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Sample records for gene turtle encodes

  1. Molecular cloning of the cDNA encoding follicle-stimulating hormone beta subunit of the Chinese soft-shell turtle Pelodiscus sinensis, and its gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chien, Jung-Tsun; Shen, San-Tai; Lin, Yao-Sung; Yu, John Yuh-Lin

    2005-04-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is a member of the pituitary glycoprotein hormone family. These hormones are composed of two dissimilar subunits, alpha and beta. Very little information is available regarding the nucleotide and amino acid sequence of FSHbeta in reptilian species. For better understanding of the phylogenetic diversity and evolution of FSH molecule, we have isolated and sequenced the complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the Chinese soft-shell turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis, Family of Trionychidae) FSHbeta precursor molecule by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) methods. The cloned Chinese soft-shell turtle FSHbeta cDNA consists of 602-bp nucleotides, including 34-bp nucleotides of the 5'-untranslated region (UTR), 396-bp of the open reading frame, and 3'-UTR of 206-bp nucleotides. It encodes a 131-amino acid precursor molecule of FSHbeta subunit with a signal peptide of 20 amino acids followed by a mature protein of 111 amino acids. Twelve cysteine residues, forming six disulfide bonds within beta-subunit and two putative asparagine-linked glycosylation sites, are also conserved in the Chinese soft-shell turtle FSHbeta subunit. The deduced amino acid sequence of the Chinese soft-shell turtle FSHbeta shares identities of 97% with Reeves's turtle (Family of Bataguridae), 83-89% with birds, 61-70% with mammals, 63-66% with amphibians and 40-58% with fish. By contrast, when comparing the FSHbeta with the beta-subunits of the Chinese soft-shell turtle luteinizing hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone, the homologies are as low as 38 and 39%, respectively. A phylogenetic tree including reptilian species of FSHbeta subunits, is presented for the first time. Out of various tissues examined, FSHbeta mRNA was only expressed in the pituitary gland and can be up-regulated by gonadotropin-releasing hormone in pituitary tissue culture as estimated by fluorescence real-time PCR analysis.

  2. Immunoglobulin genes of the turtles.

    PubMed

    Magadán-Mompó, Susana; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    The availability of reptile genomes for the use of the scientific community is an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of immunoglobulin genes. The genome of Chrysemys picta bellii and Pelodiscus sinensis is the first one that has been reported for turtles. The scanning for immunoglobulin genes resulted in the presence of a complex locus for the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH). This IGH locus in both turtles contains genes for 13 isotypes in C. picta bellii and 17 in P. sinensis. These correspond with one immunoglobulin M, one immunoglobulin D, several immunoglobulins Y (six in C. picta bellii and eight in P. sinensis), and several immunoglobulins that are similar to immunoglobulin D2 (five in C. picta belli and seven in P. sinensis) that was previously described in Eublepharis macularius. It is worthy to note that IGHD2 are placed in an inverted transcriptional orientation and present sequences for two immunoglobulin domains that are similar to bird IgA domains. Furthermore, its phylogenetic analysis allows us to consider about the presence of IGHA gene in a primitive reptile, so we would be dealing with the memory of the gene that originated from the bird IGHA. In summary, we provide a clear picture of the immunoglobulins present in a turtle, whose analysis supports the idea that turtles emerged from the evolutionary line from the differentiation of birds and the presence of the IGHA gene present in a common ancestor.

  3. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of a cDNA encoding pituitary thyroid stimulating hormone beta-subunit of the Chinese soft-shell turtle Pelodiscus sinensis and regulation of its gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chien, Jung-Tsun; Chowdhury, Indrajit; Lin, Yao-Sung; Liao, Ching-Fong; Shen, San-Tai; Yu, John Yuh-Lin

    2006-04-01

    A cDNA encoding thyroid stimulating hormone beta-subunit (TSHbeta) was cloned from pituitary of the Chinese soft-shell turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis, and its regulation of mRNA expression was investigated for the first time in reptile. The Chinese soft-shell turtle TSHbeta cDNA was cloned from pituitary RNA by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and rapid amplification cDNA end (RACE) methods. The Chinese soft-shell turtle TSHbeta cDNA consists of 580-bp nucleotides, including 67-bp nucleotides of 5'-untranslated region (UTR), 402-bp of the open reading frame, and 97-bp of 3'-UTR followed by a 14 poly (A) trait. It encodes a precursor protein molecule of 133 amino acids with a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acids and a putative mature protein of 114 amino acids. The number and position of 12 cysteine residues, presumably forming six disulfide bonds, one putative asparagine-linked glycosylation site, and six proline residues that are found at positions for changing the backbone direction of the protein have been conserved in the turtle as in other vertebrate groups. The deduced amino acid sequence of the Chinese soft-shell turtle TSHbeta mature protein shares identities of 82-83% with birds, 71-72% with mammals, 49-57% with amphibians, and 44-61% with fish. The Chinese soft-shell turtle pituitaries were incubated in vitro with synthetic TRH (TSH-releasing hormone), thyroxine and triiodothyronine at doses of 10(-10) and 10(-8)M. TRH stimulated, while thyroid hormones suppressed, TSHbeta mRNA levels in dose-related manner. The sequences of cDNA and its deduced peptide of TSHbeta as well as the regulation of its mRNA level were reported for the first time in reptile.

  4. Turtles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.; LaRoe, Edward T.; Farris, Gaye S.; Puckett, Catherine E.; Doran, Peter D.; Mac, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Turtles have existed virtually unchanged for the last 200 million years. Unfortunately, some of the same traits that allowed them to survive the ages often predispose them to endangerment. Delayed maturity and low and variable annual reproductive success make turtles unusually susceptible to increased mortality through exploitation and habitat modifications (Brooks et al. 1991; Congdon et al. 1993). In general, turtles are overlooked by wildlife managers in spite of their ecological significance and importance to humans. Turtles are, however, important as scavengers, herbivores, and carnivores, and often contribute significant biomass to ecosystems. In addition, they are an important link in ecosystems, providing dispersal mechanisms for plants, contributing to environmental diversity, and fostering symbiotic associations with a diverse array of organisms. Adults and eggs of many turtles have been used as a food resource by humans for centuries (Brooks et al. 1988; Lovich 1994). As use pressures and habitat destruction increase, management that considers the life-history traits of turtles will be needed.

  5. Using genes as characters and a parsimony analysis to explore the phylogenetic position of turtles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bin; Yang, Weizhao; Dai, Qiang; Fu, Jinzhong

    2013-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of turtles within the vertebrate tree of life remains controversial. Conflicting conclusions from different studies are likely a consequence of systematic error in the tree construction process, rather than random error from small amounts of data. Using genomic data, we evaluate the phylogenetic position of turtles with both conventional concatenated data analysis and a "genes as characters" approach. Two datasets were constructed, one with seven species (human, opossum, zebra finch, chicken, green anole, Chinese pond turtle, and western clawed frog) and 4584 orthologous genes, and the second with four additional species (soft-shelled turtle, Nile crocodile, royal python, and tuatara) but only 1638 genes. Our concatenated data analysis strongly supported turtle as the sister-group to archosaurs (the archosaur hypothesis), similar to several recent genomic data based studies using similar methods. When using genes as characters and gene trees as character-state trees with equal weighting for each gene, however, our parsimony analysis suggested that turtles are possibly sister-group to diapsids, archosaurs, or lepidosaurs. None of these resolutions were strongly supported by bootstraps. Furthermore, our incongruence analysis clearly demonstrated that there is a large amount of inconsistency among genes and most of the conflict relates to the placement of turtles. We conclude that the uncertain placement of turtles is a reflection of the true state of nature. Concatenated data analysis of large and heterogeneous datasets likely suffers from systematic error and over-estimates of confidence as a consequence of a large number of characters. Using genes as characters offers an alternative for phylogenomic analysis. It has potential to reduce systematic error, such as data heterogeneity and long-branch attraction, and it can also avoid problems associated with computation time and model selection. Finally, treating genes as characters provides a

  6. Using Genes as Characters and a Parsimony Analysis to Explore the Phylogenetic Position of Turtles

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bin; Yang, Weizhao; Dai, Qiang; Fu, Jinzhong

    2013-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of turtles within the vertebrate tree of life remains controversial. Conflicting conclusions from different studies are likely a consequence of systematic error in the tree construction process, rather than random error from small amounts of data. Using genomic data, we evaluate the phylogenetic position of turtles with both conventional concatenated data analysis and a “genes as characters” approach. Two datasets were constructed, one with seven species (human, opossum, zebra finch, chicken, green anole, Chinese pond turtle, and western clawed frog) and 4584 orthologous genes, and the second with four additional species (soft-shelled turtle, Nile crocodile, royal python, and tuatara) but only 1638 genes. Our concatenated data analysis strongly supported turtle as the sister-group to archosaurs (the archosaur hypothesis), similar to several recent genomic data based studies using similar methods. When using genes as characters and gene trees as character-state trees with equal weighting for each gene, however, our parsimony analysis suggested that turtles are possibly sister-group to diapsids, archosaurs, or lepidosaurs. None of these resolutions were strongly supported by bootstraps. Furthermore, our incongruence analysis clearly demonstrated that there is a large amount of inconsistency among genes and most of the conflict relates to the placement of turtles. We conclude that the uncertain placement of turtles is a reflection of the true state of nature. Concatenated data analysis of large and heterogeneous datasets likely suffers from systematic error and over-estimates of confidence as a consequence of a large number of characters. Using genes as characters offers an alternative for phylogenomic analysis. It has potential to reduce systematic error, such as data heterogeneity and long-branch attraction, and it can also avoid problems associated with computation time and model selection. Finally, treating genes as characters

  7. Msx genes are expressed in the carapacial ridge of turtle shell: a study of the European pond turtle, Emys orbicularis.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Christine; Bontoux, Martine; Le Douarin, Nicole M; Pieau, Claude; Monsoro-Burq, Anne-Hélène

    2003-09-01

    The turtle shell forms by extensive ossification of dermis ventrally and dorsally. The carapacial ridge (CR) controls early dorsal shell formation and is thought to play a similar role in shell growth as the apical ectodermal ridge during limb development. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying carapace development are still unknown. Msx genes are involved in the development of limb mesenchyme and of various skeletal structures. In particular, precocious Msx expression is recorded in skeletal precursors that develop close to the ectoderm, such as vertebral spinous processes or skull. Here, we have studied the embryonic expression of Msx genes in the European pond turtle, Emys orbicularis. The overall Msx expression in head, limb, and trunk is similar to what is observed in other vertebrates. We have focused on the CR area and pre-skeletal shell condensations. The CR expresses Msx genes transiently, in a pattern similar to that of fgf10. In the future carapace domain, the dermis located dorsal to the spinal cord expresses Msx genes, as in other vertebrates, but we did not see expansion of this expression in the dermis located more laterally, on top of the dermomyotomes. In the ventral plastron, although the dermal osseous condensations form in the embryonic Msx-positive somatopleura, we did not observe enhanced Msx expression around these elements. These observations may indicate that common mechanisms participate in limb bud and CR early development, but that pre-differentiation steps differ between shell and other skeletal structures and involve other gene activities than that of Msx genes.

  8. Gene encoding plant asparagine synthetase

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Tsai, Fong-Ying

    1993-10-26

    The identification and cloning of the gene(s) for plant asparagine synthetase (AS), an important enzyme involved in the formation of asparagine, a major nitrogen transport compound of higher plants is described. Expression vectors constructed with the AS coding sequence may be utilized to produce plant AS; to engineer herbicide resistant plants, salt/drought tolerant plants or pathogen resistant plants; as a dominant selectable marker; or to select for novel herbicides or compounds useful as agents that synchronize plant cells in culture. The promoter for plant AS, which directs high levels of gene expression and is induced in an organ specific manner and by darkness, is also described. The AS promoter may be used to direct the expression of heterologous coding sequences in appropriate hosts.

  9. RNAi-Mediated Gene Silencing in a Gonad Organ Culture to Study Sex Determination Mechanisms in Sea Turtle

    PubMed Central

    Sifuentes-Romero, Itzel; Merchant-Larios, Horacio; Milton, Sarah L.; Moreno-Mendoza, Norma; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Gasca, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    The autosomal Sry-related gene, Sox9, encodes a transcription factor, which performs an important role in testis differentiation in mammals. In several reptiles, Sox9 is differentially expressed in gonads, showing a significant upregulation during the thermo-sensitive period (TSP) at the male-promoting temperature, consistent with the idea that SOX9 plays a central role in the male pathway. However, in spite of numerous studies, it remains unclear how SOX9 functions during this event. In the present work, we developed an RNAi-based method for silencing Sox9 in an in vitro gonad culture system for the sea turtle, Lepidochelys olivacea. Gonads were dissected as soon as the embryos entered the TSP and were maintained in organ culture. Transfection of siRNA resulted in the decrease of both Sox9 mRNA and protein. Furthermore, we found coordinated expression patterns for Sox9 and the anti-Müllerian hormone gene, Amh, suggesting that SOX9 could directly or indirectly regulate Amh expression, as it occurs in mammals. These results demonstrate an in vitro method to knockdown endogenous genes in gonads from a sea turtle, which represents a novel approach to investigate the roles of important genes involved in sex determination or differentiation pathways in species with temperature-dependent sex determination. PMID:24705165

  10. Molecular decay of enamel matrix protein genes in turtles and other edentulous amniotes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Secondary edentulism (toothlessness) has evolved on multiple occasions in amniotes including several mammalian lineages (pangolins, anteaters, baleen whales), birds, and turtles. All edentulous amniote clades have evolved from ancestors with enamel-capped teeth. Previous studies have documented the molecular decay of tooth-specific genes in edentulous mammals, all of which lost their teeth in the Cenozoic, and birds, which lost their teeth in the Cretaceous. By contrast with mammals and birds, tooth loss in turtles occurred in the Jurassic (201.6-145.5 Ma), providing an extended time window for tooth gene degradation in this clade. The release of the painted turtle and Chinese softshell turtle genomes provides an opportunity to recover the decayed remains of tooth-specific genes in Testudines. Results We queried available genomes of Testudines (Chrysemys picta [painted turtle], Pelodiscus sinensis [Chinese softshell turtle]), Aves (Anas platyrhynchos [duck], Gallus gallus [chicken], Meleagris gallopavo [turkey], Melopsittacus undulatus [budgerigar], Taeniopygia guttata [zebra finch]), and enamelless mammals (Orycteropus afer [aardvark], Choloepus hoffmanni [Hoffmann’s two-toed sloth], Dasypus novemcinctus [nine-banded armadillo]) for remnants of three enamel matrix protein (EMP) genes with putative enamel-specific functions. Remnants of the AMBN and ENAM genes were recovered in Chrysemys and retain their original synteny. Remnants of AMEL were recovered in both testudines, although there are no shared frameshifts. We also show that there are inactivated copies of AMBN, AMEL and ENAM in representatives of divergent avian lineages including Galloanserae, Passeriformes, and Psittaciformes, and that there are shared frameshift mutations in all three genes that predate the basal split in Neognathae. Among enamelless mammals, all three EMP genes exhibit inactivating mutations in Orycteropus and Choloepus. Conclusions Our results highlight the power of

  11. Molecular decay of enamel matrix protein genes in turtles and other edentulous amniotes.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Robert W; Gatesy, John; Springer, Mark S

    2013-01-23

    Secondary edentulism (toothlessness) has evolved on multiple occasions in amniotes including several mammalian lineages (pangolins, anteaters, baleen whales), birds, and turtles. All edentulous amniote clades have evolved from ancestors with enamel-capped teeth. Previous studies have documented the molecular decay of tooth-specific genes in edentulous mammals, all of which lost their teeth in the Cenozoic, and birds, which lost their teeth in the Cretaceous. By contrast with mammals and birds, tooth loss in turtles occurred in the Jurassic (201.6-145.5 Ma), providing an extended time window for tooth gene degradation in this clade. The release of the painted turtle and Chinese softshell turtle genomes provides an opportunity to recover the decayed remains of tooth-specific genes in Testudines. We queried available genomes of Testudines (Chrysemys picta [painted turtle], Pelodiscus sinensis [Chinese softshell turtle]), Aves (Anas platyrhynchos [duck], Gallus gallus [chicken], Meleagris gallopavo [turkey], Melopsittacus undulatus [budgerigar], Taeniopygia guttata [zebra finch]), and enamelless mammals (Orycteropus afer [aardvark], Choloepus hoffmanni [Hoffmann's two-toed sloth], Dasypus novemcinctus [nine-banded armadillo]) for remnants of three enamel matrix protein (EMP) genes with putative enamel-specific functions. Remnants of the AMBN and ENAM genes were recovered in Chrysemys and retain their original synteny. Remnants of AMEL were recovered in both testudines, although there are no shared frameshifts. We also show that there are inactivated copies of AMBN, AMEL and ENAM in representatives of divergent avian lineages including Galloanserae, Passeriformes, and Psittaciformes, and that there are shared frameshift mutations in all three genes that predate the basal split in Neognathae. Among enamelless mammals, all three EMP genes exhibit inactivating mutations in Orycteropus and Choloepus. Our results highlight the power of combining fossil and genomic evidence

  12. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  13. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  14. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  15. Three closely related herpesviruses are associated with fibropapillomatosis in marine turtles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quackenbush, S.L.; Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Casey, R.N.; Rovnak, J.; Chaves, A.; duToit, L.; Baines, J.D.; Parrish, C.R.; Bowser, P.R.; Casey, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Green turtle fibropapillomatosis is a neoplastic disease of increasingly significant threat to the survivability of this species. Degenerate PCR primers that target highly conserved regions of genes encoding herpesvirus DNA polymerases were used to amplify a DNA sequence from fibropapillomas and fibromas from Hawaiian and Florida green turtles. All of the tumors tested (n= 23) were found to harbor viral DNA, whereas no viral DNA was detected in skin biopsies from tumor-negative turtles. The tissue distribution of the green turtle herpesvirus appears to be generally limited to tumors where viral DNA was found to accumulate at approximately two to five copies per cell and is occasionally detected, only by PCR, in some tissues normally associated with tumor development. In addition, herpesviral DNA was detected in fibropapillomas from two loggerhead and four olive ridley turtles. Nucleotide sequencing of a 483-bp fragment of the turtle herpesvirus DNA polymerase gene determined that the Florida green turtle and loggerhead turtle sequences are identical and differ from the Hawaiian green turtle sequence by five nucleotide changes, which results in two amino acid substitutions. The olive ridley sequence differs from the Florida and Hawaiian green turtle sequences by 15 and 16 nucleotide changes, respectively, resulting in four amino acid substitutions, three of which are unique to the olive ridley sequence. Our data suggest that these closely related turtle herpesviruses are intimately involved in the genesis of fibropapillomatosis.

  16. Three closely related herpesviruses are associated with fibropapillomatosis in marine turtles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quackenbush, S.L.; Work, Thierry M.; Balazs, George H.; Casey, Rufina N.; Rovnak, J.; Chaves, A.; duToit, L.; Baines, J.D.; Parrish, C.R.; Bowser, Paul R.; Casey, James W.

    1998-01-01

    Green turtle fibropapillomatosis is a neoplastic disease of increasingly significant threat to the survivability of this species. Degenerate PCR primers that target highly conserved regions of genes encoding herpesvirus DNA polymerases were used to amplify a DNA sequence from fibropapillomas and fibromas from Hawaiian and Florida green turtles. All of the tumors tested (n= 23) were found to harbor viral DNA, whereas no viral DNA was detected in skin biopsies from tumor-negative turtles. The tissue distribution of the green turtle herpesvirus appears to be generally limited to tumors where viral DNA was found to accumulate at approximately two to five copies per cell and is occasionally detected, only by PCR, in some tissues normally associated with tumor development. In addition, herpesviral DNA was detected in fibropapillomas from two loggerhead and four olive ridley turtles. Nucleotide sequencing of a 483-bp fragment of the turtle herpesvirus DNA polymerase gene determined that the Florida green turtle and loggerhead turtle sequences are identical and differ from the Hawaiian green turtle sequence by five nucleotide changes, which results in two amino acid substitutions. The olive ridley sequence differs from the Florida and Hawaiian green turtle sequences by 15 and 16 nucleotide changes, respectively, resulting in four amino acid substitutions, three of which are unique to the olive ridley sequence. Our data suggest that these closely related turtle herpesviruses are intimately involved in the genesis of fibropapillomatosis.

  17. The First Gene-encoded Amphibian Neurotoxin*

    PubMed Central

    You, Dewen; Hong, Jing; Rong, Mingqiang; Yu, Haining; Liang, Songping; Ma, Yufang; Yang, Hailong; Wu, Jing; Lin, Donghai; Lai, Ren

    2009-01-01

    Many gene-encoded neurotoxins with various functions have been discovered in fish, reptiles, and mammals. A novel 60-residue neurotoxin peptide (anntoxin) that inhibited tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) was purified and characterized from the skin secretions of the tree frog Hyla annectans (Jerdon). This is the first gene-encoded neurotoxin found in amphibians. The IC50 of anntoxin for the TTX-S channel was about 3.4 μm. Anntoxin shares sequence homology with Kunitz-type toxins but contains only two of three highly conserved cysteine bridges, which are typically found in these small, basic neurotoxin modules, i.e. snake dendrotoxins. Anntoxin showed an inhibitory ability against trypsin with an inhibitory constant (Ki) of 0.025 μm. Anntoxin was distributed in skin, brain, stomach, and liver with a concentration of 25, 7, 3, and 2 μg/g wet tissue, respectively. H. annectans lives on trees or other plants for its entire life cycle, and its skin contains the largest amount of anntoxin, which possibly helps defend against various aggressors or predators. A low dose of anntoxin was found to induce lethal toxicity for several potential predators, including the insect, snake, bird, and mouse. The tissue distribution and functional properties of the current toxin may provide insights into the ecological adaptation of tree-living amphibians. PMID:19535333

  18. Rapid Evolution of Beta-Keratin Genes Contribute to Phenotypic Differences That Distinguish Turtles and Birds from Other Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang I.; Kong, Lesheng; Ponting, Chris P.; Haerty, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Sequencing of vertebrate genomes permits changes in distinct protein families, including gene gains and losses, to be ascribed to lineage-specific phenotypes. A prominent example of this is the large-scale duplication of beta-keratin genes in the ancestors of birds, which was crucial to the subsequent evolution of their beaks, claws, and feathers. Evidence suggests that the shell of Pseudomys nelsoni contains at least 16 beta-keratins proteins, but it is unknown whether this is a complete set and whether their corresponding genes are orthologous to avian beak, claw, or feather beta-keratin genes. To address these issues and to better understand the evolution of the turtle shell at a molecular level, we surveyed the diversity of beta-keratin genes from the genome assemblies of three turtles, Chrysemys picta, Pelodiscus sinensis, and Chelonia mydas, which together represent over 160 Myr of chelonian evolution. For these three turtles, we found 200 beta-keratins, which indicate that, as for birds, a large expansion of beta-keratin genes in turtles occurred concomitantly with the evolution of a unique phenotype, namely, their plastron and carapace. Phylogenetic reconstruction of beta-keratin gene evolution suggests that separate waves of gene duplication within a single genomic location gave rise to scales, claws, and feathers in birds, and independently the scutes of the shell in turtles. PMID:23576313

  19. Rapid evolution of Beta-keratin genes contribute to phenotypic differences that distinguish turtles and birds from other reptiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang I; Kong, Lesheng; Ponting, Chris P; Haerty, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Sequencing of vertebrate genomes permits changes in distinct protein families, including gene gains and losses, to be ascribed to lineage-specific phenotypes. A prominent example of this is the large-scale duplication of beta-keratin genes in the ancestors of birds, which was crucial to the subsequent evolution of their beaks, claws, and feathers. Evidence suggests that the shell of Pseudomys nelsoni contains at least 16 beta-keratins proteins, but it is unknown whether this is a complete set and whether their corresponding genes are orthologous to avian beak, claw, or feather beta-keratin genes. To address these issues and to better understand the evolution of the turtle shell at a molecular level, we surveyed the diversity of beta-keratin genes from the genome assemblies of three turtles, Chrysemys picta, Pelodiscus sinensis, and Chelonia mydas, which together represent over 160 Myr of chelonian evolution. For these three turtles, we found 200 beta-keratins, which indicate that, as for birds, a large expansion of beta-keratin genes in turtles occurred concomitantly with the evolution of a unique phenotype, namely, their plastron and carapace. Phylogenetic reconstruction of beta-keratin gene evolution suggests that separate waves of gene duplication within a single genomic location gave rise to scales, claws, and feathers in birds, and independently the scutes of the shell in turtles.

  20. Tau-crystallin/alpha-enolase: one gene encodes both an enzyme and a lens structural protein

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    tau-Crystallin has been a major component of the cellular lenses of species throughout vertebrate evolution, from lamprey to birds. Immunofluorescence analysis of the embryonic turtle lens, using antiserum to lamprey tau-crystallin showed that the protein is expressed throughout embryogenesis and is present at high concentrations in all parts of the lens. Partial peptide sequence for the isolated turtle protein and deduced sequences for several lamprey peptides all revealed a close similarity to the glycolytic enzyme enolase (E.C. 4.2.1.11). A full-sized cDNA for putative duck tau- crystallin was obtained and sequenced, confirming the close relationship with alpha-enolase. Southern blot analysis showed that the duck genome contains a single alpha-enolase gene, while Northern blot analysis showed that the message for tau-crystallin/alpha-enolase is present in embryonic duck lens at 25 times the abundance found in liver. tau-Crystallin possesses enolase activity, but the activity is greatly reduced, probably because of age-related posttranslational modification. It thus appears that a highly conserved, important glycolytic enzyme has been used as a structural component of lens since the start of vertebrate evolution. Apparently the enzyme has not been recruited for its catalytic activity but for some distinct structural property. tau-Crystallin/alpha-enolase is an example of a multifunctional protein playing two very different roles in evolution but encoded by a single gene. PMID:2462567

  1. The gene encoding proopiomelanocortin in the dog.

    PubMed

    Mol, J A; van Mansfeld, A D; Kwant, M M; van Wolferen, M; Rothuizen, J

    1991-01-01

    The regulation of the synthesis of ACTH in the dog is of interest for studies of the physiology of the pituitary-adrenocortical axis as well as for studies of the pathogenesis of pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism. Despite this broad interest the nucleotide sequence encoding ACTH and its precursor proopiomelanocortin (POMC) is not known, nor is it clear whether there are differences in POMC mRNA from the anterior lobe or the intermediate lobe of the normal pituitary or from pituitary tumours causing ACTH excess. Following the preparation of a cDNA library from the canine intermediate lobe of the pituitary gland, the part of the mRNA that is translated into the proopiomelanocortin prohormone was amplified using a polymerase chain reaction. Sequence analysis revealed the highest homology with the porcine mRNA sequence. Translation in a single reading frame revealed highly homologous areas in the amino-terminal, carboxy-terminal, and ACTH part of the prohormone, whereas a high diversity was noticed at the sequence preceding ACTH and the beginning of beta-lipotropin. Northern blot analysis disclosed the presence of a POMC mRNA of approximately 1300 nucleotides. There were no size differences between the anterior lobe, intermediate lobe, and pituitary tumour derived POMC mRNA. The highest expression levels of POMC mRNA as related to the expression of the gene encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were found in the intermediate lobe of the canine pituitary gland. It is concluded that excessive production of ACTH by pituitary tumours is not caused by relatively high expression levels or alterations in the size of mRNA.

  2. Characterization of the gene encoding mouse serum amyloid P component. Comparison with genes encoding other pentraxins.

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, A S; Rits, M

    1989-01-01

    A CBA/J-strain mouse serum amyloid P component (SAP) genomic clone was isolated and analysed. The clone contains the entire SAP gene and specifies a primary transcript of 1065 nucleotide residues. This comprises a first exon of 206 nucleotide residues containing the mRNA 5'-untranslated region and sequence encoding the pre-SAP leader peptide and the first two amino acid residues of mature SAP separated by a single 110-base intron from a 749-nucleotide-residue second exon containing sequence encoding the bulk of the mature SAP and specifying the mRNA 3'-untranslated region. The overall organization is similar to that of the human SAP gene, and the coding region and intron sequences are highly conserved. The SAP RNA cap site was defined by primer extension analysis of polyadenylated acute-phase liver RNA. The 5'-region of the mouse SAP gene contains modified CAAT and TATA promoter elements preceded by a putative hepatocyte-nuclear-factor-1-recognition site; these structures are in a region that is highly homologous to the corresponding region of the human SAP gene. Comparisons of the mouse SAP gene structure and derived amino acid sequence with those of other mammalian pentraxins were made. Images Fig. 3. PMID:2481440

  3. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Thomas D.; Edenberg, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of beverage alcohol (ethanol) on the body are determined largely by the rate at which it and its main breakdown product, acetaldehyde, are metabolized after consumption. The main metabolic pathway for ethanol involves the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Seven different ADHs and three different ALDHs that metabolize ethanol have been identified. The genes encoding these enzymes exist in different variants (i.e., alleles), many of which differ by a single DNA building block (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]). Some of these SNPs result in enzymes with altered kinetic properties. For example, certain ADH1B and ADH1C variants that are commonly found in East Asian populations lead to more rapid ethanol breakdown and acetaldehyde accumulation in the body. Because acetaldehyde has harmful effects on the body, people carrying these alleles are less likely to drink and have a lower risk of alcohol dependence. Likewise, an ALDH2 variant with reduced activity results in acetaldehyde buildup and also has a protective effect against alcoholism. In addition to affecting drinking behaviors and risk for alcoholism, ADH and ALDH alleles impact the risk for esophageal cancer. PMID:23134050

  4. Mollusk genes encoding lysine tRNA (UUU) contain introns.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, M; Abe, Y; Saruta, Y; Okada, N

    1995-11-20

    New intron-containing genes encoding tRNAs were discovered when genomic DNA isolated from various animal species was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers based on sequences of rabbit tRNA(Lys). From sequencing analysis of the products of PCR, we found that introns are present in several genes encoding tRNA(Lys) in mollusks, such as Loligo bleekeri (squid) and Octopus vulgaris (octopus). These introns were specific to genes encoding tRNA(Lys)(CUU) and were not present in genes encoding tRNA(Lys)(CUU). In addition, the sequences of the introns were different from one another. To confirm the results of our initial experiments, we isolated and sequenced genes encoding tRNA(Lys)(CUU) and tRNA(Lys)(UUU). The gene for tRNA(Lys)(UUU) from squid contained an intron, whose sequence was the same as that identified by PCR, and the gene formed a cluster with a corresponding pseudogene. Several DNA regions of 2.1 kb containing this cluster appeared to be tandemly arrayed in the squid genome. By contrast, the gene encoding tRNA(Lys)(CUU) did not contain an intron, as shown also by PCR. The tRNA(Lys)(UUU) that corresponded to the analyzed gene was isolated and characterized. The present study provides the first example of an intron-containing gene encoding a tRNA in mollusks and suggests the universality of introns in such genes in higher eukaryotes.

  5. Mosaic tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Philip J.; Amodeo, Nina; Roberts, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    First reported in 2003, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes are a subgroup of the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs). They are formed when two or more RPP-encoding genes recombine resulting in a functional chimera. To date, the majority of mosaic genes are derived from sections of three RPP genes, tet(O), tet(W) and tet(32), with others comprising tet(M) and tet(S). In this first review of mosaic genes, we report on their structure, diversity and prevalence, and suggest that these genes may be responsible for an under-reported contribution to tetracycline resistance in bacteria. PMID:27494928

  6. Mosaic tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Philip J; Amodeo, Nina; Roberts, Adam P

    2016-12-01

    First reported in 2003, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes are a subgroup of the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs). They are formed when two or more RPP-encoding genes recombine resulting in a functional chimera. To date, the majority of mosaic genes are derived from sections of three RPP genes, tet(O), tet(W) and tet(32), with others comprising tet(M) and tet(S). In this first review of mosaic genes, we report on their structure, diversity and prevalence, and suggest that these genes may be responsible for an under-reported contribution to tetracycline resistance in bacteria.

  7. Heritable variation in heat shock gene expression: a potential mechanism for adaptation to thermal stress in embryos of sea turtles

    PubMed Central

    Kennington, W. J.; Tomkins, J. L.; Berry, O.; Whiting, S.; Meekan, M. G.; Mitchell, N. J.

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of species to respond adaptively to warming temperatures will be key to their survival in the Anthropocene. The embryos of egg-laying species such as sea turtles have limited behavioural means for avoiding high nest temperatures, and responses at the physiological level may be critical to coping with predicted global temperature increases. Using the loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) as a model, we used quantitative PCR to characterise variation in the expression response of heat-shock genes (hsp60, hsp70 and hsp90; molecular chaperones involved in cellular stress response) to an acute non-lethal heat shock. We show significant variation in gene expression at the clutch and population levels for some, but not all hsp genes. Using pedigree information, we estimated heritabilities of the expression response of hsp genes to heat shock and demonstrated both maternal and additive genetic effects. This is the first evidence that the heat-shock response is heritable in sea turtles and operates at the embryonic stage in any reptile. The presence of heritable variation in the expression of key thermotolerance genes is necessary for sea turtles to adapt at a molecular level to warming incubation environments. PMID:26763709

  8. Heritable variation in heat shock gene expression: a potential mechanism for adaptation to thermal stress in embryos of sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, J N; Kennington, W J; Tomkins, J L; Berry, O; Whiting, S; Meekan, M G; Mitchell, N J

    2016-01-13

    The capacity of species to respond adaptively to warming temperatures will be key to their survival in the Anthropocene. The embryos of egg-laying species such as sea turtles have limited behavioural means for avoiding high nest temperatures, and responses at the physiological level may be critical to coping with predicted global temperature increases. Using the loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) as a model, we used quantitative PCR to characterise variation in the expression response of heat-shock genes (hsp60, hsp70 and hsp90; molecular chaperones involved in cellular stress response) to an acute non-lethal heat shock. We show significant variation in gene expression at the clutch and population levels for some, but not all hsp genes. Using pedigree information, we estimated heritabilities of the expression response of hsp genes to heat shock and demonstrated both maternal and additive genetic effects. This is the first evidence that the heat-shock response is heritable in sea turtles and operates at the embryonic stage in any reptile. The presence of heritable variation in the expression of key thermotolerance genes is necessary for sea turtles to adapt at a molecular level to warming incubation environments.

  9. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.D.; Scott-Craig, J.S.

    1999-10-26

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is presented. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with vectors and seeds from the plants.

  10. An unbiased approach to identify genes involved in development in a turtle with temperature-dependent sex determination.

    PubMed

    Chojnowski, Jena L; Braun, Edward L

    2012-07-15

    Many reptiles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). The initial cue in TSD is incubation temperature, unlike genotypic sex determination (GSD) where it is determined by the presence of specific alleles (or genetic loci). We used patterns of gene expression to identify candidates for genes with a role in TSD and other developmental processes without making a priori assumptions about the identity of these genes (ortholog-based approach). We identified genes with sexually dimorphic mRNA accumulation during the temperature sensitive period of development in the Red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta), a turtle with TSD. Genes with differential mRNA accumulation in response to estrogen (estradiol-17β; E(2)) exposure and developmental stages were also identified. Sequencing 767 clones from three suppression-subtractive hybridization libraries yielded a total of 581 unique sequences. Screening a macroarray with a subset of those sequences revealed a total of 26 genes that exhibited differential mRNA accumulation: 16 female biased and 10 male biased. Additional analyses revealed that C16ORF62 (an unknown gene) and MALAT1 (a long noncoding RNA) exhibited increased mRNA accumulation at the male producing temperature relative to the female producing temperature during embryonic sexual development. Finally, we identified four genes (C16ORF62, CCT3, MMP2, and NFIB) that exhibited a stage effect and five genes (C16ORF62, CCT3, MMP2, NFIB and NOTCH2) showed a response to E(2) exposure. Here we report a survey of genes identified using patterns of mRNA accumulation during embryonic development in a turtle with TSD. Many previous studies have focused on examining the turtle orthologs of genes involved in mammalian development. Although valuable, the limitations of this approach are exemplified by our identification of two genes (MALAT1 and C16ORF62) that are sexually dimorphic during embryonic development. MALAT1 is a noncoding RNA that has not been implicated

  11. Novel cDNA sequences of aryl hydrocarbon receptors and gene expression in turtles (Chrysemys picta and Pseudemys scripta) exposed to different environments

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Emily C.; Traylor-Knowles, Nikki; Novillo-Villajos, Apolonia; Callard, Ian P.

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive changes have been observed in painted turtles from a site with known contamination located on Cape Cod, MA, USA. We hypothesize that these changes are caused by exposure to endocrine-disrupting compounds and that genes involved in reproduction are affected. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is an orphan receptor that is activated by environmental contaminants. AHR mRNA was measured in turtles exposed to soil collected from a contaminated site. Adult turtles were trapped from the study site (Moody Pond, MP) or a reference site and exposed to laboratory environments containing soil from either site. The red-eared slider was used to assess neonatal exposure to soil and water from the sites. The environmental exposures occurred over a 13-month period. Juveniles showed an age-dependent increase in brain AHR1. Juvenile turtles exposed to the MP environment had elevated gonadal AHR1. Adult turtles exposed to the MP environment showed significantly decreased brain AHR2. The painted turtle AHR is the first complete reptile AHR cDNA sequence. Phylogenetic analysis of the painted turtle AHR showed that it clusters with other AHR2s. Partial AHR1 and partial AHR2 cDNA sequences were cloned from the red-eared slider. MEME analysis identified 18 motifs in the turtle AHRs, showing high conservation between motifs that overlapped functional regions in both AHR isoforms. PMID:21763458

  12. Gene encoding herbicide safener binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Walton, Jonathan D.; Scott-Craig, John S.

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA encoding safener binding protein (SafBP), also referred to as SBP1, is set forth in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 1. The deduced amino acid sequence is provided in FIG. 5 and SEQ ID No. 2. Methods of making and using SBP1 and SafBP to alter a plant's sensitivity to certain herbicides or a plant's responsiveness to certain safeners are also provided, as well as expression vectors, transgenic plants or other organisms transfected with said vectors and seeds from said plants.

  13. A Novel Candidate Gene for Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination in the Common Snapping Turtle.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Anthony L; Metzger, Kelsey J; Miller, Alexandra; Rhen, Turk

    2016-05-01

    Temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) was described nearly 50 years ago. Researchers have since identified many genes that display differential expression at male- vs. female-producing temperatures. Yet, it is unclear whether these genes (1) are involved in sex determination per se, (2) are downstream effectors involved in differentiation of ovaries and testes, or (3) are thermo-sensitive but unrelated to gonad development. Here we present multiple lines of evidence linking CIRBP to sex determination in the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina We demonstrate significant associations between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (c63A > C) in CIRBP, transcript levels in embryonic gonads during specification of gonad fate, and sex in hatchlings from a thermal regime that produces mixed sex ratios. The A allele was induced in embryos exposed to a female-producing temperature, while expression of the C allele did not differ between female- and male-producing temperatures. In accord with this pattern of temperature-dependent, allele-specific expression, AA homozygotes were more likely to develop ovaries than AC heterozygotes, which, in turn, were more likely to develop ovaries than CC homozygotes. Multiple regression using SNPs in CIRBP and adjacent loci suggests that c63A > C may be the causal variant or closely linked to it. Differences in CIRBP allele frequencies among turtles from northern Minnesota, southern Minnesota, and Texas reflect small and large-scale latitudinal differences in TSD pattern. Finally, analysis of CIRBP protein localization reveals that CIRBP is in a position to mediate temperature effects on the developing gonads. Together, these studies strongly suggest that CIRBP is involved in determining the fate of the bipotential gonad.

  14. A Novel Candidate Gene for Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination in the Common Snapping Turtle

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Anthony L.; Metzger, Kelsey J.; Miller, Alexandra; Rhen, Turk

    2016-01-01

    Temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) was described nearly 50 years ago. Researchers have since identified many genes that display differential expression at male- vs. female-producing temperatures. Yet, it is unclear whether these genes (1) are involved in sex determination per se, (2) are downstream effectors involved in differentiation of ovaries and testes, or (3) are thermo-sensitive but unrelated to gonad development. Here we present multiple lines of evidence linking CIRBP to sex determination in the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina. We demonstrate significant associations between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (c63A > C) in CIRBP, transcript levels in embryonic gonads during specification of gonad fate, and sex in hatchlings from a thermal regime that produces mixed sex ratios. The A allele was induced in embryos exposed to a female-producing temperature, while expression of the C allele did not differ between female- and male-producing temperatures. In accord with this pattern of temperature-dependent, allele-specific expression, AA homozygotes were more likely to develop ovaries than AC heterozygotes, which, in turn, were more likely to develop ovaries than CC homozygotes. Multiple regression using SNPs in CIRBP and adjacent loci suggests that c63A > C may be the causal variant or closely linked to it. Differences in CIRBP allele frequencies among turtles from northern Minnesota, southern Minnesota, and Texas reflect small and large-scale latitudinal differences in TSD pattern. Finally, analysis of CIRBP protein localization reveals that CIRBP is in a position to mediate temperature effects on the developing gonads. Together, these studies strongly suggest that CIRBP is involved in determining the fate of the bipotential gonad. PMID:26936926

  15. Hepatocyte growth factor is crucial for development of the carapace in turtles

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima-Ohya, Yoshie; Narita, Yuichi; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Usuda, Ryo; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    Turtles are characterized by their shell, composed of a dorsal carapace and a ventral plastron. The carapace first appears as the turtle-specific carapacial ridge (CR) on the lateral aspect of the embryonic flank. Accompanying the acquisition of the shell, unlike in other amniotes, hypaxial muscles in turtle embryos appear as thin threads of fibrous tissue. To understand carapacial evolution from the perspective of muscle development, we compared the development of the muscle plate, the anlage of hypaxial muscles, between the Chinese soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis, and chicken embryos. We found that the ventrolateral lip (VLL) of the thoracic dermomyotome of P. sinensis delaminates early and produces sparse muscle plate in the lateral body wall. Expression patterns of the regulatory genes for myotome differentiation, such as Myf5, myogenin, Pax3, and Pax7 have been conserved among amniotes, including turtles. However, in P. sinensis embryos, the gene hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), encoding a regulatory factor for delamination of the dermomyotomal VLL, was uniquely expressed in sclerotome and the lateral body wall at the interlimb level. Implantation of COS-7 cells expressing a HGF antagonist into the turtle embryo inhibited CR formation. We conclude that the de novo expression of HGF in the turtle mesoderm would have played an innovative role resulting in the acquisition of the turtle-specific body plan. PMID:21535464

  16. Hepatocyte growth factor is crucial for development of the carapace in turtles.

    PubMed

    Kawashima-Ohya, Yoshie; Narita, Yuichi; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Usuda, Ryo; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    Turtles are characterized by their shell, composed of a dorsal carapace and a ventral plastron. The carapace first appears as the turtle-specific carapacial ridge (CR) on the lateral aspect of the embryonic flank. Accompanying the acquisition of the shell, unlike in other amniotes, hypaxial muscles in turtle embryos appear as thin threads of fibrous tissue. To understand carapacial evolution from the perspective of muscle development, we compared the development of the muscle plate, the anlage of hypaxial muscles, between the Chinese soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis, and chicken embryos. We found that the ventrolateral lip (VLL) of the thoracic dermomyotome of P. sinensis delaminates early and produces sparse muscle plate in the lateral body wall. Expression patterns of the regulatory genes for myotome differentiation, such as Myf5, myogenin, Pax3, and Pax7 have been conserved among amniotes, including turtles. However, in P. sinensis embryos, the gene hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), encoding a regulatory factor for delamination of the dermomyotomal VLL, was uniquely expressed in sclerotome and the lateral body wall at the interlimb level. Implantation of COS-7 cells expressing a HGF antagonist into the turtle embryo inhibited CR formation. We conclude that the de novo expression of HGF in the turtle mesoderm would have played an innovative role resulting in the acquisition of the turtle-specific body plan.

  17. Characterization of a ribonuclease gene and encoded protein from the reptile, Iguana iguana.

    PubMed

    Nitto, Takeaki; Lin, Cynthia; Dyer, Kimberly D; Wagner, Robert A; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2005-06-06

    In this work we identify an intronless open reading frame encoding an RNase A ribonuclease from genomic DNA from the Iguana iguana IgH2 cell line. The iguana RNase is expressed primarily in pancreas, and represents the majority of the specific enzymatic activity in this tissue. The encoded sequence shares many features with its better-known mammalian counterparts including the crucial His12, Lys40 and His114 catalytic residues and efficient hydrolytic activity against yeast tRNA substrate (k(cat)/K(m)=6 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)), albeit at a reduced pH optimum (pH 6.0). Although the catalytic activity of the iguana RNase is not diminished by human placental RI, iguana RNase is not bactericidal nor is it cytotoxic even at micromolar concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis indicates moderate (46%) amino acid sequence similarity to a pancreatic RNase isolated from Chelydra serpentina (snapping turtle) although no specific relationship could be determined between these RNases and the pancreatic ribonucleases characterized among mammalian species. Further analysis of ribonucleases from non-mammalian vertebrate species is needed in order to define relationships and lineages within the larger RNase A gene superfamily.

  18. De novo assembly and characterization of the Chinese three-keeled pond turtle (Mauremys reevesii) transcriptome: presence of longevity-related genes

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Huazong; Zhao, Feifei; Zhou, Huaxing; Li, Haifeng; Dong, Xianmei; Zhang, Huanhuan; Wang, Yuqin; Shi, Qiong; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Mauremys reevesii (Geoemydidae) is one of the most common and widespread semi-aquatic turtles in East Asia. The unusually long lifespan of some individuals makes this turtle species a potentially useful model organism for studying the molecular basis of longevity. In this study, pooled total RNA extracted from liver, spleen and skeletal-muscle of three adult individuals were sequenced using Illumina Hiseq 2500 platform. A set of telomere-related genes were found in the transcriptome, including tert, tep1, and six shelterin complex proteins coding genes (trf1, trf2, tpp1, pot1, tin2 and rap1). These genes products protect chromosome ends from deterioration and therefore significantly contribute to turtle longevity. The transcriptome data generated in this study provides a comprehensive reference for future molecular studies in the turtle. PMID:27257545

  19. Trichoderma asperellum Chi42 Genes Encode Chitinase

    PubMed Central

    Quang, Hoang Tan; Hung, Nguyen Bao; Huy, Nguyen Duc; Phuong, Truong Thi Bich; Ha, Tran Thi Thu

    2011-01-01

    Four Trichoderma strains (CH2, SH16, PQ34, and TN42) were isolated from soil samples collected from Quang Tri and Thua Thien Hue provinces in Vietnam. The strains exhibited high chitinolytic secretion. Strain PQ34 formed the largest zone of chitinase-mediated clearance (> 4 cm in diameter) in agar containing 1% (w/v) colloidal chitin. Analysis of the internal transcribed spacer regions of these strains indicated that they were Trichoderma asperellum. The molecular weights of the chitinases were approximately 42 kDa. Chitinase genes (chi42) of T. asperellum strains TN42, CH2, SH16, and PQ34 were 98~99% homologous to the ech42 gene of T. harzianum CB-Pin-01 (accession No. DQ166036). The deduced amino acid sequences of both T. asperellum strains SH16 and TN42 shared 100% similarity. PMID:22783101

  20. Bioinformatics analysis and detection of gelatinase encoded gene in Lysinibacillussphaericus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repin, Rul Aisyah Mat; Mutalib, Sahilah Abdul; Shahimi, Safiyyah; Khalid, Rozida Mohd.; Ayob, Mohd. Khan; Bakar, Mohd. Faizal Abu; Isa, Mohd Noor Mat

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we performed bioinformatics analysis toward genome sequence of Lysinibacillussphaericus (L. sphaericus) to determine gene encoded for gelatinase. L. sphaericus was isolated from soil and gelatinase species-specific bacterium to porcine and bovine gelatin. This bacterium offers the possibility of enzymes production which is specific to both species of meat, respectively. The main focus of this research is to identify the gelatinase encoded gene within the bacteria of L. Sphaericus using bioinformatics analysis of partially sequence genome. From the research study, three candidate gene were identified which was, gelatinase candidate gene 1 (P1), NODE_71_length_93919_cov_158.931839_21 which containing 1563 base pair (bp) in size with 520 amino acids sequence; Secondly, gelatinase candidate gene 2 (P2), NODE_23_length_52851_cov_190.061386_17 which containing 1776 bp in size with 591 amino acids sequence; and Thirdly, gelatinase candidate gene 3 (P3), NODE_106_length_32943_cov_169.147919_8 containing 1701 bp in size with 566 amino acids sequence. Three pairs of oligonucleotide primers were designed and namely as, F1, R1, F2, R2, F3 and R3 were targeted short sequences of cDNA by PCR. The amplicons were reliably results in 1563 bp in size for candidate gene P1 and 1701 bp in size for candidate gene P3. Therefore, the results of bioinformatics analysis of L. Sphaericus resulting in gene encoded gelatinase were identified.

  1. Identification of a heat shock cognate protein 70 gene in Chinese soft-shell turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) and its expression profiles under thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-liang; Kang, Yue; Zhang, Xiao-yan; Zhu, Bing-lin; Fang, Wei-huan

    2012-06-01

    The heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70) is a member of a 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) family that functions as molecular chaperones. In this study, a novel Hsc70 gene from Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) (tHsc70) was identified. The tHsc70 full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) is 2272 bp long with a 1941-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding 646 amino acids. Three characteristic signature regions of the HSP70 family, two major domains of an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)/guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding domain (ABD), and a substrate-binding domain (SBD) were present in the predicted tHsc70 amino acid sequence. The tHsc70 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and the expression product reacted with the anti-Hsc70 mouse monoclonal antibody by Western blotting. Homology analysis revealed that tHsc70 shared identity from 53.9% to 87.7% at the nucleotide level, and 49.1% to 99.5% at the amino acid level with the known Hsc70s. Phylogenetic analysis showed that tHsc70 was clustered together with the Hsc70 gene of another reptile species (Alligator mississippiensis). The tHsc70 was expressed in the liver, lung, heart, and skeletal muscle. The expression patterns of tHsc70 messenger RNA (mRNA) differed among different tissues under different durations of heat stress at 40 °C. Adaptation at 25 °C for 1 h after heat stress was also different among tissues and length of heat stress. Irrespective of different profiles of expression under heat stress, tHsc70 may play roles in protecting turtles from thermal stress.

  2. Identification of a heat shock cognate protein 70 gene in Chinese soft-shell turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) and its expression profiles under thermal stress*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-liang; Kang, Yue; Zhang, Xiao-yan; Zhu, Bing-lin; Fang, Wei-huan

    2012-01-01

    The heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70) is a member of a 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) family that functions as molecular chaperones. In this study, a novel Hsc70 gene from Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) (tHsc70) was identified. The tHsc70 full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) is 2 272 bp long with a 1 941-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding 646 amino acids. Three characteristic signature regions of the HSP70 family, two major domains of an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)/guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding domain (ABD), and a substrate-binding domain (SBD) were present in the predicted tHsc70 amino acid sequence. The tHsc70 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and the expression product reacted with the anti-Hsc70 mouse monoclonal antibody by Western blotting. Homology analysis revealed that tHsc70 shared identity from 53.9% to 87.7% at the nucleotide level, and 49.1% to 99.5% at the amino acid level with the known Hsc70s. Phylogenetic analysis showed that tHsc70 was clustered together with the Hsc70 gene of another reptile species (Alligator mississippiensis). The tHsc70 was expressed in the liver, lung, heart, and skeletal muscle. The expression patterns of tHsc70 messenger RNA (mRNA) differed among different tissues under different durations of heat stress at 40 °C. Adaptation at 25 °C for 1 h after heat stress was also different among tissues and length of heat stress. Irrespective of different profiles of expression under heat stress, tHsc70 may play roles in protecting turtles from thermal stress. PMID:22661209

  3. Evolution of MHC class I genes in the endangered loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) revealed by 454 amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Stiebens, Victor A; Merino, Sonia E; Chain, Frédéric J J; Eizaguirre, Christophe

    2013-04-30

    In evolutionary and conservation biology, parasitism is often highlighted as a major selective pressure. To fight against parasites and pathogens, genetic diversity of the immune genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are particularly important. However, the extensive degree of polymorphism observed in these genes makes it difficult to conduct thorough population screenings. We utilized a genotyping protocol that uses 454 amplicon sequencing to characterize the MHC class I in the endangered loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) and to investigate their evolution at multiple relevant levels of organization. MHC class I genes revealed signatures of trans-species polymorphism across several reptile species. In the studied loggerhead turtle individuals, it results in the maintenance of two ancient allelic lineages. We also found that individuals carrying an intermediate number of MHC class I alleles are larger than those with either a low or high number of alleles. Multiple modes of evolution seem to maintain MHC diversity in the loggerhead turtles, with relatively high polymorphism for an endangered species.

  4. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  5. Human Germline Antibody Gene Segments Encode Polyspecific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Jordan R.; Briney, Bryan S.; DeLuca, Samuel L.; Crowe, James E.; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding. PMID:23637590

  6. A reanalysis of mouse ENCODE comparative gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Gilad, Yoav; Mizrahi-Man, Orna

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium reported that comparative gene expression data from human and mouse tend to cluster more by species rather than by tissue. This observation was surprising, as it contradicted much of the comparative gene regulatory data collected previously, as well as the common notion that major developmental pathways are highly conserved across a wide range of species, in particular across mammals. Here we show that the Mouse ENCODE gene expression data were collected using a flawed study design, which confounded sequencing batch (namely, the assignment of samples to sequencing flowcells and lanes) with species. When we account for the batch effect, the corrected comparative gene expression data from human and mouse tend to cluster by tissue, not by species. PMID:26236466

  7. Gene Cluster Encoding Cholate Catabolism in Rhodococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Wilbrink, Maarten H.; Casabon, Israël; Stewart, Gordon R.; Liu, Jie; van der Geize, Robert; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2012-01-01

    Bile acids are highly abundant steroids with important functions in vertebrate digestion. Their catabolism by bacteria is an important component of the carbon cycle, contributes to gut ecology, and has potential commercial applications. We found that Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 grows well on cholate, as well as on its conjugates, taurocholate and glycocholate. The transcriptome of RHA1 growing on cholate revealed 39 genes upregulated on cholate, occurring in a single gene cluster. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR confirmed that selected genes in the cluster were upregulated 10-fold on cholate versus on cholesterol. One of these genes, kshA3, encoding a putative 3-ketosteroid-9α-hydroxylase, was deleted and found essential for growth on cholate. Two coenzyme A (CoA) synthetases encoded in the cluster, CasG and CasI, were heterologously expressed. CasG was shown to transform cholate to cholyl-CoA, thus initiating side chain degradation. CasI was shown to form CoA derivatives of steroids with isopropanoyl side chains, likely occurring as degradation intermediates. Orthologous gene clusters were identified in all available Rhodococcus genomes, as well as that of Thermomonospora curvata. Moreover, Rhodococcus equi 103S, Rhodococcus ruber Chol-4 and Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1 each grew on cholate. In contrast, several mycolic acid bacteria lacking the gene cluster were unable to grow on cholate. Our results demonstrate that the above-mentioned gene cluster encodes cholate catabolism and is distinct from a more widely occurring gene cluster encoding cholesterol catabolism. PMID:23024343

  8. (Structure and expression of nuclear genes encoding rubisco activase)

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Our activities during the past year have centered around two basic aspects of the project: describing more thoroughly the diurnal and light irradiance effects on activase gene expression in barley; and isolating and structurally characterizing cDNA and genomic DNA sequences encoding activase from barley. Three appendices are included that summarize these activities.

  9. The Long Intron 1 of Growth Hormone Gene from Reeves' Turtle (Chinemys reevesii) Correlates with Negatively Regulated GH Expression in Four Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Sheng; Ma, Jing-E; Li, Wei-Xia; Zhang, Jin-Ge; Wang, Juan; Nie, Qing-Hua; Qiu, Feng-Fang; Fang, Mei-Xia; Zeng, Fang; Wang, Xing; Lin, Xi-Ran; Zhang, Li; Chen, Shao-Hao; Zhang, Xi-Quan

    2016-04-12

    Turtles grow slowly and have a long lifespan. Ultrastructural studies of the pituitary gland in Reeves' turtle (Chinemys reevesii) have revealed that the species possesses a higher nucleoplasmic ratio and fewer secretory granules in growth hormone (GH) cells than other animal species in summer and winter. C. reevesii GH gene was cloned and species-specific similarities and differences were investigated. The full GH gene sequence in C. reevesii contains 8517 base pairs (bp), comprising five exons and four introns. Intron 1 was found to be much longer in C. reevesii than in other species. The coding sequence (CDS) of the turtle's GH gene, with and without the inclusion of intron 1, was transfected into four cell lines, including DF-1 chicken embryo fibroblasts, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, human embryonic kidney 293FT cells, and GH4C1 rat pituitary cells; the turtle growth hormone (tGH) gene mRNA and protein expression levels decreased significantly in the intron-containing CDS in these cell lines, compared with that of the corresponding intronless CDS. Thus, the long intron 1 of GH gene in Reeves' turtle might correlate with downregulated gene expression.

  10. Chlorella viruses contain genes encoding a complete polyamine biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Sascha; Sander, Adrianne; Gurnon, James R.; Yanai-Balser, Giane; VanEtten, James L.; Piotrowski, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Two genes encoding the putative polyamine biosynthetic enzymes agmatine iminohydrolase (AIH) and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase (CPA) were cloned from the chloroviruses PBCV-1, NY-2A and MT325. They were expressed in Escherichia coli to form C-terminal (His)6-tagged proteins and the recombinant proteins were purified by Ni2+- binding affinity chromatography. The biochemical properties of the two enzymes are similar to AIH and CPA enzymes from Arabidopsis thaliana and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Together with the previously known virus genes encoding ornithine/arginine decarboxlyase (ODC/ADC) and homospermidine synthase, the chloroviruses have genes that encode a complete set of functional enzymes that synthesize the rare polyamine homospermidine from arginine via agmatine, N-carbamoylputrescine and putrescine. The PBCV-1 aih and cpa genes are expressed early during virus infection together with the odc/adc gene, suggesting that biosynthesis of putrescine is important in early stages of viral replication. The aih and cpa genes are widespread in the chlorella viruses. PMID:17101165

  11. The TL region gene 37 encodes a Qa-1 antigen

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Of all the biochemically defined mouse MHC class I molecules, the Qa-1 antigens are the only ones for which a gene has not been identified. Recent evidence has suggested that Qa-1 antigens are functional class I molecules and can function as restriction elements for gamma/delta T cells. We have examined the relationship between Qa-1 and the product of gene 37, a presumed novel class I antigen encoded within the TL region. Immunoprecipitation and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the molecules reactive with anti-Qa-1 and anti-37 sera show that the Qa-1 molecule of Qa-1b (Qa-1.2) mouse strains is identical to the product of gene 37 on the basis of molecular weight, pI, and strain distribution. Immunodepletion, biosynthetic labeling, and tunicamycin treatment confirm that the protein encoded by gene 37 in Qa-1b mice is Qa-1.2. In contrast, the anti-37 serum was unable to recognize the Qa-1 molecule in Qa-1a strains. Given the fact that the only allele to gene 37 thus far identified in a Qa-1a strain (A/J) has a termination codon in the alpha 3 domain, our data lead us to conclude that the Qa-1 molecule expressed in Qa-1a mice is not a true allelic product of the gene 37 encoded antigen of Qa-1b mouse strains. PMID:2258708

  12. Functions Encoded by Pyrrolnitrin Biosynthetic Genes from Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Kirner, Sabine; Hammer, Philip E.; Hill, D. Steven; Altmann, Annett; Fischer, Ilona; Weislo, Laura J.; Lanahan, Mike; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Ligon, James M.

    1998-01-01

    Pyrrolnitrin is a secondary metabolite derived from tryptophan and has strong antifungal activity. Recently we described four genes, prnABCD, from Pseudomonas fluorescens that encode the biosynthesis of pyrrolnitrin. In the work presented here, we describe the function of each prn gene product. The four genes encode proteins identical in size and serology to proteins present in wild-type Pseudomonas fluorescens, but absent from a mutant from which the entire prn gene region had been deleted. The prnA gene product catalyzes the chlorination of l-tryptophan to form 7-chloro-l-tryptophan. The prnB gene product catalyzes a ring rearrangement and decarboxylation to convert 7-chloro-l-tryptophan to monodechloroaminopyrrolnitrin. The prnC gene product chlorinates monodechloroaminopyrrolnitrin at the 3 position to form aminopyrrolnitrin. The prnD gene product catalyzes the oxidation of the amino group of aminopyrrolnitrin to a nitro group to form pyrrolnitrin. The organization of the prn genes in the operon is identical to the order of the reactions in the biosynthetic pathway. PMID:9537395

  13. Functions encoded by pyrrolnitrin biosynthetic genes from Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Kirner, S; Hammer, P E; Hill, D S; Altmann, A; Fischer, I; Weislo, L J; Lanahan, M; van Pée, K H; Ligon, J M

    1998-04-01

    Pyrrolnitrin is a secondary metabolite derived from tryptophan and has strong antifungal activity. Recently we described four genes, prnABCD, from Pseudomonas fluorescens that encode the biosynthesis of pyrrolnitrin. In the work presented here, we describe the function of each prn gene product. The four genes encode proteins identical in size and serology to proteins present in wild-type Pseudomonas fluorescens, but absent from a mutant from which the entire prn gene region had been deleted. The prnA gene product catalyzes the chlorination of L-tryptophan to form 7-chloro-L-tryptophan. The prnB gene product catalyzes a ring rearrangement and decarboxylation to convert 7-chloro-L-tryptophan to monodechloroaminopyrrolnitrin. The prnC gene product chlorinates monodechloroaminopyrrolnitrin at the 3 position to form aminopyrrolnitrin. The prnD gene product catalyzes the oxidation of the amino group of aminopyrrolnitrin to a nitro group to form pyrrolnitrin. The organization of the prn genes in the operon is identical to the order of the reactions in the biosynthetic pathway.

  14. Distorting gene pools by conservation: Assessing the case of doomed turtle eggs.

    PubMed

    Mrosovsky, N

    2006-10-01

    Sea turtles have a high reproductive output and high mortality at early stages of the life cycle. In particular, many nests are laid below or close to high tide lines, and subsequently large numbers of eggs may be inundated and destroyed. A common conservation procedure is to relocate such doomed eggs to higher ground. This article examines this practice in the light of recent data revealing that some individual turtles tend to nest relatively near the water and others relatively higher up the beach. Discussion is focused on the question of why apparently poor placement of nests has not been selected against. Comparison between the ecology of leatherback and hawksbill turtle nesting beaches suggests that predictability of environmental conditions on the nesting beaches has an important influence on patterns of nest-site selection. Options are outlined for the management of nesting beaches where a high proportion of turtle eggs is subject to destruction by flooding.

  15. Distorting Gene Pools by Conservation: Assessing the Case of Doomed Turtle Eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrosovsky, N.

    2006-10-01

    Sea turtles have a high reproductive output and high mortality at early stages of the life cycle. In particular, many nests are laid below or close to high tide lines, and subsequently large numbers of eggs may be inundated and destroyed. A common conservation procedure is to relocate such doomed eggs to higher ground. This article examines this practice in the light of recent data revealing that some individual turtles tend to nest relatively near the water and others relatively higher up the beach. Discussion is focused on the question of why apparently poor placement of nests has not been selected against. Comparison between the ecology of leatherback and hawksbill turtle nesting beaches suggests that predictability of environmental conditions on the nesting beaches has an important influence on patterns of nest-site selection. Options are outlined for the management of nesting beaches where a high proportion of turtle eggs is subject to destruction by flooding.

  16. (Genetic engineering with a gene encoding a soybean storage protein)

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R.N.

    1985-12-18

    We have isolated and characterized a gene which encodes the alpha prime subunit of beta conglycinin. This gene was fully sequenced by DNA sequence analysis and a report of that work was prepared and submitted for publication in early November 1985. This represented the culmination of several years of research effort by several scientists. A preprint of that work is attached to this report and has been offered by Dr. J.J. Doyle, Dr. Mary A. Schuler and Dr. Jerry Slighton, as well as myself. This paper is a comparison of the alpha prime subunit gene with a similar gene from phaseolus vulgaris, the common garden bean. In this paper we compare the sequences that are 5' of the gene, and which would represent the transcriptional promoter, as well as the sequences within the structural region of the gene. The sequence paper also compares the amino acid sequence of these two genes with that of other genes from Phaseolus, peas and from soybeans. On the basis of this comparison, we predict evolutionary trends within the multigene families which encode these proteins in the various plants, as well as to look at the protein itself to try to predict regions of the protein that might have functional significance. All of this work was done on a prior DOE-BER grant and has simply been reported here for the first time.

  17. The murine Sry gene encodes a nuclear transcriptional activator

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, R.A.; Ostrer, H.

    1994-09-01

    The Sry gene functions as a genetic switch in gonadal ridge initiating testis determination. The murine Sry and human SRY open reading frames (ORF) share a conserved 79 amino acid motif, the HMG-box, that binds DNA. Outside this region the two genes share no additional homology. These studies were undertaken to determine whether the Sry/SRY genes encode nuclear transcriptional regulators. As judged by the accumulation of lacZ-SRY hybrid proteins in the nucleus, both the human and murine SRY ORFs contain a nuclear localization signal. The murine Sry HMG-box selectively binds the sequence NACAAT in vitro when presented with a random pool of oligonucleotides and binds AACAAT with the highest affinity. The murine Sry ORF, when expressed in HeLa cells, activates transcription of a reporter gene containing multiple copies of the AACAAT binding site. Activation was observed for a GAL4-responsive gene when the murine Sry ORF was linked to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. Using this system, the activation function was mapped to a C-terminal glutamine/histidine-rich domain. In addition, LexA-Sry fusion genes activated a LexA-responsive gene in yeast. In contrast, a GAL4-human SRY fusion gene did not cause transcriptional activation. These studies suggest that both the human and mouse SRY ORFs encode nuclear, DNA-binding proteins, and that the mouse Sry ORF can function as a transcriptional activator with separable DNA-binding and activator domains.

  18. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe cho1+ gene encodes a phospholipid methyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Kanipes, M I; Hill, J E; Henry, S A

    1998-01-01

    The isolation of mutants of Schizosaccharomyces pombe defective in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine via the methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine is reported. These mutants are choline auxotrophs and fall into two unlinked complementation groups, cho1 and cho2. We also report the analysis of the cho1+ gene, the first structural gene encoding a phospholipid biosynthetic enzyme from S. pombe to be cloned and characterized. The cho1+ gene disruption mutant (cho1Delta) is viable if choline is supplied and resembles the cho1 mutants isolated after mutagenesis. Sequence analysis of the cho1+ gene indicates that it encodes a protein closely related to phospholipid methyltransferases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and rat. Phospholipid methyltransferases encoded by a rat liver cDNA and the S. cerevisiae OPI3 gene are both able to complement the choline auxotrophy of the S. pombe cho1 mutants. These results suggest that both the structure and function of the phospholipid N-methyltransferases are broadly conserved among eukaryotic organisms. PMID:9755189

  19. Identification and use of genes encoding amatoxin and phallotoxin

    DOEpatents

    Hallen, Heather E.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong; Scott-Craig, John S.

    2016-12-13

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptide toxins and toxin production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Amanita species encoding Amanita peptides, specifically relating to amatoxins and phallotoxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for detecting Amanita peptide toxin genes for identifying Amanita peptide-producing mushrooms and for diagnosing suspected cases of mushroom poisoning. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for diagnosing and monitoring suspected cases of mushroom poisoning in patients.

  20. Clustered Genes Encoding the Methyltransferases of Methanogenesis from Monomethylamine

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Stephen A.; Lo, Sam L.; Krzycki, Joseph A.

