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Sample records for gene product trans-activates

  1. Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early gene product trans-activates gene expression from the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, S.; Kamine, J.; Markovitz, D.; Fenrick, R.; Pagano, J.

    1988-03-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients are frequently coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this report, the authors demonstrate that an EBV immediate-early gene product, BamHI MLF1, stimulates expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene linked to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter. The HIV promoter sequences necessary for trans-activation by EBV do not include the tat-responsive sequences. In addition, in contrast to the other herpesvirus trans-activators previously studied, the EBV BamHI MLF1 gene product appears to function in part by a posttranscriptional mechanism, since it increases pHIV-CAT protein activity more than it increases HIV-CAT mRNA. This ability of an EBV gene product to activate HIV gene expression may have biologic consequences in persons coinfected with both viruses.

  2. The full-length transcript of a caulimovirus is a polycistronic mRNA whose genes are trans activated by the product of gene VI.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, H B; Gowda, S; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1992-05-01

    Gene expression of figwort mosaic virus (FMV), a caulimovirus, was investigated by electroporation of Nicotiana edwardsonii cell suspension protoplasts with cloned viral constructs in which a reporter gene was inserted at various positions on the genome. The results showed that the genome of FMV contains two promoters; one is used for the production of a full-length RNA and another initiates synthesis of a separate monocistronic RNA for gene VI. Evidence is provided that the full-length transcript, the probable template for reverse transcription, can serve as a polycistronic mRNA for translation of genes I through V and perhaps also gene VI. Expression of all the genes on the polycistronic mRNA is trans activated by the gene VI protein. Reporter gene expression appears most efficient when its start codon is in close proximity to the stop codon of the preceding gene, as for the native genes of caulimoviruses. We propose that the gene VI product enables expression of the polycistronic mRNA by promoting reinitiation of ribosomes to give translational coupling of individual genes.

  3. Trans-activation function of a 3 prime truncated X gene-cell fusion product from integrated hepatitis B virus DNA in chronic hepatitis tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, Shinako; Koike, Katsuro )

    1990-08-01

    To investigate the expression and transactivation function of the X gene in integrated hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA from chronic hepatitis tissues, a series of transfectants containing cloned integrated HBV DNAs was made and analyzed for X mRNA expression and trans-activation activity by using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay. Most of the integrated HBV DNAs expressed X mRNA and encoded a product with trans-activation activity in spite of the loss of the 3{prime} end region of the X gene due to integration. From cDNA cloning and sequence analysis of X mRNA transcribed from native or integrated HBV DNA, the X protein was found to be translated from the X open reading frame without splicing. For integrated HBV DNA, transcription was extended to a cellular flanking DNA and an X gene-cell fusion transcript was terminated by using a cellular poly(A) signal. The amino acid sequence deduced from an X-cell fusion transcript indicated truncation of the carboxyl-terminal five amino acids, but the upstream region of seven amino acids conserved among hepadnaviruses was retained in the integrated HBV DNA, suggesting that this conserved region is essential for the transactivation function of the X protein. These findings support the following explanation for hepatocarcinogenesis by HBV DNA integration: the expression of a cellular oncogene(s) is transactivated at the time of chronic infection by the increasing amounts of the integrated HBV gene product(s), such as the X-cell fusion product.

  4. Cryptic carbapenem antibiotic production genes are widespread in Erwinia carotovora: facile trans activation by the carR transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed

    Holden, M T; McGowan, S J; Bycroft, B W; Stewart, G S; Williams, P; Salmond, G P

    1998-06-01

    Few strains of Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) make carbapenem antibiotics. Strain GS101 makes the basic carbapenem molecule, 1-carbapen-2-em-3-carboxylic acid (Car). The production of this antibiotic has been shown to be cell density dependent, requiring the accumulation of the small diffusible molecule N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (OHHL) in the growth medium. When the concentration of this inducer rises above a threshold level, OHHL is proposed to interact with the transcriptional activator of the carbapenem cluster (CarR) and induce carbapenem biosynthesis. The introduction of the GS101 carR gene into an Ecc strain (SCRI 193) which is naturally carbapenem-negative resulted in the production of Car. This suggested that strain SCRI 193 contained functional cryptic carbapenem biosynthetic genes, but lacked a functional carR homologue. The distribution of trans-activatable antibiotic genes was assayed in Erwinia strains from a culture collection and was found to be common in a large proportion of Ecc strains. Significantly, amongst the Ecc strains identified, a larger proportion contained trans-activatable cryptic genes than produced antibiotics constitutively. Southern hybridization of the chromosomal DNA of cryptic Ecc strains confirmed the presence of both the car biosynthetic cluster and the regulatory genes. Identification of homologues of the transcriptional activator carR suggests that the cause of the silencing of the carbapenem biosynthetic cluster in these strains is not the deletion of carR. In an attempt to identify the cause of the silencing in the Ecc strain SCRI 193 the carR homologue from this strain was cloned and sequenced. The SCRI 193 CarR homologue was 94% identical to the GS101 CarR and contained 14 amino acid substitutions. Both homologues could be expressed from their native promoters and ribosome-binding sites using an in vitro prokaryotic transcription and translation assay, and when the SCRI 193 carR homologue was

  5. The human papillomavirus type 16 E7 gene product interacts with and trans-activates the AP1 family of transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Antinore, M J; Birrer, M J; Patel, D; Nader, L; McCance, D J

    1996-01-01

    The E7 gene product of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) binds to the retinoblastoma gene product (pRb) and dissociates pRb-E2F complexes. However, the observation that the ability of E7 to bind pRb is not required for the HPV16-induced immortalization of primary keratinocytes prompted a search for other cellular factors bound by E7. Using a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion protein system, we show that E7 complexes with AP1 transcription factors including c-Jun, JunB, JunD and c-Fos. The ability of E7 to complex with c-Jun in vivo is demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and the yeast two-hybrid system. An analysis of E7 point mutants in the GST system indicates that the E7 zinc-finger motif, but not the pRb binding domain, is involved in these interactions. Using c-Jun deletion mutants, E7 binding maps between amino acids 224 and 286 of c-Jun. E7 trans-activates c-Jun-induced transcription from a Jun responsive promoter, and this activity correlates with the ability of E7 mutants to bind Jun proteins. Finally, a transcriptionally inactive c-Jun deletion, which can bind E7, interferes with the E7-induced transformation of rat embryo fibroblasts in cooperation with an activated ras, indicating that the Jun-E7 interaction is physiologically relevant and that Jun factors may be targeted in the E7 transformation pathway. Images PMID:8617242

  6. Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinberger, T.; Flint, Y.B.; Blank, M.; Etkin, S.; Lavi, S.

    1988-03-01

    The authors report a new mechanism of carcinogen action by which the expression of several genes was concomitantly enhanced. This mechanism involved the altered activity of cellular factors which modulate the expression of genes under their control. The increased expression was regulated at least in part on the transcriptional level and did not require amplification of the overexpressed genes. This phenomenon was transient; it was apparent as early as 24 h after carcinogen treatment and declined a few days later.

  7. Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinberger, T; Flint, Y B; Blank, M; Etkin, S; Lavi, S

    1988-01-01

    We report a new mechanism of carcinogen action by which the expression of several genes was concomitantly enhanced. This mechanism involved the altered activity of cellular factors which modulate the expression of genes under their control. The increased expression was regulated at least in part on the transcriptional level and did not require amplification of the overexpressed genes. This phenomenon was transient; it was apparent as early as 24 h after carcinogen treatment and declined a few days later. Images PMID:2835673

  8. Immediate-early gene region of human cytomegalovirus trans-activates the promoter of human immunodeficiency virus

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.G.; Kenney, S.C.; Kamine, J.; Pagano, J.S.; Huang, E.S.

    1987-12-01

    Almost all homosexual patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are also actively infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The authors have hypothesized that an interaction between HCMV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the agent that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, may exist at a molecular level and contribute to the manifestations of HIV infection. In this report, they demonstrate that the immediate-early gene region of HCMV, in particular immediate-early region 2, trans-activates the expression of the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase that is fused to the HIV long terminal repeat and carried by plasmid pHIV-CAT. The HCMV immediate-early trans-activator increases the level of mRNA from the plamid pHIV-CAT. The sequences of HIV that are responsive to trans-activation by the HDMV immediate-early region are distinct from HIV sequences that are required for response to the HIV tat. The stimulation of HIV gene expression by HDMV gene functions could enhance the consequences of HIV infection in persons with previous or concurrent HCMV infection.

  9. Recombinant production of Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 trans-activator and characterization of its DNA-binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chun Shen; Goh, Siang Ling; Krishnan, Gopala; Ng, Ching Ching

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the recombinant production of a biologically active Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 trans-activator, i.e., Z-encoded broadly reactive activator (ZEBRA), that recognized specific DNA motifs. We used auto-induction for histidine-tagged BZLF1 expression in Escherichia coli and immobilized cobalt affinity membrane chromatography for protein purification under native conditions. We obtained the purified BZLF1 at a yield of 5.4mg per gram of wet weight cells at 75% purity, in which 27% of the recombinant BZLF1 remained biologically active. The recombinant BZLF1 bound to oligonucleotides containing ZEBRA response elements, either AP-1 or ZIIIB, but not a ZIIIB mutant. The recombinant BZLF1 showed a specific DNA-binding activity which could be useful for functional studies.

  10. cis and trans activation of globin gene transcription in transient assays.

    PubMed

    Treisman, R; Green, M R; Maniatis, T

    1983-12-01

    We examined the effects of the simian virus 40 enhancer sequence on transcription of cloned human alpha- and beta-globin genes shortly after their introduction into cultured mammalian cells. We find that (i) detectable transcription of the beta-globin gene but not the alpha-globin gene requires linkage to the enhancer; (ii) the enhancer increases the amount of beta-globin RNA at least 100-fold but results in only a 5- to 10-fold increase in the amount of alpha-globin RNA; (iii) plasmid replication does not increase the level of beta-globin RNA, regardless of linkage to the enhancer, but does result in an approximately equal to 50-fold increase in the level of alpha-globin RNA; (iv) the enhancer is not required for and does not increase transcription of either gene in 293 cells, an adenovirus 5-transformed human kidney cell line. We also show that an enhancer sequence is not required for activity of the normally enhancer-dependent simian virus 40 early promoter in 293 cells, indicating that these cells contain a trans-acting factor(s) that circumvents the requirement for the enhancer sequence.

  11. Exosomes from HIV-1-infected Cells Stimulate Production of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines through Trans-activating Response (TAR) RNA.

    PubMed

    Sampey, Gavin C; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Schwab, Angela; Barclay, Robert; Punya, Shreya; Chung, Myung-Chul; Hakami, Ramin M; Zadeh, Mohammad Asad; Lepene, Benjamin; Klase, Zachary A; El-Hage, Nazira; Young, Mary; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2016-01-15

    HIV-1 infection results in a chronic illness because long-term highly active antiretroviral therapy can lower viral titers to an undetectable level. However, discontinuation of therapy rapidly increases virus burden. Moreover, patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy frequently develop various metabolic disorders, neurocognitive abnormalities, and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously shown that exosomes containing trans-activating response (TAR) element RNA enhance susceptibility of undifferentiated naive cells to HIV-1 infection. This study indicates that exosomes from HIV-1-infected primary cells are highly abundant with TAR RNA as detected by RT-real time PCR. Interestingly, up to a million copies of TAR RNA/μl were also detected in the serum from HIV-1-infected humanized mice suggesting that TAR RNA may be stable in vivo. Incubation of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells with primary macrophages resulted in a dramatic increase of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-β, indicating that exosomes containing TAR RNA could play a direct role in control of cytokine gene expression. The intact TAR molecule was able to bind to PKR and TLR3 effectively, whereas the 5' and 3' stems (TAR microRNAs) bound best to TLR7 and -8 and none to PKR. Binding of TAR to PKR did not result in its phosphorylation, and therefore, TAR may be a dominant negative decoy molecule in cells. The TLR binding through either TAR RNA or TAR microRNA potentially can activate the NF-κB pathway and regulate cytokine expression. Collectively, these results imply that exosomes containing TAR RNA could directly affect the proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and may explain a possible mechanism of inflammation observed in HIV-1-infected patients under cART. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Exosomes from HIV-1-infected Cells Stimulate Production of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines through Trans-activating Response (TAR) RNA*

    PubMed Central

    Sampey, Gavin C.; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Schwab, Angela; Barclay, Robert; Punya, Shreya; Chung, Myung-Chul; Hakami, Ramin M.; Asad Zadeh, Mohammad; Lepene, Benjamin; Klase, Zachary A.; El-Hage, Nazira; Young, Mary; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 infection results in a chronic illness because long-term highly active antiretroviral therapy can lower viral titers to an undetectable level. However, discontinuation of therapy rapidly increases virus burden. Moreover, patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy frequently develop various metabolic disorders, neurocognitive abnormalities, and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously shown that exosomes containing trans-activating response (TAR) element RNA enhance susceptibility of undifferentiated naive cells to HIV-1 infection. This study indicates that exosomes from HIV-1-infected primary cells are highly abundant with TAR RNA as detected by RT-real time PCR. Interestingly, up to a million copies of TAR RNA/μl were also detected in the serum from HIV-1-infected humanized mice suggesting that TAR RNA may be stable in vivo. Incubation of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells with primary macrophages resulted in a dramatic increase of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-β, indicating that exosomes containing TAR RNA could play a direct role in control of cytokine gene expression. The intact TAR molecule was able to bind to PKR and TLR3 effectively, whereas the 5′ and 3′ stems (TAR microRNAs) bound best to TLR7 and -8 and none to PKR. Binding of TAR to PKR did not result in its phosphorylation, and therefore, TAR may be a dominant negative decoy molecule in cells. The TLR binding through either TAR RNA or TAR microRNA potentially can activate the NF-κB pathway and regulate cytokine expression. Collectively, these results imply that exosomes containing TAR RNA could directly affect the proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and may explain a possible mechanism of inflammation observed in HIV-1-infected patients under cART. PMID:26553869

  13. The functional importance of a cap site-proximal region of the human prointerleukin 1 beta gene is defined by viral protein trans-activation.

    PubMed Central

    Hunninghake, G W; Monks, B G; Geist, L J; Monick, M M; Monroy, M A; Stinski, M F; Webb, A C; Dayer, J M; Auron, P E; Fenton, M J

    1992-01-01

    Prointerleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) is a cytokine that mediates a broad range of biological activities. Genomic sequences that regulate IL-1 beta transcription include both inducible regulatory elements located more than 2,700 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site (cap site) and proximal elements located near the TATA box of this gene. In this study, we focused on the identification and characterization of trans-acting nuclear regulatory proteins that bind to the cap site-proximal region of the human IL-1 beta gene. We identified a protein, termed NFIL-1 beta A (NF beta A), that binds to a highly conserved 12-bp DNA sequence (-49 to -38) located upstream of the TATA box motif in both the human and murine IL-1 beta genes. The IL-1 alpha gene, which lacks a TATA motif, does not possess an NF beta A-binding sequence within the promoter region, suggesting that NF beta A may selectively regulate IL-1 beta expression. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we identified several distinct DNA-protein complexes that are expressed in a cell-type-specific manner. In monocytic cell lines, the relative abundance of these complexes varies rapidly following stimulation of the cells with phorbol esters or lipopolysaccharide. UV cross-linking analysis identified two distinct DNA-binding polypeptides that comprise distinct complexes. The functional role of NF beta A was assessed in transient transfection assays. These data indicate that NF beta A is required for both basal and inducible promoter activity in monocytic cells. Furthermore, the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early 1 gene product requires the presence of NF beta A in order to trans-activate the proximal IL-1 beta promoter in a monocytic cell line. We propose that NF beta A is a factor that mediates either direct or indirect activation by the immediate-early 1 gene product. The proximity of this essential factor to the TATA motif suggests a possible role in transcriptional initiation. Images PMID:1630455

  14. Silencing and trans-activation of the mouse IL-2 gene in Xenopus oocytes by proteins from resting and mitogen-induced primary T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Mouzaki, A; Weil, R; Muster, L; Rungger, D

    1991-01-01

    The Xenopus oocyte system was used to test functionally, putative trans-active elements involved in the transcriptional control of the mouse interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene in resting and mitogen-induced primary T-lymphocytes. The IL-2 gene injected into the oocyte is active over a wide range of DNA concentrations. This basal activity is silenced by the addition of protein extracts from G0-arrested spleen cells. Extracts from 8 h-stimulated spleen cells do not silence but moderately increase transcription over basal level. When IL-2 transcription is silenced first by an injection of extract from resting spleen cells, the addition of proteins from stimulated cells results in a strong increase in transcription (derepression). Use of proteins from purified splenic T-lymphocytes shows that both silencer(s) and activator(s) are contributed by these cells. Extracts from control tissues have neither a silencing nor stimulatory effect. None of the proteins tested affects the activities of co-injected control genes. Injections with IL-2 promoter mutants indicate that the main target sequence of the silencing and activating factors is a purine region (Pu-box) lying between positions -261 and -292 upstream of the IL-2 gene. Bandshift assays show differential binding of the Pu-box with proteins from resting or activated T-cells. Images PMID:2026141

  15. Development of a Fish Cell Biosensor System for Genotoxicity Detection Based on DNA Damage-Induced Trans-Activation of p21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Deyu; Zhang, Zhixia; Guo, Huarong

    2012-01-01

    p21CIP1/WAF1 is a p53-target gene in response to cellular DNA damage. Here we report the development of a fish cell biosensor system for high throughput genotoxicity detection of new drugs, by stably integrating two reporter plasmids of pGL3-p21-luc (human p21 promoter linked to firefly luciferase) and pRL-CMV-luc (CMV promoter linked to Renilla luciferase) into marine flatfish flounder gill (FG) cells, referred to as p21FGLuc. Initial validation of this genotoxicity biosensor system showed that p21FGLuc cells had a wild-type p53 signaling pathway and responded positively to the challenge of both directly acting genotoxic agents (bleomycin and mitomycin C) and indirectly acting genotoxic agents (cyclophosphamide with metabolic activation), but negatively to cyclophosphamide without metabolic activation and the non-genotoxic agents ethanol and D-mannitol, thus confirming a high specificity and sensitivity, fast and stable response to genotoxic agents for this easily maintained fish cell biosensor system. This system was especially useful in the genotoxicity detection of Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), a rodent carcinogen, but negatively reported in most non-mammalian in vitro mutation assays, by providing a strong indication of genotoxicity for DEHP. A limitation for this biosensor system was that it might give false positive results in response to sodium butyrate and any other agents, which can trans-activate the p21 gene in a p53-independent manner. PMID:25585933

  16. trans activation of nerve growth factor in transgenic mice containing the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I tax gene.

    PubMed

    Green, J E

    1991-09-01

    Three lines of transgenic mice containing the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) tax gene develop neurofibromas composed of perineural fibroblasts (S. H. Hinrichs, M. Nerenberg, R. K. Reynolds, G. Khoury, and G. Jay, Science 237:1340-1343, 1987; M. Nerenberg, S. H. Hinrichs, R. K. Reynolds, G. Khoury, and G. Jay, Science 237:1324-1327, 1987). Tumors and tumor cell lines derived from these mice produce neurite outgrowth from PC-12 cells and nerve growth factor (NGF), as determined by RNA (Northern) blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. In vitro cotransfection studies demonstrate that Tax is able to trans activate the NGF promoter in NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells. The major cis-acting tax-responsive element in the NGF promoter (AGGGTGTGACGA) has 92% homology with a tax-responsive element contained within the 21-bp repeats of the HTLV-I long terminal repeat. The receptor for NGF is also expressed in the transgenic tumor cells, suggesting that Tax may activate an autocrine mechanism through the upregulation of NGF.

  17. Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite as a plant gene delivery vector trans-activated by taxonomically diverse geminiviruses.

    PubMed

    Kharazmi, S; Behjatnia, S A A; Hamzehzarghani, H; Niazi, A

    2012-07-01

    Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite (CLCuMB) replicates in tobacco, tomato and datura plants in the presence of the helper viruses tomato leaf curl virus-Australia, Iranian isolates of tomato yellow leaf curl virus, tomato leaf curl Karnataka virus, and beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV). Infectious recombinant CLCuMB constructs were made in which segments of either the CaMV 35S or the petunia ChsA promoter replaced the CLCuMB βC1 ORF, and these were designated pBinβΔC1-35S and pBinβΔC1-ChsA, respectively. Inoculation of tobacco plants containing a functional 35S-GUS transgene with pBinβΔC1-35S, and normal petunia plants with pBinβΔC1-ChsA, in the presence of helper viruses resulted in silencing of GUS and ChsA activities in transgenic tobacco and non-transgenic petunia plants, respectively. Replication of CLCuMB with different geminiviruses, especially BSCTV, a curtovirus with a broad host range, makes it a valuable gene delivery vector to the large number of host plant species of geminiviruses that support CLCuMB.

  18. trans activation of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and the interleukin-2 receptor in transgenic mice carrying the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 tax gene.

    PubMed

    Green, J E; Begley, C G; Wagner, D K; Waldmann, T A; Jay, G

    1989-11-01

    Three lines of transgenic mice carrying the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 tax gene have previously been reported to develop neurofibromas composed of perineural fibroblasts (S. H. Hinrichs, M. Nerenberg, R. K. Reynolds, G. Khoury, and G. Jay, Science 237:1340-1343, 1987; M. Nerenberg, S. H. Hinrichs, R. K. Reynolds, G. Khoury, and G. Jay, Science 237:1324-1329, 1987). Tumors from these mice and tumor cell lines derived from them expressed high levels of tax RNA and protein. They also expressed high levels of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene as measured by proliferative responses of FD-CP1 target cells using conditioned media from tumor cells and by Northern (RNA) blot analysis of RNA from tumors and tumor cell lines. Although other tissues, such as salivary glands and muscles, in the transgenic mice also expressed high levels of tax, they did not express the gene for GM-CSF. This indicates that tissue-specific cellular factors, in addition to tax, are required for GM-CSF gene expression. Systemic effects of excessive GM-CSF production were demonstrated by infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes into tumor tissues which are not necrotic, by peripheral granulocytosis, and by splenomegaly resulting from myeloid hyperplasia. The interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor was also found to be expressed by the tumors and tumor cell lines as measured by IL-2-binding and cross-linking studies. This is the first demonstration that the IL-2 receptor can be activated by tax in a nonlymphoid cell type. These in vivo findings are consistent with other reports which have demonstrated in vitro cis-regulatory elements within the 5'-flanking regions of the genes for GM-CSF and the IL-2 receptor which are responsive to trans activation by the tax gene.

  19. Bovine immunodeficiency-like virus encodes factors which trans activate the long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Pallansch, L A; Lackman-Smith, C S; Gonda, M A

    1992-01-01

    Lentiviruses are known to encode factors which trans activate expression from the viral long terminal repeat (LTR); the primary trans activator is the tat gene product. One of the putative accessory genes (tat) of the bovine immunodeficiency-like virus (BIV) bears sequence similarity to other lentivirus tat genes. This finding suggests that BIV may encode a trans-activating protein capable of stimulating LTR-directed gene expression. To test this hypothesis in vitro, BIV LTR-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene plasmids were constructed and transfected into three cell lines established from canine, bovine, or lapine tissues that are susceptible to BIV infection. The level of BIV LTR-directed CAT gene expression was significantly elevated in BIV-infected cells compared with uninfected cells. The relatively high basal-level expression of BIV LTR-CAT in uninfected canine and bovine cell lines suggests that cellular factors play a role in regulating BIV LTR-directed gene expression. Additionally, by using a clonal canine cell line in which the BIV LTR-CAT plasmid is stably expressed, BIV LTR-directed CAT expression is elevated 15- to 80-fold by cocultivation with BIV-infected cells, supporting the notion that BIV encodes a trans activator. The relative specificity of this viral activation was assessed by coculturing the clonal BIV LTR-CAT cell line with bovine leukemia virus- or bovine syncytial virus-infected cells; these bovine retroviruses increased expression from the BIV LTR only two- to threefold. Thus, BIV LTR regulatory elements in infected cells, like those of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and other lentiviruses, are trans activated, presumably through the action of a Tat-like protein and cellular factors. PMID:1313891

  20. The equine herpesvirus-1 IR3 gene that lies antisense to the sole immediate-early (IE) gene is trans-activated by the IE protein, and is poorly expressed to a protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Byung Chul; Breitenbach, Jonathan E.; Kim, Seong K.; O'Callaghan, Dennis J. . E-mail: docall@lsuhsc.edu

    2007-06-20

    The unique IR3 gene of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) is expressed as a late 1.0-kb transcript. Previous studies confirmed the IR3 transcription initiation site and tentatively identified other cis-acting elements specific to IR3 such as a TATA box, a 443 base pair 5'untranslated region (UTR), a 285 base pair open reading frame (ORF), and a poly adenylation (A) signal [Holden, V.R., Harty, R.N., Yalamanchili, R.R., O'Callaghan, D.J., 1992. The IR3 gene of equine herpesvirus type 1: a unique gene regulated by sequences within the intron of the immediate-early gene. DNA Seq. 3, 143-152]. Transient transfection assays revealed that the IR3 promoter is strongly trans-activated by the IE protein (IEP) and that coexpression of the IEP with the early EICP0 and IR4 regulatory proteins results in maximal trans-activation of the IR3 promoter. Gel shift assays revealed that the IEP directly binds to the IR3 promoter region. Western blot analysis showed that the IR3 protein produced in E. coli was detected by antibodies to IR3 synthetic peptides; however, the IR3 protein was not detected in EHV-1 infected cell extracts by these same anti-IR3 antibodies, even though the IR3 transcript was detected by northern blot. These findings suggest that the IR3 may not be expressed to a protein. Expression of an IR3/GFP fusion gene was not observed, but expression of a GFP/IR3 fusion gene was detected by fluorescent microscopy. In further attempts to detect the IR3/GFP fusion protein using anti-GFP antibody, western blot analysis showed that the IR3/GFP fusion protein was not detected in vivo. Interestingly, a truncated form of the GFP/IR3 protein was synthesized from the GFP/IR3 fusion gene. However, GFP/IR3 and IR3/GFP fusion proteins of the predicted sizes were synthesized by in vitro coupled transcription and translation of the fusion genes, suggesting poor expression of the IR3 protein in vivo. The possible role of the IR3 transcript in EHV-1 infection is discussed.

  1. The equine herpesvirus-1 IR3 gene that lies antisense to the sole immediate-early (IE) gene is trans-activated by the IE protein, and is poorly expressed to a protein

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Byung Chul; Breitenbach, Jonathan E.; Kim, Seong K.; O’Callaghan, Dennis J.

    2007-01-01

    The unique IR3 gene of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) is expressed as a late 1.0-kb transcript. Previous studies confirmed the IR3 transcription initiation site and tentatively identified other cis-acting elements specific to IR3 such as a TATA box, a 443 base pair 5′untranslated region (UTR), a 285 base pair open reading frame (ORF) and a poly adenylation (A) signal (Holden et al., 1992 DNA Seq 3, 143-52). Transient transfection assays revealed that the IR3 promoter is strongly trans-activated by the IE protein (IEP) and that coexpression of the IEP with the early EICP0 and IR4 regulatory proteins results in maximal trans-activation of the IR3 promoter. Gel shift assays revealed that the IEP directly binds to the IR3 promoter region. Western blot analysis showed that the IR3 protein produced in E. coli was detected by antibodies to IR3 synthetic peptides; however, the IR3 protein was not detected in EHV-1 infected cell extracts by these same anti-IR3 antibodies, even though the IR3 transcript was detected by northern blot. These findings suggest that the IR3 may not be expressed to a protein. Expression of an IR3/GFP fusion gene was not observed, but expression of a GFP/IR3 fusion gene was detected by fluorescent microscopy. In further attempts to detect the IR3/GFP fusion protein using anti-GFP antibody, western blot analysis showed that the IR3/GFP fusion protein was not detected in vivo. Interestingly, a truncated form of the GFP/IR3 protein was synthesized from the GFP/IR3 fusion gene. However, GFP/IR3 and IR3/GFP fusion proteins of the predicted sizes were synthesized by in vitro coupled transcription and translation of the fusion genes, suggesting poor expression of the IR3 protein in vivo. The possible role of the IR3 transcript in EHV-1 infection is discussed. PMID:17306852

  2. Additive activity between the trans-activation response RNA-binding protein, TRBP2, and cyclin T1 on HIV type 1 expression and viral production in murine cells.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Pier-Luigi; Daher, Aïcha; Bannwarth, Sylvie; Voortman, Johannes; Peden, Keith W C; Hiscott, John; Mouland, Andrew J; Benarous, Richard; Gatignol, Anne

    2003-09-01

    Tat-mediated trans-activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) occurs through the phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II. The kinase complex, pTEFb, composed of cyclin T1 (CycT1) and CDK9, mediates this process. The trans-activation response (TAR) RNA-binding protein 2 (TRBP2) increases HIV-1 LTR expression through TAR and protein kinase R (PKR) binding, but not through interactions with the Tat-CycT1-CDK9 complex. TRBP2 and the Tat-CycT1-CDK9 complex have overlapping binding sites on TAR RNA. TRBP2 and CycT1 increased Tat trans-activation in NIH 3T3 cells with additive effects. Upon transfection of HIV-1 pLAI, pNL4-3, pMAL, and pAD molecular clones, reverse transcriptase (RT) activity and p24 concentration were decreased 200- to 900-fold in NIH 3T3 cells compared with HeLa cells in both cells and supernatants. In murine cells, cotransfection of the HIV clones with CycT1 or TRBP2 increased modestly the expression of RT activity in cell extracts. The analysis of Gag expression in murine cells transfected with CycT1 compared with human cells showed a 20-fold decrease in expression and a strong processing defect. The expression of both CycT1 and TRBP2 had a more than additive activity on RT function in cell extracts and on viral particle production in supernatant of murine cells. These results suggest an activity of CycT1 and TRBP2 at different steps in HIV-1 expression and indicate the requirement for another posttranscriptional factor in murine cells for full HIV replication.

  3. Nuclear factor-I and activator protein-2 bind in a mutually exclusive way to overlapping promoter sequences and trans-activate the human growth hormone gene.

    PubMed Central

    Courtois, S J; Lafontaine, D A; Lemaigre, F P; Durviaux, S M; Rousseau, G G

    1990-01-01

    Transcription of the human growth hormone (hGH) gene and its regulation are controlled by trans-acting factors that bind to hGH gene promoter sequences. Several DNase I footprints have been described within 500 bp of this promoter, one of which (-289 to -267) has not yet been ascribed to a defined factor. By DNase I footprinting, gel mobility shift, and methylation interference assays with extracts from HeLa cells and GH-producing pituitary tumor (GC) cells, we show that this factor belongs to the NF-I family. When NF-I was competed out of the cell extracts, the trans-acting factor AP-2 bound to the same site as NF-I. AP-2 was present not only in HeLa cells, but also in GC cells albeit at a much lower concentration. Consistent with the mutually exclusive binding of NF-I and AP-2, their methylation interference patterns included four guanine residues that were crucial for binding of both NF-I and AP-2. Cell-free transcription from the hGH gene promoter showed that these two factors can transactivate this gene. Images PMID:2308836

  4. CITED2 silencing sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin by inhibiting p53 trans-activation and chromatin relaxation on the ERCC1 DNA repair gene

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Chin; Chang, Pu-Yuan; Chao, Chuck C.-K.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we show that silencing of CITED2 using small-hairpin RNA (shCITED2) induced DNA damage and reduction of ERCC1 gene expression in HEK293, HeLa and H1299 cells, even in the absence of cisplatin. In contrast, ectopic expression of ERCC1 significantly reduced intrinsic and induced DNA damage levels, and rescued the effects of CITED2 silencing on cell viability. The effects of CITED2 silencing on DNA repair and cell death were associated with p53 activity. Furthermore, CITED2 silencing caused severe elimination of the p300 protein and markers of relaxed chromatin (acetylated H3 and H4, i.e. H3K9Ac and H3K14Ac) in HEK293 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that DNA damage induced binding of p53 along with H3K9Ac or H3K14Ac at the ERCC1 promoter, an effect which was almost entirely abrogated by silencing of CITED2 or p300. Moreover, lentivirus-based CITED2 silencing sensitized HeLa cell line-derived tumor xenografts to cisplatin in immune-deficient mice. These results demonstrate that CITED2/p300 can be recruited by p53 at the promoter of the repair gene ERCC1 in response to cisplatin-induced DNA damage. The CITED2/p300/p53/ERCC1 pathway is thus involved in the cell response to cisplatin and represents a potential target for cancer therapy. PMID:26384430

  5. A transcriptional enhancer sequence of HTLV-I is responsible for trans-activation mediated by p40 chi HTLV-I.

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, J; Seiki, M; Sato, M; Yoshida, M

    1986-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) contains a unique sequence pX that is located between env and the 3' long terminal repeat (LTR) and codes for three pX proteins, p40 chi, pp27 chi-III and pp21 chi-III. One of these proteins, p40 chi, was previously shown to activate transcription from the LTR in a trans-acting manner, which suggested that it activated some cellular genes involved in leukemogenesis. In this study, the sequences in the LTR responsible for this trans-activation were analyzed. Construction of deletion mutants of the LTR in pLTR-CAT and measurement of their activities in trans-activated expression of the CAT gene showed that sequences upstream of the TATA box were responsible for the trans-activation mediated by p40 chi. The active unit was identified as an enhancer sequence containing direct repeats by inserting it into an enhancer-minus SV40 promoter. Thus, it was concluded that an enhancer sequence in HTLV-I LTR is responsible, at least in part, for transcriptional trans-activation mediated by the viral product p40 chi. Images Fig.2. Fig.4. PMID:3011423

  6. trans-Activation of a globin promoter in nonerythroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, T; Felsenfeld, G

    1991-01-01

    We show that expression in fibroblasts of a single cDNA, encoding the erythroid DNA-binding protein Eryf1 (GF-1, NF-E1), very efficiently activates transcription of a chicken alpha-globin promoter, trans-Activation in these cells occurred when Eryf1 bound to a single site within a minimal globin promoter. In contrast, efficient activation in erythroid cells required multiple Eryf1 binding sites. Our results indicate that mechanisms exist that are capable of modulating the trans-acting capabilities of Eryf1 in a cell-specific manner, without affecting DNA binding. The response of the minimal globin promoter to Eryf1 in fibroblasts was at least as great as for optimal constructions in erythroid cells. Therefore, the assay provides a very simple and sensitive system with which to study gene activation by a tissue-specific factor. Images PMID:1990287

  7. Random mutagenesis of the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 trans-activator of transcription (HIV-1 Tat).

    PubMed Central

    Siderovski, D P; Matsuyama, T; Frigerio, E; Chui, S; Min, X; Erfle, H; Sumner-Smith, M; Barnett, R W; Mak, T W

    1992-01-01

    A new method is described for the direct construction of randomly mutagenized genes by applying the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to an oligonucleotide synthesized using doped nucleotide reservoirs. We have demonstrated the utility of this method by generating a library of mutant HIV-1 tat genes. Several arbitrarily selected, inactive tat clones were sequenced to evaluate the extent of the mutagenesis. Moreover, fourteen recombinants encoding varying levels of transcriptional trans-activator activity were isolated by transient transfection of sub-library pools into a HeLa cell line bearing an HIV-LTR-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene. Sequence data revealed a spectrum of alterations including nucleotide substitutions, insertions, and deletions, suggesting that mutations arose from both the doped DNA synthesis and the subsequent PCR 'rescue' of full-length product. Sequence comparison between inactive and active Tat clones revealed a selection pressure against amino-acid substitutions within the N-terminal domains of Tat, indicating the importance of this region to trans-activation competence. In addition, single and double missense mutations within the basic-rich, TAR RNA-binding domain were seen to be tolerated within active Tat clones. Images PMID:1437550

  8. EPAS1 trans-activation during hypoxia requires p42/p44 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Conrad, P W; Freeman, T L; Beitner-Johnson, D; Millhorn, D E

    1999-11-19

    Hypoxia is a common environmental stress that regulates gene expression and cell function. A number of hypoxia-regulated transcription factors have been identified and have been shown to play critical roles in mediating cellular responses to hypoxia. One of these is the endothelial PAS-domain protein 1 (EPAS1/HIF2-alpha/HLF/HRF). This protein is 48% homologous to hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1-alpha). To date, virtually nothing is known about the signaling pathways that lead to either EPAS1 or HIF1-alpha activation. Here we show that EPAS1 is phosphorylated when PC12 cells are exposed to hypoxia and that p42/p44 MAPK is a critical mediator of EPAS1 activation. Pretreatment of PC12 cells with the MEK inhibitor, PD98059, completely blocked hypoxia-induced trans-activation of a hypoxia response element (HRE) reporter gene by transfected EPAS1. Likewise, expression of a constitutively active MEK1 mimicked the effects of hypoxia on HRE reporter gene expression. However, pretreatment with PD98059 had no effect on EPAS1 phosphorylation during hypoxia, suggesting that MAPK targets other proteins that are critical for the trans-activation of EPAS1. We further show that hypoxia-induced trans-activation of EPAS1 is independent of Ras. Finally, pretreatment with calmodulin antagonists nearly completely blocked both the hypoxia-induced phosphorylation of MAPK and the EPAS1 trans-activation of HRE-Luc. These results demonstrate that the MAPK pathway is a critical mediator of EPAS1 activation and that activation of MAPK and EPAS1 occurs through a calmodulin-sensitive pathway and not through the GTPase, Ras. These results are the first to identify a specific signaling pathway involved in EPAS1 activation.

  9. Lack of trans-activation function for Maedi Visna virus and Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus Tat proteins.

    PubMed

    Villet, Stéphanie; Faure, Claudine; Bouzar, Baya Amel; Morin, Thierry; Verdier, Gérard; Chebloune, Yahia; Legras, Catherine

    2003-03-15

    All lentiviruses contain an open reading frame located shortly upstream or inside of the env gene and encoding a small protein which has been designated Tat. This designation was mainly with respect to the positional analogy with the first exon of the trans-activator protein of the well studied human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In this work we comparatively studied the trans- activation activity induced by Tat proteins of the small ruminant Maedi Visna virus (MVV) of sheep and Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) of goats on MVV and CAEV LTRs with that induced by the human lentivirus HIV-1 on its own LTR. The HIV-1 LTR alone weakly expresses the reporter GFP gene except when the HIV-1 Tat protein is coexpressed, the GFP expression is increased 60-fold. In similar conditions only minimal trans-activation increasing two- to three-fold the MVV and CAEV LTR activity was found with MVV Tat protein, and no trans-activation activity was detected in any used cell type or with any virus strain when CAEV Tat was tested. These results indicate that the small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) differ from the primate lentiviruses in their control of expression from the viral LTRs and put into question the biological role of the encoded protein named "Tat."

  10. A versatile cis-blocking and trans-activation strategy for ribozyme characterization

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Andrew B.; Liang, Joe C.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic RNA control devices that use ribozymes as gene-regulatory components have been applied to controlling cellular behaviors in response to environmental signals. Quantitative measurement of the in vitro cleavage rate constants associated with ribozyme-based devices is essential for advancing the molecular design and optimization of this class of gene-regulatory devices. One of the key challenges encountered in ribozyme characterization is the efficient generation of full-length RNA from in vitro transcription reactions, where conditions generally lead to significant ribozyme cleavage. Current methods for generating full-length ribozyme-encoding RNA rely on a trans-blocking strategy, which requires a laborious gel separation and extraction step. Here, we develop a simple two-step gel-free process including cis-blocking and trans-activation steps to support scalable generation of functional full-length ribozyme-encoding RNA. We demonstrate our strategy on various types of natural ribozymes and synthetic ribozyme devices, and the cleavage rate constants obtained for the RNA generated from our strategy are comparable with those generated through traditional methods. We further develop a rapid, label-free ribozyme cleavage assay based on surface plasmon resonance, which allows continuous, real-time monitoring of ribozyme cleavage. The surface plasmon resonance-based characterization assay will complement the versatile cis-blocking and trans-activation strategy to broadly advance our ability to characterize and engineer ribozyme-based devices. PMID:23155065

  11. Promoter-specific trans activation and repression by human cytomegalovirus immediate-early proteins involves common and unique protein domains.

    PubMed Central

    Stenberg, R M; Fortney, J; Barlow, S W; Magrane, B P; Nelson, J A; Ghazal, P

    1990-01-01

    trans activation of promoters by viral regulatory proteins provides a useful tool to study coordinate control of gene expression. Immediate-early (IE) regions 1 and 2 of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) code for a series of proteins that originate from differentially spliced mRNAs. These IE proteins are proposed to regulate the temporal expression of the viral genome. To examine the structure and function of the IE proteins, we used linker insertion mutagenesis of the IE gene region as well as cDNA expression vector cloning of the abundant IE mRNAs. We showed that IE1 and IE2 proteins of CMV exhibit promoter-specific differences in their modes of action by either trans activating early and IE promoters or repressing the major IE promoter (MIEP). Transient cotransfection experiments with permissive human cells revealed a synergistic interaction between the 72- and the 86-kilodalton (kDa) IE proteins in trans activating an early promoter. In addition, transfection studies revealed that the 72-kDa protein was capable of trans activating the MIEP. In contrast, the 86-kDa protein specifically repressed the MIEP and this repression was suppressed by the 72-kDa protein. Furthermore, observations based on the primary sequence structure revealed a modular arrangement of putative regulatory motifs that could either potentiate or repress gene expression. These modular domains are either shared or unique among the IE proteins. From these data, we propose a model for IE protein function in the coordinate control of CMV gene expression. Images PMID:2157043

  12. FIS-dependent trans activation of stable RNA operons of Escherichia coli under various growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, L; Verbeek, H; Vijgenboom, E; van Drunen, C; Vanet, A; Bosch, L

    1992-02-01

    In Escherichia coli transcription of the tRNA operon thrU (tufB) and the rRNA operon rrnB is trans-activated by the protein FIS. This protein, which stimulates the inversion of various viral DNA segments, binds specifically to a cis-acting sequence (designated UAS) upstream of the promoter of thrU (tufB) and the P1 promoter of the rrnB operon. There are indications that this type of regulation is representative for the regulation of more stable RNA operons. In the present investigation we have studied UAS-dependent transcription activation of the thrU (tufB) operon in the presence and absence of FIS during a normal bacterial growth cycle and after a nutritional shift-up. In early log phase the expression of the operon rises steeply in wild-type cells, whereafter it declines. Concomitantly, a peak of the cellular FIS concentration is observed. Cells in the stationary phase are depleted of FIS. The rather abrupt increase of transcription activation depends on the nutritional quality of the medium. It is not seen in minimal medium. After a shift from minimal to rich medium, a peak of transcription activation and of FIS concentration is measured. This peak gets higher as the medium gets more strongly enriched. We conclude that a correlation between changes of the UAS-dependent activation of the thrU (tufB) operon and changes of the cellular FIS concentration under a variety of experimental conditions exists. This correlation strongly suggests that the production of FIS responds to environmental signals, thereby trans-activating the operon. Cells unable to produce FIS (fis cells) also show an increase of operon transcription in the early log phase and after a nutritional shift-up, albeit less pronounced than that wild-type cells. Presumably it is controlled by the ribosome feedback regulatory system. cis activation of the operon by the upstream activator sequence is apparent in the absence of FIS. This activation is constant throughout the entire growth cycle and is

  13. The number of positively charged amino acids in the basic domain of Tat is critical for trans-activation and complex formation with TAR RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Delling, U; Roy, S; Sumner-Smith, M; Barnett, R; Reid, L; Rosen, C A; Sonenberg, N

    1991-01-01

    The basic domain of Tat is required for trans-activation of viral gene expression. We have performed scanning peptide studies to demonstrate that only this domain is capable of binding to the TAR RNA stem-loop. Strikingly, the basic domain of the other human immunodeficiency virus trans-acting factor, Rev, but no other region, is also capable of binding to TAR. Peptide derivatives of Tat do not require the highly conserved glutamine residue at position 54 for TAR binding, since it may be substituted or deleted. In addition, the two lysine residues may be replaced by arginines. Analysis of binding and trans-activation demonstrated that homopolymers of arginine can completely substitute for the basic domain. Such homopolymers have high affinity for wild-type TAR RNA and lower affinity for mutant TAR. Homopolymers of six to nine arginines substituting for the basic domain of Tat enable full trans-activation in vivo. Homopolymers of at least seven arginines are required for detectable in vitro complex formation, although approximately 30% trans-activation is achieved with a mutant Tat containing only five arginines. Images PMID:2068104

  14. Leptin Overexpression in VTA Trans-activates the Hypothalamus whereas Prolonged Leptin Action in either Region Cross-Desensitizes

    PubMed Central

    Scarpace, P. J.; Matheny, M.; Kirichenko, N.V.; Gao, Y.X.; Tümer, N.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-01-01

    High-fat feeding or CNS leptin overexpression in chow-fed rats results in a region-specific cellular leptin resistance in medial basal hypothalamic regions and the ventral tegmental area (VTA). The present investigation examined the effects of targeted chronic leptin overexpression in the VTA as compared with the medial basal hypothalamus on long-term body weight homeostasis. The study also examined if this targeted intervention conserves regional leptin sensitivity or results in localized leptin resistance. Cellular leptin resistance was assessed by leptin-stimulated phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). Tyrosine hydroxylase was measured in hypothalamus and VTA along with brown adipose tissue uncoupling protein 1. Leptin overexpression in VTA tempered HF-induced obesity, but to a slightly lesser extent than that with leptin overexpression in the hypothalamus. Moreover, the overexpression of leptin in the VTA stimulated cellular STAT3 phosphorylation in several regions of the medial basal hypothalamus, whereas verexpression in the hypothalamus did not activate STAT3 signaling in the VTA. This unidirectional trans-stimulation did not appear to involve migration of either the vector or the gene product. Long-term leptin overexpression in either the medial basal hypothalamus or VTA caused desensitization of leptin signaling in the treated region and cross-desensitization of leptin signaling in the untreated region. These results demonstrate a role of leptin receptors in the VTA in long-term body weight regulation, but the trans-activation of the hypothalamus following VTA leptin stimulation suggests that an integrative response involving both brain regions may account for the observed physiological outcomes. PMID:22982569

  15. Exosomes Derived from HIV-1-infected Cells Contain Trans-activation Response Element RNA*

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Das, Ravi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Santos, Steven; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Guendel, Irene; Sampey, Gavin; Dalby, Elizabeth; Iglesias-Ussel, Maria; Popratiloff, Anastas; Hakami, Ramin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Young, Mary; Subra, Caroline; Gilbert, Caroline; Bailey, Charles; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles produced by healthy and virus-infected cells. Exosomes derived from infected cells have been shown to contain viral microRNAs (miRNAs). HIV-1 encodes its own miRNAs that regulate viral and host gene expression. The most abundant HIV-1-derived miRNA, first reported by us and later by others using deep sequencing, is the trans-activation response element (TAR) miRNA. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of TAR RNA in exosomes from cell culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected cells and patient sera. TAR miRNA was not in Ago2 complexes outside the exosomes but enclosed within the exosomes. We detected the host miRNA machinery proteins Dicer and Drosha in exosomes from infected cells. We report that transport of TAR RNA from the nucleus into exosomes is a CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-dependent active process. Prior exposure of naive cells to exosomes from infected cells increased susceptibility of the recipient cells to HIV-1 infection. Exosomal TAR RNA down-regulated apoptosis by lowering Bim and Cdk9 proteins in recipient cells. We found 104–106 copies/ml TAR RNA in exosomes derived from infected culture supernatants and 103 copies/ml TAR RNA in the serum exosomes of highly active antiretroviral therapy-treated patients or long term nonprogressors. Taken together, our experiments demonstrated that HIV-1-infected cells produced exosomes that are uniquely characterized by their proteomic and RNA profiles that may contribute to disease pathology in AIDS. PMID:23661700

  16. Exosomes derived from HIV-1-infected cells contain trans-activation response element RNA.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Das, Ravi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Santos, Steven; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Guendel, Irene; Sampey, Gavin; Dalby, Elizabeth; Iglesias-Ussel, Maria; Popratiloff, Anastas; Hakami, Ramin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Young, Mary; Subra, Caroline; Gilbert, Caroline; Bailey, Charles; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-07-05

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles produced by healthy and virus-infected cells. Exosomes derived from infected cells have been shown to contain viral microRNAs (miRNAs). HIV-1 encodes its own miRNAs that regulate viral and host gene expression. The most abundant HIV-1-derived miRNA, first reported by us and later by others using deep sequencing, is the trans-activation response element (TAR) miRNA. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of TAR RNA in exosomes from cell culture supernatants of HIV-1-infected cells and patient sera. TAR miRNA was not in Ago2 complexes outside the exosomes but enclosed within the exosomes. We detected the host miRNA machinery proteins Dicer and Drosha in exosomes from infected cells. We report that transport of TAR RNA from the nucleus into exosomes is a CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-dependent active process. Prior exposure of naive cells to exosomes from infected cells increased susceptibility of the recipient cells to HIV-1 infection. Exosomal TAR RNA down-regulated apoptosis by lowering Bim and Cdk9 proteins in recipient cells. We found 10(4)-10(6) copies/ml TAR RNA in exosomes derived from infected culture supernatants and 10(3) copies/ml TAR RNA in the serum exosomes of highly active antiretroviral therapy-treated patients or long term nonprogressors. Taken together, our experiments demonstrated that HIV-1-infected cells produced exosomes that are uniquely characterized by their proteomic and RNA profiles that may contribute to disease pathology in AIDS.

  17. Runx2 Trans-Activation Mediated by the Msx2-Interacting Nuclear Target Requires Homeodomain Interacting Protein Kinase-3

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Oscar L.; Towler, Dwight A.

    2010-01-01

    Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and muscle segment homeobox homolog 2-interacting nuclear target (MINT) (Spen homolog) are transcriptional regulators critical for mammalian development. MINT enhances Runx2 activation of osteocalcin (OC) fibroblast growth factor (FGF) response element in an FGF2-dependent fashion in C3H10T1/2 cells. Although the MINT N-terminal RNA recognition motif domain contributes, the muscle segment homeobox homolog 2-interacting domain is sufficient for Runx2 activation. Intriguingly, Runx1 cannot replace Runx2 in this assay. To better understand this Runx2 signaling cascade, we performed structure-function analysis of the Runx2-MINT trans-activation relationship. Systematic truncation and domain swapping in Runx1:Runx2 chimeras identified that the unique Runx2 activation domain 3 (AD3), encompassed by residues 316–421, conveys MINT+FGF2 trans-activation in transfection assays. Ala mutagenesis of Runx2 Ser/Thr residues identified that S301 and T326 in AD3 are necessary for full MINT+FGF2 trans-activation. Conversely, phosphomimetic Asp substitution of these AD3 Ser/Thr residues enhanced activation by MINT. Adjacent Pro residues implicated regulation by a proline-directed protein kinase (PDPK). Systematic screening with PDPK inhibitors identified that the casein kinase-2/homeodomain-interacting protein kinase (HIPK)/dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase inhibitor 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (DMAT), but not ERK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38MAPK, or other casein kinase-2 inhibitors, abrogated Runx2-, MINT-, and FGF2-activation. Systematic small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of DMAT-inhibited PDPKs revealed that HIPK3 depletion reduced MINT+FGF2-dependent activation of Runx2. HIPK3 and Runx2 coprecipitate after in vitro transcription-translation, and recombinant HIPK3 recognizes Runx2 AD3 as kinase substrate. Furthermore, DMAT treatment and HIPK3 RNAi inhibited MINT+FGF2 activation of

  18. Drosophila Polycomb-group regulated chromatin inhibits the accessibility of a trans-activator to its target DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Zink, D; Paro, R

    1995-01-01

    The genes of the Polycomb-group (Pc-G) are responsible for maintaining the inactive expression state of homeotic genes. They act through specific cis-regulatory DNA elements termed PREs (Pc-G Response Elements). Multimeric complexes containing the Pc-G proteins are thought to induce heterochromatin-like structures, which stably and heritably inactivate transcription. We have tested the functional role of the FAB fragment, a PRE of the bithorax complex. We find that this element behaves as an orientation dependent silencer, capable of inducing mosaic gene expression on neighboring genes. Transgenic fly lines were constructed containing a PRE adjacent to a reporter gene inducible by the yeast GAL4 trans-activator. The competition between the activator and Pc-G-containing chromatin was visualized on polytene chromosomes using immunocytochemistry. The Pc-G protein Polycomb and GAL4 have mutually exclusive binding patterns, supporting the notion that Pc-G-induced chromatin structures can prevent activators from binding to their target sequences. However, this antagonistic function can be overcome by high doses of GAL4, even in the absence of DNA replication. Images PMID:8521823

  19. Effect of p40tax trans-activator of human T cell lymphotropic virus type I on expression of autoantigens.

    PubMed

    Banki, K; Ablonczy, E; Nakamura, M; Perl, A

    1994-03-01

    The possibility of a retroviral etiology has long been raised in a number of autoimmune disorders. More recently, Sjögren's syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis were noted in transgenic mice carrying the tax gene of human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I). To evaluate the involvement of HTLV-I Tax in autoimmunity, its effect on expression of autoantigens was investigated. A metallothionein promoter-driven p40tax expression plasmid, pMAXRHneo-1, was stably transfected into Molt4 and Jurkat cells and the p40tax protein was induced with CdCl2. trans-Activation or trans-repression of autoantigens by HTLV-I Tax was studied by Western blot analysis utilizing autoantigen-specific murine monoclonal and rabbit polyvalent antibodies as well as sera from 161 autoimmune patients. Induction of p40tax of HTLV-I had no significant effect on levels of expression of common autoantigens U1 snRNP, Sm, Ro, La, HSP-70, topoisomerase I/Scl70, PCNA, and HRES-1. Expression of two potentially novel autoantigens, 44 and 46 kDa, was induced by p40tax as detected by sera of progressive systemic sclerosis patients, BAK and VAR. By contrast, expression of 24- and 34-kDa proteins was suppressed in response to induction of p40tax as detected by sera of systemic lupus erythematosus patients PUS and HOR. Because none of these patients were infected by HTLV-I, a protein functionally similar to p40tax may be involved in eliciting autoantigen expression and a subsequent autoantibody response in a minority of patients with PSS and SLE. Sera of autoimmune patients may also be utilized to detect novel proteins trans-activated or trans-repressed by p40tax of HTLV-I.

  20. Identification of genes and gene products necessary for bacterial bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Engebrecht, J; Silverman, M

    1984-07-01

    Expression of luminescence in Escherichia coli was recently achieved by cloning genes from the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. One DNA fragment on a hybrid plasmid encoded regulatory functions and enzymatic activities necessary for light production. We report the results of a genetic analysis to identify the luminescence genes (lux) that reside on this recombinant plasmid. lux gene mutations were generated by hydroxylamine treatment, and these mutations were ordered on a linear map by complementation in trans with a series of polar transposon insertions on other plasmids. lux genes were defined by complementation of lux gene defects on pairs of plasmids in trans in E. coli. Hybrid plasmids were also used to direct the synthesis of polypeptides in the E. coli minicell system. Seven lux genes and the corresponding gene products were identified from the complementation analysis and the minicell programing experiments. These genes, in the order of their position on a linear map, and the apparent molecular weights of the gene products are luxR (27,000), luxI (25,000), luxC (53,000), luxD (33,000), luxA (40,000), luxB (38,000), and luxE (42,000). From the luminescence phenotypes of E. coli containing mutant plasmids, functions were assigned to these genes: luxA, luxB, luxC, luxD, and luxE encode enzymes for light production and luxR and luxI encode regulatory functions.

  1. EHV-1 EICP22 protein sequences that mediate its physical interaction with the immediate-early protein are not sufficient to enhance the trans-activation activity of the IE protein.

    PubMed

    Derbigny, Wilbert A; Kim, Seong K; Jang, Hyung K; O'Callaghan, Dennis J

    2002-03-20

    The early 293 amino acid EICP22 protein (EICP22P) of equine herpesvirus 1 localizes within the nucleus and functions as an accessory regulatory protein (J. Virol. 68 (1994) 4329). Transient transfection assays indicated that although the EICP22P by itself only minimally trans-activates EHV-1 promoters, the EICP22P functions synergistically with the immediate-early protein (IEP) to enhance expression of EHV-1 early genes (J. Virol. 71 (1997) 1004). We previously showed that the EICP22 protein enhances the DNA-binding activity of the EHV-1 IEP and that it also physically interacts with the IEP (J. Virol. 74 (2000) 1425). In this communication, we employed transient trans-activation assays utilizing EICP22P deletion mutants to address whether the sequences required for EICP22P-IEP physical interactions are essential for EICP22P's ability to interact synergistically with the IEP. Assays employing various classes of the EHV-1 promoters fused to the chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) reporter gene indicated that: (1) neither full length nor any of the EICP22P mutants tested was able to overcome repression of the IE promoter elicited by the IEP, (2) the full-length EICP22P interacted synergistically with the IEP to trans-activate the early and late promoters tested, and (3) all of the EICP22P mutants, including those that were able to physically interact with IEP and itself, failed to function synergistically with the IEP to trans-activate representative EHV-1 early and late promoters. The results suggest that EICP22P sequences required for its interaction with the IE protein are not sufficient to mediate its synergistic effect on the trans-activation function of the IEP. The possible explanations as to why sequences in addition to those that mediate EICP22P-IEP interaction and EICP22P self-interactions are essential for the synergistic function of EICP22P are discussed.

  2. Human GATA-3 trans-activation, DNA-binding, and nuclear localization activities are organized into distinct structural domains.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z; Gu, L; Romeo, P H; Bories, D; Motohashi, H; Yamamoto, M; Engel, J D

    1994-01-01

    GATA-3 is a zinc finger transcription factor which is expressed in a highly restricted and strongly conserved tissue distribution pattern in vertebrate organisms, specifically, in a subset of hematopoietic cells, in cells within the central and peripheral nervous systems, in the kidney, and in placental trophoblasts. Tissue-specific cellular genes regulated by GATA-3 have been identified in T lymphocytes and the placenta, while GATA-3-regulated genes in the nervous system and kidney have not yet been defined. We prepared monoclonal antibodies with which we could dissect the biochemical and functional properties of human GATA-3. The results of these experiments show some anticipated phenotypes, for example, the definition of discrete domains required for specific DNA-binding site recognition (amino acids 303 to 348) and trans activation (amino acids 30 to 74). The signaling sequence for nuclear localization of human GATA-3 is a property conferred by sequences within and surrounding the amino finger (amino acids 249 to 311) of the protein, thereby assigning a function to this domain and thus explaining the curious observation that this zinc finger is dispensable for DNA binding by the GATA family of transcription factors. Images PMID:8114750

  3. Synergistic trans-activation of the human C-reactive protein promoter by transcription factor HNF-1 binding at two distinct sites.

    PubMed Central

    Toniatti, C; Demartis, A; Monaci, P; Nicosia, A; Ciliberto, G

    1990-01-01

    The promoter region of the human C-reactive protein (CRP) gene comprises two distinct regions (APREs, for Acute Phase Responsive Elements) each one containing information necessary and sufficient for liver specific and IL-6 inducible expression in human hepatoma Hep3B cells. In this paper we show that both APREs contain a low affinity binding site for the liver specific transcription factor HNF-1/LF-B1. The two sites are separated by approximately 80 bp. Mutations in either of the two sites abolish inducible expression. The same effect is specifically obtained in cotransfection competition experiments when the human albumin HNF-1 site is used as competitor. However, HNF-1 is not the intranuclear mediator of IL-6 because synthetic promoters formed by multimerized copies of different HNF-1 binding sites are not transcriptionally activated by this cytokine. An expression vector encoding full length HNF-1 is capable of trans-activating transcription from the wild-type CRP promoter but not from mutants which have lost the ability to bind HNF-1. Moreover, the level of trans-activation observed with the natural promoter containing both HNF-1 binding sites is far greater than the level of mutated variants containing only one of the two sites. This result strongly suggests that two HNF-1 molecules bound simultaneously to sites distant from each other can act synergistically to activate gene expression. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:2265613

  4. Modulation of F1 hybrid stature without altering parent plants through trans-activated expression of a mutated rice GAI homologue.

    PubMed

    Su, Ning; Sullivan, James A; Deng, Xing Wang

    2005-03-01

    Hybrid breeding, by taking advantage of heterosis, brings about many superior properties to the F1 progeny. However, some properties, such as increased plant height, are not desirable for agronomic purposes. To specifically counter the height increase associated with hybrid progeny, we employed an Arabidopsis model and tested a trans-activation system for specifically expressing a mutated GAI gene only in the F1 hybrid plants to reduce plant stature. A transcriptional activator, the Gal4 DNA-binding domain fused to the acidic activation domain of herpes simplex virus VP16 protein, driven by a maize ubiquitin promoter, was introduced in one parental line. A rice GAI homologue with an N-terminal deletion of the DELLA domain, driven by a promoter that is responsive to the transcriptional activator, was transferred into another parental line. After genetic crossing, trans-activation of the GAI mutant gene resulted in a dwarf phenotype. Over 50 pair-wise crosses between the parental lines were performed, and analyses suggested that the percentage of F1 progeny exhibiting dwarfism ranged from about 25% to 100%. Furthermore, the dwarfism trait introduced in F1 progeny did not seem to affect total seed yield. Our result suggests the feasibility of manipulating F1 hybrid progeny traits without affecting parent plants or the agronomic property of the progeny.

  5. The LIM homeobox transcription factor Lhx2 is required to specify the retina field and synergistically cooperates with Pax6 for Six6 trans-activation.

    PubMed

    Tétreault, Nicolas; Champagne, Marie-Pier; Bernier, Gilbert

    2009-03-15

    In mammals, a limited set of homeobox-containing transcription factors are expressed in the presumptive eye field and required to initiate eye development. How these factors interact together at the genetic and molecular level to coordinate this developmental process is poorly understood. We found that the Lhx2 and Pax6 transcription factors operate in a concerted manner during retinal development to promote transcriptional activation of the Six6 homeobox-gene in primitive and mature retinal progenitors. Lhx2 demarcates the presumptive retina field at the neural plate stage and Lhx2 inactivation delays initiation of Rx, Six3 and Pax6 expression in this domain. The later expressed Six6 is properly activated in the pituitary/hypothalamic axis of Lhx2(-/-) embryos, but expression fails to be initiated in the optic vesicle. Lhx2 and Pax6 associate with the chromatin at several regions of Six6 in vivo and cooperate for trans-activation of Six6 regulatory elements in vitro. In retinal progenitor/stem cells, both Lhx2 and Pax6 are genetically required for proper Six6 expression and forced co-expression of Lhx2 and Pax6 can synergistically trans-activate the Six6 locus. Our work reveals how two master regulators of eye development coordinate their action to sequentially promote tissue-specific transcriptional initiation and full activation of a retinal determinant gene.

  6. Regulation of the trans-activation potential of STAT5 through its DNA-binding activity and interactions with heterologous transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Groner, B; Fritsche, M; Stöcklin, E; Berchtold, S; Merkle, C; Moriggl, R; Pfitzner, E

    2000-04-01

    Extracellular hormones, growth factors and cytokines relay their effects on the transcription of genes through the recognition of specific receptors and intracellular signalling molecules. Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) have been recognized as crucial intracellular signalling molecules. The cytokine receptor-associated Janus kinases (JAKs) convert the latent monomeric form of the STAT molecules to the activated dimeric form through tyrosine phosphorylation. The dimers bind to specific DNA response elements and are able to induce transcription. This induction requires the full-length form of the STAT molecules. Negative regulatory potential is exerted by the short form of the molecule, which lacks the trans-activation domain. This short form is activated and dimerized, but dephosphorylation is impaired. The short form of STAT occupies the DNA-binding sites in a stable fashion and acts as a strong suppressor of wild-type action. Positive enhancement of STAT5 trans-activation potential is provided by the glucocorticoid receptor. Ligand activation of this receptor causes the formation of a complex with STAT5 and deviation to the STAT5 DNA-binding site. An additional regulatory loop is provided by the reactivation of the short form of STAT5 through glucocorticoid receptor association. Conversely, classical glucocorticoid-responsive genes are negatively affected by STAT5 activation.

  7. EGFR trans-activation mediates pleiotrophin-induced activation of Akt and Erk in cultured osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jian-Bo; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Kun; Zhu, Xin-Hui; Xu, Da-Wei; Chen, Jia-Jia; Cui, Zhi-Ming

    2014-05-09

    Pleiotrophin (Ptn) plays an important role in bone growth through regulating osteoblasts' functions. The underlying signaling mechanisms are not fully understood. In the current study, we found that Ptn induced heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) release to trans-activate EGF-receptor (EGFR) in both primary osteoblasts and osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. Meanwhile, Ptn activated Akt and Erk signalings in cultured osteoblasts. The EGFR inhibitor AG1478 as well as the monoclonal antibody against HB-EGF (anti-HB-EGF) significantly inhibited Ptn-induced EGFR activation and Akt and Erk phosphorylations in MC3T3-E1 cells and primary osteoblasts. Further, EGFR siRNA depletion or dominant negative mutation suppressed also Akt and Erk activation in MC3T3-E1 cells. Finally, we observed that Ptn increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and inhibited dexamethasone (Dex)-induced cell death in both MC3T3-E1 cells and primary osteoblasts, such effects were alleviated by AG1478 or anti-HB-EGF. Together, these results suggest that Ptn-induced Akt/Erk activation and some of its pleiotropic functions are mediated by EGFR trans-activation in cultured osteoblasts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  9. CREB trans-activation of disruptor of telomeric silencing-1 mediates forskolin inhibition of CTGF transcription in mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Kong, Qun; Kone, Bruce C

    2010-03-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) participates in diverse fibrotic processes including glomerulosclerosis. The adenylyl cyclase agonist forskolin inhibits CTGF expression in mesangial cells by unclear mechanisms. We recently reported that the histone H3K79 methyltransferase disruptor of telomeric silencing-1 (Dot1) suppresses CTGF gene expression in collecting duct cells (J Clin Invest 117: 773-783, 2007) and HEK 293 cells (J Biol Chem In press). In the present study, we characterized the involvement of Dot1 in mediating the inhibitory effect of forskolin on CTGF transcription in mouse mesangial cells. Overexpression of Dot1 or treatment with forskolin dramatically suppressed basal CTGF mRNA levels and CTGF promoter-luciferase activity, while hypermethylating H3K79 in chromatin associated with the CTGF promoter. siRNA knockdown of Dot1 abrogated the inhibitory effect of forskolin on CTGF mRNA expression. Analysis of the Dot1 promoter sequence identified a CREB response element (CRE) at -384/-380. Overexpression of CREB enhanced forskolin-stimulated Dot1 promoter activity. A constitutively active CREB mutant (CREB-VP16) strongly induced Dot1 promoter-luciferase activity, whereas overexpression of CREBdLZ-VP16, which lacks the CREB DNA-binding domain, abolished this activation. Mutation of the -384/-380 CRE resulted in 70% lower levels of Dot1 promoter activity. ChIP assays confirmed CREB binding to the Dot1 promoter in chromatin. We conclude that forskolin stimulates CREB-mediated trans-activation of the Dot1 gene, which leads to hypermethylation of histone H3K79 at the CTGF promoter, and inhibition of CTGF transcription. These data are the first to describe regulation of the Dot1 gene, and disclose a complex network of genetic and epigenetic controls on CTGF transcription.

  10. Trans-Activation Response Element RNA is Detectable in the Plasma of a Subset of Aviremic HIV-1-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Hladnik, Anžej; Ferdin, Jana; Goričar, Katja; Deeks, G Steven; Peterlin, M Boris; Plemenitaš, Ana; Vita, Dolžan; Metka, Lenassi

    2017-09-01

    Determining the HIV-1 reservoir size in infected individuals is of great importance for improvement of their treatment. Plasma trans-activation response element (TAR) RNA has been suggested as one of the possible biomarkers. TAR RNA is produced during non-processive transcription in HIV-1 productively infected and latent T cells. Here, plasma samples and paired exosome samples of 55 subjects from the observational SCOPE cohort were analysed for the presence of TAR RNA. First, a PCR-based assay was optimized, which provided 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity in differentiating HIV-1 infected non-controllers from uninfected individuals. Next, TAR RNA was detected in the plasma of 63% of aviremic HIV-1-infected patients, who were either treated with antiretroviral therapy or were elite controllers. Although TAR RNA levels did not correlate with patient gender, age, CD4 levels, CD8 levels, they tended to correlate with CD4/CD8 ratio (P = 0.047). This study is the first to investigate plasma TAR RNA in a relatively large cohort of HIV-1-infected patients. We additionally show that the TAR RNA molecules in the plasma of aviremic patients are not limited to exosomes.

