investigate the evolutionary history of the MBW components in land plants.

  8. Constructing gene co-expression networks and predicting functions of unknown genes by random matrix theory

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Feng; Yang, Yunfeng; Zhong, Jianxin; Gao, Haichun; Khan, Latifur; Thompson, Dorothea K; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-01-01

    Background Large-scale sequencing of entire genomes has ushered in a new age in biology. One of the next grand challenges is to dissect the cellular networks consisting of many individual functional modules. Defining co-expression networks without ambiguity based on genome-wide microarray data is difficult and current methods are not robust and consistent with different data sets. This is particularly problematic for little understood organisms since not much existing biological knowledge can be exploited for determining the threshold to differentiate true correlation from random noise. Random matrix theory (RMT), which has been widely and successfully used in physics, is a powerful approach to distinguish system-specific, non-random properties embedded in complex systems from random noise. Here, we have hypothesized that the universal predictions of RMT are also applicable to biological systems and the correlation threshold can be determined by characterizing the correlation matrix of microarray profiles using random matrix theory. Results Application of random matrix theory to microarray data of S. oneidensis, E. coli, yeast, A. thaliana, Drosophila, mouse and human indicates that there is a sharp transition of nearest neighbour spacing distribution (NNSD) of correlation matrix after gradually removing certain elements insider the matrix. Testing on an in silico modular model has demonstrated that this transition can be used to determine the correlation threshold for revealing modular co-expression networks. The co-expression network derived from yeast cell cycling microarray data is supported by gene annotation. The topological properties of the resulting co-expression network agree well with the general properties of biological networks. Computational evaluations have showed that RMT approach is sensitive and robust. Furthermore, evaluation on sampled expression data of an in silico modular gene system has showed that under-sampled expressions do not affect the

  9. The formulation of the control of an expression pattern in a gene network by propositional calculus.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hideki; Tanaka, Hiroto; Ushio, Toshimitsu

    2006-06-07

    In this study we model a gene network as a continuous-time switching network. In this model, each gene has a binary state which indicates if the gene expresses or not. We propose a method to control a sequence of expression patterns in the gene network model by adding another continuous-time switching network. By using propositional calculus, we will show that the control problem can be formulated as a mixed-integer linear programming problem with linear constraints.

  10. Literature Mining and Ontology based Analysis of Host-Brucella Gene-Gene Interaction Network.

    PubMed

    Karadeniz, İlknur; Hur, Junguk; He, Yongqun; Özgür, Arzucan

    2015-01-01

    Brucella is an intracellular bacterium that causes chronic brucellosis in humans and various mammals. The identification of host-Brucella interaction is crucial to understand host immunity against Brucella infection and Brucella pathogenesis against host immune responses. Most of the information about the inter-species interactions between host and Brucella genes is only available in the text of the scientific publications. Many text-mining systems for extracting gene and protein interactions have been proposed. However, only a few of them have been designed by considering the peculiarities of host-pathogen interactions. In this paper, we used a text mining approach for extracting host-Brucella gene-gene interactions from the abstracts of articles in PubMed. The gene-gene interactions here represent the interactions between genes and/or gene products (e.g., proteins). The SciMiner tool, originally designed for detecting mammalian gene/protein names in text, was extended to identify host and Brucella gene/protein names in the abstracts. Next, sentence-level and abstract-level co-occurrence based approaches, as well as sentence-level machine learning based methods, originally designed for extracting intra-species gene interactions, were utilized to extract the interactions among the identified host and Brucella genes. The extracted interactions were manually evaluated. A total of 46 host-Brucella gene interactions were identified and represented as an interaction network. Twenty four of these interactions were identified from sentence-level processing. Twenty two additional interactions were identified when abstract-level processing was performed. The Interaction Network Ontology (INO) was used to represent the identified interaction types at a hierarchical ontology structure. Ontological modeling of specific gene-gene interactions demonstrates that host-pathogen gene-gene interactions occur at experimental conditions which can be ontologically represented. Our

  11. Systems biology and gene networks in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Parikshak, Neelroop N.; Gandal, Michael J.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and genomic approaches have implicated hundreds of genetic loci in neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegeneration, but mechanistic understanding continues to lag behind the pace of gene discovery. Understanding the role of specific genetic variants in the brain involves dissecting a functional hierarchy that encompasses molecular pathways, diverse cell types, neural circuits and, ultimately, cognition and behaviour. With a focus on transcriptomics, this Review discusses how high-throughput molecular, integrative and network approaches inform disease biology by placing human genetics in a molecular systems and neurobiological context. We provide a framework for interpreting network biology studies and leveraging big genomics data sets in neurobiology. PMID:26149713

  12. Prioritization of Susceptibility Genes for Ectopic Pregnancy by Gene Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji-Long; Zhao, Miao

    2016-02-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is a very dangerous complication of pregnancy, affecting 1%-2% of all reported pregnancies. Due to ethical constraints on human biopsies and the lack of suitable animal models, there has been little success in identifying functionally important genes in the pathogenesis of ectopic pregnancy. In the present study, we developed a random walk-based computational method named TM-rank to prioritize ectopic pregnancy-related genes based on text mining data and gene network information. Using a defined threshold value, we identified five top-ranked genes: VEGFA (vascular endothelial growth factor A), IL8 (interleukin 8), IL6 (interleukin 6), ESR1 (estrogen receptor 1) and EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor). These genes are promising candidate genes that can serve as useful diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Our approach represents a novel strategy for prioritizing disease susceptibility genes.