    1998-01-01

    Coenzyme M (CoM) is methylated during methanogenesis from monomethyamine in a reaction catalyzed by three proteins. Using monomethylamine, a 52-kDa polypeptide termed monomethylamine methyltransferase (MMAMT) methylates the corrinoid cofactor bound to a second polypeptide, monomethylamine corrinoid protein (MMCP). Methylated MMCP then serves as a substrate for MT2-A, which methylates CoM. The genes for these proteins are clustered on 6.8 kb of DNA in Methanosarcina barkeri MS. The gene encoding MMCP (mtmC) is located directly upstream of the gene encoding MMAMT (mtmB). The gene encoding MT2-A (mtbA) was found 1.1 kb upstream of mtmC, but no obvious open reading frame was found in the intergenic region between mtbA and mtmC. A single monocistronic transcript was found for mtbA that initiated 76 bp from the translational start. Separate transcripts of 2.4 and 4.7 kb were detected, both of which carried mtmCB. The larger transcript also encoded mtmP, which is homologous to the APC family of cationic amine permeases and may therefore encode a methylamine permease. A single transcriptional start site was found 447 bp upstream of the translational start of mtmC. MtmC possesses the corrinoid binding motif found in corrinoid proteins involved in dimethylsulfide- and methanol-dependent methanogenesis, as well as in methionine synthase. The open reading frame of mtmB was interrupted by a single in-frame, midframe, UAG codon which was also found in mtmB from M. barkeri NIH. A mechanism that circumvents UAG-directed termination of translation must operate during expression of mtmB in this methanogen. PMID:9642198

  1. Clustered genes encoding the methyltransferases of methanogenesis from monomethylamine.

    PubMed

    Burke, S A; Lo, S L; Krzycki, J A

    1998-07-01

    Coenzyme M (CoM) is methylated during methanogenesis from monomethyamine in a reaction catalyzed by three proteins. Using monomethylamine, a 52-kDa polypeptide termed monomethylamine methyltransferase (MMAMT) methylates the corrinoid cofactor bound to a second polypeptide, monomethylamine corrinoid protein (MMCP). Methylated MMCP then serves as a substrate for MT2-A, which methylates CoM. The genes for these proteins are clustered on 6.8 kb of DNA in Methanosarcina barkeri MS. The gene encoding MMCP (mtmC) is located directly upstream of the gene encoding MMAMT (mtmB). The gene encoding MT2-A (mtbA) was found 1.1 kb upstream of mtmC, but no obvious open reading frame was found in the intergenic region between mtbA and mtmC. A single monocistronic transcript was found for mtbA that initiated 76 bp from the translational start. Separate transcripts of 2.4 and 4.7 kb were detected, both of which carried mtmCB. The larger transcript also encoded mtmP, which is homologous to the APC family of cationic amine permeases and may therefore encode a methylamine permease. A single transcriptional start site was found 447 bp upstream of the translational start of mtmC. MtmC possesses the corrinoid binding motif found in corrinoid proteins involved in dimethylsulfide- and methanol-dependent methanogenesis, as well as in methionine synthase. The open reading frame of mtmB was interrupted by a single in-frame, midframe, UAG codon which was also found in mtmB from M. barkeri NIH. A mechanism that circumvents UAG-directed termination of translation must operate during expression of mtmB in this methanogen.

  2. Atrazine alters expression of reproductive and stress genes in the developing hypothalamus of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina.

    PubMed

    Russart, Kathryn L G; Rhen, Turk

    2016-07-29

    Atrazine is an herbicide used to control broadleaf grasses and a suspected endocrine disrupting chemical. Snapping turtles lay eggs between late May and early June, which could lead to atrazine exposure via field runoff. Our goal was to determine whether a single exposure to 2ppb or 40ppb atrazine during embryogenesis could induce short- and long-term changes in gene expression within the hypothalamus of snapping turtles. We treated eggs with atrazine following sex determination and measured gene expression within the hypothalamus. We selected genes a priori for their role in the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad or the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axes of the endocrine system. We did not identify any changes in gene expression 24-h after treatment. However, at hatching AR, Kiss1R, and POMC expression was upregulated in both sexes, while expression of CYP19A1 and PDYN was increased in females. Six months after hatching, CYP19A1 and PRLH expression was increased in animals treated with 2ppb atrazine. Our study shows persistent changes in hypothalamic gene expression due to low-dose embryonic exposure to the herbicide atrazine with significant effects in both the HPG and HPA axes. Effects reported here appear to be conserved among vertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Global distribution of Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus among clinically healthy sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Alfaro-Núñez, Alonzo; Frost Bertelsen, Mads; Bojesen, Anders Miki; Rasmussen, Isabel; Zepeda-Mendoza, Lisandra; Tange Olsen, Morten; Gilbert, Marcus Thomas Pius

    2014-10-25

    CFPHV and its turtle-host across species. Finally, computational analysis of amino acid variants within the Turks and Caicos samples suggest potential functional importance in a substitution for marker UL18 that encodes the major capsid protein gene, which potentially could explain differences in pathogenicity. Nevertheless, such a theory remains to be validated by further research.

  4. Identification of β-haemolysin-encoding genes in Streptococcus anginosus.

    PubMed

    Asam, D; Mauerer, S; Walheim, E; Spellerberg, B

    2013-08-01

    Streptococcus anginosus is an emerging pathogen, but little is known about its virulence factors. To detect the genes responsible for β-haemolysis we performed genomic mutagenesis of the β-haemolytic S. anginosus type strain ATCC 12395 using the vector pGhost9:ISS1. Integration site analysis of 15 non-haemolytic mutants identified a gene cluster with high homology to the genes of the streptolysin S (SLS) encoding sag gene cluster of S. pyogenes. The gene cluster harbours 10 open reading frames displaying significant similarities to the S. pyogenes genes sagA-sagI, with the identities on protein level ranging from 38 to 87%. Complementation assays of S. anginosus sagB and sagD integration mutants with the respective genes confirmed their importance for β-haemolysin production and suggest the presence of post-translational modifications in S. anginosus SLS similar to SLS of S. pyogenes. Characterization of the S. anginosus haemolysin in comparison to the S. pyogenes SLS showed that the haemolysin is surface bound, but in contrast to S. pyogenes neither fetal calf serum nor RNA was able to stabilize the haemolysin of S. anginosus in culture supernatants. Inhibition of β-haemolysis by polyethylene glycol of different sizes was carried out, giving no evidence of a pore-forming haemolytic mechanism. Analysis of a whole genome shotgun sequence of Streptococcus constellatus, a closely related streptococcal species that belongs to the S. anginosus group, revealed a similar sag gene cluster. Employing a genomic mutagenesis strategy we were able to determine an SLS encoding gene cluster in S. anginosus and demonstrate its importance for β-haemolysin production in S. anginosus.

  5. The sulfolobicin genes of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius encode novel antimicrobial proteins.

    PubMed

    Ellen, Albert F; Rohulya, Olha V; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Wagner, Michaela; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2011-09-01

    Crenarchaea, such as Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Sulfolobus tokodaii, produce antimicrobial proteins called sulfolobicins. These antimicrobial proteins inhibit the growth of closely related species. Here we report the identification of the sulfolobicin-encoding genes in S. acidocaldarius. The active sulfolobicin comprises two proteins that are equipped with a classical signal sequence. These proteins are secreted by the cells and found to be membrane vesicle associated. Gene inactivation studies demonstrate that both proteins are required for the bacteriostatic antimicrobial activity. Sulfolobicins constitute a novel class of antimicrobial proteins without detectable homology to any other protein.

  6. A Mycoplasma species of Emydidae turtles in the northeastern USA.

    PubMed

    Ossiboff, Robert J; Raphael, Bonnie L; Ammazzalorso, Alyssa D; Seimon, Tracie A; Niederriter, Holly; Zarate, Brian; Newton, Alisa L; McAloose, Denise

    2015-04-01

    Mycoplasma infections can cause significant morbidity and mortality in captive and wild chelonians. As part of a health assessment of endangered bog turtles (Glyptemys muhlenbergii) in the northeastern US, choanal and cloacal swabs from these and other sympatric species, including spotted turtles (Clemmys guttata), eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina), wood turtles (Glyptemys insculpta), and common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) from 10 sampling sites in the states (US) of Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, were tested by PCR for Mycoplasma. Of 108 turtles tested, 63 (58.3%) were PCR positive for Mycoplasma including 58 of 83 bog turtles (70%), three of three (100%) eastern box turtles, and two of 11 (18%) spotted turtles; all snapping turtles (n = 7) and wood turtles (n = 4) were negative. Sequence analysis of portions of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region and the 16S ribosomal RNA gene revealed a single, unclassified species of Mycoplasma that has been previously reported in eastern box turtles, ornate box turtles (Terrapene ornata ornata), western pond turtles (Emys marmorata), and red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans). We document a high incidence of Mycoplasma, in the absence of clinical disease, in wild emydid turtles. These findings, along with wide distribution of the identified Mycoplasma sp. across a broad geographic region, suggest this bacterium is likely a commensal inhabitant of bog turtles, and possibly other species of emydid turtles, in the northeastern US.

  7. Acute phase response in Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Trionyx sinensis) with Aeromonas hydrophila infection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiuxia; Wang, Lu; Feng, Hong; Guo, Qionglin; Dai, Heping

    2011-04-01

    Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Trionyx sinensis) is an important culture reptile. However, little is known about its acute phase response (APR) caused by bacteria. Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a major acute phase protein (APP). In this study, a turtle SAA homologue was identified and described in reptiles. The full-length cDNA of turtle SAA was 554 bp and contained a 381 bp open reading frame (ORF) coding for a protein of 127 aa. Similar to other known SAA genes, the turtle SAA gene contained three exons and two introns. The promoter region of turtle SAA gene contained the consensus binding sites for nuclear factor (NF)-κB and c-Rel. The turtle SAA amino acid sequence shared the highest identity to avian SAA sequences. Meantime, we present the first systematic study with expression levels of five genes encoding APPs in immune response caused by Aeromonas hydrophila infection. After infection, turtle SAA mRNA was induced in liver at 8h, then increased more than 1200-fold at 2d; in spleen and kidney, the SAA mRNAs were also induced during 8h-7d, but the level was far lower than that in the liver. The complement 3 (C3), fibrinogen-gamma chain (Fb-G) and cathepsin L (CathL) mRNAs were increased in liver at 2d, whereas the albumin (ALB) mRNA was significantly decreased during 8h-7d. Our studies suggest that the APR in turtle with A. hydrophila infection is similar to that in mammals, and SAA is a major indicator of bacterial infection, especially at early stage, in reptiles. Additionally, the different expression patterns of five APP genes observed in present studies could provide clues for understanding the innate immune mechanisms in the APR of reptiles. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Long Intron 1 of Growth Hormone Gene from Reeves’ Turtle (Chinemys reevesii) Correlates with Negatively Regulated GH Expression in Four Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Sheng; Ma, Jing-E; Li, Wei-Xia; Zhang, Jin-Ge; Wang, Juan; Nie, Qing-Hua; Qiu, Feng-Fang; Fang, Mei-Xia; Zeng, Fang; Wang, Xing; Lin, Xi-Ran; Zhang, Li; Chen, Shao-Hao; Zhang, Xi-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Turtles grow slowly and have a long lifespan. Ultrastructural studies of the pituitary gland in Reeves’ turtle (Chinemys reevesii) have revealed that the species possesses a higher nucleoplasmic ratio and fewer secretory granules in growth hormone (GH) cells than other animal species in summer and winter. C. reevesii GH gene was cloned and species-specific similarities and differences were investigated. The full GH gene sequence in C. reevesii contains 8517 base pairs (bp), comprising five exons and four introns. Intron 1 was found to be much longer in C. reevesii than in other species. The coding sequence (CDS) of the turtle’s GH gene, with and without the inclusion of intron 1, was transfected into four cell lines, including DF-1 chicken embryo fibroblasts, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, human embryonic kidney 293FT cells, and GH4C1 rat pituitary cells; the turtle growth hormone (tGH) gene mRNA and protein expression levels decreased significantly in the intron-containing CDS in these cell lines, compared with that of the corresponding intronless CDS. Thus, the long intron 1 of GH gene in Reeves’ turtle might correlate with downregulated gene expression. PMID:27077853

  9. Turtle Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Charles; Ponder, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The day the Turtle Girls received Montel's adoption papers, piercing screams ricocheted across the school grounds instantaneously and simultaneously--in that moment, each student felt the joy of civic stewardship. Read on to find out how a visit to The Turtle Hospital inspired a group of elementary students to create a club devoted to supporting…

  10. Turtle Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Charles; Ponder, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The day the Turtle Girls received Montel's adoption papers, piercing screams ricocheted across the school grounds instantaneously and simultaneously--in that moment, each student felt the joy of civic stewardship. Read on to find out how a visit to The Turtle Hospital inspired a group of elementary students to create a club devoted to supporting…

  11. Characterization and mapping of human genes encoding zinc finger proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, P; Lichter, P; Thiesen, H J; Ward, D C; Dawid, I B

    1991-01-01

    The zinc finger motif, exemplified by a segment of the Drosophila gap gene Krüppel, is a nucleic acid-binding domain present in many transcription factors. To investigate the gene family encoding this motif in the human genome, a placental genomic library was screened at moderate stringency with a degenerate oligodeoxynucleotide probe designed to hybridize to the His/Cys (H/C) link region between adjoining zinc fingers. Over 200 phage clones were obtained and are being sorted into groups by partial sequencing, cross-hybridization with oligodeoxynucleotide probes, and PCR amplification. Further, the genomic clones were cross-hybridized with a set of 30 zinc finger-encoding cDNAs (Kox1-Kox30) isolated from a human T-cell cDNA library. Four cDNAs (Kox4, Kox7, Kox12, and Kox15) were identified that match one or more genomic clones; these matches were confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis. One or more clones from each locus were mapped onto human metaphase chromosomes by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization with fluorescent probe detection. We mapped ZNF7/Kox4 to chromosome 8qter, ZNF19/Kox12 to 16q22, ZNF22/Kox15 to 10q11, and ZNF44/Kox7 to 16p11. The results of these analyses support the conclusion that the human genome contains many, probably several hundred, zinc finger genes with consensus H/C link regions. Images PMID:1946370

  12. Emydid herpesvirus 1 infection in northern map turtles (Graptemys geographica) and painted turtles (Chrysemys picta).

    PubMed

    Ossiboff, Robert J; Newton, Alisa L; Seimon, Tracie A; Moore, Robert P; McAloose, Denise

    2015-05-01

    A captive, juvenile, female northern map turtle (Graptemys geographica) was found dead following a brief period of weakness and nasal discharge. Postmortem examination identified pneumonia with necrosis and numerous epithelial, intranuclear viral inclusion bodies, consistent with herpesviral pneumonia. Similar intranuclear inclusions were also associated with foci of hepatocellular and splenic necrosis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screening of fresh, frozen liver for the herpesviral DNA-dependent DNA polymerase gene yielded an amplicon with 99.2% similarity to recently described emydid herpesvirus 1 (EmyHV-1). Molecular screening of turtles housed in enclosures that shared a common circulation system with the affected map turtle identified 4 asymptomatic, EmyHV-1 PCR-positive painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) and 1 asymptomatic northern map turtle. Herpesvirus transmission between painted and map turtles has been previously suggested, and our report provides the molecular characterization of a herpesvirus in asymptomatic painted turtles that can cause fatal herpesvirus-associated disease in northern map turtles.

  13. Gene family encoding the major toxins of lethal Amanita mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Hallen, Heather E; Luo, Hong; Scott-Craig, John S; Walton, Jonathan D

    2007-11-27

    Amatoxins, the lethal constituents of poisonous mushrooms in the genus Amanita, are bicyclic octapeptides. Two genes in A. bisporigera, AMA1 and PHA1, directly encode alpha-amanitin, an amatoxin, and the related bicyclic heptapeptide phallacidin, a phallotoxin, indicating that these compounds are synthesized on ribosomes and not by nonribosomal peptide synthetases. alpha-Amanitin and phallacidin are synthesized as proproteins of 35 and 34 amino acids, respectively, from which they are predicted to be cleaved by a prolyl oligopeptidase. AMA1 and PHA1 are present in other toxic species of Amanita section Phalloidae but are absent from nontoxic species in other sections. The genomes of A. bisporigera and A. phalloides contain multiple sequences related to AMA1 and PHA1. The predicted protein products of this family of genes are characterized by a hypervariable "toxin" region capable of encoding a wide variety of peptides of 7-10 amino acids flanked by conserved sequences. Our results suggest that these fungi have a broad capacity to synthesize cyclic peptides on ribosomes.

  14. 'Green revolution' genes encode mutant gibberellin response modulators.

    PubMed

    Peng, J; Richards, D E; Hartley, N M; Murphy, G P; Devos, K M; Flintham, J E; Beales, J; Fish, L J; Worland, A J; Pelica, F; Sudhakar, D; Christou, P; Snape, J W; Gale, M D; Harberd, N P

    1999-07-15

    World wheat grain yields increased substantially in the 1960s and 1970s because farmers rapidly adopted the new varieties and cultivation methods of the so-called 'green revolution'. The new varieties are shorter, increase grain yield at the expense of straw biomass, and are more resistant to damage by wind and rain. These wheats are short because they respond abnormally to the plant growth hormone gibberellin. This reduced response to gibberellin is conferred by mutant dwarfing alleles at one of two Reduced height-1 (Rht-B1 and Rht-D1) loci. Here we show that Rht-B1/Rht-D1 and maize dwarf-8 (d8) are orthologues of the Arabidopsis Gibberellin Insensitive (GAI) gene. These genes encode proteins that resemble nuclear transcription factors and contain an SH2-like domain, indicating that phosphotyrosine may participate in gibberellin signalling. Six different orthologous dwarfing mutant alleles encode proteins that are altered in a conserved amino-terminal gibberellin signalling domain. Transgenic rice plants containing a mutant GAI allele give reduced responses to gibberellin and are dwarfed, indicating that mutant GAI orthologues could be used to increase yield in a wide range of crop species.

  15. Nuclear genes encoding plastid proteins expressed early in chloroplast development

    SciTech Connect

    Mullet, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of this grant was to characterize events which occur early in chloroplast biogenesis and to isolate nuclear genes encoding plastid proteins which are expressed during this developmental phase. In addition, the possible requirement of plastid transcription for the expression of the nuclear genes such as rbcS and cab was to be tested. The impetus for this research came from studies of chloroplast biogenesis in barley. We found that plastid DNA copy number was relatively high (120 copies/plastid vs 200 at maximal accumulation) in the meristematic region of the leaf base whereas plastid transcription activity was low in this plastid population. Later in chloroplast development transcription activity increased at least 5 fold per plastid or per template indicating that activation of plastid transcription occurred after most of the build up in plastid DNA per plastid. This suggested that activation of plastid DNA synthesis occurred early in chloroplast development and that nuclear genes involved in this activity must be regulated differently from genes such rbcS or cab which are expressed later in development. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Comparative Genomics Identifies Epidermal Proteins Associated with the Evolution of the Turtle Shell.

    PubMed

    Holthaus, Karin Brigit; Strasser, Bettina; Sipos, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Heiko A; Mlitz, Veronika; Sukseree, Supawadee; Weissenbacher, Anton; Tschachler, Erwin; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Eckhart, Leopold

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of reptiles, birds, and mammals was associated with the origin of unique integumentary structures. Studies on lizards, chicken, and humans have suggested that the evolution of major structural proteins of the outermost, cornified layers of the epidermis was driven by the diversification of a gene cluster called Epidermal Differentiation Complex (EDC). Turtles have evolved unique defense mechanisms that depend on mechanically resilient modifications of the epidermis. To investigate whether the evolution of the integument in these reptiles was associated with specific adaptations of the sequences and expression patterns of EDC-related genes, we utilized newly available genome sequences to determine the epidermal differentiation gene complement of turtles. The EDC of the western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii) comprises more than 100 genes, including at least 48 genes that encode proteins referred to as beta-keratins or corneous beta-proteins. Several EDC proteins have evolved cysteine/proline contents beyond 50% of total amino acid residues. Comparative genomics suggests that distinct subfamilies of EDC genes have been expanded and partly translocated to loci outside of the EDC in turtles. Gene expression analysis in the European pond turtle (Emys orbicularis) showed that EDC genes are differentially expressed in the skin of the various body sites and that a subset of beta-keratin genes within the EDC as well as those located outside of the EDC are expressed predominantly in the shell. Our findings give strong support to the hypothesis that the evolutionary innovation of the turtle shell involved specific molecular adaptations of epidermal differentiation.

  17. Comparative Genomics Identifies Epidermal Proteins Associated with the Evolution of the Turtle Shell

    PubMed Central

    Holthaus, Karin Brigit; Strasser, Bettina; Sipos, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Heiko A.; Mlitz, Veronika; Sukseree, Supawadee; Weissenbacher, Anton; Tschachler, Erwin; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Eckhart, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of reptiles, birds, and mammals was associated with the origin of unique integumentary structures. Studies on lizards, chicken, and humans have suggested that the evolution of major structural proteins of the outermost, cornified layers of the epidermis was driven by the diversification of a gene cluster called Epidermal Differentiation Complex (EDC). Turtles have evolved unique defense mechanisms that depend on mechanically resilient modifications of the epidermis. To investigate whether the evolution of the integument in these reptiles was associated with specific adaptations of the sequences and expression patterns of EDC-related genes, we utilized newly available genome sequences to determine the epidermal differentiation gene complement of turtles. The EDC of the western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii) comprises more than 100 genes, including at least 48 genes that encode proteins referred to as beta-keratins or corneous beta-proteins. Several EDC proteins have evolved cysteine/proline contents beyond 50% of total amino acid residues. Comparative genomics suggests that distinct subfamilies of EDC genes have been expanded and partly translocated to loci outside of the EDC in turtles. Gene expression analysis in the European pond turtle (Emys orbicularis) showed that EDC genes are differentially expressed in the skin of the various body sites and that a subset of beta-keratin genes within the EDC as well as those located outside of the EDC are expressed predominantly in the shell. Our findings give strong support to the hypothesis that the evolutionary innovation of the turtle shell involved specific molecular adaptations of epidermal differentiation. PMID:26601937

  18. The Pea Gene LH Encodes ent-Kaurene Oxidase1

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Sandra E.; Smith, Jennifer J.; Helliwell, Chris A.; Poole, Andrew T.; Reid, James B.

    2004-01-01

    The pea (Pisum sativum) homolog, PsKO1, of the Arabidopsis GA3 gene was isolated. It codes for a cytochrome P450 from the CYP701A subfamily and has ent-kaurene oxidase (KO) activity, catalyzing the three step oxidation of ent-kaurene to ent-kaurenoic acid in the gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic pathway when expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). PsKO1 is encoded by the LH gene because in three independent mutant alleles, lh-1, lh-2, and lh-3, PsKO1 has altered sequence, and the lh-1 allele, when expressed in yeast, failed to metabolize ent-kaurene. The lh mutants of pea are GA deficient and have reduced internode elongation and root growth. One mutant (lh-2) also causes a large increase in seed abortion. PsKO1 (LH) is expressed in all tissues examined, including stems, roots, and seeds, and appears to be a single-copy gene. Differences in sensitivity to the GA synthesis inhibitor, paclobutrazol, between the mutants appear to result from the distinct nature of the genetic lesions. These differences may also explain the tissue-specific differences between the mutants. PMID:14988475

  19. The pea gene LH encodes ent-kaurene oxidase.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sandra E; Smith, Jennifer J; Helliwell, Chris A; Poole, Andrew T; Reid, James B

    2004-03-01

    The pea (Pisum sativum) homolog, PsKO1, of the Arabidopsis GA3 gene was isolated. It codes for a cytochrome P450 from the CYP701A subfamily and has ent-kaurene oxidase (KO) activity, catalyzing the three step oxidation of ent-kaurene to ent-kaurenoic acid in the gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic pathway when expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). PsKO1 is encoded by the LH gene because in three independent mutant alleles, lh-1, lh-2, and lh-3, PsKO1 has altered sequence, and the lh-1 allele, when expressed in yeast, failed to metabolize ent-kaurene. The lh mutants of pea are GA deficient and have reduced internode elongation and root growth. One mutant (lh-2) also causes a large increase in seed abortion. PsKO1 (LH) is expressed in all tissues examined, including stems, roots, and seeds, and appears to be a single-copy gene. Differences in sensitivity to the GA synthesis inhibitor, paclobutrazol, between the mutants appear to result from the distinct nature of the genetic lesions. These differences may also explain the tissue-specific differences between the mutants.

  20. Genome-wide analysis of NBS-encoding disease resistance genes in Cucumis sativus and phylogenetic study of NBS-encoding genes in Cucurbitaceae crops

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant nucleotide-binding site (NBS)-leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins encoded by resistance genes play an important role in the responses of plants to various pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and nematodes. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of NBS-encoding genes within the whole cucumber genome was performed, and the phylogenetic relationships of NBS-encoding resistance gene homologues (RGHs) belonging to six species in five genera of Cucurbitaceae crops were compared. Results Cucumber has relatively few NBS-encoding genes. Nevertheless, cucumber maintains genes belonging to both Toll/interleukine-1 receptor (TIR) and CC (coiled-coil) families. Eight commonly conserved motifs have been established in these two families which support the grouping into TIR and CC families. Moreover, three additional conserved motifs, namely, CNBS-1, CNBS-2 and TNBS-1, have been identified in sequences from CC and TIR families. Analyses of exon/intron configurations revealed that some intron loss or gain events occurred during the structural evolution between the two families. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that gene duplication, sequence divergence, and gene loss were proposed as the major modes of evolution of NBS-encoding genes in Cucurbitaceae species. Compared with NBS-encoding sequences from the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, the remaining seven TIR familes of NBS proteins and RGHs from Cucurbitaceae species have been shown to be phylogenetically distinct from the TIR family of NBS-encoding genes in Arabidopsis, except for two subfamilies (TIR4 and TIR9). On the other hand, in the CC-NBS family, they grouped closely with the CC family of NBS-encoding genes in Arabidopsis. Thus, the NBS-encoding genes in Cucurbitaceae crops are shown to be ancient, and NBS-encoding gene expansions (especially the TIR family) may have occurred before the divergence of Cucurbitaceae and Arabidopsis. Conclusion The results of this paper will provide a genomic framework

  1. Genome-wide analysis of NBS-encoding disease resistance genes in Cucumis sativus and phylogenetic study of NBS-encoding genes in Cucurbitaceae crops.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hongjian; Yuan, Wei; Bo, Kailiang; Shen, Jia; Pang, Xin; Chen, Jinfeng

    2013-02-19

    Plant nucleotide-binding site (NBS)-leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins encoded by resistance genes play an important role in the responses of plants to various pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and nematodes. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of NBS-encoding genes within the whole cucumber genome was performed, and the phylogenetic relationships of NBS-encoding resistance gene homologues (RGHs) belonging to six species in five genera of Cucurbitaceae crops were compared. Cucumber has relatively few NBS-encoding genes. Nevertheless, cucumber maintains genes belonging to both Toll/interleukine-1 receptor (TIR) and CC (coiled-coil) families. Eight commonly conserved motifs have been established in these two families which support the grouping into TIR and CC families. Moreover, three additional conserved motifs, namely, CNBS-1, CNBS-2 and TNBS-1, have been identified in sequences from CC and TIR families. Analyses of exon/intron configurations revealed that some intron loss or gain events occurred during the structural evolution between the two families. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that gene duplication, sequence divergence, and gene loss were proposed as the major modes of evolution of NBS-encoding genes in Cucurbitaceae species. Compared with NBS-encoding sequences from the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, the remaining seven TIR familes of NBS proteins and RGHs from Cucurbitaceae species have been shown to be phylogenetically distinct from the TIR family of NBS-encoding genes in Arabidopsis, except for two subfamilies (TIR4 and TIR9). On the other hand, in the CC-NBS family, they grouped closely with the CC family of NBS-encoding genes in Arabidopsis. Thus, the NBS-encoding genes in Cucurbitaceae crops are shown to be ancient, and NBS-encoding gene expansions (especially the TIR family) may have occurred before the divergence of Cucurbitaceae and Arabidopsis. The results of this paper will provide a genomic framework for the further isolation of

  2. RAG4 gene encodes a glucose sensor in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Betina, S; Goffrini, P; Ferrero, I; Wésolowski-Louvel, M

    2001-01-01

    The rag4 mutant of Kluyveromyces lactis was previously isolated as a fermentation-deficient mutant, in which transcription of the major glucose transporter gene RAG1 was affected. The wild-type RAG4 was cloned by complementation of the rag4 mutation and found to encode a protein homologous to Snf3 and Rgt2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These two proteins are thought to be sensors of low and high concentrations of glucose, respectively. Rag4, like Snf3 and Rgt2, is predicted to have the transmembrane structure of sugar transporter family proteins as well as a long C-terminal cytoplasmic tail possessing a characteristic 25-amino-acid sequence. Rag4 may therefore be expected to have a glucose-sensing function. However, the rag4 mutation was fully complemented by one copy of either SNF3 or RGT2. Since K. lactis appears to have no other genes of the SNF3/RGT2 type, we suggest that Rag4 of K. lactis may have a dual function of signaling high and low concentrations of glucose. In rag4 mutants, glucose repression of several inducible enzymes is abolished. PMID:11404320

  3. The gene encoding proline dehydrogenase modulates sensorimotor gating in mice.

    PubMed

    Gogos, J A; Santha, M; Takacs, Z; Beck, K D; Luine, V; Lucas, L R; Nadler, J V; Karayiorgou, M

    1999-04-01

    Hemizygous cryptic deletions of the q11 band of human chromosome 22 have been associated with a number of psychiatric and behavioural phenotypes, including schizophrenia. Here we report the isolation and characterization of PRODH, a human homologue of Drosophila melanogaster sluggish-A (slgA), which encodes proline dehydrogenase responsible for the behavioural phenotype of the slgA mutant. PRODH is localized at chromosome 22q11 in a region deleted in some psychiatric patients. We also isolated the mouse homologue of slgA (Prodh), identified a mutation in this gene in the Pro/Re hyperprolinaemic mouse strain and found that these mice have a deficit in sensorimotor gating accompanied by regional neurochemical alterations in the brain. Sensorimotor gating is a neural filtering process that allows attention to be focused on a given stimulus, and is affected in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. Furthermore, several lines of evidence suggest that proline may serve as a modulator of synaptic transmission in the mammalian brain. Our observations, in conjunction with the chromosomal location of PRODH, suggest a potential involvement of this gene in the 22q11-associated psychiatric and behavioural phenotypes.

  4. Characterization of a baculovirus gene encoding a small conotoxinlike polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, R; Li, Y; Miller, L K

    1992-01-01

    We identified a gene of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) that encodes a small cysteine-rich polypeptide which has size and sequence similarity to omega-conotoxins, a class of calcium ion (Ca2+) channel inhibitors, found in the venom of cone snails. Transcriptional analysis indicated that the 159-bp open reading frame, which we named ctl, and a downstream 984-bp open reading frame are transcribed as a single 1.3-kb bicistronic late RNA. The mature ctl gene product was identified as a small secreted protein by high-pressure liquid chromatography fractionation of extracellular fluid. Viruses with a site-specific deletion in ctl appeared normal with regard to the kinetics and virulence of infection, both in vitro and in vivo. Although we studied the behavior of wild-type and mutant virus-infected insects in some detail, a biological role for ctl in AcMNPV infection remains to be established. Images PMID:1404603

  5. Amniote phylogeny and the position of turtles.

    PubMed

    Hedges, S Blair

    2012-07-27

    The position of turtles among amniotes remains in dispute, with morphological and molecular comparisons giving different results. Morphological analyses align turtles with either lizards and their relatives, or at the base of the reptile tree, whereas molecular analyses, including a recent study by Chiari et al. in BMC Biology, place turtles with birds and crocodilians. Molecular studies have not wavered as the numbers of genes and species have increased, but morphologists have been reluctant to embrace the molecular tree.

  6. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, E.E.; Roessler, P.G.

    1999-07-27

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities. 8 figs.

  7. Characterization of a plasmid-encoded urease gene cluster found in members of the family Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, S E; Collins, C M

    1993-03-01

    Plasmid-encoded urease gene clusters found in uropathogenic isolates of Escherichia coli, Providencia stuartii, and Salmonella cubana demonstrated DNA homology, similar positions of restriction endonuclease cleavage sites, and manners of urease expression and therefore represent the same locus. DNA sequence analysis indicated that the plasmid-encoded urease genes are closely related to the Proteus mirabilis urease genes.

  8. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, Eric E.; Roessler, Paul G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities.

  9. Genomic Organization and Identification of Promoter Regions for the BDNF Gene in the Pond Turtle Trachemys scripta elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhaoqing; Keifer, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an important regulator of neuronal development and synaptic function. The BDNF gene undergoes significant activity-dependent regulation during learning. Here, we identified the BDNF promoter regions, transcription start sites, and potential regulatory sequences for BDNF exons I–III that may contribute to activity-dependent gene and protein expression in the pond turtle Trachemys scripta elegans (tBDNF). By using transfection of BDNF promoter/luciferase plasmid constructs into human neuroblastoma SHSY5Y cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH3T3 cells, we identified the basal regulatory activity of promoter sequences located upstream of each tBDNF exon, designated as pBDNFI–III. Further, through chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, we detected CREB binding directly to exon I and exon III promoters, while BHLHB2, but not CREB, binds within the exon II promoter. Elucidation of the promoter regions and regulatory protein binding sites in the tBDNF gene is essential for understanding the regulatory mechanisms that control tBDNF gene expression. PMID:24443176

  10. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Many individual chloroplast genes require the products of a collection of nuclear genes for their successful expression. These nuclear gene products apparently work with great specificity, each committed to the expression of a single chloroplast gene. We have chosen as a model nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas affected in different stages in the expression of the chloroplast encoded Photosystem II polypeptide, D2. We have made the progress in understanding how nuclear gene products affect the translation of the D2 encoding MRNA. Two nuclear genes are required for this process which have been mapped genetically. In contrast to other examples of nuclear control of translation in the chloroplast, these nuclear gene products appear to be required either for specific stages in translation elongation or for the post-translational stabilization of the nascent D2 protein. Pseudoreversion analysis has led us to a locus which may be directly involved in D2 expression. We have made considerable progress in pursuing the molecular basis of psbd MRNA stabilization. psbD 5' UTR specific transcripts have been synthesized in vitro and used in gel mobility shift assays. UV-crosslinking studies are underway to identify the transacting factors which bind to these sequences. The continued examination of these mutants will help us to understand how nuclear gene products work in this specific case of chloroplast gene expression, and will elucidate how two distinct genomes can interact generally.

  11. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    The following is a review of research accomplished in the first two years of funding for the above mentioned project. The work performed is a molecular characterization of nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which are deficient in different stages in the post-transcriptional expression of a single chloroplast encoded polypeptide, the D2 protein of Photosystem II. Our long-term goals are to understand the molecular mechanisms by which nuclear gene products affect the expression of chloroplast genes. Specifically, we which to understand how specific nuclear gene products affect the turnover rate of the D2 encoding mRNA (psbD), how other nuclear encoded factors work to promote the translation of psbD mRNA and/or stabilize the D2 protein, and what the role of the D2 protein itself is in Photosystem II assembly and in the control of expression of other chloroplast genes. This progress report will be organized into four major sections concerning (I) The characterization of nuclear mutants affected in D2 translation/turnover, (II) The study of trans-acting factors which associate with the 5{prime} end of the psbD mRNA, (III) In vitro mutagenesis of the psbD gene, and (IV) Additional studies.

  12. Eukaryotic expression vectors bearing genes encoding cytotoxic proteins for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Glinka, Elena M

    2012-09-01

    Cancer gene therapy is a promising direction for the treatment of cancer patients. A primary goal of all cancer therapies is to selectively target and kill tumour cells. Such therapies are administered via different approaches, including both viral and non-viral delivery; however, both methods have advantages and disadvantages. Transcriptional targeting enables genes encoding toxic proteins to be expressed directly in cancer cells. Numerous vectors have been created with the purpose of killing cancer cells, and some have successfully suppressed malignant tumours. Data concerning the function of vectors bearing genes that encode cytotoxic proteins under the control of different promoters, including tissue/tumour specific and constitutive promoters, is summarised here. This review focuses on vectors that bear genes encoding diphtheria toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin A, caspases, gef, streptolysin, and melittin. Data describing the efficacy of such vectors have been summarised. Notably, there are vectors that killed cancer cell lines originating from the same type of cancer with differential efficiency. Thus, there is differential inhibition of cancer cell growth dependent on the cell line. In this review, the constructs employing genes whose expression induces cell death and the efficiency with which they suppress cancer cell growth will be summarised.

  13. The maize brittle 1 gene encodes amyloplast membrane polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, T D; Kaneko, Y

    1995-01-01

    A chimeric protein, formed of 56 amino acids from the carboxy terminus of the maize (Zea mays L.) wild-type Brittle1 (Bt1) protein fused to the glutathione-S-transferase gene, was synthesized in Escherichia coli, and used to raise antibodies. Following affinity purification, the antibodies recognized a set of 38- to 42-kDa proteins in endosperm from wild-type Bt1 plants, as well as from brittle2, shrunken2 and sugary1 plants, but not in mutant bt1 endosperm. Bt1 proteins were not detected with the preimmune antibodies. A low level of Bt1-specific proteins was detected at 10 d after pollination (DAP) and increased to a plateau at 16 DAP. At the same time, the ratio of slow- to fast-migrating forms of the protein decreased. During endosperm fractionation by differential centrifugation and membrane sedimentation in sucrose gradients, the Bt1 proteins co-purified with the carotenoid-containing plastid membranes. They were localized to amyloplasts by electron-microscopic immunocytochemistry; most of the signal was detected at the plastid periphery. These results are consistent with predictions made from the deduced amino-acid sequence and previous in-vitro experiments that the bt1 locus encodes amyloplast membrane proteins.

  14. [Association of schizophrenia with variations in genes encoding transcription factors].

    PubMed

    Boyajyan, A S; Atshemyan, S A; Zakharyan, R V

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in neuronal plasticity and immune system play a key role in pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Identification of genetic factors contributing to these alterations will significantly encourage elucidation of molecular etiopathomechanisms of this disorder. Transcription factors c-Fos, c-Jun, and Ier5 are the important regulators of neuronal plasticity and immune response. In the present work we investigated a potential association of schizophrenia with a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms of c-Fos-,c-Jun and Ier5 encoding genes (FOS, JUN, and IER5 respectively). Genotyping of DNA samples of patients with schizophrenia and healthy individuals was performed using polymerase chain reaction with allele specific primers. The results obtained demonstrated association between schizophrenia and FOS rs1063169, FOS rs7101, JUN rs11688, and IER5 rs6425663 polymorphisms. Namely, it was found that the inheritance of FOS rs1063169*T, JUN rs11688*A, and IER5 rs6425663*T minor variants decreases risk for development of schizophrenia whereas the inheritance of FOS rs7101*T minor variant, especially its homozygous form, increases risk for development of this disorder.

  15. (Genetic engineering with a gene encoding a soybean storage protein). Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    Progress is reported on research directed toward introducing a gene (Gmg 17.1) encoding the ..cap alpha..'-subunit of ..beta..-conglycinin, a soybean seed protein, into petunia plants using gene transfer mechanisms. (ACR)

  16. Tracing the origin and evolution of plant TIR-encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoqin; Pang, Hui; Li, Mimi; Chen, Jianqun; Hang, Yueyu

    2014-08-10

    Toll-interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-encoding proteins represent one of the most important families of disease resistance genes in plants. Studies that have explored the functional details of these genes tended to focus on only a few limited groups; the origin and evolutionary history of these genes were therefore unclear. In this study, focusing on the four principal groups of TIR-encoding genes, we conducted an extensive genome-wide survey of 32 fully sequenced plant genomes and Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) from the gymnosperm Pinus taeda and explored the origins and evolution of these genes. Through the identification of the TIR-encoding genes, the analysis of chromosome positions, the identification and analysis of conserved motifs, and sequence alignment and phylogenetic reconstruction, our results showed that the genes of the TIR-X family (TXs) had an earlier origin and a wider distribution than the genes from the other three groups. TIR-encoding genes experienced large-scale gene duplications during evolution. A skeleton motif pattern of the TIR domain was present in all spermatophytes, and the genes with this skeleton pattern exhibited a conserved and independent evolutionary history in all spermatophytes, including monocots, that followed their gymnosperm origin. This study used comparative genomics to explore the origin and evolutionary history of the four main groups of TIR-encoding genes. Additionally, we unraveled the mechanism behind the uneven distribution of TIR-encoding genes in dicots and monocots. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Biochemical evidence that secretor gene, Se, is a structural gene encoding a specific fucosyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Kumazaki, T; Yoshida, A

    1984-01-01

    Nonsecretors have no ABH blood group substances in their saliva and milk, but their erythrocytes contain the blood group substances. It has been generally believed that the secretor gene, Se, is a regulatory gene, not a structural gene, controlling the expression of (alpha 1----2)fucosyltransferase, which synthesizes the blood group H substance from its precursor, in secretions. To account for the existence of the blood type of "para Bombay" phenotype--i.e., H-negative in erythrocytes but H-positive in secretory fluids, another regulatory gene, Z, which would regulate the expression of the enzyme in the hematopoietic tissues, has been proposed. Contrary to this, a more simple model, in which the H gene and Se gene are both structural genes, encoding two separate fucosyltransferases in different tissues, was recently proposed. To settle the controversy, (alpha 1----2)fucosyltransferases were partially purified from human plasma and milk. The two enzymes differed from each other in the following respects: (i) the milk enzyme adsorbed to SP-Sephadex at pH 6.0, while the plasma enzyme did not; (ii) pH-activity profiles, with phenyl beta-D-galactoside as an acceptor, differed between the two enzymes; (iii) the milk enzyme exhibited lower thermal stability than the plasma enzyme; and (iv) Km values for several oligosaccharides with Gal(beta 1----3)GlcNAc and Gal(beta 1----4)GlcNAc as acceptors differed between the two enzymes. These results support the model that the Se gene is a structural gene encoding a distinctive (alpha 1----2)fucosyltransferase, refuting the classical regulatory gene model for the Se locus. The anomeric configuration of the fucosylated galactose residue produced by the action of enzyme was identified, thus establishing the specificity of the enzyme. Images PMID:6588382

  18. Ethylene-regulated gene expression: molecular cloning of the genes encoding an endochitinase from Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Broglie, K E; Gaynor, J J; Broglie, R M

    1986-01-01

    A full-length copy of bean leaf chitinase mRNA has been cloned. The 1146-base-pair insert of pCH18 encodes the 27-residue amino-terminal signal peptide of the precursor and 301 residues of the mature protein. Utilizing pCH18 as a hybridization probe, we have shown that the increase in translatable chitinase mRNA seen upon ethylene treatment of bean seedlings is due to a 75- to 100-fold increase in steady-state mRNA levels. Southern blot analysis of bean genomic DNA revealed that chitinase is encoded by a small, multigene family consisting of approximately four members. From our nucleotide sequence analysis of five additional chitinase cDNA clones, it appears that at least two of these genes are expressed. Three of the bean chitinase genes have been isolated from a Sau3A genomic library and partially characterized. Images PMID:2428042

  19. Genome-wide comparative analysis of NBS-encoding genes in four Gossypium species.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Liuxin; Liu, Jinggao; Wu, Chaofeng; Deng, Yushan; Cai, Chaowei; Zhang, Xiao; Cai, Yingfan

    2017-04-12

    Nucleotide binding site (NBS) genes encode a large family of disease resistance (R) proteins in plants. The availability of genomic data of the two diploid cotton species, Gossypium arboreum and Gossypium raimondii, and the two allotetraploid cotton species, Gossypium hirsutum (TM-1) and Gossypium barbadense allow for a more comprehensive and systematic comparative study of NBS-encoding genes to elucidate the mechanisms of cotton disease resistance. Based on the genome assembly data, 246, 365, 588 and 682 NBS-encoding genes were identified in G. arboreum, G. raimondii, G. hirsutum and G. barbadense, respectively. The distribution of NBS-encoding genes among the chromosomes was nonrandom and uneven, and was tended to form clusters. Gene structure analysis showed that G. arboreum and G. hirsutum possessed a greater proportion of CN, CNL, and N genes and a lower proportion of NL, TN and TNL genes compared to that of G. raimondii and G. barbadense, while the percentages of RN and RNL genes remained relatively unchanged. The percentage changes among them were largest for TNL genes, about 7 times. Exon statistics showed that the average exon numbers per NBS gene in G. raimondii and G. barbadense were all greater than that in G. arboretum and G. hirsutum. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the TIR-NBS genes of G. barbadense were closely related with that of G. raimondii. Sequence similarity analysis showed that diploid cotton G. arboreum possessed a larger proportion of NBS-encoding genes similar to that of allotetraploid cotton G. hirsutum, while diploid G. raimondii possessed a larger proportion of NBS-encoding genes similar to that of allotetraploid cotton G. barbadense. The synteny analysis showed that more NBS genes in G. raimondii and G. arboreum were syntenic with that in G. barbadense and G. hirsutum, respectively. The structural architectures, amino acid sequence similarities and synteny of NBS-encoding genes between G. arboreum and G. hirsutum, and between G

  20. Species-specific duplications of NBS-encoding genes in Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima)

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yan; Li, Yingjun; Huang, Kaihui; Cheng, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The disease resistance (R) genes play an important role in protecting plants from infection by diverse pathogens in the environment. The nucleotide-binding site (NBS)-leucine-rich repeat (LRR) class of genes is one of the largest R gene families. Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima) is resistant to Chestnut Blight Disease, but relatively little is known about the resistance mechanism. We identified 519 NBS-encoding genes, including 374 NBS-LRR genes and 145 NBS-only genes. The majority of Ka/Ks were less than 1, suggesting the purifying selection operated during the evolutionary history of NBS-encoding genes. A minority (4/34) of Ka/Ks in non-TIR gene families were greater than 1, showing that some genes were under positive selection pressure. Furthermore, Ks peaked at a range of 0.4 to 0.5, indicating that ancient duplications arose during the evolution. The relationship between Ka/Ks and Ks indicated greater selective pressure on the newer and older genes with the critical value of Ks = 0.4–0.5. Notably, species-specific duplications were detected in NBS-encoding genes. In addition, the group of RPW8-NBS-encoding genes clustered together as an independent clade located at a relatively basal position in the phylogenetic tree. Many cis-acting elements related to plant defense responses were detected in promoters of NBS-encoding genes. PMID:26559332

  1. Expression of turtle riboflavin-binding protein represses mitochondrial electron transport gene expression and promotes flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Hu, Li; Han, Li-Ping; Ji, Hongtao; Zhu, Yueyue; Wang, Xiaobing; Ge, Jun; Xu, Manyu; Shen, Dan; Dong, Hansong

    2014-12-30

    Recently we showed that de novo expression of a turtle riboflavin-binding protein (RfBP) in transgenic Arabidopsis increased H2O2 concentrations inside leaf cells, enhanced the expression of floral regulatory gene FD and floral meristem identity gene AP1 at the shoot apex, and induced early flowering. Here we report that RfBP-induced H2O2 presumably results from electron leakage at the mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) and this source of H2O2 contributes to the early flowering phenotype. While enhanced expression of FD and AP1 at the shoot apex was correlated with early flowering, the foliar expression of 13 of 19 METC genes was repressed in RfBP-expressing (RfBP+) plants. Inside RfBP+ leaf cells, cytosolic H2O2 concentrations were increased possibly through electron leakage because similar responses were also induced by a known inducer of electron leakage from METC. Early flowering no longer occurred when the repression on METC genes was eliminated by RfBP gene silencing, which restored RfBP+ to wild type in levels of FD and AP1 expression, H2O2, and flavins. Flowering was delayed by the external riboflavin application, which brought gene expression and flavins back to the steady-state levels but only caused 55% reduction of H2O2 concentrations in RfBP+ plants. RfBP-repressed METC gene expression remedied the cytosolic H2O2 diminution by genetic disruption of transcription factor NFXLl and compensated for compromises in FD and AP1 expression and flowering time. By contrast, RfBP resembled a peroxisomal catalase mutation, which augments the cytosolic H2O2, to enhance FD and AP1 expression and induce early flowering. RfBP-repressed METC gene expression potentially causes electron leakage as one of cellular sources for the generation of H2O2 with the promoting effect on flowering. The repressive effect on METC gene expression is not the only way by which RfBP induces H2O2 and currently unappreciated factors may also function under RfBP+ background.

  2. Combinatorial selection for replicable RNA by Qβ replicase while maintaining encoded gene function.

    PubMed

    Yumura, Mio; Yamamoto, Natsuko; Yokoyama, Katsushi; Mori, Hirotada; Yomo, Tetsuya; Ichihashi, Norikazu

    2017-01-01

    Construction of a complex artificial self-replication system is challenging in the field of in vitro synthetic biology. Recently, we developed a translation-coupled RNA replication system, wherein an artificial genomic RNA replicates with the Qβ RNA replicase gene encoded on itself. The challenge is to introduce additional genes into the RNA to develop a complex system that mimics natural living systems. However, most RNA sequence encoding genes are not replicable by the Qβ replicase owing to its requirement for strong secondary structures throughout the RNA sequence that are absent in most genes. In this study, we establish a new combinatorial selection method to find an RNA sequence with secondary structures and functional amino acid sequences of the encoded gene. We selected RNA sequences based on their in vitro replication and in vivo gene functions. First, we used the α-domain gene of β-galactosidase as a model-encoding gene, with functional selection based on blue-white screening. Through the combinatorial selection, we developed more replicable RNAs while maintaining the function of the encoded α-domain. The selected sequence improved the affinity between the minus strand RNA and Qβ replicase. Second, we established an in vivo selection method applicable to a broader range of genes by using an Escherichia coli strain with one of the essential genes complemented with a plasmid. We performed the combinatorial selection using an RNA encoding serS and obtained more replicable RNA encoding functional serS gene. These results suggest that combinatorial selection methods are useful for the development of RNA sequences replicable by Qβ replicase while maintaining the encoded gene function.

  3. Combinatorial selection for replicable RNA by Qβ replicase while maintaining encoded gene function

    PubMed Central

    Yumura, Mio; Yamamoto, Natsuko; Yokoyama, Katsushi; Mori, Hirotada; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Construction of a complex artificial self-replication system is challenging in the field of in vitro synthetic biology. Recently, we developed a translation-coupled RNA replication system, wherein an artificial genomic RNA replicates with the Qβ RNA replicase gene encoded on itself. The challenge is to introduce additional genes into the RNA to develop a complex system that mimics natural living systems. However, most RNA sequence encoding genes are not replicable by the Qβ replicase owing to its requirement for strong secondary structures throughout the RNA sequence that are absent in most genes. In this study, we establish a new combinatorial selection method to find an RNA sequence with secondary structures and functional amino acid sequences of the encoded gene. We selected RNA sequences based on their in vitro replication and in vivo gene functions. First, we used the α-domain gene of β-galactosidase as a model-encoding gene, with functional selection based on blue-white screening. Through the combinatorial selection, we developed more replicable RNAs while maintaining the function of the encoded α-domain. The selected sequence improved the affinity between the minus strand RNA and Qβ replicase. Second, we established an in vivo selection method applicable to a broader range of genes by using an Escherichia coli strain with one of the essential genes complemented with a plasmid. We performed the combinatorial selection using an RNA encoding serS and obtained more replicable RNA encoding functional serS gene. These results suggest that combinatorial selection methods are useful for the development of RNA sequences replicable by Qβ replicase while maintaining the encoded gene function. PMID:28328998

  4. Isolation of a gene encoding a putative polyamine transporter from Candida albicans, GPT1.

    PubMed

    McNemar, M D; Gorman, J A; Buckley, H R

    2001-04-01

    A gene encoding a transport protein from the pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans, has been isolated during a complementation experiment utilizing an ornithine decarboxylase-negative (spe1 Delta) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This gene restores gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport to a GABA transport-negative mutant of S. cerevisiae and encodes a protein which putatively allows transport of one or more of the polyamines. We have assigned the name GPT1 (GABA/polyamine transporter) to this gene.

  5. Enterotoxin-encoding genes in Staphylococcus spp. from bulk goat milk.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Daniele G; Sousa, Francisca G C; Borges, Maria F; Givisiez, Patrícia E N; Queiroga, Rita C R E; Souza, Evandro L; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A; Oliveira, Celso J B

    2013-02-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus has been implicated as the main Staphylococcus species causing human food poisoning, recent studies have shown that coagulase-negative Staphylococcus could also harbor enterotoxin-encoding genes. Such organisms are often present in goat milk and are the most important mastitis-causing agents. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the occurrence of enterotoxin-encoding genes among coagulase-positive (CoPS) and coagulase-negative (CoNS) staphylococci isolated from raw goat milk produced in the semi-arid region of Paraiba, the most important region for goat milk production in Brazil. Enterotoxin-encoding genes were screened in 74 staphylococci isolates (30 CoPS and 44 CoNS) by polymerase chain reaction targeting the genes sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg, seh, and sei. Enterotoxin-encoding genes were found in nine (12.2%) isolates, and four different genes (sea, sec, seg, and sei) were identified amongst the isolates. The most frequent genes were seg and sei, which were often found simultaneously in 44.5% of the isolates. The gene sec was the most frequent among the classical genes, and sea was found only in one isolate. All CoPS isolates (n=7) harboring enterotoxigenic genes were identified as S. aureus. The two coagulase-negative isolates were S. haemolyticus and S. hominis subsp. hominis and they harbored sei and sec genes, respectively. A higher frequency of enterotoxin-encoding genes was observed amongst CoPS (23.3%) than CoNS (4.5%) isolates (p<0.05), reinforcing the importance of S. aureus as a potential foodborne agent. However, the potential risk posed by CoNS in goat milk should not be ignored because it has a higher occurrence in goat milk and enterotoxin-encoding genes were detected in some isolates.

  6. Marine turtle mitogenome phylogenetics and evolution.

    PubMed

    Duchene, Sebastián; Frey, Amy; Alfaro-Núñez, Alonzo; Dutton, Peter H; Thomas P Gilbert, M; Morin, Phillip A

    2012-10-01

    The sea turtles are a group of cretaceous origin containing seven recognized living species: leatherback, hawksbill, Kemp's ridley, olive ridley, loggerhead, green, and flatback. The leatherback is the single member of the Dermochelidae family, whereas all other sea turtles belong in Cheloniidae. Analyses of partial mitochondrial sequences and some nuclear markers have revealed phylogenetic inconsistencies within Cheloniidae, especially regarding the placement of the flatback. Population genetic studies based on D-Loop sequences have shown considerable structuring in species with broad geographic distributions, shedding light on complex migration patterns and possible geographic or climatic events as driving forces of sea-turtle distribution. We have sequenced complete mitogenomes for all sea-turtle species, including samples from their geographic range extremes, and performed phylogenetic analyses to assess sea-turtle evolution with a large molecular dataset. We found variation in the length of the ATP8 gene and a highly variable site in ND4 near a proton translocation channel in the resulting protein. Complete mitogenomes show strong support and resolution for phylogenetic relationships among all sea turtles, and reveal phylogeographic patterns within globally-distributed species. Although there was clear concordance between phylogenies and geographic origin of samples in most taxa, we found evidence of more recent dispersal events in the loggerhead and olive ridley turtles, suggesting more recent migrations (<1 Myr) in these species. Overall, our results demonstrate the complexity of sea-turtle diversity, and indicate the need for further research in phylogeography and molecular evolution.

  7. SURVEY AND SUMMARY: A survey of small RNA-encoding genes in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hershberg, Ruth; Altuvia, Shoshy; Margalit, Hanah

    2003-01-01

    Small RNA (sRNA) molecules have gained much interest lately, as recent genome-wide studies have shown that they are widespread in a variety of organisms. The relatively small family of 10 known sRNA-encoding genes in Escherichia coli has been significantly expanded during the past two years with the discovery of 45 novel genes. Most of these genes are still uncharacterized and their cellular roles are unknown. In this survey we examined the sequence and genomic features of the 55 currently known sRNA-encoding genes in E.coli, attempting to identify their common characteristics. Such characterization is important for both expanding our understanding of this unique gene family and for improving the methods to predict and identify sRNA-encoding genes based on genomic information. PMID:12654996

  8. Two Fis Regulators Directly Repress the Expression of Numerous Effector-Encoding Genes in Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Zusman, Tal; Speiser, Yariv

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular human pathogen that utilizes the Icm/Dot type IVB secretion system to translocate a large repertoire of effectors into host cells. For most of these effectors, there is no information regarding their regulation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the involvement of the three L. pneumophila Fis homologs in the regulation of effector-encoding genes. Deletion mutants constructed in the genes encoding the three Fis regulators revealed that Fis1 (lpg0542 gene) and Fis3 (lpg1743) but not Fis2 (lpg1370) are partially required for intracellular growth of L. pneumophila in Acanthamoeba castellanii. To identify pathogenesis-related genes directly regulated by Fis, we established a novel in vivo system which resulted in the discovery of numerous effector-encoding genes directly regulated by Fis. Further examination of these genes revealed that Fis1 and Fis3 repress the level of expression of effector-encoding genes during exponential phase. Three groups of effector-encoding genes were identified: (i) effectors regulated mainly by Fis1, (ii) effectors regulated mainly by Fis3, and (iii) effectors regulated by both Fis1 and Fis3. Examination of the upstream regulatory region of all of these effector-encoding genes revealed multiple putative Fis regulatory elements, and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that a few of these sites constitute part of a repressor binding element. Furthermore, gel mobility shift assays demonstrated the direct relation between the Fis1 and Fis3 regulators and these regulatory elements. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that two of the three L. pneumophila Fis regulators directly repress the expression of Icm/Dot effector-encoding genes. PMID:25225276

  9. Isolation of a gene encoding a novel spectinomycin phosphotransferase from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Suter, T M; Viswanathan, V K; Cianciotto, N P

    1997-01-01

    A gene capable of conferring spectinomycin resistance was isolated from Legionella pneumophila, the agent of Legionnaires' disease. The gene (aph) encoded a 36-kDa protein which has similarity to aminoglycoside phosphotransferases. Biochemical analysis confirmed that aph encodes a phosphotransferase which modifies spectinomycin but not hygromycin, kanamycin, or streptomycin. The strain that was the source of aph demonstrated resistance to spectinomycin, and Southern hybridizations determined that aph also exists in other legionellae. PMID:9174205

  10. Gene encoding human Ro-associated autoantigen Y5 RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Maraia, R; Sakulich, A L; Brinkmann, E; Green, E D

    1996-01-01

    Ro ribonucleoproteins are composed of Y RNAs and the Ro 60 kDa protein. While the Ro 60 kDa protein is implicated in an RNA discard pathway that recognizes 3'-extended 5S rRNAs, the function of Y RNAs remains unknown [O'Brien,C.A. and Wolin,S.L. (1995) Genes Dev. 8,2891-2903]. Y5 RNA occupies a large fraction of Ro 60 kDa protein in human Ro RNPs, contains an atypical 3'-extension not found on other Y RNAs, and constitutes an RNA antigen in certain autoimmune patients [Boulanger et al. (1995) Clin. Exp. Immunol. 99, 29-36]. An overabundance of Y RNA retroposed pseudogenes has previously complicated the isolation of mammalian Y RNA genes. The source gene for Y5 RNA was isolated from human DNA as well as from Galago senegalis DNA. Authenticity of the hY5 RNA gene was demonstrated in vivo and its activity was compared with the hY4 RNA gene that also uses a type 3 promoter for RNA polymerase III. The hY5 RNA gene was subsequently found to reside within a few hundred thousand base pairs of other Y RNA genes and the linear order of the four human Y RNA genes on chromosome 7q36 was determined. Phylogenetic comparative analyses of promoter and RNA structure indicate that the Y5 RNA gene has been subjected to positive selection during primate evolution. Consistent with the proposal of O'Brien and Harley [O'Brian,C.A. and Wolin,S.L. (1992) Gene 116, 285-289], analysis of flanking sequences suggest that the hY5 RNA gene may have originated as a retroposon. PMID:8836182

  11. Molecular and Genomic Analysis of Genes Encoding Surface-Anchored Proteins from Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Karjalainen, Tuomo; Waligora-Dupriet, Anne-Judith; Cerquetti, Marina; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Maggioni, Andrea; Mauri, Pierluigi; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2001-01-01

    The gene slpA, encoding the S-layer precursor protein in the virulent Clostridium difficile strains C253 and 79–685, was identified. The precursor protein carries a C-terminal highly conserved anchoring domain, similar to the one found in the Cwp66 adhesin (previously characterized in strain 79–685), an SLH domain, and a variable N-terminal domain mediating cell adherence. The genes encoding the S-layer precursor proteins and the Cwp66 adhesin are present in a genetic locus carrying 17 open reading frames, 11 of which encode a similar two-domain architecture, likely to include surface-anchored proteins. PMID:11292772

  12. Characterization and functional analysis of toll-like receptor 4 in Chinese soft-shelled turtle Pelodiscus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yingshan; Liang, Quan; Li, Weifen; Gu, Yuanxing; Liao, Xun; Fang, Weihuan; Li, Xiaoliang

    2016-10-01

    Mammalian Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) recognizes lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in initiating the innate immune responses. Early studies indicate that turtles are more resistant to LPS challenge than mammals. It remains unknown if turtles express TLR4 and why they are more resistant to LPS. In this study, TLR4 gene from Chinese soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis, was cloned and characterized. The full length cDNA of turtle TLR4 (tTLR4) consists of 3396 base pairs with an 2499-bp open reading frame, encoding 833 amino acids. Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses suggest that tTLR4 is to be orthologous to human TLR4. Its mRNA expression was up-regulated in spleen and blood of turtles upon Aeromonas hydrophila infection. Stimulation of turtle peripheral blood monocytes with LPS significantly upregulated tTLR4 mRNA and inflammation-related gene expression, such as Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). In tTLR4-expressing HEK293 cells, higher concentration of LPS exposure could enhance the activity of the NF-κB promoter, but not the INF-β promoter. Such activity required co-expression of turtle myeloid differentiation factor 2 (tMD2) and cluster of differentiation 14 (tCD14). These results provide evidence for a functional TLR4 in reptiles and, together with the syntenic analysis, support the idea that the TLR4 receptor for LPS recognition may have arisen after reptiles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of the gene encoding rat submandibular gland apomucin, Mucsmg.

    PubMed

    Albone, E F; Hagen, F K; Szpirer, C; Tabak, L A

    1996-10-01

    Mucin glycoproteins are a major constituent of salivary secretions and play a primary role in the protection of the oral cavity. Rat submandibular glands (RSMG) synthesize and secrete a low molecular weight (114 kDa) mucin glycoprotein. We have isolated, partially sequenced, and characterized the gene which encodes the RSMG apomucin. The gene is encoded by three exons of 106 nt, 69 nt, and 991 nt, separated by introns of 921 nt and 12.5 kb. CAAT and TATA elements are present, at -68 and -26, respectively, in the 5' flanking sequence of the RSMG apomucin gene. The tandem repeat domain present in exon III consists of ten tandem repeats of 39 nt encoding the consensus sequence PTTDSTTPAPTTK. Sequence comparison and organization of the nucleic acid sequence encoding the tandem repeats of two alleles for this gene suggests that the apomucin gene has undergone recombinational events during its evolution. No significant sequence similarity was found with other mucin genes, or with other known salivary gland-specific genes. The gene was localized to rat chromosome 14 using somatic cell hybrids that segregate rat chromosomes. Since this, to our knowledge, represents the first RSMG mucin gene cloned, we have designated this gene Mucsmg.

  14. Development of a gene synthesis platform for the efficient large scale production of small genes encoding animal toxins.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Ana Filipa; Brás, Joana L A; Guerreiro, Catarina I P D; Vincentelli, Renaud; Fontes, Carlos M G A

    2016-12-01

    Gene synthesis is becoming an important tool in many fields of recombinant DNA technology, including recombinant protein production. De novo gene synthesis is quickly replacing the classical cloning and mutagenesis procedures and allows generating nucleic acids for which no template is available. In addition, when coupled with efficient gene design algorithms that optimize codon usage, it leads to high levels of recombinant protein expression. Here, we describe the development of an optimized gene synthesis platform that was applied to the large scale production of small genes encoding venom peptides. This improved gene synthesis method uses a PCR-based protocol to assemble synthetic DNA from pools of overlapping oligonucleotides and was developed to synthesise multiples genes simultaneously. This technology incorporates an accurate, automated and cost effective ligation independent cloning step to directly integrate the synthetic genes into an effective Escherichia coli expression vector. The robustness of this technology to generate large libraries of dozens to thousands of synthetic nucleic acids was demonstrated through the parallel and simultaneous synthesis of 96 genes encoding animal toxins. An automated platform was developed for the large-scale synthesis of small genes encoding eukaryotic toxins. Large scale recombinant expression of synthetic genes encoding eukaryotic toxins will allow exploring the extraordinary potency and pharmacological diversity of animal venoms, an increasingly valuable but unexplored source of lead molecules for drug discovery.

  15. Human major histocompatibility complex class I gene that encodes a protein with a shortened cytoplasmic segment

    SciTech Connect

    Geraghty, D.E.; Koller, B.H.; Orr, H.T.

    1987-12-01

    The authors have cloned genomic DNA encoding a non-HLA-A, -B, -C class I gene located within a HindIII-generated restriction fragment of 6.0 kilobase pairs. This gene, designated HLA-6.0, is as homologous to HLA-A and HLA-B as they are to each other. The HLA class I protein encoded by HLA-6.0 is similar in organization to the HLA-A-, -B-, and -C-encoded proteins except that an in-frame termination codon prevents translation of a majority of the cytoplasmic region of the HLA-6.0 polypeptide. Moreover, the promoter region of HLA-6.0 resembles the promoter region of a Qa region gene. These structural features of HLA-6.0 suggest that this nonHLA-A, -B, -C gene is a structural homolog of a murine Qa region class I gene.

  16. An intron-encoded protein assists RNA splicing of multiple similar introns of different bacterial genes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing; Wang, Yanfei; Liu, Xiang-Qin

    2005-10-21

    Four group II introns were found in an unusually intron-rich dnaN gene (encoding the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III) of the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium erythraeum, and they have strong similarities to two introns of the RIR gene (encoding ribonucleotide reductase) of the same organism. Of these six introns, only the RIR-3 intron encodes a maturase protein and showed efficient RNA splicing when expressed in Escherichia coli cells. The other five introns do not encode a maturase protein and did not show RNA splicing in E. coli. But these maturase-less introns showed efficient RNA splicing when the RIR-3 intron-encoded maturase protein was co-expressed from a freestanding gene in the same cell. These findings demonstrated that an intron-encoded protein could function as a general maturase for multiple introns of different genes. Major implications may include an intron-mediated co-regulation of the different genes and a resemblance of the evolutionary origin of spliceosomal introns.

  17. Organization and control of genes encoding catabolic enzymes in Rhizobiaceae

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, D.; Ornston, L.N.

    1993-03-01

    Rhizobiaceae, a diverse bacterial group comprising rhizobia and agrobacteria, symbiotic partnership with plants form nitrogen-fixing nodules on plant roots or are plant pathogens. Phenolic compounds produced by plants serve as inducers of rhizobial nodulation genes and agrobacterial virulence genes reflect their capacity to utilize numerous aromatics, including phenolics, as a source of carbon and energy. In many microbes the aerobic degradation of numerous aromatic compounds to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is achieved by the [beta]-ketoadipate pathway. Our initial studies focused on the organization and regulation of the ketoadipate pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We have cloned, identified and characterized a novel regulatory gene that modulates expression of an adjacent pca (protocatechuate) structural gene, pcaD. Regulation of pcaD is mediated by the regulatory gene, termed pcaQ, in concert with the intermediate [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. [beta]-carboxy-cis,cismuconate is an unstable chemical, not marketed commercially, and it is unlikely to permeate Escherichia coli cells if supplied in media. Because of these factors, characterization of pcaQ in E. coli required an in vivo delivery system for [beta]-carboxycis,cis-muconate. This was accomplished by designing an E. coli strain that expressed an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus pcaA gene for conversion of protocatechuate to [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate.

  18. A highly divergent gene cluster in honey bees encodes a novel silk family.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Tara D; Campbell, Peter M; Weisman, Sarah; Trueman, Holly E; Sriskantha, Alagacone; Wanjura, Wolfgang J; Haritos, Victoria S

    2006-11-01

    The pupal cocoon of the domesticated silk moth Bombyx mori is the best known and most extensively studied insect silk. It is not widely known that Apis mellifera larvae also produce silk. We have used a combination of genomic and proteomic techniques to identify four honey bee fiber genes (AmelFibroin1-4) and two silk-associated genes (AmelSA1 and 2). The four fiber genes are small, comprise a single exon each, and are clustered on a short genomic region where the open reading frames are GC-rich amid low GC intergenic regions. The genes encode similar proteins that are highly helical and predicted to form unusually tight coiled coils. Despite the similarity in size, structure, and composition of the encoded proteins, the genes have low primary sequence identity. We propose that the four fiber genes have arisen from gene duplication events but have subsequently diverged significantly. The silk-associated genes encode proteins likely to act as a glue (AmelSA1) and involved in silk processing (AmelSA2). Although the silks of honey bees and silkmoths both originate in larval labial glands, the silk proteins are completely different in their primary, secondary, and tertiary structures as well as the genomic arrangement of the genes encoding them. This implies independent evolutionary origins for these functionally related proteins.

  19. Identification of three related human GRO genes encoding cytokine functions

    SciTech Connect

    Haskill, S.; Peace, A.; Morris, J.; Sporn, S.A. ); Anisowicz, A.; Lee, S.W.; Sager, R. ); Smith, T. ); Martin, G.; Ralph, P. )

    1990-10-01

    The product of the human GRO gene is a cytokine with inflammatory and growth-regulatory properties; GRO is also called MGSA for melanoma growth-stimulatory activity. The authors have identified two additional genes, GRO{beta} and GRO{gamma}, that share 90{percent} and 86{percent} identity at the deduced amino acid level with the original GRO{alpha} isolate. One amino acid substitution of proline in GRO{alpha} by leucine in GRO{beta} and GRO{gamma} leads to a large predicted change in protein conformation. Significant differences also exist in the 3' untranslated region, including different numbers of ATTTA repeats associated with mRNA instability. A 122-base-pair region in the 3' region is conserved among the three GRO genes, and a part of it is also conserved in the Chinese hamster genome, suggesting a role in regulation. DNA hybridization with oligonucleotide probes and partial sequence analysis of the genomic clones confirm that the three forms are derived from related but different genes. Only one chromosomal locus has been identified, at 4q21, by using a GRO{alpha} cDNA clone that hybridized to all three genes. Expression studies reveal tissue-specific regulation as well as regulation by specific inducing agents, including interleukin 1, tumor necrosis factor, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and lipopolysaccharide.