  11. APOBEC3G Inhibits HIV-1 RNA Elongation by Inactivating the Viral Trans-Activation Response Element

    PubMed Central

    Nowarski, Roni; Prabhu, Ponnandy; Kenig, Edan; Smith, Yoav; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Deamination of cytidine residues in viral DNA (vDNA) is a major mechanism by which APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits vif-deficient HIV-1 replication. dC to dU transition following RNase-H activity leads to viral cDNA degradation, production of non-functional proteins, formation of undesired stop codons and decreased viral protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that A3G provides an additional layer of defence against HIV-1 infection dependent on inhibition of proviral transcription. HIV-1 transcription elongation is regulated by the trans-activation response (TAR) element, a short stem-loop RNA structure required for elongation factors binding. Vif-deficient HIV-1-infected cells accumulate short viral transcripts and produce lower amounts of full-length HIV-1 transcripts due to A3G deamination of the TAR apical loop cytidine, highlighting the requirement for TAR loop integrity in HIV-1 transcription. Finally, we show that free ssDNA termini are not essential for A3G activity and a gap of CCC motif blocked with juxtaposed DNA or RNA on either or 3′+5′ ends is sufficient for A3G deamination, identifying A3G as an efficient mutator, and that deamination of (−)SSDNA results in an early block of HIV-1 transcription. PMID:24859335

  12. APOBEC3G inhibits HIV-1 RNA elongation by inactivating the viral trans-activation response element.

    PubMed

    Nowarski, Roni; Prabhu, Ponnandy; Kenig, Edan; Smith, Yoav; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe

    2014-07-29

    Deamination of cytidine residues in viral DNA is a major mechanism by which APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits vif-deficient human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. dC-to-dU transition following RNase-H activity leads to viral cDNA degradation, production of non-functional proteins, formation of undesired stop codons and decreased viral protein synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that A3G provides an additional layer of defense against HIV-1 infection dependent on inhibition of proviral transcription. HIV-1 transcription elongation is regulated by the trans-activation response (TAR) element, a short stem-loop RNA structure required for elongation factors binding. Vif-deficient HIV-1-infected cells accumulate short viral transcripts and produce lower amounts of full-length HIV-1 transcripts due to A3G deamination of the TAR apical loop cytidine, highlighting the requirement for TAR loop integrity in HIV-1 transcription. We further show that free single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) termini are not essential for A3G activity and a gap of CCC motif blocked with juxtaposed DNA or RNA on either or 3'+5' ends is sufficient for A3G deamination. These results identify A3G as an efficient mutator and that deamination of (-)SSDNA results in an early block of HIV-1 transcription. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Immune response genes products in human physiology].

    PubMed

    Khaitov, R M; Alekseev, L P

    2012-09-01

    Current data on physiological role of human immune response genes' proteomic products (antigens) are discussed. The antigens are specified by a very high level of diversity that mediates a wide specter ofphysiological functions. They actually provide integrity and biological stability of human as species. These data reveal new ideas on many pathological processes as well as drafts new approaches for prophylaxis and treatment.

  14. Trans-activation of TRPV1 by D1R in mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woo; Cho, Pyung Sun; Lee, Han Kyu; Lee, Sang Hoon; Jung, Sung Jun; Oh, Seog Bae

    2015-10-02

    TRPV1, a ligand-gated ion channel expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons is modulated by a variety of intracellular signaling pathways. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that plays important roles in motor control, cognition, and pain modulation in the CNS, and acts via a variety of dopamine receptors (D1R-D5R), a class of GPCRs. Although nociceptive sensory neurons express D1-like receptors, very little is known about the effect of dopamine on TRPV1 in the peripheral nervous system. Therefore, in this study, we examined the effects of D1R activation on TRPV1 in mouse DRG neurons using Ca(2+) imaging and immunohistochemical analysis. The D1R agonist SKF-38393 induced reproducible Ca(2+) responses via Ca(2+) influx through TRPV1 rather than Ca(2+) mobilization from intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed co-expression of D1R and TRPV1 in mouse DRG neurons. The PLC-specific inhibitor blocked the SKF-38393-induced Ca(2+) response, whereas the PKC, DAG lipase, AC, and PKA inhibitors had no effect on the SKF-38393-induced Ca(2+) response. Taken together, our results suggest that the SKF-38393-induced Ca(2+) response results from the direct activation of TRPV1 by a PLC/DAG-mediated membrane-delimited pathway. These results provide evidence that the trans-activation of TRPV1 following D1R activation may contribute to the modulation of pain signaling in nociceptive sensory neurons.

  15. The role of FIS in trans activation of stable RNA operons of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, L; Vanet, A; Vijgenboom, E; Bosch, L

    1990-03-01

    The thrU(tufB) operon of Escherichia coli is endowed with a cis-acting region upstream of the promoter, designated UAS for Upstream Activator Sequence. A protein fraction has been isolated that binds specifically to DNA fragments of the UAS, thus forming three protein-DNA complexes corresponding to three binding sites on the UAS. It stimulates in vitro transcription of the operon by facilitating the binding of the RNA polymerase to the promoter. All three protein-DNA complexes contain one and the same protein. Dissociation constants for the three complexes have been determined, the lowest being in the sub-nanomolar range. The protein also binds to the UAS of the tyrT operon and to the UAS upstream of the P1 promoter of the rrnB operon, suggesting that transcription of the three operons, if not of more stable RNA operons, is activated by a common trans activator. We demonstrate that the E.coli protein FIS (Factor for Inversion Stimulation) also binds to the UAS of the thrU(tufB) operon forming three protein-DNA complexes. A burst of UAS- and FIS-dependent promoter activity is observed after reinitiation of growth of stationary cultures in fresh medium.

  16. Brain-Targeted Delivery of Trans-Activating Transcriptor-Conjugated Magnetic PLGA/Lipid Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifang; Sun, Tingting; Zhang, Fang; Wu, Jian; Fu, Yanyan; Du, Yang; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Ying; Liu, YongHai; Ma, Kai; Liu, Hongzhi; Song, Yuanjian

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)/lipid nanoparticles (MPLs) were fabricated from PLGA, L-α-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-amino (polyethylene glycol) (DSPE-PEG-NH2), and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs), and then conjugated to trans-activating transcriptor (TAT) peptide. The TAT-MPLs were designed to target the brain by magnetic guidance and TAT conjugation. The drugs hesperidin (HES), naringin (NAR), and glutathione (GSH) were encapsulated in MPLs with drug loading capacity (>10%) and drug encapsulation efficiency (>90%). The therapeutic efficacy of the drug-loaded TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was compared with that of drug-loaded MPLs. The cells accumulated higher levels of TAT-MPLs than MPLs. In addition, the accumulation of QD-loaded fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was dose and time dependent. Our results show that TAT-conjugated MPLs may function as an effective drug delivery system that crosses the blood brain barrier to the brain. PMID:25187980

  17. Brain-targeted delivery of trans-activating transcriptor-conjugated magnetic PLGA/lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiangru; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Ziming; Zhang, Yifang; Sun, Tingting; Zhang, Fang; Wu, Jian; Fu, Yanyan; Du, Yang; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Ying; Liu, YongHai; Ma, Kai; Liu, Hongzhi; Song, Yuanjian

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)/lipid nanoparticles (MPLs) were fabricated from PLGA, L-α-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-amino (polyethylene glycol) (DSPE-PEG-NH2), and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs), and then conjugated to trans-activating transcriptor (TAT) peptide. The TAT-MPLs were designed to target the brain by magnetic guidance and TAT conjugation. The drugs hesperidin (HES), naringin (NAR), and glutathione (GSH) were encapsulated in MPLs with drug loading capacity (>10%) and drug encapsulation efficiency (>90%). The therapeutic efficacy of the drug-loaded TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was compared with that of drug-loaded MPLs. The cells accumulated higher levels of TAT-MPLs than MPLs. In addition, the accumulation of QD-loaded fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was dose and time dependent. Our results show that TAT-conjugated MPLs may function as an effective drug delivery system that crosses the blood brain barrier to the brain.

  18. Trans-activity of Plasma Membrane-associated Ganglioside Sialyltransferase in Mammalian Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Vilcaes, Aldo A.; Demichelis, Vanina Torres; Daniotti, Jose L.

    2011-01-01

    Gangliosides are acidic glycosphingolipids that contain sialic acid residues and are expressed in nearly all vertebrate cells. They are synthesized at the Golgi complex by a combination of glycosyltransferase activities followed by vesicular delivery to the plasma membrane, where they participate in a variety of physiological as well as pathological processes. Recently, a number of enzymes of ganglioside anabolism and catabolism have been shown to be associated with the plasma membrane. In particular, it was observed that CMP-NeuAc:GM3 sialyltransferase (Sial-T2) is able to sialylate GM3 at the plasma membrane (cis-catalytic activity). In this work, we demonstrated that plasma membrane-integrated ecto-Sial-T2 also displays a trans-catalytic activity at the cell surface of epithelial and melanoma cells. By using a highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay combined with confocal fluorescence microscopy, we observed that ecto-Sial-T2 was able to sialylate hydrophobically or covalently immobilized GM3 onto a solid surface. More interestingly, we observed that ecto-Sial-T2 was able to sialylate GM3 exposed on the membrane of neighboring cells by using both the exogenous and endogenous donor substrate (CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid) available at the extracellular milieu. In addition, the trans-activity of ecto-Sial-T2 was considerably reduced when the expression of the acceptor substrate was inhibited by using a specific inhibitor of biosynthesis of glycolipids, indicating the lipidic nature of the acceptor. Our findings provide the first direct evidence that an ecto-sialyltransferase is able to trans-sialylate substrates exposed in the plasma membrane from mammalian cells, which represents a novel insight into the molecular events that regulate the local glycosphingolipid composition. PMID:21768099

  19. Full trans-activation mediated by the immediate-early protein of equine herpesvirus 1 requires a consensus TATA box, but not its cognate binding sequence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong K; Shakya, Akhalesh K; O'Callaghan, Dennis J

    2016-01-04

    The immediate-early protein (IEP) of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) has extensive homology to the IEP of alphaherpesviruses and possesses domains essential for trans-activation, including an acidic trans-activation domain (TAD) and binding domains for DNA, TFIIB, and TBP. Our data showed that the IEP directly interacted with transcription factor TFIIA, which is known to stabilize the binding of TBP and TFIID to the TATA box of core promoters. When the TATA box of the EICP0 promoter was mutated to a nonfunctional TATA box, IEP-mediated trans-activation was reduced from 22-fold to 7-fold. The IEP trans-activated the viral promoters in a TATA motif-dependent manner. Our previous data showed that the IEP is able to repress its own promoter when the IEP-binding sequence (IEBS) is located within 26-bp from the TATA box. When the IEBS was located at 100 bp upstream of the TATA box, IEP-mediated trans-activation was very similar to that of the minimal IE(nt -89 to +73) promoter lacking the IEBS. As the distance from the IEBS to the TATA box decreased, IEP-mediated trans-activation progressively decreased, indicating that the IEBS located within 100 bp from the TATA box sequence functions as a distance-dependent repressive element. These results indicated that IEP-mediated full trans-activation requires a consensus TATA box of core promoters, but not its binding to the cognate sequence (IEBS).

  20. Cholecystokinin 1 receptor modulates the MEKK1-induced c-Jun trans-activation: structural requirements of the receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ibarz, Géraldine; Oiry, Catherine; Carnazzi, Eric; Crespy, Philippe; Escrieut, Chantal; Fourmy, Daniel; Galleyrand, Jean Claude; Gagne, Didier; Martinez, Jean

    2006-01-01

    In cells overexpressing active MEKK1 to enhance c-Jun trans-activation, expression of rat cholecystokinin 1 receptor increased the activity of c-Jun while in the same experimental conditions overexpression of mouse cholecystokinin 1 receptor repressed it. This differential trans-activation is specific, since it was not observed for either the other overexpressed kinases (MEK, PKA) or for other transcription factors (ATF2, ELK-1, CREB). This differential behaviour was also detected in a human colon adenocarcinoma cell-line naturally producing high levels of endogenous MEKK1. This differential behaviour between the two receptors on the MEKK1-induced c-Jun trans-activation was independent of the activation state of JNK, of the phosphorylation level of c-Jun and of its ability to bind its specific DNA responsive elements. Two amino acids (Val43 and Phe50 in the mouse cholecystokinin 1 receptor, replaced by Leu43 and Ileu50 in the rat cholecystokinin 1 receptor) localized in the first transmembrane domain were found to play a crucial role in this differential behaviour. MEKK1 probably activates a transcriptional partner of c-Jun whose activity is maintained or increased in the presence of the rat cholecystokinin 1 receptor but repressed in the presence of the mouse cholecystokinin 1 receptor. PMID:16491099

  1. Cholecystokinin 1 receptor modulates the MEKK1-induced c-Jun trans-activation: structural requirements of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Ibarz, Géraldine; Oiry, Catherine; Carnazzi, Eric; Crespy, Philippe; Escrieut, Chantal; Fourmy, Daniel; Galleyrand, Jean Claude; Gagne, Didier; Martinez, Jean

    2006-04-01

    In cells overexpressing active MEKK1 to enhance c-Jun trans-activation, expression of rat cholecystokinin 1 receptor increased the activity of c-Jun while in the same experimental conditions overexpression of mouse cholecystokinin 1 receptor repressed it. This differential trans-activation is specific, since it was not observed for either the other overexpressed kinases (MEK, PKA) or for other transcription factors (ATF2, ELK-1, CREB). This differential behaviour was also detected in a human colon adenocarcinoma cell-line naturally producing high levels of endogenous MEKK1. This differential behaviour between the two receptors on the MEKK1-induced c-Jun trans-activation was independent of the activation state of JNK, of the phosphorylation level of c-Jun and of its ability to bind its specific DNA responsive elements. Two amino acids (Val43 and Phe50 in the mouse cholecystokinin 1 receptor, replaced by Leu43 and Ileu50 in the rat cholecystokinin 1 receptor) localized in the first transmembrane domain were found to play a crucial role in this differential behaviour. MEKK1 probably activates a transcriptional partner of c-Jun whose activity is maintained or increased in the presence of the rat cholecystokinin 1 receptor but repressed in the presence of the mouse cholecystokinin 1 receptor.

  2. Trans-activation of the Tetrahymena group I intron ribozyme via a non-native RNA-RNA interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Ikawa, Y; Shiraishi, H; Inoue, T

    1999-01-01

    The peripheral P2.1 domain of the Tetrahymena group I intron ribozyme has been shown to be non-essential for splicing. We found, however, that separately prepared P2.1 RNA efficiently accelerates the 3' splice-site-specific hydrolysis reaction of a mutant ribozyme lacking both P2.1 and its upstream region in trans. We report here the unusual properties of this trans-activation. Compensatory mutational analysis revealed that non-native long-range base-pairings between the loop region of P2.1 RNA and L5c region of the mutant ribozyme are needed for the activation in spite of the fact that P2.1 forms base-pairings with P9.1 in the Tetrahymena ribozyme. The trans -activation depends on the non-native RNA-RNA interaction together with the higher order structure of P2.1 RNA. This activation is unique among the known trans-activations that utilize native tertiary interactions or RNA chaperons. PMID:10075996

  3. Regulation of photoreceptor gene transcription via a highly conserved transcriptional regulatory element by vsx gene products

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi; Comiskey, Daniel F.; Kelly, Lisa E.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The photoreceptor conserved element-1 (PCE-1) sequence is found in the transcriptional regulatory regions of many genes expressed in photoreceptors. The retinal homeobox (Rx or Rax) gene product functions by binding to PCE-1 sites. However, other transcriptional regulators have also been reported to bind to PCE-1. One of these, vsx2, is expressed in retinal progenitor and bipolar cells. The purpose of this study is to identify Xenopus laevis vsx gene products and characterize vsx gene product expression and function with respect to the PCE-1 site. Methods X. laevis vsx gene products were amplified with PCR. Expression patterns were determined with in situ hybridization using whole or sectioned X. laevis embryos and digoxigenin- or fluorescein-labeled antisense riboprobes. DNA binding characteristics of the vsx gene products were analyzed with electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) using in vitro translated proteins and radiolabeled oligonucleotide probes. Gene transactivation assays were performed using luciferase-based reporters and in vitro transcribed effector gene products, injected into X. laevis embryos. Results We identified one vsx1 and two vsx2 gene products. The two vsx2 gene products are generated by alternate mRNA splicing. We verified that these gene products are expressed in the developing retina and that expression resolves into distinct cell types in the mature retina. Finally, we found that vsx gene products can bind the PCE-1 site in vitro and that the two vsx2 isoforms have different gene transactivation activities. Conclusions vsx gene products are expressed in the developing and mature neural retina. vsx gene products can bind the PCE-1 site in vitro and influence the expression of a rhodopsin promoter-luciferase reporter gene. The two isoforms of vsx have different gene transactivation activities in this reporter gene system. PMID:28003732

  4. Production and pathogenicity of hepatitis C virus core gene products

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-Chun; Ma, Hsin-Chieh; Yang, Chee-Hing; Lo, Shih-Yen

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic liver diseases, including steatosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and its infection is also associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. HCV, belonging to the Flaviviridae family, is a small enveloped virus whose positive-stranded RNA genome encoding a polyprotein. The HCV core protein is cleaved first at residue 191 by the host signal peptidase and further cleaved by the host signal peptide peptidase at about residue 177 to generate the mature core protein (a.a. 1-177) and the cleaved peptide (a.a. 178-191). Core protein could induce insulin resistance, steatosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma through various mechanisms. The peptide (a.a. 178-191) may play a role in the immune response. The polymorphism of this peptide is associated with the cellular lipid drop accumulation, contributing to steatosis development. In addition to the conventional open reading frame (ORF), in the +1 frame, an ORF overlaps with the core protein-coding sequence and encodes the alternative reading frame proteins (ARFP or core+1). ARFP/core+1/F protein could enhance hepatocyte growth and may regulate iron metabolism. In this review, we briefly summarized the current knowledge regarding the production of different core gene products and their roles in viral pathogenesis. PMID:24966583

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus trans-activator of transcription peptide detection via ribonucleic acid aptamer on aminated diamond biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahim Ruslinda, A.; Wang, Xianfen; Ishii, Yoko; Ishiyama, Yuichiro; Tanabe, Kyosuke; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    The potential of ribonucleic acid (RNA) as both informational and ligand binding molecule have opened a scenario in the development of biosensors. An aminated diamond-based RNA aptasensor is presented for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) trans-activator of transcription (Tat) peptide protein detection that not only gives a labeled or label-free detection method but also provides a reusable platform for a simple, sensitive, and selective detection of proteins. The immobilized procedure was based on the binding interaction between positively charged amine terminated diamond and the RNA aptamer probe molecules with the negatively charged surface carboxylic compound linker molecule such as terephthalic acid.

  6. Combining Hierarchical and Associative Gene Ontology Relations with Textual Evidence in Estimating Gene and Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Posse, Christian; Gopalan, Banu; Riensche, Roderick M.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Baddeley, Bob L.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2007-03-01

    Gene and gene product similarity is a fundamental diagnostic measure in analyzing biological data and constructing predictive models for functional genomics. With the rising influence of the Gene Ontology, two complementary approaches have emerged where the similarity between two genes or gene products is obtained by comparing Gene Ontology (GO) annotations associated with the genes or gene products. One approach captures GO-based similarity in terms of hierarchical relations within each gene subontology. The other approach identifies GO-based similarity in terms of associative relations across the three gene subontologies. We propose a novel methodology where the two approaches can be merged with ensuing benefits in coverage and accuracy, and demonstrate that further improvements can be obtained by integrating textual evidence extracted from relevant biomedical literature.

  7. Whole-genome analysis of genetic recombination of hepatitis delta virus: molecular domain in delta antigen determining trans-activating efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chao, Mei; Lin, Chia-Chi; Lin, Feng-Ming; Li, Hsin-Pai; Iang, Shan-Bei

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the only animal RNA virus that has an unbranched rod-like genome with ribozyme activity and is replicated by host RNA polymerase. HDV RNA recombination was previously demonstrated in patients and in cultured cells by analysis of a region corresponding to the C terminus of the delta antigen (HDAg), the only viral-encoded protein. Here, a whole-genome recombination map of HDV was constructed using an experimental system in which two HDV-1 sequences were co-transfected into cultured cells and the recombinants were analysed by sequencing of cloned reverse transcription-PCR products. Fifty homologous recombinants with 60 crossovers mapping to 22 junctions were identified from 200 analysed clones. Small HDAg chimeras harbouring a junction newly detected in the recombination map were then constructed. The results further indicated that the genome-replication level of HDV was sensitive to the sixth amino acid within the N-terminal 22 aa of HDAg. Therefore, the recombination map established in this study provided a tool for not only understanding HDV RNA recombination, but also elucidating the related mechanisms, such as molecular elements responsible for the trans-activation levels of the small HDAg.

  8. Correlating information contents of gene ontology terms to infer semantic similarity of gene products.

    PubMed

    Gan, Mingxin

    2014-01-01

    Successful applications of the gene ontology to the inference of functional relationships between gene products in recent years have raised the need for computational methods to automatically calculate semantic similarity between gene products based on semantic similarity of gene ontology terms. Nevertheless, existing methods, though having been widely used in a variety of applications, may significantly overestimate semantic similarity between genes that are actually not functionally related, thereby yielding misleading results in applications. To overcome this limitation, we propose to represent a gene product as a vector that is composed of information contents of gene ontology terms annotated for the gene product, and we suggest calculating similarity between two gene products as the relatedness of their corresponding vectors using three measures: Pearson's correlation coefficient, cosine similarity, and the Jaccard index. We focus on the biological process domain of the gene ontology and annotations of yeast proteins to study the effectiveness of the proposed measures. Results show that semantic similarity scores calculated using the proposed measures are more consistent with known biological knowledge than those derived using a list of existing methods, suggesting the effectiveness of our method in characterizing functional relationships between gene products.

  9. Determination and validation of principal gene products

    PubMed Central

    Tress, Michael L.; Wesselink, Jan-Jaap; Frankish, Adam; López, Gonzalo; Goldman, Nick; Löytynoja, Ari; Massingham, Tim; Pardi, Fabio; Whelan, Simon; Harrow, Jennifer; Valencia, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Motivation Alternative splicing has the potential to generate a wide range of protein isoforms. For many computational applications and for experimental research, it is important to be able to concentrate on the isoform that retains the core biological function. For many genes this is far from clear. Results We have combined five methods into a pipeline that allows us to detect the principal variant for a gene. Most of the methods were based on conservation between species, at the level of both gene and protein. The five methods used were the conservation of exonic structure, the detection of non-neutral evolution, the conservation of functional residues, the existence of a known protein structure and the abundance of vertebrate orthologues. The pipeline was able to determine a principal isoform for 83% of a set of well-annotated genes with multiple variants. PMID:18006548

  10. Integrating Ontological Knowledge and Textual Evidence in Estimating Gene and Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Posse, Christian; Gopalan, Banu; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2006-06-08

    With the rising influence of the Gene On-tology, new approaches have emerged where the similarity between genes or gene products is obtained by comparing Gene Ontology code annotations associ-ated with them. So far, these approaches have solely relied on the knowledge en-coded in the Gene Ontology and the gene annotations associated with the Gene On-tology database. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate that improvements to these approaches can be obtained by integrating textual evidence extracted from relevant biomedical literature.

  11. Functions of the gene products of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M

    1993-01-01

    A list of currently identified gene products of Escherichia coli is given, together with a bibliography that provides pointers to the literature on each gene product. A scheme to categorize cellular functions is used to classify the gene products of E. coli so far identified. A count shows that the numbers of genes concerned with small-molecule metabolism are on the same order as the numbers concerned with macromolecule biosynthesis and degradation. One large category is the category of tRNAs and their synthetases. Another is the category of transport elements. The categories of cell structure and cellular processes other than metabolism are smaller. Other subjects discussed are the occurrence in the E. coli genome of redundant pairs and groups of genes of identical or closely similar function, as well as variation in the degree of density of genetic information in different parts of the genome. PMID:7508076

  12. appR gene product activates transcription of microcin C7 plasmid genes.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Guerra, L; Moreno, F; San Millán, J L

    1989-01-01

    Microcin C7 (MccC7) is encoded by Escherichia coli plasmid pMccC7. However, some strains of E. coli K-12 carrying this plasmid do not produce this antibiotic. Here we show that these strains differ in the gene locus appR. This chromosomal gene product controls MccC7 production by activating the transcription of some, but not all, MccC7 plasmid genes. PMID:2651423

  13. Detection in vivo of a new gene product (gene III) of cauliflower mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, C.; Lebeurier, G.; Hirth, L.

    1984-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus DNA contains six major open reading frames (ORFs). As only the mRNA corresponding to the transcription of gene VI and its translation product have been isolated, the identification in infected plants of products corresponding to the five other putative genes remains to be established. The present paper reports the detection of an ORF III product by means of antibodies raised against an NH2-terminal synthetic peptide of 19 amino acids corresponding to a sequence predicted from the nucleotide sequence of ORF III. The detection of this gene product raises the question of the mechanism of its expression. Images PMID:16593524

  14. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Many individual chloroplast genes require the products of a collection of nuclear genes for their successful expression. These nuclear gene products apparently work with great specificity, each committed to the expression of a single chloroplast gene. We have chosen as a model nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas affected in different stages in the expression of the chloroplast encoded Photosystem II polypeptide, D2. We have made the progress in understanding how nuclear gene products affect the translation of the D2 encoding MRNA. Two nuclear genes are required for this process which have been mapped genetically. In contrast to other examples of nuclear control of translation in the chloroplast, these nuclear gene products appear to be required either for specific stages in translation elongation or for the post-translational stabilization of the nascent D2 protein. Pseudoreversion analysis has led us to a locus which may be directly involved in D2 expression. We have made considerable progress in pursuing the molecular basis of psbd MRNA stabilization. psbD 5' UTR specific transcripts have been synthesized in vitro and used in gel mobility shift assays. UV-crosslinking studies are underway to identify the transacting factors which bind to these sequences. The continued examination of these mutants will help us to understand how nuclear gene products work in this specific case of chloroplast gene expression, and will elucidate how two distinct genomes can interact generally.

  15. Inactivation of p53 by HTLV type 1 and HTLV type 2 Tax trans-activators.

    PubMed

    Mahieux, R; Pise-Masison, C A; Nicot, C; Green, P; Hall, W W; Brady, J N

    2000-11-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-2) was originally isolated from a patient with a hairy T cell leukemia. It has been associated with rare cases of CD8(+) T lymphoproliferative disorders, and has a controversial role as a pathogen. The loss of p53 function, as a consequence of mutation or inactivation, increases the chances of genetic damage. Indeed, the importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor is evident from the fact that over 60% of all human cancers have a mutant or inactive p53. p53 status has been extensively studied in HTLV-1-infected cell lines. Interestingly, despite the fact that p53 mutations have been found in only a minority of cells, the p53 functions were found to be impaired. We have analyzed the functional activity of the p53 tumor suppressor in cells transformed with HTLV-2 subtypes A and B. As with HTLV-1-infected cells, abundant levels of the p53 protein are detected in HTLV-2 virus-infected cell lines. Using p53 reporter plasmid or induction of p53-responsive genes in response to gamma-irradiation, the p53 was found to be transcriptionally inhibited in HTLV-2-infected cells. Interestingly, although Tax-2A and-2B inactivate p53, the Tax-2A protein appears to inhibit p53 function less efficiently than either Tax-1 or Tax-2B in T cells, but not in fibroblasts.

  16. Cross-Ontological Analytics: Combining Associative and Hierarchical Relations in the Gene Ontologies to Assess Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Posse, Christian; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Gopalan, Banu; Riensche, Roderick M.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Baddeley, Bob L.

    2006-05-28

    Gene and gene product similarity is a fundamental diagnostic measure in analyzing biological data and constructing predictive models for functional genomics. With the rising influence of the gene ontologies, two complementary approaches have emerged where the similarity between two genes/gene products is obtained by comparing gene ontology (GO) annotations associated with the gene/gene products. One approach captures GO-based similarity in terms of hierarchical relations within each gene ontology. The other approach identifies GO-based similarity in terms of associative relations across the three gene ontologies. We propose a novel methodology where the two approaches can be merged with ensuing benefits in coverage and accuracy.

  17. Regulation of Cell and Gene Therapy Medicinal Products in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Chu; Wang, Po-Yu; Tsai, Shih-Chih; Lin, Chien-Liang; Tai, Hsuen-Yung; Lo, Chi-Fang; Wu, Shiow-Ing; Chiang, Yu-Mei; Liu, Li-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the rapid and mature development of emerging biotechnology in the fields of cell culture, cell preservation, and recombinant DNA technology, more and more cell or gene medicinal therapy products have been approved for marketing, to treat serious diseases which have been challenging to treat with current medical practice or medicine. This chapter will briefly introduce the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA) and elaborate regulation of cell and gene therapy medicinal products in Taiwan, including regulatory history evolution, current regulatory framework, application and review procedures, and relevant jurisdictional issues. Under the promise of quality, safety, and efficacy of medicinal products, it is expected the regulation and environment will be more flexible, streamlining the process of the marketing approval of new emerging cell or gene therapy medicinal products and providing diverse treatment options for physicians and patients.

  18. A new measure for functional similarity of gene products based on Gene Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Schlicker, Andreas; Domingues, Francisco S; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Lengauer, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Background Gene Ontology (GO) is a standard vocabulary of functional terms and allows for coherent annotation of gene products. These annotations provide a basis for new methods that compare gene products regarding their molecular function and biological role. Results We present a new method for comparing sets of GO terms and for assessing the functional similarity of gene products. The method relies on two semantic similarity measures; simRel and funSim. One measure (simRel) is applied in the comparison of the biological processes found in different groups of organisms. The other measure (funSim) is used to find functionally related gene products within the same or between different genomes. Results indicate that the method, in addition to being in good agreement with established sequence similarity approaches, also provides a means for the identification of functionally related proteins independent of evolutionary relationships. The method is also applied to estimating functional similarity between all proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to visualizing the molecular function space of yeast in a map of the functional space. A similar approach is used to visualize the functional relationships between protein families. Conclusion The approach enables the comparison of the underlying molecular biology of different taxonomic groups and provides a new comparative genomics tool identifying functionally related gene products independent of homology. The proposed map of the functional space provides a new global view on the functional relationships between gene products or protein families. PMID:16776819

  19. Gene analogue finder: a GRID solution for finding functionally analogous gene products

    PubMed Central

    Tulipano, Angelica; Donvito, Giacinto; Licciulli, Flavio; Maggi, Giorgio; Gisel, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Background To date more than 2,1 million gene products from more than 100000 different species have been described specifying their function, the processes they are involved in and their cellular localization using a very well defined and structured vocabulary, the gene ontology (GO). Such vast, well defined knowledge opens the possibility of compare gene products at the level of functionality, finding gene products which have a similar function or are involved in similar biological processes without relying on the conventional sequence similarity approach. Comparisons within such a large space of knowledge are highly data and computing intensive. For this reason this project was based upon the use of the computational GRID, a technology offering large computing and storage resources. Results We have developed a tool, GENe AnaloGue FINdEr (ENGINE) that parallelizes the search process and distributes the calculation and data over the computational GRID, splitting the process into many sub-processes and joining the calculation and the data on the same machine and therefore completing the whole search in about 3 days instead of occupying one single machine for more than 5 CPU years. The results of the functional comparison contain potential functional analogues for more than 79000 gene products from the most important species. 46% of the analyzed gene products are well enough described for such an analysis to individuate functional analogues, such as well-known members of the same gene family, or gene products with similar functions which would never have been associated by standard methods. Conclusion ENGINE has produced a list of potential functionally analogous relations between gene products within and between species using, in place of the sequence, the gene description of the GO, thus demonstrating the potential of the GO. However, the current limiting factor is the quality of the associations of many gene products from non-model organisms that often have

  20. Efficient translation of distal cistrons of a polycistronic mRNA of a plant pararetrovirus requires a compatible interaction between the mRNA 3' end and the proteinaceous trans-activator.

    PubMed

    Edskes, H K; Kiernan, J M; Shepherd, R J

    1996-10-15

    Caulimoviruses, a type of plant pararetrovirus, employ a highly unusual mechanism to express the multiple cistrons of their pregenomic RNA. It involves translation of a polycistronic mRNA utilizing cis-acting viral RNA sequences and a transacting virus-encoded protein (P6). In addition to its role in polycistronic translation, the translational trans-activator protein P6 also activates its own expression from a monocistronic subgenomic RNA. Using Nicotiana Edwardsonii cell suspension protoplasts, we analyzed the ability of P6 proteins from three different caulimoviruses to activate viral RNA-based reporter constructs. Cis-acting elements present in figwort mosaic caulimovirus (FMV) are functional not only in the presence of the cognate P6 activator protein, but also in the presence of the heterologous activators from cauliflower mosaic caulimovirus (CaMV) and peanut chlorotic streak caulimovirus (PCISV). However, when 3' cis-acting elements essential for efficient polycistronic expression of FMV are replaced by their counterparts from PCISV, reporter gene expression is only observed in the presence of PCISV P6. Derepression of monocistronic reporter constructs tailed with FMV or CaMV 3' proximal sequences is less efficient in the presence of PCISV P6 than with either FMV or CaMV P6, but more efficient when the constructs contain a cognate PCISV 3' cis-element. Efficient expression of polycistronic and monocistronic caulimovirus mRNAs in plant cells thus requires compatible interactions between P6, a translational trans-activator, and its cognate cis-element at the 3' end of the mRNA.

  1. Discovery of a small molecule Tat-trans-activation-responsive RNA antagonist that potently inhibits human immunodeficiency virus-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seongwoo; Tamilarasu, Natarajan; Kibler, Karen; Cao, Hong; Ali, Akbar; Ping, Yueh-Hsin; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Rana, Tariq M

    2003-10-03

    Antiretroviral therapy to treat AIDS uses molecules that target the reverse transcriptase and protease enzymes of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1). A major problem associated with these treatments, however, is the emergence of drug-resistant strains. Thus, there is a compelling need to find drugs against other viral targets. One such target is the interaction between Tat, an HIV-1 regulatory protein essential for viral replication, and trans-activation-responsive (TAR) RNA. Here we describe the design and synthesis of an encoded combinatorial library containing 39,304 unnatural small molecules. Using a rapid high through-put screening technology, we identified 59 compounds. Structure-activity relationship studies led to the synthesis of 19 compounds that bind TAR RNA with high affinities. In the presence of a representative Tat-TAR inhibitor (5 microM TR87), we observed potent and sustained suppression of HIV replication in cultured cells over 24 days. The same concentration of this inhibitor did not exhibit any toxicity in cell cultures or in mice. TR87 was also shown to specifically disrupt Tat-TAR binding in vitro and inhibit Tat-mediated transcriptional activation in vitro and in vivo, providing a strong correlation between its activities and inhibition of HIV-1 replication. These results provide a structural scaffold for further development of new drugs, alone or in combination with other drugs, for treatment of HIV-1-infected individuals. Our results also suggest a general strategy for discovering pharmacophores targeting RNA structures that are essential in progression of other infectious, inflammatory, and genetic diseases.

  2. Regulatory Oversight of Cell and Gene Therapy Products in Canada.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, Anthony; Agbanyo, Francisca; Wang, Jian; Rosu-Myles, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Health Canada regulates gene therapy products and many cell therapy products as biological drugs under the Canadian Food and Drugs Act and its attendant regulations. Cellular products that meet certain criteria, including minimal manipulation and homologous use, may be subjected to a standards-based approach under the Safety of Human Cells, Tissues and Organs for Transplantation Regulations. The manufacture and clinical testing of cell and gene therapy products (CGTPs) presents many challenges beyond those for protein biologics. Cells cannot be subjected to pathogen removal or inactivation procedures and must frequently be administered shortly after final formulation. Viral vector design and manufacturing control are critically important to overall product quality and linked to safety and efficacy in patients through concerns such as replication competence, vector integration, and vector shedding. In addition, for many CGTPs, the value of nonclinical studies is largely limited to providing proof of concept, and the first meaningful data relating to appropriate dosing, safety parameters, and validity of surrogate or true determinants of efficacy must come from carefully designed clinical trials in patients. Addressing these numerous challenges requires application of various risk mitigation strategies and meeting regulatory expectations specifically adapted to the product types. Regulatory cooperation and harmonisation at an international level are essential for progress in the development and commercialisation of these products. However, particularly in the area of cell therapy, new regulatory paradigms may be needed to harness the benefits of clinical progress in situations where the resources and motivation to pursue a typical drug product approval pathway may be lacking.

  3. Natural Products Version 2.0: Connecting Genes to Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Christopher T.; Fischbach, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Natural products have played a prominent role in the history of organic chemistry, and they continue to be important as drugs, biological probes, and targets of study for synthetic and analytical chemists. In this perspective, we explore how connecting Nature’s small molecules to the genes that encode them has sparked a renaissance in natural product research, focusing primarily on the biosynthesis of polyketides and nonribosomal peptides. We survey monomer biogenesis, coupling chemistries from templated and non-templated pathways, and the broad set of tailoring reactions and hybrid pathways that give rise to the diverse scaffolds and functionalization patterns of natural products. We conclude by considering two questions: What would it take to find all natural product scaffolds? What kind of scientists will be studying natural products in the future? PMID:20121095

  4. Epigenetic engineering of ribosomal RNA genes enhances protein production.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Raffaella; Lienemann, Philipp; Fussenegger, Martin

    2009-08-14

    Selection of mammalian high-producer cell lines remains a major challenge for the biopharmaceutical manufacturing industry. Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes encode the major component of the ribosome but many rRNA gene copies are not transcribed due to epigenetic silencing by the nucleolar remodelling complex (NoRC) [6], which may limit the cell's full production capacity. Here we show that the knockdown of TIP5, a subunit of NoRC, decreases the number of silent rRNA genes, upregulates rRNA transcription, enhances ribosome synthesis and increases production of recombinant proteins. However, general enhancement of rRNA transcription rate did not stimulate protein synthesis. Our data demonstrates that the number of transcriptionally competent rRNA genes limits efficient ribosome synthesis. Epigenetic engineering of ribosomal RNA genes offers new possibilities for improving biopharmaceutical manufacturing and provides novel insights into the complex regulatory network which governs the translation machinery in normal cellular processes as well as in pathological conditions like cancer.

  5. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    DOEpatents

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2017-03-21

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  6. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    DOEpatents

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  7. Deduced products of C4-dicarboxylate transport regulatory genes of Rhizobium leguminosarum are homologous to nitrogen regulatory gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Ronson, C W; Astwood, P M; Nixon, B T; Ausubel, F M

    1987-01-01

    We have sequenced two genes dctB and dctD required for the activation of the C4-dicarboxylate transport structural gene dctA in free-living Rhizobium leguminosarum. The hydropathic profile of the dctB gene product (DctB) suggested that its N-terminal region may be located in the periplasm and its C-terminal region in the cytoplasm. The C-terminal region of DctB was strongly conserved with similar regions of the products of several regulatory genes that may act as environmental sensors, including ntrB, envZ, virA, phoR, cpxA, and phoM. The N-terminal domains of the products of several regulatory genes thought to be transcriptional activators, including ntrC, ompR, virG, phoB and sfrA. In addition, the central and C-terminal regions of DctD were strongly conserved with the products of ntrC and nifA, transcriptional activators that require the alternate sigma factor rpoN (ntrA) as co-activator. The central region of DctD also contained a potential ATP-binding domain. These results are consistent with recent results that show that rpoN product is required for dctA activation, and suggest that DctB plus DctD-mediated transcriptional activation of dctA may be mechanistically similar to NtrB plus NtrC-mediated activation of glnA in E. coli. PMID:3671068

  8. Transcriptional activation of cloned human beta-globin genes by viral immediate-early gene products.

    PubMed

    Green, M R; Treisman, R; Maniatis, T

    1983-11-01

    When the human beta-globin gene is transfected into Hela cells, no beta-globin RNA is detected unless the gene is linked to a viral transcription enhancer. In this paper we show that trans-acting adenovirus and herpesvirus (pseudorabies) transcriptional regulatory proteins can circumvent this enhancer requirement for detectable beta-globin transcription in transient expression assays. The viral gene products can be provided by constitutively expressed, integrated viral genes in established cell lines, by viral infection of permissive cells, or by transfection of cells with bacterial plasmids carrying the viral immediate-early genes. These results demonstrate the utility of transient expression assays for studying regulatory mechanisms involving trans-acting factors. Analysis of beta-globin promoter mutants indicates that between 75 and 128 bp of sequence 5' to the mRNA cap site is required for enhancer-dependent transcription in Hela cells. In contrast, beta-globin transcription in the presence of viral immediate-early gene products requires only 36 bp of 5'-flanking sequence, which includes the TATA box. Thus both cis and trans-acting viral factors activate beta-globin gene transcription in transient expression experiments, but the mechanisms by which they act appear to be fundamentally different.

  9. Id-1 gene and gene products as therapeutic targets for treatment of breast cancer and other types of carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2014-08-19

    A method for treatment of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises targeting and modulating Id-1 gene expression, if any, for the Id-1 gene, or gene products in breast or other epithelial cancers in a patient by delivering products that modulate Id-1 gene expression. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that cancer cells are invasive and metastatic.

  10. Plasmid genes required for microcin B17 production.

    PubMed Central

    San Millán, J L; Kolter, R; Moreno, F

    1985-01-01

    The production of the antibiotic substance microcin B17 (Mcc) is determined by a 3.5-kilobase DNA fragment from plasmid pMccB17. Several Mcc- mutations on plasmid pMccB17 were obtained by both transposon insertion and nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. Plasmids carrying these mutations were tested for their ability to complement Mcc- insertion or deletion mutations on pMM102 (pMM102 is a pBR322 derivative carrying the region encoding microcin B17). Results from these experiments indicate that at least four plasmid genes are required for microcin production. PMID:2993228

  11. Polymorphisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in wine production.

    PubMed

    Vigentini, Ileana; Fracassetti, Daniela; Picozzi, Claudia; Foschino, Roberto

    2009-03-01

    The setting up of new molecular methods for Saccharomyces cerevisiae typing is valuable in enology. Actually, the ability to discriminate different strains in wine making can have a benefit both for the control of the fermentation process and for the preservation of wine typicity. This study focused on the screening of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in wine production that could evolve rapidly considering the selective pressure of the isolation environment. Preliminary screening of 30 genes in silico was performed, followed by the selection of 10 loci belonging to 8 genes. The sequence analysis showed a low polymorphism and a degree of heterozygosity. However, a new potential molecular target was recognized in the TPS1 gene coding for the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase enzyme involved in the ethanol resistance mechanism. This gene showed a 1.42% sequence diversity with seven different nucleotide substitutions. Moreover, classic techniques were applied to a collection of 50 S. cerevisiae isolates, mostly with enologic origin. Our results confirmed that the wine making was not carried out only by the inoculated commercial starter because indigenous strains of S. cerevisiae present during fermentation were detected. In addition, a high genetic relationship among some commercial cultures was found, highlighting imprecision or fraudulent practices by starter manufacturers.

  12. A Novel Regulatory Gene, Tri10, Controls Trichothecene Toxin Production and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tag, Andrew G.; Garifullina, Gulnara F.; Peplow, Andrew W.; Ake, Charles; Phillips, T. D.; Hohn, Thomas M.; Beremand, Marian N.

    2001-01-01

    We report here the characterization of Tri10, a novel regulatory gene within the trichothecene gene cluster. Comparison of Tri10 genomic and mRNA sequences revealed that removal of a single 77-bp intron provided a 1,260-bp open reading frame, encoding a 420-amino-acid protein. Disruption of Tri10 in Fusarium sporotrichioides abolished T-2 toxin production and dramatically decreased the transcript accumulation for four trichothecene genes (Tri4, Tri5, Tri6, and Tri101) and an apparent farnesyl pyrophosphate synthetase (Fpps) gene. Conversely, homologous integration of a disruption vector by a single upstream crossover event significantly increased T-2 toxin production and elevated the transcript accumulation of the trichothecene genes and Fpps. Further analysis revealed that disruption of Tri10, and to a greater extent the disruption of Tri6, increased sensitivity to T-2 toxin under certain growth conditions. Although Tri10 is conserved in Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium sambucinum and clearly plays a central role in regulating trichothecene gene expression, it does not show any significant matches to proteins of known or predicted function or to motifs except a single transmembrane domain. We suggest a model in which Tri10 acts upstream of the cluster-encoded transcription factor TRI6 and is necessary for full expression of both the other trichothecene genes and the genes for the primary metabolic pathway that precedes the trichothecene biosynthetic pathway, as well as for wild-type levels of trichothecene self-protection. We further suggest the presence of a regulatory loop where Tri6 is not required for the transcription of Tri10 but is required to limit the expression of Tri10. PMID:11679358

  13. Metabolic engineering of Arabidopsis for butanetriol production using bacterial genes.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghany, Salah E; Day, Irene; Heuberger, Adam L; Broeckling, Corey D; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2013-11-01

    1,2,4-butanetriol (butanetriol) is a useful precursor for the synthesis of the energetic material butanetriol trinitrate and several pharmaceutical compounds. Bacterial synthesis of butanetriol from xylose or arabinose takes place in a pathway that requires four enzymes. To produce butanetriol in plants by expressing bacterial enzymes, we cloned native bacterial or codon optimized synthetic genes under different promoters into a binary vector and stably transformed Arabidopsis plants. Transgenic lines expressing introduced genes were analyzed for the production of butanetriol using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Soil-grown transgenic plants expressing these genes produced up to 20 µg/g of butanetriol. To test if an exogenous supply of pentose sugar precursors would enhance the butanetriol level, transgenic plants were grown in a medium supplemented with either xylose or arabinose and the amount of butanetriol was quantified. Plants expressing synthetic genes in the arabinose pathway showed up to a forty-fold increase in butanetriol levels after arabinose was added to the medium. Transgenic plants expressing either bacterial or synthetic xylose pathways, or the arabinose pathway showed toxicity symptoms when xylose or arabinose was added to the medium, suggesting that a by-product in the pathway or butanetriol affected plant growth. Furthermore, the metabolite profile of plants expressing arabinose and xylose pathways was altered. Our results demonstrate that bacterial pathways that produce butanetriol can be engineered into plants to produce this chemical. This proof-of-concept study for phytoproduction of butanetriol paves the way to further manipulate metabolic pathways in plants to enhance the level of butanetriol production.

  14. ADAR1 and PACT contribute to efficient translation of transcripts containing HIV-1 trans-activating response (TAR) element

    PubMed Central

    Chukwurah, Evelyn; Handy, Indhira

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has evolved various measures to counter the host cell's innate antiviral response during the course of infection. Interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene products are produced following HIV-1 infection to limit viral replication, but viral proteins and RNAs counteract their effect. One such mechanism is specifically directed against the IFN-induced Protein Kinase PKR, which is centrally important to the cellular antiviral response. In the presence of viral RNAs, PKR is activated and phosphorylates the translation initiation factor eIF2α. This shuts down the synthesis of both host and viral proteins, allowing the cell to mount an effective antiviral response. PACT (protein activator of PKR) is a cellular protein activator of PKR, primarily functioning to activate PKR in response to cellular stress. Recent studies have indicated that during HIV-1 infection, PACT's normal cellular function is compromised and that PACT is unable to activate PKR. Using various reporter systems and in vitro kinase assays, we establish in this report that interactions between PACT, ADAR1 and HIV-1-encoded Tat protein diminish the activation of PKR in response to HIV-1 infection. Our results highlight an important pathway by which HIV-1 transcripts subvert the host cell's antiviral activities to enhance their translation. PMID:28167698

  15. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    The following is a review of research accomplished in the first two years of funding for the above mentioned project. The work performed is a molecular characterization of nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which are deficient in different stages in the post-transcriptional expression of a single chloroplast encoded polypeptide, the D2 protein of Photosystem II. Our long-term goals are to understand the molecular mechanisms by which nuclear gene products affect the expression of chloroplast genes. Specifically, we which to understand how specific nuclear gene products affect the turnover rate of the D2 encoding mRNA (psbD), how other nuclear encoded factors work to promote the translation of psbD mRNA and/or stabilize the D2 protein, and what the role of the D2 protein itself is in Photosystem II assembly and in the control of expression of other chloroplast genes. This progress report will be organized into four major sections concerning (I) The characterization of nuclear mutants affected in D2 translation/turnover, (II) The study of trans-acting factors which associate with the 5{prime} end of the psbD mRNA, (III) In vitro mutagenesis of the psbD gene, and (IV) Additional studies.

  16. Chemiluminescent reporter gene assays: sensitive detection of the GUS and SEAP gene products.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, I; Fortin, J J; Voyta, J C; Juo, R R; Edwards, B; Olesen, C E; Lijam, N; Kricka, L J

    1994-07-01

    Chemiluminescent assays are described for the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) and beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene products. These assays provide simple, sensitive, non-isotopic alternatives to existing detection methods and are performed in microplate or tube luminometers or in a scintillation counter. The SEAP reporter gene product is secreted from mammalian cells and is thus easily detected in a sample of culture medium. Sensitive detection of secreted placental alkaline phosphatase is performed with CSPD chemiluminescent alkaline phosphatase substrate, and approximately 3 fg of enzyme can be detected. GUS has become the major reporter gene used for the analysis of plant gene expression. Sensitive chemiluminescent detection of GUS activity can be performed with an assay system we have developed using Glucuron, a beta-glucuronidase substrate. This chemiluminescent assay detects 60 fg of GUS and is linear over six orders of magnitude of enzyme concentration. CSPD and Glucuron substrates have been incorporated into two new chemiluminescent reporter gene assay kits for SEAP and GUS.

  17. Epstein-Barr Virus BKRF4 Gene Product Is Required for Efficient Progeny Production.

    PubMed

    Masud, H M Abdullah Al; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yoshida, Masahiro; Sato, Yoshitaka; Goshima, Fumi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Murata, Takayuki

    2017-09-13

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a member of human gammaherpesvirus, infects mainly B cells. EBV has two alternative life cycles, latent and lytic, and is reactivated occasionally from the latent stage to the lytic cycle. To combat EBV-associated disorders, understanding the molecular mechanisms of the EBV lytic replication cycle is also important. Here, we focused on an EBV lytic gene, BKRF4. Using our anti-BKRF4 antibody, we revealed that the BKRF4 gene product is expressed during the lytic cycle with late kinetics. To characterize the role of BKRF4, we constructed BKRF4-knockout mutants using the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) and CRISPR/Cas9 systems. While disruption of the BKRF4 gene had almost no effect on viral protein expression and DNA synthesis, it significantly decreased progeny virion levels in HEK293 and Akata cells. Furthermore, we show that BKRF4 is involved not only in production of progeny virions but also in increasing the infectivity of the virus particles. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed that BKRF4 interacted with a virion protein, BGLF2. We showed that the C-terminal region of BKRF4 was critical for this interaction and for efficient progeny production. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that BKRF4 partially colocalized with BGLF2 in the nucleus and perinuclear region. Finally, we showed that BKRF4 is a phosphorylated, possible tegument protein and that the EBV protein kinase BGLF4 may be important for this phosphorylation. Taken together, our data suggest that BKRF4 is involved in the production of infectious virions.IMPORTANCE While the latent genes of EBV have been studied extensively, the lytic genes are less well characterized. This study focused on one such lytic gene, BKRF4, which is conserved only among gammaherpesviruses (ORF45 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus or murine herpesvirus-68). After preparing the BKRF4 knockout virus using B95-8 EBV-BAC, we demonstrated that the BKRF4 gene was involved in infectious progeny

  18. Identification of the neurofibromatosis type 1 gene product

    SciTech Connect

    Gutmann, D.H.; Wood, D.L.; Collins, F.S. )

    1991-11-01

    The gene for neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) was recently identified by positional cloning. The complete cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 2818 amino acids. To study the NF1 gene product, antibodies were raised against both fusion proteins and synthetic peptides. Initial characterization of two anti-peptide antibodies and one fusion-protein antibody demonstrated a specific protein of {approx}250 kDa by both immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. This protein was found in all tissues and cell lines examined and is detected in human, rat, and mouse tissues. To demonstrate that these antibodies specifically recognize the NF1 protein, additional fusion proteins containing the sequence specific to the synthetic peptide were generated. Both peptide antisera recognize the proper specific fusion proteins so generated. Immunoprecipitates using the peptide antisera were shown to recognize the same protein detected by immunoblotting with either the other peptide antiserum or the fusion-protein antiserum. Immunoblotting using antiserum specific to spatially distinct epitopes conducted on tissue homogenates demonstrated the NF1 protein in all adult tissues. Based on the homology between the NF1 gene product and members of the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) superfamily, the name NF1-GAP-related protein (NF1GRP) is suggested.

  19. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon

    PubMed Central

    Basen, Mirko; Schut, Gerrit J.; Nguyen, Diep M.; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Benn, Robert A.; Prybol, Cameron J.; Vaccaro, Brian J.; Poole, Farris L.; Kelly, Robert M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 °C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways. PMID:25368184

  20. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon

    SciTech Connect

    Basen, M; Schut, GJ; Nguyen, DM; Lipscomb, GL; Benn, RA; Prybol, CJ; Vaccaro, BJ; Poole, FL; Kelly, RM; Adams, MWW

    2014-12-09

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 degrees C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways.

  1. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon.

    PubMed

    Basen, Mirko; Schut, Gerrit J; Nguyen, Diep M; Lipscomb, Gina L; Benn, Robert A; Prybol, Cameron J; Vaccaro, Brian J; Poole, Farris L; Kelly, Robert M; Adams, Michael W W

    2014-12-09

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 °C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways.

  2. Alphavirus vectors: applications for DNA vaccine production and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, K

    2000-01-01

    Replication-deficient alphavirus vectors have been developed for efficient high-level transgene expression. The broad host range of alphaviruses has allowed infection of a wide variety of mammalian cell lines and primary cultures. Particularly, G protein-coupled receptors have been expressed at high levels and subjected to binding and functional studies. Expression in suspension cultures has greatly facilitated production of large quantities of recombinant proteins for structural studies. Injection of recombinant alphavirus vectors into rodent brain resulted in local reporter gene expression. Highly neuron-specific expression was obtained in hippocampal slice cultures in vivo. Additionally, preliminary studies in animal models suggest that alphavirus vectors can be attractive candidates for gene therapy applications. Traditionally alphavirus vectors, either attenuated strains or replication-deficient particles, have been used to elicit efficient immune responses in animals. Recently, the application of alphaviruses has been extended to naked nucleic acids. Injection of DNA as well as RNA vectors has demonstrated efficient antigen production. In many cases, protection against lethal challenges has been obtained after immunization with alphavirus particles or nucleic acid vectors. Alphavirus vectors can therefore be considered as potentially promising vectors for vaccine production.

  3. 76 FR 9028 - Guidance for Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products'' dated January 2011. The guidance document provides manufacturers of cellular and gene therapy (CGT) products with recommendations for developing... document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products'' dated...

  4. Gas-inducible product gene expression in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Weber, Wilfried; Rimann, Markus; de Glutz, François-Nicolas; Weber, Eric; Memmert, Klaus; Fussenegger, Martin

    2005-05-01

    Inducible transgene expression technologies are of unmatched potential for biopharmaceutical manufacturing of unstable, growth-impairing and cytotoxic proteins as well as conditional metabolic engineering to improve desired cell phenotypes. Currently available transgene dosing modalities which rely on physical parameters or small-molecule drugs for transgene fine-tuning compromise downstream processing and/or are difficult to implement technologically. The recently designed gas-inducible acetaldehyde-inducible regulation (AIR) technology takes advantage of gaseous acetaldehyde to modulate product gene expression levels. At regulation effective concentrations gaseous acetaldehyde is physiologically inert and approved as food additive by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA). During standard bioreactor operation, gaseous acetaldehyde could simply be administered using standard/existing gas supply tubing and eventually eliminated by stripping with inducer-free air. We have determined key parameters controlling acetaldehyde transfer in three types of bioreactors and designed a mass balance-based model for optimal product gene expression fine-tuning using gaseous acetaldehyde. Operating a standard stirred-tank bioreactor set-up at 10 L scale we have validated AIR technology using CHO-K1-derived serum-free suspension cultures transgenic for gas-inducible production of human interferon-beta (IFN-beta). Gaseous acetaldehyde-inducible IFN-beta production management was fully reversible while maintaining cell viability at over 95% during the entire process. Compatible with standard bioreactor design and downstream processing procedures AIR-based technology will foster novel opportunities for pilot and large-scale manufacturing of difficult-to-produce protein pharmaceuticals.

  5. Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) improves lutein production in Chlorella vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruijuan; Lin, Xiangzhi

    2014-03-01

    Vitreoscilla hemoglobin is an oxygen-binding protein that promotes oxygen delivery and reduces oxygen consumption under low oxygen conditions to increase the efficiency of cell respiration and metabolism. In this study, we introduced a Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) into Chlorella vulgaris by Agrobacterium tumefaciens -mediated transformation (ATMT). PCR analysis confirmed that the vgb gene was successfully integrated into the Chlorella vulgaris genome. Analysis of biomass obtained in shake flasks revealed transformant biomass concentrations as high as 3.28 g/L, which was 38.81% higher than that of the wild-type strain. Lutein content of transformants also increased slightly. Further experiments recovered a maximum lutein yield of 2.91 mg/L from the transformants, which was 36.77% higher than that of the wild-type strain. The above results suggest that integrated expression of the vgb gene may improve cell growth and lutein yield in Chlorella vulgaris, with applications to lutein production from Chlorella during fermentation.

  6. Polyhydroxyalkanoate production in Rhodobacter capsulatus: genes, mutants, expression, and physiology.

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, R G; Gabbert, K K; Locke, T A; Madigan, M T

    1997-01-01

    Like many other prokaryotes, the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus produces high levels of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) when a suitable carbon source is available. The three genes that are traditionally considered to be necessary in the PHA biosynthetic pathway, phaA (beta-ketothiolase), phaB (acetoacetylcoenzyme A reductase), and phaC (PHA synthase), were cloned from Rhodobacter capsulatus. In R. capsulatus, the phaAB genes are not linked to the phaC gene. Translational beta-galactosidase fusions to phaA and phaC were constructed and recombined into the chromosome. Both phaC and phaA were constitutively expressed regardless of whether PHA production was induced, suggesting that control is posttranslational at the enzymatic level. Consistent with this conclusion, it was shown that the R. capsulatus transcriptional nitrogen-sensing circuits were not involved in PHA synthesis. The doubling times of R. capsulatus transcriptional nitrogen-sensing circuits were not involved in PHA synthesis. The doubling times of R. capsulatus grown on numerous carbon sources were determined, indicating that this bacterium grows on C2 to C12 fatty acids. Grown on acetone, caproate, or heptanoate, wild-type R. capsulatus produced high levels of PHAs. Although a phaC deletion strain was unable to synthesize PHAs on any carbon source, phaA and phaAB deletion strains were able to produce PHAs, indicating that alternative routes for the synthesis of substrates for the synthase are present. The nutritional versatility and bioenergetic versatility of R. capsulatus, coupled with its ability to produce large amounts of PHAs and its genetic tractability, make it an attractive model for the study of PHA production. PMID:9251189

  7. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors suppress UV-induced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gene expression at the posttranscriptional level.

    PubMed Central

    Yamagoe, S; Kohda, T; Oishi, M

    1991-01-01

    Gene expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is induced not only by trans activation mediated through a gene product (tat) encoded by the virus but also by treatment of virus-carrying cells with DNA-damaging agents such as UV light. Employing an artificially constructed DNA in which the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was placed under the control of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, we analyzed the induction process in HeLa cells and found that inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase suppressed UV-induced HIV-1 gene expression but not tat-mediated expression. We also found that suppression occurs at the posttranscriptional level. These results indicate that HIV-1 gene expression is activated by at least two different mechanisms, one of which involves poly-ADP ribosylation. A possible new role of poly-ADP ribosylation in the regulation of specific gene expression is also discussed. Images PMID:1828533

  8. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors suppress UV-induced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gene expression at the posttranscriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagoe, S.; Kohda, T.; Oishi, M. )

    1991-07-01

    Gene expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is induced not only by trans activation mediated through a gene product (tat) encoded by the virus but also by treatment of virus-carrying cells with DNA-damaging agents such as UV light. Employing an artificially constructed DNA in which the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was placed under the control of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, we analyzed the induction process in HeLa cells and found that inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase suppressed UV-induced HIV-1 gene expression but not tat-mediated expression. We also found that suppression occurs at the posttranscriptional level. These results indicate that HIV-1 gene expression is activated by at least two different mechanisms, one of which involves poly-ADP ribosylation. A possible new role of poly-ADP ribosylation in the regulation of specific gene expression is also discussed.

  9. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    DOEpatents

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  10. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    DOEpatents

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2014-08-05

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  11. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    DOEpatents

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2016-11-29

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  12. Regulation of the Escherichia coli glyA gene by the metR gene product and homocysteine.

    PubMed Central

    Plamann, M D; Stauffer, G V

    1989-01-01

    The methionine component of glyA gene regulation in Escherichia coli K-12 was investigated. The results indicate that the glyA gene is positively controlled by the metR gene product. Activation of glyA by the MetR protein requires homocysteine, an intermediate in methionine biosynthesis. The positive-acting metR regulatory system functions independently of a regulatory system shown previously to control glyA gene expression. PMID:2670901

  13. A Weighted Multipath Measurement Based on Gene Ontology for Estimating Gene Products Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lizhen; Dai, Xuemin; Song, Wei; Lu, Jingli

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Many different methods have been proposed for calculating the semantic similarity of term pairs based on gene ontology (GO). Most existing methods are based on information content (IC), and the methods based on IC are used more commonly than those based on the structure of GO. However, most IC-based methods not only fail to handle identical annotations but also show a strong bias toward well-annotated proteins. We propose a new method called weighted multipath measurement (WMM) for estimating the semantic similarity of gene products based on the structure of the GO. We not only considered the contribution of every path between two GO terms but also took the depth of the lowest common ancestors into account. We assigned different weights for different kinds of edges in GO graph. The similarity values calculated by WMM can be reused because they are only relative to the characteristics of GO terms. Experimental results showed that the similarity values obtained by WMM have a higher accuracy. We compared the performance of WMM with that of other methods using GO data and gene annotation datasets for yeast and humans downloaded from the GO database. We found that WMM is more suited for prediction of gene function than most existing IC-based methods and that it can distinguish proteins with identical annotations (two proteins are annotated with the same terms) from each other. PMID:25229994

  14. Identifying the Interaction between Genes and Gene Products Based on Frequently Seen Verbs in Medline Abstracts.

    PubMed

    Sekimizu; Park; Tsujii

    1998-01-01

    We have selected the most frequently seen verbs from raw texts made up of 1-million-words of Medline abstracts, and we were able to identify (or bracket) noun phrases contained in the corpus, with a precision rate of 90%. Then, based on the noun-phrase-bracketted corpus, we tried to find the subject and object terms for some frequently seen verbs in the domain. The precision rate of finding the right subject and object for each verb was about 73%. This task was only made possible because we were able to linguistically analyze (or parse) a large quantity of a raw corpus. Our approach will be useful for classifying genes and gene products and for identifying the interaction between them. It is the first step of our effort in building a genome-related thesaurus and hierarchies in a fully automatic way.

  15. Identification of the dnaA and dnaN gene products of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, S; Sakakibara, Y

    1980-01-01

    A specialized transducing lambda phage carrying the dnaN genes of Escherichia coli specifies two proteins of about 41 and 48 kilodaltons (kd). The temperature-sensitive mutations, dnaN59 and dnaA167, were found to result in altered isoelectric points of the 41 and 48 kd proteins, respectively. Thus the dnaN gene product was identified as a weakly acidic 41 and 48 kd protein. The synthesis of the dnaN gene product is greatly reduced by insertion of a transposon Tn3 in the dnaA gene and by deletion in the gene at the distal end to the dnaN gene. Temperature-sensitive dnaA mutations, on the dnaN gene product. These results indicate that the synthesis of the dnaN gene product is dependent on the structural integrity of the dnaA gene.

  16. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products. Progress report, June 1, 1990--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    Many individual chloroplast genes require the products of a collection of nuclear genes for their successful expression. These nuclear gene products apparently work with great specificity, each committed to the expression of a single chloroplast gene. We have chosen as a model nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas affected in different stages in the expression of the chloroplast encoded Photosystem II polypeptide, D2. We have made the progress in understanding how nuclear gene products affect the translation of the D2 encoding MRNA. Two nuclear genes are required for this process which have been mapped genetically. In contrast to other examples of nuclear control of translation in the chloroplast, these nuclear gene products appear to be required either for specific stages in translation elongation or for the post-translational stabilization of the nascent D2 protein. Pseudoreversion analysis has led us to a locus which may be directly involved in D2 expression. We have made considerable progress in pursuing the molecular basis of psbd MRNA stabilization. psbD 5` UTR specific transcripts have been synthesized in vitro and used in gel mobility shift assays. UV-crosslinking studies are underway to identify the transacting factors which bind to these sequences. The continued examination of these mutants will help us to understand how nuclear gene products work in this specific case of chloroplast gene expression, and will elucidate how two distinct genomes can interact generally.

  17. The cavity in the hydrophobic core of Myb DNA-binding domain is reserved for DNA recognition and trans-activation.

    PubMed

    Ogata, K; Kanei-Ishii, C; Sasaki, M; Hatanaka, H; Nagadoi, A; Enari, M; Nakamura, H; Nishimura, Y; Ishii, S; Sarai, A

    1996-02-01

    The DNA-binding domain of Myb consists of three imperfect repeats, R1, R2 and R3, each containing a helix-turn-helix motif variation. Among these repeats, R2 has distinct characteristics with high thermal instability. The NMR structure analysis found a cavity inside the hydrophobic core of R2 but not in R1 or R3. Here, we show that R2 has slow conformational fluctuations, and that a cavity-filling mutation which stabilizes the R2 structure significantly reduces specific Myb DNA-binding activity and trans-activation. Structural observations of the free and DNA-complexed stages suggest that the implied inherent conformational flexibility of R2, associated with the presence of the cavity, could be important for DNA recognition by Myb.

  18. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  19. Off Target, but Sequence-Specific, shRNA-Associated Trans-Activation of Promoter Reporters in Transient Transfection Assays

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jun; Yerrabelli, Anitha; Berlinicke, Cindy; Kallman, Alyssa; Qian, Jiang; Zack, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    Transient transfection promoter reporter assays are commonly used in the study of transcriptional regulation, and can be used to define and characterize both cis-acting regulatory sequences and trans-acting factors. In the process of using a variety of reporter assays designed to study regulation of the rhodopsin (rho) promoter, we discovered that rhodopsin promoter-driven reporter expression could be activated by certain species of shRNA in a gene-target-independent but shRNA sequence-specific manner, suggesting involvement of a specific shRNA associated pathway. Interestingly, the shRNA-mediated increase of rhodopsin promoter activity was synergistically enhanced by the rhodopsin transcriptional regulators CRX and NRL. Additionally, the effect was cell line-dependent, suggesting that this pathway requires the expression of cell-type specific factors. Since microRNA (miRNA) and interferon response-mediated processes have been implicated in RNAi off-target phenomena, we performed miRNA and gene expression profiling on cells transfected with shRNAs that do target a specific gene but have varied effects on rho reporter expression in order to identify transcripts whose expression levels are associated with shRNA induced rhodopsin promoter reporter activity. We identified a total of 50 miRNA species, and by microarray analysis, 320 protein-coding genes, some of which were predicted targets of the identified differentially expressed miRNAs, whose expression was altered in the presence of shRNAs that stimulated rhodopsin-promoter activity in a non-gene-targeting manner. Consistent with earlier studies on shRNA off-target effects, a number of interferon response genes were among those identified to be upregulated. Taken together, our results confirm the importance of considering off-target effects when interpreting data from RNAi experiments and extend prior results by focusing on the importance of including multiple and carefully designed controls in the design and

  20. The Wilms’ Tumor Suppressor Gene (wt1) Product Regulates Dax-1 Gene Expression during Gonadal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungho; Prawitt, Dirk; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Torban, Elena; Vicaner, Caroline; Goodyer, Paul; Zabel, Bernard; Pelletier, Jerry

    1999-01-01

    Gonadal differentiation is dependent upon a molecular cascade responsible for ovarian or testicular development from the bipotential gonadal ridge. Genetic analysis has implicated a number of gene products essential for this process, which include Sry, WT1, SF-1, and DAX-1. We have sought to better define the role of WT1 in this process by identifying downstream targets of WT1 during normal gonadal development. We have noticed that in the developing murine gonadal ridge, wt1 expression precedes expression of Dax-1, a nuclear receptor gene. We document here that the spatial distribution profiles of both proteins in the developing gonad overlap. We also demonstrate that WT1 can activate the Dax-1 promoter. Footprinting analysis, transient transfections, promoter mutagenesis, and mobility shift assays suggest that WT1 regulates Dax-1 via GC-rich binding sites found upstream of the Dax-1 TATA box. We show that two WT1-interacting proteins, the product of a Denys-Drash syndrome allele of wt1 and prostate apoptosis response-4 protein, inhibit WT1-mediated transactivation of Dax-1. In addition, we demonstrate that WT1 can activate the endogenous Dax-1 promoter. Our results indicate that the WT1–DAX-1 pathway is an early event in the process of mammalian sex determination. PMID:10022915

  1. Production and clinical development of nanoparticles for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Guo, Zhaopei; Tian, Huayu; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising strategy for specific treatment of numerous gene-associated human diseases by intentionally altering the gene expression in pathological cells. A successful clinical application of gene-based therapy depends on an efficient gene delivery system. Many efforts have been attempted to improve the safety and efficiency of gene-based therapies. Nanoparticles have been proved to be the most promising vehicles for clinical gene therapy due to their tunable size, shape, surface, and biological behaviors. In this review, the clinical development of nanoparticles for gene delivery will be particularly highlighted. Several promising candidates, which are closest to clinical applications, will be briefly reviewed. Then, the recent developments of nanoparticles for clinical gene therapy will be identified and summarized. Finally, the development of nanoparticles for clinical gene delivery in future will be prospected. PMID:27088105

  2. Natural product proteomining, a quantitative proteomics platform, allows rapid discovery of biosynthetic gene clusters for different classes of natural products.