  13. Recurrent neural network based hybrid model for reconstructing gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Raza, Khalid; Alam, Mansaf

    2016-10-01

    One of the exciting problems in systems biology research is to decipher how genome controls the development of complex biological system. The gene regulatory networks (GRNs) help in the identification of regulatory interactions between genes and offer fruitful information related to functional role of individual gene in a cellular system. Discovering GRNs lead to a wide range of applications, including identification of disease related pathways providing novel tentative drug targets, helps to predict disease response, and also assists in diagnosing various diseases including cancer. Reconstruction of GRNs from available biological data is still an open problem. This paper proposes a recurrent neural network (RNN) based model of GRN, hybridized with generalized extended Kalman filter for weight update in backpropagation through time training algorithm. The RNN is a complex neural network that gives a better settlement between biological closeness and mathematical flexibility to model GRN; and is also able to capture complex, non-linear and dynamic relationships among variables. Gene expression data are inherently noisy and Kalman filter performs well for estimation problem even in noisy data. Hence, we applied non-linear version of Kalman filter, known as generalized extended Kalman filter, for weight update during RNN training. The developed model has been tested on four benchmark networks such as DNA SOS repair network, IRMA network, and two synthetic networks from DREAM Challenge. We performed a comparison of our results with other state-of-the-art techniques which shows superiority of our proposed model. Further, 5% Gaussian noise has been induced in the dataset and result of the proposed model shows negligible effect of noise on results, demonstrating the noise tolerance capability of the model.

  14. Optimal Control of Gene Regulatory Networks with Effectiveness of Multiple Drugs: A Boolean Network Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Hiraishi, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    Developing control theory of gene regulatory networks is one of the significant topics in the field of systems biology, and it is expected to apply the obtained results to gene therapy technologies in the future. In this paper, a control method using a Boolean network (BN) is studied. A BN is widely used as a model of gene regulatory networks, and gene expression is expressed by a binary value (0 or 1). In the control problem, we assume that the concentration level of a part of genes is arbitrarily determined as the control input. However, there are cases that no gene satisfying this assumption exists, and it is important to consider structural control via external stimuli. Furthermore, these controls are realized by multiple drugs, and it is also important to consider multiple effects such as duration of effect and side effects. In this paper, we propose a BN model with two types of the control inputs and an optimal control method with duration of drug effectiveness. First, a BN model and duration of drug effectiveness are discussed. Next, the optimal control problem is formulated and is reduced to an integer linear programming problem. Finally, numerical simulations are shown. PMID:24058904

  15. Optimal control of gene regulatory networks with effectiveness of multiple drugs: a Boolean network approach.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Hiraishi, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    Developing control theory of gene regulatory networks is one of the significant topics in the field of systems biology, and it is expected to apply the obtained results to gene therapy technologies in the future. In this paper, a control method using a Boolean network (BN) is studied. A BN is widely used as a model of gene regulatory networks, and gene expression is expressed by a binary value (0 or 1). In the control problem, we assume that the concentration level of a part of genes is arbitrarily determined as the control input. However, there are cases that no gene satisfying this assumption exists, and it is important to consider structural control via external stimuli. Furthermore, these controls are realized by multiple drugs, and it is also important to consider multiple effects such as duration of effect and side effects. In this paper, we propose a BN model with two types of the control inputs and an optimal control method with duration of drug effectiveness. First, a BN model and duration of drug effectiveness are discussed. Next, the optimal control problem is formulated and is reduced to an integer linear programming problem. Finally, numerical simulations are shown.

  16. Estimation of soil compaction parameters by using statistical analyses and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günaydın, O.

    2009-03-01

    This study presents the application of different methods (simple-multiple analysis and artificial neural networks) for the estimation of the compaction parameters (maximum dry unit weight and optimum moisture content) from classification properties of the soils. Compaction parameters can only be defined experimentally by Proctor tests. The data collected from the dams in some areas of Nigde (Turkey) were used for the estimation of soil compaction parameters. Regression analysis and artificial neural network estimation indicated strong correlations ( r 2 = 0.70-0.95) between the compaction parameters and soil classification properties. It has been shown that the correlation equations obtained as a result of regression analyses are in satisfactory agreement with the test results. It is recommended that the proposed correlations will be useful for a preliminary design of a project where there is a financial limitation and limited time.

  17. The Efficacy of Galaxy Shape Parameters in Photometric Redshift Estimation: A Neural Network Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Shmakova, M.; Gerke, B.; Griffith, R.L.; Lotz, J.; /NOAO, Tucson

    2011-05-20

    We present a determination of the effects of including galaxy morphological parameters in photometric redshift estimation with an artificial neural network method. Neural networks, which recognize patterns in the information content of data in an unbiased way, can be a useful estimator of the additional information contained in extra parameters, such as those describing morphology, if the input data are treated on an equal footing. We show that certain principal components of the morphology information are correlated with galaxy type. However, we find that for the data used the inclusion of morphological information does not have a statistically significant benefit for photometric redshift estimation with the techniques employed here. The inclusion of these parameters may result in a trade-off between extra information and additional noise, with the additional noise becoming more dominant as more parameters are added.

  18. GENIUS: web server to predict local gene networks and key genes for biological functions

    PubMed Central

    Puelma, Tomas; Araus, Viviana; Canales, Javier; Vidal, Elena A.; Cabello, Juan M.; Soto, Alvaro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Summary: GENIUS is a user-friendly web server that uses a novel machine learning algorithm to infer functional gene networks focused on specific genes and experimental conditions that are relevant to biological functions of interest. These functions may have different levels of complexity, from specific biological processes to complex traits that involve several interacting processes. GENIUS also enriches the network with new genes related to the biological function of interest, with accuracies comparable to highly discriminative Support Vector Machine methods. Availability and Implementation: GENIUS currently supports eight model organisms and is freely available for public use at http://networks.bio.puc.cl/genius. Contact: genius.psbl@gmail.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27993775

