Science.gov

Sample records for gene order conservation

  1. In the QTL region surrounding porcine MHC, gene order is conserved with human genome.

    PubMed

    Genêt, C; Renard, C; Cabau, C; Rogel-Gaillard, C; Gellin, J; Milan, D

    2001-03-01

    On the porcine genome, the region surrounding the Major Histocompatibility Complex, also called Swine Leukocyte Antigens (SLA), is of particular interest not only owing to itq role in the control of immune response, but also because of its influence on many traits such as growth, fatness, and meat quality. To help in the identification of responsible genes, detailed comparative maps of the MHC region in mammalian species and powerful mapping tools allowing accurate ordering of genes and markers in this region are needed. In this report, we describe the use of the recently developed IMpRH radiation hybrid panel, to construct a higher density radiation hybrid map of swine Sscr 7p-q12, containing 23 additional loci. Our results show that the gene order is conserved between the two MHC-containing regions, even if an inversion is observed above the QTL region in the region containing DEK, SCA1, and EDN1 genes. The framework map produced shows that the IMpRH panel permits the ordering of genes and markers in the three MHC classes and would thus allow accurate localization of ESTs and candidate genes. PMID:11252175

  2. Transfer RNA gene arrangement and codon usage in vertebrate mitochondrial genomes: a new insight into gene order conservation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial (mt) gene arrangement has been highly conserved among vertebrates from jawless fishes to mammals for more than 500 million years. It remains unclear, however, whether such long-term persistence is a consequence of some constraints on the gene order. Results Based on the analysis of codon usage and tRNA gene positions, we suggest that tRNA gene order of the typical vertebrate mt-genomes may be important for their translational efficiency. The vertebrate mt-genome encodes 2 rRNA, 22 tRNA, and 13 transmembrane proteins consisting mainly of hydrophobic domains. We found that the tRNA genes specifying the hydrophobic residues were positioned close to the control region (CR), where the transcription efficiency is estimated to be relatively high. Using 47 vertebrate mt-genome sequences representing jawless fishes to mammals, we further found a correlation between codon usage and tRNA gene positions, implying that highly-used tRNA genes are located close to the CR. In addition, an analysis considering the asymmetric nature of mtDNA replication suggested that the tRNA loci that remain in single-strand for a longer time tend to have more guanine and thymine not suffering deamination mutations in their anticodon sites. Conclusions Our analyses imply the existence of translational constraint acting on the vertebrate mt-gene arrangement. Such translational constraint, together with the deamination-related constraint, may have contributed to long-term maintenance of gene order. PMID:20723209

  3. Mitochondrial genomes of Clymenella torquata (Maldanidae) and Riftia pachyptila (Siboglinidae): evidence for conserved gene order in annelida.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Robert M; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2005-02-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are useful tools for inferring evolutionary history. However, many taxa are poorly represented by available data. Thus, to further understand the phylogenetic potential of complete mitochondrial genome sequence data in Annelida (segmented worms), we examined the complete mitochondrial sequence for Clymenella torquata (Maldanidae) and an estimated 80% of the sequence of Riftia pachyptila (Siboglinidae). These genomes have remarkably similar gene orders to previously published annelid genomes, suggesting that gene order is conserved across annelids. This result is interesting, given the high variation seen in the closely related Mollusca and Brachiopoda. Phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence, amino acid sequence, and gene order all support the recent hypothesis that Sipuncula and Annelida are closely related. Our findings suggest that gene order data is of limited utility in annelids but that sequence data holds promise. Additionally, these genomes show AT bias (approximately 66%) and codon usage biases but have a typical gene complement for bilaterian mitochondrial genomes. PMID:15483328

  4. Mitochondrial genomes of Clymenella torquata (Maldanidae) and Riftia pachyptila (Siboglinidae): evidence for conserved gene order in annelida.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Robert M; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2005-02-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are useful tools for inferring evolutionary history. However, many taxa are poorly represented by available data. Thus, to further understand the phylogenetic potential of complete mitochondrial genome sequence data in Annelida (segmented worms), we examined the complete mitochondrial sequence for Clymenella torquata (Maldanidae) and an estimated 80% of the sequence of Riftia pachyptila (Siboglinidae). These genomes have remarkably similar gene orders to previously published annelid genomes, suggesting that gene order is conserved across annelids. This result is interesting, given the high variation seen in the closely related Mollusca and Brachiopoda. Phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence, amino acid sequence, and gene order all support the recent hypothesis that Sipuncula and Annelida are closely related. Our findings suggest that gene order data is of limited utility in annelids but that sequence data holds promise. Additionally, these genomes show AT bias (approximately 66%) and codon usage biases but have a typical gene complement for bilaterian mitochondrial genomes.

  5. Making teeth to order: conserved genes reveal an ancient molecular pattern in paddlefish (Actinopterygii)

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Moya M.; Johanson, Zerina; Butts, Thomas; Ericsson, Rolf; Modrell, Melinda; Tulenko, Frank J.; Davis, Marcus C.; Fraser, Gareth J.

    2015-01-01

    Ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) are the dominant vertebrate group today (+30 000 species, predominantly teleosts), with great morphological diversity, including their dentitions. How dental morphological variation evolved is best addressed by considering a range of taxa across actinopterygian phylogeny; here we examine the dentition of Polyodon spathula (American paddlefish), assigned to the basal group Acipenseriformes. Although teeth are present and functional in young individuals of Polyodon, they are completely absent in adults. Our current understanding of developmental genes operating in the dentition is primarily restricted to teleosts; we show that shh and bmp4, as highly conserved epithelial and mesenchymal genes for gnathostome tooth development, are similarly expressed at Polyodon tooth loci, thus extending this conserved developmental pattern within the Actinopterygii. These genes map spatio-temporal tooth initiation in Polyodon larvae and provide new data in both oral and pharyngeal tooth sites. Variation in cellular intensity of shh maps timing of tooth morphogenesis, revealing a second odontogenic wave as alternate sites within tooth rows, a dental pattern also present in more derived actinopterygians. Developmental timing for each tooth field in Polyodon follows a gradient, from rostral to caudal and ventral to dorsal, repeated during subsequent loss of teeth. The transitory Polyodon dentition is modified by cessation of tooth addition and loss. As such, Polyodon represents a basal actinopterygian model for the evolution of developmental novelty: initial conservation, followed by tooth loss, accommodating the adult trophic modification to filter-feeding. PMID:25788604

  6. Making teeth to order: conserved genes reveal an ancient molecular pattern in paddlefish (Actinopterygii).

    PubMed

    Smith, Moya M; Johanson, Zerina; Butts, Thomas; Ericsson, Rolf; Modrell, Melinda; Tulenko, Frank J; Davis, Marcus C; Fraser, Gareth J

    2015-04-22

    Ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) are the dominant vertebrate group today (+30 000 species, predominantly teleosts), with great morphological diversity, including their dentitions. How dental morphological variation evolved is best addressed by considering a range of taxa across actinopterygian phylogeny; here we examine the dentition of Polyodon spathula (American paddlefish), assigned to the basal group Acipenseriformes. Although teeth are present and functional in young individuals of Polyodon, they are completely absent in adults. Our current understanding of developmental genes operating in the dentition is primarily restricted to teleosts; we show that shh and bmp4, as highly conserved epithelial and mesenchymal genes for gnathostome tooth development, are similarly expressed at Polyodon tooth loci, thus extending this conserved developmental pattern within the Actinopterygii. These genes map spatio-temporal tooth initiation in Polyodon larvae and provide new data in both oral and pharyngeal tooth sites. Variation in cellular intensity of shh maps timing of tooth morphogenesis, revealing a second odontogenic wave as alternate sites within tooth rows, a dental pattern also present in more derived actinopterygians. Developmental timing for each tooth field in Polyodon follows a gradient, from rostral to caudal and ventral to dorsal, repeated during subsequent loss of teeth. The transitory Polyodon dentition is modified by cessation of tooth addition and loss. As such, Polyodon represents a basal actinopterygian model for the evolution of developmental novelty: initial conservation, followed by tooth loss, accommodating the adult trophic modification to filter-feeding. PMID:25788604

  7. Evolutionary analyses of the small subunit of glutamate synthase: gene order conservation, gene fusions, and prokaryote-to-eukaryote lateral gene transfers.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jan O; Roger, Andrew J

    2002-04-01

    Lateral gene transfer has been identified as an important mode of genome evolution within prokaryotes. Except for the special case of gene transfer from organelle genomes to the eukaryotic nucleus, only a few cases of lateral gene transfer involving eukaryotes have been described. Here we present phylogenetic and gene order analyses on the small subunit of glutamate synthase (encoded by gltD) and its homologues, including the large subunit of sulfide dehydrogenase (encoded by sudA). The scattered distribution of the sudA and sudB gene pair and the phylogenetic analysis strongly suggest that lateral gene transfer was involved in the propagation of the genes in the three domains of life. One of these transfers most likely occurred between a prokaryote and an ancestor of diplomonad protists. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses indicate that the gene for the small subunit of glutamate synthase was transferred from a low-GC gram-positive bacterium to a common ancestor of animals, fungi, and plants. Interestingly, in both examples, the eukaryotes encode a single gene that corresponds to a conserved operon structure in prokaryotes. Our analyses, together with several recent publications, show that lateral gene transfers from prokaryotes to unicellular eukaryotes occur with appreciable frequency. In the case of the genes for sulfide dehydrogenase, the transfer affected only a limited group of eukaryotes--the diplomonads--while the transfer of the glutamate synthase gene probably happened earlier in evolution and affected a wider range of eukaryotes.

  8. Conservation of Gene Order and Content in the Circular Chromosomes of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ and Other Rhizobiales

    PubMed Central

    Kuykendall, L. David; Shao, Jonathan Y.; Hartung, John S.

    2012-01-01

    ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus,’ an insect-vectored, obligate intracellular bacterium associated with citrus-greening disease, also called “HLB," is a member of the Rhizobiales along with nitrogen-fixing microsymbionts Sinorhizobium meliloti and Bradyrhizobium japonicum, plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens and facultative intracellular mammalian pathogen Bartonella henselae. Comparative analyses of their circular chromosomes identified 514 orthologous genes shared among all five species. Shared among all five species are 50 identical blocks of microsyntenous orthologous genes (MOGs), containing a total of 283 genes. While retaining highly conserved genomic blocks of microsynteny, divergent evolution, horizontal gene transfer and niche specialization have disrupted macrosynteny among the five circular chromosomes compared. Highly conserved microsyntenous gene clusters help define the Rhizobiales, an order previously defined by 16S RNA gene similarity and herein represented by the three families: Bartonellaceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae and Rhizobiaceae. Genes without orthologs in the other four species help define individual species. The circular chromosomes of each of the five Rhizobiales species examined had genes lacking orthologs in the other four species. For example, 63 proteins are encoded by genes of ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ not shared with other members of the Rhizobiales. Of these 63 proteins, 17 have predicted functions related to DNA replication or RNA transcription, and some of these may have roles related to low genomic GC content. An additional 17 proteins have predicted functions relevant to cellular processes, particularly modifications of the cell surface. Seventeen unshared proteins have specific metabolic functions including a pathway to synthesize cholesterol encoded by a seven-gene operon. The remaining 12 proteins encoded by ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ genes not shared with other Rhizobiales are of bacteriophage origin.

  9. Gene order is conserved within the human chromosome 21 linkage group on mouse chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, N.G.; Cabin, D.E.; Swanson, D.A.; Reeves, R.H. )

    1994-05-01

    One hundred progeny from each of two intersubspecific mouse backcrosses were used to construct a comparative genetic map of a region of mouse chromosome 10 (MMU10) that is homologous to the distal tip of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (HSA21). The analysis included five genes and three simple sequence repeat markers, two of which flanked the HSA21-homologous cluster on either side. Analysis of 200 backcross progeny detected at least one crossover between each pair of adjacent genes and demonstrated that the proximal to distal orientation of the cluster was reversed between human and mouse. The order was determined to be Fyn-1-D10Mit20-S100b-Col6a1-Itgb2-Pfk1/D10Mit7-D10Mit11. Comparative mapping supports the order of corresponding markers on HSA21 determined using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and radiation hybrid line data. However, sequence tagged site content mapping of human yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) yielded conflicting data on the relative positions of human COL6A1 and S100B on HSA21. This discrepancy was resolved here by demonstrating that several key YACs used in the human contig analysis were mistyped for S100B. The murine map reported here provides a scaffold for construction of physical maps and yeast artificial chromosome contigs that will be useful in the development of mouse models for the study of Down syndrome. 28 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. CONSERVED HIGHER ORDER CHROMATIN REGULATES NMDA RECEPTOR GENE EXPRESSION AND COGNITION

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Rahul; Peter, Cyril J.; Jiang, Yan; Roussos, Panos; Vogel-Ciernia, Annie; Shen, Erica; Mitchell, Amanda; Mao, Wenjie; Whittle, Catheryne; Dincer, Aslihan; Jakovcevski, Mira; Pothula, Venu; Rasmussen, Theodore P.; Giakoumaki, Stella G.; Bitsios, Panos; Sherif, Ajfar; Gardner, Paul D.; Ernst, Patricia; Ghose, Subroto; Sklar, Pamela; Haroutunian, Vahram; Tamminga, Carol; Myers, Richard H.; Futai, Kensuke; Wood, Marcelo A.; Akbarian, Schahram

    2014-01-01

    3-dimensional chromosomal conformations regulate transcription by moving enhancers and regulatory elements into spatial proximity with target genes. Here, we describe activity-regulated long-range loopings bypassing up to 0.5 megabase of linear genome to modulate NMDA glutamate receptor GRIN2B expression in human and mouse prefrontal cortex. Distal intronic and 3’ intergenic loop formations competed with repressor elements to access promoter-proximal sequences, and facilitated expression via a ‘cargo’ of AP-1 and NRF-1 transcription factors and TALE-based transcriptional activators. Neuronal deletion or overexpression of Kmt2a/Mll1 H3K4- and Kmt1e/Setdb1 H3K9-methyltransferase was associated with higher order chromatin changes at distal regulatory Grin2b sequences and impairments in working memory. Genetic polymorphisms and isogenic deletions of loop-bound sequences conferred liability for cognitive performance and decreased GRIN2B expression. Dynamic regulation of chromosomal conformations emerges as a novel layer for transcriptional mechanisms impacting neuronal signaling and cognition. PMID:25467983

  11. Genetic Mapping in a Natural Population of Collared Flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis): Conserved Synteny but Gene Order Rearrangements on the Avian Z Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Backström, Niclas; Brandström, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lars; Qvarnström, Anna; Cheng, Hans; Ellegren, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Data from completely sequenced genomes are likely to open the way for novel studies of the genetics of nonmodel organisms, in particular when it comes to the identification and analysis of genes responsible for traits that are under selection in natural populations. Here we use the draft sequence of the chicken genome as a starting point for linkage mapping in a wild bird species, the collared flycatcher—one of the most well-studied avian species in ecological and evolutionary research. A pedigree of 365 flycatchers was established and genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms in 23 genes selected from (and spread over most of) the chicken Z chromosome. All genes were also found to be located on the Z chromosome in the collared flycatcher, confirming conserved synteny at the level of gene content across distantly related avian lineages. This high degree of conservation mimics the situation seen for the mammalian X chromosome and may thus be a general feature in sex chromosome evolution, irrespective of whether there is male or female heterogamety. Alternatively, such unprecedented chromosomal conservation may be characteristic of most chromosomes in avian genome evolution. However, several internal rearrangements were observed, meaning that the transfer of map information from chicken to nonmodel bird species cannot always assume conserved gene orders. Interestingly, the rate of recombination on the Z chromosome of collared flycatchers was only ∼50% that of chicken, challenging the widely held view that birds generally have high recombination rates. PMID:16783008

  12. Conservation and gene banking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant conservation has several objectives the main ones include safeguarding our food supply, preserving crop wild relatives for breeding and selection of new cultivars, providing material for industrial and pharmaceutical uses and preserving the beauty and diversity of our flora for generations to ...

  13. Targeted gene flow for conservation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Ella; Phillips, Ben L

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic threats often impose strong selection on affected populations, causing rapid evolutionary responses. Unfortunately, these adaptive responses are rarely harnessed for conservation. We suggest that conservation managers pay close attention to adaptive processes and geographic variation, with an eye to using them for conservation goals. Translocating pre-adapted individuals into recipient populations is currently considered a potentially important management tool in the face of climate change. Targeted gene flow, which involves moving individuals with favorable traits to areas where these traits would have a conservation benefit, could have a much broader application in conservation. Across a species' range there may be long-standing geographic variation in traits or variation may have rapidly developed in response to a threatening process. Targeted gene flow could be used to promote natural resistance to threats to increase species resilience. We suggest that targeted gene flow is a currently underappreciated strategy in conservation that has applications ranging from the management of invasive species and their impacts to controlling the impact and virulence of pathogens.

  14. Evolution of mitochondrial gene order in Annelida.

    PubMed

    Weigert, Anne; Golombek, Anja; Gerth, Michael; Schwarz, Francine; Struck, Torsten H; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Annelida is a highly diverse animal group with over 21,000 described species. As part of Lophotrochozoa, the vast majority of annelids are currently classified into two groups: Errantia and Sedentaria, together forming Pleistoannelida. Besides these taxa, Sipuncula, Amphinomidae, Chaetopteridae, Oweniidae and Magelonidae can be found branching at the base of the tree. Comparisons of mitochondrial genomes have been used to investigate phylogenetic relationship within animal taxa. Complete annelid mitochondrial genomes are available for some Sedentaria and Errantia and in most cases exhibit a highly conserved gene order. Only two complete genomes have been published from the basal branching lineages and these are restricted to Sipuncula. We describe the first complete mitochondrial genome sequences for all other basal branching annelid families: Owenia fusiformis (Oweniidae), Magelona mirabilis (Magelonidae), Eurythoe complanata (Amphinomidae), Chaetopterus variopedatus and Phyllochaetopterus sp. (Chaetopteridae). The mitochondrial gene order of all these taxa is substantially different from the pattern found in Pleistoannelida. Additionally, we report the first mitochondrial genomes in Annelida that encode genes on both strands. Our findings demonstrate that the supposedly highly conserved mitochondrial gene order suggested for Annelida is restricted to Pleistoannelida, representing the ground pattern of this group. All investigated basal branching annelid taxa show a completely different arrangement of genes than observed in Pleistoannelida. The gene order of protein coding and ribosomal genes in Magelona mirabilis differs only in two transposition events from a putative lophotrochozoan ground pattern and might be the closest to an ancestral annelid pattern. The mitochondrial genomes of Myzostomida show the conserved pattern of Pleistoannelida, thereby supporting their inclusion in this taxon.

  15. Evolutionary conservation of neighbouring gene pairs in plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiling; Han, Bin

    2009-05-15

    Evolutionary conservation of neighbouring gene pairs has been widely explored in many species, but remains poorly understood in plants. The availability of several plant genome sequences allows for an in-depth investigation of this problem in plants. Here, we analyzed the phylogenetic conservation of physically linked gene pairs in nine plant genomes and compared the conservation in different orientations. We also examined several potential determinants to detect whether they affect the conservation of neighbouring gene pairs. Our results suggested that among the three types of neighbouring gene pairs, closely linked parallel pairs might be the least conserved. Intergenic distance was shown to be a major determinant of linkage conservation, suggesting that the conservation of gene order in plants was determined primarily by chance. The enrichment of housekeeping genes was identified to contribute to the conservation of all three types and the enrichment of genes involved in protein metabolism might contribute to the conservation of parallel pairs. Moreover, a co-expressed signal was detected in conserved divergent pairs, which might be determined by intergenic distance.

  16. 77 FR 60381 - Migratory Bird Conservation; Executive Order 13186

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC148 Migratory Bird Conservation; Executive Order... the U.S. Fish and ] Wildlife Service (FWS) to promote the conservation of migratory birds. DATES: This... Migratory Birds''. One of the requirements of E.O. 13186 is that each Federal agency taking actions...

  17. Intron conservation in the fragile X gene (FMR 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Panther, R.; Ostrowski, R.S.; Stoerker, J.

    1994-09-01

    The intron probe STB12.3 was used to search for conservation of the intron sequence corresponding to the PstI fragment located approximately 450 bp downstream of the end of the first exon of the fragile X (FMR 1) gene. Standard techniques for DNA extraction, isolation, restriction enzyme digestion, blotting and probing were employed. The probe STB12.3 that hybridizes to an intron sequence in the human MR 1 gene is 1.2 bp long. Our results demonstrated that the STB12.3 sequence is conserved across at least two Kindgoms. Specifically, we have observed cross-hybridization between STB12.3 and sequences in Drosophila, Apis and Saccharomyces. Hybridization was not observed in Triticum. Most surprising was our observation of intron hybridization in Drosophila since Annemieke et al. (1991) did not find FMR 1 exon conservation in Drosophila. Intron sequence conservation had been previously reported but only between closely related (same Order) species.

  18. 50 CFR 21.60 - Conservation order for light geese.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... persons who pursued light geese with the aid of a shotgun capable of holding more than three shells; (iv... shotgun shell; (ix) The number of light geese taken during the period one-half hour after sunset; and (x... in question may warrant reinstatement of the conservation order to control the population....

  19. Second-order accurate nonoscillatory schemes for scalar conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1989-01-01

    Explicit finite difference schemes for the computation of weak solutions of nonlinear scalar conservation laws is presented and analyzed. These schemes are uniformly second-order accurate and nonoscillatory in the sense that the number of extrema of the discrete solution is not increasing in time.

  20. Robust high-order space-time conservative schemes for solving conservation laws on hybrid meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hua; Wen, Chih-Yung; Liu, Kaixin; Zhang, Deliang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the second-order space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method proposed by Chang (1995) [3] is implemented on hybrid meshes for solving conservation laws. In addition, the present scheme has been extended to high-order versions including third and fourth order. Most methodologies of proposed schemes are consistent with that of the original CE/SE method, including: (i) a unified treatment of space and time (thereby ensuring good conservation in both space and time); (ii) a highly compact node stencil (the solution node is calculated using only the neighboring mesh nodes) regardless of the order of accuracy at the cost of storing all derivatives. A staggered time marching strategy is adopted and the solutions are updated alternatively between cell centers and vertexes. To construct explicit high-order schemes, second- and third-order derivatives are calculated by a modified finite-difference/weighted-average procedure which is different from that used to calculate the first-order derivatives. The present schemes can be implemented on a wide variety of meshes, including triangular, quadrilateral and hybrid (consisting of both triangular and quadrilateral elements). Beyond that, it can be easily extended to arbitrary-order schemes and arbitrary shape of polygonal elements by using the present methodologies. A series of common benchmark examples are used to confirm the accuracy and robustness of the proposed schemes.

  1. CoreSVM: a generalized high-order spectral volume method bearing Conservative Order RElease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamouroux, Raphael; Gressier, Jeremie; Joly, Laurent; Grondin, Gilles

    2014-11-01

    The spectral volume method (SVM) introduced by Wang in 2002 is based on a compact polynomial reconstruction where the interpolation's degree is driven by the partition of the spectral volumes. We propose a generalization of the SVM which releases the polynomial degree from this constraint and more importantly that allows to resort to any polynomial order inferior to the regular stencil order without changing the original spectral volume partition. Using one-dimensional advection and Burgers equation, we prove that the proposed extended method exhibits versatile high-order convergence together with conservativity properties. This new method is thus named the CoreSVM for Conservative Order-REleased SVM and we therefore explore its potential towards the numerical simulation of stiff problems. It is stressed that CoreSVM is indeed particularly suited to handle discontinuities, as the order-reduction serves to damp the numerical oscillations due to Runge's phenomenon. To ensure computational stability, local p-coarsening is used to obtain the highest adequate polynomial degree. It is advocated finally that, since the CoreSVM sets the polynomial order adaptation free from any stencil changes, these features do not come at the expense of any extra remeshing or data adaptation cost. Part of this research was funded by the French DGA.

  2. LCGserver: A Webserver for Exploring Evolutionary Trajectory of Gene Orders in a Large Number of Genomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng; Yu, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Genes and chromosomes are highly organized; together with protein-coding sequence, gene structure at per gene level and gene order at cluster level are both variable in a context of lineages and under natural selection. How gene order and chromosome organization are related and selected remains to be illuminated. The number of newly-sequenced genomes from various taxa has been increasing rapidly, but there have not been easy-to-use web tools that allow better visualization for gene order in a large genome collection. Here, we describe a webserver, LCGserver (http://lcgbase.big.ac.cn/LCGserver/), for exploring evolutionary dynamics of gene orders over diverse lineages. This server provides gene order information at three levels: single gene, paired gene (a minimal cluster), and clustered gene (more than two genes). The most exclusive feature of LCGserver is alignment and visualization of neighboring genes based on orthology, allowing users to inspect all conserved and dynamic events of gene order along chromosomes in a lineage-specific manner. In addition, it categories paired genes into six patterns and identifies fully-conserved gene clusters within and among lineages.

  3. 43 CFR 3513.23 - May BLM order a suspension of operations and production (conservation concerns)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Rental and Minimum Royalties Suspension of Operations and Production (conservation Concerns) § 3513.23 May BLM order a suspension of operations and production (conservation concerns)? Yes, BLM may order a suspension of operations and production....

  4. High-Order Space-Time Methods for Conservation Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, H. T.

    2013-01-01

    Current high-order methods such as discontinuous Galerkin and/or flux reconstruction can provide effective discretization for the spatial derivatives. Together with a time discretization, such methods result in either too small a time step size in the case of an explicit scheme or a very large system in the case of an implicit one. To tackle these problems, two new high-order space-time schemes for conservation laws are introduced: the first is explicit and the second, implicit. The explicit method here, also called the moment scheme, achieves a Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition of 1 for the case of one-spatial dimension regardless of the degree of the polynomial approximation. (For standard explicit methods, if the spatial approximation is of degree p, then the time step sizes are typically proportional to 1/p(exp 2)). Fourier analyses for the one and two-dimensional cases are carried out. The property of super accuracy (or super convergence) is discussed. The implicit method is a simplified but optimal version of the discontinuous Galerkin scheme applied to time. It reduces to a collocation implicit Runge-Kutta (RK) method for ordinary differential equations (ODE) called Radau IIA. The explicit and implicit schemes are closely related since they employ the same intermediate time levels, and the former can serve as a key building block in an iterative procedure for the latter. A limiting technique for the piecewise linear scheme is also discussed. The technique can suppress oscillations near a discontinuity while preserving accuracy near extrema. Preliminary numerical results are shown

  5. Physella acuta: atypical mitochondrial gene order among panpulmonates (Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Nolan, Journey R; Bergthorsson, Ulfar; Adema, Coen M

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) sequences are frequently used for phylogenetic reconstruction and for identification of species of molluscs. This study expands the phylogenetic range of Hygrophila (Panpulmonata) for which such sequence data are available by characterizing the full mt genome of the invasive freshwater snail Physella acuta (Physidae). The mt genome sequences of two P. acuta isolates from Stubblefield Lake, New Mexico, USA, differed in length (14,490 vs 14,314 bp) and showed 11.49% sequence divergence, whereas ITS1 and ITS2 sequences from the nuclear genome differed by 1.75%. The mt gene order of P. acuta (cox1, P, nad6, nad5, nad1, D, F, cox2, Y, W, nad4L, C, Q, atp6, R, E, rrnS, M, T, cox3, I, nad2, K, V, rrnL, L1, A, cytb, G, H, L2, atp8, N, nad2, S1, S2, nad4) differs considerably from the relatively conserved gene order within Panpulmonata. Phylogenetic trees show that the 13 protein-encoding mt gene sequences (equivalent codons) of P. acuta group according to gastropod phylogeny, yet branch lengths and dN/dS ratios for P. acuta indicate elevated amino acid substitutions relative to other gastropods. This study indicates that mt sequences of P. acuta are phylogenetically informative despite a considerable intraspecific divergence and the atypical gene order in its mt genome.

  6. Physella acuta: atypical mitochondrial gene order among panpulmonates (Gastropoda)

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Journey R.; Bergthorsson, Ulfar; Adema, Coen M.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) sequences are frequently used for phylogenetic reconstruction and for identification of species of molluscs. This study expands the phylogenetic range of Hygrophila (Panpulmonata) for which such sequence data are available by characterizing the full mt genome of the invasive freshwater snail Physella acuta (Physidae). The mt genome sequences of two P. acuta isolates from Stubblefield Lake, New Mexico, USA, differed in length (14,490 vs 14,314 bp) and showed 11.49% sequence divergence, whereas ITS1 and ITS2 sequences from the nuclear genome differed by 1.75%. The mt gene order of P. acuta (cox1, P, nad6, nad5, nad1, D, F, cox2, Y, W, nad4L, C, Q, atp6, R, E, rrnS, M, T, cox3, I, nad2, K, V, rrnL, L1, A, cytb, G, H, L2, atp8, N, nad2, S1, S2, nad4) differs considerably from the relatively conserved gene order within Panpulmonata. Phylogenetic trees show that the 13 protein-encoding mt gene sequences (equivalent codons) of P. acuta group according to gastropod phylogeny, yet branch lengths and dN/dS ratios for P. acuta indicate elevated amino acid substitutions relative to other gastropods. This study indicates that mt sequences of P. acuta are phylogenetically informative despite a considerable intraspecific divergence and the atypical gene order in its mt genome. PMID:25368439

  7. Genes conserved for arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis identified through phylogenomics.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Armando; York, Thomas; Pumplin, Nathan; Mueller, Lukas A; Harrison, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis (AMS), a widespread mutualistic association of land plants and fungi(1), is predicted to have arisen once, early in the evolution of land plants(2-4). Consistent with this notion, several genes required for AMS have been conserved throughout evolution(5) and their symbiotic functions preserved, at least between monocot and dicot plants(6,7). Despite its significance, knowledge of the plants' genetic programme for AMS is limited. To date, most genes required for AMS have been found through commonalities with the evolutionarily younger nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium legume symbiosis (RLS)(8) or by reverse genetic analyses of differentially expressed candidate genes(9). Large sequence-indexed insertion mutant collections and recent genome editing technologies have vastly increased the power of reverse genetics but selection of candidate genes, from the thousands of genes that change expression during AMS, remains an arbitrary process. Here, we describe a phylogenomics approach to identify genes whose evolutionary history predicts conservation for AMS and we demonstrate the accuracy of the predictions through reverse genetics analysis. Phylogenomics analysis of 50 plant genomes resulted in 138 genes from Medicago truncatula predicted to function in AMS. This includes 15 genes with known roles in AMS. Additionally, we demonstrate that mutants in six previously uncharacterized AMS-conserved genes are all impaired in AMS. Our results demonstrate that phylogenomics is an effective strategy to identify a set of evolutionarily conserved genes required for AMS. PMID:27249190

  8. Patterns of sequence conservation in presynaptic neural genes

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, Dexter; Murphy, Tara; Valladares, Otto; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Ungar, Lyle; Kim, Junhyong; Bućan, Maja

    2006-01-01

    Background The neuronal synapse is a fundamental functional unit in the central nervous system of animals. Because synaptic function is evolutionarily conserved, we reasoned that functional sequences of genes and related genomic elements known to play important roles in neurotransmitter release would also be conserved. Results Evolutionary rate analysis revealed that presynaptic proteins evolve slowly, although some members of large gene families exhibit accelerated evolutionary rates relative to other family members. Comparative sequence analysis of 46 megabases spanning 150 presynaptic genes identified more than 26,000 elements that are highly conserved in eight vertebrate species, as well as a small subset of sequences (6%) that are shared among unrelated presynaptic genes. Analysis of large gene families revealed that upstream and intronic regions of closely related family members are extremely divergent. We also identified 504 exceptionally long conserved elements (≥360 base pairs, ≥80% pair-wise identity between human and other mammals) in intergenic and intronic regions of presynaptic genes. Many of these elements form a highly stable stem-loop RNA structure and consequently are candidates for novel regulatory elements, whereas some conserved noncoding elements are shown to correlate with specific gene expression profiles. The SynapseDB online database integrates these findings and other functional genomic resources for synaptic genes. Conclusion Highly conserved elements in nonprotein coding regions of 150 presynaptic genes represent sequences that may be involved in the transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation of these genes. Furthermore, comparative sequence analysis will facilitate selection of genes and noncoding sequences for future functional studies and analysis of variation studies in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:17096848

  9. Conserved repeats in diverged ice nucleation structural genes from two species of Pseudomonas.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, G; Corotto, L; Wolber, P

    1986-01-01

    Sequence analysis shows that an ice nucleation gene (inaW) from Pseudomonas fluorescens is related to the inaZ gene of Pseudomonas syringae. The two genes have diverged by many amino acid substitutions, and have effectively randomized the third bases of homologous codons. By reference to their potential for change, it is shown that certain conserved features must have been maintained by selection pressure. In particular, their conservation of internal sequence repetition, with three orders of repeat periodicity in each gene, suggests that the pattern of repetition is significant to the gene products' function. We propose models for the structure of the gene products in which each order of periodicity would be required for the nucleation function. PMID:3774551

  10. Visualizing conserved gene location across microbe genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Chris D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces an analysis-based zoomable visualization technique for displaying the location of genes across many related species of microbes. The purpose of this visualizatiuon is to enable a biologist to examine the layout of genes in the organism of interest with respect to the gene organization of related organisms. During the genomic annotation process, the ability to observe gene organization in common with previously annotated genomes can help a biologist better confirm the structure and function of newly analyzed microbe DNA sequences. We have developed a visualization and analysis tool that enables the biologist to observe and examine gene organization among genomes, in the context of the primary sequence of interest. This paper describes the visualization and analysis steps, and presents a case study using a number of Rickettsia genomes.

  11. Evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements in vertebrate HOX gene clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, Simona; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Axel

    2003-12-31

    Due to their high degree of conservation, comparisons of DNA sequences among evolutionarily distantly-related genomes permit to identify functional regions in noncoding DNA. Hox genes are optimal candidate sequences for comparative genome analyses, because they are extremely conserved in vertebrates and occur in clusters. We aligned (Pipmaker) the nucleotide sequences of HoxA clusters of tilapia, pufferfish, striped bass, zebrafish, horn shark, human and mouse (over 500 million years of evolutionary distance). We identified several highly conserved intergenic sequences, likely to be important in gene regulation. Only a few of these putative regulatory elements have been previously described as being involved in the regulation of Hox genes, while several others are new elements that might have regulatory functions. The majority of these newly identified putative regulatory elements contain short fragments that are almost completely conserved and are identical to known binding sites for regulatory proteins (Transfac). The conserved intergenic regions located between the most rostrally expressed genes in the developing embryo are longer and better retained through evolution. We document that presumed regulatory sequences are retained differentially in either A or A clusters resulting from a genome duplication in the fish lineage. This observation supports both the hypothesis that the conserved elements are involved in gene regulation and the Duplication-Deletion-Complementation model.

  12. Training-Task Orders and Transfer in Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Richard B.; Norton, Janice M.

    1981-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out in which groups of children (mean age = 68 months) were matched on number, length, mass, and liquid conservation scores and then trained on a distance-layout task developed by Inhelder et al (1974). (Author/MP)

  13. Bioinformatic Identification of Conserved Cis-Sequences in Coregulated Genes.

    PubMed

    Bülow, Lorenz; Hehl, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatics tools can be employed to identify conserved cis-sequences in sets of coregulated plant genes because more and more gene expression and genomic sequence data become available. Knowledge on the specific cis-sequences, their enrichment and arrangement within promoters, facilitates the design of functional synthetic plant promoters that are responsive to specific stresses. The present chapter illustrates an example for the bioinformatic identification of conserved Arabidopsis thaliana cis-sequences enriched in drought stress-responsive genes. This workflow can be applied for the identification of cis-sequences in any sets of coregulated genes. The workflow includes detailed protocols to determine sets of coregulated genes, to extract the corresponding promoter sequences, and how to install and run a software package to identify overrepresented motifs. Further bioinformatic analyses that can be performed with the results are discussed. PMID:27557771

  14. Ancient eudicot hexaploidy meets ancestral eurosid gene order

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A hexaploidization event over 125 Mya underlies the evolutionary lineage of the majority of flowering plants, including very many species of agricultural importance. Half of these belong to the rosid subgrouping, containing severals whose genome sequences have been published. Although most duplicate and triplicate genes have been lost in all descendants, clear traces of the original chromosome triples can be discerned, their internal contiguity highly conserved in some genomes and very fragmented in others. To understand the particular evolutionary patterns of plant genomes, there is a need to systematically survey the fate of the subgenomes of polyploids, including the retention of a small proportion of the duplicate and triplicate genes and the reconstruction of putative ancestral intermediates between the original hexaploid and modern species, in this case the ancestor of the eurosid clade. Results We quantitatively trace the fate of gene triples originating in the hexaploidy across seven core eudicot flowering plants, and fit this to a two-stage model, pre- and post-radiation. We also measure the simultaneous dynamics of duplicate orthologous gene loss in three rosids, as influenced by biological functional class. We propose a new protocol for reconstructing ancestral gene order using only gene adjacency data from pairwise genomic analyses, based on repeating MAXIMUM WEIGHT MATCHING at two levels of resolution, an approach designed to transcend limitations on reconstructed contig size, while still avoiding the ambiguities of a multiplicity of solutions. Applied to three high-quality rosid genomes without subsequent polyploidy events, our automated procedure reconstructs the ancestor of the eurosid clade. Conclusions The gene loss analysis and the ancestor reconstruction present complementary assessments of post-hexaploidization evolution, the first at the level of individual gene families within and across sister genomes and the second at the

  15. Dissecting the Gene Network of Dietary Restriction to Identify Evolutionarily Conserved Pathways and New Functional Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wuttke, Daniel; Connor, Richard; Vora, Chintan; Craig, Thomas; Li, Yang; Wood, Shona; Vasieva, Olga; Shmookler Reis, Robert; Tang, Fusheng; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), limiting nutrient intake from diet without causing malnutrition, delays the aging process and extends lifespan in multiple organisms. The conserved life-extending effect of DR suggests the involvement of fundamental mechanisms, although these remain a subject of debate. To help decipher the life-extending mechanisms of DR, we first compiled a list of genes that if genetically altered disrupt or prevent the life-extending effects of DR. We called these DR–essential genes and identified more than 100 in model organisms such as yeast, worms, flies, and mice. In order for other researchers to benefit from this first curated list of genes essential for DR, we established an online database called GenDR (http://genomics.senescence.info/diet/). To dissect the interactions of DR–essential genes and discover the underlying lifespan-extending mechanisms, we then used a variety of network and systems biology approaches to analyze the gene network of DR. We show that DR–essential genes are more conserved at the molecular level and have more molecular interactions than expected by chance. Furthermore, we employed a guilt-by-association method to predict novel DR–essential genes. In budding yeast, we predicted nine genes related to vacuolar functions; we show experimentally that mutations deleting eight of those genes prevent the life-extending effects of DR. Three of these mutants (OPT2, FRE6, and RCR2) had extended lifespan under ad libitum, indicating that the lack of further longevity under DR is not caused by a general compromise of fitness. These results demonstrate how network analyses of DR using GenDR can be used to make phenotypically relevant predictions. Moreover, gene-regulatory circuits reveal that the DR–induced transcriptional signature in yeast involves nutrient-sensing, stress responses and meiotic transcription factors. Finally, comparing the influence of gene expression changes during DR on the interactomes of multiple

  16. Dissecting the gene network of dietary restriction to identify evolutionarily conserved pathways and new functional genes.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Daniel; Connor, Richard; Vora, Chintan; Craig, Thomas; Li, Yang; Wood, Shona; Vasieva, Olga; Shmookler Reis, Robert; Tang, Fusheng; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), limiting nutrient intake from diet without causing malnutrition, delays the aging process and extends lifespan in multiple organisms. The conserved life-extending effect of DR suggests the involvement of fundamental mechanisms, although these remain a subject of debate. To help decipher the life-extending mechanisms of DR, we first compiled a list of genes that if genetically altered disrupt or prevent the life-extending effects of DR. We called these DR-essential genes and identified more than 100 in model organisms such as yeast, worms, flies, and mice. In order for other researchers to benefit from this first curated list of genes essential for DR, we established an online database called GenDR (http://genomics.senescence.info/diet/). To dissect the interactions of DR-essential genes and discover the underlying lifespan-extending mechanisms, we then used a variety of network and systems biology approaches to analyze the gene network of DR. We show that DR-essential genes are more conserved at the molecular level and have more molecular interactions than expected by chance. Furthermore, we employed a guilt-by-association method to predict novel DR-essential genes. In budding yeast, we predicted nine genes related to vacuolar functions; we show experimentally that mutations deleting eight of those genes prevent the life-extending effects of DR. Three of these mutants (OPT2, FRE6, and RCR2) had extended lifespan under ad libitum, indicating that the lack of further longevity under DR is not caused by a general compromise of fitness. These results demonstrate how network analyses of DR using GenDR can be used to make phenotypically relevant predictions. Moreover, gene-regulatory circuits reveal that the DR-induced transcriptional signature in yeast involves nutrient-sensing, stress responses and meiotic transcription factors. Finally, comparing the influence of gene expression changes during DR on the interactomes of multiple organisms led

  17. The drug target genes show higher evolutionary conservation than non-target genes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wenhua; Xu, Yongdeng; Guo, Yiying; Yu, Ziqi; Feng, Guanglong; Liu, Panpan; Luan, Meiwei; Zhu, Hongjie; Liu, Guiyou; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Duan, Lian; Shang, Zhenwei; Li, Jin; Jiang, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ruijie

    2016-01-26

    Although evidence indicates that drug target genes share some common evolutionary features, there have been few studies analyzing evolutionary features of drug targets from an overall level. Therefore, we conducted an analysis which aimed to investigate the evolutionary characteristics of drug target genes. We compared the evolutionary conservation between human drug target genes and non-target genes by combining both the evolutionary features and network topological properties in human protein-protein interaction network. The evolution rate, conservation score and the percentage of orthologous genes of 21 species were included in our study. Meanwhile, four topological features including the average shortest path length, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficient and degree were considered for comparison analysis. Then we got four results as following: compared with non-drug target genes, 1) drug target genes had lower evolutionary rates; 2) drug target genes had higher conservation scores; 3) drug target genes had higher percentages of orthologous genes and 4) drug target genes had a tighter network structure including higher degrees, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficients and lower average shortest path lengths. These results demonstrate that drug target genes are more evolutionarily conserved than non-drug target genes. We hope that our study will provide valuable information for other researchers who are interested in evolutionary conservation of drug targets.

  18. Assessment of gene order computing methods for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Computational genomics of Alzheimer disease (AD), the most common form of senile dementia, is a nascent field in AD research. The field includes AD gene clustering by computing gene order which generates higher quality gene clustering patterns than most other clustering methods. However, there are few available gene order computing methods such as Genetic Algorithm (GA) and Ant Colony Optimization (ACO). Further, their performance in gene order computation using AD microarray data is not known. We thus set forth to evaluate the performances of current gene order computing methods with different distance formulas, and to identify additional features associated with gene order computation. Methods Using different distance formulas- Pearson distance and Euclidean distance, the squared Euclidean distance, and other conditions, gene orders were calculated by ACO and GA (including standard GA and improved GA) methods, respectively. The qualities of the gene orders were compared, and new features from the calculated gene orders were identified. Results Compared to the GA methods tested in this study, ACO fits the AD microarray data the best when calculating gene order. In addition, the following features were revealed: different distance formulas generated a different quality of gene order, and the commonly used Pearson distance was not the best distance formula when used with both GA and ACO methods for AD microarray data. Conclusion Compared with Pearson distance and Euclidean distance, the squared Euclidean distance generated the best quality gene order computed by GA and ACO methods. PMID:23369541

  19. Conservation of silk genes in Trichoptera and Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Yonemura, Naoyuki; Mita, Kazuei; Tamura, Toshiki; Sehnal, Frantisek

    2009-06-01

    Larvae of the sister orders Trichoptera and Lepidoptera are characterized by silk secretion from a pair of labial glands. In both orders the silk filament consists of heavy (H)- and light (L)-chain fibroins and in Lepidoptera it also includes a P25 glycoprotein. The L-fibroin and H-fibroin genes of Rhyacophila obliterata and Hydropsyche angustipennis caddisflies have exon/intron structuring (seven exons in L-fibroin and two in H-fibroin) similar to that in their counterparts in Lepidoptera. Fibroin cDNAs are also known in Limnephilus decipiens, representing the third caddisfly suborder. Amino acid sequences of deduced L-fibroin proteins and of the terminal H-fibroin regions are about 50% identical among the three caddisfly species but their similarity to lepidopteran fibroins is <25%. Positions of some residues are conserved, including cysteines that were shown to link the L-fibroin and H-fibroin by a disulfide bridge in Lepidoptera. The long internal part of H-fibroins is composed of short motifs arranged in species-specific repeats. They are extremely uniform in R. obliterata. Motifs (SX)(n), GGX, and GPGXX occur in both Trichoptera and Lepidoptera. The trichopteran H-fibroins further contain charged amphiphilic motifs but lack the strings of alanines or alanine-glycine dipeptides that are typical lepidopteran motifs. On the other hand, sequences composed of a motif similar to ERIVAPTVITR surrounded by the (SX)(4-6) strings and modifications of the GRRGWGRRG motif occur in Trichoptera and not in Lepidoptera.

  20. Functional conservation of the promoter regions of vertebrate tyrosinase genes.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Tanaka, M; Miura, H; Ikeo, K; Gojobori, T; Takeuchi, T; Yamamoto, H

    2001-11-01

    Tyrosinase is the key enzyme for synthesizing melanin pigments, which primarily determine mammalian skin coloration. Considering the important roles of pigments in the evolution and the adaptation of vertebrates, phylogenetic changes in the coding and flanking regulatory sequences of the tyrosinase gene are particularly intriguing. We have now cloned cDNA encoding tyrosinase from Japanese quail and snapping turtle. These nonmammalian cDNA are highly homologous to those of the mouse and human tyrosinases, whereas the 5' flanking sequences are far less conserved except for a few short sequence motifs. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that the 5' flanking sequences from the quail or turtle tyrosinase genes are capable of directing the expression of a fused mouse tyrosinase cDNA when introduced into cultured mouse albino melanocytes. This experimental method, which reveals the functional conservation of regulatory sequences in one cell type (the melanocyte), may be utilized to evaluate phylogenetic differences in mechanisms controlling specific gene expression in many other types of cells. We also provide evidence that the 5' flanking sequences from these nonmammalian genes are functional in vivo by producing transgenic mice. Phylogenetic changes of vertebrate tyrosinase promoters and the possible involvement of conserved sequence motifs in melanocyte-specific expression of tyrosinase are discussed. PMID:11764277

  1. Karyotypic conservation in the mammalian order monotremata (subclass Prototheria).

    PubMed

    Wrigley, J M; Graves, J A

    1988-01-01

    The order Monotremata, comprising the platypus and two species of echidna (Australian and Nuigini) is the only extant representative of the mammalian subclass Prototheria, which diverged from subclass Theria (marsupials and placental mammals) 150-200 million years ago. The 2n = 63 male, 64 female karyotype (newly described here) of the Nuigini echidna is almost identical in morphology and G-band pattern to that of the Australian echidna, from which it diverged about a million years ago. The karyotype of the platypus (2n = 52) has several features in common with those of the echidna species; six pairs of large autosomes, many pairs of small (but not micro-) chromosomes, and a series of small unpaired chromosomes which form a multivalent at meiosis. Comparison of the G-band patterns of platypus and echidna autosomes reveals considerable homology. Chromomycin banding demonstrates GC-rich heterochromatin at the centromeres of many platypus and echidna chromosomes, and at the nucleolar organizing regions; some of this heterochromatin C-bands weakly in platypus (but not echidna) spreads. Late replication banding patterns resemble G-banding patterns and confirm the homologies between the species. Striking heteromorphism between chromosomes of some of the large autosomal pairs can be accounted for in the echidna by differences in amount of chromomycin-bright, late replicating heterochromatin. The sex chromosomes in all three species also bear striking homology, despite the difference in sex determination mechanism between platypus (XX/XY) and the echidna species (X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y). The platypus X and echidna X1 each represent about 5.8% of haploid chromosome length, and are G-band identical. Y chromosomes are similar between species, and are largely homologous to the X (or X1).

  2. Octocoral Mitochondrial Genomes Provide Insights into the Phylogenetic History of Gene Order Rearrangements, Order Reversals, and Cnidarian Phylogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Diego F.; Baco, Amy R.

    2015-01-01

    We use full mitochondrial genomes to test the robustness of the phylogeny of the Octocorallia, to determine the evolutionary pathway for the five known mitochondrial gene rearrangements in octocorals, and to test the suitability of using mitochondrial genomes for higher taxonomic-level phylogenetic reconstructions. Our phylogeny supports three major divisions within the Octocorallia and show that Paragorgiidae is paraphyletic, with Sibogagorgia forming a sister branch to the Coralliidae. Furthermore, Sibogagorgia cauliflora has what is presumed to be the ancestral gene order in octocorals, but the presence of a pair of inverted repeat sequences suggest that this gene order was not conserved but rather evolved back to this apparent ancestral state. Based on this we recommend the resurrection of the family Sibogagorgiidae to fix the paraphyly of the Paragorgiidae. This is the first study to show that in the Octocorallia, mitochondrial gene orders have evolved back to an ancestral state after going through a gene rearrangement, with at least one of the gene orders evolving independently in different lineages. A number of studies have used gene boundaries to determine the type of mitochondrial gene arrangement present. However, our findings suggest that this method known as gene junction screening may miss evolutionary reversals. Additionally, substitution saturation analysis demonstrates that while whole mitochondrial genomes can be used effectively for phylogenetic analyses within Octocorallia, their utility at higher taxonomic levels within Cnidaria is inadequate. Therefore for phylogenetic reconstruction at taxonomic levels higher than subclass within the Cnidaria, nuclear genes will be required, even when whole mitochondrial genomes are available. PMID:25539723

  3. Human Intellectual Disability Genes Form Conserved Functional Modules in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Oortveld, Merel A. W.; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Oti, Martin; Nijhof, Bonnie; Fernandes, Ana Clara; Kochinke, Korinna; Castells-Nobau, Anna; van Engelen, Eva; Ellenkamp, Thijs; Eshuis, Lilian; Galy, Anne; van Bokhoven, Hans; Habermann, Bianca; Brunner, Han G.; Zweier, Christiane; Verstreken, Patrik; Huynen, Martijn A.; Schenck, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual Disability (ID) disorders, defined by an IQ below 70, are genetically and phenotypically highly heterogeneous. Identification of common molecular pathways underlying these disorders is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of cognition and for the development of therapeutic intervention strategies. To systematically establish their functional connectivity, we used transgenic RNAi to target 270 ID gene orthologs in the Drosophila eye. Assessment of neuronal function in behavioral and electrophysiological assays and multiparametric morphological analysis identified phenotypes associated with knockdown of 180 ID gene orthologs. Most of these genotype-phenotype associations were novel. For example, we uncovered 16 genes that are required for basal neurotransmission and have not previously been implicated in this process in any system or organism. ID gene orthologs with morphological eye phenotypes, in contrast to genes without phenotypes, are relatively highly expressed in the human nervous system and are enriched for neuronal functions, suggesting that eye phenotyping can distinguish different classes of ID genes. Indeed, grouping genes by Drosophila phenotype uncovered 26 connected functional modules. Novel links between ID genes successfully predicted that MYCN, PIGV and UPF3B regulate synapse development. Drosophila phenotype groups show, in addition to ID, significant phenotypic similarity also in humans, indicating that functional modules are conserved. The combined data indicate that ID disorders, despite their extreme genetic diversity, are caused by disruption of a limited number of highly connected functional modules. PMID:24204314

  4. Gene family size conservation is a good indicator of evolutionary rates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Chi; Chen, Chiuan-Jung; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Chuang, Trees-Juen

    2010-08-01

    The evolution of duplicate genes has been a topic of broad interest. Here, we propose that the conservation of gene family size is a good indicator of the rate of sequence evolution and some other biological properties. By comparing the human-chimpanzee-macaque orthologous gene families with and without family size conservation, we demonstrate that genes with family size conservation evolve more slowly than those without family size conservation. Our results further demonstrate that both family expansion and contraction events may accelerate gene evolution, resulting in elevated evolutionary rates in the genes without family size conservation. In addition, we show that the duplicate genes with family size conservation evolve significantly more slowly than those without family size conservation. Interestingly, the median evolutionary rate of singletons falls in between those of the above two types of duplicate gene families. Our results thus suggest that the controversy on whether duplicate genes evolve more slowly than singletons can be resolved when family size conservation is taken into consideration. Furthermore, we also observe that duplicate genes with family size conservation have the highest level of gene expression/expression breadth, the highest proportion of essential genes, and the lowest gene compactness, followed by singletons and then by duplicate genes without family size conservation. Such a trend accords well with our observations of evolutionary rates. Our results thus point to the importance of family size conservation in the evolution of duplicate genes.

  5. Unusual Gene Order and Organization of the Sea Urchin Hox Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, R A; Rowen, L; Nesbitt, R; Bloom, S; Rast, J P; Berney, K; Arenas-Mena, C; Martinez, P; Lucas, S; Richardson, P M; Davidson, E H; Peterson, K J; Hood, L

    2005-10-11

    The highly consistent gene order and axial colinear expression patterns found in vertebrate hox gene clusters are less well conserved across the rest of bilaterians. We report the first deuterostome instance of an intact hox cluster with a unique gene order where the paralog groups are not expressed in a sequential manner. The finished sequence from BAC clones from the genome of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, reveals a gene order wherein the anterior genes (Hox1, Hox2 and Hox3) lie nearest the posterior genes in the cluster such that the most 3 gene is Hox5. (The gene order is : 5-Hox1, 2, 3, 11/13c, 11/13b, 11/13a, 9/10, 8, 7, 6, 5 - 3). The finished sequence result is corroborated by restriction mapping evidence and BAC-end scaffold analyses. Comparisons with a putative ancestral deuterostome Hox gene cluster suggest that the rearrangements leading to the sea urchin gene order were many and complex.

  6. Unusual Gene Order and Organization of the Sea Urchin HoxCluster

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Paul M.; Lucas, Susan; Cameron, R. Andrew; Rowen,Lee; Nesbitt, Ryan; Bloom, Scott; Rast, Jonathan P.; Berney, Kevin; Arenas-Mena, Cesar; Martinez, Pedro; Davidson, Eric H.; Peterson, KevinJ.; Hood, Leroy

    2005-05-10

    The highly consistent gene order and axial colinear expression patterns found in vertebrate hox gene clusters are less well conserved across the rest of bilaterians. We report the first deuterostome instance of an intact hox cluster with a unique gene order where the paralog groups are not expressed in a sequential manner. The finished sequence from BAC clones from the genome of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, reveals a gene order wherein the anterior genes (Hox1, Hox2 and Hox3) lie nearest the posterior genes in the cluster such that the most 3' gene is Hox5. (The gene order is : 5'-Hox1,2, 3, 11/13c, 11/13b, '11/13a, 9/10, 8, 7, 6, 5 - 3)'. The finished sequence result is corroborated by restriction mapping evidence and BAC-end scaffold analyses. Comparisons with a putative ancestral deuterostome Hox gene cluster suggest that the rearrangements leading to the sea urchin gene order were many and complex.

  7. Conserved gene clusters in bacterial genomes provide further support for the primacy of RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siefert, J. L.; Martin, K. A.; Abdi, F.; Widger, W. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    Five complete bacterial genome sequences have been released to the scientific community. These include four (eu)Bacteria, Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma genitalium, M. pneumoniae, and Synechocystis PCC 6803, as well as one Archaeon, Methanococcus jannaschii. Features of organization shared by these genomes are likely to have arisen very early in the history of the bacteria and thus can be expected to provide further insight into the nature of early ancestors. Results of a genome comparison of these five organisms confirm earlier observations that gene order is remarkably unpreserved. There are, nevertheless, at least 16 clusters of two or more genes whose order remains the same among the four (eu)Bacteria and these are presumed to reflect conserved elements of coordinated gene expression that require gene proximity. Eight of these gene orders are essentially conserved in the Archaea as well. Many of these clusters are known to be regulated by RNA-level mechanisms in Escherichia coli, which supports the earlier suggestion that this type of regulation of gene expression may have arisen very early. We conclude that although the last common ancestor may have had a DNA genome, it likely was preceded by progenotes with an RNA genome.

  8. Energy Stable Flux Formulas For The Discontinuous Galerkin Discretization Of First Order Nonlinear Conservation Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy; Charrier, Pierre; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We consider the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element discretization of first order systems of conservation laws derivable as moments of the kinetic Boltzmann equation. This includes well known conservation law systems such as the Euler For the class of first order nonlinear conservation laws equipped with an entropy extension, an energy analysis of the DG method for the Cauchy initial value problem is developed. Using this DG energy analysis, several new variants of existing numerical flux functions are derived and shown to be energy stable.

  9. Vertebrate Paralogous MEF2 Genes: Origin, Conservation, and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenwu; de Folter, Stefan; Shen, Xia; Zhang, Wenqian; Tao, Shiheng

    2011-01-01

    Background The myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) gene family is broadly expressed during the development and maintenance of muscle cells. Although a great deal has been elucidated concerning MEF2 transcription factors' regulation of specific gene expression in diverse programs and adaptive responses, little is known about the origin and evolution of the four members of the MEF2 gene family in vertebrates. Methodology/Principal Findings By phylogenetic analyses, we investigated the origin, conservation, and evolution of the four MEF2 genes. First, among the four MEF2 paralogous branches, MEF2B is clearly distant from the other three branches in vertebrates, mainly because it lacks the HJURP_C (Holliday junction recognition protein C-terminal) region. Second, three duplication events might have occurred to produce the four MEF2 paralogous genes and the latest duplication event occurred near the origin of vertebrates producing MEF2A and MEF2C. Third, the ratio (Ka/Ks) of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitution rates showed that MEF2B evolves faster than the other three MEF2 proteins despite purifying selection on all of the four MEF2 branches. Moreover, a pair model of M0 versus M3 showed that variable selection exists among MEF2 proteins, and branch-site analysis presented that sites 53 and 64 along the MEF2B branch are under positive selection. Finally, and interestingly, substitution rates showed that type II MADS genes (i.e., MEF2-like genes) evolve as slowly as type I MADS genes (i.e., SRF-like genes) in animals, which is inconsistent with the fact that type II MADS genes evolve much slower than type I MADS genes in plants. Conclusion Our findings shed light on the relationship of MEF2A, B, C, and D with functional conservation and evolution in vertebrates. This study provides a rationale for future experimental design to investigate distinct but overlapping regulatory roles of the four MEF2 genes in various tissues. PMID:21394201

  10. Deciphering the onychophoran 'segmentation gene cascade': Gene expression reveals limited involvement of pair rule gene orthologs in segmentation, but a highly conserved segment polarity gene network.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2013-10-01

    The hallmark of the arthropods is their segmented body, although origin of segmentation, however, is unresolved. In order to shed light on the origin of segmentation we investigated orthologs of pair rule genes (PRGs) and segment polarity genes (SPGs) in a member of the closest related sister-group to the arthropods, the onychophorans. Our gene expression data analysis suggests that most of the onychophoran PRGs do not play a role in segmentation. One possible exception is the even-skipped (eve) gene that is expressed in the posterior end of the onychophoran where new segments are likely patterned, and is also expressed in segmentation-gene typical transverse stripes in at least a number of newly formed segments. Other onychophoran PRGs such as runt (run), hairy/Hes (h/Hes) and odd-skipped (odd) do not appear to have a function in segmentation at all. Onychophoran PRGs that act low in the segmentation gene cascade in insects, however, are potentially involved in segment-patterning. Most obvious is that from the expression of the pairberry (pby) gene ortholog that is expressed in a typical SPG-pattern. Since this result suggested possible conservation of the SPG-network we further investigated SPGs (and associated factors) such as Notum in the onychophoran. We find that the expression patterns of SPGs in arthropods and the onychophoran are highly conserved, suggesting a conserved SPG-network in these two clades, and indeed also in an annelid. This may suggest that the common ancestor of lophotrochozoans and ecdysozoans was already segmented utilising the same SPG-network, or that the SPG-network was recruited independently in annelids and onychophorans/arthropods. PMID:23880430

  11. Deciphering the onychophoran 'segmentation gene cascade': Gene expression reveals limited involvement of pair rule gene orthologs in segmentation, but a highly conserved segment polarity gene network.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2013-10-01

    The hallmark of the arthropods is their segmented body, although origin of segmentation, however, is unresolved. In order to shed light on the origin of segmentation we investigated orthologs of pair rule genes (PRGs) and segment polarity genes (SPGs) in a member of the closest related sister-group to the arthropods, the onychophorans. Our gene expression data analysis suggests that most of the onychophoran PRGs do not play a role in segmentation. One possible exception is the even-skipped (eve) gene that is expressed in the posterior end of the onychophoran where new segments are likely patterned, and is also expressed in segmentation-gene typical transverse stripes in at least a number of newly formed segments. Other onychophoran PRGs such as runt (run), hairy/Hes (h/Hes) and odd-skipped (odd) do not appear to have a function in segmentation at all. Onychophoran PRGs that act low in the segmentation gene cascade in insects, however, are potentially involved in segment-patterning. Most obvious is that from the expression of the pairberry (pby) gene ortholog that is expressed in a typical SPG-pattern. Since this result suggested possible conservation of the SPG-network we further investigated SPGs (and associated factors) such as Notum in the onychophoran. We find that the expression patterns of SPGs in arthropods and the onychophoran are highly conserved, suggesting a conserved SPG-network in these two clades, and indeed also in an annelid. This may suggest that the common ancestor of lophotrochozoans and ecdysozoans was already segmented utilising the same SPG-network, or that the SPG-network was recruited independently in annelids and onychophorans/arthropods.

  12. DLGP: A database for lineage-conserved and lineage-specific gene pairs in animal and plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng

    2016-01-15

    The conservation of gene organization in the genome with lineage-specificity is an invaluable resource to decipher their potential functionality with diverse selective constraints, especially in higher animals and plants. Gene pairs appear to be the minimal structure for such kind of gene clusters that tend to reside in their preferred locations, representing the distinctive genomic characteristics in single species or a given lineage. Despite gene families having been investigated in a widespread manner, the definition of gene pair families in various taxa still lacks adequate attention. To address this issue, we report DLGP (http://lcgbase.big.ac.cn/DLGP/) that stores the pre-calculated lineage-based gene pairs in currently available 134 animal and plant genomes and inspect them under the same analytical framework, bringing out a set of innovational features. First, the taxonomy or lineage has been classified into four levels such as Kingdom, Phylum, Class and Order. It adopts all-to-all comparison strategy to identify the possible conserved gene pairs in all species for each gene pair in certain species and reckon those that are conserved in over a significant proportion of species in a given lineage (e.g. Primates, Diptera or Poales) as the lineage-conserved gene pairs. Furthermore, it predicts the lineage-specific gene pairs by retaining the above-mentioned lineage-conserved gene pairs that are not conserved in any other lineages. Second, it carries out pairwise comparison for the gene pairs between two compared species and creates the table including all the conserved gene pairs and the image elucidating the conservation degree of gene pairs in chromosomal level. Third, it supplies gene order browser to extend gene pairs to gene clusters, allowing users to view the evolution dynamics in the gene context in an intuitive manner. This database will be able to facilitate the particular comparison between animals and plants, between vertebrates and arthropods, and

  13. The gsdf gene locus harbors evolutionary conserved and clustered genes preferentially expressed in fish previtellogenic oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Aude; Le Gac, Florence; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques

    2011-02-01

    The gonadal soma-derived factor (GSDF) belongs to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily and is conserved in teleostean fish species. Gsdf is specifically expressed in the gonads, and gene expression is restricted to the granulosa and Sertoli cells in trout and medaka. The gsdf gene expression is correlated to early testis differentiation in medaka and was shown to stimulate primordial germ cell and spermatogonia proliferation in trout. In the present study, we show that the gsdf gene localizes to a syntenic chromosomal fragment conserved among vertebrates although no gsdf-related gene is detected on the corresponding genomic region in tetrapods. We demonstrate using quantitative RT-PCR that most of the genes localized in the synteny are specifically expressed in medaka gonads. Gsdf is the only gene of the synteny with a much higher expression in the testis compared to the ovary. In contrast, gene expression pattern analysis of the gsdf surrounding genes (nup54, aff1, klhl8, sdad1, and ptpn13) indicates that these genes are preferentially expressed in the female gonads. The tissue distribution of these genes is highly similar in medaka and zebrafish, two teleostean species that have diverged more than 110 million years ago. The cellular localization of these genes was determined in medaka gonads using the whole-mount in situ hybridization technique. We confirm that gsdf gene expression is restricted to Sertoli and granulosa cells in contact with the premeiotic and meiotic cells. The nup54 gene is expressed in spermatocytes and previtellogenic oocytes. Transcripts corresponding to the ovary-specific genes (aff1, klhl8, and sdad1) are detected only in previtellogenic oocytes. No expression was detected in the gonocytes in 10 dpf embryos. In conclusion, we show that the gsdf gene localizes to a syntenic chromosomal fragment harboring evolutionary conserved genes in vertebrates. These genes are preferentially expressed in previtelloogenic oocytes, and thus, they

  14. Evolutionary conservation and disease gene association of the human genes composing pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    Sen, Kamalika; Ghosh, Tapash Chandra

    2012-06-15

    Pseudogenes, the 'genomic fossils' present portrayal of evolutionary history of human genome. The human genes configuring pseudogenes are also now coming forth as important resources in the study of human protein evolution. In this communication, we explored evolutionary conservation of the genes forming pseudogenes over the genes lacking any pseudogene and delving deeper, we probed an evolutionary rate difference between the disease genes in the two groups. We illustrated this differential evolutionary pattern by gene expressivity, number of regulatory miRNA targeting per gene, abundance of protein complex forming genes and lesser percentage of protein intrinsic disorderness. Furthermore, pseudogenes are observed to harbor sequence variations, over their entirety, those become degenerative disease-causing mutations though the disease involvement of their progenitors is still unexplored. Here, we unveiled an immense association of disease genes in the genes casting pseudogenes in human. We interpreted the issue by disease associated miRNA targeting, genes containing polymorphisms in miRNA target sites, abundance of genes having disease causing non-synonymous mutations, disease gene specific network properties, presence of genes having repeat regions, affluence of dosage sensitive genes and the presence of intrinsically unstructured protein regions.

  15. Mimivirus gene promoters exhibit an unprecedented conservation among all eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Karsten; Audic, Stéphane; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2005-10-11

    The initial analysis of the recently sequenced genome of Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus, the largest known double-stranded DNA virus, predicted a proteome of size and complexity more akin to small parasitic bacteria than to other nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses and identified numerous functions never before described in a virus. It has been proposed that the Mimivirus lineage could have emerged before the individualization of cellular organisms from the three domains of life. An exhaustive in silico analysis of the noncoding moiety of all known viral genomes now uncovers the unprecedented perfect conservation of an AAAATTGA motif in close to 50% of the Mimivirus genes. This motif preferentially occurs in genes transcribed from the predicted leading strand and is associated with functions required early in the viral infectious cycle, such as transcription and protein translation. A comparison with the known promoter of unicellular eukaryotes, amoebal protists in particular, strongly suggests that the AAAATTGA motif is the structural equivalent of the TATA box core promoter element. This element is specific to the Mimivirus lineage and may correspond to an ancestral promoter structure predating the radiation of the eukaryotic kingdoms. This unprecedented conservation of core promoter regions is another exceptional feature of Mimivirus that again raises the question of its evolutionary origin.

  16. High-Order Entropy Stable Finite Difference Schemes for Nonlinear Conservation Laws: Finite Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Developing stable and robust high-order finite difference schemes requires mathematical formalism and appropriate methods of analysis. In this work, nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference methods with formal boundary closures for conservation laws. Particular emphasis is placed on the entropy stability of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A newly derived entropy stable weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite difference method is used to simulate problems with shocks and a conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference approach is used to approximate viscous terms.

  17. Evolution of a large, conserved, and syntenic gene family in insects.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neethu; Dorer, Douglas R; Moriyama, Etsuko N; Christensen, Alan C

    2012-02-01

    The Osiris gene family, first described in Drosophila melanogaster, is clustered in the genomes of all Drosophila species sequenced to date. In D. melanogaster, it explains the enigmatic phenomenon of the triplo-lethal and haploinsufficient locus Tpl. The synteny of Osiris genes in flies is well conserved, and it is one of the largest syntenic blocks in the Drosophila group. By examining the genome sequences of other insects in a wide range of taxonomic orders, we show here that the gene family is well-conserved and syntenic not only in the diptera but across the holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects. Osiris gene homologs have also been found in the expressed sequence tag sequences of various other insects but are absent from all groups that are not insects, including crustacea and arachnids. It is clear that the gene family evolved by gene duplication and neofunctionalization very soon after the divergence of the insects from other arthropods but before the divergence of the insects from one another and that the sequences and synteny have been maintained by selection ever since.

  18. Ancient conserved regions in new gene sequences and the protein databases

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.; Hillier, L.; Waterston, R. ); Lipman, D.; States, D.; Claverie, J.M. )

    1993-03-19

    Sets of new gene sequences from human, nematode, and yeast were compared with each other and with a set of Escherichia coli genes in order to detect ancient evolutionarily conserved regions (ACRs) in the encoded proteins. Nearly all of the ACRs so identified were found to be homologous to sequences in the protein databases. This suggests that currently known proteins may already include representatives of most ACRs and that new sequences not similar to any database sequence are unlikely to contain ACRs. Preliminary analyses indicate that moderately expressed genes may be more likely to contain ACRs than rarely expressed genes. It is estimated that there are fewer than 900 ACRs in all. 20 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Similarity-based gene detection: using COGs to find evolutionarily-conserved ORFs

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Bradford C; Hutchison, Clyde A

    2006-01-01

    Background Experimental verification of gene products has not kept pace with the rapid growth of microbial sequence information. However, existing annotations of gene locations contain sufficient information to screen for probable errors. Furthermore, comparisons among genomes become more informative as more genomes are examined. We studied all open reading frames (ORFs) of at least 30 codons from the genomes of 27 sequenced bacterial strains. We grouped the potential peptide sequences encoded from the ORFs by forming Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs). We used this grouping in order to find homologous relationships that would not be distinguishable from noise when using simple BLAST searches. Although COG analysis was initially developed to group annotated genes, we applied it to the task of grouping anonymous DNA sequences that may encode proteins. Results "Mixed COGs" of ORFs (clusters in which some sequences correspond to annotated genes and some do not) are attractive targets when seeking errors of gene predicion. Examination of mixed COGs reveals some situations in which genes appear to have been missed in current annotations and a smaller number of regions that appear to have been annotated as gene loci erroneously. This technique can also be used to detect potential pseudogenes or sequencing errors. Our method uses an adjustable parameter for degree of conservation among the studied genomes (stringency). We detail results for one level of stringency at which we found 83 potential genes which had not previously been identified, 60 potential pseudogenes, and 7 sequences with existing gene annotations that are probably incorrect. Conclusion Systematic study of sequence conservation offers a way to improve existing annotations by identifying potentially homologous regions where the annotation of the presence or absence of a gene is inconsistent among genomes. PMID:16423288

  20. Expression analysis of five zebrafish RXFP3 homologues reveals evolutionary conservation of gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Donizetti, Aldo; Fiengo, Marcella; Iazzetti, Giovanni; del Gaudio, Rosanna; Di Giaimo, Rossella; Pariante, Paolo; Minucci, Sergio; Aniello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Relaxin peptides exert different functions in reproduction and neuroendocrine processes via interaction with two evolutionarily unrelated groups of receptors: RXFP1 and RXFP2 on one hand, RXFP3 and RXFP4 on the other hand. Evolution of receptor genes after splitting of tetrapods and teleost lineage led to a different retention rate between mammals and fish, with the latter having more gene copies compared to the former. In order to improve our knowledge on the evolution of the relaxin ligands/receptors system and have insights on their function in early stages of life, in the present paper we analyzed the expression pattern of five zebrafish RXFP3 homologue genes during embryonic development. In our analysis, we show that only two of the five genes are expressed during embryogenesis and that their transcripts are present in all the developmental stages. Spatial localization analysis of these transcripts revealed that the gene expression is restricted in specific territories starting from early pharyngula stage. Both genes are expressed in the brain but in different cell clusters and in extra-neural territories, one gene in the interrenal gland and the other in the pancreas. These two genes share expression territories with the homologue mammalian counterpart, highlighting a general conservation of gene expression regulatory processes and their putative function during evolution that are established early in vertebrate embryogenesis.

