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Sample records for gene variants influence

  1. IL18 Gene Variants Influence the Susceptibility to Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F. David; Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disorder caused by the infection with the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. According to the World Health Organization, more than six million people are currently infected in endemic regions. Genetic factors have been proposed to influence predisposition to infection and development of severe clinical phenotypes like chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). Interleukin 18 (IL18) encodes a proinflammatory cytokine that has been proposed to be involved in controlling T. cruzi infection. In this study, we analyzed the possible role of six IL18 gene variants (rs5744258, rs360722, rs2043055, rs187238, rs1946518 and rs360719), which cover most of the variation within the locus, in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi and/or CCC. In total, 1,171 individuals from a Colombian region endemic for Chagas disease, classified as seronegative (n = 595), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 175) and CCC (n = 401), were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Significant associations with T. cruzi infection were observed when comparing seronegative and seropositive individuals for rs187238 (P = 2.18E-03, OR = 0.77), rs360719 (P = 1.49E-03, OR = 0.76), rs2043055 (P = 2.52E-03, OR = 1.29), and rs1946518 (P = 0.0162, OR = 1.22). However, dependence analyses suggested that the association was mainly driven by the polymorphism rs360719. This variant is located within the promoter region of the IL18 gene, and it has been described that it creates a binding site for the transcription factor OCT-1 affecting IL-18 expression levels. In addition, no evidence of association was observed between any of the analyzed IL18 gene polymorphisms and the development of CCC. In summary, our data suggest that genetic variation within the promoter region of IL18 is directly involved in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi, which provides novel insight into disease pathophysiology and adds new perspectives to achieve a more effective disease control. PMID:27027876

  2. Renin-Angiotensin System Gene Variants and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Influence of Angiotensinogen.

    PubMed

    Joyce-Tan, Siew Mei; Zain, Shamsul Mohd; Abdul Sattar, Munavvar Zubaid; Abdullah, Nor Azizan

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successfully used to call for variants associated with diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, some variants are not included in the GWAS to avoid penalty in multiple hypothetic testing. Thus, candidate gene approach is still useful even at GWAS era. This study attempted to assess whether genetic variations in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and their gene interactions are associated with T2DM risk. We genotyped 290 T2DM patients and 267 controls using three genes of the RAS, namely, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensinogen (AGT), and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1). There were significant differences in allele frequencies between cases and controls for AGT variants (P = 0.05) but not for ACE and AGTR1. Haplotype TCG of the AGT was associated with increased risk of T2DM (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.15-3.20, permuted P = 0.012); however, no evidence of significant gene-gene interactions was seen. Nonetheless, our analysis revealed that the associations of the AGT variants with T2DM were independently associated. Thus, this study suggests that genetic variants of the RAS can modestly influence the T2DM risk.

  3. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity.

    PubMed

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P; Nir, Talia M; Toga, Arthur W; Jack, Clifford R; Saykin, Andrew J; Green, Robert C; Weiner, Michael W; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Hansell, Narelle K; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-03-19

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain's connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain's wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer's disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases.

  4. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  5. Common genetic variants in NEFL influence gene expression and neuroblastoma risk.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Mario; Diskin, Sharon; Cimmino, Flora; Acierno, Giovanni; Totaro, Francesca; Petrosino, Giuseppe; Pezone, Lucia; Diamond, Maura; McDaniel, Lee; Hakonarson, Hakon; Iolascon, Achille; Devoto, Marcella; Maris, John M

    2014-12-01

    The genetic etiology of sporadic neuroblastoma is still largely obscure. In a genome-wide association study, we identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associated with neuroblastoma at the CASC15, BARD1, LMO1, DUSP12, HSD17B12, HACE1, and LIN28B gene loci, but these explain only a small fraction of neuroblastoma heritability. Other neuroblastoma susceptibility genes are likely hidden among signals discarded by the multiple testing corrections. In this study, we evaluated eight additional genes selected as candidates for further study based on proven involvement in neuroblastoma differentiation. SNPs at these candidate genes were tested for association with disease susceptibility in 2,101 cases and 4,202 controls, with the associations found replicated in an independent cohort of 459 cases and 809 controls. Replicated associations were further studied for cis-effect using gene expression, transient overexpression, silencing, and cellular differentiation assays. The neurofilament gene NEFL harbored three SNPs associated with neuroblastoma (rs11994014: Pcombined = 0.0050; OR, 0.88; rs2979704: Pcombined = 0.0072; OR, 0.87; rs1059111: Pcombined = 0.0049; OR, 0.86). The protective allele of rs1059111 correlated with increased NEFL expression. Biologic investigations showed that ectopic overexpression of NEFL inhibited cell growth specifically in neuroblastoma cells carrying the protective allele. NEFL overexpression also enhanced differentiation and impaired the proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of cells with protective allele and basal NEFL expression, while impairing invasiveness and proliferation of cells homozygous for the risk genotype. Clinically, high levels of NEFL expression in primary neuroblastoma specimens were associated with better overall survival (P = 0.03; HR, 0.68). Our results show that common variants of NEFL influence neuroblastoma susceptibility and they establish that NEFL expression influences disease initiation and

  6. Inherited Variants in Wnt Pathway Genes Influence Outcomes of Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jiun-Hung; Lin, Victor C.; Yu, Chia-Cheng; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Yin, Hsin-Ling; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Lu, Te-Ling; Huang, Shu-Pin; Bao, Bo-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant Wnt signaling has been associated with many types of cancer. However, the association of inherited Wnt pathway variants with clinical outcomes in prostate cancer patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has not been determined. Here, we comprehensively studied the contribution of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Wnt pathway genes to the clinical outcomes of 465 advanced prostate cancer patients treated with ADT. Two SNPs, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) rs2707765 and rs497844, were significantly (p ≤ 0.009 and q ≤ 0.043) associated with both prostate cancer progression and all-cause mortality, even after multivariate analyses and multiple testing correction. Patients with a greater number of favorable alleles had a longer time to disease progression and better overall survival during ADT (p for trend ≤ 0.003). Additional, cDNA array and in silico analyses of prostate cancer tissue suggested that rs2707765 affects APC expression, which in turn is correlated with tumor aggressiveness and patient prognosis. This study identifies the influence of inherited variants in the Wnt pathway on the efficacy of ADT and highlights a preclinical rationale for using APC as a prognostic marker in advanced prostate cancer. PMID:27898031

  7. Social Environment Influences Performance in a Cognitive Task in Natural Variants of the Foraging Gene

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Celine; Burns, James G.; Sokolowski, Marla B.; Mery, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, natural genetic variation in the foraging gene affects the foraging behaviour of larval and adult flies, larval reward learning, adult visual learning, and adult aversive training tasks. Sitters (fors) are more sedentary and aggregate within food patches whereas rovers (forR) have greater movement within and between food patches, suggesting that these natural variants are likely to experience different social environments. We hypothesized that social context would differentially influence rover and sitter behaviour in a cognitive task. We measured adult rover and sitter performance in a classical olfactory training test in groups and alone. All flies were reared in groups, but fly training and testing were done alone and in groups. Sitters trained and tested in a group had significantly higher learning performances compared to sitters trained and tested alone. Rovers performed similarly when trained and tested alone and in a group. In other words, rovers learning ability is independent of group training and testing. This suggests that sitters may be more sensitive to the social context than rovers. These differences in learning performance can be altered by pharmacological manipulations of PKG activity levels, the foraging (for) gene's gene product. Learning and memory is also affected by the type of social interaction (being in a group of the same strain or in a group of a different strain) in rovers, but not in sitters. These results suggest that for mediates social learning and memory in D. melanogaster. PMID:24349049

  8. Fatty acid translocase gene CD36 rs1527483 variant influences oral fat perception in Malaysian subjects.

    PubMed

    Ong, Hing-Huat; Tan, Yen-Nee; Say, Yee-How

    2017-01-01

    We determined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs1761667 and rs1527483) in the fatty acid translocase CD36 gene - a receptor for fatty acids - is associated with oral fat perception (OFP) of different fat contents in custards and commercially-available foods, and obesity measures in Malaysian subjects (n=313; 118 males, 293 ethnic Chinese; 20 ethnic Indians). A 170-mm visual analogue scale was used to assess the ratings of perceived fat content, oiliness and creaminess of 0%, 2%, 6% and 10% fat content-by-weight custards and low-fat/regular versions of commercially-available milk, mayonnaise and cream crackers. Overall, the subjects managed to significantly discriminate the fat content, oiliness and creaminess between low-fat/regular versions of milk and mayonnaise. Females rated the perception of fat content and oiliness of both milks higher, but ethnicity, obesity and adiposity status did not seem to play a role in influencing most of OFP. The overall minor allele frequencies for rs1761667 and rs1527483 were 0.30 and 0.26, respectively. Females and individuals with rs1527483 TT genotype significantly perceived greater creaminess of 10% fat-by-weight custard. Also, individuals with rs1527483 TT genotype and T allele significantly perceived greater fat content of cream crackers, independent of fat concentration. rs1761667 SNP did not significantly affect OFP, except for cream crackers. Both gene variants were also not associated with obesity measures. Taken together, this study supports the notion that CD36 - specifically rs1527483, plays a role in OFP, but not in influencing obesity in Malaysian subjects. Besides, gender is an important factor for OFP, where females had higher sensitivity.

  9. Serotonin 5-HT2A receptor gene variants influence antidepressant response to repeated total sleep deprivation in bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Barbini, Barbara; Bernasconi, Alessandro; Fulgosi, Mara Cigala; Colombo, Cristina; Dallaspezia, Sara; Gavinelli, Chiara; Marino, Elena; Pirovano, Adele; Radaelli, Daniele; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2008-12-12

    5-HT2A receptor density in prefrontal cortex was associated with depression and suicide. 5-HT2A receptor gene polymorphism rs6313 was associated with 5-HT2A receptor binding potential, with the ability of individuals to use environmental support in order to prevent depression, and with sleep improvement after antidepressant treatment with mirtazapine. Studies on response to antidepressant drugs gave inconsistent results. Here we studied the effect of rs6313 on response to repeated total sleep deprivation (TSD) in 80 bipolar depressed inpatients treated with three consecutive TSD cycles (each one made of 36 h awake followed by a night of undisturbed sleep). All genotype groups showed comparable acute effects of the first TSD, but patients homozygotes for the T variant had better perceived and observed benefits from treatment than carriers of the C allele. These effects became significant after the first recovery night and during the following days, leading to a 36% higher final response rate (Hamilton depression rating<8). The higher density of postsynaptic excitatory 5-HT2A receptors in T/T homozygotes could have led to higher behavioural effects of increased 5-HT neurotransmission due to repeated TSD. Other possible mechanisms involve allostatic/homeostatic adaptation to sleep loss, and a different effect of the allele variants on epigenetic influences. Results confirm the interest for individual gene variants of the serotonin pathway in shaping clinical characteristics of depression and antidepressant response.

  10. Ghrelin Gene Variants Influence on Metabolic Syndrome Components in Aged Spanish Population

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Mireia; Adam, Victoria; Palomera, Elisabet; Blesa, Sebastian; Díaz, Gonzalo; Buquet, Xavier; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Martín-Escudero, Juan Carlos; Palanca, Ana; Chaves, Javier Felipe; Puig-Domingo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Background The role of genetic variations within the ghrelin gene on cardiometabolic profile and nutritional status is still not clear in humans, particularly in elderly people. Objectives We investigated six SNPs of the ghrelin gene and their relationship with metabolic syndrome (MS) components. Subjects and Methods 824 subjects (413 men/411 women, age 77.31±5.04) participating in the Mataró aging study (n = 310) and the Hortega study (n = 514) were analyzed. Anthropometric variables, ghrelin, lipids, glucose and blood pressure levels were measured, and distribution of SNPs -994CT (rs26312), -604GA (rs27647), -501AC (rs26802), R51Q (rs34911341), M72L (rs696217) and L90G (rs4684677) of the ghrelin gene evaluated. Genotypes were determined by multiplex PCR and SNaPshot minisequencing. MS (IDF criteria) was found in 54.9%. Results No association between any of the SNPs and levels of total fasting circulating ghrelin levels was found. C/A-A/A genotype of M72L was associated with increased risk of central obesity according to IDF criteria, while G/A-G/G genotypes of -604GA with reduced risk. A/A genotype of -501AC polymorphism was associated to decreased BMI. In relation to lipid profile, the same genotypes of -604GA were associated with increased total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol and -501AC with reduced triglycerides. There were no associations with systolic or diastolic blood pressure levels or with hypertension, glucose levels or diabetes and ghrelin polymorphisms. However, G/G genotype of -604GA was associated with glucose >100 mg/dL. Haplotype analysis showed that only one haplotype is associated with increased risk of waist circumference and central obesity. The analysis of subjects by gender showed an important and different association of these polymorphisms regarding MS parameters. Conclusion Ghrelin gene variants -604GA, -501AC and M72L are associated with certain components of MS, in particular to BMI and lipid profile in elderly Spanish subjects. PMID

  11. Variants in toll-like receptor 9 gene influence susceptibility to tuberculosis in a Mexican population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection begins with the recognition of mycobacterial structural components by toll like receptors (TLRs) and other pattern recognition receptors. Our objective was to determine the influence of TLRs polymorphisms in the susceptibility to develop tuberculosis (TB) in Amerindian individuals from a rural area of Oaxaca, Mexico with high TB incidence. Methods We carried out a case–control association community based study, genotyping 12 polymorphisms of TLR2, TLR4, TLR6 and TLR9 genes in 90 patients with confirmed pulmonary TB and 90 unrelated exposed but asymptomatic household contacts. Results We found a significant increase in the frequency of the allele A of the TLR9 gene polymorphism rs352139 (A>G) in the group of TB patients (g.f. = 0.522) when compared with controls (g.f. = 0.383), (Pcorr = 0.01, OR = 1.75). Under the recessive model (A/G + A/A vs G/G) this polymorphism was also significantly associated with TB (Pcorr = 0.01, OR= 2.37). The association of the SNP rs352139 was statistically significant after adjustment by age, gender and comorbidities by regression logistic analysis (Dominant model: p value = 0.016, OR = 2.31; Additive model: p value = 0.023, OR = 1.68). The haplotype GAA of TLR9 SNPs was also associated with TB susceptibility (Pcorr = 0.02). Differences in the genotype or allele frequencies of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR6 polymorphisms between TB patients and healthy contacts were not detected. Conclusions Our study suggests that the allele A of the intronic polymorphism rs352139 on TLR9 gene might contribute to the risk of developing TB in Mexican Amerindians. PMID:24053111

  12. Influence of DNA-repair gene variants on the micronucleus frequency in thyroid cancer patients.

    PubMed

    García-Quispes, W A; Pastor, S; Galofré, P; Biarnés, F; Castell, J; Velázquez, A; Marcos, R

    2013-01-20

    The role of different DNA-repair genes (OGG1, XRCC1, XRCC2 and XRCC3) on both the spontaneous and the induced frequency of micronuclei (MN) has been studied in the lymphocytes of a group of 114 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Induction of MN was achieved by treatment of the lymphocytes with 0.5Gy of gamma-radiation. The selected genes are involved in base-excision repair (BER) (OGG1, Ser326Cys; XRCC1, Arg280His and Arg399Gln), and in homologous recombination repair (HRR) (XRCC2, Arg188His and XRCC3, IVS5-14G). Genotyping was carried out by use of the iPLEX (Sequenom) technique. Results indicate that only the OGG1-Ser326Cys polymorphism was able to modulate the MN frequency. This effect was only observed in the spontaneous MN frequency (P=0.016), but not in the MN frequency induced after irradiation. In addition, a strong correlation was observed between spontaneous and induced MN frequency, which would suggest an underlying genetic background.

  13. Adiponectin gene variant interacts with fish oil supplementation to influence serum adiponectin in older individuals.

    PubMed

    Alsaleh, Aseel; Crepostnaia, Daria; Maniou, Zoitsa; Lewis, Fiona J; Hall, Wendy L; Sanders, Thomas A B; O'Dell, Sandra D

    2013-07-01

    Marine n3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) activate the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ), which modulates the expression of adiponectin. We investigated the interaction of dietary n3 PUFAs with adiponectin gene (ADIPOQ) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes as a determinant of serum adiponectin concentration. The Modulation of Atherosclerosis Risk by Increasing Doses of n3 Fatty Acids study is a parallel design, double-blind, controlled trial. Serum adiponectin was measured in 142 healthy men and 225 women aged 45-70 y randomized to treatment with doses of 0.45, 0.9, and 1.8 g/d 20:5n3 and 22:6n3 (1.51:1), or placebo for 12 mo. The 310 participants who completed the study were genotyped for 5 SNPs at the ADIPOQ locus: -11391 G/A (rs17300539), -11377 C/G (rs266729), -10066 G/A (rs182052), +45 T/G (rs2241766), and +276 G/T (rs1501299). The -11391 A-allele was associated with a higher serum adiponectin concentration at baseline (n = 290; P < 0.001). The interaction between treatment and age as a determinant of adiponectin was significant in participants aged >58 y after the highest dose (n = 92; P = 0.020). The interaction between +45 T/G and treatment and age was a nominally significant determinant of serum adiponectin after adjustment for BMI, gender, and ethnicity (P = 0.029). Individuals homozygous for the +45 T-allele aged >58 y had a 22% increase in serum adiponectin concentration compared with baseline after the highest dose (P-treatment effect = 0.008). If substantiated in a larger sample, a diet high in n3 PUFAs may be recommended for older individuals, especially those of the +45 TT genotype who have reported increased risk of hypoadiponectinemia, type 2 diabetes, and obesity.

  14. A blood pressure-associated variant of the SLC39A8 gene influences cellular cadmium accumulation and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruoxin; Witkowska, Kate; Afonso Guerra-Assunção, José; Ren, Meixia; Ng, Fu Liang; Mauro, Claudio; Tucker, Arthur T.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Ye, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed a relationship between inter-individual variation in blood pressure and the single nucleotide polymorphism rs13107325 in the SLC39A8 gene. This gene encodes the ZIP8 protein which co-transports divalent metal cations, including heavy metal cadmium, the accumulation of which has been associated with increased blood pressure. The polymorphism results in two variants of ZIP8 with either an alanine (Ala) or a threonine (Thr) at residue 391. We investigated the functional impact of this variant on protein conformation, cadmium transport, activation of signalling pathways and cell viability in relation to blood pressure regulation. Following incubation with cadmium, higher intracellular cadmium was detected in cultured human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) expressing heterologous ZIP8-Ala391, compared with HEK293 cells expressing heterologous ZIP8-Thr391. This Ala391-associated cadmium accumulation also increased the phosphorylation of the signal transduction molecule ERK2, activation of the transcription factor NFκB, and reduced cell viability. Similarly, vascular endothelial cells with the Ala/Ala genotype had higher intracellular cadmium concentration and lower cell viability than their Ala/Thr counterpart following cadmium exposure. These results indicate that the ZIP8 Ala391-to-Thr391 substitution has an effect on intracellular cadmium accumulation and cell toxicity, providing a potential mechanistic explanation for the association of this genetic variant with blood pressure. PMID:27466201

  15. Intronic variants in the NFKB1 gene may influence hearing forecast in patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss in Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Sonia; Sanchez, Elena; Requena, Teresa; Martinez-Bueno, Manuel; Benitez, Jesus; Perez, Nicolas; Trinidad, Gabriel; Soto-Varela, Andrés; Santos-Perez, Sofía; Martin-Sanz, Eduardo; Fraile, Jesus; Perez, Paz; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E; Batuecas, Angel; Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan M; Aran, Ismael; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A

    2014-01-01

    Meniere's disease is an episodic vestibular syndrome associated with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and tinnitus. Patients with MD have an elevated prevalence of several autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriasis), which suggests a shared autoimmune background. Functional variants of several genes involved in the NF-κB pathway, such as REL, TNFAIP3, NFKB1 and TNIP1, have been associated with two or more immune-mediated diseases and allelic variations in the TLR10 gene may influence bilateral affectation and clinical course in MD. We have genotyped 716 cases of MD and 1628 controls by using the ImmunoChip, a high-density genotyping array containing 186 autoimmune loci, to explore the association of immune system related-loci with sporadic MD. Although no single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) reached a genome-wide significant association (p<10(-8)), we selected allelic variants in the NF-kB pathway for further analyses to evaluate the impact of these SNPs in the clinical outcome of MD in our cohort. None of the selected SNPs increased susceptibility for MD in patients with uni or bilateral SNHL. However, two potential regulatory variants in the NFKB1 gene (rs3774937 and rs4648011) were associated with a faster hearing loss progression in patients with unilateral SNHL. So, individuals with unilateral MD carrying the C allele in rs3774937 or G allele in rs4648011 had a shorter mean time to reach hearing stage 3 (>40 dB HL) (log-rank test, corrected p values were p = 0.009 for rs3774937 and p = 0.003 for rs4648011, respectively). No variants influenced hearing in bilateral MD. Our data support that the allelic variants rs3774937 and rs4648011 can modify hearing outcome in patients with MD and unilateral SNHL.

  16. Intronic Variants in the NFKB1 Gene May Influence Hearing Forecast in Patients with Unilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Meniere's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Sonia; Sanchez, Elena; Requena, Teresa; Martinez-Bueno, Manuel; Benitez, Jesus; Perez, Nicolas; Trinidad, Gabriel; Soto-Varela, Andrés; Santos-Perez, Sofía; Martin-Sanz, Eduardo; Fraile, Jesus; Perez, Paz; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; Batuecas, Angel; Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan M.; Aran, Ismael; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A.

    2014-01-01

    Meniere's disease is an episodic vestibular syndrome associated with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and tinnitus. Patients with MD have an elevated prevalence of several autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriasis), which suggests a shared autoimmune background. Functional variants of several genes involved in the NF-κB pathway, such as REL, TNFAIP3, NFKB1 and TNIP1, have been associated with two or more immune-mediated diseases and allelic variations in the TLR10 gene may influence bilateral affectation and clinical course in MD. We have genotyped 716 cases of MD and 1628 controls by using the ImmunoChip, a high-density genotyping array containing 186 autoimmune loci, to explore the association of immune system related-loci with sporadic MD. Although no single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) reached a genome-wide significant association (p<10−8), we selected allelic variants in the NF-kB pathway for further analyses to evaluate the impact of these SNPs in the clinical outcome of MD in our cohort. None of the selected SNPs increased susceptibility for MD in patients with uni or bilateral SNHL. However, two potential regulatory variants in the NFKB1 gene (rs3774937 and rs4648011) were associated with a faster hearing loss progression in patients with unilateral SNHL. So, individuals with unilateral MD carrying the C allele in rs3774937 or G allele in rs4648011 had a shorter mean time to reach hearing stage 3 (>40 dB HL) (log-rank test, corrected p values were p = 0.009 for rs3774937 and p = 0.003 for rs4648011, respectively). No variants influenced hearing in bilateral MD. Our data support that the allelic variants rs3774937 and rs4648011 can modify hearing outcome in patients with MD and unilateral SNHL. PMID:25397881

  17. Imaging oxytocin × dopamine interactions: an epistasis effect of CD38 and COMT gene variants influences the impact of oxytocin on amygdala activation to social stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Carina; Montag, Christian; Reuter, Martin; Kirsch, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Although oxytocin (OT) has become a major target for the investigation of positive social processes, it can be assumed that it exerts its effects in concert with other neurotransmitters. One candidate for such an interaction is dopamine (DA). For both systems, genetic variants have been identified that influence the availability of the particular substance. A variant of the gene coding for the transmembrane protein CD38 (rs3796863), which is engaged in OT secretion, has been associated with OT plasma level. The common catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) val158met polymorphism is known to influence COMT activity and therefore the degradation of DA. The present study aimed to investigate OT × DA interactions in the context of an OT challenge study. Hence, we tested the influence of the above mentioned genetic variants and their interaction on the activation of different brain regions (amygdala, VTA, ventral striatum and fusiform gyrus) during the presentation of social stimuli. In a pharmacological cross-over design 55 participants were investigated under OT and placebo (PLA) by means of fMRI. Brain imaging results revealed no significant effects for VTA or ventral striatum. Regarding the fusiform gyrus, we could not find any effects apart from those already described in Sauer et al. (2012). Analyses of amygdala activation resulted in no gene main effect, no gene × substance interaction but a significant gene × gene × substance interaction. While under PLA the effect of CD38 on bilateral amygdala activation to social stimuli was modulated by the COMT genotype, no such epistasis effect was found under OT. Our results provide evidence for an OT × DA interaction during responses to social stimuli. We postulate that the effect of central OT secretion on amygdala response is modulated by the availability of DA. Therefore, for an understanding of the effect of social hormones on social behavior, interactions of OT with other transmitter systems have to be taken into

  18. Chemokine gene variants in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dasdemir, Selcuk; Kucukali, Cem Ismail; Bireller, Elif Sinem; Tuzun, Erdem; Cakmakoglu, Bedia

    2016-08-01

    Background Chemokines are known to play a major role in driving inflammation and immune responses in several neuroinflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Inflammation has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Aim We aimed to investigate a potential link between chemokines and schizophrenia and analyze the role of MCP-1-A2518G, SDF-1-3'A, CCR5-delta32, CCR5-A55029G, CXCR4-C138T and CCR2-V64I gene polymorphisms in the Turkish population. Methods Genotyping was conducted by PCR-RFLP based on 140 patients and 123 unrelated healthy controls to show the relation between chemokine gene variants and schizophrenia risk. Results Frequencies of CCR5-A55029G A genotypes and CCR5-A55029G AG genotypes were found higher in patients than the controls and even also CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes significantly associated according to Bonferroni correction. However, no significant association was found for any of the other polymorphisms with the risk of schizophrenia. Conclusions Our findings suggest that CCR5-A55029G polymorphisms and CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes might have association with schizophrenia pathogenesis.

  19. Variants in interleukin family of cytokines genes influence clearance of high risk HPV in HIV-1 coinfected African-American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sudenga, Staci L; Wiener, Howard W; Shendre, Aditi; Wilson, Craig M; Tang, Jianming; Shrestha, Sadeep

    2013-12-01

    Our work aimed to examine the potential influence of variants in interleukin/interleukin receptors genes on high-risk (HR-HPV) HPV clearance. Clearance of genital HR-HPV infection was evaluated for 134 HIV-1 seropositive African-American female adolescents from the Reaching for Excellence in Adolescent Care and Health (REACH) cohort. Genotyping targeted 225 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the exons, 5' untranslated region (UTR) and 3' UTR sequences of 27 immune-related candidate genes encoding interleukin family of cytokines. Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine the association of type-specific HPV clearance adjusting for time-varying CD4+ T-cell count and low-risk (LR-HPV) HPV co-infections. HR-HPV clearance rates were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with five SNPs (rs228942, rs419598, rs315950, rs7737000, and rs9292618) mapped to coding and regulatory regions in three genes (IL2RB, IL1RN, and IL7R). These data suggest that the analyzed genetic variants in interleukin family of cytokines modulate HR-HPV clearance in HIV-1 seropositive African-Americans that warrants replication.

  20. Common Variants of the Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein Gene Influence the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Insulin Resistance in Spanish Population

    PubMed Central

    Mansego, Maria Luisa; Martínez, Fernando; Martínez-Larrad, Maria Teresa; Zabena, Carina; Rojo, Gemma; Morcillo, Sonsoles; Soriguer, Federico; Martín-Escudero, Juan Carlos; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Redon, Josep; Chaves, Felipe Javier

    2012-01-01

    Summary The main objective was to evaluate the association between SNPs and haplotypes of the FABP1-4 genes and type 2 diabetes, as well as its interaction with fat intake, in one general Spanish population. The association was replicated in a second population in which HOMA index was also evaluated. Methods 1217 unrelated individuals were selected from a population-based study [Hortega study: 605 women; mean age 54 y; 7.8% with type 2 diabetes]. The replication population included 805 subjects from Segovia, a neighboring region of Spain (446 females; mean age 52 y; 10.3% with type 2 diabetes). DM2 mellitus was defined in a similar way in both studies. Fifteen SNPs previously associated with metabolic traits or with potential influence in the gene expression within the FABP1-4 genes were genotyped with SNPlex and tested. Age, sex and BMI were used as covariates in the logistic regression model. Results One polymorphism (rs2197076) and two haplotypes of the FABP-1 showed a strong association with the risk of DM2 in the original population. This association was further confirmed in the second population as well as in the pooled sample. None of the other analyzed variants in FABP2, FABP3 and FABP4 genes were associated. There was not a formal interaction between rs2197076 and fat intake. A significant association between the rs2197076 and the haplotypes of the FABP1 and HOMA-IR was also present in the replication population. Conclusions The study supports the role of common variants of the FABP-1 gene in the development of type 2 diabetes in Caucasians. PMID:22396741

  1. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-09

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.

  2. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  3. G-protein beta3 subunit gene variant is unlikely to have a significant influence on serum uric acid level in Japanese workers.

    PubMed

    Suwazono, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Uetani, Mirei; Miura, Katsuyuki; Morikawa, Yuko; Ishizaki, Masao; Kido, Teruhiko; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Nogawa, Koji

    2006-06-01

    The C825T variant of the G-protein beta3 subunit (GNB3) gene has attracted renewed attention as a candidate gene for obesity, hypertension and hyperuricemia. The main role of G-protein is to translate signals from the cell surface into a cellular response. The 825T allele is associated with a splice variant of GNB3 protein and enhanced G-protein activation. We examined the relationship between this variant and the risk of hyperuricemia in Japanese workers. The study subjects were 1,452 men and 1,169 women selected from 3,834 men and 2,591 women in 1997. On the basis of common clinical criteria, hyperuricemia I was defined as serum uric acid >or= 7.0 mg/dl in men and 6.0 mg/dl in women or taking antihyperuricemic medication. The hyperuricemia I group consisted of 186 men and 20 women and its control of 1,266 men and 1,149 women. Hyperuricemia II was defined as serum uric acid > 5.7 mg/dl (median) in men and 3.9 mg/dl (median) in women or taking antihyperuricemic medication. The hyperuricemic II group consisted of 684 men and 570 women and its control of 768 men and 599 women. To replicate previous significant results in young Caucasian men, we selected these criteria because the authors of the study in young Caucasian men adopted the median in their subjects as a cut-off. The statistical power was estimated as 99% based on the significant results in Caucasians. Genotype and allele distributions in men and women with hyperuricemia I and II were not significantly different from those in the corresponding control groups. Logistic regression analysis on hyperuricemia I and II, and multiple regression on serum uric acid level demonstrated no significant effect of the C825T genotype. Despite the sufficient statistical power, this study could not demonstrate the significant influence of C825T on hyperuricemia or serum uric acid. The targeting of this polymorphism is unlikely to be beneficial in the prevention of hyperuricemia in the general Japanese population.

  4. Circadian gene variants in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kettner, Nicole M.; Katchy, Chinenye A.; Fu, Loning

    2014-01-01

    Humans as diurnal beings are active during the day and rest at night. This daily oscillation of behavior and physiology is driven by an endogenous circadian clock not environmental cues. In modern societies, changes in lifestyle have led to a frequent disruption of the endogenous circadian homeostasis leading to increased risk of various diseases including cancer. The clock is operated by the feedback loops of circadian genes and controls daily physiology by coupling cell proliferation and metabolism, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis in peripheral tissues with physical activity, energy homeostasis, immune and neuroendocrine functions at the organismal level. Recent studies have revealed that defects in circadian genes due to targeted gene ablation in animal models or single nucleotide polymorphism, deletion, deregulation and/or epigenetic silencing in humans are closely associated with increased risk of cancer. In addition, disruption of circadian rhythm can disrupt the molecular clock in peripheral tissues in the absence of circadian gene mutations. Circadian disruption has recently been recognized as an independent cancer risk factor. Further study of the mechanism of clock-controlled tumor suppression will have a significant impact on human health by improving the efficiencies of cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:24901356

  5. Gene variants as risk factors for gastroschisis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Schultz, Kathleen; Tom, Lauren; Lin, Bin; Carmichael, Suzan L.; Lammer, Edward J.; Shaw, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    In a population‐based case‐control study in California of 228 infants, we investigated 75 genetic variants in 20 genes and risk of gastroschisis with regard to maternal age, race/ethnicity, vitamin use, and smoking exposure. We hypothesized that genes related to vascular compromise may interact with environmental factors to affect the risk of gastroschisis. Haplotypes were constructed for 75 gene variants using the HaploView program. Risk for gastroschisis associated with each gene variant was calculated for both the homozygotes and the heterozygotes, with the homozygous wildtypes as the referent. Risks were estimated as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by logistic regression. We found 11 gene variants with increased risk and four variants with decreased risk of gastroschisis for heterozygous (ORh) or homozygous variants (ORv) genotypes. These included NOS3 (rs1036145) ORh = 0.4 (95% CI: 0.2–0.7); NOS3 (rs10277237) ORv = 2.7 (95% CI: 1.3–6.0); ADD1 (rs12503220) ORh = 2.9 (95% CI: 1.6–5.4), GNB3 (rs5443) ORh = 0.2 (95% CI: 0.1–0.5), ORv = 0.4 (95% CI: 0.2–0.9); ICAM1 (rs281428) ORv = 6.9 (95% CI: 2.1–22.9), ICAM1 (rs3093030) ORv = 2.6 (95% CI: 1.2–5.6); ICAM4 (rs281438) ORv = 4.9 (95% CI: 1.4–16.6), ICAM5 (rs281417) ORh = 2.1 (95% CI: 1.1–4.1), ORv = 4.8 (95% CI: 1.7–13.6); ICAM5 (rs281440) ORh = 23.7 (95% CI: 5.5–102.5), ORv = 20.6 (95% CI: 3.4–124.3); ICAM5 (rs2075741) ORv = 2.2 (95% CI: 1.1–4.4); NAT1 ORv = 0.3 (95% CI: 0.1–0.9). There were additional associations between several gene variants and gastroschisis among women aged 20–24 and among mothers with and without vitamin use. NOS3, ADD1, ICAM1, ICAM4, and ICAM5 warrant further investigation in additional populations and with the interaction of additional environmental exposures. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27616475

  6. The influence of genomic context on mutation patterns in the human genome inferred from rare variants.

    PubMed

    Schaibley, Valerie M; Zawistowski, Matthew; Wegmann, Daniel; Ehm, Margaret G; Nelson, Matthew R; St Jean, Pamela L; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Novembre, John; Zöllner, Sebastian; Li, Jun Z

    2013-12-01

    Understanding patterns of spontaneous mutations is of fundamental interest in studies of human genome evolution and genetic disease. Here, we used extremely rare variants in humans to model the molecular spectrum of single-nucleotide mutations. Compared to common variants in humans and human-chimpanzee fixed differences (substitutions), rare variants, on average, arose more recently in the human lineage and are less affected by the potentially confounding effects of natural selection, population demographic history, and biased gene conversion. We analyzed variants obtained from a population-based sequencing study of 202 genes in >14,000 individuals. We observed considerable variability in the per-gene mutation rate, which was correlated with local GC content, but not recombination rate. Using >20,000 variants with a derived allele frequency ≤ 10(-4), we examined the effect of local GC content and recombination rate on individual variant subtypes and performed comparisons with common variants and substitutions. The influence of local GC content on rare variants differed from that on common variants or substitutions, and the differences varied by variant subtype. Furthermore, recombination rate and recombination hotspots have little effect on rare variants of any subtype, yet both have a relatively strong impact on multiple variant subtypes in common variants and substitutions. This observation is consistent with the effect of biased gene conversion or selection-dependent processes. Our results highlight the distinct biases inherent in the initial mutation patterns and subsequent evolutionary processes that affect segregating variants.

  7. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  8. ABCB1 gene variants influence tolerance to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in a large sample of Dutch cases with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    de Klerk, O L; Nolte, I M; Bet, P M; Bosker, F J; Snieder, H; den Boer, J A; Bruggeman, R; Hoogendijk, W J; Penninx, B W

    2013-08-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-driven efflux pump in the blood-brain barrier, has a major impact on the delivery of antidepressant drugs in the brain. Genetic variants in the gene ABCB1 encoding for P-gp have inconsistently been associated with adverse effects. In order to resolve these inconsistencies, we conducted a study in a large cohort of patients with major depressive disorder with the aim to unravel the association of ABCB1 variants with adverse effects of antidepressants and in particular with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which display affinity as substrate for P-gp. The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) study was used as a clinical sample. For 424 patients data were available on drug use, side effects. We selected six ABCB1 gene variants (1236T>C, 2677G>T/A, 3435T>C, rs2032583, rs2235040 and rs2235015) and analyzed them for association with adverse drug effects using multinomial regression analysis for both single variants and haplotypes. We found a significant association between the number of SSRI-related adverse drug effects and rs2032583 (P=0.001), rs2235040 (P=0.002) and a haplotype (P=0.002). Moreover, serotonergic effects (sleeplessness, gastrointestinal complaints and sexual effects) were significantly predicted by these variants and haplotype (P=0.002/0.003). We conclude that adverse drug effects with SSRI treatment, in particular serotonergic effects, are predicted by two common polymorphisms of the ABCB1 gene.

  9. Genome-wide association study suggests common variants within RP11-634B7.4 gene influencing severe pre-treatment pain in head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Gibby, Cielito C.; Wang, Jian; Silvas, Mary Rose T.; Yu, Robert K.; Hanna, Ehab Y.; Shete, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Pain is often one of the first signs of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). Pain at diagnosis is an important prognostic marker for the development of chronic pain, and importantly, for the overall survival time. To identify variants influencing severe pre-treatment pain in 1,368 patients newly diagnosed with HNSCC, we conducted a genome-wide association study based on 730,525 tagging SNPs. The patients were all previously untreated for cancer. About 15% of the patients had severe pre-treatment pain, defined as pain score ≥7 (0 = “no pain” and 10 = “worst pain”). We identified 3 common genetic variants in high linkage disequilibrium for severe pre-treatment pain, representing one genomic region at 1q44 (rs3862188, P = 3.45 × 10−8; rs880143, P = 3.45 × 10−8; and rs7526880, P = 4.92 × 10−8), which maps to the RP11-634B7.4 gene, a novel antisense gene to three olfactory receptor genes. Olfactory receptor genes, upstream effectors of the MAPK signaling cascade, might be novel target genes for pain in HNSCC patients. Future experimental validation to explore biological mechanisms will be key to defining the role of the intronic variants and non-coding RNA for pain in patients with HNSCC. PMID:27670397

  10. Influence of Cyp2c19*2 Gene Variant on Therapeutic Response During Clopidogrel Treatment in Patients with Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Ignjatović, Svetlana; Rakićević, Ljiljana; Kusić-Tišma, Jelena; Radojković, Dragica; Čalija, Branko; Strugarević, Evgenija; Radak, Ðorđe; Kovač, Mirjana

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Despite the proven clinical effect of oral antiplatelet drugs, a considerable number of patients do not have an adequate response to clopidogrel. The aim of our study was to determine the influence of CYP2C19*2 loss-of-function variant allele on clopidogrel responsiveness in patients with carotid artery stenosis. Methods One hundred and twelve patients with carotid artery stenosis undergoing endarterectomy were included in this one-year prospective study. All of them received clopidogrel (75 mg daily) for at least 30 days after the intervention. They were followed from the moment of hospital admission. CYP2C19*2 genotyping was performed by TaqMan Assay. The influence of CYP2C19*2 variant allele on clopidogrel platelet reactivity was determined using multiple-electrode aggregometry (MEA). Results Genotyping results showed that 82 (73.2%) patients were homozygous for wild type, 29 (25.9%) were heterozygous for the CYP2C19*2 allele and 1 (0.9%) was CYP2C19*2 homozygous. After 24 hours, among those with the wild type 29.3% were clopidogrel responders, and in those with the CYP2C19*2 alleles 10%. In the wild type group, 74.4% were clopidogrel responders after 7 days of taking the drug; 82.9% after 30 days of clopidogrel introduction, respectively. In patients with the CYP2C19*2 alleles the number of responders increased up to 46.7% after 7 days; 53.3% after 30 days of taking the drug, respectively. The risk for being a low-responder is higher for the patients heterozygous for the CYP2C19*2 allele vs. wild-type (OR 4.250, 95% CI 1.695-10.658, P<0.01). Conclusions The CYP2C19*2 loss-of-function variant allele has significant influence on clopidogrel response in patients with carotid artery stenosis undergoing endarterectomy. PMID:28356861

  11. PRRC2A and BCL2L11 gene variants influence risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma: results from the InterLymph consortium

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Lucia; Slager, Susan L.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Morton, Lindsay; Skibola, Danica R.; Novak, Anne J.; Riby, Jacques; Ansell, Stephen M.; Halperin, Eran; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Agana, Luz; Wang, Alice H.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Severson, Richard K.; Cozen, Wendy; Spinelli, John; Butterbach, Katja; Becker, Nikolaus; de Sanjose, Silvia; Benavente, Yolanda; Cocco, Pierluigi; Staines, Anthony; Maynadié, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Lan, Qing; Zhang, Yawei; Zheng, Tongzhang; Purdue, Mark; Armstrong, Bruce; Kricker, Anne; Vajdic, Claire M.; Grulich, Andrew; Smith, Martyn T.; Bracci, Paige M.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hartge, Patricia; Cerhan, James R.; Wang, Sophia S.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Skibola, Christine F.

    2012-01-01

    Many common genetic variants have been associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but individual study results are often conflicting. To confirm the role of putative risk alleles in B-cell NHL etiology, we performed a validation genotyping study of 67 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms within InterLymph, a large international consortium of NHL case-control studies. A meta-analysis was performed on data from 5633 B-cell NHL cases and 7034 controls from 8 InterLymph studies. rs3789068 in the proapoptotic BCL2L11 gene was associated with an increased risk for B-cell NHL (odds ratio = 1.21, P random = 2.21 × 10−11), with similar risk estimates for common B-cell subtypes. PRRC2A rs3132453 in the HLA complex class III region conferred a reduced risk of B-cell NHL (odds ratio = 0.68, P random = 1.07 × 10−9) and was likewise evident for common B-cell subtypes. These results are consistent with the known biology of NHL and provide insights into shared pathogenic components, including apoptosis and immune regulation, for the major B-cell lymphoma subtypes. PMID:23047821

  12. A functional variant in the neuropeptide S receptor 1 gene moderates the influence of urban upbringing on stress processing in the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Streit, Fabian; Haddad, Leila; Paul, Torsten; Frank, Josef; Schäfer, Axel; Nikitopoulos, Jörg; Akdeniz, Ceren; Lederbogen, Florian; Treutlein, Jens; Witt, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Rietschel, Marcella; Kirsch, Peter; Wüst, Stefan

    2014-07-01

    We have previously shown that urban upbringing and city living were associated with stress-induced activity in the amygdala and the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC). This finding might link the epidemiological risk factor "urbanicity" to neurobiological mechanisms of psychiatric disorders. However, given the heritability of stress-related phenotypes, it appears likely that genetic factors can modulate the effect of urbanicity on social stress processing. In the present exploratory study, we investigated if a functional sequence variation in the neuropeptide S receptor gene (NPSR1 rs324981) is associated with brain activation patterns under acute psychosocial stress and if it modulates the link between urbanicity and central stress processing. In animals, neuropeptide S has strong anxiolytic effects and it induces hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation. In humans, rs324981 was found to be associated with anxiety and stress-related phenotypes. Forty-two subjects were exposed to a psychosocial stress task for scanner environments (ScanSTRESS). While no main effect of rs324981 on amygdala and pACC activity was detected, we found a distinct interaction between rs324981 and urban upbringing modulating right amygdala responses. Moreover, right amygdala responses were significantly higher in subjects who also showed a salivary cortisol response to the stress exposure. The present finding of a gene × environment interaction further supports the view that the brain NPS system is involved in central stress regulation. This study provides first evidence for the assumption that a NPSR1 variant modulates brain activation under stress, interacting with the environmental risk factor urban upbringing.

  13. Clinical Relevance of HLA Gene Variants in HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Zou, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Host gene variants may influence the natural history of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in humans, is one of the most important host factors that are correlated with the clinical course of HBV infection. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near certain HLA gene loci are strongly associated with not only persistent HBV infection but also spontaneous HBV clearance and seroconversion, disease progression, and the development of liver cirrhosis and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB). These variations also influence the efficacy of interferon (IFN) and nucleot(s)ide analogue (NA) treatment and response to HBV vaccines. Meanwhile, discrepant conclusions were reached with different patient cohorts. It is therefore essential to identify the associations of specific HLA allele variants with disease progression and viral clearance in chronic HBV infection among different ethnic populations. A better understanding of HLA polymorphism relevance in HBV infection outcome would enable us to elucidate the roles of HLA SNPs in the pathogenesis and clearance of HBV in different areas and ethnic groups, to improve strategies for the prevention and treatment of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27243039

  14. Lack of influence of COMT and NET genes variants on executive functions in schizophrenic and bipolar patients, their first-degree relatives and controls.

    PubMed

    Szöke, A; Schürhoff, F; Méary, A; Mathieu, F; Chevalier, F; Trandafir, A; Alter, C; Roy, I; Bellivier, F; Leboyer, M

    2006-07-05

    Abnormal dopaminergic function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) may be a key factor in the etiopathogeny of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Both schizophrenic and bipolar subjects have executive functions (EF) deficits, thought to reflect abnormal PFC function. The main inactivation pathways for dopamine in the PFC are enzymatic cleavage by the Carboxy-O-Methyl-Transferase (COMT) and reuptake by the nor-epinephrine transporter (NET). Our aim in this study was to replicate previous studies that investigated influence of the COMT genotype on EF in schizophrenic subjects, their relatives and controls and extend their scope by including bipolar patients, and their relatives and by exploring NET gene polymorphisms influence on executive performances. We investigated one functional polymorphism of the COMT gene and two polymorphisms of the NET gene. EF were assessed by means of the Trail Making Test (TMT) and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). We assessed the effect of each of the three genotypes on EF for the whole sample (N = 318) and separately in schizophrenic (N = 66), bipolar (N = 94) and healthy subjects (i.e., relatives and controls N = 158). Separate analyses were performed because of the presence, in patients samples, of potentially confounding factors, especially medication. Genotype had no significant effect on the cognitive measures in any of the analyses (for the two EF measures, the three polymorphisms, and the four groups). In our sample we found no evidence in favor of a major effect of COMT or NET polymorphisms on the two tests of EF.

  15. Comprehensive Analysis of Pathogenic Deletion Variants in Fanconi Anemia Genes

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Elizabeth K.; Kamat, Aparna; Lach, Francis P.; Donovan, Frank X.; Kimble, Danielle C.; Narisu, Narisu; Sanborn, Erica; Boulad, Farid; Davies, Stella M.; Gillio, Alfred P.; Harris, Richard E.; MacMillan, Margaret L.; Wagner, John E.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Auerbach, Arleen D.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C.

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare recessive disease resulting from mutations in one of at least 16 different genes. Mutation types and phenotypic manifestations of FA are highly heterogeneous and influence the clinical management of the disease. We analyzed 202 FA families for large deletions, using high-resolution Comparative Genome Hybridization arrays (arrayCGH), Single Nucleotide Polymorphism arrays (SNParrays) and DNA sequencing. We found pathogenic deletions in 88 FANCA, seven FANCC, two FANCD2, and one FANCB families. We find 35% of FA families carry large deletions, accounting for 18% of all FA pathogenic variants. Cloning and sequencing across the deletion breakpoints revealed that 52 FANCA deletion ends, and one FANCC deletion end extended beyond the gene boundaries, potentially affecting neighboring genes with phenotypic consequences. Seventy-five percent of the FANCA deletions are Alu-Alu mediated, predominantly by AluY elements, and appear to be caused by Non-Allelic Homologous Recombination. Individual Alu hotspots were identified. Defining the haplotypes of four FANCA deletions shared by multiple families revealed that three share a common ancestry. Knowing the exact molecular changes that lead to the disease may be critical for a better understanding of the FA phenotype, and to gain insight into the mechanisms driving these pathogenic deletion variants. PMID:25168418

  16. GBA Variants Influence Motor and Non-Motor Features of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Jesús, Silvia; Huertas, Ismael; Bernal-Bernal, Inmaculada; Bonilla-Toribio, Marta; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas-González, Laura; Gómez-Llamas, Myriam; Carrillo, Fátima; Calderón, Enrique; Carballo, Manuel; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Mir, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The presence of mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene is a known factor increasing the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). Mutations carriers have earlier disease onset and are more likely to develop neuropsychiatric symptoms than other sporadic PD cases. These symptoms have primarily been observed in Parkinson's patients carrying the most common pathogenic mutations L444P and N370S. However, recent findings suggest that other variants across the gene may have a different impact on the phenotype as well as on the disease progression. We aimed to explore the influence of variants across GBA gene on the clinical features and treatment related complications in PD. In this study, we screened the GBA gene in a cohort of 532 well-characterised PD patients and 542 controls from southern Spain. The potential pathogeniticy of the identified variants was assessed using in-silico analysis and subsequently classified as benign or deleterious. As a result, we observed a higher frequency of GBA variants in PD patients (12.2% vs. 7.9% in controls, p = 0.021), earlier mean age at disease onset in GBA variant carriers (50.6 vs. 56.6 years; p = 0.013), as well as more prevalent motor and non-motor symptoms in patients carrying deleterious variants. In addition, we found that dopaminergic motor complications are influenced by both benign and deleterious variants. Our results highlight the fact that the impact on the phenotype highly depends on the potential pathogenicity of the carried variants. Therefore, the course of motor and non-motor symptoms as well as treatment-related motor complications could be influenced by GBA variants.

  17. GBA Variants Influence Motor and Non-Motor Features of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jesús, Silvia; Huertas, Ismael; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas-González, Laura; Gómez-Llamas, Myriam; Carrillo, Fátima; Calderón, Enrique; Carballo, Manuel; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Mir, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The presence of mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene is a known factor increasing the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease (PD). Mutations carriers have earlier disease onset and are more likely to develop neuropsychiatric symptoms than other sporadic PD cases. These symptoms have primarily been observed in Parkinson’s patients carrying the most common pathogenic mutations L444P and N370S. However, recent findings suggest that other variants across the gene may have a different impact on the phenotype as well as on the disease progression. We aimed to explore the influence of variants across GBA gene on the clinical features and treatment related complications in PD. In this study, we screened the GBA gene in a cohort of 532 well-characterised PD patients and 542 controls from southern Spain. The potential pathogeniticy of the identified variants was assessed using in-silico analysis and subsequently classified as benign or deleterious. As a result, we observed a higher frequency of GBA variants in PD patients (12.2% vs. 7.9% in controls, p = 0.021), earlier mean age at disease onset in GBA variant carriers (50.6 vs. 56.6 years; p = 0.013), as well as more prevalent motor and non-motor symptoms in patients carrying deleterious variants. In addition, we found that dopaminergic motor complications are influenced by both benign and deleterious variants. Our results highlight the fact that the impact on the phenotype highly depends on the potential pathogenicity of the carried variants. Therefore, the course of motor and non-motor symptoms as well as treatment-related motor complications could be influenced by GBA variants. PMID:28030538

  18. Adrenergic-pathway Gene Variants Influence β-Blocker-related Outcomes after Acute Coronary Syndrome in a Race-specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Cresci, Sharon; Dorn, Gerald W.; Jones, Philip G.; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Li, Allie Y.; Lenzini, Petra A.; Province, Michael A.; Spertus, John A.; Lanfear, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Overcoming racial differences in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) outcomes is a strategic goal for US healthcare. Genetic polymorphisms in the adrenergic pathway appear to explain some outcome differences by race in other cardiovascular diseases treated with β-adrenergic receptor-blockade (BB). Whether these genetic variants are associated with survival among ACS patients treated with BB, and if this differs by race, is unknown. Background BB after ACS is a measure of quality care, but the effectiveness across racial groups, is less clear. Methods A prospective cohort of 2,673 ACS patients (2,072 Caucasian; 601 African Americans) discharged on BB from 22 U.S. hospitals were followed for 2 years. Subjects were genotyped for polymorphisms in ADRB1, ADRB2, ADRA2C, and GRK5. We used proportional hazards regression to model the effect of genotype on mortality, stratified by race and adjusted for baseline factors. Results The overall 2-year mortality rate was 7.5% for Caucasians and 16.7% for African Americans. The prognosis associated with different genotypes in these BB-treated patients differed by race. In Caucasians, ADRA2C 322-325 deletion (D) carriers had significantly lower mortality as compared with homozygous individuals lacking the deletion (HR 0.46; CI 0.21, 0.99; p=0.047; race-by-genotype interaction p= 0.053). In African Americans, the ADRB2 16R allele was associated with significantly increased mortality (HR for RG vs. GG =2.10; CI 1.14, 3.86; RR vs. GG =2.65; CI 1.38, 5.08; p=0.013; race-by-genotype interaction p=0.096). Conclusions Adrenergic pathway polymorphisms are associated with mortality in ACS patients receiving BB in a race-specific manner. Understanding the mechanism by which different genes impact post-ACS mortality differently in Caucasian and African Americans may illuminate opportunities to improve BB therapy in these groups. PMID:22703928

  19. Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... 20, 2014 Common gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism Roles of heritability, mutations, environment ... ASD) was traced to inherited variations in the genetic code shared by many people. These and other ( ...

  20. Identifying Mendelian disease genes with the Variant Effect Scoring Tool

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Whole exome sequencing studies identify hundreds to thousands of rare protein coding variants of ambiguous significance for human health. Computational tools are needed to accelerate the identification of specific variants and genes that contribute to human disease. Results We have developed the Variant Effect Scoring Tool (VEST), a supervised machine learning-based classifier, to prioritize rare missense variants with likely involvement in human disease. The VEST classifier training set comprised ~ 45,000 disease mutations from the latest Human Gene Mutation Database release and another ~45,000 high frequency (allele frequency >1%) putatively neutral missense variants from the Exome Sequencing Project. VEST outperforms some of the most popular methods for prioritizing missense variants in carefully designed holdout benchmarking experiments (VEST ROC AUC = 0.91, PolyPhen2 ROC AUC = 0.86, SIFT4.0 ROC AUC = 0.84). VEST estimates variant score p-values against a null distribution of VEST scores for neutral variants not included in the VEST training set. These p-values can be aggregated at the gene level across multiple disease exomes to rank genes for probable disease involvement. We tested the ability of an aggregate VEST gene score to identify candidate Mendelian disease genes, based on whole-exome sequencing of a small number of disease cases. We used whole-exome data for two Mendelian disorders for which the causal gene is known. Considering only genes that contained variants in all cases, the VEST gene score ranked dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) number 2 of 2253 genes in four cases of Miller syndrome, and myosin-3 (MYH3) number 2 of 2313 genes in three cases of Freeman Sheldon syndrome. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the potential power gain of aggregating bioinformatics variant scores into gene-level scores and the general utility of bioinformatics in assisting the search for disease genes in large-scale exome sequencing studies. VEST is

  1. Arrhythmogenic KCNE gene variants: current knowledge and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Crump, Shawn M.; Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    There are twenty-five known inherited cardiac arrhythmia susceptibility genes, all of which encode either ion channel pore-forming subunits or proteins that regulate aspects of ion channel biology such as function, trafficking, and localization. The human KCNE gene family comprises five potassium channel regulatory subunits, sequence variants in each of which are associated with cardiac arrhythmias. KCNE gene products exhibit promiscuous partnering and in some cases ubiquitous expression, hampering efforts to unequivocally correlate each gene to specific native potassium currents. Likewise, deducing the molecular etiology of cardiac arrhythmias in individuals harboring rare KCNE gene variants, or more common KCNE polymorphisms, can be challenging. In this review we provide an update on putative arrhythmia-causing KCNE gene variants, and discuss current thinking and future challenges in the study of molecular mechanisms of KCNE-associated cardiac rhythm disturbances. PMID:24478792

  2. Variants in the vitamin D receptor gene and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wjst, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Background Early lifetime exposure to dietary or supplementary vitamin D has been predicted to be a risk factor for later allergy. Twin studies suggest that response to vitamin D exposure might be influenced by genetic factors. As these effects are primarily mediated through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), single base variants in this gene may be risk factors for asthma or allergy. Results 951 individuals from 224 pedigrees with at least 2 asthmatic children were analyzed for 13 SNPs in the VDR. There was no preferential transmission to children with asthma. In their unaffected sibs, however, one allele in the 5' region was 0.5-fold undertransmitted (p = 0.049), while two other alleles in the 3' terminal region were 2-fold over-transmitted (p = 0.013 and 0.018). An association was also seen with bronchial hyperreactivity against methacholine and with specific immunoglobulin E serum levels. Conclusion The transmission disequilibrium in unaffected sibs of otherwise multiple-affected families seem to be a powerful statistical test. A preferential transmission of vitamin D receptor variants to children with asthma could not be confirmed but raises the possibility of a protective effect for unaffected children. PMID:15651992

  3. Cellobiohydrolase I gene and improved variants

    DOEpatents

    Adney, William S.; Decker, Stephen R.; Mc Carter, Suzanne; Baker, John O.; Nieves, Raphael; Himmel, Michael E.; Vinzant, Todd B.

    2008-05-20

    The disclosure provides a method for preparing an active exoglucanase in a heterologous host of eukaryotic origin. The method includes mutagenesis to reduce glycosylation of the exoglucanase when expressed in a heterologous host. It is further disclosed a method to produce variant cellobiohydrolase that is stable at high temperature through mutagenesis.

  4. Utility of gene-specific algorithms for predicting pathogenicity of uncertain gene variants

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Elaine; Williams, Marc S; Narus, Scott P; Facelli, Julio C; Mitchell, Joyce A

    2011-01-01

    The rapid advance of gene sequencing technologies has produced an unprecedented rate of discovery of genome variation in humans. A growing number of authoritative clinical repositories archive gene variants and disease phenotypes, yet there are currently many more gene variants that lack clear annotation or disease association. To date, there has been very limited coverage of gene-specific predictors in the literature. Here the evaluation is presented of “gene-specific” predictor models based on a naïve Bayesian classifier for 20 gene–disease datasets, containing 3986 variants with clinically characterized patient conditions. The utility of gene-specific prediction is then compared with “all-gene” generalized prediction and also with existing popular predictors. Gene-specific computational prediction models derived from clinically curated gene variant disease datasets often outperform established generalized algorithms for novel and uncertain gene variants. PMID:22037892

  5. Association between gene variants and response to buprenorphine maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Somaini, Lorenzo; Leonardi, Claudio; Cortese, Elena; Maremmani, Icro; Manfredini, Matteo; Donnini, Claudia

    2014-01-30

    A variety of studies were addressed to differentiate responders and non-responders to substitution treatment among heroin dependent patients, without conclusive findings. In particular, preliminary pharmacogenetic findings have been reported to predict treatment effectiveness in mental health and substance use disorders. Aim of the present study was to investigate the possible association of buprenorphine (BUP) treatment outcome with gene variants that may affect kappa-opioid receptors and dopamine system function. One hundred and seven heroin addicts (West European, Caucasians) who underwent buprenorphine maintenance treatment were genotyped and classified into two groups (A and B) on the basis of treatment outcome. Non-responders to buprenorphine (group B) have been identified taking into account early drop out, continuous use of heroin, severe behavioral or psychiatric problems, misbehavior and diversion during the 6 months treatment period. No difference was evidenced between responders and non-responders to BUP in the frequency of kappa opioid receptor (OPRK1) 36G>T SNP. The frequency of dopamine transporter (DAT) gene polymorphism (SLC6A3/DAT1), allele 10, was evidently much higher in "non-responder" than in "responder" individuals (64.9% vs. 55.93%) whereas the frequency of the category of other alleles (6, 7 and 11) was higher in responder than in non-responder individuals (11.02% vs. 2.13% respectively). On one hand, the hypothesis that possible gene-related changes in kappa-opioid receptor could consistently affect buprenorphine pharmacological action and clinical effectiveness was not confirmed in our study, at least in relation to the single nucleotide polymorphism 36G>T. On the other hand, the possibility that gene-related dopamine changes could have reduced BUP effectiveness and impaired maintenance treatment outcome was cautiously supported by our findings. DAT1 gene variants such as allele 10, previously reported in association with personality and

  6. Genetic variant in the 3'-untranslated region of VEGFR1 gene influences chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer development in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Yang, Lei; Deng, Jieqiong; Wang, Bo; Yang, Xiaorong; Yang, Rongrong; Cheng, Mei; Fang, Wenxiang; Qiu, Fuman; Zhang, Xin; Ji, Weidong; Ran, Pixin; Zhou, Yifeng; Lu, Jiachun

    2014-09-01

    Lung inflammation and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) are two pathogenic features for the two contextual diseases: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. VEGFR1 (or FLT1) plays a certain role in promoting tumour growth, inflammation and EMT. To simultaneously test the association between the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in VEGFR1 and risk of COPD and lung cancer would reveal genetic mechanisms shared by these two diseases and joint aetiology. We conducted a two-population hospital-based case-control study. Three potential functional SNPs (rs664393, rs7326277 and rs9554314) were genotyped in southern Chinese and validated in eastern Chinese to explore their associations with COPD risk in 1511 COPD patients and 1677 normal lung function controls, and with lung cancer risk in 1559 lung cancer cases and 1679 cancer-free controls. We also detected the function of the promising SNP. Individuals carrying the rs7326277C (CT+CC) variant genotypes of VEGFR1 had a significant decrease in risk of both COPD (OR = 0.78; 95% CI = 0.68-0.90) and lung cancer (OR = 0.79; 95% CI = 0.64-0.98), compared with those carrying the rs7326277TT genotype. Functional assays further showed that the rs7326277C genotypes had lower transcriptional activity and caused decreased VEGFR expression, compared with the rs7326277TT genotype. However, no significant association was observed for the other two SNPs (rs664393 and rs9554314) and either COPD or lung cancer risk. Our data suggested that the rs7326277C variant of VEGFR1 could reduce both COPD and lung cancer risk by lowering VEGFR1 mRNA expression; the SNP might be a common susceptible locus for both COPD and lung cancer.

  7. COMT gene locus: new functional variants

    PubMed Central

    Meloto, Carolina B.; Segall, Samantha K.; Smith, Shad; Parisien, Marc; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M.; Gauthier, Josée; Tsao, Douglas; Convertino, Marino; Piltonen, Marjo H.; Slade, Gary Dmitri; Fillingim, Roger B.; Greenspan, Joel D.; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charles; Maixner, William; Zaykin, Dmitri; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Reenilä, Ilkka; Männistö, Pekka T.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. Numerous studies have linked COMT to pivotal brain functions such as mood, cognition, response to stress, and pain. Both nociception and risk of clinical pain have been associated with COMT genetic variants, and this association was shown to be mediated through adrenergic pathways. Here, we show that association studies between COMT polymorphic markers and pain phenotypes in 2 independent cohorts identified a functional marker, rs165774, situated in the 3′ untranslated region of a newfound splice variant, (a)-COMT. Sequence comparisons showed that the (a)-COMT transcript is highly conserved in primates, and deep sequencing data demonstrated that (a)-COMT is expressed across several human tissues, including the brain. In silico analyses showed that the (a)-COMT enzyme features a distinct C-terminus structure, capable of stabilizing substrates in its active site. In vitro experiments demonstrated not only that (a)-COMT is catalytically active but also that it displays unique substrate specificity, exhibiting enzymatic activity with dopamine but not epinephrine. They also established that the pain-protective A allele of rs165774 coincides with lower COMT activity, suggesting contribution to decreased pain sensitivity through increased dopaminergic rather than decreased adrenergic tone, characteristic of reference isoforms. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of the (a)-COMT isoform in nociceptive signaling and suggest that genetic variations in (a)-COMT isoforms may contribute to individual variability in pain phenotypes. PMID:26207649

  8. COMT gene locus: new functional variants.

    PubMed

    Meloto, Carolina B; Segall, Samantha K; Smith, Shad; Parisien, Marc; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M; Gauthier, Josée; Tsao, Douglas; Convertino, Marino; Piltonen, Marjo H; Slade, Gary Dmitri; Fillingim, Roger B; Greenspan, Joel D; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charles; Maixner, William; Zaykin, Dmitri; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Reenilä, Ilkka; Männistö, Pekka T; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-10-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. Numerous studies have linked COMT to pivotal brain functions such as mood, cognition, response to stress, and pain. Both nociception and risk of clinical pain have been associated with COMT genetic variants, and this association was shown to be mediated through adrenergic pathways. Here, we show that association studies between COMT polymorphic markers and pain phenotypes in 2 independent cohorts identified a functional marker, rs165774, situated in the 3' untranslated region of a newfound splice variant, (a)-COMT. Sequence comparisons showed that the (a)-COMT transcript is highly conserved in primates, and deep sequencing data demonstrated that (a)-COMT is expressed across several human tissues, including the brain. In silico analyses showed that the (a)-COMT enzyme features a distinct C-terminus structure, capable of stabilizing substrates in its active site. In vitro experiments demonstrated not only that (a)-COMT is catalytically active but also that it displays unique substrate specificity, exhibiting enzymatic activity with dopamine but not epinephrine. They also established that the pain-protective A allele of rs165774 coincides with lower COMT activity, suggesting contribution to decreased pain sensitivity through increased dopaminergic rather than decreased adrenergic tone, characteristic of reference isoforms. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of the (a)-COMT isoform in nociceptive signaling and suggest that genetic variations in (a)-COMT isoforms may contribute to individual variability in pain phenotypes.

  9. Religion priming differentially increases prosocial behavior among variants of the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Joni Y; Kim, Heejung S; Mojaverian, Taraneh; Kelley, Lauren D S; Park, In Young; Janusonis, Skirmantas

    2013-02-01

    Building on gene-environment interaction (G × E) research, this study examines how the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene interacts with a situational prime of religion to influence prosocial behavior. Some DRD4 variants tend to be more susceptible to environmental influences, whereas other variants are less susceptible. Thus, certain life environments may be associated with acts of prosociality for some DRD4 variants but not others. Given that religion can act as an environmental influence that increases prosocial behavior, environmental input in the form of religion priming may have G × E effects. Results showed that participants with DRD4 susceptibility variants were more prosocial when implicitly primed with religion than not primed with religion, whereas participants without DRD4 susceptibility variants were not impacted by priming. This research has implications for understanding why different people may behave prosocially for different reasons and also integrates G × E research with experimental psychology.

  10. BRCA Share: A Collection of Clinical BRCA Gene Variants.

    PubMed

    Béroud, Christophe; Letovsky, Stanley I; Braastad, Corey D; Caputo, Sandrine M; Beaudoux, Olivia; Bignon, Yves Jean; Bressac-De Paillerets, Brigitte; Bronner, Myriam; Buell, Crystal M; Collod-Béroud, Gwenaëlle; Coulet, Florence; Derive, Nicolas; Divincenzo, Christina; Elzinga, Christopher D; Garrec, Céline; Houdayer, Claude; Karbassi, Izabela; Lizard, Sarab; Love, Angela; Muller, Danièle; Nagan, Narasimhan; Nery, Camille R; Rai, Ghadi; Revillion, Françoise; Salgado, David; Sévenet, Nicolas; Sinilnikova, Olga; Sobol, Hagay; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Toulas, Christine; Trautman, Edwin; Vaur, Dominique; Vilquin, Paul; Weymouth, Katelyn S; Willis, Alecia; Eisenberg, Marcia; Strom, Charles M

    2016-12-01

    As next-generation sequencing increases access to human genetic variation, the challenge of determining clinical significance of variants becomes ever more acute. Germline variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes can confer substantial lifetime risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Assessment of variant pathogenicity is a vital part of clinical genetic testing for these genes. A database of clinical observations of BRCA variants is a critical resource in that process. This article describes BRCA Share™, a database created by a unique international alliance of academic centers and commercial testing laboratories. By integrating the content of the Universal Mutation Database generated by the French Unicancer Genetic Group with the testing results of two large commercial laboratories, Quest Diagnostics and Laboratory Corporation of America (LabCorp), BRCA Share™ has assembled one of the largest publicly accessible collections of BRCA variants currently available. Although access is available to academic researchers without charge, commercial participants in the project are required to pay a support fee and contribute their data. The fees fund the ongoing curation effort, as well as planned experiments to functionally characterize variants of uncertain significance. BRCA Share™ databases can therefore be considered as models of successful data sharing between private companies and the academic world.