  19. Network component analysis provides quantitative insights on an Arabidopsis transcription factor-gene regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are models of molecule-gene interactions instrumental in the coordination of gene expression. Transcription factor (TF)-GRNs are an important subset of GRNs that characterize gene expression as the effect of TFs acting on their target genes. Although such networks can qualitatively summarize TF-gene interactions, it is highly desirable to quantitatively determine the strengths of the interactions in a TF-GRN as well as the magnitudes of TF activities. To our knowledge, such analysis is rare in plant biology. A computational methodology developed for this purpose is network component analysis (NCA), which has been used for studying large-scale microbial TF-GRNs to obtain nontrivial, mechanistic insights. In this work, we employed NCA to quantitatively analyze a plant TF-GRN important in floral development using available regulatory information from AGRIS, by processing previously reported gene expression data from four shoot apical meristem cell types. Results The NCA model satisfactorily accounted for gene expression measurements in a TF-GRN of seven TFs (LFY, AG, SEPALLATA3 [SEP3], AP2, AGL15, HY5 and AP3/PI) and 55 genes. NCA found strong interactions between certain TF-gene pairs including LFY → MYB17, AG → CRC, AP2 → RD20, AGL15 → RAV2 and HY5 → HLH1, and the direction of the interaction (activation or repression) for some AGL15 targets for which this information was not previously available. The activity trends of four TFs - LFY, AG, HY5 and AP3/PI as deduced by NCA correlated well with the changes in expression levels of the genes encoding these TFs across all four cell types; such a correlation was not observed for SEP3, AP2 and AGL15. Conclusions For the first time, we have reported the use of NCA to quantitatively analyze a plant TF-GRN important in floral development for obtaining nontrivial information about connectivity strengths between TFs and their target genes as well as TF

  20. An Arabidopsis gene regulatory network for secondary cell wall synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Teeples, M.; Lin, L.; de Lucas, M.; Turco, G.; Toal, T. W.; Gaudinier, A.; Young, N. F.; Trabucco, G. M.; Veling, M. T.; Lamothe, R.; Handakumbura, P. P.; Xiong, G.; Wang, C.; Corwin, J.; Tsoukalas, A.; Zhang, L.; Ware, D.; Pauly, M.; Kliebenstein, D. J.; Dehesh, K.; Tagkopoulos, I.; Breton, G.; Pruneda-Paz, J. L.; Ahnert, S. E.; Kay, S. A.; Hazen, S. P.; Brady, S. M.

    2014-12-24

    The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptional regulation of synthesis for each polymer is complex and vital to cell function. A regulatory hierarchy of developmental switches has been proposed, although the full complement of regulators remains unknown. In this paper, we present a protein–DNA network between Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors and secondary cell wall metabolic genes with gene expression regulated by a series of feed-forward loops. This model allowed us to develop and validate new hypotheses about secondary wall gene regulation under abiotic stress. Distinct stresses are able to perturb targeted genes to potentially promote functional adaptation. Finally, these interactions will serve as a foundation for understanding the regulation of a complex, integral plant component.

  1. The use of gene interaction networks to improve the identification of cancer driver genes.

    PubMed

    Ramsahai, Emilie; Walkins, Kheston; Tripathi, Vrijesh; John, Melford

    2017-01-01

    Bioinformaticians have implemented different strategies to distinguish cancer driver genes from passenger genes. One of the more recent advances uses a pathway-oriented approach. Methods that employ this strategy are highly dependent on the quality and size of the pathway interaction network employed, and require a powerful statistical environment for analyses. A number of genomic libraries are available in R. DriverNet and DawnRank employ pathway-based methods that use gene interaction graphs in matrix form. We investigated the benefit of combining data from 3 different sources on the prediction outcome of cancer driver genes by DriverNet and DawnRank. An enriched dataset was derived comprising 13,862 genes with 372,250 interactions, which increased its accuracy by 17% and 28%, respectively, compared to their original networks. The study identified 33 new candidate driver genes. Our study highlights the potential of combining networks and weighting edges to provide greater accuracy in the identification of cancer driver genes.

  2. The use of gene interaction networks to improve the identification of cancer driver genes

    PubMed Central

    Walkins, Kheston; Tripathi, Vrijesh; John, Melford

    2017-01-01

    Bioinformaticians have implemented different strategies to distinguish cancer driver genes from passenger genes. One of the more recent advances uses a pathway-oriented approach. Methods that employ this strategy are highly dependent on the quality and size of the pathway interaction network employed, and require a powerful statistical environment for analyses. A number of genomic libraries are available in R. DriverNet and DawnRank employ pathway-based methods that use gene interaction graphs in matrix form. We investigated the benefit of combining data from 3 different sources on the prediction outcome of cancer driver genes by DriverNet and DawnRank. An enriched dataset was derived comprising 13,862 genes with 372,250 interactions, which increased its accuracy by 17% and 28%, respectively, compared to their original networks. The study identified 33 new candidate driver genes. Our study highlights the potential of combining networks and weighting edges to provide greater accuracy in the identification of cancer driver genes. PMID:28149674

  3. Structures and Boolean Dynamics in Gene Regulatory Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szedlak, Anthony

    This dissertation discusses the topological and dynamical properties of GRNs in cancer, and is divided into four main chapters. First, the basic tools of modern complex network theory are introduced. These traditional tools as well as those developed by myself (set efficiency, interset efficiency, and nested communities) are crucial for understanding the intricate topological properties of GRNs, and later chapters recall these concepts. Second, the biology of gene regulation is discussed, and a method for disease-specific GRN reconstruction developed by our collaboration is presented. This complements the traditional exhaustive experimental approach of building GRNs edge-by-edge by quickly inferring the existence of as of yet undiscovered edges using correlations across sets of gene expression data. This method also provides insight into the distribution of common mutations across GRNs. Third, I demonstrate that the structures present in these reconstructed networks are strongly related to the evolutionary histories of their constituent genes. Investigation of how the forces of evolution shaped the topology of GRNs in multicellular organisms by growing outward from a core of ancient, conserved genes can shed light upon the ''reverse evolution'' of normal cells into unicellular-like cancer states. Next, I simulate the dynamics of the GRNs of cancer cells using the Hopfield model, an infinite range spin-glass model designed with the ability to encode Boolean data as attractor states. This attractor-driven approach facilitates the integration of gene expression data into predictive mathematical models. Perturbations representing therapeutic interventions are applied to sets of genes, and the resulting deviations from their attractor states are recorded, suggesting new potential drug targets for experimentation. Finally, I extend the Hopfield model to modular networks, cyclic attractors, and complex attractors, and apply these concepts to simulations of the cell cycle

  4. Predicting gene targets of perturbations via network-based filtering of mRNA expression compendia

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Elissa J.; Zhou, Yingchun; Gardner, Timothy S.; Kolaczyk, Eric D.