  1. Gene order computation using Alzheimer's DNA microarray gene expression data and the Ant Colony Optimisation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chaoyang; Jiang, Gang; Wang, Shipeng; Hu, Benqiong; Liu, Qingzhong; Deng, Youping; Huang, Xudong

    2012-01-01

    As Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, the study of AD-related genes via biocomputation is an important research topic. One method of studying AD-related gene is to cluster similar genes together into a gene order. Gene order is a good clustering method as the results can be optimal globally while other clustering methods are only optimal locally. Herein we use the Ant Colony Optimisation (ACO)-based algorithm to calculate the gene order from an Alzheimer's DNA microarray dataset. We test it with four distance measurements: Pearson distance, Spearmen distance, Euclidean distance, and squared Euclidean distance. Our computing results indicate: a different distance formula generated a different quality of gene order, the squared Euclidean distance approach produced the optimal AD-related gene order.

  2. Second- and third-order upwind difference schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Second- and third-order two time-level five-point explicit upwind-difference schemes are described for the numerical solution of hyperbolic systems of conservation laws and applied to the Euler equations of inviscid gas dynamics. Nonliner smoothing techniques are used to make the schemes total variation diminishing. In the method both hyperbolicity and conservation properties of the hyperbolic conservation laws are combined in a very natural way by introducing a normalized Jacobian matrix of the hyperbolic system. Entropy satisfying shock transition operators which are consistent with the upwind differencing are locally introduced when transonic shock transition is detected. Schemes thus constructed are suitable for shockcapturing calculations. The stability and the global order of accuracy of the proposed schemes are examined. Numerical experiments for the inviscid Burgers equation and the compressible Euler equations in one and two space dimensions involving various situations of aerodynamic interest are included and compared.

  3. Multipartitioning Møller-Plesset perturbation theory: Size-extensivity at third order and symmetry conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolik, Zoltán; Szabados, Ágnes

    Multipartitioning multireference many-body perturbation theory (Zaitevskii and Malrieu, Chem. Phys. Lett. 1995, 233, 597) is investigated with regard to symmetry and size-extensivity. We show that the spin-adapted formulation suffers from spatial symmetry breaking and propose a general symmetry-conserving zero-order Hamiltonian. We analyze size-extensivity of various partitionings at the third order and find that extensivity holds if one-particle quantities in the zero-order Hamiltonian are properly chosen. In particular, third order of the spin-adapted and general symmetry-adapted theory prove to be extensive.

  4. Pangenome Analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei: Genome Evolution Preserves Gene Order despite High Recombination Rates.

    PubMed

    Spring-Pearson, Senanu M; Stone, Joshua K; Doyle, Adina; Allender, Christopher J; Okinaka, Richard T; Mayo, Mark; Broomall, Stacey M; Hill, Jessica M; Karavis, Mark A; Hubbard, Kyle S; Insalaco, Joseph M; McNew, Lauren A; Rosenzweig, C Nicole; Gibbons, Henry S; Currie, Bart J; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul; Tuanyok, Apichai

    2015-01-01

    The pangenomic diversity in Burkholderia pseudomallei is high, with approximately 5.8% of the genome consisting of genomic islands. Genomic islands are known hotspots for recombination driven primarily by site-specific recombination associated with tRNAs. However, recombination rates in other portions of the genome are also high, a feature we expected to disrupt gene order. We analyzed the pangenome of 37 isolates of B. pseudomallei and demonstrate that the pangenome is 'open', with approximately 136 new genes identified with each new genome sequenced, and that the global core genome consists of 4568±16 homologs. Genes associated with metabolism were statistically overrepresented in the core genome, and genes associated with mobile elements, disease, and motility were primarily associated with accessory portions of the pangenome. The frequency distribution of genes present in between 1 and 37 of the genomes analyzed matches well with a model of genome evolution in which 96% of the genome has very low recombination rates but 4% of the genome recombines readily. Using homologous genes among pairs of genomes, we found that gene order was highly conserved among strains, despite the high recombination rates previously observed. High rates of gene transfer and recombination are incompatible with retaining gene order unless these processes are either highly localized to specific sites within the genome, or are characterized by symmetrical gene gain and loss. Our results demonstrate that both processes occur: localized recombination introduces many new genes at relatively few sites, and recombination throughout the genome generates the novel multi-locus sequence types previously observed while preserving gene order.

  5. Pangenome Analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei: Genome Evolution Preserves Gene Order despite High Recombination Rates

    PubMed Central

    Spring-Pearson, Senanu M.; Stone, Joshua K.; Doyle, Adina; Allender, Christopher J.; Okinaka, Richard T.; Mayo, Mark; Broomall, Stacey M.; Hill, Jessica M.; Karavis, Mark A.; Hubbard, Kyle S.; Insalaco, Joseph M.; McNew, Lauren A.; Rosenzweig, C. Nicole; Gibbons, Henry S.; Currie, Bart J.; Wagner, David M.; Keim, Paul; Tuanyok, Apichai

    2015-01-01

    The pangenomic diversity in Burkholderia pseudomallei is high, with approximately 5.8% of the genome consisting of genomic islands. Genomic islands are known hotspots for recombination driven primarily by site-specific recombination associated with tRNAs. However, recombination rates in other portions of the genome are also high, a feature we expected to disrupt gene order. We analyzed the pangenome of 37 isolates of B. pseudomallei and demonstrate that the pangenome is ‘open’, with approximately 136 new genes identified with each new genome sequenced, and that the global core genome consists of 4568±16 homologs. Genes associated with metabolism were statistically overrepresented in the core genome, and genes associated with mobile elements, disease, and motility were primarily associated with accessory portions of the pangenome. The frequency distribution of genes present in between 1 and 37 of the genomes analyzed matches well with a model of genome evolution in which 96% of the genome has very low recombination rates but 4% of the genome recombines readily. Using homologous genes among pairs of genomes, we found that gene order was highly conserved among strains, despite the high recombination rates previously observed. High rates of gene transfer and recombination are incompatible with retaining gene order unless these processes are either highly localized to specific sites within the genome, or are characterized by symmetrical gene gain and loss. Our results demonstrate that both processes occur: localized recombination introduces many new genes at relatively few sites, and recombination throughout the genome generates the novel multi-locus sequence types previously observed while preserving gene order. PMID:26484663

  6. Conserved Gene Expression Programs in Developing Roots from Diverse Plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling; Schiefelbein, John

    2015-08-01

    The molecular basis for the origin and diversification of morphological adaptations is a central issue in evolutionary developmental biology. Here, we defined temporal transcript accumulation in developing roots from seven vascular plants, permitting a genome-wide comparative analysis of the molecular programs used by a single organ across diverse species. The resulting gene expression maps uncover significant similarity in the genes employed in roots and their developmental expression profiles. The detailed analysis of a subset of 133 genes known to be associated with root development in Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that most of these are used in all plant species. Strikingly, this was also true for root development in a lycophyte (Selaginella moellendorffii), which forms morphologically different roots and is thought to have evolved roots independently. Thus, despite vast differences in size and anatomy of roots from diverse plants, the basic molecular mechanisms employed during root formation appear to be conserved. This suggests that roots evolved in the two major vascular plant lineages either by parallel recruitment of largely the same developmental program or by elaboration of an existing root program in the common ancestor of vascular plants.

  7. On the Total Variation of High-Order Semi-Discrete Central Schemes for Conservation Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Levy, Doron

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a new fifth-order, semi-discrete, central-upwind scheme for solving one-dimensional systems of conservation laws. This scheme combines a fifth-order WENO reconstruction, a semi-discrete central-upwind numerical flux, and a strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta method. We test our method with various examples, and give particular attention to the evolution of the total variation of the approximations.

  8. Third-order accurate entropy-stable schemes for initial-boundary-value conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svärd, Magnus

    2012-08-01

    We consider initial-boundary-value conservation laws with the objective to obtain high-order approximations. We study two different approaches to obtain third-order accuracy, local entropy stability and a global bound on the entropy. The results are applicable to, for example the Euler equations of gas dynamics, for which we present numerical results demonstrating the robustness and accuracy of the scheme.

  9. Inference of gene interaction networks using conserved subsequential patterns from multiple time course gene expression datasets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Deciphering gene interaction networks (GINs) from time-course gene expression (TCGx) data is highly valuable to understand gene behaviors (e.g., activation, inhibition, time-lagged causality) at the system level. Existing methods usually use a global or local proximity measure to infer GINs from a single dataset. As the noise contained in a single data set is hardly self-resolved, the results are sometimes not reliable. Also, these proximity measurements cannot handle the co-existence of the various in vivo positive, negative and time-lagged gene interactions. Methods and results We propose to infer reliable GINs from multiple TCGx datasets using a novel conserved subsequential pattern of gene expression. A subsequential pattern is a maximal subset of genes sharing positive, negative or time-lagged correlations of one expression template on their own subsets of time points. Based on these patterns, a GIN can be built from each of the datasets. It is assumed that reliable gene interactions would be detected repeatedly. We thus use conserved gene pairs from the individual GINs of the multiple TCGx datasets to construct a reliable GIN for a species. We apply our method on six TCGx datasets related to yeast cell cycle, and validate the reliable GINs using protein interaction networks, biopathways and transcription factor-gene regulations. We also compare the reliable GINs with those GINs reconstructed by a global proximity measure Pearson correlation coefficient method from single datasets. It has been demonstrated that our reliable GINs achieve much better prediction performance especially with much higher precision. The functional enrichment analysis also suggests that gene sets in a reliable GIN are more functionally significant. Our method is especially useful to decipher GINs from multiple TCGx datasets related to less studied organisms where little knowledge is available except gene expression data. PMID:26681650

  10. A Conserved Structural Signature of the Homeobox Coding DNA in HOX genes

    PubMed Central

    Fongang, Bernard; Kong, Fanping; Negi, Surendra; Braun, Werner; Kudlicki, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The homeobox encodes a DNA-binding domain found in transcription factors regulating key developmental processes. The most notable examples of homeobox containing genes are the Hox genes, arranged on chromosomes in the same order as their expression domains along the body axis. The mechanisms responsible for the synchronous regulation of Hox genes and the molecular function of their colinearity remain unknown. Here we report the discovery of a conserved structural signature of the 180-base pair DNA fragment comprising the homeobox. We demonstrate that the homeobox DNA has a characteristic 3-base-pair periodicity in the hydroxyl radical cleavage pattern. This periodic pattern is significant in most of the 39 mammalian Hox genes and in other homeobox-containing transcription factors. The signature is present in segmented bilaterian animals as evolutionarily distant as humans and flies. It remains conserved despite the fact that it would be disrupted by synonymous mutations, which raises the possibility of evolutionary selective pressure acting on the structure of the coding DNA. The homeobox coding DNA may therefore have a secondary function, possibly as a regulatory element. The existence of such element may have important consequences for understanding how these genes are regulated. PMID:27739488

  11. Phylogenetic Resolution of Deep Eukaryotic and Fungal Relationships Using Highly Conserved Low-Copy Nuclear Genes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ren; Sun, Yazhou; Zhao, Yue; Geiser, David; Ma, Hong; Zhou, Xiaofan

    2016-09-11

    A comprehensive and reliable eukaryotic tree of life is important for many aspects of biological studies from comparative developmental and physiological analyses to translational medicine and agriculture. Both gene-rich and taxon-rich approaches are effective strategies to improve phylogenetic accuracy and are greatly facilitated by marker genes that are universally distributed, well conserved, and orthologous among divergent eukaryotes. In this article, we report the identification of 943 low-copy eukaryotic genes and we show that many of these genes are promising tools in resolving eukaryotic phylogenies, despite the challenges of determining deep eukaryotic relationships. As a case study, we demonstrate that smaller subsets of ∼20 and 52 genes could resolve controversial relationships among widely divergent taxa and provide strong support for deep relationships such as the monophyly and branching order of several eukaryotic supergroups. In addition, the use of these genes resulted in fungal phylogenies that are congruent with previous phylogenomic studies that used much larger datasets, and successfully resolved several difficult relationships (e.g., forming a highly supported clade with Microsporidia, Mitosporidium and Rozella sister to other fungi). We propose that these genes are excellent for both gene-rich and taxon-rich analyses and can be applied at multiple taxonomic levels and facilitate a more complete understanding of the eukaryotic tree of life.

  12. Phylogenetic Resolution of Deep Eukaryotic and Fungal Relationships Using Highly Conserved Low-Copy Nuclear Genes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ren; Sun, Yazhou; Zhao, Yue; Geiser, David; Ma, Hong; Zhou, Xiaofan

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive and reliable eukaryotic tree of life is important for many aspects of biological studies from comparative developmental and physiological analyses to translational medicine and agriculture. Both gene-rich and taxon-rich approaches are effective strategies to improve phylogenetic accuracy and are greatly facilitated by marker genes that are universally distributed, well conserved, and orthologous among divergent eukaryotes. In this article, we report the identification of 943 low-copy eukaryotic genes and we show that many of these genes are promising tools in resolving eukaryotic phylogenies, despite the challenges of determining deep eukaryotic relationships. As a case study, we demonstrate that smaller subsets of ∼20 and 52 genes could resolve controversial relationships among widely divergent taxa and provide strong support for deep relationships such as the monophyly and branching order of several eukaryotic supergroups. In addition, the use of these genes resulted in fungal phylogenies that are congruent with previous phylogenomic studies that used much larger datasets, and successfully resolved several difficult relationships (e.g., forming a highly supported clade with Microsporidia, Mitosporidium and Rozella sister to other fungi). We propose that these genes are excellent for both gene-rich and taxon-rich analyses and can be applied at multiple taxonomic levels and facilitate a more complete understanding of the eukaryotic tree of life. PMID:27604879

  13. Evolutionary analysis of the mammalian M1 aminopeptidases reveals conserved exon structure and gene death.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Karen Beasley; Smith, Shannon A; Davis, Anthony C; Trivette, Andrew; Seipelt-Thiemann, Rebecca L

    2014-11-15

    The members of the M1 aminopeptidase family share conserved domains, yet show functional divergence within the family as a whole. In order to better understand this family, this study analyzed the mammalian members in depth at exon, gene, and protein levels. The twelve human members, eleven rat members, and eleven mouse members were first analyzed in multiple alignments to visualize both reported and unreported conserved domains. Phylogenetic trees were then generated for humans, rats, mice, and all mammals to determine how closely related the homologs were and to gain insight to the divergence in the family members. This produced three groups with similarity within the family. Next, a synteny study was completed to determine the present locations of the genes and changes that had occurred. It became apparent that gene death likely resulted in the lack of one member in mouse and rat. Finally, an in-depth analysis of the exon structure revealed that nine members of the human family and eight in mouse, are highly conserved within the exon structure. Taken together, these results indicate that the M1 aminopeptidase family is a divergent family with three subgroups and that genetic evidence mirrors categorization of the family by enzymatic function.

  14. Ordered expression of virulence genes in Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Papezova, K; Gregorova, D; Jonuschies, J; Rychlik, I

    2007-01-01

    Using transcriptional promoter fusions, we investigated the expression of selected SPI-1 and SPI-2 genes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Promoters of genes related to the invasion of the epithelial cell (hilA, hilC, hilD, invF, sicA, sopA, sopB and sopE2) were active in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium and LB with butyrate but were suppressed by bile salts and in glucose minimal (M9) medium. Genes related to S. Typhimurium intracellular survival (phoP, ssrA, ssaB, ssaG, sifA, sifB and pipB) were characterized by their expression in stationary phase in LB and M9 medium. Activity of phoP and ssrA promoters indicated that these might be expressed inside the gut. SPI-1 genes were expressed on the transition to stationary phase while SPI-2 genes were expressed in stationary phase. Among SPI-1 genes, those with regulatory functions preceded in expression the effector genes and sop genes were expressed in the order of sopA, sopB and sopE2, showing hierarchy in the expression of S. Typhimurium virulence genes.

  15. Cytochrome b gene for species identification of the conservation animals.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, H M; Chiang, H L; Tsai, L C; Lai, S Y; Huang, N E; Linacre, A; Lee, J C

    2001-10-15

    A partial DNA sequence of cytochrome b gene was used to identify the remains of endangered animals and species endemic to Taiwan. The conservation of animals species included in this study were: the formosan gem-faced civets, leopard cats, tigers, clouded leopards, lion, formosan muntjacs, formosan sika deers, formosan sambars, formosan serows, water buffalo, formosan pangolins and formosan macaques. The control species used included domestic cats, domestic dogs, domestic sheeps, domestic cattles, domestic pigs and humans. Heteroplasmy was detected in the formosan macaque, domestic pig and domestic cats. The frequencies of heteroplasmy in these animals were about 0.25% (1 in 402bp). Sequences were aligned by Pileup program of GCG computer package, and the phylogenetic tree was constructed by the neighbor-joining method. The results of sequence comparison showed that the percentage range of sequence diversity in the same species was from 0.25 to 2.74%, and that between the different species was from 5.97 to 34.83%. The results of phylogenetic analysis showed that the genetic distance between the different species was from 6.33 to 40.59. Animals of the same species, both the endangered animal species and domestic animals, were clustered together in the neighbor-joining tree. Three unknown samples of animal remains were identified by this system. The partial sequence of cytochrome b gene adopted in this study proved to be usable for animal identification.

  16. Second-order, exact charge conservation for electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation in complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pointon, T. D.

    2008-10-01

    A second-order, exact charge-conserving algorithm for accumulating charge and current on the spatial grid for electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EM-PIC) simulation in bounded geometry is presented. The algorithm supports standard EM-PIC exterior boundary conditions and complex internal conductors on non-uniform grids. Boundary surfaces are handled by smoothly transitioning from second to first-order weighting within half a cell of the boundary. When a particle is exactly on the boundary surface (either about to be killed, or just created), the weighting is fully first-order. This means that particle creation and particle/surface interaction models developed for first-order weighting do not need to be modified. An additional feature is the use of an energy-conserving interpolation scheme from the electric field on the grid to the particles. Results show that high-density, cold plasmas with ωΔt˜1, and Δx/λ≫1, can be modeled with reasonable accuracy and good energy conservation. This opens up a significant new capability for explicit simulation of high-density plasmas in high-power devices.

  17. PHYLOGENOMICS - GUIDED VALIDATION OF FUNCTION FOR CONSERVED UNKNOWN GENES

    SciTech Connect

    V, DE CRECY-LAGARD; D, HANSON A

    2012-01-03

    Identifying functions for all gene products in all sequenced organisms is a central challenge of the post-genomic era. However, at least 30-50% of the proteins encoded by any given genome are of unknown function, or wrongly or vaguely annotated. Many of these 'unknown' proteins are common to prokaryotes and plants. We accordingly set out to predict and experimentally test the functions of such proteins. Our approach to functional prediction is integrative, coupling the extensive post-genomic resources available for plants with comparative genomics based on hundreds of microbial genomes, and functional genomic datasets from model microorganisms. The early phase is computer-assisted; later phases incorporate intellectual input from expert plant and microbial biochemists. The approach thus bridges the gap between automated homology-based annotations and the classical gene discovery efforts of experimentalists, and is much more powerful than purely computational approaches to identifying gene-function associations. Among Arabidopsis genes, we focused on those (2,325 in total) that (i) are unique or belong to families with no more than three members, (ii) are conserved between plants and prokaryotes, and (iii) have unknown or poorly known functions. Computer-assisted selection of promising targets for deeper analysis was based on homology .. independent characteristics associated in the SEED database with the prokaryotic members of each family, specifically gene clustering and phyletic spread, as well as availability of functional genomics data, and publications that could link candidate families to general metabolic areas, or to specific functions. In-depth comparative genomic analysis was then performed for about 500 top candidate families, which connected ~55 of them to general areas of metabolism and led to specific functional predictions for a subset of ~25 more. Twenty predicted functions were experimentally tested in at least one prokaryotic organism via reverse

  18. The third order correction on Hawking radiation and entropy conservation during black hole evaporation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hao-Peng; Liu, Wen-Biao

    2016-08-01

    Using Parikh-Wilczek tunneling framework, we calculate the tunneling rate from a Schwarzschild black hole under the third order WKB approximation, and then obtain the expressions for emission spectrum and black hole entropy to the third order correction. The entropy contains four terms including the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, the logarithmic term, the inverse area term, and the square of inverse area term. In addition, we analyse the correlation between sequential emissions under this approximation. It is shown that the entropy is conserved during the process of black hole evaporation, which consists with the request of quantum mechanics and implies the information is conserved during this process. We also compare the above result with that of pure thermal spectrum case, and find that the non-thermal correction played an important role.

  19. A High-Order Finite Spectral Volume Method for Conservation Laws on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Z. J.; Liu, Yen; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A time accurate, high-order, conservative, yet efficient method named Finite Spectral Volume (FSV) is developed for conservation laws on unstructured grids. The concept of a 'spectral volume' is introduced to achieve high-order accuracy in an efficient manner similar to spectral element and multi-domain spectral methods. In addition, each spectral volume is further sub-divided into control volumes (CVs), and cell-averaged data from these control volumes is used to reconstruct a high-order approximation in the spectral volume. Riemann solvers are used to compute the fluxes at spectral volume boundaries. Then cell-averaged state variables in the control volumes are updated independently. Furthermore, TVD (Total Variation Diminishing) and TVB (Total Variation Bounded) limiters are introduced in the FSV method to remove/reduce spurious oscillations near discontinuities. A very desirable feature of the FSV method is that the reconstruction is carried out only once, and analytically, and is the same for all cells of the same type, and that the reconstruction stencil is always non-singular, in contrast to the memory and CPU-intensive reconstruction in a high-order finite volume (FV) method. Discussions are made concerning why the FSV method is significantly more efficient than high-order finite volume and the Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods. Fundamental properties of the FSV method are studied and high-order accuracy is demonstrated for several model problems with and without discontinuities.

  20. High-order entropy stable finite difference schemes for nonlinear conservation laws: Finite domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-11-01

    Nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference operators including boundary closure stencils, for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A comparison technique is used to derive a new Entropy Stable Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (SSWENO) finite difference method, appropriate for simulations of problems with shocks. Viscous terms are approximated using conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference operators. The efficacy of the new discrete operators is demonstrated using both smooth and discontinuous test cases.

  1. High order filtering methods for approximating hyperbolic systems of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafon, F.; Osher, S.

    1991-01-01

    The essentially nonoscillatory (ENO) schemes, while potentially useful in the computation of discontinuous solutions of hyperbolic conservation-law systems, are computationally costly relative to simple central-difference methods. A filtering technique is presented which employs central differencing of arbitrarily high-order accuracy except where a local test detects the presence of spurious oscillations and calls upon the full ENO apparatus to remove them. A factor-of-three speedup is thus obtained over the full-ENO method for a wide range of problems, with high-order accuracy in regions of smooth flow.

  2. Construction of Second-Order TVD Schemes for Nonhomogeneous Hyperbolic Conservation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascón, Ll.; Corberán, J. M.

    2001-09-01

    Many of the problems of approximating numerically solutions to nonhomogeneous hyperbolic conservation laws appear to arise from an inability to balance the source and flux terms at steady states. In this paper we present a technique based on the transformation of the nonhomogeneous problem to homogeneous form through the definition of a new flux formed by the physical flux and the primitive of the source term. This change preserves the mentioned balance directly and suggests a way to apply well-known schemes to nonhomogeneous conservation laws. However, the application of the numerical methods described for homogeneous conservation laws is not immediate and a new formalization of the classic schemes is required. Particularly, for such cases we extend the explicit, second-order, total variation diminishing schemes of Harten [11]. Numerical test cases in the context of the quasi-one-dimensional flow validate the current schemes, although these schemes are more general and can also be applied to solve other hyperbolic conservation laws with source terms.

  3. Regulatory function of conserved sequences upstream of the long-wave sensitive opsin genes in teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Tam, Kevin J; Watson, Corey T; Massah, Shabnam; Kolybaba, Addie M; Breden, Felix; Prefontaine, Gratien G; Beischlag, Timothy V

    2011-11-01

    Vertebrate opsin genes often occur in sets of tandem duplicates, and their expression varies developmentally and in response to environmental cues. We previously identified two highly conserved regions upstream of the long-wave sensitive opsin (LWS) gene cluster in teleosts. This region has since been shown in zebrafish to drive expression of LWS genes in vivo. In order to further investigate how elements in this region control opsin gene expression, we tested constructs encompassing the highly conserved regions and the less conserved portions upstream of the coding sequences in a promoter-less luciferase expression system. A ∼4500 bp construct of the upstream region, including the highly-conserved regions Reg I and Reg II, increased expression 100-fold, and successive 5' deletions reduced expression relative to the full 4.5 Kb region. Gene expression was highest when the transcription factor RORα was co-transfected with the proposed regulatory regions. Because these regions were tested in a promoter-less expression system, they include elements able to initiate and drive transcription. Teleosts exhibit complex color-mediated adaptive behavior and their adaptive significance has been well documented in several species. Therefore these upstream regions of LWS represent a model system for understanding the molecular basis of adaptive variation in gene regulation of color vision.

  4. Genome-wide gene order distances support clustering the gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    House, Christopher H.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel T.

    2015-01-01

    Initially using 143 genomes, we developed a method for calculating the pair-wise distance between prokaryotic genomes using a Monte Carlo method to estimate the conservation of gene order. The method was based on repeatedly selecting five or six non-adjacent random orthologs from each of two genomes and determining if the chosen orthologs were in the same order. The raw distances were then corrected for gene order convergence using an adaptation of the Jukes-Cantor model, as well as using the common distance correction D′ = −ln(1-D). First, we compared the distances found via the order of six orthologs to distances found based on ortholog gene content and small subunit rRNA sequences. The Jukes-Cantor gene order distances are reasonably well correlated with the divergence of rRNA (R2 = 0.24), especially at rRNA Jukes-Cantor distances of less than 0.2 (R2 = 0.52). Gene content is only weakly correlated with rRNA divergence (R2 = 0.04) over all distances, however, it is especially strongly correlated at rRNA Jukes-Cantor distances of less than 0.1 (R2 = 0.67). This initial work suggests that gene order may be useful in conjunction with other methods to help understand the relatedness of genomes. Using the gene order distances in 143 genomes, the relations of prokaryotes were studied using neighbor joining and agreement subtrees. We then repeated our study of the relations of prokaryotes using gene order in 172 complete genomes better representing a wider-diversity of prokaryotes. Consistently, our trees show the Actinobacteria as a sister group to the bulk of the Firmicutes. In fact, the robustness of gene order support was found to be considerably greater for uniting these two phyla than for uniting any of the proteobacterial classes together. The results are supportive of the idea that Actinobacteria and Firmicutes are closely related, which in turn implies a single origin for the gram-positive cell. PMID:25653643

  5. Synteny conservation of the Huntington's disease gene and surrounding loci on mouse Chromosome 5.

    PubMed

    Grosson, C L; MacDonald, M E; Duyao, M P; Ambrose, C M; Roffler-Tarlov, S; Gusella, J F

    1994-07-01

    The mouse homologs of the Huntington's disease (HD) gene and 17 other human Chromosome (Chr) 4 loci (including six previously unmapped) were localized by use of an interspecific cross. All loci mapped in a continuous linkage group on mouse Chr 5, distal to En2 and I16, whose human counterparts are located on Chr 7. The relative order of the loci on human Chr 4 and mouse Chr 5 was maintained, except for a break between D5H4S115E and Idua/rd, with relocation of the latter to the opposite end of the map. The mouse HD homolog (Hdh) mapped within a cluster of seven genes that were completely linked in our data set. In human these loci span a approximately 1.8 Mb stretch of human 4p16.3 that has been entirely cloned. To date, there is no phenotypic correspondence between human and mouse mutations mapping to this region of synteny conservation.

  6. High order filtering methods for approximating hyberbolic systems of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafon, F.; Osher, S.

    1990-01-01

    In the computation of discontinuous solutions of hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, the recently developed essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) schemes appear to be very useful. However, they are computationally costly compared to simple central difference methods. A filtering method which is developed uses simple central differencing of arbitrarily high order accuracy, except when a novel local test indicates the development of spurious oscillations. At these points, the full ENO apparatus is used, maintaining the high order of accuracy, but removing spurious oscillations. Numerical results indicate the success of the method. High order of accuracy was obtained in regions of smooth flow without spurious oscillations for a wide range of problems and a significant speed up of generally a factor of almost three over the full ENO method.

  7. An evolutionarily conserved mutual interdependence between Aire and microRNAs in promiscuous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ucar, Olga; Tykocinski, Lars-Oliver; Dooley, James; Liston, Adrian; Kyewski, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    The establishment and maintenance of central tolerance depends to a large extent on the ability of medullary thymic epithelial cells to express a variety of tissue-restricted antigens, the so-called promiscuous gene expression (pGE). Autoimmune regulator (Aire) is to date the best characterised transcriptional regulator known to at least partially coordinate pGE. There is accruing evidence that the expression of Aire-dependent and -independent genes is modulated by higher order chromatin configuration, epigenetic modifications and post-transcriptional control. Given the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) as potent post-transcriptional modulators of gene expression, we investigated their role in the regulation of pGE in purified mouse and human thymic epithelial cells (TECs). Microarray profiling of TEC subpopulations revealed evolutionarily conserved cell type and differentiation-specific miRNA signatures with a subset of miRNAs being significantly upregulated during terminal medullary thymic epithelial cell differentiation. The differential regulation of this subset of miRNAs was correlated with Aire expression and some of these miRNAs were misexpressed in the Aire knockout thymus. In turn, the specific absence of miRNAs in TECs resulted in a progressive reduction of Aire expression and pGE, affecting both Aire-dependent and -independent genes. In contrast, the absence of miR-29a only affected the Aire-dependent gene pool. These findings reveal a mutual interdependence of miRNA and Aire.

  8. Conservation of genes and culture: historical and contemporary issues.

    PubMed

    Hodges, J

    2006-02-01

    The paper examines the reasons for and consequences of lost domestic animal biodiversity. The origin of domestic poultry and livestock diversity is reviewed from the first center of domestication in the Middle East during the Neolithic Revolution. Accompanied by domestic animals and birds, mankind spread worldwide over the last 12,000 yr, thereby increasing domestic animal biodiversity via adaptation to many environmental challenges, resulting in about 6,000 breeds within only a small number of species used for food. During the last 50 yr of the 20th century, about 20% of these livestock and poultry breeds have become extinct, and the remainder is at risk. This erosion of unique biodiversity is due to changes in farm practices developed in the West that involve mono-breed, intensive farming systems that are unsustainable. The close symbiotic relationship of Homo sapiens and domestic animals and birds over millennia is changing, resulting in a lost understanding of sustainability among urban communities. The single-minded focus on profit is resulting in the loss of the historic European and Western culture based on Judeo-Christian values. Respect for biological boundaries, community, and quality of life are disappearing in Western society. Concurrently, farming is now only a business. The principal decision makers are no longer farmers but business executives, who are remote from the farm. The emphasis on cheap food is the principal driver that leads to increased competition and unsustainable practices. Farmers as well as their breeds are disappearing. The advent of gene technology and transgenic livestock is reviewed with the prospect of extensive manipulation of animal form and function and abuse of genotypes as animals are redesigned, suffer, and lose all dignity. By handling its animals in this manner, high Western civilization is losing its culture and values and becoming simply the top animal species by using its power selfishly. The case is presented that the

  9. High-order finite-volume methods for hyperbolic conservation laws on mapped multiblock grids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McCorquodale, P. W.; Colella, P.; Dorr, M. R.; Hittinger, J. A. F.

    2015-01-13

    We present an approach to solving hyperbolic conservation laws by finite-volume methods on mapped multiblock grids, extending the approach of Colella, Dorr, Hittinger, and Martin (2011) [10] for grids with a single mapping. We consider mapped multiblock domains for mappings that are conforming at inter-block boundaries. By using a smooth continuation of the mapping into ghost cells surrounding a block, we reduce the inter-block communication problem to finding an accurate, robust interpolation into these ghost cells from neighboring blocks. Lastly, we demonstrate fourth-order accuracy for the advection equation for multiblock coordinate systems in two and three dimensions.

  10. Magnetic-charge ordering and phase transitions in monopole-conserved square spin ice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Y-L; Du, Z-Z; Yan, Z-B; Liu, J-M

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic-charge ordering and corresponding magnetic/monopole phase transitions in spin ices are the emergent topics of condensed matter physics. In this work, we investigate a series of magnetic-charge (monopole) phase transitions in artificial square spin ice model using the conserved monopole density algorithm. It is revealed that the dynamics of low monopole density lattices is controlled by the effective Coulomb interaction and the Dirac string tension, leading to the monopole dimerization which is quite different from the dynamics of three-dimensional pyrochlore spin ice. The condensation of the monopole dimers into monopole crystals with staggered magnetic-charge order can be predicted clearly. For the high monopole density cases, the lattice undergoes two consecutive phase transitions from high-temperature paramagnetic/charge-disordered phase into staggered charge-ordered phase before eventually toward the long-range magnetically-ordered phase as the ground state which is of staggered charge order too. A phase diagram over the whole temperature-monopole density space, which exhibits a series of emergent spin and monopole ordered states, is presented. PMID:26511870

  11. Phase transitions and charge ordering in a square spin ice model with conserved monopole density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yunlong; Zhou, Xiaohui; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2015-03-01

    Artificial spin ices represent a class of highly interested frustrated magnetic systems under intensive investigations for fascinating ground states and thermodynamics/dynamics of spin excitations in recent years. As one of these issues, magnetic charge ordering and the corresponding phase transitions in the two-dimensional system are emerging topics in condensed matter physics. In this work, we investigate all the monopole-ordered phases of the square spin ice model using the conserved monopole density algorithm. In low monopole density (ρ ~ 0), the Coulomb potential determines the monopoles' dynamics. We test the Coulomb's law in a two-dimension lattice and justify the monopole dimerization which is quite different from the three-dimensional pyrochlore spin ice. These monopole dimers are charge neutral, and the interactions between them have also been investigated using our algorithm. In the cases of high monopole density (ρ ~ 1), the system is similar to the dipolar kagome spin ice model, and our simulation results show that there exists an intermediate phase between the paramagnetic phase and the ordered magnetic phase. Such intermediate phase can be distinguished by the order of magnetic charges. In a cooling process, the system undergoes a two-stage magnetic phase transition before freezing to the long range magnetic ordered phase via a staggered charge ordering. Furthermore, a liquefaction process of monopole dimers can be justified upon the increasing effective internal pressure in the isothermal condition.

  12. A new fifth order finite difference WENO scheme for solving hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Qiu, Jianxian

    2016-08-01

    In this paper a new simple fifth order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is presented in the finite difference framework for solving the hyperbolic conservation laws. The new WENO scheme is a convex combination of a fourth degree polynomial with two linear polynomials in a traditional WENO fashion. This new fifth order WENO scheme uses the same five-point information as the classical fifth order WENO scheme [14,20], could get less absolute truncation errors in L1 and L∞ norms, and obtain the same accuracy order in smooth region containing complicated numerical solution structures simultaneously escaping nonphysical oscillations adjacent strong shocks or contact discontinuities. The associated linear weights are artificially set to be any random positive numbers with the only requirement that their sum equals one. New nonlinear weights are proposed for the purpose of sustaining the optimal fifth order accuracy. The new WENO scheme has advantages over the classical WENO scheme [14,20] in its simplicity and easy extension to higher dimensions. Some benchmark numerical tests are performed to illustrate the capability of this new fifth order WENO scheme.

  13. Magnetic-charge ordering and phase transitions in monopole-conserved square spin ice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Y.-L.; Du, Z.-Z.; Yan, Z.-B.; Liu, J.-M.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic-charge ordering and corresponding magnetic/monopole phase transitions in spin ices are the emergent topics of condensed matter physics. In this work, we investigate a series of magnetic-charge (monopole) phase transitions in artificial square spin ice model using the conserved monopole density algorithm. It is revealed that the dynamics of low monopole density lattices is controlled by the effective Coulomb interaction and the Dirac string tension, leading to the monopole dimerization which is quite different from the dynamics of three-dimensional pyrochlore spin ice. The condensation of the monopole dimers into monopole crystals with staggered magnetic-charge order can be predicted clearly. For the high monopole density cases, the lattice undergoes two consecutive phase transitions from high-temperature paramagnetic/charge-disordered phase into staggered charge-ordered phase before eventually toward the long-range magnetically-ordered phase as the ground state which is of staggered charge order too. A phase diagram over the whole temperature-monopole density space, which exhibits a series of emergent spin and monopole ordered states, is presented. PMID:26511870

  14. Genes with stable DNA methylation levels show higher evolutionary conservation than genes with fluctuant DNA methylation levels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruijie; Lv, Wenhua; Luan, Meiwei; Zheng, Jiajia; Shi, Miao; Zhu, Hongjie; Li, Jin; Lv, Hongchao; Zhang, Mingming; Shang, Zhenwei; Duan, Lian; Jiang, Yongshuai

    2015-11-24

    Different human genes often exhibit different degrees of stability in their DNA methylation levels between tissues, samples or cell types. This may be related to the evolution of human genome. Thus, we compared the evolutionary conservation between two types of genes: genes with stable DNA methylation levels (SM genes) and genes with fluctuant DNA methylation levels (FM genes). For long-term evolutionary characteristics between species, we compared the percentage of the orthologous genes, evolutionary rate dn/ds and protein sequence identity. We found that the SM genes had greater percentages of the orthologous genes, lower dn/ds, and higher protein sequence identities in all the 21 species. These results indicated that the SM genes were more evolutionarily conserved than the FM genes. For short-term evolutionary characteristics among human populations, we compared the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density, and the linkage disequilibrium (LD) degree in HapMap populations and 1000 genomes project populations. We observed that the SM genes had lower SNP densities, and higher degrees of LD in all the 11 HapMap populations and 13 1000 genomes project populations. These results mean that the SM genes had more stable chromosome genetic structures, and were more conserved than the FM genes.

  15. Reanalyze unassigned reads in Sanger based metagenomic data using conserved gene adjacency

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Investigation of metagenomes provides greater insight into uncultured microbial communities. The improvement in sequencing technology, which yields a large amount of sequence data, has led to major breakthroughs in the field. However, at present, taxonomic binning tools for metagenomes discard 30-40% of Sanger sequencing data due to the stringency of BLAST cut-offs. In an attempt to provide a comprehensive overview of metagenomic data, we re-analyzed the discarded metagenomes by using less stringent cut-offs. Additionally, we introduced a new criterion, namely, the evolutionary conservation of adjacency between neighboring genes. To evaluate the feasibility of our approach, we re-analyzed discarded contigs and singletons from several environments with different levels of complexity. We also compared the consistency between our taxonomic binning and those reported in the original studies. Results Among the discarded data, we found that 23.7 ± 3.9% of singletons and 14.1 ± 1.0% of contigs were assigned to taxa. The recovery rates for singletons were higher than those for contigs. The Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a high degree of similarity (0.94 ± 0.03 at the phylum rank and 0.80 ± 0.11 at the family rank) between the proposed taxonomic binning approach and those reported in original studies. In addition, an evaluation using simulated data demonstrated the reliability of the proposed approach. Conclusions Our findings suggest that taking account of conserved neighboring gene adjacency improves taxonomic assignment when analyzing metagenomes using Sanger sequencing. In other words, utilizing the conserved gene order as a criterion will reduce the amount of data discarded when analyzing metagenomes. PMID:21083935

  16. ECHO: a Eulerian conservative high-order scheme for general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics and magnetodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, L.; Zanotti, O.; Bucciantini, N.; Londrillo, P.

    2007-10-01

    Aims:We present a new numerical code, ECHO, based on a Eulerian conservative high-order scheme for time dependent three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) and magnetodynamics (GRMD). ECHO is aimed at providing a shock-capturing conservative method able to work at an arbitrary level of formal accuracy (for smooth flows), where the other existing GRMHD and GRMD schemes yield an overall second order at most. Moreover, our goal is to present a general framework based on the 3+1 Eulerian formalism, allowing for different sets of equations and different algorithms and working in a generic space-time metric, so that ECHO may be easily coupled to any solver for Einstein's equations. Methods: Our finite-difference conservative scheme previously developed for special relativistic hydrodynamics and MHD is extended here to the general relativistic case. Various high-order reconstruction methods are implemented and a two-wave approximate Riemann solver is used. The induction equation is treated by adopting the upwind constrained transport (UCT) procedures, appropriate to preserving the divergence-free condition of the magnetic field in shock-capturing methods. The limiting case of magnetodynamics (also known as force-free degenerate electrodynamics) is implemented by simply replacing the fluid velocity with the electromagnetic drift velocity and by neglecting the contribution of matter to the stress tensor. Results: ECHO is particularly accurate, efficient, versatile, and robust. It has been tested against several astrophysical applications, like magnetized accretion onto black holes and constant angular momentum thick disks threaded by toroidal fields. A novel test of the propagation of large-amplitude, circularly polarized Alfvén waves is proposed, and this allows us to prove the spatial and temporal high-order properties of ECHO very accurately. In particular, we show that reconstruction based on a monotonicity-preserving (MP) filter applied to a

  17. A highly conserved gene island of three genes on chromosome 3B of hexaploid wheat: diverse gene function and genomic structure maintained in a tightly linked block

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The complexity of the wheat genome has resulted from waves of retrotransposable element insertions. Gene deletions and disruptions generated by the fast replacement of repetitive elements in wheat have resulted in disruption of colinearity at a micro (sub-megabase) level among the cereals. In view of genomic changes that are possible within a given time span, conservation of genes between species tends to imply an important functional or regional constraint that does not permit a change in genomic structure. The ctg1034 contig completed in this paper was initially studied because it was assigned to the Sr2 resistance locus region, but detailed mapping studies subsequently assigned it to the long arm of 3B and revealed its unusual features. Results BAC shotgun sequencing of the hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring) genome has been used to assemble a group of 15 wheat BACs from the chromosome 3B physical map FPC contig ctg1034 into a 783,553 bp genomic sequence. This ctg1034 sequence was annotated for biological features such as genes and transposable elements. A three-gene island was identified among >80% repetitive DNA sequence. Using bioinformatics analysis there were no observable similarity in their gene functions. The ctg1034 gene island also displayed complete conservation of gene order and orientation with syntenic gene islands found in publicly available genome sequences of Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa, Sorghum bicolor and Zea mays, even though the intergenic space and introns were divergent. Conclusion We propose that ctg1034 is located within the heterochromatic C-band region of deletion bin 3BL7 based on the identification of heterochromatic tandem repeats and presence of significant matches to chromodomain-containing gypsy LTR retrotransposable elements. We also speculate that this location, among other highly repetitive sequences, may account for the relative stability in gene order and orientation within the gene

  18. Sequence conservation of homeologous bacterial artificial chromosomes and transcription of homeologous genes in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.).

    PubMed

    Schlueter, Jessica A; Scheffler, Brian E; Schlueter, Shannon D; Shoemaker, Randy C

    2006-10-01

    The paleopolyploid soybean genome was investigated by sequencing homeologous BAC clones anchored by duplicate N-hydroxycinnamoyl/benzoyltransferase (HCBT) genes. The homeologous BACs were genetically mapped to linkage groups C1 and C2. Annotation of the 173,747- and 98,760-bp BACs showed that gene conservation in both order and orientation is high between homeologous regions with only a single gene insertion/deletion and local tandem duplications differing between the regions. The nucleotide sequence conservation extends into intergenic regions as well, probably due to conserved regulatory sequences. Most of the homeologs appear to have a role in either transcription/DNA binding or cellular signaling, suggesting a potential preference for retention of duplicate genes with these functions. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis of homeologs showed that in the tissues sampled, most homeologs have not diverged greatly in their transcription profiles. However, four cases of changes in transcription were identified, primarily in the HCBT gene cluster. Because a mapped locus corresponds to a soybean cyst nematode (SCN) QTL, the potential role of HCBT genes in response to SCN is discussed. These results are the first sequenced-based analysis of homeologous BACs in soybean, a diploidized paleopolyploid. PMID:16888343

  19. Evolutionary conservation analysis between the essential and nonessential genes in bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hao; Gao, Feng; Lin, Yan

    2015-08-14

    Essential genes are thought to be critical for the survival of the organisms under certain circumstances, and the natural selection acting on essential genes is expected to be stricter than on nonessential ones. Up to now, essential genes have been identified in approximately thirty bacterial organisms by experimental methods. In this paper, we performed a comprehensive comparison between the essential and nonessential genes in the genomes of 23 bacterial species based on the Ka/Ks ratio, and found that essential genes are more evolutionarily conserved than nonessential genes in most of the bacteria examined. Furthermore, we also analyzed the conservation by functional clusters with the clusters of orthologous groups (COGs), and found that the essential genes in the functional categories of G (Carbohydrate transport and metabolism), H (Coenzyme transport and metabolism), I (Transcription), J (Translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis), K (Lipid transport and metabolism) and L (Replication, recombination and repair) tend to be more evolutionarily conserved than the corresponding nonessential genes in bacteria. The results suggest that the essential genes in these subcategories are subject to stronger selective pressure than the nonessential genes, and therefore, provide more insights of the evolutionary conservation for the essential and nonessential genes in complex biological processes.

  20. Gene sequence, localization, and evolutionary conservation of DAZLA, a candidate male sterility gene.

    PubMed

    Seboun, E; Barbaux, S; Bourgeron, T; Nishi, S; Agulnik, A; Egashira, M; Nikkawa, N; Bishop, C; Fellous, M; McElreavey, K; Kasahara, M; Algonik, A

    1997-04-15

    We have isolated the human homologue of the mouse germ cell-specific transcript Tpx2, which we had previously mapped to mouse chromosome 17. Sequence analysis shows that the human gene is part of the DAZ (Deleted in Azoospermia) family, represents the human homologue of the mouse Dazla and Drosophila boule genes, and is termed DAZLA. Like Dazla and boule, DAZLA is single copy and maps to 3p25. This defines a new region of synteny between mouse chromosome 17 and human chromosome 3. Unlike DAZ, which has multiple DAZ repeats, DAZLA encodes a putative RNA-binding protein with a single RNA-binding motif and a single DAZ repeat. DAZLA is more closely related to Dazla in the mouse than to the Y-linked homologue DAZ (88% identity overall with mouse Dazla compared to 76% identity with the human DAZ protein sequence). Southern blot analysis showed that DAZLA is autosomal in all mammals tested and that DAZ has been recently translocated to the Y chromosome, sometime after the divergence of Old World and New World primates. To investigate the evolutionary relatedness of DAZLA and DAZ further, their partial genomic structures were obtained and compared. This revealed that the genomic organization of both genes in the 5' region is highly conserved. DAZLA is a new member of the DAZ family of genes, which is associated with spermatogenesis and male sterility. Familial cases of male infertility in humans show an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. It is possible that some of these families may carry mutations in the DAZLA gene.

  1. Conservation Laws and Symmetry Properties of a Class of Higher Order Theories of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraco, D.; Dominguez, E.; Guibert, R.; Hamity, V.

    1998-04-01

    We consider a class of fourth order theories of gravity with arbitrary matter fields arising from a diffeomorphism invariant Lagrangian density mathcal{L}_T = mathcal{L}_G + mathcal{L}_M, with mathcal{L}_G = sqrt { - g} left[ {R + hleft( R right)} right]and mathcal{L}_Mthe phenomenological representation of the nongravitational fields. We derive first the generalization of the Einstein pseudotensor and the von Freud superpotential. We then show, using the arbitrariness that is always present in the choice of pseudotensor and superpotential, that we can choose these superpotentials to have the same form as those for the Hilbert Lagrangian of general relativity (GR). In particular we may introduce the Moller superpotential of GR as associated with a double-index differential conservation law. Similarly, using the Moller superpotential we prove that we can choose the Komar vector of GR to construct a conserved quantity for isolated asymptotically flat systems. For the example R + R2theory we prove then, that the active mass is equal to the total energy (or inertial mass) of the system.

  2. Phase ordering with a global conservation law: Ostwald ripening and coalescence.

    PubMed

    Conti, Massimo; Meerson, Baruch; Peleg, Avner; Sasorov, Pavel V

    2002-04-01

    Globally conserved phase ordering dynamics is investigated in systems with short range correlations at t=0. A Ginzburg-Landau equation with a global conservation law is employed as the phase field model. The conditions are found under which the sharp-interface limit of this equation is reducible to the area-preserving motion by curvature. Numerical simulations show that, for both critical and off-critical quench, the equal-time pair correlation function exhibits dynamic scaling, and the characteristic coarsening length obeys l(t) approximately t(1/2). For the critical quench, our results are in excellent agreement with earlier results. For off-critical quench (Ostwald ripening) we investigate the dynamics of the size distribution function of the minority phase domains. The simulations show that, at large times, this distribution function has a self-similar form with growth exponent 1/2. The scaled distribution, however, strongly differs from the classical Wagner distribution. We attribute this difference to coalescence of domains. A theory of Ostwald ripening is developed that takes into account binary coalescence events. The theoretical scaled distribution function agrees well with that obtained in the simulations.

  3. Redeployment of a conserved gene regulatory network during Aedes aegypti development.

    PubMed

    Suryamohan, Kushal; Hanson, Casey; Andrews, Emily; Sinha, Saurabh; Scheel, Molly Duman; Halfon, Marc S

    2016-08-15

    Changes in gene regulatory networks (GRNs) underlie the evolution of morphological novelty and developmental system drift. The fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and the dengue and Zika vector mosquito Aedes aegypti have substantially similar nervous system morphology. Nevertheless, they show significant divergence in a set of genes co-expressed in the midline of the Drosophila central nervous system, including the master regulator single minded and downstream genes including short gastrulation, Star, and NetrinA. In contrast to Drosophila, we find that midline expression of these genes is either absent or severely diminished in A. aegypti. Instead, they are co-expressed in the lateral nervous system. This suggests that in A. aegypti this "midline GRN" has been redeployed to a new location while lost from its previous site of activity. In order to characterize the relevant GRNs, we employed the SCRMshaw method we previously developed to identify transcriptional cis-regulatory modules in both species. Analysis of these regulatory sequences in transgenic Drosophila suggests that the altered gene expression observed in A. aegypti is the result of trans-dependent redeployment of the GRN, potentially stemming from cis-mediated changes in the expression of sim and other as-yet unidentified regulators. Our results illustrate a novel "repeal, replace, and redeploy" mode of evolution in which a conserved GRN acquires a different function at a new site while its original function is co-opted by a different GRN. This represents a striking example of developmental system drift in which the dramatic shift in gene expression does not result in gross morphological changes, but in more subtle differences in development and function of the late embryonic nervous system.

  4. Redeployment of a conserved gene regulatory network during Aedes aegypti development.

    PubMed

    Suryamohan, Kushal; Hanson, Casey; Andrews, Emily; Sinha, Saurabh; Scheel, Molly Duman; Halfon, Marc S

    2016-08-15

    Changes in gene regulatory networks (GRNs) underlie the evolution of morphological novelty and developmental system drift. The fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and the dengue and Zika vector mosquito Aedes aegypti have substantially similar nervous system morphology. Nevertheless, they show significant divergence in a set of genes co-expressed in the midline of the Drosophila central nervous system, including the master regulator single minded and downstream genes including short gastrulation, Star, and NetrinA. In contrast to Drosophila, we find that midline expression of these genes is either absent or severely diminished in A. aegypti. Instead, they are co-expressed in the lateral nervous system. This suggests that in A. aegypti this "midline GRN" has been redeployed to a new location while lost from its previous site of activity. In order to characterize the relevant GRNs, we employed the SCRMshaw method we previously developed to identify transcriptional cis-regulatory modules in both species. Analysis of these regulatory sequences in transgenic Drosophila suggests that the altered gene expression observed in A. aegypti is the result of trans-dependent redeployment of the GRN, potentially stemming from cis-mediated changes in the expression of sim and other as-yet unidentified regulators. Our results illustrate a novel "repeal, replace, and redeploy" mode of evolution in which a conserved GRN acquires a different function at a new site while its original function is co-opted by a different GRN. This represents a striking example of developmental system drift in which the dramatic shift in gene expression does not result in gross morphological changes, but in more subtle differences in development and function of the late embryonic nervous system. PMID:27341759

  5. Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of seven Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing the teacher and student with informational reading on various topics in conservation. The bulletins have these titles: Plants as Makers of Soil, Water Pollution Control, The Ground Water Table, Conservation--To Keep This Earth Habitable, Our Threatened Air Supply,…

  6. Evolutionary Conservation of Bacterial Essential Metabolic Genes across All Bacterial Culture Media.

    PubMed

    Ish-Am, Oren; Kristensen, David M; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    One of the basic postulates of molecular evolution is that functionally important genes should evolve slower than genes of lesser significance. Essential genes, whose knockout leads to a lethal phenotype are considered of high functional importance, yet whether they are truly more conserved than nonessential genes has been the topic of much debate, fuelled by a host of contradictory findings. Here we conduct the first large-scale study utilizing genome-scale metabolic modeling and spanning many bacterial species, which aims to answer this question. Using the novel Media Variation Analysis, we examine the range of conservation of essential vs. nonessential metabolic genes in a given species across all possible media. We are thus able to obtain for the first time, exact upper and lower bounds on the levels of differential conservation of essential genes for each of the species studied. The results show that bacteria do exhibit an overall tendency for differential conservation of their essential genes vs. their non-essential ones, yet this tendency is highly variable across species. We show that the model bacterium E. coli K12 may or may not exhibit differential conservation of essential genes depending on its growth medium, shedding light on previous experimental studies showing opposite trends.

  7. Evolutionary Conservation of Bacterial Essential Metabolic Genes across All Bacterial Culture Media

    PubMed Central

    Ish-Am, Oren; Kristensen, David M.; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    One of the basic postulates of molecular evolution is that functionally important genes should evolve slower than genes of lesser significance. Essential genes, whose knockout leads to a lethal phenotype are considered of high functional importance, yet whether they are truly more conserved than nonessential genes has been the topic of much debate, fuelled by a host of contradictory findings. Here we conduct the first large-scale study utilizing genome-scale metabolic modeling and spanning many bacterial species, which aims to answer this question. Using the novel Media Variation Analysis, we examine the range of conservation of essential vs. nonessential metabolic genes in a given species across all possible media. We are thus able to obtain for the first time, exact upper and lower bounds on the levels of differential conservation of essential genes for each of the species studied. The results show that bacteria do exhibit an overall tendency for differential conservation of their essential genes vs. their non-essential ones, yet this tendency is highly variable across species. We show that the model bacterium E. coli K12 may or may not exhibit differential conservation of essential genes depending on its growth medium, shedding light on previous experimental studies showing opposite trends. PMID:25894004

  8. A stable high-order Spectral Difference method for hyperbolic conservation laws on triangular elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, Aravind; May, Georg; Schöberl, Joachim

    2012-03-01

    Numerical schemes using piecewise polynomial approximation are very popular for high order discretization of conservation laws. While the most widely used numerical scheme under this paradigm appears to be the Discontinuous Galerkin method, the Spectral Difference scheme has often been found attractive as well, because of its simplicity of formulation and implementation. However, recently it has been shown that the scheme is not linearly stable on triangles. In this paper we present an alternate formulation of the scheme, featuring a new flux interpolation technique using Raviart-Thomas spaces, which proves stable under a similar linear analysis in which the standard scheme failed. We demonstrate viability of the concept by showing linear stability both in the semi-discrete sense and for time stepping schemes of the SSP Runge-Kutta type. Furthermore, we present convergence studies, as well as case studies in compressible flow simulation using the Euler equations.

  9. High-order conservative reconstruction schemes for finite volume methods in cylindrical and spherical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignone, A.

    2014-08-01

    High-order reconstruction schemes for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates are revised in the finite volume approach. The formulation employs a piecewise polynomial approximation to the zone-average values to reconstruct left and right interface states from within a computational zone to arbitrary order of accuracy by inverting a Vandermonde-like linear system of equations with spatially varying coefficients. The approach is general and can be used on uniform and non-uniform meshes although explicit expressions are derived for polynomials from second to fifth degree in cylindrical and spherical geometries with uniform grid spacing. It is shown that, in regions of large curvature, the resulting expressions differ considerably from their Cartesian counterparts and that the lack of such corrections can severely degrade the accuracy of the solution close to the coordinate origin. Limiting techniques and monotonicity constraints are revised for conventional reconstruction schemes, namely, the piecewise linear method (PLM), third-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme and the piecewise parabolic method (PPM). The performance of the improved reconstruction schemes is investigated in a number of selected numerical benchmarks involving the solution of both scalar and systems of nonlinear equations (such as the equations of gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics) in cylindrical and spherical geometries in one and two dimensions. Results confirm that the proposed approach yields considerably smaller errors, higher convergence rates and it avoid spurious numerical effects at a symmetry axis.

  10. Conserved transcriptional responses to cyanobacterial stressors are mediated by alternate regulation of paralogous genes in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Asselman, Jana; Pfrender, Michael E; Lopez, Jacqueline A; De Coninck, Dieter I M; Janssen, Colin R; Shaw, Joseph R; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2015-04-01

    Despite a significant increase in genomic data, our knowledge of gene functions and their transcriptional responses to environmental stimuli remains limited. Here, we use the model keystone species Daphnia pulex to study environmental responses of genes in the context of their gene family history to better understand the relationship between genome structure and gene function in response to environmental stimuli. Daphnia were exposed to five different treatments, each consisting of a diet supplemented with one of five cyanobacterial species, and a control treatment consisting of a diet of only green algae. Differential gene expression profiles of Daphnia exposed to each of these five cyanobacterial species showed that genes with known functions are more likely to be shared by different expression profiles, whereas genes specific to the lineage of Daphnia are more likely to be unique to a given expression profile. Furthermore, while only a small number of nonlineage-specific genes were conserved across treatment type, there was a high degree of overlap in expression profiles at the functional level. The conservation of functional responses across the different cyanobacterial treatments can be attributed to the treatment-specific expression of different paralogous genes within the same gene family. Comparison with available gene expression data in the literature suggests differences in nutritional composition in diets with cyanobacterial species compared to diets of green algae as a primary driver for cyanobacterial effects on Daphnia. We conclude that conserved functional responses in Daphnia across different cyanobacterial treatments are mediated through alternate regulation of paralogous gene families.

  11. Conserved nodulation genes in Rhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium trifolii

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.F.; Tu, J.K.; Long, S.R.

    1985-06-01

    Plasmids which contained wild-type or mutated Rhizobium meliloti nodulation (Nod) genes were introduced into Nod/sup -/ R. trifolii mutants ANU453 and ANU851 and tested for their ability to nodulate clover. Cloned wild-type and mutated R. meliloti Nod gene segments restored ANU851 to Nod/sup +/, with the exception of nodD mutants. Similarly, wild-type and mutant R. meliloti nod genes complemented ANU453 to Nod/sup +/, except for nod CII mutants. Thus, ANU851 identifies the equivalent of the R. meliloti nodD genes, and ANU453 specifies the equivalent of the R. meliloti nodCII genes. In addition, cloned wild-type R. trifolii nod genes were introduced into seven R. meliloti Nod/sup -/ mutants. All seven mutants were restored to Nod/sup +/ on alfalfa. Our results indicate that these genes represent common nodulation functions and argue for an allelic relationship between nod genes in R. meliloti and R. trifolii.

  12. An atlas of tissue-specific conserved coexpression for functional annotation and disease gene prediction

    PubMed Central

    Piro, Rosario Michael; Ala, Ugo; Molineris, Ivan; Grassi, Elena; Bracco, Chiara; Perego, Gian Paolo; Provero, Paolo; Di Cunto, Ferdinando

    2011-01-01

    Gene coexpression relationships that are phylogenetically conserved between human and mouse have been shown to provide important clues about gene function that can be efficiently used to identify promising candidate genes for human hereditary disorders. In the past, such approaches have considered mostly generic gene expression profiles that cover multiple tissues and organs. The individual genes of multicellular organisms, however, can participate in different transcriptional programs, operating at scales as different as single-cell types, tissues, organs, body regions or the entire organism. Therefore, systematic analysis of tissue-specific coexpression could be, in principle, a very powerful strategy to dissect those functional relationships among genes that emerge only in particular tissues or organs. In this report, we show that, in fact, conserved coexpression as determined from tissue-specific and condition-specific data sets can predict many functional relationships that are not detected by analyzing heterogeneous microarray data sets. More importantly, we find that, when combined with disease networks, the simultaneous use of both generic (multi-tissue) and tissue-specific conserved coexpression allows a more efficient prediction of human disease genes than the use of generic conserved coexpression alone. Using this strategy, we were able to identify high-probability candidates for 238 orphan disease loci. We provide proof of concept that this combined use of generic and tissue-specific conserved coexpression can be very useful to prioritize the mutational candidates obtained from deep-sequencing projects, even in the case of genetic disorders as heterogeneous as XLMR. PMID:21654723

  13. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Gene E.; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization

  14. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Robinson, Gene E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization

  15. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Robinson, Gene E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization.

  16. Conservation of Transcription Start Sites within Genes across a Bacterial Genus

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Wenjun; Price, Morgan N.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Romine, Margaret F.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-07-01

    Transcription start sites (TSSs) lying inside annotated genes, on the same or opposite strand, have been observed in diverse bacteria, but the function of these unexpected transcripts is unclear. Here, we use the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and its relatives to study the evolutionary conservation of unexpected TSSs. Using high-resolution tiling microarrays and 5'-end RNA sequencing, we identified 2,531 TSSs in S. oneidensis MR-1, of which 18% were located inside coding sequences (CDSs). Comparative transcriptome analysis with seven additional Shewanella species revealed that the majority (76%) of the TSSs within the upstream regions of annotated genes (gTSSs) were conserved. Thirty percent of the TSSs that were inside genes and on the sense strand (iTSSs) were also conserved. Sequence analysis around these iTSSs showed conserved promoter motifs, suggesting that many iTSS are under purifying selection. Furthermore, conserved iTSSs are enriched for regulatory motifs, suggesting that they are regulated, and they tend to eliminate polar effects, which confirms that they are functional. In contrast, the transcription of antisense TSSs located inside CDSs (aTSSs) was significantly less likely to be conserved (22%). However, aTSSs whose transcription was conserved often have conserved promoter motifs and drive the expression of nearby genes. Overall, our findings demonstrate that some internal TSSs are conserved and drive protein expression despite their unusual locations, but the majority are not conserved and may reflect noisy initiation of transcription rather than a biological function.

  17. Association of tissue lineage and gene expression: conservatively and differentially expressed genes define common and special functions of tissues

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Embryogenesis is the process by which the embryo is formed, develops, and establishes developmental hierarchies of tissues. The recent advance in microarray technology made it possible to investigate the tissue specific patterns of gene expression and their relationship with tissue lineages. This study is focused on how tissue specific functions, tissue lineage, and cell differentiation are correlated, which is essential to understand embryonic development and organism complexity. Results We performed individual gene and gene set based analysis on multiple tissue expression data, in association with the classic topology of mammalian fate maps of embryogenesis. For each sub-group of tissues on the fate map, conservatively, differentially and correlatively expressed genes or gene sets were identified. Tissue distance was found to correlate with gene expression divergence. Tissues of the ectoderm or mesoderm origins from the same segments on the fate map shared more similar expression pattern than those from different origins. Conservatively expressed genes or gene sets define common functions in a tissue group and are related to tissue specific diseases, which is supported by results from Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analysis. Gene expression divergence is larger in certain human tissues than in the mouse homologous tissues. Conclusion The results from tissue lineage and gene expression analysis indicate that common function features of neighbor tissue groups were defined by the conservatively expressed genes and were related to tissue specific diseases, and differentially expressed genes contribute to the functional divergence of tissues. The difference of gene expression divergence in human and mouse homologous tissues reflected the organism complexity, i.e. distinct neural development levels and different body sizes. PMID:21172044

  18. Comparative Mitogenomics of the Genus Odontobutis (Perciformes: Gobioidei: Odontobutidae) Revealed Conserved Gene Rearrangement and High Sequence Variations

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhihong; Yang, Xuefen; Bercsenyi, Miklos; Wu, Junjie; Yu, Yongyao; Wei, Kaijian; Fan, Qixue; Yang, Ruibin

    2015-01-01

    To understand the molecular evolution of mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) in the genus Odontobutis, the mitogenome of Odontobutis yaluensis was sequenced and compared with those of another four Odontobutis species. Our results displayed similar mitogenome features among species in genome organization, base composition, codon usage, and gene rearrangement. The identical gene rearrangement of trnS-trnL-trnH tRNA cluster observed in mitogenomes of these five closely related freshwater sleepers suggests that this unique gene order is conserved within Odontobutis. Additionally, the present gene order and the positions of associated intergenic spacers of these Odontobutis mitogenomes indicate that this unusual gene rearrangement results from tandem duplication and random loss of large-scale gene regions. Moreover, these mitogenomes exhibit a high level of sequence variation, mainly due to the differences of corresponding intergenic sequences in gene rearrangement regions and the heterogeneity of tandem repeats in the control regions. Phylogenetic analyses support Odontobutis species with shared gene rearrangement forming a monophyletic group, and the interspecific phylogenetic relationships are associated with structural differences among their mitogenomes. The present study contributes to understanding the evolutionary patterns of Odontobutidae species. PMID:26492246

  19. Conservation of Hox gene clusters in the self-fertilizing fish Kryptolebias marmoratus (Cyprinodontiformes; Rivulidae).

    PubMed

    Kim, B-M; Lee, B-Y; Lee, J-H; Rhee, J-S; Lee, J-S

    2016-03-01

    In this study, whole Hox gene clusters in the self-fertilizing mangrove killifish Kryptolebias marmoratus (Cyprinodontiformes; Rivulidae), a unique hermaphroditic vertebrate in which both sex organs are functional at the same time, were identified from whole genome and transcriptome sequences. The aim was to increase the understanding of the evolutionary status of conservation of this Hox gene cluster across fish species. PMID:26822496

  20. ACP5 (Uteroferrin): phylogeny of an ancient and conserved gene expressed in the endometrium of mammals.

    PubMed

    Padua, Maria B; Lynch, Vincent J; Alvarez, Natalia V; Garthwaite, Mark A; Golos, Thaddeus G; Bazer, Fuller W; Kalkunte, Satyan; Sharma, Surendra; Wagner, Gunter P; Hansen, Peter J

    2012-04-01

    Type 5 acid phosphatase (ACP5; also known as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase or uteroferrin) is a metalloprotein secreted by the endometrial glandular epithelium of pigs, mares, sheep, and water buffalo. In this paper, we describe the phylogenetic distribution of endometrial expression of ACP5 and demonstrate that endometrial expression arose early in evolution (i.e., before divergence of prototherian and therian mammals ~166 million years ago). To determine expression of ACP5 in the pregnant endometrium, RNA was isolated from rhesus, mouse, rat, dog, sheep, cow, horse, armadillo, opossum, and duck-billed platypus. Results from RT-PCR and RNA-Seq experiments confirmed that ACP5 is expressed in all species examined. ACP5 was also demonstrated immunochemically in endometrium of rhesus, marmoset, sheep, cow, goat, and opossum. Alignment of inferred amino acid sequences shows a high conservation of ACP5 throughout speciation, with species-specific differences most extensive in the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the protein. Analysis by Selecton indicated that most of the sites in ACP5 are undergoing purifying selection, and no sites undergoing positive selection were found. In conclusion, endometrial expression of ACP5 is a common feature in all orders of mammals and has been subjected to purifying selection. Expression of ACP5 in the uterus predates the divergence of therians and prototherians. ACP5 is an evolutionary conserved gene that likely exerts a common function important for pregnancy in mammals using a wide range of reproductive strategies. PMID:22278982

  1. ACP5 (Uteroferrin): phylogeny of an ancient and conserved gene expressed in the endometrium of mammals.

    PubMed

    Padua, Maria B; Lynch, Vincent J; Alvarez, Natalia V; Garthwaite, Mark A; Golos, Thaddeus G; Bazer, Fuller W; Kalkunte, Satyan; Sharma, Surendra; Wagner, Gunter P; Hansen, Peter J

    2012-04-01

    Type 5 acid phosphatase (ACP5; also known as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase or uteroferrin) is a metalloprotein secreted by the endometrial glandular epithelium of pigs, mares, sheep, and water buffalo. In this paper, we describe the phylogenetic distribution of endometrial expression of ACP5 and demonstrate that endometrial expression arose early in evolution (i.e., before divergence of prototherian and therian mammals ~166 million years ago). To determine expression of ACP5 in the pregnant endometrium, RNA was isolated from rhesus, mouse, rat, dog, sheep, cow, horse, armadillo, opossum, and duck-billed platypus. Results from RT-PCR and RNA-Seq experiments confirmed that ACP5 is expressed in all species examined. ACP5 was also demonstrated immunochemically in endometrium of rhesus, marmoset, sheep, cow, goat, and opossum. Alignment of inferred amino acid sequences shows a high conservation of ACP5 throughout speciation, with species-specific differences most extensive in the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the protein. Analysis by Selecton indicated that most of the sites in ACP5 are undergoing purifying selection, and no sites undergoing positive selection were found. In conclusion, endometrial expression of ACP5 is a common feature in all orders of mammals and has been subjected to purifying selection. Expression of ACP5 in the uterus predates the divergence of therians and prototherians. ACP5 is an evolutionary conserved gene that likely exerts a common function important for pregnancy in mammals using a wide range of reproductive strategies.

  2. Conserved meiotic genes point to sex in the choanoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Carr, Martin; Leadbeater, Barry S C; Baldauf, Sandra L

    2010-01-01

    The choanoflagellates are a widespread group of heterotrophic aquatic nanoflagellates, which have recently been confirmed as the sister-group to Metazoa. Asexual reproduction is the only mode of cell division that has been observed within the group; at present the range of reproductive modes, as well as the ploidy level, within choanoflagellates are unknown. The recent discovery of long terminal repeat retrotransposons within the genome of Monosiga brevicollis suggests that this species also has sexual stages in its life cycle because asexual organisms cannot tolerate retrotransposons due to the rapid accumulation of deleterious mutations caused by their transposition. We screened the M. brevicollis genome for known eukaryotic meiotic genes, using a recently established "meiosis detection toolkit" of 19 genes. Eighteen of these genes were identified, none of which appears to be a pseudogene. Four of the genes were also identified in expressed sequence tag data from the distantly related Monosiga ovata. The presence of these meiosis-specific genes provides evidence for meiosis, and by implication sex, within this important group of protists.