    PubMed

    Gubbens, Jacob; Zhu, Hua; Girard, Geneviève; Song, Lijiang; Florea, Bogdan I; Aston, Philip; Ichinose, Koji; Filippov, Dmitri V; Choi, Young H; Overkleeft, Herman S; Challis, Gregory L; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2014-06-19

    Information on gene clusters for natural product biosynthesis is accumulating rapidly because of the current boom of available genome sequencing data. However, linking a natural product to a specific gene cluster remains challenging. Here, we present a widely applicable strategy for the identification of gene clusters for specific natural products, which we name natural product proteomining. The method is based on using fluctuating growth conditions that ensure differential biosynthesis of the bioactivity of interest. Subsequent combination of metabolomics and quantitative proteomics establishes correlations between abundance of natural products and concomitant changes in the protein pool, which allows identification of the relevant biosynthetic gene cluster. We used this approach to elucidate gene clusters for different natural products in Bacillus and Streptomyces, including a novel juglomycin-type antibiotic. Natural product proteomining does not require prior knowledge of the gene cluster or secondary metabolite and therefore represents a general strategy for identification of all types of gene clusters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a gene synthesis platform for the efficient large scale production of small genes encoding animal toxins.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Ana Filipa; Brás, Joana L A; Guerreiro, Catarina I P D; Vincentelli, Renaud; Fontes, Carlos M G A

    2016-12-01

    Gene synthesis is becoming an important tool in many fields of recombinant DNA technology, including recombinant protein production. De novo gene synthesis is quickly replacing the classical cloning and mutagenesis procedures and allows generating nucleic acids for which no template is available. In addition, when coupled with efficient gene design algorithms that optimize codon usage, it leads to high levels of recombinant protein expression. Here, we describe the development of an optimized gene synthesis platform that was applied to the large scale production of small genes encoding venom peptides. This improved gene synthesis method uses a PCR-based protocol to assemble synthetic DNA from pools of overlapping oligonucleotides and was developed to synthesise multiples genes simultaneously. This technology incorporates an accurate, automated and cost effective ligation independent cloning step to directly integrate the synthetic genes into an effective Escherichia coli expression vector. The robustness of this technology to generate large libraries of dozens to thousands of synthetic nucleic acids was demonstrated through the parallel and simultaneous synthesis of 96 genes encoding animal toxins. An automated platform was developed for the large-scale synthesis of small genes encoding eukaryotic toxins. Large scale recombinant expression of synthetic genes encoding eukaryotic toxins will allow exploring the extraordinary potency and pharmacological diversity of animal venoms, an increasingly valuable but unexplored source of lead molecules for drug discovery.

  4. Sterol-dependent nuclear import of ORP1S promotes LXR regulated trans-activation of apoE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungsoo; Wang, Ping-Yuan; Jeong, Yangsik; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Anderson, Richard G.W.; Michaely, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Oxysterol binding protein related protein 1S (ORP1S) is a member of a family of sterol transport proteins. Here we present evidence that ORP1S translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in response to sterol binding. The sterols that best promote nuclear import of ORP1S also activate the liver X receptor (LXR) transcription factors and we show that ORP1S binds to LXRs, promotes binding of LXRs to LXR response elements (LXREs) and specifically enhances LXR-dependent transcription via the ME.1 and ME.2 enhancer elements of the apoE gene. We propose that ORP1S is a cytoplasmic sterol sensor, which transports sterols to the nucleus and promotes LXR-dependent gene transcription through select enhancer elements. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP1S translocates to the nucleus in response to sterol binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sterols that best promote nuclear import of ORP1S are LXR agonists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP1S binds to LXRs, enhances binding of LXRs to LXREs and promotes LXR-dependent transcription of apoE.

  5. Extended gene expression by medium exchange and repeated transient transfection for recombinant protein production enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Laura; Gutiérrez-Granados, Sonia; Berrow, Nicholas Simon; Segura, Maria Mercedes; Gòdia, Francesc

    2015-05-01

    Production of recombinant products in mammalian cell cultures can be achieved by stable gene expression (SGE) or transient gene expression (TGE). The former is based on the integration of a plasmid DNA into the host cell genome allowing continuous gene expression. The latter is based on episomal plasmid DNA expression. Conventional TGE is limited to a short production period of usually about 96 h, therefore limiting productivity. A novel gene expression approach termed extended gene expression (EGE) is explored in this study. The aim of EGE is to prolong the production period by the combination of medium exchange and repeated transfection of cell cultures with plasmid DNA to improve overall protein production. The benefit of this methodology was evaluated for the production of three model recombinant products: intracellular GFP, secreted GFP, and a Gag-GFP virus-like particles (VLPs). Productions were carried out in HEK 293 cell suspension cultures grown in animal-derived component free media using polyethylenimine (PEI) as transfection reagent. Transfections were repeated throughout the production process using different plasmid DNA concentrations, intervals of time, and culture feeding conditions in order to identify the best approach to achieve sustained high-level gene expression. Using this novel EGE strategy, the production period was prolonged between 192 and 240 h with a 4-12-fold increase in production levels, depending on the product type considered. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [Collaborative study on regulatory science for facilitating clinical development of gene therapy products for genetic diseases].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Eriko; Igarashi, Yuka; Sato, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy products are expected as innovative medicinal products for intractable diseases such as life-threatening genetic diseases and cancer. Recently, clinical developments by pharmaceutical companies are accelerated in Europe and the United States, and the first gene therapy product in advanced countries was approved for marketing authorization by the European Commission in 2012. On the other hand, more than 40 clinical studies for gene therapy have been completed or ongoing in Japan, most of them are conducted as clinical researches by academic institutes, and few clinical trials have been conducted for approval of gene therapy products. In order to promote the development of gene therapy products, revision of the current guideline and/or preparation of concept paper to address the evaluation of the quality and safety of gene therapy products are necessary and desired to clearly show what data should be submitted before First-in-Human clinical trials of novel gene therapy products. We started collaborative study with academia and regulatory agency to promote regulatory science toward clinical development of gene therapy products for genetic diseases based on lentivirus and adeno-associated virus vectors; National Center for Child Health and Development (NCCHD), Nippon Medical School and PMDA have been joined in the task force. At first, we are preparing pre-draft of the revision of the current gene therapy guidelines in this project.

  7. Form gene clustering method about pan-ethnic-group products based on emotional semantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dengkai; Ding, Jingjing; Gao, Minzhuo; Ma, Danping; Liu, Donghui

    2016-09-01

    The use of pan-ethnic-group products form knowledge primarily depends on a designer's subjective experience without user participation. The majority of studies primarily focus on the detection of the perceptual demands of consumers from the target product category. A pan-ethnic-group products form gene clustering method based on emotional semantic is constructed. Consumers' perceptual images of the pan-ethnic-group products are obtained by means of product form gene extraction and coding and computer aided product form clustering technology. A case of form gene clustering about the typical pan-ethnic-group products is investigated which indicates that the method is feasible. This paper opens up a new direction for the future development of product form design which improves the agility of product design process in the era of Industry 4.0.

  8. Requirements for Clinical Trials with Gene Therapy and Transplant Products in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Marti, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    This chapter aims to describe and summarize the regulation of gene and cell therapy products in Switzerland and its legal basis. Product types are briefly described, as are Swiss-specific terminologies such as the term "transplant product," which means products manufactured from cells, tissues, or even whole organs. Although some parts of this chapter may show a guideline character, they are not legally binding, but represent the current thinking of Swissmedic, the Swiss Agency for Therapeutic Products. As so far the experience with marketing approval of gene therapy and cell therapy products in Switzerland is limited, this chapter focuses on the regulation of clinical trials conducted with these products. Quality, nonclinical, and clinical aspects are summarized separately for gene therapy products and transplant products.

  9. Regulatory Oversight of Gene Therapy and Cell Therapy Products in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minjoung; Han, Euiri; Lee, Sunmi; Kim, Taegyun; Shin, Won

    2015-01-01

    The Ministry of Food and Drug Safety regulates gene therapy and cell therapy products as biological products under the authority of the Pharmaceutical Affairs Act. As with other medicinal products, gene therapy and cell therapy products are subject to approval for use in clinical trials and for a subsequent marketing authorization and to post-market surveillance. Research and development of gene therapy and cell therapy products have been progressing rapidly in Korea with extensive investment, offering great potential for the treatment of various serious diseases. To facilitate development of safe and effective products and provide more opportunities to patients suffering from severe diseases, several regulatory programs, such as the use of investigational products for emergency situations, fast-track approval, prereview of application packages, and intensive regulatory consultation, can be applied to these products. The regulatory approach for these innovative products is case by case and founded on science-based review that is flexible and balances the risks and benefits.

  10. Aflatoxin conducive and non-conducive growth conditions reveal new gene associations with aflatoxin production.

    PubMed

    Price, Michael S; Conners, Shannon B; Tachdjian, Sabrina; Kelly, Robert M; Payne, Gary A

    2005-06-01

    Research on aflatoxin (AF) production has traditionally focused on defining the AF biosynthetic pathway with the goal of identifying potential targets for intervention. To understand the effect of nitrogen source, carbon source, temperature, and pH on the regulation of AF biosynthesis, a targeted cDNA microarray consisting of genes associated with AF production over time was employed. Expression profiles for genes involved in AF biosynthesis grouped into five clades. A putative regulon was identified consisting of 20 genes that were induced in the conducive nitrogen and pH treatments and the non-conducive carbon and temperature treatments, as well as four other putative regulons corresponding to each of the four variables studied. Seventeen genes exhibited consistent induction/repression profiles across all the experiments. One of these genes was consistently downregulated with AF production. Overexpression of this gene resulted in repression of AF biosynthesis. The cellular function of this gene is currently unresolved.

  11. A Mutant Gene That Increases Gibberellin Production in Brassica1

    PubMed Central

    Rood, Stewart B.; Williams, Paul H.; Pearce, David; Murofushi, Noboru; Mander, Lewis N.; Pharis, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    A single gene mutant (elongated internode [ein/ein]) with accelerated shoot elongation was identified from a rapid cycling line of Brassica rapa. Relative to normal plants, mutant plants had slightly accelerated floral development, greater stem dry weights, and particularly, increased internode and inflorescence elongation. The application of the triazole plant growth retardant, paclobutrazol, inhibited shoot elongation, returning ein to a more normal phenotype. Conversely, exogenous gibberellin A3 (GA3) can convert normal genotypes to a phenotype resembling ein. The content of endogenous GA1 and GA3 were estimated by gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring using [2H]GA1, as a quantitative internal standard and at day 14 were 1.5- and 12.1-fold higher per stem, respectively, in ein than in normal plants, although GA concentrations were more similar. The endogenous levels of GA20 and GA1, and the rate of GA19 metabolism were simultaneously analyzed at day 7 by feeding [2H2]GA19 and measuring metabolites [2H2]GA20 and [2H2]GA1 and endogenous GA20 and GA1, with [2H5]GA20 and [2H5]GA1 as quantitative internal standards. Levels of GA1 and GA20 were 4.6- and 12.9-fold higher, respectively, and conversions to GA20 and GA1 were 8.3 and 1.3 times faster in ein than normal plants. Confirming the enhanced rate of GA1 biosynthesis in ein, the conversion of [3H]GA20 to [3H]GA1 was also faster in ein than in the normal genotype. Thus, the ein allele results in accelerated GA1 biosynthesis and an elevated content of endogenous GAs, including the dihydroxylated GAs A1 and A3. The enhanced GA production probably underlies the accelerated shoot growth and development, and particularly, the increased shoot elongation. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667574

  12. Linking gene regulation to mRNA production and export.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana; Hurt, Ed

    2011-06-01

    Regulation of gene expression can occur at many different levels. One important step in the gene expression process is the transport of mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. In recent years, studies have described how nuclear mRNA export depends on the steps preceding and following transport through nuclear pore complexes. These include gene activation, transcription, mRNA processing and mRNP assembly and disassembly. In this review, we summarise recent insights into the links between these steps in the gene expression cascade.

  13. Fc-receptor and M-protein genes of group A streptococci are products of gene duplication.

    PubMed Central

    Heath, D G; Cleary, P P

    1989-01-01

    The partial nucleotide sequence for an Fc-receptor gene from an M-type 76 group A streptococcus was determined. DNA sequence analysis revealed considerable sequence similarity between the Fc-receptor and M-protein genes in their proposed promoter regions, signal sequences, and 3' termini. Additional analysis indicated that the deduced Fc-receptor protein contains a proline-rich region and membrane anchor region highly similar to that of M protein. In view of these results, we postulated that Fc-receptor and M-protein genes of group A streptococci are the products of gene duplication from a common ancestral gene. It is proposed that DNA sequence similarity between these two genes may allow for extragenic homologous recombination as a means of generating antigenic diversity in these two surface proteins. PMID:2660147

  14. Identification of potentially hazardous human gene products in GMO risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Bergmans, Hans; Logie, Colin; Van Maanen, Kees; Hermsen, Harm; Meredyth, Michelle; Van Der Vlugt, Cécile

    2008-01-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs), e.g. viral vectors, could threaten the environment if by their release they spread hazardous gene products. Even in contained use, to prevent adverse consequences, viral vectors carrying genes from mammals or humans should be especially scrutinized as to whether gene products that they synthesize could be hazardous in their new context. Examples of such potentially hazardous gene products (PHGPs) are: protein toxins, products of dominant alleles that have a role in hereditary diseases, gene products and sequences involved in genome rearrangements, gene products involved in immunomodulation or with an endocrine function, gene products involved in apoptosis, activated proto-oncogenes. For contained use of a GMO that carries a construct encoding a PHGP, the precautionary principle dictates that safety measures should be applied on a "worst case" basis, until the risks of the specific case have been assessed. The potential hazard of cloned genes can be estimated before empirical data on the actual GMO become available. Preliminary data may be used to focus hazard identification and risk assessment. Both predictive and empirical data may also help to identify what further information is needed to assess the risk of the GMO. A two-step approach, whereby a PHGP is evaluated for its conceptual dangers, then checked by data bank searches, is delineated here.

  15. A Conserved Face of the Jagged/Serrate DSL Domain is Involved in Notch Trans-Activation and Cis-Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cordle, Jemima; Johnson, Steven; Tay, Joyce Zi Yan; Roversi, Pietro; Wilkin, Marian; Hernandez-Diaz, Beatriz; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Jensen, Sacha; Whiteman, Pat; Jin, Boquan; Redfield, Christina; Baron, Martin; Lea, Susan M.; Handford, Penny A.

    2009-01-01

    The Notch receptor and its ligands are key components in a core metazoan signalling pathway which regulates the spatial patterning, timing and outcome of many cell-fate decisions. Ligands contain a disulphide-rich Delta/Serrate/LAG-2 (DSL) domain required for Notch trans-activation or cis-inhibition. Here we report the first X-ray structure of a functional fragment of a Notch ligand, the DSL-EGF3 domains of human Jagged-1 (J-1DSL-EGF3). The structure identifies a highly conserved face of the DSL domain and we show, by functional analysis of Drosophila ligand mutants, that this surface is required for both cis- and trans-regulatory interactions with Notch. We also identify, using NMR, a surface of Notch-1 involved in J-1DSL-EGF3 binding. Our data imply that cis- and trans-regulation may occur through formation of structurally distinct complexes which, unexpectedly, involve the same surfaces on both ligand and receptor. PMID:18660822

  16. A conserved face of the Jagged/Serrate DSL domain is involved in Notch trans-activation and cis-inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cordle, Jemima; Johnson, Steven; Tay, Joyce Zi Yan; Roversi, Pietro; Wilkin, Marian B; de Madrid, Beatriz Hernández; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Jensen, Sacha; Whiteman, Pat; Jin, Boquan; Redfield, Christina; Baron, Martin; Lea, Susan M; Handford, Penny A

    2008-08-01

    The Notch receptor and its ligands are key components in a core metazoan signaling pathway that regulates the spatial patterning, timing and outcome of many cell-fate decisions. Ligands contain a disulfide-rich Delta/Serrate/LAG-2 (DSL) domain required for Notch trans-activation or cis-inhibition. Here we report the X-ray structure of a receptor binding region of a Notch ligand, the DSL-EGF3 domains of human Jagged-1 (J-1(DSL-EGF3)). The structure reveals a highly conserved face of the DSL domain, and we show, by functional analysis of Drosophila melanogster ligand mutants, that this surface is required for both cis- and trans-regulatory interactions with Notch. We also identify, using NMR, a surface of Notch-1 involved in J-1(DSL-EGF3) binding. Our data imply that cis- and trans-regulation may occur through the formation of structurally distinct complexes that, unexpectedly, involve the same surfaces on both ligand and receptor.

  17. Comparison of Bacillus monooxygenase genes for unique fatty acid production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper reviews Bacillus genes encoding monooxygenase enzymes producing unique fatty acid metabolites. Specifically, it examines standard monooxygenase electron transfer schemes and related domain structures of these fused domain enzymes on route to understanding the observed oxygenase activiti...

  18. Cloning large natural product gene clusters from the environment: Piecing environmental DNA gene clusters back together with TAR

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeffrey H; Feng, Zhiyang; Bauer, John D; Kallifidas, Dimitris; Calle, Paula Y; Brady, Sean F

    2010-01-01

    A single gram of soil can contain thousands of unique bacterial species, of which only a small fraction is regularly cultured in the laboratory. Although the fermentation of cultured microorganisms has provided access to numerous bioactive secondary metabolites, with these same methods it is not possible to characterize the natural products encoded by the uncultured majority. The heterologous expression of biosynthetic gene clusters cloned from DNA extracted directly from environmental samples (eDNA) has the potential to provide access to the chemical diversity encoded in the genomes of uncultured bacteria. One of the challenges facing this approach has been that many natural product biosynthetic gene clusters are too large to be readily captured on a single fragment of cloned eDNA. The reassembly of large eDNA-derived natural product gene clusters from collections of smaller overlapping clones represents one potential solution to this problem. Unfortunately, traditional methods for the assembly of large DNA sequences from multiple overlapping clones can be technically challenging. Here we present a general experimental framework that permits the recovery of large natural product biosynthetic gene clusters on overlapping soil-derived eDNA cosmid clones and the reassembly of these large gene clusters using transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The development of practical methods for the rapid assembly of biosynthetic gene clusters from collections of overlapping eDNA clones is an important step toward being able to functionally study larger natural product gene clusters from uncultured bacteria. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 93: 833–844, 2010. PMID:20577994

  19. Enhancement of astaxanthin production in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous by efficient method for the complete deletion of genes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Keisuke; Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Morita, Toshihiko; Nishimura, Akira; Sasaki, Daisuke; Ishii, Jun; Ogino, Chiaki; Kizaki, Noriyuki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-09-13

    Red yeast, Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is the only yeast known to produce astaxanthin, an anti-oxidant isoprenoid (carotenoid) widely used in the aquaculture, food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. The potential of this microorganism as a platform cell factory for isoprenoid production has been recognized because of high flux through its native terpene pathway. Recently, we developed a multiple gene expression system in X. dendrorhous and enhanced the mevalonate synthetic pathway to increase astaxanthin production. In contrast, the mevalonate synthetic pathway is suppressed by ergosterol through feedback inhibition. Therefore, releasing the mevalonate synthetic pathway from this inhibition through the deletion of genes involved in ergosterol synthesis is a promising strategy to improve isoprenoid production. An efficient method for deleting diploid genes in X. dendrorhous, however, has not yet been developed. Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous was cultivated under gradually increasing concentrations of antibiotics following the introduction of antibiotic resistant genes to be replaced with target genes. Using this method, double CYP61 genes encoding C-22 sterol desaturases relating to ergosterol biosynthesis were deleted sequentially. This double CYP61 deleted strain showed decreased ergosterol biosynthesis compared with the parental strain and single CYP61 disrupted strain. Additionally, this double deletion of CYP61 genes showed increased astaxanthin production compared with the parental strain and the single CYP61 knockout strain. Finally, astaxanthin production was enhanced by 1.4-fold compared with the parental strain, although astaxanthin production was not affected in the single CYP61 knockout strain. In this study, we developed a system to completely delete target diploid genes in X. dendrorhous. Using this method, we deleted diploid CYP61 genes involved in the synthesis of ergosterol that inhibits the pathway for mevalonate, which is a common

  20. Vector systems for prenatal gene therapy: principles of non-viral vector design and production.

    PubMed

    Wong, Suet Ping; Argyros, Orestis; Harbottle, Richard P

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy vectors based on viruses are the most effective gene delivery systems in use today and although efficient at gene transfer their potential toxicity (Hacein-Bey-Abina et al., Science 302:415-419, 2003) provides impetus for the development of safer non-viral alternatives. An ideal vector for human gene therapy should deliver sustainable therapeutic levels of gene expression without affecting the viability of the host at either the cellular or somatic level. Vectors, which comprise entirely human elements, may provide the most suitable method of achieving this. Non-viral vectors are attractive alternatives to viral gene delivery systems because of their low toxicity, relatively easy production, and great versatility. The development of more efficient, economically prepared, and safer gene delivery vectors is a crucial prerequisite for their successful clinical application and remains a primary strategic task of gene therapy research.

  1. DNA sequence, products, and transcriptional pattern of the genes involved in production of the DNA replication inhibitor microcin B17.

    PubMed Central

    Genilloud, O; Moreno, F; Kolter, R

    1989-01-01

    The 3.8-kilobase segment of plasmid DNA that contains the genes required for production of the DNA replication inhibitor microcin B17 was sequenced. The sequence contains four open reading frames which were shown to be translated in vivo by the construction of fusions to lacZ. The location of these open reading frames fits well with the location of the four microcin B17 production genes, mcbABCD, identified previously through genetic complementation. The products of the four genes have been identified, and the observed molecular weights of the proteins agree with those predicted from the nucleotide sequence. The transcription of these genes was studied by using fusions to lacZ and physical mapping of mRNA start sites. Three promoters were identified in this region. The major promoter for all the genes is a growth phase-regulated OmpR-dependent promoter located upstream of mcbA. A second promoter is located within mcbC and is responsible for a low-level basal expression of mcbD. A third promoter, located within mcbD, promotes transcription in the reverse direction starting within mcbD and extending through mcbC. The resulting mRNA appears to be an untranslated antisense transcript that could play a regulatory role in the expression of these genes. Images PMID:2644225

  2. H11-H12 loop retinoic acid receptor mutants exhibit distinct trans-activating and trans-repressing activities in the presence of natural or synthetic retinoids.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, B; Mouchon, A; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1998-06-30

    Retinoids, such as the naturally occurring all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) and synthetic ligand CD367 modulate ligand-dependent transcription through retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Retinoid binding to RAR is believed to trigger structural transitions in the ligand-binding domain (LBD), leading to helix H1 and helix H12 repositioning and coactivator recruitment and corepressor release. Here, we carried out a detailed mutagenesis analysis of the H11-H12 loop (designated the L box) to study its contribution to hRARalpha activation process. Point mutations that reduced transactivation by atRA also reduced atRA-induced transrepression of AP1 transcription, correlating ligand-induced activation and repression. However, a correlation was not observed with these mutations when tested with another ligand CD367, a synthetic agonist with binding properties identical to those of atRA. Transcription was strongly inhibited in the presence of CD367 for some mutants, thus leading to an inverse agonist activity of this ligand. None of these mutations significantly altered binding affinity for either ligand, indicating that altered transcription was not caused by altered ligand binding by these mutations. Although simple correlations with transcriptional activities were not found, these mutations were also characterized by altered ligand-induced structural transitions, which were distinct for the atRA-hRARalpha or CD367-hRARalpha complexes. These results indicate that amino acids in the L box are involved in specifying trans-repressive and trans-activating properties of the hRARalpha, and support the notion that different agonists induce distinct conformations in the LBD of the receptor.

  3. HIV-1 trans activator of transcription protein elicits mitochondrial hyperpolarization and respiratory deficit, with dysregulation of complex IV and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide homeostasis in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Norman, John P; Perry, Seth W; Kasischke, Karl A; Volsky, David J; Gelbard, Harris A

    2007-01-15

    HIV-1 causes a common, progressive neurological disorder known as HIV-associated dementia (HAD). The prevalence of this disorder has increased despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, and its underlying pathogenesis remains poorly understood. However, evidence suggests that some aspects of HAD may be reversible. To model the reversible aspects of HAD, we have used the HIV-1 neurotoxin trans activator of transcription protein (Tat) to investigate nonlethal changes in cultured neurons. Exposure of rodent cortical neurons to sublethal concentrations of Tat elicits mitochondrial hyperpolarization. In this study, we used the cationic lipophilic dye rhodamine 123 to confirm this observation, and then performed follow-up studies to examine the mechanism involved. In intact neurons, we found Tat elicited a rapid drop in internal mitochondrial pH, and addition of Tat to purified mitochondrial extracts inhibited complex IV of the electron transport chain. To correlate enzyme activity in mitochondrial extracts with results in intact cells, we measured neuronal respiration following Tat exposure. Cortical neurons demonstrated decreased respiration upon Tat treatment, consistent with inhibition of complex IV. We examined mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis using a mitochondrial targeted enhanced yellow fluorescent protein-calmodulin construct. We detected a decrease in mitochondrial calcium concentration following exposure to Tat. Finally, we measured the energy intermediate NAD(P)H after Tat treatment, and found a 20% decrease in the autofluorescence. Based on these findings, we suggest that decreased NADPH and calcium concentration contribute to subsequent respiratory decline after exposure to Tat, with detrimental effects on neuronal signaling.

  4. Disruption of Protein Kinase A Localization Using a Trans-activator of Transcription (TAT)-conjugated A-kinase-anchoring Peptide Reduces Cardiac Function*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hemal H.; Hamuro, Lora L.; Chun, Byeong Jo; Kawaraguchi, Yoshitaka; Quick, Alexander; Rebolledo, Brian; Pennypacker, Juniper; Thurston, Jackie; Rodriguez-Pinto, Natalia; Self, Christopher; Olson, Gary; Insel, Paul A.; Giles, Wayne R.; Taylor, Susan S.; Roth, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Localization of protein kinase A (PKA) via A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) is important for cAMP responsiveness in many cellular systems, and evidence suggests that AKAPs play an important role in cardiac signaling. To test the importance of AKAP-mediated targeting of PKA on cardiac function, we designed a cell-permeable peptide, which we termed trans-activator of transcription (TAT)-AKAD for TAT-conjugated A-kinase-anchoring disruptor, using the PKA binding region of AKAP10 and tested the effects of this peptide in isolated cardiac myocytes and in Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts. We initially validated TAT-AKAD as a PKA localization inhibitor in cardiac myocytes by the use of confocal microscopy and cellular fractionation to show that treatment with the peptide disrupts type I and type II PKA regulatory subunits. Knockdown of PKA activity was demonstrated by decrease in phosphorylation of phospholamban and troponin I after β-adrenergic stimulation in isolated myocytes. Treatment with TAT-AKAD reduced myocyte shortening and rates of contraction and relaxation. Injection of TAT-AKAD (1 μm), but not scrambled control peptide, into the coronary circulation of isolated perfused hearts rapidly (<1 min) and reversibly decreased heart rate and peak left ventricular developed pressure. TAT-AKAD also had a pronounced effect on developed pressure (−dP/dt), consistent with a delayed relaxation of the heart. The effects of TAT-AKAD on heart rate and contractility persisted in hearts pretreated with isoproterenol. Disruption of PKA localization with TAT-AKAD thus had negative effects on chronotropy, inotropy, and lusitropy, thereby indicating a key role for AKAP-targeted PKA in control of heart rate and contractile function. PMID:20581396

  5. Inducible Amplification of Gene Copy Number and Heterologous Protein Production in the Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Morlino, Giovanni B.; Tizzani, Lorenza; Fleer, Reinhard; Frontali, Laura; Bianchi, Michele M.

    1999-01-01

    Heterologous protein production can be doubled by increasing the copy number of the corresponding heterologous gene. We constructed a host-vector system in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that was able to induce copy number amplification of pKD1 plasmid-based vectors upon expression of an integrated copy of the plasmid recombinase gene. We increased the production and secretion of two heterologous proteins, glucoamylase from the yeast Arxula adeninivorans and mammalian interleukin-1β, following gene dosage amplification when the heterologous genes were carried by pKD1-based vectors. The choice of the promoters for expression of the integrated recombinase gene and of the episomal heterologous genes are critical for the mitotic stability of the host-vector system. PMID:10543790

  6. Inducible amplification of gene copy number and heterologous protein production in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Morlino, G B; Tizzani, L; Fleer, R; Frontali, L; Bianchi, M M

    1999-11-01

    Heterologous protein production can be doubled by increasing the copy number of the corresponding heterologous gene. We constructed a host-vector system in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that was able to induce copy number amplification of pKD1 plasmid-based vectors upon expression of an integrated copy of the plasmid recombinase gene. We increased the production and secretion of two heterologous proteins, glucoamylase from the yeast Arxula adeninivorans and mammalian interleukin-1beta, following gene dosage amplification when the heterologous genes were carried by pKD1-based vectors. The choice of the promoters for expression of the integrated recombinase gene and of the episomal heterologous genes are critical for the mitotic stability of the host-vector system.

  7. Improvement of gougerotin and nikkomycin production by engineering their biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Du, Deyao; Zhu, Yu; Wei, Junhong; Tian, Yuqing; Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2013-07-01

    Nikkomycins and gougerotin are peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics with broad biological activities. The nikkomycin biosynthetic gene cluster comprises one pathway-specific regulatory gene (sanG) and 21 structural genes, whereas the gene cluster for gougerotin biosynthesis includes one putative regulatory gene, one major facilitator superfamily transporter gene, and 13 structural genes. In the present study, we introduced sanG driven by six different promoters into Streptomyces ansochromogenes TH322. Nikkomycin production was increased significantly with the highest increase in engineered strain harboring hrdB promoter-driven sanG. In the meantime, we replaced the native promoter of key structural genes in the gougerotin (gou) gene cluster with the hrdB promoters. The heterologous producer Streptomyces coelicolor M1146 harboring the modified gene cluster produced gougerotin up to 10-fold more than strains carrying the unmodified cluster. Therefore, genetic manipulations of genes involved in antibiotics biosynthesis with the constitutive hrdB promoter present a robust, easy-to-use system generally useful for the improvement of antibiotics production in Streptomyces.

  8. Escherichia coli yjjPB genes encode a succinate transporter important for succinate production.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Keita; Nanatani, Kei; Hara, Yoshihiko; Yamakami, Suguru; Yahagi, Daiki; Chinen, Akito; Tokura, Mitsunori; Abe, Keietsu

    2017-09-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, Escherichia coli produces succinate from glucose via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. To date, however, no genes encoding succinate exporters have been established in E. coli. Therefore, we attempted to identify genes encoding succinate exporters by screening an E. coli MG1655 genome library. We identified the yjjPB genes as candidates encoding a succinate transporter, which enhanced succinate production in Pantoea ananatis under aerobic conditions. A complementation assay conducted in Corynebacterium glutamicum strain AJ110655ΔsucE1 demonstrated that both YjjP and YjjB are required for the restoration of succinate production. Furthermore, deletion of yjjPB decreased succinate production in E. coli by 70% under anaerobic conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that YjjPB constitutes a succinate transporter in E. coli and that the products of both genes are required for succinate export.

  9. Comparative genomics of actinomycetes with a focus on natural product biosynthetic genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Actinomycetes are a diverse group of medically, industrially and ecologically important bacteria, studied as much for the diseases they cause as for the cures they hold. The genomes of actinomycetes revealed that these bacteria have a large number of natural product gene clusters, although many of these are difficult to tie to products in the laboratory. Large scale comparisons of these clusters are difficult to perform due to the presence of highly similar repeated domains in the most common biosynthetic machinery: polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). Results We have used comparative genomics to provide an overview of the genomic features of a set of 102 closed genomes from this important group of bacteria with a focus on natural product biosynthetic genes. We have focused on well-represented genera and determine the occurrence of gene cluster families therein. Conservation of natural product gene clusters within Mycobacterium, Streptomyces and Frankia suggest crucial roles for natural products in the biology of each genus. The abundance of natural product classes is also found to vary greatly between genera, revealing underlying patterns that are not yet understood. Conclusions A large-scale analysis of natural product gene clusters presents a useful foundation for hypothesis formulation that is currently underutilized in the field. Such studies will be increasingly necessary to study the diversity and ecology of natural products as the number of genome sequences available continues to grow. PMID:24020438

  10. Comparative genomics of actinomycetes with a focus on natural product biosynthetic genes.

    PubMed

    Doroghazi, James R; Metcalf, William W

    2013-09-11

    Actinomycetes are a diverse group of medically, industrially and ecologically important bacteria, studied as much for the diseases they cause as for the cures they hold. The genomes of actinomycetes revealed that these bacteria have a large number of natural product gene clusters, although many of these are difficult to tie to products in the laboratory. Large scale comparisons of these clusters are difficult to perform due to the presence of highly similar repeated domains in the most common biosynthetic machinery: polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). We have used comparative genomics to provide an overview of the genomic features of a set of 102 closed genomes from this important group of bacteria with a focus on natural product biosynthetic genes. We have focused on well-represented genera and determine the occurrence of gene cluster families therein. Conservation of natural product gene clusters within Mycobacterium, Streptomyces and Frankia suggest crucial roles for natural products in the biology of each genus. The abundance of natural product classes is also found to vary greatly between genera, revealing underlying patterns that are not yet understood. A large-scale analysis of natural product gene clusters presents a useful foundation for hypothesis formulation that is currently underutilized in the field. Such studies will be increasingly necessary to study the diversity and ecology of natural products as the number of genome sequences available continues to grow.

  11. WWOX gene and gene product: tumor suppression through specific protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Salah, Zaidoun; Aqeilan, Rami; Huebner, Kay

    2010-02-01

    The WWOX gene, an archetypal fragile gene, encompasses a chromosomal fragile site at 16q23.2, and encodes the approximately 46-kDa Wwox protein, with WW domains that interact with a growing list of interesting proteins. If the function of a protein is defined by the company it keeps, then Wwox is involved in numerous important signal pathways for bone and germ-cell development, cellular and animal growth and death, transcriptional control and suppression of cancer development. Because alterations to genes at fragile sites are exquisitely sensitive to replication stress-induced DNA damage, there has been an ongoing scientific discussion questioning whether such gene expression alterations provide a selective advantage for clonal expansion of neoplastic cells, and a parallel discussion on why important genes would be present at sites that are susceptible to inactivation. We offer some answers through a description of known WWOX functions.

  12. Database of cattle candidate genes and genetic markers for milk production and mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Ogorevc, J; Kunej, T; Razpet, A; Dovc, P

    2009-01-01

    A cattle database of candidate genes and genetic markers for milk production and mastitis has been developed to provide an integrated research tool incorporating different types of information supporting a genomic approach to study lactation, udder development and health. The database contains 943 genes and genetic markers involved in mammary gland development and function, representing candidates for further functional studies. The candidate loci were drawn on a genetic map to reveal positional overlaps. For identification of candidate loci, data from seven different research approaches were exploited: (i) gene knockouts or transgenes in mice that result in specific phenotypes associated with mammary gland (143 loci); (ii) cattle QTL for milk production (344) and mastitis related traits (71); (iii) loci with sequence variations that show specific allele-phenotype interactions associated with milk production (24) or mastitis (10) in cattle; (iv) genes with expression profiles associated with milk production (207) or mastitis (107) in cattle or mouse; (v) cattle milk protein genes that exist in different genetic variants (9); (vi) miRNAs expressed in bovine mammary gland (32) and (vii) epigenetically regulated cattle genes associated with mammary gland function (1). Fourty-four genes found by multiple independent analyses were suggested as the most promising candidates and were further in silico analysed for expression levels in lactating mammary gland, genetic variability and top biological functions in functional networks. A miRNA target search for mammary gland expressed miRNAs identified 359 putative binding sites in 3′UTRs of candidate genes. PMID:19508288

  13. In vivo effects of antibodies to immune response gene products: prevention of experimental allergic encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, L; Rosenbaum, J T; Sriram, S; McDevitt, H O

    1981-01-01

    Prevention of experimental allergic encephalitis in SJL/J [H-2s] mice was achieved with in vivo administration of antibody reactive with I-As gene products prior to immunization with spinal cord antigen. No protection was evident in animals that received antisera specific for I-Js gene products. Administration of antibody to I-As beginning 5 days after immunization with spinal cord antigen delayed, but did not prevent, the onset of experimental allergic encephalitis. PMID:6947275

  14. Requirement of the Escherichia coli dnaA gene product for plasmid F maintenance.

    PubMed Central

    Kline, B C; Kogoma, T; Tam, J E; Shields, M S

    1986-01-01

    There are DnaA protein-binding sites in at least one F origin of replication, and only potentially leaky dnaA(Ts) mutations had ever been used in previous studies indicating that F replication was independent of the dnaA gene product. Here we show that an Escherichia coli dnaA::Tn10 host which does not make a dnaA gene product cannot sustain autonomous or integrated F plasmid maintenance. PMID:3020005

  15. Double replacement gene targeting for the production of a series of mouse strains with different prion protein gene alterations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.C.; Redhead, N.J.; Selfridge, J.

    1995-09-01

    We have developed a double replacement gene targeting strategy which enables the production of a series of mouse strains bearing different subtle alterations to endogenous genes. This is a two-step process in which a region of the gene of interest is first replaced with a selectable marker to produce an inactivated allele, which is then re-targeted with a second vector to reconstruct the inactivated allele, concomitantly introducing an engineered mutation. Five independent embryonic stem cell lines have been produced bearing different targeted alterations to the prion protein gene, including one which raises the level of expression. We have constructed mice bearing the codon 101 proline to leucine substitution linked to the human familial prion disease, Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome. We anticipate that this procedure will have applications to the study of human inherited diseases and the development of therapies. 43 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Mobile antibiotic resistance - the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products.

    PubMed

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Guzek, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-07-07

    In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  17. Natural and engineered hydroxyectoine production based on the Pseudomonas stutzeri ectABCD-ask gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Seip, Britta; Galinski, Erwin A; Kurz, Matthias

    2011-02-01

    We report on the presence of a functional hydroxyectoine biosynthesis gene cluster, ectABCD-ask, in Pseudomonas stutzeri DSM5190(T) and evaluate the suitability of P. stutzeri DSM5190(T) for hydroxyectoine production. Furthermore, we present information on heterologous de novo production of the compatible solute hydroxyectoine in Escherichia coli. In this host, the P. stutzeri gene cluster remained under the control of its salt-induced native promoters. We also noted the absence of trehalose when hydroxyectoine genes were expressed, as well as a remarkable inhibitory effect of externally applied betaine on hydroxyectoine synthesis. The specific heterologous production rate in E. coli under the conditions employed exceeded that of the natural producer Pseudomonas stutzeri and, for the first time, enabled effective hydroxyectoine production at low salinity (2%), with the added advantage of simple product processing due to the absence of other cosolutes.

  18. Coregulation of terpenoid pathway genes and prediction of isoprene production in Bacillus subtilis using transcriptomics

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Becky M.; Xue, Junfeng; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C.; Wiley, H. S.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Linggi, Bryan E.

    2013-06-19

    The isoprenoid pathway converts pyruvate to isoprene and related isoprenoid compounds in plants and some bacteria. Currently, this pathway is of great interest because of the critical role that isoprenoids play in basic cellular processes as well as the industrial value of metabolites such as isoprene. Although the regulation of several pathway genes has been described, there is a paucity of information regarding the system level regulation and control of the pathway. To address this limitation, we examined Bacillus subtilis grown under multiple conditions and then determined the relationship between altered isoprene production and the pattern of gene expression. We found that terpenoid genes appeared to fall into two distinct subsets with opposing correlations with respect to the amount of isoprene produced. The group whose expression levels positively correlated with isoprene production included dxs, the gene responsible for the commitment step in the pathway, as well as ispD, and two genes that participate in the mevalonate pathway, yhfS and pksG. The subset of terpenoid genes that inversely correlated with isoprene production included ispH, ispF, hepS, uppS, ispE, and dxr. A genome wide partial least squares regression model was created to identify other genes or pathways that contribute to isoprene production. This analysis showed that a subset of 213 regulated genes was sufficient to create a predictive model of isoprene production under different conditions and showed correlations at the transcriptional level. We conclude that gene expression levels alone are sufficiently informative about the metabolic state of a cell that produces increased isoprene and can be used to build a model which accurately predicts production of this secondary metabolite across many simulated environmental conditions.

  19. Polymorphism of the ovocalyxin-32 gene and its association with egg production traits in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Uemoto, Y; Suzuki, C; Sato, S; Sato, S; Ohtake, T; Sasaki, O; Takahashi, H; Kobayashi, E

    2009-12-01

    We performed candidate gene analysis to identify SNP in the chicken ovocalyxin-32 (OCX-32) gene in the F(2) resource population, to develop a PCR-RFLP method for genotyping and to evaluate the associations of the gene polymorphism with egg production traits. The F(2) resource population-comprising 272 chickens-was obtained by crossing White Leghorn (WL) males and Rhode Island Red (RIR) females. They were measured for egg production traits and used for candidate gene analysis. Among parental individuals of the F(2) population, 2 novel nonsynonymous polymorphisms (c.267T>G and c.494A>C) and 1 known nonsynonymous polymorphism (c.381G>C) in the coding sequences of the chicken OCX-32 gene were detected. The PCR-RFLP method was used for screening the chickens of the F(2) population. In parental populations, genotype c.267T>G and c.494A>C were segregated within WL and RIR breeds, respectively, but genotype c.381G>C was breed-specific SNP between WL and RIR breeds. A total of 4 haplotypes were constructed based on the 3 SNP in parental populations, and there was no recombination between c.267T>G and c.494A>C. There was a significant association (P < 0.05) between the OCX-32 gene SNP and egg production traits, but there was no significant association between the haplotypes of the OCX-32 gene and egg production traits in the F(2) population. In the present study, there was the most significant association between c.381G>C of the OCX-32 gene and rate of egg production. The current study is the first step to confirm the relationship between OCX-32 gene polymorphisms and egg production traits.

  20. Antibacterial Discovery and Development: From Gene to Product and Back

    PubMed Central

    Fedorenko, Victor; Genilloud, Olga; Horbal, Liliya; Marcone, Giorgia Letizia; Marinelli, Flavia; Paitan, Yossi; Ron, Eliora Z.

    2015-01-01

    Concern over the reports of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections in hospitals and in the community has been publicized in the media, accompanied by comments on the risk that we may soon run out of antibiotics as a way to control infectious disease. Infections caused by Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella species, Clostridium difficile, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and other Enterobacteriaceae species represent a major public health burden. Despite the pharmaceutical sector's lack of interest in the topic in the last decade, microbial natural products continue to represent one of the most interesting sources for discovering and developing novel antibacterials. Research in microbial natural product screening and development is currently benefiting from progress that has been made in other related fields (microbial ecology, analytical chemistry, genomics, molecular biology, and synthetic biology). In this paper, we review how novel and classical approaches can be integrated in the current processes for microbial product screening, fermentation, and strain improvement. PMID:26339625

  1. Production of viral vectors for gene therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, N; Ataai, M M

    2000-04-01

    Advances in cell culture engineering, cell metabolism, bioreactor design and operation, and downstream processing will all positively impact the bioprocessing of viral vectors. Design of appropriate vectors and tailoring of packaging cells to support more productive infections will be of paramount importance for production of high-titer and high-quality vectors. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of the infection parameters during virus propagation, such as time of infection, multiplicity of infection, the length of replication cycle, virus half-life, and burst size, will also be important to the process optimization. Finally, procedures for separation, purification and formulation of vector preparations have to be further developed.

  2. Nonlinear biosynthetic gene cluster dose effect on penicillin production by Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Nijland, Jeroen G; Ebbendorf, Bjorg; Woszczynska, Marta; Boer, Rémon; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2010-11-01

    Industrial penicillin production levels by the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum increased dramatically by classical strain improvement. High-yielding strains contain multiple copies of the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster that encodes three key enzymes of the β-lactam biosynthetic pathway. We have analyzed the gene cluster dose effect on penicillin production using the high-yielding P. chrysogenum strain DS17690 that was cured from its native clusters. The amount of penicillin V produced increased with the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster number but was saturated at high copy numbers. Likewise, transcript levels of the biosynthetic genes pcbAB [δ-(l-α-aminoadipyl)-l-cysteinyl-d-valine synthetase], pcbC (isopenicillin N synthase), and penDE (acyltransferase) correlated with the cluster copy number. Remarkably, the protein level of acyltransferase, which localizes to peroxisomes, was saturated already at low cluster copy numbers. At higher copy numbers, intracellular levels of isopenicillin N increased, suggesting that the acyltransferase reaction presents a limiting step at a high gene dose. Since the number and appearance of the peroxisomes did not change significantly with the gene cluster copy number, we conclude that the acyltransferase activity is limiting for penicillin biosynthesis at high biosynthetic gene cluster copy numbers. These results suggest that at a high penicillin production level, productivity is limited by the peroxisomal acyltransferase import activity and/or the availability of coenzyme A (CoA)-activated side chains.

  3. [Quality control of gene therapy products: approach of the French Agency for the Safety of Health Products].

    PubMed

    Chenivesse, Xavier; Ridoux, Valérie; Tissier, Marie-Hélène

    2003-04-01

    Gene therapy is a new therapeutic strategy which can constitute in some diseases a true alternative or a complement to the "classical treatments". Regarding the innovative features, the complexity and the extreme diversity of the gene therapy products (naked DNA, synthetic vectors, viral vectors, genetically modified cells), these new products presently in clinical trials have to be precisely evaluated and controlled for their medicine quality as well as their biological origin and/or their specific characteristics of genetically modified organisms. The French Agency for the Safety of Health Products engaged an in-depth scientific review concerning the control of this very heterogeneous class of potential therapeutics through the creation of a working group. The objectives of this group were to determine the testings to be performed by a national authority for each type of gene therapy products and to select the appropriate techniques or methods to be developed. Controls considered as essential are listed and include the verification of the identity, the purity, the transfer and expression efficiency as well as the microbiological and viral safety of the products. This implies the development of diverse techniques of molecular biology, cellular biology, physico-chemistry, animal testing, histology and microbiology. Finally, in order to define the basis of testings of these emerging products, the marketing of which should be effective for some of them in the next years, it appears extremely important to harmonize the quality, efficiency and safety criteria, to develop specific references and standards and to create specific guidelines for the control of gene therapy products.

  4. Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as markers of epithelial cancer

    DOEpatents

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves [El Cerrito, CA; Campisi, Judith [Berkeley, CA

    2011-10-04

    A method for detection and prognosis of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises detecting expression, if any, for both an Id-1 and an Id-2 genes, or the ratio thereof, of gene products in samples of breast tissue obtained from a patient. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, whereas Id-2 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are localized and noninvasive in the breast tissue.

  5. Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as markers of epithelial cancer

    DOEpatents

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2008-09-30

    A method for detection and prognosis of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises detecting expression, if any, for both an Id-1 and an Id-2 genes, or the ratio thereof, of gene products in samples of breast tissue obtained from a patient. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, whereas Id-2 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are localized and noninvasive in the breast tissue.

  6. Dynamics and modeling of temperature-regulated gene product expression in recombinant yeast fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C; Yang, S T

    1996-06-20

    The dynamic response of temperature-regulated gene expression in the recombinant yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, strain XK1-C2 carrying plasmid pSXR125, to temperature changes during fed-batch and continuous (chemostat) cultures was studied. The production of the gene product, beta-galactosidase, in the yeast cell is sensitive to the growth temperature. Gene expression of this product was fully turned on or off by temperature shifts between 24 and 30 degrees C. However, the response for gene turn-on and turn-off in this recombinant yeast was slow, requiring from several hours to over 10 h to fully appear. The continuous reactor took 30-60 h after the temperature shift to reach a new steady state. A dynamic process model was developed to simulate the reactor and cell responses to temperature shift. A first-order model was used to account for the effect of dilution rate on the change of protein concentration in the chemostat. It was found that cell response in gene expression to temperature shift followed first-order plus dead-time dynamics. Also, the response time for gene expression to temperature shift varied with specific growth rate or dilution rate of the continuous reactor. In general, the response was slower at a higher dilution rate and for gene turn-on than for gene turn-off.

  7. B-cell translocation gene 2 promotes hepatic hepcidin production via induction of Yin Yang 1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Eun; Hwang, Seung-Lark; Jang, Won-Gu; Chang, Hyeun Wook; Kim, Yong Deuk

    2015-05-15

    Hepcidin is a peptide hormone secreted in the liver and plays a key role in maintaining iron homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate that B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) is a key player in hepatic hepcidin regulation via induction of Yin Yang 1 (YY1). Hepatic hepcidin gene expression significantly enhanced by fasting states and glucagon exposure led to induction of gluconeogenic gene expression, and elevated serum hepcidin production in mice. Notably, overexpression of BTG2 using adenoviral system (Ad-BTG2) significantly elevated serum hepcidin levels via a significant induction of YY1 gene transcription. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that BTG2 physically interacted with YY1 and recruited on the hepcidin gene promoter. Finally, ablation of hepatic BTG2 gene by gene silencing markedly attenuated the elevation of serum hepcidin production along with YY1 and hepcidin mRNA expression in fasting state. Likewise, forskolin (FSK)-stimulated hepcidin promoter activity was dramatically disrupted by endogenous BTG2 knockdown. Overall, our current study provides a novel molecular mechanism of BTG2-mediated induction of hepcidin gene expression, thereby contributing to a better understanding of the hepatic hepcidin production involved in iron homeostasis.

  8. Disruption of the Zymomonas mobilis extracellular sucrase gene (sacC) improves levan production.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, V; Rameshkumar, N; Busby, S J W; Gunasekaran, P

    2004-01-01

    Disruption of the extracellular Zymomonas mobilis sucrase gene (sacC) to improve levan production. A PCR-amplified tetracycline resistance cassette was inserted within the cloned sacC gene in pZS2811. The recombinant construct was transferred to Z. mobilis by electroporation. The Z. mobilis sacC gene, encoding an efficient extracellular sucrase, was inactivated. A sacC defective mutant of Z. mobilis, which resulted from homologous recombination, was selected and the sacC gene disruption was confirmed by PCR. Fermentation trials with this mutant were conducted, and levansucrase activity and levan production were measured. In sucrose medium, the sacC mutant strain produced threefold higher levansucrase (SacB) than the parent strain. This resulted in higher levels of levan production, whilst ethanol production was considerably decreased. Zymomonas mobilis sacC gene encoding an extracellular sucrase was inactivated by gene disruption. This sacC mutant strain produced higher level of levan in sucrose medium because of the improved levansucrase (SacB) than the parent strain. The Z. mobilis CT2, sacC mutant produces high level of levansucrase (SacB) and can be used for the production of levan.

  9. Regulation of gene expression by tobacco product preparations in cultured human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Malpass, Gloria E.; Arimilli, Subhashini; Prasad, G.L.; Howlett, Allyn C.

    2014-09-01

    Skin fibroblasts comprise the first barrier of defense against wounds, and tobacco products directly contact the oral cavity. Cultured human dermal fibroblasts were exposed to smokeless tobacco extract (STE), total particulate matter (TPM) from tobacco smoke, or nicotine at concentrations comparable to those found in these extracts for 1 h or 5 h. Differences were identified in pathway-specific genes between treatments and vehicle using qRT-PCR. At 1 h, IL1α was suppressed significantly by TPM and less significantly by STE. Neither FOS nor JUN was suppressed at 1 h by tobacco products. IL8, TNFα, VCAM1, and NFκB1 were suppressed after 5 h with STE, whereas only TNFα and NFκB1 were suppressed by TPM. At 1 h with TPM, secreted levels of IL10 and TNFα were increased. Potentially confounding effects of nicotine were exemplified by genes such as ATF3 (5 h), which was increased by nicotine but suppressed by other components of STE. Within 2 h, TPM stimulated nitric oxide production, and both STE and TPM increased reactive oxygen species. The biological significance of these findings and utilization of the gene expression changes reported herein regarding effects of the tobacco product preparations on dermal fibroblasts will require additional research. - Highlights: • Tobacco product preparations (TPPs) alter gene expression in dermal fibroblasts. • Some immediate early genes critical to the inflammatory process are affected. • Different TPPs produce differential responses in certain pro-inflammatory genes.

  10. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Andy M.; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M.; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J.; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M.; Cox, Russell J.; Willis, Christine L.; O’Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-05-01

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi.

  11. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Andy M; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M; Cox, Russell J; Willis, Christine L; O'Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W; Foster, Gary D

    2016-05-04

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi.

  12. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Andy M.; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M.; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J.; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M.; Cox, Russell J.; Willis, Christine L.; O’Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi. PMID:27143514

  13. Sequence search and analysis of gene products containing RNA recognition motifs in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sony; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2014-12-22

    Gene expression is tightly regulated at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. RNA-binding proteins are involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation events. They are involved in a variety of functions such as splicing, alternative splicing, nuclear import and export of mRNA, RNA stability and translation. There are several well-characterized RNA-binding motifs present in a whole genome, such as RNA recognition motif (RRM), KH domain, zinc-fingers etc. In the present study, we have investigated human genome for the presence of RRM-containing gene products starting from RRM domains in the Pfam (Protein family database) repository. In Pfam, seven families are recorded to contain RRM-containing proteins. We studied these families for their taxonomic representation, sequence features (identity, length, phylogeny) and structural properties (mapping conservation on the structures). We then examined the presence of RRM-containing gene products in Homo sapiens genome and identified 928 RRM-containing gene products. These were studied for their predicted domain architectures, biological processes, involvement in pathways, disease relevance and disorder content. RRM domains were observed to occur multiple times in a single polypeptide. However, there are 56 other co-existing domains involved in different regulatory functions. Further, functional enrichment analysis revealed that RRM-containing gene products are mainly involved in biological functions such as mRNA splicing and its regulation. Our sequence analysis identified RRM-containing gene products in the human genome and provides insights into their domain architectures and biological functions. Since mRNA splicing and gene regulation are important in the cellular machinery, this analysis provides an early overview of genes that carry out these functions.

  14. Coregulation of Terpenoid Pathway Genes and Prediction of Isoprene Production in Bacillus subtilis Using Transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Hess, Becky M; Xue, Junfeng; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C; Wiley, H Steven; Ahring, Birgitte K; Linggi, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    The isoprenoid pathway converts pyruvate to isoprene and related isoprenoid compounds in plants and some bacteria. Currently, this pathway is of great interest because of the critical role that isoprenoids play in basic cellular processes, as well as the industrial value of metabolites such as isoprene. Although the regulation of several pathway genes has been described, there is a paucity of information regarding system level regulation and control of the pathway. To address these limitations, we examined Bacillus subtilis grown under multiple conditions and determined the relationship between altered isoprene production and gene expression patterns. We found that with respect to the amount of isoprene produced, terpenoid genes fall into two distinct subsets with opposing correlations. The group whose expression levels positively correlated with isoprene production included dxs, which is responsible for the commitment step in the pathway, ispD, and two genes that participate in the mevalonate pathway, yhfS and pksG. The subset of terpenoid genes that inversely correlated with isoprene production included ispH, ispF, hepS, uppS, ispE, and dxr. A genome-wide partial least squares regression model was created to identify other genes or pathways that contribute to isoprene production. These analyses showed that a subset of 213 regulated genes was sufficient to create a predictive model of isoprene production under different conditions and showed correlations at the transcriptional level. We conclude that gene expression levels alone are sufficiently informative about the metabolic state of a cell that produces increased isoprene and can be used to build a model that accurately predicts production of this secondary metabolite across many simulated environmental conditions.

  15. Coregulation of Terpenoid Pathway Genes and Prediction of Isoprene Production in Bacillus subtilis Using Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Becky M.; Xue, Junfeng; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C.; Wiley, H. Steven; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Linggi, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    The isoprenoid pathway converts pyruvate to isoprene and related isoprenoid compounds in plants and some bacteria. Currently, this pathway is of great interest because of the critical role that isoprenoids play in basic cellular processes, as well as the industrial value of metabolites such as isoprene. Although the regulation of several pathway genes has been described, there is a paucity of information regarding system level regulation and control of the pathway. To address these limitations, we examined Bacillus subtilis grown under multiple conditions and determined the relationship between altered isoprene production and gene expression patterns. We found that with respect to the amount of isoprene produced, terpenoid genes fall into two distinct subsets with opposing correlations. The group whose expression levels positively correlated with isoprene production included dxs, which is responsible for the commitment step in the pathway, ispD, and two genes that participate in the mevalonate pathway, yhfS and pksG. The subset of terpenoid genes that inversely correlated with isoprene production included ispH, ispF, hepS, uppS, ispE, and dxr. A genome-wide partial least squares regression model was created to identify other genes or pathways that contribute to isoprene production. These analyses showed that a subset of 213 regulated genes was sufficient to create a predictive model of isoprene production under different conditions and showed correlations at the transcriptional level. We conclude that gene expression levels alone are sufficiently informative about the metabolic state of a cell that produces increased isoprene and can be used to build a model that accurately predicts production of this secondary metabolite across many simulated environmental conditions. PMID:23840410

  16. Identification and distribution of products from novel tryptopyrokinin genes in the locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Redeker, Jana; Bläser, Marcel; Neupert, Susanne; Predel, Reinhard

    2017-04-22

    A recent analysis of the genome of Locusta migratoria indicated the presence of four novel insect neuropeptide genes encoding for multiple tryptopyrokinin peptides (tryptoPKs); hitherto only known from pyrokinin or capa genes. In our study, mature products of tryptoPK genes 1 and 2 were identified by mass spectrometry; precursor sequences assigned to the tryptoPK genes 3 and 4 are likely partial sequences of a single precursor. The expression of tryptoPK genes 1 and 2 is restricted to two cells in the subesophageal ganglion, exhibiting not only a unique neuropeptidome but also a very distinctive axonal projection. Comparative neuroendocrinology revealed that homologous cells in other insects also produce tryptoPKs but use other genes to generate this pattern. Since capa and pyrokinin genes are discussed as ancestors of the tryptoPK genes, we completed the hitherto only partially known precursor sequences of these genes by means of transcriptome analyses. The distribution of mature products of CAPA and pyrokinin precursors in the CNS is compared with that of tryptoPKs. In addition, a novel pyrokinin-like precursor is described.

  17. Characterization of a beta-tubulin gene and a beta-tubulin gene products of Brugia pahangi.

    PubMed

    Guénette, S; Prichard, R K; Klein, R D; Matlashewski, G

    1991-02-01

    A genomic clone containing a beta-tubulin gene from the parasitic nematode Brugia pahangi was isolated. This gene was sequenced to determine its size, structural organization, and corresponding primary amino acid sequence. The coding sequence of the beta-tubulin gene spans 3.8 kb, is organized into 9 exons and expresses an mNRA of 1.8 kb which codes for a protein of 448 amino acids. The predicted beta-tubulin amino acid sequence is 89%, 94%, 90% and 88% identical to the chicken beta 2, and the Caenorhabditis elegans ben-1, tub-1 and mec-7 gene products, respectively. Southern hybridization analyses demonstrated that there is only one copy of this gene isotype but that other distinct beta-tubulin genes may exist in the Brugia pahangi genome. A nematode specific antipeptide rabbit antiserum raised against the predicted amino acid sequence of the extreme carboxy-terminal region of the B. pahangi beta-tubulin was used to identify beta-tubulin isoforms in adult nematodes and microfilariae. Isoforms detected by this nematode-specific antipeptide antiserum were identical in both adult worms and microfilariae and did not differ from the isoform patterns detected by a monoclonal antibody recognizing a conserved beta-tubulin epitope. This suggests that this carboxy-terminal peptide is highly represented in the beta-tubulin isoforms of B. pahangi.

  18. Detection of rice tungro bacilliform virus gene products in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hay, J; Grieco, F; Druka, A; Pinner, M; Lee, S C; Hull, R

    1994-12-01

    To study the products of the open reading frames (ORFs) of rice tungro bacilliform virus in rice plants the sequences containing ORFs I (encoding a 24-kDa protein, P24) and IV (P46) and the protease and polymerase (reverse transcriptase+RNaseH) domains of ORF III were cloned into a pGEX expression vector. The proteins, which were C-terminal fusions to glutathione S-transferase, were expressed in Escherichia coli and antisera were raised against them which, together with an antiserum against virus particles, was used to probe blots of proteins from infected and uninoculated plants and from virus preparations. The P24 antiserum detected virus-specific proteins of 74, 60, and 52 kDa, which are much bigger than expected. These proteins were found in virus preparations and immunogold labeling suggested that they might be internal in the particles. Virus-specific proteins of 33, 37, 62, and > 150 kDa were revealed by antiserum to virus particles. The antiserum to the protease revealed proteins of 13.5, 37, and 68 kDa both in extracts from infected plants and in purified virus preparations. This antiserum decorated intact virus particles as did the particle antiserum. The polymerase domain antiserum reacted with products of 56, 65, and 68 kDa in extracts from infected plants but not in virus particles. The antiserum to the ORF IV product did not detect any bands in either infected plant extracts or virus preparations. The significance of these products is discussed.

  19. The paf gene product modulates asexual development in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Hegedüs, Nikoletta; Sigl, Claudia; Zadra, Ivo; Pócsi, Istvan; Marx, Florentine

    2011-06-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum secretes a low molecular weight, cationic and cysteine-rich protein (PAF). It has growth inhibitory activity against the model organism Aspergillus nidulans and numerous zoo- and phytopathogenic fungi but shows only minimal conditional antifungal activity against the producing organism itself. In this study we provide evidence for an additional function of PAF which is distinct from the antifungal activity against putative ecologically concurrent microorganisms. Our data indicate that PAF enhances conidiation in P. chrysogenum by modulating the expression of brlA, the central regulatory gene for mitospore development. A paf deletion strain showed a significant impairment of mitospore formation which sustains our hypothesis that PAF plays an important role in balancing asexual differentiation in P. chrysogenum.

  20. Alphavirus vectors for vaccine production and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2003-06-01

    Alphavirus vectors demonstrate high expression of heterologous proteins in a broad range of host cells. Replication-deficient as well as replication-competent variants exist. Systemic delivery of many viral antigens has elicited strong antibody responses in immunized mice and primates, and protection against challenges with lethal viruses was obtained. Similarly, prophylactic vaccination was established against tumor challenges. Attention has been paid to the engineering of improved targeting to immunologically active cells, such as dendritic cells. In the area of gene therapy, intratumoral injections of alphavirus vectors have resulted in potentially promising tumor rejection. Moreover, encapsulation of alphavirus particles into liposomes demonstrated efficient tumor targeting in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency, which permitted the initiation of clinical trials for patients with advanced kidney carcinoma and melanoma.

  1. Systems Pharmacology-Based Discovery of Natural Products for Precision Oncology Through Targeting Cancer Mutated Genes.

    PubMed

    Fang, J; Cai, C; Wang, Q; Lin, P; Zhao, Z; Cheng, F

    2017-03-01

    Massive cancer genomics data have facilitated the rapid revolution of a novel oncology drug discovery paradigm through targeting clinically relevant driver genes or mutations for the development of precision oncology. Natural products with polypharmacological profiles have been demonstrated as promising agents for the development of novel cancer therapies. In this study, we developed an integrated systems pharmacology framework that facilitated identifying potential natural products that target mutated genes across 15 cancer types or subtypes in the realm of precision medicine. High performance was achieved for our systems pharmacology framework. In case studies, we computationally identified novel anticancer indications for several US Food and Drug Administration-approved or clinically investigational natural products (e.g., resveratrol, quercetin, genistein, and fisetin) through targeting significantly mutated genes in multiple cancer types. In summary, this study provides a powerful tool for the development of molecularly targeted cancer therapies through targeting the clinically actionable alterations by exploiting the systems pharmacology of natural products.

  2. Systems Pharmacology‐Based Discovery of Natural Products for Precision Oncology Through Targeting Cancer Mutated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Fang, J; Cai, C; Wang, Q; Lin, P

    2017-01-01

    Massive cancer genomics data have facilitated the rapid revolution of a novel oncology drug discovery paradigm through targeting clinically relevant driver genes or mutations for the development of precision oncology. Natural products with polypharmacological profiles have been demonstrated as promising agents for the development of novel cancer therapies. In this study, we developed an integrated systems pharmacology framework that facilitated identifying potential natural products that target mutated genes across 15 cancer types or subtypes in the realm of precision medicine. High performance was achieved for our systems pharmacology framework. In case studies, we computationally identified novel anticancer indications for several US Food and Drug Administration‐approved or clinically investigational natural products (e.g., resveratrol, quercetin, genistein, and fisetin) through targeting significantly mutated genes in multiple cancer types. In summary, this study provides a powerful tool for the development of molecularly targeted cancer therapies through targeting the clinically actionable alterations by exploiting the systems pharmacology of natural products. PMID:28294568

  3. Physiological evaluation of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei in production processes by marker gene expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rautio, Jari J; Bailey, Michael; Kivioja, Teemu; Söderlund, Hans; Penttilä, Merja; Saloheimo, Markku

    2007-01-01

    Background Biologically relevant molecular markers can be used in evaluation of the physiological state of an organism in biotechnical processes. We monitored at high frequency the expression of 34 marker genes in batch, fed-batch and continuous cultures of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei by the transcriptional analysis method TRAC (TRanscript analysis with the aid of Affinity Capture). Expression of specific genes was normalised either with respect to biomass or to overall polyA RNA concentration. Expressional variation of the genes involved in various process relevant cellular functions, such as protein production, growth and stress responses, was related to process parameters such as specific growth and production rates and substrate and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Results Gene expression of secreted cellulases and recombinant Melanocarpus albomyces laccase predicted the trends in the corresponding extracellular enzyme production rates and was highest in a narrow "physiological window" in the specific growth rate (μ) range of 0.03 – 0.05 h-1. Expression of ribosomal protein mRNAs was consistent with the changes in μ. Nine starvation-related genes were found as potential markers for detection of insufficient substrate feed for maintaining optimal protein production. For two genes induced in anaerobic conditions, increasing transcript levels were measured as dissolved oxygen decreased. Conclusion The data obtained by TRAC supported the usefulness of focused and intensive transcriptional analysis in monitoring of biotechnical processes providing thus tools for process optimisation purposes. PMID:17537269

  4. Regulation of a novel gene cluster involved in secondary metabolite production in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Hindra; Pak, Patricia; Elliot, Marie A

    2010-10-01

    Antibiotic biosynthesis in the streptomycetes is a complex and highly regulated process. Here, we provide evidence for the contribution of a novel genetic locus to antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor. The overexpression of a gene cluster comprising four protein-encoding genes (abeABCD) and an antisense RNA-encoding gene (α-abeA) stimulated the production of the blue-pigmented metabolite actinorhodin on solid medium. Actinorhodin production also was enhanced by the overexpression of an adjacent gene (abeR) encoding a predicted Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein (SARP), while the deletion of this gene impaired actinorhodin production. We found the abe genes to be differentially regulated and controlled at multiple levels. Upstream of abeA was a promoter that directed the transcription of abeABCD at a low but constitutive level. The expression of abeBCD was, however, significantly upregulated at a time that coincided with the initiation of aerial development and the onset of secondary metabolism; this expression was activated by the binding of AbeR to four heptameric repeats upstream of a promoter within abeA. Expressed divergently to the abeBCD promoter was α-abeA, whose expression mirrored that of abeBCD but did not require activation by AbeR. Instead, α-abeA transcript levels were subject to negative control by the double-strand-specific RNase, RNase III.

  5. Involvement of the Haemophilus ducreyi gmhA Gene Product in Lipooligosaccharide Expression and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Beth A.; Stevens, Marla K.; Hansen, Eric J.