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: DNA microarrays are routinely applied to study diseased or drug-treated cell populations. A critical challenge is distinguishing the genes directly affected by these perturbations from the hundreds of genes that are indirectly affected. Here, we developed a sparse simultaneous equation model (SSEM) of mRNA expression data and applied Lasso regression to estimate the model parameters, thus constructing a network model of gene interaction effects. This inferred network model was then used to filter data from a given experimental condition of interest and predict the genes directly targeted by that perturbation. Results: Our proposed SSEM–Lasso method demonstrated substantial improvement in sensitivity compared with other tested methods for predicting the targets of perturbations in both simulated datasets and microarray compendia. In simulated data, for two different network types, and over a wide range of signal-to-noise ratios, our algorithm demonstrated a 167% increase in sensitivity on average for the top 100 ranked genes, compared with the next best method. Our method also performed well in identifying targets of genetic perturbations in microarray compendia, with up to a 24% improvement in sensitivity on average for the top 100 ranked genes. The overall performance of our network-filtering method shows promise for identifying the direct targets of genetic dysregulation in cancer and disease from expression profiles. Availability: Microarray data are available at the Many Microbe Microarrays Database (M3D, http://m3d.bu.edu). Algorithm scripts are available at the Gardner Lab website (http://gardnerlab.bu.edu/SSEMLasso). Contact: kolaczyk@math.bu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary Data are available at Bioinformatics on line. PMID:18779235

  5. Estimating network parameters from combined dynamics of firing rate and irregularity of single neurons.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Kosuke; Riehle, Alexa; Brunel, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    High firing irregularity is a hallmark of cortical neurons in vivo, and modeling studies suggest a balance of excitation and inhibition is necessary to explain this high irregularity. Such a balance must be generated, at least partly, from local interconnected networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, but the details of the local network structure are largely unknown. The dynamics of the neural activity depends on the local network structure; this in turn suggests the possibility of estimating network structure from the dynamics of the firing statistics. Here we report a new method to estimate properties of the local cortical network from the instantaneous firing rate and irregularity (CV(2)) under the assumption that recorded neurons are a part of a randomly connected sparse network. The firing irregularity, measured in monkey motor cortex, exhibits two features; many neurons show relatively stable firing irregularity in time and across different task conditions; the time-averaged CV(2) is widely distributed from quasi-regular to irregular (CV(2) = 0.3-1.0). For each recorded neuron, we estimate the three parameters of a local network [balance of local excitation-inhibition, number of recurrent connections per neuron, and excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) size] that best describe the dynamics of the measured firing rates and irregularities. Our analysis shows that optimal parameter sets form a two-dimensional manifold in the three-dimensional parameter space that is confined for most of the neurons to the inhibition-dominated region. High irregularity neurons tend to be more strongly connected to the local network, either in terms of larger EPSP and inhibitory PSP size or larger number of recurrent connections, compared with the low irregularity neurons, for a given excitatory/inhibitory balance. Incorporating either synaptic short-term depression or conductance-based synapses leads many low CV(2) neurons to move to the excitation-dominated region as

  6. Ethanol Modulation of Gene Networks: Implications for Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Sean P.; Miles, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholism is a complex disease caused by a confluence of environmental and genetic factors influencing multiple brain pathways to produce a variety of behavioral sequelae, including addiction. Genetic factors contribute to over 50% of the risk for alcoholism and recent evidence points to a large number of genes with small effect sizes as the likely molecular basis for this disease. Recent progress in genomics (microarrays or RNA-Seq) and genetics has led to the identification of a large number of potential candidate genes influencing ethanol behaviors or alcoholism itself. To organize this complex information, investigators have begun to focus on the contribution of gene networks, rather than individual genes, for various ethanol-induced behaviors in animal models or behavioral endophenotypes comprising alcoholism. This chapter reviews some of the methods used for constructing gene networks from genomic data and some of the recent progress made in applying such approaches to the study of the neurobiology of ethanol. We show that rapid technology development in gathering genomic data, together with sophisticated experimental design and a growing collection of sophisticated tools are producing novel insights for understanding the molecular basis of alcoholism and that such approaches promise new opportunities for therapeutic development. PMID:21536129

  7. Reconstruction of Gene Networks of Iron Response in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; Harris, Daniel P; Luo, Feng; Joachimiak, Marcin; Wu, Liyou; Dehal, Paramvir; Jacobsen, Janet; Yang, Zamin Koo; Gao, Haichun; Arkin, Adam; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    It is of great interest to study the iron response of the -proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis since it possesses a high content of iron and is capable of utilizing iron for anaerobic respiration. We report here that the iron response in S. oneidensis is a rapid process. To gain more insights into the bacterial response to iron, temporal gene expression profiles were examined for iron depletion and repletion, resulting in identification of iron-responsive biological pathways in a gene co-expression network. Iron acquisition systems, including genes unique to S. oneidensis, were rapidly and strongly induced by iron depletion, and repressed by iron repletion. Some were required for iron depletion, as exemplified by the mutational analysis of the putative siderophore biosynthesis protein SO3032. Unexpectedly, a number of genes related to anaerobic energy metabolism were repressed by iron depletion and induced by repletion, which might be due to the iron storage potential of their protein products. Other iron-responsive biological pathways include protein degradation, aerobic energy metabolism and protein synthesis. Furthermore, sequence motifs enriched in gene clusters as well as their corresponding DNA-binding proteins (Fur, CRP and RpoH) were identified, resulting in a regulatory network of iron response in S. oneidensis. Together, this work provides an overview of iron response and reveals novel features in S. oneidensis, including Shewanella-specific iron acquisition systems, and suggests the intimate relationship between anaerobic energy metabolism and iron response.

