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Sample records for gene variants influence

  1. IL18 Gene Variants Influence the Susceptibility to Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F David; Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disorder caused by the infection with the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. According to the World Health Organization, more than six million people are currently infected in endemic regions. Genetic factors have been proposed to influence predisposition to infection and development of severe clinical phenotypes like chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). Interleukin 18 (IL18) encodes a proinflammatory cytokine that has been proposed to be involved in controlling T. cruzi infection. In this study, we analyzed the possible role of six IL18 gene variants (rs5744258, rs360722, rs2043055, rs187238, rs1946518 and rs360719), which cover most of the variation within the locus, in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi and/or CCC. In total, 1,171 individuals from a Colombian region endemic for Chagas disease, classified as seronegative (n = 595), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 175) and CCC (n = 401), were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Significant associations with T. cruzi infection were observed when comparing seronegative and seropositive individuals for rs187238 (P = 2.18E-03, OR = 0.77), rs360719 (P = 1.49E-03, OR = 0.76), rs2043055 (P = 2.52E-03, OR = 1.29), and rs1946518 (P = 0.0162, OR = 1.22). However, dependence analyses suggested that the association was mainly driven by the polymorphism rs360719. This variant is located within the promoter region of the IL18 gene, and it has been described that it creates a binding site for the transcription factor OCT-1 affecting IL-18 expression levels. In addition, no evidence of association was observed between any of the analyzed IL18 gene polymorphisms and the development of CCC. In summary, our data suggest that genetic variation within the promoter region of IL18 is directly involved in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi, which provides novel insight into disease pathophysiology and adds new perspectives to achieve a more effective disease control.

  2. IL18 Gene Variants Influence the Susceptibility to Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F David; Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disorder caused by the infection with the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. According to the World Health Organization, more than six million people are currently infected in endemic regions. Genetic factors have been proposed to influence predisposition to infection and development of severe clinical phenotypes like chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). Interleukin 18 (IL18) encodes a proinflammatory cytokine that has been proposed to be involved in controlling T. cruzi infection. In this study, we analyzed the possible role of six IL18 gene variants (rs5744258, rs360722, rs2043055, rs187238, rs1946518 and rs360719), which cover most of the variation within the locus, in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi and/or CCC. In total, 1,171 individuals from a Colombian region endemic for Chagas disease, classified as seronegative (n = 595), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 175) and CCC (n = 401), were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Significant associations with T. cruzi infection were observed when comparing seronegative and seropositive individuals for rs187238 (P = 2.18E-03, OR = 0.77), rs360719 (P = 1.49E-03, OR = 0.76), rs2043055 (P = 2.52E-03, OR = 1.29), and rs1946518 (P = 0.0162, OR = 1.22). However, dependence analyses suggested that the association was mainly driven by the polymorphism rs360719. This variant is located within the promoter region of the IL18 gene, and it has been described that it creates a binding site for the transcription factor OCT-1 affecting IL-18 expression levels. In addition, no evidence of association was observed between any of the analyzed IL18 gene polymorphisms and the development of CCC. In summary, our data suggest that genetic variation within the promoter region of IL18 is directly involved in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi, which provides novel insight into disease pathophysiology and adds new perspectives to achieve a more effective disease control. PMID:27027876

  3. IL18 Gene Variants Influence the Susceptibility to Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F. David; Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disorder caused by the infection with the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. According to the World Health Organization, more than six million people are currently infected in endemic regions. Genetic factors have been proposed to influence predisposition to infection and development of severe clinical phenotypes like chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). Interleukin 18 (IL18) encodes a proinflammatory cytokine that has been proposed to be involved in controlling T. cruzi infection. In this study, we analyzed the possible role of six IL18 gene variants (rs5744258, rs360722, rs2043055, rs187238, rs1946518 and rs360719), which cover most of the variation within the locus, in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi and/or CCC. In total, 1,171 individuals from a Colombian region endemic for Chagas disease, classified as seronegative (n = 595), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 175) and CCC (n = 401), were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Significant associations with T. cruzi infection were observed when comparing seronegative and seropositive individuals for rs187238 (P = 2.18E-03, OR = 0.77), rs360719 (P = 1.49E-03, OR = 0.76), rs2043055 (P = 2.52E-03, OR = 1.29), and rs1946518 (P = 0.0162, OR = 1.22). However, dependence analyses suggested that the association was mainly driven by the polymorphism rs360719. This variant is located within the promoter region of the IL18 gene, and it has been described that it creates a binding site for the transcription factor OCT-1 affecting IL-18 expression levels. In addition, no evidence of association was observed between any of the analyzed IL18 gene polymorphisms and the development of CCC. In summary, our data suggest that genetic variation within the promoter region of IL18 is directly involved in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi, which provides novel insight into disease pathophysiology and adds new perspectives to achieve a more effective disease control. PMID:27027876

  4. Multiple common variants for celiac disease influencing immune gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Patrick CA; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Hunt, Karen A; Romanos, Jihane; Curtotti, Alessandra; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Heap, Graham AR; Ádány, Róza; Aromaa, Arpo; Bardella, Maria Teresa; van den Berg, Leonard H; Bockett, Nicholas A; de la Concha, Emilio G.; Dema, Bárbara; Fehrmann, Rudolf SN; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; Fiatal, Szilvia; Grandone, Elvira; Green, Peter M; Groen, Harry JM; Gwilliam, Rhian; Houwen, Roderick HJ; Hunt, Sarah E; Kaukinen, Katri; Kelleher, Dermot; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma; Kurppa, Kalle; MacMathuna, Padraic; Mäki, Markku; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; McCann, Owen T; Mearin, M Luisa; Mein, Charles A; Mirza, Muddassar M; Mistry, Vanisha; Mora, Barbara; Morley, Katherine I; Mulder, Chris J; Murray, Joseph A; Núñez, Concepción; Oosterom, Elvira; Ophoff, Roel A; Polanco, Isabel; Peltonen, Leena; Platteel, Mathieu; Rybak, Anna; Salomaa, Veikko; Schweizer, Joachim J; Sperandeo, Maria Pia; Tack, Greetje J; Turner, Graham; Veldink, Jan H; Verbeek, Wieke HM; Weersma, Rinse K; Wolters, Victorien M; Urcelay, Elena; Cukrowska, Bozena; Greco, Luigi; Neuhausen, Susan L.; McManus, Ross; Barisani, Donatella; Deloukas, Panos; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Saavalainen, Paivi; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A

    2010-01-01

    We performed a second-generation genome wide association study of 4,533 celiac disease cases and 10,750 controls. We genotyped 113 selected SNPs with PGWAS<10−4, and 18 SNPs from 14 known loci, in a further 4,918 cases and 5,684 controls. Variants from 13 new regions reached genome wide significance (Pcombined<5×10−8), most contain immune function genes (BACH2, CCR4, CD80, CIITA/SOCS1/CLEC16A, ICOSLG, ZMIZ1) with ETS1, RUNX3, THEMIS and TNFRSF14 playing key roles in thymic T cell selection. A further 13 regions had suggestive association evidence. In an expression quantitative trait meta-analysis of 1,469 whole blood samples, 20 of 38 (52.6%) tested loci had celiac risk variants correlated (P<0.0028, FDR 5%) with cis gene expression. PMID:20190752

  5. Renin-Angiotensin System Gene Variants and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Influence of Angiotensinogen

    PubMed Central

    Joyce-Tan, Siew Mei; Zain, Shamsul Mohd; Abdul Sattar, Munavvar Zubaid; Abdullah, Nor Azizan

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successfully used to call for variants associated with diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, some variants are not included in the GWAS to avoid penalty in multiple hypothetic testing. Thus, candidate gene approach is still useful even at GWAS era. This study attempted to assess whether genetic variations in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and their gene interactions are associated with T2DM risk. We genotyped 290 T2DM patients and 267 controls using three genes of the RAS, namely, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensinogen (AGT), and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1). There were significant differences in allele frequencies between cases and controls for AGT variants (P = 0.05) but not for ACE and AGTR1. Haplotype TCG of the AGT was associated with increased risk of T2DM (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.15–3.20, permuted P = 0.012); however, no evidence of significant gene-gene interactions was seen. Nonetheless, our analysis revealed that the associations of the AGT variants with T2DM were independently associated. Thus, this study suggests that genetic variants of the RAS can modestly influence the T2DM risk. PMID:26682227

  6. Common Variants within Oxidative Phosphorylation Genes Influence Risk of Ischemic Stroke and Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher D.; Biffi, Alessandro; Nalls, Michael A.; Devan, William J.; Schwab, Kristin; Ayres, Alison M.; Valant, Valerie; Ross, Owen A.; Rost, Natalia S.; Saxena, Richa; Viswanathan, Anand; Worrall, Bradford B.; Brott, Thomas G.; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Brown, Devin; Broderick, Joseph P.; Norrving, Bo; Greenberg, Steven M.; Silliman, Scott L.; Hansen, Björn M.; Tirschwell, David L.; Lindgren, Arne; Slowik, Agnieszka; Schmidt, Reinhold; Selim, Magdy; Roquer, Jaume; Montaner, Joan; Singleton, Andrew B.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Woo, Daniel; Furie, Karen L.; Meschia, James F.; Rosand, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Prior studies demonstrated association between mitochondrial DNA variants and ischemic stroke (IS). We investigated whether variants within a larger set of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) genes encoded by both autosomal and mitochondrial DNA were associated with risk of IS and, based on our results, extended our investigation to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods This association study employed a discovery cohort of 1643 individuals, a validation cohort of 2432 individuals for IS, and an extension cohort of 1476 individuals for ICH. Gene-set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was performed on all structural OXPHOS genes, as well as genes contributing to individual respiratory complexes. Gene-sets passing GSEA were tested by constructing genetic scores using common variants residing within each gene. Associations between each variant and IS that emerged in the discovery cohort were examined in validation and extension cohorts. Results IS was associated with genetic risk scores in OXPHOS as a whole (odds ratio (OR)=1.17, p=0.008) and Complex I (OR=1.06, p=0.050). Among IS subtypes, small vessel (SV) stroke showed association with OXPHOS (OR=1.16, p=0.007), Complex I (OR=1.13, p=0.027) and Complex IV (OR 1.14, p=0.018). To further explore this SV association, we extended our analysis to ICH, revealing association between deep hemispheric ICH and Complex IV (OR=1.08, p=0.008). Conclusions This pathway analysis demonstrates association between common genetic variants within OXPHOS genes and stroke. The associations for SV stroke and deep ICH suggest that genetic variation in OXPHOS influences small vessel pathobiology. Further studies are needed to identify culprit genetic variants and assess their functional consequences. PMID:23362085

  7. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  8. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity.

    PubMed

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P; Nir, Talia M; Toga, Arthur W; Jack, Clifford R; Saykin, Andrew J; Green, Robert C; Weiner, Michael W; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Hansell, Narelle K; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-03-19

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain's connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain's wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer's disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases.

  9. Common genetic variants in the PSCA gene influence gene expression and bladder cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yi-Ping; Kohaar, Indu; Rothman, Nathaniel; Earl, Julie; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Ye, Yuanqing; Malats, Núria; Tang, Wei; Liu, Luyang; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Muchmore, Brian; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Tarway, McAnthony; Kogevinas, Manolis; Porter-Gill, Patricia; Baris, Dalsu; Mumy, Adam; Albanes, Demetrius; Purdue, Mark P.; Hutchinson, Amy; Carrato, Alfredo; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; García-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Johnson, Alison; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R.; Schned, Alan; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Thun, Michael J.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Chanock, Stephen J.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Silverman, Debra T.; Wu, Xifeng; Real, Francisco X.; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified a SNP, rs2294008, on 8q24.3 within the prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) gene, as a risk factor for bladder cancer. To fine-map this region, we imputed 642 SNPs within 100 Kb of rs2294008 in addition to 33 markers genotyped in one of the reported genome-wide association study in 8,652 subjects. A multivariable logistic regression model adjusted for rs2294008 revealed a unique signal, rs2978974 (r2 = 0.02, D′ = 0.19 with rs2294008). In the combined analysis of 5,393 cases and 7,324 controls, we detected a per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.11 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06–1.17, P = 5.8 × 10−5] for rs2294008 and OR = 1.07 (95% CI = 1.02–1.13, P = 9.7 × 10−3) for rs2978974. The effect was stronger in carriers of both risk variants (OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.08–1.41, P = 1.8 × 10−3) and there was a significant multiplicative interaction (P = 0.035) between these two SNPs, which requires replication in future studies. The T risk allele of rs2294008 was associated with increased PSCA mRNA expression in two sets of bladder tumor samples (n = 36, P = 0.0007 and n = 34, P = 0.0054) and in normal bladder samples (n = 35, P = 0.0155), but rs2978974 was not associated with PSCA expression. SNP rs2978974 is located 10 Kb upstream of rs2294008, within an alternative untranslated first exon of PSCA. The non-risk allele G of rs2978974 showed strong interaction with nuclear proteins from five cell lines tested, implying a regulatory function. In conclusion, a joint effect of two PSCA SNPs, rs2294008 and rs2978974, suggests that both variants may be important for bladder cancer susceptibility, possibly through different mechanisms that influence the control of mRNA expression and interaction with regulatory factors. PMID:22416122

  10. Lithium and GSK3-β Promoter Gene Variants Influence White Matter Microstructure in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Francesco; Bollettini, Irene; Barberi, Ignazio; Radaelli, Daniele; Poletti, Sara; Locatelli, Clara; Pirovano, Adele; Lorenzi, Cristina; Falini, Andrea; Colombo, Cristina; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Lithium is the mainstay for the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD) and inhibits glycogen synthase kinase 3-β (GSK3-β). The less active GSK3-β promoter gene variants have been associated with less detrimental clinical features of BD. GSK3-β gene variants and lithium can influence brain gray matter structure in psychiatric conditions. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures of white matter (WM) integrity showed widespred disruption of WM structure in BD. In a sample of 70 patients affected by a major depressive episode in course of BD, we investigated the effect of ongoing long-term lithium treatment and GSK3-β promoter rs334558 polymorphism on WM microstructure, using DTI and tract-based spatial statistics with threshold-free cluster enhancement. We report that the less active GSK3-β rs334558*C gene-promoter variants, and the long-term administration of the GSK3-β inhibitor lithium, were associated with increases of DTI measures of axial diffusivity (AD) in several WM fiber tracts, including corpus callosum, forceps major, anterior and posterior cingulum bundle (bilaterally including its hippocampal part), left superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculus, left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, left posterior thalamic radiation, bilateral superior and posterior corona radiata, and bilateral corticospinal tract. AD reflects the integrity of axons and myelin sheaths. We suggest that GSK3-β inhibition and lithium could counteract the detrimental influences of BD on WM structure, with specific benefits resulting from effects on specific WM tracts contributing to the functional integrity of the brain and involving interhemispheric, limbic, and large frontal, parietal, and fronto-occipital connections. PMID:22990942

  11. Lithium and GSK3-β promoter gene variants influence white matter microstructure in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Bollettini, Irene; Barberi, Ignazio; Radaelli, Daniele; Poletti, Sara; Locatelli, Clara; Pirovano, Adele; Lorenzi, Cristina; Falini, Andrea; Colombo, Cristina; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Lithium is the mainstay for the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD) and inhibits glycogen synthase kinase 3-β (GSK3-β). The less active GSK3-β promoter gene variants have been associated with less detrimental clinical features of BD. GSK3-β gene variants and lithium can influence brain gray matter structure in psychiatric conditions. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures of white matter (WM) integrity showed widespred disruption of WM structure in BD. In a sample of 70 patients affected by a major depressive episode in course of BD, we investigated the effect of ongoing long-term lithium treatment and GSK3-β promoter rs334558 polymorphism on WM microstructure, using DTI and tract-based spatial statistics with threshold-free cluster enhancement. We report that the less active GSK3-β rs334558*C gene-promoter variants, and the long-term administration of the GSK3-β inhibitor lithium, were associated with increases of DTI measures of axial diffusivity (AD) in several WM fiber tracts, including corpus callosum, forceps major, anterior and posterior cingulum bundle (bilaterally including its hippocampal part), left superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculus, left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, left posterior thalamic radiation, bilateral superior and posterior corona radiata, and bilateral corticospinal tract. AD reflects the integrity of axons and myelin sheaths. We suggest that GSK3-β inhibition and lithium could counteract the detrimental influences of BD on WM structure, with specific benefits resulting from effects on specific WM tracts contributing to the functional integrity of the brain and involving interhemispheric, limbic, and large frontal, parietal, and fronto-occipital connections.

  12. Common genetic variants in NEFL influence gene expression and neuroblastoma risk

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Mario; Diskin, Sharon; Cimmino, Flora; Acierno, Giovanni; Totaro, Francesca; Petrosino, Giuseppe; Pezone, Lucia; Diamond, Maura; McDaniel, Lee; Hakonarson, Hakon; Iolascon, Achille; Devoto, Marcella; Maris, John M

    2014-01-01

    The genetic etiology of sporadic neuroblastoma is still largely obscure. In a genome-wide association study, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associated with neuroblastoma at the LINC00340, BARD1, LMO1, DUSP12, HSD17B12, HACE1 and LIN28B gene loci, but these explain only a small fraction of neuroblastoma heritability. Other neuroblastoma susceptibility genes are likely hidden among signals discarded by the multiple testing corrections. In this study, we evaluated 8 additional genes selected as candidates for further study based on proven involvement in neuroblastoma differentiation. SNP at these candidate genes were tested for association with disease susceptibility in 2101 cases and 4202 controls, with the associations found replicated in an independent cohort of 459 cases and 809 controls. Replicated associations were further studied for cis-effect using gene expression, transient overexpression, silencing and cellular differentiation assays. The neurofilament gene NEFL harbored three SNP associated with neuroblastoma (rs11994014; Pcombined=0.0050; OR=0.88, rs2979704; Pcombined=0.0072; OR=0.87, rs105911; Pcombined=0.0049; OR=0.86). The protective allele of rs1059111 correlated with increased NEFL expression. Biological investigations showed that ectopic overexpression of NEFL inhibited cell growth specifically in neuroblastoma cells carrying the protective allele. NEFL overexpression also enhanced differentiation and impaired the proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of cells with protective allele and basal NEFL expression, while impairing invasiveness and proliferation of cells homozygous for the risk genotype. Clinically, high levels of NEFL expression in primary neuroblastoma specimens was associated with better overall survival (P=0.03; HR=0.68). Our results show that common variants of NEFL influence neuroblastoma susceptibility and they establish that NEFL expression influences disease initiation and progression. PMID:25312269

  13. Child μ-Opioid Receptor Gene Variant Influences Parent–Child Relations

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William E; Sun, Hui; Costello, E Jane; Angold, Adrian; Heilig, Markus A; Barr, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    Variation in the μ-opioid receptor gene has been associated with early social behavior in mice and rhesus macaques. The current study tested whether the functional OPRM1 A118G predicted various indices of social relations in children. The sample included 226 subjects of self-reported European ancestry (44% female; mean age 13.6, SD=2.2) who were part of a larger representative study of children aged 9–17 years in rural North Carolina. Multiple aspects of recent (past 3 months) parent–child relationship were assessed using the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Assessment. Parent problems were coded based upon a lifetime history of mental health problems, substance abuse, or criminality. Child genotype interacted with parent behavior such that there were no genotype differences for those with low levels of parent problems; however, when a history of parent problems was reported, the G allele carriers had more enjoyment of parent–child interactions (mean ratio (MR)=3.5, 95% CI=1.6, 8.0) and fewer arguments (MR=3.1, 95% CI=1.1, 8.9). These findings suggest a role for the OPRM1 gene in the genetic architecture of social relations in humans. In summary, a variant in the μ-opioid receptor gene (118G) was associated with improved parent–child relations, but only in the context of a significant disruption in parental functioning. PMID:21326192

  14. Serotonin 5-HT2A receptor gene variants influence antidepressant response to repeated total sleep deprivation in bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Barbini, Barbara; Bernasconi, Alessandro; Fulgosi, Mara Cigala; Colombo, Cristina; Dallaspezia, Sara; Gavinelli, Chiara; Marino, Elena; Pirovano, Adele; Radaelli, Daniele; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2008-12-12

    5-HT2A receptor density in prefrontal cortex was associated with depression and suicide. 5-HT2A receptor gene polymorphism rs6313 was associated with 5-HT2A receptor binding potential, with the ability of individuals to use environmental support in order to prevent depression, and with sleep improvement after antidepressant treatment with mirtazapine. Studies on response to antidepressant drugs gave inconsistent results. Here we studied the effect of rs6313 on response to repeated total sleep deprivation (TSD) in 80 bipolar depressed inpatients treated with three consecutive TSD cycles (each one made of 36 h awake followed by a night of undisturbed sleep). All genotype groups showed comparable acute effects of the first TSD, but patients homozygotes for the T variant had better perceived and observed benefits from treatment than carriers of the C allele. These effects became significant after the first recovery night and during the following days, leading to a 36% higher final response rate (Hamilton depression rating<8). The higher density of postsynaptic excitatory 5-HT2A receptors in T/T homozygotes could have led to higher behavioural effects of increased 5-HT neurotransmission due to repeated TSD. Other possible mechanisms involve allostatic/homeostatic adaptation to sleep loss, and a different effect of the allele variants on epigenetic influences. Results confirm the interest for individual gene variants of the serotonin pathway in shaping clinical characteristics of depression and antidepressant response.

  15. Deceased donor multidrug resistance protein 1 and caveolin 1 gene variants may influence allograft survival in kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Divers, Jasmin; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Julian, Bruce A.; Israni, Ajay K.; Schladt, David; Pastan, Stephen O.; Chattrabhuti, Kryt; Gautreaux, Michael D.; Hauptfeld, Vera; Bray, Robert A.; Kirk, Allan D.; Brown, W. Mark; Gaston, Robert S.; Rogers, Jeffrey; Farney, Alan C.; Orlando, Giuseppe; Stratta, Robert J.; Guan, Meijian; Palanisamy, Amudha; Reeves-Daniel, Amber M.; Bowden, Donald W.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Ma, Lijun; Freedman, Barry I.

    2015-01-01

    Variants in donor multidrug resistance protein 1 (ABCB1) and caveolin 1 (CAV1) genes are associated with renal allograft failure after transplantation in Europeans. Here we assessed transplantation outcomes of kidneys from 368 African American (AA) and 314 European American (EA) deceased donors based on 38 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning ABCB1 and 16 SNPs spanning CAV1, including previously associated index and haplotype-tagging SNPs. Tests for association with time to allograft failure were performed for the 1,233 resultant kidney transplantations, adjusting for recipient age, sex, ethnicity, cold ischemia time, PRA, HLA match, expanded-criteria donation, and APOL1- nephropathy variants in AA donors. Interaction analyses between APOL1 with ABCB1 and CAV1 were performed. In a meta-analysis of all transplantations, ABCB1 index SNP rs1045642 was associated with time to allograft failure and other ABCB1 SNPs were nominally associated, but not CAV1 SNPs. ABCB1 SNP rs1045642 showed consistent effects with the 558 transplantations from EA donors, but not with the 675 transplantations from AA donors. ABCB1 SNP rs956825 and CAV1 SNP rs6466583 interacted with APOL1 in transplants from AA donors. Thus, the T allele at ABCB1 rs1045642 is associated with shorter renal allograft survival for kidneys from American donors. Interactions between ABCB1 and CAV1 with APOL1 may influence allograft failure for transplanted kidneys from AA donors. PMID:25853335

  16. Gene-Based Sequencing Identifies Lipid-Influencing Variants with Ethnicity-Specific Effects in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Amy R.; Chen, Guanjie; Shriner, Daniel; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Hanxia; Mullikin, James C.; Blakesley, Robert W.; Hansen, Nancy F.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; Cherukuri, Praveen F.; Maskeri, Baishali; Young, Alice C.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N.

    2014-01-01

    Although a considerable proportion of serum lipids loci identified in European ancestry individuals (EA) replicate in African Americans (AA), interethnic differences in the distribution of serum lipids suggest that some genetic determinants differ by ethnicity. We conducted a comprehensive evaluation of five lipid candidate genes to identify variants with ethnicity-specific effects. We sequenced ABCA1, LCAT, LPL, PON1, and SERPINE1 in 48 AA individuals with extreme serum lipid concentrations (high HDLC/low TG or low HDLC/high TG). Identified variants were genotyped in the full population-based sample of AA (n = 1694) and tested for an association with serum lipids. rs328 (LPL) and correlated variants were associated with higher HDLC and lower TG. Interestingly, a stronger effect was observed on a “European” vs. “African” genetic background at this locus. To investigate this effect, we evaluated the region among West Africans (WA). For TG, the effect size among WA was the same in AA with only African local ancestry (2–3% lower TG), while the larger association among AA with local European ancestry matched previous reports in EA (10%). For HDLC, there was no association with rs328 in AA with only African local ancestry or in WA, while the association among AA with European local ancestry was much greater than what has been observed for EA (15 vs. ∼5 mg/dl), suggesting an interaction with an environmental or genetic factor that differs by ethnicity. Beyond this ancestry effect, the importance of African ancestry-focused, sequence-based work was also highlighted by serum lipid associations of variants that were in higher frequency (or present only) among those of African ancestry. By beginning our study with the sequence variation present in AA individuals, investigating local ancestry effects, and seeking replication in WA, we were able to comprehensively evaluate the role of a set of candidate genes in serum lipids in AA. PMID:24603370

  17. Gene-based sequencing identifies lipid-influencing variants with ethnicity-specific effects in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Amy R; Chen, Guanjie; Shriner, Daniel; Doumatey, Ayo P; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Hanxia; Mullikin, James C; Blakesley, Robert W; Hansen, Nancy F; Bouffard, Gerard G; Cherukuri, Praveen F; Maskeri, Baishali; Young, Alice C; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N

    2014-03-01

    Although a considerable proportion of serum lipids loci identified in European ancestry individuals (EA) replicate in African Americans (AA), interethnic differences in the distribution of serum lipids suggest that some genetic determinants differ by ethnicity. We conducted a comprehensive evaluation of five lipid candidate genes to identify variants with ethnicity-specific effects. We sequenced ABCA1, LCAT, LPL, PON1, and SERPINE1 in 48 AA individuals with extreme serum lipid concentrations (high HDLC/low TG or low HDLC/high TG). Identified variants were genotyped in the full population-based sample of AA (n = 1694) and tested for an association with serum lipids. rs328 (LPL) and correlated variants were associated with higher HDLC and lower TG. Interestingly, a stronger effect was observed on a "European" vs. "African" genetic background at this locus. To investigate this effect, we evaluated the region among West Africans (WA). For TG, the effect size among WA was the same in AA with only African local ancestry (2-3% lower TG), while the larger association among AA with local European ancestry matched previous reports in EA (10%). For HDLC, there was no association with rs328 in AA with only African local ancestry or in WA, while the association among AA with European local ancestry was much greater than what has been observed for EA (15 vs. ∼ 5 mg/dl), suggesting an interaction with an environmental or genetic factor that differs by ethnicity. Beyond this ancestry effect, the importance of African ancestry-focused, sequence-based work was also highlighted by serum lipid associations of variants that were in higher frequency (or present only) among those of African ancestry. By beginning our study with the sequence variation present in AA individuals, investigating local ancestry effects, and seeking replication in WA, we were able to comprehensively evaluate the role of a set of candidate genes in serum lipids in AA. PMID:24603370

  18. Gene-based sequencing identifies lipid-influencing variants with ethnicity-specific effects in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Amy R; Chen, Guanjie; Shriner, Daniel; Doumatey, Ayo P; Zhou, Jie; Huang, Hanxia; Mullikin, James C; Blakesley, Robert W; Hansen, Nancy F; Bouffard, Gerard G; Cherukuri, Praveen F; Maskeri, Baishali; Young, Alice C; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N

    2014-03-01

    Although a considerable proportion of serum lipids loci identified in European ancestry individuals (EA) replicate in African Americans (AA), interethnic differences in the distribution of serum lipids suggest that some genetic determinants differ by ethnicity. We conducted a comprehensive evaluation of five lipid candidate genes to identify variants with ethnicity-specific effects. We sequenced ABCA1, LCAT, LPL, PON1, and SERPINE1 in 48 AA individuals with extreme serum lipid concentrations (high HDLC/low TG or low HDLC/high TG). Identified variants were genotyped in the full population-based sample of AA (n = 1694) and tested for an association with serum lipids. rs328 (LPL) and correlated variants were associated with higher HDLC and lower TG. Interestingly, a stronger effect was observed on a "European" vs. "African" genetic background at this locus. To investigate this effect, we evaluated the region among West Africans (WA). For TG, the effect size among WA was the same in AA with only African local ancestry (2-3% lower TG), while the larger association among AA with local European ancestry matched previous reports in EA (10%). For HDLC, there was no association with rs328 in AA with only African local ancestry or in WA, while the association among AA with European local ancestry was much greater than what has been observed for EA (15 vs. ∼ 5 mg/dl), suggesting an interaction with an environmental or genetic factor that differs by ethnicity. Beyond this ancestry effect, the importance of African ancestry-focused, sequence-based work was also highlighted by serum lipid associations of variants that were in higher frequency (or present only) among those of African ancestry. By beginning our study with the sequence variation present in AA individuals, investigating local ancestry effects, and seeking replication in WA, we were able to comprehensively evaluate the role of a set of candidate genes in serum lipids in AA.

  19. Intronic variants in the NFKB1 gene may influence hearing forecast in patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss in Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Sonia; Sanchez, Elena; Requena, Teresa; Martinez-Bueno, Manuel; Benitez, Jesus; Perez, Nicolas; Trinidad, Gabriel; Soto-Varela, Andrés; Santos-Perez, Sofía; Martin-Sanz, Eduardo; Fraile, Jesus; Perez, Paz; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E; Batuecas, Angel; Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan M; Aran, Ismael; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A

    2014-01-01

    Meniere's disease is an episodic vestibular syndrome associated with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and tinnitus. Patients with MD have an elevated prevalence of several autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriasis), which suggests a shared autoimmune background. Functional variants of several genes involved in the NF-κB pathway, such as REL, TNFAIP3, NFKB1 and TNIP1, have been associated with two or more immune-mediated diseases and allelic variations in the TLR10 gene may influence bilateral affectation and clinical course in MD. We have genotyped 716 cases of MD and 1628 controls by using the ImmunoChip, a high-density genotyping array containing 186 autoimmune loci, to explore the association of immune system related-loci with sporadic MD. Although no single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) reached a genome-wide significant association (p<10(-8)), we selected allelic variants in the NF-kB pathway for further analyses to evaluate the impact of these SNPs in the clinical outcome of MD in our cohort. None of the selected SNPs increased susceptibility for MD in patients with uni or bilateral SNHL. However, two potential regulatory variants in the NFKB1 gene (rs3774937 and rs4648011) were associated with a faster hearing loss progression in patients with unilateral SNHL. So, individuals with unilateral MD carrying the C allele in rs3774937 or G allele in rs4648011 had a shorter mean time to reach hearing stage 3 (>40 dB HL) (log-rank test, corrected p values were p = 0.009 for rs3774937 and p = 0.003 for rs4648011, respectively). No variants influenced hearing in bilateral MD. Our data support that the allelic variants rs3774937 and rs4648011 can modify hearing outcome in patients with MD and unilateral SNHL.

  20. Gene Variants Reduce Opioid Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... a decreased risk for addiction to heroin or cocaine. The other linked variants in two genes— OPRM1 , ...

  1. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.

  2. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  3. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S.; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Launer, Lenore J.; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Becker, James T.; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W. T.; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M. Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M.; Medland, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  4. Circadian gene variants in cancer.

    PubMed

    Kettner, Nicole M; Katchy, Chinenye A; Fu, Loning

    2014-06-01

    Humans as diurnal beings are active during the day and rest at night. This daily oscillation of behavior and physiology is driven by an endogenous circadian clock not environmental cues. In modern societies, changes in lifestyle have led to a frequent disruption of the endogenous circadian homeostasis leading to increased risk of various diseases including cancer. The clock is operated by the feedback loops of circadian genes and controls daily physiology by coupling cell proliferation and metabolism, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis in peripheral tissues with physical activity, energy homeostasis, immune and neuroendocrine functions at the organismal level. Recent studies have revealed that defects in circadian genes due to targeted gene ablation in animal models or single nucleotide polymorphism, deletion, deregulation and/or epigenetic silencing in humans are closely associated with increased risk of cancer. In addition, disruption of circadian rhythm can disrupt the molecular clock in peripheral tissues in the absence of circadian gene mutations. Circadian disruption has recently been recognized as an independent cancer risk factor. Further study of the mechanism of clock-controlled tumor suppression will have a significant impact on human health by improving the efficiencies of cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:24901356

  5. Circadian gene variants in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kettner, Nicole M.; Katchy, Chinenye A.; Fu, Loning

    2014-01-01

    Humans as diurnal beings are active during the day and rest at night. This daily oscillation of behavior and physiology is driven by an endogenous circadian clock not environmental cues. In modern societies, changes in lifestyle have led to a frequent disruption of the endogenous circadian homeostasis leading to increased risk of various diseases including cancer. The clock is operated by the feedback loops of circadian genes and controls daily physiology by coupling cell proliferation and metabolism, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis in peripheral tissues with physical activity, energy homeostasis, immune and neuroendocrine functions at the organismal level. Recent studies have revealed that defects in circadian genes due to targeted gene ablation in animal models or single nucleotide polymorphism, deletion, deregulation and/or epigenetic silencing in humans are closely associated with increased risk of cancer. In addition, disruption of circadian rhythm can disrupt the molecular clock in peripheral tissues in the absence of circadian gene mutations. Circadian disruption has recently been recognized as an independent cancer risk factor. Further study of the mechanism of clock-controlled tumor suppression will have a significant impact on human health by improving the efficiencies of cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:24901356

  6. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  7. Possible Association between Suicide Committed under Influence of Ethanol and a Variant in the AUTS2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Chojnicka, Izabela; Gajos, Krzysztof; Strawa, Katarzyna; Broda, Grażyna; Fudalej, Sylwia; Fudalej, Marcin; Stawiński, Piotr; Pawlak, Aleksandra; Krajewski, Paweł; Wojnar, Marcin; Płoski, Rafał

    2013-01-01

    Background rs6943555 in AUTS2 has been shown to modulate ethanol consumption. We hypothesized that rs6943555 might be associated with completed suicide. Methods We genotyped rs6943555 in 625 completed suicides and 3861 controls using real-time TaqMan Allelic Discrimination Assay. All individuals were Polish Caucasians. Results We detected an association between suicide and rs6943555 A allele (OR = 1.17, P = 0.018 for allelic comparison, OR = 1.24, P = 0.013 for dominant, and OR = 1.18, P = 0.020 for co-dominant model of inheritance). The association remained significant after adjusting for age and gender (co-dominant: P = 0.002 and dominant model: P = 0.001). After stratifying suicides according to blood ethanol concentration (BAC≤ 20 mg/dl and BAC > 20 mg/dl) the association remained significant only for cases who committed suicide under influence of alcohol (co-dominant: OR  =  1.37, P = 0.004 and dominant model: OR = 1.45, P = 0.006). To validate this finding we genotyped another cohort of 132 cases. We reproduced the association between rs6943555 A allele and suicide under influence of ethanol (allelic comparison: OR = 1.55, P = 0.023; co-dominant : OR = 1.54, P = 0.031; dominant model: OR = 1.84, P = 0.015). Analyzing pooled suicides with BAC >20 mg/dl (N = 300) we found the association of rs6943555 A allele not only vs. controls (allelic OR = 1.41, P = 0.00029) but also vs. cases with BAC ≤ 20 mg/dl (N = 449, allelic OR = 1.33, P = 0.019). Conclusions In our study rs6943555 A allele is associated with suicide committed after drinking ethanol shortly before death. The rs6943555 A allele may be linked to adverse emotional reaction to ethanol, which could explain the association with lower consumption in general population as well as the predisposition to suicide under influence of ethanol. PMID:23437340

  8. Human mitochondrial variants influence on oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Marcuello, Ana; Martínez-Redondo, Diana; Dahmani, Yahya; Casajús, José A; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Montoya, Julio; López-Pérez, Manuel J; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen

    2009-02-01

    This work investigates if human mitochondrial variants influence on maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)). With this purpose we recruited, as a uniform population in term of nutritional habits and life style, 114 healthy male Spanish subjects that practiced fitness exercises 3-4 times a week. Once mtDNA haplogroups were determined, we found that J presents with lower VO(2max) (P=0.02) than nonJ variants. J has been related with a lower efficiency of electron transport chain (ETC), diminished ATP and ROS production. Thus, the difficult to compensate the mitochondrial energetic deficiency could explain the accumulation of J haplogroup in LHON and multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, the lower ROS production associated to J could also account for the accrual of this variant in elderly people consequent to a decreased oxidative damage.

  9. Clock gene variants differentiate mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika Paulina; Pawlak, Joanna Maria; Maciukiewicz, Malgorzata; Moczko, Jerzy; Wilkosc, Monika; Leszczynska-Rodziewicz, Anna; Zaremba, Dorota; Hauser, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variations in clock-related genes were hypothesized to be involved to in the susceptibility of mood disorders MD (both unipolar (UPD) and bipolar (BPD) disorders). In our work we investigated role of gene variants form four core period proteins: CLOCK, ARNTL, TIM and PER3. The total sample comprised from 744 mood disorders inpatients (UPD = 229, BPD = 515) and 635 healthy voluntary controls. The 42 SNPs from four genes of interest were genotyped. We used single polymorphisms, haplotypes, SNPs interactions and prediction analysis using classical statistical and machine learning methods. We observed association between two polymorphisms of CLOCK (rs1801260 and rs11932595) with BPDII and two polymorphisms of TIM (rs2291739, rs11171856) with UPD. We also detected ARNTL haplotype variant (rs1160996C/rs11022779G/rs1122780T) to be associated with increased risk of MD, BPD (both types). We established significant epistatic interaction between PER3 (rs2172563) and ARNTL (rs4146388 and rs7107287) in case of BPD. Additionally relation between PER3 (rs2172563) and CLOCK (rs1268271 and rs3805148) appeared in case of UPD. Classification and Regression Trees (C and RT) showed significant predictive value for 10 polymorphisms in all analyzed genes. However we failed to obtain model with sufficient predictive power. During analyses of sleep disturbances sample, we found carriers of homozygote variants (ARNTL: rs11022778 TT, rs1562438 TT, rs1982350 AA and PER3: rs836755 CC) showing more frequent falling asleep difficulties when compare to other genotypes carriers. Our study suggested a putative role of the CLOCK, TIM, ARNTL and PER3 and polymorphisms in MD susceptibility. In our analyses we showed association of specific gene variants with particular types of MD. We also confirmed necessity of performing separate analyzes for BPD and UPD patients. Comprehensive statistical approach is required even with individual symptoms analyses.

  10. Common gene variants, mortality and extreme longevity in humans.

    PubMed

    Heijmans, B T; Westendorp, R G; Slagboom, P E

    2000-09-01

    Genetic factors influence variation in human life span. The fast technological advancements in genome research and the methodology for statistical analysis of complex traits provided new tools to unravel these genetic influences. Most of the genetic epidemiology and quantitative genetics is focused on the dissection of the genetic component of specific diseases rather than of human life span. Nevertheless, common variants of 22 genes have been tested for their contribution to mortality in the general population and extreme longevity in one or more studies. These studies provide indications as to the nature of biological pathways that might play a role in human ageing. Perhaps even more important at this time is the fact that they give valuable insights in the strengths and weaknesses of current strategies to identify gene variants affecting human life span and point at more powerful approaches.

  11. Genome-wide association study suggests common variants within RP11-634B7.4 gene influencing severe pre-treatment pain in head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Gibby, Cielito C.; Wang, Jian; Silvas, Mary Rose T.; Yu, Robert K.; Hanna, Ehab Y.; Shete, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Pain is often one of the first signs of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). Pain at diagnosis is an important prognostic marker for the development of chronic pain, and importantly, for the overall survival time. To identify variants influencing severe pre-treatment pain in 1,368 patients newly diagnosed with HNSCC, we conducted a genome-wide association study based on 730,525 tagging SNPs. The patients were all previously untreated for cancer. About 15% of the patients had severe pre-treatment pain, defined as pain score ≥7 (0 = “no pain” and 10 = “worst pain”). We identified 3 common genetic variants in high linkage disequilibrium for severe pre-treatment pain, representing one genomic region at 1q44 (rs3862188, P = 3.45 × 10−8; rs880143, P = 3.45 × 10−8; and rs7526880, P = 4.92 × 10−8), which maps to the RP11-634B7.4 gene, a novel antisense gene to three olfactory receptor genes. Olfactory receptor genes, upstream effectors of the MAPK signaling cascade, might be novel target genes for pain in HNSCC patients. Future experimental validation to explore biological mechanisms will be key to defining the role of the intronic variants and non-coding RNA for pain in patients with HNSCC. PMID:27670397

  12. Clinical Relevance of HLA Gene Variants in HBV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Zou, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Host gene variants may influence the natural history of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in humans, is one of the most important host factors that are correlated with the clinical course of HBV infection. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near certain HLA gene loci are strongly associated with not only persistent HBV infection but also spontaneous HBV clearance and seroconversion, disease progression, and the development of liver cirrhosis and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB). These variations also influence the efficacy of interferon (IFN) and nucleot(s)ide analogue (NA) treatment and response to HBV vaccines. Meanwhile, discrepant conclusions were reached with different patient cohorts. It is therefore essential to identify the associations of specific HLA allele variants with disease progression and viral clearance in chronic HBV infection among different ethnic populations. A better understanding of HLA polymorphism relevance in HBV infection outcome would enable us to elucidate the roles of HLA SNPs in the pathogenesis and clearance of HBV in different areas and ethnic groups, to improve strategies for the prevention and treatment of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27243039

  13. A functional variant in the neuropeptide S receptor 1 gene moderates the influence of urban upbringing on stress processing in the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Streit, Fabian; Haddad, Leila; Paul, Torsten; Frank, Josef; Schäfer, Axel; Nikitopoulos, Jörg; Akdeniz, Ceren; Lederbogen, Florian; Treutlein, Jens; Witt, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Rietschel, Marcella; Kirsch, Peter; Wüst, Stefan

    2014-07-01

    We have previously shown that urban upbringing and city living were associated with stress-induced activity in the amygdala and the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC). This finding might link the epidemiological risk factor "urbanicity" to neurobiological mechanisms of psychiatric disorders. However, given the heritability of stress-related phenotypes, it appears likely that genetic factors can modulate the effect of urbanicity on social stress processing. In the present exploratory study, we investigated if a functional sequence variation in the neuropeptide S receptor gene (NPSR1 rs324981) is associated with brain activation patterns under acute psychosocial stress and if it modulates the link between urbanicity and central stress processing. In animals, neuropeptide S has strong anxiolytic effects and it induces hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation. In humans, rs324981 was found to be associated with anxiety and stress-related phenotypes. Forty-two subjects were exposed to a psychosocial stress task for scanner environments (ScanSTRESS). While no main effect of rs324981 on amygdala and pACC activity was detected, we found a distinct interaction between rs324981 and urban upbringing modulating right amygdala responses. Moreover, right amygdala responses were significantly higher in subjects who also showed a salivary cortisol response to the stress exposure. The present finding of a gene × environment interaction further supports the view that the brain NPS system is involved in central stress regulation. This study provides first evidence for the assumption that a NPSR1 variant modulates brain activation under stress, interacting with the environmental risk factor urban upbringing.

  14. Comprehensive Analysis of Pathogenic Deletion Variants in Fanconi Anemia Genes

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Elizabeth K.; Kamat, Aparna; Lach, Francis P.; Donovan, Frank X.; Kimble, Danielle C.; Narisu, Narisu; Sanborn, Erica; Boulad, Farid; Davies, Stella M.; Gillio, Alfred P.; Harris, Richard E.; MacMillan, Margaret L.; Wagner, John E.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Auerbach, Arleen D.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C.