    1998-01-01

    The lipooligosaccharide (LOS) present in the outer membrane of Haemophilus ducreyi is likely a virulence factor for this sexually transmitted pathogen. An open reading frame in H. ducreyi 35000 was found to encode a predicted protein that had 87% identity with the protein product of the gmhA (isn) gene of Haemophilus influenzae. In H. influenzae type b, inactivation of the gmhA gene caused the synthesis of a significantly truncated LOS which possessed only lipid A and a single 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid molecule (A. Preston, D. J. Maskell, A. Johnson, and E. R. Moxon, J. Bacteriol. 178:396–402, 1996). The H. ducreyi gmhA gene was able to complement a gmhA-deficient Escherichia coli strain, a result which confirmed the identity of this gene. When the gmhA gene of H. ducreyi was inactivated by insertion of a cat cartridge, the resultant H. ducreyi gmhA mutant, 35000.252, expressed a LOS that migrated much faster than wild-type LOS in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. When the wild-type H. ducreyi strain and its isogenic gmhA mutant were used in the temperature-dependent rabbit model for dermal lesion production by H. ducreyi, the gmhA mutant was found to be substantially less virulent than the wild-type parent strain. The H. ducreyi gmhA gene was amplified by PCR from the H. ducreyi chromosome and cloned into the pLS88 vector. When the H. ducreyi gmhA gene was present in trans in gmhA mutant 35000.252, expression of the gmhA gene product restored the virulence of this mutant to wild-type levels. These results indicate that the gmhA gene product of H. ducreyi is essential for the expression of wild-type LOS by this pathogen. PMID:9712780

  6. Identification of Enzyme Genes Using Chemical Structure Alignments of Substrate-Product Pairs.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Yuki; Yamada, Takuji; Okuda, Shujiro; Nakagawa, Zenichi; Kotera, Masaaki; Tokimatsu, Toshiaki; Kanehisa, Minoru; Goto, Susumu

    2016-03-28

    Although there are several databases that contain data on many metabolites and reactions in biochemical pathways, there is still a big gap in the numbers between experimentally identified enzymes and metabolites. It is supposed that many catalytic enzyme genes are still unknown. Although there are previous studies that estimate the number of candidate enzyme genes, these studies required some additional information aside from the structures of metabolites such as gene expression and order in the genome. In this study, we developed a novel method to identify a candidate enzyme gene of a reaction using the chemical structures of the substrate-product pair (reactant pair). The proposed method is based on a search for similar reactant pairs in a reference database and offers ortholog groups that possibly mediate the given reaction. We applied the proposed method to two experimentally validated reactions. As a result, we confirmed that the histidine transaminase was correctly identified. Although our method could not directly identify the asparagine oxo-acid transaminase, we successfully found the paralog gene most similar to the correct enzyme gene. We also applied our method to infer candidate enzyme genes in the mesaconate pathway. The advantage of our method lies in the prediction of possible genes for orphan enzyme reactions where any associated gene sequences are not determined yet. We believe that this approach will facilitate experimental identification of genes for orphan enzymes.

  7. O-linked glycosylation of retroviral envelope gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Pinter, A.; Honnen, W.J. )

    1988-03-01

    Treatment of ({sup 3}H)glucosamine-labeled Friend mink cell focus-forming virus (FrMCF) gp70 with excess peptide:N-glycanase F (PNGase F) resulted in removal of the expected seven N-linked oligosaccharide chains; however, approximately 10% of the glucosamine label was retained in the resulting 49,000-M{sub r} (49K) product. For ({sup 3}H)mannose-labeled gp70, similar treatment led to removal of all the carbohydrate label from the protein. Prior digestion of the PNGase F-treated gp70 with neuraminidase resulted in an addition size shift, and treatment with O-glycanase led to the removal of almost all of the PNGase F-resistant sugars. These results indicate that gp70 possesses sialic acid-containing O-linked oligosaccharides. Analysis of intracellular env precursors demonstrated that O-linked sugars were present in gPr90{sup env}, the polyprotein intermediate which contains complex sugars, but not in the primary translation product, gPr80{sup env}, and proteolytic digestion studies allowed localization of the O-linked carbohydrates to a 10K region near the center of the gp70 molecule. similar substituents were detected on the gp70s of ecotropic and xenotropic murine leukemia viruses and two subgroups of feline leukemia virus, indicting that O-linked glycosylation is a conserved feature of retroviral env proteins.

  8. Genes, language, cognition, and culture: towards productive inquiry.

    PubMed

    Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2011-04-01

    The Queen Mary conference on “Integrating Genetic and Cultural Evolutionary Approaches to Language,” and the papers in this special issue, clearly illustrate the excitement and potential of trans-disciplinary approaches to language as an evolved biological capacity (phylogeny) and an evolving cultural entity (glossogeny). Excepting the present author, the presenters/authors are mostly young rising stars in their respective fields, and include scientists with backgrounds in linguistics, animal communication, neuroscience, evolutionary biology, anthropology, and computer science. On display was a clear willingness to engage with different approaches and terminology and a commitment to shared standards of scientific rigor, empirically driven theory, and logical argument. Because the papers assembled here, together with the introduction, speak for themselves, I will focus in this “extro-duction” on some of the terminological and conceptual difficulties which threaten to block this exciting wave of scientific progress in understanding language evolution, in both senses of that term. In particular I will first argue against the regrettably widespread practice of opposing cultural and genetic explanations of human cognition as if they were dichotomous. Second, I will unpack the debate concerning “general-purpose” and “domain-specific” mechanisms, which masquerades as a debate about nativism but is nothing of the sort. I believe that framing discussions of language in these terms has generated more heat than light, and that a modern molecular understanding of genes, development, behavior, and evolution renders many of the assumptions underlying this debate invalid.

  9. Role of Vibrio polysaccharide (vps) genes in VPS production, biofilm formation and Vibrio cholerae pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fong, Jiunn C N; Syed, Khalid A; Klose, Karl E; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2010-09-01

    Biofilm formation enhances the survival and persistence of the facultative human pathogen Vibrio cholerae in natural ecosystems and its transmission during seasonal cholera outbreaks. A major component of the V. cholerae biofilm matrix is the Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS), which is essential for development of three-dimensional biofilm structures. The vps genes are clustered in two regions, the vps-I cluster (vpsU, vpsA-K, VC0916-27) and the vps-II cluster (vpsL-Q, VC0934-39), separated by an intergenic region containing the rbm gene cluster that encodes biofilm matrix proteins. In-frame deletions of the vps clusters and genes encoding matrix proteins drastically altered biofilm formation phenotypes. To determine which genes within the vps gene clusters are required for biofilm formation and VPS synthesis, we generated in-frame deletion mutants for all the vps genes. Many of these mutants exhibited reduced capacity to produce VPS and biofilms. Infant mouse colonization assays revealed that mutants lacking either vps clusters or rbmA (encoding secreted matrix protein RbmA) exhibited a defect in intestinal colonization compared to the wild-type. Understanding the roles of the various vps gene products will aid in the biochemical characterization of the VPS biosynthetic pathway and elucidate how vps gene products contribute to VPS biosynthesis, biofilm formation and virulence in V. cholerae.

  10. Split-gene system for hybrid wheat seed production.

    PubMed

    Kempe, Katja; Rubtsova, Myroslava; Gils, Mario

    2014-06-24

    Hybrid wheat plants are superior in yield and growth characteristics compared with their homozygous parents. The commercial production of wheat hybrids is difficult because of the inbreeding nature of wheat and the lack of a practical fertility control that enforces outcrossing. We describe a hybrid wheat system that relies on the expression of a phytotoxic barnase and provides for male sterility. The barnase coding information is divided and distributed at two loci that are located on allelic positions of the host chromosome and are therefore "linked in repulsion." Functional complementation of the loci is achieved through coexpression of the barnase fragments and intein-mediated ligation of the barnase protein fragments. This system allows for growth and maintenance of male-sterile female crossing partners, whereas the hybrids are fertile. The technology does not require fertility restorers and is based solely on the genetic modification of the female crossing partner.

  11. Split-gene system for hybrid wheat seed production

    PubMed Central

    Kempe, Katja; Rubtsova, Myroslava; Gils, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid wheat plants are superior in yield and growth characteristics compared with their homozygous parents. The commercial production of wheat hybrids is difficult because of the inbreeding nature of wheat and the lack of a practical fertility control that enforces outcrossing. We describe a hybrid wheat system that relies on the expression of a phytotoxic barnase and provides for male sterility. The barnase coding information is divided and distributed at two loci that are located on allelic positions of the host chromosome and are therefore “linked in repulsion.” Functional complementation of the loci is achieved through coexpression of the barnase fragments and intein-mediated ligation of the barnase protein fragments. This system allows for growth and maintenance of male-sterile female crossing partners, whereas the hybrids are fertile. The technology does not require fertility restorers and is based solely on the genetic modification of the female crossing partner. PMID:24821800

  12. Phylogenomic study of lipid genes involved in microalgal biofuel production-candidate gene mining and metabolic pathway analyses.

    PubMed

    Misra, Namrata; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Parida, Bikram Kumar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2012-01-01

    Optimizing microalgal biofuel production using metabolic engineering tools requires an in-depth understanding of the structure-function relationship of genes involved in lipid biosynthetic pathway. In the present study, genome-wide identification and characterization of 398 putative genes involved in lipid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Volvox carteri, Ostreococcus lucimarinus, Ostreococcus tauri and Cyanidioschyzon merolae was undertaken on the basis of their conserved motif/domain organization and phylogenetic profile. The results indicated that the core lipid metabolic pathways in all the species are carried out by a comparable number of orthologous proteins. Although the fundamental gene organizations were observed to be invariantly conserved between microalgae and Arabidopsis genome, with increased order of genome complexity there seems to be an association with more number of genes involved in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis and catabolism. Further, phylogenomic analysis of the genes provided insights into the molecular evolution of lipid biosynthetic pathway in microalgae and confirm the close evolutionary proximity between the Streptophyte and Chlorophyte lineages. Together, these studies will improve our understanding of the global lipid metabolic pathway and contribute to the engineering of regulatory networks of algal strains for higher accumulation of oil.

  13. B29 gene products complex with immunoglobulins on B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, K; Wood, W J; Damore, M; Hermanson, G G; Wall, R; Kincade, P W

    1992-01-01

    B29 is a B-lineage-specific gene predicted from sequence information to be a transmembrane member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily, with a single extracellular Ig-like domain. Its presumptive cytoplasmic region contains a peptide motif present in CD3 and other molecules involved in lymphocyte activation. Affinity-purified goat antibodies were prepared to a TrpE fusion protein of B29 and used to study B29 expression on lymphoid cells. The antiserum precipitated surface-labeled heterodimers from B lymphoma cells. One was 65-88 kDa (unreduced) or 36-47 plus 32-34 kDa (reduced) by SDS/PAGE analysis, regardless of detergent. A smaller heterodimer was detected only with Triton detergent extraction. IgM molecules were coprecipitated by the B29 antiserum when the weak detergent digitonin was used. In addition, cocapping experiments revealed that most B29 molecules codistribute with Ig on the cell surface. Although early B-lineage cells and plasma cells contain B29 mRNA, surface expression was detectable only on B cells that had significant amounts of surface Ig. The surface expression was B-lineage-specific and included cells from mutant xid mice and B-cell lines representing mu, delta, gamma, and alpha heavy-chain isotypes and both kappa and lambda light-chain types. The density of surface B29 protein correlated directly with surface mu heavy-chain density on subclones of a B-cell lymphoma and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated pre-B cells. These findings show that B29 is covalently linked in a heterodimer and are consistent with a recently proposed model of surface Ig complexes. Images PMID:1731334

  14. A mutant gene that increases gibberellin production in Brassica

    SciTech Connect

    Rood, S.B. ); Williams, P.H. ); Pearce, D.; Pharis, R.P. ); Murofushi, Noboru ); Mander, L.N. )

    1990-07-01

    A single gene mutant (elongated internode (ein/ein)) with accelerated shoot elongation was identified from a rapid cycling line of Brassica rapa. Relative to normal plants, mutant plants had slightly accelerated floral development, greater stem dry weights, and particularly, increased internode and inflorescence elongation. The application of the triazole plant growth retardant, paclobutrazol, inhibited shoot elongation, returning ein to a more normal phenotype. Conversely, exogenous gibberellin A{sub 3} (GA{sub 3}) can convert normal genotypes to a phenotype resembling ein. The content of endogenous GA{sub 1} and GA{sub 3} were estimated by gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring using ({sup 2}H)GA{sub 1} as a quantitative internal standard and at day 14 were 1.5- and 12.1-fold higher per stem, respectively, in ein than in normal plants, although GA concentrations were more similar. The endogenous levels of GA{sub 20} and GA{sub 1}, and the rate of GA{sub 19} metabolism were simultaneously analyzed. Levels of GA{sub 1} and GA{sub 20} were 4.6- and 12.9-fold higher, respectively, and conversions to GA{sub 20} and GA{sub 1} were 8.3 and 1.3 times faster in ein than normal plants. Confirming the enhanced rate of GA{sub 1} biosynthesis in ein, the conversion of ({sup 3}H)GA{sub 20} to ({sup 3}H) GA{sub 1} was also faster in ein than in the normal genotype. Thus, the ein allele results in accelerated GA{sub 1} biosynthesis and an elevated content of endogenous GAs, including the dihydroxylated GAs A{sub 1} and A{sub 3}.

  15. Expanded natural product diversity revealed by analysis of lanthipeptide-like gene clusters in actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Doroghazi, James R; Zhao, Xiling; Walker, Mark C; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2015-07-01

    Lanthionine-containing peptides (lanthipeptides) are a rapidly growing family of polycyclic peptide natural products belonging to the large class of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs). Lanthipeptides are widely distributed in taxonomically distant species, and their currently known biosynthetic systems and biological activities are diverse. Building on the recent natural product gene cluster family (GCF) project, we report here large-scale analysis of lanthipeptide-like biosynthetic gene clusters from Actinobacteria. Our analysis suggests that lanthipeptide biosynthetic pathways, and by extrapolation the natural products themselves, are much more diverse than currently appreciated and contain many different posttranslational modifications. Furthermore, lanthionine synthetases are much more diverse in sequence and domain topology than currently characterized systems, and they are used by the biosynthetic machineries for natural products other than lanthipeptides. The gene cluster families described here significantly expand the chemical diversity and biosynthetic repertoire of lanthionine-related natural products. Biosynthesis of these novel natural products likely involves unusual and unprecedented biochemistries, as illustrated by several examples discussed in this study. In addition, class IV lanthipeptide gene clusters are shown not to be silent, setting the stage to investigate their biological activities.

  16. Expanded Natural Product Diversity Revealed by Analysis of Lanthipeptide-Like Gene Clusters in Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Doroghazi, James R.; Zhao, Xiling; Walker, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Lanthionine-containing peptides (lanthipeptides) are a rapidly growing family of polycyclic peptide natural products belonging to the large class of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs). Lanthipeptides are widely distributed in taxonomically distant species, and their currently known biosynthetic systems and biological activities are diverse. Building on the recent natural product gene cluster family (GCF) project, we report here large-scale analysis of lanthipeptide-like biosynthetic gene clusters from Actinobacteria. Our analysis suggests that lanthipeptide biosynthetic pathways, and by extrapolation the natural products themselves, are much more diverse than currently appreciated and contain many different posttranslational modifications. Furthermore, lanthionine synthetases are much more diverse in sequence and domain topology than currently characterized systems, and they are used by the biosynthetic machineries for natural products other than lanthipeptides. The gene cluster families described here significantly expand the chemical diversity and biosynthetic repertoire of lanthionine-related natural products. Biosynthesis of these novel natural products likely involves unusual and unprecedented biochemistries, as illustrated by several examples discussed in this study. In addition, class IV lanthipeptide gene clusters are shown not to be silent, setting the stage to investigate their biological activities. PMID:25888176

  17. Targeting of promoters for trans activation by a carboxy-terminal domain of the NS-1 protein of the parvovirus minute virus of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Legendre, D; Rommelaere, J

    1994-01-01

    The NS-1 gene of the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) (prototype strain, MVMp) was fused in phase with the sequence coding for the DNA-binding domain of the bacterial LexA repressor. The resulting chimeric protein, LexNS-1, was tested for its transcriptional activity by using various target promoters in which multiple LexA operator sequences had been introduced. Under these conditions, NS-1 was shown to stimulate gene expression driven by the modified long terminal repeat promoters (from the retroviruses mouse mammary tumor virus and Rous sarcoma virus) and P38 promoter (from MVMp), indicating that the NS-1 protein is a potent transcriptional activator. It is noteworthy that in the absence of LexA operator-mediated targeting, the genuine mouse mammary tumor virus and Rous sarcoma virus promoters were inhibited by NS-1. Together these data strongly suggest that NS-1 contains an activating region able to induce promoters with which this protein interacts but also to repress transcription from nonrecognized promoters by a squelching mechanism similar to that described for other activators. Deletion mutant analysis led to the identification of an NS-1 domain that exhibited an activating potential comparable to that of the whole polypeptide when fused to the DNA-binding region of LexA. This domain is localized in the carboxy-terminal part of NS-1 and corresponds to one of the two regions previously found to be responsible for toxicity. These results argue for the involvement of the regulatory functions of NS-1 in the cytopathic effect of this parvovirus product. Images PMID:7966588

  18. Expression of MAGE-1 and -3 genes and gene products in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kariyama, K; Higashi, T; Kobayashi, Y; Nouso, K; Nakatsukasa, H; Yamano, T; Ishizaki, M; Kaneyoshi, T; Toshikuni, N; Ohnishi, T; Fujiwara, K; Nakayama, E; Terracciano, L; Spagnoli, G C; Tsuji, T

    1999-01-01

    MAGE gene family encodes peptides recognized by autologous cytotoxic T lymphocytes in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class-I restricted fashion. In the present study, we have performed reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the genes, as well as immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting of MAGE-1 and -3 proteins in 33 surgically resected hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). MAGE-1 and -3 mRNAs were constitutively expressed exclusively in 78 and 42% of HCCs respectively. On immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies, 77B for MAGE-1 and 57B for MAGE-3, MAGE-1 and -3 proteins were recognized in cytoplasm of only six among 33 (18%) and two of 29 HCCs (7%) respectively. The distribution pattern was mostly focal in HCC nodules. By contrast, the Western blot analysis revealed that the MAGE-1 (46 kDa) and -3 proteins (48 kDa) were expressed in 80 and 60% of 15 HCCs examined respectively. The proteins of MAGE-1 and -3 were also expressed exclusively in HCCs regardless of the histological grading and clinical staging. Our results indicate that the detection of the genes by RT-PCR or the proteins by Western blotting is useful for differentiating early HCCs from non-cancerous lesions, and that the peptides derived from MAGE-1 and -3 proteins might be suitable targets for immunotherapy of human HCC. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10576668

  19. Genetic resources for advanced biofuel production described with the Gene Ontology

    SciTech Connect

    Torto-Alalibo, Trudy; Purwantini, Endang; Lomax, Jane; Setubal, Joao C.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Tyler, Brett M.

    2014-10-10

    Dramatic increases in research in the area of microbial biofuel production coupled with high-throughput data generation on bioenergy-related microbes has led to a deluge of information in the scientific literature and in databases. Consolidating this information and making it easily accessible requires a unified vocabulary.The Gene Ontology (GO) fulfills that requirement, as it is a well-developed structured vocabulary that describes the activities and locations of gene products in a consistent manner across all kingdoms of life. The Microbial ENergy processes Gene Ontology (http://www.mengo.biochem.vt.edu) project is extending the GO to include new terms to describe microbial processes of interest to bioenergy production. Our effort has added over 600 bioenergy related terms to the Gene Ontology. These terms will aid in the comprehensive annotation of gene products from diverse energy-related microbial genomes. An area of microbial energy research that has received a lot of attention is microbial production of advanced biofuels. These include alcohols such as butanol, isopropanol, isobutanol, and fuels derived from fatty acids, isoprenoids, and polyhydroxyalkanoates. These fuels are superior to first generation biofuels (ethanol and biodiesel esterified from vegetable oil or animal fat), can be generated from non-food feedstock sources, can be used as supplements or substitutes for gasoline, diesel and jet fuels, and can be stored and distributed using existing infrastructure. We review the roles of genes associated with synthesis of advanced biofuels, and at the same time introduce the use of the GO to describe the functions of these genes in a standardized way.

  20. Genetic resources for advanced biofuel production described with the Gene Ontology

    DOE PAGES

    Torto-Alalibo, Trudy; Purwantini, Endang; Lomax, Jane; ...

    2014-10-10

    Dramatic increases in research in the area of microbial biofuel production coupled with high-throughput data generation on bioenergy-related microbes has led to a deluge of information in the scientific literature and in databases. Consolidating this information and making it easily accessible requires a unified vocabulary.The Gene Ontology (GO) fulfills that requirement, as it is a well-developed structured vocabulary that describes the activities and locations of gene products in a consistent manner across all kingdoms of life. The Microbial ENergy processes Gene Ontology (http://www.mengo.biochem.vt.edu) project is extending the GO to include new terms to describe microbial processes of interest to bioenergymore » production. Our effort has added over 600 bioenergy related terms to the Gene Ontology. These terms will aid in the comprehensive annotation of gene products from diverse energy-related microbial genomes. An area of microbial energy research that has received a lot of attention is microbial production of advanced biofuels. These include alcohols such as butanol, isopropanol, isobutanol, and fuels derived from fatty acids, isoprenoids, and polyhydroxyalkanoates. These fuels are superior to first generation biofuels (ethanol and biodiesel esterified from vegetable oil or animal fat), can be generated from non-food feedstock sources, can be used as supplements or substitutes for gasoline, diesel and jet fuels, and can be stored and distributed using existing infrastructure. We review the roles of genes associated with synthesis of advanced biofuels, and at the same time introduce the use of the GO to describe the functions of these genes in a standardized way.« less

  1. Genetic resources for advanced biofuel production described with the Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Torto-Alalibo, Trudy; Purwantini, Endang; Lomax, Jane; Setubal, João C; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Tyler, Brett M

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic increases in research in the area of microbial biofuel production coupled with high-throughput data generation on bioenergy-related microbes has led to a deluge of information in the scientific literature and in databases. Consolidating this information and making it easily accessible requires a unified vocabulary. The Gene Ontology (GO) fulfills that requirement, as it is a well-developed structured vocabulary that describes the activities and locations of gene products in a consistent manner across all kingdoms of life. The Microbial ENergy processes Gene Ontology () project is extending the GO to include new terms to describe microbial processes of interest to bioenergy production. Our effort has added over 600 bioenergy related terms to the Gene Ontology. These terms will aid in the comprehensive annotation of gene products from diverse energy-related microbial genomes. An area of microbial energy research that has received a lot of attention is microbial production of advanced biofuels. These include alcohols such as butanol, isopropanol, isobutanol, and fuels derived from fatty acids, isoprenoids, and polyhydroxyalkanoates. These fuels are superior to first generation biofuels (ethanol and biodiesel esterified from vegetable oil or animal fat), can be generated from non-food feedstock sources, can be used as supplements or substitutes for gasoline, diesel and jet fuels, and can be stored and distributed using existing infrastructure. Here we review the roles of genes associated with synthesis of advanced biofuels, and at the same time introduce the use of the GO to describe the functions of these genes in a standardized way.

  2. Genetic resources for advanced biofuel production described with the Gene Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Torto-Alalibo, Trudy; Purwantini, Endang; Lomax, Jane; Setubal, João C.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Tyler, Brett M.

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic increases in research in the area of microbial biofuel production coupled with high-throughput data generation on bioenergy-related microbes has led to a deluge of information in the scientific literature and in databases. Consolidating this information and making it easily accessible requires a unified vocabulary. The Gene Ontology (GO) fulfills that requirement, as it is a well-developed structured vocabulary that describes the activities and locations of gene products in a consistent manner across all kingdoms of life. The Microbial ENergy processes Gene Ontology () project is extending the GO to include new terms to describe microbial processes of interest to bioenergy production. Our effort has added over 600 bioenergy related terms to the Gene Ontology. These terms will aid in the comprehensive annotation of gene products from diverse energy-related microbial genomes. An area of microbial energy research that has received a lot of attention is microbial production of advanced biofuels. These include alcohols such as butanol, isopropanol, isobutanol, and fuels derived from fatty acids, isoprenoids, and polyhydroxyalkanoates. These fuels are superior to first generation biofuels (ethanol and biodiesel esterified from vegetable oil or animal fat), can be generated from non-food feedstock sources, can be used as supplements or substitutes for gasoline, diesel and jet fuels, and can be stored and distributed using existing infrastructure. Here we review the roles of genes associated with synthesis of advanced biofuels, and at the same time introduce the use of the GO to describe the functions of these genes in a standardized way. PMID:25346727

  3. Livestock biodiversity: from genes to animal products through safeguard actions.

    PubMed

    Caroli, Anna Maria; Pizzi, Flavia

    2012-01-01

    The 'livestock' term refers to animals domesticated for producing commodities for man such as food, fiber and draught. Livestock biodiversity is integral to our culture, history, environment, and economy. Thousands of livestock breeds have evolved over time to suit particular environments and farming systems. Conservation of these genetic resources relies on demographic characterization and correct breeding schemes. In addition, molecular genetic studies allow to identify and monitor the genetic diversity within and across breeds and to reconstruct their evolution history. The conservation of livestock variability is also a crucial element in order to preserve and valorise specific nutritional and nutraceutical properties of animal products. Efficient ex situ and in situ conservation strategies are obligatory tools in order to implement an appropriate action for the conservation of livestock biodiversity. The main issues concerning different species are summarised, with particular reference to'the livestock biodiversity still existing. Some examples of ex situ conservation strategies developed in Italy are presented, and the different actions in defense of Animal Genetic Resources (AnGR) developed within the European Community are illustrated.

  4. Production of the 2400 kb Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene transcript; transcription time and cotranscriptional splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, C.N.; Worton, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    The largest known gene in any organism is the human DMD gene which has 79 exons that span 2400 kb. The extreme nature of the DMD gene raises questions concerning the time required for transcription and whether splicing begins before transcription is complete. DMD gene transcription is induced as cultured human myoblasts differentiate to form multinucleated myotubes, providing a system for studying the kinetics of transcription and splicing. Using quantitative RT-PCR, transcript accumulation was monitored from four different regions within the gene following induction of expression. By comparing the accumulation of transcripts from the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of the gene we have shown that approximately 12 hours are required to transcribe 1770 kb of the gene, extrapolating to a time of 16 hours for the transcription unit expressed in muscle. Comparison of accumulation profiles for spliced and total transcript demonstrated that transcripts are spliced at the 5{prime} end before transcription is complete, providing strong evidence for cotranscriptional splicing of DMD gene transcripts. Finally, the rate of transcript accumulation was reduced at the 3{prime} end of the gene relative to the 5{prime} end, perhaps due to premature termination of transcription complexes as they traverse this enormous transcription unit. The lag between transcription initiation and the appearance of complete transcripts could be important in limiting transcript production in dividing cells and to the timing of mRNA appearance in differentiating muscle.

  5. Candidate genes for drought tolerance and improved productivity in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Vinod, M S; Sharma, Naveen; Manjunath, K; Kanbar, Adnan; Prakash, N B; Shashidhar, H E

    2006-03-01

    Candidate genes are sequenced genes of known biological action involved in the development or physiology of a trait. Twenty-one putative candidate genes were designed after an exhaustive search in the public databases along with an elaborate literature survey for candidate gene products and/or regulatory sequences associated with enhanced drought resistance. The downloaded sequences were then used to design primers considering the flanking sequences as well. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performed on 10 diverse cultivars that involved Japonica, Indica and local accessions, revealed 12 polymorphic candidate genes. Seven polymorphic candidate genes were then utilized to genotype 148 individuals of CT9993 x IR62266 doubled haploid (DH) mapping population. The segregation data were tested for deviation from the expected Mendelian ratio (1:1) using a Chi-square test (less than 1%). Based on this, four candidate genes were assessed to be significant and the remaining three, as non-significant. All the significant candidate genes were biased towards CT9993, the female parent in the DH mapping population. Single-marker analysis strongly associated (less than 1%) them to different traits under both well-watered and low-moisture stress conditions. Two candidate genes, EXP15 and EXP13, were found to be associated with root number and silicon content in the stem respectively, under both well-watered and low-moisture stress conditions.

  6. ROS production during symbiotic infection suppresses pathogenesis-related gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Peleg-Grossman, Smadar; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Levine, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Leguminous plants have exclusive ability to form symbiotic relationship with soil bacteria of the genus Rhizobium. Symbiosis is a complex process that involves multiple molecular signaling activities, such as calcium fluxes, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and synthesis of nodulation genes. We analyzed the role of ROS in defense gene expression in Medicago truncatula during symbiosis and pathogenesis. Studies in Arabidopsis thaliana showed that the induction of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes during systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is regulated by NPR1 protein, which resides in the cytoplasm as an oligomer. After oxidative burst and return of reducing conditions, the NPR1 undergoes monomerization and becomes translocated to the nucleus, where it functions in PR genes induction. We show that ROS production is both stronger and longer during symbiotic interactions than during interactions with pathogenic, nonhost or common nonpathogenic soil bacteria. Moreover, root cells inoculated with Sinorhizobium meliloti accumulated ROS in the cytosol but not in vacuoles, as opposed to Pseudomonas putida inoculation or salt stress treatment. Furthermore, increased ROS accumulation by addition of H2O2 reduced the PR gene expression, while catalase had an opposite effect, establishing that the PR gene expression is opposite to the level of cytoplasmic ROS. In addition, we show that salicylic acid pretreatment significantly reduced ROS production in root cells during symbiotic interaction. PMID:22499208

  7. ROS production during symbiotic infection suppresses pathogenesis-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Peleg-Grossman, Smadar; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Levine, Alex

    2012-03-01

    Leguminous plants have exclusive ability to form symbiotic relationship with soil bacteria of the genus Rhizobium. Symbiosis is a complex process that involves multiple molecular signaling activities, such as calcium fluxes, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and synthesis of nodulation genes. We analyzed the role of ROS in defense gene expression in Medicago truncatula during symbiosis and pathogenesis. Studies in Arabidopsis thaliana showed that the induction of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes during systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is regulated by NPR1 protein, which resides in the cytoplasm as an oligomer. After oxidative burst and return of reducing conditions, the NPR1 undergoes monomerization and becomes translocated to the nucleus, where it functions in PR genes induction. We show that ROS production is both stronger and longer during symbiotic interactions than during interactions with pathogenic, nonhost or common nonpathogenic soil bacteria. Moreover, root cells inoculated with Sinorhizobium meliloti accumulated ROS in the cytosol but not in vacuoles, as opposed to Pseudomonas putida inoculation or salt stress treatment. Furthermore, increased ROS accumulation by addition of H₂O₂ reduced the PR gene expression, while catalase had an opposite effect, establishing that the PR gene expression is opposite to the level of cytoplasmic ROS. In addition, we show that salicylic acid pretreatment significantly reduced ROS production in root cells during symbiotic interaction.

  8. Products of lipid, protein and RNA oxidation as signals and regulators of gene expression in plants

    PubMed Central

    Chmielowska-Bąk, Jagna; Izbiańska, Karolina; Deckert, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are engaged in several processes essential for normal cell functioning, such as differentiation, anti-microbial defense, stimulus sensing and signaling. Interestingly, recent studies imply that cellular signal transduction and gene regulation are mediated not only directly by ROS but also by the molecules derived from ROS-mediated oxidation. Lipid peroxidation leads to non-enzymatic formation of oxylipins. These molecules were shown to modulate expression of signaling associated genes including genes encoding phosphatases, kinases and transcription factors. Oxidized peptides derived from protein oxidation might be engaged in organelle-specific ROS signaling. In turn, oxidation of particular mRNAs leads to decrease in the level of encoded proteins and thus, contributes to the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Present mini review summarizes latest findings concerning involvement of products of lipid, protein and RNA oxidation in signal transduction and gene regulation. PMID:26082792

  9. Associations between polymorphisms of the gene and milk production traits in water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Deng, T X; Pang, C Y; Lu, X R; Zhu, P; Duan, A Q; Liang, X W

    2016-03-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 () is an important regulator of mammary gland differentiation and cell survival that has been regarded as a candidate gene affecting milk production traits in mammals. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate significant associations between SNP of the gene and milk production traits in buffaloes. Here, 18 SNP were identified in the buffalo gene, including 15 intronic mutations and 3 exon mutations. All the identified SNP were then genotyped using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry methods from 192 buffaloes. All the SNP were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and 2 haplotype blocks were successfully constructed based on these SNP data, which formed 5 and 3 major haplotypes in the population (>5%), respectively. The results of association analysis showed that only SNP13 located in exon 10 was significantly associated with the milk production traits in the population ( < 0.05). Single nucleotide polymorphism 2, SNP5, SNP8, and SNP9 were associated with protein percentage, and SNP4 and SNP10 were associated with 305-d milk yield ( < 0.05). Our results provide evidence that polymorphisms of the buffalo gene are associated with milk production traits and can be used as a candidate gene for marker-assisted selection in buffalo breeding.

  10. Engineering validamycin production by tandem deletion of γ-butyrolactone receptor genes in Streptomyces hygroscopicus 5008.

    PubMed

    Tan, Gao-Yi; Peng, Yao; Lu, Chenyang; Bai, Linquan; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Paired homologs of γ-butyrolactone (GBL) biosynthesis gene afsA and GBL receptor gene arpA are located at different positions in genome of Streptomyces hygroscopicus 5008. Inactivation of afsA homologs dramatically decreased biosynthesis of validamycin, an important anti-fungal antibiotic and a critical substrate for antidiabetic drug synthesis, and the deletion of arpA homologs increased validamycin production by 26% (ΔshbR1) and 20% (ΔshbR3). By double deletion, the ΔshbR1/R3 mutant showed higher transcriptional levels of adpA-H (the S. hygroscopicus ortholog of the global regulatory gene adpA) and validamycin biosynthetic genes, and validamycin production increased by 55%. Furthermore, by engineering a high-producing industrial strain via tandem deletion of GBL receptor genes, validamycin production and productivity were enhanced from 19 to 24 g/L (by 26%) and from 6.7 to 9.7 g/L(-1) d(-1) (by 45%), respectively, which was the highest ever reported. The strategy demonstrated here may be useful to engineering other Streptomyces spp. with multiple pairs of afsA-arpA homologs.

  11. New tools for reconstruction and heterologous expression of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yunzi; Enghiad, Behnam; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Natural product scaffolds remain a major source and inspiration for human therapeutics. However, generation of a natural product in the post-genomic era often requires reconstruction of the corresponding biosynthetic gene cluster in a heterologous host. In the burgeoning fields of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, a significant amount of efforts has been devoted to develop DNA assembly techniques with higher efficiency, fidelity, and modularity, and heterologous expression systems with higher productivity and yield. Here we describe recent advances in DNA assembly and host engineering and highlight their applications in natural product discovery and engineering. PMID:26647833

  12. New tools for reconstruction and heterologous expression of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yunzi; Enghiad, Behnam; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-02-01

    Natural product scaffolds remain a major source and inspiration for human therapeutics. However, generation of a natural product in the post-genomic era often requires reconstruction of the corresponding biosynthetic gene cluster in a heterologous host. In the burgeoning fields of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, a significant amount of efforts has been devoted to develop DNA assembly techniques with higher efficiency, fidelity, and modularity, and heterologous expression systems with higher productivity and yield. Here we describe recent advances in DNA assembly and host engineering and highlight their applications in natural product discovery and engineering.

  13. Investigation of genes involved in nisin production in Enterococcus spp. strains isolated from raw goat milk.

    PubMed

    Perin, Luana Martins; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2016-09-01

    Different strains of Lactococcus lactis are capable of producing the bacteriocin nisin. However, genetic transfer mechanisms allow the natural occurrence of genes involved in nisin production in members of other bacterial genera, such as Enterococcus spp. In a previous study, nisA was identified in eight enterococci capable of producing antimicrobial substances. The aim of this study was to verify the presence of genes involved in nisin production in Enterococcus spp. strains, as well as nisin expression. The nisA genes from eight Enterococcus spp. strains were sequenced and the translated amino acid sequences were compared to nisin amino-acid sequences previously described in databases. Although containing nisin structural and maturation related genes, the enterococci strains tested in the present study did not present the immunity related genes (nisFEG and nisI). The translated sequences of nisA showed some point mutations, identical to those presented by Lactococcus strains isolated from goat milk. All enterococci were inhibited by nisin, indicating the absence of immunity and thus that nisin cannot be expressed. This study demonstrated for the first time the natural occurrence of nisin structural genes in Enterococcus strains and highlights the importance of providing evidence of a link between the presence of bacteriocin genes and their expression.

  14. The product of the imprinted H19 gene is an oncofetal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ariel, I.; Ayesh, S.; Perlman, E. J.; Pizov, G.; Tanos, V.; Schneider, T.; Erdmann, V. A.; Podeh, D.; Komitowski, D.; Quasem, A. S.; de Groot, N.; Hochberg, A.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: The H19 gene is an imprinted, maternally expressed gene in humans. It is tightly linked and coregulated with the imprinted, paternally expressed gene of insulin-like growth factor 2. The H19 gene product is not translated into protein and functions as an RNA molecule. Although its role has been investigated for more than a decade, its biological function is still not understood fully. H19 is abundantly expressed in many tissues from early stages of embryogenesis through fetal life, and is down regulated postnatally. It is also expressed in certain childhood and adult tumours. This study was designed to screen the expression of H19 in human cancer and its relation to the expression of H19 in the fetus. METHODS: Using in situ hybridisation with a [35S] labelled probe, H19 mRNA was detected in paraffin wax sections of fetal tissues from the first and second trimesters of pregnancy and of a large array of human adult and childhood tumours arising from these tissues. RESULTS: The H19 gene is expressed in tumours arising from tissues which express this gene in fetal life. Its expression in the fetus and in cancer is closely linked with tissue differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: Based on these and previous data, H19 is neither a tumour suppressor gene nor an oncogene. Its product is an oncofetal RNA. The potential use of this RNA as a tumour marker should be evaluated. Images PMID:9208812

  15. Overexpression of bacterial ethylene-forming enzyme gene in Trichoderma reesei enhanced the production of ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Liang, Yong; Hua, Jing; Tao, Li; Qin, Wensheng; Chen, Sanfeng

    2010-01-01

    In order to efficiently utilize natural cellulose materials to produce ethylene, three expression vectors containing the ethylene-forming enzyme (efe) gene from Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea were constructed. The target gene was respectively controlled by different promoters: cbh I promoter from Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolases I gene, gpd promoter from Aspergillus nidulans glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene and pgk I promoter from T. reesei 3-phosphoglycerate kinase I gene. After transforming into T. reesei QM9414, 43 stable transformants were obtained by PCR amplification and ethylene determination. Southern blot analysis of 14 transformants demonstrated that the efe gene was integrated into chromosomal DNA with copy numbers from 1 to 4. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of 6 transformants showed that the heterologous gene was transcribed. By using wheat straw as a carbon source, the ethylene production rates of aforementioned 14 transformants were measured. Transformant C30-3 with pgk I promoter had the highest ethylene production (4,012 nl h-1 l-1). This indicates that agricultural wastes could be used to produce ethylene in recombinant filamentous fungus T. reesei. PMID:20150979

  16. Production of indole antibiotics induced by exogenous gene derived from sponge metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Takeshige, Yuya; Egami, Yoko; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Abe, Ikuro

    2015-05-01

    Sponge metagenomes are accessible genetic sources containing genes and gene clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of sponge-derived bioactive natural products. In this study, we obtained the clone pDC112, producing turbomycin A and 2,2-di(3-indolyl)-3-indolone, based on the functional screening of the metagenome library derived from the marine sponge Discodermia calyx. The subcloning experiment identified ORF 25, which is homologous to inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase and required for the production of 2,2-di(3-indolyl)-3-indolone in Escherichia coli.

  17. Enhanced production of acetoin and butanediol in recombinant Enterobacter aerogenes carrying Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene.

    PubMed

    Geckil, Hikmet; Barak, Ze'ev; Chipman, David M; Erenler, Sebnem O; Webster, Dale A; Stark, Benjamin C

    2004-10-01

    Microbial production of butanediol and acetoin has received increasing interest because of their diverse potential practical uses. Although both products are fermentative in nature, their optimal production requires a low level of oxygen. In this study, the use of a recombinant oxygen uptake system on production of these metabolites was investigated. Enterobacter aerogenes was transformed with a pUC8-based plasmid carrying the gene (vgb) encoding Vitreoscilla (bacterial)hemoglobin (VHb). The presence of vgb and production of VHb by this strain resulted in an increase in viability from 72 to 96 h in culture, but no overall increase in cell mass. Accumulation of the fermentation products acetoin and butanediol were enhanced (up to 83%) by the presence of vgb/VHb. This vgb/VHb related effect appears to be due to an increase of flux through the acetoin/butanediol pathway, but not at the expense of acid production.

  18. Both cis and trans Activities of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus 3D Polymerase Are Essential for Viral RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Herod, Morgan R.; Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; Loundras, Eleni-Anna; Ward, Joseph C.; Verdaguer, Nuria; Rowlands, David J.

    2016-01-01

    occurs within replication complexes, and understanding this process can facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Many of the nonstructural proteins involved in replication possess multiple functions in the viral life cycle, some of which can be supplied to the replication complex from a separate genome (i.e., in trans) while others must originate from the template (i.e., in cis). Here, we present an analysis of cis and trans activities of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 3D. We demonstrate a novel cis-acting role of 3D in replication. Our data suggest that this role is distinct from its enzymatic functions and requires interaction with the viral genome. Our data further the understanding of genome replication of this important pathogen. PMID:27194768

  19. Biofilm formation, phenotypic production of cellulose and gene expression in Salmonella enterica decrease under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lamas, A; Miranda, J M; Vázquez, B; Cepeda, A; Franco, C M

    2016-12-05

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica is one of the main food-borne pathogens. This microorganism combines an aerobic life outside the host with an anaerobic life within the host. One of the main concerns related to S. enterica is biofilm formation and cellulose production. In this study, biofilm formation, morphotype, cellulose production and transcription of biofilm and quorum sensing-related genes of 11 S. enterica strains were tested under three different conditions: aerobiosis, microaerobiosis, and anaerobiosis. The results showed an influence of oxygen levels on biofilm production. Biofilm formation was significantly higher (P<0.05) in aerobiosis than in microaerobiosis and anaerobiosis. Cellulose production and RDAR (red, dry, and rough) were expressed only in aerobiosis. In microaerobiosis, the strains expressed the SAW (smooth and white) morphotype, while in anaerobiosis the colonies appeared small and red. The expression of genes involved in cellulose synthesis (csgD and adrA) and quorum sensing (sdiA and luxS) was reduced in microaerobiosis and anaerobiosis in all S. enterica strains tested. This gene expression levels were less reduced in S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis compared to the tested serotypes. There was a relationship between the expression of biofilm and quorum sensing-related genes. Thus, the results from this study indicate that biofilm formation and cellulose production are highly influenced by atmospheric conditions. This must be taken into account as contamination with these bacteria can occur during food processing under vacuum or modified atmospheres.

  20. Analysis of the genetic effects of prolactin gene polymorphisms on chicken egg production.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Fang; Shu, Jing-Ting; Du, Yu-Feng; Shan, Yan-Ju; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Zhang, Xue-Yu; Han, Wei; Xu, Wen-Juan

    2013-01-01

    Chicken prolactin (PRL) is a physiological candidate gene for egg production. Variations of T8052C and G8113C in exon 5 of PRL gene may associate with chicken egg production. The objective of the study was to investigate the association of these two single nucleotide polymorphisms in PRL gene with egg production of Recessive White chickens and Qingyuan Partridge chickens. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction (PCR-LDR) method. The T8052C and G8113C of PRL were significantly associated with age at first egg (AFE) and total egg number at 300 days of age (EN 300). A significant association was also found between T8052C-G8113C haplotypes and AFE as well as EN300, the H2H3 was the most advantageous diplotype for egg production. We putatively drew the conclusion that these two SNPs in PRL gene as well as their haplotypes could be used as the potential molecular markers for egg production traits in chicken.

  1. Improvement of oxytetracycline production mediated via cooperation of resistance genes in Streptomyces rimosus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shouliang; Wang, Xuefeng; Shi, Mingxin; Yuan, Fang; Wang, Huizhuan; Jia, Xiaole; Yuan, Fang; Sun, Jinliang; Liu, Tiejun; Yang, Keqian; Zhang, Yuxiu; Fan, Keqiang; Li, Zilong

    2017-09-01

    Increasing the self-resistance levels of Streptomyces is an effective strategy to improve the production of antibiotics. To increase the oxytetracycline (OTC) production in Streptomyces rimosus, we investigated the cooperative effect of three co-overexpressing OTC resistance genes: one gene encodes a ribosomal protection protein (otrA) and the other two express efflux proteins (otrB and otrC). Results indicated that combinational overexpression of otrA, otrB, and otrC (MKABC) exerted a synergetic effect. OTC production increased by 179% in the recombinant strain compared with that of the wild-type strain M4018. The resistance level to OTC was increased by approximately two-fold relative to the parental strain, thereby indicating that applying the cooperative effect of self-resistance genes is useful to improve OTC production. Furthermore, the previously identified cluster-situated activator OtcR was overexpressed in MKABC in constructing the recombinant strain MKRABC; such strain can produce OTC of approximately 7.49 g L(-1), which represents an increase of 19% in comparison with that of the OtcR-overexpressing strain alone. Our work showed that the cooperative overexpression of self-resistance genes is a promising strategy to enhance the antibiotics production in Streptomyces.

  2. 1,3-Propanediol production by Escherichia coli using genes from Citrobacter freundii atcc 8090.

    PubMed

    Przystałowska, Hanna; Zeyland, Joanna; Kośmider, Alicja; Szalata, Marlena; Słomski, Ryszard; Lipiński, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Compared with chemical synthesis, fermentation has the advantage of mass production at low cost, and has been used in the production of various industrial chemicals. As a valuable organic compound, 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) has numerous applications in the production of polymers, lubricants, cosmetics and medicines. Here, conversion of glycerol (a renewable substrate and waste from biodiesel production) to 1,3-PDO by E. coli bacterial strain carrying altered glycerol metabolic pathway was investigated. Two gene constructs containing the 1,3-PDO operon from Citrobacter freundii (pCF1 and pCF2) were used to transform the bacteria. The pCF1 gene expression construct contained dhaBCE genes encoding the three subunits of glycerol dehydratase, dhaF encoding the large subunit of the glycerol dehydratase reactivation factor and dhaG encoding the small subunit of the glycerol dehydratase reactivating factor. The pCF2 gene expression construct contained the dhaT gene encoding the 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase. Expression of the genes cloned in the above constructs was under regulation of the T7lac promoter. RT-PCR, SDS-PAGE analyses and functional tests confirmed that 1,3-PDO synthesis pathway genes were expressed at the RNA and protein levels, and worked flawlessly in the heterologous host. In a batch flask culture, in a short time applied just to identify the 1,3-PDO in a preliminary study, the recombinant E. coli bacteria produced 1.53 g/L of 1,3-PDO, using 21.2 g/L of glycerol in 72 h. In the Sartorius Biostat B Plus reactor, they produced 11.7 g/L of 1,3-PDO using 24.2 g/L of glycerol, attaining an efficiency of 0.58 [mol1,3-PDO/molglycerol].

  3. Diversity of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Enterococcus Strains Isolated from Ready-to-Eat Meat Products.

    PubMed

    Chajęcka-Wierzchowska, Wioleta; Zadernowska, Anna; Łaniewska-Trokenheim, Łucja

    2016-10-25

    The objective of the study was to answer the question of whether the ready-to-eat meat products can pose indirect hazard for consumer health serving as reservoir of Enterococcus strains harboring tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, and macrolides resistance genes. A total of 390 samples of ready-to-eat meat products were investigated. Enterococcus strains were found in 74.1% of the samples. A total of 302 strains were classified as: Enterococcus faecalis (48.7%), Enterococcus faecium (39.7%), Enterococcus casseliflavus (4.3%), Enterococcus durans (3.0%), Enterococcus hirae (2.6%), and other Enterococcus spp. (1.7%). A high percentage of isolates were resistant to streptomycin high level (45%) followed by erythromycin (42.7%), fosfomycin (27.2%), rifampicin (19.2%), tetracycline (36.4%), tigecycline (19.9%). The ant(6')-Ia gene was the most frequently found gene (79.6%). Among the other genes that encode aminoglycosides-modifying enzymes, the highest portion of the strains had the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia (18.5%) and aph(3'')-IIIa (16.6%), but resistance of isolates from food is also an effect of the presence of aph(2'')-Ib, aph(2'')-Ic, aph(2'')-Id genes. Resistance to tetracyclines was associated with the presence of tetM (43.7%), tetL (32.1%), tetK (14.6%), tetW (0.7%), and tetO (0.3%) genes. The ermB and ermA genes were found in 33.8% and 18.9% of isolates, respectively. Nearly half of the isolates contained a conjugative transposon of the Tn916/Tn1545 family. Enterococci are widely present in retail ready-to-eat meat products. Many isolated strains (including such species as E. casseliflavus, E. durans, E. hirae, and Enterococcus gallinarum) are antibiotic resistant and carry transferable resistance genes. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  4. Identification and engineering of regulation-related genes toward improved kasugamycin production.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chenchen; Kang, Qianjin; Bai, Linquan; Cheng, Lin; Deng, Zixin

    2016-02-01

    Kasugamycin, produced by Streptomyces kasugaensis and Streptomyces microaureus, is an important amino-glycoside family antibiotic and widely used for veterinary and agricultural applications. In the left flanking region of the previously reported kasugamycin gene cluster, four additional genes (two-component system kasW and kasX, MerR-family kasV, and isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase kasS) were identified both in the low-yielding S. kasugaensis BCRC12349 and high-yielding S. microaureus XM301. Deletion of regulatory gene kasT abolished kasugamycin production, and its overexpression in BCRC12349 resulted in an increased titer by 186 %. Deletion of kasW, kasX, kasV, and kasS improved kasugamycin production by 12, 19, 194, and 22 %, respectively. qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the transcription of kas genes was significantly increased in all the four mutants. Similar gene inactivation was performed in the high-yielding strain S. microaureus XM301. As expected, the deletion of kasW/X resulted in a 58 % increase of the yield from 6 to 9.5 g/L. However, the deletion of kasV and over-expression of kasT had no obvious effect, and the disruption of kasS surprisingly decreased kasugamycin production. In addition, trans-complementation of the kasS mutant with a TTA codon-mutated kasS increased the kasugamycin yield by 20 %. A much higher transcription of kas genes was detected in the high-yielding XM301 than in the low-yielding BCRC12349, which may partially account for the discrepancy of gene inactivation effects between them. Our work not only generated engineered strains with improved kasugamycin yield, but also pointed out that different strategies on manipulating regulatory-related genes should be considered for low-yielding or high-yielding strains.

  5. Regulatory structures for gene therapy medicinal products in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Klug, Bettina; Celis, Patrick; Carr, Melanie; Reinhardt, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Taking into account the complexity and technical specificity of advanced therapy medicinal products: (gene and cell therapy medicinal products and tissue engineered products), a dedicated European regulatory framework was needed. Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007, the "ATMP Regulation" provides tailored regulatory principles for the evaluation and authorization of these innovative medicines. The majority of gene or cell therapy product development is carried out by academia, hospitals, and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Thus, acknowledging the particular needs of these types of sponsors, the legislation also provides incentives for product development tailored to them. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) and, in particular, its Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) provide a variety of opportunities for early interaction with developers of ATMPs to enable them to have early regulatory and scientific input. An important tool to promote innovation and the development of new medicinal products by micro-, small-, and medium-sized enterprises is the EMA's SME initiative launched in December 2005 to offer financial and administrative assistance to smaller companies. The European legislation also foresees the involvement of stakeholders, such as patient organizations, in the development of new medicines. Considering that gene therapy medicinal products are developed in many cases for treatment of rare diseases often of monogenic origin, the involvement of patient organizations, which focus on rare diseases and genetic and congenital disorders, is fruitful. Two such organizations are represented in the CAT. Research networks play another important role in the development of gene therapy medicinal products. The European Commission is funding such networks through the EU Sixth Framework Program.

  6. Isolated fungal promoters and gene transcription terminators and methods of protein and chemical production in a fungus

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Ziyu; Lasure, Linda L; Magnuson, Jon K

    2014-05-27

    The present invention encompasses isolated gene regulatory elements and gene transcription terminators that are differentially expressed in a native fungus exhibiting a first morphology relative to the native fungus exhibiting a second morphology. The invention also encompasses a method of utilizing a fungus for protein or chemical production. A transformed fungus is produced by transforming a fungus with a recombinant polynucleotide molecule. The recombinant polynucleotide molecule contains an isolated polynucleotide sequence linked operably to another molecule comprising a coding region of a gene of interest. The gene regulatory element and gene transcription terminator may temporally and spatially regulate expression of particular genes for optimum production of compounds of interest in a transgenic fungus.

  7. Isolated fungal promoters and gene transcription terminators and methods of protein and chemical production in a fungus

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Ziyu; Lasure, Linda L.; Magnuson, Jon K.

    2008-11-11

    The present invention encompasses isolated gene regulatory elements and gene transcription terminators that are differentially expressed in a native fungus exhibiting a first morphology relative to the native fungus exhibiting a second morphology. The invention also encompasses a method of utilizing a fungus for protein or chemical production. A transformed fungus is produced by transforming a fungus with a recombinant polynucleotide molecule. The recombinant polynucleotide molecule contains an isolated polynucleotide sequence linked operably to another molecule comprising a coding region of a gene of interest. The gene regulatory element and gene transcription terminator may temporally and spatially regulate expression of particular genes for optimum production of compounds of interest in a transgenic fungus.

  8. Isolated Fungal Promoters and Gene Transcription Terminators and Methods of Protein and Chemical Production in a Fungus

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Ziyu; Lasure, Linda L.; Magnuson, Jon K.

    2008-11-11

    The present invention encompasses isolated gene regulatory elements and gene transcription terminators that are differentially expressed in a native fungus exhibiting a first morphology relative to the native fungus exhibiting a second morphology. The invention also encompasses a method of utilizing a fungus for protein or chemical production. A transformed fungus is produced by transforming a fungus with a recombinant polynucleotide molecule. The recombinant polynucleotide molecule contains an isolated polynucleotide sequence linked operably to another molecule comprising a coding region of a gene of interest. The gene regulatory element and gene transcription terminator may temporally and spatially regulate expression of particular genes for optimum production of compounds of interest in a transgenic fungus.

  9. Distribution of Toxin Genes and Enterotoxins in Bacillus thuringiensis Isolated from Microbial Insecticide Products.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seung-Hak; Kang, Suk-Ho; Lee, Yea-Eun; Kim, Sung-Jo; Yoo, Young-Bin; Bak, Yeong-Seok; Kim, Jung-Beom

    2015-12-28

    Bacillus thuringiensis microbial insecticide products have been applied worldwide. Although a few cases of B. thuringiensis foodborne illness have been reported, little is known about the toxigenic properties of B. thuringiensis isolates. The aims of this study were to estimate the pathogenic potential of B. thuringiensis selected from microbial insecticide products, based on its possession of toxin genes and production of enterotoxins. Fifty-two B. thuringiensis strains selected from four kinds of microbial insecticide products were analyzed. PCR assay for detection of toxin genes and immunoassay for detection of enterotoxins were performed. The hemolysin BL complex as a major enterotoxin was produced by 17 (32.7%), whereas the nonhemolytic enterotoxin complex was detected in 1 (1.9%) of 52 B. thuringiensis strains. However, cytK, entFM, and ces genes were not detected in any of the tested B. thuringiensis strains. The potential risk of food poisoning by B. thuringiensis along with concerns over B. thuringiensis microbial insecticide products has gained attention recently. Thus, microbial insecticide products based on B. thuringiensis should be carefully controlled.

  10. Development of Ecogenomic Sensors for Remote Detection of Marine Microbes, Their Genes and Gene Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholin, C.; Preston, C.; Harris, A.; Birch, J.; Marin, R.; Jensen, S.; Roman, B.; Everlove, C.; Makarewicz, A.; Riot, V.; Hadley, D.; Benett, W.; Dzenitis, J.

    2008-12-01

    An internet search using the phrase "ecogenomic sensor" will return numerous references that speak broadly to the idea of detecting molecular markers indicative of specific organisms, genes or other biomarkers within an environmental context. However, a strict and unified definition of "ecogenomic sensor" is lacking and the phrase may be used for laboratory-based tools and techniques as well as semi or fully autonomous systems that can be deployed outside of laboratory. We are exploring development of an ecogenomic sensor from the perspective of a field-portable device applied towards oceanographic research and water quality monitoring. The device is known as the Environmental Sample Processor, or ESP. The ESP employs wet chemistry molecular analytical techniques to autonomously assess the presence and abundance of specific organisms, their genes and/or metabolites in near real-time. Current detection chemistries rely on low- density DNA probe and protein arrays. This presentation will emphasize results from 2007-8 field trials when the ESP was moored in Monterey Bay, CA, as well as current engineering activities for improving analytical capacity of the instrument. Changes in microbial community structure at the rRNA level were observed remotely in accordance with changing chemical and physical oceanographic conditions. Current developments include incorporation of a reusable solid phase extraction column for purifying nucleic acids and a 4-channel real-time PCR module. Users can configure this system to support a variety of PCR master mixes, primer/probe combinations and control templates. An update on progress towards fielding a PCR- enabled ESP will be given along with an outline of plans for its use in coastal and oligotrophic oceanic regimes.

  11. Polyhydroxyalkanoate production from sucrose by Cupriavidus necator strains harboring csc genes from Escherichia coli W.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hisashi; Matsumoto, Keiji; Fujiki, Tetsuya

    2017-09-09

    Cupriavidus necator H16 is the most promising bacterium for industrial production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) because of their remarkable ability to accumulate them in the cells. With genetic modifications, this bacterium can produce poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx), which has better physical properties, as well as poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) using plant oils and sugars as a carbon source. Considering production cost, sucrose is a very attractive raw material because it is inexpensive; however, this bacterium cannot assimilate sucrose. Here, we used the sucrose utilization (csc) genes of Escherichia coli W to generate C. necator strains that can assimilate sucrose. Especially, glucose-utilizing recombinant C. necator strains harboring the sucrose hydrolase gene (cscA) and sucrose permease gene (cscB) of E. coli W grew well on sucrose as a sole carbon source and accumulated PHB. In addition, strains introduced with a crotonyl-CoA reductase gene (ccr), ethylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase gene (emd), and some other genetic modifications besides the csc genes and the glucose-utilizing mutations produced PHBHHx with a 3-hydroxyhexanoate (3HHx) content of maximum approximately 27 mol% from sucrose. Furthermore, when one of the PHBHHx-producing strains was cultured with sucrose solution in a fed-batch fermentation, PHBHHx with a 3HHx content of approximately 4 mol% was produced and reached 113 g/L for 65 h, which is approximately 1.5-fold higher than that produced using glucose solution.

  12. Prolactin (PRL) and prolactin receptor (PRLR) genes and their role in poultry production traits.

    PubMed

    Wilkanowska, Anna; Mazurowski, Artur; Mroczkowski, Sławomir; Kokoszyński, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL), secreted from the anterior pituitary, plays extensive roles in osmoregulation, corpus luteum formation, mammogenesis, lactogenesis, lactopoiesis, and production of crop milk. In birds, prolactin (PRL) is generally accepted as crucial to the onset and maintenance of broodiness. All the actions of prolactin (PRL) hormone are mediated by its receptor (PRLR), which plays an important role in the PRL signal transduction cascade. It has been well established that the PRL gene is closely associated to the onset and maintenance of broody behavior, and could be a genetic marker in breeding against broodiness in chickens. Meanwhile, the prolactin receptor (PRLR) gene is regarded as a candidate genetic marker for reproductive traits. PRLR is also an important regulator gene for cell growth and differentiation. The identified polymorphism of this gene is mainly viewed in terms of egg production traits. Due to different biological activities attributed to PRL and PRLR, they can be used as major candidate genes in molecular animal breeding programs. Characterization of PRL and PRLR genes helps to elucidate their roles in birds and provides insights into the regulatory mechanisms of PRL and PRLR expression conserved in birds and mammals.

  13. The dam replacing gene product enhances Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 viability and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatek, Agnieszka; Bacal, Pawel; Wasiluk, Adrian; Trybunko, Anastasiya; Adamczyk-Poplawska, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Many Neisseriaceae do not exhibit Dam methyltransferase activity and, instead of the dam gene, possess drg (dam replacing gene) inserted in the leuS/dam locus. The drg locus in Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 has a lower GC-pairs content (40.5%) compared to the whole genome of N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 (52%). The gonococcal drg gene encodes a DNA endonuclease Drg, with GmeATC specificity. Disruption of drg or insertion of the dam gene in gonococcal genome changes the level of expression of genes as shown by transcriptome analysis. For the drg-deficient N. gonorrhoeae mutant, a total of 195 (8.94% of the total gene pool) genes exhibited an altered expression compared to the wt strain by at least 1.5 fold. In dam-expressing N. gonorrhoeae mutant, the expression of 240 genes (11% of total genes) was deregulated. Most of these deregulated genes were involved in translation, DNA repair, membrane biogenesis and energy production as shown by cluster of orthologous group analysis. In vivo, the inactivation of drg gene causes the decrease of the number of live neisserial cells and long lag phase of growth. The insertion of dam gene instead of drg locus restores cell viability. We have also shown that presence of the drg gene product is important for N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 in adhesion, including human epithelial cells, and biofilm formation. Biofilm produced by drg-deficient strain is formed by more dispersed cells, compared to this one formed by parental strain as shown by scanning electron and confocal microscopy. Also adherence assays show a significantly smaller biomass of formed biofilm (OD570 = 0.242 ± 0.038) for drg-deficient strain, compared to wild-type strain (OD570 = 0.378 ± 0.057). Dam-expressing gonococcal cells produce slightly weaker biofilm with cells embedded in an extracellular matrix. This strain has also a five times reduced ability for adhesion to human epithelial cells. In this context, the presence of Drg is more advantageous for N. gonorrhoeae biology than

  14. The dam replacing gene product enhances Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 viability and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kwiatek, Agnieszka; Bacal, Pawel; Wasiluk, Adrian; Trybunko, Anastasiya; Adamczyk-Poplawska, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Many Neisseriaceae do not exhibit Dam methyltransferase activity and, instead of the dam gene, possess drg (dam replacing gene) inserted in the leuS/dam locus. The drg locus in Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 has a lower GC-pairs content (40.5%) compared to the whole genome of N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 (52%). The gonococcal drg gene encodes a DNA endonuclease Drg, with GmeATC specificity. Disruption of drg or insertion of the dam gene in gonococcal genome changes the level of expression of genes as shown by transcriptome analysis. For the drg-deficient N. gonorrhoeae mutant, a total of 195 (8.94% of the total gene pool) genes exhibited an altered expression compared to the wt strain by at least 1.5 fold. In dam-expressing N. gonorrhoeae mutant, the expression of 240 genes (11% of total genes) was deregulated. Most of these deregulated genes were involved in translation, DNA repair, membrane biogenesis and energy production as shown by cluster of orthologous group analysis. In vivo, the inactivation of drg gene causes the decrease of the number of live neisserial cells and long lag phase of growth. The insertion of dam gene instead of drg locus restores cell viability. We have also shown that presence of the drg gene product is important for N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 in adhesion, including human epithelial cells, and biofilm formation. Biofilm produced by drg-deficient strain is formed by more dispersed cells, compared to this one formed by parental strain as shown by scanning electron and confocal microscopy. Also adherence assays show a significantly smaller biomass of formed biofilm (OD570 = 0.242 ± 0.038) for drg-deficient strain, compared to wild-type strain (OD570 = 0.378 ± 0.057). Dam-expressing gonococcal cells produce slightly weaker biofilm with cells embedded in an extracellular matrix. This strain has also a five times reduced ability for adhesion to human epithelial cells. In this context, the presence of Drg is more advantageous for N. gonorrhoeae biology than

  15. Ethanol production by Escherichia coli strains co-expressing Zymomonas PDC and ADH genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Conway, Tyrrell; Alterthum, Flavio

    1991-01-01

    A novel operon and plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase activities of Zymomonas mobilis are described. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of microorganisms or eukaryotic cells and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of microorganisms or cells.

  16. EpsA is an essential gene in exopolysaccharide production in L actobacillus johnsonii FI9785

    PubMed Central

    Dertli, Enes; Colquhoun, Ian J.; Narbad, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    Summary L actobacillus johnsonii FI9785 has an eps gene cluster which is required for the biosynthesis of homopolymeric exopolysaccharides (EPS)‐1 and heteropolymeric EPS‐2 as a capsular layer. The first gene of the cluster, epsA, is the putative transcriptional regulator. In this study we showed the crucial role of epsA in EPS biosynthesis by demonstrating that deletion of epsA resulted in complete loss of both EPS‐1 and EPS‐2 on the cell surface. Plasmid complementation of the epsA gene fully restored EPS production, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Furthermore, this complementation resulted in a twofold increase in the expression levels of this gene, which almost doubled amounts of EPS production in comparison with the wild‐type strain. Analysis of EPS by NMR showed an increased ratio of the heteropolysaccharide to homopolysaccharide in the complemented strain and allowed identification of the acetylated residue in EPS‐2 as the (1,4)‐linked βGlcp unit, with the acetyl group located at O‐6. These findings indicate that epsA is a positive regulator of EPS production and that EPS production can be manipulated by altering its expression. PMID:26401596

  17. Role of nitric oxide and flavohemoglobin homolog genes in Aspergillus nidulans sexual development and mycotoxin production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flavohemoglobins are widely distributed proteins in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, conferring resistance against nitrosative stress. In the present study we investigated the role of two flavohemoglobin homologous genes, fhbA and fhbB, in morphogenesis and in the production of the mycotox...

  18. Direct cellobiose production from cellulose using sextuple beta-glucosidase gene deletion Neurospora crassa mutants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Direct cellobiose production from cellulose by a genetically modified fungus—Neurospora crassa, was explored in this study. A library of N. crassa sextuple beta-glucosidase (bgl) gene deletion strains was constructed. Various concentrations of cellobiose were detected in the culture broth of the N. ...

  19. Optimizing heterologous protein production in the periplasm of E. coli by regulating gene expression levels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Escherichia coli many heterologous proteins are produced in the periplasm. To direct these proteins to the periplasm, they are equipped with an N-terminal signal sequence so that they can traverse the cytoplasmic membrane via the protein-conducting Sec-translocon. For poorly understood reasons, the production of heterologous secretory proteins is often toxic to the cell thereby limiting yields. To gain insight into the mechanism(s) that underlie this toxicity we produced two secretory heterologous proteins, super folder green fluorescent protein and a single-chain variable antibody fragment, in the Lemo21(DE3) strain. In this strain, the expression intensity of the gene encoding the target protein can be precisely controlled. Results Both SFGFP and the single-chain variable antibody fragment were equipped with a DsbA-derived signal sequence. Producing these proteins following different gene expression levels in Lemo21(DE3) allowed us to identify the optimal expression level for each target gene. Too high gene expression levels resulted in saturation of the Sec-translocon capacity as shown by hampered translocation of endogenous secretory proteins and a protein misfolding/aggregation problem in the cytoplasm. At the optimal gene expression levels, the negative effects of the production of the heterologous secretory proteins were minimized and yields in the periplasm were optimized. Conclusions Saturating the Sec-translocon capacity can be a major bottleneck hampering heterologous protein production in the periplasm. This bottleneck can be alleviated by harmonizing expression levels of the genes encoding the heterologous secretory proteins with the Sec-translocon capacity. Mechanistic insight into the production of proteins in the periplasm is key to optimizing yields in this compartment. PMID:23497240

  20. Engineering a regulatory region of jadomycin gene cluster to improve jadomycin B production in Streptomyces venezuelae.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian-Ting; Wang, Sheng-Lan; Yang, Ke-Qian

    2007-09-01

    Streptomyces venezuelae ISP5230 produces a group of jadomycin congeners with cytotoxic activities. To improve jadomycin fermentation process, a genetic engineering strategy was designed to replace a 3.4-kb regulatory region of jad gene cluster that contains four regulatory genes (3' end 272 bp of jadW2, jadW3, jadR2, and jadR1) and the native promoter upstream of jadJ (P(J)) with the ermEp* promoter sequence so that ermEp* drives the expression of the jadomycin biosynthetic genes from jadJ in the engineered strain. As expected, the mutant strain produced jadomycin B without ethanol treatment, and the yield increased to about twofold that of the stressed wild-type. These results indicated that manipulation of the regulation of a biosynthetic gene cluster is an effective strategy to increase product yield.

  1. [A tetracycline-inducible gene system allows for regulated production of proteins with therapeutic potential].

    PubMed

    Castillo-Ureta, Hipólito; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia G

    2004-01-01

    The adoption of a bacterial system of control of genic expression with tetracycline, combined with the advances in the identification of regulatory sequences and mechanisms of expression of eukaryotic genes, has increased the versatility and effectiveness of techniques to reintroduce and to make genes function in cells and in superior organisms by being able to control the activity of the transgene in a temporary or reversible manner. This approach has also facilitated making detailed studies of different cellular processes and diseases; for example, the study of the function of oncogenes and other genes involved in the formation and progression of cancer, the generation of cellular models for recombinant protein production with therapeutic purposes, the ex-vivo genetic manipulation of extracted cells from patients and returned to them for gene therapy procedures, as well as the modulation of transgenes to revert hereditary suffering in animal models.