  8. Comparison of evolutionary algorithms in gene regulatory network model inference

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The evolution of high throughput technologies that measure gene expression levels has created a data base for inferring GRNs (a process also known as reverse engineering of GRNs). However, the nature of these data has made this process very difficult. At the moment, several methods of discovering qualitative causal relationships between genes with high accuracy from microarray data exist, but large scale quantitative analysis on real biological datasets cannot be performed, to date, as existing approaches are not suitable for real microarray data which are noisy and insufficient. Results This paper performs an analysis of several existing evolutionary algorithms for quantitative gene regulatory network modelling. The aim is to present the techniques used and offer a comprehensive comparison of approaches, under a common framework. Algorithms are applied to both synthetic and real gene expression data from DNA microarrays, and ability to reproduce biological behaviour, scalability and robustness to noise are assessed and compared. Conclusions Presented is a comparison framework for assessment of evolutionary algorithms, used to infer gene regulatory networks. Promising methods are identified and a platform for development of appropriate model formalisms is established. PMID:20105328

  9. Comparison of evolutionary algorithms in gene regulatory network model inference.

    PubMed

    Sîrbu, Alina; Ruskin, Heather J; Crane, Martin

    2010-01-27

    The evolution of high throughput technologies that measure gene expression levels has created a data base for inferring GRNs (a process also known as reverse engineering of GRNs). However, the nature of these data has made this process very difficult. At the moment, several methods of discovering qualitative causal relationships between genes with high accuracy from microarray data exist, but large scale quantitative analysis on real biological datasets cannot be performed, to date, as existing approaches are not suitable for real microarray data which are noisy and insufficient. This paper performs an analysis of several existing evolutionary algorithms for quantitative gene regulatory network modelling. The aim is to present the techniques used and offer a comprehensive comparison of approaches, under a common framework. Algorithms are applied to both synthetic and real gene expression data from DNA microarrays, and ability to reproduce biological behaviour, scalability and robustness to noise are assessed and compared. Presented is a comparison framework for assessment of evolutionary algorithms, used to infer gene regulatory networks. Promising methods are identified and a platform for development of appropriate model formalisms is established.

  10. Regulatory dynamics of synthetic gene networks with positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yusuke T; Sano, Masaki

    2006-06-16

    Biological processes are governed by complex networks ranging from gene regulation to signal transduction. Positive feedback is a key element in such networks. The regulation enables cells to adopt multiple internal expression states in response to a single external input signal. However, past works lacked a dynamical aspect of this system. To address the dynamical property of the positive feedback system, we employ synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli to measure the rise-time of both the no-feedback system and the positive feedback system. We show that the kinetics of gene expression is slowed down if the gene regulatory system includes positive feedback. We also report that the transition of gene switching behaviors from the hysteretic one to the graded one occurs. A mathematical model based on the chemical reactions shows that the response delay is an inherited property of the positive feedback system. Furthermore, with the aid of the phase diagram, we demonstrate the decline of the feedback activation causes the transition of switching behaviors. Our findings provide a further understanding of a positive feedback system in a living cell from a dynamical point of view.

  11. Ethanol modulation of gene networks: implications for alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Farris, Sean P; Miles, Michael F

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholism is a complex disease caused by a confluence of environmental and genetic factors influencing multiple brain pathways to produce a variety of behavioral sequelae, including addiction. Genetic factors contribute to over 50% of the risk for alcoholism and recent evidence points to a large number of genes with small effect sizes as the likely molecular basis for this disease. Recent progress in genomics (microarrays or RNA-Seq) and genetics has led to the identification of a large number of potential candidate genes influencing ethanol behaviors or alcoholism itself. To organize this complex information, investigators have begun to focus on the contribution of gene networks, rather than individual genes, for various ethanol-induced behaviors in animal models or behavioral endophenotypes comprising alcoholism. This chapter reviews some of the methods used for constructing gene networks from genomic data and some of the recent progress made in applying such approaches to the study of the neurobiology of ethanol. We show that rapid technology development in gathering genomic data, together with sophisticated experimental design and a growing collection of analysis tools are producing novel insights for understanding the molecular basis of alcoholism and that such approaches promise new opportunities for therapeutic development.

  12. Extended kalman filter for estimation of parameters in nonlinear state-space models of biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaodian; Jin, Li; Xiong, Momiao

    2008-01-01

    It is system dynamics that determines the function of cells, tissues and organisms. To develop mathematical models and estimate their parameters are an essential issue for studying dynamic behaviors of biological systems which include metabolic networks, genetic regulatory networks and signal transduction pathways, under perturbation of external stimuli. In general, biological dynamic systems are partially observed. Therefore, a natural way to model dynamic biological systems is to employ nonlinear state-space equations. Although statistical methods for parameter estimation of linear models in biological dynamic systems have been developed intensively in the recent years, the estimation of both states and parameters of nonlinear dynamic systems remains a challenging task. In this report, we apply extended Kalman Filter (EKF) to the estimation of both states and parameters of nonlinear state-space models. To evaluate the performance of the EKF for parameter estimation, we apply the EKF to a simulation dataset and two real datasets: JAK-STAT signal transduction pathway and Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling transduction pathways datasets. The preliminary results show that EKF can accurately estimate the parameters and predict states in nonlinear state-space equations for modeling dynamic biochemical networks.

  13. Reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks based on S-systems and Bat algorithm.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sudip; Khan, Abhinandan; Saha, Goutam; Pal, Rajat Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The correct inference of gene regulatory networks for the understanding of the intricacies of the complex biological regulations remains an intriguing task for researchers. With the availability of large dimensional microarray data, relationships among thousands of genes can be simultaneously extracted. Among the prevalent models of reverse engineering genetic networks, S-system is considered to be an efficient mathematical tool. In this paper, Bat algorithm, based on the echolocation of bats, has been used to optimize the S-system model parameters. A decoupled S-system has been implemented to reduce the complexity of the algorithm. Initially, the proposed method has been successfully tested on an artificial network with and without the presence of noise. Based on the fact that a real-life genetic network is sparsely connected, a novel Accumulative Cardinality based decoupled S-system has been proposed. The cardinality has been varied from zero up to a maximum value, and this model has been implemented for the reconstruction of the DNA SOS repair network of Escherichia coli. The obtained results have shown significant improvements in the detection of a greater number of true regulations, and in the minimization of false detections compared to other existing methods.