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare recessive disease resulting from mutations in one of at least 16 different genes. Mutation types and phenotypic manifestations of FA are highly heterogeneous and influence the clinical management of the disease. We analyzed 202 FA families for large deletions, using high-resolution Comparative Genome Hybridization arrays (arrayCGH), Single Nucleotide Polymorphism arrays (SNParrays) and DNA sequencing. We found pathogenic deletions in 88 FANCA, seven FANCC, two FANCD2, and one FANCB families. We find 35% of FA families carry large deletions, accounting for 18% of all FA pathogenic variants. Cloning and sequencing across the deletion breakpoints revealed that 52 FANCA deletion ends, and one FANCC deletion end extended beyond the gene boundaries, potentially affecting neighboring genes with phenotypic consequences. Seventy-five percent of the FANCA deletions are Alu-Alu mediated, predominantly by AluY elements, and appear to be caused by Non-Allelic Homologous Recombination. Individual Alu hotspots were identified. Defining the haplotypes of four FANCA deletions shared by multiple families revealed that three share a common ancestry. Knowing the exact molecular changes that lead to the disease may be critical for a better understanding of the FA phenotype, and to gain insight into the mechanisms driving these pathogenic deletion variants. PMID:25168418

  15. Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... 20, 2014 Common gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism Roles of heritability, mutations, environment ... ASD) was traced to inherited variations in the genetic code shared by many people. These and other ( ...

  16. Identifying Mendelian disease genes with the Variant Effect Scoring Tool

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Whole exome sequencing studies identify hundreds to thousands of rare protein coding variants of ambiguous significance for human health. Computational tools are needed to accelerate the identification of specific variants and genes that contribute to human disease. Results We have developed the Variant Effect Scoring Tool (VEST), a supervised machine learning-based classifier, to prioritize rare missense variants with likely involvement in human disease. The VEST classifier training set comprised ~ 45,000 disease mutations from the latest Human Gene Mutation Database release and another ~45,000 high frequency (allele frequency >1%) putatively neutral missense variants from the Exome Sequencing Project. VEST outperforms some of the most popular methods for prioritizing missense variants in carefully designed holdout benchmarking experiments (VEST ROC AUC = 0.91, PolyPhen2 ROC AUC = 0.86, SIFT4.0 ROC AUC = 0.84). VEST estimates variant score p-values against a null distribution of VEST scores for neutral variants not included in the VEST training set. These p-values can be aggregated at the gene level across multiple disease exomes to rank genes for probable disease involvement. We tested the ability of an aggregate VEST gene score to identify candidate Mendelian disease genes, based on whole-exome sequencing of a small number of disease cases. We used whole-exome data for two Mendelian disorders for which the causal gene is known. Considering only genes that contained variants in all cases, the VEST gene score ranked dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) number 2 of 2253 genes in four cases of Miller syndrome, and myosin-3 (MYH3) number 2 of 2313 genes in three cases of Freeman Sheldon syndrome. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the potential power gain of aggregating bioinformatics variant scores into gene-level scores and the general utility of bioinformatics in assisting the search for disease genes in large-scale exome sequencing studies. VEST is

  17. Cellobiohydrolase I gene and improved variants

    DOEpatents

    Adney, William S.; Decker, Stephen R.; Mc Carter, Suzanne; Baker, John O.; Nieves, Raphael; Himmel, Michael E.; Vinzant, Todd B.

    2008-05-20

    The disclosure provides a method for preparing an active exoglucanase in a heterologous host of eukaryotic origin. The method includes mutagenesis to reduce glycosylation of the exoglucanase when expressed in a heterologous host. It is further disclosed a method to produce variant cellobiohydrolase that is stable at high temperature through mutagenesis.

  18. Variants in the vitamin D receptor gene and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wjst, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Background Early lifetime exposure to dietary or supplementary vitamin D has been predicted to be a risk factor for later allergy. Twin studies suggest that response to vitamin D exposure might be influenced by genetic factors. As these effects are primarily mediated through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), single base variants in this gene may be risk factors for asthma or allergy. Results 951 individuals from 224 pedigrees with at least 2 asthmatic children were analyzed for 13 SNPs in the VDR. There was no preferential transmission to children with asthma. In their unaffected sibs, however, one allele in the 5' region was 0.5-fold undertransmitted (p = 0.049), while two other alleles in the 3' terminal region were 2-fold over-transmitted (p = 0.013 and 0.018). An association was also seen with bronchial hyperreactivity against methacholine and with specific immunoglobulin E serum levels. Conclusion The transmission disequilibrium in unaffected sibs of otherwise multiple-affected families seem to be a powerful statistical test. A preferential transmission of vitamin D receptor variants to children with asthma could not be confirmed but raises the possibility of a protective effect for unaffected children. PMID:15651992

  19. COMT gene locus: new functional variants.

    PubMed

    Meloto, Carolina B; Segall, Samantha K; Smith, Shad; Parisien, Marc; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M; Gauthier, Josée; Tsao, Douglas; Convertino, Marino; Piltonen, Marjo H; Slade, Gary Dmitri; Fillingim, Roger B; Greenspan, Joel D; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charles; Maixner, William; Zaykin, Dmitri; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Reenilä, Ilkka; Männistö, Pekka T; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-10-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. Numerous studies have linked COMT to pivotal brain functions such as mood, cognition, response to stress, and pain. Both nociception and risk of clinical pain have been associated with COMT genetic variants, and this association was shown to be mediated through adrenergic pathways. Here, we show that association studies between COMT polymorphic markers and pain phenotypes in 2 independent cohorts identified a functional marker, rs165774, situated in the 3' untranslated region of a newfound splice variant, (a)-COMT. Sequence comparisons showed that the (a)-COMT transcript is highly conserved in primates, and deep sequencing data demonstrated that (a)-COMT is expressed across several human tissues, including the brain. In silico analyses showed that the (a)-COMT enzyme features a distinct C-terminus structure, capable of stabilizing substrates in its active site. In vitro experiments demonstrated not only that (a)-COMT is catalytically active but also that it displays unique substrate specificity, exhibiting enzymatic activity with dopamine but not epinephrine. They also established that the pain-protective A allele of rs165774 coincides with lower COMT activity, suggesting contribution to decreased pain sensitivity through increased dopaminergic rather than decreased adrenergic tone, characteristic of reference isoforms. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of the (a)-COMT isoform in nociceptive signaling and suggest that genetic variations in (a)-COMT isoforms may contribute to individual variability in pain phenotypes. PMID:26207649

  20. COMT gene locus: new functional variants

    PubMed Central

    Meloto, Carolina B.; Segall, Samantha K.; Smith, Shad; Parisien, Marc; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia M.; Gauthier, Josée; Tsao, Douglas; Convertino, Marino; Piltonen, Marjo H.; Slade, Gary Dmitri; Fillingim, Roger B.; Greenspan, Joel D.; Ohrbach, Richard; Knott, Charles; Maixner, William; Zaykin, Dmitri; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Reenilä, Ilkka; Männistö, Pekka T.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. Numerous studies have linked COMT to pivotal brain functions such as mood, cognition, response to stress, and pain. Both nociception and risk of clinical pain have been associated with COMT genetic variants, and this association was shown to be mediated through adrenergic pathways. Here, we show that association studies between COMT polymorphic markers and pain phenotypes in 2 independent cohorts identified a functional marker, rs165774, situated in the 3′ untranslated region of a newfound splice variant, (a)-COMT. Sequence comparisons showed that the (a)-COMT transcript is highly conserved in primates, and deep sequencing data demonstrated that (a)-COMT is expressed across several human tissues, including the brain. In silico analyses showed that the (a)-COMT enzyme features a distinct C-terminus structure, capable of stabilizing substrates in its active site. In vitro experiments demonstrated not only that (a)-COMT is catalytically active but also that it displays unique substrate specificity, exhibiting enzymatic activity with dopamine but not epinephrine. They also established that the pain-protective A allele of rs165774 coincides with lower COMT activity, suggesting contribution to decreased pain sensitivity through increased dopaminergic rather than decreased adrenergic tone, characteristic of reference isoforms. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of the (a)-COMT isoform in nociceptive signaling and suggest that genetic variations in (a)-COMT isoforms may contribute to individual variability in pain phenotypes. PMID:26207649

  1. Gene variant linked to lung cancer risk

    Cancer.gov

    A variation of the gene NFKB1, called rs4648127, is associated with an estimated 44 percent reduction in lung cancer risk. When this information, derived from samples obtained as part of a large NCI-sponsored prevention clinical trial, was compared with d

  2. Evidence for the role of EPHX2 gene variants in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Scott-Van Zeeland, A A; Bloss, C S; Tewhey, R; Bansal, V; Torkamani, A; Libiger, O; Duvvuri, V; Wineinger, N; Galvez, L; Darst, B F; Smith, E N; Carson, A; Pham, P; Phillips, T; Villarasa, N; Tisch, R; Zhang, G; Levy, S; Murray, S; Chen, W; Srinivasan, S; Berenson, G; Brandt, H; Crawford, S; Crow, S; Fichter, M M; Halmi, K A; Johnson, C; Kaplan, A S; La Via, M; Mitchell, J E; Strober, M; Rotondo, A; Treasure, J; Woodside, D B; Bulik, C M; Keel, P; Klump, K L; Lilenfeld, L; Plotnicov, K; Topol, E J; Shih, P B; Magistretti, P; Bergen, A W; Berrettini, W; Kaye, W; Schork, N J

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and related eating disorders are complex, multifactorial neuropsychiatric conditions with likely rare and common genetic and environmental determinants. To identify genetic variants associated with AN, we pursued a series of sequencing and genotyping studies focusing on the coding regions and upstream sequence of 152 candidate genes in a total of 1205 AN cases and 1948 controls. We identified individual variant associations in the Estrogen Receptor-ß (ESR2) gene, as well as a set of rare and common variants in the Epoxide Hydrolase 2 (EPHX2) gene, in an initial sequencing study of 261 early-onset severe AN cases and 73 controls (P=0.0004). The association of EPHX2 variants was further delineated in: (1) a pooling-based replication study involving an additional 500 AN patients and 500 controls (replication set P=0.00000016); (2) single-locus studies in a cohort of 386 previously genotyped broadly defined AN cases and 295 female population controls from the Bogalusa Heart Study (BHS) and a cohort of 58 individuals with self-reported eating disturbances and 851 controls (combined smallest single locus P<0.01). As EPHX2 is known to influence cholesterol metabolism, and AN is often associated with elevated cholesterol levels, we also investigated the association of EPHX2 variants and longitudinal body mass index (BMI) and cholesterol in BHS female and male subjects (N=229) and found evidence for a modifying effect of a subset of variants on the relationship between cholesterol and BMI (P<0.01). These findings suggest a novel association of gene variants within EPHX2 to susceptibility to AN and provide a foundation for future study of this important yet poorly understood condition. PMID:23999524

  3. Copy Number Variants in pharmacogenetic genes

    PubMed Central

    He, Yijing; Hoskins, Janelle M.; McLeod, Howard L.

    2011-01-01

    Variation in drug efficacy and toxicity remains an important clinical concern. Presently, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) only explain a portion of this problem, even in situations where the pharmacological trait is clearly heritable. The Human CNV Project identified copy number variations (CNVs) across approximately 12% of the human genome, and these CNVs were considered causes of diseases. Although the contribution of CNVs to the pathogenesis of many common diseases is questionable, CNVs play a clear role in drug related genes by altering drug metabolizing and drug response. Here we provide a comprehensive review of the clinical relevance of CNVs to drug efficacy, toxicity, disease prevalence in world populations and discuss the implication of using CNVs as diagnosis in clinical intervention. PMID:21388883

  4. CDKAL1 gene variants affect the anti-TNF response among Psoriasis patients.

    PubMed

    Coto-Segura, Pablo; Batalla, Ana; González-Fernández, Daniel; Gómez, Juan; Santos-Juanes, Jorge; Queiro, Rubén; Alonso, Belén; Iglesias, Sara; Coto, Eliecer

    2015-12-01

    The heterogeneous response to anti-TNF biological drugs among Psoriasis (Psor) patients might be explained by gene variants linked to the risk for Psor. Common variants in the CDKAL1 gene have been associated with the risk of developing Psor. Our hypothesis was that these variants could also influence the response to anti-TNFs among Psor-patients. A reduction of at least 75% in the Psoriasis area and severity index (PASI 75) at week 24 was considered a positive response to treatment. A total of 116 patients (78 responders and 38 non-responders) were genotyped for the CDKAL1 rs6908425, rs4712523, rs111739077, and rs77152992 (p.P409L) single nucleotide polymorphisms. Allele and genotype frequencies differed between the two response groups, with the highest difference for the rs6908425: CC homozygotes were significantly more common among responders (72% vs. 45%; p=0.005; OR=3.14, 95%CI=1.40-7.05). In conclusion, our data suggested that CDKAL1 gene variants have a significant effect on the response to anti-TNF therapies among Psor patients. If confirmed on other large cohorts of patients, the genotyping of these variants might help to predict the biological response. PMID:26563541

  5. CDKAL1 gene variants affect the anti-TNF response among Psoriasis patients.

    PubMed

    Coto-Segura, Pablo; Batalla, Ana; González-Fernández, Daniel; Gómez, Juan; Santos-Juanes, Jorge; Queiro, Rubén; Alonso, Belén; Iglesias, Sara; Coto, Eliecer

    2015-12-01

    The heterogeneous response to anti-TNF biological drugs among Psoriasis (Psor) patients might be explained by gene variants linked to the risk for Psor. Common variants in the CDKAL1 gene have been associated with the risk of developing Psor. Our hypothesis was that these variants could also influence the response to anti-TNFs among Psor-patients. A reduction of at least 75% in the Psoriasis area and severity index (PASI 75) at week 24 was considered a positive response to treatment. A total of 116 patients (78 responders and 38 non-responders) were genotyped for the CDKAL1 rs6908425, rs4712523, rs111739077, and rs77152992 (p.P409L) single nucleotide polymorphisms. Allele and genotype frequencies differed between the two response groups, with the highest difference for the rs6908425: CC homozygotes were significantly more common among responders (72% vs. 45%; p=0.005; OR=3.14, 95%CI=1.40-7.05). In conclusion, our data suggested that CDKAL1 gene variants have a significant effect on the response to anti-TNF therapies among Psor patients. If confirmed on other large cohorts of patients, the genotyping of these variants might help to predict the biological response.

  6. Examining the Impact of Gene Variants on Histone Lysine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Van Rechem, Capucine; Whetstine, Johnathan R.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a boom in the amount of genome-wide sequencing data that has uncovered important and unappreciated links between certain genes, families of genes and enzymatic processes and diseases such as cancer. Such studies have highlighted the impact that chromatin modifying enzymes could have in cancer and other genetic diseases. In this review, we summarize characterized mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in histone lysine methyltransferases (KMTs), histone lysine demethylases (KDMs) and histones. We primarily focus on variants with strong disease correlations and discuss how they could impact histone lysine methylation dynamics and gene regulation. PMID:24859469

  7. DNA-based identification of novel bovine casein gene variants.

    PubMed

    Gallinat, J L; Qanbari, S; Drögemüller, C; Pimentel, E C G; Thaller, G; Tetens, J

    2013-01-01

    In cattle, at least 39 variants of the 4 casein proteins (α(S1)-, β-, α(S2)- and κ-casein) have been described to date. Many of these variants are known to affect milk-production traits, cheese-processing properties, and the nutritive value of milk. They also provide valuable information for phylogenetic studies. So far, the majority of studies exploring the genetic variability of bovine caseins considered European taurine cattle breeds and were carried out at the protein level by electrophoretic techniques. This only allows the identification of variants that, due to amino acid exchanges, differ in their electric charge, molecular weight, or isoelectric point. In this study, the open reading frames of the casein genes CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN1S2, and CSN3 of 356 animals belonging to 14 taurine and 3 indicine cattle breeds were sequenced. With this approach, we identified 23 alleles, including 5 new DNA sequence variants, with a predicted effect on the protein sequence. The new variants were only found in indicine breeds and in one local Iranian breed, which has been phenotypically classified as a taurine breed. A multidimensional scaling approach based on available SNP chip data, however, revealed an admixture of taurine and indicine populations in this breed as well as in the local Iranian breed Golpayegani. Specific indicine casein alleles were also identified in a few European taurine breeds, indicating the introgression of indicine breeds into these populations. This study shows the existence of substantial undiscovered genetic variability of bovine casein loci, especially in indicine cattle breeds. The identification of new variants is a valuable tool for phylogenetic studies and investigations into the evolution of the milk protein genes.

  8. Diversity and Impact of Rare Variants in Genes Encoding the Platelet G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Matthew L.; Norman, Jane E.; Morgan, Neil V.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Daly, Martina E.; Simpson, Michael A.; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70% had global minor allele frequency (MAF) < 0.05%. Functional annotation using six computational algorithms, experimental evidence and structural data identified 156/740 (21%) SNVs as potentially damaging to GPCR function, most commonly in regions encoding the transmembrane and C-terminal intracellular receptor domains. In 31 index cases with IPFDs (Gi-pathway defect n=15; secretion defect n=11; thromboxane pathway defect n=3 and complex defect n=2) there were 256 SNVs in the target regions of 15 stimulatory platelet GPCRs (34 unique; 12 with MAF<1% and 22 with MAF ≥ 1%). These included rare variants predicting R122H, P258T and V207A substitutions in the P2Y12 receptor that were annotated as potentially damaging, but only partially explained the platelet function defects in each case. Our data highlight that potentially damaging variants in platelet GPCR genes have low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes. PMID:25567036

  9. Shift work, circadian gene variants and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Anne; Schuetz, Johanna M; Lai, Agnes S; Janoo-Gilani, Rozmin; Leach, Stephen; Burstyn, Igor; Richardson, Harriet; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Spinelli, John J; Aronson, Kristan J

    2013-10-01

    Circadian (clock) genes have been linked with several functions relevant to cancer, and epidemiologic research has suggested relationships with breast cancer risk for variants in NPAS2, CLOCK, CRY2 and TIMELESS. Increased breast cancer risk has also been observed among shift workers, suggesting potential interactions in relationships of circadian genes with breast cancer. Relationships with breast cancer of 100 SNPs in 14 clock-related genes, as well as potential interactions with shift work history, were investigated in a case-control study (1042 cases, 1051 controls). Odds ratios in an additive genetic model for European-ancestry participants (645 cases, 806 controls) were calculated, using a two-step correction for multiple testing: within each gene through permutation testing (10,000 permutations), and correcting for the false discovery rate across genes. Interactions of genotypes with ethnicity and shift work (<2 years vs ≥2 years) were evaluated individually. Following permutation analysis, two SNPs (rs3816360 in ARNTL and rs11113179 in CRY1) displayed significant associations with breast cancer and one SNP (rs3027188 in PER1) was marginally significant; however, none were significant following adjustment for the false discovery rate. No significant interaction with shift work history was detected. If shift work causes circadian disruption, this was not reflected in associations between clock gene variants and breast cancer risk in this study. Larger studies are needed to assess interactions with longer durations (>30 years) of shift work that have been associated with breast cancer.

  10. Interleukin-37 gene variants segregated anciently coexist during hominid evolution.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bin; Cheng, Shimeng; Peng, Jinbiao; Yan, Jingjing; Zhang, Shuye

    2015-10-01

    IL37 is a member of IL-1 cytokine family but conveys anti-inflammatory functions. The biological characteristic and genetic heterogeneity of IL37 are not fully understood yet. Here using the whole-genome sequencing data from 1000 Genomes Project, we performed population and evolutionary genetic analysis of human IL37 gene. First, 2184 IL37 gene sequences from different human populations were retrieved. The IL37 protein sequences were inferred from the coding DNA sequences and multiple species alignment was made. Then, the phylogenetic tree of IL37 was built and dN/dS ratios were calculated for each evolutionary branch, the classic McDonald and Kreitman test was also performed. Next, we conducted intraspecific evolutionary genetic analysis and built the genealogy network of 116 unique IL37 haplotypes through median-joining network analysis. Finally, we compared IL37 sequences between the modern and archaic humans. Our results for the first time provide solid evidence that common IL37 variants other than NCBI reference sequence are present worldwide. Our data also supports that IL37 variants are shaped and maintained by selection instead of neutral evolution. We further identified that human IL37 variants consist of two major haplogroups and their presence in archaic humans corroborates its ancient origin in hominid evolution. In conclusion, these data indicate that common IL37 variants are maintained among human populations by selective force, suggesting their potential involvements in immune regulation and human diseases. In addition, the ancient history of IL37 variants reveals interesting insight into the complicated human evolutionary history. PMID:25626704

  11. Exploring structural variants in environmentally sensitive gene families.

    PubMed

    Young, Nevin Dale; Zhou, Peng; Silverstein, Kevin At

    2016-04-01

    Environmentally sensitive plant gene families like NBS-LRRs, receptor kinases, defensins and others, are known to be highly variable. However, most existing strategies for discovering and describing structural variation in complex gene families provide incomplete and imperfect results. The move to de novo genome assemblies for multiple accessions or individuals within a species is enabling more comprehensive and accurate insights about gene family variation. Earlier array-based genome hybridization and sequence-based read mapping methods were limited by their reliance on a reference genome and by misplacement of paralogous sequences. Variant discovery based on de novo genome assemblies overcome the problems arising from a reference genome and reduce sequence misplacement. As de novo genome sequencing moves to the use of longer reads, artifacts will be minimized, intact tandem gene clusters will be constructed accurately, and insights into rapid evolution will become feasible. PMID:26855303

  12. [Correlations between risk gene variants for schizophrenia and brain structure anomalies].

    PubMed

    Nickl-Jockschat, T; Rietschel, M; Kircher, T

    2009-01-01

    The specific etiologies of schizophrenia are largely unknown. Genetic predisposition constitutes an important, however, not exclusive risk factor for the development of schizophrenia. In recent years, a number of candidate genes were identified and have been consistently replicated. Magnetic resonance imaging studies have characterized structural changes in brain morphology, such as ventricular enlargement or volume reduction of the medial temporal structures and the superior temporal gyrus. Several studies have found correlations between gene variants and changes of brain morphology in schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. In this review, publications examining correlations of schizophrenia susceptibility gene polymorphisms and structural brain anomalies in patients and healthy controls are described. An overview and a critical reflection of the current research are outlined. The results of genome-wide studies will soon provide a multitude of additional schizophrenia susceptibility genes. If and to what extent these genes exert an influence on the brain structure in the healthy and the diseased, can be clarified by gene structure correlations. Given the many possible gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, most variants will probably not show simple interactions with sizable effects.

  13. Cytokines and Tumor Metastasis Gene Variants in Oral Cancer and Precancer in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Erdei, Esther; Luo, Li; Sheng, Huiping; Maestas, Erika; White, Kirsten A. M.; Mackey, Amanda; Dong, Yan; Berwick, Marianne; Morse, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives A cross-sectional epidemiological study explored genetic susceptibility to oral precancer and cancer in Puerto Rico (PR). Materials and Methods Three hundred three individuals with a benign oral condition, oral precancer (oral epithelial hyperplasia/hyperkeratosis, oral epithelial dysplasia), or oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) were identified via PR pathology laboratories. A standardized, structured questionnaire obtained information on epidemiological variables; buccal cells were collected for genetic analysis. Genotyping was performed using Taqman® assays. Allelic frequencies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were evaluated in cytokine genes and genes influencing tumor metastasis. Risk estimates for a diagnosis of oral precancer or SCCA while having a variant allele were generated using logistic regression. Adjusted models controlled for age, gender, ancestry, education, smoking and alcohol consumption. Results Relative to persons with a benign oral lesion, individuals with homozygous recessive allelic variants of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) −238 A/G SNP had a reduced odds of having an oral precancer (ORadjusted = 0.15; 95% CI 0.03–0.70). The transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ-1 −509 C/T) polymorphism was inversely associated with having an oral SCCA among persons homozygous for the recessive variant (ORcrude = 0.27; 95% CI 0.09–0.79). The matrix metalloproteinase gene (MMP-1) variant, rs5854, was associated with oral SCCA; participants with even one variant allele were more likely to have oral SCCA (ORadjusted = 2.62, 95% CI 1.05–6.53) compared to people with ancestral alleles. Conclusion Our exploratory analyses suggest that genetic alterations in immune system genes and genes with metastatic potential are associated with oral precancer and SCCA risk in PR. PMID:24278120

  14. Relation of FTO gene variants to fetal growth trajectories: Findings from the Southampton Women's survey

    PubMed Central

    Barton, S.J.; Mosquera, M.; Cleal, J.K.; Fuller, A.S.; Crozier, S.R.; Cooper, C.; Inskip, H.M.; Holloway, J.W.; Lewis, R.M.; Godfrey, K.M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Placental function is an important determinant of fetal growth, and fetal growth influences obesity risk in childhood and adult life. Here we investigated how FTO and MC4R gene variants linked with obesity relate to patterns of fetal growth and to placental FTO expression. Methods Southampton Women's Survey children (n = 1990) with measurements of fetal growth from 11 to 34 weeks gestation were genotyped for common gene variants in FTO (rs9939609, rs1421085) and MC4R (rs17782313). Linear mixed-effect models were used to analyse relations of gene variants with fetal growth. Results Fetuses with the rs9939609 A:A FTO genotype had faster biparietal diameter and head circumference growth velocities between 11 and 34 weeks gestation (by 0.012 (95% CI 0.005 to 0.019) and 0.008 (0.002–0.015) standard deviations per week, respectively) compared to fetuses with the T:T FTO genotype; abdominal circumference growth velocity did not differ between genotypes. FTO genotype was not associated with placental FTO expression, but higher placental FTO expression was independently associated with larger fetal size and higher placental ASCT2, EAAT2 and y + LAT2 amino acid transporter expression. Findings were similar for FTO rs1421085, and the MC4R gene variant was associated with the fetal growth velocity of head circumference. Discussion FTO gene variants are known to associate with obesity but this is the first time that the risk alleles and placental FTO expression have been linked with fetal growth trajectories. The lack of an association between FTO genotype and placental FTO expression adds to emerging evidence of complex biology underlying the association between FTO genotype and obesity. PMID:26907388

  15. Association of Germline CHEK2 Gene Variants with Risk and Prognosis of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Havranek, Ondrej; Kleiblova, Petra; Hojny, Jan; Lhota, Filip; Soucek, Pavel; Trneny, Marek; Kleibl, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    The checkpoint kinase 2 gene (CHEK2) codes for the CHK2 protein, an important mediator of the DNA damage response pathway. The CHEK2 gene has been recognized as a multi-cancer susceptibility gene; however, its role in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) remains unclear. We performed mutation analysis of the entire CHEK2 coding sequence in 340 NHL patients using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Identified hereditary variants were genotyped in 445 non-cancer controls. The influence of CHEK2 variants on disease risk was statistically evaluated. Identified CHEK2 germline variants included four truncating mutations (found in five patients and no control; P = 0.02) and nine missense variants (found in 21 patients and 12 controls; P = 0.02). Carriers of non-synonymous variants had an increased risk of NHL development [odds ratio (OR) 2.86; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.42-5.79] and an unfavorable prognosis [hazard ratio (HR) of progression-free survival (PFS) 2.1; 95% CI 1.12-4.05]. In contrast, the most frequent intronic variant c.319+43dupA (identified in 22% of patients and 31% of controls) was associated with a decreased NHL risk (OR = 0.62; 95% CI 0.45-0.86), but its positive prognostic effect was limited to NHL patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) treated by conventional chemotherapy without rituximab (HR-PFS 0.4; 94% CI 0.17-0.74). Our results show that germ-line CHEK2 mutations affecting protein coding sequence confer a moderately-increased risk of NHL, they are associated with an unfavorable NHL prognosis, and they may represent a valuable predictive biomarker for patients with DLBCL. PMID:26506619

  16. Gene variants associated with antisocial behaviour: A latent variable approach

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Mary Jane; Lin, Haiqun; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Lee, Maria; Yrigollen, Carolyn M.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Katsovich, Liliya; Olds, David L.; Grigorenko, Elena L.; Leckman, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine if a latent variable approach might be useful in identifying shared variance across genetic risk alleles that is associated with antisocial behaviour at age 15 years. Methods Using a conventional latent variable approach, we derived an antisocial phenotype in 328 adolescents utilizing data from a 15-year follow-up of a randomized trial of a prenatal and infancy nurse-home visitation program in Elmira, New York. We then investigated, via a novel latent variable approach, 450 informative genetic polymorphisms in 71 genes previously associated with antisocial behaviour, drug use, affiliative behaviours, and stress response in 241 consenting individuals for whom DNA was available. Haplotype and Pathway analyses were also performed. Results Eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 8 genes contributed to the latent genetic variable that in turn accounted for 16.0% of the variance within the latent antisocial phenotype. The number of risk alleles was linearly related to the latent antisocial variable scores. Haplotypes that included the putative risk alleles for all 8 genes were also associated with higher latent antisocial variable scores. In addition, 33 SNPs from 63 of the remaining genes were also significant when added to the final model. Many of these genes interact on a molecular level, forming molecular networks. The results support a role for genes related to dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, glutamate, opioid, and cholinergic signaling as well as stress response pathways in mediating susceptibility to antisocial behaviour. Conclusions This preliminary study supports use of relevant behavioural indicators and latent variable approaches to study the potential “co-action” of gene variants associated with antisocial behaviour. It also underscores the cumulative relevance of common genetic variants for understanding the etiology of complex behaviour. If replicated in future studies, this approach may

  17. Rare coding variants in the phospholipase D3 gene confer risk for Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several risk variants for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). These common variants have replicable but small effects on LOAD risk and generally do not have obvious functional effects. Low-frequency coding variants, not detected by GWAS, are predicted to include functional variants with larger effects on risk. To identify low-frequency coding variants with large effects on LOAD risk, we carried out whole-exome sequencing (WES) in 14 large LOAD families and follow-up analyses of the candidate variants in several large LOAD case-control data sets. A rare variant in PLD3 (phospholipase D3; Val232Met) segregated with disease status in two independent families and doubled risk for Alzheimer's disease in seven independent case-control series with a total of more than 11,000 cases and controls of European descent. Gene-based burden analyses in 4,387 cases and controls of European descent and 302 African American cases and controls, with complete sequence data for PLD3, reveal that several variants in this gene increase risk for Alzheimer's disease in both populations. PLD3 is highly expressed in brain regions that are vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease pathology, including hippocampus and cortex, and is expressed at significantly lower levels in neurons from Alzheimer's disease brains compared to control brains. Overexpression of PLD3 leads to a significant decrease in intracellular amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) and extracellular Aβ42 and Aβ40 (the 42- and 40-residue isoforms of the amyloid-β peptide), and knockdown of PLD3 leads to a significant increase in extracellular Aβ42 and Aβ40. Together, our genetic and functional data indicate that carriers of PLD3 coding variants have a twofold increased risk for LOAD and that PLD3 influences APP processing. This study provides an example of how densely affected families may help to identify rare variants with large effects on risk for disease or other complex

  18. A GABBR2 gene variant modifies pathophysiology in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Philpott, April L; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Bailey, Neil W; Churchyard, Andrew; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Cummins, Tarrant D R

    2016-05-01

    Striatal degeneration in Huntington's disease (HD) causes changes in cortico-subcortical pathways. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a valuable tool for assessing pathophysiology within these pathways, yet has had limited application in HD. As cortico-subcortical pathways are largely mediated by GABA and dopamine receptor genes, understanding how these genes modulate neurophysiology in HD may provide new insights into how underlying pathology maps onto clinical phenotype. Twenty-nine participants with HD underwent motor cortex stimulation, while corticospinal excitability, cortical inhibition and intracortical facilitation were indexed via peripheral electromyography. Single-nucleotide polymorphism mapping was performed across six genes that are known to modulate cortico-subcortical pathways (GABRA2, GABBR1, GABBR2, DRD1, DRD2, DRD4). Genetic associations with six TMS measures and age at onset were investigated. Our hierarchical multiple regression analysis, controlling for CAG and age, revealed that a GABBR2 variant, predicted to be disease-causative, was significantly associated with corticospinal excitability at corrected levels. A subsequent uncorrected exploratory analysis revealed associations between GABBR2, GABRA2 and DRD2 variants with TMS measures of corticospinal excitability and cortical inhibition in HD, as well as with age at onset. Our findings support the notion that uncovering genetic associations with pathophysiological measures and age at onset is an important way forward in terms of generating meaningful biomarkers with diagnostic and prognostic sensitivity, and identifying novel human-validated targets for future clinical trials.

  19. The Biotinidase Gene Variants Registry: A Paradigm Public Database

    PubMed Central

    Procter, Melinda; Wolf, Barry; Crockett, David K.; Mao, Rong

    2013-01-01

    The BTD gene codes for production of biotinidase, the enzyme responsible for helping the body reuse and recycle the biotin found in foods. Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder resulting in the inability to recycle the vitamin biotin and affects approximately 1 in 60,000 newborns. If untreated, the depletion of intracellular biotin leads to impaired activities of the biotin-dependent carboxylases and can result in cutaneous and neurological abnormalities in individuals with the disorder. Mutations in the biotinidase gene (BTD) alter enzymatic function. To date, more than 165 mutations in BTD have been reported. Our group has developed a database that characterizes the known mutations and sequence variants in BTD. (http://arup.utah.edu/database/BTD/BTD_welcome.php). All sequence variants have been verified for their positions within the BTD gene and designated according to standard nomenclature suggested by Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS). In addition, we describe the change in the protein, indicate whether the variant is a known or likely mutation vs. a benign polymorphism, and include the reference that first described the alteration. We also indicate whether the alteration is known to be clinically pathological based on an observation of a known symptomatic individual or predicted to be pathological based on enzymatic activity or putative disruption of the protein structure. We incorporated the published phenotype to help establish genotype-phenotype correlations and facilitate this process for those performing mutation analysis and/or interpreting results. Other features of this database include disease information, relevant links about biotinidase deficiency, reference sequences, ability to query by various criteria, and the process for submitting novel variations. This database is free to the public and will be updated quarterly. This database is a paradigm for formulating databases for other inherited metabolic disorders

  20. Meta-analysis of gene-level associations for rare variants based on single-variant statistics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi-Juan; Berndt, Sonja I; Gustafsson, Stefan; Ganna, Andrea; Hirschhorn, Joel; North, Kari E; Ingelsson, Erik; Lin, Dan-Yu

    2013-08-01

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) has led to the discoveries of many common variants associated with complex human diseases. There is a growing recognition that identifying "causal" rare variants also requires large-scale meta-analysis. The fact that association tests with rare variants are performed at the gene level rather than at the variant level poses unprecedented challenges in the meta-analysis. First, different studies may adopt different gene-level tests, so the results are not compatible. Second, gene-level tests require multivariate statistics (i.e., components of the test statistic and their covariance matrix), which are difficult to obtain. To overcome these challenges, we propose to perform gene-level tests for rare variants by combining the results of single-variant analysis (i.e., p values of association tests and effect estimates) from participating studies. This simple strategy is possible because of an insight that multivariate statistics can be recovered from single-variant statistics, together with the correlation matrix of the single-variant test statistics, which can be estimated from one of the participating studies or from a publicly available database. We show both theoretically and numerically that the proposed meta-analysis approach provides accurate control of the type I error and is as powerful as joint analysis of individual participant data. This approach accommodates any disease phenotype and any study design and produces all commonly used gene-level tests. An application to the GWAS summary results of the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium reveals rare and low-frequency variants associated with human height. The relevant software is freely available. PMID:23891470

  1. Meta-analysis of Gene-Level Associations for Rare Variants Based on Single-Variant Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi-Juan; Berndt, Sonja I.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Ganna, Andrea; Berndt, Sonja I.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Mägi, Reedik; Ganna, Andrea; Wheeler, Eleanor; Feitosa, Mary F.; Justice, Anne E.; Monda, Keri L.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Esko, Tõnu; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gentilini, Davide; Jackson, Anne U.; Luan, Jian’an; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Willer, Cristen J.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Wood, Andrew R.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Hu, Yi-Juan; Lee, Sang Hong; Liang, Liming; Lin, Dan-Yu; Min, Josine L.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Yang, Jian; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Cadby, Gemma; den Heijer, Martin; Eklund, Niina; Fischer, Krista; Goel, Anuj; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Jarick, Ivonne; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E.; König, Inke R.; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lamina, Claudia; Lecoeur, Cecile; Li, Guo; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Perola, Markus; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Rose, Lynda M.; Shi, Jianxin; Shungin, Dmitry; Smith, Albert Vernon; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; Trip, Mieke D.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Waite, Lindsay L.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atalay, Mustafa; Attwood, Antony P.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Basart, Hanneke; Beilby, John; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Brambilla, Paolo; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Campbell, Harry; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chines, Peter S.; Collins, Francis S.; Connell, John M.; Cookson, William; de Faire, Ulf; de Vegt, Femmie; Dei, Mariano; Dimitriou, Maria; Edkins, Sarah; Estrada, Karol; Evans, David M.; Farrall, Martin; Ferrario, Marco M.; Ferrières, Jean; Franke, Lude; Frau, Francesca; Gejman, Pablo V.; Grallert, Harald; Grönberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Alistair S.; Hall, Per; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hebebrand, Johannes; Homuth, Georg; Hu, Frank B.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Hyppönen, Elina; Iribarren, Carlos; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jansson, John-Olov; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kivimaki, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana H.; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J.; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Liuzzi, Antonio; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Madden, Pamela A.; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; März, Winfried; Leach, Irene Mateo; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mooser, Vincent; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Musk, Arthur W.; Narisu, Narisu; Navis, Gerjan; Nicholson, George; Nohr, Ellen A.; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Palotie, Aarno; Peden, John F.; Pedersen, Nancy; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Prokopenko, Inga; Pütter, Carolin; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Raitakari, Olli; Rendon, Augusto; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Saaristo, Timo E.; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Sanders, Alan R.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Shin, So-Youn; Signorini, Stefano; Sinisalo, Juha; Skrobek, Boris; Soranzo, Nicole; Stančáková, Alena; Stark, Klaus; Stephens, Jonathan C.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P.; Stumvoll, Michael; Swift, Amy J.; Theodoraki, Eirini V.; Thorand, Barbara; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tremoli, Elena; Van der Klauw, Melanie M.; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Viikari, Jorma; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Waeber, Gérard; Wang, Zhaoming; Widén, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.

    2013-01-01

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) has led to the discoveries of many common variants associated with complex human diseases. There is a growing recognition that identifying “causal” rare variants also requires large-scale meta-analysis. The fact that association tests with rare variants are performed at the gene level rather than at the variant level poses unprecedented challenges in the meta-analysis. First, different studies may adopt different gene-level tests, so the results are not compatible. Second, gene-level tests require multivariate statistics (i.e., components of the test statistic and their covariance matrix), which are difficult to obtain. To overcome these challenges, we propose to perform gene-level tests for rare variants by combining the results of single-variant analysis (i.e., p values of association tests and effect estimates) from participating studies. This simple strategy is possible because of an insight that multivariate statistics can be recovered from single-variant statistics, together with the correlation matrix of the single-variant test statistics, which can be estimated from one of the participating studies or from a publicly available database. We show both theoretically and numerically that the proposed meta-analysis approach provides accurate control of the type I error and is as powerful as joint analysis of individual participant data. This approach accommodates any disease phenotype and any study design and produces all commonly used gene-level tests. An application to the GWAS summary results of the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium reveals rare and low-frequency variants associated with human height. The relevant software is freely available. PMID:23891470

  2. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Stefanie; Battke, Florian; Sprecher, Andrea; Munz, Marita; Synofzik, Matthis; Schöls, Ludger; Gasser, Thomas; Grehl, Torsten; Prudlo, Johannes; Biskup, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1) identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2) assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3) connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities. We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses. Based on our

  3. Copy Number Variants in the Kallikrein Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Pernilla; Säll, Torbjörn; Bjartell, Anders; Johansson, Anna M.; Lilja, Hans; Halldén, Christer

    2013-01-01

    The kallikrein gene family (KLK1-KLK15) is the largest contiguous group of protease genes within the human genome and is associated with both risk and outcome of cancer and other diseases. We searched for copy number variants in all KLK genes using quantitative PCR analysis and analysis of inheritance patterns of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Two deletions were identified: one 2235-bp deletion in KLK9 present in 1.2% of alleles, and one 3394-bp deletion in KLK15 present in 4.0% of alleles. Each deletion eliminated one complete exon and created out-of-frame coding that eliminated the catalytic triad of the resulting truncated gene product, which therefore likely is a non-functional protein. Deletion breakpoints identified by DNA sequencing located the KLK9 deletion breakpoint to a long interspersed element (LINE) repeated sequence, while the deletion in KLK15 is located in a single copy sequence. To search for an association between each deletion and risk of prostate cancer (PC), we analyzed a cohort of 667 biopsied men (266 PC cases and 401 men with no evidence of PC at biopsy) using short deletion-specific PCR assays. There was no association between evidence of PC in this cohort and the presence of either gene deletion. Haplotyping revealed a single origin of each deletion, with most recent common ancestor estimates of 3000-8000 and 6000-14 000 years for the deletions in KLK9 and KLK15, respectively. The presence of the deletions on the same haplotypes in 1000 Genomes data of both European and African populations indicate an early origin of both deletions. The old age in combination with homozygous presence of loss-of-function variants suggests that some kallikrein-related peptidases have non-essential functions. PMID:23894413

  4. Role of calpain-10 gene variants in familial type 2 diabetes in Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Elbein, Steven C; Chu, Winston; Ren, Qianfang; Hemphill, Chris; Schay, John; Cox, Nancy J; Hanis, Craig L; Hasstedt, Sandra J

    2002-02-01

    The calpain-10 gene (CAPN10) has been implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) susceptibility by both linkage and association in a Hispanic population from Starr County Texas. Common intronic variants seem to alter CAPN10 mRNA levels and were associated with insulin resistance but not diabetes in Pima Indians. The role of these variants in Caucasian populations is less clear. We found some evidence for linkage of T2DM to chromosome 2q approximately 20 cM proximal to the NIDDM1/CAPN10 locus. To test the hypothesis that CAPN10 is a diabetes susceptibility locus in Caucasian families at high risk for T2DM, we examined the influence of the three previously implicated CAPN10 variants on both diabetes risk and measures of insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis. We genotyped approximately 700 members of 63 families for 3 variants (SNP-43, SNP-19, and SNP-63). We tested each variant separately and as haplotype combinations for altered transmission from parents to affected children (transmission disequilibrium test), and we tested for an effect of each variant individually on measures of glucose and insulin during a glucose tolerance test in nondiabetic family members. Finally, we looked for an effect of each variant on measures of insulin sensitivity (S(I)) and insulin secretion estimated by frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test and Minimal Model analysis. We could not confirm an increase in risk for T2DM susceptibility for any variant or for any haplotype combination, although we found marginal evidence for an increased risk of the 111/221 haplotype combination (P = 0.036) after ascertainment correction. However, both SNP-19 and SNP-63 increased fasting and/or postchallenge insulin levels, consistent with reduced insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, SNP-19 had modest effects on insulin sensitivity measured by homeostatic model, and on postchallenge glucose. The reduction in insulin sensitivity was confirmed by analysis of the subset of individuals who underwent iv

  5. Von Willebrand Factor Gene Variants Associate with Herpes simplex Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Atanur, Santosh; Musilová, Alena; Zídek, Václav; Saba, Laura; Warnecke, Andreas; Khademi, Mohsen; Studahl, Marie; Aurelius, Elisabeth; Hjalmarsson, Anders; Garcia-Diaz, Ana; Denis, Cécile V.; Bergström, Tomas; Sköldenberg, Birgit; Kockum, Ingrid; Aitman, Timothy; Hübner, Norbert; Olsson, Tomas; Pravenec, Michal; Diez, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a rare complication of Herpes simplex virus type-1 infection. It results in severe parenchymal damage in the brain. Although viral latency in neurons is very common in the population, it remains unclear why certain individuals develop HSE. Here we explore potential host genetic variants predisposing to HSE. In order to investigate this we used a rat HSE model comparing the HSE susceptible SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats) with the asymptomatic infection of BN (Brown Norway). Notably, both strains have HSV-1 spread to the CNS at four days after infection. A genome wide linkage analysis of 29 infected HXB/BXH RILs (recombinant inbred lines—generated from the prior two strains), displayed variable susceptibility to HSE enabling the definition of a significant QTL (quantitative trait locus) named Hse6 towards the end of chromosome 4 (160.89–174Mb) containing the Vwf (von Willebrand factor) gene. This was the only gene in the QTL with both cis-regulation in the brain and included several non-synonymous SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism). Intriguingly, in human chromosome 12 several SNPs within the intronic region between exon 43 and 44 of the VWF gene were associated with human HSE pathogenesis. In particular, rs917859 is nominally associated with an odds ratio of 1.5 (95% CI 1.11–2.02; p-value = 0.008) after genotyping in 115 HSE cases and 428 controls. Although there are possibly several genetic and environmental factors involved in development of HSE, our study identifies variants of the VWF gene as candidates for susceptibility in experimental and human HSE. PMID:27224245

  6. Von Willebrand Factor Gene Variants Associate with Herpes simplex Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Abdelmagid, Nada; Bereczky-Veress, Biborka; Atanur, Santosh; Musilová, Alena; Zídek, Václav; Saba, Laura; Warnecke, Andreas; Khademi, Mohsen; Studahl, Marie; Aurelius, Elisabeth; Hjalmarsson, Anders; Garcia-Diaz, Ana; Denis, Cécile V; Bergström, Tomas; Sköldenberg, Birgit; Kockum, Ingrid; Aitman, Timothy; Hübner, Norbert; Olsson, Tomas; Pravenec, Michal; Diez, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a rare complication of Herpes simplex virus type-1 infection. It results in severe parenchymal damage in the brain. Although viral latency in neurons is very common in the population, it remains unclear why certain individuals develop HSE. Here we explore potential host genetic variants predisposing to HSE. In order to investigate this we used a rat HSE model comparing the HSE susceptible SHR (Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats) with the asymptomatic infection of BN (Brown Norway). Notably, both strains have HSV-1 spread to the CNS at four days after infection. A genome wide linkage analysis of 29 infected HXB/BXH RILs (recombinant inbred lines-generated from the prior two strains), displayed variable susceptibility to HSE enabling the definition of a significant QTL (quantitative trait locus) named Hse6 towards the end of chromosome 4 (160.89-174Mb) containing the Vwf (von Willebrand factor) gene. This was the only gene in the QTL with both cis-regulation in the brain and included several non-synonymous SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism). Intriguingly, in human chromosome 12 several SNPs within the intronic region between exon 43 and 44 of the VWF gene were associated with human HSE pathogenesis. In particular, rs917859 is nominally associated with an odds ratio of 1.5 (95% CI 1.11-2.02; p-value = 0.008) after genotyping in 115 HSE cases and 428 controls. Although there are possibly several genetic and environmental factors involved in development of HSE, our study identifies variants of the VWF gene as candidates for susceptibility in experimental and human HSE.