  3. Identification of a conserved set of upregulated genes in mouse skeletal muscle hypertrophy and regrowth

    PubMed Central

    Chaillou, Thomas; Jackson, Janna R.; England, Jonathan H.; Kirby, Tyler J.; Richards-White, Jena; Esser, Karyn A.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the gene expression profile of mouse skeletal muscle undergoing two forms of growth (hypertrophy and regrowth) with the goal of identifying a conserved set of differentially expressed genes. Expression profiling by microarray was performed on the plantaris muscle subjected to 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14 days of hypertrophy or regrowth following 2 wk of hind-limb suspension. We identified 97 differentially expressed genes (≥2-fold increase or ≥50% decrease compared with control muscle) that were conserved during the two forms of muscle growth. The vast majority (∼90%) of the differentially expressed genes was upregulated and occurred at a single time point (64 out of 86 genes), which most often was on the first day of the time course. Microarray analysis from the conserved upregulated genes showed a set of genes related to contractile apparatus and stress response at day 1, including three genes involved in mechanotransduction and four genes encoding heat shock proteins. Our analysis further identified three cell cycle-related genes at day and several genes associated with extracellular matrix (ECM) at both days 3 and 10. In conclusion, we have identified a core set of genes commonly upregulated in two forms of muscle growth that could play a role in the maintenance of sarcomere stability, ECM remodeling, cell proliferation, fast-to-slow fiber type transition, and the regulation of skeletal muscle growth. These findings suggest conserved regulatory mechanisms involved in the adaptation of skeletal muscle to increased mechanical loading. PMID:25554798

  4. Conserved deployment of genes during odontogenesis across osteichthyans.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Gareth J; Graham, Anthony; Smith, Moya M

    2004-11-22

    Odontogenesis has only been closely scrutinized at the molecular level in the mouse, an animal with an extremely restricted dentition of only two types and one set. However, within osteichthyans many species display complex and extensive dentitions, which questions the extent to which information from the mouse is applicable to all osteichthyans. We present novel comparative molecular and morphological data in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that show that three genes, essential for murine odontogenesis, follow identical spatial-temporal expression. Thus, at all tooth bud sites, epithelial genes Pitx-2 and Shh initiate the odontogenic cascade, resulting in dental mesenchymal Bmp-4 expression, importantly, including the previously unknown formation of replacement teeth. Significantly, this spatial-temporal sequence is the same for marginal and lingual dentitions, but we find notable differences regarding the deployment of Pitx-2 in the developing pharyngeal dentition. This difference may be highly significant in relation to the theory that dentitions may have evolved from pharyngeal tooth sets in jawless fishes. We have provided the first data on operational genes in tooth development to show that the same signalling genes choreograph this evolutionary stable event in fishes since the osteichthyan divergence 420 Myr ago, with the identical spatial-temporal expression as in mammals.

  5. Identification of essential Alphaproteobacterial genes reveals operational variability in conserved developmental and cell cycle systems

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Patrick D.; Brun, Yves V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus is controlled by a complex signaling network that coordinates events. Genome sequencing has revealed many C. crescentus cell cycle genes are conserved in other Alphaproteobacteria, but it is not clear to what extent their function is conserved. As many cell cycle regulatory genes are essential in C. crescentus, the essential genes of two Alphaproteobacteria, Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Rhizobiales) and Brevundimonas subvibrioides (Caulobacterales), were elucidated to identify changes in cell cycle protein function over different phylogenetic distances as demonstrated by changes in essentiality. The results show the majority of conserved essential genes are involved in critical cell cycle processes. Changes in component essentiality reflect major changes in lifestyle, such as divisome components in A. tumefaciens resulting from that organism’s different growth pattern. Larger variability of essentiality was observed in cell cycle regulators, suggesting regulatory mechanisms are more customizable than the processes they regulate. Examples include variability in the essentiality of divJ and divK spatial cell cycle regulators, and non-essentiality of the highly conserved and usually essential DNA methyltransferase CcrM. These results show that while essential cell functions are conserved across varying genetic distance, much of a given organism’s essential gene pool is specific to that organism. PMID:24975755

  6. Evolutionary conservation in genes underlying human psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Lisa M; Vallender, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of the protein-coding regions of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago) and 34 non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals, and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant) compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in humans to the exclusion of non-human primates was absent, however elevated dN/dS was detected in catarrhines as a whole, as well as in cetaceans, possibly as part of a more general trend. Although this may suggest that protein changes associated with schizophrenia and autism are not a cost of the higher brain function found in humans, it may also point to insufficiencies in the study of these diseases including incomplete or inaccurate gene association lists and/or a greater role of regulatory changes or copy number variation. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained. PMID:24834046

  7. Evolutionary conservation in genes underlying human psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Lisa M; Vallender, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of the protein-coding regions of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago) and 34 non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals, and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant) compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in humans to the exclusion of non-human primates was absent, however elevated dN/dS was detected in catarrhines as a whole, as well as in cetaceans, possibly as part of a more general trend. Although this may suggest that protein changes associated with schizophrenia and autism are not a cost of the higher brain function found in humans, it may also point to insufficiencies in the study of these diseases including incomplete or inaccurate gene association lists and/or a greater role of regulatory changes or copy number variation. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained.

  8. Evolutionary conservation in genes underlying human psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Lisa M.; Vallender, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of the protein-coding regions of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago) and 34 non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals, and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant) compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in humans to the exclusion of non-human primates was absent, however elevated dN/dS was detected in catarrhines as a whole, as well as in cetaceans, possibly as part of a more general trend. Although this may suggest that protein changes associated with schizophrenia and autism are not a cost of the higher brain function found in humans, it may also point to insufficiencies in the study of these diseases including incomplete or inaccurate gene association lists and/or a greater role of regulatory changes or copy number variation. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained. PMID:24834046

  9. Conservation of the pyrrolnitrin biosynthetic gene cluster among six pyrrolnitrin-producing strains.

    PubMed

    Hammer, P E; Burd, W; Hill, D S; Ligon, J M; van Pée, K

    1999-11-01

    The prnABCD gene cluster from Pseudomonas fluorescens encodes the biosynthetic pathway for pyrrolnitrin, a secondary metabolite derived from tryptophan which has strong anti-fungal activity. We used the prn genes from P. fluorescens strain BL915 as a probe to clone and sequence homologous genes from three other Pseudomonas strains, Burkholderia cepacia and Myxococcus fulvus. With the exception of the prnA gene from M. fulvus59% similar among the strains, indicating that the biochemical pathway for pyrrolnitrin biosynthesis is highly conserved. The prnA gene from M. fulvus is about 45% similar to prnA from the other strains and contains regions which are highly conserved among all six strains.

  10. Gene structure and evolution of transthyretin in the order Chiroptera.

    PubMed

    Khwanmunee, Jiraporn; Leelawatwattana, Ladda; Prapunpoj, Porntip

    2016-02-01

    Bats are mammals in the order Chiroptera. Although many extensive morphologic and molecular genetics analyses have been attempted, phylogenetic relationships of bats has not been completely resolved. The paraphyly of microbats is of particular controversy that needs to be confirmed. In this study, we attempted to use the nucleotide sequence of transthyretin (TTR) intron 1 to resolve the relationship among bats. To explore its utility, the complete sequences of TTR gene and intron 1 region of bats in Vespertilionidae: genus Eptesicus (Eptesicus fuscus) and genus Myotis (Myotis brandtii, Myotis davidii, and Myotis lucifugus), and Pteropodidae (Pteropus alecto and Pteropus vampyrus) were extracted from the retrieved sequences, whereas those of Rhinoluphus affinis and Scotophilus kuhlii were amplified and sequenced. The derived overall amino sequences of bat TTRs were found to be very similar to those in other eutherians but differed from those in other classes of vertebrates. However, missing of amino acids from N-terminal or C-terminal region was observed. The phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences suggested bat and other eutherian TTRs lineal descent from a single most recent common ancestor which differed from those of non-placental mammals and the other classes of vertebrates. The splicing of bat TTR precursor mRNAs was similar to those of other eutherian but different from those of marsupial, bird, reptile and amphibian. Based on TTR intron 1 sequence, the inferred evolutionary relationship within Chiroptera revealed more closely relatedness of R. affinis to megabats than to microbats. Accordingly, the paraphyly of microbats was suggested.

  11. Structural analysis of the regulatory elements of the type-II procollagen gene. Conservation of promoter and first intron sequences between human and mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Vikkula, M; Metsäranta, M; Syvänen, A C; Ala-Kokko, L; Vuorio, E; Peltonen, L

    1992-01-01

    Transcription of the type-II procollagen gene (COL2A1) is very specifically restricted to a limited number of tissues, particularly cartilages. In order to identify transcription-control motifs we have sequenced the promoter region and the first intron of the human and mouse COL2A1 genes. With the assumption that these motifs should be well conserved during evolution, we have searched for potential elements important for the tissue-specific transcription of the COL2A1 gene by aligning the two sequences with each other and with the available rat type-II procollagen sequence for the promoter. With this approach we could identify specific evolutionarily well-conserved motifs in the promoter area. On the other hand, several suggested regulatory elements in the promoter region did not show evolutionary conservation. In the middle of the first intron we found a cluster of well-conserved transcription-control elements and we conclude that these conserved motifs most probably possess a significant function in the control of the tissue-specific transcription of the COL2A1 gene. We also describe locations of additional, highly conserved nucleotide stretches, which are good candidate regions in the search for binding sites of yet-uncharacterized cartilage-specific transcription regulators of the COL2A1 gene. PMID:1637314

  12. Constraints on genes shape long-term conservation of macro-synteny in metazoan genomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many metazoan genomes conserve chromosome-scale gene linkage relationships (“macro-synteny”) from the common ancestor of multicellular animal life [1-4], but the biological explanation for this conservation is still unknown. Double cut and join (DCJ) is a simple, well-studied model of neutral genome evolution amenable to both simulation and mathematical analysis [5], but as we show here, it is not sufficent to explain long-term macro-synteny conservation. Results We examine a family of simple (one-parameter) extensions of DCJ to identify models and choices of parameters consistent with the levels of macro- and micro-synteny conservation observed among animal genomes. Our software implements a flexible strategy for incorporating genomic context into the DCJ model to incorporate various types of genomic context (“DCJ-[C]”), and is available as open source software from http://github.com/putnamlab/dcj-c. Conclusions A simple model of genome evolution, in which DCJ moves are allowed only if they maintain chromosomal linkage among a set of constrained genes, can simultaneously account for the level of macro-synteny conservation and for correlated conservation among multiple pairs of species. Simulations under this model indicate that a constraint on approximately 7% of metazoan genes is sufficient to constrain genome rearrangement to an average rate of 25 inversions and 1.7 translocations per million years. PMID:22151646

  13. A cross-species bi-clustering approach to identifying conserved co-regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiangwen; Jiang, Zongliang; Tian, Xiuchun; Bi, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: A growing number of studies have explored the process of pre-implantation embryonic development of multiple mammalian species. However, the conservation and variation among different species in their developmental programming are poorly defined due to the lack of effective computational methods for detecting co-regularized genes that are conserved across species. The most sophisticated method to date for identifying conserved co-regulated genes is a two-step approach. This approach first identifies gene clusters for each species by a cluster analysis of gene expression data, and subsequently computes the overlaps of clusters identified from different species to reveal common subgroups. This approach is ineffective to deal with the noise in the expression data introduced by the complicated procedures in quantifying gene expression. Furthermore, due to the sequential nature of the approach, the gene clusters identified in the first step may have little overlap among different species in the second step, thus difficult to detect conserved co-regulated genes. Results: We propose a cross-species bi-clustering approach which first denoises the gene expression data of each species into a data matrix. The rows of the data matrices of different species represent the same set of genes that are characterized by their expression patterns over the developmental stages of each species as columns. A novel bi-clustering method is then developed to cluster genes into subgroups by a joint sparse rank-one factorization of all the data matrices. This method decomposes a data matrix into a product of a column vector and a row vector where the column vector is a consistent indicator across the matrices (species) to identify the same gene cluster and the row vector specifies for each species the developmental stages that the clustered genes co-regulate. Efficient optimization algorithm has been developed with convergence analysis. This approach was first validated on

  14. Effects of the light goose conservation order on non-target waterfowl distribution during spring migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinges, Andrew J.; Webb, Elisabeth B.; Vrtiska, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    The Light Goose Conservation Order (LGCO) was initiated in 1999 to reduce mid-continent populations of light geese (lesser snow geese Chen caerulescens and Ross's geese C. rossi). However, concern about potential for LGCO activities (i.e. hunting activities) to negatively impact non-target waterfowl species during spring migration in the Rainwater Basin (RWB) of Nebraska prompted agency personnel to limit the number of hunt days each week and close multiple public wetlands to LGCO activities entirely. To evaluate the effects of the LGCO in the RWB, we quantified waterfowl density at wetlands open and closed to LGCO hunting and recorded all hunter encounters during springs 2011 and 2012. We encountered a total of 70 hunting parties on 22 study wetlands, with over 90% of these encounters occurring during early season when the majority of waterfowl used the RWB region. We detected greater overall densities of dabbling ducks Anas spp., as well as for mallards A. platyrhynchos and northern pintails A. acuta on wetlands closed to the LGCO. We detected no effects of hunt day in the analyses of dabbling duck densities. We detected no differences in mean weekly dabbling duck densities among wetlands open to hunting, regardless of weekly or cumulative hunting encounter frequency throughout early season. Additionally, hunting category was not a predictor for the presence of greater white-fronted geese Anser albifronsin a logistic regression model. Given that dabbling duck densities were greater on wetlands closed to hunting, providing wetlands free from hunting disturbance as refugia during the LGCO remains an important management strategy at migration stopover sites. However, given that we did not detect an effect of hunt day or hunting frequency on dabbling duck density, our results suggest increased hunting frequency at sites already open to hunting would likely have minimal impacts on the distribution of non-target waterfowl species using the region for spring

  15. Conservation of position-specific gene expression in axolotl limb skin.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Makanae, Aki

    2014-01-01

    Urodele amphibians can regenerate their limbs after amputation. After amputation, undifferentiated cells appear on the amputation plane and form regeneration blastema. A limb blastema recreates a complete replica of the original limb. It is well known that disturbance of the location of limb tissues prior to amputation perturbs limb patterning, suggesting that different intact limb tissues carry different location information despite their identical appearance. The cause of such differences in intact tissues remains unknown. In this study, we found that Lmx1b, Tbx2, and Tbx3 genes, which are expressed in developing limb in a region specific manner, remained detectable in a mature axolotl limb. Furthermore, those position-specific gene expression patterns were conserved in mature limbs. Treatment with retinoic acid (RA), which is known to have ventralizing activity, changed Lmx1b expression in intact dorsal skin and dorsal character to ventral, indicating that conserved Lmx1b expression was due to the dorsal character and not leaky gene expression. Furthermore, we found that such conserved gene expression was rewritable in regeneration blastemas. These results suggest that axolotl limb cells can recognize their locations and maintain limbness via conserved expression profiles of developmental genes.

  16. Conservation of position-specific gene expression in axolotl limb skin.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Makanae, Aki

    2014-01-01

    Urodele amphibians can regenerate their limbs after amputation. After amputation, undifferentiated cells appear on the amputation plane and form regeneration blastema. A limb blastema recreates a complete replica of the original limb. It is well known that disturbance of the location of limb tissues prior to amputation perturbs limb patterning, suggesting that different intact limb tissues carry different location information despite their identical appearance. The cause of such differences in intact tissues remains unknown. In this study, we found that Lmx1b, Tbx2, and Tbx3 genes, which are expressed in developing limb in a region specific manner, remained detectable in a mature axolotl limb. Furthermore, those position-specific gene expression patterns were conserved in mature limbs. Treatment with retinoic acid (RA), which is known to have ventralizing activity, changed Lmx1b expression in intact dorsal skin and dorsal character to ventral, indicating that conserved Lmx1b expression was due to the dorsal character and not leaky gene expression. Furthermore, we found that such conserved gene expression was rewritable in regeneration blastemas. These results suggest that axolotl limb cells can recognize their locations and maintain limbness via conserved expression profiles of developmental genes. PMID:24410490

  17. Identification and analysis of a highly conserved chemotaxis gene cluster in Shewanella species.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Ward, M.

    2007-08-01

    A conserved cluster of chemotaxis genes was identified from the genome sequences of fifteen Shewanella species. An in-frame deletion of the cheA-3 gene, which is located in this cluster, was created in S. oneidensis MR-1 and the gene shown to be essential for chemotactic responses to anaerobic electron acceptors. The CheA-3 protein showed strong similarity to Vibrio cholerae CheA-2 and P. aeruginosa CheA-1, two proteins that are also essential for chemotaxis. The genes encoding these proteins were shown to be located in chemotaxis gene clusters closely related to the cheA-3-containing cluster in Shewanella species. The results of this study suggest that a combination of gene neighborhood and homology analyses may be used to predict which cheA genes are essential for chemotaxis in groups of closely related microorganisms.

  18. CENP-B is a conserved gene among vegetal species.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Cisneros, Olga; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2002-01-01

    To explore the CENP-B centromere protein in beans, carrots, onions and potatoes, total RNA was isolated and reverse transcribed by PCR, and the cDNA encoding the CENP-B amino terminus domain amplified using CENP-B oligonucleotides. Blots containing PCR products were hybridized with a nick-translated pG/CNPB probe containing a complete human CENP-B gene. In all the plant species, anti-CENP-B antibodies recognized an 80-kDa protein. A 360-bp sequence encoding for the amino terminus region of the CENP-B protein was amplified by PCR in all the species and the nick translated pG/CNPB probe hybridized with the PCR products. Apparently the CENP-B centromere protein or an equivalent protein is widely distributed in the vegetal kingdom. PMID:14963831

  19. Syntenic conservation of HSP70 genes in cattle and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Grosz, M.D.; Womack, J.E.; Skow, L.C. )

    1992-12-01

    A phage library of bovine genomic DNA was screened for hybridization with a human HSP70 cDNA probe, and 21 positive plaques were identified and isolated. Restriction mapping and blot hybridization analysis of DNA from the recombinant plaques demonstrated that the cloned DNAs were derived from three different regions of the bovine genome. Ore region contains two tandemly arrayed HSP70 sequences, designated HSP70-1 and HSP70-2, separated by approximately 8 kb of DNA. Single HSP70 sequences, designated HSP70-3 and HSP70-4, were found in two other genomic regions. Locus-specific probes of unique flanking sequences from representative HSP70 clones were hybridized to restriction endonuclease-digested DNA from bovine-hamster and bovine-mouse somatic cell hybrid panels to determine the chromosomal location of the HSP70 sequences. The probe for the tandemly arrayed HSP70-1 and HSP70-2 sequences mapped to bovine chromosome 23, syntenic with glyoxalase 1, 21 steroid hydroxylase, and major histocompatibility class I loci. HSP70-3 sequences mapped to bovine chromosome 10, syntenic with nucleoside phosphorylase and murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene (v-fos), and HSP70-4 mapped to bovine syntenic group U6, syntenic with amylase 1 and phosphoglucomutase 1. On the basis of these data, the authors propose that bovine HSP70-1,2 are homologous to human HSPA1 and HSPA1L on chromosome 6p21.3, bovine HSP70-3 is the homolog of an unnamed human HSP70 gene on chromosome 14q22-q24, and bovine HSP70-4 is homologous to one of the human HSPA-6,-7 genes on chromosome 1. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. A high order approximation of hyperbolic conservation laws in networks: Application to one-dimensional blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Lucas O.; Blanco, Pablo J.

    2015-11-01

    We present a methodology for the high order approximation of hyperbolic conservation laws in networks by using the Dumbser-Enaux-Toro solver and exact solvers for the classical Riemann problem at junctions. The proposed strategy can be applied to any hyperbolic system, conservative or non-conservative, and possibly with flux functions containing discontinuous parameters, as long as an exact or approximate Riemann problem solver is available. The methodology is implemented for a one-dimensional blood flow model that considers discontinuous variations of mechanical and geometrical properties of vessels. The achievement of formal order of accuracy, as well as the robustness of the resulting numerical scheme, is verified through the simulation of both, academic tests and physiological flows.

  1. Molecular evolution of the insect Halloween family of cytochrome P450s: phylogeny, gene organization and functional conservation.

    PubMed

    Rewitz, Kim F; O'Connor, Michael B; Gilbert, Lawrence I

    2007-08-01

    The insect molting hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), is a major modulator of the developmental processes resulting in molting and metamorphosis. During evolution selective forces have preserved the Halloween genes encoding cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes that mediate the biosynthesis of 20E. In the present study, we examine the phylogenetic relationships of these P450 genes in holometabolous insects belonging to the orders Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera and Diptera. The analyzed insect genomes each contains single orthologs of Phantom (CYP306A1), Disembodied (CYP302A1), Shadow (CYP315A1) and Shade (CYP314A1), the terminal hydroxylases. In Drosophila melanogaster, the Halloween gene spook (Cyp307a1) is required for the biosynthesis of 20E, although a function has not yet been identified. Unlike the other Halloween genes, the ancestor of this gene evolved into three paralogs, all in the CYP307 family, through gene duplication. The genomic stability of these paralogs varies among species. Intron-exon structures indicate that D. melanogaster Cyp307a1 is a mRNA-derived paralog of spookier (Cyp307a2), which is the ancestral gene and the closest ortholog of the coleopteran, lepidopteran and mosquito CYP307A subfamily genes. Evolutionary links between the insect Halloween genes and vertebrate steroidogenic P450s suggest that they originated from common ancestors, perhaps destined for steroidogenesis, before the deuterostome-arthropod split. Conservation of putative substrate recognition sites of orthologous Halloween genes indicates selective constraint on these residues to prevent functional divergence. The results suggest that duplications of ancestral P450 genes that acquired novel functions may have been an important mechanism for evolving the ecdysteroidogenic pathway. PMID:17628274

  2. Molecular evolution of the insect Halloween family of cytochrome P450s: phylogeny, gene organization and functional conservation.

    PubMed

    Rewitz, Kim F; O'Connor, Michael B; Gilbert, Lawrence I

    2007-08-01

    The insect molting hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), is a major modulator of the developmental processes resulting in molting and metamorphosis. During evolution selective forces have preserved the Halloween genes encoding cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes that mediate the biosynthesis of 20E. In the present study, we examine the phylogenetic relationships of these P450 genes in holometabolous insects belonging to the orders Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera and Diptera. The analyzed insect genomes each contains single orthologs of Phantom (CYP306A1), Disembodied (CYP302A1), Shadow (CYP315A1) and Shade (CYP314A1), the terminal hydroxylases. In Drosophila melanogaster, the Halloween gene spook (Cyp307a1) is required for the biosynthesis of 20E, although a function has not yet been identified. Unlike the other Halloween genes, the ancestor of this gene evolved into three paralogs, all in the CYP307 family, through gene duplication. The genomic stability of these paralogs varies among species. Intron-exon structures indicate that D. melanogaster Cyp307a1 is a mRNA-derived paralog of spookier (Cyp307a2), which is the ancestral gene and the closest ortholog of the coleopteran, lepidopteran and mosquito CYP307A subfamily genes. Evolutionary links between the insect Halloween genes and vertebrate steroidogenic P450s suggest that they originated from common ancestors, perhaps destined for steroidogenesis, before the deuterostome-arthropod split. Conservation of putative substrate recognition sites of orthologous Halloween genes indicates selective constraint on these residues to prevent functional divergence. The results suggest that duplications of ancestral P450 genes that acquired novel functions may have been an important mechanism for evolving the ecdysteroidogenic pathway.

  3. Comprehensive analysis of animal TALE homeobox genes: new conserved motifs and cases of accelerated evolution.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Krishanu; Bürglin, Thomas R

    2007-08-01

    TALE homeodomain proteins are an ancient subgroup within the group of homeodomain transcription factors that play important roles in animal, plant, and fungal development. We have extracted the full complement of TALE superclass homeobox genes from the genome projects of seven protostomes, seven deuterostomes, and Nematostella. This was supplemented with TALE homeobox genes from additional species and phylogenetic analyses were carried out with 276 sequences. We found 20 homeobox genes and 4 pseudogenes in humans, 21 genes in mouse, 8 genes in Drosophila, and 5 genes plus one truncated gene in Caenorhabditis elegans. Apart from the previously identified TALE classes MEIS, PBC, IRO, and TGIF, a novel class is identified, termed MOHAWK (MKX). Further, we show that the MEIS class can be divided into two families, PREP and MEIS. Prep genes have previously only been described in vertebrates but are lacking in Drosophila. Here we identify orthologues in other insect taxa as well as in the cnidarian Nematostella. In C. elegans, a divergent Prep protein has lost the homeodomain. Full-length multiple sequence alignment of the protostome and deuterostome sequences allowed us to identify several novel conserved motifs within the MKX, TGIF, and MEIS classes. Phylogenetic analyses revealed fast-evolving PBC class genes; in particular, some X-linked PBC genes in nematodes are subject to rapid evolution. In addition, several instances of gene loss were identified. In conclusion, our comprehensive analysis provides a defining framework for the classification of animal TALE homeobox genes and the understanding of their evolution.

  4. A subset of conserved tRNA genes in plastid DNA of nongreen plants.

    PubMed Central

    Lohan, A J; Wolfe, K H

    1998-01-01

    The plastid genome of the nonphotosynthetic parasitic plant Epifagus virginiana contains only 17 of the 30 tRNA genes normally found in angiosperm plastid DNA. Although this is insufficient for translation, the genome is functional, so import of cytosolic tRNAs into plastids has been suggested. This raises the question of whether the tRNA genes that remain in E. virginiana plastid DNA are active or have just fortuitously escaped deletion. We report the sequences of 20 plastid tRNA loci from Orobanche minor, which shares a nonphotosynthetic ancestor with E. virginiana. The two species have 9 intact tRNA genes in common, the others being defunct in one or both species. The intron-containing trnLUAA gene is absent from E. virginiana, but it is intact, transcribed, and spliced in O. minor. The shared intact genes are better conserved than intergenic sequences, which indicates that these genes are being maintained by natural selection and, therefore, must be functional. For the most part, the tRNA species conserved in nonphotosynthetic plastids are also those that have never been found to be imported in plant mitochondria, which suggests that the same rules may govern tRNA import in the two organelles. A small photosynthesis gene, psbI, is still intact in O. minor, and computer simulations show that some small nonessential genes have an appreciable chance of escaping deletion. PMID:9725858

  5. A Second-Order Accurate, Component-Wise TVD Scheme for Nonlinear, Hyperbolic Conservation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Heng; Liu, Yu-Ping

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, we present a two-step, component-wise TVD scheme for nonlinear, hyperbolic conservation laws, which is obtained by combining the schemes of Mac Cormack and Warming-Beam. The scheme does not necessitate the characteristic decompositions of the usual TVD schemes. It employs component-wise limiting; hence the programming is much simpler, especially for complicated coupled systems. For Euler systems of conservation laws, we found the scheme is two times faster in computation than the usual TVD schemes based on field-by-field decomposition limiting. A lot of numerical results show primarily the value of the new method.

  6. Achieving spectrum conservation for the minimum-span and minimum-order frequency assignment problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyward, Ann O.

    1992-01-01

    Effective and efficient solutions of frequency assignment problems assumes increasing importance as the radiofrequency spectrum experiences ever increasing utilization by diverse communications services, requiring that the most efficient use of this resource be achieved. The research presented explores a general approach to the frequency assignment problem, in which such problems are categorized by the appropriate spectrum conserving objective function, and are each treated as an N-job, M-machine scheduling problem appropriate for the objective. Results obtained and presented illustrate that such an approach presents an effective means of achieving spectrum conserving frequency assignments for communications systems in a variety of environments.

  7. A Collection of Conserved Noncoding Sequences to Study Gene Regulation in Flowering Plants.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Jan; Van Bel, Michiel; Vaneechoutte, Dries; Vandepoele, Klaas

    2016-08-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression by binding cis-regulatory elements, of which the identification remains an ongoing challenge owing to the prevalence of large numbers of nonfunctional TF binding sites. Powerful comparative genomics methods, such as phylogenetic footprinting, can be used for the detection of conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs), which are functionally constrained and can greatly help in reducing the number of false-positive elements. In this study, we applied a phylogenetic footprinting approach for the identification of CNSs in 10 dicot plants, yielding 1,032,291 CNSs associated with 243,187 genes. To annotate CNSs with TF binding sites, we made use of binding site information for 642 TFs originating from 35 TF families in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In three species, the identified CNSs were evaluated using TF chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data, resulting in significant overlap for the majority of data sets. To identify ultraconserved CNSs, we included genomes of additional plant families and identified 715 binding sites for 501 genes conserved in dicots, monocots, mosses, and green algae. Additionally, we found that genes that are part of conserved mini-regulons have a higher coherence in their expression profile than other divergent gene pairs. All identified CNSs were integrated in the PLAZA 3.0 Dicots comparative genomics platform (http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/plaza/versions/plaza_v3_dicots/) together with new functionalities facilitating the exploration of conserved cis-regulatory elements and their associated genes. The availability of this data set in a user-friendly platform enables the exploration of functional noncoding DNA to study gene regulation in a variety of plant species, including crops. PMID:27261064

  8. A Collection of Conserved Noncoding Sequences to Study Gene Regulation in Flowering Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression by binding cis-regulatory elements, of which the identification remains an ongoing challenge owing to the prevalence of large numbers of nonfunctional TF binding sites. Powerful comparative genomics methods, such as phylogenetic footprinting, can be used for the detection of conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs), which are functionally constrained and can greatly help in reducing the number of false-positive elements. In this study, we applied a phylogenetic footprinting approach for the identification of CNSs in 10 dicot plants, yielding 1,032,291 CNSs associated with 243,187 genes. To annotate CNSs with TF binding sites, we made use of binding site information for 642 TFs originating from 35 TF families in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In three species, the identified CNSs were evaluated using TF chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data, resulting in significant overlap for the majority of data sets. To identify ultraconserved CNSs, we included genomes of additional plant families and identified 715 binding sites for 501 genes conserved in dicots, monocots, mosses, and green algae. Additionally, we found that genes that are part of conserved mini-regulons have a higher coherence in their expression profile than other divergent gene pairs. All identified CNSs were integrated in the PLAZA 3.0 Dicots comparative genomics platform (http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/plaza/versions/plaza_v3_dicots/) together with new functionalities facilitating the exploration of conserved cis-regulatory elements and their associated genes. The availability of this data set in a user-friendly platform enables the exploration of functional noncoding DNA to study gene regulation in a variety of plant species, including crops. PMID:27261064

  9. 75 FR 62127 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ..., discussed below. Whirlpool claims that water softeners can prevent consumer behaviors that consume... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision... for Consumer Products Other Than Automobiles.'' 42 U.S.C. 6291-6309. Part A includes definitions,...

  10. 76 FR 13169 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision... Residential Clothes Washer Test Procedure AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Michael G. Raymond, U.S. Department of Energy, Building...

  11. Effects of High-Order Rule Instruction on Preschool Children's Understanding of Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, Joseph T.; Reddy, P.

    Examined were effects of advance organizer (AO) instruction on acquisition of conservation concepts in 3- and 4-year-olds. Participants were 28 children who were equally divided into experimental and control groups, pretested, and found to be nonconservers. A sequence of two AO lessons and related learning activities was presented to the…

  12. Conservative Politicians Are Lashing Out at Courts That Order Equal Funding for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corriher, Billy

    2014-01-01

    Conservative governors and legislators across America are angry at the third branch of government. Some of these lawmakers are pushing legislation that could throw judges off the bench, while others are pushing to limit judicial authority. In one state, a governor unilaterally removed a justice of the state supreme court. Another Republican…

  13. Metazoan remaining genes for essential amino acid biosynthesis: sequence conservation and evolutionary analyses.

    PubMed

    Costa, Igor R; Thompson, Julie D; Ortega, José Miguel; Prosdocimi, Francisco

    2014-12-24

    Essential amino acids (EAA) consist of a group of nine amino acids that animals are unable to synthesize via de novo pathways. Recently, it has been found that most metazoans lack the same set of enzymes responsible for the de novo EAA biosynthesis. Here we investigate the sequence conservation and evolution of all the metazoan remaining genes for EAA pathways. Initially, the set of all 49 enzymes responsible for the EAA de novo biosynthesis in yeast was retrieved. These enzymes were used as BLAST queries to search for similar sequences in a database containing 10 complete metazoan genomes. Eight enzymes typically attributed to EAA pathways were found to be ubiquitous in metazoan genomes, suggesting a conserved functional role. In this study, we address the question of how these genes evolved after losing their pathway partners. To do this, we compared metazoan genes with their fungal and plant orthologs. Using phylogenetic analysis with maximum likelihood, we found that acetolactate synthase (ALS) and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) diverged from the expected Tree of Life (ToL) relationships. High sequence conservation in the paraphyletic group Plant-Fungi was identified for these two genes using a newly developed Python algorithm. Selective pressure analysis of ALS and BHMT protein sequences showed higher non-synonymous mutation ratios in comparisons between metazoans/fungi and metazoans/plants, supporting the hypothesis that these two genes have undergone non-ToL evolution in animals.

  14. Identification of a conserved sequence in the non-coding regions of many human genes.

    PubMed Central

    Donehower, L A; Slagle, B L; Wilde, M; Darlington, G; Butel, J S

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed a sequence of approximately 70 base pairs (bp) that shows a high degree of similarity to sequences present in the non-coding regions of a number of human and other mammalian genes. The sequence was discovered in a fragment of human genomic DNA adjacent to an integrated hepatitis B virus genome in cells derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue. When one of the viral flanking sequences was compared to nucleotide sequences in GenBank, more than thirty human genes were identified that contained a similar sequence in their non-coding regions. The sequence element was usually found once or twice in a gene, either in an intron or in the 5' or 3' flanking regions. It did not share any similarities with known short interspersed nucleotide elements (SINEs) or presently known gene regulatory elements. This element was highly conserved at the same position within the corresponding human and mouse genes for myoglobin and N-myc, indicating evolutionary conservation and possible functional importance. Preliminary DNase I footprinting data suggested that the element or its adjacent sequences may bind nuclear factors to generate specific DNase I hypersensitive sites. The size, structure, and evolutionary conservation of this sequence indicates that it is distinct from other types of short interspersed repetitive elements. It is possible that the element may have a cis-acting functional role in the genome. Images PMID:2536922

  15. Discovery of five conserved beta -defensin gene clusters using a computational search strategy.

    PubMed

    Schutte, Brian C; Mitros, Joseph P; Bartlett, Jennifer A; Walters, Jesse D; Jia, Hong Peng; Welsh, Michael J; Casavant, Thomas L; McCray, Paul B

    2002-02-19

    The innate immune system includes antimicrobial peptides that protect multicellular organisms from a diverse spectrum of microorganisms. beta-Defensins comprise one important family of mammalian antimicrobial peptides. The annotation of the human genome fails to reveal the expected diversity, and a recent query of the draft sequence with the blast search engine found only one new beta-defensin gene (DEFB3). To define better the beta-defensin gene family, we adopted a genomics approach that uses hmmer, a computational search tool based on hidden Markov models, in combination with blast. This strategy identified 28 new human and 43 new mouse beta-defensin genes in five syntenic chromosomal regions. Within each syntenic cluster, the gene sequences and organization were similar, suggesting each cluster pair arose from a common ancestor and was retained because of conserved functions. Preliminary analysis indicates that at least 26 of the predicted genes are transcribed. These results demonstrate the value of a genomewide search strategy to identify genes with conserved structural motifs. Discovery of these genes represents a new starting point for exploring the role of beta-defensins in innate immunity.

  16. Discovering gene re-ranking efficiency and conserved gene-gene relationships derived from gene co-expression network analysis on breast cancer data.

    PubMed

    Bourdakou, Marilena M; Athanasiadis, Emmanouil I; Spyrou, George M

    2016-01-01

    Systemic approaches are essential in the discovery of disease-specific genes, offering a different perspective and new tools on the analysis of several types of molecular relationships, such as gene co-expression or protein-protein interactions. However, due to lack of experimental information, this analysis is not fully applicable. The aim of this study is to reveal the multi-potent contribution of statistical network inference methods in highlighting significant genes and interactions. We have investigated the ability of statistical co-expression networks to highlight and prioritize genes for breast cancer subtypes and stages in terms of: (i) classification efficiency, (ii) gene network pattern conservation, (iii) indication of involved molecular mechanisms and (iv) systems level momentum to drug repurposing pipelines. We have found that statistical network inference methods are advantageous in gene prioritization, are capable to contribute to meaningful network signature discovery, give insights regarding the disease-related mechanisms and boost drug discovery pipelines from a systems point of view. PMID:26892392

  17. Discovering gene re-ranking efficiency and conserved gene-gene relationships derived from gene co-expression network analysis on breast cancer data

    PubMed Central

    Bourdakou, Marilena M.; Athanasiadis, Emmanouil I.; Spyrou, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic approaches are essential in the discovery of disease-specific genes, offering a different perspective and new tools on the analysis of several types of molecular relationships, such as gene co-expression or protein-protein interactions. However, due to lack of experimental information, this analysis is not fully applicable. The aim of this study is to reveal the multi-potent contribution of statistical network inference methods in highlighting significant genes and interactions. We have investigated the ability of statistical co-expression networks to highlight and prioritize genes for breast cancer subtypes and stages in terms of: (i) classification efficiency, (ii) gene network pattern conservation, (iii) indication of involved molecular mechanisms and (iv) systems level momentum to drug repurposing pipelines. We have found that statistical network inference methods are advantageous in gene prioritization, are capable to contribute to meaningful network signature discovery, give insights regarding the disease-related mechanisms and boost drug discovery pipelines from a systems point of view. PMID:26892392

  18. Conservation of Pax gene expression in ectodermal placodes of the lamprey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCauley, David W.; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    Ectodermal placodes contribute to the cranial ganglia and sense organs of the head and, together with neural crest cells, represent defining features of the vertebrate embryo. The identity of different placodes appears to be specified in part by the expression of different Pax genes, with Pax-3/7 class genes being expressed in the trigeminal placode of mice, chick, frogs and fish, and Pax-2/5/8 class genes expressed in the otic placode. Here, we present the cloning and expression pattern of lamprey Pax-7 and Pax-2, which mark the trigeminal and otic placodes, respectively, as well as other structures characteristic of vertebrate Pax genes. These results suggest conservation of Pax genes and placodal structures in basal and derived vertebrates.

  19. Fibrinogen {alpha} genes: Conservation of bipartite transcripts and carboxy-terminal-extended {alpha} subunits in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Cao, Y.; Hertzberg, K.M.; Grieninger, G.

    1995-11-01

    All three well-studied subunits of the clotting protein fibrinogen ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}) share N-terminal structural homologies, but until recently only the {beta} and {gamma} chains were recognized as having similar globular C-termini. With the discovery of an extra exon in the human fibrinogen {alpha} gene (exon VI), a minor form of the {alpha} subunit ({alpha}{sub E}) with an extended {beta}- and {gamma}-like C-terminus has been identified. In the present study, the polymerase chain reaction has been used to identify sequences that encode counterparts to {alpha}{sub E} in chicken, rabbit, rat, and baboon. The basic six-exon structure of the fibrinogen {alpha} genes is shown to be conserved among mammals and birds, as are the intron positions. Bipartite transcripts - still bearing an intron prior to the last exon - are found among the products of the various vertebrate fibrinogen {alpha} genes. The last exon represents the largest conserved segment of the gene and, in each species examined, encodes exactly 236 amino acids. The C-termini of these {alpha}{sub E} chains align without a single gap and are between 76 and 99% identical. Since the exon VI-encoded domain of {alpha}{sub E} is as well conserved as the corresponding regions of the {beta} and {gamma} chains, it follows that it is equally important and that {alpha}{sub E}-fibrinogen plays a vital, if as-yet unrecognized physiological role. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Gene expression of pluripotency determinants is conserved between mammalian and planarian stem cells.

    PubMed

    Onal, Pinar; Grün, Dominic; Adamidi, Catherine; Rybak, Agnieszka; Solana, Jordi; Mastrobuoni, Guido; Wang, Yongbo; Rahn, Hans-Peter; Chen, Wei; Kempa, Stefan; Ziebold, Ulrike; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2012-06-13

    Freshwater planaria possess extreme regeneration capabilities mediated by abundant, pluripotent stem cells (neoblasts) in adult animals. Although planaria emerged as an attractive in vivo model system for stem cell biology, gene expression in neoblasts has not been profiled comprehensively and it is unknown how molecular mechanisms for pluripotency in neoblasts relate to those in mammalian embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We purified neoblasts and quantified mRNA and protein expression by sequencing and shotgun proteomics. We identified ∼4000 genes specifically expressed in neoblasts, including all ∼30 known neoblast markers. Genes important for pluripotency in ESCs, including regulators as well as targets of OCT4, were well conserved and upregulated in neoblasts. We found conserved expression of epigenetic regulators and demonstrated their requirement for planarian regeneration by knockdown experiments. Post-transcriptional regulatory genes characteristic for germ cells were also enriched in neoblasts, suggesting the existence of a common ancestral state of germ cells and ESCs. We conclude that molecular determinants of pluripotency are conserved throughout evolution and that planaria are an informative model system for human stem cell biology.

  1. Gene expression of pluripotency determinants is conserved between mammalian and planarian stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Önal, Pinar; Grün, Dominic; Adamidi, Catherine; Rybak, Agnieszka; Solana, Jordi; Mastrobuoni, Guido; Wang, Yongbo; Rahn, Hans-Peter; Chen, Wei; Kempa, Stefan; Ziebold, Ulrike; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater planaria possess extreme regeneration capabilities mediated by abundant, pluripotent stem cells (neoblasts) in adult animals. Although planaria emerged as an attractive in vivo model system for stem cell biology, gene expression in neoblasts has not been profiled comprehensively and it is unknown how molecular mechanisms for pluripotency in neoblasts relate to those in mammalian embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We purified neoblasts and quantified mRNA and protein expression by sequencing and shotgun proteomics. We identified ∼4000 genes specifically expressed in neoblasts, including all ∼30 known neoblast markers. Genes important for pluripotency in ESCs, including regulators as well as targets of OCT4, were well conserved and upregulated in neoblasts. We found conserved expression of epigenetic regulators and demonstrated their requirement for planarian regeneration by knockdown experiments. Post-transcriptional regulatory genes characteristic for germ cells were also enriched in neoblasts, suggesting the existence of a common ancestral state of germ cells and ESCs. We conclude that molecular determinants of pluripotency are conserved throughout evolution and that planaria are an informative model system for human stem cell biology. PMID:22543868

  2. Epigenetic conservation at gene regulatory elements revealed by non-methylated DNA profiling in seven vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Long, Hannah K; Sims, David; Heger, Andreas; Blackledge, Neil P; Kutter, Claudia; Wright, Megan L; Grützner, Frank; Odom, Duncan T; Patient, Roger; Ponting, Chris P; Klose, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Two-thirds of gene promoters in mammals are associated with regions of non-methylated DNA, called CpG islands (CGIs), which counteract the repressive effects of DNA methylation on chromatin. In cold-blooded vertebrates, computational CGI predictions often reside away from gene promoters, suggesting a major divergence in gene promoter architecture across vertebrates. By experimentally identifying non-methylated DNA in the genomes of seven diverse vertebrates, we instead reveal that non-methylated islands (NMIs) of DNA are a central feature of vertebrate gene promoters. Furthermore, NMIs are present at orthologous genes across vast evolutionary distances, revealing a surprising level of conservation in this epigenetic feature. By profiling NMIs in different tissues and developmental stages we uncover a unifying set of features that are central to the function of NMIs in vertebrates. Together these findings demonstrate an ancient logic for NMI usage at gene promoters and reveal an unprecedented level of epigenetic conservation across vertebrate evolution. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00348.001. PMID:23467541

  3. How do genes make teeth to order through development?

    PubMed

    Mitsiadis, Thimios A; Smith, Moya M

    2006-05-15

    This introduction to new patterning theories for the vertebrate dentition outlines the historical concepts to explain graded sequences in tooth shape in mammals (incisors, canines, premolars, molars) which change in evolution in a linked manner, constant for each region. The classic developmental models for shape regulation, known as the 'regional field' and 'dental clone' models, were inspired by the human dentition, where it is known that the last tooth in each series is the one commonly absent. The mouse, as a valuable experimental model, has provided data to test these models and more recently, based on spatial-temporal gene expression data, the 'dental homeobox code' was proposed to specify regions and regulate tooth shape. We have attempted to combine these hypotheses in a new model of the combinatorial homeobox gene expression pattern with the clone and field theories in one of 'co-operative genetic interaction'. This also explains the genetic absence of teeth in humans ascribed to point mutations in mesenchymally expressed genes, which affect tooth number in each series.

  4. Three Dimensional Organization of Genome Might Have Guided the Dynamics of Gene Order Evolution in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Bagadia, Meenakshi; Singh, Arashdeep; Singh Sandhu, Kuljeet

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, genes are nonrandomly organized into short gene-dense regions or “gene-clusters” interspersed by long gene-poor regions. How these gene-clusters have evolved is not entirely clear. Gene duplication may not account for all the gene-clusters since the genes in most of the clusters do not exhibit significant sequence similarity. In this study, using genome-wide data sets from budding yeast, fruit-fly, and human, we show that: 1) long-range evolutionary repositioning of genes strongly associate with their spatial proximity in the nucleus; 2) presence of evolutionary DNA break-points at involved loci hints at their susceptibility to undergo long-range genomic rearrangements; and 3) correlated epigenetic and transcriptional states of engaged genes highlight the underlying evolutionary constraints. The significance of observation 1, 2, and 3 are particularly stronger for the instances of inferred evolutionary gain, as compared with loss, of linear gene-clustering. These observations suggest that the long-range genomic rearrangements guided through 3D genome organization might have contributed to the evolution of gene order. We further hypothesize that the evolution of linear gene-clusters in eukaryotic genomes might have been mediated through spatial interactions among distant loci in order to optimize co-ordinated regulation of genes. We model this hypothesis through a heuristic model of gene-order evolution. PMID:26957031

  5. A comprehensive characterization of the caspase gene family in insects from the order Lepidoptera

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The cell suicide pathway of apoptosis is a necessary event in the life of multicellular organisms. It is involved in many biological processes ranging from development to the immune response. Evolutionarily conserved proteases, called caspases, play a central role in regulating apoptosis. Reception of death stimuli triggers the activation of initiator caspases, which in turn activate the effector caspases. In Lepidoptera, apoptosis is crucial in processes such as metamorphosis or defending against baculovirus infection. The discovery of p35, a baculovirus protein inhibiting caspase activity, has led to the characterization of the first lepidopteran caspase, Sf-Caspase-1. Studies on Sf-Caspase-1 mode of activation suggested that apoptosis in Lepidoptera requires a cascade of caspase activation, as demonstrated in many other species. Results In order to get insights into this gene family in Lepidoptera, we performed an extensive survey of lepidopteran-derived EST datasets. We identified 66 sequences distributed among 27 species encoding putative caspases. Phylogenetic analyses showed that Lepidoptera possess at least 5 caspases, for which we propose a unified nomenclature. According to homology to their Drosophila counterparts and their primary structure, we determined that Lep-Caspase-1, -2 and -3 are putative effector caspases, whereas Lep-Caspase-5 and -6 are putative initiators. The likely function of Lep-Caspase-4 remains unclear. Lep-Caspase-2 is absent from the silkworm genome and appears to be noctuid-specific, and to have arisen from a tandem duplication of the Caspase-1 gene. In the tobacco hawkmoth, 3 distinct transcripts encoding putative Caspase-4 were identified, suggesting at least 2 duplication events in this species. Conclusions The basic repertoire of five major types of caspases shared among Lepidoptera seems to be smaller than for most other groups studied to date, but gene duplication still plays a role in lineage-specific increases in

  6. Rapid screening of an ordered fosmid library to clone multiple polyketide synthase genes of the phytopathogenic fungus Cladosporium phlei.

    PubMed

    So, Kum-Kang; Kim, Jung-Mi; Nguyen, Ngoc-Luong; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Beom-Tae; Park, Seung-Moon; Hwang, Ki-Jun; Kim, Dae-Hyuk

    2012-12-01

    In previous studies, the biological characteristics of the fungus Cladosporium phlei and its genetic manipulation by transformation were assessed to improve production of the fungal pigment, phleichrome, which is a fungal perylenequinone that plays an important role in the production of a photodynamic therapeutic agent. However, the low production of this metabolite by the wild-type strain has limited its application. Thus, we attempted to clone and characterize the genes that encode polyketide synthases (PKS), which are responsible for the synthesis of fungal pigments such as perylenequinones including phleichrome, elsinochrome and cercosporin. Thus, we performed genomic DNA PCR using 11 different combinations of degenerate primers targeting conserved domains including β-ketoacyl synthase and acyltransferase domains. Sequence comparison of the PCR amplicons revealed a high homology to known PKSs, and four different PKS genes showing a high similarity to three representative types of PKS genes were amplified. To obtain full-length PKS genes, an ordered gene library of a phleichrome-producing C. phlei strain (ATCC 36193) was constructed in a fosmid vector and 4800 clones were analyzed using a simple pyramidal arrangement system. This hierarchical clustering method combines the efficiency of PCR with enhanced specificity. Among the three representative types of PKSs, two reducing, one partially reducing, and one non-reducing PKS were identified. These genes were subsequently cloned, sequenced, and characterized. Biological characterization of these genes to determine their roles in phleichrome production is underway, with the ultimate aim of engineering this pathway to overproduce the desired substance.

  7. [Identification of new conserved and variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene of acetic acid bacteria and acetobacteraceae family].

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, S; Sarkar, S; Gachhui, R

    2015-01-01

    The Acetobacteraceae family of the class Alpha Proteobacteria is comprised of high sugar and acid tolerant bacteria. The Acetic Acid Bacteria are the economically most significant group of this family because of its association with food products like vinegar, wine etc. Acetobacteraceae are often hard to culture in laboratory conditions and they also maintain very low abundances in their natural habitats. Thus identification of the organisms in such environments is greatly dependent on modern tools of molecular biology which require a thorough knowledge of specific conserved gene sequences that may act as primers and or probes. Moreover unconserved domains in genes also become markers for differentiating closely related genera. In bacteria, the 16S rRNA gene is an ideal candidate for such conserved and variable domains. In order to study the conserved and variable domains of the 16S rRNA gene of Acetic Acid Bacteria and the Acetobacteraceae family, sequences from publicly available databases were aligned and compared. Near complete sequences of the gene were also obtained from Kombucha tea biofilm, a known Acetobacteraceae family habitat, in order to corroborate the domains obtained from the alignment studies. The study indicated that the degree of conservation in the gene is significantly higher among the Acetic Acid Bacteria than the whole Acetobacteraceae family. Moreover it was also observed that the previously described hypervariable regions V1, V3, V5, V6 and V7 were more or less conserved in the family and the spans of the variable regions are quite distinct as well.

  8. Phylogenetic conservation of immunoglobulin heavy chains: direct comparison of hamster and mouse Cmu genes.

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, K L; Duncan, W R; Tucker, P W

    1985-01-01

    We have analyzed the JH-Cmu locus of the Syrian hamster by DNA cloning and sequencing. The single Cmu gene is highly homologous to that of the mouse. The hamster equivalents of the JH and switch (S) recombination regions are arranged as in the mouse, but surprisingly are not highly conserved. Also unlike its close murine relative, the Smu regions among inbred hamster strains are not polymorphic. The complete nucleotide sequence of hamster and mouse Cmu genes have been compared to partial Cmu sequences of other species. Conservation within a portion of the 3' untranslated region may signify functional requirements for 3' end processing. Mutational frequencies within exons and introns of hamster and mouse do not support the theory that the rate of DNA transitions to transversions decreases with evolutionary distance. Images PMID:2994005

  9. Conserved or lost: molecular evolution of the key gene GULO in vertebrate vitamin C biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongwen

    2013-06-01

    L-gulono-gamma-lactone oxidase (GULO) catalyzes the final step in vertebrate vitamin C biosynthesis. Vitamin C-incapable vertebrates lack the GULO gene. Gene structure and phylogenetic analyses showed that vertebrate GULO genes are 64-95% identical at the amino acid level and consist of 11 conserved exons. GULO pseudogenes have multiple indel mutations and premature stop codons in higher primates, guinea pigs, and some bats. No GULO-like sequences were identified in teleost fishes. During animal GULO evolution, exon F was subdivided into F1 and F2. Additional GULO retropseudogenes were identified in dogs, cats, and giant pandas. GULO-flanking genome regions acquired frequent segment translocations and inversions during vertebrate evolution. Purifying selection was detected across vertebrate GULO genes (d(N)/d(S) = 0.069), except for some positively selected sites identified in sharks and frogs. These positive sites demonstrated little functional significance when mapped onto the three-dimensional GULO protein structure. Vertebrate GULO genes are conserved except for those that are lost. PMID:23404229

  10. Comparative genomic analysis reveals the evolutionary conservation of Pax gene family.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhong, Jing; Wang, Yi-Quan

    2010-01-01

    The Pax gene family encodes a group of transcription factors whose evolution has accompanied the major morphological and functional innovations of vertebrate species. The evolutionary conservation throughout diverse lineages of metazoan and the functional importance in development rendered Pax family an ideal system to address the relationship inside Chordata phylum. In the present study, we sequenced and annotated four genomic regions containing Chinese amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) Pax genes, and retrieved homologous sequences from public database. In comparison with vertebrate homologues, the predicted amphioxus Pax proteins display high sequence conservation. Evidences from the molecular phylogenetic studies and gene organization analyses supports cephalochordates have a much closer relationship to vertebrates than that between tunicates and vertebrates, contrasting to urochordate relatives hypothesis proposed by several latest studies. Analysis of phylogenetic topology derived from concatenated subfamily datasets uncovered a potential statistical bias of supermatrix approach. Furthermore, we deduced an evolutionary scenario of Pax gene family. This scenario provided a plausible explanation for the origin and dynamics of the Pax gene members.

  11. rbcS genes in Solanum tuberosum: conservation of transit peptide and exon shuffling during evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Wolter, F P; Fritz, C C; Willmitzer, L; Schell, J; Schreier, P H

    1988-01-01

    Five genes of the rbcS gene family of Solanum tuberosum (potato) were studied. One of these is a cDNA clone; the other four are located on two genomic clones representing two different chromosomal loci containing one (locus 1) and three genes (locus 2), respectively. The intron/exon structure of the three genes in locus 2 is highly conserved with respect to size and position. These genes contain two introns, whereas the gene from locus 1 contains three introns. Although in most cases the amino acid sequences in the transit peptide part of different rbcS genes from the same species varied considerably more than the corresponding mature amino acid sequences, one exception found in tomato and potato indicates that the transit peptide of rbcS could have a special function. A comparison of the rbcS genes of higher plants with those of prokaryotes offers suggestive evidence that introns first served as spacer material in the process of exon shuffling and then were removed stepwise during the evolution of higher plants. PMID:3422467

  12. The Mdm2 and p53 genes are conserved in the Arachnids.

    PubMed

    Lane, David P; Cheok, Chit Fang; Brown, Christopher J; Madhumalar, Arumugam; Ghadessy, Farid J; Verma, Chandra

    2010-02-15

    The p53 protein and its negative regulator the ubiquitin E3 ligase Mdm2 have been shown to be conserved from the T. adhaerens to man. In common with D. melanogaster and C. elegans, there is a single copy of the p53 gene in T. adhaerens, while in the vertebrates three p53-like genes can be found: p53, p63 and p73. The Mdm2 gene is not present within the fully sequenced and highly annotated genomes of C. elegans and D. melanogaster. However, it is present in Placazoanand the presence of multiple distinct p53 genes in the Sea anemone N. vectensis led us to examine the genomes of other phyla for p53 and Mdm2-like genes. We report here the discovery of an Mdm2-like gene and two distinct p53-like genes in the Arachnid Ioxodes scapularis (Northern Deer Tick). The two predicted Deer Tick p53 proteins are much more highly related to the human p53 protein in sequence than are the fruit fly and nematode proteins. One of the Deer Tick genes encodes a p53 protein that is initiated within the DNA binding domain of p53 and shows remarkable homology to the newly described N-terminally truncated delta isoforms of human and zebrafish p53. PMID:20160485

  13. CORECLUST: identification of the conserved CRM grammar together with prediction of gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nikulova, Anna A.; Favorov, Alexander V.; Sutormin, Roman A.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Mironov, Andrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of transcriptional regulatory regions and tracing their internal organization are important for understanding the eukaryotic cell machinery. Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) of higher eukaryotes are believed to possess a regulatory ‘grammar’, or preferred arrangement of binding sites, that is crucial for proper regulation and thus tends to be evolutionarily conserved. Here, we present a method CORECLUST (COnservative REgulatory CLUster STructure) that predicts CRMs based on a set of positional weight matrices. Given regulatory regions of orthologous and/or co-regulated genes, CORECLUST constructs a CRM model by revealing the conserved rules that describe the relative location of binding sites. The constructed model may be consequently used for the genome-wide prediction of similar CRMs, and thus detection of co-regulated genes, and for the investigation of the regulatory grammar of the system. Compared with related methods, CORECLUST shows better performance at identification of CRMs conferring muscle-specific gene expression in vertebrates and early-developmental CRMs in Drosophila. PMID:22422836

  14. High order weighted essentially non-oscillatory WENO-Z schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcos; Costa, Bruno; Don, Wai Sun

    2011-03-01

    In [10], the authors have designed a new fifth order WENO finite-difference scheme by adding a higher order smoothness indicator which is obtained as a simple and inexpensive linear combination of the already existing low order smoothness indicators. Moreover, this new scheme, dubbed as WENO-Z, has a CPU cost which is equivalent to the one of the classical WENO-JS [2], and smaller than that of the mapped WENO-M, [5], since it involves no mapping of the nonlinear weights. In this article, we take a closer look at Taylor expansions of the Lagrangian polynomials of the WENO substencils and the related inherited symmetries of the classical lower order smoothness indicators to obtain a general formula for the higher order smoothness indicators that allows the extension of the WENO-Z scheme to all (odd) orders of accuracy. We further investigate the improved accuracy of the WENO-Z schemes at critical points of smooth solutions as well as their distinct numerical features as a result of the new sets of nonlinear weights and we show that regarding the numerical dissipation WENO-Z occupies an intermediary position between WENO-JS and WENO-M. Some standard numerical experiments such as the one dimensional Riemann initial values problems for the Euler equations and the Mach 3 shock density-wave interaction and the two dimensional double-Mach shock reflection problems are presented.

  15. Plastid-LCGbase: a collection of evolutionarily conserved plastid-associated gene pairs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dapeng; Yu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Plastids carry their own genetic material that encodes a variable set of genes that are limited in number but functionally important. Aside from orthology, the lineage-specific order and orientation of these genes are also relevant. Here, we develop a database, Plastid-LCGbase (http://lcgbase.big.ac.cn/plastid-LCGbase/), which focuses on organizational variability of plastid genes and genomes from diverse taxonomic groups. The current Plastid-LCGbase contains information from 470 plastid genomes and exhibits several unique features. First, through a genome-overview page generated from OrganellarGenomeDRAW, it displays general arrangement of all plastid genes (circular or linear). Second, it shows patterns and modes of all paired plastid genes and their physical distances across user-defined lineages, which are facilitated by a step-wise stratification of taxonomic groups. Third, it divides the paired genes into three categories (co-directionally-paired genes or CDPGs, convergently-paired genes or CPGs and divergently-paired genes or DPGs) and three patterns (separation, overlap and inclusion) and provides basic statistics for each species. Fourth, the gene pairing scheme is expandable, where neighboring genes can also be included in species-/lineage-specific comparisons. We hope that Plastid-LCGbase facilitates gene variation (insertion-deletion, translocation and rearrangement) and transcription-level studies of plastid genomes. PMID:25378306

  16. Plastid-LCGbase: a collection of evolutionarily conserved plastid-associated gene pairs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng; Yu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Plastids carry their own genetic material that encodes a variable set of genes that are limited in number but functionally important. Aside from orthology, the lineage-specific order and orientation of these genes are also relevant. Here, we develop a database, Plastid-LCGbase (http://lcgbase.big.ac.cn/plastid-LCGbase/), which focuses on organizational variability of plastid genes and genomes from diverse taxonomic groups. The current Plastid-LCGbase contains information from 470 plastid genomes and exhibits several unique features. First, through a genome-overview page generated from OrganellarGenomeDRAW, it displays general arrangement of all plastid genes (circular or linear). Second, it shows patterns and modes of all paired plastid genes and their physical distances across user-defined lineages, which are facilitated by a step-wise stratification of taxonomic groups. Third, it divides the paired genes into three categories (co-directionally-paired genes or CDPGs, convergently-paired genes or CPGs and divergently-paired genes or DPGs) and three patterns (separation, overlap and inclusion) and provides basic statistics for each species. Fourth, the gene pairing scheme is expandable, where neighboring genes can also be included in species-/lineage-specific comparisons. We hope that Plastid-LCGbase facilitates gene variation (insertion-deletion, translocation and rearrangement) and transcription-level studies of plastid genomes. PMID:25378306

  17. Gene order in rosid phylogeny, inferred from pairwise syntenies among extant genomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ancestral gene order reconstruction for flowering plants has lagged behind developments in yeasts, insects and higher animals, because of the recency of widespread plant genome sequencing, sequencers' embargoes on public data use, paralogies due to whole genome duplication (WGD) and fractionation of undeleted duplicates, extensive paralogy from other sources, and the computational cost of existing methods. Results We address these problems, using the gene order of four core eudicot genomes (cacao, castor bean, papaya and grapevine) that have escaped any recent WGD events, and two others (poplar and cucumber) that descend from independent WGDs, in inferring the ancestral gene order of the rosid clade and those of its main subgroups, the fabids and malvids. We improve and adapt techniques including the OMG method for extracting large, paralogy-free, multiple orthologies from conflated pairwise synteny data among the six genomes and the PATHGROUPS approach for ancestral gene order reconstruction in a given phylogeny, where some genomes may be descendants of WGD events. We use the gene order evidence to evaluate the hypothesis that the order Malpighiales belongs to the malvids rather than as traditionally assigned to the fabids. Conclusions Gene orders of ancestral eudicot species, involving 10,000 or more genes can be reconstructed in an efficient, parsimonious and consistent way, despite paralogies due to WGD and other processes. Pairwise genomic syntenies provide appropriate input to a parameter-free procedure of multiple ortholog identification followed by gene-order reconstruction in solving instances of the "small phylogeny" problem. PMID:22759433

  18. Rescue of Drosophila labial null mutant by the chicken ortholog Hoxb-1 demonstrates that the function of Hox genes is phylogenetically conserved.

    PubMed

    Lutz, B; Lu, H C; Eichele, G; Miller, D; Kaufman, T C

    1996-01-15

    Hox complexes are important players in the establishment of the body plan of invertebrates and vertebrates. Sequence comparison demonstrates a remarkable phylogenetic conservation of key structural features of Hox genes. The correlation between the physical order of genes along the chromosomes and their domains of function along the body axis is conserved between arthropods and vertebrates. Ectopic expression experiments suggest that the functions of homeo proteins also are conserved between invertebrates and vertebrates. However, it remains an open question whether vertebrate Hox genes expressed under the control of Drosophila regulatory sequences can substitute the function of Drosophila Hox genes. We have studied this issue with the Drosophila labial (lab) gene and its chicken ortholog gHoxb-1. We fused the entire protein-coding region of gHoxb-1 with previously identified regulatory sequences of lab. This approach places gHoxb-1 into the normal embryonic spatiotemporal context in which lab acts. Ten transgenic lines carrying gHoxb-1 were established and tested for their ability to rescue lab null mutant animals. Eight lines rescued with high efficiency, embryonic lethality, and abnormal head morphogenesis, two defects observed in lab null mutant embryos. The rescue with the gHoxb-1 minigene was close to the efficiency of that obtained with the Drosophila lab minigene. This indicates that gHoxb-1 protein can regulate lab target genes and thereby restore embryonic viability. This is striking, as Lab and gHoxb-1 proteins are divergent except for their homeo domains and a short stretch of amino acids amino-terminal to the homeo domain. Our findings demonstrate a functional conservation of the lab class homeo proteins between insects and vertebrates and support the view that function of Hox genes resides in relatively few conserved motifs and largely in the homeo domain. PMID:8566751

  19. The a(3) Scheme--A Fourth-Order Space-Time Flux-Conserving and Neutrally Stable CESE Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung

    2008-01-01

    The CESE development is driven by a belief that a solver should (i) enforce conservation laws in both space and time, and (ii) be built from a non-dissipative (i.e., neutrally stable) core scheme so that the numerical dissipation can be controlled effectively. To initiate a systematic CESE development of high order schemes, in this paper we provide a thorough discussion on the structure, consistency, stability, phase error, and accuracy of a new 4th-order space-time flux-conserving and neutrally stable CESE solver of an 1D scalar advection equation. The space-time stencil of this two-level explicit scheme is formed by one point at the upper time level and three points at the lower time level. Because it is associated with three independent mesh variables (the numerical analogues of the dependent variable and its 1st-order and 2ndorder spatial derivatives, respectively) and three equations per mesh point, the new scheme is referred to as the a(3) scheme. Through the von Neumann analysis, it is shown that the a(3) scheme is stable if and only if the Courant number is less than 0.5. Moreover, it is established numerically that the a(3) scheme is 4th-order accurate.

  20. Second order symmetry-preserving conservative Lagrangian scheme for compressible Euler equations in two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Juan; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2014-09-01

    In applications such as astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion, there are many three-dimensional cylindrical-symmetric multi-material problems which are usually simulated by Lagrangian schemes in the two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates. For this type of simulation, a critical issue for the schemes is to keep spherical symmetry in the cylindrical coordinate system if the original physical problem has this symmetry. In the past decades, several Lagrangian schemes with such symmetry property have been developed, but all of them are only first order accurate. In this paper, we develop a second order cell-centered Lagrangian scheme for solving compressible Euler equations in cylindrical coordinates, based on the control volume discretizations, which is designed to have uniformly second order accuracy and capability to preserve one-dimensional spherical symmetry in a two-dimensional cylindrical geometry when computed on an equal-angle-zoned initial grid. The scheme maintains several good properties such as conservation for mass, momentum and total energy, and the geometric conservation law. Several two-dimensional numerical examples in cylindrical coordinates are presented to demonstrate the good performance of the scheme in terms of accuracy, symmetry, non-oscillation and robustness. The advantage of higher order accuracy is demonstrated in these examples.

  1. High order weighted essentially nonoscillatory WENO-η schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ping

    2014-07-01

    In [8], the authors have designed a new fifth-order WENO finite-difference scheme (named WENO-η) by introducing a new local smoothness indicator which is defined based on the Lagrangian interpolation polynomials and has a more succinct form compared with the classical one proposed by Jiang and Shu [12]. With this new local smoothness indicator, higher order global smoothness indicators were able to be devised and the corresponding scheme (named WENO-Zη) displayed less numerical dissipations than the classic fifth-order WENO schemes, including WENO-JS [12] and WENO-Z [5,6]. In this paper, a close look is taken at Taylor expansions of the Lagrangian interpolation polynomials of the WENO sub-stencils and the related inherited symmetries of the local smoothness indicators, which allows the extension of the WENO-η scheme to higher orders of accuracy. Furthermore, general formulae for the global smoothness indicators are derived with which the WENO-Zη schemes can be extended to all odd-orders of accuracy. Numerical experiments are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed schemes.

  2. Discovery of functional non-coding conserved regions in the α-synuclein gene locus

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Lori; Walter, Michael; Ting, Dennis; Schüle, Birgitt

    2014-01-01

    Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the Rep-1 microsatellite marker of the α-synuclein ( SNCA) gene have consistently been shown to be associated with Parkinson’s disease, but the functional relevance is unclear. Based on these findings we hypothesized that conserved cis-regulatory elements in the SNCA genomic region regulate expression of SNCA, and that SNPs in these regions could be functionally modulating the expression of SNCA, thus contributing to neuronal demise and predisposing to Parkinson’s disease. In a pair-wise comparison of a 206kb genomic region encompassing the SNCA gene, we revealed 34 evolutionary conserved DNA sequences between human and mouse. All elements were cloned into reporter vectors and assessed for expression modulation in dual luciferase reporter assays.  We found that 12 out of 34 elements exhibited either an enhancement or reduction of the expression of the reporter gene. Three elements upstream of the SNCA gene displayed an approximately 1.5 fold (p<0.009) increase in expression. Of the intronic regions, three showed a 1.5 fold increase and two others indicated a 2 and 2.5 fold increase in expression (p<0.002). Three elements downstream of the SNCA gene showed 1.5 fold and 2.5 fold increase (p<0.0009). One element downstream of SNCA had a reduced expression of the reporter gene of 0.35 fold (p<0.0009) of normal activity. Our results demonstrate that the SNCA gene contains cis-regulatory regions that might regulate the transcription and expression of SNCA. Further studies in disease-relevant tissue types will be important to understand the functional impact of regulatory regions and specific Parkinson’s disease-associated SNPs and its function in the disease process. PMID:25566351

  3. Discovery of functional non-coding conserved regions in the α-synuclein gene locus.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Lori; Walter, Michael; Ting, Dennis; Schüle, Birgitt

    2014-01-01

    Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the Rep-1 microsatellite marker of the α-synuclein ( SNCA) gene have consistently been shown to be associated with Parkinson's disease, but the functional relevance is unclear. Based on these findings we hypothesized that conserved cis-regulatory elements in the SNCA genomic region regulate expression of SNCA, and that SNPs in these regions could be functionally modulating the expression of SNCA, thus contributing to neuronal demise and predisposing to Parkinson's disease. In a pair-wise comparison of a 206kb genomic region encompassing the SNCA gene, we revealed 34 evolutionary conserved DNA sequences between human and mouse. All elements were cloned into reporter vectors and assessed for expression modulation in dual luciferase reporter assays.  We found that 12 out of 34 elements exhibited either an enhancement or reduction of the expression of the reporter gene. Three elements upstream of the SNCA gene displayed an approximately 1.5 fold (p<0.009) increase in expression. Of the intronic regions, three showed a 1.5 fold increase and two others indicated a 2 and 2.5 fold increase in expression (p<0.002). Three elements downstream of the SNCA gene showed 1.5 fold and 2.5 fold increase (p<0.0009). One element downstream of SNCA had a reduced expression of the reporter gene of 0.35 fold (p<0.0009) of normal activity. Our results demonstrate that the SNCA gene contains cis-regulatory regions that might regulate the transcription and expression of SNCA. Further studies in disease-relevant tissue types will be important to understand the functional impact of regulatory regions and specific Parkinson's disease-associated SNPs and its function in the disease process.

  4. Conserved and divergent processing of neuroligin and neurexin genes: from the nematode C. elegans to human.

    PubMed

    Calahorro, Fernando

    2014-09-01

    Neuroligins are cell-adhesion proteins that interact with neurexins at the synapse. This interaction may contribute to differentiation, plasticity and specificity of synapses. In humans, single mutations in neuroligin-encoding genes are implicated in autism spectrum disorder and/or mental retardation. Moreover, some copy number variations and point mutations in neurexin-encoding genes have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders including autism. Neurexins are subject to extensive alternative splicing, highly regulated in mammals, with a great physiological importance. In addition, neuroligins and neurexins are subjected to proteolytic processes that regulate synaptic transmission modifying pre- and postsynaptic activities and may also regulate the remodelling of spines at specific synapses. Four neuroligin genes exist in mice and five in human, whilst in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, there is only one orthologous gene. In a similar manner, in mammals, there are three neurexin genes, each of them encoding two major isoforms named α and β, respectively. In contrast, there is one neurexin gene in C. elegans that also generates two isoforms like mammals. The complexity of the genetic organization of neurexins is due to extensive processing resulting in hundreds of isoforms. In this review, a wide comparison is made between the genes in the nematode and human with a view to better understanding the conservation of processing in these synaptic proteins in C. elegans, which may serve as a genetic model to decipher the synaptopathies underpinning neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism.

