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Sample records for gene trap mutation

  1. A large-scale gene-trap screen for insertional mutations in developmentally regulated genes in mice.

    PubMed

    Wurst, W; Rossant, J; Prideaux, V; Kownacka, M; Joyner, A; Hill, D P; Guillemot, F; Gasca, S; Cado, D; Auerbach, A

    1995-02-01

    We have used a gene-trap vector and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells to screen for insertional mutations in genes developmentally regulated at 8.5 days of embryogenesis (dpc). From 38,730 cell lines with vector insertions, 393 clonal integrations had disrupted active transcription units, as assayed by beta-galactosidase reporter gene expression. From these lines, 290 clones were recovered and injected into blastocysts to assay for reporter gene expression in 8.5-dpc chimeric mouse embryos. Of these, 279 clones provided a sufficient number of chimeric embryos for analysis. Thirty-six (13%) showed restricted patterns of reporter-gene expression, 88 (32%) showed widespread expression and 155 (55%) failed to show detectable levels of expression. Further analysis showed that approximately one-third of the clones that did not express detectable levels of the reporter gene at 8.5 dpc displayed reporter gene activity at 12.5 dpc. Thus, a large proportion of the genes that are expressed in ES cells are either temporally or spatially regulated during embryogenesis. These results indicate that gene-trap mutageneses in embryonic stem cells provide an effective approach for isolating mutations in a large number of developmentally regulated genes.

  2. A Large-Scale Gene-Trap Screen for Insertional Mutations in Developmentally Regulated Genes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wurst, W.; Rossant, J.; Prideaux, V.; Kownacka, M.; Joyner, A.; Hill, D. P.; Guillemot, F.; Gasca, S.; Cado, D.; Auerbach, A.; Ang, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    We have used a gene-trap vector and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells to screen for insertional mutations in genes developmentally regulated at 8.5 days of embryogenesis (dpc). From 38,730 cell lines with vector insertions, 393 clonal integrations had disrupted active transcription units, as assayed by β-galactosidase reporter gene expression. From these lines, 290 clones were recovered and injected into blastocysts to assay for reporter gene expression in 8.5-dpc chimeric mouse embryos. Of these, 279 clones provided a sufficient number of chimeric embryos for analysis. Thirty-six (13%) showed restricted patterns of reporter-gene expression, 88 (32%) showed widespread expression and 155 (55%) failed to show detectable levels of expression. Further analysis showed that approximately one-third of the clones that did not express detectable levels of the reporter gene at 8.5 dpc displayed reporter gene activity at 12.5 dpc. Thus, a large proportion of the genes that are expressed in ES cells are either temporally or spatially regulated during embryogenesis. These results indicate that gene-trap mutageneses in embryonic stem cells provide an effective approach for isolating mutations in a large number of developmentally regulated genes. PMID:7713439

  3. Conditional gene-trap mutagenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Maddison, Lisette A; Li, Mingyu; Chen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish has become a widely used model for analysis of gene function. Several methods have been used to create mutations in this organism and thousands of mutant lines are available. However, all the conventional zebrafish mutations affect the gene in all cells at all time, making it difficult to determine tissue-specific functions. We have adopted a FlEx Trap approach to generate conditional mutations in zebrafish by gene-trap mutagenesis. Combined with appropriate Cre or Flp lines, the insertional mutants not only allow spatial- and temporal-specific gene inactivation but also permit spatial- and temporal-specific rescue of the disrupted gene. We provide experimental details on how to generate and use such mutations.

  4. Secondary amyloidosis in a patient carrying mutations in the familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 syndrome (TRAPS) genes.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Anna; Cruz, Dinna N; Granata, Antonio; Virzì, Grazia Maria; Battaglia, Giorgio

    2013-12-01

    Secondary amyloidosis (AA) is characterized by the extracellular tissue deposition of fibrils composed of fragments of an acute-phase reactant protein, serum amyloid A (SAA), due to chronic inflammatory diseases, infections and several neoplasms. AA amyloidosis may also complicate several hereditary diseases, where genetic factors play a pivotal role in the expression of amyloidosis. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 syndrome (TRAPS) are the most frequently involved. We describe a case of a 21-year-old Romanian woman who presented at the 35th week of gestation with acute abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. The laboratory workup performed after delivery showed proteinuria in the nephrotic range and increased SAA protein. Kidney amyloid deposits were detected and genetic testing for secondary amyloidosis was performed identifying two mutations, one involving the gene of FMF (MEFV), and the other involving the tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 gene (TNFRSF1A). To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature where secondary amyloidosis develops in a patient carrying mutations involving the genes of both FMF and TRAPS.

  5. Gene trapping in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Stanford, William L; Epp, Trevor; Reid, Tammy; Rossant, Janet

    2006-01-01

    Gene trapping in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) generates random, sequence-tagged insertional mutations, which can often report the gene expression pattern of the mutated gene. This mutagenesis strategy has often been coupled to expression or function-based assays in gene discovery screens. The availability of the mouse genome sequence has shifted gene trapping from a gene discovery platform to a high-throughput mutagenesis platform. At present, a concerted worldwide effort is underway to develop a library of loss-of-function mutations in all mouse genes. The International Gene Trap Consortium (IGTC) is leading the way by making a first pass of the genome by random mutagenesis before a high-throughput gene targeting program takes over. In this chapter, we provide a methods guidebook to exploring and using the IGTC resource, explain the different kinds of vectors and insertions that reside in the different libraries, and provide advice and methods for investigators to design novel expression-based "cottage industry" screens.

  6. Effective Gene Trapping Mediated by Sleeping Beauty Transposon

    PubMed Central

    Song, Guili; Li, Qing; Long, Yong; Gu, Qilin; Hackett, Perry B.; Cui, Zongbin

    2012-01-01

    Gene trapping is a high-throughput approach to elucidate gene functions by disrupting and recapitulating expression of genes in a target genome. A number of transposon-based gene-trapping systems are developed for mutagenesis in cells and model organisms, but there is still much room for the improvement of their efficiency in gene disruption and mutation. Herein, a gene-trapping system mediated by Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon was developed by inclusion of three functional cassettes. The mutation cassette can abrogate the splice of trapped genes and terminate their translation. Once an endogenous gene is captured, the finding cassette independently drives the translation of reporter gene in HeLa cells and zebrafish embryos. The efficiency cassette controls the remobilization of integrated traps through inducible expression of SB gene. Analysis of transposon-genome junctions indicate that most of trap cassettes are integrated into an intron without an obvious 3′ bias. The transcription of trapped genes was abrogated by alternative splicing of the mutation cassette. In addition, integrated transposons can be induced to excise from their original insertion sites. Furthermore, the Cre/LoxP system was introduced to delete the efficiency cassette for stabilization of gene interruption and bio-safety. Thus, this gene-trap vector is an alternative and effective tool for the capture and disruption of endogenous genes in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22952894

  7. Gene and enhancer traps for gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Pierce, Marcela; Springer, Patricia S

    2003-01-01

    Gene traps and enhancer traps provide a valuable tool for gene discovery. With this system, genes can be identified based solely on the expression pattern of an inserted reporter gene. The use of a reporter gene, such as beta-glucuoronidase (GUS), provides a very sensitive assay for the identification of tissue- and cell-type specific expression patterns. In this chapter, protocols for examining and documenting GUS reporter gene activity in individual lines are described. Methods for the amplification of sequences flanking transposant insertions and subsequent molecular and genetic characterization of individual insertions are provided.

  8. A temperature-sensitive trpS mutation interferes with trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) regulation of trp gene expression in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Lee, A I; Sarsero, J P; Yanofsky, C

    1996-11-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, the tryptophan-activated trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) regulates expression of the seven tryptophan biosynthetic genes by binding to specific repeat sequences in the transcripts of the trp operon and of the folate operon, the operon containing trpG. Steinberg observed that strains containing a temperature-sensitive mutant form of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase, encoded by the trpS1 allele, produced elevated levels of the tryptophan pathway enzymes, when grown at high temperatures in the presence of excess L-tryptophan (W. Steinberg, J. Bacteriol. 117:1023-1034, 1974). We have confirmed this observation and have shown that expression of two reporter gene fusions, trpE'-'lacZ and trpG'-'lacZ, is also increased under these conditions. Deletion of the terminator or antiterminator RNA secondary structure involved in TRAP regulation of trp operon expression eliminated the trpS1 effect, suggesting that temperature-sensitive expression was mediated by the TRAP protein. Analysis of expression of mtrB, the gene encoding the TRAP subunit, both by examination of a lacZ translational fusion and by measuring the intracellular levels of TRAP by immunoblotting, indicated that the trpS1-induced increase in trp gene expression was not due to inhibition of mtrB expression or to alteration of the amount of TRAP present per cell. Increasing the cellular level of TRAP by overexpressing mtrB partially counteracted the trpS1 effect, demonstrating that active TRAP was limiting in the trpS1 mutant. We also showed that elevated trp operon expression was not due to increased transcription initiation at the upstream aroF promoter, a promoter that also contributes to trp operon expression. We postulate that the increase in trp gene expression observed in the trpS1 mutant is due to the reduced availability of functional TRAP. This could result from inhibition of TRAP function by uncharged tRNA(Trp) molecules or by increased synthesis of some other transcript

  9. Recurrent gene mutations in CLL.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Quesada, Víctor; Villamor, Neus; Puente, Xose S; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of whole genomes and exomes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has provided the first comprehensive view of somatic mutations in this disease. Subsequent studies have characterized the oncogenic pathways and clinical implications of a number of these mutations. The global number of somatic mutations per case is lower than those described in solid tumors but is in agreement with previous estimates of less than one mutation per megabase in hematological neoplasms. The number and pattern of somatic mutations differ in tumors with unmutated and mutated IGHV, extending at the genomic level the clinical differences observed in these two CLL subtypes. One of the striking conclusions of these studies has been the marked genetic heterogeneity of the disease, with a relatively large number of genes recurrently mutated at low frequency and only a few genes mutated in up to 10-15 % of the patients. The mutated genes tend to cluster in different pathways that include NOTCH1 signaling, RNA splicing and processing machinery, innate inflammatory response, Wnt signaling, and DNA damage and cell cycle control, among others. These results highlight the molecular heterogeneity of CLL and may provide new biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for the diagnosis and management of the disease.

  10. Efficient disruption of Zebrafish genes using a Gal4-containing gene trap

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background External development and optical transparency of embryos make zebrafish exceptionally suitable for in vivo insertional mutagenesis using fluorescent proteins to visualize expression patterns of mutated genes. Recently developed Gene Breaking Transposon (GBT) vectors greatly improve the fidelity and mutagenicity of transposon-based gene trap vectors. Results We constructed and tested a bipartite GBT vector with Gal4-VP16 as the primary gene trap reporter. Our vector also contains a UAS:eGFP cassette for direct detection of gene trap events by fluorescence. To confirm gene trap events, we generated a UAS:mRFP tester line. We screened 270 potential founders and established 41 gene trap lines. Three of our gene trap alleles display homozygous lethal phenotypes ranging from embryonic to late larval: nsf tpl6, atp1a3atpl10 and flrtpl19. Our gene trap cassette is flanked by direct loxP sites, which enabled us to successfully revert nsf tpl6, atp1a3atpl10 and flrtpl19 gene trap alleles by injection of Cre mRNA. The UAS:eGFP cassette is flanked by direct FRT sites. It can be readily removed by injection of Flp mRNA for use of our gene trap alleles with other tissue-specific GFP-marked lines. The Gal4-VP16 component of our vector provides two important advantages over other GBT vectors. The first is increased sensitivity, which enabled us to detect previously unnoticed expression of nsf in the pancreas. The second advantage is that all our gene trap lines, including integrations into non-essential genes, can be used as highly specific Gal4 drivers for expression of other transgenes under the control of Gal4 UAS. Conclusions The Gal4-containing bipartite Gene Breaking Transposon vector presented here retains high specificity for integrations into genes, high mutagenicity and revertibility by Cre. These features, together with utility as highly specific Gal4 drivers, make gene trap mutants presented here especially useful to the research community. PMID:24034702

  11. Trap(Seq): An RNA Sequencing-Based Pipeline for the Identification of Gene-Trap Insertions in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Mayor-Ruiz, Cristina; Dominguez, Orlando; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2017-09-01

    The development of haploid mammalian cell lines, coupled to next-generation sequencing, has recently facilitated forward genetic screenings in mammals. For mutagenesis, retrovirus- or transposon-based gene traps are frequently used. Current methods to map gene-trap insertions are based on inverse or splinkerette PCR, which despite their efficacy are prone to artifacts and do not provide information on expression of the targeted gene. Here, we describe a new RNA sequencing-based method (Trap(Seq)) to map gene-trap insertions. By recognizing chimeric mRNAs containing gene-trap sequences spliced to an exon, our method identifies insertions that lead to productive trapping. When applied to individual mutant clones, our method provides a fast and cost-effective way that not only identifies the insertion site but also reveals its impact on the expression of the trapped gene. As proof of principle, we conducted two independent screenings for resistance against 6-thioguanine and an ATR inhibitor, which identified mutations known to provide resistance to these reagents and revealed ECT2 as a novel determinant for the sensitivity to ATR inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Database for exchangeable gene trap clones: pathway and gene ontology analysis of exchangeable gene trap clone mouse lines.

    PubMed

    Araki, Masatake; Nakahara, Mai; Muta, Mayumi; Itou, Miharu; Yanai, Chika; Yamazoe, Fumika; Miyake, Mikiko; Morita, Ayaka; Araki, Miyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiyuki; Nakagata, Naomi; Yoshinobu, Kumiko; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Araki, Kimi

    2014-02-01

    Gene trapping in embryonic stem (ES) cells is a proven method for large-scale random insertional mutagenesis in the mouse genome. We have established an exchangeable gene trap system, in which a reporter gene can be exchanged for any other DNA of interest through Cre/mutant lox-mediated recombination. We isolated trap clones, analyzed trapped genes, and constructed the database for Exchangeable Gene Trap Clones (EGTC) [http://egtc.jp]. The number of registered ES cell lines was 1162 on 31 August 2013. We also established 454 mouse lines from trap ES clones and deposited them in the mouse embryo bank at the Center for Animal Resources and Development, Kumamoto University, Japan. The EGTC database is the most extensive academic resource for gene-trap mouse lines. Because we used a promoter-trap strategy, all trapped genes were expressed in ES cells. To understand the general characteristics of the trapped genes in the EGTC library, we used Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) for pathway analysis and found that the EGTC ES clones covered a broad range of pathways. We also used Gene Ontology (GO) classification data provided by Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) to compare the functional distribution of genes in each GO term between trapped genes in the EGTC mouse lines and total genes annotated in MGI. We found the functional distributions for the trapped genes in the EGTC mouse lines and for the RefSeq genes for the whole mouse genome were similar, indicating that the EGTC mouse lines had trapped a wide range of mouse genes. © 2014 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2014 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  13. Overlap syndrome between FMF and TRAPS in a patient carrying MEFV and TNFRSF1A mutations.

    PubMed

    Granel, B; Serratrice, J; Dodé, C; Grateau, G; Disdier, P; Weiller, P-J

    2007-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) and TNF-Receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome (TRAPS) are two inheritable inflammatory disorders. They share some clinical manifestations but their treatments are different. We present here the case of an overlap syndrome of FMF and TRAPS in a patient carrying a mutation in both the MEFV and TNFRSF1A genes. A 20-year-old woman of Mediterranean origin had suffered since childhood from attacks of fever and arthritis, with skin and ophthalmic manifestations. The initial diagnosis was FMF. The symptoms responded poorly to colchicine but regressed with steroids. Genetic analysis revealed a homozygous M694V mutation in MEFV and a heterozygous R92Q mutation in TNFRSF1A. We discuss the complexity of this combined FMF-TRAPS phenotype. This case shows that mutations in MEFV and TNFRSF1A can occur together in a single patient, a condition that may modify its response to treatment. It would be interesting to evaluate the role of the R92Q mutation in TNFRSF1A in patients of Mediterranean origin with FMF unresponsive to colchicine.

  14. Secretion Trap Tagging of Secreted and Membrane-Spanning Proteins Using Arabidopsis Gene Traps

    Treesearch

    Andrew T. Groover; Joseph R. Fontana; Juana M. Arroyo; Cristina Yordan; W. Richard McCombie; Robert A. Martienssen

    2003-01-01

    Secreted and membrane-spanning proteins play fundamental roles in plant development but pose challenges for genetic identification and characterization. We describe a "secretion trap" screen for gene trap insertions in genes encoding proteins routed through the secretory pathway. The gene trap transposon encodes a ß-glucuronidase reporter enzyme...

  15. Gene identification by 3' terminal exon trapping.

    PubMed

    Krizman, D B

    1996-01-01

    3' terminal exon trapping offers a powerful and efficient technology for rendering fragments of transcribed genes from large stretches of unsequenced, vertebrate, genomic DNA. The products from this methodology are the starting point for further studies of gene discovery and analysis. Future considerations for this technology include answering questions about the degree of efficiency from various trapping substrates and whether or not this approach can be scaled up for large-scale gene discovery such as individual chromosome or whole genomic approaches. With the onset of EST database searching, the final analysis becomes a computer assay that is consistent with the future of genetics as this field continues to move towards informational experimentation based on DNA sequence.

  16. Gene mutations in Cushing's disease

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qi; Ge, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) is a severe (and potentially fatal) disease caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting adenomas of the pituitary gland (often termed pituitary adenomas). The majority of ACTH-secreting corticotroph tumors are sporadic and CD rarely appears as a familial disorder, thus, the genetic mechanisms underlying CD are poorly understood. Studies have reported that various mutated genes are associated with CD, such as those in menin 1, aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein and the nuclear receptor subfamily 3 group C member 1. Recently it was identified that ubiquitin-specific protease 8 mutations contribute to CD, which was significant towards elucidating the genetic mechanisms of CD. The present study reviews the associated gene mutations in CD patients. PMID:27588171

  17. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M N; Hughes, I A; Gottlieb, B; Pinsky, L

    1994-09-01

    The androgen receptor gene mutations database is a comprehensive listing of mutations published in journals and meetings proceedings. The majority of mutations are point mutations identified in patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Information is included regarding the phenotype, the nature and location of the mutations, as well as the effects of the mutations on the androgen binding activity of the receptor. The current version of the database contains 149 entries, of which 114 are unique mutations. The database is available from EMBL (NetServ@EMBL-Heidelberg.DE) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (mc33001@musica.mcgill.ca).

  18. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-associated Protein 1 (TRAP1) Mutation and TRAP1 Inhibitor Gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium (G-TPP) Induce a Forkhead Box O (FOXO)-dependent Cell Protective Signal from Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjin; Yang, Jinsung; Kim, Min Ju; Choi, Sekyu; Chung, Ju-Ryung; Kim, Jong-Min; Yoo, Young Hyun; Chung, Jongkyeong; Koh, Hyongjong

    2016-01-01

    TRAP1 (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1), a mitochondrial Hsp90 family chaperone, has been identified as a critical regulator of cell survival and bioenergetics in tumor cells. To discover novel signaling networks regulated by TRAP1, we generated Drosophila TRAP1 mutants. The mutants successfully developed into adults and produced fertile progeny, showing that TRAP1 is dispensable in development and reproduction. Surprisingly, mutation or knockdown of TRAP1 markedly enhanced Drosophila survival under oxidative stress. Moreover, TRAP1 mutation ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction and dopaminergic (DA) neuron loss induced by deletion of a familial Parkinson disease gene PINK1 (Pten-induced kinase 1) in Drosophila. Gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium, a mitochondria-targeted Hsp90 inhibitor that increases cell death in HeLa and MCF7 cells, consistently inhibited cell death induced by oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by PINK1 mutation in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells and DA cell models such as SH-SY5Y and SN4741 cells. Additionally, gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium also suppressed the defective locomotive activity and DA neuron loss in Drosophila PINK1 null mutants. In further genetic analyses, we showed enhanced expression of Thor, a downstream target gene of transcription factor FOXO, in TRAP1 mutants. Furthermore, deletion of FOXO almost nullified the protective roles of TRAP1 mutation against oxidative stress and PINK1 mutation. These results strongly suggest that inhibition of the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1 generates a retrograde cell protective signal from mitochondria to the nucleus in a FOXO-dependent manner. PMID:26631731

  19. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-associated Protein 1 (TRAP1) Mutation and TRAP1 Inhibitor Gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium (G-TPP) Induce a Forkhead Box O (FOXO)-dependent Cell Protective Signal from Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjin; Yang, Jinsung; Kim, Min Ju; Choi, Sekyu; Chung, Ju-Ryung; Kim, Jong-Min; Yoo, Young Hyun; Chung, Jongkyeong; Koh, Hyongjong

    2016-01-22

    TRAP1 (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1), a mitochondrial Hsp90 family chaperone, has been identified as a critical regulator of cell survival and bioenergetics in tumor cells. To discover novel signaling networks regulated by TRAP1, we generated Drosophila TRAP1 mutants. The mutants successfully developed into adults and produced fertile progeny, showing that TRAP1 is dispensable in development and reproduction. Surprisingly, mutation or knockdown of TRAP1 markedly enhanced Drosophila survival under oxidative stress. Moreover, TRAP1 mutation ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction and dopaminergic (DA) neuron loss induced by deletion of a familial Parkinson disease gene PINK1 (Pten-induced kinase 1) in Drosophila. Gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium, a mitochondria-targeted Hsp90 inhibitor that increases cell death in HeLa and MCF7 cells, consistently inhibited cell death induced by oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by PINK1 mutation in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells and DA cell models such as SH-SY5Y and SN4741 cells. Additionally, gamitrinib-triphenylphosphonium also suppressed the defective locomotive activity and DA neuron loss in Drosophila PINK1 null mutants. In further genetic analyses, we showed enhanced expression of Thor, a downstream target gene of transcription factor FOXO, in TRAP1 mutants. Furthermore, deletion of FOXO almost nullified the protective roles of TRAP1 mutation against oxidative stress and PINK1 mutation. These results strongly suggest that inhibition of the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1 generates a retrograde cell protective signal from mitochondria to the nucleus in a FOXO-dependent manner.

  20. Gene regulation by substoichiometric heterocomplex formation of undecameric TRAP and trimeric anti-TRAP.

    PubMed

    Ihms, Elihu C; Zhou, Mowei; Zhang, Yun; Kleckner, Ian R; McElroy, Craig A; Wysocki, Vicki H; Gollnick, Paul; Foster, Mark P

    2014-03-04

    The control of tryptophan production in Bacillus is a paradigmatic example of gene regulation involving the interplay of multiple protein and nucleic acid components. Central to this combinatorial mechanism are the homo-oligomeric proteins TRAP (trp RNA-binding attenuation protein) and anti-TRAP (AT). TRAP forms undecameric rings, and AT assembles into triskelion-shaped trimers. Upon activation by tryptophan, the outer circumference of the TRAP ring binds specifically to a series of tandem sequences present in the 5' UTR of RNA transcripts encoding several tryptophan metabolism genes, leading to their silencing. AT, whose expression is up-regulated upon tryptophan depletion to concentrations not exceeding a ratio of one AT trimer per TRAP 11-mer, restores tryptophan production by binding activated TRAP and preventing RNA binding. How the smaller AT inhibitor prevents RNA binding at such low stoichiometries has remained a puzzle, in part because of the large RNA-binding surface on the tryptophan-activated TRAP ring and its high affinity for RNA. Using X-ray scattering, hydrodynamic, and mass spectrometric data, we show that the polydentate action of AT trimers can condense multiple intact TRAP rings into large heterocomplexes, effectively reducing the available contiguous RNA-binding surfaces. This finding reveals an unprecedented mechanism for substoichiometric inhibition of a gene-regulatory protein, which may be a widespread but underappreciated regulatory mechanism in pathways that involve homo-oligomeric or polyvalent components.

  1. Gene regulation by substoichiometric heterocomplex formation of undecameric TRAP and trimeric anti-TRAP

    PubMed Central

    Ihms, Elihu C.; Zhou, Mowei; Zhang, Yun; Kleckner, Ian R.; McElroy, Craig A.; Wysocki, Vicki H.; Gollnick, Paul; Foster, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    The control of tryptophan production in Bacillus is a paradigmatic example of gene regulation involving the interplay of multiple protein and nucleic acid components. Central to this combinatorial mechanism are the homo-oligomeric proteins TRAP (trp RNA-binding attenuation protein) and anti-TRAP (AT). TRAP forms undecameric rings, and AT assembles into triskelion-shaped trimers. Upon activation by tryptophan, the outer circumference of the TRAP ring binds specifically to a series of tandem sequences present in the 5′ UTR of RNA transcripts encoding several tryptophan metabolism genes, leading to their silencing. AT, whose expression is up-regulated upon tryptophan depletion to concentrations not exceeding a ratio of one AT trimer per TRAP 11-mer, restores tryptophan production by binding activated TRAP and preventing RNA binding. How the smaller AT inhibitor prevents RNA binding at such low stoichiometries has remained a puzzle, in part because of the large RNA-binding surface on the tryptophan-activated TRAP ring and its high affinity for RNA. Using X-ray scattering, hydrodynamic, and mass spectrometric data, we show that the polydentate action of AT trimers can condense multiple intact TRAP rings into large heterocomplexes, effectively reducing the available contiguous RNA-binding surfaces. This finding reveals an unprecedented mechanism for substoichiometric inhibition of a gene-regulatory protein, which may be a widespread but underappreciated regulatory mechanism in pathways that involve homo-oligomeric or polyvalent components. PMID:24550461

  2. Gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Amin, Nisar A; Malek, Sami N

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of genes mutated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has stimulated new research into the role of these genes in CLL pathogenesis. CLL cases carry approximately 5-20 mutated genes per exome, a lower number than detected in many human tumors. Of the recurrently mutated genes in CLL, all are mutated in 10% or less of patients when assayed in unselected CLL cohorts at diagnosis. Mutations in TP53 are of major clinical relevance, are often associated with del17p and gain in frequency over time. TP53 mutated and associated del17p states substantially lower response rates, remission duration, and survival in CLL. Mutations in NOTCH1 and SF3B1 are recurrent, often associated with progressive CLL that is also IgVH unmutated and ZAP70-positive and are under investigation as targets for novel therapies and as factors influencing CLL outcome. There are an estimated 20-50 additional mutated genes with frequencies of 1%-5% in CLL; more work is needed to identify these and to study their significance. Finally, of the major biological aberration categories influencing CLL as a disease, gene mutations will need to be placed into context with regard to their ultimate role and importance. Such calibrated appreciation necessitates studies incorporating multiple CLL driver aberrations into biological and clinical analyses.

  3. Gene and enhancer trap tagging of vascular-expressed genes in poplar trees

    Treesearch

    Andrew Groover; Joseph R. Fontana; Gayle Dupper; Caiping Ma; Robert Martienssen; Steven Strauss; Richard Meilan

    2004-01-01

    We report a gene discovery system for poplar trees based on gene and enhancer traps. Gene and enhancer trap vectors carrying the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene were inserted into the poplar genome via Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation, where they reveal the expression pattern of genes at or near the insertion sites. Because GUS...

  4. Genes and mutations causing retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Daiger, SP; Sullivan, LS; Bowne, SJ

    2013-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous set of inherited retinopathies with many disease-causing genes, many known mutations, and highly varied clinical consequences. Progress in finding treatments is dependent on determining the genes and mutations causing these diseases, which includes both gene discovery and mutation screening in affected individuals and families. Despite the complexity, substantial progress has been made in finding RP genes and mutations. Depending on the type of RP, and the technology used, it is possible to detect mutations in 30–80% of cases. One of the most powerful approaches to genetic testing is high-throughput ‘deep sequencing’, that is, next-generation sequencing (NGS). NGS has identified several novel RP genes but a substantial fraction of previously unsolved cases have mutations in genes that are known causes of retinal disease but not necessarily RP. Apparent discrepancy between the molecular defect and clinical findings may warrant reevaluation of patients and families. In this review, we summarize the current approaches to gene discovery and mutation detection for RP, and indicate pitfalls and unsolved problems. Similar considerations apply to other forms of inherited retinal disease. PMID:23701314

  5. DHPLC screening of cystic fibrosis gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Ravnik-Glavac, Metka; Atkinson, Andrew; Glavac, Damjan; Dean, Michael

    2002-04-01

    Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) using ion-pairing reverse phase chromatography (IPRPC) columns is a technique for the screening of gene mutations. In order to evaluate the potential utility of this assay method in a clinical laboratory setting, we subjected the PCR products of 73 CF patients known to bear CFTR mutations to this analytic technique. We used thermal denaturation profile parameters specified by the MELT program tool, made available by Stanford University. Using this strategy, we determined an initial analytic sensitivity of 90.4% for any of 73 known CFTR mutations. Most of the mutations not detected by DHPLC under these conditions are alpha-substitutions. This information may eventually help to improve the MELT algorithm. Increasing column denaturation temperatures for one or two degrees above those recommended by the MELT program allowed 100% detection of CFTR mutations tested. By comparing DHPLC methodology used in this study with the recently reported study based on Wavemaker 3.4.4 software (Transgenomic, Omaha, NE) [Le Marechal et al., 2001) and with previous SSCP analysis of CFTR mutations [Ravnik-Glavac et al., 1994] we emphasized differences and similarities in order to refine the DHPLC system and discuss the relationship to the alternative approaches. We conclude that the DHPLC method, under optimized conditions, is highly accurate, rapid, and efficient in detecting mutations in the CFTR gene and may find high utility in screening individuals for CFTR mutations. Hum Mutat 19:374-383, 2002. Published 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Vasiliou, D M; Pinsky, L

    1996-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. We have added (if available) data on the androgen binding phenotype of the mutant AR, the clinical phenotype of the affected persons, the family history and whether the pathogenicity of a mutation has been proven. Exonic mutations are now listed in 5'-->3' sequence regardless of type and single base pair changes are presented in codon context. Splice site and intronic mutations are listed separately. The database has allowed us to substantiate and amplify the observation of mutational hot spots within exons encoding the AR androgen binding domain. The database is available from EML (ftp://www.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  7. Transcriptome Analysis of Targeted Mouse Mutations Reveals the Topography of Local Changes in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A. J.; Kirov, Julia V.; Cipollone, Andreanna; Willis, Brandon; Rapp, Jared; de Jong, Pieter J.; Lloyd, Kent C.

    2016-01-01

    The unintended consequences of gene targeting in mouse models have not been thoroughly studied and a more systematic analysis is needed to understand the frequency and characteristics of off-target effects. Using RNA-seq, we evaluated targeted and neighboring gene expression in tissues from 44 homozygous mutants compared with C57BL/6N control mice. Two allele types were evaluated: 15 targeted trap mutations (TRAP); and 29 deletion alleles (DEL), usually a deletion between the translational start and the 3’ UTR. Both targeting strategies insert a bacterial beta-galactosidase reporter (LacZ) and a neomycin resistance selection cassette. Evaluating transcription of genes in +/- 500 kb of flanking DNA around the targeted gene, we found up-regulated genes more frequently around DEL compared with TRAP alleles, however the frequency of alleles with local down-regulated genes flanking DEL and TRAP targets was similar. Down-regulated genes around both DEL and TRAP targets were found at a higher frequency than expected from a genome-wide survey. However, only around DEL targets were up-regulated genes found with a significantly higher frequency compared with genome-wide sampling. Transcriptome analysis confirms targeting in 97% of DEL alleles, but in only 47% of TRAP alleles probably due to non-functional splice variants, and some splicing around the gene trap. Local effects on gene expression are likely due to a number of factors including compensatory regulation, loss or disruption of intragenic regulatory elements, the exogenous promoter in the neo selection cassette, removal of insulating DNA in the DEL mutants, and local silencing due to disruption of normal chromatin organization or presence of exogenous DNA. An understanding of local position effects is important for understanding and interpreting any phenotype attributed to targeted gene mutations, or to spontaneous indels. PMID:26839965

  8. GJB2 gene mutations in childhood deafness.

    PubMed

    Angeli, S; Utrera, R; Dib, S; Chiossone, E; Naranjo, C; Henríquez, O; Porta, M

    2000-03-01

    The frequency of childhood deafness is estimated at 1:1,000 and at least half of these cases are genetic. Recently, mutations in the GJB2 gene have been found in a great number of familial and sporadic cases of congenital deafness in Caucasians. The most common mutation (70%) is the frameshift mutation of a single guanine in position 35 (35delG). More than 20 mutations in the GJB2 gene are associated with DFNB1, a prevalent type of autosomal recessive non-syndromic neurosensory deafness. Last year we initiated a systematic screening programme to evaluate the causes of deafness in the population of prelingually deaf children who are referred to our cochlear implant programme. All of the deaf children and their parents undergo a comprehensive medical review, directed to identify causes of acquired deafness and manifestations of syndromic hearing impairment. DNA is extracted from the blood of all of the children. The technique AS-PCR (allele-specific polymerase chain reaction) is used for the identification of the mutation 35delG. Screening for other GJB2 gene mutations is carried out by single-strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP). Our results on the identification of DFNB1 will be presented, as well as a discussion on the implications of an aetiological diagnosis in cochlear implantation.

  9. Mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ćwikła, Jarosław; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Kwiatek, Paweł; Szperl, Małgorzata; Michalski, Wojciech; Wyrwicz, Lucjan; Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Maciejczyk, Anna; Roszczynko, Marta; Pęczkowska, Mariola

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paragangliomas (PGLs) related to hereditary syndromes are rare mediastinal tumors. Paragangliomas are caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of succinate dehydrogenase enzyme (SDH). Aim To evaluate clinical, anatomical and functional characteristics of mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations. Material and methods Retrospective analysis of 75 patients with confirmed SDHx gene mutations (24 patients with SDHB, 5 SDHC, 46 with SDHD mutations) was performed. Patients underwent evaluation using computed tomography (CT), somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) (99mTc-[HYNIC,Tyr3]-octreotide), 123I mIBG scintigraphy and urinary excretion of total methoxycatecholamines. Results Out of 75 patients, 16 (21%) patients (1 SDHB, 15 SDHD mutations) had 17 PGLs localized in the mediastinum. Fourteen PGLs were localized in the middle mediastinum (intrapericardial) and 3 PGLs in the posterior mediastinum. The median diameter of paragangliomas measured on the axial slice was 24.3 mm (interquartile range (IQR): 14.7–36.6), and the median volume was 2.78 ml (IQR: 0.87–16.16). Twelve out of 16 patients (75%) underwent SRS, and 11 of them (92.3%) had pathological uptake of the radiotracer. Eleven (68.75%) out of 16 patients underwent 123 I mIBG, with only 3 positive results. Symptoms of catecholamine excretion were observed in 3 patients with PGLs localized in the posterior mediastinum. All PGLs were benign except in 1 patient with the SDHB mutation and PGL detected in the posterior mediastinum, who had a metastatic disease. Conclusions Most mediastinal paragangliomas were related to SDHD gene mutations. They were asymptomatic, localized in the medial mediastinum, intrapericardially. PMID:27785149

  10. PTCH gene mutations in odontogenic keratocysts.

    PubMed

    Barreto, D C; Gomez, R S; Bale, A E; Boson, W L; De Marco, L

    2000-06-01

    An odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a benign cystic lesion of the jaws that occurs sporadically or in association with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). Recently, the gene for NBCCS was cloned and shown to be the human homologue of the Drosophila segment polarity gene Patched (PTCH), a tumor suppressor gene. The PTCH gene encodes a transmembrane protein that acts in opposition to the Hedgehog signaling protein, controlling cell fates, patterning, and growth in numerous tissues, including tooth. We investigated three cases of sporadic odontogenic keratocysts and three other cases associated with NBCCS, looking for mutations of the PTCH gene. Non-radioactive single-strand conformational polymorphism and direct sequencing of PCR products revealed a deletion of 5 base pairs (bp) in exon 3 (518delAAGCG) in one sporadic cyst as well as mutations in two cysts associated with NBCCS, a nonsense (C2760A) and a missense (G3499A) alteration. This report is the first to describe a somatic mutation of PTCH in sporadic odontogenic keratocysts as well as two novel mutations in cysts associated with NBCCS, indicating a similar pathogenesis in a subset of sporadic keratocysts.

  11. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L

    1997-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 212 to 272. We have expanded the database: (i) by adding a large amount of new data on somatic mutations in prostatic cancer tissue; (ii) by defining a new constitutional phenotype, mild androgen insensitivity (MAI); (iii) by placing additional relevant information on an internet site (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/ ). The database has allowed us to examine the contribution of CpG sites to the multiplicity of reports of the same mutation in different families. The database is also available from EMBL (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker Pro or Word file (MC33@musica,mcgill.ca)

  12. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L

    1997-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 212 to 272. We have expanded the database: (i) by adding a large amount of new data on somatic mutations in prostatic cancer tissue; (ii) by defining a new constitutional phenotype, mild androgen insensitivity (MAI); (iii) by placing additional relevant information on an internet site (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/ ). The database has allowed us to examine the contribution of CpG sites to the multiplicity of reports of the same mutation in different families. The database is also available from EMBL (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker Pro or Word file (MC33@musica,mcgill.ca) PMID:9016528

  13. From Gene Mutation to Protein Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffet, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A seven-week "gene to protein" laboratory sequence is described for an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Student pairs were given the task of introducing a point mutation of their choosing into the well studied protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After conducting literature searches, each student group chose the…

  14. From Gene Mutation to Protein Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffet, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A seven-week "gene to protein" laboratory sequence is described for an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Student pairs were given the task of introducing a point mutation of their choosing into the well studied protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After conducting literature searches, each student group chose the…

  15. Multicentric origin of hemochromatosis gene (HFE) mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Rochette, J; Pointon, J J; Fisher, C A; Perera, G; Arambepola, M; Arichchi, D S; De Silva, S; Vandwalle, J L; Monti, J P; Old, J M; Merryweather-Clarke, A T; Weatherall, D J; Robson, K J

    1999-01-01

    Genetic hemochromatosis (GH) is believed to be a disease restricted to those of European ancestry. In northwestern Europe, >80% of GH patients are homozygous for one mutation, the substitution of tyrosine for cysteine at position 282 (C282Y) in the unprocessed protein. In a proportion of GH patients, two mutations are present, C282Y and H63D. The clinical significance of this second mutation is such that it appears to predispose 1%-2% of compound heterozygotes to expression of the disease. The distribution of the two mutations differ, C282Y being limited to those of northwestern European ancestry and H63D being found at allele frequencies>5%, in Europe, in countries bordering the Mediterranean, in the Middle East, and in the Indian subcontinent. The C282Y mutation occurs on a haplotype that extends mutation has arisen during the past 2,000 years. The H63D mutation is older and does not occur on such a large extended haplotype, the haplotype in this case extending mutations on new haplotypes. In Sri Lanka we have found H63D on three new haplotypes and have found C282Y on one new haplotype, demonstrating that these mutations have arisen independently on this island. These results suggest that the HFE gene has been the subject of selection pressure. These selection pressures could be due to infectious diseases, environmental conditions, or other genetic disorders such as anemia. PMID:10090890

  16. INPPL1 gene mutations in opsismodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fradet, Anaïs; Fitzgerald, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    The INPPL1 (inositol polyphosphate phosphatase-like 1) gene encodes the inositol phosphatase, SHIP2 (for src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase 2). SHIP2 functions to dephosphorylate, and negatively regulate, the lipid second messenger phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)P3. SHIP2 has been well studied in the area of insulin resistance and obesity but has roles in cancer and other disorders. Recently, it was reported that mutations in INPPL1 cause opsismodysplasia, a rare, autosomal recessive severe skeletal dysplasia. This review focuses on the mutations associated with opsismodysplasia and explores the role of INPPL1/ SHIP2 in skeletal development. PMID:27708270

  17. INPPL1 gene mutations in opsismodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Fradet, Anaïs; Fitzgerald, Jamie

    2017-02-01

    The INPPL1 (inositol polyphosphate phosphatase-like 1) gene encodes the inositol phosphatase, SHIP2 (for src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase 2). SHIP2 functions to dephosphorylate, and negatively regulate, the lipid second messenger phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)P3. SHIP2 has been well studied in the area of insulin resistance and obesity but has roles in cancer and other disorders. Recently, it was reported that mutations in INPPL1 cause opsismodysplasia, a rare, autosomal recessive severe skeletal dysplasia. This review focuses on the mutations associated with opsismodysplasia and explores the role of INPPL1/ SHIP2 in skeletal development.

  18. Recurrent APC gene mutations in Polish FAP families

    PubMed Central

    Pławski, Andrzej; Podralska, Marta; Słomski, Ryszard

    2007-01-01

    The molecular diagnostics of genetically conditioned disorders is based on the identification of the mutations in the predisposing genes. Hereditary cancer disorders of the gastrointestinal tracts are caused by mutations of the tumour suppressor genes or the DNA repair genes. Occurrence of recurrent mutation allows improvement of molecular diagnostics. The mutation spectrum in the genes causing hereditary forms of colorectal cancers in the Polish population was previously described. In the present work an estimation of the frequency of the recurrent mutations of the APC gene was performed. Eight types of mutations occurred in 19.4% of our FAP families and these constitute 43% of all Polish diagnosed families. PMID:19725996

  19. Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters August 12, 2013 Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks Schizophrenia networks in the prefrontal ... Vasculitis Therapy as Effective as Standard Care Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks Connect with Us Subscribe to ...

  20. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  1. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca). PMID:9399843

  2. [Gene mutation analysis of X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets].

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Ma, Hong-Wei; Li, Fang; Hu, Man; Ren, Shuang; Yu, Ya-Fen; Zhao, Gui-Jie

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the frequency and type of PHEX gene mutations in children with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH), the possible presence of mutational hot spots, and the relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype. Clinical data of 10 children with XLH was retrospectively reviewed. The relationship between gene mutation type and severity of XLH was evaluated. PHEX gene mutations were detected in all 10 children with XLH, including 6 cases of missense mutation, 2 cases of splice site mutation, 1 case of frameshift mutation, and 1 case of nonsense mutation. Two new mutations, c.2048T>C and IVS14+1delAG, were found. The type of PHEX gene mutation was not associated with the degree of short stature and leg deformity (P=0.571 and 0.467), and the mutation site was also not associated with the degree of short stature and leg deformity (P=0.400 and 1.000). Missense mutation is the most common type of PHEX gene mutation in children with XLH, and c.2048T>C and IVS14+1delAG are two new PHEX gene mutations. The type and site of PHEX gene mutation are not associated with the severity of XLH.

  3. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia: pathophysiology and gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Harigae, Hideo; Furuyama, Kazumichi

    2010-10-01

    Sideroblastic anemia is characterized by anemia with the emergence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. Ring sideroblasts are erythroblasts characterized by iron accumulation in perinuclear mitochondria due to impaired iron utilization. There are two forms of sideroblastic anemia, i.e., inherited and acquired sideroblastic anemia. Inherited sideroblastic anemia is a rare and heterogeneous disease caused by mutations of genes involved in heme biosynthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or Fe-S cluster transport, and mitochondrial metabolism. The most common inherited sideroblastic anemia is X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) caused by mutations of the erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinate synthase gene (ALAS2), which is the first enzyme of heme biosynthesis in erythroid cells. Sideroblastic anemia due to SLC25A38 gene mutations, which is a mitochondrial transporter, is the next most common inherited sideroblastic anemia. Other forms of inherited sideroblastic anemia are very rare, and accompanied by impaired function of organs other than hematopoietic tissue, such as the nervous system, muscle, or exocrine glands due to impaired mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, there are still significant numbers of cases with genetically undefined inherited sideroblastic anemia. Molecular analysis of these cases will contribute not only to the development of effective treatment, but also to the understanding of mitochondrial iron metabolism.

  4. Novel radiation response genes identified in gene-trapped MCF10A mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Malone, Jennifer; Ullrich, Robert

    2007-02-01

    We have used a gene-trapping strategy to screen human mammary epithelial cells for radiation response genes. Relative mRNA expression levels of five candidate genes in MCF10A cells were analyzed, both with and without exposure to radiation. In all five cases, the trapped genes were significantly down-regulated after radiation treatment. Sequence analysis of the fusion transcripts identified the trapped genes: (1) the human androgen receptor, (2) the uncharacterized DREV1 gene, which has known homology to DNA methyltransferases, (3) the human creatine kinase gene, (4) the human eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 beta 2, and (5) the human ribosomal protein L27. All five genes were down-regulated significantly after treatment with varying doses of ionizing radiation (0.10 to 4.0 Gy) and at varying times (2-30 h after treatment). The genes were also analyzed in human fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines to determine whether the radiation response being observed was cell-type specific. The results verified that the observed radiation response was not a cell-type-specific phenomenon, suggesting that the genes play essential roles in the radiation damage control pathways. This study demonstrates the potential of the gene-trap approach for the identification and functional analysis of novel radiation response genes.

  5. Novel recurrently mutated genes in African American colon cancers

    PubMed Central

    Guda, Kishore; Veigl, Martina L.; Varadan, Vinay; Nosrati, Arman; Ravi, Lakshmeswari; Lutterbaugh, James; Beard, Lydia; Willson, James K. V.; Sedwick, W. David; Wang, Zhenghe John; Molyneaux, Neil; Miron, Alexander; Adams, Mark D.; Elston, Robert C.; Markowitz, Sanford D.; Willis, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    We used whole-exome and targeted sequencing to characterize somatic mutations in 103 colorectal cancers (CRC) from African Americans, identifying 20 new genes as significantly mutated in CRC. Resequencing 129 Caucasian derived CRCs confirmed a 15-gene set as a preferential target for mutations in African American CRCs. Two predominant genes, ephrin type A receptor 6 (EPHA6) and folliculin (FLCN), with mutations exclusive to African American CRCs, are by genetic and biological criteria highly likely African American CRC driver genes. These previously unsuspected differences in the mutational landscapes of CRCs arising among individuals of different ethnicities have potential to impact on broader disparities in cancer behaviors. PMID:25583493

  6. A new versatile gene-trap vector for insect transgenics.

    PubMed

    Lukacsovich, Tamas; Hamada, Noriko; Miyazaki, Sakura; Kimpara, Akiyo; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2008-12-01

    A new piggyBac-based gene-trap vector, pB-GT1, was constructed. pB-GT1 contains three marker genes, dsRed, Gal4, and EGFP. dsRed is under the control of the constitutive 3xP3 promoter, which induces dsRed expression wherever the vector is inserted in the host genome. The Gal4 sequence has no promoter but is preceded by the splice acceptor site so that it can be transcribed as a transcript fused with the host exon 5' to the insertion site. EGFP is driven by the constitutive ie+hr promoter but lacks a poly(A)(+) signal sequence, and thus the EGFP expression is detectable only when its transcript is fused with the host exon 3' downstream of the insertion. By the microinjection of the vector into fertilized eggs, we obtained transgenic Drosophila with a single copy of pB-GT1, which was inserted into the first intron of the ovo gene. The female flies of this transgenic line are sterile, indicating that the insertion inactivated the ovo gene, generating a new allele of this locus, ovo(pB-GT1). RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that an ovo-Gal4-fusion transcript is produced in ovo(pB-GT1) flies. The fact that UAS-EGFP reporter expression was detected in ovo(pB-GT1) germ cells in a pattern similar to that reported for wild-type ovo indicates that functional Gal4 is expressed via pB-GT1, recapitulating the endogenous expression pattern of the trapped gene. pB-GT1 is thus useful in insect genomics for the efficient assignment of functions of individual genes. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. [Hyperuricemia and gene mutations: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tattoli, Fabio; Falconi, Daniela; De Prisco, Ornella; Maurizio, Gherzi; Marazzi, Federico; Marengo, Marita; Serra, Ilaria; Tamagnone, Michela; Cordero di Montezemolo, Luca; Pasini, Barbara; Formica, Marco

    2017-06-01

    Hyperuricemia is frequently found in nephrology. The case presented may be useful to clarify some pathogenetic aspects. It is a patient of 18 years, hyperuricaemic. Non-consanguineous parents, hyperuricemia in the paternal line, not neuropsychiatric disorders in the family. Delay in neuromotor acquisitions, average intellectual disabilities, anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive personality traits. Normal renal function and renal ultrasound. Evidence of hyperuricemia in 2015. Never gouty episodes and / or lithiasis, initiated allopurinol 100 mg on alternate days, with no side effects, urea in the control range, slightly below normal uricuria. Given the complex clinical, he carried out a genetic analysis of array-CGH. He showed a deletion on the short arm of chromosome 3 (3p12.3) and a duplication of the long arm of chromosome 1 (19q13-42). The deletion 3p12.3 (paternal inheritance), involves the ROBO2 gene. Duplication 19q13.42, (maternal inheritance), includes NLRP12, DPRX, ZNF331 genes. The ROBO2 gene with its mutation, is associated with vesicoureteral reflux. The NLRP12 gene encodes proteins called "Nalps", forming a subfamily of proteins "CATERPILLAR". Many "Nalps" as well as the "Nalps 12" have an N-terminal domain (DYP) with a purin. Since uric acid is a byproduct of purine metabolism, considered the familiarity, we believe that we can hypothesize that the mutations found. In particular those concerning the NLRP-12 gene, may have a role in the presence of hyperuricemia. We believe that in patients with hyperuricemia, associated with a particular impairment of neurological picture, it is likely that there is a subtended common genetic deficiency. Copyright by Società Italiana di Nefrologia SIN, Rome, Italy.

  8. Mutational analysis of the human MAOA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tivol, E.A.; Shalish, C.; Schuback, D.E.; Breakefield, X.O.; Hsu, Yun-Pung

    1996-02-16

    The monoamine oxidases (MAO-A and MAO-B) are the enzymes primarily responsible for the degradation of amine neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. Wide variations in activity of these isozymes have been reported in control humans. The MAOA and MAOB genes are located next to each other in the p11.3-11.4 region of the human X chromosome. Our recent documentation of an MAO-A-deficiency state, apparently associated with impulsive aggressive behavior in males, has focused attention on genetic variations in the MAOA gene. In the present study, variations in the coding sequence of the MAOA gene were evaluated by RT-PCR, SSCP, and sequencing of mRNA or genomic DNA in 40 control males with >100-fold variations in MAOA activity, as measured in cultured skin fibroblasts. Remarkable conservation of the coding sequence was found, with only 5 polymorphisms observed. All but one of these were in the third codon position and thus did not alter the deduced amino acid sequence. The one amino acid alteration observed, lys{r_arrow}arg, was neutral and should not affect the structure of the protein. This study demonstrates high conservation of coding sequence in the human MAOA gene in control males, and provides primer sets which can be used to search genomic DNA for mutations in this gene in males with neuropsychiatric conditions. 47 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Patterns of Somatic Mutations in Immunoglobulin Variable Genes

    PubMed Central

    Golding, G. Brian; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Glickman, Barry W.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for somatic mutation in the variable genes of antibodies is unknown and may differ from previously described mechanisms that produce mutation in DNA. We have analyzed 421 somatic mutations from the rearranged immunoglobulin variable genes of mice to determine (1) if the nucleotide substitutions differ from those generated during meiosis and (2) if the presence of nearby direct and inverted repeated sequences could template mutations around the variable gene. The results reveal a difference in the pattern of substitutions obtained from somatic mutations vs. meiotic mutations. An increased frequency of T:A to C:G transitions and a decreased frequency of mutations involving a G in the somatic mutants compared to the meiotic mutants is indicated. This suggests that the mutational processes responsible for somatic mutation in antibody genes differs from that responsible for mutation during meiosis. An analysis of the local DNA sequences revealed many direct repeats and palindromic sequences that were capable of templating some of the known mutations. Although additional factors may be involved in targeting mutations to the variable gene, mistemplating by nearby repeats may provide a mechanism for the enhancement of somatic mutation. PMID:3557109

  10. Succinate dehydrogenase gene mutations in cardiac paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Victoria L; Emaminia, Abbas; del Rivero, Jaydira; Lechan, Ronald M; Magoon, Bindiya T; Galia, Analyza; Fojo, Tito; Leung, Steve; Lorusso, Roberto; Jimenez, Camilo; Shulkin, Barry L; Audibert, Jennifer L; Adams, Karen T; Rosing, Douglas R; Vaidya, Anand; Dluhy, Robert G; Horvath, Keith A; Pacak, Karel

    2015-06-15

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are chromaffin cell tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells. At least 1/3 of paragangliomas are related to germline mutations in 1 of 17 genes. Although these tumors can occur throughout the body, cardiac paragangliomas are very rare, accounting for <0.3% of mediastinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with cardiac paragangliomas, particularly focusing on their genetic backgrounds. A retrospective chart analysis of 15 patients with cardiac paragangliomas was performed to determine clinical presentation, genetic background, diagnostic workup, and outcomes. The average age at diagnosis was 41.9 years. Typical symptoms of paraganglioma (e.g., hypertension, sweating, palpitations, headache) were reported at initial presentation in 13 patients (86.7%); the remaining 2, as well as 4 symptomatic patients, initially presented with cardiac-specific symptoms (e.g., chest pain, dyspnea). Genetic testing was done in 13 patients (86.7%); 10 (76.9%) were positive for mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) subunits B, C, or D. Thirteen patients (86.7%) underwent surgery to remove the paraganglioma with no intraoperative morbidity or mortality; 1 additional patient underwent surgical resection but experienced intraoperative complications after removal of the tumor due to co-morbidities and did not survive. SDHx mutations are known to be associated with mediastinal locations and malignant behavior of paragangliomas. In this report, the investigators extend the locations of predominantly SDHx-related paragangliomas to cardiac tumors. In conclusion, cardiac paragangliomas are frequently associated with underlying SDHx germline mutations, suggesting a need for genetic testing of all patients with this rare tumor. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Succinate Dehydrogenase Gene Mutations in Cardiac Paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Martucci, Victoria L.; Emaminia, Abbas; del Rivero, Jaydira; Lechan, Ronald M.; Magoon, Bindiya T.; Galia, Analyza; Fojo, Tito; Leung, Steve; Lorusso, Roberto; Jimenez, Camilo; Shulkin, Barry L.; Audibert, Jennifer L.; Adams, Karen T.; Rosing, Douglas R.; Vaidya, Anand; Dluhy, Robert G.; Horvath, Keith A.; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are chromaffin cell tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells. At least one third of paragangliomas are related to germline mutations in one of 17 genes. While these tumors can occur throughout the body, cardiac paragangliomas are very rare, accounting for less than 0.3% of mediastinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with cardiac paragangliomas, particularly focusing on their genetic backgrounds. A retrospective chart analysis of fifteen patients with cardiac paraganglioma was performed to determine clinical presentation, genetic background, diagnostic work-up, and outcomes. The average age at diagnosis was 41.9 years. Typical symptoms of paraganglioma (e.g., hypertension, sweating, palpitations, headache) were reported at initial presentation in 13 patients (86.7%); the remaining 2, as well as 4 symptomatic patients, initially presented with cardiac-specific symptoms (e.g., chest pain, dyspnea). Genetic testing was done in 13 cases (86.7%); 10 (76.9%) were positive for mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) subunits B, C, or D. Thirteen cases (86.7%) underwent surgery to remove the paraganglioma with no intraoperative morbidity or mortality; one additional patient underwent surgical resection but experienced intraoperative complications after removal of the tumor due to comorbities and did not survive. SDHx mutations are known to be associated with mediastinal locations and malignant behavior of paragangliomas. In this report, we extend the locations of predominantly SDHx-related paragangliomas to cardiac tumors. In conclusion, cardiac paragangliomas are frequently associated with underlying SDHx germline mutations, suggesting a need for genetic testing of all patients with this rare tumor. PMID:25896150

  12. Parkinson disease (PARK) genes are somatically mutated in cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Yardena; Azizi, Esther; Qutob, Nouar; Inzelberg, Lilah; Domany, Eytan; Schechtman, Edna; Friedman, Eitan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether Parkinson disease (PD) genes are somatically mutated in cutaneous melanoma (CM) tissue, because CM occurs in patients with PD at higher rates than in the general population and PD is more common than expected in CM cohorts. Methods: We cross-referenced somatic mutations in metastatic CM detected by whole-exome sequencing with the 15 known PD (PARK) genes. We computed the empirical distribution of the sum of mutations in each gene (Smut) and of the number of tissue samples in which a given gene was mutated at least once (SSampl) for each of the analyzable genes, determined the 90th and 95th percentiles of the empirical distributions of these sums, and verified the location of PARK genes in these distributions. Identical analyses were applied to adenocarcinoma of lung (ADENOCA-LUNG) and squamous cell carcinoma of lung (SQUAMCA-LUNG). We also analyzed the distribution of the number of mutated PARK genes in CM samples vs the 2 lung cancers. Results: Somatic CM mutation analysis (n = 246) detected 315,914 mutations in 18,758 genes. Somatic CM mutations were found in 14 of 15 PARK genes. Forty-eight percent of CM samples carried ≥1 PARK mutation and 25% carried multiple PARK mutations. PARK8 mutations occurred above the 95th percentile of the empirical distribution for SMut and SSampl. Significantly more CM samples harbored multiple PARK gene mutations compared with SQUAMCA-LUNG (p = 0.0026) and with ADENOCA-LUNG (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The overrepresentation of somatic PARK mutations in CM suggests shared dysregulated pathways for CM and PD. PMID:27123489

  13. Phylogenic analysis of adhesion related genes Mad1 revealed a positive selection for the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Liu, Yue; Zhu, Hongyan; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Adhesions, the major components of the extracellular fibrillar polymers which accumulate on the outer surface of adhesive traps of nematode-trapping fungi, are thought to have played important roles during the evolution of trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses based on the genes related to adhesive materials can be of great importance for understanding the evolution of trapping devices. Recently, AoMad1, one homologous gene of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae cell wall protein MAD1, has been functionally characterized as involved in the production of adhesions in the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora. In this study, we cloned Mad1 homologous genes from nematode-trapping fungi with various trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that species which formed nonadhesive constricting ring (CR) traps more basally placed and species with adhesive traps evolved along two lineages. Likelihood ratio tests (LRT) revealed that significant positive selective pressure likely acted on the ancestral trapping devices including both adhesive and mechanical traps, indicating that the Mad1 genes likely played important roles during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi. Our study provides new insights into the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi and also contributes to understanding the importance of adhesions during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi. PMID:26941065

  14. Phylogenic analysis of adhesion related genes Mad1 revealed a positive selection for the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Liu, Yue; Zhu, Hongyan; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2016-03-04

    Adhesions, the major components of the extracellular fibrillar polymers which accumulate on the outer surface of adhesive traps of nematode-trapping fungi, are thought to have played important roles during the evolution of trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses based on the genes related to adhesive materials can be of great importance for understanding the evolution of trapping devices. Recently, AoMad1, one homologous gene of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae cell wall protein MAD1, has been functionally characterized as involved in the production of adhesions in the nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora. In this study, we cloned Mad1 homologous genes from nematode-trapping fungi with various trapping devices. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that species which formed nonadhesive constricting ring (CR) traps more basally placed and species with adhesive traps evolved along two lineages. Likelihood ratio tests (LRT) revealed that significant positive selective pressure likely acted on the ancestral trapping devices including both adhesive and mechanical traps, indicating that the Mad1 genes likely played important roles during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi. Our study provides new insights into the evolution of trapping devices of nematode-trapping fungi and also contributes to understanding the importance of adhesions during the evolution of nematode-trapping fungi.

  15. A histone H3K9M mutation traps histone methyltransferase Clr4 to prevent heterochromatin spreading

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Chun-Min; Wang, Jiyong; Xu, Ke; Chen, Huijie; Yue, Jia-Xing; Andrews, Stuart; Moresco, James J; Yates, John R; Nagy, Peter L; Tong, Liang; Jia, Songtao

    2016-01-01

    Histone lysine-to-methionine (K-to-M) mutations are associated with multiple cancers, and they function in a dominant fashion to block the methylation of corresponding lysines on wild type histones. However, their mechanisms of function are controversial. Here we show that in fission yeast, introducing the K9M mutation into one of the three histone H3 genes dominantly blocks H3K9 methylation on wild type H3 across the genome. In addition, H3K9M enhances the interaction of histone H3 tail with the H3K9 methyltransferase Clr4 in a SAM (S-adenosyl-methionine)-dependent manner, and Clr4 is trapped at nucleation sites to prevent its spreading and the formation of large heterochromatin domains. We further determined the crystal structure of an H3K9M peptide in complex with human H3K9 methyltransferase G9a and SAM, which reveales that the methionine side chain had enhanced van der Waals interactions with G9a. Therefore, our results provide a detailed mechanism by which H3K9M regulates H3K9 methylation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17903.001 PMID:27648579

  16. A histone H3K9M mutation traps histone methyltransferase Clr4 to prevent heterochromatin spreading

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Chun-Min; Wang, Jiyong; Xu, Ke; Chen, Huijie; Yue, Jia-Xing; Andrews, Stuart; Moresco, James J.; Yates, John R.; Nagy, Peter L.; Tong, Liang; Jia, Songtao

    2016-09-20

    Histone lysine-to-methionine (K-to-M) mutations are associated with multiple cancers, and they function in a dominant fashion to block the methylation of corresponding lysines on wild type histones. However, their mechanisms of function are controversial. Here we show that in fission yeast, introducing the K9M mutation into one of the three histone H3 genes dominantly blocks H3K9 methylation on wild type H3 across the genome. In addition, H3K9M enhances the interaction of histone H3 tail with the H3K9 methyltransferase Clr4 in a SAM (S-adenosyl-methionine)-dependent manner, and Clr4 is trapped at nucleation sites to prevent its spreading and the formation of large heterochromatin domains. We further determined the crystal structure of an H3K9M peptide in complex with human H3K9 methyltransferase G9a and SAM, which reveales that the methionine side chain had enhanced van der Waals interactions with G9a. Therefore, our results provide a detailed mechanism by which H3K9M regulates H3K9 methylation.

  17. A gene-trap strategy identifies quiescence-induced genes in synchronized myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Sambasivan, Ramkumar; Pavlath, Grace K; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2008-03-01

    Cellular quiescence is characterized not only by reduced mitotic and metabolic activity but also by altered gene expression. Growing evidence suggests that quiescence is not merely a basal state but is regulated by active mechanisms. To understand the molecular programme that governs reversible cell cycle exit, we focused on quiescence-related gene expression in a culture model of myogenic cell arrest and activation. Here we report the identification of quiescence-induced genes using a gene-trap strategy. Using a retroviral vector, we generated a library of gene traps in C2C12 myoblasts that were screened for arrest-induced insertions by live cell sorting (FACS-gal). Several independent gene- trap lines revealed arrest-dependent induction of betagal activity, confirming the efficacy of the FACS screen. The locus of integration was identified in 15 lines. In three lines,insertion occurred in genes previously implicated in the control of quiescence, i.e. EMSY - a BRCA2--interacting protein, p8/com1 - a p300HAT -- binding protein and MLL5 - a SET domain protein. Our results demonstrate that expression of chromatin modulatory genes is induced in G0, providing support to the notion that this reversibly arrested state is actively regulated.

  18. Novel strategies for gene trapping and insertional mutagenesis mediated by Sleeping Beauty transposon.

    PubMed

    Song, Guili; Cui, Zongbin

    2013-09-01

    Gene and poly(A) trappings are high-throughput approaches to capture and interrupt the expression of endogenous genes within a target genome. Although a number of trapping vectors have been developed for investigation of gene functions in cells and vertebrate models, there is still room for the improvement of their efficiency and sensitivity. Recently, two novel trapping vectors mediated by Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon have been generated by the combination of three functional cassettes that are required for finding endogenous genes, disrupting the expression of trapped genes, and inducing the excision of integrated traps from their original insertion sites and then inserting into another gene. In addition, several other strategies are utilized to improve the activities of two trapping vectors. First, activities of all components were examined in vitro before the generation of two vectors. Second, the inducible promoter from the tilapia Hsp70 gene was used to drive the expression of SB gene, which can mediate the excision of integrated transposons upon induction at 37 °C. Third, the Cre/LoxP system was introduced to delete the SB expression cassette for stabilization of gene interruption and bio-safety. Fourth, three stop codons in different reading frames were introduced downstream of a strong splice acceptor (SA) in the gene trapping vector to effectively terminate the translation of trapped endogenous genes. Fifth, the strong splicing donor (SD) and AU-rich RNA-destabilizing element exhibited no obvious insertion bias and markedly reduced SD read-through events, and the combination of an enhanced SA, a poly(A) signal and a transcript terminator in the poly(A) trapping vector efficiently disrupted the transcription of trapped genes. Thus, these two trapping vectors are alternative and effective tools for large-scale identification and disruption of endogenous genes in vertebrate cells and animals.

  19. Mutation analysis of the gene involved in adrenoleukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Oost, B.A. van; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Kemp, S.; Bolhuis, P.A.

    1994-09-01

    A gene responsible for the X-linked genetic disorder adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) that is characterized by demyelination of the nervous system and adrenocortical insufficiency has been identified by positional cloning. The gene encodes an ATP-binding transporter which is located in the peroxisomal membrane. Deficiency of the gene leads to accumulation of unsaturated very long chain fatty acids due to impaired peroxisomal {beta}-oxidation. A systematic analysis of the open reading frame of the ALD gene unraveled the mutations in 28 different families using reverse transcriptase-PCR followed by direct sequencing. No entire gene deletions or drastic promoter mutations have been detected. Only in one family did the mutation involved multiple exons. The remaining mutations were subtle alterations leading to missense (about 50%) or nonsense mutations, frameshifts or splice acceptor site defects. In one patient a single codon was missing. Mutations affecting a single amino acid were concentrated in the region between the third and fourth putative membrane spanning fragments and in the ATP-binding domain. This overview of mutations aids in the determination of structural and functional important regions and facilitates the screening for mutations in other ALD patients. The detection of mutations in virtually all ALD families tested indicates that the isolated gene is the only gene responsible for ALD located in Xq28.