  7. Functional Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Variants Associate With Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nikkari, Seppo T.; Määttä, Kirsi M.; Kunnas, Tarja A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity and expression has been associated with hypertension, but less is known whether the 2 known functional polymorphic sites in the iNOS gene (g.–1026 C/A (rs2779249), g.2087 G/A (rs2297518)) affect susceptibility to hypertension. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between the genetic variants of iNOS and diagnosed hypertension in a Finnish cohort. This study included 320 hypertensive cases and 439 healthy controls. All participants were 50-year-old men and women and the data were collected from the Tampere adult population cardiovascular risk study (TAMRISK). DNA was extracted from buccal swabs and iNOS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were analyzed using KASP genotyping PCR. Data analysis was done by logistic regression. At the age of 50 years, the SNP rs2779249 (C/A) associated significantly with hypertension (P = 0.009); specifically, subjects carrying the A-allele had higher risk of hypertension compared to those carrying the CC genotype (OR = 1.47; CI = 1.08–2.01; P = 0.015). In addition, a 15-year follow-up period (35, 40, and 45 years) of the same individuals showed that carriers of the A-allele had more often hypertension in all of the studied age-groups. The highest risk for developing hypertension was obtained among 35-year-old subjects (odds ratio [OR] 3.83; confidence interval [CI] = 1.20–12.27; P = 0.024). Those carrying variant A had also significantly higher readings of both systolic (P = 0.047) and diastolic (P = 0.048) blood pressure during the follow-up. No significant associations between rs2297518 (G/A) variants alone and hypertension were found. However, haplotype analysis of rs2779249 and rs2297518 revealed that individuals having haplotype H3 which combines both A alleles (CA–GA, 19.7% of individuals) was more commonly found in the hypertensive group than in the normotensive group (OR = 2.01; CI = 1

  8. The human gene damage index as a gene-level approach to prioritizing exome variants

    PubMed Central

    Itan, Yuval; Shang, Lei; Boisson, Bertrand; Patin, Etienne; Bolze, Alexandre; Moncada-Vélez, Marcela; Scott, Eric; Ciancanelli, Michael J.; Lafaille, Fabien G.; Markle, Janet G.; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; de Jong, Sarah Jill; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Nitschke, Patrick; Belkadi, Aziz; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Stenson, Peter D.; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Cooper, David N.; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The protein-coding exome of a patient with a monogenic disease contains about 20,000 variants, only one or two of which are disease causing. We found that 58% of rare variants in the protein-coding exome of the general population are located in only 2% of the genes. Prompted by this observation, we aimed to develop a gene-level approach for predicting whether a given human protein-coding gene is likely to harbor disease-causing mutations. To this end, we derived the gene damage index (GDI): a genome-wide, gene-level metric of the mutational damage that has accumulated in the general population. We found that the GDI was correlated with selective evolutionary pressure, protein complexity, coding sequence length, and the number of paralogs. We compared GDI with the leading gene-level approaches, genic intolerance, and de novo excess, and demonstrated that GDI performed best for the detection of false positives (i.e., removing exome variants in genes irrelevant to disease), whereas genic intolerance and de novo excess performed better for the detection of true positives (i.e., assessing de novo mutations in genes likely to be disease causing). The GDI server, data, and software are freely available to noncommercial users from lab.rockefeller.edu/casanova/GDI. PMID:26483451

  9. The human gene damage index as a gene-level approach to prioritizing exome variants.

    PubMed

    Itan, Yuval; Shang, Lei; Boisson, Bertrand; Patin, Etienne; Bolze, Alexandre; Moncada-Vélez, Marcela; Scott, Eric; Ciancanelli, Michael J; Lafaille, Fabien G; Markle, Janet G; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; de Jong, Sarah Jill; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Nitschke, Patrick; Belkadi, Aziz; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Stenson, Peter D; Gleeson, Joseph G; Cooper, David N; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-11-01

    The protein-coding exome of a patient with a monogenic disease contains about 20,000 variants, only one or two of which are disease causing. We found that 58% of rare variants in the protein-coding exome of the general population are located in only 2% of the genes. Prompted by this observation, we aimed to develop a gene-level approach for predicting whether a given human protein-coding gene is likely to harbor disease-causing mutations. To this end, we derived the gene damage index (GDI): a genome-wide, gene-level metric of the mutational damage that has accumulated in the general population. We found that the GDI was correlated with selective evolutionary pressure, protein complexity, coding sequence length, and the number of paralogs. We compared GDI with the leading gene-level approaches, genic intolerance, and de novo excess, and demonstrated that GDI performed best for the detection of false positives (i.e., removing exome variants in genes irrelevant to disease), whereas genic intolerance and de novo excess performed better for the detection of true positives (i.e., assessing de novo mutations in genes likely to be disease causing). The GDI server, data, and software are freely available to noncommercial users from lab.rockefeller.edu/casanova/GDI. PMID:26483451

  10. Fire Usage and Ancient Hominin Detoxification Genes: Protective Ancestral Variants Dominate While Additional Derived Risk Variants Appear in Modern Humans

    PubMed Central

    Alink, Gerrit M.; Scherjon, Fulco; MacDonald, Katharine; Smith, Alison C.; Nijveen, Harm; Roebroeks, Wil

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the defence capacity of ancient hominins against toxic substances may contribute importantly to the reconstruction of their niche, including their diets and use of fire. Fire usage implies frequent exposure to hazardous compounds from smoke and heated food, known to affect general health and fertility, probably resulting in genetic selection for improved detoxification. To investigate whether such genetic selection occurred, we investigated the alleles in Neanderthals, Denisovans and modern humans at gene polymorphisms well-known to be relevant from modern human epidemiological studies of habitual tobacco smoke exposure and mechanistic evidence. We compared these with the alleles in chimpanzees and gorillas. Neanderthal and Denisovan hominins predominantly possess gene variants conferring increased resistance to these toxic compounds. Surprisingly, we observed the same in chimpanzees and gorillas, implying that less efficient variants are derived and mainly evolved in modern humans. Less efficient variants are observable from the first early Upper Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers onwards. While not clarifying the deep history of fire use, our results highlight the long-term stability of the genes under consideration despite major changes in the hominin dietary niche. Specifically for detoxification gene variants characterised as deleterious by epidemiological studies, our results confirm the predominantly recent appearance reported for deleterious human gene variants, suggesting substantial impact of recent human population history, including pre-Holocene expansions. PMID:27655273

  11. Molecular analyses of circadian gene variants reveal sex-dependent links between depression and clocks.

    PubMed

    Shi, S-q; White, M J; Borsetti, H M; Pendergast, J S; Hida, A; Ciarleglio, C M; de Verteuil, P A; Cadar, A G; Cala, C; McMahon, D G; Shelton, R C; Williams, S M; Johnson, C H

    2016-03-01

    An extensive literature links circadian irregularities and/or sleep abnormalities to mood disorders. Despite the strong genetic component underlying many mood disorders, however, previous genetic associations between circadian clock gene variants and major depressive disorder (MDD) have been weak. We applied a combined molecular/functional and genetic association approach to circadian gene polymorphisms in sex-stratified populations of control subjects and case subjects suffering from MDD. This approach identified significant sex-dependent associations of common variants of the circadian clock genes hClock, hPer3 and hNpas2 with major depression and demonstrated functional effects of these polymorphisms on the expression or activity of the hCLOCK and hPER3 proteins, respectively. In addition, hCLOCK expression is affected by glucocorticoids, consistent with the sex-dependency of the genetic associations and the modulation of glucocorticoid-mediated stress response, providing a mechanism by which the circadian clock controls outputs that may affect psychiatric disorders. We conclude that genetic polymorphisms in circadian genes (especially hClock and hPer3, where functional assays could be tested) influence risk of developing depression in a sex- and stress-dependent manner. These studies support a genetic connection between circadian disruption and mood disorders, and confirm a key connection between circadian gene variation and major depression.

  12. Molecular analyses of circadian gene variants reveal sex-dependent links between depression and clocks

    PubMed Central

    Shi, S-q; White, M J; Borsetti, H M; Pendergast, J S; Hida, A; Ciarleglio, C M; de Verteuil, P A; Cadar, A G; Cala, C; McMahon, D G; Shelton, R C; Williams, S M; Johnson, C H

    2016-01-01

    An extensive literature links circadian irregularities and/or sleep abnormalities to mood disorders. Despite the strong genetic component underlying many mood disorders, however, previous genetic associations between circadian clock gene variants and major depressive disorder (MDD) have been weak. We applied a combined molecular/functional and genetic association approach to circadian gene polymorphisms in sex-stratified populations of control subjects and case subjects suffering from MDD. This approach identified significant sex-dependent associations of common variants of the circadian clock genes hClock, hPer3 and hNpas2 with major depression and demonstrated functional effects of these polymorphisms on the expression or activity of the hCLOCK and hPER3 proteins, respectively. In addition, hCLOCK expression is affected by glucocorticoids, consistent with the sex-dependency of the genetic associations and the modulation of glucocorticoid-mediated stress response, providing a mechanism by which the circadian clock controls outputs that may affect psychiatric disorders. We conclude that genetic polymorphisms in circadian genes (especially hClock and hPer3, where functional assays could be tested) influence risk of developing depression in a sex- and stress-dependent manner. These studies support a genetic connection between circadian disruption and mood disorders, and confirm a key connection between circadian gene variation and major depression. PMID:26926884

  13. Common variants of the vitamin D binding protein gene and adverse health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Suneil; Fu, Lei; Juras, David James; Karmali, Mohamed; Wong, Betty Y. L.; Gozdzik, Agnes

    2013-01-01

    The vitamin D binding protein (DBP) is the major plasma carrier for vitamin D and its metabolites, but it is also an actin scavenger, and is the precursor to the immunomodulatory protein, Gc-MAF. Two missense variants of the DBP gene – rs7041 encoding Asp432Glu and rs4588 encoding Thr436Lys – change the amino acid sequence and alter the protein function. They are common enough to generate population-wide constitutive differences in vitamin D status, based on assay of the serum metabolite, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD). Whether these variants also influence the role of vitamin D in an immunologic milieu is not known. However, the issue is relevant, given the immunomodulatory effects of DBP and the role of protracted innate immune-related inflammation in response to tissue injury or repeated infection. Indeed, DBP and vitamin D may jointly or independently contribute to a variety of adverse health outcomes unrelated to classical notions of their function in bone and mineral metabolism. This review summarizes the reports to date of associations between DBP variants, and various chronic and infectious diseases. The available information leads us to conclude that DBP variants are a significant and common genetic factor in some common disorders, and therefore, are worthy of closer attention. In view of the heightened interest in vitamin D as a public health target, well-designed studies that look simultaneously at vitamin D and its carrier in relation to genotypes and adverse health outcome should be encouraged. PMID:23427793

  14. Vitamin E transport gene variants and prostate cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the February 15, 2009 issue of Cancer Research, Wright et al. investigated whether polymorphisms in two vitamin E transport genes are associated with elevated prostate cancer risk resulting from altered plasma vitamin E concentrations. However, the circulating vitamin E level is influenced by man...

  15. Breast and Prostate Cancer and Hormone-Related Gene Variant Study

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast and Prostate Cancer and Hormone-Related Gene Variant Study allows large-scale analyses of breast and prostate cancer risk in relation to genetic polymorphisms and gene-environment interactions that affect hormone metabolism.

  16. Association between SLC2A9 transporter gene variants and uric acid phenotypes in African American and white families

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Mariza; Matsumoto, Martha; Mosley, Tom H.; Kardia, Sharon; Turner, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. SLC2A9 gene variants associate with serum uric acid in white populations, but little is known about African American populations. Since SLC2A9 is a transporter, gene variants may be expected to associate more closely with the fractional excretion of urate, a measure of renal tubular transport, than with serum uric acid, which is influenced by production and extrarenal clearance. Methods. Genotypes of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed across the SLC2A9 gene were obtained in the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy cohorts. The associations of SNPs with serum uric acid, fractional excretion of urate and urine urate-to-creatinine ratio were assessed with adjustments for age, sex, diuretic use, BMI, homocysteine and triglycerides. Results. We identified SLC2A9 gene variants that were associated with serum uric acid in 1155 African American subjects (53 SNPs) and 1132 white subjects (63 SNPs). The most statistically significant SNPs in African American subjects (rs13113918) and white subjects (rs11723439) were in the latter half of the gene and explained 2.7 and 2.8% of the variation in serum uric acid, respectively. After adjustment for this SNP in African Americans, 0.9% of the variation in serum uric acid was explained by an SNP (rs1568318) in the first half of the gene. Unexpectedly, SLC2A9 gene variants had stronger associations with serum uric acid than with fractional excretion of urate. Conclusions. These findings support two different loci by which SLC2A9 variants affect uric acid levels in African Americans and suggest SLC2A9 variants affect serum uric acid level via renal and extrarenal clearance. PMID:21186168

  17. Loss aversion and 5HTT gene variants in adolescent anxiety.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Monique; Plate, Rista C; Carlisi, Christina O; Gorodetsky, Elena; Goldman, David; Pine, Daniel S

    2014-04-01

    Loss aversion, a well-documented behavioral phenomenon, characterizes decisions under risk in adult populations. As such, loss aversion may provide a reliable measure of risky behavior. Surprisingly, little is known about loss aversion in adolescents, a group who manifests risk-taking behavior, or in anxiety disorders, which are associated with risk-avoidance. Finally, loss aversion is expected to be modulated by genotype, particularly the serotonin transporter (SERT) gene variant, based on its role in anxiety and impulsivity. This genetic modulation may also differ between anxious and healthy adolescents, given their distinct propensities for risk taking. The present work examines the modulation of loss aversion, an index of risk-taking, and reaction-time to decision, an index of impulsivity, by the serotonin-transporter-gene-linked polymorphisms (5HTTLPR) in healthy and clinically anxious adolescents. Findings show that loss aversion (1) does manifest in adolescents, (2) does not differ between healthy and clinically anxious participants, and (3), when stratified by SERT genotype, identifies a subset of anxious adolescents who are high SERT-expressers, and show excessively low loss-aversion and high impulsivity. This last finding may serve as preliminary evidence for 5HTTLPR as a risk factor for the development of comorbid disorders associated with risk-taking and impulsivity in clinically anxious adolescents. PMID:24280015

  18. Loss aversion and 5HTT gene variants in adolescent anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Monique; Plate, Rista C.; Carlisi, Christina; Gorodetsky, Elena; Goldman, David; Pine, Daniel S

    2013-01-01

    Loss aversion, a well-documented behavioural phenomenon, characterizes decisions under risk in adult populations. As such, loss aversion may provide a reliable measure of risky behaviour. Surprisingly, little is known about loss aversion in adolescents, a group who manifests risk-taking behaviour, or in anxiety disorders, which is associated with risk-avoidance. Finally, loss aversion is expected to be modulated by genotype, particularly the serotonin transporter (SERT) gene variant, based on its role in anxiety and impulsivity. This genetic modulation may also differ between anxious and healthy adolescents, given their distinct propensities for risk taking. The present work examines the modulation of loss aversion, an index of risk-taking, and reaction-time to decision, an index of impulsivity, by the serotonin- transporter-gene-linked polymorphisms (5HTTLPR) in healthy and clinically anxious adolescents. Findings show that loss aversion (1) does manifest in adolescents, (2) does not differ between healthy and clinically anxious participants, and (3), when stratified by SERT genotype, identifies a subset of anxious adolescents who are high SERT-expressers, and show excessively low loss-aversion and high impulsivity. This last finding may serve as preliminary evidence for 5HTTLPR as a risk factor for the development of comorbid disorders associated with risk-taking and impulsivity in clinically anxious adolescents. PMID:24280015

  19. Association of gene variants with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes among Omanis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sinani, Sawsan; Woodhouse, Nicolas; Al-Mamari, Ali; Al-Shafie, Omaima; Al-Shafaee, Mohammed; Al-Yahyaee, Said; Hassan, Mohammed; Jaju, Deepali; Al-Hashmi, Khamis; Al-Abri, Mohammed; Al-Rassadi, Khalid; Rizvi, Syed; Loic, Yengo; Froguel, Philippe; Bayoumi, Riad

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association of 10 known common gene variants with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) among Omanis. METHODS: Using case-control design, a total of 992 diabetic patients and 294 normoglycemic Omani Arabs were genotyped, by an allelic discrimination assay-by-design TaqMan method on fast real time polymerase chain reaction system, for the following gene variants: KCNJ11 (rs5219), TCF7L2 (rs7903146), CDKAL1 (rs10946398), CDKN2A/B (rs10811661), FTO (rs9939609 and rs8050136), IGF2BP2 (rs4402960), SLC30A8 (rs13266634) CAPN10 (rs3792267) and HHEX (rs1111875). T2D patients were recruited from the Diabetes Clinic (n = 243) and inpatients (n = 749) at Sultan Qaboos Univesity Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman. Adult control participants (n = 294) were volunteers from the community and from those visiting Family Medicine Clinic at SQU, for regular medical checkup. The difficulty in recruiting Omani participants with no family history of diabetes was the main reason behind the small number of control participants in this study. Almost all volunteers questioned had a relative with diabetes mellitus. Inspite of the small number of normoglycemic controls in this study, this sample was sufficient for detection of genes and loci for common alleles influencing T2D with an odds ratio of ≥ 1.3 reaching at least 80% power. Data was collected from June 2010 to February 2012. RESULTS: Using binary logistic regression analysis, four gene variants showed significant association with T2D risk: KCNJ11 (rs5219, P = 5.8 × 10-6, OR = 1.74), TCF7L2 (rs7903146, P = 0.001, OR = 1.46), CDKAL1 (rs10946398, P = 0.002, OR = 1.44) and CDKN2A/B (rs10811661, P = 0.020, OR = 1.40). The fixation index analysis of these four gene variants indicated significant genetic differentiation between diabetics and controls {[KCNJ11 (rs5219), P < 0.001], [TCF7L2 (rs7903146), P < 0.001], [CDKAL1 (rs10946398), P < 0.05], [CDKN2A/B (rs10811661), P < 0.05]}. The highest genotype

  20. A survey of haplotype variants at several disease candidate genes: the importance of rare variants for complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, P; Zhang, Y; Lu, Y; Long, J; Shen, H; Zhao, L.; Xu, F; Xiao, P; Xiong, D; Liu, Y; Recker, R; Deng, H

    2005-01-01

    Background: The haplotype based association method offers a powerful approach to complex disease gene mapping. In this method, a few common haplotypes that account for the vast majority of chromosomes in the populations are usually examined for association with disease phenotypes. This brings us to a critical question of whether rare haplotypes play an important role in influencing disease susceptibility and thus should not be ignored in the design and execution of association studies. Methods: To address this question we surveyed, in a large sample of 1873 white subjects, six candidate genes for osteoporosis (a common late onset bone disorder), which had 29 SNPs, an average marker density of 13 kb, and covered a total of 377 kb of the DNA sequence. Results: Our empirical data demonstrated that two rare haplotypes of the parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH related peptide receptor type 1 and vitamin D receptor genes (PTHR1 and VDR) with frequencies of 1.1% and 2.9%, respectively, had significant effects on osteoporosis phenotypes (p = 4.2 x 10–6 and p = 1.6 x 10–4, respectively). Large phenotypic differences (4.0∼5.0%) were observed between carriers of these rare haplotypes and non-carriers. Carriers of the two rare haplotypes showed quantitatively continuous variation in the population and were derived from a wide spectrum rather than from one extreme tail of the population phenotype distribution. Conclusions: These findings indicate that rare haplotypes/variants are important for disease susceptibility and cannot be ignored in genetics studies of complex diseases. The study has profound implications for association studies and applications of the HapMap project. PMID:15744035

  1. A Robust Model-free Approach for Rare Variants Association Studies Incorporating Gene-Gene and Gene-Environmental Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ruixue; Lo, Shaw-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Recently more and more evidence suggest that rare variants with much lower minor allele frequencies play significant roles in disease etiology. Advances in next-generation sequencing technologies will lead to many more rare variants association studies. Several statistical methods have been proposed to assess the effect of rare variants by aggregating information from multiple loci across a genetic region and testing the association between the phenotype and aggregated genotype. One limitation of existing methods is that they only look into the marginal effects of rare variants but do not systematically take into account effects due to interactions among rare variants and between rare variants and environmental factors. In this article, we propose the summation of partition approach (SPA), a robust model-free method that is designed specifically for detecting both marginal effects and effects due to gene-gene (G×G) and gene-environmental (G×E) interactions for rare variants association studies. SPA has three advantages. First, it accounts for the interaction information and gains considerable power in the presence of unknown and complicated G×G or G×E interactions. Secondly, it does not sacrifice the marginal detection power; in the situation when rare variants only have marginal effects it is comparable with the most competitive method in current literature. Thirdly, it is easy to extend and can incorporate more complex interactions; other practitioners and scientists can tailor the procedure to fit their own study friendly. Our simulation studies show that SPA is considerably more powerful than many existing methods in the presence of G×G and G×E interactions. PMID:24358248

  2. Genetic variants influencing effectiveness of exercise training programmes in obesity - an overview of human studies.

    PubMed

    Leońska-Duniec, A; Ahmetov, I I; Zmijewski, P

    2016-09-01

    Frequent and regular physical activity has significant benefits for health, including improvement of body composition and help in weight control. Consequently, promoting training programmes, particularly in those who are genetically predisposed, is a significant step towards controlling the presently increasing epidemic of obesity. Although the physiological responses of the human body to exercise are quite well described, the genetic background of these reactions still remains mostly unknown. This review not only summarizes the current evidence, through a literature review and the results of our studies on the influence of gene variants on the characteristics and range of the body's adaptive response to training, but also explores research organization problems, future trends, and possibilities. We describe the most reliable candidate genetic markers that are involved in energy balance pathways and body composition changes in response to training programmes, such as FTO, MC4R, ACE, PPARG, LEP, LEPR, ADRB2, and ADRB3. This knowledge can have an enormous impact not only on individualization of exercise programmes to make them more efficient and safer, but also on improved recovery, traumatology, medical care, diet, supplementation and many other areas. Nevertheless, the current studies still represent only the first steps towards a better understanding of the genetic factors that influence obesity-related traits, as well as gene variant x physical activity interactions, so further research is necessary. PMID:27601774

  3. Genetic variants influencing effectiveness of exercise training programmes in obesity – an overview of human studies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmetov, II; Zmijewski, P

    2016-01-01

    Frequent and regular physical activity has significant benefits for health, including improvement of body composition and help in weight control. Consequently, promoting training programmes, particularly in those who are genetically predisposed, is a significant step towards controlling the presently increasing epidemic of obesity. Although the physiological responses of the human body to exercise are quite well described, the genetic background of these reactions still remains mostly unknown. This review not only summarizes the current evidence, through a literature review and the results of our studies on the influence of gene variants on the characteristics and range of the body's adaptive response to training, but also explores research organization problems, future trends, and possibilities. We describe the most reliable candidate genetic markers that are involved in energy balance pathways and body composition changes in response to training programmes, such as FTO, MC4R, ACE, PPARG, LEP, LEPR, ADRB2, and ADRB3. This knowledge can have an enormous impact not only on individualization of exercise programmes to make them more efficient and safer, but also on improved recovery, traumatology, medical care, diet, supplementation and many other areas. Nevertheless, the current studies still represent only the first steps towards a better understanding of the genetic factors that influence obesity-related traits, as well as gene variant x physical activity interactions, so further research is necessary.

  4. Genetic variants influencing effectiveness of exercise training programmes in obesity – an overview of human studies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmetov, II; Zmijewski, P

    2016-01-01

    Frequent and regular physical activity has significant benefits for health, including improvement of body composition and help in weight control. Consequently, promoting training programmes, particularly in those who are genetically predisposed, is a significant step towards controlling the presently increasing epidemic of obesity. Although the physiological responses of the human body to exercise are quite well described, the genetic background of these reactions still remains mostly unknown. This review not only summarizes the current evidence, through a literature review and the results of our studies on the influence of gene variants on the characteristics and range of the body's adaptive response to training, but also explores research organization problems, future trends, and possibilities. We describe the most reliable candidate genetic markers that are involved in energy balance pathways and body composition changes in response to training programmes, such as FTO, MC4R, ACE, PPARG, LEP, LEPR, ADRB2, and ADRB3. This knowledge can have an enormous impact not only on individualization of exercise programmes to make them more efficient and safer, but also on improved recovery, traumatology, medical care, diet, supplementation and many other areas. Nevertheless, the current studies still represent only the first steps towards a better understanding of the genetic factors that influence obesity-related traits, as well as gene variant x physical activity interactions, so further research is necessary. PMID:27601774

  5. Inhaled corticosteroid treatment modulates ZNF432 gene variant's effect on bronchodilator response in asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ann C.; Himes, Blanca E.; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Litonjua, Augusto; Peters, Stephen P.; Lima, John; Kubo, Michiaki; Tamari, Mayumi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Qiu, Weiliang; Weiss, Scott T.; Tantisira, Kelan

    2013-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) influence a patient's response to inhaled corticosteroids and β2-agonists, and the effect of treatment with inhaled corticosteroids is synergistic with the effect of β2-agonists. We hypothesized that use of inhaled corticosteroids could influence the effect of SNPs associated with bronchodilator response. Objective To assess whether, among asthma subjects, the association of SNPs with bronchodilator response is different between those treated with inhaled corticosteroids vs. those on placebo. Methods A genome-wide association analysis was conducted using 581 white subjects from the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP). Using data for 449,540 SNPs, we conducted a gene by environment analysis in PLINK with inhaled corticosteroid treatment as the environmental exposure and bronchodilator response as the outcome measure. We attempted to replicate the top 12 SNPs in the Leukotriene Modifier Or Corticosteroid or Corticosteroid-Salmeterol (LOCCS) Trial. Results The combined P-value for the CAMP and LOCCS populations was 4.81E-08 for rs3752120, which is located in the zinc finger protein gene ZNF432, and has unknown function. Conclusions Inhaled corticosteroids appear to modulate the association of bronchodilator response with variant(s) in the ZNF432 gene among adults and children with asthma. Clinical Implications Clinicians who treat asthma patients with inhaled corticosteroids should be aware that the patient's genetic makeup likely influences response as measured in lung function. Capsule Summary Our study suggests that inhaled corticosteroids could influence the effect of multiple SNPs associated with bronchodilator response across the genome. PMID:24280104

  6. Consensus: a framework for evaluation of uncertain gene variants in laboratory test reporting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Accurate interpretation of gene testing is a key component in customizing patient therapy. Where confirming evidence for a gene variant is lacking, computational prediction may be employed. A standardized framework, however, does not yet exist for quantitative evaluation of disease association for uncertain or novel gene variants in an objective manner. Here, complementary predictors for missense gene variants were incorporated into a weighted Consensus framework that includes calculated reference intervals from known disease outcomes. Data visualization for clinical reporting is also discussed. PMID:22640420

  7. Common variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes do not confer genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Chen; Yi, Zhenghui; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Gong, Wei; Tang, Jinsong; Wang, Dong; Lu, Weihong; Chen, Xiaogang; Fang, Yiru; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2015-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a prevalent psychiatric disorder with a complex etiology. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been frequently reported in schizophrenia. Phosphatase and tension homologue-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and presenilin-associated rhomboid-like protease (PARL) are mitochondrial proteins, and genetic variants of these two genes may confer genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia by influencing mitochondrial function. In this study, we conducted a two-stage genetic association study to test this hypothesis. We genotyped 4 PINK1 and 5 PARL genetic variants and evaluated the potential association of the 9 SNPs with schizophrenia in two independent case-control cohorts of 2510 Han Chinese individuals. No positive association of common genetic variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes with schizophrenia was identified in our samples after Bonferroni correction. Re-analysis of the newly updated Psychiatric Genetics Consortium (PGC) data sets confirmed our negative result. Intriguingly, one PINK1 SNP (rs10916832), which showed a marginally significant association in only Hunan samples (P = 0.032), is associated with the expression of a schizophrenia susceptible gene KIF17 according to the expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis. Our study indicated that common genetic variants of the PINK1 and PARL genes are unlikely to be involved in schizophrenia. Further studies are essential to characterize the role of the PINK1 and PARL genes in schizophrenia.

  8. Progesterone receptor gene variants and risk of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    O'Mara, Tracy A.; Fahey, Paul; Ferguson, Kaltin; Marquart, Louise; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Amant, Frederic; Hall, Per; Liu, Jianjun; Czene, Kamila; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Ahmed, Shahana; Dunning, Alison M.; Gregory, Catherine S.; Shah, Mitul; Webb, Penelope M.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2011-01-01

    Prolonged excessive estrogen exposure unopposed by progesterone is widely accepted to be a risk factor for endometrial cancer development. The physiological function of progesterone is dependent upon the presence of its receptor [progesterone receptor (PGR)] and several studies have reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PGR gene to be associated with endometrial cancer risk. We sought to confirm the associations with endometrial cancer risk previously reported for four different PGR polymorphisms. A maximum of 2888 endometrial cancer cases and 4483 female control subjects from up to three studies were genotyped for four PGR polymorphisms (rs1042838, rs10895068, rs11224561 and rs471767). Logistic regression with adjustment for age, study, ethnicity and body mass index was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and P-values. Of the four SNPs investigated, only rs11224561 in the 3′ region of the PGR gene was found to be significantly associated with endometrial cancer risk. The A allele of the rs11224561 SNP was associated with increased risk of endometrial cancer (OR per allele 1.31; 95% CI 1.12–1.53, P = 0.001, adjusted for age and study), an effect of the same magnitude and direction as reported previously. We have validated the endometrial cancer risk association with a tagSNP in the 3′ untranslated region of PGR previously reported in an Asian population. Replication studies will be required to refine the risk estimate and to establish if this, or a correlated SNP, is the underlying causative variant. PMID:21148628

  9. Prioritizing disease-linked variants, genes, and pathways with an interactive whole-genome analysis pipeline.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Hee; Lee, Kyungjoon; Hsing, Michael; Choe, Yongjoon; Park, Jin-Ho; Kim, Shu Hee; Bohn, Justin M; Neu, Matthew B; Hwang, Kyu-Baek; Green, Robert C; Kohane, Isaac S; Kong, Sek Won

    2014-05-01

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) studies are uncovering disease-associated variants in both rare and nonrare diseases. Utilizing the next-generation sequencing for WGS requires a series of computational methods for alignment, variant detection, and annotation, and the accuracy and reproducibility of annotation results are essential for clinical implementation. However, annotating WGS with up to date genomic information is still challenging for biomedical researchers. Here, we present one of the fastest and highly scalable annotation, filtering, and analysis pipeline-gNOME-to prioritize phenotype-associated variants while minimizing false-positive findings. Intuitive graphical user interface of gNOME facilitates the selection of phenotype-associated variants, and the result summaries are provided at variant, gene, and genome levels. Moreover, the enrichment results of specific variants, genes, and gene sets between two groups or compared with population scale WGS datasets that is already integrated in the pipeline can help the interpretation. We found a small number of discordant results between annotation software tools in part due to different reporting strategies for the variants with complex impacts. Using two published whole-exome datasets of uveal melanoma and bladder cancer, we demonstrated gNOME's accuracy of variant annotation and the enrichment of loss-of-function variants in known cancer pathways. gNOME Web server and source codes are freely available to the academic community (http://gnome.tchlab.org).

  10. A TOMM40 poly-T variant modulates gene expression and is associated with vocabulary ability and decline in nonpathologic aging.

    PubMed

    Payton, A; Sindrewicz, P; Pessoa, V; Platt, H; Horan, M; Ollier, W; Bubb, V J; Pendleton, N; Quinn, J P

    2016-03-01

    The Translocase of Outer Mitochondrial Membrane 40 Homolog and Apolipoprotein E (TOMM40-APOE) locus has been associated with a number of age-related phenotypes in humans including nonpathologic cognitive aging, late-onset Alzheimer's disease, and longevity. Here, we investigate the influence of the TOMM40 intron 6 poly-T variant (rs10524523) on TOMM40 gene expression and cognitive abilities and decline in a cohort of 1613 community-dwelling elderly volunteers who had been followed for changes in cognitive functioning over a period of 14 years (range = 12-18 years). We showed that the shorter length poly-T variants were found to act as a repressor of luciferase gene expression in reporter gene constructs. Expression was reduced to approximately half of that observed for the very long variant. We further observed that the shorter poly-T variant was significantly associated with reduced vocabulary ability and a slower rate of vocabulary decline with age compared to the very long poly-T variants. No significant associations were observed for memory, fluid intelligence or processing speed, although the direction of effect, where the short variant was correlated with reduced ability and slower rate of decline was observed for all tests. Our results indicate that the poly-T variant has the ability to interact with transcription machinery and differentially modulate reporter gene expression and influence vocabulary ability and decline with age.

  11. High Frequency of Inherited Variants in the MEFV Gene in Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sayan, Ozkan; Kilicaslan, Emrah; Celik, Serkan; Tangi, Fatih; Erikci, Alev A; Ipcioglu, Osman; Sanisoglu, Yavuz S; Nalbant, Selim; Oktenli, Cagatay

    2011-09-01

    In the present study, we aimed to determine the frequency of inherited variants in the MEFV (Mediterranean FeVer), the gene responsible for familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), gene in patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). The eight MEFV gene variants (M694I, M694V, M680I (G/C-A), V726A, R761H, E148Q and P369S) were detected in 36 patients with ALL and 65 healthy controls; none had own and/or family history compatible with FMF. We identified 11 heterozygous inherited variants in the MEFV gene in both ALL patients and controls. The mean overall frequency of inherited variants in the MEFV gene rate was higher in ALL patients than healthy controls (P = 0.040). It is interesting to note that M680I/0 is predominant variant in patients with ALL. In addition, E148Q variant frequency was also significantly higher in the patient group than the controls (P = 0.012). In conclusion, overall frequency of inherited variants in the MEFV gene was found to be higher in patients with ALL. Based on the present data, it is difficult to reach a definitive conclusion regarding the possibility that inherited variants in the MEFV gene could represent a causative role in ALL. However, the data of our study may provide some new insights in understanding of individual genetic differences in susceptibility to these neoplasms. Further investigations are needed to determine the actual role of inherited variants in the MEFV gene in pathogenesis of ALL.

  12. Pleiotrophin Gene Therapy for Peripheral Ischemia: Evaluation of Full-Length and Truncated Gene Variants

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qizhi; Mok, Pamela Y.; Thomas, Anila E.; Haddad, Daniel J.; Saini, Shereen A.; Clifford, Brian T.; Kapasi, Neel K.; Danforth, Olivia M.; Usui, Minako; Ye, Weisheng; Luu, Emmy; Sharma, Rikki; Bartel, Maya J.; Pathmanabhan, Jeremy A.; Ang, Andrew A. S.; Sievers, Richard E.; Lee, Randall J.; Springer, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a growth factor with both pro-angiogenic and limited pro-tumorigenic activity. We evaluated the potential for PTN to be used for safe angiogenic gene therapy using the full length gene and a truncated gene variant lacking the domain implicated in tumorigenesis. Mouse myoblasts were transduced to express full length or truncated PTN (PTN or T-PTN), along with a LacZ reporter gene, and injected into mouse limb muscle and myocardium. In cultured myoblasts, PTN was expressed and secreted via the Golgi apparatus, but T-PTN was not properly secreted. Nonetheless, no evidence of uncontrolled growth was observed in cells expressing either form of PTN. PTN gene delivery to myocardium, and non-ischemic skeletal muscle, did not result in a detectable change in vascularity or function. In ischemic hindlimb at 14 days post-implantation, intramuscular injection with PTN-expressing myoblasts led to a significant increase in skin perfusion and muscle arteriole density. We conclude that (1) delivery of the full length PTN gene to muscle can be accomplished without tumorigenesis, (2) the truncated PTN gene may be difficult to use in a gene therapy context due to inefficient secretion, (3) PTN gene delivery leads to functional benefit in the mouse acute ischemic hindlimb model. PMID:23630585

  13. A common variant in MTHFR influences response to chemoradiotherapy and recurrence of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nikas, Jason B; Lee, Janet T; Maring, Elizabeth D; Washechek-Aletto, Jill; Felmlee-Devine, Donna; Johnson, Ruth A; Smyrk, Thomas C; Tawadros, Patrick S; Boardman, Lisa A; Steer, Clifford J

    2015-01-01

    An important determinant of the pathogenesis and prognosis of various diseases is inherited genetic variation. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), variations at a single base position, have been identified in both protein-coding and noncoding DNA sequences, but the vast majority of millions of those variants are far from being functionally understood. Here we show that a common variant in the gene MTHFR [rs1801133 (C>T)] not only influences response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer, but it also influences recurrence of the disease itself. More specifically, patients with the homozygous ancestral (wild type) genotype (C/C) were 2.91 times more likely (291% increased benefit) to respond to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy {95% CI: [1.23, 6.89]; P=0.0150} and 3.25 times more likely (325% increased benefit) not to experience recurrence of the disease {95% CI: [1.37, 7.72]; P=0.0079} than patients with either the heterozygous (C/T) or the homozygous mutation (T/T) genotype. These results identify MTHFR as an important genetic marker and open up new, pharmacogenomic strategies in the treatment and management of rectal cancer. PMID:26693073

  14. FTO gene variant modulates the neural correlates of visual food perception.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Anne B; Feis, Delia-Lisa; Schilbach, Leonhard; Kracht, Lutz; Hess, Martin E; Mauer, Jan; Brüning, Jens C; Tittgemeyer, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Variations in the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene are currently the strongest known genetic factor predisposing humans to non-monogenic obesity. Recent experiments have linked these variants to a broad spectrum of behavioural alterations, including food choice and substance abuse. Yet, the underlying neurobiological mechanisms by which these genetic variations influence body weight remain elusive. Here, we explore the brain structural substrate of the obesity-predisposing rs9939609 T/A variant of the FTO gene in non-obese subjects by means of multivariate classification and use fMRI to investigate genotype-specific differences in neural food-cue reactivity by analysing correlates of a visual food perception task. Our findings demonstrate that MRI-derived measures of morphology along middle and posterior fusiform gyrus (FFG) are highly predictive for FTO at-risk allele carriers, who also show enhanced neural responses elicited by food cues in the same posterior FFG area. In brief, these findings provide first-time evidence for FTO-specific differences in both brain structure and function already in non-obese individuals, thereby contributing to a mechanistic understanding of why FTO is a predisposing factor for obesity. PMID:26767945

  15. Role of luteinizing hormone β-subunit gene variants among South Indian women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Shilpi; Sirisha, P V S; Neelaveni, K; Anuradha, K; Sudhakar, G; Reddy, B Mohan

    2012-02-15

    Abnormal luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion and action are known to affect ovarian steroidogenesis and thus playing a crucial role in manifestation of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This study is first of its kind to study association of LH β-subunit gene variants with PCOS among South-Indian women. 250 PCOS cases and 299 controls were recruited for the study. All the exons of LH β gene were screened. Allele and genotype frequencies of the SNPs were compared between the cases and controls. We identified seven SNPs in the LH β gene; one SNP in exon 3 (rs#1056917) exhibited significant difference in the allele frequency between the PCOS cases and controls (p=0.015). Although, the LH β variants that are found to be more frequent among PCOS cases are silent in nature and not of any functional significance, they might influence other significant functional polymorphisms in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis which needs to be explored.

  16. Sequence variants in oxytocin pathway genes and preterm birth: a candidate gene association study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Preterm birth (PTB) is a complex disorder associated with significant neonatal mortality and morbidity and long-term adverse health consequences. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that genetic factors play an important role in its etiology. This study was designed to identify genetic variation associated with PTB in oxytocin pathway genes whose role in parturition is well known. Methods To identify common genetic variants predisposing to PTB, we genotyped 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the oxytocin (OXT), oxytocin receptor (OXTR), and leucyl/cystinyl aminopeptidase (LNPEP) genes in 651 case infants from the U.S. and one or both of their parents. In addition, we examined the role of rare genetic variation in susceptibility to PTB by conducting direct sequence analysis of OXTR in 1394 cases and 1112 controls from the U.S., Argentina, Denmark, and Finland. This study was further extended to maternal triads (maternal grandparents-mother of a case infant, N=309). We also performed in vitro analysis of selected rare OXTR missense variants to evaluate their functional importance. Results Maternal genetic effect analysis of the SNP genotype data revealed four SNPs in LNPEP that show significant association with prematurity. In our case–control sequence analysis, we detected fourteen coding variants in exon 3 of OXTR, all but four of which were found in cases only. Of the fourteen variants, three were previously unreported novel rare variants. When the sequence data from the maternal triads were analyzed using the transmission disequilibrium test, two common missense SNPs (rs4686302 and rs237902) in OXTR showed suggestive association for three gestational age subgroups. In vitro functional assays showed a significant difference in ligand binding between wild-type and two mutant receptors. Conclusions Our study suggests an association between maternal common polymorphisms in LNPEP and susceptibility to PTB. Maternal OXTR missense SNPs rs4686302

  17. High-performance web services for querying gene and variant annotation.

    PubMed

    Xin, Jiwen; Mark, Adam; Afrasiabi, Cyrus; Tsueng, Ginger; Juchler, Moritz; Gopal, Nikhil; Stupp, Gregory S; Putman, Timothy E; Ainscough, Benjamin J; Griffith, Obi L; Torkamani, Ali; Whetzel, Patricia L; Mungall, Christopher J; Mooney, Sean D; Su, Andrew I; Wu, Chunlei

    2016-01-01

    Efficient tools for data management and integration are essential for many aspects of high-throughput biology. In particular, annotations of genes and human genetic variants are commonly used but highly fragmented across many resources. Here, we describe MyGene.info and MyVariant.info, high-performance web services for querying gene and variant annotation information. These web services are currently accessed more than three million times permonth. They also demonstrate a generalizable cloud-based model for organizing and querying biological annotation information. MyGene.info and MyVariant.info are provided as high-performance web services, accessible at http://mygene.info and http://myvariant.info . Both are offered free of charge to the research community. PMID:27154141

  18. Expression of the human growth hormone variant gene in cultured fibroblasts and transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, R.F.; Wagner, T.E.; Blethen, S.; Yun, J.S.; Rowe, M.E.; Goodman, H.M. )

    1988-11-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the human growth hormone variant gene, one of the five members of the growth hormone gene family, predicts that it encodes a growth hormone-like protein. As a first step in determining whether this gene is functional in humans, the authors have expressed a mouse methallothionein I/human growth hormone variant fusion gene in mouse L cells and in transgenic mice. The growth hormone variant protein expressed in transiently transfected L cells is distinct from growth hormone itself with respect to reactivity with anti-growth hormone monoclonal antibodies, behavior during column chromatography, and isoelectric point. Transgenic mice expressing the growth hormone variant protein are 1.4- to 1.9-fold larger than nontransgenic controls, suggesting that the protein has growth-promoting properties.