  5. Phylogeny of Bacterial and Archaeal Genomes Using Conserved Genes: Supertrees and Supermatrices

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Jenna Morgan; Darling, Aaron E.; Eisen, Jonathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Over 3000 microbial (bacterial and archaeal) genomes have been made publically available to date, providing an unprecedented opportunity to examine evolutionary genomic trends and offering valuable reference data for a variety of other studies such as metagenomics. The utility of these genome sequences is greatly enhanced when we have an understanding of how they are phylogenetically related to each other. Therefore, we here describe our efforts to reconstruct the phylogeny of all available bacterial and archaeal genomes. We identified 24, single-copy, ubiquitous genes suitable for this phylogenetic analysis. We used two approaches to combine the data for the 24 genes. First, we concatenated alignments of all genes into a single alignment from which a Maximum Likelihood (ML) tree was inferred using RAxML. Second, we used a relatively new approach to combining gene data, Bayesian Concordance Analysis (BCA), as implemented in the BUCKy software, in which the results of 24 single-gene phylogenetic analyses are used to generate a “primary concordance” tree. A comparison of the concatenated ML tree and the primary concordance (BUCKy) tree reveals that the two approaches give similar results, relative to a phylogenetic tree inferred from the 16S rRNA gene. After comparing the results and the methods used, we conclude that the current best approach for generating a single phylogenetic tree, suitable for use as a reference phylogeny for comparative analyses, is to perform a maximum likelihood analysis of a concatenated alignment of conserved, single-copy genes. PMID:23638103

  6. Role of Conserved Non-Coding Regulatory Elements in LMW Glutenin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Angéla; Makai, Szabolcs; Sebestyén, Endre; Tamás, László; Balázs, Ervin

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of LMW glutenin genes were investigated in-silico, using publicly available gene sequences and expression data. Genes were grouped into different LMW glutenin types and their promoter profiles were determined using cis-acting regulatory elements databases and published results. The various cis-acting elements belong to some conserved non-coding regulatory regions (CREs) and might act in two different ways. There are elements, such as GCN4 motifs found in the long endosperm box that could serve as key factors in tissue-specific expression. Some other elements, such as the AACA/TA motifs or the individual prolamin box variants, might modulate the level of expression. Based on the promoter sequences and expression characteristic LMW glutenin genes might be transcribed following two different mechanisms. Most of the s- and i-type genes show a continuously increasing expression pattern. The m-type genes, however, demonstrate normal distribution in their expression profiles. Differences observed in their expression could be related to the differences found in their promoter sequences. Polymorphisms in the number and combination of cis-acting elements in their promoter regions can be of crucial importance in the diverse levels of production of single LMW glutenin gene types. PMID:22242127

  7. Evolutionary history of the recruitment of conserved developmental genes in association to the formation and diversification of a novel trait

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The origin and modification of novel traits are important aspects of biological diversification. Studies combining concepts and approaches of developmental genetics and evolutionary biology have uncovered many examples of the recruitment, or co-option, of genes conserved across lineages for the formation of novel, lineage-restricted traits. However, little is known about the evolutionary history of the recruitment of those genes, and of the relationship between them -for example, whether the co-option involves whole or parts of existing networks, or whether it occurs by redeployment of individual genes with de novo rewiring. We use a model novel trait, color pattern elements on butterfly wings called eyespots, to explore these questions. Eyespots have greatly diversified under natural and sexual selection, and their formation involves genetic circuitries shared across insects. Results We investigated the evolutionary history of the recruitment and co-recruitment of four conserved transcription regulators to the larval wing disc region where circular pattern elements develop. The co-localization of Antennapedia, Notch, Distal-less, and Spalt with presumptive (eye)spot organizers was examined in 13 butterfly species, providing the largest comparative dataset available for the system. We found variation between families, between subfamilies, and between tribes. Phylogenetic reconstructions by parsimony and maximum likelihood methods revealed an unambiguous evolutionary history only for Antennapedia, with a resolved single origin of eyespot-associated expression, and many homoplastic events for Notch, Distal-less, and Spalt. The flexibility in the (co-)recruitment of the targeted genes includes cases where different gene combinations are associated with morphologically similar eyespots, as well as cases where identical protein combinations are associated with very different phenotypes. Conclusions The evolutionary history of gene (co-)recruitment is

  8. Evolutionary analysis of multidrug resistance genes in fungi - impact of gene duplication and family conservation.

    PubMed

    Gossani, Cristiani; Bellieny-Rabelo, Daniel; Venancio, Thiago M

    2014-11-01

    Although the emergence of bacterial drug resistance is of great concern to the scientific community, few studies have evaluated this phenomenon systematically in fungi by using genome-wide datasets. In the present study, we assembled a large compendium of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chemical genetic data to study the evolution of multidrug resistance genes (MDRs) in the fungal lineage. We found that MDRs typically emerge in widely conserved families, most of which containing homologs from pathogenic fungi, such as Candida albicans and Coccidioides immitis, which could favor the evolution of drug resistance in those species. By integrating data from chemical genetics with protein family conservation, genetic and protein interactions, we found that gene families rarely have more than one MDR, indicating that paralogs evolve asymmetrically with regard to multidrug resistance roles. Furthermore, MDRs have more genetic and protein interaction partners than non-MDRs, supporting their participation in complex biochemical systems underlying the tolerance to multiple bioactive molecules. MDRs share more chemical genetic interactions with other MDRs than with non-MDRs, regardless of their evolutionary affinity. These results suggest the existence of an intricate system involved in the global drug tolerance phenotypes. Finally, MDRs are more likely to be hit repeatedly by mutations in laboratory evolution experiments, indicating that they have great adaptive potential. The results presented here not only reveal the main genomic features underlying the evolution of MDRs, but also shed light on the gene families from which drug resistance is more likely to emerge in fungi.

  9. 76 FR 31951 - Energy Conservation Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Decision and Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... which Mitsubishi could test and make valid energy efficiency representations for its R410A CITY MULTI.... Today's decision prohibits Carrier from making any representations concerning the energy efficiency of... alternate test procedure set forth in the Decision and Order below, and the representations fairly...

  10. Functional conservation and diversification of the soybean maturity gene E1 and its homologs in legumes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingzheng; Zhai, Hong; Wang, Yaying; Tian, Xiaojie; Zhang, Yupeng; Wu, Hongyan; Lü, Shixiang; Yang, Guang; Li, Yuqiu; Wang, Lu; Hu, Bo; Bu, Qingyun; Xia, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks involved in flowering time and photoperiodic responses in legumes remain unknown. Although the major maturity gene E1 has been successfully deciphered in soybean, knowledge on the functional conservation of this gene is limited to a certain extent to E1 homologs in legumes. The ectopic expression of Phvul.009G204600 (PvE1L), an E1 homolog from common bean, delayed the onset of flowering in soybean. By contrast, the ectopic expression of Medtr2g058520 (MtE1L) from Medicago truncatula did not affect the flowering of soybean. Characterization of the late-flowering mte1l mutant indicated that MtE1L promoted flowering in Medicago truncatula. Moreover, all transgenic E1, PvE1L and MtE1L soybean lines exhibited phenotypic changes in terms of plant height. Transgenic E1 or PvE1L plants were taller than the wild-type, whereas transgenic MtE1L plants produced dwarf phenotype with few nodes and short internode. Thus, functional conservation and diversification of E1 family genes from legumes in the regulation of flowering and plant growth may be associated with lineage specification and genomic duplication. PMID:27405888

  11. Functional conservation and diversification of the soybean maturity gene E1 and its homologs in legumes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingzheng; Zhai, Hong; Wang, Yaying; Tian, Xiaojie; Zhang, Yupeng; Wu, Hongyan; Lü, Shixiang; Yang, Guang; Li, Yuqiu; Wang, Lu; Hu, Bo; Bu, Qingyun; Xia, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks involved in flowering time and photoperiodic responses in legumes remain unknown. Although the major maturity gene E1 has been successfully deciphered in soybean, knowledge on the functional conservation of this gene is limited to a certain extent to E1 homologs in legumes. The ectopic expression of Phvul.009G204600 (PvE1L), an E1 homolog from common bean, delayed the onset of flowering in soybean. By contrast, the ectopic expression of Medtr2g058520 (MtE1L) from Medicago truncatula did not affect the flowering of soybean. Characterization of the late-flowering mte1l mutant indicated that MtE1L promoted flowering in Medicago truncatula. Moreover, all transgenic E1, PvE1L and MtE1L soybean lines exhibited phenotypic changes in terms of plant height. Transgenic E1 or PvE1L plants were taller than the wild-type, whereas transgenic MtE1L plants produced dwarf phenotype with few nodes and short internode. Thus, functional conservation and diversification of E1 family genes from legumes in the regulation of flowering and plant growth may be associated with lineage specification and genomic duplication. PMID:27405888

  12. Evolutionary Conservation of Xylan Biosynthetic Genes in Selaginella moellendorffii and Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Haghighat, Marziyeh; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Xylan is a major cross-linking hemicellulose in secondary walls of vascular tissues, and the recruitment of xylan as a secondary wall component was suggested to be a pivotal event for the evolution of vascular tissues. To decipher the evolution of xylan structure and xylan biosynthetic genes, we analyzed xylan substitution patterns and characterized genes mediating methylation of glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains in xylan of the model seedless vascular plant, Selaginella moellendorffii, and investigated GT43 genes from S. moellendorffii and the model non-vascular plant, Physcomitrella patens, for their roles in xylan biosynthesis. Using nuclear magentic resonance spectroscopy, we have demonstrated that S. moellendorffii xylan consists of β-1,4-linked xylosyl residues subsituted solely with methylated GlcA residues and that xylans from both S. moellendorffii and P. patens are acetylated at O-2 and O-3. To investigate genes responsible for GlcA methylation of xylan, we identified two DUF579 genes in the S. moellendorffii genome and showed that one of them, SmGXM, encodes a glucuronoxylan methyltransferase capable of adding the methyl group onto the GlcA side chain of xylooligomers. Furthermore, we revealed that the two GT43 genes in S. moellendorffii, SmGT43A and SmGT43B, are functional orthologs of the Arabidopsis xylan backbone biosynthetic genes IRX9 and IRX14, respectively, indicating the evolutionary conservation of the involvement of two functionally non-redundant groups of GT43 genes in xylan backbone biosynthesis between seedless and seed vascular plants. Among the five GT43 genes in P. patens, PpGT43A was found to be a functional ortholog of Arabidopsis IRX9, suggesting that the recruitment of GT43 genes in xylan backbone biosynthesis occurred when non-vascular plants appeared on land. PMID:27345025

  13. Conserved synteny at the protein family level reveals genes underlying Shewanella species cold tolerance and predicts their novel phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Obraztsova, Anna; Wang, Yanbing; Schmoyer, Denise D.; Kora, Guruprasad; Park, Byung H.; Serres, Margrethe H.; Romine, Margaret F.; Land, Miriam L.; Kothe, Terence B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Uberbacher, Edward

    2010-03-01

    Bacteria of the genus Shewanella can thrive in different environments and demonstrate significant variability in their metabolic and ecophysiological capabilities including cold and salt tolerance. Genomic characteristics underlying this variability across species are largely unknown. In this study we address the problem by a comparison of the physiological, metabolic and genomic characteristics of 19 sequenced Shewanella species. We have employed two novel approaches based on association of a phenotypic trait with the number of the trait-specific protein families (Pfam domains) and on the conservation of synteny (order in the genome) of the trait-related genes. Our first approach is top-down and involves experimental evaluation and quantification of the species’ cold tolerance followed by identification of the correlated Pfam domains and genes with a conserved synteny. The second, a bottom-up approach, predicts novel phenotypes of the species by calculating profiles of each Pfam domain among their genomes and following pair-wise correlation of the profiles and their network clustering. Using the first approach we find a link between cold and salt tolerance of the species and the presence in the genome of a Na+/H+ antiporter gene cluster. Other cold tolerance related genes includes peptidases, chemotaxis sensory transducer proteins, a cysteine exporter, and helicases. Using the bottom-up approach we found several novel phenotypes in the newly sequenced Shewanella species, including degradation of aromatic compounds by an aerobic hybrid pathway in S. woodyi, degradation of ethanolamine by S. benthica, and propanediol degradation by S. putrefaciens CN32 and S. sp. W3-18-1.

  14. Functional conservation of the Drosophila gooseberry gene and its evolutionary alleles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Xue, Lei

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila Pax gene gooseberry (gsb) is required for development of the larval cuticle and CNS, survival to adulthood, and male fertility. These functions can be rescued in gsb mutants by two gsb evolutionary alleles, gsb-Prd and gsb-Pax3, which express the Drosophila Paired and mouse Pax3 proteins under the control of gooseberry cis-regulatory region. Therefore, both Paired and Pax3 proteins have conserved all the Gsb functions that are required for survival of embryos to fertile adults, despite the divergent primary sequences in their C-terminal halves. As gsb-Prd and gsb-Pax3 uncover a gsb function involved in male fertility, construction of evolutionary alleles may provide a powerful strategy to dissect hitherto unknown gene functions. Our results provide further evidence for the essential role of cis-regulatory regions in the functional diversification of duplicated genes during evolution.

  15. Area-preserving dynamics of a long slender finger by curvature: a test case for globally conserved phase ordering.

    PubMed

    Peleg, A; Meerson, B; Vilenkin, A; Conti, M

    2001-06-01

    A long and slender finger can serve as a simple "test bed" for different phase-ordering models. In this work, the globally conserved, interface-controlled dynamics of a long finger is investigated, analytically and numerically, in two dimensions. An important limit is considered when the finger dynamics is reducible to area-preserving motion by curvature. A free boundary problem for the finger shape is formulated. An asymptotic perturbation theory is developed that uses the finger aspect ratio as a small parameter. The leading-order approximation is a modification of the Mullins finger (a well-known analytic solution) whose width is allowed to slowly vary with time. This time dependence is described, in the leading order, by an exponential law with the characteristic time proportional to the (constant) finger area. The subleading terms of the asymptotic theory are also calculated. Finally, the finger dynamics is investigated numerically, employing the Ginzburg-Landau equation with a global conservation law. The theory is in very good agreement with the numerical solution.

  16. Isolation of BAC clones containing conserved genes from libraries of three distantly related moths: a useful resource for comparative genomics of Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Yasukochi, Yuji; Tanaka-Okuyama, Makiko; Kamimura, Manabu; Nakano, Ryo; Naito, Yota; Ishikawa, Yukio; Sahara, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Lepidoptera, butterflies and moths, is the second largest animal order and includes numerous agricultural pests. To facilitate comparative genomics in Lepidoptera, we isolated BAC clones containing conserved and putative single-copy genes from libraries of three pests, Heliothis virescens, Ostrinia nubilalis, and Plutella xylostella, harboring the haploid chromosome number, n = 31, which are not closely related with each other or with the silkworm, Bombyx mori, (n = 28), the sequenced model lepidopteran. A total of 108-184 clones representing 101-182 conserved genes were isolated for each species. For 79 genes, clones were isolated from more than two species, which will be useful as common markers for analysis using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), as well as for comparison of genome sequence among multiple species. The PCR-based clone isolation method presented here is applicable to species which lack a sequenced genome but have a significant collection of cDNA or EST sequences.

  17. The rnhB gene encoding RNase HII of Streptococcus pneumoniae and evidence of conserved motifs in eucaryotic genes.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y B; Ayalew, S; Lacks, S A

    1997-01-01

    A single RNase H enzyme was detected in extracts of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The gene encoding this enzyme was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, as demonstrated by its ability to complement a double-mutant rnhA recC strain. Sequence analysis of the cloned DNA revealed an open reading frame of 290 codons that encodes a polypeptide of 31.9 kDa. The predicted protein exhibits a low level of homology (19% identity of amino acid residues) to RNase HII encoded by rnhB of E. coli. Identification of the S. pneumoniae RNase HII translation start site by amino-terminal sequencing of the protein and of mRNA start sites by primer extension with reverse transcriptase showed that the major transcript encoding rnhB begins at the protein start site. Comparison of the S. pneumoniae and E. coli RNase HII sequences and sequences of other, putative bacterial rnhB gene products surmised from sequencing data revealed three conserved motifs. Use of these motifs to search for homologous genes in eucaryotes demonstrated the presence of rnhB genes in a yeast and a roundworm. Partial rnhB gene sequences were detected among expressed sequences of mouse and human cells. From these data, it appears that RNase HII is universally present in living cells. PMID:9190796

  18. The physics of the second-order gyrokinetic magnetohydrodynamic Hamiltonian: μ conservation, Galilean invariance, and ponderomotive potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J. A.

    2013-12-15

    Some physical interpretations are given of the well-known second-order gyrokinetic Hamiltonian in the magnetohydrodynamic limit. Its relations to the conservation of the true (Galilean-invariant) magnetic moment and fluid nonlinearities are described. Subtleties about its derivation as a cold-ion limit are explained; it is important to take that limit in the frame moving with the E×B velocity. The discussion also provides some geometric understanding of certain well-known Lie generating functions, and it makes contact with general discussions of ponderomotive potentials and the thermodynamics of dielectric media.

  19. A Large Gene Cluster Encoding Several Magnetosome Proteins Is Conserved in Different Species of Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Grünberg, Karen; Wawer, Cathrin; Tebo, Bradley M.; Schüler, Dirk

    2001-01-01

    In magnetotactic bacteria, a number of specific proteins are associated with the magnetosome membrane (MM) and may have a crucial role in magnetite biomineralization. We have cloned and sequenced the genes of several of these polypeptides in the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense that could be assigned to two different genomic regions. Except for mamA, none of these genes have been previously reported to be related to magnetosome formation. Homologous genes were found in the genome sequences of M. magnetotacticum and magnetic coccus strain MC-1. The MM proteins identified display homology to tetratricopeptide repeat proteins (MamA), cation diffusion facilitators (MamB), and HtrA-like serine proteases (MamE) or bear no similarity to known proteins (MamC and MamD). A major gene cluster containing several magnetosome genes (including mamA and mamB) was found to be conserved in all three of the strains investigated. The mamAB cluster also contains additional genes that have no known homologs in any nonmagnetic organism, suggesting a specific role in magnetosome formation. PMID:11571158

  20. Mammalian ets-1 and ets-2 genes encode highly conserved proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.K.; McWilliams, M.J.; Lapis, P.; Lautenberger, J.A.; Schweinfest, C.W.; Papas, T.S. )

    1988-11-01

    Cellular ets sequences homologous to v-ets of the avian leukemia virus E26 are highly conserved. In mammals the ets sequences are dispersed on two separate chromosomal loci, called ets-1 and ets-2. To determine the structure of these two genes and identify the open reading frames that code for the putative proteins, the authors have sequenced human ets-1 cDNAs and ets-2 cDNA clones obtained from both human and mouse. The human ETS1 gene is capable of encoding a protein of 441 amino acids. This protein is >95% identical to the chicken c-ets-1 gene product. Thus, the human ETS1 gene is homologous to the chicken c-ets-1 gene, the protooncogene that the E26 virus transduced. Human and mouse ets-2 cDNA clones are closely related and contain open reading frames capable of encoding proteins of 469 and 468 residues, respectively. Direct comparison of these data with previously published finding indicates that ets is a family of genes whose members share distinct domains.

  1. The Neurospora crassa carotenoid biosynthetic gene (albino 3) reveals highly conserved regions among prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Carattoli, A; Romano, N; Ballario, P; Morelli, G; Macino, G

    1991-03-25

    In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa the biosynthesis of carotenoids is regulated by blue light. Here we report the characterization of the albino-3 (al-3) gene of N. crassa, which encodes the carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate synthetase. This is the first geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate synthetase gene isolated. Nucleotide sequence comparison of al-3 genomic and cDNA clones revealed that the al-3 gene is not interrupted by introns. Transcription of the al-3 gene has been examined in dark-grown and light-induced mycelia. The analysis revealed that the al-3 gene is not expressed in the dark and that its transcription is induced by blue light (Nelson, M. A., Morelli, G., Carattoli, A., Romano, N., and Macino, G. (1989) Mol. Cell. Biol. 9, 1271-1276). The al-3 gene encodes a polypeptide of 428 amino acids. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of al-3 with the sequences of prenyltransferases of other species, from bacteria to humans, showed three highly conserved homologous regions. These homologous regions may be involved in the formation of the catalytic site of the prenyltransferases.

  2. Divergent mechanisms regulate conserved cardiopharyngeal development and gene expression in distantly related ascidians

    PubMed Central

    Stolfi, Alberto; Lowe, Elijah K; Racioppi, Claudia; Ristoratore, Filomena; Brown, C Titus; Swalla, Billie J; Christiaen, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Ascidians present a striking dichotomy between conserved phenotypes and divergent genomes: embryonic cell lineages and gene expression patterns are conserved between distantly related species. Much research has focused on Ciona or Halocynthia spp. but development in other ascidians remains poorly characterized. In this study, we surveyed the multipotent myogenic B7.5 lineage in Molgula spp. Comparisons to the homologous lineage in Ciona revealed identical cell division and fate specification events that result in segregation of larval, cardiac, and pharyngeal muscle progenitors. Moreover, the expression patterns of key regulators are conserved, but cross-species transgenic assays uncovered incompatibility, or ‘unintelligibility’, of orthologous cis-regulatory sequences between Molgula and Ciona. These sequences drive identical expression patterns that are not recapitulated in cross-species assays. We show that this unintelligibility is likely due to changes in both cis- and trans-acting elements, hinting at widespread and frequent turnover of regulatory mechanisms underlying otherwise conserved aspects of ascidian embryogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03728.001 PMID:25209999

  3. Composition and Expression of Conserved MicroRNA Genes in Diploid Cotton (Gossypium) Species

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lei; Kakrana, Atul; Arikit, Siwaret; Meyers, Blake C.; Wendel, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are ubiquitous in plant genomes but vary greatly in their abundance within and conservation among plant lineages. To gain insight into the evolutionary birth/death dynamics of microRNA families, we sequenced small RNA and 5′-end PARE libraries generated from two closely related species of Gossypium. Here, we demonstrate that 33 microRNA families, with similar copy numbers and average evolutionary rates, are conserved in the two congeneric cottons. Analysis of the presence/absence of these microRNA families in other land plants sheds light on their depth of phylogenetic origin and lineage-specific loss/gain. Conserved microRNA families in Gossypium exhibit a striking interspecific asymmetry in expression, potentially connected to relative proximity to neighboring transposable elements. A complex correlated expression pattern of microRNA target genes with their controlling microRNAs indicates that possible functional divergence of conserved microRNA families can also exist even within a single plant genus. PMID:24281048

  4. Inferring the evolutionary history of gene clusters from phylogenetic and gene order data.

    PubMed

    Lajoie, Mathieu; Bertrand, Denis; El-Mabrouk, Nadia

    2010-04-01

    Gene duplication is frequent within gene clusters and plays a fundamental role in evolution by providing a source of new genetic material upon which natural selection can act. Although classical phylogenetic inference methods provide some insight into the evolutionary history of a gene cluster, they are not sufficient alone to differentiate single- from multiple gene duplication events and to answer other questions regarding the nature and size of evolutionary events. In this paper, we present an algorithm allowing to infer a set of optimal evolutionary histories for a gene cluster in a single species, according to a general cost model involving variable length duplications (in tandem or inverted), deletions, and inversions. We applied our algorithm to the human olfactory receptor and protocadherin gene clusters, showing that the duplication size distribution differs significantly between the two gene families. The algorithm is available through a web interface at http://www-lbit.iro.umontreal.ca/DILTAG/.

  5. Conserved and Diversified Gene Families of Monovalent Cation/H+ Antiporters from Algae to Flowering Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chanroj, Salil; Wang, Guoying; Venema, Kees; Zhang, Muren Warren; Delwiche, Charles F.; Sze, Heven

    2012-01-01

    All organisms have evolved strategies to regulate ion and pH homeostasis in response to developmental and environmental cues. One strategy is mediated by monovalent cation–proton antiporters (CPA) that are classified in two superfamilies. Many CPA1 genes from bacteria, fungi, metazoa, and plants have been functionally characterized; though roles of plant CPA2 genes encoding K+-efflux antiporter (KEA) and cation/H+ exchanger (CHX) families are largely unknown. Phylogenetic analysis showed that three clades of the CPA1 Na+–H+ exchanger (NHX) family have been conserved from single-celled algae to Arabidopsis. These are (i) plasma membrane-bound SOS1/AtNHX7 that share ancestry with prokaryote NhaP, (ii) endosomal AtNHX5/6 that is part of the eukaryote Intracellular-NHE clade, and (iii) a vacuolar NHX clade (AtNHX1–4) specific to plants. Early diversification of KEA genes possibly from an ancestral cyanobacterium gene is suggested by three types seen in all plants. Intriguingly, CHX genes diversified from three to four members in one subclade of early land plants to 28 genes in eight subclades of Arabidopsis. Homologs from Spirogyra or Physcomitrella share high similarity with AtCHX20, suggesting that guard cell-specific AtCHX20 and its closest relatives are founders of the family, and pollen-expressed CHX genes appeared later in monocots and early eudicots. AtCHX proteins mediate K+ transport and pH homeostasis, and have been localized to intracellular and plasma membrane. Thus KEA genes are conserved from green algae to angiosperms, and their presence in red algae and secondary endosymbionts suggest a role in plastids. In contrast, AtNHX1–4 subtype evolved in plant cells to handle ion homeostasis of vacuoles. The great diversity of CHX genes in land plants compared to metazoa, fungi, or algae would imply a significant role of ion and pH homeostasis at dynamic endomembranes in the vegetative and reproductive success of flowering plants. PMID:22639643

  6. [Analysis of conserved flanking elements associated with antibiotic resistance genes dissemination].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Mao, Da-Qing; Ren, Jun; Luo, Yi; Cao, Wen-Qing

    2012-01-01

    The overuse of antibiotics in medicine, animal husbandry, and aquiculture industry increases the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), and also, accelerates the dissemination of ARGs within environmental bacteria. In this study, the total DNA was directly extracted from environmental samples, and the upstream and downstream of antibiotic resistance genes were directly amplified by thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (Tail-PCR) technique. By optimizing the Tail-PCR program, the multiple flanking sequences of tetW, including 6 upstream sequences and 9 downstream sequences, were simultaneously acquired. Through the bioinformatics analysis, the upstream of tetW presented a perfect inverted repeat (IR), a known tetW regulator peptide, and an insertional sequence (IS), whereas the downstream of tetW presented a most conservative fragment and a common open reading frame (ORF) coding methyltransferase. This study not only revealed several conserved flanking tetW gene modules, but also supplied a highly-efficient and convenient methodology for the research of tetW's dissemination within bacteria, i. e., several flanking sequences could be concisely obtained from one sample by using Tail-PCR program.

  7. Conservation of endangered Spanish cattle breeds using markers of candidate genes for meat quality.

    PubMed

    Rodero, E; González, A; Avilés, C; Luque, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to analyze the allelic and genotypic frequencies for two genes associated with tenderness of meat (CAPN1 and CAST) and one with fat deposits (DGAT1) in three endangered Spanish cattle breeds: Berrenda en Colorado (BC), Berrenda en Negro (BN), and Cardena Andaluza (CA) to utility of their involvement in the selection of them and to help the adoption of conservation measurement. Seventy-five males and 298 females of those breeds were genotyped. Genotypic and allelic frequencies for each polymorphic locus were estimated. There were significant differences in the genotypic frequencies among breeds in CAPN1 and DGTA1 genes and in the case of the genic frequencies in CAPN1, CAST, and DGAT1 genes. The three breeds analyzed (BC, BN, and CA) presented high allelic frequencies for the favorable allele of the three markers (from 0.41 to 0.75). The association between the favorable allele and meat quality must be confirmed. In cases of association with differences in quality meat, the absence of differences in the genotypic and genic frequency distributions between the sexes is advantageous in mating planning because it implies that there is no handicap to be overcome for the conservation program and it would allow the use of sires to promote the increase in improvements within a short period of time.

  8. Nucleotide Variation and Conservation at the Dpp Locus, a Gene Controlling Early Development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Richter, B.; Long, M.; Lewontin, R. C.; Nitasaka, E.

    1997-01-01

    A study of polymorphism and species divergence of the dpp gene of Drosophila has been made. Eighteen lines from a population of D. melanogaster were sequenced for 5200 bp of the Hin region of the gene, coding for the dpp polypeptide. A comparison was made with sequence from D. simulans. Ninety-six silent polymorphisms and three amino acid replacement polymorphisms were found. The overall silent polymorphism (0.0247) is low, but haplotype diversity (0.0066 for effectively silent sites and 0.0054 for all sites) is in the range found for enzyme loci. Amino acid variation is absent in the N-terminal signal peptide, the C-terminal TGF-β peptide and in the N-terminal half of the pro-protein region. At the nucleotide level there is strong conservation in the middle half of the large intron and in the 3' untranslated sequence of the last exon. The 3' untranslated conservation, which is perfect for 110 bp among all the divergent species, is unexplained. There is strong positive linkage disequilibrium among polymorphic sites, with stretches of apparent gene conversion among originally divergent sequences. The population apparently is a migration mixture of divergent clades. PMID:9071586

  9. Ancestral major histocompatibility complex DRB genes beget conserved patterns of localized polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, L K; Nepom, G T

    1996-01-01

    Genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are characterized by extensive polymorphism within species and also by a remarkable conservation of contemporary human allelic sequences in evolutionarily distant primates. Mechanisms proposed to account for strict nucleotide conservation in the context of highly variable genes include the suggestion that intergenic exchange generates repeated sets of MHC DRB polymorphisms [Gyllensten, U. B., Sundvall, M. & Erlich, H. A. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88, 3686-3690; Lundberg, A. S. & McDevitt, H. 0. (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89, 6545-6549]. We analyzed over 50 primate MHC DRB sequences, and identified nucleotide elements within macaque and baboon DRB6-like sequences with deletions corresponding to specific exon 2 hypervariable regions, which encode a discrete alpha helical segment of the MHC antigen combining site. This precisely localized deletion provides direct evidence implicating segmental exchange of MHC-encoded DRB gene fragments as one of the evolutionary mechanisms both generating and maintaining MHC diversity. Intergenic exchange at this site may be fundamental to the diversification of immune protection in populations by permitting alteration in the specificity of the MHC that determines the repertoire of antigens bound. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8643583

  10. Strict evolutionary conservation followed rapid gene loss on human and rhesus Y chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jennifer F; Skaletsky, Helen; Brown, Laura G; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Graves, Tina; Fulton, Robert S; Dugan, Shannon; Ding, Yan; Buhay, Christian J; Kremitzki, Colin; Wang, Qiaoyan; Shen, Hua; Holder, Michael; Villasana, Donna; Nazareth, Lynne V; Cree, Andrew; Courtney, Laura; Veizer, Joelle; Kotkiewicz, Holland; Cho, Ting-Jan; Koutseva, Natalia; Rozen, Steve; Muzny, Donna M; Warren, Wesley C; Gibbs, Richard A; Wilson, Richard K; Page, David C

    2012-02-22

    The human X and Y chromosomes evolved from an ordinary pair of autosomes during the past 200-300 million years. The human MSY (male-specific region of Y chromosome) retains only three percent of the ancestral autosomes' genes owing to genetic decay. This evolutionary decay was driven by a series of five 'stratification' events. Each event suppressed X-Y crossing over within a chromosome segment or 'stratum', incorporated that segment into the MSY and subjected its genes to the erosive forces that attend the absence of crossing over. The last of these events occurred 30 million years ago, 5 million years before the human and Old World monkey lineages diverged. Although speculation abounds regarding ongoing decay and looming extinction of the human Y chromosome, remarkably little is known about how many MSY genes were lost in the human lineage in the 25 million years that have followed its separation from the Old World monkey lineage. To investigate this question, we sequenced the MSY of the rhesus macaque, an Old World monkey, and compared it to the human MSY. We discovered that during the last 25 million years MSY gene loss in the human lineage was limited to the youngest stratum (stratum 5), which comprises three percent of the human MSY. In the older strata, which collectively comprise the bulk of the human MSY, gene loss evidently ceased more than 25 million years ago. Likewise, the rhesus MSY has not lost any older genes (from strata 1-4) during the past 25 million years, despite its major structural differences to the human MSY. The rhesus MSY is simpler, with few amplified gene families or palindromes that might enable intrachromosomal recombination and repair. We present an empirical reconstruction of human MSY evolution in which each stratum transitioned from rapid, exponential loss of ancestral genes to strict conservation through purifying selection.

  11. A high-order finite-volume method for hyperbolic conservation laws on locally-refined grids

    SciTech Connect

    McCorquodale, Peter; Colella, Phillip

    2011-01-28

    We present a fourth-order accurate finite-volume method for solving time-dependent hyperbolic systems of conservation laws on Cartesian grids with multiple levels of refinement. The underlying method is a generalization of that in [5] to nonlinear systems, and is based on using fourth-order accurate quadratures for computing fluxes on faces, combined with fourth-order accurate Runge?Kutta discretization in time. To interpolate boundary conditions at refinement boundaries, we interpolate in time in a manner consistent with the individual stages of the Runge-Kutta method, and interpolate in space by solving a least-squares problem over a neighborhood of each target cell for the coefficients of a cubic polynomial. The method also uses a variation on the extremum-preserving limiter in [8], as well as slope flattening and a fourth-order accurate artificial viscosity for strong shocks. We show that the resulting method is fourth-order accurate for smooth solutions, and is robust in the presence of complex combinations of shocks and smooth flows.

  12. High-order conservative finite difference GLM-MHD schemes for cell-centered MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignone, Andrea; Tzeferacos, Petros; Bodo, Gianluigi

    2010-08-01

    We present and compare third- as well as fifth-order accurate finite difference schemes for the numerical solution of the compressible ideal MHD equations in multiple spatial dimensions. The selected methods lean on four different reconstruction techniques based on recently improved versions of the weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes, monotonicity preserving (MP) schemes as well as slope-limited polynomial reconstruction. The proposed numerical methods are highly accurate in smooth regions of the flow, avoid loss of accuracy in proximity of smooth extrema and provide sharp non-oscillatory transitions at discontinuities. We suggest a numerical formulation based on a cell-centered approach where all of the primary flow variables are discretized at the zone center. The divergence-free condition is enforced by augmenting the MHD equations with a generalized Lagrange multiplier yielding a mixed hyperbolic/parabolic correction, as in Dedner et al. [J. Comput. Phys. 175 (2002) 645-673]. The resulting family of schemes is robust, cost-effective and straightforward to implement. Compared to previous existing approaches, it completely avoids the CPU intensive workload associated with an elliptic divergence cleaning step and the additional complexities required by staggered mesh algorithms. Extensive numerical testing demonstrate the robustness and reliability of the proposed framework for computations involving both smooth and discontinuous features.

  13. The insect cytochrome oxidase I gene: evolutionary patterns and conserved primers for phylogenetic studies.

    PubMed

    Lunt, D H; Zhang, D X; Szymura, J M; Hewitt, G M

    1996-08-01

    Insect mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) genes are used as a model to examine the within-gene heterogeneity of evolutionary rate and its implications for evolutionary analyses. The complete sequence (1537 bp) of the meadow grasshopper (Chorthippus parallelus) COI gene has been determined, and compared with eight other insect COI genes at both the DNA and amino acid sequence levels. This reveals that different regions evolve at different rates, and the patterns of sequence variability seems associated with functional constraints on the protein. The COOH-terminal was found to be significantly more variable than internal loops (I), external loops (E), transmembrane helices (M) or the NH2 terminal. The central region of COI (M5-M8) has lower levels of sequence variability, which is related to several important functional domains in this region. Highly conserved primers which amplify regions of different variabilities have been designed to cover the entire insect COI gene. These primers have been shown to amplify COI in a wide range of species, representing all the major insect groups; some even in an arachnid. Implications of the observed evolutionary pattern for phylogenetic analysis are discussed, with particular regard to the choice of regions of suitable variability for specific phylogenetic projects.

  14. Involvement of the conserved Hox gene Antennapedia in the development and evolution of a novel trait

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hox proteins specify segment identity during embryogenesis and have typical associated expression patterns. Changes in embryonic expression and activity of Hox genes were crucial in the evolution of animal body plans, but their role in the post-embryonic development of lineage-specific traits remains largely unexplored. Here, we focus on the insect Hox genes Ultrabithorax (Ubx) and Antennapedia (Antp), and implicate the latter in the formation and diversification of novel, butterfly-specific wing patterns. Results First, we describe a conserved pattern of Ubx expression and a novel pattern of Antp expression in wing discs of Bicyclus anynana butterflies. The discrete, reiterated domains of Antp contrast with the typical expression of Hox genes in single continuous regions in arthropod embryos. Second, we show that this pattern is associated with the establishment of the organizing centres of eyespots. Antp upregulation is the earliest event in organizer development described to date, and in contrast to all genes implicated in eyespot formation, is exclusive to those centres. Third, our comparative analysis of gene expression across nymphalids reveals unexpected differences in organizer determination. Conclusions We show that the Antp's recruitment for the formation of novel traits in butterfly wing discs involved the evolution of new expression domains, and is restricted to a particular lineage. This study contributes novel insights into the evolution of Antp expression, as well as into the genetic mechanisms underlying morphological diversification. Our results also underscore how a wider representation of morphological and phylogenetic diversity is essential in evolutionary developmental biology. PMID:21504568

  15. Preferential utilization of conserved immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene segments during human fetal life.

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, H W; Wang, J Y

    1990-01-01

    The ability to respond to specific antigens develops in a programmed fashion. Although the antibody repertoire in adults is presumably generated by stochastic combinatorial joining of rearranged heavy variable, diversity, and joining (VH-DH-JH) and light (VL-JL) chains, experimental evidence in the mouse has shown nonrandom utilization of variable gene segments during ontogeny and in response to specific antigens. In this study, we have performed sequence analysis of 104-day human fetal liver-derived, randomly isolated constant region C+ mu transcripts and demonstrate a consistent preference during fetal life for a small subset of three highly conserved VH3 family gene segments. In addition, the data show that this preferential gene segment utilization extends to the DHQ52 and the JH3 and JH4 loci. Sequence analysis of two "sterile" DH-JH transcripts suggests that transcriptional activation of the JH-proximal DHQ52 element may precede initiation of DH-JH rearrangement and influence fetal DH utilization. Sequence comparisons reveal striking nucleotide polymorphism in allelic gene segments which is poorly reflected in the peptide sequence, implying considerable evolutionary selection pressure. Although vertebrate species utilize a variety of strategies to generate their antibody repertoire, preferential utilization of VH3 elements is consistently found during early development. These data support the hypothesis that VH3 gene segments play an essential role in the development of the immune response. Images PMID:2117273

  16. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Strain-Specific and Conserved Stemness Genes in Schmidtea mediterranea

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi-Chien; Horowitz, Michael; Graveley, Brenton R.

    2012-01-01

    The planarian Schmidtea mediterranea is a powerful model organism for studying stem cell biology due to its extraordinary regenerative ability mediated by neoblasts, a population of adult somatic stem cells. Elucidation of the S. mediterranea transcriptome and the dynamics of transcript expression will increase our understanding of the gene regulatory programs that regulate stem cell function and differentiation. Here, we have used RNA-Seq to characterize the S. mediterranea transcriptome in sexual and asexual animals and in purified neoblast and differentiated cell populations. Our analysis identified many uncharacterized genes, transcripts, and alternatively spliced isoforms that are differentially expressed in a strain or cell type-specific manner. Transcriptome profiling of purified neoblasts and differentiated cells identified neoblast-enriched transcripts, many of which likely play important roles in regeneration and stem cell function. Strikingly, many of the neoblast-enriched genes are orthologs of genes whose expression is enriched in human embryonic stem cells, suggesting that a core set of genes that regulate stem cell function are conserved across metazoan species. PMID:22496805

  17. Conservation and divergence of autonomous pathway genes in the flowering regulatory network of Beta vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Abou-Elwafa, Salah F; Büttner, Bianca; Chia, Tansy; Schulze-Buxloh, Gretel; Hohmann, Uwe; Mutasa-Göttgens, Effie; Jung, Christian; Müller, Andreas E

    2011-06-01

    The transition from vegetative growth to reproductive development is a complex process that requires an integrated response to multiple environmental cues and endogenous signals. In Arabidopsis thaliana, which has a facultative requirement for vernalization and long days, the genes of the autonomous pathway function as floral promoters by repressing the central repressor and vernalization-regulatory gene FLC. Environmental regulation by seasonal changes in daylength is under control of the photoperiod pathway and its key gene CO. The root and leaf crop species Beta vulgaris in the caryophyllid clade of core eudicots, which is only very distantly related to Arabidopsis, is an obligate long-day plant and includes forms with or without vernalization requirement. FLC and CO homologues with related functions in beet have been identified, but the presence of autonomous pathway genes which function in parallel to the vernalization and photoperiod pathways has not yet been reported. Here, this begins to be addressed by the identification and genetic mapping of full-length homologues of the RNA-regulatory gene FLK and the chromatin-regulatory genes FVE, LD, and LDL1. When overexpressed in A. thaliana, BvFLK accelerates bolting in the Col-0 background and fully complements the late-bolting phenotype of an flk mutant through repression of FLC. In contrast, complementation analysis of BvFVE1 and the presence of a putative paralogue in beet suggest evolutionary divergence of FVE homologues. It is further shown that BvFVE1, unlike FVE in Arabidopsis, is under circadian clock control. Together, the data provide first evidence for evolutionary conservation of components of the autonomous pathway in B. vulgaris, while also suggesting divergence or subfunctionalization of one gene. The results are likely to be of broader relevance because B. vulgaris expands the spectrum of evolutionarily diverse species which are subject to differential developmental and/or environmental regulation

  18. Left-Right Function of dmrt2 Genes Is Not Conserved between Zebrafish and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Raquel; Lopes, Susana S.; Saúde, Leonor

    2010-01-01

    Background Members of the Dmrt family, generally associated with sex determination, were shown to be involved in several other functions during embryonic development. Dmrt2 has been studied in the context of zebrafish development where, due to a duplication event, two paralog genes dmrt2a and dmrt2b are present. Both zebrafish dmrt2a/terra and dmrt2b are important to regulate left-right patterning in the lateral plate mesoderm. In addition, dmrt2a/terra is necessary for symmetric somite formation while dmrt2b regulates somite differentiation impacting on slow muscle development. One dmrt2 gene is also expressed in the mouse embryo, where it is necessary for somite differentiation but with an impact on axial skeleton development. However, nothing was known about its role during left-right patterning in the lateral plate mesoderm or in the symmetric synchronization of somite formation. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a dmrt2 mutant mouse line, we show that this gene is not involved in symmetric somite formation and does not regulate the laterality pathway that controls left-right asymmetric organ positioning. We reveal that dmrt2a/terra is present in the zebrafish laterality organ, the Kupffer's vesicle, while its homologue is excluded from the mouse equivalent structure, the node. On the basis of evolutionary sub-functionalization and neo-functionalization theories we discuss this absence of functional conservation. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that the role of dmrt2 gene is not conserved during zebrafish and mouse embryonic development. PMID:21203428

  19. Conservative second-order gravitational self-force on circular orbits and the effective one-body formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Damour, Thibault

    2016-05-01

    We consider Detweiler's redshift variable z for a nonspinning mass m1 in circular motion (with orbital frequency Ω ) around a nonspinning mass m2. We show how the combination of effective-one-body (EOB) theory with the first law of binary dynamics allows one to derive a simple, exact expression for the functional dependence of z on the (gauge-invariant) EOB gravitational potential u =(m1+m2)/R . We then use the recently obtained high-post-Newtonian(PN)-order knowledge of the main EOB radial potential A (u ;ν ) [where ν =m1m2/(m1+m2)2] to decompose the second-self-force-order contribution to the function z (m2Ω ,m1/m2) into a known part (which goes beyond the 4PN level in including the 5PN logarithmic term and the 5.5PN contribution) and an unknown one [depending on the yet unknown, 5PN, 6 PN ,… , contributions to the O (ν2) contribution to the EOB radial potential A (u ;ν )]. We apply our results to the second-self-force-order contribution to the frequency shift of the last stable orbit. We indicate the expected singular behaviors, near the lightring, of the second-self-force-order contributions to both the redshift and the EOB A potential. Our results should help both in extracting information of direct dynamical significance from ongoing second-self-force-order computations and in parametrizing their global strong-field behaviors. We also advocate computing second-self-force-order conservative quantities by iterating the time-symmetric Green-function in the background spacetime.

  20. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)-based methods for detection and identification of mycotoxigenic Penicillium species using conserved genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymerase chain reaction amplification of conserved genes and sequence analysis provides a very powerful tool for the identification of toxigenic as well as non-toxigenic Penicillium species. Sequences are obtained by amplification of the gene fragment, sequencing via capillary electrophoresis of d...

  1. Buffering by gene duplicates: an analysis of molecular correlates and evolutionary conservation

    PubMed Central

    Hannay, Kevin; Marcotte, Edward M; Vogel, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Background One mechanism to account for robustness against gene knockouts or knockdowns is through buffering by gene duplicates, but the extent and general correlates of this process in organisms is still a matter of debate. To reveal general trends of this process, we provide a comprehensive comparison of gene essentiality, duplication and buffering by duplicates across seven bacteria (Mycoplasma genitalium, Bacillus subtilis, Helicobacter pylori, Haemophilus influenzae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli), and four eukaryotes (Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast), Caenorhabditis elegans (worm), Drosophila melanogaster (fly), Mus musculus (mouse)). Results In nine of the eleven organisms, duplicates significantly increase chances of survival upon gene deletion (P-value ≤ 0.05), but only by up to 13%. Given that duplicates make up to 80% of eukaryotic genomes, the small contribution is surprising and points to dominant roles of other buffering processes, such as alternative metabolic pathways. The buffering capacity of duplicates appears to be independent of the degree of gene essentiality and tends to be higher for genes with high expression levels. For example, buffering capacity increases to 23% amongst highly expressed genes in E. coli. Sequence similarity and the number of duplicates per gene are weak predictors of the duplicate's buffering capacity. In a case study we show that buffering gene duplicates in yeast and worm are somewhat more similar in their functions than non-buffering duplicates and have increased transcriptional and translational activity. Conclusion In sum, the extent of gene essentiality and buffering by duplicates is not conserved across organisms and does not correlate with the organisms' apparent complexity. This heterogeneity goes beyond what would be expected from differences in experimental approaches alone. Buffering by duplicates contributes to robustness in several organisms, but to a small extent

  2. The human archain gene, ARCN1, has highly conserved homologs in rice and drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Radice, P.; Jones, C.; Perry, H.

    1995-03-01

    A novel human gene, ARCN1, has been identified in chromosome band 11q23.3. It maps approximately 50 kb telomeric to MLL, a gene that is disrupted in a number of leukemia-associated translocation chromosomes. cDNA clones representing ARCN1 hybridize to 4-kb mRNA species present in all tissues tested. Sequencing of cDNAs suggests that at least two forms of mRNA with alternative 5 {prime} ends are present within the cell. The mRNA with the longest open reading frame gives rise to a protein of 57 kDa. Although the sequence reported is novel, remarkable similarity is observed with two predicted protein sequences from partial DNA sequences generated by rice (Oryza sativa) and fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) genome projects. The degree of sequence conservation is comparable to that observed for highly conserved structural proteins, such as heat shock protein HSP70, and is greater than that of {gamma}-gubulin and heat shock protein HSP60. A more distant relationship to the group of clathrin-associated proteins suggests a possible role in vesicle structure or trafficking. In view of its ancient pedigree and a potential involvement in cellular architecture, the authors propose that the ARCN1 protein be named archain. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Association analysis between polymorphisms in the conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) gene and cocaine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Lohoff, Falk W.; Bloch, Paul J.; Ferraro, Thomas N.; Berrettini, Wade H.; Pettinati, Helen M.; Dackis, Charles A.; O’Brien, Charles P.; Kampman, Kyle M.; Oslin, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine induced neuroplasticity changes in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems are thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of cocaine dependence. Since neurotrophic factors have been observed to prevent/reverse and mimic cocaine-induced neurobiological changes in the brain, related genes are plausible candidates for susceptibility to cocaine dependence. The novel conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor protein (CDNF) promotes the survival, growth, and function of dopamine-specific neurons and is expressed in brain regions that undergo cocaine-induced neuroplasticity. In this study, we hypothesize that polymorphisms in the CDNF gene (CDNF/ARMETL1) contribute to increased risk for cocaine dependence. Cocaine dependent individuals (n=351) and unaffected controls (n=257) of African descent were genotyped for four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CDNF gene (rs11259365, rs7094179, rs7900873, rs2278871). We observed no significant differences in allele, genotype, or haplotype frequencies between cases and controls for any of the tested SNPs. Our study suggests that there is no association between variants in the CDNF gene and cocaine dependence. However, additional studies using larger sample sizes, comprehensive SNP coverage, and clinically homogenous populations are necessary before confidently excluding CDNF as a significant genetic risk factor for cocaine dependence. PMID:19429035

  4. Conservation of Arabidopsis thaliana photoperiodic flowering time genes in onion (Allium cepa L.).

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew; Massiah, Andrea Juliet; Thomas, Brian

    2010-10-01

    The genetics underlying onion development are poorly understood. Here the characterization of onion homologs of Arabidopsis photoperiodic flowering pathway genes is reported with the end goal of accelerating onion breeding programs by understanding the genetic basis of adaptation to different latitudes. The expression of onion GI, FKF1 and ZTL homologs under short day (SD) and long day (LD) conditions was examined using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). The expression of AcGI and AcFKF1 was examined in onion varieties which exhibit different daylength responses. Phylogenetic trees were constructed to confirm the identity of the homologs. AcGI and AcFKF1 showed diurnal expression patterns similar to their Arabidopsis counterparts, while AcZTL was found to be constitutively expressed. AcGI showed similar expression patterns in varieties which exhibit different daylength responses, whereas AcFKF1 showed differences. It is proposed that these differences could contribute to the different daylength responses in these varieties. Phylogenetic analyses showed that all the genes isolated are very closely related to their proposed homologs. The results presented here show that key genes controlling photoperiodic flowering in Arabidopsis are conserved in onion, and a role for these genes in the photoperiodic control of bulb initiation is predicted. This theory is supported by expression and phylogenetic data.

  5. Conservation, Duplication, and Divergence of Five Opsin Genes in Insect Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Feuda, Roberto; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Bentley, Michael A.; Holland, Peter W.H.

    2016-01-01

    Opsin proteins covalently bind to small molecular chromophores and each protein-chromophore complex is sensitive to particular wavelengths of light. Multiple opsins with different wavelength absorbance peaks are required for color vision. Comparing opsin responses is challenging at low light levels, explaining why color vision is often lost in nocturnal species. Here, we investigated opsin evolution in 27 phylogenetically diverse insect species including several transitions between photic niches (nocturnal, diurnal, and crepuscular). We find widespread conservation of five distinct opsin genes, more than commonly considered. These comprise one c-opsin plus four r-opsins (long wavelength sensitive or LWS, blue sensitive, ultra violet [UV] sensitive and the often overlooked Rh7 gene). Several recent opsin gene duplications are also detected. The diversity of opsin genes is consistent with color vision in diurnal, crepuscular, and nocturnal insects. Tests for positive selection in relation to photic niche reveal evidence for adaptive evolution in UV-sensitive opsins in day-flying insects in general, and in LWS opsins of day-flying Lepidoptera specifically. PMID:26865071

  6. Conservation, Duplication, and Divergence of Five Opsin Genes in Insect Evolution.

    PubMed

    Feuda, Roberto; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Bentley, Michael A; Holland, Peter W H

    2016-03-01

    Opsin proteins covalently bind to small molecular chromophores and each protein-chromophore complex is sensitive to particular wavelengths of light. Multiple opsins with different wavelength absorbance peaks are required for color vision. Comparing opsin responses is challenging at low light levels, explaining why color vision is often lost in nocturnal species. Here, we investigated opsin evolution in 27 phylogenetically diverse insect species including several transitions between photic niches (nocturnal, diurnal, and crepuscular). We find widespread conservation of five distinct opsin genes, more than commonly considered. These comprise one c-opsin plus four r-opsins (long wavelength sensitive or LWS, blue sensitive, ultra violet [UV] sensitive and the often overlooked Rh7 gene). Several recent opsin gene duplications are also detected. The diversity of opsin genes is consistent with color vision in diurnal, crepuscular, and nocturnal insects. Tests for positive selection in relation to photic niche reveal evidence for adaptive evolution in UV-sensitive opsins in day-flying insects in general, and in LWS opsins of day-flying Lepidoptera specifically. PMID:26865071

  7. Sphingolipids, Transcription Factors, and Conserved Toolkit Genes: Developmental Plasticity in the Ant Cardiocondyla obscurior

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Lukas; Simola, Daniel F.; Heinze, Jürgen; Oettler, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Developmental plasticity allows for the remarkable morphological specialization of individuals into castes in eusocial species of Hymenoptera. Developmental trajectories that lead to alternative caste fates are typically determined by specific environmental stimuli that induce larvae to express and maintain distinct gene expression patterns. Although most eusocial species express two castes, queens and workers, the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior expresses diphenic females and males; this provides a unique system with four discrete phenotypes to study the genomic basis of developmental plasticity in ants. We sequenced and analyzed the transcriptomes of 28 individual C. obscurior larvae of known developmental trajectory, providing the first in-depth analysis of gene expression in eusocial insect larvae. Clustering and transcription factor binding site analyses revealed that different transcription factors and functionally distinct sets of genes are recruited during larval development to induce the four alternative trajectories. In particular, we found complex patterns of gene regulation pertaining to sphingolipid metabolism, a conserved molecular pathway involved in development, obesity, and aging. PMID:25725431

  8. A highly conserved sequence is a novel gene involved in de novo vitamin B6 biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Bilski, Piotr; Li, Ming Y.; Chignell, Colin F.; Daub, Margaret E.

    1999-01-01

    The Cercospora nicotianae SOR1 (singlet oxygen resistance) gene was identified previously as a gene involved in resistance of this fungus to singlet-oxygen-generating phototoxins. Although homologues to SOR1 occur in organisms in four kingdoms and encode one of the most highly conserved proteins yet identified, the precise function of this protein has, until now, remained unknown. We show that SOR1 is essential in pyridoxine (vitamin B6) synthesis in C. nicotianae and Aspergillus flavus, although it shows no homology to previously identified pyridoxine synthesis genes identified in Escherichia coli. Sequence database analysis demonstrated that organisms encode either SOR1 or E. coli pyridoxine biosynthesis genes, but not both, suggesting that there are two divergent pathways for de novo pyridoxine biosynthesis in nature. Pathway divergence appears to have occurred during the evolution of the eubacteria. We also present data showing that pyridoxine quenches singlet oxygen at a rate comparable to that of vitamins C and E, two of the most highly efficient biological antioxidants, suggesting a previously unknown role for pyridoxine in active oxygen resistance. PMID:10430950

  9. Conservation in the involvement of heterochronic genes and hormones during developmental transitions.

    PubMed

    Faunes, Fernando; Larraín, Juan

    2016-08-01

    Developmental transitions include molting in some invertebrates and the metamorphosis of insects and amphibians. While the study of Caenorhabditis elegans larval transitions was crucial to determine the genetic control of these transitions, Drosophila melanogaster and Xenopus laevis have been classic models to study the role of hormones in metamorphosis. Here we review how heterochronic genes (lin-4, let-7, lin-28, lin-41), hormones (dafachronic acid, ecdysone, thyroid hormone) and the environment regulate developmental transitions. Recent evidence suggests that some heterochronic genes also regulate transitions in higher organisms that they are controlled by hormones involved in metamorphosis. We also discuss evidence demonstrating that heterochronic genes and hormones regulate the proliferation and differentiation of embryonic and neural stem cells. We propose the hypothesis that developmental transitions are regulated by an evolutionary conserved mechanism in which heterochronic genes and hormones interact to control stem/progenitor cells proliferation, cell cycle exit, quiescence and differentiation and determine the proper timing of developmental transitions. Finally, we discuss the relevance of these studies to understand post-embryonic development, puberty and regeneration in humans. PMID:27297887

  10. [Bioinformatic prediction of conserved microRNAs and their target genes in eggplant (Solanum melongena L.)].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Chao, Jiang-Tao; Cui, Meng-Meng; Chen, Ya-Qiong; Zong, Peng; Sun, Yu-He

    2011-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a recently discovered class of small (-21nt), non-coding, endogenous, single-stranded RNAs in eukaryotes, regulate gene expression negatively at the post-transcriptional levels depending on the extent of complementation between miRNA and mRNA. To date, a large number of miRNAs have been reported in many species, but none for eggplant (Solanum melongena L.). In this paper, a computational homology search approach based on the conservation of miRNA sequences and the stem-loop hairpin secondary structures of miRNAs was adopted. The search was started with the known plant miRNAs compared to eggplant expressed sequence tags (EST) databases to find potential miRNAs. Following a range of filtering criteria, a total of 16 potential miRNAs belonging to 12 families were identified. Three pairs of sense and antisense strand eggplant miRNAs belonging to three different miRNA families were also found. Furthermore, miR390 and miR399 sense/antisense pairs are identified for the first time in plants. Using online software psRNATarget, we further predicted the target genes of these 16 miRNAs and got 71 potential targets genes on base of 15 eggplant miRNAs. Most of these target genes were predicted to encode proteins that play key role in eggplant growth, development, metabolism, and stress responses.

  11. Evolutionary conservation pattern of zinc-finger domains of Drosophila segmentation genes.

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, R J; Retzlaff, M; Goerlich, K; Sander, K; Tautz, D

    1992-01-01

    A number of genes of the developmental gene hierarchy in Drosophila encode transcription factors containing Cys2His2 zinc finger domains as DNA-binding motifs. To learn more about the evolution of these genes, it is necessary to clone the homologs, or more correctly the orthologs, from different species. Using PCR, we were able to obtain apparently orthologous fragments of hunchback (hb), Krüppel (Kr), and snail (sna) from a variety of arthropods and partly also from other animal phyla. Sequence alignments of these fragments show that the amino acid differences can normally not be correlated with the evolutionary distances of the respective species. This is due to an apparent saturation of potential replacements within the finger domains, which is also evident from the frequent occurrence of convergent replacements. Another recurrent feature of these alignments is that those amino acids that are directly involved in determining the DNA-binding specificity of the fingers are most conserved. Using in vitro bandshift experiments we can indeed show that the binding specificity of a hunchback finger fragment from different species is not changed. This implies that there is a high selective pressure to maintain the regulatory target elements of these genes during evolution. Images PMID:1438276

  12. Conservation, Duplication, and Divergence of Five Opsin Genes in Insect Evolution.

    PubMed

    Feuda, Roberto; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Bentley, Michael A; Holland, Peter W H

    2016-02-09

    Opsin proteins covalently bind to small molecular chromophores and each protein-chromophore complex is sensitive to particular wavelengths of light. Multiple opsins with different wavelength absorbance peaks are required for color vision. Comparing opsin responses is challenging at low light levels, explaining why color vision is often lost in nocturnal species. Here, we investigated opsin evolution in 27 phylogenetically diverse insect species including several transitions between photic niches (nocturnal, diurnal, and crepuscular). We find widespread conservation of five distinct opsin genes, more than commonly considered. These comprise one c-opsin plus four r-opsins (long wavelength sensitive or LWS, blue sensitive, ultra violet [UV] sensitive and the often overlooked Rh7 gene). Several recent opsin gene duplications are also detected. The diversity of opsin genes is consistent with color vision in diurnal, crepuscular, and nocturnal insects. Tests for positive selection in relation to photic niche reveal evidence for adaptive evolution in UV-sensitive opsins in day-flying insects in general, and in LWS opsins of day-flying Lepidoptera specifically.

  13. Nematode orphan genes are adopted by conserved regulatory networks and find a home in ecology.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Melanie G; Sommer, Ralf J

    2015-01-01

    Nematode dauer formation represents an essential survival and dispersal strategy and is one of a few ecologically relevant traits that can be studied in laboratory approaches. Under harsh environmental conditions, the nematode model organisms Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus arrest their development and induce the formation of stress-resistant dauer larvae in response to dauer pheromones, representing a key example of phenotypic plasticity. Previous studies have indicated that in P. pacificus, many wild isolates show cross-preference of dauer pheromones and compete for access to a limited food source. When investigating the genetic mechanisms underlying this intraspecific competition, we recently discovered that the orphan gene dauerless (dau-1) controls dauer formation by copy number variation. Our results show that dau-1 acts in parallel to or downstream of steroid hormone signaling but upstream of the nuclear hormone receptor daf-12, suggesting that DAU-1 represents a novel inhibitor of DAF-12. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that the observed copy number variation is part of a complex series of gene duplication events that occurred over short evolutionary time scales. Here, we comment on the incorporation of novel or fast-evolving genes into conserved genetic networks as a common principle for the evolution of phenotypic plasticity and intraspecific competition. We discuss the possibility that orphan genes might often function in the regulation and execution of ecologically relevant traits. Given that only few ecological processes can be studied in model organisms, the function of such genes might often go unnoticed, explaining the large number of uncharacterized genes in model system genomes. PMID:27123366

  14. On a fourth order accurate implicit finite difference scheme for hyperbolic conservation laws. I - Nonstiff strongly dynamic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.; Tal-Ezer, H.

    1981-01-01

    An implicit finite difference method of fourth order accuracy in space and time is introduced for the numerical solution of one-dimensional systems of hyperbolic conservation laws. The basic form of the method is a two-level scheme which is unconditionally stable and nondissipative. The scheme uses only three mesh points at level t and three mesh points at level t + delta t. The dissipative version of the basic method given is conditionally stable under the CFL (Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy) condition. This version is particularly useful for the numerical solution of problems with strong but nonstiff dynamic features, where the CFL restriction is reasonable on accuracy grounds. Numerical results are provided to illustrate properties of the proposed method.

  15. On a fourth order accurate implicit finite difference scheme for hyperbolic conservation laws. II - Five-point schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.; Tal-Ezer, H.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a family of two-level five-point implicit schemes for the solution of one-dimensional systems of hyperbolic conservation laws, which generalized the Crank-Nicholson scheme to fourth order accuracy (4-4) in both time and space. These 4-4 schemes are nondissipative and unconditionally stable. Special attention is given to the system of linear equations associated with these 4-4 implicit schemes. The regularity of this system is analyzed and efficiency of solution-algorithms is examined. A two-datum representation of these 4-4 implicit schemes brings about a compactification of the stencil to three mesh points at each time-level. This compact two-datum representation is particularly useful in deriving boundary treatments. Numerical results are presented to illustrate some properties of the proposed scheme.

  16. Genes of the most conserved WOX clade in plants affect root and flower development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The Wuschel related homeobox (WOX) family proteins are key regulators implicated in the determination of cell fate in plants by preventing cell differentiation. A recent WOX phylogeny, based on WOX homeodomains, showed that all of the Physcomitrella patens and Selaginella moellendorffii WOX proteins clustered into a single orthologous group. We hypothesized that members of this group might preferentially share a significant part of their function in phylogenetically distant organisms. Hence, we first validated the limits of the WOX13 orthologous group (WOX13 OG) using the occurrence of other clade specific signatures and conserved intron insertion sites. Secondly, a functional analysis using expression data and mutants was undertaken. Results The WOX13 OG contained the most conserved plant WOX proteins including the only WOX detected in the highly proliferating basal unicellular and photosynthetic organism Ostreococcus tauri. A large expansion of the WOX family was observed after the separation of mosses from other land plants and before monocots and dicots have arisen. In Arabidopsis thaliana, AtWOX13 was dynamically expressed during primary and lateral root initiation and development, in gynoecium and during embryo development. AtWOX13 appeared to affect the floral transition. An intriguing clade, represented by the functional AtWOX14 gene inside the WOX13 OG, was only found in the Brassicaceae. Compared to AtWOX13, the gene expression profile of AtWOX14 was restricted to the early stages of lateral root formation and specific to developing anthers. A mutational insertion upstream of the AtWOX14 homeodomain sequence led to abnormal root development, a delay in the floral transition and premature anther differentiation. Conclusion Our data provide evidence in favor of the WOX13 OG as the clade containing the most conserved WOX genes and established a functional link to organ initiation and development in Arabidopsis, most likely by preventing premature

  17. Co-conservation of rRNA tetraloop sequences and helix length suggests involvement of the tetraloops in higher-order interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedenstierna, K. O.; Siefert, J. L.; Fox, G. E.; Murgola, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    Terminal loops containing four nucleotides (tetraloops) are common in structural RNAs, and they frequently conform to one of three sequence motifs, GNRA, UNCG, or CUUG. Here we compare available sequences and secondary structures for rRNAs from bacteria, and we show that helices capped by phylogenetically conserved GNRA loops display a strong tendency to be of conserved length. The simplest interpretation of this correlation is that the conserved GNRA loops are involved in higher-order interactions, intramolecular or intermolecular, resulting in a selective pressure for maintaining the lengths of these helices. A small number of conserved UNCG loops were also found to be associated with conserved length helices, consistent with the possibility that this type of tetraloop also takes part in higher-order interactions.

  18. Gene expression suggests conserved aspects of Hox gene regulation in arthropods and provides additional support for monophyletic Myriapoda.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2010-01-01

    Antisense transcripts of Ultrabithorax (aUbx) in the millipede Glomeris and the centipede Lithobius are expressed in patterns complementary to that of the Ubx sense transcripts. A similar complementary expression pattern has been described for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) of the bithoraxoid (bxd) locus in Drosophila, in which the transcription of bxd ncRNAs represses Ubx via transcriptional interference. We discuss our findings in the context of possibly conserved mechanisms of Ubx regulation in myriapods and the fly.Bicistronic transcription of Ubx and Antennapedia (Antp) has been reported previously for a myriapod and a number of crustaceans. In this paper, we show that Ubx/Antp bicistronic transcripts also occur in Glomeris and an onychophoran, suggesting further conserved mechanisms of Hox gene regulation in arthropods.Myriapod monophyly is supported by the expression of aUbx in all investigated myriapods, whereas in other arthropod classes, including the Onychophora, aUbx is not expressed. Of the two splice variants of Ubx/Antp only one could be isolated from myriapods, representing a possible further synapomorphy of the Myriapoda. PMID:20849647

  19. Mitochondrial Genomes of Kinorhyncha: trnM Duplication and New Gene Orders within Animals

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Olga V.; Mikhailov, Kirill V.; Nikitin, Mikhail A.; Logacheva, Maria D.; Penin, Aleksey A.; Muntyan, Maria S.; Kedrova, Olga S.; Petrov, Nikolai B.; Panchin, Yuri V.

    2016-01-01

    Many features of mitochondrial genomes of animals, such as patterns of gene arrangement, nucleotide content and substitution rate variation are extensively used in evolutionary and phylogenetic studies. Nearly 6,000 mitochondrial genomes of animals have already been sequenced, covering the majority of animal phyla. One of the groups that escaped mitogenome sequencing is phylum Kinorhyncha—an isolated taxon of microscopic worm-like ecdysozoans. The kinorhynchs are thought to be one of the early-branching lineages of Ecdysozoa, and their mitochondrial genomes may be important for resolving evolutionary relations between major animal taxa. Here we present the results of sequencing and analysis of mitochondrial genomes from two members of Kinorhyncha, Echinoderes svetlanae (Cyclorhagida) and Pycnophyes kielensis (Allomalorhagida). Their mitochondrial genomes are circular molecules approximately 15 Kbp in size. The kinorhynch mitochondrial gene sequences are highly divergent, which precludes accurate phylogenetic inference. The mitogenomes of both species encode a typical metazoan complement of 37 genes, which are all positioned on the major strand, but the gene order is distinct and unique among Ecdysozoa or animals as a whole. We predict four types of start codons for protein-coding genes in E. svetlanae and five in P. kielensis with a consensus DTD in single letter code. The mitochondrial genomes of E. svetlanae and P. kielensis encode duplicated methionine tRNA genes that display compensatory nucleotide substitutions. Two distant species of Kinorhyncha demonstrate similar patterns of gene arrangements in their mitogenomes. Both genomes have duplicated methionine tRNA genes; the duplication predates the divergence of two species. The kinorhynchs share a few features pertaining to gene order that align them with Priapulida. Gene order analysis reveals that gene arrangement specific of Priapulida may be ancestral for Scalidophora, Ecdysozoa, and even Protostomia

  20. A stationary-phase gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a member of a novel, highly conserved gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, E L; Fuge, E K; Padilla, P A; Werner-Washburne, M

    1996-01-01

    The regulation of cellular growth and proliferation in response to environmental cues is critical for development and the maintenance of viability in all organisms. In unicellular organisms, such as the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, growth and proliferation are regulated by nutrient availability. We have described changes in the pattern of protein synthesis during the growth of S. cerevisiae cells to stationary phase (E. K. Fuge, E. L. Braun, and M. Werner-Washburne, J. Bacteriol. 176:5802-5813, 1994) and noted a protein, which we designated Snz1p (p35), that shows increased synthesis after entry into stationary phase. We report here the identification of the SNZ1 gene, which encodes this protein. We detected increased SNZ1 mRNA accumulation almost 2 days after glucose exhaustion, significantly later than that of mRNAs encoded by other postexponential genes. SNZ1-related sequences were detected in phylogenetically diverse organisms by sequence comparisons and low-stringency hybridization. Multiple SNZ1-related sequences were detected in some organisms, including S. cerevisiae. Snz1p was found to be among the most evolutionarily conserved proteins currently identified, indicating that we have identified a novel, highly conserved protein involved in growth arrest in S. cerevisiae. The broad phylogenetic distribution, the regulation of the SNZ1 mRNA and protein in S. cerevisiae, and identification of a Snz protein modified during sporulation in the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis support the hypothesis that Snz proteins are part of an ancient response that occurs during nutrient limitation and growth arrest. PMID:8955308

  1. Functional Conservation of MIKC*-Type MADS Box Genes in Arabidopsis and Rice Pollen Maturation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Cui, Shaojie; Wu, Feng; Yan, Shuo; Lin, Xuelei; Du, Xiaoqiu; Chong, Kang; Schilling, Susanne; Theißen, Günter; Meng, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    There are two groups of MADS intervening keratin-like and C-terminal (MIKC)-type MADS box genes, MIKCC type and MIKC* type. In seed plants, the MIKCC type shows considerable diversity, but the MIKC* type has only two subgroups, P- and S-clade, which show conserved expression in the gametophyte. To examine the functional conservation of MIKC*-type genes, we characterized all three rice (Oryza sativa) MIKC*-type genes. All three genes are specifically expressed late in pollen development. The single knockdown or knockout lines, respectively, of the S-clade MADS62 and MADS63 did not show a mutant phenotype, but lines in which both S-clade genes were affected showed severe defects in pollen maturation and germination, as did knockdown lines of MADS68, the only P-clade gene in rice. The rice MIKC*-type proteins form strong heterodimeric complexes solely with partners from the other subclade; these complexes specifically bind to N10-type C-A-rich-G-boxes in vitro and regulate downstream gene expression by binding to N10-type promoter motifs. The rice MIKC* genes have a much lower degree of functional redundancy than the Arabidopsis thaliana MIKC* genes. Nevertheless, our data indicate that the function of heterodimeric MIKC*-type protein complexes in pollen development has been conserved since the divergence of monocots and eudicots, roughly 150 million years ago. PMID:23613199

  2. Cloning and expression study of the lobster (Homarus americanus) vitellogenin: Conservation in gene structure among decapods.