  2. Efficient production of multi-modified pigs for xenotransplantation by 'combineering', gene stacking and gene editing.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Konrad; Kraner-Scheiber, Simone; Petersen, Björn; Rieblinger, Beate; Buermann, Anna; Flisikowska, Tatiana; Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Christan, Susanne; Edlinger, Marlene; Baars, Wiebke; Kurome, Mayuko; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Kessler, Barbara; Plotzki, Elena; Szczerbal, Izabela; Switonski, Marek; Denner, Joachim; Wolf, Eckhard; Schwinzer, Reinhard; Niemann, Heiner; Kind, Alexander; Schnieke, Angelika

    2016-06-29

    Xenotransplantation from pigs could alleviate the shortage of human tissues and organs for transplantation. Means have been identified to overcome hyperacute rejection and acute vascular rejection mechanisms mounted by the recipient. The challenge is to combine multiple genetic modifications to enable normal animal breeding and meet the demand for transplants. We used two methods to colocate xenoprotective transgenes at one locus, sequential targeted transgene placement - 'gene stacking', and cointegration of multiple engineered large vectors - 'combineering', to generate pigs carrying modifications considered necessary to inhibit short to mid-term xenograft rejection. Pigs were generated by serial nuclear transfer and analysed at intermediate stages. Human complement inhibitors CD46, CD55 and CD59 were abundantly expressed in all tissues examined, human HO1 and human A20 were widely expressed. ZFN or CRISPR/Cas9 mediated homozygous GGTA1 and CMAH knockout abolished α-Gal and Neu5Gc epitopes. Cells from multi-transgenic piglets showed complete protection against human complement-mediated lysis, even before GGTA1 knockout. Blockade of endothelial activation reduced TNFα-induced E-selectin expression, IFNγ-induced MHC class-II upregulation and TNFα/cycloheximide caspase induction. Microbial analysis found no PERV-C, PCMV or 13 other infectious agents. These animals are a major advance towards clinical porcine xenotransplantation and demonstrate that livestock engineering has come of age.

  3. Functional Reconstitution of a Fungal Natural Product Gene Cluster by Advanced Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jakob; Valiante, Vito; Nødvig, Christina S; Mattern, Derek J; Slotkowski, Rebecca A; Mortensen, Uffe H; Brakhage, Axel A

    2017-01-20

    Filamentous fungi produce varieties of natural products even in a strain dependent manner. However, the genetic basis of chemical speciation between strains is still widely unknown. One example is trypacidin, a natural product of the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, which is not produced among different isolates. Combining computational analysis with targeted gene editing, we could link a single nucleotide insertion in the polyketide synthase of the trypacidin biosynthetic pathway and reconstitute its production in a nonproducing strain. Thus, we present a CRISPR/Cas9-based tool for advanced molecular genetic studies in filamentous fungi, exploiting selectable markers separated from the edited locus.

  4. Analysis of ldh genes in Lactobacillus casei BL23: role on lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Rico, Juan; Yebra, María Jesús; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Deutscher, Josef; Monedero, Vicente

    2008-06-01

    Lactobacillus casei is a lactic acid bacterium that produces L-lactate as the main product of sugar fermentation via L-lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh1) activity. In addition, small amounts of the D-lactate isomer are produced by the activity of a D-hydroxycaproate dehydrogenase (HicD). Ldh1 is the main L-lactate producing enzyme, but mutation of its gene does not eliminate L-lactate synthesis. A survey of the L. casei BL23 draft genome sequence revealed the presence of three additional genes encoding Ldh paralogs. In order to study the contribution of these genes to the global lactate production in this organism, individual, as well as double mutants (ldh1 ldh2, ldh1 ldh3, ldh1 ldh4 and ldh1 hicD) were constructed and lactic acid production was assessed in culture supernatants. ldh2, ldh3 and ldh4 genes play a minor role in lactate production, as their single mutation or a mutation in combination with an ldh1 deletion had a low impact on L-lactate synthesis. A Deltaldh1 mutant displayed an increased production of D-lactate, which was probably synthesized via the activity of HicD, as it was abolished in a Deltaldh1 hicD double mutant. Contrarily to HicD, no Ldh1, Ldh2, Ldh3 or Ldh4 activities could be detected by zymogram assays. In addition, these assays revealed the presence of extra bands exhibiting D-/L-lactate dehydrogenase activity, which could not be attributed to any of the described genes. These results suggest that L. casei BL23 possesses a complex enzymatic system able to reduce pyruvic to lactic acid.

  5. Consistent quantitative gene product expression: #2. Antigen intensities on bone marrow cells are invariant between individuals

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Andrew P.; Eidenschink Brodersen, Lisa; Fritschle, Wayne; Menssen, Andrew J.; Meshinchi, Soheil; Wells, Denise A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Five reference populations in bone marrow specimens were identified by flow cytometry using specific combinations of reagents in order define the variation of gene product expression intensities both within and between individuals. Mature lymphocytes, uncommitted progenitor cells, promyelocytes, mature monocytes and mature neutrophils can be reproducibly identified as distinct clusters of events in heterogeneous, maturing bone marrow specimens. Support Vector Machines were used to identify the reference populations in order to reduce subjective bias in manually defining boundaries of these populations since they were not discretely separated from the remainder of the cells. Reference populations were identified in 50 randomly selected bone marrow aspirates obtained over a period spanning 3 years and 6 months from pediatric patients following chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The quantitative expression of gene products (cell surface antigens) and light scattering characteristics on these stressed specimens were demonstrated to be tightly regulated both within individuals and between individuals. Within an individual most gene products (CD45, CD34, CD14, CD16, CD64, CD33) demonstrated limited variability with a standard deviation of <0.20 log units while CD13 and CD36 exhibited broader variation >0.25 log units. Surprisingly, with the exception of CD33, the variation of the mean intensities of each antigen between individuals was even less than the variation within an individual. These data confirm that the amounts of gene products expressed on normal developing cells are highly regulated but differ in intensities between different lineages and during the maturational pathway of those lineages. The amounts of gene products expressed at specific stages of development of each lineage are a biologic constant with minimal variation within or between individuals. © 2016 The Authors. Cytometry Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  6. Ghrelin gene products rescue cultured adult rat hippocampal neural stem cells from high glucose insult.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sehee; Kim, Chanyang; Park, Seungjoon

    2016-10-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is decreased in type 2 diabetes, and this impairment appears to be important in cognitive dysfunction. Previous studies suggest that ghrelin gene products (acylated ghrelin (AG), unacylated ghrelin (UAG) and obestatin (OB)) promote neurogenesis. Therefore, we hypothesize that ghrelin gene products may reduce the harmful effects of high glucose (HG) on hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of these peptides on the survival of cultured hippocampal NSCs exposed to HG insult. Treatment of hippocampal NSCs with AG, UAG or OB inhibited HG-induced cell death and apoptosis. Exposure of cells to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a antagonist abolished the protective effects of AG against HG toxicity, whereas those of UAG or OB were preserved. All three peptides attenuated HG-induced decrease in BrdU-labeled and phosphohistone-H3-labeled cells. We also investigated the effects of ghrelin gene products on the regulation of apoptosis at the mitochondrial level. AG, UAG or OB rescued hippocampal NSCs from HG insult by inhibiting intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation and stabilizing mitochondrial transmembrane potential. In addition, cells treated with ghrelin gene products showed an increased Bcl-2 and decreased Bax levels, thereby increasing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, inhibiting cytochrome c release and preventing caspase-3 activation. Finally, AG-, UAG- or OB-mediated protection was dependent on the activities of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase/uncoupling protein 2 pathway. Our data indicate that ghrelin gene products may act as survival factors that preserve mitochondrial function and inhibit oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  7. The Gene bldA, a regulator of morphological differentiation and antibiotic production in streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Hackl, Stefanie; Bechthold, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Streptomyces species are well known for their particular features of morphological differentiation. On solid agar, a mold-like aerial mycelium is formed and spores are produced, in which the bld genes play a crucial role. In S. coelicolor, mutations in one specific bld gene called bldA led to a "naked" phenotype lacking aerial hyphae and spores. This peculiar behavior became a major interest for scientific research in the past and it was revealed that bldA is coding for a unique tRNA able to translate a UUA codon into the amino acid leucine. UUA codons are a very rare property of G + C-rich Streptomyces genomes. The impact of bldA on morphology can in parts be attributed to the regulatory effect of bldA on the translational level, because TTA-containing genes can only be translated into their corresponding protein in the presence of a fully functioning bldA gene. In addition to the visible effect of bldA expression on the phenotype of S. coelicolor, bldA mutants were also deficient in antibiotic production. This led to the assumption that the role of bldA must exceed translational control. Many TTA-containing genes are coding for transcriptional regulators which are activating or repressing the transcription of many more genes. Proteomics and transcriptomics are two powerful methods for identifying bldA target genes and it was possible to assign also post-translational regulation to bldA. This review wants to give a short overview on the importance of bldA as a regulator of morphological differentiation and antibiotic production by switching on "silent" gene clusters in Streptomyces.

  8. Modern plant metabolomics: Advanced natural product gene discoveries, improved technologies, and future prospects

    DOE PAGES

    Sumner, Lloyd W.; Lei, Zhentian; Nikolau, Basil J.; ...

    2014-10-24

    Plant metabolomics has matured and modern plant metabolomics has accelerated gene discoveries and the elucidation of a variety of plant natural product biosynthetic pathways. This study highlights specific examples of the discovery and characterization of novel genes and enzymes associated with the biosynthesis of natural products such as flavonoids, glucosinolates, terpenoids, and alkaloids. Additional examples of the integration of metabolomics with genome-based functional characterizations of plant natural products that are important to modern pharmaceutical technology are also reviewed. This article also provides a substantial review of recent technical advances in mass spectrometry imaging, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, integrated LC-MS-SPE-NMR formore » metabolite identifications, and x-ray crystallography of microgram quantities for structural determinations. The review closes with a discussion on the future prospects of metabolomics related to crop species and herbal medicine.« less

  9. Modern plant metabolomics: Advanced natural product gene discoveries, improved technologies, and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, Lloyd W.; Lei, Zhentian; Nikolau, Basil J.; Saito, Kazuki

    2014-10-24

    Plant metabolomics has matured and modern plant metabolomics has accelerated gene discoveries and the elucidation of a variety of plant natural product biosynthetic pathways. This study highlights specific examples of the discovery and characterization of novel genes and enzymes associated with the biosynthesis of natural products such as flavonoids, glucosinolates, terpenoids, and alkaloids. Additional examples of the integration of metabolomics with genome-based functional characterizations of plant natural products that are important to modern pharmaceutical technology are also reviewed. This article also provides a substantial review of recent technical advances in mass spectrometry imaging, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, integrated LC-MS-SPE-NMR for metabolite identifications, and x-ray crystallography of microgram quantities for structural determinations. The review closes with a discussion on the future prospects of metabolomics related to crop species and herbal medicine.

  10. Correlation of gene expression and protein production rate - a system wide study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Growth rate is a major determinant of intracellular function. However its effects can only be properly dissected with technically demanding chemostat cultivations in which it can be controlled. Recent work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae chemostat cultivations provided the first analysis on genome wide effects of growth rate. In this work we study the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) that is an industrial protein production host known for its exceptional protein secretion capability. Interestingly, it exhibits a low growth rate protein production phenotype. Results We have used transcriptomics and proteomics to study the effect of growth rate and cell density on protein production in chemostat cultivations of T. reesei. Use of chemostat allowed control of growth rate and exact estimation of the extracellular specific protein production rate (SPPR). We find that major biosynthetic activities are all negatively correlated with SPPR. We also find that expression of many genes of secreted proteins and secondary metabolism, as well as various lineage specific, mostly unknown genes are positively correlated with SPPR. Finally, we enumerate possible regulators and regulatory mechanisms, arising from the data, for this response. Conclusions Based on these results it appears that in low growth rate protein production energy is very efficiently used primarly for protein production. Also, we propose that flux through early glycolysis or the TCA cycle is a more fundamental determining factor than growth rate for low growth rate protein production and we propose a novel eukaryotic response to this i.e. the lineage specific response (LSR). PMID:22185473

  11. Report of the International Regulatory Forum on Human Cell Therapy and Gene Therapy Products.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Takao; Harris, Ian; Joung, Jeewon; Kanai, Nobuo; Kawamata, Shin; Kellathur, Srinivasan; Koga, Junichi; Lin, Yi-Chu; Maruyama, Yoshiaki; McBlane, James; Nishimura, Takuya; Renner, Matthias; Ridgway, Anthony; Salmikangas, Paula; Sakamoto, Norihisa; Sato, Daisaku; Sato, Yoji; Toda, Yuzo; Umezawa, Akihiro; Werner, Michael; Wicks, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    The development of human cell therapy and gene therapy products has progressed internationally. Efforts have been made to address regulatory challenges in the evaluation of quality, efficacy, and safety of the products. In this forum, updates on the specific challenges in quality, efficacy, and safety of products in the view of international development were shared through the exchange of information and opinions among experts from regulatory authorities, academic institutions, and industry practitioners. Sessions identified specific/critical points to consider for the evaluation of human cell therapy and gene therapy products that are different from conventional biological products; common approaches and practices among regulatory regions were also shared. Certain elements of current international guidelines might not be appropriate to be applied to these products. Further, international discussion on the concept of potency and in vivo tumorigenicity studies, among others, is needed. This forum concluded that the continued collective actions are expected to promote international convergence of regulatory approaches of the products. The Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency and Japanese Society for Regenerative Medicine jointly convened the forum with support from the National Institutes of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition. Participants at the forum include 300 experts in and outside of Japan. Copyright © 2016.

  12. A unique enhancer element for the trans activator (p40 sup tax ) of human T-cell leukemia virus type I that is distinct from cyclic AMP- and 12-O-tetradecanoylphobol-13-acetate-responsive elements

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, Junichi; Toita, Masami; Yoshida, Mitsuaki )

    1989-08-01

    The trans activator (p40{sup tax}) of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is a transcriptional factor that activates the long terminal repeat (LTR) of HTLV-I and interleukin-2 receptor {alpha}. The authors examined the HTLV-I enhancer responsible for tax-mediated trans activation and identified (A/T)(G/C)(G/C)CNNTGACG(T/A) as a plausible tax-responsive element (TRE). The putative TRE in the LTR was found to be different from the elements required for activation by cyclic AMP and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, although these elements overlapped each other. The TRE was also different from a binding site of N-{kappa}B-like factor that was identified was identified in the interleukin-2 receptor {alpha} promoter and human immunodeficiency virus LTR as a TRE. The latter result was further demonstrated by the failure of the NF-{kappa}B sequence to compete with the TRE of the LTR in a protein-binding assay. These findings indicate that tax function and its cascade can modulate activities of various enhancer sequences, which are probably regulated by distinct DNA-binding factors.

  13. Production of 2-ketoisocaproate with Corynebacterium glutamicum strains devoid of plasmids and heterologous genes

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Michael; Haas, Sabine; Polen, Tino; van Ooyen, Jan; Bott, Michael

    2015-01-01

    2-Ketoisocaproate (KIC), the last intermediate in l-leucine biosynthesis, has various medical and industrial applications. After deletion of the ilvE gene for transaminase B in l-leucine production strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum, KIC became the major product, however, the strains were auxotrophic for l-isoleucine. To avoid auxotrophy, reduction of IlvE activity by exchanging the ATG start codon of ilvE by GTG was tested instead of an ilvE deletion. The resulting strains were indeed able to grow in glucose minimal medium without amino acid supplementation, but at the cost of lowered growth rates and KIC production parameters. The best production performance was obtained with strain MV-KICF1, which carried besides the ilvE start codon exchange three copies of a gene for a feedback-resistant 2-isopropylmalate synthase, one copy of a gene for a feedback-resistant acetohydroxyacid synthase and deletions of ltbR and iolR encoding transcriptional regulators. In the presence of 1 mM l-isoleucine, MV-KICF1 accumulated 47 mM KIC (6.1 g l−1) with a yield of 0.20 mol/mol glucose and a volumetric productivity of 1.41 mmol KIC l−1 h−1. Since MV-KICF1 is plasmid free and lacks heterologous genes, it is an interesting strain for industrial application and as platform for the production of KIC-derived compounds, such as 3-methyl-1-butanol. PMID:25488800

  14. Production of 2-ketoisocaproate with Corynebacterium glutamicum strains devoid of plasmids and heterologous genes.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Michael; Haas, Sabine; Polen, Tino; van Ooyen, Jan; Bott, Michael

    2015-03-01

    2-Ketoisocaproate (KIC), the last intermediate in l-leucine biosynthesis, has various medical and industrial applications. After deletion of the ilvE gene for transaminase B in l-leucine production strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum, KIC became the major product, however, the strains were auxotrophic for l-isoleucine. To avoid auxotrophy, reduction of IlvE activity by exchanging the ATG start codon of ilvE by GTG was tested instead of an ilvE deletion. The resulting strains were indeed able to grow in glucose minimal medium without amino acid supplementation, but at the cost of lowered growth rates and KIC production parameters. The best production performance was obtained with strain MV-KICF1, which carried besides the ilvE start codon exchange three copies of a gene for a feedback-resistant 2-isopropylmalate synthase, one copy of a gene for a feedback-resistant acetohydroxyacid synthase and deletions of ltbR and iolR encoding transcriptional regulators. In the presence of 1 mM l-isoleucine, MV-KICF1 accumulated 47 mM KIC (6.1 g l(-1)) with a yield of 0.20 mol/mol glucose and a volumetric productivity of 1.41 mmol KIC l(-1)  h(-1). Since MV-KICF1 is plasmid free and lacks heterologous genes, it is an interesting strain for industrial application and as platform for the production of KIC-derived compounds, such as 3-methyl-1-butanol. © 2014 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. 1,3-Propanediol production by new recombinant Escherichia coli containing genes from pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Przystałowska, Hanna; Zeyland, Joanna; Szymanowska-Powałowska, Daria; Szalata, Marlena; Słomski, Ryszard; Lipiński, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    1,3-Propanediol (1,3-PDO) is an organic compound, which is a valuable intermediate product, widely used as a monomer for synthesizing biodegradable polymers, increasing their strength; as well as an ingredient of textile, cosmetic and medical products. 1,3-PDO is mostly synthesized chemically. Global companies have developed technologies for 1,3-PDO synthesis from petroleum products such as acrolein and ethylene oxide. A potentially viable alternative is offered by biotechnological processes using microorganisms capable of synthesizing 1,3-PDO from renewable substrates (waste glycerol, a by-product of biofuel production, or glucose). In the present study, genes from Citrobacter freundii and Klebsiella pneumoniae were introduced into Escherichia coli bacteria to enable the synthesis of 1,3-PDO from waste glycerol. These strains belong to the best 1,3-PDO producers, but they are pathogenic, which restricts their application in industrial processes. The present study involved the construction of two gene expression constructs, containing a total of six heterologous glycerol catabolism pathway genes from C. freundii ATCC 8090 and K. pneumoniae ATCC 700721. Heterologous genes encoding glycerol dehydratase (dhaBCE) and the glycerol dehydratase reactivation factor (dhaF, dhaG) from C. freundii and gene encoding 1,3-PDO oxidoreductase (dhaT) from K. pneumoniae were expressed in E. coli under the control of the T7lac promoter. An RT-PCR analysis and overexpression confirmed that 1,3-PDO synthesis pathway genes were expressed on the RNA and protein levels. In batch fermentation, recombinant E. coli bacteria used 32.6gl(-1) of glycerol to produce 10.6 gl(-1) of 1,3-PDO, attaining the efficiency of 0.4 (mol₁,₃-PDO molglycerol(-1)). The recombinant E. coli created is capable of metabolizing glycerol to produce 1,3-PDO, and the efficiency achieved provides a significant research potential of the bacterium. In the face of shortage of fossil fuel supplies and climate warming

  16. Decarboxylase gene expression and cadaverine and putrescine production by Serratia proteamaculans in vitro and in beef.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Francesca; Pennacchia, Carmela; Di Pasqua, Rosangela; Fiore, Alberto; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Villani, Francesco; Ercolini, Danilo

    2013-08-01

    Studies of the molecular basis of microbial metabolic activities that are important for the changes in food quality are valuable in order to help in understanding the behavior of spoiling bacteria in food. The growth of a psychrotrophic Serratia proteamaculans strain was monitored in vitro and in artificially inoculated raw beef. Two growth temperatures (25°C and 4°C) were tested in vitro, while growth at 15°C and 4°C was monitored in beef. During growth, the expression of inducible lysine and ornithine-decarboxylase genes was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), while the presence of cadaverine and putrescine was quantified by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The expression of the decarboxylase genes, and the consequent production of cadaverine and putrescine were shown to be influenced by the temperature, as well as by the complexity of the growth medium. Generally, the maximum gene expression and amine production took place during the exponential and early stationary phase, respectively. In addition, lower temperatures caused slower growth and gene downregulation. Higher amounts of cadaverine compared to putrescine were found during growth in beef with the highest concentrations corresponding to microbial loads of ca. 9CFU/g. The differences found in gene expression evaluated in vitro and in beef suggested that such activities are more reliably investigated in situ in specific food matrices.

  17. IgM antigen receptor complex contains phosphoprotein products of B29 and mb-1 genes.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, K S; Hager, E J; Friedrich, R J; Cambier, J C

    1991-01-01

    Membrane immunoglobulin M (mIgM) and mIgD are major B-lymphocyte antigen receptors, which function by internalizing antigens for processing and presentation to T cells and by transducing essential signals for proliferation and differentiation. Although ligation of mIgM or mIgD results in rapid activation of a phospholipase C and a tyrosine kinase(s), these receptors have cytoplasmic tails of only three amino acid residues (Lys-Val-Lys), which seem ill suited for direct physical coupling with cytoplasmic signal transduction structures. In this report, we identify the alpha, beta, and gamma components of the mIgM-associated phosphoprotein complex, which may play a role in signal transduction. Proteolytic peptide mapping demonstrated that the IgM-alpha chain differs from Ig-beta and Ig-gamma. The chains were purified, and amino-terminal sequencing revealed identity with two previously cloned B-cell-specific genes. One component, IgM-alpha, is a product of the mb-1 gene, and the two additional components, Ig-beta and Ig-gamma, are products of the B29 gene. Immunoblotting analysis using rabbit antibodies prepared against predicted peptide sequences of each gene product confirmed the identification of these mIgM-associated proteins. The deduced sequence indicates that these receptor subunits lack inherent protein kinase domains but include common tyrosine-containing sequence motifs, which are likely sites of induced tyrosine phosphorylation. Images PMID:2023945

  18. Major histocompatibility complex gene product expression on pancreatic beta cells in acutely diabetic BB rats.

    PubMed Central

    Issa-Chergui, B.; Yale, J. F.; Vigeant, C.; Seemayer, T. A.

    1988-01-01

    Type I diabetes mellitus was induced in young, diabetes-prone BB rats by the passive transfer of concanavalin A-activated T lymphocytes from the spleens of acutely diabetic BB rats. The pancreas of the recipients was examined 1-2 days after the onset of glycosuria by immunocytochemistry by means of monoclonal antibodies for determining whether 1) Class I and/or II major histocompatibility gene complex (MHC) products were expressed on beta cells and 2) the mononuclear cell infiltrates were represented by T cells. Marked expression of Class I MHC gene products was evident on beta cells. In contrast, Class II MHC gene products were not identified on normal-appearing beta cells. Dendritic cells dispersed throughout the acinar and interstitial pancreas were markedly increased in number. The mononuclear cell infiltrate contained few cells (1-15%) recognized by a pan-T cell marker. Although it is possible that this passive transfer model might differ considerably from the spontaneously occurring diabetic state in the rat, this study suggests that 1) Class I, rather than Class II, MHC gene expression may be pivotal to beta-cell injury in diabetic rats, and 2) non-T cells may constitute an effector cell population central to beta-cell necrosis in Type I diabetes mellitus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3276208

  19. Knockdown of Broad-Complex Gene Expression of Bombyx mori by Oligopyrrole Carboxamides Enhances Silk Production.

    PubMed

    Ali, Asfa; Bovilla, Venugopal Reddy; Mysarla, Danti Kumari; Siripurapu, Prasanthi; Pathak, Rashmi U; Basu, Bhakti; Mamillapalli, Anitha; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2017-04-11

    Bombyx mori (B. mori) is important due to its major role in the silk production. Though DNA binding ligands often influence gene expression, no attempt has been made to exploit their use in sericulture. The telomeric heterochromatin of B. mori is enriched with 5'-TTAGG-3' sequences. These sequences were also found to be present in several genes in the euchromatic regions. We examined three synthetic oligopyrrole carboxamides that target 5'-TTAGG-3' sequences in controlling the gene expression in B. mori. The ligands did not show any defect or feeding difference in the larval stage, crucial for silk production. The ligands caused silencing of various isoforms of the broad-complex transcription factor and cuticle proteins which resulted in late pupal developmental defects. Furthermore, treatment with such drugs resulted in statistically enhanced cocoon weight, shell weight, and silk yield. This study shows for the first time use of oligopyrrole carboxamide drugs in controlling gene expression in B. mori and their long term use in enhancing silk production.

  20. Scarless and sequential gene modification in Pseudomonas using PCR product flanked by short homology regions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The lambda Red recombination system has been used to inactivate chromosomal genes in various bacteria and fungi. The procedure consists of electroporating a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment containing antibiotic cassette flanked by homology regions to the target locus into a strain that can express the lambda Red proteins (Gam, Bet, Exo). Results Here a scarless gene modification strategy based on the Red recombination system has been developed to modify Pseudomonas genome DNA via sequential deletion of multiple targets. This process was mediated by plasmid pRKaraRed encoding the Red proteins regulated by PBAD promoter, which was functional in P. aeruginosa as well as in other bacteria. First the target gene was substituted for the sacB-bla cassette flanked by short homology regions (50 bp), and then this marker gene cassette could be replaced by the PCR fragment flanking itself, generating target-deleted genome without any remnants and no change happened to the surrounding region. Twenty genes involved in the synthesis and regulation pathways of the phenazine derivate, pyocyanin, were modified, including one single-point mutation and deletion of two large operons. The recombination efficiencies ranged from 88% to 98%. Multiple-gene modification was also achieved, generating a triple-gene deletion strain PCA (PAO1, ΔphzHΔphzMΔphzS), which could produce another phenazine derivate, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), efficiently and exclusively. Conclusions This lambda Red-based technique can be used to generate scarless and sequential gene modification mutants of P. aeruginosa efficiently, using one-step PCR product flanked by short homology regions. Single-point mutation, scarless deletion of genes can be achieved easily in less than three days. This method may give a new way to construct genetically modified P. aeruginosa strains more efficiently and advance the regulatory network study of this organism. PMID:20682065

  1. Correlation of methane production and functional gene transcriptional activity in a peat soil.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Thomas E; Prosser, James I

    2009-11-01

    The transcription dynamics of subunit A of the key gene in methanogenesis (methyl coenzyme M reductase; mcrA) was studied to evaluate the relationship between process rate (methanogenesis) and gene transcription dynamics in a peat soil ecosystem. Soil methanogen process rates were determined during incubation of peat slurries at temperatures from 4 to 37 degrees C, and real-time quantitative PCR was applied to quantify the abundances of mcrA genes and transcripts; corresponding transcriptional dynamics were calculated from mcrA transcript/gene ratios. Internal standards suggested unbiased recovery of mRNA abundances in comparison to DNA levels. In comparison to those in pure-culture studies, mcrA transcript/gene ratios indicated underestimation by 1 order of magnitude, possibly due to high proportions of inactive or dead methanogens. Methane production rates were temperature dependent, with maxima at 25 degrees C, but changes in abundance and transcription of the mcrA gene showed no correlation with temperature. However, mcrA transcript/gene ratios correlated weakly (regression coefficient = 0.76) with rates of methanogenesis. Methanogen process rates increased over 3 orders of magnitude, while the corresponding maximum transcript/gene ratio increase was only 18-fold. mcrA transcript dynamics suggested steady-state expression in peat soil after incubation for 24 and 48 h, similar to that in stationary-phase cultures. mcrA transcript/gene ratios are therefore potential in situ indicators of methanogen process rate changes in complex soil systems.

  2. New Insights about Antibiotic Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A Gene Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gionco, Bárbara; Tavares, Eliandro R.; de Oliveira, Admilton G.; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F.; do Carmo, Anderson O.; Pereira, Ulisses de Pádua; Chideroli, Roberta T.; Simionato, Ane S.; Navarro, Miguel O. P.; Chryssafidis, Andreas L.; Andrade, Galdino

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial resistance for antibiotics is one of the most important problems in public health and only a small number of new products are in development. Antagonistic microorganisms from soil are a promising source of new candidate molecules. Products of secondary metabolism confer adaptive advantages for their producer, in the competition for nutrients in the microbial community. The biosynthesis process of compounds with antibiotic activity is the key to optimize their production and the transcriptomic study of microorganisms is of great benefit for the discovery of these metabolic pathways. Pseudomonas aeruginosa LV strain growing in the presence of copper chloride produces a bioactive organometallic compound, which has a potent antimicrobial activity against various microorganisms. The objective of this study was to verify overexpressed genes and evaluate their relation to the organometallic biosynthesis in this microorganism. P. aeruginosa LV strain was cultured in presence and absence of copper chloride. Two methods were used for transcriptomic analysis, genome reference-guided assembly and de novo assembly. The genome referenced analysis identified nine upregulated genes when bacteria were exposed to copper chloride, while the De Novo Assembly identified 12 upregulated genes. Nineteen genes can be related to an increased microbial metabolism for the extrusion process of exceeding intracellular copper. Two important genes are related to the biosynthesis of phenazine and tetrapyrroles compounds, which can be involved in the bioremediation of intracellular copper and we suggesting that may involve in the biosynthesis of the organometallic compound. Additional studies are being carried out to further prove the function of the described genes and relate them to the biosynthetic pathway of the organometallic compound. PMID:28966922

  3. Identification of the phoM gene product and its regulation in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Ludtke, D; Bernstein, J; Hamilton, C; Torriani, A

    1984-01-01

    Plasmids containing the chromosome region of Escherichia coli encoding phoM, whose product is a positive regulator of alkaline phosphatase expression, were isolated from the Clarke and Carbon plasmid bank. A 9.9-kilobase EcoRI fragment of plasmid pLC17-39 (subcloned into pBR322) was able to complement both phoM and thrB mutations. Restriction endonuclease analysis and in vitro mutagenesis of the hybird plasmids enabled the localization of the phoM gene locus to 3 kilobases of the cloned chromosomal fragment. The phoM gene product was identified, with maxicell techniques, as a protein with an approximate molecular weight of 55,000. A phoM-lacZ protein fusion was constructed by using a plasmid carrying the phoM gene and a derivative of phage lambda, lambda plac Mu2. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the plasmid carrying the fusion indicated that phoM is transcribed in a clockwise direction on the circular E. coli chromosome. Analysis of strains bearing the fusion on a multiple-copy plasmid or integrated at the lambda attachment site of the chromosome indicated that the synthesis of the phoM gene product was unaffected by phosphate limitation of growth. The expression of the phoM gene was studied in strains with mutations in genes encoding effectors of the pho regulon. A threefold increase in phoM expression was seen in a phoU strain in comparison with the wild-type strain. Images PMID:6330029

  4. Comprehensive curation and analysis of fungal biosynthetic gene clusters of published natural products.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong Fuga; Tsai, Kathleen J S; Harvey, Colin J B; Li, James Jian; Ary, Beatrice E; Berlew, Erin E; Boehman, Brenna L; Findley, David M; Friant, Alexandra G; Gardner, Christopher A; Gould, Michael P; Ha, Jae H; Lilley, Brenna K; McKinstry, Emily L; Nawal, Saadia; Parry, Robert C; Rothchild, Kristina W; Silbert, Samantha D; Tentilucci, Michael D; Thurston, Alana M; Wai, Rebecca B; Yoon, Yongjin; Aiyar, Raeka S; Medema, Marnix H; Hillenmeyer, Maureen E; Charkoudian, Louise K

    2016-04-01

    Microorganisms produce a wide range of natural products (NPs) with clinically and agriculturally relevant biological activities. In bacteria and fungi, genes encoding successive steps in a biosynthetic pathway tend to be clustered on the chromosome as biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). Historically, "activity-guided" approaches to NP discovery have focused on bioactivity screening of NPs produced by culturable microbes. In contrast, recent "genome mining" approaches first identify candidate BGCs, express these biosynthetic genes using synthetic biology methods, and finally test for the production of NPs. Fungal genome mining efforts and the exploration of novel sequence and NP space are limited, however, by the lack of a comprehensive catalog of BGCs encoding experimentally-validated products. In this study, we generated a comprehensive reference set of fungal NPs whose biosynthetic gene clusters are described in the published literature. To generate this dataset, we first identified NCBI records that included both a peer-reviewed article and an associated nucleotide record. We filtered these records by text and homology criteria to identify putative NP-related articles and BGCs. Next, we manually curated the resulting articles, chemical structures, and protein sequences. The resulting catalog contains 197 unique NP compounds covering several major classes of fungal NPs, including polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, terpenoids, and alkaloids. The distribution of articles published per compound shows a bias toward the study of certain popular compounds, such as the aflatoxins. Phylogenetic analysis of biosynthetic genes suggests that much chemical and enzymatic diversity remains to be discovered in fungi. Our catalog was incorporated into the recently launched Minimum Information about Biosynthetic Gene cluster (MIBiG) repository to create the largest known set of fungal BGCs and associated NPs, a resource that we anticipate will guide future genome mining and

  5. [Association of both peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, gene-gene interactions and the lipid accumulation product].

    PubMed

    Hai, Bo; Xie, Hui-jian; Guo, Zhi-rong; Wu, Ming; Chen, Qiu; Zhou, Zheng-yuan; Yu, Hao; Ding, Yi

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the association of ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα, δ, γ) with lipid accumulation product (LAP) and the additional role of a gene-gene interactions among the 10 SNPs. Participants were recruited under the framework of the PMMJS (Prevention of Multiple Metabolic Disorders and Metabolic Syndrome in Jiangsu province) cohort populations survey in the urban community of Jiangsu province of China. A total of 820 subjects were randomly selected and no individual was related. Ten SNPs (rs135539, rs4253778, rs1800206, rs2016520, rs9794, rs10865710, rs1805192, rs709158, rs3856806 and rs4684847) were selected from the HapMap database, which covered PPARα, PPARδ and PPARγ. A linear regression model was used to analyze the relations between ten SNPs in the PPARs and LAP. Mean difference (Difference) and 95% confident interval (95%CI)were calculated. Interactions were explored by using the method of Generalized Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (GMDR). After adjusting the factors as age, gender, smoking status, occupational physical activity, educational level, high-fat diet as well as low-fiber diet, both rs1800206, s1805192 and rs3856806 were significantly associated with the increased level of LAP. Difference (95% CI) values were 32.47 (22.62-42.31), 12.97 (4.61-21.33) and 12.49 (4.24-20.75). Whereas rs2016520 was significantly associated with the decreased level of LAP. Difference (95%CI) values was -14.67 ( -22.97--6.55). GMDR analysis showed a significant gene-gene interaction among rs135539, rs1800206 of PPARα, rs2016520 of PPARδ and rs10865710, rs3856806, rs709158, rs1805192, rs4684847 of PPARγ for eight-dimension models (P < 0.05), in which prediction accuracy was 0.5902 and cross-validation consistency was 10/10. The rs1800206 of PPARα and rs1805192, rs3856806 of PPARγ were significantly associated with the increased level of LAP; rs2016520 of PPARδ was associated with

  6. Association of methionine synthase gene polymorphisms with wool production and quality traits in Chinese Merino population.

    PubMed

    Rong, E G; Yang, H; Zhang, Z W; Wang, Z P; Yan, X H; Li, H; Wang, N

    2015-10-01

    Methionine synthase (MTR) plays a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis of intracellular methionine, folate, and homocysteine, and its activity correlates with DNA methylation in many mammalian tissues. Our previous genomewide association study identified that 1 SNP located in the gene was associated with several wool production and quality traits in Chinese Merino. To confirm the potential involvement of the gene in sheep wool production and quality traits, we performed sheep tissue expression profiling, SNP detection, and association analysis with sheep wool production and quality traits. The semiquantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis showed that the gene was differentially expressed in skin from Merino and Kazak sheep. The sequencing analysis identified a total of 13 SNP in the gene from Chinese Merino sheep. Comparison of the allele frequencies revealed that these 13 identified SNP were significantly different among the 6 tested Chinese Merino strains ( < 0.001). Linkage disequilibrium analysis showed that SNP 3 to 11 were strongly linked in a single haplotype block in the tested population. Association analysis showed that SNP 2 to 11 were significantly associated with the average wool fiber diameter and the fineness SD and that SNP 4 to 11 were significantly associated with the CV of fiber diameter trait ( < 0.05). Single nucleotide polymorphism 2 and SNP 5 to 12 were weakly associated with wool crimp. Similarly, the haplotypes derived from these 13 identified SNP were also significantly associated with the average wool fiber diameter, fineness SD, and the CV of fiber diameter ( < 0.05). Our results suggest that is a candidate gene for sheep wool production and quality traits, and the identified SNP might be used in sheep breeding.

  7. Iterative carotenogenic screens identify combinations of yeast gene deletions that enhance sclareol production.

    PubMed

    Trikka, Fotini A; Nikolaidis, Alexandros; Athanasakoglou, Anastasia; Andreadelli, Aggeliki; Ignea, Codruta; Kotta, Konstantia; Argiriou, Anagnostis; Kampranis, Sotirios C; Makris, Antonios M

    2015-04-24

    Terpenoids (isoprenoids) have numerous applications in flavors, fragrances, drugs and biofuels. The number of microbially produced terpenoids is increasing as new biosynthetic pathways are being elucidated. However, efforts to improve terpenoid production in yeast have mostly taken advantage of existing knowledge of the sterol biosynthetic pathway, while many additional factors may affect the output of the engineered system. Aiming to develop a yeast strain that can support high titers of sclareol, a diterpene of great importance for the perfume industry, we sought to identify gene deletions that improved carotenoid, and thus potentially sclareol, production. Using a carotenogenic screen, the best 100 deletion mutants, out of 4,700 mutant strains, were selected to create a subset for further analysis. To identify combinations of deletions that cooperate to further boost production, iterative carotenogenic screens were applied, and each time the top performing gene deletions were further ranked according to the number of genetic and physical interactions known for each specific gene. The gene selected in each round was deleted and the resulting strain was employed in a new round of selection. This approach led to the development of an EG60 derived haploid strain combining six deletions (rox1, dos2, yer134c, vba5, ynr063w and ygr259c) and exhibiting a 40-fold increase in carotenoid and 12-fold increase in sclareol titers, reaching 750 mg/L sclareol in shake flask cultivation. Using an iterative approach, we identified novel combinations of yeast gene deletions that improve carotenoid and sclareol production titers without compromising strain growth and viability. Most of the identified deletions have not previously been implicated in sterol pathway control. Applying the same approach using a different starting point could yield alternative sets of deletions with similar or improved outcome.

  8. Agroinfiltration as an Effective and Scalable Strategy of Gene Delivery for Production of Pharmaceutical Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Lai, Huafang; Hurtado, Jonathan; Stahnke, Jake; Leuzinger, Kahlin; Dent, Matthew

    2013-06-01

    Current human biologics are most commonly produced by mammalian cell culture-based fermentation technologies. However, its limited scalability and high cost prevent this platform from meeting the ever increasing global demand. Plants offer a novel alternative system for the production of pharmaceutical proteins that is more scalable, cost-effective, and safer than current expression paradigms. The recent development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed rapid and high-level transient expression of recombinant proteins, and in turn, provided a preferred plant based production platform. One of the remaining challenges for the commercial application of this platform was the lack of a scalable technology to deliver the transgene into plant cells. Therefore, this review focuses on the development of an effective and scalable technology for gene delivery in plants. Direct and indirect gene delivery strategies for plant cells are first presented, and the two major gene delivery technologies based on agroinfiltration are subsequently discussed. Furthermore, the advantages of syringe and vacuum infiltration as gene delivery methodologies are extensively discussed, in context of their applications and scalability for commercial production of human pharmaceutical proteins in plants. The important steps and critical parameters for the successful implementation of these strategies are also detailed in the review. Overall, agroinfiltration based on syringe and vacuum infiltration provides an efficient, robust and scalable gene-delivery technology for the transient expression of recombinant proteins in plants. The development of this technology will greatly facilitate the realization of plant transient expression systems as a premier platform for commercial production of pharmaceutical proteins.

  9. [Adeno-associated viral vectors: methods for production and purification for gene therapy applications].

    PubMed

    Mena-Enriquez, Mayra; Flores-Contreras, Lucia; Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Viral vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) are widely used in gene therapy protocols, because they have characteristics that make them valuable for the treatment of genetic and chronic degenerative diseases. AAV2 serotype had been the best characterized to date. However, the AAV vectors developed from other serotypes is of special interest, since they have organ-specific tropism which increases their potential for transgene delivery to target cells for performing their therapeutic effects. This article summarizes AAV generalities, methods for their production and purification. It also discusses the use of these vectors in vitro, in vivo and their application in gene therapy clinical trials.

  10. Glutamic acid promotes monacolin K production and monacolin K biosynthetic gene cluster expression in Monascus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chan; Liang, Jian; Yang, Le; Chai, Shiyuan; Zhang, Chenxi; Sun, Baoguo; Wang, Chengtao

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of glutamic acid on production of monacolin K and expression of the monacolin K biosynthetic gene cluster. When Monascus M1 was grown in glutamic medium instead of in the original medium, monacolin K production increased from 48.4 to 215.4 mg l(-1), monacolin K production increased by 3.5 times. Glutamic acid enhanced monacolin K production by upregulating the expression of mokB-mokI; on day 8, the expression level of mokA tended to decrease by Reverse Transcription-polymerase Chain Reaction. Our findings demonstrated that mokA was not a key gene responsible for the quantity of monacolin K production in the presence of glutamic acid. Observation of Monascus mycelium morphology using Scanning Electron Microscope showed glutamic acid significantly increased the content of Monascus mycelium, altered the permeability of Monascus mycelium, enhanced secretion of monacolin K from the cell, and reduced the monacolin K content in Monascus mycelium, thereby enhancing monacolin K production.

  11. The Unfolded Protein Response and the Phosphorylations of Activating Transcription Factor 2 in the trans-Activation of il23a Promoter Produced by β-Glucans*

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Mario; Domingo, Esther; Alonso, Sara; Frade, Javier García; Eiros, José; Crespo, Mariano Sánchez; Fernández, Nieves

    2014-01-01

    Current views on the control of IL-23 production focus on the regulation of il23a, the gene encoding IL-23 p19, by NF-κB in combination with other transcription factors. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), X2-Box-binding protein 1 (XBP1), activator protein 1 (AP1), SMAD, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPβ), and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) have been involved in response to LPS, but no data are available regarding the mechanism triggered by the fungal mimic and β-glucan-containing stimulus zymosan, which produces IL-23 and to a low extent the related cytokine IL-12 p70. Zymosan induced the mobilization of CHOP from the nuclear fractions to phagocytic vesicles. Hypha-forming Candida also induced the nuclear disappearance of CHOP. Assay of transcription factor binding to the il23a promoter showed an increase of Thr(P)-71–Thr(P)-69-activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) binding in response to zymosan. PKC and PKA/mitogen- and stress-activated kinase inhibitors down-regulated Thr(P)-71–ATF2 binding to the il23a promoter and il23a mRNA expression. Consistent with the current concept of complementary phosphorylations on N-terminal Thr-71 and Thr-69 of ATF2 by ERK and p38 MAPK, MEK, and p38 MAPK inhibitors blunted Thr(P)-69–ATF2 binding. Knockdown of atf2 mRNA with siRNA correlated with inhibition of il23a mRNA, but it did not affect the expression of il12/23b and il10 mRNA. These data indicate the following: (i) zymosan decreases nuclear proapoptotic CHOP, most likely by promoting its accumulation in phagocytic vesicles; (ii) zymosan-induced il23a mRNA expression is best explained through coordinated κB- and ATF2-dependent transcription; and (iii) il23a expression relies on complementary phosphorylation of ATF2 on Thr-69 and Thr-71 dependent on PKC and MAPK activities. PMID:24982422

  12. Regulation of gene expression by tobacco product preparations in cultured human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Malpass, Gloria E; Arimilli, Subhashini; Prasad, G L; Howlett, Allyn C

    2014-09-01

    Skin fibroblasts comprise the first barrier of defense against wounds, and tobacco products directly contact the oral cavity. Cultured human dermal fibroblasts were exposed to smokeless tobacco extract (STE), total particulate matter (TPM) from tobacco smoke, or nicotine at concentrations comparable to those found in these extracts for 1h or 5h. Differences were identified in pathway-specific genes between treatments and vehicle using qRT-PCR. At 1h, IL1α was suppressed significantly by TPM and less significantly by STE. Neither FOS nor JUN was suppressed at 1h by tobacco products. IL8, TNFα, VCAM1, and NFκB1 were suppressed after 5h with STE, whereas only TNFα and NFκB1 were suppressed by TPM. At 1h with TPM, secreted levels of IL10 and TNFα were increased. Potentially confounding effects of nicotine were exemplified by genes such as ATF3 (5h), which was increased by nicotine but suppressed by other components of STE. Within 2h, TPM stimulated nitric oxide production, and both STE and TPM increased reactive oxygen species. The biological significance of these findings and utilization of the gene expression changes reported herein regarding effects of the tobacco product preparations on dermal fibroblasts will require additional research.

  13. Regulation of gene expression by tobacco product preparations in cultured human dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Malpass, Gloria E.; Arimilli, Subhashini; Prasad, G. L.; Howlett, Allyn C.

    2015-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts comprise the first barrier of defense against wounds, and tobacco products directly contact the oral cavity. Cultured human dermal fibroblasts were exposed to smokeless tobacco extract (STE), total particulate matter (TPM) from tobacco smoke, or nicotine at concentrations comparable to those found in these extracts for 1 h or 5 h. Differences were identified in pathway-specific genes between treatments and vehicle using qRT-PCR. At 1 h, IL1α was suppressed significantly by TPM and less significantly by STE. Neither FOS nor JUN was suppressed at 1 h by tobacco products. IL8, TNFα, VCAM1, and NFκB1 were suppressed after 5 h with STE, whereas only TNFα and NFκB1 were suppressed by TPM. At 1 h with TPM, secreted levels of IL10 and TNFα were increased. Potentially confounding effects of nicotine were exemplified by genes such as ATF3 (5 h), which was increased by nicotine but suppressed by other components of STE. Within 2 h, TPM stimulated nitric oxide production, and both STE and TPM increased reactive oxygen species. The biological significance of these findings and utilization of the gene expression changes reported herein regarding effects of the tobacco product preparations on dermal fibroblasts will require additional research. PMID:24927667

  14. Improving Pertuzumab production by gene optimization and proper signal peptide selection.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Amin; Mahmoudi Maymand, Elham; Yazdanpanah-Samani, Mahsa; Hosseini, Ahmad; Toghraie, Fatemeh Sadat; Ghaderi, Abbas

    2017-07-01

    Using proper signal peptide and codon optimization are important factors that must be considered when designing the vector to increase protein expression in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. The aim of the present study is to investigate how to enhance Pertuzumab production through heavy and light chain coding gene optimization and proper signal peptide selection. First, CHO-K1 cells were transiently transfected with whole-antibody-gene-optimized, variable-regions-optimized and non-optimized constructs and then we employed five different signal peptides to improve the secretion efficiency of Pertuzumab. Compared to the native antibody gene, a 3.8 fold increase in Pertuzumab production rate was achieved with the whole heavy and light chain sequence optimization. Although an overall two fold increase in monoclonal antibody production was achieved by human albumin signal peptide compared to the control signal peptide, this overproduction was not statistically significant. Selected signal peptides had no effect on the binding of Pertuzumab to the ErbB2 antigen. The combined data indicate that human albumin signal peptide along with whole antibody sequence optimization can be used to improve Pertuzumab production rates. This sequence was used to produce Pertuzumab producing CHO-K1 stably transfected cells. This result is useful for producing Pertuzumab as a biosimilar drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sequencing rare marine actinomycete genomes reveals high density of unique natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Schorn, Michelle A; Alanjary, Mohammad M; Aguinaldo, Kristen; Korobeynikov, Anton; Podell, Sheila; Patin, Nastassia; Lincecum, Tommie; Jensen, Paul R; Ziemert, Nadine; Moore, Bradley S

    2016-12-01

    Traditional natural product discovery methods have nearly exhausted the accessible diversity of microbial chemicals, making new sources and techniques paramount in the search for new molecules. Marine actinomycete bacteria have recently come into the spotlight as fruitful producers of structurally diverse secondary metabolites, and remain relatively untapped. In this study, we sequenced 21 marine-derived actinomycete strains, rarely studied for their secondary metabolite potential and under-represented in current genomic databases. We found that genome size and phylogeny were good predictors of biosynthetic gene cluster diversity, with larger genomes rivalling the well-known marine producers in the Streptomyces and Salinispora genera. Genomes in the Micrococcineae suborder, however, had consistently the lowest number of biosynthetic gene clusters. By networking individual gene clusters into gene cluster families, we were able to computationally estimate the degree of novelty each genus contributed to the current sequence databases. Based on the similarity measures between all actinobacteria in the Joint Genome Institute's Atlas of Biosynthetic gene Clusters database, rare marine genera show a high degree of novelty and diversity, with Corynebacterium, Gordonia, Nocardiopsis, Saccharomonospora and Pseudonocardia genera representing the highest gene cluster diversity. This research validates that rare marine actinomycetes are important candidates for exploration, as they are relatively unstudied, and their relatives are historically rich in secondary metabolites.

  16. The FHIT gene product: tumor suppressor and genome ‘caretaker’

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Catherine E.; Saldivar, Joshua C.; Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Huebner, Kay

    2014-01-01

    The FHIT gene at FRA3B is one of the earliest and most frequently altered genes in the majority of human cancers. It was recently discovered that the FHIT gene is not the most fragile locus in epithelial cells, the cell of origin for most Fhit negative cancers, eroding support for past claims that deletions at this locus are simply passenger events that are carried along in expanding cancer clones, due to extreme vulnerability to DNA damage rather than to loss of FHIT function. Indeed, recent reports have reconfirmed FHIT as a tumor suppressor gene with roles in apoptosis and prevention of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Other recent works have identified a novel role for the FHIT gene product, Fhit, as a genome ‘caretaker.’ Loss of this caretaker function leads to nucleotide imbalance, spontaneous replication stress, and DNA breaks. Because Fhit loss-induced DNA damage is “checkpoint blind,” cells accumulate further DNA damage during subsequent cell cycles, accruing global genome instability that could facilitate oncogenic mutation acquisition and expedite clonal expansion. Loss of Fhit activity therefore induces a mutator phenotype. Evidence for FHIT as a mutator gene is discussed in light of these recent investigations of Fhit loss and subsequent genome instability. PMID:25283145

  17. Leptin and leptin receptor gene polymorphisms are correlated with production performance in the Arctic fox.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Bai, X J

    2015-05-25

    The polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism technique was employed to measure mononucleotide diversity in the coding region of the leptin and leptin receptor genes in the Arctic fox. The relationships between specific genetic mutations and reproductive performance in Arctic foxes were determined to im-prove breeding strategies. We found that a leptin gene polymorphism was significantly associated with body weight (P < 0.01), abdominal circumference (P < 0.01), and fur length (P < 0.01). Furthermore, a polymorphism in the leptin receptor gene was associated with carcass weight and guard hair length (P < 0.01). Leptin and leptin receptor gene combinatorial genotypes were significantly associated with abdominal circumference, fur length (P < 0.01), and body weight (P < 0.05). The leptin gene is thus a key gene affecting body weight, abdominal circumference, and fur length in Arctic foxes, whereas variations in the leptin receptor mainly affect carcass weight and guard hair. The marker loci identified in this study can be used to assist in the selection of Arctic foxes for breeding to raise the production performance of this species.

  18. Stable disruption of ethanol production by deletion of the genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase isozymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ida, Yoshihiro; Furusawa, Chikara; Hirasawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    We analyzed the effects of the deletions of genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isozymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The decrease in ethanol production by ADH1 deletion alone could be partially compensated by the upregulation of other isozyme genes, while the deletion of all known ADH isozyme genes stably disrupted ethanol production. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2015-07-21

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this "dead" cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

  20. Localization of the mei-1 gene product of Caenorhaditis elegans, a meiotic-specific spindle component

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Genetic evidence suggests that the product of the mei-1 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans is specifically required for meiosis in the female germline. Loss-of-function mei-1 mutations block meiotic spindle formation while a gain-of-function allele instead results in spindle defects during the early mitotic cleavages. In this report, we use immunocytochemistry to examine the localization of the mei-1 product in wild-type and mutant embryos. During metaphase of meiosis I in wild- type embryos, mei-1 protein was found throughout the spindle but was more concentrated toward the poles. At telophase I, mei-1 product colocalized with the chromatin at the spindle poles. The pattern was repeated during meiosis II but no mei-1 product was visible during the subsequent mitotic cleavages. The mei-1 gain-of-function allele resulted in ectopic mei-1 staining in the centers of the microtubule- organizing centers during interphase and in the spindles during the early cleavages. This aberrant localization is probably responsible for the poorly formed and misoriented cleavage spindles characteristic of the mutation. We also examined the localization of mei-1(+) product in the presence of mutations of genes that genetically interact with mei-1 alleles. mei-2 is apparently required to localize mei-1 product to the spindle during meiosis while mel-26 acts as a postmeiotic inhibitor. We conclude that mei-1 encodes a novel spindle component, one that is specialized for the acentriolar meiotic spindles unique to female meiosis. The genes mei-2 and mel-26 are part of a regulatory network that confines mei-1 activity to meiosis. PMID:8027178

  1. Production of taxadiene from cultured ginseng roots transformed with taxadiene synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Cha, Mijeong; Shim, Sang Hee; Kim, Sung Hong; Kim, Ok Tae; Lee, Se-Weon; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    Paclitaxel is produced by various species of yew trees and has been extensively used to treat tumors. In our research, a taxadiene synthase (TS) gene from Taxus brevifolia was used to transform the roots of cultured ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) to produce taxadiene, the unique skeletal precursor to taxol. The TS gene was successfully introduced into the ginseng genome, and the de novo formation of taxadiene was identified by mass spectroscopy profiling. Without any change in phenotypes or growth difference in a TS-transgenic ginseng line, the transgenic TSS3-2 line accumulated 9.1 μg taxadiene per gram of dry weight. In response to the treatment of methyl jasmonate for 3 or 6 days, the accumulation was 14.6 and 15.9 μg per g of dry weight, respectively. This is the first report of the production of taxadiene by engineering ginseng roots with a taxadiene synthase gene.

  2. Disruption of ubiquitin-related genes in laboratory yeast strains enhances ethanol production during sake brewing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Watanabe, Tomoko; Araki, Yoshio; Kitagaki, Hiroshi; Akao, Takeshi; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2009-06-01

    Sake yeast can produce high levels of ethanol in concentrated rice mash. While both sake and laboratory yeast strains belong to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the laboratory strains produce much less ethanol. This disparity in fermentation activity may be due to the strains' different responses to environmental stresses, including ethanol accumulation. To obtain more insight into the stress response of yeast cells under sake brewing conditions, we carried out small-scale sake brewing tests using laboratory yeast strains disrupted in specific stress-related genes. Surprisingly, yeast strains with disrupted ubiquitin-related genes produced more ethanol than the parental strain during sake brewing. The elevated fermentation ability conferred by disruption of the ubiquitin-coding gene UBI4 was confined to laboratory strains, and the ubi4 disruptant of a sake yeast strain did not demonstrate a comparable increase in ethanol production. These findings suggest different roles for ubiquitin in sake and laboratory yeast strains.

  3. PepPSy: a web server to prioritize gene products in experimental and biocuration workflows

    PubMed Central

    Sallou, Olivier; Duek, Paula D.; Darde, Thomas A.; Collin, Olivier; Lane, Lydie; Chalmel, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Among the 20 000 human gene products predicted from genome annotation, about 3000 still lack validation at protein level. We developed PepPSy, a user-friendly gene expression-based prioritization system, to help investigators to determine in which human tissues they should look for an unseen protein. PepPSy can also be used by biocurators to revisit the annotation of specific categories of proteins based on the ‘omics’ data housed by the system. In this study, it was used to prioritize 21 dubious protein-coding genes among the 616 annotated in neXtProt for reannotation. PepPSy is freely available at http://peppsy.genouest.org. Database URL: http://peppsy.genouest.org. PMID:27173522

  4. Stable production of mutant mice from double gene converted ES cells with puromycin and neomycin.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, S; Kai, N; Yasuda, M; Kohmura, N; Sanbo, M; Mishina, M; Yagi, T

    1995-08-04

    The antibiotic puromycin is an effective inhibitor of protein synthesis and puromycin N-acetyl transferase gene could be used as a dominant selection marker. We report the effective production of mutant mice from double gene-converted ES cells by selection with G418 and puromycin. We confirmed that (i) puromycin efficiently inhibited the growth of ES cells at a low-dose (0.1 microgram/ml) and for a short time (2 days), independent of G418 selection; (ii) when these selected ES cells were injected into eight-cell stage embryos, the cells produced chimeras with high levels of chimerism; (iii) these chimeric males were fertile and exclusively yielded ES cell-derived offspring; and (iv) each offspring contained both neomycin transferase and puromycin N-acetyl transferase genes.

  5. EMEA and Gene Therapy Medicinal Products Development in the European Union

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    The evaluation of quality, safety, and efficacy of medicinal products by the European Medicines Evaluation Agency (EMEA) via the centralized procedure is the only available regulatory procedure for obtaining marketing authorization for gene therapy (GT) medicinal products in the European Union. The responsibility for the authorization of clinical trials remains with the national competent authorities (NCA) acting in a harmonized framework from the scientific viewpoint. With the entry into force of a new directive on good clinical practice implementation in clinical trials as of 1 May 2004, procedural aspects will also be harmonized at EU level. Scientifically sound development of medicinal products is the key for the successful registration of dossiers and for contributing to the promotion and protection of public health. The objective of this paper is to introduce the EMEA regulatory processes and scientific activities relevant to GT medicinal products. PMID:12686717

  6. The SKP1-like gene family of Arabidopsis exhibits a high degree of differential gene expression and gene product interaction during development.

    PubMed

    Dezfulian, Mohammad H; Soulliere, Danielle M; Dhaliwal, Rajdeep K; Sareen, Madhulika; Crosby, William L

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes several families of polypeptides that are known or predicted to participate in the formation of the SCF-class of E3-ubiquitin ligase complexes. One such gene family encodes the Skp1-like class of polypeptide subunits, where 21 genes have been identified and are known to be expressed in Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis based on deduced polypeptide sequence organizes the family of ASK proteins into 7 clades. The complexity of the ASK gene family, together with the close structural similarity among its members raises the prospect of significant functional redundancy among select paralogs. We have assessed the potential for functional redundancy within the ASK gene family by analyzing an expanded set of criteria that define redundancy with higher resolution. The criteria used include quantitative expression of locus-specific transcripts using qRT-PCR, assessment of the sub-cellular localization of individual ASK:YFP auto-fluorescent fusion proteins expressed in vivo as well as the in planta assessment of individual ASK-F-Box protein interactions using bimolecular fluorescent complementation techniques in combination with confocal imagery in live cells. The results indicate significant functional divergence of steady state transcript abundance and protein-protein interaction specificity involving ASK proteins in a pattern that is poorly predicted by sequence-based phylogeny. The information emerging from this and related studies will prove important for defining the functional intersection of expression, localization and gene product interaction that better predicts the formation of discrete SCF complexes, as a prelude to investigating their molecular mode of action.

  7. Gene expression and flavonolignan production in fruits and cell cultures of Silybum marianum.

    PubMed

    Torres, María; Corchete, Purificación

    2016-03-15

    The hepatoprotectant flavonolignan silymarin (Sm) is synthesized through 4-coumaroyl-CoA, which enters both the flavonoid and the monolignol pathway giving the two immediate precursors taxifolin (Tx) and coniferyl alcohol (CA), respectively. Sm formation occurs via oxidative radicalization of Tx and CA and is accumulated at high levels at final stages of maturation of Silybum marianum fruits. By contrast, Sm production is severely reduced in cell cultures of this species, although suspensions are able to excrete Sm compounds into the medium upon elicitation with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) or cyclodextrins (CD). Knowledge of gene expression is important to understand Sm dynamics and to develop strategies aimed at increasing production by means of cell cultures but, to date, only one gene of the pathway (chalcone synthase, SmCHS) has been cloned. Therefore, to elucidate the relationship between expression of Sm pathway genes and production of these metabolites, four cDNA fragments of genes putatively involved in flavonolignan biosynthesis, chalcone isomerase, flavanone 3-hydroxylase, flavonol 3'-hydroxylase and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, were isolated from Sm producing S. marianum fruits and their expression, together with that of the SmCHS, were studied both in fruits at different maturation stages and in elicited cell suspensions. Combined results at both transcript expression and metabolite levels at three different stages of fruit maturation revealed that the formation of the flavonoid moiety precedes flavonolignan biosynthesis, being Sm accumulation associated to expression of the monolignol pathway. There was not detectable accumulation of transcripts in cell suspensions, however, elicitation with MeJA or CD notably induced expression of the studied fragments. These results indicate that the five genes expressed during maturation of S. marianum fruits may contribute to observed increases in flavonolignan accumulation upon treatment of cell cultures with

  8. Regulation of Aspergillus genes encoding plant cell wall polysaccharide-degrading enzymes; relevance for industrial production.

    PubMed

    de Vries, R P

    2003-03-01

    The genus Aspergillus is widely used for the production of plant cell wall polysaccharide-degrading enzymes. The range of enzymes purified from these fungi covers nearly every function required for the complete degradation of cellulose, xyloglucan, xylan, galacto(gluco)mannan and pectin. This paper describes the Aspergillus enzymes involved in the degradation of these polysaccharides and discusses the regulatory systems involved in the expression of the genes encoding these proteins. The latter is of major importance in the large-scale production of these enzymes for industrial applications.

  9. TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF THE HUMAN KiSS1 GENE

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Johanna K.; Dietzel, Anja; Lomniczi, Alejandro; Loche, Alberto; Tefs, Katrin; Kiess, Wieland; Danne, Thomas; Ojeda, Sergio R.; Heger, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    Kisspeptin, the product of the KiSS1 gene, has emerged as a key component of the mechanism by which the hypothalamus controls puberty and reproductive development. It does so by stimulating the secretion of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). Little is known about the transcriptional control of the KiSS1 gene. Here we show that a set of proteins postulated to be upstream components of a hypothalamic network involved in controlling female puberty regulates KiSS1 transcriptional activity. Using RACE-PCR we determined that transcription of KiSS1 mRNA is initiated at a single transcription start site (TSS) located 153–156 bp upstream of the ATG translation initiation codon. Promoter assays performed using 293 MSR cells showed that the KiSS1 promoter is activated by TTF1 and CUX1-p200, and repressed by EAP1, YY1, and CUX1-p110. EAP1 and CUX-110 were also repressive in GT1-7 cells. All four TFs are recruited in vivo to the KiSS1 promoter and are expressed in kisspeptin neurons. These results suggest that expression of the KiSS1 gene is regulated by trans-activators and repressors involved in the system-wide control of mammalian puberty. PMID:21672609

  10. Gene Disruption Technologies Have the Potential to Transform Stored Product Insect Pest Control.

    PubMed

    Perkin, Lindsey C; Adrianos, Sherry L; Oppert, Brenda

    2016-09-19

    Stored product insects feed on grains and processed commodities manufactured from grain post-harvest, reducing the nutritional value and contaminating food. Currently, the main defense against stored product insect pests is the pesticide fumigant phosphine. Phosphine is highly toxic to all animals, but is the most effective and economical control method, and thus is used extensively worldwide. However, many insect populations have become resistant to phosphine, in some cases to very high levels. New, environmentally benign and more effective control strategies are needed for stored product pests. RNA interference (RNAi) may overcome pesticide resistance by targeting the expression of genes that contribute to resistance in insects. Most data on RNAi in stored product insects is from the coleopteran genetic model, Tribolium castaneum, since it has a strong RNAi response via injection of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) in any life stage. Additionally, Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) technology has been suggested as a potential resource for new pest control strategies. In this review we discuss background information on both gene disruption technologies and summarize the advances made in terms of molecular pest management in stored product insects, mainly T. castaneum, as well as complications and future needs.

  11. Gene Disruption Technologies Have the Potential to Transform Stored Product Insect Pest Control

    PubMed Central

    Perkin, Lindsey C.; Adrianos, Sherry L.; Oppert, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Stored product insects feed on grains and processed commodities manufactured from grain post-harvest, reducing the nutritional value and contaminating food. Currently, the main defense against stored product insect pests is the pesticide fumigant phosphine. Phosphine is highly toxic to all animals, but is the most effective and economical control method, and thus is used extensively worldwide. However, many insect populations have become resistant to phosphine, in some cases to very high levels. New, environmentally benign and more effective control strategies are needed for stored product pests. RNA interference (RNAi) may overcome pesticide resistance by targeting the expression of genes that contribute to resistance in insects. Most data on RNAi in stored product insects is from the coleopteran genetic model, Tribolium castaneum, since it has a strong RNAi response via injection of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) in any life stage. Additionally, Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) technology has been suggested as a potential resource for new pest control strategies. In this review we discuss background information on both gene disruption technologies and summarize the advances made in terms of molecular pest management in stored product insects, mainly T. castaneum, as well as complications and future needs. PMID:27657138

  12. Induction of mitotic gene conversion by browning reaction products and its modulation by naturally occurring agents.

    PubMed

    Rosin, M P; Stich, H F; Powrie, W D; Wu, C H

    1982-05-01

    Mitotic gene conversion in the D7 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was significantly enhanced by exposure to non-enzymatic browning reaction products. These products were formed during the heating of sugar (caramelization reaction) or sugar-amino acid mixtures (Maillard reaction) at temperatures normally used during the cooking of food. Several modulating factors of this convertogenic activity were identified. These factors included two main groups: (1) trace metals which are widely distributed in the environment; and (2) several cellular enzymatic systems. The convertogenic activities of a heated glucose-lysine mixture and a commercial caramel powder were completely suppresses when yeast were concurrently exposed to these products and to either FeIII or CuII. Equimolar concentrations of MnII or sodium selenite had no effect on the convertogenic activity of the products of either model system. Horse-radish peroxidase, beef liver catalase and rat liver S9 preparations each decreased the frequency of gene conversion induced by the caramel powder and the heated glucose-lysine products. This modulating activity of the enzymes was lost if they were heat-inactivated. These studies indicate the presence of a variety of protective mechanisms which can modify genotoxic components in complex food mixtures.

  13. A repressor-response regulator gene pair controlling jadomycin B production in Streptomyces venezuelae ISP5230.

    PubMed

    Yang, K; Han, L; He, J; Wang, L; Vining, L C

    2001-11-28

    A second regulatory gene (jadR(1)) is located immediately upstream of the putative repressor gene (jadR(2)) in the jad cluster for biosynthesis of the antibiotic jadomycin B in Streptomyces venezuelae ISP5230. It encodes a 234-amino acid polypeptide with a sequence resembling those of response regulator proteins in two-component control systems. Features in the conserved C-terminal domain of JadR(1) place the protein in the OmpR-PhoB subfamily of response regulators. In mutants where jadR(1) was deleted or disrupted, jadomycin B was not produced, implying that the gene has an essential role in biosynthesis of the antibiotic. Cloning jadR(1) from S. venezuelae in pJV73A, and introducing additional copies of the gene into the wild-type parent by plasmid transformation gave unstable strains with pJV73A integrated into the chromosome. The transformants initially showed increased production of jadomycin B but gave lower titers as excess copies of jadR(1) were lost; mature cultures stabilized with a wild-type level of antibiotic production. The mutant from which jadR(1) had been deleted could not be transformed with pJV73A. Altering the composition of jadR genes in the chromosome by integration of vectors carrying intact and disrupted copies of jadR(1) and jadR(2) provided evidence that the two genes form a regulatory pair different in function from previously reported two-component systems controlling antibiotic biosynthesis in streptomycetes.