  19. Analytical Complexity in Detection of Gene Variant-by-Environment Exposure Interactions in High-Throughput Genomic and Exposomic Research.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chirag J

    2016-03-01

    It seems intuitive that disease risk is influenced by the interaction between inherited genetic variants and environmental exposure factors; however, we have few documented interactions between variants and exposures. Advances in technology may enable the simultaneous measurement (i.e., on the same individuals in an epidemiological study) of millions of genome variants with thousands of environmental "exposome" factors, significantly increasing the number of possible factor pairs available for testing for the presence of interactions. The burden of analytic complexity, or sheer number of genetic and exposure factors measured, poses a considerable challenge for discovery of interactions in population-scale data. Advances in analytic approaches, large sample sizes, less conservative methods to mitigate multiple testing, and strong biological priors will be required to prune the search space to find reproducible and robust gene-by-environment interactions in observational data.

  20. Candidate genes in panic disorder: meta-analyses of 23 common variants in major anxiogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Howe, A S; Buttenschøn, H N; Bani-Fatemi, A; Maron, E; Otowa, T; Erhardt, A; Binder, E B; Gregersen, N O; Mors, O; Woldbye, D P; Domschke, K; Reif, A; Shlik, J; Kõks, S; Kawamura, Y; Miyashita, A; Kuwano, R; Tokunaga, K; Tanii, H; Smoller, J W; Sasaki, T; Koszycki, D; De Luca, V

    2016-05-01

    The utilization of molecular genetics approaches in examination of panic disorder (PD) has implicated several variants as potential susceptibility factors for panicogenesis. However, the identification of robust PD susceptibility genes has been complicated by phenotypic diversity, underpowered association studies and ancestry-specific effects. In the present study, we performed a succinct review of case-control association studies published prior to April 2015. Meta-analyses were performed for candidate gene variants examined in at least three studies using the Cochrane Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effect model. Secondary analyses were also performed to assess the influences of sex, agoraphobia co-morbidity and ancestry-specific effects on panicogenesis. Meta-analyses were performed on 23 variants in 20 PD candidate genes. Significant associations after correction for multiple testing were observed for three variants, TMEM132D rs7370927 (T allele: odds ratio (OR)=1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.15-1.40, P=2.49 × 10(-6)), rs11060369 (CC genotype: OR=0.65, 95% CI: 0.53-0.79, P=1.81 × 10(-5)) and COMT rs4680 (Val (G) allele: OR=1.27, 95% CI: 1.14-1.42, P=2.49 × 10(-5)) in studies with samples of European ancestry. Nominal associations that did not survive correction for multiple testing were observed for NPSR1 rs324891 (T allele: OR=1.22, 95% CI: 1.07-1.38, P=0.002), TPH1 rs1800532 (AA genotype: OR=1.46, 95% CI: 1.14-1.89, P=0.003) and HTR2A rs6313 (T allele: OR=1.19, 95% CI: 1.07-1.33, P=0.002) in studies with samples of European ancestry and for MAOA-uVNTR in female PD (low-active alleles: OR=1.21, 95% CI: 1.07-1.38, P=0.004). No significant associations were observed in the secondary analyses considering sex, agoraphobia co-morbidity and studies with samples of Asian ancestry. Although these findings highlight a few associations, PD likely involves genetic variation in a multitude of biological pathways that is diverse among populations. Future studies must

  1. Associations between a common variant near the MC4R gene and serum triglyceride levels in an obese pediatric cohort.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ariana Ester; de Melo, Maria Edna; Fujiwara, Clarissa Tamie Hiwatashi; Pioltine, Marina Brosso; Matioli, Sergio Russo; Santos, Aritânia; Cercato, Cintia; Halpern, Alfredo; Mancini, Marcio C

    2015-08-01

    Polymorphisms near the MC4R gene may be related to an increased risk for obesity, but studies of variations in this gene and its relation to cardiometabolic profiles and food intake are scarce and controversial. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of the variants rs12970134 and rs17782313 near the MC4R gene in food intake, binge eating (BE) behavior, anthropometric parameters, body composition, metabolic profile, and cardiometabolic risk factors in obese children and adolescents. This is a cross-sectional study that included obese children and adolescents. We evaluated anthropometric, metabolic parameters and cardiometabolic risk factors, including hypertension, impaired fasting glucose, hypertriglyceridemia, and low HDL-cholesterol. BE was assessed through the BE scale, and a 24-h recall was used to evaluate total caloric intake and percentage of macronutrients and types of dietary fat. The MC4R variants rs12970134 and rs17782313 were genotyped using TaqMan assay. To assess the magnitude of risk, a logistic regression adjusted for Z-BMI, age, and gender was performed, adopting the significance level of 0.05. The study included 518 subjects (52.1 % girls, 12.7 ± 2.7 years old, Z-BMI = 3.24 ± 0.57). Carriers of the variant rs17782313 exhibit increased triglyceride levels (108 ± 48 vs. 119 ± 54, p = 0.034) and an increased risk of hypertriglyceridemia (OR 1.985, 95 % CI 1.288-3.057, p = 0.002). There was no association of the SNP rs12970134 with clinical, metabolic, or nutritional parameters. The variant rs12970134 and rs17782313 did not influence food intake or the presence of BE. The variant rs17782313 is associated with an increased risk of hypertriglyceridemia in obese children and adolescents. PMID:25948074

  2. Gene-environment and gene-gene interactions of specific MTHFR, MTR and CBS gene variants in relation to homocysteine in black South Africans.

    PubMed

    Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie; Ellis, Suria M; Moss, Sarah J; Melse-Boonstra, Alida; Towers, G Wayne

    2013-11-01

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), cystathione-β-synthase (CBS) and methionine synthase (MTR) genes interact with each other and the environment. These interactions could influence homocysteine (Hcy) and diseases contingent thereon. We determined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within these genes, their relationships and interactions with total Hcy concentrations within black South Africans to address the increased prevalence of diseases associated with Hcy. The MTHFR 677 TT and MTR 2756 AA genotypes were associated with higher Hcy concentrations (16.6 and 10.1 μmol/L; p<0.05) compared to subjects harboring the MTHFR 677 CT/CC and the MTR 2756 AG genotypes (10.5, 9.7 and 9.5 μmol/L, respectively). The investigated CBS genotypes did not influence Hcy. We demonstrated interactions between the area of residence and the CBS T833C/844ins68 genotypes (p=0.005) so that when harboring the wildtype allele, rural subjects had significantly higher Hcy than their urban counterparts, but when hosting the variant allele the environment made no difference to Hcy. Between the CBS T833C/844ins68 or G9276A and MTHFR C677T genotypes, there were two-way interactions (p=0.003 and=0.004, respectively), with regard to Hcy. Subjects harboring the MTHFR 677 TT genotype in combination with the CBS 833 TT/homozygous 844 non-insert or the MTHFR 677 TT genotype in combination with the CBS 9276 GA/GG displayed higher Hcy concentrations. Therefore, some of the investigated genotypes affected Hcy; residential area changed the way in which the CBS T833C/844ins68 SNPs influenced Hcy concentrations highlighting the importance of environmental factors; and gene-gene interactions allude to epistatic effects.

  3. Variants in GBA, SNCA, and MAPT influence Parkinson disease risk, age at onset, and progression.

    PubMed

    Davis, Albert A; Andruska, Kristin M; Benitez, Bruno A; Racette, Brad A; Perlmutter, Joel S; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Multiple genetic variants have been linked to risk of Parkinson disease (PD), but known mutations do not explain a large proportion of the total PD cases. Similarly, multiple loci have been associated with PD risk by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The influence that genetic factors confer on phenotypic diversity remains unclear. Few studies have been performed to determine whether the GWAS loci are also associated with age at onset (AAO) or motor progression. We used 2 PD case-control data sets (Washington University and the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative) to determine whether polymorphisms located at the GWAS top hits (GBA, ACMSD/TMEM163, STK39, MCCC1/LAMP3, GAK/TMEM175, SNCA, and MAPT) show association with AAO or motor progression. We found associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms at the GBA and MAPT loci and PD AAO and progression. These findings reinforce the complex genetic basis of PD and suggest that distinct genes and variants explain the genetic architecture of PD risk, onset, and progression.

  4. Functional variants of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 gene associate with asthma susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoguang; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Wade, Michael S.; Flores, Carlos; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Moitra, Jaideep; Ober, Carole; Kittles, Rick; Husain, Aliya N.; Ford, Jean G.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2012-01-01

    Background The genetic mechanisms underlying asthma remain unclear. Increased permeability of the microvasculature is a feature of asthma and the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor, S1PR1, is an essential participant regulating lung vascular integrity and responses to lung inflammation. Objective We explored the contribution of polymorphisms in the S1PR1 gene (S1PR1) to asthma susceptibility. Methods A combination of gene re-sequencing for SNP discovery, case-control association, functional evaluation of associated SNPs, and protein immunochemistry studies was utilized. Results Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated significantly decreased S1PR1 protein expression in pulmonary vessels in asthmatic lungs compared to non-asthmatic individuals (p<0.05). Direct DNA sequencing of 27 multiethnic samples identified 39 S1PR1 variants (18 novel SNPs). Association studies were performed based on genotyping results from cosmopolitan tagging SNPs in three case-control cohorts from Chicago and New York totaling 1061 subjects (502 cases and 559 controls). Promoter SNP rs2038366 (−1557G/T) was found to be associated with asthma (p=0.03) in European Americans. In African Americans, an association was found for both asthma and severe asthma for intronic SNP rs3753194 (c.−164+170A/G) (p=0.006 and p=0.040, respectively) and for promoter SNP rs59317557 (−532C/G) with severe asthma (p=0.028). Consistent with predicted in silico functionality, alleles of promoter SNPs rs2038366 (−1557G/T) and rs59317557 (−532C/G) influenced the activity of a luciferase S1PR1 reporter vector in transfected endothelial cells exposed to growth factors (EGF, PDGF, VEGF) known to be increased in asthmatic airways. Conclusion These data provide strong support for a role for S1PR1 gene variants in asthma susceptibility and severity. Clinical Implications Our results indicate S1PR1 is a novel asthma candidate gene and an attractive target for future therapeutic strategies. Capsule summary This study

  5. Patterns of Variant Polyadenylation Signal Usage in Human Genes

    PubMed Central

    Beaudoing, Emmanuel; Freier, Susan; Wyatt, Jacqueline R.; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Gautheret, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    The formation of mature mRNAs in vertebrates involves the cleavage and polyadenylation of the pre-mRNA, 10–30 nt downstream of an AAUAAA or AUUAAA signal sequence. The extensive cDNA data now available shows that these hexamers are not strictly conserved. In order to identify variant polyadenylation signals on a large scale, we compared over 8700 human 3′ untranslated sequences to 157,775 polyadenylated expressed sequence tags (ESTs), used as markers of actual mRNA 3′ ends. About 5600 EST-supported putative mRNA 3′ ends were collected and analyzed for significant hexameric sequences. Known polyadenylation signals were found in only 73% of the 3′ fragments. Ten single-base variants of the AAUAAA sequence were identified with a highly significant occurrence rate, potentially representing 14.9% of the actual polyadenylation signals. Of the mRNAs, 28.6% displayed two or more polyadenylation sites. In these mRNAs, the poly(A) sites proximal to the coding sequence tend to use variant signals more often, while the 3′-most site tends to use a canonical signal. The average number of ESTs associated with each signal type suggests that variant signals (including the common AUUAAA) are processed less efficiently than the canonical signal and could therefore be selected for regulatory purposes. However, the position of the site in the untranslated region may also play a role in polyadenylation rate. PMID:10899149

  6. [Lack of association between the S447X variant of the lipoprotein lipase gene and plasma lipids. A preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Zambrano Morales, Mariana; Fernández Salgado, Erika; Balzán Urdaneta, Ligia; Labastidas, Neila; Aranguren-Méndez, José; Connell, Lissette; Molero Paredes, Tania; Rojas, Alicia; Panunzio, Amelia

    2014-06-01

    The increase in lipid plasma values is an important cardiovascular risk factor. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) plays an important role in the lipoprotein metabolism and metabolic and genetic factors may influence its levels and functions. The S447X variant of the lipoprotein lipase gene is associated with changes in plasma lipids in different populations. The objective of this research was to analyze the S447X variant of the LPL gene and its relation with plasma lipids of individuals in Zulia state, Venezuela. With this purpose, we studied 75 individuals (34 men and 41 women) between 20 and 60 years of age. Each subject had a medical history which included family history, anthropometric characteristics, nutritional status evaluation and biochemical tests. Genomic DNA was extracted for the molecular study and the polymerase chain reaction was used, followed by enzyme digestion, for restriction fragments length polymorphisms using the Hinf I enzyme. The individuals studied had normal levels of blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol and low density lipoproteins (LDL-C) and slightly decreased levels of high density lipoproteins (HDL-C). The genotypic distribution of the LPL gene S447X variant in the studied population was 90.6% for the homozygous genotype SS447 and 9.4% for the heterozygote SX447. The genotype 447XX was not identified. The population was found in Hardy Weinberg genetic equilibrium. No association between the S447X polymorphism of lipoprotein lipase gene and plasma lipids was observed.

  7. Whole-exome sequencing identifies rare pathogenic variants in new predisposition genes for familial colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Garre, Pilar; Lozano, Juan José; Pristoupilova, Anna; Beltran, Sergi; Muñoz, Jenifer; Ocaña, Teresa; Balaguer, Francesc; López-Cerón, Maria; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Franch-Expósito, Sebastià; Piqué, Josep M.; Castells, Antoni; Carracedo, Angel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Abulí, Anna; Bessa, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Bujanda, Luis; Caldés, Trinidad; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Colorectal cancer is an important cause of mortality in the developed world. Hereditary forms are due to germ-line mutations in APC, MUTYH, and the mismatch repair genes, but many cases present familial aggregation but an unknown inherited cause. The hypothesis of rare high-penetrance mutations in new genes is a likely explanation for the underlying predisposition in some of these familial cases. Methods: Exome sequencing was performed in 43 patients with colorectal cancer from 29 families with strong disease aggregation without mutations in known hereditary colorectal cancer genes. Data analysis selected only very rare variants (0–0.1%), producing a putative loss of function and located in genes with a role compatible with cancer. Variants in genes previously involved in hereditary colorectal cancer or nearby previous colorectal cancer genome-wide association study hits were also chosen. Results: Twenty-eight final candidate variants were selected and validated by Sanger sequencing. Correct family segregation and somatic studies were used to categorize the most interesting variants in CDKN1B, XRCC4, EPHX1, NFKBIZ, SMARCA4, and BARD1. Conclusion: We identified new potential colorectal cancer predisposition variants in genes that have a role in cancer predisposition and are involved in DNA repair and the cell cycle, which supports their putative involvement in germ-line predisposition to this neoplasm. PMID:25058500

  8. FARVATX: Family-Based Rare Variant Association Test for X-Linked Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungkyoung; Lee, Sungyoung; Qiao, Dandi; Hardin, Megan; Cho, Michael H; Silverman, Edwin K; Park, Taesung; Won, Sungho

    2016-09-01

    Although the X chromosome has many genes that are functionally related to human diseases, the complicated biological properties of the X chromosome have prevented efficient genetic association analyses, and only a few significantly associated X-linked variants have been reported for complex traits. For instance, dosage compensation of X-linked genes is often achieved via the inactivation of one allele in each X-linked variant in females; however, some X-linked variants can escape this X chromosome inactivation. Efficient genetic analyses cannot be conducted without prior knowledge about the gene expression process of X-linked variants, and misspecified information can lead to power loss. In this report, we propose new statistical methods for rare X-linked variant genetic association analysis of dichotomous phenotypes with family-based samples. The proposed methods are computationally efficient and can complete X-linked analyses within a few hours. Simulation studies demonstrate the statistical efficiency of the proposed methods, which were then applied to rare-variant association analysis of the X chromosome in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Some promising significant X-linked genes were identified, illustrating the practical importance of the proposed methods.

  9. LOVD v.2.0: the next generation in gene variant databases.

    PubMed

    Fokkema, Ivo F A C; Taschner, Peter E M; Schaafsma, Gerard C P; Celli, J; Laros, Jeroen F J; den Dunnen, Johan T

    2011-05-01

    Locus-Specific DataBases (LSDBs) store information on gene sequence variation associated with human phenotypes and are frequently used as a reference by researchers and clinicians. We developed the Leiden Open-source Variation Database (LOVD) as a platform-independent Web-based LSDB-in-a-Box package. LOVD was designed to be easy to set up and maintain and follows the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) recommendations. Here we describe LOVD v.2.0, which adds enhanced flexibility and functionality and has the capacity to store sequence variants in multiple genes per patient. To reduce redundancy, patient and sequence variant data are stored in separate tables. Tables are linked to generate connections between sequence variant data for each gene and every patient. The dynamic structure allows database managers to add custom columns. The database structure supports fast queries and allows storage of sequence variants from high-throughput sequence analysis, as demonstrated by the X-chromosomal Mental Retardation LOVD installation. LOVD contains measures to ensure database security from unauthorized access. Currently, the LOVD Website (http://www.LOVD.nl/) lists 71 public LOVD installations hosting 3,294 gene variant databases with 199,000 variants in 84,000 patients. To promote LSDB standardization and thereby database interoperability, we offer free server space and help to establish an LSDB on our Leiden server. PMID:21520333

  10. Sequence variants in the PTCH1 gene associate with spine bone mineral density and osteoporotic fractures.

    PubMed

    Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Center, Jacqueline R; Lee, Seung Hun; Nguyen, Tuan V; Kwok, Timothy C Y; Lee, Jenny S W; Ho, Suzanne C; Woo, Jean; Leung, Ping-C; Kim, Beom-Jun; Rafnar, Thorunn; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Ingvarsson, Thorvaldur; Koh, Jung-Min; Tang, Nelson L S; Eisman, John A; Christiansen, Claus; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a measure of osteoporosis and is useful in evaluating the risk of fracture. In a genome-wide association study of BMD among 20,100 Icelanders, with follow-up in 10,091 subjects of European and East-Asian descent, we found a new BMD locus that harbours the PTCH1 gene, represented by rs28377268 (freq. 11.4-22.6%) that associates with reduced spine BMD (P=1.0 × 10(-11), β=-0.09). We also identified a new spine BMD signal in RSPO3, rs577721086 (freq. 6.8%), that associates with increased spine BMD (P=6.6 × 10(-10), β=0.14). Importantly, both variants associate with osteoporotic fractures and affect expression of the PTCH1 and RSPO3 genes that is in line with their influence on BMD and known biological function of these genes. Additional new BMD signals were also found at the AXIN1 and SOST loci and a new lead SNP at the EN1 locus. PMID:26733130

  11. Sequence variants in the PTCH1 gene associate with spine bone mineral density and osteoporotic fractures

    PubMed Central

    Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Center, Jacqueline R.; Lee, Seung Hun; Nguyen, Tuan V.; Kwok, Timothy C.Y.; Lee, Jenny S.W.; Ho, Suzanne C.; Woo, Jean; Leung, Ping-C.; Kim, Beom-Jun; Rafnar, Thorunn; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Ingvarsson, Thorvaldur; Koh, Jung-Min; Tang, Nelson L.S.; Eisman, John A.; Christiansen, Claus; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a measure of osteoporosis and is useful in evaluating the risk of fracture. In a genome-wide association study of BMD among 20,100 Icelanders, with follow-up in 10,091 subjects of European and East-Asian descent, we found a new BMD locus that harbours the PTCH1 gene, represented by rs28377268 (freq. 11.4–22.6%) that associates with reduced spine BMD (P=1.0 × 10−11, β=−0.09). We also identified a new spine BMD signal in RSPO3, rs577721086 (freq. 6.8%), that associates with increased spine BMD (P=6.6 × 10−10, β=0.14). Importantly, both variants associate with osteoporotic fractures and affect expression of the PTCH1 and RSPO3 genes that is in line with their influence on BMD and known biological function of these genes. Additional new BMD signals were also found at the AXIN1 and SOST loci and a new lead SNP at the EN1 locus. PMID:26733130

  12. Sequence variants in the PTCH1 gene associate with spine bone mineral density and osteoporotic fractures.

    PubMed

    Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Center, Jacqueline R; Lee, Seung Hun; Nguyen, Tuan V; Kwok, Timothy C Y; Lee, Jenny S W; Ho, Suzanne C; Woo, Jean; Leung, Ping-C; Kim, Beom-Jun; Rafnar, Thorunn; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Ingvarsson, Thorvaldur; Koh, Jung-Min; Tang, Nelson L S; Eisman, John A; Christiansen, Claus; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a measure of osteoporosis and is useful in evaluating the risk of fracture. In a genome-wide association study of BMD among 20,100 Icelanders, with follow-up in 10,091 subjects of European and East-Asian descent, we found a new BMD locus that harbours the PTCH1 gene, represented by rs28377268 (freq. 11.4-22.6%) that associates with reduced spine BMD (P=1.0 × 10(-11), β=-0.09). We also identified a new spine BMD signal in RSPO3, rs577721086 (freq. 6.8%), that associates with increased spine BMD (P=6.6 × 10(-10), β=0.14). Importantly, both variants associate with osteoporotic fractures and affect expression of the PTCH1 and RSPO3 genes that is in line with their influence on BMD and known biological function of these genes. Additional new BMD signals were also found at the AXIN1 and SOST loci and a new lead SNP at the EN1 locus.

  13. Unbiased Functional Clustering of Gene Variants with a Phenotypic-Linkage Network

    PubMed Central

    Honti, Frantisek; Meader, Stephen; Webber, Caleb

    2014-01-01

    Groupwise functional analysis of gene variants is becoming standard in next-generation sequencing studies. As the function of many genes is unknown and their classification to pathways is scant, functional associations between genes are often inferred from large-scale omics data. Such data types—including protein–protein interactions and gene co-expression networks—are used to examine the interrelations of the implicated genes. Statistical significance is assessed by comparing the interconnectedness of the mutated genes with that of random gene sets. However, interconnectedness can be affected by confounding bias, potentially resulting in false positive findings. We show that genes implicated through de novo sequence variants are biased in their coding-sequence length and longer genes tend to cluster together, which leads to exaggerated p-values in functional studies; we present here an integrative method that addresses these bias. To discern molecular pathways relevant to complex disease, we have inferred functional associations between human genes from diverse data types and assessed them with a novel phenotype-based method. Examining the functional association between de novo gene variants, we control for the heretofore unexplored confounding bias in coding-sequence length. We test different data types and networks and find that the disease-associated genes cluster more significantly in an integrated phenotypic-linkage network than in other gene networks. We present a tool of superior power to identify functional associations among genes mutated in the same disease even after accounting for significant sequencing study bias and demonstrate the suitability of this method to functionally cluster variant genes underlying polygenic disorders. PMID:25166029

  14. Identification and functional characterization of G6PC2 coding variants influencing glycemic traits define an effector transcript at the G6PC2-ABCB11 locus.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Anubha; Sim, Xueling; Ng, Hui Jin; Manning, Alisa; Rivas, Manuel A; Highland, Heather M; Locke, Adam E; Grarup, Niels; Im, Hae Kyung; Cingolani, Pablo; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gaulton, Kyle J; Teslovich, Tanya M; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil R; Beer, Nicola L; Rundle, Jana K; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Ladenvall, Claes; Blancher, Christine; Buck, David; Buck, Gemma; Burtt, Noël P; Gabriel, Stacey; Gjesing, Anette P; Groves, Christopher J; Hollensted, Mette; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Jackson, Anne U; Jun, Goo; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Mangino, Massimo; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Neville, Matt; Onofrio, Robert; Small, Kerrin S; Stringham, Heather M; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Trakalo, Joseph; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bell, Graeme I; Blangero, John; Cox, Nancy J; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Hanis, Craig L; Seielstad, Mark; Wilson, James G; Christensen, Cramer; Brandslund, Ivan; Rauramaa, Rainer; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Doney, Alex S F; Lannfelt, Lars; Linneberg, Allan; Isomaa, Bo; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Kuusisto, Johanna; Uusitupa, Matti; Salomaa, Veikko; Spector, Timothy D; Morris, Andrew D; Palmer, Colin N A; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Bergman, Richard N; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hansen, Torben; Watanabe, Richard M; Prokopenko, Inga; Dupuis, Josee; Karpe, Fredrik; Groop, Leif; Laakso, Markku; Pedersen, Oluf; Florez, Jose C; Morris, Andrew P; Altshuler, David; Meigs, James B; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Gloyn, Anna L

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI) have identified common variant signals which explain 4.8% and 1.2% of trait variance, respectively. It is hypothesized that low-frequency and rare variants could contribute substantially to unexplained genetic variance. To test this, we analyzed exome-array data from up to 33,231 non-diabetic individuals of European ancestry. We found exome-wide significant (P<5×10-7) evidence for two loci not previously highlighted by common variant GWAS: GLP1R (p.Ala316Thr, minor allele frequency (MAF)=1.5%) influencing FG levels, and URB2 (p.Glu594Val, MAF = 0.1%) influencing FI levels. Coding variant associations can highlight potential effector genes at (non-coding) GWAS signals. At the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus, we identified multiple coding variants in G6PC2 (p.Val219Leu, p.His177Tyr, and p.Tyr207Ser) influencing FG levels, conditionally independent of each other and the non-coding GWAS signal. In vitro assays demonstrate that these associated coding alleles result in reduced protein abundance via proteasomal degradation, establishing G6PC2 as an effector gene at this locus. Reconciliation of single-variant associations and functional effects was only possible when haplotype phase was considered. In contrast to earlier reports suggesting that, paradoxically, glucose-raising alleles at this locus are protective against type 2 diabetes (T2D), the p.Val219Leu G6PC2 variant displayed a modest but directionally consistent association with T2D risk. Coding variant associations for glycemic traits in GWAS signals highlight PCSK1, RREB1, and ZHX3 as likely effector transcripts. These coding variant association signals do not have a major impact on the trait variance explained, but they do provide valuable biological insights. PMID:25625282

  15. Identification and Functional Characterization of G6PC2 Coding Variants Influencing Glycemic Traits Define an Effector Transcript at the G6PC2-ABCB11 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Anubha; Sim, Xueling; Ng, Hui Jin; Manning, Alisa; Rivas, Manuel A.; Highland, Heather M.; Locke, Adam E.; Grarup, Niels; Im, Hae Kyung; Cingolani, Pablo; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Rayner, N. William; Robertson, Neil R.; Beer, Nicola L.; Rundle, Jana K.; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Ladenvall, Claes; Blancher, Christine; Buck, David; Buck, Gemma; Burtt, Noël P.; Gabriel, Stacey; Gjesing, Anette P.; Groves, Christopher J.; Hollensted, Mette; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; Jackson, Anne U.; Jun, Goo; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Mangino, Massimo; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Neville, Matt; Onofrio, Robert; Small, Kerrin S.; Stringham, Heather M.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Trakalo, Joseph; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bell, Graeme I.; Blangero, John; Cox, Nancy J.; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Hanis, Craig L.; Seielstad, Mark; Wilson, James G.; Christensen, Cramer; Brandslund, Ivan; Rauramaa, Rainer; Surdulescu, Gabriela L.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Lannfelt, Lars; Linneberg, Allan; Isomaa, Bo; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Jørgensen, Torben; Kuusisto, Johanna; Uusitupa, Matti; Salomaa, Veikko; Spector, Timothy D.; Morris, Andrew D.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Collins, Francis S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Bergman, Richard N.; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hansen, Torben; Watanabe, Richard M.; Prokopenko, Inga; Dupuis, Josee; Karpe, Fredrik; Groop, Leif; Laakso, Markku; Pedersen, Oluf; Florez, Jose C.; Morris, Andrew P.; Altshuler, David; Meigs, James B.; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Gloyn, Anna L.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI) have identified common variant signals which explain 4.8% and 1.2% of trait variance, respectively. It is hypothesized that low-frequency and rare variants could contribute substantially to unexplained genetic variance. To test this, we analyzed exome-array data from up to 33,231 non-diabetic individuals of European ancestry. We found exome-wide significant (P<5×10-7) evidence for two loci not previously highlighted by common variant GWAS: GLP1R (p.Ala316Thr, minor allele frequency (MAF)=1.5%) influencing FG levels, and URB2 (p.Glu594Val, MAF = 0.1%) influencing FI levels. Coding variant associations can highlight potential effector genes at (non-coding) GWAS signals. At the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus, we identified multiple coding variants in G6PC2 (p.Val219Leu, p.His177Tyr, and p.Tyr207Ser) influencing FG levels, conditionally independent of each other and the non-coding GWAS signal. In vitro assays demonstrate that these associated coding alleles result in reduced protein abundance via proteasomal degradation, establishing G6PC2 as an effector gene at this locus. Reconciliation of single-variant associations and functional effects was only possible when haplotype phase was considered. In contrast to earlier reports suggesting that, paradoxically, glucose-raising alleles at this locus are protective against type 2 diabetes (T2D), the p.Val219Leu G6PC2 variant displayed a modest but directionally consistent association with T2D risk. Coding variant associations for glycemic traits in GWAS signals highlight PCSK1, RREB1, and ZHX3 as likely effector transcripts. These coding variant association signals do not have a major impact on the trait variance explained, but they do provide valuable biological insights. PMID:25625282

  16. Large-Scale Gene-Centric Analysis Identifies Novel Variants for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has a significant genetic contribution that is incompletely characterized. To complement genome-wide association (GWA) studies, we conducted a large and systematic candidate gene study of CAD susceptibility, including analysis of many uncommon and functional variants. We examined 49,094 genetic variants in ∼2,100 genes of cardiovascular relevance, using a customised gene array in 15,596 CAD cases and 34,992 controls (11,202 cases and 30,733 controls of European descent; 4,394 cases and 4,259 controls of South Asian origin). We attempted to replicate putative novel associations in an additional 17,121 CAD cases and 40,473 controls. Potential mechanisms through which the novel variants could affect CAD risk were explored through association tests with vascular risk factors and gene expression. We confirmed associations of several previously known CAD susceptibility loci (eg, 9p21.3:p<10−33; LPA:p<10−19; 1p13.3:p<10−17) as well as three recently discovered loci (COL4A1/COL4A2, ZC3HC1, CYP17A1:p<5×10−7). However, we found essentially null results for most previously suggested CAD candidate genes. In our replication study of 24 promising common variants, we identified novel associations of variants in or near LIPA, IL5, TRIB1, and ABCG5/ABCG8, with per-allele odds ratios for CAD risk with each of the novel variants ranging from 1.06–1.09. Associations with variants at LIPA, TRIB1, and ABCG5/ABCG8 were supported by gene expression data or effects on lipid levels. Apart from the previously reported variants in LPA, none of the other ∼4,500 low frequency and functional variants showed a strong effect. Associations in South Asians did not differ appreciably from those in Europeans, except for 9p21.3 (per-allele odds ratio: 1.14 versus 1.27 respectively; P for heterogeneity = 0.003). This large-scale gene-centric analysis has identified several novel genes for CAD that relate to diverse biochemical and cellular functions and

  17. Association between variants of zinc finger genes and psychiatric disorders: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Hu, Die; Liang, Jie; Bao, Yan-Ping; Meng, Shi-Qiu; Lu, Lin; Shi, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Psychiatric disorders have a negative impact on society and human lives. Genetic factors are involved in the occurrence and development of psychiatric diseases. ZNF804A has been identified as one of the most compelling risk genes associated with broad phenotypes related to psychosis. We conducted a systematic meta-analysis and reviewed ZNF804A variants in psychosis-related disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. We also summarized the association between other zinc finger protein genes (ZNFs) and psychiatric diseases. The meta-analysis included a total of six variants of ZNF804A and three variants of other ZNFs (ZDHHC8 and ZKSCAN4), and the effects of ZNF variants on neurocognition and neuroimaging phenotypes were reviewed. The biological functions of these variants are also presented. We verified that ZNF804A was significantly related to psychiatric diseases, and the association between ZNF804A rs1344706 and psychosis (schizophrenia and bipolar disorder) did not vary with disease or ethnicity. The main brain area regulated by ZNF804A rs1344706 was the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. The effect of ZNF804A variants on cognition did not display consistency with different diseases or methodologies. These findings suggest that ZNF804A might play an important role in common pathogenesis of psychiatric diseases, and its variants are likely involved in regulating the expression of psychosis-related genes, especially the dopamine pathway genes. Further research should focus on the molecular mechanisms by which ZNF804A variants act in psychiatric diseases and related phenotypes.

  18. Variants within the immunoregulatory CBLB gene are associated with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Serena; Pitzalis, Maristella; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Zara, Ilenia; Sidore, Carlo; Murru, Raffaele; Whalen, Michael B.; Busonero, Fabio; Maschio, Andrea; Costa, Gianna; Melis, Maria Cristina; Deidda, Francesca; Poddie, Fausto; Morelli, Laura; Farina, Gabriele; Li, Yun; Dei, Mariano; Lai, Sandra; Mulas, Antonella; Cuccuru, Gianmauro; Porcu, Eleonora; Liang, Liming; Zavattari, Patrizia; Moi, Loredana; Deriu, Elisa; Urru, M. Francesca; Bajorek, Michele; Satta, Maria Anna; Cocco, Eleonora; Ferrigno, Paola; Sotgiu, Stefano; Pugliatti, Maura; Traccis, Sebastiano; Angius, Andrea; Melis, Maurizio; Rosati, Giulio; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Uda, Manuela; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Schlessinger, David; Cucca., Francesco

    2013-01-01

    A genome wide association scan of ~6.6 million genotyped or imputed variants in 882 Sardinian Multiple Sclerosis (MS) cases and 872 controls suggested association of CBLB gene variants with disease, which was confirmed in 1,775 cases and 2,005 controls (overall P =1.60 × 10-10). CBLB encodes a negative regulator of adaptive immune responses and mice lacking the orthologue are prone to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the animal model of MS. PMID:20453840

  19. Multiple DNA variant association analysis: Application to the insulin gene region in type I diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Julier, C.; Delepine, M.; Lathrop, G.M. |; Villedieu, P.; Froguel, P.; Levy-Marchal, C.; Boitard, C.; Bell, J.; Danze, P.M.; Bianchi, F.

    1994-12-01

    Association and linkage studies have shown that at least one of the genetic factors involved in susceptibility to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is contained within a 4.1-kb region of the insulin gene. Sequence analysis has led to the identification of 10 DNA variants in this region that are associated with increased risk for IDDM. These variants are in strong linkage disequilibrium with each other, and previous studies have failed to distinguish between the variant(s) that cause increased susceptibility to IDDM and others that are associated with the disease because of linkage disequilibrium. To address this problem, we have undertaken a large population study of French diabetics and controls and have analyzed genotype patterns for several of the variant sites simultaneously. This has led to the identification of a subset consisting of four variants (-2733AC, -23HphI, -365VNTR, and +1140AC), at least one of which appears to be directly implicated in disease susceptibility. The multiple-DNA-variant association-analysis approach that is applied here to the problem of identifying potential susceptibility variants in IDDM is likely to be important in studies of many other multifactorial diseases.

  20. HFE gene variants, iron, and lipids: a novel connection in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ali-Rahmani, Fatima; Schengrund, Cara-Lynne; Connor, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Iron accumulation and associated oxidative stress in the brain have been consistently found in several neurodegenerative diseases. Multiple genetic studies have been undertaken to try to identify a cause of neurodegenerative diseases but direct connections have been rare. In the iron field, variants in the HFE gene that give rise to a protein involved in cellular iron regulation, are associated with iron accumulation in multiple organs including the brain. There is also substantial epidemiological, genetic, and molecular evidence of disruption of cholesterol homeostasis in several neurodegenerative diseases, in particular Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Despite the efforts that have been made to identify factors that can trigger the pathological events associated with neurodegenerative diseases they remain mostly unknown. Because molecular phenotypes such as oxidative stress, synaptic failure, neuronal loss, and cognitive decline, characteristics associated with AD, have been shown to result from disruption of a number of pathways, one can easily argue that the phenotype seen may not arise from a linear sequence of events. Therefore, a multi-targeted approach is needed to understand a complex disorder like AD. This can be achieved only when knowledge about interactions between the different pathways and the potential influence of environmental factors on them becomes available. Toward this end, this review discusses what is known about the roles and interactions of iron and cholesterol in neurodegenerative diseases. It highlights the effects of gene variants of HFE (H63D- and C282Y-HFE) on iron and cholesterol metabolism and how they may contribute to understanding the etiology of complex neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25071582

  1. Using Whole Exome Sequencing to Identify Candidate Genes With Rare Variants In Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Aylward, Alana; Cai, Yi; Lee, Andrew; Blue, Elizabeth; Rabinowitz, Daniel; Haddad, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Studies suggest that nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate (NSCLP) is polygenic with variable penetrance, presenting a challenge in identifying all causal genetic variants. Despite relatively high prevalence of NSCLP among Amerindian populations, no large whole exome sequencing (WES) studies have been completed in this population. Our goal was to identify candidate genes with rare genetic variants for NSCLP in a Honduran population using WES. WES was performed on two to four members of 27 multiplex Honduran families. Genetic variants with a minor allele frequency > 1% in reference databases were removed. Heterozygous variants consistent with dominant disease with incomplete penetrance were ascertained, and variants with predicted functional consequence were prioritized for analysis. Pedigree-specific P-values were calculated as the probability of all affected members in the pedigree being carriers, given that at least one is a carrier. Preliminary results identified 3,727 heterozygous rare variants; 1,282 were predicted to be functionally consequential. Twenty-three genes had variants of interest in ≥3 families, where some genes had different variants in each family, giving a total of 50 variants. Variant validation via Sanger sequencing of the families and unrelated unaffected controls excluded variants that were sequencing errors or common variants not in databases, leaving four genes with candidate variants in ≥3 families. Of these, candidate variants in two genes consistently segregate with NSCLP as a dominant variant with incomplete penetrance: ACSS2 and PHYH. Rare variants found at the same gene in all affected individuals in several families are likely to be directly related to NSCLP. PMID:27229527

  2. Prioritizing Variants in Complete Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Genes in Patients Lacking Known BRCA Mutations.

    PubMed

    Caminsky, Natasha G; Mucaki, Eliseos J; Perri, Ami M; Lu, Ruipeng; Knoll, Joan H M; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-07-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) does not identify all pathogenic variants. Sequencing of 20 complete genes in HBOC patients with uninformative test results (N = 287), including noncoding and flanking sequences of ATM, BARD1, BRCA1, BRCA2, CDH1, CHEK2, EPCAM, MLH1, MRE11A, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, NBN, PALB2, PMS2, PTEN, RAD51B, STK11, TP53, and XRCC2, identified 38,372 unique variants. We apply information theory (IT) to predict and prioritize noncoding variants of uncertain significance in regulatory, coding, and intronic regions based on changes in binding sites in these genes. Besides mRNA splicing, IT provides a common framework to evaluate potential affinity changes in transcription factor (TFBSs), splicing regulatory (SRBSs), and RNA-binding protein (RBBSs) binding sites following mutation. We prioritized variants affecting the strengths of 10 splice sites (four natural, six cryptic), 148 SRBS, 36 TFBS, and 31 RBBS. Three variants were also prioritized based on their predicted effects on mRNA secondary (2°) structure and 17 for pseudoexon activation. Additionally, four frameshift, two in-frame deletions, and five stop-gain mutations were identified. When combined with pedigree information, complete gene sequence analysis can focus attention on a limited set of variants in a wide spectrum of functional mutation types for downstream functional and co-segregation analysis. PMID:26898890

  3. FTO gene variants are associated with growth and carcass traits in cattle.

    PubMed

    Jevsinek Skok, D; Kunej, T; Kovac, M; Malovrh, S; Potocnik, K; Petric, N; Zgur, S; Dovc, P; Horvat, S

    2016-04-01

    An important aim in animal breeding is the improvement of growth and meat quality traits. Previous studies have demonstrated that genetic variants in the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene have a relatively large effect on human obesity as well as on body composition in rodents and, more recently, in livestock. Here, we examined the effects of the FTO gene variants on growth and carcass traits in the Slovenian population of Simmental (SS) and Brown (SB) cattle. To validate and identify new polymorphisms, we used sequencing, PCR-RFLP analysis and TaqMan assays in the SS breed and FTO gene variants data from the Illumina BovineSNP50 v1 array for the SB breed. Sequencing of the eight samples of progeny-tested SS sires detected 108 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the bovine FTO gene. Statistical analyses between growth and carcass traits and 34 FTO polymorphisms revealed significant association of FTO variants with lean meat percentage in both breeds. Additionally, FTO SNPs analyzed in SS cattle were associated with fat percentage, bone weight and live weight at slaughter. The FTO gene can thus be regarded as a candidate gene for the marker-assisted selection programs in our and possibly other populations of cattle. Future studies in cattle might reveal novel roles for the FTO gene in shaping carcass traits in livestock species as well as body composition control in other mammals.

  4. FTO gene variants are associated with growth and carcass traits in cattle.

    PubMed

    Jevsinek Skok, D; Kunej, T; Kovac, M; Malovrh, S; Potocnik, K; Petric, N; Zgur, S; Dovc, P; Horvat, S

    2016-04-01

    An important aim in animal breeding is the improvement of growth and meat quality traits. Previous studies have demonstrated that genetic variants in the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene have a relatively large effect on human obesity as well as on body composition in rodents and, more recently, in livestock. Here, we examined the effects of the FTO gene variants on growth and carcass traits in the Slovenian population of Simmental (SS) and Brown (SB) cattle. To validate and identify new polymorphisms, we used sequencing, PCR-RFLP analysis and TaqMan assays in the SS breed and FTO gene variants data from the Illumina BovineSNP50 v1 array for the SB breed. Sequencing of the eight samples of progeny-tested SS sires detected 108 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the bovine FTO gene. Statistical analyses between growth and carcass traits and 34 FTO polymorphisms revealed significant association of FTO variants with lean meat percentage in both breeds. Additionally, FTO SNPs analyzed in SS cattle were associated with fat percentage, bone weight and live weight at slaughter. The FTO gene can thus be regarded as a candidate gene for the marker-assisted selection programs in our and possibly other populations of cattle. Future studies in cattle might reveal novel roles for the FTO gene in shaping carcass traits in livestock species as well as body composition control in other mammals. PMID:26708680

  5. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T.; Edwards, Robert P.; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Nieuwenhuysen, Els Van; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D.; Gayther, Simon A.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10–7). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r 2 with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11–1.24, P = 1.1×10−7). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10−8). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r 2 = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10-8). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene. PMID:26424751

  6. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T; Edwards, Robert P; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Narod, Steven A; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Ramus, Susan J; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Freedman, Matthew L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D; Gayther, Simon A; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10(-7)). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r (2) with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11-1.24, P = 1.1×10(-7)). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10(-8)). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r (2) = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10(-8)). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene.