  20. Isolation and characterization of genes encoding two chitinase enzymes from Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jonathan D. G.; Grady, Karen L.; Suslow, Trevor V.; Bedbrook, John R.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of clones isolated from a cosmid DNA library indicates that the Serratia marcescens chromosome contains at least two genes, chiA and chiB, which encode distinct secreted forms of the enzyme chitinase. These genes have been characterized by inspection of chitinase activity and secreted proteins in Escherichia coli strains containing subclones of these cosmids. The two chitinase genes show no detectable homology to each other. DNA sequence analysis of one of the genes predicts an amino acid sequence with an N-terminal signal peptide typical of genes encoding secreted bacterial proteins. This gene was mutagenized by cloning a neomycin phosphotransferase gene within its coding region, and the insertion mutation was recombined into the parental S. marcescens strain. The resulting chiA mutant transconjugant showed reduced chitinase production, reduced inhibition of fungal spore germination and reduced biological control of a fungal plant pathogen. ImagesFig. 2. PMID:16453672

  1. The transferome of metabolic genes explored: analysis of the horizontal transfer of enzyme encoding genes in unicellular eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, John W; McConkey, Glenn A; Westhead, David R

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic networks are responsible for many essential cellular processes, and exhibit a high level of evolutionary conservation from bacteria to eukaryotes. If genes encoding metabolic enzymes are horizontally transferred and are advantageous, they are likely to become fixed. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has played a key role in prokaryotic evolution and its importance in eukaryotes is increasingly evident. High levels of endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT) accompanied the establishment of plastids and mitochondria, and more recent events have allowed further acquisition of bacterial genes. Here, we present the first comprehensive multi-species analysis of E/HGT of genes encoding metabolic enzymes from bacteria to unicellular eukaryotes. The phylogenetic trees of 2,257 metabolic enzymes were used to make E/HGT assertions in ten groups of unicellular eukaryotes, revealing the sources and metabolic processes of the transferred genes. Analyses revealed a preference for enzymes encoded by genes gained through horizontal and endosymbiotic transfers to be connected in the metabolic network. Enrichment in particular functional classes was particularly revealing: alongside plastid related processes and carbohydrate metabolism, this highlighted a number of pathways in eukaryotic parasites that are rich in enzymes encoded by transferred genes, and potentially key to pathogenicity. The plant parasites Phytophthora were discovered to have a potential pathway for lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis of E/HGT origin not seen before in eukaryotes outside the Plantae. The number of enzymes encoded by genes gained through E/HGT has been established, providing insight into functional gain during the evolution of unicellular eukaryotes. In eukaryotic parasites, genes encoding enzymes that have been gained through horizontal transfer may be attractive drug targets if they are part of processes not present in the host, or are significantly diverged from equivalent host enzymes.

  2. NBS-LRR-Encoding genes in sorghum and their role in plant defense

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeats (NBS-LRR) proteins are encoded by a large class of plant genes and many of them play an important role in plant defense against pest attack. Identification and characterization of the whole set of NBS-LRR genes in a plant genome will provide insights int...

  3. Characterization of the gene encoding a fibrinogen-related protein expressed in Crassostrea gigas hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Skazina, M A; Gorbushin, A M

    2016-07-01

    Four exons of the CgFrep1 gene (3333 bp long) encode a putative fibrinogen-related protein (324 aa) bearing a single C-terminal FBG domain. Transcripts of the gene obtained from hemocytes of different Pacific oysters show prominent individual variation based on SNP and indels of tandem repeats resulted in polymorphism of N-terminus of the putative CgFrep1 polypeptide. The polypeptide chain bears N-terminal coiled-coil region potentially acting as inter-subunit interface in the protein oligomerization. It is suggested that CgFrep1 gene encodes the oligomeric lectin composed of at least two subunits.

  4. The EWS–Oct-4 fusion gene encodes a transforming gene

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwoon; Kim, Ja Young; Kang, In Young; Kim, Hye Kyoung; Han, Yong-Mahn; Kim, Jungho

    2007-01-01

    The t(6;22)(p21;q12) translocation associated with human bone and soft-tissue tumours results in a chimaeric molecule fusing the NTD (N-terminal domain) of the EWS (Ewing's sarcoma) gene to the CTD (C-terminal domain) of the Oct-4 (octamer-4) embryonic gene. Since the N-terminal domains of EWS and Oct-4 are structurally different, in the present study we have assessed the functional consequences of the EWS–Oct-4 fusion. We find that this chimaeric gene encodes a nuclear protein which binds DNA with the same sequence specificity as the parental Oct-4 protein. Comparison of the transactivation properties of EWS–Oct-4 and Oct-4 indicates that the former has higher transactivation activity for a known target reporter gene containing Oct-4 binding. Deletion analysis of the functional domains of EWS–Oct-4 indicates that the EWS (NTD), the POU domain and the CTD of EWS–Oct-4 are necessary for full transactivation potential. EWS–Oct-4 induced the expression of fgf-4 (fibroblast growth factor 4) and nanog, which are potent mitogens as well as Oct-4 downstream target genes whose promoters contain potential Oct-4-binding sites. Finally, ectopic expression of EWS–Oct-4 in Oct-4-null ZHBTc4 ES (embryonic stem) cells resulted in increased tumorigenic growth potential in nude mice. These results suggest that the oncogenic effect of the t(6;22) translocation is due to the EWS–Oct-4 chimaeric protein and that fusion of the EWS NTD to the Oct-4 DNA-binding domain produces a transforming chimaeric product. PMID:17564582

  5. Escherichia coli yjjPB genes encode a succinate transporter important for succinate production.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Keita; Nanatani, Kei; Hara, Yoshihiko; Yamakami, Suguru; Yahagi, Daiki; Chinen, Akito; Tokura, Mitsunori; Abe, Keietsu

    2017-09-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, Escherichia coli produces succinate from glucose via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. To date, however, no genes encoding succinate exporters have been established in E. coli. Therefore, we attempted to identify genes encoding succinate exporters by screening an E. coli MG1655 genome library. We identified the yjjPB genes as candidates encoding a succinate transporter, which enhanced succinate production in Pantoea ananatis under aerobic conditions. A complementation assay conducted in Corynebacterium glutamicum strain AJ110655ΔsucE1 demonstrated that both YjjP and YjjB are required for the restoration of succinate production. Furthermore, deletion of yjjPB decreased succinate production in E. coli by 70% under anaerobic conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that YjjPB constitutes a succinate transporter in E. coli and that the products of both genes are required for succinate export.

  6. Cloning of a Serratia marcescens Gene Encoding Chitinase

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, R. L.; McPherson, S. A.; Drahos, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Serratia marcescens, a chitinase-producing microorganism, was shown to produce five unique chitinolytic proteins with subunit molecular masses of 21, 36, 48, 52, and 57 kilodaltons. A cosmid library of S. marcescens DNA was constructed in the broad-host-range cosmid pLAFR1 and screened in Escherichia coli for clones capable of degrading chitin. A total of four independent clones (22- to 27-kilobase inserts) were isolated, characterized by restriction endonuclease digestion, and shown to share a common 9.5-kilobase EcoR1 fragment apparently encoding the same 57-kilodalton chitinase, the most abundant chitinase produced by S. marcescens. Chitinase expression from these constructs in both E. coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens 701E1 is apparently driven by an S. marcescens promoter. The significantly higher chitinase levels produced in E. coli relative to those in P. fluorescens 701E1 suggest that E. coli may recognize this promoter sequence more efficiently than P. fluorescens. Images PMID:16347012

  7. Palaeontology: turtles in transition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S Y

    2013-06-17

    One of the major remaining gaps in the vertebrate fossil record concerns the origin of turtles. The enigmatic little reptile Eunotosaurus could represent an important transitional form, as it has a rudimentary shell that resembles the turtle carapace.

  8. The gene encoding topoisomerase II from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Cheesman, S; McAleese, S; Goman, M; Johnson, D; Horrocks, P; Ridley, R G; Kilbey, B J

    1994-07-11

    The gene for topoisomerase II has been isolated from genomic libraries of strain K1 of the human malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. The sequence reveals an open reading frame of 4194 nucleotides which predicts a polypeptide of 1398 amino acids. There are apparently no introns. The sequence is present as a single copy which has an identity of 47.4% and a similarity of 65.4% with its human homologue. Sequences conserved in topoisomerase II from other species are present in Pftopoisomerase II but in addition it has two adjacent asparagine-rich insertions which are unique to it. We have also detected asparagine-rich regions in the gene for PfDNA polymerase alpha. The gene for Pftopoisomerase II has been localised to chromosome 14 and northern analysis reveals a transcript of 5.8 kb. Two independent antisera raised in mice against glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins containing the amino terminal portion of the malarial protein detect a weak band on western blots at about 160kDa, the expected size of the protein. Use of the same antisera for immunofluorescence analysis suggests that the protein is present at all stages of intraerythrocytic growth of the parasite.

  9. Eukaryotic expression vectors containing genes encoding plant proteins for killing of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Glinka, Elena M

    2013-12-01

    Gene therapy has attracted attention for its potential to specifically and efficiently target cancer cells with minimal toxicity to normal cells. At present, it offers a promising direction for the treatment of cancer patients. Numerous vectors have been engineered for the sole purpose of killing cancer cells, and some have successfully suppressed malignant tumours. Many plant proteins have anticancer properties; consequently, genes encoding some of these proteins are being used to design constructs for the inhibition of multiplying cancer cells. Data addressing the function of vectors harbouring genes specifically encoding ricin, saporin, lunasin, linamarase, and tomato thymidine kinase 1 under the control of different promoters are summarised here. Constructs employing genes to encode cytotoxic proteins as well as constructs employing genes of enzymes that convert a nontoxic prodrug into a toxic drug are considered here. Generation of eukaryotic expression vectors containing genes encoding plant proteins for killing of cancer cells may permit the broadening of cancer gene therapy strategy, particularly because of the specific mode of action of anticancer plant proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Expression of hcp in freshwater Synechococcus spp., a gene encoding a hyperconserved protein in picocyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kutovaya, Olga A; McKay, R Michael L; Bullerjahn, George S

    2010-06-01

    Marine picoplankton of the genus Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus spp. are widely studied members of the picocyanobacterial clade, composed of unicellular cyanobacteria that dominate pelagic regions of the ocean. Less studied are the related freshwater Synechococcus spp. that similarly dominate the euphotic zone of oligotrophic lakes. Previous work has shown that marine picocyanobacteria harbor a small gene, hcp, that encodes a 62 amino acid protein 100% conserved among all strains examined. The gene is restricted exclusively to the picocyanobacterial lineage. The current study reveals that hcp is also 100% conserved in four freshwater Synechococcus spp. strains isolated from the Laurentian Great Lakes, and that the gene constitutively expressed with genes encoding a ribosomal protein and two tRNA genes. The synteny of the hcp region is also conserved between the marine and freshwater strains. Last, the hcp gene and the organization of the surrounding genetic region has been retained in the reduced genome of a picocyanobacterial endosymbiont of the amoeba Paulinella sp.

  11. The ZIC gene family encodes multi-functional proteins essential for patterning and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Houtmeyers, Rob; Souopgui, Jacob; Tejpar, Sabine; Arkell, Ruth

    2013-10-01

    The zinc finger of the cerebellum gene (ZIC) discovered in Drosophila melanogaster (odd-paired) has five homologs in Xenopus, chicken, mice, and humans, and seven in zebrafish. This pattern of gene copy expansion is accompanied by a divergence in gene and protein structure, suggesting that Zic family members share some, but not all, functions. ZIC genes are implicated in neuroectodermal development and neural crest cell induction. All share conserved regions encoding zinc finger domains, however their heterogeneity and specification remain unexplained. In this review, the evolution, structure, and expression patterns of the ZIC homologs are described; specific functions attributable to individual family members are supported. A review of data from functional studies in Xenopus and murine models suggest that ZIC genes encode multifunctional proteins operating in a context-specific manner to drive critical events during embryogenesis. The identification of ZIC mutations in congenital syndromes highlights the relevance of these genes in human development.

  12. A unique endoglucanase-encoding gene cloned from the phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Jones, R W

    1995-05-01

    The deduced amino acid sequence derived from a Macrophomina phaseolina beta-1,4-endoglucanase-encoding gene revealed 48% identity (over 119 amino acids) with egl1 from the phytopathogen Pseudomonas solanacearum. Its similarity to saprophyte endoglucanases was not significant. Its minimum substrate size, unlike that of any known saprophyte endoglucanase, was cellopentaose. The unique characteristics of M. phaseolina egl1-encoded endoglucanase suggest that it is phytopathogen specific.

  13. A unique endoglucanase-encoding gene cloned from the phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H; Jones, R W

    1995-01-01

    The deduced amino acid sequence derived from a Macrophomina phaseolina beta-1,4-endoglucanase-encoding gene revealed 48% identity (over 119 amino acids) with egl1 from the phytopathogen Pseudomonas solanacearum. Its similarity to saprophyte endoglucanases was not significant. Its minimum substrate size, unlike that of any known saprophyte endoglucanase, was cellopentaose. The unique characteristics of M. phaseolina egl1-encoded endoglucanase suggest that it is phytopathogen specific. PMID:7646037

  14. Comparative differential gene expression analysis of nucleus-encoded proteins for Rafflesia cantleyi against Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Siuk-Mun; Lee, Xin-Wei; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Regulation of functional nucleus-encoded proteins targeting the plastidial functions was comparatively studied for a plant parasite, Rafflesia cantleyi versus a photosynthetic plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. This study involved two species of different feeding modes and different developmental stages. A total of 30 nucleus-encoded proteins were found to be differentially-regulated during two stages in the parasite; whereas 17 nucleus-encoded proteins were differentially-expressed during two developmental stages in Arabidopsis thaliana. One notable finding observed for the two plants was the identification of genes involved in the regulation of photosynthesis-related processes where these processes, as expected, seem to be present only in the autotroph.

  15. Cloning and expression of prion protein encoding gene of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiwen; Sun, Xiuqin; Zhang, Jinxing; Zan, Jindong

    2008-02-01

    The prion protein (PrP) encoding gene of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) was cloned. It was not interrupted by an intron. This gene has two promoters in its 5' upstream, indicating that its transcription may be intensive, and should have an important function. It was expressed in all 14 tissues tested, demonstrating that it is a house-keeping gene. Its expression in digestion and reproduction systems implies that the possible prions of fish may transfer horizontally.

  16. Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding cytochrome c sub 553 from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    van Rooijen, G.J.H.; Voordouw, G. ); Bruschi, M. )

    1989-06-01

    The gene encoding cytochrome c{sub 553} from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was cloned by using two synthetic deoxyoligonucleotide probes. The amino acid sequence derived from the sequence of the gene differs from that reported by Bruschi and LeGall. Renewed protein sequencing confirmed the correctness of the DNA-derived sequence. The gene sequence indicates cytochrome c{sub 553} to be synthesized as a precursor protein with an NH{sub 2}-terminal signal sequence of 24 residues.

  17. Characterization of transcript processing of the gene encoding precerebellin-1.

    PubMed

    Kavety, B; Morgan, J I

    1998-12-10

    Precerebellin-1 (Cbln1) is a cerebellum-specific protein that shares significant sequence identity with the globular domains of the complement components C1qA, B and C, suggesting some common aspects of function and/or structure. As the C1q complex is composed of heterotrimers of C1qA, B and C it was hypothesized that multiple precerebellins may exist in a ternary complex. Northern blotting for cbln1 revealed multiple bands that could represent further family members or alternatively spliced variants. To discriminate these alternatives, probes derived from different regions of the cbln1 gene were used to identify and clone the transcripts detected on Northern blots. Four independent transcripts were repeatedly cloned from an adult mouse cerebellum cDNA library. Upon sequencing, all of these clones were found to be derived from the cbln1 gene and no additional precerebellin-related genes were isolated. Moreover, these clones accounted for the four cbln1-hybridizing bands (1.9, 2. 2, 3.2 and 5.5 kb) detected on Northern blots of adult cerebellum RNA. With one possible exception, these clones were all derived through alterations in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of cbln1 that did not affect the coding sequence. This was achieved by the use of two polyadenylation sites and alternative (non-canonical) splicing in the 3'-UTR. Some additional variation in mRNA structure is provided by the use of alternative transcription start sites in cbln1. The possible significance of this level of diversity in the 3'-UTR is discussed.

  18. The draft genomes of soft-shell turtle and green sea turtle yield insights into the development and evolution of the turtle-specific body plan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Pascual-Anaya, Juan; Zadissa, Amonida; Li, Wenqi; Niimura, Yoshihito; Huang, Zhiyong; Li, Chunyi; White, Simon; Xiong, Zhiqiang; Fang, Dongming; Wang, Bo; Ming, Yao; Chen, Yan; Zheng, Yuan; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Pignatelli, Miguel; Herrero, Javier; Beal, Kathryn; Nozawa, Masafumi; Li, Qiye; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Hongyan; Yu, Lili; Shigenobu, Shuji; Wang, Junyi; Liu, Jiannan; Flicek, Paul; Searle, Steve; Wang, Jun; Kuratani, Shigeru; Yin, Ye; Aken, Bronwen; Zhang, Guojie; Irie, Naoki

    2013-06-01

    The unique anatomical features of turtles have raised unanswered questions about the origin of their unique body plan. We generated and analyzed draft genomes of the soft-shell turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) and the green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas); our results indicated the close relationship of the turtles to the bird-crocodilian lineage, from which they split ∼267.9-248.3 million years ago (Upper Permian to Triassic). We also found extensive expansion of olfactory receptor genes in these turtles. Embryonic gene expression analysis identified an hourglass-like divergence of turtle and chicken embryogenesis, with maximal conservation around the vertebrate phylotypic period, rather than at later stages that show the amniote-common pattern. Wnt5a expression was found in the growth zone of the dorsal shell, supporting the possible co-option of limb-associated Wnt signaling in the acquisition of this turtle-specific novelty. Our results suggest that turtle evolution was accompanied by an unexpectedly conservative vertebrate phylotypic period, followed by turtle-specific repatterning of development to yield the novel structure of the shell.

  19. A neurotransmitter transporter encoded by the Drosophila inebriated gene

    PubMed Central

    Soehnge, Holly; Huang, Xi; Becker, Marie; Whitley, Penn; Conover, Diana; Stern, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Behavioral and electrophysiological studies on mutants defective in the Drosophila inebriated (ine) gene demonstrated increased excitability of the motor neuron. In this paper, we describe the cloning and sequence analysis of ine. Mutations in ine were localized on cloned DNA by restriction mapping and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) mapping of ine mutants. DNA from the ine region was then used to isolate an ine cDNA. In situ hybridization of ine transcripts to developing embryos revealed expression of this gene in several cell types, including the posterior hindgut, Malpighian tubules, anal plate, garland cells, and a subset of cells in the central nervous system. The ine cDNA contains an open reading frame of 658 amino acids with a high degree of sequence similarity to members of the Na+/Cl−-dependent neurotransmitter transporter family. Members of this family catalyze the rapid reuptake of neurotransmitters released into the synapse and thereby play key roles in controlling neuronal function. We conclude that ine mutations cause increased excitability of the Drosophila motor neuron by causing the defective reuptake of the substrate neurotransmitter of the ine transporter and thus overstimulation of the motor neuron by this neurotransmitter. From this observation comes a unique opportunity to perform a genetic dissection of the regulation of excitability of the Drosophila motor neuron. PMID:8917579

  20. The evolution of genes encoding for green fluorescent proteins: insights from cephalochordates (amphioxus)

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-01-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally found in cnidarians, and later in copepods and cephalochordates (amphioxus) (Branchiostoma spp). Here, we looked for GFP-encoding genes in Asymmetron, an early-diverged cephalochordate lineage, and found two such genes closely related to some of the Branchiostoma GFPs. Dim fluorescence was found throughout the body in adults of Asymmetron lucayanum, and, as in Branchiostoma floridae, was especially intense in the ripe ovaries. Spectra of the fluorescence were similar between Asymmetron and Branchiostoma. Lineage-specific expansion of GFP-encoding genes in the genus Branchiostoma was observed, largely driven by tandem duplications. Despite such expansion, purifying selection has strongly shaped the evolution of GFP-encoding genes in cephalochordates, with apparent relaxation for highly duplicated clades. All cephalochordate GFP-encoding genes are quite different from those of copepods and cnidarians. Thus, the ancestral cephalochordates probably had GFP, but since GFP appears to be lacking in more early-diverged deuterostomes (echinoderms, hemichordates), it is uncertain whether the ancestral cephalochordates (i.e. the common ancestor of Asymmetron and Branchiostoma) acquired GFP by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from copepods or cnidarians or inherited it from the common ancestor of copepods and deuterostomes, i.e. the ancestral bilaterians. PMID:27311567

  1. Characterization of two genes, Impa1 and Impa2 encoding mouse myo-inositol monophosphatases.

    PubMed

    Shamir, A; Sjøholt, G; Ebstein, R P; Agam, G; Steen, V M

    2001-06-27

    The enzyme myo-inositol monophosphatase (Impa) catalyzes the synthesis of free myo-inositol from various myo-inositol monophosphates in the phosphatidylinositol signaling system. Impa is a lithium-blockable enzyme that has been hypothesized to be the biological target for lithium-salts used as mood-stabilizing drugs in the treatment of manic-depressive (bipolar) illness. As an initial step to explore the functional consequences of reduced or absent Impa activity in an animal model we here report the isolation of two Impa-encoding mouse genes, Impa1 and Impa2. Impa1 spans approximately 17.5 kb and contains nine exons of 46--1354 bp encoding a protein of 277 amino acids. Impa2 spans at least 19.5 kb and contains eight exons of 46--444 bp size encoding a protein of 290 amino acids. The genomic structure including the positions of the exon-intron splice sites seems to be conserved among myo-inositol monophosphatase genes in mammalian species. One or more Impa-like genes do also exist in evolutionary more distant species like invertebrates, plants and bacteria. The proteins encoded by the non-vertebrate genes seem to be equally related to Impa1 and Impa2. We therefore suggest that the Impa1 and Impa2 genes duplicated from a common ancestral gene after the evolutionary divergence of vertebrates.

  2. The evolution of genes encoding for green fluorescent proteins: insights from cephalochordates (amphioxus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-06-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally found in cnidarians, and later in copepods and cephalochordates (amphioxus) (Branchiostoma spp). Here, we looked for GFP-encoding genes in Asymmetron, an early-diverged cephalochordate lineage, and found two such genes closely related to some of the Branchiostoma GFPs. Dim fluorescence was found throughout the body in adults of Asymmetron lucayanum, and, as in Branchiostoma floridae, was especially intense in the ripe ovaries. Spectra of the fluorescence were similar between Asymmetron and Branchiostoma. Lineage-specific expansion of GFP-encoding genes in the genus Branchiostoma was observed, largely driven by tandem duplications. Despite such expansion, purifying selection has strongly shaped the evolution of GFP-encoding genes in cephalochordates, with apparent relaxation for highly duplicated clades. All cephalochordate GFP-encoding genes are quite different from those of copepods and cnidarians. Thus, the ancestral cephalochordates probably had GFP, but since GFP appears to be lacking in more early-diverged deuterostomes (echinoderms, hemichordates), it is uncertain whether the ancestral cephalochordates (i.e. the common ancestor of Asymmetron and Branchiostoma) acquired GFP by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from copepods or cnidarians or inherited it from the common ancestor of copepods and deuterostomes, i.e. the ancestral bilaterians.

  3. Unusual conservation among genes encoding small secreted salivary gland proteins from a gall midge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Shun; Liu, Xuming; Yang, Ziheng; Zhao, Huixian; Shukle, Richard H; Stuart, Jeffrey J; Hulbert, Scot

    2010-09-28

    In most protein-coding genes, greater sequence variation is observed in noncoding regions (introns and untranslated regions) than in coding regions due to selective constraints. During characterization of genes and transcripts encoding small secreted salivary gland proteins (SSSGPs) from the Hessian fly, we found exactly the opposite pattern of conservation in several families of genes: the non-coding regions were highly conserved, but the coding regions were highly variable. Seven genes from the SSSGP-1 family are clustered as one inverted and six tandem repeats within a 15 kb region of the genome. Except for SSSGP-1A2, a gene that encodes a protein identical to that encoded by SSSGP-1A1, the other six genes consist of a highly diversified, mature protein-coding region as well as highly conserved regions including the promoter, 5'- and 3'-UTRs, a signal peptide coding region, and an intron. This unusual pattern of highly diversified coding regions coupled with highly conserved regions in the rest of the gene was also observed in several other groups of SSSGP-encoding genes or cDNAs. The unusual conservation pattern was also found in some of the SSSGP cDNAs from the Asian rice gall midge, but not from the orange wheat blossom midge. Strong positive selection was one of the forces driving for diversification whereas concerted homogenization was likely a mechanism for sequence conservation. Rapid diversification in mature SSSGPs suggests that the genes are under selection pressure for functional adaptation. The conservation in the noncoding regions of these genes including introns also suggested potential mechanisms for sequence homogenization that are not yet fully understood. This report should be useful for future studies on genetic mechanisms involved in evolution and functional adaptation of parasite genes.

  4. The same Arabidopsis gene encodes both cytosolic and mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed Central

    Mireau, H; Lancelin, D; Small, I D

    1996-01-01

    In plants, all aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are nuclearly encoded, despite the fact that their activities are required in the three protein-synthesizing cell compartments (cytosol, mitochondria, and chloroplasts). To investigate targeting of these enzymes, we cloned cDNAs encoding alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS) and the corresponding nuclear gene, ALATS, from Arabidopsis by using degenerate polymerase chain reaction primers based on highly conserved regions shared between known AlaRSs from other organisms. Analysis of the transcription of the gene showed the presence of two potential translation initiation codons in some ALATS mRNAs. Translation from the upstream AUG would generate an N-terminal extension with features characteristic of mitochondrial targeting peptides. A polyclonal antibody raised against part of the Arabidopsis AlaRS revealed that the Arabidopsis cytosolic and mitochondrial AlaRSs are immunologically similar, suggesting that both isoforms are encoded by the ALATS gene. In vitro experiments confirmed that two polypeptides can be translated from AlATS transcripts, with most ribosomes initiating on the downstream AUG to give the shorter polypeptide corresponding in size to the cytosolic enzyme. The ability of the presequence encoded between the two initiation codons to direct polypeptides to mitochondria was demonstrated by expression of fusion proteins in tobacco protoplasts and in yeast. We conclude that the ALATS gene encodes both the cytosolic and the mitochondrial forms of AlaRS, depending on which of the two AUG codons is used to initiate translation. PMID:8672889

  5. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  6. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  7. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vaka S; Ali, Gul S; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2002-03-22

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  8. A hydrogenase-linked gene in Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum strain delta H encodes a polyferredoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, J N; Beckler, G S; Cram, D S; Hamilton, P T; Brown, J W; Krzycki, J A; Kolodziej, A F; Alex, L; Orme-Johnson, W H; Walsh, C T

    1989-01-01

    The genes mvhDGA, which encode the subunit polypeptides of the methyl viologen-reducing hydrogenase in Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum strain delta H, have been cloned and sequenced. These genes, together with a fourth open reading frame designated mvhB, are tightly linked and appear to form an operon that is transcribed starting 42 base pairs upstream of mvhD. The organization and sequences of the mvhG and mvhA genes indicate a common evolutionary ancestry with genes encoding the small and large subunits of hydrogenases in eubacterial species. The product of the mvhB gene is predicted to contain six tandomly repeated bacterial-ferredoxin-like domains and, therefore, is predicted to be a polyferredoxin that could contain as many as 48 iron atoms in 12 Fe4S4 clusters. PMID:2654933

  9. Identification and Properties of the Genes Encoding Microcin E492 and Its Immunity Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lagos, Rosalba; Villanueva, Jorge E.; Monasterio, Octavio

    1999-01-01

    The gene coding for the immunity protein (mceB) and the structural gene of microcin E492 (mceA), a low-molecular-weight channel-forming bacteriocin produced by a strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae, have been characterized. The microcin gene codes for a precursor protein of either 99 or 103 amino acids. Protein sequencing of the N-terminal region of microcin E492 unequivocally identified this gene as the microcin structural gene and indicated that this microcin is synthesized as a precursor protein that is cleaved at either amino acid 15 or 19, at a site resembling the double-glycine motif. The gene encoding the 95-amino-acid immunity protein (mceB) was identified by cloning the DNA segment that encodes only this polypeptide into an expression vector and demonstrating the acquisition of immunity to microcin E492. As expected, the immunity protein was found to be associated with the inner membrane. Analysis of the DNA sequence indicates that these genes belong to the same family as microcin 24, and they do not share structural motifs with any other known channel-forming bacteriocin. The organization of the microcin- and immunity protein-encoding genes suggests that they are coordinately expressed. PMID:9864332

  10. The euryhaline yeast Debaryomyces hansenii has two catalase genes encoding enzymes with differential activity profile.

    PubMed

    Segal-Kischinevzky, Claudia; Rodarte-Murguía, Beatriz; Valdés-López, Victor; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; González, Alicia; Alba-Lois, Luisa

    2011-03-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii is a spoilage yeast able to grow in a variety of ecological niches, from seawater to dairy products. Results presented in this article show that (i) D. hansenii has an inherent resistance to H2O2 which could be attributed to the fact that this yeast has a basal catalase activity which is several-fold higher than that observed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under the same culture conditions, (ii) D. hansenii has two genes (DhCTA1 and DhCTT1) encoding two catalase isozymes with a differential enzymatic activity profile which is not strictly correlated with a differential expression profile of the encoding genes.

  11. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes cause various disorders of connective tissues. This minireview focuses on growing glycobiological studies of recently described genetic diseases caused by disturbances in biosynthetic enzymes for sulfated GAGs. PMID:23457301

  12. Common origin of plasmid encoded alpha-hemolysin genes in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Alpha (α)-hemolysin is a pore forming cytolysin and serves as a virulence factor in intestinal and extraintestinal pathogenic strains of E. coli. It was suggested that the genes encoding α-hemolysin (hlyCABD) which can be found on the chromosome and plasmid, were acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Plasmid-encoded α-hly is associated with certain enterotoxigenic (ETEC), shigatoxigenic (STEC) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) strains. In uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), the α-hly genes are located on chromosomal pathogenicity islands. Previous work suggested that plasmid and chromosomally encoded α-hly may have evolved independently. This was explored in our study. Results We have investigated 11 α-hly plasmids from animal and human ETEC, STEC and EPEC strains. The size of α-hly plasmids ranges from 48-157 kb and eight plasmids are conjugative. The regulatory gene (hlyR) located upstream of the hlyCABD gene operon and an IS911 element located downstream of hlyD are conserved. Chromosomally-encoded α-hly operons lack the hlyR and IS911 elements. The DNA sequence of hlyC and hlyA divided the plasmid- and chromosomally-encoded α-hemolysins into two clusters. The plasmid-encoded α-hly genes could be further divided into three groups based on the insertion of IS1 and IS2 in the regulatory region upstream of the α-hly operon. Transcription of the hlyA gene was higher than the housekeeping icdA gene in all strains (rq 4.8 to 143.2). Nucleotide sequence analysis of a chromosomally located α-hly determinant in Enterobacter cloacae strain indicates that it originates from an E. coli α-hly plasmid. Conclusion Our data indicate that plasmids encoding α-hly in E. coli descended from a common ancestor independent of the plasmid size and the origin of the strains. Conjugative plasmids could contribute to the spread of the α-hly determinant to Enterobacter cloacae. The presence of IS-elements flanking the plasmid-encoded α-hly indicate that they

  13. Characterization of the FKBP12-Encoding Genes in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Amber D.; Vargas-Muñiz, José M.; Renshaw, Hilary; Steinbach, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis, largely caused by Aspergillus fumigatus, is responsible for a growing number of deaths among immunosuppressed patients. Immunosuppressants such as FK506 (tacrolimus) that target calcineurin have shown promise for antifungal drug development. FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) form a complex with calcineurin in the presence of FK506 (FKBP12-FK506) and inhibit calcineurin activity. Research on FKBPs in fungi is limited, and none of the FKBPs have been previously characterized in A. fumigatus. We identified four orthologous genes of FKBP12, the human FK506 binding partner, in A. fumigatus and designated them fkbp12-1, fkbp12-2, fkbp12-3, and fkbp12-4. Deletional analysis of the four genes revealed that the Δfkbp12-1 strain was resistant to FK506, indicating FKBP12-1 as the key mediator of FK506-binding to calcineurin. The endogenously expressed FKBP12-1-EGFP fusion protein localized to the cytoplasm and nuclei under normal growth conditions but also to the hyphal septa following FK506 treatment, revealing its interaction with calcineurin. The FKBP12-1-EGFP fusion protein didn’t localize at the septa in the presence of FK506 in the cnaA deletion background, confirming its interaction with calcineurin. Testing of all deletion strains in the Galleria mellonella model of aspergillosis suggested that these proteins don’t play an important role in virulence. While the Δfkbp12-2 and Δfkbp12-3 strains didn’t show any discernable phenotype, the Δfkbp12-4 strain displayed slight growth defect under normal growth conditions and inhibition of the caspofungin-mediated “paradoxical growth effect” at higher concentrations of the antifungal caspofungin. Together, these results indicate that while only FKBP12-1 is the bona fide binding partner of FK506, leading to the inhibition of calcineurin in A. fumigatus, FKBP12-4 may play a role in basal growth and the caspofungin-mediated paradoxical growth response. Exploitation of differences between A

  14. Association of the gene encoding neurogranin with schizophrenia in males.

    PubMed

    Ruano, Dina; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Macedo, António; Soares, Maria J; Valente, José; Azevedo, Maria H; Hutz, Mara H; Gama, Clarissa S; Lobato, Maria I; Belmonte-de-Abreu, Paulo; Goodman, Ann B; Pato, Carlos; Heutink, Peter; Palha, Joana A

    2008-01-01

    The neurogranin (NRGN) gene produces a postsynaptic brain-specific protein that regulates calmodulin-Ca(2+) availability in neurons. Acting downstream of the NMDA receptor and upstream of calcineurin and other proteins implicated in schizophrenia, NRGN is a good candidate for association studies in schizophrenia. NRGN expression is regulated during development and is modulated by thyroid hormones and retinoids, molecules essential for the proper development of the central nervous system. Given the genetic complexity of schizophrenia and the potential genetic heterogeneity in different populations, we studied a possible association of NRGN with schizophrenia in 73 Azorean proband-parent triads and in two independent case-control samples from the Portuguese-mainland (244 schizophrenic and 210 controls) and Brazil (69 schizophrenic and 85 mentally healthy individuals). Genotype distribution showed association of the rs7113041 SNP with schizophrenia in males of Portuguese origin, which was confirmed by the analysis of the proband-parent triads. This evidence, implicating NRGN in schizophrenia, introduces another player into the glutamatergic hypothesis of schizophrenia.

  15. [Differential expression of genes that encode glycolysis enzymes in kidney and lung cancer in humans].

    PubMed

    Oparina, N Yu; Snezhkina, A V; Sadritdinova, A F; Veselovskii, V A; Dmitriev, A A; Senchenko, V N; Mel'nikova, N V; Speranskaya, A S; Darii, M V; Stepanov, O A; Barkhatov, I M; Kudryavtseva, A V

    2013-07-01

    Glycolysis is a main catabolic pathway of glucose metabolism, accompanied by ATP synthesis. More than 30 enzymes are involved in glycolysis, and genes that encode them can be considered housekeeping genes due to the high conservatism and evolutionary antiquity of the process. We studied the expression of these genes in kidney papillary cancer and planocellular lung cancer via the bioinformatic analysis of transcriptome database and method of quantitative real time PCR. Quantitative analysis of mRNA level demonstrated that only a part ofgenes that encode glycolysis enzymes maintain relatively stable mRNA level, including the HK1, ADPGK, GPI, PGK1, and PKM2 genes in kidney papillary cancer and the ADPGK, ALDOA, GAPDH, PGK1, BPGM, ENO1, and PKM2 genes in planocellular lung cancer. The frequent increase in the mRNA expression of PFKP, ALDOA, and GAPDH genes in kidney cancer, as well as the GPI gene in lung cancer, were detected for the first time by real time PCR. For other genes, their differential expression was demonstrated; the cases of both a decrease and increase in the mRNA level were detected. Thus, several genes that can be used as control genes in transcriptome analysis by real time PCR in kidney and lung cancer, as well as a number of differentially expressed genes that can be potential oncomarkers, were identified.

  16. Cloning and expression of genes encoding Haemophilus somnus antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Corbeil, L B; Chikami, G; Yarnall, M; Smith, J; Guiney, D G

    1988-01-01

    A genomic library of Haemophilus somnus 2336, a virulent isolate from a calf with pneumonia (later used to reproduce H. somnus experimental pneumonia), was constructed in the cosmid vector pHC79. The gene bank in Escherichia coli DH1 was screened by filter immunoassay with convalescent-phase serum, which reacted with several outer membrane antigens of H. somnus. On Western blotting (immunoblotting) of immunoreactive colonies, five clones were found to express proteins which comigrated with H. somnus surface antigens. Three clones (DH1 pHS1, pHS3, and pHS4) expressed both a 120-kilodalton (kDa) antigen and a 76-kDa antigen, one clone (DH1 pHS2) expressed only the 76-kDa antigen, and the fifth clone (DH1 pHS5) expressed a 60-kDa antigen. The 120-kDa and 76-kDa antigens were found internally, whereas the 60-kDa protein was detected in the DH1 pHS5 culture supernatant as membrane blebs or insoluble protein. Both the H. somnus 120-kDa antigen and the recombinant 120-kDa antigen had immunoglobulin Fc-binding activity. Restriction endonuclease mapping demonstrated that the genomic DNA inserts of clones expressing the 76-kDa antigen shared a common 28.4-kilobase-pair region, and the three clones also expressing the 120-kDa antigen shared an additional 7.0-kilobase-pair region. The restriction endonuclease map of pHS5, which expressed the 60-kDa antigen, was not similar to the maps of the other four plasmids. Since these three H. somnus antigens reacted with protective convalescent-phase serum, the recombinants which express these proteins should be useful in further studies of protective immunity in bovine H. somnus disease. Images PMID:2843469

  17. Identification of the VH genes encoding xenoantibodies in non-immunosuppressed rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Kleihauer, Annette; Gregory, Clare R; Borie, Dominic C; Kyles, Andrew E; Shulkin, Irina; Patanwala, Insiyyah; Zahorsky-Reeves, Joanne; Starnes, Vaughn A; Mullen, Yoko; Todorov, Ivan T; Kearns-Jonker, Mary

    2005-01-01

    The major immunological barrier that prevents the use of wild-type pig xenografts as an alternative source of organs for human xenotransplantation is antibody-mediated rejection. In this study, we identify the immunoglobulin variable region heavy (IgVH) chain genes encoding xenoantibodies to porcine heart and fetal porcine islet xenografts in non-immunosuppressed rhesus monkeys. We sought to compare the IgVH genes encoding xenoantibodies to porcine islets and solid organ xenografts. The immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG xenoantibody response was analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and cDNA libraries from peripheral blood lymphocytes were prepared and sequenced. The relative frequency of IgVH gene usage was established by colony filter hybridization. Induced xenoantibodies were encoded by the IGHV3-11 germline progenitor, the same germline gene that encodes xenoantibodies in humans mounting active xenoantibody responses. The immune response to pig xenografts presented as solid organs or isolated cells is mediated by identical IgVH genes in rhesus monkeys. These animals represent a clinically relevant model to identify the immunological basis of pig-to-human xenograft rejection. PMID:16108821

  18. Population-level expression variability of mitochondrial DNA-encoded genes in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Yang, Ence; Mandhan, Ishita; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L; Cai, James J

    2014-01-01

    Human mitochondria contain multiple copies of a circular genome made up of double-stranded DNA (mtDNA) that encodes proteins involved in cellular respiration. Transcript abundance of mtDNA-encoded genes varies between human individuals, yet the level of variation in the general population has not been systematically assessed. In the present study, we revisited large-scale RNA sequencing data generated from lymphoblastoid cell lines of HapMap samples of European and African ancestry to estimate transcript abundance and quantify expression variation for mtDNA-encoded genes. In both populations, we detected up to over 100-fold difference in mtDNA gene expression between individuals. The marked variation was not due to differences in mtDNA copy number between individuals, but was shaped by the transcription of hundreds of nuclear genes. Many of these nuclear genes were co-expressed with one another, resulting in a module-enriched co-expression network. Significant correlations in expression between genes of the mtDNA and nuclear genomes were used to identify factors involved with the regulation of mitochondrial functions. In conclusion, we determined the baseline amount of variability in mtDNA gene expression in general human populations and cataloged a complete set of nuclear genes whose expression levels are correlated with those of mtDNA-encoded genes. Our findings will enable the integration of information from both mtDNA and nuclear genetic systems, and facilitate the discovery of novel regulatory pathways involving mitochondrial functions. PMID:24398800

  19. Compensation for differences in gene copy number among yeast ribosomal proteins is encoded within their promoters

    PubMed Central

    Zeevi, Danny; Sharon, Eilon; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Lubling, Yaniv; Shipony, Zohar; Raveh-Sadka, Tali; Keren, Leeat; Levo, Michal; Weinberger, Adina; Segal, Eran

    2011-01-01

    Coordinate regulation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes is key for controlling cell growth. In yeast, it is unclear how this regulation achieves the required equimolar amounts of the different RP components, given that some RP genes exist in duplicate copies, while others have only one copy. Here, we tested whether the solution to this challenge is partly encoded within the DNA sequence of the RP promoters, by fusing 110 different RP promoters to a fluorescent gene reporter, allowing us to robustly detect differences in their promoter activities that are as small as ∼10%. We found that single-copy RP promoters have significantly higher activities, suggesting that proper RP stoichiometry is indeed partly encoded within the RP promoters. Notably, we also partially uncovered how this regulation is encoded by finding that RP promoters with higher activity have more nucleosome-disfavoring sequences and characteristic spatial organizations of these sequences and of binding sites for key RP regulators. Mutations in these elements result in a significant decrease of RP promoter activity. Thus, our results suggest that intrinsic (DNA-dependent) nucleosome organization may be a key mechanism by which genomes encode biologically meaningful promoter activities. Our approach can readily be applied to uncover how transcriptional programs of other promoters are encoded. PMID:22009988

  20. Geographic variation in marine turtle fibropapillomatosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenblatt, R.J.; Work, Thierry M.; Dutton, P.; Sutton, C.A.; Spraker, T.R.; Casey, R.N.; Diez, C.E.; Parker, Dana C.; St. Ledger, J.; Balazs, G.H.; Casey, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    We document three examples of fibropapillomatosis by histology, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and sequence analysis from three different geographic areas. Tumors compatible in morphology with fibropapillomatosis were seen in green turtles from Puerto Rico and San Diego (California) and in a hybrid loggerhead/ hawksbill turtle from Florida Bay (Florida). Tumors were confirmed as fibropapillomas on histology, although severity of disease varied between cases. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses revealed infection with the fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesvirus (FPTHV) in all cases, albeit at highly variable copy numbers per cell. Alignment of a portion of the polymerase gene from each fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesvirus isolate demonstrated geographic variation in sequence. These cases illustrate geographic variation in both the pathology and the virology of fibropapillomatosis.

  1. Geographic variation in marine turtle fibropapillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Greenblatt, Rebecca J; Work, Thierry M; Dutton, Peter; Sutton, Claudia A; Spraker, Terry R; Casey, Rufina N; Diez, Carlos E; Parker, Denise; St Leger, Judy; Balazs, George H; Casey, James W

    2005-09-01

    We document three examples of fibropapillomatosis by histology, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and sequence analysis from three different geographic areas. Tumors compatible in morphology with fibropapillomatosis were seen in green turtles from Puerto Rico and San Diego (California) and in a hybrid loggerhead/ hawksbill turtle from Florida Bay (Florida). Tumors were confirmed as fibropapillomas on histology, although severity of disease varied between cases. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses revealed infection with the fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesvirus (FPTHV) in all cases, albeit at highly variable copy numbers per cell. Alignment of a portion of the polymerase gene from each fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesvirus isolate demonstrated geographic variation in sequence. These cases illustrate geographic variation in both the pathology and the virology of fibropapillomatosis.

  2. Geographic variation in marine turtle fibropapillomatosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenblatt, R.J.; Work, T.M.; Dutton, P.; Sutton, C.A.; Spraker, T.R.; Casey, R.N.; Diez, C.E.; Parker, Dana C.; St. Ledger, J.; Balazs, G.H.; Casey, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    We document three examples of fibropapillomatosis by histology, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and sequence analysis from three different geographic areas. Tumors compatible in morphology with fibropapillomatosis were seen in green turtles from Puerto Rico and San Diego (California) and in a hybrid loggerhead/ hawksbill turtle from Florida Bay (Florida). Tumors were confirmed as fibropapillomas on histology, although severity of disease varied between cases. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses revealed infection with the fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesvirus (FPTHV) in all cases, albeit at highly variable copy numbers per cell. Alignment of a portion of the polymerase gene from each fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesvirus isolate demonstrated geographic variation in sequence. These cases illustrate geographic variation in both the pathology and the virology of fibropapillomatosis.

  3. Prevalence of Salmonella spp. in pet turtles and their environment.

    PubMed

    Back, Du-San; Shin, Gee-Wook; Wendt, Mitchell; Heo, Gang-Joon

    2016-09-01

    Pet turtles are known as a source of Salmonella infection to humans when handled in captivity. Thirty four turtles purchased from pet shops and online markets in Korea were examined to determine whether the turtles and their environment were contaminated with Salmonella spp. Salmonella spp. were isolated from fecal samples of 17 turtles. These isolates were identified as S. enterica through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The isolation rate of Salmonella spp. from the soil and water samples increased over time. We concluded that a high percentage of turtles being sold in pet shops were infected with Salmonella spp., and their environments tend to become contaminated over time unless they are maintained properly. These results indicate that pet turtles could be a potential risk of salmonellosis in Korea.

  4. Prevalence of Salmonella spp. in pet turtles and their environment

    PubMed Central

    Back, Du-San; Shin, Gee-Wook; Wendt, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Pet turtles are known as a source of Salmonella infection to humans when handled in captivity. Thirty four turtles purchased from pet shops and online markets in Korea were examined to determine whether the turtles and their environment were contaminated with Salmonella spp. Salmonella spp. were isolated from fecal samples of 17 turtles. These isolates were identified as S. enterica through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The isolation rate of Salmonella spp. from the soil and water samples increased over time. We concluded that a high percentage of turtles being sold in pet shops were infected with Salmonella spp., and their environments tend to become contaminated over time unless they are maintained properly. These results indicate that pet turtles could be a potential risk of salmonellosis in Korea. PMID:27729933

  5. Characteristics analysis of the luzA gene encoding chaperone from Photobacterium leiognathi related to bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Lin, J W; Lin, B J; Chen, H Y; Weng, S F

    1998-03-27

    Nucleotide sequence of the luzA gene (GenBank accession No. AF039303) from Photobacterium leiognathi ATCC 25521 (NCIMB 2193) has been determined, and the chaperone encoded by the luzA gene was deduced. The LuzA chaperone has a calculated M(r) 26,295 and comprises 230 amino acid residues; the hydrophobic alpha-helix N-terminal 21 amino acid residues MKKTIFALLFMSVFI SYPSFA is the leader peptide, therefore the matured LuzA chaperone has a calculated M(r) 23,871 and comprises 209 amino acid residues only. The periplasmic LuzA chaperone is the protein concerned with the protein folding, assembly and stability. The luzA gene and the related genes are closely linked to the sod gene, that encoding Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase enables to enhance bioluminescence of the lux operon; the gene order of the luzA gene and related genes is -ufo'-luzA-ufoI-ufoII-ter->-R&R'-sod-ufo-- >. In trans complementation bioluminoassays in vivo elicit that the LuzA chaperone might be not directly concerned with bioluminescence of the lux operon from P. leiognathi in E. coli, but might enable to stabilize the proteins related to bioluminescence. The unidentified ufoII gene closely linked to the luzA gene is able to enhance bioluminescence.

  6. Structure, Expression, Chromosomal Location and Product of the Gene Encoding Adh2 in Petunia

    PubMed Central

    Gregerson, R. G.; Cameron, L.; McLean, M.; Dennis, P.; Strommer, J.

    1993-01-01

    In most higher plants the genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase comprise a small gene family, usually with two members. The Adh1 gene of Petunia has been cloned and analyzed, but a second identifiable gene was not recovered from any of three genomic libraries. We have therefore employed the polymerase chain reaction to obtain the major portion of a second Adh gene. From sequence, mapping and northern data we conclude this gene encodes ADH2, the major anaerobically inducible Adh gene of Petunia. The availability of both Adh1 and Adh2 from Petunia has permitted us to compare their structures and patterns of expression to those of the well-studied Adh genes of maize, of which one is highly expressed developmentally, while both are induced in response to hypoxia. Despite their evolutionary distance, evidenced by deduced amino acid sequence as well as taxonomic classification, the pairs of genes are regulated in strikingly similar ways in maize and Petunia. Our findings suggest a significant biological basis for the regulatory strategy employed by these distant species for differential expression of multiple Adh genes. PMID:8096485

  7. Intra- and inter-generic transfer of pathogenicity island-encoded virulence genes by cos phages.

    PubMed

    Chen, John; Carpena, Nuria; Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Ram, Geeta; Novick, Richard P; Penadés, José R

    2015-05-01

    Bacteriophage-mediated horizontal gene transfer is one of the primary driving forces of bacterial evolution. The pac-type phages are generally thought to facilitate most of the phage-mediated gene transfer between closely related bacteria, including that of mobile genetic elements-encoded virulence genes. In this study, we report that staphylococcal cos-type phages transferred the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island SaPIbov5 to non-aureus staphylococcal species and also to different genera. Our results describe the first intra- and intergeneric transfer of a pathogenicity island by a cos phage, and highlight a gene transfer mechanism that may have important implications for pathogen evolution.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of the phosphotransacetylase-encoding and acetate kinase-encoding genes (pta and ack) from Methanosarcina thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Singh-Wissmann, K; Ferry, J G

    1995-01-01

    Phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase catalyze the activation of acetate to acetyl coenzyme A in the first step of methanogenesis from acetate in Methanosarcina thermophila. The genes encoding these enzymes (pta and ack) have been cloned and sequenced. They are arranged on the chromosome with pta upstream of ack (M.T. Latimer, and J. G. Ferry, J. Bacteriol. 175:6822-6829, 1993). The activities of phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase are at least 8- to 11-fold higher in acetate-grown cells than in cells grown on methanol, monomethylamine, dimethylamine, or trimethylamine. Northern blot (RNA) analyses demonstrated that pta and ack are transcribed as an approximately 2.4-kb polycistronic message and that the regulation of enzyme synthesis occurs at the mRNA level. Primer extension analyses revealed a transcriptional start site located 27 bp upstream from the translational start of the pta gene and 24 bp downstream from a consensus archaeal boxA promoter sequence. S1 nuclease protection assays detected transcripts with four different 3' ends, each of which mapped to the beginning of four consecutive direct repeats. Northern blot analysis using an ack-specific probe detected both the 2.4-kb polycistronic transcript and a smaller 1.4-kb transcript which is the estimated size of monocistronic ack mRNA. A primer extension product was detected with an ack-specific primer; the 5' end of the product was in the intergenic region between the pta and ack genes but did not follow a consensus archaeal boxA sequence. This result, as well as detection of an additional 1.4-kb mRNA species, suggests processing of the polycistronic 2.4-kb transcript. PMID:7896690

  9. Sequence and transcriptional analysis of the nourseothricin acetyltransferase-encoding gene nat1 from Streptomyces noursei.

    PubMed

    Krügel, H; Fiedler, G; Smith, C; Baumberg, S

    1993-05-15

    We have determined the nucleotide (nt) sequence of nat1, a gene encoding nourseothricin (Nc) acetyltransferase (AT) from Streptomyces noursei, and its transcriptional start point (tsp). The nt sequence upstream from the coding region is completely different from that of the stat gene (encoding streptothricin AT) from Streptomyces lavendulae [S. Horinouchi, K. Furuya, M. Nishiyama, H. Suzuki and T. Beppu, J. Bacteriol. 169 (1987) 1929-1937], even though the nt sequences of the two genes and the deduced amino acid (aa) sequences of the two enzymes show a high degree of similarity. Another stat gene, derived from a Gram-negative plasmid, showed only deduced aa similarity, but not nt sequence similarity, to the above two. A database search for related aa sequences did not reveal any clear-cut homologies to other types of protein. A multiple aa sequence alignment of several ATs is presented.

  10. A Gene Selection Method for Microarray Data Based on Binary PSO Encoding Gene-to-Class Sensitivity Information.

    PubMed

    Han, Fei; Yang, Chun; Wu, Ya-Qi; Zhu, Jian-Sheng; Ling, Qing-Hua; Song, Yu-Qing; Huang, De-Shuang

    2017-01-01

    Traditional gene selection methods for microarray data mainly considered the features' relevance by evaluating their utility for achieving accurate predication or exploiting data variance and distribution, and the selected genes were usually poorly explicable. To improve the interpretability of the selected genes as well as prediction accuracy, an improved gene selection method based on binary particle swarm optimization (BPSO) and prior information is proposed in this paper. In the proposed method, BPSO encoding gene-to-class sensitivity (GCS) information is used to perform gene selection. The gene-to-class sensitivity information, extracted from the samples by extreme learning machine (ELM), is encoded into the selection process in four aspects: initializing particles, updating the particles, modifying maximum velocity, and adopting mutation operation adaptively. Constrained by the gene-to-class sensitivity information, the new method can select functional gene subsets which are significantly sensitive to the samples' classes. With the few discriminative genes selected by the proposed method, ELM, K-nearest neighbor and support vector machine classifiers achieve much high prediction accuracy on five public microarray data, which in turn verifies the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed gene selection method.

  11. Genes Encoding Cher-TPR Fusion Proteins Are Predominantly Found in Gene Clusters Encoding Chemosensory Pathways with Alternative Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Alfonso, Carlos; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemosensory pathways correspond to major signal transduction mechanisms and can be classified into the functional families flagellum-mediated taxis, type four pili-mediated taxis or pathways with alternative cellular functions (ACF). CheR methyltransferases are core enzymes in all of these families. CheR proteins fused to tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains have been reported and we present an analysis of this uncharacterized family. We show that CheR-TPRs are widely distributed in GRAM-negative but almost absent from GRAM-positive bacteria. Most strains contain a single CheR-TPR and its abundance does not correlate with the number of chemoreceptors. The TPR domain fused to CheR is comparatively short and frequently composed of 2 repeats. The majority of CheR-TPR genes were found in gene clusters that harbor multidomain response regulators in which the REC domain is fused to different output domains like HK, GGDEF, EAL, HPT, AAA, PAS, GAF, additional REC, HTH, phosphatase or combinations thereof. The response regulator architectures coincide with those reported for the ACF family of pathways. Since the presence of multidomain response regulators is a distinctive feature of this pathway family, we conclude that CheR-TPR proteins form part of ACF type pathways. The diversity of response regulator output domains suggests that the ACF pathways form a superfamily which regroups many different regulatory mechanisms, in which all CheR-TPR proteins appear to participate. In the second part we characterize WspC of Pseudomonas putida, a representative example of CheR-TPR. The affinities of WspC-Pp for S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine were comparable to those of prototypal CheR, indicating that WspC-Pp activity is in analogy to prototypal CheRs controlled by product feed-back inhibition. The removal of the TPR domain did not impact significantly on the binding constants and consequently not on the product feed-back inhibition. WspC-Pp was found to be

  12. Genes encoding Cher-TPR fusion proteins are predominantly found in gene clusters encoding chemosensory pathways with alternative cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Martínez, Francisco; García-Fontana, Cristina; Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Alfonso, Carlos; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemosensory pathways correspond to major signal transduction mechanisms and can be classified into the functional families flagellum-mediated taxis, type four pili-mediated taxis or pathways with alternative cellular functions (ACF). CheR methyltransferases are core enzymes in all of these families. CheR proteins fused to tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains have been reported and we present an analysis of this uncharacterized family. We show that CheR-TPRs are widely distributed in GRAM-negative but almost absent from GRAM-positive bacteria. Most strains contain a single CheR-TPR and its abundance does not correlate with the number of chemoreceptors. The TPR domain fused to CheR is comparatively short and frequently composed of 2 repeats. The majority of CheR-TPR genes were found in gene clusters that harbor multidomain response regulators in which the REC domain is fused to different output domains like HK, GGDEF, EAL, HPT, AAA, PAS, GAF, additional REC, HTH, phosphatase or combinations thereof. The response regulator architectures coincide with those reported for the ACF family of pathways. Since the presence of multidomain response regulators is a distinctive feature of this pathway family, we conclude that CheR-TPR proteins form part of ACF type pathways. The diversity of response regulator output domains suggests that the ACF pathways form a superfamily which regroups many different regulatory mechanisms, in which all CheR-TPR proteins appear to participate. In the second part we characterize WspC of Pseudomonas putida, a representative example of CheR-TPR. The affinities of WspC-Pp for S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine were comparable to those of prototypal CheR, indicating that WspC-Pp activity is in analogy to prototypal CheRs controlled by product feed-back inhibition. The removal of the TPR domain did not impact significantly on the binding constants and consequently not on the product feed-back inhibition. WspC-Pp was found to be

  13. Global Population Genetic Structure and Male-Mediated Gene Flow in the Green Turtle (Chelonia Mydas): RFLP Analyses of Anonymous Nuclear Loci

    PubMed Central

    Karl, S. A.; Bowen, B. W.; Avise, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    We introduce an approach for the analysis of Mendelian polymorphisms in nuclear DNA (nDNA), using restriction fragment patterns from anonymous single-copy regions amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, and apply this method to the elucidation of population structure and gene flow in the endangered green turtle, Chelonia mydas. Seven anonymous clones isolated from a total cell DNA library were sequenced to generate primers for the amplification of nDNA fragments. Nine individuals were screened for restriction site polymorphisms at these seven loci, using 40 endonucleases. Two loci were monomorphic, while the remainder exhibited a total of nine polymorphic restriction sites and three size variants (reflecting 600-base pair (bp) and 20-bp deletions and a 20-bp insertion). A total of 256 turtle specimens from 15 nesting populations worldwide were then scored for these polymorphisms. Genotypic proportions within populations were in accord with Hardy-Weinberg expectations. Strong linkage disequilibrium observed among polymorphic sites within loci enabled multisite haplotype assignments. Estimates of the standardized variance in haplotype frequency among global collections (F(ST) = 0.17), within the Atlantic-Mediterranean (F(ST) = 0.13), and within the Indian-Pacific (F(ST) = 0.13), revealed a moderate degree of population substructure. Although a previous study concluded that nesting populations appear to be highly structured with respect to female (mitochondrial DNA) lineages, estimates of Nm based on nDNA data from this study indicate moderate rates of male-mediated gene flow. A positive relationship between genetic similarity and geographic proximity suggests historical connections and/or contemporary gene flow between particular rookery populations, likely via matings on overlapping feeding grounds, migration corridors or nonnatal rookeries. PMID:1350555

  14. Identification of nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins required for embryo development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Nicole; Lloyd, Johnny; Sweeney, Colleen; Myouga, Fumiyoshi; Meinke, David

    2011-04-01

    We describe here the diversity of chloroplast proteins required for embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Interfering with certain chloroplast functions has long been known to result in embryo lethality. What has not been reported before is a comprehensive screen for embryo-defective (emb) mutants altered in chloroplast proteins. From a collection of transposon and T-DNA insertion lines at the RIKEN chloroplast function database (http://rarge.psc.riken.jp/chloroplast/) that initially appeared to lack homozygotes and segregate for defective seeds, we identified 23 additional examples of EMB genes that likely encode chloroplast-localized proteins. Fourteen gene identities were confirmed with allelism tests involving duplicate mutant alleles. We then queried journal publications and the SeedGenes database (www.seedgenes.org) to establish a comprehensive dataset of 381 nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins of Arabidopsis associated with embryo-defective (119 genes), plant pigment (121 genes), gametophyte (three genes), and alternate (138 genes) phenotypes. Loci were ranked based on the level of certainty that the gene responsible for the phenotype had been identified and the protein product localized to chloroplasts. Embryo development is frequently arrested when amino acid, vitamin, or nucleotide biosynthesis is disrupted but proceeds when photosynthesis is compromised and when levels of chlorophyll, carotenoids, or terpenoids are reduced. Chloroplast translation is also required for embryo development, with genes encoding chloroplast ribosomal and pentatricopeptide repeat proteins well represented among EMB datasets. The chloroplast accD locus, which is necessary for fatty acid biosynthesis, is essential in Arabidopsis but not in Brassica napus or maize (Zea mays), where duplicated nuclear genes compensate for its absence or loss of function.

  15. Genes encoding phospholipases A2 mediate insect nodulation reactions to bacterial challenge.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sony; Park, Yoonseong; Stanley, David; Kim, Yonggyun

    2010-03-01

    We propose that expression of four genes encoding secretory phospholipases A(2) (sPLA(2)) mediates insect nodulation responses to bacterial infection. Nodulation is the quantitatively predominant cellular defense reaction to bacterial infection. This reaction is mediated by eicosanoids, the biosynthesis of which depends on PLA(2)-catalyzed hydrolysis of arachidonic acid (AA) from cellular phospholipids. Injecting late instar larvae of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, with the bacterium, Escherichia coli, stimulated nodulation reactions and sPLA(2) activity in time- and dose-related manners. Nodulation was inhibited by pharmaceutical inhibitors of enzymes involved in eicosanoid biosynthesis, and the inhibition was rescued by AA. We cloned five genes encoding sPLA(2) and expressed them in E. coli cells to demonstrate these genes encode catalytically active sPLA(2)s. The recombinant sPLA(2)s were inhibited by sPLA(2) inhibitors. Injecting larvae with double-stranded RNAs specific to each of the five genes led to reduced expression of the corresponding sPLA(2) genes and to reduced nodulation reactions to bacterial infections for four of the five genes. The reduced nodulation was rescued by AA, indicating that expression of four genes encoding sPLA(2)s mediates nodulation reactions. A polyclonal antibody that reacted with all five sPLA(2)s showed the presence of the sPLA(2) enzymes in hemocytes and revealed that the enzymes were more closely associated with hemocyte plasma membranes following infection. Identifying specific sPLA(2) genes that mediate nodulation reactions strongly supports our hypothesis that sPLA(2)s are central enzymes in insect cellular immune reactions. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of Genes Encoding for Acquired Bacitracin Resistance in Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jalbert, Louis-Alexandre; Harel, Josée; Masson, Luke; Archambault, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic bacitracin resistance has been reported in Clostridium perfringens. However, the genes responsible for the resistance have not yet been characterized. Ninety-nine C. perfringens isolates recovered from broilers and turkeys were tested for phenotypic bacitracin resistance. Bacitracin MIC90 (>256 µg/ml) was identical for both turkey and chicken isolates; whereas MIC50 was higher in turkey isolates (6 µg/ml) than in chicken isolates (3 µg/ml). Twenty-four of the 99 isolates showed high-level bacitracin resistance (MIC breakpoint >256 µg/ml) and the genes encoding for this resistance were characterized in C. perfringens c1261_A strain using primer walking. Sequence analysis and percentages of amino acid identity revealed putative genes encoding for both an ABC transporter and an overproduced undecaprenol kinase in C. perfringens c1261_A strain. These two mechanisms were shown to be both encoded by the putative bcrABD operon under the control of a regulatory gene, bcrR. Efflux pump inhibitor thioridazine was shown to increase significantly the susceptibility of strain c1261_A to bacitracin. Upstream and downstream from the bcr cluster was an IS1216-like element, which may play a role in the dissemination of this resistance determinant. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with prior double digestion with I-CeuI/MluI enzymes followed by hybridization analyses revealed that the bacitracin resistance genes bcrABDR were located on the chromosome. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that this gene cluster is expressed under bacitracin stress. Microarray analysis revealed the presence of these genes in all bacitracin resistant strains. This study reports the discovery of genes encoding for a putative ABC transporter and an overproduced undecaprenol kinase associated with high-level bacitracin resistance in C. perfringens isolates from turkeys and broiler chickens. PMID:22970221

  17. Genome-wide comparative analysis of NBS-encoding genes in four Gossypium species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nucleotide binding site (NBS) genes encode a large family of disease resistance (R) proteins in plants. The availability of genomic data of the two diploid cotton species, Gossypium arboreum and Gossypium raimondii, and the two allotetraploid cotton species, Gossypium hirsutum (TM-1) and Gossypium ...

  18. Genes Encoding Phospholipases A2 Mediate Insect Nodulation Reactions to Bacterial Challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We propose that expression of four genes encoding secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) mediates insect nodulation responses to bacterial infection. Nodulation is the quantitatively predominant cellular defense reaction to bacterial infection. This reaction is mediated by eicosanoids, the biosynthesis...

  19. Characterization of Genes Encoding Key Enzymes Involved in Anthocyanin Metabolism of Kiwifruit during Storage Period

    PubMed Central

    Li, Boqiang; Xia, Yongxiu; Wang, Yuying; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2017-01-01

    ‘Hongyang’ is a red fleshed kiwifruit with high anthocyanin content. In this study, we mainly investigated effects of different temperatures (25 and 0°C) on anthocyanin biosynthesis in harvested kiwifruit, and characterized the genes encoding key enzymes involved in anthocyanin metabolism, as well as evaluated the mode of the action, by which low temperature regulates anthocyanin accumulation in ‘Hongyang’ kiwifruit during storage period. The results showed that low temperature could effectively enhance the anthocyanin accumulation of kiwifruit in the end of storage period (90 days), which related to the increase in mRNA levels of ANS1, ANS2, DRF1, DRF2, and UGFT2. Moreover, the transcript abundance of MYBA1-1 and MYB5-1, the genes encoding an important component of MYB–bHLH–WD40 (MBW) complex, was up-regulated, possibly contributing to the induction of specific anthocyanin biosynthesis genes under the low temperature. To further investigate the roles of AcMYB5-1/5-2/A1-1 in regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis, genes encoding the three transcription factors were transiently transformed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Overexpression of AcMYB5-1/5-2/A1-1 activated the gene expression of NtANS and NtDFR in tobacco. Our results suggested that low temperature storage could stimulate the anthocyanin accumulation in harvested kiwifruit via regulating several structural and regulatory genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis. PMID:28344589

  20. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M.

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Bacillus subtilis acyl carrier protein is encoded in a cluster of lipid biosynthesis genes.

    PubMed Central

    Morbidoni, H R; de Mendoza, D; Cronan, J E

    1996-01-01

    A cluster of Bacillus subtilis fatty acid synthetic genes was isolated by complementation of an Escherichia coli fabD mutant encoding a thermosensitive malonyl coenzyme A-acyl carrier protein transacylase. The B. subtilis genomic segment contains genes that encode three fatty acid synthetic proteins, malonyl coenzyme A-acyl carrier protein transacylase (fabD), 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (fabG), and the N-terminal 14 amino acid residues of acyl carrier protein (acpP). Also present is a sequence that encodes a homolog of E. coli plsX, a gene that plays a poorly understood role in phospholipid synthesis. The B. subtilis plsX gene weakly complemented an E. coli plsX mutant. The order of genes in the cluster is plsX fabD fabG acpP, the same order found in E. coli, except that in E. coli the fabH gene lies between plsX and fabD. The absence of fabH in the B. subtilis cluster is consistent with the different fatty acid compositions of the two organisms. The amino acid sequence of B. subtilis acyl carrier protein was obtained by sequencing the purified protein, and the sequence obtained strongly resembled that of E. coli acyl carrier protein, except that most of the protein retained the initiating methionine residue. The B. subtilis fab cluster was mapped to the 135 to 145 degrees region of the chromosome. PMID:8759840

  2. Unusually high frequency of genes encoding vegetative insecticidal proteins in an Australian Bacillus thuringiensis collection.

    PubMed

    Beard, Cheryl E; Court, Leon; Boets, Annemie; Mourant, Roslyn; Van Rie, Jeroen; Akhurst, Raymond J

    2008-09-01

    Of 188 Australian Bacillus thuringiensis strains screened for genes encoding soluble insecticidal proteins by polymerase chain reaction/restriction-length fragment polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, 87% showed the presence of such genes. Although 135 isolates (72%) produced an RFLP pattern identical to that expected for vip3A genes, 29 isolates possessed a novel vip-like gene. The novel vip-like gene was cloned from B. thuringiensis isolate C81, and sequence analysis demonstrated that it was 94% identical to the vip3Ba1 gene. The new gene was designated vip3Bb2. Cell-free supernatants from both the B. thuringiensis strain C81 and from Escherichia coli expressing the Vip3Bb2 protein were toxic for the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera.