  14. TITER AND PRODUCT AFFECTS THE DISTRIBUTION OF GENE EXPRESSION AFTER INTRAPUTAMINAL CONVECTION-ENHANCED DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Emborg, Marina E.; Hurley, Samuel A.; Joers, Valerie; Tromp, Do P.M.; Swanson, Christine R.; Ohshima-Hosoyama, Sachiko; Bondarenko, Viktorya; Cummisford, Kyle; Sonnemans, Marc; Hermening, Stephan; Blits, Bas; Alexander, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Efficacy and safety of intracerebral gene therapy for brain disorders, like Parkinson’s disease, depends on appropriate distribution of gene expression. Objectives To assess if the distribution of gene expression is affected by vector titer and protein type. Methods Four adult macaque monkeys seronegative for adeno-associated virus 5 (AAV5) received in the right and left ventral postcommisural putamen 30μl inoculation of a high or low titer suspension of AAV5 encoding glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or green fluorescent protein (GFP). Inoculations were performed using convection enhanced delivery and intraoperative MRI (IMRI). Results IMRI confirmed targeting and infusion cloud irradiating from the catheter tip into surrounding area. Postmortem analysis six weeks after surgery revealed GFP and GDNF expression ipsilateral to the injection side that had a titer-dependent distribution. GFP and GDNF expression was also observed in fibers in the Substantia Nigra (SN) pars reticulata (pr), demonstrating anterograde transport. Few GFP-positive neurons were present in the SN pars compacta (pc), possibly by direct retrograde transport of the vector. GDNF was present in many SNpc and SNpr neurons. Conclusions After controlling for target and infusate volume, intracerebral distribution of gene product is affected by vector titer and product biology. PMID:24943657

  15. Effects of Copper on Hemocyte Apoptosis, ROS Production, and Gene Expression in White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Li, Kexu; Wang, Wei; Wang, Chenggui; Shen, Yuchun

    2017-02-25

    Copper, a common chemical contaminant in aquatic environment, is known to be toxic to aquatic life at high concentrations. In the present study, we evaluated the apoptotic cell ratio and ROS production in hemocytes of the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei exposed to 1 or 5 mg L(-1) Cu for 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h. The expression changes of antioxidant biomarker genes, i.e., copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn SOD) and catalase (CAT), apoptosis-related genes, i.e., caspase-3 and inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP), and a specific biomarker gene of heavy metal pollution, i.e., metallothionein (MT), were also determined in hemocytes. Significant increases in ROS production were observed in both treatment groups at each time points. The apoptotic cell ratios were significantly increased at 6-48 h among shrimp exposed to 1 mg L(-1) Cu and at each time points in 5 mg L(-1) Cu group. These results indicated that Cu would induce oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hemocyte of L. vannamei. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the relative expression levels of Cu-Zn SOD, CAT, caspase-3, IAP, and MT were upregulated in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner, suggesting the involvement of these genes in stress response against Cu exposure.

  16. Golden pigment production and virulence gene expression are affected by metabolisms in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lan, Lefu; Cheng, Alice; Dunman, Paul M; Missiakas, Dominique; He, Chuan

    2010-06-01

    The pathogenesis of staphylococcal infections is multifactorial. Golden pigment is an eponymous feature of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus that shields the microbe from oxidation-based clearance, an innate host immune response to infection. Here, we screened a collection of S. aureus transposon mutants for pigment production variants. A total of 15 previously unidentified genes were discovered. Notably, disrupting metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle, purine biosynthesis, and oxidative phosphorylation yields mutants with enhanced pigmentation. The dramatic effect on pigment production seems to correlate with altered expression of virulence determinants. Microarray analysis further indicates that purine biosynthesis impacts the expression of approximately 400 genes involved in a broad spectrum of functions including virulence. The purine biosynthesis mutant and oxidative phosphorylation mutant strains exhibit significantly attenuated virulence in a murine abscess model of infection. Inhibition of purine biosynthesis with a known small-molecule inhibitor results in altered virulence gene expression and virulence attenuation during infection. Taken together, these results suggest an intimate link between metabolic processes and virulence gene expression in S. aureus. This study also establishes the importance of purine biosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation for in vivo survival.

  17. Golden Pigment Production and Virulence Gene Expression Are Affected by Metabolisms in Staphylococcus aureus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Lefu; Cheng, Alice; Dunman, Paul M.; Missiakas, Dominique; He, Chuan

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of staphylococcal infections is multifactorial. Golden pigment is an eponymous feature of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus that shields the microbe from oxidation-based clearance, an innate host immune response to infection. Here, we screened a collection of S. aureus transposon mutants for pigment production variants. A total of 15 previously unidentified genes were discovered. Notably, disrupting metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle, purine biosynthesis, and oxidative phosphorylation yields mutants with enhanced pigmentation. The dramatic effect on pigment production seems to correlate with altered expression of virulence determinants. Microarray analysis further indicates that purine biosynthesis impacts the expression of ∼400 genes involved in a broad spectrum of functions including virulence. The purine biosynthesis mutant and oxidative phosphorylation mutant strains exhibit significantly attenuated virulence in a murine abscess model of infection. Inhibition of purine biosynthesis with a known small-molecule inhibitor results in altered virulence gene expression and virulence attenuation during infection. Taken together, these results suggest an intimate link between metabolic processes and virulence gene expression in S. aureus. This study also establishes the importance of purine biosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation for in vivo survival. PMID:20400547

  18. CAPA-Gene Products in the Haematophagous Sandfly Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) - Vector for Leishmaniasis Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this article in press as: Predel R, et al. CAPA-gene products in the haematophagous sandfly Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) – vector for...the haematophagous sandfly Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) – vector for leishmaniasis disease 1 2 Reinhard Predela,e,∗, Susanne Neuperta,e...neuropeptides24 Periviscerokinins25 Corazonin26 Phlebotomus papatasi27 Psychodidae28 Differential processing29 a b s t r a c t Sandflies

  19. Genetic resources for methane production from biomass described with the Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Purwantini, Endang; Torto-Alalibo, Trudy; Lomax, Jane; Setubal, João C; Tyler, Brett M; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup

    2014-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is a valuable fuel, constituting 70-95% of natural gas, and a potent greenhouse gas. Release of CH4 into the atmosphere contributes to climate change. Biological CH4 production or methanogenesis is mostly performed by methanogens, a group of strictly anaerobic archaea. The direct substrates for methanogenesis are H2 plus CO2, acetate, formate, methylamines, methanol, methyl sulfides, and ethanol or a secondary alcohol plus CO2. In numerous anaerobic niches in nature, methanogenesis facilitates mineralization of complex biopolymers such as carbohydrates, lipids and proteins generated by primary producers. Thus, methanogens are critical players in the global carbon cycle. The same process is used in anaerobic treatment of municipal, industrial and agricultural wastes, reducing the biological pollutants in the wastes and generating methane. It also holds potential for commercial production of natural gas from renewable resources. This process operates in digestive systems of many animals, including cattle, and humans. In contrast, in deep-sea hydrothermal vents methanogenesis is a primary production process, allowing chemosynthesis of biomaterials from H2 plus CO2. In this report we present Gene Ontology (GO) terms that can be used to describe processes, functions and cellular components involved in methanogenic biodegradation and biosynthesis of specialized coenzymes that methanogens use. Some of these GO terms were previously available and the rest were generated in our Microbial Energy Gene Ontology (MENGO) project. A recently discovered non-canonical CH4 production process is also described. We have performed manual GO annotation of selected methanogenesis genes, based on experimental evidence, providing "gold standards" for machine annotation and automated discovery of methanogenesis genes or systems in diverse genomes. Most of the GO-related information presented in this report is available at the MENGO website (http://www.mengo.biochem.vt.edu/).

  20. Genetic resources for methane production from biomass described with the Gene Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Purwantini, Endang; Torto-Alalibo, Trudy; Lomax, Jane; Setubal, João C.; Tyler, Brett M.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup

    2014-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is a valuable fuel, constituting 70–95% of natural gas, and a potent greenhouse gas. Release of CH4 into the atmosphere contributes to climate change. Biological CH4 production or methanogenesis is mostly performed by methanogens, a group of strictly anaerobic archaea. The direct substrates for methanogenesis are H2 plus CO2, acetate, formate, methylamines, methanol, methyl sulfides, and ethanol or a secondary alcohol plus CO2. In numerous anaerobic niches in nature, methanogenesis facilitates mineralization of complex biopolymers such as carbohydrates, lipids and proteins generated by primary producers. Thus, methanogens are critical players in the global carbon cycle. The same process is used in anaerobic treatment of municipal, industrial and agricultural wastes, reducing the biological pollutants in the wastes and generating methane. It also holds potential for commercial production of natural gas from renewable resources. This process operates in digestive systems of many animals, including cattle, and humans. In contrast, in deep-sea hydrothermal vents methanogenesis is a primary production process, allowing chemosynthesis of biomaterials from H2 plus CO2. In this report we present Gene Ontology (GO) terms that can be used to describe processes, functions and cellular components involved in methanogenic biodegradation and biosynthesis of specialized coenzymes that methanogens use. Some of these GO terms were previously available and the rest were generated in our Microbial Energy Gene Ontology (MENGO) project. A recently discovered non-canonical CH4 production process is also described. We have performed manual GO annotation of selected methanogenesis genes, based on experimental evidence, providing “gold standards” for machine annotation and automated discovery of methanogenesis genes or systems in diverse genomes. Most of the GO-related information presented in this report is available at the MENGO website (http

  1. Identification of the Three Genes Involved in Controlling Production of a Phytotoxin Tropolone in Burkholderia plantarii

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Shunpei; Kihira, Eri; Yoshioka, Akinori; Nakasone, Kaoru; Okamoto, Sho; Hatano, Masaki; Igarashi, Masayuki; Eguchi, Yoko; Kato, Akinori; Ichikawa, Natsuko; Sekine, Mitsuo; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Kanesaki, Yu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tropolone, a phytotoxin produced by Burkholderia plantarii, causes rice seedling blight. To identify genes involved in tropolone synthesis, we systematically constructed mutations in the genes encoding 55 histidine kinases and 72 response regulators. From the resulting defective strains, we isolated three mutants, KE1, KE2, and KE3, in which tropolone production was repressed. The deleted genes of these mutants were named troR1, troK, and troR2, respectively. The mutant strains did not cause rice seedling blight, and complementation experiments indicated that TroR1, TroK, and TroR2 were involved in the synthesis of tropolone in B. plantarii. However, tropolone synthesis was repressed in the TroR1 D52A, TroK H253A, and TroR2 D46A site-directed mutants. These results suggest that the putative sensor kinase (TroK) and two response regulators (TroR1 and TroR2) control the production of tropolone in B. plantarii. IMPORTANCE A two-component system is normally composed of a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and a cognate response regulator (RR) pair. In this study, HK (TroK) and two RRs (TroR1 and TroR2) were found to be involved in controlling tropolone production in B. plantarii. These three genes may be part of a bacterial signal transduction network. Such networks are thought to exist in other bacteria to regulate phytotoxin production, as well as environmental adaptation and signal transduction. PMID:27002128

  2. Increasing cocoa butter-like lipid production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by expression of selected cocoa genes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yongjun; Gossing, Michael; Bergenholm, David; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-12-01

    Cocoa butter (CB) extracted from cocoa beans mainly consists of three different kinds of triacylglycerols (TAGs), 1,3-dipalmitoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol (POP, C16:0-C18:1-C16:0), 1-palmitoyl-3-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol (POS, C16:0-C18:1-C18:0) and 1,3-distearoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol (SOS, C18:0-C18:1-C18:0), but CB supply is limited. Therefore, CB-like lipids (CBL, which are composed of POP, POS and SOS) are in great demand. Saccharomyces cerevisiae produces TAGs as storage lipids, which are also mainly composed of C16 and C18 fatty acids. However, POP, POS and SOS are not among the major TAG forms in yeast. TAG synthesis is mainly catalyzed by three enzymes: glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT), lysophospholipid acyltransferase (LPAT) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT). In order to produce CBL in S. cerevisiae, we selected six cocoa genes encoding GPAT, LPAT and DGAT potentially responsible for CB biosynthesis from the cocoa genome using a phylogenetic analysis approach. By expressing the selected cocoa genes in S. cerevisiae, we successfully increased total fatty acid production, TAG production and CBL production in some S. cerevisiae strains. The relative CBL content in three yeast strains harboring cocoa genes increased 190, 230 and 196% over the control strain, respectively; especially, the potential SOS content of the three yeast strains increased 254, 476 and 354% over the control strain. Moreover, one of the three yeast strains had a 2.25-fold increased TAG content and 6.7-fold higher level of CBL compared with the control strain. In summary, CBL production by S. cerevisiae were increased through expressing selected cocoa genes potentially involved in CB biosynthesis.

  3. Characterization of the Expression of Basigin Gene Products Within the Pineal Gland of Mice.

    PubMed

    Tokar, Derek; van Ekeris, Leslie; Linser, Paul J; Ochrietor, Judith D

    2016-11-04

    The expression of Basigin gene products and monocarboxylate transporter-1 (MCT1) has been investigated within the mammalian neural retina and suggests a role for these proteins in cellular metabolism within that tissue. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the expression of these same proteins in the pineal gland of the mouse brain. Mouse pineal gland and neural retina RNA and protein were subjected to quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting analyses. In addition, paraffin-embedded sections of each tissue were analyzed for expression of Basigin gene products and MCT1 via immunohistochemistry. The results indicate that MCT1 and Basigin variant-2, but not Basigin variant-1, are expressed within the mouse pineal gland. The expression of Basigin variant-2 and MCT1 was localized to the capsule surrounding the gland. The position and relative amounts of the gene products suggest that they play a much less prominent role within the pineal gland than in the neural retina.

  4. Diversity of Streptococcus thermophilus in bacteriocin production; inhibitory spectrum and occurrence of thermophilin genes.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Franca; Marzotto, Marta; Cremonese, Silvia; Rizzotti, Lucia; Torriani, Sandra

    2013-08-01

    The bacteriocin-producing Streptococcus thermophilus strains that can dominate in natural dairy ecosystems, may also enhance safety in products obtained from natural cultures. In this study, we sought to identify bacteriocin production and bacteriocin genes in 75 strains of dairy and plant origin. The strains were tested for antimicrobial activity against pathogens or pathogen models, spoiling bacteria, and lactic acid bacteria associated with dairy products. All strains moderately inhibited Staphylococcus aureus P310, none inhibited Listeria innocua LMG 11387(T) or Clostridium tyrobutyricum LMG 1285(T). In addition, 14 were active against one or more indicators in addition to S. aureus P310. Inhibition of other starter bacteria was more common than the inhibition of unwanted microorganisms. The involvement of a proteinaceous compound was ascertained in all cases. Results suggested that the selection of bacteriocinogenic S. thermophilus strains for use in biopreservation must take into account the effects exerted on other lactic acid bacteria. PCR detection of thermophilin genes proved unreliable in predicting antimicrobial activity. For S. thermophilus PRI36 and PRI45, with relevant inhibitory features, the identity of the bacteriocin genes present in the thermophilin 9 cluster was defined, thus revealing novel variants for this genome region.

  5. The transport of antibiotic resistance genes and residues in groundwater near swine production facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. F.; Yannarell, A. C.; Mackie, R. I.; Krapac, I. G.; Chee-Sanford, J. S.; Koike, S.

    2008-12-01

    The use of antibiotics at concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) for disease prevention, disease treatment, and growth promotion can contribute to the spread of antibiotic compounds, their breakdown products, and antibiotic resistant bacteria and/or the genes that confer resistance. In addition, constitutive use of antibiotics at sub-therapeutic levels can select for antibiotic resistance among the bacteria that inhabit animal intestinal tracts, onsite manure treatment facilities, and any environments receiving significant inputs of manure (e.g. through waste lagoon leakage or fertilizer amendments to farm soils). If the antibiotic resistant organisms persist in these new environments, or if they participate in genetic exchanges with the native microflora, then CAFOs may constitute a significant reservoir for the spread of antibiotic resistance to the environment at large. Our results have demonstrated that leakage from waste treatment lagoons can influence the presence and persistence of tetracycline resistance genes in the shallow aquifer adjacent to swine CAFOs, and molecular phylogeny allowed us to distinguish "native" tetracycline resistance genes in control groundwater wells from manure-associated genes introduced from the lagoon. We have also been able to detect the presence of erythromycin resistance genes in CAFO surface and groundwater even though erythromycin is strictly reserved for use in humans and thus is not utilized at any of these sites. Ongoing research, including modeling of particle transport in groundwater, will help to determine the potential spatial and temporal extent of CAFO-derived antibiotic resistance.

  6. Identification of the Pr1 Gene Product Completes the Anthocyanin Biosynthesis Pathway of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mandeep; Cortes-Cruz, Moises; Ahern, Kevin R.; McMullen, Michael; Brutnell, Thomas P.; Chopra, Surinder

    2011-01-01

    In maize, mutations in the pr1 locus lead to the accumulation of pelargonidin (red) rather than cyanidin (purple) pigments in aleurone cells where the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway is active. We characterized pr1 mutation and isolated a putative F3′H encoding gene (Zmf3′h1) and showed by segregation analysis that the red kernel phenotype is linked to this gene. Genetic mapping using SNP markers confirms its position on chromosome 5L. Furthermore, genetic complementation experiments using a CaMV 35S::ZmF3′H1 promoter–gene construct established that the encoded protein product was sufficient to perform a 3′-hydroxylation reaction. The Zmf3′h1-specific transcripts were detected in floral and vegetative tissues of Pr1 plants and were absent in pr1. Four pr1 alleles were characterized: two carry a 24 TA dinucleotide repeat insertion in the 5′-upstream promoter region, a third has a 17-bp deletion near the TATA box, and a fourth contains a Ds insertion in exon1. Genetic and transcription assays demonstrated that the pr1 gene is under the regulatory control of anthocyanin transcription factors red1 and colorless1. The cloning and characterization of pr1 completes the molecular identification of all genes encoding structural enzymes of the anthocyanin pathway of maize. PMID:21385724

  7. Expression of the HMGI(Y) gene products in human neuroblastic tumours correlates with differentiation status

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, G; Kim, C J; Marcotullio, L Di; Manfioletti, G; Cardinali, B; Cerignoli, F; Ristori, E; Zani, M; Frati, L; Screpanti, I; Gulino, A

    2000-01-01

    HMGI and HMGY are splicing variants of the HMGI(Y) gene and together with HMGI-C, belong to a family of DNA binding proteins involved in maintaining active chromatin conformation and in the regulation of gene transcription. The expression of the HMGI(Y) gene is maximal during embryonic development, declines in adult differentiated tissues and is reactivated in most transformed cells in vitro and in many human cancers in vivo. The HMGI(Y) genomic locus is frequently rearranged in mesenchymal tumours, suggesting a biological role for HMGI(Y) gene products in tumour biology. HMGIs are both target and modulators of retinoic acid activity. In fact, HMGI(Y) gene expression is differentially regulated by retinoic acid in retinoid-sensitive and -resistant neuroblastoma cells, while HMGI-C participates in conferring retinoic acid resistance in some neuroblastoma cells. In this paper we show that HMGI and HMGY isoforms are equally regulated by retinoic acid in neuroblastoma cell lines at both RNA and protein levels. More importantly our immunohistochemical analysis shows that, although HMGI(Y) is expressed in all neuroblastic tumours, consistently higher levels are observed in less differentiated neuroblastomas compared to more differentiated ganglioneuromas, indicating that HMGI(Y) expression should be evaluated as a potential diagnostic and prognostic marker in neuroblastic tumours. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11076660

  8. Characterization of Toxin Genes and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in Fishery Products in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Arfatahery, Noushin; Davoodabadi, Abolfazl; Abedimohtasab, Taranehpeimaneh

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of seafood-borne diseases worldwide, which are attributable to the contamination of food by preformed enterotoxins. In this study, a total of 206 (34.3%) Staphylococcus aureus strains were obtained from 600 fish and shrimp samples and were tested for their antimicrobial susceptibility. We assessed the prevalence of the genes responsible for the staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEA, SEB) and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) genes. The results indicated that 34% of aqua food samples were contaminated with S. aureus, and 23.8% of these isolates were mec-A-positive. Sixty-four percent of the strains isolated from contaminated seafood was enterotoxigenic S. aureus, and 28.2% of SEs were MRSA-positive. The most prevalent genotype was characterized by the presence of the sea gene (45.2%), followed by the seb gene (18.5%), and the tst gene encoding TSST-1 was found in eight strains (3.9%). Of the 206 S. aureus isolates, 189 strains (84.9%) were resistant to at least one antibiotic. Given the frequent outbreaks of enterotoxigenic MRSA, it is necessary to make revisions to mandatory programmes to facilitate improved hygiene practices during fishing, aquaculture, processing, and sales to prevent the contamination of fishery products in Iran. PMID:27694813

  9. Functional cooperation of the dnaE and dnaN gene products in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, N; Uchida, H

    1981-01-01

    A system was designed to isolate second-site intergenic suppressors of a thermosensitive mutation of the dnaE gene of Escherichia coli. The dnaE gene codes for the alpha subunit of DNA polymerase III [McHenry, C. S. & Crow, W. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 1748-1753]. One such suppressor, named sueA77, was finely mapped and found to be located at 82 min on the E. coli chromosome, between dnaA and recF, and within the dnaN gene [Sakakibara, Y. & Mizukami, T. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 178, 541-553]. The dnaN gene codes for the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme [Burgers, P. M. J., Kornberg, A. & Sakakibara, Y. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 5391-5395]. The sueA77 mutation was trans-dominant over its wild-type allele, and it suppressed different thermosensitive mutations of dnaE with different maximal permissive temperature. These properties were interpreted as providing genetic evidence for interaction of the dnaE and dnaN gene products in E. coli. Images PMID:6458043

  10. Functional cooperation of the dnaE and dnaN gene products in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, N; Uchida, H

    1981-09-01

    A system was designed to isolate second-site intergenic suppressors of a thermosensitive mutation of the dnaE gene of Escherichia coli. The dnaE gene codes for the alpha subunit of DNA polymerase III [McHenry, C. S. & Crow, W. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 1748-1753]. One such suppressor, named sueA77, was finely mapped and found to be located at 82 min on the E. coli chromosome, between dnaA and recF, and within the dnaN gene [Sakakibara, Y. & Mizukami, T. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 178, 541-553]. The dnaN gene codes for the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme [Burgers, P. M. J., Kornberg, A. & Sakakibara, Y. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 5391-5395]. The sueA77 mutation was trans-dominant over its wild-type allele, and it suppressed different thermosensitive mutations of dnaE with different maximal permissive temperature. These properties were interpreted as providing genetic evidence for interaction of the dnaE and dnaN gene products in E. coli.

  11. A mutation in the Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae wxoD gene affects xanthan production and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jae-Young; Kim, Hong-Il; Lee, Chang-Soo; Park, Young-Jin

    2013-11-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae causes bacterial blight in rice (Oryza sativa L.). The effect of a mutation in the wxoD gene, that encodes a putative O-antigen acetylase, on xanthan production as well as bacterial chemotaxis was investigated. The mutation increased xanthan production by 52 %. The mutant strain was non-motile on semi-solid agar swarm plates. In addition, several genes involved in chemotaxis, including the cheW, cheV, cheR, and cheD genes, were down-regulated by a mutation in the wxoD gene. Thus, the mutation in the wxoD gene affects xanthan production as well as bacterial chemotaxis. However, the wxoD gene is not essential for the virulence of X. oryzae.

  12. Molecular characterization of genes involved in the production of the bacteriocin leucocin A from Leuconostoc gelidum.

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, M J; Stiles, M E

    1995-01-01

    Leucocin A is a small heat-stable bacteriocin produced by Leuconostoc gelidum UAL187. A 2.9-kb fragment of plasmid DNA that contains the leucocin structural gene and a second open reading frame (ORF) in an operon was previously cloned (J. W. Hastings, M. Sailer, K. Johnson, K. L. Roy, J. C. Vederas, and M. E. Stiles, J. Bacteriol. 173:7491-7500, 1991). When a 1-kb DraI-HpaI fragment containing this operon was introduced into a bacteriocin-negative variant (UAL187-13), immunity but no leucocin production was detected. Leucocin production was observed when an 8-kb SacI-HindIII fragment of the leucocin plasmid was introduced into L. gelidum UAL187-13 and Lactococcus lactis IL1403. Nucleotide sequence analysis of this 8-kb fragment revealed the presence of three ORFs in an operon upstream of and on the strand opposite from the leucocin structural gene. The first ORF (lcaE) encodes a putative protein of 149 amino acids with no apparent function in leucocin A production. The second ORF (lcaC) contains 717 codons that encode a protein homologous to members of the HlyB family of ATP-binding cassette transporters. The third ORF (lcaD) contains 457 codons that encode a protein with marked similarity to LcnD, a protein essential for the expression of the lactococcal bacteriocin lactococcin A. Deletion mutations in lcaC and lcaD resulted in loss of leucocin production, indicating that LcaC and LcaD are involved in production and translocation of leucocin A. The secretion apparatus for lactococcin A did not complement mutations in the lcaCD genes to express leucocin A in L. lactis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7486992

  13. Molecular characterization of genes involved in the production of the bacteriocin leucocin A from Leuconostoc gelidum.

    PubMed

    van Belkum, M J; Stiles, M E

    1995-10-01

    Leucocin A is a small heat-stable bacteriocin produced by Leuconostoc gelidum UAL187. A 2.9-kb fragment of plasmid DNA that contains the leucocin structural gene and a second open reading frame (ORF) in an operon was previously cloned (J. W. Hastings, M. Sailer, K. Johnson, K. L. Roy, J. C. Vederas, and M. E. Stiles, J. Bacteriol. 173:7491-7500, 1991). When a 1-kb DraI-HpaI fragment containing this operon was introduced into a bacteriocin-negative variant (UAL187-13), immunity but no leucocin production was detected. Leucocin production was observed when an 8-kb SacI-HindIII fragment of the leucocin plasmid was introduced into L. gelidum UAL187-13 and Lactococcus lactis IL1403. Nucleotide sequence analysis of this 8-kb fragment revealed the presence of three ORFs in an operon upstream of and on the strand opposite from the leucocin structural gene. The first ORF (lcaE) encodes a putative protein of 149 amino acids with no apparent function in leucocin A production. The second ORF (lcaC) contains 717 codons that encode a protein homologous to members of the HlyB family of ATP-binding cassette transporters. The third ORF (lcaD) contains 457 codons that encode a protein with marked similarity to LcnD, a protein essential for the expression of the lactococcal bacteriocin lactococcin A. Deletion mutations in lcaC and lcaD resulted in loss of leucocin production, indicating that LcaC and LcaD are involved in production and translocation of leucocin A. The secretion apparatus for lactococcin A did not complement mutations in the lcaCD genes to express leucocin A in L. lactis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Dynamic gene expression regulation model for growth and penicillin production in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Douma, Rutger D; Verheijen, Peter J T; de Laat, Wim T A M; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2010-07-01

    As is often the case for microbial product formation, the penicillin production rate of Penicillium chrysogenum has been observed to be a function of the growth rate of the organism. The relation between the biomass specific rate of penicillin formation (q(p)) and growth rate (mu) has been measured under steady state conditions in carbon limited chemostats resulting in a steady state q(p)(mu) relation. Direct application of such a relation to predict the rate of product formation during dynamic conditions, as they occur, for example, in fed-batch experiments, leads to errors in the prediction, because q(p) is not an instantaneous function of the growth rate but rather lags behind because of adaptational and regulatory processes. In this paper a dynamic gene regulation model is presented, in which the specific rate of penicillin production is assumed to be a linear function of the amount of a rate-limiting enzyme in the penicillin production pathway. Enzyme activity assays were performed and strongly indicated that isopenicillin-N synthase (IPNS) was the main rate-limiting enzyme for penicillin-G biosynthesis in our strain. The developed gene regulation model predicts the expression of this rate limiting enzyme based on glucose repression, fast decay of the mRNA encoding for the enzyme as well as the decay of the enzyme itself. The gene regulation model was combined with a stoichiometric model and appeared to accurately describe the biomass and penicillin concentrations for both chemostat steady-state as well as the dynamics during chemostat start-up and fed-batch cultivation.

  15. Effects of Enterococcus faecalis fsr genes on production of gelatinase and a serine protease and virulence.

    PubMed

    Qin, X; Singh, K V; Weinstock, G M; Murray, B E

    2000-05-01

    Three agr-like genes (fsrA, fsrB, and fsrC, for Enterococcus faecalis regulator) were found upstream of the previously reported gelatinase gene (gelE) and a downstream putative serine protease gene (sprE; accession number Z12296) of Enterococcus faecalis OG1RF. The deduced amino acid sequence of fsrA shows 26% identity and 38% similarity to Staphylococcus aureus AgrA (the response regulator of the accessory gene regulator system in the agr locus), FsrB shows 23% identity and 41% similarity to S. aureus AgrB, and FsrC shows 23% identity and 36% similarity to S. aureus AgrC (the sensor transducer of Agr system). Northern blot analysis suggested that gelE and sprE are cotranscribed and that fsrB and fsrC are also cotranscribed in OG1RF. Northern blot analysis of fsrA, fsrB, fsrC, gelE, and sprE insertion mutants showed that fsrB, fsrC, gelE, and sprE are not expressed in fsrA, fsrB, and fsrC mutants, while insertion in an open reading frame further upstream of fsrA did not effect the expression of these genes, suggesting that agr-like genes may be autoregulated and that they regulate gelE and sprE expression, as further confirmed by complementation of fsr gene mutations with a 6-kb fragment which contains all three fsr genes in the shuttle vector, pAT18. Testing of 95 other isolates of E. faecalis showed that 62% produced gelatinase (Gel(+)), while 91% (including all Gel(+) strains) hybridized to a gelE probe; 71% (including all Gel(+) strains) hybridized to an fsr probe, corroborating the conclusion that both gelE and fsr are necessary for gelatinase production. Testing of fsrA, fsrB, and sprE mutants in a mouse peritonitis model showed that sprE and agr-like gene mutants resulted in highly significantly prolonged survival compared to the parent strain OG1RF, a finding similar to what we had previously shown for a gelE mutant. These results suggest that sprE and agr-like genes contribute to the virulence of E. faecalis OG1RF in this model.

  16. Engineering cell lines for production of replication defective HSV-1 gene therapy vectors.

    PubMed

    Grant, Kyle G; Krisky, David M; Ataai, Mohammed M; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2009-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) represents an attractive vehicle for a variety of gene therapy applications. To render this virus safe for clinical use, its cytotoxic genes must be removed without losing its ability to express transgenes efficiently. Our vectors are deleted for the essential immediate early genes ICP4 and ICP27. These genes are controlled by unique promoters having enhancer elements responsive to a viral structural protein VP16. The expression of these genes occurs prior to the activation of all other lytic functions and is thus required to initiate and complete the virus replication cycle. For large scale manufacture of clinical grade vectors, efficient cell lines must be generated that express the essential viral gene products in trans during vector propagation. Here we describe methods for engineering HSV-1 production cell lines that improve vector growth by altering the kinetics of complementing gene expression. We examined the ability of Vero cells independently transduced with ICP4 and ICP27 under transcriptional control of their respective promoters to support the growth of a replication defective vector (JDTOZHE), deleted for ICP4, ICP27 and approximately 20 kb of internal elements that are not required for virus growth in Vero cells. Vector yield on this cell line was 3 logs lower than wild-type virus grown on Vero cells. To understand the mechanism underlying poor vector yield, we examined the expression of ICP4 and ICP27 during virus complementation. While ICP27 was expressed immediately on vector infection, the expression of ICP4 was considerably delayed by 8-10 h, suggesting that the ICP4 promoter was not adequately activated by VP16 delivered by the infectious vector particle. Use of the ICP0 promoter to express ICP4 from the cellular genome resulted in higher induction levels and faster kinetics of ICP4 expression and a 10-fold improvement in vector yield. This study suggests that vector complementation is highly dependent on the

  17. Tetracycline residues and tetracycline resistance genes in groundwater impacted by swine production facilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mackie, R.I.; Koike, S.; Krapac, I.; Chee-Sanford, J.; Maxwell, Susan; Aminov, R.I.

    2006-01-01

    Antibiotics are used at therapeutic levels to treat disease; at slightly lower levels as prophylactics; and at low, subtherapeutic levels for growth promotion and improvement of feed efficiency. Over 88% of swine producers in the United States gave antimicrobials to grower/finisher pigs in feed as a growth promoter in 2000. It is estimated that ca. 75% of antibiotics are not absorbed by animals and are excreted in urine and feces. The extensive use of antibiotics in swine production has resulted in antibiotic resistance in many intestinal bacteria, which are also excreted in swine feces, resulting in dissemination of resistance genes into the environment.To assess the impact of manure management on groundwater quality, groundwater samples have been collected near two swine confinement facilities that use lagoons for manure storage and treatment. Several key contaminant indicators-including inorganic ions, antibiotics, and antibiotic resistance genes-were analyzed in groundwater collected from the monitoring wells. Chloride, ammonium, potassium, and sodium were predominant inorganic constituents in the manure samples and served as indicators of groundwater contamination. Based on these analyses, shallow groundwater has been impacted by lagoon seepage at both sites. Liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) was used to measure the dissolved concentrations of tetracycline, chlortetracycline, and oxytetracycline in groundwater and manure. Although tetracyclines were regularly used at both facilities, they were infrequently detected in manure samples and then at relatively trace concentrations. Concentrations of all tetracyclines and their breakdown products in the groundwater sampled were generally less than 0.5 ??g/L.Bacterial tetracycline resistance genes served as distinct genotypic markers to indicate the dissemination and mobility of antibiotic resistance genes that originated from the lagoons. Applying PCR to genomic DNA extracted from the lagoon and

  18. Production of Phloroglucinol, a Platform Chemical, in Arabidopsis using a Bacterial Gene

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Ghany, Salah E.; Day, Irene; Heuberger, Adam L.; Broeckling, Corey D.; Reddy, Anireddy S.N.

    2016-01-01

    Phloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene; PG) and its derivatives are phenolic compounds that are used for various industrial applications. Current methods to synthesize PG are not sustainable due to the requirement for carbon-based precursors and co-production of toxic byproducts. Here, we describe a more sustainable production of PG using plants expressing a native bacterial or a codon-optimized synthetic PhlD targeted to either the cytosol or chloroplasts. Transgenic lines were analyzed for the production of PG using gas and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy. Phloroglucinol was produced in all transgenic lines and the line with the highest PhlD transcript level showed the most accumulation of PG. Over 80% of the produced PG was glycosylated to phlorin. Arabidopsis leaves have the machinery to glycosylate PG to form phlorin, which can be hydrolyzed enzymatically to produce PG. Furthermore, the metabolic profile of plants with PhlD in either the cytosol or chloroplasts was altered. Our results provide evidence that plants can be engineered to produce PG using a bacterial gene. Phytoproduction of PG using a bacterial gene paves the way for further genetic manipulations to enhance the level of PG with implications for the commercial production of this important platform chemical in plants. PMID:27924918

  19. Manipulation of IL-10 gene expression by Toxoplasma gondii and its products

    PubMed Central

    Pestechian, Nader; Khanahmad Shahreza, Hosein; Faridnia, Roghiyeh; Kalani, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to evaluate whether or not T. gondii and its derivatives can change the gene expression level of IL-10 in murine leukocytes in vivo. Methods: Fifty BALB/c mice were divided into 5 groups, four of which received the excretory/secretory product (ESP) from cell culture medium, the ESP from cell free medium, the Toxoplasma lysate product (TLP) and the active tachyzoites, respectively. The fifth group was considered as control and received PBS. The peritoneal leukocytes from the mice were collected. Their total RNA were extracted and converted to cDNA and the gene expression levels of IL-10 in the samples were evaluated by quantitative real time-PCR using the REST-2009 software. Results: The findings showed a decrease in the expression level of IL-10 in the TLP group (p=0.004). Moreover, the IL-10 gene expression level was upregulated in the group of the ESP from cell culture medium (p=0.04) and the active tachyzoite group (p=0.04). The expression of IL-10 gene in the group of ESP from cell-free medium was not significant compared to the control one (p=0.45). Conclusion: T. gondii and its derivatives are able to increase (the active T. gondii tachyzoite and the ESP from cell culture medium) and decrease (the TLP) the gene expression level of IL-10 in a murine model. The question remains to be examined in further study about which molecules are involved in this process. PMID:27683651

  20. Potential for hydrogen production with inducible chloroplast gene expression in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Surzycki, Raymond; Cournac, Laurent; Peltier, Gilles; Rochaix, Jean-David

    2007-01-01

    An inducible chloroplast gene expression system was developed in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by taking advantage of the properties of the copper-sensitive cytochrome c6 promoter and of the nucleus-encoded Nac2 chloroplast protein. This protein is specifically required for the stable accumulation of the chloroplast psbD RNA and acts on its 5′ UTR. A construct containing the Nac2 coding sequence fused to the cytochrome c6 promoter was introduced into the nac2-26 mutant strain deficient in Nac2. In this transformant, psbD is expressed in copper-depleted but not in copper-replete medium. Because psbD encodes the D2 reaction center polypeptide of photosystem II (PSII), the repression of psbD leads to the loss of PSII. We have tested this system for hydrogen production. Upon addition of copper to cells pregrown in copper-deficient medium, PSII levels declined to a level at which oxygen consumption by respiration exceeded oxygen evolution by PSII. The resulting anaerobic conditions led to the induction of hydrogenase activity. Because the Cyc6 promoter is also induced under anaerobic conditions, this system opens possibilities for sustained cycling hydrogen production. Moreover, this inducible gene expression system is applicable to any chloroplast gene by replacing its 5′ UTR with the psbD 5′ UTR in the same genetic background. To make these strains phototrophic, the 5′ UTR of the psbD gene was replaced by the petA 5′ UTR. As an example, we show that the reporter gene aadA driven by the psbD 5′ UTR confers resistance to spectinomycin in the absence of copper and sensitivity in its presence in the culture medium. PMID:17951433

  1. Production of lentiviral vectors by transient expression of minimal packaging genes from recombinant adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Kuate, Seraphin; Stefanou, Daniela; Hoffmann, Dennis; Wildner, Oliver; Uberla, Klaus

    2004-11-01

    The potential of lentiviral vectors for clinical gene therapy has not yet been evaluated. One of the reasons is the cytotoxicity of lentiviral packaging genes which makes the generation of stable producer cell lines difficult. Therefore, a novel packaging system for lentiviral vectors based on transient expression of packaging genes by recombinant adenoviruses was developed. Adenoviral vectors expressing VSV-G, codon-optimized HIV-1 gag-pol, and codon-optimized SIV gag-pol under the control of a tetracycline-regulatable promoter (adenoviral lenti-pack vectors) were constructed and the production levels of this vector system were evaluated. The generated adenoviral lenti-pack vectors could be grown to high titers when transgene expression was suppressed and no evidence for instabilities was obtained. Cells stably transfected with a SIV-based vector construct were converted into lentiviral vector producer cells by infection with the adenoviral lenti-pack vectors. Lentiviral vector titers obtained were as high as vector titers obtained by transient cotransfection experiments. A protocol was developed that allowed preparation of lentiviral vector stocks with undetectable levels of contaminating adenoviral lenti-pack vectors. The adenoviral lenti-pack vectors described should provide a convenient alternative approach to inducible packaging cell lines for large-scale lentiviral vector production. Transient expression of cytotoxic lentiviral packaging genes by the adenoviral lenti-pack vectors circumvents loss of titers during prolonged culture of packaging cell lines. The design of the adenoviral lenti-pack vectors should reduce the risk of transfer of packaging genes to target cells and at the same time provide flexibility with respect to the lentiviral vector constructs that can be packaged.

  2. Transcriptome analysis of pigeon milk production - role of cornification and triglyceride synthesis genes.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Meagan J; Crowley, Tamsyn M; Haring, Volker R; Wilson, Susanne L; Harper, Jennifer A; Payne, Jean S; Green, Diane; Monaghan, Paul; Stanley, Dragana; Donald, John A; Nicholas, Kevin R; Moore, Robert J

    2013-03-13

    The pigeon crop is specially adapted to produce milk that is fed to newly hatched young. The process of pigeon milk production begins when the germinal cell layer of the crop rapidly proliferates in response to prolactin, which results in a mass of epithelial cells that are sloughed from the crop and regurgitated to the young. We proposed that the evolution of pigeon milk built upon the ability of avian keratinocytes to accumulate intracellular neutral lipids during the cornification of the epidermis. However, this cornification process in the pigeon crop has not been characterised. We identified the epidermal differentiation complex in the draft pigeon genome scaffold and found that, like the chicken, it contained beta-keratin genes. These beta-keratin genes can be classified, based on sequence similarity, into several clusters including feather, scale and claw keratins. The cornified cells of the pigeon crop express several cornification-associated genes including cornulin, S100-A9 and A16-like, transglutaminase 6-like and the pigeon 'lactating' crop-specific annexin cp35. Beta-keratins play an important role in 'lactating' crop, with several claw and scale keratins up-regulated. Additionally, transglutaminase 5 and differential splice variants of transglutaminase 4 are up-regulated along with S100-A10. This study of global gene expression in the crop has expanded our knowledge of pigeon milk production, in particular, the mechanism of cornification and lipid production. It is a highly specialised process that utilises the normal keratinocyte cellular processes to produce a targeted nutrient solution for the young at a very high turnover.

  3. Transcriptome analysis of pigeon milk production – role of cornification and triglyceride synthesis genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The pigeon crop is specially adapted to produce milk that is fed to newly hatched young. The process of pigeon milk production begins when the germinal cell layer of the crop rapidly proliferates in response to prolactin, which results in a mass of epithelial cells that are sloughed from the crop and regurgitated to the young. We proposed that the evolution of pigeon milk built upon the ability of avian keratinocytes to accumulate intracellular neutral lipids during the cornification of the epidermis. However, this cornification process in the pigeon crop has not been characterised. Results We identified the epidermal differentiation complex in the draft pigeon genome scaffold and found that, like the chicken, it contained beta-keratin genes. These beta-keratin genes can be classified, based on sequence similarity, into several clusters including feather, scale and claw keratins. The cornified cells of the pigeon crop express several cornification-associated genes including cornulin, S100-A9 and A16-like, transglutaminase 6-like and the pigeon ‘lactating’ crop-specific annexin cp35. Beta-keratins play an important role in ‘lactating’ crop, with several claw and scale keratins up-regulated. Additionally, transglutaminase 5 and differential splice variants of transglutaminase 4 are up-regulated along with S100-A10. Conclusions This study of global gene expression in the crop has expanded our knowledge of pigeon milk production, in particular, the mechanism of cornification and lipid production. It is a highly specialised process that utilises the normal keratinocyte cellular processes to produce a targeted nutrient solution for the young at a very high turnover. PMID:23497009

  4. Engineering Klebsiella oxytoca for efficient 2, 3-butanediol production through insertional inactivation of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiao-Jun; Huang, He; Zhu, Jian-Guo; Ren, Lu-Jing; Nie, Zhi-Kui; Du, Jun; Li, Shuang

    2010-02-01

    Ethanol was a major byproduct of 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD) fermentation by Klebsiella oxytoca ME-UD-3. In order to achieve a high efficiency of 2,3-BD production, K. oxytoca mutants deficient in ethanol formation were successfully constructed by replace the aldA gene coding for aldehyde dehydrogenase with a tetracycline resistance cassette. The results suggested that inactivation of aldA led to a significantly improved 2,3-BD production. The carbon flux to 2,3-BD was enhanced by eliminating the byproducing ethanol and at the same time reducing the accumulation of another byproduct acetoin. At last, by fed-batch culturing of the mutant, the final 2,3-BD titer up to 130 g/l with the productivity of 1.63 g/l.h and the 2,3-BD yield relative to glucose of 0.48 g/g was obtained.

  5. Overexpression of polyphosphate kinase gene (ppk) increases bioinsecticide production by Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Doruk, Tugrul; Avican, Ummehan; Camci, Irem Yalim; Gedik, Sedef Tunca

    2013-05-06

    Polyphosphate (polyP), synthesized by polyP kinase (PPK) using the terminal phosphate of ATP as substrate, performs important functions in every living cell. The present work reports on the relationship between polyP metabolism and bioinsecticide production in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti). The ppk gene of Bti was cloned into vector pHT315 and the effect of its overexpression on endotoxin production was determined. Endotoxin production by the recombinant strain was found to be consistently higher than that by the wild type strain and the strain that carried the empty plasmid. The toxicity of the recombinant mutant strain (LC50 5.8±0.6ngml(-1)) against late 2nd instar Culex quinquefasciatus was about 7.7 times higher than that of Bti (LC50 44.9±7ngml(-1)). To our knowledge this is the first reported study which relates polyP metabolism with bioinsecticide biosynthesis.

  6. Ubiquinone-10 production using Agrobacterium tumefaciens dps gene in Escherichia coli by coexpression system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; Shrestha, Binaya; Li, Zhaopeng; Tan, Tianwei

    2007-01-01

    Ubiquinone (Coenzyme Q; abbreviation, UQ) acts as a mobile component of the respiratory chain by playing an essential role in the electron transport system, and has been widely used in pharmaceuticals. The biosynthesis of UQ involves 10 sequential reactions brought about by various enzymes. In this study we have cloned, expressed the decaprenyl diphosphate synthase, designated dps gene, from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and succeeded in detecting UQ-10 in addition to innate UQ-8 in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the production of UQ-10 was higher than UQ-8. To establish an efficient expression system for UQ- 10 production, we used genes, including ubiC, ubiA, and ubiG involved in UQ biosynthesis in E. coli, to construct a better co-expression system. The expression coupled by dps and ubiCA was effective for increasing UQ-10 production by five times than that by expressing single dps gene in the shake flask culture. To study for a large-scale production of UQ-10 in E. coli, fed-batch fermentations were implemented to achieve a high cell density culture. A cell concentration of 85.40 g/L and 94.58 g/L dry cell weight (DCW), and UQ-10 content of 50.29 mg/L and 45.86 mg/L was obtained after 32.5 h and 27.5 h of cultivation, subsequent to isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside and lactose induction, respectively. In addition, plasmid stability was maintained at high level throughout the fermentation.

  7. Expressing the sweet potato orange gene in transgenic potato improves drought tolerance and marketable tuber production.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Soo; Han, Eun-Heui; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Cho, Ji-Hong; Im, Ju-Seong; Hong, Su-Young; Sohn, Hwang-Bae; Kim, Yun-Hee; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is generally considered to be sensitive to drought stress. Even short periods of water shortage can result in reduced tuber production and quality. We previously reported that transgenic potato plants expressing the sweet potato orange gene (IbOr) under the control of the stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter (referred to as SOR plants) showed increased tolerance to methyl viologen-mediated oxidative stress and high salinity, along with increased carotenoid contents. In this study, in an effort to improve the productivity and environmental stress tolerance of potato, we subjected transgenic potato plants expressing IbOr to water-deficient conditions in the greenhouse. The SOR plants exhibited increased tolerance to drought stress under greenhouse conditions. IbOr expression was associated with slightly negative phenotypes, including reduced tuber production. Controlling IbOr expression imparted the same degree of drought tolerance while ameliorating these negative phenotypic effects, leading to levels of tuber production similar to or better than those of wild-type plants under drought stress conditions. In particular, under drought stress, drought tolerance and the production of marketable tubers (over 80g) were improved in transgenic plants compared with non-transgenic plants. These results suggest that expressing the IbOr transgene can lead to significant gains in drought tolerance and tuber production in potato, thereby improving these agronomically important traits. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Automated type specific ELISA probe detection of amplified NS3 gene products of dengue viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, V T; Yong, R Y; Ngoh, B L; Chan, Y C

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To apply an automated system of nucleic acid hybridisation coupled with the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the type specific detection of amplification products of dengue viruses. METHODS: Non-structural 3 (NS3) gene targets of reference strains of all four dengue and other flaviviruses, as well as dengue patient viraemic sera, were subjected to reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction using consensus and dengue type specific primers and digoxigenin-11-dUTP label incorporation. The amplification products were detected by biotinylated type specific primers which served as ELISA capture probes bound to streptavidin coated tubes. RESULTS: Significantly high spectrophotometric absorbance readings were obtained by hybridisation of the consensus and seminested amplification products of all four dengue viruses with their respective capture probes. In contrast, extremely low absorbances were observed for consensus products of Japanese encephalitis, yellow fever, and Kunjin viruses, which served as negative controls. These ELISA data correlated well with agarose gel electrophoresis of dengue type specific amplified products of diagnostic sizes. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of in vitro amplification and antibody based detection offers rapid, type specific, high throughput, and gel-free detection of amplified products of dengue viruses. Images PMID:9215155

  9. Novel diabetes mellitus treatment: mature canine insulin production by canine striated muscle through gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Niessen, S J M; Fernandez-Fuente, M; Mahmoud, A; Campbell, S C; Aldibbiat, A; Huggins, C; Brown, A E; Holder, A; Piercy, R J; Catchpole, B; Shaw, J A M; Church, D B

    2012-07-01

    Muscle-targeted gene therapy using insulin genes has the potential to provide an inexpensive, low maintenance alternative or adjunctive treatment method for canine diabetes mellitus. A canine skeletal muscle cell line was established through primary culture, as well as through transdifferentiation of canine fibroblasts after infection with a myo-differentiation gene containing adenovirus vector. A novel mutant furin-cleavable canine preproinsulin gene insert (cppI4) was designed and created through de novo gene synthesis. Various cell lines, including the generated canine muscle cell line, were transfected with nonviral plasmids containing cppI4. Insulin and desmin immunostaining were used to prove insulin production by muscle cells and specific canine insulin ELISA to prove mature insulin secretion into the medium. The canine myoblast cultures proved positive on desmin immunostaining. All cells tolerated transfection with cppI4-containing plasmid, and double immunostaining for insulin and desmin proved present in the canine cells. Canine insulin ELISA assessment of medium of cppI4-transfected murine myoblasts and canine myoblast and fibroblast mixture proved presence of mature fully processed canine insulin, 24 and 48 h after transfection. The present study provides proof of principle that canine muscle cells can be induced to produce and secrete canine insulin on transfection with nonviral plasmid DNA containing a novel mutant canine preproinsulin gene that produces furin-cleavable canine preproinsulin. This technology could be developed to provide an alternative canine diabetes mellitus treatment option or to provide a constant source for background insulin, as well as C-peptide, alongside current treatment options.

  10. Prevalence of ten putative virulence genes in the emerging foodborne pathogen Arcobacter isolated from food products.

    PubMed

    Girbau, Cecilia; Guerra, Cristian; Martínez-Malaxetxebarria, Irati; Alonso, Rodrigo; Fernández-Astorga, Aurora

    2015-12-01

    Arcobacter spp. are considered to be emerging food- and waterborne pathogens for both humans and animals. However, their virulence mechanisms are still poorly understood. In this study the presence of ten virulence genes (cadF, ciaB, cj1349, hecA, hecB, mviN, pldA, irgA, tlyA and iroE) was assessed in a set of 47 strains of Arcobacter butzleri, 10 of Arcobacter cryaerophilus and 1 Arcobacter skirrowii strain recovered from different food products (pork, chicken, beef, milk, clams and mussels). Overall, the genes cadF, ciaB, cj1349, mviN, pldA and tlyA were detected in all A. butzleri and A. skirrowii strains. Lower detection rates were observed for irgA, iroE, hecA and hecB. The genes hecB and iroE were detected neither in A. cryaerophilus nor in A. skirrowii. The genes hecA and irgA were not detected in A. skirrowii. It was noteworthy that the genes hecA and hecB were significantly (P < 0.05) highly detected in A. butzleri strains isolated from clams compared with strains isolated from milk and chicken. Therefore, our findings underline clams as a source of A. butzleri strains with high prevalence of putative virulence genes. This could be hazardous to human health, especially because these bivalves are usually consumed raw or undercooked.

  11. Silver Resistance Genes Are Overrepresented among Escherichia coli Isolates with CTX-M Production

    PubMed Central

    Edquist, Petra; Sandegren, Linus; Adler, Marlen; Tängdén, Thomas; Drobni, Mirva; Olsen, Björn; Melhus, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Enterobacteriaceae with extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) of the CTX-M type have disseminated rapidly in recent years and have become a threat to public health. In parallel with the CTX-M type expansion, the consumption and widespread use of silver-containing products has increased. To determine the carriage rates of silver resistance genes in different Escherichia coli populations, the presence of three silver resistance genes (silE, silP, and silS) and genes encoding CTX-M-, TEM-, and SHV-type enzymes were explored in E. coli isolates of human (n = 105) and avian (n = 111) origin. The antibiotic profiles were also determined. Isolates harboring CTX-M genes were further characterized, and phenotypic silver resistance was examined. The silE gene was present in 13 of the isolates. All of them were of human origin. Eleven of these isolates harbored ESBLs of the CTX-M type (P = 0.007), and eight of them were typed as CTX-M-15 and three as CTX-M-14. None of the silE-positive isolates was related to the O25b-ST131 clone, but 10 out of 13 belonged to the ST10 or ST58 complexes. Phenotypic silver resistance (silver nitrate MIC > 512 mg/liter) was observed after silver exposure in 12 of them, and a concomitant reduced susceptibility to piperacillin-tazobactam developed in three. In conclusion, 12% of the human E. coli isolates but none of the avian isolates harbored silver resistance genes. This indicates another route for or level of silver exposure for humans than that caused by common environmental contamination. Since silE-positive isolates were significantly more often found in CTX-M-positive isolates, it is possible that silver may exert a selective pressure on CTX-M-producing E. coli isolates. PMID:25128339

  12. Silver resistance genes are overrepresented among Escherichia coli isolates with CTX-M production.

    PubMed

    Sütterlin, Susanne; Edquist, Petra; Sandegren, Linus; Adler, Marlen; Tängdén, Thomas; Drobni, Mirva; Olsen, Björn; Melhus, Asa

    2014-11-01

    Members of the Enterobacteriaceae with extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) of the CTX-M type have disseminated rapidly in recent years and have become a threat to public health. In parallel with the CTX-M type expansion, the consumption and widespread use of silver-containing products has increased. To determine the carriage rates of silver resistance genes in different Escherichia coli populations, the presence of three silver resistance genes (silE, silP, and silS) and genes encoding CTX-M-, TEM-, and SHV-type enzymes were explored in E. coli isolates of human (n = 105) and avian (n = 111) origin. The antibiotic profiles were also determined. Isolates harboring CTX-M genes were further characterized, and phenotypic silver resistance was examined. The silE gene was present in 13 of the isolates. All of them were of human origin. Eleven of these isolates harbored ESBLs of the CTX-M type (P = 0.007), and eight of them were typed as CTX-M-15 and three as CTX-M-14. None of the silE-positive isolates was related to the O25b-ST131 clone, but 10 out of 13 belonged to the ST10 or ST58 complexes. Phenotypic silver resistance (silver nitrate MIC > 512 mg/liter) was observed after silver exposure in 12 of them, and a concomitant reduced susceptibility to piperacillin-tazobactam developed in three. In conclusion, 12% of the human E. coli isolates but none of the avian isolates harbored silver resistance genes. This indicates another route for or level of silver exposure for humans than that caused by common environmental contamination. Since silE-positive isolates were significantly more often found in CTX-M-positive isolates, it is possible that silver may exert a selective pressure on CTX-M-producing E. coli isolates.

  13. Cloning and functional analysis by gene disruption of a novel gene involved in indigo production and fluoranthene metabolism in Pseudomonas alcaligenes PA-10.

    PubMed

    Alemayehu, D; Gordon, L M; O'Mahony, M M; O'Leary, N D; Dobson, A D W

    2004-10-15

    A novel indole dioxygenase (idoA) gene has been cloned from Pseudomonas alcaligenes PA-10, based on its ability to convert indole to indigo. The chromosomally encoded idoA gene exhibits no similarity to previously cloned naphthalene dioxygenases or to aromatic oxygenases from other species at the nucleotide level. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the idoA gene product is most similar to an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase from Novosphingobium aromaticivorans. The enzyme encoded by the idoA gene is essential for the metabolism of fluoranthene, since a mutant in which the idoA gene has been disrupted looses the ability to degrade this compound. The idoA gene appears to be constitutively expressed in PA-10, but its expression is also subject to regulation following prior exposure to salicylate and to fluoranthene degradative intermediates.

  14. Improvements in algal lipid production: a systems biology and gene editing approach.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Avik; Banerjee, Chiranjib; Negi, Sangeeta; Chang, Jo-Shu; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2017-08-09

    In the wake of rising energy demands, microalgae have emerged as potential sources of sustainable and renewable carbon-neutral fuels, such as bio-hydrogen and bio-oil. For rational metabolic engineering, the elucidation of metabolic pathways in fine detail and their manipulation according to requirements is the key to exploiting the use of microalgae. Emergence of site-specific nucleases have revolutionized applied research leading to biotechnological gains. Genome engineering as well as modulation of the endogenous genome with high precision using CRISPR systems is being gradually employed in microalgal research. Further, to optimize and produce better algal platforms, use of systems biology network analysis and integration of omics data is required. This review discusses two important approaches: systems biology and gene editing strategies used on microalgal systems with a focus on biofuel production and sustainable solutions. It also emphasizes that the integration of such systems would contribute and compliment applied research on microalgae. Recent advances in microalgae are discussed, including systems biology, gene editing approaches in lipid bio-synthesis, and antenna engineering. Lastly, it has been attempted here to showcase how CRISPR/Cas systems are a better editing tool than existing techniques that can be utilized for gene modulation and engineering during biofuel production.

  15. Protein X is the product of the recA gene of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    McEntee, K

    1977-01-01

    The inducible protein X of Escherichia coli has been compared to the recA+ protein made by specialized recA transducing phages. The molecular weights and isoelectric points of these proteins are identical. Two mutations located in the recA gene that alter the electrophoretic mobility or the isoelectric point of protein X have been studied. A recA12 mutant strain, deficient in homologous recombination and repair, produces a smaller-than-normal protein X. A transducing phage carrying the recA12 allele directs the synthesis of a smaller recA protein after infection of irradiated cells. A transducing phage carrying the recA region of a tif-1 mutant strain codes for a recA protein with an isoelectric point more basic than that of the lambdaprecA+ product. The protein X of a tif-1 mutant strain shows an identical shift in its isoelectric properties. Examination of several tsl- recA- strains indicates that protein X can be induced in several missense recA mutants but is not detected in tsl- strains carrying amber or deletion mutations of the recA gene. These results demonstrate that protein X is the product of the recA gene and that the tif-1 mutation alters the properties of the recA protein. A model is suggested for autoregulation of the recA protein in the induction of functions expressed in response to DNA damage (SOS functions). Images PMID:341151

  16. Nucleic acid binding property of the gene products of rice stripe virus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Delin; Ma, Xiangqiang; Qu, Zhicai; Hull, Roger

    2005-10-01

    GST fusion proteins of the six gene products from RNAs 2,3 and 4 of the tenuivirus, Rice stripe virus (RSV), were used to study the nucleic acid binding activities in vitro. Three of the proteins, p3, pc3 and pc4, bound both single- and double-stranded cDNA of RSV RNA4 and also RNA3 transcribed from its cDNA clone, while p2, pc2-N (the N-terminal part of pc2) nor p4 bound the cDNA or RNA transcript. The binding activity of p3 is located in the carboxyl-terminus amino acid 154-194, which contains basic amino acid rich beta-sheets. The acidic amino acid-rich amino-terminus (amino acids 1-100) of p3 did not have nucleic acid binding activity. The related analogous gene product of the tenuivirus, Rice hoja blanca virus, is a suppressor of gene silencing and the possibility of the nucleic acid binding ability of RSV p3 being associated with this property is discussed. The C-terminal part of the RSV nucleocapsid protein, which also contains a basic region, binds nucleic acids, which is consistent with its function. The central and C-terminal regions of pc4 bind nucleic acid. It has been suggested that this protein is a cell-to-cell movement protein and nucleic acid binding would be in accord with this function.

  17. Identification and Characterization of Two Bordetella avium Gene Products Required for Hemagglutination▿

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Louise M.; Miyamoto, David M.; Mehta, Manju; Capitini, Christian M.; Von Stetina, Stephen; Barnes, H. John; Christensen, Vern L.; Horton, John R.; Spears, Patricia A.; Orndorff, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    Bordetella avium causes bordetellosis in birds, a disease similar to whooping cough caused by Bordetella pertussis in children. B. avium agglutinates guinea pig erythrocytes via an unknown mechanism. Loss of hemagglutination ability results in attenuation. We report the use of transposon mutagenesis to identify two genes required for hemagglutination. The genes (hagA and hagB) were adjacent and divergently oriented and had no orthologs in the genomes of other Bordetella species. Construction of in-frame, unmarked mutations in each gene allowed examination of the role of each in conferring erythrocyte agglutination, explanted tracheal cell adherence, and turkey poult tracheal colonization. In all of the in vitro and in vivo assays, the requirement for the trans-acting products of hagA and hagB (HagA and HagB) was readily shown. Western blotting, using antibodies to purified HagA and HagB, revealed proteins of the predicted sizes of HagA and HagB in an outer membrane-enriched fraction. Antiserum to HagB, but not HagA, blocked B. avium erythrocyte agglutination and explanted turkey tracheal ring binding. Bioinformatic analysis indicated the similarity of HagA and HagB to several two-component secretory apparatuses in which one product facilitates the exposition of the other. HagB has the potential to serve as a useful immunogen to protect turkeys against colonization and subsequent disease. PMID:20351141

  18. Mouse A-myb encodes a trans-activator and is expressed in mitotically active cells of the developing central nervous system, adult testis and B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Trauth, K; Mutschler, B; Jenkins, N A; Gilbert, D J; Copeland, N G; Klempnauer, K H

    1994-01-01

    C-myb encodes a transcriptional activator that is essential for the development of the hematopoietic system but appears to lack major roles in non-hematopoietic cells. The identification of two conserved myb-related genes, designated A-myb and B-myb, has raised the possibility that these genes are functional equivalents of c-myb in non-hematopoietic cells. Here, we report the isolation and preliminary characterization of the mouse A-myb gene. Mouse A-myb maps to the proximal region of chromosome 1 and encodes a transcriptional activator with properties similar to those of the c-myb and v-myb proteins. During embryo-genesis A-myb is predominantly expressed in several regions of the developing central nervous system (CNS) and the urogenital ridge. Expression in the CNS is confined to the neural tube, the hindbrain, the neural retina and the olfactory epithelium, and coincides with the presence of proliferating immature neuronal precursor cells. In the adult mouse, A-myb is expressed during the early stages of sperm cell differentiation and in B lymphocytes located in germinal centers of the spleen. Taken together, these results suggest a role for A-myb in the proliferation and/or differentiation of neurogenic, spermatogenic and B-lymphoid cells. Images PMID:7813437

  19. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for ethanol production without foreign genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngnyun

    Worldwide dependence on finite petroleum-based energy necessitates alternative energy sources that can be produced from renewable resources. A successful example of an alternative transportation fuel is bioethanol, produced by microorganisms, from corn starch that is blended with gasoline. However, corn, currently the main feedstock for bioethanol production, also occupies a significant role in human food and animal feed chains. As more corn is diverted to bioethanol, the cost of corn is expected to increase with an increase in the price of food, feed and ethanol. Using lignocellulosic biomass for ethanol production is considered to resolve this problem. However, this requires a microbial biocatalyst that can ferment hexoses and pentoses to ethanol. Escherichia coli is an efficient biocatalyst that can use all the monomeric sugars in lignocellulose, and recombinant derivatives of E. coli have been engineered to produce ethanol as the major fermentation product. In my study, ethanologenic E. coli strains were isolated from a ldhA-, pflB- derivative without introduction of foreign genes. These isolates grew anaerobically and produced ethanol as the main fermentation product. The mutation responsible for anaerobic growth and ethanol production was mapped in the lpdA gene and the mutation was identified as E354K in three of the isolates tested. Another three isolates carried an lpdA mutation, H352Y. Enzyme kinetic studies revealed that the mutated form of the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LPD) encoded by the lpdA was significantly less sensitive to NADH inhibition than the native LPD. This reduced NADH sensitivity of the mutated LPD was translated into lower sensitivity to NADH of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in strain SE2378. The net yield of 4 moles of NADH and 2 moles of acetyl-CoA per mole of glucose produced by a combination of glycolysis and PDH provided a logical basis to explain the production of 2 moles of ethanol per glucose. The development of E

  20. Global adaptive rank truncated product method for gene-set analysis in association studies.

    PubMed

    Vilor-Tejedor, Natalia; Calle, M Luz

    2014-09-01

    Gene set analysis (GSA) aims to assess the overall association of a set of genetic variants with a phenotype and has the potential to detect subtle effects of variants in a gene or a pathway that might be missed when assessed individually. We present a new implementation of the Adaptive Rank Truncated Product method (ARTP) for analyzing the association of a set of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene or pathway. The new implementation, referred to as globalARTP, improves the original one by allowing the different SNPs in the set to have different modes of inheritance. We perform a simulation study for exploring the power of the proposed methodology in a set of scenarios with different numbers of causal SNPs with different effect sizes. Moreover, we show the advantage of using the gene set approach in the context of an Alzheimer's disease case-control study where we explore the endocytosis pathway. The new method is implemented in the R function globalARTP of the globalGSA package available at http://cran.r-project.org. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Structural and functional studies of the intracellular tyrosine kinase MATK gene and its translated product.

    PubMed

    Avraham, S; Jiang, S; Ota, S; Fu, Y; Deng, B; Dowler, L L; White, R A; Avraham, H

    1995-01-27

    We recently cloned the cDNA which encodes a novel megakaryocyte-associated tyrosine kinase termed MATK. In this study, we have cloned and characterized the human MATK gene as well as the murine homolog of human MATK cDNA and performed functional studies of its translated product. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of human and murine MATK cDNAs revealed 85% homology, indicating that MATK is highly conserved in mouse and human. The human gene consists of 13 exons interrupted by 12 introns. The genetic units which encode the SH3 and SH2 domains are located on separate exons. The putative ATP binding site (GXGXXG) is localized on exon 7, and the entire catalytic domain is subdivided into seven exons (7-13). Somatic cell hybrid analysis indicated that human MATK gene is located on chromosome 19 while the murine Matk gene is located on chromosome 10. The immediate 5'-flanking region was highly rich in GC sequences, and potential cis-acting elements were identified including several SP1, GATA-1, APRE, and APRE1. Antisense oligonucleotides directed against MATK mRNA sequences significantly inhibited megakaryocyte progenitor proliferation. Functional studies indicated that MATK can phosphorylate the carboxyl-terminal conserved tyrosine of the Src protein. These results support the notion that MATK acts as a regulator of p60c-src in megakaryocytic cells and participates in the pathways regulating growth of cells of this lineage.

  2. Primary structure of the Escherichia coli thyA gene and its thymidylate synthase product.

    PubMed Central

    Belfort, M; Maley, G; Pedersen-Lane, J; Maley, F

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 1,163-base-pair fragment that encodes the entire thyA gene of Escherichia coli K-12 was determined. The strategy involved sequence determination of both DNA strands by using overlapping deletions that had been generated in vitro from the two ends of the fragment with BAL-31 nuclease. The amino-terminal sequence of thymidylate synthase (5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate:dUMP C-methyltransferase, EC 2.1.1.45), the product of the thyA gene, located the 792-base-pair open reading frame, which codes for the 264 amino acid residues of this enzyme. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide data was confirmed to the extent of 40% by partial sequence analysis of the enzyme purified from extracts of the amplified cloned gene. Transcriptional and translational control areas were apparent in the regions flanking the structural gene. The 5-fluorodeoxyuridylate-binding residue of the active site was identified as cysteine-146. Comparison of the E. coli and Lactobacillus casei synthase sequences reveals consistent homology (62%) over extensive regions. This homology is particularly striking in a very hydrophobic region bordering cysteine-146. In the two enzymes, this region, which probably defines the active site, is 82% homologous. However, a dramatic difference between the two sequences is reflected by the surprising finding that a 51-amino-acid stretch, present midway through the L. casei sequence, is completely absent from the E. coli enzyme. PMID:6308660

  3. Dissection of Maize Kernel Composition and Starch Production by Candidate Gene Association

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Larissa M.; Whitt, Sherry R.; Ibáñez, Ana M.; Rocheford, Torbert R.; Goodman, Major M.; Buckler, Edward S.

    2004-01-01

    Cereal starch production forms the basis of subsistence for much of the world's human and domesticated animal populations. Starch concentration and composition in the maize (Zea mays ssp mays) kernel are complex traits controlled by many genes. In this study, an association approach was used to evaluate six maize candidate genes involved in kernel starch biosynthesis: amylose extender1 (ae1), brittle endosperm2 (bt2), shrunken1 (sh1), sh2, sugary1, and waxy1. Major kernel composition traits, such as protein, oil, and starch concentration, were assessed as well as important starch composition quality traits, including pasting properties and amylose levels. Overall, bt2, sh1, and sh2 showed significant associations for kernel composition traits, whereas ae1 and sh2 showed significant associations for starch pasting properties. ae1 and sh1 both associated with amylose levels. Additionally, haplotype analysis of sh2 suggested this gene is involved in starch viscosity properties and amylose content. Despite starch concentration being only moderately heritable for this particular panel of diverse maize inbreds, high resolution was achieved when evaluating these starch candidate genes, and diverse alleles for breeding and further molecular analysis were identified. PMID:15377761

  4. DNA repair in Escherichia coli: identification of the uvrD gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Maples, V F; Kushner, S R

    1982-01-01

    A 2.9-kilobase (kb) Pvu II DNA fragment that contains the uvrD gene of Escherichia coli K-12 has been cloned in both low-copy and multiple-copy plasmid vehicles. The low-copy uvrD plasmid (pVMK49) complements a variety of uvrD, uvrE, and recL mutations. In contrast, the same strains carrying the 2.9-kb fragment in a multiple-copy plasmid (pVMK45) remain sensitive to ultraviolet light (UV). Additionally, pVMK45 transformants of wild-type E. coli are sensitive to UV and methyl methanesulfonate and appear to be recombination deficient. The cloned uvrD gene does not complement the dominant uvrD3 allele. The 2.9-kb Pvu II insert in these plasmids encodes a single 76,000-dalton protein, which, on the basis of insertional inactivation experiments with the Tn1000 transposon, must be the uvrD gene product. These data confirm earlier genetic analysis which suggested that recL, uvrE, and uvrD were all allelic. The direction of transcription of the uvrD gene has also been determined. Images PMID:6291053

  5. Identification and characterization of a novel yeast gene: the YGP1 gene product is a highly glycosylated secreted protein that is synthesized in response to nutrient limitation.