    PubMed

    Tiu, Shirley Hiu Kwan; Hui, Ho-Lam; Tsukimura, Brian; Tobe, Stephen S; He, Jian-Guo; Chan, Siu-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This study reports the molecular characterization of the vitellogenin (Vg) of the lobster, Homarus americanus. Based on the annual collection of female lobsters, vitellogenesis commences in early March and continues through to September of each year. Using an antibody to vitellin of the lobster, H. americanus, several immunoreactive ovarian proteins were initially identified by Western blot analysis. The 80kDa protein contained the amino acid sequence APWGGNTPRC, identified subsequently by cDNA cloning to be identical to the lobster Vg. In common with the shrimp Metapenaeus ensis and crab Charybdis feriatus, the lobster HaVg1 gene comprises 14 introns and 15 exons. The deduced HaVg1 precursor is most similar to the Vg of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (57%), followed by M. ensis (40-43% identity) and C. feriatus (38%). The results from genomic and RT-PCR cloning also confirmed the presence of multiple Vg genes in lobster. At early reproductive stages, the hepatopancreas HaVg1 transcript levels are low but increased to a maximum in animals with mature oocytes. The ovary, however, also expressed low levels of HaVg1. Using in vitro explant culture, treatment of hepatopancreas fragments with farnesoic acid or 20-hydroxyecdysone resulted in a significant stimulation in HaVg1 expression. From this study, it appears that Vg gene organization and expression pattern in decapods is highly conserved. Similar endocrine mechanisms may govern the process of vitellogenesis across the decapods.

  3. Deep Conservation of Genes Required for Both Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans Sleep Includes a Role for Dopaminergic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Komudi; Ju, Jennifer Y.; Walsh, Melissa B.; DiIorio, Michael A.; Hart, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Cross-species conservation of sleep-like behaviors predicts the presence of conserved molecular mechanisms underlying sleep. However, limited experimental evidence of conservation exists. Here, this prediction is tested directly. Measurements and Results: During lethargus, Caenorhabditis elegans spontaneously sleep in short bouts that are interspersed with bouts of spontaneous locomotion. We identified 26 genes required for Drosophila melanogaster sleep. Twenty orthologous C. elegans genes were selected based on similarity. Their effect on C. elegans sleep and arousal during the last larval lethargus was assessed. The 20 most similar genes altered both the quantity of sleep and arousal thresholds. In 18 cases, the direction of change was concordant with Drosophila studies published previously. Additionally, we delineated a conserved genetic pathway by which dopamine regulates sleep and arousal. In C. elegans neurons, G-alpha S, adenylyl cyclase, and protein kinase A act downstream of D1 dopamine receptors to regulate these behaviors. Finally, a quantitative analysis of genes examined herein revealed that C. elegans arousal thresholds were directly correlated with amount of sleep during lethargus. However, bout duration varies little and was not correlated with arousal thresholds. Conclusions: The comprehensive analysis presented here suggests that conserved genes and pathways are required for sleep in invertebrates and, likely, across the entire animal kingdom. The genetic pathway delineated in this study implicates G-alpha S and previously known genes downstream of dopamine signaling in sleep. Quantitative analysis of various components of quiescence suggests that interdependent or identical cellular and molecular mechanisms are likely to regulate both arousal and sleep entry. Citation: Singh K, Ju JY, Walsh MB, Dilorio MA, Hart AC. Deep conservation of genes required for both Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans sleep includes a role for

  4. Genomics in cereals: from genome-wide conserved orthologous set (COS) sequences to candidate genes for trait dissection.

    PubMed

    Quraishi, Umar Masood; Abrouk, Michael; Bolot, Stéphanie; Pont, Caroline; Throude, Mickael; Guilhot, Nicolas; Confolent, Carole; Bortolini, Fernanda; Praud, Sébastien; Murigneux, Alain; Charmet, Gilles; Salse, Jerome

    2009-11-01

    Recent updates in comparative genomics among cereals have provided the opportunity to identify conserved orthologous set (COS) DNA sequences for cross-genome map-based cloning of candidate genes underpinning quantitative traits. New tools are described that are applicable to any cereal genome of interest, namely, alignment criterion for orthologous couples identification, as well as the Intron Spanning Marker software to automatically select intron-spanning primer pairs. In order to test the software, it was applied to the bread wheat genome, and 695 COS markers were assigned to 1,535 wheat loci (on average one marker/2.6 cM) based on 827 robust rice-wheat orthologs. Furthermore, 31 of the 695 COS markers were selected to fine map a pentosan viscosity quantitative trait loci (QTL) on wheat chromosome 7A. Among the 31 COS markers, 14 (45%) were polymorphic between the parental lines and 12 were mapped within the QTL confidence interval with one marker every 0.6 cM defining candidate genes among the rice orthologous region.

  5. Conserved sequences in both coding and 5' flanking regions of mammalian opal suppressor tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, K; Eden, F C; You, K H; O'Neill, V A; Hatfield, D

    1985-01-01

    The rabbit genome encodes an opal suppressor tRNA gene. The coding region is strictly conserved between the rabbit gene and the corresponding gene in the human genome. The rabbit opal suppressor gene contains the consensus sequence in the 3' internal control region but like the human and chicken genes, the rabbit 5' internal control region contains two additional nucleotides. The 5' flanking sequences of the rabbit and the human opal suppressor genes contain extensive regions of homology. A subset of these homologies is also present 5' to the chicken opal suppressor gene. Both the rabbit and the human genomes also encode a pseudogene. That of the rabbit lacks the 3' half of the coding region. Neither pseudogene has homologous regions to the 5' flanking regions of the genes. The presence of 5' homologies flanking only the transcribed genes and not the pseudogenes suggests that these regions may be regulatory control elements specifically involved in the expression of the eukaryotic opal suppressor gene. Moreover the strict conservation of coding sequences indicates functional importance for the opal suppressor tRNA genes. Images PMID:4022772

  6. Structural levansucrase gene (lsdA) constitutes a functional locus conserved in the species Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus.

    PubMed

    Hernández, L; Sotolongo, M; Rosabal, Y; Menéndez, C; Ramírez, R; Caballero-Mellado, J; Arrieta, J

    2000-01-01

    Levansucrase (EC 2.4.1.10) was identified as a constitutive exoenzyme in 14 Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus strains recovered from different host plants in diverse geographical regions. The enzyme, consisting of a single 60-kDa polypeptide, hydrolysed sucrose to synthesise oligofructans and levan. Sugar-cane-associated strains of the most abundant genotype (electrophoretic type 1) showed maximal values of levansucrase production. These values were three-fold higher than those of the isolates recovered from coffee plants. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed a high degree of conservation of the levansucrase locus (IsdA) among the 14 strains under study, which represented 11 different G. diazotrophicus genotypes. Targeted disruption of the lsdA gene in four representative strains abolished their ability to grow on sucrose, indicating that the endophytic species G. diazotrophicus utilises plant sucrose via levansucrase.

  7. A WDR Gene Is a Conserved Member of a Chitin Synthase Gene Cluster and Influences the Cell Wall in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Gea; Silvestrini, Lucia; Obersriebnig, Michael; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Strauss, Joseph; Ezcurra, Inés

    2016-01-01

    WD40 repeat (WDR) proteins are pleiotropic molecular hubs. We identify a WDR gene that is a conserved genomic neighbor of a chitin synthase gene in Ascomycetes. The WDR gene is unique to fungi and plants, and was called Fungal Plant WD (FPWD). FPWD is within a cell wall metabolism gene cluster in the Ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina) comprising chsD, a Chs activator and a GH17 glucanase. The FPWD, AN1556.2 locus was deleted in Aspergillus nidulans strain SAA.111 by gene replacement and only heterokaryon transformants were obtained. The re-annotation of Aspergilli genomes shows that AN1556.2 consists of two tightly linked separate genes, i.e., the WDR gene and a putative beta-flanking gene of unknown function. The WDR and the beta-flanking genes are conserved genomic neighbors localized within a recently identified metabolic cell wall gene cluster in genomes of Aspergilli. The heterokaryons displayed increased susceptibility to drugs affecting the cell wall, and their phenotypes, observed by optical, confocal, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, suggest cell wall alterations. Quantitative real-time PCR shows altered expression of some cell wall-related genes. The possible implications on cell wall biosynthesis are discussed.

  8. A WDR Gene Is a Conserved Member of a Chitin Synthase Gene Cluster and Influences the Cell Wall in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Gea; Silvestrini, Lucia; Obersriebnig, Michael; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Strauss, Joseph; Ezcurra, Inés

    2016-01-01

    WD40 repeat (WDR) proteins are pleiotropic molecular hubs. We identify a WDR gene that is a conserved genomic neighbor of a chitin synthase gene in Ascomycetes. The WDR gene is unique to fungi and plants, and was called Fungal Plant WD (FPWD). FPWD is within a cell wall metabolism gene cluster in the Ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina) comprising chsD, a Chs activator and a GH17 glucanase. The FPWD, AN1556.2 locus was deleted in Aspergillus nidulans strain SAA.111 by gene replacement and only heterokaryon transformants were obtained. The re-annotation of Aspergilli genomes shows that AN1556.2 consists of two tightly linked separate genes, i.e., the WDR gene and a putative beta-flanking gene of unknown function. The WDR and the beta-flanking genes are conserved genomic neighbors localized within a recently identified metabolic cell wall gene cluster in genomes of Aspergilli. The heterokaryons displayed increased susceptibility to drugs affecting the cell wall, and their phenotypes, observed by optical, confocal, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, suggest cell wall alterations. Quantitative real-time PCR shows altered expression of some cell wall-related genes. The possible implications on cell wall biosynthesis are discussed. PMID:27367684

  9. Cloning of noggin gene from hydra and analysis of its functional conservation using Xenopus laevis embryos.

    PubMed

    Chandramore, Kalpana; Ito, Yuzuro; Takahashi, Shuji; Asashima, Makoto; Ghaskadbi, Surendra

    2010-01-01

    Hydra, a member of phylum Cnidaria that arose early in evolution, is endowed with a defined axis, organized nervous system, and active behavior. It is a powerful model system for the elucidation of evolution of developmental mechanisms in animals. Here, we describe the identification and cloning of noggin-like gene from hydra. Noggin is a secreted protein involved at multiple stages of vertebrate embryonic development including neural induction and is known to exert its effects by inhibiting the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-signaling pathway. Sequence analysis revealed that hydra Noggin shows considerable similarity with its orthologs at the amino acid level. When microinjected in the early Xenopus embryos, hydra noggin mRNA induced a secondary axis in 100% of the injected embryos, demonstrating functional conservation of hydra noggin in vertebrates. This was further confirmed by the partial rescue of Xenopus embryos by hydra noggin mRNA from UV-induced ventralization. By using animal cap assay in Xenopus embryos, we demonstrate that these effects of hydra noggin in Xenopus embryos are because of inhibition of BMP signaling by Noggin. Our data indicate that BMP/Noggin antagonism predates the bilaterian divergence and is conserved during the evolution. PMID:20565537

  10. Conserving Plants in Gene Banks and Nature: Investigating Complementarity with Trifolium thompsonii Morton

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Stephanie L.; Kisha, Theodore J.; Yu, Long-Xi; Parra-Quijano, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    A standard conservation strategy for plant genetic resources integrates in situ (on-farm or wild) and ex situ (gene or field bank) approaches. Gene bank managers collect ex situ accessions that represent a comprehensive snap shot of the genetic diversity of in situ populations at a given time and place. Although simple in theory, achieving complementary in situ and ex situ holdings is challenging. Using Trifolium thompsonii as a model insect-pollinated herbaceous perennial species, we used AFLP markers to compare genetic diversity and structure of ex situ accessions collected at two time periods (1995, 2004) from four locations, with their corresponding in situ populations sampled in 2009. Our goal was to assess the complementarity of the two approaches. We examined how gene flow, selection and genetic drift contributed to population change. Across locations, we found no difference in diversity between ex situ and in situ samples. One population showed a decline in genetic diversity over the 15 years studied. Population genetic differentiation among the four locations was significant, but weak. Association tests suggested infrequent, long distance gene flow. Selection and drift occurred, but differences due to spatial effects were three times as strong as differences attributed to temporal effects, and suggested recollection efforts could occur at intervals greater than fifteen years. An effective collecting strategy for insect pollinated herbaceous perennial species was to sample >150 plants, equalize maternal contribution, and sample along random transects with sufficient space between plants to minimize intrafamilial sampling. Quantifying genetic change between ex situ and in situ accessions allows genetic resource managers to validate ex situ collecting and maintenance protocols, develop appropriate recollection intervals, and provide an early detection mechanism for identifying problematic conditions that can be addressed to prevent further decline in

  11. Conserved but Attenuated Parental Gene Expression in Allopolyploids: Constitutive Zinc Hyperaccumulation in the Allotetraploid Arabidopsis kamchatica

    PubMed Central

    Paape, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Masaomi; Shimizu-Inatsugi, Rie; Cereghetti, Teo; Onda, Yoshihiko; Kenta, Tanaka; Sese, Jun; Shimizu, Kentaro K.

    2016-01-01

    Allopolyploidization combines parental genomes and often confers broader species distribution. However, little is known about parentally transmitted gene expression underlying quantitative traits following allopolyploidization because of the complexity of polyploid genomes. The allopolyploid species Arabidopsis kamchatica is a natural hybrid of the zinc hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri and of the nonaccumulator Arabidopsis lyrata. We found that A. kamchatica retained the ability to hyperaccumulate zinc from A. halleri and grows in soils with both low and high metal content. Hyperaccumulation of zinc by A. kamchatica was reduced to about half of A. halleri, but is 10-fold greater than A. lyrata. Homeologs derived from A. halleri had significantly higher levels of expression of genes such as HEAVY METAL ATPASE4 (HMA4), METAL TRANSPORTER PROTEIN1 and other metal ion transporters than those derived from A. lyrata, which suggests cis-regulatory differences. A. kamchatica has on average about half the expression of these genes compared with A. halleri due to fixed heterozygosity inherent in allopolyploids. Zinc treatment significantly changed the ratios of expression of 1% of homeologous pairs, including genes putatively involved in metal homeostasis. Resequencing data showed a significant reduction in genetic diversity over a large genomic region (290 kb) surrounding the HMA4 locus derived from the A. halleri parent compared with the syntenic A. lyrata-derived region, which suggests different evolutionary histories. We also estimated that three A. halleri-derived HMA4 copies are present in A. kamchatica. Our findings support a transcriptomic model in which environment-related transcriptional patterns of both parents are conserved but attenuated in the allopolyploids. PMID:27413047

  12. Conserved and novel gene expression between regeneration and asexual fission in Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    Burton, Patrick M; Finnerty, John R

    2009-02-01

    Due to work in model systems (e.g., flies and mice), the molecular mechanisms of embryogenesis are known in exquisite detail. However, these organisms are incapable of asexual reproduction and possess limited regenerative abilities. Thus, the mechanisms of alternate developmental trajectories and their relation to embryonic mechanisms remain understudied. Because these developmental trajectories are present in a diverse group of animal phyla spanning the metazoan phylogeny, including cnidarians, annelids, and echinoderms, they are likely to have played a major role in animal evolution. The starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, an emerging model system, undergoes larval development, asexual fission, and complete bi-directional regeneration in the field and laboratory. In order to investigate to what extent embryonic patterning mechanisms are utilized during alternate developmental trajectories, we examined expression of developmental regulatory genes during regeneration and fission. When compared to previously reported embryonic expression patterns, we found that all genes displayed some level of expression consistent with embryogenesis. However, five of seven genes investigated also displayed striking differences in gene expression between one or more developmental trajectory. These results demonstrate that alternate developmental trajectories utilize distinct molecular mechanisms upstream of major developmental regulatory genes such as fox, otx, and Hox-like. PMID:19184098

  13. Conservation, Spillover and Gene Flow within a Network of Northern European Marine Protected Areas

    PubMed Central

    Huserbråten, Mats Brockstedt Olsen; Moland, Even; Knutsen, Halvor; Olsen, Esben Moland; André, Carl; Stenseth, Nils Chr.

    2013-01-01

    To ensure that marine protected areas (MPAs) benefit conservation and fisheries, the effectiveness of MPA designs has to be evaluated in field studies. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we empirically assessed the design of a network of northern MPAs where fishing for European lobster (Homarusgammarus) is prohibited. First, we demonstrate a high level of residency and survival (50%) for almost a year (363 days) within MPAs, despite small MPA sizes (0.5-1 km2). Second, we demonstrate limited export (4.7%) of lobsters tagged within MPAs (N = 1810) to neighbouring fished areas, over a median distance of 1.6 km out to maximum 21 km away from MPA centres. In comparison, median movement distance of lobsters recaptured within MPAs was 164 m, and recapture rate was high (40%). Third, we demonstrate a high level of gene flow within the study region, with an estimated FST of less than 0.0001 over a ≈ 400 km coastline. Thus, the restricted movement of older life stages, combined with a high level of gene flow suggests that connectivity is primarily driven by larval drift. Larval export from the MPAs can most likely affect areas far beyond their borders. Our findings are of high importance for the design of MPA networks for sedentary species with pelagic early life stages. PMID:24039927

  14. Conserved Senescence Associated Genes and Pathways in Primary Human Fibroblasts Detected by RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Marthandan, S.; Baumgart, M.; Priebe, S.; Groth, M.; Schaer, J.; Kaether, C.; Guthke, R.; Cellerino, A.; Platzer, M.; Diekmann, S.; Hemmerich, P.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence correlates with changes in the transcriptome. To obtain a complete view on senescence-associated transcription networks and pathways, we assessed by deep RNA sequencing the transcriptomes of five of the most commonly used laboratory strains of human fibroblasts during their transition into senescence. In a number of cases, we verified the RNA-seq data by real-time PCR. By determining cellular protein levels we observed that the age-related expression of most but not all genes is regulated at the transcriptional level. We found that 78% of the age-affected differentially expressed genes were commonly regulated in the same direction (either up- or down-regulated) in all five fibroblast strains, indicating a strong conservation of age-associated changes in the transcriptome. KEGG pathway analyses confirmed up-regulation of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype and down-regulation of DNA synthesis/repair and most cell cycle pathways common in all five cell strains. Newly identified senescence-induced pathways include up-regulation of endocytotic/phagocytic pathways and down-regulation of the mRNA metabolism and the mRNA splicing pathways. Our results provide an unprecedented comprehensive and deep view into the individual and common transcriptome and pathway changes during the transition into of senescence of five human fibroblast cell strains. PMID:27140416

  15. The current source of human Alu retroposons is a conserved gene shared with Old World monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, R.J.; Stout, D.B.; Davidson, E.H. )

    1989-05-01

    A significant fraction of human Alu repeated sequences are members of the precise, recently inserted class. A cloned member of this class has been used as a probe for interspecies hybridization and thermal stability determination. The probe was reassociated with human, mandrill, and spider monkey DNA under conditions such that only almost perfectly matching duplexes could form. Equally precise hybrids were formed with human and mandrill DNA (Old World monkey) but not with spider monkey DNA (New World). These measurements as well as reassociation kinetics show the presence in mandrill DNA of many precise class Alu sequences that are very similar or identical in quantity and sequence to those in human DNA. Human and mandrill are moderately distant species with a single-copy DNA divergence of about 6%. Nevertheless, their recently inserted Alu sequences arise by retroposition of transcripts of source genes with nearly identical sequences. Apparently a gene present in our common ancestor at the time of branching was inherited and highly conserved in sequence in both the lineage of Old World monkeys and the lineage of apes and man.

  16. REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1, a conserved gene that regulates ethylene receptor function in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Josephine S; Wen, Chi-Kuang; Shockey, Jason A; Chang, Caren

    2006-05-16

    Arabidopsis thaliana has five ethylene hormone receptors, which bind ethylene and elicit responses critical for plant growth and development. Here we describe a negative regulator of ethylene responses, REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1), which regulates the function of at least one of the receptors, ETR1, in Arabidopsis. RTE1 was identified based on the ability of rte1 mutations to suppress ethylene insensitivity of the dominant gain-of-function allele etr1-2. rte1 loss-of-function mutants have an enhanced ethylene response that closely resembles the etr1 null phenotype. The etr1 rte1 double null mutant is identical to the etr1 and rte1 single null mutants, suggesting that the two genes act in the same pathway. rte1 is unable to suppress the etr1-1 gain-of-function allele, placing RTE1 at or upstream of ETR1. rte1 also fails to suppress gain-of-function mutations in each of the four other ethylene receptor genes. RTE1 encodes a previously undescribed predicted membrane protein, which is highly conserved in plants, animals [corrected] and protists but absent in fungi and prokaryotes. Ethylene treatment induces RTE1 expression, and overexpression of RTE1 confers reduced ethylene sensitivity that partially depends on ETR1. These findings demonstrate that RTE1 is a negative regulator of ethylene signaling and suggest that RTE1 plays an important role in ETR1 function.

  17. SCNN1, an epithelial cell sodium channel gene in the conserved linkage group on mouse chromosome 6 and human chromosome 12

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.; Barrow, L.L.; Canessa, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    SCNN1, a gene encoding a nonvoltage-gated sodium channel, was detected using a rat colon cDNA probe with homology to Caenorhabditis elegans degenerin genes. Human SCNN1 was assigned to chromosome 12 using the NIGMS hybrid mapping panel 2. Mouse SCNN1 was mapped to a conserved linkage group on distal chromosome 6. The observed order of mouse genes was centromere-Raf1-(2.1 {plus_minus} 2.1)Scnn1, Vwf-(1.9 {plus_minus} 1.9)-Ntf3, with 0/101 recombinants between Scnn1 and Vwf. No rearrangements of genomic DNA were detected in the linked mouse mutations deaf waddler (dfw) and opisthotonus (opt). 10 refs., 1 fig.

  18. An entropy-residual shock detector for solving conservation laws using high-order discontinuous Galerkin methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yu; See, Yee Chee; Ihme, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    This manuscript is concerned with the detection of shock discontinuities in the solution of conservation laws for high-order discontinuous Galerkin methods. A shock detector based on the entropy residual is proposed to distinguish smooth and non-smooth parts of the solution. The numerical analysis shows that the proposed entropy residual converges if the true solution is smooth and sufficiently regularized in space and time. To precisely localize discontinuities of different natures, an approach is developed that dynamically sets the threshold on the detection function, such that the detection criterion retains its sensitivity to the characteristics of the local solution. The implementation is conducted in an entropy-bounded discontinuous Galerkin framework, and numerical tests confirm the convergence property of the entropy-residual formulation and the effectiveness of the thresholding procedure. This shock detector is combined with an artificial viscosity scheme for shock stabilization. Comparison with other detectors is performed to demonstrate the excellent performance of the entropy-residual based shock detector for a wide range of problems on regular and triangular grids.

  19. Second-order number-conserving description of nonequilibrium dynamics in finite-temperature Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billam, T. P.; Mason, P.; Gardiner, S. A.

    2013-03-01

    While the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is well established as the canonical dynamical description of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) at zero temperature, describing the dynamics of BECs at finite temperatures remains a difficult theoretical problem, particularly when considering low-temperature, nonequilibrium systems in which depletion of the condensate occurs dynamically as a result of external driving. In this paper, we describe a fully time-dependent numerical implementation of a second-order, number-conserving description of finite-temperature BEC dynamics. This description consists of equations of motion describing the coupled dynamics of the condensate and noncondensate fractions in a self-consistent manner, and is ideally suited for the study of low-temperature, nonequilibrium, driven systems. The δ-kicked-rotor BEC provides a prototypical example of such a system, and we demonstrate the efficacy of our numerical implementation by investigating its dynamics at finite temperature. We demonstrate that the qualitative features of the system dynamics at zero temperature are generally preserved at finite temperatures, and predict a quantitative finite-temperature shift of resonance frequencies which would be relevant for, and could be verified by, future experiments.

  20. Phylogenetic conservation of the 3' cryptic recombination signal sequence (3'cRSS) in the VH genes of jawed vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Liu, Zhancai; Li, Zhaoyong; Lian, Zhengxing; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2012-01-01

    The VH replacement process is a RAG-mediated secondary recombination in which the variable region of a rearranged VHDJH is replaced by a different germline VH gene. In almost all human and mouse VH genes, two sequence features appear to be crucial for VH replacement. First, an embedded heptamer, which is located near the 3' end of the rearranged VH gene, serves as a cryptic recombination signal sequence (3'cRSS) for the VH replacement process. Second, a short stretch of nucleotides located downstream of the 3'cRSS serve as a footprint of the original VH region, frequently encoding charged amino acids. In this review, we show that both of these two features are conserved in the VH genes of all jawed vertebrates, which suggests that the VH replacement process may be a conserved mechanism.

  1. Conservation of the Exon-Intron Structure of Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes in Eutherian Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Chernikova, Diana; Managadze, David; Glazko, Galina V.; Makalowski, Wojciech; Rogozin, Igor B.

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of mammalian long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes is high, yet their functions remain largely unknown. One possible way to study this important question is to use large-scale comparisons of various characteristics of lincRNA with those of protein-coding genes for which a large body of functional information is available. A prominent feature of mammalian protein-coding genes is the high evolutionary conservation of the exon-intron structure. Comparative analysis of putative intron positions in lincRNA genes from various mammalian genomes suggests that some lincRNA introns have been conserved for over 100 million years, thus the primary and/or secondary structure of these molecules is likely to be functionally important. PMID:27429005

  2. Conservation of the Exon-Intron Structure of Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes in Eutherian Mammals.

    PubMed

    Chernikova, Diana; Managadze, David; Glazko, Galina V; Makalowski, Wojciech; Rogozin, Igor B

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of mammalian long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes is high, yet their functions remain largely unknown. One possible way to study this important question is to use large-scale comparisons of various characteristics of lincRNA with those of protein-coding genes for which a large body of functional information is available. A prominent feature of mammalian protein-coding genes is the high evolutionary conservation of the exon-intron structure. Comparative analysis of putative intron positions in lincRNA genes from various mammalian genomes suggests that some lincRNA introns have been conserved for over 100 million years, thus the primary and/or secondary structure of these molecules is likely to be functionally important. PMID:27429005

  3. SMARCA4 regulates gene expression and higher-order chromatin structure in proliferating mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Barutcu, A Rasim; Lajoie, Bryan R; Fritz, Andrew J; McCord, Rachel P; Nickerson, Jeffrey A; van Wijnen, Andre J; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Dekker, Job; Stein, Gary S; Imbalzano, Anthony N

    2016-09-01

    The packaging of DNA into chromatin plays an important role in transcriptional regulation and nuclear processes. Brahma-related gene-1 SMARCA4 (also known as BRG1), the essential ATPase subunit of the mammalian SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex, uses the energy from ATP hydrolysis to disrupt nucleosomes at target regions. Although the transcriptional role of SMARCA4 at gene promoters is well-studied, less is known about its role in higher-order genome organization. SMARCA4 knockdown in human mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells resulted in 176 up-regulated genes, including many related to lipid and calcium metabolism, and 1292 down-regulated genes, some of which encode extracellular matrix (ECM) components that can exert mechanical forces and affect nuclear structure. ChIP-seq analysis of SMARCA4 localization and SMARCA4-bound super-enhancers demonstrated extensive binding at intergenic regions. Furthermore, Hi-C analysis showed extensive SMARCA4-mediated alterations in higher-order genome organization at multiple resolutions. First, SMARCA4 knockdown resulted in clustering of intra- and inter-subtelomeric regions, demonstrating a novel role for SMARCA4 in telomere organization. SMARCA4 binding was enriched at topologically associating domain (TAD) boundaries, and SMARCA4 knockdown resulted in weakening of TAD boundary strength. Taken together, these findings provide a dynamic view of SMARCA4-dependent changes in higher-order chromatin organization and gene expression, identifying SMARCA4 as a novel component of chromatin organization. PMID:27435934

  4. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  5. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K.; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  6. Evolutionary conservation of an atypical glucocorticoid-responsive element in the human tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Sheela Rani, C S; Soto-Pina, Alexandra; Iacovitti, Lorraine; Strong, Randy

    2013-07-01

    The human tyrosine hydroxylase (hTH) gene has a 42 bp evolutionarily conserved region designated (CR) II at -7.24 kb, which bears 93% homology to the region we earlier identified as containing the glucocorticoid response element, a 7 bp activator protein-1 (AP-1)-like motif in the rat TH gene. We cloned this hTH-CRII region upstream of minimal basal hTH promoter in luciferase (Luc) reporter vector, and tested glucocorticoid responsiveness in human cell lines. Dexamethasone (Dex) stimulated Luc activity of hTH-CRII in HeLa cells, while mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist, prevented Dex stimulation. Deletion of the 7 bp 5'-TGACTAA at -7243 bp completely abolished the Dex-stimulated Luc activity of hTH-CRII construct. The AP-1 agonist, tetradeconoyl-12,13-phorbol acetate (TPA), also stimulated hTH promoter activity, and Dex and TPA together further accentuated this response. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed the presence of both GR and AP-1 proteins, especially Jun family members, at this hTH promoter site. Dex did not stimulate hTH promoter activity in a catecholaminergic cell line, which had low endogenous GR levels, but did activate the response when GR was expressed exogenously. Thus, our studies have clearly identified a glucocorticoid-responsive element in a 7 bp AP-1-like motif in the promoter region at -7.24 kb of the human TH gene.

  7. Ancora: a web resource for exploring highly conserved noncoding elements and their association with developmental regulatory genes

    PubMed Central

    Engström, Pär G; Fredman, David; Lenhard, Boris

    2008-01-01

    Metazoan genomes contain arrays of highly conserved noncoding elements (HCNEs) that span developmental regulatory genes and define regulatory domains. We describe Ancora , a web resource that provides data and tools for exploring genomic organization of HCNEs for multiple genomes. Ancora includes a genome browser that shows HCNE locations and features novel HCNE density plots as a powerful tool to discover developmental regulatory genes and distinguish their regulatory elements and domains. PMID:18279518

  8. The pseudogenes of Mycobacterium leprae reveal the functional relevance of gene order within operons

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Enrique M.; Mah, Nancy; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Almost 50 years following the discovery of the prokaryotic operon, the functional relevance of gene order within operons remains unclear. In this work, we take advantage of the eroded genome of Mycobacterium leprae to add evidence supporting the notion that functionally less important genes have a tendency to be located at the end of its operons. M. leprae’s genome includes 1133 pseudogenes and 1614 protein-coding genes and can be compared with the close genome of M. tuberculosis. Assuming M. leprae’s pseudogenes to represent dispensable genes, we have studied the position of these pseudogenes in the operons of M. leprae and of their orthologs in M. tuberculosis. We observed that both tend to be located in the 3′ (downstream) half of the operon (P-values of 0.03 and 0.18, respectively). Analysis of pseudogenes in all available prokaryotic genomes confirms this trend (P-value of 7.1 × 10−7). In a complementary analysis, we found a significant tendency for essential genes to be located at the 5′ (upstream) half of the operon (P-value of 0.006). Our work provides an indication that, in prokarya, functionally less important genes have a tendency to be located at the end of operons, while more relevant genes tend to be located toward operon starts. PMID:21051341

  9. The pseudogenes of Mycobacterium leprae reveal the functional relevance of gene order within operons.

    PubMed

    Muro, Enrique M; Mah, Nancy; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2011-03-01

    Almost 50 years following the discovery of the prokaryotic operon, the functional relevance of gene order within operons remains unclear. In this work, we take advantage of the eroded genome of Mycobacterium leprae to add evidence supporting the notion that functionally less important genes have a tendency to be located at the end of its operons. M. leprae's genome includes 1133 pseudogenes and 1614 protein-coding genes and can be compared with the close genome of M. tuberculosis. Assuming M. leprae's pseudogenes to represent dispensable genes, we have studied the position of these pseudogenes in the operons of M. leprae and of their orthologs in M. tuberculosis. We observed that both tend to be located in the 3' (downstream) half of the operon (P-values of 0.03 and 0.18, respectively). Analysis of pseudogenes in all available prokaryotic genomes confirms this trend (P-value of 7.1 × 10(-7)). In a complementary analysis, we found a significant tendency for essential genes to be located at the 5' (upstream) half of the operon (P-value of 0.006). Our work provides an indication that, in prokarya, functionally less important genes have a tendency to be located at the end of operons, while more relevant genes tend to be located toward operon starts.

  10. Patterns of Evolutionary Conservation of Ascorbic Acid-Related Genes Following Whole-Genome Triplication in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Weike; Song, Xiaoming; Liu, Tongkun; Huang, Zhinan; Ren, Jun; Hou, Xilin; Du, Jianchang; Li, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) is an important antioxidant in plants and an essential vitamin for humans. Extending the study of AsA-related genes from Arabidopsis thaliana to Brassica rapa could shed light on the evolution of AsA in plants and inform crop breeding. In this study, we conducted whole-genome annotation, molecular-evolution and gene-expression analyses of all known AsA-related genes in B. rapa. The nucleobase–ascorbate transporter (NAT) gene family and AsA l-galactose pathway genes were also compared among plant species. Four important insights gained are that: 1) 102 AsA-related gene were identified in B. rapa and they mainly diverged 12–18 Ma accompanied by the Brassica-specific genome triplication event; 2) during their evolution, these AsA-related genes were preferentially retained, consistent with the gene dosage hypothesis; 3) the putative proteins were highly conserved, but their expression patterns varied; and 4) although the number of AsA-related genes is higher in B. rapa than in A. thaliana, the AsA contents and the numbers of expressed genes in leaves of both species are similar, the genes that are not generally expressed may serve as substitutes during emergencies. In summary, this study provides genome-wide insights into evolutionary history and mechanisms of AsA-related genes following whole-genome triplication in B. rapa. PMID:25552535

  11. Patterns of evolutionary conservation of ascorbic acid-related genes following whole-genome triplication in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weike; Song, Xiaoming; Liu, Tongkun; Huang, Zhinan; Ren, Jun; Hou, Xilin; Du, Jianchang; Li, Ying

    2014-12-31

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) is an important antioxidant in plants and an essential vitamin for humans. Extending the study of AsA-related genes from Arabidopsis thaliana to Brassica rapa could shed light on the evolution of AsA in plants and inform crop breeding. In this study, we conducted whole-genome annotation, molecular-evolution and gene-expression analyses of all known AsA-related genes in B. rapa. The nucleobase-ascorbate transporter (NAT) gene family and AsA l-galactose pathway genes were also compared among plant species. Four important insights gained are that: 1) 102 AsA-related gene were identified in B. rapa and they mainly diverged 12-18 Ma accompanied by the Brassica-specific genome triplication event; 2) during their evolution, these AsA-related genes were preferentially retained, consistent with the gene dosage hypothesis; 3) the putative proteins were highly conserved, but their expression patterns varied; and 4) although the number of AsA-related genes is higher in B. rapa than in A. thaliana, the AsA contents and the numbers of expressed genes in leaves of both species are similar, the genes that are not generally expressed may serve as substitutes during emergencies. In summary, this study provides genome-wide insights into evolutionary history and mechanisms of AsA-related genes following whole-genome triplication in B. rapa.

  12. Patterns of evolutionary conservation of ascorbic acid-related genes following whole-genome triplication in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weike; Song, Xiaoming; Liu, Tongkun; Huang, Zhinan; Ren, Jun; Hou, Xilin; Du, Jianchang; Li, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) is an important antioxidant in plants and an essential vitamin for humans. Extending the study of AsA-related genes from Arabidopsis thaliana to Brassica rapa could shed light on the evolution of AsA in plants and inform crop breeding. In this study, we conducted whole-genome annotation, molecular-evolution and gene-expression analyses of all known AsA-related genes in B. rapa. The nucleobase-ascorbate transporter (NAT) gene family and AsA l-galactose pathway genes were also compared among plant species. Four important insights gained are that: 1) 102 AsA-related gene were identified in B. rapa and they mainly diverged 12-18 Ma accompanied by the Brassica-specific genome triplication event; 2) during their evolution, these AsA-related genes were preferentially retained, consistent with the gene dosage hypothesis; 3) the putative proteins were highly conserved, but their expression patterns varied; and 4) although the number of AsA-related genes is higher in B. rapa than in A. thaliana, the AsA contents and the numbers of expressed genes in leaves of both species are similar, the genes that are not generally expressed may serve as substitutes during emergencies. In summary, this study provides genome-wide insights into evolutionary history and mechanisms of AsA-related genes following whole-genome triplication in B. rapa. PMID:25552535

  13. A Functionally Conserved Gene Regulatory Network Module Governing Olfactory Neuron Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Okuwa, Sumie; Maciejewski, Abigail; Brandt, Alicia T.; Reinhold, Dominik; Jones, Corbin D.; Volkan, Pelin Cayirlioglu

    2016-01-01

    Sensory neuron diversity is required for organisms to decipher complex environmental cues. In Drosophila, the olfactory environment is detected by 50 different olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) classes that are clustered in combinations within distinct sensilla subtypes. Each sensilla subtype houses stereotypically clustered 1–4 ORN identities that arise through asymmetric divisions from a single multipotent sensory organ precursor (SOP). How each class of SOPs acquires a unique differentiation potential that accounts for ORN diversity is unknown. Previously, we reported a critical component of SOP diversification program, Rotund (Rn), increases ORN diversity by generating novel developmental trajectories from existing precursors within each independent sensilla type lineages. Here, we show that Rn, along with BarH1/H2 (Bar), Bric-à-brac (Bab), Apterous (Ap) and Dachshund (Dac), constitutes a transcription factor (TF) network that patterns the developing olfactory tissue. This network was previously shown to pattern the segmentation of the leg, which suggests that this network is functionally conserved. In antennal imaginal discs, precursors with diverse ORN differentiation potentials are selected from concentric rings defined by unique combinations of these TFs along the proximodistal axis of the developing antennal disc. The combinatorial code that demarcates each precursor field is set up by cross-regulatory interactions among different factors within the network. Modifications of this network lead to predictable changes in the diversity of sensilla subtypes and ORN pools. In light of our data, we propose a molecular map that defines each unique SOP fate. Our results highlight the importance of the early prepatterning gene regulatory network as a modulator of SOP and terminally differentiated ORN diversity. Finally, our model illustrates how conserved developmental strategies are used to generate neuronal diversity. PMID:26765103

  14. A Functionally Conserved Gene Regulatory Network Module Governing Olfactory Neuron Diversity.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingyun; Barish, Scott; Okuwa, Sumie; Maciejewski, Abigail; Brandt, Alicia T; Reinhold, Dominik; Jones, Corbin D; Volkan, Pelin Cayirlioglu

    2016-01-01

    Sensory neuron diversity is required for organisms to decipher complex environmental cues. In Drosophila, the olfactory environment is detected by 50 different olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) classes that are clustered in combinations within distinct sensilla subtypes. Each sensilla subtype houses stereotypically clustered 1-4 ORN identities that arise through asymmetric divisions from a single multipotent sensory organ precursor (SOP). How each class of SOPs acquires a unique differentiation potential that accounts for ORN diversity is unknown. Previously, we reported a critical component of SOP diversification program, Rotund (Rn), increases ORN diversity by generating novel developmental trajectories from existing precursors within each independent sensilla type lineages. Here, we show that Rn, along with BarH1/H2 (Bar), Bric-à-brac (Bab), Apterous (Ap) and Dachshund (Dac), constitutes a transcription factor (TF) network that patterns the developing olfactory tissue. This network was previously shown to pattern the segmentation of the leg, which suggests that this network is functionally conserved. In antennal imaginal discs, precursors with diverse ORN differentiation potentials are selected from concentric rings defined by unique combinations of these TFs along the proximodistal axis of the developing antennal disc. The combinatorial code that demarcates each precursor field is set up by cross-regulatory interactions among different factors within the network. Modifications of this network lead to predictable changes in the diversity of sensilla subtypes and ORN pools. In light of our data, we propose a molecular map that defines each unique SOP fate. Our results highlight the importance of the early prepatterning gene regulatory network as a modulator of SOP and terminally differentiated ORN diversity. Finally, our model illustrates how conserved developmental strategies are used to generate neuronal diversity. PMID:26765103

  15. A conserved role for CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON genes during ovule development.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Beatriz; Hasson, Alice; Belcram, Katia; Cortizo, Millán; Morin, Halima; Nikovics, Krisztina; Vialette-Guiraud, Aurélie; Takeda, Seiji; Aida, Mitsuhiro; Laufs, Patrick; Arnaud, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    The evolution of plant reproductive strategies has led to a remarkable diversity of structures, especially within the flower, a structure characteristic of the angiosperms. In flowering plants, sexual reproduction depends notably on the development of the gynoecium that produces and protects the ovules. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ovule initiation is promoted by the concerted action of auxin with CUC1 (CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON1) and CUC2, two genes that encode transcription factors of the NAC family (NAM/ATAF1,2/CUC). Here we highlight an additional role for CUC2 and CUC3 in Arabidopsis thaliana ovule separation. While CUC1 and CUC2 are broadly expressed in the medial tissue of the gynoecium, CUC2 and CUC3 are expressed in the placental tissue between developing ovules. Consistent with the partial overlap between CUC1, CUC2 and CUC3 expression patterns, we show that CUC proteins can physically interact, both in yeast cells and in planta. We found that the cuc2;cuc3 double mutant specifically harbours defects in ovule separation, producing fused seeds that share the seed coat, and suggesting that CUC2 and CUC3 promote ovule separation in a partially redundant manner. Functional analyses show that CUC transcription factors are also involved in ovule development in Cardamine hirsuta. Additionally we show a conserved expression pattern of CUC orthologues between ovule primordia in other phylogenetically distant species with different gynoecium architectures. Taken together these results suggest an ancient role for CUC transcription factors in ovule separation, and shed light on the conservation of mechanisms involved in the development of innovative structures.

  16. Dishevelled genes mediate a conserved mammalian PCP pathway to regulate convergent extension during neurulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbo; Hamblet, Natasha S; Mark, Sharayne; Dickinson, Mary E; Brinkman, Brendan C; Segil, Neil; Fraser, Scott E; Chen, Ping; Wallingford, John B; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2006-05-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway is conserved throughout evolution, but it mediates distinct developmental processes. In Drosophila, members of the PCP pathway localize in a polarized fashion to specify the cellular polarity within the plane of the epithelium, perpendicular to the apicobasal axis of the cell. In Xenopus and zebrafish, several homologs of the components of the fly PCP pathway control convergent extension. We have shown previously that mammalian PCP homologs regulate both cell polarity and polarized extension in the cochlea in the mouse. Here we show, using mice with null mutations in two mammalian Dishevelled homologs, Dvl1 and Dvl2, that during neurulation a homologous mammalian PCP pathway regulates concomitant lengthening and narrowing of the neural plate, a morphogenetic process defined as convergent extension. Dvl2 genetically interacts with Loop-tail, a point mutation in the mammalian PCP gene Vangl2, during neurulation. By generating Dvl2 BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenes and introducing different domain deletions and a point mutation identical to the dsh1 allele in fly, we further demonstrated a high degree of conservation between Dvl function in mammalian convergent extension and the PCP pathway in fly. In the neuroepithelium of neurulating embryos, Dvl2 shows DEP domain-dependent membrane localization, a pre-requisite for its involvement in convergent extension. Intriguing, the Loop-tail mutation that disrupts both convergent extension in the neuroepithelium and PCP in the cochlea does not disrupt Dvl2 membrane distribution in the neuroepithelium, in contrast to its drastic effect on Dvl2 localization in the cochlea. These results are discussed in light of recent models on PCP and convergent extension.

  17. A Functionally Conserved Gene Regulatory Network Module Governing Olfactory Neuron Diversity.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingyun; Barish, Scott; Okuwa, Sumie; Maciejewski, Abigail; Brandt, Alicia T; Reinhold, Dominik; Jones, Corbin D; Volkan, Pelin Cayirlioglu

    2016-01-01

    Sensory neuron diversity is required for organisms to decipher complex environmental cues. In Drosophila, the olfactory environment is detected by 50 different olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) classes that are clustered in combinations within distinct sensilla subtypes. Each sensilla subtype houses stereotypically clustered 1-4 ORN identities that arise through asymmetric divisions from a single multipotent sensory organ precursor (SOP). How each class of SOPs acquires a unique differentiation potential that accounts for ORN diversity is unknown. Previously, we reported a critical component of SOP diversification program, Rotund (Rn), increases ORN diversity by generating novel developmental trajectories from existing precursors within each independent sensilla type lineages. Here, we show that Rn, along with BarH1/H2 (Bar), Bric-à-brac (Bab), Apterous (Ap) and Dachshund (Dac), constitutes a transcription factor (TF) network that patterns the developing olfactory tissue. This network was previously shown to pattern the segmentation of the leg, which suggests that this network is functionally conserved. In antennal imaginal discs, precursors with diverse ORN differentiation potentials are selected from concentric rings defined by unique combinations of these TFs along the proximodistal axis of the developing antennal disc. The combinatorial code that demarcates each precursor field is set up by cross-regulatory interactions among different factors within the network. Modifications of this network lead to predictable changes in the diversity of sensilla subtypes and ORN pools. In light of our data, we propose a molecular map that defines each unique SOP fate. Our results highlight the importance of the early prepatterning gene regulatory network as a modulator of SOP and terminally differentiated ORN diversity. Finally, our model illustrates how conserved developmental strategies are used to generate neuronal diversity.

  18. The human homolog of a candidate mouse t complex responder gene: conserved motifs and evolution with punctuated equilibria.

    PubMed

    Islam, S D; Pilder, S H; Decker, C L; Cebra-Thomas, J A; Silver, L M

    1993-12-01

    The mouse Tcp-10 gene has been established as a molecular candidate for the t complex responder locus which plays a central role in the transmission ratio distortion phenotype expressed by males heterozygous for a t haplotype. Here we describe a comparison of the mouse and human TCP10 coding sequences. The results show that whole exons have been added or eliminated from the transcripts expressed in each species, suggesting an evolutionary process of punctuated equilibria for this gene. Two of the polypeptide regions that are most conserved between the two species contain specific peptide motifs. The conserved C-terminal region contains a unique nonapeptide repeat of unknown function and the conserved N-terminal region contains a pair of leucine zippers within a region that shows additional similarity to the coiled-coil regions of various cytosolic polypeptides. These results are discussed in terms of the possible function of the TCP10 protein.

  19. THE GRK4 SUBFAMILY OF G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR KINASES: ALTERNATIVE SPLICING, GENE ORGANIZATION, AND SEQUENCE CONSERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The GRK4 subfamily of G protein-coupled receptor kinases. Alternative splicing, gene organization, and sequence conservation.

    Premont RT, Macrae AD, Aparicio SA, Kendall HE, Welch JE, Lefkowitz RJ.

    Department of Medicine, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Duke Univer...

  20. Molecular phylogeny of the order Euryalida (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea), based on mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal genes.

    PubMed

    Okanishi, Masanori; O'Hara, Timothy D; Fujita, Toshihiko

    2011-11-01

    The existing taxonomy of Euryalida, one of the two orders of the Ophiuroidea (Echinodermata), is uncertain and characterized by controversial delimitation of taxonomic ranks from genus to family-level. Their phylogeny was not studied in detail until now. We investigated a dataset of sequence from a mitochondrial gene (16S rRNA) and two nucleic genes (18S rRNA and 28S rRNA) for 49 euryalid ophiuroids and four outgroup species from the order Ophiurida. The monophyly of the order Euryalida was supported as was the monophyly of Asteronychidae, Gorgonocephalidae and an Asteroschematidae+Euryalidae clade. However, the group currently known as the Asteroschematidae was paraphyletic with respect to the Euryalidae. The Asteroschematidae+Euryalidae clade, which we recognise as an enlarged Euryalidae, contains three natural groups: the Asteroschematinae (Asteroschema and Ophiocreas), a new subfamily Astrocharinae (Astrocharis) and the Euryalinae with remaining genera. These subfamilies can be distinguished by internal ossicle morphology.

  1. Comparative analysis of a conserved zinc finger gene cluster on human chromosome 19q and mouse chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, M.; Mucenski, M.L.; Stubbs, L.

    1996-04-01

    Several lines of evidence now suggest that many of the zinc-finger-containing (ZNF) genes in the human genome are arranged in clusters. However, little is known about the structure or function of the clusters or about their conservation throughout evolution. Here, we report the analysis of a conserved ZNF gene cluster located in human chromosome 19q13.2 and mouse chromosome 7. Our results indicate that the human cluster consists of at least 10 related Kruppel-associated box (KRAB)-containing ZNF genes organized in tandem over a distance of 350-450 kb. Two cDNA clones representing genes in the murine cluster have been studied in detail. The KRAB A domains of these genes are nearly identical and are highly similar to human 19q13.2-derived KRAB sequences, but DNA-binding ZNF domains and other portions of the genes differ considerably. The two murine genes display distinct expression patterns, but are coexpressed in some adult tissues. These studies pave the way for a systematic analysis of the evolution of structure and function of genes within the numerous clustered ZNF families located on human chromosome 19 and elsewhere in the human and mouse genomes. 32 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Regulation of Dlx3 gene expression in visceral arches by evolutionarily conserved enhancer elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kenta Sumiyama; Frank H. Ruddle

    2003-04-01

    The mammalian Distal-less (Dlx) clusters (Dlx1-2, Dlx5-6, and Dlx3-7) have a nested expression pattern in developing visceral (branchial) arches. Genetic regulatory mechanisms controlling Dlx spatial expression within the visceral arches have not yet been defined. Here we show that an enhancer in the Dlx3-7 cluster can regulate the visceral arch specific expression pattern of the Dlx3 gene. We have used a 79-kb transgene construct containing the entire Dlx3-7 bigene cluster with a LacZ reporter inserted in frame in the first exon of the Dlx3 gene. Visceral arch expression is absent when a 4-kb element located within the Dlx3-7 intergenic region is deleted. A 245-bp element (I37-2) whose DNA sequence is highly conserved between human and mouse located within the 4kb-deleted region can drive visceral arch expression when fused to a hsp68-lacZ reporter transgene construct. Reporter expression is detected in 9.5 and 10.5 days postcoitum transgenic embryos in a manner consistent with the endogenous Dlx3 expression pattern in the mesenchyme of the first and second visceral arches. Thus the I37-2 element is both necessary and sufficient for Dlx3 expression. The I37-2 element contains several putative binding sites for several transcription factors including Dlx and other homeodomain proteins within the evolutionarily conserved region. Significantly, the I37-2 element shows a sequence-match including a Dlx binding site to a cis-element in the Dlx5-6 intermediate region designated mI56i [Zerucha, T., Stuhmer, T., Hatch, G., Park, B. K., Long, Q., Yu, G., Gambarotta, A., Schultz, J. R., Rubenstein, J. L. & Ekker, M. (2000) J. Neurosci. 20, 709-721], despite distant phylogenetic relationship between these clusters. Our results provide evidence for a concerted role for DLX auto- and cross-regulation in the establishment of a nested expression pattern for Dlx3-7 and Dlx5-6 clusters within the visceral arches.

  3. Controlling false discoveries in multidimensional directional decisions, with applications to gene expression data on ordered categories.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenge; Sarkar, Sanat K; Peddada, Shyamal D

    2010-06-01

    Microarray gene expression studies over ordered categories are routinely conducted to gain insights into biological functions of genes and the underlying biological processes. Some common experiments are time-course/dose-response experiments where a tissue or cell line is exposed to different doses and/or durations of time to a chemical. A goal of such studies is to identify gene expression patterns/profiles over the ordered categories. This problem can be formulated as a multiple testing problem where for each gene the null hypothesis of no difference between the successive mean gene expressions is tested and further directional decisions are made if it is rejected. Much of the existing multiple testing procedures are devised for controlling the usual false discovery rate (FDR) rather than the mixed directional FDR (mdFDR), the expected proportion of Type I and directional errors among all rejections. Benjamini and Yekutieli (2005, Journal of the American Statistical Association 100, 71-93) proved that an augmentation of the usual Benjamini-Hochberg (BH) procedure can control the mdFDR while testing simple null hypotheses against two-sided alternatives in terms of one-dimensional parameters. In this article, we consider the problem of controlling the mdFDR involving multidimensional parameters. To deal with this problem, we develop a procedure extending that of Benjamini and Yekutieli based on the Bonferroni test for each gene. A proof is given for its mdFDR control when the underlying test statistics are independent across the genes. The results of a simulation study evaluating its performance under independence as well as under dependence of the underlying test statistics across the genes relative to other relevant procedures are reported. Finally, the proposed methodology is applied to a time-course microarray data obtained by Lobenhofer et al. (2002, Molecular Endocrinology 16, 1215-1229). We identified several important cell-cycle genes, such as DNA

  4. Variable Gene Dispersal Conditions and Spatial Deforestation Patterns Can Interact to Affect Tropical Tree Conservation Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kashimshetty, Yamini; Pelikan, Stephan; Rogstad, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    Tropical lowland rain forest (TLRF) biodiversity is under threat from anthropogenic factors including deforestation which creates forest fragments of different sizes that can further undergo various internal patterns of logging. Such interventions can modify previous equilibrium abundance and spatial distribution patterns of offspring recruitment and/or pollen dispersal. Little is known about how these aspects of deforestation and fragmentation might synergistically affect TLRF tree recovery demographics and population genetics in newly formed forest fragments. To investigate these TLRF anthropogenic disturbance processes we used the computer program NEWGARDEN (NG), which models spatially-explicit, individual-based plant populations, to simulate 10% deforestation in six different spatial logging patterns for the plant functional type of a long-lived TLRF canopy tree species. Further, each logging pattern was analyzed under nine varying patterns of offspring versus pollen dispersal distances that could have arisen post-fragmentation. Results indicated that gene dispersal condition (especially via offspring) had a greater effect on population growth and genetic diversity retention (explaining 98.5% and 88.8% of the variance respectively) than spatial logging pattern (0.2% and 4.7% respectively), with ‘Near’ distance dispersal maximizing population growth and genetic diversity relative to distant dispersal. Within logged regions of the fragment, deforestation patterns closer to fragment borders more often exhibited lower population recovery rates and founding genetic diversity retention relative to more centrally located logging. These results suggest newly isolated fragments have populations that are more sensitive to the way in which their offspring and pollen dispersers are affected than the spatial pattern in which subsequent logging occurs, and that large variation in the recovery rates of different TLRF tree species attributable to altered gene dispersal

  5. Variable gene dispersal conditions and spatial deforestation patterns can interact to affect tropical tree conservation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kashimshetty, Yamini; Pelikan, Stephan; Rogstad, Steven H

    2015-01-01

    Tropical lowland rain forest (TLRF) biodiversity is under threat from anthropogenic factors including deforestation which creates forest fragments of different sizes that can further undergo various internal patterns of logging. Such interventions can modify previous equilibrium abundance and spatial distribution patterns of offspring recruitment and/or pollen dispersal. Little is known about how these aspects of deforestation and fragmentation might synergistically affect TLRF tree recovery demographics and population genetics in newly formed forest fragments. To investigate these TLRF anthropogenic disturbance processes we used the computer program NEWGARDEN (NG), which models spatially-explicit, individual-based plant populations, to simulate 10% deforestation in six different spatial logging patterns for the plant functional type of a long-lived TLRF canopy tree species. Further, each logging pattern was analyzed under nine varying patterns of offspring versus pollen dispersal distances that could have arisen post-fragmentation. Results indicated that gene dispersal condition (especially via offspring) had a greater effect on population growth and genetic diversity retention (explaining 98.5% and 88.8% of the variance respectively) than spatial logging pattern (0.2% and 4.7% respectively), with 'Near' distance dispersal maximizing population growth and genetic diversity relative to distant dispersal. Within logged regions of the fragment, deforestation patterns closer to fragment borders more often exhibited lower population recovery rates and founding genetic diversity retention relative to more centrally located logging. These results suggest newly isolated fragments have populations that are more sensitive to the way in which their offspring and pollen dispersers are affected than the spatial pattern in which subsequent logging occurs, and that large variation in the recovery rates of different TLRF tree species attributable to altered gene dispersal

  6. Complete structural organization of the human {alpha}1(V) collagen gene (COL5A1): Divergence from the conserved organization of other characterized fibrillar collagen genes

    SciTech Connect

    Takahara, Kazuhiko; Hoffman, G.G.; Greenspan, D.S.

    1995-10-10

    Genes that encode the vertebrate fibrillar collagen types I-III have previously been shown to share a highly conserved intron/exon organization, thought to reflect common ancestry and evolutionary pressures at the protein level. We report here the complete intron/exon organization of COL5A1, the human gene that encodes the {alpha}1 chain of fibrillar collagen type V. The structure of COL5A1 is shown to be considerably diverged from the conserved structure of the genes for fibrillar collagen types I-III. COL5A1 has 66 exons, which is greater than the number of exons found in the genes for collagen types I-III. The increased number of exons is partly due to the increased size of the pro-{alpha}1(V) N-propeptide, relative to the sizes of the N-propeptides of the types I-III procollagen molecules. In addition, however, the increased number of exons is due to differences in the intron/exon organization of the triple-helix coding region of COL5A1 compared to the organization of the triple-helix coding regions of the genes for collagen types I-III. Of particular interest is the increase of 54 bp exons in this region of COL5A1, strongly supporting the proposal that the triple-helix coding regions of fibrillar collagen genes evolved from duplication of a 54 bp primordial genetic element. Moreover, comparison of the structure of COL5A1 to the highly conserved structure of the genes of collagen types I-III provides insights into the probable structure of the ancestral gene that gave rise to what appears to be two classes of vertebrate fibrillar collagen genes. 50 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Genome engineering uncovers 54 evolutionarily conserved and testis-enriched genes that are not required for male fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Haruhiko; Castaneda, Julio M; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Yu, Zhifeng; Archambeault, Denise R; Isotani, Ayako; Kiyozumi, Daiji; Kriseman, Maya L; Mashiko, Daisuke; Matsumura, Takafumi; Matzuk, Ryan M; Mori, Masashi; Noda, Taichi; Oji, Asami; Okabe, Masaru; Prunskaite-Hyyrylainen, Renata; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Satouh, Yuhkoh; Zhang, Qian; Ikawa, Masahito; Matzuk, Martin M

    2016-07-12

    Gene-expression analysis studies from Schultz et al. estimate that more than 2,300 genes in the mouse genome are expressed predominantly in the male germ line. As of their 2003 publication [Schultz N, Hamra FK, Garbers DL (2003) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100(21):12201-12206], the functions of the majority of these testis-enriched genes during spermatogenesis and fertilization were largely unknown. Since the study by Schultz et al., functional analysis of hundreds of reproductive-tract-enriched genes have been performed, but there remain many testis-enriched genes for which their relevance to reproduction remain unexplored or unreported. Historically, a gene knockout is the "gold standard" to determine whether a gene's function is essential in vivo. Although knockout mice without apparent phenotypes are rarely published, these knockout mouse lines and their phenotypic information need to be shared to prevent redundant experiments. Herein, we used bioinformatic and experimental approaches to uncover mouse testis-enriched genes that are evolutionarily conserved in humans. We then used gene-disruption approaches, including Knockout Mouse Project resources (targeting vectors and mice) and CRISPR/Cas9, to mutate and quickly analyze the fertility of these mutant mice. We discovered that 54 mutant mouse lines were fertile. Thus, despite evolutionary conservation of these genes in vertebrates and in some cases in all eukaryotes, our results indicate that these genes are not individually essential for male mouse fertility. Our phenotypic data are highly relevant in this fiscally tight funding period and postgenomic age when large numbers of genomes are being analyzed for disease association, and will prevent unnecessary expenditures and duplications of effort by others. PMID:27357688

  8. Marker production by PCR amplification with primer pairs from conserved sequences of WRKY genes in chili pepper.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoun-Joung; Lee, Heung-Ryul; Han, Jung-Heon; Yeom, Seon-In; Harn, Chee-Hark; Kim, Byung-Dong

    2008-04-30

    Despite increasing awareness of the importance of WRKY genes in plant defense signaling, the locations of these genes in the Capsicum genome have not been established. To develop WRKY-based markers, primer sequences were deduced from the conserved sequences of the DNA binding motif within the WRKY domains of tomato and pepper genes. These primers were derived from upstream and downstream parts of the conserved sequences of the three WRKY groups. Six primer combinations of each WRKY group were tested for polymorphisms between the mapping parents, C. annuum 'CM334' and C. annuum 'Chilsungcho'. DNA fragments amplified by primer pairs deduced from WRKY Group II genes revealed high levels of polymorphism. Using 32 primer pairs to amplify upstream and downstream parts of the WRKY domain of WRKY group II genes, 60 polymorphic bands were detected. Polymorphisms were not detected with primer pairs from downstream parts of WRKY group II genes. Half of these primers were subjected to F2 genotyping to construct a linkage map. Thirty of 41 markers were located evenly spaced on 20 of the 28 linkage groups, without clustering. This linkage map also consisted of 199 AFLP and 26 SSR markers. This WRKY-based marker system is a rapid and simple method for generating sequence-specific markers for plant gene families.

  9. Bacterial intra-species gene loss occurs in a largely clocklike manner mostly within a pool of less conserved and constrained genes

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Evgeni; Hershberg, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Gene loss is a major contributor to the evolution of bacterial gene content. Gene loss may occur as a result of shifts in environment leading to changes in the intensity and/or directionality of selection applied for the maintenance of specific genes. Gene loss may also occur in a more neutral manner, when gene functions are lost that were not subject to strong selection to be maintained, irrespective of changes to environment. Here, we used a pangenome-based approach to investigate patterns of gene loss across 15 bacterial species. We demonstrate that gene loss tends to occur mostly within a pool of genes that are less constrained within species, even in those strains from which they are not lost, and less conserved across bacterial species. Our results indicate that shifts in selection, resulting from shifts in environment are not required to explain the majority of gene loss events occurring within a diverse collection of bacterial species. Caution should therefore be taken when attributing differences in gene content to differences in environment. PMID:27734920

  10. Maximal Expression of the Evolutionarily Conserved Slit2 Gene Promoter Requires Sp1.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Jacquelyn; Wisidagama, D Roonalika; Morford, Travis; Malone, Cindy S

    2016-08-01

    Slit2 is a neural axon guidance and chemorepellent protein that stimulates motility in a variety of cell types. The role of Slit2 in neural development and neoplastic growth and migration has been well established, while the genetic mechanisms underlying regulation of the Slit2 gene have not. We identified the core and proximal promoter of Slit2 by mapping multiple transcriptional start sites, analyzing transcriptional activity, and confirming sequence homology for the Slit2 proximal promoter among a number of species. Deletion series and transient transfection identified the Slit2 proximal promoter as within 399 base pairs upstream of the start of transcription. A crucial region for full expression of the Slit2 proximal promoter lies between 399 base pairs and 296 base pairs upstream of the start of transcription. Computer modeling identified three transcription factor-binding consensus sites within this region, of which only site-directed mutagenesis of one of the two identified Sp1 consensus sites inhibited transcriptional activity of the Slit2 proximal promoter (-399 to +253). Bioinformatics analysis of the Slit2 proximal promoter -399 base pair to -296 base pair region shows high sequence conservation over twenty-two species, and that this region follows an expected pattern of sequence divergence through evolution.

  11. blue cheese Mutations Define a Novel, Conserved Gene Involved in Progressive Neural Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Finley, Kim D.; Edeen, Philip T.; Cumming, Robert C.; Mardahl-Dumesnil, Michelle D.; Taylor, Barbara J.; Rodriguez, Maria H.; Hwang, Calvin E.; Benedetti, Michael; McKeown, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A common feature of many human neurodegenerative diseases is the accumulation of insoluble ubiquitin-containing protein aggregates in the CNS. Although Drosophila has been helpful in understanding several human neurodegenerative disorders, a loss-of-function mutation has not been identified that leads to insoluble CNS protein aggregates. The study of Drosophila mutations may identify unique components that are associated with human degenerative diseases. The Drosophila blue cheese (bchs) gene defines such a novel degenerative pathway. bchs mutants have a reduced adult life span with the age-dependent formation of protein aggregates throughout the neuropil of the CNS. These inclusions contain insoluble ubiquitinated proteins and amyloid precursor-like protein. Progressive loss of CNS size and morphology along with extensive neuronal apoptosis occurs in aged bchs mutants. BCHS protein is widely expressed in the cytoplasm of CNS neurons and is present over the entire length of axonal projections. BCHS is nearly 3500 amino acids in size, with the last 1000 amino acids consisting of three functional protein motifs implicated in vesicle transport and protein processing. This region along with previously unidentified proteins encoded in the human, mouse, and nematode genomes shows striking homology along the full length of the BCHS protein. The high degree of conservation between Drosophila and human bchs suggests that study of the functional pathway of BCHS and associated mutant phenotype may provide useful insights into human neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:12598614

  12. Integrating bioinformatic resources to predict transcription factors interacting with cis-sequences conserved in co-regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Using motif detection programs it is fairly straightforward to identify conserved cis-sequences in promoters of co-regulated genes. In contrast, the identification of the transcription factors (TFs) interacting with these cis-sequences is much more elaborate. To facilitate this, we explore the possibility of using several bioinformatic and experimental approaches for TF identification. This starts with the selection of co-regulated gene sets and leads first to the prediction and then to the experimental validation of TFs interacting with cis-sequences conserved in the promoters of these co-regulated genes. Results Using the PathoPlant database, 32 up-regulated gene groups were identified with microarray data for drought-responsive gene expression from Arabidopsis thaliana. Application of the binding site estimation suite of tools (BEST) discovered 179 conserved sequence motifs within the corresponding promoters. Using the STAMP web-server, 49 sequence motifs were classified into 7 motif families for which similarities with known cis-regulatory sequences were identified. All motifs were subjected to a footprintDB analysis to predict interacting DNA binding domains from plant TF families. Predictions were confirmed by using a yeast-one-hybrid approach to select interacting TFs belonging to the predicted TF families. TF-DNA interactions were further experimentally validated in yeast and with a Physcomitrella patens transient expression system, leading to the discovery of several novel TF-DNA interactions. Conclusions The present work demonstrates the successful integration of several bioinformatic resources with experimental approaches to predict and validate TFs interacting with conserved sequence motifs in co-regulated genes. PMID:24773781

  13. Novel parasitic nematode-specific protein of bovine filarial parasite Setaria digitata displays conserved gene structure and ubiquitous expression.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, W W; Dassanayake, R S; Weerasena, S J; Silva Gunawardene, Y I

    2014-09-01

    Setaria digitata is an animal filarial parasite, which can cause fatal diseases to livestock such as cattle, sheep, goat, buffaloes, horses etc. inflicting considerable economic losses to livelihood of livestock farmers. In spite of this, the biology and parasitic nature of this organism is largely unknown. As a step towards understanding these, we screened the cDNA library of S. digitata and identified an open reading frame that code for parasitic nematode-specific protein, which showed a significant homology to functionally and structurally unannotated sequences of parasitic nematodes Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, Loa loa etc., suggesting its role in parasitism. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the S. digitata novel gene (SDNP) is expressed in adult female and male, and microfilariae. Southern hybridization studies revealed that this gene is a single-copy gene. Sequence analysis of the genomic region obtained from overlapping PCR amplification indicated that the size of the genomic region is 1819 bp in which four exons encoding 205 amino acids were interrupted by three introns of varying lengths of 419, 659 and 123 bp, and also the expansion of the size of the introns of S. digitata compared to its orthologues by integrating micro and mini-satellite containing sequence. Sequences around the splice junctions were conserved and agreed with the general GT-AG splicing rule. The gene was found to be AT rich with a GC content of 38.1%. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the gene structure of SDNP and its orthologues is conserved and it expressed ubiqutously in all the stages of nematode's life cycle. Therefore, taking these outcomes together, it can be concluded that SDNP is a parasitic nematode-specific, single copy gene having conserved gene structure of four exons interrupted by three introns and that the gene is expressed ubiquitously throughout nematode's life cycle. PMID:25382479

  14. Identification of CROWN ROOTLESS1-regulated genes in rice reveals specific and conserved elements of postembryonic root formation.

    PubMed

    Coudert, Yoan; Le, Van Anh Thi; Adam, Hélène; Bès, Martine; Vignols, Florence; Jouannic, Stefan; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Gantet, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    In monocotyledons, the root system is mostly composed of postembryonic shoot-borne roots called crown roots. In rice (Oryza sativa), auxin promotes crown root initiation via the LOB-domain transcription factor (LBD) transcription factor CROWN ROOTLESS1 (CRL1); however, the gene regulatory network downstream of CRL1 remains largely unknown. We tested CRL1 transcriptional activity in yeast and in planta, identified CRL1-regulated genes using an inducible gene expression system and a transcriptome analysis, and used in situ hybridization to demonstrate coexpression of a sample of CRL1-regulated genes with CRL1 in crown root primordia. We show that CRL1 positively regulates 277 genes, including key genes involved in meristem patterning (such as QUIESCENT-CENTER SPECIFIC HOMEOBOX; QHB), cell proliferation and hormone homeostasis. Many genes are homologous to Arabidopsis genes involved in lateral root formation, but about a quarter are rice-specific. Our study reveals that several genes acting downstream of LBD transcription factors controlling postembryonic root formation are conserved between monocots and dicots. It also provides evidence that specific genes are involved in the formation of shoot-derived roots in rice.

  15. The evolution of novelty in conserved genes; evidence of positive selection in the Drosophila fruitless gene is localised to alternatively spliced exons

    PubMed Central

    Parker, D J; Gardiner, A; Neville, M C; Ritchie, M G; Goodwin, S F

    2014-01-01

    There has been much debate concerning whether cis-regulatory or coding changes are more likely to produce evolutionary innovation or adaptation in gene function, but an additional complication is that some genes can dramatically diverge through alternative splicing, increasing the diversity of gene function within a locus. The fruitless gene is a major transcription factor with a wide range of pleiotropic functions, including a fundamental conserved role in sexual differentiation, species-specific morphology and an important influence on male sexual behaviour. Here, we examine the structure of fruitless in multiple species of Drosophila, and determine the patterns of selective constraint acting across the coding region. We found that the pattern of selection, estimated from the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions, varied considerably across the gene, with most regions of the gene evolutionarily conserved but with several regions showing evidence of divergence as a result of positive selection. The regions that showed evidence of positive selection were found to be localised to relatively consistent regions across multiple speciation events, and are associated with alternative splicing. Alternative splicing may thus provide a route to gene diversification in key regulatory loci. PMID:24149653

  16. Well-balanced high-order centred schemes for non-conservative hyperbolic systems. Applications to shallow water equations with fixed and mobile bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canestrelli, Alberto; Siviglia, Annunziato; Dumbser, Michael; Toro, Eleuterio F.

    2009-06-01

    This paper concerns the development of high-order accurate centred schemes for the numerical solution of one-dimensional hyperbolic systems containing non-conservative products and source terms. Combining the PRICE-T method developed in [Toro E, Siviglia A. PRICE: primitive centred schemes for hyperbolic system of equations. Int J Numer Methods Fluids 2003;42:1263-91] with the theoretical insights gained by the recently developed path-conservative schemes [Castro M, Gallardo J, Parés C. High-order finite volume schemes based on reconstruction of states for solving hyperbolic systems with nonconservative products applications to shallow-water systems. Math Comput 2006;75:1103-34; Parés C. Numerical methods for nonconservative hyperbolic systems: a theoretical framework. SIAM J Numer Anal 2006;44:300-21], we propose the new PRICE-C scheme that automatically reduces to a modified conservative FORCE scheme if the underlying PDE system is a conservation law. The resulting first-order accurate centred method is then extended to high order of accuracy in space and time via the ADER approach together with a WENO reconstruction technique. The well-balanced properties of the PRICE-C method are investigated for the shallow water equations. Finally, we apply the new scheme to the shallow water equations with fix bottom topography and with variable bottom solving an additional sediment transport equation.