  14. Anomaly detection in gene expression via stochastic models of gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haseong; Gelenbe, Erol

    2009-12-03

    The steady-state behaviour of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) can provide crucial evidence for detecting disease-causing genes. However, monitoring the dynamics of GRNs is particularly difficult because biological data only reflects a snapshot of the dynamical behaviour of the living organism. Also most GRN data and methods are used to provide limited structural inferences. In this study, the theory of stochastic GRNs, derived from G-Networks, is applied to GRNs in order to monitor their steady-state behaviours. This approach is applied to a simulation dataset which is generated by using the stochastic gene expression model, and observe that the G-Network properly detects the abnormally expressed genes in the simulation study. In the analysis of real data concerning the cell cycle microarray of budding yeast, our approach finds that the steady-state probability of CLB2 is lower than that of other agents, while most of the genes have similar steady-state probabilities. These results lead to the conclusion that the key regulatory genes of the cell cycle can be expressed in the absence of CLB type cyclines, which was also the conclusion of the original microarray experiment study. G-networks provide an efficient way to monitor steady-state of GRNs. Our method produces more reliable results then the conventional t-test in detecting differentially expressed genes. Also G-networks are successfully applied to the yeast GRNs. This study will be the base of further GRN dynamics studies cooperated with conventional GRN inference algorithms.

  15. Vertebrate segmentation: from cyclic gene networks to scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Pourquié, Olivier

    2011-05-27

    One of the most striking features of the human vertebral column is its periodic organization along the anterior-posterior axis. This pattern is established when segments of vertebrates, called somites, bud off at a defined pace from the anterior tip of the embryo's presomitic mesoderm (PSM). To trigger this rhythmic production of somites, three major signaling pathways--Notch, Wnt/β-catenin, and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)--integrate into a molecular network that generates a traveling wave of gene expression along the embryonic axis, called the "segmentation clock." Recent systems approaches have begun identifying specific signaling circuits within the network that set the pace of the oscillations, synchronize gene expression cycles in neighboring cells, and contribute to the robustness and bilateral symmetry of somite formation. These findings establish a new model for vertebrate segmentation and provide a conceptual framework to explain human diseases of the spine, such as congenital scoliosis.

  16. Charting gene regulatory networks: strategies, challenges and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    One of the foremost challenges in the post-genomic era will be to chart the gene regulatory networks of cells, including aspects such as genome annotation, identification of cis-regulatory elements and transcription factors, information on protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions, and data mining and integration. Some of these broad sets of data have already been assembled for building networks of gene regulation. Even though these datasets are still far from comprehensive, and the approach faces many important and difficult challenges, some strategies have begun to make connections between disparate regulatory events and to foster new hypotheses. In this article we review several different genomics and proteomics technologies, and present bioinformatics methods for exploring these data in order to make novel discoveries. PMID:15080794

  17. Model calcium sensors for network homeostasis: Sensor and readout parameter analysis from a database of model neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Günay, Cengiz; Prinz, Astrid A.

    2010-01-01

    In activity-dependent homeostatic regulation (ADHR) of neuronal and network properties, the intra-cellular Ca2+ concentration is a good candidate for sensing activity levels because it is correlated with the cell's electrical activity. Previous ADHR models, developed with abstract activity sensors for model pyloric neurons and networks of the crustacean stomatogastric ganglion (STG), showed that functional activity can be maintained by a regulation mechanism that senses activity levels solely from Ca2+. At the same time, several intracellular pathways have been discovered for Ca2+-dependent regulation of ion channels. To generate testable predictions for dynamics of these signaling pathways, we undertook a parameter study of model Ca2+ sensors across thousands of model pyloric networks. We found that an optimal regulation signal can be generated for 86% of model networks with a sensing mechanism that activates with a time constant of 1 millisecond and that inactivates within 1 second. The sensor performed robustly around this optimal point and did not need to be specific to the role of the cell. When multiple sensors with different time constants were used, coverage extended to 88% of the networks. Without changing the sensors, it extended to 95% of the networks by letting the sensors affect the readout non-linearly. Specific to this pyloric network model, the follower pyloric constrictor cell's sensor was more informative than the pacemaker anterior burster cell for producing a regulatory signal. Conversely, a global signal indicating network activity that was generated by summing the sensors in individual cells was less informative for regulation. PMID:20130178

  18. Antagonistic Coevolution Drives Whack-a-Mole Sensitivity in Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jeewoen; MacCarthy, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Robustness, defined as tolerance to perturbations such as mutations and environmental fluctuations, is pervasive in biological systems. However, robustness often coexists with its counterpart, evolvability—the ability of perturbations to generate new phenotypes. Previous models of gene regulatory network evolution have shown that robustness evolves under stabilizing selection, but it is unclear how robustness and evolvability will emerge in common coevolutionary scenarios. We consider a two-species model of coevolution involving one host and one parasite population. By using two interacting species, key model parameters that determine the fitness landscapes become emergent properties of the model, avoiding the need to impose these parameters externally. In our study, parasites are modeled on species such as cuckoos where mimicry of the host phenotype confers high fitness to the parasite but lower fitness to the host. Here, frequent phenotype changes are favored as each population continually adapts to the other population. Sensitivity evolves at the network level such that point mutations can induce large phenotype changes. Crucially, the sensitive points of the network are broadly distributed throughout the network and continually relocate. Each time sensitive points in the network are mutated, new ones appear to take their place. We have therefore named this phenomenon “whack-a-mole” sensitivity, after a popular fun park game. We predict that this type of sensitivity will evolve under conditions of strong directional selection, an observation that helps interpret existing experimental evidence, for example, during the emergence of bacterial antibiotic resistance. PMID:26451700