    PubMed Central

    Destruelle, M; Holzer, H; Klionsky, D J

    1994-01-01

    Nutrient starvation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to a number of physiological changes that accompany entry into stationary phase. The expression of genes whose products play a role in stress adaptation is regulated in a manner that allows the cell to sense and respond to changing environmental conditions. We have identified a novel yeast gene, YGP1, that displays homology to the sporulation-specific SPS100 gene. The expression of YGP1 is regulated by nutrient availability. The gene is expressed at a basal level during "respiro-fermentative" (logarithmic) growth. When the glucose concentration in the medium falls below 1%, the YGP1 gene is derepressed and the gene product, gp37, is synthesized at levels up to 50-fold above the basal level. The glucose-sensing mechanism is independent of the SNF1 pathway and does not operate when cells are directly shifted to a low glucose concentration. The expression of YGP1 also responds to the depletion of nitrogen and phosphate, indicating a general response to nutrient deprivation. These results suggest that the YGP1 gene product may be involved in cellular adaptations prior to stationary phase and may be a useful marker protein for monitoring early events associated with the stress response. Images PMID:8139573

  6. Discovery of a Linear Peptide for Improving Tumor Targeting of Gene Products and Treatment of Distal Tumors by IL-12 Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cutrera, Jeffry; Dibra, Denada; Xia, Xueqing; Hasan, Azeem; Reed, Scott; Li, Shulin

    2011-01-01

    Like many effective therapeutics, interleukin-12 (IL-12) therapy often causes side effects. Tumor targeted delivery may improve the efficacy and decrease the toxicity of systemic IL-12 treatments. In this study, a novel targeting approach was investigated. A secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene-based screening process was used to identify a mini-peptide which can be produced in vivo to target gene products to tumors. The coding region for the best peptide was inserted into an IL-12 gene to determine the antitumor efficacy. Affinity chromatography, mass spectrometry analysis, and binding studies were used to identify a receptor for this peptide. We discovered that the linear peptide VNTANST increased the tumor accumulation of the reporter gene products in five independent tumor models including one human xenogeneic model. The product from VNTANST-IL-12 fusion gene therapy increased accumulation of IL-12 in the tumor environment, and in three tumor models, VNTANST-IL-12 gene therapy inhibited distal tumor growth. In a spontaneous lung metastasis model, inhibition of metastatic tumor growth was improved compared to wild-type IL-12 gene therapy, and in a squamous cell carcinoma model, toxic liver lesions were reduced. The receptor for VNTANST was identified as vimentin. These results show the promise of using VNTANST to improve IL-12 treatments. PMID:21386825

  7. Transcriptome and Gene Ontology (GO) Enrichment Analysis Reveals Genes Involved in Biotin Metabolism That Affect L-Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Il; Kim, Jong-Hyeon; Park, Young-Jin

    2016-03-09

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is widely used for amino acid production. In the present study, 543 genes showed a significant change in their mRNA expression levels in L-lysine-producing C. glutamicum ATCC21300 than that in the wild-type C. glutamicum ATCC13032. Among these 543 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 28 genes were up- or downregulated. In addition, 454 DEGs were functionally enriched and categorized based on BLAST sequence homologies and gene ontology (GO) annotations using the Blast2GO software. Interestingly, NCgl0071 (bioB, encoding biotin synthase) was expressed at levels ~20-fold higher in the L-lysine-producing ATCC21300 strain than that in the wild-type ATCC13032 strain. Five other genes involved in biotin metabolism or transport--NCgl2515 (bioA, encoding adenosylmethionine-8-amino-7-oxononanoate aminotransferase), NCgl2516 (bioD, encoding dithiobiotin synthetase), NCgl1883, NCgl1884, and NCgl1885--were also expressed at significantly higher levels in the L-lysine-producing ATCC21300 strain than that in the wild-type ATCC13032 strain, which we determined using both next-generation RNA sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR analysis. When we disrupted the bioB gene in C. glutamicum ATCC21300, L-lysine production decreased by approximately 76%, and the three genes involved in biotin transport (NCgl1883, NCgl1884, and NCgl1885) were significantly downregulated. These results will be helpful to improve our understanding of C. glutamicum for industrial amino acid production.

  8. Production of Penicillin by Fungi Growing on Food Products: Identification of a Complete Penicillin Gene Cluster in Penicillium griseofulvum and a Truncated Cluster in Penicillium verrucosum

    PubMed Central

    Laich, Federico; Fierro, Francisco; Martín, Juan F.

    2002-01-01

    Mycobiota growing on food is often beneficial for the ripening and development of the specific flavor characteristics of the product, but it can also be harmful due to the production of undesirable compounds such as mycotoxins or antibiotics. Some of the fungi most frequently isolated from fermented and cured meat products such as Penicillium chrysogenum and Penicillium nalgiovense are known penicillin producers; the latter has been shown to be able to produce penicillin when growing on the surface of meat products and secrete it to the medium. The presence of penicillin in food must be avoided, since it can lead to allergic reactions and the arising of penicillin resistance in human-pathogenic bacteria. In this article we describe a study of the penicillin production ability among fungi of the genus Penicillium that are used as starters for cheese and meat products or that are frequently isolated from food products. Penicillium griseofulvum was found to be a new penicillin producer and to have a penicillin gene cluster similar to that of Penicillium chrysogenum. No other species among the studied fungi were found to produce penicillin or to possess the penicillin biosynthetic genes, except P. verrucosum, which contains the pcbAB gene (as shown by hybridization and PCR cloning of fragments of the gene) but lacks pcbC and penDE. Antibacterial activities due to the production of secondary metabolites other than penicillin were observed in some fungi. PMID:11872470

  9. Production of penicillin by fungi growing on food products: identification of a complete penicillin gene cluster in Penicillium griseofulvum and a truncated cluster in Penicillium verrucosum.

    PubMed

    Laich, Federico; Fierro, Francisco; Martín, Juan F

    2002-03-01

    Mycobiota growing on food is often beneficial for the ripening and development of the specific flavor characteristics of the product, but it can also be harmful due to the production of undesirable compounds such as mycotoxins or antibiotics. Some of the fungi most frequently isolated from fermented and cured meat products such as Penicillium chrysogenum and Penicillium nalgiovense are known penicillin producers; the latter has been shown to be able to produce penicillin when growing on the surface of meat products and secrete it to the medium. The presence of penicillin in food must be avoided, since it can lead to allergic reactions and the arising of penicillin resistance in human-pathogenic bacteria. In this article we describe a study of the penicillin production ability among fungi of the genus Penicillium that are used as starters for cheese and meat products or that are frequently isolated from food products. Penicillium griseofulvum was found to be a new penicillin producer and to have a penicillin gene cluster similar to that of Penicillium chrysogenum. No other species among the studied fungi were found to produce penicillin or to possess the penicillin biosynthetic genes, except P. verrucosum, which contains the pcbAB gene (as shown by hybridization and PCR cloning of fragments of the gene) but lacks pcbC and penDE. Antibacterial activities due to the production of secondary metabolites other than penicillin were observed in some fungi.

  10. Deletion of pigR gene in Monascus ruber leads to loss of pigment production.

    PubMed

    Xie, Nana; Liu, Qingpei; Chen, Fusheng

    2013-09-01

    Pigments produced by Monascus are traditional food colorants and are widely used as dietary supplements. Since genes involving in pigment biosynthesis have not been reported, we describe the identification of a putative pigment-regulatory gene (pigR) obtained by molecular analysis of an albino strain of Monascus ruber M7. In the pigR-deleted strain (ΔpigR), neither the pigments nor pigR expression were detected by HPLC or reverse-transcription PCR, respectively, whereas the introduction of the pigR, together with a constitutive trpC promoter into ΔpigR, caused it to produce 5.4 U of red pigments/g dry mycelia, about 12-fold higher than Monascus ruber M7 (0.46 U/g dry mycelia). Thus pigR up-regulates pigment production in Monascus ruber M7.

  11. Directed natural product biosynthesis gene cluster capture and expression in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxin; Li, Zhongrui; Yamanaka, Kazuya; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Weipeng; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto; Moore, Bradley S.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-03-01

    Bacilli are ubiquitous low G+C environmental Gram-positive bacteria that produce a wide assortment of specialized small molecules. Although their natural product biosynthetic potential is high, robust molecular tools to support the heterologous expression of large biosynthetic gene clusters in Bacillus hosts are rare. Herein we adapt transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast to design a single genomic capture and expression vector for antibiotic production in Bacillus subtilis. After validating this direct cloning ``plug-and-play'' approach with surfactin, we genetically interrogated amicoumacin biosynthetic gene cluster from the marine isolate Bacillus subtilis 1779. Its heterologous expression allowed us to explore an unusual maturation process involving the N-acyl-asparagine pro-drug intermediates preamicoumacins, which are hydrolyzed by the asparagine-specific peptidase into the active component amicoumacin A. This work represents the first direct cloning based heterologous expression of natural products in the model organism B. subtilis and paves the way to the development of future genome mining efforts in this genus.

  12. Genetic association between SNPs in the DGAT1 gene and milk production traits in Murrah buffaloes.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Ana Cláudia; de Camargo, Gregório Miguel Ferreira; Stafuzza, Nedenia Bonvino; Aspilcueta-Borquis, Rusbel Raul; Venturini, Guilherme Costa; Dias, Marina Mortati; Cardoso, Diercles Francisco; Tonhati, Humberto

    2016-10-01

    This study identified polymorphisms in the DGAT1 gene in Murrah buffaloes and investigated the associations to milk production and quality traits (milk, fat and protein yields and percentages, somatic cell count). Genomic DNA was extracted from hair follicles collected from the tail of 196 females. Three SNPs were identified in DGAT1 gene by sequencing. Statistical analyses were performed to verify the linkage and the association between polymorphisms and traits. The estimated value of r (2) between two SNPs in exon 17 (g.11,783G > A and g.11,785 T > C) was 0.029. SNP g.11,785 T > C was significantly associated (P < 0.05) to fat and protein percentage. Dominance effect was significant for milk and fat yields and protein percentage (P < 0.05). The additive effect of the SNP g.11,785 T > C was significant for protein production and somatic cell count (P < 0.05). It indicates that assisted marker selection might be done with considerations to balance production and udder health.

  13. Identification of the human papilloma virus-1a E4 gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Doorbar, J; Campbell, D; Grand, R J; Gallimore, P H

    1986-01-01

    Antibodies prepared against a human papilloma virus-1 (HPV-1) E4/beta-galactosidase fusion protein identified several polypeptides in HPV-1, but not HPV-2 or 4, induced papillomas. The major E4 protein, that represented up to 30% of total cellular protein, was a 16/17-K doublet which was purified by column chromatography and analysed for amino acid content. A peptide derived by chymotryptic digestion was purified by h.p.l.c. and subjected to amino acid sequencing. The unique sequence obtained, Gly-His-Pro-Asp-Leu-Ser-Leu, identified the 16/17-K doublet as a product of the HPV-1 E4 gene region. Antibodies to both the E4/beta-galactosidase fusion protein and the 16/17-K doublet identified two smaller polypeptides (10/11-K) which may represent spliced products of E4. We propose that the products of the HPV-1 E4 gene region are not classical DNA tumor virus early proteins and suggest that they play a role in virus maturation. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3011404

  14. Increase of xanthan production by cloning xps genes into wild-type Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Y H; Ting, W Y; Chou, H C; Yang, B Y; Chen, C C

    1992-02-01

    Previously, genomic banks of Xanthomonas campestris were constructed in Escherichia coli, using mobilizable broad-host-range cosmids as the vectors. Following conjugal transfer, genes involved in the biosynthesis of xanthan polysaccharide (XPS) were cloned by the ability to restore the mucoid phenotype to the non-mucoid mutants. In this study, all clones were transferred into the wild-type strain Xc17 to evaluate the effects of the cloned genes on XPS production. Most clones showed no significant effect; however, two plasmids, pP2401 and pP2201, caused 10 and 15% yield increases, respectively, compared with that of controls. While it was not clear how pP2201 caused the yield increase, the effect of pP2401 seemed to result from elevated phosphomannose isomerase activity. Since XPS synthesis in X. campestris is a very efficient process, only relatively small increases are to be expected; an enhancement of productivity by 10-15% is important to the commercial production of xanthan.

  15. Genes Involved in SkfA Killing Factor Production Protect a Bacillus subtilis Lipase against Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Westers, Helga; Braun, Peter G.; Westers, Lidia; Antelmann, Haike; Hecker, Michael; Jongbloed, Jan D. H.; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Teruo; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Quax, Wim J.

    2005-01-01

    Small lipases of Bacillus species, such as LipA from Bacillus subtilis, have a high potential for industrial applications. Recent studies showed that deletion of six AT-rich islands from the B. subtilis genome results in reduced amounts of extracellular LipA. Here we demonstrate that the reduced LipA levels are due to the absence of four genes, skfABCD, located in the prophage 1 region. Intact skfABCD genes are required not only for LipA production at wild-type levels by B. subtilis 168 but also under conditions of LipA overproduction. Notably, SkfA has bactericidal activity and, probably, requires the SkfB to SkfD proteins for its production. The present results show that LipA is more prone to proteolytic degradation in the absence of SkfA and that high-level LipA production can be improved significantly by employing multiple protease-deficient B. subtilis strains. In conclusion, our findings imply that SkfA protects LipA, directly or indirectly, against proteolytic degradation. Conceivably, SkfA could act as a modulator in LipA folding or as a protease inhibitor. PMID:15812018

  16. Increased biomass production and glycogen accumulation in apcE gene deleted Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Ancy; Aikawa, Shimpei; Sasaki, Kengo; Matsuda, Fumio; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    The effect of phycobilisome antenna-truncation in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 on biomass production and glycogen accumulation have not yet been fully clarified. To investigate these effects here, the apcE gene, which encodes the anchor protein linking the phycobilisome to the thylakoid membrane, was deleted in a glucose tolerant strain of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Biomass production of the apcE-deleted strain under photoautotrophic and atmospheric air conditions was 1.6 times higher than that of strain PCC 6803 (1.32 ± 0.01 versus 0.84 ± 0.07 g cell-dry weight L(-1), respectively) after 15 days of cultivation. In addition, the glycogen content of the apcE-deleted strain (24.2 ± 0.7%) was also higher than that of strain PCC 6803 (11.1 ± 0.3%). Together, these results demonstrate that antenna truncation by deleting the apcE gene was effective for increasing biomass production and glycogen accumulation under photoautotrophic and atmospheric air conditions in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  17. Identification of genes affecting production of the adhesion organelle of Caulobacter crescentus CB2.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, D; Smit, J

    1990-01-01

    Transposon (Tn5) mutagenesis was used to identify regions in the genome involved with production, regulation, or attachment to the cell surface of the adhesive holdfast of the freshwater bacterium Caulobacter crescentus CB2. A total of 12,000 independently selected transposon insertion mutants were screened for defects in adhesion to cellulose acetate; 77 mutants were detected and examined by Southern blot hybridization mapping methods and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Ten unique sites of Tn5 insertion affecting holdfast function were identified that were clustered in four regions of the genome. Representative mutants of the 10 Tn5 insertion sites were examined by a variety of methods for differences in their phenotype leading to the loss of adhesiveness. Four phenotypes were identified: no holdfast production, production of a smaller or an altered holdfast, production of a holdfast that was unable to remain attached to the cell, and a fourth category in which a possible alteration of the stalk was related to impaired adhesion of the cell. With the possible exception of the last class, no pleiotropic mutants (those with multiple defects in the polar region of the cell) were detected among the adhesion-defective mutants. This was unexpected, since holdfast deficiency is often a characteristic of pleiotropic mutants obtained when selecting for loss of other polar structures. Overall, the evidence suggests that we have identified regions containing structural genes for the holdfast, genes involved with proper attachment or positioning on the caulobacter surface, and possibly regions that regulate the levels of holdfast production. Images PMID:2168382

  18. Regulation of xanthine dehydrogensase gene expression and uric acid production in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Huff, Ryan D; Hsu, Alan C-Y; Nichol, Kristy S; Jones, Bernadette; Knight, Darryl A; Wark, Peter A B; Hansbro, Philip M; Hirota, Jeremy A

    2017-01-01

    The airway epithelium is a physical and immunological barrier that protects the pulmonary system from inhaled environmental insults. Uric acid has been detected in the respiratory tract and can function as an antioxidant or damage associated molecular pattern. We have demonstrated that human airway epithelial cells are a source of uric acid. Our hypothesis is that uric acid production by airway epithelial cells is induced by environmental stimuli associated with chronic respiratory diseases. We therefore examined how airway epithelial cells regulate uric acid production. Allergen and cigarette smoke mouse models were performed using house dust mite (HDM) and cigarette smoke exposure, respectively, with outcome measurements of lung uric acid levels. Primary human airway epithelial cells isolated from clinically diagnosed patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were grown in submerged cultures and compared to age-matched healthy controls for uric acid release. HBEC-6KT cells, a human airway epithelial cell line, were grown under submerged monolayer conditions for mechanistic and gene expression studies. HDM, but not cigarette smoke exposure, stimulated uric acid production in vivo and in vitro. Primary human airway epithelial cells from asthma, but not COPD patients, displayed elevated levels of extracellular uric acid in culture. In HBEC-6KT, production of uric acid was sensitive to the xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) inhibitor, allopurinol, and the ATP Binding Cassette C4 (ABCC4) inhibitor, MK-571. Lastly, the pro-inflammatory cytokine combination of TNF-α and IFN-γ elevated extracellular uric acid levels and XDH gene expression in HBEC-6KT cells. Our results suggest that the active production of uric acid from human airway epithelial cells may be intrinsically altered in asthma and be further induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  19. Identification of a putative FR901469 biosynthesis gene cluster in fungal sp. No. 11243 and enhancement of the productivity by overexpressing the transcription factor gene frbF.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Makoto; Yokoyama, Tatsuya; Nemoto, Kaoru; Kumagai, Toshitaka; Terai, Goro; Tamano, Koichi; Machida, Masayuki; Shibata, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    FR901469 is an antifungal antibiotic produced by fungal sp. No. 11243. Here, we searched for FR901469 biosynthesis genes in the genome of No. 11243. Based on the molecular structure of FR901469 and endogenous functional motifs predicted in each genomic NRPS gene, a putative FR901469 biosynthesis gene cluster harboring the most plausible NRPS gene was identified. A transcription factor gene, designated frbF, was found in the cluster. To improve FR901469 productivity, we constructed a strain in which frbF was overexpressed and named it TFH2-2. FR901469 productivity of TFH2-2 was 3.4 times higher than that of the wild-type strain. Transcriptome analysis revealed that most of the genes in the putative FR901469 biosynthesis gene cluster were upregulated in TFH2-2. It also showed that the expression of genes related to ergosterol biosynthesis, β-1,3-glucan catabolism, and chitin synthesis was inclined to exhibit significant differences in TFH2-2.

  20. Gene sequences regulating the production of apoE and cerebral palsy of variable severity.

    PubMed

    Lien, Espen; Andersen, Guro L; Bao, Yongde; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Skranes, Jon; Blackman, James A; Vik, Torstein

    2014-09-01

    The apoE protein is the most important lipid transporter in the brain and has also been shown to have several regulatory functions in the central nervous system. The production of apoE is regulated by a number of genes and increases under certain conditions such as cerebral injury in adults. Our aim was to study whether variations in genes regulating the expression of the APOE gene were associated with severity of cerebral palsy (CP). Children enrolled in the Cerebral Palsy Register of Norway (CPRN) were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study; 281 of the invited 703 children (40%) returned swabs with buccal cells collected by parents. Six genetic variations thought to affect the production of apoE were genotyped and correlated with clinical data recorded in the CPRN. Compared with children carrying the GG allele, children with genotype GT or TT in a specific genetic variation (rs59007384 located in the nearby TOMM40 gene) had excess risk for worse fine motor function (Odds ratio (OR): 1.82; 95% Confidence interval (CI): 1.10-2.99; p = 0.019) and epilepsy (OR: 2.32; CI: 1.17-4.61; p = 0.016). There was no association between severity of CP and any of the other five genetic variations analyzed. Our findings suggest that genetic variations in one of the sequences regulating the expression of APOE, may be associated with worse clinical outcome in children with cerebral palsy. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Uteroferrin and intracellular tartrate-resistant acid phosphatases are the products of the same gene.

    PubMed

    Ling, P; Roberts, R M

    1993-04-05

    Uteroferrin (Uf) is a purple acid phosphatase with a bi-iron center. It is the major secretory product of the porcine uterus under the influence of progesterone and supplies iron to the developing fetuses during pregnancy. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatases (TRAP) are clearly similar to Uf in many of their properties but are generally located intracellularly in lysosomes. To determine whether Uf and intracellular TRAP are distinct gene products, cDNA for the TRAP from pig spleen were compared with Uf cDNA. Although no full-length cDNA for the former were isolated, a TRAP cDNA of 1.1 kilobases was identical in nucleotide sequence to a Uf cDNA (1.42 kilobases) in the region of overlap, which included the entire 3'-end of the transcript and most of the open reading frame. TRAP purified from porcine spleen also had an NH2-terminal amino acid sequence that corresponded to that of Uf purified from uterine secretions and was also similar in sequence to intracellular TRAP isolated from tissues of other species, including ones from human osteoclastomas and spleen. Finally, Southern hybridization analysis with two probes specific for exons 1 and 2 of the Uf gene strongly suggested the presence of only a single gene for acid phosphatases of this class in the pig. A similar analysis performed on human DNA with an exon-specific probe for human TRAP was also consistent with a single gene. It is concluded that the difference in trafficking between a secreted TRAP, such as Uf, and TRAP located in lysosomes is not the result of distinctive primary sequence of the polypeptides and that the variability within species ascribed to such enzymes is most likely the result of minor posttranslational changes.

  2. Gut symbiotic bacteria stimulate insect growth and egg production by modulating hexamerin and vitellogenin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Beom; Park, Kyoung-Eun; Lee, Seung Ah; Jang, Seong Han; Eo, Ho Jeong; Jang, Ho Am; Kim, Chan-Hee; Ohbayashi, Tsubasa; Matsuura, Yu; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Futahashi, Ryo; Fukatsu, Takema; Lee, Bok Luel

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies have suggested that gut symbionts modulate insect development and reproduction. However, the mechanisms by which gut symbionts modulate host physiologies and the molecules involved in these changes are unclear. To address these questions, we prepared three different groups of the insect Riptortus pedestris: Burkholderia gut symbiont-colonized (Sym) insects, Burkholderia-non-colonized (Apo) insects, and Burkholderia-depleted (Sym(Burk-)) insects, which were fed tetracycline. When the hemolymph proteins of three insects were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, the hexamerin-α, hexamerin-β and vitellogenin-1 proteins of Sym-adults were highly expressed compared to those of Apo- and Sym(Burk-)-insects. To investigate the expression patterns of these three genes during insect development, we measured the transcriptional levels of these genes. The hexamerin-β gene was specifically expressed at all nymphal stages, and its expression was detected 4-5 days earlier in Sym-insect nymphs than that in Apo- and Sym(Burk-)-insects. However, the hexamerin-α and vitellogenin-1 genes were only expressed in adult females, and they were also detected 6-7 days earlier and were 2-fold higher in Sym-adult females than those in the other insects. Depletion of hexamerin-β by RNA interference in 2nd instar Sym-nymphs delayed adult emergence, whereas hexamerin-α and vitellogenin-1 RNA interference in 5th instar nymphs caused loss of color of the eggs of Sym-insects. These results demonstrate that the Burkholderia gut symbiont modulates host development and egg production by regulating production of these three hemolymph storage proteins.

  3. Increased biomass production of industrial bakers' yeasts by overexpression of Hap4 gene.

    PubMed

    Dueñas-Sánchez, Rafael; Codón, Antonio C; Rincón, Ana M; Benítez, Tahía

    2010-10-15

    HAP4 encodes a transcriptional activator of respiration-related genes and so, redirection from fermentation to respiration flux should give rise to an increase in biomass production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae transformants that overexpress HAP4. With this aim, three bakers' yeasts, that is, V1 used for lean doughs, its 2-deoxy-D-glucose resistant derivative DOG21, and V3 employed for sweet doughs, were transformed with integrative cassettes that carried HAP4 gene under the control of constitutive promoter pTEF2; in addition VTH, DTH and 3TH transformants were selected and characterized. Transformants showed increased expression of HAP4 and respiration-related genes such as QCR7 and QCR8 with regard to parental, and similar expression of SUC2 and MAL12; these genes are relevant in bakers' industry. Invertase (Suc2p) and maltase (Mal12p) activities, growth and sugar consumption rates in laboratory (YPD) or industrial media (MAB) were also comparable in bakers' strains and their transformants, but VTH, DTH and 3TH increased their final biomass production by 9.5, 5.0 and 5.0% respectively as compared to their parentals in MAB. Furthermore, V1 and its transformant VTH had comparable capacity to ferment lean doughs (volume increase rate and final volume) while V3 and its transformant 3TH fermented sweet doughs in a similar manner. Therefore transformants possessed increased biomass yield and appropriate characteristics to be employed in bakers' industry because they lacked drug resistant markers and bacterial DNA, and were genetically stable. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Suppression of Tla1 gene expression for improved solar conversion efficiency and photosynthetic productivity in plants and algae

    DOEpatents

    Melis, Anastasios; Mitra, Mautusi

    2010-06-29

    The invention provides method and compositions to minimize the chlorophyll antenna size of photosynthesis by decreasing TLA1 gene expression, thereby improving solar conversion efficiencies and photosynthetic productivity in plants, e.g., green microalgae, under bright sunlight conditions.

  5. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products with antisera against bacterially synthesized fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Strebel, K.; Beck, E.; Strohmaier, K.; Schaller, H.

    1986-03-01

    Defined segments of the cloned foot-and-mouth disease virus genome corresponding to all parts of the coding region were expressed in Escherichia coli as fusions to the N-terminal part of the MS2-polymerase gene under the control of the inducible lambdaPL promoter. All constructs yielded large amounts of proteins, which were purified and used to raise sequence-specific antisera in rabbits. These antisera were used to identify the corresponding viral gene products in /sup 35/S-labeled extracts from foot-and-mouth disease virus-infected BHK cells. This allowed us to locate unequivocally all mature foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products in the nucleotide sequence, to identify precursor-product relationships, and to detect several foot-and mouth disease virus gene products not previously identified in vivo or in vitro.

  6. Improvement of exopolysaccharide production in Lactobacillus casei LC2W by overexpression of NADH oxidase gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Wang, Yuanlong; Zhu, Ping; Liu, Zhenmin; Guo, Benheng; Ren, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Lactobacillus casei LC2W is an exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing strain with probiotic effects. To investigate the regulation mechanism of EPS biosynthesis and to improve EPS production through cofactor engineering, a H₂O-forming NADH oxidase gene was cloned from Streptococcus mutans and overexpressed in L. casei LC2W under the control of constitutive promoter P₂₃. The recombinant strain LC-nox exhibited 0.854 U/mL of NADH oxidase activity, which was elevated by almost 20-fold in comparison with that of wild-type strain. As a result, overexpression of NADH oxidase resulted in a reduction in growth rate. In addition, lactate production was decreased by 22% in recombinant strain. It was proposed that more carbon source was saved and used for the biosynthesis of EPS, the production of which was reached at 219.4 mg/L, increased by 46% compared to that of wild-type strain. This work provided a novel and convenient genetic approach to manipulate metabolic flux and to increase EPS production. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report which correlates cofactor engineering with EPS production.

  7. Gene Discovery for Synthetic Biology: Exploring the Novel Natural Product Biosynthetic Capacity of Eukaryotic Microalgae.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, E C; Saalbach, G; Field, R A

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic microalgae are an incredibly diverse group of organisms whose sole unifying feature is their ability to photosynthesize. They are known for producing a range of potent toxins, which can build up during harmful algal blooms causing damage to ecosystems and fisheries. Genome sequencing is lagging behind in these organisms because of their genetic complexity, but transcriptome sequencing is beginning to make up for this deficit. As more sequence data becomes available, it is apparent that eukaryotic microalgae possess a range of complex natural product biosynthesis capabilities. Some of the genes concerned are responsible for the biosynthesis of known toxins, but there are many more for which we do not know the products. Bioinformatic and analytical techniques have been developed for natural product discovery in bacteria and these approaches can be used to extract information about the products synthesized by algae. Recent analyses suggest that eukaryotic microalgae produce many complex natural products that remain to be discovered. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Seasonal cardenolide production and Dop5betar gene expression in natural populations of Digitalis obscura.

    PubMed

    Roca-Pérez, Luis; Boluda, Rafael; Gavidia, Isabel; Pérez-Bermúdez, Pedro

    2004-07-01

    Productivity variations and seasonal fluctuations of cardenolides have been studied in 10 natural populations of Digitalis obscura distributed in three bioclimatic belts. Main cardenolides in D. obscura plants are those of the series A and such predominance (ca. 80-85%) over the series B metabolites is independent of the population studied or the degree of maturity of the leaves. Primary glycosides represent ca. 50-60% of total cardenolides; this percentage did not vary among populations or with the leaf age but increased in summer and decreased in winter. A correlation analysis between plant biomass and cardenolide content showed a positive relationship of these parameters, which, according to the bioclimatic distribution of the populations, suggests that certain environmental conditions may cause marked decreases in plant biomass together with a reduction in productivity. Cardenolide contents changed in the timecourse of the four seasons as a multiple response to distinct plant and/or environmental factors. The lowest production was recorded in May, followed by a fast cardenolide accumulation in summer, a decreasing phase in autumn, and a stationary phase in winter. We also analysed the seasonal expression of the gene encoding the progesterone 5beta-reductase, enzyme producing the required 5beta-configured intermediaries of cardenolides. A fragment of the isolated partial genomic sequence was used as a probe for Northern analysis to study the seasonal gene expression in selected populations. The expression pattern showed increasing levels from February to July and a further reduction in autumn, although harmful climatic conditions seems to induce overexpression of this gene.

  9. Alternative splicing of human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARdelta):effects on translation efficiency and trans-activation ability

    PubMed Central

    Lundell, Kerstin; Thulin, Petra; Hamsten, Anders; Ehrenborg, Ewa

    2007-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Numerous studies have aimed at unravelling the physiological role of PPARδ as a transcriptional regulator whereas the regulation of PPARδ gene expression has been less studied. Results The principal transcription start site in the human PPARδ gene identified here is positioned upstream of exon 1, although four alternative 5'-ends related to downstream exons were identified. The demonstration of multiple 5'-UTR splice variants of PPARδ mRNA, with an impact on translation efficiency, suggests a translational regulation of human PPARδ expression. Five untranslated exons identified in this study contribute to the variability among the 5'-UTRs of human PPARδ mRNAs. Moreover, in vitro studies of a 3'-splice transcript encoding a truncated variant of PPARδ (designated PPARδ2) show that this isoform constitutes a potential dominant negative form of the receptor. Conclusion We propose that alternative splicing of human PPARδ constitutes an intrinsic role for the regulation of PPARδ expression and thus activity, and highlight the significance of alternative splicing of this nuclear receptor in physiology and disease. PMID:17705821

  10. Interleukin-4-Mediated 15-Lipoxygenase-1 Trans-Activation Requires UTX Recruitment and H3K27me3 Demethylation at the Promoter in A549 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hongya; Xu, Dawei; Liu, Cheng; Claesson, Hans-Erik; Björkholm, Magnus; Sjöberg, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase-1 (ALOX15) oxygenates polyunsaturated fatty acids and bio-membranes, generating multiple lipid signalling mediators involved in inflammation. Several lines of evidence indicate that ALOX15 activation in the respiratory tract contributes to asthma progression. Recent experimental data reveals that histone modification at the promoter plays a critical role in ALOX15 gene transcription. In the present study, we examined the status of histone H3 trimethyl-lysine 27 (H3K27me3) at the ALOX15 promoter by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay in human lung epithelial carcinoma A549 cells incubated with or without interleukin (IL)-4. We identified demethylation of H3K27me3 at the ALOX15 promoter after IL-4 treatment. Furthermore, we found that the H3K27me2/3-specific demethylase, ubiquitously transcribed tetratricopeptide repeat, X chromosome (UTX), mediates the H3K27me3 demethylation during ALOX15 transcriptional activation. When UTX expression was knocked down using siRNA, IL-4-mediated H3K27me3 demethylation and ALOX15 induction were significantly attenuated. The critical role of UTX in ALOX15 expression was confirmed in human monocytes and the Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) cell line L1236, but was in these cells not related to H3K27me3-demethylase activity. These results demonstrate that UTX is implicated in IL-4 mediated transcriptional activation of the ALOX15 gene. PMID:24465480

  11. Ocurrence of Staphylococcus aureus and multiplex pcr detection of classic enterotoxin genes in cheese and meat products

    PubMed Central

    Pelisser, Marcia Regina; Klein, Cátia Silene; Ascoli, Kelen Regina; Zotti, Thaís Regina; Arisi, Ana Carolina Maisonnave

    2009-01-01

    Multiplex PCR was used to investigate the presence of enterotoxins genes (sea, seb, sec, sed and see) and femA gene (specific for Staphylococcus aureus) in coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS) isolated from cheese and meat products. From 102 CPS isolates, 91 were positive for femA, 10 for sea, 12 for sed and four for see. PMID:24031334

  12. Multiplexed CRISPR/Cas9- and TAR-Mediated Promoter Engineering of Natural Product Biosynthetic Gene Clusters in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hahk-Soo; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2016-09-16

    The use of DNA sequencing to guide the discovery of natural products has emerged as a new paradigm for revealing chemistries encoded in bacterial genomes. A major obstacle to implementing this approach to natural product discovery is the transcriptional silence of biosynthetic gene clusters under laboratory growth conditions. Here we describe an improved yeast-based promoter engineering platform (mCRISTAR) that combines CRISPR/Cas9 and TAR to enable single-marker multiplexed promoter engineering of large gene clusters. mCRISTAR highlights the first application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to multiplexed promoter engineering of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. In this method, CRISPR/Cas9 is used to induce DNA double-strand breaks in promoter regions of biosynthetic gene clusters, and the resulting operon fragments are reassembled by TAR using synthetic gene-cluster-specific promoter cassettes. mCRISTAR uses a CRISPR array to simplify the construction of a CRISPR plasmid for multiplex CRISPR and a single auxotrophic selection to improve the inefficiency of using a CRISPR array for multiplex gene cluster refactoring. mCRISTAR is a simple and generic method for multiplexed replacement of promoters in biosynthetic gene clusters that will facilitate the discovery of natural products from the rapidly growing collection of gene clusters found in microbial genome and metagenome sequencing projects.

  13. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug activated gene-1 (NAG-1) modulators from natural products as anti-cancer agents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Natural products are rich source of gene modulators for prevention and treatment of cancer. In recent days, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) activated gene-1 (NAG-1) has been focused as a new target of diverse cancers like colorectal, pancreatic, prostate, and breast. A variety of natural...

  14. Bayesian Computational Approaches for Gene Regulation Studies of Bioethanol and Biohydrogen Production. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, Lee; McCue, Lee Anne; Van Roey, Patrick

    2014-04-17

    The project developed mathematical models and first-version software tools for the understanding of gene regulation across multiple related species. The project lays the foundation for understanding how certain alpha-proteobacterial species control their own genes for bioethanol and biohydrogen production, and sets the stage for exploiting bacteria for the production of fuels. Enabling such alternative sources of fuel is a high priority for the Department of Energy and the public.

  15. Expression of cell cycle-related gene products in different forms of primary versus recurrent PVNS.

    PubMed

    Weckauf, Helgard; Helmchen, Birgit; Hinz, Ulf; Meyer-Scholten, Carola; Aulmann, Sebastian; Otto, Herwart F; Berger, Irina

    2004-07-08

    Expression patterns of cell cycle regulating gene products and Ki-67 in proliferating synovial cells of primary and recurrent pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) in localized and diffuse lesions were examined by immunohistochemistry. Alterations of cell cycle-related proteins were seen in 98.7% of analyzed lesions. Both RB- and p53 pathways play a role in cell cycle dysregulation in PVNS. The RB pathway was more frequently altered in primary disease, while alterations of the p53 pathway seemed to be more important in recurrent lesions, regardless of the histomorphological type of disease. Ki-67 proliferation rate was elevated in recurrent tumors. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Vaccine antigen production in transgenic plants: strategies, gene constructs and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sala, Francesco; Manuela Rigano, M; Barbante, Alessandra; Basso, Barbara; Walmsley, Amanda M; Castiglione, Stefano

    2003-01-30

    Stable integration of a gene into the plant nuclear or chloroplast genome can transform higher plants (e.g. tobacco, potato, tomato, banana) into bioreactors for the production of subunit vaccines for oral or parental administration. This can also be achieved by using recombinant plant viruses as transient expression vectors in infected plants. The use of plant-derived vaccines may overcome some of the major problems encountered with traditional vaccination against infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases and tumours. They also offer a convenient tool against the threat of bio-terrorism. State of the art, experimental strategies, safety and perspectives are discussed in this article.

  17. Multiplexed, targeted gene editing in Nicotiana benthamiana for glyco-engineering and monoclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Stoddard, Thomas J; Demorest, Zachary L; Lavoie, Pierre-Olivier; Luo, Song; Clasen, Benjamin M; Cedrone, Frederic; Ray, Erin E; Coffman, Andrew P; Daulhac, Aurelie; Yabandith, Ann; Retterath, Adam J; Mathis, Luc; Voytas, Daniel F; D'Aoust, Marc-André; Zhang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Biopharmaceutical glycoproteins produced in plants carry N-glycans with plant-specific residues core α(1,3)-fucose and β(1,2)-xylose, which can significantly impact the activity, stability and immunogenicity of biopharmaceuticals. In this study, we have employed sequence-specific transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to knock out two α(1,3)-fucosyltransferase (FucT) and the two β(1,2)-xylosyltransferase (XylT) genes within Nicotiana benthamiana to generate plants with improved capacity to produce glycoproteins devoid of plant-specific residues. Among plants regenerated from N. benthamiana protoplasts transformed with TALENs targeting either the FucT or XylT genes, 50% (80 of 160) and 73% (94 of 129) had mutations in at least one FucT or XylT allele, respectively. Among plants regenerated from protoplasts transformed with both TALEN pairs, 17% (18 of 105) had mutations in all four gene targets, and 3% (3 of 105) plants had mutations in all eight alleles comprising both gene families; these mutations were transmitted to the next generation. Endogenous proteins expressed in the complete knockout line had N-glycans that lacked β(1,2)-xylose and had a significant reduction in core α(1,3)-fucose levels (40% of wild type). A similar phenotype was observed in the N-glycans of a recombinant rituximab antibody transiently expressed in the homozygous mutant plants. More importantly, the most desirable glycoform, one lacking both core α(1,3)-fucose and β(1,2)-xylose residues, increased in the antibody from 2% when produced in the wild-type line to 55% in the mutant line. These results demonstrate the power of TALENs for multiplexed gene editing. Furthermore, the mutant N. benthamiana lines provide a valuable platform for producing highly potent biopharmaceutical products.

  18. Effect of gene disruptions of the TCA cycle on production of succinic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Y; Kuroyanagi, T; Shimosaka, M; Muratsubaki, H; Enomoto, K; Kodaira, R; Okazaki, M

    1999-01-01

    Succinate is the main taste component produced by yeasts during sake (Japanese rice wine) fermentation. The pathway leading to accumulation of succinate was examined in liquid culture in the presence of a high concentration (15%) of glucose under aerobic and anaerobic conditions using a series of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in which various genes that encode the expression of enzymes required in TCA cycle were disrupted. When cultured in YPD medium containing 15% glucose under aerobic conditions, the KGD1 (alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase) gene disrupted mutant produced a lower level of succinate than the wild-type strain, while the SDH1 (succinate dehydrogenase) gene-disrupted mutant produced an increased level of succinate. On the other hand, the FUM1 (fumarase) gene disrupted mutant produced significantly higher levels of fumarate but did not form malate at all. These results indicate that succinate, fumarate and malate are mainly synthesized through the TCA cycle (oxidative direction) even in the presence of glucose at a concentration as high as 15%. When the growth condition was shifted from aerobic to anaerobic, the increased level of succinate in SDH1 disruptants was no longer observed, whereas the decreased level of succinate in the KGD1 diruptant was still observed. A double mutant of the two fumarate reductase isozyme genes (OSM1 and FRDS) showed a succinate productivity of 50% as compared to the parent when cells were incubated in glucose-buffered solution. These results indicate that succinate could be synthesized through two pathways, namely, alpha-ketoglutarate oxidation via the TCA cycle and fumarate reduction under anaerobic conditions.

  19. Regulation of insulin gene expression and insulin production in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Hrytsenko, Olga; Wright, James R; Pohajdak, Bill

    2008-01-15

    Compared to mammals, little is known about insulin gene expression in fish. Using transient transfection experiments and mammalian insulinoma cell lines we demonstrate that transcription of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) insulin gene is (a) regulated in a beta-cell-specific manner; and (b) not sensitive to the glucose stimulations. Deletion analysis of the 1575 bp 5' insulin gene flanking sequence revealed that cooperative interactions between regulatory elements within the proximal (-1 to -396 bp) and the distal (-396 bp to -1575 bp) promoter regions were necessary for induction of the beta-cell-specific transcription. Effects of glucose and arginine on endogenous insulin secretion, translation, and transcription in isolated tilapia Brockmann bodies were determined using Northern hybridization, Western analysis, and quantitative RT-PCR. Similar to the regulation of mammalian insulin, we found that increases of glucose (1-70 mM) and arginine (0.4-25 mM) induced insulin secretion. However, transcription of the insulin gene was activated only by extremely high concentrations of glucose and arginine added simultaneously. When stimulated for 24 h with low concentrations of both inducers or with either of them added separately, tilapia beta-cells were able to replenish secreted insulin and to maintain insulin stores at a constant level without elevations of the insulin mRNA levels. Since the basal level of insulin mRNA was approximately 3.7-fold higher in tilapia beta-cells than it is in mammalian beta-cells, insulin production in tilapia cells probably relies on an enlarged intracellular insulin mRNA pool and does not require the transcriptional activation of the insulin gene.

  20. Self-association of the WT1 tumor suppressor gene product

    SciTech Connect

    Bruening, W.; Nakagama, H.: Bardessy, N.

    1994-09-01

    Wilms` tumor (WT), an embryonal malignancy of the kidney, occurs most frequently in children under the age of 5 years, affecting {approximately}1 in 10,000 individuals. The WT1 tumor suppressor gene, residing at 11p13, is structurally altered in {approximately}10-15% of WT cases. Individuals with germline mutations within the WT1 gene suffer from predisposition to WT and developmental defects of the urogenital system. Patients with heterozygous deletions of the WT1 gene, or mutations predicted to cause inactivation of one WT1 allele, suffer relatively mild genital system defects (notably hypospadias and cryptorchidism in males) and a predisposition to WT. These results suggest that developing genital system development is sensitive to the absolute concentrations of the WT1 gene products. Patients with missense mutations within the WT1 gene, however, can suffer from a much more severe disorder known as Denys-Drash syndrome (DDS). This syndrome is characterized by intersex disorders, renal nephropathy, and a predisposition to WTs. The increased severity of the developmental defects associated with DDS, compared to those individuals with mild genital system anomalies and WTs, suggests that mutations defined in patients with DDS behave in a dominant-negative fashion. We have identified a novel WT1 mutation in a patient with DDS. This mutation, predicted to produce a truncated WT1 polypeptide encompassing exons 1, 2, and 3, defines a domain capable of behaving as an antimorph. We have also demonstrated that WT1 can self-associate in vivo using yeast two-hybrid systems. Deletion analysis have mapped the interacting domains to the amino terminus of the WT1 polypeptide, within exons 1 and 2. These results provide a molecular mechanism to explain how WT1 mutations can function in a dominant-negative fashion to eliminate wild-type WT1 activity, leading to DDS.

  1. Phytoalexin detoxification genes and gene products: Implication for the evolution of host specific traits for pathogenicity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    VanEtten, H.

    1997-06-01

    The overall objectives of this research were to determine which differences among PDA genes were associated with different levels of virulence on pea and to clone and characterize a MAK gene. The authors also proposed to characterize the pisatin detoxifying system in pea pathogens in addition to N. haematococca to assess whether pathogens of a common host had evolved similar pathogenicity genes.

  2. Tumor suppressor genes which encode transcriptional repressors: studies on the EGR and Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene products.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, F J

    1993-01-01

    The study of the WT1 and EGR-1 transcription factors has provided a molecular paradigm for regulation of a coordinate set of target genes during cell growth and differentiation. The next critical questions that must be addressed are: what are the target genes which are normally regulated by WT1-EGR-1, and how does misregulation of these genes result in tumor formation?

  3. RNA polymerase gene, microorganism having said gene and the production of RNA polymerase by the use of said microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Kotani, Hirokazu; Hiraoka, Nobutsugu; Obayashi, Akira

    1991-01-01

    SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase is produced by cultivating a new microorganism (particularly new strains of Escherichia coli) harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene and recovering SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase from the culture broth. SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene is provided as are new microorganisms harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene.

  4. Computational identification of gene over-expression targets for metabolic engineering of taxadiene production.

    PubMed

    Boghigian, Brett A; Armando, John; Salas, Daniel; Pfeifer, Blaine A

    2012-03-01

    Taxadiene is the first dedicated intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway of the anticancer compound Taxol. Recent studies have taken advantage of heterologous hosts to produce taxadiene and other isoprenoid compounds, and such ventures now offer research opportunities that take advantage of the engineering tools associated with the surrogate host. In this study, metabolic engineering was applied in the context of over-expression targets predicted to improve taxadiene production. Identified targets included genes both within and outside of the isoprenoid precursor pathway. These targets were then tested for experimental over-expression in a heterologous Escherichia coli host designed to support isoprenoid biosynthesis. Results confirmed the computationally predicted improvements and indicated a synergy between targets within the expected isoprenoid precursor pathway and those outside this pathway. The presented algorithm is broadly applicable to other host systems and/or product choices.

  5. Natural and Engineered Hydroxyectoine Production Based on the Pseudomonas stutzeri ectABCD-ask Gene Cluster▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Seip, Britta; Galinski, Erwin A.; Kurz, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    We report on the presence of a functional hydroxyectoine biosynthesis gene cluster, ectABCD-ask, in Pseudomonas stutzeri DSM5190T and evaluate the suitability of P. stutzeri DSM5190T for hydroxyectoine production. Furthermore, we present information on heterologous de novo production of the compatible solute hydroxyectoine in Escherichia coli. In this host, the P. stutzeri gene cluster remained under the control of its salt-induced native promoters. We also noted the absence of trehalose when hydroxyectoine genes were expressed, as well as a remarkable inhibitory effect of externally applied betaine on hydroxyectoine synthesis. The specific heterologous production rate in E. coli under the conditions employed exceeded that of the natural producer Pseudomonas stutzeri and, for the first time, enabled effective hydroxyectoine production at low salinity (2%), with the added advantage of simple product processing due to the absence of other cosolutes. PMID:21169432

  6. Expression of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 Genes in Escherichia coli for Acetone Production and Acetate Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Lourdes L.; Welker, Neil E.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    1998-01-01

    A synthetic acetone operon (ace4) composed of four Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 genes (adc, ctfAB, and thl, coding for the acetoacetate decarboxylase, coenzyme A transferase, and thiolase, respectively) under the control of the thl promoter was constructed and was introduced into Escherichia coli on vector pACT. Acetone production demonstrated that ace4 is expressed in E. coli and resulted in the reduction of acetic acid levels in the fermentation broth. Since different E. coli strains vary significantly in their growth characteristics and acetate metabolism, ace4 was expressed in three E. coli strains: ER2275, ATCC 11303, and MC1060. Shake flask cultures of MC1060(pACT) produced ca. 2 mM acetone, while both strains ER2275(pACT) and ATCC 11303(pACT) produced ca. 40 mM acetone. Glucose-fed cultures of strain ATCC 11303(pACT) resulted in a 150% increase in acetone titers compared to those of batch shake flask cultures. External addition of sodium acetate to glucose-fed cultures of ATCC 11303(pACT) resulted in further increased acetone titers. In bioreactor studies, acidic conditions (pH 5.5 versus 6.5) improved acetone production. Despite the substantial acetone evaporation due to aeration and agitation in the bioreactor, 125 to 154 mM acetone accumulated in ATCC 11303(pACT) fermentations. These acetone titers are equal to or higher than those produced by wild-type C. acetobutylicum. This is the first study to demonstrate the ability to use clostridial genes in nonclostridial hosts for solvent production. In addition, acetone-producing E. coli strains may be useful hosts for recombinant protein production in that detrimental acetate accumulation can be avoided. PMID:9501448

  7. 5-Aminolevulinate production by Escherichia coli containing the Rhodobacter sphaeroides hemA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Werf, M.J.; Zeikus, J.G. |

    1996-10-01

    The Rhodobacter sphaeroides hemA gene codes for 5-aminolevulinate (ALA) synthase. This enzyme catalyzes the pyridoxal phosphate-dependent condensation of succinyl coenzyme A and glycine-forming ALA. The R. sphaeroides hemA gene in the pUC18/19 vector system was transformed into Escherichia coli. The effects of both genetic and physiological factors on the expression of ALA synthase and the production of ALA were studied. ALA synthase activity levels were maximal when hemA had the same transcription direction as the lac promoter. The distance between the lac promoter and hemA affected the expression of ALA synthase on different growth substrates. The E. coli host strain used had an enormous effect on the ALA synthase activity level and on the production of ALA, with E. coli DH1 being best suited. The ALA synthase activity level was also dependent on the carbon source. Succinate, L-malate, fumarate, and L-aspartate gave the highest levels of ALA synthase activity, while the use of lactose as a carbon source resulted in a repression of ALA synthase. After growth on succinate, ALA synthase represented {approx}5% of total cellular protein. The ALA synthase activity level was also dependent on the pH of the medium, with maximal activity occurring at pH 6.5. ALA production by whole cells was limited by the availability of glycine, and the addition of 2 g of glycine per liter to the growth medium increased the production of ALA fivefold, to 2.25 mM. In recombinant E. coli extracts, up to 22 mM ALA was produced from succinate, glycine, and ATP. 58 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Increased isobutanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of genes in valine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Isobutanol can be a better biofuel than ethanol due to its higher energy density and lower hygroscopicity. Furthermore, the branched-chain structure of isobutanol gives a higher octane number than the isomeric n-butanol. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was chosen as the production host because of its relative tolerance to alcohols, robustness in industrial fermentations, and the possibility for future combination of isobutanol production with fermentation of lignocellulosic materials. Results The yield of isobutanol was improved from 0.16 to 0.97 mg per g glucose by simultaneous overexpression of biosynthetic genes ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 in valine metabolism in anaerobic fermentation of glucose in mineral medium in S. cerevisiae. Isobutanol yield was further improved by twofold by the additional overexpression of BAT2, encoding the cytoplasmic branched-chain amino-acid aminotransferase. Overexpression of ILV6, encoding the regulatory subunit of Ilv2, in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain decreased isobutanol production yield by threefold. In aerobic cultivations in shake flasks in mineral medium, the isobutanol yield of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain were 3.86 and 0.28 mg per g glucose, respectively. They increased to 4.12 and 2.4 mg per g glucose in yeast extract/peptone/dextrose (YPD) complex medium under aerobic conditions, respectively. Conclusions Overexpression of genes ILV2, ILV3, ILV5, and BAT2 in valine metabolism led to an increase in isobutanol production in S. cerevisiae. Additional overexpression of ILV6 in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain had a negative effect, presumably by increasing the sensitivity of Ilv2 to valine inhibition, thus weakening the positive impact of overexpression of ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 on isobutanol production. Aerobic cultivations of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain showed that supplying amino acids in cultivation media gave a substantial

  9. L-lactic acid production by Aspergillus brasiliensis overexpressing the heterologous ldha gene from Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Liaud, Nadège; Rosso, Marie-Noëlle; Fabre, Nicolas; Crapart, Sylvaine; Herpoël-Gimbert, Isabelle; Sigoillot, Jean-Claude; Raouche, Sana; Levasseur, Anthony

    2015-05-03

    Lactic acid is the building block of poly-lactic acid (PLA), a biopolymer that could be set to replace petroleum-based plastics. To make lactic acid production cost-effective, the production process should be carried out at low pH, in low-nutrient media, and with a low-cost carbon source. Yeasts have been engineered to produce high levels of lactic acid at low pH from glucose but not from carbohydrate polymers (e.g. cellulose, hemicellulose, starch). Aspergilli are versatile microbial cell factories able to naturally produce large amounts of organic acids at low pH and to metabolize cheap abundant carbon sources such as plant biomass. However, they have never been used for lactic acid production. To investigate the feasibility of lactic acid production with Aspergillus, the NAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) responsible for lactic acid production by Rhizopus oryzae was produced in Aspergillus brasiliensis BRFM103. Among transformants, the best lactic acid producer, A. brasiliensis BRFM1877, integrated 6 ldhA gene copies, and intracellular LDH activity was 9.2 × 10(-2) U/mg. At a final pH of 1.6, lactic acid titer reached 13.1 g/L (conversion yield: 26%, w/w) at 138 h in glucose-ammonium medium. This extreme pH drop was subsequently prevented by switching nitrogen source from ammonium sulfate to Na-nitrate, leading to a final pH of 3 and a lactic acid titer of 17.7 g/L (conversion yield: 47%, w/w) at 90 h of culture. Final titer was further improved to 32.2 g/L of lactic acid (conversion yield: 44%, w/w) by adding 20 g/L glucose to the culture medium at 96 h. This strain was ultimately able to produce lactic acid from xylose, arabinose, starch and xylan. We obtained the first Aspergillus strains able to produce large amounts of lactic acid by inserting recombinant ldhA genes from R. oryzae into a wild-type A. brasiliensis strain. pH regulation failed to significantly increase lactic acid production, but switching nitrogen source and changing culture feed

  10. Increased isobutanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of genes in valine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Nielsen, Kristian F; Borodina, Irina; Kielland-Brandt, Morten C; Karhumaa, Kaisa

    2011-07-28

    Isobutanol can be a better biofuel than ethanol due to its higher energy density and lower hygroscopicity. Furthermore, the branched-chain structure of isobutanol gives a higher octane number than the isomeric n-butanol. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was chosen as the production host because of its relative tolerance to alcohols, robustness in industrial fermentations, and the possibility for future combination of isobutanol production with fermentation of lignocellulosic materials. The yield of isobutanol was improved from 0.16 to 0.97 mg per g glucose by simultaneous overexpression of biosynthetic genes ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 in valine metabolism in anaerobic fermentation of glucose in mineral medium in S. cerevisiae. Isobutanol yield was further improved by twofold by the additional overexpression of BAT2, encoding the cytoplasmic branched-chain amino-acid aminotransferase. Overexpression of ILV6, encoding the regulatory subunit of Ilv2, in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain decreased isobutanol production yield by threefold. In aerobic cultivations in shake flasks in mineral medium, the isobutanol yield of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain were 3.86 and 0.28 mg per g glucose, respectively. They increased to 4.12 and 2.4 mg per g glucose in yeast extract/peptone/dextrose (YPD) complex medium under aerobic conditions, respectively. Overexpression of genes ILV2, ILV3, ILV5, and BAT2 in valine metabolism led to an increase in isobutanol production in S. cerevisiae. Additional overexpression of ILV6 in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain had a negative effect, presumably by increasing the sensitivity of Ilv2 to valine inhibition, thus weakening the positive impact of overexpression of ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 on isobutanol production. Aerobic cultivations of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain showed that supplying amino acids in cultivation media gave a substantial improvement in isobutanol production

  11. ZCT1 and ZCT2 transcription factors repress the activity of a gene promoter from the methyl erythritol phosphate pathway in Madagascar periwinkle cells.

    PubMed

    Chebbi, Mouadh; Ginis, Olivia; Courdavault, Vincent; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Lanoue, Arnaud; Clastre, Marc; Papon, Nicolas; Gaillard, Cécile; Atanassova, Rossitza; St-Pierre, Benoit; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Courtois, Martine; Oudin, Audrey

    2014-10-15

    In Catharanthus roseus, accumulating data highlighted the existence of a coordinated transcriptional regulation of structural genes that takes place within the secoiridoid biosynthetic branch, including the methyl erythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway and the following steps leading to secologanin. To identify transcription factors acting in these pathways, we performed a yeast one-hybrid screening using as bait a promoter region of the hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase (HDS) gene involved in the responsiveness of C. roseus cells to hormonal signals inducing monoterpene indole alkaloid (MIA) production. We identified that ZCT2, one of the three members of the zinc finger Catharanthus protein (ZCT) family, can bind to a HDS promoter region involved in hormonal responsiveness. By trans-activation assays, we demonstrated that ZCT1 and ZCT2 but not ZCT3 repress the HDS promoter activity. Gene expression analyses in C. roseus cells exposed to methyljasmonate revealed a persistence of induction of ZCT2 gene expression suggesting the existence of feed-back regulatory events acting on HDS gene expression in correlation with the MIA production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases: Identifying the cryptic gene clusters and decoding the natural product.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mangal; Chaudhary, Sandeep; Sareen, Dipti

    2017-03-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs) present in bacteria and fungi are the major multi-modular enzyme complexes which synthesize secondary metabolites like the pharmacologically important antibiotics and siderophores. Each of the multiple modules of an NRPS activates a different amino or aryl acid, followed by their condensation to synthesize a linear or cyclic natural product. The studies on NRPS domains, the knowledge of their gene cluster architecture and tailoring enzymes have helped in the in silico genetic screening of the ever-expanding sequenced microbial genomic data for the identification of novel NRPS/PKS clusters and thus deciphering novel non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs). Adenylation domain is an integral part of the NRPSs and is the substrate selecting unit for the final assembled NRP. In some cases, it also requires a small protein, the MbtH homolog, for its optimum activity. The presence of putative adenylation domain and MbtH homologs in a sequenced genome can help identify the novel secondary metabolite producers. The role of the adenylation domain in the NRPS gene clusters and its characterization as a tool for the discovery of novel cryptic NRPS gene clusters are discussed.

  13. WNP: A Novel Algorithm for Gene Products Annotation from Weighted Functional Networks

    PubMed Central

    Magi, Alberto; Tattini, Lorenzo; Benelli, Matteo; Giusti, Betti; Abbate, Rosanna; Ruffo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Predicting the biological function of all the genes of an organism is one of the fundamental goals of computational system biology. In the last decade, high-throughput experimental methods for studying the functional interactions between gene products (GPs) have been combined with computational approaches based on Bayesian networks for data integration. The result of these computational approaches is an interaction network with weighted links representing connectivity likelihood between two functionally related GPs. The weighted network generated by these computational approaches can be used to predict annotations for functionally uncharacterized GPs. Here we introduce Weighted Network Predictor (WNP), a novel algorithm for function prediction of biologically uncharacterized GPs. Tests conducted on simulated data show that WNP outperforms other 5 state-of-the-art methods in terms of both specificity and sensitivity and that it is able to better exploit and propagate the functional and topological information of the network. We apply our method to Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and Arabidopsis thaliana networks and we predict Gene Ontology function for about 500 and 10000 uncharacterized GPs respectively. PMID:22761703

  14. Identification of a host protein necessary for bacteriophage morphogenesis (the groE gene product).

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, C P; Hohn, B

    1978-01-01

    Mutations in the groE gene of Escherichia coli, which block the correct assembly of the phage lambda head, have been previously described. Many groE mutations exert pleiotropic effects, such as inability to propagate phages T4 and T5 and inability to form colonies at 43 degrees. With the help of the EcoRI and HindIII restrictionenzymes and the appropriate phage vectors, we have constructed two lambda transducing phages, called W3 and H18, that carry the groE+ bacterial gene. Upon lysogenization by phage H18 the groE bacterial mutants recover their gro+ phenotype for both phage growth and the ability to form colonies at 43 degrees. We have identified the groE+ bacterial gene product as a protein of 65,000 molecular weight. Mutants of the W3 transducing phage that were selected on the basis of their ability to propagate on some groE mutant hosts induce the synthesis of a groE protein with altered electrophoretic mobility. Images PMID:343101

  15. c-Myb influences HIV type 1 gene expression and virus production.

    PubMed

    Churchill, M J; Ramsay, R G; Rhodes, D I; Deacon, N J

    2001-11-01

    c-Myb is expressed in proliferating T cells. Fifteen c-Myb-binding sites can be identified in the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR), suggesting that c-Myb may regulate HIV-1 gene expression and virus replication. Increasing the cellular levels of c-Myb by transient transfection of CEM cells resulted in a 10- to 20-fold activation of HIV-1 LTR-driven gene expression and mutation of one high-affinity Myb-binding site within the LTR reduced this activation by 60 to 70%. Conversely, inhibition of c-Myb expression in MT-2 cells by treatment with c-myb antisense oligonucleotides decreased HIV-1 replication by 85%, as measured by reverse transcriptase activity and cytopathic effects. The effect of c-myb antisense oligonucleotides on HIV-1 gene expression and virus particle production appeared to be independent of cell proliferation, but dependent on the presence of c-Myb activity mediated through the HIV-1 LTR. These data show that c-myb expression affects HIV-1 replication in CD4(+) T cells.

  16. Immune-responsive gene 1 protein links metabolism to immunity by catalyzing itaconic acid production.

    PubMed

    Michelucci, Alessandro; Cordes, Thekla; Ghelfi, Jenny; Pailot, Arnaud; Reiling, Norbert; Goldmann, Oliver; Binz, Tina; Wegner, André; Tallam, Aravind; Rausell, Antonio; Buttini, Manuel; Linster, Carole L; Medina, Eva; Balling, Rudi; Hiller, Karsten

    2013-05-07

    Immunoresponsive gene 1 (Irg1) is highly expressed in mammalian macrophages during inflammation, but its biological function has not yet been elucidated. Here, we identify Irg1 as the gene coding for an enzyme producing itaconic acid (also known as methylenesuccinic acid) through the decarboxylation of cis-aconitate, a tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate. Using a gain-and-loss-of-function approach in both mouse and human immune cells, we found Irg1 expression levels correlating with the amounts of itaconic acid, a metabolite previously proposed to have an antimicrobial effect. We purified IRG1 protein and identified its cis-aconitate decarboxylating activity in an enzymatic assay. Itaconic acid is an organic compound that inhibits isocitrate lyase, the key enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, a pathway essential for bacterial growth under specific conditions. Here we show that itaconic acid inhibits the growth of bacteria expressing isocitrate lyase, such as Salmonella enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Furthermore, Irg1 gene silencing in macrophages resulted in significantly decreased intracellular itaconic acid levels as well as significantly reduced antimicrobial activity during bacterial infections. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IRG1 links cellular metabolism with immune defense by catalyzing itaconic acid production.

  17. Production of human glucocerebrosidase in mice after retroviral gene transfer into multipotential hematopoietic progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, P.H.; Fink, J.K.; Brady, R.O.; Perry, L.K.; Karlsson, S. )

    1989-11-01

    The human glucocerebrosidase (GC) gene has been transferred efficiently into spleen colony-forming unit (CFU-S) multipotential hematopoietic progenitor cells, and production of human GC RNA and protein has been achieved in transduced CFU-S colonies. High-titer retroviral vectors containing the human GC cDNA were constructed. Four vectors were compared with respect to gene-transfer efficiency into CFU-S progenitors. One vector (G vector) required high concentrations of interleukins 3 and 6 during stimulation and coculture for efficient transduction of CFU-S progenitors. The remaining three vectors (NTG, GTN, and GI vectors) transduced these progenitors at infection frequencies approaching 100% using low concentrations of hematopoietic growth factors to simulate cell division prior to and during the infection. Vectors using the viral long terminal repeat enhancer/promoter to drive the human GC cDNA produced high levels of human GC RNA in the progeny of CFU-S progenitors after gene transfer. All three vectors producing human GC RNA in CFU-S colonies can generate human GC as detected by immunochemical analysis of CFU-S colonies. The capacity of the viral long terminal repeat and the internal thymidine kinase promoter to direct synthesis of RNA in transduced bone marrow and spleen cells 5 months after bone marrow transplantation reflected the performance of these promoters in NTG-transduced CFU-S colonies.

  18. Enhancement of ganoderic acid production by constitutively expressing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene in Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan-Jun; He, Yi-Long; Zhang, De-Huai; Yue, Tong-Hui; Jiang, Lu-Xi; Li, Na; Xu, Jun-Wei

    2016-06-10

    The Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) gene was expressed in Ganoderma lucidum to enhance antitumor ganoderic acid (GA) production. The effects of VHb expression on the accumulation of GAs and lanosterol (intermediate) and the transcription of GA biosynthesis genes were also investigated. In VHb-expressing G. lucidum, the maximum concentrations of four individual GAs (GA-S, GA-T, GA-Mk and GA-Me) were 19.1±1.8, 34.6±2.1, 191.5±13.1 and 45.2±2.8μg/100mg dry weight, respectively, which were 1.4-, 2.2, 1.9- and 2.0-fold higher than those obtained in the wild-type strain. Moreover, the maximum lanosterol concentration in the strain expressing VHb was 1.28-fold lower than that in the wild-type strain. The transcription levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, squalene synthase, and lanosterol synthase genes were up-regulated by 1.6-, 1.5-, and 1.6-fold, respectively, in the strain expressing VHb. This work is beneficial in developing an efficient fermentation process for the hyperproduction of GAs.

  19. Immune-responsive gene 1 protein links metabolism to immunity by catalyzing itaconic acid production

    PubMed Central

    Michelucci, Alessandro; Cordes, Thekla; Ghelfi, Jenny; Pailot, Arnaud; Reiling, Norbert; Goldmann, Oliver; Binz, Tina; Wegner, André; Tallam, Aravind; Rausell, Antonio; Buttini, Manuel; Linster, Carole L.; Medina, Eva; Balling, Rudi; Hiller, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Immunoresponsive gene 1 (Irg1) is highly expressed in mammalian macrophages during inflammation, but its biological function has not yet been elucidated. Here, we identify Irg1 as the gene coding for an enzyme producing itaconic acid (also known as methylenesuccinic acid) through the decarboxylation of cis-aconitate, a tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate. Using a gain-and-loss-of-function approach in both mouse and human immune cells, we found Irg1 expression levels correlating with the amounts of itaconic acid, a metabolite previously proposed to have an antimicrobial effect. We purified IRG1 protein and identified its cis-aconitate decarboxylating activity in an enzymatic assay. Itaconic acid is an organic compound that inhibits isocitrate lyase, the key enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, a pathway essential for bacterial growth under specific conditions. Here we show that itaconic acid inhibits the growth of bacteria expressing isocitrate lyase, such as Salmonella enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Furthermore, Irg1 gene silencing in macrophages resulted in significantly decreased intracellular itaconic acid levels as well as significantly reduced antimicrobial activity during bacterial infections. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IRG1 links cellular metabolism with immune defense by catalyzing itaconic acid production. PMID:23610393

  20. Biochemical and biological comparison of HIV-1 NEF and ras gene products.

    PubMed

    Nebreda, A R; Bryan, T; Segade, F; Wingfield, P; Venkatesan, S; Santos, E

    1991-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NEF protein has been reported to share certain biochemical and structural properties with known oncoproteins like src or rats. To determine whether this is a general property of NEF from various HIV isolates, three different NEF proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli using a thermoinducible expression system previously exploited to overproduce functionally active p21 ras proteins. ras and NEF proteins expressed in this manner were evaluated in parallel to compare their biochemical and biological properties. In contrast to ras, our NEF protein preparations had no detectable GTP binding but showed autophosphorylation activity when incubated in the presence of either GTP or ATP. This putative autokinase activity was higher in NEF proteins containing threonine at position 15 than in those carrying alanine at that position. Two different NEF genes also failed to induce oncogenic transformation of permanently transfected NIH 3T3 cells under conditions that led to oncogenic transformation using activated ras genes. Also, unlike ras, the NEF gene products failed to induce meiotic maturation when injected into fully grown Xenopus oocytes.