  20. Use of Dominant-Negative/Substrate Trapping PTP Mutations to Search for PTP Interactors/Substrates.

    PubMed

    Radha, Vegesna

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine residues is the consequence of coordinated action of tyrosine kinases (TKs), and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Together, they regulate intermolecular interactions, subcellular localization, and activity of a variety of proteins. The level of total protein-associated tyrosine phosphorylation in eukaryotic cells is only a small fraction of the total phosphorylation. PTPs, which have high specific activity compared to tyrosine kinases, play an important role in maintaining the tyrosine phosphorylation state of proteins and regulate signal transduction pathways and cellular responses. PTPs depend on specific invariant residues that enable binding to substrates phosphorylated at tyrosine and aid catalytic activity. Identification of PTP substrates has helped understand their role in distinct intracellular signaling pathways. Because of their high specific activity, the interaction between tyrosine phosphatases and their substrates is often very transient in the cellular context, and therefore identification of physiological substrates has been difficult. Single-site mutations in the enzymes stabilize interaction between the enzyme and its targets and have been used extensively to identify substrates. The mutations are either of the catalytic cysteine (Cys) residue or other invariant residues and have been classified as substrate-trapping mutants (STMs). These mutants often serve as dominant negatives that can inactivate effector functions of a specific PTP within cells. Considering their association with human disorders, inhibiting specific PTPs is important therapeutically. Since the catalytic domains are largely conserved, developing small-molecule inhibitors to a particular enzyme has proven difficult and therefore alternate strategies to block functions of individual enzymes are seriously being investigated. We provide a description of methods that will be useful to design strategies of using dominant-negative and

  1. Chromatin accessibility contributes to simultaneous mutations of cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yi; Su, Xian-Bin; He, Kun-Yan; Wu, Bing-Hao; Zhang, Bo-Yu; Han, Ze-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations of many cancer genes tend to co-occur (termed co-mutations) in certain patterns during tumor initiation and progression. However, the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to the co-mutations of these cancer genes have yet to be explored. Here, we systematically investigated the association between the somatic co-mutations of cancer genes and high-order chromatin conformation. Significantly, somatic point co-mutations in protein-coding genes were closely associated with high-order spatial chromatin folding. We propose that these regions be termed Spatial Co-mutation Hotspots (SCHs) and report their occurrence in different cancer types. The conserved mutational signatures and DNA sequences flanking these point co-mutations, as well as CTCF-binding sites, are also enriched within the SCH regions. The genetic alterations that are harboured in the same SCHs tend to disrupt cancer driver genes involved in multiple signalling pathways. The present work demonstrates that high-order spatial chromatin organisation may contribute to the somatic co-mutations of certain cancer genes during tumor development. PMID:27762310

  2. Effect of Mutation to Streptomycin Resistance on Amber Suppressor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Otsuji, Nozomu; Aono, Hiroyuki

    1968-01-01

    Three classes of nonidentical streptomycin-resistant mutations were distinguished in Escherichia coli by their effect on the efficiency of suppression by an amber suppressor gene, sup E. The first class of mutation caused a strong restriction in efficiency of suppression of an amber codon in various cistrons of phage λ and in an alkaline phosphatase structural gene of E. coli. The second class caused weak restriction, and the third class caused no restriction. The restrictive effect of the streptomycin resistance mutation of the first class on the sup E gene was reduced by addition of streptomycin. This mutation had little effect on efficiencies of suppression by amber suppressor genes sup D and sup F. Analyses on the alkaline phosphatase formed in the suppressor strain indicated that mutation to restrictive streptomycin resistance causes a reduction in translation of the amber codon in the alkaline phosphatase structural gene. Images PMID:4874314

  3. [Research advances of IDH gene mutation and AML].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Dong; Zheng, Yong-Qin

    2014-10-01

    The isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutation has been recently found, which may be involved in the occurrence of leukemia. The incidence of IDH gene mutation in the patients with adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is high, especially in the AML patients with normal karyotype. Different subtype and molecular biology of IDH display a different effect on the AML prognosis. This gene mutation is related with treatment response, residual, recurrence of leukemia, and it could be a sign of test and a monitoring tool of minimal residual disease (MRD). The IDH gene mutation may be an index for predicting prognosis and guiding therapy. In this article, the research progress of IDH gene mutation and its correlation with acute myeloid leukemia, especially with the clinical characteristics,are reviewed.

  4. Structural Basis for the Disruption of the Cerebral Cavernous Malformations 2 (CCM2) Interaction with Krev Interaction Trapped 1 (KRIT1) by Disease-associated Mutations*

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Oriana S.; Liu, Weizhi; Zhang, Rong; Stiegler, Amy L.; Ghedia, Sondhya; Weber, James L.; Boggon, Titus J.

    2015-01-01

    Familial cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are predominantly neurovascular lesions and are associated with mutations within the KRIT1, CCM2, and PDCD10 genes. The protein products of KRIT1 and CCM2 (Krev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1) and cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2), respectively) directly interact with each other. Disease-associated mutations in KRIT1 and CCM2 mostly result in loss of their protein products, although rare missense point mutations can also occur. From gene sequencing of patients known or suspected to have one or more CCMs, we discover a series of missense point mutations in KRIT1 and CCM2 that result in missense mutations in the CCM2 and KRIT1 proteins. To place these mutations in the context of the molecular level interactions of CCM2 and KRIT1, we map the interaction of KRIT1 and CCM2 and find that the CCM2 phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain displays a preference toward the third of the three KRIT1 NPX(Y/F) motifs. We determine the 2.75 Å co-crystal structure of the CCM2 PTB domain with a peptide corresponding to KRIT1NPX(Y/F)3, revealing a Dab-like PTB fold for CCM2 and its interaction with KRIT1NPX(Y/F)3. We find that several disease-associated missense mutations in CCM2 have the potential to interrupt the KRIT1-CCM2 interaction by destabilizing the CCM2 PTB domain and that a KRIT1 mutation also disrupts this interaction. We therefore provide new insights into the architecture of CCM2 and how the CCM complex is disrupted in CCM disease. PMID:25525273

  5. Structural basis for the disruption of the cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2) interaction with Krev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1) by disease-associated mutations.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Oriana S; Liu, Weizhi; Zhang, Rong; Stiegler, Amy L; Ghedia, Sondhya; Weber, James L; Boggon, Titus J

    2015-01-30

    Familial cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are predominantly neurovascular lesions and are associated with mutations within the KRIT1, CCM2, and PDCD10 genes. The protein products of KRIT1 and CCM2 (Krev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1) and cerebral cavernous malformations 2 (CCM2), respectively) directly interact with each other. Disease-associated mutations in KRIT1 and CCM2 mostly result in loss of their protein products, although rare missense point mutations can also occur. From gene sequencing of patients known or suspected to have one or more CCMs, we discover a series of missense point mutations in KRIT1 and CCM2 that result in missense mutations in the CCM2 and KRIT1 proteins. To place these mutations in the context of the molecular level interactions of CCM2 and KRIT1, we map the interaction of KRIT1 and CCM2 and find that the CCM2 phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain displays a preference toward the third of the three KRIT1 NPX(Y/F) motifs. We determine the 2.75 Å co-crystal structure of the CCM2 PTB domain with a peptide corresponding to KRIT1(NPX(Y/F)3), revealing a Dab-like PTB fold for CCM2 and its interaction with KRIT1(NPX(Y/F)3). We find that several disease-associated missense mutations in CCM2 have the potential to interrupt the KRIT1-CCM2 interaction by destabilizing the CCM2 PTB domain and that a KRIT1 mutation also disrupts this interaction. We therefore provide new insights into the architecture of CCM2 and how the CCM complex is disrupted in CCM disease.

  6. A novel TNFRSF1A gene mutation in a patient with tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khabazi, Alireza; Maralani, Mahafarin; Andalib, Sasan; Sakhinia, Ebrahim

    2016-10-19

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is a periodic fever syndrome inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. It stems from mutations in the TNFRSF1A (accession number: NM_001065) gene expressing the receptor for tumor necrosis factor α. A patient with TRAPS may present with prolonged episodes of fever attacks, abdominal pain, severe myalgia, and painful erythema on the trunk or extremities. Here, we report an 8-year-old boy with febrile attacks occurring every 1-2months and continuing for 3-4days. The patient experienced 40°C-fever attacks without chills. Approximately 80% of fever attacks were accompanied by abdominal manifestations. Direct sequencing analysis was used to assess the genomic DNA of the patient, and a heterozygous R426L mutation in exon 10 of the TNFRSF1A gene in an autosomal dominant inheritance fashion was identified. Further genetic analyses were also carried out on his parents. Due to the fact that the mutation was not inherited from the parents, it was likely that R426L was a de novo and novel mutation in the TNFRSF1A gene, which can trigger TRAPS or TRAPS-like symptoms.

  7. Multiple de novo mutations in the MECP2 gene.

    PubMed

    Bunyan, David J; Robinson, David O

    2008-09-01

    Rett syndrome is an X-linked dominant disorder that usually arises following a single de novo mutation in the MECP2 gene. Point mutation testing and gene dosage analysis of a cohort of British Rett syndrome patients in our laboratory revealed four females who each had two different de novo causative mutations, presumed to be in cis because the patients showed no deviation from the classical Rett syndrome phenotype. Two of these cases had a point mutation and a small intraexonic deletion, a third had a whole exon deletion and a separate small intraexonic deletion, and a fourth case had a small intraexonic deletion and a large duplication. These findings highlight the necessity to perform both point mutation analysis and exon dosage analysis in such cases, particularly because of the possibility of undetected parental mosaicism and the implications for prenatal diagnosis in future pregnancies. These cases also suggest that the MECP2 gene may be particularly prone to multiple mutation events.

  8. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents. PMID:25045626

  9. Screening for mutations in candidate genes for hypospadias.

    PubMed

    Nordenskjöld, A; Friedman, E; Tapper-Persson, M; Söderhäll, C; Leviav, A; Svensson, J; Anvret, M

    1999-01-01

    Hypospadias. a condition with a frontally placed urethral orifice on the penis, is the most common malformation in males. During fetal development several components are necessary for normal male genital development. Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone act via the androgen receptor but a defective receptor function results in different degrees of genital malformations. Testosterone-5alpha-reductase converts testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, which is crucial for normal differentiation, and a total lack of this enzyme results, in syndromes with hypospadias. The Wilms' tumour 1 (WT1) gene is expressed in the fetal gonad and genital malformations can occur due to WT1 gene mutations. These genes are therefore strong candidate genes for hypospadias. We have analysed 35 boys with hypopadias and one girl diagnosed as with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome, using exon by exon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the AR, WTI and 5alpha-reductase genes and screened for point mutations and performed subsequent DNA sequencing. No mutations in any of these genes were found in the 26 patients with isolated hypospadias. Two patients with severe hypospadias with cryptorchidism were found to carry mutations in the androgen receptor gene. Also the girl with clinically diagnosed complete androgen insensitivity was found to be homozygous for a splice mutation in the 5alpha-reductase gene. In summary, mutations in the WT1, AR and 5alpha-reductase genes are not common causes of isolated hypospadias.

  10. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html.

  11. Germline mutations of TP53 gene in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Damineni, Surekha; Rao, Vadlamudi Raghavendra; Kumar, Satish; Ravuri, Rajasekar Reddy; Kagitha, Sailaja; Dunna, Nageswara Rao; Digumarthi, Raghunadharao; Satti, Vishnupriya

    2014-09-01

    Germline alterations of the TP53 gene encoding the p53 protein have been observed in the majority of families with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, a rare dominantly inherited disorder with breast cancer. Genomic DNA samples of 182 breast cancer cases and 186 controls were sequenced for TP53 mutations in the exon 5-9 and intervening introns 5, 7-9. Direct sequencing was done using Applied Biosystem 3730 DNA analyzer. In the present study, we observed nine mutations in the sequenced region, of which five were novel. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was done for all the mutations; C14181T, T14201G, and G13203A have shown deviation from HWE. High linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed between C14181T (rs129547788) and T14201G (rs12951053) (r (2) = 0.98.3; D' = 1.00), whereas other observed mutations do not show strong LD with any of the other mutations. None of the intronic mutations has shown significant association with the breast cancer, two exonic mutations G13203A (rs28934578) and A14572G are significantly (P = 0.04, P = 0.007) associated with breast cancer. Germline mutations observed in DNA-binding domain of the gene showed significant association with breast cancer. This study reports five novel germline mutations in the TP53 gene out of which one mutation may confer significant risk to the breast cancer. Mutations in DNA-binding domain of TP53 gene may play role in the early onset and prognosis of breast cancer. The population-based studies of germline mutations in DNA-binding domain of TP53 gene helps in identification of individuals and families who are at risk of developing cancers.

  12. Capture of cytokine-responsive genes (NACA and RBM3) using a gene trap approach.

    PubMed

    Baghdoyan, S; Dubreuil, P; Eberlé, F; Gomez, S

    2000-06-15

    We have developed a gene trap approach to select specific cytokine receptor/ligand responsive genes in the cell line TF-1. This cell line exhibits a dependency on granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interleukin-3 (IL-3) and responds to interleukin-5 (IL-5). In an attempt to detect genes modulated by one of these factors, cells were infected with the Rosabetageo retrovirus in the presence of GM-CSF, IL-3, or IL-5 and clones were selected for retroviral integration on the basis of G418 resistance. Housekeeping and cytokine-regulated trapped genes were then differentiated on the basis of G418 resistance versus sensitivity in the presence of the different cytokines. To determine the reliability of this screen, DNA sequences upstream of the proviral integration site were identified by 5' rapid amplification of DNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE PCR) from selected GM-CSF-treated and -infected clones. Comparison of the sequences with those in the Genbank database revealed that 2 sequences correspond to known genes: NACA and RBM3. NACA was recently defined as a coactivator of c-jun-mediated transcription factors in osteoblasts, and RBM3 as a protein from the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein family. Data from transcriptional analysis of these 2 genes in TF-1 cells showed a specific up-regulation by GM-CSF. Both transcripts were also found to be up-regulated in purified CD34(+) cells, suggesting their involvement in proliferative processes during hematopoiesis. Interestingly, down-regulation was observed during monocytic differentiation of TF-1 cells, suggesting their extinction could contribute to monocytic lineage development. This study demonstrates that this gene trap approach is a useful method for identifying novel, specific cytokine-responsive genes that are involved in the regulation of hematopoiesis. (Blood. 2000;95:3750-3757)

  13. CFTR gene mutations in isolated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatti, P.F.; Bombien, C.; Marigo, C.

    1994-09-01

    In order to identify a possible hereditary predisposition to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we have looked for the presence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene DNA sequence modifications in 28 unrelated patients with no signs of cystic fibrosis. The known mutations in Italian CF patients, as well as the most frequent worldwide CF mutations, were investigated. In addition, a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of about half of the coding sequence of the gene in 56 chromosomes from the patients and in 102 chromosomes from control individuals affected by other pulmonary diseases and from normal controls was performed. Nine different CFTR gene mutations and polymorphisms were found in seven patients, a highly significant increase over controls. Two of the patients were compound heterozygotes. Two frequent CF mutations were detected: deletion F508 and R117H; two rare CF mutations: R1066C and 3667ins4; and five CF sequence variants: R75Q (which was also described as a disease-causing mutation in male sterility cases due to the absence of the vasa deferentia), G576A, 2736 A{r_arrow}G, L997F, and 3271+18C{r_arrow}T. Seven (78%) of the mutations are localized in transmembrane domains. Six (86%) of the patients with defined mutations and polymorphisms had bronchiectasis. These results indicate that CFTR gene mutations and sequence alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of COPD.

  14. Somatic mutations of CASP3 gene in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Soung, Young Hwa; Lee, Jong Woo; Kim, Su Young; Park, Won Sang; Nam, Suk Woo; Lee, Jung Young; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2004-07-01

    Failure of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer. As an execution-phase caspase, caspase-3 plays a crucial role during apoptosis. To explore the possibility that the genetic alterations of CASP3, which encodes caspase-3, might be involved in the development of human tumors, we analyzed the entire coding region and all splice sites of human CASP3 gene for the detection of somatic mutations in a series of 944 human tumors, including 165 stomach carcinomas, 95 colon carcinomas, 76 breast carcinomas, 80 hepatocellular carcinomas, 181 non-small cell lung cancers, 45 acute leukemias, 28 multiple myelomas, 12 medulloblastomas, 15 Wilms' tumors, 12 renal cell carcinomas, 40 esophagus carcinomas, 33 urinary bladder carcinomas, 33 laryngeal carcinomas, and 129 non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Overall, we detected 14 somatic mutations of the CASP3 gene, including six missense and four silent mutations, two mutations in the introns, one mutation in the 5'-untranslated region, and one mutation in the 3'-untranslated region. The mutations were observed in four of 98 colon carcinomas (4.1%), four of 181 non-small cell lung cancers (2.2%), two of 129 non-Hodgkin lymphomas (1.6%), two of 165 stomach carcinomas (1.2%), one of 80 hepatocellular carcinomas (1.3%), and one of 28 multiple myelomas (3.6%). This is the first report on CASP3 gene mutations in human tumors; these data indicate that the CASP3 gene is occasionally mutated in human tumors.

  15. Mutational specificity analysis: assay for mutations in the yeast SUP4-o gene.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Bernard A

    2014-01-01

    Mutational specificity analysis can yield valuable insights into processes that generate genetic change or maintain genetic stability. Powerful diagnostic tools for such analysis have been created by combining genetic assays for mutation with DNA sequencing. Here, steps for isolating spontaneous mutations in the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) suppressor tRNA gene SUP4-o as a prelude to sequence characterization are described (modifications of this protocol can be used to study induction of mutations by various physical or chemical agents). Mutations in SUP4-o are selected on drug-containing medium by virtue of their inactivation of suppressor activity. The small size, detailed knowledge of detectably mutable sites, and other features of the target gene facilitate subsequent analysis of these mutations.

  16. Transcriptional regulation of the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) gene by iron.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, O; Reddy, S V; Roodman, G D; Boldt, D H

    1994-03-01

    Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) was first identified in cells from patients with hairy cell leukaemia. Subsequently, it has been found in other leukaemias, B-lymphoblastoid cell lines, osteoclasts and subsets of normal lymphocytes, macrophages, and granulocytes. Recent data indicate that TRAP and porcine uteroferrin, a placental iron-transport protein, represent a single gene product. However, the intracellular role of TRAP is unknown. We used a full-length human placental TRAP cDNA probe to examine TRAP expression in human peripheral mononuclear cells (PMCs). TRAP mRNA increased 50-75-fold after 24 h in unstimulated PMC cultures. Cell-fractionation experiments indicated that monocytes were the main cell population accounting for increased TRAP mRNA transcripts, and this was confirmed by histochemical staining for TRAP enzyme activity. Because expression of other iron-binding and -transport proteins is controlled by iron availability, we examined the role of iron in regulating TRAP expression. Increase of TRAP mRNA transcripts in PMCs was inhibited by 50 microM desferrioxamine, a potent iron chelator. The 5' flanking region of the TRAP gene was cloned from a mouse genomic library. In preliminary transient transfection experiments, it was determined that the 5'-flanking region of the TRAP gene contained iron-responsive elements. Therefore, a series of stably transfected HRE H9 cell lines was developed bearing genetic constructs containing various segments of the murine TRAP 5' promoter region driving a luciferase reporter gene. Treatment of transfectants with 100 micrograms/ml iron-saturated human transferrin (FeTF) was performed to assess iron responsiveness of the constructs. Constructs containing a full-length TRAP promoter (comprising base pairs -1846 to +2) responded to FeTF with a 4-5-fold increase of luciferase activity whereas constructs containing only base pairs -363 to +2 of the TRAP promoter did not respond. Constructs containing 1240 or 881

  17. Transcriptional regulation of the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) gene by iron.

    PubMed Central

    Alcantara, O; Reddy, S V; Roodman, G D; Boldt, D H

    1994-01-01

    Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) was first identified in cells from patients with hairy cell leukaemia. Subsequently, it has been found in other leukaemias, B-lymphoblastoid cell lines, osteoclasts and subsets of normal lymphocytes, macrophages, and granulocytes. Recent data indicate that TRAP and porcine uteroferrin, a placental iron-transport protein, represent a single gene product. However, the intracellular role of TRAP is unknown. We used a full-length human placental TRAP cDNA probe to examine TRAP expression in human peripheral mononuclear cells (PMCs). TRAP mRNA increased 50-75-fold after 24 h in unstimulated PMC cultures. Cell-fractionation experiments indicated that monocytes were the main cell population accounting for increased TRAP mRNA transcripts, and this was confirmed by histochemical staining for TRAP enzyme activity. Because expression of other iron-binding and -transport proteins is controlled by iron availability, we examined the role of iron in regulating TRAP expression. Increase of TRAP mRNA transcripts in PMCs was inhibited by 50 microM desferrioxamine, a potent iron chelator. The 5' flanking region of the TRAP gene was cloned from a mouse genomic library. In preliminary transient transfection experiments, it was determined that the 5'-flanking region of the TRAP gene contained iron-responsive elements. Therefore, a series of stably transfected HRE H9 cell lines was developed bearing genetic constructs containing various segments of the murine TRAP 5' promoter region driving a luciferase reporter gene. Treatment of transfectants with 100 micrograms/ml iron-saturated human transferrin (FeTF) was performed to assess iron responsiveness of the constructs. Constructs containing a full-length TRAP promoter (comprising base pairs -1846 to +2) responded to FeTF with a 4-5-fold increase of luciferase activity whereas constructs containing only base pairs -363 to +2 of the TRAP promoter did not respond. Constructs containing 1240 or 881

  18. Typical and severe tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome in the absence of mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene: a case series.

    PubMed

    Cantarini, Luca; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Cimaz, Rolando; Rigante, Donato; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; Laghi Pasini, Franco; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2012-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-1-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is the most common autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder and is caused by mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene encoding the 55-kDa receptor for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. TRAPS is characterized by recurrent attacks of fever, typically lasting from 1 to 3 weeks. In addition to fever, common clinical features include periorbital edema, a migratory erythematous plaque simulating erysipela with underlying myalgia, and arthralgia or arthritis. Serosal membrane inflammation is also a common feature, usually in the form of polyserositis. To date, at least 40 different TNFRSF1A mutations have been identified, but few patients with symptoms highly suggestive of TRAPS with no mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene have recently been described, thus suggesting that not all mutations are yet known or that alternative mechanisms might be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. We report on three such patients here.

  19. Application of automatic mutation-gene pair extraction to diseases.

    PubMed

    Erdogmus, Muge; Sezerman, Osman Ugur

    2007-12-01

    To have a better understanding of the mechanisms of disease development, knowledge of mutations and the genes on which the mutations occur is of crucial importance. Information on disease-related mutations can be accessed through public databases or biomedical literature sources. However, information retrieval from such resources can be problematic because of two reasons: manually created databases are usually incomplete and not up to date, and reading through a vast amount of publicly available biomedical documents is very time-consuming. In this paper, we describe an automated system, MuGeX (Mutation Gene eXtractor), that automatically extracts mutation-gene pairs from Medline abstracts for a disease query. Our system is tested on a corpus that consists of 231 Medline abstracts. While recall for mutation detection alone is 85.9%, precision is 95.9%. For extraction of mutation-gene pairs, we focus on Alzheimer's disease. The recall for mutation-gene pair identification is estimated at 91.3%, and precision is estimated at 88.9%. With automatic extraction techniques, MuGeX overcomes the problems of information retrieval from public resources and reduces the time required to access relevant information, while preserving the accuracy of retrieved information.

  20. Association of CFTR gene mutation with bronchial asthma

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Nutan; Awasthi, Shally; Dixit, Pratibha

    2012-01-01

    Mutation on both the copies of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene results in cystic fibrosis (CF), which is a recessively transmitted genetic disorder. It is hypothesized that individuals heterozygous for CFTR gene mutation may develop obstructive pulmonary diseases like asthma. There is great heterogeneity in the phenotypic presentation and severity of CF lung disease. This could be due to genetic or environmental factors. Several modifier genes have been identified which may directly or indirectly interact with CFTR pathway and affect the severity of disease. This review article discusses the information related to the association of CFTR gene mutation with asthma. Association between CFTR gene mutation and asthma is still unclear. Report ranges from studies showing positive or protective association to those showing no association. Therefore, studies with sufficiently large sample size and detailed phenotype are required to define the potential contribution of CFTR in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:22664493

  1. Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Screening of Mutation in Amelogenin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Fernanda Veronese; Gurgel, Carla Vecchione; Kobayashi, Tatiana Yuriko; Dionísio, Thiago José; Neves, Lucimara Teixeira; Santos, Carlos Ferreira; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report the clinical findings and the screening of mutations of amelogenin gene of a 7-year-old boy with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). The genomic DNA was extracted from saliva of patient and his family, followed by PCR and direct DNA sequencing. The c.261C>T mutation was found in samples of mother, father, and brother, but the mutation was not found in the sequence of the patient. This mutation is a silent mutation and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs2106416). Thus, it is suggested that the mutation found was not related to the clinical presence of AI. Further research is necessary to examine larger number of patients and genes related to AI. PMID:25045544

  2. Novel strategies for comprehensive mutation screening of the APC gene.

    PubMed

    Wachsmannova, L; Mego, M; Stevurkova, V; Zajac, V; Ciernikova, S

    2017-03-03

    Colorectal cancer is the 4th most common cause of cancer related deaths worldwide and new possibilities in accurate diagnosis and targeted treatment are highly required. Mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene play a pivotal role in adenoma-carcinoma pathway of colorectal tumorigenesis. The quarter century from its´ first cloning, APC became one of the most frequently mutated, known driver genes in colorectal cancer. Intensive routine molecular testing of APC has brought the benefits for patients with family history of polyposis or colorectal cancer. Nevertheless, multiple mutational disease-causing mechanisms make the genetic testing still challenging. This minireview is focused on implementation of novel APC mutation screening diagnostic strategies for polyposis families according to the current findings. A further understanding and improved algorithms may help to increase the mutation detection rate. APC germline mutations achieve close to 100% penetrance, so more comprehensive approach followed by preventive and therapeutic strategies might reflect in decrease in burden of colorectal cancer.

  3. Cilia gene mutations cause atrioventricular septal defects by multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Burnicka-Turek, Ozanna; Steimle, Jeffrey D.; Huang, Wenhui; Felker, Lindsay; Kamp, Anna; Kweon, Junghun; Peterson, Michael; Reeves, Roger H.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Gruber, Peter J.; Yang, Xinan H.; Shendure, Jay; Moskowitz, Ivan P.

    2016-01-01

    Atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs) are a common severe form of congenital heart disease (CHD). In this study we identified deleterious non-synonymous mutations in two cilia genes, Dnah11 and Mks1, in independent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mouse mutant lines with heritable recessive AVSDs by whole-exome sequencing. Cilia are required for left/right body axis determination and second heart field (SHF) Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, and we find that cilia mutations affect these requirements differentially. Dnah11avc4 did not disrupt SHF Hh signaling and caused AVSDs only concurrently with heterotaxy, a left/right axis abnormality. In contrast, Mks1avc6 disrupted SHF Hh signaling and caused AVSDs without heterotaxy. We performed unbiased whole-genome SHF transcriptional profiling and found that cilia motility genes were not expressed in the SHF whereas cilia structural and signaling genes were highly expressed. SHF cilia gene expression predicted the phenotypic concordance between AVSDs and heterotaxy in mice and humans with cilia gene mutations. A two-step model of cilia action accurately predicted the AVSD/heterotaxyu phenotypic expression pattern caused by cilia gene mutations. We speculate that cilia gene mutations contribute to both syndromic and non-syndromic AVSDs in humans and provide a model that predicts the phenotypic consequences of specific cilia gene mutations. PMID:27340223

  4. Mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients with retinoblastoma reveals 11 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Katia; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; Mari, Francesca; Speciale, Caterina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Cetta, Francesco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Giachino, Daniela; Pasini, Barbara; Acquaviva, Antonio; Caporossi, Aldo; Frezzotti, Renato; Renieri, Alessandra; Bruttini, Mirella

    2006-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB, OMIM#180200) is the most common intraocular tumour in infancy and early childhood. Constituent mutations in the RB1 gene predispose individuals to RB development. We performed a mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients affected by RB referred to the Medical Genetics of the University of Siena. In 35 unrelated patients, we identified germline RB1 mutations in 6 out of 9 familial cases (66%) and in 7 out of 26 with no family history of RB (27%). Using the single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique, 11 novel mutations were detected, including 3 nonsense, 5 frameshift and 4 splice-site mutations. Only two of these mutations (1 splice site and 1 missense) were previously reported. The mutation spectrum reflects the published literature, encompassing predominately nonsense or frameshift and splicing mutations. RB1 germline mutation was detected in 37% of our cases. Gross rearrangements outside the investigated region, altered DNA methylation, or mutations in non-coding regions, may be the cause of disease in the remainder of the patients. Some cases, e.g. a case of incomplete penetrance, or variable expressivity ranging from retinoma to multiple tumours, are discussed in detail. In addition, a case of pre-conception genetic counselling resolved by rescue of banked cordonal blood of the affected deceased child is described.

  5. Bioinformatic Analysis of GJB2 Gene Missense Mutations.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Akin

    2015-04-01

    Gap junction beta 2 (GJB2) gene is the most commonly mutated connexin gene in patients with autosomal recessive and dominant hearing loss. According to Ensembl (release 74) database, 1347 sequence variations are reported in the GJB2 gene and about 13.5% of them are categorized as missense SNPs or nonsynonymous variant. Because of the high incidence of GJB2 mutations in hearing loss patients, revealing the molecular effect of GJB2 mutations on protein structure may also provide clear point of view regarding the molecular etiology of deafness. Hence, the aim of this study is to analyze structural and functional consequences of all known GJB2 missense variations to the Cx26 protein by applying multiple bioinformatics methods. Two-hundred and eleven nonsynonymous variants were collected from Ensembl release 74, Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD) and The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD). A number of bioinformatic tools were utilized for predicting the effect of GJB2 missense mutations at the sequence, structural, and functional levels. Some of the mutations were found to locate highly conserved regions and have structural and functional properties. Moreover, GJB2 mutations were also found to affect Cx26 protein at the molecular level via loss or gain of disorder, catalytic site, and post-translational modifications, including methylation, glycosylation, and ubiquitination. Findings, presented here, demonstrated the application of bioinformatic algorithms to predict the effects of mutations causing hearing impairment. I expect, this type of analysis will serve as a start point for future experimental evaluation of the GJB2 gene mutations and it will also be helpful in evaluating other deafness-related gene mutations.

  6. Founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    PubMed

    Ferla, R; Calò, V; Cascio, S; Rinaldi, G; Badalamenti, G; Carreca, I; Surmacz, E; Colucci, G; Bazan, V; Russo, A

    2007-06-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations contribute to a significant number of familial and hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. The proportion of high-risk families with breast and/or ovarian cancer cases due to mutations in these tumor suppressor genes varies widely among populations. In some population, a wide spectrum of different mutations in both genes are present, whereas in other groups specific mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported with high frequency. Most of these mutations are prevalent in restricted populations as consequence of a founder effect. The comparison of haplotypes between families with the same mutation can distinguish whether high-frequency alleles derive from an older or more recent single mutational event or whether they have arisen independently more than once. Here, we review some of the most well-known and significant examples of founder mutations in BRCA genes found in European and non-European populations. In conclusion, the identification of the ethnic group of families undergoing genetic counseling enables the geneticist and oncologist to make more specific choices, leading to simplify the clinical approach to genetic testing carried out on members of high-risk families. Futhermore, the high frequency of founder mutations, allowing to analyze a large number of cases, might provide accurate information regarding their penetrance.

  7. Variable expressivity and mutation databases: The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Trifiro, M A

    2001-05-01

    For over 50 years genetics has presumed that variations in phenotypic expression have, for the most part, been the result of alterations in genotype. The importance and value of mutation databases has been based on the premise that the same gene or allelic variation in a specific gene that has been proven to determine a specific phenotype, will always produce the same phenotype. However, recent evidence has shown that so called "simple" Mendelian disorders or monogenic traits are often far from simple, exhibiting phenotypic variation (variable expressivity) that cannot be explained solely by a gene or allelic alteration. The AR gene mutations database now lists 25 cases where different degrees of androgen insensitivity are caused by identical mutations in the androgen receptor gene. In five of these cases the phenotypic variability is due to somatic mosaicism, that is, somatic mutations that occur in only certain cells of androgen-sensitive tissue. Recently, a number of other cases of variable expressivity have also been linked to somatic mosaicism. The impact of variable expressivity due to somatic mutations and mosaicism on mutation databases is discussed. In particular, the effect of an organism exhibiting genetic heterogeneity within its tissues, and the possibility of an organism's genotype changing over its lifetime, are considered to have important implications for mutation databases in the future. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Recessive truncating titin gene, TTN, mutations presenting as centronuclear myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Agrawal, Pankaj B.; Hidalgo, Carlos; Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; DeChene, Elizabeth T.; Swanson, Lindsay C.; Soemedi, Rachel; Vasli, Nasim; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Shieh, Perry B.; Shur, Natasha; Dennison, Jane M.; Lawlor, Michael W.; Laporte, Jocelyn; Markianos, Kyriacos; Fairbrother, William G.; Granzier, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify causative genes for centronuclear myopathies (CNM), a heterogeneous group of rare inherited muscle disorders that often present in infancy or early life with weakness and hypotonia, using next-generation sequencing of whole exomes and genomes. Methods: Whole-exome or -genome sequencing was performed in a cohort of 29 unrelated patients with clinicopathologic diagnoses of CNM or related myopathy depleted for cases with mutations of MTM1, DNM2, and BIN1. Immunofluorescence analyses on muscle biopsies, splicing assays, and gel electrophoresis of patient muscle proteins were performed to determine the molecular consequences of mutations of interest. Results: Autosomal recessive compound heterozygous truncating mutations of the titin gene, TTN, were identified in 5 individuals. Biochemical analyses demonstrated increased titin degradation and truncated titin proteins in patient muscles, establishing the impact of the mutations. Conclusions: Our study identifies truncating TTN mutations as a cause of congenital myopathy that is reported as CNM. Unlike the classic CNM genes that are all involved in excitation-contraction coupling at the triad, TTN encodes the giant sarcomeric protein titin, which forms a myofibrillar backbone for the components of the contractile machinery. This study expands the phenotypic spectrum associated with TTN mutations and indicates that TTN mutation analysis should be considered in cases of possible CNM without mutations in the classic CNM genes. PMID:23975875

  9. Simulation of gene evolution under directional mutational pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkiewicz, Małgorzata; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Kowalczuk, Maria; Mackiewicz, Dorota; Nowicka, Aleksandra; Polak, Natalia; Smolarczyk, Kamila; Banaszak, Joanna; R. Dudek, Mirosław; Cebrat, Stanisław

    2004-05-01

    The two main mechanisms generating the genetic diversity, mutation and recombination, have random character but they are biased which has an effect on the generation of asymmetry in the bacterial chromosome structure and in the protein coding sequences. Thus, like in a case of two chiral molecules-the two possible orientations of a gene in relation to the topology of a chromosome are not equivalent. Assuming that the sequence of a gene may oscillate only between certain limits of its structural composition means that the gene could be forced out of these limits by the directional mutation pressure, in the course of evolution. The probability of the event depends on the time the gene stays under the same mutation pressure. Inversion of the gene changes the directional mutational pressure to the reciprocal one and hence it changes the distance of the gene to its lower and upper bound of the structural tolerance. Using Monte Carlo methods we were able to simulate the evolution of genes under experimentally found mutational pressure, assuming simple mechanisms of selection. We found that the mutation and recombination should work in accordance to lower their negative effects on the function of the products of coding sequences.

  10. [Obesity based on mutation of genes involved in energy balance].

    PubMed

    Hainerová, I

    2007-01-01

    Within the last decade an intensive research led to an identification of several genes which are involved in a regulation of energy balance. In most cases, carriers of these gene mutations do not exhibit further characteristic phenotypic features except for a severe obesity. Obesity based on mutation of one gene product is called monogenic obesity. Mutations in genes for leptin, leptin receptor, proopiomelanocortin, prohormone convertase 1, melanocortin 4 and 3 receptor disrupt the physiological humoral signalization between peripheral signals and the hypothalamic centres of satiety and hunger. Defects of all above mentioned genes lead to phenotype of abnormal eating behaviour followed by a development of severe early-onset obesity. Mutations of melanocortin 4 receptor gene represent the most common cause of monogenic obesity because they are detected in almost 6 % children with early-onset severe obesity. Mutations of the other genes involved in energy homeostasis are very rare. Although these mutations are sporadic we assume that further research of monogenic forms of obesity might lead to our understanding of physiology and pathophysiology of regulation of the energy homeostasis and eating behaviour. Additionally, they may open new approach to the management of eating behaviour and to the treatment of obesity.

  11. Molecular analysis of mutations in the human HPRT gene.

    PubMed

    Keohavong, Phouthone; Xi, Liqiang; Grant, Stephen G

    2014-01-01

    The HPRT assay uses incorporation of toxic nucleotide analogues to select for cells lacking the purine scavenger enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase. A major advantage of this assay is the ability to isolate mutant cells and determine the molecular basis for their functional deficiency. Many types of analyses have been performed at this locus: the current protocol involves generation of a cDNA and multiplex PCR of each exon, including the intron/exon junctions, followed by direct sequencing of the products. This analysis detects point mutations, small deletions and insertions within the gene, mutations affecting RNA splicing, and products of illegitimate V(D)J recombination within the gene. Establishment of and comparisons with mutational spectra hold the promise of identifying exposures to mutation-inducing genotoxicants from their distinctive pattern of gene-specific DNA damage at this easily analyzed reporter gene.

  12. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Murray, James L; Zhao, Junfei; Sheng, Jinsong; Zhao, Zhongming; Rubin, Donald H

    2016-09-01

    Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap) host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase). Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B) identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline) that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola). In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics.

  13. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Junfei; Sheng, Jinsong; Rubin, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap) host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase). Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B) identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline) that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola). In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics. PMID:27632082

  14. Microarray-based mutation detection in the dystrophin gene.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Madhuri R; Chin, Ephrem L H; Mulle, Jennifer G; Okou, David T; Warren, Stephen T; Zwick, Michael E

    2008-09-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are X-linked recessive neuromuscular disorders caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 males. The human dystrophin gene spans>2,200 kb, or roughly 0.1% of the genome, and is composed of 79 exons. The mutational spectrum of disease-causing alleles, including exonic copy number variations (CNVs), is complex. Deletions account for approximately 65% of DMD mutations and 85% of BMD mutations. Duplications occur in approximately 6 to 10% of males with either DMD or BMD. The remaining 30 to 35% of mutations consist of small deletions, insertions, point mutations, or splicing mutations, most of which introduce a premature stop codon. Laboratory analysis of dystrophin can be used to confirm a clinical diagnosis of DMD, characterize the type of dystrophin mutation, and perform prenatal testing and carrier testing for females. Current dystrophin diagnostic assays involve a variety of methodologies, including multiplex PCR, Southern blot analysis, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), detection of virtually all mutations-SSCP (DOVAM-S), and single condition amplification/internal primer sequencing (SCAIP); however, these methods are time-consuming, laborious, and do not accurately detect duplication mutations in the dystrophin gene. Furthermore, carrier testing in females is often difficult when a related affected male is unavailable. Here we describe the development, design, validation, and implementation of a high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarray-based approach capable of accurately detecting both deletions and duplications in the dystrophin gene. This assay can be readily adopted by clinical molecular testing laboratories and represents a rapid, cost-effective approach for screening a large gene, such as dystrophin.

  15. Cancer Susceptibility Gene Mutations in Individuals With Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yurgelun, Matthew B; Kulke, Matthew H; Fuchs, Charles S; Allen, Brian A; Uno, Hajime; Hornick, Jason L; Ukaegbu, Chinedu I; Brais, Lauren K; McNamara, Philip G; Mayer, Robert J; Schrag, Deborah; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Ng, Kimmie; Kidd, John; Singh, Nanda; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Wenstrup, Richard J; Syngal, Sapna

    2017-04-01

    Purpose Hereditary factors play an important role in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, yet the prevalence of germline cancer susceptibility gene mutations in patients with CRC unselected for high-risk features (eg, early age at diagnosis, personal/family history of cancer or polyps, tumor microsatellite instability [MSI], mismatch repair [MMR] deficiency) is unknown. Patients and Methods We recruited 1,058 participants who received CRC care in a clinic-based setting without preselection for age at diagnosis, personal/family history, or MSI/MMR results. All participants underwent germline testing for mutations in 25 genes associated with inherited cancer risk. Each gene was categorized as high penetrance or moderate penetrance on the basis of published estimates of the lifetime cancer risks conferred by pathogenic germline mutations in that gene. Results One hundred five (9.9%; 95% CI, 8.2% to 11.9%) of 1,058 participants carried one or more pathogenic mutations, including 33 (3.1%) with Lynch syndrome (LS). Twenty-eight (96.6%) of 29 available LS CRCs demonstrated abnormal MSI/MMR results. Seventy-four (7.0%) of 1,058 participants carried non-LS gene mutations, including 23 (2.2%) with mutations in high-penetrance genes (five APC, three biallelic MUTYH, 11 BRCA1/2, two PALB2, one CDKN2A, and one TP53), 15 of whom lacked clinical histories suggestive of their underlying mutation. Thirty-eight (3.6%) participants had moderate-penetrance CRC risk gene mutations (19 monoallelic MUTYH, 17 APC*I1307K, two CHEK2). Neither proband age at CRC diagnosis, family history of CRC, nor personal history of other cancers significantly predicted the presence of pathogenic mutations in non-LS genes. Conclusion Germline cancer susceptibility gene mutations are carried by 9.9% of patients with CRC. MSI/MMR testing reliably identifies LS probands, although 7.0% of patients with CRC carry non-LS mutations, including 1.0% with BRCA1/2 mutations.

  16. Convergence in pigmentation at multiple levels: mutations, genes and function

    PubMed Central

    Manceau, Marie; Domingues, Vera S.; Linnen, Catherine R.; Rosenblum, Erica Bree; Hoekstra, Hopi E.

    2010-01-01

    Convergence—the independent evolution of the same trait by two or more taxa—has long been of interest to evolutionary biologists, but only recently has the molecular basis of phenotypic convergence been identified. Here, we highlight studies of rapid evolution of cryptic coloration in vertebrates to demonstrate that phenotypic convergence can occur at multiple levels: mutations, genes and gene function. We first show that different genes can be responsible for convergent phenotypes even among closely related populations, for example, in the pale beach mice inhabiting Florida's Gulf and Atlantic coasts. By contrast, the exact same mutation can create similar phenotypes in distantly related species such as mice and mammoths. Next, we show that different mutations in the same gene need not be functionally equivalent to produce similar phenotypes. For example, separate mutations produce divergent protein function but convergent pale coloration in two lizard species. Similarly, mutations that alter the expression of a gene in different ways can, nevertheless, result in similar phenotypes, as demonstrated by sister species of deer mice. Together these studies underscore the importance of identifying not only the genes, but also the precise mutations and their effects on protein function, that contribute to adaptation and highlight how convergence can occur at different genetic levels. PMID:20643733

  17. Hereditary angioedema with a mutation in the plasminogen gene.

    PubMed

    Bork, K; Wulff, K; Steinmüller-Magin, L; Braenne, I; Staubach-Renz, P; Witzke, G; Hardt, J

    2017-08-10

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) with normal C1-INH (HAEnCI) may be linked to specific mutations in the coagulation factor 12 (FXII) gene (HAE-FXII) or functional mutations in other genes that are still unknown. We sought to identify and characterize a hitherto unknown type of HAE with normal C1-INH and without mutation in the F12 gene. The study comprised analysis of whole-exome sequencing, Sanger sequencing, and clinical data of patients. We detected a mutation in the plasminogen (PLG) gene in patients with HAEnCI. The mutation c.9886A>G was located in exon 9 leading to the missense mutation p.Lys330Glu (K330E) in the kringle 3 domain of the PLG protein. The mutation was identified by next-generation sequencing in 14 patients with HAEnCI belonging to 4 of 7 families. Family studies revealed that this type of HAE was transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. The PLG gene mutation was present in all studied symptomatic patients and was also found in 9 of 38 index patients from 38 further families with HAEnCI. Most patients had swelling of face/lips (78.3%) and tongue (78.3%). A total of 331 of all 3.795 tongue swellings (8.7%) were associated with dyspnea, voice changes, and imminent asphyxiation. Two women died by asphyxiation due to a tongue swelling. Hereditary angioedema with a mutation in the PLG gene is a novel type of HAE. It is associated with a high risk of tongue swellings. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  18. Mutations That Alter the Transmission of Chloroplast Genes in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Ruth; Ramanis, Zenta

    1974-01-01

    Two mutations are described that alter the pattern of inheritance of chloroplast genes in Chlamydomonas. The mutant gene mat-1 linked to the mating type allele mt- greatly increases the frequency of exceptional zygotes, i.e., zygotes that transmit chloroplast genes from the mt- (male) parent. In some crosses, 80-90% of the zygotes are biparental, transmitting chloroplast genes from both parents. The mat-2 mutation, linked to mt+, acts to decrease the frequency of exceptional zygotes below the spontaneous level. The mutant effects are discussed in terms of a DNA modification-restriction system, postulated to regulate the transmission of chloroplast DNA in zygotes. PMID:4531010

  19. Pancreatic adenocarcinomas frequently show p53 gene mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Scarpa, A.; Capelli, P.; Mukai, K.; Zamboni, G.; Oda, T.; Iacono, C.; Hirohashi, S.

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-four pancreatic adenocarcinomas were studied for the presence of p53 gene mutations by the single-strand conformation polymorphism method and by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments. p53 protein expression was immunohistochemically evaluated using monoclonal PAb1801 and polyclonal CM1 antibodies. Mutations were detected in 14 cases. The transitions were six G to A and two A to G; the transversions were one C to G and two A to C; the remaining three were frameshift mutations. Immunostaining results were identical with both antibodies. Nuclear immunohistochemical p53-positive cells were found in nine p53 mutated cases and in 12 cases in which no mutation was detected. In most of these latter cases only a minority of cancer cells showed immunohistochemical positivity. Twenty-nine cases, including all p53 mutated cancers, were known to contain codon 12 Ki-ras gene mutations. Also in the light of the demonstrated cooperation of ras and p53 gene alterations in the transformation of cultured cells, our data suggest that p53 mutation is one of the genetic defects that may have a role in the pathogenesis of a proportion of pancreatic cancers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8494051

  20. Dihydropteroate Synthase Gene Mutations in Pneumocystis and Sulfa Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Crothers, Kristina; Atzori, Chiara; Benfield, Thomas; Miller, Robert; Rabodonirina, Meja; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik

    2004-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) remains a major cause of illness and death in HIV-infected persons. Sulfa drugs, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) and dapsone are mainstays of PCP treatment and prophylaxis. While prophylaxis has reduced the incidence of PCP, its use has raised concerns about development of resistant organisms. The inability to culture human Pneumocystis, Pneumocystis jirovecii, in a standardized culture system prevents routine susceptibility testing and detection of drug resistance. In other microorganisms, sulfa drug resistance has resulted from specific point mutations in the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene. Similar mutations have been observed in P. jirovecii. Studies have consistently demonstrated a significant association between the use of sulfa drugs for PCP prophylaxis and DHPS gene mutations. Whether these mutations confer resistance to TMP-SMX or dapsone plus trimethoprim for PCP treatment remains unclear. We review studies of DHPS mutations in P. jirovecii and summarize the evidence for resistance to sulfamethoxazole and dapsone. PMID:15504256

  1. De novo mutation in the NOTCH3 gene causing CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Stojanov, Dragan; Grozdanović, Danijela; Petrović, Sladjana; Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela; Stefanović, Ivan; Stojanović, Nebojša; Ilić, Dušica N

    2014-02-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is one of the most common hereditary forms of stroke, and migraine with aura, mood disorders and dementia. CADASIL is caused by mutations of the NOTCH3 gene. This mutation is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Most individuals with CADASIL have a parent with the disorder. In extremely rare cases, CADASIL may occur due to a spontaneous genetic mutation that occurs for unknown reasons (de novo mutation). We report a new case of patient with de novo mutation of the NOTCH3 gene and a condition strongly suggestive of CADASIL (migraine, stroke, and white matter abnormalities), except that this patient did not have any first-degree relatives with similar symptoms.

  2. Dihydropteroate synthase gene mutations in Pneumocystis and sulfa resistance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Laurence; Crothers, Kristina; Atzori, Chiara; Benfield, Thomas; Miller, Robert; Rabodonirina, Meja; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik

    2004-10-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) remains a major cause of illness and death in HIV-infected persons. Sulfa drugs, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) and dapsone are mainstays of PCP treatment and prophylaxis. While prophylaxis has reduced the incidence of PCP, its use has raised concerns about development of resistant organisms. The inability to culture human Pneumocystis, Pneumocystis jirovecii, in a standardized culture system prevents routine susceptibility testing and detection of drug resistance. In other microorganisms, sulfa drug resistance has resulted from specific point mutations in the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene. Similar mutations have been observed in P. jirovecii. Studies have consistently demonstrated a significant association between the use of sulfa drugs for PCP prophylaxis and DHPS gene mutations. Whether these mutations confer resistance to TMP-SMX or dapsone plus trimethoprim for PCP treatment remains unclear. We review studies of DHPS mutations in P. jirovecii and summarize the evidence for resistance to sulfamethoxazole and dapsone.

  3. ATM Gene Mutation Detection Techniques and Functional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rieunier, Guillaume; D'Enghien, Catherine Dubois; Fievet, Alice; Bellanger, Dorine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Stern, Marc-Henri

    2017-01-01

    Ataxia Telangiectasia (A-T) is caused by biallelic inactivation of the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) gene, due to nonsense or missense mutations, small insertions/deletions (indels), splicing alterations, and large genomic rearrangements. After establishing A-T clinical diagnosis, a molecular confirmation is needed, based on the detection of one of these loss-of-function mutations in at least one allele. In most cases, the pathogenicity of the detected mutations is sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis. More rarely, mutations of unknown consequences are identified and direct biological analyses are required to establish their pathogenic characters. In such cases, complementary analyses of ATM expression, localization, and activity allow fine characterization of these mutations and facilitate A-T diagnosis. Here, we present genetic and biochemical protocols currently used in the laboratory that have proven to be highly accurate, reproducible, and quantitative. We also provide additional discussion on the critical points of the techniques presented here.

  4. Preservation of duplicate genes by complementary, degenerative mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Force, A; Lynch, M; Pickett, F B; Amores, A; Yan, Y L; Postlethwait, J

    1999-01-01

    The origin of organismal complexity is generally thought to be tightly coupled to the evolution of new gene functions arising subsequent to gene duplication. Under the classical model for the evolution of duplicate genes, one member of the duplicated pair usually degenerates within a few million years by accumulating deleterious mutations, while the other duplicate retains the original function. This model further predicts that on rare occasions, one duplicate may acquire a new adaptive function, resulting in the preservation of both members of the pair, one with the new function and the other retaining the old. However, empirical data suggest that a much greater proportion of gene duplicates is preserved than predicted by the classical model. Here we present a new conceptual framework for understanding the evolution of duplicate genes that may help explain this conundrum. Focusing on the regulatory complexity of eukaryotic genes, we show how complementary degenerative mutations in different regulatory elements of duplicated genes can facilitate the preservation of both duplicates, thereby increasing long-term opportunities for the evolution of new gene functions. The duplication-degeneration-complementation (DDC) model predicts that (1) degenerative mutations in regulatory elements can increase rather than reduce the probability of duplicate gene preservation and (2) the usual mechanism of duplicate gene preservation is the partitioning of ancestral functions rather than the evolution of new functions. We present several examples (including analysis of a new engrailed gene in zebrafish) that appear to be consistent with the DDC model, and we suggest several analytical and experimental approaches for determining whether the complementary loss of gene subfunctions or the acquisition of novel functions are likely to be the primary mechanisms for the preservation of gene duplicates. For a newly duplicated paralog, survival depends on the outcome of the race between

  5. Sporadic Cerebral Cavernous Malformations: Report of Further Mutations of CCM Genes in 40 Italian Patients

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Rosalia; Alafaci, Concetta; Scimone, Concetta; Ruggeri, Alessia; Salpietro, Francesco Maria; Bramanti, Placido; Tomasello, Francesco; Sidoti, Antonina

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular lesions characterized by abnormally enlarged capillary cavities, affecting the central nervous system. CCMs can occur sporadically or as a familial autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression attributable to mutations in three different genes: CCM1 (K-Rev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1)), CCM2 (MGC4607), and CCM3 (PDCD10). CCMs occur as a single or multiple malformations that can lead to seizures, focal neurological deficits, hemorrhagic stroke, and headache. However, patients are frequently asymptomatic. In our previous mutation screening, performed in a cohort of 95 Italian patients, both sporadic and familial, we have identified several mutations in CCM genes, three of which in three distinct sporadic patients. In this study, representing further molecular screening of the three CCM genes, in a south Italian cohort of CCM patients enrolled by us in the last three years, we report the identification of other four new mutations in 40 sporadic patients with either single or multiple CCM. PMID:24058906

  6. Sporadic cerebral cavernous malformations: report of further mutations of CCM genes in 40 Italian patients.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Rosalia; Alafaci, Concetta; Scimone, Concetta; Ruggeri, Alessia; Salpietro, Francesco Maria; Bramanti, Placido; Tomasello, Francesco; Sidoti, Antonina

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular lesions characterized by abnormally enlarged capillary cavities, affecting the central nervous system. CCMs can occur sporadically or as a familial autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression attributable to mutations in three different genes: CCM1 (K-Rev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1)), CCM2 (MGC4607), and CCM3 (PDCD10). CCMs occur as a single or multiple malformations that can lead to seizures, focal neurological deficits, hemorrhagic stroke, and headache. However, patients are frequently asymptomatic. In our previous mutation screening, performed in a cohort of 95 Italian patients, both sporadic and familial, we have identified several mutations in CCM genes, three of which in three distinct sporadic patients. In this study, representing further molecular screening of the three CCM genes, in a south Italian cohort of CCM patients enrolled by us in the last three years, we report the identification of other four new mutations in 40 sporadic patients with either single or multiple CCM.

  7. PFAPA and 12 Common MEFV Gene Mutations Our Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Salehzadeh, Farhad; Vahedi, Maryam; Hosseini-Asl, Saeid; Jahangiri, Sepideh; Habibzadeh, Shahram; Hosseini-Khotbesara, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Marshall Syndrome or PFAPA is an inflammatory periodic disease characterized by periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis. Although PFAPA is an auto inflammatory disease, it doesn't have genetic basis such as other periodic fevers. This study evaluates the 12 common MEFV gene mutations in patients with PFAPA syndrome. Methods: 21 patients with PFAPA syndrome who had diagnostic criteria were enrolled in this study and 12 common MEFV gene mutations i.e. P369S, F479L, M680I (G/C), M680I (G/A), I692del, M694V, M694I, K695R, V726A, A744S, R761H, E148Q evaluated. All the patients were screened for MEFV gene mutations by a reverse hybridization assay (FMF Strip Assay, Vienna lab, Vienna, Austria) according to the instructions provided by the manufacturer. Findings : The age of patients was between 6 months to 14 years, and 15 were males. Seven patients had heterozygote and one had compound heterozygote (K695R, V725A) mutation. There were 4 alleles M694V, 3 alleles V726A, 1 allele E148Q and 1 allele K694R. No significant difference existed between mutated patients with non-mutated in symptoms like aphthous and stomatitis, duration of attacks, episodes of fever and response to treatment. Gaslini score test was not helpful to predict the probability of gene mutations. Conclusion: About 30 percent of patients had MEFV gene mutations but these mutations did not play a main role in presentation of PFAPA symptoms. PMID:25793047

  8. Microarray-based mutation detection in the dystrophin gene

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Madhuri R.; Chin, Ephrem L.H.; Mulle, Jennifer G.; Okou, David T.; Warren, Stephen T.; Zwick, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are X-linked recessive neuromuscular disorders caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 males. The human dystrophin gene spans > 2,200 kb, or roughly 0.1% of the genome, and is composed of 79 exons. The mutational spectrum of disease-causing alleles, including exonic copy number variations (CNVs), is complex. Deletions account for approximately 65% of DMD mutations and 85% of BMD mutations. Duplications occur in approximately 6–10% of males with either DMD or BMD. The remaining 30–35% of mutations consist of small deletions, insertions, point mutations, or splicing mutations, most of which introduce a premature stop codon. Laboratory analysis of dystrophin can be used to confirm a clinical diagnosis of DMD, characterize the type of dystrophin mutation, and perform prenatal testing and carrier testing for females. Current dystrophin diagnostic assays involve a variety of methodologies, including multiplex PCR, Southern blot analysis, MLPA, DOVAM-S, and SCAIP; however, these methods are time-consuming, laborious, and do not accurately detect duplication mutations in the dystrophin gene. Furthermore, carrier testing in females is often difficult when a related affected male is unavailable. Here we describe the development, design, validation, and implementation of a high-resolution CGH microarray-based approach capable of accurately detecting both deletions and duplications in the dystrophin gene. This assay can be readily adopted by clinical molecular testing laboratories and represents a rapid, cost-effective approach for screening a large gene, such as dystrophin. PMID:18663755

  9. PFAPA and 12 Common MEFV Gene Mutations Our Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Salehzadeh, Farhad; Vahedi, Maryam; Hosseini-Asl, Saeid; Jahangiri, Sepideh; Habibzadeh, Shahram; Hosseini-Khotbesara, Mahsa

    2014-02-01

    Marshall Syndrome or PFAPA is an inflammatory periodic disease characterized by periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis. Although PFAPA is an auto inflammatory disease, it doesn't have genetic basis such as other periodic fevers. This study evaluates the 12 common MEFV gene mutations in patients with PFAPA syndrome. 21 patients with PFAPA syndrome who had diagnostic criteria were enrolled in this study and 12 common MEFV gene mutations i.e. P369S, F479L, M680I (G/C), M680I (G/A), I692del, M694V, M694I, K695R, V726A, A744S, R761H, E148Q evaluated. All the patients were screened for MEFV gene mutations by a reverse hybridization assay (FMF Strip Assay, Vienna lab, Vienna, Austria) according to the instructions provided by the manufacturer. Findings : The age of patients was between 6 months to 14 years, and 15 were males. Seven patients had heterozygote and one had compound heterozygote (K695R, V725A) mutation. There were 4 alleles M694V, 3 alleles V726A, 1 allele E148Q and 1 allele K694R. No significant difference existed between mutated patients with non-mutated in symptoms like aphthous and stomatitis, duration of attacks, episodes of fever and response to treatment. Gaslini score test was not helpful to predict the probability of gene mutations. About 30 percent of patients had MEFV gene mutations but these mutations did not play a main role in presentation of PFAPA symptoms.

  10. Noninvasive detection of filaggrin gene mutations using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    González, Francisco J; Valdes-Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Elías, Miguel G; Castillo-Martínez, Claudio; Saavedra-Alanis, Victor M; Moncada, Benjamín

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of the existence of filaggrin (FLG) gene mutations might be helpful for a subclassification of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) which can be used to introduce individualized treatments. In this work the filaggrin content in the skin is assessed using Raman spectroscopy and the results are compared to FLG genotyping of Mexican-mestizo patients. Results showed that the 2282del4 and R501X mutations present in the European population but absent in people of Asian or African descent are also present in the Mexican-mestizo population. The results also showed that patients with filaggrin gene mutations presented lower filaggrin concentrations measured using the vector correlation of their skin Raman spectra and a fixed spectrum of pure human recombinant filaggrin, these results indicate that Raman spectroscopy may be used as a noninvasive tool to detect FLG gene mutations.

  11. Noninvasive detection of filaggrin gene mutations using Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    González, Francisco J.; Valdes-Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Elías, Miguel G.; Castillo-Martínez, Claudio; Saavedra-Alanis, Victor M.; Moncada, Benjamín

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the existence of filaggrin (FLG) gene mutations might be helpful for a subclassification of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) which can be used to introduce individualized treatments. In this work the filaggrin content in the skin is assessed using Raman spectroscopy and the results are compared to FLG genotyping of Mexican-mestizo patients. Results showed that the 2282del4 and R501X mutations present in the European population but absent in people of Asian or African descent are also present in the Mexican-mestizo population. The results also showed that patients with filaggrin gene mutations presented lower filaggrin concentrations measured using the vector correlation of their skin Raman spectra and a fixed spectrum of pure human recombinant filaggrin, these results indicate that Raman spectroscopy may be used as a noninvasive tool to detect FLG gene mutations. PMID:22162825

  12. Mutation in δ-Sg Gene in Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Marzieh; Foo, Roger; Salehi, Ahmad Reza; Salehi, Rasoul; Samienasab, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mutations in different genes including dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex caused familial dilated cardiomyopathy which is a genetically heterogeneous disease. The δ-SG gene contains nine exons spanning a 433-kb region of genomic DNA. It encodes a 35-kDa, singlepass, and type II transmembrane glycoprotein. Materials and Methods: In this study for the first time in Iran we screened 6 patients of a large family that they had positive family history of MI or sudden death by next generation sequencing method. Results: By employing NGS method we found missense mutation (p.R97Q) of δ-SG gene in 2 of 6 patients. Conclusions: The missense mutation (p.R97Q) in familial DCM patients is reported for the first time in Iranian patients with cardiac disease. Although this mutation is already known in other populations in Iran, it is not reported before. PMID:28401079

  13. Mutations in MTP gene in abeta- and hypobeta-lipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Di Leo, Enza; Lancellotti, Sandra; Penacchioni, Junia Y; Cefalù, Angelo B; Averna, Maurizio; Pisciotta, L; Bertolini, Stefano; Calandra, Sebastiano; Gabelli, Carlo; Tarugi, Patrizia

    2005-06-01

    Familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL) and abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) are inherited disorders of apolipoprotein B (apo B)-containing lipoproteins that result from mutations in apo B and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) genes, respectively. Here we report three patients with severe deficiency of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and apo B. Two of them (probands F.A. and P.E.) had clinical and biochemical phenotype consistent with ABL. Proband F.A. was homozygous for a minute deletion/insertion (c.1228delCCCinsT) in exon 9 of MTP gene predicted to cause a truncated MTP protein of 412 amino acids. Proband P. E. was heterozygous for a mutation in intron 9 (IVS9-1G>A), previously reported in an ABL patient. We failed to find the second pathogenic mutation in MTP gene of this patient. No mutations were found in apo B gene. The third proband (D.F.) had a less severe lipoprotein phenotype which was similar to that of heterozygous FHBL and appeared to be inherited as a co-dominant trait. However, he had no mutations in apo B gene. He was found to be a compound heterozygote for two missense mutations (D384A and G661A), involving highly conserved regions of MTP. Since this proband was also homozygous for varepsilon2 allele of apolipoprotein E (apo E), it is likely that his hypobetalipoproteinemia derives from a combined effect of a mild MTP deficiency and homozygosity for apo E2 isoform.

  14. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  15. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  16. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a device used to simultaneously detect and identify a panel of mutations and variants in the CFTR gene. It...

  19. Somatic mutation of immunoglobulin VH6 genes in human infants

    PubMed Central

    Ridings, J; Dinan, L; Williams, R; Roberton, D; Zola, H

    1998-01-01

    Infants respond to antigen by making antibody that is generally of low affinity for antigen. Somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes, and selection of cells expressing mutations with improved affinity for antigen, are the molecular and cellular processes underlying the maturation of antibody affinity. We have reported previously that neonates and infants up to 2 months of age, including individuals undergoing strong immunological challenge, show very few mutated VH6 sequences, with low mutation frequencies in mutated sequences, and little evidence of selection. We have now examined immunoglobulin genes from healthy infants between 2 and 10 months old for mutation and evidence of selection. In this age group, the proportion of VH6 sequences which are mutated and the mutation frequency in mutated sequences increase with age. There is evidence of selection from 6 months old. These results indicate that the process of affinity maturation, which depends on cognate T–B cell interaction and functional germinal centres, is approaching maturity from 6 months old. PMID:9764600

  20. Somatic cell gene mutations in humans: biomarkers for genotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Albertini, R J; Nicklas, J A; O'Neill, J P

    1993-01-01

    Somatic cell gene mutations arising in vivo in humans provide biomarkers for genotoxicity. Four assays, each measuring changes in a different "recorder" gene, are available for detecting mutations of the hemoglobin (Hb) and glycophorin A (gpa) genes in red blood cells and the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) and HLA genes in T-lymphocytes. Mean adult background mutant frequencies have been established; i.e., approximately 4 x 10(-8) (Hb), 5-10 x 10(-6) (hprt), 10-20 x 10(-6) (gpa) and 30 x 10(-6) (HLA). All the assays have now been used in studies of individuals exposed to physical and/or chemical genotoxic agents, and all have shown elevated values following exposures; examples are presented. In addition to quantitation, the lymphocyte assays allow molecular analyses of in vivo mutations, the definition of background and induced mutational spectra, and the search for unique changes for characterizing specific mutagens. The HPRT system currently has the largest database in this regard. Approximately 15% of adult background hprt mutations are due to gross structural alterations (primarily deletions) having random breakpoints; 85% result from "point" changes detected only by sequencing. In contrast, a specific intragenic deletion due to DNA cleavage at specific sites characterizes fetal hprt mutations, implicating a developmental mistake in their genesis. (This kind of developmental mistake in other genes is frequently observed in lymphoid malignancies.) Mutational spectra are just beginning to be defined for induced hprt mutations, e.g., ionizing radiation produces large deletions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8143616

  1. Mutation analysis of the Smad3 gene in human osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun-Yan; Wang, Yan; An, Jing; Mao, Chun-Ming; Hou, Ning; Lv, Ya-Xin; Wang, You-Liang; Cui, Fang; Huang, Min; Yang, Xiao

    2003-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease worldwide. Recent studies have shown that targeted disruption of Smad3 in mouse results in OA. To reveal the possible association between the Smad3 gene mutation and human OA, we employed polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism and sequencing to screen mutations in all nine exons of the Smad3 gene in 32 patients with knee OA and 50 patients with only bone fracture. A missense mutation of the Smad3 gene was found in one patient. The single base mutation located in the linker region of the SMAD3 protein was A --> T change in the position 2 of codon 197 and resulted in an asparagine to isoleucine amino-acid substitution. The expressions of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 in sera of the patient carrying the mutation were higher than other OA patients and controls. This is the first report showing that the Smad3 gene mutations could be associated with the pathogenesis of human OA.