  19. Evolutionary Signatures amongst Disease Genes Permit Novel Methods for Gene Prioritization and Construction of Informative Gene-Based Networks

    PubMed Central

    Priedigkeit, Nolan; Wolfe, Nicholas; Clark, Nathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Genes involved in the same function tend to have similar evolutionary histories, in that their rates of evolution covary over time. This coevolutionary signature, termed Evolutionary Rate Covariation (ERC), is calculated using only gene sequences from a set of closely related species and has demonstrated potential as a computational tool for inferring functional relationships between genes. To further define applications of ERC, we first established that roughly 55% of genetic diseases posses an ERC signature between their contributing genes. At a false discovery rate of 5% we report 40 such diseases including cancers, developmental disorders and mitochondrial diseases. Given these coevolutionary signatures between disease genes, we then assessed ERC's ability to prioritize known disease genes out of a list of unrelated candidates. We found that in the presence of an ERC signature, the true disease gene is effectively prioritized to the top 6% of candidates on average. We then apply this strategy to a melanoma-associated region on chromosome 1 and identify MCL1 as a potential causative gene. Furthermore, to gain global insight into disease mechanisms, we used ERC to predict molecular connections between 310 nominally distinct diseases. The resulting “disease map” network associates several diseases with related pathogenic mechanisms and unveils many novel relationships between clinically distinct diseases, such as between Hirschsprung's disease and melanoma. Taken together, these results demonstrate the utility of molecular evolution as a gene discovery platform and show that evolutionary signatures can be used to build informative gene-based networks. PMID:25679399

  20. Evolutionary signatures amongst disease genes permit novel methods for gene prioritization and construction of informative gene-based networks.

    PubMed

    Priedigkeit, Nolan; Wolfe, Nicholas; Clark, Nathan L

    2015-02-01

    Genes involved in the same function tend to have similar evolutionary histories, in that their rates of evolution covary over time. This coevolutionary signature, termed Evolutionary Rate Covariation (ERC), is calculated using only gene sequences from a set of closely related species and has demonstrated potential as a computational tool for inferring functional relationships between genes. To further define applications of ERC, we first established that roughly 55% of genetic diseases posses an ERC signature between their contributing genes. At a false discovery rate of 5% we report 40 such diseases including cancers, developmental disorders and mitochondrial diseases. Given these coevolutionary signatures between disease genes, we then assessed ERC's ability to prioritize known disease genes out of a list of unrelated candidates. We found that in the presence of an ERC signature, the true disease gene is effectively prioritized to the top 6% of candidates on average. We then apply this strategy to a melanoma-associated region on chromosome 1 and identify MCL1 as a potential causative gene. Furthermore, to gain global insight into disease mechanisms, we used ERC to predict molecular connections between 310 nominally distinct diseases. The resulting "disease map" network associates several diseases with related pathogenic mechanisms and unveils many novel relationships between clinically distinct diseases, such as between Hirschsprung's disease and melanoma. Taken together, these results demonstrate the utility of molecular evolution as a gene discovery platform and show that evolutionary signatures can be used to build informative gene-based networks.

  1. Analyzing stationary states of gene regulatory network using petri nets.

    PubMed

    Gambin, Anna; Lasota, Sławomir; Rutkowski, Michał

    2006-01-01

    We introduce and formally define the notion of a stationary state for Petri nets. We also propose a fully automatic method for finding such states. The procedure makes use of the Presburger arithmetic to describe all the stationary states. Finally we apply this novel approach to find stationary states of a gene regulatory network describing the flower morphogenesis of A. thaliana. This shows that the proposed method can be successfully applied in the study of biological systems.

  2. Analyzing stationary States of gene regulatory network using petri nets.

    PubMed

    Gambin, Anna; Lasota, Sławomir; Rutkowski, Michał

    2011-01-01

    We introduce and formally define the notion of a stationary state for Petri nets. We also propose a fully automatic method for finding such states. The procedure makes use of the Presburger arithmetic to describe all the stationary states. Finally we apply this novel approach to find stationary states of a gene regulatory network describing the flower morphogenesis of A. thaliana. This shows that the proposed method can be successfully applied in the study of biological systems.

  3. A novel analytical characterization for short-term plasticity parameters in spiking neural networks

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Michael J.; Thibeault, Corey M.; Srinivasa, Narayan

    2014-01-01

    Short-term plasticity (STP) is a phenomenon that widely occurs in the neocortex with implications for learning and memory. Based on a widely used STP model, we develop an analytical characterization of the STP parameter space to determine the nature of each synapse (facilitating, depressing, or both) in a spiking neural network based on presynaptic firing rate and the corresponding STP parameters. We demonstrate consistency with previous work by leveraging the power of our characterization to replicate the functional volumes that are integral for the previous network stabilization results. We then use our characterization to predict the precise transitional point from the facilitating regime to the depressing regime in a simulated synapse, suggesting in vitro experiments to verify the underlying STP model. We conclude the work by integrating our characterization into a framework for finding suitable STP parameters for self-sustaining random, asynchronous activity in a prescribed recurrent spiking neural network. The systematic process resulting from our analytical characterization improves the success rate of finding the requisite parameters for such networks by three orders of magnitude over a random search. PMID:25477812

  4. A novel analytical characterization for short-term plasticity parameters in spiking neural networks.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Michael J; Thibeault, Corey M; Srinivasa, Narayan

    2014-01-01

    Short-term plasticity (STP) is a phenomenon that widely occurs in the neocortex with implications for learning and memory. Based on a widely used STP model, we develop an analytical characterization of the STP parameter space to determine the nature of each synapse (facilitating, depressing, or both) in a spiking neural network based on presynaptic firing rate and the corresponding STP parameters. We demonstrate consistency with previous work by leveraging the power of our characterization to replicate the functional volumes that are integral for the previous network stabilization results. We then use our characterization to predict the precise transitional point from the facilitating regime to the depressing regime in a simulated synapse, suggesting in vitro experiments to verify the underlying STP model. We conclude the work by integrating our characterization into a framework for finding suitable STP parameters for self-sustaining random, asynchronous activity in a prescribed recurrent spiking neural network. The systematic process resulting from our analytical characterization improves the success rate of finding the requisite parameters for such networks by three orders of magnitude over a random search.