  7. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T; Edwards, Robert P; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Narod, Steven A; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Ramus, Susan J; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Freedman, Matthew L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D; Gayther, Simon A; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10(-7)). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r (2) with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11-1.24, P = 1.1×10(-7)). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10(-8)). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r (2) = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10(-8)). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene. PMID:26424751

  8. A polygenic burden of rare variants across extracellular matrix genes among individuals with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Haller, Gabe; Alvarado, David; Mccall, Kevin; Yang, Ping; Cruchaga, Carlos; Harms, Matthew; Goate, Alison; Willing, Marcia; Morcuende, Jose A; Baschal, Erin; Miller, Nancy H; Wise, Carol; Dobbs, Matthew B; Gurnett, Christina A

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a complex inherited spinal deformity whose etiology has been elusive. While common genetic variants are associated with AIS, they explain only a small portion of disease risk. To explore the role of rare variants in AIS susceptibility, exome sequence data of 391 severe AIS cases and 843 controls of European ancestry were analyzed using a pathway burden analysis in which variants are first collapsed at the gene level then by Gene Ontology terms. Novel non-synonymous/splice-site variants in extracellular matrix genes were significantly enriched in AIS cases compared with controls (P = 6 × 10(-9), OR = 1.7, CI = 1.4-2.0). Specifically, novel variants in musculoskeletal collagen genes were present in 32% (126/391) of AIS cases compared with 17% (146/843) of in-house controls and 18% (780/4300) of EVS controls (P = 1 × 10(-9), OR = 1.9, CI = 1.6-2.4). Targeted resequencing of six collagen genes replicated this association in combined 919 AIS cases (P = 3 × 10(-12), OR = 2.2, CI = 1.8-2.7) and revealed a highly significant single-gene association with COL11A2 (P = 6 × 10(-9), OR = 3.8, CI = 2.6-7.2). Importantly, AIS cases harbor mainly non-glycine missense mutations and lack the clinical features of monogenic musculoskeletal collagenopathies. Overall, our study reveals a complex genetic architecture of AIS in which a polygenic burden of rare variants across extracellular matrix genes contributes strongly to risk. PMID:26566670

  9. Hirschsprung's disease and variants in genes that regulate enteric neural crest cell proliferation, migration and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tonia C; Kay, Denise M; Browne, Marilyn L; Liu, Aiyi; Romitti, Paul A; Kuehn, Devon; Conley, Mary R; Caggana, Michele; Druschel, Charlotte M; Brody, Lawrence C; Mills, James L

    2012-08-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) results from failed colonization of the embryonic gut by enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs); colonization requires RET proto-oncogene (RET) signaling. We sequenced RET to identify coding and splice-site variants in a population-based case group and we tested for associations between HSCR and common variants in RET and candidate genes (ASCL1, homeobox B5 (HOXB5), L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM), paired-like homeobox 2b (PHOX2B), PROK1 and PROKR1) chosen because they are involved in ENCC proliferation, migration and differentiation in animal models. We conducted a nested case-control study of 304 HSCR cases and 1215 controls. Among 38 (12.5%) cases with 34 RET coding and splice-site variants, 18 variants were previously unreported. We confirmed associations with common variants in HOXB5 and PHOX2B but the associations with variants in ASCL1, L1CAM and PROK1 were not significant after multiple comparisons adjustment. RET variants were strongly associated with HSCR (P-values between 10(-3) and 10(-31)) but this differed by race/ethnicity: associations were absent in African-Americans. Our population-based study not only identified novel RET variants in HSCR cases, it showed that common RET variants may not contribute to HSCR in all race/ethnic groups. The findings for HOXB5 and PHOX2B provide supportive evidence that genes regulating ENCC proliferation, migration and differentiation could be risk factors for HSCR.

  10. Functional variants of the interleukin-23 receptor gene in non-gastrointestinal autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Safrany, E; Melegh, B

    2009-01-01

    Variants of the gene of the interleukin-23 receptor (IL23R) were first identified as susceptibility factors in association with inflammatory bowel diseases. Since then it became clear that different variants of the gene play also role in a number of other autoimmune diseases like psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and multiple sclerosis while in others, like systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus or Sjögren syndrome the same effect could not be seen. However, the results are very controversial both in terms of the various polymorphisms and also in population specificity. The aim of the current paper is to overview all available reports on IL23R gene polymorphisms in various autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and to try to give an explanation on the possible effect of the examined variants.

  11. Cis and trans effects of human genomic variants on gene expression.

    PubMed

    Bryois, Julien; Buil, Alfonso; Evans, David M; Kemp, John P; Montgomery, Stephen B; Conrad, Donald F; Ho, Karen M; Ring, Susan; Hurles, Matthew; Deloukas, Panos; Davey Smith, George; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T

    2014-07-01

    Gene expression is a heritable cellular phenotype that defines the function of a cell and can lead to diseases in case of misregulation. In order to detect genetic variations affecting gene expression, we performed association analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy number variants (CNVs) with gene expression measured in 869 lymphoblastoid cell lines of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) cohort in cis and in trans. We discovered that 3,534 genes (false discovery rate (FDR) = 5%) are affected by an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) in cis and 48 genes are affected in trans. We observed that CNVs are more likely to be eQTLs than SNPs. In addition, we found that variants associated to complex traits and diseases are enriched for trans-eQTLs and that trans-eQTLs are enriched for cis-eQTLs. As a variant affecting both a gene in cis and in trans suggests that the cis gene is functionally linked to the trans gene expression, we looked specifically for trans effects of cis-eQTLs. We discovered that 26 cis-eQTLs are associated to 92 genes in trans with the cis-eQTLs of the transcriptions factors BATF3 and HMX2 affecting the most genes. We then explored if the variation of the level of expression of the cis genes were causally affecting the level of expression of the trans genes and discovered several causal relationships between variation in the level of expression of the cis gene and variation of the level of expression of the trans gene. This analysis shows that a large sample size allows the discovery of secondary effects of human variations on gene expression that can be used to construct short directed gene regulatory networks.

  12. Cis and Trans Effects of Human Genomic Variants on Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bryois, Julien; Buil, Alfonso; Evans, David M.; Kemp, John P.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Conrad, Donald F.; Ho, Karen M.; Ring, Susan; Hurles, Matthew; Deloukas, Panos; Davey Smith, George; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is a heritable cellular phenotype that defines the function of a cell and can lead to diseases in case of misregulation. In order to detect genetic variations affecting gene expression, we performed association analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy number variants (CNVs) with gene expression measured in 869 lymphoblastoid cell lines of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) cohort in cis and in trans. We discovered that 3,534 genes (false discovery rate (FDR) = 5%) are affected by an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) in cis and 48 genes are affected in trans. We observed that CNVs are more likely to be eQTLs than SNPs. In addition, we found that variants associated to complex traits and diseases are enriched for trans-eQTLs and that trans-eQTLs are enriched for cis-eQTLs. As a variant affecting both a gene in cis and in trans suggests that the cis gene is functionally linked to the trans gene expression, we looked specifically for trans effects of cis-eQTLs. We discovered that 26 cis-eQTLs are associated to 92 genes in trans with the cis-eQTLs of the transcriptions factors BATF3 and HMX2 affecting the most genes. We then explored if the variation of the level of expression of the cis genes were causally affecting the level of expression of the trans genes and discovered several causal relationships between variation in the level of expression of the cis gene and variation of the level of expression of the trans gene. This analysis shows that a large sample size allows the discovery of secondary effects of human variations on gene expression that can be used to construct short directed gene regulatory networks. PMID:25010687

  13. Search for new loci and low-frequency variants influencing glioma risk by exome-array analysis.

    PubMed

    Kinnersley, Ben; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Labussière, Marianne; Wang, Yufei; Galan, Pilar; Mokhtari, Karima; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Gousias, Konstantinos; Schramm, Johannes; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Swerdlow, Anthony; Fleming, Sarah J; Herms, Stefan; Heilmann, Stefanie; Nöthen, Markus M; Simon, Matthias; Sanson, Marc; Lathrop, Mark; Houlston, Richard S

    2016-05-01

    To identify protein-altering variants (PAVs) for glioma, we analysed Illumina HumanExome BeadChip exome-array data on 1882 glioma cases and 8079 controls from three independent European populations. In addition to single-variant tests we incorporated information on the predicted functional consequences of PAVs and analysed sets of genes with a higher likelihood of having a role in glioma on the basis of the profile of somatic mutations documented by large-scale sequencing initiatives. Globally there was a strong relationship between effect size and PAVs predicted to be damaging (P=2.29 × 10(-49)); however, these variants which are most likely to impact on risk, are rare (MAF<5%). Although no single variant showed an association which was statistically significant at the genome-wide threshold a number represented promising associations - BRCA2:c.9976A>T, p.(Lys3326Ter), which has been shown to influence breast and lung cancer risk (odds ratio (OR)=2.3, P=4.00 × 10(-4) for glioblastoma (GBM)) and IDH2:c.782G>A, p.(Arg261His) (OR=3.21, P=7.67 × 10(-3), for non-GBM). Additionally, gene burden tests revealed a statistically significant association for HARS2 and risk of GBM (P=2.20 × 10(-6)). Genome scans of low-frequency PAVs represent a complementary strategy to identify disease-causing variants compared with scans based on tagSNPs. Strategies to lessen the multiple testing burden by restricting analysis to PAVs with higher priors affords an opportunity to maximise study power.

  14. Search for new loci and low-frequency variants influencing glioma risk by exome-array analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kinnersley, Ben; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Labussière, Marianne; Wang, Yufei; Galan, Pilar; Mokhtari, Karima; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Gousias, Konstantinos; Schramm, Johannes; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Swerdlow, Anthony; Fleming, Sarah J; Herms, Stefan; Heilmann, Stefanie; Nöthen, Markus M; Simon, Matthias; Sanson, Marc; Lathrop, Mark; Houlston, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    To identify protein-altering variants (PAVs) for glioma, we analysed Illumina HumanExome BeadChip exome-array data on 1882 glioma cases and 8079 controls from three independent European populations. In addition to single-variant tests we incorporated information on the predicted functional consequences of PAVs and analysed sets of genes with a higher likelihood of having a role in glioma on the basis of the profile of somatic mutations documented by large-scale sequencing initiatives. Globally there was a strong relationship between effect size and PAVs predicted to be damaging (P=2.29 × 10−49); however, these variants which are most likely to impact on risk, are rare (MAF<5%). Although no single variant showed an association which was statistically significant at the genome-wide threshold a number represented promising associations – BRCA2:c.9976A>T, p.(Lys3326Ter), which has been shown to influence breast and lung cancer risk (odds ratio (OR)=2.3, P=4.00 × 10−4 for glioblastoma (GBM)) and IDH2:c.782G>A, p.(Arg261His) (OR=3.21, P=7.67 × 10−3, for non-GBM). Additionally, gene burden tests revealed a statistically significant association for HARS2 and risk of GBM (P=2.20 × 10−6). Genome scans of low-frequency PAVs represent a complementary strategy to identify disease-causing variants compared with scans based on tagSNPs. Strategies to lessen the multiple testing burden by restricting analysis to PAVs with higher priors affords an opportunity to maximise study power. PMID:26264438

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 gene variants and hyperbilirubinemia risk in North Indian newborns.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Pankaj Kumar; Sethi, Amanpreet; Basu, Sriparna; Raman, Rajiva; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-12-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in bilirubin metabolism, and its genetic variant may modulate hyperbilirubinemia risk in neonates. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between heme oxygenase-1 gene variants and hyperbilirubinemia risk in Indian newborns. In a prospective case-control study, we analyzed (GT)n repeats and g.-413A>T variant of HO-1 gene and UGT1A1 gene variants in 100 case newborns with total serum bilirubin (TSB) levels exceeding 95th percentile and 100 control newborns with TSB levels below 75th percentile on the hour-specific bilirubin nomogram of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Study population consisted of term (37-41 weeks) and late preterm (34-36 weeks) newborns during the first 2 weeks of age. In our analysis, the (GT)n allele was highly polymorphic, ranging in number from 15 to 40. The incidence of short (GT)n allele (≤ 20) was significantly higher in neonates with hyperbilirubinemia than in controls. Although g.-413A>T variant was widely prevalent in the study population, no difference was noted in its prevalence between cases and controls. Short (GT)n repeats of HO-1 gene, c.211G>A variant of UGT1A1 gene, and excessive weight loss were independent risk factors for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. In the presence of two or more risk factors, the odds of developing neonatal hyperbilirubinemia were high. Shorter (GT)n genotype in the promoter region of HO-1 gene is significantly associated with hyperbilirubinemia risk in Indian newborns. This genotype may interact with other genetic and clinical risk factors to further potentiate hyperbilirubinemia risk in newborns.

  16. Differential expression of cytokine genes and inducible nitric oxide synthase induced by opacity phenotype variants of Streptococcus pneumoniae during acute otitis media in the rat.

    PubMed

    Long, J P; Tong, H H; Shannon, P A; DeMaria, T F

    2003-10-01

    Phase variation in the colonial opacity phenotype of Streptococcus pneumoniae has been implicated as a factor in bacterial adherence, colonization, and invasion in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal otitis media (OM). The purpose of this study was to determine whether S. pneumoniae opacity variants influence the induction of gene expression for proinflammatory mediators in vivo using the rat model of OM. Both the opaque and transparent phenotype variants induced a significant up-regulation in gene expression for interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) compared to saline sham-inoculated controls at both 4 and 24 h postinoculation (P < 0.05 in all cases). Furthermore, whereas a significant difference in gene expression was evident for only IL-6 (greater following challenge with the opaque variant) and IL-1beta (greater following challenge with the transparent variant) at 4 h, by 24 h the opaque variant cohort demonstrated a significant increase in gene expression for IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, and iNOS relative to animals inoculated with the transparent phenotype variant (P < 0.05 in all cases). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results confirmed the gene expression data as determined by real-time PCR. Moreover, the concentrations of the opaque variant in the middle ear lavage fluid were a full log higher than those of the transparent variant. The aforementioned results indicate that the opaque phenotype variant is more efficient at survival and multiplication within the middle ear space, resulting in the accumulation of more inflammatory cells and the enhanced expression and production of inflammatory mediators. However, when the data were normalized to account for differences in middle ear bacterial titers, it became apparent that the transparent variant of S. pneumoniae is a more potent inducer of inflammation, triggering the accumulation of more inflammatory cells and

  17. RARE VARIANTS IN TENASCIN GENES IN A COHORT OF CHILDREN WITH PRIMARY VESICOURETERIC REFLUX

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Shan; Homstad, Alison; Vaidya, Himani; Stout, Jennifer; Hall, Gentzon; Wu, Guanghong; Conlon, Peter; Routh, Jonathan C.; Wiener, John S.; Ross, Sherry S.; Nagaraj, Shashi; Wigfall, Delbert; Foreman, John; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Gupta, Indra R.; Brophy, Patrick D.; Rabinovich, C. Egla; Gbadegesin, Rasheed A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary vesicoureteral reflux (PVUR) is the most common malformation of the kidney and urinary tract and reflux nephropathy is a major cause of chronic kidney disease in children. Recently, we reported mutations in tenascin XB (TNXB) as a cause of PVUR with joint hypermobility. Methods To define the role of rare variants in tenascin genes in the etiology of PVUR, we screened a cohort of patients with familial PVUR (FPVUR) and non-familial PVUR (NFPVUR) for rare missense variants in TNXB and tenascin C (TNC) genes after excluding mutations in ROBO2 and SOX17. Results We identified 134 individuals from 112 families with PVUR, we excluded two families with mutations in ROBO2. We found rare missense variants in TNXB in the remaining 110 families comprising of 5/55 (9%) of families with FPVUR and 2/55 (4%) of NFPVUR. There were no differences in high-grade reflux, or renal parenchymal scarring between patients with and without TNXB variants. All patients with TNXB rare variants that were tested exhibited joint hypermobility. Overall we were able to identify causes of FPVUR in 7/57 (12%) families (9% in TNXB and 3% in ROBO2). Conclusions In conclusion, a rare missense variant in TNXB in combination with a positive family history of VUR and joint hypermobility may represent a non-invasive method to diagnose PVUR and warrants further evaluation in other cohorts. PMID:26408188

  18. Low prevalence of most frequent pathogenic variants of six PARK genes in sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    García, Silvia; López-Hernández, Luz Berenice; Suarez-Cuenca, Juan Antonio; Solano-Rojas, Marlene; Gallegos-Arreola, Martha P; Gama-Moreno, Olga; Valdez-Anguiano, Paulina; Canto, Patricia; Dávila-Maldonado, Luis; Cuevas-García, Carlos F; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variants that confer susceptibility to Parkinson's disease (PD) show unbalanced distribution among different populations; genetic predisposition to either familial or sporadic forms of PD in Mexican-mestizo population has not been comprehensively studied. The aim of the present study was to analyze genetic variants in six PARK genes in PD patients. In total 381 individuals (173 patients, 208 controls) were genotyped for p.Gly2019Ser and p.Gly2385Arg variants of LRRK2. The p.Gly2019Ser variant was present in two patients and one healthy control; the p.Gly2385Arg variant was not found. In a subgroup of early-onset PD (EOPD), MLPA analysis was done for PARKIN (PARK2), PINK1 (PARK6), DJ-1 (PARK7), LRRK2 (PARK8), SNCA (PARK1/4) and ATP13A2 (PARK9). We found a heterozygous deletion of exon 2 in PARK2 in the youngest patient of the early-onset group, who showed limited response to antiparkinsonian therapy. Although the changes Gly2019Ser and Gly2385Arg of LRRK2 are associated with PD in different populations; they may be a rare cause of PD in our population. Novel population-specific variants may underlie PD susceptibility in Mexican mestizos. Our study suggests that the heterozygous deletion of exon 2 in the PARK2 gene is a risk factor for EOPD.

  19. BRONCO: Biomedical entity Relation ONcology COrpus for extracting gene-variant-disease-drug relations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyubum; Lee, Sunwon; Park, Sungjoon; Kim, Sunkyu; Kim, Suhkyung; Choi, Kwanghun; Tan, Aik Choon; Kang, Jaewoo

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of genomic variants in a biological context is key for precision medicine. As next-generation sequencing technologies improve, the amount of literature containing genomic variant data, such as new functions or related phenotypes, rapidly increases. Because numerous articles are published every day, it is almost impossible to manually curate all the variant information from the literature. Many researchers focus on creating an improved automated biomedical natural language processing (BioNLP) method that extracts useful variants and their functional information from the literature. However, there is no gold-standard data set that contains texts annotated with variants and their related functions. To overcome these limitations, we introduce a Biomedical entity Relation ONcology COrpus (BRONCO) that contains more than 400 variants and their relations with genes, diseases, drugs and cell lines in the context of cancer and anti-tumor drug screening research. The variants and their relations were manually extracted from 108 full-text articles. BRONCO can be utilized to evaluate and train new methods used for extracting biomedical entity relations from full-text publications, and thus be a valuable resource to the biomedical text mining research community. Using BRONCO, we quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated the performance of three state-of-the-art BioNLP methods. We also identified their shortcomings, and suggested remedies for each method. We implemented post-processing modules for the three BioNLP methods, which improved their performance.Database URL:http://infos.korea.ac.kr/bronco. PMID:27074804

  20. BRONCO: Biomedical entity Relation ONcology COrpus for extracting gene-variant-disease-drug relations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyubum; Lee, Sunwon; Park, Sungjoon; Kim, Sunkyu; Kim, Suhkyung; Choi, Kwanghun; Tan, Aik Choon; Kang, Jaewoo

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of genomic variants in a biological context is key for precision medicine. As next-generation sequencing technologies improve, the amount of literature containing genomic variant data, such as new functions or related phenotypes, rapidly increases. Because numerous articles are published every day, it is almost impossible to manually curate all the variant information from the literature. Many researchers focus on creating an improved automated biomedical natural language processing (BioNLP) method that extracts useful variants and their functional information from the literature. However, there is no gold-standard data set that contains texts annotated with variants and their related functions. To overcome these limitations, we introduce a Biomedical entity Relation ONcology COrpus (BRONCO) that contains more than 400 variants and their relations with genes, diseases, drugs and cell lines in the context of cancer and anti-tumor drug screening research. The variants and their relations were manually extracted from 108 full-text articles. BRONCO can be utilized to evaluate and train new methods used for extracting biomedical entity relations from full-text publications, and thus be a valuable resource to the biomedical text mining research community. Using BRONCO, we quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated the performance of three state-of-the-art BioNLP methods. We also identified their shortcomings, and suggested remedies for each method. We implemented post-processing modules for the three BioNLP methods, which improved their performance. Database URL: http://infos.korea.ac.kr/bronco PMID:27074804

  1. Transcriptome outlier analysis implicates schizophrenia susceptibility genes and enriches putatively functional rare genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jubao; Sanders, Alan R.; Moy, Winton; Drigalenko, Eugene I.; Brown, Eric C.; Freda, Jessica; Leites, Catherine; Göring, Harald H. H.; Gejman, Pablo V.

    2015-01-01

    We searched a gene expression dataset comprised of 634 schizophrenia (SZ) cases and 713 controls for expression outliers (i.e., extreme tails of the distribution of transcript expression values) with SZ cases overrepresented compared with controls. These outlier genes were enriched for brain expression and for genes known to be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. SZ cases showed higher outlier burden (i.e., total outlier events per subject) than controls for genes within copy number variants (CNVs) associated with SZ or neurodevelopmental disorders. Outlier genes were enriched for CNVs and for rare putative regulatory variants, but this only explained a small proportion of the outlier subjects, highlighting the underlying presence of additional genetic and potentially, epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:26022996

  2. Transcriptome outlier analysis implicates schizophrenia susceptibility genes and enriches putatively functional rare genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jubao; Sanders, Alan R; Moy, Winton; Drigalenko, Eugene I; Brown, Eric C; Freda, Jessica; Leites, Catherine; Göring, Harald H H; Gejman, Pablo V

    2015-08-15

    We searched a gene expression dataset comprised of 634 schizophrenia (SZ) cases and 713 controls for expression outliers (i.e., extreme tails of the distribution of transcript expression values) with SZ cases overrepresented compared with controls. These outlier genes were enriched for brain expression and for genes known to be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. SZ cases showed higher outlier burden (i.e., total outlier events per subject) than controls for genes within copy number variants (CNVs) associated with SZ or neurodevelopmental disorders. Outlier genes were enriched for CNVs and for rare putative regulatory variants, but this only explained a small proportion of the outlier subjects, highlighting the underlying presence of additional genetic and potentially, epigenetic mechanisms.

  3. Coordinate amplification of metallothionein I and II gene sequences in cadmium-resistant CHO variants

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, C.E.; Crawford, B.D.; Enger, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    Cadmium-resistanc (Cd/sup r/) variants of the Chinese hamster cell line, CHO, have been derived by stepwise selection for growth in medium containing CdCl/sub 2/. These variants show coordinately increased production of both metallothionein (MT) I and II and were stably resistant to Cd/sup 2 +/ in the absence of continued selection. Genomic DNAs from these Cd/sup r/ sublines were analyzed for both MT gene copy number and MT gene organization, using cDNA sequence probes specific for each of the two Chinese hamster isometallothioneins. These analyses revealed coordinate amplification of MT I and II genes in all Cd/sup r/ variants which had increased copies of MT-encoding sequences. In situ hybridization of an MT-encoding probe to mitotic chromosomes of a Cd/sup r/ variant, which has amplified MT genes at least 14-fold, revealed a single chromosomal site of hybridization. These results suggest that the isoMTs constitute a functionally related gene cluster which amplifies coordinately in response to toxic metal stress.

  4. Targeted next-generation sequencing reveals multiple deleterious variants in OPLL-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Guo, Jun; Cai, Tao; Zhang, Fengshan; Pan, Shengfa; Zhang, Li; Wang, Shaobo; Zhou, Feifei; Diao, Yinze; Zhao, Yanbin; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoguang; Chen, Zhongqiang; Liu, Zhongjun; Sun, Yu; Du, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (OPLL), which is characterized by ectopic bone formation in the spinal ligaments, can cause spinal-cord compression. To date, at least 11 susceptibility genes have been genetically linked to OPLL. In order to identify potential deleterious alleles in these OPLL-associated genes, we designed a capture array encompassing all coding regions of the target genes for next-generation sequencing (NGS) in a cohort of 55 unrelated patients with OPLL. By bioinformatics analyses, we successfully identified three novel and five extremely rare variants (MAF < 0.005). These variants were predicted to be deleterious by commonly used various algorithms, thereby resulting in missense mutations in four OPLL-associated genes (i.e., COL6A1, COL11A2, FGFR1, and BMP2). Furthermore, potential effects of the patient with p.Q89E of BMP2 were confirmed by a markedly increased BMP2 level in peripheral blood samples. Notably, seven of the variants were found to be associated with the patients with continuous subtype changes by cervical spinal radiological analyses. Taken together, our findings revealed for the first time that deleterious coding variants of the four OPLL-associated genes are potentially pathogenic in the patients with OPLL. PMID:27246988

  5. Association analysis of bitter receptor genes in five isolated populations identifies a significant correlation between TAS2R43 variants and coffee liking.

    PubMed

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Traglia, Michela; Robino, Antonietta; Willems, Sara M; Pistis, Giorgio; d'Adamo, Pio; Amin, Najaf; d'Eustacchio, Angela; Navarini, Luciano; Sala, Cinzia; Karssen, Lennart C; van Duijn, Cornelia; Toniolo, Daniela; Gasparini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Coffee, one of the most popular beverages in the world, contains many different physiologically active compounds with a potential impact on people's health. Despite the recent attention given to the genetic basis of its consumption, very little has been done in understanding genes influencing coffee preference among different individuals. Given its markedly bitter taste, we decided to verify if bitter receptor genes (TAS2Rs) variants affect coffee liking. In this light, 4066 people from different parts of Europe and Central Asia filled in a field questionnaire on coffee liking. They have been consequently recruited and included in the study. Eighty-eight SNPs covering the 25 TAS2R genes were selected from the available imputed ones and used to run association analysis for coffee liking. A significant association was detected with three SNP: one synonymous and two functional variants (W35S and H212R) on the TAS2R43 gene. Both variants have been shown to greatly reduce in vitro protein activity. Surprisingly the wild type allele, which corresponds to the functional form of the protein, is associated to higher liking of coffee. Since the hTAS2R43 receptor is sensible to caffeine, we verified if the detected variants produced differences in caffeine bitter perception on a subsample of people coming from the FVG cohort. We found a significant association between differences in caffeine perception and the H212R variant but not with the W35S, which suggests that the effect of the TAS2R43 gene on coffee liking is mediated by caffeine and in particular by the H212R variant. No other significant association was found with other TAS2R genes. In conclusion, the present study opens new perspectives in the understanding of coffee liking. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of the TAS2R43 gene in coffee hedonics and to identify which other genes and pathways are involved in its genetics.

  6. Cystinuria Associated with Different SLC7A9 Gene Variants in the Cat

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Karthik; Osborne, Carl; Giger, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Cystinuria is a classical inborn error of metabolism characterized by a selective proximal renal tubular defect affecting cystine, ornithine, lysine, and arginine (COLA) reabsorption, which can lead to uroliths and urinary obstruction. In humans, dogs and mice, cystinuria is caused by variants in one of two genes, SLC3A1 and SLC7A9, which encode the rBAT and bo,+AT subunits of the bo,+ basic amino acid transporter system, respectively. In this study, exons and flanking regions of the SLC3A1 and SLC7A9 genes were sequenced from genomic DNA of cats (Felis catus) with COLAuria and cystine calculi. Relative to the Felis catus-6.2 reference genome sequence, DNA sequences from these affected cats revealed 3 unique homozygous SLC7A9 missense variants: one in exon 5 (p.Asp236Asn) from a non-purpose-bred medium-haired cat, one in exon 7 (p.Val294Glu) in a Maine Coon and a Sphinx cat, and one in exon 10 (p.Thr392Met) from a non-purpose-bred long-haired cat. A genotyping assay subsequently identified another cystinuric domestic medium-haired cat that was homozygous for the variant originally identified in the purebred cats. These missense variants result in deleterious amino acid substitutions of highly conserved residues in the bo,+AT protein. A limited population survey supported that the variants found were likely causative. The remaining 2 sequenced domestic short-haired cats had a heterozygous variant at a splice donor site in intron 10 and a homozygous single nucleotide variant at a branchpoint in intron 11 of SLC7A9, respectively. This study identifies the first SLC7A9 variants causing feline cystinuria and reveals that, as in humans and dogs, this disease is genetically heterogeneous in cats. PMID:27404572

  7. Cystinuria Associated with Different SLC7A9 Gene Variants in the Cat.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Raj, Karthik; Osborne, Carl; Giger, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Cystinuria is a classical inborn error of metabolism characterized by a selective proximal renal tubular defect affecting cystine, ornithine, lysine, and arginine (COLA) reabsorption, which can lead to uroliths and urinary obstruction. In humans, dogs and mice, cystinuria is caused by variants in one of two genes, SLC3A1 and SLC7A9, which encode the rBAT and bo,+AT subunits of the bo,+ basic amino acid transporter system, respectively. In this study, exons and flanking regions of the SLC3A1 and SLC7A9 genes were sequenced from genomic DNA of cats (Felis catus) with COLAuria and cystine calculi. Relative to the Felis catus-6.2 reference genome sequence, DNA sequences from these affected cats revealed 3 unique homozygous SLC7A9 missense variants: one in exon 5 (p.Asp236Asn) from a non-purpose-bred medium-haired cat, one in exon 7 (p.Val294Glu) in a Maine Coon and a Sphinx cat, and one in exon 10 (p.Thr392Met) from a non-purpose-bred long-haired cat. A genotyping assay subsequently identified another cystinuric domestic medium-haired cat that was homozygous for the variant originally identified in the purebred cats. These missense variants result in deleterious amino acid substitutions of highly conserved residues in the bo,+AT protein. A limited population survey supported that the variants found were likely causative. The remaining 2 sequenced domestic short-haired cats had a heterozygous variant at a splice donor site in intron 10 and a homozygous single nucleotide variant at a branchpoint in intron 11 of SLC7A9, respectively. This study identifies the first SLC7A9 variants causing feline cystinuria and reveals that, as in humans and dogs, this disease is genetically heterogeneous in cats. PMID:27404572

  8. Cystinuria Associated with Different SLC7A9 Gene Variants in the Cat.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Raj, Karthik; Osborne, Carl; Giger, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Cystinuria is a classical inborn error of metabolism characterized by a selective proximal renal tubular defect affecting cystine, ornithine, lysine, and arginine (COLA) reabsorption, which can lead to uroliths and urinary obstruction. In humans, dogs and mice, cystinuria is caused by variants in one of two genes, SLC3A1 and SLC7A9, which encode the rBAT and bo,+AT subunits of the bo,+ basic amino acid transporter system, respectively. In this study, exons and flanking regions of the SLC3A1 and SLC7A9 genes were sequenced from genomic DNA of cats (Felis catus) with COLAuria and cystine calculi. Relative to the Felis catus-6.2 reference genome sequence, DNA sequences from these affected cats revealed 3 unique homozygous SLC7A9 missense variants: one in exon 5 (p.Asp236Asn) from a non-purpose-bred medium-haired cat, one in exon 7 (p.Val294Glu) in a Maine Coon and a Sphinx cat, and one in exon 10 (p.Thr392Met) from a non-purpose-bred long-haired cat. A genotyping assay subsequently identified another cystinuric domestic medium-haired cat that was homozygous for the variant originally identified in the purebred cats. These missense variants result in deleterious amino acid substitutions of highly conserved residues in the bo,+AT protein. A limited population survey supported that the variants found were likely causative. The remaining 2 sequenced domestic short-haired cats had a heterozygous variant at a splice donor site in intron 10 and a homozygous single nucleotide variant at a branchpoint in intron 11 of SLC7A9, respectively. This study identifies the first SLC7A9 variants causing feline cystinuria and reveals that, as in humans and dogs, this disease is genetically heterogeneous in cats.

  9. Association between genetic variants of the clock gene and obesity and sleep duration.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Macarena; Obregón, Ana María; Chaput, Jean-Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors related to lifestyle aspects. It has been shown that reduced sleep is associated with increased body mass index (BMI). Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput (CLOCK) gene variants have also been associated with obesity. The objective of this mini-review was to discuss the available literature related to CLOCK gene variants associated with adiposity and sleep duration in humans. In total, 16 articles complied with the terms of the search that reported CLOCK variants associated with sleep duration, energy intake, and BMI. Overall, six CLOCK single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with sleep duration, and three variants have been associated with energy intake variables. Overall, the most studied area has been the association of CLOCK gene with obesity; close to eight common variants have been associated with obesity. The most studied CLOCK SNP in different populations is rs1801260, and most of these populations correspond to European populations. Collectively, identifying at risk CLOCK genotypes is a new area of research that may help identify individuals who are more susceptible to overeating and gaining weight when exposed to short sleep durations. PMID:26553137

  10. Genetic variants of GSNOR and ADRB2 influence response to albuterol in African-American children with severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Moore, Paul E; Ryckman, Kelli K; Williams, Scott M; Patel, Neal; Summar, Marshall L; Sheller, James R

    2009-07-01

    African Americans are disproportionately affected by asthma. Social and economic factors play a role in this disparity, but there is evidence that genetic factors may also influence the development of asthma and response to therapy in African American children. Our hypothesis is that variations in asthma related genes contribute to the observed asthma disparities by influencing the response to asthma-specific therapy. In order to test this hypothesis, we characterized the clinical response to asthma-specific therapy in 107 African American children who presented to the emergency room in status asthmaticus, with a primary outcome indicator of length of time on continuous albuterol. Single locus analysis indicated that genotype variation in glutathione-dependent S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) is associated with a decreased response to asthma treatment in African American children. A post hoc multi-locus analysis revealed that a combination of four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within GSNOR, adrenergic receptor beta 2, and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase-1 give a 70% predictive value for lack of response to therapy. This predictive model needs replication in other cohorts of patients with asthma, but suggests gene-gene interactions may have greater significance than that identified with single variants. Our findings also suggest that genetic variants may contribute to the observed population disparities in asthma. PMID:19514054

  11. Variants of the PPARD Gene and Their Clinicopathological Significance in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ticha, Ivana; Gnosa, Sebastian; Lindblom, Annika; Liu, Tao; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARD) is nuclear hormone receptor involved in colorectal cancer (CRC) differentiation and progression. The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence and spectrum of variants in the PPARD gene in CRC, and their contribution to clinicopathological endpoints. Methods and Findings Direct sequencing of the PPARD gene was performed in 303 primary tumors, in blood samples from 50 patients with ≥3 affected first-degree relatives, 50 patients with 2 affected first-degree relatives, 50 sporadic patients, 360 healthy controls, and in 6 colon cancer cell lines. Mutation analysis revealed 22 different transversions, 7 of them were novel. Three of all variants were somatic (c.548A>G, p.Y183C, c.425-9C>T, and c.628-16G>A). Two missense mutations (p.Y183C and p.R258Q) were pathogenic using in silico predictive program. Five recurrent variants were detected in/adjacent to the exons 4 (c.1-87T>C, c.1-67G>A, c.130+3G>A, and c.1-101-8C>T) and exon 7 (c.489T>C). Variant c.489C/C detected in tumors was correlated to worse differentiation (P = 0.0397). Conclusions We found 7 novel variants among 22 inherited or acquired PPARD variants. Somatic and/or missense variants detected in CRC patients are rare but indicate the clinical importance of the PPARD gene. PMID:24391853

  12. Genetic Variants in Genes of the Inflammatory Response in Association with Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Weinstock, Melanie; Grimm, Imke; Dreier, Jens; Knabbe, Cornelius; Vollmer, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Aims Inflammation in infective endocarditis (IE) is a complex network including interactions of inflammatory cytokines and other components of host response. Certainly, any variation in this network could influence susceptibility or disease progression of IE. In this study, 14 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in genes coding for interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, toll–like receptor-4, tumor necrosis factor-α, selectin E and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 were analyzed for an association with susceptibility to IE and correlated with disease-related laboratory parameters. Furthermore, the occurrence of SNVs was examined to elucidate pathogen-dependent associations. Methods and Results The distribution of SNVs was determined in IE-patients and healthy blood donors by RFLP analysis. White blood cells (WBC) were counted using flow cytometry, concentration of C-reactive protein and procalcitonin was measured immunologically. Interleukin-6 c.471+870G>A genotypes differed significantly between IE patients and controls. The frequency of the heterozygote genotype GA was considerably higher in the patient group (68.9% vs. 43.8%, Pc<0.0003). Interleukin-6 c.-237 minor allele frequency was increased in patients, although not statistically significant. Additionally, we detected a potential relation between interleukin-1β c.315C>T and IE. Pathogen-dependent analysis showed no significantly associated subgroup in relation to IE susceptibility, but gave hints towards alterations regarding Enterococcus-caused IE cases. Patients with genotype selectin-E c.-19 GT tend to have higher preoperative WBC counts than patients with genotype GG. We further showed an association between two interleukin-1β SNVs and laboratory biomarkers. Conclusion This study shows genetic predispositions for the establishment of IE. Furthermore, correlation of SNVs with disease-related biomarkers suggests a role of genetic variants regarding the inflammatory response in IE. PMID:25299518

  13. FOXC2 and FLT4 Gene Variants in Lymphatic Filariasis.

    PubMed

    Sheik, Yasmeen; Qureshi, Sameera Fatima; Mohhammed, Basheeruddin; Nallari, Pratibha

    2015-06-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is the leading cause of secondary lymphedema wherein lymph transport is impaired due to lymphatic damage. FLT4 signaling and transcription factors such as FOXC2 play an important role in this type of lymphangiogenesis process induced by filarial parasites. The present study aims to assess the association of FLT4 and FOXC2 genes in lymphatic development/remodeling in lymphatic filariasis. A total of 118 lymphatic filariasis patients and 100 non-endemic and 50 endemic healthy subjects were enrolled for the present study. Allele-specific PCR and PCR-RFLP were adopted for the genotyping, and screening of FLT4 and FOXC2 genes was carried out by PCR-SSCP, followed by in-silico and statistical analysis. A novel variation (G357A SNP) was identified on FOXC2 gene screening that may have an effect on codon usage frequency during translational process. In FLT4, A3123G mutation was found in 3.39% of the case subjects but the functional role of this mutation, along with subject's clinical presentations and patient's age, emphasize its pathogenic role in lymphedema development. Two of the subjects exhibit compound heterozygosity (A3123G FLT4 mutation and G357A SNP of FOXC2 gene). As these two genes share a common pathway, we hypothesise a synergistic interaction of these two SNPs in inhibiting the downstream signaling resulting in lymphedema progression.

  14. Innate immune activity conditions the effect of regulatory variants upon monocyte gene expression.

    PubMed

    Fairfax, Benjamin P; Humburg, Peter; Makino, Seiko; Naranbhai, Vivek; Wong, Daniel; Lau, Evelyn; Jostins, Luke; Plant, Katharine; Andrews, Robert; McGee, Chris; Knight, Julian C

    2014-03-01

    To systematically investigate the impact of immune stimulation upon regulatory variant activity, we exposed primary monocytes from 432 healthy Europeans to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or differing durations of lipopolysaccharide and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). More than half of cis-eQTLs identified, involving hundreds of genes and associated pathways, are detected specifically in stimulated monocytes. Induced innate immune activity reveals multiple master regulatory trans-eQTLs including the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), coding variants altering enzyme and receptor function, an IFN-β cytokine network showing temporal specificity, and an interferon regulatory factor 2 (IRF2) transcription factor-modulated network. Induced eQTL are significantly enriched for genome-wide association study loci, identifying context-specific associations to putative causal genes including CARD9, ATM, and IRF8. Thus, applying pathophysiologically relevant immune stimuli assists resolution of functional genetic variants.

  15. Exome sequencing of ion channel genes reveals complex variant profiles confounding personal risk assessment in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Klassen, Tara; Davis, Caleb; Goldman, Alica; Burgess, Dan; Chen, Tim; Wheeler, David; McPherson, John; Bourquin, Traci; Lewis, Lora; Villasana, Donna; Morgan, Margaret; Muzny, Donna; Gibbs, Richard; Noebels, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Ion channel mutations are an important cause of rare Mendelian disorders affecting brain, heart, and other tissues. We performed parallel exome sequencing of 237 channel genes in a well characterized human sample, comparing variant profiles of unaffected individuals to those with the most common neuronal excitability disorder, sporadic idiopathic epilepsy. Rare missense variation in known Mendelian disease genes is prevalent in both groups at similar complexity, revealing that even deleterious ion channel mutations confer uncertain risk to an individual depending on the other variants with which they are combined. Our findings indicate that variant discovery via large scale sequencing efforts is only a first step in illuminating the complex allelic architecture underlying personal disease risk. We propose that in silico modeling of channel variation in realistic cell and network models will be crucial to future strategies assessing mutation profile pathogenicity and drug response in individuals with a broad spectrum of excitability disorders. PMID:21703448

  16. Innate Immune Activity Conditions the Effect of Regulatory Variants upon Monocyte Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Naranbhai, Vivek; Wong, Daniel; Lau, Evelyn; Jostins, Luke; Plant, Katharine; Andrews, Robert; McGee, Chris; Knight, Julian C.

    2014-01-01

    To systematically investigate the impact of immune stimulation upon regulatory variant activity, we exposed primary monocytes from 432 healthy Europeans to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or differing durations of lipopolysaccharide and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). More than half of cis-eQTLs identified, involving hundreds of genes and associated pathways, are detected specifically in stimulated monocytes. Induced innate immune activity reveals multiple master regulatory trans-eQTLs including the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), coding variants altering enzyme and receptor function, an IFN-β cytokine network showing temporal specificity, and an interferon regulatory factor 2 (IRF2) transcription factor–modulated network. Induced eQTL are significantly enriched for genome-wide association study loci, identifying context-specific associations to putative causal genes including CARD9, ATM, and IRF8. Thus, applying pathophysiologically relevant immune stimuli assists resolution of functional genetic variants. PMID:24604202

  17. Expression of splice variants of mts1 gene in normal and neoplastic human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ambartsumyan, N.S. |; Grigorian, M.S.; Lukanidin, E.M.

    1995-09-01

    Data on cloning of cDNA corresponding to human mts1 gene transcripts are presented. By comparing nucleotide sequences of the genomic DNA clone and cDNA of mts1, it was shown that human osteosarcoma OHS cells contain two alternative splice variants of mts1 transcripts. Alternative splicing occurs in the 5{prime}-untranslated region of the mts1 pre-mRNA. Both splice variants, hu-mts1 and hu-mts1(var), demonstrate similar stability in the cells, and each contains one open reading frame for the MTS1 protein. However, the two types of transcripts are translated with different effectiveness. The level of transcription of mts1 splice variants in different normal and neoplastic tissues and cell lines varies significantly. The role of alternative splicing as the mechanism responsible for posttranscriptional regulation of mts1 gene expression is discussed. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony R.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Johnson, Randall C.; Odell, Dennis; Westover, Jonna B.; Bray-Ward, Patricia; Ward, David C.; Davies, Christopher J.; Thomas, Aaron J.; Croen, Lisa A.; Benson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The “common variant—common disease” hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased vs. matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the “common variant—common disease” hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics. Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14 bp-indel) frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table 2). The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2). Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1, and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15, 22, and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR genes in

  19. Common variants in Mendelian kidney disease genes and their association with renal function.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Afshin; Fuchsberger, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; O'Seaghdha, Conall M; Pattaro, Cristian; de Andrade, Mariza; Chasman, Daniel I; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Kim, Young J; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Feitosa, Mary; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Rao, Madhumathi; Smith, Albert V; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Johansson, Asa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Couraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Hofer, Edith; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A; Turner, Stephen T; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S; Freedman, Barry I; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H-Erich; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L R; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M; Siscovick, David S; Fox, Caroline S; Kao, W Linda; Böger, Carsten A

    2013-12-01

    Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research.

  20. Common Variants in Mendelian Kidney Disease Genes and Their Association with Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; O’Seaghdha, Conall M.; Pattaro, Cristian; de Andrade, Mariza; Chasman, Daniel I.; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Kim, Young J.; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Feitosa, Mary; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Rao, Madhumathi; Smith, Albert V.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Couraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Hofer, Edith; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M.; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Siscovick, David S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Kao, W. Linda; Böger, Carsten A.