  17. Conservation of the gene for outer membrane protein OprF in the family Pseudomonadaceae: sequence of the Pseudomonas syringae oprF gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ullstrom, C A; Siehnel, R; Woodruff, W; Steinbach, S; Hancock, R E

    1991-01-01

    The conservation of the oprF gene for the major outer membrane protein OprF was determined by restriction mapping and Southern blot hybridization with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa oprF gene as a probe. The restriction map was highly conserved among 16 of the 17 serotype strains and 42 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. Only the serotype 12 isolate and one clinical isolate showed small differences in restriction pattern. Southern probing of PstI chromosomal digests of 14 species from the family Pseudomonadaceae revealed that only the nine members of rRNA homology group I hybridized with the oprF gene. To reveal the actual extent of homology, the oprF gene and its product were characterized in Pseudomonas syringae. Nine strains of P. syringae from seven different pathovars hybridized with the P. aeruginosa gene to produce five different but related restriction maps. All produced an OprF protein in their outer membranes with the same apparent molecular weight as that of P.aeruginosa OprF. In each case the protein reacted with monoclonal antibody MA4-10 and was similarly heat and 2-mercaptoethanol modifiable. The purified OprF protein of the type strain P. syringae pv. syringae ATCC 19310 reconstituted small channels in lipid bilayer membranes. The oprF gene from this latter strain was cloned and sequenced. Despite the low level of DNA hybridization between P. aeruginosa and P. syringae DNA, the OprF gene was highly conserved between the species with 72% DNA sequence identity and 68% amino acid sequence identity overall. The carboxy terminus-encoding region of P. syringae oprF showed 85 and 33% identity, respectively, with the same regions of the P. aeruginosa oprF and Escherichia coli ompA genes. Images PMID:1898935

  18. Conservation and Expression Patterns Divergence of Ascorbic Acid d-mannose/l-galactose Pathway Genes in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Weike; Ren, Jun; Li, Yan; Liu, Tongkun; Song, Xiaoming; Chen, Zhongwen; Huang, Zhinan; Hou, Xilin; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) participates in diverse biological processes, is regulated by multiple factors and is a potent antioxidant and cellular reductant. The D-Mannose/L-Galactose pathway is a major plant AsA biosynthetic pathway that is highly connected within biosynthetic networks, and generally conserved across plants. Previous work has shown that, although most genes of this pathway are expressed under standard growth conditions in Brassica rapa, some paralogs of these genes are not. We hypothesize that regulatory evolution in duplicate AsA pathway genes has occurred as an adaptation to environmental stressors, and that gene retention has been influenced by polyploidation events in Brassicas. To test these hypotheses, we explored the conservation of these genes in Brassicas and their expression patterns divergence in B. rapa. Similar retention and a high degree of gene sequence similarity were identified in B. rapa (A genome), B. oleracea (C genome) and B. napus (AC genome). However, the number of genes that encode the same type of enzymes varied among the three plant species. With the exception of GMP, which has nine genes, there were one to four genes that encoded the other enzymes. Moreover, we found that expression patterns divergence widely exists among these genes. (i) VTC2 and VTC5 are paralogous genes, but only VTC5 is influenced by FLC. (ii) Under light treatment, PMI1 co-regulates the AsA pool size with other D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes, whereas PMI2 is regulated only by darkness. (iii) Under NaCl, Cu2+, MeJA and wounding stresses, most of the paralogs exhibit different expression patterns. Additionally, GME and GPP are the key regulatory enzymes that limit AsA biosynthesis in response to these treatments. In conclusion, our data support that the conservative and divergent expression patterns of D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes not only avoid AsA biosynthesis network instability but also allow B. rapa to better adapt to complex environments. PMID:27313597

  19. Conservation and Expression Patterns Divergence of Ascorbic Acid d-mannose/l-galactose Pathway Genes in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weike; Ren, Jun; Li, Yan; Liu, Tongkun; Song, Xiaoming; Chen, Zhongwen; Huang, Zhinan; Hou, Xilin; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) participates in diverse biological processes, is regulated by multiple factors and is a potent antioxidant and cellular reductant. The D-Mannose/L-Galactose pathway is a major plant AsA biosynthetic pathway that is highly connected within biosynthetic networks, and generally conserved across plants. Previous work has shown that, although most genes of this pathway are expressed under standard growth conditions in Brassica rapa, some paralogs of these genes are not. We hypothesize that regulatory evolution in duplicate AsA pathway genes has occurred as an adaptation to environmental stressors, and that gene retention has been influenced by polyploidation events in Brassicas. To test these hypotheses, we explored the conservation of these genes in Brassicas and their expression patterns divergence in B. rapa. Similar retention and a high degree of gene sequence similarity were identified in B. rapa (A genome), B. oleracea (C genome) and B. napus (AC genome). However, the number of genes that encode the same type of enzymes varied among the three plant species. With the exception of GMP, which has nine genes, there were one to four genes that encoded the other enzymes. Moreover, we found that expression patterns divergence widely exists among these genes. (i) VTC2 and VTC5 are paralogous genes, but only VTC5 is influenced by FLC. (ii) Under light treatment, PMI1 co-regulates the AsA pool size with other D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes, whereas PMI2 is regulated only by darkness. (iii) Under NaCl, Cu(2+), MeJA and wounding stresses, most of the paralogs exhibit different expression patterns. Additionally, GME and GPP are the key regulatory enzymes that limit AsA biosynthesis in response to these treatments. In conclusion, our data support that the conservative and divergent expression patterns of D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes not only avoid AsA biosynthesis network instability but also allow B. rapa to better adapt to complex environments.

  20. Conservation and Expression Patterns Divergence of Ascorbic Acid d-mannose/l-galactose Pathway Genes in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weike; Ren, Jun; Li, Yan; Liu, Tongkun; Song, Xiaoming; Chen, Zhongwen; Huang, Zhinan; Hou, Xilin; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) participates in diverse biological processes, is regulated by multiple factors and is a potent antioxidant and cellular reductant. The D-Mannose/L-Galactose pathway is a major plant AsA biosynthetic pathway that is highly connected within biosynthetic networks, and generally conserved across plants. Previous work has shown that, although most genes of this pathway are expressed under standard growth conditions in Brassica rapa, some paralogs of these genes are not. We hypothesize that regulatory evolution in duplicate AsA pathway genes has occurred as an adaptation to environmental stressors, and that gene retention has been influenced by polyploidation events in Brassicas. To test these hypotheses, we explored the conservation of these genes in Brassicas and their expression patterns divergence in B. rapa. Similar retention and a high degree of gene sequence similarity were identified in B. rapa (A genome), B. oleracea (C genome) and B. napus (AC genome). However, the number of genes that encode the same type of enzymes varied among the three plant species. With the exception of GMP, which has nine genes, there were one to four genes that encoded the other enzymes. Moreover, we found that expression patterns divergence widely exists among these genes. (i) VTC2 and VTC5 are paralogous genes, but only VTC5 is influenced by FLC. (ii) Under light treatment, PMI1 co-regulates the AsA pool size with other D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes, whereas PMI2 is regulated only by darkness. (iii) Under NaCl, Cu(2+), MeJA and wounding stresses, most of the paralogs exhibit different expression patterns. Additionally, GME and GPP are the key regulatory enzymes that limit AsA biosynthesis in response to these treatments. In conclusion, our data support that the conservative and divergent expression patterns of D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes not only avoid AsA biosynthesis network instability but also allow B. rapa to better adapt to complex environments. PMID:27313597

  1. The First Myriapod Genome Sequence Reveals Conservative Arthropod Gene Content and Genome Organisation in the Centipede Strigamia maritima

    PubMed Central

    Chipman, Ariel D.; Ferrier, David E. K.; Brena, Carlo; Qu, Jiaxin; Hughes, Daniel S. T.; Schröder, Reinhard; Torres-Oliva, Montserrat; Znassi, Nadia; Jiang, Huaiyang; Almeida, Francisca C.; Alonso, Claudio R.; Apostolou, Zivkos; Aqrawi, Peshtewani; Arthur, Wallace; Barna, Jennifer C. J.; Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Brites, Daniela; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Coyle, Marcus; Dearden, Peter K.; Du Pasquier, Louis; Duncan, Elizabeth J.; Ebert, Dieter; Eibner, Cornelius; Erikson, Galina; Evans, Peter D.; Extavour, Cassandra G.; Francisco, Liezl; Gabaldón, Toni; Gillis, William J.; Goodwin-Horn, Elizabeth A.; Green, Jack E.; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J. P.; Gubbala, Sai; Guigó, Roderic; Han, Yi; Hauser, Frank; Havlak, Paul; Hayden, Luke; Helbing, Sophie; Holder, Michael; Hui, Jerome H. L.; Hunn, Julia P.; Hunnekuhl, Vera S.; Jackson, LaRonda; Javaid, Mehwish; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Jiggins, Francis M.; Jones, Tamsin E.; Kaiser, Tobias S.; Kalra, Divya; Kenny, Nathan J.; Korchina, Viktoriya; Kovar, Christie L.; Kraus, F. Bernhard; Lapraz, François; Lee, Sandra L.; Lv, Jie; Mandapat, Christigale; Manning, Gerard; Mariotti, Marco; Mata, Robert; Mathew, Tittu; Neumann, Tobias; Newsham, Irene; Ngo, Dinh N.; Ninova, Maria; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Ongeri, Fiona; Palmer, William J.; Patil, Shobha; Patraquim, Pedro; Pham, Christopher; Pu, Ling-Ling; Putman, Nicholas H.; Rabouille, Catherine; Ramos, Olivia Mendivil; Rhodes, Adelaide C.; Robertson, Helen E.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Ronshaugen, Matthew; Rozas, Julio; Saada, Nehad; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Scherer, Steven E.; Schurko, Andrew M.; Siggens, Kenneth W.; Simmons, DeNard; Stief, Anna; Stolle, Eckart; Telford, Maximilian J.; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin; Thornton, Rebecca; van der Zee, Maurijn; von Haeseler, Arndt; Williams, James M.; Willis, Judith H.; Wu, Yuanqing; Zou, Xiaoyan; Lawson, Daniel; Muzny, Donna M.; Worley, Kim C.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Akam, Michael; Richards, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Myriapods (e.g., centipedes and millipedes) display a simple homonomous body plan relative to other arthropods. All members of the class are terrestrial, but they attained terrestriality independently of insects. Myriapoda is the only arthropod class not represented by a sequenced genome. We present an analysis of the genome of the centipede Strigamia maritima. It retains a compact genome that has undergone less gene loss and shuffling than previously sequenced arthropods, and many orthologues of genes conserved from the bilaterian ancestor that have been lost in insects. Our analysis locates many genes in conserved macro-synteny contexts, and many small-scale examples of gene clustering. We describe several examples where S. maritima shows different solutions from insects to similar problems. The insect olfactory receptor gene family is absent from S. maritima, and olfaction in air is likely effected by expansion of other receptor gene families. For some genes S. maritima has evolved paralogues to generate coding sequence diversity, where insects use alternate splicing. This is most striking for the Dscam gene, which in Drosophila generates more than 100,000 alternate splice forms, but in S. maritima is encoded by over 100 paralogues. We see an intriguing linkage between the absence of any known photosensory proteins in a blind organism and the additional absence of canonical circadian clock genes. The phylogenetic position of myriapods allows us to identify where in arthropod phylogeny several particular molecular mechanisms and traits emerged. For example, we conclude that juvenile hormone signalling evolved with the emergence of the exoskeleton in the arthropods and that RR-1 containing cuticle proteins evolved in the lineage leading to Mandibulata. We also identify when various gene expansions and losses occurred. The genome of S. maritima offers us a unique glimpse into the ancestral arthropod genome, while also displaying many adaptations to its specific

  2. The first myriapod genome sequence reveals conservative arthropod gene content and genome organisation in the centipede Strigamia maritima.

    PubMed

    Chipman, Ariel D; Ferrier, David E K; Brena, Carlo; Qu, Jiaxin; Hughes, Daniel S T; Schröder, Reinhard; Torres-Oliva, Montserrat; Znassi, Nadia; Jiang, Huaiyang; Almeida, Francisca C; Alonso, Claudio R; Apostolou, Zivkos; Aqrawi, Peshtewani; Arthur, Wallace; Barna, Jennifer C J; Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Brites, Daniela; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Coyle, Marcus; Dearden, Peter K; Du Pasquier, Louis; Duncan, Elizabeth J; Ebert, Dieter; Eibner, Cornelius; Erikson, Galina; Evans, Peter D; Extavour, Cassandra G; Francisco, Liezl; Gabaldón, Toni; Gillis, William J; Goodwin-Horn, Elizabeth A; Green, Jack E; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Gubbala, Sai; Guigó, Roderic; Han, Yi; Hauser, Frank; Havlak, Paul; Hayden, Luke; Helbing, Sophie; Holder, Michael; Hui, Jerome H L; Hunn, Julia P; Hunnekuhl, Vera S; Jackson, LaRonda; Javaid, Mehwish; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Jiggins, Francis M; Jones, Tamsin E; Kaiser, Tobias S; Kalra, Divya; Kenny, Nathan J; Korchina, Viktoriya; Kovar, Christie L; Kraus, F Bernhard; Lapraz, François; Lee, Sandra L; Lv, Jie; Mandapat, Christigale; Manning, Gerard; Mariotti, Marco; Mata, Robert; Mathew, Tittu; Neumann, Tobias; Newsham, Irene; Ngo, Dinh N; Ninova, Maria; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Ongeri, Fiona; Palmer, William J; Patil, Shobha; Patraquim, Pedro; Pham, Christopher; Pu, Ling-Ling; Putman, Nicholas H; Rabouille, Catherine; Ramos, Olivia Mendivil; Rhodes, Adelaide C; Robertson, Helen E; Robertson, Hugh M; Ronshaugen, Matthew; Rozas, Julio; Saada, Nehad; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Scherer, Steven E; Schurko, Andrew M; Siggens, Kenneth W; Simmons, DeNard; Stief, Anna; Stolle, Eckart; Telford, Maximilian J; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin; Thornton, Rebecca; van der Zee, Maurijn; von Haeseler, Arndt; Williams, James M; Willis, Judith H; Wu, Yuanqing; Zou, Xiaoyan; Lawson, Daniel; Muzny, Donna M; Worley, Kim C; Gibbs, Richard A; Akam, Michael; Richards, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    Myriapods (e.g., centipedes and millipedes) display a simple homonomous body plan relative to other arthropods. All members of the class are terrestrial, but they attained terrestriality independently of insects. Myriapoda is the only arthropod class not represented by a sequenced genome. We present an analysis of the genome of the centipede Strigamia maritima. It retains a compact genome that has undergone less gene loss and shuffling than previously sequenced arthropods, and many orthologues of genes conserved from the bilaterian ancestor that have been lost in insects. Our analysis locates many genes in conserved macro-synteny contexts, and many small-scale examples of gene clustering. We describe several examples where S. maritima shows different solutions from insects to similar problems. The insect olfactory receptor gene family is absent from S. maritima, and olfaction in air is likely effected by expansion of other receptor gene families. For some genes S. maritima has evolved paralogues to generate coding sequence diversity, where insects use alternate splicing. This is most striking for the Dscam gene, which in Drosophila generates more than 100,000 alternate splice forms, but in S. maritima is encoded by over 100 paralogues. We see an intriguing linkage between the absence of any known photosensory proteins in a blind organism and the additional absence of canonical circadian clock genes. The phylogenetic position of myriapods allows us to identify where in arthropod phylogeny several particular molecular mechanisms and traits emerged. For example, we conclude that juvenile hormone signalling evolved with the emergence of the exoskeleton in the arthropods and that RR-1 containing cuticle proteins evolved in the lineage leading to Mandibulata. We also identify when various gene expansions and losses occurred. The genome of S. maritima offers us a unique glimpse into the ancestral arthropod genome, while also displaying many adaptations to its specific

  3. The first myriapod genome sequence reveals conservative arthropod gene content and genome organisation in the centipede Strigamia maritima.

    PubMed

    Chipman, Ariel D; Ferrier, David E K; Brena, Carlo; Qu, Jiaxin; Hughes, Daniel S T; Schröder, Reinhard; Torres-Oliva, Montserrat; Znassi, Nadia; Jiang, Huaiyang; Almeida, Francisca C; Alonso, Claudio R; Apostolou, Zivkos; Aqrawi, Peshtewani; Arthur, Wallace; Barna, Jennifer C J; Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Brites, Daniela; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Coyle, Marcus; Dearden, Peter K; Du Pasquier, Louis; Duncan, Elizabeth J; Ebert, Dieter; Eibner, Cornelius; Erikson, Galina; Evans, Peter D; Extavour, Cassandra G; Francisco, Liezl; Gabaldón, Toni; Gillis, William J; Goodwin-Horn, Elizabeth A; Green, Jack E; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Gubbala, Sai; Guigó, Roderic; Han, Yi; Hauser, Frank; Havlak, Paul; Hayden, Luke; Helbing, Sophie; Holder, Michael; Hui, Jerome H L; Hunn, Julia P; Hunnekuhl, Vera S; Jackson, LaRonda; Javaid, Mehwish; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Jiggins, Francis M; Jones, Tamsin E; Kaiser, Tobias S; Kalra, Divya; Kenny, Nathan J; Korchina, Viktoriya; Kovar, Christie L; Kraus, F Bernhard; Lapraz, François; Lee, Sandra L; Lv, Jie; Mandapat, Christigale; Manning, Gerard; Mariotti, Marco; Mata, Robert; Mathew, Tittu; Neumann, Tobias; Newsham, Irene; Ngo, Dinh N; Ninova, Maria; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Ongeri, Fiona; Palmer, William J; Patil, Shobha; Patraquim, Pedro; Pham, Christopher; Pu, Ling-Ling; Putman, Nicholas H; Rabouille, Catherine; Ramos, Olivia Mendivil; Rhodes, Adelaide C; Robertson, Helen E; Robertson, Hugh M; Ronshaugen, Matthew; Rozas, Julio; Saada, Nehad; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Scherer, Steven E; Schurko, Andrew M; Siggens, Kenneth W; Simmons, DeNard; Stief, Anna; Stolle, Eckart; Telford, Maximilian J; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin; Thornton, Rebecca; van der Zee, Maurijn; von Haeseler, Arndt; Williams, James M; Willis, Judith H; Wu, Yuanqing; Zou, Xiaoyan; Lawson, Daniel; Muzny, Donna M; Worley, Kim C; Gibbs, Richard A; Akam, Michael; Richards, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    Myriapods (e.g., centipedes and millipedes) display a simple homonomous body plan relative to other arthropods. All members of the class are terrestrial, but they attained terrestriality independently of insects. Myriapoda is the only arthropod class not represented by a sequenced genome. We present an analysis of the genome of the centipede Strigamia maritima. It retains a compact genome that has undergone less gene loss and shuffling than previously sequenced arthropods, and many orthologues of genes conserved from the bilaterian ancestor that have been lost in insects. Our analysis locates many genes in conserved macro-synteny contexts, and many small-scale examples of gene clustering. We describe several examples where S. maritima shows different solutions from insects to similar problems. The insect olfactory receptor gene family is absent from S. maritima, and olfaction in air is likely effected by expansion of other receptor gene families. For some genes S. maritima has evolved paralogues to generate coding sequence diversity, where insects use alternate splicing. This is most striking for the Dscam gene, which in Drosophila generates more than 100,000 alternate splice forms, but in S. maritima is encoded by over 100 paralogues. We see an intriguing linkage between the absence of any known photosensory proteins in a blind organism and the additional absence of canonical circadian clock genes. The phylogenetic position of myriapods allows us to identify where in arthropod phylogeny several particular molecular mechanisms and traits emerged. For example, we conclude that juvenile hormone signalling evolved with the emergence of the exoskeleton in the arthropods and that RR-1 containing cuticle proteins evolved in the lineage leading to Mandibulata. We also identify when various gene expansions and losses occurred. The genome of S. maritima offers us a unique glimpse into the ancestral arthropod genome, while also displaying many adaptations to its specific

  4. Genome engineering uncovers 54 evolutionarily conserved and testis-enriched genes that are not required for male fertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Haruhiko; Castaneda, Julio M.; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Yu, Zhifeng; Archambeault, Denise R.; Isotani, Ayako; Kiyozumi, Daiji; Kriseman, Maya L.; Mashiko, Daisuke; Matsumura, Takafumi; Matzuk, Ryan M.; Mori, Masashi; Noda, Taichi; Oji, Asami; Okabe, Masaru; Prunskaite-Hyyrylainen, Renata; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Satouh, Yuhkoh; Zhang, Qian; Ikawa, Masahito; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2016-01-01

    Gene-expression analysis studies from Schultz et al. estimate that more than 2,300 genes in the mouse genome are expressed predominantly in the male germ line. As of their 2003 publication [Schultz N, Hamra FK, Garbers DL (2003) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100(21):12201–12206], the functions of the majority of these testis-enriched genes during spermatogenesis and fertilization were largely unknown. Since the study by Schultz et al., functional analysis of hundreds of reproductive-tract–enriched genes have been performed, but there remain many testis-enriched genes for which their relevance to reproduction remain unexplored or unreported. Historically, a gene knockout is the “gold standard” to determine whether a gene’s function is essential in vivo. Although knockout mice without apparent phenotypes are rarely published, these knockout mouse lines and their phenotypic information need to be shared to prevent redundant experiments. Herein, we used bioinformatic and experimental approaches to uncover mouse testis-enriched genes that are evolutionarily conserved in humans. We then used gene-disruption approaches, including Knockout Mouse Project resources (targeting vectors and mice) and CRISPR/Cas9, to mutate and quickly analyze the fertility of these mutant mice. We discovered that 54 mutant mouse lines were fertile. Thus, despite evolutionary conservation of these genes in vertebrates and in some cases in all eukaryotes, our results indicate that these genes are not individually essential for male mouse fertility. Our phenotypic data are highly relevant in this fiscally tight funding period and postgenomic age when large numbers of genomes are being analyzed for disease association, and will prevent unnecessary expenditures and duplications of effort by others. PMID:27357688

  5. Isolation of the mouse (MFH-1) and human (FKHL14) mesenchyme fork head-1 genes reveals conservation of their gene and protein structures

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Naoyuki; Iida, Kiyoshi; Yang, Xiao-Li

    1997-05-01

    The very recently found evolutionarily conserved DNA-binding domain of 100 amino acids, termed the fork head domain, emerged from a sequence comparison of the rat hepatocyte transcription factor HNF-3{alpha} and the homeotic gene fork head of Drosophila. We previously isolated a new member of this family, the mesenchyme fork head-1 (MFH-1) gene, which is expressed in developing mesenchyme. Here we describe the isolation of the mouse (MFH-1) and human (FKHL14) chromosomal MFH-1 genes and the determination of the gene and protein structures of MFH-1. We found that the MFH-1 gene has no introns and that the identity of the amino acid sequences of mouse and human MFH-1 proteins is 94%. We also investigated the transcriptional activity of the mouse and human MFH-1 proteins and found that both proteins act as positive transactivators. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Understanding the basis of a novel fruit type in Brassicaceae: conservation and deviation in expression patterns of six genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Variation in fruit morphology is important for plant fitness because it influences dispersal capabilities. Approximately half the members of tribe Brassiceae (Brassicaceae) exhibit fruits with segmentation and variable dehiscence, called heteroarthrocarpy. The knowledge of the genetics of fruit patterning in Arabidopsis offers the opportunity to ask: (1) whether this genetic pathway is conserved in taxa with different fruit morphologies; (2) how the pathway may be modified to produce indehiscence; and (3) whether the pathway has been recruited for a novel abscission zone. Methods We identified homologs of ALCATRAZ, FRUITFULL, INDEHISCENT, SHATTERPROOF, and REPLUMLESS from two taxa, representing different types of heteroarthrocarpy. Comparative gene expression of twelve loci was assessed to address how their expression may have been modified to produce heteroarthrocarpy. Results Studies demonstrated overall conservation in gene expression patterns between dehiscent segments of Erucaria erucarioides and Arabidopsis, with some difference in expression of genes that position the valve margin. In contrast, indehiscence in heteroarthrocarpic fruit segments was correlated with the elimination of the entire valve margin pathway in Erucaria and Cakile lanceolata as well as its absence from a novel lateral abscission zone. Conclusions These findings suggest that modifications in the valve margin positioning genes are responsible for differences between heteroarthrocarpic and Arabidopsis-like fruits and support the hypothesis that heteroarthrocarpy evolved via repositioning the valve margin. They also highlight conservation in the dehiscence pathway across Brassicaceae. PMID:22943452

  7. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants encoding a truncated ghrelin peptide.

    PubMed

    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Thomas, Patrick B; Walpole, Carina M; Maugham, Michelle; Fung, Jenny N T; Yap, Pei-Yi; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Lai, John; Whiteside, Eliza J; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2016-06-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is a potent orexigen produced predominantly in the stomach. It has a number of other biological actions, including roles in appetite stimulation, energy balance, the stimulation of growth hormone release and the regulation of cell proliferation. Recently, several ghrelin gene splice variants have been described. Here, we attempted to identify conserved alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene by cross-species sequence comparisons. We identified a novel human exon 2-deleted variant and provide preliminary evidence that this splice variant and in1-ghrelin encode a C-terminally truncated form of the ghrelin peptide, termed minighrelin. These variants are expressed in humans and mice, demonstrating conservation of alternative splicing spanning 90 million years. Minighrelin appears to have similar actions to full-length ghrelin, as treatment with exogenous minighrelin peptide stimulates appetite and feeding in mice. Forced expression of the exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant mirrors the effect of the canonical preproghrelin, stimulating cell proliferation and migration in the PC3 prostate cancer cell line. This is the first study to characterise an exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant and to demonstrate sequence conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants that encode a truncated ghrelin peptide. This adds further impetus for studies into the alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene and the function of novel ghrelin peptides in vertebrates.

  8. Landscape genetics as a tool for conservation planning: predicting the effects of landscape change on gene flow.

    PubMed

    van Strien, Maarten J; Keller, Daniela; Holderegger, Rolf; Ghazoul, Jaboury; Kienast, Felix; Bolliger, Janine

    2014-03-01

    For conservation managers, it is important to know whether landscape changes lead to increasing or decreasing gene flow. Although the discipline of landscape genetics assesses the influence of landscape elements on gene flow, no studies have yet used landscape-genetic models to predict gene flow resulting from landscape change. A species that has already been severely affected by landscape change is the large marsh grasshopper (Stethophyma grossum), which inhabits moist areas in fragmented agricultural landscapes in Switzerland. From transects drawn between all population pairs within maximum dispersal distance (< 3 km), we calculated several measures of landscape composition as well as some measures of habitat configuration. Additionally, a complete sampling of all populations in our study area allowed incorporating measures of population topology. These measures together with the landscape metrics formed the predictor variables in linear models with gene flow as response variable (F(ST) and mean pairwise assignment probability). With a modified leave-one-out cross-validation approach, we selected the model with the highest predictive accuracy. With this model, we predicted gene flow under several landscape-change scenarios, which simulated construction, rezoning or restoration projects, and the establishment of a new population. For some landscape-change scenarios, significant increase or decrease in gene flow was predicted, while for others little change was forecast. Furthermore, we found that the measures of population topology strongly increase model fit in landscape genetic analysis. This study demonstrates the use of predictive landscape-genetic models in conservation and landscape planning.

  9. Small RNA pathway genes identified by patterns of phylogenetic conservation and divergence

    PubMed Central

    Tabach, Yuval; Billi, Allison C.; Hayes, Gabriel D.; Newman, Martin A.; Zuk, Or; Gabel, Harrison; Kamath, Ravi; Yacoby, Keren; Chapman, Brad; Garcia, Susana M.; Borowsky, Mark; Kim, John K.; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical analyses of RNA interference (RNAi) and microRNA (miRNA) pathways have revealed proteins such as Argonaute/PIWI and Dicer that process and present small RNAs to their targets. Well validated small RNA pathway cofactors, such as the Argonaute/PIWI proteins show distinctive patterns of conservation or divergence in particular animal, plant, fungal, and protist species. We compared 86 divergent eukaryotic genome sequences to discern sets of proteins that show similar phylogenetic profiles with known small RNA cofactors. A large set of additional candidate small RNA cofactors have emerged from functional genomic screens for defects in miRNA- or siRNA-mediated repression in C. elegans and D. melanogaster1,2 and from proteomic analyses of proteins co-purifying with validated small RNA pathway proteins3,4. The phylogenetic profiles of many of these candidate small RNA pathway proteins are similar to those of known small RNA cofactor proteins. We used a Bayesian approach to integrate the phylogenetic profile analysis with predictions from diverse transcriptional coregulation and proteome interaction datasets to assign a probability for each protein for a role in a small RNA pathway. Testing high-confidence candidates from this analysis for defects in RNAi silencing, we found that about half of the predicted small RNA cofactors are required for RNAi silencing. Many of the newly identified small RNA pathway proteins are orthologues of proteins implicated in RNA splicing. In support of a deep connection between the mechanism of RNA splicing and small RNA-mediated gene silencing, the presence of the Argonaute proteins and other small RNA components in the many species analysed strongly correlates with the number of introns in that species. PMID:23364702

  10. Integrating gene flow, crop biology, and farm management in on-farm conservation of avocado (Persea americana, Lauraceae).

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Kenneth; Desalle, Rob; Peters, Charles M; Benfey, Philip N

    2003-11-01

    Maintaining crop diversity on farms where cultivars can evolve is a conservation goal, but few tools are available to assess the long-term maintenance of genetic diversity on farms. One important issue for on-farm conservation is gene flow from crops with a narrow genetic base into related populations that are genetically diverse. In a case study of avocado (Persea americana var. americana) in one of its centers of diversity (San Jerónimo, Costa Rica), we used 10 DNA microsatellite markers in a parentage analysis to estimate gene flow from commercialized varieties into a traditional crop population. Five commercialized genotypes comprised nearly 40% of orchard trees, but they contributed only about 14.5% of the gametes to the youngest cohort of trees. Although commercialized varieties and the diverse population were often planted on the same farm, planting patterns appeared to keep the two types of trees separated on small scales, possibly explaining the limited gene flow. In a simulation that combined gene flow estimates, crop biology, and graft tree management, loss of allelic diversity was less than 10% over 150 yr, and selection was effective in retaining desirable alleles in the diverse subpopulation. Simulations also showed that, in addition to gene flow, managing the genetic makeup and life history traits of the invasive commercialized varieties could have a significant impact on genetic diversity in the target population. The results support the feasibility of on-farm crop conservation, but simulations also showed that higher levels of gene flow could lead to severe losses of genetic diversity even if farmers continue to plant diverse varieties. PMID:21653337

  11. A Conserved Helicobacter pylori Gene, HP0102, Is Induced Upon Contact With Gastric Cells and Has Multiple Roles in Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Saurabh; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Chowdhury, Rukhsana

    2016-07-15

    Contact with host cells is recognized as a signal capable of triggering expression of bacterial genes important for host pathogen interaction. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to the gastric epithelial cell line AGS strongly upregulated expression of a gene, HP0102, in the adhered bacteria in all strains examined, including several Indian clinical isolates. The gene is highly conserved and ubiquitously present in all 69 sequenced H. pylori genomes at the same genomic locus, as well as in 15 Indian clinical isolates. The gene is associated with 2 distinct phenotypes related to pathogenicity. In AGS cell-adhered H. pylori, it has a role in upregulation of cagA expression from a specific σ(28)-RNAP promoter and consequent induction of the hummingbird phenotype in the infected AGS cells. Furthermore, HP0102 has a role in chemotaxis and a ΔHP0102 mutant exhibited low acid-escape response that might account for the poor colonization efficiency of the mutant.

  12. A Conserved Helicobacter pylori Gene, HP0102, Is Induced Upon Contact With Gastric Cells and Has Multiple Roles in Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Saurabh; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Chowdhury, Rukhsana

    2016-07-15

    Contact with host cells is recognized as a signal capable of triggering expression of bacterial genes important for host pathogen interaction. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to the gastric epithelial cell line AGS strongly upregulated expression of a gene, HP0102, in the adhered bacteria in all strains examined, including several Indian clinical isolates. The gene is highly conserved and ubiquitously present in all 69 sequenced H. pylori genomes at the same genomic locus, as well as in 15 Indian clinical isolates. The gene is associated with 2 distinct phenotypes related to pathogenicity. In AGS cell-adhered H. pylori, it has a role in upregulation of cagA expression from a specific σ(28)-RNAP promoter and consequent induction of the hummingbird phenotype in the infected AGS cells. Furthermore, HP0102 has a role in chemotaxis and a ΔHP0102 mutant exhibited low acid-escape response that might account for the poor colonization efficiency of the mutant. PMID:27056952

  13. Phylogenetic relationships within mammalian order Carnivora indicated by sequences of two nuclear DNA genes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Li, Qing-wei; Ryder, O A; Zhang, Ya-ping

    2004-12-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among 37 living species of order Carnivora spanning a relatively broad range of divergence times and taxonomic levels were examined using nuclear sequence data from exon 1 of the IRBP gene (approximately 1.3 kb) and first intron of the TTR gene (approximately 1 kb). These data were used to analyze carnivoran phylogeny at the family and generic level as well as the interspecific relationships within recently derived Felidae. Phylogenetic results using a combined IRBP+TTR dataset strongly supported within the superfamily Califormia, the red panda as the closest lineage to procyonid-mustelid (i.e., Musteloidea) clade followed by pinnipeds (Otariidae and Phocidae), Ursidae (including the giant panda), and Canidae. Four feliform families, namely the monophyletic Herpestidae, Hyaenidae, and Felidae, as well as the paraphyletic Viverridae were consistently recovered convincingly. The utilities of these two gene segments for the phylogenetic analyses were extensively explored and both were found to be fairly informative for higher-group associations within the order Carnivora, but not for those of low level divergence at the species level. Therefore, there is a need to find additional genetic markers with more rapid mutation rates that would be diagnostic at deciphering relatively recent relationships within the Carnivora.

  14. Conserved cis-regulatory modules in promoters of genes encoding wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits

    PubMed Central

    Ravel, Catherine; Fiquet, Samuel; Boudet, Julie; Dardevet, Mireille; Vincent, Jonathan; Merlino, Marielle; Michard, Robin; Martre, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The concentration and composition of the gliadin and glutenin seed storage proteins (SSPs) in wheat flour are the most important determinants of its end-use value. In cereals, the synthesis of SSPs is predominantly regulated at the transcriptional level by a complex network involving at least five cis-elements in gene promoters. The high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) are encoded by two tightly linked genes located on the long arms of group 1 chromosomes. Here, we sequenced and annotated the HMW-GS gene promoters of 22 electrophoretic wheat alleles to identify putative cis-regulatory motifs. We focused on 24 motifs known to be involved in SSP gene regulation. Most of them were identified in at least one HMW-GS gene promoter sequence. A common regulatory framework was observed in all the HMW-GS gene promoters, as they shared conserved cis-regulatory modules (CCRMs) including all the five motifs known to regulate the transcription of SSP genes. This common regulatory framework comprises a composite box made of the GATA motifs and GCN4-like Motifs (GLMs) and was shown to be functional as the GLMs are able to bind a bZIP transcriptional factor SPA (Storage Protein Activator). In addition to this regulatory framework, each HMW-GS gene promoter had additional motifs organized differently. The promoters of most highly expressed x-type HMW-GS genes contain an additional box predicted to bind R2R3-MYB transcriptional factors. However, the differences in annotation between promoter alleles could not be related to their level of expression. In summary, we identified a common modular organization of HMW-GS gene promoters but the lack of correlation between the cis-motifs of each HMW-GS gene promoter and their level of expression suggests that other cis-elements or other mechanisms regulate HMW-GS gene expression. PMID:25429295

  15. Genetic diversity of the conserved motifs of six bacterial leaf blight resistance genes in a set of rice landraces

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial leaf blight (BLB) caused by the vascular pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is one of the most serious diseases leading to crop failure in rice growing countries. A total of 37 resistance genes against Xoo has been identified in rice. Of these, ten BLB resistance genes have been mapped on rice chromosomes, while 6 have been cloned, sequenced and characterized. Diversity analysis at the resistance gene level of this disease is scanty, and the landraces from West Bengal and North Eastern states of India have received little attention so far. The objective of this study was to assess the genetic diversity at conserved domains of 6 BLB resistance genes in a set of 22 rice accessions including landraces and check genotypes collected from the states of Assam, Nagaland, Mizoram and West Bengal. Results In this study 34 pairs of primers were designed from conserved domains of 6 BLB resistance genes; Xa1, xa5, Xa21, Xa21(A1), Xa26 and Xa27. The designed primer pairs were used to generate PCR based polymorphic DNA profiles to detect and elucidate the genetic diversity of the six genes in the 22 diverse rice accessions of known disease phenotype. A total of 140 alleles were identified including 41 rare and 26 null alleles. The average polymorphism information content (PIC) value was 0.56/primer pair. The DNA profiles identified each of the rice landraces unequivocally. The amplified polymorphic DNA bands were used to calculate genetic similarity of the rice landraces in all possible pair combinations. The similarity among the rice accessions ranged from 18% to 89% and the dendrogram produced from the similarity values was divided into 2 major clusters. The conserved domains identified within the sequenced rare alleles include Leucine-Rich Repeat, BED-type zinc finger domain, sugar transferase domain and the domain of the carbohydrate esterase 4 superfamily. Conclusions This study revealed high genetic diversity at conserved domains of six BLB

  16. Higher-order conservative interpolation between control-volume meshes: Application to advection and multiphase flow problems with dynamic mesh adaptivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, A.; Pavlidis, D.; Percival, J. R.; Salinas, P.; Xie, Z.; Fang, F.; Pain, C. C.; Muggeridge, A. H.; Jackson, M. D.

    2016-09-01

    A general, higher-order, conservative and bounded interpolation for the dynamic and adaptive meshing of control-volume fields dual to continuous and discontinuous finite element representations is presented. Existing techniques such as node-wise interpolation are not conservative and do not readily generalise to discontinuous fields, whilst conservative methods such as Grandy interpolation are often too diffusive. The new method uses control-volume Galerkin projection to interpolate between control-volume fields. Bounded solutions are ensured by using a post-interpolation diffusive correction. Example applications of the method to interface capturing during advection and also to the modelling of multiphase porous media flow are presented to demonstrate the generality and robustness of the approach.

  17. Conservation and expression of PIWI-interacting RNA pathway genes in male and female adult gonad of amniotes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shu Ly; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; Kortschak, R Daniel; Jacob, Reuben; Ricciardelli, Carmela; Oehler, Martin K; Grützner, Frank

    2013-12-01

    The PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway is essential for germline development and transposable element repression. Key elements of this pathway are members of the piRNA-binding PIWI/Argonaute protein family and associated factors (e.g., VASA, MAELSTROM, and TUDOR domain proteins). PIWI-interacting RNAs have been identified in mouse testis and oocytes, but information about the expression of the different piRNA pathway genes, in particular in the mammalian ovary, remains incomplete. We investigated the evolution and expression of piRNA pathway genes in gonads of amniote species (chicken, platypus, and mouse). Database searches confirm a high level of conservation and revealed lineage-specific gain and loss of Piwi genes in vertebrates. Expression analysis in mammals shows that orthologs of Piwi-like (Piwil) genes, Mael (Maelstrom), Mvh (mouse vasa homolog), and Tdrd1 (Tudor domain-containing protein 1) are expressed in platypus adult testis. In contrast to mouse, Piwil4 is expressed in platypus and human adult testis. We found evidence for Mael and Piwil2 expression in mouse Sertoli cells. Importantly, we show mRNA expression of Piwil2, Piwil4, and Mael in oocytes and supporting cells of human, mouse, and platypus ovary. We found no Piwil1 expression in mouse and chicken ovary. The conservation of gene expression in somatic parts of the gonad and germ cells of species that diverged over 800 million yr ago indicates an important role in adult male and female gonad. PMID:24108303

  18. A conservative region of the mercuric reductase gene (mera) as a molecular marker of bacterial mercury resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sotero-Martins, Adriana; de Jesus, Michele Silva; Lacerda, Michele; Moreira, Josino Costa; Filgueiras, Ana Luzia Lauria; Barrocas, Paulo Rubens Guimarães

    2008-01-01

    The most common bacterial mercury resistance mechanism is based on the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg0, which is dependent of the mercuric reductase enzyme (MerA) activity. The use of a 431 bp fragment of a conservative region of the mercuric reductase (merA) gene was applied as a molecular marker of this mechanism, allowing the identification of mercury resistant bacterial strains. PMID:24031221

  19. Systematic analysis of maize class III peroxidase gene family reveals a conserved subfamily involved in abiotic stress response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Qianqian; Zhao, Yang; Han, Guomin; Zhu, Suwen

    2015-07-15

    Class III peroxidases (PRXs) are plant-specific enzymes that play key roles in the responses to biotic and abiotic stress during plant growth and development. In this study, we identified 119 nonredundant PRX genes (designated ZmPRXs). These PRX genes were divided into 18 groups based on their phylogenetic relationships. We performed systematic bioinformatics analysis of the PRX genes, including analysis of gene structures, conserved motifs, phylogenetic relationships and gene expression profiles. The ZmPRXs are unevenly distributed on the 10 maize chromosomes. In addition, these genes have undergone 16 segmental duplication and 12 tandem duplication events, indicating that both segmental and tandem duplication were the main contributors to the expansion of the maize PRX family. Ka/Ks analysis suggested that most duplicated ZmPRXs experienced purifying selection, with limited functional divergence during the duplication events, and comparative analysis among maize, sorghum and rice revealed that there were independent duplication events besides the whole-genome duplication of the maize genome. Furthermore, microarray analysis indicated that most highly expressed genes might play significant roles in root. We examined the expression of five candidate ZmPRXs under H2O2, SA, NaCl and PEG stress conditions using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), revealing differential expression patterns. This study provides useful information for further functional analysis of the PRX gene family in maize.

  20. Multiple Conserved Heteroplasmic Sites in tRNA Genes in the Mitochondrial Genomes of Terrestrial Isopods (Oniscidea)

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Christopher H.; Badawi, Myriam; Moumen, Bouziane; Grève, Pierre; Cordaux, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome structure and organization are relatively conserved among metazoans. However, in many isopods, especially the terrestrial isopods (Oniscidea), the mitochondrial genome consists of both ∼14-kb linear monomers and ∼28-kb circular dimers. This unusual organization is associated with an ancient and conserved constitutive heteroplasmic site. This heteroplasmy affects the anticodon of a tRNA gene, allowing this single locus to function as a “dual” tRNA gene for two different amino acids. Here, we further explore the evolution of these unusual mitochondrial genomes by assembling complete mitochondrial sequences for two additional Oniscidean species, Trachelipus rathkei and Cylisticus convexus. Strikingly, we find evidence of two additional heteroplasmic sites that also alter tRNA anticodons, creating additional dual tRNA genes, and that are conserved across both species. These results suggest that the unique linear/circular organization of isopods’ mitochondrial genomes may facilitate the evolution of stable mitochondrial heteroplasmies, and, conversely, once such heteroplasmies have evolved, they constrain the multimeric structure of the mitochondrial genome in these species. Finally, we outline some possible future research directions to identify the factors influencing mitochondrial genome evolution in this group. PMID:25911226

  1. Multiple Conserved Heteroplasmic Sites in tRNA Genes in the Mitochondrial Genomes of Terrestrial Isopods (Oniscidea).

    PubMed

    Chandler, Christopher H; Badawi, Myriam; Moumen, Bouziane; Grève, Pierre; Cordaux, Richard

    2015-04-24

    Mitochondrial genome structure and organization are relatively conserved among metazoans. However, in many isopods, especially the terrestrial isopods (Oniscidea), the mitochondrial genome consists of both ∼14-kb linear monomers and ∼28-kb circular dimers. This unusual organization is associated with an ancient and conserved constitutive heteroplasmic site. This heteroplasmy affects the anticodon of a tRNA gene, allowing this single locus to function as a "dual" tRNA gene for two different amino acids. Here, we further explore the evolution of these unusual mitochondrial genomes by assembling complete mitochondrial sequences for two additional Oniscidean species, Trachelipus rathkei and Cylisticus convexus. Strikingly, we find evidence of two additional heteroplasmic sites that also alter tRNA anticodons, creating additional dual tRNA genes, and that are conserved across both species. These results suggest that the unique linear/circular organization of isopods' mitochondrial genomes may facilitate the evolution of stable mitochondrial heteroplasmies, and, conversely, once such heteroplasmies have evolved, they constrain the multimeric structure of the mitochondrial genome in these species. Finally, we outline some possible future research directions to identify the factors influencing mitochondrial genome evolution in this group.

  2. 75 FR 76968 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... and Order Granting a Waiver to the General Electric Company from the Department of Energy Residential... decision and order (Case No. CW-013) that grants to the General Electric Company (GE) a waiver from the DOE..., Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Decision and Order In the Matter of: The General Electric...

  3. Transcriptional co-regulation of evolutionarily conserved microRNA/cone opsin gene pairs: implications for photoreceptor subtype specification.

    PubMed

    Daido, Yutaka; Hamanishi, Sakurako; Kusakabe, Takehiro G

    2014-08-01

    The vertebrate retina contains two types of photoreceptor cells, rods and cones, which use distinct types of opsins and phototransduction proteins. Cones can be further divided into several subtypes with differing wavelength sensitivity and morphology. Although photoreceptor development has been extensively studied in a variety of vertebrate species, the mechanism by which photoreceptor subtypes are established is still largely unknown. Here we report two microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-726 and miR-729, which are potentially involved in photoreceptor subtype specification. In the medaka Oryzias latipes, the genes encoding miR-726 and miR-729 are located upstream of the red-sensitive opsin gene LWS-A and the UV-sensitive opsin gene SWS1, respectively, and are transcribed in the opposite direction from the respective opsin genes. The miR-726/LWS pair is conserved between teleosts and tetrapods, and the miR-729/SWS1 pair is conserved among teleosts. in situ hybridization analyses and fluorescence reporter assays suggest that these miRNAs are co-expressed with the respective opsins in specific cone subtypes. Potential targets of miR-726 and miR-729 predicted in silico include several transcription factors that regulate photoreceptor development. Functional analyses of cis-regulatory sequences in vivo suggest that transcription of the paired microRNA and opsin genes is co-regulated by common cis-regulatory modules. We propose an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that controls photoreceptor subtype identity through coupling between transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations.

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the tubeworm Lamellibrachia satsuma and structural conservation in the mitochondrial genome control regions of Order Sabellida.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ajit Kumar; Kwon, Yong Min; Kang, Sung Gyun; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2016-04-01

    The control region of the mitochondrial genomes shows high variation in conserved sequence organizations, which follow distinct evolutionary patterns in different species or taxa. In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Lamellibrachia satsuma from the cold-seep region of Kagoshima Bay, as a part of whole genome study and extensively studied the structural features and patterns of the control region sequences. We obtained 15,037 bp of mitochondrial genome using Illumina sequencing and identified the non-coding AT-rich region or control region (354 bp, AT=83.9%) located between trnH and trnR. We found 7 conserved sequence blocks (CSB), scattered throughout the control region of L. satsuma and other taxa of Annelida. The poly-TA stretches, which commonly form the stem of multiple stem-loop structures, are most conserved in the CSB-I and CSB-II regions. The mitochondrial genome of L. satsuma encodes a unique repetitive sequence in the control region, which forms a unique secondary structure in comparison to Lamellibrachia luymesi. Phylogenetic analyses of all protein-coding genes indicate that L. satsuma forms a monophyletic clade with L. luymesi along with other tubeworms found in cold-seep regions (genera: Lamellibrachia, Escarpia, and Seepiophila). In general, the control region sequences of Annelida could be aligned with certainty within each genus, and to some extent within the family, but with a higher rate of variation in conserved regions. PMID:26776396

  5. Rye Pm8 and wheat Pm3 are orthologous genes and show evolutionary conservation of resistance function against powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Hurni, Severine; Brunner, Susanne; Buchmann, Gabriele; Herren, Gerhard; Jordan, Tina; Krukowski, Patricia; Wicker, Thomas; Yahiaoui, Nabila; Mago, Rohit; Keller, Beat

    2013-12-01

    The improvement of wheat through breeding has relied strongly on the use of genetic material from related wild and domesticated grass species. The 1RS chromosome arm from rye was introgressed into wheat and crossed into many wheat lines, as it improves yield and fungal disease resistance. Pm8 is a powdery mildew resistance gene on 1RS which, after widespread agricultural cultivation, is now widely overcome by adapted mildew races. Here we show by homology-based cloning and subsequent physical and genetic mapping that Pm8 is the rye orthologue of the Pm3 allelic series of mildew resistance genes in wheat. The cloned gene was functionally validated as Pm8 by transient, single-cell expression analysis and stable transformation. Sequence analysis revealed a complex mosaic of ancient haplotypes among Pm3- and Pm8-like genes from different members of the Triticeae. These results show that the two genes have evolved independently after the divergence of the species 7.5 million years ago and kept their function in mildew resistance. During this long time span the co-evolving pathogens have not overcome these genes, which is in strong contrast to the breakdown of Pm8 resistance since its introduction into commercial wheat 70 years ago. Sequence comparison revealed that evolutionary pressure acted on the same subdomains and sequence features of the two orthologous genes. This suggests that they recognize directly or indirectly the same pathogen effectors that have been conserved in the powdery mildews of wheat and rye.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of the common sea slater, Ligia oceanica (Crustacea, Isopoda) bears a novel gene order and unusual control region features

    PubMed Central

    Kilpert, Fabian; Podsiadlowski, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Background Sequence data and other characters from mitochondrial genomes (gene translocations, secondary structure of RNA molecules) are useful in phylogenetic studies among metazoan animals from population to phylum level. Moreover, the comparison of complete mitochondrial sequences gives valuable information about the evolution of small genomes, e.g. about different mechanisms of gene translocation, gene duplication and gene loss, or concerning nucleotide frequency biases. The Peracarida (gammarids, isopods, etc.) comprise about 21,000 species of crustaceans, living in many environments from deep sea floor to arid terrestrial habitats. Ligia oceanica is a terrestrial isopod living at rocky seashores of the european North Sea and Atlantic coastlines. Results The study reveals the first complete mitochondrial DNA sequence from a peracarid crustacean. The mitochondrial genome of Ligia oceanica is a circular double-stranded DNA molecule, with a size of 15,289 bp. It shows several changes in mitochondrial gene order compared to other crustacean species. An overview about mitochondrial gene order of all crustacean taxa yet sequenced is also presented. The largest non-coding part (the putative mitochondrial control region) of the mitochondrial genome of Ligia oceanica is unexpectedly not AT-rich compared to the remainder of the genome. It bears two repeat regions (4× 10 bp and 3× 64 bp), and a GC-rich hairpin-like secondary structure. Some of the transfer RNAs show secondary structures which derive from the usual cloverleaf pattern. While some tRNA genes are putative targets for RNA editing, trnR could not be localized at all. Conclusion Gene order is not conserved among Peracarida, not even among isopods. The two isopod species Ligia oceanica and Idotea baltica show a similarly derived gene order, compared to the arthropod ground pattern and to the amphipod Parhyale hawaiiensis, suggesting that most of the translocation events were already present the last common

  7. K+ current diversity is produced by an extended gene family conserved in Drosophila and mouse.

    PubMed

    Wei, A; Covarrubias, M; Butler, A; Baker, K; Pak, M; Salkoff, L

    1990-05-01

    The Drosophila Shaker gene on the X chromosome has three sister genes, Shal, Shab, and Shaw, which map to the second and third chromosomes. This extended gene family encodes voltage-gated potassium channels with widely varying kinetics (rate of macroscopic current activation and inactivation) and voltage sensitivity of steady-state inactivation. The differences in the currents of the various gene products are greater than the differences produced by alternative splicing of the Shaker gene. In Drosophila, the transient (A current) subtype of the potassium channel (Shaker and Shal) and the delayed-rectifier subtype (Shab and Shaw) are encoded by homologous genes, and there is more than one gene for each subtype of channel. Homologs of Shaker, Shal, Shab, and Shaw are present in mammals; each Drosophila potassium-channel gene may be represented as a multigene subfamily in mammals.

  8. 75 FR 13122 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... and Order Granting a Waiver to the General Electric Company From the Department of Energy Residential... of the decision and order (Case No. CD-004) that grants to the General Electric Co. (GE) a waiver... the General Electric Co. (Case No. CD-004) is hereby granted as set forth in the paragraphs below....

  9. Conserved interactions of a compact highly active enhancer/promoter upstream of the rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) gene.

    PubMed

    Young, Joyce E; Kasperek, Eileen M; Vogt, Todd M; Lis, Agnieszka; Khani, Shahrokh C

    2007-08-01

    Rhodopsin kinase (RK) is a conserved component of the light adaptation and recovery pathways shared among rod and cone photoreceptors of a variety of species. To gain insight into transcriptional mechanisms driving RK and potentially other genes of similar spatial profile, the components and the interactions of the highly compact enhancer/promoter region (E/P) upstream of the human RK gene were examined. Cross-species comparison outlined an active 49-bp widely shared E/P core as the major site of conservation in the entire 5' flanking sequence. The area consisted of a bicoid-type homeodomain recognition cassette and a unique T-rich module interacting with TATA-binding proteins. Homeodomain interactions involved primarily Crx and secondarily Otx2. Both strongly stimulated the E/P. In the absence of Crx, persistent E/P activity shifted from the outer retina to the inner to follow the Otx2 pattern. The spatial patterns were largely unaffected by the absence of rod transcription factors, Nrl and Nr2e3, and the RK transcriptional activity preceded the surge in rod-specific transcription. Conserved bicoid homeodomain factors thus appear to be the key factors governing localization of RK E/P activity in retina and photoreceptors.

  10. The gp63 Gene Cluster Is Highly Polymorphic in Natural Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis Populations, but Functional Sites Are Conserved.

    PubMed

    Medina, Lilian S; Souza, Bruno Araújo; Queiroz, Adriano; Guimarães, Luiz Henrique; Lima Machado, Paulo Roberto; M Carvalho, Edgar; Wilson, Mary Edythe; Schriefer, Albert

    2016-01-01

    GP63 or leishmanolysin is the major surface protease of Leishmania spp. involved in parasite virulence and host cell interaction. As such, GP63 is a potential target of eventual vaccines against these protozoa. In the current study we evaluate the polymorphism of gp63 in Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis isolated from two sets of American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) cases from Corte de Pedra, Brazil, including 35 cases diagnosed between 1994 and 2001 and 6 cases diagnosed between 2008 and 2011. Parasites were obtained from lesions by needle aspiration and cultivation. Genomic DNA was extracted, and 405 bp fragments, including sequences encoding the putative macrophage interacting sites, were amplified from gp63 genes of all isolates. DNA amplicons were cloned into plasmid vectors and ten clones per L. (V.) braziliensis isolate were sequenced. Alignment of cloned sequences showed extensive polymorphism among gp63 genes within, and between parasite isolates. Overall, 45 different polymorphic alleles were detected in all samples, which could be segregated into two clusters. Cluster one included 25, and cluster two included 20 such genotypes. The predicted peptides showed overall conservation below 50%. In marked contrast, the conservation at segments with putative functional domains approached 90% (Fisher's exact test p<0.0001). These findings show that gp63 is very polymorphic even among parasites from a same endemic focus, but the functional domains interacting with the mammalian host environment are conserved.

  11. The gp63 Gene Cluster Is Highly Polymorphic in Natural Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis Populations, but Functional Sites Are Conserved

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Lilian S.; Souza, Bruno Araújo; Queiroz, Adriano; Guimarães, Luiz Henrique; Lima Machado, Paulo Roberto; M Carvalho, Edgar; Wilson, Mary Edythe; Schriefer, Albert

    2016-01-01

    GP63 or leishmanolysin is the major surface protease of Leishmania spp. involved in parasite virulence and host cell interaction. As such, GP63 is a potential target of eventual vaccines against these protozoa. In the current study we evaluate the polymorphism of gp63 in Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis isolated from two sets of American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) cases from Corte de Pedra, Brazil, including 35 cases diagnosed between 1994 and 2001 and 6 cases diagnosed between 2008 and 2011. Parasites were obtained from lesions by needle aspiration and cultivation. Genomic DNA was extracted, and 405 bp fragments, including sequences encoding the putative macrophage interacting sites, were amplified from gp63 genes of all isolates. DNA amplicons were cloned into plasmid vectors and ten clones per L. (V.) braziliensis isolate were sequenced. Alignment of cloned sequences showed extensive polymorphism among gp63 genes within, and between parasite isolates. Overall, 45 different polymorphic alleles were detected in all samples, which could be segregated into two clusters. Cluster one included 25, and cluster two included 20 such genotypes. The predicted peptides showed overall conservation below 50%. In marked contrast, the conservation at segments with putative functional domains approached 90% (Fisher’s exact test p<0.0001). These findings show that gp63 is very polymorphic even among parasites from a same endemic focus, but the functional domains interacting with the mammalian host environment are conserved. PMID:27648939

  12. The gp63 Gene Cluster Is Highly Polymorphic in Natural Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis Populations, but Functional Sites Are Conserved.

    PubMed

    Medina, Lilian S; Souza, Bruno Araújo; Queiroz, Adriano; Guimarães, Luiz Henrique; Lima Machado, Paulo Roberto; M Carvalho, Edgar; Wilson, Mary Edythe; Schriefer, Albert

    2016-01-01

    GP63 or leishmanolysin is the major surface protease of Leishmania spp. involved in parasite virulence and host cell interaction. As such, GP63 is a potential target of eventual vaccines against these protozoa. In the current study we evaluate the polymorphism of gp63 in Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis isolated from two sets of American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) cases from Corte de Pedra, Brazil, including 35 cases diagnosed between 1994 and 2001 and 6 cases diagnosed between 2008 and 2011. Parasites were obtained from lesions by needle aspiration and cultivation. Genomic DNA was extracted, and 405 bp fragments, including sequences encoding the putative macrophage interacting sites, were amplified from gp63 genes of all isolates. DNA amplicons were cloned into plasmid vectors and ten clones per L. (V.) braziliensis isolate were sequenced. Alignment of cloned sequences showed extensive polymorphism among gp63 genes within, and between parasite isolates. Overall, 45 different polymorphic alleles were detected in all samples, which could be segregated into two clusters. Cluster one included 25, and cluster two included 20 such genotypes. The predicted peptides showed overall conservation below 50%. In marked contrast, the conservation at segments with putative functional domains approached 90% (Fisher's exact test p<0.0001). These findings show that gp63 is very polymorphic even among parasites from a same endemic focus, but the functional domains interacting with the mammalian host environment are conserved. PMID:27648939

  13. From conservation genetics to conservation genomics.

    PubMed

    Primmer, Craig R

    2009-04-01

    Although the application of population and evolutionary genetic theory and methods to address issues of conservation relevance has a long history, the formalization of conservation genetics as a research field is still relatively recent. One of the periodic catalysts for increased research effort in the field has been advances in molecular technologies, leading to an increasingly wider variety of molecular markers for application in conservation genetic studies. To date, genetic methods have been applied in conservation biology primarily as selectively neutral molecular tools for resolving questions of conservation relevance. However, there has been renewed interest in complementing the analysis of neutral markers with the assessment of loci that may be directly involved in responses to processes such as environmental change, with a view to identifying the genes involved in them. These kinds of studies are now possible due to the increase in availability of genomic resources for nonmodel organisms, and there will likely be an even more rapid increase in the near future due to the advent of new ultrahigh throughput-sequencing technologies. This review considers the implications of the most recent developments in genomic technologies and their potential for contributing to the conservation of populations and species. Three "conservation genomics" case studies are presented (Atlantic salmon, Salmo sala; the butterfly, Melitaea cinxia; and the California condor, Gymnogyps californianus) in order to demonstrate the diversity of applications now possible. While it is clear that genomics approaches in conservation will not replace other tried-and-true methods, these recent developments open up an exciting new range of possibilities that will enable further diversification of the application of genomics in conservation biology. PMID:19432656

  14. Localization of a highly conserved human potassium channel gene (NGK2-KV4-KCNC1) to chromosome 11p15

    SciTech Connect

    Ried, T.; Ward, D.C. ); Rudy, B.; Miera, V.S. de; Lau, D.; Sen, K. )

    1993-02-01

    Several genes (the Shaker or Sh gene family) encoding components of voltage-gated K[sub +] channels have been identified in various species. Based on sequence similarities Sh genes are classified into four groups or subfamilies. Mammalian genes of each one of these subfamilies also show high levels of sequence similarity to one of four related Drosophila genes: Shaker, Shab, Shaw, and Shal. Here we report the isolation of human cDNAs for a Shaw-related product (NGK2,KV2.1a) previously identified in rat and mice. A comparison of the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of NGK2 in rodents and humans shows that this product is highly conserved in mammals; the human NGK2 protein shows over 99% amino acid sequence identity to its rodent homologue. The gene (NGK2-KV4; KCNC1) encoding NGK2 was mapped to human chromosome 11p15 by fluorescence in situ hybridization with the human NGK2 cDNAs. 65 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Conservation of the organization of the mitochondrial nad3 and rps12 genes in evolutionarily distant angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, G; Regina, T M; Ceci, L R; Quagliariello, C

    1996-06-12

    The organization of the genes nad3 and rps12 has been investigated in the mitochondrial genome of two dicotyledonous plants - Helianthus and Magnolia - and one monocotyledonous plant (Allium). These plants all contain a complete rps12 gene downstream of the nad3 gene. This arrangement is thus highly conserved within angiosperms. The two genes are co-transcribed and the transcript is modified at several positions by RNA editing of the C to U-type, thus confirming that both genes encode functional proteins. Some 26, 35 and 27 editing events have been identified in the PCR-derived nad3-rps12 cDNA population from sunflower, Magnolia and onion, respectively. Editing of the nad3-rps12 transcript is thus more extensive in Magnolia than in the other angiosperms so far investigated and radically changes the genomically encoded polypeptide sequence. A novel species-specific codon modification was observed in Magnolia. Several homologous sites show differences in editing pattern among plant species. A C-to-U alteration is also found in the non-coding region separating the nad3 and rps12 genes in sunflower. The PCR-derived cDNA populations from the nad3-rps12 loci analysed were found to be differently edited. In addition the plant species show marked variations in the completeness of RNA editing, with only the Magnolia nad3 mRNA being edited fully. PMID:8676875

  16. Phylogenetic relationships among insect orders based on three nuclear protein-coding gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, Keisuke; Sasaki, Go; Ogawa, Jiro; Miyata, Takashi; Su, Zhi-Hui

    2011-02-01

    Many attempts to resolve the phylogenetic relationships of higher groups of insects have been made based on both morphological and molecular evidence; nonetheless, most of the interordinal relationships of insects remain unclear or are controversial. As a new approach, in this study we sequenced three nuclear genes encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase delta and the two largest subunits of RNA polymerase II from all insect orders. The predicted amino acid sequences (In total, approx. 3500 amino acid sites) of these proteins were subjected to phylogenetic analyses based on the maximum likelihood and Bayesian analysis methods with various models. The resulting trees strongly support the monophyly of Palaeoptera, Neoptera, Polyneoptera, and Holometabola, while within Polyneoptera, the groupings of Isoptera/"Blattaria"/Mantodea (Superorder Dictyoptera), Dictyoptera/Zoraptera, Dermaptera/Plecoptera, Mantophasmatodea/Grylloblattodea, and Embioptera/Phasmatodea are supported. Although Paraneoptera is not supported as a monophyletic group, the grouping of Phthiraptera/Psocoptera is robustly supported. The interordinal relationships within Holometabola are well resolved and strongly supported that the order Hymenoptera is the sister lineage to all other holometabolous insects. The other orders of Holometabola are separated into two large groups, and the interordinal relationships of each group are (((Siphonaptera, Mecoptera), Diptera), (Trichoptera, Lepidoptera)) and ((Coleoptera, Strepsiptera), (Neuroptera, Raphidioptera, Megaloptera)). The sister relationship between Strepsiptera and Diptera are significantly rejected by all the statistical tests (AU, KH and wSH), while the affinity between Hymenoptera and Mecopterida are significantly rejected only by AU and KH tests. Our results show that the use of amino acid sequences of these three nuclear genes is an effective approach for resolving the relationships of higher groups of insects. PMID:21075208

  17. FUS regulates genes coding for RNA-binding proteins in neurons by binding to their highly conserved introns

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Tadashi; Alexiou, Panagiotis; Maragkakis, Manolis; Chang, Alexandra; Mourelatos, Zissimos

    2013-01-01

    Dominant mutations and mislocalization or aggregation of Fused in Sarcoma (FUS), an RNA-binding protein (RBP), cause neuronal degeneration in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD), two incurable neurological diseases. However, the function of FUS in neurons is not well understood. To uncover the impact of FUS in the neuronal transcriptome, we used high-throughput sequencing of immunoprecipitated and cross-linked RNA (HITS–CLIP) of FUS in human brains and mouse neurons differentiated from embryonic stem cells, coupled with RNA-seq and FUS knockdowns. We report conserved neuronal RNA targets and networks that are regulated by FUS. We find that FUS regulates splicing of genes coding for RBPs by binding to their highly conserved introns. Our findings have important implications for understanding the impact of FUS in neurodegenerative diseases and suggest that perturbations of FUS can impact the neuronal transcriptome via perturbations of RBP transcripts. PMID:23389473

  18. Trehalose synthesis in Aspergillus niger: characterization of six homologous genes, all with conserved orthologs in related species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The disaccharide trehalose is a major component of fungal spores and is released upon germination. Moreover, the sugar is well known for is protective functions, e.g. against thermal stress and dehydration. The properties and synthesis of trehalose have been well investigated in the bakers’ yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In filamentous fungi, such knowledge is limited, although several gene products have been identified. Results Using Aspergillus niger as a model fungus, the aim of this study was to provide an overview of all genes involved in trehalose synthesis. This fungus has three potential trehalose-6-phosphate synthase encoding genes, tpsA-C, and three putative trehalose phosphate phosphatase encoding genes, tppA-C, of which two have not previously been identified. Expression of all six genes was confirmed using real-time PCR, and conserved orthologs could be identified in related Aspergilli. Using a two-hybrid approach, there is a strong indication that four of the proteins physically interact, as has previously been shown in S. cerevisiae. When creating null mutants of all the six genes, three of them, ΔtpsA, ΔtppA and ΔtppB, had lower internal trehalose contents. The only mutant with a pronounced morphological difference was ΔtppA, in which sporulation was severely reduced with abnormal conidiophores. This was also the only mutant with accumulated levels of trehalose-6-phosphate, indicating that the encoded protein is the main phosphatase under normal conditions. Besides ΔtppA, the most studied deletion mutant in this work was ΔtppB. This gene encodes a protein conserved in filamentous Ascomycota. The ΔtppB mutant displayed a low, but not depleted, internal trehalose content, and conidia were more susceptible to thermal stress. Conclusion A. niger contains at least 6 genes putatively involved in trehalose synthesis. Gene expressions related to germination have been quantified and deletion mutants characterized: Mutants lacking tps

  19. A Conserved Core of Programmed Cell Death Indicator Genes Discriminates Developmentally and Environmentally Induced Programmed Cell Death in Plants.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Van Bel, Michiel; Van Hautegem, Tom; Fendrych, Matyáš; Huysmans, Marlies; Simaskova, Maria; van Durme, Matthias; Buscaill, Pierre; Rivas, Susana; S Coll, Nuria; Coppens, Frederik; Maere, Steven; Nowack, Moritz K

    2015-12-01

    A plethora of diverse programmed cell death (PCD) processes has been described in living organisms. In animals and plants, different forms of PCD play crucial roles in development, immunity, and responses to the environment. While the molecular control of some animal PCD forms such as apoptosis is known in great detail, we still know comparatively little about the regulation of the diverse types of plant PCD. In part, this deficiency in molecular understanding is caused by the lack of reliable reporters to detect PCD processes. Here, we addressed this issue by using a combination of bioinformatics approaches to identify commonly regulated genes during diverse plant PCD processes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Our results indicate that the transcriptional signatures of developmentally controlled cell death are largely distinct from the ones associated with environmentally induced cell death. Moreover, different cases of developmental PCD share a set of cell death-associated genes. Most of these genes are evolutionary conserved within the green plant lineage, arguing for an evolutionary conserved core machinery of developmental PCD. Based on this information, we established an array of specific promoter-reporter lines for developmental PCD in Arabidopsis. These PCD indicators represent a powerful resource that can be used in addition to established morphological and biochemical methods to detect and analyze PCD processes in vivo and in planta.

  20. Conservation of the Low-shear Modeled Microgravity Response in Enterobacteriaceae and Analysis of the trp Genes in this Response.

    PubMed

    Soni, Anjali; O'Sullivan, Laura; Quick, Laura N; Ott, C Mark; Nickerson, Cheryl A; Wilson, James W

    2014-01-01

    Low fluid shear force, including that encountered in microgravity models, induces bacterial responses, but the range of bacteria capable of responding to this signal remains poorly characterized. We systematically analyzed a range of Gram negative Enterobacteriaceae for conservation of the low-shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG) response using phenotypic assays, qPCR, and targeted mutations. Our results indicate LSMMG response conservation across Enterobacteriacae with potential variance in up- or down-regulation of a given response depending on genus. Based on the data, we analyzed the role of the trp operon genes and the TrpR regulator in the LSMMG response using targeted mutations in these genes in S. Typhimurium and E. coli. We found no alteration of the LSMMG response compared to WT in these mutant strains under the conditions tested here. To our knowledge, this study is first-of-kind for Citrobacter, Enterobacter, and Serratia, presents novel data for Escherichia, and provides the first analysis of trp genes in LSMMG responses. This impacts our understanding of how LSMMG affects bacteria and our ability to modify bacteria with this condition in the future. PMID:25006354

  1. Conservation of a vitellogenin gene cluster in oviparous vertebrates and identification of its traces in the platypus genome.

    PubMed

    Babin, Patrick J

    2008-04-30

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) derivatives are the main egg-yolk proteins in most oviparous animal species, and are, therefore, key players in reproduction and embryo development. Conserved synteny and phylogeny were used to identify a Vtg gene cluster (VGC) that had been evolutionarily conserved in most oviparous vertebrates, encompassing the three linked Vtgs on chicken (Gallus gallus) chromosome 8. Tandem arranged homologs to chicken VtgII and VtgIII were retrieved in similar locations in Xenopus (Xenopus tropicalis) and homologous transcribed inverted genes were found in medaka (Oryzias latipes), stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes), and Tetrahodon (Tetraodon nigroviridis), while zebrafish (Danio rerio) Vtg3 may represent a residual trace of VGC in this genome. Vtgs were not conserved in the paralogous chromosomal segment attributed to a whole-genome duplication event in the ancestor of teleosts, while tandem duplicated forms have survived the recent African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) tetraploidization. Orthologs to chicken VtgI were found in similar locations in teleost fish, as well as in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus). Additional Vtg fragments found suggested that VGC had been conserved in this egg-laying mammal. A low ratio of nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitution values and the paucity of pseudogene features suggest functional platypus Vtg products. Genomic identification of Vtgs, Apob, and Mtp in this genome, together with maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference phylogenetic analyses, support the existence of these three large lipid transfer protein superfamily members at the base of the mammalian lineage. In conclusion, the establishment of a VGC in the vertebrate lineage predates the divergence of ray-finned fish and tetrapods and the shift in reproductive and developmental strategy observed between prototherians and therians may be associated with its loss, as shown by its absence from the genomic resources currently

  2. Conservation of a vitellogenin gene cluster in oviparous vertebrates and identification of its traces in the platypus genome.