  5. Functional divergence and convergence between the transcript network and gene network in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Min-Kung; Pan, Chia-Lin; Chen, Feng-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Alternative RNA splicing is a critical regulatory mechanism during tumorigenesis. However, previous oncological studies mainly focused on the splicing of individual genes. Whether and how transcript isoforms are coordinated to affect cellular functions remain underexplored. Also of great interest is how the splicing regulome cooperates with the transcription regulome to facilitate tumorigenesis. The answers to these questions are of fundamental importance to cancer biology. Results Here, we report a comparative study between the transcript-based network (TN) and the gene-based network (GN) derived from the transcriptomes of paired tumor–normal tissues from 77 lung adenocarcinoma patients. We demonstrate that the two networks differ significantly from each other in terms of patient clustering and the number and functions of network modules. Interestingly, the majority (89.5%) of multi-transcript genes have their transcript isoforms distributed in at least two TN modules, suggesting regulatory and functional divergences between transcript isoforms. Furthermore, TN and GN modules share onlŷ50%–60% of their biological functions. TN thus appears to constitute a regulatory layer separate from GN. Nevertheless, our results indicate that functional convergence and divergence both occur between TN and GN, implying complex interactions between the two regulatory layers. Finally, we report that the expression profiles of module members in both TN and GN shift dramatically yet concordantly during tumorigenesis. The mechanisms underlying this coordinated shifting remain unclear yet are worth further explorations. Conclusion We show that in lung adenocarcinoma, transcript isoforms per se are coordinately regulated to conduct biological functions not conveyed by the network of genes. However, the two networks may interact closely with each other by sharing the same or related biological functions. Unraveling the effects and mechanisms of such interactions will

  6. How to infer gene networks from expression profiles, revisited

    PubMed Central

    Penfold, Christopher A.; Wild, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Inferring the topology of a gene-regulatory network (GRN) from genome-scale time-series measurements of transcriptional change has proved useful for disentangling complex biological processes. To address the challenges associated with this inference, a number of competing approaches have previously been used, including examples from information theory, Bayesian and dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs), and ordinary differential equation (ODE) or stochastic differential equation. The performance of these competing approaches have previously been assessed using a variety of in silico and in vivo datasets. Here, we revisit this work by assessing the performance of more recent network inference algorithms, including a novel non-parametric learning approach based upon nonlinear dynamical systems. For larger GRNs, containing hundreds of genes, these non-parametric approaches more accurately infer network structures than do traditional approaches, but at significant computational cost. For smaller systems, DBNs are competitive with the non-parametric approaches with respect to computational time and accuracy, and both of these approaches appear to be more accurate than Granger causality-based methods and those using simple ODEs models. PMID:23226586

  7. Framework for engineering finite state machines in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Kevin; Klavins, Eric

    2014-09-19

    Finite state machines are fundamental computing devices at the core of many models of computation. In biology, finite state machines are commonly used as models of development in multicellular organisms. However, it remains unclear to what extent cells can remember state, how they can transition from one state to another reliably, and whether the existing parts available to the synthetic biologist are sufficient to implement specified finite state machines in living cells. Furthermore, how complex multicellular behaviors can be realized by multiple cells coordinating their states with signaling, growth, and division is not well understood. Here, we describe a method by which any finite state machine can be built using nothing more than a suitably engineered network of readily available repressing transcription factors. In particular, we show the mathematical equivalence of finite state machines with a Boolean model of gene regulatory networks. We describe how such networks can be realized with a small class of promoters and transcription factors. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, we show that the behavior of the coarse grained ideal Boolean network model approximates a fine grained delay differential equation model of gene expression. Finally, we explore a framework for the design of more complex systems via an example, synthetic bacterial microcolony edge detection, that illustrates how finite state machines could be used together with cell signaling to construct novel multicellular behaviors.

  8. Accelerated parallel algorithm for gene network reverse engineering.

    PubMed

    He, Jing; Zhou, Zhou; Reed, Michael; Califano, Andrea

    2017-09-21

    The Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNE) represents one of the most effective tools to reconstruct gene regulatory networks from large-scale molecular profile datasets. However, previous implementations require intensive computing resources and, in some cases, restrict the number of samples that can be used. These issues can be addressed elegantly in a GPU computing framework, where repeated mathematical computation can be done efficiently, but requires extensive redesign to apply parallel computing techniques to the original serial algorithm, involving detailed optimization efforts based on a deep understanding of both hardware and software architecture. Here, we present an accelerated parallel implementation of ARACNE (GPU-ARACNE). By taking advantage of multi-level parallelism and the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) parallel kernel-call library, GPU-ARACNE successfully parallelizes a serial algorithm and simplifies the user experience from multi-step operations to one step. Using public datasets on comparable hardware configurations, we showed that GPU-ARACNE is faster than previous implementations and is able to reconstruct equally valid gene regulatory networks. Given that previous versions of ARACNE are extremely resource demanding, either in computational time or in hardware investment, GPU-ARACNE is remarkably valuable for researchers who need to build complex regulatory networks from large expression datasets, but with limited budget on computational resources. In addition, our GPU-centered optimization of adaptive partitioning for Mutual Information (MI) estimation provides lessons that are applicable to other domains.

  9. Systems Biology Approach to Identify Gene Network Signatures for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sonachalam, Madhankumar; Shen, Jeffrey; Huang, Hui; Wu, Xiaogang

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we integrated prior knowledge from gene signatures and protein interactions with gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA), and gene/protein network modeling together to identify gene network signatures from gene expression microarray data. We demonstrated how to apply this approach into discovering gene network signatures for co