  2. A novel mutation of the fibrillin gene causing Ectopia lentis

    SciTech Connect

    Loennqvist, L.; Kainulainen, K.; Puhakka, L.; Peltonen, L. ); Child, A. ); Peltonen, L. )

    1994-02-01

    Ectopia lentis (EL), a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder, has been genetically linked to the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 (FBN1) in earlier studies. Here, the authors report the first EL mutation in the FBN1 gene confirming that EL is caused by mutations of this gene. So far, several mutations in the FBN1 gene have been reported in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS). EL and MFS are clinically related but distinct conditions with typical manifestations in the ocular and skeletal systems, the fundamental difference between them being the absence of cardiovascular involvement in EL. They report a point mutation, cosegregating with the disease in the described family, that displays EL over four generations. The mutation changes a conserved glutamic acid residue in an EGF-like motif, which is the major structural component of the fibrillin and is repeated throughout the polypeptide. In vitro mutagenetic studies have demonstrated the necessity of an analogous glutamic acid residue for calcium binding in an EGF-like repeat of human factor IX. This provides a possible explanation for the role of this mutation in the disease pathogenesis. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Neurocognitive Profiles in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Gene Mutation Site

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maria Grazia; Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Civati, Federica; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Magri, Francesca; Del Bo, Roberto; Guglieri, Michela; Molteni, Massimo; Turconi, Anna Carla; Bresolin, Nereo

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nonprogressive cognitive impairment is recognized as a common feature in a substantial proportion of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To investigate the possible role of mutations along the dystrophin gene affecting different brain dystrophin isoforms and specific cognitive profiles, 42 school-age children affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, subdivided according to sites of mutations along the dystrophin gene, underwent a battery of tests tapping a wide range of intellectual, linguistic, and neuropsychologic functions. Full-scale intelligence quotient was approximately 1 S.D. below the population average in the whole group of dystrophic children. Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the distal portion of the dystrophin gene (involving the 140-kDa brain protein isoform, called Dp140) were generally more severely affected and expressed different patterns of strengths and impairments, compared with patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the proximal portion of the dystrophin gene (not involving Dp140). Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and distal mutations demonstrated specific impairments in visuospatial functions and visual memory (which seemed intact in proximally mutated patients) and greater impairment in syntactic processing. PMID:22000308

  4. p53 gene mutations in asbestos associated cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, B C; Fu, D C; Miao, Q; Wang, H H; You, B R

    1998-09-01

    The accumulation of mutant p53 protein in cancer cells was observed by immunohistochemistry analysis. DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue. Exons 5, 7 and 8 were amplified and studied by PCR-SSCP and sequencing analysis. Ten cases of asbestos associated cancer tissue were studied, of which five cases had adenocarcinoma, and the other five had mesothelioma, squamous carcinoma, small cell lung cancer, adenosquamous carcinoma and malignant lymphoma respectively. Employing monoclonal antibody PAb1801, five cases were found to be mutant p53 protein positive. Seven cases were found to have mutations by PCR-SSCP. A total of 7 cases (8 mutations) were found to be positive and 4 cases were found to be positive by both of these analyses. Of the 8 mutations found by SSCP analysis, 4(50%, 4/8) were clustered in exon 8. A high mutation frequency was noticed in adenocarcinoma (80%, 4/5). Sequencing analysis on two specimens revealed two hotspot mutations. In codon 234, TAC for tyrosin was mutated to AAC for asparagine by a T to A transversion of the first letter. In codon 273, CGT for arginine was mutated to AGT for serine by a C to A transversion of the first letter. In conclusion, the mutation of p53 gene is common in asbestos associated cancers. However, the mutational spectrum of asbestos associated cancers might be different from that of non-asbestos associated cancers.

  5. Glandular odontogenic cyst: absence of PTCH gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Barreto, D C; De Marco, L; Castro, W H; Gomez, R S

    2001-02-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare jawbone cyst of odontogenic origin. Human patched (PTCH) is a tumour suppressor gene that has been recently associated with signalling pathways during odontogenesis. Recently alterations of this gene were found on sporadic odontogenic keratocysts. This evidence, together with the biological behaviour similarities of both lesions, and the absence of reports on molecular analysis of GOC, led us to hypothesize that PTCH gene mutations may underlie the tumorigenesis of GOC. Therefore the aim of this study was to report one additional case of GOC and investigate the PTCH gene of the cyst. No mutations were found in the splicing and coding regions of the PTCH gene. In conclusion, the PTCH gene does not seem to be involved in GOC pathogenesis.

  6. Prioritization of neurodevelopmental disease genes by discovery of new mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hoischen, Alexander; Krumm, Niklas; Eichler, Evan E.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in genome sequencing technologies have begun to revolutionize neurogenetics allowing the full spectrum of genetic variation to be better understood in relationship to disease. Exome sequencing of hundreds to thousands of samples from patients with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and schizophrenia provide strong evidence of the importance of de novo and gene-disruptive events. There are now several hundred new candidate genes and targeted resequencing technologies that allow screening of dozens of genes in tens of thousands of individuals with high specificity and sensitivity. The decision of which genes to pursue depends on numerous factors including recurrence, prior evidence of overlap with pathogenic copy number variants, the position of the mutation within the protein, the mutational burden among healthy individuals, and membership of the candidate gene within disease-implicated protein networks. We discuss these emerging criteria for gene prioritization and the potential impact on the field of neuroscience. PMID:24866042

  7. Gene mutation-based and specific therapies in precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-04-01

    Precision medicine has been initiated and gains more and more attention from preclinical and clinical scientists. A number of key elements or critical parts in precision medicine have been described and emphasized to establish a systems understanding of precision medicine. The principle of precision medicine is to treat patients on the basis of genetic alterations after gene mutations are identified, although questions and challenges still remain before clinical application. Therapeutic strategies of precision medicine should be considered according to gene mutation, after biological and functional mechanisms of mutated gene expression or epigenetics, or the correspondent protein, are clearly validated. It is time to explore and develop a strategy to target and correct mutated genes by direct elimination, restoration, correction or repair of mutated sequences/genes. Nevertheless, there are still numerous challenges to integrating widespread genomic testing into individual cancer therapies and into decision making for one or another treatment. There are wide-ranging and complex issues to be solved before precision medicine becomes clinical reality. Thus, the precision medicine can be considered as an extension and part of clinical and translational medicine, a new alternative of clinical therapies and strategies, and have an important impact on disease cures and patient prognoses.

  8. RAS gene hot-spot mutations in canine neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Richter, A; Murua Escobar, H; Günther, K; Soller, J T; Winkler, S; Nolte, I; Bullerdiek, J

    2005-01-01

    Point mutations in the cellular homologues HRAS, KRAS2, and NRAS of the viral Harvey and Kirsten rat sarcoma virus oncogenes are commonly involved in the onset of malignancies in humans and other species such as dog, mouse, and rat. Most often, three particular hot-spot codons are affected, with one amino acid exchange being sufficient for the induction of tumor growth. While RAS genes have been shown to play an important role in canine tumors such as non-small lung cell carcinomas, data about RAS mutations in canine fibrosarcomas as well as KRAS2 mutations in canine melanomas is sparse. To increase the number of tumors examined, we recently screened 13 canine fibrosarcomas and 11 canine melanomas for point mutations, particularly within the mutational hot spots. The results were compared to the already existing data from other studies about these tumors in dogs.

  9. SERPINA1 Full-Gene Sequencing Identifies Rare Mutations Not Detected in Targeted Mutation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Graham, Rondell P; Dina, Michelle A; Howe, Sarah C; Butz, Malinda L; Willkomm, Kurt S; Murray, David L; Snyder, Melissa R; Rumilla, Kandelaria M; Halling, Kevin C; Highsmith, W Edward

    2015-11-01

    Genetic α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is characterized by low serum AAT levels and the identification of causal mutations or an abnormal protein. It needs to be distinguished from deficiency because of nongenetic causes, and diagnostic delay may contribute to worse patient outcome. Current routine clinical testing assesses for only the most common mutations. We wanted to determine the proportion of unexplained cases of AAT deficiency that harbor causal mutations not identified through current standard allele-specific genotyping and isoelectric focusing (IEF). All prospective cases from December 1, 2013, to October 1, 2014, with a low serum AAT level not explained by allele-specific genotyping and IEF were assessed through full-gene sequencing with a direct sequencing method for pathogenic mutations. We reviewed the results using American Council of Medical Genetics criteria. Of 3523 cases, 42 (1.2%) met study inclusion criteria. Pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations not identified through clinical testing were detected through full-gene sequencing in 16 (38%) of the 42 cases. Rare mutations not detected with current allele-specific testing and IEF underlie a substantial proportion of genetic AAT deficiency. Full-gene sequencing, therefore, has the ability to improve accuracy in the diagnosis of AAT deficiency. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Runaway telomere elongation caused by telomerase RNA gene mutations.

    PubMed

    McEachern, M J; Blackburn, E H

    1995-08-03

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase adds telomeric DNA onto chromosome ends and is normally regulated so that telomeric DNA lengths are kept within defined bounds. In the telomerase RNA gene from the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, specific mutations that alter telomeric DNA sequences result in telomeres elongating to up to 100 times their normal length and impair cell growth. Some mutations cause immediate elongation whereas others behave like genetic time bombs, causing elongation only after a latent period of hundreds of generations.

  11. GPR143 gene mutation analysis in pediatric patients with albinism.

    PubMed

    Trebušak Podkrajšek, Katarina; Stirn Kranjc, Branka; Hovnik, Tinka; Kovač, Jernej; Battelino, Tadej

    2012-09-01

    X-linked ocular albinism type 1 is difficult to differentiate clinically from other forms of albinism in young patients. X-linked ocular albinism type 1 is caused by mutations in the GPR143 gene, encoding melanosome specific G-protein coupled receptor. Patients typically present with moderately to severely reduced visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus, photophobia, iris translucency, hypopigmentation of the retina, foveal hypoplasia and misrouting of optic nerve fibers at the chiasm. Following clinical ophthalmological evaluation, GPR143 gene mutational analyses were performed in a cohort of 15 pediatric male patients with clinical signs of albinism. Three different mutations in the GPR143 gene were identified in four patients, including a novel c.886G>A (p.Gly296Arg) mutation occurring "de novo" and a novel intronic c.360 + 5G>A mutation, identified in two related boys. Four patients with X-linked ocular albinism type 1 were identified from a cohort of 15 boys with clinical signs of albinism using mutation detection methods. Genetic analysis offers the possibility of early definitive diagnosis of ocular albinism type 1 in a significant portion of boys with clinical signs of albinism.

  12. Optimization of Gene Expression through Divergent Mutational Paths

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsin-Hung; Marx, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Adaptation under similar selective pressure often leads to comparable phenotypes. A longstanding question is whether such phenotypic repeatability entails similar (parallelism) or different genotypic changes (convergence). To better understand this, we characterized mutations that optimized expression of a plasmid-borne metabolic pathway during laboratory evolution of a bacterium. Expressing these pathway genes was essential for growth but came with substantial costs. Starting from overexpression, replicate populations founded by this bacterium all evolved to reduce expression. Despite this phenotypic repetitiveness, the underlying mutational spectrum was highly diverse. Analysis of these plasmid mutations identified three distinct means to modulate gene expression: (1) reducing the gene copy number, (2) lowering transcript stability, and (3) integration of the pathway-bearing plasmid into the host genome. Our study revealed diverse molecular changes beneath convergence to a simple phenotype. This complex genotype-phenotype mapping presents a challenge to inferring genetic evolution based solely on phenotypic changes. PMID:22832162

  13. Frequent mutations in chromatin-remodelling genes in pulmonary carcinoids.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Cuesta, Lynnette; Peifer, Martin; Lu, Xin; Sun, Ruping; Ozretić, Luka; Seidal, Danila; Zander, Thomas; Leenders, Frauke; George, Julie; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Pinther, Berit; Bosco, Graziella; Konrad, Kathryn; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Schneider, Peter M; Bogus, Magdalena; Soltermann, Alex; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug; Solberg, Steinar; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Ansén, Sascha; Stoelben, Erich; Wright, Gavin M; Russell, Prudence; Wainer, Zoe; Solomon, Benjamin; Field, John K; Hyde, Russell; Davies, Michael Pa; Heukamp, Lukas C; Petersen, Iver; Perner, Sven; Lovly, Christine; Cappuzzo, Federico; Travis, William D; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Haas, Stefan A; Buettner, Reinhard; Thomas, Roman K

    2014-03-27

    Pulmonary carcinoids are rare neuroendocrine tumours of the lung. The molecular alterations underlying the pathogenesis of these tumours have not been systematically studied so far. Here we perform gene copy number analysis (n=54), genome/exome (n=44) and transcriptome (n=69) sequencing of pulmonary carcinoids and observe frequent mutations in chromatin-remodelling genes. Covalent histone modifiers and subunits of the SWI/SNF complex are mutated in 40 and 22.2% of the cases, respectively, with MEN1, PSIP1 and ARID1A being recurrently affected. In contrast to small-cell lung cancer and large-cell neuroendocrine lung tumours, TP53 and RB1 mutations are rare events, suggesting that pulmonary carcinoids are not early progenitor lesions of the highly aggressive lung neuroendocrine tumours but arise through independent cellular mechanisms. These data also suggest that inactivation of chromatin-remodelling genes is sufficient to drive transformation in pulmonary carcinoids.

  14. Activating GNAS1 gene mutations in patients with premature thelarche.

    PubMed

    Román, Rossana; Johnson, Mara Cecilia; Codner, Ethel; Boric, Mara Angélica; áVila, Alejandra; Cassorla, Fernando

    2004-08-01

    To identify GNAS1 gene mutations in girls with exaggerated and/or chronic fluctuating thelarche for at least 1-year duration with no other signs of precocious puberty, skeletal dysplasia, or typical skin lesions of McCune-Albright syndrome. We studied the GNAS1 gene mutation by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction and enzymatic digestion in leukocyte DNA in 23 girls previously described. Fluctuating thelarche was present in 14 girls and exaggerated thelarche was observed in 9. Molecular study revealed that 6 girls had a substitution of arginine by histidine in codon 201 (R201H [+]). Three R201H (+) girls reached their menarche at a mean chronologic age of 10.8 years and 9 of the R201H (-) girls at a mean age of 11 years. Activating mutations of GNAS1 gene may be observed in some girls with chronic fluctuating and/or exaggerated thelarche, without other classic signs of McCune-Albright syndrome.

  15. An enhancer trap screen for ecdysone-inducible genes required for Drosophila adult leg morphogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Gates, J; Thummel, C S

    2000-01-01

    Although extensive studies of Drosophila imaginal disc development have focused on proliferation and patterning, relatively little is known about how the patterned imaginal discs are transformed into adult structures during metamorphosis. Studies focused primarily on leg development have shown that this remarkable transformation is coordinated by pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone and requires the function of ecdysone-inducible transcription factors as well as proteases and components of the contractile cytoskeleton and adherens junctions. Here, we describe a genetic screen aimed at expanding our understanding of the hormonal regulation of Drosophila adult leg morphogenesis. We screened 1300 lethal P-element enhancer trap insertions on the second chromosome for a series of sequential parameters including pupal lethality, defects in leg morphogenesis, and ecdysone-induced lacZ reporter gene expression. From this screen we identified four mutations, one of which corresponds to bancal, which encodes the Drosophila homolog of hnRNP K. We also identified vulcan, which encodes a protein that shares sequence similarity with a family of rat SAPAP proteins. Both bancal and vulcan are inducible by ecdysone, thus linking the hormone signal with leg morphogenesis. This screen provides new directions for understanding the hormonal regulation of leg development during Drosophila metamorphosis. PMID:11102372

  16. Sudden infant death syndrome and activating GNAS1 gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Román, Rossana; López, Patricia; Johnson, María Cecilia; Boric, María Angélica; Gallo, Miriam; Ponce, Carolina; Vargas, Sergio; Codner, Ethel; Cassorla, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    GNAS1 gene mutations cause the McCune-Albright syndrome. Some patients may develop unusual, severe, nonendocrine manifestations that may lead to death. We postulate that some cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) might be caused by GNAS1 gene mutations affecting vital organs. We studied two GNAS1 gene mutations (R201H and R201C) by allele specific PCR and enzymatic digestion in pulmonary, pancreas, liver, kidney, and heart tissue from 29 infants who suffered SIDS. The infants died at age 96 +/- 78 days. At the time of death, children had a height Z score of -0,04 +/- 0,95, a weight Z score of 0,04 +/- 0,91, and a weight for length Z score of 0,1 +/- 0,83. The molecular study by both techniques did not reveal any GNAS1 mutations in the tissues examined. We conclude that GNAS1 gene mutations do not appear to be present in tissues of infants with SIDS.

  17. ATM gene mutations in sporadic breast cancer patients from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mangone, Flavia Rotea; Miracca, Elisabete C; Feilotter, Harriet E; Mulligan, Lois M; Nagai, Maria Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    The Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene encodes a multifunctional kinase, which is linked to important cellular functions. Women heterozygous for ATM mutations have an estimated relative risk of developing breast cancer of 3.8. However, the pattern of ATM mutations and their role in breast cancer etiology has been controversial and remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the frequency and spectrum of ATM mutations in a series of sporadic breast cancers and controls from the Brazilian population. Using PCR-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and direct DNA sequencing, we screened a panel of 100 consecutive, unselected sporadic breast tumors and 100 matched controls for all 62 coding exons and flanking introns of the ATM gene. Several polymorphisms were detected in 12 of the 62 coding exons of the ATM gene. These polymorphisms were observed in both breast cancer patients and the control population. In addition, evidence of potential ATM mutations was observed in 7 of the 100 breast cancer cases analyzed. These potential mutations included six missense variants found in exon 13 (p.L546V), exon 14 (p.P604S), exon 20 (p.T935R), exon 42 (p.G2023R), exon 49 (p.L2307F), and exon 50 (p.L2332P) and one nonsense mutation in exon 39 (p.R1882X), which was predicted to generate a truncated protein. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that sporadic breast tumors may occur in carriers of low penetrance ATM mutant alleles and these mutations confer different levels of breast cancer risk.

  18. Gene-Specific Function Prediction for Non-Synonymous Mutations in Monogenic Diabetes Genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quan; Liu, Xiaoming; Gibbs, Richard A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Polychronakos, Constantin; Qu, Hui-Qi

    2014-01-01

    The rapid progress of genomic technologies has been providing new opportunities to address the need of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) molecular diagnosis. However, whether a new mutation causes MODY can be questionable. A number of in silico methods have been developed to predict functional effects of rare human mutations. The purpose of this study is to compare the performance of different bioinformatics methods in the functional prediction of nonsynonymous mutations in each MODY gene, and provides reference matrices to assist the molecular diagnosis of MODY. Our study showed that the prediction scores by different methods of the diabetes mutations were highly correlated, but were more complimentary than replacement to each other. The available in silico methods for the prediction of diabetes mutations had varied performances across different genes. Applying gene-specific thresholds defined by this study may be able to increase the performance of in silico prediction of disease-causing mutations. PMID:25136813

  19. Mutation analysis of the FRAS1 gene demonstrates new mutations in a propositus with Fraser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Slavotinek, A; Li, C; Sherr, E H; Chudley, A E

    2006-09-15

    Fraser syndrome (OMIM 219000) is a rare, autosomal recessive condition with classical features of cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, ambiguous genitalia, laryngeal, and genitourinary malformations, oral clefting and mental retardation. Mutations causing loss of function of the FRAS1 gene have been demonstrated in five patients with Fraser syndrome. However, no phenotype-genotype correlation was established and there was evidence for genetic heterogeneity. Fraser syndrome is rare and the FRAS1 gene has 75 exons, complicating mutation screening in affected patients. We have screened two patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for Fraser syndrome and three patients with related phenotypes (two patients with Manitoba oculotrichoanal syndrome and one patient with unilateral cryptophthalmos and labial fusion) for mutations in FRAS1 to increase the molecular genetic data in patients with Fraser syndrome and related conditions. We report two new mutations in a patient with Fraser syndrome, a frameshift mutation and a deletion of two amino acids that we consider pathogenic as both alter the NG2-like domain of the protein. Although we are still unable to clarify a phenotype-genotype relationship in Fraser syndrome, our data add to the list of mutations associated with this syndrome.

  20. Selection for distinct gene expression properties favours the evolution of mutational robustness in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Soto, C

    2016-11-01

    Mutational robustness is a genotype's tendency to keep a phenotypic trait with little and few changes in the face of mutations. Mutational robustness is both ubiquitous and evolutionarily important as it affects in different ways the probability that new phenotypic variation arises. Understanding the origins of robustness is specially relevant for systems of development that are phylogenetically widespread and that construct phenotypic traits with a strong impact on fitness. Gene regulatory networks are examples of this class of systems. They comprise sets of genes that, through cross-regulation, build the gene activity patterns that define cellular responses, different tissues or distinct cell types. Several empirical observations, such as a greater robustness of wild-type phenotypes, suggest that stabilizing selection underlies the evolution of mutational robustness. However, the role of selection in the evolution of robustness is still under debate. Computer simulations of the dynamics and evolution of gene regulatory networks have shown that selection for any gene activity pattern that is steady and self-sustaining is sufficient to promote the evolution of mutational robustness. Here, I generalize this scenario using a computational model to show that selection for different aspects of a gene activity phenotype increases mutational robustness. Mutational robustness evolves even when selection favours properties that conflict with the stationarity of a gene activity pattern. The results that I present support an important role for stabilizing selection in the evolution of robustness in gene regulatory networks.

  1. Novel mutations in the SLC26A4 gene.

    PubMed

    Busi, Micol; Castiglione, Alessandro; Taddei Masieri, Marina; Ravani, Anna; Guaran, Valeria; Astolfi, Laura; Trevisi, Patrizia; Ferlini, Alessandra; Martini, Alessandro

    2012-09-01

    Mutations in the SLC26A4 gene (7q22.3-7q31.1) are considered one of the most common causes of genetic hearing loss. There are two clinical forms related to these mutations: syndromic and non-syndromic deafness. The first one is named Pendred Syndrome (PS) when deafness is associated with thyroid goiter; the second is called DFNB4, when no other symptoms are present. Both are transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait, but simple heterozygotes can develop both forms of deafness. Actually it is thought that Pendred Syndrome occurs when both alleles of SLC26A4 gene are mutated; DFNB4 seems due to monoallelic mutations. PS and DFNB4 can be associated with inner ear malformations. In most of the cases (around 80%), these consist in Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct (EVA). EVA can also be present without SLC26A4 mutations. Understanding the role of new SLC26A4 variants should facilitate clinical assessment, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. This investigation aims to detect and report genetic causes of two unrelated Italian boys with hearing loss. Patients and family members underwent clinical, audiological and genetic evaluations. To identify genetic mutations, DNA sequencing of SLC26A4 gene (including all 21 exons, exon-intron boundaries and promoter region) was carried out. Both probands were affected by congenital, progressive and fluctuating mixed hearing loss. Temporal bone imaging revealed a bilateral EVA with no other abnormalities in both cases. Probands were heterozygotes for previously undescribed mutations in the SLC26A4 gene: R409H/IVS2+1delG (proband 1) and L236P/K590X (proband 2). No other mutations were detected in GJB2, GJB6 genes or mitochondrial DNA (mit-DNA). The IVS2+1delG and K590X mutations have not yet been described in literature but there is some evidence to suggest that they have a pathological role. The results underlined the importance of considering the complete DNA sequencing of the SLC26A4 gene for differential molecular

  2. Law-medicine interfacing: patenting of human genes and mutations.

    PubMed

    Fialho, Arsenio M; Chakrabarty, Ananda M

    2011-08-01

    Mutations, Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), deletions and genetic rearrangements in specific genes in the human genome account for not only our physical characteristics and behavior, but can lead to many in-born and acquired diseases. Such changes in the genome can also predispose people to cancers, as well as significantly affect the metabolism and efficacy of many drugs, resulting in some cases in acute toxicity to the drug. The testing of the presence of such genetic mutations and rearrangements is of great practical and commercial value, leading many of these genes and their mutations/deletions and genetic rearrangements to be patented. A recent decision by a judge in the Federal District Court in the Southern District of New York, has created major uncertainties, based on the revocation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene patents, in the eligibility of all human and presumably other gene patents. This article argues that while patents on BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes could be challenged based on a lack of utility, the patenting of the mutations and genetic rearrangements is of great importance to further development and commercialization of genetic tests that can save human lives and prevent suffering, and should be allowed.

  3. Management of Individuals With a Mutation in the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Gene.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Suzanne M

    2016-01-01

    Advances in genetic testing have led to the identification of multiple genes associated with a hereditary risk for developing breast and other cancers. One such gene is the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, which is available on many genetic panels offered to individuals with suspected hereditary risk. Genetic testing can often lead to improved understanding and clarification of risk for developing cancer, as well as allow affected individuals to make informed choices about management, including the adoption of primary prevention strategies and more aggressive screening than typically recommended in the general population. This article provides an overview of the role of mutations in the ATM gene in developing malignancies, along with emerging research on treatment implications based on genetic testing results.
.

  4. New mutations identified in the ocular albinism type 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Roma, Cristin; Ferrante, Paola; Guardiola, Ombretta; Ballabio, Andrea; Zollo, Massimo

    2007-11-01

    As the most common form of ocular albinism, ocular albinism type I (OA1) is an X-linked disorder that has an estimated prevalence of about 1:50,000. We searched for mutations through the human genome sequence draft by direct sequencing on eighteen patients with OA1, both within the coding region and in a thousand base pairs upstream of its start site. Here, we have identified eight new mutations located in the coding region of the gene. Two independent mutations, both located in the most carboxyterminal protein regions, were further characterized by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, thus showing an impairment in their subcellular distribution into the lysosomal compartment of Cos-7A cells. The mutations found can result in protein misfolding, thus underlining the importance of the structure-function relationships of the protein as a major pathogenic mechanism in ocular albinism. Seven individuals out of eighteen (38.9%) with a clinical diagnosis of ocular albinism showed mutations, thus underlining the discrepancies between the clinical phenotype features and their genotype correlations. We postulate that mutations that have not yet been identified are potentially located in non-coding conserved regions or regulatory sequences of the OA1 gene.

  5. An inherited LMNA gene mutation in atypical Progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Doubaj, Yassamine; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Vera, Esteves-Vieira; Navarro, Claire Laure; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Tajir, Mariam; Lévy, Nicolas; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2012-11-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder, characterized by several clinical features that begin in early childhood, recalling an accelerated aging process. The diagnosis of HGPS is based on the recognition of common clinical features and detection of the recurrent heterozygous c.1824C>T (p.Gly608Gly) mutation within exon 11 in the Lamin A/C encoding gene (LMNA). Besides "typical HGPS," several "atypical progeria" syndromes (APS) have been described, in a clinical spectrum ranging from mandibuloacral dysplasia to atypical Werner syndrome. These patients's clinical features include progeroid manifestations, such as short stature, prominent nose, premature graying of hair, partial alopecia, skin atrophy, lipodystrophy, skeletal anomalies, such as mandibular hypoplasia and acroosteolyses, and in some cases severe atherosclerosis with metabolic complications. APS are due in several cases to de novo heterozygous LMNA mutations other than the p.Gly608Gly, or due to homozygous BAFN1 mutations in Nestor-Guillermo Progeria syndrome (NGPS). We report here and discuss the observation of a non-consanguineous Moroccan patient presenting with atypical progeria. The molecular studies showed the heterozygous mutation c.412G>A (p.Glu138Lys) of the LMNA gene. This mutation, previously reported as a de novo mutation, was inherited from the apparently healthy father who showed a somatic cell mosaicism.

  6. Update of the androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1999-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 309 to 374 during the past year. We have expanded the database by adding information on AR-interacting proteins; and we have improved the database by identifying those mutation entries that have been updated. Mutations of unknown significance have now been reported in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the AR gene, and in individuals who are somatic mosaics constitutionally. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms, including silent mutations, have been discovered in normal individuals and in individuals with male infertility. A mutation hotspot associated with prostatic cancer has been identified in exon 5. The database is available on the internet (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca). Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Gene mutations and actionable genetic lesions in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Makhdum; Zhang, Leo; Nomie, Krystle; Lam, Laura; Wang, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mutations and epigenetic alterations are key events in transforming normal cells to cancer cells. Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the B-cell, is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis especially for those patients who are resistant to the frontline drugs. There is a great need to describe the molecular basis and mechanism of drug resistance in MCL to develop new strategies for treatment. We reviewed frequent somatic mutations and mutations involving the B-cell pathways in MCL and discussed clinical trials that attempted to disrupt these gene pathways and/or epigenetic events. Recurrent gene mutations were discussed in the light of prognostic and therapeutic opportunity and also the challenges of targeting these lesions. Mutations in the ATM, CCND1, TP53, MLL2, TRAF2 and NOTCH1 were most frequently encountered in mantle cell lymphoma. Translational models should be built that would assess mutations longitudinally to identify important compensatory, pro-survival and anti-apoptic pathways and actionable genetic targets. PMID:27449094

  8. Characterization of the mouse tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S V; Hundley, J E; Windle, J J; Alcantara, O; Linn, R; Leach, R J; Boldt, D H; Roodman, G D

    1995-04-01

    Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) is an iron-binding protein that is highly expressed in osteoclasts. To characterize the regulation of TRAP gene expression, progressive 5' and 3' deletions of a 1.8 kb fragment containing the 5'-flanking sequence were fused to a luciferase reporter gene. Two nonoverlapping regions of this 1.8 kb fragment had promoter activity. The upstream promoter (P1) was located within the region from -881 bp to -463 bp relative to the ATG, while the downstream promoter (P2) was located between -363 bp to -1 bp in a region we have previously shown to be an intron in transcripts originating from the upstream promoter. A putative repressor region for the P2 promoter at -1846 bp to -1240 bp and a putative enhancer region at -962 bp to -881 bp relative to the ATG were identified. PCR analysis of promoter-specific transcription of the TRAP gene in various murine tissues showed that both promoters were active in several tissues. Transferrin-bound iron increased P1 promoter activity 2.5-fold and hemin decreased P1 promoter activity, but neither had any effect on P2 activity. These data show that the transcriptional regulation of the TRAP gene is complex and that iron may play a key role in TRAP gene regulation.

  9. [Gliomas and BRCA genes mutations: fortuitous association or imputability?].

    PubMed

    Girardstein-Boccara, Laura; Mari, Véronique; Met-Domestici, Marie; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Berthet, Pascaline; Paquis, Philippe; Frenay, Marc Paul; Lebrun-Frenay, Christine

    2014-09-01

    BRCA is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the major mechanisms of cellular stability in every type of cell. Its mutations are described in numerous cancers, mainly breast and ovarian in women. It was also found an increase of lifetime risk of pancreas, colon, prostate cancer or lymphoma in men carriers. We report the cases of two female patients aged 40 and 58-years-old female patients and one 35-years-old male patient, with brain or medullar gliomas, carriers of a germline mutation of BRCA gene. Those gliomas were particularly aggressive and were not responding to the standard treatment, with chemo and radiotherapy. The very unusual characteristics in location and evolutive profile of these central nervous system tumors raise the question of a genetical underlying mechanism, maybe linked to the BRCA gene mutation that carry these patients. In addition, a non-fortuitous association between germline mutation of BRCA and occurrence of a glioma can be evoked according to the embryological, epidemiological and biomolecular findings noted in the literature. Other clinical and experimental studies are necessary to precise the physiopathological link existing between BRCA mutations and the occurrence of a glioma; this could have therapeutical and clinical implications in the future.

  10. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  11. A human haploid gene trap collection to study lncRNAs with unusual RNA biology.

    PubMed

    Kornienko, Aleksandra E; Vlatkovic, Irena; Neesen, Jürgen; Barlow, Denise P; Pauler, Florian M

    2016-01-01

    Many thousand long non-coding (lnc) RNAs are mapped in the human genome. Time consuming studies using reverse genetic approaches by post-transcriptional knock-down or genetic modification of the locus demonstrated diverse biological functions for a few of these transcripts. The Human Gene Trap Mutant Collection in haploid KBM7 cells is a ready-to-use tool for studying protein-coding gene function. As lncRNAs show remarkable differences in RNA biology compared to protein-coding genes, it is unclear if this gene trap collection is useful for functional analysis of lncRNAs. Here we use the uncharacterized LOC100288798 lncRNA as a model to answer this question. Using public RNA-seq data we show that LOC100288798 is ubiquitously expressed, but inefficiently spliced. The minor spliced LOC100288798 isoforms are exported to the cytoplasm, whereas the major unspliced isoform is nuclear localized. This shows that LOC100288798 RNA biology differs markedly from typical mRNAs. De novo assembly from RNA-seq data suggests that LOC100288798 extends 289kb beyond its annotated 3' end and overlaps the downstream SLC38A4 gene. Three cell lines with independent gene trap insertions in LOC100288798 were available from the KBM7 gene trap collection. RT-qPCR and RNA-seq confirmed successful lncRNA truncation and its extended length. Expression analysis from RNA-seq data shows significant deregulation of 41 protein-coding genes upon LOC100288798 truncation. Our data shows that gene trap collections in human haploid cell lines are useful tools to study lncRNAs, and identifies the previously uncharacterized LOC100288798 as a potential gene regulator.

  12. [Gene diagnosis and genetic counselling of Rb gene mutations in retinoblastoma patients and their family members].

    PubMed

    Huang, Q; Dryja, T P; Yandell, D W

    1998-04-10

    To develop a diagnostic test for direct identification of disease-causing mutation in the patients with retinoblastoma and correct prediction of carrier- status in unaffected adults and newborns in the RB kindred. Southern blot hybridized by Rb cDNA and other intragenic probes were used to detect big deletions or rearrangements at Rb gene locus. SSCP analysis and direct sequencing of primer-directed enzymatic amplification to identify point mutations as small as a single nucleotide change. RFLPs and VNTRs within the Rb gene were used as genetic markers for haplotype analysis. The probands from 79 RB kindreds were identified to have Rb gene mutation, including 25 somatic mutations and 54 germline mutations (36 new germline mutations, 15 inherited mutations and 3 mosaicisms). The WBC DNAs from their family members were also analyzed for determining origin and carrier of mutation. The direct identification of causing- cancer mutations by combining SSCP analysis and direct DNA sequencing showed many advantages than other indirect methods such as haplotype analysis. It can distinguish hereditary RB from nonhereditary RB and identify the unaffected carriers without family history and informes affected family member. This method is helpful in gene diagnosis and genetic counselling.

  13. Identification of Constrained Cancer Driver Genes Based on Mutation Timing

    PubMed Central

    Sakoparnig, Thomas; Fried, Patrick; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2015-01-01

    Cancer drivers are genomic alterations that provide cells containing them with a selective advantage over their local competitors, whereas neutral passengers do not change the somatic fitness of cells. Cancer-driving mutations are usually discriminated from passenger mutations by their higher degree of recurrence in tumor samples. However, there is increasing evidence that many additional driver mutations may exist that occur at very low frequencies among tumors. This observation has prompted alternative methods for driver detection, including finding groups of mutually exclusive mutations and incorporating prior biological knowledge about gene function or network structure. Dependencies among drivers due to epistatic interactions can also result in low mutation frequencies, but this effect has been ignored in driver detection so far. Here, we present a new computational approach for identifying genomic alterations that occur at low frequencies because they depend on other events. Unlike passengers, these constrained mutations display punctuated patterns of occurrence in time. We test this driver–passenger discrimination approach based on mutation timing in extensive simulation studies, and we apply it to cross-sectional copy number alteration (CNA) data from ovarian cancer, CNA and single-nucleotide variant (SNV) data from breast tumors and SNV data from colorectal cancer. Among the top ranked predicted drivers, we find low-frequency genes that have already been shown to be involved in carcinogenesis, as well as many new candidate drivers. The mutation timing approach is orthogonal and complementary to existing driver prediction methods. It will help identifying from cancer genome data the alterations that drive tumor progression. PMID:25569148

  14. Mutations in the deubiquitinase gene USP8 cause Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Reincke, Martin; Sbiera, Silviu; Hayakawa, Akira; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Osswald, Andrea; Beuschlein, Felix; Meitinger, Thomas; Mizuno-Yamasaki, Emi; Kawaguchi, Kohei; Saeki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Wieland, Thomas; Graf, Elisabeth; Saeger, Wolfgang; Ronchi, Cristina L; Allolio, Bruno; Buchfelder, Michael; Strom, Tim M; Fassnacht, Martin; Komada, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's disease is caused by corticotroph adenomas of the pituitary. To explore the molecular mechanisms of endocrine autonomy in these tumors, we performed exome sequencing of 10 corticotroph adenomas. We found somatic mutations in the USP8 deubiquitinase gene in 4 of 10 adenomas. The mutations clustered in the 14-3-3 protein binding motif and enhanced the proteolytic cleavage and catalytic activity of USP8. Cleavage of USP8 led to increased deubiqutination of the EGF receptor, impairing its downregulation and sustaining EGF signaling. USP8 mutants enhanced promoter activity of the gene encoding proopiomelanocortin. In summary, our data show that dominant mutations in USP8 cause Cushing's disease via activation of EGF receptor signaling.

  15. [Fibrinogen beta chain gene mutation contributes to one congenital afibrinogenemia].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiu-cai; Zhou, Rong-fu; Wu, Jing-sheng; Fang, Yi; Wang, Xue-feng; Zhai, Zhi-min; Wang, Hong-li

    2005-03-01

    To identify the fibrinogen (Fg) gene mutations in a Chinese pedigree of congenital afibrinogenemia. The plasma Fg activity and protein of the proband and his family members were detected. Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells. All the exons and exon-intron boundaries of fibrinogen gene were amplified by PCR and sequenced thereafter. Two mutations, 7972 del G in FGB and T2543A in FGG, were found in the proband. FGG2543 is a polymorphism site, which lead to the polymorphism of gamma144 I/K. The G deletion at base 7972 of FGB contributes to the frameshift mutation after amino acid 419, resulting in the truncated beta chain without the terminal 27 amino acids. The latter may contributes to the pathogenetic mechanisms in Chinese congenital afibrinogenemia patients. The G deletion at base 7972 of FGB is identified for the first time.

  16. Mutability and mutational spectrum of chromosome transmission fidelity genes.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Peter C; Crisp, Matthew J; Basrai, Munira A; Tucker, Cheryl M; Dunham, Maitreya J; Spencer, Forrest A; Hieter, Philip

    2012-06-01

    It has been more than two decades since the original chromosome transmission fidelity (Ctf) screen of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was published. Since that time the spectrum of mutations known to cause Ctf and, more generally, chromosome instability (CIN) has expanded dramatically as a result of systematic screens across yeast mutant arrays. Here we describe a comprehensive summary of the original Ctf genetic screen and the cloning of the remaining complementation groups as efforts to expand our knowledge of the CIN gene repertoire and its mutability in a model eukaryote. At the time of the original screen, it was impossible to predict either the genes and processes that would be overrepresented in a pool of random mutants displaying a Ctf phenotype or what the entire set of genes potentially mutable to Ctf would be. We show that in a collection of 136 randomly selected Ctf mutants, >65% of mutants map to 13 genes, 12 of which are involved in sister chromatid cohesion and/or kinetochore function. Extensive screening of systematic mutant collections has shown that ~350 genes with functions as diverse as RNA processing and proteasomal activity mutate to cause a Ctf phenotype and at least 692 genes are required for faithful chromosome segregation. The enrichment of random Ctf alleles in only 13 of ~350 possible Ctf genes suggests that these genes are more easily mutable to cause genome instability than the others. These observations inform our understanding of recurring CIN mutations in human cancers where presumably random mutations are responsible for initiating the frequently observed CIN phenotype of tumors.

  17. A new strategy of gene trapping in ES cells using 3'RACE.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M; Yagi, T; Furuta, Y; Takayanagi, K; Kominami, R; Takeda, N; Tokunaga, T; Chiba, J; Ikawa, Y; Aizawa, S

    1995-07-01

    "Gene trapping" in embryonic stem (ES) cells is a novel approach to identify a series of genes in mammals concomitant with the production of the corresponding mutant mice. However, this approach is currently unable to identify genes that are not expressed in ES cells. Here we describe a strategy to identify gene trapping clones which is not based on expression of a reporter gene. It uses the neor gene which lacks a polyadenylation signal and has a splice donor signal. Expression of the neor gene as fusion transcripts with the 3' end containing the polyadenylation signal of tagged genes allows the identification of these clones by 3' rapid amplification of the cDNA end in undifferentiated ES cells, even if the genes are not expressed in ES cells. Amplification was observed in about 25% of G418-resistant clones. Sequence analyses suggested the amplifications represent gene trapping events. The feasibility of this approach was further assessed by analysing one clone, PAT-12, in detail.

  18. Detection of driver pathways using mutated gene network in cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Gao, Lin; Ma, Xiaoke; Yang, Xiaofei

    2016-06-21

    Distinguishing driver pathways has been extensively studied because they are critical for understanding the development and molecular mechanisms of cancers. Most existing methods for driver pathways are based on high coverage as well as high mutual exclusivity, with the underlying assumption that mutations are exclusive. However, in many cases, mutated driver genes in the same pathways are not strictly mutually exclusive. Based on this observation, we propose an index for quantifying mutual exclusivity between gene pairs. Then, we construct a mutated gene network for detecting driver pathways by integrating the proposed index and coverage. The detection of driver pathways on the mutated gene network consists of two steps: raw pathways are obtained using a CPM method, and the final driver pathways are selected using a strict testing strategy. We apply this method to glioblastoma and breast cancers and find that our method is more accurate than state-of-the-art methods in terms of enrichment of KEGG pathways. Furthermore, the detected driver pathways intersect with well-known pathways with moderate exclusivity, which cannot be discovered using the existing algorithms. In conclusion, the proposed method provides an effective way to investigate driver pathways in cancers.

  19. Detecting gene mutations in Japanese Alzheimer's patients by semiconductor sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Ryoichi; Miyamoto, Ryosuke; Morino, Hiroyuki; Izumi, Yuishin; Kuramochi, Masahito; Kurashige, Takashi; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Mizuno, Noriyoshi; Kurihara, Hidemi; Kawakami, Hideshi

    2014-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. To date, several genes have been identified as the cause of AD, including PSEN1, PSEN2, and APP. The association between APOE and late-onset AD has also been reported. We here used a bench top next-generation sequencer, which uses an integrated semiconductor device, detects hydrogen ions, and operates at a high-speed using nonoptical technology. We examined 45 Japanese AD patients with positive family histories, and 29 sporadic patients with early onset (<60-year-old). Causative mutations were detected in 5 patients in the familial group (11%). Three patients had a known heterozygous missense mutation in the PSEN1 gene (p.H163R). Two patients from 1 family had a novel heterozygous missense mutation in the PSEN1 gene (p.F386L). In the early onset group, 1 patient carrying homozygous APOEε4 had a novel heterozygous missense mutation in the PSEN2 gene (p.T421M). Approximately 43% patients were APOEε4 positive in our study. This new sequencing technology is useful for detecting genetic variations in familial AD.

  20. GJB2 gene mutations causing familial hereditary deafness in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bayazit, Yildirim A; Cable, Benjamin B; Cataloluk, Osman; Kara, Cengiz; Chamberlin, Parker; Smith, Richard J H; Kanlikama, Muzaffer; Ozer, Enver; Cakmak, Ecir Ali; Mumbuc, Semih; Arslan, Ahmet

    2003-12-01

    Mutations in Connexin 26 (Cx26) play an important role in autosomal non-syndromic hereditary hearing loss. In this study, our objective was to find out the significance of Cx26 mutations in Turkish families who had hereditary deafness. Fourteen families who had at least two prelingually deaf children per family were included in the study. One affected child from each of the 14 families was selected for single-stranded conformational polymorphism SSCP analysis. Three PCR reactions were used for each subject to amplify the entire Cx26 coding region with overlap. PCR products were sequenced on an Applied Biosystems (ABI) model 3700 automated sequencer. Six of the 14 representative family members (42.9%) demonstrated shifts on SSCP and were subsequently sequenced for Exons 1 and 2 of GJB2 and were tested for the 432 kb upstream deletion. No mutations were found in Exon 1 and no 432 kb deletions were noted. Three different GJB2 mutations were found in Exon 2 of the probands, which were 35delG, 299-300delAT, and 487G > A (M163V). GJB2 mutations were detected in 21.4% of the families. Two patients were homozygous for 35delG and 299-300delAT mutations, and were given a diagnosis of DFNB1 deafness (14.3%). Two different polymorphisms, 457G > A (V153I) and 380G > AG (R127H) were also found. In conclusion, although GJB2 mutations were detected in 21.4% of the families tested, only 14.3% of subject representatives were homozygous and therefore deafness caused by Cx26 mutation segregated with DFNB1. Thus, contribution of GJB2 mutations appears less significant in familial deafness. This necessitates further assessment for the other known gene regions as well as a search for new genetic factors in familial type of genetic deafness.

  1. A Tie2-driven BAC-TRAP transgenic line for in vivo endothelial gene profiling

    PubMed Central

    Santhosh, Devi; Huang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological innovations including bacterial artificial chromosome-based translating ribosome affinity purification (BAC-TRAP) have greatly facilitated analysis of cell type-specific gene expression in vivo, especially in the nervous system. To better study endothelial gene expression in vivo, we have generated a BAC-TRAP transgenic mouse line where the L10a ribosomal subunit is tagged with EGFP and placed under the control of the endothelium-specific Tie2 (Tek) promoter. We show that transgene expression in this line is widely, but specifically, detected in endothelial cells in several brain regions throughout pre- and postnatal development, as well as in other organs. We also show that this line results in highly significant enrichment of endothelium-specific mRNAs from brain tissues at different stages. This BAC-TRAP line therefore provides a useful genetic tool for in vivo endothelial gene profiling under various developmental, physiological, and pathological conditions. PMID:26817747

  2. Germline Mutations in Predisposition Genes in Pediatric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edmonson, Michael N.; Gruber, Tanja A.; Easton, John; Hedges, Dale; Ma, Xiaotu; Zhou, Xin; Yergeau, Donald A.; Wilkinson, Mark R.; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Chen, Xiang; McGee, Rose B.; Hines-Dowell, Stacy; Nuccio, Regina; Quinn, Emily; Shurtleff, Sheila A.; Rusch, Michael; Patel, Aman; Becksfort, Jared B.; Wang, Shuoguo; Weaver, Meaghann S.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Gajjar, Amar; Ellison, David W.; Pappo, Alberto S.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Downing, James R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prevalence and spectrum of predisposing mutations among children and adolescents with cancer are largely unknown. Knowledge of such mutations may improve the understanding of tumorigenesis, direct patient care, and enable genetic counseling of patients and families. METHODS In 1120 patients younger than 20 years of age, we sequenced the whole genomes (in 595 patients), whole exomes (in 456), or both (in 69). We analyzed the DNA sequences of 565 genes, including 60 that have been associated with autosomal dominant cancer-predisposition syndromes, for the presence of germline mutations. The pathogenicity of the mutations was determined by a panel of medical experts with the use of cancer-specific and locus-specific genetic databases, the medical literature, computational predictions, and second hits identified in the tumor genome. The same approach was used to analyze data from 966 persons who did not have known cancer in the 1000 Genomes Project, and a similar approach was used to analyze data from an autism study (from 515 persons with autism and 208 persons without autism). RESULTS Mutations that were deemed to be pathogenic or probably pathogenic were identified in 95 patients with cancer (8.5%), as compared with 1.1% of the persons in the 1000 Genomes Project and 0.6% of the participants in the autism study. The most commonly mutated genes in the affected patients were TP53 (in 50 patients), APC (in 6), BRCA2 (in 6), NF1 (in 4), PMS2 (in 4), RB1 (in 3), and RUNX1 (in 3). A total of 18 additional patients had protein-truncating mutations in tumor-suppressor genes. Of the 58 patients with a predisposing mutation and available information on family history, 23 (40%) had a family history of cancer. CONCLUSIONS Germline mutations in cancer-predisposing genes were identified in 8.5% of the children and adolescents with cancer. Family history did not predict the presence of an underlying predisposition syndrome in most patients. (Funded by the American

  3. MYH Gene Status in Polish FAP Patients without APC Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) is an inheritable predisposition for the occurrence of numerous polyps in the large intestine. In about 50% of all patients, the occurrence of the disease is conditioned by heterozygotic mutations of the APC gene. Screening for genetic factors in persons without mutations in the APC gene led to the identification of homozygotic mutations of the MYH gene as the cause of the appearance of the polyposis form which is characterized by recessive heritability and a milder course than in the case of the classic form of the disease. The authors examined 90 persons from the DNA bank of patients with FAP from the Institute of Human Genetics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Poznań in whom no mutations in the APC gene were detected. Two of the most frequent mutations of the MYH gene (Y165C and G382D) were found to be heterozygous in 13% of patients and no other mutations in this gene coding sequence were observed. In the group with heterozygotic occurrence of the mutation in the MYH gene, the disease phenotype was not milder in comparison with the entire examined group and the mean age of the disease manifestation was even lower. This observation allows one to conclude that the employed methods of mutation screening were correct and, in the case of the examined group, the mutation ratio of the MYH gene does not precondition the occurrence of the disease, but it cannot be excluded that it may modify its phenotype. The obtained results indicate that the criteria applied during the process of FAP qualification are more rigorous than those applied in other countries. PMID:20223003

  4. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene produce autosomal recessive ocular albinism

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.A.; Summers, C.G.; Oetting, W.S.

    1994-09-01

    Albinism has historically been divided into ocular (OA) and oculocutaneous (OCA) types based on the presence or absence of clinically apparent skin and hair involvement in an individual with the ocular features of albinism. The major genes for OCA include the tyrosinase gene in OCA1 and the P gene in OCA2. X-linked and autosomal recessive OA have been described and the responsible genes have not been identified. We now present six Caucasian individuals who have the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA but who have OCA1 as shown by the presence of mutations of the tyrosinase. They had white or very light hair and white skin at birth, and cutaneous pigment developed in the first decade of life. At ages ranging from 1.5-23 years, hair color was dark blond to light brown. The skin had generalized pigment and well developed tan was present on the exposed arm and face skin of four. Iris pigment was present and iris translucency varied. Molecular analysis of the tyrosinase gene, using PCR amplification and direct di-deoxy sequencing showed the following mutations: E398Z/E398Q, P406S/g346a, R402E/T373K, ?/D383N, and H211N/T373K. The homozygous individual was not from a known consanguineous mating. T373K is the most common tyrosinase gene mutation in our laboratory. Three of these mutations are associated with a total loss of tyrosinase activity (g346a splice-site, T373K, and D383N), while four are associated with residual enzyme activity (H211N, R402E, E398Q, and P406S). These studies show that mutations of the tyrosinase gene can produce the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA in an individual who has normal amounts of cutaneous pigment and the ability to tan after birth. This extends the phenotypic range of OCA1 to normal cutaneous pigment after early childhood, and suggest that mutations of the tyrosinase gene account for a significant number of individuals with autosomal recessive OA.

  5. Activating and inactivating mutations in the human GNAS1 gene.

    PubMed

    Aldred, M A; Trembath, R C

    2000-09-01

    GNAS1 on chromosome 20 is a complex locus, encoding multiple proteins, of which G(s)alpha, the alpha-subunit of the heterotrimeric stimulatory G protein G(s), is of particular interest clinically. Amino acid substitutions at two specific codons lead to constitutive activation of G(s)alpha. Such gain-of-function mutations are found in a variety of sporadic endocrine tumors and in McCune-Albright syndrome, a sporadic condition characterized by multiple endocrine abnormalities. Heterozygous loss of G(s)alpha function results in the dominantly inherited condition, Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO). Here we present a review of published GNAS1 mutations and report 19 additional mutations, of which 15 are novel. A diverse range of inactivating mutations has been detected, scattered throughout the gene but showing some evidence of clustering. Only one, a recurring 4 bp deletion in exon 7, could be considered common among AHO patients. The parental origin of the mutation apparently determines whether or not the patient shows end-organ resistance to hormones such as parathyroid hormone. G(s)alpha is biallelically expressed in all tissues studied to date and thus there is no direct evidence that this transcript is imprinted. However, the recent identification of other imprinted transcripts encoded by GNAS1 and overlapping G(s)alpha, together with at least one imprinted antisense transcript, raises intriguing questions about how the primary effect of mutations in GNAS1 might be modulated. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. PDCD10 gene mutations in multiple cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Cigoli, Maria Sole; Avemaria, Francesca; De Benedetti, Stefano; Gesu, Giovanni P; Accorsi, Lucio Giordano; Parmigiani, Stefano; Corona, Maria Franca; Capra, Valeria; Mosca, Andrea; Giovannini, Simona; Notturno, Francesca; Ciccocioppo, Fausta; Volpi, Lilia; Estienne, Margherita; De Michele, Giuseppe; Antenora, Antonella; Bilo, Leda; Tavoni, Antonietta; Zamponi, Nelia; Alfei, Enrico; Baranello, Giovanni; Riva, Daria; Penco, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular abnormalities that may cause seizures, intracerebral haemorrhages, and focal neurological deficits. Familial form shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression. Three genes have been identified causing familial CCM: KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3. Aim of this study is to report additional PDCD10/CCM3 families poorly described so far which account for 10-15% of hereditary cerebral cavernous malformations. Our group investigated 87 consecutive Italian affected individuals (i.e. positive Magnetic Resonance Imaging) with multiple/familial CCM through direct sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis. We identified mutations in over 97.7% of cases, and PDCD10/CCM3 accounts for 13.1%. PDCD10/CCM3 molecular screening revealed four already known mutations and four novel ones. The mutated patients show an earlier onset of clinical manifestations as compared to CCM1/CCM2 mutated patients. The study of further families carrying mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 may help define a possible correlation between genotype and phenotype; an accurate clinical follow up of the subjects would help define more precisely whether mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 lead to a characteristic phenotype.

  7. Mutational analysis of adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) gene in Japanese ALD patients

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, R.; Onodera, O.; Tabe, H.

    1994-09-01

    Recently a putative ALD gene containing a striking homology with peroxisomal membrane protein (PMP70) has been identified. Besides childhood ALD, various clinical phenotypes have been identified with the onset in adolescence or adulthood (adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), adult cerebral ALD or cerebello-brainstem dominant type). The different clinical phenotypes occasionally coexist even in the same family. To investigate if there is a correlation between the clinical phenotypes and genotypes of the mutations in the ALD gene, we have analyzed 43 Japanese ALD patients. By Southern blot analysis, we identified non-overlapping deletions of 0.5 kb to 10.4 kb involving the ALD gene in 3 patients with adult onset cerebello-brainstem dominant type. By detailed direct sequence analysis, we found 4 patients who had point mutations in the coding region. An AMN patient had a point mutation leading to {sup 266}Gly{r_arrow}Arg change, and another patient with adult cerebral ALD had a 3 bp deletion resulting in the loss of glutamic acid at codon 291, which is a conserved amino acid both in ALD protein and PMP70. Two patients with childhood ALD had point mutations leading to {sup 507}Gly{r_arrow}Val, and {sup 518}Arg{r_arrow}Gln, respectively. Since amino acids from 507 to 520 are highly conserved as ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins, mutations in this region are expected to result in dramatic changes of the function of this protein. Although there is a tendancy for mutation in childhood ALD to be present within the ATP-binding site motif, we found two adult patients who had large deletions involving the region. Taken together, strong correlation between genotypes and clinical phenotypes is unlikely to exist, and some other modifying factors might well play an important role for the clinical manifestations of ALD.

  8. Novel mutation in VCP gene causes atypical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    González-Pérez, Paloma; Cirulli, Elizabeth T.; Drory, Vivian E.; Dabby, Ron; Nisipeanu, Puiu; Carasso, Ralph L.; Sadeh, Menachem; Fox, Andrew; Festoff, Barry W.; Sapp, Peter C.; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; Goldstein, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic variant that causes autosomal dominantly inherited motor neuron disease in a 4-generation Israeli-Arab family using genetic linkage and whole exome sequencing. Methods: Genetic linkage analysis was performed in this family using Illumina single nucleotide polymorphism chips. Whole exome sequencing was then undertaken on DNA samples from 2 affected family members using an Illumina 2000 HiSeq platform in pursuit of potentially pathogenic genetic variants that comigrate with the disease in this pedigree. Variants meeting these criteria were then screened in all affected individuals. Results: A novel mutation (p.R191G) in the valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene was identified in the index family. Direct sequencing of the VCP gene in a panel of DNA from 274 unrelated individuals with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) revealed 5 additional mutations. Among them, 2 were previously identified in pedigrees with a constellation of inclusion body myopathy with Paget disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) and in FALS, and 2 other mutations (p.R159C and p.R155C) in IBMPFD alone. We did not detect VCP gene mutations in DNA from 178 cases of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Conclusions: We report a novel VCP mutation identified in an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis family (p.R191G) with atypical clinical features. In our experience, VCP mutations arise in approximately 1.5% of FALS cases. Our study supports the view that motor neuron disease is part of the clinical spectrum of VCP-associated disease. PMID:23152587

  9. Recognizable cerebellar dysplasia associated with mutations in multiple tubulin genes

    PubMed Central

    Oegema, Renske; Cushion, Thomas D.; Phelps, Ian G.; Chung, Seo-Kyung; Dempsey, Jennifer C.; Collins, Sarah; Mullins, Jonathan G.L.; Dudding, Tracy; Gill, Harinder; Green, Andrew J.; Dobyns, William B.; Ishak, Gisele E.; Rees, Mark I.; Doherty, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in alpha- and beta-tubulins are increasingly recognized as a major cause of malformations of cortical development (MCD), typically lissencephaly, pachygyria and polymicrogyria; however, sequencing tubulin genes in large cohorts of MCD patients has detected tubulin mutations in only 1–13%. We identified patients with a highly characteristic cerebellar dysplasia but without lissencephaly, pachygyria and polymicrogyria typically associated with tubulin mutations. Remarkably, in seven of nine patients (78%), targeted sequencing revealed mutations in three different tubulin genes (TUBA1A, TUBB2B and TUBB3), occurring de novo or inherited from a mosaic parent. Careful re-review of the cortical phenotype on brain imaging revealed only an irregular pattern of gyri and sulci, for which we propose the term tubulinopathy-related dysgyria. Basal ganglia (100%) and brainstem dysplasia (80%) were common features. On the basis of in silico structural predictions, the mutations affect amino acids in diverse regions of the alpha-/beta-tubulin heterodimer, including the nucleotide binding pocket. Cell-based assays of tubulin dynamics reveal various effects of the mutations on incorporation into microtubules: TUBB3 p.Glu288Lys and p.Pro357Leu do not incorporate into microtubules at all, whereas TUBB2B p.Gly13Ala shows reduced incorporation and TUBA1A p.Arg214His incorporates fully, but at a slower rate than wild-type. The broad range of effects on microtubule incorporation is at odds with the highly stereotypical clinical phenotype, supporting differential roles for the three tubulin genes involved. Identifying this highly characteristic phenotype is important due to the low recurrence risk compared with the other (recessive) cerebellar dysplasias and the apparent lack of non-neurological medical issues. PMID:26130693

  10. Novel mutation in the TMEM127 gene associated with phaeochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Elston, M S; Meyer-Rochow, G Y; Prosser, D; Love, D R; Conaglen, J V

    2013-04-01

    Phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas are rare neuroendocrine tumours that arise from the adrenal glands or paraganglia (paragangliomas) within the abdomen, thorax and neck. Although it was originally suggested that approximately 10% of these tumours were inherited, it is now recognised that up to approximately 30% of these tumours are associated with a germline mutation in one of the phaeochromocytoma/paraganglioma susceptibility genes. Of the 12 currently known genes predisposing to these tumours, the TMEM127 gene is one of the more recently identified and appears to be present in approximately 2% of apparently sporadic phaeochromocytomas. We report a 33-year-old man who presented with an apparently sporadic adrenal phaeochromocytoma and was identified as carrying a novel TMEM127 germline mutation, p.Gln139X. Patients harbouring a germline TMEM127 mutation most commonly present with an apparently sporadic solitary adrenal phaeochromocytoma. Testing patients who present with a phaeochromocytoma or paraganglioma for an underlying germline mutation needs to be considered in all patients due to implications for family members, but a strategy based on clinical and immunohistochemical findings would be prudent to limit costs. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  11. Inactivating mutations of CASPASE-7 gene in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Soung, Young Hwa; Lee, Jong Woo; Kim, Hong Sug; Park, Won Sang; Kim, Su Young; Lee, Jong Heun; Park, Jik Young; Cho, Yong Gu; Kim, Chang Jae; Park, Yong Gyu; Nam, Suk Woo; Jeong, Seong Whan; Kim, Sang Ho; Lee, Jung Young; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2003-09-11

    Caspase-7 is a caspase involved in the execution phase of apoptosis. To explore the possibility that the genetic alterations of CASPASE-7 might be involved in the development of human cancers, we analysed the entire coding region and all splice sites of human CASPASE-7 gene for the detection of somatic mutations in a series of human solid cancers, including carcinomas from stomach, colon, head/neck, esophagus, urinary bladder and lung. Overall, we detected CASPASE-7 mutations in two of 98 colon carcinomas (2.0%), one of 50 esophageal carcinomas (2.0%) and one of 33 head/neck carcinomas (3.0%). We expressed the tumor-derived caspase-7 mutants in 293 T cells and found that the apoptosis was reduced compared to the wild-type caspase-7. This is the first report on the CASPASE-7 gene mutations in human malignancies, and our data suggest that the inactivating mutations of the CASPASE-7 gene might lead to the loss of its apoptotic function and contribute to the pathogenesis of some human solid cancers.

  12. Mutational Analysis of the Wilms' Tumor (WTI) Gene.

    PubMed

    King-Underwood, L; Pritchard-Jones, K

    1996-01-01

    Mutations of the Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene have been shown to underlie a proportion of cases of Wilms' tumor, an embryonal kidney cancer occurring mainly in childhood. The WTl gene comprtses ten exons spanning approx 50 kb of genomrc DNA. The messenger RNA is approx 3 kb in length and encodes a zinc finger protein. The four zinc fingers, which he at the C-terminal end of the protein, are encoded by separate exons 7-10. The 5' end of the gene is extremely GC-rich, with areas approaching a 70% GC content. This makes this region difficult to amplify in polymerase chain reactions.

  13. Two frameshift mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene

    PubMed Central

    Iannuzzi, Michael C.; Stern, Robert C.; Collins, Francis S.; Hon, Catherine Tom; Hidaka, Noriko; Strong, Theresa; Becker, Lisa; Drumm, Mitchell L.; White, Marga B.; Gerrard, Bernard; Dean, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a recessive disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. We have identified in exon 7 two frameshift mutations, one caused by a two-nucleotide insertion and the other caused by a one-nucleotide deletion; these mutations–CF1154insTC and CF1213delT, respectively, are predicted to shift the reading frame of the protein and to introduce UAA(ochre) termination codons at residues 369 and 368. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:1990834

  14. Multiscale mutation clustering algorithm identifies pan-cancer mutational clusters associated with pathway-level changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Poole, William; Leinonen, Kalle; Shmulevich, Ilya; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Bernard, Brady

    2017-02-01

    Cancer researchers have long recognized that somatic mutations are not uniformly distributed within genes. However, most approaches for identifying cancer mutations focus on either the entire-gene or single amino-acid level. We have bridged these two methodologies with a multiscale mutation clustering algorithm that identifies variable length mutation clusters in cancer genes. We ran our algorithm on 539 genes using the combined mutation data in 23 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 1295 mutation clusters. The resulting mutation clusters cover a wide range of scales and often overlap with many kinds of protein features including structured domains, phosphorylation sites, and known single nucleotide variants. We statistically associated these multiscale clusters with gene expression and drug response data to illuminate the functional and clinical consequences of mutations in our clusters. Interestingly, we find multiple clusters within individual genes that have differential functional associations: these include PTEN, FUBP1, and CDH1. This methodology has potential implications in identifying protein regions for drug targets, understanding the biological underpinnings of cancer, and personalizing cancer treatments. Toward this end, we have made the mutation clusters and the clustering algorithm available to the public. Clusters and pathway associations can be interactively browsed at m2c.systemsbiology.net. The multiscale mutation clustering algorithm is available at https://github.com/IlyaLab/M2C.

  15. Multiscale mutation clustering algorithm identifies pan-cancer mutational clusters associated with pathway-level changes in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Poole, William; Leinonen, Kalle; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2017-01-01

    Cancer researchers have long recognized that somatic mutations are not uniformly distributed within genes. However, most approaches for identifying cancer mutations focus on either the entire-gene or single amino-acid level. We have bridged these two methodologies with a multiscale mutation clustering algorithm that identifies variable length mutation clusters in cancer genes. We ran our algorithm on 539 genes using the combined mutation data in 23 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 1295 mutation clusters. The resulting mutation clusters cover a wide range of scales and often overlap with many kinds of protein features including structured domains, phosphorylation sites, and known single nucleotide variants. We statistically associated these multiscale clusters with gene expression and drug response data to illuminate the functional and clinical consequences of mutations in our clusters. Interestingly, we find multiple clusters within individual genes that have differential functional associations: these include PTEN, FUBP1, and CDH1. This methodology has potential implications in identifying protein regions for drug targets, understanding the biological underpinnings of cancer, and personalizing cancer treatments. Toward this end, we have made the mutation clusters and the clustering algorithm available to the public. Clusters and pathway associations can be interactively browsed at m2c.systemsbiology.net. The multiscale mutation clustering algorithm is available at https://github.com/IlyaLab/M2C. PMID:28170390

  16. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Sigova, Alla A; Abraham, Brian J; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M; Guo, Yang Eric; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Sharp, Phillip A; Young, Richard A

    2015-11-20

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and -distal DNA elements to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) binds to both gene regulatory elements and their associated RNA species across the entire genome. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy, whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive-feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  18. Sister chromatid exchange, DNA repair, and single-gene mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, A.V.; Thompson, L.H.

    1982-01-01

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) has been studied in cultured mammalian cells with regard to the nature of the inducing lesion, mutation induction, and factors that modify the observed frequency following mutagen exposure, SCEs can be induced by a wide spectrum of DNA lesions and, for nine agents examined, the frequency of induced SCE is linearly related to induced single-gene mutation. Further, a deficiency in DNA repair may alter the expression of both SCE and mutation in a qualitatively similar manner. The frequency of SCE induced by mitomycin-C is suppressed in heterochromatic relative to euchromatin and, in nondividing lymphocytes, the lesions leading to the formation of SCEs may persist for several months.