    PubMed

    Babin, Patrick J

    2008-04-30

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) derivatives are the main egg-yolk proteins in most oviparous animal species, and are, therefore, key players in reproduction and embryo development. Conserved synteny and phylogeny were used to identify a Vtg gene cluster (VGC) that had been evolutionarily conserved in most oviparous vertebrates, encompassing the three linked Vtgs on chicken (Gallus gallus) chromosome 8. Tandem arranged homologs to chicken VtgII and VtgIII were retrieved in similar locations in Xenopus (Xenopus tropicalis) and homologous transcribed inverted genes were found in medaka (Oryzias latipes), stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes), and Tetrahodon (Tetraodon nigroviridis), while zebrafish (Danio rerio) Vtg3 may represent a residual trace of VGC in this genome. Vtgs were not conserved in the paralogous chromosomal segment attributed to a whole-genome duplication event in the ancestor of teleosts, while tandem duplicated forms have survived the recent African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) tetraploidization. Orthologs to chicken VtgI were found in similar locations in teleost fish, as well as in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus). Additional Vtg fragments found suggested that VGC had been conserved in this egg-laying mammal. A low ratio of nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitution values and the paucity of pseudogene features suggest functional platypus Vtg products. Genomic identification of Vtgs, Apob, and Mtp in this genome, together with maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference phylogenetic analyses, support the existence of these three large lipid transfer protein superfamily members at the base of the mammalian lineage. In conclusion, the establishment of a VGC in the vertebrate lineage predates the divergence of ray-finned fish and tetrapods and the shift in reproductive and developmental strategy observed between prototherians and therians may be associated with its loss, as shown by its absence from the genomic resources currently

  3. Discovery of conserved motifs in promoters of orthologous genes in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Janky, Rekin's; van Helden, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    We present a method to predict cis-acting elements for a given gene by detecting over-represented motifs in promoters of a set of ortholo gous genes in prokaryotes (single-gene, multiple-genomes approach). The method has been used successfully to detect regulatory elements at various taxonomical levels in prokaryotes. A web interface is available at the Regulatory Sequence Analysis Tools site (http://rsat.scmbb.ulb.ac.be/rsat/).

  4. Phylogenetic footprinting reveals evolutionarily conserved regions of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene that enhance cell-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Givens, Marjory L; Kurotani, Reiko; Rave-Harel, Naama; Miller, Nichol L G; Mellon, Pamela L

    2004-12-01

    Reproductive function is controlled by the hypothalamic neuropeptide, GnRH, which serves as the central regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. GnRH expression is limited to a small population of neurons in the hypothalamus. Targeting this minute population of neurons (as few as 800 in the mouse) requires regulatory elements upstream of the GnRH gene that remain to be fully characterized. Previously, we have identified an evolutionarily conserved promoter region (-173 to +1) and an enhancer (-1863 to -1571) in the rat gene that targets a subset of the GnRH neurons in vivo. In the present study, we used phylogenetic sequence comparison between human and rodents and analysis of the transcription factor clusters within conserved regions in an attempt to identify additional upstream regulatory elements. This approach led to the characterization of a new upstream enhancer that regulates expression of GnRH in a cell-specific manner. Within this upstream enhancer are nine binding sites for Octamer-binding transcription factor 1 (OCT1), known to be an important transcriptional regulator of GnRH gene expression. In addition, we have identified nuclear factor I (NF1) binding to multiple elements in the GnRH-regulatory regions, each in close proximity to OCT1. We show that OCT1 and NF1 physically and functionally interact. Moreover, the OCT1 and NF1 binding sites in the regulatory regions appear to be essential for appropriate GnRH gene expression. These findings indicate a role for this upstream enhancer and novel OCT1/NF1 complexes in neuron-restricted expression of the GnRH gene.

  5. Differential Responses to Wnt and PCP Disruption Predict Expression and Developmental Function of Conserved and Novel Genes in a Cnidarian

    PubMed Central

    Lapébie, Pascal; Ruggiero, Antonella; Barreau, Carine; Chevalier, Sandra; Chang, Patrick; Dru, Philippe; Houliston, Evelyn; Momose, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We have used Digital Gene Expression analysis to identify, without bilaterian bias, regulators of cnidarian embryonic patterning. Transcriptome comparison between un-manipulated Clytia early gastrula embryos and ones in which the key polarity regulator Wnt3 was inhibited using morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (Wnt3-MO) identified a set of significantly over and under-expressed transcripts. These code for candidate Wnt signaling modulators, orthologs of other transcription factors, secreted and transmembrane proteins known as developmental regulators in bilaterian models or previously uncharacterized, and also many cnidarian-restricted proteins. Comparisons between embryos injected with morpholinos targeting Wnt3 and its receptor Fz1 defined four transcript classes showing remarkable correlation with spatiotemporal expression profiles. Class 1 and 3 transcripts tended to show sustained expression at “oral” and “aboral” poles respectively of the developing planula larva, class 2 transcripts in cells ingressing into the endodermal region during gastrulation, while class 4 gene expression was repressed at the early gastrula stage. The preferential effect of Fz1-MO on expression of class 2 and 4 transcripts can be attributed to Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) disruption, since it was closely matched by morpholino knockdown of the specific PCP protein Strabismus. We conclude that endoderm and post gastrula-specific gene expression is particularly sensitive to PCP disruption while Wnt-/β-catenin signaling dominates gene regulation along the oral-aboral axis. Phenotype analysis using morpholinos targeting a subset of transcripts indicated developmental roles consistent with expression profiles for both conserved and cnidarian-restricted genes. Overall our unbiased screen allowed systematic identification of regionally expressed genes and provided functional support for a shared eumetazoan developmental regulatory gene set with both predicted and previously

  6. The trehalose pathway in maize: conservation and gene regulation in response to the diurnal cycle and extended darkness

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Clémence; Bledsoe, Samuel W.; Siekman, Allison; Kollman, Alec; Waters, Brian M.; Feil, Regina; Stitt, Mark; Lagrimini, L. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Energy resources in plants are managed in continuously changing environments, such as changes occurring during the day/night cycle. Shading is an environmental disruption that decreases photosynthesis, compromises energy status, and impacts on crop productivity. The trehalose pathway plays a central but not well-defined role in maintaining energy balance. Here, we characterized the maize trehalose pathway genes and deciphered the impacts of the diurnal cycle and disruption of the day/night cycle on trehalose pathway gene expression and sugar metabolism. The maize genome encodes 14 trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) genes, 11 trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP) genes, and one trehalase gene. Transcript abundance of most of these genes was impacted by the day/night cycle and extended dark stress, as were sucrose, hexose sugars, starch, and trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P) levels. After extended darkness, T6P levels inversely followed class II TPS and sucrose non-fermenting-related protein kinase 1 (SnRK1) target gene expression. Most significantly, T6P no longer tracked sucrose levels after extended darkness. These results showed: (i) conservation of the trehalose pathway in maize; (ii) that sucrose, hexose, starch, T6P, and TPS/TPP transcripts respond to the diurnal cycle; and(iii) that extended darkness disrupts the correlation between T6P and sucrose/hexose pools and affects SnRK1 target gene expression. A model for the role of the trehalose pathway in sensing of sucrose and energy status in maize seedlings is proposed. PMID:25271261

  7. Computational identification of conserved transcription factor binding sites upstream of genes induced in rat brain by transient focal ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pulliam, John V.K.; Xu, Zhenfeng; Ford, Gregory D.; Liu, Cuimei; Li, Yonggang; Stovall, Kyndra; Cannon, Virginetta S.; Tewolde, Teclemichael; Moreno, Carlos S.; Ford, Byron D.

    2013-01-01

    Microarray analysis has been used to understand how gene regulation plays a critical role in neuronal injury, survival and repair following ischemic stroke. To identify the transcriptional regulatory elements responsible for ischemia-induced gene expression, we examined gene expression profiles of rat brains following focal ischemia and performed computational analysis of consensus transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in the genes of the dataset. In this study, rats were sacrificed 24 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke and gene transcription in brain tissues following ischemia/reperfusion was examined using Affymetrix GeneChip technology. The CONserved transcription FACtor binding site (CONFAC) software package was used to identify over-represented TFBS in the upstream promoter regions of ischemia-induced genes compared to control datasets. CONFAC identified 12 TFBS that were statistically over-represented from our dataset of ischemia-induced genes, including three members of the Ets-1 family of transcription factors (TFs). Microarray results showed that mRNA for Ets-1 was increased following tMCAO but not pMCAO. Immunohistochemical analysis of Ets-1 protein in rat brains following MCAO showed that Ets-1 was highly expressed in neurons in the brain of sham control animals. Ets-1 protein expression was virtually abolished in injured neurons of the ischemic brain but was unchanged in peri-infarct brain areas. These data indicate that TFs, including Ets-1, may influence neuronal injury following ischemia. These findings could provide important insights into the mechanisms that lead to brain injury and could provide avenues for the development of novel therapies. PMID:23246490

  8. ACC deaminase genes are conserved among Mesorhizobium species able to nodulate the same host plant.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Francisco X; Brígido, Clarisse; Glick, Bernard R; Oliveira, Solange

    2012-11-01

    Rhizobia strains expressing the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase have been reported to display an augmented symbiotic performance as a consequence of lowering the plant ethylene levels that inhibit the nodulation process. Genes encoding ACC deaminase (acdS) have been studied in Rhizobium spp.; however, not much is known about the presence of acdS genes in Mesorhizobium spp. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and phylogeny of acdS genes in Mesorhizobium strains including a collection of chickpea-nodulating mesorhizobia from Portugal. ACC deaminase genes were detected in 10 of 12 mesorhizobia type strains as well as in 18 of 18 chickpea Mesorhizobium isolates studied in this work. No ACC deaminase activity was detected in any Mesorhizobium strain tested under free-living conditions. Despite the lack of ACC deaminase activity, it was possible to demonstrate that in Mesorhizobium ciceri UPM-Ca7(T) , the acdS gene is transcribed under symbiotic conditions. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that strains belonging to different species of Mesorhizobium, but nodulating the same host plant, have similar acdS genes, suggesting that acdS genes are horizontally acquired by transfer of the symbiosis island. This data, together with analysis of the symbiosis islands from completely sequenced Mesorhizobium genomes, suggest the presence of the acdS gene in a Mesorhizobium common ancestor that possessed this gene in a unique symbiosis island.

  9. Identification of Novel Human Genes Evolutionarily Conserved in Caenorhabditis elegans by Comparative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chun-Hung; Chou, Chang-Yuan; Ch'ang, Lan-Yang; Liu, Chung-Shyan; Lin, Wen-chang

    2000-01-01

    Modern biomedical research greatly benefits from large-scale genome-sequencing projects ranging from studies of viruses, bacteria, and yeast to multicellular organisms, like Caenorhabditis elegans. Comparative genomic studies offer a vast array of prospects for identification and functional annotation of human ortholog genes. We presented a novel comparative proteomic approach for assembling human gene contigs and assisting gene discovery. The C. elegans proteome was used as an alignment template to assist in novel human gene identification from human EST nucleotide databases. Among the available 18,452 C. elegans protein sequences, our results indicate that at least 83% (15,344 sequences) of C. elegans proteome has human homologous genes, with 7,954 records of C. elegans proteins matching known human gene transcripts. Only 11% or less of C. elegans proteome contains nematode-specific genes. We found that the remaining 7,390 sequences might lead to discoveries of novel human genes, and over 150 putative full-length human gene transcripts were assembled upon further database analyses. [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession nos. AF132936–AF132973, AF151799–AF151909, and AF152097.] PMID:10810093

  10. The Two-Component Camassa-Holm Equations CH(2,1) and CH(2,2): First-Order Integrating Factors and Conservation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, Marianna; Euler, Norbert; Wolf, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Recently, Holm and Ivanov, proposed and studied a class of multi-component generalizations of the Camassa-Holm equations [D. D. Holm and R. I. Ivanov, Multi-component generalizations of the CH equation: geometrical aspects, peakons and numerical examples, J. Phys A: Math. Theor.43 (2010) 492001 (20pp)]. We consider two of those systems, denoted by Holm and Ivanov by CH(2,1) and CH(2,2), and report a class of integrating factors and its corresponding conservation laws for these two systems. In particular, we obtain the complete set of first-order integrating factors for the systems in Cauchy-Kovalevskaya form and evaluate the corresponding sets of conservation laws for CH(2,1) and CH(2,2).

  11. Rapid pair-wise synteny analysis of large bacterial genomes using web-based GeneOrder4.0

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The growing whole genome sequence databases necessitate the development of user-friendly software tools to mine these data. Web-based tools are particularly useful to wet-bench biologists as they enable platform-independent analysis of sequence data, without having to perform complex programming tasks and software compiling. Findings GeneOrder4.0 is a web-based "on-the-fly" synteny and gene order analysis tool for comparative bacterial genomics (ca. 8 Mb). It enables the visualization of synteny by plotting protein similarity scores between two genomes and it also provides visual annotation of "hypothetical" proteins from older archived genomes based on more recent annotations. Conclusions The web-based software tool GeneOrder4.0 is a user-friendly application that has been updated to allow the rapid analysis of synteny and gene order in large bacterial genomes. It is developed with the wet-bench researcher in mind. PMID:20178631

  12. Overexpression screens identify conserved dosage chromosome instability genes in yeast and human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Supipi; Fam, Hok Khim; Wang, Yi Kan; Styles, Erin B.; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ang, J. Sidney; Singh, Tejomayee; Larionov, Vladimir; Shah, Sohrab P.; Andrews, Brenda; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Hieter, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number amplification and gene overexpression are common features of many cancers. To determine the role of gene overexpression on chromosome instability (CIN), we performed genome-wide screens in the budding yeast for yeast genes that cause CIN when overexpressed, a phenotype we refer to as dosage CIN (dCIN), and identified 245 dCIN genes. This catalog of genes reveals human orthologs known to be recurrently overexpressed and/or amplified in tumors. We show that two genes, TDP1, a tyrosyl-DNA-phosphdiesterase, and TAF12, an RNA polymerase II TATA-box binding factor, cause CIN when overexpressed in human cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma lines with elevated human Tdp1 levels also exhibit CIN that can be partially rescued by siRNA-mediated knockdown of TDP1. Overexpression of dCIN genes represents a genetic vulnerability that could be leveraged for selective killing of cancer cells through targeting of an unlinked synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) partner. Using SDL screens in yeast, we identified a set of genes that when deleted specifically kill cells with high levels of Tdp1. One gene was the histone deacetylase RPD3, for which there are known inhibitors. Both HT1080 cells overexpressing hTDP1 and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with elevated levels of hTdp1 were more sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), recapitulating the SDL interaction in human cells and suggesting VPA and TSA as potential therapeutic agents for tumors with elevated levels of hTdp1. The catalog of dCIN genes presented here provides a candidate list to identify genes that cause CIN when overexpressed in cancer, which can then be leveraged through SDL to selectively target tumors. PMID:27551064

  13. Overexpression screens identify conserved dosage chromosome instability genes in yeast and human cancer.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Supipi; Fam, Hok Khim; Wang, Yi Kan; Styles, Erin B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ang, J Sidney; Singh, Tejomayee; Larionov, Vladimir; Shah, Sohrab P; Andrews, Brenda; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Hieter, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Somatic copy number amplification and gene overexpression are common features of many cancers. To determine the role of gene overexpression on chromosome instability (CIN), we performed genome-wide screens in the budding yeast for yeast genes that cause CIN when overexpressed, a phenotype we refer to as dosage CIN (dCIN), and identified 245 dCIN genes. This catalog of genes reveals human orthologs known to be recurrently overexpressed and/or amplified in tumors. We show that two genes, TDP1, a tyrosyl-DNA-phosphdiesterase, and TAF12, an RNA polymerase II TATA-box binding factor, cause CIN when overexpressed in human cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma lines with elevated human Tdp1 levels also exhibit CIN that can be partially rescued by siRNA-mediated knockdown of TDP1 Overexpression of dCIN genes represents a genetic vulnerability that could be leveraged for selective killing of cancer cells through targeting of an unlinked synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) partner. Using SDL screens in yeast, we identified a set of genes that when deleted specifically kill cells with high levels of Tdp1. One gene was the histone deacetylase RPD3, for which there are known inhibitors. Both HT1080 cells overexpressing hTDP1 and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with elevated levels of hTdp1 were more sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), recapitulating the SDL interaction in human cells and suggesting VPA and TSA as potential therapeutic agents for tumors with elevated levels of hTdp1. The catalog of dCIN genes presented here provides a candidate list to identify genes that cause CIN when overexpressed in cancer, which can then be leveraged through SDL to selectively target tumors. PMID:27551064

  14. Mapping of the gene for a major penicillin-binding protein to a genetically conserved region of the Bacillus subtilis chromosome and conservation of the protein among related species of Bacillus.

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, C E; Gustafson, A

    1991-01-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 5 is the most abundant penicillin-binding protein in the vegetative membranes of Bacillus subtilis and accounts for 95% of the D,D-carboxypeptidase activity of the cell. The structural gene for penicillin-binding protein 5 was mapped to a genetically conserved region near guaB at 0 degrees on the B. subtilis chromosome, and immunoassays revealed that there is conservation of this major penicillin-binding protein among related species. Images PMID:1900282

  15. SPN1, a conserved gene identified by suppression of a postrecruitment-defective yeast TATA-binding protein mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Fischbeck, Julie A; Kraemer, Susan M; Stargell, Laurie A

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about TATA-binding protein (TBP) functions after recruitment to the TATA element, although several TBP mutants display postrecruitment defects. Here we describe a genetic screen for suppressors of a postrecruitment-defective TBP allele. Suppression was achieved by a single point mutation in a previously uncharacterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, SPN1 (suppresses postrecruitment functions gene number 1). SPN1 is an essential yeast gene that is highly conserved throughout evolution. The suppressing mutation in SPN1 substitutes an asparagine for an invariant lysine at position 192 (spn1(K192N)). The spn1(K192N) strain is able to suppress additional alleles of TBP that possess postrecruitment defects, but not a TBP allele that is postrecruitment competent. In addition, Spn1p does not stably associate with TFIID in vivo. Cells containing the spn1(K192N) allele exhibit a temperature-sensitive phenotype and some defects in activated transcription, whereas constitutive transcription appears relatively robust in the mutant background. Consistent with an important role in postrecruitment functions, transcription from the CYC1 promoter, which has been shown to be regulated by postrecruitment mechanisms, is enhanced in spn1(K192N) cells. Moreover, we find that SPN1 is a member of the SPT gene family, further supporting a functional requirement for the SPN1 gene product in transcriptional processes. PMID:12524336

  16. Pi class glutathione S-transferase genes are regulated by Nrf 2 through an evolutionarily conserved regulatory element in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takafumi; Takagi, Yaeko; Osanai, Hitoshi; Li, Li; Takeuchi, Miki; Katoh, Yasutake; Kobayashi, Makoto; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2005-01-01

    Pi class GSTs (glutathione S-transferases) are a member of the vertebrate GST family of proteins that catalyse the conjugation of GSH to electrophilic compounds. The expression of Pi class GST genes can be induced by exposure to electrophiles. We demonstrated previously that the transcription factor Nrf 2 (NF-E2 p45-related factor 2) mediates this induction, not only in mammals, but also in fish. In the present study, we have isolated the genomic region of zebrafish containing the genes gstp1 and gstp2. The regulatory regions of zebrafish gstp1 and gstp2 have been examined by GFP (green fluorescent protein)-reporter gene analyses using microinjection into zebrafish embryos. Deletion and point-mutation analyses of the gstp1 promoter showed that an ARE (antioxidant-responsive element)-like sequence is located 50 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site which is essential for Nrf 2 transactivation. Using EMSA (electrophoretic mobility-shift assay) analysis we showed that zebrafish Nrf 2–MafK heterodimer specifically bound to this sequence. All the vertebrate Pi class GST genes harbour a similar ARE-like sequence in their promoter regions. We propose that this sequence is a conserved target site for Nrf 2 in the Pi class GST genes. PMID:15654768

  17. Mitochondrial genome sequence and gene order of Sipunculus nudus give additional support for an inclusion of Sipuncula into Annelida

    PubMed Central

    Mwinyi, Adina; Meyer, Achim; Bleidorn, Christoph; Lieb, Bernhard; Bartolomaeus, Thomas; Podsiadlowski, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial genomes are a valuable source of data for analysing phylogenetic relationships. Besides sequence information, mitochondrial gene order may add phylogenetically useful information, too. Sipuncula are unsegmented marine worms, traditionally placed in their own phylum. Recent molecular and morphological findings suggest a close affinity to the segmented Annelida. Results The first complete mitochondrial genome of a member of Sipuncula, Sipunculus nudus, is presented. All 37 genes characteristic for metazoan mtDNA were detected and are encoded on the same strand. The mitochondrial gene order (protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes) resembles that of annelids, but shows several derivations so far found only in Sipuncula. Sequence based phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial protein-coding genes results in significant bootstrap support for Annelida sensu lato, combining Annelida together with Sipuncula, Echiura, Pogonophora and Myzostomida. Conclusion The mitochondrial sequence data support a close relationship of Annelida and Sipuncula. Also the most parsimonious explanation of changes in gene order favours a derivation from the annelid gene order. These results complement findings from recent phylogenetic analyses of nuclear encoded genes as well as a report of a segmental neural patterning in Sipuncula. PMID:19149868

  18. High-order central ENO finite-volume scheme for hyperbolic conservation laws on three-dimensional cubed-sphere grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivan, L.; De Sterck, H.; Susanto, A.; Groth, C. P. T.

    2015-02-01

    A fourth-order accurate finite-volume scheme for hyperbolic conservation laws on three-dimensional (3D) cubed-sphere grids is described. The approach is based on a central essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) finite-volume method that was recently introduced for two-dimensional compressible flows and is extended to 3D geometries with structured hexahedral grids. Cubed-sphere grids feature hexahedral cells with nonplanar cell surfaces, which are handled with high-order accuracy using trilinear geometry representations in the proposed approach. Varying stencil sizes and slope discontinuities in grid lines occur at the boundaries and corners of the six sectors of the cubed-sphere grid where the grid topology is unstructured, and these difficulties are handled naturally with high-order accuracy by the multidimensional least-squares based 3D CENO reconstruction with overdetermined stencils. A rotation-based mechanism is introduced to automatically select appropriate smaller stencils at degenerate block boundaries, where fewer ghost cells are available and the grid topology changes, requiring stencils to be modified. Combining these building blocks results in a finite-volume discretization for conservation laws on 3D cubed-sphere grids that is uniformly high-order accurate in all three grid directions. While solution-adaptivity is natural in the multi-block setting of our code, high-order accurate adaptive refinement on cubed-sphere grids is not pursued in this paper. The 3D CENO scheme is an accurate and robust solution method for hyperbolic conservation laws on general hexahedral grids that is attractive because it is inherently multidimensional by employing a K-exact overdetermined reconstruction scheme, and it avoids the complexity of considering multiple non-central stencil configurations that characterizes traditional ENO schemes. Extensive numerical tests demonstrate fourth-order convergence for stationary and time-dependent Euler and magnetohydrodynamic flows on

  19. The Conservation and Application of Three Hypothetical Protein Coding Gene for Direct Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Sputum Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lianhua; Gao, Shihui; Wang, Jie; Zheng, Ruijuan; Lu, Junmei; Hu, Zhongyi

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate and early diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is of major importance in the control of TB. One of the most important technical advances in diagnosis of tuberculosis is the development of nucleic acid amplification (NAA) tests. However, the choice of the target sequence remains controversial in NAA tests. Recently, interesting alternatives have been found in hypothetical protein coding sequences from mycobacterial genome. Methodology/Principal Findings To obtain rational biomarker for TB diagnosis, the conservation of three hypothetical genes was firstly evaluated in 714 mycobacterial strains. The results showed that SCAR1 (Sequenced Characterized Amplified Region) based on Rv0264c coding gene showed the highest conservation (99.8%) and SCAR2 based on Rv1508c gene showed the secondary high conservation (99.7%) in M. tuberculosis (MTB) strains. SCAR3 based on Rv2135c gene (3.2%) and IS6110 (8%) showed relatively high deletion rate in MTB strains. Secondly, three SCAR markers were evaluated in 307 clinical sputum from patients in whom TB was suspected or patients with diseases other than TB. The amplification of IS6110 and 16SrRNA sequences together with both clinical and bacteriological identification was as a protocol to evaluate the efficacy of SCAR markers. The sensitivities and specificities, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of all NAA tests were higher than those of bacteriological detection. In four NAA tests, IS6110 and SCAR3 showed the highest PPV (100%) and low NPV (70% and 68.8%, respectively), and SCAR1 and SCAR2 showed the relatively high PPV and NPV (97% and 82.6%, 95.6% and 88.8%, respectively). Conclusions/Significance Our result indicated that SCAR1 and SCAR2 with a high degree of sequence conservation represent efficient and promising alternatives as NAA test targets in identification of MTB. Moreover, the targets developed from this study may provide more alternative targets for the development of a

  20. 77 FR 59916 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to BSH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Bryan Berringer, U.S. Department of Energy, Building Technologies Program, Mail Stop..., subpart B, appendix C. BSH's petition was published in the Federal Register on April 2, 2012. 77 FR 19650...: Decision and Order. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) gives notice of the decision and...

  1. 75 FR 51262 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to GE...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... published in the Federal Register on April 17, 2007. 72 FR 19189. DOE granted the GE petition in a decision & order published on February 27, 2008. 73 FR 10425. On February 16, 2010, GE informed DOE that it has... Register on April 29, 2010. 75 FR 22586. Assertions and Determinations GE's Petition for Waiver: In...

  2. The function of temporally ordered viral gene expression in the intracellular replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1).

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Jun; Sasaki, Akira

    2009-11-01

    In the reproduction of HSV-1, the temporal profile of the viral gene expressions and the molecular mechanisms regulating the expressions are extensively studied. Functional roles of the temporally ordered gene expressions has not yet been clarified. We construct a simple mathematical model for the intracellular replication of HSV-1 to investigate the function of the ordered gene expressions. We obtain the condition for the 'explosion' of the virus from our model. The expression ratio of the early gene to the late gene must be higher than the ratio of the reaction rate of the encapsidation to that of the viral DNA replication for viruses to reproduce successfully. The preceded accumulation of the early gene product prevents the growth arrest. Further, as promoter activity of the early gene becomes higher, the replication speed of virus becomes faster. The structure of early gene promoter that has many binding motif to transcription factor accelerates the replication speed of HSV-1. This structure of the early gene promoter might be selectively maintained by allowing fast growth of the virus. With amino acid limitation, there exist finite optimal ratio of early/late gene promoter activity.

  3. An Amphioxus Gli Gene Reveals Conservation of Midline Patterning and the Evolution of Hedgehog Signalling Diversity in Chordates

    PubMed Central

    Shimeld, Sebastian M.; van den Heuvel, Marcel; Dawber, Rebecca; Briscoe, James

    2007-01-01

    Background Hedgehog signalling, interpreted in receiving cells by Gli transcription factors, plays a central role in the development of vertebrate and Drosophila embryos. Many aspects of the signalling pathway are conserved between these lineages, however vertebrates have diverged in at least one key aspect: they have evolved multiple Gli genes encoding functionally-distinct proteins, increasing the complexity of the hedgehog-dependent transcriptional response. Amphioxus is one of the closest living relatives of the vertebrates, having split from the vertebrate lineage prior to the widespread gene duplication prominent in early vertebrate evolution. Principal Findings We show that amphioxus has a single Gli gene, which is deployed in tissues adjacent to sources of hedgehog signalling derived from the midline and anterior endoderm. This shows the duplication and divergence of the Gli gene family, and hence the origin of vertebrate Gli functional diversity, was specific to the vertebrate lineage. However we also show that the single amphioxus Gli gene produces two distinct transcripts encoding different proteins. We utilise three tests of Gli function to examine the transcription regulatory capacities of these different proteins, demonstrating one has activating activity similar to Gli2, while the other acts as a weak repressor, similar to Gli3. Conclusions These data show that vertebrates and amphioxus have evolved functionally-similar repertoires of Gli proteins using parallel molecular routes; vertebrates via gene duplication and divergence, and amphioxus via alternate splicing of a single gene. Our results demonstrate that similar functional complexity of intercellular signalling can be achieved via different evolutionary pathways. PMID:17848995

  4. Abscisic acid-induced gene expression in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha is mediated by evolutionarily conserved promoter elements.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Totan K; Kaneko, Midori; Akter, Khaleda; Murai, Shuhei; Komatsu, Kenji; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Kohchi, Takayuki; Takezawa, Daisuke

    2016-04-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a phytohormone widely distributed among members of the land plant lineage (Embryophyta), regulating dormancy, stomata closure and tolerance to environmental stresses. In angiosperms (Magnoliophyta), ABA-induced gene expression is mediated by promoter elements such as the G-box-like ACGT-core motifs recognized by bZIP transcription factors. In contrast, the mode of regulation by ABA of gene expression in liverworts (Marchantiophyta), representing one of the earliest diverging land plant groups, has not been elucidated. In this study, we used promoters of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha dehydrin and the wheat Em genes fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene to investigate ABA-induced gene expression in liverworts. Transient assays of cultured cells of Marchantia indicated that ACGT-core motifs proximal to the transcription initiation site play a role in the ABA-induced gene expression. The RY sequence recognized by B3 transcriptional regulators was also shown to be responsible for the ABA-induced gene expression. In transgenic Marchantia plants, ABA treatment elicited an increase in GUS expression in young gemmalings, which was abolished by simultaneous disruption of the ACGT-core and RY elements. ABA-induced GUS expression was less obvious in mature thalli than in young gemmalings, associated with reductions in sensitivity to exogenous ABA during gametophyte growth. In contrast, lunularic acid, which had been suggested to function as an ABA-like substance, had no effect on GUS expression. The results demonstrate the presence of ABA-specific response mechanisms mediated by conserved cis-regulatory elements in liverworts, implying that the mechanisms had been acquired in the common ancestors of embryophytes. PMID:26456006

  5. Evolutionary conservation of candidate osmoregulation genes in plant phloem sap-feeding insects.

    PubMed

    Jing, X; White, T A; Luan, J; Jiao, C; Fei, Z; Douglas, A E

    2016-06-01

    The high osmotic pressure generated by sugars in plant phloem sap is reduced in phloem-feeding aphids by sugar transformations and facilitated water flux in the gut. The genes mediating these osmoregulatory functions have been identified and validated empirically in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum: sucrase 1 (SUC1), a sucrase in glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13), and aquaporin 1 (AQP1), a member of the Drosophila integral protein (DRIP) family of aquaporins. Here, we describe molecular analysis of GH13 and AQP genes in phloem-feeding representatives of the four phloem-feeding groups: aphids (Myzus persicae), coccids (Planococcus citri), psyllids (Diaphorina citri, Bactericera cockerelli) and whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 and MED). A single candidate GH13-SUC gene and DRIP-AQP gene were identified in the genome/transcriptome of most insects tested by the criteria of sequence motif and gene expression in the gut. Exceptionally, the psyllid Ba. cockerelli transcriptome included a gut-expressed Pyrocoelia rufa integral protein (PRIP)-AQP, but has no DRIP-AQP transcripts, suggesting that PRIP-AQP is recruited for osmoregulatory function in this insect. This study indicates that phylogenetically related SUC and AQP genes may generally mediate osmoregulatory functions in these diverse phloem-feeding insects, and provides candidate genes for empirical validation and development as targets for osmotic disruption of pest species. PMID:26896054

  6. Comparative Mitogenomics of Leeches (Annelida: Clitellata): Genome Conservation and Placobdella-Specific trnD Gene Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Andrés; Siddall, Mark E.; Latorre, Amparo

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences, often in combination with nuclear markers and morphological data, are frequently used to unravel the phylogenetic relationships, population dynamics and biogeographic histories of a plethora of organisms. The information provided by examining complete mitochondrial genomes also enables investigation of other evolutionary events such as gene rearrangements, gene duplication and gene loss. Despite efforts to generate information to represent most of the currently recognized groups, some taxa are underrepresented in mitochondrial genomic databases. One such group is leeches (Annelida: Hirudinea: Clitellata). Herein, we expand our knowledge concerning leech mitochondrial makeup including gene arrangement, gene duplication and the evolution of mitochondrial genomes by adding newly sequenced mitochondrial genomes for three bloodfeeding species: Haementeria officinalis, Placobdella lamothei and Placobdella parasitica. With the inclusion of three new mitochondrial genomes of leeches, a better understanding of evolution for this organelle within the group is emerging. We found that gene order and genomic arrangement in the three new mitochondrial genomes is identical to previously sequenced members of Clitellata. Interestingly, within Placobdella, we recovered a genus-specific duplication of the trnD gene located between cox2 and atp8. We performed phylogenetic analyses using 12 protein-coding genes and expanded our taxon sampling by including GenBank sequences for 39 taxa; the analyses confirm the monophyletic status of Clitellata, yet disagree in several respects with other phylogenetic hypotheses based on morphology and analyses of non-mitochondrial data. PMID:27176910

  7. Comparative Mitogenomics of Leeches (Annelida: Clitellata): Genome Conservation and Placobdella-Specific trnD Gene Duplication.

    PubMed

    Oceguera-Figueroa, Alejandro; Manzano-Marín, Alejandro; Kvist, Sebastian; Moya, Andrés; Siddall, Mark E; Latorre, Amparo

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences, often in combination with nuclear markers and morphological data, are frequently used to unravel the phylogenetic relationships, population dynamics and biogeographic histories of a plethora of organisms. The information provided by examining complete mitochondrial genomes also enables investigation of other evolutionary events such as gene rearrangements, gene duplication and gene loss. Despite efforts to generate information to represent most of the currently recognized groups, some taxa are underrepresented in mitochondrial genomic databases. One such group is leeches (Annelida: Hirudinea: Clitellata). Herein, we expand our knowledge concerning leech mitochondrial makeup including gene arrangement, gene duplication and the evolution of mitochondrial genomes by adding newly sequenced mitochondrial genomes for three bloodfeeding species: Haementeria officinalis, Placobdella lamothei and Placobdella parasitica. With the inclusion of three new mitochondrial genomes of leeches, a better understanding of evolution for this organelle within the group is emerging. We found that gene order and genomic arrangement in the three new mitochondrial genomes is identical to previously sequenced members of Clitellata. Interestingly, within Placobdella, we recovered a genus-specific duplication of the trnD gene located between cox2 and atp8. We performed phylogenetic analyses using 12 protein-coding genes and expanded our taxon sampling by including GenBank sequences for 39 taxa; the analyses confirm the monophyletic status of Clitellata, yet disagree in several respects with other phylogenetic hypotheses based on morphology and analyses of non-mitochondrial data.

  8. Comparative Mitogenomics of Leeches (Annelida: Clitellata): Genome Conservation and Placobdella-Specific trnD Gene Duplication.

    PubMed

    Oceguera-Figueroa, Alejandro; Manzano-Marín, Alejandro; Kvist, Sebastian; Moya, Andrés; Siddall, Mark E; Latorre, Amparo

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences, often in combination with nuclear markers and morphological data, are frequently used to unravel the phylogenetic relationships, population dynamics and biogeographic histories of a plethora of organisms. The information provided by examining complete mitochondrial genomes also enables investigation of other evolutionary events such as gene rearrangements, gene duplication and gene loss. Despite efforts to generate information to represent most of the currently recognized groups, some taxa are underrepresented in mitochondrial genomic databases. One such group is leeches (Annelida: Hirudinea: Clitellata). Herein, we expand our knowledge concerning leech mitochondrial makeup including gene arrangement, gene duplication and the evolution of mitochondrial genomes by adding newly sequenced mitochondrial genomes for three bloodfeeding species: Haementeria officinalis, Placobdella lamothei and Placobdella parasitica. With the inclusion of three new mitochondrial genomes of leeches, a better understanding of evolution for this organelle within the group is emerging. We found that gene order and genomic arrangement in the three new mitochondrial genomes is identical to previously sequenced members of Clitellata. Interestingly, within Placobdella, we recovered a genus-specific duplication of the trnD gene located between cox2 and atp8. We performed phylogenetic analyses using 12 protein-coding genes and expanded our taxon sampling by including GenBank sequences for 39 taxa; the analyses confirm the monophyletic status of Clitellata, yet disagree in several respects with other phylogenetic hypotheses based on morphology and analyses of non-mitochondrial data. PMID:27176910

  9. Conserved Gene Regulatory Function of the Carboxy-Terminal Domain of Dictyostelid C-Module-Binding Factor

    PubMed Central

    Schmith, Anika; Groth, Marco; Ratka, Josephine; Gatz, Sara; Spaller, Thomas; Siol, Oliver; Glöckner, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    C-module-binding factor A (CbfA) is a jumonji-type transcription regulator that is important for maintaining the expression and mobility of the retrotransposable element TRE5-A in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. CbfA-deficient cells have lost TRE5-A retrotransposition, are impaired in the ability to feed on bacteria, and do not enter multicellular development because of a block in cell aggregation. In this study, we performed Illumina RNA-seq of growing CbfA mutant cells to obtain a list of CbfA-regulated genes. We demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA alone is sufficient to mediate most CbfA-dependent gene expression. The carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA from the distantly related social amoeba Polysphondylium pallidum restored the expression of CbfA-dependent genes in the D. discoideum CbfA mutant, indicating a deep conservation in the gene regulatory function of this domain in the dictyostelid clade. The CbfA-like protein CbfB displays ∼25% sequence identity with CbfA in the amino-terminal region, which contains a JmjC domain and two zinc finger regions and is thought to mediate chromatin-remodeling activity. In contrast to CbfA proteins, where the carboxy-terminal domains are strictly conserved in all dictyostelids, CbfB proteins have completely unrelated carboxy-terminal domains. Outside the dictyostelid clade, CbfA-like proteins with the CbfA-archetypical JmjC/zinc finger arrangement and individual carboxy-terminal domains are prominent in filamentous fungi but are not found in yeasts, plants, and metazoans. Our data suggest that two functional regions of the CbfA-like proteins evolved at different rates to allow the occurrence of species-specific adaptation processes during genome evolution. PMID:23355006

  10. Regulation of carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis genes and identification of an evolutionarily conserved gene required for bacteriochlorophyll accumulation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, G A; Cook, D N; Ma, D; Alberti, M; Burke, D H; Hearst, J E

    1993-05-01

    The temporal expression of ten clustered genes required for carotenoid (crt) and bacteriochlorophyll (bch) biosynthesis was examined during the transition from aerobic respiration to anaerobiosis requisite for the development of the photosynthetic membrane in the bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. Accumulation of crtA, crtC, crtD, crtE, crtF, crtK, bchC and bchD mRNAs increased transiently and coordinately, up to 12-fold following removal of oxygen from the growth medium, paralleling increases in mRNAs encoding pigment-binding polypeptides of the photosynthetic apparatus. The crtB and crtI genes, in contrast, were expressed similarly in the presence or absence of oxygen. The regulation patterns of promoters for the crtA and crtI genes and the bchCXYZ operon were characterized using lacZ transcriptional fusion and qualitatively reflected the corresponding mRNA accumulation patterns. We also report that the bchI gene product, encoded by a DNA sequence previously considered to be a portion of crtA, shares 49% sequence identity with the nuclear-encoded Arabidopsis thaliana Cs chloroplast protein required for normal pigmentation in plants.

  11. Kullback-Leibler information for ordering genes using sperm typing and radiation-hybrid mapping. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Chernoff, H.

    1991-10-01

    Two technologies applicable to gene mapping are those of sperm typing and radiation hybrid mapping. Sperm typing makes use of the polymerase chain reaction, a biochemical technique which allows enormous amplification (production of multiple copies) of small, selected DNA fragments from a single chromosome. A sample of sperm from a single donor is analyzed to see which alleles (distinct forms of the various genes) are present in the individual sperms. The frequencies with which the various possibilities occur can be used to supply estimates of the ordering and of the recombination probabilities among the genes for which that donor is heterozygous (having different alleles of the same gene.)

  12. An expanded inventory of conserved meiotic genes provides evidence for sex in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Malik, Shehre-Banoo; Pightling, Arthur W; Stefaniak, Lauren M; Schurko, Andrew M; Logsdon, John M

    2008-01-01

    Meiosis is a defining feature of eukaryotes but its phylogenetic distribution has not been broadly determined, especially among eukaryotic microorganisms (i.e. protists)-which represent the majority of eukaryotic 'supergroups'. We surveyed genomes of animals, fungi, plants and protists for meiotic genes, focusing on the evolutionarily divergent parasitic protist Trichomonas vaginalis. We identified homologs of 29 components of the meiotic recombination machinery, as well as the synaptonemal and meiotic sister chromatid cohesion complexes. T. vaginalis has orthologs of 27 of 29 meiotic genes, including eight of nine genes that encode meiosis-specific proteins in model organisms. Although meiosis has not been observed in T. vaginalis, our findings suggest it is either currently sexual or a recent asexual, consistent with observed, albeit unusual, sexual cycles in their distant parabasalid relatives, the hypermastigotes. T. vaginalis may use meiotic gene homologs to mediate homologous recombination and genetic exchange. Overall, this expanded inventory of meiotic genes forms a useful "meiosis detection toolkit". Our analyses indicate that these meiotic genes arose, or were already present, early in eukaryotic evolution; thus, the eukaryotic cenancestor contained most or all components of this set and was likely capable of performing meiotic recombination using near-universal meiotic machinery. PMID:18663385

  13. An expanded inventory of conserved meiotic genes provides evidence for sex in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Malik, Shehre-Banoo; Pightling, Arthur W; Stefaniak, Lauren M; Schurko, Andrew M; Logsdon, John M

    2008-01-01

    Meiosis is a defining feature of eukaryotes but its phylogenetic distribution has not been broadly determined, especially among eukaryotic microorganisms (i.e. protists)-which represent the majority of eukaryotic 'supergroups'. We surveyed genomes of animals, fungi, plants and protists for meiotic genes, focusing on the evolutionarily divergent parasitic protist Trichomonas vaginalis. We identified homologs of 29 components of the meiotic recombination machinery, as well as the synaptonemal and meiotic sister chromatid cohesion complexes. T. vaginalis has orthologs of 27 of 29 meiotic genes, including eight of nine genes that encode meiosis-specific proteins in model organisms. Although meiosis has not been observed in T. vaginalis, our findings suggest it is either currently sexual or a recent asexual, consistent with observed, albeit unusual, sexual cycles in their distant parabasalid relatives, the hypermastigotes. T. vaginalis may use meiotic gene homologs to mediate homologous recombination and genetic exchange. Overall, this expanded inventory of meiotic genes forms a useful "meiosis detection toolkit". Our analyses indicate that these meiotic genes arose, or were already present, early in eukaryotic evolution; thus, the eukaryotic cenancestor contained most or all components of this set and was likely capable of performing meiotic recombination using near-universal meiotic machinery.

  14. A conserved gene regulatory network subcircuit drives different developmental fates in the vegetal pole of highly divergent echinoderm embryos.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Brenna S; Weideman, Erin P; Hinman, Veronica F

    2010-04-15

    Comparisons of orthologous developmental gene regulatory networks (GRNs) from different organisms explain how transcriptional regulation can, or cannot, change over time to cause morphological evolution and stasis. Here, we examine a subset of the GRN connections in the central vegetal pole mesoderm of the late sea star blastula and compare them to the GRN for the same embryonic territory of sea urchins. In modern sea urchins, this territory gives rise to skeletogenic mesoderm; in sea stars, it develops into other mesodermal derivatives. Orthologs of many transcription factors that function in the sea urchin skeletogenic mesoderm are co-expressed in the sea star vegetal pole, although this territory does not form a larval skeleton. Systematic perturbation of erg, hex, tbr, and tgif gene function was used to construct a snapshot of the sea star mesoderm GRN. A comparison of this network to the sea urchin skeletogenic mesoderm GRN revealed a conserved, recursively wired subcircuit operating in both organisms. We propose that, while these territories have evolved different functions in sea urchins and sea stars, this subcircuit is part of an ancestral GRN governing echinoderm vegetal pole mesoderm development. The positive regulatory feedback between these transcription factors may explain the conservation of this subcircuit.

  15. Automated conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) discovery reveals differences in gene content and promoter evolution among grasses

    PubMed Central

    Turco, Gina; Schnable, James C.; Pedersen, Brent; Freeling, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Conserved non-coding sequences (CNS) are islands of non-coding sequence that, like protein coding exons, show less divergence in sequence between related species than functionless DNA. Several CNSs have been demonstrated experimentally to function as cis-regulatory regions. However, the specific functions of most CNSs remain unknown. Previous searches for CNS in plants have either anchored on exons and only identified nearby sequences or required years of painstaking manual annotation. Here we present an open source tool that can accurately identify CNSs between any two related species with sequenced genomes, including both those immediately adjacent to exons and distal sequences separated by >12 kb of non-coding sequence. We have used this tool to characterize new motifs, associate CNSs with additional functions, and identify previously undetected genes encoding RNA and protein in the genomes of five grass species. We provide a list of 15,363 orthologous CNSs conserved across all grasses tested. We were also able to identify regulatory sequences present in the common ancestor of grasses that have been lost in one or more extant grass lineages. Lists of orthologous gene pairs and associated CNSs are provided for reference inbred lines of arabidopsis, Japonica rice, foxtail millet, sorghum, brachypodium, and maize. PMID:23874343

  16. Pleiotropic effect of disrupting a conserved sequence involved in a long-range compensatory interaction in the Drosophila Adh gene.

    PubMed Central

    Baines, John F; Parsch, John; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental analyses of the evolution of RNA secondary structures suggest a more complex scenario than that typically considered by Kimura's classical model of compensatory evolution. In this study, we examine one such case in more detail. Previous experimental analysis of long-range compensatory interactions between the two ends of Drosophila Adh mRNA failed to fit the classical model of compensatory evolution. To further investigate and verify long-range pairing in Drosophila Adh with respect to models of compensatory evolution and its potential functional role, we introduced site-directed mutations in the Drosophila melanogaster Adh gene. We explore two alternative hypotheses for why previous analysis of long-range compensatory interactions failed to fit the classical model. Specifically, we investigate whether the disruption of a conserved short-range pairing within Adh exon 2 has an effect on Adh expression or if there is a dual functional role of a conserved sequence in the 3'-UTR in both long-range pairing and the negative regulation of Adh expression. We find that a classical result was not observed due to the pleiotropic effect of changing a nucleotide involved in both long-range base pairing and the negative regulation of gene expression. PMID:15020421

  17. Anxa4 Genes are Expressed in Distinct Organ Systems in Xenopus laevis and tropicalis But are Functionally Conserved

    PubMed Central

    Massé, Karine L; Collins, Robert J; Bhamra, Surinder; Seville, Rachel A

    2007-01-01

    Anxa4 belongs to the multigenic annexin family of proteins which are characterized by their ability to interact with membranes in a calcium-dependent manner. Defined as a marker for polarized epithelial cells, Anxa4 is believed to be involved in many cellular processes but its functions in vivo are still poorly understood. Previously, we cloned Xanx4 in Xenopus laevis (now referred to as anxa4a) and demonstrated its role during organogenesis of the pronephros, providing the first evidence of a specific function for this protein during the development of a vertebrate. Here, we describe the strict conservation of protein sequence and functional domains of anxa4 during vertebrate evolution. We also identify the paralog of anxa4a, anxa4b and show its specific temporal and spatial expression pattern is different from anxa4a. We show that anxa4 orthologs in X. laevis and tropicalis display expression domains in different organ systems. Whilst the anxa4a gene is mainly expressed in the kidney, Xt anxa4 is expressed in the liver. Finally, we demonstrate Xt anxa4 and anxa4a can display conserved function during kidney organogenesis, despite the fact that Xt anxa4 transcripts are not expressed in this domain. This study highlights the divergence of expression of homologous genes during Xenopus evolution and raises the potential problems of using X. tropicalis promoters in X. laevis. PMID:19279706

  18. Computational identification and characterization of conserved miRNAs and their target genes in beet (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Li, J L; Cui, J; Cheng, D Y

    2015-08-07

    Highly conserved endogenous non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in plants and animals by silencing genes via destruction or blocking of translation of homologous mRNA. Sugar beet, Beta vulgaris, is one of the most important sugar crops in China, with properties that include wide adaptability and strong tolerance to salinity and impoverished soils. Seedlings of B. vulgaris can grow in soils containing up to 0.6% salt; it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms of salt tolerance to enrich genetic resources for breeding salt-tolerant sugar beets. Here, we report 13 mature miRNAs from 12 families, predicted using an in silico approach from 29,857 expressed sequence tags and 279,223 genome survey sequences. The psRNATarget server predicted 25 target genes for the 13 miRNAs. Most of the target genes appeared to encode transcription factors or were involved in metabolism, signal transduction, stress response, growth, and development. These results improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of miRNA in beet and may aid in the development of novel and precise techniques for understanding post-transcriptional gene-silencing mechanisms in response to stress tolerance.

  19. Autosomal location of genes from the conserved mammalian X in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus): implications for mammalian sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Waters, Paul D; Delbridge, Margaret L; Deakin, Janine E; El-Mogharbel, Nisrine; Kirby, Patrick J; Carvalho-Silva, Denise R; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian sex chromosomes evolved from an ancient autosomal pair. Mapping of human X- and Y-borne genes in distantly related mammals and non-mammalian vertebrates has proved valuable to help deduce the evolution of this unique part of the genome. The platypus, a monotreme mammal distantly related to eutherians and marsupials, has an extraordinary sex chromosome system comprising five X and five Y chromosomes that form a translocation chain at male meiosis. The largest X chromosome (X1), which lies at one end of the chain, has considerable homology to the human X. Using comparative mapping and the emerging chicken database, we demonstrate that part of the therian X chromosome, previously thought to be conserved across all mammals, was lost from the platypus X1 to an autosome. This region included genes flanking the XIST locus, and also genes with Y-linked homologues that are important to male reproduction in therians. Since these genes lie on the X in marsupials and eutherians, and also on the homologous region of chicken chromosome 4, this represents a loss from the monotreme X rather than an additional evolutionary stratum of the human X. PMID:15973504

  20. Conserved factor Dhp1/Rat1/Xrn2 triggers premature transcription termination and nucleates heterochromatin to promote gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Chalamcharla, Venkata R.; Folco, H. Diego; Dhakshnamoorthy, Jothy; Grewal, Shiv I. S.

    2015-01-01

    Cotranscriptional RNA processing and surveillance factors mediate heterochromatin formation in diverse eukaryotes. In fission yeast, RNAi machinery and RNA elimination factors including the Mtl1–Red1 core and the exosome are involved in facultative heterochromatin assembly; however, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that RNA elimination factors cooperate with the conserved exoribonuclease Dhp1/Rat1/Xrn2, which couples pre-mRNA 3′-end processing to transcription termination, to promote premature termination and facultative heterochromatin formation at meiotic genes. We also find that Dhp1 is critical for RNAi-mediated heterochromatin assembly at retroelements and regulated gene loci and facilitates the formation of constitutive heterochromatin at centromeric and mating-type loci. Remarkably, our results reveal that Dhp1 interacts with the Clr4/Suv39h methyltransferase complex and acts directly to nucleate heterochromatin. Our work uncovers a previously unidentified role for 3′-end processing and transcription termination machinery in gene silencing through premature termination and suggests that noncanonical transcription termination by Dhp1 and RNA elimination factors is linked to heterochromatin assembly. These findings have important implications for understanding silencing mechanisms targeting genes and repeat elements in higher eukaryotes. PMID:26631744

  1. cDNA sequence, genomic organization, and evolutionary conservation of a novel gene from the WAGR region

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, F.; Eisenman, R.; Knoll, J.; Bruns, G.

    1995-09-20

    A new gene (239FB) with predominant and differential expression in fetal brain has recently been isolated from a chromosome 11p13-p14 boundary area near FSHB. The corresponding mRNA has an open reading frame of 294 amino acids, a 3` untranslated region of 1247 nucleotides, and a highly GC-rich 5` untranslated region. The coding and 3` UT sequence is specified by 6 exons within nearly 87 kb of isolated genomic locus. The 5` end region of the transcript maps adjacent to the only genomically defined CpG island in a chromosomal subregion that may be associated with part of the mental retardation of some WAGR (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genitourinary anomalies, and mental retardation) syndrome patients. In addition to nucleotide and amino acid similarity to an EST from a normalized infant brain cDNA library, the predicted protein has extensive similarity to Caenorhbditis elegans polypeptides of, as yet, unknown function. The 239FB locus is, therefore, likely part of a family of genes with two members expressed in human brain. The extensive conservation of the predicted protein suggests a fundamental function of the gene product and will enable evaluation of the role of the 239FB gene in neurogenesis in model organisms. 48 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Different Sets of Post-Embryonic Development Genes Are Conserved or Lost in Two Caryophyllales Species (Reaumuria soongorica and Agriophyllum squarrosum).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pengshan; Zhang, Jiwei; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Guoxiong; Ma, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Reaumuria soongorica and sand rice (Agriophyllum squarrosum) belong to the clade of Caryophyllales and are widely distributed in the desert regions of north China. Both plants have evolved many specific traits and adaptation strategies to cope with recurring environmental threats. However, the genetic basis that underpins their unique traits and adaptation remains unknown. In this study, the transcriptome data of R. soongorica and sand rice were compared with three other species with previously sequenced genomes (Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, and Beta vulgaris). Four different gene sets were identified, namely, the genes conserved in both species, those lost in both species, those conserved in R. soongorica only, and those conserved in sand rice only. Gene ontology showed that post-embryonic development genes (PEDGs) were enriched in all gene sets, and different sets of PEDGs were conserved or lost in both the R. soongorica and sand rice genomes. Expression profiles of Arabidopsis orthologs further provided some clues to the function of the species-specific conserved PEDGs. Such orthologs included LEAFY PETIOLE, which could be a candidate gene involved in the development of branch priority in sand rice. PMID:26815143

  3. Different Sets of Post-Embryonic Development Genes Are Conserved or Lost in Two Caryophyllales Species (Reaumuria soongorica and Agriophyllum squarrosum)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pengshan; Zhang, Jiwei; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Guoxiong; Ma, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Reaumuria soongorica and sand rice (Agriophyllum squarrosum) belong to the clade of Caryophyllales and are widely distributed in the desert regions of north China. Both plants have evolved many specific traits and adaptation strategies to cope with recurring environmental threats. However, the genetic basis that underpins their unique traits and adaptation remains unknown. In this study, the transcriptome data of R. soongorica and sand rice were compared with three other species with previously sequenced genomes (Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, and Beta vulgaris). Four different gene sets were identified, namely, the genes conserved in both species, those lost in both species, those conserved in R. soongorica only, and those conserved in sand rice only. Gene ontology showed that post-embryonic development genes (PEDGs) were enriched in all gene sets, and different sets of PEDGs were conserved or lost in both the R. soongorica and sand rice genomes. Expression profiles of Arabidopsis orthologs further provided some clues to the function of the species-specific conserved PEDGs. Such orthologs included LEAFY PETIOLE, which could be a candidate gene involved in the development of branch priority in sand rice. PMID:26815143

  4. Short-tailed stx phages exploit the conserved YaeT protein to disseminate Shiga toxin genes among enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darren L; James, Chloë E; Sergeant, Martin J; Yaxian, Yan; Saunders, Jon R; McCarthy, Alan J; Allison, Heather E

    2007-10-01

    Infection of Escherichia coli by Shiga toxin-encoding bacteriophages (Stx phages) was the pivotal event in the evolution of the deadly Shiga toxin-encoding E. coli (STEC), of which serotype O157:H7 is the most notorious. The number of different bacterial species and strains reported to produce Shiga toxin is now more than 500, since the first reported STEC infection outbreak in 1982. Clearly, Stx phages are spreading rapidly, but the underlying mechanism for this dissemination has not been explained. Here we show that an essential and highly conserved gene product, YaeT, which has an essential role in the insertion of proteins in the gram-negative bacterial outer membrane, is the surface molecule recognized by the majority (ca. 70%) of Stx phages via conserved tail spike proteins associated with a short-tailed morphology. The yaeT gene was initially identified through complementation, and its role was confirmed in phage binding assays with and without anti-YaeT antiserum. Heterologous cloning of E. coli yaeT to enable Stx phage adsorption to Erwinia carotovora and the phage adsorption patterns of bacterial species possessing natural yaeT variants further supported this conclusion. The use of an essential and highly conserved protein by the majority of Stx phages is a strategy that has enabled and promoted the rapid spread of shigatoxigenic potential throughout multiple E. coli serogroups and related bacterial species. Infection of commensal bacteria in the mammalian gut has been shown to amplify Shiga toxin production in vivo, and the data from this study provide a platform for the development of a therapeutic strategy to limit this YaeT-mediated infection of the commensal flora.

  5. Energy-momentum conserving higher-order time integration of nonlinear dynamics of finite elastic fiber-reinforced continua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erler, Norbert; Groß, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Since many years the relevance of fibre-reinforced polymers is steadily increasing in fields of engineering, especially in aircraft and automotive industry. Due to the high strength in fibre direction, but the possibility of lightweight construction, these composites replace more and more traditional materials as metals. Fibre-reinforced polymers are often manufactured from glass or carbon fibres as attachment parts or from steel or nylon cord as force transmission parts. Attachment parts are mostly subjected to small strains, but force transmission parts usually suffer large deformations in at least one direction. Here, a geometrically nonlinear formulation is necessary. Typical examples are helicopter rotor blades, where the fibres have the function to stabilize the structure in order to counteract large centrifugal forces. For long-run analyses of rotor blade deformations, we have to apply numerically stable time integrators for anisotropic materials. This paper presents higher-order accurate and numerically stable time stepping schemes for nonlinear elastic fibre-reinforced continua with anisotropic stress behaviour.

  6. Climate-Driven Reshuffling of Species and Genes: Potential Conservation Roles for Species Translocations and Recombinant Hybrid Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Scriber, Jon Mark

    2013-01-01

    Comprising 50%-75% of the world's fauna, insects are a prominent part of biodiversity in communities and ecosystems globally. Biodiversity across all levels of biological classifications is fundamentally based on genetic diversity. However, the integration of genomics and phylogenetics into conservation management may not be as rapid as climate change. The genetics of hybrid introgression as a source of novel variation for ecological divergence and evolutionary speciation (and resilience) may generate adaptive potential and diversity fast enough to respond to locally-altered environmental conditions. Major plant and herbivore hybrid zones with associated communities deserve conservation consideration. This review addresses functional genetics across multi-trophic-level interactions including "invasive species" in various ecosystems as they may become disrupted in different ways by rapid climate change. "Invasive genes" (into new species and populations) need to be recognized for their positive creative potential and addressed in conservation programs. "Genetic rescue" via hybrid translocations may provide needed adaptive flexibility for rapid adaptation to environmental change. While concerns persist for some conservationists, this review emphasizes the positive aspects of hybrids and hybridization. Specific implications of natural genetic introgression are addressed with a few examples from butterflies, including transgressive phenotypes and climate-driven homoploid recombinant hybrid speciation. Some specific examples illustrate these points using the swallowtail butterflies (Papilionidae) with their long-term historical data base (phylogeographical diversity changes) and recent (3-decade) climate-driven temporal and genetic divergence in recombinant homoploid hybrids and relatively recent hybrid speciation of Papilio appalachiensis in North America. Climate-induced "reshuffling" (recombinations) of species composition, genotypes, and genomes may become

  7. The bi-Hamiltonian structure of some nonlinear fifth- and seventh-order differential equations and recursion formulas for their symmetries and conserved covariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchssteiner, Benno; Oevel, Walter

    1982-03-01

    Using a bi-Hamiltonian formulation we give explicit formulas for the conserved quantities and infinitesimal generators of symmetries for some nonlinear fifth- and seventh-order nonlinear partial differential equations; among them, the Caudrey-Dodd-Gibbon-Sawada-Kotera equation and the Kupershmidt equation. We show that the Lie algebras of the symmetry groups of these equations are of a very special form: Among the C∞ vector fields they are generated from two given commuting vector fields by a recursive application of a single operator. Furthermore, for some higher order equations, those multisoliton solutions, which for ||t||→∞ asymptotically decompose into traveling wave solutions, are characterized as eigenvector decompositions of certain operators.

  8. A zebrafish screen for craniofacial mutants identifies wdr68 as a highly conserved gene required for endothelin-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Robert M; Amsterdam, Adam; Hopkins, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    % of the essential genes required for craniofacial development. The identification of zebrafish models for two human disease syndromes indicates that homologs to the other genes are likely to also be relevant for human craniofacial development. The initial characterization of wdr68 suggests an important role in craniofacial development for the highly conserved Wdr68-Dyrk1 protein complexes. PMID:16759393

  9. Sequence conservation of the 12D3 gene in Mexican isolates of Babesia bovis.

    PubMed

    Perez, J; Javier Perez, J; Vargas, P; Antonio Alvarez, J; Rojas, C; Figueroa, J V

    2010-04-01

    The 12D3 antigen present in Babesia bovis has been evaluated as a recombinant vaccine candidate and the 12d3 coding sequence has been reported for an Australian and an USA (Texas) isolate of B. bovis. However, no approach has been conducted to perform analysis of 12d3 sequence conservation on a larger number of B. bovis isolates. This could provide important information to determine whether a recombinant vaccine containing this antigen could be widely used. This study reports the cloning and sequencing analysis of the 12d3 coding region in 20 different B. bovis isolates collected from various geographical regions in the tropics and subtropics of Mexico. Comparative analysis of the consensus nucleotide sequences obtained for each isolate revealed a high degree of conservation (94-99% sequence identity) among the 12d3 alleles present in the Mexican isolates when compared with the 12d3 ORF sequences from the Texan (T2Bo) B. bovis isolate. Similarly, BLASTX sequence homology search showed a high percent identity (93-99%) of the deduced amino acid 12D3 sequence as compared with the T2Bo isolate sequence. The high level of sequence conservation in 12d3 among the 20 B. bovis isolates collected from geographically distant locations in Mexico suggests that there exists a minimal bovine-host immunological pressure which could be translated into antigenic diversity or variation, and most probably this is reflected in the non-inmunodominant characteristic of the 12D3 antigen as it has been previously described in the literature. 12D3 antigen can be considered as a viable candidate for inclusion in a recombinant vaccine for cattle babesiosis caused by B. bovis in Mexico.

  10. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the murine 2 P domain potassium channel gene Kcnk8: conservation of gene structure in 2 P domain potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Bockenhauer, D; Nimmakayalu, M A; Ward, D C; Goldstein, S A; Gallagher, P G

    2000-12-31

    A 2 P domain potassium channel expressed in eye, lung, and stomach, Kcnk8, has recently been identified. To initiate further biochemical and genetic studies of this channel, we assembled the murine Kcnk8 cDNA sequence, characterized the genomic structure of the Kcnk8 gene, determined its chromosomal localization, and analyzed its activity in a Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system. The composite cDNA has an open reading frame of 1029 bp and encodes a protein of 343 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 36 kDa. Structure analyses predict 2 P domains and four potential transmembrane helices with a potential single EF-hand motif and four potential SH3-binding motifs in the COOH-terminus. Cloning of the Kcnk8 chromosomal gene revealed that it is composed of three exons distributed over 4 kb of genomic DNA. Genome database searching revealed that one of the intron/exon boundaries identified in Kcnk8 is present in other mammalian 2 P domain potassium channels genes and many C. elegans 2P domain potassium channel genes, revealing evolutionary conservation of gene structure. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, the murine Kcnk8 gene was mapped to chromosome 19, 2B, the locus of the murine dancer phenotype, and syntenic to 11q11-11q13, the location of the human homologue. No significant currents were generated in a Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system using the composite Kcnk8 cDNA sequence, suggesting, like many potassium channels, additional channel subunits, modulator substances, or cellular chaperones are required for channel function.

  11. Conservative Inheritance of Newly Synthesized DNA in Double-Strand Break-Induced Gene Conversion▿

    PubMed Central

    Ira, Grzegorz; Satory, Dominik; Haber, James E.

    2006-01-01

    To distinguish among possible mechanisms of repair of a double-strand break (DSB) by gene conversion in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we employed isotope density transfer to analyze budding yeast mating type (MAT) gene switching in G2/M-arrested cells. Both of the newly synthesized DNA strands created during gene conversion are found at the repaired locus, leaving the donor unchanged. These results support suggestions that mitotic DSBs are primarily repaired by a synthesis-dependent strand-annealing mechanism. We also show that the proportion of crossing-over associated with DSB-induced ectopic recombination is not affected by the presence of nonhomologous sequences at one or both ends of the DSB or the presence of additional sequences that must be copied from the donor. PMID:17030630

  12. Conserved structure and varied expression reveal key roles of phosphoglucan phosphatase gene starch excess 4 in barley.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Jiang, Qian-Tao; Wei, Long; Yang, Qiang; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Peng, Yuan-Ying; Chen, Guo-Yue; Wei, Yu-Ming; Liu, Chunji; Zheng, You-Liang

    2014-12-01

    As one of the phosphoglucan phosphatases, starch excess 4 (SEX4) encoded by SEX4 gene has recently been intensively studied because of its vital role in the degradation of leaf starch. In this study, we isolated and chromosomally mapped barley SEX4, characterized its gene and protein structure, predicted the cis-elements of its promoter, and analysed its expression based on real-time quantitative PCR and publically available microarray data. The full length of barely SEX4 (HvSEX4) was 4,598 bp and it was mapped on the long arm of chromosome 4H (4HL). This gene contained 14 exons and 13 introns in all but two of the species analysed, Arabidopsis (13 exons and 12 introns) and Oryza brachyantha (12 exons and 11 introns). An exon-intron junction composed of intron 4 to intron 7 and exon 5 to exon 8 was highly conserved among the analysed species. SEX4 is characterized with conserved functional domains (dual specificity phosphatase domain and carbohydrate-binding module 48) and varied chloroplast transit peptide and C-terminal. Expression analyses indicated that: (1) SEX4 was mainly expressed in anthers of barley, young leaf and anthers of rice, and leaf of Arabidopsis; (2) it exhibited a diurnal pattern in barley, rice and Arabidopsis; (3) significant difference in the expression of SEX4 was not detected for either barley or rice under any of the investigated stresses; and (4) it was significantly down-regulated at middle stage and up-regulated at late stage under cold treatment, down-regulated at early stage under heat treatment, and up-regulated at late stage under salt treatment in Arabidopsis. The strong relationships detected in the current study between SEX4 and glucan, water dikinases (GWD) or phosphoglucan, water dikinases (PWD) were discussed. Collectively, our results provide insights into genetic manipulation of SEX4, especially in monocotyledon and uncovering the possible roles of SEX4 in plant development.

  13. A survey of well conserved families of C2H2 zinc-finger genes in Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A recent comparative genomic analysis tentatively identified roughly 40 orthologous groups of C2H2 Zinc-finger proteins that are well conserved in "bilaterians" (i.e. worms, flies, and humans). Here we extend that analysis to include a second arthropod genome from the crustacean, Daphnia pulex. Results Most of the 40 orthologous groups of C2H2 zinc-finger proteins are represented by just one or two proteins within each of the previously surveyed species. Likewise, Daphnia were found to possess a similar number of orthologs for all of these small orthology groups. In contrast, the number of Sp/KLF homologs tends to be greater and to vary between species. Like the corresponding mammalian Sp/KLF proteins, most of the Drosophila and Daphnia homologs can be placed into one of three sub-groups: Class I-III. Daphnia were found to have three Class I proteins that roughly correspond to their Drosophila counterparts, dSP1, btd, CG5669, and three Class II proteins that roughly correspond to Luna, CG12029, CG9895. However, Daphnia have four additional KLF-Class II proteins that are most similar to the vertebrate KLF1/2/4 proteins, a subset not found in Drosophila. Two of these four proteins are encoded by genes linked in tandem. Daphnia also have three KLF-Class III members, one more than Drosophila. One of these is a likely Bteb2 homolog, while the other two correspond to Cabot and KLF13, a vertebrate homolog of Cabot. Conclusion Consistent with their likely roles as fundamental determinants of bilaterian form and function, most of the 40 groups of C2H2 zinc-finger proteins are conserved in kind and number in Daphnia. However, the KLF family includes several additional genes that are most similar to genes present in vertebrates but missing in Drosophila. PMID:20433734

  14. Conservation of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene in mice and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.P.; Monaco, A.P.; Feener, C.C.; Kunkel, L.M.

    1987-10-16

    A portion of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene transcript from human fetal skeletal muscle and mouse adult heart was sequence, representing approximately 25 percent of the total, 14-kb DMD transcript. The nucleic acid and predicted amino acid sequences from the two species are nearly 90 percent homologous. The amino acid sequence that is predicted from this portion of the DMD gene indicates that the protein product might serve a structural role in muscle, but the abundance and tissue distribution of the messenger RNA suggest that the DMD protein is not nebulin.

  15. Phylogeny of Syndermata (syn. Rotifera): Mitochondrial gene order verifies epizoic Seisonidea as sister to endoparasitic Acanthocephala within monophyletic Hemirotifera.

    PubMed

    Sielaff, Malte; Schmidt, Hanno; Struck, Torsten H; Rosenkranz, David; Mark Welch, David B; Hankeln, Thomas; Herlyn, Holger

    2016-03-01

    A monophyletic origin of endoparasitic thorny-headed worms (Acanthocephala) and wheel-animals (Rotifera) is widely accepted. However, the phylogeny inside the clade, be it called Syndermata or Rotifera, has lacked validation by mitochondrial (mt) data. Herein, we present the first mt genome of the key taxon Seison and report conflicting results of phylogenetic analyses: while mt sequence-based topologies showed monophyletic Lemniscea (Bdelloidea+Acanthocephala), gene order analyses supported monophyly of Pararotatoria (Seisonidea+Acanthocephala) and Hemirotifera (Bdelloidea+Pararotatoria). Sequence-based analyses obviously suffered from substitution saturation, compositional bias, and branch length heterogeneity; however, we observed no compromising effects in gene order analyses. Moreover, gene order-based topologies were robust to changes in coding (genes vs. gene pairs, two-state vs. multistate, aligned vs. non-aligned), tree reconstruction methods, and the treatment of the two monogonont mt genomes. Thus, mt gene order verifies seisonids as sister to acanthocephalans within monophyletic Hemirotifera, while deviating results of sequence-based analyses reflect artificial signal. This conclusion implies that the complex life cycle of extant acanthocephalans evolved from a free-living state, as retained by most monogononts and bdelloids, via an epizoic state with a simple life cycle, as shown by seisonids. Hence, Acanthocephala represent a rare example where ancestral transitional stages have counterparts amongst the closest relatives. PMID:26702959

  16. Phylogeny and mitochondrial gene order variation in Lophotrochozoa in the light of new mitogenomic data from Nemertea

    PubMed Central

    Podsiadlowski, Lars; Braband, Anke; Struck, Torsten H; von Döhren, Jörn; Bartolomaeus, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background The new animal phylogeny established several taxa which were not identified by morphological analyses, most prominently the Ecdysozoa (arthropods, roundworms, priapulids and others) and Lophotrochozoa (molluscs, annelids, brachiopods and others). Lophotrochozoan interrelationships are under discussion, e.g. regarding the position of Nemertea (ribbon worms), which were discussed to be sister group to e.g. Mollusca, Brachiozoa or Platyhelminthes. Mitochondrial genomes contributed well with sequence data and gene order characters to the deep metazoan phylogeny debate. Results In this study we present the first complete mitochondrial genome record for a member of the Nemertea, Lineus viridis. Except two trnP and trnT, all genes are located on the same strand. While gene order is most similar to that of the brachiopod Terebratulina retusa, sequence based analyses of mitochondrial genes place nemerteans close to molluscs, phoronids and entoprocts without clear preference for one of these taxa as sister group. Conclusion Almost all recent analyses with large datasets show good support for a taxon comprising Annelida, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, Phoronida and Nemertea. But the relationships among these taxa vary between different studies. The analysis of gene order differences gives evidence for a multiple independent occurrence of a large inversion in the mitochondrial genome of Lophotrochozoa and a re-inversion of the same part in gastropods. We hypothesize that some regions of the genome have a higher chance for intramolecular recombination than others and gene order data have to be analysed carefully to detect convergent rearrangement events. PMID:19660126

  17. Phylogeny of Syndermata (syn. Rotifera): Mitochondrial gene order verifies epizoic Seisonidea as sister to endoparasitic Acanthocephala within monophyletic Hemirotifera.