  11. Functional characterization of BRCA1 gene variants by mini-gene splicing assay

    PubMed Central

    Steffensen, Ane Y; Dandanell, Mette; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Finn C; Hansen, Thomas vO

    2014-01-01

    Mutational screening of the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 leads to the identification of numerous pathogenic variants such as frameshift and nonsense variants, as well as large genomic rearrangements. The screening moreover identifies a large number of variants, for example, missense, silent, and intron variants, which are classified as variants of unknown clinical significance owing to the lack of causal evidence. Variants of unknown clinical significance can potentially have an impact on splicing and therefore functional examinations are warranted to classify whether these variants are pathogenic or benign. Here we validate a mini-gene splicing assay by comparing the results of 24 variants with previously published data from RT-PCR analysis on RNA from blood samples/lymphoblastoid cell lines. The analysis showed an overall concordance of 100%. In addition, we investigated 13 BRCA1 variants of unknown clinical significance or putative variants affecting splicing by in silico analysis and mini-gene splicing assay. Both the in silico analysis and mini-gene splicing assay classified six BRCA1 variants as pathogenic (c.80+1G>A, c.132C>T (p.=), c.213−1G>A, c.670+1delG, c.4185+1G>A, and c.5075−1G>C), whereas six BRCA1 variants were classified as neutral (c.-19-22_-19-21dupAT, c.302−15C>G, c.547+14delG, c.4676−20A>G, c.4987−21G>T, and c.5278−14C>G) and one BRCA1 variant remained unclassified (c.670+16G>A). In conclusion, our study emphasizes that in silico analysis and mini-gene splicing assays are important for the classification of variants, especially if no RNA is available from the patient. This knowledge is crucial for proper genetic counseling of patients and their family members. PMID:24667779

  12. Functional characterization of BRCA1 gene variants by mini-gene splicing assay.

    PubMed

    Steffensen, Ane Y; Dandanell, Mette; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Finn C; Hansen, Thomas vO

    2014-12-01

    Mutational screening of the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 leads to the identification of numerous pathogenic variants such as frameshift and nonsense variants, as well as large genomic rearrangements. The screening moreover identifies a large number of variants, for example, missense, silent, and intron variants, which are classified as variants of unknown clinical significance owing to the lack of causal evidence. Variants of unknown clinical significance can potentially have an impact on splicing and therefore functional examinations are warranted to classify whether these variants are pathogenic or benign. Here we validate a mini-gene splicing assay by comparing the results of 24 variants with previously published data from RT-PCR analysis on RNA from blood samples/lymphoblastoid cell lines. The analysis showed an overall concordance of 100%. In addition, we investigated 13 BRCA1 variants of unknown clinical significance or putative variants affecting splicing by in silico analysis and mini-gene splicing assay. Both the in silico analysis and mini-gene splicing assay classified six BRCA1 variants as pathogenic (c.80+1G>A, c.132C>T (p.=), c.213-1G>A, c.670+1delG, c.4185+1G>A, and c.5075-1G>C), whereas six BRCA1 variants were classified as neutral (c.-19-22_-19-21dupAT, c.302-15C>G, c.547+14delG, c.4676-20A>G, c.4987-21G>T, and c.5278-14C>G) and one BRCA1 variant remained unclassified (c.670+16G>A). In conclusion, our study emphasizes that in silico analysis and mini-gene splicing assays are important for the classification of variants, especially if no RNA is available from the patient. This knowledge is crucial for proper genetic counseling of patients and their family members.

  13. Combination of polymorphic variants in serotonin transporter and monoamine oxidase-A genes may influence the risk for early-onset alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Bordukalo-Niksic, Tatjana; Stefulj, Jasminka; Matosic, Ana; Mokrovic, Gordana; Cicin-Sain, Lipa

    2012-12-30

    The combinatory effect of polymorphisms in serotonin transporter and monoamine oxidase-A genes on the aetiopathogenesis of alcoholism was investigated in a sample of 714 individuals. Increased frequency of subjects having three 'suspected' genotypes (5-HTTLPR-LL, STin2-1010 and MAO-A 3-repeat allele) was found among type-2 alcoholic patients (P=0.0189). Results highlight serotonergic/genetic contribution to early-onset alcoholism.

  14. Gene variant linked to lung cancer risk

    Cancer.gov

    A variation of the gene NFKB1, called rs4648127, is associated with an estimated 44 percent reduction in lung cancer risk. When this information, derived from samples obtained as part of a large NCI-sponsored prevention clinical trial, was compared with d

  15. Risk alleles of genes with monoallelic expression are enriched in gain-of-function variants and depleted in loss-of-function variants for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Savova, V; Vinogradova, S; Pruss, D; Gimelbrant, A A; Weiss, L A

    2017-03-07

    Over 3000 human genes can be expressed from a single allele in one cell, and from the other allele-or both-in neighboring cells. Little is known about the consequences of this epigenetic phenomenon, monoallelic expression (MAE). We hypothesized that MAE increases expression variability, with a potential impact on human disease. Here, we use a chromatin signature to infer MAE for genes in lymphoblastoid cell lines and human fetal brain tissue. We confirm that across clones MAE status correlates with expression level, and that in human tissue data sets, MAE genes show increased expression variability. We then compare mono- and biallelic genes at three distinct scales. In the human population, we observe that genes with polymorphisms influencing expression variance are more likely to be MAE (P<1.1 × 10(-6)). At the trans-species level, we find gene expression differences and directional selection between humans and chimpanzees more common among MAE genes (P<0.05). Extending to human disease, we show that MAE genes are under-represented in neurodevelopmental copy number variants (CNVs) (P<2.2 × 10(-10)), suggesting that pathogenic variants acting via expression level are less likely to involve MAE genes. Using neuropsychiatric single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and single-nucleotide variant (SNV) data, we see that genes with pathogenic expression-altering or loss-of-function variants are less likely MAE (P<7.5 × 10(-11)) and genes with only missense or gain-of-function variants are more likely MAE (P<1.4 × 10(-6)). Together, our results suggest that MAE genes tolerate a greater range of expression level than biallelic expression (BAE) genes, and this information may be useful in prediction of pathogenicity.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 7 March 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.13.

  16. Influence of CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 gene variants on antidepressant response in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Brandl, E J; Tiwari, A K; Zhou, X; Deluce, J; Kennedy, J L; Müller, D J; Richter, M A

    2014-04-01

    Numerous studies have reported on pharmacogenetics of antidepressant response in depression. In contrast, little is known of response predictors in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), a disorder with among the lowest proportion of responders to medication (40-60%). Our study is the largest investigation to date (N=184) of treatment response and side effects to antidepressants in OCD based on metabolizer status for CYP2D6 and CYP2C19. We observed significantly more failed medication trials in CYP2D6 non-extensive compared with extensive metabolizers (P=0.007). CYP2D6 metabolizer status was associated with side effects to venlafaxine (P=0.022). There were nonsignificant trends for association of CYP2D6 metabolizer status with response to fluoxetine (P=0.056) and of CYP2C19 metabolizer status with response to sertraline (P=0.064). Our study is the first to indicate that CYP genes may have a role in antidepressant response in OCD. More research is required for a future clinical application of genetic testing, which could lead to improved treatment outcomes.

  17. Splice variants and seasonal expression of buffalo HSF genes.

    PubMed

    Lal, Shardul Vikram; Brahma, Biswajit; Gohain, Moloya; Mohanta, Debashish; De, Bidan Chandra; Chopra, Meenu; Dass, Gulshan; Vats, Ashutosh; Upadhyay, Ramesh C; Datta, T K; De, Sachinandan

    2015-05-01

    In eukaryotes, the heat shock factors (HSFs) are recognized as the master regulator of the heat shock response. In this respect, the genes encoding the heat shock factors seem to be important for adaptation to thermal stress in organisms. Despite this, only few mammalian HSFs has been characterized. In this study, four major heat shock factor genes viz. HSF-1, 2, 4, and 5 were studied. The main objective of the present study was to characterize the cDNA encoding using conserved gene specific primers and to investigate the expression status of these buffalo HSF genes. Our RT-PCR analysis uncovered two distinct variants of buffalo HSF-1 and HSF-2 gene transcripts. In addition, we identified a variant of the HSF5 transcript in buffalo lacking a DNA-binding domain. In silico analysis of deduced amino acid sequences for buffalo HSF genes showed domain architecture similar to other mammalian species. Changes in the gene expression profile were noted by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis. We detected the transcript of buffalo HSF genes in different tissues. We also evaluated the seasonal changes in the expression of HSF genes. Interestingly, the transcript level of HSF-1 gene was found upregulated in months of high and low ambient temperatures. In contrast, the expression of the HSF-4 and 5 genes was found to be downregulated in months of high ambient temperature. This suggests that the intricate balance of different HSFs is adjusted to minimize the effect of seasonal changes in environmental conditions. These findings advance our understanding of the complex, context-dependent regulation of HSF gene expression under normal and stressful conditions.

  18. Confirmed rare copy number variants implicate novel genes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tam, Gloria W C; van de Lagemaat, Louie N; Redon, Richard; Strathdee, Karen E; Croning, Mike D R; Malloy, Mary P; Muir, Walter J; Pickard, Ben S; Deary, Ian J; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Carter, Nigel P; Grant, Seth G N

    2010-04-01

    Understanding how cognitive processes including learning, memory, decision making and ideation are encoded by the genome is a key question in biology. Identification of sets of genes underlying human mental disorders is a path towards this objective. Schizophrenia is a common disease with cognitive symptoms, high heritability and complex genetics. We have identified genes involved with schizophrenia by measuring differences in DNA copy number across the entire genome in 91 schizophrenia cases and 92 controls in the Scottish population. Our data reproduce rare and common variants observed in public domain data from >3000 schizophrenia cases, confirming known disease loci as well as identifying novel loci. We found copy number variants in PDE10A (phosphodiesterase 10A), CYFIP1 [cytoplasmic FMR1 (Fragile X mental retardation 1)-interacting protein 1], K(+) channel genes KCNE1 and KCNE2, the Down's syndrome critical region 1 gene RCAN1 (regulator of calcineurin 1), cell-recognition protein CHL1 (cell adhesion molecule with homology with L1CAM), the transcription factor SP4 (specificity protein 4) and histone deacetylase HDAC9, among others (see http://www.genes2cognition.org/SCZ-CNV). Integrating the function of these many genes into a coherent model of schizophrenia and cognition is a major unanswered challenge.

  19. Interleukin-37 gene variants segregated anciently coexist during hominid evolution.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bin; Cheng, Shimeng; Peng, Jinbiao; Yan, Jingjing; Zhang, Shuye

    2015-10-01

    IL37 is a member of IL-1 cytokine family but conveys anti-inflammatory functions. The biological characteristic and genetic heterogeneity of IL37 are not fully understood yet. Here using the whole-genome sequencing data from 1000 Genomes Project, we performed population and evolutionary genetic analysis of human IL37 gene. First, 2184 IL37 gene sequences from different human populations were retrieved. The IL37 protein sequences were inferred from the coding DNA sequences and multiple species alignment was made. Then, the phylogenetic tree of IL37 was built and dN/dS ratios were calculated for each evolutionary branch, the classic McDonald and Kreitman test was also performed. Next, we conducted intraspecific evolutionary genetic analysis and built the genealogy network of 116 unique IL37 haplotypes through median-joining network analysis. Finally, we compared IL37 sequences between the modern and archaic humans. Our results for the first time provide solid evidence that common IL37 variants other than NCBI reference sequence are present worldwide. Our data also supports that IL37 variants are shaped and maintained by selection instead of neutral evolution. We further identified that human IL37 variants consist of two major haplogroups and their presence in archaic humans corroborates its ancient origin in hominid evolution. In conclusion, these data indicate that common IL37 variants are maintained among human populations by selective force, suggesting their potential involvements in immune regulation and human diseases. In addition, the ancient history of IL37 variants reveals interesting insight into the complicated human evolutionary history.

  20. Melanoma risk associated with MC1R gene variants in Latvia and the functional analysis of rare variants.

    PubMed

    Ozola, Aija; Azarjana, Kristīne; Doniņa, Simona; Proboka, Guna; Mandrika, Ilona; Petrovska, Ramona; Cēma, Ingrīda; Heisele, Olita; Eņģele, Ludmila; Streinerte, Baiba; Pjanova, Dace

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the association of melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R) variants with melanoma risk in a Latvian population, the MC1R gene was sequenced in 200 melanoma patients and 200 control persons. A functional study of previously uncharacterized, rare MC1R variants was also performed. In total, 26 different MC1R variants, including two novel variants Val165Ile and Val188Ile, were detected. The highest risk of melanoma was associated with the Arg151Cys variant (odds ratio (OR) 4.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.19-9.14, P<0.001). A gene dosage effect was observed, with melanoma risk for carriers of two variants being twice (OR 3.98, 95% CI 2.15-7.38, P<0.001) that of carriers of one variant (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.26-3.11, P=0.003). After stratification according to the pigmentation phenotype, the risk of melanoma remained in groups with otherwise protective phenotypes. Functional analyses of eight previously uncharacterized MC1R variants revealed that a subset of them is functionally relevant. Our results support the contribution of MC1R variants to a genetic predisposition to melanoma in Latvia.

  1. Genomic variants, genes, and pathways of Alzheimer's disease: An overview.

    PubMed

    Naj, Adam C; Schellenberg, Gerard D

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) (MIM: 104300) is a highly heritable disease with great complexity in its genetic contributors, and represents the most common form of dementia. With the gradual aging of the world's population, leading to increased prevalence of AD, and the substantial cost of care for those afflicted, identifying the genetic causes of disease represents a critical effort in identifying therapeutic targets. Here we provide a comprehensive review of genomic studies of AD, from the earliest linkage studies identifying monogenic contributors to early-onset forms of AD to the genome-wide and rare variant association studies of recent years that are being used to characterize the mosaic of genetic contributors to late-onset AD (LOAD), and which have identified approximately ∼20 genes with common variants contributing to LOAD risk. In addition, we explore studies employing alternative approaches to identify genetic contributors to AD, including studies of AD-related phenotypes and multi-variant association studies such as pathway analyses. Finally, we introduce studies of next-generation sequencing, which have recently helped identify multiple low-frequency and rare variant contributors to AD, and discuss on-going efforts with next-generation sequencing studies to develop statistically well- powered and comprehensive genomic studies of AD. Through this review, we help uncover the many insights the genetics of AD have provided into the pathways and pathophysiology of AD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. An Obesity-Predisposing Variant of the FTO Gene Regulates D2R-Dependent Reward Learning.

    PubMed

    Sevgi, Meltem; Rigoux, Lionel; Kühn, Anne B; Mauer, Jan; Schilbach, Leonhard; Hess, Martin E; Gruendler, Theo O J; Ullsperger, Markus; Stephan, Klaas Enno; Brüning, Jens C; Tittgemeyer, Marc

    2015-09-09

    Variations in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene are linked to obesity. However, the underlying neurobiological mechanisms by which these genetic variants influence obesity, behavior, and brain are unknown. Given that Fto regulates D2/3R signaling in mice, we tested in humans whether variants in FTO would interact with a variant in the ANKK1 gene, which alters D2R signaling and is also associated with obesity. In a behavioral and fMRI study, we demonstrate that gene variants of FTO affect dopamine (D2)-dependent midbrain brain responses to reward learning and behavioral responses associated with learning from negative outcome in humans. Furthermore, dynamic causal modeling confirmed that FTO variants modulate the connectivity in a basic reward circuit of meso-striato-prefrontal regions, suggesting a mechanism by which genetic predisposition alters reward processing not only in obesity, but also in other disorders with altered D2R-dependent impulse control, such as addiction. Significance statement: Variations in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene are associated with obesity. Here we demonstrate that variants of FTO affect dopamine-dependent midbrain brain responses and learning from negative outcomes in humans during a reward learning task. Furthermore, FTO variants modulate the connectivity in a basic reward circuit of meso-striato-prefrontal regions, suggesting a mechanism by which genetic vulnerability in reward processing can increase predisposition to obesity.

  3. Rare coding variants in the phospholipase D3 gene confer risk for Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several risk variants for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). These common variants have replicable but small effects on LOAD risk and generally do not have obvious functional effects. Low-frequency coding variants, not detected by GWAS, are predicted to include functional variants with larger effects on risk. To identify low-frequency coding variants with large effects on LOAD risk, we carried out whole-exome sequencing (WES) in 14 large LOAD families and follow-up analyses of the candidate variants in several large LOAD case-control data sets. A rare variant in PLD3 (phospholipase D3; Val232Met) segregated with disease status in two independent families and doubled risk for Alzheimer's disease in seven independent case-control series with a total of more than 11,000 cases and controls of European descent. Gene-based burden analyses in 4,387 cases and controls of European descent and 302 African American cases and controls, with complete sequence data for PLD3, reveal that several variants in this gene increase risk for Alzheimer's disease in both populations. PLD3 is highly expressed in brain regions that are vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease pathology, including hippocampus and cortex, and is expressed at significantly lower levels in neurons from Alzheimer's disease brains compared to control brains. Overexpression of PLD3 leads to a significant decrease in intracellular amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) and extracellular Aβ42 and Aβ40 (the 42- and 40-residue isoforms of the amyloid-β peptide), and knockdown of PLD3 leads to a significant increase in extracellular Aβ42 and Aβ40. Together, our genetic and functional data indicate that carriers of PLD3 coding variants have a twofold increased risk for LOAD and that PLD3 influences APP processing. This study provides an example of how densely affected families may help to identify rare variants with large effects on risk for disease or other complex

  4. Meta-analysis of Gene-Level Associations for Rare Variants Based on Single-Variant Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi-Juan; Berndt, Sonja I.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Ganna, Andrea; Berndt, Sonja I.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Mägi, Reedik; Ganna, Andrea; Wheeler, Eleanor; Feitosa, Mary F.; Justice, Anne E.; Monda, Keri L.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Esko, Tõnu; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gentilini, Davide; Jackson, Anne U.; Luan, Jian’an; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Willer, Cristen J.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Wood, Andrew R.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Hu, Yi-Juan; Lee, Sang Hong; Liang, Liming; Lin, Dan-Yu; Min, Josine L.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Yang, Jian; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Cadby, Gemma; den Heijer, Martin; Eklund, Niina; Fischer, Krista; Goel, Anuj; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Jarick, Ivonne; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E.; König, Inke R.; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lamina, Claudia; Lecoeur, Cecile; Li, Guo; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Perola, Markus; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Rose, Lynda M.; Shi, Jianxin; Shungin, Dmitry; Smith, Albert Vernon; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; Trip, Mieke D.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Waite, Lindsay L.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atalay, Mustafa; Attwood, Antony P.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Basart, Hanneke; Beilby, John; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Brambilla, Paolo; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Campbell, Harry; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chines, Peter S.; Collins, Francis S.; Connell, John M.; Cookson, William; de Faire, Ulf; de Vegt, Femmie; Dei, Mariano; Dimitriou, Maria; Edkins, Sarah; Estrada, Karol; Evans, David M.; Farrall, Martin; Ferrario, Marco M.; Ferrières, Jean; Franke, Lude; Frau, Francesca; Gejman, Pablo V.; Grallert, Harald; Grönberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Alistair S.; Hall, Per; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hebebrand, Johannes; Homuth, Georg; Hu, Frank B.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Hyppönen, Elina; Iribarren, Carlos; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jansson, John-Olov; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kivimaki, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana H.; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J.; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Liuzzi, Antonio; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Madden, Pamela A.; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; März, Winfried; Leach, Irene Mateo; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mooser, Vincent; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Musk, Arthur W.; Narisu, Narisu; Navis, Gerjan; Nicholson, George; Nohr, Ellen A.; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Palotie, Aarno; Peden, John F.; Pedersen, Nancy; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Prokopenko, Inga; Pütter, Carolin; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Raitakari, Olli; Rendon, Augusto; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Saaristo, Timo E.; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Sanders, Alan R.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Shin, So-Youn; Signorini, Stefano; Sinisalo, Juha; Skrobek, Boris; Soranzo, Nicole; Stančáková, Alena; Stark, Klaus; Stephens, Jonathan C.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P.; Stumvoll, Michael; Swift, Amy J.; Theodoraki, Eirini V.; Thorand, Barbara; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tremoli, Elena; Van der Klauw, Melanie M.; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Viikari, Jorma; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Waeber, Gérard; Wang, Zhaoming; Widén, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Amouyel, Philippe; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Cusi, Daniele; Dedoussis, George V.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G.; Franks, Paul W.; Froguel, Philippe; Gieger, Christian; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, Kees G.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Lehtimäki, Terho; Levinson, Douglas F.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Metspalu, Andres; Morris, Andrew D.; Nieminen, Markku S.; Njølstad, Inger; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Penninx, Brenda; Power, Chris; Province, Michael A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qi, Lu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Ridker, Paul M.; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Spector, Timothy D.; Stefansson, Kari; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G.; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Frayling, Timothy; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunian, Talin; Heid, Iris M.; Hunter, David; Kaplan, Robert C.; Karpe, Fredrik; Moffatt, Miriam; Mohlke, Karen L.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Pawitan, Yudi; Schadt, Eric E.; Schlessinger, David; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Strachan, David P.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Visscher, Peter M.; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Morris, Andrew P.; Meyre, David; Scherag, André; McCarthy, Mark I.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; North, Kari E.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Ingelsson, Erik; Hirschhorn, Joel; North, Kari E.; Ingelsson, Erik; Lin, Dan-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) has led to the discoveries of many common variants associated with complex human diseases. There is a growing recognition that identifying “causal” rare variants also requires large-scale meta-analysis. The fact that association tests with rare variants are performed at the gene level rather than at the variant level poses unprecedented challenges in the meta-analysis. First, different studies may adopt different gene-level tests, so the results are not compatible. Second, gene-level tests require multivariate statistics (i.e., components of the test statistic and their covariance matrix), which are difficult to obtain. To overcome these challenges, we propose to perform gene-level tests for rare variants by combining the results of single-variant analysis (i.e., p values of association tests and effect estimates) from participating studies. This simple strategy is possible because of an insight that multivariate statistics can be recovered from single-variant statistics, together with the correlation matrix of the single-variant test statistics, which can be estimated from one of the participating studies or from a publicly available database. We show both theoretically and numerically that the proposed meta-analysis approach provides accurate control of the type I error and is as powerful as joint analysis of individual participant data. This approach accommodates any disease phenotype and any study design and produces all commonly used gene-level tests. An application to the GWAS summary results of the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium reveals rare and low-frequency variants associated with human height. The relevant software is freely available. PMID:23891470

  5. Meta-analysis of gene-level associations for rare variants based on single-variant statistics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi-Juan; Berndt, Sonja I; Gustafsson, Stefan; Ganna, Andrea; Hirschhorn, Joel; North, Kari E; Ingelsson, Erik; Lin, Dan-Yu

    2013-08-08

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) has led to the discoveries of many common variants associated with complex human diseases. There is a growing recognition that identifying "causal" rare variants also requires large-scale meta-analysis. The fact that association tests with rare variants are performed at the gene level rather than at the variant level poses unprecedented challenges in the meta-analysis. First, different studies may adopt different gene-level tests, so the results are not compatible. Second, gene-level tests require multivariate statistics (i.e., components of the test statistic and their covariance matrix), which are difficult to obtain. To overcome these challenges, we propose to perform gene-level tests for rare variants by combining the results of single-variant analysis (i.e., p values of association tests and effect estimates) from participating studies. This simple strategy is possible because of an insight that multivariate statistics can be recovered from single-variant statistics, together with the correlation matrix of the single-variant test statistics, which can be estimated from one of the participating studies or from a publicly available database. We show both theoretically and numerically that the proposed meta-analysis approach provides accurate control of the type I error and is as powerful as joint analysis of individual participant data. This approach accommodates any disease phenotype and any study design and produces all commonly used gene-level tests. An application to the GWAS summary results of the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium reveals rare and low-frequency variants associated with human height. The relevant software is freely available.

  6. Lessons from the canine Oxtr gene: populations, variants and functional aspects.

    PubMed

    Bence, M; Marx, P; Szantai, E; Kubinyi, E; Ronai, Z; Banlaki, Z

    2017-04-01

    Oxytocin receptor (OXTR) acts as a key behavioral modulator of the central nervous system, affecting social behavior, stress, affiliation and cognitive functions. Variants of the Oxtr gene are known to influence behavior both in animals and humans; however, canine Oxtr polymorphisms are less characterized in terms of possible relevance to function, selection criteria in breeding and domestication. In this report, we provide a detailed characterization of common variants of the canine Oxtr gene. In particular (1) novel polymorphisms were identified by direct sequencing of wolf and dog samples, (2) allelic distributions and pairwise linkage disequilibrium patterns of several canine populations were compared, (3) neighbor joining (NJ) tree based on common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was constructed, (4) mRNA expression features were assessed, (5) a novel splice variant was detected and (6) in vitro functional assays were performed. Results indicate marked differences regarding Oxtr variations between purebred dogs of different breeds, free-ranging dog populations, wolf subspecies and golden jackals. This, together with existence of explicitly dog-specific alleles and data obtained from the NJ tree implies that Oxtr could indeed have been a target gene during domestication and selection for human preferred aspects of temperament and social behavior. This assumption is further supported by the present observations on gene expression patterns within the brain and luciferase reporter experiments, providing a molecular level link between certain canine Oxtr polymorphisms and differences in nervous system function and behavior.

  7. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Stefanie; Battke, Florian; Sprecher, Andrea; Munz, Marita; Synofzik, Matthis; Schöls, Ludger; Gasser, Thomas; Grehl, Torsten; Prudlo, Johannes; Biskup, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1) identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2) assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3) connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities. We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses. Based on our

  8. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Stefanie; Battke, Florian; Sprecher, Andrea; Munz, Marita; Synofzik, Matthis; Schöls, Ludger; Gasser, Thomas; Grehl, Torsten; Prudlo, Johannes; Biskup, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1) identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2) assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3) connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities. We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses. Based on our

  9. Genetic variants in epigenetic genes and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Cebrian, Arancha; Pharoah, Paul D; Ahmed, Shahana; Ropero, Santiago; Fraga, Mario F; Smith, Paula L; Conroy, Don; Luben, Robert; Perkins, Barbara; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M; Esteller, Manel; Ponder, Bruce A J

    2006-08-01

    Epigenetic events, resulting changes in gene expression capacity, are important in tumour progression, and variation in genes involved in epigenetic mechanisms might therefore be important in cancer susceptibility. To evaluate this hypothesis, we examined common variants in 12 genes coding for DNA methyltransferases (DNMT), histone acetyltransferases, histone deacetyltransferases, histone methyltrasferases and methyl-CpG binding domain proteins, for association with breast cancer in a large case-control study (N cases = 4474 and N controls = 4580). We identified 63 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that efficiently tag all the known common variants in these genes, and are also expected to tag any unknown SNP in each gene. We found some evidence for association for six SNPs: DNMT3b-c31721t [P (2 df) = 0.007], PRDM2-c99243 t [P (2 df) = 0.03] and t105413c [P-recessive = 0.05], EHMT1-g-9441a [P (2df) = 0.05] and g41451t (P-trend = 0.04), and EHMT2-S237S [P (2df) = 0.04]. The most significant result was for DNMT3b-c31721t (P-trend = 0.124 after adjusting for multiple testing). However, there were three other results with P < 0.05. The permutation-based probability of this occurring by chance was 0.335. These significant SNPs were genotyped in 75 human cancer cell lines from different tumour types to assess if there was an association between them and six epigenetic measures. No statistically significant association was found. However, a trend was observed: homozygotes for the rare alleles of the EHMT1, EHMT2 and PRDM2 had a mean value for both trimethylation of K9 and K27 of histone H3 remarkably different to the homozygotes for the common alleles. Thus, these preliminary observations suggest the possible existence of a functional consequence of harbouring these genetic variants in histone methyltransferases, and warrant the design of larger epidemiological and biochemical studies to establish the true meaning of these findings.

  10. Inherited Variants in the Chemokine CCL2 Gene and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness in a Caucasian Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tong; Lee, Gwo-Shu Mary; Oh, William K.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Pomerantz, Mark; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Kantoff, Philip W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Though C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in prostate cancer tumorigenesis and invasion, the role of inherited variation in the CCL2 gene in prostate cancer progression and metastases remains unanswered. This study is aimed to determine the influence of CCL2 germline variants on prostate cancer aggressiveness. Experimental Design We performed an association study between six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CCL2 gene and prostate cancer clinicopathologic variables in a large hospital based Caucasian patient cohort (N =4073). Results Genetic variantion at CCL2 is associated with markers of disease aggressiveness. Three SNPs, each in strong linkage disequilibrium, are associated with a higher (>7) biopsy Gleason score: CCL2-1811 A/G, −2835A/C and +3726 T/C (P =0.01, 0.03 and 0.04 respectively). The CCL2 −1811 G allele is addionally associated with advanced pathologic stages in patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (P = 0.04). In haplotype analysis, we found that the frequency of a common haplotype, H5, was higher among patients with D’Amico good risk features (Ppermutation = 0.04). Conclusions These results support the influence of CCL2 variants on prostate cancer development and progression. PMID:21135144

  11. Fire Usage and Ancient Hominin Detoxification Genes: Protective Ancestral Variants Dominate While Additional Derived Risk Variants Appear in Modern Humans

    PubMed Central

    Alink, Gerrit M.; Scherjon, Fulco; MacDonald, Katharine; Smith, Alison C.; Nijveen, Harm; Roebroeks, Wil

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the defence capacity of ancient hominins against toxic substances may contribute importantly to the reconstruction of their niche, including their diets and use of fire. Fire usage implies frequent exposure to hazardous compounds from smoke and heated food, known to affect general health and fertility, probably resulting in genetic selection for improved detoxification. To investigate whether such genetic selection occurred, we investigated the alleles in Neanderthals, Denisovans and modern humans at gene polymorphisms well-known to be relevant from modern human epidemiological studies of habitual tobacco smoke exposure and mechanistic evidence. We compared these with the alleles in chimpanzees and gorillas. Neanderthal and Denisovan hominins predominantly possess gene variants conferring increased resistance to these toxic compounds. Surprisingly, we observed the same in chimpanzees and gorillas, implying that less efficient variants are derived and mainly evolved in modern humans. Less efficient variants are observable from the first early Upper Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers onwards. While not clarifying the deep history of fire use, our results highlight the long-term stability of the genes under consideration despite major changes in the hominin dietary niche. Specifically for detoxification gene variants characterised as deleterious by epidemiological studies, our results confirm the predominantly recent appearance reported for deleterious human gene variants, suggesting substantial impact of recent human population history, including pre-Holocene expansions. PMID:27655273

  12. Fire Usage and Ancient Hominin Detoxification Genes: Protective Ancestral Variants Dominate While Additional Derived Risk Variants Appear in Modern Humans.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Jac M M J G; Alink, Gerrit M; Scherjon, Fulco; MacDonald, Katharine; Smith, Alison C; Nijveen, Harm; Roebroeks, Wil

    Studies of the defence capacity of ancient hominins against toxic substances may contribute importantly to the reconstruction of their niche, including their diets and use of fire. Fire usage implies frequent exposure to hazardous compounds from smoke and heated food, known to affect general health and fertility, probably resulting in genetic selection for improved detoxification. To investigate whether such genetic selection occurred, we investigated the alleles in Neanderthals, Denisovans and modern humans at gene polymorphisms well-known to be relevant from modern human epidemiological studies of habitual tobacco smoke exposure and mechanistic evidence. We compared these with the alleles in chimpanzees and gorillas. Neanderthal and Denisovan hominins predominantly possess gene variants conferring increased resistance to these toxic compounds. Surprisingly, we observed the same in chimpanzees and gorillas, implying that less efficient variants are derived and mainly evolved in modern humans. Less efficient variants are observable from the first early Upper Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers onwards. While not clarifying the deep history of fire use, our results highlight the long-term stability of the genes under consideration despite major changes in the hominin dietary niche. Specifically for detoxification gene variants characterised as deleterious by epidemiological studies, our results confirm the predominantly recent appearance reported for deleterious human gene variants, suggesting substantial impact of recent human population history, including pre-Holocene expansions.

  13. The human gene damage index as a gene-level approach to prioritizing exome variants

    PubMed Central

    Itan, Yuval; Shang, Lei; Boisson, Bertrand; Patin, Etienne; Bolze, Alexandre; Moncada-Vélez, Marcela; Scott, Eric; Ciancanelli, Michael J.; Lafaille, Fabien G.; Markle, Janet G.; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; de Jong, Sarah Jill; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Nitschke, Patrick; Belkadi, Aziz; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Stenson, Peter D.; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Cooper, David N.; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The protein-coding exome of a patient with a monogenic disease contains about 20,000 variants, only one or two of which are disease causing. We found that 58% of rare variants in the protein-coding exome of the general population are located in only 2% of the genes. Prompted by this observation, we aimed to develop a gene-level approach for predicting whether a given human protein-coding gene is likely to harbor disease-causing mutations. To this end, we derived the gene damage index (GDI): a genome-wide, gene-level metric of the mutational damage that has accumulated in the general population. We found that the GDI was correlated with selective evolutionary pressure, protein complexity, coding sequence length, and the number of paralogs. We compared GDI with the leading gene-level approaches, genic intolerance, and de novo excess, and demonstrated that GDI performed best for the detection of false positives (i.e., removing exome variants in genes irrelevant to disease), whereas genic intolerance and de novo excess performed better for the detection of true positives (i.e., assessing de novo mutations in genes likely to be disease causing). The GDI server, data, and software are freely available to noncommercial users from lab.rockefeller.edu/casanova/GDI. PMID:26483451

  14. Mutations in the paralogous human alpha-globin genes yielding identical hemoglobin variants.

    PubMed

    Moradkhani, Kamran; Préhu, Claude; Old, John; Henderson, Shirley; Balamitsa, Vera; Luo, Hong-Yuan; Poon, Man-Chiu; Chui, David H K; Wajcman, Henri; Patrinos, George P

    2009-06-01

    The human alpha-globin genes are paralogues, sharing a high degree of DNA sequence similarity and producing an identical alpha-globin chain. Over half of the alpha-globin structural variants reported to date are only characterized at the amino acid level. It is likely that a fraction of these variants, with phenotypes differing from one observation to another, may be due to the same mutation but on a different alpha-globin gene. There have been very few previous examples of hemoglobin variants that can be found at both HBA1 and HBA2 genes. Here, we report the results of a systematic multicenter study in a large multiethnic population to identify such variants and to analyze their differences from a functional and evolutionary perspective. We identified 14 different Hb variants resulting from identical mutations on either one of the two human alpha-globin paralogue genes. We also showed that the average percentage of hemoglobin variants due to a HBA2 gene mutation (alpha2) is higher than the percentage of hemoglobin variants due to the same HBA1 gene mutation (alpha1) and that the alpha2/alpha1 ratio varied between variants. These alpha-globin chain variants have most likely occurred via recurrent mutations, gene conversion events, or both. Based on these data, we propose a nomenclature for hemoglobin variants that fall into this category.

  15. Common variants of the vitamin D binding protein gene and adverse health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Suneil; Fu, Lei; Juras, David James; Karmali, Mohamed; Wong, Betty Y. L.; Gozdzik, Agnes

    2013-01-01

    The vitamin D binding protein (DBP) is the major plasma carrier for vitamin D and its metabolites, but it is also an actin scavenger, and is the precursor to the immunomodulatory protein, Gc-MAF. Two missense variants of the DBP gene – rs7041 encoding Asp432Glu and rs4588 encoding Thr436Lys – change the amino acid sequence and alter the protein function. They are common enough to generate population-wide constitutive differences in vitamin D status, based on assay of the serum metabolite, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD). Whether these variants also influence the role of vitamin D in an immunologic milieu is not known. However, the issue is relevant, given the immunomodulatory effects of DBP and the role of protracted innate immune-related inflammation in response to tissue injury or repeated infection. Indeed, DBP and vitamin D may jointly or independently contribute to a variety of adverse health outcomes unrelated to classical notions of their function in bone and mineral metabolism. This review summarizes the reports to date of associations between DBP variants, and various chronic and infectious diseases. The available information leads us to conclude that DBP variants are a significant and common genetic factor in some common disorders, and therefore, are worthy of closer attention. In view of the heightened interest in vitamin D as a public health target, well-designed studies that look simultaneously at vitamin D and its carrier in relation to genotypes and adverse health outcome should be encouraged. PMID:23427793

  16. High prevalence of an anti-hypertriglyceridemic variant of the MLXIPL gene in Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kazuhiro; Yanagisawa, Yoshiko; Ogawa, Ayumi; Ishizuka, Yuumi; Munkhtulga, Lkhagvasuren; Charupoonphol, Phitaya; Supannnatas, Somjit; Kuartei, Stevenson; Chimedregzen, Ulziiburen; Koda, Yoshiro; Ishida, Takafumi; Kagawa, Yasuo; Iwamoto, Sadahiko

    2011-12-01

    MLXIPL is a transcription factor integral to the regulation of glycolysis and lipogenesis in the liver. Common variants of the MLXIPL gene (MLXIPL) are known to influence plasma triglyceride levels in people of European descent. As MLXIPL has a key role in energy storage, genetic variations of the MLXIPL may be relevant to physiological adaptations to nutritional stresses that have occurred during the evolution of modern humans. In the present study, we assessed the phenotypic consequences of the Q241H variant of MLXIPL in populations of Asian and Oceanian origin and also surveyed the prevalence of Q241H variant in populations worldwide. Multiple linear regression models based on 2373 individuals of Asian origin showed that the H allele was significantly associated with decreased concentrations of plasma triglycerides (P=0.0003). Direct genotyping of 1455 individuals from Africa, Asia and Oceania showed that the triglyceride-lowering H allele was found at quite low frequencies (0.00-0.16) in most of the populations examined. The exceptions were some Central Asian populations, including Mongolians, Tibetans and Uyghurs, which exhibited much higher frequencies of the H allele (0.21-0.26). The high prevalence of the H allele in Central Asia implies that the Q241H variant of MLXIPL might have been significant for utilization of carbohydrates and fats in the common ancestors of these populations, who successfully adapted to the environment of Central Asia by relying on nomadic livestock herding.

  17. Molecular analyses of circadian gene variants reveal sex-dependent links between depression and clocks

    PubMed Central

    Shi, S-q; White, M J; Borsetti, H M; Pendergast, J S; Hida, A; Ciarleglio, C M; de Verteuil, P A; Cadar, A G; Cala, C; McMahon, D G; Shelton, R C; Williams, S M; Johnson, C H

    2016-01-01

    An extensive literature links circadian irregularities and/or sleep abnormalities to mood disorders. Despite the strong genetic component underlying many mood disorders, however, previous genetic associations between circadian clock gene variants and major depressive disorder (MDD) have been weak. We applied a combined molecular/functional and genetic association approach to circadian gene polymorphisms in sex-stratified populations of control subjects and case subjects suffering from MDD. This approach identified significant sex-dependent associations of common variants of the circadian clock genes hClock, hPer3 and hNpas2 with major depression and demonstrated functional effects of these polymorphisms on the expression or activity of the hCLOCK and hPER3 proteins, respectively. In addition, hCLOCK expression is affected by glucocorticoids, consistent with the sex-dependency of the genetic associations and the modulation of glucocorticoid-mediated stress response, providing a mechanism by which the circadian clock controls outputs that may affect psychiatric disorders. We conclude that genetic polymorphisms in circadian genes (especially hClock and hPer3, where functional assays could be tested) influence risk of developing depression in a sex- and stress-dependent manner. These studies support a genetic connection between circadian disruption and mood disorders, and confirm a key connection between circadian gene variation and major depression. PMID:26926884

  18. Molecular analyses of circadian gene variants reveal sex-dependent links between depression and clocks.

    PubMed

    Shi, S-q; White, M J; Borsetti, H M; Pendergast, J S; Hida, A; Ciarleglio, C M; de Verteuil, P A; Cadar, A G; Cala, C; McMahon, D G; Shelton, R C; Williams, S M; Johnson, C H

    2016-03-01

    An extensive literature links circadian irregularities and/or sleep abnormalities to mood disorders. Despite the strong genetic component underlying many mood disorders, however, previous genetic associations between circadian clock gene variants and major depressive disorder (MDD) have been weak. We applied a combined molecular/functional and genetic association approach to circadian gene polymorphisms in sex-stratified populations of control subjects and case subjects suffering from MDD. This approach identified significant sex-dependent associations of common variants of the circadian clock genes hClock, hPer3 and hNpas2 with major depression and demonstrated functional effects of these polymorphisms on the expression or activity of the hCLOCK and hPER3 proteins, respectively. In addition, hCLOCK expression is affected by glucocorticoids, consistent with the sex-dependency of the genetic associations and the modulation of glucocorticoid-mediated stress response, providing a mechanism by which the circadian clock controls outputs that may affect psychiatric disorders. We conclude that genetic polymorphisms in circadian genes (especially hClock and hPer3, where functional assays could be tested) influence risk of developing depression in a sex- and stress-dependent manner. These studies support a genetic connection between circadian disruption and mood disorders, and confirm a key connection between circadian gene variation and major depression.

  19. Vitamin E transport gene variants and prostate cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the February 15, 2009 issue of Cancer Research, Wright et al. investigated whether polymorphisms in two vitamin E transport genes are associated with elevated prostate cancer risk resulting from altered plasma vitamin E concentrations. However, the circulating vitamin E level is influenced by man...

  20. Stable variant-specific transcripts of the variant cell surface glycoprotein gene 1. 8 expression site in Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, C.; Van der Ploeg, L.H.T.

    1988-02-01

    The structure and transcriptional regulation of the 1.8 variant cell surface glycoproteins (VSG) gene expression site located on a 430-kilobase (kb) chromosome was examined in a 430-kb-chromosome-specific library. Using /sup 32/P-labeled nascent transcripts generated by nuclear run-on, the authors selected recombinant clones derived from the 430-kb chromosome which were coordinately activated with the 1.8 VSG gene. The results show that a repetitive region with a minimum size of 27 kb is coordinately activated with the 1.8 VSG gene. As with the 1.8 VSG gene, transcription is by RNA polymerases that are insensitive to the drug alpha-amanitin at concentrations up to 1 mgml. Transcription results in the generation of several stable variant-specific mRNAs. These mRNAs most likely belong to a family of repetitive expression-site-associated genes.

  1. Familial atypical parkinsonism with rare variant in VPS35 and FBXO7 genes

    PubMed Central

    Bartonikova, Tereza; Mensikova, Katerina; Mikulicova, Lenka; Vodicka, Radek; Vrtel, Radek; Godava, Marek; Vastik, Miroslav; Kaiserova, Michaela; Otruba, Pavel; Dolinova, Iva; Nevrly, Martin; Kanovsky, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: A higher prevalence of parkinsonism was recently identified in southeastern Moravia (Czech Republic). Further research confirmed 3 large pedigrees with familial autosomal-dominant parkinsonism spanning 5 generations. Methods: This case report concerns a patient belonging to one of these 3 pedigrees, in whom motor and oculomotor symptoms were accompanied by frontal-type dementia, who finally developed a clinical phenotype of progressive supranuclear palsy. Molecular genetic examinations were performed due to the positive family history. Results: No previously described causal mutation was found. After filtering against common variants (minor allele frequency (MAF) < 0.01), 2 noncoding and 1 synonymous rare mutation potentially associable with parkinsonism were identified: GIGYF2—GRB10 Interacting GYF Protein 2, PARK11 (c.∗2030G > A, rs115669549); VPS35 gene—vacuolar protein sorting 35, PARK17 (c.102 + 33G > A, rs192115886); and FBXO7—F-box only protein 7 gene, PARK15 (c.540A > G, rs41311141). Conclusion: As to the changes in the FBXO7 and VPS35 genes (despite phylogenetic conservation in primates), probably neither the FBXO7 nor the VPS35 variants will be direct causal mutations. Both described variants, and possibly the influence of their combination, could increase the risk of the disease. PMID:27861377

  2. Association between SLC2A9 transporter gene variants and uric acid phenotypes in African American and white families

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Mariza; Matsumoto, Martha; Mosley, Tom H.; Kardia, Sharon; Turner, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. SLC2A9 gene variants associate with serum uric acid in white populations, but little is known about African American populations. Since SLC2A9 is a transporter, gene variants may be expected to associate more closely with the fractional excretion of urate, a measure of renal tubular transport, than with serum uric acid, which is influenced by production and extrarenal clearance. Methods. Genotypes of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed across the SLC2A9 gene were obtained in the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy cohorts. The associations of SNPs with serum uric acid, fractional excretion of urate and urine urate-to-creatinine ratio were assessed with adjustments for age, sex, diuretic use, BMI, homocysteine and triglycerides. Results. We identified SLC2A9 gene variants that were associated with serum uric acid in 1155 African American subjects (53 SNPs) and 1132 white subjects (63 SNPs). The most statistically significant SNPs in African American subjects (rs13113918) and white subjects (rs11723439) were in the latter half of the gene and explained 2.7 and 2.8% of the variation in serum uric acid, respectively. After adjustment for this SNP in African Americans, 0.9% of the variation in serum uric acid was explained by an SNP (rs1568318) in the first half of the gene. Unexpectedly, SLC2A9 gene variants had stronger associations with serum uric acid than with fractional excretion of urate. Conclusions. These findings support two different loci by which SLC2A9 variants affect uric acid levels in African Americans and suggest SLC2A9 variants affect serum uric acid level via renal and extrarenal clearance. PMID:21186168

  3. Breast and Prostate Cancer and Hormone-Related Gene Variant Study

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast and Prostate Cancer and Hormone-Related Gene Variant Study allows large-scale analyses of breast and prostate cancer risk in relation to genetic polymorphisms and gene-environment interactions that affect hormone metabolism.

  4. Genetic variants influencing effectiveness of exercise training programmes in obesity – an overview of human studies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmetov, II; Zmijewski, P

    2016-01-01

    Frequent and regular physical activity has significant benefits for health, including improvement of body composition and help in weight control. Consequently, promoting training programmes, particularly in those who are genetically predisposed, is a significant step towards controlling the presently increasing epidemic of obesity. Although the physiological responses of the human body to exercise are quite well described, the genetic background of these reactions still remains mostly unknown. This review not only summarizes the current evidence, through a literature review and the results of our studies on the influence of gene variants on the characteristics and range of the body's adaptive response to training, but also explores research organization problems, future trends, and possibilities. We describe the most reliable candidate genetic markers that are involved in energy balance pathways and body composition changes in response to training programmes, such as FTO, MC4R, ACE, PPARG, LEP, LEPR, ADRB2, and ADRB3. This knowledge can have an enormous impact not only on individualization of exercise programmes to make them more efficient and safer, but also on improved recovery, traumatology, medical care, diet, supplementation and many other areas. Nevertheless, the current studies still represent only the first steps towards a better understanding of the genetic factors that influence obesity-related traits, as well as gene variant x physical activity interactions, so further research is necessary. PMID:27601774

  5. MYO7A and USH2A gene sequence variants in Italian patients with Usher syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sodi, Andrea; Mariottini, Alessandro; Passerini, Ilaria; Murro, Vittoria; Bianchi, Benedetta; Menchini, Ugo; Torricelli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the spectrum of sequence variants in the MYO7A and USH2A genes in a group of Italian patients affected by Usher syndrome (USH). Methods Thirty-six Italian patients with a diagnosis of USH were recruited. They received a standard ophthalmologic examination, visual field testing, optical coherence tomography (OCT) scan, and electrophysiological tests. Fluorescein angiography and fundus autofluorescence imaging were performed in selected cases. All the patients underwent an audiologic examination for the 0.25–8,000 Hz frequencies. Vestibular function was evaluated with specific tests. DNA samples were analyzed for sequence variants of the MYO7A gene (for USH1) and the USH2A gene (for USH2) with direct sequencing techniques. A few patients were analyzed for both genes. Results In the MYO7A gene, ten missense variants were found; three patients were compound heterozygous, and two were homozygous. Thirty-four USH2A gene variants were detected, including eight missense variants, nine nonsense variants, six splicing variants, and 11 duplications/deletions; 19 patients were compound heterozygous, and three were homozygous. Four MYO7A and 17 USH2A variants have already been described in the literature. Among the novel mutations there are four USH2A large deletions, detected with multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technology. Two potentially pathogenic variants were found in 27 patients (75%). Affected patients showed variable clinical pictures without a clear genotype-phenotype correlation. Conclusions Ten variants in the MYO7A gene and 34 variants in the USH2A gene were detected in Italian patients with USH at a high detection rate. A selective analysis of these genes may be valuable for molecular analysis, combining diagnostic efficiency with little time wastage and less resource consumption. PMID:25558175

  6. A systematic survey of loss-of-function variants in human protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    MacArthur, Daniel G; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Frankish, Adam; Huang, Ni; Morris, James; Walter, Klaudia; Jostins, Luke; Habegger, Lukas; Pickrell, Joseph K; Montgomery, Stephen B; Albers, Cornelis A; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Conrad, Donald F; Lunter, Gerton; Zheng, Hancheng; Ayub, Qasim; DePristo, Mark A; Banks, Eric; Hu, Min; Handsaker, Robert E; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey A; Fromer, Menachem; Jin, Mike; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Khurana, Ekta; Ye, Kai; Kay, Mike; Saunders, Gary Ian; Suner, Marie-Marthe; Hunt, Toby; Barnes, If H A; Amid, Clara; Carvalho-Silva, Denise R; Bignell, Alexandra H; Snow, Catherine; Yngvadottir, Bryndis; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Cooper, David N; Xue, Yali; Romero, Irene Gallego; Wang, Jun; Li, Yingrui; Gibbs, Richard A; McCarroll, Steven A; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Harrow, Jennifer; Hurles, Matthew E; Gerstein, Mark B; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2012-02-17

    Genome-sequencing studies indicate that all humans carry many genetic variants predicted to cause loss of function (LoF) of protein-coding genes, suggesting unexpected redundancy in the human genome. Here we apply stringent filters to 2951 putative LoF variants obtained from 185 human genomes to determine their true prevalence and properties. We estimate that human genomes typically contain ~100 genuine LoF variants with ~20 genes completely inactivated. We identify rare and likely deleterious LoF alleles, including 26 known and 21 predicted severe disease-causing variants, as well as common LoF variants in nonessential genes. We describe functional and evolutionary differences between LoF-tolerant and recessive disease genes and a method for using these differences to prioritize candidate genes found in clinical sequencing studies.

  7. Genes that affect brain structure and function identified by rare variant analyses of Mendelian neurologic disease

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Ender; Harel, Tamar; Pehlivan, Davut; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Gambin, Tomasz; Akdemir, Zeynep Coban; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Erdin, Serkan; Bayram, Yavuz; Campbell, Ian M.; Hunter, Jill V.; Atik, Mehmed M.; Van Esch, Hilde; Yuan, Bo; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Isikay, Sedat; Yesil, Gozde; Yuregir, Ozge O.; Bozdogan, Sevcan Tug; Aslan, Huseyin; Aydin, Hatip; Tos, Tulay; Aksoy, Ayse; De Vivo, Darryl C.; Jain, Preti; Geckinli, B. Bilge; Sezer, Ozlem; Gul, Davut; Durmaz, Burak; Cogulu, Ozgur; Ozkinay, Ferda; Topcu, Vehap; Candan, Sukru; Cebi, Alper Han; Ikbal, Mevlit; Gulec, Elif Yilmaz; Gezdirici, Alper; Koparir, Erkan; Ekici, Fatma; Coskun, Salih; Cicek, Salih; Karaer, Kadri; Koparir, Asuman; Duz, Mehmet Bugrahan; Kirat, Emre; Fenercioglu, Elif; Ulucan, Hakan; Seven, Mehmet; Guran, Tulay; Elcioglu, Nursel; Yildirim, Mahmut Selman; Aktas, Dilek; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet; Ture, Mehmet; Yakut, Tahsin; Overton, John D.; Yuksel, Adnan; Ozen, Mustafa; Muzny, Donna M.; Adams, David R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chung, Wendy K.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R

    2015-01-01

    Development of the human nervous system involves complex interactions between fundamental cellular processes and requires a multitude of genes, many of which remain to be associated with human disease. We applied whole exome sequencing to 128 mostly consanguineous families with neurogenetic disorders that often included brain malformations. Rare variant analyses for both single nucleotide variant (SNV) and copy number variant (CNV) alleles allowed for identification of 45 novel variants in 43 known disease genes, 41 candidate genes, and CNVs in 10 families, with an overall potential molecular cause identified in >85% of families studied. Among the candidate genes identified, we found PRUNE, VARS, and DHX37 in multiple families, and homozygous loss of function variants in AGBL2, SLC18A2, SMARCA1, UBQLN1, and CPLX1. Neuroimaging and in silico analysis of functional and expression proximity between candidate and known disease genes allowed for further understanding of genetic networks underlying specific types of brain malformations. PMID:26539891

  8. Differential Expression of Histone H3 Gene Variants during Cell Cycle and Somatic Embryogenesis in Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Kapros, Tamás; Bögre, László; Németh, Kinga; Bakó, László; Györgyey, János; Wu, Sheng Cheng; Dudits, Dénes

    1992-01-01

    Northern analysis has revealed substantial differences in mRNA accumulation of the two histone H3 gene variants represented by pH3c-1 and pH3c-11 cDNA clones. Both in partially synchronized cell suspension cultures and in protoplast-derived cells from alfalfa, Medicago varia, the maximal level of the histone H3-1 gene transcript coincided with the peak in [3H]thymidine incorporation. Histone H3-11 mRNA was detectable in cells throughout the period of the cell cycle studied. Various stress factors such as medium replacement, enzyme digestion of the cell wall, osmotic shock, and auxin treatment considerably increased the level of the histone H3-11 transcript. In alfalfa (Medicago sativa), the presence of H3-11 mRNA in unorganized tissues of microcallus suspension and in somatic embryos induced by auxin treatment supports the idea that this H3 variant exists in a continously active state of transcription. During embryo development, the early globular stage embryos showed increased accumulation of histone H3-11 mRNA in comparison with the later stages. The highest level of the histone H3-1 transcript was detectable 1 day after treatment of callus tissues with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Somatic embryos contained appreciable levels of histone H3-1 transcripts at all stages of somatic embryo development. These observations suggest that the histone H3-1 gene belòngs to the class of replication-dependent histone genes. The histone H3-11 gene showed characteristics of a constitutively expressed replacement-type histone gene, with a specific characteristic that external factors can influence the level of gene transcription. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:16668686

  9. MC1R variants affect the expression of melanocortin and melanogenic genes and the association between melanocortin genes and coloration.

    PubMed

    San-Jose, Luis M; Ducrest, Anne-Lyse; Ducret, Valérie; Simon, Céline; Richter, Hannes; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Roulin, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    The melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene influences coloration by altering the expression of genes acting downstream in the melanin synthesis. MC1R belongs to the melanocortin system, a genetic network coding for the ligands that regulate MC1R and other melanocortin receptors controlling different physiological and behavioural traits. The impact of MC1R variants on these regulatory melanocortin genes was never considered, even though MC1R mutations could alter the influence of these genes on coloration (e.g. by decreasing MC1R response to melanocortin ligands). Using barn owl growing feathers, we investigated the differences between MC1R genotypes in the (co)expression of six melanocortin and nine melanogenic-related genes and in the association between melanocortin gene expression and phenotype (feather pheomelanin content). Compared to the MC1R rufous allele, responsible for reddish coloration, the white allele was not only associated with an expected lower expression of melanogenic-related genes (TYR, TYRP1, OCA2, SLC45A2, KIT, DCT) but also with a lower MC1R expression and a higher expression of ASIP, the MC1R antagonist. More importantly, the expression of PCSK2, responsible for the maturation of the MC1R agonist, α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, was positively related to pheomelanin content in MC1R white homozygotes but not in individuals carrying the MC1R rufous allele. These findings indicate that MC1R mutations not only alter the expression of melanogenic-related genes but also the association between coloration and the expression of melanocortin genes upstream of MC1R. This suggests that MC1R mutations can modulate the regulation of coloration by the pleiotropic melanocortin genes, potentially decoupling the often-observed associations between coloration and other phenotypes.

  10. Common variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes do not confer genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Chen; Yi, Zhenghui; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Gong, Wei; Tang, Jinsong; Wang, Dong; Lu, Weihong; Chen, Xiaogang; Fang, Yiru; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2015-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a prevalent psychiatric disorder with a complex etiology. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been frequently reported in schizophrenia. Phosphatase and tension homologue-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and presenilin-associated rhomboid-like protease (PARL) are mitochondrial proteins, and genetic variants of these two genes may confer genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia by influencing mitochondrial function. In this study, we conducted a two-stage genetic association study to test this hypothesis. We genotyped 4 PINK1 and 5 PARL genetic variants and evaluated the potential association of the 9 SNPs with schizophrenia in two independent case-control cohorts of 2510 Han Chinese individuals. No positive association of common genetic variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes with schizophrenia was identified in our samples after Bonferroni correction. Re-analysis of the newly updated Psychiatric Genetics Consortium (PGC) data sets confirmed our negative result. Intriguingly, one PINK1 SNP (rs10916832), which showed a marginally significant association in only Hunan samples (P = 0.032), is associated with the expression of a schizophrenia susceptible gene KIF17 according to the expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis. Our study indicated that common genetic variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes are unlikely to be involved in schizophrenia. Further studies are essential to characterize the role of the PINK1 and PARL genes in schizophrenia.

  11. Variants in the Dopamine-4-Receptor Gene Promoter Are Not Associated with Sensation Seeking in Skiers

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Cynthia J.; Rajala, Amelia K.; Carlson, Scott R.; Rupert, Jim L.

    2014-01-01

    Sensation seeking is a personality trait that has been associated with disinhibited behaviours including substance use and gambling, but also with high-risk sport practices including skydiving, paragliding, and downhill skiing. Twin studies have shown that sensation seeking is moderately heritable, and candidate genes encoding components involved in dopaminergic transmission have been investigated as contributing to this type of behaviour. To determine whether variants in the regulatory regions of the dopamine-4-receptor gene (DRD4) influenced sport-specific sensation seeking, we analyzed five polymorphisms (−1106T/C, −906T/C, −809G/A, −291C/T, 120-bp duplication) in the promoter region of the gene in a cohort of skiers and snowboarders (n = 599) that represented a broad range of sensation seeking behaviours. We grouped subjects by genotype at each of the five loci and compared impulsive sensation seeking and domain-specific (skiing) sensation seeking between groups. There were no significant associations between genotype(s) and general or domain-specific sensation seeking in the skiers and snowboarders, suggesting that while DRD4 has previously been implicated in sensation seeking, the promoter variants investigated in this study do not contribute to sensation seeking in this athlete population. PMID:24691022

  12. Variants in the dopamine-4-receptor gene promoter are not associated with sensation seeking in skiers.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Cynthia J; Rajala, Amelia K; Carlson, Scott R; Rupert, Jim L

    2014-01-01

    Sensation seeking is a personality trait that has been associated with disinhibited behaviours including substance use and gambling, but also with high-risk sport practices including skydiving, paragliding, and downhill skiing. Twin studies have shown that sensation seeking is moderately heritable, and candidate genes encoding components involved in dopaminergic transmission have been investigated as contributing to this type of behaviour. To determine whether variants in the regulatory regions of the dopamine-4-receptor gene (DRD4) influenced sport-specific sensation seeking, we analyzed five polymorphisms (-1106T/C, -906T/C, -809G/A, -291C/T, 120-bp duplication) in the promoter region of the gene in a cohort of skiers and snowboarders (n = 599) that represented a broad range of sensation seeking behaviours. We grouped subjects by genotype at each of the five loci and compared impulsive sensation seeking and domain-specific (skiing) sensation seeking between groups. There were no significant associations between genotype(s) and general or domain-specific sensation seeking in the skiers and snowboarders, suggesting that while DRD4 has previously been implicated in sensation seeking, the promoter variants investigated in this study do not contribute to sensation seeking in this athlete population.

  13. Chromatin stretch enhancer states drive cell-specific gene regulation and harbor human disease risk variants

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Stephen C. J.; Stitzel, Michael L.; Taylor, D. Leland; Orozco, Jose Miguel; Erdos, Michael R.; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; van Bueren, Kelly Lammerts; Chines, Peter S.; Narisu, Narisu; Black, Brian L.; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A.; Collins, Francis S.; Becker, Jesse; Benjamin, Betty; Blakesley, Robert; Bouffard, Gerry; Brooks, Shelise; Coleman, Holly; Dekhtyar, Mila; Gregory, Michael; Guan, Xiaobin; Gupta, Jyoti; Han, Joel; Hargrove, April; Johnson, Taccara; Legaspi, Richelle; Lovett, Sean; Maduro, Quino; Masiello, Cathy; Maskeri, Baishali; McDowell, Jenny; Montemayor, Casandra; Mullikin, James; Park, Morgan; Riebow, Nancy; Schandler, Karen; Schmidt, Brian; Sison, Christina; Stantripop, Mal; Thomas, James; Thomas, Pam; Vemulapalli, Meg; Young, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin-based functional genomic analyses and genomewide association studies (GWASs) together implicate enhancers as critical elements influencing gene expression and risk for common diseases. Here, we performed systematic chromatin and transcriptome profiling in human pancreatic islets. Integrated analysis of islet data with those from nine cell types identified specific and significant enrichment of type 2 diabetes and related quantitative trait GWAS variants in islet enhancers. Our integrated chromatin maps reveal that most enhancers are short (median = 0.8 kb). Each cell type also contains a substantial number of more extended (≥3 kb) enhancers. Interestingly, these stretch enhancers are often tissue-specific and overlap locus control regions, suggesting that they are important chromatin regulatory beacons. Indeed, we show that (i) tissue specificity of enhancers and nearby gene expression increase with enhancer length; (ii) neighborhoods containing stretch enhancers are enriched for important cell type–specific genes; and (iii) GWAS variants associated with traits relevant to a particular cell type are more enriched in stretch enhancers compared with short enhancers. Reporter constructs containing stretch enhancer sequences exhibited tissue-specific activity in cell culture experiments and in transgenic mice. These results suggest that stretch enhancers are critical chromatin elements for coordinating cell type–specific regulatory programs and that sequence variation in stretch enhancers affects risk of major common human diseases. PMID:24127591

  14. Chromatin stretch enhancer states drive cell-specific gene regulation and harbor human disease risk variants.

    PubMed

    Parker, Stephen C J; Stitzel, Michael L; Taylor, D Leland; Orozco, Jose Miguel; Erdos, Michael R; Akiyama, Jennifer A; van Bueren, Kelly Lammerts; Chines, Peter S; Narisu, Narisu; Black, Brian L; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A; Collins, Francis S

    2013-10-29

    Chromatin-based functional genomic analyses and genomewide association studies (GWASs) together implicate enhancers as critical elements influencing gene expression and risk for common diseases. Here, we performed systematic chromatin and transcriptome profiling in human pancreatic islets. Integrated analysis of islet data with those from nine cell types identified specific and significant enrichment of type 2 diabetes and related quantitative trait GWAS variants in islet enhancers. Our integrated chromatin maps reveal that most enhancers are short (median = 0.8 kb). Each cell type also contains a substantial number of more extended (≥ 3 kb) enhancers. Interestingly, these stretch enhancers are often tissue-specific and overlap locus control regions, suggesting that they are important chromatin regulatory beacons. Indeed, we show that (i) tissue specificity of enhancers and nearby gene expression increase with enhancer length; (ii) neighborhoods containing stretch enhancers are enriched for important cell type-specific genes; and (iii) GWAS variants associated with traits relevant to a particular cell type are more enriched in stretch enhancers compared with short enhancers. Reporter constructs containing stretch enhancer sequences exhibited tissue-specific activity in cell culture experiments and in transgenic mice. These results suggest that stretch enhancers are critical chromatin elements for coordinating cell type-specific regulatory programs and that sequence variation in stretch enhancers affects risk of major common human diseases.

  15. Systematic Evaluation Of Genes And Genetic Variants Associated With Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Ramesh; Mehta, Munish; Nguyen, Quang T.; Larma, Irma; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Pociot, Flemming; Concannon, Patrick; Morahan, Grant

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have found over 60 loci that confer genetic susceptibility to Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Many of these are defined only by anonymous SNPs: the underlying causative genes, and the molecular bases by which they mediate susceptibility, are not known. Identification of how these variants affect the complex mechanisms contributing to the loss of tolerance is a challenge. We performed systematic analyses to characterize these variants. First, all known genes in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) (r2 > 0.8) with the reported SNPs for each locus were tested for commonly occurring non-synonymous variations. We found only a total of 22 candidate genes at 16 T1D loci with common non-synonymous alleles. Next, we performed functional studies to examine the effect of non-HLA T1D risk alleles on regulating expression levels of genes in four different cell types: EBV- transformed B cell lines (resting and 6h PMA stimulated); purified CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We mapped cis-acting expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) and found 24 non-HLA loci that affected the expression of 31 transcripts significantly in at least one cell type. Additionally, we observed 25 loci that affected 38 transcripts in trans. In summary, our systems genetics analyses defined the effect of T1D risk alleles on levels of gene expression and provide novel insights into the complex genetics of T1D, suggesting most of the T1D risk alleles mediate their effect by influencing expression of multiple nearby genes. PMID:26912320

  16. A TOMM40 poly-T variant modulates gene expression and is associated with vocabulary ability and decline in nonpathologic aging.

    PubMed

    Payton, A; Sindrewicz, P; Pessoa, V; Platt, H; Horan, M; Ollier, W; Bubb, V J; Pendleton, N; Quinn, J P

    2016-03-01

    The Translocase of Outer Mitochondrial Membrane 40 Homolog and Apolipoprotein E (TOMM40-APOE) locus has been associated with a number of age-related phenotypes in humans including nonpathologic cognitive aging, late-onset Alzheimer's disease, and longevity. Here, we investigate the influence of the TOMM40 intron 6 poly-T variant (rs10524523) on TOMM40 gene expression and cognitive abilities and decline in a cohort of 1613 community-dwelling elderly volunteers who had been followed for changes in cognitive functioning over a period of 14 years (range = 12-18 years). We showed that the shorter length poly-T variants were found to act as a repressor of luciferase gene expression in reporter gene constructs. Expression was reduced to approximately half of that observed for the very long variant. We further observed that the shorter poly-T variant was significantly associated with reduced vocabulary ability and a slower rate of vocabulary decline with age compared to the very long poly-T variants. No significant associations were observed for memory, fluid intelligence or processing speed, although the direction of effect, where the short variant was correlated with reduced ability and slower rate of decline was observed for all tests. Our results indicate that the poly-T variant has the ability to interact with transcription machinery and differentially modulate reporter gene expression and influence vocabulary ability and decline with age.

  17. Analysis of functional variants reveals new candidate genes associated with alexithymia.

    PubMed

    Mezzavilla, Massimo; Ulivi, Sheila; Bianca, Martina La; Carlino, Davide; Gasparini, Paolo; Robino, Antonietta

    2015-06-30

    In this study we explored the possible association between 36,915 functional variants and alexithymia, a personality trait characterized by the inability to identify and describe emotions and feelings. From our analysis, variants in the genes ABCB4, TP53AIP1, ARHGAP32 and TMEM88B were identified linked to the alexithymia phenotype.

  18. FTO gene variant modulates the neural correlates of visual food perception.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Anne B; Feis, Delia-Lisa; Schilbach, Leonhard; Kracht, Lutz; Hess, Martin E; Mauer, Jan; Brüning, Jens C; Tittgemeyer, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Variations in the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene are currently the strongest known genetic factor predisposing humans to non-monogenic obesity. Recent experiments have linked these variants to a broad spectrum of behavioural alterations, including food choice and substance abuse. Yet, the underlying neurobiological mechanisms by which these genetic variations influence body weight remain elusive. Here, we explore the brain structural substrate of the obesity-predisposing rs9939609 T/A variant of the FTO gene in non-obese subjects by means of multivariate classification and use fMRI to investigate genotype-specific differences in neural food-cue reactivity by analysing correlates of a visual food perception task. Our findings demonstrate that MRI-derived measures of morphology along middle and posterior fusiform gyrus (FFG) are highly predictive for FTO at-risk allele carriers, who also show enhanced neural responses elicited by food cues in the same posterior FFG area. In brief, these findings provide first-time evidence for FTO-specific differences in both brain structure and function already in non-obese individuals, thereby contributing to a mechanistic understanding of why FTO is a predisposing factor for obesity.

  19. Surface Gene Variants of Hepatitis B Virus in Saudi Patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qudari, Ahmed Y.; Amer, Haitham M.; Abdo, Ayman A.; Hussain, Zahid; Al-Hamoudi, Waleed; Alswat, Khalid; Almajhdi, Fahad N.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) continues to be one of the most important viral pathogens in humans. Surface (S) protein is the major HBV antigen that mediates virus attachment and entry and determines the virus subtype. Mutations in S gene, particularly in the “a” determinant, can influence virus detection by ELISA and may generate escape mutants. Since no records have documented the S gene mutations in HBV strains circulating in Saudi Arabia, the current study was designed to study sequence variation of S gene in strains circulating in Saudi Arabia and its correlation with clinical and risk factors. Patients and Methods: A total of 123 HBV-infected patients were recruited for this study. Clinical and biochemical parameters, serological markers, and viral load were determined in all patients. The entire S gene sequence of samples with viral load exceeding 2000 IU/mL was retrieved and exploited in sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Patients and Methods: A total of 123 HBV-infected patients were recruited for this study. Clinical and biochemical parameters, serological markers, and viral load were determined in all patients. The entire S gene sequence of samples with viral load exceeding 2000 IU/mL was retrieved and exploited in sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Results: A total of 48 mutations (21 unique) were recorded in viral strains in Saudi Arabia, among which 24 (11 unique) changed their respective amino acids. Two amino acid changes were recorded in “a” determinant, including F130L and S135F with no evidence of the vaccine escape mutant G145R in any of the samples. No specific relationship was recognized between the mutation/amino acid change record of HBsAg in strains in Saudi Arabia and clinical or laboratory data. Phylogenetic analysis categorized HBV viral strains in Saudi Arabia as members of subgenotypes D1 and D3. Conclusion: The present report is the first that describes mutation analysis of HBsAg in strains in Saudi Arabia on both

  20. Sequence variants in oxytocin pathway genes and preterm birth: a candidate gene association study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Preterm birth (PTB) is a complex disorder associated with significant neonatal mortality and morbidity and long-term adverse health consequences. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that genetic factors play an important role in its etiology. This study was designed to identify genetic variation associated with PTB in oxytocin pathway genes whose role in parturition is well known. Methods To identify common genetic variants predisposing to PTB, we genotyped 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the oxytocin (OXT), oxytocin receptor (OXTR), and leucyl/cystinyl aminopeptidase (LNPEP) genes in 651 case infants from the U.S. and one or both of their parents. In addition, we examined the role of rare genetic variation in susceptibility to PTB by conducting direct sequence analysis of OXTR in 1394 cases and 1112 controls from the U.S., Argentina, Denmark, and Finland. This study was further extended to maternal triads (maternal grandparents-mother of a case infant, N=309). We also performed in vitro analysis of selected rare OXTR missense variants to evaluate their functional importance. Results Maternal genetic effect analysis of the SNP genotype data revealed four SNPs in LNPEP that show significant association with prematurity. In our case–control sequence analysis, we detected fourteen coding variants in exon 3 of OXTR, all but four of which were found in cases only. Of the fourteen variants, three were previously unreported novel rare variants. When the sequence data from the maternal triads were analyzed using the transmission disequilibrium test, two common missense SNPs (rs4686302 and rs237902) in OXTR showed suggestive association for three gestational age subgroups. In vitro functional assays showed a significant difference in ligand binding between wild-type and two mutant receptors. Conclusions Our study suggests an association between maternal common polymorphisms in LNPEP and susceptibility to PTB. Maternal OXTR missense SNPs rs4686302

  1. High-performance web services for querying gene and variant annotation.

    PubMed

    Xin, Jiwen; Mark, Adam; Afrasiabi, Cyrus; Tsueng, Ginger; Juchler, Moritz; Gopal, Nikhil; Stupp, Gregory S; Putman, Timothy E; Ainscough, Benjamin J; Griffith, Obi L; Torkamani, Ali; Whetzel, Patricia L; Mungall, Christopher J; Mooney, Sean D; Su, Andrew I; Wu, Chunlei

    2016-05-06

    Efficient tools for data management and integration are essential for many aspects of high-throughput biology. In particular, annotations of genes and human genetic variants are commonly used but highly fragmented across many resources. Here, we describe MyGene.info and MyVariant.info, high-performance web services for querying gene and variant annotation information. These web services are currently accessed more than three million times permonth. They also demonstrate a generalizable cloud-based model for organizing and querying biological annotation information. MyGene.info and MyVariant.info are provided as high-performance web services, accessible at http://mygene.info and http://myvariant.info . Both are offered free of charge to the research community.