  3. Analyses of nuclearly encoded mitochondrial genes suggest gene duplication as a mechanism for resolving intralocus sexually antagonistic conflict in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Gallach, Miguel; Chandrasekaran, Chitra; Betrán, Esther

    2010-01-01

    Gene duplication is probably the most important mechanism for generating new gene functions. However, gene duplication has been overlooked as a potentially effective way to resolve genetic conflicts. Here, we analyze the entire set of Drosophila melanogaster nuclearly encoded mitochondrial duplicate genes and show that both RNA- and DNA-mediated mitochondrial gene duplications exhibit an unexpectedly high rate of relocation (change in location between parental and duplicated gene) as well as an extreme tendency to avoid the X chromosome. These trends are likely related to our observation that relocated genes tend to have testis-specific expression. We also infer that these trends hold across the entire Drosophila genus. Importantly, analyses of gene ontology and functional interaction networks show that there is an overrepresentation of energy production-related functions in these mitochondrial duplicates. We discuss different hypotheses to explain our results and conclude that our findings substantiate the hypothesis that gene duplication for male germline function is likely a mechanism to resolve intralocus sexually antagonistic conflicts that we propose are common in testis. In the case of nuclearly encoded mitochondrial duplicates, our hypothesis is that past sexually antagonistic conflict related to mitochondrial energy function in Drosophila was resolved by gene duplication.

  4. cDNA-based gene mapping and GC3 profiling in the soft-shelled turtle suggest a chromosomal size-dependent GC bias shared by sauropsids.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro; Ishijima, Junko; Nishida-Umehara, Chizuko; Agata, Kiyokazu; Kuratani, Shigeru; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian and avian genomes comprise several classes of chromosomal segments that vary dramatically in GC-content. Especially in chicken, microchromosomes exhibit a higher GC-content and a higher gene density than macrochromosomes. To understand the evolutionary history of the intra-genome GC heterogeneity in amniotes, it is necessary to examine the equivalence of this GC heterogeneity at the nucleotide level between these animals including reptiles, from which birds diverged. We isolated cDNAs for 39 protein-coding genes from the Chinese soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis, and performed chromosome mapping of 31 genes. The GC-content of exonic third positions (GC3) of P. sinensis genes showed a heterogeneous distribution, and exhibited a significant positive correlation with that of chicken and human orthologs, indicating that the last common ancestor of extant amniotes had already established a GC-compartmentalized genomic structure. Furthermore, chromosome mapping in P. sinensis revealed that microchromosomes tend to contain more GC-rich genes than GC-poor genes, as in chicken. These results illustrate two modes of genome evolution in amniotes: mammals elaborated the genomic configuration in which GC-rich and GC-poor regions coexist in individual chromosomes, whereas sauropsids (reptiles and birds) refined the chromosomal size-dependent GC compartmentalization in which GC-rich genomic fractions tend to be confined to microchromosomes.

  5. Gene set of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial regulators is enriched for common inherited variation in obesity.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Nadja; Jarick, Ivonne; Volckmar, Anna-Lena; Klingenspor, Martin; Illig, Thomas; Grallert, Harald; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Peters, Annette; Hebebrand, Johannes; Scherag, André; Hinney, Anke

    2013-01-01

    There are hints of an altered mitochondrial function in obesity. Nuclear-encoded genes are relevant for mitochondrial function (3 gene sets of known relevant pathways: (1) 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes, (2) 91 genes for oxidative phosphorylation and (3) 966 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes). Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) showed no association with type 2 diabetes mellitus in these gene sets. Here we performed a GSEA for the same gene sets for obesity. Genome wide association study (GWAS) data from a case-control approach on 453 extremely obese children and adolescents and 435 lean adult controls were used for GSEA. For independent confirmation, we analyzed 705 obesity GWAS trios (extremely obese child and both biological parents) and a population-based GWAS sample (KORA F4, n = 1,743). A meta-analysis was performed on all three samples. In each sample, the distribution of significance levels between the respective gene set and those of all genes was compared using the leading-edge-fraction-comparison test (cut-offs between the 50(th) and 95(th) percentile of the set of all gene-wise corrected p-values) as implemented in the MAGENTA software. In the case-control sample, significant enrichment of associations with obesity was observed above the 50(th) percentile for the set of the 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes (p(GSEA,50) = 0.0103). This finding was not confirmed in the trios (p(GSEA,50) = 0.5991), but in KORA (p(GSEA,50) = 0.0398). The meta-analysis again indicated a trend for enrichment (p(MAGENTA,50) = 0.1052, p(MAGENTA,75) = 0.0251). The GSEA revealed that weak association signals for obesity might be enriched in the gene set of 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes.

  6. Screening of the Enterocin-Encoding Genes and Antimicrobial Activity in Enterococcus Species.

    PubMed

    Ogaki, Mayara Baptistucci; Rocha, Katia Real; Terra, MÁrcia Regina; Furlaneto, MÁrcia Cristina; Maia, Luciana Furlaneto

    2016-06-28

    In the current study, a total of 135 enterococci strains from different sources were screened for the presence of the enterocin-encoding genes entA, entP, entB, entL50A, and entL50B. The enterocin genes were present at different frequencies, with entA occurring the most frequently, followed by entP and entB; entL50A and L50B were not detected. The occurrence of single enterocin genes was higher than the occurrence of multiple enterocin gene combinations. The 80 isolates that harbor at least one enterocin-encoding gene (denoted "Gene(+) strains") were screened for antimicrobial activity. A total of 82.5% of the Gene(+) strains inhibited at least one of the indicator strains, and the isolates harboring multiple enterocin-encoding genes inhibited a larger number of indicator strains than isolates harboring a single gene. The indicator strains that exhibited growth inhibition included Listeria innocua strain CLIP 12612 (ATCC BAA-680), Listeria monocytogenes strain CDC 4555, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, S. aureus ATCC 29213, S. aureus ATCC 6538, Salmonella enteritidis ATCC 13076, Salmonella typhimurium strain UK-1 (ATCC 68169), and Escherichia coli BAC 49LT ETEC. Inhibition due to either bacteriophage lysis or cytolysin activity was excluded. The growth inhibition of antilisterial Gene+ strains was further tested under different culture conditions. Among the culture media formulations, the MRS agar medium supplemented with 2% (w/v) yeast extract was the best solidified medium for enterocin production. Our findings extend the current knowledge of enterocin-producing enterococci, which may have potential applications as biopreservatives in the food industry due to their capability of controlling food spoilage pathogens.

  7. A Single Gene May Encode Differentially Localized Ca2+-ATPases in Tomato.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrol, N; Bennett, AB

    1996-01-01

    Previously, a partial-length cDNA and a complete genomic clone encoding a putative sarcoplasmic reticulum-type Ca2+-ATPase (LCA, Lycopersicon Ca2+-ATPase) were isolated from tomato. To determine the subcellular localization of this Ca2+-ATPase, specific polyclonal antibodies raised against a fusion protein encoding a portion of the LCA polypeptide were generated. Based on hybridization of the LCA cDNA and of the nucleotide sequence encoding the fusion protein to genomic DNA, it appears that LCA and the fusion protein domain are encoded by a single gene in tomato. Antibodies raised against the LCA domain fusion protein reacted specifically with two polypeptides of 116 and 120 kD that are localized in the vacuolar and plasma membranes, respectively. The distribution of vanadate-sensitive ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport activities in sucrose gradients coincided with the distribution of the immunodetected proteins. The ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport activities associated with tonoplast and plasma membrane fractions shared similar properties, because both fractions were inhibited by vanadate but insensitive to carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, nitrate, and calmodulin. Moreover, antibodies raised against the LCA domain fusion protein inhibited ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake activity associated with both the tonoplast and plasma membrane fractions. These data suggest that a single gene (LCA) may encode two P-type Ca2+-ATPase isoforms that are differentially localized in the tonoplast and plasma membrane of tomato roots. PMID:12239413

  8. Vitellogenin (VTG) conservation in sea turtles: anti-VTG antibody in Chelonia mydas versus Caretta caretta.

    PubMed

    Zaccaroni, Annalisa; Zucchini, Marina; Segatta, Lorenzo; Gamberoni, Matteo; Freggi, Daniela; Accorsi, Pier A; Scaravelli, Dino; Gardner, Susan C

    2010-01-01

    Vitellogenin (VTG) is considered as a marker of endocrine disruption. A Western blot method for VTG quantification in Caretta caretta turtle plasma was developed using anti-VTG antibody for Chelonia mydas. A screening of samples (n = 61) collected in the southern Mediterranean Sea around Lampedusa Island, Italy, was performed. The antibody showed a good cross-reactivity with C. caretta VTG, suggesting a certain conservation of the core of the protein in different sea turtle species. The optimal operative condition for Western blot analysis consists of using diluted plasma at 1:50. In field samples, a certain mismatch with morphological sexing was observed, and VTG was detected in young animals. These results suggest the possibility of a precocious activation of VTG-encoding genes before sexual maturation and/or exposure to endocrine disrupter substances.

  9. The effect of high fat diet on daily rhythm of the core clock genes and muscle functional genes in the skeletal muscle of Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Trionyx sinensis).

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Jiang, Guomin; Peng, Zhitao; Li, Yulong; Li, Jinlong; Zou, Li; He, Zhigang; Wang, Xiaoqing; Chu, Wuying

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, we sought to investigate the influence of high fat diet on the core clock genes and the muscle functional genes daily expression in the skeletal muscle of Chinese soft-shelled turtle. The turtles were fed by two diets including a control fat diet (the CON treatment, 7.98% lipid) and a high fat diet (the HFD treatment, 13.86% lipid) for six weeks and administrated by the photophase regimen of 24h light/dark (12L:12D) cycle. After the feeding trial experiment, we measured the daily expression levels of 17 core clock genes (Clock, Bmal1/2, NPAS2, Tim, Cry1/2, Per1/2, DBP, AANAT, NIFL3, BHLHE40, NR1D2, RORA, RORB, RORC) and 12 muscle functional genes (FBXO32, MBNL1, MSTN, Myf5, Myf6, MyoD, MyoG, MyoM1, PPARa, PDK4, Trim63, UCP3) in the skeletal muscle of the two treatments. The results showed that except for Bmal1, NPAS2, Per2 and RORB, the expression of the other 13 core clock genes exhibited circadian oscillation in the CON treatment. Among the 12 muscle functional genes, MBNL1, PDK4 and MyoM1 did not exhibit circadian oscillation in the CON treatment. In the HFD treatment, the circadian rhythms expressional patterns of the 8 core clock genes (Clock, Bmal2, Cry2, Per1, DBP, NFIL3, BHLHE40 and RORA) and 6 muscle functional genes (MSTN, Myf5, MyoD, MyoG, PPARa and Trim63) were disrupted. In addition, compared with the CON treatment, the circadian expression of the 5 core clock genes (Tim, Cry1, AANAT, NR1D2, RORC) and the 3 muscle functional genes (FBXO32, Myf6, UCP3) showed the advanced or delayed expression peaks in the HFD treatment. In CON treatment, the circadian expression of the MyoG, MyoD, Myf6, FBXO32 and PPARa showed positive or negative correlation with the transcription pattern of Clock, Bmal2, Cry1/2, Per1/2. However, only the FBXO32 and Myf6 presented positive or negative correlation with the circadian expression of Cry1, RORB, AANAT and Tim in HFD treatment. In summary, these results demonstrate that the disruption of the circadian

  10. Organization of the genes encoding [Fe] hydrogenase in Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. oxamicus Monticello.

    PubMed Central

    Voordouw, G; Strang, J D; Wilson, F R

    1989-01-01

    The genes encoding the periplasmic [Fe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. oxamicus Monticello were cloned by exploiting their homology with the hydAB genes from D. vulgaris subsp. vulgaris Hildenborough, in which this enzyme is present as a heterologous dimer of alpha and beta subunits. Nucleotide sequencing showed that the enzyme is encoded by an operon in which the gene for the 46-kilodalton (kDa) alpha subunit precedes that of the 13.5-kDa beta subunit, exactly as in the Hildenborough strain. The pairs of hydA and hydB genes are highly homologous; both alpha subunits (420 amino acid residues) share 79% sequence identity, while the unprocessed beta subunits (124 and 123 amino acid residues, respectively) share 71% sequence identity. In contrast, there appears to be no sequence homology outside these coding regions, with the exception of a possible promoter element, which was found approximately 90 base pairs upstream from the translational start of the hydA gene. The recently discovered hydC gene, which may code for a 65.8-kDa fusion protein (gamma) of the alpha and beta subunits and is present immediately downstream from the hydAB genes in the Hildenborough strain, was found to be absent from the Monticello strain. The implication of this result for the possible function of the hydC gene product in Desulfovibrio species is discussed. Images PMID:2661538

  11. The maize brown midrib4 (bm4) gene encodes a functional folylpolyglutamate synthase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Hill-Skinner, Sarah; Liu, Sanzhen; Beuchle, Danielle; Tang, Ho Man; Yeh, Cheng-Ting; Nettleton, Dan; Schnable, Patrick S

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the brown midrib4 (bm4) gene affect the accumulation and composition of lignin in maize. Fine-mapping analysis of bm4 narrowed the candidate region to an approximately 105 kb interval on chromosome 9 containing six genes. Only one of these six genes, GRMZM2G393334, showed decreased expression in mutants. At least four of 10 Mu-induced bm4 mutant alleles contain a Mu insertion in the GRMZM2G393334 gene. Based on these results, we concluded that GRMZM2G393334 is the bm4 gene. GRMZM2G393334 encodes a putative folylpolyglutamate synthase (FPGS), which functions in one-carbon (C1) metabolism to polyglutamylate substrates of folate-dependent enzymes. Yeast complementation experiments demonstrated that expression of the maize bm4 gene in FPGS-deficient met7 yeast is able to rescue the yeast mutant phenotype, thus demonstrating that bm4 encodes a functional FPGS. Consistent with earlier studies, bm4 mutants exhibit a modest decrease in lignin concentration and an overall increase in the S:G lignin ratio relative to wild-type. Orthologs of bm4 include at least one paralogous gene in maize and various homologs in other grasses and dicots. Discovery of the gene underlying the bm4 maize phenotype illustrates a role for FPGS in lignin biosynthesis. PMID:25495051

  12. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products. Progress report, June 1, 1990--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    Many individual chloroplast genes require the products of a collection of nuclear genes for their successful expression. These nuclear gene products apparently work with great specificity, each committed to the expression of a single chloroplast gene. We have chosen as a model nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas affected in different stages in the expression of the chloroplast encoded Photosystem II polypeptide, D2. We have made the progress in understanding how nuclear gene products affect the translation of the D2 encoding MRNA. Two nuclear genes are required for this process which have been mapped genetically. In contrast to other examples of nuclear control of translation in the chloroplast, these nuclear gene products appear to be required either for specific stages in translation elongation or for the post-translational stabilization of the nascent D2 protein. Pseudoreversion analysis has led us to a locus which may be directly involved in D2 expression. We have made considerable progress in pursuing the molecular basis of psbd MRNA stabilization. psbD 5` UTR specific transcripts have been synthesized in vitro and used in gel mobility shift assays. UV-crosslinking studies are underway to identify the transacting factors which bind to these sequences. The continued examination of these mutants will help us to understand how nuclear gene products work in this specific case of chloroplast gene expression, and will elucidate how two distinct genomes can interact generally.

  13. Systematic Identification and Characterization of Novel Human Skin-Associated Genes Encoding Membrane and Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Martinez, Cynthia; Schrumpf, Holger; Gasis, Marcia; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Krutmann, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Through bioinformatics analyses of a human gene expression database representing 105 different tissues and cell types, we identified 687 skin-associated genes that are selectively and highly expressed in human skin. Over 50 of these represent uncharacterized genes not previously associated with skin and include a subset that encode novel secreted and plasma membrane proteins. The high levels of skin-associated expression for eight of these novel therapeutic target genes were confirmed by semi-quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of normal skin and skin-derived cell lines. Four of these are expressed specifically by epidermal keratinocytes; two that encode G-protein-coupled receptors (GPR87 and GPR115), and two that encode secreted proteins (WFDC5 and SERPINB7). Further analyses using cytokine-activated and terminally differentiated human primary keratinocytes or a panel of common inflammatory, autoimmune or malignant skin diseases revealed distinct patterns of regulation as well as disease associations that point to important roles in cutaneous homeostasis and disease. Some of these novel uncharacterized skin genes may represent potential biomarkers or drug targets for the development of future diagnostics or therapeutics. PMID:23840300

  14. Structure and expression of nuclear genes encoding rubisco activase. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, R.E.

    1994-06-01

    Rubisco activase (Rca) is a soluble chloroplast protein that catalyzes the activation of rubisco, the enzyme that initiates the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle, to catalytic competency. Rca in barley consists of three polypeptides, one of 46- and two of 42-kDa, but the quaternary structure of the protein is not known. The authors have isolated and completely sequenced 8.8 kb of barley genomic DNA containing two, tandemly oriented activase genes (RcaA and RcaB) and three different cDNAs encoding the 42- and 46-kDa Rca polypeptide isoforms. Genomic Southern blot assays indicate that these sequences represent the entire Rca gene family in barley. Pre-mRNAs transcribed from the RcaA gene are alternatively spliced to give mRNAs encoding both 46- (RcaA1) and 42-kDa (RcaA2) Rca isoforms. The RcaB gene encodes a single polypeptide of 42 kDa. Primer extension and northern blot assays indicate that RcaB mRNA is expressed at a level that is 10- to 100-fold lower than RcaA mRNA. Analyses at the mRNA and protein level showed that Rca gene expression is coordinated by that of the rubisco subunits during barley leaf development.

  15. Identification and Functional Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Genes That Encode Proteins of the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Biosynthetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Mariana S.; Junqueira, Caroline; Trigueiro, Ricardo C.; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Macedo, Cristiana S.; Araújo, Patrícia R.; Gomes, Dawidson A.; Martinelli, Patrícia M.; Kimmel, Jürgen; Stahl, Philipp; Niehus, Sebastian; Schwarz, Ralph T.; Previato, José O.; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Teixeira, Santuza M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is a protist parasite that causes Chagas disease. Several proteins that are essential for parasite virulence and involved in host immune responses are anchored to the membrane through glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) molecules. In addition, T. cruzi GPI anchors have immunostimulatory activities, including the ability to stimulate the synthesis of cytokines by innate immune cells. Therefore, T. cruzi genes related to GPI anchor biosynthesis constitute potential new targets for the development of better therapies against Chagas disease. Methodology/Principal Findings In silico analysis of the T. cruzi genome resulted in the identification of 18 genes encoding proteins of the GPI biosynthetic pathway as well as the inositolphosphorylceramide (IPC) synthase gene. Expression of GFP fusions of some of these proteins in T. cruzi epimastigotes showed that they localize in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Expression analyses of two genes indicated that they are constitutively expressed in all stages of the parasite life cycle. T. cruzi genes TcDPM1, TcGPI10 and TcGPI12 complement conditional yeast mutants in GPI biosynthesis. Attempts to generate T. cruzi knockouts for three genes were unsuccessful, suggesting that GPI may be an essential component of the parasite. Regarding TcGPI8, which encodes the catalytic subunit of the transamidase complex, although we were able to generate single allele knockout mutants, attempts to disrupt both alleles failed, resulting instead in parasites that have undergone genomic recombination and maintained at least one active copy of the gene. Conclusions/Significance Analyses of T. cruzi sequences encoding components of the GPI biosynthetic pathway indicated that they are essential genes involved in key aspects of host-parasite interactions. Complementation assays of yeast mutants with these T. cruzi genes resulted in yeast cell lines that can now be employed in high throughput screenings of drugs against this

  16. Filamentous-haemagglutinin-like protein genes encoded on a plasmid of Moraxella bovis.

    PubMed

    Kakuda, Tsutomu; Sarataphan, Nopporn; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Takai, Shinji

    2006-11-26

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a plasmid, pMBO-1, from Moraxella bovis strain Epp63 was determined. We identified 30 open reading frames (ORFs) encoded by the 44,215bp molecule. Two large ORFs, flpA and flpB, encoding proteins with similarity to Bordetella pertussis filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA), were identified on the same plasmid. The gene for a specific accessory protein (Fap), which may play a role in the secretion of Flp protein, was also identified. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of total RNA isolated from M. bovis Epp63 indicated that the flpA, flpB, and fap genes are all transcribed. Southern blot analysis indicated that the flp and fap genes are present in other clinical isolates of geographically diverse M. bovis.

  17. Expression patterns of genes encoding plasma membrane aquaporins during fruit development in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Shi, Jin; Wang, Jinfang; Li, Ren; Li, Dianbo; Xu, Fengfeng; Sun, Qianqian; Zhao, Bin; Mao, Ai-Jun; Guo, Yang-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Aquaporins are membrane channels precisely regulating water movement through cell membranes in most living organisms. Despite the advances in the physiology of fruit development, their participation during fruit development in cucumber still barely understood. In this paper, the expressions of 12 genes encoding plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) were analyzed during cucumber fruit development in our work. Based on the homology search with known PIPs from rice, Arabidopsis and strawberry, 12 cucumber PIP genes subfamily members were identified. Cellular localization assays indicated that CsPIPs were localized in the plasma membrane. The qRT-PCR analysis of CsPIPs showed that 12 CsPIPs were differentially expressed during fruit development. These results suggest that 12 genes encoding plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (CsPIPs) play very important roles in cucumber life cycle and the data generated will be helpful in understanding their precise roles during fruit development in cucumber.

  18. Cloning and expression analysis of a prion protein encoding gene in guppy ( Poecilia reticulata)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Suihan; Wei, Qiwei; Yang, Guanpin; Wang, Dengqiang; Zou, Guiwei; Chen, Daqing

    2008-11-01

    The full length cDNA of a prion protein (PrP) encoding gene of guppy ( Poecilia reticulata) and the corresponding genomic DNA were cloned. The cDNA was 2245 bp in length and contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 1545 bp encoding a protein of 515 amino acids, which held all typical structural characteristics of the functional PrP. The cloned genomic DNA fragment corresponding to the cDNA was 3720 bp in length, consisting of 2 introns and 2 exons. The 5' untranslated region of cDNA originated from the 2 exons, while the ORF originated from the second exon. Although the gene was transcribed in diverse tissues including brain, eye, liver, intestine, muscle and tail, its transcript was most abundant in the brain. In addition, the transcription of the gene was enhanced by 5 salinity, implying that it was associated with the response of guppy to saline stress.

  19. Cloning and characterization of two genes encoding dihydroxyacetone kinase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe IFO 0354.

    PubMed

    Kimura, T; Takahashi, M; Yoshihara, K; Furuichi, T; Suzuki, K; Imai, K; Karita, S; Sakka, K; Ohmiya, K

    1998-11-08

    We report the cloning and characterization of two genes encoding dihydroxyacetone kinase (EC 2.7.1.29), SpDAK1 and SpDAK2, from Schizosaccharomyces pombe IFO 0354. The open reading frames of both genes encode 591 amino acids and have Mrs of 62158 and 62170, respectively. Both predicted amino acid sequences exhibited a high identity to each other (99.8%) and relatively high identities (30% to 76%) to other putative dihydroxyacetone kinase gene products. A Western blot analysis showed that these enzymes are induced by glycerol and repressed by glucose. A genomic Southern blot analysis indicated the presence of SpDAK1 and the absence of SpDAK2 in a standard laboratory strain, S. pombe 972h-.

  20. Isolation of the gene encoding the Hin recombinational enhancer binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R C; Ball, C A; Pfeffer, D; Simon, M I

    1988-01-01

    In vitro DNA inversion mediated by the protein Hin requires the presence of a recombinational enhancer sequence located in cis relative to the recombination sites and a protein, Fis, which binds to the enhancer. We have cloned and determined the primary sequence of the gene encoding Fis. The deduced amino acid sequence of Fis indicates that the protein is 98 amino acids long and contains a potential helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif at its carboxyl terminus. The gene encoding Fis maps at 72 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome. The construction of mutant strains of E. coli that lack a functional fis gene demonstrates that Fis is not essential for cell growth under laboratory conditions but is required for high rates of Hin-mediated site-specific inversion in vivo. PMID:2835774

  1. The Classroom Animal: Box Turtles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Provides basic information on the anatomy, physiology, behaviors, and distribution patterns of the box turtle. Offers suggestions for the turtle's care and maintenance in a classroom environment. (ML)

  2. The Classroom Animal: Box Turtles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Provides basic information on the anatomy, physiology, behaviors, and distribution patterns of the box turtle. Offers suggestions for the turtle's care and maintenance in a classroom environment. (ML)

  3. Horse cDNA clones encoding two MHC class I genes

    SciTech Connect

    Barbis, D.P.; Maher, J.K.; Stanek, J.; Klaunberg, B.A.; Antczak, D.F.

    1994-12-31

    Two full-length clones encoding MHC class I genes were isolated by screening a horse cDNA library, using a probe encoding in human HLA-A2.2Y allele. The library was made in the pcDNA1 vector (Invitrogen, San Diego, CA), using mRNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from a Thoroughbred stallion (No. 0834) homozygous for a common horse MHC haplotype (ELA-A2, -B2, -D2; Antczak et al. 1984; Donaldson et al. 1988). The clones were sequenced, using SP6 and T7 universal primers and horse-specific oligonucleotides designed to extend previously determined sequences.

  4. Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encodes a serine peptidase essential for colonisation

    PubMed Central

    Karlyshev, A.V.; Thacker, G.; Jones, M.A.; Clements, M.O.; Wren, B.W.

    2014-01-01

    According to MEROPS peptidase database, Campylobacter species encode 64 predicted peptidases. However, proteolytic properties of only a few of these proteins have been confirmed experimentally. In this study we identified and characterised a Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encoding a novel peptidase. The proteolytic activity associated with this enzyme was demonstrated in cell lysates. Moreover, enzymatic studies conducted with a purified protein confirmed a prediction of it being a serine peptidase. Furthermore, cj0511 mutant was found to be severely attenuated in chicken colonisation model, suggesting a role of the Cj0511 protein in infection. PMID:24918062

  5. A mouse speciation gene encodes a meiotic histone H3 methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Vlcek, Cestmir; Schimenti, John C; Forejt, Jiri

    2009-01-16

    Speciation genes restrict gene flow between the incipient species and related taxa. Three decades ago, we mapped a mammalian speciation gene, hybrid sterility 1 (Hst1), in the intersubspecific hybrids of house mouse. Here, we identify this gene as Prdm9, encoding a histone H3 lysine 4 trimethyltransferase. We rescued infertility in male hybrids with bacterial artificial chromosomes carrying Prdm9 from a strain with the "fertility" Hst1(f) allele. Sterile hybrids display down-regulated microrchidia 2B (Morc2b) and fail to compartmentalize gammaH2AX into the pachynema sex (XY) body. These defects, seen also in Prdm9-null mutants, are rescued by the Prdm9 transgene. Identification of a vertebrate hybrid sterility gene reveals a role for epigenetics in speciation and opens a window to a hybrid sterility gene network.

  6. Global analysis of differential gene expression related to long-term sperm storage in oviduct of Chinese Soft-Shelled Turtle Pelodiscus sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tengfei; Yang, Ping; Chen, Hong; Huang, Yufei; Liu, Yi; Waqas, Yasir; Ahmed, Nisar; Chu, Xiaoya; Chen, Qiusheng

    2016-01-01

    Important evolutionary and ecological consequences arise from the ability of female turtles to store viable spermatozoa for an extended period. Although previous morphological studies have observed the localization of spermatozoa in Pelodiscus sinensis oviduct, no systematic study on the identification of genes that are involved in long-term sperm storage has been performed. In this study, the oviduct of P. sinensis at different phases (reproductive and hibernation seasons) was prepared for RNA-Seq and gene expression profiling. In total, 2,662 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) including 1,224 up- and 1,438 down-regulated genes were identified from two cDNA libraries. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that many genes were predominantly involved in the immune response, apoptosis pathway and regulation of autophagy. RT-qPCR, ELISA, western blot and IHC analyses showed that the expression profiles of mRNA and protein in selected DEGs were in consistent with results from RNA-Seq analysis. Remarkably, TUNEL analysis revealed the reduced number of apoptotic cells during sperm storage. IHC and TEM analyses found that autophagy occurred in the oviduct epithelial cells, where the spermatozoa were closely attached. The outcomes of this study provide fundamental insights into the complex sperm storage regulatory process and facilitate elucidating the mechanism of sperm storage in P. sinensis. PMID:27628424

  7. [Identification of genes encoding ligninolytic enzymes in naturally occurring basidiomycete isolates].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, E A; Bessolitsyna, E A; Darmov, I V

    2013-01-01

    The presence of genes encoding lignin peroxidase, laccase, and manganese peroxidase was assessed in more than 20 types of polypore fungi collected in the woods of Kirov oblast; the fungi studied had not been previously characterized with regard to ligninolytic enzyme production. Fifteen isolates of eleven basidiomycete species were shown to contain genes coding for all three ligninolytic enzymes. Genes coding for these enzymes were detected in D. mollis, D. quercina, F. pinicola, G. trabeum, G. lucidum, H. fasciculare, L. betulina, P. betulinus, P. igniarus, P. pomaceus, P. pini, and P. cinnabarinus for the first time.

  8. [Expression of the genes encoding RhtB family proteins depends on global regulator Lrp].

    PubMed

    Kutukova, E A; Zakataeva, N P; Livshits, V A

    2005-01-01

    In the present work, further study of the genes encoding RhtB family proteins is presented. In our previous work the involvement of two family members, RhtB and RhtC, in efflux of amino acids was demonstrated. Now we investigated regulation of expression of the rhtB, rhtC, yeaS and yahN genes. It is shown that expression of these genes is under control of the global regulator Lrp, depends on the presence of some amino acids in growth medium, and increases during different physiological stresses.

  9. Characterization of a ubiquitous expressed gene family encoding polygalacturonase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Torki, M; Mandaron, P; Mache, R; Falconet, D

    2000-01-25

    Pectin, as one of the major components of plant cell wall, has been implicated in many developmental processes occurring during plant growth. Among the different enzymes known to participate in the pectin structure modifications, polygalacturonase (PG) activity has been shown to be associated with fruit ripening, organ abscission and pollen grain development. Until now, sequence analyses of the deduced polypeptides of the plant PG genes allowed their grouping into three clades corresponding to genes involved in one of these three activities. In this study, we report the sequence of three genomic clones encoding PG in Arabidopsis thaliana. These genes, together with 16 other genes present in the databases form a large gene family, ubiquitously expressed, present on the five chromosomes with at least two gene clusters on chromosomes II and V, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the A. thaliana gene family contains five classes of genes, with three of them corresponding to the previously defined clades. Comparison of positions and numbers of introns among the A. thaliana genes reveals structural conservation between genes belonging to the same class. The pattern of intron losses that could have given rise to the PG gene family is consistent with a mechanism of intron loss by replacement of an ancestral intron-containing gene with a reverse-transcribed DNA copy of a spliced mRNA. Following this event of intron loss, the acquisition of introns in novel positions is consistent with a mechanism of intron gain at proto-splice sites.

  10. Body plan of turtles: an anatomical, developmental and evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hiroshi; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Uchida, Katsuhisa; Kawashima-Ohya, Yoshie; Narita, Yuichi; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2012-03-01

    The evolution of the turtle shell has long been one of the central debates in comparative anatomy. The turtle shell consists of dorsal and ventral parts: the carapace and plastron, respectively. The basic structure of the carapace comprises vertebrae and ribs. The pectoral girdle of turtles sits inside the carapace or the rib cage, in striking contrast to the body plan of other tetrapods. Due to this topological change in the arrangement of skeletal elements, the carapace has been regarded as an example of evolutionary novelty that violates the ancestral body plan of tetrapods. Comparing the spatial relationships of anatomical structures in the embryos of turtles and other amniotes, we have shown that the topology of the musculoskeletal system is largely conserved even in turtles. The positional changes seen in the ribs and pectoral girdle can be ascribed to turtle-specific folding of the lateral body wall in the late developmental stages. Whereas the ribs of other amniotes grow from the axial domain to the lateral body wall, turtle ribs remain arrested axially. Marginal growth of the axial domain in turtle embryos brings the morphologically short ribs in to cover the scapula dorsocaudally. This concentric growth appears to be induced by the margin of the carapace, which involves an ancestral gene expression cascade in a new location. These comparative developmental data allow us to hypothesize the gradual evolution of turtles, which is consistent with the recent finding of a transitional fossil animal, Odontochelys, which did not have the carapace but already possessed the plastron.

  11. Analysis of genes encoding penicillin-binding proteins in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Cayô, Rodrigo; Rodríguez, María-Cruz; Espinal, Paula; Fernández-Cuenca, Felipe; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain A; Pascual, Alvaro; Ayala, Juan A; Vila, Jordi; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2011-12-01

    There is limited information on the role of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in the resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii to β-lactams. This study presents an analysis of the allelic variations of PBP genes in A. baumannii isolates. Twenty-six A. baumannii clinical isolates (susceptible or resistant to carbapenems) from three teaching hospitals in Spain were included. The antimicrobial susceptibility profile, clonal pattern, and genomic species identification were also evaluated. Based on the six complete genomes of A. baumannii, the PBP genes were identified, and primers were designed for each gene. The nucleotide sequences of the genes identified that encode PBPs and the corresponding amino acid sequences were compared with those of ATCC 17978. Seven PBP genes and one monofunctional transglycosylase (MGT) gene were identified in the six genomes, encoding (i) four high-molecular-mass proteins (two of class A, PBP1a [ponA] and PBP1b [mrcB], and two of class B, PBP2 [pbpA or mrdA] and PBP3 [ftsI]), (ii) three low-molecular-mass proteins (two of type 5, PBP5/6 [dacC] and PBP6b [dacD], and one of type 7 (PBP7/8 [pbpG]), and (iii) a monofunctional enzyme (MtgA [mtgA]). Hot spot mutation regions were observed, although most of the allelic changes found translated into silent mutations. The amino acid consensus sequences corresponding to the PBP genes in the genomes and the clinical isolates were highly conserved. The changes found in amino acid sequences were associated with concrete clonal patterns but were not directly related to susceptibility or resistance to β-lactams. An insertion sequence disrupting the gene encoding PBP6b was identified in an endemic carbapenem-resistant clone in one of the participant hospitals.

  12. Analysis of Genes Encoding Penicillin-Binding Proteins in Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cayô, Rodrigo; Rodríguez, María-Cruz; Espinal, Paula; Fernández-Cuenca, Felipe; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain A.; Pascual, Álvaro; Ayala, Juan A.; Vila, Jordi; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2011-01-01

    There is limited information on the role of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in the resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii to β-lactams. This study presents an analysis of the allelic variations of PBP genes in A. baumannii isolates. Twenty-six A. baumannii clinical isolates (susceptible or resistant to carbapenems) from three teaching hospitals in Spain were included. The antimicrobial susceptibility profile, clonal pattern, and genomic species identification were also evaluated. Based on the six complete genomes of A. baumannii, the PBP genes were identified, and primers were designed for each gene. The nucleotide sequences of the genes identified that encode PBPs and the corresponding amino acid sequences were compared with those of ATCC 17978. Seven PBP genes and one monofunctional transglycosylase (MGT) gene were identified in the six genomes, encoding (i) four high-molecular-mass proteins (two of class A, PBP1a [ponA] and PBP1b [mrcB], and two of class B, PBP2 [pbpA or mrdA] and PBP3 [ftsI]), (ii) three low-molecular-mass proteins (two of type 5, PBP5/6 [dacC] and PBP6b [dacD], and one of type 7 (PBP7/8 [pbpG]), and (iii) a monofunctional enzyme (MtgA [mtgA]). Hot spot mutation regions were observed, although most of the allelic changes found translated into silent mutations. The amino acid consensus sequences corresponding to the PBP genes in the genomes and the clinical isolates were highly conserved. The changes found in amino acid sequences were associated with concrete clonal patterns but were not directly related to susceptibility or resistance to β-lactams. An insertion sequence disrupting the gene encoding PBP6b was identified in an endemic carbapenem-resistant clone in one of the participant hospitals. PMID:21947403

  13. Deep time perspective on turtle neck evolution: chasing the Hox code by vertebral morphology.

    PubMed

    Böhmer, Christine; Werneburg, Ingmar

    2017-08-21

    The unparalleled ability of turtle neck retraction is possible in three different modes, which characterize stem turtles, living side-necked (Pleurodira), and hidden-necked (Cryptodira) turtles, respectively. Despite the conservatism in vertebral count among turtles, there is significant functional and morphological regionalization in the cervical vertebral column. Since Hox genes play a fundamental role in determining the differentiation in vertebra morphology and based on our reconstruction of evolutionary genetics in deep time, we hypothesize genetic differences among the turtle groups and between turtles and other land vertebrates. We correlated anterior Hox gene expression and the quantifiable shape of the vertebrae to investigate the morphological modularity in the neck across living and extinct turtles. This permitted the reconstruction of the hypothetical ancestral Hox code pattern of the whole turtle clade. The scenario of the evolution of axial patterning in turtles indicates shifts in the spatial expression of HoxA-5 in relation to the reduction of cervical ribs in modern turtles and of HoxB-5 linked with a lower morphological differentiation between the anterior cervical vertebrae observed in cryptodirans. By comparison with the mammalian pattern, we illustrate how the fixed count of eight cervical vertebrae in turtles resulted from the emergence of the unique turtle shell.

  14. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Sabir, Jamal S M; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K

    2016-02-17

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear-plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems.

  15. MYB98 positively regulates a battery of synergid-expressed genes encoding filiform apparatus localized proteins.

    PubMed

    Punwani, Jayson A; Rabiger, David S; Drews, Gary N

    2007-08-01

    The synergid cells within the female gametophyte are essential for reproduction in angiosperms. MYB98 encodes an R2R3-MYB protein required for pollen tube guidance and filiform apparatus formation by the synergid cells. To test the predicted function of MYB98 as a transcriptional regulator, we determined its subcellular localization and examined its DNA binding properties. We show that MYB98 binds to a specific DNA sequence (TAAC) and that a MYB98-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localizes to the nucleus, consistent with a role in transcriptional regulation. To identify genes regulated by MYB98, we tested previously identified synergid-expressed genes for reduced expression in myb98 female gametophytes and identified 16 such genes. We dissected the promoter of one of the downstream genes, DD11, and show that it contains a MYB98 binding site required for synergid expression, suggesting that DD11 is regulated directly by MYB98. To gain insight into the functions of the downstream genes, we chose five genes and determined the subcellular localization of the encoded proteins. We show that these five proteins are secreted into the filiform apparatus, suggesting that they play a role in either the formation or the function of this unique structure. Together, these data suggest that MYB98 functions as a transcriptional regulator in the synergid cells and activates the expression of genes required for pollen tube guidance and filiform apparatus formation.

  16. Expression of neuropeptide- and hormone-encoding genes in the Ciona intestinalis larval brain.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Mayuko; Shimozono, Naoki; Ohta, Naoyuki; Satou, Yutaka; Horie, Takeo; Kawada, Tsuyoshi; Satake, Honoo; Sasakura, Yasunori; Satoh, Nori

    2011-04-15

    Despite containing only approximately 330 cells, the central nervous system (CNS) of Ciona intestinalis larvae has an architecture that is similar to the vertebrate CNS. Although only vertebrates have a distinct hypothalamus-the source of numerous neurohormone peptides that play pivotal roles in the development, function, and maintenance of various neuronal and endocrine systems, it is suggested that the Ciona brain contains a region that corresponds to the vertebrate hypothalamus. To identify genes expressed in the brain, we isolated brain vesicles using transgenic embryos carrying Ci-β-tubulin(promoter)::Kaede, which resulted in robust Kaede expression in the larval CNS. The associated transcriptome was investigated using microarray analysis. We identified 565 genes that were preferentially expressed in the larval brain. Among these genes, 11 encoded neurohormone peptides including such hypothalamic peptides as gonadotropin-releasing hormone and oxytocin/vasopressin. Six of the identified peptide genes had not been previously described. We also found that genes encoding receptors for some of the peptides were expressed in the brain. Interestingly, whole-mount in situ hybridization showed that most of the peptide genes were expressed in the ventral brain. This catalog of the genes expressed in the larval brain should help elucidate the evolution, development, and functioning of the chordate brain.

  17. A gene encoding a new cold-active lipase from an Antarctic isolate of Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Suja; Te'o, Junior; Nevalainen, Helena

    2013-08-01

    Cold-active lipases are of significant interest as biocatalysts in industrial processes. We have identified a lipase that displayed activity towards long carbon-chain-p-nitrophenyl substrates (C12-C18) at 25 °C from the culture supernatant of an Antarctic Penicillium expansum strain assigned P. expansum SM3. Zymography revealed a protein band of around 30 kDa with activity towards olive oil. DNA fragments of a lipase gene designated as lipPE were isolated from the genomic DNA of P. expansum SM3 by genomic walking PCR. Subsequently, the complete genomic lipPE gene was amplified using gene-specific primers designed from the 5'- and 3'-regions. Reverse transcription PCR was used to amplify the lipPE cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence consisted of 285 residues that included a predicted signal peptide. Three peptides identified by LC/MS/MS analysis of the proteins in the culture supernatant of P. expansum were also present in the deduced amino acid sequence of the lipPE gene suggesting that this gene encoded the lipase identified by initial zymogram activity analysis. Full analysis of the nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequences indicated that the lipPE gene encodes a novel P. expansum lipase. The lipPE gene was expressed in E. coli for further characterization of the enzyme with a view of assessing its suitability for industrial applications.

  18. The Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Spt7 Gene Encodes a Very Acidic Protein Important for Transcription in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gansheroff, L. J.; Dollard, C.; Tan, P.; Winston, F.

    1995-01-01

    Mutations in the SPT7 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae originally were identified as suppressors of Ty and {delta small} insertion mutations in the 5' regions of the HIS4 and LYS2 genes. Other genes that have been identified in mutant hunts of this type have been shown to play a role in transcription. In this work we show that SPT7 is also important for proper transcription in vivo. We have cloned and sequenced the SPT7 gene and have shown that it encodes a large, acidic protein that is localized to the nucleus. The SPT7 protein contains a bromodomain sequence; a deletion that removes the bromodomain from the SPT7 protein causes no detectable mutant phenotype. Strains that contain an spt7 null mutation are viable but grow very slowly and have transcriptional defects at many loci including insertion mutations, Ty elements, the INO1 gene and the MFA1 gene. These transcriptional defects and other mutant phenotypes are similar to those caused by certain mutations in SPT15, which encodes the TATA binding protein (TBP). The similarity of the phenotypes of spt7 and spt15 mutants, including effects of spt7 mutations on the transcription start site of certain genes, suggests that SPT7 plays an important role in transcription initiation in vivo. PMID:7713415

  19. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A.; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear–plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems. PMID:26893456

  20. THE BOG TURTLE: Georgia's Rarest Turtle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Lawrence

    1991-01-01

    This article discusses the description and range, the status, the habitat, the natural history, and the proper management of the diminutive, rare, and endangered species known as the box turtle. (JJK)

  1. THE BOG TURTLE: Georgia's Rarest Turtle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Lawrence

    1991-01-01

    This article discusses the description and range, the status, the habitat, the natural history, and the proper management of the diminutive, rare, and endangered species known as the box turtle. (JJK)

  2. Housekeeping genes essential for pantothenate biosynthesis are plasmid-encoded in Rhizobium etli and Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    PubMed

    Villaseñor, Tomás; Brom, Susana; Dávalos, Araceli; Lozano, Luis; Romero, David; Los Santos, Alejandro García-de

    2011-04-05

    A traditional concept in bacterial genetics states that housekeeping genes, those involved in basic metabolic functions needed for maintenance of the cell, are encoded in the chromosome, whereas genes required for dealing with challenging environmental conditions are located in plasmids. Exceptions to this rule have emerged from genomic sequence data of bacteria with multipartite genomes. The genome sequence of R. etli CFN42 predicts the presence of panC and panB genes clustered together on the 642 kb plasmid p42f and a second copy of panB on plasmid p42e. They encode putative pantothenate biosynthesis enzymes (pantoate-β-alanine ligase and 3-methyl-2-oxobutanoate hydroxymethyltransferase, respectively). Due to their ubiquitous distribution and relevance in the central metabolism of the cell, these genes are considered part of the core genome; thus, their occurrence in a plasmid is noteworthy. In this study we investigate the contribution of these genes to pantothenate biosynthesis, examine whether their presence in plasmids is a prevalent characteristic of the Rhizobiales with multipartite genomes, and assess the possibility that the panCB genes may have reached plasmids by horizontal gene transfer. Analysis of mutants confirmed that the panC and panB genes located on plasmid p42f are indispensable for the synthesis of pantothenate. A screening of the location of panCB genes among members of the Rhizobiales showed that only R. etli and R. leguminosarum strains carry panCB genes in plasmids. The panCB phylogeny attested a common origin for chromosomal and plasmid-borne panCB sequences, suggesting that the R. etli and R. leguminosarum panCB genes are orthologs rather than xenologs. The panCB genes could not totally restore the ability of a strain cured of plasmid p42f to grow in minimal medium. This study shows experimental evidence that core panCB genes located in plasmids of R. etli and R. leguminosarum are indispensable for the synthesis of pantothenate. The

  3. Isolation and expression of two aquaporin-encoding genes from the marine phanerogam Posidonia oceanica.

    PubMed

    Maestrini, Pierluigi; Giordani, Tommaso; Lunardi, Andrea; Cavallini, Andrea; Natali, Lucia

    2004-12-01

    Seagrasses such as Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile are marine phanerogams, widespread in various seas, where they form large prairies representing dynamic substrates exceeding the area of the sediment surface several times over and allowing settlement of epiphyte organisms. Studying mechanisms involved in water transport in marine plants, we isolated two aquaporin-encoding genes, PoPIP1;1 and PoTIP1;1, showing high similarity to plasma membrane- and tonoplast-intrinsic protein-encoding genes, respectively. PoPIP1;1 is unique in the genome of P. oceanica, while PoTIP1;1 belongs to an aquaporin subfamily of at least four members. PoPIP1;1 and PoTIP1;1 encode functional proteins, as indicated by expression experiments in Xenopus oocytes. Both genes are constitutively expressed in the leaves, with higher levels of transcripts in young than in differentiated leaf tissues. Variations of salt concentration in aquarium determined different PoPIP1;1 and PoTIP1;1 transcript accumulation, indicating the existence of adaptation mechanisms related to gene expression also in marine plants, i.e. adapted to very high salt concentrations. Hyposalinity induced lower levels of PIP1 transcripts, while hypersalinity determined more PIP1 transcripts than normal salinity. TIP1 transcripts increased in response to both hypo- and hypersalinity after 2 days of treatment and went back to control levels after 5 d.

  4. Cloning and characterization of largemouth bass ( Micropterus salmoides) myostatin encoding gene and its promoter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengjie; Bai, Junjie; Wang, Lin

    2008-08-01

    Myostatin or GDF-8, a member of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily, has been demonstrated to be a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass in mammals. In the present study, we obtained a 5.64 kb sequence of myostatin encoding gene and its promoter from largemouth bass ( Micropterus salmoides). The myostatin encoding gene consisted of three exons (488 bp, 371 bp and 1779 bp, respectively) and two introns (390 bp and 855 bp, respectively). The intron-exon boundaries were conservative in comparison with those of mammalian myostatin encoding genes, whereas the size of introns was smaller than that of mammals. Sequence analysis of 1.569 kb of the largemouth bass myostatin gene promoter region revealed that it contained two TATA boxes, one CAAT box and nine putative E-boxes. Putative muscle growth response elements for myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), serum response factor (SRF), activator protein 1 (AP1), etc., and muscle-specific Mt binding site (MTBF) were also detected. Some of the transcription factor binding sites were conserved among five teleost species. This information will be useful for studying the transcriptional regulation of myostatin in fish.

  5. Overexpression of a Harpin-encoding gene hrf1 in rice enhances drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Xiao, Shanshan; Feng, Wei; Wu, Zhidan; Gao, Xuewen; Liu, Fengquan; Shao, Min

    2011-01-01

    Harpin proteins are well known as eliciters that induce multiple responses in plants, such as systemic acquired resistance, hypersensitive response, enhancement of growth, resistance to the green peach aphid, and tolerance to drought. Overexpression of Harpin-encoding genes enhances plant resistance to diseases in tobacco, rice, rape, and cotton; however, it is not yet known whether the expression of Harpin-encoding genes in vivo improves plant tolerance to abiotic stresses. The results of this study showed that overexpression of a Harpin-encoding gene hrf1 in rice increased drought tolerance through abscisic acid (ABA) signalling. hrf1- overexpression induces an increase in ABA content and promotes stomatal closure in rice. The hrf1 transgenic rice lines exhibited a significant increase in water retention ability, levels of free proline and soluble sugars, tolerance to oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species-scavenging ability, and expression levels of four stress-related genes, OsLEA3-1, OsP5CS, Mn-SOD, and NM_001074345, under drought stress. The study confirmed that hrf1 conferred enhanced tolerance to drought stress on transgenic crops. These results suggest that Harpins may offer new opportunities for generating drought resistance in other crops. PMID:21527628

  6. Metagenomic Analysis of Apple Orchard Soil Reveals Antibiotic Resistance Genes Encoding Predicted Bifunctional Proteins▿

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Justin J.; Moe, Luke A.; Converse, Brandon J.; Smart, Keith D.; Berklein, Flora C.; McManus, Patricia S.; Handelsman, Jo

    2010-01-01

    To gain insight into the diversity and origins of antibiotic resistance genes, we identified resistance genes in the soil in an apple orchard using functional metagenomics, which involves inserting large fragments of foreign DNA into Escherichia coli and assaying the resulting clones for expressed functions. Among 13 antibiotic-resistant clones, we found two genes that encode bifunctional proteins. One predicted bifunctional protein confers resistance to ceftazidime and contains a natural fusion between a predicted transcriptional regulator and a β-lactamase. Sequence analysis of the entire metagenomic clone encoding the predicted bifunctional β-lactamase revealed a gene potentially involved in chloramphenicol resistance as well as a predicted transposase. A second clone that encodes a predicted bifunctional protein confers resistance to kanamycin and contains an aminoglycoside acetyltransferase domain fused to a second acetyltransferase domain that, based on nucleotide sequence, was predicted not to be involved in antibiotic resistance. This is the first report of a transcriptional regulator fused to a β-lactamase and of an aminoglycoside acetyltransferase fused to an acetyltransferase not involved in antibiotic resistance. PMID:20453147

  7. Identification and transcriptional control of Caulobacter crescentus genes encoding proteins containing a cold shock domain.

    PubMed

    Lang, Elza A S; Marques, Marilis V

    2004-09-01

    The cold shock proteins are small peptides that share a conserved domain, called the cold shock domain (CSD), that is important for nucleic acid binding. The Caulobacter crescentus genome has four csp genes that encode proteins containing CSDs. Three of these (cspA, cspB, and cspC) encode peptides of about 7 kDa and are very similar to the cold shock proteins of other bacteria. Analysis by reverse transcription-PCR of the fourth gene (cspD), which was previously annotated as encoding a 7-kDa protein, revealed that the mRNA is larger and probably encodes a putative 21-kDa protein, containing two CSDs. A search in protein sequences databases revealed that this new domain arrangement has thus far only been found among deduced peptides of alpha-proteobacteria. Expression of each Caulobacter csp gene was studied both in response to cold shock and to growth phase, and we have found that only cspA and cspB are induced by cold shock, whereas cspC and cspD are induced at stationary phase, with different induction rates. The transcription start sites were determined for each gene, and a deletion mapping of the cspD promoter region defined a sequence required for maximal levels of expression, indicating that regulation of this gene occurs at the transcriptional level. Deletion of cspA, but not cspD, caused a reduction in viability when cells were incubated at 10 degrees C for prolonged times, suggesting that cspA is important for adaptation to a low temperature.

  8. Adaptive patterns of mitogenome evolution are associated with the loss of shell scutes in turtles.

    PubMed

    Escalona, Tibisay; Weadick, Cameron J; Antunes, Agostinho

    2017-06-06

    The mitochondrial genome encodes several protein components of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) pathway and is critical for aerobic respiration. These proteins have evolved adaptively in many taxa, but linking molecular-level patterns with higher-level attributes (e.g., morphology, physiology) remains a challenge. Turtles are a promising system for exploring mitochondrial genome evolution as different species face distinct respiratory challenges and employ multiple strategies for ensuring efficient respiration. One prominent adaptation to a highly aquatic lifestyle in turtles is the secondary loss of keratenized shell scutes (i.e., soft-shells), which is associated with enhanced swimming ability and, in some species, cutaneous respiration. We used codon models to examine patterns of selection on mitochondrial protein-coding genes along the three turtle lineages that independently evolved soft-shells. We found strong evidence for positive selection along the branches leading to the pig-nosed turtle (Carettochelys insculpta) and the softshells clade (Trionychidae), but only weak evidence for the leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) branch. Positively selected sites were found to be particularly prevalent in OXPHOS Complex I proteins, especially subunit ND2, along both positively selected lineages, consistent with convergent adaptive evolution. Structural analysis showed that many of the identified sites are within key regions or near residues involved in proton transport, indicating that positive selection may have precipitated substantial changes in mitochondrial function. Overall, our study provides evidence that physiological challenges associated with adaptation to a highly aquatic lifestyle have shaped the evolution of the turtle mitochondrial genome in a lineage-specific manner. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. A common developmental plan for neocortical gene-expressing neurons in the pallium of the domestic chicken Gallus gallus domesticus and the Chinese softshell turtle Pelodiscus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ikuo K; Hirata, Tatsumi

    2014-01-01

    The six-layered neocortex is a unique characteristic of mammals and likely provides the neural basis of their sophisticated cognitive abilities. Although all mammalian species share the layered structure of the neocortex, the sauropsids exhibit an entirely different cytoarchitecture of the corresponding pallial region. Our previous gene expression study revealed that the chicken pallium possesses neural subtypes that express orthologs of layer-specific genes of the mammalian neocortex. To understand the evolutionary steps leading toward animal group-specific neuronal arrangements in the pallium in the course of amniote diversification, we examined expression patterns of the same orthologs and a few additional genes in the pallial development of the Chinese softshell turtle Pelodiscus sinensis, and compared these patterns to those of the chicken. Our analyses highlighted similarities in neuronal arrangements between the two species; the mammalian layer 5 marker orthologs are expressed in the medial domain and the layer 2/3 marker orthologs are expressed in the lateral domain in the pallia of both species. We hypothesize that the mediolateral arrangement of the neocortical layer-specific gene-expressing neurons originated in their common ancestor and is conserved among all sauropsid groups, whereas the neuronal arrangement within the pallium could have highly diversified independently in the mammalian lineage.

  10. A common developmental plan for neocortical gene-expressing neurons in the pallium of the domestic chicken Gallus gallus domesticus and the Chinese softshell turtle Pelodiscus sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Ikuo K.; Hirata, Tatsumi

    2014-01-01

    The six-layered neocortex is a unique characteristic of mammals and likely provides the neural basis of their sophisticated cognitive abilities. Although all mammalian species share the layered structure of the neocortex, the sauropsids exhibit an entirely different cytoarchitecture of the corresponding pallial region. Our previous gene expression study revealed that the chicken pallium possesses neural subtypes that express orthologs of layer-specific genes of the mammalian neocortex. To understand the evolutionary steps leading toward animal group-specific neuronal arrangements in the pallium in the course of amniote diversification, we examined expression patterns of the same orthologs and a few additional genes in the pallial development of the Chinese softshell turtle Pelodiscus sinensis, and compared these patterns to those of the chicken. Our analyses highlighted similarities in neuronal arrangements between the two species; the mammalian layer 5 marker orthologs are expressed in the medial domain and the layer 2/3 marker orthologs are expressed in the lateral domain in the pallia of both species. We hypothesize that the mediolateral arrangement of the neocortical layer-specific gene-expressing neurons originated in their common ancestor and is conserved among all sauropsid groups, whereas the neuronal arrangement within the pallium could have highly diversified independently in the mammalian lineage. PMID:24778607

  11. Bidirectional imprinting of a single gene: GNAS1 encodes maternally, paternally, and biallelically derived proteins.

    PubMed

    Hayward, B E; Moran, V; Strain, L; Bonthron, D T

    1998-12-22

    The GNAS1 gene encodes the alpha subunit of the guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs, which couples signaling through peptide hormone receptors to cAMP generation. GNAS1 mutations underlie the hormone resistance syndrome pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHP-Ia), so the maternal inheritance displayed by PHP-Ia has raised suspicions that GNAS1 is imprinted. Despite this suggestion, in most tissues Gsalpha is biallelically encoded. In contrast, the large G protein XLalphas, also encoded by GNAS1, is paternally derived. Because the inheritance of PHP-Ia predicts the existence of maternally, rather than paternally, expressed transcripts, we have investigated the allelic origin of other mRNAs derived from GNAS1. We find this gene to be remarkable in the complexity of its allele-specific regulation. Two upstream promoters, each associated with a large coding exon, lie only 11 kb apart, yet show opposite patterns of allele-specific methylation and monoallelic transcription. The more 5' of these exons encodes the neuroendocrine secretory protein NESP55, which is expressed exclusively from the maternal allele. The NESP55 exon is 11 kb 5' to the paternally expressed XLalphas exon. The transcripts from these two promoters both splice onto GNAS1 exon 2, yet share no coding sequences. Despite their structural unrelatedness, the encoded proteins, of opposite allelic origin, both have been implicated in regulated secretion in neuroendocrine tissues. Remarkably, maternally (NESP55), paternally (XLalphas), and biallelically (Gsalpha) derived proteins all are produced by different patterns of promoter use and alternative splicing of GNAS1, a gene showing simultaneous imprinting in both the paternal and maternal directions.

  12. Bidirectional imprinting of a single gene: GNAS1 encodes maternally, paternally, and biallelically derived proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Bruce E.; Moran, Veronica; Strain, Lisa; Bonthron, David T.

    1998-01-01

    The GNAS1 gene encodes the α subunit of the guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs, which couples signaling through peptide hormone receptors to cAMP generation. GNAS1 mutations underlie the hormone resistance syndrome pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHP-Ia), so the maternal inheritance displayed by PHP-Ia has raised suspicions that GNAS1 is imprinted. Despite this suggestion, in most tissues Gsα is biallelically encoded. In contrast, the large G protein XLαs, also encoded by GNAS1, is paternally derived. Because the inheritance of PHP-Ia predicts the existence of maternally, rather than paternally, expressed transcripts, we have investigated the allelic origin of other mRNAs derived from GNAS1. We find this gene to be remarkable in the complexity of its allele-specific regulation. Two upstream promoters, each associated with a large coding exon, lie only 11 kb apart, yet show opposite patterns of allele-specific methylation and monoallelic transcription. The more 5′ of these exons encodes the neuroendocrine secretory protein NESP55, which is expressed exclusively from the maternal allele. The NESP55 exon is 11 kb 5′ to the paternally expressed XLαs exon. The transcripts from these two promoters both splice onto GNAS1 exon 2, yet share no coding sequences. Despite their structural unrelatedness, the encoded proteins, of opposite allelic origin, both have been implicated in regulated secretion in neuroendocrine tissues. Remarkably, maternally (NESP55), paternally (XLαs), and biallelically (Gsα) derived proteins all are produced by different patterns of promoter use and alternative splicing of GNAS1, a gene showing simultaneous imprinting in both the paternal and maternal directions. PMID:9860993

  13. Variants in genes that encode muscle contractile proteins influence risk for isolated clubfoot

    PubMed Central

    Weymouth, Katelyn S.; Blanton, Susan H.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Beck, Anita E.; Alvarez, Christine; Richards, Steve; Gurnett, Christina A.; Dobbs, Matthew B.; Barnes, Douglas; Mitchell, Laura E.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.

    2011-01-01

    Isolated clubfoot is a relatively common birth defect that affects approximately 4,000 newborns in the US each year. Calf muscles in the affected leg(s) are underdeveloped and remain small even after corrective treatment. This observation suggests that variants in genes that influence muscle development are priority candidate risk factors for clubfoot. This contention is further supported by the discovery that mutations in genes that encode components of the muscle contractile complex (MYH3, TPM2, TNNT3, TNNI2, and MYH8) cause congenital contractures, including clubfoot, in distal arthrogryposis (DA) syndromes. Interrogation of fifteen genes encoding proteins that control myofiber contractility in a cohort of both nonHispanic white (NHW) and Hispanic families, identified positive associations (p<0.05) with SNPs in twelve genes; only one was identified in a family-based validation dataset. Six SNPs in TNNC2 deviated from Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) in mothers in our NHW discovery dataset. Relative risk and likelihood ratio tests showed evidence for a maternal genotypic effect with TNNC2/rs383112 and an inherited/child genotypic effect with two SNPs, TNNC2/rs4629 and rs383112. Associations with multiple SNPs in TPM1 were identified in the NHW discovery (rs4075583, p=0.01), family-based validation (rs1972041, p=0.000074) and case-control validation (rs12148828, p=0.04) datasets. Gene interactions were identified between multiple muscle contraction genes with many of the interactions involving at least one potential regulatory SNP. Collectively, our results suggest that variation in genes that encode contractile proteins of skeletal myofibers may play a role in the etiology of clubfoot. PMID:21834041

  14. Distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Perumal, N; Murugesan, S; Krishnan, P

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS). Antibiotic susceptibility test was done using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The presence of SCCmec types and AME genes, namely, aac (6')-Ie-aph (2''), aph (3')-IIIa and ant (4')-Ia was determined using two different multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The most encountered AME genes were aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') (55.4%) followed by aph (3')-IIIa (32.3%) and ant (4')-Ia gene (9%). SCCmec type I (34%) was predominant in this study. In conclusion, the aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') was the most common AME gene and SCCmec type I was most predominant among the MRS isolates.

  15. A negative element involved in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded ORF11 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lei

    2009-01-01

    The ORF11 of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a lytic viral gene with delayed-early expression kinetics. How the ORF11 gene expression is regulated in the KSHV lytic cascade is largely unknown. Here we report that the deletion of the KSHV viral IL-6 gene from the viral genome leads to deregulated ORF11 gene expression. The KSHV-encoded viral IL-6 protein was found not to be essentially involved in the regulation of ORF11, suggesting a potential transcriptional cis-regulation. A negative element was identified downstream of the ORF11 gene, which suppresses the ORF11 basal promoter activity in a position-independent manner.

  16. Isolation of a gene encoding a glycosylated cytokinin oxidase from maize.

    PubMed

    Morris, R O; Bilyeu, K D; Laskey, J G; Cheikh, N N

    1999-02-16

    The major cytokinin oxidase in immature maize kernels was purified to homogeneity. Selected tryptic peptides were used to design degenerate oligonucleotide primers for PCR isolation of a fragment of the oxidase gene. Hybridization of the PCR fragment to a maize genomic library allowed isolation of a full-length cytokinin oxidase gene (ckx1). The gene encodes a protein of approximately 57 kDa that possesses a signal peptide, eight consensus N-glycosylation sequences and a consensus FAD binding sequence. Expression of ckx1 in Pichia caused secretion of active glycosylated cytokinin oxidase that contains a substrate-reducible FAD. The gene displays sequence homology with a putative oxidoreductase from Arabidopsis thaliana and with the fas5 gene from Rhodococcus fascians.

  17. Molecular identification and first report of mitochondrial COI gene haplotypes in the hawksbill turtle Eretmochelys imbricata (Testudines: Cheloniidae) in the Colombian Caribbean nesting colonies.

    PubMed

    Daza-Criado, L; Hernández-Fernández, J

    2014-02-21

    Hawksbill sea turtles Eretmochelys imbricata are found extensively around the world, including the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans; the Persian Gulf, and the Red and Mediterranean Seas. Populations of this species are affected by international trafficking of their shields, meat, and eggs, making it a critically endangered animal. We determined the haplotypes of 17 hawksbill foraging turtles of Islas del Rosario (Bolivar) and of the nesting beach Don Diego (Magdalena) in the Colombian Caribbean based on amplification and sequencing of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (COI). We identified 5 haplotypes, including EI-A1 previously reported in Puerto Rico, which was similar to 10 of the study samples. To our knowledge, the remaining 4 haplotypes have not been described. Samples EICOI11 and EICOI3 showed 0.2% divergence from EI-A1, by a single nucleotide change, and were classified as the EI-A2 haplotype. EICOI6, EICOI14, and EICOI12 samples showed 0.2% divergence from EI-A1 and 0.3% divergence from EI-A2 and were classified as EI-A3 haplotype. Samples EICOI16 and EICOI15 presented 5 nucleotide changes each and were classified as 2 different haplotypes, EI-A4 and EI-A5, respectively. The last 2 haplotypes had higher nucleotide diversity (K2P=1.7%) than that by the first 3 haplotypes. EI-A1 and EI-A2 occurred in nesting individuals, and EI-A2, EI-A3, EI-A4, and EI-A5 occurred in foraging individuals. The description of the haplotypes may be associated with reproductive migrations or foraging and could support the hypothesis of natal homing. Furthermore, they can be used in phylogeographic studies.

  18. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    PubMed Central

    Niskanen, Einari A; Hytönen, Vesa P; Grapputo, Alessandro; Nordlund, Henri R; Kulomaa, Markku S; Laitinen, Olli H

    2005-01-01

    Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs), whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins. PMID:15777476

  19. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Einari A; Hytönen, Vesa P; Grapputo, Alessandro; Nordlund, Henri R; Kulomaa, Markku S; Laitinen, Olli H

    2005-03-18

    A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs), whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  20. Mammalian ets-1 and ets-2 genes encode highly conserved proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, D K; McWilliams, M J; Lapis, P; Lautenberger, J A; Schweinfest, C W; Papas, T S

    1988-01-01

    Cellular ets sequences homologous to v-ets of the avian leukemia virus E26 are highly conserved. In mammals the ets sequences are dispersed on two separate chromosomal loci, called ets-1 and ets-2. To determine the structure of these two genes and identify the open reading frames that code for the putative proteins, we have sequenced human ets-1 cDNAs and ets-2 cDNA clones obtained from both human and mouse. The human ETS1 gene is capable of encoding a protein of 441 amino acids. This protein is greater than 95% identical to the chicken c-ets-1 gene product. Thus, the human ETS1 gene is homologous to the chicken c-ets-1 gene, the protooncogene that the E26 virus transduced. Human and mouse ets-2 cDNA clones are closely related and contain open reading frames capable of encoding proteins of 469 and 468 residues, respectively. Direct comparison of these data with previously published findings indicates that ets is a family of genes whose members share distinct domains. PMID:2847145

  1. The ctnG gene encodes carbonic anhydrase involved in mycotoxin citrinin biosynthesis from Monascus aurantiacus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Ping; Tang, Xiao; Wu, Wei; Xu, Yang; Huang, Zhi-Bing; He, Qing-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Citrinin, a fungal secondary metabolite of polyketide origin, is moderately nephrotoxic to vertebrates, including humans. Citrinin is synthesised by condensation of acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA. Six genes involved in the citrinin biosynthesis, including pksCT, ctnA and ctnB, have been cloned in Monascus purpureus. The pksCT gene encodes a polyketide synthase; ctnA is a regulatory factor; and ctnB encodes an oxidoreductase. When the three genes were respectively disrupted, the disruption strains drastically decreased citrinin production or barely produced citrinin. Ten new genes have been discovered in Monascus aurantiacus besides the above six genes. One of these gene displayed the highest similarity to the β-carbonic anhydrase gene from Aspergillus oryzae (74% similarity) and was designated ctnG. To learn more about the citrinin biosynthetic pathway, a ctnG-replacement vector was constructed to disrupt ctnG with the hygromycin resistance gene as the selection marker, then transformed into M. aurantiacus Li AS3.4384 by a protoplast-PEG method. The citrinin content of three disruptants was reduced to about 50%, meanwhile pigment production decreased by 23%, respectively, over those of the wild-type strains. ctnG was deduced to be involved in the formation of malonyl-CoA as a common precursor of red pigments and citrinin. Therefore, the disruption of the ctnG gene decreased citrinin and pigment production. M. aurantiacus Li AS3.4384 can produce higher concentrations of citrinin than other strains such as M. purpureus and M. ruber. Establishing the function of citrinin biosynthetic genes in M. aurantiacus is helpful in understanding the citrinin synthetic pathway and adopting some strategies to control contamination.

  2. High polymorphism in genes encoding antigen B from human infecting strains of Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed

    Kamenetzky, L; Muzulin, P M; Gutierrez, A M; Angel, S O; Zaha, A; Guarnera, E A; Rosenzvit, M C

    2005-12-01

    Echinococcus granulosus antigen B (AgB) is encoded by a gene family and is involved in the evasion of the host immune response. E. granulosus exists as a number of strains (G1-G10) that differ in biological characteristics. We used PCR-SSCP followed by DNA sequencing to evaluate sequence variation and transcription profile of AgB in 5 E. granulosus strains. Twenty-four genomic sequences were isolated and clustered in 3 groups related to 2 of the 5 reported AgB genes. AgB4 genes were present in almost all strains, whereas AgB2 were present as functional genes exclusively in G1/G2 cluster, and as non-functional genes in G5 and the G6/G7 cluster, suggesting inter-strain variation. The AgB transcription patterns, analysed by RT-PCR, showed that AgB2 and AgB4 genes were transcribed in G1, while only the AgB4 gene was transcribed in G7 strain. Cysts from the same strain or cluster shared more genomic and cDNA variants than cysts from different strain or cluster. The level of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence variation observed is higher than that reported so far for coding genes of other helminths. Neutrality was rejected for AgB2 genes. These data show the genetic polymorphism of antigen-coding genes among genetically characterized strains of E. granulosus.