  1. The c10orf10 gene product is a new link between oxidative stress and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Stepp, Marcus W; Folz, Rodney J; Yu, Jerry; Zelko, Igor N

    2014-06-01

    The human c10orf10 gene product, also known as decidual protein induced by progesterone (DEPP), is known to be differentially regulated in mouse tissues in response to hypoxia and oxidative stress, however its biological function remains unknown. We found that mice lacking extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) show attenuated expression of DEPP in response to acute hypoxia. DEPP mRNA levels, as well as the activity of a reporter gene expressed under the control of the DEPP 5'-flanking region, were significantly upregulated in Hep3B and Vero cells overexpressing EC-SOD. Subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescent microscopy indicated that overexpressed DEPP is co-localized with both protein aggregates and aggresomes. Further biochemical characterization indicates that DEPP protein is unstable and undergoes rapid degradation. Inhibition of proteasome activities significantly increases DEPP protein levels in soluble and insoluble cytosolic fractions. Attenuation of autophagosomal activity by 3-methyladenine increases DEPP protein levels while activation of autophagy by rapamycin reduced DEPP protein levels. In addition, ectopic overexpression of DEPP leads to autophagy activation, while silencing of DEPP attenuates autophagy. Collectively, these results indicate that DEPP is a major hypoxia-inducible gene involved in the activation of autophagy and whose expression is regulated by oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A genetic strategy to measure circulating Drosophila insulin reveals genes regulating insulin production and secretion.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangbin; Alfa, Ronald W; Topper, Sydni M; Kim, Grace E S; Kockel, Lutz; Kim, Seung K

    2014-08-01

    Insulin is a major regulator of metabolism in metazoans, including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) suggest a genetic basis for reductions of both insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion, phenotypes commonly observed in humans with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). To identify molecular functions of genes linked to T2DM risk, we developed a genetic tool to measure insulin-like peptide 2 (Ilp2) levels in Drosophila, a model organism with superb experimental genetics. Our system permitted sensitive quantification of circulating Ilp2, including measures of Ilp2 dynamics during fasting and re-feeding, and demonstration of adaptive Ilp2 secretion in response to insulin receptor haploinsufficiency. Tissue specific dissection of this reduced insulin signaling phenotype revealed a critical role for insulin signaling in specific peripheral tissues. Knockdown of the Drosophila orthologues of human T2DM risk genes, including GLIS3 and BCL11A, revealed roles of these Drosophila genes in Ilp2 production or secretion. Discovery of Drosophila mechanisms and regulators controlling in vivo insulin dynamics should accelerate functional dissection of diabetes genetics.

  3. Disruption of the acetate kinase (ack) gene of Clostridium acetobutylicum results in delayed acetate production.

    PubMed

    Kuit, Wouter; Minton, Nigel P; López-Contreras, Ana M; Eggink, Gerrit

    2012-05-01

    In microorganisms, the enzyme acetate kinase (AK) catalyses the formation of ATP from ADP by de-phosphorylation of acetyl phosphate into acetic acid. A mutant strain of Clostridium acetobutylicum lacking acetate kinase activity is expected to have reduced acetate and acetone production compared to the wild type. In this work, a C. acetobutylicum mutant strain with a selectively disrupted ack gene, encoding AK, was constructed and genetically and physiologically characterized. The ack (-) strain showed a reduction in acetate kinase activity of more than 97% compared to the wild type. The fermentation profiles of the ack (-) and wild-type strain were compared using two different fermentation media, CGM and CM1. The latter contains acetate and has a higher iron and magnesium content than CGM. In general, fermentations by the mutant strain showed a clear shift in the timing of peak acetate production relative to butyrate and had increased acid uptake after the onset of solvent formation. Specifically, in acetate containing CM1 medium, acetate production was reduced by more than 80% compared to the wild type under the same conditions, but both strains produced similar final amounts of solvents. Fermentations in CGM showed similar peak acetate and butyrate levels, but increased acetoin (60%), ethanol (63%) and butanol (16%) production and reduced lactate (-50%) formation by the mutant compared to the wild type. These findings are in agreement with the proposed regulatory function of butyryl phosphate as opposed to acetyl phosphate in the metabolic switch of solventogenic clostridia.

  4. Fermentative hydrogen production from Jerusalem artichoke by Clostridium tyrobutyricum expressing exo-inulinase gene.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ling; Wu, Qian; Xu, Qing; Zhu, Liying; Huang, He

    2017-08-11

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC25755 has been reported as being able to produce significant quantities of hydrogen. In this study, the exo-inulinase encoding gene cloned from Paenibacillus polymyxa SC-2 was into the expression plasmid pSY6 and expressed in the cells of C. tyrobutyricum. The engineered C. tyrobutyricum strain efficiently fermented the inulin-type carbohydrates from Jerusalem artichoke, without any pretreatment being necessary for the production of hydrogen. A comparatively high hydrogen yield (3.7 mol/mol inulin-type sugar) was achieved after 96 h in a batch process with simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF), with an overall volumetric productivity rate of 620 ± 60 mL/h/L when the initial total sugar concentration of the inulin extract was increased to 100 g/L. Synthesis of inulinase in the batch SSF culture was closely associated with strain growth until the end of the exponential phase, reaching a maximum activity of 28.4 ± 0.26 U/mL. The overall results show that the highly productive and abundant biomass crop Jerusalem artichoke can be a good substrate for hydrogen production, and that the application of batch SSF for its conversion has the potential to become a cost-effective process in the near future.

  5. Abundance and distribution of Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin resistance genes in an anaerobic-aerobic system treating spiramycin production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Miaomiao; Ding, Ran; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yingxin; Tian, Zhe; Zhang, Tong; Yang, Min

    2014-10-15

    The behaviors of the Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes were investigated in an anaerobic-aerobic pilot-scale system treating spiramycin (SPM) production wastewater. After screening fifteen typical MLS resistance genes with different mechanisms using conventional PCR, eight detected genes were determined by quantitative PCR, together with three mobile elements. Aerobic sludge in the pilot system exhibited a total relative abundance of MLS resistance genes (per 16S rRNA gene) 2.5 logs higher than those in control samples collected from sewage and inosine wastewater treatment systems (P < 0.05), implying the presence of SPM could induce the production of MLS resistance genes. However, the total relative gene abundance in anaerobic sludge (4.3 × 10(-1)) was lower than that in aerobic sludge (3.7 × 10(0)) despite of the higher SPM level in anaerobic reactor, showing the advantage of anaerobic treatment in reducing the production of MLS resistance genes. The rRNA methylase genes (erm(B), erm(F), erm(X)) were the most abundant in the aerobic sludge (5.3 × 10(-1)-1.7 × 10(0)), followed by esterase gene ere(A) (1.3 × 10(-1)) and phosphorylase gene mph(B) (5.7 × 10(-2)). In anaerobic sludge, erm(B), erm(F), ere(A), and msr(D) were the major ones (1.2 × 10(-2)-3.2 × 10(-1)). These MLS resistance genes (except for msr(D)) were positively correlated with Class 1 integron (r(2) = 0.74-0.93, P < 0.05), implying the significance of horizontal transfer in their proliferation.

  6. Essential Oils Modulate Gene Expression and Ochratoxin A Production in Aspergillus carbonarius

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Rachelle; Atoui, Ali; Verheecke, Carol; Maroun, Richard; El Khoury, Andre; Mathieu, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin, mainly produced on grapes by Aspergillus carbonarius, that causes massive health problems for humans. This study aims to reduce the occurrence of OTA by using the ten following essential oils (E.Os): fennel, cardamom, anise, chamomile, celery, cinnamon, thyme, taramira, oregano and rosemary at 1 µL/mL and 5 µL/mL for each E.O.As a matter of fact, their effects on the OTA production and the growth of A. carbonarius S402 cultures were evaluated, after four days at 28 °C on a Synthetic Grape Medium (SGM). Results showed that A. carbonarius growth was reduced up to 100%, when cultured with the E.Os of cinnamon, taramira, and oregano at both concentrations and the thyme at 5 µL/mL. As for the other six E.Os, their effect on A. carbonarius growth was insignificant, but highly important on the OTA production. Interestingly, the fennel E.O at 5 µL/mL reduced the OTA production up to 88.9% compared to the control, with only 13.8% of fungal growth reduction. We further investigated the effect of these E.Os on the expression levels of the genes responsible for the OTA biosynthesis (acOTApks and acOTAnrps along with the acpks gene) as well as the two regulatory genes laeA and vea, using the quantitative Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) method. The results revealed that these six E.Os reduced the expression of the five studied genes, where the ackps was downregulated by 99.2% (the highest downregulation in this study) with 5 µL/mL of fennel E.O.As for the acOTApks, acOTAnrps, veA and laeA, their reduction levels ranged between 10% and 96% depending on the nature of the E.O and its concentration in the medium. PMID:27548221

  7. Nucleotide and protein sequences for dog masticatory tropomyosin identify a novel Tpm4 gene product

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Jaw-closing muscles of several vertebrate species, including members of Carnivora, express a unique, “masticatory”, isoform of myosin heavy chain, along with isoforms of other myofibrillar proteins that are not expressed in most other muscles. It is generally believed that the complement of myofibrillar isoforms in these muscles serves high force generation for capturing live prey, breaking down tough plant material and defensive biting. A unique isoform of tropomyosin (Tpm) was reported to be expressed in cat jaw-closing muscle, based upon two-dimensional gel mobility, peptide mapping, and immunohistochemistry. The objective of this study was to obtain protein and gene sequence information for this unique Tpm isoform. Samples of masseter (also a jaw-closing muscle), tibialis (with predominantly fast-twitch fibers), and the deep lateral gastrocnemius (predominantly slow-twitch fibers) were obtained from adult dogs. Expressed Tpm isoforms were cloned and sequencing yielded cDNAs that were identical to genomic predicted striated muscle Tpm1.1St(a,b,b,a) (historically referred to as αTpm), Tpm2.2St(a,b,b,a) (βTpm) and Tpm3.12St(a,b,b,a) (cTpm) isoforms (nomenclature reflects predominant tissue expression (“St”—striated muscle) and exon splicing pattern), as well as a novel 284 amino acid isoform observed in jaw-closing muscle that is identical to a genomic predicted product of the Tpm4 gene (δTpm) family. The novel isoform is designated as Tpm4.3St(a,b,b,a). The myofibrillar Tpm isoform expressed in dog masseter exhibits a unique electrophoretic mobility on gels containing 6 M urea, compared to other skeletal Tpm isoforms. To validate that the cloned Tpm4.3 isoform is the Tpm expressed in dog masseter, E. coli-expressed Tpm4.3 was electrophoresed in the presence of urea. Results demonstrate that Tpm4.3 has identical electrophoretic mobility to the unique dog masseter Tpm isoform and is of different mobility from that of muscle Tpm1.1, Tpm2.2 and Tpm3

  8. Effect of retS gene on antibiotics production in Pseudomonas fluorescens FD6.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingxia; Xiao, Qi; Xu, Jingyou; Tong, Yunhui; Wen, Jia; Chen, Xijun; Wei, Lihui

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid sensor kinase termed RetS (regulator of exopolysaccharide and Type III secretion) controls expression of numerous genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To investigate the function of RetS in P. fluorescens FD6, the retS gene was disrupted. Genetic inactivation of retS resulted in enhanced production of 2, 4-diacetylphloroglucinol, pyrrolnitrin, and pyoluteorin. The retS mutant also exhibited significant increase in phlA-lacZ, prnA-lacZ, and pltA-lacZ transcription levels, influencing expression levels of the small regulatory RNAs RsmX and RsmZ. In the gacSretS double mutant, all the phenotypic changes caused by the retS deletion were reversed to the level of gacS single mutant. Furthermore, the retS mutation drastically elevated biofilm formation and improved the colonization ability of strain FD6 on wheat rhizospheres. Based on these results, we proposed that RetS negatively controlled the production of antibiotics through the Gac/Rsm pathway in P. fluorescens FD6.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of gene product 44 from bacteriophage Mu

    SciTech Connect

    Kondou, Youhei; Kitazawa, Daisuke; Takeda, Shigeki; Yamashita, Eiki; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Kawano, Keiichi; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2005-01-01

    Bacteriophage Mu baseplate protein gene product 44 was crystallized. The crystal belongs to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 126.6, c = 64.2 Å. Bacteriophage Mu baseplate protein gene product 44 (gp44) is an essential protein required for the assembly of viable phages. To investigate the roles of gp44 in baseplate assembly and infection, gp44 was crystallized at pH 6.0 in the presence of 20% 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol. The crystals belong to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 127.47, c = 63.97 Å. The crystals diffract X-rays to at least 2.1 Å resolution and are stable in the X-ray beam and are therefore appropriate for structure determination. Native data have been collected to 2.1 Å resolution using a DIP6040 image-plate system at beamline BL44XU at the SPring-8 facility in Japan.

  10. Quantitative trait loci linked to PRNP gene controlling health and production traits in INRA 401 sheep

    PubMed Central

    Vitezica, Zulma G; Moreno, Carole R; Lantier, Frederic; Lantier, Isabelle; Schibler, Laurent; Roig, Anne; François, Dominique; Bouix, Jacques; Allain, Daniel; Brunel, Jean-Claude; Barillet, Francis; Elsen, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the potential association of PrP genotypes with health and productive traits was investigated. Data were recorded on animals of the INRA 401 breed from the Bourges-La Sapinière INRA experimental farm. The population consisted of 30 rams and 852 ewes, which produced 1310 lambs. The animals were categorized into three PrP genotype classes: ARR homozygous, ARR heterozygous, and animals without any ARR allele. Two analyses differing in the approach considered were carried out. Firstly, the potential association of the PrP genotype with disease (Salmonella resistance) and production (wool and carcass) traits was studied. The data used included 1042, 1043 and 1013 genotyped animals for the Salmonella resistance, wool and carcass traits, respectively. The different traits were analyzed using an animal model, where the PrP genotype effect was included as a fixed effect. Association analyses do not indicate any evidence of an effect of PrP genotypes on traits studied in this breed. Secondly, a quantitative trait loci (QTL) detection approach using the PRNP gene as a marker was applied on ovine chromosome 13. Interval mapping was used. Evidence for one QTL affecting mean fiber diameter was found at 25 cM from the PRNP gene. However, a linkage between PRNP and this QTL does not imply unfavorable linkage disequilibrium for PRNP selection purposes. PMID:17612481

  11. Tissue Engineering for Bone Production- Stem Cells, Gene Therapy and Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, E.G; Saleh, M; Hindocha, S; Griffin, M; Khan, Wasim S

    2011-01-01

    A bone graft has been the gold standard treatment for repairing bone defects. However, due to bone grafts associated donor site morbidity several alternative bone substitutes options have been made available but with their added expense and limited osteoinductive properties they are not ideal. Therefore, research has begun in tissue engineering to investigate stem cells, which are one of the body’s own mechanisms used to repair bone. Stem cells are clonogenic undifferentiated cells capable of self-renewal. Readily available from numerous of sources stem cells have the potential to differentiate in osteoblasts and chrondrocytes showing capability to repair both bone and cartilage. The known immunologic properties of stem cells further enhance their therapeutic appeal. Stem cells have shown to be excellent carriers for gene transfer having the capability to be transduced. Gene transfer could enable growth factors and bone morphogentic proteins to enhance bone repair. Stem cells are implanted onto scaffolds, which are structures capable of supporting tissue formation by allowing cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. Research aims to produce scaffolds that deliver and retain cells, allow for cell attachment has adequate biodegradability, biocompatibility and non-immunogenicity. However, having tried and testing numerous materials including synthetic and natural products research into the perfect scaffold product continues. This review aims to explain how stem cells were discovered, the techniques used to isolate stem cells, identify and manipulate them down different cell lineages and discuss the research into using stem cells to reconstruct bone using genetic modification and scaffolds. PMID:21886695

  12. Enhancement of doxorubicin production by expression of structural sugar biosynthesis and glycosyltransferase genes in Streptomyces peucetius.

    PubMed

    Malla, Sailesh; Niraula, Narayan Prasad; Liou, Kwangkyoung; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2009-08-01

    To enhance doxorubicin (DXR) production, the structural sugar biosynthesis genes desIII and desIV from Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439 and the glycosyltransferase pair dnrS/dnrQ from Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 27952 were cloned into the expression vector pIBR25, which contains a strong ermE promoter. The recombinant plasmids pDnrS25 and pDnrQS25 were constructed for overexpression of dnrS and the dnrS/dnrQ pair, whereas pDesSD25 and pDesQS25 were constructed to express desIII/desIV and dnrS/dnrQ-desIII/desIV, respectively. All of these recombinant plasmids were introduced into S. peucetius ATCC 27952. The recombinant strains produced more DXR than the S. peucetius parental strain: a 1.2-fold increase with pDnrS25, a 2.8-fold increase with pDnrQS25, a 2.6-fold increase with pDesSD25, and a 5.6-fold increase with pDesQS25. This study showed that DXR production was significantly enhanced by overexpression of potential biosynthetic sugar genes and glycosyltransferase.

  13. Characterization and expression of the human rhoH12 gene product

    SciTech Connect

    Avraham, H.; Weinberg, R.A.

    1989-05-01

    The rho genes constitute an evolutionarily conserved family having significant homology to the ras oncogene family. These genes have been found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, rat, and human; their 21,000-dalton products show strong conservation of structure. In humans, three classes of rho cDNA clones have been identified which differ by virtue of the presence of variable C-terminal domains: rhoH12, rhoH6, and rhoH9. The predicted 193 amino acids of human rhoH12 protein show 88% similarity with those of the human rhoH6 clone, 96.8% similarity with those of the Aplysia rho product, and 81.8% similarity with those of the yeast RHO1 protein. Rat-1 and NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts were transfected with clones containing the normal human rhoH12 allele as well as the variants encoding valine in the place of the glycine and leucine in place of the gutamine normally found at residues 14 and 64, respectively. These replacements mirror the changes responsible for oncogenic activation of the related ras-encoded p21 proteins. These mutant rhoH12 clone alleles did not cause focus formation in monolayers or growth in soft agar. However, amplification of normal rhoH12 via contransfection with a dihydrofolate reductase gene resulted in colonies that displayed reduced dependence on serum for growth, grew to higher saturation densities, and were tumorigenic when inoculated into nude mice. Normal p21rho proteins was detected in the transfected cell lines as well as in normal cell lines by Western immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analysis with rabbit antibodies raised against the peptide corresponding to amino acids 122 to 135.

  14. Quantification of Tri5 gene, expression, and deoxynivalenol production during the malting of barley.

    PubMed

    Vegi, Anuradha; Schwarz, Paul; Wolf-Hall, Charlene E

    2011-11-01

    Fusarium can survive, grow, and produce mycotoxins during malting. We evaluated the percentage of barley kernels infected with Fusarium (FI) and deoxynivalenol (DON) concentration in three barley treatments (high-quality, naturally infected, and Fusarium graminearum inoculated barley) during various stages of malting. We also applied real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) and real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (real-time RT-PCR) methods to quantify trichothecene-producing (Tri5) DNA concentration and expression, respectively. We observed that FI significantly (P<0.05) increased during the germination stage of malting in all barley treatments. Temperatures of 49°C and higher during kilning reduced the FI in high-quality barley treatments, but for inoculated treatments temperatures in excess of 60°C were needed to reduce FI. The Tri5 DNA concentration ranged from non-detectable to 3.9 ng/50mg, 0.1 to 109.8 ng/50mg and 3.4 to 397.5 ng/50 mg in malted high-quality, inoculated and naturally infected barley treatments respectively. Strong gene expression (Tri5) in naturally infected barley treatments was found during the third day of germination, when compared to high-quality and inoculated barley treatments during malting. Deoxynivalenol was present even at high kilning temperatures, as DON is heat stable. The average DON concentration ranged from non-detectable to 0.1 μg/g, non-detectable to 1.1 μg/g, and 1.5 to 45.9 μg/g during various stages of malting in high-quality, inoculated and infected barley and malt samples respectively. Overall, the last 2 days of germination and initial stages of kilning were peak stages for FI, Tri5 gene production, Tri5 gene expression and DON production.

  15. A mutation in the aroE gene affects pigment production, virulence, and chemotaxis in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Il; Noh, Tae-Hwan; Lee, Chang-Soo; Park, Young-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight (BB) in rice. To study its function, a random insertion mutation library of Xoo was constructed using the Tn5 transposon. A mutant strain with decreased virulence against the susceptible rice cultivar IR24 was isolated from the library (aroE mutant), which also had extremely low pigment production. Thermal asymmetric interlaced-polymerase chain reaction (TAIL-PCR) and sequence analysis of the mutant revealed that the transposon was inserted into the aroE gene (encoding shikimate dehydrogenase). To investigate gene expression changes in the pigment- and virulence-deficient mutant, DNA microarray analysis was performed, which showed downregulation of 20 genes involved in the chemotaxis of Xoo. Our findings reveal that mutation of the aroE gene affects virulence and pigment production, as well as expression of genes involved in Xoo chemotaxis.

  16. Mutational Analysis of the sbo-alb Locus of Bacillus subtilis: Identification of Genes Required for Subtilosin Production and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guolu; Hehn, Robin; Zuber, Peter

    2000-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis 168 derivative JH642 produces a bacteriocin, subtilosin, which possesses activity against Listeria monocytogenes. Inspection of the amino acid sequence of the presubtilosin polypeptide encoded by the gene sboA and sequence data from analysis of mature subtilosin indicate that the precursor subtilosin peptide undergoes several unique and unusual chemical modifications during its maturation process. The genes of the sbo-alb operon are believed to function in the synthesis and maturation of subtilosin. Nonpolar mutations introduced into each of the alb genes resulted in loss or reduction of subtilosin production. sboA, albA, and albF mutants showed no antilisterial activity, indicating that the products of these genes are critical for the production of active subtilosin. Mutations in albB, -C, and -D resulted in reduction of antilisterial activity and decreased immunity to subtilosin, particularly under anaerobic conditions. A new gene, sboX, encoding another bacteriocin-like product was discovered residing in a sequence overlapping the coding region of sboA. Construction of an sboX-lacZ translational fusion and analysis of its expression indicate that sboX is induced in stationary phase of anaerobic cultures of JH642. An in-frame deletion of the sboX coding sequence did not affect the antilisterial activity or production of or immunity to subtilosin. The results of this investigation show that the sbo-alb genes are required for the mechanisms of subtilosin synthesis and immunity. PMID:10809709

  17. Trans-activation of the JC virus late promoter by the tat protein of type 1 human immunodeficiency virus in glial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Hiroomi; Lashgari, M.; Amini, S.; Khalili, K. ); Rappaport, J.; Wong-Staal, F. )

    1990-05-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system caused by the JC virus (JCV), a human papovavirus. PML is a relatively rare disease seen predominantly in immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent complication observed in AIDS patients. The significantly higher incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders has suggested that the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the brain may directly or indirectly contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. In the present study the authors have examined the expression of the JCV genome in both glial and non-glial cells in the presence of HIV-1 regulatory proteins. They find that the HIV-1-encoded trans-regulatory protein tat increases the basal activity of the JCV late promoter, JCV{sub L}, in glial cells. They conclude that the presence of the HIV-1-encoded tat protein may positively affect the JCV lytic cycle in glial cells by stimulating JCV gene expression. The results suggest a mechanism for the relatively high incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders. Furthermore, the findings indicate that the HIV-1 regulatory protein tat may stimulate other viral and perhaps cellular promoters, in addition to its own.

  18. Roles of the 2 microns gene products in stable maintenance of the 2 microns plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, A E; Murray, A W; Szostak, J W

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the replication and segregation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 2 microns circle. The amplification of the plasmid at low copy numbers requires site-specific recombination between the 2 microns inverted repeat sequences catalyzed by the plasmid-encoded FLP gene. No other 2 microns gene products are required. The overexpression of FLP in a strain carrying endogenous 2 microns leads to uncontrolled plasmid replication, longer cell cycles, and cell death. Two different assays show that the level of Flp activity decreases with increasing 2 microns copy number. This regulation requires the products of the REP1 and REP2 genes. These gene products also act together to ensure that 2 microns molecules are randomly segregated between mother and daughter cells at cell division. Images PMID:3316982

  19. [Improvement of natamycin production in an industrial strain by heterologous expression of the afsRS(cla) global regulatory genes].

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhengsheng; Wang, Yemin; Zheng, Hualiang; Tao, Meifeng

    2015-05-01

    The afsRS(cla) global regulatory genes from Streptomyces clavuligerus activate the production of two antibiotics in Streptomyces lividans. In this study, we gained an increase of 38% in the production of natamycin (3.56 g/L) in an industrial strain Streptomyces gilvosporeus TZ1401 through the integration of pHL851 that bears the afsRS(cla) global regulatory genes into its genome. We discovered by quantitive real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) that the expression of 6 genes of the natamycin biosynthetic gene cluster were improved from 1.9 to 2.7 times. This suggests that afsRS(cla) improve the production of natamycin through increased transcription. This study provides a good example for applying afsRS(cla) in high yield breeding of industrial antibiotic producers.

  20. Association of RUNX2 and TNFSF11 genes with production traits in a paternal broiler line.

    PubMed

    Grupioni, N V; Stafuzza, N B; Carvajal, A B; Ibelli, A M G; Peixoto, J O; Ledur, M C; Munari, D P

    2017-03-22

    Intense selection for production traits has improved the genetic gain of important economic traits. However, selection for performance and carcass traits has led to the onset of locomotors problems and decreasing bone strength in broilers. Thus, genes associated with bone integrity traits have become candidates for genetic studies in order to reduce the impact of bone disorders in broilers. This study investigated the association of the RUNX2 and TNFSF11 genes with 79 traits related to performance, carcass composition, organs, and bone integrity in a paternal broiler line. Analyses of genetic association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and traits were carried out using the maximum likelihood procedures for mixed models. Genetic associations (P < 0.05) were found between SNP g.124,883A>G in the RUNX2 gene and chilled femur weight (additive plus dominance deviation effects within sex) and with performance traits (additive within sex and additive effects). The SNP g.14,862T>C in the TNFSF11 gene presented genetic associations (P < 0.05) with additive plus dominance deviation effects within sex for performance traits. Suggestive genetic associations (P < 0.10) were found with abdominal fat and its yield. Selection based on SNPs g.14,862T>C in TNFSF11 and g.124,883A>G in RUNX2 could be used to improve performance and carcass quality traits in the population studied, although SNP g.14,862T>C was not in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium because it was not undergoing a selection process. Furthermore, it is important to validate these markers in an unrelated population for use in the selection process.

  1. Cocktail δ-integration of xylose assimilation genes for efficient ethanol production from xylose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroko; Matsuda, Fumio; Yamada, Ryosuke; Nagata, Kento; Shirai, Tomokazu; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2013-09-01

    Cocktail δ-integration was applied to improve ethanol production from xylose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two hundred of recombinant S. cerevisiae strains possessing various copies of XYL1, XYL2, and XKS1 genes were constructed by cocktail δ-integration. Efficient strains with efficient ethanol production from xylose were successfully obtained by the fermentation test.

  2. Diversity, Distribution and Quantification of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Goat and Lamb Slaughterhouse Surfaces and Meat Products

    PubMed Central

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Knapp, Charles W.; Correa Galeote, David; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and quantification of tetracycline, sulfonamide and beta-lactam resistance genes were assessed in slaughterhouse zones throughout meat chain production and the meat products; this study represents the first to report quantitatively monitor antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in goat and lamb slaughterhouse using a culture independent approach, since most studies focused on individual bacterial species and their specific resistance types. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed a high prevalence of tetracycline resistance genes tetA and tetB in almost all slaughterhouse zones. Sulfonamide resistance genes were largely distributed, while beta-lactam resistance genes were less predominant. Statistical analysis revealed that resistant bacteria, in most cases, were spread by the same route in almost all slaughterhouse zones, except for tetB, blaCTX and blaTEM genes, which occurred in few zones as isolated ‘hot spots.’ The sum of all analyzed ARG indicated that slaughterhouse surfaces and end products act as reservoirs of ARG, mainly tet genes, which were more prevalent in slaughtering room (SR), cutting room (CR) and commercial meat products (MP). Resistance gene patterns suggest they were disseminated throughout slaughterhouse zones being also detected in commercial meat products, with significant correlations between different sampling zones/end products and total resistance in SR, CR and white room (WR) zones, and also refrigerator 4 (F4) and MP were observed. Strategically controlling key zones in slaughterhouse (SR, CR and WR) by adequate disinfection methods could strategically reduce the risks of ARG transmission and minimize the issues of food safety and environment contamination. PMID:25479100

  3. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens TpeL Toxin Gene Carriage, Production, Cytotoxic Contributions, and Trypsin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Large clostridial toxins (LCTs) are produced by at least four pathogenic clostridial species, and several LCTs are proven pivotal virulence factors for both human and veterinary diseases. TpeL is a recently identified LCT produced by Clostridium perfringens that has received relatively limited study. In response, the current study surveyed carriage of the tpeL gene among different C. perfringens strains, detecting this toxin gene in some type A, B, and C strains but not in any type D or E strains. This study also determined that all tested strains maximally produce, and extracellularly release, TpeL at the late-log or early-stationary growth stage during in vitro culture, which is different from the maximal late-stationary-phase production reported previously for other LCTs and for TpeL production by C. perfringens strain JIR12688. In addition, the present study found that TpeL levels in culture supernatants can be repressed by either glucose or sucrose. It was also shown that, at natural production levels, TpeL is a significant contributor to the cytotoxic activity of supernatants from cultures of tpeL-positive strain CN3685. Lastly, this study identified TpeL, which presumably is produced in the intestines during diseases caused by TpeL-positive type B and C strains, as a toxin whose cytotoxicity decreases after treatment with trypsin; this finding may have pathophysiologic relevance by suggesting that, like beta toxin, TpeL contributes to type B and C infections in hosts with decreased trypsin levels due to disease, diet, or age. PMID:25824828

  4. Enhanced biosurfactant production through cloning of three genes and role of esterase in biosurfactant release

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biosurfactants have been reported to utilize a number of immiscible substrates and thereby facilitate the biodegradation of panoply of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Olive oil is one such carbon source which has been explored by many researchers. However, studying the concomitant production of biosurfactant and esterase enzyme in the presence of olive oil in the Bacillus species and its recombinants is a relatively novel approach. Results Bacillus species isolated from endosulfan sprayed cashew plantation soil was cultivated on a number of hydrophobic substrates. Olive oil was found to be the best inducer of biosurfactant activity. The protein associated with the release of the biosurfactant was found to be an esterase. There was a twofold increase in the biosurfactant and esterase activities after the successful cloning of the biosurfactant genes from Bacillus subtilis SK320 into E.coli. Multiple sequence alignment showed regions of similarity and conserved sequences between biosurfactant and esterase genes, further confirming the symbiotic correlation between the two. Biosurfactants produced by Bacillus subtilis SK320 and recombinant strains BioS a, BioS b, BioS c were found to be effective emulsifiers, reducing the surface tension of water from 72 dynes/cm to as low as 30.7 dynes/cm. Conclusion The attributes of enhanced biosurfactant and esterase production by hyper-producing recombinant strains have many utilities from industrial viewpoint. This study for the first time has shown a possible association between biosurfactant production and esterase activity in any Bacillus species. Biosurfactant-esterase complex has been found to have powerful emulsification properties, which shows promising bioremediation, hydrocarbon biodegradation and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:21707984

  5. Immunological characterization of the gag gene products of bovine immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Battles, J K; Hu, M Y; Rasmussen, L; Tobin, G J; Gonda, M A

    1992-12-01

    The bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) gag gene encodes a 53-kDa precursor (Pr53gag) that is involved in virus particle assembly and is further processed into the putative matrix (MA), capsid (CA), and nucleocapsid (NC) functional domains in the mature virus. Gag determinants are also found in the Gag-Pol polyprotein precursor. To immunologically identify the major precursors and processed products of the BIV gag gene, monospecific rabbit sera to recombinant BIV MA protein and Pr53gag and peptides predicted to correspond to the CA and NC proteins and the MA-CA cleavage site were developed and used in immunoprecipitations and immunoblots of BIV antigens. Monospecific antisera to native and recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteins were also used to identify analogous BIV Gag proteins and to determine whether cross-reactive epitopes were present in the BIV Gag precursors or processed products. The BIV MA, CA, and NC Gag proteins were identified as p16, p26, and p13, respectively. In addition to BIV Pr53gag, the major Gag precursor, two other Gag-related precursors of 170 and 49 kDa were identified that have been designated pPr170gag-pol and Pr49gag, respectively; pPr170gag-pol is the Gag-Pol polyprotein precursor, and Pr49gag is the transframe Gag precursor present in pPr170gag-pol. Several alternative Gag cleavage products were also observed, including p23, which contains CA and NC determinants, and p10, which contains a peptide sequence conserved in the CA proteins of most lentiviruses. The monospecific antisera to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 CA (p24) and NC (p7) proteins showed cross-reactivity to and aided in the identification of analogous BIV proteins. Based on the present data, a scheme for the processing of BIV Gag precursors is proposed.

  6. Immunological characterization of the gag gene products of bovine immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Battles, J K; Hu, M Y; Rasmussen, L; Tobin, G J; Gonda, M A

    1992-01-01

    The bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) gag gene encodes a 53-kDa precursor (Pr53gag) that is involved in virus particle assembly and is further processed into the putative matrix (MA), capsid (CA), and nucleocapsid (NC) functional domains in the mature virus. Gag determinants are also found in the Gag-Pol polyprotein precursor. To immunologically identify the major precursors and processed products of the BIV gag gene, monospecific rabbit sera to recombinant BIV MA protein and Pr53gag and peptides predicted to correspond to the CA and NC proteins and the MA-CA cleavage site were developed and used in immunoprecipitations and immunoblots of BIV antigens. Monospecific antisera to native and recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteins were also used to identify analogous BIV Gag proteins and to determine whether cross-reactive epitopes were present in the BIV Gag precursors or processed products. The BIV MA, CA, and NC Gag proteins were identified as p16, p26, and p13, respectively. In addition to BIV Pr53gag, the major Gag precursor, two other Gag-related precursors of 170 and 49 kDa were identified that have been designated pPr170gag-pol and Pr49gag, respectively; pPr170gag-pol is the Gag-Pol polyprotein precursor, and Pr49gag is the transframe Gag precursor present in pPr170gag-pol. Several alternative Gag cleavage products were also observed, including p23, which contains CA and NC determinants, and p10, which contains a peptide sequence conserved in the CA proteins of most lentiviruses. The monospecific antisera to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 CA (p24) and NC (p7) proteins showed cross-reactivity to and aided in the identification of analogous BIV proteins. Based on the present data, a scheme for the processing of BIV Gag precursors is proposed. Images PMID:1331499

  7. A Gene Optimization Strategy that Enhances Production of Fully Functional P-Glycoprotein in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Protasevich, Irina I.; Brouillette, Christie G.; Harrell, Patina M.; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Gasser, Brigitte; Mattanovich, Diethard; Ward, Andrew; Chang, Geoffrey; Urbatsch, Ina L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Structural and biochemical studies of mammalian membrane proteins remain hampered by inefficient production of pure protein. We explored codon optimization based on highly expressed Pichia pastoris genes to enhance co-translational folding and production of P-glycoprotein (Pgp), an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump involved in multidrug resistance of cancers. Methodology/Principal Findings Codon-optimized “Opti-Pgp” and wild-type Pgp, identical in primary protein sequence, were rigorously analyzed for differences in function or solution structure. Yeast expression levels and yield of purified protein from P. pastoris (∼130 mg per kg cells) were about three-fold higher for Opti-Pgp than for wild-type protein. Opti-Pgp conveyed full in vivo drug resistance against multiple anticancer and fungicidal drugs. ATP hydrolysis by purified Opti-Pgp was strongly stimulated ∼15-fold by verapamil and inhibited by cyclosporine A with binding constants of 4.2±2.2 µM and 1.1±0.26 µM, indistinguishable from wild-type Pgp. Maximum turnover number was 2.1±0.28 µmol/min/mg and was enhanced by 1.2-fold over wild-type Pgp, likely due to higher purity of Opti-Pgp preparations. Analysis of purified wild-type and Opti-Pgp by CD, DSC and limited proteolysis suggested similar secondary and ternary structure. Addition of lipid increased the thermal stability from Tm ∼40°C to 49°C, and the total unfolding enthalpy. The increase in folded state may account for the increase in drug-stimulated ATPase activity seen in presence of lipids. Conclusion The significantly higher yields of protein in the native folded state, higher purity and improved function establish the value of our gene optimization approach, and provide a basis to improve production of other membrane proteins. PMID:21826197

  8. From a Natural Product to Its Biosynthetic Gene Cluster: A Demonstration Using Polyketomycin from Streptomyces diastatochromogenes Tü6028

    PubMed Central

    Greule, Anja; Zhang, Songya; Paululat, Thomas; Bechthold, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Streptomyces strains are known for their capability to produce a lot of different compounds with various bioactivities. Cultivation under different conditions often leads to the production of new compounds. Therefore, production cultures of the strains are extracted with ethyl acetate and the crude extracts are analyzed by HPLC. Furthermore, the extracts are tested for their bioactivity by different assays. For structure elucidation the compound of interest is purified by a combination of different chromatography methods. Genome sequencing coupled with genome mining allows the identification of a natural product biosynthetic gene cluster using different computer programs. To confirm that the correct gene cluster has been identified, gene inactivation experiments have to be performed. The resulting mutants are analyzed for the production of the particular natural product. Once the correct gene cluster has been inactivated, the strain should fail to produce the compound. The workflow is shown for the antibacterial compound polyketomycin produced by Streptomyces diastatochromogenes Tü6028. Around ten years ago, when genome sequencing was still very expensive, the cloning and identification of a gene cluster was a very time-consuming process. Fast genome sequencing combined with genome mining accelerates the trial of cluster identification and opens up new ways to explore biosynthesis and to generate novel natural products by genetic methods. The protocol described in this paper can be assigned to any other compound derived from a Streptomyces strain or another microorganism. PMID:28117820

  9. From a Natural Product to Its Biosynthetic Gene Cluster: A Demonstration Using Polyketomycin from Streptomyces diastatochromogenes Tü6028.

    PubMed

    Greule, Anja; Zhang, Songya; Paululat, Thomas; Bechthold, Andreas

    2017-01-13

    Streptomyces strains are known for their capability to produce a lot of different compounds with various bioactivities. Cultivation under different conditions often leads to the production of new compounds. Therefore, production cultures of the strains are extracted with ethyl acetate and the crude extracts are analyzed by HPLC. Furthermore, the extracts are tested for their bioactivity by different assays. For structure elucidation the compound of interest is purified by a combination of different chromatography methods. Genome sequencing coupled with genome mining allows the identification of a natural product biosynthetic gene cluster using different computer programs. To confirm that the correct gene cluster has been identified, gene inactivation experiments have to be performed. The resulting mutants are analyzed for the production of the particular natural product. Once the correct gene cluster has been inactivated, the strain should fail to produce the compound. The workflow is shown for the antibacterial compound polyketomycin produced by Streptomyces diastatochromogenes Tü6028. Around ten years ago, when genome sequencing was still very expensive, the cloning and identification of a gene cluster was a very time-consuming process. Fast genome sequencing combined with genome mining accelerates the trial of cluster identification and opens up new ways to explore biosynthesis and to generate novel natural products by genetic methods. The protocol described in this paper can be assigned to any other compound derived from a Streptomyces strain or another microorganism.

  10. Mineralocorticoid Receptor (MR) trans-Activation of Inflammatory AP-1 Signaling: DEPENDENCE ON DNA SEQUENCE, MR CONFORMATION, AND AP-1 FAMILY MEMBER EXPRESSION.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Edward J; Elinoff, Jason M; Ferreyra, Gabriela A; Hou, Angela; Cai, Rongman; Sun, Junfeng; Blaine, Kevin P; Wang, Shuibang; Danner, Robert L

    2016-11-04

    Glucocorticoids are commonly used to treat inflammatory disorders. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) can tether to inflammatory transcription factor complexes, such as NFκB and AP-1, and trans-repress the transcription of cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. In contrast, aldosterone and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) primarily promote cardiovascular inflammation by incompletely understood mechanisms. Although MR has been shown to weakly repress NFκB, its role in modulating AP-1 has not been established. Here, the effects of GR and MR on NFκB and AP-1 signaling were directly compared using a variety of ligands, two different AP-1 consensus sequences, GR and MR DNA-binding domain mutants, and siRNA knockdown or overexpression of core AP-1 family members. Both GR and MR repressed an NFκB reporter without influencing p65 or p50 binding to DNA. Likewise, neither GR nor MR affected AP-1 binding, but repression or activation of AP-1 reporters occurred in a ligand-, AP-1 consensus sequence-, and AP-1 family member-specific manner. Notably, aldosterone interactions with both GR and MR demonstrated a potential to activate AP-1. DNA-binding domain mutations that eliminated the ability of GR and MR to cis-activate a hormone response element-driven reporter variably affected the strength and polarity of these responses. Importantly, MR modulation of NFκB and AP-1 signaling was consistent with a trans-mechanism, and AP-1 effects were confirmed for specific gene targets in primary human cells. Steroid nuclear receptor trans-effects on inflammatory signaling are context-dependent and influenced by nuclear receptor conformation, DNA sequence, and the expression of heterologous binding partners. Aldosterone activation of AP-1 may contribute to its proinflammatory effects in the vasculature.

  11. Microarray-based gene expression analysis as a process characterization tool to establish comparability of complex biological products: scale-up of a whole-cell immunotherapy product.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Senger, Ryan S; Paredes, Carlos; Banik, Gautam G; Lin, Andy; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2009-11-01

    Whole-cell immunotherapies and other cellular therapies have shown promising results in clinical trials. Due to the complex nature of the whole cell product and of the sometimes limited correlation of clinical potency with the proposed mechanism of action, these cellular immunotherapy products are generally not considered well characterized. Therefore, one major challenge in the product development of whole cell therapies is the ability to demonstrate comparability of product after changes in the manufacturing process. Such changes are nearly inevitable with increase in manufacturing experience leading to improved and robust processes that may have higher commercial feasibility. In order to comprehensively assess the impact of the process changes on the final product, and thus establish comparability, a matrix of characterization assays (in addition to lot release assays) assessing the various aspects of the cellular product are required. In this study, we assessed the capability of DNA-microarray-based, gene-expression analysis as a characterization tool using GVAX cancer immunotherapy cells manufactured by Cell Genesys, Inc. The GVAX immunotherapy product consists two prostate cancer cell lines (CG1940 and CG8711) engineered to secrete human GM-CSF. To demonstrate the capability of the assay, we assessed the transcriptional changes in the product when produced in the presence or absence of fetal bovine serum, and under normal and hypoxic conditions, both changes intended to stress the cell lines. We then assessed the impact of an approximately 10-fold process scale-up on the final product at the transcriptional level. These data were used to develop comparisons and statistical analyses suitable for characterizing culture reproducibility and cellular product similarity. Use of gene-expression data for process characterization proved to be a reproducible and sensitive method for detecting differences due to small or large changes in culture conditions as might be

  12. Production of staphylococcal enterotoxins in microbial broth and milk by Staphylococcus aureus strains harboring seh gene.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Justyna; Podkowik, Magdalena; Bystroń, Jarosław; Bania, Jacek

    2016-10-17

    Twenty Staphylococcus aureus strains harboring seh gene, including one carrying also sec gene and 11 sea gene, were grown in BHI+YE broth and milk and were tested for SEA, SEC and SEH production. All strains decreased pH of BHI+YE broth at 24h and increased them at 48h. Seventeen S. aureus strains grown in milk changed pH for no >0.3 unit until 48h. Three other S. aureus strains significantly decreased pH during growth in milk. All S. aureus produced SEH in BHI+YE broth in amounts ranging from 95 to 1292ng/ml, and from 170 to 4158ng/ml at 24 and 48h, respectively. SEH production in milk by 17 strains did not exceed 23ng/ml at 24h and 36ng/ml at 48h. Three S. aureus strains able to decrease milk pH produced 107-3029ng/ml and 320-4246ng/ml of SEH in milk at 24 and 48h, respectively. These strains were grown in milk and BHI+YE broth with pH stabilized at values near neutral leading to a significant decrease of SEH production. Representative weak SEH producers were grown in milk at reduced pH resulting in moderate increase in SEH production. SEA was produced in milk by 10S. aureus strains at 24-151ng/ml at 24h, and 31-303ng/ml at 48h. SEA production in milk was higher or comparable as in BHI+YE broth in 3 strains and lower for remaining strains. Production of SEC by sec-positive S. aureus strains was lower in milk than in BHI+YE broth, ranging from 131 to 2319ng/ml at 24 and 48h in milk and 296-30,087ng/ml in BHI+YE at 24 and 48h. Both lacE and lacG transcripts involved in lactose metabolism were significantly up-regulated in milk in strong SEH producers. In these strains hld, rot and sarA transcripts were up-regulated in milk as compared to weak SEH producers. Stabilization of milk pH at a value of raw milk significantly down-regulated hld, rot and sarA RNA in strong SEH producers. Milk was generally found unfavorable for enterotoxin production. However, certain S. aureus strains were not restricted in SEH and SEA expression in milk, unlike SEC which remained down

  13. Increasing Avermectin Production in Streptomyces avermitilis by Manipulating the Expression of a Novel TetR-Family Regulator and Its Target Gene Product

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenshuai; Zhang, Qinling; Guo, Jia; Chen, Zhi; Li, Jilun

    2015-01-01

    Avermectins produced by Streptomyces avermitilis are commercially important anthelmintic agents. The detailed regulatory mechanisms of avermectin biosynthesis remain unclear. Here, we identified SAV3619, a TetR-family transcriptional regulator designated AveT, to be an activator for both avermectin production and morphological differentiation in S. avermitilis. AveT was shown to indirectly stimulate avermectin production by affecting transcription of the cluster-situated activator gene aveR. AveT directly repressed transcription of its own gene (aveT), adjacent gene pepD2 (sav_3620), sav_7490 (designated aveM), and sav_7491 by binding to an 18-bp perfect palindromic sequence (CGAAACGKTKYCGTTTCG, where K is T or G and Y is T or C and where the underlining indicates inverted repeats) within their promoter regions. aveM (which encodes a putative transmembrane efflux protein belonging to the major facilitator superfamily [MFS]), the important target gene of AveT, had a striking negative effect on avermectin production and morphological differentiation. Overexpression of aveT and deletion of aveM in wild-type and industrial strains of S. avermitilis led to clear increases in the levels of avermectin production. In vitro gel-shift assays suggested that C-5–O-B1, the late pathway precursor of avermectin B1, acts as an AveT ligand. Taken together, our findings indicate positive-feedback regulation of aveT expression and avermectin production by a late pathway intermediate and provide the basis for an efficient strategy to increase avermectin production in S. avermitilis by manipulation of AveT and its target gene product, AveM. PMID:26002902

  14. The Epstein-Barr Virus BcRF1 Gene Product Is a TBP-Like Protein with an Essential Role in Late Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kadjouf, Faouzi; Mariamé, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    That the expression of late genes is coupled to viral genome replication is well established for all herpesviruses, but the exact mechanisms of their regulation, especially by viral proteins, are poorly understood. Here, we report the identification of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) early protein BcRF1 as a viral factor crucial for the activation of late gene transcription following viral DNA replication during the productive cycle. In order to study the function of the BcRF1 protein, we constructed a recombinant EBV lacking this gene. In HEK293 cells, this recombinant virus underwent normal DNA replication during the productive cycle but failed to express high levels of late gene transcripts or proteins, resulting in a nonproductive infection. Interestingly, a TATT motif is present in the promoter of most EBV late genes, at the position of the TATA box. We show here that BcRF1 forms a complex with the TATT motif and that this interaction is required for activation of late viral gene expression. Moreover, our results suggest that BcRF1 acts via interaction with other viral proteins. PMID:22457524

  15. The Epstein-Barr virus BcRF1 gene product is a TBP-like protein with an essential role in late gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gruffat, Henri; Kadjouf, Faouzi; Mariamé, Bernard; Manet, Evelyne

    2012-06-01

    That the expression of late genes is coupled to viral genome replication is well established for all herpesviruses, but the exact mechanisms of their regulation, especially by viral proteins, are poorly understood. Here, we report the identification of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) early protein BcRF1 as a viral factor crucial for the activation of late gene transcription following viral DNA replication during the productive cycle. In order to study the function of the BcRF1 protein, we constructed a recombinant EBV lacking this gene. In HEK293 cells, this recombinant virus underwent normal DNA replication during the productive cycle but failed to express high levels of late gene transcripts or proteins, resulting in a nonproductive infection. Interestingly, a TATT motif is present in the promoter of most EBV late genes, at the position of the TATA box. We show here that BcRF1 forms a complex with the TATT motif and that this interaction is required for activation of late viral gene expression. Moreover, our results suggest that BcRF1 acts via interaction with other viral proteins.

  16. Clustered Genes Involved in Cyclopiazonic Acid Production are Next to the Aflatoxin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster in Aspergillus flavus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), an indole-tetramic acid toxin, is produced by many species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. In addition to CPA Aspergillus flavus produces polyketide-derived carcinogenic aflatoxins (AFs). AF biosynthesis genes form a gene cluster in a subtelomeric region. Isolates of A. fla...

  17. Genes Linked to Production of Secondary Metabolites in Talaromyces atroroseus Revealed Using CRISPR-Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Maria Lund; Isbrandt, Thomas; Rasmussen, Kasper Bøwig; Thrane, Ulf; Hoof, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2017-01-01

    The full potential of fungal secondary metabolism has until recently been impeded by the lack of universal genetic tools for most species. However, the emergence of several CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing systems adapted for several genera of filamentous fungi have now opened the doors for future efforts in discovery of novel natural products and elucidation and engineering of their biosynthetic pathways in fungi where no genetic tools are in place. So far, most studies have focused on demonstrating the performance of CRISPR-Cas9 in various fungal model species, and recently we presented a versatile CRISPR-Cas9 system that can be successfully applied in several diverse Aspergillus species. Here we take it one step further and show that our system can be used also in a phylogenetically distinct and largely unexplored species from the genus of Talaromyces. Specifically, we exploit CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing to identify a new gene in T. atroroseus responsible for production of polyketide-nonribosomal peptide hybrid products, hence, linking fungal secondary metabolites to their genetic origin in a species where no genetic engineering has previously been performed. PMID:28056079

  18. Nitric oxide production and NO synthase gene expression contribute to vascular regulation during exercise.

    PubMed

    Shen, W; Zhang, X; Zhao, G; Wolin, M S; Sessa, W; Hintze, T H

    1995-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a vasodilator produced under normal physiologic conditions primarily by the vascular endothelium lining all blood vessels. The primary stimulus for the production of nitric oxide by the constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ECNOS, Type II) found in blood vessels is most likely the shear stress, the frictional force, caused by blood flowing through blood vessels. During exercise there is an increase in cardiac output and redistribution of blood flow to increase blood flow in skeletal muscle and in the coronary circulation. These adjustments provide increased oxygen delivery to support aerobic energy production and to sustain the exercise response. NO may be involved in the regulation of vascular tone in exercising skeletal and cardiac muscle by promoting, enhancing the metabolic vasodilation. In addition, the production of NO by capillary endothelium may regulate oxygen consumption by mitochondria through chemical interactions between NO and the iron-sulfur center of these enzymes. Finally, brief exercise training may alter the gene expression for the enzyme, the constitutive endothelial NO synthase, which forms NO and may be part of the vascular adaptation seen after aerobic exercise training. Furthermore, if there is a genetic predisposition to produce NO, as in world class athletes or animals bred to race, NO may contribute to spectacular exercise performance. These three potential roles of NO will be discussed and data presented to support each of these in our review.

  19. Ethanol production from cellobiose by Zymobacter palmae carrying the Ruminocuccus albus beta-glucosidase gene.

    PubMed

    Yanase, Hideshi; Yamamoto, Keiko; Sato, Dai; Okamoto, Kenji

    2005-07-21

    Its metabolic characteristics suggest Zymobacter palmae gen. nov., sp. nov. could serve as a useful new ethanol-fermenting bacterium, but its biotechnological exploitation would require certain genetic improvements. We therefore established a method for transforming Z. palmae using the broad-host vector plasmids pRK290, pMFY31 and pMFY40 as a source of transforming DNA. Using electroporation, the frequency of transformation was 10(5) to 10(6) transformants/mug of DNA. To confer the ability to ferment cellobiose, which is a hydrolysis product from cellulosic materials treated enzymatically or with acid, the beta-glucosidase gene from Ruminococcus albus was introduced into Z. palmae, where its expression was driven by its endogenous promoter. About 56% of the enzyme expressed was localized on the cell-surface or in the periplasm. The recombinant Z. palmae could ferment 2% cellobiose to ethanol, producing 95% of the theoretical yield with no accumulation of organic acids as metabolic by-products. Thus, expression of beta-glucosidase in Z. palmae expanded the substrate spectrum of the strain, enabling ethanol production from cellulosic materials.

  20. Cellulosic Ethanol Production by Recombinant Cellulolytic Bacteria Harbouring pdc and adh II Genes of Zymomonas mobilis

    PubMed Central

    Piriya, P. Sobana; Vasan, P. Thirumalai; Padma, V. S.; Vidhyadevi, U.; Archana, K.; Vennison, S. John

    2012-01-01

    The ethanol fermenting genes such as pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adh II) were cloned from Zymomonas mobilis and transformed into three different cellulolytic bacteria, namely Enterobacter cloacae JV, Proteus mirabilis JV and Erwinia chrysanthemi and their cellulosic ethanol production capability was studied. Recombinant E. cloacae JV was found to produce 4.5% and 3.5% (v/v) ethanol, respectively, when CMC and 4% NaOH pretreated bagasse were used as substrates, whereas recombinant P. mirabilis and E. chrysanthemi with the same substrates could only produce 4%, 3.5%, 1%, and 1.5 % of ethanol, respectively. The recombinant E. cloacae strain produced twofold higher percentage of ethanol than the wild type. The recombinant E. cloacae strain could be improved further by increasing its ethanol tolerance capability through media optimization and also by combining multigene cellulase expression for enhancing ethanol production from various types of lignocellulosic biomass so that it can be used for industrial level ethanol production. PMID:22919503

  1. Amplified expression of the tag+ and alkA+ genes in Escherichia coli: identification of gene products and effects on alkylation resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Kaasen, I; Evensen, G; Seeberg, E

    1986-01-01

    We have constructed plasmids which overproduce the tag and alkA gene products of Escherichia coli, i.e., 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases I and II. The tag and alkA gene products were identified radiochemically in maxi- or minicells as polypeptides of 21 and 30 kilodaltons, respectively, which are consistent with the gel filtration molecular weights of the enzyme activities, thus confirming the identity of the cloned genes. High expression of the tag+-coded glycosylase almost completely suppressed the alkylation sensitivity of alkA mutants, indicating that high levels of 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase I will eliminate the need for 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase II in repair of alkylated DNA. Furthermore, overproduction of the alkA+-coded glycosylase greatly sensitizes wild-type cells to alkylation, suggesting that only a limited expression of this enzyme will allow efficient DNA repair. Images PMID:3536857

  2. L-lactic acid production from D-xylose with Candida sonorensis expressing a heterologous lactate dehydrogenase encoding gene.

    PubMed

    Koivuranta, Kari T; Ilmén, Marja; Wiebe, Marilyn G; Ruohonen, Laura; Suominen, Pirkko; Penttilä, Merja

    2014-08-08

    Bioplastics, like polylactic acid (PLA), are renewable alternatives for petroleum-based plastics. Lactic acid, the monomer of PLA, has traditionally been produced biotechnologically with bacteria. With genetic engineering, yeast have the potential to replace bacteria in biotechnological lactic acid production, with the benefits of being acid tolerant and having simple nutritional requirements. Lactate dehydrogenase genes have been introduced to various yeast to demonstrate this potential. Importantly, an industrial lactic acid producing process utilising yeast has already been implemented. Utilisation of D-xylose in addition to D-glucose in production of biochemicals such as lactic acid by microbial fermentation would be beneficial, as it would allow lignocellulosic raw materials to be utilised in the production processes. The yeast Candida sonorensis, which naturally metabolises D-xylose, was genetically modified to produce L-lactic acid from D-xylose by integrating the gene encoding L-lactic acid dehydrogenase (ldhL) from Lactobacillus helveticus into its genome. In microaerobic, CaCO3-buffered conditions a C. sonorensis ldhL transformant having two copies of the ldhL gene produced 31 g l-1 lactic acid from 50 g l-1 D-xylose free of ethanol.Anaerobic production of lactic acid from D-xylose was assessed after introducing an alternative pathway of D-xylose metabolism, i.e. by adding a xylose isomerase encoded by XYLA from Piromyces sp. alone or together with the xylulokinase encoding gene XKS1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strains were further modified by deletion of the endogenous xylose reductase encoding gene, alone or together with the xylitol dehydrogenase encoding gene. Strains of C. sonorensis expressing xylose isomerase produced L-lactic acid from D-xylose in anaerobic conditions. The highest anaerobic L-lactic acid production (8.5 g l-1) was observed in strains in which both the xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase encoding genes had been

  3. Nucleotide sequence of the pnd gene in plasmid R483 and role of the pnd gene product in plasmolysis.

    PubMed

    Ono, K; Akimoto, S; Ohnishi, Y

    1987-01-01

    The pnd gene of R plasmid R483, like the srnB gene of the F plasmid, increases the degradation of stable RNA in Escherichia coli. The nucleotide sequence of the pnd locus was determined and compared with that of the srnB locus. The genes have open reading frames that are 54% homologous, and both have an upstream inverted repeat sequence. The pnd gene expression seems to decrease the osmotic barrier of the cytoplasmic membrane, since no plasmolytic vacuoles were formed in the cells carrying the gene when the cells were exposed to hypertonic sucrose solution. This result suggests that RNase I in the periplasm passes through the altered membrane to degrade stable RNA in the cytoplasm.

  4. Transcriptome and Gene Ontology (GO) Enrichment Analysis Reveals Genes Involved in Biotin Metabolism That Affect l-Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Il; Kim, Jong-Hyeon; Park, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is widely used for amino acid production. In the present study, 543 genes showed a significant change in their mRNA expression levels in l-lysine-producing C. glutamicum ATCC21300 than that in the wild-type C. glutamicum ATCC13032. Among these 543 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 28 genes were up- or downregulated. In addition, 454 DEGs were functionally enriched and categorized based on BLAST sequence homologies and gene ontology (GO) annotations using the Blast2GO software. Interestingly, NCgl0071 (bioB, encoding biotin synthase) was expressed at levels ~20-fold higher in the l-lysine-producing ATCC21300 strain than that in the wild-type ATCC13032 strain. Five other genes involved in biotin metabolism or transport—NCgl2515 (bioA, encoding adenosylmethionine-8-amino-7-oxononanoate aminotransferase), NCgl2516 (bioD, encoding dithiobiotin synthetase), NCgl1883, NCgl1884, and NCgl1885—were also expressed at significantly higher levels in the l-lysine-producing ATCC21300 strain than that in the wild-type ATCC13032 strain, which we determined using both next-generation RNA sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR analysis. When we disrupted the bioB gene in C. glutamicum ATCC21300, l-lysine production decreased by approximately 76%, and the three genes involved in biotin transport (NCgl1883, NCgl1884, and NCgl1885) were significantly downregulated. These results will be helpful to improve our understanding of C. glutamicum for industrial amino acid production. PMID:27005618

  5. The BnGRF2 gene (GRF2-like gene from Brassica napus) enhances seed oil production through regulating cell number and plant photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Hua, Wei; Yang, Hong-Li; Zhan, Gao-Miao; Deng, Lin-Bin; Wang, Xin-Fa; Liu, Gui-Hua; Wang, Han-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Seed yield and oil content are two important agricultural characteristics in oil crop breeding, and a lot of functional gene research is being concentrated on increasing these factors. In this study, by differential gene expression analyses between rapeseed lines (zy036 and 51070) which exhibit different levels of seed oil production, BnGRF2 (Brassica napus growth-regulating factor 2-like gene) was identified in the high oil-producing line zy036. To elucidate the possible roles of BnGRF2 in seed oil production, the cDNA sequences of the rapeseed GRF2 gene were isolated. The Blastn result showed that rapeseed contained BnGRF2a/2b which were located in the A genome (A1 and A3) and C genome (C1 and C6), respectively, and the dominantly expressed gene BnGRF2a was chosen for transgenic research. Analysis of 35S-BnGRF2a transgenic Arabidopsis showed that overexpressed BnGRF2a resulted in an increase in seed oil production of >50%. Moreover, BnGRF2a also induced a >20% enlargement in extended leaves and >40% improvement in photosynthetic efficiency because of an increase in the chlorophyll content. Furthermore, transcriptome analyses indicated that some genes associated with cell proliferation, photosynthesis, and oil synthesis were up-regulated, which revealed that cell number and plant photosynthesis contributed to the increased seed weight and oil content. Because of less efficient self-fertilization induced by the longer pistil in the 35S-BnGRF2a transgenic line, Napin-BnGRF2a transgenic lines were further used to identify the function of BnGRF2, and the results showed that seed oil production also could increase >40% compared with the wild-type control. The results suggest that improvement to economically important characteristics in oil crops may be achieved by manipulation of the GRF2 expression level. PMID:22442419

  6. The BnGRF2 gene (GRF2-like gene from Brassica napus) enhances seed oil production through regulating cell number and plant photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Hua, Wei; Yang, Hong-Li; Zhan, Gao-Miao; Li, Rong-Jun; Deng, Lin-Bin; Wang, Xin-Fa; Liu, Gui-Hua; Wang, Han-Zhong

    2012-06-01

    Seed yield and oil content are two important agricultural characteristics in oil crop breeding, and a lot of functional gene research is being concentrated on increasing these factors. In this study, by differential gene expression analyses between rapeseed lines (zy036 and 51070) which exhibit different levels of seed oil production, BnGRF2 (Brassica napus growth-regulating factor 2-like gene) was identified in the high oil-producing line zy036. To elucidate the possible roles of BnGRF2 in seed oil production, the cDNA sequences of the rapeseed GRF2 gene were isolated. The Blastn result showed that rapeseed contained BnGRF2a/2b which were located in the A genome (A1 and A3) and C genome (C1 and C6), respectively, and the dominantly expressed gene BnGRF2a was chosen for transgenic research. Analysis of 35S-BnGRF2a transgenic Arabidopsis showed that overexpressed BnGRF2a resulted in an increase in seed oil production of >50%. Moreover, BnGRF2a also induced a >20% enlargement in extended leaves and >40% improvement in photosynthetic efficiency because of an increase in the chlorophyll content. Furthermore, transcriptome analyses indicated that some genes associated with cell proliferation, photosynthesis, and oil synthesis were up-regulated, which revealed that cell number and plant photosynthesis contributed to the increased seed weight and oil content. Because of less efficient self-fertilization induced by the longer pistil in the 35S-BnGRF2a transgenic line, Napin-BnGRF2a transgenic lines were further used to identify the function of BnGRF2, and the results showed that seed oil production also could increase >40% compared with the wild-type control. The results suggest that improvement to economically important characteristics in oil crops may be achieved by manipulation of the GRF2 expression level.

  7. Trade-off between constitutive and inducible resistance against herbivores is only partially explained by gene expression and glucosinolate production.

    PubMed

    Rasmann, Sergio; Chassin, Estelle; Bilat, Julia; Glauser, Gaétan; Reymond, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    The hypothesis that constitutive and inducible plant resistance against herbivores should trade-off because they use the same resources and impose costs to plant fitness has been postulated for a long time. Negative correlations between modes of deployment of resistance and defences have been observed across and within species in common garden experiments. It was therefore tested whether that pattern of resistance across genotypes follows a similar variation in patterns of gene expression and chemical defence production. Using the genetically tractable model Arabidopsis thaliana and different modes of induction, including the generalist herbivore Spodoptera littoralis, the specialist herbivore Pieris brassicae, and jasmonate application, constitutive and inducibility of resistance was measured across seven A. thaliana accessions that were previously selected based on constitutive levels of defence gene expression. According to theory, it was found that modes of resistance traded-off among accessions, particularly against S. littoralis, in which accessions investing in high constitutive resistance did not increase it substantially after attack and vice-versa. Accordingly, the average expression of eight genes involved in glucosinolate production negatively predicted larval growth across the seven accessions. Glucosinolate production and genes related to defence induction on healthy and herbivore-damaged plants were measured next. Surprisingly, only a partial correlation between glucosinolate production, gene expression, and the herbivore resistance results was found. These results suggest that the defence outcome of plants against herbivores goes beyond individual molecules or genes but stands on a complex network of interactions.

  8. Exopolysaccharide Production and Ropy Phenotype Are Determined by Two Gene Clusters in Putative Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus paraplantarum BGCG11

    PubMed Central

    Zivkovic, Milica; Miljkovic, Marija; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Strahinic, Ivana; Tolinacki, Maja; Golic, Natasa

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus paraplantarum BGCG11, a putative probiotic strain isolated from a soft, white, artisanal cheese, produces a high-molecular-weight heteropolysaccharide, exopolysaccharide (EPS)-CG11, responsible for the ropy phenotype and immunomodulatory activity of the strain. In this study, a 26.4-kb region originating from the pCG1 plasmid, previously shown to be responsible for the production of EPS-CG11 and a ropy phenotype, was cloned, sequenced, and functionally characterized. In this region 16 putative open reading frames (ORFs), encoding enzymes for the production of EPS-CG11, were organized in specific loci involved in the biosynthesis of the repeat unit, polymerization, export, regulation, and chain length determination. Interestingly, downstream of the eps gene cluster, a putative transposase gene was identified, followed by an additional rfb gene cluster containing the rfbACBD genes, the ones most probably responsible for dTDP-l-rhamnose biosynthesis. The functional analysis showed that the production of the high-molecular-weight fraction of EPS-CG11 was absent in two knockout mutants, one in the eps and the other in the rfb gene cluster, as confirmed by size exclusion chromatography analysis. Therefore, both eps and rfb genes clusters are prerequisites for the production of high-molecular-weight EPS-CG11 and for the ropy phenotype of strain L. paraplantarum BGCG11. PMID:25527533

  9. deadpan, an essential pan-neural gene in Drosophila, encodes a helix-loop-helix protein similar to the hairy gene product.

    PubMed

    Bier, E; Vaessin, H; Younger-Shepherd, S; Jan, L Y; Jan, Y N

    1992-11-01

    Neural precursor cells in Drosophila acquire their identity early during their formation. In an attempt to determine whether all neural precursors share a set of genetic machinery, perhaps to control properties of differentiation common to all neurons, we used the enhancer-trap method to identify several genes (pan-neural genes) that are expressed in all neurons and/or their precursors. One of the pan-neural genes is deadpan, which encodes a helix-loop-helix protein closely related to the product of the segmentation gene hairy. The function of deadpan is essential for viability and is likely to be involved in the functional rather than the morphological differentiation of neurons.

  10. Epstein–Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 trans-activates miR-155 transcription through the NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, Graziana; Rossi, Annalisa; Rossi, Daniela; Kroening, Sven; Bonatti, Stefano; Mallardo, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    The Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-encoded latent membrane protein-1 (LMP1), a functional homologue of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, substantially contributes to EBV's oncogenic potential by activating nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). miR-155 is an oncogenic miRNA critical for B-cell maturation and immunoglobulin production in response to antigen. We report that miR-155 expression is much higher in EBV-immortalized B cells than in EBV-negative B cells. LMP1, but not LMP2, up-regulated the expression of miR-155, when transfected in EBV-negative B cells. We analyzed two putative NF-κB binding sites in the miR-155 promoter; both sites recruited NF-κB complex, in nuclear extract from EBV-immortalized cells. The exogenous expression of LMP1, in EBV-negative background, is temporally correlated to induction of p65 with binding on both NF-κB sites and with miR-155 overexpression. The induction of p65 binding together with increased RNA polymerase II binding, confirms that LMP1-mediated activation of miR-155 occurs transcriptionally. In reporter assays, miR-155 promoter lacking NF-κB binding sites was no longer activated by LMP1 expression and an intact AP1 site is needed to attain maximum activation. Finally, we demonstrate that LMP1-mediated activation of miR-155 in an EBV-negative background correlates with reduction of protein PU.1, which is a possible miR target. PMID:18940871

  11. Gene identification in black cohosh (Actaea racemosa L.): expressed sequence tag profiling and genetic screening yields candidate genes for production of bioactive secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Spiering, Martin J; Urban, Lori A; Nuss, Donald L; Gopalan, Vivek; Stoltzfus, Arlin; Eisenstein, Edward

    2011-04-01

    Black cohosh (Actaea racemosa L., syn. Cimicifuga racemosa, Nutt., Ranunculaceae) is a popular herb used for relieving menopausal discomforts. A variety of secondary metabolites, including triterpenoids, phenolic dimers, and serotonin derivatives have been associated with its biological activity, but the genes and metabolic pathways as well as the tissue distribution of their production in this plant are unknown. A gene discovery effort was initiated in A. racemosa by partial sequencing of cDNA libraries constructed from young leaf, rhizome, and root tissues. In total, 2,066 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were assembled into 1,590 unique genes (unigenes). Most of the unigenes were predicted to encode primary metabolism genes, but about 70 were identified as putative secondary metabolism genes. Several of these candidates were analyzed further and full-length cDNA and genomic sequences for a putative 2,3 oxidosqualene cyclase (CAS1) and two BAHD-type acyltransferases (ACT1 and HCT1) were obtained. Homology-based PCR screening for the central gene in plant serotonin biosynthesis, tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), identified two TDC-related sequences in A. racemosa. CAS1, ACT1, and HCT1 were expressed in most plant tissues, whereas expression of TDC genes was detected only sporadically in immature flower heads and some very young leaf tissues. The cDNA libraries described and assorted genes identified provide initial insight into gene content and diversity in black cohosh, and provide tools and resources for detailed investigations of secondary metabolite genes and enzymes in this important medicinal plant.

  12. Gene network analysis identifies rumen epithelial cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolic pathways perturbed by diet and correlated with methane production.

    PubMed