    PubMed

    Sielaff, Malte; Schmidt, Hanno; Struck, Torsten H; Rosenkranz, David; Mark Welch, David B; Hankeln, Thomas; Herlyn, Holger

    2016-03-01

    A monophyletic origin of endoparasitic thorny-headed worms (Acanthocephala) and wheel-animals (Rotifera) is widely accepted. However, the phylogeny inside the clade, be it called Syndermata or Rotifera, has lacked validation by mitochondrial (mt) data. Herein, we present the first mt genome of the key taxon Seison and report conflicting results of phylogenetic analyses: while mt sequence-based topologies showed monophyletic Lemniscea (Bdelloidea+Acanthocephala), gene order analyses supported monophyly of Pararotatoria (Seisonidea+Acanthocephala) and Hemirotifera (Bdelloidea+Pararotatoria). Sequence-based analyses obviously suffered from substitution saturation, compositional bias, and branch length heterogeneity; however, we observed no compromising effects in gene order analyses. Moreover, gene order-based topologies were robust to changes in coding (genes vs. gene pairs, two-state vs. multistate, aligned vs. non-aligned), tree reconstruction methods, and the treatment of the two monogonont mt genomes. Thus, mt gene order verifies seisonids as sister to acanthocephalans within monophyletic Hemirotifera, while deviating results of sequence-based analyses reflect artificial signal. This conclusion implies that the complex life cycle of extant acanthocephalans evolved from a free-living state, as retained by most monogononts and bdelloids, via an epizoic state with a simple life cycle, as shown by seisonids. Hence, Acanthocephala represent a rare example where ancestral transitional stages have counterparts amongst the closest relatives.

  18. New insights into the wheat chromosome 4D structure and virtual gene order, revealed by survey pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Helguera, Marcelo; Rivarola, Máximo; Clavijo, Bernardo; Martis, Mihaela M.; Vanzetti, Leonardo S.; González, Sergio; Garbus, Ingrid; Leroy, Phillippe; Šimková, Hana; Valárik, Miroslav; Caccamo, Mario; Doležel, Jaroslav; Mayer, Klaus F.X.; Feuillet, Catherine; Tranquilli, Gabriela; Paniego, Norma; Echenique, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Survey sequencing of the bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genome (AABBDD) has been approached through different strategies delivering important information. However, the current wheat sequence knowledge is not complete. The aim of our study is to provide different and complementary set of data for chromosome 4D. A survey sequence was obtained by pyrosequencing of flow-sorted 4DS (7.2×) and 4DL (4.1×) arms. Single ends (SE) and long mate pairs (LMP) reads were assembled into contigs (223 Mb) and scaffolds (65 Mb) that were aligned to Aegilops tauschii draft genome (DD), anchoring 34 Mb to chromosome 4. Scaffolds annotation rendered 822 gene models. A virtual gene order comprising 1973 wheat orthologous gene loci and 381 wheat gene models was built. This order was largely consistent with the scaffold order determined based on a published high density map from the Ae. tauschii chromosome 4, using bin-mapped 4D ESTs as a common reference. The virtual order showed a higher collinearity with homeologous 4B compared to 4A. Additionally, a virtual map was constructed and ∼5700 genes (∼2200 on 4DS and ∼3500 on 4DL) predicted. The sequence and virtual order obtained here using the 454 platform were compared with the Illumina one used by the IWGSC, giving complementary information. PMID:25711827

  19. New insights into the wheat chromosome 4D structure and virtual gene order, revealed by survey pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Helguera, Marcelo; Rivarola, Máximo; Clavijo, Bernardo; Martis, Mihaela M; Vanzetti, Leonardo S; González, Sergio; Garbus, Ingrid; Leroy, Phillippe; Šimková, Hana; Valárik, Miroslav; Caccamo, Mario; Doležel, Jaroslav; Mayer, Klaus F X; Feuillet, Catherine; Tranquilli, Gabriela; Paniego, Norma; Echenique, Viviana

    2015-04-01

    Survey sequencing of the bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genome (AABBDD) has been approached through different strategies delivering important information. However, the current wheat sequence knowledge is not complete. The aim of our study is to provide different and complementary set of data for chromosome 4D. A survey sequence was obtained by pyrosequencing of flow-sorted 4DS (7.2×) and 4DL (4.1×) arms. Single ends (SE) and long mate pairs (LMP) reads were assembled into contigs (223Mb) and scaffolds (65Mb) that were aligned to Aegilops tauschii draft genome (DD), anchoring 34Mb to chromosome 4. Scaffolds annotation rendered 822 gene models. A virtual gene order comprising 1973 wheat orthologous gene loci and 381 wheat gene models was built. This order was largely consistent with the scaffold order determined based on a published high density map from the Ae. tauschii chromosome 4, using bin-mapped 4D ESTs as a common reference. The virtual order showed a higher collinearity with homeologous 4B compared to 4A. Additionally, a virtual map was constructed and ∼5700 genes (∼2200 on 4DS and ∼3500 on 4DL) predicted. The sequence and virtual order obtained here using the 454 platform were compared with the Illumina one used by the IWGSC, giving complementary information.

  20. Conservation of the genes for HC-toxin biosynthesis in Alternaria jesenskae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HC-toxin, a cyclic tetrapeptide, is a virulence determinant for the plant pathogenic fungus Cochliobolus carbonum. It was recently discovered that another fungus, Alternaria jesenskae, also produces HC-toxin. Results The major genes (collectively known as AjTOX2) involved in the biosynthesis of HC-toxin were identified from A. jesenskae by genomic sequencing. The encoded orthologous proteins share 75-85% amino acid identity, and the genes for HC-toxin biosynthesis are duplicated in both fungi. The genomic organization of the genes in the two fungi show a similar but not identical partial clustering arrangement. A set of representative housekeeping proteins show a similar high level of amino acid identity between C. carbonum and A. jesenskae, which is consistent with the close relatedness of these two genera within the family Pleosporaceae (Dothideomycetes). Conclusions This is the first report that the plant virulence factor HC-toxin is made by an organism other than C. carbonum. The genes may have moved by horizontal transfer between the two species, but it cannot be excluded that they were present in a common ancestor and lost from other species of Alternaria and Cochliobolus. PMID:23865912

  1. Transcriptome shock invokes disruption of parental expression-conserved genes in tetraploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huakun; Gou, Xiaowan; Zhang, Ai; Wang, Xutong; Zhao, Na; Dong, Yuzhu; Li, Linfeng; Liu, Bao

    2016-01-01

    Allopolyploidy often triggers phenotypic novelty and gene expression remolding in the resulting polyploids. In this study, we employed multiple phenotypic and genetic approaches to investigate the nature and consequences of allotetraploidization between A- and S-subgenome of tetraploid wheat. Results showed that karyotype of the nascent allopolyploid plants (AT2) is stable but they showed clear novelty in multiple morphological traits which might have positively contributed to the initial establishment of the tetraploids. Further microarray-based transcriptome profiling and gene-specific cDNA-pyrosequencing have documented that transcriptome shock was exceptionally strong in AT2, but a substantial proportion of the induced expression changes was rapidly stabilized in early generations. Meanwhile, both additive and nonadditive expression genes showed extensive homeolog expression remodeling and which have led to the subgenome expression dominance in leaf and young inflorescence of AT2. Through comparing the homeolog-expressing patterns between synthetic and natural tetraploid wheats, it appears that the shock-induced expression changes at both the total expression level and subgenome homeolog partitioning are evolutionarily persistent. Together, our study shed new light on how gene expression changes have rapidly occurred at the initial stage following allotetraploidization, as well as their evolutionary relevance, which may have implications for wheat improvements. PMID:27198893

  2. Evolutionary conservation of the insulinoma gene rig and its possible function

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, C.; Shiga, K.; Takasawa, S.; Kitagawa, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Okamoto, H.

    1987-10-01

    The authors have identified a gene, rig (rat insulinoma gene), that is activated in chemically induced rat insulinomas but not in normal pancreatic islets or in regenerating islets. In the present study, they have found that the insulinoma gene was activated in a BK virus-induced hamster insulinoma cell line and in a spontaneously occurring human insulinoma. From the hamster and human insulinoma cDNA libraries, rig homologues were isolated, and their nucleotide sequences were determined. In the same manner as the rat gene, both hamster and human homologues contained one open reading frame of 435 nucleotides, differing by 32- and 41-base substitutions, respectively. All the base substitutions were same-sense mutations. Accordingly, the deduced 145-amino acid sequence remained invariant in hamster, human, and rat insulinomas, suggesting that rig has evolved under extraordinarily strong selective constraints. Computerized structure analysis indicated that rig-encoded protein is a possible DNA-binding protein. The antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide complementary to hamster rig mRNA was synthesized and injected into the hamster insulinoma cells. The antisense rig oligodeoxyribouncleotide inhibited DNA synthesis in the insulinoma cells, whereas the sense rig oligodeoxyribonucleotide or antisense insulin oligodeoxyribonucleotide had no inhibitory effect. These results strongly suggest that the activation of rig is both common and potentially significant in the oncogenic growth of pancreatic B cells of islets of Langerhans.

  3. Transcriptome shock invokes disruption of parental expression-conserved genes in tetraploid wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huakun; Gou, Xiaowan; Zhang, Ai; Wang, Xutong; Zhao, Na; Dong, Yuzhu; Li, Linfeng; Liu, Bao

    2016-01-01

    Allopolyploidy often triggers phenotypic novelty and gene expression remolding in the resulting polyploids. In this study, we employed multiple phenotypic and genetic approaches to investigate the nature and consequences of allotetraploidization between A- and S-subgenome of tetraploid wheat. Results showed that karyotype of the nascent allopolyploid plants (AT2) is stable but they showed clear novelty in multiple morphological traits which might have positively contributed to the initial establishment of the tetraploids. Further microarray-based transcriptome profiling and gene-specific cDNA-pyrosequencing have documented that transcriptome shock was exceptionally strong in AT2, but a substantial proportion of the induced expression changes was rapidly stabilized in early generations. Meanwhile, both additive and nonadditive expression genes showed extensive homeolog expression remodeling and which have led to the subgenome expression dominance in leaf and young inflorescence of AT2. Through comparing the homeolog-expressing patterns between synthetic and natural tetraploid wheats, it appears that the shock-induced expression changes at both the total expression level and subgenome homeolog partitioning are evolutionarily persistent. Together, our study shed new light on how gene expression changes have rapidly occurred at the initial stage following allotetraploidization, as well as their evolutionary relevance, which may have implications for wheat improvements. PMID:27198893

  4. Sexually dimorphic gene expressions in eels: useful markers for early sex assessment in a conservation context

    PubMed Central

    Geffroy, Benjamin; Guilbaud, Florian; Amilhat, Elsa; Beaulaton, Laurent; Vignon, Matthias; Huchet, Emmanuel; Rives, Jacques; Bobe, Julien; Fostier, Alexis; Guiguen, Yann; Bardonnet, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Environmental sex determination (ESD) has been detected in a range of vertebrate reptile and fish species. Eels are characterized by an ESD that occurs relatively late, since sex cannot be histologically determined before individuals reach 28 cm. Because several eel species are at risk of extinction, assessing sex at the earliest stage is a crucial management issue. Based on preliminary results of RNA sequencing, we targeted genes susceptible to be differentially expressed between ovaries and testis at different stages of development. Using qPCR, we detected testis-specific expressions of dmrt1, amh, gsdf and pre-miR202 and ovary-specific expressions were obtained for zar1, zp3 and foxn5. We showed that gene expressions in the gonad of intersexual eels were quite similar to those of males, supporting the idea that intersexual eels represent a transitional stage towards testicular differentiation. To assess whether these genes would be effective early molecular markers, we sampled juvenile eels in two locations with highly skewed sex ratios. The combined expression of six of these genes allowed the discrimination of groups according to their potential future sex and thus this appears to be a useful tool to estimate sex ratios of undifferentiated juvenile eels. PMID:27658729

  5. Morgan’s Legacy: Fruit Flies and the Functional Annotation of Conserved Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bellen, Hugo J.; Yamamoto, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    In 1915, “The Mechanism of Mendelian Heredity” was published by four prominent Drosophila geneticists. They discovered that genes form linkage groups on chromosomes inherited in a Mendelian fashion and laid the genetic foundation that promoted Drosophila as a model organism. Flies continue to offer great opportunities, including studies in the field of functional genomics. PMID:26406362

  6. Divergent Expression Regulation of Gonad Development Genes in Medaka Shows Incomplete Conservation of the Downstream Regulatory Network of Vertebrate Sex Determination

    PubMed Central

    Herpin, Amaury; Adolfi, Mateus C.; Nicol, Barbara; Hinzmann, Maria; Schmidt, Cornelia; Klughammer, Johanna; Engel, Mareen; Tanaka, Minoru; Guiguen, Yann; Schartl, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Genetic control of male or female gonad development displays between different groups of organisms a remarkable diversity of “master sex-determining genes” at the top of the genetic hierarchies, whereas downstream components surprisingly appear to be evolutionarily more conserved. Without much further studies, conservation of sequence has been equalized to conservation of function. We have used the medaka fish to investigate the generality of this paradigm. In medaka, the master male sex-determining gene is dmrt1bY, a highly conserved downstream regulator of sex determination in vertebrates. To understand its function in orchestrating the complex gene regulatory network, we have identified targets genes and regulated pathways of Dmrt1bY. Monitoring gene expression and interactions by transgenic fluorescent reporter fish lines, in vivo tissue-chromatin immunoprecipitation and in vitro gene regulation assays revealed concordance but also major discrepancies between mammals and medaka, notably amongst spatial, temporal expression patterns and regulations of the canonical Hedgehog and R-spondin/Wnt/Follistatin signaling pathways. Examination of Foxl2 protein distribution in the medaka ovary defined a new subpopulation of theca cells, where ovarian-type aromatase transcriptional regulation appears to be independent of Foxl2. In summary, these data show that the regulation of the downstream regulatory network of sex determination is less conserved than previously thought. PMID:23883523

  7. Seminal-type ribonuclease genes in ruminants, sequence conservation without protein expression?

    PubMed

    Kleineidam, R G; Jekel, P A; Beintema, J J; Situmorang, P

    1999-04-29

    Bovine seminal ribonuclease (BS-RNase) is an interesting enzyme both for functional and structural reasons. The enzyme is the product of a gene duplication that occurred in an ancestral ruminant. It is possible to demonstrate the presence of seminal-type genes in all other investigated ruminant species, but they are not expressed and show features of pseudogenes. In this paper we report the determination of two pancreatic and one seminal-type ribonuclease gene sequences of swamp-type water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). The two pancreatic sequences encode proteins with identical amino acid sequences as previously determined for the enzymes isolated from swamp-type and river-type water buffalo, respectively. The seminal-type sequence has no pseudogene features and codes for an enzyme with no unusual features compared with the active bovine enzyme, except for the replacement of one of the cysteines which takes part in the two intersubunit disulfide bridges. However, Western blotting demonstrates the presence of only small amounts of the pancreatic enzymes in water buffalo semen, suggesting that also in this species the seminal-type sequence is not expressed. But it is still possible that the gene is expressed somewhere else in the body or during development. Reconstruction of seminal-type ribonuclease sequences in ancestors of Bovinae and Bovidae indicates no serious abnormalities in the encoded proteins and leads us to the hypothesis that the ruminant seminal-type ribonuclease gene has not come to expression during most of its evolutionary history, but did not exhibit a high evolutionary rate that is generally observed in pseudogenes.

  8. A subgroup of MYB transcription factor genes undergoes highly conserved alternative splicing in Arabidopsis and rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jigang; Li, Xiaojuan; Guo, Lei; Lu, Feng; Feng, Xiaojie; He, Kun; Wei, Liping; Chen, Zhangliang; Qu, Li-Jia; Gu, Hongya

    2006-01-01

    MYB transcription factor genes play important roles in many developmental processes and in various defence responses of plants. Two Arabidopsis R2R3-type MYB genes, AtMYB59 and AtMYB48, were found to undergo similar alternative splicing. Both genes have four distinctively spliced transcripts that encode either MYB-related proteins or R2R3-MYB proteins. An extensive BLAST search of the GenBank database resulted in finding and cloning two rice homologues, both of which were also found to share a similar alternative splicing pattern. In a semi-quantitative study, the expression of one splice variant of AtMYB59 was found to be differentially regulated in treatments with different phytohormones and stresses. GFP fusion protein analysis revealed that both of the two predicted nuclear localization signals (NLSs) in the R3 domain are required for localizing to the nucleus. Promoter-GUS analysis in transgenic plants showed that 5'-UTR is sufficient for the translation initiation of type 3 transcripts (encoding R2R3-MYB proteins), but not for type 2 transcripts (encoding MYB-related proteins). Moreover, a new type of non-canonical intron, with the same nucleotide repeats at the 5' and 3' splice sites, was identified. Thirty-eight Arabidopsis and rice genes were found to have this type of non-canonical intron, most of which undergo alternative splicing. These data suggest that this subgroup of transcription factor genes may be involved in multiple biological processes and may be transcriptionally regulated by alternative splicing. PMID:16531467

  9. Marker genes that are less conserved in their sequences are useful for predicting genome-wide similarity levels between closely related prokaryotic strains

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lan, Yemin; Rosen, Gail; Hershberg, Ruth

    2016-05-03

    The 16s rRNA gene is so far the most widely used marker for taxonomical classification and separation of prokaryotes. Since it is universally conserved among prokaryotes, it is possible to use this gene to classify a broad range of prokaryotic organisms. At the same time, it has often been noted that the 16s rRNA gene is too conserved to separate between prokaryotes at finer taxonomic levels. In this paper, we examine how well levels of similarity of 16s rRNA and 73 additional universal or nearly universal marker genes correlate with genome-wide levels of gene sequence similarity. We demonstrate that themore » percent identity of 16s rRNA predicts genome-wide levels of similarity very well for distantly related prokaryotes, but not for closely related ones. In closely related prokaryotes, we find that there are many other marker genes for which levels of similarity are much more predictive of genome-wide levels of gene sequence similarity. Finally, we show that the identities of the markers that are most useful for predicting genome-wide levels of similarity within closely related prokaryotic lineages vary greatly between lineages. However, the most useful markers are always those that are least conserved in their sequences within each lineage. In conclusion, our results show that by choosing markers that are less conserved in their sequences within a lineage of interest, it is possible to better predict genome-wide gene sequence similarity between closely related prokaryotes than is possible using the 16s rRNA gene. We point readers towards a database we have created (POGO-DB) that can be used to easily establish which markers show lowest levels of sequence conservation within different prokaryotic lineages.« less

  10. Nme Gene Family Evolutionary History Reveals Pre-Metazoan Origins and High Conservation between Humans and the Sea Anemone, Nematostella vectensis

    PubMed Central

    Desvignes, Thomas; Pontarotti, Pierre; Bobe, Julien

    2010-01-01

    Background The Nme gene family is involved in multiple physiological and pathological processes such as cellular differentiation, development, metastatic dissemination, and cilia functions. Despite the known importance of Nme genes and their use as clinical markers of tumor aggressiveness, the associated cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Over the last 20 years, several non-vertebrate model species have been used to investigate Nme functions. However, the evolutionary history of the family remains poorly understood outside the vertebrate lineage. The aim of the study was thus to elucidate the evolutionary history of the Nme gene family in Metazoans. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a total of 21 eukaryote species including 14 metazoans, the evolutionary history of Nme genes was reconstructed in the metazoan lineage. We demonstrated that the complexity of the Nme gene family, initially thought to be restricted to chordates, was also shared by the metazoan ancestor. We also provide evidence suggesting that the complexity of the family is mainly a eukaryotic innovation, with the exception of Nme8 that is likely to be a choanoflagellate/metazoan innovation. Highly conserved gene structure, genomic linkage, and protein domains were identified among metazoans, some features being also conserved in eukaryotes. When considering the entire Nme family, the starlet sea anemone is the studied metazoan species exhibiting the most conserved gene and protein sequence features with humans. In addition, we were able to show that most of the proteins known to interact with human NME proteins were also found in starlet sea anemone. Conclusion/Significance Together, our observations further support the association of Nme genes with key cellular functions that have been conserved throughout metazoan evolution. Future investigations of evolutionarily conserved Nme gene functions using the starlet sea anemone could shed new light on a wide variety of key developmental and

  11. A ribosomal protein gene cluster is encoded in the mitochondrial DNA of Dictyostelium discoideum: UGA termination codons and similarity of gene order to Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, M; Pi, M; Kurihara, M; Morio, T; Tanaka, Y

    1998-04-01

    We sequenced a region of about 14.5 kb downstream from the ribosomal protein L11 gene (rpl11) in the mitochondrial DNA (54+/-2 kb) of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Sequence analysis revealed that eleven ribosomal protein genes and six open reading frames (ORFs) formed a cluster arranged in the order: rpl11-orf189-rps12-rps7-rpl2-rps19-+ ++orf425-orf1740-rpl16-rpl14-orf188- rps14-rps8-rpl6-rps13-orf127-orf796. This order was very similar to that of homologous genes in Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondrial DNA. The N-terminal region of ORF425 and the C-terminal region of ORF1740 had partial similarities to the S3 ribosomal protein of other organisms. The termination codons of rpl16 and orf188 were UGA, which has not hitherto been found in genes encoded in D. discoideum mitochondrial DNA. PMID:9560439

  12. Conserved and divergent expression patterns of the proteolipid protein gene family in the amphibian central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M; Shan, W S; Colman, D R

    1999-07-01

    The recent discovery of a proteolipid protein gene family has revealed that its members are in fact widely distributed and are not exclusively associated with myelination. To date, three different gene products, DMalpha/DM-20/PLP, DMbeta/M6a, and DMgamma/M6b, have been isolated from certain primitive fish species, mouse, and human central nervous system (CNS). We cloned Xenopus laevis orthologues of DMbeta/M6a and DMgamma/M6b and investigated the expression patterns of these gene transcripts as well as that of PLP in developing Xenopus CNS. As is the case in shark and mouse, the mRNA encoding the major myelin integral protein, PLP, is first detected at stage 42/43 in tadpoles and is exclusively found in morphologically recognizable oligodendrocytes throughout the brain, while DMbeta mRNA is solely expressed in young presumptive neurons in the gray matter. There exist two distinct DMgamma mRNAs and, in contrast to these evolutionarily conserved expression patterns, DMgamma mRNAs distribute uniquely within the ventricular zone in young tadpoles (stage 25) through maturity. Furthermore, both DMbeta and DMgamma are expressed in the developing retina, and their distributions are different from one other. In Xenopus CNS, therefore, the expression patterns of three proteolipid proteins, PLP, DMbeta, and DMgamma, are distinct from each other, implying very different roles for their protein products within the cell populations in which they are expressed. PMID:10397631

  13. The clot gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a conserved member of the thioredoxin-like protein superfamily.

    PubMed

    Giordano, E; Peluso, I; Rendina, R; Digilio, A; Furia, M

    2003-02-01

    The conversion of pyruvoyl-H(4)-pterin to pyrimidodiazepine (PDA), which is an essential step in the biosynthesis of the red components of Drosophila eye pigments known as drosopterins, requires the products of the genes sepia and clot. While the product of sepia has been shown to correspond to the enzyme PDA-synthase, the role of clot remains unknown, although the clot(1) allele was one of the first eye-color mutants to be isolated in Drosophila melanogaster,and much genetic and biochemical data has become available since. Here we report the cloning of the clot gene, describe its molecular organization and characterize the sequence alterations associated with the alleles cl(1) and cl(2). The coding properties of the gene show that it encodes a protein related to the Glutaredoxin class of the Thioredoxin-like enzyme superfamily, conserved members of which are found in human, mouse and plants. We suggest that the Clot protein is an essential component of a glutathione redox system required for the final step in the biosynthetic pathway for drosopterins. PMID:12589444

  14. Distorting Gene Pools by Conservation: Assessing the Case of Doomed Turtle Eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrosovsky, N.

    2006-10-01

    Sea turtles have a high reproductive output and high mortality at early stages of the life cycle. In particular, many nests are laid below or close to high tide lines, and subsequently large numbers of eggs may be inundated and destroyed. A common conservation procedure is to relocate such doomed eggs to higher ground. This article examines this practice in the light of recent data revealing that some individual turtles tend to nest relatively near the water and others relatively higher up the beach. Discussion is focused on the question of why apparently poor placement of nests has not been selected against. Comparison between the ecology of leatherback and hawksbill turtle nesting beaches suggests that predictability of environmental conditions on the nesting beaches has an important influence on patterns of nest-site selection. Options are outlined for the management of nesting beaches where a high proportion of turtle eggs is subject to destruction by flooding.

  15. Structure Conservation and Differential Expression of Farnesyl Diphosphate Synthase Genes in Euphorbiaceous Plants

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Li, Hui-Liang; Peng, Shi-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPS) is a key enzyme of isoprenoids biosynthesis. However, knowledge of the FPSs of euphorbiaceous species is limited. In this study, ten FPSs were identified in four euphorbiaceous plants. These FPSs exhibited similar exon/intron structure. The deduced FPS proteins showed close identities and exhibited the typical structure of plant FPS. The members of the FPS family exhibit tissue expression patterns that vary among several euphorbiaceous plant species under normal growth conditions. The expression profiles reveal spatial and temporal variations in the expression of FPSs of different tissues from Euphorbiaceous plants. Our results revealed wide conservation of FPSs and diverse expression in euphorbiaceous plants during growth and development. PMID:26389894

  16. Functional conservation of cis-regulatory elements of heat-shock genes over long evolutionary distances.

    PubMed

    He, Zhengying; Eichel, Kelsie; Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional control of gene regulation is an intricate process that requires precise orchestration of a number of molecular components. Studying its evolution can serve as a useful model for understanding how complex molecular machines evolve. One way to investigate evolution of transcriptional regulation is to test the functions of cis-elements from one species in a distant relative. Previous results suggested that few, if any, tissue-specific promoters from Drosophila are faithfully expressed in C. elegans. Here we show that, in contrast, promoters of fly and human heat-shock genes are upregulated in C. elegans upon exposure to heat. Inducibility under conditions of heat shock may represent a relatively simple "on-off" response, whereas complex expression patterns require integration of multiple signals. Our results suggest that simpler aspects of regulatory logic may be retained over longer periods of evolutionary time, while more complex ones may be diverging more rapidly.

  17. Resolution of deep angiosperm phylogeny using conserved nuclear genes and estimates of early divergence times

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Liping; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Renran; Kong, Hongzhi; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Angiosperms are the most successful plants and support human livelihood and ecosystems. Angiosperm phylogeny is the foundation of studies of gene function and phenotypic evolution, divergence time estimation and biogeography. The relationship of the five divergent groups of the Mesangiospermae (~99.95% of extant angiosperms) remains uncertain, with multiple hypotheses reported in the literature. Here transcriptome data sets are obtained from 26 species lacking sequenced genomes, representing each of the five groups: eudicots, monocots, magnoliids, Chloranthaceae and Ceratophyllaceae. Phylogenetic analyses using 59 carefully selected low-copy nuclear genes resulted in highly supported relationships: sisterhood of eudicots and a clade containing Chloranthaceae and Ceratophyllaceae, with magnoliids being the next sister group, followed by monocots. Our topology allows a re-examination of the evolutionary patterns of 110 morphological characters. The molecular clock estimates of Mesangiospermae diversification during the late to middle Jurassic correspond well to the origins of some insects, which may have been a factor facilitating early angiosperm radiation. PMID:25249442

  18. A Survey of the Gene Repertoire of Gigaspora rosea Unravels Conserved Features among Glomeromycota for Obligate Biotrophy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Nianwu; San Clemente, Hélène; Roy, Sébastien; Bécard, Guillaume; Zhao, Bin; Roux, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are a diverse group of soil fungi (Glomeromycota) that form the most ancient mutualistic association termed AM symbiosis with a majority of land plants, improving their nutrition uptake and resistance to stresses. In contrast to their great ecological implications, the knowledge of the molecular biological mechanisms involved is still scant, partly due to the limited genomic resources available. Here, we describe the gene repertoire of a new AM fungus Gigaspora rosea (Diversisporales). Among the 86332 non-redundant virtual transcripts assembled, 15346 presented similarities with proteins in the Refseq database and 10175 were assigned with GO terms. KOG and Interpro domain annotations clearly showed an enrichment of genes involved in signal transduction in G. rosea. KEGG pathway analysis indicates that most primary metabolic processes are active in G. rosea. However, as for Rhizophagus irregularis, several metabolic genes were not found, including the fatty acid synthase (FAS) gene. This finding supports the hypothesis that AM fungi depend on the lipids produced by their hosts. Furthermore, the presence of a large number of transporters and 100s of secreted proteins, together with the reduced number of plant cell wall degrading enzymes could be interpreted as an evolutionary adaptation to its mutualistic obligate biotrophy. The detection of meiosis-related genes suggests that G. rosea might use a cryptic sexual process. Lastly, a phylogeny of basal fungi clearly shows Glomeromycota as a sister clade to Mucoromycotina, not only to the Mucorales or Mortierellales. The characterization of the gene repertoire from an AM fungal species belonging to the order of Diversisporales and its comparison with the gene sets of R. irregularis (Glomerales) and Gigaspora margarita (Diversisporales), reveal that AM fungi share several features linked to mutualistic obligate biotrophy. This work contributes to lay the foundation for forthcoming studies

  19. Functional conservation and diversification of APETALA1/FRUITFULL genes in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Wang, Ye; Wang, Fuxiang; Guo, Yuyu; Duan, Xueqing; Sun, Jinhao; An, Hailong

    2016-08-01

    The duplicated grass APETALA1/FRUITFULL (AP1/FUL) genes have distinct but overlapping patterns of expression, suggesting their discrete roles in transition to flowering, specification of spikelet meristem identity and specification of floral organ identity. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns and functions of four AP1/FUL paralogs (BdVRN1, BdFUL2, BdFUL3 and BdFUL4) in Brachypodium distachyon, a model plant for the temperate cereals and related grasses. Among the four genes tested, only BdVRN1 could remember the prolonged cold treatment. The recently duplicated BdVRN1 and BdFUL2 genes were expressed in a highly consistent manner and ectopic expressions of them caused similar phenotypes such as extremely early flowering and severe morphological alterations of floral organs, indicating their redundant roles in floral transition, inflorescence development and floral organ identity. In comparison, ectopic expressions of BdFUL3 and BdFUL4 only caused a moderate early flowering phenotype, suggesting their divergent function. In yeast two-hybrid assay, both BdVRN1 and BdFUL2 physically interact with SEP proteins but only BdFUL2 is able to form a homodimer. BdVRN1 also interacts weakly with BdFUL2. Our results indicate that, since the separation of AP1/FUL genes in grasses, the process of sub- or neo-functionalization has occurred and paralogs function redundantly and/or separately in flowering competence and inflorescence development.

  20. Functional conservation and diversification of APETALA1/FRUITFULL genes in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Wang, Ye; Wang, Fuxiang; Guo, Yuyu; Duan, Xueqing; Sun, Jinhao; An, Hailong

    2016-08-01

    The duplicated grass APETALA1/FRUITFULL (AP1/FUL) genes have distinct but overlapping patterns of expression, suggesting their discrete roles in transition to flowering, specification of spikelet meristem identity and specification of floral organ identity. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns and functions of four AP1/FUL paralogs (BdVRN1, BdFUL2, BdFUL3 and BdFUL4) in Brachypodium distachyon, a model plant for the temperate cereals and related grasses. Among the four genes tested, only BdVRN1 could remember the prolonged cold treatment. The recently duplicated BdVRN1 and BdFUL2 genes were expressed in a highly consistent manner and ectopic expressions of them caused similar phenotypes such as extremely early flowering and severe morphological alterations of floral organs, indicating their redundant roles in floral transition, inflorescence development and floral organ identity. In comparison, ectopic expressions of BdFUL3 and BdFUL4 only caused a moderate early flowering phenotype, suggesting their divergent function. In yeast two-hybrid assay, both BdVRN1 and BdFUL2 physically interact with SEP proteins but only BdFUL2 is able to form a homodimer. BdVRN1 also interacts weakly with BdFUL2. Our results indicate that, since the separation of AP1/FUL genes in grasses, the process of sub- or neo-functionalization has occurred and paralogs function redundantly and/or separately in flowering competence and inflorescence development. PMID:26856680

  1. The peptidylarginine deiminase gene is a conserved feature of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Gabarrini, Giorgio; de Smit, Menke; Westra, Johanna; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Vissink, Arjan; Zhou, Kai; A. Rossen, John W.; Stobernack, Tim; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Jan van Winkelhoff, Arie

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infective process that ultimately leads to destruction of the soft and hard tissues that support the teeth (the periodontium). Periodontitis has been proposed as a candidate risk factor for development of the autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major periodontal pathogen, is the only known prokaryote expressing a peptidyl arginine deiminase (PAD) enzyme necessary for protein citrullination. Antibodies to citrullinated proteins (anti-citrullinated protein antibodies, ACPA) are highly specific for RA and precede disease onset. Objective of this study was to assess P. gingivalis PAD (PPAD) gene expression and citrullination patterns in representative samples of P. gingivalis clinical isolates derived from periodontitis patients with and without RA and in related microbes of the Porphyromonas genus. Our findings indicate that PPAD is omnipresent in P. gingivalis, but absent in related species. No significant differences were found in the composition and expression of the PPAD gene of P. gingivalis regardless of the presence of RA or periodontal disease phenotypes. From this study it can be concluded that if P. gingivalis plays a role in RA, it is unlikely to originate from a variation in PPAD gene expression. PMID:26403779

  2. DNA sequence analysis of conserved genes reveals hybridization events that increase genetic diversity in Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Collado-Romero, Melania; Jiménez-Díaz, Rafael M; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    The hybrid origin of a Verticillium dahliae isolate belonging to the vegetative compatibility group (VCG) 3 is reported in this work. Moreover, new data supporting the hybrid origin of two V. dahliae var. longisporum (VDLSP) isolates are provided as well as information about putative parentals. Thus, isolates of VDLSP and V. dahliae VCG3 were found harboring multiple sequences of actin (Act), β-tubulin (β-tub), calmodulin (Cal) and histone 3 (H3) genes. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequences, the internal transcribed sequences (ITS-1 and ITS-2) of the rRNA genes and of a V. dahliae-specific sequence provided molecular evidences for the interspecific hybrid origin of those isolates. Sequence analysis suggests that some of VDLSP isolates may have resulted from hybridization events between a V. dahliae isolate of VCG1 and/or VCG4A and, probably, a closely related taxon to Verticillium alboatrum but not this one. Similarly, phylogenetic analysis and PCR markers indicated that a V. dahliae VCG3 isolate might have arisen from a hybridization event between a V. dahliae VCG1B isolate and as yet unidentified parent. This second parental probably does not belong to the Verticillium genus according to the gene sequences dissimilarities found between the VCG3 isolate and Verticillium spp. These results suggest an important role of parasexuality in diversity and evolution in the genus Verticillium and show that interspecific hybrids within this genus may not be rare in nature.

  3. TGA cysteine codons and intron sequences in conserved and nonconserved positions are found in macronuclear RNA polymerase genes of Euplotes octocarinatus.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, J; Florian, V; Klein, A

    1992-01-01

    The gene sequences of the second largest subunits of RNA polymerases I and II of Euplotes octocarinatus, RPA2 and RPB2, were determined and compared to the respective known sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The similarity of the derived polypeptide sequences permitted their assignment to the respective polymerases and allowed the comparison of the zinc binding regions. In frame TGA codons were detected, which are likely to encode conserved cysteinyl residues in the putative zinc-finger region of the RPA2 gene. They were also found in other positions in both the RPA2 and RPB2 genes. The RPB2 gene contains a 30 bp intron close to the 5'-end of its coding region. The 5'-ends of the coding regions of all three genes encoding the largest subunits of the three different polymerases were also analyzed. The zinc finger structures again show the use of TGA codons for conserved cysteinyl residues in two of the genes. An N-terminal intron is located in the RPB1 gene at a conserved position as compared to the respective genes of several other eucarya. Images PMID:1461731

  4. Complete mitochondrial genomes of Trisidos kiyoni and Potiarca pilula: Varied mitochondrial genome size and highly rearranged gene order in Arcidae

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shao’e; Li, Qi; Kong, Lingfeng; Yu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    We present the complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of Trisidos kiyoni and Potiarca pilula, both important species from the family Arcidae (Arcoida: Arcacea). Typical bivalve mtDNA features were described, such as the relatively conserved gene number (36 and 37), a high A + T content (62.73% and 61.16%), the preference for A + T-rich codons, and the evidence of non-optimal codon usage. The mitogenomes of Arcidae species are exceptional for their extraordinarily large and variable sizes and substantial gene rearrangements. The mitogenome of T. kiyoni (19,614 bp) and P. pilula (28,470 bp) are the two smallest Arcidae mitogenomes. The compact mitogenomes are weakly associated with gene number and primarily reflect shrinkage of the non-coding regions. The varied size in Arcidae mitogenomes reflect a dynamic history of expansion. A significant positive correlation is observed between mitogenome size and the combined length of cox1-3, the lengths of Cytb, and the combined length of rRNAs (rrnS and rrnL) (P < 0.001). Both protein coding genes (PCGs) and tRNA rearrangements is observed in P. pilula and T. kiyoni mitogenomes. This analysis imply that the complicated gene rearrangement in mitochondrial genome could be considered as one of key characters in inferring higher-level phylogenetic relationship of Arcidae. PMID:27653979

  5. Regulation of gene expression during early neuronal differentiation: evidence for patterns conserved across neuron populations and vertebrate classes.

    PubMed

    Ernsberger, Uwe

    2012-04-01

    Analysis of transcription factor function during neurogenesis has provided a huge amount of data on the generation and specification of diverse neuron populations in the central and peripheral nervous systems of vertebrates. However, an understanding of the induction of key neuron functions including electrical information processing and synaptic transmission lags seriously behind. Whereas pan-neuronal markers such as neurofilaments, neuron-specific tubulin and RNA-binding proteins have often been included in developmental analysis, the molecular players underlying electrical activity and transmitter release have been neglected in studies addressing gene expression during neuronal induction. Here, I summarize the evidence for a distinct accumulation pattern of mRNAs for synaptic proteins, a pattern that is delayed compared with pan-neuronal gene expression during neurogenesis. The conservation of this pattern across diverse avian and mammalian neuron populations suggests a common mechanism for the regulation of various sets of neuronal genes during initial neuronal differentiation. The co-regulation of genes coding for synaptic proteins from embryonic to postnatal development indicates that the expression of the players required for synaptic transmission shares common regulatory features. For the ion channels involved in neuronal electrical activity, such as voltage-gated sodium channels, the situation is less clear because of the lack of comparative studies early during neurogenesis. Transcription factors have been characterized that regulate the expression of synaptic proteins in vitro and in vivo. They currently do not explain the co-regulation of these genes across different neuron populations. The neuron-restrictive silencing factor NRSF/REST targets a large gene set, but not all of the genes coding for pan-neuronal, synaptic and ion channel proteins. The discrepancy between NRSF/REST loss-of-function and silencer-to-activator-switch studies leaves the full

  6. Analysis of introns and promoters of L/M visual pigment genes in relation to deutan color-vision deficiency with an array of normal gene orders.

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Hisao; Tanabe, Shoko; Muraki-Oda, Sanae; Yamade, Shinichi; Ohji, Masahito; Ohkubo, Iwao

    2009-09-01

    Among the 447 Japanese men with deutan color-vision deficiency that we analyzed, 61 had a normal order array of L/M pigment genes. Three of the 61 men had an exonic mutation, but the other 58 had no mutations even in the flanking introns of their M genes. In these 58 men, 55 had a -71A --> C substitution in the M gene. Two hypotheses were built up for the substitution: it is in linkage disequilibrium with a genuine cause of deficiency in the introns, or itself is the cause of the deficiency. For the first hypothesis, we sequenced entire regions of both the L and M genes in 30 color-normal Japanese men who had one each of the L and M genes to understand normal variations of the introns. Fifty-two already known and 15 newly identified polymorphic sites could be classified into three categories: those with no polymorphisms in the Japanese group, those essentially different between the L and the M genes, and the others. We then sequenced the entire region of the M genes in 12 representative deutan individuals with a normal gene-order array but found no significant mutations. For the second hypothesis, we performed a reporter assay and found that the M gene promoter with -71C had a 60-70% reduction in activity when compared to that with -71A. These results suggest that the -71A --> C substitution is not in linkage disequilibrium with an intronic mutation, but the substitution itself may affect the transcription of the M gene, leading to deutan deficiency. PMID:19662027

  7. Tissue-Restricted Transcription from a Conserved Intragenic CpG Island in the Klf1 Gene in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Southwood, Cherie M.; Lipovich, Leonard; Gow, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Beyond Mendelian inheritance, an understanding of the complexities and consequences of the transfer of nonhereditary information to successive generations is at an early stage. Such epigenetic functionality is exemplified by DNA methylation and, as genome-wide high-throughput methodologies emerge, is increasingly being considered in the context of conserved intragenic and intergenic CpG islands that function as alternate sites of transcription initiation. Here we characterize an intragenic CpG island in exon 2 of the protein-coding mouse Klf1 gene, from which clustered transcription initiation sites yield positive-strand, severely truncated, capped and spliced RNAs. Expression from this CpG island in the testis begins between Postnatal Days 14–20, increases during development, and is temporally correlated with the maturation of secondary spermatocytes as they become the dominant cell population in the seminiferous epithelium. Only full-length KLF1-encoding mRNAs are detected in the hematopoietic tissue, spleen; thus, expression from the exon 2 CpG island is both developmentally regulated and tissue restricted. DNA methylation analysis indicates that spatiotemporal expression from the Klf1 CpG island is not associated with hypermethylation. Finally, our computational analysis from multiple species confirms intragenic transcription initiation and indicates that the KLF1 CpG island is evolutionarily conserved. Currently we have no evidence that these truncated RNAs can be translated via nonconventional mechanisms such as in-frame, conserved non-AUG-dependent Kozak consensus sequences; however, high-quality carboxyl-terminal antibodies will more effectively address this issue. PMID:22933519

  8. RNA splicing regulates the temporal order of TNF-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shengli; Baltimore, David

    2013-07-16

    When cells are induced to express inflammatory genes by treatment with TNF, the mRNAs for the induced genes appear in three distinct waves, defining gene groups I, II, and III, or early, intermediate, and late genes. To examine the basis for these different kinetic classes, we have developed a PCR-based procedure to distinguish pre-mRNAs from mRNAs. It shows that the three groups initiate transcription virtually simultaneously but that delays in splicing characterize groups II and III. We also examined the elongation times, concluding that pre-mRNA synthesis is coordinate but splicing differences directly regulate the timing of mRNA production.

  9. Common fragile sites are conserved features of human and mouse chromosomes and relate to large active genes

    PubMed Central

    Helmrich, Anne; Stout-Weider, Karen; Hermann, Klaus; Schrock, Evelin; Heiden, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Common fragile sites (CFSs) are seen as chromosomal gaps and breaks brought about by inhibition of replication, and it is thought that they cluster with tumor breakpoints. This study presents a comprehensive analysis using conventional and molecular cytogenetic mapping of CFSs and their expression frequencies in two mouse strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6, and in human probands. Here we show that induced mouse CFSs relate to sites of spontaneous gaps and breaks and that CFS expression levels in chromosome bands are conserved between the two mouse strains and between syntenic mouse and human DNA segments. Furthermore, four additional mouse CFSs were found to be homologous to human CFSs on the molecular cytogenetic level (Fra2D-FRA2G, Fra4C2-FRA9E, Fra6A3.1-FRA7G, and Fra6B1-FRA7H), increasing the number of such CFSs already described in the literature to eight. Contrary to previous reports, DNA helix flexibility is not increased in the 15 human and eight mouse CFSs molecularly defined so far, compared to large nonfragile control regions. Our findings suggest that the mechanisms that provoke instability at CFSs are evolutionarily conserved. The role that large transcriptionally active genes may play in CFS expression is discussed. PMID:16954539

  10. Evolutionary variations in the expression of dorso-ventral patterning genes and the conservation of pioneer neurons in Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Biffar, Lucia; Stollewerk, Angelika

    2015-04-01

    Insects are ideally suited for gaining insight into the evolutionary developmental mechanisms that have led to adaptive changes of the nervous system since the specific structure of the nervous system can be directly linked to the neural stem cell (neuroblast) lineages, which in turn can be traced back to the last common ancestor of insects. The recent comparative analysis of the Drosophila melanogaster and Tribolium castaneum neuroblast maps revealed substantial differences in the expression profiles of neuroblasts. Here we show that despite the overall conservation of the dorso-ventral expression domains of muscle segment homeobox, intermediate neuroblasts defective and ventral nervous system defective, the expression of these genes relative to the neuroblasts in the respective domains has changed considerably during insect evolution. Furthermore, functional studies show evolutionary changes in the requirement of ventral nervous system defective in the formation of neuroblast 1-1 and the correct differentiation of its presumptive progeny, the pioneer neurons aCC and pCC. The inclusion of the expression data of the dorso-ventral genes into the recently established T. castaneum neuroblast map further increases the differences in the neuroblast expression profiles between D. melanogaster and T. castaneum. Despite these molecular variations, the Even-skipped positive pioneer neurons show an invariant arrangement, except for an additional Even-skipped positive cluster that we discovered in T. castaneum. Given the importance of these pioneer neurons in establishing the intersegmental nerves and the longitudinal tracts, which are part of the conserved axonal scaffold of arthropods, we discuss internal buffering mechanisms that might ensure that neuroblast lineages invariantly generate pioneer neurons over a wide range of molecular variations.

  11. Segment polarity gene expression in a myriapod reveals conserved and diverged aspects of early head patterning in arthropods.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf

    2012-09-01

    Arthropods show two kinds of developmental mode. In the so-called long germ developmental mode (as exemplified by the fly Drosophila), all segments are formed almost simultaneously from a preexisting field of cells. In contrast, in the so-called short germ developmental mode (as exemplified by the vast majority of arthropods), only the anterior segments are patterned similarly as in Drosophila, and posterior segments are added in a single or double segmental periodicity from a posterior segment addition zone (SAZ). The addition of segments from the SAZ is controlled by dynamic waves of gene activity. Recent studies on a spider have revealed that a similar dynamic process, involving expression of the segment polarity gene (SPG) hedgehog (hh), is involved in the formation of the anterior head segments. The present study shows that in the myriapod Glomeris marginata the early expression of hh is also in a broad anterior domain, but this domain corresponds only to the ocular and antennal segment. It does not, like in spiders, represent expression in the posterior adjacent segment. In contrast, the anterior hh pattern is conserved in Glomeris and insects. All investigated myriapod SPGs and associated factors are expressed with delay in the premandibular (tritocerebral) segment. This delay is exclusively found in insects and myriapods, but not in chelicerates, crustaceans and onychophorans. Therefore, it may represent a synapomorphy uniting insects and myriapods (Atelocerata hypothesis), contradicting the leading opinion that suggests a sister relationship of crustaceans and insects (Pancrustacea hypothesis). In Glomeris embryos, the SPG engrailed is first expressed in the mandibular segment. This feature is conserved in representatives of all arthropod classes suggesting that the mandibular segment may have a special function in anterior patterning.

  12. The conserved mitochondrial gene distribution in relatives of Turritopsis nutricula, an immortal jellyfish

    PubMed Central

    Devarapalli, Pratap; Kumavath, Ranjith N; Barh, Debmalya; Azevedo, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Turritopsis nutricula (T. nutricula) is the one of the known reported organisms that can revert its life cycle to the polyp stage even after becoming sexually mature, defining itself as the only immortal organism in the animal kingdom. Therefore, the animal is having prime importance in basic biological, aging, and biomedical researches. However, till date, the genome of this organism has not been sequenced and even there is no molecular phylogenetic study to reveal its close relatives. Here, using phylogenetic analysis based on available 16s rRNA gene and protein sequences of Cytochrome oxidase subunit-I (COI or COX1) of T. nutricula, we have predicted the closest relatives of the organism. While we found Nemopsis bachei could be closest organism based on COX1 gene sequence; T. dohrnii may be designated as the closest taxon to T. nutricula based on rRNA. Moreover, we have figured out four species that showed similar root distance based on COX1 protein sequence. PMID:25352727

  13. The conserved mitochondrial gene distribution in relatives of Turritopsis nutricula, an immortal jellyfish.

    PubMed

    Devarapalli, Pratap; Kumavath, Ranjith N; Barh, Debmalya; Azevedo, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Turritopsis nutricula (T. nutricula) is the one of the known reported organisms that can revert its life cycle to the polyp stage even after becoming sexually mature, defining itself as the only immortal organism in the animal kingdom. Therefore, the animal is having prime importance in basic biological, aging, and biomedical researches. However, till date, the genome of this organism has not been sequenced and even there is no molecular phylogenetic study to reveal its close relatives. Here, using phylogenetic analysis based on available 16s rRNA gene and protein sequences of Cytochrome oxidase subunit-I (COI or COX1) of T. nutricula, we have predicted the closest relatives of the organism. While we found Nemopsis bachei could be closest organism based on COX1 gene sequence; T. dohrnii may be designated as the closest taxon to T. nutricula based on rRNA. Moreover, we have figured out four species that showed similar root distance based on COX1 protein sequence.

  14. Gene Coexpression and Evolutionary Conservation Analysis of the Human Preimplantation Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tiancheng; Yu, Lin; Ding, Guohui; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Lei; Li, Hong; Li, Yixue

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary developmental biology (EVO-DEVO) tries to decode evolutionary constraints on the stages of embryonic development. Two models—the “funnel-like” model and the “hourglass” model—have been proposed by investigators to illustrate the fluctuation of selective pressure on these stages. However, selective indices of stages corresponding to mammalian preimplantation embryonic development (PED) were undetected in previous studies. Based on single cell RNA sequencing of stages during human PED, we used coexpression method to identify gene modules activated in each of these stages. Through measuring the evolutionary indices of gene modules belonging to each stage, we observed change pattern of selective constraints on PED for the first time. The selective pressure decreases from the zygote stage to the 4-cell stage and increases at the 8-cell stage and then decreases again from 8-cell stage to the late blastocyst stages. Previous EVO-DEVO studies concerning the whole embryo development neglected the fluctuation of selective pressure in these earlier stages, and the fluctuation was potentially correlated with events of earlier stages, such as zygote genome activation (ZGA). Such oscillation in an earlier stage would further affect models of the evolutionary constraints on whole embryo development. Therefore, these earlier stages should be measured intensively in future EVO-DEVO studies. PMID:26273607

  15. Gene Coexpression and Evolutionary Conservation Analysis of the Human Preimplantation Embryos.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiancheng; Yu, Lin; Ding, Guohui; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Lei; Li, Hong; Li, Yixue

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary developmental biology (EVO-DEVO) tries to decode evolutionary constraints on the stages of embryonic development. Two models--the "funnel-like" model and the "hourglass" model--have been proposed by investigators to illustrate the fluctuation of selective pressure on these stages. However, selective indices of stages corresponding to mammalian preimplantation embryonic development (PED) were undetected in previous studies. Based on single cell RNA sequencing of stages during human PED, we used coexpression method to identify gene modules activated in each of these stages. Through measuring the evolutionary indices of gene modules belonging to each stage, we observed change pattern of selective constraints on PED for the first time. The selective pressure decreases from the zygote stage to the 4-cell stage and increases at the 8-cell stage and then decreases again from 8-cell stage to the late blastocyst stages. Previous EVO-DEVO studies concerning the whole embryo development neglected the fluctuation of selective pressure in these earlier stages, and the fluctuation was potentially correlated with events of earlier stages, such as zygote genome activation (ZGA). Such oscillation in an earlier stage would further affect models of the evolutionary constraints on whole embryo development. Therefore, these earlier stages should be measured intensively in future EVO-DEVO studies.

  16. Conserved plant genes with similarity to mammalian de novo DNA methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaofeng; Springer, Nathan M.; Muszynski, Michael G.; Phillips, Ronald L.; Kaeppler, Shawn; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2000-01-01

    DNA methylation plays a critical role in controlling states of gene activity in most eukaryotic organisms, and it is essential for proper growth and development. Patterns of methylation are established by de novo methyltransferases and maintained by maintenance methyltransferase activities. The Dnmt3 family of de novo DNA methyltransferases has recently been characterized in animals. Here we describe DNA methyltransferase genes from both Arabidopsis and maize that show a high level of sequence similarity to Dnmt3, suggesting that they encode plant de novo methyltransferases. Relative to all known eukaryotic methyltransferases, these plant proteins contain a novel arrangement of the motifs required for DNA methyltransferase catalytic activity. The N termini of these methyltransferases contain a series of ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains. UBA domains are found in several ubiquitin pathway proteins and in DNA repair enzymes such as Rad23, and they may be involved in ubiquitin binding. The presence of UBA domains provides a possible link between DNA methylation and ubiquitin/proteasome pathways. PMID:10781108

  17. [Isolation and amplification cDNA of 8H07 gene conservative region of nematode Heterodera schachtii with high relationship to its rape homolog].

    PubMed

    Tsyhankova, V A; Andrusevych, Ia V; Ponomarenko, S P; Halkin, A P; Blium, Ia B

    2012-01-01

    Original method of small regulatory si/miRNA isolation from plant cells was elaborated. PCR amplification of fragment cDNA 8H07 nematode Heterodera schachtii gene was carried out. Using Northern-blot method hybridization of plant si/miRNA with cDNA fragment of conservative region 8H07 gene the presence of their high homology is found out. The amplified cDNA fragment of nematode 8H07 gene in future will be used for creation recombinant gene with complementary antisense dsRNA sequence for increasing resistance of rape plants to parasitic nematodes.

  18. Evolutionary conservation of zinc finger transcription factor binding sites in promoters of genes co-expressed with WT1 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Tandon, Sunpreet; Bazarov, Anton; Brett, Adina; Fraizer, Gail; Piontkivska, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Background Gene expression analyses have led to a better understanding of growth control of prostate cancer cells. We and others have identified the presence of several zinc finger transcription factors in the neoplastic prostate, suggesting a potential role for these genes in the regulation of the prostate cancer transcriptome. One of the transcription factors (TFs) identified in the prostate cancer epithelial cells was the Wilms tumor gene (WT1). To rapidly identify coordinately expressed prostate cancer growth control genes that may be regulated by WT1, we used an in silico approach. Results Evolutionary conserved transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) recognized by WT1, EGR1, SP1, SP2, AP2 and GATA1 were identified in the promoters of 24 differentially expressed prostate cancer genes from eight mammalian species. To test the relationship between sequence conservation and function, chromatin of LNCaP prostate cancer and kidney 293 cells were tested for TF binding using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Multiple putative TFBS in gene promoters of placental mammals were found to be shared with those in human gene promoters and some were conserved between genomes that diverged about 170 million years ago (i.e., primates and marsupials), therefore implicating these sites as candidate binding sites. Among those genes coordinately expressed with WT1 was the kallikrein-related peptidase 3 (KLK3) gene commonly known as the prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene. This analysis located several potential WT1 TFBS in the PSA gene promoter and led to the rapid identification of a novel putative binding site confirmed in vivo by ChIP. Conversely for two prostate growth control genes, androgen receptor (AR) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), known to be transcriptionally regulated by WT1, regulatory sequence conservation was observed and TF binding in vivo was confirmed by ChIP. Conclusion Overall, this targeted approach rapidly identified important candidate

  19. Species identification using genetic tools: the value of nuclear and mitochondrial gene sequences in whale conservation.

    PubMed

    Palumbi, S R; Cipriano, F

    1998-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis is a powerful tool for identifying the source of samples thought to be derived from threatened or endangered species. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from retail whale meat markets has shown consistently that the expected baleen whale in these markets, the minke whale, makes up only about half the products analyzed. The other products are either unregulated small toothed whales like dolphins or are protected baleen whales such as humpback, Bryde's, fin, or blue whales. Independent verification of such mtDNA identifications requires analysis of nuclear genetic loci, but this is technically more difficult than standard mtDNA sequencing. In addition, evolution of species-specific sequences (i.e., fixation of sequence differences to produce reciprocally monophyletic gene trees) is slower in nuclear than in mitochondrial genes primarily because genetic drift is slower at nuclear loci. When will use of nuclear sequences allow forensic DNA identification? Comparison of neutral theories of coalescence of mitochondrial and nuclear loci suggests a simple rule of thumb. The "three-times rule" suggests that phylogenetic sorting at nuclear loci is likely to produce species-specific sequences when mitochondrial alleles are reciprocally monophyletic and the branches leading to the mtDNA sequences of a species are three times longer than the average difference observed within species. A preliminary test of the three-times rule, which depends on many assumptions about the species and genes involved, suggests that blue and fin whales should have species-specific sequences at most neutral nuclear loci, whereas humpback and fin whales should show species-specific sequences at fewer nuclear loci. Partial sequences of actin introns from these species confirm the predictions of the three-times rule and show that blue and fin whales are reciprocally monophyletic at this locus. These intron sequences are thus good tools for the identification of these species

  20. Inactivation of conserved genes induces microbial aversion, drug detoxification, and innate immunity in C.elegans

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Justine A.; Ruvkun, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Summary The nematode C. elegans consumes benign bacteria such as E. coli and is repelled by pathogens and toxins. Here we show that RNAi and toxin-mediated disruption of core cellular activities, including translation, respiration, and protein turnover, stimulates behavioral avoidance of attractive E. coli. RNAi of such essential processes also induces expression of detoxification and innate immune response genes in the absence of toxins or pathogens. Disruption of core processes in non-neuronal tissues can stimulate aversion behavior, revealing a neuroendocrine axis of control. Microbial avoidance requires serotonergic and Jnk kinase signaling. We propose that surveillance pathways oversee critical cellular activities to detect pathogens, many of which deploy toxins and virulence factors to disrupt these same host pathways. Variation in cellular surveillance and endocrine pathways controlling behavior, detoxification and immunity selected by past toxin or microbial interactions could underlie aberrant responses to foods, medicines, and microbes. PMID:22500807

  1. An ESTs description of the new Vanin gene family conserved from fly to human.

    PubMed

    Granjeaud, S; Naquet, P; Galland, F

    1999-10-01

    Circulation and tissue colonization are essential properties of lymphoid cells and involve major families of adhesion molecules (e.g. , integrin, selectin, mucin-like, and molecules from the immunoglobulin superfamily). The mouse Vanin-1 molecule was recently identified and found to be involved in the colonization of the thymus by hematopoietic precursor cells. Here we show based on computational analysis of EST sequence database resources that Vanin-1 belongs to a new family of related molecules present from drosophila to human. This family includes the amidase enzyme Biotinidase, and a central protein domain is shared between Vanin and Nitrilase families, suggesting that Vanin molecules might bear an enzymatic activity. Five of these molecules were new uncharacterized cDNA sequences only described as ESTs. The three human Vanin genes map to the same region of Chromosome 6q. The detailed results are consultable at the VANIN web page (http://tagc. univ-mrs.fr/pub/vanin/).

  2. Primer Sets Developed To Amplify Conserved Genes from Filamentous Ascomycetes Are Useful in Differentiating Fusarium Species Associated with Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, G. C.; Ball, L. A.; Axelrood, P. E.; Glass, N. L.

    1995-01-01

    We examined the usefulness of primer sets designed to amplify introns within conserved genes in filamentous ascomycetes to differentiate 35 isolates representing six different species of Fusarium commonly found in association with conifer seedlings. We analyzed restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) in five amplified PCR products from each Fusarium isolate. The primers used in this study were constructed on the basis of sequence information from the H3, H4, and (beta)-tubulin genes in Neurospora crassa. Primers previously developed for the intergenic transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA were also used. The degree of interspecific polymorphism observed in the PCR products from the six Fusarium species allowed differentiation by a limited number of amplifications and restriction endonuclease digestions. The level of intraspecific RFLP variation in the five PCR products was low in both Fusarium proliferatum and F. avenaceum but was high in a population sample of F. oxysporum isolates. Clustering of the 35 isolates by statistical analyses gave similar dendrograms for H3, H4, and (beta)-tubulin RFLP analysis, but a dendrogram produced by intergenic transcribed spacer analysis varied in the placement of some F. oxysporum isolates. PMID:16534991

  3. A highly conserved baculovirus gene p48 (ac103) is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Meijin; Wu Wenbi; Liu Chao; Wang Yanjie; Hu Zhaoyang; Yang Kai Pang Yi

    2008-09-15

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) p48 (ac103) is a highly conserved baculovirus gene of unknown function. In the present study, we generated a knockout of the p48 gene in an AcMNPV bacmid and investigated the role of P48 in baculovirus life cycle. The p48-null Bacmid vAc{sup P48-KO-PH-GFP} was unable to propagate in cell culture, while a 'repair' Bacmid vAc{sup P48-REP-PH-GFP} was able to replicate in a manner similar to a wild-type Bacmid vAc{sup PH-GFP}. Titration assays and Western blotting confirmed that vAc{sup P48-KO-PH-GFP} was unable to produce budded viruses (BVs). qPCR analysis showed that p48 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy indicated that P48 was required for nucleocapsid envelopment to form occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) and their subsequent occlusion. Confocal analysis showed that P48 prominently condensed in the centre of the nucleus. Our results demonstrate that P48 plays an essential role in BV production and ODV envelopment in the AcMNPV life cycle.

  4. A highly conserved baculovirus gene p48 (ac103) is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Meijin; Wu, Wenbi; Liu, Chao; Wang, Yanjie; Hu, Zhaoyang; Yang, Kai; Pang, Yi

    2008-09-15

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) p48 (ac103) is a highly conserved baculovirus gene of unknown function. In the present study, we generated a knockout of the p48 gene in an AcMNPV bacmid and investigated the role of P48 in baculovirus life cycle. The p48-null Bacmid vAc(P48-KO-PH-GFP) was unable to propagate in cell culture, while a 'repair' Bacmid vAc(P48-REP-PH-GFP) was able to replicate in a manner similar to a wild-type Bacmid vAc(PH-GFP). Titration assays and Western blotting confirmed that vAc(P48-KO-PH-GFP) was unable to produce budded viruses (BVs). qPCR analysis showed that p48 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy indicated that P48 was required for nucleocapsid envelopment to form occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) and their subsequent occlusion. Confocal analysis showed that P48 prominently condensed in the centre of the nucleus. Our results demonstrate that P48 plays an essential role in BV production and ODV envelopment in the AcMNPV life cycle.

  5. Highly conserved functions of the Brachyury gene on morphogenetic movements: insight from the early-diverging phylum Ctenophora.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Atsuko; Martindale, Mark Q; Fukui, Akimasa; Tochinai, Shin

    2010-03-01

    Brachyury, a member of the T-box transcription family identified in a diverse array of metazoans, was initially recognized for its function in mesoderm formation and notochord differentiation in vertebrates; however, its ancestral role has been suggested to be in control of morphogenetic movements. Here, we show that morpholino oligonucleotide knockdown of Brachyury (MlBra) in embryos of a ctenophore, one of the most ancient groups of animals, prevents the invagination of MlBra expressing stomodeal cells and is rescued with corresponding RNA injections. Injection of RNA encoding a dominant-interfering construct of MlBra causes identical phenotypes to that of RNA encoding a dominant-interfering form of Xenopus Brachyury (Xbra) in Xenopus embryos. Both injected embryos down-regulate Xbra downstream genes, Xbra itself and Xwnt11 but not axial mesodermal markers, resulting in failure to complete gastrulation due to loss of convergent extension movements. Moreover, animal cap assay reveals that MlBra induces Xwnt11 like Xbra. Overall results using Xenopus embryos show that these two genes are functionally interchangeable. These functional experiments demonstrate for the first time in a basal metazoan that the primitive role of Brachyury is to regulate morphogenetic movements, rather than to specify endomesodermal fates, and the role is conserved between non-bilaterian metazoans and vertebrates.

  6. Development of a multiplex assay for genus- and species-specific detection of Phytophthora based on differences in mitochondrial gene order.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Guillaume J; Martin, Frank N; Coffey, Michael D; Blomquist, Cheryl L

    2014-07-01

    A molecular diagnostic assay for Phytophthora spp. that is specific, sensitive, has both genus- and species-specific detection capabilities multiplexed, and can be used to systematically develop markers for detection of a wide range of species would facilitate research and regulatory efforts. To address this need, a marker system was developed based on the high copy sequences of the mitochondrial DNA utilizing gene orders that were highly conserved in the genus Phytophthora but different in the related genus Pythium and plants to reduce the importance of highly controlled annealing temperatures for specificity. An amplification primer pair designed from conserved regions of the atp9 and nad9 genes produced an amplicon of ≈340 bp specific for the Phytophthora spp. tested. The TaqMan probe for the genus-specific Phytophthora test was designed from a conserved portion of the atp9 gene whereas variable intergenic spacer sequences were used for designing the species-specific TaqMan probes. Specific probes were developed for 13 species and the P. citricola species complex. In silico analysis suggests that species-specific probes could be developed for at least 70 additional described and provisional species; the use of locked nucleic acids in TaqMan probes should expand this list. A second locus spanning three tRNAs (trnM-trnP-trnM) was also evaluated for genus-specific detection capabilities. At 206 bp, it was not as useful for systematic development of a broad range of species-specific probes as the larger 340-bp amplicon. All markers were validated against a test panel that included 87 Phytophthora spp., 14 provisional Phytophthora spp., 29 Pythium spp., 1 Phytopythium sp., and 39 plant species. Species-specific probes were validated further against a range of geographically diverse isolates to ensure uniformity of detection at an intraspecific level, as well as with other species having high levels of sequence similarity to ensure specificity. Both diagnostic

  7. Conservation of gene order and content in the circular chromosomes of 'Candidatus Liberibacter' asiaticus and other rhizbiales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The intracellular plant pathogen ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ is a member of the Rhizobiales, as are the nitrogen fixing Sinorhizobium meliloti and Bradyrhizobium japonicum, the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens and the intracellular mammalian pathogen Bartonella henselae. Whole genome compar...

  8. Finding New Order in Biological Functions from the Network Structure of Gene Annotations

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Kimberly; Girvan, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) provides biologists with a controlled terminology that describes how genes are associated with functions and how functional terms are related to one another. These term-term relationships encode how scientists conceive the organization of biological functions, and they take the form of a directed acyclic graph (DAG). Here, we propose that the network structure of gene-term annotations made using GO can be employed to establish an alternative approach for grouping functional terms that captures intrinsic functional relationships that are not evident in the hierarchical structure established in the GO DAG. Instead of relying on an externally defined organization for biological functions, our approach connects biological functions together if they are performed by the same genes, as indicated in a compendium of gene annotation data from numerous different sources. We show that grouping terms by this alternate scheme provides a new framework with which to describe and predict the functions of experimentally identified sets of genes. PMID:26588252

  9. Population genomics of C. melanopterus using target gene capture data: demographic inferences and conservation perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Maisano Delser, Pierpaolo; Corrigan, Shannon; Hale, Matthew; Li, Chenhong; Veuille, Michel; Planes, Serge; Naylor, Gavin; Mona, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Population genetics studies on non-model organisms typically involve sampling few markers from multiple individuals. Next-generation sequencing approaches open up the possibility of sampling many more markers from fewer individuals to address the same questions. Here, we applied a target gene capture method to deep sequence ~1000 independent autosomal regions of a non-model organism, the blacktip reef shark (Carcharhinus melanopterus). We devised a sampling scheme based on the predictions of theoretical studies of metapopulations to show that sampling few individuals, but many loci, can be extremely informative to reconstruct the evolutionary history of species. We collected data from a single deme (SID) from Northern Australia and from a scattered sampling representing various locations throughout the Indian Ocean (SCD). We explored the genealogical signature of population dynamics detected from both sampling schemes using an ABC algorithm. We then contrasted these results with those obtained by fitting the data to a non-equilibrium finite island model. Both approaches supported an Nm value ~40, consistent with philopatry in this species. Finally, we demonstrate through simulation that metapopulations exhibit greater resilience to recent changes in effective size compared to unstructured populations. We propose an empirical approach to detect recent bottlenecks based on our sampling scheme. PMID:27651217

  10. Population genomics of C. melanopterus using target gene capture data: demographic inferences and conservation perspectives.

    PubMed

    Maisano Delser, Pierpaolo; Corrigan, Shannon; Hale, Matthew; Li, Chenhong; Veuille, Michel; Planes, Serge; Naylor, Gavin; Mona, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Population genetics studies on non-model organisms typically involve sampling few markers from multiple individuals. Next-generation sequencing approaches open up the possibility of sampling many more markers from fewer individuals to address the same questions. Here, we applied a target gene capture method to deep sequence ~1000 independent autosomal regions of a non-model organism, the blacktip reef shark (Carcharhinus melanopterus). We devised a sampling scheme based on the predictions of theoretical studies of metapopulations to show that sampling few individuals, but many loci, can be extremely informative to reconstruct the evolutionary history of species. We collected data from a single deme (SID) from Northern Australia and from a scattered sampling representing various locations throughout the Indian Ocean (SCD). We explored the genealogical signature of population dynamics detected from both sampling schemes using an ABC algorithm. We then contrasted these results with those obtained by fitting the data to a non-equilibrium finite island model. Both approaches supported an Nm value ~40, consistent with philopatry in this species. Finally, we demonstrate through simulation that metapopulations exhibit greater resilience to recent changes in effective size compared to unstructured populations. We propose an empirical approach to detect recent bottlenecks based on our sampling scheme. PMID:27651217

  11. Conservation and phylogeny of a novel family of non-Hox genes of the Antp class in Demospongiae (porifera).

    PubMed

    Richelle-Maurer, Evelyn; Boury-Esnault, Nicole; Itskovich, Valeria B; Manuel, Michaël; Pomponi, Shirley A; Van de Vyver, Gisèle; Borchiellini, Carole

    2006-08-01

    A survey across the most basal animal phylum, the Porifera, for the presence of homeobox-containing genes led to the isolation of 24 partial or complete homeobox sequences from 21 sponge species distributed in 15 families and 6 orders of Demospongiae. All the new sequences shared a high identity/similarity with EmH-3 (Ephydatia muelleri), a non-Hox gene from the Antp class. The Demox sequences, EmH-3, and related homeodomains formed a well-supported clade with no true affinity with any known bilaterian family, including the Tlx/Hox11 family, suggesting that the EmH-3 family of genes, comprising 31 members, represents a novel family of non-Hox genes, called the Demox family, widespread among Demospongiae. The presence of the Tlx/Hox11 specific signature in the Demox family and common regulatory elements suggested that the Demox and Tlx/Hox11 families are closely related. In the phylogenetic analyses, freshwater Haplosclerida appeared as monophyletic, and Haplosclerida and Halichondrida as polyphyletic, with a clade comprising Agelas species and Axinella corrugata. As for their expression, high levels of Demox transcripts were found in adult tissues. Our data add to the number of published poriferan homeobox sequences and provide independent confirmation of the current Demospongiae phylogenies.

  12. Conservation laws, bilinear forms and solitons for a fifth-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the attosecond pulses in an optical fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Jun; Tian, Bo Zhen, Hui-Ling; Sun, Wen-Rong

    2015-08-15

    Under investigation in this paper is a fifth-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which describes the propagation of attosecond pulses in an optical fiber. Based on the Lax pair, infinitely-many conservation laws are derived. With the aid of auxiliary functions, bilinear forms, one-, two- and three-soliton solutions in analytic forms are generated via the Hirota method and symbolic computation. Soliton velocity varies linearly with the coefficients of the high-order terms. Head-on interaction between the bidirectional two solitons and overtaking interaction between the unidirectional two solitons as well as the bound state are depicted. For the interactions among the three solitons, two head-on and one overtaking interactions, three overtaking interactions, an interaction between a bound state and a single soliton and the bound state are displayed. Graphical analysis shows that the interactions between the two solitons are elastic, and interactions among the three solitons are pairwise elastic. Stability analysis yields the modulation instability condition for the soliton solutions.