  3. The Evolutionary Fate of the Genes Encoding the Purine Catabolic Enzymes in Hominoids, Birds, and Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Keebaugh, Alaine C.; Thomas, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Gene loss has been proposed to play a major role in adaptive evolution, and recent studies are beginning to reveal its importance in human evolution. However, the potential consequence of a single gene-loss event upon the fates of functionally interrelated genes is poorly understood. Here, we use the purine metabolic pathway as a model system in which to explore this important question. The loss of urate oxidase (UOX) activity, a necessary step in this pathway, has occurred independently in the hominoid and bird/reptile lineages. Because the loss of UOX would have removed the functional constraint upon downstream genes in this pathway, these downstream genes are generally assumed to have subsequently deteriorated. In this study, we used a comparative genomics approach to empirically determine the fate of UOX itself and the downstream genes in five hominoids, two birds, and a reptile. Although we found that the loss of UOX likely triggered the genetic deterioration of the immediate downstream genes in the hominoids, surprisingly in the birds and reptiles, the UOX locus itself and some of the downstream genes were present in the genome and predicted to encode proteins. To account for the variable pattern of gene retention and loss after the inactivation of UOX, we hypothesize that although gene loss is a common fate for genes that have been rendered obsolete due to the upstream loss of an enzyme a metabolic pathway, it is also possible that same lack of constraint will foster the evolution of new functions or allow the optimization of preexisting alternative functions in the downstream genes, thereby resulting in gene retention. Thus, adaptive single-gene losses have the potential to influence the long-term evolutionary fate of functionally interrelated genes. PMID:20106906

  4. Human TOP3: a single-copy gene encoding DNA topoisomerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Hanai, R; Caron, P R; Wang, J C

    1996-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding a protein homologous to the Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I subfamily of enzymes has been identified through cloning and sequencing. Expressing the cloned human cDNA in yeast (delta)top1 cells lacking endogenous DNA topoisomerase I yielded an activity in cell extracts that specifically reduces the number of supercoils in a highly negatively supercoiled DNA. On the basis of these results, the human gene containing the cDNA sequence has been denoted TOP3, and the protein it encodes has been denoted DNA topoisomerase III. Screening of a panel of human-rodent somatic hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization of cloned TOP3 genomic DNA to metaphase chromosomes indicate that human TOP3 is a single-copy gene located at chromosome 17p11.2-12. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8622991

  5. Characterization of emb, a Gene Encoding the Major Adhesin of Streptococcus defectivus

    PubMed Central

    Manganelli, Riccardo; van de Rijn, Ivo

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus defectivus is one of the nutritionally variant streptococci, a class of viridans group streptococci first isolated from patients with endocarditis and otitis media. In previous studies, NVS-47, a clinical isolate of S. defectivus, was shown to bind to the extracellular matrix. A high-molecular-weight surface protein was identified and proposed to be responsible for mediating this binding. In the present study, the gene encoding this protein was identified by transposon mutagenesis and characterized. The gene (emb) was found to be larger than 14 kb and was partially sequenced. It encodes a protein containing at least 50 repeats of 77 amino acids predicted to assume an alternating coiled-coil conformation. The domain responsible for extracellular matrix binding was mapped to the N terminus of the protein. From sequence analysis, Emb is proposed to be the prototype of a new family of streptococcal fibrillar proteins. PMID:9864195

  6. Bacteriophage T5 gene D10 encodes a branch-migration protein

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Io Nam; Sayers, Jon R.; Sanders, Cyril M.

    2016-01-01

    Helicases catalyze the unwinding of double-stranded nucleic acids where structure and phosphate backbone contacts, rather than nucleobase sequence, usually determines substrate specificity. We have expressed and purified a putative helicase encoded by the D10 gene of bacteriophage T5. Here we report that this hitherto uncharacterized protein possesses branch migration and DNA unwinding activity. The initiation of substrate unwinding showed some sequence dependency, while DNA binding and DNA-dependent ATPase activity did not. DNA footprinting and purine-base interference assays demonstrated that D10 engages these substrates with a defined polarity that may be established by protein-nucleobase contacts. Bioinformatic analysis of the nucleotide databases revealed genes predicted to encode proteins related to D10 in archaebacteria, bacteriophages and in viruses known to infect a range of eukaryotic organisms. PMID:28009009

  7. Cloning of the gene encoding streptococcal immunoglobulin A protease and its expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, J V; Plaut, A G; Fishman, Y; Wright, A

    1988-01-01

    We have identified and cloned a 6-kilobase-pair segment of chromosomal DNA from Streptococcus sanguis ATCC 10556 that encodes immunoglobulin A (IgA) protease activity when cloned into Escherichia coli. The enzyme specified by the iga gene in plasmid pJG1 accumulates in the periplasm of E. coli MM294 cells and has a substrate specificity for human IgA1 identical to that of native S. sanguis protease. Hybridization experiments with probes from within the encoding DNA showed no detectable homology at the nucleotide sequence level with chromosomal DNA of gram-negative bacteria that excrete IgA protease. Moreover, the S. sanguis iga gene probes showed no detectable hybridization with chromosomal DNA of S. pneumoniae, although the IgA proteases of these two streptococcal species cleaved the identical peptide bond in the human IgA1 heavy-chain hinge region. Images PMID:3294181

  8. Molecular characterization and expression profiles in response to bacterial infection of Chinese soft-shelled turtle interleukin-8 (IL-8), the first reptilian chemokine gene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiuxia; Guo, Qionglin; Dai, Heping

    2009-07-01

    In this study, an IL-8 homologue has been cloned and identified from a reptile, Chinese soft-shelled turtle for the first time. The full-length cDNA of turtle IL-8 was 1188bp and contained a 312bp open reading frame (ORF) coding for a protein of 104 amino acids. The chemokine CXC domain, which contained Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif and four cysteine residues, was well conserved in turtle IL-8. The 4924bp genomic DNA of turtle IL-8 contained four exons and three introns. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the amino acid sequence of turtle IL-8 clustered together with birds. RT-PCR analysis showed that turtle IL-8 mRNA was constitutively expressed liver, spleen, kidney, heart, blood and intestine tissues of control turtles. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis further indicated that the turtle IL-8 mRNA expression was apparent in various tissues at 8h and up-regulated significantly during 8h-7d after Aeromonas hydrophila infection. The present studies will help us to understand the evolution of IL-8 molecule and the inflammatory response mechanism in reptiles.

  9. The udhA Gene of Escherichia coli Encodes a Soluble Pyridine Nucleotide Transhydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Birgitte; French, Christopher E.; Wainwright, Ian; Bruce, Neil C.

    1999-01-01

    The udhA gene of Escherichia coli was cloned and expressed in E. coli and found to encode an enzyme with soluble pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase activity. The N-terminal end of the enzyme contains the fingerprint motif of a dinucleotide binding domain, not present in published E. coli genome sequences due to a sequencing error. E. coli is hereby the first organism reported to possess both a soluble and a membrane-bound pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase. PMID:9922271

  10. Expression of the gene encoding secreted placental alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) by a nondefective adenovirus vector.

    PubMed

    Doronin, K K; Zakharchuk, A N; Grinenko, N F; Yurov, G K; Krougliak, V A; Naroditsky, B S

    1993-04-30

    A nondefective recombinant human adenovirus 5 (Ad5) carrying the SEAP gene, encoding human secreted placental alkaline phosphatase, in the E3 region of the Ad5 genome was obtained. The expression of SEAP at the early and late stages of Ad5 infection was demonstrated in permissive and semi-permissive cell cultures. The amount of SEAP in the culture medium of the 293 cells was 13.6% of the total protein.

  11. Sieve element occlusion (SEO) genes encode structural phloem proteins involved in wound sealing of the phloem.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Antonia M; Jekat, Stephan B; Zielonka, Sascia; Müller, Boje; Neumann, Ulla; Rüping, Boris; Twyman, Richard M; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Prüfer, Dirk; Noll, Gundula A

    2012-07-10

    The sieve element occlusion (SEO) gene family originally was delimited to genes encoding structural components of forisomes, which are specialized crystalloid phloem proteins found solely in the Fabaceae. More recently, SEO genes discovered in various non-Fabaceae plants were proposed to encode the common phloem proteins (P-proteins) that plug sieve plates after wounding. We carried out a comprehensive characterization of two tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) SEO genes (NtSEO). Reporter genes controlled by the NtSEO promoters were expressed specifically in immature sieve elements, and GFP-SEO fusion proteins formed parietal agglomerates in intact sieve elements as well as sieve plate plugs after wounding. NtSEO proteins with and without fluorescent protein tags formed agglomerates similar in structure to native P-protein bodies when transiently coexpressed in Nicotiana benthamiana, and the analysis of these protein complexes by electron microscopy revealed ultrastructural features resembling those of native P-proteins. NtSEO-RNA interference lines were essentially devoid of P-protein structures and lost photoassimilates more rapidly after injury than control plants, thus confirming the role of P-proteins in sieve tube sealing. We therefore provide direct evidence that SEO genes in tobacco encode P-protein subunits that affect translocation. We also found that peptides recently identified in fascicular phloem P-protein plugs from squash (Cucurbita maxima) represent cucurbit members of the SEO family. Our results therefore suggest a common evolutionary origin for P-proteins found in the sieve elements of all dicotyledonous plants and demonstrate the exceptional status of extrafascicular P-proteins in cucurbits.

  12. Enterotoxin-Encoding Genes in Staphylococcus spp. from Food Handlers in a University Restaurant.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Sabina Dos Santos Paulino; Cidral, Thiago André; Soares, Maria José dos Santos; de Melo, Maria Celeste Nunes

    2015-11-01

    Food handlers carrying enterotoxin-producing Staphylococcus are a potential source of food poisoning. The aim of this study was to analyze genes encoding enterotoxins in coagulase-positive Staphylococcus (CoPS) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) isolated from the anterior nostrils and hands of food handlers at a university restaurant in the city of Natal, Northeast Brazil. Thirty food handlers were screened for the study. The isolates were subjected to Gram staining, a bacitracin sensitivity test, mannitol fermentation, and catalase and coagulase tests. CoNS and CoPS strains were subsequently identified by a Vitek 2 System (BioMerieux, France) and various biochemical tests. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect genes for enterotoxins A, B, C, D, E, G, H, and I (sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg, seh, and sei) and a disc-diffusion method was used to determine susceptibility to several classes of antimicrobials. All food handlers presented staphylococci on their hands and/or noses. The study found 58 Staphylococcus spp., of which 20.7% were CoPS and 79.3% were CoNS. S. epidermidis was the most prevalent species. Twenty-nine staphylococci (50%) were positive for one or more enterotoxin genes, and the most prevalent genes were seg and sei, each with a frequency of 29.3%. Indeed, CoNS encoded a high percentage of enterotoxin genes (43.5%). However, S. aureus encoded even more enterotoxin genes (75%). Most isolates showed sensitivity to the antibiotics used for testing, except for penicillin (only 35% sensitive). The results from this study reinforce that coagulase-negative as well as coagulase-positive staphylococci isolated from food handlers are capable of genotypic enterotoxigenicity.

  13. Mutations in the gene encoding epsilon-sarcoglycan cause myoclonus-dystonia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zimprich, A; Grabowski, M; Asmus, F; Naumann, M; Berg, D; Bertram, M; Scheidtmann, K; Kern, P; Winkelmann, J; Müller-Myhsok, B; Riedel, L; Bauer, M; Müller, T; Castro, M; Meitinger, T; Strom, T M; Gasser, T

    2001-09-01

    The dystonias are a common clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of movement disorders. More than ten loci for inherited forms of dystonia have been mapped, but only three mutated genes have been identified so far. These are DYT1, encoding torsin A and mutant in the early-onset generalized form, GCH1 (formerly known as DYT5), encoding GTP-cyclohydrolase I and mutant in dominant dopa-responsive dystonia, and TH, encoding tyrosine hydroxylase and mutant in the recessive form of the disease. Myoclonus-dystonia syndrome (MDS; DYT11) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by bilateral, alcohol-sensitive myoclonic jerks involving mainly the arms and axial muscles. Dystonia, usually torticollis and/or writer's cramp, occurs in most but not all affected patients and may occasionally be the only symptom of the disease. In addition, patients often show prominent psychiatric abnormalities, including panic attacks and obsessive-compulsive behavior. In most MDS families, the disease is linked to a locus on chromosome 7q21 (refs. 11-13). Using a positional cloning approach, we have identified five different heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the gene for epsilon-sarcoglycan (SGCE), which we mapped to a refined critical region of about 3.2 Mb. SGCE is expressed in all brain regions examined. Pedigree analysis shows a marked difference in penetrance depending on the parental origin of the disease allele. This is indicative of a maternal imprinting mechanism, which has been demonstrated in the mouse epsilon-sarcoglycan gene.

  14. Structure and function of the DNA ligases encoded by the mammalian LIG3 gene.

    PubMed

    Tomkinson, Alan E; Sallmyr, Annahita

    2013-12-01

    Among the mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases (LIG), the LIG3 gene is unique in that it encodes multiple DNA ligase polypeptides with different cellular functions. Notably, this nuclear gene encodes the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and so is essential for this organelle. In the nucleus, there is significant functional redundancy between DNA ligase IIIα and DNA ligase I in excision repair. In addition, DNA ligase IIIα is essential for DNA replication in the absence of the replicative DNA ligase, DNA ligase I. DNA ligase IIIα is a component of an alternative non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair that is more active when the major DNA ligase IV-dependent pathway is defective. Unlike its other nuclear functions, the role of DNA ligase IIIα in alternative NHEJ is independent of its nuclear partner protein, X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1). DNA ligase IIIα is frequently overexpressed in cancer cells, acting as a biomarker for increased dependence upon alternative NHEJ for DSB repair and it is a promising novel therapeutic target. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Structure and function of the DNA ligases encoded by the mammalian LIG3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Tomkinson, Alan E.; Sallmyr, Annahita

    2013-01-01

    Among the mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases (LIG), the LIG3 gene is unique in that it encodes multiple DNA ligase polypeptides with different cellular functions. Notably, this nuclear gene encodes the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and so is essential for this organelle. In the nucleus, there is significant functional redundancy between DNA ligase IIIα and DNA ligase I in excision repair. In addition, DNA ligase IIIα is essential for DNA replication in the absence of the replicative DNA ligase, DNA ligase I. DNA ligase IIIα is a component of an alternative non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair that is more active when the major DNA ligase IV-dependent pathway is defective. Unlike its other nuclear functions, the role of DNA ligase IIIα in alternative NHEJ is independent of its nuclear partner protein, X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1). DNA ligase IIIα is frequently overexpressed in cancer cells, acting as a biomarker for increased dependence upon alternative NHEJ for DSB repair and it is a promising novel therapeutic target. PMID:24013086

  16. Citrate synthase encoded by the CIT2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is peroxisomal.

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, A S; Hines, V; Small, G M

    1990-01-01

    The product of the CIT2 gene has the tripeptide SKL at its carboxyl terminus. This amino acid sequence has been shown to act as a peroxisomal targeting signal in mammalian cells. We examined the subcellular site of this extramitochondrial citrate synthase. Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were grown on oleate medium to induce peroxisome proliferation. A fraction containing membrane-enclosed vesicles and organelles was analyzed by sedimentation on density gradients. In wild-type cells, the major peak of citrate synthase activity was recovered in the mitochondrial fraction, but a second peak of activity cosedimented with peroxisomes. The peroxisomal activity, but not the mitochondrial activity, was inhibited by incubation at pH 8.1, a characteristic of the extramitochondrial citrate synthase encoded by the CIT2 gene. In a strain in which the CIT1 gene encoding mitochondrial citrate synthase had been disrupted, the major peak of citrate synthase activity was peroxisomal, and all of the activity was sensitive to incubation at pH 8.1. Yeast cells bearing a cit2 disruption were unable to mobilize stored lipids and did not form stable peroxisomes in oleate. We conclude that citrate synthase encoded by CIT2 is peroxisomal and participates in the glyoxylate cycle. Images PMID:2181273

  17. Temporal regulation of genes encoding the flagellar proximal rod in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Boyd, C H; Gober, J W

    2001-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus has a life cycle that includes two distinct and separable developmental stages, a motile swarmer phase and a sessile stalked phase. The cell cycle-controlled biogenesis of the single polar flagellum of the swarmer cell is the best-studied aspect of this developmental program. The flagellar regulon is arranged into a rigid trans-acting hierarchy of gene expression in which successful expression of early genes is required for the expression of genes that are later in the hierarchy and in which the order of gene expression mirrors the order of assembly of gene products into the completed flagellum. The flgBC-fliE genes were identified as a result of the C. crescentus genome sequencing project and encode the homologues of two flagellar proximal rod proteins, FlgB and FlgC, and one conserved protein, FliE, that is of unknown function. Footprint assays on a DNA fragment containing the operon promoter as well as in vivo mutant suppressor analysis of promoter mutations indicate that this operon is controlled by the cell cycle response regulator CtrA, which with sigma(70) is responsible for regulating transcription of other early flagellar genes in C. crescentus. Promoter analysis, timing of expression, and epistasis experiments place these genes outside of the flagellar regulatory hierarchy; they are expressed in class II mutants, and flgB deletions do not prevent class III gene expression. This operon is also unusual in that it is expressed from a promoter that is divergent from the class II operon containing fliP, which encodes a member of the flagellum-specific protein export apparatus.

  18. A novel gene encoding an integral membrane protein is mutated in nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Town, M; Jean, G; Cherqui, S; Attard, M; Forestier, L; Whitmore, S A; Callen, D F; Gribouval, O; Broyer, M; Bates, G P; van't Hoff, W; Antignac, C

    1998-04-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis, an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from defective lysosomal transport of cystine, is the most common inherited cause of renal Fanconi syndrome. The cystinosis gene has been mapped to chromosome 17p13. We found that the locus D17S829 was homozygously deleted in 23 out of 70 patients, and identified a novel gene, CTNS, which mapped to the deletion interval. CTNS encodes an integral membrane protein, cystinosin, with features of a lysosomal membrane protein. Eleven different mutations, all predicted to cause loss of function of the protein, were found to segregate with the disorder.

  19. Localization of the human genes encoding the two subunits of general transcription factor TFIIE.

    PubMed

    Purrello, M; Di Pietro, C; Rapisarda, A; Motta, S; Pavone, L; Grzeschik, K H; Sichel, G

    1994-09-01

    TFIIE is a general transcription factor for class II genes composed of two types of subunits, a large one of 56 kDa and a small of 34 kDa. By Southern analysis at high and at low stringency of a panel of mouse/human hybrid cell lines and by in situ chromosomal hybridization, we have demonstrated that both polypeptides are encoded by genes that are single copy in the human genome and are localized at 3q13-q21 and at 8p12, respectively. A TaqI RFLP (heterozygosity index of 0.07) was detected at the locus for the 56-kDa subunit.

  20. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence and expression of a Sulfolobus solfataricus gene encoding a class II fumarase.

    PubMed

    Colombo, S; Grisa, M; Tortora, P; Vanoni, M

    1994-01-03

    Fumarase catalyzes the interconversion of L-malate and fumarate. A Sulfolobus solfataricus fumarase gene (fumC) was cloned and sequenced. Typical archaebacterial regulatory sites were identified in the region flanking the fumC open reading frame. The fumC gene encodes a protein of 438 amino acids (47,899 Da) which shows several significant similarities with class II fumarases from both eubacterial and eukariotic sources as well as with aspartases. S. solfataricus fumarase expressed in Escherichia coli retains enzymatic activity and its thermostability is comparable to that of S. solfataricus purified enzyme despite a 11 amino acid C-terminal deletion.

  1. Chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human DNA helicase RECQL and its mouse homologue

    SciTech Connect

    Puranam, K.L.; Kennington, E.; Blackshear, P.J.

    1995-04-10

    We have determined the chromosomal location of the human and mouse genes encoding the RECQL protein, a putative DNA helicase homologous to the bacterial DNA helicase, RecQ. RECQL was localized to human chromosome 12 by analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrid DNA, fine mapping of RECQL by fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed its chromosomal location to be 12p11-p12. The corresponding mouse gene, Recql, was mapped to the telomeric end of mouse chromosome 6 by analysis of DNA from an interspecific cross. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Prime time for turtle conservation

    Treesearch

    A. Ross Kiester; Deanna H. Olson

    2011-01-01

    Our turtle heritage is diminishing at a rate outpacing that of other main animal groups. The 2011-Year of the Turtle partnership and campaign is an opportunity to raise awareness for turtles, celebrate our turtle heritage, herald conservation and research successes, and identify gaps in our understanding that can be the focus of future work. We outline seven...

  3. Molecular characterization of genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase involved in proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in apple

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Liao; Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Wei, Guochao; Zhou, Hui; Korban, Schuyler S.; Han, Yuepeng

    2015-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are the major component of phenolics in apple, but mechanisms involved in PA biosynthesis remain unclear. Here, the relationship between the PA biosynthesis and the expression of genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) and anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) was investigated in fruit skin of one apple cultivar and three crabapples. Transcript levels of LAR1 and ANR2 genes were significantly correlated with the contents of catechin and epicatechin, respectively, which suggests their active roles in PA synthesis. Surprisingly, transcript levels for both LAR1 and LAR2 genes were almost undetectable in two crabapples that accumulated both flavan-3-ols and PAs. This contradicts the previous finding that LAR1 gene is a strong candidate regulating the accumulation of metabolites such as epicatechin and PAs in apple. Ectopic expression of apple MdLAR1 gene in tobacco suppresses expression of the late genes in anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway, resulting in loss of anthocyanin in flowers. Interestingly, a decrease in PA biosynthesis was also observed in flowers of transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing the MdLAR1 gene, which could be attributed to decreased expression of both the NtANR1 and NtANR2 genes. Our study not only confirms the in vivo function of apple LAR1 gene, but it is also helpful for understanding the mechanism of PA biosynthesis. PMID:25914714

  4. Four genes from Pseudomonas fluorescens that encode the biosynthesis of pyrrolnitrin.

    PubMed

    Hammer, P E; Hill, D S; Lam, S T; Van Pée, K H; Ligon, J M

    1997-06-01

    Pyrrolnitrin is a secondary metabolite of Pseudomonas and Burkholderia sp. strains with strong antifungal activity. Production of pyrrolnitrin has been correlated with the ability of some bacteria to control plant diseases caused by fungal pathogens, including the damping-off pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. Pseudomonas fluorescens BL915 has been reported to produce pyrrolnitrin and to be an effective biocontrol agent for this pathogen. We have isolated a 32-kb genomic DNA fragment from this strain that contains genes involved in the biosynthesis of pyrrolnitrin. Marker-exchange mutagenesis of this DNA with Tn5 revealed the presence of a 6.2-kb region that contains genes required for the synthesis of pyrrolnitrin. The nucleotide sequence of the 6.2-kb region was determined and found to contain a cluster of four genes that are required for the production of pyrrolnitrin. Deletion mutations in any of the four genes resulted in a pyrrolnitrin-nonproducing phenotype. The putative coding sequences of the four individual genes were cloned by PCR and fused to the tac promoter from Escherichia coli. In each case, the appropriate tac promoter-pyrrolnitrin gene fusion was shown to complement the pyrrolnitrin-negative phenotype of the corresponding deletion mutant. Transfer of the four gene cluster to E. coli resulted in the production of pyrrolnitrin by this organism, thereby demonstrating that the four genes are sufficient for the production of this metabolite and represent all of the genes required to encode the pathway for pyrrolnitrin biosynthesis.

  5. Four genes from Pseudomonas fluorescens that encode the biosynthesis of pyrrolnitrin.

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, P E; Hill, D S; Lam, S T; Van Pée, K H; Ligon, J M

    1997-01-01

    Pyrrolnitrin is a secondary metabolite of Pseudomonas and Burkholderia sp. strains with strong antifungal activity. Production of pyrrolnitrin has been correlated with the ability of some bacteria to control plant diseases caused by fungal pathogens, including the damping-off pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. Pseudomonas fluorescens BL915 has been reported to produce pyrrolnitrin and to be an effective biocontrol agent for this pathogen. We have isolated a 32-kb genomic DNA fragment from this strain that contains genes involved in the biosynthesis of pyrrolnitrin. Marker-exchange mutagenesis of this DNA with Tn5 revealed the presence of a 6.2-kb region that contains genes required for the synthesis of pyrrolnitrin. The nucleotide sequence of the 6.2-kb region was determined and found to contain a cluster of four genes that are required for the production of pyrrolnitrin. Deletion mutations in any of the four genes resulted in a pyrrolnitrin-nonproducing phenotype. The putative coding sequences of the four individual genes were cloned by PCR and fused to the tac promoter from Escherichia coli. In each case, the appropriate tac promoter-pyrrolnitrin gene fusion was shown to complement the pyrrolnitrin-negative phenotype of the corresponding deletion mutant. Transfer of the four gene cluster to E. coli resulted in the production of pyrrolnitrin by this organism, thereby demonstrating that the four genes are sufficient for the production of this metabolite and represent all of the genes required to encode the pathway for pyrrolnitrin biosynthesis. PMID:9172332

  6. Three hormone receptor-like Drosophila genes encode an identical DNA-binding finger.

    PubMed

    Rothe, M; Nauber, U; Jäckle, H

    1989-10-01

    The putative finger domain of knirps (kni), a member of the gap class of segmentation genes, was used to isolate two sequence-related genes of Drosophila melanogaster under reduced stringency hybridization conditions. The two kni homologous genes map close to kni in the proximal portion of the third chromosome. One of them is the previously identified gene knirps-related (knrl), kni and knrl are spatially co-regulated in both early and late stages of embryogenesis. Their posterior domains of expression at blastoderm stage are under the control of the maternal pattern organizer gene nanos. In contrast, the expression of the second kni homologous gene is restricted to the late embryonic gonads. Due to its site of expression, we termed this gene 'embryonic gonad' (egon). In addition to the conserved DNA-binding domain, these three genes share an additional sequence of 19 amino acids, the kni-box, adjacent to the finger region. The identical N-terminal Cys/Cys finger encoded by each of the three genes suggests that they code for DNA-binding proteins which might bind to similar (or even identical) target sequences.

  7. Three hormone receptor-like Drosophila genes encode an identical DNA-binding finger.

    PubMed Central

    Rothe, M; Nauber, U; Jäckle, H

    1989-01-01

    The putative finger domain of knirps (kni), a member of the gap class of segmentation genes, was used to isolate two sequence-related genes of Drosophila melanogaster under reduced stringency hybridization conditions. The two kni homologous genes map close to kni in the proximal portion of the third chromosome. One of them is the previously identified gene knirps-related (knrl), kni and knrl are spatially co-regulated in both early and late stages of embryogenesis. Their posterior domains of expression at blastoderm stage are under the control of the maternal pattern organizer gene nanos. In contrast, the expression of the second kni homologous gene is restricted to the late embryonic gonads. Due to its site of expression, we termed this gene 'embryonic gonad' (egon). In addition to the conserved DNA-binding domain, these three genes share an additional sequence of 19 amino acids, the kni-box, adjacent to the finger region. The identical N-terminal Cys/Cys finger encoded by each of the three genes suggests that they code for DNA-binding proteins which might bind to similar (or even identical) target sequences. Images PMID:2555153

  8. Two homologous low-temperature-inducible genes from Arabidopsis encode highly hydrophobic proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Capel, J; Jarillo, J A; Salinas, J; Martínez-Zapater, J M

    1997-01-01

    We have characterized two related cDNAs (RCI2A and RCI2B) corresponding to genes from Arabidopsis thaliana, the expression of which is transiently induced by low, nonfreezing temperatures. RCI2A and RCI2B encode small (54 amino acids), highly hydrophobic proteins that bear two potential transmembrane domains. They show similarity to proteins encoded by genes from barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and wheatgrass (Lophophyrum elongatum) that are regulated by different stress conditions. Their high level of sequence homology (78%) and their genomic location in a single restriction fragment suggest that both genes originated as a result of a tandem duplication. However, their regulatory sequences have diverged enough to confer on them different expression patterns. Like most of the cold-inducible plant genes characterized, the expression of RCI2A and RCI2B is also promoted by abscisic acid (ABA) and dehydration but is not a general response to stress conditions, since it is not induced by salt stress or by anaerobiosis. Furthermore, low temperatures are able to induce RCI2A and RCI2B expression in ABA-deficient and -insensitive genetic backgrounds, indicating that both ABA-dependent and -independent pathways regulate the low-temperature responsiveness of these two genes. PMID:9342870

  9. Codon usage analysis of photolyase encoding genes of cyanobacteria inhabiting diverse habitats.

    PubMed

    Rajneesh; Pathak, Jainendra; Kannaujiya, Vinod K; Singh, Shailendra P; Sinha, Rajeshwar P

    2017-07-01

    Nucleotide and amino acid compositions were studied to determine the genomic and structural relationship of photolyase gene in freshwater, marine and hot spring cyanobacteria. Among three habitats, photolyase encoding genes from hot spring cyanobacteria were found to have highest GC content. The genomic GC content was found to influence the codon usage and amino acid variability in photolyases. The third position of codon was found to have more effect on amino acid variability in photolyases than the first and second positions of codon. The variation of amino acids Ala, Asp, Glu, Gly, His, Leu, Pro, Gln, Arg and Val in photolyases of three different habitats was found to be controlled by first position of codon (G1C1). However, second position (G2C2) of codon regulates variation of Ala, Cys, Gly, Pro, Arg, Ser, Thr and Tyr contents in photolyases. Third position (G3C3) of codon controls incorporation of amino acids such as Ala, Phe, Gly, Leu, Gln, Pro, Arg, Ser, Thr and Tyr in photolyases from three habitats. Photolyase encoding genes of hot spring cyanobacteria have 85% codons with G or C at third position, whereas marine and freshwater cyanobacteria showed 82 and 60% codons, respectively, with G or C at third position. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that GC content has a profound effect in separating the genes along the first major axis according to their RSCU (relative synonymous codon usage) values, and neutrality analysis indicated that mutational pressure has resulted in codon bias in photolyase genes of cyanobacteria.

  10. A single Danio rerio hars gene encodes both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial histidyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Ashley L; Cahan, Sara Helms; Franklyn, Christopher S; Ebert, Alicia M

    2017-01-01

    Histidyl tRNA Synthetase (HARS) is a member of the aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (ARS) family of enzymes. This family of 20 enzymes is responsible for attaching specific amino acids to their cognate tRNA molecules, a critical step in protein synthesis. However, recent work highlighting a growing number of associations between ARS genes and diverse human diseases raises the possibility of new and unexpected functions in this ancient enzyme family. For example, mutations in HARS have been linked to two different neurological disorders, Usher Syndrome Type IIIB and Charcot Marie Tooth peripheral neuropathy. These connections raise the possibility of previously undiscovered roles for HARS in metazoan development, with alterations in these functions leading to complex diseases. In an attempt to establish Danio rerio as a model for studying HARS functions in human disease, we characterized the Danio rerio hars gene and compared it to that of human HARS. Using a combination of bioinformatics, molecular biology, and cellular approaches, we found that while the human genome encodes separate genes for cytoplasmic and mitochondrial HARS protein, the Danio rerio genome encodes a single hars gene which undergoes alternative splicing to produce the respective cytoplasmic and mitochondrial versions of Hars. Nevertheless, while the HARS genes of humans and Danio differ significantly at the genomic level, we found that they are still highly conserved at the amino acid level, underscoring the potential utility of Danio rerio as a model organism for investigating HARS function and its link to human diseases in vivo.

  11. Structure and evolutionary origin of the gene encoding a human serum mannose-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, M E; Brickell, P M; Craig, R K; Summerfield, J A

    1989-01-01

    The N-terminal sequence of the major human serum mannose-binding protein (MBP1) was shown to be identical at all positions determined with the amino acid sequence predicted from a cDNA clone of a human liver MBP mRNA. An oligonucleotide corresponding to part of the sequence of this cDNA clone was used to isolate a cosmid genomic clone containing a homologous gene. The intron/exon structure of this gene was found to closely resemble that of the gene encoding a rat liver MBP (MBP A). The nucleotide sequence of the exons differed in several places from that of the human cDNA clone published by Ezekowitz, Day & Herman [(1988) J. Exp. Med. 167, 1034-1046]. The MBP molecule comprises a signal peptide, a cysteine-rich domain, a collagen-like domain, a 'neck' region and a carbohydrate-binding domain. Each domain is encoded by a separate exon. This genomic organization lends support to the hypothesis that the gene arose during evolution by a process of exon shuffling. Several consensus sequences that may be involved in controlling the expression of human serum MBP have been identified in the promoter region of the gene. The consensus sequences are consistent with the suggestion that this mammalian serum lectin is regulated as an acute-phase protein synthesized by the liver. PMID:2590164

  12. Separate nuclear genes encode cytosolic and mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphate kinase in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Troll, H; Winckler, T; Lascu, I; Müller, N; Saurin, W; Véron, M; Mutzel, R

    1993-12-05

    We have previously isolated cDNA clones for the gip17 gene encoding the cytosolic nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase from Dictyostelium discoideum, and partial cDNAs for guk, a second member of the NDP kinase gene family (Wallet, V., Mutzel, R., Troll, H., Barzu, O., Wurster, B., Véron, M., and Lacombe, M. L. (1990) J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 80, 1199-1202). We now characterize genomic DNA clones for both NDP kinase genes, and we show that guk defines a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial NDP kinase. Isolated D. discoideum mitochondria contain 3% of the total cellular NDP kinase activity. Antibodies which specifically recognize and inhibit the activity of either cytosolic or mitochondrial NDP kinase unambiguously distinguish between these activities. The nascent mitochondrial NDP kinase contains a presequence of 57 amino acids that is removed during import into the organelle as shown by determination of the NH2 terminus of the mature protein from mitochondria. The genes for mitochondrial and cytosolic NDP kinases contain four and two introns, respectively. The positions of the of the introns in the gene for the cytosolic enzyme match exactly the positions of the second and fourth introns in the coding region of its mitochondrial homologue. From these results we conclude that the isozymes diverged from a common ancestor, and we discuss possible phylogenetic pathways for the evolution of cytosolic and organelle NDP kinases.

  13. The dhnA gene of Escherichia coli encodes a class I fructose bisphosphate aldolase.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, G J; Howlett, G J; Ashcroft, A E; Berry, A

    1998-01-01

    The gene encoding the Escherichia coli Class I fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBP aldolase) has been cloned and the protein overproduced in high amounts. This gene sequence has previously been identified as encoding an E. coli dehydrin in the GenBanktrade mark database [gene dhnA; entry code U73760; Close and Choi (1996) Submission to GenBanktrade mark]. However, the purified protein overproduced from the dhnA gene shares all its properties with those known for the E. coli Class I FBP aldolase. The protein is an 8-10-mer with a native molecular mass of approx. 340 kDa, each subunit consisting of 349 amino acids. The Class I enzyme shows low sequence identity with other known FBP aldolases, both Class I and Class II (in the order of 20%), which may be reflected by some novel properties of this FBP aldolase. The active-site peptide has been isolated and the Schiff-base-forming lysine residue (Lys236) has been identified by a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, kinetics and electrospray-ionization MS. A second lysine residue (Lys238) has been implicated in substrate binding. The cloning of this gene and the high levels of overexpression obtained will facilitate future structure-function studies. PMID:9531482

  14. Characterization of the lys2 gene of Penicillium chrysogenum encoding alpha-aminoadipic acid reductase.

    PubMed

    Casqueiro, J; Gutiérrez, S; Bañuelos, O; Fierro, F; Velasco, J; Martín, J F

    1998-09-01

    A DNA fragment containing a gene homologous to LYS2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cloned from a genomic DNA library of Penicillium chrysogenum AS-P-78. It encodes a protein of 1409 amino acids (Mr 154859) with strong similarity to the S. cerevisiae (49.9% identity) Schizosaccharomyces pombe (51.3% identity) and Candida albicans (48.12% identity) alpha-aminoadipate reductases and a lesser degree of identity to the amino acid-activating domains of the non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, including the alpha-aminoadipate-activating domain of the alpha-aminoadipyl-cysteinyl-valine synthetase of P. chrysogenum (12.4% identical amino acids). The lys2 gene contained one intron in the 5'-region and other in the 3'-region, as shown by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the cDNA and genomic DNA, and was transcribed as a 4.7-kb monocistronic mRNA. The lys2 gene was localized on chromosome III (7.5 Mb) in P. chrysogenum AS-P-78 and on chromosome IV (5.6 Mb) in strain P2, whereas the penicillin gene cluster is known to be located in chromosome I in both strains. The lys2-encoded protein is a member of the aminoacyladenylate-forming enzyme family with a reductase domain in its C-terminal region.

  15. Genome analysis and identification of gelatinase encoded gene in Enterobacter aerogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahimi, Safiyyah; Mutalib, Sahilah Abdul; Khalid, Rozida Abdul; Repin, Rul Aisyah Mat; Lamri, Mohd Fadly; Bakar, Mohd Faizal Abu; Isa, Mohd Noor Mat

    2016-11-01

    In this study, bioinformatic analysis towards genome sequence of E. aerogenes was done to determine gene encoded for gelatinase. Enterobacter aerogenes was isolated from hot spring water and gelatinase species-specific bacterium to porcine and fish gelatin. This bacterium offers the possibility of enzymes production which is specific to both species gelatine, respectively. Enterobacter aerogenes was partially genome sequenced resulting in 5.0 mega basepair (Mbp) total size of sequence. From pre-process pipeline, 87.6 Mbp of total reads, 68.8 Mbp of total high quality reads and 78.58 percent of high quality percentage was determined. Genome assembly produced 120 contigs with 67.5% of contigs over 1 kilo base pair (kbp), 124856 bp of N50 contig length and 55.17 % of GC base content percentage. About 4705 protein gene was identified from protein prediction analysis. Two candidate genes selected have highest similarity identity percentage against gelatinase enzyme available in Swiss-Prot and NCBI online database. They were NODE_9_length_26866_cov_148.013245_12 containing 1029 base pair (bp) sequence with 342 amino acid sequence and NODE_24_length_155103_cov_177.082458_62 which containing 717 bp sequence with 238 amino acid sequence, respectively. Thus, two paired of primers (forward and reverse) were designed, based on the open reading frame (ORF) of selected genes. Genome analysis of E. aerogenes resulting genes encoded gelatinase were identified.

  16. The Embryonically Active Gene, Unkempt, of Drosophila Encodes a Cys(3)his Finger Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mohler, J.; Weiss, N.; Murli, S.; Mohammadi, S.; Vani, K.; Vasilakis, G.; Song, C. H.; Epstein, A.; Kuang, T.; English, J.; Cherdak, D.

    1992-01-01

    The unkempt gene of Drosophila encodes a set of embryonic RNAs, which are abundant during early stages of embryogenesis and are present ubiquitously in most somatic tissues from the syncytial embryo through stage 15 of embryogenesis. Expression of unkempt RNAs becomes restricted predominantly to the central nervous system in stages 16 and early 17. Analysis of cDNAs from this locus reveals the presence of five Cys(3)His fingers in the protein product. Isolation and analysis of mutations affecting the unkempt gene, including complete deletions of this gene, indicate that there is no zygotic requirement for unkempt during embryogenesis, presumably due to the contribution of maternally supplied RNA, although the gene is essential during post-embryonic development. PMID:1339381

  17. Somatic instability of the DNA sequences encoding the polymorphic polyglutamine tract of the AIB1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Dai, P; Wong, L

    2003-01-01

    Background: AIB1 contains a polymorphic polyglutamine tract (poly Q) that is encoded by a trinucleotide CAG repeat. Previously there have been conflicting results regarding the effect of the poly Q tract length on breast cancer. Since poly Q is not encoded by a perfect CAG repeat, the heterozygous polymorphic alleles need to be resolved, to understand the exact DNA sequences encoding poly Q. Methods: Poly Q encoding sequences of AIB1 from 107 DNA samples, including breast cancer cell lines, sporadic primary breast tumours, and blood samples from BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers and the general population, were resolved by PCR/cloning followed by sequencing of each individual clone. Results: 25 distinct poly Q encoding sequence patterns were found. More than two distinct sequence patterns were found in a significantly higher proportion of tumours and cell lines than that of the general population, suggesting somatic instability. A significantly higher proportion of cancer cell lines or primary breast tumours than that of the general population contained rare sequence patterns. The proportion of sporadic breast tumours having at least one allele ⩽27 repeats is significantly higher than that in the blood of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carrier breast cancer patients or the general population. Conclusion: The poly Q encoding DNA sequences are somatically unstable in tumour tissues and cell lines. A missense mutation and a very short glutamine repeat in primary tumours suggests that AIB1 activity may be modulated through poly Q, which in turn plays a role in the cotransactivation of gene expressions in breast cancers. PMID:14684685

  18. Current Bacterial Gene Encoding Capsule Biosynthesis Protein CapI Contains Nucleotides Derived from Exonization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Tao, Xia-Fang; Su, Zhi-Xi; Liu, A-Ke; Liu, Tian-Lei; Sun, Ling; Yao, Qin; Chen, Ke-Ping; Gu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Since the proposition of introns-early hypothesis, although many studies have shown that most eukaryotic ancestors possessed intron-rich genomes, evidence of intron existence in genomes of ancestral bacteria has still been absent. While not a single intron has been found in all protein-coding genes of current bacteria, analyses on bacterial genes horizontally transferred into eukaryotes at ancient time may provide evidence of intron existence in bacterial ancestors. In this study, a bacterial gene encoding capsule biosynthesis protein CapI was found in the genome of sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis. This horizontally transferred gene contains a phase 1 intron of 40 base pairs. The nucleotides of this intron have high sequence identity with those encoding amino acids in current bacterial CapI gene, indicating that the intron and the amino acid-coding nucleotides are originated from the same ancestor sequence. Moreover, 5′-splice site of this intron is located in a GT-poor region associated with a closely following AG-rich region, suggesting that deletion mutation at 5′-splice site has been employed to remove this intron and the intron-like amino acid-coding nucleotides in current bacterial CapI gene are derived from exonization. These data suggest that bacterial CapI gene contained intron(s) at ancient time. This is the first report providing the result of sequence analysis to suggest possible existence of spliceosomal introns in ancestral bacterial genes. The methodology employed in this study may be used to identify more such evidence that would aid in settlement of the dispute between introns-early and introns-late theories. PMID:27980385

  19. Transcription Factors Encoded on Core and Accessory Chromosomes of Fusarium oxysporum Induce Expression of Effector Genes

    PubMed Central

    van der Does, H. Charlotte; Schmidt, Sarah M.; Langereis, Léon; Hughes, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins secreted by pathogens during host colonization largely determine the outcome of pathogen-host interactions and are commonly called ‘effectors’. In fungal plant pathogens, coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of effector genes is a key feature of pathogenesis and effectors are often encoded in genomic regions with distinct repeat content, histone code and rate of evolution. In the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), effector genes reside on one of four accessory chromosomes, known as the ‘pathogenicity’ chromosome, which can be exchanged between strains through horizontal transfer. The three other accessory chromosomes in the Fol reference strain may also be important for virulence towards tomato. Expression of effector genes in Fol is highly up-regulated upon infection and requires Sge1, a transcription factor encoded on the core genome. Interestingly, the pathogenicity chromosome itself contains 13 predicted transcription factor genes and for all except one, there is a homolog on the core genome. We determined DNA binding specificity for nine transcription factors using oligonucleotide arrays. The binding sites for homologous transcription factors were highly similar, suggesting that extensive neofunctionalization of DNA binding specificity has not occurred. Several DNA binding sites are enriched on accessory chromosomes, and expression of FTF1, its core homolog FTF2 and SGE1 from a constitutive promoter can induce expression of effector genes. The DNA binding sites of only these three transcription factors are enriched among genes up-regulated during infection. We further show that Ftf1, Ftf2 and Sge1 can activate transcription from their binding sites in yeast. RNAseq analysis revealed that in strains with constitutive expression of FTF1, FTF2 or SGE1, expression of a similar set of plant-responsive genes on the pathogenicity chromosome is induced, including most effector genes. We conclude that the Fol

  20. Identification of the gene encoding vaccinia virus immunodominant protein p35.

    PubMed

    Zinoviev, V V; Tchikaev, N A; Chertov OYu; Malygin, E G

    1994-09-30

    The major envelope protein, p35, of vaccinia virus (VV; strain LIVP) was purified by extraction from virions with the non-ionic detergent Nonidet P-40. The protein was cleaved with CNBr. Four homogeneous peptides were isolated and their N-terminal amino-acid (aa) sequences determined. A computer search of a protein sequence databank revealed complete identity of the determined sequences with aa 44-63, 144-149, 154-165 and 224-238 of ORF H3 of the HindIII-H fragment of the VV genome [Rosel et al., J. Virol. 60 (1989) 436-446]. Earlier, Gordon et al. [Virology 167 (1988) 361-369] determined that the p35 surface protein of VV strain IHD-W is encoded by the H6 gene. Muravlev et al. [Biopolymery i kletka 6 (1990) 83-89 (Russian)] deduced from their data that gene A2 encodes this prominent antigen. Taking into account this ambiguity, we cloned the genes H3, H6 and A2 in expression vectors, prepared the specific antisera against the expression products and conducted the immunochemical analysis of the recombinant and native VV-specific proteins. It has been established that the H6 codes for an early protein that is found only in the infected cell extracts, but is absent in mature virions. The immunodominant protein p35 of VV strain LIVP is encoded by the gene H3. The gene A2 protein product is present mainly in the infected cell extract, but the antiserum against the A2 product shows a rather weak interaction with the 35-kDa fraction of structural VV proteins resolved by electrophoresis.

  1. Identification and differential expression dynamics of peach small GTPases encoding genes during fruit development and ripening

    PubMed Central

    Falchi, Rachele; Cipriani, Guido; Marrazzo, Teresa; Nonis, Alberto; Vizzotto, Giannina; Ruperti, Benedetto

    2010-01-01

    The function of monomeric GTPases of the RAS superfamily in fruit development and ripening has been partially characterized. Here the identification of peach (Prunus persica) small GTPases of the RAS superfamily expressed in fruit and the characterization of their expression profiles during fruit development are described. Extensive searches on expressed sequence tag (EST) databases led to the selection of a total of 24 genes from peach encoding proteins with significant similarity to Arabidopsis small GTPases. Sequence similarity analyses and identification of conserved motifs, diagnostic of specific RAS families and subfamilies, enabled bona fide assignment of fourteen PpRAB, seven PpARF/ARL/SAR, two PpROP and one PpRAN GTPases. Transcriptional expression profiles of peach monomeric GTPases, analysed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, were obtained for mesocarp samples, collected in two consecutive years. Reproducible patterns of expression could be identified for five peach RAB-encoding genes (PpRABA1-1, PpRABA2, PpRABD2-1, PpRABD2-2, and PpRABC2), two ARFs (PpARFA1-1 and PpARLB1), and two ROPs (PpROP3 and PpROP4). Interestingly, the transient transcriptional up-regulation of PpARF genes and of PpRAB genes of the A and D clades, putatively controlling the exocytic delivery of cell wall components and modifying enzymes, appeared to coincide with peaks of growth speed and sugar accumulation and with the final phases of ripening. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the co-ordinated differential expression of a set of genes encoding small GTPases of the ARF and RAB families which takes place during key moments of fruit development and maturation. PMID:20501747

  2. funRNA: a fungi-centered genomics platform for genes encoding key components of RNAi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is involved in genome defense as well as diverse cellular, developmental, and physiological processes. Key components of RNAi are Argonaute, Dicer, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), which have been functionally characterized mainly in model organisms. The key components are believed to exist throughout eukaryotes; however, there is no systematic platform for archiving and dissecting these important gene families. In addition, few fungi have been studied to date, limiting our understanding of RNAi in fungi. Here we present funRNA http://funrna.riceblast.snu.ac.kr/, a fungal kingdom-wide comparative genomics platform for putative genes encoding Argonaute, Dicer, and RdRP. Description To identify and archive genes encoding the abovementioned key components, protein domain profiles were determined from reference sequences obtained from UniProtKB/SwissProt. The domain profiles were searched using fungal, metazoan, and plant genomes, as well as bacterial and archaeal genomes. 1,163, 442, and 678 genes encoding Argonaute, Dicer, and RdRP, respectively, were predicted. Based on the identification results, active site variation of Argonaute, diversification of Dicer, and sequence analysis of RdRP were discussed in a fungus-oriented manner. funRNA provides results from diverse bioinformatics programs and job submission forms for BLAST, BLASTMatrix, and ClustalW. Furthermore, sequence collections created in funRNA are synced with several gene family analysis portals and databases, offering further analysis opportunities. Conclusions funRNA provides identification results from a broad taxonomic range and diverse analysis functions, and could be used in diverse comparative and evolutionary studies. It could serve as a versatile genomics workbench for key components of RNAi. PMID:25522231

  3. Molecular characterization of genes encoding inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channels in the bed bug (Cimex lectularius).

    PubMed

    Mamidala, Praveen; Mittapelly, Priyanka; Jones, Susan C; Piermarini, Peter M; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2013-04-01

    The molecular genetics of inward-rectifier potassium (Kir) channels in insects is poorly understood. To date, Kir channel genes have been characterized only from a few representative dipterans (i.e., fruit flies and mosquitoes). The goal of the present study was to characterize Kir channel cDNAs in a hemipteran, the bed bug (Cimex lectularius). Using our previously reported bed bug transcriptome (RNA-seq), we identified two cDNAs that encode putative Kir channels. One was a full-length cDNA that encodes a protein belonging to the insect 'Kir3' clade, which we designate as 'ClKir3'. The other was a partial cDNA that encodes a protein with similarity to both the insect 'Kir1' and 'Kir2' clades, which we designate as 'ClKir1/2'. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that ClKir1/2 and ClKir3 exhibited peak expression levels in late-instar nymphs and early-instar nymphs, respectively. Furthermore, ClKir3, but not ClKir1/2, showed tissue-specific expression in Malpighian tubules of adult bed bugs. Lastly, using an improved procedure for delivering double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to male and female bed bugs (via the cervical membrane) we demonstrate rapid and systemic knockdown of ClKir3 transcripts. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the bed bug possesses at least two genes encoding Kir channels, and that RNAi is possible for at least Kir3, thereby offering a potential approach for elucidating the roles of Kir channel genes in bed bug physiology.

  4. Entamoeba histolytica: a unicellular organism containing two active genes encoding for members of the TBP family.

    PubMed

    Castañon-Sanchez, Carlos Alberto; Luna-Arias, Juan Pedro; de Dios-Bravo, Ma Guadalupe; Herrera-Aguirre, Maria Esther; Olivares-Trejo, Jose J; Orozco, Esther; Hernandez, Jose Manuel

    2010-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite which causes human amoebiasis. In this parasite, few encoding genes for transcription factors have been cloned and characterized. The E. histolytica TATA-box binding protein (EhTBP) is the first basal transcription factor that has been studied. To continue with the identification of other members of the basal transcription machinery, we performed an in silico analysis of the E. histolytica genome and found three loci encoding for polypeptides with similarity to EhTBP. One locus has a 100% identity to the previously Ehtbp gene reported by our group. The second locus encodes for a 212 aa polypeptide that is 100% identical to residues 23-234 from EhTBP. The third one encodes for a 216 aa polypeptide of 24kDa that showed 42.6% identity and 73.7% similarity to EhTBP. This protein was named E. histolytica TBP-related factor 1 (EhTRF1). Ehtrf1 gene was expressed in bacteria and the purified 28kDa recombinant polypeptide showed the capacity to bind to TATTTAAA-box by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. K(D) values for rEhTBP and rEhTRF1 were (1.71+/-2.90)x10(-12)M and (1.12+/-0.160)x10(-11)M, respectively. Homology modeling of EhTRF1 and EhTBP revealed that, although they were very similar, they showed some differences on their surfaces. Thus, E. histolytica is a unicellular organism having two members of the TBP family.

  5. Involvement of the Serotonin Transporter Gene in Accurate Subcortical Speech Encoding.

    PubMed

    Selinger, Lenka; Zarnowiec, Katarzyna; Via, Marc; Clemente, Immaculada C; Escera, Carles

    2016-10-19

    A flourishing line of evidence has highlighted the encoding of speech sounds in the subcortical auditory system as being shaped by acoustic, linguistic, and musical experience and training. And while the heritability of auditory speech as well as nonspeech processing has been suggested, the genetic determinants of subcortical speech processing have not yet been uncovered. Here, we postulated that the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), a common functional polymorphism located in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), is implicated in speech encoding in the human subcortical auditory pathway. Serotonin has been shown as essential for modulating the brain response to sound both cortically and subcortically, yet the genetic factors regulating this modulation regarding speech sounds have not been disclosed. We recorded the frequency following response, a biomarker of the neural tracking of speech sounds in the subcortical auditory pathway, and cortical evoked potentials in 58 participants elicited to the syllable /ba/, which was presented >2000 times. Participants with low serotonin transporter expression had higher signal-to-noise ratios as well as a higher pitch strength representation of the periodic part of the syllable than participants with medium to high expression, possibly by tuning synaptic activity to the stimulus features and hence a more efficient suppression of noise. These results imply the 5-HTTLPR in subcortical auditory speech encoding and add an important, genetically determined layer to the factors shaping the human subcortical response to speech sounds. The accurate encoding of speech sounds in the subcortical auditory nervous system is of paramount relevance for human communication, and it has been shown to be altered in different disorders of speech and auditory processing. Importantly, this encoding is plastic and can therefore be enhanced by language and music experience. Whether genetic factors

  6. Florida snapping turtle

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-10-22

    A rare photo of a Florida snapping turtle out in the open on Beach Road, near NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Found only in Florida and Georgia, this species is related to the common snapping turtle. It is considered a dangerous turtle because it can snap very quickly with its extremely strong jaws. Its tail, which is almost as long as its shell, has saw-edges along the top. The shell also has rough points down the middle. The shell is tan to dark brown and may have green algae growing on it. It can grow to 17 inches long and weigh 45 pounds. Snapping turtles usually live in ponds under the shadows and don’t like to rest in the sun like most turtles. They eat almost anything: water bugs, fish, lizards, small birds, mice, plants and even dead animals

  7. Florida snapping turtle

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-10-22

    A rare photo of a Florida snapping turtle out in the open on Beach Road, near NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Found only in Florida and Georgia, this species is related to the common snapping turtle. It is considered a dangerous turtle because it can snap very quickly with its extremely strong jaws. Its tail, which is almost as long as its shell, has saw-edges along the top. The shell also has rough points down the middle. The shell is tan to dark brown and may have green algae growing on it. It can grow to 17 inches long and weigh 45 pounds. Snapping turtles usually live in ponds under the shadows and don’t like to rest in the sun like most turtles. They eat almost anything: water bugs, fish, lizards, small birds, mice, plants and even dead animals.

  8. Hatching behavior in turtles.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Ricky-John; Janzen, Fredric J

    2011-07-01

    Incubation temperature plays a prominent role in shaping the phenotypes and fitness of embryos, including affecting developmental rates. In many taxa, including turtles, eggs are deposited in layers such that thermal gradients alter developmental rates within a nest. Despite this thermal effect, a nascent body of experimental work on environmentally cued hatching in turtles has revealed unexpected synchronicity in hatching behavior. This review discusses environmental cues for hatching, physiological mechanisms behind synchronous hatching, proximate and ultimate causes for this behavior, and future directions for research. Four freshwater turtle species have been investigated experimentally, with hatching in each species elicited by different environmental cues and responding via various physiological mechanisms. Hatching of groups of eggs in turtles apparently involves some level of embryo-embryo communication and thus is not a purely passive activity. Although turtles are not icons of complex social behavior, life-history theory predicts that the group environment of the nest can drive the evolution of environmentally cued hatching.

  9. Genetic analysis of the variable region genes encoding a monospecific human natural anti-DNA antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Daley, M D; Misener, V; Olee, T; Chen, P P; Siminovitch, K A

    1993-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that natural autoantibodies may play an integral role in the development of the normal immune repertoire. To explore the genetic origins of these antibodies, we have isolated and sequenced the variable (V) region genes encoding both the heavy (H) and light (L) chains of a natural anti-DNA antibody, Kim11.4. The genes appear to be derived from the VH4.18 (subgroup VHIV), JH5, Hum1L1 (subgroup V lambda I) and J lambda 3 germline genes. The origin of the H chain diversity gene is more obscure, being potentially derived from one or more of several germline genes, arranged in either the forward or reverse orientations. Both the Kim11.4 VH and VL genes share significant degrees of similarity with those utilized in other autoantibodies, indicating that at least some degree of V restriction may exist in human autoreactive B cells. The pattern of nucleotide differences between the Kim11.4 VH and VL genes and their putative germline counterparts suggests that the Kim11.4 genes may have undergone somatic mutation and arisen as a result of antigen selection. PMID:8324896

  10. Identification of candidate genes encoding an LDL-C QTL in baboons[S

    PubMed Central

    Karere, Genesio M.; Glenn, Jeremy P.; Birnbaum, Shifra; Hafizi, Sussan; Rainwater, David L.; Mahaney, Michael C.; VandeBerg, John L.; Cox, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in developed countries, and dyslipidemia is a major risk factor for CVD. We previously identified a cluster of quantitative trait loci (QTL) on baboon chromosome 11 for multiple, related quantitative traits for serum LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C). Here we report differentially regulated hepatic genes encoding an LDL-C QTL that influences LDL-C levels in baboons. We performed hepatic whole-genome expression profiling for LDL-C-discordant baboons fed a high-cholesterol, high-fat (HCHF) diet for seven weeks. We detected expression of 117 genes within the QTL 2-LOD support interval. Three genes were differentially expressed in low LDL-C responders and 8 in high LDL-C responders in response to a HCHF diet. Seven genes (ACVR1B, CALCOCO1, DGKA, ERBB3, KRT73, MYL6B, TENC1) showed discordant expression between low and high LDL-C responders. To prioritize candidate genes, we integrated miRNA and mRNA expression profiles using network tools and found that four candidates (ACVR1B, DGKA, ERBB3, TENC1) were miRNA targets and that the miRNAs were inversely expressed to the target genes. Candidate gene expression was validated using QRT-PCR and Western blotting. This study reveals candidate genes that influence variation in LDL-C in baboons and potential genetic mechanisms for further investigation. PMID:23596326

  11. Heterogenic expression of genes encoding secreted proteins at the periphery of Aspergillus niger colonies.

    PubMed

    Vinck, Arman; de Bekker, Charissa; Ossin, Adam; Ohm, Robin A; de Vries, Ronald P; Wösten, Han A B

    2011-01-01

    Colonization of a substrate by fungi starts with the invasion of exploring hyphae. These hyphae secrete enzymes that degrade the organic material into small molecules that can be taken up by the fungus to serve as nutrients. We previously showed that only part of the exploring hyphae of Aspergillus niger highly express the glucoamylase gene glaA. This was an unexpected finding since all exploring hyphae are exposed to the same environmental conditions. Using GFP as a reporter, we here demonstrate that the acid amylase gene aamA, the α-glucuronidase gene aguA, and the feruloyl esterase gene faeA of A. niger are also subject to heterogenic expression within the exploring mycelium. Coexpression studies using GFP and dTomato as reporters showed that hyphae that highly express one of these genes also highly express the other genes encoding secreted proteins. Moreover, these hyphae also highly express the amylolytic regulatory gene amyR, and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene gpdA. In situ hybridization demonstrated that the high expressers are characterized by a high 18S rRNA content. Taken together, it is concluded that two subpopulations of hyphae can be distinguished within the exploring mycelium of A. niger. The experimental data indicate that these subpopulations differ in their transcriptional and translational activity.

  12. Identification and characterization of multiple Spidroin 1 genes encoding major ampullate silk proteins in Nephila clavipes.

    PubMed

    Gaines, W A; Marcotte, W R

    2008-09-01

    Spider dragline silk is primarily composed of proteins called major ampullate spidroins (MaSps) that consist of a large repeat array flanked by nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains. Until recently, there has been little evidence for more than one gene encoding each of the two major spidroin silk proteins, MaSp1 and MaSp2. Here, we report the deduced N-terminal domain sequences for two distinct MaSp1 genes from Nephila clavipes (MaSp1A and MaSp1B) and for MaSp2. All three MaSp genes are co-expressed in the major ampullate gland. A search of the GenBank database also revealed two distinct MaSp1 C-terminal domain sequences. Sequencing confirmed that both MaSp1 genes are present in all seven Nephila clavipes spiders examined. The presence of nucleotide polymorphisms in these genes confirmed that MaSp1A and MaSp1B are distinct genetic loci and not merely alleles of the same gene. We experimentally determined the transcription start sites for all three MaSp genes and established preliminary pairing between the two MaSp1 N- and C-terminal domains. Phylogenetic analysis of these new sequences and other published MaSp N- and C-terminal domain sequences illustrated that duplications of MaSp genes may be widespread among spider species.

  13. Clusters of genes encoding fructan biosynthesizing enzymes in wheat and barley.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Bao-Lam; Mather, Diane E; Schreiber, Andreas W; Toubia, John; Baumann, Ute; Shoaei, Zahra; Stein, Nils; Ariyadasa, Ruvini; Stangoulis, James C R; Edwards, James; Shirley, Neil; Langridge, Peter; Fleury, Delphine

    2012-10-01

    Fructans are soluble carbohydrates with health benefits and possible roles in plant adaptation. Fructan biosynthetic genes were isolated using comparative genomics and physical mapping followed by BAC sequencing in barley. Genes encoding sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase (1-SST), fructan:fructan 1-fructosyltransferase (1-FFT) and sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase (6-SFT) were clustered together with multiple copies of vacuolar invertase genes and a transposable element on two barley BAC. Intron-exon structures of the genes were similar. Phylogenetic analysis of the fructosyltransferases and invertases in the Poaceae showed that the fructan biosynthetic genes may have evolved from vacuolar invertases. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed using leaf RNA extracted from three wheat cultivars grown under different conditions. The 1-SST, 1-FFT and 6-SFT genes had correlated expression patterns in our wheat experiment and in existing barley transcriptome database. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were developed and successfully mapped to a major QTL region affecting wheat grain fructan accumulation in two independent wheat populations. The alleles controlling high- and low- fructan in parental lines were also found to be associated in fructan production in a diverse set of 128 wheat lines. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on the mapping and sequencing of a fructan biosynthetic gene cluster and in particular, the isolation of a novel 1-FFT gene from barley.

  14. A highly conserved NB-LRR encoding gene cluster effective against Setosphaeria turcica in sorghum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The fungal pathogen Setosphaeria turcica causes turcicum or northern leaf blight disease on maize, sorghum and related grasses. A prevalent foliar disease found worldwide where the two host crops, maize and sorghum are grown. The aim of the present study was to find genes controlling the host defense response to this devastating plant pathogen. A cDNA-AFLP approach was taken to identify candidate sequences, which functions were further validated via virus induced gene silencing (VIGS), and real-time PCR analysis. Phylogenetic analysis was performed to address evolutionary events. Results cDNA-AFLP analysis was run on susceptible and resistant sorghum and maize genotypes to identify resistance-related sequences. One CC-NB-LRR encoding gene GRMZM2G005347 was found among the up-regulated maize transcripts after fungal challenge. The new plant resistance gene was designated as St referring to S. turcica. Genome sequence comparison revealed that the CC-NB-LRR encoding St genes are located on chromosome 2 in maize, and on chromosome 5 in sorghum. The six St sorghum genes reside in three pairs in one locus. When the sorghum St genes were silenced via VIGS, the resistance was clearly compromised, an observation that was supported by real-time PCR. Database searches and phylogenetic analysis suggest that the St genes have a common ancestor present before the grass subfamily split 50-70 million years ago. Today, 6 genes are present in sorghum, 9 in rice and foxtail millet, respectively, 3 in maize and 4 in Brachypodium distachyon. The St gene homologs have all highly conserved sequences, and commonly reside as gene pairs in the grass genomes. Conclusions Resistance genes to S. turcica, with a CC-NB-LRR protein domain architecture, have been found in maize and sorghum. VIGS analysis revealed their importance in the surveillance to S. turcica in sorghum. The St genes are highly conserved in sorghum, rice, foxtail millet, maize and Brachypodium, suggesting an

  15. Hypothalamic and amygdalar cell lines differ markedly in mitochondrial rather than nuclear encoded gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays an important role in regulating the mammalian stress response. Two of the most extensively studied neuronal populations that express CRH are in the hypothalamus and amygdala. Both regions are involved in the stress response, but the amygdala is also involved in mediating response to fear and anxiety. Given that both hypothalamus and amygdala have overlapping functions, but their CRH-expressing neurons may respond differently to a given perturbation, we sought to identify differentially expressed genes between two neuronal cell types, amygdalar AR-5 and hypothalamic IVB cells. Thus, we performed a microarray analysis. Our hypothesis was that we would identify differentially expressed transcription factors, coregulators and chromatin-modifying enzymes. Results A total of 31,042 genes were analyzed, 10,572 of which were consistently expressed in both cell lines at a 95% confidence level. Of the 10,572 genes, 2,320 genes in AR-5 were expressed at ≥ 2-fold relative to IVBs, 1,104 genes were expressed at ≥2-fold in IVB relative to AR-5 and 7,148 genes were expressed at similar levels between the two cell lines. The greatest difference was in six mitochondrial DNA-encoded genes, which were highly abundant in AR-5 relative to IVB cells. The relative abundance of these genes ranged from 413 to 885-fold according to the microarray results. Differential expression of these genes was verified by RTqPCR. The differentially expressed mitochondrial genes were cytochrome b (MT-CYB), cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 2 (MT-CO1 and MT-CO2) and NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase chain 1, 2, and 3 (MT-ND1, MT-ND2, MT-ND3). Conclusion As expected, the array revealed differential expression of transcription factors and coregulators; however the greatest difference between the two cell lines was in genes encoded by the mitochondrial genome. These genes were abundant in AR-5 relative to IVBs. At present, the reason for the marked

  16. Duplicated gelsolin family genes in zebrafish: a novel scinderin-like gene (scinla) encodes the major corneal crystallin.

    PubMed

    Jia, Sujuan; Omelchenko, Marina; Garland, Donita; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Kanungo, Jyotshnabala; Spencer, Michael; Wolf, Yuri; Koonin, Eugene; Piatigorsky, Joram

    2007-10-01

    We have previously identified a gelsolin-like protein (C/L-gelsolin) as a corneal crystallin in zebrafish. Here we show by phylogenetic analysis that there are at least six genes encoding gelsolin-like proteins based on their gelsolin domains in zebrafish: gsna and gsnb group with the vertebrate gelsolin gene, scina and scinb group with the scinderin (adseverin) gene, and scinla (C/L-gelsolin) and scinlb are novel scinderin-like genes. RT-PCR showed that scinla, scinlb, and gsnb are preferentially expressed in the adult cornea whereas gsna is expressed to a similar extent in cornea, lens, brain, and heart; scina and scinb expression were detectable only in whole zebrafish and not in these adult tissues. Quantitative RT-PCR and 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI/TOF mass spectroscopy confirmed high expression of beta-actin and scinla, moderate expression of scinlb, and very low expression of gsna and gsnb in the cornea. Finally, transgenic zebrafish carrying a green fluorescent protein reporter transgene driven by a 4 kb scinla promoter fragment showed expression in the cornea, snout, dorsal fin, and tail fin of 3-day-old zebrafish larvae. Our data suggest that scinla and scinlb are diverged paralogs of the vertebrate scinderin gene and show that scinla encodes the zebrafish corneal crystallin previously called C/L-gelsolin.