  2. Variants of Folate Metabolism Genes and Risk of Left-Sided Cardiac Defects

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Laura E.; Long, Jin; Garbarini, Jennifer; Paluru, Prasuna; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Background Congenital heart defects (CHD) are the most common, serious group of birth defects. Although relatively little is known about the causes of these conditions and there are no established prevention strategies, evidence suggests that the risk of CHD may be related to maternal folate status as well as genetic variants in folate-related genes. Efforts to establish the relationships between these factors and CHD risk have, however, been hampered by a number of factors, including small study sample sizes and phenotypic heterogeneity. Methods The present study examined the relationship between nine genetic variants in eight folate-related genes and a relatively homogeneous group of left-sided cardiac defects in a cohort of 386 case-parent triads. Log-linear analyses were used to assess both maternal and inherited genetic effects. Results Analyses of the study data provided marginal evidence that the maternal MTR A2756G (unadjusted p=0.01) and the inherited BHMT G742A genotypes (unadjusted p=0.06) influence the risk of this subset of CHD. However, neither association achieved significance when the false-discovery rate was controlled at 0.05. Conclusions These results, which are based on the largest study sample and most comprehensive assessment of the relationship between left-sided cardiac defects and folate-related genes reported to date, provide little evidence that this subset of CHD is folate-related. However, even larger studies and more comprehensive evaluations of the folate pathway genes are required to fully explore the relationship between folate and left-sided cardiac defects. PMID:19777601

  3. Gene Variant from Africa Linked to Black Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health News on: African American Health Genes and Gene Therapy Obesity Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics African American Health Genes and Gene Therapy Obesity About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support ...

  4. Burden of rare sarcomere gene variants in the Framingham and Jackson Heart Study cohorts.

    PubMed

    Bick, Alexander G; Flannick, Jason; Ito, Kaoru; Cheng, Susan; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Parfenov, Michael G; Herman, Daniel S; DePalma, Steven R; Gupta, Namrata; Gabriel, Stacey B; Funke, Birgit H; Rehm, Heidi L; Benjamin, Emelia J; Aragam, Jayashri; Taylor, Herman A; Fox, Ervin R; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Kathiresan, Sekar; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Wilson, James G; Altshuler, David M; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Seidman, J G; Seidman, Christine

    2012-09-07

    Rare sarcomere protein variants cause dominant hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. To evaluate whether allelic variants in eight sarcomere genes are associated with cardiac morphology and function in the community, we sequenced 3,600 individuals from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) and Jackson Heart Study (JHS) cohorts. Out of the total, 11.2% of individuals had one or more rare nonsynonymous sarcomere variants. The prevalence of likely pathogenic sarcomere variants was 0.6%, twice the previous estimates; however, only four of the 22 individuals had clinical manifestations of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Rare sarcomere variants were associated with an increased risk for adverse cardiovascular events (hazard ratio: 2.3) in the FHS cohort, suggesting that cardiovascular risk assessment in the general population can benefit from rare variant analysis.

  5. CT gene modulate differential expression of chitinase gene under variant habitats in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Yogendra Kumar; Verma, Mahendra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the interrelation of cholera toxin gene (CT gene) in expression of chitinase gene under different pH conditions among pathogenic and Non-pathogenic strains of Vibrio cholera (V. cholera). Methods The chitinase assay well diffusion method and calorimetric chitinase assay were performed. Further, time depended chitinase activity among pathogenic and nonpathogenic strain was evaluated with control as Escherichia coli. The expressed protein in variant environment was purified by cascade of chromatographic techniques. The partially purified protein was analyzed by SDS-PAGE in both the strain of V. cholera. Results The results have shown differential expression of chitinase gene among vibrio in time depended chitinase activity, purification of expressed protein and SDS-PAGE analysis. Conclusions From the current study, two conclusions came in picture, habitat is prime factor that regulation of chitin gene expression among many bacterial strains, second, moreover among the vibrio pathogenic strains (CT+) expression of chitinase gene is more precisely regulated by CT gene rather than external environments while in non-pathogenic strain ( CT-) completely absent.

  6. Interleukin 1B Variant -1473G/C (rs1143623) Influences Triglyceride and Interleukin 6 Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Lista, Javier; Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Solivera, Juan; Yubero-Serrano, Elena M.; Fuentes, Francisco; Parnell, Laurence D.; Shen, Jian; Gomez, Purificacion; Jimenez-Gomez, Yolanda; Gomez-Luna, Maria J.; Marin, Carmen; Belisle, Sarah E.; Rodriguez-Cantalejo, Fernando; Meydani, Simin N.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Context: IL1b (IL1B or IL1β), a key modulator of the immune response, exerts its functions mainly via IL6 regulation. Fatty meals cause transient hypertriglyceridemia and are considered to be proinflammatory, but the extent of these responses shows high interindividual susceptibility. Objective: We evaluated the influence of a genetic variant located in the promoter region of IL1B (-1473G/C) on fasting and postprandial lipids and IL6. Design, Setting, and Participants: A total of 477 people over age 65 yr were genotyped for IL1B -1473G/C, and we evaluated fasting lipids depending on genotype. Then, 88 healthy young men were also genotyped and were fed a saturated fatty acid-rich meal. Serial blood samples were drawn for 11 h after the meal, and lipid fractions and IL6 were assayed. Main Outcome and Interventions: Fasting lipids were studied in the aged persons. Fasting and postprandial measurements of lipids and IL6 were performed in the healthy young men. Results: In the aged persons, CC subjects (minor allele homozygotes) showed higher triglyceride (P = 0.002) and cholesterol (P = 0.011) levels. Healthy young male carriers of the minor C allele showed higher postprandial triglycerides (P = 0.037), and those carried into large triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (P = 0.004). In addition, they showed higher postprandial IL6 concentrations (P = 0.008). Conclusions: Our work shows that inflammatory genes may regulate fasting and postprandial lipids because the carriers of the minor allele of an IL gene variant have altered lipid metabolism. To reinforce these gene-phenotype findings, IL6 (the natural effector of IL1B) was increased in these persons. PMID:21307135

  7. Variants in GBA, SNCA, and MAPT influence Parkinson disease risk, age at onset, and progression.

    PubMed

    Davis, Albert A; Andruska, Kristin M; Benitez, Bruno A; Racette, Brad A; Perlmutter, Joel S; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Multiple genetic variants have been linked to risk of Parkinson disease (PD), but known mutations do not explain a large proportion of the total PD cases. Similarly, multiple loci have been associated with PD risk by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The influence that genetic factors confer on phenotypic diversity remains unclear. Few studies have been performed to determine whether the GWAS loci are also associated with age at onset (AAO) or motor progression. We used 2 PD case-control data sets (Washington University and the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative) to determine whether polymorphisms located at the GWAS top hits (GBA, ACMSD/TMEM163, STK39, MCCC1/LAMP3, GAK/TMEM175, SNCA, and MAPT) show association with AAO or motor progression. We found associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms at the GBA and MAPT loci and PD AAO and progression. These findings reinforce the complex genetic basis of PD and suggest that distinct genes and variants explain the genetic architecture of PD risk, onset, and progression.

  8. Liver X Receptor Genes Variants Modulate ALS Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mouzat, Kevin; Molinari, Nicolas; Kantar, Jovana; Polge, Anne; Corcia, Philippe; Couratier, Philippe; Clavelou, Pierre; Juntas-Morales, Raul; Pageot, Nicolas; Lobaccaro, Jean -Marc A; Raoul, Cedric; Lumbroso, Serge; Camu, William

    2017-02-27

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is one of the most severe motor neuron (MN) disorders in adults. Phenotype of ALS patients is highly variable and may be influenced by modulators of energy metabolism. Recent works have implicated the liver X receptors α and β (LXRs), either in the propagation process of ALS or in the maintenance of MN survival. LXRs are nuclear receptors activated by oxysterols, modulating cholesterol levels, a suspected modulator of ALS severity. In a cohort of 438 ALS patients and 330 healthy controls, the influence of LXR genes on ALS risk and phenotype was studied using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The two LXRα SNPs rs2279238 and rs7120118 were shown to be associated with age at onset in ALS patients. Consistently, homozygotes were twice more correlated than were heterozygotes to delayed onset. The onset was thus delayed by 3.9 years for rs2279238 C/T carriers and 7.8 years for T/T carriers. Similar results were obtained for rs7120118 (+2.1 years and +6.7 years for T/C and C/C genotypes, respectively). The LXRβ SNP rs2695121 was also shown to be associated with a 30% increase of ALS duration (p = 0.0055, FDR = 0.044). The tested genotypes were not associated with ALS risk. These findings add further evidence to the suspected implication of LXR genes in the disease process of ALS and might open new perspectives in ALS therapeutics.

  9. Differential sensitivity to interferon influences the replication and transcription of Urabe AM9 mumps virus variants in nerve cells.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Murrieta, Nora; Herrera-Camacho, Irma; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Millán-Pérez-Peña, Lourdes; Cruz, Carlos; Tapia-Ramírez, José; Santos-López, Gerardo; Reyes-Leyva, Julio

    2007-06-01

    Urabe AM9 mumps virus vaccine causes post-vaccination meningitis. Two variants of Urabe AM9 virus differ in their replication efficiency in human nerve cells, HN-A(1081) variant being more neurotropic than HN-G(1081). The effect of interferon (IFN) on viral replication and transcription was analyzed. Priming of nerve cells with IFN reduced more significantly the replication of HN-G(1081) variant (from 10(2.5) to 10(1.3) TCID(50)) than that of HN-A(1081) (from 10(3.5) to 10(2.6) TCID(50)). IFN-priming also reduced the transcription of HN-G(1081) genes, but not of HN-A(1081). The effect of viral infection on the transcription of cellular IFN responsive genes was analyzed. HN-A(1081) virus reduced the transcription of STAT1, STAT2, p48 and MxA in both unprimed and IFN-primed cells; whereas HN-G(1081) virus just reduced MxA transcription. Since rubulavirus V protein inhibits IFN signaling, the V mRNA was cloned and sequenced, finding that HN-G(1081) but not HN-A(1081) presented three extra G in the P/V edition site, producing the insertion of Gly156 in the V protein. Our results suggest that the replication efficiency of Urabe AM9 mumps virus variants is influenced by their sensitivity to interferon and their capacity to reduce the antiviral response.

  10. Understanding V(D)J recombination initiator RAG1 gene using molecular phylogenetic and genetic variant analyses and upgrading missense and non-coding variants of clinical importance.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Bhandari, Anita; Sarde, Sandeep J; Muppavarapu, Sekhar; Tandon, Ravi

    2015-07-10

    The recombination-activating genes (RAGs) encode for V(D)J recombinases responsible for rearrangements of antigen-receptor genes during T and B cell development, and RAG expression is known to correlate strictly with the process of rearrangement. There have been several studies of RAG1 illustrating biochemical, physiological and immunological properties. Hitherto, there are limited studies on RAG1 focusing molecular phylogenetic analyses, evolutionary traits, and genetic variants in human populations. Hence, there is a need of a comprehensive study on this topic. In the current report, we have shed light into insights of evolutionary traits and genetic variants of human RAG1 gene using 1092 genomes from human populations. Syntenic analyses revealed that two RAG genes are physically linked and conserved on the same locus in head-to-head orientation from sea urchin to human for about 550 MY. Spliceosomal introns have been in invaded in fishes and sea urchin, whereas gene structures of RAG1 gene from tetrapods remained single exon architecture. We compiled 751 genetic variants in human RAG1 gene using 1092 human genomes; where major stockholders of variant classes are 79% single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 12.2% somatic single nucleotide variants (somatic SNVs) and 6.8% deletion. Out of 267 missense variants, 140 are deleterious mutations. We identified 284 non-coding variants with 94% regulatory in nature.

  11. Quantitative EEG during normal aging: association with the Alzheimer's disease genetic risk variant in PICALM gene.

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, Natalya V; Andreeva, Tatiana V; Protasova, Maria S; Shagam, Lef I; Malina, Daria D; Goltsov, Andrey Yu; Fokin, Vitaly F; Illarioshkin, Sergey N; Rogaev, Evgeny I

    2017-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified novel risk variants for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Among these, a gene carrying one of the highest risks for AD is PICALM. The PICALM rs3851179 A allele is thought to have a protective effect, whereas the G allele appears to confer risk for AD. The influence of the PICALM genotype on brain function in nondemented subjects remains largely unknown. We examined the possible effect of the PICALM rs3851179 genotype on quantitative electroencephalography recording at rest in 137 nondemented volunteers (age range: 20-79 years) subdivided into cohorts of those younger than and those older than 50 years of age. The homozygous presence of the AD risk variant PICALM GG was associated with an increase in beta relative power, with the effect being more pronounced in the older cohort. Beta power elevation in resting-state electroencephalography has previously been linked to cortical disinhibition and hyperexcitability. The increase in beta relative power in the carriers of the AD risk PICALM GG genotype suggests changes in the cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance, which are heightened during normal aging.

  12. Targeted Resequencing of Deafness Genes Reveals a Founder MYO15A Variant in Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Manzoli, Gabrielle N; Bademci, Guney; Acosta, Angelina X; Félix, Têmis M; Cengiz, F Basak; Foster, Joseph; Da Silva, Danniel S Dias; Menendez, Ibis; Sanchez-Pena, Isalis; Tekin, Demet; Blanton, Susan H; Abe-Sandes, Kiyoko; Liu, Xue Zhong; Tekin, Mustafa

    2016-11-01

    Identifying the genetic etiology in a person with hearing loss (HL) is challenging due to the extreme genetic heterogeneity in HL and the population-specific variability. In this study, after excluding GJB2 variants, targeted resequencing of 180 deafness-related genes revealed the causative variants in 11 of 19 (58%) Brazilian probands with autosomal recessive HL. Identified pathogenic variants were in MYO15A (10 families) and CLDN14 (one family). Remarkably, the MYO15A p.(Val1400Met) variant was identified in eight families from the city of Monte Santo in the northeast region of Brazil. Haplotype analysis of this variant was consistent with a single founder. No other cases with this variant were detected among 105 simplex cases from other cities of northeastern Brazil, suggesting that this variant is confined to a geographical region. This study suggests that it is feasible to develop population-specific screening for deafness variants once causative variants are identified in different geographical groups.

  13. Variants in microRNA genes in familial papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tomsic, Jerneja; Fultz, Rebecca; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Genutis, Luke K; Wang, Yanqiang; Li, Wei; Volinia, Stefano; Jazdzewski, Krystian; He, Huiling; Wakely, Paul E; Senter, Leigha; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2017-01-24

    Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (PTC) displays one of the highest familiality scores of all cancers as measured by case-control studies, yet only a handful of genes have been implicated until now. Variants in microRNAs have been associated with the risk of several cancers including PTC but the magnitude of this involvement is unclear. This study was designed to test to what extent genomic variants in microRNAs contribute to PTC risk. We used SOLiD technology to sequence 321 genomic regions encoding 427 miRNAs in one affected individual from each of 80 PTC families. After excluding variants with frequency ≥ 1% in 1000 Genomes Phase 1 (n = 1092) we detected 1978 variants. After further functional filtering steps 25 variants in pre-miRs remained. Co-segregation was observed for six out of 16 tested miRNA variants with PTC in the families, namely let-7e, miR-181b, miR-135a, miR-15b, miR-320, and miR-484. Expression of miR-135a and miR-181b was tested in normal thyroid and tumor tissue from patients that carry the variants and a decrease in expression was observed. In vitro assays were applied to measure the effect of the variants on microRNAs' maturation. Four out of six variants were tested. Only the let-7e and miR-181b variants showed an effect on processing leading to lower levels of mature miRNA. These two variants were not detected in 1170 sporadic PTC cases nor in 1404 controls. Taken together, our data show that high penetrance germline sequence variants of miRNAs potentially predispose to a fraction of all PTC but are not common.

  14. Variants in microRNA genes in familial papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tomsic, Jerneja; Fultz, Rebecca; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Genutis, Luke K; Wang, Yanqiang; Li, Wei; Volinia, Stefano; Jazdzewski, Krystian; He, Huiling; Wakely, Paul E; Senter, Leigha; de Chapelle la, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (PTC) displays one of the highest familiality scores of all cancers as measured by case-control studies, yet only a handful of genes have been implicated until now. Variants in microRNAs have been associated with the risk of several cancers including PTC but the magnitude of this involvement is unclear. This study was designed to test to what extent genomic variants in microRNAs contribute to PTC risk. We used SOLiD technology to sequence 321 genomic regions encoding 427 miRNAs in one affected individual from each of 80 PTC families. After excluding variants with frequency ≥ 1% in 1000 Genomes Phase 1 (n = 1092) we detected 1978 variants. After further functional filtering steps 25 variants in pre-miRs remained. Co-segregation was observed for six out of 16 tested miRNA variants with PTC in the families, namely let-7e, miR-181b, miR-135a, miR-15b, miR-320, and miR-484. Expression of miR-135a and miR-181b was tested in normal thyroid and tumor tissue from patients that carry the variants and a decrease in expression was observed. In vitro assays were applied to measure the effect of the variants on microRNAs’ maturation. Four out of six variants were tested. Only the let-7e and miR-181b variants showed an effect on processing leading to lower levels of mature miRNA. These two variants were not detected in 1170 sporadic PTC cases nor in 1404 controls. Taken together, our data show that high penetrance germline sequence variants of miRNAs potentially predispose to a fraction of all PTC but are not common. PMID:28031538

  15. [Lack of association between the S447X variant of the lipoprotein lipase gene and plasma lipids. A preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Zambrano Morales, Mariana; Fernández Salgado, Erika; Balzán Urdaneta, Ligia; Labastidas, Neila; Aranguren-Méndez, José; Connell, Lissette; Molero Paredes, Tania; Rojas, Alicia; Panunzio, Amelia

    2014-06-01

    The increase in lipid plasma values is an important cardiovascular risk factor. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) plays an important role in the lipoprotein metabolism and metabolic and genetic factors may influence its levels and functions. The S447X variant of the lipoprotein lipase gene is associated with changes in plasma lipids in different populations. The objective of this research was to analyze the S447X variant of the LPL gene and its relation with plasma lipids of individuals in Zulia state, Venezuela. With this purpose, we studied 75 individuals (34 men and 41 women) between 20 and 60 years of age. Each subject had a medical history which included family history, anthropometric characteristics, nutritional status evaluation and biochemical tests. Genomic DNA was extracted for the molecular study and the polymerase chain reaction was used, followed by enzyme digestion, for restriction fragments length polymorphisms using the Hinf I enzyme. The individuals studied had normal levels of blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol and low density lipoproteins (LDL-C) and slightly decreased levels of high density lipoproteins (HDL-C). The genotypic distribution of the LPL gene S447X variant in the studied population was 90.6% for the homozygous genotype SS447 and 9.4% for the heterozygote SX447. The genotype 447XX was not identified. The population was found in Hardy Weinberg genetic equilibrium. No association between the S447X polymorphism of lipoprotein lipase gene and plasma lipids was observed.

  16. Identification and Functional Characterization of G6PC2 Coding Variants Influencing Glycemic Traits Define an Effector Transcript at the G6PC2-ABCB11 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Anubha; Sim, Xueling; Ng, Hui Jin; Manning, Alisa; Rivas, Manuel A.; Highland, Heather M.; Locke, Adam E.; Grarup, Niels; Im, Hae Kyung; Cingolani, Pablo; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Rayner, N. William; Robertson, Neil R.; Beer, Nicola L.; Rundle, Jana K.; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Ladenvall, Claes; Blancher, Christine; Buck, David; Buck, Gemma; Burtt, Noël P.; Gabriel, Stacey; Gjesing, Anette P.; Groves, Christopher J.; Hollensted, Mette; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; Jackson, Anne U.; Jun, Goo; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Mangino, Massimo; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Neville, Matt; Onofrio, Robert; Small, Kerrin S.; Stringham, Heather M.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Trakalo, Joseph; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bell, Graeme I.; Blangero, John; Cox, Nancy J.; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Hanis, Craig L.; Seielstad, Mark; Wilson, James G.; Christensen, Cramer; Brandslund, Ivan; Rauramaa, Rainer; Surdulescu, Gabriela L.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Lannfelt, Lars; Linneberg, Allan; Isomaa, Bo; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Jørgensen, Torben; Kuusisto, Johanna; Uusitupa, Matti; Salomaa, Veikko; Spector, Timothy D.; Morris, Andrew D.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Collins, Francis S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Bergman, Richard N.; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hansen, Torben; Watanabe, Richard M.; Prokopenko, Inga; Dupuis, Josee; Karpe, Fredrik; Groop, Leif; Laakso, Markku; Pedersen, Oluf; Florez, Jose C.; Morris, Andrew P.; Altshuler, David; Meigs, James B.; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Gloyn, Anna L.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI) have identified common variant signals which explain 4.8% and 1.2% of trait variance, respectively. It is hypothesized that low-frequency and rare variants could contribute substantially to unexplained genetic variance. To test this, we analyzed exome-array data from up to 33,231 non-diabetic individuals of European ancestry. We found exome-wide significant (P<5×10-7) evidence for two loci not previously highlighted by common variant GWAS: GLP1R (p.Ala316Thr, minor allele frequency (MAF)=1.5%) influencing FG levels, and URB2 (p.Glu594Val, MAF = 0.1%) influencing FI levels. Coding variant associations can highlight potential effector genes at (non-coding) GWAS signals. At the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus, we identified multiple coding variants in G6PC2 (p.Val219Leu, p.His177Tyr, and p.Tyr207Ser) influencing FG levels, conditionally independent of each other and the non-coding GWAS signal. In vitro assays demonstrate that these associated coding alleles result in reduced protein abundance via proteasomal degradation, establishing G6PC2 as an effector gene at this locus. Reconciliation of single-variant associations and functional effects was only possible when haplotype phase was considered. In contrast to earlier reports suggesting that, paradoxically, glucose-raising alleles at this locus are protective against type 2 diabetes (T2D), the p.Val219Leu G6PC2 variant displayed a modest but directionally consistent association with T2D risk. Coding variant associations for glycemic traits in GWAS signals highlight PCSK1, RREB1, and ZHX3 as likely effector transcripts. These coding variant association signals do not have a major impact on the trait variance explained, but they do provide valuable biological insights. PMID:25625282

  17. FARVATX: Family-Based Rare Variant Association Test for X-Linked Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungkyoung; Lee, Sungyoung; Qiao, Dandi; Hardin, Megan; Cho, Michael H; Silverman, Edwin K; Park, Taesung; Won, Sungho

    2016-09-01

    Although the X chromosome has many genes that are functionally related to human diseases, the complicated biological properties of the X chromosome have prevented efficient genetic association analyses, and only a few significantly associated X-linked variants have been reported for complex traits. For instance, dosage compensation of X-linked genes is often achieved via the inactivation of one allele in each X-linked variant in females; however, some X-linked variants can escape this X chromosome inactivation. Efficient genetic analyses cannot be conducted without prior knowledge about the gene expression process of X-linked variants, and misspecified information can lead to power loss. In this report, we propose new statistical methods for rare X-linked variant genetic association analysis of dichotomous phenotypes with family-based samples. The proposed methods are computationally efficient and can complete X-linked analyses within a few hours. Simulation studies demonstrate the statistical efficiency of the proposed methods, which were then applied to rare-variant association analysis of the X chromosome in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Some promising significant X-linked genes were identified, illustrating the practical importance of the proposed methods.

  18. Assessing the RNA effect of 26 DNA variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Mireia; Castellsagué, Joan; Mirete, Marc; Pros, Eva; Feliubadaló, Lídia; Osorio, Ana; Calaf, Mónica; Tornero, Eva; del Valle, Jesús; Fernández-Rodríguez, Juana; Quiles, Francisco; Salinas, Mónica; Velasco, Angela; Teulé, Alex; Brunet, Joan; Blanco, Ignacio; Capellá, Gabriel; Lázaro, Conxi

    2012-04-01

    Comprehensive genetic testing of the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 identified approximately 16% of variants of unknown significance (VUS), a significant proportion of which could affect the correct splicing of the genes. Our aim is to establish a workflow for classifying VUS in these complex genes, the first stage of which is splicing analysis. We used a combined approach consisting of five in silico splicing prediction programs and RT-PCR analysis for a set of 26 variants not previously studied at the mRNA level and six variants that had already been studied, four of which were used as positive controls as they were found to affect the splicing of these genes and the other two were used as negative controls. We identified a splicing defect in 8 of the 26 newly studied variants and ruled out splicing alteration in the remaining 18 variants. The results for the four positive and the two negative control variants were consistent with results presented in the literature. Our results strongly suggest that the combination of RNA analysis and in silico programs is an important step towards the classification of VUS. The results revealed a very high correlation between experimental data and in silico programs when using tools for predicting acceptor/donor sites but a lower correlation in the case of tools for identifying ESE elements.

  19. LOVD v.2.0: the next generation in gene variant databases.

    PubMed

    Fokkema, Ivo F A C; Taschner, Peter E M; Schaafsma, Gerard C P; Celli, J; Laros, Jeroen F J; den Dunnen, Johan T

    2011-05-01

    Locus-Specific DataBases (LSDBs) store information on gene sequence variation associated with human phenotypes and are frequently used as a reference by researchers and clinicians. We developed the Leiden Open-source Variation Database (LOVD) as a platform-independent Web-based LSDB-in-a-Box package. LOVD was designed to be easy to set up and maintain and follows the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) recommendations. Here we describe LOVD v.2.0, which adds enhanced flexibility and functionality and has the capacity to store sequence variants in multiple genes per patient. To reduce redundancy, patient and sequence variant data are stored in separate tables. Tables are linked to generate connections between sequence variant data for each gene and every patient. The dynamic structure allows database managers to add custom columns. The database structure supports fast queries and allows storage of sequence variants from high-throughput sequence analysis, as demonstrated by the X-chromosomal Mental Retardation LOVD installation. LOVD contains measures to ensure database security from unauthorized access. Currently, the LOVD Website (http://www.LOVD.nl/) lists 71 public LOVD installations hosting 3,294 gene variant databases with 199,000 variants in 84,000 patients. To promote LSDB standardization and thereby database interoperability, we offer free server space and help to establish an LSDB on our Leiden server.

  20. DTNBP1 (dysbindin) gene variants modulate prefrontal brain function in schizophrenic patients--support for the glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenias.

    PubMed

    Fallgatter, A J; Ehlis, A-C; Herrmann, M J; Hohoff, C; Reif, A; Freitag, C M; Deckert, J

    2010-07-01

    Dysbindin (DTNBP1) is a recently characterized protein that seems to be involved in the modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the human brain, thereby influencing prefrontal cortex function and associated cognitive processes. While association, neuroanatomical and cellular studies indicate that DTNBP1 might be one of several susceptibility genes for schizophrenia, the effect of dysbindin on prefrontal brain function at an underlying neurophysiological level has not yet been explored for these patients. The NoGo-anteriorization (NGA) is a topographical event-related potential measure, which has been established as a valid neurophysiological marker of prefrontal brain function. In the present study, we investigated the influence of seven dysbindin gene variants on the NGA in a group of 44 schizophrenic patients. In line with our a priori hypothesis, one DTNBP1 polymorphism previously linked to schizophrenia (rs2619528) was found to be associated with changes in the NGA; however, the direction of this association directly contrasts with our previous findings in a healthy control sample. This differential impact of DTNBP1 gene variation on prefrontal functioning in schizophrenic patients vs. healthy controls is discussed in terms of abnormal glutamatergic baseline levels in patients suffering from schizophrenic illnesses. This is the first report on a role of DTNBP1 gene variation for prefrontal functioning at a basic neurophysiological level in schizophrenic patients. An impact on fundamental processes of cognitive response control may be one mechanism by which DTNBP1 gene variants via glutamatergic transmission contribute to the pathophysiology underlying schizophrenic illnesses.

  1. The influence of angiotensin converting enzyme and bradykinin receptor B2 gene variants on voluntary fluid intake and fluid balance in healthy men during moderate-intensity exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Yau, Adora M W; Moss, Andrew D; James, Lewis John; Gilmore, William; Ashworth, Jason J; Evans, Gethin H

    2015-02-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and bradykinin receptor B2 (B2R) genetic variation may affect thirst because of effects on angiotensin II production and bradykinin activity, respectively. To examine this, 45 healthy Caucasian men completed 60 min of cycle exercise at 62% ± 5% peak oxygen uptake in a room heated to 30.5 ± 0.3 °C with ad libitum fluid intake. Blood samples were collected pre-, mid-, and immediately post-cycle. Fluid intake, body mass loss (BML), sweat loss (determined via changes in body mass and fluid intake), and thirst sensation were recorded. All participants were genotyped for the ACE insert fragment (I) and the B2R insert sequence (P). Participants were homozygous for the wild-type allele (WW or MM), heterozygous (WI or MP) or homozygous for the insert (II or PP). No differences between genotype groups were found in mean (±SD) voluntary fluid intake (WW: 613 ± 388, WI: 753 ± 385, II: 862 ± 421 mL, p = 0.31; MM: 599 ± 322, MP: 745 ± 374, PP: 870 ± 459 mL, p = 0.20), percentage BML or any other fluid balance variables for both the ACE and B2R genes, respectively. Mean thirst perception in the B2R PP group, however, was higher (p < 0.05) than both MM and MP at 30, 45, and 60 min. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that voluntary fluid intake and fluid balance in healthy men performing 60 min of moderate-intensity exercise in the heat are not predominantly influenced by ACE or B2R genetic variation.

  2. Unbiased Functional Clustering of Gene Variants with a Phenotypic-Linkage Network

    PubMed Central

    Honti, Frantisek; Meader, Stephen; Webber, Caleb

    2014-01-01

    Groupwise functional analysis of gene variants is becoming standard in next-generation sequencing studies. As the function of many genes is unknown and their classification to pathways is scant, functional associations between genes are often inferred from large-scale omics data. Such data types—including protein–protein interactions and gene co-expression networks—are used to examine the interrelations of the implicated genes. Statistical significance is assessed by comparing the interconnectedness of the mutated genes with that of random gene sets. However, interconnectedness can be affected by confounding bias, potentially resulting in false positive findings. We show that genes implicated through de novo sequence variants are biased in their coding-sequence length and longer genes tend to cluster together, which leads to exaggerated p-values in functional studies; we present here an integrative method that addresses these bias. To discern molecular pathways relevant to complex disease, we have inferred functional associations between human genes from diverse data types and assessed them with a novel phenotype-based method. Examining the functional association between de novo gene variants, we control for the heretofore unexplored confounding bias in coding-sequence length. We test different data types and networks and find that the disease-associated genes cluster more significantly in an integrated phenotypic-linkage network than in other gene networks. We present a tool of superior power to identify functional associations among genes mutated in the same disease even after accounting for significant sequencing study bias and demonstrate the suitability of this method to functionally cluster variant genes underlying polygenic disorders. PMID:25166029

  3. Genetic variants in REC8, RNF212, and PRDM9 influence male recombination in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sandor, Cynthia; Li, Wanbo; Coppieters, Wouter; Druet, Tom; Charlier, Carole; Georges, Michel

    2012-01-01

    We use >250,000 cross-over events identified in >10,000 bovine sperm cells to perform an extensive characterization of meiotic recombination in male cattle. We map Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) influencing genome-wide recombination rate, genome-wide hotspot usage, and locus-specific recombination rate. We fine-map three QTL and present strong evidence that genetic variants in REC8 and RNF212 influence genome-wide recombination rate, while genetic variants in PRDM9 influence genome-wide hotspot usage.

  4. Genetic variants in microRNA genes: impact on microRNA expression, function, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Cammaerts, Sophia; Strazisar, Mojca; De Rijk, Peter; Del Favero, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression and like any other gene, their coding sequences are subject to genetic variation. Variants in miRNA genes can have profound effects on miRNA functionality at all levels, including miRNA transcription, maturation, and target specificity, and as such they can also contribute to disease. The impact of variants in miRNA genes is the focus of the present review. To put these effects into context, we first discuss the requirements of miRNA transcripts for maturation. In the last part an overview of available databases and tools and experimental approaches to investigate miRNA variants related to human disease is presented. PMID:26052338

  5. Large-Scale Gene-Centric Analysis Identifies Novel Variants for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has a significant genetic contribution that is incompletely characterized. To complement genome-wide association (GWA) studies, we conducted a large and systematic candidate gene study of CAD susceptibility, including analysis of many uncommon and functional variants. We examined 49,094 genetic variants in ∼2,100 genes of cardiovascular relevance, using a customised gene array in 15,596 CAD cases and 34,992 controls (11,202 cases and 30,733 controls of European descent; 4,394 cases and 4,259 controls of South Asian origin). We attempted to replicate putative novel associations in an additional 17,121 CAD cases and 40,473 controls. Potential mechanisms through which the novel variants could affect CAD risk were explored through association tests with vascular risk factors and gene expression. We confirmed associations of several previously known CAD susceptibility loci (eg, 9p21.3:p<10−33; LPA:p<10−19; 1p13.3:p<10−17) as well as three recently discovered loci (COL4A1/COL4A2, ZC3HC1, CYP17A1:p<5×10−7). However, we found essentially null results for most previously suggested CAD candidate genes. In our replication study of 24 promising common variants, we identified novel associations of variants in or near LIPA, IL5, TRIB1, and ABCG5/ABCG8, with per-allele odds ratios for CAD risk with each of the novel variants ranging from 1.06–1.09. Associations with variants at LIPA, TRIB1, and ABCG5/ABCG8 were supported by gene expression data or effects on lipid levels. Apart from the previously reported variants in LPA, none of the other ∼4,500 low frequency and functional variants showed a strong effect. Associations in South Asians did not differ appreciably from those in Europeans, except for 9p21.3 (per-allele odds ratio: 1.14 versus 1.27 respectively; P for heterogeneity = 0.003). This large-scale gene-centric analysis has identified several novel genes for CAD that relate to diverse biochemical and cellular functions and

  6. Identification of Three Novel Splicing Variants and Expression Analysis of Chicken GPR1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueyou; Xiao, Qihai; Tian, Kai; Zhao, Xiaoling; Yin, Huadong; Li, Diyan

    2017-01-01

    GPR1 is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays critical roles in eukaryotic cells: typically, response to glucose stimulation, lipid accumulation, and transmitting nutrition signals to cAMP pathway. However, the alternative splicing of the GPR1 gene and its expression pattern in chicken tissues and ovarian follicles were unknown. In our current study, we used RACE-PCR to identify three GPR1 variants, including the full-length variant (GPR1-va1) and two alternatively spliced variants (GPR1-va2, GPR1-vb). Quantitative real-time PCR examined the expression pattern of GPR1 mRNA in chicken tissues and ovarian follicles. The result reveals that the coding sequence of the three variants cDNA is 1053, 1053, and 627 bp in length, encoding 350, 350, and 208 amino acids, respectively. The three variants of GPR1 show similar tissue distributions; GPR1 expression was abundant in the abdominal fat, lung, and heart. With the follicular development, the expression of GPR1 gene gradually increased, and GPR1-va1 and GPR1-va2 spliced variants expression in F2 were significantly higher than in F5, F4, and prehierarchical follicles (P < 0.05). Taken together, we found three novel variants of GPR1, and the results of GPR1 expression profiling in adipose tissues and ovarian follicles suggest that GPR1 may play a significant role in the lipid accumulation and progression of follicular development. PMID:28203567

  7. HFE gene variants, iron, and lipids: a novel connection in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ali-Rahmani, Fatima; Schengrund, Cara-Lynne; Connor, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Iron accumulation and associated oxidative stress in the brain have been consistently found in several neurodegenerative diseases. Multiple genetic studies have been undertaken to try to identify a cause of neurodegenerative diseases but direct connections have been rare. In the iron field, variants in the HFE gene that give rise to a protein involved in cellular iron regulation, are associated with iron accumulation in multiple organs including the brain. There is also substantial epidemiological, genetic, and molecular evidence of disruption of cholesterol homeostasis in several neurodegenerative diseases, in particular Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Despite the efforts that have been made to identify factors that can trigger the pathological events associated with neurodegenerative diseases they remain mostly unknown. Because molecular phenotypes such as oxidative stress, synaptic failure, neuronal loss, and cognitive decline, characteristics associated with AD, have been shown to result from disruption of a number of pathways, one can easily argue that the phenotype seen may not arise from a linear sequence of events. Therefore, a multi-targeted approach is needed to understand a complex disorder like AD. This can be achieved only when knowledge about interactions between the different pathways and the potential influence of environmental factors on them becomes available. Toward this end, this review discusses what is known about the roles and interactions of iron and cholesterol in neurodegenerative diseases. It highlights the effects of gene variants of HFE (H63D- and C282Y-HFE) on iron and cholesterol metabolism and how they may contribute to understanding the etiology of complex neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25071582

  8. Alternative spliced variants in the pantetheinase family of genes expressed in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nitto, Takeaki; Inoue, Teruo; Node, Koichi

    2008-12-15

    Pantetheinase (EC 3.5.1.92) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes pantetheine, an intermediate metabolite of coenzyme A, into pantothenic acid (vitamin B(5)) and cysteamine, a potent antioxidant. The pantetheinase gene family consists of three independent genes, pantetheinase/vanin-1/VNN1, GPI-80/VNN2 and vanin-3/VNN3 that are each composed of seven exons. We herein report that human neutrophils express transcripts encoding at least nine splice variants of VNN3 and four splice variants of GPI-80/VNN2. Analysis of the DNA sequence of the human VNN3 gene demonstrated that the VNN3 locus in the human genome as well as the sequence of cDNA clones obtained in this study does not encode the complete VNN3 protein, as previously reported due to a frame shift caused by lack of one nucleotide. Moreover, the VNN3 locus indeed encodes smaller peptides compared to the proteins encoded by the mouse orthologous gene, vanin-3. The anti-GPI-80 monoclonal antibody 3H9 recognized amino acids 120-179 of the GPI-80/VNN2 protein as shown by the results of immunoblotting with recombinant GPI-80/VNN2 variant proteins. Immunoblotting with human neutrophil lysate suggests that the GPI-80/VNN2 variants exist in human neutrophils. The existence of splice variants in the pantetheinase gene family suggests the possibility of alternative roles in addition to canonical enzymatic activity in human neutrophils.

  9. Prioritizing Variants in Complete Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Genes in Patients Lacking Known BRCA Mutations.

    PubMed

    Caminsky, Natasha G; Mucaki, Eliseos J; Perri, Ami M; Lu, Ruipeng; Knoll, Joan H M; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-07-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) does not identify all pathogenic variants. Sequencing of 20 complete genes in HBOC patients with uninformative test results (N = 287), including noncoding and flanking sequences of ATM, BARD1, BRCA1, BRCA2, CDH1, CHEK2, EPCAM, MLH1, MRE11A, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, NBN, PALB2, PMS2, PTEN, RAD51B, STK11, TP53, and XRCC2, identified 38,372 unique variants. We apply information theory (IT) to predict and prioritize noncoding variants of uncertain significance in regulatory, coding, and intronic regions based on changes in binding sites in these genes. Besides mRNA splicing, IT provides a common framework to evaluate potential affinity changes in transcription factor (TFBSs), splicing regulatory (SRBSs), and RNA-binding protein (RBBSs) binding sites following mutation. We prioritized variants affecting the strengths of 10 splice sites (four natural, six cryptic), 148 SRBS, 36 TFBS, and 31 RBBS. Three variants were also prioritized based on their predicted effects on mRNA secondary (2°) structure and 17 for pseudoexon activation. Additionally, four frameshift, two in-frame deletions, and five stop-gain mutations were identified. When combined with pedigree information, complete gene sequence analysis can focus attention on a limited set of variants in a wide spectrum of functional mutation types for downstream functional and co-segregation analysis.

  10. Are all the previously reported genetic variants in limb girdle muscular dystrophy genes pathogenic?

    PubMed Central

    Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Garofalo, Arcomaria; Mutarelli, Margherita; Savarese, Marco; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of variants in autosomal genes associated with the limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) have been reported as being causative. However, in most cases the proof of pathogenicity derives from their non-occurrence in hundreds of healthy controls and/or from segregation studies in small families. The limited statistics of the genetic variations in the general population may hamper a correct interpretation of the effect of variants on the protein. To clarify the meaning of low-frequency variants in LGMD genes, we have selected all variants described as causative in the Leiden Open Variation Database and the Human Gene Mutation Database. We have systematically searched for their frequency in the NHLBI GO Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) and in our internal database. Surprisingly, the ESP contains about 4% of the variants previously associated with a dominant inheritance and about 9% of those associated with a recessive inheritance. The putative disease alleles are much more frequent than those estimated considering the disease prevalence. In conclusion, we hypothesize that a number of disease-associated variants are non-pathogenic and that other variations are not fully penetrant, even if they affect the protein function, suggesting a more complex genetic mechanisms for such heterogeneous disorders. PMID:25898921

  11. Rare variants in SQSTM1 and VCP genes and risk of sporadic inclusion body myositis.

    PubMed

    Gang, Qiang; Bettencourt, Conceição; Machado, Pedro M; Brady, Stefen; Holton, Janice L; Pittman, Alan M; Hughes, Deborah; Healy, Estelle; Parton, Matthew; Hilton-Jones, David; Shieh, Perry B; Needham, Merrilee; Liang, Christina; Zanoteli, Edmar; de Camargo, Leonardo Valente; De Paepe, Boel; De Bleecker, Jan; Shaibani, Aziz; Ripolone, Michela; Violano, Raffaella; Moggio, Maurizio; Barohn, Richard J; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Mora, Marina; Mantegazza, Renato; Zanotti, Simona; Singleton, Andrew B; Hanna, Michael G; Houlden, Henry

    2016-11-01

    Genetic factors have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM). Sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1) and valosin-containing protein (VCP) are 2 key genes associated with several neurodegenerative disorders but have yet to be thoroughly investigated in sIBM. A candidate gene analysis was conducted using whole-exome sequencing data from 181 sIBM patients, and whole-transcriptome expression analysis was performed in patients with genetic variants of interest. We identified 6 rare missense variants in the SQSTM1 and VCP in 7 sIBM patients (4.0%). Two variants, the SQSTM1 p.G194R and the VCP p.R159C, were significantly overrepresented in this sIBM cohort compared with controls. Five of these variants had been previously reported in patients with degenerative diseases. The messenger RNA levels of major histocompatibility complex genes were upregulated, this elevation being more pronounced in SQSTM1 patient group. We report for the first time potentially pathogenic SQSTM1 variants and expand the spectrum of VCP variants in sIBM. These data suggest that defects in neurodegenerative pathways may confer genetic susceptibility to sIBM and reinforce the mechanistic overlap in these neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. FTO gene variants are associated with growth and carcass traits in cattle.

    PubMed

    Jevsinek Skok, D; Kunej, T; Kovac, M; Malovrh, S; Potocnik, K; Petric, N; Zgur, S; Dovc, P; Horvat, S

    2016-04-01

    An important aim in animal breeding is the improvement of growth and meat quality traits. Previous studies have demonstrated that genetic variants in the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene have a relatively large effect on human obesity as well as on body composition in rodents and, more recently, in livestock. Here, we examined the effects of the FTO gene variants on growth and carcass traits in the Slovenian population of Simmental (SS) and Brown (SB) cattle. To validate and identify new polymorphisms, we used sequencing, PCR-RFLP analysis and TaqMan assays in the SS breed and FTO gene variants data from the Illumina BovineSNP50 v1 array for the SB breed. Sequencing of the eight samples of progeny-tested SS sires detected 108 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the bovine FTO gene. Statistical analyses between growth and carcass traits and 34 FTO polymorphisms revealed significant association of FTO variants with lean meat percentage in both breeds. Additionally, FTO SNPs analyzed in SS cattle were associated with fat percentage, bone weight and live weight at slaughter. The FTO gene can thus be regarded as a candidate gene for the marker-assisted selection programs in our and possibly other populations of cattle. Future studies in cattle might reveal novel roles for the FTO gene in shaping carcass traits in livestock species as well as body composition control in other mammals.

  13. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Torres, Anthony R; Sweeten, Thayne L; Johnson, Randall C; Odell, Dennis; Westover, Jonna B; Bray-Ward, Patricia; Ward, David C; Davies, Christopher J; Thomas, Aaron J; Croen, Lisa A; Benson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The "common variant-common disease" hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased vs. matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the "common variant-common disease" hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics. Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14 bp-indel) frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table 2). The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2). Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1, and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15, 22, and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR genes in autism over

  14. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T.; Edwards, Robert P.; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Nieuwenhuysen, Els Van; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D.; Gayther, Simon A.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10–7). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r 2 with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11–1.24, P = 1.1×10−7). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10−8). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r 2 = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10-8). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene. PMID:26424751

  15. Genetic variants of the DNA repair genes from Exome Aggregation Consortium (EXAC) database: significance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Das, Raima; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2017-04-01

    DNA repair pathway is a primary defense system that eliminates wide varieties of DNA damage. Any deficiencies in them are likely to cause the chromosomal instability that leads to cell malfunctioning and tumorigenesis. Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes have demonstrated a significant association with cancer risk. Our study attempts to give a glimpse of the overall scenario of the germline polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes by taking into account of the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) database as well as the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) for evaluating the disease link, particularly in cancer. It has been found that ExAC DNA repair dataset (which consists of 228 DNA repair genes) comprises 30.4% missense, 12.5% dbSNP reported and 3.2% ClinVar significant variants. 27% of all the missense variants has the deleterious SIFT score of 0.00 and 6% variants carrying the most damaging Polyphen-2 score of 1.00, thus affecting the protein structure and function. However, as per HGMD, only a fraction (1.2%) of ExAC DNA repair variants was found to be cancer-related, indicating remaining variants reported in both the databases to be further analyzed. This, in turn, may provide an increased spectrum of the reported cancer linked variants in the DNA repair genes present in ExAC database. Moreover, further in silico functional assay of the identified vital cancer-associated variants, which is essential to get their actual biological significance, may shed some lights in the field of targeted drug development in near future.

  16. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T; Edwards, Robert P; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Narod, Steven A; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Ramus, Susan J; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Freedman, Matthew L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D; Gayther, Simon A; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10(-7)). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r (2) with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11-1.24, P = 1.1×10(-7)). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10(-8)). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r (2) = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10(-8)). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene.

  17. Drosophila melanogaster genes for U1 snRNA variants and their expression during development.

    PubMed Central

    Lo, P C; Mount, S M

    1990-01-01

    We have cloned and characterized a complete set of seven U1-related sequences from Drosophila melanogaster. These sequences are located at the three cytogenetic loci 21D, 82E, and 95C. Three of these sequences have been previously studied: one U1 gene at 21D which encodes the prototype U1 sequence (U1a), one U1 gene at 82E which encodes a U1 variant with a single nucleotide substitution (U1b), and a pseudogene at 82E. The four previously uncharacterized genes are another U1b gene at 82E, two additional U1a genes at 95C, and a U1 gene at 95C which encodes a new variant (U1c) with a distinct single nucleotide change relative to U1a. Three blocks of 5' flanking sequence similarity are common to all six full length genes. Using specific primer extension assays, we have observed that the U1b RNA is expressed in Drosophila Kc cells and is associated with snRNP proteins, suggesting that the U1b-containing snRNP particles are able to participate in the process of pre-mRNA splicing. We have also examined the expression throughout Drosophila development of the two U1 variants relative to the prototype sequence. The U1c variant is undetectable by our methods, while the U1b variant exhibits a primarily embryonic pattern reminiscent of the expression of certain U1 variants in sea urchin, Xenopus, and mouse. Images PMID:2124674

  18. A polygenic burden of rare variants across extracellular matrix genes among individuals with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Haller, Gabe; Alvarado, David; Mccall, Kevin; Yang, Ping; Cruchaga, Carlos; Harms, Matthew; Goate, Alison; Willing, Marcia; Morcuende, Jose A; Baschal, Erin; Miller, Nancy H; Wise, Carol; Dobbs, Matthew B; Gurnett, Christina A

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a complex inherited spinal deformity whose etiology has been elusive. While common genetic variants are associated with AIS, they explain only a small portion of disease risk. To explore the role of rare variants in AIS susceptibility, exome sequence data of 391 severe AIS cases and 843 controls of European ancestry were analyzed using a pathway burden analysis in which variants are first collapsed at the gene level then by Gene Ontology terms. Novel non-synonymous/splice-site variants in extracellular matrix genes were significantly enriched in AIS cases compared with controls (P = 6 × 10(-9), OR = 1.7, CI = 1.4-2.0). Specifically, novel variants in musculoskeletal collagen genes were present in 32% (126/391) of AIS cases compared with 17% (146/843) of in-house controls and 18% (780/4300) of EVS controls (P = 1 × 10(-9), OR = 1.9, CI = 1.6-2.4). Targeted resequencing of six collagen genes replicated this association in combined 919 AIS cases (P = 3 × 10(-12), OR = 2.2, CI = 1.8-2.7) and revealed a highly significant single-gene association with COL11A2 (P = 6 × 10(-9), OR = 3.8, CI = 2.6-7.2). Importantly, AIS cases harbor mainly non-glycine missense mutations and lack the clinical features of monogenic musculoskeletal collagenopathies. Overall, our study reveals a complex genetic architecture of AIS in which a polygenic burden of rare variants across extracellular matrix genes contributes strongly to risk.

  19. Associations of common variants in genes involved in metabolism and response to exogenous chemicals with risk of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Laura S.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Lan, Qing; Milliken, Kevin; Davis, Scott; Chanock, Stephen J.; Zhang, Yawei; Severson, Richard; Zahm, Sheila H.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Rothman, Nat; Baris, Dalsu

    2009-01-01

    Background We examined risk of multiple myeloma (MM) associated with variants in genes involved in metabolism and response to exogenous chemicals [cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP1B1, CYP2C9), epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1), paraoxonase 1 (PON1), arylhydrocarbon hydroxylase receptor (AHR), and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)]. Methods This study included 279 MM cases and 782 controls in a pooled analysis of two population-based case control studies. One common variant from each candidate gene was genotyped using DNA from blood or buccal cells. We estimated risk of MM associated with each genotype, controlling for race, gender, study site, and age, using odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Evaluations of the CYP1B1 V432L variant (rs1056836) suggested increased risk of MM among persons with the CG and GG genotypes compared to the CC genotype [OR (95% CI) = 1.4 (1.0–2.0)]. Similar results were seen in analyses stratified by race and gender. We did not find any associations between MM and the CYP2C9, EPHX1, NQO1, or PON1 genes. Conclusions CYP1B1 activates chemicals such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dioxins to create oxidized, reactive intermediates, and higher gene activity has been shown for the G allele. We conducted the largest analysis to date on MM and these genetic variants and our results provide preliminary evidence that variation in CYP1B1 may influence susceptibility to MM. PMID:19736056

  20. Novel factor VIII variants with a modified furin cleavage site improve the efficacy of gene therapy for hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, G N; George, L A; Siner, J I; Davidson, R J; Zander, C B; Zheng, X L; Arruda, V R; Camire, R M; Sabatino, D E

    2017-01-01

    Essentials Factor (F) VIII is an inefficiently expressed protein. Furin deletion FVIII variants were purified and characterized using in vitro and in vivo assays. These minimally modified novel FVIII variants have enhanced function. These variants provide a strategy for increasing FVIII expression in hemophilia A gene therapy.

  1. Increased burden of deleterious variants in essential genes in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kember, Rachel L.; Brown, Christopher D.; Bućan, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous, highly heritable neurodevelopmental syndrome characterized by impaired social interaction, communication, and repetitive behavior. It is estimated that hundreds of genes contribute to ASD. We asked if genes with a strong effect on survival and fitness contribute to ASD risk. Human orthologs of genes with an essential role in pre- and postnatal development in the mouse [essential genes (EGs)] are enriched for disease genes and under strong purifying selection relative to human orthologs of mouse genes with a known nonlethal phenotype [nonessential genes (NEGs)]. This intolerance to deleterious mutations, commonly observed haploinsufficiency, and the importance of EGs in development suggest a possible cumulative effect of deleterious variants in EGs on complex neurodevelopmental disorders. With a comprehensive catalog of 3,915 mammalian EGs, we provide compelling evidence for a stronger contribution of EGs to ASD risk compared with NEGs. By examining the exonic de novo and inherited variants from 1,781 ASD quartet families, we show a significantly higher burden of damaging mutations in EGs in ASD probands compared with their non-ASD siblings. The analysis of EGs in the developing brain identified clusters of coexpressed EGs implicated in ASD. Finally, we suggest a high-priority list of 29 EGs with potential ASD risk as targets for future functional and behavioral studies. Overall, we show that large-scale studies of gene function in model organisms provide a powerful approach for prioritization of genes and pathogenic variants identified by sequencing studies of human disease. PMID:27956632

  2. Identifying the source of unknown microcystin genes and predicting microcystin variants by comparing genes within uncultured cyanobacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Allender, Christopher J; LeCleir, Gary R; Rinta-Kanto, Johanna M; Small, Randall L; Satchwell, Michael F; Boyer, Gregory L; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2009-06-01

    While multiple phylogenetic markers have been used in the culture-independent study of microcystin-producing cyanobacteria, in only a few instances have multiple markers been studied within individual cells, and in all cases these studies have been conducted with cultured isolates. Here, we isolate and evaluate large DNA fragments (>6 kb) encompassing two genes involved in microcystin biosynthesis (mcyA2 and mcyB1) and use them to identify the source of gene fragments found in water samples. Further investigation of these gene loci from individual cyanobacterial cells allowed for improved analysis of the genetic diversity within microcystin producers as well as a method to predict microcystin variants for individuals. These efforts have also identified the source of the novel mcyA genotype previously termed Microcystis-like that is pervasive in the Laurentian Great Lakes and they predict the microcystin variant(s) that it produces.

  3. Isolation and characterization of alternatively spliced variants of the mouse sigma1 receptor gene, Sigmar1

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ling; Pasternak, David A.; Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Lu, Zhigang; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2017-01-01

    The sigma1 receptor acts as a chaperone at the endoplasmic reticulum, associates with multiple proteins in various cellular systems, and involves in a number of diseases, such as addiction, pain, cancer and psychiatric disorders. The sigma1 receptor is encoded by the single copy SIGMAR1 gene. The current study identifies five alternatively spliced variants of the mouse sigma1 receptor gene using a polymerase chain reaction cloning approach. All the splice variants are generated by exon skipping or alternative 3’ or 5’ splicing, producing the truncated sigma1 receptor. Similar alternative splicing has been observed in the human SIGMAR1 gene based on the molecular cloning or genome sequence prediction, suggesting conservation of alternative splicing of SIGMAR1 gene. Using quantitative polymerase chain reactions, we demonstrate differential expression of several splice variants in mouse tissues and brain regions. When expressed in HEK293 cells, all the splice variants fail to bind sigma ligands, implicating that each truncated region in these splice variants is important for ligand binding. However, co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) study in HEK293 cells co-transfected with tagged constructs reveals that all the splice variants maintain their ability to physically associate with a mu opioid receptor (mMOR-1), providing useful information to correlate the motifs/sequences necessary for their physical association. Furthermore, a competition Co-IP study showed that all the variants can disrupt in a dose-dependent manner the dimerization of the original sigma1 receptor with mMOR-1, suggesting a potential dominant negative function and providing significant insights into their function. PMID:28350844

  4. The PTPN22 C1858T gene variant is associated with proinsulin in new-onset type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 2 (PTPN22) has been established as a type 1 diabetes susceptibility gene. A recent study found the C1858T variant of this gene to be associated with lower residual fasting C-peptide levels and poorer glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes. We investigated the association of the C1858T variant with residual beta-cell function (as assessed by stimulated C-peptide, proinsulin and insulin dose-adjusted HbA1c), glycemic control, daily insulin requirements, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and diabetes-related autoantibodies (IA-2A, GADA, ICA, ZnT8Ab) in children during the first year after diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Methods The C1858T variant was genotyped in an international cohort of children (n = 257 patients) with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes during 12 months after onset. We investigated the association of this variant with liquid-meal stimulated beta-cell function (proinsulin and C-peptide) and antibody status 1, 6 and 12 months after onset. In addition HbA1c and daily insulin requirements were determined 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after diagnosis. DKA was defined at disease onset. Results A repeated measurement model of all time points showed the stimulated proinsulin level is significantly higher (22%, p = 0.03) for the T allele carriers the first year after onset. We also found a significant positive association between proinsulin and IA levels (est.: 1.12, p = 0.002), which did not influence the association between PTPN22 and proinsulin (est.: 1.28, p = 0.03). Conclusions The T allele of the C1858T variant is positively associated with proinsulin levels during the first 12 months in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes children. PMID:21429197

  5. Serum cholesterol and variant in cholesterol-related gene CETP predict white matter microstructure.

    PubMed

    Warstadt, Nicholus M; Dennis, Emily L; Jahanshad, Neda; Kohannim, Omid; Nir, Talia M; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Montgomery, Grant W; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Whitfield, John B; Jack, Clifford R; Bernstein, Matt A; Weiner, Michael W; Toga, Arthur W; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-11-01

    Several common genetic variants influence cholesterol levels, which play a key role in overall health. Myelin synthesis and maintenance are highly sensitive to cholesterol concentrations, and abnormal cholesterol levels increase the risk for various brain diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. We report significant associations between higher serum cholesterol (CHOL) and high-density lipoprotein levels and higher fractional anisotropy in 403 young adults (23.8 ± 2.4 years) scanned with diffusion imaging and anatomic magnetic resonance imaging at 4 Tesla. By fitting a multi-locus genetic model within white matter areas associated with CHOL, we found that a set of 18 cholesterol-related, single-nucleotide polymorphisms implicated in Alzheimer's disease risk predicted fractional anisotropy. We focused on the single-nucleotide polymorphism with the largest individual effects, CETP (rs5882), and found that increased G-allele dosage was associated with higher fractional anisotropy and lower radial and mean diffusivities in voxel-wise analyses of the whole brain. A follow-up analysis detected white matter associations with rs5882 in the opposite direction in 78 older individuals (74.3 ± 7.3 years). Cholesterol levels may influence white matter integrity, and cholesterol-related genes may exert age-dependent effects on the brain.

  6. Transcriptome outlier analysis implicates schizophrenia susceptibility genes and enriches putatively functional rare genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jubao; Sanders, Alan R.; Moy, Winton; Drigalenko, Eugene I.; Brown, Eric C.; Freda, Jessica; Leites, Catherine; Göring, Harald H. H.; Gejman, Pablo V.

    2015-01-01

    We searched a gene expression dataset comprised of 634 schizophrenia (SZ) cases and 713 controls for expression outliers (i.e., extreme tails of the distribution of transcript expression values) with SZ cases overrepresented compared with controls. These outlier genes were enriched for brain expression and for genes known to be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. SZ cases showed higher outlier burden (i.e., total outlier events per subject) than controls for genes within copy number variants (CNVs) associated with SZ or neurodevelopmental disorders. Outlier genes were enriched for CNVs and for rare putative regulatory variants, but this only explained a small proportion of the outlier subjects, highlighting the underlying presence of additional genetic and potentially, epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:26022996

  7. Transcriptome outlier analysis implicates schizophrenia susceptibility genes and enriches putatively functional rare genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jubao; Sanders, Alan R; Moy, Winton; Drigalenko, Eugene I; Brown, Eric C; Freda, Jessica; Leites, Catherine; Göring, Harald H H; Gejman, Pablo V

    2015-08-15

    We searched a gene expression dataset comprised of 634 schizophrenia (SZ) cases and 713 controls for expression outliers (i.e., extreme tails of the distribution of transcript expression values) with SZ cases overrepresented compared with controls. These outlier genes were enriched for brain expression and for genes known to be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. SZ cases showed higher outlier burden (i.e., total outlier events per subject) than controls for genes within copy number variants (CNVs) associated with SZ or neurodevelopmental disorders. Outlier genes were enriched for CNVs and for rare putative regulatory variants, but this only explained a small proportion of the outlier subjects, highlighting the underlying presence of additional genetic and potentially, epigenetic mechanisms.

  8. Association analysis of bitter receptor genes in five isolated populations identifies a significant correlation between TAS2R43 variants and coffee liking.

    PubMed

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Traglia, Michela; Robino, Antonietta; Willems, Sara M; Pistis, Giorgio; d'Adamo, Pio; Amin, Najaf; d'Eustacchio, Angela; Navarini, Luciano; Sala, Cinzia; Karssen, Lennart C; van Duijn, Cornelia; Toniolo, Daniela; Gasparini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Coffee, one of the most popular beverages in the world, contains many different physiologically active compounds with a potential impact on people's health. Despite the recent attention given to the genetic basis of its consumption, very little has been done in understanding genes influencing coffee preference among different individuals. Given its markedly bitter taste, we decided to verify if bitter receptor genes (TAS2Rs) variants affect coffee liking. In this light, 4066 people from different parts of Europe and Central Asia filled in a field questionnaire on coffee liking. They have been consequently recruited and included in the study. Eighty-eight SNPs covering the 25 TAS2R genes were selected from the available imputed ones and used to run association analysis for coffee liking. A significant association was detected with three SNP: one synonymous and two functional variants (W35S and H212R) on the TAS2R43 gene. Both variants have been shown to greatly reduce in vitro protein activity. Surprisingly the wild type allele, which corresponds to the functional form of the protein, is associated to higher liking of coffee. Since the hTAS2R43 receptor is sensible to caffeine, we verified if the detected variants produced differences in caffeine bitter perception on a subsample of people coming from the FVG cohort. We found a significant association between differences in caffeine perception and the H212R variant but not with the W35S, which suggests that the effect of the TAS2R43 gene on coffee liking is mediated by caffeine and in particular by the H212R variant. No other significant association was found with other TAS2R genes. In conclusion, the present study opens new perspectives in the understanding of coffee liking. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of the TAS2R43 gene in coffee hedonics and to identify which other genes and pathways are involved in its genetics.

  9. Cystinuria Associated with Different SLC7A9 Gene Variants in the Cat

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Karthik; Osborne, Carl; Giger, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Cystinuria is a classical inborn error of metabolism characterized by a selective proximal renal tubular defect affecting cystine, ornithine, lysine, and arginine (COLA) reabsorption, which can lead to uroliths and urinary obstruction. In humans, dogs and mice, cystinuria is caused by variants in one of two genes, SLC3A1 and SLC7A9, which encode the rBAT and bo,+AT subunits of the bo,+ basic amino acid transporter system, respectively. In this study, exons and flanking regions of the SLC3A1 and SLC7A9 genes were sequenced from genomic DNA of cats (Felis catus) with COLAuria and cystine calculi. Relative to the Felis catus-6.2 reference genome sequence, DNA sequences from these affected cats revealed 3 unique homozygous SLC7A9 missense variants: one in exon 5 (p.Asp236Asn) from a non-purpose-bred medium-haired cat, one in exon 7 (p.Val294Glu) in a Maine Coon and a Sphinx cat, and one in exon 10 (p.Thr392Met) from a non-purpose-bred long-haired cat. A genotyping assay subsequently identified another cystinuric domestic medium-haired cat that was homozygous for the variant originally identified in the purebred cats. These missense variants result in deleterious amino acid substitutions of highly conserved residues in the bo,+AT protein. A limited population survey supported that the variants found were likely causative. The remaining 2 sequenced domestic short-haired cats had a heterozygous variant at a splice donor site in intron 10 and a homozygous single nucleotide variant at a branchpoint in intron 11 of SLC7A9, respectively. This study identifies the first SLC7A9 variants causing feline cystinuria and reveals that, as in humans and dogs, this disease is genetically heterogeneous in cats. PMID:27404572

  10. The human RHOX gene cluster: target genes and functional analysis of gene variants in infertile men.

    PubMed

    Borgmann, Jennifer; Tüttelmann, Frank; Dworniczak, Bernd; Röpke, Albrecht; Song, Hye-Won; Kliesch, Sabine; Wilkinson, Miles F; Laurentino, Sandra; Gromoll, Jörg

    2016-09-15

    The X-linked reproductive homeobox (RHOX) gene cluster encodes transcription factors preferentially expressed in reproductive tissues. This gene cluster has important roles in male fertility based on phenotypic defects of Rhox-mutant mice and the finding that aberrant RHOX promoter methylation is strongly associated with abnormal human sperm parameters. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of RHOX function in humans. Using gene expression profiling, we identified genes regulated by members of the human RHOX gene cluster. Some genes were uniquely regulated by RHOXF1 or RHOXF2/2B, while others were regulated by both of these transcription factors. Several of these regulated genes encode proteins involved in processes relevant to spermatogenesis; e.g. stress protection and cell survival. One of the target genes of RHOXF2/2B is RHOXF1, suggesting cross-regulation to enhance transcriptional responses. The potential role of RHOX in human infertility was addressed by sequencing all RHOX exons in a group of 250 patients with severe oligozoospermia. This revealed two mutations in RHOXF1 (c.515G > A and c.522C > T) and four in RHOXF2/2B (-73C > G, c.202G > A, c.411C > T and c.679G > A), of which only one (c.202G > A) was found in a control group of men with normal sperm concentration. Functional analysis demonstrated that c.202G > A and c.679G > A significantly impaired the ability of RHOXF2/2B to regulate downstream genes. Molecular modelling suggested that these mutations alter RHOXF2/F2B protein conformation. By combining clinical data with in vitro functional analysis, we demonstrate how the X-linked RHOX gene cluster may function in normal human spermatogenesis and we provide evidence that it is impaired in human male fertility.

  11. Targeted next-generation sequencing reveals multiple deleterious variants in OPLL-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Guo, Jun; Cai, Tao; Zhang, Fengshan; Pan, Shengfa; Zhang, Li; Wang, Shaobo; Zhou, Feifei; Diao, Yinze; Zhao, Yanbin; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoguang; Chen, Zhongqiang; Liu, Zhongjun; Sun, Yu; Du, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (OPLL), which is characterized by ectopic bone formation in the spinal ligaments, can cause spinal-cord compression. To date, at least 11 susceptibility genes have been genetically linked to OPLL. In order to identify potential deleterious alleles in these OPLL-associated genes, we designed a capture array encompassing all coding regions of the target genes for next-generation sequencing (NGS) in a cohort of 55 unrelated patients with OPLL. By bioinformatics analyses, we successfully identified three novel and five extremely rare variants (MAF < 0.005). These variants were predicted to be deleterious by commonly used various algorithms, thereby resulting in missense mutations in four OPLL-associated genes (i.e., COL6A1, COL11A2, FGFR1, and BMP2). Furthermore, potential effects of the patient with p.Q89E of BMP2 were confirmed by a markedly increased BMP2 level in peripheral blood samples. Notably, seven of the variants were found to be associated with the patients with continuous subtype changes by cervical spinal radiological analyses. Taken together, our findings revealed for the first time that deleterious coding variants of the four OPLL-associated genes are potentially pathogenic in the patients with OPLL. PMID:27246988

  12. Association between genetic variants of the clock gene and obesity and sleep duration.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Macarena; Obregón, Ana María; Chaput, Jean-Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors related to lifestyle aspects. It has been shown that reduced sleep is associated with increased body mass index (BMI). Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput (CLOCK) gene variants have also been associated with obesity. The objective of this mini-review was to discuss the available literature related to CLOCK gene variants associated with adiposity and sleep duration in humans. In total, 16 articles complied with the terms of the search that reported CLOCK variants associated with sleep duration, energy intake, and BMI. Overall, six CLOCK single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with sleep duration, and three variants have been associated with energy intake variables. Overall, the most studied area has been the association of CLOCK gene with obesity; close to eight common variants have been associated with obesity. The most studied CLOCK SNP in different populations is rs1801260, and most of these populations correspond to European populations. Collectively, identifying at risk CLOCK genotypes is a new area of research that may help identify individuals who are more susceptible to overeating and gaining weight when exposed to short sleep durations.