    2013-01-01

    Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research. PMID:24029420

  1. Genetic variants on chromosome 1q41 influence ocular axial length and high myopia.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiao; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Meguro, Akira; Nakata, Isao; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Goh, Liang-Kee; Li, Yi-Ju; Lim, Wan'e; Ho, Candice E H; Hawthorne, Felicia; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chua, Daniel; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Yamashiro, Kenji; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Matsuo, Keitaro; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Vithana, Eranga; Seielstad, Mark; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Beuerman, Roger W; Tai, E-Shyong; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Saw, Seang-Mei

    2012-01-01

    As one of the leading causes of visual impairment and blindness, myopia poses a significant public health burden in Asia. The primary determinant of myopia is an elongated ocular axial length (AL). Here we report a meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies on AL conducted in 1,860 Chinese adults, 929 Chinese children, and 2,155 Malay adults. We identified a genetic locus on chromosome 1q41 harboring the zinc-finger 11B pseudogene ZC3H11B showing genome-wide significant association with AL variation (rs4373767, β = -0.16 mm per minor allele, P(meta) =2.69 × 10(-10)). The minor C allele of rs4373767 was also observed to significantly associate with decreased susceptibility to high myopia (per-allele odds ratio (OR) =0.75, 95% CI: 0.68-0.84, P(meta) =4.38 × 10(-7)) in 1,118 highly myopic cases and 5,433 controls. ZC3H11B and two neighboring genes SLC30A10 and LYPLAL1 were expressed in the human neural retina, retinal pigment epithelium, and sclera. In an experimental myopia mouse model, we observed significant alterations to gene and protein expression in the retina and sclera of the unilateral induced myopic eyes for the murine genes ZC3H11A, SLC30A10, and LYPLAL1. This supports the likely role of genetic variants at chromosome 1q41 in influencing AL variation and high myopia.

  2. The contribution of rare and common variants in 30 genes to risk nicotine dependence.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Wang, S; Yang, Z; Hodgkinson, C A; Iarikova, P; Ma, J Z; Payne, T J; Goldman, D; Li, M D

    2015-11-01

    Genetic and functional studies have revealed that both common and rare variants of several nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits are associated with nicotine dependence (ND). In this study, we identified variants in 30 candidate genes including nicotinic receptors in 200 sib pairs selected from the Mid-South Tobacco Family population with equal numbers of African Americans (AAs) and European Americans (EAs). We selected 135 of the rare and common variants and genotyped them in the Mid-South Tobacco Case-Control (MSTCC) population, which consists of 3088 AAs and 1430 EAs. None of the genotyped common variants showed significant association with smoking status (smokers vs non-smokers), Fagerström Test for ND scores or indexed cigarettes per day after Bonferroni correction. Rare variants in NRXN1, CHRNA9, CHRNA2, NTRK2, GABBR2, GRIN3A, DNM1, NRXN2, NRXN3 and ARRB2 were significantly associated with smoking status in the MSTCC AA sample, with weighted sum statistic (WSS) P-values ranging from 2.42 × 10(-3) to 1.31 × 10(-4) after 10(6) phenotype rearrangements. We also observed a significant excess of rare nonsynonymous variants exclusive to EA smokers in NRXN1, CHRNA9, TAS2R38, GRIN3A, DBH, ANKK1/DRD2, NRXN3 and CDH13 with WSS P-values between 3.5 × 10(-5) and 1 × 10(-6). Variants rs142807401 (A432T) and rs139982841 (A452V) in CHRNA9 and variants V132L, V389L, rs34755188 (R480H) and rs75981117 (N549S) in GRIN3A are of particular interest because they are found in both the AA and EA samples. A significant aggregate contribution of rare and common coding variants in CHRNA9 to the risk for ND (SKAT-C: P=0.0012) was detected by applying the combined sum test in MSTCC EAs. Together, our results indicate that rare variants alone or combined with common variants in a subset of 30 biological candidate genes contribute substantially to the risk of ND. PMID:25450229

  3. Orofacial clefts, parental cigarette smoking, and transforming growth factor-alpha gene variants

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, G.M.; Wasserman, C.R.; O`Malley, C.D.

    1996-03-01

    Results of studies determine whether women who smoke during early pregnancy are at increased risk of delivering infants with orofacial clefts have been mixed, and recently a gene-environment interaction between maternal smoking, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFa), and clefting has been reported. Using a large population-based case-control study, we investigated whether parental periconceptional cigarette smoking was associated with an increased risk for having offspring with orofacial clefts. We also investigated the influence of genetic variation of the TGFa locus on the relation between smoking and clefting. Parental smoking information was obtained from telephone interviews with mothers of 731 (84.7% of eligible) orofacial cleft case infants and with mothers of 734 (78.2%) nonmalformed control infants. DNA was obtained from newborn screening blood spots and genotyped for the allelic variants of TGFa. We found that risks associated with maternal smoking were most elevated for isolated cleft lip with or without cleft palate, (odds ratio 2.1 [95% confidence interval 1.3-3.6]) and for isolated cleft palate (odds ratio 2.2 [1.1-4.5]) when mothers smoked {ge} 20 cigarrettes/d. These risks for white infants ranged from 3-fold to 11-fold across phenotypic groups. Paternal smoking was not associated with clefting among the offspring of nonsmoking mothers, and passive smoke exposures were associated with at most slightly increased risks. This study offers evidence that the risk for orofacial clefting in infants may be influenced by maternal smoke exposures alone as well as in combination (gene-environment interaction) with the presence of the uncommon TGFa allele. 56 refs., 5 tabs.

  4. A Burden of Rare Variants Associated with Extremes of Gene Expression in Human Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Akinsanmi, Idowu; Arafat, Dalia; Cradick, T.J.; Lee, Ciaran M.; Banskota, Samridhi; Marigorta, Urko M.; Bao, Gang; Gibson, Greg

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate whether rare regulatory variants in the vicinity of promoters are likely to impact gene expression, we conducted a novel burden test for enrichment of rare variants at the extremes of expression. After sequencing 2-kb promoter regions of 472 genes in 410 healthy adults, we performed a quadratic regression of rare variant count on bins of peripheral blood transcript abundance from microarrays, summing over ranks of all genes. After adjusting for common eQTLs and the major axes of gene expression covariance, a highly significant excess of variants with minor allele frequency less than 0.05 at both high and low extremes across individuals was observed. Further enrichment was seen in sites annotated as potentially regulatory by RegulomeDB, but a deficit of effects was associated with known metabolic disease genes. The main result replicates in an independent sample of 75 individuals with RNA-seq and whole-genome sequence information. Three of four predicted large-effect sites were validated by CRISPR/Cas9 knockdown in K562 cells, but simulations indicate that effect sizes need not be unusually large to produce the observed burden. Unusually divergent low-frequency promoter haplotypes were observed at 31 loci, at least 9 of which appear to be derived from Neandertal admixture, but these were not associated with divergent gene expression in blood. The overall burden test results are consistent with rare and private regulatory variants driving high or low transcription at specific loci, potentially contributing to disease. PMID:26849112

  5. Parkinson-associated risk variant in distal enhancer of α-synuclein modulates target gene expression.

    PubMed

    Soldner, Frank; Stelzer, Yonatan; Shivalila, Chikdu S; Abraham, Brian J; Latourelle, Jeanne C; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Goldmann, Johanna; Myers, Richard H; Young, Richard A; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2016-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous genetic variants associated with complex diseases, but mechanistic insights are impeded by a lack of understanding of how specific risk variants functionally contribute to the underlying pathogenesis. It has been proposed that cis-acting effects of non-coding risk variants on gene expression are a major factor for phenotypic variation of complex traits and disease susceptibility. Recent genome-scale epigenetic studies have highlighted the enrichment of GWAS-identified variants in regulatory DNA elements of disease-relevant cell types. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-specific changes in transcription factor binding are correlated with heritable alterations in chromatin state and considered a major mediator of sequence-dependent regulation of gene expression. Here we describe a novel strategy to functionally dissect the cis-acting effect of genetic risk variants in regulatory elements on gene expression by combining genome-wide epigenetic information with clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells. By generating a genetically precisely controlled experimental system, we identify a common Parkinson's disease associated risk variant in a non-coding distal enhancer element that regulates the expression of α-synuclein (SNCA), a key gene implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Our data suggest that the transcriptional deregulation of SNCA is associated with sequence-dependent binding of the brain-specific transcription factors EMX2 and NKX6-1. This work establishes an experimental paradigm to functionally connect genetic variation with disease-relevant phenotypes. PMID:27096366

  6. Parkinson-associated risk variant in enhancer element produces subtle effect on target gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Soldner, Frank; Stelzer, Yonatan; Shivalila, Chikdu S.; Abraham, Brian J.; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Goldmann, Johanna; Myers, Richard H.; Young, Richard A.; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous genetic variants associated with complex diseases but mechanistic insights are impeded by the lack of understanding of how specific risk variants functionally contribute to the underlying pathogenesis1. It has been proposed that cis-acting effects of non-coding risk variants on gene expression are a major factor for phenotypic variation of complex traits and disease susceptibility. Recent genome-scale chromatin mapping studies have highlighted the enrichment of GWAS variants in regulatory DNA elements of disease-relevant cell types2–6. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-specific changes in transcription factor (TF) binding are correlated with heritable alterations in chromatin state and considered a major mediator of sequence-dependent regulation of gene expression7–10. Here we describe a novel strategy to functionally dissect the cis-acting effect of genetic risk variants in regulatory elements on gene expression by combining genome-wide epigenetic information with clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). By generating a genetically precisely controlled experimental system we identify a common Parkinson’s disease (PD)-associated risk variant in a non-coding distal enhancer element that regulates the expression of alpha-synuclein (SNCA), a key gene implicated in the pathogenesis of PD. Our data suggest that the transcriptional deregulation of SNCA is associated with sequence-dependent binding of the brain-specific TFs EMX2 and NKX6-1. This work establishes an experimental paradigm to functionally connect genetic variation with disease relevant phenotypes. PMID:27096366

  7. Pharmacodynamic Impact of Carboxylesterase 1 Gene Variants in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Treated with Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bie, Peter; Ferrero, Laura; Bjerre, Ditte; Bruun, Niels E.; Egfjord, Martin; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Hansen, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Variation in the carboxylesterase 1 gene (CES1) may contribute to the efficacy of ACEIs. Accordingly, we examined the impact of CES1 variants on plasma angiotensin II (ATII)/angiotensin I (ATI) ratio in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) that underwent ACEI dose titrations. Five of these variants have previously been associated with drug response or increased CES1 expression, i.e., CES1 copy number variation, the variant of the duplicated CES1 gene with high transcriptional activity, rs71647871, rs2244613, and rs3815583. Additionally, nine variants, representatives of CES1Var, and three other CES1 variants were examined. Methods Patients with CHF, and clinical indication for ACEIs were categorized according to their CES1 genotype. Differences in mean plasma ATII/ATI ratios between genotype groups after ACEI dose titration, expressed as the least square mean (LSM) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), were assessed by analysis of variance. Results A total of 200 patients were recruited and 127 patients (63.5%) completed the study. The mean duration of the CHF drug dose titration was 6.2 (SD 3.6) months. After ACEI dose titration, there was no difference in mean plasma ATII/ATI ratios between subjects with the investigated CES1 variants, and only one previously unexplored variation (rs2302722) qualified for further assessment. In the fully adjusted analysis of effects of rs2302722 on plasma ATII/ATI ratios, the difference in mean ATII/ATI ratio between the GG genotype and the minor allele carriers (GT and TT) was not significant, with a relative difference in LSMs of 0.67 (95% CI 0.43–1.07; P = 0.10). Results of analyses that only included enalapril-treated patients remained non-significant after Bonferroni correction for multiple parallel comparisons (difference in LSM 0.60 [95% CI 0.37–0.98], P = 0.045). Conclusion These findings indicate that the included single variants of CES1 do not significantly influence plasma ATII/ATI ratios in CHF

  8. Examination of genetic variants influencing lipid traits in pediatric populations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Haitao; Mentch, Frank D.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Glessner, Joseph T.; Qiu, Haijun; Guo, Yiran; Hou, Cuiping; Frackelton, Edward C.; Thomas, Kelly; Bender, Amber; Albano, Anthony; Otieno, George; Garris, Maria; Seidler, Kallyn; Moy, Alexander; Kim, Cecilia E.; Keating, Brendan; Chiavacci, Rosetta M.; Grundmeier, Robert; Sleiman, Patrick A.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2012-01-01

    Previous large-scale genome-wide association studies in adult populations have implicated ∽100 loci in determining high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or triglyceride levels. However, whether these loci also contribute to variations of lipid traits in pediatric populations remain unknown. Here we assayed a population of Philadelphia children by high-density single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, and performed association analysis on lipid traits ascertained from lipid measurements stored in electronic medical records. We examined previously reported lipid trait associations, and found that most of them show identical direction of association in our pediatric cohorts, including genome-wide significant association on cholesteryl ester transfer protein with HDL-C levels (rs3764261, P = 2.1 × 10−8) and other significant associations on oxysterol-binding protein-like protein 7, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1. Additionally, we identified suggestive association on low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1B with HDL-C levels (rs17736712, P = 2.1 × 10−7), but this signal is not supported by previous meta-analysis on adult cohorts. Finally, we examined rare copy number variants and identified deletions encompassing tetratricopeptide repeat domain 39B in two children with extreme lipid measures. Our results highlight the commonalities and differences of genetic components in determining lipid traits in pediatric versus adult populations. Furthermore, our study demonstrates the unique utility of automated information retrieval from electronic medical records in facilitating the identification of genotype-phenotype associations.

  9. Examination of genetic variants influencing lipid traits in pediatric populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Haitao; Mentch, Frank D; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Glessner, Joseph T; Qiu, Haijun; Guo, Yiran; Hou, Cuiping; Frackelton, Edward C; Thomas, Kelly; Bender, Amber; Albano, Anthony; Otieno, George; Garris, Maria; Seidler, Kallyn; Moy, Alexander; Kim, Cecilia E; Keating, Brendan; Chiavacci, Rosetta M; Grundmeier, Robert; Sleiman, Patrick A; Grant, Struan F A; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2012-06-01

    Previous large-scale genome-wide association studies in adult populations have implicated ∽100 loci in determining high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or triglyceride levels. However, whether these loci also contribute to variations of lipid traits in pediatric populations remain unknown. Here we assayed a population of Philadelphia children by high-density single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, and performed association analysis on lipid traits ascertained from lipid measurements stored in electronic medical records. We examined previously reported lipid trait associations, and found that most of them show identical direction of association in our pediatric cohorts, including genome-wide significant association on cholesteryl ester transfer protein with HDL-C levels (rs3764261, P = 2.1 × 10(-8)) and other significant associations on oxysterol-binding protein-like protein 7, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1. Additionally, we identified suggestive association on low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1B with HDL-C levels (rs17736712, P = 2.1 × 10(-7)), but this signal is not supported by previous meta-analysis on adult cohorts. Finally, we examined rare copy number variants and identified deletions encompassing tetratricopeptide repeat domain 39B in two children with extreme lipid measures. Our results highlight the commonalities and differences of genetic components in determining lipid traits in pediatric versus adult populations. Furthermore, our study demonstrates the unique utility of automated information retrieval from electronic medical records in facilitating the identification of genotype-phenotype associations. PMID:27625808

  10. Community acquired pneumonia: genetic variants influencing systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ferrer Agüero, J M; Millán, S; Rodríguez de Castro, F; Martín-Loeches, I; Solé Violán, J

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory response depends on several factors, including pathogenicity and duration of the stimulus, and also on the balance between inflammatory and antiinflammatory response. Several studies have presented evidence of the importance of genetic factors in severe infections. The innate immune response prevents the invasion and spread of pathogens during the first hours after infection. Each of the different processes involved in innate immunity may be affected by genetic polymorphisms, which can result in susceptibility or resistance to infection. The results obtained in the different studies do not irrefutably prove the role or function of a gene in the pathogenesis of respiratory infections. However, they can generate new hypotheses, suggest new candidate genes based on their role in the inflammatory response, and constitute a first step in understanding the underlying genetic factors.

  11. Community acquired pneumonia: genetic variants influencing systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ferrer Agüero, J M; Millán, S; Rodríguez de Castro, F; Martín-Loeches, I; Solé Violán, J

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory response depends on several factors, including pathogenicity and duration of the stimulus, and also on the balance between inflammatory and antiinflammatory response. Several studies have presented evidence of the importance of genetic factors in severe infections. The innate immune response prevents the invasion and spread of pathogens during the first hours after infection. Each of the different processes involved in innate immunity may be affected by genetic polymorphisms, which can result in susceptibility or resistance to infection. The results obtained in the different studies do not irrefutably prove the role or function of a gene in the pathogenesis of respiratory infections. However, they can generate new hypotheses, suggest new candidate genes based on their role in the inflammatory response, and constitute a first step in understanding the underlying genetic factors. PMID:24183496

  12. Defining the disease liability of variants in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene

    PubMed Central

    Sosnay, Patrick R; Siklosi, Karen R; Van Goor, Fredrick; Kaniecki, Kyle; Yu, Haihui; Sharma, Neeraj; Ramalho, Anabela S; Amaral, Margarida D; Dorfman, Ruslan; Zielenski, Julian; Masica, David L; Karchin, Rachel; Millen, Linda; Thomas, Philip J; Patrinos, George P; Corey, Mary; Lewis, Michelle H; Rommens, Johanna M; Castellani, Carlo; Penland, Christopher M; Cutting, Garry R

    2013-01-01

    Allelic heterogeneity in disease-causing genes presents a substantial challenge to the translation of genomic variation to clinical practice. Few of the almost 2,000 variants in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene have empirical evidence that they cause cystic fibrosis. To address this gap, we collected both genotype and phenotype data for 39,696 cystic fibrosis patients in registries and clinics in North America and Europe. Among these patients, 159 CFTR variants had an allele frequency of ≥0.01%. These variants were evaluated for both clinical severity and functional consequence with 127 (80%) meeting both clinical and functional criteria consistent with disease. Assessment of disease penetrance in 2,188 fathers of cystic fibrosis patients enabled assignment of 12 of the remaining 32 variants as neutral while the other 20 variants remained indeterminate. This study illustrates that sourcing data directly from well-phenotyped subjects can address the gap in our ability to interpret clinically-relevant genomic variation. PMID:23974870

  13. Variants in mitochondrial tRNA gene may not be associated with thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lv, F; Qian, G; You, W; Lin, H; Wang, XF; Qiu, GS; Jiang, YS; Pang, LX; Kang, YM; Jia, BF

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thyroid cancer is a very common form of endocrine system malignancy. To date, the molecular mechanism underlying thyroid cancer remains poorly understood. Studies of oncocytic tumors have led to a hypothesis which proposes that defects in oxidative phosphorylation (OX- PHOS) may result in a compensatory increase in mitochondrial replication and gene expression. As a result, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation analysis has become a useful tool to explore the molecular basis of this disease. Among these mutations, mitochondrial transfer RNAs (mttRNAs) are the hot spots for pathogenic mutations associated with thyroid cancer. However, due to its high mutation rate, the role of mt-tRNA variants in thyroid cancer is still controversial. To address this problem, in this study, we reassessed seven reported mt-tRNA variants: tRNAAsp G7521A, tRNAArg T10411C and T10463C, tRNALeu(CUN) A12308G, tRNAIle G4292C and C4312T, and tRNAAla T5655C, in clinical manifestations of thyroid cancer. We first performed the phylogenetic conservation analysis for these variants; moreover, we used a bioinformatic tool to compare the minimum free energy (G) of mt-tRNA with and without mutations. Most strikingly, none of these variants caused the significant change of the G between the wild-type and the mutant form, suggesting that they may not play an important roles in thyroid cancer. In addition, we screened the frequency of the “pathogenic” A12308G alternation in 300 patients with thyroid cancer and 200 healthy controls. We found that there were five patients and three control subjects carrying this variant. It seemed that the A12308G variant may be a common polymorphism in the human population. Taken together, our study indicated that variants in mt-tRNA genes may not play active roles in patients with thyroid cancer.

  14. The Influence of AHI1 Variants on the Diagnosis and Treatment Outcome in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Porcelli, Stefano; Pae, Chi-Un; Han, Changsu; Lee, Soo-Jung; Patkar, Ashwin A.; Masand, Prakash S.; Balzarro, Beatrice; Alberti, Siegfried; De Ronchi, Diana; Serretti, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore whether four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the AHI1 gene could be associated with schizophrenia (SCZ) and whether they could predict the clinical outcomes in SCZ patients treated with antipsychotics. Four hundred twenty-six (426) in-patients with SCZ and 345 controls were genotyped for four AHI1 SNPs (rs11154801, rs7750586, rs9647635 and rs9321501). Baseline and clinical measures for SCZ patients were assessed through the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Allelic and genotypic frequencies in SCZ subjects were compared with those of controls using the χ2 statistics. The repeated-measure ANOVA was used for the assessment of treatment outcomes measured by PANSS changes. The case-control analysis did not show any difference in the genotypic distribution of the SNPs, while in the allelic analysis, a weak association was found between the rs9647635 A allele and SCZ. Furthermore, in the haplotype analysis, three haplotypes resulted in being associated with SCZ. On the other hand, two SNPs (rs7750586 and rs9647635) were associated with clinical improvement of negative symptoms in the allelic analysis, although in the genotypic analysis, only trends of association were found for the same SNPs. Our findings suggest a possible influence of AHI1 variants on SCZ susceptibility and antipsychotic response, particularly concerning negative symptomatology. Subsequent well-designed studies would be mandatory to confirm our results due to the methodological shortcomings of the present study. PMID:25622261

  15. Identification of common variants influencing risk of the tauopathy Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Höglinger, Günter U.; Melhem, Nadine M.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Wang, Li-San; Klei, Lambertus; Rademakers, Rosa; de Silva, Rohan; Litvan, Irene; Riley, David E.; van Swieten, John C.; Heutink, Peter; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Vandrovcova, Jana; Hurtig, Howard I.; Gross, Rachel G.; Maetzler, Walter; Goldwurm, Stefano; Tolosa, Eduardo; Borroni, Barbara; Pastor, Pau; Cantwell, Laura B.; Han, Mi Ryung; Dillman, Allissa; van der Brug, Marcel P.; Gibbs, J Raphael; Cookson, Mark R.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Farrer, Matthew J.; Yu, Chang-En; Golbe, Lawrence I.; Revesz, Tamas; Hardy, John; Lees, Andrew J.; Devlin, Bernie; Hakonarson, Hakon; Müller, Ulrich; Schellenberg, Gerard D.

    2011-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a movement disorder with prominent tau neuropathology. Brain diseases with abnormal tau deposits are called tauopathies, the most common being Alzheimer’s disease. Environmental causes of tauopathies include repetitive head trauma associated with some sports. To identify common genetic variation contributing to risk for tauopathies, we carried out a genome-wide association study of 1,114 PSP cases and 3,247 controls (Stage 1) followed up by a second stage where 1,051 cases and 3,560 controls were genotyped for Stage 1 SNPs that yielded P ≤ 10−3. We found significant novel signals (P < 5 × 10−8) associated with PSP risk at STX6, EIF2AK3, and MOBP. We confirmed two independent variants in MAPT affecting risk for PSP, one of which influences MAPT brain expression. The genes implicated encode proteins for vesicle-membrane fusion at the Golgi-endosomal interface, for the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response, and for a myelin structural component. PMID:21685912

  16. Dopamine Inactivation Efficacy Related to Functional DAT1 and COMT Variants Influences Motor Response Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Stephan; Rellum, Thomas; Freitag, Christine; Resch, Franz; Rietschel, Marcella; Treutlein, Jens; Jennen-Steinmetz, Christine; Brandeis, Daniel; Banaschewski, Tobias; Laucht, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Background Dopamine plays an important role in orienting, response anticipation and movement evaluation. Thus, we examined the influence of functional variants related to dopamine inactivation in the dopamine transporter (DAT1) and catechol-O-methyltransferase genes (COMT) on the time-course of motor processing in a contingent negative variation (CNV) task. Methods 64-channel EEG recordings were obtained from 195 healthy adolescents of a community-based sample during a continuous performance task (A-X version). Early and late CNV as well as motor postimperative negative variation were assessed. Adolescents were genotyped for the COMT Val158Met and two DAT1 polymorphisms (variable number tandem repeats in the 3′-untranslated region and in intron 8). Results The results revealed a significant interaction between COMT and DAT1, indicating that COMT exerted stronger effects on lateralized motor post-processing (centro-parietal motor postimperative negative variation) in homozygous carriers of a DAT1 haplotype increasing DAT1 expression. Source analysis showed that the time interval 500–1000 ms after the motor response was specifically affected in contrast to preceding movement anticipation and programming stages, which were not altered. Conclusions Motor slow negative waves allow the genomic imaging of dopamine inactivation effects on cortical motor post-processing during response evaluation. This is the first report to point towards epistatic effects in the motor system during response evaluation, i.e. during the post-processing of an already executed movement rather than during movement programming. PMID:22649558

  17. Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Ehret, Georg B; Munroe, Patricia B; Rice, Kenneth M; Bochud, Murielle; Johnson, Andrew D; Chasman, Daniel I; Smith, Albert V; Tobin, Martin D; Verwoert, Germaine C; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L; Launer, Lenore; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii; Heath, Simon; Sõber, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Dehghan, Abbas; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A; Jackson, Anne U; Peden, John F; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N; Fava, Cristiano; Chambers, John C; Fox, Ervin R; Kumari, Meena; Go, Min Jin; van der Harst, Pim; Kao, Wen Hong Linda; Sjögren, Marketa; Vinay, D G; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H; Liu, Yongmei; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Tayo, Bamidele; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang; Lehtimäki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Cooper, Matthew N; Platou, Carl G P; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Palmas, Walter; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen-Pei C; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Steinle, Nanette I; Grobbee, Diederick E; Arking, Dan E; Kardia, Sharon L; Morrison, Alanna C; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Hingorani, Aroon D; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Beilby, John P; Lawrence, Robert W; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Dreisbach, Albert W; Li, Yali; Young, J Hunter; Bis, Joshua C; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Adair, Linda S; Lee, Nanette R; Chen, Ming-Huei; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Köttgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R; Bornstein, Stefan R; Grässler, Jürgen; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Weder, Alan B; Hunt, Steven C; Sun, Yan V; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Scott, Laura J; Stringham, Heather M; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Staessen, Jan A; Wang, Thomas J; Burton, Paul R; Soler Artigas, Maria; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt K; Rudock, Megan E; Heckbert, Susan R; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Doumatey, Ayo; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stančáková, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J; Yao, Jie; Kathiresan, Sekar; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Schwartz, Stephen M; Ikram, M Arfan; Longstreth, W T; Mosley, Thomas H; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R G; Wain, Louise V; Morken, Mario A; Swift, Amy J; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A; Humphries, Steve E; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Bakker, Stephan J L; van Gilst, Wiek H; Janipalli, Charles S; Mani, K Radha; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Hofman, Albert; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; Oostra, Ben A; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Würtz, Peter; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Dörr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F; Nalls, Michael A; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kumar, M V Kranthi; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Fowkes, F Gerald R; Charchar, Fadi J; Schwarz, Peter E H; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotimi, Charles; Bots, Michiel L; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Casas, Juan P; Mohlke, Karen L; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli; Ganesh, Santhi K; Wong, Tien Y; Tai, E Shyong; Cooper, Richard S; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C; Harris, Tamara B; Morris, Richard W; Dominiczak, Anna F; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G; Miki, Tetsuro; Saleheen, Danish; Chandak, Giriraj R; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Kooner, Jaspal S; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wright, Alan F; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P; Elosua, Roberto; Soranzo, Nicole; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Psaty, Bruce M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Caulfield, Mark J; Johnson, Toby

    2011-09-11

    Blood pressure is a heritable trait influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (≥140 mm Hg systolic blood pressure or  ≥90 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure). Even small increments in blood pressure are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This genome-wide association study of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified sixteen novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate blood pressure (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3, NPR3-C5orf23, ADM, FURIN-FES, GOSR2, GNAS-EDN3); the other ten provide new clues to blood pressure physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with blood pressure in East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of blood pressure, and suggest potential novel therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention.

  18. Genetic Variants in Novel Pathways Influence Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable trait1 influenced by multiple biological pathways and is responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (BP ≥140 mm Hg systolic [SBP] or ≥90 mm Hg diastolic [DBP])2. Even small increments in BP are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events3. This genome-wide association study of SBP and DBP, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified 16 novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate BP (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3; NPR3-C5orf23; ADM; FURIN-FES; GOSR2; GNAS-EDN3); the other 10 provide new clues to BP physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke, and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with BP in East Asian, South Asian, and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of BP, and suggest novel potential therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:21909115

  19. Candidate genes and functional noncoding variants identified in a canine model of obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), a severe mental disease manifested in time-consuming repetition of behaviors, affects 1 to 3% of the human population. While highly heritable, complex genetics has hampered attempts to elucidate OCD etiology. Dogs suffer from naturally occurring compulsive disorders that closely model human OCD, manifested as an excessive repetition of normal canine behaviors that only partially responds to drug therapy. The limited diversity within dog breeds makes identifying underlying genetic factors easier. Results We use genome-wide association of 87 Doberman Pinscher cases and 63 controls to identify genomic loci associated with OCD and sequence these regions in 8 affected dogs from high-risk breeds and 8 breed-matched controls. We find 119 variants in evolutionarily conserved sites that are specific to dogs with OCD. These case-only variants are significantly more common in high OCD risk breeds compared to breeds with no known psychiatric problems. Four genes, all with synaptic function, have the most case-only variation: neuronal cadherin (CDH2), catenin alpha2 (CTNNA2), ataxin-1 (ATXN1), and plasma glutamate carboxypeptidase (PGCP). In the 2 Mb gene desert between the cadherin genes CDH2 and DSC3, we find two different variants found only in dogs with OCD that disrupt the same highly conserved regulatory element. These variants cause significant changes in gene expression in a human neuroblastoma cell line, likely due to disrupted transcription factor binding. Conclusions The limited genetic diversity of dog breeds facilitates identification of genes, functional variants and regulatory pathways underlying complex psychiatric disorders that are mechanistically similar in dogs and humans. PMID:24995881

  20. Variants in the interleukin 6 receptor gene are associated with obesity in Pima Indians.

    PubMed

    Wolford, Johanna K; Colligan, Peter B; Gruber, Jonathan D; Bogardus, Clifton

    2003-11-01

    Circulating levels of the cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6) are elevated in obesity, correlate with body mass index (BMI), and predict the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A promoter polymorphism in the IL6 gene is associated with obesity, altered levels of insulin sensitivity, and T2DM. IL-6 exerts its effects by binding to the IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) and levels of IL-6R have been correlated with BMI. It is possible that IL6R variants may also be related to obesity, but to our knowledge, no study has yet examined this relationship. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between genetic variants in the IL6R gene and obesity in Pima Indians, a population prone to excess adiposity. We sequenced 6kb of the IL6R gene, corresponding to all exons, exon-intron boundaries, and 2kb of promoter in 30 Pima Indians. We identified six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL6R gene: a predicted Asp --> Ala substitution at position 358, a variant in the 3'-untranslated region, and 4 intronic SNPs. All SNPs were in strong linkage disequilibrium (D' >/= 0.90) and varied in minor allele frequency from 0.33 to 0.48. Association between IL6R genotype and BMI (kg/m(2)) was assessed in approximately 700 nondiabetic, full-heritage Pima Indians. For each SNP, individuals carrying the variant allele had a higher mean BMI compared to those with the wild-type allele (range: [37.3+/-7.2-38.2+/-7.0] vs. [35.5+/-7.3-36.0+/-7.5]; P=0.02-0.004). Our findings suggest that genetic variants in the IL6R gene may play a role in susceptibility to obesity. Assessment of these SNPs in other populations will be useful to determine the magnitude of obesity risk.

  1. Human longevity is influenced by many genetic variants: evidence from 75,000 UK Biobank participants

    PubMed Central

    Pilling, Luke C.; Atkins, Janice L.; Bowman, Kirsty; Jones, Samuel E.; Tyrrell, Jessica; Beaumont, Robin N.; Ruth, Katherine S.; Tuke, Marcus A.; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Wood, Andrew R.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Murray, Anna; Weedon, Michael N.; Xue, Luting; Lunetta, Kathryn; Murabito, Joanne M.; Harries, Lorna W.; Robine, Jean-Marie; Brayne, Carol; Kuchel, George A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M.; Melzer, David

    2016-01-01

    Variation in human lifespan is 20 to 30% heritable in twins but few genetic variants have been identified. We undertook a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) using age at death of parents of middle-aged UK Biobank participants of European decent (n=75,244 with father's and/or mother's data, excluding early deaths). Genetic risk scores for 19 phenotypes (n=777 proven variants) were also tested. In GWAS, a nicotine receptor locus (CHRNA3, previously associated with increased smoking and lung cancer) was associated with fathers' survival. Less common variants requiring further confirmation were also identified. Offspring of longer lived parents had more protective alleles for coronary artery disease, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, type-1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease and Alzheimer's disease. In candidate analyses, variants in the TOMM40/APOE locus were associated with longevity, but FOXO variants were not. Associations between extreme longevity (mother >=98 years, fathers >=95 years, n=1,339) and disease alleles were similar, with an additional association with HDL cholesterol (p=5.7×10-3). These results support a multiple protective factors model influencing lifespan and longevity (top 1% survival) in humans, with prominent roles for cardiovascular-related pathways. Several of these genetically influenced risks, including blood pressure and tobacco exposure, are potentially modifiable. PMID:27015805

  2. Human longevity is influenced by many genetic variants: evidence from 75,000 UK Biobank participants.

    PubMed

    Pilling, Luke C; Atkins, Janice L; Bowman, Kirsty; Jones, Samuel E; Tyrrell, Jessica; Beaumont, Robin N; Ruth, Katherine S; Tuke, Marcus A; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Wood, Andrew R; Freathy, Rachel M; Murray, Anna; Weedon, Michael N; Xue, Luting; Lunetta, Kathryn; Murabito, Joanne M; Harries, Lorna W; Robine, Jean-Marie; Brayne, Carol; Kuchel, George A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M; Melzer, David

    2016-03-01

    Variation in human lifespan is 20 to 30% heritable in twins but few genetic variants have been identified. We undertook a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) using age at death of parents of middle-aged UK Biobank participants of European decent (n=75,244 with father's and/or mother's data, excluding early deaths). Genetic risk scores for 19 phenotypes (n=777 proven variants) were also tested. In GWAS, a nicotine receptor locus(CHRNA3, previously associated with increased smoking and lung cancer) was associated with fathers' survival. Less common variants requiring further confirmation were also identified. Offspring of longer lived parents had more protective alleles for coronary artery disease, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, type-1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease and Alzheimer's disease. In candidate analyses, variants in the TOMM40/APOE locus were associated with longevity, but FOXO variants were not. Associations between extreme longevity (mother >=98 years, fathers >=95 years, n=1,339) and disease alleles were similar, with an additional association with HDL cholesterol (p=5.7x10-3). These results support a multiple protective factors model influencing lifespan and longevity (top 1% survival) in humans, with prominent roles for cardiovascular-related pathways. Several of these genetically influenced risks, including blood pressure and tobacco exposure, are potentially modifiable. PMID:27015805

  3. Loss-of-function variants influence the human serum metabolome.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Li, Alexander H; Metcalf, Ginger A; Muzny, Donna M; Morrison, Alanna C; White, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H; Gibbs, Richard A; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2016-08-01

    The metabolome is a collection of small molecules resulting from multiple cellular and biological processes that can act as biomarkers of disease, and African-Americans exhibit high levels of genetic diversity. Exome sequencing of a sample of deeply phenotyped African-Americans allowed us to analyze the effects of annotated loss-of-function (LoF) mutations on 308 serum metabolites measured by untargeted liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. In an independent sample, we identified and replicated four genes harboring six LoF mutations that significantly affected five metabolites. These sites were related to a 19 to 45% difference in geometric mean metabolite levels, with an average effect size of 25%. We show that some of the affected metabolites are risk predictors or diagnostic biomarkers of disease and, using the principle of Mendelian randomization, are in the causal pathway of disease. For example, LoF mutations in SLCO1B1 elevate the levels of hexadecanedioate, a fatty acid significantly associated with increased blood pressure levels and risk of incident heart failure in both African-Americans and an independent sample of European-Americans. We show that SLCO1B1 LoF mutations significantly increase the risk of incident heart failure, thus implicating the metabolite in the causal pathway of disease. These results reveal new avenues into gene function and the understanding of disease etiology by integrating -omic technologies into a deeply phenotyped population study. PMID:27602404

  4. Loss-of-function variants influence the human serum metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bing; Li, Alexander H.; Metcalf, Ginger A.; Muzny, Donna M.; Morrison, Alanna C.; White, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The metabolome is a collection of small molecules resulting from multiple cellular and biological processes that can act as biomarkers of disease, and African-Americans exhibit high levels of genetic diversity. Exome sequencing of a sample of deeply phenotyped African-Americans allowed us to analyze the effects of annotated loss-of-function (LoF) mutations on 308 serum metabolites measured by untargeted liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. In an independent sample, we identified and replicated four genes harboring six LoF mutations that significantly affected five metabolites. These sites were related to a 19 to 45% difference in geometric mean metabolite levels, with an average effect size of 25%. We show that some of the affected metabolites are risk predictors or diagnostic biomarkers of disease and, using the principle of Mendelian randomization, are in the causal pathway of disease. For example, LoF mutations in SLCO1B1 elevate the levels of hexadecanedioate, a fatty acid significantly associated with increased blood pressure levels and risk of incident heart failure in both African-Americans and an independent sample of European-Americans. We show that SLCO1B1 LoF mutations significantly increase the risk of incident heart failure, thus implicating the metabolite in the causal pathway of disease. These results reveal new avenues into gene function and the understanding of disease etiology by integrating -omic technologies into a deeply phenotyped population study. PMID:27602404

  5. Loss-of-function variants influence the human serum metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bing; Li, Alexander H.; Metcalf, Ginger A.; Muzny, Donna M.; Morrison, Alanna C.; White, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The metabolome is a collection of small molecules resulting from multiple cellular and biological processes that can act as biomarkers of disease, and African-Americans exhibit high levels of genetic diversity. Exome sequencing of a sample of deeply phenotyped African-Americans allowed us to analyze the effects of annotated loss-of-function (LoF) mutations on 308 serum metabolites measured by untargeted liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. In an independent sample, we identified and replicated four genes harboring six LoF mutations that significantly affected five metabolites. These sites were related to a 19 to 45% difference in geometric mean metabolite levels, with an average effect size of 25%. We show that some of the affected metabolites are risk predictors or diagnostic biomarkers of disease and, using the principle of Mendelian randomization, are in the causal pathway of disease. For example, LoF mutations in SLCO1B1 elevate the levels of hexadecanedioate, a fatty acid significantly associated with increased blood pressure levels and risk of incident heart failure in both African-Americans and an independent sample of European-Americans. We show that SLCO1B1 LoF mutations significantly increase the risk of incident heart failure, thus implicating the metabolite in the causal pathway of disease. These results reveal new avenues into gene function and the understanding of disease etiology by integrating -omic technologies into a deeply phenotyped population study.

  6. Contributions of PTCH Gene Variants to Isolated Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla, M.A.; Cooper, M.E.; Goldstein, T.; Castilla, E.E.; Camelo, J.S. Lopez; Marazita, M.L.; Murray, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Mutations in patched (PTCH) cause the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), or Gorlin syndrome. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome may present with developmental anomalies, including rib and craniofacial abnormalities, and predisposes to several tumor types, including basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma. Cleft palate is found in 4% of individuals with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Because there might be specific sequence alterations in PTCH that limit expression to orofacial clefting, a genetic study of PTCH was undertaken in cases with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) known not to have nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Results Seven new normal variants spread along the entire gene and three missense mutations were found among cases with cleft lip and/or palate. One of these variants (P295S) was not found in any of 1188 control samples. A second variant was found in a case and also in 1 of 1119 controls. The third missense (S827G) was found in 5 of 1369 cases and in 5 of 1104 controls and is likely a rare normal variant. Linkage and linkage desequilibrium also was assessed using normal variants in and adjacent to the PTCH gene in 220 families (1776 individuals), each with two or more individuals with isolated clefting. Although no statistically significant evidence of linkage (multipoint HLOD peak = 2.36) was uncovered, there was borderline evidence of significant transmission distortion for one haplotype of two single nucleotide polymorphisms located within the PTCH gene (p = .08). Conclusion Missense mutations in PTCH may be rare causes of isolated cleft lip and/or palate. An as yet unidentified variant near PTCH may act as a modifier of cleft lip and/or palate. PMID:16405370

  7. Gene-gene interactions among genetic variants from obesity candidate genes for nonobese and obese populations in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Eugene; Pei, Dee; Huang, Yi-Jen; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that obesity may play a key role in modulating genetic predispositions to type 2 diabetes (T2D). This study examines the main effects of both single-locus and multilocus interactions among genetic variants in Taiwanese obese and nonobese individuals to test the hypothesis that obesity-related genes may contribute to the etiology of T2D independently and/or through such complex interactions. We genotyped 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms for 10 obesity candidate genes including adrenergic beta-2-receptor surface, adrenergic beta-3-receptor surface, angiotensinogen, fat mass and obesity associated gene, guanine nucleotide binding protein beta polypeptide 3 (GNB3), interleukin 6 receptor, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 1 (PCSK1), uncoupling protein 1, uncoupling protein 2, and uncoupling protein 3. There were 389 patients diagnosed with T2D and 186 age- and sex-matched controls. Single-locus analyses showed significant main effects of the GNB3 and PCSK1 genes on the risk of T2D among the nonobese group (p = 0.002 and 0.047, respectively). Further, interactions involving GNB3 and PCSK1 were suggested among the nonobese population using the generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction method (p = 0.001). In addition, interactions among angiotensinogen, fat mass and obesity associated gene, GNB3, and uncoupling protein 3 genes were found in a significant four-locus generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction model among the obese population (p = 0.001). The results suggest that the single nucleotide polymorphisms from the obesity candidate genes may contribute to the risk of T2D independently and/or in an interactive manner according to the presence or absence of obesity.

  8. Surveying genetic variants and molecular phylogeny of cerebral cavernous malformation gene, CCM3/PDCD10.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Bhandari, Anita; Goswami, Chandan

    2014-12-01

    The three cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) genes namely CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2/MGC4607 and CCM3/PDCD10 have been identified for which mutations cause cerebral cavernous malformations. However, the protein products of these genes involved in forming CCM signaling, are still poorly understood imposing an urgent need to understand these genes and their signaling processes in details. So far involvement of CCM3/PDCD10 in the cavernous angioma has been characterized from biochemical and biophysical analyses. However, there is no comprehensive study illustrating the phylogenetic history and comprehensive genetic variants of CCM3/PDCD10. Herein, we explored the phylogenetic history and genetic variants of CCM3/PDCD10 gene. Synteny analyses revealed that CCM3/PDCD10 gene shared same genomic loci from Drosophila to human and the gene structure of CCM3/PDCD10 is conserved from human to Branchiostoma floridae for about 500 MYs with some changes in sea urchin and in insects. The conserved CCM3/PDCD10 is characterized by presence of indels in the N-terminal dimerization domain. We identified 951 CCM3/PDCD10 variants by analysis of 1092 human genomes with top three variation classes belongs to 84% SNPs, 6.9% insertions and 6.2% deletions. We identified 22 missense mutations in the human CCM3/PDCD10 protein and out of which three mutations are deleterious. We also identified four stop-codon gaining mutations at the positions E34*, E68*, E97* and E140*, respectively. This study is the first comprehensive analysis of the CCM3/PDCD10 gene based on phylogenetic origin and genetic variants. This study corroborates that the evolution of CCM proteins with tubular organization evolvements by endothelial cells.