  19. Gene trapping identifies a putative tumor suppressor and a new inducer of cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Haendeler, Judith; Lukosz, Margarete; Sturm, Karsten; Melchner, Harald von; Altschmied, Joachim

    2008-11-28

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha}) is a pleiotropic cytokine involved in apoptotic cell death, cellular proliferation, differentiation, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. In tumors it is secreted by tumor associated macrophages and can have both pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects. To identify genes regulated by TNF{alpha}, we performed a gene trap screen in the mammary carcinoma cell line MCF-7 and recovered 64 unique, TNF{alpha}-induced gene trap integration sites. Among these were the genes coding for the zinc finger protein ZC3H10 and for the transcription factor grainyhead-like 3 (GRHL3). In line with the dual effects of TNF{alpha} on tumorigenesis, we found that ZC3H10 inhibits anchorage independent growth in soft agar suggesting a tumor suppressor function, whereas GRHL3 strongly stimulated the migration of endothelial cells which is consistent with an angiogenic, pro-tumorigenic function.

  20. Heterogeneous AVPR2 gene mutations in congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed Central

    Wildin, R. S.; Antush, M. J.; Bennett, R. L.; Schoof, J. M.; Scott, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in the AVPR2 gene encoding the receptor for arginine vasopressin in the kidney (V2 ADHR) have been reported in patients with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, a predominantly X-linked disorder of water homeostasis. We have used restriction-enzyme analysis and direct DNA sequencing of genomic PCR product to evaluate the AVPR2 gene in 11 unrelated affected males. Each patient has a different DNA sequence variation, and only one matches a previously reported mutation. Cosegregation of the variations with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was demonstrated for two families, and a de novo mutation was documented in two additional cases. Carrier detection was accomplished in one family. All the variations predict frameshifts, truncations, or nonconservative amino acid substitutions in evolutionarily conserved positions in the V2 ADHR and related receptors. Of interest, a 28-bp deletion is found in one patient, while another, unrelated patient has a tandem duplication of the same 28-bp segment, suggesting that both resulted from the same unusual unequal crossing-over mechanism facilitated by 9-mer direct sequence repeats. Since the V2 ADHR is a member of the seven-transmembrane-domain, G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, the loss-of-function mutations from this study and others provide important clues to the structure-function relationship of this and related receptors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7913579

  1. Mutations in BTD gene causing biotinidase deficiency: a regional report.

    PubMed

    Kasapkara, Çiğdem Seher; Akar, Melek; Özbek, Mehmet Nuri; Tüzün, Heybet; Aldudak, Bedri; Baran, Rıza Taner; Tanyalçın, Tijen

    2015-03-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive inborn error of biotin metabolism. Children with biotinidase deficiency cannot cleave biocytin and, therefore, cannot recycle biotin. Untreated individuals become secondarily biotin deficient, which in turn results in decreased activities of the biotin-dependent carboxylases and the subsequent accumulation of toxic metabolites causing clinical symptoms. Biotinidase deficiency is characterized by neurological, cutaneous manifestations and metabolic abnormalities. The worldwide incidence of profound biotinidase deficiency has been estimated at 1:112,271. The human biotinidase gene is located on chromosome 3p25 and consists of four exons with a total length of 1629 base pairs. To date, more than 100 mutations in the biotinidase gene known to cause biotinidase deficiency have been reported. The vast majority of mutations are homozygous or compound heterozygous. Finding known mutations can be correlated with the biochemical enzymatic results. This report summarizes the demographic features of patients identified as biotinidase deficient from August of 2012 through August of 2013 and mutation analysis results for 20 cases in the southeast region of Turkey.

  2. α-Globin gene mutations in Isfahan Province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Karamzade, Arezo; Mirzapour, Hadi; Hoseinzade, Majid; Asadi, Sara; Gholamrezapour, Tahere; Tavakoli, Parvaneh; Salehi, Mansoor; Selebi, Mansoor

    2014-01-01

    α-Thalassemia (α-thal) encompasses a spectrum of mutations including deletion and point mutations on the α-globin chains that is characterized by a reduction or complete absence of α-globin genes. Most of the α-thal cases are deletions involving one (α(+)) or both (α(0)) α-globin genes, although point mutations (α(T)α or αα(T)) are found as well. In this study, 314 individuals with low hematological values, normal Hb A2 who were not affected with β-thal or iron deficiency, were investigated for the presence of α-thal mutations. The most common deletion was -α(3.7) (rightward) with a frequency of 70.7%, followed by α(-5 nt) (-TGAGG) (8.7%), -α(4.2) (leftward) (4.7%), the polyadenylation signal (polyA2) site (AATAAA > AATGAA) (4.2%), -(α)(20.5) (3.8%), Hb Constant Spring [Hb CS, α142, Stop→Gln; HBA2: c.427T > C] (2.9%), polyA1 (AATAAA > AATAAG) and α(codon 19) (GCG > GC-, α2) (16%), and - -(MED) (0.9%). The results of this study may be valuable for designing a plan for carrier screening, premarital genetic counseling, prenatal diagnosis (PND) and reducing excessive health care costs to an affordable level in Isfahan Province, Iran.

  3. Familial dysautonomia is caused by mutations of the IKAP gene.

    PubMed

    Anderson, S L; Coli, R; Daly, I W; Kichula, E A; Rork, M J; Volpi, S A; Ekstein, J; Rubin, B Y

    2001-03-01

    The defective gene DYS, which is responsible for familial dysautonomia (FD) and has been mapped to a 0.5-cM region on chromosome 9q31, has eluded identification. We identified and characterized the RNAs encoded by this region of chromosome 9 in cell lines derived from individuals homozygous for the major FD haplotype, and we observed that the RNA encoding the IkappaB kinase complex-associated protein (IKAP) lacks exon 20 and, as a result of a frameshift, encodes a truncated protein. Sequence analysis reveals a T-->C transition in the donor splice site of intron 20. In individuals bearing a minor FD haplotype, a missense mutation in exon 19 disrupts a consensus serine/threonine kinase phosphorylation site. This mutation results in defective phosphorylation of IKAP. These mutations were observed to be present in a random sample of Ashkenazi Jewish individuals, at approximately the predicted carrier frequency of FD. These findings demonstrate that mutations in the gene encoding IKAP are responsible for FD.

  4. Familial Dysautonomia Is Caused by Mutations of the IKAP Gene

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sylvia L.; Coli, Rocco; Daly, Ira W.; Kichula, Elizabeth A.; Rork, Matthew J.; Volpi, Sabrina A.; Ekstein, Josef; Rubin, Berish Y.

    2001-01-01

    The defective gene DYS, which is responsible for familial dysautonomia (FD) and has been mapped to a 0.5-cM region on chromosome 9q31, has eluded identification. We identified and characterized the RNAs encoded by this region of chromosome 9 in cell lines derived from individuals homozygous for the major FD haplotype, and we observed that the RNA encoding the IκB kinase complex–associated protein (IKAP) lacks exon 20 and, as a result of a frameshift, encodes a truncated protein. Sequence analysis reveals a T→C transition in the donor splice site of intron 20. In individuals bearing a minor FD haplotype, a missense mutation in exon 19 disrupts a consensus serine/threonine kinase phosphorylation site. This mutation results in defective phosphorylation of IKAP. These mutations were observed to be present in a random sample of Ashkenazi Jewish individuals, at approximately the predicted carrier frequency of FD. These findings demonstrate that mutations in the gene encoding IKAP are responsible for FD. PMID:11179021

  5. [Application of gene capture technology on mutation screening of RB1 gene in retinoblastoma patients].

    PubMed

    Meng, Q Y; Huang, L Z; Wang, B; Li, X X; Liang, J H

    2017-06-11

    Objectives: To analyze RB1 gene mutation in retinoblastoma (RB) patients using gene capture technology. Methods: Experimental research. The clinical data of 17 RB patients were collected at Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University People's Hospital from June 2010 to Jun 2014. Peripheral blood samples of seventeen RB patients and their parents were collected and genomic DNA were extracted. DNA library from RB patients was mixed with designed gene capture probe of RB1 exons and its flanking sequences. The data were analyzed using bioinformatics software. To avoid the false positive, the abnormal sites were verified using the Sanger sequencing method. Results: Totally, there were 17 RB patients, including 12 males and 5 females, from 0.5 to 23 years old, average ages were (3.2±5.2) years old. Both eyes were involved in 6 patients. The other 11 cases were only one eye was attacked. Four RB patients were found to have germline mutations, among whom 2 had bilateral tumors and 2 had unilateral tumors. 2 novel missense mutations were identified, including 15(th) exon c.1408A>T (p. Ile470Phe) and c.1960G>C (p. Val654Leu) at 19(th) exon. No RB1 mutation was identified in any of their parents. We also identified 2 mutations reported previously. One is c.1030C>T termination mutation at 10(th) exon in a bilateral RB patients and his father, who was diagnosed with unilateral RB. The other is c.371-372delTA frame shift mutation at 3(rd) exon. No mutation was found in their parents. Conclusions: Two novel germline RB1 mutations were found using gene capture technology, which enriched RB1 mutations library.(Chin J Ophthalmol, 2017, 53: 455-459).

  6. FUS GENE MUTATIONS IN FAMILIAL AND SPORADIC AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Rademakers, Rosa; Stewart, Heather; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Krieger, Charles; Graff-Radford, Neill; Fabros, Marife; Briemberg, Hannah; Cashman, Neil; Eisen, Andrew; Mackenzie, Ian R. A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Mutations in the fused in sarcoma (FUS) gene have recently been found to cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS). Methods We screened FUS in a cohort of 200 ALS patients [32 FALS and 168 sporadic ALS (SALS)]. Results In one FALS proband, we identified a mutation (p.R521C) that was also present in her affected daughter. Their clinical phenotype was remarkably similar and atypical of classic ALS, with symmetric proximal pelvic and pectoral weakness. Distal weakness and upper motor neuron features only developed late. Neuropathological examination demonstrated FUS-immunoreactive neuronal and glial inclusions in the spinal cord and many extramotor regions, but no TDP-43 pathology. We also identified a novel mutation (p.G187S) in one SALS patient. Overall, FUS mutations accounted for 3% of our non-SOD1, non-TARDBP FALS cases and 0.6% of SALS. Discussion This study demonstrates that the phenotype with FUS mutations extends beyond classical ALS. It suggests there are specific clinicogenetic correlations and provides the first detailed neuropathological description. PMID:20544928

  7. Molecular screening of pituitary adenomas for gene mutations and rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, V.; Drazin, N.Z.; Gonskey, R.; Melmed, S. )

    1993-07-01

    Although pituitary tumors arise as benign monoclonal neoplasms, genetic alterations have not readily been identified in these adenomas. The authors studied restriction fragment abnormalities involving the GH gene locus, and mutations in the p53 and H-, K-, and N-ras genes in 22 human GH cell adenomas. Twenty two nonsecretory adenomas were also examined for p53 and ras gene mutations. Seven prolactinoma DNA samples were tested for deletions in the multiple endocrine neoplasia-1 (MEN-1) locus, as well as for rearrangements in the hst gene, a member of the fibroblast growth factor family. In DNA from GH-cell adenomas, identical GH restriction patterns were detected in both pituitary and lymphocyte DNA in all patients and in one patient with a mixed GH-TSH cell adenoma. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single stranded conformation polymorphism analysis, no mutations were detected in exons 5, 6, 7 and 8 of the p53 gene in GH cell adenomas nor in 22 nonsecretory adenomas. Codons 12/13 and 61 of H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras genes were also intact on GH cell adenomas and in nonsecretory adenomas. Site-specific probes for chromosome 11q13 including, PYGM, D11S146, and INT2 were used in 7 sporadic PRL-secreting adenomas to detect deletions of the MEN-1 locus on chromosome 11. One patient was identified with a loss of 11p, and the remaining 6 patients did not demonstrate loss of heterozygosity in the pituitary 11q13 locus, compared to lymphocyte DNA. None of these patients demonstrated hst gene rearrangements which also maps to this locus. These results show that p53 and ras gene mutations are not common events in the pathogenesis of acromegaly and nonsecretory tumors. Although hst gene rearrangements and deletions of 11q13 are not associated with sporadic PRl-cell adenoma formation, a single patient was detected with a partial loss of chromosome 11, including the putative MEN-1 site. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Gene-trap mutagenesis using Mol/MSM-1 embryonic stem cells from MSM/Ms mice.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Mai; Tateyama, Hiroki; Araki, Masatake; Nakagata, Naomi; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Araki, Kimi

    2013-06-01

    The MSM/Ms strain is derived from the Japanese wild mouse Mus musculus molossinus and displays characteristics not observed in common laboratory strains. Functional genomic analyses using genetically engineered MSM/Ms mice will reveal novel phenotypes and gene functions/interactions. We previously reported the establishment of a germline-competent embryonic stem (ES) cell line, Mol/MSM-1, from the MSM/Ms strain. To analyze its usefulness for insertional mutagenesis, we performed gene-trapping using these cells. In the present study, we compared the gene-trap events between Mol/MSM-1 and a conventional ES cell line, KTPU8, derived from the F1 progeny of a C57BL/6 × CBA cross. We introduced a promoter-trap vector carrying the promoterless β-galactosidase/neomycin-resistance fusion gene into Mol/MSM-1 and KTPU8 cells, isolated clones, and identified the trapped genes by rapid amplification of cDNA 5'-ends (5'-RACE), inverse PCR, or plasmid rescue. Unexpectedly, the success rate of 5'-RACE in Mol/MSM trap clones was 47 %, lower than the 87 % observed in KTPU8 clones. Genomic analysis of the 5'-RACE-failed clones revealed that most had trapped ribosomal RNA gene regions. The percentage of ribosomal RNA region trap clones was 41 % in Mol/MSM-1 cells, but less than 10 % in KTPU8 cells. However, within the Mol/MSM-1 5'-RACE-successful clones, the trapping frequency of annotated genes, the chromosomal distribution of vector insertions, the frequency of integration into an intron around the start codon-containing exon, and the functional spectrum of trapped genes were comparable to those in KTPU8 cells. By selecting 5'-RACE-successful clones, it is possible to perform gene-trapping efficiently using Mol/MSM-1 ES cells and promoter-trap vectors.

  9. Paracellin-1 gene mutation with multiple congenital abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, Mehmet; Kasap, Belde; Soylu, Alper; Böber, Ece; Konrad, Martin; Kavukçu, Salih

    2006-11-01

    Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis is an autosomal recessive renal tubular disorder characterized by renal magnesium wasting, hypercalciuria, advanced nephrocalcinosis and progressive renal failure. Mutations in the paracellin-1 (CLDN16) gene have been defined as the underlying genetic defect. The tubular disorders and progression in renal failure are usually resistant to magnesium substitution and hydrochlorothiazide therapy, but hypomagnesemia may improve with advanced renal insufficiency. We present a patient with a homozygous truncating CLDN16 gene mutation (W237X) who had early onset of renal insufficiency despite early diagnosis at 2 months. He also had additional abnormalities including horseshoe kidney, neonatal teeth, atypical face, cardiac abnormalities including coarctation of the aorta associated with atrial and ventricular septal defects, umbilical hernia and hypertrichosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the youngest case diagnosed as familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis and the first case having such additional congenital abnormalities independent of the disease itself.

  10. Single molecule targeted sequencing for cancer gene mutation detection

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Deng, Liwei; Yan, Qin; Gao, Yongqian; Wu, Zengding; Cai, Jinsen; Ji, Daorui; Li, Gailing; Wu, Ping; Jin, Huan; Zhao, Luyang; Liu, Song; Ge, Liangjin; Deem, Michael W.; He, Jiankui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid decline in cost of sequencing, it is now affordable to examine multiple genes in a single disease-targeted clinical test using next generation sequencing. Current targeted sequencing methods require a separate step of targeted capture enrichment during sample preparation before sequencing. Although there are fast sample preparation methods available in market, the library preparation process is still relatively complicated for physicians to use routinely. Here, we introduced an amplification-free Single Molecule Targeted Sequencing (SMTS) technology, which combined targeted capture and sequencing in one step. We demonstrated that this technology can detect low-frequency mutations using artificially synthesized DNA sample. SMTS has several potential advantages, including simple sample preparation thus no biases and errors are introduced by PCR reaction. SMTS has the potential to be an easy and quick sequencing technology for clinical diagnosis such as cancer gene mutation detection, infectious disease detection, inherited condition screening and noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27193446

  11. Mutations in the pericentrin (PCNT) gene cause primordial dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Anita; Thiel, Christian T; Schindler, Detlev; Wick, Ursula; Crow, Yanick J; Ekici, Arif B; van Essen, Anthonie J; Goecke, Timm O; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Chrzanowska, Krystyna H; Zweier, Christiane; Brunner, Han G; Becker, Kristin; Curry, Cynthia J; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Devriendt, Koenraad; Dörfler, Arnd; Kinning, Esther; Megarbane, André; Meinecke, Peter; Semple, Robert K; Spranger, Stephanie; Toutain, Annick; Trembath, Richard C; Voss, Egbert; Wilson, Louise; Hennekam, Raoul; de Zegher, Francis; Dörr, Helmuth-Günther; Reis, André

    2008-02-08

    Fundamental processes influencing human growth can be revealed by studying extreme short stature. Using genetic linkage analysis, we find that biallelic loss-of-function mutations in the centrosomal pericentrin (PCNT) gene on chromosome 21q22.3 cause microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) in 25 patients. Adults with this rare inherited condition have an average height of 100 centimeters and a brain size comparable to that of a 3-month-old baby, but are of near-normal intelligence. Absence of PCNT results in disorganized mitotic spindles and missegregation of chromosomes. Mutations in related genes are known to cause primary microcephaly (MCPH1, CDK5RAP2, ASPM, and CENPJ).

  12. A new spontaneous mouse mutation in the Kcne1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Letts, V.A.; Valenzuela, A.; Dunbar, C.; Zheng, Q.Y.; Johnson, K.R.; Frankel, W.N.

    2010-01-01

    A new mouse mutant, punk rocker (allele symbol Kcne1pkr), arose spontaneously on a C57BL/10J inbred strain background and is characterized by a distinctive head-tossing, circling, and ataxic phenotype. It is also profoundly and bilaterally deaf. The mutation resides in the Kcne1 gene on Chromosome (Chr) 16 and has been identified as a single base change within the coding region of the third exon. The C to T nucleotide substitution causes an arginine to be altered to a termination codon at amino acid position 67, and predictably this will result in a significantly truncated protein product. The Kcne1pkr mutant represents the first spontaneous mouse model for the human disorder, Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome, associated with mutations in the homologous KCNE1 gene on human Chr 21. PMID:11003695

  13. Three faces of recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations.

    PubMed

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Van Der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-12-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a group of genetic disorder associated with development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Recombination-activating genes (RAG1/2) play a critical role on VDJ recombination process that leads to the production of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire in the development of T and B cells. RAG1/2 genes mutations result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from classic SCID to Omenn syndrome (OS) to atypical SCID with such as granuloma formation and autoimmunity. Herein, we reported 4 patients with RAG1 deficiency: classic SCID was seen in two patients who presented with recurrent pneumonia and chronic diarrhoea, and failure to thrive. OS was observed in one patient who presented with chronic diarrhoea, skin rash, recurrent lower respiratory infections, and atypical SCID was seen in one patient who presented with Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and had novel RAG1 mutation.

  14. A new spontaneous mouse mutation in the Kcne1 gene.

    PubMed

    Letts, V A; Valenzuela, A; Dunbar, C; Zheng, Q Y; Johnson, K R; Frankel, W N

    2000-10-01

    A new mouse mutant, punk rocker (allele symbol Kcne1(pkr)), arose spontaneously on a C57BL/10J inbred strain background and is characterized by a distinctive head-tossing, circling, and ataxic phenotype. It is also profoundly and bilaterally deaf. The mutation resides in the Kcne1 gene on Chromosome (Chr) 16 and has been identified as a single base change within the coding region of the third exon. The C to T nucleotide substitution causes an arginine to be altered to a termination codon at amino acid position 67, and predictably this will result in a significantly truncated protein product. The Kcne1(pkr) mutant represents the first spontaneous mouse model for the human disorder, Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome, associated with mutations in the homologous KCNE1 gene on human Chr 21.

  15. A piggyBac transposon gene trap for the analysis of gene expression and function in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Christopher P; Mann, Richard S

    2004-01-01

    P-element-based gene and enhancer trap strategies have provided a wealth of information on the expression and function of genes in Drosophila melanogaster. Here we present a new vector that utilizes the simple insertion requirements of the piggyBac transposon, coupled to a splice acceptor (SA) site fused to the sequence encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and a transcriptional terminator. Mobilization of the piggyBac splice site gene trap vector (PBss) was accomplished by heat-shock-induced expression of piggyBac transposase (PBase). We show that insertion of PBss into genes leads to fusions between the gene's mRNA and the PBss-encoded EGFP transcripts. As heterozygotes, these fusions report the normal pattern of expression of the trapped gene. As homozygotes, these fusions can inactivate the gene and lead to lethality. Molecular characterization of PBss insertion events shows that they are single copy, that they always occur at TTAA sequences, and that splicing utilizes the engineered splice site in PBss. In those instances where protein-EGFP fusions are predicted to occur, the subcellular localization of the wild-type protein can be inferred from the localization of the EGFP fusion protein. These experiments highlight the utility of the PBss system for expanding the functional genomics tools that are available in Drosophila. PMID:15342518

  16. Optimization of gene sequences under constant mutational pressure and selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczuk, M.; Gierlik, A.; Mackiewicz, P.; Cebrat, S.; Dudek, M. R.

    1999-12-01

    We have analyzed the influence of constant mutational pressure and selection on the nucleotide composition of DNA sequences of various size, which were represented by the genes of the Borrelia burgdorferi genome. With the help of MC simulations we have found that longer DNA sequences accumulate much less base substitutions per sequence length than short sequences. This leads us to the conclusion that the accuracy of replication may determine the size of genome.

  17. Co-inheritance of novel ATRX gene mutation and globin (α & β) gene mutations in transfusion dependent beta-thalassemia patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Nafie, Awatif N; Borgio, J Francis; AbdulAzeez, Sayed; Al-Suliman, Ahmed M; Qaw, Fuad S; Naserullah, Zaki A; Al-Jarrash, Sana; Al-Madan, Mohammed S; Al-Ali, Rudaynah A; AlKhalifah, Mohammed A; Al-Muhanna, Fahad; Steinberg, Martin H; Al-Ali, Amein K

    2015-06-01

    α-Thalassemia X-linked mental retardation syndrome is a rare inherited intellectual disability disorder due to mutations in the ATRX gene. In our previous study of the prevalence of β-thalassemia mutations in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, we confirmed the widespread coinheritance of α-thalassemia mutation. Some of these subjects have a family history of mental retardation, the cause of which is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the presence or absence of mutations in the ATRX gene in these patients. Three exons of the ATRX gene and their flanking regions were directly sequenced. Only four female transfusion dependent β-thalassemia patients were found to be carriers of a novel mutation in the ATRX gene. Two of the ATRX gene mutations, c.623delA and c.848T>C were present in patients homozygous for IVS I-5(G→C) and homozygous for Cd39(C → T) β-thalassemia mutation, respectively. While the other two that were located in the intronic region (flanking regions), were present in patients homozygous for Cd39(C → T) β-thalassemia mutation. The two subjects with the mutations in the coding region had family members with mental retardation, which suggests that the novel frame shift mutation and the missense mutation at coding region of ATRX gene are involved in ATRX syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Gene augmentation for adRP mutations in RHO.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Alfred S; Rossmiller, Brian; Mao, Haoyu

    2014-07-18

    Mutations in the gene for rhodopsin, RHO, cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa, a disease characterized by death of rod photoreceptor cells. At the end stage, when most rods are gone, cones die too, taking central vision with them. One goal of gene therapy, therefore, is to preserve central vision by promoting rod survival in the vicinity of the macula. Dominance in RHO mutations is associated with two phenomena: interference with the function of normal rhodopsin and intrinsic toxicity of the mutant protein. In the case of interference, increased production of the wild-type protein may be therapeutic, but in the case of toxicity, suppression of the mutant protein may also be needed. RHO augmentation has made use of advances in gene delivery to the retina using adeno-associated virus (AAV). Several strategies have been developed for suppression of rhodopsin expression, but because of the heterogeneity of RHO mutations they are not specific for the mutant allele: They suppress both mutant and wild-type RHO. Experiments in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) mouse models suggest that both RHO augmentation and supplementation plus suppression preserve the survival of rod cells. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  19. Myostatin gene mutated mice induced with tale nucleases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fangfang; Sun, Ruilin; Chen, Hongyan; Fei, Jian; Lu, Daru

    2015-01-01

    Myostain gene (MSTN) is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle, and negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass; it has been suggested that mice with MSTN inhibition have reduced adiposity and improved insulin sensitivity. Therefore, it is important to establish a fast and effective gene editing method. In this report, we established the myostatin mutated-mouse model by microinjection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) mRNA within the mouse fertilized oocytes and achieved high rates of mutagenesis of the mouse MSTN in C57BL/6J. Six of 45 born mice carried target mutations and we appointed one as the parental mating with wild mouse to produce the F1 and backcross to produce the F2 generation. All the mutations of the mice were examined quickly and efficiently by high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRMA) and then verified by direct sequencing. We obtained the homozygous of the F2 generation which transmitted the mutant alleles to the progeny with 100% efficiency. Mutant mice exhibited increases in muscle mass comparable to those observed in wild-type mice. Therefore, combining TALEN-mediated gene targeting with HRMA technology is a superior method of constructing genetically modified mice through microinjection in the mouse fertilized oocytes with high efficiency and short time of selection.

  20. Unverricht-Lundborg disease: homozygosity for a new splicing mutation in the cystatin B gene.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Eugénia; Freitas, Joel; Duarte, Ana Joana; Ribeiro, Isaura; Ribeiro, Diogo; Lima, J Lopes; Chaves, João; Amaral, Olga

    2012-03-01

    Unverricht-Lundborg disease is the most common form of progressive myoclonic epilepsy (PME). It is due to cystatin B gene (CSTB) mutations. Several mutations in CSTB gene have been published, but few in homozygosity. We describe a patient with a new splicing alteration. Mutation Gln22Gln leads to abnormal splicing and partial inclusion of intronic sequence. This is one of the few cases of homozygosity for a non-classic mutation and adds to mutational heterogeneity of CSTB.

  1. Identification of Novel Genes Affected by Gamma Irradiation Using a Gene-Trapped Library of Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Chromosomal and chromatid analysis was performed on the DREV 1 knockdown MCF10A cells to access cel l survival following ionizing radiation treatment...statement of work as well as their response to ionizing radiation . 14 . SUBJECT TERMS 15 . NUMBER OF PAGE S 3 0 Gamma Irradiation, gene trapping...line with and without ionizing radiation treatment . We felt that it was important t o analyze the identified gene expression levels following IR

  2. NDP gene mutations in 14 French families with Norrie disease.

    PubMed

    Royer, Ghislaine; Hanein, Sylvain; Raclin, Valérie; Gigarel, Nadine; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Munnich, Arnold; Steffann, Julie; Dufier, Jean-Louis; Kaplan, Josseline; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul

    2003-12-01

    Norrie disease is a rare X-inked recessive condition characterized by congenital blindness and occasionally deafness and mental retardation in males. This disease has been ascribed to mutations in the NDP gene on chromosome Xp11.1. Previous investigations of the NDP gene have identified largely sixty disease-causing sequence variants. Here, we report on ten different NDP gene allelic variants in fourteen of a series of 21 families fulfilling inclusion criteria. Two alterations were intragenic deletions and eight were nucleotide substitutions or splicing variants, six of them being hitherto unreported, namely c.112C>T (p.Arg38Cys), c.129C>G (p.His43Gln), c.133G>A (p.Val45Met), c.268C>T (p.Arg90Cys), c.382T>C (p.Cys128Arg), c.23479-1G>C (unknown). No NDP gene sequence variant was found in seven of the 21 families. This observation raises the issue of misdiagnosis, phenocopies, or existence of other X-linked or autosomal genes, the mutations of which would mimic the Norrie disease phenotype.

  3. Adenovirus with DNA Packaging Gene Mutations Increased Virus Release

    PubMed Central

    Wechman, Stephen L.; Rao, Xiao-Mei; McMasters, Kelly M.; Zhou, Heshan Sam

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) have been extensively manipulated for the development of cancer selective replication, leading to cancer cell death or oncolysis. Clinical studies using E1-modified oncolytic Ads have shown that this therapeutic platform was safe, but with limited efficacy, indicating the necessity of targeting other viral genes for manipulation. To improve the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic Ads, we treated the entire Ad genome repeatedly with UV-light and have isolated AdUV which efficiently lyses cancer cells as reported previously (Wechman, S. L. et al. Development of an Oncolytic Adenovirus with Enhanced Spread Ability through Repeated UV Irradiation and Cancer Selection. Viruses 2016, 8, 6). In this report, we show that no mutations were observed in the early genes (E1 or E4) of AdUV while several mutations were observed within the Ad late genes which have structural or viral DNA packaging functions. This study also reported the increased release of AdUV from cancer cells. In this study, we found that AdUV inhibits tumor growth following intratumoral injection. These results indicate the potentially significant role of the viral late genes, in particular the DNA packaging genes, to enhance Ad oncolysis. PMID:27999391

  4. The FBN2 gene: new mutations, locus-specific database (Universal Mutation Database FBN2), and genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Frédéric, Melissa Yana; Monino, Christine; Marschall, Christoph; Hamroun, Dalil; Faivre, Laurence; Jondeau, Guillaume; Klein, Hanns-Georg; Neumann, Luitgard; Gautier, Elodie; Binquet, Christine; Maslen, Cheryl; Godfrey, Maurice; Gupta, Prateek; Milewicz, Dianna; Boileau, Catherine; Claustres, Mireille; Béroud, Christophe; Collod-Béroud, Gwenaëlle

    2009-02-01

    Congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) is an extremely rare disease, due to mutations in the FBN2 gene encoding fibrillin-2. Another member of the fibrillin family, the FBN1 gene, is involved in a broad phenotypic continuum of connective-tissue disorders including Marfan syndrome. Identifying not only what is in common but also what differentiates these two proteins should enable us to better comprehend their respective functions and better understand the multitude of diseases in which these two genes are involved. In 1995 we created a locus-specific database (LSDB) for FBN1 mutations with the Universal Mutation Database (UMD) tool. To facilitate comparison of identified mutations in these two genes and search for specific functional areas, we created an LSDB for the FBN2 gene: the UMD-FBN2 database. This database lists 26 published and six newly identified mutations that mainly comprise missense and splice-site mutations. Although the number of described FBN2 mutations was low, the frequency of joint dislocation was significantly higher with missense mutations when compared to splice site mutations. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Analysis of gene mutations among South Indian patients with maple syrup urine disease: identification of four novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, M P; Menon, Krishnakumar N; Vasudevan, D M

    2013-10-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is predominantly caused by mutations in the BCKDHA, BCKDHB and DBT genes, which encode for the E1alpha, E1beta and E2 subunits of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex, respectively. Because disease causing mutations play a major role in the development of the disease, prenatal diagnosis at gestational level may have significance in making decisions by parents. Thus, this study was aimed to screen South Indian MSUD patients for mutations and assess the genotype-phenotype correlation. Thirteen patients diagnosed with MSUD by conventional biochemical screening such as urine analysis by DNPH test, thin layer chromatography for amino acids and blood amino acid quantification by HPLC were selected for mutation analysis. The entire coding regions of the BCKDHA, BCKDHB and DBT genes were analyzed for mutations by PCR-based direct DNA sequencing. BCKDHA and BCKDHB mutations were seen in 43% of the total ten patients, while disease-causing DBT gene mutation was observed only in 14%. Three patients displayed no mutations. Novel mutations were c.130C>T in BCKDHA gene, c. 599C>T and c.121_122delAC in BCKDHB gene and c.190G>A in DBT gene. Notably, patients harbouring these mutations were non-responsive to thiamine supplementation and other treatment regimens and might have a worse prognosis as compared to the patients not having such mutations. Thus, identification of these mutations may have a crucial role in the treatment as well as understanding the molecular mechanisms in MSUD.

  6. Sarcomeric gene mutations in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

    PubMed

    Brion, Maria; Allegue, Catarina; Santori, Montserrat; Gil, Rocio; Blanco-Verea, Alejandro; Haas, Cordula; Bartsch, Christine; Poster, Simone; Madea, Burkhard; Campuzano, Oscar; Brugada, Ramon; Carracedo, Angel

    2012-06-10

    In developed countries, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) represents the most prevalent cause of death in children between 1 month and 1 year of age. SIDS is a diagnosis of exclusion, a negative autopsy which requires the absence of structural organ disease. Although investigators have confirmed that a significant percentage of SIDS cases are actually channelopathies, no data have been made available as to whether other sudden cardiac death-associated diseases, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), could be responsible for some cases of SIDS. The presence of a genetic mutation in the sarcomeric protein usually affects the force of contraction of the myocyte, whose weakness is compensated with progressive hypertrophy and disarray. However, it is unclear whether in the most incipient forms, that is, first years of life, the lack of these phenotypes still confers a risk of arrhythmogenesis. The main goal of the present study is to wonder whether genetic defects in the sarcomeric proteins, previously associated with HCM, could be responsible for SIDS. We have analysed 286 SIDS cases for the most common genes implicated in HCM in adults. A total of 680 mutations localised in 16 genes were analysed by semi-automated matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDITOF-MS) using the Sequenom MassARRAY(®) System. Ten subjects with completely normal hearts showed mutated alleles at nine of the genetic variants analysed, and one additional novel mutation was detected by conventional sequencing. Therefore, a genetic mutation associated with HCM may cause sudden cardiac death in the absence of an identifiable phenotype. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. HFE gene mutations and iron status of Brazilian blood donors.

    PubMed

    Santos, P C J L; Cançado, R D; Terada, C T; Rostelato, S; Gonzales, I; Hirata, R D C; Hirata, M H; Chiattone, C S; Guerra-Shinohara, E M

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of the HFE and TFR2 genes have been associated with iron overload. HFE and TFR2 mutations were assessed in blood donors, and the relationship with iron status was evaluated. Subjects (N = 542) were recruited at the Hemocentro da Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Iron status was not influenced by HFE mutations in women and was independent of blood donation frequency. In contrast, men carrying the HFE 282CY genotype had lower total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) than HFE 282CC genotype carriers. Men who donated blood for the first time and were carriers of the HFE 282CY genotype had higher transferrin saturation values and lower TIBC concentrations than those with the homozygous wild genotype for the HFE C282Y mutation. Moreover, in this group of blood donors, carriers of HFE 63DD plus 63HD genotypes had higher serum ferritin values than those with the homozygous wild genotype for HFE H63D mutation. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that HFE 282CY leads to a 17.21% increase (P = 0.018) and a 83.65% decrease (P = 0.007) in transferrin saturation and TIBC, respectively. In addition, serum ferritin is influenced by age (3.91%, P = 0.001) and the HFE 63HD plus DD genotype (55.84%, P = 0.021). In conclusion, the HFE 282Y and 65C alleles were rare, while the HFE 63D allele was frequent in Brazilian blood donors. The HFE C282Y and H63D mutations were associated with alterations in iron status in blood donors in a gender-dependent manner.

  8. Combining gene mutation with gene expression data improves outcome prediction in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gerstung, Moritz; Pellagatti, Andrea; Malcovati, Luca; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Porta, Matteo G Della; Jädersten, Martin; Dolatshad, Hamid; Verma, Amit; Cross, Nicholas C. P.; Vyas, Paresh; Killick, Sally; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Cazzola, Mario; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Campbell, Peter J.; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease, but two patients rarely have identical genotypes. Similarly, patients differ in their clinicopathological parameters, but how genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity are interconnected is not well understood. Here we build statistical models to disentangle the effect of 12 recurrently mutated genes and 4 cytogenetic alterations on gene expression, diagnostic clinical variables and outcome in 124 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. Overall, one or more genetic lesions correlate with expression levels of ~20% of all genes, explaining 20–65% of observed expression variability. Differential expression patterns vary between mutations and reflect the underlying biology, such as aberrant polycomb repression for ASXL1 and EZH2 mutations or perturbed gene dosage for copy-number changes. In predicting survival, genomic, transcriptomic and diagnostic clinical variables all have utility, with the largest contribution from the transcriptome. Similar observations are made on the TCGA acute myeloid leukaemia cohort, confirming the general trends reported here. PMID:25574665

  9. Gene-trapping to identify and analyze genes expressed in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Steel, M; Moss, J; Clark, K A; Kearns, I R; Davies, C H; Morris, R G; Skarnes, W C; Lathe, R

    1998-01-01

    Mice harboring random gene-trap insertions of a lacZ (beta-galactosidase)-neomycin resistance fusion cassette (beta-geo) were analyzed for expression in the hippocampus. In 4 of 15 lines reporter gene activity was observed in the hippocampal formation. In the obn line, enzyme activity was detected in the CA1-3 hippocampal subfields, in hpk expression was restricted to CA1, but in both lines reporter activity was also present in other brain regions. In the third line, kin, reporter activity was robustly expressed throughout the stratum pyrimidale of CA1-3, with only low-level expression elsewhere. The final line (glnC) displayed ubiquitous expression of the reporter and was not analyzed further. Fusion transcripts for the first three lines were characterized; all encode polypeptides with features of membrane-associated signalling proteins. The obn fusion identified a human cDNA (B2-1) encoding a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, while hpk sequences matched the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) inducible G-protein coupled receptor, EBI-1. kin identified an alternative form of the abl-related nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-arg. Electrophysiological studies on mice homozygous for the insertions revealed normal synaptic transmission, paired pulse facilitation and paired-pulse depression at Schaffer collateral-commissural CA1 synapses, and normal long-term potentiation (LTP) in obn and kin. hpk mice displayed an increase in hippocampal CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP), suggesting a role for this receptor in synaptic plasticity.

  10. Vector Integration Sites Identification for Gene-Trap Screening in Mammalian Haploid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian; Ciaudo, Constance

    2017-01-01

    Forward genetic screens using retroviral (or transposon) gene-trap vectors in a haploid genome revolutionized the investigation of molecular networks in mammals. However, the sequencing data generated by Phenotypic interrogation followed by Tag sequencing (PhiT-seq) were not well characterized. The analysis of human and mouse haploid screens allowed us to describe PhiT-seq data and to define quality control steps. Moreover, we identified several blind spots in both haploid genomes where gene-trap vectors can hardly integrate. Integration of transcriptomic data improved the performance of candidate gene identification. Furthermore, we experimented with various statistical tests to account for biological replicates in PhiT-seq and investigated the effect of normalization methods and other parameters on the performance. Finally, we developed: VISITs, a dedicated pipeline for analyzing PhiT-seq data (https://sourceforge.net/projects/visits/). PMID:28303933

  11. Gene Expression Analysis of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Following Levitation in an Ultrasound Standing Wave Trap

    PubMed Central

    Bazou, Despina; Kearney, Roisin; Mansergh, Fiona; Bourdon, Celine; Farrar, Jane; Wride, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In the present paper, gene expression analysis of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells levitated in a novel ultrasound standing wave trap (USWT) (Bazou et al. 2005a) at variable acoustic pressures (0.08–0.85 MPa) and times (5–60 min) was performed. Our results showed that levitation of ES cells at the highest employed acoustic pressure for 60 min does not modify gene expression and cells maintain their pluripotency. Embryoid bodies (EBs) also expressed the early and late neural differentiation markers, which were also unaffected by the acoustic field. Our results suggest that the ultrasound trap microenvironment is minimally invasive as the biologic consequences of ES cell replication and EB differentiation proceed without significantly affecting gene expression. The technique holds great promise in safe cell manipulation techniques for a variety of applications including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. (E-mail: Bazoud@tcd.ie) PMID:21208732

  12. Gene expression analysis of mouse embryonic stem cells following levitation in an ultrasound standing wave trap.

    PubMed

    Bazou, Despina; Kearney, Roisin; Mansergh, Fiona; Bourdon, Celine; Farrar, Jane; Wride, Michael

    2011-02-01

    In the present paper, gene expression analysis of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells levitated in a novel ultrasound standing wave trap (USWT) (Bazou et al. 2005a) at variable acoustic pressures (0.08-0.85 MPa) and times (5-60 min) was performed. Our results showed that levitation of ES cells at the highest employed acoustic pressure for 60 min does not modify gene expression and cells maintain their pluripotency. Embryoid bodies (EBs) also expressed the early and late neural differentiation markers, which were also unaffected by the acoustic field. Our results suggest that the ultrasound trap microenvironment is minimally invasive as the biologic consequences of ES cell replication and EB differentiation proceed without significantly affecting gene expression. The technique holds great promise in safe cell manipulation techniques for a variety of applications including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clusters of point mutations are found exclusively around rearranged antibody variable genes.

    PubMed

    Gearhart, P J; Bogenhagen, D F

    1983-06-01

    We have examined the nucleotide sequences of a series of murine antibody genes derived from one kappa light chain gene in order to gain insight into the mechanism that specifically mutates variable genes. Six rearranged VK167 genes from hybridoma and myeloma cells were cloned from bacteriophage lambda libraries. The sequences were compared to the germ-line sequence of the VK167 gene, the JK genes, and the CK gene to identify sites of mutation. Four of six rearranged genes had extensive mutation which occurred exclusively in a 1-kilobase region of DNA centered around the V-J gene. No mutations were found at more distant sites in the intervening sequence or in the constant gene. The frequency of mutation was approximately 0.5% (32 mutations per 6,749 base pairs). Mutations were mostly due to nucleotide substitutions with no preference for transitions or transversions. The location of mutations around each gene indicates that they occur in clusters at random sites. The observation of mutations in the intervening sequence downstream from the JK5 gene rules out models for the mechanism of mutagenesis that rely solely on gene conversion or recombination. The distribution and high frequency of mutations are most easily explained by a mechanism of error-prone repair that occurs during several cycles of cell division.

  14. Mutational analysis of genes coding for cell surface proteins in colorectal cancer cell lines reveal novel altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Bruna R.; Bettoni, Fabiana; Koyama, Fernanda C.; Navarro, Fabio C.P.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Mariadason, John; Sieber, Oliver M.; Strausberg, Robert L.; Simpson, Andrew J.G.; Jardim, Denis L.F.; Reis, Luiz Fernando L.; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a mutational analysis of 3,594 genes coding for cell surface proteins (Surfaceome) in 23 colorectal cancer cell lines, searching for new altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy in colorectal cancer. A total of 3,944 somatic non-synonymous substitutions and 595 InDels, occurring in 2,061 (57%) Surfaceome genes were catalogued. We identified 48 genes not previously described as mutated in colorectal tumors in the TCGA database, including genes that are mutated and expressed in >10% of the cell lines (SEMA4C, FGFRL1, PKD1, FAM38A, WDR81, TMEM136, SLC36A1, SLC26A6, IGFLR1). Analysis of these genes uncovered important roles for FGF and SEMA4 signaling in colorectal cancer with possible therapeutic implications. We also found that cell lines express on average 11 druggable mutations, including frequent mutations (>20%) in the receptor tyrosine kinases AXL and EPHA2, which have not been previously considered as potential targets for colorectal cancer. Finally, we identified 82 cell surface mutated epitopes, however expression of only 30% of these epitopes was detected in our cell lines. Notwithstanding, 92% of these epitopes were expressed in cell lines with the mutator phenotype, opening new venues for the use of “general” immune checkpoint drugs in this subset of patients. PMID:25193853

  15. Screening of sarcomere gene mutations in young athletes with abnormal findings in electrocardiography: identification of a MYH7 mutation and MYBPC3 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Chika; Arimura, Takuro; Hayashi, Takeharu; Naruse, Taeko K; Kawai, Sachio; Kimura, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    There is an overlap between the physiological cardiac remodeling associated with training in athletes, the so-called athlete's heart, and mild forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common hereditary cardiac disease. HCM is often accompanied by unfavorable outcomes including a sudden cardiac death in the adolescents. Because one of the initial signs of HCM is abnormality in electrocardiogram (ECG), athletes may need to monitor for ECG findings to prevent any unfavorable outcomes. HCM is caused by mutations in genes for sarcomere proteins, but there is no report on the systematic screening of gene mutations in athletes. One hundred and two genetically unrelated young Japanese athletes with abnormal ECG findings were the subjects for the analysis of four sarcomere genes, MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2 and TNNI3. We found that 5 out of 102 (4.9%) athletes carried mutations: a heterozygous MYH7 Glu935Lys mutation, a heterozygous MYBPC3 Arg160Trp mutation and another heterozygous MYBPC3 Thr1046Met mutation, all of which had been reported as HCM-associated mutations, in 1, 2 and 2 subjects, respectively. This is the first study of systematic screening of sarcomere gene mutations in a cohort of athletes with abnormal ECG, demonstrating the presence of sarcomere gene mutations in the athlete's heart.

  16. Patient with FMF and Triple MEFV Gene Mutations.

    PubMed

    Salehzadeh, Farhad; Fathi, Afshin

    2015-08-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common auto-inflammatory disease with monogenic (MEditerranean FeVer -MEFV- gene) inherited pattern. It mainly affects ethnic groups living along the eastern Mediterranean Sea: Turks, Sephardic Jews, Armenians, and Arabs [1]. Today FMF is not rare disease in other Mediterranean ethnicities, such as Greeks, Italians, and Iranians. Here we report a child with complex allele mutations E148Q/V726A/R761H, whilst, whose mother showed E148Q/V726A and his father had R761H/wt in analysis. The severity of the disease and genotype-phenotype correlation of patient showed no significant differences with his mother and other patients with the same two mutations, V726A/R761H, E148Q/V726A, and E148Q/R761H. This type of mutation is the first report of triple mutations in FMF patients with no specific phenotype correlation.

  17. Progranulin gene mutation with an unusual clinical and neuropathologic presentation.

    PubMed

    Wider, Christian; Uitti, Ryan J; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Fang, John Y; Josephs, Keith A; Baker, Matthew C; Rademakers, Rosa; Hutton, Michael L; Dickson, Dennis W

    2008-06-15

    Progranulin gene (PGRN) mutations cause frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U). Patients usually present with a frontotemporal dementia syndrome and have prominent atrophy and neuronal loss in frontal and temporal cortices and the striatum, with neuronal intranuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions. Clinical, neuropathological, and genetic studies are reported on an individual with PGRN mutation and her family members. We describe a patient with a PGRN c.26C>A mutation who presented with progressive stuttering dysarthria, oculomotor abnormalities, choreic buccolingual movements, and mild parkinsonism. Two other family members were affected, one with a behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia syndrome, the other with a diagnosis of probable Alzheimer's disease. At autopsy there was no neuronal loss in the cortex or medial temporal lobe structures, but there was striatal gliosis. Immunohistochemistry for ubiquitin and TDP-43 revealed neuronal cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions as well as neurites. This study further expands the clinical and pathological spectrum of PGRN mutations, and suggests the diagnosis could be missed in some individuals with atypical presentations.

  18. The clinical implications of gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a molecularly heterogeneous disease as revealed by recent genomic studies. Among genetic lesions that are recurrent in CLL, few clinically validated prognostic markers, such as TP53 mutations and 17p deletion, are available for the use in clinical practice to guide treatment decisions. Recently, several novel molecular markers have been identified in CLL. Though these mutations have not yet gained the qualification of predictive factors for treatment tailoring, they have shown to be promising to refine the prognostic stratification of patients. The introduction of targeted drugs is changing the genetics of CLL, and has disclosed the acquisition of previously unexpected drug resistant mutations in signalling pathway genes. Ultra-deep next generation sequencing has allowed to reach deep levels of resolution of the genetic portrait of CLL providing a precise definition of its subclonal genetic architecture. This approach has shown that small subclones harbouring drug resistant mutations anticipate the development of a chemorefractory phenotype. Here we review the recent advances in the definition of the genomic landscape of CLL and the ongoing research to characterise the clinical implications of old and new molecular lesions in the setting of both conventional chemo-immunotherapy and targeted drugs. PMID:27031852

  19. Mutations of the p53 and PTCH gene in basal cell carcinomas: UV mutation signature and strand bias.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Yeon; Park, Hyun Jeong; Baek, Seung-Cheol; Byun, Dae Gyoo; Houh, Dong

    2002-05-01

    Mutations of p53 and PTCH gene, two candidate tumor suppressor genes for basal cell carcinoma (BCC), were screened in 15 cases of sporadic BCCs that developed in sun-exposed skin region in a Korean population. p53 and PTCH mutations were detected at a frequency of 33 and 40%, respectively, and the mutations were predominantly UV-signature transition, C-->T transitions at dipyrimidine sites and CC-->TT tandem mutations. In both genes, the most common mutations were missense mutations resulting in amino acid substitution, which is different than the results from Caucasian BCCs where mutations are frequently predicted to make truncated or absent proteins. All mutations, except for one, occurred on the nontranscribed strand where is little efficient removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers relative to the transcribed strand. Loss of heterozygocity (LOH) of 9q22 for PTCH loci was found in eight of 15 informative cases of BCCs (53%), but none of the cases were informative for LOH of 17p13 for p53 loci. Not only do our data indicate the key role played by p53 and PTCH in the development of BCCs, these findings also suggest that UVB may significantly contribute to BCC tumorigenesis. Moreover, molecular epidemiology composed of incidence of p53 and PTCH mutations, difference in the type of mutation and repair bias of UV-induced DNA lesions might affect the distinct features of BCCs between different racial population.

  20. A versatile gene trap to visualize and interrogate the function of the vertebrate proteome

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Le A.; Hochgreb, Tatiana; Graham, Matthew; Wu, David; Ruf-Zamojski, Frederique; Jayasena, Chathurani S.; Saxena, Ankur; Hawk, Rasheeda; Gonzalez-Serricchio, Aidyl; Dixson, Alana; Chow, Elly; Gonzales, Constanza; Leung, Ho-Yin; Solomon, Ilana; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne; Megason, Sean G.; Fraser, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    We report a multifunctional gene-trapping approach, which generates full-length Citrine fusions with endogenous proteins and conditional mutants from a single integration event of the FlipTrap vector. We identified 170 FlipTrap zebrafish lines with diverse tissue-specific expression patterns and distinct subcellular localizations of fusion proteins generated by the integration of an internal citrine exon. Cre-mediated conditional mutagenesis is enabled by heterotypic lox sites that delete Citrine and “flip” in its place mCherry with a polyadenylation signal, resulting in a truncated fusion protein. Inducing recombination with Cerulean-Cre results in fusion proteins that often mislocalize, exhibit mutant phenotypes, and dramatically knock down wild-type transcript levels. FRT sites in the vector enable targeted genetic manipulation of the trapped loci in the presence of Flp recombinase. Thus, the FlipTrap captures the functional proteome, enabling the visualization of full-length fluorescent fusion proteins and interrogation of function by conditional mutagenesis and targeted genetic manipulation. PMID:22056673

  1. Melanocortin-4 receptor gene mutations in obese Slovak children.

    PubMed

    Stanikova, D; Surova, M; Ticha, L; Petrasova, M; Virgova, D; Huckova, M; Skopkova, M; Lobotkova, D; Valentinova, L; Mokan, M; Stanik, J; Klimes, I; Gasperikova, D

    2015-01-01

    The most common etiology of non-syndromic monogenic obesity are mutations in gene for the Melanocortin-4 receptor (MC485) with variable prevalence in different countries (1.2-6.3 % of obese children). The aim of our study was 1) to search for MC4R mutations in obese children in Slovakia and compare their prevalence with other European countries, and 2) to describe the phenotype of the mutation carriers. DNA analysis by direct Sanger sequencing of the coding exons and intron/exon boundaries of the MC4R gene was performed in 268 unrelated Slovak children and adolescents with body mass index above the 97(th) percentile for age and sex and obesity onset up to 11 years (mean 4.3+/-2.8 years). Two different previously described heterozygous loss of function MC4R variants (i.e. p.Ser19Alafs*34, p.Ser127Leu) were identified in two obese probands, and one obese (p.Ser19Alafs*34), and one lean (p.Ser127Leu) adult family relatives. No loss of function variants were found in lean controls. The prevalence of loss-of-function MC4R variants in obese Slovak children was 0.7 %, what is one of the lowest frequencies in Europe.

  2. Genes and Mutations Causing Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Daiger, Stephen P.; Bowne, Sara J.; Sullivan, Lori S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) has a prevalence of approximately one in 4000; 25%–30% of these cases are autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). Like other forms of inherited retinal disease, adRP is exceptionally heterogeneous. Mutations in more than 25 genes are known to cause adRP, more than 1000 mutations have been reported in these genes, clinical findings are highly variable, and there is considerable overlap with other types of inherited disease. Currently, it is possible to detect disease-causing mutations in 50%–75% of adRP families in select populations. Genetic diagnosis of adRP has advantages over other forms of RP because segregation of disease in families is a useful tool for identifying and confirming potentially pathogenic variants, but there are disadvantages too. In addition to identifying the cause of disease in the remaining 25% of adRP families, a central challenge is reconciling clinical diagnosis, family history, and molecular findings in patients and families. PMID:25304133

  3. Thyroglobulin gene mutations in Chinese patients with congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuyun; Chen, Rongyu; Fu, Chunyun; Fan, Xin; Wang, Jin; Qian, Jiale; Yi, Shang; Li, Chuan; Luo, Jingsi; Su, Jiasun; Zhang, Shujie; Xie, Bobo; Zheng, Haiyang; Lai, Yunli; Chen, Yun; Li, Hongdou; Gu, Xuefan; Chen, Shaoke; Shen, Yiping

    2016-03-05

    Mutations in Thyroglobulin (TG) are common genetic causes of congenital hypothyroidism (CH). But the TG mutation spectrum and its frequency in Chinese CH patients have not been investigated. Here we conducted a genetic screening of TG gene in a cohort of 382 Chinese CH patients. We identified 22 rare non-polymorphic variants including six truncating variants and 16 missense variants of unknown significance (VUS). Seven patients carried homozygous pathogenic variants, and three patients carried homozygous or compound heterozygous VUS. 48 out of 382 patients carried one of 18 heterozygous VUS which is significantly more often than their occurrences in control cohort (P < 0.0001). Unique to Asian population, the c.274+2T>G variant is the most common pathogenic variant with an allele frequency of 0.021. The prevalence of CH due to TG gene defect in Chinese population was estimated to be approximately 1/101,000. Our study uncovered ethnicity specific TG mutation spectrum and frequency.

  4. Cardiac ion channel gene mutations in sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Otagiri, Tesshu; Kijima, Kazuki; Osawa, Motoki; Ishii, Kuniaki; Makita, Naomasa; Matoba, Ryoji; Umetsu, Kazuo; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2008-11-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is multifactorial and may result from the interaction of a number of environmental, genetic, and developmental factors. We studied three major genes causing long QT syndrome in 42 Japanese SIDS victims and found five mutations, KCNQ1-K598R, KCNH2-T895M, SCN5A-F532C, SCN5A-G1084S, and SCN5A-F1705S, in four cases; one case had both KCNH2-T895M and SCN5A-G1084S. All mutations were novel except for SCN5A-F532C, which was previously detected in an arrhythmic patient. Heterologous expression study revealed significant changes in channel properties of KCNH2-T895M, SCN5A-G1084S, and SCN5A-F1705S, but did not in KCNQ1-K598R and SCN5A-F532C. Our data suggests that nearly 10% of SIDS victims in Japan have mutations of the cardiac ion channel genes similar to in other countries.

  5. IL7R and RAG1/2 genes mutations/polymorphisms in patients with SCID.

    PubMed

    Safaei, Sepideh; Pourpak, Zahra; Moin, Mostafa; Houshmand, Massoud

    2011-06-01

    SCID disorder is major failure of the immune system, usually genetic. The aim of this study was on mutations detection of RAG1, RAG2, and IL7RG genes in SCID cases. Mutation detection was performed by PCR sequencing. Our results indicated that 13 mutations were found through cases which include 4 mutations in IL7R gene (T661I, I138V, T56A, C57W), 7 mutations in RAG1 (W896X, W204R, M324V, T731I, M1006V, K820R, and R249H), and 2 mutations in RAG2 gene (R229W, ΔT251).

  6. Suppression of TGA Mutations in the Bacillus subtilis spoIIR Gene by prfB Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Karow, Margaret L.; Rogers, Elizabeth J.; Lovett, Paul S.; Piggot, Patrick J.

    1998-01-01

    An unexpectedly high proportion of TGA nonsense mutations was obtained in a collection of chemically induced mutations in the spoIIR locus of Bacillus subtilis. Of 11 different mutations obtained, TGA mutations were found in four codons, whereas only three codons yielded missense mutations. Six suppressors of the TGA mutations were isolated, and five of the suppressing mutations were mapped to the prfB gene encoding protein release factor 2. These are the first mutations shown to map to the B. subtilis prfB locus. The sequence of the prfB gene was completed, and two revisions of the published sequence were made. The five prfB mutations also resulted in suppression of the catA86-TGA mutation to between 19 and 54% of the expression of catA86+, compared to the readthrough level of 6% in the prfB+ strain. N-terminal sequencing of suppressed catA86-TGA-specified protein demonstrated that the amino acid inserted at UGA because of the prfB1 mutations was tryptophan. PMID:9696765

  7. Mutations in human monoamine-related neurotransmitter pathway genes.

    PubMed

    Haavik, Jan; Blau, Nenad; Thöny, Beat

    2008-07-01

    Biosynthesis and metabolism of serotonin and catecholamines involve at least eight individual enzymes that are mainly expressed in tissues derived from the neuroectoderm, e.g., the central nervous system (CNS), pineal gland, adrenal medulla, enterochromaffin tissue, sympathetic nerves, and ganglia. Some of the enzymes appear to have additional biological functions and are also expressed in the heart and various other internal organs. The biosynthetic enzymes are tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), tryptophan hydroxylases type 1 and 2 (TPH1, TPH2), aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DbetaH), and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT), and the specific catabolic enzymes are monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) and catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT). For the TH, DDC, DBH, and MAOA genes, many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with unknown function, and small but increasing numbers of cases with autosomal recessive mutations have been recognized. For the remaining genes (TPH1, TPH2, PNMT, and COMT) several different genetic markers have been suggested to be associated with regulation of mood, pain perception, and aggression, as well as psychiatric disturbances such as schizophrenia, depression, suicidality, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The genetic markers may either have a functional role of their own, or be closely linked to other unknown functional variants. In the future, molecular testing may become important for the diagnosis of such conditions. Here we present an overview on mutations and polymorphisms in the group of genes encoding monoamine neurotransmitter metabolizing enzymes. At the same time we propose a unified nomenclature for the nucleic acid aberrations in these genes. New variations or details on mutations will be updated in the Pediatric Neurotransmitter Disorder Data Base (PNDDB) database (www.bioPKU.org).

  8. Mutations and a polymorphism in the tuberin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Northup, H.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Au, K.S.; Rodriguez, E.

    1994-09-01

    Two deletions and a polymorphism have been identified in the recently described tuberin gene. The tuberin gene (designated TSC2) when mutated causes tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Fifty-three affected individuals (30 from families with multiple affected and 23 isolated cases) were screened with the tuberin cDNA for gross deletions or rearrangements. Both deletions were found in families with multiple affected members (family designations: HOU-5 and HOU-22). The approximate size of the deletion in HOU-5 is ten kilobases and eliminates a BamHI restriction site. The deletion includes a portion of the 5{prime} half of the tuberin cDNA. The deletion in HOU-22 occurs in the 3{prime} half of the gene. The deletions are being further characterized. A HindIII restriction site polymorphism was detected by a 0.5 kilobase probe from the 5{prime} coding region of the tuberin gene in an individual from a family linked to chromosome 9 (posterior probability of linkage 93%). The polymorphism did not segregate with TSC in the family. The family had previously been shown to give negative results with multiple markers on chromosome 16. The polymorphism was also seen in one individual among a panel of 20 randomly selected unaffected individuals. Thirty-five additional affected probands (five from families and 30 isolated cases) are being tested with the tuberin cDNA. Testing for subtle mutations is our panel of 80 affected probands is underway utilizing SSCP. Additional mutations or polymorphisms detected will be reported. The tuberin cDNA was a kind gift of The European Chromosome 16 Tuberous Sclerosis Consortium.

  9. A substitution mutation in the myosin binding protein C gene in ragdoll hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Meurs, Kathryn M; Norgard, Michelle M; Ederer, Martina M; Hendrix, Kristina P; Kittleson, Mark D

    2007-08-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary myocardial disease with a prevalence of 1 in 500 in human beings. Causative mutations have been identified in several sarcomeric genes, including the cardiac myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) gene. Heritable HCM also exists in a large-animal model, the cat, and we have previously reported a mutation in the MYBPC3 gene in the Maine coon breed. We now report a separate mutation in the MYBPC3 gene in ragdoll cats with HCM. The mutation changes a conserved arginine to tryptophan and appears to alter the protein structure. The ragdoll is not related to the Maine coon and the mutation identified is in a domain different from that of the previously identified feline mutation. The identification of two separate mutations within this gene in unrelated breeds suggests that these mutations occurred independently rather than being passed on from a common founder.

  10. LNDriver: identifying driver genes by integrating mutation and expression data based on gene-gene interaction network.

    PubMed

    Wei, Pi-Jing; Zhang, Di; Xia, Junfeng; Zheng, Chun-Hou

    2016-12-23

    Cancer is a complex disease which is characterized by the accumulation of genetic alterations during the patient's lifetime. With the development of the next-generation sequencing technology, multiple omics data, such as cancer genomic, epigenomic and transcriptomic data etc., can be measured from each individual. Correspondingly, one of the key challenges is to pinpoint functional driver mutations or pathways, which contributes to tumorigenesis, from millions of functional neutral passenger mutations. In this paper, in order to identify driver genes effectively, we applied a generalized additive model to mutation profiles to filter genes with long length and constructed a new gene-gene interaction network. Then we integrated the mutation data and expression data into the gene-gene interaction network. Lastly, greedy algorithm was used to prioritize candidate driver genes from the integrated data. We named the proposed method Length-Net-Driver (LNDriver). Experiments on three TCGA datasets, i.e., head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, kidney renal clear cell carcinoma and thyroid carcinoma, demonstrated that the proposed method was effective. Also, it can identify not only frequently mutated drivers, but also rare candidate driver genes.

  11. Phylogenetics and evolution of nematode-trapping fungi (Orbiliales) estimated from nuclear and protein coding genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Hyde, Kevin D; Jeewon, Rajesh; Cai, Lei; Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Zhang, Keqin

    2005-01-01

    The systematic classification of nematode-trapping fungi is redefined based on phylogenies inferred from sequence analyses of 28S rDNA, 5.8S rDNA and beta-tubulin genes. Molecular data were analyzed with maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian analysis. An emended generic concept of nematode-trapping fungi is provided. Arthrobotrys is characterized by adhesive networks, Dactylellina by adhesive knobs, and Drechslerella by constricting-rings. Phylogenetic placement of taxa characterized by stalked adhesive knobs and non-constricting rings also is confirmed in Dactylellina. Species that produce unstalked adhesive knobs that grow out to form loops are transferred from Gamsylella to Dactylellina, and those that produce unstalked adhesive knobs that grow out to form networks are transferred from Gamsylella to Arthrobotrys. Gamsylella as currently circumscribed cannot be treated as a valid genus. A hypothesis for the evolution of trapping-devices is presented based on multiple gene data and morphological studies. Predatory and nonpredatory fungi appear to have been derived from nonpredatory members of Orbilia. The adhesive knob is considered to be the ancestral type of trapping device from which constricting rings and networks were derived via two pathways. In the first pathway adhesive knobs retained their adhesive material forming simple two-dimension networks, eventually forming complex three-dimension networks. In the second pathway adhesive knobs lost their adhesive materials, with their ends meeting to form nonconstricting rings and they in turn formed constricting rings with three inflated-cells.

  12. A novel KRAS gene mutation report in sporadic colorectal cancer, from Northwest of Iran.

    PubMed

    Dolatkhah, Roya; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Kermani, Iraj Asvadi; Farassati, Faris; Dastgiri, Saeed

    2017-03-01

    While the role of KRAS gene mutations has been widely accepted for predicting responses to anti-EGFR therapy in patients with colorectal cancer, although this study was based on observation of a single case it gives hope that some KRAS gene mutation may have favorable prognosis. More studies are required on patients with similar mutation to validate this finding.

  13. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-11-02

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT(+/-) cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT(+/-) rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species.