  13. Evaluation of PARKIN gene variants in West Bengal Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Jaya; Jana, Arpita; Ghosh, Epsita; Banerjee, Tapas K; Chakraborty, Durga P; Rao, Vadlamudi R

    2015-09-01

    Little information is available regarding the molecular pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) among the Bengalee population in West Bengal, India. This study was undertaken to determine the contribution of Parkin variants in well-defined ethnically identical Bengalee population of India and further to describe the clinical spectrum associated with these mutations. A total of 150 unrelated PD patients and 150 controls were recruited for the study. The entire cohort was screened for mutations in all the 12 exons of the gene along with flanking splice junctions by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. Eleven nucleotide variants including two novel changes were detected. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) parkin protein expression of the novel mutation, Val186Ile (found in heterozygous condition in one patient only) was almost 2.7 folds lower than the controls and other PD patients. Molecular characterization of polymorphisms Ser167Asn and Val380Leu depicted that homozygous Ser167 and Val380 are significantly associated with the disease. We did not find any linkage disequilibrium among the SNPs, the low r(2) for every pair of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) indicated that these SNPs cannot be tagged by each other. Another novel intronic change, IVS8+48C>T was present in almost equally in PD patients and controls. Among the ethnically defined Bengalee population of West Bengal, occurrence of Parkin mutation is 4% (6/150) of the PD patient pool supported with decreased folds of expression of CSF PARKIN protein. Parkin polymorphisms, Ser167 and Val380 are risk factors for the progression of the disease, and their frequency is greatly influenced by ethnic origin.

  14. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. Methods We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be associated with altered enzymatic activity. Using the three SNPs, eight different haplotypes were constructed. The haplotype frequencies were estimated in cases and controls and then compared. The odds ratio for each tumour type, associated with each haplotype was estimated, with reference to the most common haplotype observed in the controls. Results The three SNPs rs10012, rs1056827 and rs1056836 alone did not provide any significant evidence of association with colorectal cancer risk. Haplotypes of rs1056827 and rs10012 or rs1056827 and rs1056836 revealed an association with colorectal cancer which was significantly stronger in the homozygous carriers. One haplotype was under represented in the colorectal cancer patient group compared to the control population suggesting a protective effect. Conclusion Genetic variants within the CYP1B1 that are associated with altered function appear to influence susceptibility to a colorectal cancer in Poland. Three haplotypes were associated with altered cancer risk; one conferred protection and two were associated with an increased risk of disease. These observations should be confirmed in other populations. PMID:20701755

  15. Community acquired pneumonia: genetic variants influencing systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ferrer Agüero, J M; Millán, S; Rodríguez de Castro, F; Martín-Loeches, I; Solé Violán, J

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory response depends on several factors, including pathogenicity and duration of the stimulus, and also on the balance between inflammatory and antiinflammatory response. Several studies have presented evidence of the importance of genetic factors in severe infections. The innate immune response prevents the invasion and spread of pathogens during the first hours after infection. Each of the different processes involved in innate immunity may be affected by genetic polymorphisms, which can result in susceptibility or resistance to infection. The results obtained in the different studies do not irrefutably prove the role or function of a gene in the pathogenesis of respiratory infections. However, they can generate new hypotheses, suggest new candidate genes based on their role in the inflammatory response, and constitute a first step in understanding the underlying genetic factors.

  16. Positive correlation between variants of lipid metabolism-related genes and coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LI-NA; LIU, PAN-PAN; ZHOU, JIANQING; HUANG, R. STEPHANIE; YUAN, FANG; FEI, LI-JUAN; HUANG, YI; XU, LIMIN; HAO, LING-MEI; QIU, XU-JUN; LE, YANPING; YANG, XI; XU, WEIFENG; HUANG, XIAOYAN; YE, MENG; LIAN, JIANGFANG; DUAN, SHIWEI

    2013-01-01

    Four gene variants related to lipid metabolism (including the rs562338 and rs503662 variants of the APOB gene, the rs7767084 variant of the LPA gene and the rs2246942 variant of the LIPA gene) have been shown to be associated with coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of the present study was to assess their association with CHD in the Han Chinese population and to assess the contribution of these gene variants to CHD. Using the standardized coronary angiography method, we enrolled 290 CHD patients and 193 non-CHD patients as non-CHD controls from Lihuili Hospital (Ningbo, China). In addition, we recruited 330 unrelated healthy volunteers as healthy controls from the Xi Men Community (Ningbo, China). Our results demonstrated that the rs503662 and rs562338 variants of the APOB gene were extremely rare in the Han Chinese population (minor allele frequency <1%). Genotype rs2246942-GG of the LIPA gene was associated with an increased risk of CHD [CHD cases versus healthy controls: P=0.04; odds ratio (OR)=1.63; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.02–2.60). Genotype rs7767084-CC of the LPA gene was identified as a protective factor against CHD in females (CHD cases versus non-CHD controls: P=0.04, OR=0.21; CHD cases versus healthy controls: P=0.02, OR=0.21). The results of our meta-analysis indicated that rs7767084 was not associated with a high risk of CHD (P=0.83; combined OR=0.93; 95% CI=0.47–1.85). In the present study, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes involved in lipid metabolism (rs2246942 and rs7767084) were identified to be significantly associated with CHD in the Han Chinese population. Specifically, rs2246942-GG of the LIPA gene was a risk factor for CHD, while rs7767084-CC of the LPA gene was a protective factor against CHD in females. However, our meta-analysis indicated that rs7767084 is not associated with a higher risk of CHD. PMID:23653095

  17. [Analysis of the association of interleukin 4 and interleukin 10 gene variants with basic personality traits].

    PubMed

    Golimbet, V E; Alfimova, M V; Korovaitseva, G I; Lezheiko, T V

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that serum levels of various inflammation markers are associated with personality traits. However, only few studies investigated the link between genetic variants of cytokine encoding genes and psychological characteristics. In this study, we examined genotypes in 297 individuals to assess the association between common variants of interleukin 4 (IL-4) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) genes and basic personality traits of extraversion and neuroticism, measured using the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ). We found that, in homozygous female carriers of high expression alleles Т (IL-4 C-589T) and G (IL-10 G-1082A), neuroticism scores were higher (p = 0.045 and p = 0.08, respectively). In turn, extraversion scores were significantly higher in both male and female carriers of heterozygous variants CT and GA (p = 0.01). Our results are in accordance with the behavioral immune system hypothesis, and the general paradigm on the role of personality traits in health and longevity.

  18. cepip: context-dependent epigenomic weighting for prioritization of regulatory variants and disease-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Mulin Jun; Li, Miaoxin; Liu, Zipeng; Yan, Bin; Pan, Zhicheng; Huang, Dandan; Liang, Qian; Ying, Dingge; Xu, Feng; Yao, Hongcheng; Wang, Panwen; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A; Xia, Zhengyuan; Sham, Pak Chung; Liu, Jun S; Wang, Junwen

    2017-03-16

    It remains challenging to predict regulatory variants in particular tissues or cell types due to highly context-specific gene regulation. By connecting large-scale epigenomic profiles to expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) in a wide range of human tissues/cell types, we identify critical chromatin features that predict variant regulatory potential. We present cepip, a joint likelihood framework, for estimating a variant's regulatory probability in a context-dependent manner. Our method exhibits significant GWAS signal enrichment and is superior to existing cell type-specific methods. Furthermore, using phenotypically relevant epigenomes to weight the GWAS single-nucleotide polymorphisms, we improve the statistical power of the gene-based association test.

  19. Expression of splice variants of mts1 gene in normal and neoplastic human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ambartsumyan, N.S. |; Grigorian, M.S.; Lukanidin, E.M.

    1995-09-01

    Data on cloning of cDNA corresponding to human mts1 gene transcripts are presented. By comparing nucleotide sequences of the genomic DNA clone and cDNA of mts1, it was shown that human osteosarcoma OHS cells contain two alternative splice variants of mts1 transcripts. Alternative splicing occurs in the 5{prime}-untranslated region of the mts1 pre-mRNA. Both splice variants, hu-mts1 and hu-mts1(var), demonstrate similar stability in the cells, and each contains one open reading frame for the MTS1 protein. However, the two types of transcripts are translated with different effectiveness. The level of transcription of mts1 splice variants in different normal and neoplastic tissues and cell lines varies significantly. The role of alternative splicing as the mechanism responsible for posttranscriptional regulation of mts1 gene expression is discussed. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Common variants of xeroderma pigmentosum genes and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Mirecka, Aneta; Paszkowska-Szczur, Katarzyna; Scott, Rodney J; Górski, Bohdan; van de Wetering, Thierry; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Gromowski, Tomasz; Serrano-Fernandez, Pablo; Cybulski, Cezary; Kashyap, Aniruddh; Gupta, Satish; Gołąb, Adam; Słojewski, Marcin; Sikorski, Andrzej; Lubiński, Jan; Dębniak, Tadeusz

    2014-08-10

    The genetic basis of prostate cancer (PC) is complex and appears to involve multiple susceptibility genes. A number of studies have evaluated a possible correlation between several NER gene polymorphisms and PC risk, but most of them evaluated only single SNPs among XP genes and the results remain inconsistent. Out of 94 SNPs located in seven XP genes (XPA-XPG) a total of 15 SNPs were assayed in 720 unselected patients with PC and compared to 1121 healthy adults. An increased risk of disease was associated with the XPD SNP, rs1799793 (Asp312Asn) AG genotype (OR=2.60; p<0.001) and with the AA genotype (OR=531; p<0.0001) compared to the control population. Haplotype analysis of XPD revealed one protective haplotype and four associated with an increased disease risk, which showed that the A allele (XPD rs1799793) appeared to drive the main effect on promoting prostate cancer risk. Polymorphism in XPD gene appears to be associated with the risk of prostate cancer.

  1. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony R.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Johnson, Randall C.; Odell, Dennis; Westover, Jonna B.; Bray-Ward, Patricia; Ward, David C.; Davies, Christopher J.; Thomas, Aaron J.; Croen, Lisa A.; Benson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The “common variant—common disease” hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased vs. matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the “common variant—common disease” hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics. Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14 bp-indel) frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table 2). The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2). Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1, and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15, 22, and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR genes in

  2. Orofacial clefts, parental cigarette smoking, and transforming growth factor-alpha gene variants

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, G.M.; Wasserman, C.R.; O`Malley, C.D.

    1996-03-01

    Results of studies determine whether women who smoke during early pregnancy are at increased risk of delivering infants with orofacial clefts have been mixed, and recently a gene-environment interaction between maternal smoking, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFa), and clefting has been reported. Using a large population-based case-control study, we investigated whether parental periconceptional cigarette smoking was associated with an increased risk for having offspring with orofacial clefts. We also investigated the influence of genetic variation of the TGFa locus on the relation between smoking and clefting. Parental smoking information was obtained from telephone interviews with mothers of 731 (84.7% of eligible) orofacial cleft case infants and with mothers of 734 (78.2%) nonmalformed control infants. DNA was obtained from newborn screening blood spots and genotyped for the allelic variants of TGFa. We found that risks associated with maternal smoking were most elevated for isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate, (odds ratio 2.1 [95% confidence interval 1.3-3.6]) and for isolated cleft palate (odds ratio 2.2 [1.1-4.5]) when mothers smoked {ge} 20 cigarrettes/d. These risks for white infants ranged from 3-fold to 11-fold across phenotypic groups. Paternal smoking was not associated with clefting among the offspring of nonsmoking mothers, and passive smoke exposures were associated with at most slightly increased risks. This study offers evidence that the risk for orofacial clefting in infants may be influenced by maternal smoke exposures alone as well as in combination (gene-environment interaction) with the presence of the uncommon TGFa allele. 56 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. Common variants in Mendelian kidney disease genes and their association with renal function.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Afshin; Fuchsberger, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; O'Seaghdha, Conall M; Pattaro, Cristian; de Andrade, Mariza; Chasman, Daniel I; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Kim, Young J; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Feitosa, Mary; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Rao, Madhumathi; Smith, Albert V; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Johansson, Asa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Couraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Hofer, Edith; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A; Turner, Stephen T; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S; Freedman, Barry I; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H-Erich; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L R; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M; Siscovick, David S; Fox, Caroline S; Kao, W Linda; Böger, Carsten A

    2013-12-01

    Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research.

  4. Common Variants in Mendelian Kidney Disease Genes and Their Association with Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; O’Seaghdha, Conall M.; Pattaro, Cristian; de Andrade, Mariza; Chasman, Daniel I.; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Kim, Young J.; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Feitosa, Mary; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Rao, Madhumathi; Smith, Albert V.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Couraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Hofer, Edith; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M.; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Siscovick, David S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Kao, W. Linda; Böger, Carsten A.

    2013-01-01

    Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research. PMID:24029420

  5. Pharmacodynamic Impact of Carboxylesterase 1 Gene Variants in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Treated with Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bie, Peter; Ferrero, Laura; Bjerre, Ditte; Bruun, Niels E.; Egfjord, Martin; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Hansen, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Variation in the carboxylesterase 1 gene (CES1) may contribute to the efficacy of ACEIs. Accordingly, we examined the impact of CES1 variants on plasma angiotensin II (ATII)/angiotensin I (ATI) ratio in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) that underwent ACEI dose titrations. Five of these variants have previously been associated with drug response or increased CES1 expression, i.e., CES1 copy number variation, the variant of the duplicated CES1 gene with high transcriptional activity, rs71647871, rs2244613, and rs3815583. Additionally, nine variants, representatives of CES1Var, and three other CES1 variants were examined. Methods Patients with CHF, and clinical indication for ACEIs were categorized according to their CES1 genotype. Differences in mean plasma ATII/ATI ratios between genotype groups after ACEI dose titration, expressed as the least square mean (LSM) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), were assessed by analysis of variance. Results A total of 200 patients were recruited and 127 patients (63.5%) completed the study. The mean duration of the CHF drug dose titration was 6.2 (SD 3.6) months. After ACEI dose titration, there was no difference in mean plasma ATII/ATI ratios between subjects with the investigated CES1 variants, and only one previously unexplored variation (rs2302722) qualified for further assessment. In the fully adjusted analysis of effects of rs2302722 on plasma ATII/ATI ratios, the difference in mean ATII/ATI ratio between the GG genotype and the minor allele carriers (GT and TT) was not significant, with a relative difference in LSMs of 0.67 (95% CI 0.43–1.07; P = 0.10). Results of analyses that only included enalapril-treated patients remained non-significant after Bonferroni correction for multiple parallel comparisons (difference in LSM 0.60 [95% CI 0.37–0.98], P = 0.045). Conclusion These findings indicate that the included single variants of CES1 do not significantly influence plasma ATII/ATI ratios in CHF

  6. Association of adenovirus 36 infection with obesity-related gene variants in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Dušátková, L; Zamrazilová, H; Aldhoon Hainerová, I; Atkinson, R L; Sedláčková, B; Lee, Z P; Včelák, J; Bendlová, B; Kunešová, M; Hainer, V

    2015-01-01

    Both, common gene variants and human adenovirus 36 (Adv36) are involved in the pathogenesis of obesity. The potential relationship between these two pathogenic factors has not yet been investigated. The aim of our study was to examine the association of obesity susceptibility loci with Adv36 status. Genotyping of ten gene variants (in/near TMEM18, SH2B1, KCTD15, PCSK1, BDNF, SEC16B, MC4R, FTO) and analysis of Adv36 antibodies was performed in 1,027 Czech adolescents aged 13.0-17.9 years. Variants of two genes (PCSK1 and BDNF) were associated with Adv36 seropositivity. A higher prevalence of Adv36 antibody positivity was observed in obesity risk allele carriers of PCSK1 rs6232, rs6235 and BDNF rs4923461 vs. non-carriers (chi(2)=6.59, p=0.010; chi(2)=7.56, p=0.023 and chi(2)=6.84, p=0.033, respectively). The increased risk of Adv36 positivity was also found in PCSK1 variants: rs6232 (OR=1.67, 95 % CI 1.11-2.49, p=0.016) and rs6235 (OR=1.34, 95 % CI 1.08-1.67, p=0.010). PCSK1 rs6232 and BDNF rs925946 variants were closely associated with Adv36 status in boys and girls, respectively (chi(2)=5.09, p=0.024; chi(2)=7.29, p=0.026). Furthermore, PCSK1 rs6235 risk allele was related to Adv36 seropositivity (chi(2)=6.85, p=0.033) in overweight/obese subgroup. In conclusion, our results suggest that obesity risk variants of PCSK1 and BDNF genes may be related to Adv36 infection.

  7. Parkinson-associated risk variant in distal enhancer of α-synuclein modulates target gene expression.

    PubMed

    Soldner, Frank; Stelzer, Yonatan; Shivalila, Chikdu S; Abraham, Brian J; Latourelle, Jeanne C; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Goldmann, Johanna; Myers, Richard H; Young, Richard A; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2016-05-05

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous genetic variants associated with complex diseases, but mechanistic insights are impeded by a lack of understanding of how specific risk variants functionally contribute to the underlying pathogenesis. It has been proposed that cis-acting effects of non-coding risk variants on gene expression are a major factor for phenotypic variation of complex traits and disease susceptibility. Recent genome-scale epigenetic studies have highlighted the enrichment of GWAS-identified variants in regulatory DNA elements of disease-relevant cell types. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-specific changes in transcription factor binding are correlated with heritable alterations in chromatin state and considered a major mediator of sequence-dependent regulation of gene expression. Here we describe a novel strategy to functionally dissect the cis-acting effect of genetic risk variants in regulatory elements on gene expression by combining genome-wide epigenetic information with clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells. By generating a genetically precisely controlled experimental system, we identify a common Parkinson's disease associated risk variant in a non-coding distal enhancer element that regulates the expression of α-synuclein (SNCA), a key gene implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Our data suggest that the transcriptional deregulation of SNCA is associated with sequence-dependent binding of the brain-specific transcription factors EMX2 and NKX6-1. This work establishes an experimental paradigm to functionally connect genetic variation with disease-relevant phenotypes.

  8. Identification of common variants influencing risk of the tauopathy Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Höglinger, Günter U.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Wang, Li-San; Klei, Lambertus; Rademakers, Rosa; de Silva, Rohan; Litvan, Irene; Riley, David E.; van Swieten, John C.; Heutink, Peter; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Vandrovcova, Jana; Hurtig, Howard I.; Gross, Rachel G.; Maetzler, Walter; Goldwurm, Stefano; Tolosa, Eduardo; Borroni, Barbara; Pastor, Pau; Cantwell, Laura B.; Han, Mi Ryung; Dillman, Allissa; van der Brug, Marcel P.; Gibbs, J Raphael; Cookson, Mark R.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Farrer, Matthew J.; Yu, Chang-En; Golbe, Lawrence I.; Revesz, Tamas; Hardy, John; Lees, Andrew J.; Devlin, Bernie; Hakonarson, Hakon; Müller, Ulrich; Schellenberg, Gerard D.

    2011-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a movement disorder with prominent tau neuropathology. Brain diseases with abnormal tau deposits are called tauopathies, the most common being Alzheimer’s disease. Environmental causes of tauopathies include repetitive head trauma associated with some sports. To identify common genetic variation contributing to risk for tauopathies, we carried out a genome-wide association study of 1,114 PSP cases and 3,247 controls (Stage 1) followed up by a second stage where 1,051 cases and 3,560 controls were genotyped for Stage 1 SNPs that yielded P ≤ 10−3. We found significant novel signals (P < 5 × 10−8) associated with PSP risk at STX6, EIF2AK3, and MOBP. We confirmed two independent variants in MAPT affecting risk for PSP, one of which influences MAPT brain expression. The genes implicated encode proteins for vesicle-membrane fusion at the Golgi-endosomal interface, for the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response, and for a myelin structural component. PMID:21685912

  9. Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Ehret, Georg B; Munroe, Patricia B; Rice, Kenneth M; Bochud, Murielle; Johnson, Andrew D; Chasman, Daniel I; Smith, Albert V; Tobin, Martin D; Verwoert, Germaine C; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L; Launer, Lenore; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii; Heath, Simon; Sõber, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Dehghan, Abbas; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A; Jackson, Anne U; Peden, John F; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N; Fava, Cristiano; Chambers, John C; Fox, Ervin R; Kumari, Meena; Go, Min Jin; van der Harst, Pim; Kao, Wen Hong Linda; Sjögren, Marketa; Vinay, D G; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H; Liu, Yongmei; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Tayo, Bamidele; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang; Lehtimäki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Cooper, Matthew N; Platou, Carl G P; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Palmas, Walter; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen-Pei C; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Steinle, Nanette I; Grobbee, Diederick E; Arking, Dan E; Kardia, Sharon L; Morrison, Alanna C; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Hingorani, Aroon D; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Beilby, John P; Lawrence, Robert W; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Dreisbach, Albert W; Li, Yali; Young, J Hunter; Bis, Joshua C; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Adair, Linda S; Lee, Nanette R; Chen, Ming-Huei; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Köttgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R; Bornstein, Stefan R; Grässler, Jürgen; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Weder, Alan B; Hunt, Steven C; Sun, Yan V; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Scott, Laura J; Stringham, Heather M; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Staessen, Jan A; Wang, Thomas J; Burton, Paul R; Soler Artigas, Maria; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt K; Rudock, Megan E; Heckbert, Susan R; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Doumatey, Ayo; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stančáková, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J; Yao, Jie; Kathiresan, Sekar; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Schwartz, Stephen M; Ikram, M Arfan; Longstreth, W T; Mosley, Thomas H; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R G; Wain, Louise V; Morken, Mario A; Swift, Amy J; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A; Humphries, Steve E; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Bakker, Stephan J L; van Gilst, Wiek H; Janipalli, Charles S; Mani, K Radha; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Hofman, Albert; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; Oostra, Ben A; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Würtz, Peter; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Dörr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F; Nalls, Michael A; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kumar, M V Kranthi; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Fowkes, F Gerald R; Charchar, Fadi J; Schwarz, Peter E H; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotimi, Charles; Bots, Michiel L; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Casas, Juan P; Mohlke, Karen L; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli; Ganesh, Santhi K; Wong, Tien Y; Tai, E Shyong; Cooper, Richard S; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C; Harris, Tamara B; Morris, Richard W; Dominiczak, Anna F; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G; Miki, Tetsuro; Saleheen, Danish; Chandak, Giriraj R; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Kooner, Jaspal S; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wright, Alan F; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P; Elosua, Roberto; Soranzo, Nicole; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Psaty, Bruce M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Caulfield, Mark J; Johnson, Toby

    2011-09-11

    Blood pressure is a heritable trait influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (≥140 mm Hg systolic blood pressure or  ≥90 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure). Even small increments in blood pressure are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This genome-wide association study of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified sixteen novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate blood pressure (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3, NPR3-C5orf23, ADM, FURIN-FES, GOSR2, GNAS-EDN3); the other ten provide new clues to blood pressure physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with blood pressure in East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of blood pressure, and suggest potential novel therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention.

  10. Genetic Variants in Novel Pathways Influence Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable trait1 influenced by multiple biological pathways and is responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (BP ≥140 mm Hg systolic [SBP] or ≥90 mm Hg diastolic [DBP])2. Even small increments in BP are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events3. This genome-wide association study of SBP and DBP, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified 16 novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate BP (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3; NPR3-C5orf23; ADM; FURIN-FES; GOSR2; GNAS-EDN3); the other 10 provide new clues to BP physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke, and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with BP in East Asian, South Asian, and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of BP, and suggest novel potential therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:21909115

  11. Dopamine Inactivation Efficacy Related to Functional DAT1 and COMT Variants Influences Motor Response Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Stephan; Rellum, Thomas; Freitag, Christine; Resch, Franz; Rietschel, Marcella; Treutlein, Jens; Jennen-Steinmetz, Christine; Brandeis, Daniel; Banaschewski, Tobias; Laucht, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Background Dopamine plays an important role in orienting, response anticipation and movement evaluation. Thus, we examined the influence of functional variants related to dopamine inactivation in the dopamine transporter (DAT1) and catechol-O-methyltransferase genes (COMT) on the time-course of motor processing in a contingent negative variation (CNV) task. Methods 64-channel EEG recordings were obtained from 195 healthy adolescents of a community-based sample during a continuous performance task (A-X version). Early and late CNV as well as motor postimperative negative variation were assessed. Adolescents were genotyped for the COMT Val158Met and two DAT1 polymorphisms (variable number tandem repeats in the 3′-untranslated region and in intron 8). Results The results revealed a significant interaction between COMT and DAT1, indicating that COMT exerted stronger effects on lateralized motor post-processing (centro-parietal motor postimperative negative variation) in homozygous carriers of a DAT1 haplotype increasing DAT1 expression. Source analysis showed that the time interval 500–1000 ms after the motor response was specifically affected in contrast to preceding movement anticipation and programming stages, which were not altered. Conclusions Motor slow negative waves allow the genomic imaging of dopamine inactivation effects on cortical motor post-processing during response evaluation. This is the first report to point towards epistatic effects in the motor system during response evaluation, i.e. during the post-processing of an already executed movement rather than during movement programming. PMID:22649558

  12. Human longevity is influenced by many genetic variants: evidence from 75,000 UK Biobank participants.

    PubMed

    Pilling, Luke C; Atkins, Janice L; Bowman, Kirsty; Jones, Samuel E; Tyrrell, Jessica; Beaumont, Robin N; Ruth, Katherine S; Tuke, Marcus A; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Wood, Andrew R; Freathy, Rachel M; Murray, Anna; Weedon, Michael N; Xue, Luting; Lunetta, Kathryn; Murabito, Joanne M; Harries, Lorna W; Robine, Jean-Marie; Brayne, Carol; Kuchel, George A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M; Melzer, David

    2016-03-01

    Variation in human lifespan is 20 to 30% heritable in twins but few genetic variants have been identified. We undertook a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) using age at death of parents of middle-aged UK Biobank participants of European decent (n=75,244 with father's and/or mother's data, excluding early deaths). Genetic risk scores for 19 phenotypes (n=777 proven variants) were also tested. In GWAS, a nicotine receptor locus(CHRNA3, previously associated with increased smoking and lung cancer) was associated with fathers' survival. Less common variants requiring further confirmation were also identified. Offspring of longer lived parents had more protective alleles for coronary artery disease, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, type-1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease and Alzheimer's disease. In candidate analyses, variants in the TOMM40/APOE locus were associated with longevity, but FOXO variants were not. Associations between extreme longevity (mother >=98 years, fathers >=95 years, n=1,339) and disease alleles were similar, with an additional association with HDL cholesterol (p=5.7x10-3). These results support a multiple protective factors model influencing lifespan and longevity (top 1% survival) in humans, with prominent roles for cardiovascular-related pathways. Several of these genetically influenced risks, including blood pressure and tobacco exposure, are potentially modifiable.

  13. Human longevity is influenced by many genetic variants: evidence from 75,000 UK Biobank participants

    PubMed Central

    Pilling, Luke C.; Atkins, Janice L.; Bowman, Kirsty; Jones, Samuel E.; Tyrrell, Jessica; Beaumont, Robin N.; Ruth, Katherine S.; Tuke, Marcus A.; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Wood, Andrew R.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Murray, Anna; Weedon, Michael N.; Xue, Luting; Lunetta, Kathryn; Murabito, Joanne M.; Harries, Lorna W.; Robine, Jean-Marie; Brayne, Carol; Kuchel, George A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M.; Melzer, David

    2016-01-01

    Variation in human lifespan is 20 to 30% heritable in twins but few genetic variants have been identified. We undertook a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) using age at death of parents of middle-aged UK Biobank participants of European decent (n=75,244 with father's and/or mother's data, excluding early deaths). Genetic risk scores for 19 phenotypes (n=777 proven variants) were also tested. In GWAS, a nicotine receptor locus (CHRNA3, previously associated with increased smoking and lung cancer) was associated with fathers' survival. Less common variants requiring further confirmation were also identified. Offspring of longer lived parents had more protective alleles for coronary artery disease, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, type-1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease and Alzheimer's disease. In candidate analyses, variants in the TOMM40/APOE locus were associated with longevity, but FOXO variants were not. Associations between extreme longevity (mother >=98 years, fathers >=95 years, n=1,339) and disease alleles were similar, with an additional association with HDL cholesterol (p=5.7×10-3). These results support a multiple protective factors model influencing lifespan and longevity (top 1% survival) in humans, with prominent roles for cardiovascular-related pathways. Several of these genetically influenced risks, including blood pressure and tobacco exposure, are potentially modifiable. PMID:27015805

  14. Loss-of-function variants influence the human serum metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bing; Li, Alexander H.; Metcalf, Ginger A.; Muzny, Donna M.; Morrison, Alanna C.; White, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The metabolome is a collection of small molecules resulting from multiple cellular and biological processes that can act as biomarkers of disease, and African-Americans exhibit high levels of genetic diversity. Exome sequencing of a sample of deeply phenotyped African-Americans allowed us to analyze the effects of annotated loss-of-function (LoF) mutations on 308 serum metabolites measured by untargeted liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. In an independent sample, we identified and replicated four genes harboring six LoF mutations that significantly affected five metabolites. These sites were related to a 19 to 45% difference in geometric mean metabolite levels, with an average effect size of 25%. We show that some of the affected metabolites are risk predictors or diagnostic biomarkers of disease and, using the principle of Mendelian randomization, are in the causal pathway of disease. For example, LoF mutations in SLCO1B1 elevate the levels of hexadecanedioate, a fatty acid significantly associated with increased blood pressure levels and risk of incident heart failure in both African-Americans and an independent sample of European-Americans. We show that SLCO1B1 LoF mutations significantly increase the risk of incident heart failure, thus implicating the metabolite in the causal pathway of disease. These results reveal new avenues into gene function and the understanding of disease etiology by integrating -omic technologies into a deeply phenotyped population study. PMID:27602404

  15. Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Antigen-4 Gene Variants in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with or without Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Javad; Khadempar, Saedeh; Hajilooi, Mehrdad; Rezaei, Hamzeh; Keshavarzi, Fatemeh; Solgi, Ghasem

    2016-06-01

    Many studies have shown that cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) gene variants are associated with several autoimmune diseases particularly type 1 diabetes. Due to the lack of consistent data for this association with type 2 diabetes (T2D), this study explored the possible influence of CTLA-4 gene polymorphisms at -1722 (T/C), -318 (C/T), and +49 (G/A) positions for susceptibility to T2D in relation with neuropathy. One hundred and eleven unrelated patients with T2D [49 patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and 62 patients without PDN] and 100 healthy ethnic- and gender-matched controls were included in this study. The dimorphisms at -1722 (C/T), -318 (C/T) and +49 (A/G) for CTLA-4 gene were determined using ARMS-PCR. The CTLA-4 (+49 G/G) and (+49 A/A) genotypes were found to be positively and negatively associated with T2D, respectively (p=0.03). The -318 C/T and T/T genotypes were more frequent in patients than controls and -318 C/C genotype was shown to be protective for T2D (p=0.003). ACT and GTT Haplotypes were less and more frequent in controls and patients, respectively (p=3.86×10-7 and p=2.29×10-5). Genotypes distribution among T2D patients with and without DPN compared to healthy controls showed significantly lower frequencies for -318 C/C and +49 A/A genotypes and significantly higher frequencies for -318 C/T and T/T genotypes as well. Our findings indicate that CTLA-4 (+49 A/G) and (-318 C/T) genotypes could be considered as genetic risk factors associated with susceptibility or protection for T2D.

  16. Telomere structure and maintenance gene variants and risk of five cancer types.

    PubMed

    Karami, Sara; Han, Younghun; Pande, Mala; Cheng, Iona; Rudd, James; Pierce, Brandon L; Nutter, Ellen L; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Lindstrom, Sara; Witte, John S; Fang, Shenying; Han, Jiali; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J; Song, Fengju; Hung, Rayjean J; McKay, James; Gruber, Stephen B; Chanock, Stephen J; Risch, Angela; Shen, Hongbing; Haiman, Christopher A; Boardman, Lisa; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Casey, Graham; Peters, Ulrike; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Berchuck, Andrew; Berndt, Sonja I; Bezieau, Stephane; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Caporaso, Neil; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Christiani, David C; Cunningham, Julie M; Easton, Douglas; Eeles, Rosalind A; Eisen, Timothy; Gala, Manish; Gallinger, Steven J; Gayther, Simon A; Goode, Ellen L; Grönberg, Henrik; Henderson, Brian E; Houlston, Richard; Joshi, Amit D; Küry, Sébastien; Landi, Mari T; Le Marchand, Loic; Muir, Kenneth; Newcomb, Polly A; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Pharoah, Paul; Phelan, Catherine; Potter, John D; Ramus, Susan J; Risch, Harvey; Schildkraut, Joellen; Slattery, Martha L; Song, Honglin; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Wiklund, Fredrik; Zanke, Brent W; Sellers, Thomas A; Zheng, Wei; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Amos, Christopher I; Doherty, Jennifer A

    2016-12-15

    Telomeres cap chromosome ends, protecting them from degradation, double-strand breaks, and end-to-end fusions. Telomeres are maintained by telomerase, a reverse transcriptase encoded by TERT, and an RNA template encoded by TERC. Loci in the TERT and adjoining CLPTM1L region are associated with risk of multiple cancers. We therefore investigated associations between variants in 22 telomere structure and maintenance gene regions and colorectal, breast, prostate, ovarian, and lung cancer risk. We performed subset-based meta-analyses of 204,993 directly-measured and imputed SNPs among 61,851 cancer cases and 74,457 controls of European descent. Independent associations for SNP minor alleles were identified using sequential conditional analysis (with gene-level p value cutoffs ≤3.08 × 10(-5) ). Of the thirteen independent SNPs observed to be associated with cancer risk, novel findings were observed for seven loci. Across the DCLRE1B region, rs974494 and rs12144215 were inversely associated with prostate and lung cancers, and colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers, respectively. Across the TERC region, rs75316749 was positively associated with colorectal, breast, ovarian, and lung cancers. Across the DCLRE1B region, rs974404 and rs12144215 were inversely associated with prostate and lung cancers, and colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers, respectively. Near POT1, rs116895242 was inversely associated with colorectal, ovarian, and lung cancers, and RTEL1 rs34978822 was inversely associated with prostate and lung cancers. The complex association patterns in telomere-related genes across cancer types may provide insight into mechanisms through which telomere dysfunction in different tissues influences cancer risk.

  17. Orsomucoid: A new variant and additional duplicated ORM1 gene in Qatari population

    SciTech Connect

    Sebetan, I.M.; Alali, K.A.; Alzaman, A.

    1994-09-01

    A new genetically determined ORM2 variant and additional duplicated ORM1 gene were observed in Qatari population using isoelectric focusing in ultra thin layer polyacrylamide gels. The studied population samples indicate occurence of six ORM1 alleles and three ORM2 ones. A simple reliable method for separation of orsomucoid variations with comparison of different reported methods will be presented.

  18. Disease Risk Assessment Using a Voronoi-Based Network Analysis of Genes and Variants Scores

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Mukerjee, Gouri; Dorfman, Ruslan; Moghadas, Seyed M.

    2017-01-01

    Much effort has been devoted to assess disease risk based on large-scale protein-protein network and genotype-phenotype associations. However, the challenge of risk prediction for complex diseases remains unaddressed. Here, we propose a framework to quantify the risk based on a Voronoi tessellation network analysis, taking into account the disease association scores of both genes and variants. By integrating ClinVar, SNPnexus, and DISEASES databases, we introduce a gene-variant map that is based on the pairwise disease-associated gene-variant scores. This map is clustered using Voronoi tessellation and network analysis with a threshold obtained from fitting the background Voronoi cell density distribution. We define the relative risk of disease that is inferred from the scores of the data points within the related clusters on the gene-variant map. We identify autoimmune-associated clusters that may interact at the system-level. The proposed framework can be used to determine the clusters that are specific to a subtype or contribute to multiple subtypes of complex diseases. PMID:28326099

  19. Differential effect of H1 variant overexpression on cell cycle progression and gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D T; Alexander, B T; Sittman, D B

    1996-01-01

    To identify functional differences among non-allelic variants of the mammalian H1 linker histones a system for the overexpression of individual H1 variants in vivo was developed. Mouse 3T3 cells were transformed with an expression vector containing the coding regions for the H1c or H10 variant under the control of an inducible promoter. Stable, single colony transformants, in which the normal stoichiometry of H1 variants was perturbed, displayed normal viability, unaltered morphology and no long-term growth arrest. However, upon release from synchronization at different points in the cell cycle transformants significantly overproducing H10 exhibited transient inhibition of both G1 and S phase progression. Overexpression of H1c to comparable levels had no effect on cell cycle progression. Analysis of transcript levels for several cell cycle-regulated and housekeeping genes indicated that overexpression of H10 resulted in significantly reduced expression of all genes tested. Surprisingly, overexpression of H1c to comparable levels resulted in either a negligible effect or, in some cases, a dramatic increase in transcript levels. These results support the suggestion that functional differences exist among H1 variants. PMID:8602362

  20. Defining the disease liability of variants in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene

    PubMed Central

    Sosnay, Patrick R; Siklosi, Karen R; Van Goor, Fredrick; Kaniecki, Kyle; Yu, Haihui; Sharma, Neeraj; Ramalho, Anabela S; Amaral, Margarida D; Dorfman, Ruslan; Zielenski, Julian; Masica, David L; Karchin, Rachel; Millen, Linda; Thomas, Philip J; Patrinos, George P; Corey, Mary; Lewis, Michelle H; Rommens, Johanna M; Castellani, Carlo; Penland, Christopher M; Cutting, Garry R

    2013-01-01

    Allelic heterogeneity in disease-causing genes presents a substantial challenge to the translation of genomic variation to clinical practice. Few of the almost 2,000 variants in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene have empirical evidence that they cause cystic fibrosis. To address this gap, we collected both genotype and phenotype data for 39,696 cystic fibrosis patients in registries and clinics in North America and Europe. Among these patients, 159 CFTR variants had an allele frequency of ≥0.01%. These variants were evaluated for both clinical severity and functional consequence with 127 (80%) meeting both clinical and functional criteria consistent with disease. Assessment of disease penetrance in 2,188 fathers of cystic fibrosis patients enabled assignment of 12 of the remaining 32 variants as neutral while the other 20 variants remained indeterminate. This study illustrates that sourcing data directly from well-phenotyped subjects can address the gap in our ability to interpret clinically-relevant genomic variation. PMID:23974870

  1. New variants of lepidoptericidal toxin genes encoding Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa proteins.

    PubMed

    Sauka, Diego H; Rodriguez, Sonia E; Benintende, Graciela B

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an entomopathogenic bacterium characterized by producing parasporal proteinaceous insecticidal crystal inclusions during sporulation. Many strains are capable of also expressing other insecticidal proteins called Vip during the vegetative growing phase. Particularly, Vip3A proteins have activity against certain Lepidoptera species through a unique mechanism of action which emphasized their possible use in resistance management strategies against resistant pests. The aim of the work was to develop a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method that can distinguish between vip3A genes from B. thuringiensis strains. In addition, 4 novel vip3Aa genes were cloned and sequenced. The method was originally based on amplification of a single PCR amplicon and the use of 2 restriction enzymes with recognition sites that facilitate simultaneous detection. Subsequently, a third restriction enzyme was used to distinguish between vip3A variants. Thirteen vip3Aa genes were identified in strains belonging to 10 different B. thuringiensis serovars. Three intra-subclass variants of vip3Aa genes could be differentiated. The presented method can serve as an invaluable tool for the investigation of known and novel vip3A genes in B. thuringiensis strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report where variants of a same subclass of insecticidal genes could be distinguished following PCR-RFLP.

  2. Candidate genes and functional noncoding variants identified in a canine model of obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), a severe mental disease manifested in time-consuming repetition of behaviors, affects 1 to 3% of the human population. While highly heritable, complex genetics has hampered attempts to elucidate OCD etiology. Dogs suffer from naturally occurring compulsive disorders that closely model human OCD, manifested as an excessive repetition of normal canine behaviors that only partially responds to drug therapy. The limited diversity within dog breeds makes identifying underlying genetic factors easier. Results We use genome-wide association of 87 Doberman Pinscher cases and 63 controls to identify genomic loci associated with OCD and sequence these regions in 8 affected dogs from high-risk breeds and 8 breed-matched controls. We find 119 variants in evolutionarily conserved sites that are specific to dogs with OCD. These case-only variants are significantly more common in high OCD risk breeds compared to breeds with no known psychiatric problems. Four genes, all with synaptic function, have the most case-only variation: neuronal cadherin (CDH2), catenin alpha2 (CTNNA2), ataxin-1 (ATXN1), and plasma glutamate carboxypeptidase (PGCP). In the 2 Mb gene desert between the cadherin genes CDH2 and DSC3, we find two different variants found only in dogs with OCD that disrupt the same highly conserved regulatory element. These variants cause significant changes in gene expression in a human neuroblastoma cell line, likely due to disrupted transcription factor binding. Conclusions The limited genetic diversity of dog breeds facilitates identification of genes, functional variants and regulatory pathways underlying complex psychiatric disorders that are mechanistically similar in dogs and humans. PMID:24995881

  3. MC1R gene variants and sporadic malignant melanoma susceptibility in the Canary Islands population.

    PubMed

    Córdoba-Lanús, Elizabeth; Hernández-Jiménez, José G; Medina-Coello, Chaxiraxi; Espinoza-Jiménez, Adriana; González, Ana; Rodríguez-Pérez, María-Del-Cristo; Carretero-Hernández, Gregorio; Almeida, Pablo; Suárez-Hernández, José; Perera-Molinero, Antonio; Fernández-de-Misa, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Several MC1R variants are associated with increased risk of malignant melanoma (MM) in a variety of populations. We aim to examine the influence of the MC1R variants (RHC: D84E, R151C, R160W; NRHC: V60L, R163Q and the synonymous polymorphism T314T) on the MM risk in a population from the Canary Islands. Overall, 1,046 Caucasian individuals were included in the study. A thousand of them were genotyped for MC1R variants: 509 were sporadic MM patients and 491 were healthy control subjects from general population. The analysis was adjusted for age, sex, hair colour, eye colour, skin phototype and ancestry. We found that carriers of the R151C and R163Q variants were at an increased risk for melanoma OR 2.76 (1.59-4.78) and OR 5.62 (2.54-12.42), respectively. The risk of carrying RHC variants was 3.04 (1.90-4.86). Current study confirms the increased MM risk for R151C carriers. It also supports the association between R163Q variant and MM risk in the population on the Canary Islands, as opposed to reported on northern populations. These results highlight the importance of the sample population selection in this kind of studies.

  4. A haplotype derived from the common variants at the -1997G/T and Sp1 binding site of the COL1A1 gene influences risk of postmenopausal osteoporosis in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Monica; Singh, Puneetpal; Singh, Surinder; Juneja, Pawan Kumar; Kaur, Taranpal

    2013-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between Collagen 1 alpha 1 (COL1A1) polymorphism and osteoporosis in DEXA verified 349 (145 osteoporotic, 87 osteopenic and 117 normal) postmenopausal women of India, who were not taking hormone replacement therapy. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), that is, -1997G/T (rs1107946) and +1245G/T (rs1800012, Sp1) of the COL1A1 gene, were analyzed. Minor allele frequencies of rs1107946 and rs1800012 were 0.15 and 0.20 in osteoporotic women, 0.18 and 0.18 in osteopenic and 0.20 and 0.17 in women having normal bone mass. An allele dose effect with BMD of lumbar spine has been exhibited by major allele G of rs1107946 (GG: 0.86 g/cm(2), GT: 0.91 g/cm(2) and TT: 0.93 g/cm(2)) and minor allele T of rs1800012 (GG: 0.91 g/cm(2), GT: 0.87 g/cm(2) and TT: 0.81 g/cm(2)). Disease association analysis revealed a haplotype GT that confers approximately threefold higher risk of osteoporosis in the carriers (OR 3.12, 95% CI 1.24-8.88, P = 0.008) after adjusting the confounding effect of age, BMI and years since menopause. These results suggest that GT haplotype of COL1A1 gene is associated with a higher risk of postmenopausal osteoporosis in Northwest Indian women.

  5. Exon skipping creates novel splice variants of DMC1 gene in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, S; Chopra, M; Jaiswal, L; Sharma, R; Arora, R; Brahma, B; Lal, S V; De, S

    2016-04-01

    Disrupted meiotic cDNA1 (DMC1) recombinase plays a pivotal role in homology search and strand exchange reactions during meiotic homologous recombination. In the present study, full length coding sequence of DMC1 gene was sequence characterized for the first time from four ruminant species (cattle, buffalo, sheep and goat) and phylogenetic relationship of ruminant DMC1 with other eukaryotes was analyzed. DMC1 gene encodes a putative protein of 340 amino acids in cattle, sheep and buffalo and 341 amino acids in goat. A high degree of evolutionary conservation at both nucleotide and amino acid level was observed for the four ruminant orthologs. In cattle and sheep, novel alternatively spliced mRNAs with skipping of exons 7 and 8 (Transcript variant 1, TV1) were isolated in addition to the full length (FL) transcript. Novel transcript variants with partial skipping of exon 7 and complete skipping of exon 8 (Transcript variant 2, TV2) were found in sheep and goat. The presence of these variants was validated by amplifying cDNA isolated from testis tissue of ruminants using two oligonucleotides flanking the deleted region. To accurately estimate their relative proportions, real-time PCR was performed using primers specific for each variant. Expression level of DMC1-FL was significantly higher than that of TV1 in cattle and TV2 in goat (P < 0.05). Relative ratio for expression of DMC1-FL: TV1: TV2 in sheep was 6.78: 1.43: 1. In-silico analysis revealed presence of splice variants of DMC1 gene across other mammalian species underpinning the role of alternative splicing in functional innovation.

  6. Correlation of a set of gene variants, life events and personality features on adult ADHD severity.

    PubMed

    Müller, Daniel J; Chiesa, Alberto; Mandelli, Laura; De Luca, Vincenzo; De Ronchi, Diana; Jain, Umesh; Serretti, Alessandro; Kennedy, James L

    2010-07-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) could persist into adult life in a substantial proportion of cases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of (1) adverse events, (2) personality traits and (3) genetic variants chosen on the basis of previous findings and (4) their possible interactions on adult ADHD severity. One hundred and ten individuals diagnosed with adult ADHD were evaluated for occurrence of adverse events in childhood and adulthood, and personality traits by the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Common polymorphisms within a set of nine important candidate genes (SLC6A3, DBH, DRD4, DRD5, HTR2A, CHRNA7, BDNF, PRKG1 and TAAR9) were genotyped for each subject. Life events, personality traits and genetic variations were analyzed in relationship to severity of current symptoms, according to the Brown Attention Deficit Disorder Scale (BADDS). Genetic variations were not significantly associated with severity of ADHD symptoms. Life stressors displayed only a minor effect as compared to personality traits. Indeed, symptoms' severity was significantly correlated with the temperamental trait of Harm avoidance and the character trait of Self directedness. The results of the present work are in line with previous evidence of a significant correlation between some personality traits and adult ADHD. However, several limitations such as the small sample size and the exclusion of patients with other severe comorbid psychiatric disorders could have influenced the significance of present findings.

  7. Surveying genetic variants and molecular phylogeny of cerebral cavernous malformation gene, CCM3/PDCD10.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Bhandari, Anita; Goswami, Chandan

    2014-12-05

    The three cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) genes namely CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607 and CCM3/PDCD10 have been identified for which mutations cause cerebral cavernous malformations. However, the protein products of these genes involved in forming CCM signaling, are still poorly understood imposing an urgent need to understand these genes and their signaling processes in details. So far involvement of CCM3/PDCD10 in the cavernous angioma has been characterized from biochemical and biophysical analyses. However, there is no comprehensive study illustrating the phylogenetic history and comprehensive genetic variants of CCM3/PDCD10. Herein, we explored the phylogenetic history and genetic variants of CCM3/PDCD10 gene. Synteny analyses revealed that CCM3/PDCD10 gene shared same genomic loci from Drosophila to human and the gene structure of CCM3/PDCD10 is conserved from human to Branchiostoma floridae for about 500 MYs with some changes in sea urchin and in insects. The conserved CCM3/PDCD10 is characterized by presence of indels in the N-terminal dimerization domain. We identified 951 CCM3/PDCD10 variants by analysis of 1092 human genomes with top three variation classes belongs to 84% SNPs, 6.9% insertions and 6.2% deletions. We identified 22 missense mutations in the human CCM3/PDCD10 protein and out of which three mutations are deleterious. We also identified four stop-codon gaining mutations at the positions E34*, E68*, E97* and E140*, respectively. This study is the first comprehensive analysis of the CCM3/PDCD10 gene based on phylogenetic origin and genetic variants. This study corroborates that the evolution of CCM proteins with tubular organization evolvements by endothelial cells.

  8. Finding the 'Guilty' Gene Variant of Sporadic Parkinson's Disease Via CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shenzhao; Zhou, Jiawei

    2017-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder affecting millions of people worldwide, but its cause and pathogenesis are still not fully understood. Earlier studies have shown that SNCA, which encodes α-synuclein, is one of the key genes associated with PD. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variants of SNCA are thought to be correlated with disease onset. The underlying mechanisms however are enigmatic. A recent study published in Nature revealed that one of the SNP variants in the SNCA non-coding element elevated α-synuclein expression in human neurons by reducing the binding efficiency of transcription factors, demonstrating a previously uncharted role for SNPs in the pathogenesis of PD.

  9. MTP Gene Variants and Response to Lomitapide in Patients with Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Kolovou, Genovefa D; Kolovou, Vana; Papadopoulou, Anna; Watts, Gerald F

    2016-07-01

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare genetic disorder, which leads to premature cardiovascular diseases. Microsomal triglyceride transport protein (MTP) inhibitors, such as lomitapide, offer a new therapeutic approach for treating these patients. We evaluated the lipid lowering (LL) efficacy of lomitapide according to several gene variants in MTP. Four clinically and/or molecularly defined HoFH patients were treated with lomitapide in addition to conventional high intensity LL therapy and regular lipoprotein apheresis. Two patients responded to the therapy, with a significant reduction of LDL cholesterol (LDL-C>50%, hyper-responders). Sequencing of all exonic and intronic flanking regions of the MTP gene in all patients revealed 36 different variants. The hyper-responders to lomitapide shared six common variants: rs17533489, rs79194015, rs745075, rs41275715, rs1491246, and rs17533517, which were not seen in hypo-responders (reduction in LDL-C<50%). We suggest that in HoFH variants in the MTP gene may impact on the therapeutic response to lomitapide, but this requires further investigation.

  10. Folate receptor gene variants and neural tube defect occurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Finnell, R.; Greer, K.; Lammer, E.

    1994-09-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence shows that periconceptional use of folic acid supplements may prevent 40-50% of neural tube defects (NTDs). The FDA has subsequently recommended folic acid supplementation of all women of childbearing potential, even though the mechanism by which folic acid prevents NTDs is unknown. We investigated genetic variation of a candidate gene, the 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MeTHF) receptor, that may mediate this preventive effect. The receptor concentrates folate within cells and we have localized its mRNA to neuroepithelial cells during neurulation. Our hypothesis is that dysfunctional 5-MeTHF receptors inadequately concentrate folate intracellularly, predisposing infants to NTDs. We have completed SSCP analysis on 3 of the 4 coding exons of the 5-MeTHF receptor gene of 474 infants participating in a large population-based epidemiological case-control study of NTDs in California; genotyping of another 500 infants is ongoing. Genomic DNA was extracted from residual blood spots from newborn screening samples of cases and controls. Genotyping was done blinded to case status. Polymorphisms have been detected for exons 4 and 5; fourteen percent of the infants have exon 5 polymorphisms. Data will be presented on the prevalence of 5-MeTHF receptor polymorphisms among cases and controls. Relationships among the polymorphisms and NTD occurrence may shed light on how folic acid supplementation prevents NTDs.

  11. Calpain-5 gene variants are associated with diastolic blood pressure and cholesterol levels

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, María E; Martínez-Larrad, María T; Ramírez-Lorca, Reposo; González-Sánchez, José L; Zabena, Carina; Martinez-Calatrava, María J; González, Alejandro; Morón, Francisco J; Ruiz, Agustín; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Background Genes implicated in common complex disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or cardiovascular diseases are not disease specific, since clinically related disorders also share genetic components. Cysteine protease Calpain 10 (CAPN10) has been associated with T2DM, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, increased body mass index (BMI) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a reproductive disorder of women in which isunlin resistance seems to play a pathogenic role. The calpain 5 gene (CAPN5) encodes a protein homologue of CAPN10. CAPN5 has been previously associated with PCOS by our group. In this new study, we have analysed the association of four CAPN5 gene variants(rs948976A>G, rs4945140G>A, rs2233546C>T and rs2233549G>A) with several cardiovascular risk factors related to metabolic syndrome in general population. Methods Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, insulin, glucose and lipid profiles were determined in 606 individuals randomly chosen from a cross-sectional population-based epidemiological survey in the province of Segovia in Central Spain (Castille), recruited to investigate the prevalence of anthropometric and physiological parameters related to obesity and other components of the metabolic syndrome. Genotypes at the four polymorphic loci in CAPN5 gene were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results Genotype association analysis was significant for BMI (p ≤ 0.041), diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.015) and HDL-cholesterol levels (p = 0.025). Different CAPN5 haplotypes were also associated with diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (0.0005 ≤ p ≤ 0.006) and total cholesterol levels (0.001 ≤ p ≤ 0.029). In addition, the AACA haplotype, over-represented in obese individuals, is also more frequent in individuals with metabolic syndrome defined by ATPIII criteria (p = 0.029). Conclusion As its homologue CAPN10, CAPN5 seems to influence traits related to increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. Our results also

  12. Ancient Out-of-Africa Mitochondrial DNA Variants Associate with Distinct Mitochondrial Gene Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Mishmar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants have been traditionally used as markers to trace ancient population migrations. Although experiments relying on model organisms and cytoplasmic hybrids, as well as disease association studies, have served to underline the functionality of certain mtDNA SNPs, only little is known of the regulatory impact of ancient mtDNA variants, especially in terms of gene expression. By analyzing RNA-seq data of 454 lymphoblast cell lines from the 1000 Genomes Project, we found that mtDNA variants defining the most common African genetic background, the L haplogroup, exhibit a distinct overall mtDNA gene expression pattern, which was independent of mtDNA copy numbers. Secondly, intra-population analysis revealed subtle, yet significant, expression differences in four tRNA genes. Strikingly, the more prominent African mtDNA gene expression pattern best correlated with the expression of nuclear DNA-encoded RNA-binding proteins, and with SNPs within the mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins PTCD1 and MRPS7. Our results thus support the concept of an ancient regulatory transition of mtDNA-encoded genes as humans left Africa to populate the rest of the world. PMID:27812116

  13. Mannose-binding lectin gene polymorphic variants predispose to the development of bronchopulmonary complications but have no influence on other clinical and laboratory symptoms or signs of common variable immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Litzman, J; Freiberger, T; Grimbacher, B; Gathmann, B; Salzer, U; Pavlík, T; Vlček, J; Postránecká, V; Trávníčková, Z; Thon, V

    2008-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), activating protein of the lectin pathway of the complement system, is an important component of the non-specific immune response. MBL2 gene polymorphisms, both in the coding and promoter regions, lead to low or deficient serum MBL levels. Low serum MBL levels were shown to be associated with serious infectious complications, mainly in patients in whom other non-specific immune system barriers were disturbed (granulocytopenia, cystic fibrosis). We have analysed two promoter (−550 and −221) and three exon (codons 52, 54 and 57) MBL2 polymorphisms in a total of 94 patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) from two immunodeficiency centres. Low-producing genotypes were associated with the presence of bronchiectasis (P = 0·009), lung fibrosis (P = 0·037) and also with respiratory insufficiency (P = 0·029). We could not demonstrate any association of MBL deficiency with age at onset of clinical symptoms, age at diagnosis, the number of pneumonias before diagnosis or serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA and IgM levels before initiation of Ig treatment. No association with emphysema development was observed, such as with lung function test abnormalities. No effect of MBL2 genotypes on the presence of diarrhoea, granuloma formation, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, frequency of respiratory tract infection or the number of antibiotic courses of the patients was observed. Our study suggests that low MBL-producing genotypes predispose to bronchiectasis formation, and also fibrosis and respiratory insufficiency development, but have no effect on other complications in CVID patients. PMID:18637104

  14. Imputing Variants in HLA-DR Beta Genes Reveals That HLA-DRB1 Is Solely Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Nath, Swapan K.; Lee, Hye-Soon; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    The genetic association of HLA-DRB1 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is well documented, but association with other HLA-DR beta genes (HLA-DRB3, HLA-DRB4 and HLA-DRB5) has not been thoroughly studied, despite their similar functions and chromosomal positions. We examined variants in all functional HLA-DR beta genes in RA and SLE patients and controls, down to the amino-acid level, to better understand disease association with the HLA-DR locus. To this end, we improved an existing HLA reference panel to impute variants in all protein-coding HLA-DR beta genes. Using the reference panel, HLA variants were inferred from high-density SNP data of 9,271 RA-control subjects and 5,342 SLE-control subjects. Disease association tests were performed by logistic regression and log-likelihood ratio tests. After imputation using the newly constructed HLA reference panel and statistical analysis, we observed that HLA-DRB1 variants better accounted for the association between MHC and susceptibility to RA and SLE than did the other three HLA-DRB variants. Moreover, there were no secondary effects in HLA-DRB3, HLA-DRB4, or HLA-DRB5 in RA or SLE. Of all the HLA-DR beta chain paralogs, those encoded by HLA-DRB1 solely or dominantly influence susceptibility to RA and SLE. PMID:26919467

  15. Dynamic expression of combinatorial replication-dependent histone variant genes during mouse spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rongfang; Qi, Huayu

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosomes are basic chromatin structural units that are formed by DNA sequences wrapping around histones. Global chromatin states in different cell types are specified by combinatorial effects of post-translational modifications of histones and the expression of histone variants. During mouse spermatogenesis, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) self-renew while undergo differentiation, events that occur in the company of constant re-modeling of chromatin structures. Previous studies have shown that testes contain highly expressed or specific histone variants to facilitate these epigenetic modifications. However, mechanisms of regulating the epigenetic changes and the specific histone compositions of spermatogenic cells are not fully understood. Using real time quantitative RT-PCR, we examined the dynamic expression of replication-dependent histone genes in post-natal mouse testes. It was found that distinct sets of histone genes are expressed in various spermatogenic cells at different stages during spermatogenesis. While gonocyte-enriched testes from mice at 2-dpp (days post partum) express pre-dominantly thirteen histone variant genes, SSC-stage testes at 9-dpp highly express a different set of eight histone genes. During differentiation stage when testes are occupied mostly by spermatocytes and spermatids, another twenty-two histone genes are expressed much higher than the rest, including previously known testis-specific hist1h1t, hist1h2ba and hist1h4c. In addition, histone genes that are pre-dominantly expressed in gonocytes and SSCs are also highly expressed in embryonic stem cells. Several of them were changed when embryoid bodies were formed from ES cells, suggesting their roles in regulating pluripotency of the cells. Further more, differentially expressed histone genes are specifically localized in either SSCs or spermatocytes and spermatids, as demonstrated by in situ hybridization using gene specific probes. Taken together, results presented here

  16. The CFTR M470V gene variant as a potential modifier of COPD severity: study of Serbian population.

    PubMed

    Stankovic, Marija; Nikolic, Aleksandra; Divac, Aleksandra; Tomovic, Andrija; Petrovic-Stanojevic, Natasa; Andjelic, Marina; Dopudja-Pantic, Vesna; Surlan, Mirjana; Vujicic, Ivan; Ponomarev, Dimitrije; Mitic-Milikic, Marija; Kusic, Jelena; Radojkovic, Dragica

    2008-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex disease influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is an important component of the lung tissue homeostasis, involved in the regulation of the rate of mucociliary clearance. As it is known that certain CFTR variants have consequences on the function of CFTR protein, the aim of this study was to examine the possible role of F508del, M470V, Tn locus, and R75Q variants in COPD development and modulation. Total number of 86 COPD patients and 102 control subjects were included in the study. Possible association between COPD susceptibility, severity, and onset of the disease and allele or genotype of four analyzed CFTR variants was examined. No associations were detected between COPD development, onset of the disease and tested CFTR alleles and genotypes. However, VV470 genotype was associated with mild/moderate COPD stages in comparison to severe/very severe ones (OR = 0.29, 95%CI = 0.11-0.80, p = 0.016). Our study showed that patients with VV470 genotype had a 3.4-fold decreased risk for the appearance of severe/very severe COPD symptoms, and the obtained results indicate that this genotype may have a protective role. These results also suggest the importance of studying CFTR gene as a modifier of this disease.

  17. Apolipoprotein L1 gene variants in deceased organ donors are associated with renal allograft failure

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Barry I.; Julian, Bruce A.; Pastan, Stephen O.; Israni, Ajay K.; Schladt, David; Gautreaux, Michael D.; Hauptfeld, Vera; Bray, Robert A.; Gebel, Howard M.; Kirk, Allan D.; Gaston, Robert S.; Rogers, Jeffrey; Farney, Alan C.; Orlando, Giuseppe; Stratta, Robert J.; Mohan, Sumit; Ma, Lijun; Langefeld, Carl D.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Adams, Patricia L.; Palanisamy, Amudha; Reeves-Daniel, Amber M.; Divers, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) nephropathy variants in African American deceased kidney donors were associated with shorter renal allograft survival in a prior single-center report. APOL1 G1 and G2 variants were genotyped in newly accrued DNA samples from African American deceased donors of kidneys recovered and/or transplanted in Alabama and North Carolina. APOL1 genotypes and allograft outcomes in subsequent transplants from 55 U.S. centers were linked, adjusting for age, sex and race/ethnicity of recipients, HLA match, cold ischemia time, panel reactive antibody levels, and donor type. For 221 transplantations from kidneys recovered in Alabama, there was a statistical trend toward shorter allograft survival in recipients of two-APOL1-nephropathy-variant kidneys (hazard ratio [HR] 2.71; p=0.06). For all 675 kidneys transplanted from donors at both centers, APOL1 genotype (HR 2.26; p=0.001) and African American recipient race/ethnicity (HR 1.60; p=0.03) were associated with allograft failure. Kidneys from African American deceased donors with two APOL1 nephropathy variants reproducibly associate with higher risk for allograft failure after transplantation. These findings warrant consideration of rapidly genotyping deceased African American kidney donors for APOL1 risk variants at organ recovery and incorporation of results into allocation and informed-consent processes. PMID:25809272

  18. Increased frequency of double and triple heterozygous gene variants in children with intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Monique L.; Mourya, Reena; Connor, Jessica; Dexheimer, Phillip; Karns, Rebekah; Miethke, Alexander; Sheridan, Rachel; Zhang, Kejian; Bezerra, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Single-gene mutations cause syndromes of intrahepatic cholestasis, but previous multi-gene mutation screening in children with idiopathic cholestasis failed to fulfill diagnostic criteria in about two-thirds of children. In adults with fibrosing cholestatic disease, heterozygous ABCB4 mutations were present in 34% of patients. Here, we hypothesized that children with idiopathic cholestasis have a higher frequency of heterozygous non-synonymous gene sequence variants. Methods We analyzed the frequency and types of variants in 717 children in whom high-throughput sequencing of the genes SERPINA1, JAG1, ATP8B1, ABCB11, and ABCB4 was performed as part of an evaluation for intrahepatic idiopathic cholestasis. The frequency of non-synonymous variants (NSVs) was compared to those of 1092 control subjects enrolled in the 1000-Genome-Project. Results The frequency of NSVs in single genes was similar between disease (25%) and controls (26%, P=0.518). In contrast, double or triple NSVs in 2 or more genes were more frequent in disease (N= 7%) than controls (N=4.7%, P=0.028). Detailed review of clinical and laboratory information in a subgroup of double or triple heterozygous patients revealed variable GGT levels and severity of pruritus, with liver biopsies showing stage 2–3 fibrosis. Conclusion Children with intrahepatic idiopathic cholestasis have a higher frequency of double or triple NSVs in SERPINA1, JAG1, ATPB1, ABCB11, or ABCB4. These findings raise the potential role for gene-gene relationships in determining the phenotype of cholestatic liver disease in children. PMID:26126923

  19. Analysis of ERCC1 and ERCC2 gene variants in osteosarcoma, colorectal and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    GÓMEZ-DÍAZ, BENJAMÍN; DE LA LUZ AYALA-MADRIGAL, MARÍA; GUTIÉRREZ-ANGULO, MELVA; VALLE-SOLIS, AURA ERAZO; LINARES-GONZÁLEZ, LUIS MIGUEL; GONZÁLEZ-GUZMÁN, ROBERTO; CRUZ-GUILLÉN, DAVID; CEDEÑO-GARCIDUEÑAS, ANA LILIA; CANTO, PATRICIA; LÓPEZ-HERNÁNDEZ, LUZ BERENICE

    2015-01-01

    The Asn118Asn (rs11615) variant in the ERCC1 gene, and the Lys751Gln (rs13181) and Asp312Asn (rs1799793) variants in the ERCC2 gene have been associated with the development of varied types of cancer. The aim of the present study was to test for any association between the ERCC1 and ERCC2 gene variants and three different types of cancer in Mexican-mestizo patients. Patients and their respective controls were formed into three groups: The osteosarcoma group, with 28 patients and 97 controls; the colorectal group, with 108 patients and 119 controls; and the breast cancer group, with 71 patients and 74 controls. Genotyping was performed using TaqMan probes and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared using a χ2 test. Only one SNP (rs1799793) was found to be associated with breast cancer. This is the first study analyzing the SNPs in ERCC1 and ERCC2 genes and the susceptibility to cancer in Mexican-mestizo patients with osteosarcoma, and colorectal and breast cancer. PMID:25789018

  20. Mucosal Expression of T Cell Gene Variants Is Associated with Differential Resistance to Teladorsagia circumcincta

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Hazel; Nicol, Louise; Gossner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Resistance of sheep to the gastrointestinal nematode Teladorsagia circumcincta is a heritable characteristic. Control of parasite colonization and egg production is strongly linked to IgA antibody levels regulated by Th2 T cell activation within lymphoid tissue; and persistently-infected susceptible animals develop an inflammatory Th1/Th17 response within the abomasum that fails to control infection. Differential T cell polarization therefore is associated with parasite resistance and/or susceptibility and is controlled by a specific set of transcription factors and cytokine receptors. Transcript variants of these genes have been characterized in sheep, while in humans and mice different variants of the genes are associated with inflammatory diseases. RT-qPCR was used to quantify mucosal expression of the transcript variants of the sheep genes in trickle-infected animals with defined phenotypic traits. Genes that encode full-length GATA3 and IL17RB were shown to be significantly increased in resistant sheep that had controlled parasite infection. Expression levels of both were significantly negatively correlated with abomasal worm count (a parameter of susceptibility) and positively correlated with body weight (a parameter of resistance). These data show that polarized Th2 T cells within the abomasal mucosa play an important role in the maintenance of resistance. PMID:27973603

  1. Efficient expression of gene variants that harbour AGA codons next to the initiation codon

    PubMed Central

    Zamora-Romo, Efraín; Cruz-Vera, Luis Rogelio; Vivanco-Domínguez, Serafín; Magos-Castro, Marco Antonio; Guarneros, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to improve the knowledge about the rules which direct the effect of the early ORF sequences on translation efficiency, we have analyzed the effect of pairs of the six arginine codons at the second and third positions on the expression of lacZ variants. Whereas the pairs of identical AGA or AGG codons were favorable for the gene expression, identical pairs of each of the four CGN codons were very inefficient. This result was unexpected because tandems of AGA or AGG codons located in more internal gene positions provoke deficient expression whilst internally located CGU and CGC are the most abundant and efficiently translated arginine codons. The mixed combinations of AGA and each of the CGN codons usually resulted in efficient rates of lacZ expression independently of the peptidyl-tRNA propensity to dissociate from the ribosome. Thus, the variant harboring the pair of AGA codons was expressed as efficiently as the variant carrying a pair of AAA codons in the same positions, a configuration reported as one of the most common and efficient for gene expression. We explain these results assuming that the presence of adenines in these early positions enhance gene expression. As expected, specific mRNA levels correlated with the intensity of lacZ expression for each variant. However, the induction of lacZ AGA AGA gene in pth cells accumulated peptidyl-tRNAArg4 as well as a short 5′-proximal lacZ mRNA fragment suggesting ribosome stalling due to depletion of aminoacylated-tRNAArg4. PMID:17726048

  2. Distribution of allelic variants of the chromosomal gene bla OXA-114-like in Achromobacter xylosoxidans clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Traglia, German Matías; Almuzara, Marisa; Merkier, Andrea Karina; Papalia, Mariana; Galanternik, Laura; Radice, Marcela; Vay, Carlos; Centrón, Daniela; Ramírez, María Soledad

    2013-11-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is increasingly being documented in cystic fibrosis patients. The bla(OXA-114) gene has been recognized as a naturally occurring chromosomal gene, exhibiting different allelic variants. In the population under study, the bla(OXA-114)-like gene was found in 19/19 non-epidemiological-related clinical isolates of A. xylosoxidans with ten different alleles including 1 novel OXA-114 variant.

  3. How might ZNF804A variants influence risk for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder? A literature review, synthesis, and bioinformatic analysis.