  9. Correlation of a set of gene variants, life events and personality features on adult ADHD severity.

    PubMed

    Müller, Daniel J; Chiesa, Alberto; Mandelli, Laura; De Luca, Vincenzo; De Ronchi, Diana; Jain, Umesh; Serretti, Alessandro; Kennedy, James L

    2010-07-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) could persist into adult life in a substantial proportion of cases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of (1) adverse events, (2) personality traits and (3) genetic variants chosen on the basis of previous findings and (4) their possible interactions on adult ADHD severity. One hundred and ten individuals diagnosed with adult ADHD were evaluated for occurrence of adverse events in childhood and adulthood, and personality traits by the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Common polymorphisms within a set of nine important candidate genes (SLC6A3, DBH, DRD4, DRD5, HTR2A, CHRNA7, BDNF, PRKG1 and TAAR9) were genotyped for each subject. Life events, personality traits and genetic variations were analyzed in relationship to severity of current symptoms, according to the Brown Attention Deficit Disorder Scale (BADDS). Genetic variations were not significantly associated with severity of ADHD symptoms. Life stressors displayed only a minor effect as compared to personality traits. Indeed, symptoms' severity was significantly correlated with the temperamental trait of Harm avoidance and the character trait of Self directedness. The results of the present work are in line with previous evidence of a significant correlation between some personality traits and adult ADHD. However, several limitations such as the small sample size and the exclusion of patients with other severe comorbid psychiatric disorders could have influenced the significance of present findings.

  10. MTP Gene Variants and Response to Lomitapide in Patients with Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Kolovou, Genovefa D; Kolovou, Vana; Papadopoulou, Anna; Watts, Gerald F

    2016-07-01

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare genetic disorder, which leads to premature cardiovascular diseases. Microsomal triglyceride transport protein (MTP) inhibitors, such as lomitapide, offer a new therapeutic approach for treating these patients. We evaluated the lipid lowering (LL) efficacy of lomitapide according to several gene variants in MTP. Four clinically and/or molecularly defined HoFH patients were treated with lomitapide in addition to conventional high intensity LL therapy and regular lipoprotein apheresis. Two patients responded to the therapy, with a significant reduction of LDL cholesterol (LDL-C>50%, hyper-responders). Sequencing of all exonic and intronic flanking regions of the MTP gene in all patients revealed 36 different variants. The hyper-responders to lomitapide shared six common variants: rs17533489, rs79194015, rs745075, rs41275715, rs1491246, and rs17533517, which were not seen in hypo-responders (reduction in LDL-C<50%). We suggest that in HoFH variants in the MTP gene may impact on the therapeutic response to lomitapide, but this requires further investigation. PMID:27170061

  11. When is it MODY? Challenges in the Interpretation of Sequence Variants in MODY Genes.

    PubMed

    Althari, Sara; Gloyn, Anna L

    2015-01-01

    The genomics revolution has raised more questions than it has provided answers. Big data from large population-scale resequencing studies are increasingly deconstructing classic notions of Mendelian disease genetics, which support a simplistic correlation between mutational severity and phenotypic outcome. The boundaries are being blurred as the body of evidence showing monogenic disease-causing alleles in healthy genomes, and in the genomes of individu-als with increased common complex disease risk, continues to grow. In this review, we focus on the newly emerging challenges which pertain to the interpretation of sequence variants in genes implicated in the pathogenesis of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY), a presumed mono-genic form of diabetes characterized by Mendelian inheritance. These challenges highlight the complexities surrounding the assignments of pathogenicity, in particular to rare protein-alerting variants, and bring to the forefront some profound clinical diagnostic implications. As MODY is both genetically and clinically heterogeneous, an accurate molecular diagnosis and cautious extrapolation of sequence data are critical to effective disease management and treatment. The biological and translational value of sequence information can only be attained by adopting a multitude of confirmatory analyses, which interrogate variant implication in disease from every possible angle. Indeed, studies which have effectively detected rare damaging variants in known MODY genes in normoglycemic individuals question the existence of a sin-gle gene mutation scenario: does monogenic diabetes exist when the genetic culprits of MODY have been systematical-ly identified in individuals without MODY? PMID:27111119

  12. Folate receptor gene variants and neural tube defect occurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Finnell, R.; Greer, K.; Lammer, E.

    1994-09-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence shows that periconceptional use of folic acid supplements may prevent 40-50% of neural tube defects (NTDs). The FDA has subsequently recommended folic acid supplementation of all women of childbearing potential, even though the mechanism by which folic acid prevents NTDs is unknown. We investigated genetic variation of a candidate gene, the 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MeTHF) receptor, that may mediate this preventive effect. The receptor concentrates folate within cells and we have localized its mRNA to neuroepithelial cells during neurulation. Our hypothesis is that dysfunctional 5-MeTHF receptors inadequately concentrate folate intracellularly, predisposing infants to NTDs. We have completed SSCP analysis on 3 of the 4 coding exons of the 5-MeTHF receptor gene of 474 infants participating in a large population-based epidemiological case-control study of NTDs in California; genotyping of another 500 infants is ongoing. Genomic DNA was extracted from residual blood spots from newborn screening samples of cases and controls. Genotyping was done blinded to case status. Polymorphisms have been detected for exons 4 and 5; fourteen percent of the infants have exon 5 polymorphisms. Data will be presented on the prevalence of 5-MeTHF receptor polymorphisms among cases and controls. Relationships among the polymorphisms and NTD occurrence may shed light on how folic acid supplementation prevents NTDs.

  13. ACVRL1 gene variant in a patient with vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation

    PubMed Central

    Chida, Ayako; Shintani, Masaki; Wakamatsu, Hajime; Tsutsumi, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Yuo; Kawaguchi, Nanako; Furutani, Yoshiyuki; Inai, Kei; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Nakanishi, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Although mutations in the RASA1 gene in vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation (VGAM) and an endoglin gene mutation in a VGAM patient with a family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) have been identified, most VGAM cases have no mutation in these genes. We sought to detect mutations in other genes related to HHT. We screened for mutations in RASA1 and three genes (endoglin, activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ACVRL1), encoding ALK1, and SMAD4) related to HHT in four VGAM patients. One variant (c.652 C>T p.R218W) in ACVRL1 was identified. Immunoblotting revealed that the ALK1-R218W protein could not promote SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation by BMP9 stimulation. On the other hand, wild-type ALK1 could enhance the phosphorylation as expected. Furthermore, the transcriptional activation of ALK1-R218W was less efficient than that of wild-type ALK1. We identified 1 variant in ACVRL1 in a VGAM patient. These findings suggest that the ACVRL1 variant-R218W may be associated with the pathogenesis of VGAM. PMID:27625857

  14. Transcription variants of SLA-7, a swine non classical MHC class I gene.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rui; Lemonnier, Gaëtan; Bourneuf, Emmanuelle; Vincent-Naulleau, Silvia; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire

    2011-06-03

    In pig, very little information is available on the non classical class I (Ib) genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) i.e. SLA-6, -7 and -8. Our aim was to focus on the transcription pattern of the SLA-7 gene. RT-PCR experiments were carried out with SLA-7 specific primers targeting either the full coding sequence (CDS) from exon 1 to the 3 prime untranslated region (3UTR) or a partial CDS from exon 4 to the 3UTR. We show that the SLA-7 gene expresses a full length transcript not yet identified that refines annotation of the gene with eight exons instead of seven as initially described from the existing RefSeq RNA. These two RNAs encode molecules that differ in cytoplasmic tail length. In this study, another SLA-7 transcript variant was characterized, which encodes a protein with a shorter alpha 3 domain, as a consequence of a splicing site within exon 4. Surprisingly, a cryptic non canonical GA-AG splicing site is used to generate this transcript variant. An additional SLA-7 variant was also identified in the 3UTR with a splicing site occurring 31 nucleotides downstream to the stop codon. In conclusion, the pig SLA-7 MHC class Ib gene presents a complex transcription pattern with two transcripts encoding various molecules and transcripts that do not alter the CDS and may be subject to post-transcriptional regulation.

  15. dbDNV: a resource of duplicated gene nucleotide variants in human genome.

    PubMed

    Ho, Meng-Ru; Tsai, Kuo-Wang; Chen, Chun-houh; Lin, Wen-chang

    2011-01-01

    Gene duplications are scattered widely throughout the human genome. A single-base difference located in nearly identical duplicated segments may be misjudged as a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) from individuals. This imperfection is undistinguishable in current genotyping methods. As the next-generation sequencing technologies become more popular for sequence-based association studies, numerous ambiguous SNPs are rapidly accumulated. Thus, analyzing duplication variations in the reference genome to assist in preventing false positive SNPs is imperative. We have identified >10% of human genes associated with duplicated gene loci (DGL). Through meticulous sequence alignments of DGL, we systematically designated 1,236,956 variations as duplicated gene nucleotide variants (DNVs). The DNV database (dbDNV) (http://goods.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/DNVs/) has been established to promote more accurate variation annotation. Aside from the flat file download, users can explore the gene-related duplications and the associated DNVs by DGL and DNV searches, respectively. In addition, the dbDNV contains 304,110 DNV-coupled SNPs. From DNV-coupled SNP search, users observe which SNP records are also variants among duplicates. This is useful while ∼58% of exonic SNPs in DGL are DNV-coupled. Because of high accumulation of ambiguous SNPs, we suggest that annotating SNPs with DNVs possibilities should improve association studies of these variants with human diseases.

  16. ACVRL1 gene variant in a patient with vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation.

    PubMed

    Chida, Ayako; Shintani, Masaki; Wakamatsu, Hajime; Tsutsumi, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Yuo; Kawaguchi, Nanako; Furutani, Yoshiyuki; Inai, Kei; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Nakanishi, Toshio

    2013-12-01

    Although mutations in the RASA1 gene in vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation (VGAM) and an endoglin gene mutation in a VGAM patient with a family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) have been identified, most VGAM cases have no mutation in these genes. We sought to detect mutations in other genes related to HHT. We screened for mutations in RASA1 and three genes (endoglin, activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ACVRL1), encoding ALK1, and SMAD4) related to HHT in four VGAM patients. One variant (c.652 C>T p.R218W) in ACVRL1 was identified. Immunoblotting revealed that the ALK1-R218W protein could not promote SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation by BMP9 stimulation. On the other hand, wild-type ALK1 could enhance the phosphorylation as expected. Furthermore, the transcriptional activation of ALK1-R218W was less efficient than that of wild-type ALK1. We identified 1 variant in ACVRL1 in a VGAM patient. These findings suggest that the ACVRL1 variant-R218W may be associated with the pathogenesis of VGAM. PMID:27625857

  17. Identification and characterization of the genes encoding the core histones and histone variants of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Shan M; Swanson, Johanna; Selker, Eric U

    2002-01-01

    We have identified and characterized the complete complement of genes encoding the core histones of Neurospora crassa. In addition to the previously identified pair of genes that encode histones H3 and H4 (hH3 and hH4-1), we identified a second histone H4 gene (hH4-2), a divergently transcribed pair of genes that encode H2A and H2B (hH2A and hH2B), a homolog of the F/Z family of H2A variants (hH2Az), a homolog of the H3 variant CSE4 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (hH3v), and a highly diverged H4 variant (hH4v) not described in other species. The hH4-1 and hH4-2 genes, which are 96% identical in their coding regions and encode identical proteins, were inactivated independently. Strains with inactivating mutations in either gene were phenotypically wild type, in terms of growth rates and fertility, but the double mutants were inviable. As expected, we were unable to isolate null alleles of hH2A, hH2B, or hH3. The genomic arrangement of the histone and histone variant genes was determined. hH2Az and the hH3-hH4-1 gene pair are on LG IIR, with hH2Az centromere-proximal to hH3-hH4-1 and hH3 centromere-proximal to hH4-1. hH3v and hH4-2 are on LG IIIR with hH3v centromere-proximal to hH4-2. hH4v is on LG IVR and the hH2A-hH2B pair is located immediately right of the LG VII centromere, with hH2A centromere-proximal to hH2B. Except for the centromere-distal gene in the pairs, all of the histone genes are transcribed toward the centromere. Phylogenetic analysis of the N. crassa histone genes places them in the Euascomycota lineage. In contrast to the general case in eukaryotes, histone genes in euascomycetes are few in number and contain introns. This may be a reflection of the evolution of the RIP (repeat-induced point mutation) and MIP (methylation induced premeiotically) processes that detect sizable duplications and silence associated genes. PMID:11901114

  18. The role of tyrosine hydroxylase gene variants in suicide attempt in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiayi; Chan, Lai Fong; Souza, Renan P; Tampakeras, Maria; Kennedy, James L; Zai, Clement; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2014-01-24

    Evidence has shown that attempted suicide in psychiatric disorders is a complex interplay of genes and environment. Noradrenergic dysfunction due to abnormalities in the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene has been implicated in the pathogenesis of suicidal behavior in mood disorders. However, suicide is a leading cause of mortality in schizophrenia too. Recent evidence suggests that TH gene variants may also increase the risk of suicide attempts in schizophrenia patients, although the interaction with established clinical risk factors is unclear. This study aimed to identify TH gene variants conferring risk for suicide attempt in schizophrenia while accounting for the interaction between this gene and clinical risk factors. We performed analysis on four TH SNPs (rs11564717, rs11042950, rs2070762, rs689) and the common TCAT repeat (UniSTS:240639) for 234 schizophrenia patients (51 suicide attempters and 183 non-attempters). Clinical risk factors and ethnic stratification were included as covariates. Single marker analysis identified the SNP rs11564717 (p=0.042) and the TCAT(6) (p=0.004) as risk variants for suicide attempt. We also identified the haplotype A-A-A-G as a risk factor for suicide attempt (p=0.0025). In conclusion, our findings suggest that TH polymorphisms may contribute to the risk of attempted suicide in schizophrenia even after accounting for established clinical risk factors and ethnic stratification. Further larger scale studies are needed to confirm these findings and to understand the mechanisms underlying the role of TH gene variants in suicide attempt in schizophrenia. PMID:24275212

  19. HLA class II sequence variants influence tuberculosis risk in populations of European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Halldorsson, Bjarni V; Kristinsson, Karl G; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Gudmundsson, Larus J; Blondal, Kai; Gylfason, Arnaldur; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon Axel; Helgadottir, Hafdis T; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Karason, Ari; Kardum, Ljiljana Bulat; Knežević, Jelena; Kristjansson, Helgi; Kristjansson, Mar; Love, Arthur; Luo, Yang; Magnusson, Olafur T; Sulem, Patrick; Kong, Augustine; Masson, Gisli; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Dembic, Zlatko; Nejentsev, Sergey; Blondal, Thorsteinn; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections cause 9 million new tuberculosis cases and 1.5 million deaths annually. To identify variants conferring risk of tuberculosis, we tested 28.3 million variants identified through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders for association with tuberculosis (8,162 cases and 277,643 controls), pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and M. tuberculosis infection. We found association of three variants in the region harboring genes encoding the class II human leukocyte antigens (HLAs): rs557011[T] (minor allele frequency (MAF) = 40.2%), associated with M. tuberculosis infection (odds ratio (OR) = 1.14, P = 3.1 × 10(-13)) and PTB (OR = 1.25, P = 5.8 × 10(-12)), and rs9271378[G] (MAF = 32.5%), associated with PTB (OR = 0.78, P = 2.5 × 10(-12))--both located between HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DRB1--and a missense variant encoding p.Ala210Thr in HLA-DQA1 (MAF = 19.1%, rs9272785), associated with M. tuberculosis infection (P = 9.3 × 10(-9), OR = 1.14). We replicated association of these variants with PTB in samples of European ancestry from Russia and Croatia (P < 5.9 × 10(-4)). These findings show that the HLA class II region contributes to genetic risk of tuberculosis, possibly through reduced presentation of protective M. tuberculosis antigens to T cells.

  20. Gene-Wise Association of Variants in Four Lysosomal Storage Disorder Genes in Neuropathologically Confirmed Lewy Body Disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Lorraine N.; Chan, Robin; Cheng, Rong; Liu, Xinmin; Park, Naeun; Parmalee, Nancy; Kisselev, Sergey; Cortes, Etty; Torres, Paola A.; Pastores, Gregory M.; Vonsattel, Jean P.; Alcalay, Roy; Marder, Karen; Honig, Lawrence L.; Fahn, Stanley; Mayeux, Richard; Shelanski, Michael; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Lee, Joseph H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Variants in GBA are associated with Lewy Body (LB) pathology. We investigated whether variants in other lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) genes also contribute to disease pathogenesis. Methods We performed a genetic analysis of four LSD genes including GBA, HEXA, SMPD1, and MCOLN1 in 231 brain autopsies. Brain autopsies included neuropathologically defined LBD without Alzheimer Disease (AD) changes (n = 59), AD without significant LB pathology (n = 71), Alzheimer disease and lewy body variant (ADLBV) (n = 68), and control brains without LB or AD neuropathology (n = 33). Sequencing of HEXA, SMPD1, MCOLN1 and GBA followed by ‘gene wise’ genetic association analysis was performed. To determine the functional effect, a biochemical analysis of GBA in a subset of brains was also performed. GCase activity was measured in a subset of brain samples (n = 64) that included LBD brains, with or without GBA mutations, and control brains. A lipidomic analysis was also performed in brain autopsies (n = 67) which included LBD (n = 34), ADLBV (n = 3), AD (n = 4), PD (n = 9) and control brains (n = 17), comparing GBA mutation carriers to non-carriers. Results In a ‘gene-wise’ analysis, variants in GBA, SMPD1 and MCOLN1 were significantly associated with LB pathology (p range: 0.03–4.14 x10-5). Overall, the mean levels of GCase activity were significantly lower in GBA mutation carriers compared to non-carriers (p<0.001). A significant increase and accumulation of several species for the lipid classes, ceramides and sphingolipids, was observed in LBD brains carrying GBA mutations compared to controls (p range: p<0.05-p<0.01). Interpretation Our study indicates that variants in GBA, SMPD1 and MCOLN1 are associated with LB pathology. Biochemical data comparing GBA mutation carrier to non-carriers support these findings, which have important implications for biomarker development and therapeutic strategies. PMID:25933391

  1. Imputing Variants in HLA-DR Beta Genes Reveals That HLA-DRB1 Is Solely Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Nath, Swapan K.; Lee, Hye-Soon; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    The genetic association of HLA-DRB1 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is well documented, but association with other HLA-DR beta genes (HLA-DRB3, HLA-DRB4 and HLA-DRB5) has not been thoroughly studied, despite their similar functions and chromosomal positions. We examined variants in all functional HLA-DR beta genes in RA and SLE patients and controls, down to the amino-acid level, to better understand disease association with the HLA-DR locus. To this end, we improved an existing HLA reference panel to impute variants in all protein-coding HLA-DR beta genes. Using the reference panel, HLA variants were inferred from high-density SNP data of 9,271 RA-control subjects and 5,342 SLE-control subjects. Disease association tests were performed by logistic regression and log-likelihood ratio tests. After imputation using the newly constructed HLA reference panel and statistical analysis, we observed that HLA-DRB1 variants better accounted for the association between MHC and susceptibility to RA and SLE than did the other three HLA-DRB variants. Moreover, there were no secondary effects in HLA-DRB3, HLA-DRB4, or HLA-DRB5 in RA or SLE. Of all the HLA-DR beta chain paralogs, those encoded by HLA-DRB1 solely or dominantly influence susceptibility to RA and SLE. PMID:26919467

  2. Obesity-related phenotypes and the beta3-adrenoceptor gene variant in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Tchernof, A; Starling, R D; Walston, J D; Shuldiner, A R; Dvorak, R V; Silver, K; Matthews, D E; Poehlman, E T

    1999-07-01

    We examined the hypothesis that postmenopausal women with the beta3-adrenoceptor gene variant (Trp64Arg) have reduced total daily energy expenditure (TEE), altered free fatty acid kinetics, and increased intra-abdominal fat. A secondary objective was to examine whether the obese state masks the effect of the variant on resting metabolic rate (RMR). There were 23 obese heterozygous women with the genetic variant (age 58 +/- 6 years; BMI 36 +/- 7 kg/m2) who were compared with 19 homozygous obese women with the normal allele (age 56 +/- 4 years; BMI 36 +/- 3 kg/m2). Daily energy expenditure was determined from doubly labeled water and indirect calorimetry, lipolysis from infusion of [1-13C]palmitate, and body fat distribution from computed tomography. No significant differences were found in TEE, RMR, energy expenditure of physical activity, the thermic effect of a meal, fat oxidation as estimated by fasting and postprandial respiratory quotients (RQs), or rate of lipolysis. Similarly, no difference was found in visceral adipose tissue and abdominal subcutaneous fat areas. When RMR was compared between obese (n = 23) and never-obese women with the Trp64Arg variant (n = 16), we found a 317 kcal/day lower RMR in never-obese women after controlling for fat mass, fat-free mass, and age (P < 0.0017). These results do not support the hypothesis that already obese women with the Trp64Arg polymorphism of the beta3-adrenergic receptor gene have lower daily energy expenditure, altered lipolysis, and increased abdominal obesity. On the other hand, the lower RMR in never-obese women suggests that the obese state may mask a moderate effect of the Trp64Arg variant on energy expenditure. Although these results need to be confirmed in other populations, the obese state may have been a confounding factor in previous studies of the beta3-adrenoceptor Trp64Arg variant and energy expenditure. PMID:10389848

  3. Germline Missense Variants in the BTNL2 Gene Are Associated with Prostate Cancer Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, Liesel M.; Kumar, Akash; Boyle, Evan A.; Zhang, Yuzheng; McIntosh, Laura M.; Kolb, Suzanne; Stott-Miller, Marni; Smith, Tiffany; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Hsu, Li; Shendure, Jay; Stanford, Janet L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rare, inherited mutations account for 5%–10% of all prostate cancer (PCa) cases. However, to date, few causative mutations have been identified. Methods To identify rare mutations for PCa, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in multiple kindreds (n = 91) from 19 hereditary prostate cancer (HPC) families characterized by aggressive or early onset phenotypes. Candidate variants (n = 130) identified through family- and bioinformatics-based filtering of WES data were then genotyped in an independent set of 270 HPC families (n = 819 PCa cases; n = 496 unaffected relatives) for replication. Two variants with supportive evidence were subsequently genotyped in a population-based case-control study (n = 1,155 incident PCa cases; n = 1,060 age-matched controls) for further confirmation. All participants were men of European ancestry. Results The strongest evidence was for two germline missense variants in the butyrophilin-like 2 (BTNL2) gene (rs41441651, p.Asp336Asn and rs28362675, p.Gly454Cys) that segregated with affection status in two of the WES families. In the independent set of 270 HPC families, 1.5% (rs41441651; P = 0.0032) and 1.2% (rs28362675; P = 0.0070) of affected men, but no unaffected men, carried a variant. Both variants were associated with elevated PCa risk in the population-based study (rs41441651: OR = 2.7; 95% CI, 1.27–5.87; P = 0.010; rs28362675: OR = 2.5; 95% CI, 1.16–5.46; P = 0.019). Conclusions Results indicate that rare BTNL2 variants play a role in susceptibility to both familial and sporadic prostate cancer. Impact Results implicate BTNL2 as a novel PCa susceptibility gene. PMID:23833122

  4. Apolipoprotein L1 gene variants in deceased organ donors are associated with renal allograft failure

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Barry I.; Julian, Bruce A.; Pastan, Stephen O.; Israni, Ajay K.; Schladt, David; Gautreaux, Michael D.; Hauptfeld, Vera; Bray, Robert A.; Gebel, Howard M.; Kirk, Allan D.; Gaston, Robert S.; Rogers, Jeffrey; Farney, Alan C.; Orlando, Giuseppe; Stratta, Robert J.; Mohan, Sumit; Ma, Lijun; Langefeld, Carl D.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Adams, Patricia L.; Palanisamy, Amudha; Reeves-Daniel, Amber M.; Divers, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) nephropathy variants in African American deceased kidney donors were associated with shorter renal allograft survival in a prior single-center report. APOL1 G1 and G2 variants were genotyped in newly accrued DNA samples from African American deceased donors of kidneys recovered and/or transplanted in Alabama and North Carolina. APOL1 genotypes and allograft outcomes in subsequent transplants from 55 U.S. centers were linked, adjusting for age, sex and race/ethnicity of recipients, HLA match, cold ischemia time, panel reactive antibody levels, and donor type. For 221 transplantations from kidneys recovered in Alabama, there was a statistical trend toward shorter allograft survival in recipients of two-APOL1-nephropathy-variant kidneys (hazard ratio [HR] 2.71; p=0.06). For all 675 kidneys transplanted from donors at both centers, APOL1 genotype (HR 2.26; p=0.001) and African American recipient race/ethnicity (HR 1.60; p=0.03) were associated with allograft failure. Kidneys from African American deceased donors with two APOL1 nephropathy variants reproducibly associate with higher risk for allograft failure after transplantation. These findings warrant consideration of rapidly genotyping deceased African American kidney donors for APOL1 risk variants at organ recovery and incorporation of results into allocation and informed-consent processes. PMID:25809272

  5. Cloning and identification of splice variants of the porcine PILRA gene.

    PubMed

    Lizu, Li; Lixin, Han; Jinkui, Wang; Liang, Wang; Di, Liu; Xiuqin, Yang

    2015-09-01

    Paired immunoglobulin-like type 2 receptors (PILRs) are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily and composed of two subtypes, α and β. PILRα plays an important role in the immune response against invading pathogens, but so far there is no report on porcine PILRα. In order to analyze the potential role of PILRα in porcine disease-resistant breeding, we first cloned the PILRA gene (V1-V3, GenBank accession Nos. KJ143679-81) into pigs, and identified its three splice variants. Each variant conceptually translates into proteins of 271 amino acids (aa), 254aa and 283aa, respectively. Furthermore, quantitative real-time PCR was used to construct expression profiles of each variant in tissues and that induced by Poly(I:C). All three variants had the highest expression levels in the spleen, followed by liver and lung tissues. While levels were low or undetectable in the heart, kidney, stomach, muscle, lymph, large intestine, small intestine and bladder. Poly(I:C) significantly induced the expression of splice variant 1 (V1) of porcine PILRA, but hardly affected the expression of V2 and V3. The results lay a foundation for further study on the role of PILRA in porcine breeding and disease resistance. PMID:26399532

  6. Increased frequency of double and triple heterozygous gene variants in children with intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Monique L.; Mourya, Reena; Connor, Jessica; Dexheimer, Phillip; Karns, Rebekah; Miethke, Alexander; Sheridan, Rachel; Zhang, Kejian; Bezerra, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Single-gene mutations cause syndromes of intrahepatic cholestasis, but previous multi-gene mutation screening in children with idiopathic cholestasis failed to fulfill diagnostic criteria in about two-thirds of children. In adults with fibrosing cholestatic disease, heterozygous ABCB4 mutations were present in 34% of patients. Here, we hypothesized that children with idiopathic cholestasis have a higher frequency of heterozygous non-synonymous gene sequence variants. Methods We analyzed the frequency and types of variants in 717 children in whom high-throughput sequencing of the genes SERPINA1, JAG1, ATP8B1, ABCB11, and ABCB4 was performed as part of an evaluation for intrahepatic idiopathic cholestasis. The frequency of non-synonymous variants (NSVs) was compared to those of 1092 control subjects enrolled in the 1000-Genome-Project. Results The frequency of NSVs in single genes was similar between disease (25%) and controls (26%, P=0.518). In contrast, double or triple NSVs in 2 or more genes were more frequent in disease (N= 7%) than controls (N=4.7%, P=0.028). Detailed review of clinical and laboratory information in a subgroup of double or triple heterozygous patients revealed variable GGT levels and severity of pruritus, with liver biopsies showing stage 2–3 fibrosis. Conclusion Children with intrahepatic idiopathic cholestasis have a higher frequency of double or triple NSVs in SERPINA1, JAG1, ATPB1, ABCB11, or ABCB4. These findings raise the potential role for gene-gene relationships in determining the phenotype of cholestatic liver disease in children. PMID:26126923

  7. Association of an ACSL1 gene variant with polyunsaturated fatty acids in bovine skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The intramuscular fat deposition and the fatty acid profiles of beef affect meat quality. High proportions of unsaturated fatty acids are related to beef flavor and are beneficial for the nutritional value of meat. Moreover, a variety of clinical and epidemiologic studies showed that particularly long-chain omega-3 fatty acids from animal sources have a positive impact on human health and disease. Results To screen for genetic factors affecting fatty acid profiles in beef, we initially performed a microsatellite-based genome scan in a F2 Charolais × German Holstein resource population and identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for fatty acid composition in a region on bovine chromosome 27 where previously QTL affecting marbling score had been detected in beef cattle populations. The long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) gene was identified as the most plausible functional and positional candidate gene in the QTL interval due to its direct impact on fatty acid metabolism and its position in the QTL interval. ACSL1 is necessary for synthesis of long-chain acyl-CoA esters, fatty acid degradation and phospholipid remodeling. We validated the genomic annotation of the bovine ACSL1 gene by in silico comparative sequence analysis and experimental verification. Re-sequencing of the complete coding, exon-flanking intronic sequences, 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) and partial promoter region of the ACSL1 gene revealed three synonymous mutations in exons 6, 7, and 20, six noncoding intronic gene variants, six polymorphisms in the promoter region, and four variants in the 3' UTR region. The association analysis identified the gene variant in intron 5 of the ACSL1 gene (c.481-233A>G) to be significantly associated with the relative content of distinct fractions and ratios of fatty acids (e.g., n-3 fatty acids, polyunsaturated, n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, trans vaccenic acid) in skeletal muscle. A tentative association of the ACSL1 gene

  8. Analysis of ERCC1 and ERCC2 gene variants in osteosarcoma, colorectal and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    GÓMEZ-DÍAZ, BENJAMÍN; DE LA LUZ AYALA-MADRIGAL, MARÍA; GUTIÉRREZ-ANGULO, MELVA; VALLE-SOLIS, AURA ERAZO; LINARES-GONZÁLEZ, LUIS MIGUEL; GONZÁLEZ-GUZMÁN, ROBERTO; CRUZ-GUILLÉN, DAVID; CEDEÑO-GARCIDUEÑAS, ANA LILIA; CANTO, PATRICIA; LÓPEZ-HERNÁNDEZ, LUZ BERENICE

    2015-01-01

    The Asn118Asn (rs11615) variant in the ERCC1 gene, and the Lys751Gln (rs13181) and Asp312Asn (rs1799793) variants in the ERCC2 gene have been associated with the development of varied types of cancer. The aim of the present study was to test for any association between the ERCC1 and ERCC2 gene variants and three different types of cancer in Mexican-mestizo patients. Patients and their respective controls were formed into three groups: The osteosarcoma group, with 28 patients and 97 controls; the colorectal group, with 108 patients and 119 controls; and the breast cancer group, with 71 patients and 74 controls. Genotyping was performed using TaqMan probes and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared using a χ2 test. Only one SNP (rs1799793) was found to be associated with breast cancer. This is the first study analyzing the SNPs in ERCC1 and ERCC2 genes and the susceptibility to cancer in Mexican-mestizo patients with osteosarcoma, and colorectal and breast cancer. PMID:25789018

  9. A novel splice variant of the decapentaplegic (dpp) gene in the wild silkworm, Bombyx mandarina.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Woori; Choi, Jung-Won; Ryul Kim, Seong; Choi, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Kee-Young; Goo, Tae-Won; Park, Seung-Won

    2015-10-23

    Decapentaplegic (dpp) is a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily. Although the dpp gene and related pathways are known to play important roles in insect development, few studies have examined its function in Bombyx mori and Bombyx mandarina. To date, there have been no previous reports on novel splice variants of dpp in silkworm. In the present study, we conducted RT-PCR to examine dpp expression in the mid-gut tissue of B. mandarina and discovered a novel dpp isoform. The isoform sequence was confirmed using sequencing analysis and found to have 333 bp deletion compared to full-length cDNA encoding dpp. The deleted sequence encodes a region of the latency associated peptide (LAP) region of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), which may affect the activity and specificity of TGF-β. Using variant calling analyses, we detected 7 candidate single nucleotide variants (SNVs) for different alternative splicing in dpp. This is the first report of a novel splice variant of the dpp gene in B. mandarina and these results provide insight about the domestication process and distinct phenotypic traits of B. mori and B. mandarina.

  10. Detection and putative effect of GATA4 gene variants in patients with congenital cardiac septal defects.

    PubMed

    Al-Azzouny, M A; El Ruby, M O; Issa, H A; Behiry, E G; Elsayed, N R; Fayez, A G

    2016-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor GATA4, located on chromosome 8p23.1-p22, has been implicated as a critical regulator of cardiac development during embryogenesis. Mutations of GATA4 appear to be responsible for some cardiac septal defects. The aim of this work was to screen for mutations in the GATA4 gene in sample of Egyptian patients affected by isolated and non-isolated cardiac septal defects. We examined 20 patients with atrial septal defect (ASD), ventricle septal defect (VSD), atrioventricular septal defects (AVSD) and A-V canal disturbance defect and compared with examined 10 unaffected individuals as normal control. The patients were referred from Congenital Heart Disease Clinic of the Clinical Genetics department at the National Research Centre. All patients were subjected to clinical evaluation, echocardiography and karyotyping. Genomic DNA was extracted from all cases and subjected to PCR followed by direct sequencing. The predicted effect of variants was done by a variety of proper prediction tools. We detected six variants in GATA4 gene, two of them are novel variants. Predicted functional analysis of the relevant variants was performed by In silico analysis. Further confirmatory studies on familial segregation and in vitro / in vivo functional analysis are recommended to support our results. PMID:27064867

  11. The rs3857059 variant of the SNCA gene is associated with Parkinson's disease in Mexican Mestizos.

    PubMed

    García, S; Chavira-Hernández, G; Gallegos-Arreola, M P; Dávila-Maldonado, L; García Martínez, F; Montes Almanza, L A; Palma-Flores, C; Mondragón-Terán, P; Alcaraz Estrada, S L; López-Hernández, L B

    2016-06-01

    Among the candidate genes for Parkinson's disease (PD), SNCA has replicated association in different populations. Besides other known mutations in the SNCA gene, the rs3857059 variant has also been linked to various neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to search for association of this variant and sporadic PD in Mexican Mestizo patients. A case-control study was performed including 241 individuals, 106 patients, and 135 healthy controls. Genotyping was performed using real-time PCR. The rs3857059 variant demonstrated an association with PD in Mexican Mestizos (OR = 2.40, CI, 1.1 to 5.1, p = 0.02) under the recessive model. In addition, a gender effect was found for the GG genotype in females (OR = 1.31, CI, 1.01 to 1.7, p = 0.037). This is the first study to confirm an association of the rs3857059 variant with PD and also to show a gender effect. Our data contribute to the elucidation of the link between rs3857059 and susceptibility to PD observed in the Mexican Mestizo population. PMID:27332068

  12. Association of Variants in Estrogen-Related Pathway Genes with Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Sarah K.; Kwon, Erika M.; Fu, Rong; Kolb, Suzanne; Feng, Ziding; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Stanford, Janet L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Through mediation of estrogen receptors, estradiol has been shown to have both carcinogenic and anti-carcinogenic effects on the prostate. We performed a population-based case-control study to investigate variants in estrogen-related genes ESR1, ESR2, CYP19A1, CYP1A1, and CYP1B1 and the potential association with risk of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods We evaluated prostate cancer risk conferred by 73 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 1,304 incident prostate cancer cases and 1,266 age-matched controls. Analysis included stratification by clinical features and assessment of environmental modifiers. Results There was evidence of altered risk of developing prostate cancer for variants in ESR1, CYP1A1, and CYP1B1, however, only CYP1B1 rs1056836 retained significance after adjustment for multiple comparisons. An association with risk for more aggressive prostate cancer was observed for variants in ESR1, ESR2, and CYP19A1, but none was significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. There was no effect modification by obesity. Conclusions Germline genetic variation of these estrogen pathway genes may contribute to risk of prostate cancer. Additional studies to validate these results and examine the functional consequence of validated variants are warranted. PMID:22549291

  13. The rs3857059 variant of the SNCA gene is associated with Parkinson's disease in Mexican Mestizos.

    PubMed

    García, S; Chavira-Hernández, G; Gallegos-Arreola, M P; Dávila-Maldonado, L; García Martínez, F; Montes Almanza, L A; Palma-Flores, C; Mondragón-Terán, P; Alcaraz Estrada, S L; López-Hernández, L B

    2016-06-01

    Among the candidate genes for Parkinson's disease (PD), SNCA has replicated association in different populations. Besides other known mutations in the SNCA gene, the rs3857059 variant has also been linked to various neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to search for association of this variant and sporadic PD in Mexican Mestizo patients. A case-control study was performed including 241 individuals, 106 patients, and 135 healthy controls. Genotyping was performed using real-time PCR. The rs3857059 variant demonstrated an association with PD in Mexican Mestizos (OR = 2.40, CI, 1.1 to 5.1, p = 0.02) under the recessive model. In addition, a gender effect was found for the GG genotype in females (OR = 1.31, CI, 1.01 to 1.7, p = 0.037). This is the first study to confirm an association of the rs3857059 variant with PD and also to show a gender effect. Our data contribute to the elucidation of the link between rs3857059 and susceptibility to PD observed in the Mexican Mestizo population.

  14. How might ZNF804A variants influence risk for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder? A literature review, synthesis, and bioinformatic analysis.

    PubMed

    Hess, Jonathan L; Glatt, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    The gene that encodes zinc finger protein 804A (ZNF804A) became a candidate risk gene for schizophrenia (SZ) after surpassing genome-wide significance thresholds in replicated genome-wide association scans and meta-analyses. Much remains unknown about this reported gene expression regulator; however, preliminary work has yielded insights into functional and biological effects of ZNF804A by targeting its regulatory activities in vitro and by characterizing allele-specific interactions with its risk-conferring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). There is now strong epidemiologic evidence for a role of ZNF804A polymorphisms in both SZ and bipolar disorder (BD); however, functional links between implicated variants and susceptible biological states have not been solidified. Here we briefly review the genetic evidence implicating ZNF804A polymorphisms as genetic risk factors for both SZ and BD, and discuss the potential functional consequences of these variants on the regulation of ZNF804A and its downstream targets. Empirical work and predictive bioinformatic analyses of the alternate alleles of the two most strongly implicated ZNF804A polymorphisms suggest they might alter the affinity of the gene sequence for DNA- and/or RNA-binding proteins, which might in turn alter expression levels of the gene or particular ZNF804A isoforms. Future work should focus on clarifying the critical periods and cofactors regulating these genetic influences on ZNF804A expression, as well as the downstream biological consequences of an imbalance in the expression of ZNF804A and its various mRNA isoforms.

  15. Genetic Variants in Nicotine Addiction and Alcohol Metabolism Genes, Oral Cancer Risk and the Propensity to Smoke and Drink Alcohol: A Replication Study in India

    PubMed Central

    Anantharaman, Devasena; Chabrier, Amélie; Gaborieau, Valérie; Franceschi, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Samant, Tanuja; Mahimkar, Manoj B.; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic variants in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and alcohol metabolism genes have been associated with propensity to smoke tobacco and drink alcohol, respectively, and also implicated in genetic susceptibility to head and neck cancer. In addition to smoking and alcohol, tobacco chewing is an important oral cancer risk factor in India. It is not known if these genetic variants influence propensity or oral cancer susceptibility in the context of this distinct etiology. Methods We examined 639 oral and pharyngeal cancer cases and 791 controls from two case-control studies conducted in India. We investigated six variants known to influence nicotine addiction or alcohol metabolism, including rs16969968 (CHRNA5), rs578776 (CHRNA3), rs1229984 (ADH1B), rs698 (ADH1C), rs1573496 (ADH7), and rs4767364 (ALDH2). Results The CHRN variants were associated with the number of chewing events per day, including in those who chewed tobacco but never smoked (P =  0.003, P =  0.01 for rs16969968 and rs578776 respectively). Presence of the variant allele contributed to approximately 13% difference in chewing frequency compared to non-carriers. While no association was observed between rs16969968 and oral cancer risk (OR =  1.01, 95% CI =  0.83– 1.22), rs578776 was modestly associated with a 16% decreased risk of oral cancer (OR =  0.84, 95% CI =  0.72– 0.98). There was little evidence for association between polymorphisms in genes encoding alcohol metabolism and oral cancer in this population. Conclusion The association between rs16969968 and number of chewing events implies that the effect on smoking propensity conferred by this gene variant extends to the use of smokeless tobacco. PMID:24505444

  16. Loss-of-Function Variants in Schizophrenia Risk and SETD1A as a Candidate Susceptibility Gene

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Atsushi; Xu, Bin; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Roos, J. Louw; Gogos, Joseph A.; Karayiorgou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss-of-function (LOF) (i.e., nonsense, splice site, and frameshift) variants that lead to disruption of gene function are likely to contribute to the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we perform a systematic investigation of the role of both de novo and inherited LOF variants in schizophrenia using exome sequencing data from 231 case and 34 control trios. We identify two de novo LOF variants in the SETD1A gene, which encodes a subunit of his-tone methyltransferase, a finding unlikely to have occurred by chance, and provide evidence for a more general role of chromatin regulators in schizophrenia risk. Transmission pattern analyses reveal that LOF variants are more likely to be transmitted to affected individuals than controls. This is especially true for private LOF variants in genes intolerant to functional genetic variation. These findings highlight the contribution of LOF mutations to the genetic architecture of schizophrenia and provide important insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:24853937

  17. Loss-of-function variants in schizophrenia risk and SETD1A as a candidate susceptibility gene.

    PubMed

    Takata, Atsushi; Xu, Bin; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Roos, J Louw; Gogos, Joseph A; Karayiorgou, Maria

    2014-05-21

    Loss-of-function (LOF) (i.e., nonsense, splice site, and frameshift) variants that lead to disruption of gene function are likely to contribute to the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we perform a systematic investigation of the role of both de novo and inherited LOF variants in schizophrenia using exome sequencing data from 231 case and 34 control trios. We identify two de novo LOF variants in the SETD1A gene, which encodes a subunit of histone methyltransferase, a finding unlikely to have occurred by chance, and provide evidence for a more general role of chromatin regulators in schizophrenia risk. Transmission pattern analyses reveal that LOF variants are more likely to be transmitted to affected individuals than controls. This is especially true for private LOF variants in genes intolerant to functional genetic variation. These findings highlight the contribution of LOF mutations to the genetic architecture of schizophrenia and provide important insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:24853937

  18. Association between Variants in Atopy-Related Immunologic Candidate Genes and Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cotterchio, Michelle; Lowcock, Elizabeth; Bider-Canfield, Zoe; Lemire, Mathieu; Greenwood, Celia; Gallinger, Steven; Hudson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Many epidemiology studies report that atopic conditions such as allergies are associated with reduced pancreas cancer risk. The reason for this relationship is not yet understood. This is the first study to comprehensively evaluate the association between variants in atopy-related candidate genes and pancreatic cancer risk. Methods A population-based case-control study of pancreas cancer cases diagnosed during 2011-2012 (via Ontario Cancer Registry), and controls recruited using random digit dialing utilized DNA from 179 cases and 566 controls. Following an exhaustive literature review, SNPs in 180 candidate genes were pre-screened using dbGaP pancreas cancer GWAS data; 147 SNPs in 56 allergy-related immunologic genes were retained and genotyped. Logistic regression was used to estimate age-adjusted odd ratio (AOR) for each variant and false discovery rate was used to adjust Wald p-values for multiple testing. Subsequently, a risk allele score was derived based on statistically significant variants. Results 18 SNPs in 14 candidate genes (CSF2, DENND1B, DPP10, FLG, IL13, IL13RA2, LRP1B, NOD1, NPSR1, ORMDL3, RORA, STAT4, TLR6, TRA) were significantly associated with pancreas cancer risk. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, two LRP1B SNPs remained statistically significant; for example, LRP1B rs1449477 (AA vs. CC: AOR=0.37, 95% CI: 0.22-0.62; p (adjusted)=0.04). Furthermore, the risk allele score was associated with a significant reduction in pancreas cancer risk (p=0.0007). Conclusions Preliminary findings suggest certain atopy-related variants may be associated with pancreas cancer risk. Further studies are needed to replicate this, and to elucidate the biology behind the growing body of epidemiologic evidence suggesting allergies may reduce pancreatic cancer risk. PMID:25945796

  19. Genetic and Functional Sequence Variants of the SIRT3 Gene Promoter in Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiaoyun; Pang, Shuchao; Huang, Jian; Cui, Yinghua; Yan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD), including myocardial infarction (MI), is a common complex disease that is caused by atherosclerosis. Although a large number of genetic variants have been associated with CAD, only 10% of CAD cases could be explained. It has been proposed that low frequent and rare genetic variants may be main causes for CAD. SIRT3, a mitochondrial deacetylase, plays important roles in mitochondrial function and metabolism. Lack of SIRT3 in experimental animal leads to several age-related diseases, including cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, SIRT3 gene variants may contribute to the MI development. In this study, SIRT3 gene promoter was genetically and functionally analyzed in large cohorts of MI patients (n = 319) and ethnic-matched controls (n = 322). Total twenty-three DNA sequence variants (DSVs) were identified, including 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Six novel heterozygous DSVs, g.237307A>G, g.237270G>A, g.237023_25del, g.236653C>A, g.236628G>C, g.236557T>C, and two SNPs g.237030C>T (rs12293349) and g.237022C>G (rs369344513), were identified in nine MI patients, but in none of controls. Three SNPs, g.236473C>T (rs11246029), g.236380_81ins (rs71019893) and g.236370C>G (rs185277566), were more significantly frequent in MI patients than controls (P<0.05). These DSVs and SNPs, except g.236557T>C, significantly decreased the transcriptional activity of the SIRT3 gene promoter in cultured HEK-293 cells and H9c2 cells. Therefore, these DSVs identified in MI patients may change SIRT3 level by affecting the transcriptional activity of SIRT3 gene promoter, contributing to the MI development as a risk factor. PMID:27078640

  20. Variants at serotonin transporter and 2A receptor genes predict cooperative behavior differentially according to presence of punishment.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Kari B; McElreath, Richard; Nettle, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Punishment of free-riding has been implicated in the evolution of cooperation in humans, and yet mechanisms for punishment avoidance remain largely uninvestigated. Individual variation in these mechanisms may stem from variation in the serotonergic system, which modulates processing of aversive stimuli. Functional serotonin gene variants have been associated with variation in the processing of aversive stimuli and widely studied as risk factors for psychiatric disorders. We show that variants at the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) and serotonin 2A receptor gene (HTR2A) predict contributions to the public good in economic games, dependent upon whether contribution behavior can be punished. Participants with a variant at the serotonin transporter gene contribute more, leading to group-level differences in cooperation, but this effect dissipates in the presence of punishment. When contribution behavior can be punished, those with a variant at the serotonin 2A receptor gene contribute more than those without it. This variant also predicts a more stressful experience of the games. The diversity of institutions (including norms) that govern cooperation and punishment may create selective pressures for punishment avoidance that change rapidly across time and space. Variant-specific epigenetic regulation of these genes, as well as population-level variation in the frequencies of these variants, may facilitate adaptation to local norms of cooperation and punishment. PMID:23431136

  1. Variants at serotonin transporter and 2A receptor genes predict cooperative behavior differentially according to presence of punishment.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Kari B; McElreath, Richard; Nettle, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Punishment of free-riding has been implicated in the evolution of cooperation in humans, and yet mechanisms for punishment avoidance remain largely uninvestigated. Individual variation in these mechanisms may stem from variation in the serotonergic system, which modulates processing of aversive stimuli. Functional serotonin gene variants have been associated with variation in the processing of aversive stimuli and widely studied as risk factors for psychiatric disorders. We show that variants at the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) and serotonin 2A receptor gene (HTR2A) predict contributions to the public good in economic games, dependent upon whether contribution behavior can be punished. Participants with a variant at the serotonin transporter gene contribute more, leading to group-level differences in cooperation, but this effect dissipates in the presence of punishment. When contribution behavior can be punished, those with a variant at the serotonin 2A receptor gene contribute more than those without it. This variant also predicts a more stressful experience of the games. The diversity of institutions (including norms) that govern cooperation and punishment may create selective pressures for punishment avoidance that change rapidly across time and space. Variant-specific epigenetic regulation of these genes, as well as population-level variation in the frequencies of these variants, may facilitate adaptation to local norms of cooperation and punishment.