  14. Diaphanous gene mutation affects spiral cleavage and chirality in snails

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Reiko; Fujikura, Kohei; Abe, Masanori; Hosoiri, Yuji; Asakawa, Shuichi; Shimizu, Miho; Umeda, Shin; Ichikawa, Futaba; Takahashi, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    L-R (left and right) symmetry breaking during embryogenesis and the establishment of asymmetric body plan are key issues in developmental biology, but the onset including the handedness-determining gene locus still remains unknown. Using pure dextral (DD) and sinistral (dd) strains of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis as well as its F2 through to F10 backcrossed lines, the single handedness-determining-gene locus was mapped by genetic linkage analysis, BAC cloning and chromosome walking. We have identified the actin-related diaphanous gene Lsdia1 as the strongest candidate. Although the cDNA and derived amino acid sequences of the tandemly duplicated Lsdia1 and Lsdia2 genes are very similar, we could discriminate the two genes/proteins in our molecular biology experiments. The Lsdia1 gene of the sinistral strain carries a frameshift mutation that abrogates full-length LsDia1 protein expression. In the dextral strain, it is already translated prior to oviposition. Expression of Lsdia1 (only in the dextral strain) and Lsdia2 (in both chirality) decreases after the 1-cell stage, with no asymmetric localization throughout. The evolutionary relationships among body handedness, SD/SI (spiral deformation/spindle inclination) at the third cleavage, and expression of diaphanous proteins are discussed in comparison with three other pond snails (L. peregra, Physa acuta and Indoplanorbis exustus). PMID:27708420

  15. Mutation screening of the HGD gene identifies a novel alkaptonuria mutation with significant founder effect and high prevalence.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Srinivasan; Zatkova, Andrea; Nemethova, Martina; Surovy, Milan; Kadasi, Ludevit; Saravanan, Madurai P

    2014-05-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder; caused by the mutations in the homogentisate 1, 2-dioxygenase (HGD) gene located on Chromosome 3q13.33. AKU is a rare disorder with an incidence of 1: 250,000 to 1: 1,000,000, but Slovakia and the Dominican Republic have a relatively higher incidence of 1: 19,000. Our study focused on studying the frequency of AKU and identification of HGD gene mutations in nomads. HGD gene sequencing was used to identify the mutations in alkaptonurics. For the past four years, from subjects suspected to be clinically affected, we found 16 positive cases among a randomly selected cohort of 41 Indian nomads (Narikuravar) settled in the specific area of Tamil Nadu, India. HGD gene mutation analysis showed that 11 of these patients carry the same homozygous splicing mutation c.87 + 1G > A; in five cases, this mutation was found to be heterozygous, while the second AKU-causing mutation was not identified in these patients. This result indicates that the founder effect and high degree of consanguineous marriages have contributed to AKU among nomads. Eleven positive samples were homozygous for a novel mutation c.87 + 1G > A, that abolishes an intron 2 donor splice site and most likely causes skipping of exon 2. The prevalence of AKU observed earlier seems to be highly increased in people of nomadic origin. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  16. Genetic epidemiology of muscular dystrophies resulting from sarcoglycan gene mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Fanin, M; Duggan, D J; Mostacciuolo, M L; Martinello, F; Freda, M P; Sorarù, G; Trevisan, C P; Hoffman, E P; Angelini, C

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) are a group of genetically heterogeneous muscle diseases characterised by progressive proximal limb muscle weakness. Six different loci have been mapped and pathogenetic mutations in the genes encoding the sarcoglycan complex components (alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and delta-sarcoglycan) have been documented. LGMD patients affected with primary "sarcoglycanopathies" are classified as LGMD2D, 2E, 2C, and 2F, respectively. METHODS: A geographical area in north east Italy (2,319,147 inhabitants) was selected for a genetic epidemiological study on primary sarcoglycanopathies. Within the period 1982 to 1996, all patients living in this region and diagnosed with muscular dystrophy were seen at our centre. Immunohistochemical and immunoblot screening for alpha-sarcoglycan protein deficiency was performed on all muscle biopsies from patients with a progressive muscular dystrophy of unknown aetiology and normal dystrophin. Sarcoglycan mutation analyses were conducted on all patient muscle biopsies shown to have complete or partial absence of alpha-sarcoglycan immunostaining or a decreased quantity of alpha-sarcoglycan protein on immunoblotting. RESULTS: Two hundred and four patient muscle biopsies were screened for alpha-sarcoglycan protein deficiency and 18 biopsies showed a deficiency. Pathogenetic mutations involving one gene for sarcoglycan complex components were identified in 13 patients: alpha-sarcoglycan in seven, beta-sarcoglycan in two, gamma-sarcoglycan in four, and none in the delta-sarcoglycan gene. The overall prevalence of primary sarcoglycanopathies, as of 31 December 1996, was estimated to be 5.6 x 10(-6) inhabitants. CONCLUSION: The prevalence rate estimated in this study is the first to be obtained after biochemical and molecular genetic screening for sarcoglycan defects. PMID:9429136

  17. Monogenic forms of childhood obesity due to mutations in the leptin gene.

    PubMed

    Funcke, Jan-Bernd; von Schnurbein, Julia; Lennerz, Belinda; Lahr, Georgia; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Wabitsch, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Congenital leptin deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive monogenic obesity syndrome caused by mutations in the leptin gene. This review describes the molecular and cellular characteristics of the eight distinct mutations found so far in humans.

  18. When Is Risk Highest for Women with Breast Cancer Gene Mutations?

    MedlinePlus

    ... html When Is Risk Highest for Women With Breast Cancer Gene Mutations? Study narrows down peak times, possibly ... of Public Health and Primary Care in England. Breast cancer risk peaks around the 40s for BRCA1 mutation ...

  19. Novel germline mutations in the calreticulin gene: implications for the diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Szuber, Natasha; Lamontagne, Bruno; Busque, Lambert

    2016-07-27

    Mutations in the calreticulin (CALR) gene are found in the majority of Janus kinase 2-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms MPN and, thus far, have exclusively been reported as acquired, somatic mutations. We assessed the mutational status of exon 9 of the CALR gene in 2000 blood samples submitted to our centre and identified 12 subjects (0.6%) harbouring distinctive CALR mutations, all with an allelic frequency of 50% and all involving indels occurring as multiples of 3 bp. Buccal cell samples obtained from these patients confirmed the germline nature of the mutations. Importantly, these germline mutations were not diagnostic of MPN. We thus report for the first time the identification and confirmation of germline mutations in CALR distinct from those somatic mutations that define classical MPN. The finding of a non-standard CALR mutation with an allelic frequency of 50% should raise suspicion of the possibility of a germline CALR mutation and these cases investigated further.

  20. A Tie2-driven BAC-TRAP transgenic line for in vivo endothelial gene profiling.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Devi; Huang, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Recent technological innovations including bacterial artificial chromosome-based translating ribosome affinity purification (BAC-TRAP) have greatly facilitated analysis of cell type-specific gene expression in vivo, especially in the nervous system. To better study endothelial gene expression in vivo, we have generated a BAC-TRAP transgenic mouse line where the L10a ribosomal subunit is tagged with EGFP and placed under the control of the endothelium-specific Tie2 (Tek) promoter. We show that transgene expression in this line is widely, but specifically, detected in endothelial cells in several brain regions throughout pre- and postnatal development, as well as in other organs. We also show that this line results in highly significant enrichment of endothelium-specific mRNAs from brain tissues at different stages. This BAC-TRAP line therefore provides a useful genetic tool for in vivo endothelial gene profiling under various developmental, physiological, and pathological conditions. genesis 54:136-145, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Mutational analysis of caspase 1, 4, and 5 genes in common human cancers.

    PubMed

    Soung, Young Hwa; Jeong, Eun Goo; Ahn, Chang Hyeok; Kim, Sung Soo; Song, Sang Yong; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2008-06-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that deregulation of apoptosis is involved in the mechanisms of cancer development. Mutations of genes encoding caspases, the executioners of apoptosis, have been detected in human cancers, indicating inactivation of apoptosis by the mutations of caspase is an important mechanism in cancer development. The aim of this study was to see whether genes encoding human caspases 1, 4, and 5 are mutated in human cancers. We analyzed the entire coding region and all splice sites of human caspase 1, 4, and 5 genes for the detection of somatic mutations in 337 human cancers, including 103 colorectal, 54 gastric, 60 breast, 60 hepatocellular, and 60 lung carcinomas by a single-strand conformation polymorphism assay. We detected 2 (0.6%) caspase-1, 2 (0.6%) caspase-4, and 15 (4.4%) caspase-5 mutations in the 343 cancers. The mutations were detected in 11 gastric carcinomas (2 caspase-1 and 9 caspase-5 mutations), 6 colorectal carcinomas (2 caspase-4 and 4 caspase-5 mutations), 1 breast carcinoma (1 caspase-5 mutation), and 1 lung carcinoma (1 caspase-5 mutation). The mutations consisted of 11 mutations in exons and 8 mutations in noncoding sequences. The 11 mutations in the exons consisted of 3 missense, 1 silent, and 7 frameshift mutation(s). Of note, most (6/9) of the caspase-5 mutations in the coding sequences were detected in microsatellite instability (MSI)-positive cancers. These data indicate that somatic mutations of caspase-1 and caspase-4 genes are rare in common solid cancers. In addition, the data indicate that caspase-5 gene is commonly mutated in the MSI-positive cancers, and suggest that inactivation of caspase-5 may play a role in the tumorigenesis of MSI-positive cancers.

  2. Mutation-associated fusion cancer genes in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Frederic J

    2009-06-01

    Chromosomal translocations and fusion oncogenes serve as the ultimate biomarker for clinicians as they show specificity for distinct histopathologic malignancies while simultaneously encoding an etiologic mutation and a therapeutic target. Previously considered a minor mutational event in epithelial solid tumors, new methodologies that do not rely on the detection of macroscopic cytogenetic alterations, as well as access to large series of annotated clinical material, are expanding the inventory of recurrent fusion oncogenes in both common and rare solid epithelial tumors. Unexpectedly, related assays are also revealing a high number of tandem or chimeric transcripts in normal tissues including, in one provocative case, a template for a known fusion oncogene. These observations may force us to reassess long-held views on the definition of a gene. They also raise the possibility that some rearrangements might represent constitutive forms of a physiological chimeric transcript. Defining the chimeric transcriptome in both health (transcription-induced chimerism and intergenic splicing) and disease (mutation-associated fusion oncogenes) will play an increasingly important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of patients with cancer.

  3. [Mutations of MTHFR, MTR, MTRR genes as high risk factors for neural tube defects].

    PubMed

    Sliwerska, Elzbieta; Szpecht-Potocka, Agnieszka

    2002-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) have a polygenic background. There are numerous genes known to be high-risk genetic factors for NTDs. Ones of them are mutations of foliate metabolisms pathways genes. This paper shows the results of analysis of common mutations of MTHFR, MTR and MTRR genes. Results of screening mutations 2756A-->G and 66A-->G in MTR and MTRR genes respectively show that are might have an effect on NTDs incidence among the examined population. Analysis of data for the studied population does not prove the influence of mutations 677C-->T and 1298A-->C of MTHFR gene on NTDs.

  4. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Duvekot, J. J.; Roos-Hesselink, J. W.; Gonzalez Candel, A.; van der Marel, C. D.; Adriaens, V. F. R.

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour. PMID:27668095

  5. Analysis of coliphage lambda mutations that affect Q gene activity: puq, byp, and nin5.

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, N; Enquist, L

    1979-01-01

    We describe in this paper the isolation and characterization of a class of mutations, designated puq, that allow phage lambda to grow better under conditions that limit the synthesis of the phage Q gene product. These mutations were located between phage genes P and Q, a region of the lambda chromosome containing two gene N-independent mutations, nin5 and byp, that we also show to be puq mutations. Whereas the puq-3 and puq-16 mutations probably map under the nin5 deletion, the byp mutation maps between this deletion and the Q lambda-Q phi 80 crossover point. These mutations likely act by increasing the synthesis of the Q gene product. We demonstrate that the clear-plaque phenotype and reduced lysogenization frequency of byp mutants depend on increased Q gene activity. The significance of these results in understanding how transcription proceeds through the P-Q region of the lambda genome is discussed. PMID:158097

  6. Mutation analysis of the Fanconi Anemia Gene FACC

    SciTech Connect

    Verlander, P.C.; Lin, J.D.; Udono, M.U.; Zhang, Q.; Auerbach, A.D. ); Gibson, R.A.; Mathew, C.G. )

    1994-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a unique hypersensitivity of cells to DNA cross-linking agents; a gene for complementation group C (FACC) has recently been cloned. The authors have amplified FACC exons with their flanking intron sequences from genomic DNA from 174 racially and ethnically diverse families in the International Fanconi Anemia Registry and have screened for mutations by using SSCP analysis. They have identified eight different variants in 32 families; three were detected in exon 1, one in exon 4, one in intron 4, two in exon 6, and one in exon 14. Two of the eight variants, in seven families, did not segregate with the disease allele in multiplex families, suggesting that these variants represented benign polymorphisms. Disease-associated mutations in FACC were detected in a total of 25 (14.4%) of 174 families screened. The most frequent mutations were IVS4 + 4 A [yields] T (intron 4; 12 families) and 322delG (exon 1; 9 families). Other, less common mutations include Q13X in exon 1, R185X and D195V in exon 6, and L554P in exon 14. The polymorphisms were S26F in exon 1 and G139E in exon 4. All patients in the study with 322delG, Q13X, R185X, and D195V are of northern or eastern European or southern Italian ancestry, and 18 of 19 have a mild form of the disease, while the 2 patients with L554P, both from the same family, have a severe phenotype. All 19 patients with IVS4 + 4 A [yields] T have Jewish ancestry and have a severe phenotype. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Alu distribution and mutation types of cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Alu elements are the most abundant retrotransposable elements comprising ~11% of the human genome. Many studies have highlighted the role that Alu elements have in genetic instability and how their contribution to the assortment of mutagenic events can lead to cancer. As of yet, little has been done to quantitatively assess the association between Alu distribution and genes that are causally implicated in oncogenesis. Results We have investigated the effect of various Alu densities on the mutation type based classifications of cancer genes. In order to establish the direct relationship between Alus and the cancer genes of interest, genome wide Alu-related densities were measured using genes rather than the sliding windows of fixed length as the units. Several novel genomic features, such as the density of the adjacent Alu pairs and the number of Alu-Exon-Alu triplets, were developed in order to extend the investigation via the multivariate statistical analysis toward more advanced biological insight. In addition, we characterized the genome-wide intron Alu distribution with a mixture model that distinguished genes containing Alu elements from those with no Alus, and evaluated the gene-level effect of the 5'-TTAAAA motif associated with Alu insertion sites using a two-step regression analysis method. Conclusions The study resulted in several novel findings worthy of further investigation. They include: (1) Recessive cancer genes (tumor suppressor genes) are enriched with Alu elements (p < 0.01) compared to dominant cancer genes (oncogenes) and the entire set of genes in the human genome; (2) Alu-related genomic features can be used to cluster cancer genes into biological meaningful groups; (3) The retention of exon Alus has been restricted in the human genome development, and an upper limit to the chromosome-level exon Alu densities is suggested by the distribution profile; (4) For the genes with at least one intron Alu repeat in individual chromosomes

  8. Disease-causing mutations in genes of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Degn, Søren E; Jensenius, Jens C; Thiel, Steffen

    2011-06-10

    Recent studies have revealed profound developmental consequences of mutations in genes encoding proteins of the lectin pathway of complement activation, a central component of the innate immune system. Apart from impairment of immunity against microorganisms, it is known that hereditary deficiencies of this system predispose one to autoimmune conditions. Polymorphisms in complement genes are linked to, for example, atypical hemolytic uremia and age-dependent macular degeneration. The complement system comprises three convergent pathways of activation: the classical, the alternative, and the lectin pathway. The recently discovered lectin pathway is less studied, but polymorphisms in the plasma pattern-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL) are known to impact its level, and polymorphisms in the MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) result in defects of complement activation. Recent studies have described roles outside complement and immunity of another MBL-associated serine protease, MASP-3, in the etiology of 3MC syndrome, an autosomal-recessive disorder involving a spectrum of developmental features, including characteristic facial dysmorphism. Syndrome-causing mutations were identified in MASP1, encoding MASP-3 and two additional proteins, MASP-1 and MAp44. Furthermore, an association was discovered between 3MC syndrome and mutations in COLEC11, encoding CL-K1, another molecule of the lectin pathway. The findings were confirmed in zebrafish, indicating that MASP-3 and CL-K1 underlie an evolutionarily conserved pathway of embryonic development. Along with the discovery of a role of C1q in pruning synapses in mice, these recent advances point toward a broader role of complement in development. Here, we compare the functional immunologic consequences of "conventional" complement deficiencies with these newly described developmental roles.

  9. Disease-Causing Mutations in Genes of the Complement System

    PubMed Central

    Degn, Søren E.; Jensenius, Jens C.; Thiel, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed profound developmental consequences of mutations in genes encoding proteins of the lectin pathway of complement activation, a central component of the innate immune system. Apart from impairment of immunity against microorganisms, it is known that hereditary deficiencies of this system predispose one to autoimmune conditions. Polymorphisms in complement genes are linked to, for example, atypical hemolytic uremia and age-dependent macular degeneration. The complement system comprises three convergent pathways of activation: the classical, the alternative, and the lectin pathway. The recently discovered lectin pathway is less studied, but polymorphisms in the plasma pattern-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL) are known to impact its level, and polymorphisms in the MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) result in defects of complement activation. Recent studies have described roles outside complement and immunity of another MBL-associated serine protease, MASP-3, in the etiology of 3MC syndrome, an autosomal-recessive disorder involving a spectrum of developmental features, including characteristic facial dysmorphism. Syndrome-causing mutations were identified in MASP1, encoding MASP-3 and two additional proteins, MASP-1 and MAp44. Furthermore, an association was discovered between 3MC syndrome and mutations in COLEC11, encoding CL-K1, another molecule of the lectin pathway. The findings were confirmed in zebrafish, indicating that MASP-3 and CL-K1 underlie an evolutionarily conserved pathway of embryonic development. Along with the discovery of a role of C1q in pruning synapses in mice, these recent advances point toward a broader role of complement in development. Here, we compare the functional immunologic consequences of “conventional” complement deficiencies with these newly described developmental roles. PMID:21664996

  10. Mutations of the CYP1B1 gene in congenital anterior staphylomas.

    PubMed

    Al Judaibi, Ramzi; Abu-Amero, Khaled K; Morales, Jose; Al Shahwan, Sami; Edward, Deepak P

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present two patients with congenital anterior staphyloma, with mutations in the CYP1B1 gene. We reviewed the medical records, including the genetic analysis. Two unrelated patients presented with congenital anterior staphylomas. Both patients showed mutations in the CYP1B1 gene. The first patient, the product of a consanguineous marriage, showed a homozygous misssense mutation g.3987G>A (p.G61E). The second patient had compound heterozygous misssense mutations [g.4160 G>T (p.A119S) and g.8131 C>G (p.L432V)]. CYP1B1 gene mutation may be associated with congenital anterior staphylomas.

  11. Cellular dissection of the spinal cord motor column by BAC transgenesis and gene trapping in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Kazuhide; Abe, Gembu; Kawakami, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenesis and gene/enhancer trapping are effective approaches for identification of genetically defined neuronal populations in the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we applied these techniques to zebrafish (Danio rerio) in order to obtain insights into the cellular architecture of the axial motor column in vertebrates. First, by using the BAC for the Mnx class homeodomain protein gene mnr2b/mnx2b, we established the mnGFF7 transgenic line expressing the Gal4FF transcriptional activator in a large part of the motor column. Single cell labeling of Gal4FF-expressing cells in the mnGFF7 line enabled a detailed investigation of the morphological characteristics of individual spinal motoneurons, as well as the overall organization of the motor column in a spinal segment. Secondly, from a large-scale gene trap screen, we identified transgenic lines that marked discrete subpopulations of spinal motoneurons with Gal4FF. Molecular characterization of these lines led to the identification of the ADAMTS3 gene, which encodes an evolutionarily conserved ADAMTS family of peptidases and is dynamically expressed in the ventral spinal cord. The transgenic fish established here, along with the identified gene, should facilitate an understanding of the cellular and molecular architecture of the spinal cord motor column and its connection to muscles in vertebrates.

  12. A novel mutation in the OAR domain of the ARX gene.

    PubMed

    Tapie, Alejandra; Pi-Denis, Natalia; Souto, Jorge; Vomero, Alejandra; Peluffo, Gabriel; Boidi, María; Ciganda, Martín; Curbelo, Nicolás; Raggio, Victor; Roche, Leda; Pastro, Lucía

    2017-02-01

    Mutations in ARX gene should be considered in patients with mental disability or/and epilepsy. It is an X-linked gene that has pleiotropic effects. Here, we report the case of a boy diagnosed with Ohtahara syndrome. We performed the molecular analysis of the gene and identified a new missense mutation.

  13. First-Step Mutations during Adaptation Restore the Expression of Hundreds of Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Verdugo, Alejandra; Tenaillon, Olivier; Gaut, Brandon S.

    2016-01-01

    The temporal change of phenotypes during the adaptive process remains largely unexplored, as do the genetic changes that affect these phenotypic changes. Here we focused on three mutations that rose to high frequency in the early stages of adaptation within 12 Escherichia coli populations subjected to thermal stress (42 °C). All the mutations were in the rpoB gene, which encodes the RNA polymerase beta subunit. For each mutation, we measured the growth curves and gene expression (mRNAseq) of clones at 42 °C. We also compared growth and gene expression with their ancestor under unstressed (37 °C) and stressed conditions (42 °C). Each of the three mutations changed the expression of hundreds of genes and conferred large fitness advantages, apparently through the restoration of global gene expression from the stressed toward the prestressed state. These three mutations had a similar effect on gene expression as another single mutation in a distinct domain of the rpoB protein. Finally, we compared the phenotypic characteristics of one mutant, I572L, with two high-temperature adapted clones that have this mutation plus additional background mutations. The background mutations increased fitness, but they did not substantially change gene expression. We conclude that early mutations in a global transcriptional regulator cause extensive changes in gene expression, many of which are likely under positive selection for their effect in restoring the prestress physiology. PMID:26500250

  14. Mutation profiling of 19 candidate genes in acute myeloid leukemia suggests significance of DNMT3A mutations

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sang-Yong; Lee, Seung-Tae; Kim, Hee-Jin; Cho, Eun Hae; Kim, Jong-Won; Park, Silvia; Jung, Chul Won; Kim, Sun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    We selected 19 significantly-mutated genes in AMLs, including FLT3, DNMT3A, NPM1, TET2, RUNX1, CEBPA, WT1, IDH1, IDH2, NRAS, ASXL1, SETD2, PTPN11, TP53, KIT, JAK2, KRAS, BRAF and CBL, and performed massively parallel sequencing for 114 patients with acute myeloid leukemias, mainly including those with normal karyotypes (CN-AML). More than 80% of patients had at least one mutation in the genes tested. DNMT3A mutation was significantly associated with adverse outcome in addition to conventional risk stratification such as the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) classification. We observed clinical usefulness of mutation testing on multiple target genes and the association with disease subgroups, clinical features and prognosis in AMLs. PMID:27359055

  15. High frequency of additional gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with MLL partial tandem duplication: DNMT3A mutation is associated with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, D Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wu, Jin-Hou; Dunn, Po; Wang, Po-Nan; Lin, Tung-Liang; Shih, Yu-Shu; Liang, Sung-Tzu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Lai, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2015-10-20

    The mutational profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with partial tandem duplication of mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL-PTD) have not been comprehensively studied. We studied 19 gene mutations for 98 patients with MLL-PTD AML to determine the mutation frequency and clinical correlations. MLL-PTD was screened by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. The mutational analyses were performed with PCR-based assays followed by direct sequencing. Gene mutations of signaling pathways occurred in 63.3% of patients, with FLT3-ITD (44.9%) and FLT3-TKD (13.3%) being the most frequent. 66% of patients had gene mutations involving epigenetic regulation, and DNMT3A (32.7%), IDH2 (18.4%), TET2 (18.4%), and IDH1 (10.2%) mutations were most common. Genes of transcription pathways and tumor suppressors accounted for 23.5% and 10.2% of patients. RUNX1 mutation occurred in 23.5% of patients, while none had NPM1 or double CEBPA mutation. 90.8% of MLL-PTD AML patients had at least one additional gene mutation. Of 55 MLL-PTD AML patients who received standard chemotherapy, age older than 50 years and DNMT3A mutation were associated with inferior outcome. In conclusion, gene mutations involving DNA methylation and activated signaling pathway were common co-existed gene mutations. DNMT3A mutation was a poor prognostic factor in MLL-PTD AML.

  16. The landscape of cancer genes and mutational processes in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Philip J.; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Davies, Helen; Loo, Peter Van; Greenman, Chris; Wedge, David C.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Martin, Sancha; Varela, Ignacio; Bignell, Graham R.; Yates, Lucy R.; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Beare, David; Butler, Adam; Cheverton, Angela; Gamble, John; Hinton, Jonathan; Jia, Mingming; Jayakumar, Alagu; Jones, David; Latimer, Calli; Lau, King Wai; McLaren, Stuart; McBride, David J.; Menzies, Andrew; Mudie, Laura; Raine, Keiran; Rad, Roland; Chapman, Michael Spencer; Teague, Jon; Easton, Douglas; Langerød, Anita; OSBREAC; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Shen, Chen-Yang; Tee, Benita Tan Kiat; Huimin, Bernice Wong; Broeks, Annegien; Vargas, Ana Cristina; Turashvili, Gulisa; Martens, John; Fatima, Aquila; Miron, Penelope; Chin, Suet-Feung; Thomas, Gilles; Boyault, Sandrine; Mariani, Odette; Lakhani, Sunil R.; van de Vijver, Marc; van ’t Veer, Laura; Foekens, John; Desmedt, Christine; Sotiriou, Christos; Tutt, Andrew; Caldas, Carlos; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Aparicio, Samuel A. J. R.; Salomon, Anne Vincent; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Richardson, Andrea L.; Campbell, Peter J.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Stratton, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    All cancers carry somatic mutations in their genomes. A subset, known as driver mutations, confer clonal selective advantage on cancer cells and are causally implicated in oncogenesis1, and the remainder are passenger mutations. The driver mutations and mutational processes operative in breast cancer have not yet been comprehensively explored. Here we examine the genomes of 100 tumours for somatic copy number changes and mutations in the coding exons of protein-coding genes. The number of somatic mutations varied markedly between individual tumours. We found strong correlations between mutation number, age at which cancer was diagnosed and cancer histological grade, and observed multiple mutational signatures, including one present in about ten per cent of tumours characterized by numerous mutations of cytosine at TpC dinucleotides. Driver mutations were identified in several new cancer genes including AKT2, ARID1B, CASP8, CDKN1B, MAP3K1, MAP3K13, NCOR1, SMARCD1 and TBX3. Among the 100 tumours, we found driver mutations in at least 40 cancer genes and 73 different combinations of mutated cancer genes. The results highlight the substantial genetic diversity underlying this common disease. PMID:22722201

  17. Mutation spectrum of Meckel syndrome genes: one group of syndromes or several distinct groups?

    PubMed

    Tallila, Jonna; Salonen, Riitta; Kohlschmidt, Nicolai; Peltonen, Leena; Kestilä, Marjo

    2009-08-01

    Meckel syndrome (MKS) is a lethal malformation syndrome that belongs to the group of disorders that are associated with primary cilia dysfunction. Total of five genes are known to be involved in the molecular background of MKS. Here we have systematically analyzed all these genes in a total of 29 MKS families. Seven of the families were Finnish and the rest originated from elsewhere in Europe. We found 12 novel mutations in 13 families. Mutations in the MKS genes are also found in other syndromes and it seems reasonable to assume that there is a correlation between the syndromes and the mutations. To obtain some supportive information, we collected all the previously published mutations in the genes to see whether the different syndromes are dictated by the nature of the mutations. Based on this study, mutations play a role in the clinical phenotype, given that the same allelic combination of mutations has never been reported in two clinically distinct syndromes.

  18. Mutation Spectrum of Meckel Syndrome Genes: One Group of Syndromes or Several Distinct Groups?

    PubMed Central

    Tallila, Jonna; Salonen, Riitta; Kohlschmidt, Nicolai; Peltonen, Leena; Kestilä, Marjo

    2009-01-01

    Meckel syndrome (MKS) is a lethal malformation syndrome that belongs to the group of disorders that are associated with primary cilia dysfunction. Total of five genes are known to be involved in the molecular background of MKS. Here we have systematically analyzed all these genes in a total of 29 MKS families. Seven of the families were Finnish and the rest originated from elsewhere in Europe. We found 12 novel mutations in 13 families. Mutations in the MKS genes are also found in other syndromes and it seems reasonable to assume that there is a correlation between the syndromes and the mutations. To obtain some supportive information, we collected all the previously published mutations in the genes to see whether the different syndromes are dictated by the nature of the mutations. Based on this study, mutations play a role in the clinical phenotype, given that the same allelic combination of mutations has never been reported in two clinically distinct syndromes. PMID:19466712

  19. Contrasting Frequencies and Effects of cis- and trans-Regulatory Mutations Affecting Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Brian P. H.; Duveau, Fabien; Yuan, David C.; Tryban, Stephen; Yang, Bing; Wittkopp, Patricia J.

    2016-01-01

    Heritable differences in gene expression are caused by mutations in DNA sequences encoding cis-regulatory elements and trans-regulatory factors. These two classes of regulatory change differ in their relative contributions to expression differences in natural populations because of the combined effects of mutation and natural selection. Here, we investigate how new mutations create the regulatory variation upon which natural selection acts by quantifying the frequencies and effects of hundreds of new cis- and trans-acting mutations altering activity of the TDH3 promoter in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the absence of natural selection. We find that cis-regulatory mutations have larger effects on expression than trans-regulatory mutations and that while trans-regulatory mutations are more common overall, cis- and trans-regulatory changes in expression are equally abundant when only the largest changes in expression are considered. In addition, we find that cis-regulatory mutations are skewed toward decreased expression while trans-regulatory mutations are skewed toward increased expression. We also measure the effects of cis- and trans-regulatory mutations on the variability in gene expression among genetically identical cells, a property of gene expression known as expression noise, finding that trans-regulatory mutations are much more likely to decrease expression noise than cis-regulatory mutations. Because new mutations are the raw material upon which natural selection acts, these differences in the frequencies and effects of cis- and trans-regulatory mutations should be considered in models of regulatory evolution. PMID:26782996

  20. Disposable sensors for rapid screening of mutated genes.

    PubMed

    García, T; Fernández-Barrena, M G; Revenga-Parra, M; Núñez, A; Casero, E; Pariente, F; Prieto, J; Lorenzo, E

    2010-10-01

    A screening method for rapid detection of gene mutations directly in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of genomic DNA is described. The method involves the development of a disposable screen-printed gold electrode modified with a thiolated capture probe directly obtained from denaturated PCR genomic DNA, which recognizes (by hybridization) its fully complementary sequence (wild type), giving a signal, whereas no signal is obtained for single-mismatched target (mutant). The detection of the hybridization event is achieved by changes in the metal redox center electroactivity of the complex [Ru(NH(3))(5) L](2+), where L is [3-(2-phenanthren-9-yl-vinyl)-pyridine], at -0.200 V. This complex binds to double-stranded DNA in a very selective form. The method allows discrimination between the wild type and the mutant of gene MRP3 directly in large PCR amplicons extracted from blood cells, without the need to use either synthetic probes or labeled targets. The mutation involves the presence of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at base 54 of a 145-base-pair sequence from exon 21 of gene MRP3. Since the presence of this SNP might lead to a variety of hereditary liver disorders, its identification in a rapid and easy form may provide novel therapeutic targets for the future. The screening method proposed has excellent signal reproducibility, with a relative standard deviation of 10%. In addition, with the method developed as little as 6.6 ng/muL PCR product can be detected.

  1. A single gene mutation that increases maize seed weight

    SciTech Connect

    Giroux, M.J.; Shaw, J.; Hannah, L.C. |

    1996-06-11

    The maize endosperm-specific gene shrunken2 (Sh2) encodes the large subunit of the heterotetrameric starch synthetic enzyme adenosine diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP; EC 2.7.7.27). Here we exploit an in vivo, site-specific mutagenesis system to create short insertion mutations in a region of the gene known to be involved in the allosteric regulation of AGP. The site-specific mutagen is the transposable element dissociation (Ds). Approximately one-third (8 of 23) of the germinal revertants sequenced restored the wild-type sequence, whereas the remaining revertants contained insertions of 3 or 6 bp. All revertants retained the original reading frame 3 feet to the insertion site and involved the addition of tyrosine and/or serine. Each insertion revertant reduced total AGP activity and the amount of the SH2 protein. The revertant containing additional tyrosine and serine residues increased seed weight 11-18% without increasing or decreasing the percentage of starch. Other insertion revertants lacking an additional serine reduced seed weight. Reduced sensitivity to phosphate, a long-known inhibitor of AGP, was found in the high seed-weight revertant. This alteration is likely universally important since insertion of tyrosine and serine in the potato large subunit of AGP at the comparable position and expression in Escherichia coli also led to a phosphate-insensitive enzyme. These results show that single gene mutations giving rise to increased seed weight, and therefore perhaps yield, are clearly possible in a plant with a long history of intensive and successful breeding efforts. 20 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Point mutations in dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthase genes of Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Urdaneta, L; Plowe, C; Goldman, I; Lal, A A

    1999-09-01

    The present study was designed to characterize mutations in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) genes of Plasmodium falciparum in the Bolivar region of Venezuela, where high levels of clinical resistance to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP, Fansidar; F. Hoffman-La Roche, Basel, Switzerland) has been documented. We used a nested mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction and restriction digestion methods to measure 1) the prevalence of DHFR mutations at 16, 50, 51, 59, 108, and 164 codon positions, and 2) the prevalence of mutations in the 436, 437, 581, and 613 codon sites in DHPS gene. In the case of the DHFR gene, of the 54 parasite isolates analyzed, we detected the presence of Asn-108 and Ile-51 in 96% of the isolates and Arg-50 mutation in 64% of the isolates. Each of these mutations has been associated with high level of resistance to pyrimethamine. Only 2 samples (4%) showed the wild type Ser-108 mutation and none showed Thr-108 and Val-16 mutations that are specific for resistance to cycloguanil. In the case of DHPS gene, we found a mutation at position 437 (Gly) in 100% of the isolates and Gly-581 in 96% of the isolates. The simultaneous presence of mutations Asn-108 and Ile-51 in the DHFR gene and Gly-437 and Gly-581 in the DHPS gene in 96% of the samples tested suggested that a cumulative effect of mutations could be the major mechanism conferring high SP resistance in this area.

  3. Recurrent mutation, gene conversion, or recombination at the human phenylalanine hydroxylase locus: evidence in French-Canadians and a catalog of mutations.

    PubMed Central

    John, S W; Rozen, R; Scriver, C R; Laframboise, R; Laberge, C

    1990-01-01

    The codon 408 mutation (CGG----TGG, Arg----Trp) in exon 12 of the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene occurs on haplotype 1 in French-Canadians; elsewhere this mutation (R408W) occurs on haplotype 2. A CpG dinucleotide is involved. The finding is compatible with a recurrent mutation, gene conversion, or a single recombination between haplotypes 2 and 1. A tabulation of 20 known mutations at the PAH locus reveals three instances of putative recurrent mutation. PMID:1971147

  4. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia associated with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ryotokuji, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Usuki, Kensuke; Kurosawa, Saiko; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Kawata, Eri; Tajika, Kenji; Gomi, Seiji; Kanda, Junya; Kobayashi, Anna; Omori, Ikuko; Marumo, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Yui, Shunsuke; Terada, Kazuki; Fukunaga, Keiko; Hirakawa, Tsuneaki; Arai, Kunihito; Kitano, Tomoaki; Kosaka, Fumiko; Tamai, Hayato; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Wakita, Satoshi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, it has been reported that the frequency of DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutationsmutations of the genes that regulate gene expression through DNA methylation – is high in acute myeloid leukemia. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia with associated DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation. We studied 308 patients with acute myeloid leukemia. DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations were observed in 135 of the 308 cases (43.8%). Acute myeloid leukemia associated with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was more frequent in older patients (P<0.0001) and in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk (P<0.0001) accompanied by a high white blood cell count (P=0.0032). DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival in the whole cohort (P=0.0018), in patients aged ≤70 years, in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk, and in FLT3-ITD-negative patients (P=0.0409). Among the patients with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations, 26.7% were found to have two or more such mutations and prognosis worsened with increasing number of mutations. In multivariate analysis DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival (P=0.0424). However, patients with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first remission had a significantly better prognosis than those who did not undergo such transplantation (P=0.0254). Our study establishes that DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation is an important unfavorable prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27247325

  5. [Detection of CFTR gene mutations in azoospermia patients with congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-jian; Yuan, Ping; Wu, Xiao; Zhang, Hao; He, Qing-qing; Zhang, Yan

    2015-03-01

    To discuss the results and significance of the detection of the CFTR gene mutation in azoospermia patients with congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens (CUAVD). We collected peripheral blood samples from 6 azoospermia patients with CUAVD for detection of the CFTR gene mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. We analyzed the genome sequences of the CFTR gene in comparison with the website of the UCSC Genome Browser on Human Dec. 2013 Assembly. Missense mutation of c. 592G > C in exon 6 was found in 1 of the 6 azoospermia patients with CUAVD and splicing mutation of c. 1210-12T[5] was observed in the noncoding region before exon 10 in 2 of the patients, both with the V470 haplotype in exon 11. Mutations of the CFTR gene can be detected in azoospermia patients with CUAVD and the detection of the CFTR gene mutation is necessary for these patients.

  6. Mutational analysis of PKD1 gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyan; Li, Lanrong; Liu, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary disease and common renal disease. Mutations of PKD genes are responsible for this disease. We analyzed a large Chinese family with ADPKD using Sanger sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for this disease. The family comprised 27 individuals including 10 ADPKD patients. These ADPKD patients had severe renal disease and most of them died very young. We analyzed 6 survival patients gene and found they all had C10529T mutation in exon 35 of PKD1 gene. We did not found gene mutation in any unaffected relatives or 300 unrelated controls. These findings suggested that the C10529T mutation in PKD1 gene might be the pathogenic mutation responsible for the disease in this family. PMID:26722532

  7. Mutational analysis of PKD1 gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyan; Li, Lanrong; Liu, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary disease and common renal disease. Mutations of PKD genes are responsible for this disease. We analyzed a large Chinese family with ADPKD using Sanger sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for this disease. The family comprised 27 individuals including 10 ADPKD patients. These ADPKD patients had severe renal disease and most of them died very young. We analyzed 6 survival patients gene and found they all had C10529T mutation in exon 35 of PKD1 gene. We did not found gene mutation in any unaffected relatives or 300 unrelated controls. These findings suggested that the C10529T mutation in PKD1 gene might be the pathogenic mutation responsible for the disease in this family.

  8. Interlocus gene conversion events introduce deleterious mutations into at least 1% of human genes associated with inherited disease.

    PubMed

    Casola, Claudio; Zekonyte, Ugne; Phillips, Andrew D; Cooper, David N; Hahn, Matthew W

    2012-03-01

    Establishing the molecular basis of DNA mutations that cause inherited disease is of fundamental importance to understanding the origin, nature, and clinical sequelae of genetic disorders in humans. The majority of disease-associated mutations constitute single-base substitutions and short deletions and/or insertions resulting from DNA replication errors and the repair of damaged bases. However, pathological mutations can also be introduced by nonreciprocal recombination events between paralogous sequences, a phenomenon known as interlocus gene conversion (IGC). IGC events have thus far been linked to pathology in more than 20 human genes. However, the large number of duplicated gene sequences in the human genome implies that many more disease-associated mutations could originate via IGC. Here, we have used a genome-wide computational approach to identify disease-associated mutations derived from IGC events. Our approach revealed hundreds of known pathological mutations that could have been caused by IGC. Further, we identified several dozen high-confidence cases of inherited disease mutations resulting from IGC in ∼1% of all genes analyzed. About half of the donor sequences associated with such mutations are functional paralogous genes, suggesting that epistatic interactions or differential expression patterns will determine the impact upon fitness of specific substitutions between duplicated genes. In addition, we identified thousands of hitherto undescribed and potentially deleterious mutations that could arise via IGC. Our findings reveal the extent of the impact of interlocus gene conversion upon the spectrum of human inherited disease.

  9. Unusual mutation clusters provide insight into class I gene conversion mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Pease, L R; Horton, R M; Pullen, J K; Yun, T J

    1993-01-01

    Genetic diversity among the K and D alleles of the mouse major histocompatibility complex is generated by gene conversion among members of the class I multigene family. The majority of known class I mutants contain clusters of nucleotide changes that can be traced to linked family members. However, the details of the gene conversion mechanism are not known. The bm3 and bm23 mutations represent exceptions to the usual pattern and provide insight into intermediates generated during the gene conversion process. Both of these variants contain clusters of five nucleotide substitutions, but they differ from the classic conversion mutants in the important respect that no donor gene for either mutation could be identified in the parental genome. Nevertheless, both mutation clusters are composed of individual mutations that do exist within the parent. Therefore, they are not random and appear to be templated. Significantly, the bm3 and bm23 mutation clusters are divided into overlapping regions that match class I genes which have functioned as donor genes in other characterized gene conversion events. The unusual structure of the mutation clusters indicates an underlying gene conversion mechanism that can generate mutation clusters as a result of the interaction of three genes in a single genetic event. The unusual mutation clusters are consistent with a hypothetical gene conversion model involving extrachromosomal intermediates. Images PMID:8321237

  10. The mouse Enhancer trap locus 1 (Etl-1): a novel mammalian gene related to Drosophila and yeast transcriptional regulator genes.

    PubMed

    Soininen, R; Schoor, M; Henseling, U; Tepe, C; Kisters-Woike, B; Rossant, J; Gossler, A

    1992-11-01

    A novel mouse gene, Enhancer trap locus 1 (Etl-1), was identified in close proximity to a lacZ enhancer trap integration in the mouse genome showing a specific beta-galactosidase staining pattern during development. In situ analysis revealed a widespread but not ubiquitous expression of Etl-1 throughout development with particularly high levels in the central nervous system and epithelial cells. The amino acid sequence of the Etl-1 protein deduced from the cDNA shows strong similarity, over a stretch of 500 amino acids, to the Drosophila brahma protein involved in the regulation of homeotic genes and to the yeast transcriptional activator protein SNF2/SWI2 as well as to the RAD54 protein and the recently described helicase-related yeast proteins STH1 and MOT1. Etl-1 is the first mammalian member of this group of proteins that are implicated in gene regulation and/or influencing chromatin structure. The homology to the regulatory proteins SNF2/SWI2 and brahma and the expression pattern during embryogenesis suggest that Etl-1 protein might be involved in gene regulating pathways during mouse development.

  11. Occult HBV among Anti-HBc Alone: Mutation Analysis of an HBV Surface Gene and Pre-S Gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeong Hee; Kang, So Young; Lee, Woo In

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the molecular characteristics of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in 'anti-HBc alone' subjects. Twenty-four patients with 'anti-HBc alone' and 20 control patients diagnosed with HBV were analyzed regarding S and pre-S gene mutations. All specimens were analyzed for HBs Ag, anti-HBc, and anti-HBs. For specimens with an anti-HBc alone, quantitative analysis of HBV DNA, as well as sequencing and mutation analysis of S and pre-S genes, were performed. A total 24 were analyzed for the S gene, and 14 were analyzed for the pre-S gene through sequencing. A total of 20 control patients were analyzed for S and pre-S gene simultaneously. Nineteen point mutations of the major hydrophilic region were found in six of 24 patients. Among them, three mutations, S114T, P127S/T, M133T, were detected in common. Only one mutation was found in five subjects of the control group; this mutation was not found in the occult HBV infection group, however. Pre-S mutations were detected in 10 patients, and mutations of site aa58-aa100 were detected in 9 patients. A mutation on D114E was simultaneously detected. Although five mutations from the control group were found at the same location (aa58-aa100), no mutations of occult HBV infection were detected. The prevalence of occult HBV infection is not low among 'anti-HBc alone' subjects. Variable mutations in the S gene and pre-S gene were associated with the occurrence of occult HBV infection. Further larger scale studies are required to determine the significance of newly detected mutations.

  12. Amelogenesis Imperfecta: 1 Family, 2 Phenotypes, and 2 Mutated Genes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, M K; Laouina, S; El Alloussi, M; Dollfus, H; Bloch-Zupan, A

    2016-12-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by enamel defects. The authors have identified a large consanguineous Moroccan family segregating different clinical subtypes of hypoplastic and hypomineralized AI in different individuals within the family. Using targeted next-generation sequencing, the authors identified a novel heterozygous nonsense mutation in COL17A1 (c.1873C>T, p.R625*) segregating with hypoplastic AI and a novel homozygous 8-bp deletion in C4orf26 (c.39_46del, p.Cys14Glyfs*18) segregating with hypomineralized-hypoplastic AI in this family. This study highlights the phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity of AI that can exist even within a single consanguineous family. Furthermore, the identification of novel mutations in COL17A1 and C4orf26 and their correlation with distinct AI phenotypes can contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of AI and the contribution of these genes to amelogenesis.

  13. Severe childhood SMA and axonal CMT due to anticodon binding domain mutations in the GARS gene.

    PubMed

    James, P A; Cader, M Z; Muntoni, F; Childs, A-M; Crow, Y J; Talbot, K

    2006-11-14

    We screened 100 patients with inherited and sporadic lower motor neuron degeneration and identified three novel missense mutations in the glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) gene. One mutation was in the anticodon binding domain and associated with onset in early childhood and predominant involvement of the lower limbs, thus extending the phenotype associated with GARS mutations.

  14. Clinical Manifestations in Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia Patients with Proline-Rich Transmembrane Protein 2 Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Jinyoung; Kim, Ji Sun; Lee, Munhyang; Lee, Jeehun; Roh, Hakjae

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Given the diverse phenotypes including combined non-dyskinetic symptoms in patients harboring mutations of the gene encoding proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2), the clinical significance of these mutations in paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is questionable. In this study, we investigated the clinical characteristics of PKD patients with PRRT2 mutations. Methods Familial and sporadic PKD patients were enrolled and PRRT2 gene sequencing was performed. Demographic and clinical data were compared between PKD patients with and without a PRRT2 mutation. Results Among the enrolled PKD patients (8 patients from 5 PKD families and 19 sporadic patients), PRRT2 mutations were detected in 3 PKD families (60%) and 2 sporadic cases (10.5%). All familial patients with a PRRT2 gene mutation had the c.649dupC mutation, which is the most commonly reported mutation. Two uncommon mutations (c.649delC and c.629dupC) were detected only in the sporadic cases. PKD patients with PRRT2 mutation were younger at symptom onset and had more non-dyskinetic symptoms than those without PRRT2 mutation. However, the characteristics of dyskinetic movement did not differ between the two groups. Conclusions This is the first study of PRRT2 mutations in Korea. The presence of a PRRT2 mutation was more strongly related to familial PKD, and was clinically related with earlier age of onset and common non-dyskinetic symptoms in PKD patients. PMID:24465263

  15. Gene mutations in primary ciliary dyskinesia related to otitis media.

    PubMed

    Mata, Manuel; Milian, Lara; Armengot, Miguel; Carda, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is the most common cause of conductive hearing loss in children and is strongly associated with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Approximately half of the children with PCD require otolaryngology care, posing a major problem in this population. Early diagnosis of PCD is critical in these patients to minimise the collateral damage related to OME. The current gold standard for PCD diagnosis requires determining ciliary structure defects by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or clearly documenting ciliary dysfunction via digital high-speed video microscopy (DHSV). Although both techniques are useful for PCD diagnosis, they have limitations and need to be supported by new methodologies, including genetic analysis of genes related to PCD. In this article, we review classical and recently associated mutations related to ciliary alterations leading to PCD, which can be useful for early diagnosis of the disease and subsequent early management of OME.

  16. [Gene mutation analysis in four Chinese patients with multiple carboxylase deficiency].

    PubMed

    Li, Duan; Liu, Li; Li, Xiu-zhen; Cheng, Jing; Zhao, Xiao-yuan; Zhou, Rong

    2006-11-01

    Multiple carboxylase deficiency (MCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder. MCD is characterized by skin rash, metabolic acidosis, vomiting and psychomotor retardation. Depending on deficiency of the enzyme, MCD includes two different forms, biotinidase deficiency (BTD, OMIM 253260) and holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency (HLCSD, OMIM 253270). In this study, we analyzed gene mutations of four Chinese MCD patients and to explore the mutation spectrum and possibility of a molecular diagnosis. All exons and their flanking introns of biotinidase gene and HLCS gene were screened by polymerase chain reaction combined with DNA direct sequencing in four Chinese MCD patients. Genomic DNA was extracted using a kit from the peripheral blood leukocytes of each patient. PCR amplification products were checked by 2% agarose gel electrophoresis and were subsequently sequenced with both the forward and reverse primers. All patients showed mutations in HLCS gene, whereas no mutation was found in biotinidase gene, proving that all the four patients had HLCS deficiency. Four previously reported mutations in HLCS gene were detected (Y456C, R508W, D634N and 780delG). A missense mutation of 1522C > T in exon 11 of HLCS gene, which was a homozygotic mutation, was identified in patient 1; a mutation of 1522C > T in exon 11 combined with a mutation of 1367A > G in exon 9, which was a compound heterozygotic mutation, was identified in patient 2; a mutation of 1522C > T in exon 11 combined with a mutation of 1900G > A in exon 13, which was a compound heterozygotic mutation, was identified in patient 3; a mutation of 1522C > T in exon 11 combined with a mutation of 780delG in exon 7, which was a compound heterozygotic mutation, was identified in patient 4. All the parents were carriers of mutations. No additional carrier of this four mutations was identified from 50 samples of Chinese controls. The 1522C > T (R508W) mutation probably represents a mutational hot-spot in Chinese HLCS deficiency

  17. Development of an efficient screening system to identify novel bone metabolism-related genes using the exchangeable gene trap mutagenesis mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Kurogi, Syuji; Sekimoto, Tomohisa; Funamoto, Taro; Ota, Tomomi; Nakamura, Shihoko; Nagai, Takuya; Nakahara, Mai; Yoshinobu, Kumiko; Araki, Kimi; Araki, Masatake; Chosa, Etsuo

    2017-01-01

    Despite numerous genetic studies on bone metabolism, understanding of the specific mechanisms is lacking. We developed an efficient screening system to identify novel genes involved in bone metabolism using mutant mouse strains registered with the Exchangeable Gene Trap Clones (EGTC) database. From 1278 trap clones in the EGTC database, 52 candidate lines were selected in the first screening, determined based on “EST profile”, “X-gal”, “Related article”, and “Novel gene”. For the second screening, bone morphometric analysis, biomechanical strength analysis, bone X-gal staining, etc. were performed on candidate lines. Forty-two male trap lines (80.8%) showed abnormalities with either bone morphometric analysis or biomechanical strength analysis. In the screening process, X-gal staining was significantly efficient (P = 0.0057). As examples, Lbr and Nedd4 trap lines selected using the screening system showed significant bone decrease and fragility, suggesting a relationship with osteoblast differentiation. This screening system using EGTC mouse lines is extremely efficient for identifying novel genes involved in bone metabolism. The gene trap lines identified as abnormal using this screening approach are highly likely to trap important genes for bone metabolism. These selected trap mice will be valuable for use as novel bio-resources in bone research. PMID:28106071

  18. Moderate malnutrition in rats induces somatic gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Martínez, M Monserrat; Cortés-Barberena, Edith; Cervantes-Ríos, Elsa; Del Carmen García-Rodríguez, María; Rodríguez-Cruz, Leonor; Ortiz-Muñiz, Rocío

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between malnutrition and genetic damage has been widely studied in human and animal models, leading to the observation that interactions between genotoxic exposure and micronutrient status appear to affect genomic stability. A new assay has been developed that uses the phosphatidylinositol glycan class A gene (Pig-a) as a reporter for measuring in vivo gene mutation. The Pig-a assay can be employed to evaluate mutant frequencies (MFs) in peripheral blood reticulocytes (RETs) and erythrocytes (RBCs) using flow cytometry. In the present study, we assessed the effects of malnutrition on mutagenic susceptibility by exposing undernourished (UN) and well-nourished (WN) rats to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) and measuring Pig-a MFs. Two week-old UN and WN male Han-Wistar rats were treated daily with 0, 20, or 40mg/kg ENU for 3 consecutive days. Blood was collected from the tail vein one day before ENU treatment (Day-1) and after ENU administration on Days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56 and 63. Pig-a MFs were measured in RETs and RBCs as the RET(CD59-) and RBC(CD59-) frequencies. In the vehicle control groups, the frequencies of mutant RETs and RBCs were significantly higher in UN rats compared with WN rats at all sampling times. The ENU treatments increased RET and RBC MFs starting at Day 7. Although ENU-induced Pig-a MFs were consistently lower in UN rats than in WN rats, these differences were not significant. To understand these responses, further studies should use other mutagens and nucleated surrogate cells and examine the types of mutations induced in UN and WN rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dynamic changes of driver genes' mutations across clinical stages in nine cancer types.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia

    2016-07-01

    The driver genes play critical roles for tumorigenesis, and the number of identified driver genes reached plateau. But how they act during different cancer development stages is lack of knowledge. We investigated 138 driver genes' mutation changes across clinical stages using 3,477 cases in nine cancer types from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and constructed their temporal order relationships. We also examined the codon changes for the widely mutated TP53 and PIK3CA in tumor stages. Combinations of one to three driver genes specifically dominated in each cancer. Across the clinical stages, we categorized three patterns for the behaviors of driver genes' mutation changes in the nine cancer types: recurrently mutated in all the stages and triggering other mutations; certain mutations lost meanwhile other mutations emerged; mutations dominated across entire stages, while other mutations gradually appeared or disappeared. We observed different codon changes dominated in different stages and revealed mutations recurrently occurring on the hotspot regions of the coding sequence may be the core factor for driver genes' tumorigenesis. Our results highlighted the dynamic changes of oncogenesis roles in different clinical stages and suggested different diagnostic decision making according to the clinical stages of patients.

  20. Recurrent and founder mutations in the PMS2 gene.

    PubMed

    Tomsic, J; Senter, L; Liyanarachchi, S; Clendenning, M; Vaughn, C P; Jenkins, M A; Hopper, J L; Young, J; Samowitz, W; de la Chapelle, A

    2013-03-01

    Germline mutations in PMS2 are associated with Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common known cause of hereditary colorectal cancer. Mutation detection in PMS2 has been difficult due to the presence of several pseudogenes, but a custom-designed long-range PCR strategy now allows adequate mutation detection. Many mutations are unique. However, some mutations are observed repeatedly across individuals not known to be related due to the mutation being either recurrent, arising multiple times de novo at hot spots for mutations, or of founder origin, having occurred once in an ancestor. Previously, we observed 36 distinct mutations in a sample of 61 independently ascertained Caucasian probands of mixed European background with PMS2 mutations. Eleven of these mutations were detected in more than one individual not known to be related and of these, six were detected more than twice. These six mutations accounted for 31 (51%) ostensibly unrelated probands. Here, we performed genotyping and haplotype analysis in four mutations observed in multiple probands and found two (c.137G>T and exon 10 deletion) to be founder mutations and one (c.903G>T) a probable founder. One (c.1A>G) could not be evaluated for founder mutation status. We discuss possible explanations for the frequent occurrence of founder mutations in PMS2. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Mutation of FADD gene is rare in human colon and stomach cancers.

    PubMed

    Soung, Young Hwa; Lee, Jong Woo; Kim, Su Young; Nam, Suk Woo; Park, Won Sang; Kim, Sang Ho; Lee, Jung Young; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2004-09-01

    Failure of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer. As an adaptor, FADD plays a crucial role during death receptor-mediated apoptosis. We previously reported that the FADD gene is somatically mutated in non-small cell lung cancers. To explore the possibility that the genetic alterations of the FADD gene might be involved in the development of other human cancers, we analyzed the entire coding region and all splice sites of the human FADD gene to detect somatic mutations in 116 stomach cancers and 98 colon cancers. Overall, we detected a somatic missense mutation of the FADD gene in a colon carcinoma, which was predicted to change an amino acid (R140H) in the death domain (DD) of the FADD protein. This is the first report of FADD gene mutation in gastrointestinal cancers, and our data suggest that the FADD gene is rarely mutated in human colon and stomach cancers.

  2. Identification of nine novel arylsulfatase a (ARSA) gene mutations in patients with metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD).

    PubMed

    Eng, Barry; Nakamura, Lisa N; O'Reilly, Natasha; Schokman, Natasha; Nowaczyk, Magorzata M J; Krivit, William; Waye, John S

    2003-11-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the arylsulfatase A (ARSA) gene. We have investigated more than fifty MLD patients using allele-specific PCR assays to detect the pseudodeficiency (PD) allele and several common MLD mutations, followed by comprehensive nucleotide sequencing of the ARSA gene to detect rare or private mutations. Here we report the identification of nine novel microlesions in the ARSA gene: five missense mutations (c.464C>T, c.542T>A, c.916T>C, c.973G>A, c.1286A>C), three frameshift mutations (c.205_206delTG, c.489_495del, c.1483_1486dup), and one splice donor site mutation (c.973+1G>A). Comprehensive mutation detection has facilitated carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis for several at-risk MLD families.

  3. Mutational analysis of proapoptotic caspase-9 gene in common human carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Soung, Young Hwa; Lee, Jong Woo; Kim, Su Young; Park, Won Sang; Nam, Suk Woo; Lee, Jung Young; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2006-04-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that deregulation of apoptosis is involved in the mechanisms of cancer development. Caspase-9 plays a crucial role in the initiation phase of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. To explore the possibility that the genetic alterations of caspase-9 might be involved in the development of human cancers, we analyzed the entire coding region and all splice sites of the human caspase-9 gene for the detection of somatic mutations in a series of 353 cancers, including 180 gastric, 104 colorectal and 69 lung adenocarcinomas. Overall, we detected three somatic mutations of caspase-9, but all of the mutations were silent mutations. The mutations were observed in 2 of 104 colorectal carcinomas and 1 of 180 gastric carcinomas. These data indicate that the caspase-9 gene is rarely mutated in gastric, colorectal and lung adenocarcinomas, and suggest that caspase-9 gene mutation may not contribute to the pathogenesis of these cancers.

  4. Mutations in two regions upstream of the A gamma globin gene canonical promoter affect gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, J A; Lee, R F; Lingrel, J B

    1989-01-01

    Two regions upstream of the human fetal (A gamma) globin gene, which interact with protein factors from K562 and HeLa nuclear extracts, have functional significance in gene expression. One binding site (site I) is at a position -290 to -267 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site, the other (site II) is at -182 to -168 bp. Site II includes the octamer sequence (ATGCAAAT) found in an immunoglobulin enhancer and the histone H2b gene promoter. A point mutation (T----C) at -175, within the octamer sequence, is characteristic of a naturally occurring HPFH (hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin), and decreases factor binding to an oligonucleotide containing the octamer motif. Expression assays using a A gamma globin promoter-CAT (chloramphenicol acetyl transferase) fusion gene show that the point mutation at -175 increases expression in erythroid, but not non-erythroid cells when compared to a wild-type construct. This correlates with the actual effect of the HPFH mutation in humans. This higher expression may result from a mechanism more complex than reduced binding of a negative regulator. A site I clustered-base substitution gives gamma-CAT activity well below wild-type, suggesting that this factor is a positive regulator. Images PMID:2472607

  5. Low load for disruptive mutations in autism genes and their biased transmission.

    PubMed

    Iossifov, Ivan; Levy, Dan; Allen, Jeremy; Ye, Kenny; Ronemus, Michael; Lee, Yoon-Ha; Yamrom, Boris; Wigler, Michael

    2015-10-13

    We previously computed that genes with de novo (DN) likely gene-disruptive (LGD) mutations in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have high vulnerability: disruptive mutations in many of these genes, the vulnerable autism genes, will have a high likelihood of resulting in ASD. Because individuals with ASD have lower fecundity, such mutations in autism genes would be under strong negative selection pressure. An immediate prediction is that these genes will have a lower LGD load than typical genes in the human gene pool. We confirm this hypothesis in an explicit test by measuring the load of disruptive mutations in whole-exome sequence databases from two cohorts. We use information about mutational load to show that lower and higher intelligence quotients (IQ) affected individuals can be distinguished by the mutational load in their respective gene targets, as well as to help prioritize gene targets by their likelihood of being autism genes. Moreover, we demonstrate that transmission of rare disruptions in genes with a lower LGD load occurs more often to affected offspring; we show transmission originates most often from the mother, and transmission of such variants is seen more often in offspring with lower IQ. A surprising proportion of transmission of these rare events comes from genes expressed in the embryonic brain that show sharply reduced expression shortly after birth.

  6. Mutation analysis in F9 gene of 17 families with haemophilia B from Iran.

    PubMed

    Enayat, M S; Karimi, M; Chana, G; Farjadian, S; Theophilus, B D M; Hill, F G H

    2004-11-01

    Seventeen haemophilia B families from Iran were investigated to determine the causative mutation. All the essential regions of the F9 gene were initially screened by conformational sensitive gel electrophoresis and exons with band shift were sequenced. Seven of the 15 mutations identified in these families were novel mutations. The mutations were authenticated in nine families as other affected members or heterozygous female carriers were available for verification.

  7. Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus caused by a novel mutation in the KCNJ11 gene.

    PubMed

    Doneray, Hakan; Houghton, Jayne; Tekgunduz, Kadir Serafettin; Balkir, Ferat; Caner, Ibrahim

    2014-03-01

    Mutations in the KCNJ11 gene are responsible for the majority of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) cases. Some mutations in this gene, including p.Q52R, are associated with the developmental delay, epilepsy, neonatal diabetes (DEND) syndrome. We describe a patient with PNDM who had no neurological finding although she was determined to have a novel mutation (p.Q52L) in the same residue of the KCNJ11 as in the previously reported cases with DEND syndrome. This case suggests that not all Q52 mutations in the KCNJ11 gene are necessarily related to DEND syndrome.

  8. Mutational screening of the USH2A gene in Spanish USH patients reveals 23 novel pathogenic mutations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Usher Syndrome type II (USH2) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by moderate to severe hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Among the three genes implicated, mutations in the USH2A gene account for 74-90% of the USH2 cases. Methods To identify the genetic cause of the disease and determine the frequency of USH2A mutations in a cohort of 88 unrelated USH Spanish patients, we carried out a mutation screening of the 72 coding exons of this gene by direct sequencing. Moreover, we performed functional minigene studies for those changes that were predicted to affect splicing. Results As a result, a total of 144 DNA sequence variants were identified. Based upon previous studies, allele frequencies, segregation analysis, bioinformatics' predictions and in vitro experiments, 37 variants (23 of them novel) were classified as pathogenic mutations. Conclusions This report provide a wide spectrum of USH2A mutations and clinical features, including atypical Usher syndrome phenotypes resembling Usher syndrome type I. Considering only the patients clearly diagnosed with Usher syndrome type II, and results obtained in this and previous studies, we can state that mutations in USH2A are responsible for 76.1% of USH2 disease in patients of Spanish origin. PMID:22004887

  9. Mal de Meleda in Indonesia: Mutations in the SLURP1 gene appear to be ubiquitous.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jessica A; Bondavalli, Davide; Monif, Mastura; Yap, Lee Mei; Winship, Ingrid

    2016-02-01

    Mal de Meleda is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis caused by mutations in the ARS B (SLURP1) gene, with possible founder effects in the Mediterranean and Adriatic regions. We report an affected individual from Indonesia without known consanguinity in the family, suggesting that SLURP1 gene mutations are ubiquitous. Recognition of the phenotype can be confirmed by genetic testing, thus facilitating genetic counselling.

  10. [The MDR3 gene mutation: a rare cause of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC)].

    PubMed

    Maisonnette, F; Abita, T; Barriere, E; Pichon, N; Vincensini, J F; Descottes, B

    2005-10-01

    A 47-year old man complained about persistant pain and cholestasis 12-years after a cholescystectomy. In his family, all his brothers and sisters had cholecystectomy. Genetic explorations revealed a MDR3 gene mutation. All symptoms disappeared with a treatment by ursodesoxycholic acid. MDR3 gene mutation is to be researched in all cases of familial cholestasis.

  11. Novel autosomal recessive gene mutations in aquaporin-2 in two Chinese congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Jing; Nie, Min; Duan, Lian; Gu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has linked novel mutations in the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 gene (AVPR2) and aquaporin-2 gene (AQP2) present in Southeast Asian populations to congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). To investigate mutations in 2 distinct Chinese pedigrees with NDI patients, clinical data, laboratory findings, and genomic DNA sequences from peripheral blood leukocytes were analyzed in two 5.5- and 8-year-old boys (proband 1 and 2, respectively) and their first-degree relatives. Water intake, urinary volume, body weight and medication use were recorded. Mutations in coding regions and intron-exon borders of both AQP2 and AVPR2 gene were sequenced. Three mutations in AQP2 were detected, including previously reported heterozygous frameshift mutation (c.127_128delCA, p.Gln43Aspfs ×63) inherited from the mother, a novel frameshift mutation (c.501_502insC, p.Val168Argfs ×30, inherited from the father) in proband 1 and a novel missense mutation (c. 643G>A, p. G215S), inherited from both parents in proband 2. In family 2 both parents and one sister were heterozygous carriers of the novel missense mutation. Neither pedigree exhibited mutation in the AVPR2 gene. The patient with truncated AQP2 may present with much more severe NDI manifestations. Identification of these novel AQP2 gene mutations expands the AQP2 genotypic spectrum and may contribute to etiological diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:26064258

  12. Novel autosomal recessive gene mutations in aquaporin-2 in two Chinese congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Cen, Jing; Nie, Min; Duan, Lian; Gu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has linked novel mutations in the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 gene (AVPR2) and aquaporin-2 gene (AQP2) present in Southeast Asian populations to congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). To investigate mutations in 2 distinct Chinese pedigrees with NDI patients, clinical data, laboratory findings, and genomic DNA sequences from peripheral blood leukocytes were analyzed in two 5.5- and 8-year-old boys (proband 1 and 2, respectively) and their first-degree relatives. Water intake, urinary volume, body weight and medication use were recorded. Mutations in coding regions and intron-exon borders of both AQP2 and AVPR2 gene were sequenced. Three mutations in AQP2 were detected, including previously reported heterozygous frameshift mutation (c.127_128delCA, p.Gln43Aspfs ×63) inherited from the mother, a novel frameshift mutation (c.501_502insC, p.Val168Argfs ×30, inherited from the father) in proband 1 and a novel missense mutation (c. 643G>A, p. G215S), inherited from both parents in proband 2. In family 2 both parents and one sister were heterozygous carriers of the novel missense mutation. Neither pedigree exhibited mutation in the AVPR2 gene. The patient with truncated AQP2 may present with much more severe NDI manifestations. Identification of these novel AQP2 gene mutations expands the AQP2 genotypic spectrum and may contribute to etiological diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  13. mutLBSgeneDB: mutated ligand binding site gene DataBase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pora; Zhao, Junfei; Lu, Pinyi; Zhao, Zhongming

    2017-01-01

    Mutations at the ligand binding sites (LBSs) can influence protein structure stability, binding affinity with small molecules, and drug resistance in cancer patients. Our recent analysis revealed that ligand binding residues had a significantly higher mutation rate than other parts of the protein. Here, we built mutLBSgeneDB (mutated Ligand Binding Site gene DataBase) available at http://zhaobioinfo.org/mutLBSgeneDB. We collected and curated over 2300 genes (mutLBSgenes) having ∼12 000 somatic mutations at ∼10 000 LBSs across 16 cancer types and selected 744 drug targetable genes (targetable_mutLBSgenes) by incorporating kinases, transcription factors, pharmacological genes, and cancer driver genes. We analyzed LBS mutation information, differential gene expression network, drug response correlation with gene expression, and protein stability changes for all mutLBSgenes using integrated genetic, genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, network and functional information. We calculated and compared the binding affinities of 20 carefully selected genes with their drugs in wild type and mutant forms. mutLBSgeneDB provides a user-friendly web interface for searching and browsing through seven categories of annotations: Gene summary, Mutated information, Protein structure related information, Differential gene expression and gene-gene network, Phenotype information, Pharmacological information, and Conservation information. mutLBSgeneDB provides a useful resource for functional genomics, protein structure, drug and disease research communities. PMID:27907895

  14. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: genes, mutations, and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Smith, K D; Kemp, S; Braiterman, L T; Lu, J F; Wei, H M; Geraghty, M; Stetten, G; Bergin, J S; Pevsner, J; Watkins, P A

    1999-04-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a complex and perplexing neurodegenerative disorder. The metabolic abnormality, elevated levels of very long-chain fatty acids in tissues and plasma, and the biochemical defect, reduced peroxisomal very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (VLCS) activity, are ubiquitous features of the disease. However, clinical manifestations are highly variable with regard to time of onset, site of initial pathology and rate of progression. In addition, the abnormal gene in X-ALD is not the gene for VLCS. Rather, it encodes a peroxisomal membrane protein with homology to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transmembrane transporter superfamily of proteins. The X-ALD protein (ALDP) is closely related to three other peroxisomal membrane ABC proteins. In this report we summarize all known X-ALD mutations and establish the lack of an X-ALD genotype/phenotype correlation. We compare the evolutionary relationships among peroxisomal ABC proteins, demonstrate that ALDP forms homodimers with itself and heterodimers with other peroxisomal ABC proteins and present cDNA complementation studies suggesting that the peroxisomal ABC proteins have overlapping functions. We also establish that there are at least two peroxisomal VLCS activities, one that is ALDP dependent and one that is ALDP independent. Finally, we discuss variable expression of the peroxisomal ABC proteins and ALDP independent VLCS in relation to the variable clinical presentations of X-ALD.