    PubMed

    Hess, Jonathan L; Glatt, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    The gene that encodes zinc finger protein 804A (ZNF804A) became a candidate risk gene for schizophrenia (SZ) after surpassing genome-wide significance thresholds in replicated genome-wide association scans and meta-analyses. Much remains unknown about this reported gene expression regulator; however, preliminary work has yielded insights into functional and biological effects of ZNF804A by targeting its regulatory activities in vitro and by characterizing allele-specific interactions with its risk-conferring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). There is now strong epidemiologic evidence for a role of ZNF804A polymorphisms in both SZ and bipolar disorder (BD); however, functional links between implicated variants and susceptible biological states have not been solidified. Here we briefly review the genetic evidence implicating ZNF804A polymorphisms as genetic risk factors for both SZ and BD, and discuss the potential functional consequences of these variants on the regulation of ZNF804A and its downstream targets. Empirical work and predictive bioinformatic analyses of the alternate alleles of the two most strongly implicated ZNF804A polymorphisms suggest they might alter the affinity of the gene sequence for DNA- and/or RNA-binding proteins, which might in turn alter expression levels of the gene or particular ZNF804A isoforms. Future work should focus on clarifying the critical periods and cofactors regulating these genetic influences on ZNF804A expression, as well as the downstream biological consequences of an imbalance in the expression of ZNF804A and its various mRNA isoforms.

  4. An investigation of mammographic density and gene variants in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Lurie, Galina; Williams, Andrew E; Le Marchand, Loic

    2004-11-20

    This cross-sectional study examined if polymorphisms in genes that code for enzymes involved in the production and metabolism of estrogens are associated with mammographic density, a strong predictor of breast cancer risk. The study included 328 healthy women of different ethnicities who underwent mammographic screening and donated a blood or mouthwash sample for DNA analysis. After digitizing cranio-caudal views of the mammograms, we performed computer-assisted mammographic density assessment. Following DNA extraction, samples were analyzed for polymorphisms in the COMT (Val158Met), CYP1A1 (Ile462Val), CYP1B1 (Val432Leu), CYP1A2 (*1F) and CYP17 (T27C) genes using PCR-RFLP. Breast density was lower in Caucasians than in Asians. Caucasian women were less likely to carry the CYP1A1 variant allele and more likely to carry the variant alleles for CYP1B1 and COMT than women with Asian or Hawaiian ancestry. The low-activity COMT and CYP1A2 variant alleles were weakly related to lower percent mammographic density after adjustment for age, ethnicity, body mass index and reproductive variables (p for gene-dosage =0.08 and 0.05, respectively). These relations were observed in premenopausal women only and were similar in direction and magnitude after stratification by ethnicity. We found no significant associations between breast density and the variant alleles for CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and CYP17. Our data suggest lower mammographic density for women carrying the COMT and CYP1A2 variant alleles than for women carrying the common alleles, though this is the opposite of what is commonly hypothesized from the enzyme function.

  5. A de novo variant in the ASPRV1 gene in a dog with ichthyosis

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Anina; Galichet, Arnaud; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Sayar, Beyza S.; Wiener, Dominique J.; Müller, Eliane J.; Roosje, Petra; Welle, Monika M.

    2017-01-01

    Ichthyoses are a heterogeneous group of inherited cornification disorders characterized by generalized dry skin, scaling and/or hyperkeratosis. Ichthyosis vulgaris is the most common form of ichthyosis in humans and caused by genetic variants in the FLG gene encoding filaggrin. Filaggrin is a key player in the formation of the stratum corneum, the uppermost layer of the epidermis and therefore crucial for barrier function. During terminal differentiation of keratinocytes, the precursor profilaggrin is cleaved by several proteases into filaggrin monomers and eventually processed into free amino acids contributing to the hydration of the cornified layer. We studied a German Shepherd dog with a novel form of ichthyosis. Comparing the genome sequence of the affected dog with 288 genomes from genetically diverse non-affected dogs we identified a private heterozygous variant in the ASPRV1 gene encoding “aspartic peptidase, retroviral-like 1”, which is also known as skin aspartic protease (SASPase). The variant was absent in both parents and therefore due to a de novo mutation event. It was a missense variant, c.1052T>C, affecting a conserved residue close to an autoprocessing cleavage site, p.(Leu351Pro). ASPRV1 encodes a retroviral-like protease involved in profilaggrin-to-filaggrin processing. By immunofluorescence staining we showed that the filaggrin expression pattern was altered in the affected dog. Thus, our findings provide strong evidence that the identified de novo variant is causative for the ichthyosis in the affected dog and that ASPRV1 plays an essential role in skin barrier formation. ASPRV1 is thus a novel candidate gene for unexplained human forms of ichthyoses. PMID:28249031

  6. Role of inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase gene variant on fever incidence during zidovudine antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Coelho, A V C; Silva, S P S; Zandonà, L; Stocco, G; Decorti, G; Crovella, S

    2017-01-23

    Zidovudine, the antiretroviral drug used to treat HIV infection, commonly causes adverse effects, such as systemic fever and gastrointestinal alterations. In the present study, the potential role of inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPA) gene variant on the incidence of adverse events during antiretroviral therapy (ART) of HIV with zidovudine was discussed. Individuals from Northeastern Brazil (N = 204) receiving treatment for HIV-1 infection were recruited. Zidovudine-related adverse effects developed during the treatment were registered. The rs1127354 polymorphism in the ITPA gene was genotyped using real-time PCR to assess whether this single nucleotide polymorphism was associated with the occurrence of zidovudine-related adverse effects. We observed a significant association between the ITPA variant genotype and the reported systemic fever (odds ratio = 7.17, 95% confidence interval = 1.19-43.15; P = 0.032). Zidovudine use could indirectly lead to an increase in the levels of inosine monophosphate in an antimetabolite-like manner, which is converted to inosine triphosphate (ITP). The rs1127354 variant caused a decrease in ITPA activity, thereby leading to ITP accumulation. This in turn resulted in cytotoxicity, which was manifested by neutropenia and fever. Therefore, we hypothesized a pharmacogenetic model involving the ITPA variant genotype in multifactorial components that act together to determine the onset of zidovudine-related adverse effects.

  7. Association of Variants in Estrogen-Related Pathway Genes with Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Sarah K.; Kwon, Erika M.; Fu, Rong; Kolb, Suzanne; Feng, Ziding; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Stanford, Janet L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Through mediation of estrogen receptors, estradiol has been shown to have both carcinogenic and anti-carcinogenic effects on the prostate. We performed a population-based case-control study to investigate variants in estrogen-related genes ESR1, ESR2, CYP19A1, CYP1A1, and CYP1B1 and the potential association with risk of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods We evaluated prostate cancer risk conferred by 73 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 1,304 incident prostate cancer cases and 1,266 age-matched controls. Analysis included stratification by clinical features and assessment of environmental modifiers. Results There was evidence of altered risk of developing prostate cancer for variants in ESR1, CYP1A1, and CYP1B1, however, only CYP1B1 rs1056836 retained significance after adjustment for multiple comparisons. An association with risk for more aggressive prostate cancer was observed for variants in ESR1, ESR2, and CYP19A1, but none was significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. There was no effect modification by obesity. Conclusions Germline genetic variation of these estrogen pathway genes may contribute to risk of prostate cancer. Additional studies to validate these results and examine the functional consequence of validated variants are warranted. PMID:22549291

  8. Unique surface gene variants of hepatitis B virus isolated from patients in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Baclig, Michael O; Alvarez, May R; Gopez-Cervantes, Juliet; Natividad, Filipinas F

    2014-02-01

    Point mutations and multiple variants across the "a" determinant can destroy the antigenicity and immunogenicity of hepatitis B virus (HBV) leading to false negative assay and vaccine escape. In this study, the presence of surface gene variants of HBV was investigated among patients clinically diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B and positive for HBV DNA from 2002 to 2009. Sequence analysis of the surface gene of HBV showed that 23 (43%) of the 53 isolates had variations. Out of the 23 isolates, 15 (65%) exhibited single or multiple substitutions, which resulted to specific amino acid changes. The remaining 8 (35%) isolates had silent mutations. The amino acid substitution M133T which was associated with failure of HBsAg detection was found in one isolate (7%, 1/15), while the amino acid substitution D144A which was associated with vaccine escape was observed in one isolate (7%, 1/15). No G145R mutation was observed. Of the 15 isolates with identified single or multiple substitutions, 6 (40%) were found to have unique sequences which caused changes in the hydrophobicity profile in the protein. Unique sequence variants at amino acid positions M103I, L109P, S117R, F134I, and S136L found in this study have not yet been reported. These data should be taken into account when developing next generation HBV assays to detect both common and unique variants, and when new HBV vaccines will be designed.

  9. Polymorphic variants of DNA repair gene XRCC3 and XRCC7 and risk of prostate cancer: a study from North Indian population.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Raju K; Kapoor, Rakesh; Mittal, Rama Devi

    2010-11-01

    DNA repair gene alterations may cause a reduction in DNA repair capacity and influence an individual's susceptibility to carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms of DNA repair genes may be a risk factor for prostate cancer (PCa) susceptibility, influencing expression of homologous recombination (XRCC3) and nonhomologous end-joining (XRCC7) genes and conferring predisposition to PCa. In a case-control study, genotyping was done in 192 patients with PCa and 224 age matched unrelated healthy controls of similar ethnicity to determine variants in XRCC3 Exon 7 (C18067T, rs861539), IVS5-14 (A17893G, rs1799796), and XRCC7 Intron 8 (G6721T, rs7003908) by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism methods. Variant genotype GG (odds ratio [OR], 2.23; p=0.003) and combined genotype TG+GG (OR, 1.541; p=0.049), G allele of XRCC7 Intron 8 (G>T), demonstrated significant risk for PCa (OR, 1.529; p=0.002). Stratification on bases of Gleason grade and bone metastasis, significant risk with high Gleason grade for CT genotype of XRCC3 Exon 7, and variant genotype GG of XRCC7 Intron 8 were observed. Our results strongly support that common sequence variants (GG) genotype of XRCC7 may increase risk of PCa. G allele being a risk allele in our study also suggests that this polymorphism be used as a marker for the PCa susceptibility.

  10. Genetic Variants in Nicotine Addiction and Alcohol Metabolism Genes, Oral Cancer Risk and the Propensity to Smoke and Drink Alcohol: A Replication Study in India

    PubMed Central

    Anantharaman, Devasena; Chabrier, Amélie; Gaborieau, Valérie; Franceschi, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Samant, Tanuja; Mahimkar, Manoj B.; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic variants in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and alcohol metabolism genes have been associated with propensity to smoke tobacco and drink alcohol, respectively, and also implicated in genetic susceptibility to head and neck cancer. In addition to smoking and alcohol, tobacco chewing is an important oral cancer risk factor in India. It is not known if these genetic variants influence propensity or oral cancer susceptibility in the context of this distinct etiology. Methods We examined 639 oral and pharyngeal cancer cases and 791 controls from two case-control studies conducted in India. We investigated six variants known to influence nicotine addiction or alcohol metabolism, including rs16969968 (CHRNA5), rs578776 (CHRNA3), rs1229984 (ADH1B), rs698 (ADH1C), rs1573496 (ADH7), and rs4767364 (ALDH2). Results The CHRN variants were associated with the number of chewing events per day, including in those who chewed tobacco but never smoked (P =  0.003, P =  0.01 for rs16969968 and rs578776 respectively). Presence of the variant allele contributed to approximately 13% difference in chewing frequency compared to non-carriers. While no association was observed between rs16969968 and oral cancer risk (OR =  1.01, 95% CI =  0.83– 1.22), rs578776 was modestly associated with a 16% decreased risk of oral cancer (OR =  0.84, 95% CI =  0.72– 0.98). There was little evidence for association between polymorphisms in genes encoding alcohol metabolism and oral cancer in this population. Conclusion The association between rs16969968 and number of chewing events implies that the effect on smoking propensity conferred by this gene variant extends to the use of smokeless tobacco. PMID:24505444

  11. Loss-of-Function Variants in Schizophrenia Risk and SETD1A as a Candidate Susceptibility Gene

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Atsushi; Xu, Bin; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Roos, J. Louw; Gogos, Joseph A.; Karayiorgou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss-of-function (LOF) (i.e., nonsense, splice site, and frameshift) variants that lead to disruption of gene function are likely to contribute to the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we perform a systematic investigation of the role of both de novo and inherited LOF variants in schizophrenia using exome sequencing data from 231 case and 34 control trios. We identify two de novo LOF variants in the SETD1A gene, which encodes a subunit of his-tone methyltransferase, a finding unlikely to have occurred by chance, and provide evidence for a more general role of chromatin regulators in schizophrenia risk. Transmission pattern analyses reveal that LOF variants are more likely to be transmitted to affected individuals than controls. This is especially true for private LOF variants in genes intolerant to functional genetic variation. These findings highlight the contribution of LOF mutations to the genetic architecture of schizophrenia and provide important insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:24853937

  12. Genetic and Functional Sequence Variants of the SIRT3 Gene Promoter in Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiaoyun; Pang, Shuchao; Huang, Jian; Cui, Yinghua; Yan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD), including myocardial infarction (MI), is a common complex disease that is caused by atherosclerosis. Although a large number of genetic variants have been associated with CAD, only 10% of CAD cases could be explained. It has been proposed that low frequent and rare genetic variants may be main causes for CAD. SIRT3, a mitochondrial deacetylase, plays important roles in mitochondrial function and metabolism. Lack of SIRT3 in experimental animal leads to several age-related diseases, including cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, SIRT3 gene variants may contribute to the MI development. In this study, SIRT3 gene promoter was genetically and functionally analyzed in large cohorts of MI patients (n = 319) and ethnic-matched controls (n = 322). Total twenty-three DNA sequence variants (DSVs) were identified, including 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Six novel heterozygous DSVs, g.237307A>G, g.237270G>A, g.237023_25del, g.236653C>A, g.236628G>C, g.236557T>C, and two SNPs g.237030C>T (rs12293349) and g.237022C>G (rs369344513), were identified in nine MI patients, but in none of controls. Three SNPs, g.236473C>T (rs11246029), g.236380_81ins (rs71019893) and g.236370C>G (rs185277566), were more significantly frequent in MI patients than controls (P<0.05). These DSVs and SNPs, except g.236557T>C, significantly decreased the transcriptional activity of the SIRT3 gene promoter in cultured HEK-293 cells and H9c2 cells. Therefore, these DSVs identified in MI patients may change SIRT3 level by affecting the transcriptional activity of SIRT3 gene promoter, contributing to the MI development as a risk factor. PMID:27078640

  13. Type II Transmembrane Serine Protease Gene Variants Associate with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luostari, Kaisa; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Tengström, Maria; Palvimo, Jorma J.; Kataja, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) are related to tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis in cancer. Genetic variants in these genes may alter their function, leading to cancer onset and progression, and affect patient outcome. Here, 464 breast cancer cases and 370 controls were genotyped for 82 single-nucleotide polymorphisms covering eight genes. Association of the genotypes was estimated against breast cancer risk, breast cancer–specific survival, and survival in different treatment groups, and clinicopathological variables. SNPs in TMPRSS3 (rs3814903 and rs11203200), TMPRSS7 (rs1844925), and HGF (rs5745752) associated significantly with breast cancer risk (Ptrend = 0.008–0.042). SNPs in TMPRSS1 (rs12151195 and rs12461158), TMPRSS2 (rs2276205), TMPRSS3 (rs3814903), and TMPRSS7 (rs2399403) associated with prognosis (P = 0.004–0.046). When estimating the combined effect of the variants, the risk of breast cancer was higher with 4–5 alleles present compared to 0–2 alleles (P = 0.0001; OR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.39–3.94). Women with 6–8 survival-associating alleles had a 3.3 times higher risk of dying of breast cancer compared to women with 1–3 alleles (P = 0.001; HR, 3.30; 95% CI, 1.58–6.88). The results demonstrate the combined effect of variants in TTSPs and their related genes in breast cancer risk and patient outcome. Functional analysis of these variants will lead to further understanding of this gene family, which may improve individualized risk estimation and development of new strategies for treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25029565

  14. Melanocortin-1 receptor gene variants determine the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer independently of fair skin and red hair.

    PubMed

    Bastiaens, M T; ter Huurne, J A; Kielich, C; Gruis, N A; Westendorp, R G; Vermeer, B J; Bavinck, J N

    2001-04-01

    Melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene variants are associated with fair skin and red hair and, independently of these, with cutaneous malignant melanoma. The association of MC1R gene variants with nonmelanoma skin cancer is largely unknown. A total of 838 subjects were included in the present study: 453 patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer and 385 subjects with no skin cancer. The coding sequence of the human MC1R gene was tested using single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis followed by sequencing of unknown variants. Risk of skin cancer dependent on the various MC1R gene variants was estimated using the exposure odds ratio. We investigated whether subjects with MC1R variant alleles were at increased risk of developing nonmelanoma skin cancer and, if so, whether this increased risk was mediated by fair skin and red hair. A total of 27 MC1R gene variants were found. The number of carriers of one, two, or three MC1R gene variants was 379 (45.2%), 208 (24.8%), and 7 (0.9%), respectively. A strong association between MC1R gene variants and fair skin and red hair was established, especially the variants Arg151Cys and Arg160Trp (P < .0001). Carriers of two variant alleles were at increased risk for developing cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (odds ratio 3.77; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.11-6.78), nodular basal cell carcinoma (odds ratio 2.26; 95% CI 1.45-3.52), and superficial multifocal basal cell carcinoma (odds ratio 3.43; 95% CI 1.92-6.15), compared with carriers of two wild-type alleles. Carriers of one variant allele had half the risk. The highest relative risks of nonmelanoma skin cancer were found in carriers of the Asp84Glu, His260Pro, and Asp294His variant alleles, and the risk was only slightly lower for carriers of the Val60Leu, Val92Met, Arg142His, Arg151Cys, and Arg160Trp variant alleles. When subjects were stratified by skin type and hair color, analysis showed that these factors did not materially change the relative risks. These findings

  15. A novel variant of the putative demethylase gene, s-JMJD1C, is a coactivator of the AR.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Siegmund S; Patchev, Vladimir K; Obendorf, Maik

    2007-04-01

    Evidence is accumulating in support of the view that tissue-specific effects of steroid hormones depend on the recruitment of nuclear receptor comodulator proteins. The latter interact directly with the hormone receptors and modify their transcriptional effects on specific target genes. The mechanisms of comodulator influence on nuclear receptor-controlled gene transcription is only partially understood. Here, we describe the discovery of a new AR coactivator which belongs to the JmjC containing enzyme family as a novel variant of JMJD1C (jumonji domain-containing 1C). By using a fragment of the human AR (aa 325-919) as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen, a region of the human JMJD1C gene was identified as interacting with AR. A novel splice variant s-JMJD1C was amplified by RACE, and the binding to AR was analysed by GST-pull-down and mammalian one-hybrid experiments. As a nuclear-localized protein, the s-JMJD1C gene is expressed in a variety of human tissues. In the brain, this protein is present in several, but not confined to, AR-expressing neuronal populations and its abundance varies with the hormonal status in a region-specific fashion. Interestingly, the expression of s-JMJD1C is reduced in breast cancer tumors and significantly higher in normal breast tissues indicating a putative role in tumor suppression. As s-JMJD1C has putative demethylase activity, removal of methylation seems to be important for nuclear receptor-based gene regulation.

  16. Adenosine A(2A) receptor gene (ADORA2A) variants may increase autistic symptoms and anxiety in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Christine M; Agelopoulos, Konstantin; Huy, Ellen; Rothermundt, Matthias; Krakowitzky, Petra; Meyer, Jobst; Deckert, Jürgen; von Gontard, Alexander; Hohoff, Christa

    2010-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are heterogeneous disorders presenting with increased rates of anxiety. The adenosine A(2A) receptor gene (ADORA2A) is associated with panic disorder and is located on chromosome 22q11.23. Its gene product, the adenosine A(2A) receptor, is strongly expressed in the caudate nucleus, which also is involved in ASD. As autistic symptoms are increased in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and large 22q11.2 deletions and duplications have been observed in ASD individuals, in this study, 98 individuals with ASD and 234 control individuals were genotyped for eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms in ADORA2A. Nominal association with the disorder was observed for rs2236624-CC, and phenotypic variability in ASD symptoms was influenced by rs3761422, rs5751876 and rs35320474. In addition, association of ADORA2A variants with anxiety was replicated for individuals with ASD. Findings point toward a possible mediating role of ADORA2A variants on phenotypic expression in ASD that need to be replicated in a larger sample.

  17. Association of vitamin D receptor gene variants with polycystic ovary syndrome: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Touraj; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Farahani, Hamid; Mirakhorli, Mojgan; Dabiri, Reza; Nobakht, Hossein; Asadi, Asadollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D and insulin play an important role in susceptibility to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and therefore vitamin D receptor (VDR), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and insulin receptor (INSR) gene variants might be involved in the pathogenesis of PCOS. Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the possible associations between polymorphisms in VDR, PTH, and INSR genes and the risk of PCOS. Materials and Methods: VDR, PTH, and INSR gene variants were genotyped in 35 women with PCOS and 35 controls using Polymerase chain reaction – Restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Furthermore, serum levels of glucose and insulin were measured in all participants. Results: No significant differences were observed for the VDR FokI, VDR Tru9I, VDR TaqI, PTH DraII, INSR NsiI, and INSR PmlI gene polymorphisms between the women with PCOS and controls. However, after adjustment for confounding factors, the VDR BsmI “Bb” genotype and the VDR ApaI "Aa" genotype were significantly under transmitted to the patients (p= 0.016; OR= 0.250; 95% CI= 0.081-0.769, and p= 0.017; OR= 0.260; 95% CI= 0.086-0.788, respectively). Furthermore, in the women with PCOS, insulin levels were lower in the participants with the INSR NsiI "NN" genotype compared with those with the "Nn + nn" genotypes (P= 0.045). Conclusion: The results showed an association between the VDR gene BsmI and ApaI polymorphisms and PCOS risk. These data also indicated that the INSR "NN" genotype was a marker of decreased insulin in women with PCOS. Our findings, however, do not lend support to the hypothesis that PTH gene DraII variant plays a role in susceptibility to PCOS. PMID:27141540

  18. The spread of alphabetical writing may have favored the latest variant of the ASPM gene.

    PubMed

    Frost, Peter

    2008-01-01

    ASPM, a gene that regulates brain growth, has evolved considerably in the primate lineage that leads to humans. It continued to evolve even after the emergence of modern humans, with the latest ASPM variant arising about 6000 years ago somewhere in the Middle East. The new variant then proliferated within and outside this region, reaching higher incidences in the Middle East (37-52%) and in Europe (38-50%) than in East Asia (0-25%). Despite its apparent selective advantage, this variant does not seem to improve cognitive performance, at least not on standard IQ tests. At present, we can only say that it probably assists performance on a task that exhibited the same geographic expansion from a Middle Eastern origin roughly 6000 years ago. The closest match seems to be the invention of alphabetical writing, specifically the task of transcribing speech and copying texts into alphabetical script. Though more easily learned than ideographs, alphabetical characters place higher demands on mental processing, especially under premodern conditions (continuous text with little or no punctuation, real-time stenography, absence of automated assistance for publishing or copying, etc.). This task was largely delegated to scribes of various sorts who enjoyed privileged status and probably superior reproductive success. Such individuals may have served as vectors for spreading the new ASPM variant.

  19. Different outcome of six homozygotes for prothrombin A20210A gene variant

    PubMed Central

    Di Micco, Pierpaolo; Di Fiore, Rosanna; Niglio, Alferio; Quaranta, Sandro; Angiolillo, Antonella; Cardillo, Giuseppe; Castaldo, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Prothrombin G20210A gene variant (FII G20210A) is a risk factor for venous thrombotic disease while conflicting results have been reported for the risk of arterial thrombotic events. However, vascular episodes were absent in up to 40% of the 67 homozygotes for the G20210A described so far, which indicates that the clinical expression depends on additional risk/trigger factors. We describe six homozygotes for the G20210A variant, among which the first pair of siblings (cases n. 3 and 4) reported so far that displayed a strongly heterogeneous clinical outcome. Case 1, a female of 27 years, developed a full thrombosis of common femoral, superficial and popliteal veins. She assumed oral contraceptives in the last two years. Case n. 2, 34 years old, suffered of recurrent pregnancy loss in absence of any causative alteration. Cases n. 3 and n. 5 experienced arterial thrombotic disease, i.e., juvenile myocardial infarction (40 years old) and stroke (48 years old), respectively, in absence of other risk factors. Finally, cases n. 4 and 6 identified as homozygotes for the FII G20210A variant being consanguineous of symptomatic subjects bearing the variant, did not experience any episode of venous nor arterial disease. Both of them have chronic liver disease with an impairement of the prothrombin time INR. Thus, homozygotes for the G20210A are at risk for arterial (in addition to venous) thromobotic events; chronic liver disease might modulate this risk. PMID:18627609

  20. Sex-dependent association of common variants of microcephaly genes with brain structure.

    PubMed

    Rimol, Lars M; Agartz, Ingrid; Djurovic, Srdjan; Brown, Andrew A; Roddey, J Cooper; Kähler, Anna K; Mattingsdal, Morten; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Joyner, Alexander H; Schork, Nicholas J; Halgren, Eric; Sundet, Kjetil; Melle, Ingrid; Dale, Anders M; Andreassen, Ole A

    2010-01-05

    Loss-of-function mutations in the genes associated with primary microcephaly (MCPH) reduce human brain size by about two-thirds, without producing gross abnormalities in brain organization or physiology and leaving other organs largely unaffected [Woods CG, et al. (2005) Am J Hum Genet 76:717-728]. There is also evidence suggesting that MCPH genes have evolved rapidly in primates and humans and have been subjected to selection in recent human evolution [Vallender EJ, et al. (2008) Trends Neurosci 31:637-644]. Here, we show that common variants of MCPH genes account for some of the common variation in brain structure in humans, independently of disease status. We investigated the correlations of SNPs from four MCPH genes with brain morphometry phenotypes obtained with MRI. We found significant, sex-specific associations between common, nonexonic, SNPs of the genes CDK5RAP2, MCPH1, and ASPM, with brain volume or cortical surface area in an ethnically homogenous Norwegian discovery sample (n = 287), including patients with mental illness. The most strongly associated SNP findings were replicated in an independent North American sample (n = 656), which included patients with dementia. These results are consistent with the view that common variation in brain structure is associated with genetic variants located in nonexonic, presumably regulatory, regions.

  1. Catecholaminergic gene variants: contribution in ADHD and associated comorbid attributes in the eastern Indian probands.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Paramita; Sarkar, Kanyakumarika; Bhaduri, Nipa; Ray, Anirban; Sarkar, Keka; Sinha, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Kanchan

    2013-01-01

    Contribution of genes in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been explored in various populations, and several genes were speculated to contribute small but additive effects. We have assessed variants in four genes, DDC (rs3837091 and rs3735273), DRD2 (rs1800496, rs1801028, and rs1799732), DRD4 (rs4646984 and rs4646983), and COMT (rs165599 and rs740603) in Indian ADHD subjects with comorbid attributes. Cases were recruited following the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-IV-TR after obtaining informed written consent. DNA isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes of ADHD probands (N = 170), their parents (N = 310), and ethnically matched controls (n = 180) was used for genotyping followed by population- and family-based analyses by the UNPHASED program. DRD4 sites showed significant difference in allelic frequencies by case-control analysis, while DDC and COMT exhibited bias in familial transmission (P < 0.05). rs3837091 "AGAG," rs3735273 "A," rs1799732 "C," rs740603 "G," rs165599 "G" and single repeat alleles of rs4646984/rs4646983 showed positive correlation with co-morbid characteristics (P < 0.05). Multi dimensionality reduction analysis of case-control data revealed significant interactive effects of all four genes (P < 0.001), while family-based data showed interaction between DDC and DRD2 (P = 0.04). This first study on these gene variants in Indo-Caucasoid ADHD probands and associated co-morbid conditions indicates altered dopaminergic neurotransmission in ADHD.

  2. Novel and functional ATG12 gene variants in sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuequn; Huang, Jian; Pang, Shuchao; Wang, Haihua; Zhang, Aimei; Hawley, Robert G; Yan, Bo

    2017-03-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common and progressive neurodegenerative disease, including familial and sporadic cases. To date, genetic causes for sporadic PD, majority of PD cases, remain largely unknown. Accumulating evidence indicates that dysfunctional autophagy, a highly conserved cellular process, is involved in the PD pathogenesis. We speculated that changed expression levels of autophagy-related genes (ATG) may contribute to PD development. Previously, we have genetically analyzed ATG5 and ATG7 genes in sporadic PD patients and identified several functional DNA sequence variants (DSVs). In groups of sporadic PD patients and ethic-matched healthy controls in this study, we further genetically and functionally analyzed the promoter of ATG12, a critical gene for autophagososme formation. The results showed that three DNA sequence variants (DSVs), g.115842507G>T,g.115842394C>T and g.115841817_18del, were identified three PD patients, which significantly altered transcriptional activity of ATG12 gene promoter, probably due to abolishing or creating binding sites for transcription factors. The transcriptional activity of ATG12 gene promoter was not significantly affected by other two DSVs identified in PD patients, g.115842640A>C and g.115842242G>C, which may not alter binding sites for transcription factors. Therefore, these three functional DSVs identified in PD patient may change ATG12 protein levels, contributing to PD development as a risk factor by interfering with autophagy as well as non-autophagy functions.

  3. A genome-wide survey of CD4+ lymphocyte regulatory genetic variants identifies novel asthma genes

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunita; Zhou, Xiaobo; Thibault, Derek M.; Himes, Blanca E.; Liu, Andy; Szefler, Stanley J.; Strunk, Robert; Castro, Mario; Hansel, Nadia N.; Diette, Gregory B.; Vonakis, Becky M.; Adkinson, N. Franklin; Avila, Lydiana; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Barraza-Villareal, Albino; Lemanske, Robert F.; Solway, Julian; Krishnan, Jerry; White, Steven R.; Cheadle, Chris; Berger, Alan E.; Fan, Jinshui; Boorgula, Meher Preethi; Nicolae, Dan; Gilliland, Frank; Barnes, Kathleen; London, Stephanie J.; Martinez, Fernando; Ober, Carole; Celedón, Juan C.; Carey, Vincent J.; Weiss, Scott T.; Raby, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies have yet to identify the majority of genetic variants involved in asthma. We hypothesized that expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping can identify novel asthma genes by enabling prioritization of putative functional variants for association testing. Objective We evaluated 6,706 cis-acting expression-associated variants (eSNP) identified through a genome-wide eQTL survey of CD4+ lymphocytes for association with asthma. Methods eSNP were tested for association with asthma in 359 asthma cases and 846 controls from the Childhood Asthma Management Program, with verification using family-based testing. Significant associations were tested for replication in 579 parent-child trios with asthma from Costa Rica. Further functional validation was performed by Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements (FAIRE)-qPCR and Chromatin-Immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-PCR in lung derived epithelial cell lines (Beas-2B and A549) and Jurkat cells, a leukemia cell line derived from T lymphocytes. Results Cis-acting eSNP demonstrated associations with asthma in both cohorts. We confirmed the previously-reported association of ORMDL3/GSDMB variants with asthma (combined p=2.9 × 108). Reproducible associations were also observed for eSNP in three additional genes: FADS2 (p=0.002), NAGA (p=0.0002), and F13A1 (p=0.0001). We subsequently demonstrated that FADS2 mRNA is increased in CD4+ lymphocytes in asthmatics, and that the associated eSNPs reside within DNA segments with histone modifications that denote open chromatin status and confer enhancer activity. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the utility of eQTL mapping in the identification of novel asthma genes, and provide evidence for the importance of FADS2, NAGA, and F13A1 in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:24934276

  4. Role and diagnostic value of gene variants in assessing the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Yan, Z P; Tong, X; Liu, S T; Ma, Y; Peng, S F; Yang, X; Fan, H

    2016-05-13

    Meta-analyses have revealed many positive associations between gene variants and susceptibility to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, some of those positive results may be false positives. Therefore, we investigated the genetic polymorphisms associated with COPD risk and determined their diagnostic value. We extracted the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval for each polymorphism from published meta-analyses concerning gene variants and COPD susceptibility in October 2014, subsequently we calculated false-positive report probabilities (FPRPs) for statistically significant associations (P value < 0.05). We determined the diagnostic value of the true positive polymorphisms of COPD using the Meta-DiSc software. Twenty-five gene polymorphisms were significantly associated with COPD risk. The FPRP test results were as follows: 1) when the prior probability was 0.001 and the OR was 1.5, ADAM33 rs612709, CHRNA3/5 rs1051730, CHRNA3/5 rs8034191, CHRNA3/5 rs16969968, and TGFB1 rs1800470 were truly associated with COPD risk (FPRP < 0.2); 2) when the prior probability was 0.000001 and the OR was 1.5, all the variants except TGFB1 rs1800470 remained noteworthy; and 3) when the probability was 0.000001 and the OR was 1.2, ADAM33 rs612709 and CHRNA3/5 rs1051730 remained true positives. Unfortunately, the results of the diagnostic accuracy meta-analyses suggested that none of the variants had high value for COPD diagnosis.

  5. Genetic variants alter T-bet binding and gene expression in mucosal inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Soderquest, Katrina; Hertweck, Arnulf; Mohamed, Rami; Goldberg, Rimma; Perucha, Esperanza; Franke, Lude; Herrero, Javier; Lord, Graham M.

    2017-01-01

    The polarization of CD4+ T cells into distinct T helper cell lineages is essential for protective immunity against infection, but aberrant T cell polarization can cause autoimmunity. The transcription factor T-bet (TBX21) specifies the Th1 lineage and represses alternative T cell fates. Genome-wide association studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that may be causative for autoimmune diseases. The majority of these polymorphisms are located within non-coding distal regulatory elements. It is considered that these genetic variants contribute to disease by altering the binding of regulatory proteins and thus gene expression, but whether these variants alter the binding of lineage-specifying transcription factors has not been determined. Here, we show that SNPs associated with the mucosal inflammatory diseases Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis (UC) and celiac disease, but not rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis, are enriched at T-bet binding sites. Furthermore, we identify disease-associated variants that alter T-bet binding in vitro and in vivo. ChIP-seq for T-bet in individuals heterozygous for the celiac disease-associated SNPs rs1465321 and rs2058622 and the IBD-associated SNPs rs1551398 and rs1551399, reveals decreased binding to the minor disease-associated alleles. Furthermore, we show that rs1465321 is an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) for the neighboring gene IL18RAP, with decreased T-bet binding associated with decreased expression of this gene. These results suggest that genetic polymorphisms may predispose individuals to mucosal autoimmune disease through alterations in T-bet binding. Other disease-associated variants may similarly act by modulating the binding of lineage-specifying transcription factors in a tissue-selective and disease-specific manner. PMID:28187197

  6. Acromegaly Is More Severe in Patients With AHR or AIP Gene Variants Living in Highly Polluted Areas.

    PubMed

    Cannavo, S; Ragonese, M; Puglisi, S; Romeo, P D; Torre, M L; Alibrandi, A; Scaroni, C; Occhi, G; Ceccato, F; Regazzo, D; De Menis, E; Sartorato, P; Arnaldi, G; Trementino, L; Trimarchi, F; Ferrau, F

    2016-04-01

    In this multicentric study, we aimed to correlate the occurrence of AHR and/or AIP. genes variants in acromegalic patients with the disease severity and/or with the response to somatostatin analogs (SSa) treatment, according to pollution exposition.

  7. Mutation Spectrum of the ABCA4 Gene in 335 Stargardt Disease Patients From a Multicenter German Cohort—Impact of Selected Deep Intronic Variants and Common SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Heidi L.; Grassmann, Felix; Kellner, Ulrich; Spital, Georg; Rüther, Klaus; Jägle, Herbert; Hufendiek, Karsten; Rating, Philipp; Huchzermeyer, Cord; Baier, Maria J.; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Stöhr, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Stargardt disease (STGD1) is an autosomal recessive retinopathy, caused by mutations in the retina-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCA4) gene. To establish the mutational spectrum and to assess effects of selected deep intronic and common genetic variants on disease, we performed a comprehensive sequence analysis in a large cohort of German STGD1 patients. Methods DNA samples of 335 STGD1 patients were analyzed for ABCA4 mutations in its 50 coding exons and adjacent intronic sequences by resequencing array technology or next generation sequencing (NGS). Parts of intron 30 and 36 were screened by Sanger chain-terminating dideoxynucleotide sequencing. An in vitro splicing assay was used to test selected variants for their splicing behavior. By logistic regression analysis we assessed the association of common ABCA4 alleles while a multivariate logistic regression model calculated a genetic risk score (GRS). Results Our analysis identified 148 pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations, of which 48 constitute so far unpublished ABCA4-associated disease alleles. Four rare deep intronic variants were found once in 472 alleles analyzed. In addition, we identified six risk-modulating common variants. Genetic risk score estimates suggest that defined common ABCA4 variants influence disease risk in carriers of a single pathogenic ABCA4 allele. Conclusions Our study adds to the mutational spectrum of the ABCA4 gene. Moreover, in our cohort, deep intronic variants in intron 30 and 36 likely play no or only a minor role in disease pathology. Of note, our findings demonstrate a possible modifying effect of common sequence variants on ABCA4-associated disease. PMID:28118664

  8. Co-stimulatory CD28 and transcription factor NFKB1 gene variants affect idiopathic recurrent miscarriages.

    PubMed

    Misra, Maneesh Kumar; Singh, Bharti; Mishra, Aditi; Agrawal, Suraksha

    2016-12-01

    Co-stimulatory CD28 and transcription factor NFKB1 genes are considered as a crucial player in the determination of inflammatory responses; genetic variability in these may modulate the risk for idiopathic recurrent miscarriages (IRM). We investigated the association of functional variants of CD28 (rs3116496 T/C) and NFKB1 (rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G) with IRM cases. We recruited 200 IRM women with a history of at least three consecutive pregnancy losses before 20th week of pregnancy and 300 fertile control women. Determination of CD28 (rs3116496 T/C) and NFKB1 (rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G) gene variants were based on the polymerase chain reaction pursued by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and validated with Sanger sequencing. Single marker analysis and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) model used to predict the IRM risk. We observed nearly three- to twofold increased risk in single marker analysis for minor homozygous genotypes of rs3116496 T/C, rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G tag-SNPs in IRM cases, suggesting the risk association. In MDR analysis, we observed 10.5-fold augmented risk among IRM women in three-SNP model (rs3116496 T/C, rs28362491 ins/del and rs696 A/G). The eQTL mapping analyses was performed to strengthen the results of our study. The eQTL mapping analysis revealed that the variations in CD28 and NFKB1 gene content might affect the abundance of transcripts of CD28 and Family with sequence similarity 177 member A1 (FAM177A1) genes, respectively. These results suggest that CD28 and NFKB1 gene variants may be associated with increased risks to IRM.

  9. Novel gene-by-environment interactions: APOB and NPC1L1 variants affect the relationship between dietary and total plasma cholesterol[S

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel S.; Burt, Amber A.; Ranchalis, Jane E.; Jarvik, Ella R.; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A.; Hatsukami, Thomas S.; Furlong, Clement E.; Jarvik, Gail P.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in developed countries. Plasma cholesterol level is a key risk factor in CVD pathogenesis. Genetic and dietary variation both influence plasma cholesterol; however, little is known about dietary interactions with genetic variants influencing the absorption and transport of dietary cholesterol. We sought to determine whether gut expressed variants predicting plasma cholesterol differentially affected the relationship between dietary and plasma cholesterol levels in 1,128 subjects (772/356 in the discovery/replication cohorts, respectively). Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within three genes (APOB, CETP, and NPC1L1) were significantly associated with plasma cholesterol in the discovery cohort. These were subsequently evaluated for gene-by-environment (GxE) interactions with dietary cholesterol for the prediction of plasma cholesterol, with significant findings tested for replication. Novel GxE interactions were identified and replicated for two variants: rs1042034, an APOB Ser4338Asn missense SNP and rs2072183 (in males only), a synonymous NPC1L1 SNP in linkage disequilibrium with SNPs 5′ of NPC1L1. This study identifies the presence of novel GxE and gender interactions implying that differential gut absorption is the basis for the variant associations with plasma cholesterol. These GxE interactions may account for part of the “missing heritability” not accounted for by genetic associations. PMID:23482652

  10. Future Trends in the Pharmacogenomics of Brain Disorders and Dementia: Influence of APOE and CYP2D6 Variants

    PubMed Central

    Cacabelos, Ramón; Fernández-Novoa, Lucía; Martínez-Bouza, Rocío; McKay, Adam; Carril, Juan C.; Lombardi, Valter; Corzo, Lola; Carrera, Iván; Tellado, Iván; Nebril, Laura; Alcaraz, Margarita; Rodríguez, Susana; Casas, Ángela; Couceiro, Verónica; Álvarez, Antón

    2010-01-01

    About 80% of functional genes in the human genome are expressed in the brain and over 1,200 different genes have been associated with the pathogenesis of CNS disorders and dementia. Pharmacogenetic studies of psychotropic drug response have focused on determining the relationship between variations in specific candidate genes and the positive and adverse effects of drug treatment. Approximately, 18% of neuroleptics are substrates of CYP1A2 enzymes, 40% of CYP2D6, and 23% of CYP3A4; 24% of antidepressants are substrates of CYP1A2 enzymes, 5% of CYP2B6, 38% of CYP2C19, 85% of CYP2D6, and 38% of CYP3A4; 7% of benzodiazepines are substrates of CYP2C19 enzymes, 20% of CYP2D6, and 95% of CYP3A4. 10-20% of Western populations are defective in genes of the CYP superfamily; and the pharmacogenomic response of psychotropic drugs also depends on genetic variants associated with dementia. Prospective studies with anti-dementia drugs or with multifactorial strategies have revealed that the therapeutic response to conventional drugs in Alzheimer’s disease is genotype-specific. The disease-modifying effects (cognitive performance, biomarker modification) of therapeutic intervention are APOE-dependent, with APOE-4 carriers acting as the worst responders (APOE-3/3 > APOE-3/4 > APOE-4/4). APOE-CYP2D6 interactions also influence the therapeutic outcome in patients with dementia.

  11. The type of variants at the COL3A1 gene associates with the phenotype and severity of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Frank, Michael; Albuisson, Juliette; Ranque, Brigitte; Golmard, Lisa; Mazzella, Jean-Michael; Bal-Theoleyre, Laurence; Fauret, Anne-Laure; Mirault, Tristan; Denarié, Nicolas; Mousseaux, Elie; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Fiessinger, Jean-Noël; Emmerich, Joseph; Messas, Emmanuel; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is a rare and severe autosomal dominant disorder caused by variants at the COL3A1 gene. Clinical characteristics and course of disease of 215 molecularly proven patients (146 index cases and 69 relatives) were analysed. We found 126 distincts variants that were divided into five groups: (1) Glycine substitutions (n=71), (2) splice-site and in-frame insertions-deletions (n=36), (3) variants leading to haplo-insufficiency (n=7), (4) non-glycine missense variants within the triple helix (n=4 variants), and (5) non-glycine missense variants or in-frame insertions-deletions, in the N- or C-terminal part of the protein (n=8). Overall, our cohort confirmed the severity of the disease with a median age at first complication of 29 years (IQR 22-39), the most frequent being arterial (48%) and digestive (24%) ruptures. Groups 2 and 1 were significantly more severe than groups 3-5, with extreme median ages at first major complication of 23-47 years. Patients of groups 3-5 had a less typical phenotype and remarkably absence of digestive events. The distribution of glycine-replacing amino acids was strongly biased towards more destabilizing residues of the collagen assembly. Thus the natural course of vEDS and the clinical phenotype of patients are influenced by the type of COL3A1 variant. This study also confirms that patients with variants located in the C- and N-termini or leading to haplo-insufficiency have milder course of the disease and less prevalent diagnostic criteria. These findings may help refine diagnostic strategy, genetic counselling and clinical care.

  12. The type of variants at the COL3A1 gene associates with the phenotype and severity of vascular Ehlers–Danlos syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Michael; Albuisson, Juliette; Ranque, Brigitte; Golmard, Lisa; Mazzella, Jean-Michael; Bal-Theoleyre, Laurence; Fauret, Anne-Laure; Mirault, Tristan; Denarié, Nicolas; Mousseaux, Elie; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Fiessinger, Jean-Noël; Emmerich, Joseph; Messas, Emmanuel; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Vascular Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is a rare and severe autosomal dominant disorder caused by variants at the COL3A1 gene. Clinical characteristics and course of disease of 215 molecularly proven patients (146 index cases and 69 relatives) were analysed. We found 126 distincts variants that were divided into five groups: (1) Glycine substitutions (n=71), (2) splice-site and in-frame insertions–deletions (n=36), (3) variants leading to haplo-insufficiency (n=7), (4) non-glycine missense variants within the triple helix (n=4 variants), and (5) non-glycine missense variants or in-frame insertions–deletions, in the N- or C-terminal part of the protein (n=8). Overall, our cohort confirmed the severity of the disease with a median age at first complication of 29 years (IQR 22–39), the most frequent being arterial (48%) and digestive (24%) ruptures. Groups 2 and 1 were significantly more severe than groups 3–5, with extreme median ages at first major complication of 23–47 years. Patients of groups 3–5 had a less typical phenotype and remarkably absence of digestive events. The distribution of glycine-replacing amino acids was strongly biased towards more destabilizing residues of the collagen assembly. Thus the natural course of vEDS and the clinical phenotype of patients are influenced by the type of COL3A1 variant. This study also confirms that patients with variants located in the C- and N-termini or leading to haplo-insufficiency have milder course of the disease and less prevalent diagnostic criteria. These findings may help refine diagnostic strategy, genetic counselling and clinical care. PMID:25758994

  13. Rare missense neuronal cadherin gene (CDH2) variants in specific obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette disorder phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Moya, Pablo R; Dodman, Nicholas H; Timpano, Kiara R; Rubenstein, Liza M; Rana, Zaker; Fried, Ruby L; Reichardt, Louis F; Heiman, Gary A; Tischfield, Jay A; King, Robert A; Galdzicka, Marzena; Ginns, Edward I; Wendland, Jens R

    2013-08-01

    The recent finding that the neuronal cadherin gene CDH2 confers a highly significant risk for canine compulsive disorder led us to investigate whether missense variants within the human ortholog CDH2 are associated with altered susceptibility to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Tourette disorder (TD) and related disorders. Exon resequencing of CDH2 in 320 individuals identified four non-synonymous single-nucleotide variants, which were subsequently genotyped in OCD probands, Tourette disorder probands and relatives, and healthy controls (total N=1161). None of the four variants was significantly associated with either OCD or TD. One variant, N706S, was found only in the OCD/TD groups, but not in controls. By examining clinical data, we found there were significant TD-related phenotype differences between those OCD probands with and without the N845S variant with regard to the co-occurrence of TD (Fisher's exact test P=0.014, OR=6.03). Both N706S and N845S variants conferred reduced CDH2 protein expression in transfected cells. Although our data provide no overall support for association of CDH2 rare variants in these disorders considered as single entities, the clinical features and severity of probands carrying the uncommon non-synonymous variants suggest that CDH2, along with other cadherin and cell adhesion genes, is an interesting gene to pursue as a plausible contributor to OCD, TD and related disorders with repetitive behaviors, including autism spectrum disorders.

  14. Missense variants in AIMP1 gene are implicated in autosomal recessive intellectual disability without neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Zafar; Püttmann, Lucia; Musante, Luciana; Razzaq, Attia; Zahoor, Muhammad Yasir; Hu, Hao; Wienker, Thomas F; Garshasbi, Masoud; Fattahi, Zohreh; Gilissen, Christian; Vissers, Lisenka ELM; de Brouwer, Arjan PM; Veltman, Joris A; Pfundt, Rolph; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Kahrizi, Kimia; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2016-01-01

    AIMP1/p43 is a multifunctional non-catalytic component of the multisynthetase complex. The complex consists of nine catalytic and three non-catalytic proteins, which catalyze the ligation of amino acids to their cognate tRNA isoacceptors for use in protein translation. To date, two allelic variants in the AIMP1 gene have been reported as the underlying cause of autosomal recessive primary neurodegenerative disorder. Here, we present two consanguineous families from Pakistan and Iran, presenting with moderate to severe intellectual disability, global developmental delay, and speech impairment without neurodegeneration. By the combination of homozygosity mapping and next generation sequencing, we identified two homozygous missense variants, p.(Gly299Arg) and p.(Val176Gly), in the gene AIMP1 that co-segregated with the phenotype in the respective families. Molecular modeling of the variants revealed deleterious effects on the protein structure that are predicted to result in reduced AIMP1 function. Our findings indicate that the clinical spectrum for AIMP1 defects is broader than witnessed so far. PMID:26173967

  15. Rare missense variants within a single gene form yin yang haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Curtis, David

    2016-01-01

    Yin yang haplotype pairs differ at every SNP. They would not be accounted for by population models that incorporate sequential mutation, with or without recombination. Previous reports have claimed that there is a tendency for common SNPs to form yin yang haplotypes more often than would be expected by sequential mutation or by a random sample of all possible haplotypic arrangements of alleles. In the course of analysing next-generation sequencing data, instances of yin yang haplotypes being formed by very rare variants within a single gene were observed. As an example, this report describes a completely yin yang haplotype formed by eight rare missense variants in the ABCA13 gene. Of 1000 genome subjects, 21 have a copy of the alternate allele at all eight of these positions and a single subject is homozygous for all of them. None of the other 1070 subjects possesses any of the altetrnates. Thus, the eight alternate alleles are always found together and never occur separately. The existence of such yin yang haplotypes has important implications for statistical methods for analysing rare variants. Also, they may be of use for gaining a better understanding of the history of human populations.

  16. Missense variants in AIMP1 gene are implicated in autosomal recessive intellectual disability without neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zafar; Püttmann, Lucia; Musante, Luciana; Razzaq, Attia; Zahoor, Muhammad Yasir; Hu, Hao; Wienker, Thomas F; Garshasbi, Masoud; Fattahi, Zohreh; Gilissen, Christian; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Veltman, Joris A; Pfundt, Rolph; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Kahrizi, Kimia; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2016-03-01

    AIMP1/p43 is a multifunctional non-catalytic component of the multisynthetase complex. The complex consists of nine catalytic and three non-catalytic proteins, which catalyze the ligation of amino acids to their cognate tRNA isoacceptors for use in protein translation. To date, two allelic variants in the AIMP1 gene have been reported as the underlying cause of autosomal recessive primary neurodegenerative disorder. Here, we present two consanguineous families from Pakistan and Iran, presenting with moderate to severe intellectual disability, global developmental delay, and speech impairment without neurodegeneration. By the combination of homozygosity mapping and next generation sequencing, we identified two homozygous missense variants, p.(Gly299Arg) and p.(Val176Gly), in the gene AIMP1 that co-segregated with the phenotype in the respective families. Molecular modeling of the variants revealed deleterious effects on the protein structure that are predicted to result in reduced AIMP1 function. Our findings indicate that the clinical spectrum for AIMP1 defects is broader than witnessed so far.

  17. Identification of a new hereditary amyloidosis prealbumin variant, Tyr-77, and detection of the gene by DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, M R; Dwulet, F E; Williams, E C; Conneally, P M; Benson, M D

    1988-01-01

    In the last several years, five human plasma prealbumin (transthyretin) variants have been discovered in association with hereditary amyloidosis, a late-onset fatal disorder. We recently studied a patient of German descent with peripheral neuropathy and bowel dysfunction. Biopsied rectal tissue contained amyloid that stained with anti-human prealbumin. Amino acid sequence analysis of the patient's plasma prealbumin revealed both normal and variant prealbumin molecules, with the variant containing a tyrosine at position 77 instead of serine. We predicted a single nucleotide change in codon 77 of the variant prealbumin gene, which we then detected in the patient's DNA using the restriction enzyme SspI and a specifically tailored genomic prealbumin probe. DNA tests of other family members identified several gene carriers. This is the sixth prealbumin variant implicated in amyloidosis, and adds to the accumulating evidence that the prealbumin amyloidoses are more varied and prevalent than previously thought. Images PMID:2891727

  18. Predicting the Pathogenic Potential of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Gene Variants Identified in Clinical Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Clare; Lai, Stella; Doherty, Elaine; Love, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Missense variants are very commonly detected when screening for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes lead to an increased risk of developing breast, ovarian, prostate and/or pancreatic cancer. This study aimed to assess the predictive capability of in silico programmes and mutation databases in assisting diagnostic laboratories to determine the pathogenicity of sequence-detectable mutations. Methods: Between July 2011 and April 2013, an analysis was undertaken of 13 missense BRCA gene variants that had been detected in patients referred to the Genetic Health Services New Zealand (Northern Hub) for BRCA gene analysis. The analysis involved the use of 13 in silico protein prediction programmes, two in silico transcript analysis programmes and the examination of three BRCA gene databases. Results: In most of the variants, the analysis showed different in silico interpretations. This illustrates the interpretation challenges faced by diagnostic laboratories. Conclusion: Unfortunately, when using online mutation databases and carrying out in silico analyses, there is significant discordance in the classification of some missense variants in the BRCA genes. This discordance leads to complexities in interpreting and reporting these variants in a clinical context. The authors have developed a simple procedure for analysing variants; however, those of unknown significance largely remain unknown. As a consequence, the clinical value of some reports may be negligible. PMID:26052455

  19. Gene and Network Analysis of Common Variants Reveals Novel Associations in Multiple Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nakka, Priyanka; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Ramachandran, Sohini

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies typically lack power to detect genotypes significantly associated with complex diseases, where different causal mutations of small effect may be present across cases. A common, tractable approach for identifying genomic elements associated with complex traits is to evaluate combinations of variants in known pathways or gene sets with shared biological function. Such gene-set analyses require the computation of gene-level P-values or gene scores; these gene scores are also useful when generating hypotheses for experimental validation. However, commonly used methods for generating GWA gene scores are computationally inefficient, biased by gene length, imprecise, or have low true positive rate (TPR) at low false positive rates (FPR), leading to erroneous hypotheses for functional validation. Here we introduce a new method, PEGASUS, for analytically calculating gene scores. PEGASUS produces gene scores with as much as 10 orders of magnitude higher numerical precision than competing methods. In simulation, PEGASUS outperforms existing methods, achieving up to 30% higher TPR when the FPR is fixed at 1%. We use gene scores from PEGASUS as input to HotNet2 to identify networks of interacting genes associated with multiple complex diseases and traits; this is the first application of HotNet2 to common variation. In ulcerative colitis and waist–hip ratio, we discover networks that include genes previously associated with these phenotypes, as well as novel candidate genes. In contrast, existing methods fail to identify these networks. We also identify networks for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, in which GWA studies have yet to identify any significant SNPs. PMID:27489002

  20. Gene and Network Analysis of Common Variants Reveals Novel Associations in Multiple Complex Diseases.

    PubMed

    Nakka, Priyanka; Raphael, Benjamin J; Ramachandran, Sohini

    2016-10-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies typically lack power to detect genotypes significantly associated with complex diseases, where different causal mutations of small effect may be present across cases. A common, tractable approach for identifying genomic elements associated with complex traits is to evaluate combinations of variants in known pathways or gene sets with shared biological function. Such gene-set analyses require the computation of gene-level P-values or gene scores; these gene scores are also useful when generating hypotheses for experimental validation. However, commonly used methods for generating GWA gene scores are computationally inefficient, biased by gene length, imprecise, or have low true positive rate (TPR) at low false positive rates (FPR), leading to erroneous hypotheses for functional validation. Here we introduce a new method, PEGASUS, for analytically calculating gene scores. PEGASUS produces gene scores with as much as 10 orders of magnitude higher numerical precision than competing methods. In simulation, PEGASUS outperforms existing methods, achieving up to 30% higher TPR when the FPR is fixed at 1%. We use gene scores from PEGASUS as input to HotNet2 to identify networks of interacting genes associated with multiple complex diseases and traits; this is the first application of HotNet2 to common variation. In ulcerative colitis and waist-hip ratio, we discover networks that include genes previously associated with these phenotypes, as well as novel candidate genes. In contrast, existing methods fail to identify these networks. We also identify networks for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, in which GWA studies have yet to identify any significant SNPs.

  1. Variants of insulin-signaling inhibitor genes in type 2 diabetes and related metabolic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    de Lorenzo, Carlo; Greco, Annalisa; Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Mannino, Gaia Chiara; Hribal, Marta Letizia

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance has a central role in the pathogenesis of several metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, glucose intolerance, metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Insulin resistance and related traits are likely to be caused by abnormalities in the genes encoding for proteins involved in the composite network of insulin-signaling; in this review we have focused our attention on genetic variants of insulin-signaling inhibitor molecules. These proteins interfere with different steps in insulin-signaling: ENPP1/PC-1 and the phosphatases PTP1B and PTPRF/LAR inhibit the insulin receptor activation; INPPL1/SHIP-2 hydrolyzes PI3-kinase products, hampering the phosphoinositide-mediated downstream signaling; and TRIB3 binds the serine-threonine kinase Akt, reducing its phosphorylation levels. While several variants have been described over the years for all these genes, solid evidence of an association with type 2 diabetes and related diseases seems to exist only for rs1044498 of the ENPP1 gene and for rs2295490 of the TRIB3 gene. However, overall the data recapitulated in this Review article may supply useful elements to interpret the results of novel, more technically advanced genetic studies; indeed it is becoming increasingly evident that genetic information on metabolic diseases should be interpreted taking into account the complex biological pathways underlying their pathogenesis.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA variants can mediate methylation status of inflammation, angiogenesis and signaling genes

    PubMed Central

    Atilano, Shari R.; Malik, Deepika; Chwa, Marilyn; Cáceres-Del-Carpio, Javier; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Boyer, David S.; Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Jazwinski, S. Michal; Miceli, Michael V.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Udar, Nitin; Kenney, M. Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) DNA can be classified into haplogroups representing different geographic and/or racial origins of populations. The H haplogroup is protective against age-related macular degeneration (AMD), while the J haplogroup is high risk for AMD. In the present study, we performed comparison analyses of human retinal cell cybrids, which possess identical nuclei, but mtDNA from subjects with either the H or J haplogroups, and demonstrate differences in total global methylation, and expression patterns for two genes related to acetylation and five genes related to methylation. Analyses revealed that untreated-H and -J cybrids have different expression levels for nuclear genes (CFH, EFEMP1, VEGFA and NFkB2). However, expression levels for these genes become equivalent after treatment with a methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Moreover, sequencing of the entire mtDNA suggests that differences in epigenetic status found in cybrids are likely due to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the haplogroup profiles rather than rare variants or private SNPs. In conclusion, our findings indicate that mtDNA variants can mediate methylation profiles and transcription for inflammation, angiogenesis and various signaling pathways, which are important in several common diseases. PMID:25964427

  3. Lack of association between dopamine D2 receptor gene Cys311 variant and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihisa; Fukushima, Noboru; Takahashi, Makoto; Kameda, Kensuke; Ihda, Shin

    1996-04-09

    Itokawa et al. reported identifying one missense nucleotide mutation from C to G resulting in a substitution of serine with cysteine at codon 311 in the third intracellular loop of the dopamine D2 receptor in schizophrenics. Arinami et al. reported finding a positive association between the Cys311 variant and schizophrenia. In response to the report by Arinami et al. we examined 106 unrelated Japanese schizophrenics and 106 normal controls to determine if there is any association of the Cys311 variant with schizophrenia. However, we found no statistically significant differences in allelic frequencies of Cys311 between schizophrenia and normal controls. The present results as well as those of all previous studies except for that of Arinami et al. indicated that an association between the dopamine D2 receptor gene and schizophrenia is unlikely to exist. 24 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Common Variants in the Trichohyalin Gene Are Associated with Straight Hair in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Medland, Sarah E.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Painter, Jodie N.; McEvoy, Brian P.; McRae, Allan F.; Zhu, Gu; Gordon, Scott D.; Ferreira, Manuel A.R.; Wright, Margaret J.; Henders, Anjali K.; Campbell, Megan J.; Duffy, David L.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Macgregor, Stuart; Slutske, Wendy S.; Heath, Andrew C.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2009-01-01

    Hair morphology is highly differentiated between populations and among people of European ancestry. Whereas hair morphology in East Asian populations has been studied extensively, relatively little is known about the genetics of this trait in Europeans. We performed a genome-wide association scan for hair morphology (straight, wavy, curly) in three Australian samples of European descent. All three samples showed evidence of association implicating the Trichohyalin gene (TCHH), which is expressed in the developing inner root sheath of the hair follicle, and explaining ∼6% of variance (p = 1.5 × 10−31). These variants are at their highest frequency in Northern Europeans, paralleling the distribution of the straight-hair EDAR variant in Asian populations. PMID:19896111

  5. Marked increase in biofilm-derived rough pneumococcal variants and rifampin-resistant strains not due to hex gene mutations.

    PubMed

    McEllistrem, M Catherine; Scott, Jennifer R; Zuniga-Castillo, Jacobo; Khan, Saleem A

    2009-06-01

    Otitis, pneumonia, and meningitis are tissue-based pneumococcal infections that can be associated with biofilms. The emergence of phenotypic rough variants, also known as acapsular small-colony variants, is essential for pneumococcal biofilm formation. These rough variants can increase nearly 100-fold in biofilms over time and can arise through single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), deletions, or tandem duplications in the first gene of the capsular operon, cps3D. We detected a 100-fold increase in rifampin-resistant (Rif(r)) mutants in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures using a nonvaccine serotype 3 strain, which is causing an increasing number of cases of otitis in the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era. Since both rough variants and Rif(r) strains can arise through SNPs, they could emerge due to alteration of the mismatch repair (MMR) system. The Hex system, a pneumococcal MMR system, repairs mismatches during replication and transformation. In this study, no mutations were detected in the hexAB gene sequences among several rough variants with unique mutations in the cps3D gene. Within a hexA null mutant grown in broth, we detected only a 17.5-fold increase in rough variants compared to the wild-type parental strain. Taken together, these data suggest that mutations in the hex genes and modulation of hexA activity are unlikely to account for the generation of biofilm-derived rough variants.

  6. Exome-Wide Association Study Identifies New Low-Frequency and Rare UGT1A1 Coding Variants and UGT1A6 Coding Variants Influencing Serum Bilirubin in Elderly Subjects: A Strobe Compliant Article.

    PubMed

    Oussalah, Abderrahim; Bosco, Paolo; Anello, Guido; Spada, Rosario; Guéant-Rodriguez, Rosa-Maria; Chery, Céline; Rouyer, Pierre; Josse, Thomas; Romano, Antonino; Elia, Maurizzio; Bronowicki, Jean-Pierre; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2015-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified loci contributing to total serum bilirubin level. However, no exome-wide approaches have been performed to address this question. Using exome-wide approach, we assessed the influence of protein-coding variants on unconjugated, conjugated, and total serum bilirubin levels in a well-characterized cohort of 773 ambulatory elderly subjects from Italy. Coding variants were replicated in 227 elderly subjects from the same area. We identified 4 missense rare (minor allele frequency, MAF < 0.5%) and low-frequency (MAF, 0.5%-5%) coding variants located in the first exon of the UGT1A1 gene, which encodes for the substrate-binding domain (rs4148323 [MAF = 0.06%; p.Gly71Arg], rs144398951 [MAF = 0.06%; p.Ile215Val], rs35003977 [MAF = 0.78%; p.Val225Gly], and rs57307513 [MAF = 0.06%; p.Ser250Pro]). These variants were in strong linkage disequilibrium with 3 intronic UGT1A1 variants (rs887829, rs4148325, rs6742078), which were significantly associated with total bilirubin level (P = 2.34 × 10(-34), P = 7.02 × 10(-34), and P = 8.27 × 10(-34)), as well as unconjugated, and conjugated bilirubin levels. We also identified UGT1A6 variants in association with total (rs6759892, p.Ser7Ala, P = 1.98 × 10(-26); rs2070959, p.Thr181Ala, P = 2.87 × 10(-27); and rs1105879, p.Arg184Ser, P = 3.27 × 10(-29)), unconjugated, and conjugated bilirubin levels. All UGT1A1 intronic variants (rs887829, rs6742078, and rs4148325) and UGT1A6 coding variants (rs6759892, rs2070959, and rs1105879) were significantly associated with gallstone-related cholecystectomy risk. The UGT1A6 variant rs2070959 (p.Thr181Ala) was associated with the highest risk of gallstone-related cholecystectomy (OR, 4.58; 95% CI, 1.58-13.28; P = 3.21 × 10(-3)). Using an exome-wide approach we identified coding variants on UGT1A1 and UGT1A6 genes in association with serum bilirubin level and

  7. Association study between BDNF gene variants and Mexican patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Lidia; Camarena, Beatriz; Hernández, Sandra; Lóyzaga, Cristina; Vargas, Luis; Nicolini, Humberto

    2013-11-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a psychiatric disorder whose etiology is not yet known. We investigate the role of three variants of the BDNF gene (rs6265, rs1519480 and rs7124442) by single SNP and haplotype analysis in OCD Mexican patients using a case-control and family-based association design. BDNF gene variants were genotyped in 283 control subjects, 232 OCD patients and first degree relatives of 111 OCD subjects. Single SNP analysis in case-control study showed an association between rs6265 and OCD with a high frequency of Val/Val genotype and Val allele (p=0.0001 and p=0.0001, respectively). Also, genotype and allele analysis of rs1519480 showed significant differences (p=0.0001, p=0.0001; respectively) between OCD and control groups. Haplotype analysis showed a high frequency of A-T (rs6265-rs1519480) in OCD patients compared with the control group (OR=2.06 [1.18-3.59], p=0.0093) and a low frequency of haplotype A-C in the OCD patients (OR=0.04 [0.01-0.16], p=0.000002). The family-based association study showed no significant differences in the transmission of any variant. Our study replicated the association between BDNF Val66Met gene polymorphism and OCD. Also, we found a significant association of rs1519480 in OCD patients compared with a control group, region that has never been analyzed in OCD. In conclusion, our findings suggest that BDNF gene could be related to the development of OCD.

  8. Nonrandom Distribution of miRNAs Genes and Single Nucleotide Variants in Keratoconus Loci.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dorota M; Gajecka, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies, the causes of both development and progression of keratoconus remain elusive. Previous studies of this disorder focused mainly on one or two genetic factors only. However, in the analysis of such complex diseases all potential factors should be taken into consideration. The purpose of this study was a comprehensive analysis of known keratoconus loci to uncover genetic factors involved in this disease causation in the general population, which could be omitted in the original studies. In this investigation genomic data available in various databases and experimental own data were assessed. The lists of single nucleotide variants and miRNA genes localized in reported keratoconus loci were obtained from Ensembl and miRBase, respectively. The potential impact of nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions on protein structure and function was assessed with PolyPhen-2 and SIFT. For selected protein genes the ranking was made to choose those most promising for keratoconus development. Ranking results were based on topological features in the protein-protein interaction network. High specificity for the populations in which the causative sequence variants have been identified was found. In addition, the possibility of links between previously analyzed keratoconus loci was confirmed including miRNA-gene interactions. Identified number of genes associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory agents corroborated the hypothesis of their effect on the disease etiology. Distribution of the numerous sequences variants within both exons and mature miRNA which forces you to search for a broader look at the determinants of keratoconus. Our findings highlight the complexity of the keratoconus genetics.

  9. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) gene variants and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) risk

    PubMed Central

    Amankwah, Ernest K.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Chornokur, Ganna; Aben, Katja KH.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie T.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H.; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Y. Ann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Edwards, Robert P.; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T.; Gronwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis N.; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K.; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Jim, Heather; Kellar, Melissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schernhammer, Eva; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Thomsen, Lotte; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wu, Anna H.; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Kelemen, Linda E.; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Goode, Ellen L.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Narod, Steven A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Phelan, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process whereby epithelial cells assume mesenchymal characteristics to facilitate cancer metastasis. However, EMT also contributes to the initiation and development of primary tumors. Prior studies that explored the hypothesis that EMT gene variants contribute to EOC risk have been based on small sample sizes and none have sought replication in an independent population. Methods We screened 1254 SNPs in 296 genes in a discovery phase using data from a genome-wide association study of EOC among women of European ancestry (1,947 cases and 2,009 controls) and identified 793 variants in 278 EMT-related genes that were nominally (p<0.05) associated with invasive EOC. These SNPs were then genotyped in a larger study of 14,525 invasive-cancer patients and 23,447 controls. A p-value <0.05 and a false discovery rate (FDR) <0.2 was considered statistically significant. Results In the larger dataset, GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 was associated with the endometrioid subtype among Caucasians (OR=1.16, 95%CI=1.07–1.25, p=0.0003, FDR=0.19), while F8 rs7053448 (OR=1.69, 95%CI=1.27–2.24, p=0.0003, FDR=0.12), F8 rs7058826 (OR=1.69, 95%CI=1.27–2.24, p=0.0003, FDR=0.12), and CAPN13 rs1983383 (OR=0.79, 95%CI=0.69–0.90, p=0.0005, FDR=0.12) were associated with combined invasive EOC among Asians. In silico functional analyses revealed that GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 coincided with DNA regulatory elements. Conclusion These results suggest that EMT gene variants do not appear to play a significant role in the susceptibility to EOC. PMID:26399219

  10. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) Gene Variants and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) Risk.