  17. Hypoxia: adapting to high altitude by mutating EPAS-1, the gene encoding HIF-2α.

    PubMed

    van Patot, Martha C Tissot; Gassmann, Max

    2011-01-01

    Living at high altitude is demanding and thus drives adaptational mechanisms. The Tibetan population has had a longer evolutionary period to adapt to high altitude than other mountain populations such as Andeans. As a result, some Tibetans living at high altitudes do not show markedly elevated red blood cell production as compared to South American high altitude natives such as Quechuas or Aymaras, thereby avoiding high blood viscosity creating cardiovascular risk. Unexpectedly, the responsible mutation(s) reducing red blood cell production do not involve either the gene encoding the blood hormone erythropoietin (Epo), or the corresponding regulatory sequences flanking the Epo gene. Similarly, functional mutations in the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF-1α) gene that represents the oxygen-dependent subunit of the HIF-1 heterodimer, the latter being the main regulator of over 100 hypoxia-inducible genes, have not been described so far. It was not until very recently that three independent groups showed that the gene encoding HIF-2α, EPAS-1 (Wenger et al. 1997), represents a key gene mutated in Tibetan populations adapted to living at high altitudes (Beall et al. 2010 , Yi et al. 2010 , Simonson et al. 2010). Hypoxia-inducible transcription factors were first identified by the description of HIF-1 (Semenza et al. 1991 , 1992), which was subsequently found to enhance transcription of multiple genes that encode proteins necessary for rescuing from hypoxic exposure, including erythropoietic, angiogenic and glycolytic proteins. Then HIF-2 was identified (Ema et al. 1997 ; Flamme et al. 1997 ; Hogenesch et al. 1997 ; and Tian et al. 1997) and although it is highly similar to HIF-1 and has the potential to bind (Camenisch et al. 2001) and mediate (Mole et al. 2009) many of the same genes as HIF-1, its biological actions in response to hypoxia are distinct from those of HIF-1 (reviewed by Loboda et al. 2010). By now, several of these HIF-2 mediated

  18. Identification and characterization of a gene encoding for a nucleotidase from Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Díaz, Juan Miguel; Gálvez-Valdivieso, Gregorio; Caballo, Cristina; Lambert, Rocío; Quiles, Francisco Antonio; Pineda, Manuel; Piedras, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Nucleotidases are phosphatases that catalyze the removal of phosphate from nucleotides, compounds with an important role in plant metabolism. A phosphatase enzyme, with high affinity for nucleotides monophosphate previously identified and purified in embryonic axes from French bean, has been analyzed by MALDI TOF/TOF and two internal peptides have been obtained. The information of these peptide sequences has been used to search in the genome database and only a candidate gene that encodes for the phosphatase was identified (PvNTD1). The putative protein contains the conserved domains (motif I-IV) for haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolases superfamily. The residues involved in the catalytic activity are also conserved. A recombinant protein overexpressed in Escherichia coli has shown molybdate resistant phosphatase activity with nucleosides monophosphate as substrate, confirming that the identified gene encodes for the phosphatase with high affinity for nucleotides purified in French bean embryonic axes. The activity of the purified protein was inhibited by adenosine. The expression of PvNTD1 gene was induced at the specific moment of radicle protrusion in embryonic axes. The gene was also highly expressed in young leaves whereas the level of expression in mature tissues was minimal. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of the gene encoding the human LW blood group protein in LW+ and LW- phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Hermand, P; Le Pennec, P Y; Rouger, P; Cartron, J P; Bailly, P

    1996-04-01

    The LW blood group is carried by a 42-kD glycoprotein that belongs to the family of intercellular adhesion molecules. The LW gene is organized into three exons spanning an HindIII fragment of approximately 2.65 kb. The exon/intron architecture correlates to the structural domains of the protein and resembles that of other Ig superfamily members except that the signal peptide and the first Ig-like domain are encoded by the first exon. The 5'UT region (nucleotides -289 to +9) includes potential binding sites for various transcription factors (Ets, CACC, SP1, GATA-1, AP2) and exhibited a significant transcriptional activity after transfection in the erythroleukemic K562 cells. No obvious abnormality of the LW gene, including the 5'UT region, has been detected by sequencing polymerase chain reaction-amplified genomic DNA from RhD+ or RhD- donors and from an Rhnull variant that lacks the Rh and LW proteins on red blood cells. However, a deletion of 10 bp in exon 1 of the LW gene was identified in the genome of an LW (a- b-) individual (Big) deficient for LW antigens but carrying a normal Rh phenotype. The 10-bp deletion generates a premature stop codon and encodes a truncated protein without transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain. No detectable abnormality of the LW gene or transcript could be detected in another LW(a- b-) individual (Nic), suggesting the heterogeneity of these phenotypes.

  20. Extranuclear gene expression in yeast: evidence for a plasmid-encoded RNA polymerase of unique structure.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D W; Meacock, P A

    1988-01-01

    Strains of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis that produce killer-toxin have been found to contain two linear dsDNA plasmids, k1 (8.9 Kb) and k2 (13.4 Kb). The four transcribed open reading frames of plasmid k1 contain no recognisable yeast nuclear expression signals. Moreover, a toxin subunit gene fused with the lacZ gene of Escherichia coli is not detectably expressed when introduced to K.lactis or Saccharomyces cerevisiae on a nuclear vector, even when native k1 and k2 are present in the cell. This and other evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that k1 and k2 reside in an extranuclear location, and do not utilise the nuclear RNA polymerases I, II or III for transcription of their genes. Sequencing of plasmid k2, which is thought to encode factors necessary for the maintenance or expression of k1, reveals an open reading frame predicted to encode a 974 amino acid polypeptide with homology to several DNA-directed RNA polymerases. We suggest that this is a component of a novel plasmid-specific extranuclear gene expression system. PMID:3138657

  1. A corm-specific gene encodes tarin, a major globulin of taro (Colocasia esculenta L. Schott).

    PubMed

    Bezerra, I C; Castro, L A; Neshich, G; de Almeida, E R; de Sá, M F; Mello, L V; Monte-Neshich, D C

    1995-04-01

    A gene encoding a globulin from a major taro (Colocasia esculenta L. Schott) corm protein family, tarin (G1, ca. 28 kDa) was isolated from a lambda Charon 35 library, using a cDNA derived from a highly abundant corm-specific mRNA, as probe. The gene, named tar1, and the corresponding cDNA were characterized and compared. No introns were found. The major transcription start site was determined by primer extension analysis. The gene has an open reading frame (ORF) of 765 bp, and the deduced amino acid sequence indicated a precursor polypeptide of 255 residues that is post-translationally processed into two subunits of about 12.5 kDa each. The deduced protein is 45% homologous to curculin, a sweet-tasting protein found in the fruit pulp of Curculigo latifolia and 40% homologous to a mannose-binding lectin from Galanthus nivalis. Significant similarity was also found at the nucleic acid sequence level with genes encoding lectins from plant species of the Amaryllidaceae and Lilliaceae families.

  2. Identification of the gene encoding scHelI, a DNA helicase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bean, D W; Matson, S W

    1997-12-01

    The gene encoding scHelI, a previously characterized DNA helicase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been identified as YER176w, an open reading frame on chromosome V. The gene has been named HEL1 to indicate the DNA helicase activity of the gene product. HEL1 was identified by screening a lambda gt11 yeast protein expression library with antiserum to purified scHelI. Several independent immunopositive clones were isolated and shown to contain portions of HEL1 either by sequencing or by hybridization to a probe containing HEL1 sequences. The HEL1 open reading frame includes the seven conserved helicase motifs, consistent with the DNA helicase activity of scHelI, and the predicted size of the protein is in agreement with the size of purified scHelI. Partially purified cellular extracts from a hel1 deletion mutant strain did not contain scHelI activity. Homology searches revealed protein sequence homology between HEL1 and two previously identified and biochemically characterized yeast helicases, encoded by the DNA2 and UPF1 genes. Haploid hel1 deletion strains were constructed and shown to be viable with growth rates equivalent to those of parental strains. These strains did not differ from the parental strains in ultraviolet light sensitivity or the generation of petite colonies. Furthermore, these haploid deletion strains were capable for mating, the resultant diploid homozygous mutants were viable, capable of sporulation, and the spores displayed no reduction in viability.

  3. An Arabidopsis gene encoding an α-xylosyltransferase involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Faik, Ahmed; Price, Nicholas J.; Raikhel, Natasha V.; Keegstra, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Microsomal membranes catalyze the formation of xyloglucan from UDP-Glc and UDP-Xyl by cooperative action of α-xylosyltransferase and β-glucan synthase activities. Here we report that etiolated pea microsomes contain an α-xylosyltransferase that catalyzes the transfer of xylose from UDP-[14C]xylose onto β(1,4)-linked glucan chains. The solubilized enzyme had the capacity to transfer xylosyl residues onto cello-oligosaccharides having 5 or more glucose residues. Analysis of the data from these biochemical assays led to the identification of a group of Arabidopsis genes and the hypothesis that one or more members of this group may encode α-xylosyltransferases involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis. To evaluate this hypothesis, the candidate genes were expressed in Pichia pastoris and their activities measured with the biochemical assay described above. One of the candidate genes showed cello-oligosaccharide-dependent xylosyltransferase activity. Characterization of the radiolabeled products obtained with cellopentaose as acceptor indicated that the pea and the Arabidopsis enzymes transfer the 14C-labeled xylose mainly to the second glucose residue from the nonreducing end. Enzymatic digestion of these radiolabeled products produced results that would be expected if the xylose was attached in an α(1,6)-linkage to the glucan chain. We conclude that this Arabidopsis gene encodes an α-xylosyltransferase activity involved in xyloglucan biosynthesis. PMID:12032363

  4. Transcriptional analysis of genes encoding β-glucosidase of Schizophyllum commune KUC9397 under optimal conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Min; Lee, Hanbyul; Heo, Young Mok; Lee, Hwanhwi; Hong, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2017-05-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the gene responsible for beta-glucosidase (BGL) production and to generate a full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) of one of the putative BGL genes, which showed a significant expression level when Schizophyllum commune KUC9397 was grown in optimized medium. The relative expression levels of seven genes encoding BGL of S. commune KUC9397 were determined with real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR in cellulose-containing optimized medium (OM) compared to glucose-containing basal medium (BM). The most abundant transcript was bgl3a in OM. The transcript number of the bgl3a increased more than 57.60-fold when S. commune KUC9397 was grown on cellulose-containing OM compared to that on glucose-containing BM. The bgl3a was identified, and a deduced amino acid sequence of bgl3a shared homology (97%) with GH3 BGL of S. commune H4-8. This is the first report showing the transcription levels of genes encoding BGL and identification of full-length cDNA of glycoside hydrolase 3 (GH3) BGL from S. commune. Furthermore, this study is one of the steps for consolidated bioprocessing of lignocellulosic biomass to bioethanol.

  5. K-sam gene encodes secreted as well as transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, M; Hattori, Y; Sasaki, H; Tanaka, M; Sugano, K; Yazaki, Y; Sugimura, T; Terada, M

    1992-01-01

    K-sam was first identified as a gene amplified in the stomach cancer cell line KATO-III. The size of the major transcript of the K-sam gene was 3.5 kilobases in KATO-III cells, and we have previously shown that K-sam encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase that belongs to the heparin-binding growth factor receptor, or fibroblast growth factor receptor, gene family. The K-sam gene expresses multiple sizes of mRNAs in brain tissue, the immature teratoma cell line NCC-IT, and KATO-III. RNA blot analyses with a variety of K-sam probes indicate that there are at least four classes of K-sam mRNAs. Three types of K-sam cDNAs in addition to the previously reported type of K-sam cDNA were isolated, and their nucleotide sequences encode a full-length transmembrane receptor, a secreted receptor with a tyrosine kinase domain, and a secreted receptor without a tyrosine kinase domain. Images PMID:1313574

  6. Identification of Cellular Genes Targeted by KSHV-Encoded MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Samols, Mark A; Skalsky, Rebecca L; Maldonado, Ann M; Riva, Alberto; Lopez, M. Cecilia; Baker, Henry V; Renne, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 19 to 23 nucleotide–long RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. Human cells express several hundred miRNAs which regulate important biological pathways such as development, proliferation, and apoptosis. Recently, 12 miRNA genes have been identified within the genome of Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus; however, their functions are still unknown. To identify host cellular genes that may be targeted by these novel viral regulators, we performed gene expression profiling in cells stably expressing KSHV-encoded miRNAs. Data analysis revealed a set of 81 genes whose expression was significantly changed in the presence of miRNAs. While the majority of changes were below 2-fold, eight genes were down-regulated between 4- and 20-fold. We confirmed miRNA-dependent regulation for three of these genes and found that protein levels of thrombospondin 1 (THBS1) were decreased >10-fold. THBS1 has previously been reported to be down-regulated in Kaposi sarcoma lesions and has known activity as a strong tumor suppressor and anti-angiogenic factor, exerting its anti-angiogenic effect in part by activating the latent form of TGF-β. We show that reduced THBS1 expression in the presence of viral miRNAs translates into decreased TGF-β activity. These data suggest that KSHV-encoded miRNAs may contribute directly to pathogenesis by down-regulation of THBS1, a major regulator of cell adhesion, migration, and angiogenesis. PMID:17500590

  7. Developmental Regulation of Genes Encoding Universal Stress Proteins in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Isokpehi, Raphael D.; Mahmud, Ousman; Mbah, Andreas N.; Simmons, Shaneka S.; Avelar, Lívia; Rajnarayanan, Rajendram V.; Udensi, Udensi K.; Ayensu, Wellington K.; Cohly, Hari H.; Brown, Shyretha D.; Dates, Centdrika R.; Hentz, Sonya D.; Hughes, Shawntae J.; Smith-McInnis, Dominique R.; Patterson, Carvey O.; Sims, Jennifer N.; Turner, Kelisha T.; Williams, Baraka S.; Johnson, Matilda O.; Adubi, Taiwo; Mbuh, Judith V.; Anumudu, Chiaka I.; Adeoye, Grace O.; Thomas, Bolaji N.; Nashiru, Oyekanmi; Oliveira, Guilherme

    2011-01-01

    The draft nuclear genome sequence of the snail-transmitted, dimorphic, parasitic, platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni revealed eight genes encoding proteins that contain the Universal Stress Protein (USP) domain. Schistosoma mansoni is a causative agent of human schistosomiasis, a severe and debilitating Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) of poverty, which is endemic in at least 76 countries. The availability of the genome sequences of Schistosoma species presents opportunities for bioinformatics and genomics analyses of associated gene families that could be targets for understanding schistosomiasis ecology, intervention, prevention and control. Proteins with the USP domain are known to provide bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists and plants with the ability to respond to diverse environmental stresses. In this research investigation, the functional annotations of the USP genes and predicted nucleotide and protein sequences were initially verified. Subsequently, sequence clusters and distinctive features of the sequences were determined. A total of twelve ligand binding sites were predicted based on alignment to the ATP-binding universal stress protein from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. In addition, six USP sequences showed the presence of ATP-binding motif residues indicating that they may be regulated by ATP. Public domain gene expression data and RT-PCR assays confirmed that all the S. mansoni USP genes were transcribed in at least one of the developmental life cycle stages of the helminth. Six of these genes were up-regulated in the miracidium, a free-swimming stage that is critical for transmission to the snail intermediate host. It is possible that during the intra-snail stages, S. mansoni gene transcripts for universal stress proteins are low abundant and are induced to perform specialized functions triggered by environmental stressors such as oxidative stress due to hydrogen peroxide that is present in the snail hemocytes. This report serves to catalyze the

  8. [Cloning and structure of gene encoded alpha-latrocrustoxin from the Black widow spider venom].

    PubMed

    Danilevich, V N; Luk'ianov, S A; Grishin, E V

    1999-07-01

    The primary structure of the crusta gene encoding alpha-latrocrustoxin (alpha-LCT), a high molecular mass neurotoxin specific to crustaceans, was determined in the black widow spider Latrodectus mactans tredicimguttatus genome. The total length of the sequenced DNA was 4693 bp. The structural part of the black widow spider chromosome gene encoding alpha-LCT does not contain introns. The sequenced DNA contains a single extended open reading frame (4185 bp) and encodes a protein precursor of alpha-LCT, comprising 1395 aa. We assume the Met residue at position -10 relative to the N-terminal residue of Glu1 of the mature toxin to be the first one in the protein precursor. The calculated molecular mass of the precursor (156147 Da) exceeds that of the mature toxin by approximately 30 kDa. These data are in agreement with the notion that over the course of maturation the protein precursor undergoes double processing--cleavage of a decapeptide from the N-terminal part and of a approximately 200-aa fragment from the C-terminal part. alpha-LCT displayed a number of imperfect ankyrin-like repeats and areas of structural homology with earlier studied latrotoxins; the highest homology degree (62%) was revealed with alpha-latroinsectotoxin (alpha-LIT).

  9. Two histone H1-encoding genes of the green alga Volvox carteri with features intermediate between plant and animal genes.

    PubMed

    Lindauer, A; Müller, K; Schmitt, R

    1993-07-15

    Southern hybridization indicated the presence of at least two and possibly four histone H1-encoding genes occurring as singlets in the Volvox carteri genome. Two of these genes, H1-I and H1-II, have been cloned and characterized. Their coding sequences are each interrupted by three introns, but only the position of the second intron is identically conserved in both H1-I and H1-II. The encoded 260-amino-acid (aa) (H1-I) and 240-aa (H1-II) polypeptides possess the typical tripartite organization of animal H1 histones, with variable N- and C-terminal domains flanking a conserved 'globular' DNA-binding domain. Extensive differences in their variable regions suggest that H1-I and H1-II (62% identity) represent two isotypes with different functions. A prominent KAPKAP-KAA motif in the H1-I N-terminal region, similarly seen in single H1 variants of a mosquito and a nematode, has a putative function in packing condensed subtypes of chromatin. Different from higher plants, but like animals, the H1 genes of V. carteri possess a typical 3' palindrome for mRNA processing, resulting in non-polyadenylated mRNAs. Transcription initiates 33 nucleotides (nt) (H1-I) and 26 nt (H1-II) downstream of typical TATA boxes. A putative 20-bp conserved enhancer element upstream of each TATA box closely resembles the consensus sequence associated with the nucleosomal histone-encoding genes in V. carteri [Müller et al., Gene 93 (1990) 167-175] and suggests stringent regulation. Accordingly, transcription of H1 was shown to be restricted to late embryogenesis, when new flagella are produced. We discuss the inferred accessory role of histone H1 proteins in stabilizing axonemal microtubules, as has been recently observed in sea urchin flagella [Multigner et al., Nature 360 (1992) 33-39].

  10. Genome-Wide Identification and Mapping of NBS-Encoding Resistance Genes in Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Roberto; Ponce, Olga; Ramirez, Manuel; Mostajo, Nelly; Orjeda, Gisella

    2012-01-01

    The majority of disease resistance (R) genes identified to date in plants encode a nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain containing protein. Additional domains such as coiled-coil (CC) and TOLL/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domains can also be present. In the recently sequenced Solanum tuberosum group phureja genome we used HMM models and manual curation to annotate 435 NBS-encoding R gene homologs and 142 NBS-derived genes that lack the NBS domain. Highly similar homologs for most previously documented Solanaceae R genes were identified. A surprising ∼41% (179) of the 435 NBS-encoding genes are pseudogenes primarily caused by premature stop codons or frameshift mutations. Alignment of 81.80% of the 577 homologs to S. tuberosum group phureja pseudomolecules revealed non-random distribution of the R-genes; 362 of 470 genes were found in high density clusters on 11 chromosomes. PMID:22493716

  11. The twisted Gene Encodes Drosophila Protein O-Mannosyltransferase 2 and Genetically Interacts With the rotated abdomen Gene Encoding Drosophila Protein O-Mannosyltransferase 1

    PubMed Central

    Lyalin, Dmitry; Koles, Kate; Roosendaal, Sigrid D.; Repnikova, Elena; Van Wechel, Laura; Panin, Vladislav M.

    2006-01-01

    The family of mammalian O-mannosyltransferases includes two enzymes, POMT1 and POMT2, which are thought to be essential for muscle and neural development. Similar to mammalian organisms, Drosophila has two O-mannosyltransferase genes, rotated abdomen (rt) and DmPOMT2, encoding proteins with high homology to their mammalian counterparts. The previously reported mutant phenotype of the rt gene includes a clockwise rotation of the abdomen and defects in embryonic muscle development. No mutants have been described so far for the DmPOMT2 locus. In this study, we determined that the mutation in the twisted (tw) locus, tw1, corresponds to a DmPOMT2 mutant. The twisted alleles represent a complementation group of recessive mutations that, similar to the rt mutants, exhibit a clockwise abdomen rotation phenotype. Several tw alleles were isolated in the past; however, none of them was molecularly characterized. We used an expression rescue approach to confirm that tw locus represents DmPOMT2 gene. We found that the tw1 allele represents an amino acid substitution within the conserved PMT domain of DmPOMT2 (TW) protein. Immunostaining experiments revealed that the protein products of both rt and tw genes colocalize within Drosophila cells where they reside in the ER subcellular compartment. In situ hybridization analysis showed that both genes have essentially overlapping patterns of expression throughout most of embryogenesis (stages 8–17), while only the rt transcript is present at early embryonic stages (5 and 6), suggesting its maternal origin. Finally, we analyzed the genetic interactions between rt and tw using several mutant alleles, RNAi, and ectopic expression approaches. Our data suggest that the two Drosophila O-mannosyltransferase genes, rt and tw, have nonredundant functions within the same developmental cascade and that their activities are required simultaneously for possibly the same biochemical process. Our results establish the possibility of using

  12. MeCP2 regulates Tet1-catalyzed demethylation, CTCF binding, and learning-dependent alternative splicing of the BDNF gene in Turtle

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhaoqing; Ambigapathy, Ganesh; Keifer, Joyce

    2017-01-01

    MECP2 mutations underlying Rett syndrome cause widespread misregulation of gene expression. Functions for MeCP2 other than transcriptional are not well understood. In an ex vivo brain preparation from the pond turtle Trachemys scripta elegans, an intraexonic splicing event in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene generates a truncated mRNA transcript in naïve brain that is suppressed upon classical conditioning. MeCP2 and its partners, splicing factor Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) and methylcytosine dioxygenase 1 (Tet1), bind to BDNF chromatin in naïve but dissociate during conditioning; the dissociation correlating with decreased DNA methylation. Surprisingly, conditioning results in new occupancy of BDNF chromatin by DNA insulator protein CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), which is associated with suppression of splicing in conditioning. Knockdown of MeCP2 shows it is instrumental for splicing and inhibits Tet1 and CTCF binding thereby negatively impacting DNA methylation and conditioning-dependent splicing regulation. Thus, mutations in MECP2 can have secondary effects on DNA methylation and alternative splicing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25384.001 PMID:28594324

  13. Global population genetic structure and male-mediated gene flow in the green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas): analysis of microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Mark A; Schwartz, Tonia S; Karl, Stephen A

    2004-04-01

    We assessed the degree of population subdivision among global populations of green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, using four microsatellite loci. Previously, a single-copy nuclear DNA study indicated significant male-mediated gene flow among populations alternately fixed for different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and that genetic divergence between populations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans was more common than subdivisions among populations within ocean basins. Even so, overall levels of variation at single-copy loci were low and inferences were limited. Here, the markedly more variable microsatellite loci confirm the presence of male-mediated gene flow among populations within ocean basins. This analysis generally confirms the genetic divergence between the Atlantic and Pacific. As with the previous study, phylogenetic analyses of genetic distances based on the microsatellite loci indicate a close genetic relationship among eastern Atlantic and Indian Ocean populations. Unlike the single-copy study, however, the results here cannot be attributed to an artifact of general low variability and likely represent recent or ongoing migration between ocean basins. Sequence analyses of regions flanking the microsatellite repeat reveal considerable amounts of cryptic variation and homoplasy and significantly aid in our understanding of population connectivity. Assessment of the allele frequency distributions indicates that at least some of the loci may not be evolving by the stepwise mutation model.

  14. Global population genetic structure and male-mediated gene flow in the green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas): analysis of microsatellite loci.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Mark A; Schwartz, Tonia S; Karl, Stephen A

    2004-01-01

    We assessed the degree of population subdivision among global populations of green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, using four microsatellite loci. Previously, a single-copy nuclear DNA study indicated significant male-mediated gene flow among populations alternately fixed for different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and that genetic divergence between populations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans was more common than subdivisions among populations within ocean basins. Even so, overall levels of variation at single-copy loci were low and inferences were limited. Here, the markedly more variable microsatellite loci confirm the presence of male-mediated gene flow among populations within ocean basins. This analysis generally confirms the genetic divergence between the Atlantic and Pacific. As with the previous study, phylogenetic analyses of genetic distances based on the microsatellite loci indicate a close genetic relationship among eastern Atlantic and Indian Ocean populations. Unlike the single-copy study, however, the results here cannot be attributed to an artifact of general low variability and likely represent recent or ongoing migration between ocean basins. Sequence analyses of regions flanking the microsatellite repeat reveal considerable amounts of cryptic variation and homoplasy and significantly aid in our understanding of population connectivity. Assessment of the allele frequency distributions indicates that at least some of the loci may not be evolving by the stepwise mutation model. PMID:15126404

  15. A plasmid-encoded UmuD homologue regulates expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa SOS genes.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Magaña, Amada; Alva-Murillo, Nayeli; Chávez-Moctezuma, Martha P; López-Meza, Joel E; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Cervantes, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmid pUM505 contains the umuDC operon that encodes proteins similar to error-prone repair DNA polymerase V. The umuC gene appears to be truncated and its product is probably not functional. The umuD gene, renamed umuDpR, possesses an SOS box overlapped with a Sigma factor 70 type promoter; accordingly, transcriptional fusions revealed that the umuDpR gene promoter is activated by mitomycin C. The predicted sequence of the UmuDpR protein displays 23 % identity with the Ps. aeruginosa SOS-response LexA repressor. The umuDpR gene caused increased MMC sensitivity when transferred to the Ps. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. As expected, PAO1-derived knockout lexA-  mutant PW6037 showed resistance to MMC; however, when the umuDpR gene was transferred to PW6037, MMC resistance level was reduced. These data suggested that UmuDpR represses the expression of SOS genes, as LexA does. To test whether UmuDpR exerts regulatory functions, expression of PAO1 SOS genes was evaluated by reverse transcription quantitative PCR assays in the lexA-  mutant with or without the pUC_umuD recombinant plasmid. Expression of lexA, imuA and recA genes increased 3.4-5.3 times in the lexA-  mutant, relative to transcription of the corresponding genes in the lexA+ strain, but decreased significantly in the lexA- /umuDpR transformant. These results confirmed that the UmuDpR protein is a repressor of Ps. aeruginosa SOS genes controlled by LexA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, however, did not show binding of UmuDpR to 5' regions of SOS genes, suggesting an indirect mechanism of regulation.

  16. Development and Application of Real-Time PCR Assays for Quantification of Genes Encoding Tetracycline Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhongtang; Michel, Frederick C.; Hansen, Glenn; Wittum, Thomas; Morrison, Mark

    2005-01-01

    We report here the development, validation, and use of three real-time PCR assays to quantify the abundance of the following three groups of tetracycline resistance genes: tet(A) and tet(C); tet(G); and tet genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins, including tet(M), tet(O), tetB(P), tet(Q), tet(S), tet(T), and tet(W). The assays were validated using known numbers of sample-derived tet gene templates added to microbiome DNA. These assays are both precise and accurate over at least 6 log tet gene copies. New tet gene variants were also identified from cloned tet amplicons as part of this study. The utility of these real-time PCR assays was demonstrated by quantifying the three tet gene groups present in bovine and swine manures, composts of swine manure, lagoons of hog house effluent, and samples from an Ekokan upflow biofilter system treating hog house effluent. The bovine manures were found to contain fewer copies of all three groups of tet genes than the swine manures. The composts of swine manures had substantially reduced tet gene abundance (up to 6 log), while lagoon storage or the upflow biofilter had little effect on tet gene abundance. These results suggest that the method of manure storage and treatment may have a substantial impact on the persistence and dissemination of tet genes in agricultural environments. These real-time PCR assays provide rapid, quantitative, cultivation-independent measurements of 10 major classes of tet genes, which should be useful for ecological studies of antibiotic resistance. PMID:16269727

  17. Distribution of Genes Encoding Resistance to Macrolides, Lincosamides, and Streptogramins among Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Lina, Gerard; Quaglia, Alain; Reverdy, Marie-Elisabeth; Leclercq, Roland; Vandenesch, François; Etienne, Jerome

    1999-01-01

    The relative frequency of 10 determinants of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins was investigated by PCR in a series of 294 macrolide-, lincosamide-, and/or streptogramin-resistant clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated in 1995 from 32 French hospitals. Resistance was mainly due to the presence of ermA or ermC genes, which were detected in 259 strains (88%), in particular those resistant to methicillin (78% of the strains). Macrolide resistance due to msrA was more prevalent in coagulase-negative staphylococci (14.6%) than in S. aureus (2.1%). Genes related to linA/linA′ and conferring resistance to lincomycin were detected in one strain of S. aureus and seven strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci. Resistance to pristinamycin and quinupristin-dalfopristin was phenotypically detected in 10 strains of S. aureus and in three strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci; it was always associated with resistance to type A streptogramins encoded by vat or vatB genes and occurred in association with erm genes. The vga gene conferring decreased susceptibility to type A streptogramins was present alone in three strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci and in combination with erm genes in 10 strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci. A combination of vga-vgb-vat and ermA genes was found in a single strain of S. epidermidis. PMID:10223914

  18. Developmental expression of tobacco pistil-specific genes encoding novel extensin-like proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, M H; Pezzotti, M; Seurinck, J; Mariani, C

    1992-01-01

    We have sought to identify pistil-specific genes that can be used as molecular markers to study pistil development. For this purpose, a cDNA library was constructed from poly(A)+ RNA extracted from tobacco stigmas and styles at different developmental stages. Differential screening of this library led to the isolation of cDNA clones that correspond to genes preferentially or specifically expressed in the pistil. Seven of these cDNA clones encode proteins containing repetitions of the pentapeptide Ser-Pro4, which is a typical motif found in extensins. Unlike extensin genes, the extensin-like genes described here are not induced under stress conditions. RNA gel blot hybridizations demonstrated the organ-specific expression of the extensin-like genes and their temporal regulation during pistil development. After pollination, the transcript levels of the pistil-specific extensin-like genes change relative to levels in unpollinated pistils. In situ hybridization experiments showed that at least one of these pistil-specific genes is specifically expressed in cells of the transmitting tissue. The possible roles of the extensin-like proteins in pistils are discussed. PMID:1392607

  19. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis of NBS-encoding genes in Rosaceae fruit crops.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiang; Wen, Xiaopeng; Deng, Xiuxin

    2007-07-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of the nucleotide binding site (NBS)-encoding resistance gene homologues (RGHs) among 12 species in five genera of Rosaceae fruit crops were evaluated. A total of 228 Rosaceous RGHs were deeply separated into two distinct clades, designated as TIR (sequences within this clade containing a Toll Interleukin-1 Receptor domain) and NonTIR (sequences lacking a TIR domain). Most Rosaceous RGH genes were phylogenetically distinct from Arabidopsis, Rice or Pine genes, except for a few Rosaceous members which grouped closely with Arabidopsis genes. Within Rosaceae, sequences from multiple species were often phylogenetically clustered together, forming heterogenous groups, however, apple- and chestnut rose-specific groups really exist. Gene duplication followed by sequence divergence were proposed as the mode for the evolution of a large number of distantly or closely related RGH genes in Rosaceae, and this mode may play a role in the generation of new resistance specificity. Positively selected sites within NBS-coding region were detected and thus nucleotide variation within NBS domain may function in determining disease resistance specificity. This study also discusses the synteny of a genomic region that encompass powdery mildew resistance locus among Malus, Prunus and Rosa, which may have potential use for fruit tree disease breeding and important gene cloning.

  20. Isolation and sequence analysis of the gene encoding triose phosphate isomerase from Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Merico, A; Rodrigues, F; Côrte-Real, M; Porro, D; Ranzi, B M; Compagno, C

    2001-06-30

    The ZbTPI1 gene encoding triose phosphate isomerase (TIM) was cloned from a Zygosaccharomyces bailii genomic library by complementation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae tpi1 mutant strain. The nucleotide sequence of a 1.5 kb fragment showed an open reading frame (ORF) of 746 bp, encoding a protein of 248 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence shares a high degree of homology with TIMs from other yeast species, including some highly conserved regions. The analysis of the promoter sequence of the ZbTPI1 revealed the presence of putative motifs known to have regulatory functions in S. cerevisiae. The GenBank Accession No. of ZbTPI1 is AF325852.

  1. The Hd0053 gene of Haemophilus ducreyi encodes an alpha2,3-sialyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhong; Sun, Mingchi; Huang, Shengshu; Yu, Hai; Chokhawala, Harshal A; Thon, Vireak; Chen, Xi

    2007-09-21

    Haemophilus ducreyi is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes chancroid, a sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease. Different lipooligosaccharide (LOS) structures have been identified from H. ducreyi strain 35000, including those sialylated glycoforms. Surface LOS of H. ducreyi is considered an important virulence factor that is involved in ulcer formation, cell adhesion, and invasion of host tissue. Gene Hd0686 of H. ducreyi, designated lst (for lipooligosaccharide sialyltransferase), was identified to encode an alpha2,3-sialyltransferase that is important for the formation of sialylated LOS. Here, we show that Hd0053 of H. ducreyi genomic strain 35000HP, the third member of the glycosyltransferase family 80 (GT80), also encodes an alpha2,3-sialyltransferase that may be important for LOS sialylation.

  2. Cloning and characterization of a novel human gene encoding a zinc finger protein with 25 fingers.

    PubMed

    Li, X A; Kokame, K; Okubo, K; Shimokado, K; Tsukamoto, Y; Miyata, T; Kato, H; Yutani, C

    1999-12-23

    This study reports cloning and characterization of a human cDNA encoding a novel human zinc finger protein, ZFD25. ZFD25 cDNA is 6118 bp long and has an open reading frame of 2352 bp that encodes a 783 amino acid protein with 25 C2H2-type zinc fingers. The ZFD25 cDNA also contains a region with high sequence similarity to the Krüppel-associated box A and B domain in the 5'-untranslated region, suggesting that ZFD25 belongs to the Krüppel-associated box zinc finger protein family. The ZFD25 gene was localized to chromosome 7q11.2. Northern blot analysis showed that ZFD25 was expressed in a wide range of human organs. In cultured endothelial cells, the mRNA level was decreased upon serum starvation.

  3. Cloning and characterization of the gene encoding inorganic pyrophosphatase of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Lahti, R; Pitkäranta, T; Valve, E; Ilta, I; Kukko-Kalske, E; Heinonen, J

    1988-12-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 gene ppa encoding inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase) was cloned and sequenced. The 5' end of the ppa mRNA was identified by primer extension mapping. A typical E. coli sigma 70 promoter was identified immediately upstream of the mRNA 5' end. The structural gene of ppa contains 528 base pairs, from which a 175-amino-acid translation product, Mr 19,572, was deduced. The deduced amino acid composition perfectly fitted with that of PPase as previously determined (P. Burton, D. C. Hall, and J. Josse, J. Biol. Chem. 245:4346-4351, 1970). Furthermore, the partial amino acid sequence (residues 1 to 108) of E. coli PPase determined by S. A. Cohen (Ph.D. thesis, University of Chicago, 1978) was the same as that deduced from the nucleotide sequence. This is the first report of the cloning of a PPase gene.

  4. Identification and characterization of the Vibrio anguillarum prtV gene encoding a new metalloprotease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Zhaolan; Guo, Dongsheng; Mao, Yunxiang; Ye, Xuhong; Zou, Yuxia; Xiao, Peng; Hao, Bin

    2010-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a prtV-like gene from Vibrio anguillarum M3 strain. This prtV gene encodes a putative protein of 918 amino acids, and is highly homologous to the V. cholerae prtV gene. We found that a prtV insertion mutant strain displayed lower gelatinase activity on gelatin agar, lower protease activity against azocasein, and lower activity for four glycosidases. This prtV mutant strain also had increased activity for two esterases in its extracellular products, as analyzed by the API ZYM system. In addition, the prtV mutant strain exhibited decreased growth in turbot intestinal mucus and reduced hemolytic activity on turbot erythrocytes. Infection experiments showed that the LD50 of the prtV mutant strain increased by at least 1 log compared to the wild-type in turbot fish. We propose that prtV plays an important role in the pathogenesis of V. anguillarum.

  5. Molecular cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, D P; Kubiniec, M A; Yoshimura, F; Genco, R J

    1988-01-01

    The gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis 381, fimbrilin, has been cloned and sequenced. The gene was present as a single copy on the bacterial chromosome, and the codon usage in the gene conformed closely to that expected for an abundant protein. The predicted size of the mature protein was 35,924 daltons, and the secretory form may have had a 10-amino-acid, hydrophilic leader sequence similar to the leader sequences of the MePhe fimbriae family. The protein sequence had no marked similarity to known fimbrial sequences, and no homologous sequences could be found in other black-pigmented Bacteroides species, suggesting that fimbrillin represents a class of fimbrial subunit protein of limited distribution. Images PMID:2895100

  6. Molecular characterization of the gene encoding the DNA gyrase A subunit of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Balas, D; Fernández-Moreira, E; De La Campa, A G

    1998-06-01

    The gene encoding the DNA gyrase A subunit of Streptococcus pneumoniae was cloned and sequenced. The gyrA gene codes for a protein of 822 amino acids homologous to the gyrase A subunit of eubacteria. Translation of the gene in an Escherichia coli expression system revealed a 92-kDa polypeptide. A sequence-directed DNA curvature was identified in the promoter region of gyrA. The bend center was mapped and located between the -35 and -10 regions of the promoter. Primer extension analysis showed that gyrA transcription initiates 6 bp downstream of an extended -10 promoter. The possible implications of the bent DNA region as a regulatory element in the transcription of gyrA are discussed.

  7. Molecular Characterization of the Gene Encoding the DNA Gyrase A Subunit of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Balas, Delia; Fernández-Moreira, Esteban; De La Campa, Adela G.

    1998-01-01

    The gene encoding the DNA gyrase A subunit of Streptococcus pneumoniae was cloned and sequenced. The gyrA gene codes for a protein of 822 amino acids homologous to the gyrase A subunit of eubacteria. Translation of the gene in an Escherichia coli expression system revealed a 92-kDa polypeptide. A sequence-directed DNA curvature was identified in the promoter region of gyrA. The bend center was mapped and located between the −35 and −10 regions of the promoter. Primer extension analysis showed that gyrA transcription initiates 6 bp downstream of an extended −10 promoter. The possible implications of the bent DNA region as a regulatory element in the transcription of gyrA are discussed. PMID:9603872

  8. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Nar1 Gene Encodes a Chloroplast Membrane Protein Involved in Nitrite Transport

    PubMed Central

    Rexach, Jesus; Fernández, Emilio; Galván, Aurora

    2000-01-01

    A key step for nitrate assimilation in photosynthetic eukaryotes occurs within chloroplasts, where nitrite is reduced to ammonium, which is incorporated into carbon skeletons. The Nar1 gene from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is clustered with five other genes for nitrate assimilation, all of them regulated by nitrate. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA and cDNA of Nar1 and comparative studies of strains having or lacking Nar1 have been performed. The deduced amino acid sequence indicates that Nar1 encodes a chloroplast membrane protein with substantial identity to putative formate and nitrite transporters in bacteria. Use of antibodies against NAR1 has corroborated its location in the plastidic membrane. Characterization of strains having or lacking this gene suggests that NAR1 is involved in nitrite transport in plastids, which is critical for cell survival under limiting nitrate conditions, and controls the amount of nitrate incorporated by the cells under limiting CO2 conditions. PMID:10948261

  9. Genetic variability in the sable (Martes zibellina L.) with respect to genes encoding blood proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kashtanov, S.N.; Kazakova, T.I.

    1995-02-01

    Electrophoresis of blood proteins was used to determine, for the first time, the level of genetic variability of certain loci in the sable (Martes zibellina L., Mustelidae). Variation of 23 blood proteins encoded by 25 genes was analyzed. Polymorphism was revealed in six genes. The level of heterozygosity was estimated at 0.069; the proportion of polymorphic loci was 24%. Data on the history of the sable population maintained at the farm, on geographical distribution of natural sable populations, and on the number of animals selected for reproduction in captivity is presented. The great number of animals studies and the extensive range of natural sable populations, on the basis of which the population maintained in captivity was obtained, suggest that the results of this work can be used for estimating the variability of the gene pool of sable as a species. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Function-Based Metagenomic Library Screening and Heterologous Expression Strategy for Genes Encoding Phosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Genis A Castillo; Nacke, Heiko; Daniel, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    The release of phosphate from inorganic and organic phosphorus compounds can be mediated enzymatically. Phosphate-releasing enzymes, comprising acid and alkaline phosphatases, are recognized as useful biocatalysts in applications such as plant and animal nutrition, bioremediation and diagnostic analysis. Metagenomic approaches provide access to novel phosphatase-encoding genes. Here, we describe a function-based screening approach for rapid identification of genes conferring phosphatase activity from small-insert and large-insert metagenomic libraries derived from various environments. This approach bears the potential for discovery of entirely novel phosphatase families or subfamilies and members of known enzyme classes hydrolyzing phosphomonoester bonds such as phytases. In addition, we provide a strategy for efficient heterologous phosphatase gene expression.

  11. Identification and Characterization of Multi-gene Family Encoding Germin-like Proteins in Cultivated Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Germins and germin-like proteins (GLPs) play diversified roles in plant development and basic defense. In this study, 36 EST-clones encoding GLPs were identified. Sequence similarity analysis demonstrated that the peanut genome possessed multi-gene family encoding at least 8 GLPs, named AhGLP1 to Ah...

  12. Cloning of the genes encoding two murine and human cochlear unconventional type I myosins

    SciTech Connect

    Crozet, F.; El Amraoui, Z.; Blanchard, S.

    1997-03-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate a crucial role for unconventional myosins in the function of the sensory hair cells of the inner ear. We report here the characterization of the cDNAs encoding two unconventional type I myosins from a mouse cochlear cDNA library. The first cDNA encodes a putative protein named Myo1c, which is likely to be the murine orthologue of the bullfrog myosin I{beta} and which may be involved in the gating of the mechanotransduction channel of the sensory hair cells. This myosin belongs to the group of short-tailed myosins I, with its tail ending shortly after a polybasic, TH-1-like domain. The second cDNA encodes a novel type I myosin Myo1f which displays three regions: a head domain with the conserved ATP- and actin-binding sites, a neck domain with a single IQ motif, and a tail domain with the tripartite structure initially described in protozoan myosins I. The tail of Myo1f includes (1) a TH-1 region rich in basic residues, which may interact with anionic membrane phospholipids; (2) a TH-2 proline-rich region, expected to contain an ATP-insensitive actin-binding site; and (3) an SH-3 domain found in a variety of cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. Northern blot analysis indicated that the genes encoding Myo1c and Myo1f display a widespread tissue expression in the adult mouse. Myo1c and Myo1f were mapped by in situ hybridization to the chromosomal regions 11D-11E and 17B-17C, respectively. The human orthologuous genes MYO1C and MYO1F were also characterized, and mapped to the human chromosomal regions 17p13 and 19p13.2- 19p1.3.3, respectively. 45 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Nucleotide sequence and characterization of a Bacillus subtilis gene encoding a flagellar switch protein.

    PubMed Central

    Zuberi, A R; Bischoff, D S; Ordal, G W

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Bacillus subtilis fliM gene has been determined. This gene encodes a 38-kDa protein that is homologous to the FliM flagellar switch proteins of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Expression of this gene in Che+ cells of E. coli and B. subtilis interferes with normal chemotaxis. The nature of the chemotaxis defect is dependent upon the host used. In B. subtilis, overproduction of FliM generates mostly nonmotile cells. Those cells that are motile switch less frequently. Expression of B. subtilis FliM in E. coli also generates nonmotile cells. However, those cells that are motile have a tumble bias. The B. subtilis fliM gene cannot complement an E. coli fliM mutant. A frameshift mutation was constructed in the fliM gene, and the mutation was transferred onto the B. subtilis chromosome. The mutant has a Fla- phenotype. This phenotype is consistent with the hypothesis that the FliM protein encodes a component of the flagellar switch in B. subtilis. Additional characterization of the fliM mutant suggests that the hag and mot loci are not expressed. These loci are regulated by the SigD form of RNA polymerase. We also did not observe any methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins in an in vivo methylation experiment. The expression of these proteins is also dependent upon SigD. It is possible that a functional basal body-hook complex may be required for the expression of SigD-regulated chemotaxis and motility genes. Images PMID:1898932

  14. PCR detection of enzyme-encoding genes in Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains of wine origin.

    PubMed

    Mtshali, Phillip Senzo; Divol, Benoit; du Toit, Maret

    2012-04-01

    Fifteen isolates of lactic acid bacteria originating from South African grape and wine samples were identified as Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides through the taxonomic analysis of their 16S rDNA gene sequences. These isolates were further tested for the presence of genes coding for enzymes of oenological relevance using PCR detection technique. A type strain of Leuc. mesenteroides (NCDO 529(T)) was also incorporated for comparative analysis. From the PCR detection results, the estA, prtP, alsD, alsS, metK, metC and metB genes were present in all the strains tested. The bgl and gshR genes encoding β-glucosidase and glutathione reductase, respectively, were not detected in some strains. On the other hand, none of the tested strains possessed the genes encoding phenolic acid decarboxylase (padA), citrate permease (citP), citrate lyase (citD, citE and citF) and arginine deiminase pathway enzymes (arcA, arcB and arcC). The verification of PCR-generated fragments was performed by sequencing. GenBank database was used to search for homologous DNA sequences. Neighbour-joining trees based on nucleotide sequences of alsS, estA, metK and mleA genes were also constructed in order to study the phylogenetic relationship between Leuc. mesenteroides strains and closely related species. The phylogenetic analyses revealed that there are genetic heterogeneities between strains of Leuc. mesenteroides species. In conclusion, this study has improved our knowledge on the genetics of oenological strains of Leuc. mesenteroides and their genetic potential to contribute to certain wine aroma compounds.

  15. A bacterial gene codA encoding cytosine deaminase is an effective conditional negative selectable marker in Glycine max

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background Conditional negative selection is a powerful technique whereby the absence of a gene product allows survival in otherwise lethal conditions. In plants, the Escherichia coli gene codA has been employed as a negative selection marker. CodA is a conditionally lethal dominant gene encoding cy...

  16. Evolutionary Characteristics of Missing Proteins: Insights into the Evolution of Human Chromosomes Related to Missing-Protein-Encoding Genes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aishi; Li, Guang; Yang, Dong; Wu, Songfeng; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Xu, Ping; He, Fuchu

    2015-12-04

    Although the "missing protein" is a temporary concept in C-HPP, the biological information for their "missing" could be an important clue in evolutionary studies. Here we classified missing-protein-encoding genes into two groups, the genes encoding PE2 proteins (with transcript evidence) and the genes encoding PE3/4 proteins (with no transcript evidence). These missing-protein-encoding genes distribute unevenly among different chromosomes, chromosomal regions, or gene clusters. In the view of evolutionary features, PE3/4 genes tend to be young, spreading at the nonhomology chromosomal regions and evolving at higher rates. Interestingly, there is a higher proportion of singletons in PE3/4 genes than the proportion of singletons in all genes (background) and OTCSGs (organ, tissue, cell type-specific genes). More importantly, most of the paralogous PE3/4 genes belong to the newly duplicated members of the paralogous gene groups, which mainly contribute to special biological functions, such as "smell perception". These functions are heavily restricted into specific type of cells, tissues, or specific developmental stages, acting as the new functional requirements that facilitated the emergence of the missing-protein-encoding genes during evolution. In addition, the criteria for the extremely special physical-chemical proteins were first set up based on the properties of PE2 proteins, and the evolutionary characteristics of those proteins were explored. Overall, the evolutionary analyses of missing-protein-encoding genes are expected to be highly instructive for proteomics and functional studies in the future.

  17. Cloning of the rice seed alpha-globulin-encoding gene: sequence similarity of the 5'-flanking region to those of the genes encoding wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin and barley D hordein.

    PubMed

    Nakase, M; Hotta, H; Adachi, T; Aoki, N; Nakamura, R; Masumura, T; Tanaka, K; Matsuda, T

    1996-05-08

    A genomic clone encoding the rice endosperm major globulin (alpha-globulin) with an apparent molecular mass of 26 kDa was isolated, and its nucleotide (nt) sequence and transcription start point (tsp) were determined. The tsp was identical to that of the gene encoding the wheat high-molecular-weight (HMW) glutenin subunit. The consensus '-300 element' and an A + T-rich sequence exist upstream from the TATA box in the 5'-flanking region. A nt sequence of about 130 bp in the 5'-flanking region was found to be markedly homologous to those of the genes encoding the wheat HMW glutenin subunit and barley D hordein.

  18. Underwater Hearing in Turtles.

    PubMed

    Willis, Katie L

    2016-01-01

    The hearing of turtles is poorly understood compared with the other reptiles. Although the mechanism of transduction of sound into a neural signal via hair cells has been described in detail, the rest of the auditory system is largely a black box. What is known is that turtles have higher hearing thresholds than other reptiles, with best frequencies around 500 Hz. They also have lower underwater hearing thresholds than those in air, owing to resonance of the middle ear cavity. Further studies demonstrated that all families of turtles and tortoises share a common middle ear cavity morphology, with scaling best suited to underwater hearing. This supports an aquatic origin of the group. Because turtles hear best under water, it is important to examine their vulnerability to anthropogenic noise. However, the lack of basic data makes such experiments difficult because only a few species of turtles have published audiograms. There are also almost no behavioral data available (understandable due to training difficulties). Finally, few studies show what kinds of sounds are behaviorally relevant. One notable paper revealed that the Australian snake-necked turtle (Chelodina oblonga) has a vocal repertoire in air, at the interface, and under water. Findings like these suggest that there is more to the turtle aquatic auditory scene than previously thought.

  19. Metabolic scaling in turtles.

    PubMed

    Ultsch, Gordon R

    2013-04-01

    Bennett and Dawson (1976) presented an analysis of the relationship of metabolic rate (MR) and body mass among turtles, based on 10 studies, but unlike most of other groups of ectotherms, there has been no update to include the many later reports on turtles. Here I present a review of the data on turtle metabolic rates at 20, 25, and 30°C, along with regression equations and graphical analyses from a large number of studies. Two generalities emerge: (1) reported metabolic rates for sea turtles are higher than for other chelonians, although it is not certain whether this is an intrinsic characteristic of sea turtles or an artifact related to experimental conditions (such as greater activity of sea turtles in metabolic chambers and the fact that a number of studies were done with the turtles out of water), and (2) the slopes of the log-log plots of metabolic rate (MR) vs. body mass [b in the allometric equation MR=a(mass)(b)] are mostly lower than previously reported in smaller studies.

  20. Full-genome identification and characterization of NBS-encoding disease resistance genes in wheat.

    PubMed

    Bouktila, Dhia; Khalfallah, Yosra; Habachi-Houimli, Yosra; Mezghani-Khemakhem, Maha; Makni, Mohamed; Makni, Hanem

    2015-02-01

    Host resistance is the most economical, effective and ecologically sustainable method of controlling diseases in crop plants. In bread wheat, despite the high number of resistance loci that have been cataloged to date, only few have been cloned, underlying the need for genomics-guided investigations capable of providing a prompt and acute knowledge on the identity of effective resistance genes that can be used in breeding programs. Proteins with a nucleotide-binding site (NBS) encoded by the major plant disease resistance (R) genes play an important role in the responses of plants to various pathogens. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of NBS-encoding genes within the whole wheat genome was performed, and the genome scale characterization of this gene family was established. From the recently published wheat genome sequence, we used a data mining and automatic prediction pipeline to identify 580 complete ORF candidate NBS-encoding genes and 1,099 partial-ORF ones. Among complete gene models, 464 were longer than 200 aa, among them 436 had less than 70 % of sequence identity to each other. This gene models set was deeply characterized. (1) First, we have analyzed domain architecture and identified, in addition to typical domain combinations, the presence of particular domains like signal peptides, zinc fingers, kinases, heavy-metal-associated and WRKY DNA-binding domains. (2) Functional and expression annotation via homology searches in protein and transcript databases, based on sufficient criteria, enabled identifying similar proteins for 60 % of the studied gene models and expression evidence for 13 % of them. (3) Shared orthologous groups were defined using NBS-domain proteins of rice and Brachypodium distachyon. (4) Finally, alignment of the 436 NBS-containing gene models to the full set of scaffolds from the IWGSC's wheat chromosome survey sequence enabled high-stringence anchoring to chromosome arms. The distribution of the R genes was found balanced

  1. The lethal toxin from Australian funnel-web spiders is encoded by an intronless gene.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Sandy Steffany; Wilson, David; Mattick, John S; King, Glenn F

    2012-01-01

    Australian funnel-web spiders are generally considered the most dangerous spiders in the world, with envenomations from the Sydney funnel-web spider Atrax robustus resulting in at least 14 human fatalities prior to the introduction of an effective anti-venom in 1980. The clinical envenomation syndrome resulting from bites by Australian funnel-web spiders is due to a single 42-residue peptide known as δ-hexatoxin. This peptide delays the inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels, which results in spontaneous repetitive firing and prolongation of action potentials, thereby causing massive neurotransmitter release from both somatic and autonomic nerve endings. Here we show that δ-hexatoxin from the Australian funnel-web spider Hadronyche versuta is produced from an intronless gene that encodes a prepropeptide that is post-translationally processed to yield the mature toxin. A limited sampling of genes encoding unrelated venom peptides from this spider indicated that they are all intronless. Thus, in distinct contrast to cone snails and scorpions, whose toxin genes contain introns, spiders may have developed a quite different genetic strategy for evolving their venom peptidome.

  2. Role of sequence encoded κB DNA geometry in gene regulation by Dorsal

    PubMed Central

    Mrinal, Nirotpal; Tomar, Archana; Nagaraju, Javaregowda

    2011-01-01

    Many proteins of the Rel family can act as both transcriptional activators and repressors. However, mechanism that discerns the ‘activator/repressor’ functions of Rel-proteins such as Dorsal (Drosophila homologue of mammalian NFκB) is not understood. Using genomic, biophysical and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that the underlying principle of this functional specificity lies in the ‘sequence-encoded structure’ of the κB-DNA. We show that Dorsal-binding motifs exist in distinct activator and repressor conformations. Molecular dynamics of DNA-Dorsal complexes revealed that repressor κB-motifs typically have A-tract and flexible conformation that facilitates interaction with co-repressors. Deformable structure of repressor motifs, is due to changes in the hydrogen bonding in A:T pair in the ‘A-tract’ core. The sixth nucleotide in the nonameric κB-motif, ‘A’ (A6) in the repressor motifs and ‘T’ (T6) in the activator motifs, is critical to confer this functional specificity as A6 → T6 mutation transformed flexible repressor conformation into a rigid activator conformation. These results highlight that ‘sequence encoded κB DNA-geometry’ regulates gene expression by exerting allosteric effect on binding of Rel proteins which in turn regulates interaction with co-regulators. Further, we identified and characterized putative repressor motifs in Dl-target genes, which can potentially aid in functional annotation of Dorsal gene regulatory network. PMID:21890896

  3. The porcine lymphotropic herpesvirus 1 encodes functional regulators of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, I.; Ehlers, B. . E-mail: ehlersb@rki.de; Noack, S.; Dural, G.; Yasmum, N.; Bauer, C.; Goltz, M.

    2007-01-20

    The porcine lymphotropic herpesviruses (PLHV) are discussed as possible risk factors in xenotransplantation because of the high prevalence of PLHV-1, PLHV-2 and PLHV-3 in pig populations world-wide and the fact that PLHV-1 has been found to be associated with porcine post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. To provide structural and functional knowledge on the PLHV immediate-early (IE) transactivator genes, the central regions of the PLHV genomes were characterized by genome walking, sequence and splicing analysis. Three spliced genes were identified (ORF50, ORFA6/BZLF1{sub h}, ORF57) encoding putative IE transactivators, homologous to (i) ORF50 and BRLF1/Rta (ii) K8/K-bZIP and BZLF1/Zta and (iii) ORF57 and BMLF1 of HHV-8 and EBV, respectively. Expressed as myc-tag or HA-tag fusion proteins, they were located to the cellular nucleus. In reporter gene assays, several PLHV-promoters were mainly activated by PLHV-1 ORF50, to a lower level by PLHV-1 ORFA6/BZLF1{sub h} and not by PLHV-1 ORF57. However, the ORF57-encoded protein acted synergistically on ORF50-mediated activation.

  4. The bean. alpha. -amylase inhibitor is encoded by a lectin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1989-04-01

    The common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, contains an inhibitor of insect and mammalian {alpha}-amylases that does not inhibit plant {alpha}-amylase. This inhibitor functions as an anti-feedant or seed-defense protein. We purified this inhibitor by affinity chromatography and found that it consists of a series of glycoforms of two polypeptides (Mr 14,000-19,000). Partial amino acid sequencing was carried out, and the sequences obtained are identical with portions of the derived amino acid sequence of a lectin-like gene. This lectin gene encodes a polypeptide of MW 28,000, and the primary in vitro translation product identified by antibodies to the {alpha}-amylase inhibitor has the same size. Co- and posttranslational processing of this polypeptide results in glycosylated polypeptides of 14-19 kDa. Our interpretation of these results is that the bean lectins constitute a gene family that encodes diverse plant defense proteins, including phytohemagglutinin, arcelin and {alpha}-amylase inhibitor.

  5. The Lethal Toxin from Australian Funnel-Web Spiders Is Encoded by an Intronless Gene

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Sandy Steffany; Wilson, David; Mattick, John S.; King, Glenn F.

    2012-01-01

    Australian funnel-web spiders are generally considered the most dangerous spiders in the world, with envenomations from the Sydney funnel-web spider Atrax robustus resulting in at least 14 human fatalities prior to the introduction of an effective anti-venom in 1980. The clinical envenomation syndrome resulting from bites by Australian funnel-web spiders is due to a single 42-residue peptide known as δ-hexatoxin. This peptide delays the inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels, which results in spontaneous repetitive firing and prolongation of action potentials, thereby causing massive neurotransmitter release from both somatic and autonomic nerve endings. Here we show that δ-hexatoxin from the Australian funnel-web spider Hadronyche versuta is produced from an intronless gene that encodes a prepropeptide that is post-translationally processed to yield the mature toxin. A limited sampling of genes encoding unrelated venom peptides from this spider indicated that they are all intronless. Thus, in distinct contrast to cone snails and scorpions, whose toxin genes contain introns, spiders may have developed a quite different genetic strategy for evolving their venom peptidome. PMID:22928020

  6. Identification of the Gene Encoding Isoprimeverose-producing Oligoxyloglucan Hydrolase in Aspergillus oryzae*

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Mitsuishi, Yasushi; Kameyama, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus oryzae produces a unique β-glucosidase, isoprimeverose-producing oligoxyloglucan hydrolase (IPase), that recognizes and releases isoprimeverose (α-d-xylopyranose-(1→6)-d-glucopyranose) units from the non-reducing ends of oligoxyloglucans. A gene encoding A. oryzae IPase, termed ipeA, was identified and expressed in Pichia pastoris. With the exception of cellobiose, IpeA hydrolyzes a variety of oligoxyloglucans and is a member of the glycoside hydrolase family 3. Xylopyranosyl branching at the non-reducing ends was vital for IPase activity, and galactosylation at a α-1,6-linked xylopyranosyl side chain completely abolished IpeA activity. Hepta-oligoxyloglucan saccharide (Xyl3Glc4) substrate was preferred over tri- (Xyl1Glc2) and tetra- (Xyl2Glc2) oligoxyloglucan saccharides substrates. IpeA transferred isoprimeverose units to other saccharides, indicating transglycosylation activity. The ipeA gene was expressed in xylose and xyloglucan media and was strongly induced in the presence of xyloglucan endo-xyloglucanase-hydrolyzed products. This is the first study to report the identification of a gene encoding IPase in eukaryotes. PMID:26755723

  7. Identification of the Gene Encoding Isoprimeverose-producing Oligoxyloglucan Hydrolase in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Mitsuishi, Yasushi; Kameyama, Akihiko; Yaoi, Katsuro

    2016-03-04

    Aspergillus oryzae produces a unique β-glucosidase, isoprimeverose-producing oligoxyloglucan hydrolase (IPase), that recognizes and releases isoprimeverose (α-D-xylopyranose-(1 → 6)-D-glucopyranose) units from the non-reducing ends of oligoxyloglucans. A gene encoding A. oryzae IPase, termed ipeA, was identified and expressed in Pichia pastoris. With the exception of cellobiose, IpeA hydrolyzes a variety of oligoxyloglucans and is a member of the glycoside hydrolase family 3. Xylopyranosyl branching at the non-reducing ends was vital for IPase activity, and galactosylation at a α-1,6-linked xylopyranosyl side chain completely abolished IpeA activity. Hepta-oligoxyloglucan saccharide (Xyl3Glc4) substrate was preferred over tri- (Xyl1Glc2) and tetra- (Xyl2Glc2) oligoxyloglucan saccharides substrates. IpeA transferred isoprimeverose units to other saccharides, indicating transglycosylation activity. The ipeA gene was expressed in xylose and xyloglucan media and was strongly induced in the presence of xyloglucan endo-xyloglucanase-hydrolyzed products. This is the first study to report the identification of a gene encoding IPase in eukaryotes. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Characterization of the nuclear gene encoding mitochondrial aconitase in the marine red alga Gracilaria verrucosa.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y H; Ragan, M A

    1995-07-01

    We have cloned a nuclear gene from the marine red alga Gracilaria verrucosa that encodes the complete 779 amino-acid mitochondrial aconitase (m-ACN), the first characterized from a photosynthetic organism. The N-terminal 28 deduced amino acids are predicted to constitute the mitochondrial transit peptide, the first described from a red alga. Putative transcriptional cis-acting elements were identified in the upstream untranslated region. The G. verrucosa m-ACN gene (m-ACN) is present in a single copy and is located ca. 1.5 kb upstream from the single-copy polyubiquitin gene. The single spliceosomal intron is located near the 5' end of the region encoding the mature m-ACN in precisely the same location and phase as intron 2 in Caenorhabditis elegans m-ACN; sequences at its 3' and 5' splice junctions and at the predicted lariat branch point conform well to the eukaryote consensus sequences. Multiple protein-sequence alignment of m-ACN, bacterial aconitase (b-ACN) and iron-responsive element-binding protein (IRE-BP), and phylogenetic analyses, revealed that m-ACN does not share a recent common ancestry with either b-ACN or IRE-BP.

  9. Cloning and characterization of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase encoding gene in Gracilaria/Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xueying, Ren; Zhenghong, Sui; Xuecheng, Zhang

    2006-04-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) plays important roles in various cellular processes. A cytosolic GAPDH encoding gene ( gpd) of Gracilaria/Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis was cloned and characterized. Deduced amino acid sequence of the enzyme of G. lemaneiformis had high homology with those of seven red algae. The 5'-untranslated regions of the GAPDHs encoding genes of these red algae varied greatly. GAPDHs of these red algae shared the highly conserved glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase active site ASCTTNCL. However, such active site of Cyanidium caldarium was different from those of the other six algae at the last two residues (CL to LF), thus the spatial structure of its GAPDH active center may be different from those of the other six. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that GAPDH of G. lemaneiformis might have undergone an evolution similar to those of Porphyra yezoensis, Chondrus crispus, and Gracilaria verrucosa. C. caldarium had a closer evolutionary relationship with Cyanidioschyzon merolae than with Cyanidium sp. Virtual Northern blot analysis revealed that gpd of G. lemaneiformis expressed constitutively, which suggested that it might be house-keeping and could be adapted as an inner control in gene expression analysis of G. lemaneiformis.

  10. A Single Arabidopsis Gene Encodes Two Differentially Targeted Geranylgeranyl Diphosphate Synthase Isoforms1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schipper, Bert; Beekwilder, Jules

    2016-01-01

    A wide diversity of isoprenoids is produced in different plant compartments. Most groups of isoprenoids synthesized in plastids, and some produced elsewhere in the plant cell derive from geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) synthesized by GGPP synthase (GGPPS) enzymes. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), five genes appear to encode GGPPS isoforms localized in plastids (two), the endoplasmic reticulum (two), and mitochondria (one). However, the loss of function of the plastid-targeted GGPPS11 isoform (referred to as G11) is sufficient to cause lethality. Here, we show that the absence of a strong transcription initiation site in the G11 gene results in the production of transcripts of different lengths. The longer transcripts encode an isoform with a functional plastid import sequence that produces GGPP for the major groups of photosynthesis-related plastidial isoprenoids. However, shorter transcripts are also produced that lack the first translation initiation codon and rely on a second in-frame ATG codon to produce an enzymatically active isoform lacking this N-terminal domain. This short enzyme localizes in the cytosol and is essential for embryo development. Our results confirm that the production of differentially targeted enzyme isoforms from the same gene is a central mechanism to control the biosynthesis of isoprenoid precursors in different plant cell compartments. PMID:27707890

  11. Identification and characterization of the Arabidopsis gene encoding the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis enzyme uroporphyrinogen III synthase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Fui-Ching; Cheng, Qi; Saha, Kaushik; Heinemann, Ilka U; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Smith, Alison G

    2008-03-01

    UROS (uroporphyrinogen III synthase; EC 4.2.1.75) is the enzyme responsible for the formation of uroporphyrinogen III, the precursor of all cellular tetrapyrroles including haem, chlorophyll and bilins. Although UROS genes have been cloned from many organisms, the level of sequence conservation between them is low, making sequence similarity searches difficult. As an alternative approach to identify the UROS gene from plants, we used functional complementation, since this does not require conservation of primary sequence. A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was constructed in which the HEM4 gene encoding UROS was deleted. This mutant was transformed with an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library in a yeast expression vector and two colonies were obtained that could grow in the absence of haem. The rescuing plasmids encoded an ORF (open reading frame) of 321 amino acids which, when subcloned into an Escherichia coli expression vector, was able to complement an E. coli hemD mutant defective in UROS. Final proof that the ORF encoded UROS came from the fact that the recombinant protein expressed with an N-terminal histidine-tag was found to have UROS activity. Comparison of the sequence of AtUROS (A. thaliana UROS) with the human enzyme found that the seven invariant residues previously identified were conserved, including three shown to be important for enzyme activity. Furthermore, a structure-based homology search of the protein database with AtUROS identified the human crystal structure. AtUROS has an N-terminal extension compared with orthologues from other organisms, suggesting that this might act as a targeting sequence. The precursor protein of 34 kDa translated in vitro was imported into isolated chloroplasts and processed to the mature size of 29 kDa. Confocal microscopy of plant cells transiently expressing a fusion protein of AtUROS with GFP (green fluorescent protein) confirmed that AtUROS was targeted exclusively to chloroplasts in vivo.

  12. Core-Gene-Encoded Peptide Regulating Virulence-Associated Traits in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Nam; Stanhope, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, high-coverage genome sequence of 57 isolates of Streptococcus mutans, the primary etiological agent of human dental caries, was completed. The SMU.1147 gene, encoding a 61-amino-acid (61-aa) peptide, was present in all sequenced strains of S. mutans but absent in all bacteria in current databases. Reverse transcription-PCR revealed that SMU.1147 is cotranscribed with scnK and scnR, which encode the histidine kinase and response regulator, respectively, of a two-component system (TCS). The C terminus of the SMU.1147 gene product was tagged with a FLAG epitope and shown to be expressed in S. mutans by Western blotting with an anti-FLAG antibody. A nonpolar mutant of SMU.1147 formed less biofilm in glucose-containing medium and grew slower than did the wild-type strain under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, at low pH, or in the presence of H2O2. Mutation of SMU.1147 dramatically reduced genetic competence and expression of comX and comY, compared to S. mutans UA159. The competence defect of the SMU.1147 mutant could not be overcome by addition of sigX-inducing peptide (XIP) in defined medium or by competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) in complex medium. Complementation with SMU.1147 on a plasmid restored all phenotypes. Interestingly, mutants lacking either one of the TCS components and a mutant lacking all three genes behaved like the wild-type strain for all phenotypes mentioned above, but all mutant strains grew slower than UA159 in medium supplemented with 0.3 M NaCl. Thus, the SMU.1147-encoded peptide affects virulence-related traits and dominantly controls quorum-sensing pathways for development of genetic competence in S. mutans. PMID:23603743

  13. Diversity of Beetle Genes Encoding Novel Plant Cell Wall Degrading Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Pauchet, Yannick; Wilkinson, Paul; Chauhan, Ritika; ffrench-Constant, Richard H.