  15. Neoplasms Associated with Germline and Somatic NF1 Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sachin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Neurofibromatosis 1 is a tumor predisposition genetic syndrome with autosomal dominant inheritance and virtually 100% penetrance by the age of 5 years. NF1 results from a loss-of-function mutation in the NF1 gene, resulting in decreased levels of neurofibromin in the cell. Neurofibromin is a negative regulator of various intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cellular proliferation. Although the loss of heterozygosity in the NF1 gene may predispose NF1 patients to certain malignancies, additional genetic alterations are a prerequisite for their development. The precise nature of these additional genetic alterations is not well defined, and genetic testing of all malignancies in NF1 patients becomes an essential component of future research in this subset of patients. In addition to germline NF1 mutations, alteration of the somatic NF1 gene is associated with sporadic malignancies such as adenocarcinoma of the colon, myelodysplastic syndrome, and anaplastic astrocytoma. Materials and Methods. A comprehensive English and non-English language search for all articles pertinent to malignancies associated with NF1 was conducted using PubMed, a search engine provided by the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health. Key words searched included the following: “malignancies associated with NF1”, “tumors associated with NF1”, and “NF1 and malignancies”. A comprehensive analysis in terms age and mode of presentation, investigation and therapeutic modalities, and outcome of the published data was performed and compared with similar information on the sporadic cases. Results. Malignancies in NF1 patients typically occur at an earlier age and, with an exception of optic pathway gliomas, certain types of malignancies carry a poor prognosis compared with their sporadic counterparts. Malignancies are the leading cause of death in NF1 patients, resulting in a 10- to 15-year decreased life expectancy compared with the

  16. UNSTABLE MUTATIONS IN THE FMR1 GENE AND THE PHENOTYPES

    PubMed Central

    Loesch, Danuta; Hagerman, Randi

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), a severe neurodevelopmental anomaly, and one of the earliest disorders linked to an unstable (‘dynamic’) mutation, is caused by the large (>200) CGG repeat expansions in the noncoding portion of the FMR1 (Fragile X Mental Retardation-1) gene. These expansions, termed full mutations, normally silence this gene's promoter through methylation, leading to a gross deficit of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) that is essential for normal brain development. Rare individuals with the expansion but with an unmethylated promoter (and thus, FMRP production), present a much less severe form of FXS. However, a unique feature of the relationship between the different sizes of CGG expanded tract and phenotypic changes is that smaller expansions (<200) generate a series of different clinical manifestations and/or neuropsychological changes. The major part of this chapter is devoted to those FMR1 alleles with small (55-200) CGG expansions, termed ‘premutations’, which have the potential for generating the full mutation alleles on mother-offspring transmission, on the one hand, and are associated with some phenotypic changes, on the other. Thus, the role of several factors known to determine the rate of CGG expansion in the premutation alleles is discussed first. Then, an account of various neurodevelopmental, congnitive, behavioural and physical changes reported in carriers of these small expansions is given, and possible association of these conditions with a toxicity of the elevated FMR1 gene's transcript (mRNA) is discussed. The next two sections are devoted to major and well defined clinical conditions associated with the premutation alleles. The first one is the late onset neurodegenerative disorder termed fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). The wide range of clinical and neuropsychological manifestations of this syndrome, and their relevance to elevated levels of the FMR1 mRNA, are described. Another distinct

  17. Specific mutation near the primary donor in photosystem I from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii alters the trapping time and spectroscopic properties of P700.

    PubMed

    Melkozernov, A N; Su, H; Lin, S; Bingham, S; Webber, A N; Blankenship, R E

    1997-03-11

    Time-resolved absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to investigate the energy and electron transfer processes in the detergent-isolated photosystem I core particles from the site-directed mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with the histidine-656 of PsaB replaced by asparagine [HN(B656) mutation]. The specific mutation near the primary donor molecule results in a 40 mV increase in the P700/P700+ midpoint potential [Webber, A. N., Su Hui, Bingham, S. E., Kass, H., Krabben, L., Kuhn, M., Jordan, R., Schlodder, E., & Lubitz, W. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 12857-12863]. There is no indication that the HN(B656) mutation affects the spectral distribution of the antenna pigments. However, the lifetime of the trapping process measured independently by transient absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy in the mutant PSI core antenna is increased by a factor of approximately 2 (approximately 65 ps compared to approximately 30 ps in the wild-type PSI). This implies that the trapping process in the PSI antenna is limited by the process where the primary donor molecule directly participates. The HN(B656) mutation results in the appearance of a new bleaching band at 670 nm in the spectrum which is due to formation of P700+ upon photooxidation. The difference spectrum of the photoreduction of the possible primary acceptor, A0 in the mutant PSI is very similar to wild type, indicating that it is unaffected by the HN(B656) mutation. Possible mechanisms for slowing of the trapping process and the appearance of a new band in the P700 - P700+ difference spectrum of the HN(B656) PSI are discussed.

  18. Mice with Alopecia, Osteoporosis, and Systemic Amyloidosis Due to Mutation in Zdhhc13, a Gene Coding for Palmitoyl Acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Ya-Wen; Huang, Hong-Wen; Kao, Hsiao-Jung; Liu, Kai-Ming; Shen, Li-Fen; Song, I-wen; Tu, Chen-Pei D.; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Kikuchi, Tateki; Justice, Monica J.; Yen, Jeffrey J. Y.; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2010-01-01

    Protein palmitoylation has emerged as an important mechanism for regulating protein trafficking, stability, and protein–protein interactions; however, its relevance to disease processes is not clear. Using a genome-wide, phenotype driven N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea–mediated mutagenesis screen, we identified mice with failure to thrive, shortened life span, skin and hair abnormalities including alopecia, severe osteoporosis, and systemic amyloidosis (both AA and AL amyloids depositions). Whole-genome homozygosity mapping with 295 SNP markers and fine mapping with an additional 50 SNPs localized the disease gene to chromosome 7 between 53.9 and 56.3 Mb. A nonsense mutation (c.1273A>T) was located in exon 12 of the Zdhhc13 gene (Zinc finger, DHHC domain containing 13), a gene coding for palmitoyl transferase. The mutation predicted a truncated protein (R425X), and real-time PCR showed markedly reduced Zdhhc13 mRNA. A second gene trap allele of Zdhhc13 has the same phenotypes, suggesting that this is a loss of function allele. This is the first report that palmitoyl transferase deficiency causes a severe phenotype, and it establishes a direct link between protein palmitoylation and regulation of diverse physiologic functions where its absence can result in profound disease pathology. This mouse model can be used to investigate mechanisms where improper palmitoylation leads to disease processes and to understand molecular mechanisms underlying human alopecia, osteoporosis, and amyloidosis and many other neurodegenerative diseases caused by protein misfolding and amyloidosis. PMID:20548961

  19. Distribution of mutations in the PEX gene in families with X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets (HYP).

    PubMed

    Rowe, P S; Oudet, C L; Francis, F; Sinding, C; Pannetier, S; Econs, M J; Strom, T M; Meitinger, T; Garabedian, M; David, A; Macher, M A; Questiaux, E; Popowska, E; Pronicka, E; Read, A P; Mokrzycki, A; Glorieux, F H; Drezner, M K; Hanauer, A; Lehrach, H; Goulding, J N; O'Riordan, J L

    1997-04-01

    Mutations in the PEX gene at Xp22.1 (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases, on the X-chromosome), are responsible for X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets (HYP). Homology of PEX to the M13 family of Zn2+ metallopeptidases which include neprilysin (NEP) as prototype, has raised important questions regarding PEX function at the molecular level. The aim of this study was to analyse 99 HYP families for PEX gene mutations, and to correlate predicted changes in the protein structure with Zn2+ metallopeptidase gene function. Primers flanking 22 characterised exons were used to amplify DNA by PCR, and SSCP was then used to screen for mutations. Deletions, insertions, nonsense mutations, stop codons and splice mutations occurred in 83% of families screened for in all 22 exons, and 51% of a separate set of families screened in 17 PEX gene exons. Missense mutations in four regions of the gene were informative regarding function, with one mutation in the Zn2+-binding site predicted to alter substrate enzyme interaction and catalysis. Computer analysis of the remaining mutations predicted changes in secondary structure, N-glycosylation, protein phosphorylation and catalytic site molecular structure. The wide range of mutations that align with regions required for protease activity in NEP suggests that PEX also functions as a protease, and may act by processing factor(s) involved in bone mineral metabolism.

  20. Association of PAX2 and Other Gene Mutations with the Clinical Manifestations of Renal Coloboma Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Higashide, Tomomi; Sakurai, Mayumi; Hashimoto, Shin-ichi; Shinozaki, Yasuyuki; Hara, Akinori; Iwata, Yasunori; Sakai, Norihiko; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa; Kaneko, Shuichi; Wada, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Background Renal coloboma syndrome (RCS) is characterized by renal anomalies and optic nerve colobomas. PAX2 mutations contribute to RCS. However, approximately half of the patients with RCS have no mutation in PAX2 gene. Methods To investigate the incidence and effects of mutations of PAX2 and 25 candidate genes, patient genes were screened using next-generation sequence analysis, and candidate mutations were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. The correlation between mutations and clinical manifestation was evaluated. Result Thirty patients, including 26 patients (two families of five and two, 19 sporadic cases) with RCS, and 4 optic nerve coloboma only control cases were evaluated in the present study. Six PAX2 mutations in 21 probands [28%; two in family cohorts (n = 5 and n = 2) and in 4 out of 19 patients with sporadic disease] including four novel mutations were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. Moreover, four other sequence variants (CHD7, SALL4, KIF26B, and SIX4) were also confirmed, including a potentially pathogenic novel KIF26B mutation. Kidney function and proteinuria were more severe in patients with PAX2 mutations than in those without the mutation. Moreover, the coloboma score was significantly higher in patients with PAX2 gene mutations. Three out of five patients with PAX2 mutations had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) diagnosed from kidney biopsies. Conclusion The results of this study identify several new mutations of PAX2, and sequence variants in four additional genes, including a novel potentially pathogenic mutation in KIF26B, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of RCS. PMID:26571382

  1. Germ-line mutational analysis of the TSC2 gene in 90 tuberous-sclerosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Au, K S; Rodriguez, J A; Finch, J L; Volcik, K A; Roach, E S; Delgado, M R; Rodriguez, E; Northrup, H

    1998-01-01

    Ninety patients with tuberous-sclerosis complex (TSC) were tested for subtle mutations in the TSC2 gene, by means of single-strand conformational analysis (SSCA) of genomic DNA. Patients included 56 sporadic cases and 34 familial probands. For all patients, SSCA was performed for each of the 41 exons of the TSC2 gene. We identified 32 SSCA changes, 22 disease-causing mutations, and 10 polymorphic variants. Interestingly, we detected mutations at a much higher frequency in the sporadic cases (32%) than in the multiplex families (9%). Among the eight families for which linkage to the TSC2 region had been determined, only one mutation was found. Mutations were distributed equally across the gene; they included 5 deletions, 3 insertions, 10 missense mutations, 2 nonsense mutations, and 2 tandem duplications. We did not detect an increase in mutations either in the GTPase-activating protein (GAP)-related domains of TSC2 or in the activating domains that have been identified in rat tuberin. We did not detect any mutations in the exons (25 and 31) that are spliced out in the isoforms. There was no evidence for correspondence between variability of phenotype and type of mutation (missense versus early termination). Diagnostic testing will be difficult because of the genetic heterogeneity of TSC (which has at least two causative genes: TSC1 and TSC2), the large size of the TSC2 gene, and the variety of mutations. More than half of the mutations that we identified (missense, small in-frame deletion, and tandem duplication) are not amenable to the mutation-detection methods, such as protein-truncation testing, that are commonly employed for genes that encode proteins with tumor-suppressor function. PMID:9463313

  2. Dysferlin Gene Mutation Spectrum in a Large Cohort of Chinese Patients with Dysferlinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Su-Qin; Yu, Meng; Zhang, Wei; Lyu, He; Yuan, Yun; Wang, Zhao-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dysferlinopathy is caused by mutations in the dysferlin (DYSF) gene. Here, we described the genetic features of a large cohort of Chinese patients with this disease. Methods: Eighty-nine index patients were included in the study. DYSF gene analysis was performed by Sanger sequencing in 41 patients and targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) in 48 patients. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) was performed to detect exon duplication/deletion in patients with only one pathogenic mutation. Results: Among the 89 index patients, 79 patients were demonstrated to carry two disease-causing (73 cases) or possibly disease-causing mutations (6 cases), including 26 patients with homozygous mutations. We identified 105 different mutations, including 59 novel ones. Notably, in 13 patients in whom only one pathogenic mutation was initially found by Sanger sequencing or NGS, 3 were further identified to carry exon deletions by MLPA. The mutations identified in this study appeared to cluster in the N-terminal region. Mutation types included missense mutations (30.06%), nonsense mutations (17.18%), frameshift mutations (30.67%), in-frame deletions (2.45%), intronic mutations (17.79%), and exonic rearrangement (1.84%). No genotype-phenotype correlation was identified. Conclusions: DYSF mutations in Chinese patients clustered in the N-terminal region of the gene. Exonic rearrangements were found in 23% of patients with only one pathogenic mutation identified by Sanger sequencing or NGS. The novel mutations found in this study greatly expanded the mutational spectrum of dysferlinopathy. PMID:27647186

  3. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-01-01

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT+/− cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT+/− rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species. PMID:26522387

  4. PTRH2 gene mutation causes progressive congenital skeletal muscle pathology.

    PubMed

    Doe, Jinger; Kaindl, Angela M; Jijiwa, Mayumi; de la Vega, Michelle; Hu, Hao; Griffiths, Genevieve S; Fontelonga, Tatiana M; Barraza, Pamela; Cruz, Vivian; Van Ry, Pam; Ramos, Joe W; Burkin, Dean J; Matter, Michelle L

    2017-04-15

    Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase 2 (PTRH2) regulates integrin-mediated pro-survival and apoptotic signaling. PTRH2 is critical in muscle development and regulates myogenic differentiation. In humans a biallelic mutation in the PTRH2 gene causes infantile-onset multisystem disease with progressive muscle weakness. We report here that the Ptrh2 knockout mouse model recapitulates the progressive congenital muscle pathology observed in patients. Ptrh2 null mice demonstrate multiple degenerating and regenerating muscle fibers, increased central nuclei, elevated creatine kinase activity and endomysial fibrosis. This progressive muscle pathology resembles the muscular dystrophy phenotype in humans and mice lacking the α7 integrin. We demonstrate that in normal muscle Ptrh2 associates in a complex with the α7β1 integrin at the sarcolemma and Ptrh2 expression is decreased in α7 integrin null muscle. Furthermore, Ptrh2 expression is altered in skeletal muscle of classical congenital muscular dystrophy mouse models. Ptrh2 levels were up-regulated in dystrophin deficient mdx muscle, which correlates with the elevated levels of the α7β1 integrin observed in mdx muscle and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Similar to the α7 integrin, Ptrh2 expression was decreased in laminin-α2 dyW null gastrocnemius muscle. Our data establishes a PTRH2 mutation as a novel driver of congenital muscle degeneration and identifies a potential novel target to treat muscle myopathies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Novel TSC1 and TSC2 gene mutations in Chinese patients with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tingting; He, Yingzhong; Li, Niu; Zhou, Yunqing; Wang, Zhiping; Fu, Qihua; Wang, Jiwen; Wang, Jian

    2017-03-01

    The study was designed to identify pathogenic TSC1 or TSC2 gene mutations and provide solid evidence for the diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). 11 unrelated Chinese patients with TSC were investigated in the present study. Characteristic skin lesions such as hypomelanotic macules and the central nervous system features such as the epilepsy, cortical tubers and subependymal nodules were the most common symptoms that were observed in the patients. All exons and exon-intron boundaries of the TSC1 and TSC2 gene of the patients were amplified by PCR. A total of 11 different TSC2 and one TSC1 mutations were identified in the present study, of which five TSC2 and 1 TSC1 gene mutations were novel. Among the 11 patients, 10 harbored TSC2 mutations, whereas only one patient had a TSC1 gene mutation. The identification of TSC1/TSC2 gene mutations confirmed the diagnosis of the 11 patients with TSC. Our study has expanded the spectrum of TSC1 and TSC2 gene mutations causing TSC. The identification of the TSC1/TSC2 gene mutations confirmed the diagnosis of the 11 patients with TSC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Spatial Clustering of de Novo Missense Mutations Identifies Candidate Neurodevelopmental Disorder-Associated Genes.

    PubMed

    Lelieveld, Stefan H; Wiel, Laurens; Venselaar, Hanka; Pfundt, Rolph; Vriend, Gerrit; Veltman, Joris A; Brunner, Han G; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Gilissen, Christian

    2017-09-07

    Haploinsufficiency (HI) is the best characterized mechanism through which dominant mutations exert their effect and cause disease. Non-haploinsufficiency (NHI) mechanisms, such as gain-of-function and dominant-negative mechanisms, are often characterized by the spatial clustering of mutations, thereby affecting only particular regions or base pairs of a gene. Variants leading to haploinsufficency might occasionally cluster as well, for example in critical domains, but such clustering is on the whole less pronounced with mutations often spread throughout the gene. Here we exploit this property and develop a method to specifically identify genes with significant spatial clustering patterns of de novo mutations in large cohorts. We apply our method to a dataset of 4,061 de novo missense mutations from published exome studies of trios with intellectual disability and developmental disorders (ID/DD) and successfully identify 15 genes with clustering mutations, including 12 genes for which mutations are known to cause neurodevelopmental disorders. For 11 out of these 12, NHI mutation mechanisms have been reported. Additionally, we identify three candidate ID/DD-associated genes of which two have an established role in neuronal processes. We further observe a higher intolerance to normal genetic variation of the identified genes compared to known genes for which mutations lead to HI. Finally, 3D modeling of these mutations on their protein structures shows that 81% of the observed mutations are unlikely to affect the overall structural integrity and that they therefore most likely act through a mechanism other than HI. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. PHEX gene mutation in a Chinese family with six cases of X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Yang, Jianbin; Huang, Xinwen

    2013-01-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic (XLH) rickets is caused by inactivating mutations in the PHEX gene, which encodes a metalloprotease that cleaves small peptide hormone. So far there are only a few reports on XLH patients from China. In the present study, we report on six XLH patients from one family. A PHEX missense mutation was found in exon 22, and a literature review on the mutations of Chinese patients was undertaken. The family included six XLH patients with five females and one male (the proband). All the patients showed a low serum phosphorus, increased blood alkaline phosphatase and normal calcium levels. Mutation analysis revealed a PHEX mutation in exon 22 (c.2237G>A). In total, 15 PHEX mutations have been reported in Chinese populations at this time. These data extend the spectrum of mutations in the PHEX gene in Chinese populations.

  8. Spliceosomal gene mutations in myelodysplasia: molecular links to clonal abnormalities of hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Daichi; Bradley, Robert K.; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Genomic analyses of the myeloid malignancies and clonal disorders of hematopoiesis that may give rise to these disorders have identified that mutations in genes encoding core spliceosomal proteins and accessory regulatory splicing factors are among the most common targets of somatic mutations. These spliceosomal mutations often occur in a mutually exclusive manner with one another and, in aggregate, account for the most frequent class of mutations in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) in particular. Although substantial progress has been made in understanding the effects of several of these mutations on splicing and splice site recognition, functional connections linking the mechanistic changes in splicing induced by these mutations to the phenotypic consequences of clonal and aberrant hematopoiesis are not yet well defined. This review describes our current understanding of the mechanistic and biological effects of spliceosomal gene mutations in MDSs as well as the regulation of splicing throughout normal hematopoiesis. PMID:27151974

  9. Mutational analysis of AKT1, AKT2 and AKT3 genes in common human carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Soung, Young Hwa; Lee, Jong Woo; Nam, Suk Woo; Lee, Jung Young; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2006-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that alterations in AKT proteins play an important role in the pathogenesis of cancer. The objective of this study was to see whether common human carcinomas harbor AKT mutations that might contribute to the development of cancer. We performed mutational analysis of the kinase domains of AKT1-AKT3 by a single-strand conformation polymorphism assay in 294 carcinoma tissues from the stomach, lung, colon and breast. Overall, we detected three somatic mutations in AKT2, but no mutations in AKT1 or AKT3 in the 294 cancer tissues. The AKT2 mutations were detected in 1 of 51 gastric carcinomas (2.0%) and 2 of 79 lung carcinomas (2.5%). AKT2 mutations consisted of one missense mutation and 2 splice site mutations in the intron. We simultaneously analyzed somatic mutations in EGFR, ERBB2, K-RAS, PIK3CA and BRAF genes in the 3 samples with the AKT2 mutations, and found a lung adenocarcinoma with the AKT2 missense mutation harbored an EGFR mutation. This study demonstrated that somatic mutations in the kinase domain of AKT2 occur in a small fraction of common human cancers, and suggested that alterations in the AKT2-mediated signaling pathway by AKT2 mutation could contribute to the development of some cases of human cancers. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Exome sequencing reveals AMER1 as a frequently mutated gene in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Pamplona, Rebeca; Lopez-Doriga, Adriana; Paré-Brunet, Laia; Lázaro, Kira; Bellido, Fernando; Alonso, M. Henar; Aussó, Susanna; Guinó, Elisabet; Beltrán, Sergi; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Gut, Marta; Sanjuan, Xavier; Closa, Adria; Cordero, David; Morón-Duran, Francisco D.; Soriano, Antonio; Salazar, Ramón; Valle, Laura; Moreno, Victor

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Somatic mutations occur at early stages of adenoma and accumulate throughout colorectal cancer (CRC) progression. The aim of this study was to characterize the mutational landscape of stage II tumors and to search for novel recurrent mutations likely implicated in CRC tumorigenesis. DESIGN The exomic DNA of 42 stage II, microsatellite stable, colon tumors and their paired mucosae were sequenced. Other molecular data available in the discovery dataset (gene expression, methylation, and CNV) was used to further characterize these tumors. Additional datasets comprising 553 CRC samples were used to validate the discovered mutations. RESULTS As a result, 4,886 somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were found. Almost all SNVs were private changes, with few mutations shared by more than one tumor, thus revealing tumor-specific mutational landscapes. Nevertheless, these diverse mutations converged into common cellular pathways such as cell cycle or apoptosis. Among this mutational heterogeneity, variants resulting in early stop-codons in the AMER1 (also known as FAM123B or WTX) gene emerged as recurrent mutations in CRC. Loses of AMER1 by other mechanisms apart from mutations such as methylation and copy number aberrations were also found. Tumors lacking this tumor suppressor gene exhibited a mesenchymal phenotype characterized by inhibition of the canonical Wnt pathway. CONCLUSION In silico and experimental validation in independent datasets confirmed the existence of functional mutations in AMER1 in approximately 10% of analyzed CRC tumors. Moreover, these tumors exhibited a characteristic phenotype. PMID:26071483

  11. Twenty-five novel mutations including duplications in the ATP7A gene.

    PubMed

    Moizard, M-P; Ronce, N; Blesson, S; Bieth, E; Burglen, L; Mignot, C; Mortemousque, I; Marmin, N; Dessay, B; Danesino, C; Feillet, F; Castelnau, P; Toutain, A; Moraine, C; Raynaud, M

    2011-03-01

    Twenty-five novel mutations including duplications in the ATP7A gene. Menkes disease (MD) and occipital horn syndrome (OHS) are allelic X-linked recessive copper deficiency disorders resulting from ATP7A gene mutations. MD is a severe condition leading to progressive neurological degeneration and death in early childhood, whereas OHS has a milder phenotype with mainly connective tissue abnormalities. Until now, molecular analyses have revealed only deletions and point mutations in both diseases. This study reports new molecular data in a series of 40 patients referred for either MD or OHS. We describe 23 point mutations (9 missense mutations, 7 splice site variants, 4 nonsense mutations, and 3 small insertions or deletions) and 7 intragenic deletions. Of these, 18 point mutations and 3 deletions are novel. Furthermore, our finding of four whole exon duplications enlarges the mutation spectrum in the ATP7A gene. ATP7A alterations were found in 85% of cases. Of these alterations, two thirds were point mutations and the remaining one third consisted of large rearrangements. We found that 66.6% of point mutations resulted in impaired ATP7A transcript splicing, a phenomenon more frequent than expected. This finding enabled us to confirm the pathogenic role of ATP7A mutations, particularly in missense and splice site variants. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Novel mutations in the RB1 gene from Chinese families with a history of retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leilei; Jia, Renbing; Zhao, Junyang; Fan, Jiayan; Zhou, YiXiong; Han, Bing; Song, Xin; Wu, Li; Zhang, He; Song, Huaidong; Ge, Shengfang; Fan, Xianqun

    2015-04-01

    Retinoblastoma is an aggressive eye cancer that develops during infancy and is divided into two clinical types, sporadic and heritable. RB1 has been identified as the only pathological gene responsible for heritable retinoblastoma. Here, we identified 11 RB1 germline mutations in the Han pedigrees of 17 bilateral retinoblastoma patients from China. Four mutations were nonsense mutations, five were splice site mutations, and two resulted in a frame shift due to an insertion or a deletion. Three of the mutations had not been previously reported, and the p.Q344L mutation occurred in two generations of retinoblastoma patients. We investigated phenotypic-genotypic relationships for the novel mutations and showed that these mutations affected the expression, location, and function of the retinoblastoma protein. Abnormal protein localization was observed after transfection of the mutant genes. In addition, changes in the cell cycle distribution and apoptosis rates were observed when the Saos-2 cell line was transfected with plasmids encoding the mutant RB1 genes. Our findings expand the spectrum of known RB1 mutations and will benefit the investigation of RB1 mutation hotspots. Genetic counseling can be offered to families with heritable RB1 mutations.

  13. Mutation analysis of NR2E3 and NRL genes in Enhanced S Cone Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alan F; Reddick, Adam C; Schwartz, Sharon B; Ferguson, Julie S; Aleman, Tomas S; Kellner, Ulrich; Jurklies, Bernhard; Schuster, Andreas; Zrenner, Eberhart; Wissinger, Bernd; Lennon, Alan; Shu, Xinhua; Cideciyan, Artur V; Stone, Edwin M; Jacobson, Samuel G; Swaroop, Anand

    2004-11-01

    Ten new and seventeen previously reported Enhanced S Cone Syndrome (ESCS) subjects were used to search for genetic heterogeneity. All subjects were diagnosed with ESCS on the basis of clinical, psychophysical and/or electroretinography testing using published criteria. Mutation analysis was performed on the NR2E3 nuclear receptor gene by single strand conformation analysis and direct sequencing, which revealed either homozygous (N=13) or compound heterozygous (N=11) mutations in 24 subjects (89%), heterozygous mutations in 2 subjects (7%) and no mutations in 1 subject (4%). Fifteen different mutations were identified, including six not previously reported. The subject (Patient A) with no detected NR2E3 mutation had features not usually associated with ESCS, in particular moderate rod photoreceptor function in peripheral retina and an abnormally thick retinal nerve fibre layer. Mutation analysis of the NRL, CRX, NR1D1 and THRB genes in this individual revealed a heterozygous one base-pair insertion in exon 2 of the NRL gene, which results in a predicted truncation of the NRL protein. Loss-of-function NRL alleles have not been described previously in humans, but since the same mutation was present in unaffected family members, it raises the possibility that the abnormal ESCS phenotype in Patient A may result from a digenic mechanism, with a heterozygous NRL mutation and a mutation in another unknown gene. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. [Characteristics of phenylalanine hydroxylase gene mutations among patients with phenylketonuria from Linyi region of Shandong Province].

    PubMed

    Li, Huafeng; Li, Yongli; Zhang, Li

    2017-06-10

    To explore the characteristics of (PAH) gene mutations among patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) from Linyi area of Shandong Province. For 51 children affected with PKU and their parents, the 13 exons and their flanking intronic sequences of the PAH gene were directly sequenced with Sanger method. PAH gene mutations were detected in all of the 102 alleles of the patients, which included 31 types of mutations. Common mutations included R243Q (17/102, 16.67%), IVS4-1G to A (9/102, 8.82%), R241C (8/102, 7.84%), R111X (8/102, 7.84%), and V399V (8/102, 7.84%). In addition, two novel mutations, D101N, 345-347del, have been detected. The 31 types of mutations included missense, nonsense, deletion, and splicing mutations, which were mainly located in exons 7 (29, 28.43%), 11 (18, 17.65%), 3 (16, 15.69%) and 12 (13, 12.75%). Mutations of the PAH gene in Linyi region mainly distributed in exons 7, 11, and 3, and the most common mutation were R243Q. Two novel mutations, D101N and 345-347del, have been detected.

  15. Tyrosine kinase domain mutations of EGFR gene in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vatte, Chittibabu; Al Amri, Ali M; Cyrus, Cyril; Chathoth, Shahanas; Acharya, Sadananda; Hashim, Tariq Mohammad; Al Ali, Zhara; Alshreadah, Saleh Tawfeeq; Alsayyah, Ahmed; Al-Ali, Amein K

    2017-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a commonly altered gene that is identified in various cancers, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Therefore, EGFR is a promising molecular marker targeted by monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the tyrosine kinase (TK) domain. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the spectrum of mutations in exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 of the EGFR gene in HNSCC patients. Materials and methods This retrospective study included 47 confirmed HNSCC cases. Mutations in the TK domain, exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 of the EGFR gene, were detected by Scorpion® chemistry and ARMS® technologies on Rotor-Gene Q real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results The tumors exhibited EGFR-TK domain mutations in 57% of cases. Four cases of T790M mutations were reported for the first time among HNSCC patients. Out of the total mutations, L861Q (exon 21), exon 20 insertions and deletions of exon 19 accounted for the majority of mutations (21%, 19%, and 17%, respectively). EGFR mutation status was correlated with the higher grade (P=0.026) and advanced stage (P=0.034) of HNSCC tumors. Conclusion Higher frequency of EGFR-TK domain mutations together with the presence of the T790M mutation suggests that identification of these mutations might streamline the therapy and provide a better prognosis in HNSCC cases. PMID:28352186

  16. Differences in gene mutations between Chinese and Caucasian cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Baoying

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cystic fibrosis (CF) is rarely seen in Asian populations. We diagnosed two CF cases. One of them had a novel mutation c.870‐1G>C in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. There have been 38 Chinese CF patients reported in literature from 1974 until the present (2016), 25 different mutations were identified. Only one of these mutations (R553X) is in the Caucasian CF screening panel. The mutations identified in Chinese CF patients are very different from the common Caucasian gene mutations. The CFTR gene mutation spectrum for the Chinese population requires further investigation. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2017;52:E11–E14. © 2016 The Authors. Pediatric Pulmonology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27717243

  17. [A novel mutation in β-globin gene of a patient with β-thalassemia].

    PubMed

    Peng, Yun-Sheng; Sun, Shun-Chang; Chen, Qun-Rong; Wang, Qing; Mo, Bao-Mei

    2012-04-01

    This study was aimed to analyze the β-globin gene mutations in a patient with β-thalassemia minor. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood cells of the patient. The full-length DNA sequence coding for β-globin was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the gene mutation was determined by DNA sequencing. The results indicated that a heterogeneous A→G mutation was found at position 129 in intron 1 of the β-thalassemia minor patient. It is concluded that the IVS-I-129(A→G) mutation is a splicing site mutation leading to a splicing error in immature messenger RNA and a protein translation error for the β-globin gene. Thus, the IVS-I-129(A→G) is a novel mutation.

  18. Compound EGFR mutation is frequently detected with co-mutations of actionable genes and associated with poor clinical outcome in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Cho, Eun Na; Park, Heae Surng; Hong, Ji Young; Lim, Seri; Youn, Jong Pil; Hwang, Seung Yong; Chang, Yoon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Compound EGFR mutations, defined as double or multiple mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain, are frequently detected with advances in sequencing technology but its clinical significance is unclear. This study analyzed 61 cases of EGFR mutation positive lung adenocarcinoma using next-generation sequencing (NGS) based repeated deep sequencing panel of 16 genes that contain actionable mutations and investigated clinical implication of compound EGFR mutations. Compound EGFR mutation was detected in 15 (24.6%) of 61 cases of EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma. The majority (12/15) of compound mutations are combination of the atypical mutation and typical mutations such as exon19 deletion, L858R or G719X substitutions, or exon 20 insertion whereas 3 were combinations of rare atypical mutations. The patients with compound mutation showed shorter overall survival than those with simple mutations (83.7 vs. 72.8 mo; P = 0.020, Breslow test). Among the 115 missense mutations discovered in the tested genes, a few number of actionable mutations were detected irrelevant to the subtype of EGFR mutations, including ALK rearrangement, BCL2L11 intron 2 deletion, KRAS c.35G>A, PIK3CA c.1633G>A which are possible target of crizotinib, BH3 mimetics, MEK inhibitors, and PI3K-tyrosine kinase inhibitors, respectively. 31 missense mutations were detected in the cases with simple mutations whereas 84 in those with compound mutation, showing that the cases with compound missense mutation have higher burden of missense mutations (P = 0.001, independent sample t-test). Compound EGFR mutations are detected at a high frequency using NGS-based repeated deep sequencing. Because patients with compound EGFR mutations showed poor clinical outcomes, they should be closely monitored during follow-up.

  19. Frequencies of the Common MEFV Gene Mutations in Adiyaman, Southeast Anatolia, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, DT; Atak, PG; Çelik, Ç

    2014-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by fever and serosal inflammation. The reasons for the disorder are mutations in the Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene; the most common of which are M694V, M680I, M694I and V726A. In this study, we aimed to screen these common mutations of the MEFV gene and then determine the prevalence of FMF according to these mutations in Adıyaman, Southeast Anatolia, Turkey. Seven hundred and sixty-seven healthy individuals from the region of Adıyaman participated in the study. Polymerase chain reaction-amplification refractory mutation system (PCR-ARMS) methods were used to determine the common mutations of the MEFV gene. Twenty-six (3.9%) individuals had only one mutation in the MEFV gene, 25 individuals were heterozygous and one person was homozygous for the V726A mutation (0.15%). In the present study, the V726A mutation (50.0%) was the most frequent, followed by M694V (38.5%), M680I (7.7%) and M694I (3.8%). It was seen that the carrier rate was very low and the prevalence of FMF was 0.15%, according to the common mutations of the MEFV gene in Adıyaman, Southeast Anatolia, Turkey. PMID:25937800

  20. Additive effect of mutations in LDLR and PCSK9 genes on the phenotype of familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Pisciotta, Livia; Priore Oliva, Claudio; Cefalù, Angelo Baldassare; Noto, Davide; Bellocchio, Antonella; Fresa, Raffaele; Cantafora, Alfredo; Patel, Dilip; Averna, Maurizio; Tarugi, Patrizia; Calandra, Sebastiano; Bertolini, Stefano

    2006-06-01

    Patients homozygous or compound heterozygous for LDLR mutations or double heterozygous for LDLR and apo B R3500Q mutation have higher LDL-C levels, more extensive xanthomatosis and more severe premature coronary disease (pCAD) than simple heterozygotes for mutations in either these genes or for missense mutations in PCSK9 gene. It is not known whether combined mutations in LDLR and PKCS9 are associated with such a severe phenotype. We sequenced Apo B and PCSK9 genes in two patients with the clinical diagnosis of homozygous FH who were heterozygous for LDLR gene mutations. Proband Z.P. (LDL-C 13.39 mmol/L and pCAD) was heterozygous for an LDLR mutation (p.E228K) inherited from her father (LDL-C 8.07 mmol/L) and a PCSK9 mutation (p.R496W) from her mother (LDL-C 5.58 mmol/L). Proband L.R. and her sister (LDL-C 11.51 and 10.47 mmol/L, xanthomatosis and carotid atherosclerosis) were heterozygous for an LDLR mutation (p.Y419X) inherited from their mother (LDL-C 6.54 mmol/L) and a PCSK9 mutation (p.N425S) probably from their deceased father. The LDL-C levels in double heterozygotes of these two families were 56 and 44% higher than those found in simple heterozygotes for the two LDLR mutations, respectively. The two PCSK9 mutations are novel and were not found in 110 controls and 80 patients with co-dominant hypercholesterolemia. These observations indicate that rare missense mutations of PCSK9 may worsen the clinical phenotype of patients carrying LDLR mutations.

  1. Mutational analysis of EGFR and K-RAS genes in lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Soung, Young Hwa; Lee, Jong Woo; Kim, Su Young; Seo, Si Hyung; Park, Won Sang; Nam, Suk Woo; Song, Sang Yong; Han, Joung Ho; Park, Cheol Keun; Lee, Jung Young; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2005-05-01

    Both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and RAS gene mutations contribute to the development of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Because RAS is one of the downstream molecules in the EGFR signal transduction, the association between the somatic mutations of EGFR and RAS may be important in the pathogenesis of NSCLC . However, to date, such data are lacking. In this study, we analyzed the hotspot regions of K-RAS gene (codons 12, 13, 59 and 61) and EGFR gene (exons 18, 19 and 21) in 153 NSCLC tissue samples including 69 adenocarcinomas. Overall, we detected 30 EGFR mutations (19.6%) and 6 K-RAS mutations (3.9%) in the 153 NSCLCs. In the 69 adenocarcinomas, 26 EGFR mutations (37.7%) and six K-RAS mutations (8.7%) were detected. Of note, the 26 tumors with EGFR mutations did not harbor any K-RAS mutations, and the six tumors with K-RAS mutations did not harbor any EGFR mutations. Inverse relationship between K-RAS and EGFR mutations in the lung adenocarcinoma was statistically significant (P=0.046, chi2 test). As regards smoking history, EGFR mutation was significantly associated with never-smoking history, whereas K-RAS mutation was significantly associated with smoking history. Our data suggest that mutations of EGFR and K-RAS genes might separately, but not cooperatively, contribute to lung adenocarcinoma pathogenesis, and that EGFR and K-RAS mutants could separately be anti-neoplastic targets in lung adenocarcinomas.

  2. Distribution of mutations in DNMT3A gene and the suitability of mutations in R882 codon for MRD monitoring in patients with AML.

    PubMed

    Jeziskova, Ivana; Musilova, Milena; Culen, Martin; Foltankova, Veronika; Dvorakova, Dana; Mayer, Jiri; Racil, Zdenek

    2015-11-01

    The DNA methyl-transferase 3A gene (DNMT3A) is the third most frequently mutated gene in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients (20-30 %), who belong to a group of patients with intermediate risk. About 60 % of mutations in this gene have been identified in the arginine codon R882. To date, there is no consensus on whether these mutations can be used as biomarkers for monitoring of minimal residual disease and management of preemptive AML therapy. We studied the occurrence of mutations in the DNMT3A gene in our cohort of patients and their persistence during AML treatment. Using next-generation sequencing, we identified four mutations in 11/25 of our analyzed patients--frequent R882C and R882H mutations, rare Y735S mutation, and a novel L347P mutation. Mutation R882C was detected in 5/11, R882H in 4/11 patients, and Y735S and L347P in one patient each. In 4/7 patients initially carrying mutations in the R882 codon, we found the persistence of mutations also during complete remission with, however, no correlation to AML kinetics. Our findings suggest that mutations in the DNMT3A gene can only be used as a biomarker for those AML patients in whom DNMT3A mutation is lost after therapy.

  3. The carcinogenic role of oncogenic HPV and p53 gene mutation in cervical adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Andersson, S; Hellström, A-C; Ren, Zhi-Ping; Wilander, E

    2006-01-01

    Thirty tumors were collected from our archive of cervical adenocarcinomas. They were examined with respect to the content of oncogenic HPV and presence of mutations in the p53 gene exons 5 through 8. Furthermore, available clinical information on the cases was reviewed. For the detection of p53 gene and presence of oncogenic HPV, PCR followed by direct sequence analysis of the amplified DNA was employed. Seventeen tumors were identified as HPV-positive, comprising both HPV types 18 and 16. Six cases showed a p53 gene mutation, of which five were of the missence and one of the silent type. No statistical correlation between the occurrence of oncogenic HPV and presence of p53 gene mutation (p = 0.67) was recorded. Among the tumors with p53 gene mutation, three were HPV-positive and three were HPV-negative. The determination of p53 gene mutations was not related to clinical findings such as the stage of the tumor or presence of metastases of the lymph nodes. However, p53 gene mutations were somewhat more prevalent in low differentiated tumors (p < 0.02). The results indicate that oncogenic HPV and p53 gene mutations have independent carcinogenic roles in cervical adenocarcinomas.

  4. Relationship between periodontal destruction and gene mutations in patients with familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Sezer, Ufuk; Şenyurt, Süleyman Ziya; Özdemir, Eda Çetin; Zengin, Orhan; Üstün, Kemal; Erciyas, Kamile; Kısacık, Bünyamin; Onat, Ahmet Mesut

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that genetic factors involved in the host responses might determine the disease severity for both familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and periodontitis. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship of FMF with periodontitis and to search for the potential association between periodontitis and MEFV gene missense variations in patients with FMF. The study consisted of 97 FMF patients and 34 healthy volunteers. FMF patients were classified according to the kind of MEFV gene mutation: (1) patients with homozygous M694V gene mutation, (2) patients with heterozygous M694V gene mutation, and (3) patients with MEFV gene different mutations. Gingival Index (GI), Plaque Index (PI), probing pocket depth (PD), and clinical attachment level (CAL) were measured in all participants. The results of multivariate logistic regression showed a highly significant association between homozygous M694V gene mutation and periodontitis in FMF patients (p < 0.05). After adjusting for potential confounders (smoking, body weight, age, and gender), FMF patients with homozygous M694V gene mutation were 3.51 (1.08-11.45) times more likely to present periodontitis than the other FMF patients. These results indicate that the presence of homozygous M694V gene mutation seems to increase the risk for periodontitis in FMF patients.

  5. Mutational analysis of the HGSNAT gene in Italian patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IIIC (Sanfilippo C syndrome). Mutation in brief #959. Online.

    PubMed

    Fedele, Anthony Olind; Filocamo, Mirella; Di Rocco, Maja; Sersale, Giovanna; Lübke, Torben; di Natale, Paola; Cosma, Maria Pia; Ballabio, Andrea

    2007-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) describes any inherited lysosomal storage disorder resulting from an inability to catabolize glycosaminoglycans. MPS III (or Sanfilippo syndrome) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by a failure to degrade heparan sulphate. There are four subtypes of MPS III, each categorized by a deficiency in a specific enzyme involved in the heparan sulphate degradation pathway. The genes mutated in three of these (MPS IIIA, MPS IIIB, and MPS IIID) have been cloned for some time. However, only very recently has the gene for MPS IIIC (heparin acetyl CoA: alpha-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase, or HGSNAT) been identified. Its product (previously termed transmembrane protein 76, or TMEM76) has little sequence similarity to other proteins of known function, although it is well conserved among all species. In this study, a group of MPS IIIC patients, who are mainly of Italian origin, have been clinically characterized. Furthermore, mutational analysis of the HGSNAT gene in these patients resulted in the identification of nine alleles, of which eight are novel. Three splice-site mutations, three frameshift deletions resulting in premature stop codons, one nonsense mutation, and two missense mutations were identified. The latter are of particular interest as they are located in regions which are predicted to be of functional significance. This research will aid in determining the molecular basis of HGSNAT protein function, and the mechanisms underlying MPS IIIC.

  6. One novel Dravet syndrome causing mutation and one recurrent MAE causing mutation in SCN1A gene.

    PubMed

    Yordanova, Iglika; Todorov, Tihomir; Dimova, Petia; Hristova, Dimitrina; Tincheva, Radka; Litvinenko, Ivan; Yotovska, Olga; Kremensky, Ivo; Todorova, Albena

    2011-04-25

    Mutations in SCN1A gene, encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel α1-subunit, are found to be associated with severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy or Dravet syndrome (DS), but only rarely with the myoclonic astatic epilepsy (MAE, or Doose syndrome). We report on two patients with SCN1A mutations and severe epilepsy within the spectrum of generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus syndrome (GEFS+), the phenotypes being consistent with DS and MAE, respectively. Analysis of SCN1A revealed a heterozygous de novo frameshift mutation (c.4205_4208delGAAA) in the patient with DS, and a recurrent missense mutation (c.3521C>G) in that suffering from MAE. The missense mutation has been reported in patients with neurological diseases of various manifestations, which suggests that this variability is likely to result from the modifying effects of other genetic or environmental factors. DS phenotype has been mainly found associated with truncation mutations, while predominantly missense mutations and very few prematurely terminating substitutions have been reported in GEFS+ patients.

  7. Ancient genes establish stress-induced mutation as a hallmark of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Adam J.; Miočević, Milica; Lineweaver, Charles H.; Davies, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is sometimes depicted as a reversion to single cell behavior in cells adapted to live in a multicellular assembly. If this is the case, one would expect that mutation in cancer disrupts functional mechanisms that suppress cell-level traits detrimental to multicellularity. Such mechanisms should have evolved with or after the emergence of multicellularity. This leads to two related, but distinct hypotheses: 1) Somatic mutations in cancer will occur in genes that are younger than the emergence of multicellularity (1000 million years [MY]); and 2) genes that are frequently mutated in cancer and whose mutations are functionally important for the emergence of the cancer phenotype evolved within the past 1000 million years, and thus would exhibit an age distribution that is skewed to younger genes. In order to investigate these hypotheses we estimated the evolutionary ages of all human genes and then studied the probability of mutation and their biological function in relation to their age and genomic location for both normal germline and cancer contexts. We observed that under a model of uniform random mutation across the genome, controlled for gene size, genes less than 500 MY were more frequently mutated in both cases. Paradoxically, causal genes, defined in the COSMIC Cancer Gene Census, were depleted in this age group. When we used functional enrichment analysis to explain this unexpected result we discovered that COSMIC genes with recessive disease phenotypes were enriched for DNA repair and cell cycle control. The non-mutated genes in these pathways are orthologous to those underlying stress-induced mutation in bacteria, which results in the clustering of single nucleotide variations. COSMIC genes were less common in regions where the probability of observing mutational clusters is high, although they are approximately 2-fold more likely to harbor mutational clusters compared to other human genes. Our results suggest this ancient mutational response to

  8. A smart device for label-free and real-time detection of gene point mutations based on the high dark phase contrast of vapor condensation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junqi; Fu, Rongxin; Xie, Liping; Li, Qi; Zhou, Wenhan; Wang, Ruliang; Ye, Jiancheng; Wang, Dong; Xue, Ning; Lin, Xue; Lu, Ying; Huang, Guoliang

    2015-10-07

    A smart device for label-free and real-time detection of gene point mutation-related diseases was developed based on the high dark phase contrast of vapor condensation. The main components of the device included a Peltier cooler and a mini PC board for image processing. Heat from the hot side of the Peltier cooler causes the fluid in a copper chamber to evaporate, and the vapor condenses on the surface of a microarray chip placed on the cold side of the cooler. The high dark phase contrast of vapor condensation relative to the analytes on the microarray chip was explored. Combined with rolling circle amplification, the device visualizes less-to-more hydrophilic transitions caused by gene trapping and DNA amplification. A lung cancer gene point mutation was analysed, proving the high selectivity and multiplex analysis capability of this low-cost device.

  9. Spectrum of MECP2 gene mutations in a cohort of Indian patients with Rett syndrome: report of two novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Das, Dhanjit Kumar; Raha, Sarbani; Sanghavi, Daksha; Maitra, Anurupa; Udani, Vrajesh

    2013-02-15

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder, primarily affecting females and characterized by developmental regression, epilepsy, stereotypical hand movements, and motor abnormalities. Its prevalence is about 1 in 10,000 female births. Rett syndrome is caused by mutations within methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Over 270 individual nucleotide changes which cause pathogenic mutations have been reported. However, eight most commonly occurring missense and nonsense mutations account for almost 70% of all patients. We screened 90 individuals with Rett syndrome phenotype. A total of 19 different MECP2 mutations and polymorphisms were identified in 27 patients. Of the 19 mutations, we identified 7 (37%) frameshift, 6 (31%) nonsense, 14 (74%) missense mutations and one duplication (5%). The most frequent pathogenic changes were: missense p.T158M (11%), p.R133C (7.4%), and p.R306C (7.4%) and nonsense p.R168X (11%), p.R255X (7.4%) mutations. We have identified two novel mutations namely p.385-388delPLPP present in atypical patients and p.Glu290AlafsX38 present in a classical patient of Rett syndrome. Sequence homology for p.385-388delPLPP mutation revealed that these 4 amino acids were conserved across mammalian species. This indicated the importance of these 4 amino acids in structure and function of the protein. A novel variant p.T479T has also been identified in a patient with atypical Rett syndrome. A total of 62 (69%) patients remained without molecular genetics diagnosis that necessitates further search for mutations in other genes like CDKL5 and FOXG1 that are known to cause Rett phenotype. The majority of mutations are detected in exon 4 and only one mutation was present in exon 3. Therefore, our study suggests the need for screening exon 4 of MECP2 as first line of diagnosis in these patients.

  10. A Mutator Affecting the Region of the Iso-1-Cytochrome c Gene in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Liebman, Susan W.; Singh, Arjun; Sherman, Fred

    1979-01-01

    The mutator gene DEL1 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae causes a high rate of formation of multisite mutations that encompass the following three adjacent genes: CYC1, which determines the structure of iso-1-cytochrome c; RAD7, which controls UV sensitivity; and OSM1, which controls osomotic sensitivity. The simplest hypothesis is that these multisite mutations are deletions, although it has not been excluded that they may involve other types of gross chromosomal aberrations. In contrast, normal strains do not produce such multisite mutations even after mutagenic treatments.—The multisite mutations arise at a rate of approximately 10-5 to 10-6 per cell per division in DEL1 strains, which is much higher than rates observed for mutation of genes in normal strains. For example, normal strains produce all types of cyc1 mutants at a low rate of approximately 10-8 to 10-9. No evidence for multisite mutations was obtained upon analysis of numerous spontaneous ade1, ade2, met2 and met15 mutants isolated in a DEL1 strain. DEL1 segregates as a single Mendelian gene closely linked to the CYC1 locus. DEL1 appears to be both cis- and trans-dominant. The location of the DEL1 gene and the lack of effect on other genes suggest that the mutator acts only on a region adjacent to itself. PMID:231539

  11. Relationship Between Patients with Clinical Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder and Mutations in Gjb2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Guilherme M.; Z. Ramos, Priscila; M. Castilho, Arthur; C. Guimarães, Alexandre; L. Sartorato, Edi

    2016-01-01

    The auditory neuropathy is a condition which there is a dyssynchrony in the nerve conduction of the auditory nerve fibers. There is no evidence about the relationship between patients with clinical auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder and mutations in GJB2 gene. There are only two studies about this topic in the medical literature. Connexin 26 (GJB2 gene) mutations are common causes of genetic deafness in many populations and we also being reported in subjects with auditory neuropathy. Objective: To analyze the pattern of clinical relationship between patients with clinical diagnosis with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder and GJB2 gene. Patients and Methods: Study Design - Retrospective analysis and genetic evaluation. Setting - Tertiary referral center. Subjects - 40 patients with Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder. Intervention - Clinical information and genetic evaluation (GJB2 gene) were analyzed. Results: Biallelic mutations that accounted for hearing loss (HL) were found in three patients, both with c.35delG mutation in homozygous state. The splice site mutation IVS1+1G>A was detected in heterozygous state in one individual. However, since the second mutant allele was not identified, it was not possible to establish its correlation with the phenotype. Conclusion: Mutations in GJB2 gene mutations were found in 7.5% of the patients with ANSD. We found no relationship between patients with clinical auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder and mutations in GJB2 gene (p>0.05). PMID:27843504

  12. [IDUA gene mutation analysis and prenatal diagnosis of two families affected with mucopolysaccharidosis type I].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinyu; Mei, Shiyue; Kong, Xiangdong; Zhao, Zhenhua; Cai, Aojie; Yao, Jiameng; Li, Yiying; Qin, Zhi

    2017-06-10

    To analyze mutations of IDUA gene in two pedigrees affected with mucopolysaccharidosis type I and provide prenatal diagnosis for them. The 14 exons of the IDUA gene were subjected to PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. For pedigree 1, the proband was found to harbor compound heterozygous mutations c.46-57delTCGCTCCTGGCC (p.Ser16_Ala19del) of exon 1 and c.1147delC (p.Arg383Alafs*57) of exon 8 of the IDUA gene, which were inherited from his father and mother, respectively. The latter was unreported previously. Prenatal diagnosis suggested that the fetus has carried a heterozygous c.46-57delTCGCTCCTGGCC mutation. For family 2, the proband was also found to carry compound mutations of the IDUA gene, namely c.721T to C (p.Cys241Arg) of exon 6 and c.1491delG (p.Thr497fs27) of exon 8, which were inherited from her mother and father, respectively. Neither mutation was reported previously. Prenatal diagnosis suggested that the fetus has carried a heterozygous c.721T to C mutation. Mutations of the IDUA gene probably underlie the MPS-I in both pedigrees. Above results have enriched the spectrum of IDUA gene mutations and facilitated prenatal diagnosis for both families.

  13. [Analysis of DIAPH3 gene mutation in a boy with autism spectrum disorder].

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiang; Li, Hua; Zhu, Hua; Huang, Li; Li, Hongxia; Zhang, Xiling; Zhou, Yongmei; Zhou, Qiang; Xu, Wenming

    2016-08-01

    To analyze the clinical manifestations and gene mutation of a 6 year old boy with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Peripheral blood of the boy and his parents were subjected to genetic testing. The patient was diagnosed with typical autism. Exome sequencing has identified mutations of four candidate genes, namely TUT1, DIAPH3, REELIN and SETD2, which were confirmed with Sanger sequencing. Analysis of family members confirmed that the missense mutations of DIAPH3 and SETD2 genes were of de novo origin. Missense mutations of DIAPH3 and SETD2 genes may have contributed to the risk of ASD. Disrupted neurogenesis associated with such mutations may have been the underlying mechanism for ASD.

  14. Human and mouse TPIT gene mutations cause early onset pituitary ACTH deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pulichino, Anne-Marie; Vallette-Kasic, Sophie; Couture, Catherine; Gauthier, Yves; Brue, Thierry; David, Michel; Malpuech, Georges; Deal, Cheri; Van Vliet, Guy; De Vroede, Monique; Riepe, Felix G.; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Sippell, Wolfgang G.; Berberoglu, Merih; Atasay, Begüm; Drouin, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Tpit is a highly cell-restricted transcription factor that is required for expression of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene and for terminal differentiation of the pituitary corticotroph lineage. Its exclusive expression in pituitary POMC-expressing cells has suggested that its mutation may cause isolated deficiency of pituitary adrenocorticotropin (ACTH). We now show that Tpit-deficient mice constitute a model of isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD) that is very similar to human IAD patients carrying TPIT gene mutations. Through genetic analysis of a panel of IAD patients, we show that TPIT gene mutations are associated at high frequency with early onset IAD, but not with juvenile forms of this deficiency. We identified seven different TPIT mutations, including nonsense, missense, point deletion, and a genomic deletion. This work defines congenital early onset IAD as a relatively homogeneous clinical entity caused by recessive transmission of loss-of-function mutations in the TPIT gene. PMID:12651888

  15. Human and mouse TPIT gene mutations cause early onset pituitary ACTH deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pulichino, Anne-Marie; Vallette-Kasic, Sophie; Couture, Catherine; Gauthier, Yves; Brue, Thierry; David, Michel; Malpuech, Georges; Deal, Cheri; Van Vliet, Guy; De Vroede, Monique; Riepe, Felix G; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Sippell, Wolfgang G; Berberoglu, Merih; Atasay, Begüm; Drouin, Jacques

    2003-03-15

    Tpit is a highly cell-restricted transcription factor that is required for expression of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene and for terminal differentiation of the pituitary corticotroph lineage. Its exclusive expression in pituitary POMC-expressing cells has suggested that its mutation may cause isolated deficiency of pituitary adrenocorticotropin (ACTH). We now show that Tpit-deficient mice constitute a model of isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD) that is very similar to human IAD patients carrying TPIT gene mutations. Through genetic analysis of a panel of IAD patients, we show that TPIT gene mutations are associated at high frequency with early onset IAD, but not with juvenile forms of this deficiency. We identified seven different TPIT mutations, including nonsense, missense, point deletion, and a genomic deletion. This work defines congenital early onset IAD as a relatively homogeneous clinical entity caused by recessive transmission of loss-of-function mutations in the TPIT gene.

  16. [Analysis of FGFR2 gene mutations in two Chinese families with Crouzon syndrome].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanru; Mei, Libin; Su, Wei; Yang, Pu; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian; Pan, Qian

    2014-06-01

    To detect potential mutations of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2) in two Chinese families with Crouzon syndrome. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes of 20 members from two affected families. All of the 18 exons of the FGFR2 gene were amplified with polymerase chain reaction and sequenced after purification. A missense mutation c.868T>C (p.W290R) in exon 8 of the FGFR2 gene was found solely in 2 affected members from family 1. Another missense mutation c.833G>T (p.C278F) in exon 8 was found solely in 5 affected members of family 2. The missense mutations of the FGFR2 gene are responsible for the Crouzon syndrome in the two families. The c.868T>C missense mutation is reported for the first time in Chinese population.

  17. Mutational analysis of glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) gene in Hirayama Disease

    PubMed Central

    Blumen, Sergiu C.; Drory, Vivian E.; Sadeh, Menachem; El-Ad, Baruch; Soimu, Uri; Groozman, Galina B.; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Goldfarb, Lev G.

    2009-01-01

    Sporadic juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper extremity or Hirayama's Disease (HD) and autosomal dominant motor distal neuronopathy/axonopathy (CMT2D/dSMA-V), produced by glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) gene mutations, share some clinical features including: young age of onset, predilection for the distal upper extremity, asymmetry, sparing of proximal muscles and unusual cold sensitivity. However, incomplete penetrance of GARS gene mutations may account for apparently non-familial cases. In order to inquire whether GARS gene mutations are associated with HD we studied seven patients fulfilling the clinical and electrodiagnostic criteria for HD. All patients underwent MRI of cervical spine that excluded compressive myelopathy in neutral position and intramedullary pathology. Each patient was tested for the presence of mutations in GARS by sequencing all coding exons amplified from genomic DNA. No pathogenic mutations were found, excluding the role of GARS gene as a possible factor in the etiology of HD in this cohort. PMID:19412816

  18. Polymorphism analysis and new JAG1 gene mutations of Alagille syndrome in Mexican population☆

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Martínez, Edgar Ricardo; Varela-Fascinetto, Gustavo; García-Delgado, Constanza; Rodríguez-Espino, Benjamín Antonio; Sánchez-Boiso, Adriana; Valencia-Mayoral, Pedro; Heller-Rosseau, Solange; Pelcastre-Luna, Erika Lisselly; Zenteno, Juan C.; Cerbón, Marco; Morán-Barroso, Verónica Fabiola

    2013-01-01

    Alagille syndrome is a multisystem disorder with an autosomic dominant pattern of inheritance that affects the liver, heart, eyes, kidneys, skeletal system and presents characteristic facial features. Mutations of the JAG1 gene have been identified in 20–89% of the patients with Alagille syndrome, this gene encodes for a ligand that activates the Notch signaling pathway. In the present study we analyzed 9 Mexican patients with Alagille syndrome who presented the clinical criteria for the classical presentation of the disease. By using the denaturing high performance liquid chromatography mutation analysis we were able to identify different mutations in 7 of the patients (77.77%), importantly, we found 5 novel mutations in JAG1 gene. The allelic frequency distribution of 13 polymorphisms in Mexican population is also reported. The overall results demonstrated an expanding mutational spectrum of JAG1 gene in the Mexican population. PMID:25606387

  19. Mutations in the fibrinogen gene cluster accounting for congenital afibrinogenemia: an update and report of 10 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite; de Moerloose, Philippe

    2007-06-01

    Fibrinogen is synthesized in hepatocytes in the form of a hexamer composed of two sets of three polypeptides (Aalpha, Bbeta, and gamma). Each polypeptide is encoded by a distinct gene, FGA, FGB, and FGG, all three clustered in a region of 50 kb on 4q31. Congenital afibrinogenemia is characterized by the complete absence of fibrinogen, the precursor of the major protein constituent of the blood clot, fibrin. Although the disease was first described in 1920, the genetic defect responsible for this disorder long remained unknown. We identified the gene and the first causative mutations for this disease in a nonconsanguineous Swiss family in 1999. Since this first report, 61 additional mutations, the majority in FGA, have been identified in patients with afibrinogenemia (in homozygosity or in compound heterozygosity) or in heterozygosity in hypofibrinogenemia, since many of these patients are in fact asymptomatic carriers of afibrinogenemia mutations. Mutations in the fibrinogen genes may lead to deficiency of fibrinogen by several mechanisms: these can act at the DNA level, at the RNA level by affecting mRNA splicing or stability, or at the protein level by affecting protein synthesis, assembly, or secretion. The expression of selected mutations has shown that mechanisms acting at all three levels play a role in the molecular basis of this disease. We report here the identification of 10 novel mutations, of which eight are localized in FGA, thus increasing the total number of causative mutations identified to 72 and confirming the relative importance of FGA in the molecular basis of fibrinogen deficiency. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. The first Slovak Legius syndrome patient carrying the SPRED1 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Sekelska, Martina; Briatkova, Lenka; Olcak, Tomas; Bolcekova, Anna; Ilencikova, Denisa; Kadasi, Ludevit; Zatkova, Andrea

    2017-02-02

    Autosomal dominant disorder Legius syndrome (NF1- like syndrome) shows phenotype features that overlap with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), such as CALMs, freckling, macrocephaly and learning disability. Mutation analysis provides an important tool in order to distinguish two entities that have different clinical implications. We analyzed SPRED1 gene by cDNA and/or gDNA sequencing in a cohort of 46 Slovak patients in whom previously NF1 mutation was excluded. In one case we identified a nonsense mutation c.46C>T (p.Arg16*) in exon 2 of SPRED1 gene, confirming diagnosis of Legius syndrome. This mutation was reported previously.

  1. Software and database for the analysis of mutations in the human FBN1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Collod, G; Béroud, C; Soussi, T; Junien, C; Boileau, C

    1996-01-01

    Fibrillin is the major component of extracellular microfibrils. Mutations in the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 (FBN1) were described at first in the heritable connective tissue disorder, Marfan syndrome (MFS). More recently, FBN1 has also been shown to harbor mutations related to a spectrum of conditions phenotypically related to MFS and many mutations will have to be accumulated before genotype/phenotype relationships emerge. To facilitate mutational analysis of the FBN1 gene, a software package along with a computerized database (currently listing 63 entries) have been created. PMID:8594563

  2. [A novel mutation of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein gene underlies multiple epiphyseal dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Xie, Jiansheng; Wu, Weiqing; Xu, Zhiyong; Luo, Fuwei; Geng, Qian

    2013-06-01

    To perform mutation analysis for a female with multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) and provide pre-symptomatic and prenatal diagnosis. Mutation screening of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) gene was carried out through targeted next-generation DNA sequencing and Sanger sequencing. A novel c.956 A>T resulting in substitution of Aspartic acid 319 for Valine (p.Asp319Val) has been identified in exon 9 of the COMP gene in the patient. As predicted by a SIFT software, above mutation can cause damage to the structure of COMP protein. A novel c.956 A>T substitution mutation has been identified in a patient featuring MED.

  3. Isolated renal vein thrombosis associated with MTHFR-1298 and PAI-1 4G gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Cinemre, Hakan; Bilir, Cemil; Akdemir, Nermin

    2010-12-01

    Isolated renal vein thrombosis is very rare without the presence of nephrotic syndrome. It is more common in the newborns and infants. Whereas major risk factors in adults are the procoagulant states such as protein C or S deficiency, factor V Leiden mutation, primary or secondary antiphospholipid syndrome, severe hypothyroidism, and trauma. Here, we report a case of isolated renal vein thrombosis associated with MTHFR-1298 and PAI-1 4G gene mutations. It should be noted that the presence of MTHFR-1298 and PAI-1 4G gene mutations together might be one of the examples of genetic mutation combinations that increase the likelihood of a thrombotic event.

  4. Analysis of the mutational spectrum of the FGFR2 gene in Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cornejo-Roldan, L R; Roessler, E; Muenke, M

    1999-05-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome (PS) is one of the classical craniosynostosis syndromes correlated with specific mutations in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) genes, FGFR1 and FGFR2. In this study, we set out to examine the exons in FGFR2 most commonly associated with mutations in PS, exons IIIa and IIIc, in a panel of 78 unrelated individuals with PS by the most sensitive method (direct DNA sequencing). We have identified a total of 18 different mutations among 40 patients; eight of these mutations have not been previously described. The mutational spectrum displays a non-random character with the frequent involvement of cysteine codons.

  5. [Frequency of the coreceptor CCR5 gene delta 32 mutation in different French regions].

    PubMed

    Lucotte, G; Mercier, G

    1998-05-01

    We studied the frequency of the coreceptor CCR5 gene delta 32 mutation on 1,836 DNA samples originating from ten French regions. This mutation confers, in the homozygous state, resistance to HIV-1 infection. For the whole territory, the mean percentage presence of the delta 32 mutation is 9.2%. The mutation is statistically more frequent in the north (11.2%) than in the south (6.3%) of the country; this differentiation corresponds probably to a gradient of decreasing frequencies of the delta 32 mutation in Europe.