    PubMed

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Chornokur, Ganna; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie T; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Y Ann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana M; Edwards, Robert P; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis N; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Jim, Heather; Kellar, Melissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Schernhammer, Eva; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Thomsen, Lotte; Tangen, Ingvild L; Tworoger, Shelley S; van Altena, Anne M; Vierkant, Robert A; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Wu, Anna H; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Kelemen, Linda E; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Ramus, Susan J; Goode, Ellen L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Gayther, Simon A; Narod, Steven A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sellers, Thomas A; Phelan, Catherine M

    2015-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process whereby epithelial cells assume mesenchymal characteristics to facilitate cancer metastasis. However, EMT also contributes to the initiation and development of primary tumors. Prior studies that explored the hypothesis that EMT gene variants contribute to epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) risk have been based on small sample sizes and none have sought replication in an independent population. We screened 15,816 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 296 genes in a discovery phase using data from a genome-wide association study of EOC among women of European ancestry (1,947 cases and 2,009 controls) and identified 793 variants in 278 EMT-related genes that were nominally (P < 0.05) associated with invasive EOC. These SNPs were then genotyped in a larger study of 14,525 invasive-cancer patients and 23,447 controls. A P-value <0.05 and a false discovery rate (FDR) <0.2 were considered statistically significant. In the larger dataset, GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 was associated with the endometrioid subtype among Caucasians (odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.07-1.25, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.19), whereas F8 rs7053448 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), F8 rs7058826 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), and CAPN13 rs1983383 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.69-0.90, P = 0.0005, FDR = 0.12) were associated with combined invasive EOC among Asians. In silico functional analyses revealed that GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 coincided with DNA regulatory elements. These results suggest that EMT gene variants do not appear to play a significant role in the susceptibility to EOC.

  11. The influence of genetic variants of sorafenib on clinical outcomes and toxic effects in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chao; Cao, Qiang; Li, Pu; Wang, Shangqian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Meilin; Chu, Haiyan; Zhou, Liqun; Li, Xuesong; Ye, Dingwei; Zhang, Hailiang; Huang, Yiran; Dong, Baijun; Sun, Xiaofeng; Zou, Qing; Cai, Hongzhou; Sun, Lijiang; Zhu, Jian; Liu, Fade; Ji, Junbiao; Cui, Li; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Zhou, Hai; Zhao, Hu; Wu, Bin; Chen, Jianchun; Jiang, Minjun; Zhang, Zhengdong; Shao, Pengfei; Ju, Xiaobing; Yin, Changjun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether genetic variants that influence angiogenesis and sorafenib pharmacokinetics are associated with clinical outcomes and toxic effects in advanced renal cell carcinoma patients treated with this drug. One hundred patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma were enrolled. Forty-two polymorphisms in 15 genes were selected for genotyping and analyzed for associations with progression-free survival, overall survival, and toxic effects. We found that rs1570360 in VEGF and rs2239702 in VEGFR2 were significantly associated with progression-free. Specifically, patients carrying the variant genotypes (AG + AA) of these two polymorphisms both had an unfavorable progression-free. In addition, compared with those with the rs2239702 GG genotype, patients with the AG + AA genotype suffered an unfavorable OS. We found that the VEGF rs2010963 CG + GG genotypes had a significantly increased risk of hand-foot syndrome, and the ABCB1 rs1045642 CT + TT genotypes had an increased risk of high blood pressure. Our results suggest that polymorphisms in VEGF and VEGFR2 are associated with sorafenib clinical outcomes, and polymorphisms in VEGF and ABCB1 are associated with sorafenib-related toxicities. Larger studies are warranted to validate our findings. PMID:26830973

  12. Epigenetic regulation of Plasmodium falciparum clonally variant gene expression during development in Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Díaz, Elena; Yerbanga, Rakiswendé S.; Lefèvre, Thierry; Cohuet, Anna; Rowley, M. Jordan; Ouedraogo, Jean Bosco; Corces, Victor G.

    2017-01-01

    P. falciparum phenotypic plasticity is linked to the variant expression of clonal multigene families such as the var genes. We have examined changes in transcription and histone modifications that occur during sporogonic development of P. falciparum in the mosquito host. All var genes are silenced or transcribed at low levels in blood stages (gametocyte/ring) of the parasite in the human host. After infection of mosquitoes, a single var gene is selected for expression in the oocyst, and transcription of this gene increases dramatically in the sporozoite. The same PF3D7_1255200 var gene was activated in 4 different experimental infections. Transcription of this var gene during parasite development in the mosquito correlates with the presence of low levels of H3K9me3 at the binding site for the PF3D7_1466400 AP2 transcription factor. This chromatin state in the sporozoite also correlates with the expression of an antisense long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that has previously been shown to promote var gene transcription during the intraerythrocytic cycle in vitro. Expression of both the sense protein-coding transcript and the antisense lncRNA increase dramatically in sporozoites. The findings suggest a complex process for the activation of a single particular var gene that involves AP2 transcription factors and lncRNAs. PMID:28091569

  13. Minor variant of rs 16827043 in the iron regulator hemojuvelin gene (HJV) contributes to hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nikkari, Seppo T.; Visto, Anni-Laura; Määttä, Kirsi M.; Kunnas, Tarja A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract It is known that iron overload may lead to an increased risk for many diseases. According to GWAS studies, iron regulatory protein HFE gene variant H63D (rs1799945) was associated with hypertension, an observation which we were able to confirm also in our TAMRISK cohort. Thus, it is possible that abnormalities in iron homeostasis may predispose to hypertension. This prompted us to study whether there is an association between hypertension and another iron overload-associated gene, hemojuvelin (HJV), which has 2 common polymorphic sites (rs 16827043, rs7536827). The study included 336 hypertensive cases and 480 controls. All participants were 50- year-old Finnish men and women, and the data was collected from the Tampere adult population cardiovascular risk study (TAMRISK). Genotypes were determined using Competitive Allelic Specific PCR (KASP). We found that the minor variant of the HJV polymorphic site rs16827043 (G-allele) is a statistically significant factor associated with hypertension among 50 year-old individuals compared with the AA genotype carriers (OR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.06 – 2.60, P = 0.03). The risk was even higher when overweight subjects (BMI>30) were excluded from the analyses. For the other polymorphic variant rs7536827, association with hypertension was found only among normal or slightly overweight A-allele carriers. In conclusion, HJV genetic variants were associated with essential hypertension in Finnish subjects from the TAMRISK cohort. Previous studies together with the present one indicate that individuals with possible dysregulation of iron metabolism may have higher risk for hypertension than those with normal iron homeostasis. PMID:28151915

  14. Variants in the CNR1 and the FAAH genes and adiposity traits in the community

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, Wolfgang; Manning, Alisa K.; Florez, Jose C.; Dupuis, Josée; Cupples, L. Adrienne; McAteer, Jarred B.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Hoffmann, Udo; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Meigs, James B.; Fox, Caroline S.

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacologic blockade of the endocannabinoid receptor 1 leads to weight loss and an improved metabolic risk profile in overweight and obese individuals. We hypothesize that common genetic variants in the CNR1 (encoding endocannabinoid receptor 1) and FAAH genes (encoding fatty acid amide hydrolase, a key enzyme hydrolyzing endocannabinoids) are associated with adiposity traits. We genotyped 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CNR1 and 9 SNPs in the FAAH gene in 2,415 Framingham Offspring Study participants (mean age 61±10 years; 52.6% women; mean BMI 28.2±5.4 kg/m2; 30.3% obese) and studied them for association with cross-sectional and longitudinal measures of adiposity (body mass index [BMI], waist circumference, change over time in BMI and waist circumference, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue) using linear mixed-effect models. The selected SNPs captured 85% (r2=0.8) of the common variation (minor allele frequency >5%) at the CNR1 locus and 96% (r2=0.8) of the common variation at the FAAH locus (defined as the genomic segment containing the gene +20 kb upstream and +10 kb downstream). After correction for multiple testing, none of the SNPs in the CNR1 gene or in the FAAH gene displayed statistical evidence for association with BMI, waist circumference and visceral adipose tissue or subcutaneous adipose tissue (all P>0.18). Despite comprehensive SNP mapping across the genes and their regulatory regions in a large unselected sample, we failed to find evidence for an association of common variants in the CNR1 and FAAH genes with measures of adiposity in our community-based sample. PMID:19165169

  15. Novel mutations in the CLN6 gene causing a variant late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Carla A; Espinola, Janice; Huo, Liang; Kohlschütter, Johannes; Persaud Sawin, Dixie-Ann; Minassian, Berge; Bessa, Carlos J P; Guimarães, A; Stephan, Dietrich A; Sá Miranda, Maria Clara; MacDonald, Marcy E; Ribeiro, Maria Gil; Boustany, Rose-Mary N

    2003-05-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive neurodegenerative diseases comprising Batten and other related diseases plus numerous variants. They are characterized by progressive neuronal cell death. The CLN6 gene was recently identified, mutations in which cause one of the variant late infantile forms of NCL (vLINCL). We describe four novel mutations in the CLN6 gene. This brings the total number of CLN6 mutations known to 11 in 38 families. This suggests that the CLN6 gene may be highly mutable. An American patient of Irish/French/Native American origin was heterozygous for a 4-bp insertion (c.267_268insAACG) in exon 3. The other allele had a point mutation (c.898T>C) in exon 7 resulting in a W300R amino acid change. Two Trinidadian siblings of Indian origin were homozygous for a mutation at the 5' donor splice site of exon 4 (IVS4+1G>T), affecting the first base of the invariant GT at the beginning of intron 4. The fourth novel mutation, a double deletion of 4 bp and 1 bp in exon 7 (c.829_832delGTCG;c.837delG), was identified in a Portuguese patient heterozygous for the I154del Portuguese CLN6 mutation. Four of the 11 mutations identified are in exon 4. Three Portuguese patients with clinical profiles similar to CLN6 patients without defects in CLN6 or other known NCL genes are described. We conclude the following: 1) the CLN6 gene may be a highly mutable gene; 2) exon 4 must code for a segment of the protein crucial for function; 3) vLINCL disease in Portugal is genetically heterogeneous; 4) the I154del accounts for 81.25% of affected CLN6 Portuguese alleles; and 5) three vLINCL Portuguese patients may have defects in a new NCL gene.

  16. Allele-Dependent Differences in Quorum-Sensing Dynamics Result in Variant Expression of Virulence Genes in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Geisinger, Edward; Chen, John

    2012-01-01

    Agr is an autoinducing, quorum-sensing system that functions in many Gram-positive species and is best characterized in the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, in which it is a global regulator of virulence gene expression. Allelic variations in the agr genes have resulted in the emergence of four quorum-sensing specificity groups in S. aureus, which correlate with different strain pathotypes. The basis for these predilections is unclear but is hypothesized to involve the phenomenon of quorum-sensing interference between strains of different agr groups, which may drive S. aureus strain isolation and divergence. Whether properties intrinsic to each agr allele directly influence virulence phenotypes within S. aureus is unknown. In this study, we examined group-specific differences in agr autoinduction and virulence gene regulation by utilizing congenic strains, each harboring a unique S. aureus agr allele, enabling a dissection of agr locus-dependent versus genotype-dependent effects on quorum-sensing dynamics and virulence factor production. Employing a reporter fusion to the principal agr promoter, P3, we observed allele-dependent differences in the timing and magnitude of agr activation. These differences were mediated by polymorphisms within the agrBDCA genes and translated to significant variations in the expression of a key transcriptional regulator, Rot, and of several important exoproteins and surface factors involved in pathogenesis. This work uncovers the contribution of divergent quorum-sensing alleles to variant expression of virulence determinants within a bacterial species. PMID:22467783

  17. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe) that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T) and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q)) have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk. Methods A tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents), including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects. Results Nearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p < 0.01 level. The ten strongest association signals (p-value range: 0.0003–0.0023) were found in nine genes (MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury)) and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225). The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele). Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Conclusions To our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the

  18. A novel splice variant of human gene NPL, mainly expressed in human liver, kidney and peripheral blood leukocyte.

    PubMed

    Wu, Maoqing; Gu, Shaohua; Xu, Jian; Zou, Xianqiong; Zheng, Huarui; Jin, Zhe; Xie, Yi; Ji, Chaoneng; Mao, Yumin

    2005-04-01

    From the human fetal brain cDNA library constructed by our lab, a novel variant cDNA of a human gene was successfully cloned and identified. Because the gene has been named N-acetylneuraminate pyruvate lyase (NPL), accordingly we term our splice variant NPL_v2. The cDNA of NPL_v2 has a full-length open reading frame (ORF) from the nucleotide position 320 to 1225 that encodes a protein comprising 301 amino acids. SMART analysis showed that our hypothetical protein has one dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) domain. Phosphorylation analysis of the deduced protein show that there are five phosphorylation sites including three "serine" and two "threonine" at the region that are not found in other splice variant. RT-PCR experiment revealed that our splice variant of the gene is mainly expressed in human placenta, liver, kidney, pancreas, spleen, thymus, ovary, small intestine and peripheral blood leukocyte.

  19. Gene discovery and functional assessment of rare copy-number variants in neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Janani; Girirajan, Santhosh

    2015-09-01

    Rare copy-number variants (CNVs) are a significant cause of neurodevelopmental disorders. The sequence architecture of the human genome predisposes certain individuals to deletions and duplications within specific genomic regions. While assessment of individuals with different breakpoints has identified causal genes for certain rare CNVs, deriving gene-phenotype correlations for rare CNVs with similar breakpoints has been challenging. We present a comprehensive review of the literature related to genetic architecture that is predisposed to recurrent rearrangements, and functional evaluation of deletions, duplications and candidate genes within rare CNV intervals using mouse, zebrafish and fruit fly models. It is clear that phenotypic assessment and complete genetic evaluation of large cohorts of individuals carrying specific CNVs and functional evaluation using multiple animal models are necessary to understand the molecular genetic basis of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  20. RAP1 is essential for silencing telomeric variant surface glycoprotein genes in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Figueiredo, Luisa M; Espinal, Amin; Okubo, Eiji; Li, Bibo

    2009-04-03

    Trypanosoma brucei expresses variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes in a strictly monoallelic fashion in its mammalian hosts, but it is unclear how this important virulence mechanism is enforced. Telomere position effect, an epigenetic phenomenon, has been proposed to play a critical role in VSG regulation, yet no telomeric protein has been identified whose disruption led to VSG derepression. We now identify tbRAP1 as an intrinsic component of the T. brucei telomere complex and a major regulator for silencing VSG expression sites (ESs). Knockdown of tbRAP1 led to derepression of all VSGs in silent ESs, but not VSGs located elsewhere, and resulted in stronger derepression of genes located within 10 kb from telomeres than genes located further upstream. This graduated silencing pattern suggests that telomere integrity plays a key role in tbRAP1-dependent silencing and VSG regulation.

  1. Association Analysis of Bitter Receptor Genes in Five Isolated Populations Identifies a Significant Correlation between TAS2R43 Variants and Coffee Liking

    PubMed Central

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Traglia, Michela; Robino, Antonietta; Willems, Sara M.; Pistis, Giorgio; d’Adamo, Pio; Amin, Najaf; d’Eustacchio, Angela; Navarini, Luciano; Sala, Cinzia; Karssen, Lennart C.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Toniolo, Daniela; Gasparini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Coffee, one of the most popular beverages in the world, contains many different physiologically active compounds with a potential impact on people’s health. Despite the recent attention given to the genetic basis of its consumption, very little has been done in understanding genes influencing coffee preference among different individuals. Given its markedly bitter taste, we decided to verify if bitter receptor genes (TAS2Rs) variants affect coffee liking. In this light, 4066 people from different parts of Europe and Central Asia filled in a field questionnaire on coffee liking. They have been consequently recruited and included in the study. Eighty-eight SNPs covering the 25 TAS2R genes were selected from the available imputed ones and used to run association analysis for coffee liking. A significant association was detected with three SNP: one synonymous and two functional variants (W35S and H212R) on the TAS2R43 gene. Both variants have been shown to greatly reduce in vitro protein activity. Surprisingly the wild type allele, which corresponds to the functional form of the protein, is associated to higher liking of coffee. Since the hTAS2R43 receptor is sensible to caffeine, we verified if the detected variants produced differences in caffeine bitter perception on a subsample of people coming from the FVG cohort. We found a significant association between differences in caffeine perception and the H212R variant but not with the W35S, which suggests that the effect of the TAS2R43 gene on coffee liking is mediated by caffeine and in particular by the H212R variant. No other significant association was found with other TAS2R genes. In conclusion, the present study opens new perspectives in the understanding of coffee liking. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of the TAS2R43 gene in coffee hedonics and to identify which other genes and pathways are involved in its genetics. PMID:24647340

  2. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviors Modify the Association between Melanocortin 4 Receptor Gene Variant and Obesity in Chinese Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie-Yun; Song, Qi-Ying; Wang, Shuo; Ma, Jun; Wang, Hai-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Effects of MC4R variants in previous Chinese population studies were inconsistent. Gene-environment interactions might influence the effect of MC4R variants on obesity, which was still unclear. We performed the study to clarify the association of variants near MC4R gene with obesity-related phenotypes and gene-environment interactions in Chinese children and adolescents. Two common variants (rs12970134 and rs17782313) near MC4R were genotyped in 2179 children and adolescents aged 7-18 years in Beijing of China. Associations between the variants and obesity-related phenotypes together with gene-environment interactions were analyzed. The A-alleles of rs12970134 were nominally associated with risk of overweight/obesity (Odds Ratios (OR) = 1.21, 95%CI: 1.03-1.44, P = 0.025) and BMI (β = 0.33 kg/m2, 95%CI: 0.02-0.63, P = 0.025), respectively. The rs12970134 was also associated with HDL-C (β = -0.03mmol/L per A-allele, 95%CI: -0.05, -0.01, P = 0.013) independent of BMI. In the further analysis, we found the significant interaction of rs12970134 and physical activity/sedentary behaviors on BMI (Pinteraction = 0.043). The rs12970134 was found to be associated with BMI only in children with physical activity<1h/d and sedentary behaviors ≥2h/d (BMI: β = 1.27 kg/m2, 95%CI: 0.10-2.45, P = 0.034). The association was not detected in their counterparts with physical activity≥1h/d or sedentary behaviors <2h/d. We identified the effect of MC4R rs12970134 on overweight/obesity and BMI, and we also found physical activity and sedentary behaviors modified the association between the rs12970134 and BMI in Chinese children and adolescents.

  3. A Candidate Gene Approach Identifies an IL33 Genetic Variant as a Novel Genetic Risk Factor for GCA

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Ana; Solans, Roser; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Cid, Maria C.; Castañeda, Santos; Ramentol, Marc; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Narváez, Javier; Blanco, Ricardo; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Palm, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Braun, Niko; Moosig, Frank; Witte, Torsten; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Vaglio, Augusto; Salvarani, Carlo; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Martín, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Increased expression of IL-33 and its receptor ST2, encoded by the IL1RL1 gene, has been detected in the inflamed arteries of giant cell arteritis (GCA) patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate for the first time the potential influence of the IL33 and IL1RL1 loci on GCA predisposition. Methods A total of 1,363 biopsy-proven GCA patients and 3,908 healthy controls from four European cohorts (Spain, Italy, Germany and Norway) were combined in a meta-analysis. Six genetic variants: rs3939286, rs7025417 and rs7044343, within the IL33 gene, and rs2058660, rs2310173 and rs13015714, within the IL1RL1 gene, previously associated with immune-related diseases, were genotyped using predesigned TaqMan assays. Results A consistent association between the rs7025417 polymorphism and GCA was evident in the overall meta-analysis, under both allele (PMH = 0.041, OR = 0.88, CI 95% 0.78–0.99) and recessive (PMH = 3.40E-03, OR = 0.53, CI 95% 0.35–0.80) models. No statistically significant differences between allele or genotype frequencies for the other IL33 and IL1RL1 genetic variants were detected in this pooled analysis. Conclusions Our results clearly evidenced the implication of the IL33 rs7025417 polymorphism in the genetic network underlying GCA. PMID:25409453

  4. Molecular characterization of a genetic variant of the steroid hormone-binding globulin gene in heterozygous subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, D.O.; Catterall, J.F.; Carino, C.

    1995-04-01

    Steroid hormone-binding globulin in human serum displays different isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns among individuals, suggesting genetic variation in the gene for this extracellular steroid carrier protein. Analysis of allele frequencies and family studies suggested the existence of two codominant alleles of the gene. Subsequent determination of the molecular basis of a variant of the gene was carried out using DNA from homozygous individuals from a single Belgian family. It was of interest to characterize other variant individuals to determine whether all variants identified by IEF phenotyping were caused by the same mutation or whether other mutations occurred in the gene in different populations. Previous studies identified Mexican subjects who were heterozygous for the variant IEF phenotype. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to localize the mutation in these subjects and to purify the variant allele for DNA sequence analysis. The results show that the mutation in this population is identical to that identified in the Belgian family, and no other mutations were detected in the gene. These data represent the first analysis of steroid hormone-binding globulin gene variation in heterozygous subjects and further support the conclusion of biallelism of the gene worldwide. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Orofacial Cleft Risk Is Increased with Maternal Smoking and Specific Detoxification-Gene Variants

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Christensen, Kaare; Weinberg, Clarice R.; Romitti, Paul; Bathum, Lise; Lozada, Anthony; Morris, Richard W.; Lovett, Michael; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2007-01-01

    Maternal smoking is a recognized risk factor for orofacial clefts. Maternal or fetal pharmacogenetic variants are plausible modulators of this risk. In this work, we studied 5,427 DNA samples, including 1,244 from subjects in Denmark and Iowa with facial clefting and 4,183 from parents, siblings, or unrelated population controls. We examined 25 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 16 genes in pathways for detoxification of components of cigarette smoke, to look for evidence of gene-environment interactions. For genes identified as related to oral clefting, we studied gene-expression profiles in fetal development in the relevant tissues and time intervals. Maternal smoking was a significant risk factor for clefting and showed dosage effects, in both the Danish and Iowan data. Suggestive effects of variants in the fetal NAT2 and CYP1A1 genes were observed in both the Iowan and the Danish participants. In an expanded case set, NAT2 continued to show significant overtransmission of an allele to the fetus, with a final P value of .00003. There was an interaction between maternal smoking and fetal inheritance of a GSTT1-null deletion, seen in both the Danish (P=.03) and Iowan (P=.002) studies, with a Fisher’s combined P value of <.001, which remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons. Gene-expression analysis demonstrated expression of GSTT1 in human embryonic craniofacial tissues during the relevant developmental interval. This study benefited from two large samples, involving independent populations, that provided substantial power and a framework for future studies that could identify a susceptible population for preventive health care. PMID:17160896

  6. Functional variants in CYP1B1, KRAS and MTHFR genes are associated with shorter telomere length in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Cerne, Jasmina Z; Pohar-Perme, Maja; Cerkovnik, Petra; Gersak, Ksenija; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2015-07-01

    Estrogens and antioxidants indirectly alleviate telomere attrition. However, available clinical data on the association between hormone exposure and telomere length are inconclusive. In the present study, we examined the effects of exogenous estrogen use and of some genetic factors implicated in estrogen metabolism and oxidative stress response on mean leukocyte telomere length. We studied 259 postmenopausal women. Genotyping was conducted for CYP1B1 (rs1056836), COMT (rs4680), GSTP1 (rs1695), MnSOD (rs4880), KRAS (rs61764370), and MTHFR (rs1801133 and rs1801131) polymorphisms. Mean leukocyte telomere length was measured using a quantitative real-time PCR assay. In multivariate analysis we found no association between oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and mean leukocyte telomere length. The presence of variant alleles in CYP1B1, KRAS and MTHFR genes was statistically significantly associated with shorter mean leukocyte telomere length. Further, the data provided evidence for the effect modification of the association between HRT and mean leukocyte telomere length by the CYP1B1, KRAS and MTHFR genotypes. Our findings suggest that functionally relevant genetic variants within estrogen and folate metabolic pathways may influence telomere length. We propose these genetic factors should be taken into consideration when interpreting associations between hormone exposure and telomere length.

  7. The K153R variant in the myostatin gene and sarcopenia at the end of the human lifespan

    PubMed Central

    González-Freire, Marta; Rodríguez-Romo, Gabriel; Santiago, Catalina; Bustamante-Ara, Natalia; Yvert, Thomas; Gómez-Gallego, Félix; Serra Rexach, José A.; Ruiz, Jonatan R.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the A55T, E164K, I225T, K153R and P198A variants in the myostatin (GDF8) gene, muscle strength and mass, and physical function during daily living in 41 nonagenarians [33 women, age range, 90, 97]. No participant carried a mutant allele of the aforementioned variants, except three participants (all women), who carried the R allele of the K153R polymorphism, with one of them (woman aged 96 years) being homozygous. Overall, in KR women muscle phenotype values (1RM leg press and estimated muscle mass) were low-to-normal compared to the whole group (∼25th–50th percentile), and their functional capacity (Barthel and Tinetti tests) was normal. In the woman bearing the RR genotype, values of muscle mass and functional capacity were below the 25th percentile. She is the first RR Caucasian whose phenotype has been characterised specifically. In summary, heterozygosity for the GDF8 K153R polymorphism does not seem to exert a negative influence on the muscle phenotypes of women who are at the end of the human lifespan, yet homozygosity might do so. More research on larger cohorts of nonagenarians is needed to corroborate the present findings. PMID:20640547

  8. Structure, tissue distribution and estrogen regulation of splice variants of the sea bream estrogen receptor α gene.

    PubMed

    Pinto, P I S; Teodósio, R; Socorro, S; Power, D M; Canário, A V M

    2012-07-15

    Estrogen actions are mainly mediated by specific nuclear estrogen receptors (ERs), for which different genes and a diversity of transcript variants have been identified, mainly in mammals. In this study, we investigated the presence of ER splice variants in the teleost fish gilthead sea bream (Sparus auratus), by comparison with the genomic organization of the related species Takifugu rubripes. Two exon2-deleted ERα transcript variants were isolated from liver cDNA of estradiol-treated fish. The ΔE2 variant lacks ERα exon 2, generating a premature termination codon and a putative C-terminal truncated receptor, while the ΔE2,3* variant contains an in-frame deletion of exon 2 and part of exon 3 and codes for a putative ERα protein variant lacking most of the DNA-binding domain. Both variants were expressed at very low levels in several female and male sea bream tissues, and their expression was highly inducible in liver by estradiol-17β treatment with a strong positive correlation with the typical wild-type (wt) ERα response in this tissue. These findings identify novel estrogen responsive splice variants of fish ERα, and provide the basis for future studies to investigate possible modulation of wt-ER actions by splice variants.

  9. Many amino acid substitution variants identified in DNA repair genes during human population screenings are predicted to impact protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, T; Jones, I M; Mohrenweiser, H W

    2003-11-03

    Over 520 different amino acid substitution variants have been previously identified in the systematic screening of 91 human DNA repair genes for sequence variation. Two algorithms were employed to predict the impact of these amino acid substitutions on protein activity. Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) classified 226 of 508 variants (44%) as ''Intolerant''. Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) classed 165 of 489 amino acid substitutions (34%) as ''Probably or Possibly Damaging''. Another 9-15% of the variants were classed as ''Potentially Intolerant or Damaging''. The results from the two algorithms are highly associated, with concordance in predicted impact observed for {approx}62% of the variants. Twenty one to thirty one percent of the variant proteins are predicted to exhibit reduced activity by both algorithms. These variants occur at slightly lower individual allele frequency than do the variants classified as ''Tolerant'' or ''Benign''. Both algorithms correctly predicted the impact of 26 functionally characterized amino acid substitutions in the APE1 protein on biochemical activity, with one exception. It is concluded that a substantial fraction of the missense variants observed in the general human population are functionally relevant. These variants are expected to be the molecular genetic and biochemical basis for the associations of reduced DNA repair capacity phenotypes with elevated cancer risk.

  10. Association between Age at Diagnosis of Graves' Disease and Variants in Genes Involved in Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Jurecka-Lubieniecka, Beata; Ploski, Rafal; Kula, Dorota; Krol, Aleksandra; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Kolosza, Zofia; Tukiendorf, Andrzej; Szpak-Ulczok, Sylwia; Stanjek-Cichoracka, Anita; Polanska, Joanna; Jarzab, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Background Graves' disease (GD) is a complex disease in which genetic predisposition is modified by environmental factors. The aim of the study was to examine the association between genetic variants in genes encoding proteins involved in immune response and the age at diagnosis of GD. Methods 735 GD patients and 1216 healthy controls from Poland were included into the study. Eight genetic variants in the HLA-DRB1, TNF, CTLA4, CD40, NFKb, PTPN22, IL4 and IL10 genes were genotyped. Patients were stratified by the age at diagnosis of GD and the association with genotype was analysed. Results Polymorphism in the HLA-DRB1, TNF and CTLA4 genes were associated with GD. The carriers of the HLA DRB1*03 allele were more frequent in patients with age at GD diagnosis ≤30 years than in patients with older age at GD diagnosis. Conclusions HLADRB1*03 allele is associated with young age at diagnosis of Graves' disease in polish population. PMID:23544060

  11. Polymorphic variants in vitamin D signaling pathway genes and the risk of endometriosis-associated infertility.

    PubMed

    Szczepańska, Malgorzata; Mostowska, Adrianna; Wirstlein, Przemyslaw; Skrzypczak, Jana; Misztal, Matthew; Jagodziński, Paweł P

    2015-11-01

    It has recently been reported that vitamin D blood plasma levels are associated with reduced risk of endometriosis. The present study aimed to investigate whether the vitamin D binding protein (GC), vitamin D receptor (VDR), and retinoid X receptor (RXR) gene variants may be genetic risk factors for endometriosis‑associated infertility. The subjects consisted of 154 women with endometriosis‑associated infertility and 347 controls. Using polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism and high resolution melt techniques, the GC rs1155563, rs2298849 and rs7041; RXRA rs10881578, rs10776909 and rs749759; VDR BsmI rs1544410; and FokI rs2228570 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were investigated in the patients with endometriosis and the healthy controls. The results indicated that no significant differences were observed between the genotype and allele frequencies of all experimental SNPs in the vitamin D signaling pathway genes in women with endometriosis-associated infertility and controls. However, a significant association was present between the A‑T haplotype, consisting of VDR rs1544410 and rs222857 minor alleles, and endometriosis-associated infertility [OR=1.659 (1.122‑2.453), P=0.011]. The results of the present study suggested that VDR gene variants act as genetic risk factors for endometriosis‑associated infertility.

  12. Association between the APC gene D1822V variant and the genetic susceptibility of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Maohui; Fang, Xiping; Yang, Qian; Ouyang, Gang; Chen, Daping; Ma, Xiang; Li, Huachi; Xie, Wei

    2014-07-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene polymorphisms are believed to contribute to tumor susceptibility. However, the association between genetic variants (A/T) in the APC gene D1822V polymorphism and colorectal cancer (CRC) susceptibility remains unknown. To determine this association, a case-control study was performed. The genotype of the APC gene D1822V variants was analyzed by DNA sequencing in blood samples collected from 196 patients with CRC and 279 healthy subjects. There were no significant associations between the case and control groups in the distribution of AT [odds ratio (OR), 0.604; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.355-1.029) and TT genotypes (OR, 0.438; 95% CI, 0.045-4.247) relative to the AA genotype. The ratio of the T allele was significantly lower (P=0.047) in the case group compared with the control group (OR, 0.611; 95% CI, 0.374-0.997), indicating that the T allele conferred a protective effect in CRC. The frequency of the AT genotype among the subjects diagnosed at >45 years of age was lower than those diagnosed at a younger age (P<0.05). The present study demonstrates that the T allele of the D1822V polymorphism may exert a protective effect against CRC, however, these findings require further validation in a larger sample size.

  13. Thymidine phosphorylase gene variant, platelet counts and survival in gastrointestinal cancer patients treated by fluoropyrimidines

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liu; Chen, Fengju; Chen, Yangyang; Yang, Xiaomei; Xu, Sanpeng; Ge, Shuwang; Fu, Shengling; Chao, Tengfei; Yu, Qianqian; Liao, Xin; Hu, Guangyuan; Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Xianglin

    2014-01-01

    The predictive value of thymidine phosphorylase gene variants (TP, also called platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor) and thrombocytosis were controversial and worthy of further study in gastrointestinal cancer (GIC) patients. We screened all of the common missense single nucleotide polymorphisms (MAF ≥ 0.1) in fluoropyrimidines (FU) pathway genes (including TP, TS, ENOSF1 and DPD). Three of them were selected and genotyped using Sequenom MassARRAY in 141 GIC patients. TP expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Our aim was to evaluate the prognostic significance of studied genes and platelet counts in GIC patients. Multivariate analyses indicated in rs11479-T allele carriers, platelet counts negatively correlated to overall survival. In addition, T allele of TP: rs11479 was associated with higher TP expression in cancer tissues. We suggest TP: rs11479 variant combined with platelet counts may be useful prognostic makers in GIC patients receiving first-line FU chemotherapy and thrombopoietin factor should be used with caution in the rs11479 T allele bearing patients. PMID:25027354

  14. In vivo emergence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli variants lacking genes for K99 fimbriae and heat-stable enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Mainil, J G; Sadowski, P L; Tarsio, M; Moon, H W

    1987-01-01

    Neonatal pigs were inoculated with porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli 431, which carries genes for K99 fimbriae and STaP enterotoxin. Colonies of strain 431 were recovered from feces of pigs for up to 17 days after inoculation and tested for hybridization with gene probes for K99 and STaP. Variants of strain 431 that did not hybridize with the probes were considered to have lost the genes. Variants were recovered from 10 of 13 suckling pigs that survived the infection. Only 0.4% of the isolates recovered during the first 2 days after inoculation were variants. Of the isolates recovered 3 to 5 days after inoculation, 20 to 36% were variants. Variant colonies were detected more frequently among pigs in some litters than in others. The litter with the highest number of variant-shedding pigs had the dam with the highest titer of K99 antibody in her colostrum. Variants also occurred in colostrum-deprived, artificially reared pigs. However, the number of variants detected was lower and they occurred later in the course of the infection in colostrum-deprived pigs than in suckling pigs. More variants were detected and they were detected earlier in colostrum-deprived pigs fed anti-K99 monoclonal antibody than in controls fed anti-K88 monoclonal antibody. Loss of STaP appeared to be secondary to loss of K99 in that some variants lacked only K99 (K99- STaP+) and some lacked both genes (K99- STaP-), but none was of the K99+ STaP- type. Our results confirmed reports of gene loss from enterotoxigenic E. coli during infection. They are consistent with the hypothesis that variants emerge under in vivo selection pressure of K99 antibody and with the speculation that gene loss may be an important component of protection in vaccinated populations. However, the emergence of variants did not appear to play a major role in the recovery of individual pigs from clinical disease. PMID:2890584

  15. Targeted Re-Sequencing Approach of Candidate Genes Implicates Rare Potentially Functional Variants in Tourette Syndrome Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, John; Potamianou, Hera; Xing, Jinchuan; Deng, Li; Karagiannidis, Iordanis; Tsetsos, Fotis; Drineas, Petros; Tarnok, Zsanett; Rizzo, Renata; Wolanczyk, Tomasz; Farkas, Luca; Nagy, Peter; Szymanska, Urszula; Androutsos, Christos; Tsironi, Vaia; Koumoula, Anastasia; Barta, Csaba; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy L.; Tischfield, Jay; Paschou, Peristera; Heiman, Gary A.; Georgitsi, Marianthi

    2016-01-01

    Although the genetic basis of Tourette Syndrome (TS) remains unclear, several candidate genes have been implicated. Using a set of 382 TS individuals of European ancestry we investigated four candidate genes for TS (HDC, SLITRK1, BTBD9, and SLC6A4) in an effort to identify possibly causal variants using a targeted re-sequencing approach by next generation sequencing technology. Identification of possible disease causing variants under different modes of inheritance was performed using the algorithms implemented in VAAST. We prioritized variants using Variant ranker and validated five rare variants via Sanger sequencing in HDC and SLITRK1, all of which are predicted to be deleterious. Intriguingly, one of the identified variants is in linkage disequilibrium with a variant that is included among the top hits of a genome-wide association study for response to citalopram treatment, an antidepressant drug with off-label use also in obsessive compulsive disorder. Our findings provide additional evidence for the implication of these two genes in TS susceptibility and the possible role of these proteins in the pathobiology of TS should be revisited. PMID:27708560

  16. Variants in the inflammatory IL6 and MPO genes modulate stroke susceptibility through main effects and gene–gene interactions

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Helena; Krug, Tiago; Sobral, João; Albergaria, Isabel; Gaspar, Gisela; Ferro, José M; Oliveira, Sofia A; Vicente, Astrid M

    2011-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that inflammation within the central nervous system contributes to stroke risk and recovery. Inflammatory conditions increase stroke risk, and the inflammatory response is of major importance in recovery and healing processes after stroke. We investigated the role of inflammatory genes IL1B, IL6, MPO, and TNF in stroke susceptibility and recovery in a population sample of 672 patients and 530 controls, adjusting for demographic, clinical and lifestyle risk factors, and stroke severity parameters. We also considered the likely complexity of inflammatory mechanisms in stroke, by assessing the combined effects of multiple genes. Two interleukin 6 (IL6) and one myeloperoxidase (MPO) single-nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly associated with stroke risk (0.022gene variants of low to moderate effect in stroke risk. An epistatic interaction between the IL6 and MPO genes was also identified in association with stroke susceptibility (P=0.031 after 1,000 permutations). In a subset of 546 patients, one IL6 haplotype was associated with stroke outcome at 3 months (correctedP=0.024), an intriguing finding warranting further validation. Our findings support the association of the IL6 gene and present novel evidence for the involvement of MPO in stroke susceptibility, suggesting a modulation of stroke risk by main gene effects, clinical and lifestyle factors, and gene–gene interactions. PMID:21407237

  17. Is the Ala12 variant of the PPARG gene an "unthrifty allele"?

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Narvaez, E

    2005-01-01

    Background: The thrifty genotype hypothesis proposes that genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes results from the positive selection of "thrifty" alleles in the past. A corollary of this hypothesis is that genetic variants protecting against the development of diabetes are "unthrifty" and thus subject to negative selection during human evolution. Methods: It was assessed whether age estimates of the diabetes protective PPARG Ala12 allele indicate effects of natural selection. Based on published data from four populations, the date of origin of the diabetes protective PPARG Ala12 variant was estimated using both allele frequency and linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the C1431T single nucleotide polymorphism in exon 6 of the PPARG gene. Results: The best LD based estimate of the age of the Ala12 allele gave an average of ∼32 000 years with a maximum upper bound of ∼58 000 years. Assuming a population with a growth rate of r = 0.01 per generation, the frequency based estimate of the age of the Ala12 variant gave an average of ∼27 000 years with a maximum upper bound of ∼42 000 years. Discussion: The similarity of both time estimates is consistent with selective equivalence of the diabetes protective PPARG Ala12 allele and the diabetes susceptible PPARG Pro12 allele. PMID:15994875

  18. Isolation and characterization of novel RECK tumor suppressor gene splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Trombetta-Lima, Marina; Winnischofer, Sheila Maria Brochado; Demasi, Marcos Angelo Almeida; Filho, Renato Astorino; Carreira, Ana Claudia Oliveira; Wei, Beiyang; de Assis Ribas, Thais; Konig, Michelle Silberspitz; Bowman-Colin, Christian; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli Mieko; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi; Stetler-Stevenson, William; Sogayar, Mari Cleide

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and lethal of the central nervous system glial-derived tumors. RECK suppresses tumor invasion by negatively regulating at least three members of the matrix metalloproteinase family: MMP-9, MMP-2, and MT1-MMP. A positive correlation has been observed between the abundance of RECK expression in tumor samples and a more favorable prognosis for patients with several types of tumors. In the present study, novel alternatively spliced variants of the RECK gene: RECK-B and RECK-I were isolated by RT-PCR and sequenced. The expression levels and profiles of these alternative RECK transcripts, as well as canonical RECK were determined in tissue samples of malignant astrocytomas of different grades and in a normal tissue RNA panel by qRT-PCR. Our results show that higher canonical RECK expression, accompanied by a higher canonical to alternative transcript expression ratio, positively correlates with higher overall survival rate after chemotherapeutic treatment of GBM patients. U87MG and T98G cells over-expressing the RECK-B alternative variant display higher anchorage-independent clonal growth and do not display modulation of, respectively, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression. Our findings suggest that RECK transcript variants might have opposite roles in GBM biology and the ratio of their expression levels may be informative for the prognostic outcome of GBM patients. PMID:26431549

  19. [Identification of variants in LMF1 gene associated with primary hypertriglyceridemia].

    PubMed

    Lamiquiz-Moneo, Itziar; Bea, Ana M; Mateo-Gallego, Rocío; Baila-Rueda, Lucía; Cenarro, Ana; Pocoví, Miguel; Civeira, Fernando; de Castro-Orós, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The majority of severe primary hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) are diagnosed in adults, and their molecular bases have not yet been fully defined. The promoter, coding regions and intron-exon boundaries of LMF1 were sequenced in 112 patients with severe primary hipertrigliceridemia (defined as TG above 500mg/dl). Five patients (4.46%) were carriers of four rare variants in the LMF1 gene associated with HTG, which participate in lipoprotein lipase (LpL) function. Also, we have identified two common variants, c.194-28 T>G and c.729+18C>G that were associated with HTG, with a different allelic frequency to that observed in the general population. A bioinformatic analysis of all found variants was conducted, defining the following as potentially harmful: p.Arg364Gln, p.Arg451Trp, p.Pro562Arg and p.Leu85Leu. Our results suggest that LMF1 mutations are involved in a substantial proportion of cases with severe HTG, putting together the moderate-aggressive effect of rare mutations with polymorphisms classically associated with this disease.

  20. Biological variation among african trypanosomes: I. Clonal expression of virulence is not linked to the variant surface glycoprotein or the variant surface glycoprotein gene telomeric expression site.

    PubMed

    Inverso, Jill A; Uphoff, Timothy S; Johnson, Scott C; Paulnock, Donna M; Mansfield, John M

    2010-05-01

    The potential association of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene expression with clonal expression of virulence in African trypanosomes was addressed. Two populations of clonally related trypanosomes, which differ dramatically in virulence for the infected host, but display the same apparent VSG surface coat phenotype, were characterized with respect to the VSG genes expressed as well as the chromosome telomeric expression sites (ES) utilized for VSG gene transcription. The VSG gene sequences expressed by clones LouTat 1 and LouTat 1A of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense were identical, and gene expression in both clones occurred precisely by the same gene conversion events (duplication and transposition), which generated an expression-linked copy (ELC) of the VSG gene. The ELC was present on the same genomic restriction fragments in both populations and resided in the telomere of a 330-kb chromosome; a single basic copy of the LouTat 1/1A VSG gene, present in all variants of the LouTat 1 serodeme, was located at an internal site of a 1.5-Mb chromosome. Restriction endonuclease mapping of the ES telomere revealed that the VSG ELC of clones LouTat 1 and 1A resides in the same site. Therefore, these findings provide evidence that the VSG gene ES and, potentially, any cotranscribed ES-associated genes do not play a role in the clonal regulation of virulence because trypanosome clones LouTat 1 and 1A, which differ markedly in their virulence properties, both express identical VSG genes from the same chromosome telomeric ES.

  1. Genetic variants in EBV reactivation-related genes and the risk and survival of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Zheng-Zheng; Tang, Lu-Ying; Lin, Ying; Su, Feng-Xi; Xie, Xiao-Ming; Su, Xue-Fen; Ren, Ze-Fang

    2016-06-01

    Tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) and activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) have been suggested to involve in the reactivation of EBV which has implications in the development and progression of breast cancer. Therefore, the polymorphisms of TSG101 and ATF2 may associate with breast cancer risk and prognosis. A case-control study with 1551 breast cancer cases and 1605 age-matched controls were conducted in Guangzhou, China. We have also successfully followed up 1168 cases until December 31, 2014. The variant allele of TSG101 rs2292179 was associated with a non-significant reduced risk of breast cancer, particularly among women with BMI < 24 (kg/m(2)) (P for interaction <0.05). For ATF2 rs3845744, the variant allele was also associated with a significantly reduced breast cancer risk [odds ratio (OR) (95 % confidence interval (CI)) 0.86 (0.74∼1.00)], and the association occurred among only postmenopausal women [OR (95 % CI) 0.69 (0.54∼0.88)] (P for interaction <0.05). Breast cancer risk was further reduced with the increasing numbers of the variant G alleles of the two polymorphisms (P for trend <0.05). We did not find an overall association of the two loci with breast cancer prognosis, while the hazard ratios of the two loci (AG/GG vs. AA) were significantly higher among postmenopausal women than premenopausal women (P = 0.046, 0.016 for TSG101 rs2292179 and ATF2 rs3845744, respectively). In summary, the variant alleles of TSG101 rs2292179 and ATF2 rs3845744 were associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer, particularly for subjects with BMI <24 (kg/m(2)) and postmenopausal women, respectively. The two SNPs and menopausal status may have a significant interaction on breast cancer progression.

  2. Association of Dopamine Transporter Gene Variants with Childhood ADHD Features in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Joo, Eun-Jeong; Shektman, Tatyana; Sadovnick, A. Dessa; Remick, Ronald A.; Keck, Paul E.; McElroy, Susan L.; Kelsoe, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar Disorder (BD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) exhibit remarkably high rates of comorbidity, as well as patterns of familial co-segregation. Epidemiological data suggests that these disorders either share a common genetic architecture or that ADHD features in BD may represent an etiologically distinct subtype. We previously used the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS) to assess ADHD features in BD families and identified three heritable factors relating to impulsivity, mood instability, and inattention. Linkage analysis revealed a LOD score of 1.33 for the inattention factor on 5p15.3 near the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1), which has been associated with both BD and ADHD. Pharmacological evidence also suggests a role for DAT in both disorders. We have now evaluated the association of ten DAT1 variants for the WURS total score and factors in an overlapping sample of 87 BD families. Significant associations for three SNPs were observed across the WURS measures, notably for a SNP in intron 8 with the WURS total score (p=0.007) and for variants in introns 9 and 13 with mood instability (p=0.009 and 0.004, respectively). Analysis of an independent sample of 52 BD cases and 46 healthy controls further supported association of the intron 8 variant with mood instability (p=0.005), and a combined analysis confirmed the associations of this SNP with WURS total score. Impulsivity, and mood instability (p= 0.002, 0.007, and 8×10−4, respectively). These data suggest that variants within DAT1 may predispose to a subtype of BD characterized by early prodromal features that include attentional deficits. PMID:23255304

  3. Variants in the ATM gene associated with a reduced risk of contralateral breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Concannon, Patrick; Haile, Robert W; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Rosenstein, Barry S; Gatti, Richard A; Teraoka, Sharon N; Diep, T Anh; Jansen, Laila; Atencio, David P; Langholz, Bryan; Capanu, Marinela; Liang, Xiaolin; Begg, Colin B; Thomas, Duncan C; Bernstein, Leslie; Olsen, Jørgen H; Malone, Kathleen E; Lynch, Charles F; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bernstein, Jonine L

    2008-08-15

    Between 5% and 10% of women who survive a first primary breast cancer will subsequently develop a second primary cancer in the contralateral breast. The Women's Environment, Cancer, and Radiation Epidemiology Study was designed to identify genetic and environmental determinants of contralateral breast cancer (CBC). In this study, 708 women with asynchronous CBC served as cases and 1,397 women with unilateral breast cancer served as controls. ATM, a serine-threonine kinase, controls the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, and has been implicated in breast cancer risk. Complete mutation screening of the ATM gene in all 2,105 study participants identified 240 distinct sequence variants; only 15 were observed in >1% of subjects. Among the rare variants, deleterious alleles resulting in loss of ATM function were associated with a nonsignificant increase in risk of CBC. In contrast, carriers of common variants had a statistically significant reduction in risk of CBC. Four of these 15 variants were individually associated with a significantly decreased risk of second primary breast cancer [c.1899-55T>G, rate ratio (RR), 0.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.3-0.8; c.3161C>G, RR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.9; c.5558A>T, RR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.1-0.6; c.6348-54T>C RR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.1-0.8]. These data suggest that some alleles of ATM may exert an antineoplastic effect, perhaps by altering the activity of ATM as an initiator of DNA damage responses or a regulator of p53.

  4. Genetic variants of eNOS gene may modify the susceptibility to idiopathic male infertility.

    PubMed

    Ying, Hou-Qun; Pu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Shuo-Ran; A, Zhou-Cun

    2013-08-01

    In testis, eNOS is responsible for synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) which is an essential gas message regulator in spermatogenesis, suggesting that eNOS gene plays a role in normal spermatogenesis and the genetic variants of eNOS gene may be potential genetic risk factors of spermatogenesis impairment. In this study, the polymorphic distributions of three common polymorphism loci including T-786C, 4A4B and G894T in eNOS gene were investigated in 355 Chinese infertile patients with azoospermia or oligozoospermia and 246 healthy fertile men and a meta-analysis was carried in order to explore the possible relationship between the three loci of eNOS gene and male infertility with spermatogenesis impairment. As a result, allele -786C of T-786C (11.4% versus 6.5%, p = 0.004) and 4A of 4A4B (11.0% versus 6.3%, p = 0.005) as well as genotype TC of T-786C (22.8% versus 13.0%, p = 0.002) and AB of 4A4B (18% versus 11%, p = 0.015) were significantly associated with idiopathic male infertility. The haplotypes T-4A-G (7.4% versus 4.1%, p = 0.015) and C-4B-G (7.6% versus 4.4%, p = 0.028) could increase the susceptibility to male infertility, whereas haplotype T-4B-G (67.0% versus 75.2%, p = 0.002) might be a protective factor for male infertility. The results of meta-analysis revealed that the polymorphism of T-786C was associated with male infertility. These findings suggested that the variants of eNOS gene may modify the susceptibility to male infertility with impaired spermatogenesis.

  5. Assessing Gene-Environment Interactions for Common and Rare Variants with Binary Traits Using Gene-Trait Similarity Regression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guolin; Marceau, Rachel; Zhang, Daowen; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Accounting for gene–environment (G×E) interactions in complex trait association studies can facilitate our understanding of genetic heterogeneity under different environmental exposures, improve the ability to discover susceptible genes that exhibit little marginal effect, provide insight into the biological mechanisms of complex diseases, help to identify high-risk subgroups in the population, and uncover hidden heritability. However, significant G×E interactions can be difficult to find. The sample sizes required for sufficient power to detect association are much larger than those needed for genetic main effects, and interactions are sensitive to misspecification of the main-effects model. These issues are exacerbated when working with binary phenotypes and rare variants, which bear less information on association. In this work, we present a similarity-based regression method for evaluating G×E interactions for rare variants with binary traits. The proposed model aggregates the genetic and G×E information across markers, using genetic similarity, thus increasing the ability to detect G×E signals. The model has a random effects interpretation, which leads to robustness against main-effect misspecifications when evaluating G×E interactions. We construct score tests to examine G×E interactions and a computationally efficient EM algorithm to estimate the nuisance variance components. Using simulations and data applications, we show that the proposed method is a flexible and powerful tool to study the G×E effect in common or rare variant studies with binary traits. PMID:25585620

  6. The frequency of polymorphic variants of filaggrin gene and clinical atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Weryńska-Kalemba, Maria; Bożek, Andrzej; Filipowska, Barbara; Żebracka-Gala, Jadwiga; Rusinek, Dagmara; Kula, Dorota; Jarząb, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction As far as pathogenesis of the atopic dermatitis (AD) is concerned, the roles of an impaired epidermal barrier and cornified cell envelope are widely emphasized. Aim The assessment of mutations of the filaggrin gene and their connection with the clinical picture of AD as well as selected allergological and environmental indicators. Material and methods 105 patients with diagnosed AD on the basis of diagnostic criteria were included. For every patient of the examined group, quantitative determination of the total concentration of IgE and the concentration of IgE antibodies to selected allergens were examined. For all patients, studies were performed by means of analysis of two genomic gene variants of profilaggrin (FLG) – R501X and 2282del4. Results Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene were shown in 12 (11.4%) patients in the examined group. All patients in the study group who developed one of the tested loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene demonstrated an extrinsic, allergic form of atopic dermatitis. A significant association (p = 0.0002) between the presence of one of the tested loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene and elevated levels of total concentration of immunoglobulin E was shown. Conclusions Patients with AD of null mutations in the filaggrin gene demonstrate a relationship with the total and specific concentration of immunoglobulin E, specifically higher concentrations of IgE against aeroallergens and alimentary allergens as well as elevated levels of total immunoglobulin E. PMID:26985177

  7. Detection of Novel Gene Variants Associated with Congenital Hypothyroidism in a Finnish Patient Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Löf, Christoffer; Patyra, Konrad; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Vangipurapu, Jagadish; Undeutsch, Henriette; Jaeschke, Holger; Pajunen, Tuulia; Kero, Andreina; Krude, Heiko; Biebermann, Heike; Kleinau, Gunnar; Kühnen, Peter; Rantakari, Krista; Miettinen, Päivi; Kirjavainen, Turkka; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Mustila, Taina; Jääskeläinen, Jarmo; Ojaniemi, Marja; Toppari, Jorma; Ignatius, Jaakko; Laakso, Markku

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is defined as the lack of thyroid hormones at birth. Mutations in at least 15 different genes have been associated with this disease. While up to 20% of CH cases are hereditary, the majority of cases are sporadic with unknown etiology. Apart from a monogenic pattern of inheritance, multigenic mechanisms have been suggested to play a role in CH. The genetics of CH has not been studied in Finland so far. Therefore, multigenic sequencing of CH candidate genes was performed in a Finnish patient cohort with both familial and sporadic CH. Methods: A targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) panel, covering all exons of the major CH genes, was applied for 15 patients with sporadic and 11 index cases with familial CH. Results: Among the familial cases, six pathogenic mutations were found in the TPO, PAX8, and TSHR genes. Furthermore, pathogenic NKX2.1 and TG mutations were identified from sporadic cases, together with likely pathogenic variants in the TG, NKX2.5, SLC26A4, and DUOX2 genes. All identified novel pathogenic mutations were confirmed by Sanger-sequencing and characterized in silico and/or in vitro. Conclusion: In summary, the CH panel provides an efficient, cost-effective, and multigenic screening tool for both known and novel CH gene mutations. Hence, it may be a useful method to identify accurately the genetic etiology for dyshormogenic, familial, or syndromic forms of CH. PMID:27373559

  8. Conformational diversity in prion protein variants influences intermolecular [beta]-sheet formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seungjoo; Antony, Lizamma; Hartmann, Rune; Knaus, Karen J.; Surewicz, Krystyna; Surewicz, Witold K.; Yee, Vivien C.

    2010-04-19

    A conformational transition of normal cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) to its pathogenic form (PrP{sup Sc}) is believed to be a central event in the transmission of the devastating neurological diseases known as spongiform encephalopathies. The common methionine/valine polymorphism at residue 129 in the PrP influences disease susceptibility and phenotype. We report here seven crystal structures of human PrP variants: three of wild-type (WT) PrP containing V129, and four of the familial variants D178N and F198S, containing either M129 or V129. Comparison of these structures with each other and with previously published WT PrP structures containing M129 revealed that only WT PrPs were found to crystallize as domain-swapped dimers or closed monomers; the four mutant PrPs crystallized as non-swapped dimers. Three of the four mutant PrPs aligned to form intermolecular {beta}-sheets. Several regions of structural variability were identified, and analysis of their conformations provides an explanation for the structural features, which can influence the formation and conformation of intermolecular {beta}-sheets involving the M/V129 polymorphic residue.

  9. Identification of Genome-Wide Variants and Discovery of Variants Associated with Brassica rapa Clubroot Resistance Gene Rcr1 through Bulked Segregant RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fengqun; Zhang, Xingguo; Huang, Zhen; Chu, Mingguang; Song, Tao; Falk, Kevin C; Deora, Abhinandan; Chen, Qilin; Zhang, Yan; McGregor, Linda; Gossen, Bruce D; McDonald, Mary Ruth; Peng, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Clubroot, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, is an important disease on Brassica species worldwide. A clubroot resistance gene, Rcr1, with efficacy against pathotype 3 of P. brassicae, was previously mapped to chromosome A03 of B. rapa in pak choy cultivar "Flower Nabana". In the current study, resistance to pathotypes 2, 5 and 6 was shown to be associated with Rcr1 region on chromosome A03. Bulked segregant RNA sequencing was performed and short read sequences were assembled into 10 chromosomes of the B. rapa reference genome v1.5. For the resistant (R) bulks, a total of 351.8 million (M) sequences, 30,836.5 million bases (Mb) in length, produced 120-fold coverage of the reference genome. For the susceptible (S) bulks, 322.9 M sequences, 28,216.6 Mb in length, produced 109-fold coverage. In total, 776.2 K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 122.2 K insertion / deletion (InDels) in R bulks and 762.8 K SNPs and 118.7 K InDels in S bulks were identified; each chromosome had about 87% SNPs and 13% InDels, with 78% monomorphic and 22% polymorphic variants between the R and S bulks. Polymorphic variants on each chromosome were usually below 23%, but made up 34% of the variants on chromosome A03. There were 35 genes annotated in the Rcr1 target region and variants were identified in 21 genes. The numbers of poly variants differed significantly among the genes. Four out of them encode Toll-Interleukin-1 receptor / nucleotide-binding site / leucine-rich-repeat proteins; Bra019409 and Bra019410 harbored the higher numbers of polymorphic variants, which indicates that they are more likely candidates of Rcr1. Fourteen SNP markers in the target region were genotyped using the Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR method and were confirmed to associate with Rcr1. Selected SNP markers were analyzed with 26 recombinants obtained from a segregating population consisting of 1587 plants, indicating that they were completely linked to Rcr1. Nine SNP markers were used for marker

  10. Plasmodium falciparum complicated malaria: Modulation and connectivity between exportome and variant surface antigen gene families.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Boopathi, P A; Pandey, Isha; Kohli, Ramandeep; Karwa, Rohan; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Kochar, Sanjay K; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2015-05-01

    In temperate and sub-tropical regions of Asia and Latin America, complicated malaria manifested as hepatic dysfunction or renal dysfunction is seen in all age groups. There has been a concerted focus on understanding the patho-physiological and molecular basis of complicated malaria in children, much less is known about it in adults. We report here, the analysis of data from a custom, cross strain microarray (Agilent Platform) using material from adult patient samples, showing hepatic dysfunction or renal failure. These are the most common manifestations seen in adults along with cerebral malaria. The data has been analyzed with reference to variant surface antigens, encoded by the var, rifin and stevor gene families. The differential regulation profiles of key genes (comparison between Plasmodium falciparum complicated and uncomplicated isolates) have been observed. The exportome has been analyzed using similar parameters. Gene ontology term based functional enrichment of differentially regulated genes identified, up-regulated genes statistically enriched (P<0.05) to critical biological processes like generation of precursor metabolite and energy, chromosome organization and electron transport chain. Systems network based functional enrichment of overall differentially regulated genes yielded a similar result. We are reporting here, up-regulation of var group B and C genes whose proteins are predicted to interact with CD36 receptor in the host, the up-regulation of domain cassette 13 (DC13) containing var group A, as also the up-regulation of group A rifins and many of the stevors. This is contrary to most other reports from pediatric patients, with cerebral malaria where the up-regulation of mostly var A group genes have been seen. A protein-protein interaction based network has been created and analysis performed. This co-expression and text mining based network has shown overall connectivity between the variant surface antigens (VSA) and the exportome. The up

  11. Circadian Gene Variants and Susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, M. Ann; Rees, Simon D.; Hydrie, M. Zafar I.; Shera, A. Samad; Bellary, Srikanth; O’Hare, J. Paul; Kumar, Sudhesh; Taheri, Shahrad; Basit, Abdul; Barnett, Anthony H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Disruption of endogenous circadian rhythms has been shown to increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, suggesting that circadian genes might play a role in determining disease susceptibility. We present the results of a pilot study investigating the association between type 2 diabetes and selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in/near nine circadian genes. The variants were chosen based on their previously reported association with prostate cancer, a disease that has been suggested to have a genetic link with type 2 diabetes through a number of shared inherited risk determinants. Methodology/Principal Findings The pilot study was performed using two genetically homogeneous Punjabi cohorts, one resident in the United Kingdom and one indigenous to Pakistan. Subjects with (N = 1732) and without (N = 1780) type 2 diabetes were genotyped for thirteen circadian variants using a competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction method. Associations between the SNPs and type 2 diabetes were investigated using logistic regression. The results were also combined with in silico data from other South Asian datasets (SAT2D consortium) and white European cohorts (DIAGRAM+) using meta-analysis. The rs7602358G allele near PER2 was negatively associated with type 2 diabetes in our Punjabi cohorts (combined odds ratio [OR] = 0.75 [0.66–0.86], p = 3.18×10−5), while the BMAL1 rs11022775T allele was associated with an increased risk of the disease (combined OR = 1.22 [1.07–1.39], p = 0.003). Neither of these associations was replicated in the SAT2D or DIAGRAM+ datasets, however. Meta-analysis of all the cohorts identified disease associations with two variants, rs2292912 in CRY2 and rs12315175 near CRY1, although statistical significance was nominal (combined OR = 1.05 [1.01–1.08], p = 0.008 and OR = 0.95 [0.91–0.99], p = 0.015 respectively). Conclusions/significance None of the selected circadian gene

  12. A Genetic Variant in Vitamin B12 Metabolic Genes That Reduces the Risk of Congenital Heart Disease in Han Chinese Populations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Peng, Qian-Qian; Hou, Jia; Sun, Shu-Na; Gui, Yong-Hao; Duan, Wen-Yuan; Qiao, Bin; Wang, Hong-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies on components of the one-carbon metabolic pathway revealed that human vitamin B12 levels could be significantly influenced by variationsinthefucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2), cubilin (CUBN), and transcobalamin-I (TCN1) genes. An altered vitamin B12 level is an important factor that disturbs the homeostasis of the folate metabolism pathway, which in turn can potentially lead to the development of congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, we investigated the association between the variants of vitamin B12-related genes and CHD in Han Chinese populations. Methods and Results Six variants of the vitamin B12-related genes were selected for analysis in two independent case-control studies, with a total of 868 CHD patients and 931 controls. The variant rs11254363 of the CUBN gene was associated with a decreased risk of developing CHD in both the separate and combined case-control studies. Combined samples from the two cohorts had a significant decrease in CHD risk for the G allele (OR = 0.48, P = 1.7×10−5) and AG+GG genotypes (OR = 0.49, P = 4×10−5), compared with the wild-type A allele and AA genotype, respectively. Conclusions Considering the G allele of variant rs11254363 of the CUBN gene was associated with an increased level of circulating vitamin B12. This result suggested that the carriers of the G allele would benefit from the protection offered by the high vitamin B12 concentration during critical heart development stages. This finding shed light on the unexpected role of CUBN in CHD development and highlighted the interplay of diet, genetics, and human birth defects. PMID:24533076

  13. A HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN MODEL FOR INFERENCE OF COPY NUMBER VARIANTS AND THEIR ASSOCIATION TO GENE EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Cassese, Alberto; Guindani, Michele; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Falciani, Francesco; Vannucci, Marina

    2014-01-01

    A number of statistical models have been successfully developed for the analysis of high-throughput data from a single source, but few methods are available for integrating data from different sources. Here we focus on integrating gene expression levels with comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array measurements collected on the same subjects. We specify a measurement error model that relates the gene expression levels to latent copy number states which, in turn, are related to the observed surrogate CGH measurements via a hidden Markov model. We employ selection priors that exploit the dependencies across adjacent copy number states and investigate MCMC stochastic search techniques for posterior inference. Our approach results in a unified modeling framework for simultaneously inferring copy number variants (CNV) and identifying their significant associations with mRNA transcripts abundance. We show performance on simulated data and illustrate an application to data from a genomic study on human cancer cell lines. PMID:24834139

  14. Common variants in left/right asymmetry genes and pathways are associated with relative hand skill.

    PubMed

    Brandler, William M; Morris, Andrew P; Evans, David M; Scerri, Thomas S; Kemp, John P; Timpson, Nicholas J; St Pourcain, Beate; Smith, George Davey; Ring, Susan M; Stein, John; Monaco, Anthony P; Talcott, Joel B; Fisher, Simon E; Webber, Caleb; Paracchini, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Humans display structural and functional asymmetries in brain organization, strikingly with respect to language and handedness. The molecular basis of these asymmetries is unknown. We report a genome-wide association study meta-analysis for a quantitative measure of relative hand skill in individuals with dyslexia [reading disability (RD)] (n = 728). The most strongly associated variant, rs7182874 (P = 8.68 × 10(-9)), is located in PCSK6, further supporting an association we previously reported. We also confirmed the specificity of this association in individuals with RD; the same locus was not associated with relative hand skill in a general population cohort (n = 2,666). As PCSK6 is known to regulate NODAL in the development of left/right (LR) asymmetry in mice, we developed a novel approach to GWAS pathway analysis, using gene-set enrichment to test for an over-representation of highly associated variants within the orthologs of genes whose disruption in mice yields LR asymmetry phenotypes. Four out of 15 LR asymmetry phenotypes showed an over-representation (FDR ≤ 5%). We replicated three of these phenotypes; situs inversus, heterotaxia, and double outlet right ventricle, in the general population cohort (FDR ≤ 5%). Our findings lead us to propose that handedness is a polygenic trait controlled in part by the molecular mechanisms that establish LR body asymmetry early in development.

  15. Cre-dependent selection yields AAV variants for widespread gene transfer to the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Deverman, Benjamin E; Pravdo, Piers L; Simpson, Bryan P; Kumar, Sripriya Ravindra; Chan, Ken Y; Banerjee, Abhik; Wu, Wei-Li; Yang, Bin; Huber, Nina; Pasca, Sergiu P; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2016-02-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) are commonly used vehicles for in vivo gene transfer. However, the tropism repertoire of naturally occurring AAVs is limited, prompting a search for novel AAV capsids with desired characteristics. Here we describe a capsid selection method, called Cre recombination-based AAV targeted evolution (CREATE), that enables the development of AAV capsids that more efficiently transduce defined Cre-expressing cell populations in vivo. We use CREATE to generate AAV variants that efficiently and widely transduce the adult mouse central nervous system (CNS) after intravenous injection. One variant, AAV-PHP.B, transfers genes throughout the CNS with an efficiency that is at least 40-fold greater than that of the current standard, AAV9 (refs. 14,15,16,17), and transduces the majority of astrocytes and neurons across multiple CNS regions. In vitro, it transduces human neurons and astrocytes more efficiently than does AAV9, demonstrating the potential of CREATE to produce customized AAV vectors for biomedical applications.

  16. Three missense variants of metabolic syndrome-related genes are associated with alpha-1 antitrypsin levels.

    PubMed

    Setoh, Kazuya; Terao, Chikashi; Muro, Shigeo; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Tabara, Yasuharu; Takahashi, Meiko; Nakayama, Takeo; Kosugi, Shinji; Sekine, Akihiro; Yamada, Ryo; Mishima, Michiaki; Matsuda, Fumihiko

    2015-07-15

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) encoded by SERPINA1 is an acute-phase inflammation marker, and AAT deficiency (AATD) is known as one of the common genetic disorders in European populations. However, no genetic determinants to AAT levels apart from the SERPINA gene clusters have been identified to date. Here we perform a genome-wide association study of serum AAT levels followed by a two-staged replication study recruiting a total of 9,359 Japanese community-dwelling population. Three missense variants of metabolic syndrome-related genes, namely, rs671 in ALDH2, rs1169288 in HNF1A and rs1260326 in GCKR, significantly associate with AAT levels (P≤1.5 × 10(-12)). Previous reports have shown the functional relevance of ALDH2 and HNF1A to AAT. We observe a significant interaction of rs671 and alcohol consumption on AAT levels. We confirm the association between AAT and rs2896268 in SERPINA1, which is independent of known causative variants of AATD. These findings would support various AAT functions including metabolic processes.

  17. Extensive libraries of gene truncation variants generated by in vitro transposition.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Aleardo; Cabezas, Yari; Mills, Lauren J; Seelig, Burckhard

    2017-01-26

    The detailed analysis of the impact of deletions on proteins or nucleic acids can reveal important functional regions and lead to variants with improved macromolecular properties. We present a method to generate large libraries of mutants with deletions of varying length that are randomly distributed throughout a given gene. This technique facilitates the identification of crucial sequence regions in nucleic acids or proteins. The approach utilizes in vitro transposition to generate 5' and 3' fragment sub-libraries of a given gene, which are then randomly recombined to yield a final library comprising both terminal and internal deletions. The method is easy to implement and can generate libraries in three to four days. We used this approach to produce a library of >9000 random deletion mutants of an artificial RNA ligase enzyme representing 32% of all possible deletions. The quality of the library was assessed by next-generation sequencing and detailed bioinformatics analysis. Finally, we subjected this library to in vitro selection and obtained fully functional variants with deletions of up to 18 amino acids of the parental enzyme that had been 95 amino acids in length.

  18. A Nonsense Variant in the ST14 Gene in Akhal-Teke Horses with Naked Foal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Anina; Hiemesch, Theresa; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Neuditschko, Markus; Bachmann, Iris; Rieder, Stefan; Mikko, Sofia; Penedo, M. Cecilia; Tarasova, Nadja; Vitková, Martina; Sirtori, Nicolò; Roccabianca, Paola; Leeb, Tosso; Welle, Monika M.

    2017-01-01

    Naked foal syndrome (NFS) is a genodermatosis in the Akhal-Teke horse breed. We provide the first scientific description of this phenotype. Affected horses have almost no hair and show a mild ichthyosis. So far, all known NFS affected horses died between a few weeks and 3 yr of age. It is not clear whether a specific pathology caused the premature deaths. NFS is inherited as a monogenic autosomal recessive trait. We mapped the disease causing genetic variant to two segments on chromosomes 7 and 27 in the equine genome. Whole genome sequencing of two affected horses, two obligate carriers, and 75 control horses from other breeds revealed a single nonsynonymous genetic variant on the chromosome 7 segment that was perfectly associated with NFS. The affected horses were homozygous for ST14:c.388G>T, a nonsense variant that truncates >80% of the open reading frame of the ST14 gene (p.Glu130*). The variant leads to partial nonsense-mediated decay of the mutant transcript. Genetic variants in the ST14 gene are responsible for autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis 11 in humans. Thus, the identified equine ST14:c.388G>T variant is an excellent candidate causative variant for NFS, and the affected horses represent a large animal model for a known human genodermatosis. Our findings will enable genetic testing to avoid the nonintentional breeding of NFS-affected foals. PMID:28235824

  19. Mucolipidosis types II and III and non-syndromic stuttering are associated with different variants in the same genes.