    2010-01-01

    Plant cell walls are a heterogeneous mixture of polysaccharides and proteins that require a range of different enzymes to degrade them. Plant cell walls are also the primary source of cellulose, the most abundant and useful biopolymer on the planet. Plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) are therefore important in a wide range of biotechnological processes from the production of biofuels and food to waste processing. However, despite the fact that the last common ancestor of all deuterostomes was inferred to be able to digest, or even synthesize, cellulose using endogenous genes, all model insects whose complete genomes have been sequenced lack genes encoding such enzymes. To establish if the apparent “disappearance” of PCWDEs from insects is simply a sampling problem, we used 454 mediated pyrosequencing to scan the gut transcriptomes of beetles that feed on a variety of plant derived diets. By sequencing the transcriptome of five beetles, and surveying publicly available ESTs, we describe 167 new beetle PCWDEs belonging to eight different enzyme families. This survey proves that these enzymes are not only present in non-model insects but that the multigene families that encode them are apparently undergoing complex birth-death dynamics. This reinforces the observation that insects themselves, and not just their microbial symbionts, are a rich source of PCWDEs. Further it emphasises that the apparent absence of genes encoding PCWDEs from model organisms is indeed simply a sampling artefact. Given the huge diversity of beetles alive today, and the diversity of their lifestyles and diets, we predict that beetle guts will emerge as an important new source of enzymes for use in biotechnology. PMID:21179425

  14. The Novel Gene CRNDE Encodes a Nuclear Peptide (CRNDEP) Which Is Overexpressed in Highly Proliferating Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Szafron, Lukasz Michal; Balcerak, Anna; Grzybowska, Ewa Anna; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Felisiak-Golabek, Anna; Podgorska, Agnieszka; Kulesza, Magdalena; Nowak, Natalia; Pomorski, Pawel; Wysocki, Juliusz; Rubel, Tymon; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Konopka, Bozena; Lukasik, Martyna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    CRNDE, recently described as the lncRNA-coding gene, is overexpressed at RNA level in human malignancies. Its role in gametogenesis, cellular differentiation and pluripotency has been suggested as well. Herein, we aimed to verify our hypothesis that the CRNDE gene may encode a protein product, CRNDEP. By using bioinformatics methods, we identified the 84-amino acid ORF encoded by one of two CRNDE transcripts, previously described by our research team. This ORF was cloned into two expression vectors, subsequently utilized in localization studies in HeLa cells. We also developed a polyclonal antibody against CRNDEP. Its specificity was confirmed in immunohistochemical, cellular localization, Western blot and immunoprecipitation experiments, as well as by showing a statistically significant decrease of endogenous CRNDEP expression in the cells with transient shRNA-mediated knockdown of CRNDE. Endogenous CRNDEP localizes predominantly to the nucleus and its expression seems to be elevated in highly proliferating tissues, like the parabasal layer of the squamous epithelium, intestinal crypts or spermatocytes. After its artificial overexpression in HeLa cells, in a fusion with either the EGFP or DsRed Monomer fluorescent tag, CRNDEP seems to stimulate the formation of stress granules and localize to them. Although the exact role of CRNDEP is unknown, our preliminary results suggest that it may be involved in the regulation of the cell proliferation. Possibly, CRNDEP also participates in oxygen metabolism, considering our in silico results, and the correlation between its enforced overexpression and the formation of stress granules. This is the first report showing the existence of a peptide encoded by the CRNDE gene. PMID:25978564

  15. Cloning and characterization of the gene encoding 1-cyclohexenylcarbonyl coenzyme A reductase from Streptomyces collinus.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, P; Denoya, C D; Morgenstern, M R; Skinner, D D; Wallace, K K; Digate, R; Patton, S; Banavali, N; Schuler, G; Speedie, M K; Reynolds, K A

    1996-01-01

    We report the cloning of the gene encoding the 1-cyclohexenylcarbonyl coenzyme A reductase (ChcA) of Streptomyces collinus, an enzyme putatively involved in the final reduction step in the formation of the cyclohexyl moiety of ansatrienin from shikimic acid. The cloned gene, with a proposed designation of chcA, encodes an 843-bp open reading frame which predicts a primary translation product of 280 amino acids and a calculated molecular mass of 29.7 kDa. Highly significant sequence similiarity extending along almost the entire length of the protein was observed with members of the short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily. The S. collinus chcA gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli by using a bacteriophage T7 transient expression system, and a protein with a specific ChcA activity was detected. The E. coli-produced ChcA protein was purified and shown to have similar steady-state kinetics and electrophoretic mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels as the enoyl-coenzyme A reductase protein prepared from S. collinus. The enzyme demonstrated the ability to catalyze, in vitro, three of the reductive steps involved in the formation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid. An S. collinus chcA mutant, constructed by deletion of a genomic region comprising the 5' end of chcA, lost the ChcA activity and the ability to synthesize either cyclohexanecarboxylic acid or ansatrienin. These results suggest that chcA encodes the ChcA that is involved in catalyzing multiple reductive steps in the pathway that provides the cyclohexanecarboxylic acid from shikimic acid. PMID:8955309

  16. The Caenorhabditis elegans unc-93 gene encodes a putative transmembrane protein that regulates muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    unc-93 is one of a set of five interacting genes involved in the regulation or coordination of muscle contraction in Caenorhabditis elegans. Rare altered-function alleles of unc-93 result in sluggish movement and a characteristic "rubber band" uncoordinated phenotype. By contrast, null alleles cause no visibly abnormal phenotype, presumably as a consequence of the functional redundancy of unc-93. To understand better the role of unc-93 in regulating muscle contraction, we have cloned and molecularly characterized this gene. We isolated transposon- insertion alleles and used them to identify the region of DNA encoding the unc-93 protein. Two unc-93 proteins differing at their NH2 termini are potentially encoded by transcripts that differ at their 5' ends. The putative unc-93 proteins are 700 and 705 amino acids in length and have two distinct regions: the NH2 terminal portion of 240 or 245 amino acids is extremely hydrophilic, whereas the rest of the protein has multiple potential membrane-spanning domains. The unc-93 transcripts are low in abundance and the unc-93 gene displays weak codon usage bias, suggesting that the unc-93 protein is relatively rare. The unc-93 protein has no sequence similarity to proteins listed in current data- bases. Thus, unc-93 is likely to encode a novel membrane-associated muscle protein. We discuss possible roles for the unc-93 protein either as a component of an ion transport system involved in excitation- contraction coupling in muscle or in coordinating muscle contraction between muscle cells by affecting the functioning of gap junctions. PMID:1313436

  17. Divergence among genes encoding the elongation factor Tu of Yersinia Species.

    PubMed

    Isabel, Sandra; Leblanc, Eric; Boissinot, Maurice; Boudreau, Dominique K; Grondin, Myrian; Picard, François J; Martel, Eric A; Parham, Nicholas J; Chain, Patrick S G; Bader, Douglas E; Mulvey, Michael R; Bryden, Louis; Roy, Paul H; Ouellette, Marc; Bergeron, Michel G

    2008-11-01

    Elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), encoded by tuf genes, carries aminoacyl-tRNA to the ribosome during protein synthesis. Duplicated tuf genes (tufA and tufB), which are commonly found in enterobacterial species, usually coevolve via gene conversion and are very similar to one another. However, sequence analysis of tuf genes in our laboratory has revealed highly divergent copies in 72 strains spanning the genus Yersinia (representing 12 Yersinia species). The levels of intragenomic divergence between tufA and tufB sequences ranged from 8.3 to 16.2% for the genus Yersinia, which is significantly greater than the 0.0 to 3.6% divergence observed for other enterobacterial genera. We further explored tuf gene evolution in Yersinia and other Enterobacteriaceae by performing directed sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Phylogenetic trees constructed using concatenated tufA and tufB sequences revealed a monophyletic genus Yersinia in the family Enterobacteriaceae. Moreover, Yersinia strains form clades within the genus that mostly correlate with their phenotypic and genetic classifications. These genetic analyses revealed an unusual divergence between Yersinia tufA and tufB sequences, a feature unique among sequenced Enterobacteriaceae and indicative of a genus-wide loss of gene conversion. Furthermore, they provided valuable phylogenetic information for possible reclassification and identification of Yersinia species.

  18. A comparison of group II introns of plastid tRNALysUUU genes encoding maturase protein.

    PubMed

    Jankowiak, Kamila; Lesicka, Joanna; Pacak, Andrzej; Rybarczyk, Agnieszka; Szweykowska-Kulińska, Zofia

    2004-01-01

    All higher plant plastid genomes have six classes of tRNA genes containing introns. One of those is the tRNALysUUU gene, which encodes maturase protein. In the case of liverwort species from the genus Porella and mosses from the genus Plagiomnium, the maturase coding gene (matK) represents a truncated form of other plant matK genes: several subdomains of the reverse transcriptase-like domain and so-called domain X are not present in these ORFs. These ORFs probably represent pseudogenes of the matK gene. The analysis of codon usage within the matK gene revealed the presence of strong A/T pressure. The use of codons with the third letter being U or A varies from 71-93%. The comparison of maturase amino acid sequences at the family level shows a high identity between species. However, when liverwort and angiosperm maturase sequences are compared, the percentage of identity drops dramatically. The calculated values of the number of nucleotide substitutions vary considerably, even when liverwort species are compared pairwise. The phenetic tree of relationships between plant species on the basis of tRNALysUUU intron sequences concur with the generally accepted plant phylogeny.

  19. A human alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH6) encoding an additional class of isozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Yasunami, Michio; Chengsheng Chen; Yoshida, Akira )

    1991-09-01

    The human alcohol dehydrogenase gene family consists of five known loci (ADH1-ADH5), which have been mapped close together on chromosome 4 (4q21-25). ADH isozymes encoded by these genes are grouped in three distinct classes in terms of their enzymological properties. A moderate structural similarity is observed between the members of different classes. The authors isolated an additional member of the ADH gene family by means of cross-hybridization with the ADH2 (class I) cDNA probe. cDNA clones corresponding to this gene were derived from PCR-amplified libraries as well. The coding sequence of a 368-amino-acid-long open reading frame was interrupted by introns into eight exons and spanned approximately 17 kilobases on the genome. The gene contains a glucocorticoid response element at the 5{prime} region. The transcript was detected in the stomach and liver. The deduced amino acid sequence of the open reading frame showed about 60% positional identity with known human ADHs. This extent of homology is comparable to interclass similarity in the human ADH family. Thus, the newly identified gene, which is designated ADH6, governs the synthesis of an enzyme that belongs to another class of ADHs presumably with a distinct physiological role.

  20. Molecular characterization of the PEL1 gene encoding a putative phosphatidylserine synthase.

    PubMed

    Janitor, M; Jarosch, E; Schweyen, R J; Subík, J

    1995-10-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae the PEL1 gene is essential for the viability of rho-/rhoo petite mutants, and its mutation in respiring cells results in a pleiotropic phenotype. Results of complementation analysis with different subclones of chromosomal DNA and re-sequencing of the YCL4w-YCL3w segment of chromsome III demonstrate that the coding region of the PEL1 gene corresponds to 1467 bp. The size of the PEL1 transcript in Northern blot analysis was estimated to be approximately 1.5 kb. Transcription initiation in wild-type cells was found to occur at the position -9 relative to the ATG. The PEL1 gene was moderately expressed irrespective of the state of the mitochondrial genome and the nature of the carbon sources. Disruption of the PEL1 gene was not lethal and resulted in the same phenotype as observed with the pel1 mutant, i.e. the cells were not able to survive ethidium bromide mutagenesis, were thermosensitive for growth on glucose at 37 degrees C and failed to grow on minimal glycerol medium. Although the Pel1 protein exhibits significant similarity to a family of phosphatidylserine synthases, the disrupted PEL1 gene was not complemented by the multicopy plasmid-borne CHO1 gene encoding an essential yeast phosphatidylserine synthase.

  1. A novel method used to delete a new Aspergillus fumigatus ABC transporter-encoding gene.

    PubMed

    Langfelder, Kim; Gattung, Stephanie; Brakhage, Axel A

    2002-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an important opportunistic human pathogenic fungus. In severely immunocompromised patients, the fungus causes life-threatening diseases, such as pneumonia and invasive aspergillosis. In order to obtain a better understanding of the key elements involved in A. fumigatus virulence and for identifying possible drug targets, it is essential to be able to generate gene-deletion strains. Until recently, the molecular techniques available did not provide a rapid method for gene deletion. A novel method described for A. nidulans was adapted for A. fumigatus. This method is quick and produces an increased homologous recombination efficiency. By using an Escherichia coli strain expressing the lambda red operon, it is possible to induce an in vivo recombination of a PCR fragment flanked by >50-bp regions with a cosmid containing the gene of interest. This produces cosmids in which the gene of interest has been replaced by a bi-functional marker. Such cosmids have large flanking regions surrounding the selectable marker pyrG of A. fumigatus used here, which result in high recombination efficiencies in A. fumigatus. Here, we identified a new ABC transporter-encoding gene in A. fumigatus, designated abcA. By using this method, an A. fumigatus knock-out mutant was generated, providing evidence that this method of generating gene deletions can also be used in A. fumigatus and significantly broadens our repertoire of molecular techniques to study A. fumigatus.

  2. Myxococcus xanthus sasS encodes a sensor histidine kinase required for early developmental gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, C; Kaplan, H B

    1997-01-01

    Initiation of Myxococcus xanthus multicellular development requires integration of information concerning the cells' nutrient status and density. A gain-of-function mutation, sasB7, that bypasses both the starvation and high cell density requirements for developmental expression of the 4521 reporter gene, maps to the sasS gene. The wild-type sasS gene was cloned and sequenced. This gene is predicted to encode a sensor histidine protein kinase that appears to be a key element in the transduction of starvation and cell density inputs. The sasS null mutants express 4521 at a basal level, form defective fruiting bodies, and exhibit reduced sporulation efficiencies. These data indicate that the wild-type sasS gene product functions as a positive regulator of 4521 expression and participates in M. xanthus development. The N terminus of SasS is predicted to contain two transmembrane domains that would locate the protein to the cytoplasmic membrane. The sasB7 mutation, an E139K missense mutation, maps to the predicted N-terminal periplasmic region. The C terminus of SasS contains all of the conserved residues typical of the sensor histidine protein kinases. SasS is predicted to be the sensor protein in a two-component system that integrates information required for M. xanthus developmental gene expression. PMID:9401035

  3. Rapid Identification of Genes Encoding DNA Polymerases by Function-Based Screening of Metagenomic Libraries Derived from Glacial Ice▿

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Carola; Herath, Judith; Rockstroh, Stephanie; Daniel, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    Small-insert and large-insert metagenomic libraries were constructed from glacial ice of the Northern Schneeferner, which is located on the Zugspitzplatt in Germany. Subsequently, these libraries were screened for the presence of DNA polymerase-encoding genes by complementation of an Escherichia coli polA mutant. Nine novel genes encoding complete DNA polymerase I proteins or domains typical of these proteins were recovered. PMID:19270136

  4. Nucleotide sequencing and characterization of the genes encoding benzene oxidation enzymes of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Irie, S; Doi, S; Yorifuji, T; Takagi, M; Yano, K

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the genes from Pseudomonas putida encoding oxidation of benzene to catechol was determined. Five open reading frames were found in the sequence. Four corresponding protein molecules were detected by a DNA-directed in vitro translation system. Escherichia coli cells containing the fragment with the four open reading frames transformed benzene to cis-benzene glycol, which is an intermediate of the oxidation of benzene to catechol. The relation between the product of each cistron and the components of the benzene oxidation enzyme system is discussed. Images PMID:3667527

  5. Identification and characterization of an oleate hydratase-encoding gene from Bifidobacterium breve

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Kerry Joan; Motherway, Mary O'Connell; Hennessey, Alan A; Brodhun, Florian; Ross, R Paul; Feussner, Ivo; Stanton, Catherine; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are common commensals of the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. Previous studies have suggested that a bifidobacterial myosin cross reactive antigen (MCRA) protein plays a role in bacterial stress tolerance, while this protein has also been linked to the biosynthesis of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in bifidobacteria. In order to increase our understanding on the role of MCRA in bifidobacteria we created and analyzed an insertion mutant of the MCRA-encoding gene of B. breve NCFB 2258. Our results demonstrate that the MCRA protein of B. breve NCFB 2258 does not appear to play a role in CLA production, yet is an oleate hydratase, which contributes to bifidobacterial solvent stress protection. PMID:23851389

  6. Mutations in the Drosophila gene encoding ribosomal protein S6 cause tissue overgrowth.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, M J; Denell, R

    1993-01-01

    We have characterized two P-element-induced, lethal mutations in Drosophila melanogaster which affect the larval hemocytes, mediators of the insect immune response. Each mutant displays larval melanotic tumors characteristic of mutations affecting the insect cellular immune system, and the moribund animals develop grossly hypertrophied hematopoietic organs because of increased cell proliferation and extra rounds of endoreduplication in some hematopoietic cells. Surprisingly, these mutations are due to P element insertions in the 5' regulatory region of the Drosophila gene encoding ribosomal protein S6 and cause a reduction of S6 transcript abundance in mutant larvae. Images PMID:8384310

  7. Regulation of Aspergillus genes encoding plant cell wall polysaccharide-degrading enzymes; relevance for industrial production.

    PubMed

    de Vries, R P

    2003-03-01

    The genus Aspergillus is widely used for the production of plant cell wall polysaccharide-degrading enzymes. The range of enzymes purified from these fungi covers nearly every function required for the complete degradation of cellulose, xyloglucan, xylan, galacto(gluco)mannan and pectin. This paper describes the Aspergillus enzymes involved in the degradation of these polysaccharides and discusses the regulatory systems involved in the expression of the genes encoding these proteins. The latter is of major importance in the large-scale production of these enzymes for industrial applications.

  8. Cloning and sequence analysis of the gene encoding isocitrate lyase from Rhodococcus fascians.

    PubMed

    Vereecke, D; Villarroel, R; Van Montagu, M; Desomer, J

    1994-07-22

    An isocitrate lyase (Icl)-encoding gene (icl) from the Gram+ plant pathogen Rhodococcus fascians was identified serendipitously as part of a scrambled fragment after shotgun cloning in the promoter probe vector, pDP1. The Icl protein is 429 amino acids long (47.11 kDa) and has a predicted pI of 4.84; it is 54% similar to the Escherichia coli Icl and 24-27% to eukaryotic homologues. Comparison of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic Icl confirms the earlier proposal of Matsuoka and McFadden [J. Bacteriol. 143 (1988) 4528-4536] that the enzyme has enlarged during evolution.

  9. Contrasted patterns of selection since maize domestication on duplicated genes encoding a starch pathway enzyme.

    PubMed

    Corbi, J; Debieu, M; Rousselet, A; Montalent, P; Le Guilloux, M; Manicacci, D; Tenaillon, M I

    2011-03-01

    Maize domestication from teosinte (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis) was accompanied by an increase of kernel size in landraces. Subsequent breeding has led to a diversification of kernel size and starch content among major groups of inbred lines. We aim at investigating the effect of domestication on duplicated genes encoding a key enzyme of the starch pathway, the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase). Three pairs of paralogs encode the AGPase small (SSU) and large (LSU) subunits mainly expressed in the endosperm, the embryo and the leaf. We first validated the putative sequence of LSU(leaf) through a comparative expression assay of the six genes. Second, we investigated the patterns of molecular evolution on a 2 kb coding region homologous among the six genes in three panels: teosintes, landraces, and inbred lines. We corrected for demographic effects by relying on empirical distributions built from 580 previously sequenced ESTs. We found contrasted patterns of selection among duplicates: three genes exhibit patterns of directional selection during domestication (SSU(end), LSU(emb)) or breeding (LSU(leaf)), two exhibit patterns consistent with diversifying (SSU(leaf)) and balancing selection (SSU(emb)) accompanying maize breeding. While patterns of linkage disequilibrium did not reveal sign of coevolution between genes expressed in the same organ, we detected an excess of non-synonymous substitutions in the small subunit functional domains highlighting their role in AGPase evolution. Our results offer a different picture on AGPase evolution than the one depicted at the Angiosperm level and reveal how genetic redundancy can provide flexibility in the response to selection.

  10. Cloning, sequencing and characterization of a gene encoding dihydroxyacetone kinase from Zygosaccharomyces rouxii NRRL2547.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng-Xiang; Kayingo, Gerald; Blomberg, Anders; Prior, Bernard A

    2002-12-01

    The dihydroxyacetone pathway, an alternative pathway for the dissimilation of glycerol via reduction by glycerol dehydrogenase and subsequent phosphorylation by dihydroxyacetone (DHA) kinase, is activated in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii during osmotic stress. In experiments aimed at investigating the physiological function of the DHA pathway in Z. rouxii, a typical osmotolerant yeast, we cloned and characterized a DAK gene encoding dihydroxyacetone kinase from Z. rouxii NRRL 2547. Sequence analysis revealed a 1761 bp open reading frame, encoding a peptide composed of 587 deduced amino acids with the predicted molecular weight of 61 664 Da. As the amino acid sequence was most closely homologous (68% identity) to the S. cerevisiae Dak1p, we named the gene and protein ZrDAK1 and ZrDak1p, respectively. A putative ATP binding site was also found but no consensus element associated with osmoregulation was found in the upstream region of the ZrDAK1 gene. The ZrDAK1 gene complemented a S. cerevisiae W303-1A dak1delta dak2 delta strain by improving the growth of the mutant on 50 mmol/l dihydroxyacetone and by increasing the tolerance to dihydroxyacetone in a medium containing 5% sodium chloride, suggesting that it is a functional homologue of the S. cerevisiae DAK1. However, expression of the ZrDAK1 gene in the S. cerevisiae dak1delta dak2 delta strain had no significant effect on glycerol levels during osmotic stress. The ZrDAK1 sequence has been deposited in the public data bases under Accession No. AJ294719; regions upstream and downstream of ZrDAK1are deposited as Accession Nos AJ294739 and AJ294720, respectively.

  11. Effects of TCDD on the expression of nuclear encoded mitochondrial genes

    SciTech Connect

    Forgacs, Agnes L.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Lynn, Scott G.; LaPres, John J.; Zacharewski, Timothy

    2010-07-15

    Generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be perturbed following exposure to environmental chemicals such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Reports indicate that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates TCDD-induced sustained hepatic oxidative stress by decreasing hepatic ATP levels and through hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane. To further elucidate the effects of TCDD on the mitochondria, high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR (HTP-QRTPCR) was used to evaluate the expression of 90 nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins involved in electron transport, oxidative phosphorylation, uncoupling, and associated chaperones. HTP-QRTPCR analysis of time course (30 {mu}g/kg TCDD at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, 24, 72, and 168 h) liver samples obtained from orally gavaged immature, ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice identified 54 differentially expressed genes (|fold change| > 1.5 and P-value < 0.1). Of these, 8 exhibited a sigmoidal or exponential dose-response profile (0.03 to 300 {mu}g/kg TCDD) at 4, 24 or 72 h. Dose-responsive genes encoded proteins associated with electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I (NADH dehydrogenase), III (cytochrome c reductase), IV (cytochrome c oxidase), and V (ATP synthase) and could be generally categorized as having proton gradient, ATP synthesis, and chaperone activities. In contrast, transcript levels of ETC complex II, succinate dehydrogenase, remained unchanged. Putative dioxin response elements were computationally found in the promoter regions of all 8 dose-responsive genes. This high-throughput approach suggests that TCDD alters the expression of genes associated with mitochondrial function which may contribute to TCDD-elicited mitochondrial toxicity.

  12. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae LSB6 gene encodes phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Gil-Soo; Audhya, Anjon; Markley, Daniel J; Emr, Scott D; Carman, George M

    2002-12-06

    The LSB6 gene product was identified from the Saccharomyces Genome Data Base (locus YJL100W) as a putative member of a novel type II phosphatidylinositol (PI) 4-kinase family. Cell extracts lacking the LSB6 gene had a reduced level of PI 4-kinase activity. In addition, multicopy plasmids containing the LSB6 gene directed the overexpression of PI 4-kinase activity in cell extracts of wild-type cells, in an lsb6Delta mutant, in a pik1(ts) stt4(ts) double mutant, and in an pik1(ts) stt4(ts) lsb6Delta triple mutant. The heterologous expression of the S. cerevisiae LSB6 gene in Escherichia coli resulted in the expression of a protein that possessed PI 4-kinase activity. Although the lsb6Delta mutant did not exhibit a growth phenotype and failed to exhibit a defect in phosphoinositide synthesis in vivo, the overexpression of the LSB6 gene could partially suppress the lethal phenotype of an stt4Delta mutant defective in the type III STT4-encoded PI 4-kinase indicating that Lsb6p functions as a PI 4-kinase in vivo. Lsb6p was localized to the membrane fraction of the cell, and when overexpressed, GFP-tagged Lsb6p was observed on both the plasma membrane and the vacuole membrane. The enzymological properties (pH optimum, dependence on magnesium or manganese as a cofactor, the dependence of activity on Triton X-100, the dependence on the PI surface concentration, and temperature sensitivity) of the LSB6-encoded enzyme were very similar to the membrane-associated 55-kDa PI 4-kinase previously purified from S. cerevisiae.

  13. An essential yeast gene encoding a TTAGGG repeat-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Brigati, C; Kurtz, S; Balderes, D; Vidali, G; Shore, D

    1993-01-01

    A yeast gene encoding a DNA-binding protein that recognizes the telomeric repeat sequence TTAGGG found in multicellular eukaryotes was identified by screening a lambda gt11 expression library with a radiolabeled TTAGGG multimer. This gene, which we refer to as TBF1 (TTAGGG repeat-binding factor 1), encodes a polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 63 kDa. The TBF1 protein, produced in vitro by transcription and translation of the cloned gene, binds to (TTAGGG)n probes and to a yeast telomeric junction sequence that contains two copies of the sequence TTAGGG separated by 5 bp. TBF1 appears to be identical to a previously described yeast TTAGGG-repeat binding activity called TBF alpha. TBF1 produced in vitro yields protein-DNA complexes with (TTAGGG)n probes that have mobilities on native polyacrylamide gels identical to those produced by partially purified TBF alpha from yeast cells. Furthermore, when extracts are prepared from a strain containing a TBF1 gene with an antigen tag, we find that the antigen copurifies with the predominant (TTAGGG)n-binding activity in the extracts. The DNA sequence of TBF1 was determined. The predicted protein sequence suggests that TBF1 may contain a nucleotide-binding domain, but no significant similarities to any other known proteins were identified, nor was an obvious DNA-binding motif apparent. Diploid cells heterozygous for a tbf1::URA3 insertion mutation are viable but upon sporulation give rise to tetrads with only two viable spores, both of which are Ura-, indicating that the TBF1 gene is essential for growth. Possible functions of TBF1 (TFB alpha) are discussed in light of these new results. Images PMID:8423796

  14. Metabolic regulation of the gene encoding glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, H M; Peng, S S; Coruzzi, G M

    1994-01-01

    Here, we characterize a cDNA encoding a glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase (ASN1) from Arabidopsis thaliana and assess the effects of metabolic regulation on ASN1 mRNA levels. Sequence analysis shows that the predicted ASN1 peptide contains a purF-type glutamine-binding domain. Southern blot experiments and cDNA clone analysis suggest that ASN1 is the only gene encoding glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase in A. thaliana. The ASN1 gene is expressed predominantly in shoot tissues, where light has a negative effect on its mRNA accumulation. This negative effect of light on ASN1 mRNA levels was shown to be mediated, at least in part, via the photoreceptor phytochrome. We also investigated whether light-induced changes in nitrogen to carbon ratios might exert a metabolic regulation of the ASN1 mRNA accumulation. These experiments demonstrated that the accumulation of ASN1 mRNA in dark-grown plants is strongly repressed by the presence of exogenous sucrose. Moreover, this sucrose repression of ASN1 expression can be partially rescued by supplementation with exogenous amino acids such as asparagine, glutamine, and glutamate. These findings suggest that the expression of the ASN1 gene is under the metabolic control of the nitrogen to carbon ratio in cells. This is consistent with the fact that asparagine, synthesized by the ASN1 gene product, is a favored compound for nitrogen storage and nitrogen transport in dark-grown plants. We have put forth a working model suggesting that when nitrogen to carbon ratios are high, the gene product of ASN1 functions to re-direct the flow of nitrogen into asparagine, which acts as a shunt for storage and/or long-distance transport of nitrogen. PMID:7846154

  15. The diageotropica gene of tomato encodes a cyclophilin: a novel player in auxin signaling.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwangchul; Ivanchenko, Maria G; White, T J; Lomax, Terri L

    2006-06-01

    The single gene, auxin-resistant diageotropica (dgt) mutant of tomato displays a pleiotropic auxin-related phenotype that includes a slow gravitropic response, lack of lateral roots, reduced apical dominance, altered vascular development, and reduced fruit growth. Some auxin responses are unaltered in dgt plants, however, and the levels, metabolism, and transport of auxin appear normal, indicating that the Dgt gene encodes a component of a specific auxin signaling pathway. By combining map-based cloning with comparative microsynteny, we determined that the Dgt gene encodes a cyclophilin (CYP) (LeCYP1; gi:170439) that has not previously been identified as a component of auxin signaling and plant development. Each of the three known dgt alleles contains a unique mutation in the coding sequence of LeCyp1. Alleles dgt(1-1)and dgt(1-2) contain single nucleotide point mutations that generate an amino acid change (G137R) and a stop codon (W128stop), respectively, while dgt(dp) has an amino acid change (W128CDelta129-133) preceding a 15 bp deletion. Complementation of dgt plants with the wild-type LeCyp1 gene restored the wild-type phenotype. Each dgt mutation reduced or nullified the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity of the GST-LeCYP1 fusion proteins in vitro. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses indicated that the dgt mutations do not affect the expression of LeCyp1 mRNA, but the accumulation of LeCYP1 protein is greatly reduced for all three mutant alleles. The CYP inhibitor, cyclosporin A, partially mimics the effects of the dgt mutation in inhibiting auxin-induced adventitious root initiation in tomato hypocotyl sections and reducing the auxin-induced expression of the early auxin response genes, LeIAA10 and 11. These observations confirm that the PPIase activity of the tomato CYP, LeCYP1, encoded by the Dgt gene is important for specific aspects of auxin regulation of plant growth, development, and environmental responses.

  16. Molecular phylogenetics of emydine turtles: taxonomic revision and the evolution of shell kinesis.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Chris R; Parham, James Ford

    2002-03-01

    The 10 extant species of emydine turtles represent an array of morphological and ecological forms recognizable and popular among scientists and hobbyists. Nevertheless, the phylogenetic affinities of most emydines remain contentious. Here, we examine the evolutionary relationships of emydine turtles using 2092 bp of DNA encoding the mitochondrial genes cyt b, ND4, and adjacent tRNAs. These data contain 339 parsimony informative characters that we use to erect hypotheses of relationships for the Emydinae. Both maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods yield a monophyletic Emydinae in which all but three nodes are well resolved. Emys orbicularis, Emydoidea blandingii, and Clemmys marmorata form a monophyletic clade, as do the species of Terrapene. Clemmys muhlenbergii and Clemmys insculpta form a third monophyletic group that may be sister to all other emydines. Clemmys guttata is problematic and probably related to Terrapene. Based on this phylogeny, and previous molecular work on the group, we suggest the following taxonomic revisions: (1) Clemmys should be restricted to a single species, C. guttata. (2) Calemys should be resurrected for C. muhlenbergii and C. insculpta. (3) Emys should be expanded to include three species: E. orbicularis, E. blandingii, and E. marmorata. Furthermore, our analyses show that neither kinetic-shelled nor akinetic-shelled emydines form monophyletic groups. Therefore, shell kinesis was either independently gained in Emys and Terrapene or secondarily lost in E. marmorata and C. guttata. Parsimony, paleontological evidence, and the multiple origins of shell kinesis in related turtle lineages (especially geoemydines) support the independent origin of plastral kinesis.

  17. Construction, cloning, and expression of synthetic genes encoding spider dragline silk.

    PubMed

    Prince, J T; McGrath, K P; DiGirolamo, C M; Kaplan, D L

    1995-08-29

    Synthetic genes encoding recombinant spider silk proteins have been constructed, cloned, and expressed. Protein sequences were derived from Nephila clavipes dragline silk proteins and reverse-translated to the corresponding DNA sequences. Codon selection was chosen to maximize expression levels in Escherichia coli. DNA "monomer" sequences were multimerized to encode high molecular weight synthetic spider silks using a "head-to-tail" construction strategy. Multimers were cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector and the encoded silk proteins were expressed in E. coli upon induction with IPTG. Four multimer, ranging in size from 14.7 to 41.3 kDa, were chosen for detailed analysis. These proteins were isolated by immobilized metal affinity chromatography and purified using reverse-phase HPLC. The composition and identity of the purified proteins were confirmed by amino acid composition analysis, N-terminal sequencing, laser desorption mass spectroscopy, and Western analysis using antibodies reactive to native spider dragline silk. Circular dichroism measurements indicate that the synthetic spider silks have substantial beta-sheet structure.

  18. Molecular cloning of the gene encoding the bovine brain ribonuclease and its expression in different regions of the brain.

    PubMed Central

    Sasso, M P; Carsana, A; Confalone, E; Cosi, C; Sorrentino, S; Viola, M; Palmieri, M; Russo, E; Furia, A

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we report the molecular cloning of the gene encoding the bovine brain ribonuclease. The nucleotide sequence determined in this work shows a high degree of identity to the homologous gene encoding the bovine pancreatic ribonuclease. Processing of the primary transcripts of these genes also follows a similar pathway, splicing of the unique intron in the 5' untranslated region occurs at corresponding positions. Expression of the bovine brain ribonuclease gene can be detected both at the transcriptional and translational levels in all the regions of the brain examined. Images PMID:1754384

  19. The GyrA encoded gene: A pertinent marker for the phylogenetic revision of Helicobacter genus.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Armelle; Buissonnière, Alice; Prouzet-Mauléon, Valérie; Sifré, Elodie; Mégraud, Francis

    2016-03-01

    Phylogeny of Epsilonproteobacteria is based on sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. However, this gene is not sufficiently discriminatory in Helicobacter species and alternative markers would be useful. In this study, the 16S rRNA, gyrA, hsp60, gyrB, and ureA-ureB gene sequences, as well as GyrA, HSP60 and GyrB protein sequences were analyzed as tools to support Helicobacter species phylogeny: 72 Helicobacter strains, belonging to 41 species of which 36 are validated species, were included. Results of the phylogenetic reconstructions of the GyrA gene encoded protein (approximately 730 residues) indicated the most stable trees to bootstrap resampling with a good separation of Helicobacter taxa, especially between gastric and enterohepatic species. Moreover, the GyrA tree revealed high similarity with that of the gyrB and ureA-ureB genes (restricted to urease-positive Helicobacter species). However, some differences in clustering were observed when compared to the hsp60 and 23S rRNA gene trees. Altogether, these revised phylogenies (except the 16S rRNA gene for enterohepatic Helicobacters) enabled reliable clustering of Helicobacter cinaedi and 'Flexispira' strains, determined a reliable position for Helicobacter mustelae (except the hsp60 gene) and for novel Helicobacter species proposed such as 'Helicobacter sanguini', 'Helicobacter apodemus' or 'Helicobacter winghamensis', and suggest that Helicobacter species MIT 09-6949 and MIT 05-5293 isolated from rodents constitute novel species. Although they are not commonly used to study the phylogeny of Epsilonproteobacteria, protein sequences and, in particular, the GyrA protein sequence may constitute pertinent phylogenetic markers for Helicobacter genus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization and developmental expression of genes encoding the early carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes in Citrus paradisi Macf.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marcio G C; Moreira, Cristina D; Melton, John R; Otoni, Wagner C; Moore, Gloria A

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, the full-length cDNA sequences of PSY, PDS, and ZDS, encoding the early carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes in the carotenoid pathway of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi), were isolated and characterized for the first time. CpPSY contained a 1311-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 436 amino acids, CpPDS contained a 1659-bp ORF encoding a polypeptide of 552 amino acids, and CpZDS contained a 1713-bp ORF encoding a polypeptide of 570 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CpPSY shares homology with PSYs from Citrus, tomato, pepper, Arabidopsis, and the monocot PSY1 group, while CpPDS and CpZDS are most closely related to orthologs from Citrus and tomato. Expression analysis revealed fluctuations in CpPSY, CpPDS, and CpZDS transcript abundance and a non-coordinated regulation between the former and the two latter genes during fruit development in albedo and juice vesicles of white ('Duncan') and red ('Flame') grapefruits. A 3× higher upregulation of CpPSY expression in juice vesicles of red-fleshed 'Flame' as compared to white-fruited 'Duncan' was observed in the middle stages of fruit development, which correlates with the well documented accumulation pattern of lycopene in red grapefruit. Together with previous data, our results suggest that the primary mechanism controlling lycopene accumulation in red grapefruit involves the transcriptional upregulation of CpPSY, which controls the flux into the carotenoid pathway, and the downregulated expression of CpLCYB2, which controls the step of cyclization of lycopene in chromoplasts during fruit ripening. A correlation between CpPSY expression and fruit color evolution in red grapefruit is demonstrated.

  1. Localization of genes encoding three distinct flavin-containing monooxygenases to human chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Shephard, E.A.; Fox, M.F.; Povey, S. ); Dolphin, C.T.; Phillips, I.R.; Smith, R. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction to map the gene encoding human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) form II (N. Lomri, Q. Gu, and J. R. Cashman, 1992, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89: 1685--1689) to chromosome 1. They propose the designation FMO3 for this gene as it is the third FMO gene to be mapped. The two other human FMO genes identified to date, FMO1 and FMO2, are also located on chromosome 1 (C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. Povey, C. N. A. Palmer, D. M. Ziegler, R. Ayesh, R. L. Smith, and 1. R. Phillips, 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266: 12379--12385; C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. F. Povey, R. L. Smith, and I. R. Phillips, 1992, Biochem. J. 286: 261--267). The localization of FMO1, FMO2, and FMO3 has been refined to the long arm of chromosome 1. Analysis of human metaphase chromosomes by in situ hybridization confirmed the mapping of FMO1 and localized this gene more precisely to 1 q23-q25. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Molecular evolution and expression profile of the chemerine encoding gene RARRES2 in baboon and chimpanzee.

    PubMed

    González-Alvarez, Rafael; Garza-Rodríguez, María de Lourdes; Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Treviño-Alvarado, Víctor Manuel; Canales-Del-Castillo, Ricardo; Martínez-De-Villarreal, Laura Elia; Lugo-Trampe, Ángel; Tejero, María Elizabeth; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia E; Rocha-Pizaña, María Del Refugio; Cole, Shelley A; Reséndez-Pérez, Diana; Moises-Alvarez, Mario; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo Alberto; Garza-Guajardo, Raquel; Barboza-Quintana, Oralia; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Irám Pablo

    2015-06-12

    Chemerin, encoded by the retinoic acid receptor responder 2 (RARRES2) gene is an adipocytesecreted protein with autocrine/paracrine functions in adipose tissue, metabolism and inflammation with a recently described function in vascular tone regulation, liver, steatosis, etc. This molecule is believed to represent a critical endocrine signal linking obesity to diabetes. There are no data available regarding evolution of RARRES2 in non-human primates and great apes. Expression profile and orthology in RARRES2 genes are unknown aspects in the biology of this multigene family in primates. Thus; we attempt to describe expression profile and phylogenetic relationship as complementary knowledge in the function of this gene in primates. To do that, we performed A RT-PCR from different tissues obtained during necropsies. Also we tested the hypotheses of positive evolution, purifying selection, and neutrality. And finally a phylogenetic analysis was made between primates RARRES2 protein. RARRES2 transcripts were present in liver, lung, adipose tissue, ovary, pancreas, heart, hypothalamus and pituitary tissues. Expression in kidney and leukocytes were not detectable in either species. It was determined that the studied genes are orthologous. RARRES2 evolution fits the hypothesis of purifying selection. Expression profiles of the RARRES2 gene are similar in baboons and chimpanzees and are also phylogenetically related.

  3. Nucleotide sequence of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens octopine Ti plasmid-encoded tmr gene.

    PubMed Central

    Heidekamp, F; Dirkse, W G; Hille, J; van Ormondt, H

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the tmr gene, encoded by the octopine Ti plasmid from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (pTiAch5), was determined. The T-DNA, which encompasses this gene, is involved in tumor formation and maintenance, and probably mediates the cytokinin-independent growth of transformed plant cells. The nucleotide sequence of the tmr gene displays a continuous open reading frame specifying a polypeptide chain of 240 amino acids. The 5'- terminus of the polyadenylated tmr mRNA isolated from octopine tobacco tumor cell lines was determined by nuclease S1 mapping. The nucleotide sequence 5'-TATAAAA-3', which sequence is identical to the canonical "TATA" box, was found 29 nucleotides upstream from the major initiation site for RNA synthesis. Two potential polyadenylation signals 5'-AATAAA-3' were found at 207 and 275 nucleotides downstream from the TAG stopcodon of the tmr gene. A comparison was made of nucleotide stretches, involved in transcription control of T-DNA genes. Images PMID:6312414

  4. Orf virus encodes a homolog of the vaccinia virus interferon-resistance gene E3L.

    PubMed

    McInnes, C J; Wood, A R; Mercer, A A

    1998-01-01

    A homolog of the vaccinia virus (VAC) interferon resistance gene E3L has been discovered in orf virus strain NZ-2, a parapoxvirus that infects sheep, goats and humans. The gene is located 20 kb from the left terminus of the orf virus genome and is transcribed towards this terminus. RNase protection studies have been used to define the limits of the gene and Northern analysis revealed that it is expressed early in infection. The predicted amino acid sequence of the orf virus protein shares 31% identity (57% similarity) with the VAC E3L protein. Four of the six residues identified as being essential to dsRNA binding in the vaccinia virus protein are conserved in the orf virus protein whilst the other two amino acid changes are conservative substitutions. The orf virus gene has been sequenced in two other orf virus strains which vary markedly in their ability to produce experimental lesions in vivo. Their predicted protein sequences vary by less than 3% from the NZ-2 protein. The recombinant orf virus protein, expressed as a fusion protein in E. coli, bound double-stranded (ds)RNA but not dsDNA, single-stranded (ss)DNA or ssRNA . This is the first demonstration of a VAC E3L-like gene encoded by a parapoxvirus.

  5. Bacterial Biosynthetic Gene Clusters Encoding the Anti-cancer Haterumalide Class of Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Matilla, Miguel A.; Stöckmann, Henning; Leeper, Finian J.; Salmond, George P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Haterumalides are halogenated macrolides with strong antitumor properties, making them attractive targets for chemical synthesis. Unfortunately, current synthetic routes to these molecules are inefficient. The potent haterumalide, oocydin A, was previously identified from two plant-associated bacteria through its high bioactivity against plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. In this study, we describe oocydin A (ooc) biosynthetic gene clusters identified by genome sequencing, comparative genomics, and chemical analysis in four plant-associated enterobacteria of the Serratia and Dickeya genera. Disruption of the ooc gene cluster abolished oocydin A production and bioactivity against fungi and oomycetes. The ooc gene clusters span between 77 and 80 kb and encode five multimodular polyketide synthase (PKS) proteins, a hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase cassette and three flavin-dependent tailoring enzymes. The presence of two free-standing acyltransferase proteins classifies the oocydin A gene cluster within the growing family of trans-AT PKSs. The amino acid sequences and organization of the PKS domains are consistent with the chemical predictions and functional peculiarities associated with trans-acyltransferase PKS. Based on extensive in silico analysis of the gene cluster, we propose a biosynthetic model for the production of oocydin A and, by extension, for other members of the haterumalide family of halogenated macrolides exhibiting anti-cancer, anti-fungal, and other interesting biological properties. PMID:23012376

  6. Mutations in the ANKRD1 gene encoding CARP are responsible for human dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Duboscq-Bidot, Laëtitia; Charron, Philippe; Ruppert, Volker; Fauchier, Laurent; Richter, Anette; Tavazzi, Luigi; Arbustini, Eloisa; Wichter, Thomas; Maisch, Bernard; Komajda, Michel; Isnard, Richard; Villard, Eric

    2009-09-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is familial in approximately 30% of cases, and mutations have been identified in several genes. However, in a majority of familial cases, the responsible genes are still to be discovered. The ANKRD1 gene is over-expressed in heart failure in human and animal models. The encoded protein CARP interacts with partners such as myopalladin or titin, previously shown to be involved in DCM. We hypothesized that mutations in ANKRD1 could be responsible for DCM. We sequenced the coding region of ANKRD1 from 231 independent DCM cases. We identified five missense mutations (three sporadic and two familial) absent from 400 controls and affecting highly conserved residues. Expression of the mutant CARP proteins after transfection in rat neonate cardiomyocytes indicated that most of them led to both significantly less repressor activity measured in a reporter gene assay and greater phenylephrin-induced hypertrophy, suggesting altered function of CARP mutant proteins. On the basis of genetic and functional analysis of CARP mutations, we have identified ANKRD1 as a new gene associated with DCM, accounting for approximately 2% of cases.

  7. The Maltase Involved in Starch Metabolism in Barley Endosperm Is Encoded by a Single Gene

    PubMed Central

    Andriotis, Vasilios M. E.; Saalbach, Gerhard; Waugh, Robbie; Field, Robert A.; Smith, Alison M.

    2016-01-01

    During germination and early seedling growth of barley (Hordeum vulgare), maltase is responsible for the conversion of maltose produced by starch degradation in the endosperm to glucose for seedling growth. Despite the potential relevance of this enzyme for malting and the production of alcoholic beverages, neither the nature nor the role of maltase is fully understood. Although only one gene encoding maltase has been identified with certainty, there is evidence for the existence of other genes and for multiple forms of the enzyme. It has been proposed that maltase may be involved directly in starch granule degradation as well as in maltose hydrolysis. The aim of our work was to discover the nature of maltase in barley endosperm. We used ion exchange chromatography to fractionate maltase activity from endosperm of young seedlings, and we partially purified activity for protein identification. We compared maltase activity in wild-type barley and transgenic lines with reduced expression of the previously-characterised maltase gene Agl97, and we used genomic and transcriptomic information to search for further maltase genes. We show that all of the maltase activity in the barley endosperm can be accounted for by a single gene, Agl97. Multiple forms of the enzyme most likely arise from proteolysis and other post-translational modifications. PMID:27011041

  8. The embryonic expression patterns of zebrafish genes encoding LysM-domains.

    PubMed

    Laroche, F J F; Tulotta, C; Lamers, G E M; Meijer, A H; Yang, P; Verbeek, F J; Blaise, M; Stougaard, J; Spaink, H P

    2013-10-01

    The function and structure of LysM-domain containing proteins are very diverse. Although some LysM domains are able to bind peptidoglycan or chitin type carbohydrates in bacteria, in fungi and in plants, the function(s) of vertebrate LysM domains and proteins remains largely unknown. In this study we have identified and annotated the six zebrafish genes of this family, which encode at least ten conceptual LysM-domain containing proteins. Two distinct sub-families called LysMD and OXR were identified and shown to be highly conserved across vertebrates. The detailed characterization of LysMD and OXR gene expression in zebrafish embryos showed that all the members of these sub-families are strongly expressed maternally and zygotically from the earliest stages of a vertebrate embryonic development. Moreover, the analysis of the spatio-temporal expression patterns, by whole mount and fluorescent in situ hybridizations, demonstrates pronounced LysMD and OXR gene expression in the zebrafish brain and nervous system during stages of larval development. None of the zebrafish LysMD or OXR genes was responsive to challenge with bacterial pathogens in embryo models of Salmonella and Mycobacterium infections. In addition, the expression patterns of the OXR genes were mapped in a zebrafish brain atlas. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Genome mining demonstrates the widespread occurrence of gene clusters encoding bacteriocins in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Fewer, David P; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2011-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are a rich source of natural products with interesting biological activities. Many of these are peptides and the end products of a non-ribosomal pathway. However, several cyanobacterial peptide classes were recently shown to be produced through the proteolytic cleavage and post-translational modification of short precursor peptides. A new class of bacteriocins produced through the proteolytic cleavage and heterocyclization of precursor proteins was recently identified from marine cyanobacteria. Here we show the widespread occurrence of bacteriocin gene clusters in cyanobacteria through comparative analysis of 58 cyanobacterial genomes. A total of 145 bacteriocin gene clusters were discovered through genome mining. These clusters encoded 290 putative bacteriocin precursors. They ranged in length from 28 to 164 amino acids with very little sequence conservation of the core peptide. The gene clusters could be classified into seven groups according to their gene organization and domain composition. This classification is supported by phylogenetic analysis, which further indicated independent evolutionary trajectories of gene clusters in different groups. Our data suggests that cyanobacteria are a prolific source of low-molecular weight post-translationally modified peptides.

  10. Expression of genes encoding multi-transmembrane proteins in specific primate taste cell populations.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Bryan D; Hevezi, Peter; Gao, Na; Lu, Min; Kalabat, Dalia; Soto, Hortensia; Echeverri, Fernando; Laita, Bianca; Yeh, Shaoyang Anthony; Zoller, Mark; Zlotnik, Albert

    2009-12-04

    Using fungiform (FG) and circumvallate (CV) taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive), sour cells (PKD2L1-positive), as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44), a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1), a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1), a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7), a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B), a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins expressed in primate taste buds provides new insights into the processes of taste cell

  11. Expression of Genes Encoding Multi-Transmembrane Proteins in Specific Primate Taste Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Na; Lu, Min; Kalabat, Dalia; Soto, Hortensia; Echeverri, Fernando; Laita, Bianca; Yeh, Shaoyang Anthony; Zoller, Mark; Zlotnik, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Background Using fungiform (FG) and circumvallate (CV) taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. Methodology/Principal Findings Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive), sour cells (PKD2L1-positive), as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44), a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1), a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1), a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7), a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B), a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. Conclusions/Significance Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins expressed in primate

  12. MHC class I-like genes in cattle, MHCLA, with similarity to genes encoding NK cell stimulatory ligands.

    PubMed

    Larson, Joshua H; Rebeiz, Mark J; Stiening, Chad M; Windish, Ryan L; Beever, Jonathan E; Lewin, Harris A

    2003-04-01

    A comparative genomics approach for mining databases of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was used to identify two members of a novel MHC class I gene family in cattle. These paralogous genes, named MHC class I-like gene family A1 ( MHCLA1) and MHCLA2, were shown by phylogenetic analysis to be related to human and mouse genes encoding NK cell stimulatory ligands, ULBP, RAET, H60 and Raet-1. Radiation hybrid mapping placed cattle MHCLA1 on BTA9, which, on the basis of existing comparative mapping data, identified the ULBP, RAET1, H60 and Raet1 genes as homologues of the cattle MHCLA genes. However, the human and mouse orthologues of MHCLA1 and MHCLA2 could not be defined due to extensive sequence divergence from all known members of the ULBP1/ RAET1/H60/Raet1 gene family. The cattle MHCLA1 molecule is predicted to be missing an alpha(3) domain, similar to the human and mouse homologues. Like the human ULBP genes, MHCLA1 was found to be transcribed constitutively in a variety of fetal and adult tissues by RT-PCR. The patterns of hybridization obtained by Southern blotting using MHCLA1 as a probe and DNA from 14 species representing five mammalian orders suggests that the MHCLA genes evolved rapidly in the Cetartiodactyla. Previous findings demonstrating that ULBPs serve as ligands for the NK cell NKG2D stimulatory receptor, and that this interaction can be blocked by a human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein that binds to ULBPs, suggests that the extensive divergence found among the cattle, human and mouse MHCLA homologues is due to selection exerted by viral pathogens.

  13. The Arabidopsis ERECTA gene encodes a putative receptor protein kinase with extracellular leucine-rich repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Torii, K U; Mitsukawa, N; Oosumi, T; Matsuura, Y; Yokoyama, R; Whittier, R F; Komeda, Y

    1996-01-01

    Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta is one of the most popular ecotypes and is used widely for both molecular and genetic studies. It harbors the erecta (er) mutation, which confers a compact inflorescence, blunt fruits, and short petioles. We have identified five er mutant alleles from ecotypes Columbia and Wassilewskija. Phenotypic characterization of the mutant alleles suggests a role for the ER gene in regulating the shape of organs originating from the shoot apical meristem. We cloned the ER gene, and here, we report that it encodes a putative receptor protein kinases. The deduced ER protein contains a cytoplasmic protein kinase catalytic domain, a transmembrane region, and an extracellular domain consisting of leucine-rich repeats, which are thought to interact with other macromolecules. Our results suggest that cell-cell communication mediated by a receptor kinase has an important role in plant morphogenesis. PMID:8624444

  14. Identification and functional analysis of the gene encoding methionine-gamma-lyase in Brevibacterium linens.

    PubMed

    Amarita, Felix; Yvon, Mireille; Nardi, Michele; Chambellon, Emilie; Delettre, Jerôme; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2004-12-01

    The enzymatic degradation of L-methionine and subsequent formation of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) is believed to be essential for flavor development in cheese. L-methionine-gamma-lyase (MGL) can convert L-methionine to methanethiol (MTL), alpha-ketobutyrate, and ammonia. The mgl gene encoding MGL was cloned from the type strain Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9175 known to produce copious amounts of MTL and related VSCs. The disruption of the mgl gene, achieved in strain ATCC 9175, resulted in a 62% decrease in thiol-producing activity and a 97% decrease in total VSC production in the knockout strain. Our work shows that L-methionine degradation via gamma-elimination is a key step in the formation of VSCs in B. linens.

  15. Expression of the gene encoding growth hormone in the human mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Mol, J.A.; Misdorp, W.; Rijnberk, A.

    1995-10-01

    Progestins cause a syndrome of growth hormone (GH) excess and enhanced mammary tumorigenesis in the dog. This has been regarded as being specific for the dog. Recently we reported that progestin-induced GH excess originates from foci of hyperplastic ductular epithelium of the mammary gland in the dog. In the present report we demonstrate by reverse-transcriptase PCR and immunohistochemistry that a main factor involved in tissue growth, i.e. GH, is also expressed in normal and neoplastic human mammary glands. The gene expressed in the human mammary gland proved to be identical to the gene encoding GH in the pituitary gland. The role of progesterone in the GH expression of the human mammary gland needs, however, to be proven. It is hypothesized that this locally produced hGH may play a pathogenetic role in breast cancer. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Cloning and characterization of a delta-6 desaturase encoding gene from Nannochloropsis oculata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Yu, Jianzhong; Zhu, Baohua; Pan, Kehou; Pan, Jin; Yang, Guanpin

    2011-03-01

    A gene ( NANOC-D6D) encoding a desaturase that removes two hydrogen atoms from fatty acids at delta 6 position was isolated from a cDNA library of Nannochloropsis oculata (Droop) D. J. Hibberd (Eustigmatophyceae). The unicellular marine microalga N. oculata synthesizes rich long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), including eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA). The deduced protein contains 474 amino acids that fold into 4 trans-membrane domains. The neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree indicates that NANOC-D6D is phylogenetically close to the delta-6 fatty acid desaturase of marine microalgae such as Glossomastix chrysoplasta, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. The gene was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae INVScl to verify the substrate specificity of NANOC-D6D. Our results suggest that the recombinant NANOC-D6D simultaneously desaturates linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (ALA).

  17. The KUP gene, located on human chromosome 14, encodes a protein with two distant zinc fingers.

    PubMed

    Chardin, P; Courtois, G; Mattei, M G; Gisselbrecht, S

    1991-04-11

    We have isolated a human cDNA (kup), encoding a new protein with two distantly spaced zinc fingers of the C2H2 type. This gene is highly conserved in mammals and is expressed mainly in hematopoietic cells and testis. Its expression was not higher in the various transformed cells tested than in the normal corresponding tissues. The kup gene is located in region q23-q24 of the long arm of human chromosome 14. The kup protein is 433 a.a. long, has a M.W. close to 50 kD and binds to DNA. Although the structure of the kup protein is unusual, the isolated fingers resemble closely those of the Krüppel family, suggesting that this protein is also a transcription factor. The precise function and DNA motif recognized by the kup protein remain to be determined.

  18. Cloning and characterization of the nucleoredoxin gene that encodes a novel nuclear protein related to thioredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Kurooka, Hisanori; Kato, Keizo; Minoguchi, Shigeru

    1997-02-01

    In a yeast artificial chromosome contig close to the nude locus on mouse chromosome 11, we identified a novel gene, nucleoredoxin, that encodes a protein with similarity to the active site of thioredoxins. Nucleoredoxin is conserved between mammalian species, and two homologous genes were found in Caenorhabditis elegans. The nucleoredoxin transcripts are expressed in all adult tissues examined, but restricted to the nervous system and the limb buds in Day 10.5-11.5 embryos. The nucleoredoxin protein is predominantly localized in the nucleus of cells transfected with the nucleoredoxin expression construct. Since the bacterially expressed protein of nucleoredoxin showed oxidoreductase activity of the insulin disulfide bonds with kinetics similar to that of thioredoxin, it may be a redox regulator of the nuclear proteins, such as transcription factors. 40 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Parkinson's disease in relation to pesticide exposure and nuclear encoded mitochondrial complex I gene variants.

    PubMed

    Corder, Elizabeth H; Mellick, George D

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common age-related neurodegenerative disorder thought to result from the integrated effects of genetic background and exposure to neuronal toxins. Certain individual nuclear-encoded mitochondrial complex I gene polymorphisms were found to be associated with approximately 2-fold risk variation in an Australian case-control sample. We further characterized this sample of 306 cases and 321 controls to determine the mutual information contained in the 22 SNPs and, additionally, level of pesticide exposure: five distinct risk sets were identified using grade-of-membership analysis. Of these, one was robust to pesticide exposure (I), three were vulnerable (II, III, IV), and another (V) denoted low risk for unexposed persons. Risk for individual subjects varied > 16-fold according to level of membership in the vulnerable groups. We conclude that inherited variation in mitochondrial complex I genes and pesticide exposure together modulate risk for PD.

  20. The KUP gene, located on human chromosome 14, encodes a protein with two distant zinc fingers.

    PubMed Central

    Chardin, P; Courtois, G; Mattei, M G; Gisselbrecht, S

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated a human cDNA (kup), encoding a new protein with two distantly spaced zinc fingers of the C2H2 type. This gene is highly conserved in mammals and is expressed mainly in hematopoietic cells and testis. Its expression was not higher in the various transformed cells tested than in the normal corresponding tissues. The kup gene is located in region q23-q24 of the long arm of human chromosome 14. The kup protein is 433 a.a. long, has a M.W. close to 50 kD and binds to DNA. Although the structure of the kup protein is unusual, the isolated fingers resemble closely those of the Krüppel family, suggesting that this protein is also a transcription factor. The precise function and DNA motif recognized by the kup protein remain to be determined. Images PMID:2027750

  1. Cloning, overexpression and nucleotide sequence of a thermostable DNA ligase-encoding gene.

    PubMed

    Barany, F; Gelfand, D H

    1991-12-20

    Thermostable DNA ligase has been harnessed for the detection of single-base genetic diseases using the ligase chain reaction [Barany, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88 (1991) 189-193]. The Thermus thermophilus (Tth) DNA ligase-encoding gene (ligT) was cloned in Escherichia coli by genetic complementation of a ligts 7 defect in an E. coli host. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the gene revealed a single chain of 676 amino acid residues with 47% identity to the E. coli ligase. Under phoA promoter control, Tth ligase was overproduced to greater than 10% of E. coli cellular proteins. Adenylated and deadenylated forms of the purified enzyme were distinguished by apparent molecular weights of 81 kDa and 78 kDa, respectively, after separation via sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis.

  2. NGF induction of the gene encoding the protease transin accompanies neuronal differentiation in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Machida, C M; Rodland, K D; Matrisian, L; Magun, B E; Ciment, G

    1989-06-01

    Various proteases have been found to be released by the growth cones of developing neurons in culture and have been hypothesized to play a role in the process of axon elongation. We report here that nerve growth factor (NGF) induced the gene encoding the metalloprotease transin in PC12 cells with a time course coincident with the initial appearance of neurites by these cells. Acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors also stimulated transin mRNA expression and neurite outgrowth, whereas various other agents had no effects on either of these phenomena. In contrast, dexamethasone was found to inhibit the induction of transin mRNA when added with, or following, NGF treatment. Finally, we show that sequences contained within 750 bp of the 5' untranscribed region of the transin gene confer responsiveness to NGF and dexamethasone.

  3. Conserved serine/threonine kinase encoded by CBK1 regulates expression of several hypha-associated transcripts and genes encoding cell wall proteins in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    McNemar, Mark D; Fonzi, William A

    2002-04-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, is reported to have several potential virulence factors. A potentially significant factor is the ability to undergo morphological transition from yeast to hypha. This alteration of form is accompanied by many changes within the cell, including alterations in gene expression and cell wall composition. We have isolated a gene that encodes a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase that appears to be involved in the regulation of proteins associated with the cell wall. We have assigned the designation CBK1 (cell wall biosynthesis kinase 1) to this gene. Mutants lacking CBK1 form large aggregates of round cells under all growth conditions and lack the ability to undergo morphological differentiation. Additionally, these mutants show an altered pattern of expression of several transcripts encoding proteins associated with the cell wall. The results suggest that the kinase encoded by CBK1 plays a general role in the maintenance and alteration of the cell wall of C. albicans in all morphologies.

  4. Multidrug resistance in fungi: regulation of transporter-encoding gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sanjoy; Moye-Rowley, W. Scott

    2014-01-01

    A critical risk to the continued success of antifungal chemotherapy is the acquisition of resistance; a risk exacerbated by the few classes of effective antifungal drugs. Predictably, as the use of these drugs increases in the clinic, more resistant organisms can be isolated from patients. A particularly problematic form of drug resistance that routinely emerges in the major fungal pathogens is known as multidrug resistance. Multidrug resistance refers to the simultaneous acquisition of tolerance to a range of drugs via a limited or even single genetic change. This review will focus on recent progress in understanding pathways of multidrug resistance in fungi including those of most medical relevance. Analyses of multidrug resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided the most detailed outline of multidrug resistance in a eukaryotic microorganism. Multidrug resistant isolates of S. cerevisiae typically result from changes in the activity of a pair of related transcription factors that in turn elicit overproduction of several target genes. Chief among these is the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-encoding gene PDR5. Interestingly, in the medically important Candida species, very similar pathways are involved in acquisition of multidrug resistance. In both C. albicans and C. glabrata, changes in the activity of transcriptional activator proteins elicits overproduction of a protein closely related to S. cerevisiae Pdr5 called Cdr1. The major filamentous fungal pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, was previously thought to acquire resistance to azole compounds (the principal antifungal drug class) via alterations in the azole drug target-encoding gene cyp51A. More recent data indicate that pathways in addition to changes in the cyp51A gene are important determinants in A. fumigatus azole resistance. We will discuss findings that suggest azole resistance in A. fumigatus and Candida species may share more mechanistic similarities than previously thought. PMID:24795641

  5. TAFII40 Protein Is Encoded by the e(y)1 Gene: Biological Consequences of Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Soldatov, Aleksei; Nabirochkina, Elena; Georgieva, Sofia; Belenkaja, Tatiana; Georgiev, Pavel

    1999-01-01

    The enhancer of yellow 1 gene, e(y)1, of Drosophila melanogaster has been cloned and demonstrated to encode the TAFII40 protein. The e(y)1 gene is expressed in females much more strongly than in males due to the accumulation of e(y)1 mRNA in the ovaries. Two different e(y)1 mutations have been obtained. The e(y)1ul mutation, induced by the insertion of Stalker into the coding region, leads to the replacement of 25 carboxy-terminal amino acids by 17 amino acids encoded by the Stalker sequences and to a decrease of the e(y)1 transcription level. The latter is the main cause of dramatic underdevelopment of the ovaries and sterility of females bearing the e(y)1 mutation. This follows from the restoration of female fertility upon transformation of e(y)1u1 flies with a construction synthesizing the mutant protein. The e(y)1P1 mutation induced by P element insertion into the transcribed nontranslated region of the gene has almost no influence on the phenotype of flies. However, in combination with the phP1 mutation, which leads to a strong P element-mediated suppression of e(y)1 transcription, this mutation is lethal. Genetic studies of the e(y)1u1 mutation revealed a sensitivity of the yellow and white expression to the TAFII40/e(y)1 level. The su(Hw)-binding region, Drosophila insulator, stabilizes the expression of the white gene and makes it independent of the e(y)1u1 mutation. PMID:10207100

  6. Expression of a gene encoding mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase in rice increases under submerged conditions.

    PubMed

    Nakazono, M; Tsuji, H; Li, Y; Saisho, D; Arimura, S; Tsutsumi, N; Hirai, A

    2000-10-01

    It is known that alcoholic fermentation is important for survival of plants under anaerobic conditions. Acetaldehyde, one of the intermediates of alcoholic fermentation, is not only reduced by alcohol dehydrogenase but also can be oxidized by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). To determine whether ALDH plays a role in anaerobic metabolism in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Nipponbare), we characterized a cDNA clone encoding mitochondrial ALDH from rice (Aldh2a). Analysis of sub-cellular localization of ALDH2a protein using green fluorescent protein and an in vitro ALDH assay using protein extracts from Escherichia coli cells that overexpressed ALDH2a indicated that ALDH2a functions in the oxidation of acetaldehyde in mitochondria. A Southern-blot analysis indicated that mitochondrial ALDH is encoded by at least two genes in rice. We found that the Aldh2a mRNA was present at high levels in leaves of dark-grown seedlings, mature leaf sheaths, and panicles. It is interesting that expression of the rice Aldh2a gene, unlike the expression of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Aldh2a gene, was induced in rice seedlings by submergence. Experiments with ruthenium red, which is a blocker of Ca(2+) fluxes in rice as well as maize (Zea mays), suggest that the induction of expression of Adh1 and Pdc1 by low oxygen stress is regulated by elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) level. However, the induction of Aldh2a gene expression may not be controlled by the cytosolic Ca(2+) level elevation. A possible involvement of ALDH2a in the submergence tolerance of rice is discussed.

  7. Dissecting signal and noise in diatom chloroplast protein encoding genes with phylogenetic information profiling.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Edward C; Ashworth, Matt P; Nakov, Teofil; Ruck, Elizabeth; Jansen, Robert K

    2015-08-01

    Previous analyses of single diatom chloroplast protein-encoded genes recovered results highly incongruent with both traditional phylogenies and phylogenies derived from the nuclear encoded small subunit (SSU) gene. Our analysis here of six individual chloroplast genes (atpB, psaA, psaB, psbA, psbC and rbcL) obtained similar anomalous results. However, phylogenetic noise in these genes did not appear to be correlated, and their concatenation appeared to effectively sum their collective signal. We empirically demonstrated the value of combining phylogenetic information profiling, partitioned Bremer support and entropy analysis in examining the utility of various partitions in phylogenetic analysis. Noise was low in the 1st and 2nd codon positions, but so was signal. Conversely, high noise levels in the 3rd codon position was accompanied by high signal. Perhaps counterintuitively, simple exclusion experiments demonstrated this was especially true at deeper nodes where the 3rd codon position contributed most to a result congruent with morphology and SSU (and the total evidence tree here). Correlated with our empirical findings, probability of correct signal (derived from information profiling) increased and the statistical significance of substitutional saturation decreased as data were aggregated. In this regard, the aggregated 3rd codon position performed as well or better than more slowly evolving sites. Simply put, direct methods of noise removal (elimination of fast-evolving sites) disproportionately removed signal. Information profiling and partitioned Bremer support suggest that addition of chloroplast data will rapidly improve our understanding of the diatom phylogeny, but conversely also illustrate that some parts of the diatom tree are likely to remain recalcitrant to addition of molecular data. The methods based on information profiling have been criticized for their numerous assumptions and parameter estimates and the fact that they are based on quartets of

  8. A Turquoise Mutant Genetically Separates Expression of Genes Encoding Phycoerythrin and Its Associated Linker Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Seib, Laura Ort; Kehoe, David M.

    2002-01-01

    During complementary chromatic adaptation (CCA), cyanobacterial light harvesting structures called phycobilisomes are restructured in response to ambient light quality shifts. Transcription of genes encoding components of the phycobilisome is differentially regulated during this process: red light activates cpcB2A2, whereas green light coordinately activates the cpeCDE and cpeBA operons. Three signal transduction components that regulate CCA have been isolated to date: a sensor-photoreceptor (RcaE) and two response regulators (RcaF and RcaC). Mutations in the genes encoding these components affect the accumulation of both cpcB2A2 and cpeBA gene products. We have isolated and characterized a new pigmentation mutant called Turquoise 1. We demonstrate that this mutant phenotype is due to a dramatic decrease in cpeBA transcript abundance and results from a lesion in the cpeR gene. However, in this mutant cpeCDE RNA levels remain near those found in wild-type cells. Our results show that the coordinate regulation of cpeBA and cpeCDE by green light can be uncoupled by the loss of CpeR, and we furnish the first genetic evidence that different regulatory mechanisms control these two operons. Sequence analysis of CpeR reveals that it shares limited sequence similarity to members of the PP2C class of protein serine/threonine phosphatases. We also demonstrate that cpeBA and cpeCDE retain light quality responsiveness in a mutant lacking the RcaE photoreceptor. This provides compelling evidence for the partial control of CCA through an as-yet-uncharacterized second light quality sensing system. PMID:11807056

  9. The maize Dwarf3 gene encodes a cytochrome P450-mediated early step in Gibberellin biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, R G; Helentjaris, T

    1995-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones required for normal growth and development in higher plants. The Dwarf3 (D3) gene of maize encodes an early step in the GA biosynthesis pathway. We transposon-tagged the D3 gene using Robertson's Mutator (Mu) and showed that the mutant allele d3.2::Mu8 is linked to a Mu8 element. The DNA flanking the Mu8 element was cloned and shown to be linked to the d3 locus by mapping in a high-resolution population developed by selecting for recombination between d3 and linked genetic markers. To establish unambiguously the identity of the cloned gene as D3, a second mutant allele of D3 (d3.4) was also cloned and characterized using the d3.2::Mu8 sequences as a probe. d3.4 was found to have a novel insertion element, named Sleepy, inserted into an exon. A third mutant allele, d3.1, which has the same size 3' restriction fragments as d3.4 but different 5' restriction fragments, was found to contain a Sleepy insertion at the same position as d3.4. On the basis of the pedigree, Sleepy insertion, and restriction map, d3.1 appears to represent a recombinational derivative of d3.4. The D3 gene encodes a predicted protein with significant sequence similarity to cytochrome P450 enzymes. Analysis of D3 mRNA showed that the D3 transcript is expressed in roots, developing leaves, the vegetative meristem, and suspension culture cells. We detected reduced D3 mRNA levels in the mutant allele d3.5. PMID:7549486

  10. Differential expression of three Chlamydia trachomatis hsp60-encoding genes in active vs. persistent infections.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Hervé C; Whittum-Hudson, Judith A; Schumacher, H Ralph; Hudson, Alan P

    2004-01-01

    Real time RT-PCR was used to assess expression of the three Chlamydia trachomatis hsp60-encoding genes (Ct110, Ct604, Ct755) over time in in vitro systems of active vs. persistent infection, and in synovial samples from patients with Chlamydia-induced arthritis. In HEp-2 cells actively infected with C. trachomatis (serovar K), mRNA from Ct110 (groEL) was apparent by 8 h post-infection (p.i.) and increased more than 10-fold through 48 h p.i.; mRNA from Ct604 followed a similar pattern. Transcripts from Ct755 were abundant at 8 h p.i. and remained 2-3-fold higher than those from Ct110 at all times. In persistently infected human monocytes in culture, expression of Ct110 and Ct755 was low from 1 to 7d p.i., while mRNA from Ct604 was abundant at 1d p.i. and increased more than 3-fold from 1 to 3d p.i., as the organism transited to the persistent state. Those mRNA levels remained high through 7d p.i. Real time analyses of RNA/cDNA from synovial tissue of patients with Chlamydia-associated arthritis showed high Ct604 mRNA levels, consistent with results from the in vitro monocyte system of persistence. These data demonstrate that each chlamydial hsp60-encoding gene is expressed independently, and that the three genes are expressed differentially in active vs. persistent infection. The results further suggest that the Ct604 gene product may function importantly during chlamydial persistence.