  6. Gene Mutation Analysis in 253 Chinese Children with Unexplained Epilepsy and Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Gao, Kai; Xie, Han; Wu, Ye; Zhang, Yuehua; Wang, Jingmin; Gao, Feng; Wu, Xiru; Jiang, Yuwu

    2015-01-01

    Objective Epilepsy and intellectual/developmental disabilities (ID/DD) have a high rate of co-occurrence. Here, we investigated gene mutations in Chinese children with unexplained epilepsy and ID/DD. Methods We used targeted next-generation sequencing to detect mutations within 300 genes related to epilepsy and ID/DD in 253 Chinese children with unexplained epilepsy and ID/DD. A series of filtering criteria was used to find the possible pathogenic variations. Validation and parental origin analyses were performed by Sanger sequencing. We reviewed the phenotypes of patients with each mutated gene. Results We identified 32 novel and 16 reported mutations within 24 genes in 46 patients. The detection rate was 18% (46/253) in the whole group and 26% (17/65) in the early-onset (before three months after birth) epilepsy group. To our knowledge, we are the first to report KCNAB1 is a disease-causing gene of epilepsy by identifying a novel de novo mutation (c.1062dupCA p.Leu355HisfsTer5) within this gene in one patient with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE). Patients with an SCN1A mutation accounted for the largest proportion, 17% (8/46). A total of 38% (9/24) of the mutated genes re-occurred at least 2 times and 63% (15/24) occurred only one time. Ion channel genes are the most common (8/24) and genes related to synapse are the next most common to occur (5/24). Significance We have established genetic diagnosis for 46 patients of our cohort. Early-onset epilepsy had the highest detection rate. KCNAB1 mutation was first identified in EIEE patient. We expanded the phenotype and mutation spectrum of the genes we identified. The mutated genes in this cohort are mostly isolated. This suggests that epilepsy and ID/DD phenotypes occur as a consequence of brain dysfunction caused by a highly diverse population of mutated genes. Ion channel genes and genes related to synapse were more common mutated in this patient cohort. PMID:26544041

  7. Mutational analysis of DBD*--a unique antileukemic gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yan-shan; Johnson, Betty H; Webb, M Scott; Thompson, E Brad

    2002-01-01

    DBD* is a novel gene encoding an 89 amino acid peptide that is constitutively lethal to leukemic cells. DBD* was derived from the DNA binding domain of the human glucocorticoid receptor by a frameshift that replaces the final 21 C-terminal amino acids of the domain. Previous studies suggested that DBD* no longer acted as the natural DNA binding domain. To confirm and extend these results, we mutated DBD* in 29 single amino acid positions, critical for the function in the native domain or of possible functional significance in the novel 21 amino acid C-terminal sequence. Steroid-resistant leukemic ICR-27-4 cells were transiently transfected by electroporation with each of the 29 mutants. Cell kill was evaluated by trypan blue dye exclusion, a WST-1 tetrazolium-based assay for cell respiration, propidium iodide exclusion, and Hoechst 33258 staining of chromatin. Eleven of the 29 point mutants increased, whereas four decreased antileukemic activity. The remainder had no effect on activity. The nonconcordances between these effects and native DNA binding domain function strongly suggest that the lethality of DBD* is distinct from that of the glucocorticoid receptor. Transfections of fragments of DBD* showed that optimal activity localized to the sequence for its C-terminal 32 amino acids.

  8. Analysis of catechol-O-methyltransferase gene mutation and identification of new pathogenic gene for paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chengzhi; Li, Jia; Zhu, Lianhai; Lu, Zhenhui; Huang, Huaiyu

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to analyze the mutation site and frequency of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene, to explore the relationship between COMT genotype and phenotype, and to find new pathogenic genes for paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD). PKD patients who were treated from December 2011 to January 2014 were selected and subjected to genetic testing in the exon region of COMT. Two patients and one intrafamilial healthy control were subjected to exome sequencing using whole exome capture in combination with high-throughput sequencing to find candidate pathogenic gene sites. The results were verified by Sanger sequencing. A total of 11 familial PKD patients from 4 families and 9 sporadic patients without family history were included. Pathogenic c.634dupC(p.P220fsX7) mutation of COMT gene was found in 7 familial PKD patients and3 sporadic patients. Mutated COMT gene carriers suffered from PKD earlier (average age of onset: 11.61 ± 2.33 vs 16.21 ± 2.58, P = 0.001) with symmetric symptoms in most cases, while the mutation-negative group only showed unilateral symptoms (P = 0.001). The mutation-positive group also had more daily attacks (P = 0.038). Carbamazepine worked for all mutation-positive patients (10/10, 100%), but only for a part of mutation-negative patients (3/10, 30.0%). About 90000 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 2000 insertion-deletion polymorphisms were detected in each of the three samples. c.737C → T(p.T246 M) mutation of POC1B gene was a new pathogenic site for a selected family. COMT gene mutation, which was the pathogenesis of most familial PKD patients and a part of sporadic patients, predicted the response to carbamazepine. POC1B may be a novel pathogenic gene for PKD.

  9. Construction and application of a promoter-trapping vector with methyl parathion hydrolase gene mpd as the reporter.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhong-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Zhou; Zhang, Zhong-Hui; Li, Shun-Peng

    2004-07-01

    A facilitative and efficient promoter-trapping vector, pUC-mpd, was constructed with the promoterless methyl parathion hydrolase gene as the reporter. This reporter gene is easily used to clone promoters with different promoting strength on selective plates. Promoter regions of the ytkA and ywoF genes with strong promoting and signal peptide functions were cloned from the Bacillus subtilis 168 genomic promoter library with this vector.

  10. Mutation analysis of 13 driver genes of colorectal cancer-related pathways in Taiwanese patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yuli Christine; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Liu, Ta-Chih; Lin, Chien-Yu; Yang, Shu-Fen; Ho, Cheng-Mao; Chen, William Tzu-Liang; Chang, Ya-Sian

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the driver gene mutations associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) in the Taiwanese population. METHODS: In this study, 103 patients with CRC were evaluated. The samples consisted of 66 men and 37 women with a median age of 59 years and an age range of 26-86 years. We used high-resolution melting analysis (HRM) and direct DNA sequencing to characterize the mutations in 13 driver genes of CRC-related pathways. The HRM assays were conducted using the LightCycler® 480 Instrument provided with the software LightCycler® 480 Gene Scanning Software Version 1.5. We also compared the clinicopathological data of CRC patients with the driver gene mutation status. RESULTS: Of the 103 patients evaluated, 73.79% had mutations in one of the 13 driver genes. We discovered 18 novel mutations in APC, MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, SMAD4 and TP53 that have not been previously reported. Additionally, we found 16 de novo mutations in APC, BMPR1A, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH and PMS2 in cancerous tissues previously reported in the dbSNP database; however, these mutations could not be detected in peripheral blood cells. The APC mutation correlates with lymph node metastasis (34.69% vs 12.96%, P = 0.009) and cancer stage (34.78% vs 14.04%, P = 0.013). No association was observed between other driver gene mutations and clinicopathological features. Furthermore, having two or more driver gene mutations correlates with the degree of lymph node metastasis (42.86% vs 24.07%, P = 0.043). CONCLUSION: Our findings confirm the importance of 13 CRC-related pathway driver genes in the development of CRC in Taiwanese patients. PMID:26900293

  11. Mutation analysis of CCM1, CCM2 and CCM3 genes in a cohort of Italian patients with cerebral cavernous malformation.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Rosalia; Marini, Valeria; Rinaldi, Carmela; Origone, Paola; Dorcaratto, Alessandra; Avolio, Maria; Goitre, Luca; Forni, Marco; Capra, Valeria; Alafaci, Concetta; Mareni, Cristina; Garrè, Cecilia; Bramanti, Placido; Sidoti, Antonina; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Amato, Aldo

    2011-03-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular lesions of the CNS characterized by abnormally enlarged capillary cavities. CCMs can occur as sporadic or familial autosomal dominant form. Familial cases are associated with mutations in CCM1[K-Rev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1)], CCM2 (MGC4607) and CCM3 (PDCD10) genes. In this study, a three-gene mutation screening was performed by direct exon sequencing, in a cohort of 95 Italian patients either sporadic or familial, as well as on their at-risk relatives. Sixteen mutations in 16 unrelated CCM patients were identified,nine mutations are novel: c.413T > C; c.601C > T; c.846 + 2T > G; c.1254delA; c.1255-4delGTA; c.1682-1683 delTA in CCM1; c.48A > G; c.82-83dupAG in CCM2; and c.395 + 1G > A in CCM3 genes [corrected].The samples, negative to direct exon sequencing, were investigated by MLPA to search for intragenic deletions or duplications. One deletion in CCM1 exon 18 was detected in a sporadic patient. Among familial cases 67% had a mutation in CCM1, 5.5% in CCM2, and 5.5% in CCM3, whereas in the remaining 22% no mutations were detected, suggesting the existence of either undetectable mutations or other CCM genes. This study represents the first extensive research program for a comprehensive molecular screening of the three known genes in an Italian cohort of CCM patients and their at-risk relatives.

  12. Isolation and characterization of mutations in the bacteriophage lambda terminase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, A; Yau, P; Murialdo, H; Gold, M

    1991-01-01

    The terminase enzyme of bacteriophage lambda is a hetero-oligomeric protein which catalyzes the site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage of lambda DNA and its packaging into phage proheads; it is composed of the products of the lambda Nul and A genes. We have developed a simple method to select mutations in the terminase genes carried on a high-copy-number plasmid, based on the ability of wild-type terminase to kill recA strains of Escherichia coli. Sixty-three different spontaneous mutations and 13 linker insertion mutations were isolated by this method and analyzed. Extracts of cells transformed by mutant plasmids displayed variable degrees of reduction in the activity of one or both terminase subunits as assayed by in vitro lambda DNA packaging. A method of genetically mapping plasmid-borne mutations in the A gene by measuring their ability to rescue various lambda Aam phages showed that the A mutations were fairly evenly distributed across the gene. Mutant A genes were also subcloned into overproducing plasmid constructs, and it was determined that more than half of them directed the synthesis of normal amounts of full-length A protein. Three of the A gene mutants displayed dramatically reduced in vitro packaging activity only when immature (uncut) lambda DNA was used as the substrate; therefore, these mutations may lie in the endonuclease domain of terminase. Interestingly, the putative endonuclease mutations mapped in two distinct locations in the A gene separated by a least 400 bp. Images PMID:1830578

  13. [Characteristics of DUOXA2 gene mutation in children with congenital hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Tan, Min-Yi; Huang, Yong-Lan; Li, Bei; Jiang, Xiang; Chen, Qian-Yu; Jia, Xue-Fang; Tang, Cheng-Fang; Liu, Li

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of DUOXA2 gene mutation and the genotype-phenotype relationship in children with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) in Guangzhou, China. A total of 20 CH patients with suspected thyroid dyshormonogenesis who had no DUOX2 gene mutation were enrolled. These patients who were born between 2011 and 2012 were screened and diagnosed with CH in the Guangzhou Newborn Screening Center. PCR and direct sequencing were used to analyze DUOXA2 gene mutation. Among the 20 patients, 2 had p.Y246X/p.Y246X homozygous mutation; 4 had monoallelic heterozygous mutation, among whom 2 carried the known pathogenic mutation c.413-414insA, 1 carried p.Y246X, and 1 carried a novel mutation, p.G79R. Reevaluation was performed at the age of 2-3 years, and the results showed that the two patients with p.Y246X/p.Y246X homozygous mutation were manifested as transient and mild permanent CH, respectively. Among the four patients with monoallelic heterozygous mutation, the one who carried p.Y246X mutation was manifested as typical permanent CH, and the other three were manifested as transient CH. DUOXA2 gene mutation is a common molecular pathogenic basis for CH children with suspected thyroid dyshormonogenesis in Guangzhou, and most of them are manifested as transient CH. There is no association between DUOXA2 genotypes and phenotypes. The novel mutation p.G79R is probably a pathogenic mutation.

  14. Expression of Von Hippel – Lindau (VHL) gene mutation in diagnosed cases of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Humera; Kehar, Shahnaz Imdad; Ali, Shahzad; Tariq, Naila

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the expression of Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) gene in diagnosed cases of renal cell carcinoma. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in department of Pathology, Basic Medical Sciences Institute, JPMC, Karachi, from January 2007 to December 2012. Paraffin embedded blocks of 30 cases of radical nephrectomy specimens diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma including CCRCC 21 (70%) CCPRCC, 3 (10%), PRCC 2 (6.79%), hybrid tumor 4 (13.3%), chromophobe tumor (0%) processed for VHL gene expression on Polymerase Chain Reaction. Results: All the 30 cases previously diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma were processed on PCR, VHL gene mutations were seen in 20 (95.23%) of CCRCC while a single case was negative for VHL mutations. All CCPRCC were negative for VHL mutation. Among the hybrid tumor 03 cases with foci of clear cells show VHL mutation while a single case showing combination of clear cells and chromophobe cells was negative for mutation. Both the cases of PRCC were positive for mutation. Exon 3 mutation at base pair 194 seen in 8 (32%) cases and Exon 2 mutation at base pair 150-159 seen in 17 (68%) cases. None of the cases showed Exon 1 mutation. Conclusion: The present study shows that majority of CCRCC showed VHL mutation including the hybrid tumor with clear cell component in our population. PMID:25097537

  15. Mutation analysis of TSC2 gene in 33 Turkish familial cases with tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Apak, Anil; Haliloğlu, Göknur; Köse, Gülşen; Yilmaz, Engin; Anlar, Banu; Aysun, Sabiha

    2003-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder characterized by hamartomatous growths in different organs. Disease determining genes are localized to 9q34 (TSC1) and 16p13.3 (TSC2). Two-thirds of the cases are sporadic and result from new mutations. The aim of this study was to determine TSC2 gene mutations by Single Stranded Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and direct sequencing in 33 familial cases with tuberous sclerosis who were followed up in the Pediatric Neurology Departments of Hacettepe University Ihsan Doğramaci and Ankara Social Security Children's Hospitals. Forty-one exons of TSC2 gene were amplified and subjected to SSCP, and sequence analysis was performed when an abnormal SSCP pattern was observed. As a result, six new mutations and nine gene polymorphisms were detected. The new mutations are G-->T mutation in exon 20, 16bp deletion in exon 29, 18bp deletion in exon 40, 538 G-->A mutation in exon 29, T-->C mutation in exon 21 and G-->A splice site mutation in exon 5. Although further studies on larger groups are needed, these results do not indicate a common region or type of mutation in the Turkish population.

  16. Correlation between germline mutations in MMR genes and microsatellite instability in ovarian cancer specimens.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mohammad R; Zhang, Shiyu; Cragun, Deborah; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Coppola, Domenico; McLaughlin, John; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Shaw, Patricia; Sellers, Thomas A; Schildkraut, Joellen; Narod, Steven A; Pal, Tuya

    2017-02-07

    A high proportion of ovarian cancers from women who carry germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes demonstrate microsatellite instability (MSI). The utility of pre-screening ovarian cancer specimens for MSI to identify potential patients for germline screening for MMR mutations is uncertain. 656 women with malignant ovarian cancer underwent both MSI testing and germline mutation testing for large rearrangements in three MMR genes, MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Germline DNA sequencing data for the same genes was available. Among the 656 women, only four (0.6%) carried a clearly pathogenic MMR mutation. All four cancers from patients with mutations had loss of two or more microsatellite markers (MSI-high). Eighty-four of 652 (13.0%) women without a mutation had MSI-high ovarian cancers. Using MSI-high as a prescreening criterion, the sensitivity of MSI testing to identify germline MMR gene mutations was 100% and the positive predictive value was 4.5%. Germline mutations in MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 are rare among unselected cases of ovarian cancer. Patients with germline mutations often will have MSI-positive cancers and pre-screening of ovarian cancer specimens may be an efficient way of identifying patients with Lynch syndrome.

  17. Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus with a novel mutation in the aquaporin 2 gene.

    PubMed

    Park, Youn Jong; Baik, Haing Woon; Cheong, Hae Il; Kang, Ju Hyung

    2014-07-01

    Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (CNDI) is a rare disorder caused by mutations of the arginine vasopressin (AVP) V2 receptor or aquaporin 2 (AQP2) genes. The current study presented the case of CNDI in a 1-month-old male with a novel mutation in the AQP2 gene. The patient was referred due to the occurrence of hypernatremia and mild-intermittent fever since birth. An AVP stimulation test was compatible with CNDI as there was no significant response to desmopressin. Molecular genetic analysis demonstrated two mutations in exon 1 of the AQP2 gene: C to T transition, which resulted in a missense mutation of (108)Thr (ACG) to Met (ATG); and a 127, 128 delCA, which resulted in a deletion mutation of glutamine in position 43 at codon CAG as the first affected amino acid, with the new reading frame endign in a termination codon at position 62. The molecular genetic analysis of the parents showed that the missense mutation was inherited maternally and the deletion mutation was inherited paternally. The parents showed no signs or symptoms of CNDI, indicating autosomal recessive inheritance. The (108)Thr (ACG) to Met (ATG) mutation was confirmed as a novel mutation. Therefore, the molecular identification of the AQP2 gene has clinical significance, as early recognition of CNDI in infants that show only non-specific symptoms, can be facilitated. Thus, repeated episodes of dehydration, which may cause physical and mental retardation can be avoided.

  18. Mutational screening in the LDLR gene among patients presenting familial hypercholesterolemia in the Southeast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Molfetta, G A; Zanette, D L; Santos, J E; Silva, W A

    2017-08-31

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a dominant, autosomal disease characterized by high LDL levels in blood plasma, and is caused by a defect in the gene encoding the LDL receptor (LDLR). The clinical diagnosis is based on personal and familial history, physical examination findings, and measures of high LDL cholesterol concentrations. LDLR is a cell-surface glycoprotein that controls the level of blood plasma cholesterol and triglyceride by LDLR-mediated endocytosis. Here we sequenced the entire LDLR gene-coding region to screen for mutations in 32 patients diagnosed with FH, and we have found 20 mutations including synonymous, missense, and intronic mutations. Six of them were characterized as pathogenic mutations (D178Y, C184Y, S326C, C681X, IVS7+10G>C, and IVS11-10G>A). We have also found one intronic mutation not described so far (IVS11-63C>A). Our study corroborates the broad spectrum of mutations distributed along the entire LDLR gene, and we suggest that the genes APOB and PCSK9 should also be screened for mutations when considering the diagnosis of FH. It is already known that different types of mutations are directly associated with the phenotype heterogeneity presented by patients. Considering that Brazilian population is highly admixed, it is important to determine the geographic spectrum of LDLR mutations to provide information on the prognosis and treatment of each FH patient.

  19. Frequent mutation of the p53 gene in human esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hollstein, M.C.; Montesano, R. ); Metcalf, R.A.; Welsh, J.A.; Harris, C.C. )

    1990-12-01

    Sequence alterations in the p53 gene have been detected in human tumors of the brain, breast, lung, and colon, and it has been proposed that p53 mutations spanning a major portion of the coding region inactivate the tumor suppressor function of this gene. To our knowledge, neither transforming mutations in oncogenes nor mutations in tumor suppressor genes have been reported in human esophageal tumors. The authors examined four human esophageal carcinoma cell lines and 14 human esophageal squamous cell carcinomas by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing for the presence of p53 mutations in exons 5,6,7,8, and 9. Two cell lines and five of the tumor speicmens contained a mutated allele (one frameshift and six missense mutations). All missense mutations detected occurred at G{center dot}C base pairs in codons at or adjacent to mutations previously reported in other cancers. The identification of aberrant p53 genes alleles in one-third of the tumors they tested suggests that mutations at this locus are common genetic events in the pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinomas of the esophagus.

  20. [Correlation between RARbeta gene promoter methylation and P53 gene mutations in non-small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Tan, Cong; Jin, Yong-tang; Xu, He-yun; Zhang, Chen-ye; Zhang, Hu; Zhang, Wei-min; Chen, Chun-mei; Sun, Xiao-yu

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the correlation between RARbeta gene promoter methylation and P53 gene mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Promoter methylation of RARbeta and P53 mutations of exons 5 through 9 in 198 resected primary NSCLC tissues were determined by methylation-specific PCR and direct sequencing. RARbeta gene promoter methylation and P53 mutation were detected in 58.1% and 36.4% of tumors, respectively. Both were higher in males than in females and in smokers than in nonsmokers. A higher prevalence of RARbeta promoter methylation was found in patients with advanced stage tumors than those with TNM stage I. P53 gene mutations were more frequent in squamous cell carcinoma and adeno-squamous carcinoma than adenocarcinoma. All such differences were statistically significant (P< 0.05). Frequencies of P53 mutations, including G:C>T:A mutations, transversions and missense mutations were significantly higher in tumors with RARbeta methylation than in those without (P< 0.05). A significantly higher prevalence of RARbeta methylation was found in tumors with only G:C>T:A mutation in P53 gene than those without P53 mutations (P< 0.05). This difference (OR=3.737, 95%CI: 1.414-9.873) was still statistically significant (P< 0.05) in smokers (OR=4.020, 95%CI: 1.263-12.800), squamous cell carcinomas (OR=5.480, 95%CI: 1.400-21.446) or patients with advanced tumors (OR=3.446, 95%CI: 1.054-11.267) after adjusting for age and sex. RARbeta methylation is associated with G:C>T:A mutations in P53 gene in NSCLC.

  1. Tumor-specific mutations in low-frequency genes affect their functional properties.

    PubMed

    Erdem-Eraslan, Lale; Heijsman, Daphne; de Wit, Maurice; Kremer, Andreas; Sacchetti, Andrea; van der Spek, Peter J; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A E; French, Pim J

    2015-05-01

    Causal genetic changes in oligodendrogliomas (OD) with 1p/19q co-deletion include mutations in IDH1, IDH2, CIC, FUBP1, TERT promoter and NOTCH1. However, it is generally assumed that more somatic mutations are required for tumorigenesis. This study aimed to establish whether genes mutated at low frequency can be involved in OD initiation and/or progression. We performed whole-genome sequencing on three anaplastic ODs with 1p/19q co-deletion. To estimate mutation frequency, we performed targeted resequencing on an additional 39 ODs. Whole-genome sequencing identified a total of 55 coding mutations (range 8-32 mutations per tumor), including known abnormalities in IDH1, IDH2, CIC and FUBP1. We also identified mutations in genes, most of which were previously not implicated in ODs. Targeted resequencing on 39 additional ODs confirmed that these genes are mutated at low frequency. Most of the mutations identified were predicted to have a deleterious functional effect. Functional analysis on a subset of these genes (e.g. NTN4 and MAGEH1) showed that the mutation affects the subcellular localization of the protein (n = 2/12). In addition, HOG cells stably expressing mutant GDI1 or XPO7 showed altered cell proliferation compared to those expressing wildtype constructs. Similarly, HOG cells expressing mutant SASH3 or GDI1 showed altered migration. The significantly higher rate of predicted deleterious mutations, the changes in subcellular localization and the effects on proliferation and/or migration indicate that many of these genes functionally may contribute to gliomagenesis and/or progression. These low-frequency genes and their affected pathways may provide new treatment targets for this tumor type.

  2. ACAN Gene Mutations in Short Children Born SGA and Response to Growth Hormone Treatment.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, Manouk; Pfundt, Rolph; Maas, Stephan J W H; Bakker-van Waarde, Willie M; Odink, Roelof J; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S

    2017-05-01

    Some children born small for gestational age (SGA) show advanced bone age (BA) maturation during growth hormone (GH) treatment. ACAN gene mutations have been described in children with short stature and advanced BA. To determine the presence of ACAN gene mutations in short SGA children with advanced BA and assess the response to GH treatment. BA assessment in 290 GH-treated SGA children. ACAN sequencing in 29 children with advanced BA ≥0.5 years compared with calendar age. Four of 29 SGA children with advanced BA had an ACAN gene mutation (13.8%). Mutations were related to additional characteristics: midface hypoplasia (P = 0.003), joint problems (P = 0.010), and broad great toes (P = 0.003). Children with one or fewer additional characteristic had no mutation. Of children with two additional characteristics, 50% had a mutation. Of children with three additional characteristics, 100% had a mutation. All GH-treated children with a mutation received gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa) treatment for 2 years from onset of puberty. At adult height, one girl was 5 cm taller than her mother and one boy was 8 cm taller than his father with the same ACAN gene mutation. This study expands the differential diagnosis of genetic variants in children born SGA and proposes a clinical scoring system for identifying subjects most likely to have an ACAN gene mutation. ACAN sequencing should be considered in children born SGA with persistent short stature, advanced BA, and midface hypoplasia, joint problems, or broad great toes. Our findings suggest that children with an ACAN gene mutation benefit from GH treatment with 2 years of GnRHa.

  3. Mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Gene and In Vivo Transepithelial Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Wilschanski, Michael; Dupuis, Annie; Ellis, Lynda; Jarvi, Keith; Zielenski, Julian; Tullis, Elizabeth; Martin, Sheelagh; Corey, Mary; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Durie, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To examine the relationship between cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene mutations (CFTR) and in vivo transepithelial potentials. Methods: We prospectively evaluated 162 men including 31 healthy subjects, 21 obligate heterozygotes, 60 with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD) and 50 with CF by extensive CFTR genotyping, sweat chloride and nasal potential difference testing. Results: Six (10%) men with CBAVD carried no CFTR mutations, 18 (30%) carried one mutation, including the 5T variant, and 36 (60%) carried mutations on both alleles, for a significantly higher rate carrying one or more mutations than healthy controls (90% versus 19%, p < 0.001). There was an overlapping spectrum of ion channel measurements among the men with CBAVD, ranging from values in the control and obligate heterozygote range at one extreme, to values in the CF range at the other. All pancreatic-sufficient patients with CF and 34 of 36 patients with CBAVD with mutations on both alleles carried at least one mild mutation. However, the distribution of mild mutations in the two groups differed greatly. Genotyping, sweat chloride and nasal potential difference (alone or in combination) excluded CF in all CBAVD men with no mutations. CF was confirmed in 56% and 67% of CBAVD men carrying 1 and 2 CFTR mutations, respectively. Conclusion: Abnormalities of CFTR transepithelial function correlate with the number and severity of CFTR gene mutations. PMID:16840743

  4. Mutation spectrum of the rhodopsin gene among patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Dryja, T.P.; Han, L.B.; Cowley, G.S.; McGee, T.L.; Berson, E.L. )

    1991-10-15

    The authors searched for point mutations in every exon of the rhodopsin gene in 150 patients from separate families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Including the 4 mutations the authors reported previously, they found a total of 17 different mutations that correlate with the disease. Each of these mutations is a single-base substitution corresponding to a single amino acid substitution. Based on current models for the structure of rhodopsin, 3 of the 17 mutant amino acids are normally located on the cytoplasmic side of the protein, 6 in transmembrane domains, and 8 on the intradiscal side. Forty-three of the 150 patients (29%) carry 1 of these mutations, and no patient has more than 1 mutation. In every family with a mutation so far analyzed, the mutation cosegregates with the disease. They found one instance of a mutation in an affected patient that was absent in both unaffected parents (i.e., a new germ-line mutation), indicating that some isolate cases of retinitis pigmentosa carry a mutation of the rhodopsin gene.

  5. Blue genes: An integrative laboratory to differentiate genetic transformation from gene mutation for underclassmen.

    PubMed

    Militello, Kevin T; Chang, Ming-Mei; Simon, Robert D; Lazatin, Justine C

    2016-01-01

    The ability of students to understand the relationship between genotype and phenotype, and the mechanisms by which genotypes and phenotypes can change is essential for students studying genetics. To this end, we have developed a four-week laboratory called Blue Genes, which is designed to help novice students discriminate between two mechanisms by which the genetic material can be altered: genetic transformation and gene mutation. In the first week of the laboratory, students incubate a plasmid DNA with calcium chloride-treated Escherichia coli JM109 cells and observe a phenotype change from ampicillin sensitive to ampicillin resistant and from white color to blue color on plates containing 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (X-gal) and isopropyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). Over the course of the next three weeks, students use a battery of approaches including plasmid DNA isolation experiments, restriction maps, and PCR to differentiate between mutation and transformation. The students ultimately come to the conclusion that the changes in phenotypes are due to genetic transformation and not mutation based on the evidence generated over the four-week period. Pre-laboratory tests and post-laboratory tests indicate that this set of exercises is successful in helping students differentiate between transformation and mutation. The laboratory is designed for underclassmen and is a good prerequisite for an apprentice-based research opportunity, although it is not designed as a class based research experience. Potential modifications and future directions of the laboratory based upon student experiences and assessment are presented.

  6. Sequencing of mutational hotspots in cancer-related genes in small cell neuroendocrine cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Frumovitz, Michael; Burzawa, Jennifer K; Byers, Lauren A; Lyons, Yasmin A; Ramalingam, Preetha; Coleman, Robert L; Brown, Jubilee

    2016-06-01

    Small cell cervical cancer is a rare malignancy with limited treatment options for recurrent disease. We sought to determine if tumor specimens of small cell cervical cancer harbor common somatic mutations and if any of these are actionable. Using a registry of patients with neuroendocrine cervical cancer, we identified 44 patients with pure or mixed small cell cervical cancer who had undergone mutational analysis. Mutations had been detected using next generation sequencing of mutational hotspots in 50 cancer-related genes. Thirty-five mutations were identified in 24 patients (55%). Fifteen of these 24 patients (63%) had 1 mutation, 7 patients (29%) had 2 mutations, and 2 patients (8%) had 3 mutations. In all 44 patients, the most commonly seen mutations were mutations in PIK3CA (8 patients; 18%), KRAS (6 patients; 14%), and TP53 (5 patients; 11%). No other mutation was found in >7% of specimens. Of the 24 patients who had a mutation, 21 (88%) had at least 1 alteration for which there currently exists a class of biological agents targeting that mutation. In the entire cohort of 44 patients, 48% had at least 1 actionable mutation. Although no single mutation was found in the majority of patients with small cell cervical cancer, almost half had at least 1 actionable mutation. As treatment options for patients with recurrent small cell cervical cancer are currently very limited, molecular testing for targetable mutations, which may suggest potential therapeutic strategies, may be useful for clinicians and patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. New mutation in periaxin gene causing Charcot Marie Tooth disease in a Puerto Rican young male.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Elizabeth; Ramos, Edwardo

    2013-12-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is an inherited peripheral neuropathy caused by mutations in more than 30 different genes. One of the genes encodes for periaxin (PRX) protein, which is required for the maintenance of peripheral nerve myelin. Individuals with PRX gene mutations have been described to present early-onset, autosomal recessive, demyelinating CMT disease or CMT4F subtype. Only 23 mutations involving the PRX gene have been reported in patients throughout the world. We describe a case of a Puerto Rican adolescent with history, neurologic examination, electromyographic data, and laboratory tests consistent with CMT4F. Genetic analysis of this individual showed a heterozygous transversion resulting in amino acid change from arginine to glycine in the PRX gene, suggesting CMT4F. We report this novel PRX mutation to expand the clinical spectrum of CMT disease.

  8. Mutations in Ehrlichia chaffeensis Causing Polar Effects in Gene Expression and Differential Host Specificities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chuanmin; Nair, Arathy D S; Jaworski, Deborah C; Ganta, Roman R

    2015-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis, a tick-borne rickettsial, is responsible for human monocytic ehrlichiosis. In this study, we assessed E. chaffeensis insertion mutations impacting the transcription of genes near the insertion sites. We presented evidence that the mutations within the E. chaffeensis genome at four genomic locations cause polar effects in altering gene expressions. We also reported mutations causing attenuated growth in deer (the pathogen's reservoir host) and in dog (an incidental host), but not in its tick vector, Amblyomma americanum. This is the first study documenting insertion mutations in E. chaffeensis that cause polar effects in altering gene expression from the genes located upstream and downstream to insertion sites and the differential requirements of functionally active genes of the pathogen for its persistence in vertebrate and tick hosts. This study is important in furthering our knowledge on E. chaffeensis pathogenesis.

  9. Phenylalanine hydroxylase gene mutations in the United States: Report from the maternal PKU collaborative study

    SciTech Connect

    Guldberg, P.; Henriksen, K.F.; Guettler, F.

    1996-07-01

    The major cause of hyperphenylalaninemia is mutations in the gene encoding phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). The known mutations have been identified primarily in European patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of mutations responsible for PAH deficiency in the United States. One hundred forty-nine patients enrolled in the Maternal PKU Collaborative Study were subjects for clinical and molecular investigations. PAH gene mutations associated with phenylketonuria (PKU) or mild hyperphenylalaninemia (MHP) were identified on 279 of 294 independent mutant chromosomes, a diagnostic efficiency of 95%. The spectrum is composed of 71 different mutations, including 47 missense mutations, 11 splice mutations, 5 nonsense mutations, and 8 microdeletions. Sixteen previously unreported mutations were identified. Among the novel mutations, five were found in patients with MHP, and the remainder were found in patients with PKU. The most common mutations were R408W, IVS12nt1g{r_arrow}a, and Y414C, accounting for 18.7%, 7.8% and 5.4% of the mutant chromosomes, respectively. Thirteen mutations had relative frequencies of 1%-5%, and 55 mutations each had frequencies {le}1%. The mutational spectrum corresponded to that observed for the European ancestry of the U.S. population. To evaluate the extent of allelic variation at the PAH locus within the United States in comparison with other populations, we used allele frequencies to calculate the homozygosity for 11 populations where >90% ascertainment has been obtained. The United States was shown to contain one of the most heterogeneous populations, with homozygosity values similar to Sicily and ethnically mixed sample populations in Europe. The extent of allelic heterogeneity must be a major determining factor in the choice of mutation-detection methodology for molecular diagnosis in PAH deficiency. 47 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  10. Interacting genes that affect microtubule function in Drosophila melanogaster: Two classes of mutation revert the failure to complement between hay sup nc2 and mutations in tubulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, C.L.; Fuller, M.T. )

    1990-05-01

    The recessive male sterile mutation hay{sup nc2} of Drosophila melanogaster fails to complement certain {beta}{sub 2}-tubulin and {alpha}-tubulin mutations, suggesting that the haywire product plays a role in microtubule function, perhaps as a structural component of microtubules. The genetic interaction appears to require the presence of the aberrant product encoded by hay{sup nc2}, which may act as a structural poison. Based on this observation, the authors have isolated ten new mutations with EMS that revert the failure to complement between hay{sup nc2} and B2t{sup n}. The revertants tested behaved as intragenic mutations of hay in recombination tests, and feel into two phenotypic classes, suggesting two functional domains of the hay gene product. Some revertants were hemizygous viable and less severe than hay{sup nc2} in their recessive phenotype. These mutations might revert the poison by restoring the aberrant product encoded by the hay{sup nc2} allele to more wild-type function. Most of the revertants were recessive lethal mutations, indicating that the hay gene product is essential for viability. These more extreme mutations could revert the poison by destroying the ability of the aberrant haywire{sup nc2} product to interact structurally with microtubules. Flies heterozygous for the original hay{sup nc2} allele and an extreme revertant show defects in both the structure and the function of the male meiotic spindle.

  11. Interacting Genes That Affect Microtubule Function in Drosophila Melanogaster: Two Classes of Mutation Revert the Failure to Complement between Hay(nc2) and Mutations in Tubulin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Regan, C. L.; Fuller, M. T.

    1990-01-01

    The recessive male sterile mutation hay(nc2) of Drosophila melanogaster fails to complement certain β(2)-tubulin and α-tubulin mutations, suggesting that the haywire product plays a role in microtubule function, perhaps as a structural component of microtubules. The genetic interaction appears to require the presence of the aberrant product encoded by hay(nc2), which may act as a structural poison. Based on this observation, we have isolated ten new mutations that revert the failure to complement between hay(nc2) and B2t(n). The revertants tested behaved as intragenic mutations of hay in recombination tests, and fell into two phenotypic classes, suggesting two functional domains of the hay gene product. Some revertants were hemizygous viable and less severe than hay(nc2) in their recessive phenotype. These mutations might revert the poison by restoring the aberrant product encoded by the hay(nc2) allele to more wild-type function. Most of the revertants were recessive lethal mutations, indicating that the hay gene product is essential for viability. These more extreme mutations could revert the poison by destroying the ability of the aberrant haywire(nc2) product to interact structurally with microtubules. Flies heterozygous for the original hay(nc2) allele and an extreme revertant show defects in both the structure and the function of the male meiotic spindle. PMID:2111265

  12. [The significance of the epigenetics modifying gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Wakita, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, recurrent somatic mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in DNA methylation and demethylation, and in histone modifications have been reported in myeloid malignancies. Large clinical correlative studies are beginning to clear the clinical importance, prevalence, and potential prognostic significance of these epigenetics modifying gene mutations. Additionally, recent studies shedding light on the role of epigenetics in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies has prompted increased interest in development of novel therapies which target DNA and histone posttranslational modifications. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the epigenetics modifying gene mutation, discuss how contribute to its pathogenesis and clinical feature in AML.

  13. Phenotypic consequences of somatic mutations in the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Anika Maria; Drobnitzky, Neele; Devery, Aoife Maire; Bokobza, Sivan Mili; Adams, Richard A.; Maughan, Timothy S.; Ryan, Anderson Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene are frequently found in human cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Loss of ATM function confers sensitivity to ionising radiation (IR) and topoisomerase inhibitors and may thus define a subset of cancer patients that could get increased benefit from these therapies. In this study, we evaluated the phenotypic consequences of ATM missense changes reported in seven NSCLC cell lines with regard to radiosensitivity and functionality of ATM signalling. Our data demonstrate that only 2/7 NSCLC cell lines (H1395 and H23) harbouring ATM missense mutations show a functional impairment of ATM signalling following IR-exposure. In these two cell lines, the missense mutations caused a significant reduction in ATM protein levels, impairment of ATM signalling and marked radiosensitivity. Of note, only cell lines with homozygous mutations in the ATM gene showed significant impairment of ATM function. Based on these observations, we developed an immunohistochemistry-based assay to identify patients with loss or reduction of ATM protein expression in a clinical setting. In a set of 137 NSCLC and 154 colorectal cancer specimens we identified tumoral loss of ATM protein expression in 9.5% and 3.9% of cases, respectively, demonstrating the potential utility of this method. PMID:27602502

  14. Mutations and polymorphism in bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus, Montagu 1821) albumin gene: First identification of mutations responsible for inherited bisalbuminemia.

    PubMed

    Gili, Claudia; Bonsembiante, Federico; Beffagna, Giorgia; Mazzariol, Sandro; Gelain, Maria Elena

    2017-02-24

    Hereditary bisalbuminemia is an asymptomatic and heterozygous condition in a range of species characterized by the presence of two serum albumin fractions with different electrophoretic mobility resulting in a bicuspid pattern on serum electrophoresis. Bisalbuminemia has been diagnosed by electrophoresis in two bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) families, but causative mutations and the inheritance pattern have not been identified. The aims of this work are: to investigate polymorphisms of the bottlenose dolphin albumin gene and to identify mutations causative of bisalbuminemia; to identify the inheritance pattern in two bottlenose dolphin families. Coding regions of the albumin gene were screened for mutations in 15 bottlenose dolphins kept under human care from two distinct families. Eighteen albumin mutations (three synonymous and 15 non-synonymous) were identified. Two non-synonymous variations co-segregated with bisalbuminemic phenotype: p.Phe146Leu in exon 4 and p.Tyr163His in exon 5. The amino acid change in exon 5 was associated with the secondary and/or tertiary structure variation of the protein and has been reported as causative of bisalbuminemia in humans. Pedigree analysis of the dolphin families showed an autosomal codominant inheritance pattern. In this work, the mutations potentially responsible for bisalbuminemia were identified and confirmed the autosomal codominant trait in bottlenose dolphins.

  15. Revisiting MSUD in Portuguese Gypsies: evidence for a founder mutation and for a mutational hotspot within the BCKDHA gene.

    PubMed

    Quental, Sofia; Gusmão, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Pombo, Pilar; Ugarte, Magdalena; Vilarinho, Laura; Amorim, António; Prata, Maria J

    2009-05-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of branched-chain amino acid metabolism. In the context of the wide mutational spectrum known for this disease, a few common mutations have been described in populations where founder effects played a major role in modeling diversities. In Portugal, for instance, a high proportion of patients are of Gypsy origin and all share the same mutation (c.117delC-alpha; p.R40GfsX23), causing the neonatal severe form of MSUD. In this study, we used four microsatellite markers closely flanking the BCKDHA gene (E1alpha protein) to demonstrate that c.117delC-alpha is a founder mutation responsible for the high incidence of the disorder among Portuguese Gypsies. These results are of medical relevance since carrier tests and prenatal diagnosis can be offered to families at risk, particularly because the carrier frequency of c.117delC-alpha was estimated at 1.4% among the healthy Portuguese Gypsies from the South of the country. Finally we present evidence that the genomic region of the BCKDHA gene where c.117delC-alpha is located is likely a mutational hotspot, since recurrence of c.117delC-alpha was observed in two distinct population groups.

  16. High frequency of additional gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with MLL partial tandem duplication: DNMT3A mutation is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, Der-Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wu, Jin-Hou; Dunn, Po; Wang, Po-Nan; Lin, Tung-Liang; Shih, Yu-Shu; Liang, Sung-Tzu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Lai, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The mutational profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with partial tandem duplication of mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL-PTD) have not been comprehensively studied. We studied 19 gene mutations for 98 patients with MLL-PTD AML to determine the mutation frequency and clinical correlations. MLL-PTD was screened by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. The mutational analyses were performed with PCR-based assays followed by direct sequencing. Gene mutations of signaling pathways occurred in 63.3% of patients, with FLT3-ITD (44.9%) and FLT3-TKD (13.3%) being the most frequent. 66% of patients had gene mutations involving epigenetic regulation, and DNMT3A (32.7%), IDH2 (18.4%), TET2 (18.4%), and IDH1 (10.2%) mutations were most common. Genes of transcription pathways and tumor suppressors accounted for 23.5% and 10.2% of patients. RUNX1 mutation occurred in 23.5% of patients, while none had NPM1 or double CEBPA mutation. 90.8% of MLL-PTD AML patients had at least one additional gene mutation. Of 55 MLL-PTD AML patients who received standard chemotherapy, age older than 50 years and DNMT3A mutation were associated with inferior outcome. In conclusion, gene mutations involving DNA methylation and activated signaling pathway were common co-existed gene mutations. DNMT3A mutation was a poor prognostic factor in MLL-PTD AML. PMID:26375248

  17. Mutational hot spots in Ig V region genes of human follicular lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The genes coding for the Ig light chains expressed in two cases of human follicular lymphoma were cloned and sequenced. In each case, multiple independent isolates of the tumor population were compared. Although each tumor represented a single clone of B cells with a unique V/J joint, different cells within each tumor had accumulated multiple point mutations in the V gene during clonal expansion. Most of the mutations observed were silent, but some resulted in amino acid replacements. Identical silent mutations were often observed in independent isolates of each tumor. By combining the current data with VH sequences obtained previously from the same cells, it was apparent that the repetitive silent mutations could not be explained solely by a genealogic tree. Such mutations could represent hot spots whose tendency to mutate may be influenced by neighboring DNA sequences or by the methylation of specific cytosine residues. PMID:3045247

  18. [Association between single nucleotide polymorphism of BARD1 gene and BRCA1 gene mutation in epithelial ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Liu, W L; Zhao, J Z; Wang, Z Z; Dong, B; Hou, Y Y; Wu, X X; Guo, Y J

    2017-06-25

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of BARD1 gene and BRCA1 gene in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Methods: Nineteen EOC patients with BRCA1 gene mutation and 50 EOC cases without BRCA1 gene mutation between January 2016 and October 2016 were collected, and all EOC were diagnosed by pathological method. BARD1 gene variants were detected by next generation sequencing (NGS). The SNP of BARD1 gene was analyzed by Pearson linear correlation. Logistic regression analysis was used to research the clinicopathologic features and BRCA1 gene mutation associated with BARD1 gene SNP. Pearson's chi-square test was used to analyze the association between BARD1 gene Val507Met, Arg378Ser and Pro24Ser with different clinicopathologic features and BRCA1 gene mutation risk. Results: (1) Eight BARD1 gene variants were found in 69 ovarian cancer patients, in which Val507Met, Arg378Ser and Pro24Ser were common variants, and the rate of mutation were all 54% (37/69). (2) There was a significant linear correlation among Val507Met, Arg378Ser and Pro24Ser (all P<0.01). (3) Obvious differences were found in Val507Met, Arg378Ser and Pro24Ser of BARD1 gene between BRCA1(+) and BRCA1(-) (all P<0.05) . (4) No differences were found between BARD1 gene Val507Met, Arg378Ser and Pro24Ser and the clinicopathologic features (all P>0.05), while obvious differences were found in BRCA1 gene mutation compared to the controls group. The risk of BRCA1 mutation in Val507Met and Arg378Ser were more evident in subjects with negative family history, positive menopause history, negative tubal ligation, onset age (≤60 years old) and sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy in EOC (all P<0.05), while Pro24Ser was only more evident in positive menopause history of EOC (P<0.05). Conclusions: BARD1 Val507Met, Arg378Ser and Pro24Ser are the common genotypes, which are associated with BRCA1 mutation in EOC. The family history, menopause history, tubal ligation

  19. Mutation analysis of PAH gene and characterization of a recurrent deletion mutation in Korean patients with phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Wha; Lee, Dong Hwan; Kim, Nam-Doo; Lee, Seung-Tae; Ahn, Jee Young; Choi, Tae-Youn; Lee, You Kyoung; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Jong-Won

    2008-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU; MIM 261600) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by a deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH; EC 1.14.16.1). Point mutations in the PAH gene are known to cause PKU in various ethnic groups, and large deletions or duplications account for up to 3% of the PAH mutations in some ethnic groups. However, a previous study could not identify ~14% of the mutant alleles by sequence analysis in Korean patients with PKU, which suggests that large deletions or duplication might be frequent causes of PKU in Koreans. To test this hypothesis, we performed multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for the identification of uncharacterized mutant alleles after PAH sequence analysis of 33 unrelated Korean patients with PKU. Bi-directional sequencing of the PAH exons and flanking intronic regions revealed 27 different mutations, including four novel mutations (two missense and two deletion mutations), comprising 57/66 (86%) mutant alleles. MLPA identified a large deletion that encompassed exons 5 and 6 in four patients, another large deletion that extended from exon 4 to exon 7 in one patient, and a duplication of exon 4 in one patient. Chromosomal walking characterized the deletion breakpoint of the most common large deletion that involved exons 5 and 6 (c.456_706+138del). The present study shows that the allelic frequency of exon deletion or duplication is 9% (6/66) in Korean PKU patients, which suggests that these mutations may be frequent causes of PKU in Korean subjects. PMID:18985011

  20. CFTR Gene Mutations and Asthma in Indian Children: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Pratibha; Awasthi, Shally; Maurya, Nutan; Agarwal, Sarita; Srinivasan, M

    2015-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Trans membrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene is an asthma susceptibility gene. In the present study we investigated the possible association of CFTR gene mutations in Indian asthmatic children as compared to controls. The study included 250 asthmatics and 250 age and sex matched controls. Case to control ratio for sample size was 1:1. Genotyping was performed for 24 CFTR gene mutations by ARMS-PCR and PCR-RFLP method. Among 24 CFTR gene mutations, heterozygous allele of R553X mutation was found in 4 (1.6 %) asthmatic cases and 2 (0.8 %) controls. Value of FVC and FEV1/FVC ratio were significantly lower in heterozygous individuals (p value <0.05). No significant difference was observed in the genotype and allele frequency of R553X mutation (OR = 1.339, 95 % CI = 0.755-2.374, p value = 0.685). Furthermore, all wild type homozygous alleles were observed in remaining 23 CFTR gene mutations. Our data concludes that R553X mutation was not significantly associated in Indian asthmatic children.

  1. Steatocystoma multiplex is associated with the R94C mutation in the KRTl7 gene

    PubMed Central

    LIU, QIAO; WU, WEIWEI; LU, JIEJIE; WANG, PING; QIAO, FENG

    2015-01-01

    Steatocystoma multiplex (SM) is an uncommon disorder, characterized by numerous skin-colored subcutaneous cysts. A number of SM pedigrees have been identified with mutations in the keratin 17 (KRT17) gene. The present study examined a four-generation Chinese pedigree with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and examined its genetic basis. A review of the literature on KRT17 gene mutations in the SM pedigree was also performed to investigate the KRT17 gene mutation and genotype-phenotype correlation. Exon 1 of the KRTl7 gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from genomic DNA obtained, which was obtained from 25 family members in the selected Chinese pedigree and from 100 unrelated control individuals. The DNA was then subjected to automatic DNA sequencing. Genealogical investigations demonstrated an autosomal dominant pattern, and direct sequencing of the PCR product revealed a heterozygous mutation, c.280C/T (R94C), which was located in exon 1 of the KRT17 gene in all 10 affected family members. The mutation was not identified in the 15 unaffected family members or in the 100 unrelated control individuals. Therefore, the present study identified a causative mutation in the KRT17 gene in a large Chinese SM pedigree, exhibiting autosomal dominance. A review of the literature suggested that, in addition to the mutation factor, other modifying factors contribute to the phenotype of familial SM. PMID:26165312

  2. Isolation of Novel CreERT2-Driver Lines in Zebrafish Using an Unbiased Gene Trap Approach.

    PubMed

    Jungke, Peggy; Hammer, Juliane; Hans, Stefan; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Gene manipulation using the Cre/loxP-recombinase system has been successfully employed in zebrafish to study gene functions and lineage relationships. Recently, gene trapping approaches have been applied to produce large collections of transgenic fish expressing conditional alleles in various tissues. However, the limited number of available cell- and tissue-specific Cre/CreERT2-driver lines still constrains widespread application in this model organism. To enlarge the pool of existing CreERT2-driver lines, we performed a genome-wide gene trap screen using a Tol2-based mCherry-T2a-CreERT2 (mCT2aC) gene trap vector. This cassette consists of a splice acceptor and a mCherry-tagged variant of CreERT2 which enables simultaneous labeling of the trapping event, as well as CreERT2 expression from the endogenous promoter. Using this strategy, we generated 27 novel functional CreERT2-driver lines expressing in a cell- and tissue-specific manner during development and adulthood. This study summarizes the analysis of the generated CreERT2-driver lines with respect to functionality, expression, integration, as well as associated phenotypes. Our results significantly enlarge the existing pool of CreERT2-driver lines in zebrafish and combined with Cre-dependent effector lines, the new CreERT2-driver lines will be important tools to manipulate the zebrafish genome.

  3. Isolation of Novel CreERT2-Driver Lines in Zebrafish Using an Unbiased Gene Trap Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jungke, Peggy; Hammer, Juliane; Hans, Stefan; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Gene manipulation using the Cre/loxP-recombinase system has been successfully employed in zebrafish to study gene functions and lineage relationships. Recently, gene trapping approaches have been applied to produce large collections of transgenic fish expressing conditional alleles in various tissues. However, the limited number of available cell- and tissue-specific Cre/CreERT2-driver lines still constrains widespread application in this model organism. To enlarge the pool of existing CreERT2-driver lines, we performed a genome-wide gene trap screen using a Tol2-based mCherry-T2a-CreERT2 (mCT2aC) gene trap vector. This cassette consists of a splice acceptor and a mCherry-tagged variant of CreERT2 which enables simultaneous labeling of the trapping event, as well as CreERT2 expression from the endogenous promoter. Using this strategy, we generated 27 novel functional CreERT2-driver lines expressing in a cell- and tissue-specific manner during development and adulthood. This study summarizes the analysis of the generated CreERT2-driver lines with respect to functionality, expression, integration, as well as associated phenotypes. Our results significantly enlarge the existing pool of CreERT2-driver lines in zebrafish and combined with Cre–dependent effector lines, the new CreERT2-driver lines will be important tools to manipulate the zebrafish genome. PMID:26083735

  4. Driver Mutations in Uveal Melanoma: Associations With Gene Expression Profile and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Decatur, Christina L; Ong, Erin; Garg, Nisha; Anbunathan, Hima; Bowcock, Anne M; Field, Matthew G; Harbour, J William

    2016-07-01

    Frequent mutations have been described in the following 5 genes in uveal melanoma (UM): BAP1, EIF1AX, GNA11, GNAQ, and SF3B1. Understanding the prognostic significance of these mutations could facilitate their use in precision medicine. To determine the associations between driver mutations, gene expression profile (GEP) classification, clinicopathologic features, and patient outcomes in UM. Retrospective study of patients with UM treated by enucleation by a single ocular oncologist between November 1, 1998, and July 31, 2014. Clinicopathologic features, patient outcomes, GEP classification (class 1 or class 2), and mutation status were recorded. The study cohort comprised 81 participants. Their mean age was 61.5 years, and 37% (30 of 81) were female. The GEP classification was class 1 in 35 of 81 (43%), class 2 in 42 of 81 (52%), and unknown in 4 of 81 (5%). BAP1 mutations were identified in 29 of 64 (45%), GNAQ mutations in 36 of 81 (44%), GNA11 mutations in 36 of 81 (44%), SF3B1 mutations in 19 of 81 (24%), and EIF1AX mutations in 14 of 81 (17%). Sixteen of the mutations in BAP1 and 6 of the mutations in EIF1AX were previously unreported in UM. GNAQ and GNA11 mutations were mutually exclusive. BAP1, SF3B1, and EIF1AX mutations were almost mutually exclusive with each other. Using multiple regression analysis, BAP1 mutations were associated with class 2 GEP and older patient. EIF1AX mutations were associated with class 1 GEP and the absence of ciliary body involvement. SF3B1 mutations were associated with younger patient age. GNAQ mutations were associated with the absence of ciliary body involvement and greater largest basal diameter. GNA11 mutations were not associated with any of the analyzed features. Using Cox proportional hazards modeling, class 2 GEP was the prognostic factor most strongly associated with metastasis (relative risk, 9.4; 95% CI, 3.1-28.5) and melanoma-specific mortality (relative risk, 15.7; 95% CI, 3.6-69.1) (P < .001 for both). After

  5. Recurrent de novo mutations implicate novel genes underlying simplex autism risk

    PubMed Central

    O'Roak, B. J.; Stessman, H. A.; Boyle, E. A.; Witherspoon, K. T.; Martin, B.; Lee, C.; Vives, L.; Baker, C.; Hiatt, J. B.; Nickerson, D. A.; Bernier, R.; Shendure, J.; Eichler, E. E.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has a strong but complex genetic component. Here we report on the resequencing of 64 candidate neurodevelopmental disorder risk genes in 5,979 individuals: 3,486 probands and 2,493 unaffected siblings. We find a strong burden of de novo point mutations for these genes and specifically implicate nine genes. These include CHD2 and SYNGAP1, genes previously reported in related disorders, and novel genes TRIP12 and PAX5. We also show that mutation carriers generally have lower IQs and enrichment for seizures. These data begin to distinguish genetically distinct subtypes of autism important for etiological classification and future therapeutics. PMID:25418537

  6. TILLING by sequencing to identify induced mutations in stress resistance genes of peanut (Arachis hypogaea).

    PubMed

    Guo, Yufang; Abernathy, Brian; Zeng, Yajuan; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2015-03-07

    Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING) is a powerful reverse genetics approach for functional genomics studies. We used high-throughput sequencing, combined with a two-dimensional pooling strategy, with either minimum read percentage with non-reference nucleotide or minimum variance multiplier as mutation prediction parameters, to detect genes related to abiotic and biotic stress resistances. In peanut, lipoxygenase genes were reported to be highly induced in mature seeds infected with Aspergillus spp., indicating their importance in plant-fungus interactions. Recent studies showed that phospholipase D (PLD) expression was elevated more quickly in drought sensitive lines than in drought tolerant lines of peanut. A newly discovered lipoxygenase (LOX) gene in peanut, along with two peanut PLD genes from previous publications were selected for TILLING. Additionally, two major allergen genes Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, and fatty acid desaturase AhFAD2, a gene which controls the ratio of oleic to linoleic acid in the seed, were also used in our study. The objectives of this research were to develop a suitable TILLING by sequencing method for this allotetraploid, and use this method to identify mutations induced in stress related genes. We screened a peanut root cDNA library and identified three candidate LOX genes. The gene AhLOX7 was selected for TILLING due to its high expression in seeds and roots. By screening 768 M2 lines from the TILLING population, four missense mutations were identified for AhLOX7, three missense mutations were identified for AhPLD, one missense and two silent mutations were identified for Ara h 1.01, three silent and five missense mutations were identified for Ara h 1.02, one missense mutation was identified for AhFAD2B, and one silent mutation was identified for Ara h 2.02. The overall mutation frequency was 1 SNP/1,066 kb. The SNP detection frequency for single copy genes was 1 SNP/344 kb and 1 SNP/3,028 kb for multiple copy genes. Our

  7. Mutations in the SLC3A1 transporter gene in cystinuria

    SciTech Connect

    Pras, E.; Raben, N.; Aksentijevich, I.

    1995-06-01

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by the development of kidney stones. Guided by the identification of the SLC3A1 amino acid-transport gene on chromosome 2, we recently established genetic linkage of cystinuria to chromosome 2p in 17 families, without evidence for locus heterogeneity. Other authors have independently identified missense mutations in SLC3A1 in cystinuria patients. In this report we describe four additional cystinuria-associated mutations in this gene: a frameshift, a deletion, a transversion inducing a critical amino acid change, and a nonsense mutation. The latter stop codon was found in all of eight Ashkenazi Jewish carrier chromosomes examined. This report brings the number of disease-associated mutations in this gene to 10. We also assess the frequency of these mutations in our 17 cystinuria families. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Mutations on the α2-Globin Gene That May Trigger α(+)-Thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Farashi, Samaneh; Vakili, Shadi; Garous, Negin F; Ashki, Mehri; Imanian, Hashem; Azarkeivan, Azita; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a total of 11 individuals with hypochromic microcytic anemia who did not reveal the most common α-thalassemia (α-thal) deletions or mutations, were subjected to more investigations by DNA sequencing of the α-globin genes. Seven novel nondeletional α-thal mutations localized on the α2-globin gene in the heterozygous state were identified. These mutations either corrupted regulatory splice sites and consequently affected RNA processing or created unstable hemoglobin (Hb) variants. The mutations described here produced globin gene variants that lead to amino acid changes in critical regions of the globin chain. The clinical presentation of most patients was a persistent mild microcytic anemia similar to an α(+)-thal. In the last decade, numerous α-globin mutations have been observed leading to an α-thal phenotype and these studies have been considered to be important as discussed here.

  9. Phenotypic patterns of desminopathy associated with three novel mutations in the desmin gene

    PubMed Central

    Olivé, Montse; Armstrong, Judith; Miralles, Francesc; Pou, Adolf; Fardeau, Michel; Gonzalez, Laura; Martínez, Francesca; Fischer, Dirk; Matos, Juan Antonio Martínez; Shatunov, Alexey; Goldfarb, Lev; Ferrer, Isidre

    2016-01-01

    Desminopathy represents a subgroup of myofibrillar myopathies caused by mutations in the desmin gene. Three novel disease-associated mutations in the desmin gene were identified in unrelated Spanish families affected by cardioskeletal myopathy. A selective pattern of muscle involvement, which differed from that observed in myofibrillar myopathy resulting from mutations in the myotilin gene, was observed in each of the three families with novel mutations and each of three desminopathy patients with known desmin mutations. Prominent joint retractions at the ankles and characteristic nasal speech were observed early in the course of illness. These findings suggest that muscle imaging in combination with routine clinical and pathological examination may be helpful in distinguishing desminopathy from other forms of myofibrillar myopathy and ordering appropriate molecular investigations. PMID:17418574

  10. A de novo nonsense mutation of the FUS gene in an apparently familial ALS case

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Canosa, Antonio; Brunetti, Maura; Barberis, Marco; Traynor, Bryan J.; Carrara, Giovanna; Valentini, Consuelo; Restagno, Gabriella; Chiò, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in C9ORF72, SOD1, TARDBP and FUS genes account for approximately two third of familial cases and 5% of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases. We present the first case of an ALS patient carrying a de novo nonsense mutation in exon 14 of the FUS gene (c.1483c>t; p.R495X) in a young patient with an apparently familial ALS. This mutation cause a phenotype characterized by a young age at onset, a rapid course (<24 months) and a bulbar onset with early respiratory involvement with a predominant lower motor neuron disease. De novo mutations could account for a sizable number of apparently sporadic ALS patients carrying mutations of ALS-related genes. PMID:24439481

  11. Comprehensive analysis of desmosomal gene mutations in Han Chinese patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiujuan; Chen, Minglong; Song, Hualian; Wang, Benqi; Chen, Hongwu; Wang, Jing; Wang, Wei; Feng, Shangpeng; Zhang, Fengxiang; Ju, Weizhu; Li, Mingfang; Gu, Kai; Cao, Kejiang; Wang, Dao W; Yang, Bing

    2015-04-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a cardiomyopathy that primarily involves the right ventricle. Mutations in desmosomal genes have been associated with ARVC. But its prevalence and spectrum are much less defined in the Chinese population, especially Han Chinese, a majority ethnic group in China; also the genotype-phenotype correlation regarding left ventricular involvement is still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate the genotype in Han Chinese patients with ARVC and the phenotype regarding cardiac left ventricle involvement in mutation carriers of ARVC. 48 Han Chinese patients were recruited into the present study based on the Original International Task Force Criteria of ARVC. Clinical data were reassessed according to the modified criteria published in 2010. A total of 36 subjects were diagnosed with ARVC; 12 patients were diagnosed with suspected ARVC. Five desmosomal genes (PKP2, DSG2, DSP, DSC2 and JUP) were sequenced directly from genomic DNA. Among the 36 patients, 21 mutations, 12 of which novel, were discovered in 19 individuals (19 of 36, 53%). The distribution of the mutations was 25% in PKP2, 14% in DSP, 11% in DSG2, 6% in JUP, and 3% in DSC2. Multiple mutations were identified in 2 subjects (2 of 36, 6%); both had digenic heterozygosity. Eight mutations, of which six were novel, were located in highly conserved regions. Seven mutations introduced a stop codon prematurely, which would result in premature termination of the protein synthesis. Two-dimensional echocardiography showed that LDVd and LDVs parameters were significantly larger in nonsense mutation carriers than in carriers of other mutations. In this comprehensive desmosome genetic analysis, 21 mutations were identified in five desmosomal genes in a group of 48 local Han Chinese subjects with ARVC, 12 of which were novel. PKP2 mutations were the most common variants. Left ventricular involvement could be a sign that the patient is a carrier of a

  12. AIRE gene mutations and autoantibodies to interferon omega in patients with chronic hypoparathyroidism without APECED.

    PubMed

    Cervato, Sara; Morlin, Luca; Albergoni, Maria Paola; Masiero, Stefano; Greggio, Nella; Meossi, Cristiano; Chen, Shu; del Pilar Larosa, Maria; Furmaniak, Jadwiga; Rees Smith, Bernard; Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Kämpe, Olle; Valenzise, Mariella; Betterle, Corrado

    2010-11-01

    To assess autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene mutations, class II HLA haplotypes, and organ- or non-organ-specific autoantibodies in patients with chronic hypoparathyroidism (CH) without associated Addison's disease (AD) or chronic candidiasis (CC). Twenty-four patients who had CH without AD or CC were included in the study. AIRE gene mutations in all 14 exons were studied using PCR in 24 patients, 105 healthy controls and 15 first-degree relatives of CH patients with AIRE mutations. Human leucocyte antigens (HLA) were determined for all 24 patients and 105 healthy controls. Autoantibodies to a range of antigens including NACHT leucine-rich-repeat protein-5 (NALP5) and interferon omega (IFNω) were tested in all 24 patients. AIRE gene mutations were found in 6 of 24 (25%) patients, all females, and this was significantly higher (P < 0·001) compared with AIRE mutations found in healthy controls (2/105). Three patients (12·5%) had homozygous AIRE mutations characteristic of Autoimmune-Poly-Endocrinopathy-Candidiasis-Ectodermal-Dystrophy and all three were also positive for IFNω-autoantibodies. Three patients (12·5%) had heterozygous AIRE mutations; two of these were novel mutations. One of the patients with heterozygous AIRE mutations was positive for both NACHT leucine-rich-repeat protein 5 and IFNω autoantibodies. Heterozygous AIRE mutations were found in 10 of 15 first-degree relatives of CH patients with AIRE mutations, although none was affected by CH. Class II HLA haplotypes were not statistically different in patients with CH compared to healthy controls. Analysis of AIRE gene mutations together with serum autoantibody profile should be helpful in the assessment of patients with CH, in particular young women with associated autoimmune diseases. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Gene trapping with GFP: the isolation of developmental mutants in the slime mold Polysphondylium.

    PubMed

    Fey, P; Cox, E C

    1997-11-01

    In order to study how a cell mass undergoes a transition from one symmetry to another in the slime mold Polysphondylium, we developed a genetic screen in which mutant phenotype and gene expression can easily be visualized in the living organism. The screen combines restriction enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) [1,2] and green fluorescent protein (GFP) [3] expression. In REMI, a restriction enzyme is electroporated along with linearized vector into cells, thus determining the site of plasmid insertion and often increasing the integration frequency. A set of transforming plasmids carrying the GFP coding sequence in three reading frames was used for transformation. The plasmids were constructed so that GFP could be expressed only under control of a host promoter. Living transformants expressing GFP spatially and temporally could be rapidly identified in a very large background of non-expressing cells and fruiting bodies. The phenotypes of representative mutants range from cells that cannot aggregate and initiate cell-cell interactions, through mutant fruiting bodies, to apparently wild-type fruiting bodies expressing GFP in all or a subpopulation of cells. The ability to screen mutant living cells and tissues for GFP expression is rapid and effective and likely to have application in many transformable systems where screening by gene and promoter trapping is essential for understanding temporal and spatial gene regulation.

  14. The mutator gene swi8 effects specific mutations in the mating-type region of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Fleck, O; Rudolph, C; Albrecht, A; Lorentz, A; Schär, P; Schmidt, H

    1994-11-01

    The swi8+ gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe appears to be involved in the termination step of copy synthesis during mating-type (MT) switching. Mutations in swi8 confer a general mutator phenotype and, in particular, generate specific mutations in the MT region. Sequencing of the MT cassettes of the h90 swi8-137 mutant revealed three altered sites. One is situated at the switching (smt) signal adjacent to the H1 homology box of the expression locus mat1:1. It reduces the rate of MT switching. The alteration at the smt signal arose frequently in other h90 swi8 strains and is probably caused by gene conversion in which the sequence adjacent to the H1 box of mat2:2 is used as template. This change might be generated during the process of MT switching when hybrid DNA formation is anomalously extended into the more heterologous region flanking the H1 homology box. In addition to the gene conversion at mat1:1, two mutations were found in the H3 homology boxes of the silent cassettes mat2:2 and mat3:3.