    PubMed

    Raza, M Hashim; Domingues, Carlos E F; Webster, Ronald; Sainz, Eduardo; Paris, Emily; Rahn, Rachel; Gutierrez, Joanne; Chow, Ho Ming; Mundorff, Jennifer; Kang, Chang-Soo; Riaz, Naveeda; Basra, Muhammad A R; Khan, Shaheen; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Braun, Allen; Drayna, Dennis

    2016-04-01

    Homozygous mutations in GNPTAB and GNPTG are classically associated with mucolipidosis II (ML II) alpha/beta and mucolipidosis III (ML III) alpha/beta/gamma, which are rare lysosomal storage disorders characterized by multiple pathologies. Recently, variants in GNPTAB, GNPTG, and the functionally related NAGPA gene have been associated with non-syndromic persistent stuttering. In a worldwide sample of 1013 unrelated individuals with non-syndromic persistent stuttering we found 164 individuals who carried a rare non-synonymous coding variant in one of these three genes. We compared the frequency of these variants with those in population-matched controls and genomic databases, and their location with those reported in mucolipidosis. Stuttering subjects displayed an excess of non-synonymous coding variants compared to controls and individuals in the 1000 Genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases. We identified a total of 81 different variants in our stuttering cases. Virtually all of these were missense substitutions, only one of which has been previously reported in mucolipidosis, a disease frequently associated with complete loss-of-function mutations. We hypothesize that rare non-synonymous coding variants in GNPTAB, GNPTG, and NAGPA may account for as much as 16% of persistent stuttering cases, and that variants in GNPTAB and GNPTG are at different sites and may in general, cause less severe effects on protein function than those in ML II alpha/beta and ML III alpha/beta/gamma.

  20. Prevalence of HPV 16 genomic variant carrying a 63 bp duplicated sequence within the E1 gene in Slovenian women.

    PubMed

    Bogovac, Zeljka; Lunar, Maja M; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Seme, Katja; Jančar, Nina; Poljak, Mario

    2011-09-01

    High-risk HPV, particularly HPV-16, is etiologically associated with the development of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions - cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). However, most precancerous lesions will not progress to cancer. Numerous studies have shown that HPV-16 consists of several genomic variants, which differ in their association with cervical cancer, viral persistence and the frequency of recurrence of cervical disease. Recently, a novel, presumably less pathogenic, HPV-16 E6-T350G genomic variant has been identified, carrying a 63-bp in-frame insertion in the E1 gene. No data from Slovenian patients have so far been reported for this specific HPV-16 variant. In the present study, therefore, a total of 390 HPV-16 positive samples obtained from the same number of women with normal cytology, CIN I, CIN II, CIN III or cervical cancer, were analyzed. The HPV-16 E1 insert variant was detected using real-time PCR-amplification of a 146-210-bp fragment of the E1 gene and PCR-sequencing of a 169-bp fragment of the E6 gene. The HPV-16 E1 insert variant was identified in 7/48 (14.6%), 1/21 (4.8%), 2/20 (10.0%), 9/131 (6.9%) and 12/170 (7.1%) of women with normal cytology, CIN I, CIN II, CIN III and cervical cancer, respectively. All HPV-16 E1 insert variants with an amplifiable E6 gene belonged to the European HPV-16 E6-350G variant group. No statistically significant differences in the prevalence of HPV-16 E1 insert genomic variant in women presenting with normal cytology and those with the different stages of HPV-16-induced disease were found.

  1. Isolation and characterization of new exon 11-associated N-terminal splice variants of the human mu opioid receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Hurd, Yasmin L; Pasternak, Gavril W; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2009-02-01

    Alternative splicing of the mu opioid receptor genes to create multiple mu receptor subtypes has been demonstrated in animals and humans. Previously, we identified a number of C-terminal variants in mice, rats and human, followed by several N-terminal variants associated with a new upstream exon in mice (exon 11). Behavioral studies in exon 11 knockout mice suggest an important role for the exon 11 variants in the analgesic actions of heroin and morphine-6beta-glucuronide, but not morphine or methadone. We now have identified a homologous human exon 11 and three similar human exon 11-associated variants, suggesting conservation of exon 11 and its associated variants across species. hMOR-1i has an additional 93 amino acids at the tip of the N-terminus but is otherwise identical to hMOR-1. When expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, the additional 93 amino acids in hMOR-1i had little effect on opioid binding, but significantly altered agonist-induced G-protein activation. hMOR-1G1 and hMOR-1G2 predicted six transmembrane domain variants, similar to those seen in mice. The regional expression of these exon 11-associated variants, as determined by RT-PCR, varied markedly, implying region-specific alternative splicing. The presence of exon 11-associated variants in humans raises questions regarding their potential role in heroin and morphine-6beta-glucuronide actions in people as they do in mice.

  2. Association analysis of SCN9A gene variants with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Tadić, André; Baskaya, Omur; Victor, Anja; Lieb, Klaus; Höppner, Wolfgang; Dahmen, Norbert

    2008-12-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a serious psychiatric disorder affecting about 1-2% of the general population. Key features of BPD are emotional instability, strong impulsivity, repeated self-injurious behavior (SIB) and dissociation. In the etiology of BPD and its predominant symptoms, genetic factors have been suggested. The voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 is expressed in sensory neurons and in the hippocampus, a key region of the limbic system probably dysfunctional in BPD and dissociative disorders. The alpha-subunit of Nav1.7 is encoded by the SCN9A gene on chromosome 2 and variations of SCN9A can lead to complete inability to sense pain. The aim of the present study was to test for associations between SCN9A gene variants and BPD as well as BPD-related phenotypes. We genotyped ten tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the SCN9A gene in 161 well-defined Caucasian BPD patients and 156 healthy controls. We found no globally significant association of SCN9A markers with BPD at level 5%. However, in the female and in the male subsample, different SCN9A markers and individual haplotypes showed uncorrected p-values<0.05. In addition, p-values<0.05 were observed in the analysis of associations between SCN9A markers and dissociative symptoms. Although our results were largely negative, replication studies in an independent sample are warranted to follow up on the potential role of SCN9A gene variants in BPD and dissociative symptoms, paying special attention to a possible gender different etiology.

  3. Thrombomodulin Gene Variants are Associated with Increased Mortality Following Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in Replicated Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lobato, Robert L.; White, William D.; Mathew, Joseph P.; Newman, Mark F.; Smith, Peter K.; McCants, Charles B.; Alexander, John H.; Podgoreanu, Mihai V.

    2011-01-01

    Background We tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in thrombotic and inflammatory pathways is independently associated with long-term mortality following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Methods and Results Two separate cohorts of patients undergoing CABG at a single institution were examined, and all-cause mortality between 30 days and 5 years after the index CABG was ascertained from the National Death Index. In a discovery cohort of 1018 patients, a panel of 90 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 49 candidate genes was tested in Cox proportional hazard models to identify clinical and genomic multivariate predictors of incident death. After adjustment for multiple comparisons and clinical predictors of mortality, the homozygote minor allele of a common variant in the thrombomodulin (THBD) gene (rs1042579) was independently associated with significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality (HR 2.26; 95%CI, 1.31–3.92; p=0.003). Six tag SNPs in the THBD gene, one of which (rs3176123) in complete linkage disequilibrium with rs1042579, were then assessed in an independent validation cohort of 930 patients. Following multivariate adjustment for the clinical predictors identified in the discovery cohort and multiple testing, the homozygote minor allele of rs3176123 independently predicted all-cause mortality (HR 3.6; 95%CI, 1.67–7.78; p=0.001). Conclusion In two independent cardiac surgery cohorts, linked common allelic variants in the THBD gene are independently associated with increased long-term mortality risk following CABG, and significantly improve the classification ability of traditional postoperative mortality prediction models. PMID:21911804

  4. CRY1 circadian gene variant interacts with carbohydrate intake for insulin resistance in two independent populations: Mediterranean and North American

    PubMed Central

    Dashti, Hassan S.; Smith, Caren E.; Lee, Yu-Chi; Parnell, Laurence D.; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Arnett, Donna K.; Ordovás, José M.; Garaulet, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation in the circadian system induced by variants of clock genes has been associated with type 2 diabetes. Evidence for the role of cryptochromes, core components of the system, in regulating glucose homeostasis is not supported by CRY1 candidate gene association studies for diabetes and insulin resistance in human, suggesting possible dietary influences. The purpose of this study was to test for interactions between a CRY1 polymorphism, rs2287161, and carbohydrate intake on insulin resistance in two independent populations: a Mediterranean (n=728) and an European origin North American population (n=820). Linear regression interaction models were performed in two populations to test for gene–diet interactions on fasting insulin and glucose and two insulin-related traits, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI). In addition, fixed effects meta-analyses for these interactions were performed. Cohort-specific interaction analyses showed significant interactions between the CRY1 variant and dietary carbohydrates for insulin resistance in both populations (p<0.05). Findings from the meta-analyses of carbohydrate–single nucleotide polymorphism interactions indicated that an increase in carbohydrate intake (% of energy intake) was associated with a significant increase in HOMA-IR (p=0.011), fasting insulin (p=0.007) and a decrease in QUICKI (p=0.028), only among individuals homozygous for the minor C allele. This novel finding supports the link between the circadian system and glucose metabolism and suggests the importance this CRY1 locus in developing personalized nutrition programs aimed at reducing insulin resistance and diabetes risk. PMID:24548145

  5. Adding In Silico Assessment of Potential Splice Aberration to the Integrated Evaluation of BRCA Gene Unclassified Variants

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Maxime P.; Di Sera, Tonya L.; Nix, David A.; Paquette, Andrew M.; Parsons, Michael T.; Bell, Russel; Hoffman, Andrea; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Goldgar, David E.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clinical mutation screening of the cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 generates many unclassified variants (UVs). Most of these UVs are either rare missense substitutions or nucleotide substitutions near the splice junctions of the protein coding exons. Previously, we developed a quantitative method for evaluation of BRCA gene UVs—the “integrated evaluation”—that combines a sequence analysis‐based prior probability of pathogenicity with patient and/or tumor observational data to arrive at a posterior probability of pathogenicity. One limitation of the sequence analysis‐based prior has been that it evaluates UVs from the perspective of missense substitution severity but not probability to disrupt normal mRNA splicing. Here, we calibrated output from the splice‐site fitness program MaxEntScan to generate spliceogenicity‐based prior probabilities of pathogenicity for BRCA gene variants; these range from 0.97 for variants with high probability to damage a donor or acceptor to 0.02 for exonic variants that do not impact a splice junction and are unlikely to create a de novo donor. We created a database http://priors.hci.utah.edu/PRIORS/ that provides the combined missense substitution severity and spliceogenicity‐based probability of pathogenicity for BRCA gene single‐nucleotide substitutions. We also updated the BRCA gene Ex‐UV LOVD, available at http://hci‐exlovd.hci.utah.edu, with 77 re‐evaluable variants. PMID:26913838

  6. Association of common variants in the Joubert syndrome gene (AHI1) with autism

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Retuerto, Ana I.; Cantor, Rita M.; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Schackwitz, Wendy S.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested that autism, like other complex genetic disorders, may benefit from the study of rare or Mendelian variants associated with syndromic or non-syndromic forms of the disease. However, there are few examples in which common variation in genes causing a Mendelian neuropsychiatric disorder has been shown to contribute to disease susceptibility in an allied common condition. Joubert syndrome (JS) is a rare recessively inherited disorder, with mutations reported at several loci including the gene Abelson’s Helper Integration 1 (AHI1). A significant proportion of patients with JS, in some studies up to 40%, have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and several linkage studies in ASD have nominally implicated the region on 6q where AHI1 resides. To evaluate AHI1 in ASD, we performed a three-stage analysis of AHI1 as an a priori candidate gene for autism. Re-sequencing was first used to screen AHI1, followed by two subsequent association studies, one limited and one covering the gene more completely, in Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) families. In stage 3, we found evidence of an associated haplotype in AHI1 with ASD after correction for multiple comparisons, in a region of the gene that had been previously associated with schizophrenia. These data suggest a role for AHI1 in common disorders affecting human cognition and behavior. PMID:18782849

  7. Spread of a New Parasitic B Chromosome Variant Is Facilitated by High Gene Flow

    PubMed Central

    Manrique-Poyato, María Inmaculada; López-León, María Dolores; Cabrero, Josefa; Perfectti, Francisco; Camacho, Juan Pedro M.

    2013-01-01

    The B24 chromosome variant emerged several decades ago in a Spanish population of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans and is currently reaching adjacent populations. Here we report, for the first time, how a parasitic B chromosome (a strictly vertically transmitted parasite) expands its geographical range aided by high gene flow in the host species. For six years we analyzed B frequency in several populations to the east and west of the original population and found extensive spatial variation, but only a slight temporal trend. The highest B24 frequency was found in its original population (Torrox) and it decreased closer to both the eastern and the western populations. The analysis of Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) markers showed the existence of a low but significant degree of population subdivision, as well as significant isolation by distance (IBD). Pairwise Nem estimates suggested the existence of high gene flow between the four populations located in the Torrox area, with higher values towards the east. No significant barriers to gene flow were found among these four populations, and we conclude that high gene flow is facilitating B24 diffusion both eastward and westward, with minor role for B24 drive due to the arrival of drive suppressor genes which are also frequent in the donor population. PMID:24386259

  8. Accumulated common variants in the broader fragile X gene family modulate autistic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Stepniak, Beata; Kästner, Anne; Poggi, Giulia; Mitjans, Marina; Begemann, Martin; Hartmann, Annette; Van der Auwera, Sandra; Sananbenesi, Farahnaz; Krueger-Burg, Dilja; Matuszko, Gabriela; Brosi, Cornelia; Homuth, Georg; Völzke, Henry; Benseler, Fritz; Bagni, Claudia; Fischer, Utz; Dityatev, Alexander; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Rujescu, Dan; Fischer, Andre; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2015-12-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is mostly caused by a CGG triplet expansion in the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1). Up to 60% of affected males fulfill criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), making FXS the most frequent monogenetic cause of syndromic ASD. It is unknown, however, whether normal variants (independent of mutations) in the fragile X gene family (FMR1, FXR1, FXR2) and in FMR2 modulate autistic features. Here, we report an accumulation model of 8 SNPs in these genes, associated with autistic traits in a discovery sample of male patients with schizophrenia (N = 692) and three independent replicate samples: patients with schizophrenia (N = 626), patients with other psychiatric diagnoses (N = 111) and a general population sample (N = 2005). For first mechanistic insight, we contrasted microRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of selected extreme group subjects with high- versus low-risk constellation regarding the accumulation model. Thereby, the brain-expressed miR-181 species emerged as potential "umbrella regulator", with several seed matches across the fragile X gene family and FMR2. To conclude, normal variation in these genes contributes to the continuum of autistic phenotypes.

  9. Association of intronic variants of the KCNAB1 gene with lateral temporal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Busolin, Giorgia; Malacrida, Sandro; Bisulli, Francesca; Striano, Pasquale; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Egeo, Gabriella; Pasini, Elena; Cianci, Vittoria; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Bianchi, Amedeo; Coppola, Giangennaro; Elia, Maurizio; Mecarelli, Oriano; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Casellato, Susanna; Marchini, Marco; Binelli, Simona; Freri, Elena; Granata, Tiziana; Posar, Annio; Parmeggiani, Antonia; Vigliano, Piernanda; Boniver, Clementina; Aguglia, Umberto; Striano, Salvatore; Tinuper, Paolo; Giallonardo, A Teresa; Michelucci, Roberto; Nobile, Carlo

    2011-03-01

    The KCNAB1 gene is a candidate susceptibility factor for lateral temporal epilepsy (LTE) because of its functional interaction with LGI1, the gene responsible for the autosomal dominant form of LTE. We investigated association between polymorphic variants across the KCNAB1 gene and LTE. The allele and genotype frequencies of 14 KCNAB1 intronic SNPs were determined in 142 Italian LTE patients and 104 healthy controls and statistically evaluated. Single SNP analysis revealed one SNP (rs992353) located near the 3'end of KCNAB1 slightly associated with LTE after multiple testing correction (odds ratio=2.25; 95% confidence interval 1.26-4.04; P=0.0058). Haplotype analysis revealed two haplotypes with frequencies higher in cases than in controls, and these differences were statistically significant after permutation tests (Psim=0.047 and 0.034). One of these haplotypes was shown to confer a high risk for the syndrome (odds ratio=12.24; 95% confidence interval 1.32-113.05) by logistic regression analysis. These results support KCNAB1 as a susceptibility gene for LTE, in agreement with previous studies showing that this gene may alter susceptibility to focal epilepsy.

  10. Allelic variants of IL1R1 gene associate with severe hand osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In search for genes predisposing to osteoarthritis (OA), several genome wide scans have provided evidence for linkage on 2q. In this study we targeted a 470 kb region on 2q11.2 presenting the locus with most evidence for linkage to severe OA of distal interphalangeal joints (DIP) in our genome wide scan families. Methods We genotyped 32 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in this 470 kb region comprising six genes belonging to the interleukin 1 superfamily and monitored for association with individual SNPs and SNP haplotypes among severe familial hand OA cases (material extended from our previous linkage study; n = 134), unrelated end-stage bilateral primary knee OA cases (n = 113), and population based controls (n = 436). Results Four SNPs in the IL1R1 gene, mapping to a 125 kb LD block, provided evidence for association with hand OA in family-based and case-control analysis, the strongest association being with SNP rs2287047 (p-value = 0.0009). Conclusions This study demonstrates an association between severe hand OA and IL1R1 gene. This gene represents a highly relevant biological candidate since it encodes protein that is a known modulator of inflammatory processes associated with joint destruction and resides within a locus providing consistent evidence for linkage to hand OA. As the observed association did not fully explain the linkage obtained in the previous study, it is plausible that also other variants in this genome region predispose to hand OA. PMID:20353565

  11. 5-HT2A Gene Variants Moderate the Association between PTSD and Reduced Default Mode Network Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark W; Sperbeck, Emily; Robinson, Meghan E; Sadeh, Naomi; Wolf, Erika J; Hayes, Jasmeet P; Logue, Mark; Schichman, Steven A; Stone, Angie; Milberg, William; McGlinchey, Regina

    2016-01-01

    The default mode network (DMN) has been used to study disruptions of functional connectivity in a wide variety of psychiatric and neurological conditions, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Studies indicate that the serotonin system exerts a modulatory influence on DMN connectivity; however, no prior study has examined associations between serotonin receptor gene variants and DMN connectivity in either clinical or healthy samples. We examined serotonin receptor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), PTSD, and their interactions for association with DMN connectivity in 134 White non-Hispanic veterans. We began by analyzing candidate SNPs identified in prior meta-analyses of relevant psychiatric traits and found that rs7997012 (an HTR2A SNP), implicated previously in anti-depressant medication response in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives for Depression study (STAR(*)D; McMahon et al., 2006), interacted with PTSD to predict reduced connectivity between the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the right medial prefrontal cortex and right middle temporal gyrus (MTG). rs130058 (HTR1B) was associated with connectivity between the PCC and right angular gyrus. We then expanded our analysis to 99 HTR1B and HTR2A SNPs and found two HTR2A SNPs (rs977003 and rs7322347) that significantly moderated the association between PTSD severity and the PCC-right MTG component of the DMN after correcting for multiple testing. Finally, to obtain a more precise localization of the most significant SNP × PTSD interaction, we performed a whole cortex vertex-wise analysis of the rs977003 effect. This analysis revealed the locus of the pre-frontal effect to be in portions of the superior frontal gyrus, while the temporal lobe effect was centered in the middle and inferior temporal gyri. These findings point to the influence of HTR2A variants on DMN connectivity and advance knowledge of the role of 5-HT2A receptors in the neurobiology of PTSD.

  12. Oxytocin Receptor Gene Variant Interacts with Intervention Delivery Format in Predicting Intervention Outcomes for Youth with Conduct Problems.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Andrea L; Lochman, John E; Dishion, Thomas; Powell, Nicole P; Boxmeyer, Caroline; Qu, Lixin

    2017-03-16

    Coping Power is an evidence-based preventive intervention program for youth with aggressive behavior problems that has traditionally been delivered in small group formats. Because of concerns about iatrogenic effects secondary to aggregation of high risk youth, the current study examined whether genetic risk may moderate intervention outcome when youth were randomly assigned to group versus individual formats of an intervention. The oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) has been associated with social behavior and may influence susceptibility to social reinforcement in general and deviant peer influence in particular. One variant of OXTR (rs2268493) was examined in 197 fourth-grade African-American children (64% male) who were randomly assigned to Group Coping Power or Individual Coping Power (Lochman et al. 2015). Longitudinal assessments of teacher- and parent-reported behavior were collected through a 1-year follow-up. Growth curve analyses revealed a genotype by delivery format interaction. Youth with the A/A genotype demonstrated reductions in externalizing problems over the course of the intervention regardless of intervention format. In contrast, carriers of the G allele receiving the group-based intervention showed little improvement during the intervention and a worsening of symptoms during the follow-up year, while those receiving the individual format demonstrated reductions in externalizing problems. Given the associations between this OXTR variant and social bonding, carriers of the G allele may be more sensitive to social rewards from deviant peers in the group setting. This study suggests that genetic factors may be useful in predicting which type of intervention will be most effective for a particular individual.

  13. 5-HT2A Gene Variants Moderate the Association between PTSD and Reduced Default Mode Network Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark W.; Sperbeck, Emily; Robinson, Meghan E.; Sadeh, Naomi; Wolf, Erika J.; Hayes, Jasmeet P.; Logue, Mark; Schichman, Steven A.; Stone, Angie; Milberg, William; McGlinchey, Regina

    2016-01-01

    The default mode network (DMN) has been used to study disruptions of functional connectivity in a wide variety of psychiatric and neurological conditions, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Studies indicate that the serotonin system exerts a modulatory influence on DMN connectivity; however, no prior study has examined associations between serotonin receptor gene variants and DMN connectivity in either clinical or healthy samples. We examined serotonin receptor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), PTSD, and their interactions for association with DMN connectivity in 134 White non-Hispanic veterans. We began by analyzing candidate SNPs identified in prior meta-analyses of relevant psychiatric traits and found that rs7997012 (an HTR2A SNP), implicated previously in anti-depressant medication response in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives for Depression study (STAR*D; McMahon et al., 2006), interacted with PTSD to predict reduced connectivity between the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the right medial prefrontal cortex and right middle temporal gyrus (MTG). rs130058 (HTR1B) was associated with connectivity between the PCC and right angular gyrus. We then expanded our analysis to 99 HTR1B and HTR2A SNPs and found two HTR2A SNPs (rs977003 and rs7322347) that significantly moderated the association between PTSD severity and the PCC-right MTG component of the DMN after correcting for multiple testing. Finally, to obtain a more precise localization of the most significant SNP × PTSD interaction, we performed a whole cortex vertex-wise analysis of the rs977003 effect. This analysis revealed the locus of the pre-frontal effect to be in portions of the superior frontal gyrus, while the temporal lobe effect was centered in the middle and inferior temporal gyri. These findings point to the influence of HTR2A variants on DMN connectivity and advance knowledge of the role of 5-HT2A receptors in the neurobiology of PTSD. PMID:27445670

  14. Association of genetic variants in the receptor for advanced glycation end products gene with diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weihong; Yang, Jingyun; Sui, Wenda; Qu, Bin; Huang, Ping; Chen, Youxin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a major sight-threatening diabetic complication. Previous studies have examined the association of DR with multiple genetic variants in the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) gene, with inconsistent results. Objective: To perform a systematic literature search and conduct meta-analyses to examine the association of genetic variants in RAGE with DR. Data sources: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, Google Scholar, and HuGE. Study eligibility criteria and participants: Studies were on human subjects; the studies were case–control ones and included subjects who had DR and those who did not have DR; and the studies provided genotype data for genetic variants in RAGE, separately for subjects who had and did not have DR, or provided odds ratios (ORs) and the 95% confidence intervals (CIs), or provided sufficient data for the calculation of OR and the 95% CI. Study appraisal and synthesis methods: We used OR as a measure of association, and used random-effects model in all the meta-analyses. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed using I2, and publication bias was evaluated using Egger test. Results: A total of 13 studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in our analyses. We found that Gly82Ser was significantly associated with DR (OR = 2.40, 95% CI: 1.46–3.97; P = 0.001) using a recessive model. -374T/A also showed significant association with DR under a dominant model (OR = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.03–1.43; P = 0.023). We did not find a significant association of DR with other genetic variants in RAGE. Limitations: The number of included studies is small for some genetic variants; duration of diabetes varied across studies; most studies were conducted in Asia; and it is not clear whether the observed association can be generalized to other ethnicities; and we could not control for other potential confounding factors. Conclusions and implications of key findings: We found that Gly82Ser in RAGE

  15. Effect of polymorphic variants of GH, Pit-1, and beta-LG genes on milk production of Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Heidari, M; Azari, M A; Hasani, S; Khanahmadi, A; Zerehdaran, S

    2012-04-01

    Effect of polymorphic variants of growth hormone (GH), beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), and Pit-1 genes on milk yield was analyzed in a Holstein herd. Genotypes of the cows for these genes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Allele frequencies were 0.884 and 0.116 for L and V variants of GH, 0.170 and 0.830 for A and B variants of Pit-1, and 0.529 and 0.471 for A and B variants of beta-LG, respectively. GLM procedure of SAS software was used to test the effects of these genes on milk yield. Results indicated significant effects of these genes on milk yield (P < 0.05). Cows with LL genotype of GH produced more milk than cows with LVgenotype (P < 0.05). Also, for Pit-1 gene, animals with AB genotype produced more milk than BB genotype (P < 0.05). In the case of beta-LG gene, milk yield of animals with AA genotype was more than BB genotype (P < 0.01). Therefore, it might be concluded that homozygote genotypes of GH (LL) and beta-LG (AA) were superior compared to heterozygote genotypes, whereas, the heterozygote genotype of Pit-1 gene (AB) was desirable.

  16. Single Nucleotide Variants of Candidate Genes in Aggrecan Metabolic Pathway Are Associated with Lumbar Disc Degeneration and Modic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayake, Poruwalage Harsha; Senarath, Upul; Wijayaratne, Lalith Sirimevan; Karunanayake, Aranjan Lional; Dissanayake, Vajira Harshadeva Weerabaddana

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Lumbar disc degeneration (LDD) is genetically determined and severity of LDD is associated with Modic changes. Aggrecan is a major proteoglycan in the intervertebral disc and end plate. Progressive reduction of aggrecan is a main feature of LDD and Modic changes. Objectives The study investigated the associations of single nucleotide variants (SNVs) of candidate genes in the aggrecan metabolic pathway with the severity of LDD and Modic changes. In-silico functional analysis of significant SNVs was also assessed. Methods A descriptive cross sectional study was carried out on 106 patients with chronic mechanical low back pain. T1, T2 sagittal lumbar MRI scans were used to assess the severity of LDD and Modic changes. 62 SNVs in ten candidate genes (ACAN, IL1A, IL1B, IL6, MMP3, ADAMTS4, ADAMTS5, TIMP1, TIMP2 and TIMP3) were genotyped on Sequenom MassARRAY iPLEX platform. Multiple linear regression analysis was carried out using PLINK 1.9 in accordance with additive genetic model. In-silico functional analysis was carried out using Provean, SIFT, PolyPhen and Mutation Taster. Results Mean age was 52.42±9.42 years. 74 (69.8%) were females. The rs2856836, rs1304037, rs17561 and rs1800587 variants of the IL1A gene were associated with the severity of LDD and Modic changes. The rs41270041 variant of the ADAMTS4 gene and the rs226794 variant of the ADAMTS5 gene were associated with severity of LDD while the rs34884997 variant of the ADAMTS4 gene, the rs55933916 variant of the ADAMTS5 gene and the rs9862 variant of the TIMP3 gene were associated with severity of Modic changes. The rs17561 variant of the IL1A gene was predicted as pathogenic by the PolyPhen prediction tool. Conclusions SNVs of candidate genes in ACAN metabolic pathway are associated with severity of LDD and Modic changes in patients with chronic mechanical low back pain. Predictions of in-silico functional analysis of significant SNVs are inconsistent. PMID:28081267

  17. An Excess of Deleterious Variants in VEGF-A Pathway Genes in Down-Syndrome-Associated Atrioventricular Septal Defects

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Christine; Locke, Adam E.; Feingold, Eleanor; Reshey, Benjamin; Espana, Karina; Thusberg, Janita; Mooney, Sean; Bean, Lora J.H.; Dooley, Kenneth J.; Cua, Clifford L.; Reeves, Roger H.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Maslen, Cheryl L.

    2012-01-01

    About half of people with trisomy 21 have a congenital heart defect (CHD), whereas the remainder have a structurally normal heart, demonstrating that trisomy 21 is a significant risk factor but is not causal for abnormal heart development. Atrioventricular septal defects (AVSD) are the most commonly occurring heart defects in Down syndrome (DS), and ∼65% of all AVSD is associated with DS. We used a candidate-gene approach among individuals with DS and complete AVSD (cases = 141) and DS with no CHD (controls = 141) to determine whether rare genetic variants in genes involved in atrioventricular valvuloseptal morphogenesis contribute to AVSD in this sensitized population. We found a significant excess (p < 0.0001) of variants predicted to be deleterious in cases compared to controls. At the most stringent level of filtering, we found potentially damaging variants in nearly 20% of cases but fewer than 3% of controls. The variants with the highest probability of being damaging in cases only were found in six genes: COL6A1, COL6A2, CRELD1, FBLN2, FRZB, and GATA5. Several of the case-specific variants were recurrent in unrelated individuals, occurring in 10% of cases studied. No variants with an equal probability of being damaging were found in controls, demonstrating a highly specific association with AVSD. Of note, all of these genes are in the VEGF-A pathway, even though the candidate genes analyzed in this study represented numerous biochemical and developmental pathways, suggesting that rare variants in the VEGF-A pathway might contribute to the genetic underpinnings of AVSD in humans. PMID:23040494

  18. Genetic variants in interferon-λ 4 influences HCV clearance in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng; Yao, Yinan; Yue, Ming; Tian, Ting; Chen, Hongbo; Chen, Mingzhu; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Yun; Yu, Rongbin

    2017-01-01

    Recent many studies indicated a novel dinucleotide variant in ss469415590 (TT vs. ΔG) of interferon-λ 4 (IFNL4) gene strongly associated with hepatitis C virus clearance. To evaluate the impact and clinical usefulness of IFNL4 ss469415590 genotype on predicting both spontaneous HCV clearance and response to therapy in Chinese population, we genotyped 795 chronic HCV carriers, 460 subjects with HCV natural clearance and 362 patients with pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin (PEG IFN-α/RBV) treatment. IFNL4 ss469415590 variant genotypes significantly decreased host HCV clearance, both spontaneous (dominant model: OR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.36–0.71) and IFN-α induced (dominant model: OR = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.18–0.56). Multivariate stepwise analysis indicated that ss469415590, rs12979860, the level of baseline HCV RNA and platelet were as independent predictors for sustained virological response (SVR). But the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was only 0.58 for ss469415590, and it was elevated to 0.71 by adding rs12979860, baseline HCV RNA and platelet in the prediction model of SVR. Therefore, these findings underscore that although genetic factors of host and pathogen were commonly important during HCV clearance, ss469415590 may be also a strongly predictive marker in the Chinese population. PMID:28186161

  19. Influence of GRIK4 genetic variants on the electroconvulsive therapy response.

    PubMed

    Minelli, Alessandra; Congiu, Chiara; Ventriglia, Mariacarla; Bortolomasi, Marco; Bonvicini, Cristian; Abate, Maria; Sartori, Riccardo; Gainelli, Giulio; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2016-07-28

    Several lines of evidence have shown the involvement of the glutamatergic system in the function of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). In particular, patients with treatment resistant depression (TRD) and chronic depression have lower levels of glutamate/glutamine than controls, and ECT can reverse this deficit. Genetic factors might contribute to modulating the mechanisms underlying ECT. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between three polymorphisms (rs1954787, rs4936554 and rs11218030) of the glutamate receptor ionotropic kainate 4 (GRIK4) gene and responsiveness to ECT treatment in a sample of one hundred individuals, TRD or depressive Bipolar Disorder patients resistant to pharmacological treatments. The results revealed that GRIK4 variants were significantly associated with the response to ECT. In particular, we found that patients carrying the G allele of the GRIK4 rs11218030 had a significantly poorer response to ECT (p=2.71×10(-4)), showing five times the risk of relapse after ECT compared to the AA homozygotes. Analogously, patients carrying the GG rs1954787 genotype and rs4936554A allele carriers presented a double risk of lack of response after ECT (p=0.013 and p=0.040, respectively). In conclusion, the current study provides new evidence, indicating that some GRIK4 variants modulate the response to ECT in patients with depression resistant to treatment, suggesting a role for kainate receptor modulation.

  20. Identification of novel functional sequence variants in the gene for peptidase inhibitor 3

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Mahboob A; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Romero, Roberto; Edwin, Samuel; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Tromp, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    Background Peptidase inhibitor 3 (PI3) inhibits neutrophil elastase and proteinase-3, and has a potential role in skin and lung diseases as well as in cancer. Genome-wide expression profiling of chorioamniotic membranes revealed decreased expression of PI3 in women with preterm premature rupture of membranes. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms contributing to the decreased expression in amniotic membranes, the PI3 gene was searched for sequence variations and the functional significance of the identified promoter variants was studied. Methods Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified by direct sequencing of PCR products spanning a region from 1,173 bp upstream to 1,266 bp downstream of the translation start site. Fourteen SNPs were genotyped from 112 and nine SNPs from 24 unrelated individuals. Putative transcription factor binding sites as detected by in silico search were verified by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) using nuclear extract from Hela and amnion cell nuclear extract. Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was tested by χ2 goodness-of-fit test. Haplotypes were estimated using expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. Results Twenty-three sequence variations were identified by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products covering 2,439 nt of the PI3 gene (-1,173 nt of promoter sequences and all three exons). Analysis of 112 unrelated individuals showed that 20 variants had minor allele frequencies (MAF) ranging from 0.02 to 0.46 representing "true polymorphisms", while three had MAF ≤ 0.01. Eleven variants were in the promoter region; several putative transcription factor binding sites were found at these sites by database searches. Differential binding of transcription factors was demonstrated at two polymorphic sites by electrophoretic mobility shift assays, both in amniotic and HeLa cell nuclear extracts. Differential binding of the transcription factor GATA1 at -689C>G site was confirmed by a

  1. Antioxidant Defense Enzyme Genes and Asthma Susceptibility: Gender-Specific Effects and Heterogeneity in Gene-Gene Interactions between Pathogenetic Variants of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Polonikov, Alexey V.; Ivanov, Vladimir P.; Bogomazov, Alexey D.; Freidin, Maxim B.; Illig, Thomas; Solodilova, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from an increased amount of reactive oxygen species and an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants plays an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The present study tested the hypothesis that genetic susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic variants of asthma is determined by complex interactions between genes encoding antioxidant defense enzymes (ADE). We carried out a comprehensive analysis of the associations between adult asthma and 46 single nucleotide polymorphisms of 34 ADE genes and 12 other candidate genes of asthma in Russian population using set association analysis and multifactor dimensionality reduction approaches. We found for the first time epistatic interactions between ADE genes underlying asthma susceptibility and the genetic heterogeneity between allergic and nonallergic variants of the disease. We identified GSR (glutathione reductase) and PON2 (paraoxonase 2) as novel candidate genes for asthma susceptibility. We observed gender-specific effects of ADE genes on the risk of asthma. The results of the study demonstrate complexity and diversity of interactions between genes involved in oxidative stress underlying susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic asthma. PMID:24895604

  2. Functional genetic variant in the Kozak sequence of WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene is associated with oral cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chun-Wen; Su, Shih-Chi; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Yang, Shun-Fa; Lin, Chiao-Wen

    2016-01-01

    In Taiwan, oral cancer is the fourth leading cancer in males and is associated with exposure to environmental carcinogens. WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX), a tumor suppressor gene, is associated with the development of various cancers. We hypothesized that genetic variants of WWOX influence the susceptibility to oral cancer. Five polymorphisms of WWOX gene from 761 male patients with oral cancer and 1199 male cancer-free individuals were genotyped. We observed that individuals carrying the polymorphic allele of WWOX rs11545028 are more susceptible to oral cancer. Furthermore, patients with advanced-stage oral cancer were associated with a higher frequency of WWOX rs11545028 polymorphisms with the variant genotype TT than did patients with the wild-type gene. An additional integrated in silico analysis confirmed that rs11545028 affects WWOX expression, which significantly correlates with tumor expression and subsequently with tumor development and aggressiveness. In conclusion, genetic variants of WWOX contribute to the occurrence of oral cancer, and the findings regarding these biomarkers provided a prediction model for risk assessment. PMID:27655721

  3. Meta-analysis identifies common and rare variants influencing blood pressure and overlapping with metabolic trait loci.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T; Smith, Jennifer A; Brody, Jennifer A; Franceschini, Nora; Bis, Joshua C; Rice, Kenneth; Morrison, Alanna C; Lu, Yingchang; Weiss, Stefan; Guo, Xiuqing; Palmas, Walter; Martin, Lisa W; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Surendran, Praveen; Drenos, Fotios; Cook, James P; Auer, Paul L; Chu, Audrey Y; Giri, Ayush; Zhao, Wei; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Lin, Li-An; Stafford, Jeanette M; Amin, Najaf; Mei, Hao; Yao, Jie; Voorman, Arend; Larson, Martin G; Grove, Megan L; Smith, Albert V; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Chen, Han; Huan, Tianxiao; Kosova, Gulum; Stitziel, Nathan O; Kathiresan, Sekar; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Deloukas, Panos; Li, Man; Fuchsberger, Christian; Pattaro, Cristian; Gorski, Mathias; Kooperberg, Charles; Papanicolaou, George J; Rossouw, Jacques E; Faul, Jessica D; Kardia, Sharon L R; Bouchard, Claude; Raffel, Leslie J; Uitterlinden, André G; Franco, Oscar H; Vasan, Ramachandran S; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Taylor, Kent D; Liu, Kiang; Bottinger, Erwin P; Gottesman, Omri; Daw, E Warwick; Giulianini, Franco; Ganesh, Santhi; Salfati, Elias; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B; Rettig, Rainer; Völzke, Henry; Kim, Eric; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lee, I-Te; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Tsosie, Krystal S; Edwards, Digna R Velez; Liu, Yongmei; Correa, Adolfo; Weir, David R; Völker, Uwe; Ridker, Paul M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Reiner, Alexander P; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Edwards, Todd L; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Loos, Ruth J F; Fornage, Myriam; Ehret, Georg B; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Chasman, Daniel I

    2016-10-01

    Meta-analyses of association results for blood pressure using exome-centric single-variant and gene-based tests identified 31 new loci in a discovery stage among 146,562 individuals, with follow-up and meta-analysis in 180,726 additional individuals (total n = 327,288). These blood pressure-associated loci are enriched for known variants for cardiometabolic traits. Associations were also observed for the aggregation of rare and low-frequency missense variants in three genes, NPR1, DBH, and PTPMT1. In addition, blood pressure associations at 39 previously reported loci were confirmed. The identified variants implicate biological pathways related to cardiometabolic traits, vascular function, and development. Several new variants are inferred to have roles in transcription or as hubs in protein-protein interaction networks. Genetic risk scores constructed from the identified variants were strongly associated with coronary disease and myocardial infarction. This large collection of blood pressure-associated loci suggests new therapeutic strategies for hypertension, emphasizing a link with cardiometabolic risk.

  4. Meta-analysis identifies common and rare variants influencing blood pressure and overlapping with metabolic trait loci

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Franceschini, Nora; Bis, Joshua C.; Rice, Kenneth; Morrison, Alanna C.; Lu, Yingchang; Weiss, Stefan; Guo, Xiuqing; Palmas, Walter; Martin, Lisa W.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Surendran, Praveen; Drenos, Fotios; Cook, James P.; Auer, Paul L.; Chu, Audrey Y.; Giri, Ayush; Zhao, Wei; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Lin, Li-An; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Amin, Najaf; Mei, Hao; Yao, Jie; Voorman, Arend; Larson, Martin G.; Grove, Megan L.; Smith, Albert V.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Chen, Han; Huan, Tianxiao; Kosova, Gulum; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Deloukas, Panos; Li, Man; Fuchsberger, Christian; Pattaro, Cristian; Gorski, Mathias; Kooperberg, Charles; Papanicolaou, George J.; Rossouw, Jacques E.; Faul, Jessica D.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Bouchard, Claude; Raffel, Leslie J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Franco, Oscar H.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Taylor, Kent D.; Liu, Kiang; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Gottesman, Omri; Daw, E. Warwick; Giulianini, Franco; Ganesh, Santhi; Salfati, Elias; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B.; Rettig, Rainer; Völzke, Henry; Kim, Eric; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lee, I-Te; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Tsosie, Krystal S.; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Liu, Yongmei; Correa, Adolfo; Weir, David R.; Völker, Uwe; Ridker, Paul M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Reiner, Alexander P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Edwards, Todd L.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rotter, Jerome I.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Fornage, Myriam; Ehret, Georg; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Chasman, Daniel I.

    2017-01-01

    Meta-analyses of association results for blood pressure using exome-centric single-variants and gene-based tests identified 31 novel loci in discovery among 146,562 individuals with follow-up and meta-analysis in 180,726 additional individuals (Ntotal=327,288). These blood pressure loci are enriched for known cardiometabolic trait variants. Associations were also observed for the aggregation of rare/low-frequency missense variants in three genes, NPR1, DBH, and PTPMT1. In addition, blood pressure associations at 39 previously reported loci were confirmed. The identified variants implicate biological pathways related to cardiometabolic traits, vascular function, and development. Several new variants are inferred to have roles in transcription or as hubs in protein-protein interaction networks. Genetic risk scores constructed from the identified variants were strongly associated with coronary disease and myocardial infarction. This large collection of blood pressure loci suggests new therapeutic strategies for hypertension emphasizing a link with cardiometabolic risk. PMID:27618448

  5. Reverse engineering gene regulatory network from microarray data using linear time-variant model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene regulatory network is an abstract mapping of gene regulations in living cells that can help to predict the system behavior of living organisms. Such prediction capability can potentially lead to the development of improved diagnostic tests and therapeutics. DNA microarrays, which measure the expression level of thousands of genes in parallel, constitute the numeric seed for the inference of gene regulatory networks. In this paper, we have proposed a new approach for inferring gene regulatory networks from time-series gene expression data using linear time-variant model. Here, Self-Adaptive Differential Evolution, a versatile and robust Evolutionary Algorithm, is used as the learning paradigm. Results To assess the potency of the proposed work, a well known nonlinear synthetic network has been used. The reconstruction method has inferred this synthetic network topology and the associated regulatory parameters with high accuracy from both the noise-free and noisy time-series data. For validation purposes, the proposed approach is also applied to the simulated expression dataset of cAMP oscillations in Dictyostelium discoideum and has proved it's strength in finding the correct regulations. The strength of this work has also been verified by analyzing the real expression dataset of SOS DNA repair system in Escherichia coli and it has succeeded in finding more correct and reasonable regulations as compared to various existing works. Conclusion By the proposed approach, the gene interaction networks have been inferred in an efficient manner from both the synthetic, simulated cAMP oscillation expression data and real expression data. The computational time of this approach is also considerably smaller, which makes it to be more suitable for larger network reconstruction. Thus the proposed approach can serve as an initiate for the future researches regarding the associated area. PMID:20122231

  6. Association Analyses of Variants in the DIO2 Gene with Early-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Pima Indians

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Yunhua Li; Ortega, Emilio; Kobes, Sayuko; Bogardus, Clifton; Baier, Leslie J.

    2012-01-01

    Background The type 2 deiodinase gene (DIO2) encodes a deiodinase that converts the thyroid prohormone, thyroxine, to the biologically active triiodothyronine. Thyroid hormones regulate energy balance and may also influence glucose metabolism. Therefore, we hypothesized that variations in DIO2 could contribute to obesity or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Pima Indians. Methods Sequencing of the DIO2 gene in DNA from 83 Pima Indians identified 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Several of these SNPs were in perfect genotypic concordance among the 83 samples that were sequenced, and all 12 could be divided into five linkage disequilibrium groups. One representative SNP from each group (Thr92Ala, rs225011, rs225015, rs6574549, and a rare 5′ flanking SNP) was selected for further genotyping for association analyses. In this study, the five selected variants in DIO2, as described above, were genotyped in three groups of Pima Indians: (i) a case (n=150)/control (n=150) group for early-onset T2DM (onset age <25 years); (ii) a case (n=362)/control (n=127) group for obesity; (iii) a large (n=1,311, cases n=810/controls n=501) family-based group, of which 256 nondiabetic subjects had undergone detailed metabolic phenotyping. Results The Thr92Ala variant common in Pima Indians, rs225011, and rs225015 were modestly associated with early-onset T2DM (p=0.01–0.04) in the case–control study, but were not associated with obesity in the obesity case–control study, nor associated with T2DM (at any age) or body–mass index (BMI; as a quantitative trait) in the family-based analysis. Thr92Ala, rs225011, rs225015, and rs6574549 were also nominally associated with hepatic glucose output (p=0.02). rs6574549 was associated with fasting insulin (p=0.02), insulin action (p=0.04), and energy expenditure (p=0.02). None of these nominal associations remained statistically significant after corrections for multiple testing. Conclusions We propose that variation in DIO2 may

  7. Evolutionary Influenced Interaction Pattern as Indicator for the Investigation of Natural Variants Causing Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Grunert, Steffen; Labudde, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The importance of short membrane sequence motifs has been shown in many works and emphasizes the related sequence motif analysis. Together with specific transmembrane helix-helix interactions, the analysis of interacting sequence parts is helpful for understanding the process during membrane protein folding and in retaining the three-dimensional fold. Here we present a simple high-throughput analysis method for deriving mutational information of interacting sequence parts. Applied on aquaporin water channel proteins, our approach supports the analysis of mutational variants within different interacting subsequences and finally the investigation of natural variants which cause diseases like, for example, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. In this work we demonstrate a simple method for massive membrane protein data analysis. As shown, the presented in silico analyses provide information about interacting sequence parts which are constrained by protein evolution. We present a simple graphical visualization medium for the representation of evolutionary influenced interaction pattern pairs (EIPPs) adapted to mutagen investigations of aquaporin-2, a protein whose mutants are involved in the rare endocrine disorder known as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and membrane proteins in general. Furthermore, we present a new method to derive new evolutionary variations within EIPPs which can be used for further mutagen laboratory investigations.

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Spike (S) Gene of the New Variants of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhoea Virus in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiou, H-Y; Huang, Y-L; Deng, M-C; Chang, C-Y; Jeng, C-R; Tsai, P-S; Yang, C; Pang, V F; Chang, H-W

    2017-02-01

    New variants of porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus (PEDV), which emerged in Taiwan in late 2013, have caused a high morbidity and mortality in neonatal piglets. To investigate the molecular characteristics of the spike (S) gene of the emerging Taiwan PEDV strains for a better understanding of the genetic diversity and relationship among the Taiwan new variants and the global PEDVs, full-length S genes of PEDVs from nine 1-7 day-old piglets from three pig farms in the central and southern Taiwan were sequenced and analysed. The result of phylogenetic analysis of the S gene showed that all the Taiwan PEDV strains were closely related to the non-S INDEL strains from US, Canada and China, suggesting a common ancestor for these strains. As compared with the historic PEDVs and CV777-based vaccine strains, the nine Taiwan PEDV variants shared almost the same genetic signatures as the global non-S INDEL strains, including a series of insertions, deletions and mutations in the amino terminal as well as identical mutations in the neutralizing epitopes of the S gene. The high similarity of the S protein among the Taiwan and the globally emerged non-S INDEL PEDV strains suggests that the Taiwan new variants may share similar pathogenesis and immunogenicity as the global outbreak variants. The development of a novel vaccine based on the Taiwan or the global non-S INDEL strains may be contributive to the control of the current global porcine epidemic diarrhoea outbreaks.

  9. No association between oxytocin or prolactin gene variants and childhood-onset mood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, John S.; Freeman, Natalie L.; Shaikh, Sajid A.; Vetró, Ágnes; Kiss, Enikő; Kapornai, Krisztina; Daróczi, Gabriella; Rimay, Timea; Kothencné, Viola Osváth; Dombovári, Edit; Kaczvinszk, Emília; Tamás, Zsuzsa; Baji, Ildikó; Besny, Márta; Gádoros, Julia; DeLuca, Vincenzo; George, Charles J.; Dempster, Emma; Barr, Cathy L.; Kovacs, Maria; Kennedy, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Oxytocin (OXT) and prolactin (PRL) are neuropeptide hormones that interact with the serotonin system and are involved in the stress response and social affiliation. In human studies, serum OXT and PRL levels have been associated with depression and related phenotypes. Our purpose was to determine if single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the loci for OXT, PRL and their receptors, OXTR and PRLR, were associated with childhood-onset mood disorders (COMD). Methods Using 678 families in a family-based association design, we genotyped sixteen SNPs at OXT, PRL, OXTR and PRLR to test for association with COMD. Results No significant associations were found for SNPs in the OXTR, PRL, or PRLR genes. Two of three SNPs 3' of the OXT gene were associated with COMD (p ≤ 0.02), significant after spectral decomposition, but were not significant after additionally correcting for the number of genes tested. Supplementary analyses of parent-of-origin and proband sex effects for OXT SNPs by Fisher’s Exact test were not significant after Bonferroni correction. Conclusions We have examined sixteen OXT and PRL system gene variants, with no evidence of statistically significant association after correction for multiple tests. PMID:20547007

  10. Analysis of the effects of rare variants on splicing identifies alterations in GABAA receptor genes in autism spectrum disorder individuals

    PubMed Central

    Piton, Amélie; Jouan, Loubna; Rochefort, Daniel; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Lachapelle, Karine; Dion, Patrick A; Gauthier, Julie; Rouleau, Guy A

    2013-01-01

    A large-scale sequencing screen of X-linked synaptic genes in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or schizophrenia (SCZ), two common neurodevelopmental disorders, identified many variants most of which have no easily predictable effect on gene function. In this report, we evaluated the impact of these rare missense and silent variants on gene splicing. For this purpose, we used complementary in silico analyses, in vitro minigene-based assays and RNA prepared from lymphoblastoid cells derived from patients with these mutations. Our goal was to identify the variants which might either create or disrupt an acceptor splice site, a donor splice site or an exonic splicing enhancer, thus leading to aberrant splicing that could be involved in the pathogenesis of ASD or SCZ. We identified truncating mutations in distinct X-linked gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptor subunit-encoding genes, GABRQ and GABRA3, in two different families. Furthermore, missense and silent variants in nuclear RNA export factor 5 and histone deacetylase 6 were shown to partially disrupt the protein. While genes from the GABAergic pathway have previously been thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of ASD, this is the first report of ASD patients with truncating mutations in GABA receptors genes. PMID:23169495

  11. Identification of rare variants of DSP gene in Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death Syndrome in the southern Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qianhao; Chen, Yili; Peng, Longlun; Gao, Rui; Liu, Nian; Jiang, Pingping; Liu, Chao; Tang, Shuangbo

    2016-01-01

    Sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS) is a perplexing disorder to both forensic pathologists and clinic physicians. Desmoplakin (DSP) gene was the first desmosomal gene linked to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) which was associated with sudden death. To identify the genetic variants of the DSP gene in SUNDS in the southern Chinese Han population, we genetically screened the DSP gene in 40 sporadic SUNDS victims, 16 Brugada syndrome (BrS) patients and 2 Early Repolarization syndrome (ERS) patients using Next Generation Sequencing (NSG) and direct Sanger sequencing. A total of 10 genetic variants of the DSP gene were detected in 11 cases, comprised of two novel missense mutations (p.I125F and p.D521A) and eight previously reported rare variants. Of eight reported variants, two were previously considered pathogenic (p.Q90R and p.R2639Q), three were predicted in silico to bepathogenic (p.R315C, p.E1357D and p.D2579H), and the rest three were predicted to be benign (p.N1234S, p.R1308Q and p.T2267S). This is the first report of DSP genetic screening in Chinese SUNDS and Brugada syndrome. Our results implies that DSP mutations contribute to the genetic cause of some SUNDS victims and maybe a new susceptible gene for Brugada syndrome. PMID:26585738

  12. Identification of rare variants of DSP gene in sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome in the southern Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qianhao; Chen, Yili; Peng, Longlun; Gao, Rui; Liu, Nian; Jiang, Pingping; Liu, Chao; Tang, Shuangbo; Quan, Li; Makielski, Jonathan C; Cheng, Jianding

    2016-03-01

    Sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS) is a perplexing disorder to both forensic pathologists and clinic physicians. Desmoplakin (DSP) gene was the first desmosomal gene linked to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) which was associated with sudden death. To identify the genetic variants of the DSP gene in SUNDS in the southern Chinese Han population, we genetically screened the DSP gene in 40 sporadic SUNDS victims, 16 Brugada syndrome (BrS) patients, and 2 early repolarization syndrome (ERS) patients using next generation sequencing (NSG) and direct Sanger sequencing. A total of 10 genetic variants of the DSP gene were detected in 11 cases, comprised of two novel missense mutations (p.I125F and p.D521A) and eight previously reported rare variants. Of eight reported variants, two were previously considered pathogenic (p.Q90R and p.R2639Q), three were predicted in silico to be pathogenic (p.R315C, p.E1357D and p.D2579H), and the rest three were predicted to be benign (p.N1234S, p.R1308Q, and p.T2267S). This is the first report of DSP genetic screening in Chinese SUNDS and Brugada syndrome. Our results imply that DSP mutations contribute to the genetic cause of some SUNDS victims and maybe a new susceptible gene for Brugada syndrome.

  13. The kallikrein gene 5 splice variant 2 is a new biomarker for breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Yousef, George M; White, Nicole M A; Kurlender, Lisa; Michael, Iacovos; Memari, Nader; Robb, John-Desmond; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Stephan, Carsten; Jung, Klaus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2004-01-01

    The presence of more than one mRNA form for the same gene is common among kallikreins, and many of the kallikrein splice variants may hold significant clinical value. The human kallikrein gene 5 (KLK5) is a member of the human kallikrein gene family of serine proteases on chromosome 19q13.4. KLK5 has been shown to be differentially expressed in a variety of endocrine tumors including ovarian, breast and prostate cancer. Utilizing Expressed Sequence Tag database analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, we identified a new alternatively spliced form of KLK5(KLK5-splice variant 2, KLK5-SV2). This variant mRNA is 1,438 bp in length; formed of 195 bp of 5' untranslated region, 882 bp of protein coding sequence and a 3' untranslated region of 326 nucleotides. KLK5-SV2 has 7 exons, the first 2 of which are untranslated, and 6 intervening introns. KLK5-SV2 is different from the classic form of the KLK5 mRNA in its 5' untranslated region, where the first 5' untranslated exon of the classic form is split into 2 exons with an intervening intron of 135 nucleotides. KLK5-SV2 is expressed in a variety of tissues, with higher expression levels in the mammary gland, cervix, salivary gland and trachea. The steroid hormone receptor-positive breast cancer cell line BT-474 was used to examine the effect of different steroids on the expression levels of KLK5-SV2. Expression levels were significantly higher after stimulation with androgens, but not estrogens, progestins, aldosterone or corticosteroids. While relatively high levels of expression were found in all 10 normal breast tissues examined, no expression was detected in 16 breast cancer tissues, and expression was significantly lower than normal in the remaining 4 cancers. Expression levels comparable to normal were found in only 1 breast cancer cell line. Weak to no expression was detected in 3 other breast cancer cell lines. KLK5-SV2 was not detectable in any of the 10 normal ovarian tissues examined. It was

  14. Common genetic variants in pituitary-thyroid axis genes and the risk of differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Susana; Akdi, Abdelmounaim; González, Eddy R; Castell, Juan; Biarnés, Josefina; Marcos, Ricard; Velázquez, Antonia

    2012-11-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors, THRA and THRB, together with the TSH receptor, TSHR, are key regulators of thyroid function. Alterations in the genes of these receptors (THRA, THRB and TSHR) have been related to thyroid diseases, including thyroid cancer. Moreover, there is evidence suggesting that predisposition to differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is related to common genetic variants with low penetrance that interact with each other and with environmental factors. In this study, we investigated the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the THRA (one SNP), THRB (three SNPs) and TSHR (two SNPs) genes with DTC risk. A case-control association study was conducted with 398 patients with sporadic DTC and 479 healthy controls from a Spanish population. Among the polymorphisms studied, only THRA-rs939348 was found to be associated with an increased risk of DTC (recessive model, odds ratio=1.80, 95% confidence interval=1.03-3.14, P=0.037). Gene-gene interaction analysis using the genotype data of this study together with our previous genotype data on TG and TRHR indicated a combined effect of the pairwises: THRB-TG (P interaction=0.014, THRB-rs3752874 with TG-rs2076740; P interaction=0.099, THRB-rs844107 with TG-rs2076740) and THRB-TRHR (P interaction=0.0024, THRB-rs3752874 with TRHR-rs4129682) for DTC risk in a Spanish population. Our results confirm that THRA is a risk factor for DTC, and we show for the first time the combined effect of THRB and TG or TRHR on DTC susceptibility, supporting the importance of gene-gene interaction in thyroid cancer risk.

  15. Association and synergistic interaction between promoter variants of the DRD4 gene in Japanese schizophrenics

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Mizuho; Hattori, Eiji; Yamada, Kazuo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Toyota, Tomoko; Iwata, Yasuhide; Tsuchiya, Kenji J.; Sugihara, Genichi; Hashimoto, Kenji; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Iyo, Masaomi; Hoshika, Akinori

    2006-01-01

    Recent association studies suggest that polymorphisms in the promoter and exon 1 upstream region of the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene play a functional role in the development of common psychiatric illnesses, although there are also conflicting results. In this study, we re-sequenced this region to identify all genomic variants, and tested them for association with schizophrenia. A total of 570 Japanese schizophrenic cases with matched controls were studied by genotyping all identified/validated common polymorphisms (−1106T>C, −906T>C, −809G>A, −616G>C, −521T>C, −376C>T, −291C>T and 12-bp repeat) and a known microsatellite (120-bp tandem duplication) in the upstream region. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) −809G>A in the promoter region was found to be significantly associated with disease (P=0.018 and 0.032 for allelic and genotypic comparisons, respectively), although not surviving after Bonferroni correction. Logistic regression analysis showed that a combination of the four polymorphisms, −809G>A, −616G>C, −291C>T and the 12-bp repeat, conferred a susceptibility to schizophrenia. These results suggest that the upstream variants have a primary functional effect in the etiology of schizophrenia in the Japanese population. PMID:17089069

  16. Asthma families show transmission disequilibrium of gene variants in the vitamin D metabolism and signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wjst, Matthias; Altmüller, Janine; Faus-Kessler, Theresia; Braig, Christine; Bahnweg, Margret; André, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    The vitamin D prophylaxis of rickets in pregnant women and newborns may play a role in early allergic sensitization. We now asked if an already diseased population may have inherited genetic variants in the vitamin D turnover or signalling pathway. Serum levels of calcidiol (25-OH-D3) and calcitriol (1,25-(OH)2-D3) were retrospectively assessed in 872 partipants of the German Asthma Family Study. 96 DNA single base variants in 13 different genes were genotyped with MALDI-TOF and a bead array system. At least one positive SNP with a TDT of p < 0.05 for asthma or total IgE and calcidiol or calcitriol was seen in IL10, GC, IL12B, CYP2R1, IL4R, and CYP24A1. Consistent strong genotypic association could not be observed. Haplotype association were found only for CYP24A1, the main calcidiol degrading enzyme, where a frequent 5-point-haplotype was associated with asthma (p = 0,00063), total IgE (p = 0,0014), calcidiol (p = 0,0043) and calcitriol (p = 0,0046). Genetic analysis of biological pathways seem to be a promising approach where this may be a first entry point into effects of a polygenic inherited vitamin D sensitivity that may affect also other metabolic, immunological and cancerous diseases. PMID:16600026

  17. A Common Variant in the SETD7 Gene Predicts Serum Lycopene Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    D’Adamo, Christopher R.; D’Urso, Antonietta; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Semba, Richard D.; Steinle, Nanette I.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; McArdle, Patrick F.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary intake and higher serum concentrations of lycopene have been associated with lower incidence of prostate cancer and other chronic diseases. Identifying determinants of serum lycopene concentrations may thus have important public health implications. Prior studies have suggested that serum lycopene concentrations are under partial genetic control. The goal of this research was to identify genetic predictors of serum lycopene concentrations using the genome-wide association study (GWAS) approach among a sample of 441 Old Order Amish adults that consumed a controlled diet. Linear regression models were utilized to evaluate associations between genetic variants and serum concentrations of lycopene. Variant rs7680948 on chromosome 4, located in the intron region of the SETD7 gene, was significantly associated with serum lycopene concentrations (p = 3.41 × 10−9). Our findings also provided nominal support for the association previously noted between SCARB1 and serum lycopene concentrations, although with a different SNP (rs11057841) in the region. This study identified a novel locus associated with serum lycopene concentrations and our results raise a number of intriguing possibilities regarding the nature of the relationship between SETD7 and lycopene, both of which have been independently associated with prostate cancer. Further investigation into this relationship might help provide greater mechanistic understanding of these associations. PMID:26861389

  18. Fusion gene and splice variant analyses in liquid biopsies of lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Giménez-Capitán, Ana; Karachaliou, Niki; Pérez-Rosado, Ana; Viteri, Santiago; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining a biopsy of solid tumors requires invasive procedures that strongly limit patient compliance. In contrast, a blood extraction is safe, can be performed at many time points during the course disease and encourages appropriate therapy modifications, potentially improving the patient’s clinical outcome and quality of life. Fusion of the tyrosine kinase genes anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), C-ROS oncogen 1 (ROS 1), rearranged during transfection (RET) and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase 1 (NTRK1) occur in 1–5% of lung adenocarcinomas and constitute therapeutic targets for tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In addition, a MET splicing variant of exon 14, has been reported in 2–4% of lung adenocarcinoma and recent studies suggests that targeted therapies inhibiting MET signaling would be beneficial for patients with this alteration. In this review, we will summarize the new techniques recently developed to detect ALK, RET, ROS and NTRK1 fusions and MET exon 14 splicing variant in liquid biopsy using plasma, serum, circulating tumor cells (CTCs), platelets and exosomes as starting material. PMID:27826534

  19. Expressed var gene repertoire and variant surface antigen diversity in a shrinking Plasmodium falciparum population.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Bianca C; Fotoran, Wesley L; Menezes, Maria J; Cabral, Fernanda J; Bastos, Marcele F; Costa, Fabio T M; Sousa-Neto, Jayme A; Ribolla, Paulo E M; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Ferreira, Marcelo U

    2016-11-01

    The var gene-encoded erythrocyte membrane protein-1 of Plasmodium falciparum (PfEMP-1) is the main variant surface antigen (VSA) expressed on infected erythrocytes. The rate at which antibody responses to VSA expressed by circulating parasites are acquired depends on the size of the local VSA repertoire and the frequency of exposure to new VSA. Because parasites from areas with declining malaria endemicity, such as the Amazon, typically express a restricted PfEMP-1 repertoire, we hypothesized that Amazonians would rapidly acquire antibodies to most locally circulating VSA. Consistent with our expectations, the analysis of 5878 sequence tags expressed by 10 local P. falciparum samples revealed little PfEMP-1 DBL1α domain diversity. Among the most commonly expressed DBL1α types, 45% were shared by two or more independent parasite lines. Nevertheless, Amazonians displayed major gaps in their repertoire of anti-VSA antibodies, although the breadth of anti-VSA antibody responses correlated positively with their cumulative exposure to malaria. We found little antibody cross-reactivity even when testing VSA from related parasites expressing the same dominant DBL1α types. We conclude that variant-specific immunity to P. falciparum VSAs develops slowly despite the relatively restricted PfEMP-1 repertoire found in low-endemicity settings.

  20. Autism gene variant causes hyperserotonemia, serotonin receptor hypersensitivity, social impairment and repetitive behavior.

    PubMed

    Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Muller, Christopher L; Iwamoto, Hideki; Sauer, Jennifer E; Owens, W Anthony; Shah, Charisma R; Cohen, Jordan; Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Jessen, Tammy; Thompson, Brent J; Ye, Ran; Kerr, Travis M; Carneiro, Ana M; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Sanders-Bush, Elaine; McMahon, Douglas G; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Daws, Lynette C; Sutcliffe, James S; Blakely, Randy D

    2012-04-03

    Fifty years ago, increased whole-blood serotonin levels, or hyperserotonemia, first linked disrupted 5-HT homeostasis to Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs). The 5-HT transporter (SERT) gene (SLC6A4) has been associated with whole blood 5-HT levels and ASD susceptibility. Previously, we identified multiple gain-of-function SERT coding variants in children with ASD. Here we establish that transgenic mice expressing the most common of these variants, SERT Ala56, exhibit elevated, p38 MAPK-dependent transporter phosphorylation, enhanced 5-HT clearance rates and hyperserotonemia. These effects are accompanied by altered basal firing of raphe 5-HT neurons, as well as 5HT(1A) and 5HT(2A) receptor hypersensitivity. Strikingly, SERT Ala56 mice display alterations in social function, communication, and repetitive behavior. Our efforts provide strong support for the hypothesis that altered 5-HT homeostasis can impact risk for ASD traits and provide a model with construct and face validity that can support further analysis of ASD mechanisms and potentially novel treatments.

  1. Association of serine racemase gene variants with type 2 diabetes in the Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Simin; Xiao, Jianzhong; Ren, Qian; Han, Xueyao; Tang, Yong; Yang, Wenying; Zhou, Xianghai; Ji, Linong

    2014-05-04

    A genome-wide association study in the Chinese Han population has identified several novel genetic variants of the serine racemase (SRR) gene in type 2 diabetes. Our purpose was to systematically evaluate the contribution of SRR variants in the Chinese Han population. rs391300 and rs4523957 in SRR were genotyped respectively in the two independent populations. A meta-analysis was used to estimate the effects of SRR in 21,305 Chinese Han individuals. Associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms and diabetes-related phenotypes were analyzed among 2,615 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients and 5,029 controls. Neither rs391300 nor rs4523957 were associated with type 2 diabetes in populations. Furthermore, meta-analysis did not confirm an association between type 2 diabetes and SRR. In the controls, rs391300-A and rs4523957-G were associated with higher 30-min plasma glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test. The present study did not confirm that SRR was associated with type 2 diabetes.

  2. A Common Variant in the SETD7 Gene Predicts Serum Lycopene Concentrations.

    PubMed

    D'Adamo, Christopher R; D'Urso, Antonietta; Ryan, Kathleen A; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Semba, Richard D; Steinle, Nanette I; Mitchell, Braxton D; Shuldiner, Alan R; McArdle, Patrick F

    2016-02-06

    Dietary intake and higher serum concentrations of lycopene have been associated with lower incidence of prostate cancer and other chronic diseases. Identifying determinants of serum lycopene concentrations may thus have important public health implications. Prior studies have suggested that serum lycopene concentrations are under partial genetic control. The goal of this research was to identify genetic predictors of serum lycopene concentrations using the genome-wide association study (GWAS) approach among a sample of 441 Old Order Amish adults that consumed a controlled diet. Linear regression models were utilized to evaluate associations between genetic variants and serum concentrations of lycopene. Variant rs7680948 on chromosome 4, located in the intron region of the SETD7 gene, was significantly associated with serum lycopene concentrations (p = 3.41 × 10(-9)). Our findings also provided nominal support for the association previously noted between SCARB1 and serum lycopene concentrations, although with a different SNP (rs11057841) in the region. This study identified a novel locus associated with serum lycopene concentrations and our results raise a number of intriguing possibilities regarding the nature of the relationship between SETD7 and lycopene, both of which have been independently associated with prostate cancer. Further investigation into this relationship might help provide greater mechanistic understanding of these associations.

  3. Reporter system for the detection of in vivo gene conversion: changing colors from blue to green using GFP variants.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Jeffrey R; Alderson, Jon; Laible, Goetz; Petters, Robert M

    2006-06-01

    We have devised a system for the study of in vivo gene correction based on the detection of color variants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. The intensity and spectra of the fluorescence emitted by the blue (BFP) and red-shifted (EGFP) variants of GFP differ from each other. We modified one nucleotide from an EGFP expression vector that we predicted would yield a blue variant (TAC-CAC, Tyr(66)-His(66)). Cells that were either transiently or stably transfected with the reporter system were used to test the functionality and feasibility of the detection of in vivo gene correction. A thio-protected single-stranded oligonucleotide designed to convert the genotype of the blue variant to that of the EGFP variant by the correction of a single base pair was delivered to the reporter cells using a variety of methodologies and strategies.Conversion events were easily observed using fluorescent microscopy because of the enhanced emission intensity and different spectra of the EGFP variant.