  11. A turquoise mutant genetically separates expression of genes encoding phycoerythrin and its associated linker peptides.

    PubMed

    Seib, Laura Ort; Kehoe, David M

    2002-02-01

    During complementary chromatic adaptation (CCA), cyanobacterial light harvesting structures called phycobilisomes are restructured in response to ambient light quality shifts. Transcription of genes encoding components of the phycobilisome is differentially regulated during this process: red light activates cpcB2A2, whereas green light coordinately activates the cpeCDE and cpeBA operons. Three signal transduction components that regulate CCA have been isolated to date: a sensor-photoreceptor (RcaE) and two response regulators (RcaF and RcaC). Mutations in the genes encoding these components affect the accumulation of both cpcB2A2 and cpeBA gene products. We have isolated and characterized a new pigmentation mutant called Turquoise 1. We demonstrate that this mutant phenotype is due to a dramatic decrease in cpeBA transcript abundance and results from a lesion in the cpeR gene. However, in this mutant cpeCDE RNA levels remain near those found in wild-type cells. Our results show that the coordinate regulation of cpeBA and cpeCDE by green light can be uncoupled by the loss of CpeR, and we furnish the first genetic evidence that different regulatory mechanisms control these two operons. Sequence analysis of CpeR reveals that it shares limited sequence similarity to members of the PP2C class of protein serine/threonine phosphatases. We also demonstrate that cpeBA and cpeCDE retain light quality responsiveness in a mutant lacking the RcaE photoreceptor. This provides compelling evidence for the partial control of CCA through an as-yet-uncharacterized second light quality sensing system.

  12. Molecular cloning of ADIR, a novel interferon responsive gene encoding a protein related to the torsins.

    PubMed

    Dron, Michel; Meritet, Jean François; Dandoy-Dron, Françoise; Meyniel, Jean-Philippe; Maury, Chantal; Tovey, Michael G

    2002-03-01

    The expression of the previously uncharacterized gene Adir (for ATP dependent interferon responsive gene) was increased by 5- to 15-fold in tissue of the oral cavity or in spleen and liver of mice treated orally or intraperitoneally with IFN-alpha, and in mouse cells treated in vitro with IFN-alpha or IFN-gamma. The level of Adir mRNA was also increased 20- to 40-fold in the brains of animals infected with encephalomyocarditis virus. Adir is expressed ubiquitously in mouse tissues as 1.9-, 2.4-, and 3.5-kb mRNA transcripts encoding a 385-amino-acid protein with a conserved ATP binding domain containing typical nucleotide and Mg(2+) binding sites. We also characterized the human ortholog, ADIR, which is located on chromosome 1q25-q31 and contains six exons encoding a 397-amino-acid protein with 80% homology to the mouse protein. A single 2.3-kb mRNA was detected in all human tissues examined, except for placenta, which also contained a 1.25-kb tissue-specific transcript generated by alternative splicing and encoding a putative 336-amino-acid protein. Although ADIR exhibits low homology to DYT1 and TOR1B, the deduced ADIR protein sequences are highly homologous to torsin A and torsin B and more distantly related to members of the Clp/HSP100 family of proteins, suggesting that ADIR, like torsins, is related to the AAA chaperone-like family of ATPases. An ADIR-EGFP fusion protein expressed in HeLa cells was shown to be associated with the endoplasmic reticulum.

  13. Gene structure and spatiotemporal expression profile of tomato genes encoding YUCCA-like flavin monooxygenases: the ToFZY gene family.

    PubMed

    Expósito-Rodríguez, Marino; Borges, Andrés A; Borges-Pérez, Andrés; Pérez, José A

    2011-07-01

    The flavin monooxygenases (FMO) encoded by plant YUCCA genes are thought to catalyze a rate-limiting step in the tryptamine pathway for indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis. Recent experiments with different plant models have indicate that YUCCA genes play essential roles in growth and development through their contribution to the local pool of free auxin. In this study we have characterized five new genes that encode YUCCA-like FMOs in the tomato genome (ToFZY2 to ToFZY6), including gene structure, conserved motifs and phylogenetic analyses. As a first step towards clarifying the individual functions of ToFZY genes, we have used quantitative real-time RT-PCR to conduct a systematic comparison of the steady-state mRNA levels of 6 ToFZY genes, in 33 samples representing major organs and the entire tomato life cycle. We followed an absolute quantification strategy which allowed us to cross-compare transcript levels among different ToFZY genes in a given spatiotemporal coordinate. Our results indicate that expression of ToFZY genes is temporally and spatially regulated, and that the distinctive expression pattern of each ToFZY gene partially overlaps with other members of the multigenic family. We compare our data with previous results in other plant species and make some predictions about the role of tryptamine pathway in tomato growth and development.

  14. The European Eel NCCβ Gene Encodes a Thiazide-resistant Na-Cl Cotransporter.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Erika; Plata, Consuelo; Rodríguez-Gama, Alejandro; Argaiz, Eduardo R; Vázquez, Norma; Leyva-Ríos, Karla; Islas, León; Cutler, Christopher; Pacheco-Alvarez, Diana; Mercado, Adriana; Cariño-Cortés, Raquel; Castañeda-Bueno, María; Gamba, Gerardo

    2016-10-21

    The thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) is the major pathway for salt reabsorption in the mammalian distal convoluted tubule. NCC plays a key role in the regulation of blood pressure. Its inhibition with thiazides constitutes the primary baseline therapy for arterial hypertension. However, the thiazide-binding site in NCC is unknown. Mammals have only one gene encoding for NCC. The eel, however, contains a duplicate gene. NCCα is an ortholog of mammalian NCC and is expressed in the kidney. NCCβ is present in the apical membrane of the rectum. Here we cloned and functionally characterized NCCβ from the European eel. The cRNA encodes a 1043-amino acid membrane protein that, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes, functions as an Na-Cl cotransporter with two major characteristics, making it different from other known NCCs. First, eel NCCβ is resistant to thiazides. Single-point mutagenesis supports that the absence of thiazide inhibition is, at least in part, due to the substitution of a conserved serine for a cysteine at position 379. Second, NCCβ is not activated by low-chloride hypotonic stress, although the unique Ste20-related proline alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) binding site in the amino-terminal domain is conserved. Thus, NCCβ exhibits significant functional differences from NCCs that could be helpful in defining several aspects of the structure-function relationship of this important cotransporter. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. A satellite phage-encoded antirepressor induces repressor aggregation and cholera toxin gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brigid M; Kimsey, Harvey H; Kane, Anne V; Waldor, Matthew K

    2002-08-15

    CTXphi is a filamentous bacteriophage whose genome encodes cholera toxin, the principal virulence factor of Vibrio cholerae. We have found that the CTXphi-related element RS1 is a satellite phage whose transmission depends upon proteins produced from a CTX prophage (its helper phage). However, unlike other satellite phages and satellite animal viruses, RS1 can aid the CTX prophage as well as exploit it, due to the RS1-encoded protein RstC. RstC, whose function previously was unknown, is an antirepressor that counteracts the activity of the phage repressor RstR. RstC promotes transcription of genes required for phage production and thereby promotes transmission of both RS1 and CTXphi. Antirepression by RstC also induces expression of the cholera toxin genes, ctxAB, and thus may contribute to the virulence of V.cholerae. In vitro, RstC binds directly to RstR, producing unusual, insoluble aggregates containing both proteins. In vivo, RstC and RstR are both found at the cell pole, where they again appear to form stable complexes. The sequestration/inactivation process induced by RstC resembles those induced by mutant polyglutamine-containing proteins implicated in human neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Characterization of a gene which encodes a mannosyltransferase homolog of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Alessandra A; Gómez, Francisco J; Pereira, Maristela; Felipe, M Sueli S; Jesuino, Rosália S A; Deepe, George S; de Almeida Soares, Célia M

    2002-08-01

    We screened an expression library of the yeast form of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis with a pool of human sera that was pre-adsorbed with mycelium, from patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). A sequence (PbYmnt) was obtained and characterized. A genomic clone was obtained by PCR of P. brasiliensis total DNA. The sequence contained a single open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein of 357 amino acid residues, with a molecular mass of 39.78 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited identity to mannosyl- and glycosyltransferases from several sources. A DXD motif was present in the translated gene and this sequence is characteristic of the glycosyltransferases. Hydropathy analysis revealed a single transmembrane region near the amino terminus of the molecule that suggested a type II membrane protein. The PbYmnt was expressed preferentially in the yeast parasitic phase. The accession number of the nucleotide sequence of PbYmnt and its flanking regions is AF374353. A recombinant protein was generated in Escherichia coli. Our data suggest that PbYmnt encodes one member of a glycosyltransferase family of proteins and that our strategy was useful in the isolation of differentially expressed genes.

  17. Cell type-specific transcriptional regulation of the gene encoding importin-{alpha}1

    SciTech Connect

    Kamikawa, Yasunao; Yasuhara, Noriko; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2011-08-15

    Importin-{alpha}1 belongs to a receptor family that recognizes classical nuclear localization signals. Encoded by Kpna2, this receptor subtype is highly expressed in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. In this study, we identified a critical promoter region in Kpna2 and showed that the expression of this gene is differentially regulated in ES cells and NIH3T3 cells. Conserved CCAAT boxes are required for Kpna2 promoter activity in both ES and NIH3T3 cells. Interestingly, deletion of the region from nucleotide position - 251 to - 179 bp resulted in a drastic reduction in Kpna2 transcriptional activity only in ES cells. This region contains Krueppel-like factor (Klf) binding sequences and is responsible for transactivation of the gene by Klf2 and Klf4. Accordingly, endogenous Kpna2 mRNA levels decreased in response to depletion of Klf2 and Klf4 in ES cells. Our results suggest that Klf2 and Klf4 function redundantly to drive high level of Kpna2 expression in ES cells. -- Research Highlights: {yields} We showed the cell type-specific transcriptional regulation of Kpna2 encoding importin-al. {yields} NF-Y binds the CCAAT boxes to activate Kpna2 transcription in NIH3T3 cells. {yields} Klf2 and Klf4 redundantly activate the expression of Kpna2 in ES cells.

  18. Plasmid-encoded genes influence exosporium assembly and morphology in Bacillus megaterium QM B1551 spores.

    PubMed

    Manetsberger, Julia; Hall, Elizabeth A H; Christie, Graham

    2015-09-01

    Spores of Bacillus megaterium QM B1551 are encased in a morphologically distinctive exosporium. We demonstrate here that genes encoded on the indigenous pBM500 and pBM600 plasmids are required for exosporium assembly and or stability in spores of this strain. Bioinformatic analyses identified genes encoding orthologues of the B. cereus-family exosporium nap and basal layer proteins within the B. megaterium genome. Transcriptional analyses, supported by electron and fluorescent microscopy, indicate that the pole-localized nap, identified here for the first time in B. megaterium QM B1551 spores, is comprised of the BclA1 protein. The role of the BxpB protein, which forms the basal layer of the exosporium in B. cereus spores, is less clear since spores of a null mutant strain display an apparently normal morphology. Retention of the localized nap in bxpB null spores suggests that B. megaterium employs an alternative mechanism to that used by B. cereus spores in anchoring the nap to the spore surface.

  19. A Gene Encoding Antigenic Peptides of Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shichijo, Shigeki; Nakao, Masanobu; Imai, Yasuhisa; Takasu, Hideo; Kawamoto, Mayumi; Niiya, Fumihiko; Yang, Damu; Toh, Yuji; Yamana, Hideaki; Itoh, Kyogo

    1998-01-01

    Except for melanomas, tumor antigens recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are yet unidentified. We have identified a gene encoding antigenic peptides of human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) recognized by human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA)- A2601–restricted CTLs. This gene showed no similarity to known sequences, and encoded two (125- and 43-kilodalton [kD]) proteins. The 125-kD protein with the leucine zipper motif was expressed in the nucleus of the majority of proliferating cells tested, including normal and malignant cells. The 43-kD protein was expressed in the cytosol of most SCCs from various organs and half of lung adenocarcinomas, but was not expressed in other cancers nor in a panel of normal tissues. The three nonapeptides shared by the two proteins were recognized by the KE4 CTLs, and one of the peptides induced in vitro from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) the CTLs restricted to the autologous tumor cells. The 43-kD protein and this nonapeptide (KGSGKMKTE) may be useful for the specific immunotherapy of HLA-A2601+ epithelial cancer patients. PMID:9449708

  20. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of Pseudomonas strain LB400 genes encoding polychlorinated biphenyl degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Mondello, F J

    1989-01-01

    Pseudomonas strain LB400 is able to degrade an unusually wide variety of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). A genomic library of LB400 was constructed by using the broad-host-range cosmid pMMB34 and introduced into Escherichia coli. Approximately 1,600 recombinant clones were tested, and 5 that expressed 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenase activity were found. This enzyme is encoded by the bphC gene of the 2,3-dioxygenase pathway for PCB-biphenyl metabolism. Two recombinant plasmids encoding the ability to transform PCBs to chlorobenzoic acids were identified, and one of these, pGEM410, was chosen for further study. The PCB-degrading genes (bphA, -B, -C, and -D) were localized by subcloning experiments to a 12.4-kilobase region of pGEM410. The ability of recombinant strains to degrade PCBs was compared with that of the wild type. In resting-cell assays, PCB degradation by E. coli strain FM4560 (containing a pGEM410 derivative) approached that of LB400 and was significantly greater than degradation by the original recombinant strain. High levels of PCB metabolism by FM4560 did not depend on the growth of the organism on biphenyl, as it did for PCB metabolism by LB400. When cells were grown with succinate as the carbon source, PCB degradation by FM4560 was markedly superior to that by LB400. Images PMID:2493454

  1. A cotton gene encoding a polygalacturonase inhibitor-like protein is specifically expressed in petals.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haiyan; Zhu, Li; Zhou, Ying; Li, Gang; Chen, Liang; Li, Xuebao

    2009-04-01

    A cDNA encoding a polygalacturonase-inhibitor-like protein (PGIP) was isolated from cotton flower cDNA library. The cDNA, designated GhPS1 (GenBank accession No. ABO47744), encodes a protein with 370 amino acids that shares high similarity with the known plant PGIPs. Fluorescent microscopy indicated that GhPS1 protein localizes on the cell membranes as well as in cytoplasm. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR and Northern blot analyses showed that GhPS1 was specifically expressed in cotton petals. Furthermore, the GhPS1 expression was gradually up-regulated in petal development, and its transcripts were accumulated to the highest level in the petals at anthesis. However, its expression level was declined rapidly in senesced petals after flowering. At low temperature, the GhPS1 gene expression was gradually decreased to very low level in petals. Collectively, our results suggest that GhPS1 gene might be involved in cotton petal development and senescence, and in response to cold stress.

  2. The Dh gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a diuretic peptide that acts through cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Cabrero, Pablo; Radford, Jonathan C; Broderick, Kate E; Costes, Laurence; Veenstra, Jan A; Spana, Eric P; Davies, Shireen A; Dow, Julian A T

    2002-12-01

    Dh, the gene that encodes a CRF-like peptide in Drosophila melanogaster, is described. The product of this gene is a 44-amino-acid peptide (Drome-DH(44)) with a sequence almost identical to the Musca domestica and Stomoxys calcitrans diuretic hormones. There are no other similar peptides encoded within the known Drosophila genomic sequence. Functional studies showed that the deduced peptide stimulated fluid production, and that this effect was mediated by cyclic AMP in principal cells only: there was no effect on the levels of either cyclic GMP or intracellular calcium. Stimulation also elevated levels of cyclic AMP (but not cyclic GMP) phosphodiesterase, a new mode of action for this class of hormone. The transcript was localised by in situ hybridisation, and the peptide by immunocytochemistry, to two groups of three neurones in the pars intercerebralis within the brain. These cells also express receptors for leucokinin, another major diuretic peptide, implying that the cells may be important in homeostatic regulation.

  3. A satellite phage-encoded antirepressor induces repressor aggregation and cholera toxin gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brigid M.; Kimsey, Harvey H.; Kane, Anne V.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2002-01-01

    CTXφ is a filamentous bacteriophage whose genome encodes cholera toxin, the principal virulence factor of Vibrio cholerae. We have found that the CTXφ-related element RS1 is a satellite phage whose transmission depends upon proteins produced from a CTX prophage (its helper phage). However, unlike other satellite phages and satellite animal viruses, RS1 can aid the CTX prophage as well as exploit it, due to the RS1-encoded protein RstC. RstC, whose function previously was unknown, is an antirepressor that counteracts the activity of the phage repressor RstR. RstC promotes transcription of genes required for phage production and thereby promotes transmission of both RS1 and CTXφ. Antirepression by RstC also induces expression of the cholera toxin genes, ctxAB, and thus may contribute to the virulence of V.cholerae. In vitro, RstC binds directly to RstR, producing unusual, insoluble aggregates containing both proteins. In vivo, RstC and RstR are both found at the cell pole, where they again appear to form stable complexes. The sequestration/inactivation process induced by RstC resembles those induced by mutant polyglutamine-containing proteins implicated in human neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:12169626

  4. Cloning, sequencing and expression of the gene encoding the extracellular metalloprotease of Aeromonas caviae.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, K; Toma, C; Honma, Y

    2000-01-01

    A gene (apk) encoding the extracellular protease of Aeromonas caviae Ae6 has been cloned and sequenced. For cloning the gene, the DNA genomic library was screened using skim milk LB agar. One clone harboring plasmid pKK3 was selected for sequencing. Nucleotide sequencing of the 3.5 kb region of pKK3 revealed a single open reading frame (ORF) of 1,785 bp encoding 595 amino acids. The deduced polypeptide contained a putative 16-amino acid signal peptide followed by a large propeptide. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of purified recombinant protein (APK) was consistent with the DNA sequence. This result suggested a mature protein of 412 amino acids with a molecular mass of 44 kDa. However, the molecular mass of purified recombinant APK revealed 34 kDa by SDS-PAGE, suggesting that further processing at the C-terminal region took place. The 2 motifs of zinc binding sites deduced are highly conserved in the APK as well as in other zinc metalloproteases including Vibrio proteolyticus neutral protease, Emp V from Vibrio vulnificus, HA/P from Vibrio cholerae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase. Proteolytic activity was inhibited by EDTA, Zincov, 1,10-phenanthroline and tetraethylenepentamine while unaffected by the other inhibitors tested. The protease showed maximum activity at pH 7.0 and was inactivated by heating at 80 C for 15 min. These results together suggest that APK belongs to the thermolysin family of metalloendopeptidases.

  5. Life without putrescine: disruption of the gene-encoding polyamine oxidase in Ustilago maydis odc mutants.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Santiago, Laura; Guzmán-de-Peña, Doralinda; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2010-11-01

    In previous communications the essential role of spermidine in Ustilago maydis was demonstrated by means of the disruption of the genes encoding ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and spermidine synthase (SPE). However, the assignation of specific roles to each polyamine in different cellular functions was not possible because the spermidine added to satisfy the auxotrophic requirement of odc/spe double mutants is partly back converted into putrescine. In this study, we have approached this problem through the disruption of the gene-encoding polyamine oxidase (PAO), required for the conversion of spermidine into putrescine, and the construction of odc/pao double mutants that were unable to synthesize putrescine by either ornithine decarboxylation or retroconversion from spermidine. Phenotypic analysis of the mutants provided evidence that putrescine is only an intermediary in spermidine biosynthesis, and has no direct role in cell growth, dimorphic transition, or any other vital function of U. maydis. Nevertheless, our results show that putrescine may play a role in the protection of U. maydis against salt and osmotic stress, and possibly virulence. Evidence was also obtained that the retroconversion of spermidine into putrescine is not essential for U. maydis growth but may be important for its survival under natural conditions.

  6. The human GNAS1 gene is imprinted and encodes distinct paternally and biallelically expressed G proteins.

    PubMed

    Hayward, B E; Kamiya, M; Strain, L; Moran, V; Campbell, R; Hayashizaki, Y; Bonthron, D T

    1998-08-18

    The GNAS1 gene encodes the alpha subunit of the G protein Gs, which couples receptor binding by several hormones to activation of adenylate cyclase. Null mutations of GNAS1 cause pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) type Ia, in which hormone resistance occurs in association with a characteristic osteodystrophy. The observation that PHP Ia almost always is inherited maternally has led to the suggestion that GNAS1 may be an imprinted gene. Here, we show that, although Gsalpha expression (directed by the promoter upstream of exon 1) is biallelic, GNAS1 is indeed imprinted in a promoter-specific fashion. We used parthenogenetic lymphocyte DNA to screen by restriction landmark genomic scanning for loci showing differential methylation between paternal and maternal alleles. This screen identified a region that was found to be methylated exclusively on a maternal allele and was located approximately 35 kb upstream of GNAS1 exon 1. This region contains three novel exons that are spliced into alternative GNAS1 mRNA species, including one exon that encodes the human homologue of the large G protein XLalphas. Transcription of these novel mRNAs is exclusively from the paternal allele in all tissues examined. The differential imprinting of separate protein products of GNAS1 therefore may contribute to the anomalous inheritance of PHP Ia.

  7. The human GNAS1 gene is imprinted and encodes distinct paternally and biallelically expressed G proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Bruce E.; Kamiya, Mamoru; Strain, Lisa; Moran, Veronica; Campbell, Roderick; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Bonthron, David T.

    1998-01-01

    The GNAS1 gene encodes the α subunit of the G protein Gs, which couples receptor binding by several hormones to activation of adenylate cyclase. Null mutations of GNAS1 cause pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) type Ia, in which hormone resistance occurs in association with a characteristic osteodystrophy. The observation that PHP Ia almost always is inherited maternally has led to the suggestion that GNAS1 may be an imprinted gene. Here, we show that, although Gsα expression (directed by the promoter upstream of exon 1) is biallelic, GNAS1 is indeed imprinted in a promoter-specific fashion. We used parthenogenetic lymphocyte DNA to screen by restriction landmark genomic scanning for loci showing differential methylation between paternal and maternal alleles. This screen identified a region that was found to be methylated exclusively on a maternal allele and was located ≈35 kb upstream of GNAS1 exon 1. This region contains three novel exons that are spliced into alternative GNAS1 mRNA species, including one exon that encodes the human homologue of the large G protein XLαs. Transcription of these novel mRNAs is exclusively from the paternal allele in all tissues examined. The differential imprinting of separate protein products of GNAS1 therefore may contribute to the anomalous inheritance of PHP Ia. PMID:9707596

  8. Plasmid-encoded genes influence exosporium assembly and morphology in Bacillus megaterium QM B1551 spores

    PubMed Central

    Manetsberger, Julia; Hall, Elizabeth A. H.; Christie, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus megaterium QM B1551 are encased in a morphologically distinctive exosporium. We demonstrate here that genes encoded on the indigenous pBM500 and pBM600 plasmids are required for exosporium assembly and or stability in spores of this strain. Bioinformatic analyses identified genes encoding orthologues of the B. cereus-family exosporium nap and basal layer proteins within the B. megaterium genome. Transcriptional analyses, supported by electron and fluorescent microscopy, indicate that the pole-localized nap, identified here for the first time in B. megaterium QM B1551 spores, is comprised of the BclA1 protein. The role of the BxpB protein, which forms the basal layer of the exosporium in B. cereus spores, is less clear since spores of a null mutant strain display an apparently normal morphology. Retention of the localized nap in bxpB null spores suggests that B. megaterium employs an alternative mechanism to that used by B. cereus spores in anchoring the nap to the spore surface. PMID:26316548

  9. Proanthocyanidin synthesis and expression of genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase and anthocyanidin reductase in developing grape berries and grapevine leaves.

    PubMed

    Bogs, Jochen; Downey, Mark O; Harvey, John S; Ashton, Anthony R; Tanner, Gregory J; Robinson, Simon P

    2005-10-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs), also called condensed tannins, can protect plants against herbivores and are important quality components of many fruits. Two enzymes, leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) and anthocyanidin reductase (ANR), can produce the flavan-3-ol monomers required for formation of PA polymers. We isolated and functionally characterized genes encoding both enzymes from grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv Shiraz). ANR was encoded by a single gene, but we found two highly related genes encoding LAR. We measured PA content and expression of genes encoding ANR, LAR, and leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase in grape berries during development and in grapevine leaves, which accumulated PA throughout leaf expansion. Grape flowers had high levels of PA, and accumulation continued in skin and seeds from fruit set until the onset of ripening. VvANR was expressed throughout early flower and berry development, with expression increasing after fertilization. It was expressed in berry skin and seeds until the onset of ripening, and in expanding leaves. The genes encoding LAR were expressed in developing fruit, particularly in seeds, but had low expression in leaves. The two LAR genes had different patterns of expression in skin and seeds. During grape ripening, PA levels decreased in both skin and seeds, and expression of genes encoding ANR and LAR were no longer detected. The results indicate that PA accumulation occurs early in grape development and is completed when ripening starts. Both ANR and LAR contribute to PA synthesis in fruit, and the tissue and temporal-specific regulation of the genes encoding ANR and LAR determines PA accumulation and composition during grape berry development.

  10. Turtles as hopeful monsters.

    PubMed

    Rieppel, O

    2001-11-01

    A recently published study on the development of the turtle shell highlights the important role that development plays in the origin of evolutionary novelties. The evolution of the highly derived adult anatomy of turtles is a prime example of a macroevolutionary event triggered by changes in early embryonic development. Early ontogenetic deviation may cause patterns of morphological change that are not compatible with scenarios of gradualistic, stepwise transformation. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Analysis of essential Arabidopsis nuclear genes encoding plastid-targeted proteins.

    PubMed

    Savage, Linda J; Imre, Kathleen M; Hall, David A; Last, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    The Chloroplast 2010 Project (http://www.plastid.msu.edu/) identified and phenotypically characterized homozygous mutants in over three thousand genes, the majority of which encode plastid-targeted proteins. Despite extensive screening by the community, no homozygous mutant alleles were available for several hundred genes, suggesting that these might be enriched for genes of essential function. Attempts were made to generate homozygotes in ~1200 of these lines and 521 of the homozygous viable lines obtained were deposited in the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (http://abrc.osu.edu/). Lines that did not yield a homozygote in soil were tested as potentially homozygous lethal due to defects either in seed or seedling development. Mutants were characterized at four stages of development: developing seed, mature seed, at germination, and developing seedlings. To distinguish seed development or seed pigment-defective mutants from seedling development mutants, development of seeds was assayed in siliques from heterozygous plants. Segregating seeds from heterozygous parents were sown on supplemented media in an attempt to rescue homozygous seedlings that could not germinate or survive in soil. Growth of segregating seeds in air and air enriched to 0.3% carbon dioxide was compared to discover mutants potentially impaired in photorespiration or otherwise responsive to CO2 supplementation. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements identified CO2-responsive mutants with altered photosynthetic parameters. Examples of genes with a viable mutant allele and one or more putative homozygous-lethal alleles were documented. RT-PCR of homozygotes for potentially weak alleles revealed that essential genes may remain undiscovered because of the lack of a true null mutant allele. This work revealed 33 genes with two or more lethal alleles and 73 genes whose essentiality was not confirmed with an independent lethal mutation, although in some cases second leaky alleles were identified.

  12. Ammonia-regulated expression of a soybean gene encoding cytosolic glutamine synthetase in transgenic Lotus corniculatus.

    PubMed

    Miao, G H; Hirel, B; Marsolier, M C; Ridge, R W; Verma, D P

    1991-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS), expressed in roots and root nodules of soybean, was isolated by direct complementation of an Escherichia coli gln A- mutant. This sequence is induced in roots by the availability of ammonia. A 3.5-kilobase promoter fragment of a genomic clone (lambda GS15) corresponding to this cDNA was isolated and fused with a reporter [beta-glucuronidase (GUS)] gene. The GS-GUS fusion was introduced into a legume (Lotus corniculatus) and a nonlegume (tobacco) plant by way of Agrobacterium-mediated transformations. This chimeric gene was found to be expressed in a root-specific manner in both tobacco and L. corniculatus, the expression being restricted to the growing root apices and the vascular bundles of the mature root. Treatment with ammonia increased the expression of this chimeric gene in the legume background (i.e., L. corniculatus); however, no induction was observed in tobacco roots. Histochemical localization of GUS activity in ammonia-treated transgenic L. corniculatus roots showed a uniform distribution across all cell types. These data suggest that the tissue specificity of the soybean cytosolic GS gene is conserved in both tobacco and L. corniculatus; however, in the latter case, this gene is ammonia inducible. Furthermore, the ammonia-enhanced GS gene expression in L. corniculatus is due to an increase in transcription. That this gene is directly regulated by externally supplied or symbiotically fixed nitrogen is also evident from the expression of GS-GUS in the infection zone, including the uninfected cells, and the inner cortex of transgenic L. corniculatus nodules, where a flux of ammonia is encountered by this tissue. The lack of expression of GS-GUS in the outer cortex of the nodules suggests that ammonia may not be able to diffuse outside the endodermis.

  13. Analysis of Essential Arabidopsis Nuclear Genes Encoding Plastid-Targeted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Linda J.; Imre, Kathleen M.; Hall, David A.; Last, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The Chloroplast 2010 Project (http://www.plastid.msu.edu/) identified and phenotypically characterized homozygous mutants in over three thousand genes, the majority of which encode plastid-targeted proteins. Despite extensive screening by the community, no homozygous mutant alleles were available for several hundred genes, suggesting that these might be enriched for genes of essential function. Attempts were made to generate homozygotes in ∼1200 of these lines and 521 of the homozygous viable lines obtained were deposited in the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (http://abrc.osu.edu/). Lines that did not yield a homozygote in soil were tested as potentially homozygous lethal due to defects either in seed or seedling development. Mutants were characterized at four stages of development: developing seed, mature seed, at germination, and developing seedlings. To distinguish seed development or seed pigment-defective mutants from seedling development mutants, development of seeds was assayed in siliques from heterozygous plants. Segregating seeds from heterozygous parents were sown on supplemented media in an attempt to rescue homozygous seedlings that could not germinate or survive in soil. Growth of segregating seeds in air and air enriched to 0.3% carbon dioxide was compared to discover mutants potentially impaired in photorespiration or otherwise responsive to CO2 supplementation. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements identified CO2-responsive mutants with altered photosynthetic parameters. Examples of genes with a viable mutant allele and one or more putative homozygous-lethal alleles were documented. RT-PCR of homozygotes for potentially weak alleles revealed that essential genes may remain undiscovered because of the lack of a true null mutant allele. This work revealed 33 genes with two or more lethal alleles and 73 genes whose essentiality was not confirmed with an independent lethal mutation, although in some cases second leaky alleles were identified

  14. Small gene family encoding an eggshell (chorion) protein of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Bobek, L.A.; Rekosh, D.M.; Lo Verde, P.T.

    1988-08-01

    The authors isolated six independent genomic clones encoding schistosome chorion or eggshell proteins from a Schistosoma mansoni genomic library. A linkage map of five of the clones spanning 35 kilobase pairs (kbp) of the S. mansoni genome was constructed. The region contained two eggshell protein genes closely linked, separated by 7.5 kbp of intergenic DNA. The two genes of the cluster were arranged in the same orientation, that is, they were transcribed from the same strand. The sixth clone probably represents a third copy of the eggshell gene that is not contained within the 35-kbp region. The 5- end of the mRNA transcribed from these genes was defined by primer extension directly off the RNA. The ATCAT cap site sequence was homologous to a silkmoth chorion PuTCATT cap site sequence, where Pu indicates any purine. DNA sequence analysis showed that there were no introns in these genes. The DNA sequences of the three genes were very homologous to each other and to a cDNA clone, pSMf61-46, differing only in three or four nucleotices. A multiple TATA box was located at positions -23 to -31, and a CAAAT sequence was located at -52 upstream of the eggshell transcription unit. Comparison of sequences in regions further upstream with silkmoth and Drosophila sequences revealed very short elements that were shared. One such element, TCACGT, recently shown to be an essential cis-regulatory element for silkmoth chorion gene promoter function, was found at a similar position in all three organisms.

  15. On the role of PDZ domain-encoding genes in Drosophila border cell migration.

    PubMed

    Aranjuez, George; Kudlaty, Elizabeth; Longworth, Michelle S; McDonald, Jocelyn A

    2012-11-01

    Cells often move as collective groups during normal embryonic development and wound healing, although the mechanisms governing this type of migration are poorly understood. The Drosophila melanogaster border cells migrate as a cluster during late oogenesis and serve as a powerful in vivo genetic model for collective cell migration. To discover new genes that participate in border cell migration, 64 out of 66 genes that encode PDZ domain-containing proteins were systematically targeted by in vivo RNAi knockdown. The PDZ domain is one of the largest families of protein-protein interaction domains found in eukaryotes. Proteins that contain PDZ domains participate in a variety of biological processes, including signal transduction and establishment of epithelial apical-basal polarity. Targeting PDZ proteins effectively assesses a larger number of genes via the protein complexes and pathways through which these proteins function. par-6, a known regulator of border cell migration, was a positive hit and thus validated the approach. Knockdown of 14 PDZ domain genes disrupted migration with multiple RNAi lines. The candidate genes have diverse predicted cellular functions and are anticipated to provide new insights into the mechanisms that control border cell movement. As a test of this concept, two genes that disrupted migration were characterized in more detail: big bang and the Dlg5 homolog CG6509. We present evidence that Big bang regulates JAK/STAT signaling, whereas Dlg5/CG6509 maintains cluster cohesion. Moreover, these results demonstrate that targeting a selected class of genes by RNAi can uncover novel regulators of collective cell migration.

  16. The facC Gene of Aspergillus nidulans Encodes an Acetate-Inducible Carnitine Acetyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Stemple, Christopher J.; Davis, Meryl A.; Hynes, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Mutations in the facC gene of Aspergillus nidulans result in an inability to use acetate as a sole carbon source. This gene has been cloned by complementation. The proposed translation product of the facC gene has significant similarity to carnitine acetyltransferases (CAT) from other organisms. Total CAT activity was found to be inducible by acetate and fatty acids and repressed by glucose. Acetate-inducible activity was found to be absent in facC mutants, while fatty acid-inducible activity was absent in an acuJ mutant. Acetate induction of facC expression was dependent on the facB regulatory gene, and an expressed FacB fusion protein was demonstrated to bind to 5′ facC sequences. Carbon catabolite repression of facC expression was affected by mutations in the creA gene and a CreA fusion protein bound to 5′ facC sequences. Mutations in the acuJ gene led to increased acetate induction of facC expression and also of an amdS-lacZ reporter gene, and it is proposed that this results from accumulation of acetate, as well as increased expression of facB. A model is presented in which facC encodes a cytosolic CAT enzyme, while a different CAT enzyme, which is acuJ dependent, is present in peroxisomes and mitochondria, and these activities are required for the movement of acetyl groups between intracellular compartments. PMID:9829933

  17. Genetic Organization of Plasmid ColJs, Encoding Colicin Js Activity, Immunity, and Release Genes

    PubMed Central

    Šmajs, David; Weinstock, George M.

    2001-01-01

    The 5.2-kb ColJs plasmid of a colicinogenic strain of Shigella sonnei (colicin type 7) was isolated and sequenced. pColJs was partly homologous to pColE1 and to pesticin-encoding plasmid pPCP1, mainly in the rep, mob, and cer regions. A 1.2-kb unique region of pColJs showed significantly different G+C content (34%) compared to the rest of pColJs (53%). Within the unique region, seven open reading frames (ORFs) were identified. ORF94 was shown to code for colicin Js activity (cja), a 94-amino-acid polypeptide (molecular mass, 10.4 kDa); ORF129 (cji) was shown to code for the 129-amino-acid colicin Js immunity protein (molecular mass, 14.3 kDa); and ORF65 was shown to be involved in colicin Js release by producer bacteria (cjl) coding for a 65-amino-acid polypeptide (molecular mass, 7.5 kDa). In contrast to the gene order in other colicin operons, the cjl gene was found upstream from cja. Moreover, the promoter upstream from cjl was similar to promoters described upstream from several colicin activity genes. The cji gene was found to be located downstream from cja with a transcription polarity opposite to that of the cjl and cja genes. The cja, cji, and cjl genes were not similar to other known colicin genes. Colicin Js was purified as an inactive fusion protein with an N-terminal histidine tag. Activity of the purified fusion form of colicin Js was restored after cleavage of the amino acids fused to the colicin Js N terminus. PMID:11395458

  18. Characterization of the gene encoding pisatin demethylase (FoPDA1) in Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jeffrey J; Wasmann, Catherine C; Usami, Toshiyuki; White, Gerard J; Temporini, Esteban D; McCluskey, Kevin; VanEtten, Hans D

    2011-12-01

    The pea pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi is able to detoxify pisatin produced as a defense response by pea, and the gene encoding this detoxification mechanism, FoPDA1, was 82% identical to the cytochrome P450 pisatin demethylase PDA1 gene in Nectria haematococca. A survey of F. oxysporum f. sp. pisi isolates demonstrated that, as in N. haematococca, the PDA gene of F. oxysporum f. sp. pisi is generally located on a small chromosome. In N. haematococca, PDA1 is in a cluster of pea pathogenicity (PEP) genes. Homologs of these PEP genes also were found in the F. oxysporum f. sp. pisi isolates, and PEP1 and PEP5 were sometimes located on the same small chromosomes as the FoPDA1 homologs. Transforming FoPDA1 into a pda(?) F. oxysporum f. sp. lini isolate conferred pda activity and promoted pathogenicity on pea to some transformants. Different hybridization patterns of FoPDA1 were found in F. oxysporum f. sp. pisi but these did not correlate with the races of the fungus, suggesting that races within this forma specialis arose independently of FoPDA1. FoPDA1 also was present in the formae speciales lini, glycines, and dianthi of F. oxysporum but they had mutations resulting in nonfunctional proteins. However, an active FoPDA1 was present in F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli and it was virulent on pea. Despite their evolutionary distance, the amino acid sequences of FoPDA1 of F. oxysporum f. sp. pisi and F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli revealed only six amino acid differences, consistent with a horizontal gene transfer event accounting for the origin of these genes.

  19. Isolation and characterization of 17 different genes encoding putative endopolygalacturonase genes from Rhizopus oryzae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polygalacturonase enzymes are a valuable aid in the retting of flax for production of linens and, more recently, production of biofuels from citrus wastes. In a search of the recently sequenced Rhizopus oryzae strain 99-880 genome database, 18 putative endopolygalacturonase genes were identified, w...

  20. The Pun1 gene for pungency in pepper encodes a putative acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Charles; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl; Liu, Kede; Mazourek, Michael; Moore, Shanna L; Yoo, Eun Young; Kim, Byung-Dong; Paran, Ilan; Jahn, Molly M

    2005-06-01

    Pungency in Capsicum fruits is due to the accumulation of the alkaloid capsaicin and its analogs. The biosynthesis of capsaicin is restricted to the genus Capsicum and results from the acylation of an aromatic moiety, vanillylamine, by a branched-chain fatty acid. Many of the enzymes involved in capsaicin biosynthesis are not well characterized and the regulation of the pathway is not fully understood. Based on the current pathway model, candidate genes were identified in public databases and the literature, and genetically mapped. A published EST co-localized with the Pun1 locus which is required for the presence of capsaicinoids. This gene, AT3, has been isolated and its nucleotide sequence has been determined in an array of genotypes within the genus. AT3 showed significant similarity to acyltransferases in the BAHD superfamily. The recessive allele at this locus contains a deletion spanning the promoter and first exon of the predicted coding region in every non-pungent accession tested. Transcript and protein expression of AT3 was tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. Virus-induced gene silencing of AT3 resulted in a decrease in the accumulation of capsaicinoids, a phenotype consistent with pun1. In conclusion, gene mapping, allele sequence data, expression profile and silencing analysis collectively indicate that the Pun1 locus in pepper encodes a putative acyltransferase, and the pun1 allele, used in pepper breeding for nearly 50 000 years, results from a large deletion at this locus.

  1. BAGEL3: automated identification of genes encoding bacteriocins and (non-)bactericidal posttranslationally modified peptides

    PubMed Central

    van Heel, Auke J.; de Jong, Anne; Montalbán-López, Manuel; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genes encoding bacteriocins and ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs) can be a challenging task. Especially those peptides that do not have strong homology to previously identified peptides can easily be overlooked. Extensive use of BAGEL2 and user feedback has led us to develop BAGEL3. BAGEL3 features genome mining of prokaryotes, which is largely independent of open reading frame (ORF) predictions and has been extended to cover more (novel) classes of posttranslationally modified peptides. BAGEL3 uses an identification approach that combines direct mining for the gene and indirect mining via context genes. Especially for heavily modified peptides like lanthipeptides, sactipeptides, glycocins and others, this genetic context harbors valuable information that is used for mining purposes. The bacteriocin and context protein databases have been updated and it is now easy for users to submit novel bacteriocins or RiPPs. The output has been simplified to allow user-friendly analysis of the results, in particular for large (meta-genomic) datasets. The genetic context of identified candidate genes is fully annotated. As input, BAGEL3 uses FASTA DNA sequences or folders containing multiple FASTA formatted files. BAGEL3 is freely accessible at http://bagel.molgenrug.nl. PMID:23677608

  2. Evolution of the gene lineage encoding the carbon dioxide receptor in insects.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Hugh M; Kent, Lauren B

    2009-01-01

    A heterodimer of the insect chemoreceptors Gr21a and Gr63a has been shown to be the carbon dioxide receptor in Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen) (Diptera: Drosophilidae). Comparison of the genes encoding these two proteins across the 12 available drosophilid fly genomes allows refined definition of their N-termini. These genes are highly conserved, along with a paralog of Gr21a, in the Anopheles gambiae, Aedes aegypti, and Culex pipiens mosquitoes, as well as in the silk moth Bombyx mori and the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. In the latter four species we name these three proteins Gr1, Gr2, and Gr3. Intron evolution within this distinctive three gene lineage is considerable, with at least 13 inferred gains and 39 losses. Surprisingly, this entire ancient gene lineage is absent from all other available more basal insect and related arthropod genomes, specifically the honey bee, parasitoid wasp, human louse, pea aphid, waterflea, and blacklegged tick genomes. At least two of these species can detect carbon dioxide, suggesting that they evolved other means to do so.

  3. Antibacterial Compounds-Macrolactin Alters the Soil Bacterial Community and Abundance of the Gene Encoding PKS

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jun; Zhao, Mengli; Li, Rong; Huang, Qiwei; Rensing, Christopher; Raza, Waseem; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Macrolactin produced by many soil microbes has been shown to be an efficient antibacterial agent against many bacterial pathogens. However, studies examining the effect of macrolactin on both the soil bacterial community and the intrinsic bacterial species that harbor genes responsible for the production of this antibiotic have not been conducted so far. In this study, a mixture of macrolactin was isolated from the liquid culture of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NJN-6, and applied to the soil once a week for four weeks. 16S rRNA Illumina MiSeq sequencing showed that continuous application of macrolactin reduced the α-diversity of the soil bacterial community and thereby changed the relative abundance of microbes at both the phylum and genus level. The relative abundance of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes was significantly increased along with a significant decrease in the relative abundance of Acidobacteria. However, the application of macrolactins had an insignificant effect on the total numbers of bacteria. Further, the native gene responsible for the production of macrolactin, the gene encoding polyketide synthase was reduced in copy number after the application of macrolactin. The results of this study suggested that a bactericide from a microbial source could decrease the diversity of the soil bacterial community and change the bacterial community structure. Moreover, the populations of the intrinsic bacterial species which harbor genes responsible for macrolactin production were inhibited when the external source antibiotic was applied. PMID:27965639

  4. Unexpected Diversity of pepA Genes Encoding Leucine Aminopeptidases in Sediments from a Freshwater Lake.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Shun; Yamamura, Shigeki; Imai, Akio; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We herein designed novel PCR primers for universal detection of the pepA gene, which encodes the representative leucine aminopeptidase gene, and investigated the genetic characteristics and diversity of pepA genes in sediments of hypereutrophic Lake Kasumigaura, Japan. Most of the amino acid sequences deduced from the obtained clones (369 out of 370) were related to PepA-like protein sequences in the M17 family of proteins. The developed primers broadly detected pepA-like clones associated with diverse bacterial phyla-Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, and Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Aquificae, Chlamydiae, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, and Spirochetes as well as the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating that prokaryotes in aquatic environments possessing leucine aminopeptidase are more diverse than previously reported. Moreover, prokaryotes related to the obtained pepA-like clones appeared to be r- and K-strategists, which was in contrast to our previous findings showing that the neutral metalloprotease gene clones obtained were related to the r-strategist genus Bacillus. Our results suggest that an unprecedented diversity of prokaryotes with a combination of different proteases participate in sedimentary proteolysis.

  5. Fibroblast growth factor-1-inducible gene FR-17 encodes a nonmuscle alpha-actinin isoform.

    PubMed

    Hsu, D K; Guo, Y; Alberts, G F; Peifley, K A; Winkles, J A

    1996-05-01

    Polypeptide growth factor binding to cell surface receptors activates a cytoplasmic signaling cascade that ultimately promotes the expression of specific nuclear genes. As an approach to investigate the molecular mechanism of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-1 mitogenic signaling, we have begun to identify and characterize FGF-1-inducible genes in murine NIH 3T3 cells. Here we report that one of these genes, termed FGF-regulated (FR)-17, is predicted to encode a nonmuscle isoform of alpha-actinin, an actin cross-linking protein found along microfilaments and in focal adhesion plaques. FGF-1 induction of alpha-actinin mRNA expression is first detectable at 2 h after mitogen addition and is dependent on the novo RNA and protein synthesis. Maximal alpha-actinin mRNA expression, corresponding to an approximately nineteenfold level of induction, is present after 12 h of FGF-1 stimulation. Western blot analysis indicated that FGF-1-stimulated cells also produce an increased amount of alpha-actinin protein. The FGF-1-related mitogen FGF-2, calf serum, several of the polypeptide growth factors present in serum, and the tumor promoter phorbol myristate acetate can also induce alpha-actinin mRNA expression. Finally, nonmuscle alpha-actinin mRNA is expressed in vivo in a tissue-specific manner, with relatively high levels detected in adult mouse intestine and kidney. These results indicate that nonmuscle alpha-actinin is a serum-, polypeptide growth factor-, and tumor promoter-inducible gene in mouse fibroblasts.

  6. [Cloning, prokaryotic expression and antibacterial assay of Tenecin gene encoding an antibacterial peptide from Tenebrio molitor].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Jiang, Yu-xin; Li, Chao-pin

    2011-12-01

    To clone tenecin gene, an antibacterial peptide gene, from Tenebrio molitor for its prokaryotic expression and explore the molecular mechanism for regulating the expression of antibacterial peptide in Tenebrio molitor larvae. The antibacterial peptide was induced from the larvae of Tenebrio molitor by intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli DH-5α (1×10(8)/ml). RT-PCR was performed 72 h after the injection to clone Tenecin gene followed by sequencing and bioinformatic analysis. The recombinant expression vector pET-28a(+)-Tenecin was constructed and transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3) cells and the expression of tenecin protein was observed after IPTG induction. Tenecin expression was detected in transformed E.coli using SDS-PAGE after 1 mmol/L IPTG induction. Tenecin gene, which was about 255 bp in length, encoded Tenecin protein with a relative molecular mass of 9 kD. Incubation of E.coli with 80, 60, 40, and 20 µg/ml tenecin for 18 h resulted in a diameter of the inhibition zone of 25.1∓0.03, 20.7∓0.06, 17.2∓0.11 and 9.3∓0.04 mm, respectively. Tenecin protein possesses strong antibacterial activity against E. coli DH-5α, which warrants further study of this protein for its potential as an antibacterial agent in clinical application.

  7. Genes encoding defensins of important Chagas disease vectors used for phylogenetic studies.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Catarina Andréa Chaves; Lima, Ana Carolina Bastos; Jansen, Ana Maria; Galvão, Cleber; Jurberg, José; Costa, Jane; Azambuja, Patricia; Waniek, Peter Josef

    2015-12-01

    Insects possess both cellular and humoral immune responses. The latter makes them capable to recognize and control invading pathogens after synthesis of a variety of small proteins, also known as antimicrobial peptides. Defensins, cysteine-rich cationic peptides with major activity against Gram-positive bacteria, are one ubiquitous class of antimicrobial peptides, widely distributed in different animal and plant taxa. Regarding triatomines in each of the so far analyzed species, various defensin gene isoforms have been identified. In the present study, these genes were sequenced and used as a molecular marker for phylogenetic analysis. Considering the vectors of Chagas disease the authors are reporting for the first time the presence of these genes in Triatoma sordida (Stål, 1859), Rhodnius nasutus (Stål, 1859), and Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister, 1835). Members of the Triatoma brasiliensis species complex were included into the study to verify the genetic variability within these taxa. Mainly in their mature peptide, the deduced defensin amino acid sequences were highly conserved. In the dendrogram based on defensin encoding nucleotide, sequences the Triatoma Def3/4 genes were separated from the rest. In the dendrogram based on deduced amino acid sequences the Triatoma Def2/3/4 together with Rhodnius DefA/B pre-propeptides were separated from the rest. In the sub-branches of both the DNA and amino acid dendrograms, the genus Triatoma was separated from the genus Rhodnius as well as from P. megistus.

  8. BAGEL3: Automated identification of genes encoding bacteriocins and (non-)bactericidal posttranslationally modified peptides.

    PubMed

    van Heel, Auke J; de Jong, Anne; Montalbán-López, Manuel; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2013-07-01

    Identifying genes encoding bacteriocins and ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs) can be a challenging task. Especially those peptides that do not have strong homology to previously identified peptides can easily be overlooked. Extensive use of BAGEL2 and user feedback has led us to develop BAGEL3. BAGEL3 features genome mining of prokaryotes, which is largely independent of open reading frame (ORF) predictions and has been extended to cover more (novel) classes of posttranslationally modified peptides. BAGEL3 uses an identification approach that combines direct mining for the gene and indirect mining via context genes. Especially for heavily modified peptides like lanthipeptides, sactipeptides, glycocins and others, this genetic context harbors valuable information that is used for mining purposes. The bacteriocin and context protein databases have been updated and it is now easy for users to submit novel bacteriocins or RiPPs. The output has been simplified to allow user-friendly analysis of the results, in particular for large (meta-genomic) datasets. The genetic context of identified candidate genes is fully annotated. As input, BAGEL3 uses FASTA DNA sequences or folders containing multiple FASTA formatted files. BAGEL3 is freely accessible at http://bagel.molgenrug.nl.

  9. Cloning and sequencing of the genes from Salmonella typhimurium encoding a new bacterial ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, A; Gibert, I; Barbé, J

    1994-01-01

    A plasmid library of Salmonella typhimurium was used to complement a temperature-sensitive nrdA mutant of Escherichia coli. Complementation was obtained with two different classes of plasmids, one carrying the E. coli nrdAB-like genes and the second containing an operon encoding a new bacterial ribonucleotide reductase. Plasmids harboring these new reductase genes also enable obligately anaerobic nrdB::Mud1 E. coli mutants to grow in the presence of oxygen. This operon consists of two open reading frames, which have been designated nrdE (2,145 bp) and nrdF (969 bp). The deduced amino acid sequences of the nrdE and nrdF products include the catalytically important residues conserved in ribonucleotide reductase enzymes of class I and show 25 and 28% overall identity with the R1 and R2 protein, respectively, of the aerobic ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase of E. coli. The 3' end of the sequenced 4.9-kb fragment corresponds to the upstream region of the previously published proU operon of both S. typhimurium and E. coli, indicating that the nrdEF genes are at 57 min on the chromosomal maps of these two bacterial species. Analysis of the nrdEF and proU sequences demonstrates that transcription of the nrdEF genes is in the clockwise direction on the S. typhimurium and E. coli maps. Images PMID:8195103

  10. Regulation of the ald gene encoding alanine dehydrogenase by AldR in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji-A; Baek, Eun-Young; Kim, Si Wouk; Choi, Jong-Soon; Oh, Jeong-Il

    2013-08-01

    The regulatory gene aldR was identified 95 bp upstream of the ald gene encoding L-alanine dehydrogenase in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The AldR protein shows sequence similarity to the regulatory proteins of the Lrp/AsnC family. Using an aldR deletion mutant, we demonstrated that AldR serves as both activator and repressor for the regulation of ald gene expression, depending on the presence or absence of L-alanine. The purified AldR protein exists as a homodimer in the absence of L-alanine, while it adopts the quaternary structure of a homohexamer in the presence of L-alanine. The binding affinity of AldR for the ald control region was shown to be increased significantly by L-alanine. Two AldR binding sites (O1 and O2) with the consensus sequence GA-N₂-ATC-N₂-TC and one putative AldR binding site with the sequence GA-N₂-GTT-N₂-TC were identified upstream of the ald gene. Alanine and cysteine were demonstrated to be the effector molecules directly involved in the induction of ald expression. The cellular level of L-alanine was shown to be increased in M. smegmatis cells grown under hypoxic conditions, and the hypoxic induction of ald expression appears to be mediated by AldR, which senses the intracellular level of alanine.

  11. A gene mutated in nephronophthisis and retinitis pigmentosa encodes a novel protein, nephroretinin, conserved in evolution.

    PubMed

    Otto, Edgar; Hoefele, Julia; Ruf, Rainer; Mueller, Adelheid M; Hiller, Karl S; Wolf, Matthias T F; Schuermann, Maria J; Becker, Achim; Birkenhäger, Ralf; Sudbrak, Ralf; Hennies, Hans C; Nürnberg, Peter; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2002-11-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP) comprises a group of autosomal recessive cystic kidney diseases, which constitute the most frequent genetic cause for end-stage renal failure in children and young adults. The most prominent histologic feature of NPHP consists of development of renal fibrosis, which, in chronic renal failure of any origin, represents the pathogenic event correlated most strongly to loss of renal function. Four gene loci for NPHP have been mapped to chromosomes 2q13 (NPHP1), 9q22 (NPHP2), 3q22 (NPHP3), and 1p36 (NPHP4). At all four loci, linkage has also been demonstrated in families with the association of NPHP and retinitis pigmentosa, known as "Senior-Løken syndrome" (SLS). Identification of the gene for NPHP type 1 had revealed nephrocystin as a novel docking protein, providing new insights into mechanisms of cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling. We here report identification of the gene (NPHP4) causing NPHP type 4, by use of high-resolution haplotype analysis and by demonstration of nine likely loss-of-function mutations in six affected families. NPHP4 encodes a novel protein, nephroretinin, that is conserved in evolution--for example, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In addition, we demonstrate two loss-of-function mutations of NPHP4 in patients from two families with SLS. Thus, we have identified a novel gene with critical roles in renal tissue architecture and ophthalmic function.

  12. Unexpected Diversity of pepA Genes Encoding Leucine Aminopeptidases in Sediments from a Freshwater Lake

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Shun; Yamamura, Shigeki; Imai, Akio; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We herein designed novel PCR primers for universal detection of the pepA gene, which encodes the representative leucine aminopeptidase gene, and investigated the genetic characteristics and diversity of pepA genes in sediments of hypereutrophic Lake Kasumigaura, Japan. Most of the amino acid sequences deduced from the obtained clones (369 out of 370) were related to PepA-like protein sequences in the M17 family of proteins. The developed primers broadly detected pepA-like clones associated with diverse bacterial phyla—Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, and Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Aquificae, Chlamydiae, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, and Spirochetes as well as the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating that prokaryotes in aquatic environments possessing leucine aminopeptidase are more diverse than previously reported. Moreover, prokaryotes related to the obtained pepA-like clones appeared to be r- and K-strategists, which was in contrast to our previous findings showing that the neutral metalloprotease gene clones obtained were related to the r-strategist genus Bacillus. Our results suggest that an unprecedented diversity of prokaryotes with a combination of different proteases participate in sedimentary proteolysis. PMID:26936797

  13. Mutations in the Drosophila melanogaster gene encoding S-adenosylmethionine suppress position-effect variegation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, J.; Rasmuson-Lestander, A.; Zhang, Jingpu

    1996-06-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the study of trans-acting modifier mutations of position-effect variegation and Polycomb group (Pc-G) genes have been useful tools to investigate genes involved in chromatin structure. We have cloned a modifier gene, Suppressor of zeste 5 (Su(z)5), which encodes S-adenosylmethionine synthetase, and we present here molecular results and data concerning its expression in mutants and genetic interactions. The mutant alleles Su(z)5, l(2)R23 and l(2)M6 show suppression of w{sup m4} and also of two white mutants induced by roo element insertions in the regulatory region i.e., w{sup is} (in combination with z{sup 1}) and w{sup sp1}. Two of the Su(z)5 alleles, as well as a deletion of the gene, also act as enhancers of Polycomb by increasing the size of sex combes on midleg. The results suggest that Su(z)5 is connected with regulation of chromatin structure. The enzyme S-adenosylmethionine synthetase is involved in the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine, a methyl group donor and also, after decarboxylation, a propylamino group donor in the biosynthesis of polyamines. Our results from HPLC analysis show that in ovaries from heterozygous Su(z)5 mutants the content of spermine is significantly reduced. Results presented here suggest that polyamines are an important molecule class in the regulation of chromatin structure. 50 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Hyphal tip extension in Aspergillus nidulans requires the manA gene, which encodes phosphomannose isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D J; Payton, M A

    1994-01-01

    A strain of Aspergillus nidulans carrying a temperature-sensitive mutation in the manA gene produces cell walls depleted of D-mannose and forms hyphal tip balloons at the restrictive temperature (B.P. Valentine and B.W. Bainbridge, J. Gen. Microbiol. 109:155-168, 1978). We have isolated and characterized the manA gene and physically located it between 3.5 and 5.5 kb centromere distal of the riboB locus on chromosome VIII. The manA gene contains four introns and encodes a 50.6-kDa protein which has significant sequence identity to type I phosphomannose isomerase proteins from other eukaryotes. We have constructed by integrative transformation a null mutation in the manA gene which can only be maintained in a heterokaryotic strain with wild-type manA+ nuclei. Thus, a manA null mutation is lethal in A. nidulans. The phenotype of the mutation was analyzed in germinating conidia. Such conidia are able to commence germination but swell abnormally, sometimes producing a misshapen germ tube, before growth ceases. The reason for the lethality is probably the lack of synthesis of mannose-containing cell wall polymers that must be required for normal cell wall development in growing hyphae. Images PMID:8065336

  15. Hypoxia-inducible genes encoding small EF-hand proteins in rice and tomato.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Chie; Minami, Ikuko; Oda, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Rice has evolved metabolic and morphological adaptations to low-oxygen stress to grow in submerged paddy fields. To characterize the molecular components that mediate the response to hypoxia in rice, we identified low-oxygen stress early response genes by microarray analysis. Among the highly responsive genes, five genes, OsHREF1 to OsHREF5, shared strong homology. They encoded small proteins harboring two EF-hands, typical Ca(2+)-binding motifs. Homologous genes were found in many land plants, including SlHREF in tomato, which is also strongly induced by hypoxia. SlHREF induction was detected in both roots and shoots of tomato plants under hypoxia. With the exception of OsHREF5, OsHREF expression was unaffected by drought, salinity, cold, or osmotic stress. Fluorescent signals of green fluorescent protein-fused OsHREFs were detected in the cytosol and nucleus. Ruthenium red, an inhibitor of intracellular Ca(2+) release, repressed induction of OsHREF1-4 under hypoxia. The HREFs may be related to the Ca(2+) response to hypoxia.

  16. A dynamin-like protein encoded by the yeast sporulation gene SPO15.

    PubMed

    Yeh, E; Driscoll, R; Coltrera, M; Olins, A; Bloom, K

    1991-02-21

    The tightly centromere-linked gene SPO15 is essential for meiotic cell division in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Diploid cells without the intact SPO15 gene product are able to complete premeiotic DNA synthesis and genetic recombination, but are unable to traverse the division cycles. Electron microscopy of blocked cells reveals a duplicated but unseparated spindle-pole body. Thus cells are unable to form a bipolar spindle. Sequence analysis of SPO15 DNA reveals an open reading frame that predicts a protein of 704 amino acids. This protein is identical to VPS1, a gene involved in vacuolar protein sorting in yeast which has significant sequence homology (45% overall, 66% over 300 amino acids) to the microtubule bundling-protein, dynamin. The SPO15 gene product expressed in Escherichia coli can be affinity-purified with microtubules. SPO15 encodes a protein that is likely to be involved in a microtubule-dependent process required for the timely separation of spindle-pole bodies in meiosis.

  17. Open reading frame 176 in the photosynthesis gene cluster of Rhodobacter capsulatus encodes idi, a gene for isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, F M; Baker, J A; Poulter, C D

    1996-01-01

    Isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) isomerase catalyzes an essential activation step in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway. A database search based on probes from the highly conserved regions in three eukaryotic IPP isomerases revealed substantial similarity with ORF176 in the photosynthesis gene cluster in Rhodobacter capsulatus. The open reading frame was cloned into an Escherichia coli expression vector. The encoded 20-kDa protein, which was purified in two steps by ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography, catalyzed the interconversion of IPP and dimethylallyl diphosphate. Thus, the photosynthesis gene cluster encodes all of the enzymes required to incorporate IPP into the ultimate carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll metabolites in R. capsulatus. More recent searches uncovered additional putative open reading frames for IPP isomerase in seed-bearing plants (Oryza sativa, Arabadopsis thaliana, and Clarkia breweri), a worm (Caenorhabiditis elegans), and another eubacterium (Escherichia coli). The R. capsulatus enzyme is the smallest of the IPP isomerases to be identified thus far and may consist mostly of a fundamental catalytic core for the enzyme. PMID:8550491

  18. Young Children and Turtle Graphics Programming: Understanding Turtle Commands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuneo, Diane O.

    The LOGO programing language developed for children includes a set of primitive graphics commands that control the displacement and rotation of a display screen cursor called a turtle. The purpose of this study was to examine 4- to 7-year-olds' understanding of single turtle commands as transformations that connect turtle states and to…

  19. Characterization of five subgroups of the sieve element occlusion gene family in Glycine max reveals genes encoding non-forisome P-proteins, forisomes and forisome tails.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Sascia; Ernst, Antonia M; Hawat, Susan; Twyman, Richard M; Prüfer, Dirk; Noll, Gundula A

    2014-09-01

    P-proteins are structural phloem proteins discussed to be involved in the rapid sealing of injured sieve elements. P-proteins are found in all dicotyledonous and some monocotyledonous plants, but additional crystalloid P-proteins, known as forisomes, have evolved solely in the Fabaceae. Both types are encoded by members of the sieve element occlusion (SEO) gene family, which comprises seven phylogenetic subgroups. The Fabaceae-specific subgroup 1 contains genes encoding forisome subunits in e.g. Medicago truncatula, Vicia faba, Dipteryx panamensis and Canavalia gladiata whereas basal subgroup 5 encodes P-proteins in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) and Arabidopsis thaliana. The function of remaining subgroups is still unknown. We chose Glycine max (soybean) as a model to investigate SEO proteins representing different subgroups in one species. We isolated native P-proteins to determine the SEO protein composition and analyzed the expression pattern, localization and structure of the G. max SEO proteins representing five of the subgroups. We found that subgroup 1 GmSEO genes encode forisome subunits, a member of subgroup 5 encodes a non-forisome P-protein and subgroup 2 GmSEO genes encode the components of forisome tails, which are present in a restricted selection of Fabaceaen species. We therefore present the first molecular characterization of a Fabaceae non-forisome P-protein and the first evidence that forisome tails are encoded by a phylogenetically-distinct branch of the SEO gene family.

  20. The Classroom Animal: Snapping Turtles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the distinctive features of the common snapping turtle. Discusses facts and misconceptions held about the turtle. Provides guidelines for proper care and treatment of a young snapper in a classroom environment. (ML)

  1. Characterization of the gene encoding the polymorphic immunodominant molecule, a neutralizing antigen of Theileria parva

    SciTech Connect

    Toye, P.G.; Metzelaar, M.J.; Wijngaard, P.L.J.

    1995-08-01

    Theileria parva, a tick-transmitted protozoan parasite related to Plasmodium spp., causes the disease East Coast fever, an acute and usually fatal lymphoproliferative disorder of cattle in Africa. Previous studies using sera from cattle that have survived infection identified a polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) that is expressed by both the infective sporozoite stage of the parasite and the intracellular schizont. Here we show that mAb specific for the PIM Ag can inhibit sporozoite invasion of lymphocytes in vitro. A cDNA clone encoding the PIM Ag of the T. parva (Muguga) stock was obtained by using these mAb in a novel eukaryotic expression cloning system that allows isolation of cDNA encoding cytoplasmic or surface Ags. To establish the molecular basis of the polymorphism of PIM, the cDNA of the PIM Ag from a buffalo-derived T. parva stock was isolated and its sequence was compared with that of the cattle-derived Muguga PIM. The two cDNAs showed considerable identity in both the 5{prime} and 3{prime} regions, but there was substantial sequence divergence in the central regions. Several types of repeated sequences were identified in the variant regions. In the Muguga form of the molecule, there were five tandem repeats of the tetrapeptide, QPEP, that were shown, by transfection of a deleted version of the PIM gene, not to react with several anti-PIM mAbs. By isolating and sequencing the genomic version of the gene, we identified two small introns in the 3{prime} region of the gene. Finally, we showed that polyclonal rat Abs against recombinant PIM neutralize sporozoite infectivity in vitro, suggesting that the PIM Ag should be evaluated for its capacity to immunize cattle against East Coast Fever.

  2. A protective epitope of Moraxella catarrhalis is encoded by two different genes.

    PubMed Central

    Aebi, C; Maciver, I; Latimer, J L; Cope, L D; Stevens, M K; Thomas, S E; McCracken, G H; Hansen, E J

    1997-01-01

    The high-molecular-weight UspA protein of Moraxella catarrhalis has been described as being both present on the surface of all M. catarrhalis disease isolates examined to date and a target for a monoclonal antibody (MAb 17C7) which enhanced pulmonary clearance of this organism in a mouse model system (M. E. Helminen et al., J. Infect. Dis. 170:867-872, 1994). A recombinant bacteriophage that formed plaques which bound MAb 17C7 was shown to contain a M. catarrhalis gene, designated uspA1, that encoded a protein with a calculated molecular weight of 88,271. Characterization of an isogenic uspA1 mutant revealed that elimination of expression of UspA1 did not eliminate the reactivity of M. catarrhalis with MAb 17C7. In addition, N-terminal amino acid analysis of internal peptides derived from native UspA protein and Southern blot analysis of M. catarrhalis chromosomal DNA suggested the existence of a second UspA-like protein. A combination of epitope mapping and ligation-based PCR methods identified a second M. catarrhalis gene, designated uspA2, which also encoded the MAb 17C7-reactive epitope. The UspA2 protein had a calculated molecular weight of 62,483. Both the isogenic uspA1 mutant and an isogenic uspA2 mutant possessed the ability to express a very-high-molecular-weight antigen that bound MAb 17C7. Southern blot analysis indicated that disease isolates of M. catarrhalis likely possess both uspA1 and uspA2 genes. Both UspA1 and UspA2 most closely resembled adhesins produced by other bacterial pathogens. PMID:9353007

  3. The gene encoding cytochrome-c oxidase subunit I from Synechocystis PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Alge, D; Schmetterer, G; Peschek, G A

    1994-01-28

    The gene (coxI or CoxA) encoding subunit I (COI) of cytochrome-c oxidase (cytochrome aa3) of Synechocystis PCC6803, Synechococcus PCC7942 (Anacystis nidulans R2) and Nostoc PCC8002 (Nostoc Mac), was identified by heterologous hybridization of chromosomal digests with a 17-bp oligodeoxyribonucleotide (probe C) derived from the coxI of Paracoccus denitrificans. A single genomic fragment was found to bind to probe C in all chromosomal digests. Due to its favorable signal-to-noise ratio, the genome of Synechocystis was chosen for the isolation and sequencing of this gene. A genomic DNA library in pUC18 was screened with probe C. The two probe C-positive plasmids, pDAUV1 and pDAUV2, contained a 1-kb overlapping region, with the conserved 17-bp sequence encoding the CuB-binding region of the COI polypeptide. These plasmids were subcloned into competent Escherichia coli DH5 alpha cells, and the nucleotide sequences were determined. The deduced amino acid (aa) sequences of Synechocystis COI and homologous proteins from a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms showed an overall similarity of between 38.6 and 45.8%. Hydropathy plots revealed 12 potential transmembrane helices. All of the six histidines needed for the binding of heme a and the heme a3/CuB bimetallic center are present in the expected positions of the Synechocystis COI protein (533 aa, M(r) 59,390). A monospecific antibody raised against P. denitrificans COI gave an unequivocal immunological cross-reaction on Western blots of membrane preparations from Synechocystis, Anacystis and Nostoc, showing that the product of gene coxI is indeed synthesized and incorporated into cyanobacterial membranes.