  15. The Mutator Gene Swi8 Effects Specific Mutations in the Mating-Type Region of Schizosaccharomyces Pombe

    PubMed Central

    Fleck, O.; Rudolph, C.; Albrecht, A.; Lorentz, A.; Schar, P.; Schmidt, H.

    1994-01-01

    The swi8(+) gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe appears to be involved in the termination step of copy synthesis during mating-type (MT) switching. Mutations in swi8 confer a general mutator phenotype and, in particular, generate specific mutations in the MT region. Sequencing of the MT cassettes of the h(90) swi8-137 mutant revealed three altered sites. One is situated at the switching (smt) signal adjacent to the H1 homology box of the expression locus mat1:1. It reduces the rate of MT switching. The alteration at the smt signal arose frequently in other h(90) swi8 strains and is probably caused by gene conversion in which the sequence adjacent to the H1 box of mat2:2 is used as template. This change might be generated during the process of MT switching when hybrid DNA formation is anomalously extended into the more heterologous region flanking the H1 homology box. In addition to the gene conversion at mat1:1, two mutations were found in the H3 homology boxes of the silent cassettes mat2:2 and mat3:3. PMID:7851760

  16. Characterisation of germline mutations in the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, M; Maynard, J; Osborn, M; Huson, S M; Ponder, M; Ponder, B A; Harper, P S

    1995-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 is one of the most common inherited disorders with an incidence of 1 in 3000. The search for NF1 mutations has been hampered by the overall size of the gene, the large number of exons, and the high mutation rate. To date, fewer than 90 mutations have been reported to the NF1 mutation analysis consortium and the details on 76 mutations have been published. We have identified five new mutations using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and heteroduplex analysis (HA) and three intragenic deletions with the microsatellite markers. Of the five new mutations, two were in exon 27a, two in exon 45, and one in exon 49 and these include 4630delA, 4572delC, R7846X, T7828A, and one in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR). The two nucleotide alterations in exon 27a and the one in exon 45 are predicted to produce a truncated protein. Images PMID:8544190

  17. Development, multiplexing, and application of ARMS tests for common mutations in the CFTR gene.

    PubMed

    Ferrie, R M; Schwarz, M J; Robertson, N H; Vaudin, S; Super, M; Malone, G; Little, S

    1992-08-01

    The amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) is a simple, rapid and reliable method for the detection of any mutation involving single base changes or small deletions. We have applied ARMS methodology to the detection of mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Single ARMS tests have been developed for 11 CFTR mutations found in the northwest of England. ARMS reactions for the most common mutations have been multiplexed to give a test which will detect the presence of the delta F508, G551D, G542X, and 621 + 1G----T mutations in a DNA sample. The multiplex test has been validated by the analysis of over 500 previously genotyped samples and has been found to be completely accurate. The rapid detection of the most common mutations has enabled early molecular confirmation of suspected cystic fibrosis in neonates, rapid typing of cystic fibrosis patients and their relatives, and testing of sperm and egg donors.

  18. Consequences of Marfan mutations to expression of fibrillin gene and to the structure of microfibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Peltonen, L.; Karttunen, L.; Rantamaeki, T.

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder which is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1). Over 40 family-specific FBN1 mutations have been identified. We have characterized 18 different heterozygous mutations including amino acid substitutions, premature stop, and splicing defects leading to deletions or one insertion, and one compound heterozygote with two differently mutated FBN1 alleles inherited from his affected parents. To unravel the consequences of FBN1 mutations to the transcription of FBN1 gene, we have measured the steady state levels of mRNA transcribed from the normal and mutated alleles. The missense mutations do not affect the transcription of the allele while the nonsense mutation leads to lower steady state amount of mutated allele. For the dissection of molecular pathogenesis of FBN1 mutations we have performed rotary shadowing of the microfibrils produced by the cell cultures from MFS patients. The cells from the neonatal patients with established mutations produced only disorganized fibrillin aggregates but no clearly defined microfibrils could be detected, suggesting a major role of this gene region coding for exons 24-26 in stabilization and organization of the bead structure of microfibrils. From the cells of a rare compound heterozygote case carrying two different mutations, no detectable microfibrils could be detected whereas the cells of his parents with heterozygous mutations were able to form identifiable but disorganized microfibrils. In the cells of an MFS case caused by a premature stop removing the C-terminus of fibrillin, the microfibril assembly takes place but the appropriate packing of the microfibrils is disturbed suggesting that C-terminae are actually located within the interbead domain of the microfibrils.

  19. [Peroneal myoatrophy type 4H FGD4 new gene mutation in one case and literature review].

    PubMed

    Yan, Chen; Yuan, Zhefeng; Xu, Lu; Jiang, Lihua; Gao, Feng

    2016-03-01

    To explore the clinical and gene mutation characteristics of children with peroneal myoatrophy FGD4 mutations. The clinical data of a patient with peroneal myoatrophy with novel FGD4 gene mutations were collected, the related literature was searched from China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, National Center for Biotechnology Information and PubMed (up to December 2014) by using search terms"muscular disorders, atrophic"peripheral nervous system diseases"genes". The clinical features and treatment of the patients with FGD4 gene mutations were studied. The patient was a 10-years-old boy, he was presented to our clinic due to lower extremity weakness for 3 years, worsening for one year with normal family history and birth history. When he was 6 years old, his feet turned inward as he walked, at 7 years of age, his toes pointed toward the ground, the heel could not touch the ground, the right foot was more serious. During the recent year his symptoms were worsened, manifested as clubfoot, foot drop, arched feet, crane legs, difficult in squatting, walking with swaying gait, easy to fall. He was brought to a number of domestic general hospitals' neurology clinic, he was clearly diagnosed as peroneal myoatrophy, but failed to make typing. Electromyography (EMG) showed neurogenic damage (peripheral neuropathy - motor and sensory fibers are involved). Target gene sequencing showed that the child had FGD4 genes compound heterozygous mutation: c. 338A> G and c. 1730G> A, where the former was inherited from his father, the latter inherited from his mother, it was a new mutation unreported previously. Literature search retrieved six reports (all in English literature) with FGD4 10 cases with mutations, which were expressed as peroneal myoatrophy, but were homozygous mutation. This study found the FGD4 4th and the 14th exons' c. 338A> G and c. 1730G> A heterozygous mutations, and this mutations may lead to peroneal myoatrophy.

  20. Mutational status of VHL gene and its clinical importance in renal clear cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Alves, Mariana Rezende; Carneiro, Felipe Cavalcanti; Lavorato-Rocha, André Mourão; da Costa, Walter Henriques; da Cunha, Isabela Werneck; de Cássio Zequi, Stênio; Guimaraes, Gustavo Cardoso; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Carraro, Dirce Maria; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli

    2014-09-01

    The most common subtype of renal cell carcinoma is the clear cell type (ccRCC), accounting for 75 % of cases. Inactivation of VHL gene is thought to be an early event in ccRCC carcinogenesis. Our intention was to assess whether VHL mutational status might provide useful predictive or prognostic information in patients with ccRCC. VHL messenger RNA (mRNA) expression was analyzed by in situ hybridization and its protein by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing samples from 148 cases. This was validated by qRT-PCR on 62 cases, for which RNA was available. The mutation status was assessed in 91 cases by Sanger sequencing. VHL was found mutated in 57 % of cases, with missense mutations in 26 %, nonsense in 5 %, splice site in 13 %, deletions in 39 %, indels in 8 %, duplications in 8 %, and insertions in 2 % of the cases. The prevalence of mutations by exon was the following: exon 1, 47 %; exon 2, 27 %; and exon 3, 13 %. VHL protein was expressed in a high number of cases (80 %), but significant correlations were not found between protein expression, clinical data, and survival. Importantly, of the 91 samples evaluated by sequencing, 45 were mutated, and 87 % of those were strongly positive. We found 32 novel mutations in the VHL gene in ccRCC. The presence of mutations was not concordant with mRNA or protein expression. Nonsense mutations of the VHL gene appear to be related with poorer prognosis and survival.

  1. Werner syndrome and mutations of the WRN and LMNA genes in France.

    PubMed

    Uhrhammer, Nancy A; Lafarge, Laurence; Dos Santos, Laetitia; Domaszewska, Anna; Lange, Magdalena; Yang, Yong; Aractingi, Selim; Bessis, Didier; Bignon, Yves-Jean

    2006-07-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a pleiotropic disease of premature aging involving short stature, tight, atrophied, and/or ulcerated skin; a characteristic 'birdlike' facies and high, squeaky or hoarse voice; premature greying and thinning of the hair; and early onset cataracts. Additional common symptoms include diabetes mellitus, hypogonadism, osteoporosis, osteosclerosis of the digits, soft tissue calcification, premature atherosclerosis, rare or multiple neoplasms, malformed teeth, and flat feet. Diagnosis can be difficult due to the variable presentation and rarity of the disorder. Transmission is usually autosomal recessive. The WS gene, WRN, is member of the RecQ DNA helicase family. Biallelic mutations of WRN are responsible for most patients. Although heterozygous missense mutations in the LMNA gene have been observed in severely affected WS patients, this only accounts for a small fraction of non-WRN patients. Eighteen WS cases were referred to us for molecular analysis. Eleven had definite and three had probable WS according to the University of Washington Registry clinical criteria. All exons of the WRN gene and their splice junctions were sequenced. Of the fourteen definite or probable cases, 11 had one or more WRN mutation. Thirteen different mutations were found, and ten of these were previously undescribed. There were few phenotypic differences between patients with WRN mutation(s) and those who met clinical criteria though lacking WRN mutations. However, patients with mutations tended to have more symptoms overall, and mutations were not observed in the two cases with cardiomyopathy. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Recessive mutations in the INS gene result in neonatal diabetes through reduced insulin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Garin, Intza; Edghill, Emma L.; Akerman, Ildem; Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Rica, Itxaso; Locke, Jonathan M.; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Alshaikh, Adnan; Bundak, Ruveyde; del Castillo, Gabriel; Deeb, Asma; Deiss, Dorothee; Fernandez, Juan M.; Godbole, Koumudi; Hussain, Khalid; O’Connell, Michele; Klupa, Thomasz; Kolouskova, Stanislava; Mohsin, Fauzia; Perlman, Kusiel; Sumnik, Zdenek; Rial, Jose M.; Ugarte, Estibaliz; Vasanthi, Thiruvengadam; Johnstone, Karen; Flanagan, Sarah E.; Martínez, Rosa; Castaño, Carlos; Patch, Ann-Marie; Fernández-Rebollo, Eduardo; Raile, Klemens; Morgan, Noel; Harries, Lorna W.; Castaño, Luis; Ellard, Sian; Ferrer, Jorge; de Nanclares, Guiomar Perez; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2010-01-01

    Heterozygous coding mutations in the INS gene that encodes preproinsulin were recently shown to be an important cause of permanent neonatal diabetes. These dominantly acting mutations prevent normal folding of proinsulin, which leads to beta-cell death through endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis. We now report 10 different recessive INS mutations in 15 probands with neonatal diabetes. Functional studies showed that recessive mutations resulted in diabetes because of decreased insulin biosynthesis through distinct mechanisms, including gene deletion, lack of the translation initiation signal, and altered mRNA stability because of the disruption of a polyadenylation signal. A subset of recessive mutations caused abnormal INS transcription, including the deletion of the C1 and E1 cis regulatory elements, or three different single base-pair substitutions in a CC dinucleotide sequence located between E1 and A1 elements. In keeping with an earlier and more severe beta-cell defect, patients with recessive INS mutations had a lower birth weight (−3.2 SD score vs. −2.0 SD score) and were diagnosed earlier (median 1 week vs. 10 weeks) compared to those with dominant INS mutations. Mutations in the insulin gene can therefore result in neonatal diabetes as a result of two contrasting pathogenic mechanisms. Moreover, the recessively inherited mutations provide a genetic demonstration of the essential role of multiple sequence elements that regulate the biosynthesis of insulin in man. PMID:20133622

  3. Mutation analysis of CFTR gene in 70 Iranian cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Alibakhshi, Reza; Zamani, Mahdi

    2006-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common inherited disorder in Caucasian populations, with over 1400 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations. The type of mutations and their distributions varies widely between different countries and/or ethnic groups. Seventy Iranian cystic fibrosis patients were screened for the CFTR gene mutation using ARMS/PCR (amplification refractory mutation system) for the following mutations: deltaF508, N1303K, G542X, 1717-1G>A, R553X, W1282X, G551D, 621+1G>T, deltaI507 and R560T. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of exons 3, 7, 10, 11 and 17b, including both the exon/intron junctions, of the CFTR gene was performed in patients in whom no mutation could be identified on one or both CFTR genes. As a result of this screening, only three mutations were found: deltaF508 mutation was found in 25 (17.8%) alleles, N1303K in six (4.3%) alleles and G542X in five (3.6%) alleles. Thus, a total of 3 mutations cover 25.7% of CF alleles. These finding will be used for planning future screening and appropriate genetic counseling programs in Iranian CF patients.

  4. Digenic mutations involving both the BSND and GJB2 genes detected in Bartter syndrome type IV.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Han; Feng, Yong; Li, Hai-Bo; Wu, Hong; Mei, Ling-Yun; Wang, Xing-Wei; Jiang, Lu; He, Chu-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Bartter syndrome type IV, characterized by salt-losing nephropathies and sensorineural deafness, is caused by mutations of BSND or simultaneous mutations of both CLCNKA and CLCNKB. GJB2 is the primary causative gene for non-syndromic sensorineural deafness and associated with several syndromic sensorineural deafness. Owing to the rarity of Bartter syndrome, only a few mutations have been reported in the abovementioned causative genes. To investigate the underlying mutations in a Chinese patient with Bartter syndrome type IV, genetic analysis of BSND, CLCNKA, CLCNKB and GJB2 were performed by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Finally, double homozygous mutations c.22C > T (p.Arg8Trp) and c.127G > A (Val43Ile) were detected in exon 1 of BSND. Intriguingly, compound heterozygous mutations c.235delC (p.Leu79CysfsX3) and c.109G > A (p.Val37Ile) were also revealed in exon 2 of GJB2 in the same patient. No pathogenic mutations were found in CLCNKA and CLCNKB. Our results indicated that the homozygous mutation c.22C > T was the key genetic reason for the proband, and a digenic effect of BSND and GJB2 might contributed to sensorineural deafness. To our knowledge, it was the first report showing that the GJB2 gene mutations were detected in Bartter syndrome.

  5. APP717, APP693, and PRIP gene mutations are rare in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Anderson, Leojean; O'dahl, Sheldon; Wisjman, Ellen M.; Sadovnick, Adele D.; Ball, Melvyn J.; Larson, Eric B.; Kukull, Walter A.; Martin, George M.; Roses, Allen D.; Bird, Thomas D.

    1991-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene codes for the precursor to the β-protein found in the amyloid deposits of Alzheimer disease (AD). Recently Goate et al. identified in codon 717 of this gene a missense mutation which segregates with AD in a familial AD (FAD) kindred. The same mutation was also found in affected subjects from a second FAD family but not in other FAD families or in normal controls. The following work was undertaken to determine the frequency of the codon 717 mutation in FAD and nonfamilial AD cases and in normal controls. We tested 76 FAD families, 127 “sporadic” AD subjects, 16 Down syndrome cases, and 256 normal controls for this mutation, and none were positive. We also tested for the APP codon 693 mutation associated with hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis–Dutch type, for PRIP gene missense mutations at codons 102, 117, and 200, and for the PRIP insertion mutations which are associated with Creutzfeld-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Straussler Scheinker syndrome. No examples of these mutations were found in our population. Thus these APP and PRIP mutations are rare in both FAD and nonfamilial AD. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:1679288

  6. An Undergraduate Laboratory Class Using CRISPR/Cas9 Technology to Mutate Drosophila Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adame, Vanesa; Chapapas, Holly; Cisneros, Marilyn; Deaton, Carol; Deichmann, Sophia; Gadek, Chauncey; Lovato, TyAnna L.; Chechenova, Maria B.; Guerin, Paul; Cripps, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology is used in the manipulation of genome sequences and gene expression. Because of the ease and rapidity with which genes can be mutated using CRISPR/Cas9, we sought to determine if a single-semester undergraduate class could be successfully taught, wherein students isolate mutants for specific genes using…

  7. An Undergraduate Laboratory Class Using CRISPR/Cas9 Technology to Mutate Drosophila Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adame, Vanesa; Chapapas, Holly; Cisneros, Marilyn; Deaton, Carol; Deichmann, Sophia; Gadek, Chauncey; Lovato, TyAnna L.; Chechenova, Maria B.; Guerin, Paul; Cripps, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology is used in the manipulation of genome sequences and gene expression. Because of the ease and rapidity with which genes can be mutated using CRISPR/Cas9, we sought to determine if a single-semester undergraduate class could be successfully taught, wherein students isolate mutants for specific genes using…

  8. Quantification of the paternal allele bias for new germline mutations in the retinoblastoma gene

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, J.F.; Rapaport, J.M.; Dryia, T.P.

    1994-09-01

    New germline mutations in the human retinoblastoma gene preferentially arise on a paternally derived allele. In nonhereditary retinoblastoma, the initial somatic mutation seems to have no such bias. The few previous reports of these phenomena included relatively few cases (less than a dozen new germline or initial somatic mutations), so that the magnitude of the paternal allele bias for new germline mutations is not known. Knowledge of the magnitude of the bias is valuable for genetic counseling, since, for example, patients with new germline mutations who reproduce transmit risk for retinoblastoma according to the risk that the transmitted allele has a germline mutation. We sought to quantitate the paternal allele bias and to determine whether paternal age is a factor possibly accounting for it. We studied 311 families with retinoblastoma (261 simplex, 50 multiplex) that underwent clinical genetic testing and 5 informative families recruited from earlier research. Using RFLPs and polymorphic microsatellites in the retinoblastoma gene, we could determine the parental origin of 45 new germline mutations and 44 probable initial somatic mutations. Thirty-seven of the 45 new germline mutations, or 82%, arose on a paternal allele while only 24 of the 44 initial somatic mutations (55%) did so. Increased paternal age does not appear to account for the excess of new paternal germline mutations, since the average age of fathers of children with new germline mutations (29.4 years, n=26, incomplete records on 11) was not significantly different from the average age of fathers of children with maternal germline mutations or somatic initial mutations (29.8 years, n=35, incomplete records on 17).

  9. Mutations in the nebulin gene in a child with nemaline (rod) myopathy.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Seema; Singh, Ankur; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Batra, Vineeta Vijay

    2013-08-01

    Nemaline myopathy, also called rod myopathy, is a relatively common congenital myopathy and probably second in incidence only to central core disease. The mainstay of diagnosis is histopathology, but detection of the causative mutation is mandatory for determining the mode of inheritance and for prenatal diagnosis. The authors report two siblings with nemaline myopathy caused by mutations in the nebulin gene.

  10. 40 CFR 798.5300 - Detection of gene mutations in somatic cells in culture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cells in culture. 798.5300 Section 798.5300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....5300 Detection of gene mutations in somatic cells in culture. (a) Purpose. Mammalian cell culture systems may be used to detect mutations induced by chemical substances. Widely used cell lines...

  11. 40 CFR 798.5300 - Detection of gene mutations in somatic cells in culture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cells in culture. 798.5300 Section 798.5300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....5300 Detection of gene mutations in somatic cells in culture. (a) Purpose. Mammalian cell culture systems may be used to detect mutations induced by chemical substances. Widely used cell lines...

  12. GPR143 Gene Mutations in Five Chinese Families with X-linked Congenital Nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ruifang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Dongjie; Wang, Liming; Yuan, Zhongfang; Ying, Ming; Li, Ningdong

    2015-01-01

    The ocular albinism type I (OA1) is clinically characterized by impaired visual acuity, nystagmus, iris hypopigmentation with translucency, albinotic fundus, and macular hypoplasia together with normally pigmented skin and hair. However, it is easily misdiagnosed as congenital idiopathic nystagmus in some Chinese patients with OA1 caused by the G-protein coupled receptor 143 (GPR143) gene mutations. Mutations in the FERM domain–containing 7 (FRMD7) gene are responsible for the X-linked congenital idiopathic nystagmus. In this study, five Chinese families initially diagnosed as X-linked congenital nystagmus were recruited and patients underwent ophthalmological examinations. After direct sequencing of the FRMD7 and GPR143 genes, five mutations in GPR143 gene were detected in each of the five families, including a novel nonsense mutation of c.333G>A (p.W111X), two novel splicing mutations of c.360+1G>C and c.659-1G>A, a novel small deletion mutation of c.43_50dupGACGCAGC (p.L20PfsX25), and a previously reported missense mutation of c.703G>A (p.E235K). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) examination showed foveal hypoplasia in all the affected patients with nystagmus. Our study further expands the GPR143 mutation spectrum and contributes to the study of GPR143 molecular pathogenesis. Molecular diagnosis and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are two useful tools for differential diagnosis. PMID:26160353

  13. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) gene mutations in Canadian subjects with abetalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Hegele, R A

    2000-03-01

    Abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) is an extremely rare autosomal recessive disorder, which is characterized by defective assembly and secretion of plasma apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins. ABL results from mutations in the gene encoding the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). We sequenced the MTP gene in six Canadian subjects with ABL, of whom four were found to be simple homozygotes and two were found to be compound heterozygotes for MTP gene mutations. Of the 8 MTP gene mutations identified, 6 had not been previously reported, including two new nonsense mutations (K448X and K842X), two new missense mutations (S590I and G746E), one new frameshift mutation (1820del1) and one new splice donor site mutation (G1770A). Despite appropriate treatment with high doses of fat-soluble vitamins in all subjects, there was a wide variation in the progression and severity of the clinical phenotypes. For example, the presence of severe retinopathy and neuropathy did not correlate with the type and position of the mutation, but rather with the age at diagnosis and onset of treatment with fat-soluble vitamins. These findings suggest that genetic and non-genetic factors can modulate the clinical impact of mutant MTP in ABL patients.

  14. Missense mutation in the Chlamydomonas chloroplast gene that encodes the Rubisco large subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Spreitzer, R.J.; Brown, T.; Chen, Zhixiang; Zhang, Donghong; Al-Abed, S.R. )

    1988-04-01

    The 69-12Q mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii lacks ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity, but retains holoenzyme protein. It results from a mutation in the chloroplast large-subunit gene that causes an isoleucine-for-threonine substitution at amino-acid residue 173. Considering that lysine-175 is involved in catalysis, it appears that mutations cluster at the active site.

  15. Does congenital cytomegalovirus infection lead to hearing loss by inducing mutation of the GJB2 gene?

    PubMed

    Li, Lu-Quan; Tan, Jun-Jie; Zhou, Yuan; Yu, Jia-Lin

    2013-08-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and mutation of the gap junction β-2 (GJB2) gene are important causes of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). This study aims to determine if congenital CMV infection leads to deafness by inducing GJB2 mutation. GJB2 gene sequencing and auditory brainstem response testing were performed in 159 neonates (63 with and 96 without CMV infection) from August 2008 to August 2011. For neonates with GJB2 mutation, their parents were further screened for GJB2 sequence. The incidence of SNHL was 12.7% in CMV-infected but 0% in uninfected children aged 1-1.5 y (P = 0.000). Similar mutation rates of the GJB2 gene were observed in neonates with or without CMV infection (34.9 vs. 32.3%, respectively, P = 0.734). No significant difference in the mutation rate of GJB2 was found among neonates with CMV infection and SNHL, those with CMV infection and normal hearing, and uninfected newborns with normal hearing (P = 0.438). Mutations 79G>A, 109G>A, 341A>G, and 608T>C were found in neonates with and without CMV infection. All of the above mutations were also found in both or one of the corresponding parents. Congenital CMV infections may cause deafness in neonates, but this might be independent of GJB2 gene mutation.

  16. Low prevalence of glucokinase gene mutations in gestational diabetic patients with good glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Frigeri, H R; Santos, I C R; Réa, R R; Almeida, A C R; Fadel-Picheth, C M T; Pedrosa, F O; Souza, E M; Rego, F G M; Picheth, G

    2012-05-18

    Glucokinase (GCK) plays a key role in glucose homeostasis. Gestational diabetes mellitus increases the risk of gestational complications in pregnant women and fetuses. We screened for mutations in coding and flanking regions of the GCK gene in pregnant women with or without gestational diabetes in a Brazilian population. A sample of 200 pregnant women classified as healthy (control, N = 100) or with gestational diabetes (N = 100) was analyzed for mutations in the GCK gene. All gestational diabetes mellitus patients had good glycemic control maintained by diet alone and no complications during pregnancy. Mutations were detected by single-strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Thirteen of the 200 subjects had GCK gene mutations. The mutations detected were in intron 3 (c.43331A>G, new), intron 6 (c.47702T>C, rs2268574), intron 9 (c.48935C>T, rs2908274), and exon 10 (c.49620G>A, rs13306388). None of these GCK mutations were found to be significantly associated with gestational diabetes mellitus. In summary, we report a low frequency of GCK mutations in a pregnant Brazilian population and describe a new intronic variation (c.43331A>G, intron 3). We conclude that mutations in GCK introns and in non-translatable regions of the GCK gene do not affect glycemic control and are not correlated with gestational diabetes mellitus.

  17. Three New Classes of Mutations in the Caenorhabditis Elegans Muscle Gene Sup-9

    PubMed Central

    Levin, J. Z.; Horvitz, H. R.

    1993-01-01

    We are studying five interacting genes involved in the regulation or coordination of muscle contraction in Caenorhabditis elegans. A distinctive ``rubber-ban'' muscle-defective phenotype was previously shown to result from rare altered-function mutations in either of two of these genes, unc-93 and sup-10. Null mutations in sup-9, sup-10, sup-18 or unc-93 act as essentially recessive suppressors of these rubber-band mutations. In this work, we identify three new classes of sup-9 alleles: altered-function rubber-band, partial loss-of-function and dominant-suppressor. The existence of rubber-band mutations in sup-9, sup-10 and unc-93 and the suppression of these mutations by null mutations in any of these three genes suggest that these proteins are required at the same step in muscle contraction. Moreover, allele-specific interactions shown by the partial loss-of-function mutations indicate that the products of these interacting genes may physically contact each other in a multiple subunit protein complex. Finally, the phenotypes of double rubber-band mutant combinations suggest that the rubber-band mutations affect a neurogenic rather than a myogenic input in excitation-contraction coupling in muscle. PMID:8224828

  18. Mutation Patterns of 16 Genes in Primary and Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) with Normal Cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Mercado, Marta; Yip, Bon Ham; Pellagatti, Andrea; Davies, Carwyn; Larrayoz, María José; Kondo, Toshinori; Pérez, Cristina; Killick, Sally; McDonald, Emma-Jane; Odero, María Dolores; Agirre, Xabier; Prósper, Felipe; Calasanz, María José; Wainscoat, James S.; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia patients with normal cytogenetics (CN-AML) account for almost half of AML cases. We aimed to study the frequency and relationship of a wide range of genes previously reported as mutated in AML (ASXL1, NPM1, FLT3, TET2, IDH1/2, RUNX1, DNMT3A, NRAS, JAK2, WT1, CBL, SF3B1, TP53, KRAS and MPL) in a series of 84 CN-AML cases. The most frequently mutated genes in primary cases were NPM1 (60.8%) and FLT3 (50.0%), and in secondary cases ASXL1 (48.5%) and TET2 (30.3%). We showed that 85% of CN-AML patients have mutations in at least one of ASXL1, NPM1, FLT3, TET2, IDH1/2 and/or RUNX1. Serial samples from 19 MDS/CMML cases that progressed to AML were analyzed for ASXL1/TET2/IDH1/2 mutations; seventeen cases presented mutations of at least one of these genes. However, there was no consistent pattern in mutation acquisition during disease progression. This report concerns the analysis of the largest number of gene mutations in CN-AML studied to date, and provides insight into the mutational profile of CN-AML. PMID:22912701

  19. Mutations and a polymorphism in the factor VIII gene discovered by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, S.; Gitschier, J. )

    1990-03-01

    Hemophilia A results from mutations in the gene coding for coagulation factor VIII. The authors gradient gel electrophoresis to screen for mutations in the region of the factor VIII gene coding for the first acidic domain. Amplification primers were designed employing the MELTMAP computer program to optimize the ability to detect mutations. Screening of amplified DNA from 228 unselected hemophilia A patients revealed two mutations and one polymorphism. Rescreening the same population by making heteroduplexes between amplified patient and control samples prior to electrophoresis revealed one additional mutation. The mutations include two missense and one 4-base-pair deletion, and each mutation was found in patients with severe hemophilia. The polymorphism, located adjacent to the adenine branch site in intron 7, is useful for genetic prediction in some cases where the Bcl I and Xba I polymorphisms are uninformative. These results suggest that DNA amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis should be an excellent strategy for identifying mutations and polymorphisms in defined regions of the factor VIII gene and other large genes.

  20. [Gene mutation analysis and prenatal diagnosis of a family with Bartter syndrome].

    PubMed

    Li, Long; Ma, Na; Li, Xiu-Rong; Gong, Fei; DU, Juan

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the mutation of related genes and prenatal diagnosis of a family with Bartter syndrome (BS). The high-throughput capture sequencing technique and PCR-Sanger sequencing were used to detect pathogenic genes in the proband of this family and analyze the whole family at the genomic level. After the genetic cause was clarified, the amniotic fluid was collected from the proband's mother who was pregnant for 5 months for prenatal diagnosis. The proband carried compound heterozygous mutations of c.88C>T(p.Arg30*) and c.968+2T>A in the CLCNKB gene; c.88C>T(p.Arg30*) had been reported as a pathogenic mutation, and c.968+2T>A was a new mutation. Pedigree analysis showed that the two mutations were inherited from the mother and father, respectively. Prenatal diagnosis showed that the fetus did not inherit the mutations from parents and had no mutations at the two loci. The follow-up visit confirmed that the infant was in a healthy state, which proved the accuracy of genetic diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis. The compound heterozygous mutations c.88C>T(p.Arg30*) and c.968+2T>A in the CLCNKB gene are the cause of BS in the proband, and prenatal diagnosis can prevent the risk of recurrence of BS in this family.

  1. Mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene in two Chinese families with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Xu, Haikun; An, Wei; Zhu, Dechun; Li, Dejun

    2016-06-01

    Androgens are essential for normal male sex differentiation and are responsible for the normal development of male secondary sexual characteristics at puberty. The physiological effects of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). Mutations in the AR gene are the most common cause of androgen insensitivity syndrome. The present study undertook a genetic analysis of the AR gene in two unrelated families affected by complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) in China. In family 1, a previously reported nonsense mutation (G-to-A; p.W751X) was identified in exon 5 of the AR gene. In addition, a novel missense mutation was detected in exon 6 of the AR gene from family 2; this mutation resulted in a predicted amino acid change from phenylalanine to serine at codon 804 (T-to-C; p.F804S) in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of AR. Computer simulation of the structural changes generated by the p.F804S substitution revealed marked conformational alterations in the hydrophobic core responsible for the stability and function of the AR-LBD. In conclusion, the present study identified two mutations from two unrelated Chinese families affected by CAIS. The novel mutation (p.F804S) may provide insights into the molecular mechanism underlying CAIS. Furthermore, it expands on the number of mutational hot spots in the international AR mutation database, which may be useful in the future for prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  2. Congenital long QT syndrome with compound mutations in the KCNH2 gene.

    PubMed

    Bando, Sachiko; Soeki, Takeshi; Matsuura, Tomomi; Niki, Toshiyuki; Ise, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Koji; Taketani, Yoshio; Iwase, Takashi; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Wakatsuki, Tetsuzo; Akaike, Masashi; Aiba, Takeshi; Shimizu, Wataru; Sata, Masataka

    2014-07-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome is a genetic disorder encompassing a family of mutations that can lead to aberrant ventricular electrical activity. We report on two brothers with long QT syndrome caused by compound mutations in the KCNH2 gene inherited from parents who had no prolonged QT interval on electrocardiography. The proband had syncope, and his elder brother suffered from ventricular fibrillation. Genetic testing revealed that both brothers had multiple mutations in the KCNH2 gene, including a missense mutation of C1474T (exon 6) as well as a frameshift/nonsense mutation, resulting from the insertion of 25 nucleotides, which caused an altered amino acid sequence beginning at codon 302 and a premature termination codon (i.e., TAG) at codon 339 (exon 4). Family genetic screening found that their father had the same frameshift mutation, and their mother and sister had the same missense mutation, in the KCNH2 gene. However, these other family members were asymptomatic, with normal QT intervals on electrocardiography. These results suggest that compound mutations in the KCNH2 gene inherited independently from the parents made the phenotypes of their sons more severe.

  3. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 gene mutation status as a prognostic biomarker in classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lennerz, Jochen K; Hoffmann, Karl; Bubolz, Anna-Maria; Lessel, Davor; Welke, Claudia; Rüther, Nele; Viardot, Andreas; Möller, Peter

    2015-10-06

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) mutations are among the most frequent somatic mutations in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), yet their prognostic relevance in cHL is unexplored. Here, we performed laser-capture microdissection of Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells from tumor samples in a cohort of 105 cHL patients. Full-length SOCS1 gene sequencing showed mutations in 61% of all cases (n = 64/105). Affected DNA-motifs and mutation pattern suggest that many of these SOCS1 mutations are the result of aberrant somatic hypermutation and we confirmed expression of mutant alleles at the RNA level. Contingency analysis showed no significant differences of patient-characteristics with HRS-cells containing mutant vs. wild-type SOCS1. By predicted mutational consequence, mutations can be separated into those with non-truncating point mutations ('minor' n = 49/64 = 77%) and those with length alteration ('major'; n = 15/64 = 23%). Subgroups did not differ in clinicopathological characteristics; however, patients with HRS-cells that contained SOCS1 major mutations suffered from early relapse and significantly shorter overall survival (P = 0.03). The SOCS1 major status retained prognostic significance in uni-(P = 0.016) and multivariate analyses (P = 0.005). Together, our data indicate that the SOCS1 mutation type qualifies as a single-gene prognostic biomarker in cHL.

  4. Germline mutations of the PTCH gene in Japanese patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tanioka, Miki; Takahashi, Katsu; Kawabata, Tomohiro; Kosugi, Shinji; Murakami, Kenichiro; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Nishigori, Chikako; Iizuka, Tadahiko

    2005-01-01

    We identified seven novel germline mutations of the PTCH gene in eight unrelated Japanese patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). In order to ensure genetic diagnosis, all 23 coding exons of the PTCH gene were amplified from genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequenced. Mutations were found in all eight patients with NBCCS. The mutations detected in this study include one insertion/deletion mutation, one 1-bp insertion, two 1-bp deletions, one nonsense mutation and two missense mutations. None of the mutations have been previously reported. Five mutations caused premature stop codons that are predicted to result in a truncated protein. In the two missense mutations, the strong basic residue arginine was substituted by serine or glycine in highly conserved components of the putative transmembrane domain of PTCH, and these mutations may therefore affect the conformation and function of the PTCH protein. No phenotype-genotype relationships were found in the Japanese NBCCS patients, consistent with results of previous studies on NBCCS in African-American and Caucasian patients.

  5. Frequent p53 gene mutations in soft tissue sarcomas arising in burn scar.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, H; Tomita, Y; Yoshikawa, H; Sato, N; Ochi, T; Aozasa, K

    1999-03-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the commonest malignancy that arises in burn scars, which frequently contain p53 mutations. Soft tissue sarcoma (STS) also develops, though less frequently, in burn scars. p53 gene mutations were analyzed in paraffin-embedded specimens from 5 patients with STS (4 males and 1 female) that had arisen in a burn scar, by means of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) followed by direct sequencing. Age at burn injury ranged from 2 to 10 (median 3) years, and STS developed with a latent period ranging from 29 to 79 (median 60) years. Histologically, all were malignant fibrous histiocytoma. The PCR-SSCP revealed aberrant bands in 4 (80%) of 5 cases. Direct sequencing revealed a total of 11 mutations in these 4 cases: 1 case had a single mutation, 1 had 2 mutations, and 2 had 4 mutations. Every tumor had at least 1 mutation that changed an amino acid, which may have provided the selection pressure for expansion. Thus, there is a high frequency of p53 gene mutations in STS appearing in burn scars. p53 mutations were also frequent in pyothorax-associated lymphoma (PAL), a lymphoma that develops in patients with long-standing pyothorax, so p53 mutations might be frequent in malignancies that develop in chronic inflammatory sites.

  6. Mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene are linked to smoking-independent, lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sonobe, M; Manabe, T; Wada, H; Tanaka, F

    2005-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are a potential predictor of the effectiveness of EGFR inhibitors for the treatment of lung cancer. Although EGFR mutations were reported to occur with high frequency in nonsmoking Japanese adenocarcinoma patients, the exact nature has not been fully elucidated. We examined EGFR gene mutations within exons 18–21 and their correlations to clinico-pathological factors and other genetic alterations in tumour specimens from 154 patients who underwent resection for lung cancer at Kyoto University Hospital. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutations were observed in 60 tumours (39.0%), all of which were adenocarcinoma. Among the patients with adenocarcinoma (n=108), EGFR mutations were more frequently observed in nonsmokers than former smokers or current smokers (83.0, 50.0, 15.2%, respectively), in women than men (76.3 vs 34.0%), in tumours with bronchio-alveolar component than those without bronchio-alveolar component (78.9 vs 42.9%), and in well or moderately differentiated tumours than poorly differentiated tumours (72.0, 64.4, 34.2%). No tumours with EGFR mutations had any K-ras codon 12 mutations, which were well-known smoking-related gene mutations. In conclusion, adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutation had a distinctive clinico-pathological feature unrelated to smoking. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutations may play a key role in the development of smoking-independent adenocarcinoma. PMID:16052218

  7. Mutation analysis of the NRXN1 gene in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kacamak, D; Kavasoglu, AN; Akgun, B; Yalcinli, M; Kose, S; Ozbaran, B

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to identify the sequence mutations in the Neurexin 1 (NRXN1) gene that has been considered as one of the strong candidate genes. A total of 30 children and adolescents (aged 3-18) with non syndromic autism were enrolled this study. Sequencing of the coding exons and the exon-intron boundaries of the NRXN1 gene was performed. Two known mutations were described in two different cases. Heterozygous S14L was determined in one patient and heterozygous L748I was determined in another patient. The S14L and L748I mutations have been described in the patients with autism before. Both of these mutations were inherited from their father. In this study, two of 30 (6.7%) autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patients carrying NRXN1 gene mutations were detected. It indicates that variants in the NRXN1 gene might confer a risk of developing nonsyndromic ASD. However, due to the reduced penetrance in the gene, the causal role of the NRXN1 gene mutations must be evaluated carefully in all cases. PMID:28289584

  8. Novel mutations in the NRL gene and associated clinical findings in patients with dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    DeAngelis, Margaret M; Grimsby, Jonna L; Sandberg, Michael A; Berson, Eliot L; Dryja, Thaddeus P

    2002-03-01

    To search for mutations in the neural retina leucine zipper (NRL) gene in patients with dominant retinitis pigmentosa and to compare the severity of disease in these patients with that observed previously in patients with dominant rhodopsin mutations. Single-strand conformation analysis was used to survey 189 unrelated patients for mutations. The available relatives of index patients with mutations were also evaluated. In our clinical examination of patients, we measured visual acuity, final dark-adaptation threshold equivalent visual field diameter, and electroretinogram amplitudes among other parameters of visual function. We compared the clinical findings with those obtained earlier from similar evaluations of a group of 39 patients with the dominant rhodopsin mutation Pro23His and a group of 25 patients with the dominant rhodopsin mutation Pro347Leu. We identified 3 novel missense mutations in a total of 4 unrelated patients with dominant retinitis pigmentosa: Ser50Pro, Ser50Leu (2 patients), and Pro51Thr. Each mutation cosegregated with dominant retinitis pigmentosa. None of these mutations were found among 91 unrelated control individuals. The visual acuities among the 4 index patients and 3 relatives with NRL mutations who were clinically evaluated ranged from 20/20 (in a 9-year-old patient) to 20/200 (in a 73-year-old patient). All patients had bone-spicule pigment deposits in their fundi. Average rod-plus-cone and cone-isolated electroretinogram amplitudes were both decreased by 99% or more compared with normal amplitudes. The dark-adaptation thresholds, equivalent visual field diameters, and electroretinogram amplitudes (all corrected for age and refractive error) indicated that the disease caused by the NRL mutations was more severe than that caused by the dominant rhodopsin mutation Pro23His and was similar in severity to that produced by the rhodopsin mutation Pro347Leu. The 3 novel NRL mutations we discovered bring the total number of reported

  9. Prevalence and significance of MEFV gene mutations in patients with gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Karaarslan, Ahmet; Kobak, Senol; Kaya, Işın; Intepe, Nazım; Orman, Mehmet; Berdelı, Afig

    2016-11-01

    Gouty arthritis is a chronic erosive autoinflammatory disease. Pyrin has anti-inflammatory effects in the regulation of inflammasome and is encoded by the MEFV gene. The relationship between different rheumatic diseases and the MEFV gene mutations was demonstrated. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of MEFV gene mutations in patients with gouty arthritis and identify a possible correlation with disease phenotype. Ninety-three patients with gouty arthritis and 102 healthy controls, compatible with age, gender and ethnicity, were included in the study. MEFV gene mutations were investigated by PCR method. Out of 93 patients with gouty arthritis, 36 (38.7 %) showed MEFV gene mutations carriage, whereas 20.6 % in healthy control group. Distribution of mutations identified in patients with gouty arthritis was as; R202Q in 18 (19.3 %), E148Q in 5 (5.4 %), K695R in 4 (4.3 %), M680I in 2 (2.1 %), V726A in 2 (2.1 %), P369S in 2 (2.1 %), R408Q in 2 (2.1 %), M694 V in 1 (1.1 %), respectively. Three patients were identified with compound heterozygosity. Distribution of MEFV gene mutations carriage in healthy controls was; E148Q in 11 (10.7 %), M694 V in 2 (1.9 %), M694I in 1 (0.9 %), M680I in 2 (1.9 %), V726A in 1 (0.9 %), A744S in 1 (0.9 %), K695R in 2 (1.9 %), and P369S in 1 (0.9 %) patients, respectively. Higher MEFV gene mutations carrier frequency was observed in patients with gouty arthritis, compared with the control group (p = 0.009). Heterozygous R202Q was the most common mutation detected in patients with gouty arthritis, while heterozygous E148Q in healthy control group. Statistically significant difference was not detected between clinical findings of gouty arthritis and the MEFV gene mutations (p > 0.05). We determined higher prevalence of MEFV gene mutations in patients with gouty arthritis compared with the healthy control group. The most frequently detected mutation was heterozygous R202Q, whereas E148Q in healthy

  10. Red blood cell PK deficiency: An update of PK-LR gene mutation database.

    PubMed

    Canu, Giulia; De Bonis, Maria; Minucci, Angelo; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2016-03-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is known as being the most common cause of chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA). Clinical PK deficiency is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait, that can segregate neither in homozygous or in a compound heterozygous modality, respectively. Two PK genes are present in mammals: the pyruvate kinase liver and red blood cells (PK-LR) and the pyruvate kinase muscle (PK-M), of which only the first encodes for the isoenzymes normally expressed in the red blood cells (R-type) and in the liver (L-type). Several reports have been published describing a large variety of genetic defects in PK-LR gene associated to CNSHA. Herein, we present a review of about 250 published mutations and six polymorphisms in PK-LR gene with the corresponding clinical and molecular data. We consulted the PubMed website for searching mutations and papers, along with two main databases: the Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD, https://grenada.lumc.nl/LOVD2/mendelian_genes/home.php?select_db=PKLR) and Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD, http://www.hgmd.cf.ac.uk/ac/gene.php?gene=PKLR) for selecting, reviewing and listing the annotated PK-LR gene mutations present in literature. This paper is aimed to provide useful information to clinicians and laboratory professionals regarding overall reported PK-LR gene mutations, also giving the opportunity to harmonize data regarding PK-deficient individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Expression from a betageo gene trap in the Slain1 gene locus is predominantly associated with the developing nervous system.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Claire E; Lim, Sue-Mei; Pereira, Lloyd A; Mayberry, Robyn A; Stanley, Edouard G; Elefanty, Andrew G

    2010-01-01

    Slain1 was originally identified as a novel stem cell-associated gene in transcriptional profiling experiments comparing mouse and human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and their immediate differentiated progeny. In order to obtain further insight into the potential function of Slain1, we examined the expression of beta-galactosidase in a gene-trap mouse line in which a beta-geo reporter gene was inserted into the second intron of Slain1. In early stage embryos (E7.5), the Slain1-betageo fusion protein was expressed within the entire epiblast, but by E9.5 became restricted to the developing nervous system and gastrointestinal tract. In later stage embryos (E11.5 - E13.5), expression was predominantly within the developing nervous system. Lower level expression was also observed in the developing limb buds, in the condensing mesenchyme, along the apical epidermal ridge and, at later stages, within the digital zones. These observations suggest that Slain1 may play a role in the development of the nervous system, as well as in the morphogenesis of several embryonic structures.

  12. Mutations in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in elderly Chinese people.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuhua; Zhao, Jiandong; Feng, Bo; Su, Yu; Kang, Dongyang; Yuan, Huijun; Zhai, Suoqiang; Dai, Pu

    2015-01-01

    Our data indicate that the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene, and particularly the A827G mutation, may be associated with susceptibility to age-related hearing loss. Hearing loss associated with aging is common among elderly persons. In all genetic backgrounds, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations may be one of the most important factors contributing to aging and age-related hearing loss. The mitochondrial 12S rRNA is a hot spot for deafness-associated mutations in Chinese populations. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the relationship of 12S rRNA gene polymorphisms and age-related hearing loss. The 12S rRNA gene polymorphisms were detected by direct sequencing. Statistical analyses were performed to assess the associations between age-related hearing loss and 12S rRNA gene variants. We report here a systematic mutational screening of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in 662 elderly subjects from the general population with various hearing threshold levels (211 controls and 451 age-related hearing loss subjects). Mutational screening of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene identified 55 nucleotide changes, including 4 mutations localized at highly conserved sites and 51 known variants. Of the known deafness-associated mutations in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene, the incidence of the A1555G mutation was 0.15%, A827G was 4.38%, T1095C was 0.45%, and T1005C was 3.78%. The incidence of the other known variants was 0.15-99.85%. We found statistically significant differences in the proportions of subjects with the A827G mutation among the various age-related hearing loss groups and normal controls.

  13. Prevalence of mitochondrial gene mutations among hearing impaired patients

    PubMed Central

    Usami, S.; Abe, S.; Akita, J.; Namba, A.; Shinkawa, H.; Ishii, M.; Iwasaki, S.; Hoshino, T.; Ito, J.; Doi, K.; Kubo, T.; Nakagawa, T.; Komiyama, S.; Tono, T.; Komune, S.

    2000-01-01

    The frequency of three mitochondrial point mutations, 1555A→G, 3243A→G, and 7445A→G, known to be associated with hearing impairment, was examined using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis in two Japanese groups: (1) 319 unrelated SNHL outpatients (including 21 with aminoglycoside antibiotic injection history), and (2) 140 cochlear implantation patients (including 22 with aminoglycoside induced hearing loss). Approximately 3% of the outpatients and 10% of the cochlear implantation patients had the 1555A→G mutation. The frequency was higher in the patients with a history of aminoglycoside injection (outpatient group 33%, cochlear implantation group 59%). One outpatient (0.314%) had the 3243A→G mutation, but no outpatients had the 7445A→G mutation and neither were found in the cochlear implantation group. The significance of the 1555A→G mutation, the most prevalent mitochondrial mutation found in this study of a hearing impaired population in Japan, among subjects with specific backgrounds, such as aminoglycoside induced hearing loss, is evident.


Keywords: mitochondria; point mutation; hearing impairment; frequencies PMID:10633132

  14. Novel mutations of NFIX gene causing Marshall-Smith syndrome or Sotos-like syndrome: one gene, two phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Francisco; Marín-Reina, Purificación; Sanchis-Calvo, Amparo; Perez-Aytés, Antonio; Oltra, Silvestre; Roselló, Mónica; Mayo, Sonia; Monfort, Sandra; Pantoja, Jorge; Orellana, Carmen

    2015-11-01

    Only 15 point mutations in NFIX gene have been reported so far, nine of them cause the Marshall-Smith syndrome (MSS) and the remaining mutations lead to an overgrowth disorder with a less severe phenotype, defined as Sotos-like. The clinical findings in three patients with MSS and two patients with a Sotos-like phenotype are presented. Analysis of the NFIX gene was performed both by conventional or next-generation sequencing. Five de novo mutations in NFIX gene were identified, four of them not previously reported. Two frameshift mutations and a donor-splice one caused MSS, while two missense mutations in the DNA binding/dimerisation domain entailed an overgrowth syndrome with some clinical features resembling Sotos syndrome, accompanied by a marfanoid habitus, very low BMI, long narrow face, or arachnodactyly. Marshall-Smith mutations are scattered through exons 6-10 of NFIX gene, while most point mutations causing an overgrowth syndrome are clustered in exon 2. Clinical features of this overgrowth syndrome may well be considered an intermediate phenotype between Sotos and Marfan syndromes.

  15. Sequence analysis of tyrosinase gene in ocular and oculocutaneous albinism patients: introducing three novel mutations

    PubMed Central

    Khordadpoor-Deilamani, Faravareh; Karimipoor, Morteza; Javadi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Albinism is a heterogeneous genetic disorder of melanin synthesis that results in hypopigmented eyes (in patients with ocular albinism) or hair, skin, and eyes (in individuals with oculocutaneous albinism). It is associated with decreased visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus, and photophobia. The tyrosinase gene is known to be involved in both oculocutaneous albinism and autosomal recessive ocular albinism. In this study, we aimed to screen the mutations in the TYR gene in the nonsyndromic OCA and autosomal recessive ocular albinism patients from Iran. Methods The tyrosinase gene was examined in 23 unrelated patients with autosomal recessive ocular albinism or nonsyndromic OCA using DNA sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. Results TYR gene mutations were identified in 14 (app. 60%) albinism patients. Conclusions We found 10 mutations, 3 of which were novel. No mutation was found in our ocular albinism patients, but one of them was heterozygous for the p.R402Q polymorphism. PMID:26167114

  16. Diffusion tensor imaging of brain white matter in Huntington gene mutation individuals.

    PubMed

    Saba, Roberta Arb; Yared, James H; Doring, Thomas M; Phys, Med; Borges, Vanderci; Ferraz, Henrique Ballalai

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the role of the involvement of white matter tracts in huntingtin gene mutation patients as a potential biomarker of the progression of the disease. We evaluated 34 participants (11 symptomatic huntingtin gene mutation, 12 presymptomatic huntingtin gene mutation, and 11 controls). We performed brain magnetic resonance imaging to assess white matter integrity using diffusion tensor imaging, with measurement of fractional anisotropy. We observed a significant decrease of fractional anisotropy in the cortical spinal tracts, corona radiate, corpus callosum, external capsule, thalamic radiations, superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculus, and inferior frontal-occipital fasciculus in the Huntington disease group compared to the control and presymptomatic groups. Reduction of fractional anisotropy is indicative of a degenerative process and axonal loss. There was no statistically significant difference between the presymptomatic and control groups. White matter integrity is affected in huntingtin gene mutation symptomatic individuals, but other studies with larger samples are required to assess its usefulness in the progression of the neurodegenerative process.

  17. Sequence analysis of tyrosinase gene in ocular and oculocutaneous albinism patients: introducing three novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Khordadpoor-Deilamani, Faravareh; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; Karimipoor, Morteza; Javadi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Albinism is a heterogeneous genetic disorder of melanin synthesis that results in hypopigmented eyes (in patients with ocular albinism) or hair, skin, and eyes (in individuals with oculocutaneous albinism). It is associated with decreased visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus, and photophobia. The tyrosinase gene is known to be involved in both oculocutaneous albinism and autosomal recessive ocular albinism. In this study, we aimed to screen the mutations in the TYR gene in the nonsyndromic OCA and autosomal recessive ocular albinism patients from Iran. The tyrosinase gene was examined in 23 unrelated patients with autosomal recessive ocular albinism or nonsyndromic OCA using DNA sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. TYR gene mutations were identified in 14 (app. 60%) albinism patients. We found 10 mutations, 3 of which were novel. No mutation was found in our ocular albinism patients, but one of them was heterozygous for the p.R402Q polymorphism.

  18. Splicing factor gene mutations in the myelodysplastic syndromes: impact on disease phenotype and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Splicing factor gene mutations are the most frequent mutations found in patients with the myeloid malignancy myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), suggesting that spliceosomal dysfunction plays a major role in disease pathogenesis. The aberrantly spliced target genes and deregulated cellular pathways associated with the commonly mutated splicing factor genes in MDS (SF3B1, SRSF2 and U2AF1) are being identified, illuminating the molecular mechanisms underlying MDS. Emerging data from mouse modeling studies indicate that the presence of splicing factor gene mutations can lead to bone marrow hematopoietic stem/myeloid progenitor cell expansion, impaired hematopoiesis and dysplastic differentiation that are hallmarks of MDS. Importantly, recent evidence suggests that spliceosome inhibitors and splicing modulators may have therapeutic value in the treatment of splicing factor mutant myeloid malignancies.

  19. Widely distributed mutations in the COL2A1 gene produce achondrogenesis type II/hypochondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Körkkö, J; Cohn, D H; Ala-Kokko, L; Krakow, D; Prockop, D J

    2000-05-15

    The COL2A1 gene was assayed for mutations in genomic DNA from 12 patients with achondrogenesis type II/hypochondrogenesis. The exons and flanking sequences of the 54 exons in the COL2A1 gene were amplified by a series of specific primers using PCR. The PCR products were scanned for mutations by conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis, and PCR products that generated heteroduplex bands were then sequenced. Mutations in the COL2A1 gene were found in all 12 patients. Ten of the mutations were single base substitutions that converted a codon for an obligate glycine to a codon for an amino acid with a bulkier side chain. One of the mutations was a change in a consensus RNA splice site. Another was an 18-base pair deletion of coding sequences. The results confirmed previous indications that conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis is highly sensitive for detection of mutations in large and complex genes. They also demonstrate that most, if not all, patients with achondrogenesis type II/hypochondrogenesis have mutations in the COL2A1 gene.

  20. The Association of Pre-S/S Gene Mutations and Hepatitis B Virus Vertical Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yuzhu; Zhang, Peizhen; Tan, Zhangmin; Zhou, Jin; Wu, Lingling; Hou, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    Background HBV Pre-S/S gene mutations can occur before or after implementation of combined vaccination program. HBV Prs-S/S gene mutation is a risk factor of vaccination failure and frequently causes HBV vertical transfection. Objectives To assess the association of hepatitis B virus (HBV) S gene mutations with vertical transmission. Patients and Methods In this prospective nested case-control study, a total of 60 pregnant women with positive serum HBsAg and HBV DNA ≥ 107 IU/mL were divided into a case group (15 cases with vaccination failure) and a control group (45 cases with vaccination success) according to whether their infants tested positive for HBV infection. Mothers and their children in the case group were further sub-divided into groups including mothers, newborns and infant (the same newborns at age of seven months). The pre-S/S gene mutations were detected by PCR and sequenced and its association with vertical transmission of HBV was analyzed. Results HBV genotype B was the dominant genotype in the both groups’ mothers. Each mother-child pair in case group had the same HBV genotype. There were no significant differences in mutation frequencies of HBV Pre-S/S gene between case and control groups’ mothers (Fragment 1 (M): 2 vs. 4, P > 0.05; Fragment 2 (M): 10 vs. 10, P > 0.05), or among the mothers, newborns and infants in the case group (Fragment 1 (M): 2, 2, and 3, respectively, P > 0.05; Fragment 2 (M): 10, 10 and 10 respectively, P > 0.05). Mutation site analysis of the both groups’ mothers demonstrated 108 different mutation sites in the HBV pre-S/S gene, with 105 silent mutations and 5 missense mutations including ntA826G, ntC531T, ntT667C, ntC512T and ntC546A. Among 15 mother-newborn-infant pairs with successful PCR and sequence in case group, 7 (41.17%) mother-newborn pairs, 9 (60.00%) mother-infant pairs and 3 (20.00%) infant-newborn pairs had different mutation sites. Conclusions HBV in children due to vaccination failure was resulted

  1. Association of a novel point mutation in MSH2 gene with familial multiple primary cancers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hai; Li, Hong; Jiao, Feng; Han, Ting; Zhuo, Meng; Cui, Jiujie; Li, Yixue; Wang, Liwei

    2017-10-03

    Multiple primary cancers (MPC) have been identified as two or more cancers without any subordinate relationship that occur either simultaneously or metachronously in the same or different organs of an individual. Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder that increases the risk of many types of cancers. Lynch syndrome patients who suffer more than two cancers can also be considered as MPC; patients of this kind provide unique resources to learn how genetic mutation causes MPC in different tissues. We performed a whole genome sequencing on blood cells and two tumor samples of a Lynch syndrome patient who was diagnosed with five primary cancers. The mutational landscape of the tumors, including somatic point mutations and copy number alternations, was characterized. We also compared Lynch syndrome with sporadic cancers and proposed a model to illustrate the mutational process by which Lynch syndrome progresses to MPC. We revealed a novel pathologic mutation on the MSH2 gene (G504 splicing) that associates with Lynch syndrome. Systematical comparison of the mutation landscape revealed that multiple cancers in the proband were evolutionarily independent. Integrative analysis showed that truncating mutations of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes were significantly enriched in the patient. A mutation progress model that included germline mutations of MMR genes, double hits of MMR system, mutations in tissue-specific driver genes, and rapid accumulation of additional passenger mutations was proposed to illustrate how MPC occurs in Lynch syndrome patients. Our findings demonstrate that both germline and somatic alterations are driving forces of carcinogenesis, which may resolve the carcinogenic theory of Lynch syndrome.

  2. Novel Somatic Mutations to PI3K Pathway Genes in Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Poornema; Leskoske, Kristin; Oroian, Dora; Birtwistle, Marc R.; Buckhaults, Phillip J.

    2012-01-01

    Background BRAFV600 inhibitors have offered a new gateway for better treatment of metastatic melanoma. However, the overall efficacy of BRAFV600 inhibitors has been lower than expected in clinical trials, and many patients have shown resistance to the drug’s effect. We hypothesized that somatic mutations in the Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase (PI3K) pathway, which promotes proliferation and survival, may coincide with BRAFV600 mutations and contribute to chemotherapeutic resistance. Methods We performed a somatic mutation profiling study using the 454 FLX pyrosequencing platform in order to identify candidate cancer genes within the MAPK and PI3K pathways of melanoma patients. Somatic mutations of theses candidate cancer genes were then confirmed using Sanger sequencing. Results As expected, BRAFV600 mutations were seen in 51% of the melanomas, whereas NRAS mutations were seen in 19% of the melanomas. However, PI3K pathway mutations, though more heterogeneous, were present in 41% of the melanoma, with PTEN being the highest mutated PI3K gene in melanomas (22%). Interestingly, several novel PI3K pathway mutations were discovered in MTOR, IRS4, PIK3R1, PIK3R4, PIK3R5, and NFKB1. PI3K pathway mutations co-occurred with BRAFV600 mutations in 17% of the tumors and co-occurred with 9% of NRAS mutant tumors, implying cooperativity between these pathways in terms of melanoma progression. Conclusions These novel PI3K pathway somatic mutations could provide alternative survival and proliferative pathways for metastatic melanoma cells. They therefore may be potential chemotherapeutic targets for melanoma patients who exhibit resistance to BRAFV600 inhibitors. PMID:22912864

  3. p16/CDKN2 and CDK4 gene mutations in sporadic melanoma development and progression.

    PubMed

    Piccinin, S; Doglioni, C; Maestro, R; Vukosavljevic, T; Gasparotto, D; D'Orazi, C; Boiocchi, M

    1997-02-20

    The p16/CDKN2(MTS1) gene encoding for the p16 inhibitor of cyclin D/CDK4 complexes is frequently mutated and deleted in a large fraction of melanoma cell lines, and p16 germline mutations have also been observed in familial melanomas. Moreover, a CDK4 gene mutation, responsible for a functional resistance of CDK4 kinase to p16 inhibitory activity, has been described to occur in some cases of familial melanoma. These data strongly support the idea that deregulation of the CDK4/cyclin D pathway, via CDKN2 or CDK4 mutations, is of biological significance in the development of melanoma. To shed light on the role of these alterations in the development and progression of sporadic melanoma, 12 primary melanomas and 9 corresponding metastases were analyzed for CDKN2 and CDK4 gene mutations. Of the 12 primary melanomas analyzed, 4 showed the presence of mutational inactivation of the p 16 protein and 2 carried silent mutations. No metastases showed the presence of CDKN2 mutations, indicating that mutations of this cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor is not common in the progression of sporadic melanoma. On the other hand, the absence, in the metastases, of the CDKN2 mutation detected in the corresponding primary tumors suggests that 9p21 homozygous deletion may play a major role in the metastatic spreading of this type of tumor. None of the cases analyzed showed the presence of an Arg24Cys mutation, which functionally protects CDK4 from p16 inhibition. This indicates that CDK4 mutation plays a minor role in the development and progression of sporadic melanoma.

  4. Whole exome sequencing reveals concomitant mutations of multiple FA genes in individual Fanconi anemia patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited genetic syndrome with highly variable clinical manifestations. Fifteen genetic subtypes of FA have been identified. Traditional complementation tests for grouping studies have been used generally in FA patients and in stepwise methods to identify the FA type, which can result in incomplete genetic information from FA patients. Methods We diagnosed five pediatric patients with FA based on clinical manifestations, and we performed exome sequencing of peripheral blood specimens from these patients and their family members. The related sequencing data were then analyzed by bioinformatics, and the FANC gene mutations identified by exome sequencing were confirmed by PCR re-sequencing. Results Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations of FANC genes were identified in all of the patients. The FA subtypes of the patients included FANCA, FANCM and FANCD2. Interestingly, four FA patients harbored multiple mutations in at least two FA genes, and some of these mutations have not been previously reported. These patients’ clinical manifestations were vastly different from each other, as were their treatment responses to androstanazol and prednisone. This finding suggests that heterozygous mutation(s) in FA genes could also have diverse biological and/or pathophysiological effects on FA patients or FA gene carriers. Interestingly, we were not able to identify de novo mutations in the genes implicated in DNA repair pathways when the sequencing data of patients were compared with those of their parents. Conclusions Our results indicate that Chinese FA patients and carriers might have higher and more complex mutation rates in FANC genes than have been conventionally recognized. Testing of the fifteen FANC genes in FA patients and their family members should be a regular clinical practice to determine the optimal care for the individual patient, to counsel the family and to obtain a better understanding of FA pathophysiology

  5. A Novel Intronic Splice Site Tafazzin Gene Mutation Detected Prenatally in a Family with Barth Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bakšienė, M; Benušienė, E; Morkūnienė, A; Ambrozaitytė, L; Utkus, A; Kučinskas, V

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Barth syndrome (BTHS) is a rare X-linked disease characterized by dilated cardiomyopathy, proximal skeletal myopathy and cyclic neutropenia. It is caused by various mutations in the tafazzin (TAZ) gene located on Xq28 that results in remodeling of cardiolipin and abnormalities in mitochondria stability and energy production. Here we report on a novel c.285-1G>C splice site mutation in intron 3 of the TAZ gene that was detected prenatally. PMID:28289596

  6. Relationship Between Patients with Clinical Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder and Mutations in Gjb2 Gene.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Guilherme M; Z Ramos, Priscila; M Castilho, Arthur; C Guimarães, Alexandre; L Sartorato, Edi

    2016-01-01

    The auditory neuropathy is a condition which there is a dyssynchrony in the nerve conduction of the auditory nerve fibers. There is no evidence about the relationship between patients with clinical auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder and mutations in GJB2 gene. There are only two studies about this topic in the medical literature. Connexin 26 (GJB2 gene) mutations are common causes of genetic deafness in many populations and we also being reported in subjects with auditory neuropathy.

  7. Immunohistochemical NF1 analysis does not predict NF1 gene mutation status in pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Stenman, Adam; Svahn, Fredrika; Welander, Jenny; Gustavson, Boel; Söderkvist, Peter; Gimm, Oliver; Juhlin, C Christofer

    2015-03-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PCCs) are tumors originating from the adrenal medulla displaying a diverse genetic background. While most PCCs are sporadic, about 40 % of the tumors have been associated with constitutional mutations in one of at least 14 known susceptibility genes. As 25 % of sporadic PCCs harbor somatic neurofibromin 1 gene (NF1) mutations, NF1 has been established as the most recurrently mutated gene in PCCs. To be able to pinpoint NF1-related pheochromocytoma (PCC) disease in clinical practice could facilitate the detection of familial cases, but the large size of the NF1 gene makes standard DNA sequencing methods cumbersome. The aim of this study was to examine whether mutations in the NF1 gene could be predicted by immunohistochemistry as a method to identify cases for further genetic characterization. Sixty-seven PCCs obtained from 67 unselected patients for which the somatic and constitutional mutational status of NF1 was known (49 NF1 wild type, 18 NF1 mutated) were investigated for NF1 protein immunoreactivity, and the results were correlated to clinical and genetic data. NF1 immunoreactivity was absent in the majority of the PCCs (44/67; 66 %), including 13 out of 18 cases (72 %) with a somatic or constitutional NF1 mutation. However, only a minority of the NF1 wild-type PCCs (18/49; 37 %) displayed retained NF1 immunoreactivity, thereby diminishing the specificity of the method. We conclude that NF1 immunohistochemistry alone is not a sufficient method to distinguish between NF1-mutated and non-mutated PCCs. In the clinical context, genetic screening therefore remains the most reliable tool to detect NF1-mutated PCCs.

  8. First report of a de novo germline mutation in the MLH1 gene.

    PubMed

    Stulp, Rein P; Vos, Yvonne J; Mol, Bart; Karrenbeld, Arend; de Raad, Monique; van der Mijle, Huub J C; Sijmons, Rolf H

    2006-02-07

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with colorectal and endometrial cancer and a range of other tumor types. Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes, particularly MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6, underlie this disorder. The vast majority of these HNPCC-associated mutati