  4. New Findings in eNOS gene and Thalidomide Embryopathy Suggest pre-transcriptional effect variants as susceptibility factors.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Thayne Woycinck; Fraga, Lucas Rosa; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Sanseverino, Maria Teresa Vieira; Hutz, Mara Helena; Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia; Vianna, Fernanda Sales Luiz

    2016-03-23

    Antiangiogenic properties of thalidomide have created an interest in the use of the drug in treatment of cancer. However, thalidomide is responsible for thalidomide embryopathy (TE). A lack of knowledge regarding the mechanisms of thalidomide teratogenesis acts as a barrier in the aim to synthesize a safer analogue of thalidomide. Recently, our group detected a higher frequency of alleles that impair the pro-angiogenic mechanisms of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), coded by the NOS3 gene. In this study we evaluated variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) functional polymorphism in intron 4 of NOS3 in individuals with TE (38) and Brazilians without congenital anomalies (136). Haplotypes were estimated for this VNTR with previously analyzed polymorphisms, rs2070744 (-786C > T) and rs1799983 (894T > G), in promoter region and exon 7, respectively. Haplotypic distribution was different between the groups (p = 0.007). Alleles -786C (rs2070744) and 4b (VNTR), associated with decreased NOS3 expression, presented in higher frequency in TE individuals (p = 0.018; OR = 2.57; IC = 1.2-5.8). This association was not identified with polymorphism 894T > G (p = 0.079), which influences eNOS enzymatic activity. These results suggest variants in NOS3, with pre-transcriptional effects as susceptibility factors, influencing the risk TE development. This finding generates insight for a new approach to research that pursues a safer analogue.

  5. Germline variants in MRE11/RAD50/NBN complex genes in childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The MRE11, RAD50, and NBN genes encode proteins of the MRE11-RAD50-NBN (MRN) complex involved in cellular response to DNA damage and the maintenance of genome stability. In our previous study we showed that the germline p.I171V mutation in NBN may be considered as a risk factor in the development of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and some specific haplotypes of that gene may be associated with childhood leukemia. These findings raise important questions about the role of mutations in others genes of the MRN complex in childhood leukemia. The aim of this study was to answer the question whether MRE11 and RAD50 alterations may be associated with childhood ALL or AML. Methods We estimated the frequency of constitutional mutations and polymorphisms in selected regions of MRE11, RAD50, and NBN in the group of 220 children diagnosed with childhood leukemias and controls (n=504/2200). The analysis was performed by specific amplification of region of interest by PCR and followed by multi-temperature single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-MSSCP) technique. We performed two molecular tests to examine any potential function of the detected the c.551+19G>A SNP in RAD50 gene. To our knowledge, this is the first analysis of the MRE11, RAD50 and NBN genes in childhood leukemia. Results The frequency of either the AA genotype or A allele of RAD50_rs17166050 were significantly different in controls compared to leukemia group (ALL+AML) (p<0.0019 and p<0.0019, respectively). The cDNA analysis of AA or GA genotypes carriers has not revealed evidence of splicing abnormality of RAD50 pre-mRNA. We measured the allelic-specific expression of G and A alleles at c.551+19G>A and the statistically significant overexpression of the G allele has been observed. Additionally we confirmed the higher incidence of the p.I171V mutation in the leukemia group (7/220) than among controls (12/2400) (p<0.0001). Conclusion The formerly reported sequence variants in the RAD50

  6. Differential effect of H1 variant overproduction on gene expression is due to differences in the central globular domain.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D T; Gunjan, A; Alexander, B T; Sittman, D B

    1997-01-01

    The in vivo overproduction of two mouse histone H1 variants in homologous mouse fibroblasts has opposite effects on gene expression. Overproduction of H1(0) results in repression of transcript levels of all polymerase II genes tested. In contrast, overproduction of H1c results in elevated levels of transcripts. We created a series of chimeric H1 genes in which the regions encoding the three structural domains common to this family of these proteins were systematically switched. Overexpression of these genes in vivo resulted in the accumulation of large amounts of the chimeric H1 in chromatin. Analysis of the effects of overproduction of these proteins revealed that the differential effect of H1 variant overproduction on gene expression is due to differences in the central globular domain. PMID:9396808

  7. Pooled sequencing of 531 genes in inflammatory bowel disease identifies an associated rare variant in BTNL2 and implicates other immune related genes.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Natalie J; Lehne, Benjamin; Stone, Kristina; Lee, James C; Taylor, Kirstin; Knight, Jo; Papouli, Efterpi; Mirza, Muddassar M; Simpson, Michael A; Spain, Sarah L; Lu, Grace; Fraternali, Franca; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Gray, Emma; Amar, Ariella; Bye, Hannah; Green, Peter; Chung-Faye, Guy; Hayee, Bu'Hussain; Pollok, Richard; Satsangi, Jack; Parkes, Miles; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Mansfield, John C; Sanderson, Jeremy; Lewis, Cathryn M; Weale, Michael E; Schlitt, Thomas; Mathew, Christopher G

    2015-02-01

    The contribution of rare coding sequence variants to genetic susceptibility in complex disorders is an important but unresolved question. Most studies thus far have investigated a limited number of genes from regions which contain common disease associated variants. Here we investigate this in inflammatory bowel disease by sequencing the exons and proximal promoters of 531 genes selected from both genome-wide association studies and pathway analysis in pooled DNA panels from 474 cases of Crohn's disease and 480 controls. 80 variants with evidence of association in the sequencing experiment or with potential functional significance were selected for follow up genotyping in 6,507 IBD cases and 3,064 population controls. The top 5 disease associated variants were genotyped in an extension panel of 3,662 IBD cases and 3,639 controls, and tested for association in a combined analysis of 10,147 IBD cases and 7,008 controls. A rare coding variant p.G454C in the BTNL2 gene within the major histocompatibility complex was significantly associated with increased risk for IBD (p = 9.65x10-10, OR = 2.3[95% CI = 1.75-3.04]), but was independent of the known common associated CD and UC variants at this locus. Rare (<1%) and low frequency (1-5%) variants in 3 additional genes showed suggestive association (p<0.005) with either an increased risk (ARIH2 c.338-6C>T) or decreased risk (IL12B p.V298F, and NICN p.H191R) of IBD. These results provide additional insights into the involvement of the inhibition of T cell activation in the development of both sub-phenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease. We suggest that although rare coding variants may make a modest overall contribution to complex disease susceptibility, they can inform our understanding of the molecular pathways that contribute to pathogenesis.

  8. A Common variant in RAB27A gene is associated with fractional exhaled nitric oxide levels in adults

    PubMed Central

    Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Nadif, Rachel; Thompson, Emma E.; Concas, Maria Pina; Kuldanek, Susan; Du, Gaixin; Brossard, Myriam; Lavielle, Nolwenn; Sarnowski, Chloé; Vaysse, Amaury; Dessen, Philippe; van der Valk, Ralf JP; Duijts, Liesbeth; Henderson, A John; Jaddoe, Vincent WV; de Jongste, Johan C; Dizier, Marie-Hélène; Pin, Isabelle; Matran, Régis; Lathrop, Mark; Pirastu, Mario; Demenais, Florence; Ober, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Background Exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is a biomarker for eosinophilic inflammation in the airways and for responsiveness to corticosteroids in asthmatics. Objective We sought to identify in adults the genetic determinants of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) levels and to assess whether environmental and disease-related factors influence these associations. Methods We performed a genome-wide association study of FeNO through meta-analysis of two independent discovery samples of European ancestry: the outbred EGEA study (French Epidemiological study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma, N=610 adults) and the Hutterites (N=601 adults), a founder population living on communal farms. Replication of main findings was assessed in adults from an isolated village in Sardinia (Talana study, N=450). We then investigated the influence of asthma, atopy and tobacco smoke exposure on these genetic associations and whether they were also associated with FeNO values in children of the EAGLE (EArly Genetics & Lifecourse Epidemiology, N=8,858) consortium. Results We detected a common variant in RAB27A (rs2444043) associated with FeNO that reached the genome-wide significant level (P=1.6×10−7) in the combined discovery and replication adult datasets. This SNP belongs to member of RAS oncogene family (RAB27A) and was associated with an expression quantitative trait locus for RAB27A in lymphoblastoid cell lines from asthmatics. A second suggestive locus (rs2194437, P=8.9×10−7) located nearby the sodium/calcium exchanger 1 (SLC8A1) was mainly detected in atopic subjects and influenced by inhaled corticosteroid use. These two loci were not associated with childhood FeNO values. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance This study identified a common variant located in RAB27A gene influencing FeNO levels specifically in adults and with a biological relevance to the regulation of FeNO levels. This study provides new insight into the biological mechanisms underlying FeNO levels in

  9. ABCA1 gene variants regulate postprandial lipid metabolism in healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Lista, Javier; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco; Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Fuentes, Francisco; Marin, Carmen; Gómez-Luna, Purificación; Camargo, Antonio; Parnell, Laurence D; Ordovas, Jose Maria; Lopez-Miranda, Jose

    2010-01-01

    Objective Genetic variants of ABCA1, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, have been linked to altered atherosclerosis progression and fasting lipid concentration, mainly high density lipoproteins (HDL) and Apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1), but results from different studies have been inconsistent. Methods and results In order to further characterize the effects of ABCA1 variants in human postprandial lipid metabolism, we studied the influence of three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) [i27943 (rs2575875); i48168 (rs4149272); R219K (rs2230806)] in the postprandial lipemia of 88 normolipidemic young men, who were given a fatty meal. For i27943 and i48168 SNPs, fasting and postprandial values of APOA1 were higher, and postprandial lipemia was much lower in homozygotes for the major alleles, for total triglycerides in plasma, and large-triglyceride rich lipoproteins (TRL) triglycerides. These persons also showed higher APOA1/APOB ratio. Major allele homozygotes for i48168 and i27943 showed additionally higher HDL and lower postprandial Apolipoprotein B (ApoB). Conclusions Our work shows that major allele homozygotes for ABCA1 SNPs i27943 and i48168 have a lower postprandial response as compared to minor allele carriers. This finding may further characterize the role of ABCA1 in lipid metabolism. PMID:20185793

  10. Delineation of the regulated Variant Surface Glycoprotein gene expression site domain of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Sheader, Karen; Berberof, Magali; Isobe, Tomoko; Borst, Piet; Rudenko, Gloria

    2003-05-01

    The African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei is protected in the bloodstream of the mammalian host by a dense Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) coat. Although an individual cell has hundreds of VSG genes, the active VSG is transcribed in a mutually exclusive fashion from one of about twenty telomeric VSG expression sites. Expression sites are regulated domains flanked by 50 bp repeat arrays and extensive tracts of repetitive elements. We have integrated exogenous rDNA and expression site promoters upstream of the 50 bp repeats of the VO2 VSG expression site. Transcription from both types of exogenous promoter is downregulated and comparable to promoters targeted into the VSG Basic Copy arrays. We show that the upstream exogenous rDNA promoter escapes VSG expression site control, as switching the downstream VO2 VSG expression site on and off does not affect its activity. Therefore, the 50 bp repeat arrays appear to be the boundary of the regulated expression site domain.

  11. CFTR gene variant for patients with congenital absence of vas deferens

    SciTech Connect

    Zielenski, J.; Markiewicz, D.; Corey, M.

    1995-10-01

    Obstructive azoospermia due to congenital absence of vas deferens is a prominent clinical feature among male patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). A similar autosomal recessive condition with no other CF manifestations is classified as congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens (CBAVD). Since 50%-64% of CBAVD patients have been found to be positive for at least one known CFTR mutation, it is believed that at least part of the CBAVD population represents an atypical form of CF affecting only the male reproductive system. This explanation is not completely satisfactory, however, because only {approximately}10% of CBAVD patients are found to carry known CF mutations on both chromosomes, even after exhaustive screening of the entire CFTR coding region. Here we present data to show that a previously known sequence variant in intron 8 of the CFTR gene is a specific and frequent mutation associated with CBAVD. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Evaluation of Heterogeneity in the Association between Congenital Heart Defects and Variants of Folate Metabolism Genes: Conotruncal and Left-Sided Cardiac Defects

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jin; Lupo, Philip J.; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Mitchell, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Genetic variation in the folate metabolic pathway may influence the risk of congenital heart defects. This study was undertaken to assess the associations between the inherited and maternal genotypes for variants in folate-related genes and the risk of a composite heart phenotype that included two component phenotypes: conotruncal heart defects (CTDs) and left-sided cardiac lesions (LSLs). METHODS Nine folate-related gene variants were evaluated using data from 692 case-parent triads (CTD, n=419; LSL, n=273). Log-linear analyses were used to test for heterogeneity of the genotype-phenotype association across the two component phenotypes (i.e. CTD and LSLS) and, when there was no evidence of heterogeneity, to assess the associations of the maternal and inherited genotypes with the composite phenotype. RESULTS There was little evidence of heterogeneity of the genotype-phenotype association across the two component phenotypes or of an association between the genotypes and the composite phenotype. There was evidence of heterogeneity in the association of the maternal MTR A2756G genotype (p = 0.01) with CTDs and LSLs. However, further analyses suggested that the observed associations with the maternal MTR A2756G genotype might be confounded by parental imprinting effects. CONCLUSIONS Our analyses of these data provide little evidence that the folate-related gene variants evaluated in this study influence the risk of this composite congenital heart defect phenotype. However, larger and more comprehensive studies that evaluate parent-of-origin effects, as well as additional folate-related genes, are required to more fully explore the relation between folate and congenital heart defects. PMID:21987465

  13. Variant non ketotic hyperglycinemia is caused by mutations in LIAS, BOLA3 and the novel gene GLRX5

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Peter R.; Friederich, Marisa W.; Swanson, Michael A.; Shaikh, Tamim; Bhattacharya, Kaustuv; Scharer, Gunter H.; Aicher, Joseph; Creadon-Swindell, Geralyn; Geiger, Elizabeth; MacLean, Kenneth N.; Lee, Wang-Tso; Deshpande, Charu; Freckmann, Mary-Louise; Shih, Ling-Yu; Wasserstein, Melissa; Rasmussen, Malene B.; Lund, Allan M.; Procopis, Peter; Cameron, Jessie M.; Robinson, Brian H.; Brown, Garry K.; Brown, Ruth M.; Compton, Alison G.; Dieckmann, Carol L.; Collard, Renata; Coughlin, Curtis R.; Spector, Elaine; Wempe, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with nonketotic hyperglycinemia and deficient glycine cleavage enzyme activity, but without mutations in AMT, GLDC or GCSH, the genes encoding its constituent proteins, constitute a clinical group which we call ‘variant nonketotic hyperglycinemia’. We hypothesize that in some patients the aetiology involves genetic mutations that result in a deficiency of the cofactor lipoate, and sequenced genes involved in lipoate synthesis and iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis. Of 11 individuals identified with variant nonketotic hyperglycinemia, we were able to determine the genetic aetiology in eight patients and delineate the clinical and biochemical phenotypes. Mutations were identified in the genes for lipoate synthase (LIAS), BolA type 3 (BOLA3), and a novel gene glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5). Patients with GLRX5-associated variant nonketotic hyperglycinemia had normal development with childhood-onset spastic paraplegia, spinal lesion, and optic atrophy. Clinical features of BOLA3-associated variant nonketotic hyperglycinemia include severe neurodegeneration after a period of normal development. Additional features include leukodystrophy, cardiomyopathy and optic atrophy. Patients with lipoate synthase-deficient variant nonketotic hyperglycinemia varied in severity from mild static encephalopathy to Leigh disease and cortical involvement. All patients had high serum and borderline elevated cerebrospinal fluid glycine and cerebrospinal fluid:plasma glycine ratio, and deficient glycine cleavage enzyme activity. They had low pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme activity but most did not have lactic acidosis. Patients were deficient in lipoylation of mitochondrial proteins. There were minimal and inconsistent changes in cellular iron handling, and respiratory chain activity was unaffected. Identified mutations were phylogenetically conserved, and transfection with native genes corrected the biochemical deficiency proving pathogenicity. Treatments of cells with lipoate and with

  14. A novel homozygous variant in the dsp gene underlies the first case of non-syndromic form of alopecia.

    PubMed

    Jan, Abid; Basit, Sulman; Wakil, Salma M; Ramzan, Khushnooda; Ahmad, Wasim

    2015-11-01

    Autosomal recessive forms of hair loss (alopecia) disorders have previously been associated with variants in at least five different genes including hairless (HR), desmoglein-4 (DSG4), desmocollin-3 (DSC3), lipase-H (LIPH), and lysophosphatidic acid receptor 6 (LPAR6). Here, we report the first familial case of alopecia resulting from a novel homozygous variant in the DSP gene. Since previous reports indicated the presence of heart abnormalities in patients carrying variants in the DSP gene; therefore, the echocardiographic evaluations of all affected members were performed. The results clearly excluded the presence of any form of heart abnormality in patients of the present family. Human genome scan mapped a disease locus on chromosome 6p25.1-p23, harboring DSP gene. Sequence analysis identified a novel homozygous missense variant [c.1493C > T (p.Pro498Leu)] in the DSP gene as the underlying genetic cause of non-syndromic alopecia in the family. The transition alters the completely conserved Pro498 residue in the SH3 domain of plakin that contributes to the stability and rigidity of this subfamily of spectrin repeats (SRs) containing proteins. Our study strengthens the evidence that hereditary hair loss disorders are genetically heterogeneous and imply that isolated form of alopecia is allelic with cardiocutaneous syndromes.

  15. Pathogenic variants screening in five non-obstructive azoospermia-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chuncheng; Xu, Miaofei; Wang, Rong; Qin, Yufeng; Wang, Ying; Wu, Wei; Song, Ling; Wang, Shoulin; Shen, Hongbing; Sha, Jiahao; Miao, Dengshun; Hu, Zhibin; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru

    2014-02-01

    Non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is one of the most severe forms of male infertility and a recent, genome-wide association study (GWAS) has identified four risk loci associated with NOA. However, a large portion of the heritability of NOA has not been well explained by GWAS. By hypothesizing that rare, low-frequency and common genetic variants might point toward a causal relation between candidate genes and NOA, we performed a two-stage study including deep exon sequencing in 96 NOA cases and 96 healthy controls and a replication study in a larger population containing 522 NOA cases and 484 healthy controls. In the solexa sequencing stage, a total of two rare mutations (chr20. 1902132 and chr20. 1902301 in SIRPA), four common mutations (rs1048055 and rs2281807 in SIRPG, rs11046992 and rs146039840 in SOX5) were identified by using next generation sequencing (NGS). In the validation stage, subjects in the NOA group had a significantly decreased frequency of the heterozygous GA genotype in SIRPA (4.23%, 22 out of 520) than that in the control group (8.60%, 41 out of 477) [odds ratios (OR) 0.47, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.28-0.80] (P = 6.00 × 10(-3)). The rs1048055 in SIRPG was associated with a significantly increased risk of spermatogenic impairment, compared with the CC genotype (OR 3.93, 95% CI 1.59-9.70) (P = 3.00 × 10(-3)). Our study provides evidence of independent NOA risk alleles driven by variants in the protein-coding sequence of two of the genes (SIRPA and SIRPG) discovered by GWAS. Further investigation in larger populations and functional characterizations are needed to validate our findings.

  16. Variants of Folate Metabolism Genes and the Risk of Conotruncal Cardiac Defects

    PubMed Central

    Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Woyciechowski, Stacy; Renstrom, Daniel; Lupo, Philip J.; Mitchell, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although congenital heart defects (CHD) are the most common, serious group of birth defects, relatively little is known about the causes of these conditions and there are no established prevention strategies. There is evidence suggesting that the risk of CHD in general, and conotruncal and ventricular septal defects in particular, may be related to maternal folate status as well as genetic variants in folate-related genes. However, efforts to establish the relationships between these factors and CHD risk have been hampered by a number of factors including small study sample sizes and phenotypic heterogeneity. Methods and Results The present study examined the relationships between variation in nine folate-related genes and a subset of CHD phenotypes (i.e. conotruncal defects, perimembranous and malalignment type ventricular septal defects, and isolated aortic arch anomalies) in a cohort of over 700 case-parent triads. Further, both maternal and embryonic genetic effects were considered. Analyses of the study data confirmed a previously reported association between embryonic genotype for MTHFR A1298C and disease risk (unadjusted p=0.002). Conclusions These results represent the most comprehensive and powerful analysis of the relationship between CHD and folate-related genes reported to date, and provide additional evidence that, similar to neural tube defects, this subset of CHD is folate-related. PMID:20031554

  17. A Highly Polymorphic Copy Number Variant in the NSF Gene is Associated with Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Cabana-Domínguez, Judit; Roncero, Carlos; Grau-López, Lara; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Barral, Carmen; Abad, Alfonso C.; Erikson, Galina; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Torrico, Bàrbara; Arenas, Concepció; Casas, Miquel; Ribasés, Marta; Cormand, Bru; Fernàndez-Castillo, Noèlia

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is a complex psychiatric disorder involving both genetic and environmental factors. Several neurotransmitter systems mediate cocaine’s effects, dependence and relapse, being the components of the neurotransmitter release machinery good candidates for the disorder. Previously, we identified a risk haplotype for cocaine dependence in the NSF gene, encoding the protein N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor essential for synaptic vesicle turnover. Here we examined the possible contribution to cocaine dependence of a large copy number variant (CNV) that encompasses part of the NSF gene. We performed a case-control association study in a discovery sample (359 cases and 356 controls) and identified an association between cocaine dependence and the CNV (P = 0.013), that was confirmed in the replication sample (508 cases and 569 controls, P = 7.1e-03) and in a pooled analysis (P = 1.8e-04), with an over-representation of low number of copies in cases. Subsequently, we studied the functional impact of the CNV on gene expression and found that the levels of two NSF transcripts were significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) along with the number of copies of the CNV. These results, together with a previous study from our group, support the role of NSF in the susceptibility to cocaine dependence. PMID:27498889

  18. Identification of a splice-site mutation in the human growth hormone-variant gene.

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, J N; Liebhaber, S A; MacGillivray, M H; Cooke, N E

    1991-01-01

    The human growth-hormone-variant (hGH-V) gene normally expresses two alternatively spliced forms of mRNA--hGH-V and hGH-V2--in the placenta. hGH-V2 mRNA differs from hGH-V rDNA by the retention of intron 4 and represents approximately 15% of transcripts at term. In a survey of hGH-V gene expression in 20 placentas of gestational age 8-40 wk, we detected a single placenta that contained, in addition to the two normal hGH-V mRNA species, a set of two slightly larger hGH-V mRNAs. Sequence analysis of the elongated hGH-V mRNA demonstrated retention of the first 12 bases of intron 2, resulting from both a base substitution at the intron 2 splice-donor dinucleotide (GT----AT) and activation of a cryptic splice-donor site 12 bases downstream. Survey of a total of 60 additional chromosomes failed to reveal additional incidence of this mutation. The mutation, which we have designated hGH-Vintron 2, pos 1 (G----A), represents both an initial example of a nondeletional mutation within the hGH-V gene and corresponding structural alteration in the encoded hGH-V hormone. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:2035535

  19. Human Gene-Centered Transcription Factor Networks for Enhancers and Disease Variants

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Juan I. Fuxman; Sahni, Nidhi; Shrestha, Shaleen; Garcia-Gonzalez, Aurian; Mori, Akihiro; Bhat, Numana; Yi, Song; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Walhout, Albertha J.M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) comprising interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and regulatory loci control development and physiology. Numerous disease-associated mutations have been identified, the vast majority residing in non-coding regions of the genome. As current GRN mapping methods test one TF at a time and require the use of cells harboring the mutation(s) of interest, they are not suitable to identify TFs that bind to wild type and mutant loci. Here, we use gene-centered yeast one-hybrid (eY1H) assays to interrogate binding of 1,086 human TFs to 246 enhancers, as well as to 109 non-coding disease mutations. We detect both loss and gain of TF interactions with mutant loci that are concordant with target gene expression changes. This work establishes eY1H assays as a powerful addition to the toolkit of mapping human GRNs and for the high-throughput characterization of genomic variants that are rapidly being identified by genome-wide association studies. PMID:25910213

  20. Physical activity and sex modulate obesity risk linked to 3111T/C gene variant of the CLOCK gene in an elderly population: the SUN Project.

    PubMed

    Galbete, Cecilia; Contreras, Rafael; Martínez, J Alfredo; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Guillén-Grima, Francisco; Marti, Amelia

    2012-12-01

    Genetic factors may interact with physical activity levels to modify obesity risk. Our aim was to explore the influence of rs1801260 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (3111T/C) of CLOCK gene on obesity risk, and to examine its potential interaction with lifestyle factors in an elderly population within the SUN ("Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra") Project. Subjects (n = 903, aged 69 ± 6 yrs) were recruited from the SUN Project. DNA was obtained from saliva, whereas lifestyle and dietary data were collected by validated self-report questionnaires. Genotype was assessed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) plus allele discrimination. A significant interaction was observed between the 3111T/C SNP of CLOCK gene and sex for overweight/obesity risk (p for sex × CLOCK interaction <.001). Our results showed that women carrying the C allele of CLOCK gene had a marginally significant lower risk of overweight/obesity compared with noncarrier-TT-subjects (odds ratio [OR]: .61, 95% confidence interval [CI]: .36-1.04; p = .069). Moreover, this association of the C allele with a decreased overweight/obesity risk might be enhanced in those women with a high physical activity level. Women practicing more than 16.8 metabolic equivalent tasks (hours per week) had a significantly lower overweight/obesity risk (OR: .36, 95% CI: .17-.79; p = .011). Furthermore, a significant interaction between the 3111T/C gene variant and physical activity (PA) for overweight/obesity risk was observed but only in women (p for PA × CLOCK interaction <.050). In conclusion, it appears that physical activity levels may act by modifying the association of the 3111T/C SNP (rs1801260) of the CLOCK gene with overweight/obesity risk in elderly women in the SUN Project.

  1. Genetic Variants of the FADS Gene Cluster and ELOVL Gene Family, Colostrums LC-PUFA Levels, Breastfeeding, and Child Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Eva; Bustamante, Mariona; Gonzalez, Juan Ramon; Guxens, Monica; Torrent, Maties; Mendez, Michelle; Garcia-Esteban, Raquel; Julvez, Jordi; Forns, Joan; Vrijheid, Martine; Molto-Puigmarti, Carolina; Lopez-Sabater, Carmen; Estivill, Xavier; Sunyer, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Breastfeeding effects on cognition are attributed to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs), but controversy persists. Genetic variation in fatty acid desaturase (FADS) and elongase (ELOVL) enzymes has been overlooked when studying the effects of LC-PUFAs supply on cognition. We aimed to: 1) to determine whether maternal genetic variants in the FADS cluster and ELOVL genes contribute to differences in LC-PUFA levels in colostrum; 2) to analyze whether these maternal variants are related to child cognition; and 3) to assess whether children's variants modify breastfeeding effects on cognition. Methods Data come from two population-based birth cohorts (n = 400 mother-child pairs from INMA-Sabadell; and n = 340 children from INMA-Menorca). LC-PUFAs were measured in 270 colostrum samples from INMA-Sabadell. Tag SNPs were genotyped both in mothers and children (13 in the FADS cluster, 6 in ELOVL2, and 7 in ELOVL5). Child cognition was assessed at 14 mo and 4 y using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development and the McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities, respectively. Results Children of mothers carrying genetic variants associated with lower FADS1 activity (regulating AA and EPA synthesis), higher FADS2 activity (regulating DHA synthesis), and with higher EPA/AA and DHA/AA ratios in colostrum showed a significant advantage in cognition at 14 mo (3.5 to 5.3 points). Not being breastfed conferred an 8- to 9-point disadvantage in cognition among children GG homozygote for rs174468 (low FADS1 activity) but not among those with the A allele. Moreover, not being breastfed resulted in a disadvantage in cognition (5 to 8 points) among children CC homozygote for rs2397142 (low ELOVL5 activity), but not among those carrying the G allele. Conclusion Genetically determined maternal supplies of LC-PUFAs during pregnancy and lactation appear to be crucial for child cognition. Breastfeeding effects on cognition are modified by child genetic variation in

  2. Parental cigarette smoking, transforming growth factor-alpha gene variant and the risk of orofacial cleft in Iranian infants

    PubMed Central

    Ebadifar, Asghar; Hamedi, Roya; KhorramKhorshid, Hamid Reza; Kamali, Koorosh; Moghadam, Fatemeh Aghakhani

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): We investigated the influence of genetic variation of the transforming growth-factor alpha (TGFA) locus on the relationship between smoking and oral clefts. Materials and Methods: In this study 105 Iranian infants with non-syndromic cleft lip/palate and 218 controls with non-cleft birth defects were examined to test for associations among maternal exposures, genetic markers, and oral clefts. Maternal and parental smoking histories during pregnancy were obtained through questionnaire. DNA was extracted from newborn screening blood samples, and genotyping of the BamHI polymorphism in the TGFA gene was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) methods. A number of factors including gender of the newborns, type of oral cleft, consanguinity of the parents, as well as the mother’s age and education were evaluated as potential confounders and effect modifiers. Results: Maternal smoking, in the absence of paternal smoking, was associated with an increased risk for CL/P (OR = 19.2, 95% CI = [(6.2-59.5)]) and cleft palate only (OR =48.7, 95% CI = [(8-29.3)]). If both parents smoked, risks were generally greater (OR = 55.6, 95% CI = [12-20.25]). Analyses for the risk of clefting from maternal smoking, stratified by the presence or absence of the TGFA/BamH1variant, revealed that the risk of clefting among the infants with the TGFA/BamH1 variant when their mothers smoked cigarettes was much greater than the infants who had non-smoker mothers (P=0.001, OR=10.4,95% CI=[3.2,33.6]). Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that first-trimester maternal smoking and infant TGFA locus mutations are both associated with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P). PMID:27279979

  3. Genetic variants in sex hormone metabolic pathway genes and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Paula L.

    2013-01-01

    In China, esophageal cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death where essentially all cases are histologically esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), in contrast to esophageal adenocarcinoma in the West. Globally, ESCC is 2.4 times more common among men than women and recently it has been suggested that sex hormones may be associated with the risk of ESCC. We examined the association between genetic variants in sex hormone metabolic genes and ESCC risk in a population from north central China with high-incidence rates. A total of 1026 ESCC cases and 1452 controls were genotyped for 797 unique tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 51 sex hormone metabolic genes. SNP-, gene- and pathway-based associations with ESCC risk were evaluated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex and geographical location and the adaptive rank truncated product (ARTP) method. Statistical significance was determined through use of permutation for pathway- and gene-based associations. No associations were observed for the overall sex hormone metabolic pathway (P = 0.14) or subpathways (androgen synthesis: P = 0.30, estrogen synthesis: P = 0.15 and estrogen removal: P = 0.19) with risk of ESCC. However, six individual genes (including SULT2B1, CYP1B1, CYP3A7, CYP3A5, SHBG and CYP11A1) were significantly associated with ESCC risk (P < 0.05). Our examination of genetic variation in the sex hormone metabolic pathway is consistent with a potential association with risk of ESCC. These positive findings warrant further evaluation in relation to ESCC risk and replication in other populations. PMID:23358850

  4. MC1R, ASIP, TYR, and TYRP1 gene variants in a population-based series of multiple primary melanomas.

    PubMed

    Helsing, Per; Nymoen, Dag A; Rootwelt, Helge; Vårdal, Mari; Akslen, Lars A; Molven, Anders; Andresen, Per A

    2012-07-01

    Allelic variants of the low-penetrance melanoma gene MC1R increase the risk of both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer. Common variants of the genes ASIP, TYR, and TYRP1, which regulate the melanogenic pathway, have also been shown to associate with melanoma. In this population-based study, we investigated SNPs of MC1R, ASIP, TYR, and TYRP1 as risk factors for development of multiple primary melanomas (MPM) in 388 Norwegian cases. The MPM patients had a significantly higher likelihood of carrying any MC1R variant than the control group of 420 blood donors [86.8 vs. 78.3%, OR = 1.73, and confidence intervals (CI) 1.18-2.52]. When MC1R variants were analyzed individually, Asp84Glu and Arg151Cys were significantly more frequent among the MPM cases than among the controls (OR = 5.77, CI 1.97-16.90, and OR = 1.80, CI 1.36-2.37, respectively). In addition, there was an allele dose-dependent increase in MPM risk for carriers of red hair color (RHC) MC1R variants. The AH haplotype of ASIP was also a significant risk factor for MPM development (OR = 1.72 and CI 1.12-2.49), whereas no association was observed for previously reported risk variants of the TYR and TYRP1 genes. In summary, by using a population-based material of high-risk melanoma cases, we demonstrate a significant effect of both MC1R RHC variants and an ASIP haplotype, but could not replicate an association with postulated risk SNPs of TYR and TYRP1.

  5. A common variant in the ABCA1 gene is associated with a lower risk for premature coronary heart disease in familial hypercholesterolaemia

    PubMed Central

    Cenarro, A; Artieda, M; Castillo, S; Mozas, P; Reyes, G; Tejedor, D; Alonso, R; Mata, P; Pocovi, M; Civeira, F

    2003-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is a common autosomal codominant hereditary disease caused by defects in the LDL receptor (LDLR) gene, and one of the most common characteristics of affected subjects is premature coronary heart disease (CHD). In heterozygous FH patients, the clinical expression of FH is highly variable in terms of the severity of hypercholesterolaemia and the age of onset and severity of CHD. Identification of mutations in the ATP binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1) gene in patients with Tangier disease, who exhibit reduced HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A1 concentrations and premature coronary atherosclerosis, has led us to hypothesise that ABCA1 could play a key role in the onset of premature CHD in FH. In order to know if the presence of the R219K variant in the ABCA1 gene could be a protective factor for premature CHD in FH, we have determined the presence of this genetic variant by amplification by PCR and restriction analysis in a group of 374 FH subjects, with and without premature CHD. The K allele of the R219K variant was significantly more frequent in FH subjects without premature CHD (0.32, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.37) than in FH subjects with premature CHD (0.25, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.29) (p<0.05), suggesting that the genetic variant R219K in ABCA1 could influence the development and progression of atherosclerosis in FH subjects. Moreover, the K allele of the R219K polymorphism seems to modify CHD risk without important modification of plasma HDL-C levels, and it appears to be more protective for smokers than non-smokers. PMID:12624133

  6. Pooled Resequencing of 122 Ulcerative Colitis Genes in a Large Dutch Cohort Suggests Population-Specific Associations of Rare Variants in MUC2

    PubMed Central

    Visschedijk, Marijn C.; Alberts, Rudi; Mucha, Soren; Deelen, Patrick; de Jong, Dirk J.; Pierik, Marieke; Spekhorst, Lieke M.; Imhann, Floris; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; van der Woude, C. Janneke; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A.; Oldenburg, Bas; Löwenberg, Mark; Dijkstra, Gerard; Ellinghaus, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Rivas, Manuel A.; Franke, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed several common genetic risk variants for ulcerative colitis (UC). However, little is known about the contribution of rare, large effect genetic variants to UC susceptibility. In this study, we performed a deep targeted re-sequencing of 122 genes in Dutch UC patients in order to investigate the contribution of rare variants to the genetic susceptibility to UC. The selection of genes consists of 111 established human UC susceptibility genes and 11 genes that lead to spontaneous colitis when knocked-out in mice. In addition, we sequenced the promoter regions of 45 genes where known variants exert cis-eQTL-effects. Targeted pooled re-sequencing was performed on DNA of 790 Dutch UC cases. The Genome of the Netherlands project provided sequence data of 500 healthy controls. After quality control and prioritization based on allele frequency and pathogenicity probability, follow-up genotyping of 171 rare variants was performed on 1021 Dutch UC cases and 1166 Dutch controls. Single-variant association and gene-based analyses identified an association of rare variants in the MUC2 gene with UC. The associated variants in the Dutch population could not be replicated in a German replication cohort (1026 UC cases, 3532 controls). In conclusion, this study has identified a putative role for MUC2 on UC susceptibility in the Dutch population and suggests a population-specific contribution of rare variants to UC. PMID:27490946

  7. Functional variant in the promoter region of IL-27 alters gene transcription and confers a risk for ulcerative colitis in northern Chinese Han.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Zhongyi; Zhang, Jiayu; Chen, Tong; Jin, Lifang

    2017-03-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology and a polygenic disease. IL-27 encodes p28, a subunit of IL-12 family cytokines, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of UC. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the genetic association of a variant of the IL-27 gene with UC and to further characterize the functional variant in the IL-27 gene that influences the risk for UC. Our data demonstrated that the genetic variant rs153109 in the 5' upstream region of IL-27 is significantly associated with UC in Chinese Han individuals. Analysis of IL-27 transcripts demonstrated that individuals carrying the risk allele of rs153109 display reduced transcription of IL-27 in PBMCs. Luciferase activity assays demonstrated that the risk allele rs153109 results in decreased promoter activity compared to a non-risk allele in a tissue specific manner. Mechanistic characterization of histone modifications in the promoter region revealed that the risk haplotype tagged by the risk allele of rs153109 reduces the levels of H3K3me3 and H3K27ac.

  8. Genetic analysis of long-lived families reveals novel variants influencing high density-lipoprotein cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Feitosa, Mary F.; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Straka, Robert; Kammerer, Candace M.; Lee, Joseph H.; Kraja, Aldi T.; Christensen, Kaare; Newman, Anne B.; Province, Michael A.; Borecki, Ingrid B.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) have an inverse relationship to the risks of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and have also been associated with longevity. We sought to identify novel loci for HDL that could potentially provide new insights into biological regulation of HDL metabolism in healthy-longevous subjects. We performed a genome-wide association (GWA) scan on HDL using a mixed model approach to account for family structure using kinship coefficients. A total of 4114 subjects of European descent (480 families) were genotyped at ~2.3 million SNPs and ~38 million SNPs were imputed using the 1000 Genome Cosmopolitan reference panel in MACH. We identified novel variants near-NLRP1 (17p13) associated with an increase of HDL levels at genome-wide significant level (p < 5.0E-08). Additionally, several CETP (16q21) and ZNF259-APOA5-A4-C3-A1 (11q23.3) variants associated with HDL were found, replicating those previously reported in the literature. A possible regulatory variant upstream of NLRP1 that is associated with HDL in these elderly Long Life Family Study (LLFS) subjects may also contribute to their longevity and health. Our NLRP1 intergenic SNPs show a potential regulatory function in Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE); however, it is not clear whether they regulate NLRP1 or other more remote gene. NLRP1 plays an important role in the induction of apoptosis, and its inflammasome is critical for mediating innate immune responses. Nlrp1a (a mouse ortholog of human NLRP1) interacts with SREBP-1a (17p11) which has a fundamental role in lipid concentration and composition, and is involved in innate immune response in macrophages. The NLRP1 region is conserved in mammals, but also has evolved adaptively showing signals of positive selection in European populations that might confer an advantage. NLRP1 intergenic SNPs have also been associated with immunity/inflammasome disorders which highlights the biological

  9. Genetic variants involved in oxidative stress, base excision repair, DNA methylation, and folate metabolism pathways influence myeloid neoplasias susceptibility and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Alves, Raquel; Baldeiras, Inês; Cortesão, Emília; Carda, José Pedro; Branco, Claudia C; Oliveiros, Bárbara; Loureiro, Luísa; Pereira, Amélia; Nascimento Costa, José Manuel; Sarmento-Ribeiro, Ana Bela; Mota-Vieira, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) share common features: elevated oxidative stress, DNA repair deficiency, and aberrant DNA methylation. We performed a hospital-based case-control study to evaluate the association in variants of genes involved in oxidative stress, folate metabolism, DNA repair, and DNA methylation with susceptibility and prognosis of these malignancies. To that end, 16 SNPs (one per gene: CAT, CYBA, DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, GPX1, KEAP1, MPO, MTRR, NEIL1, NFE2F2, OGG1, SLC19A1, SOD1, SOD2, and XRCC1) were genotyped in 191 patients (101 MDS and 90 AML) and 261 controls. We also measured oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species/total antioxidant status ratio), DNA damage (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine), and DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine) in 50 subjects (40 MDS and 10 controls). Results showed that five genes (GPX1, NEIL1, NFE2L2, OGG1, and SOD2) were associated with MDS, two (DNMT3B and SLC19A1) with AML, and two (CYBA and DNMT1) with both diseases. We observed a correlation of CYBA TT, GPX1 TT, and SOD2 CC genotypes with increased oxidative stress levels, as well as NEIL1 TT and OGG1 GG genotypes with higher DNA damage. The 5-methylcytosine levels were negatively associated with DNMT1 CC, DNMT3A CC, and MTRR AA genotypes, and positively with DNMT3B CC genotype. Furthermore, DNMT3A, MTRR, NEIL1, and OGG1 variants modulated AML transformation in MDS patients. Additionally, DNMT3A, OGG1, GPX1, and KEAP1 variants influenced survival of MDS and AML patients. Altogether, data suggest that genetic variability influence predisposition and prognosis of MDS and AML patients, as well AML transformation rate in MDS patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Gene expression, single nucleotide variant and fusion transcript discovery in archival material from breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Norton, Nadine; Sun, Zhifu; Asmann, Yan W; Serie, Daniel J; Necela, Brian M; Bhagwate, Aditya; Jen, Jin; Eckloff, Bruce W; Kalari, Krishna R; Thompson, Kevin J; Carr, Jennifer M; Kachergus, Jennifer M; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J; Perez, Edith A; Thompson, E Aubrey

    2013-01-01

    Advantages of RNA-Seq over array based platforms are quantitative gene expression and discovery of expressed single nucleotide variants (eSNVs) and fusion transcripts from a single platform, but the sensitivity for each of these characteristics is unknown. We measured gene expression in a set of manually degraded RNAs, nine pairs of matched fresh-frozen, and FFPE RNA isolated from breast tumor with the hybridization based, NanoString nCounter (226 gene panel) and with whole transcriptome RNA-Seq using RiboZeroGold ScriptSeq V2 library preparation kits. We performed correlation analyses of gene expression between samples and across platforms. We then specifically assessed whole transcriptome expression of lincRNA and discovery of eSNVs and fusion transcripts in the FFPE RNA-Seq data. For gene expression in the manually degraded samples, we observed Pearson correlations of >0.94 and >0.80 with NanoString and ScriptSeq protocols, respectively. Gene expression data for matched fresh-frozen and FFPE samples yielded mean Pearson correlations of 0.874 and 0.783 for NanoString (226 genes) and ScriptSeq whole transcriptome protocols respectively, p<2x10(-16). Specifically for lincRNAs, we observed superb Pearson correlation (0.988) between matched fresh-frozen and FFPE pairs. FFPE samples across NanoString and RNA-Seq platforms gave a mean Pearson correlation of 0.838. In FFPE libraries, we detected 53.4% of high confidence SNVs and 24% of high confidence fusion transcripts. Sensitivity of fusion transcript detection was not overcome by an increase in depth of sequencing up to 3-fold (increase from ~56 to ~159 million reads). Both NanoString and ScriptSeq RNA-Seq technologies yield reliable gene expression data for degraded and FFPE material. The high degree of correlation between NanoString and RNA-Seq platforms suggests discovery based whole transcriptome studies from FFPE material will produce reliable expression data. The RiboZeroGold ScriptSeq protocol performed

  11. Evidence for association between structural variants in lissencephaly-related genes and executive deficits in schizophrenia or bipolar patients from a Spanish isolate population.

    PubMed

    Tabarés-Seisdedos, Rafael; Mata, Ignacio; Escámez, Teresa; Vieta, Eduard; López-Ilundain, Jose M; Salazar, Jose; Selva, Gabriel; Balanzá, Vicente; Rubio, Cristina; Martínez-Arán, Anabel; Valdés-Sánchez, Lourdes; Geijo-Barrientos, Emilio; Martínez, Salvador

    2008-12-01

    There is evidence for an association between structural variants in genes for lissencephaly, which are involved in neuronal migration, and prefrontal cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and bipolar patients. On the basis of these intriguing findings, we analyzed 16 markers located in the lissencephaly critical region (LCR in chromosome 17p13.3) in 124 schizophrenic, 56 bipolar, and 141 healthy individuals. All recruits were from a Spanish population isolate of Basque origin that is characterized by low genetic heterogeneity. In addition, we examined whether structural genomic variations in the LCR were associated with executive cognition. Twenty-three patients (12.8%), but none of the controls, showed structural variants (deletions and insertions) in either of two markers related with lissencephaly (D17S1566 on tumor suppressor gene TP53: tumor protein p53 and D17S22 on SMG6 gene: Smg-6 homolog, nonsense mediated mRNA decay factor- Caenorhabditis elegans). These patients performed significantly worse in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test-Categories in comparison with patients without such variations in lissencephaly-related genes. The presence of structural variants was related to completed categories, and accounted for 10.7% of the variance (P=0.001). Finally, logistic regression showed that poor Wisconsin Card Sorting Test-Categories performance was the only predictor of belonging to the positive LCR variations group. These new findings provide further evidence for the association between some lissencephaly-related genes and both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and influence on frontal executive functioning.

  12. Impact of 3’UTR genetic variants in PCSK9 and LDLR genes on plasma lipid traits and response to atorvastatin in Brazilian subjects: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Tomás; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Cerda, Álvaro; Dorea, Egidio L; Pinto, Gelba A; Gusukuma, Maria C; Bertolami, Marcelo C; Salazar, Luis A; Hirata, Rosario Dominguez Crespo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypercholesterolemia is a complex trait, resulting from a genetic interaction with lifestyle habits. Polymorphisms are a major source of genetic heterogeneity, and variations in 2 key cholesterol homeostasis genes; low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9 (PCSK9), lead to dyslipidemia. So, we investigated the relation of 2 variants located in the 3’-UTR (3’-untranslated region) of LDLR (rs14158, G>A) and PCSK9 (rs17111557, C>T) with lipid profile and atorvastatin response. Methods: SNP influence on lipid profile was assessed in hypercholesterolemic patients (HC; n = 89) using atorvastatin (10 mg/day/4 weeks) and in normolipidemic subjects (NL; n = 171). Genotyping was completed through real-time PCR using TaqMan assays. Results: rs14158 G allele was higher in HC than in NL group (P = 0.043). NL subjects carrying the T allele of the PCSK9 variant had lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) than C allele carriers (P = 0.009). There was no association between LDLR and PCSK9 SNPs and atorvastatin response. Additionally, the PCSK9 variant creates a microRNA interaction site, which could implicate an epigenetic mechanism in PCSK9-dependent HDL-C regulation. Conclusions: The rs14158 SNP contributes to hypercholesterolemia. Also, a putative microRNA regulation may influence HDL-C variability observed in rs17111557 carriers. Cholesterol-lowering response to atorvastatin is not influenced by LDLR and PCSK9 variants. PMID:26131194

  13. Polymorphisms in MIR137HG and microRNA-137-regulated genes influence gray matter structure in schizophrenia

    DOE PAGES

    Wright, C.; Gupta, C. N.; Chen, J.; ...

    2016-02-02

    Evidence suggests that microRNA-137 (miR-137) is involved in the genetic basis of schizophrenia. Risk variants within the miR-137 host gene (MIR137HG) influence structural and functional brain-imaging measures, and miR-137 itself is predicted to regulate hundreds of genes. We evaluated the influence of a MIR137HG risk variant (rs1625579) in combination with variants in miR-137- regulated genes TCF4, PTGS2, MAPK1 and MAPK3 on gray matter concentration (GMC). These genes were selected based on our previous work assessing schizophrenia risk within possible miR-137-regulated gene sets using the same cohort of subjects. A genetic risk score (GRS) was determined based on genotypes of thesemore » four schizophrenia risk-associated genes in 221 Caucasian subjects (89 schizophrenia patients and 132 controls). The effects of the rs1625579 genotype with the GRS of miR-137-regulated genes in a three-way interaction with diagnosis on GMC patterns were assessed using a multivariate analysis. We found that schizophrenia subjects homozygous for the MIR137HG risk allele show significant decreases in occipital, parietal and temporal lobe GMC with increasing miR-137-regulated GRS, whereas those carrying the protective minor allele show significant increases in GMC with GRS. No correlations of GMC and GRS were found in control subjects. Variants within or upstream of genes regulated by miR-137 in combination with the MIR137HG risk variant may influence GMC in schizophrenia-related regions in patients. Furthermore, given that the genes evaluated here are involved in protein kinase A signaling, dysregulation of this pathway through alterations in miR-137 biogenesis may underlie the gray matter loss seen in the disease.« less

  14. Polymorphisms in MIR137HG and microRNA-137-regulated genes influence gray matter structure in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wright, C; Gupta, C N; Chen, J; Patel, V; Calhoun, V D; Ehrlich, S; Wang, L; Bustillo, J R; Perrone-Bizzozero, N I; Turner, J A

    2016-02-02

    Evidence suggests that microRNA-137 (miR-137) is involved in the genetic basis of schizophrenia. Risk variants within the miR-137 host gene (MIR137HG) influence structural and functional brain-imaging measures, and miR-137 itself is predicted to regulate hundreds of genes. We evaluated the influence of a MIR137HG risk variant (rs1625579) in combination with variants in miR-137-regulated genes TCF4, PTGS2, MAPK1 and MAPK3 on gray matter concentration (GMC). These genes were selected based on our previous work assessing schizophrenia risk within possible miR-137-regulated gene sets using the same cohort of subjects. A genetic risk score (GRS) was determined based on genotypes of these four schizophrenia risk-associated genes in 221 Caucasian subjects (89 schizophrenia patients and 132 controls). The effects of the rs1625579 genotype with the GRS of miR-137-regulated genes in a three-way interaction with diagnosis on GMC patterns were assessed using a multivariate analysis. We found that schizophrenia subjects homozygous for the MIR137HG risk allele show significant decreases in occipital, parietal and temporal lobe GMC with increasing miR-137-regulated GRS, whereas those carrying the protective minor allele show significant increases in GMC with GRS. No correlations of GMC and GRS were found in control subjects. Variants within or upstream of genes regulated by miR-137 in combination with the MIR137HG risk variant may influence GMC in schizophrenia-related regions in patients. Given that the genes evaluated here are involved in protein kinase A signaling, dysregulation of this pathway through alterations in miR-137 biogenesis may underlie the gray matter loss seen in the disease.

  15. A cytogenetic abnormality and rare coding variants identify ABCA13 as a candidate gene in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression.

    PubMed

    Knight, Helen M; Pickard, Benjamin S; Maclean, Alan; Malloy, Mary P; Soares, Dinesh C; McRae, Allan F; Condie, Alison; White, Angela; Hawkins, William; McGhee, Kevin; van Beck, Margaret; MacIntyre, Donald J; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J; Visscher, Peter M; Porteous, David J; Cannon, Ronald E; St Clair, David; Muir, Walter J; Blackwood, Douglas H R

    2009-12-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are leading causes of morbidity across all populations, with heritability estimates of approximately 80% indicating a substantial genetic component. Population genetics and genome-wide association studies suggest an overlap of genetic risk factors between these illnesses but it is unclear how this genetic component is divided between common gene polymorphisms, rare genomic copy number variants, and rare gene sequence mutations. We report evidence that the lipid transporter gene ABCA13 is a susceptibility factor for both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. After the initial discovery of its disruption by a chromosome abnormality in a person with schizophrenia, we resequenced ABCA13 exons in 100 cases with schizophrenia and 100 controls. Multiple rare coding variants were identified including one nonsense and nine missense mutations and compound heterozygosity/homozygosity in six cases. Variants were genotyped in additional schizophrenia, bipolar, depression (n > 1600), and control (n > 950) cohorts and the frequency of all rare variants combined was greater than controls in schizophrenia (OR = 1.93, p = 0.0057) and bipolar disorder (OR = 2.71, p = 0.00007). The population attributable risk of these mutations was 2.2% for schizophrenia and 4.0% for bipolar disorder. In a study of 21 families of mutation carriers, we genotyped affected and unaffected relatives and found significant linkage (LOD = 4.3) of rare variants with a phenotype including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression. These data identify a candidate gene, highlight the genetic overlap between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression, and suggest that rare coding variants may contribute significantly to risk of these disorders.

  16. TNFA gene variants related to the inflammatory status and its association with cellular aging: From the CORDIOPREV study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Several single nucleotide polymorphisms have been proposed as potential predictors of the development of age-related diseases. Objective: To explore whether Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNFA) gene variants were associated with inflammatory status, thus facilitating the rate of telomere s...

  17. COMT Val[superscript 108/158] Met Gene Variant, Birth Weight, and Conduct Disorder in Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sengupta, Sarojini M.; Grizenko, Natalie; Schmitz, Norbert; Schwartz, George; Amor, Leila Ben; Bellingham, Johanne; de Guzman, Rosherrie; Polotskaia, Anna; Stepanian, Marina Ter; Thakur, Geeta; Joober, Ridha

    2006-01-01

    Objective: In a recent study, Thapar and colleagues reported that COMT "gene variant and birth weight predict early-onset antisocial behavior in children" with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. We have attempted to replicate these findings in a group of ADHD children using a similar research design. Method: Children (n = 191)…

  18. Variants in SNAP25 are targets of natural selection and influence verbal performances in women.

    PubMed

    Cagliani, Rachele; Riva, Stefania; Marino, Cecilia; Fumagalli, Matteo; D'Angelo, Maria Grazia; Riva, Valentina; Comi, Giacomo P; Pozzoli, Uberto; Forni, Diego; Cáceres, Mario; Bresolin, Nereo; Clerici, Mario; Sironi, Manuela

    2012-05-01

    Descriptions of genes that are adaptively evolving in humans and that carry polymorphisms with an effect on cognitive performances have been virtually absent. SNAP25 encodes a presynaptic protein with a role in regulation of neurotransmitter release. We analysed the intra-specific diversity along SNAP25 and identified a region in intron 1 that shows signatures of balancing selection in humans. The estimated TMRCA (time to the most recent common ancestor) of the SNAP25 haplotype phylogeny amounted to 2.08 million years. The balancing selection signature is not secondary to demographic events or to biased gene conversion, and encompasses rs363039. This SNP has previously been associated to cognitive performances with contrasting results in different populations. We analysed this variant in two Italian cohorts in different age ranges and observed a significant genotype effect for rs363039 on verbal performances in females alone. Post hoc analysis revealed that the effect is driven by differences between heterozygotes and both homozygous genotypes. Thus, heterozygote females for rs363039 display higher verbal performances compared to both homozygotes. This finding was replicated in a cohort of Italian subjects suffering from neuromuscular diseases that do not affect cognition. Heterozygote advantage is one of the possible reasons underlying the maintenance of genetic diversity in natural populations. The observation that heterozygotes for rs363039 display higher verbal abilities compared to homozygotes perfectly fits the underlying balancing selection model. Although caution should be used in inferring selective pressures from observed signatures, SNAP25 might represent the first description of an adaptively evolving gene with a role in cognition.

  19. Caspase 8 gene variants in healthy North Indian population and comparison with worldwide ethnic group variations

    PubMed Central

    George, Ginu P.; Mittal, Rama D.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many strategies are being used for the quest for the disease causing genes. Inter-individual variations in several genes exist. Thus, even if they share the same disease-associated allele, the genomic backgrounds – and hence potential interacting alleles at other loci – of people with different regional ancestries may differ, with a consequent variation in the severity of their disease. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The present study was conducted to determine the distribution of Caspase 8 IVS12-19G/A, Caspase 8D302H, Caspase 8 -652del and Caspase 8 -678del polymorphisms (as frequency distribution of caspases in Indians generally is not yet known), which was then compared with different populations globally. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based analysis was conducted in 205 normal healthy individuals of similar ethnicity. RESULTS: The variant allele frequencies were 17.6% (A) in Caspase 8 IVS12-19G/A, 13.2% (H) in Caspase 8D302H, 23.2% (Del) in Caspase 8 -652del and 24.6% (Del) in Caspase 8 -678del. Further, comparison of frequency distribution of these genes was done with various published studies of different ethnic groups globally. CONCLUSION: It is anticipated from our results that the frequency of these caspase genes exhibits distinctive patterns in India, which could perhaps be attributed to ethnic variation. This study is important as it can form a baseline for screening individuals who are at high risk due to exposure to environmental carcinogens and cancer predisposition, and therefore, might help in investigating linked polymorphisms in a way that will not obscure potential associations between genotype and phenotype. PMID:21206702

  20. IDENTIFICATION AND HORMONE INDUCTION OF PUTATIVE CHITIN SYNTHASE GENES AND SPLICE VARIANTS IN Leptinotarsa decemlineata (SAY).

    PubMed

    Shi, Ji-Feng; Mu, Li-Li; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Chitin synthase (ChS) plays a critical role in chitin synthesis and excretion. In this study, two ChS genes (LdChSA and LdChSB) were identified in Leptinotarsa decemlineata. LdChSA contains two splicing variants, LdChSAa and LdChSAb. Within the first, second, and third larval instars, the mRNA levels of LdChSAa, LdChSAb, and LdChSB coincide with the peaks of circulating 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH). In vitro culture of midguts and an in vivo bioassay revealed that 20E and an ecdysteroid agonist halofenozide stimulated the expression of the three LdChSs. Conversely, a reduction of 20E by RNA interference (RNAi) of an ecdysteroidogenesis gene LdSHD repressed the expression of these LdChSs, and ingestion of halofenozide by LdSHD RNAi larvae rescued the repression. Moreover, disruption of 20E signaling by RNAi of LdEcR, LdE75, LdHR3, and LdFTZ-F1 reduced the expression levels of these genes. Similarly, in vitro culture and an in vivo bioassay showed that exogenous JH and a JH analog methoprene activated the expression of the three LdChSs, whereas a decrease in JH by RNAi of a JH biosynthesis gene LdJHAMT downregulated these LdChSs. It seems that JH upregulates LdChSs at the early stage of each instar, whereas a 20E pulse triggers the transcription of LdChSs during molting in L. decemlineata.

  1. Multicapillary gel electrophoresis based analysis of genetic variants in the WFS1 gene.

    PubMed

    Elek, Zsuzsanna; Dénes, Réka; Prokop, Susanne; Somogyi, Anikó; Yowanto, Handy; Luo, Jane; Souquet, Manfred; Guttman, András; Rónai, Zsolt

    2016-09-01

    The WFS1 gene is one of the thoroughly investigated targets in diabetes research, variants of the gene were suggested to be the genetic components of the common forms (type 1 and type 2) of diabetes. Our project focused on the analysis of polymorphisms (rs4689388, rs148797429, rs4273545) localized in the WFS1 promoter region. Although submarine gel electrophoresis based approaches were also employed in the genetic tests, it was demonstrated that multicapillary electrophoresis offers a state of the art approach for reliable high-throughput SNP and VNTR analysis. Association studies were carried out in a case-control setup. Luciferase reporter assay was employed to test the effect of the investigated loci on the activity of gene expression in vitro. Significant association could be demonstrated between all three polymorphisms and type 2 diabetes in both allele- and genotype-wise settings even using Bonferroni correction. It is notable; however, that the three loci were in strong linkage disequilibrium, thus the observed associations cannot be considered as separate effects. Molecular analyses showed that the rs4273545 GT SNP played a role in the regulation of transcription in vitro. However, this effect took place only in the presence of the region including the rs148797429 site, although this latter locus did not have its own impact on the regulation of gene expression. The paper provides genotyping protocols readily applicable in any multiplex SNP and VNTR analyses, moreover confirms and extends previous results about the role of WFS1 polymorphisms in the genetic risk of diabetes mellitus.

  2. Rare Variants in the Epithelial Cadherin Gene Underlying the Genetic Etiology of Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luciano Abreu; Yamamoto, Guilherme Lopes; Melo, Soraia; Malcher, Carolina; Ferreira, Simone Gomes; Figueiredo, Joana; Alvizi, Lucas; Kobayashi, Gerson Shigeru; Naslavsky, Michel Satya; Alonso, Nivaldo; Felix, Temis Maria; Zatz, Mayana; Seruca, Raquel; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2015-11-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial cleft (NSOFC) is a complex disease of still unclear genetic etiology. To investigate the contribution of rare epithelial cadherin (CDH1) gene variants to NSOFC, we target sequenced 221 probands. Candidate variants were evaluated via in vitro, in silico, or segregation analyses. Three probably pathogenic variants (c.760G>A [p.Asp254Asn], c.1023T>G [p.Tyr341*], and c.2351G>A [p.Arg784His]) segregated according to autosomal dominant inheritance in four nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) families (Lod score: 5.8 at θ = 0; 47% penetrance). A fourth possibly pathogenic variant (c.387+5G>A) was also found, but further functional analyses are needed (overall prevalence of CDH1 candidate variants: 2%; 15.4% among familial cases). CDH1 mutational burden was higher among probands from familial cases when compared to that of controls (P = 0.002). We concluded that CDH1 contributes to NSCL/P with mainly rare, moderately penetrant variants, and CDH1 haploinsufficiency is the likely etiological mechanism.

  3. Influence of DGKH variants on amygdala volume in patients with bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kittel-Schneider, S; Wobrock, T; Scherk, H; Schneider-Axmann, T; Trost, S; Zilles, D; Wolf, C; Schmitt, A; Malchow, B; Hasan, A; Backens, M; Reith, W; Falkai, P; Gruber, O; Reif, A

    2015-03-01

    The diacylglycerol kinase eta (DGKH) gene, first identified in a genome-wide association study, is one of the few replicated risk genes of bipolar affective disorder (BD). Following initial positive studies, it not only was found to be associated with BD but also implicated in the etiology of other psychiatric disorders featuring affective symptoms, rendering DGKH a cross-disorder risk gene. However, the (patho-)physiological role of the encoded enzyme is still elusive. In the present study, we investigated primarily the influence of a risk haplotype on amygdala volume in patients suffering from schizophrenia or BD as well as healthy controls and four single nucleotide polymorphisms conveying risk. There was a significant association of the DGKH risk haplotype with increased amygdala volume in BD, but not in schizophrenia or healthy controls. These findings add to the notion of a role of DGKH in the pathogenesis of BD.

  4. Detection of Copy Number Variants Reveals Association of Cilia Genes with Neural Tube Defects

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yonghui; Zhao, Huizhi; Sheng, Xiaoming; Zou, Jizhen; Lip, Va; Xie, Hua; Guo, Jin; Shao, Hong; Bao, Yihua; Shen, Jianliang; Niu, Bo; Gusella, James F.; Wu, Bai-Lin; Zhang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Background Neural tube defects (NTDs) are one of the most common birth defects caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Currently, little is known about the genetic basis of NTDs although up to 70% of human NTDs were reported to be attributed to genetic factors. Here we performed genome-wide copy number variants (CNVs) detection in a cohort of Chinese NTD patients in order to exam the potential role of CNVs in the pathogenesis of NTDs. Methods The genomic DNA from eighty-five NTD cases and seventy-five matched normal controls were subjected for whole genome CNVs analysis. Non-DGV (the Database of Genomic Variants) CNVs from each group were further analyzed for their associations with NTDs. Gene content in non-DGV CNVs as well as participating pathways were examined. Results Fifty-five and twenty-six non-DGV CNVs were detected in cases and controls respectively. Among them, forty and nineteen CNVs involve genes (genic CNV). Significantly more non-DGV CNVs and non-DGV genic CNVs were detected in NTD patients than in control (41.2% vs. 25.3%, p<0.05 and 37.6% vs. 20%, p<0.05). Non-DGV genic CNVs are associated with a 2.65-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.24–5.87). Interestingly, there are 41 cilia genes involved in non-DGV CNVs from NTD patients which is significantly enriched in cases compared with that in controls (24.7% vs. 9.3%, p<0.05), corresponding with a 3.19-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.27–8.01). Pathway analyses further suggested that two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are top canonical pathways implicated in NTD-specific CNVs, and these two novel pathways interact with known NTD pathways. Conclusions Evidence from the genome-wide CNV study suggests that genic CNVs, particularly ciliogenic CNVs are associated with NTDs and two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are potential pathways involved in NTD pathogenesis. PMID:23349908

  5. Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 due to novel variants of SCNN1B gene

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Yael R; Lodish, Maya B; Raygada, Margarita; Del Rivero, Jaydira; Faucz, Fabio R; Abraham, Smita B; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Belyavskaya, Elena; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-01-01

    Summary Autosomal recessive pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1) is a rare disorder characterized by sodium wasting, failure to thrive, hyperkalemia, hypovolemia and metabolic acidosis. It is due to mutations in the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and is characterized by diminished response to aldosterone. Patients may present with life-threatening hyperkalemia, which must be recognized and appropriately treated. A 32-year-old female was referred to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for evaluation of hyperkalemia and muscle pain. Her condition started in the second week of life, when she was brought to an outside hospital lethargic and unresponsive. At that time, she was hypovolemic, hyperkalemic and acidotic, and was eventually treated with sodium bicarbonate and potassium chelation. At the time of the presentation to the NIH, her laboratory evaluation revealed serum potassium 5.1 mmol/l (reference range: 3.4–5.1 mmol/l), aldosterone 2800 ng/dl (reference range: ≤21 ng/dl) and plasma renin activity 90 ng/ml/h (reference range: 0.6–4.3 ng/ml per h). Diagnosis of PHA1 was suspected. Sequencing of the SCNN1B gene, which codes for ENaC, revealed that the patient is a compound heterozygote for two novel variants (c.1288delC and c.1466+1 G>A), confirming the suspected diagnosis of PHA1. In conclusion, we report a patient with novel variants of the SCNN1B gene causing PHA1 with persistent, symptomatic hyperkalemia. Learning points PHA1 is a rare genetic condition, causing functional abnormalities of the amiloride-sensitive ENaC.PHA1 was caused by previously unreported SCNN1B gene mutations (c.1288delC and c.1466+1 G>A).Early recognition of this condition and adherence to symptomatic therapy is important, as the electrolyte abnormalities found may lead to severe dehydration, cardiac arrhythmias and even death.High doses of sodium polystyrene sulfonate, sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate are required for symptomatic

  6. Genetic Variants in the Bone Morphogenic Protein Gene Family Modify the Association between Residential Exposure to Traffic and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ward-Caviness, Cavin K.; Neas, Lucas M.; Blach, Colette; Haynes, Carol S.; LaRocque-Abramson, Karen; Grass, Elizabeth; Dowdy, Elaine; Devlin, Robert B.; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Cascio, Wayne E.; Lynn Miranda, Marie; Gregory, Simon G.; Shah, Svati H.; Kraus, William E.; Hauser, Elizabeth R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing literature indicating that genetic variants modify many of the associations between environmental exposures and clinical outcomes, potentially by increasing susceptibility to these exposures. However, genome-scale investigations of these interactions have been rarely performed particularly in the case of air pollution exposures. We performed race-stratified genome-wide gene-environment interaction association studies on European-American (EA, N = 1623) and African-American (AA, N = 554) cohorts to investigate the joint influence of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and residential exposure to traffic (“traffic exposure”)—a recognized vascular disease risk factor—on peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Traffic exposure was estimated via the distance from the primary residence to the nearest major roadway, defined as the nearest limited access highways or major arterial. The rs755249-traffic exposure interaction was associated with PAD at a genome-wide significant level (P = 2.29x10-8) in European-Americans. Rs755249 is located in the 3’ untranslated region of BMP8A, a member of the bone morphogenic protein (BMP) gene family. Further investigation revealed several variants in BMP genes associated with PAD via an interaction with traffic exposure in both the EA and AA cohorts; this included interactions with non-synonymous variants in BMP2, which is regulated by air pollution exposure. The BMP family of genes is linked to vascular growth and calcification and is a novel gene family for the study of PAD pathophysiology. Further investigation of BMP8A using the Genotype Tissue Expression Database revealed multiple variants with nominally significant (P < 0.05) interaction P-values in our EA cohort were significant BMP8A eQTLs in tissue types highlight relevant for PAD such as rs755249 (tibial nerve, eQTL P = 3.6x10-6) and rs1180341 (tibial artery, eQTL P = 5.3x10-6). Together these results reveal a novel gene, and possibly gene

  7. Genetic Variants in the Bone Morphogenic Protein Gene Family Modify the Association between Residential Exposure to Traffic and Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Ward-Caviness, Cavin K; Neas, Lucas M; Blach, Colette; Haynes, Carol S; LaRocque-Abramson, Karen; Grass, Elizabeth; Dowdy, Elaine; Devlin, Robert B; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Cascio, Wayne E; Lynn Miranda, Marie; Gregory, Simon G; Shah, Svati H; Kraus, William E; Hauser, Elizabeth R

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing literature indicating that genetic variants modify many of the associations between environmental exposures and clinical outcomes, potentially by increasing susceptibility to these exposures. However, genome-scale investigations of these interactions have been rarely performed particularly in the case of air pollution exposures. We performed race-stratified genome-wide gene-environment interaction association studies on European-American (EA, N = 1623) and African-American (AA, N = 554) cohorts to investigate the joint influence of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and residential exposure to traffic ("traffic exposure")-a recognized vascular disease risk factor-on peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Traffic exposure was estimated via the distance from the primary residence to the nearest major roadway, defined as the nearest limited access highways or major arterial. The rs755249-traffic exposure interaction was associated with PAD at a genome-wide significant level (P = 2.29x10-8) in European-Americans. Rs755249 is located in the 3' untranslated region of BMP8A, a member of the bone morphogenic protein (BMP) gene family. Further investigation revealed several variants in BMP genes associated with PAD via an interaction with traffic exposure in both the EA and AA cohorts; this included interactions with non-synonymous variants in BMP2, which is regulated by air pollution exposure. The BMP family of genes is linked to vascular growth and calcification and is a novel gene family for the study of PAD pathophysiology. Further investigation of BMP8A using the Genotype Tissue Expression Database revealed multiple variants with nominally significant (P < 0.05) interaction P-values in our EA cohort were significant BMP8A eQTLs in tissue types highlight relevant for PAD such as rs755249 (tibial nerve, eQTL P = 3.6x10-6) and rs1180341 (tibial artery, eQTL P = 5.3x10-6). Together these results reveal a novel gene, and possibly gene family