  2. HFE p.C282Y gene variant is associated with varicose veins in Russian population.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Ekaterina A; Shadrina, Alexandra S; Sevost'ianova, Kseniya S; Shevela, Andrey I; Soldatsky, Evgenii Yu; Seliverstov, Evgenii I; Demekhova, Marina Yu; Shonov, Oleg A; Ilyukhin, Evgenii A; Smetanina, Mariya A; Voronina, Elena N; Zolotukhin, Igor A; Filipenko, Maxim L

    2016-08-01

    Recently, the association of polymorphism rs1800562 (p.C282Y) in the hemochromatosis (HFE) gene with the increased risk of venous ulceration was shown. We hypothesized that HFE gene polymorphism might be involved not only in ulceration process, but also in susceptibility to primary varicose veins. We genotyped HFE p.C282Y (rs1800562) and p.H63D (rs1799945) variants in patients with primary varicose veins (n = 463) and in the control group (n = 754). In our study, p.282Y variant (rs1800562 A allele) was significantly associated with the risk of varicose veins (OR 1.79, 95 % CI = 1.11-2.89, P = 0.02). A borderline significant reverse association of p.63D variant (rs1799945 G allele) with venous leg ulcer development was revealed in Russians (OR 0.25, 95 % CI = 0.06-1.00, P = 0.05), but not in the meta-analysis (P = 0.56). We conclude that the HFE gene polymorphism can affect the risk of developing primary varicose veins.

  3. Association of vitamin D receptor gene variants with polycystic ovary syndrome: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Touraj; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Farahani, Hamid; Mirakhorli, Mojgan; Dabiri, Reza; Nobakht, Hossein; Asadi, Asadollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D and insulin play an important role in susceptibility to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and therefore vitamin D receptor (VDR), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and insulin receptor (INSR) gene variants might be involved in the pathogenesis of PCOS. Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the possible associations between polymorphisms in VDR, PTH, and INSR genes and the risk of PCOS. Materials and Methods: VDR, PTH, and INSR gene variants were genotyped in 35 women with PCOS and 35 controls using Polymerase chain reaction – Restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Furthermore, serum levels of glucose and insulin were measured in all participants. Results: No significant differences were observed for the VDR FokI, VDR Tru9I, VDR TaqI, PTH DraII, INSR NsiI, and INSR PmlI gene polymorphisms between the women with PCOS and controls. However, after adjustment for confounding factors, the VDR BsmI “Bb” genotype and the VDR ApaI "Aa" genotype were significantly under transmitted to the patients (p= 0.016; OR= 0.250; 95% CI= 0.081-0.769, and p= 0.017; OR= 0.260; 95% CI= 0.086-0.788, respectively). Furthermore, in the women with PCOS, insulin levels were lower in the participants with the INSR NsiI "NN" genotype compared with those with the "Nn + nn" genotypes (P= 0.045). Conclusion: The results showed an association between the VDR gene BsmI and ApaI polymorphisms and PCOS risk. These data also indicated that the INSR "NN" genotype was a marker of decreased insulin in women with PCOS. Our findings, however, do not lend support to the hypothesis that PTH gene DraII variant plays a role in susceptibility to PCOS. PMID:27141540

  4. HGCS: an online tool for prioritizing disease-causing gene variants by biological distance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying the genotypes underlying human disease phenotypes is a fundamental step in human genetics and medicine. High-throughput genomic technologies provide thousands of genetic variants per individual. The causal genes of a specific phenotype are usually expected to be functionally close to each other. According to this hypothesis, candidate genes are picked from high-throughput data on the basis of their biological proximity to core genesgenes already known to be responsible for the phenotype. There is currently no effective gene-centric online interface for this purpose. Results We describe here the human gene connectome server (HGCS), a powerful, easy-to-use interactive online tool enabling researchers to prioritize any list of genes according to their biological proximity to core genes associated with the phenotype of interest. We also make available an updated and extended version for all human gene-specific connectomes. The HGCS is freely available to noncommercial users from: http://hgc.rockefeller.edu/. Conclusions The HGCS should help investigators from diverse fields to identify new disease-causing candidate genes more effectively, via a user-friendly online interface. PMID:24694260

  5. Can common functional gene variants affect visual discrimination in metacontrast masking?

    PubMed

    Maksimov, Margus; Vaht, Mariliis; Harro, Jaanus; Bachmann, Talis

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of visual perception should be robustly fast and provide veridical information about environmental objects in order to facilitate survival and successful coping. Because species-specific brain mechanisms for fast vision must have evolved under heavy pressure for efficiency, it has been held that different human individuals see the physical world in the same way and produce psychophysical functions of visual discrimination that are qualitatively the same. For many years, this assumption has been implicitly accepted in vision research studying extremely fast, basic visual processes, including studies of visual masking. However, in recent studies of metacontrast masking surprisingly robust individual differences in the qualitative aspects of subjects' performance have been found. As the basic species-specific visual functions very likely are based on universal brain mechanisms of vision, these differences probably are the outcome of variability in ontogenetic development (i.e., formation of idiosyncrasic skills of perception). Such developmental differences can be brought about by variants of genes that are differentially expressed in the course of CNS development. The objective of this study was to assess whether visual discrimination in metacontrast masking is related to three widely studied genetic polymorphisms implicated in brain function and used here as independent variables. The findings suggest no main effects of BDNF Val66Met, NRG1/rs6994992, or 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms on metacontrast performance, but several notable interactions of genetic variables with gender, stage of the sequence of experimental trials, perceptual strategies, and target/mask shape congruence were found. Thus, basic behavioral functions of fast vision may be influenced by common genetic variability. Also, when left uncontrolled, genetic factors may seriously confound variables in vision research using masking, obscure clear theoretical interpretation, lead to unexplicable inter

  6. Sex-dependent association of common variants of microcephaly genes with brain structure.

    PubMed

    Rimol, Lars M; Agartz, Ingrid; Djurovic, Srdjan; Brown, Andrew A; Roddey, J Cooper; Kähler, Anna K; Mattingsdal, Morten; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Joyner, Alexander H; Schork, Nicholas J; Halgren, Eric; Sundet, Kjetil; Melle, Ingrid; Dale, Anders M; Andreassen, Ole A

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the genes associated with primary microcephaly (MCPH) reduce human brain size by about two-thirds, without producing gross abnormalities in brain organization or physiology and leaving other organs largely unaffected [Woods CG, et al. (2005) Am J Hum Genet 76:717-728]. There is also evidence suggesting that MCPH genes have evolved rapidly in primates and humans and have been subjected to selection in recent human evolution [Vallender EJ, et al. (2008) Trends Neurosci 31:637-644]. Here, we show that common variants of MCPH genes account for some of the common variation in brain structure in humans, independently of disease status. We investigated the correlations of SNPs from four MCPH genes with brain morphometry phenotypes obtained with MRI. We found significant, sex-specific associations between common, nonexonic, SNPs of the genes CDK5RAP2, MCPH1, and ASPM, with brain volume or cortical surface area in an ethnically homogenous Norwegian discovery sample (n = 287), including patients with mental illness. The most strongly associated SNP findings were replicated in an independent North American sample (n = 656), which included patients with dementia. These results are consistent with the view that common variation in brain structure is associated with genetic variants located in nonexonic, presumably regulatory, regions. PMID:20080800

  7. Detecting Splicing Variants in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis from Non-Differentially Expressed Genes

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Nan; Sanchez, Cecilia G.; Lasky, Joseph A.; Zhu, Dongxiao

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is an interstitial lung disease of unknown cause that lacks a proven therapy for altering its high mortality rate. Microarrays have been employed to investigate the pathogenesis of IPF, but are presented mostly at the gene-expression level due to technologic limitations. In as much as, alternative RNA splicing isoforms are increasingly identified as potential regulators of human diseases, including IPF, we propose a new approach with the capacity to detect splicing variants using RNA-seq data. We conducted a joint analysis of differential expression and differential splicing on annotated human genes and isoforms, and identified 122 non-differentially expressed genes with a high degree of “switch” between major and minor isoforms. Three cases with variant mechanisms for alternative splicing were validated using qRT-PCR, among the group of genes in which expression was not significantly changed at the gene level. We also identified 35 novel transcripts that were unique to the fibrotic lungs using exon-exon junction evidence, and selected a representative for qRT-PCR validation. The results of our study are likely to provide new insight into the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis and may eventuate in new treatment targets. PMID:23844188

  8. Sex-dependent association of common variants of microcephaly genes with brain structure.

    PubMed

    Rimol, Lars M; Agartz, Ingrid; Djurovic, Srdjan; Brown, Andrew A; Roddey, J Cooper; Kähler, Anna K; Mattingsdal, Morten; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Joyner, Alexander H; Schork, Nicholas J; Halgren, Eric; Sundet, Kjetil; Melle, Ingrid; Dale, Anders M; Andreassen, Ole A

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the genes associated with primary microcephaly (MCPH) reduce human brain size by about two-thirds, without producing gross abnormalities in brain organization or physiology and leaving other organs largely unaffected [Woods CG, et al. (2005) Am J Hum Genet 76:717-728]. There is also evidence suggesting that MCPH genes have evolved rapidly in primates and humans and have been subjected to selection in recent human evolution [Vallender EJ, et al. (2008) Trends Neurosci 31:637-644]. Here, we show that common variants of MCPH genes account for some of the common variation in brain structure in humans, independently of disease status. We investigated the correlations of SNPs from four MCPH genes with brain morphometry phenotypes obtained with MRI. We found significant, sex-specific associations between common, nonexonic, SNPs of the genes CDK5RAP2, MCPH1, and ASPM, with brain volume or cortical surface area in an ethnically homogenous Norwegian discovery sample (n = 287), including patients with mental illness. The most strongly associated SNP findings were replicated in an independent North American sample (n = 656), which included patients with dementia. These results are consistent with the view that common variation in brain structure is associated with genetic variants located in nonexonic, presumably regulatory, regions.

  9. Genetic variant in CXCL13 gene is associated with susceptibility to intrauterine infection of hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Zhihua; Lin, Xiaofang; Li, Tongyang; Zhou, Aifen; Yang, Mei; Hu, Dan; Feng, Li; Peng, Songxu; Fan, Linlin; Tu, Si; Bin Zhang; Du, Yukai

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV), which accounts for the majority of mother-to-child transmission, is one of the main reasons for the failure of combined immunoprophylaxis against the transmission. Recent studies have identified that genetic background might influence the susceptibility to intrauterine infection of HBV. We conducted this study to investigate the associations between 10 genetic variants in 9 genes (SLC10A1, HLA-DP, HLA-C, CXCR5, CXCL13, TLR3, TLR4, TLR9 and UBE2L3) of mothers and their neonates and HBV intrauterine infection. A significantly decreased risk of HBV intrauterine transmission were found among mothers who carried the rs355687 CT genotypes in CXCL13 gene compared to those with CC genotypes (OR = 0.25, 95% CI, 0.08–0.82, P = 0.022); and a marginally significantly decreased risk was also observed under the dominant model (OR = 0.34, 95% CI, 0.11–1.01, P = 0.052). Besides, neonatal rs3130542 in HLA-C gene was found to be marginally significantly associated with decreased risk of HBV intrauterine infection under the additive model (OR = 0.55, 95% CI, 0.29–1.04, P = 0.064). However, we found no evidence of associations between the remaining 8 SNPs and risk of HBV intrauterine infection among mothers and their neonates. In conclusion, this study suggested that genetic variant in CXCL13 gene was associated with susceptibility to intrauterine infection of HBV. PMID:27212637

  10. 15q12 Variants, Sputum Gene Promoter Hypermethylation, and Lung Cancer Risk: A GWAS in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuguang; Liu, Yushi; Weissfeld, Joel L.; Thomas, Cynthia L.; Han, Younghun; Picchi, Maria A.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Willink, Randall P.; Gaither Davis, Autumn L.; Do, Kieu C.; Nukui, Tomoko; Zhang, Xiequn; Burki, Elizabeth A.; Van Den Berg, David; Romkes, Marjorie; Gauderman, W. James; Crowell, Richard E.; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Stidley, Christine A.; Amos, Christopher I.; Siegfried, Jill M.; Gilliland, Frank D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Detection of promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in exfoliated cells from the lung provides an assessment of field cancerization that in turn predicts lung cancer. The identification of genetic determinants for this validated cancer biomarker should provide novel insights into mechanisms underlying epigenetic reprogramming during lung carcinogenesis. Methods: A genome-wide association study using generalized estimating equations and logistic regression models was conducted in two geographically independent smoker cohorts to identify loci affecting the propensity for cancer-related gene methylation that was assessed by a 12-gene panel interrogated in sputum. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 15q12 (rs73371737 and rs7179575) that drove gene methylation were discovered and replicated with rs73371737 reaching genome-wide significance (P = 3.3×10–8). A haplotype carrying risk alleles from the two 15q12 SNPs conferred 57% increased risk for gene methylation (P = 2.5×10–9). Rs73371737 reduced GABRB3 expression in lung cells and increased risk for smoking-induced chronic mucous hypersecretion. Furthermore, subjects with variant homozygote of rs73371737 had a two-fold increase in risk for lung cancer (P = .0043). Pathway analysis identified DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination (DSBR-HR) as a major pathway affecting susceptibility for gene methylation that was validated by measuring chromatid breaks in lymphocytes challenged by bleomycin. Conclusions: A functional 15q12 variant was identified as a risk factor for gene methylation and lung cancer. The associations could be mediated by GABAergic signaling that drives the smoking-induced mucous cell metaplasia. Our findings also substantiate DSBR-HR as a critical pathway driving epigenetic gene silencing. PMID:25713168

  11. Exceptions to the rule: case studies in the prediction of pathogenicity for genetic variants in hereditary cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, E T; Bowles, K R; Pruss, D; van Kan, A; Vail, P J; McElroy, H; Wenstrup, R J

    2015-12-01

    Based on current consensus guidelines and standard practice, many genetic variants detected in clinical testing are classified as disease causing based on their predicted impact on the normal expression or function of the gene in the absence of additional data. However, our laboratory has identified a subset of such variants in hereditary cancer genes for which compelling contradictory evidence emerged after the initial evaluation following the first observation of the variant. Three representative examples of variants in BRCA1, BRCA2 and MSH2 that are predicted to disrupt splicing, prematurely truncate the protein, or remove the start codon were evaluated for pathogenicity by analyzing clinical data with multiple classification algorithms. Available clinical data for all three variants contradicts the expected pathogenic classification. These variants illustrate potential pitfalls associated with standard approaches to variant classification as well as the challenges associated with monitoring data, updating classifications, and reporting potentially contradictory interpretations to the clinicians responsible for translating test outcomes to appropriate clinical action. It is important to address these challenges now as the model for clinical testing moves toward the use of large multi-gene panels and whole exome/genome analysis, which will dramatically increase the number of genetic variants identified. PMID:25639900

  12. The type of variants at the COL3A1 gene associates with the phenotype and severity of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Frank, Michael; Albuisson, Juliette; Ranque, Brigitte; Golmard, Lisa; Mazzella, Jean-Michael; Bal-Theoleyre, Laurence; Fauret, Anne-Laure; Mirault, Tristan; Denarié, Nicolas; Mousseaux, Elie; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Fiessinger, Jean-Noël; Emmerich, Joseph; Messas, Emmanuel; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is a rare and severe autosomal dominant disorder caused by variants at the COL3A1 gene. Clinical characteristics and course of disease of 215 molecularly proven patients (146 index cases and 69 relatives) were analysed. We found 126 distincts variants that were divided into five groups: (1) Glycine substitutions (n=71), (2) splice-site and in-frame insertions-deletions (n=36), (3) variants leading to haplo-insufficiency (n=7), (4) non-glycine missense variants within the triple helix (n=4 variants), and (5) non-glycine missense variants or in-frame insertions-deletions, in the N- or C-terminal part of the protein (n=8). Overall, our cohort confirmed the severity of the disease with a median age at first complication of 29 years (IQR 22-39), the most frequent being arterial (48%) and digestive (24%) ruptures. Groups 2 and 1 were significantly more severe than groups 3-5, with extreme median ages at first major complication of 23-47 years. Patients of groups 3-5 had a less typical phenotype and remarkably absence of digestive events. The distribution of glycine-replacing amino acids was strongly biased towards more destabilizing residues of the collagen assembly. Thus the natural course of vEDS and the clinical phenotype of patients are influenced by the type of COL3A1 variant. This study also confirms that patients with variants located in the C- and N-termini or leading to haplo-insufficiency have milder course of the disease and less prevalent diagnostic criteria. These findings may help refine diagnostic strategy, genetic counselling and clinical care. PMID:25758994

  13. The type of variants at the COL3A1 gene associates with the phenotype and severity of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Frank, Michael; Albuisson, Juliette; Ranque, Brigitte; Golmard, Lisa; Mazzella, Jean-Michael; Bal-Theoleyre, Laurence; Fauret, Anne-Laure; Mirault, Tristan; Denarié, Nicolas; Mousseaux, Elie; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Fiessinger, Jean-Noël; Emmerich, Joseph; Messas, Emmanuel; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is a rare and severe autosomal dominant disorder caused by variants at the COL3A1 gene. Clinical characteristics and course of disease of 215 molecularly proven patients (146 index cases and 69 relatives) were analysed. We found 126 distincts variants that were divided into five groups: (1) Glycine substitutions (n=71), (2) splice-site and in-frame insertions-deletions (n=36), (3) variants leading to haplo-insufficiency (n=7), (4) non-glycine missense variants within the triple helix (n=4 variants), and (5) non-glycine missense variants or in-frame insertions-deletions, in the N- or C-terminal part of the protein (n=8). Overall, our cohort confirmed the severity of the disease with a median age at first complication of 29 years (IQR 22-39), the most frequent being arterial (48%) and digestive (24%) ruptures. Groups 2 and 1 were significantly more severe than groups 3-5, with extreme median ages at first major complication of 23-47 years. Patients of groups 3-5 had a less typical phenotype and remarkably absence of digestive events. The distribution of glycine-replacing amino acids was strongly biased towards more destabilizing residues of the collagen assembly. Thus the natural course of vEDS and the clinical phenotype of patients are influenced by the type of COL3A1 variant. This study also confirms that patients with variants located in the C- and N-termini or leading to haplo-insufficiency have milder course of the disease and less prevalent diagnostic criteria. These findings may help refine diagnostic strategy, genetic counselling and clinical care.

  14. Identification of a Functional Risk Variant for Pemphigus Vulgaris in the ST18 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Vodo, Dan; Sarig, Ofer; Ben-Asher, Edna; Olender, Tsviya; Bochner, Ron; Goldberg, Ilan; Nosgorodsky, Judith; Alkelai, Anna; Tatarskyy, Pavel; Peled, Alon; Baum, Sharon; Barzilai, Aviv; Ibrahim, Saleh M.; Zillikens, Detlef; Lancet, Doron; Sprecher, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a life-threatening autoimmune mucocutaneous blistering disease caused by disruption of intercellular adhesion due to auto-antibodies directed against epithelial components. Treatment is limited to immunosuppressive agents, which are associated with serious adverse effects. The propensity to develop the disease is in part genetically determined. We therefore reasoned that the delineation of PV genetic basis may point to novel therapeutic strategies. Using a genome-wide association approach, we recently found that genetic variants in the vicinity of the ST18 gene confer a significant risk for the disease. Here, using targeted deep sequencing, we identified a PV-associated variant residing within the ST18 promoter region (p<0.0002; odds ratio = 2.03). This variant was found to drive increased gene transcription in a p53/p63-dependent manner, which may explain the fact that ST18 is up-regulated in the skin of PV patients. We then discovered that when overexpressed, ST18 stimulates PV serum-induced secretion of key inflammatory molecules and contributes to PV serum-induced disruption of keratinocyte cell-cell adhesion, two processes previously implicated in the pathogenesis of PV. Thus, the present findings indicate that ST18 may play a direct role in PV and consequently represents a potential target for the treatment of this disease. PMID:27148741

  15. Association of the rs1801133 variant in the MTHFR gene and sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    García, S; Coral-Vázquez, Rm; Gallegos-Arreola, M P; Montes-Almanza, L A; Canto, P; García-Martínez, F A; Chavira-Hernández, G; Palma-Flores, C; Dávila-Maldonado, L; Cuevas-García, C F; López Hernández, L B

    2015-01-01

    The MTHFR gene has been reported as a susceptibility locus for sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD). The functional variant rs1801133 has been linked to hyperhomocysteinemia and dopaminergic cell death. Among different populations, Mexican-Mestizos (most present-day Mexicans) have the highest frequency of this variant. Therefore, we sought to determine a possible association of rs1801133 with SPD. In total, 356 individuals were included: 140 patients with PD, diagnosed according to the Queen Square Brain Bank criteria, and 216 neurologically healthy controls. Genotyping was performed using TaqMan probes for rs1801133 and real-time PCR. Logistic regression analysis with adjustment for smoking and gender was used to test for an association between genotype and SPD. The CC genotype was associated with SPD; exp() = 2.06; 95% CI: 1.101-3.873, p = 0.024. No association with age at onset, cognitive impairment or gender was found in our study group. Our data suggest an important role of MTHFR gene variants in SPD.

  16. Rare missense variants within a single gene form yin yang haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Curtis, David

    2016-01-01

    Yin yang haplotype pairs differ at every SNP. They would not be accounted for by population models that incorporate sequential mutation, with or without recombination. Previous reports have claimed that there is a tendency for common SNPs to form yin yang haplotypes more often than would be expected by sequential mutation or by a random sample of all possible haplotypic arrangements of alleles. In the course of analysing next-generation sequencing data, instances of yin yang haplotypes being formed by very rare variants within a single gene were observed. As an example, this report describes a completely yin yang haplotype formed by eight rare missense variants in the ABCA13 gene. Of 1000 genome subjects, 21 have a copy of the alternate allele at all eight of these positions and a single subject is homozygous for all of them. None of the other 1070 subjects possesses any of the altetrnates. Thus, the eight alternate alleles are always found together and never occur separately. The existence of such yin yang haplotypes has important implications for statistical methods for analysing rare variants. Also, they may be of use for gaining a better understanding of the history of human populations.

  17. Gene and Network Analysis of Common Variants Reveals Novel Associations in Multiple Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nakka, Priyanka; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Ramachandran, Sohini

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies typically lack power to detect genotypes significantly associated with complex diseases, where different causal mutations of small effect may be present across cases. A common, tractable approach for identifying genomic elements associated with complex traits is to evaluate combinations of variants in known pathways or gene sets with shared biological function. Such gene-set analyses require the computation of gene-level P-values or gene scores; these gene scores are also useful when generating hypotheses for experimental validation. However, commonly used methods for generating GWA gene scores are computationally inefficient, biased by gene length, imprecise, or have low true positive rate (TPR) at low false positive rates (FPR), leading to erroneous hypotheses for functional validation. Here we introduce a new method, PEGASUS, for analytically calculating gene scores. PEGASUS produces gene scores with as much as 10 orders of magnitude higher numerical precision than competing methods. In simulation, PEGASUS outperforms existing methods, achieving up to 30% higher TPR when the FPR is fixed at 1%. We use gene scores from PEGASUS as input to HotNet2 to identify networks of interacting genes associated with multiple complex diseases and traits; this is the first application of HotNet2 to common variation. In ulcerative colitis and waist–hip ratio, we discover networks that include genes previously associated with these phenotypes, as well as novel candidate genes. In contrast, existing methods fail to identify these networks. We also identify networks for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, in which GWA studies have yet to identify any significant SNPs. PMID:27489002

  18. Analysis of non-synonymous-coding variants of Parkinson's disease-related pathogenic and susceptibility genes in East Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Foo, Jia Nee; Tan, Louis C; Liany, Herty; Koh, Tat Hung; Irwan, Ishak D; Ng, Yen Yek; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Au, Wing-Lok; Aung, Tin; Chan, Anne Y Y; Chong, Siow-Ann; Chung, Sun Ju; Jung, Yusun; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Kim, Juyeon; Lee, Jimmy; Lim, Shen-Yang; Mok, Vincent; Prakash, Kumar-M; Song, Kyuyoung; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga N; Wong, Tien-Yin; Tan, Eng-King; Liu, Jianjun

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate the contribution of non-synonymous-coding variants of known familial and genome-wide association studies (GWAS)-linked genes for Parkinson's disease (PD) to PD risk in the East Asian population, we sequenced all the coding exons of 39 PD-related disease genes and evaluated the accumulation of rare non-synonymous-coding variants in 375 early-onset PD cases and 399 controls. We also genotyped 782 non-synonymous-coding variants of these genes in 710 late-onset PD cases and 9046 population controls. Significant enrichment of LRRK2 variants was observed in both early- and late-onset PD (odds ratio = 1.58; 95% confidence interval = 1.29-1.93; P = 8.05 × 10(-6)). Moderate enrichment was also observed in FGF20, MCCC1, GBA and ITGA8. Half of the rare variants anticipated to cause loss of function of these genes were present in healthy controls. Overall, non-synonymous-coding variants of known familial and GWAS-linked genes appear to make a limited contribution to PD risk, suggesting that clinical sequencing of these genes will provide limited information for risk prediction and molecular diagnosis.

  19. LEP gene variant is associated with prostate cancer but not with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Juan; Xu, Guili

    2013-10-01

    The leptin (LEP) gene has been considered to be implicated in the development of cancer. However, the results have been inconsistent. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis to clarify the association of LEP rs7799039 variant with colorectal and prostate cancer risk. Published literatures from PubMed and Embase were retrieved. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95 % confidence interval (CI) was calculated using fixed or random effects model. A total of five studies (2,596 colorectal cancer cases and 3,240 controls) for association of LEP rs7799039 variant with colorectal cancer, and three studies (1,343 prostate cancer cases and 1,238 controls) for association with prostate cancer were included in the meta-analysis. For colorectal cancer, there was no significant association of LEP rs7799039 variant with this disease under homogeneous co-dominant model (OR = 0.88, 95 % CI = 0.75-1.02), heterogeneous co-dominant model (OR = 1.00, 95 % CI = 0.89-1.13) and dominant model (OR = 0.97, 95 % CI = 0.87-1.08); however, there was a marginal association under recessive model (OR = 0.87, 95 % CI = 0.76-0.99). For prostate cancer, there was significant association of LEP rs7799039 variant with this disease under homogeneous co-dominant model (OR = 1.33, 95 % CI = 1.06-1.67) and recessive model (OR = 1.26, 95 % CI = 1.05-1.51), but not under heterogeneous co-dominant model (OR = 1.24, 95 % CI = 0.87-1.77) and dominant model (OR = 1.30, 95 % CI = 1.84). The present meta-analysis demonstrated that the LEP rs7799039 variant was associated with prostate cancer, but not with colorectal cancer.

  20. Future Trends in the Pharmacogenomics of Brain Disorders and Dementia: Influence of APOE and CYP2D6 Variants

    PubMed Central

    Cacabelos, Ramón; Fernández-Novoa, Lucía; Martínez-Bouza, Rocío; McKay, Adam; Carril, Juan C.; Lombardi, Valter; Corzo, Lola; Carrera, Iván; Tellado, Iván; Nebril, Laura; Alcaraz, Margarita; Rodríguez, Susana; Casas, Ángela; Couceiro, Verónica; Álvarez, Antón

    2010-01-01

    About 80% of functional genes in the human genome are expressed in the brain and over 1,200 different genes have been associated with the pathogenesis of CNS disorders and dementia. Pharmacogenetic studies of psychotropic drug response have focused on determining the relationship between variations in specific candidate genes and the positive and adverse effects of drug treatment. Approximately, 18% of neuroleptics are substrates of CYP1A2 enzymes, 40% of CYP2D6, and 23% of CYP3A4; 24% of antidepressants are substrates of CYP1A2 enzymes, 5% of CYP2B6, 38% of CYP2C19, 85% of CYP2D6, and 38% of CYP3A4; 7% of benzodiazepines are substrates of CYP2C19 enzymes, 20% of CYP2D6, and 95% of CYP3A4. 10-20% of Western populations are defective in genes of the CYP superfamily; and the pharmacogenomic response of psychotropic drugs also depends on genetic variants associated with dementia. Prospective studies with anti-dementia drugs or with multifactorial strategies have revealed that the therapeutic response to conventional drugs in Alzheimer’s disease is genotype-specific. The disease-modifying effects (cognitive performance, biomarker modification) of therapeutic intervention are APOE-dependent, with APOE-4 carriers acting as the worst responders (APOE-3/3 > APOE-3/4 > APOE-4/4). APOE-CYP2D6 interactions also influence the therapeutic outcome in patients with dementia.

  1. Lack of association between dopamine D2 receptor gene Cys311 variant and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihisa; Fukushima, Noboru; Takahashi, Makoto; Kameda, Kensuke; Ihda, Shin

    1996-04-09

    Itokawa et al. reported identifying one missense nucleotide mutation from C to G resulting in a substitution of serine with cysteine at codon 311 in the third intracellular loop of the dopamine D2 receptor in schizophrenics. Arinami et al. reported finding a positive association between the Cys311 variant and schizophrenia. In response to the report by Arinami et al. we examined 106 unrelated Japanese schizophrenics and 106 normal controls to determine if there is any association of the Cys311 variant with schizophrenia. However, we found no statistically significant differences in allelic frequencies of Cys311 between schizophrenia and normal controls. The present results as well as those of all previous studies except for that of Arinami et al. indicated that an association between the dopamine D2 receptor gene and schizophrenia is unlikely to exist. 24 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants encoding a truncated ghrelin peptide.

    PubMed

    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Thomas, Patrick B; Walpole, Carina M; Maugham, Michelle; Fung, Jenny N T; Yap, Pei-Yi; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Lai, John; Whiteside, Eliza J; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2016-06-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is a potent orexigen produced predominantly in the stomach. It has a number of other biological actions, including roles in appetite stimulation, energy balance, the stimulation of growth hormone release and the regulation of cell proliferation. Recently, several ghrelin gene splice variants have been described. Here, we attempted to identify conserved alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene by cross-species sequence comparisons. We identified a novel human exon 2-deleted variant and provide preliminary evidence that this splice variant and in1-ghrelin encode a C-terminally truncated form of the ghrelin peptide, termed minighrelin. These variants are expressed in humans and mice, demonstrating conservation of alternative splicing spanning 90 million years. Minighrelin appears to have similar actions to full-length ghrelin, as treatment with exogenous minighrelin peptide stimulates appetite and feeding in mice. Forced expression of the exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant mirrors the effect of the canonical preproghrelin, stimulating cell proliferation and migration in the PC3 prostate cancer cell line. This is the first study to characterise an exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant and to demonstrate sequence conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants that encode a truncated ghrelin peptide. This adds further impetus for studies into the alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene and the function of novel ghrelin peptides in vertebrates.

  3. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) gene variants and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) risk

    PubMed Central

    Amankwah, Ernest K.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Chornokur, Ganna; Aben, Katja KH.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie T.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H.; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Y. Ann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Edwards, Robert P.; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T.; Gronwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis N.; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K.; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Jim, Heather; Kellar, Melissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schernhammer, Eva; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Thomsen, Lotte; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wu, Anna H.; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Kelemen, Linda E.; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Goode, Ellen L.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Narod, Steven A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Phelan, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process whereby epithelial cells assume mesenchymal characteristics to facilitate cancer metastasis. However, EMT also contributes to the initiation and development of primary tumors. Prior studies that explored the hypothesis that EMT gene variants contribute to EOC risk have been based on small sample sizes and none have sought replication in an independent population. Methods We screened 1254 SNPs in 296 genes in a discovery phase using data from a genome-wide association study of EOC among women of European ancestry (1,947 cases and 2,009 controls) and identified 793 variants in 278 EMT-related genes that were nominally (p<0.05) associated with invasive EOC. These SNPs were then genotyped in a larger study of 14,525 invasive-cancer patients and 23,447 controls. A p-value <0.05 and a false discovery rate (FDR) <0.2 was considered statistically significant. Results In the larger dataset, GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 was associated with the endometrioid subtype among Caucasians (OR=1.16, 95%CI=1.07–1.25, p=0.0003, FDR=0.19), while F8 rs7053448 (OR=1.69, 95%CI=1.27–2.24, p=0.0003, FDR=0.12), F8 rs7058826 (OR=1.69, 95%CI=1.27–2.24, p=0.0003, FDR=0.12), and CAPN13 rs1983383 (OR=0.79, 95%CI=0.69–0.90, p=0.0005, FDR=0.12) were associated with combined invasive EOC among Asians. In silico functional analyses revealed that GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 coincided with DNA regulatory elements. Conclusion These results suggest that EMT gene variants do not appear to play a significant role in the susceptibility to EOC. PMID:26399219

  4. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) Gene Variants and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) Risk.

    PubMed

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Chornokur, Ganna; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie T; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Y Ann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana M; Edwards, Robert P; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis N; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Jim, Heather; Kellar, Melissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Schernhammer, Eva; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Thomsen, Lotte; Tangen, Ingvild L; Tworoger, Shelley S; van Altena, Anne M; Vierkant, Robert A; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Wu, Anna H; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Kelemen, Linda E; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Ramus, Susan J; Goode, Ellen L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Gayther, Simon A; Narod, Steven A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sellers, Thomas A; Phelan, Catherine M

    2015-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process whereby epithelial cells assume mesenchymal characteristics to facilitate cancer metastasis. However, EMT also contributes to the initiation and development of primary tumors. Prior studies that explored the hypothesis that EMT gene variants contribute to epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) risk have been based on small sample sizes and none have sought replication in an independent population. We screened 15,816 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 296 genes in a discovery phase using data from a genome-wide association study of EOC among women of European ancestry (1,947 cases and 2,009 controls) and identified 793 variants in 278 EMT-related genes that were nominally (P < 0.05) associated with invasive EOC. These SNPs were then genotyped in a larger study of 14,525 invasive-cancer patients and 23,447 controls. A P-value <0.05 and a false discovery rate (FDR) <0.2 were considered statistically significant. In the larger dataset, GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 was associated with the endometrioid subtype among Caucasians (odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.07-1.25, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.19), whereas F8 rs7053448 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), F8 rs7058826 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), and CAPN13 rs1983383 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.69-0.90, P = 0.0005, FDR = 0.12) were associated with combined invasive EOC among Asians. In silico functional analyses revealed that GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 coincided with DNA regulatory elements. These results suggest that EMT gene variants do not appear to play a significant role in the susceptibility to EOC.

  5. Association study between BDNF gene variants and Mexican patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Lidia; Camarena, Beatriz; Hernández, Sandra; Lóyzaga, Cristina; Vargas, Luis; Nicolini, Humberto

    2013-11-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a psychiatric disorder whose etiology is not yet known. We investigate the role of three variants of the BDNF gene (rs6265, rs1519480 and rs7124442) by single SNP and haplotype analysis in OCD Mexican patients using a case-control and family-based association design. BDNF gene variants were genotyped in 283 control subjects, 232 OCD patients and first degree relatives of 111 OCD subjects. Single SNP analysis in case-control study showed an association between rs6265 and OCD with a high frequency of Val/Val genotype and Val allele (p=0.0001 and p=0.0001, respectively). Also, genotype and allele analysis of rs1519480 showed significant differences (p=0.0001, p=0.0001; respectively) between OCD and control groups. Haplotype analysis showed a high frequency of A-T (rs6265-rs1519480) in OCD patients compared with the control group (OR=2.06 [1.18-3.59], p=0.0093) and a low frequency of haplotype A-C in the OCD patients (OR=0.04 [0.01-0.16], p=0.000002). The family-based association study showed no significant differences in the transmission of any variant. Our study replicated the association between BDNF Val66Met gene polymorphism and OCD. Also, we found a significant association of rs1519480 in OCD patients compared with a control group, region that has never been analyzed in OCD. In conclusion, our findings suggest that BDNF gene could be related to the development of OCD.

  6. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) Gene Variants and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) Risk.

    PubMed

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Chornokur, Ganna; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie T; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Y Ann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana M; Edwards, Robert P; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis N; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Claus K; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Jim, Heather; Kellar, Melissa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lim, Boon Kiong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; McNeish, Ian; Menon, Usha; Milne, Roger L; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Nevanlinna, Heli; Eilber, Ursula; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Schernhammer, Eva; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Thomsen, Lotte; Tangen, Ingvild L; Tworoger, Shelley S; van Altena, Anne M; Vierkant, Robert A; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine S; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Wu, Anna H; Wu, Xifeng; Woo, Yin-Ling; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Kelemen, Linda E; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Ramus, Susan J; Goode, Ellen L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Gayther, Simon A; Narod, Steven A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sellers, Thomas A; Phelan, Catherine M

    2015-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process whereby epithelial cells assume mesenchymal characteristics to facilitate cancer metastasis. However, EMT also contributes to the initiation and development of primary tumors. Prior studies that explored the hypothesis that EMT gene variants contribute to epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) risk have been based on small sample sizes and none have sought replication in an independent population. We screened 15,816 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 296 genes in a discovery phase using data from a genome-wide association study of EOC among women of European ancestry (1,947 cases and 2,009 controls) and identified 793 variants in 278 EMT-related genes that were nominally (P < 0.05) associated with invasive EOC. These SNPs were then genotyped in a larger study of 14,525 invasive-cancer patients and 23,447 controls. A P-value <0.05 and a false discovery rate (FDR) <0.2 were considered statistically significant. In the larger dataset, GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 was associated with the endometrioid subtype among Caucasians (odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.07-1.25, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.19), whereas F8 rs7053448 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), F8 rs7058826 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), and CAPN13 rs1983383 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.69-0.90, P = 0.0005, FDR = 0.12) were associated with combined invasive EOC among Asians. In silico functional analyses revealed that GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 coincided with DNA regulatory elements. These results suggest that EMT gene variants do not appear to play a significant role in the susceptibility to EOC. PMID:26399219

  7. Genetic instability in lymphoblastoid cell lines expressing biallelic and monoallelic variants in the human MUTYH gene.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Francesca; Giacomini, Elisa; Sanchez, Massimo; Degan, Paolo; Gismondi, Viviana; Mazzei, Filomena; Varesco, Liliana; Viel, Alessandra; Bignami, Margherita

    2014-07-15

    The MUTYH DNA glycosylase counteracts mutagenesis by removing adenine misincorporated opposite DNA 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). Biallelic germline mutations in MUTYH cause the autosomal recessive MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP). The impact on genetic instability of the p.Tyr179Cys and p.Arg245His MUTYH variants was evaluated in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from MAP patients and their relatives in comparison to wild-type LCLs. No difference in MUTYH expression was identified between wild type and LCLs with the p.Tyr179Cys, while the p.Arg245His mutation was associated with an unstable MUTYH protein. LCLs homozygous for the p.Tyr179Cys or the p.Arg245His variant contained increased DNA 8-oxodG levels and exhibited a mutator phenotype at the PIG-A gene. The extent of the increased spontaneous mutation frequency was 3-fold (range 1.6- to 4.6-fold) in four independent LCLs carrying the p.Tyr179Cys variant, while a larger increase (6-fold) was observed in two p.Arg245His LCLs. A similar hypermutability and S-phase delay following treatment with KBrO3 was observed in LCLs homozygous for either variant. When genetic instability was investigated in monoallelic p.Arg245His carriers, mutant frequencies showed an increase which is intermediate between wild-type and homozygous cells, whereas the mutator effect in heterozygous p.Tyr179Cys LCLs was similar to that in homozygotes. These findings indicate that the type of MUTYH mutation can affect the extent of genome instability associated with MUTYH inactivation. In addition, the mild spontaneous mutator phenotype observed in monoallelic carriers highlights the biological importance of this gene in the protection of the genome against endogenous DNA damage.

  8. Genetic variants in multisynthetase complex genes are associated with DNA damage levels in Chinese populations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Zhu, Meng; Chen, Weihong; Xie, Kaipeng; Shen, Wei; Yuan, Jing; Cheng, Yang; Geng, Liguo; Wang, Yuzhuo; Jin, Guangfu; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Du, Jiangbo; Wang, Meilin; Zhang, Zhengdong; Hu, Zhibin; Wu, Tangchun; Shen, Hongbing

    2016-04-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) and ARS-interacting multi-functional proteins (AIMPs) form a multisynthetase complex (MSC) and play an important role in the process of DNA damage repair. We hypothesized that genetic variants in key ARSs and AIMPs might regulate the DNA damage response. Therefore, we systematically screened 23 potentially functional polymorphisms in MSC genes and evaluated the association between the genetic variants and DNA damage levels in 307 subjects from three cities in southern, central and northern China (Zhuhai, Wuhan and Tianjin, respectively). We examined personal 24-h PM2.5 exposure levels and DNA damage levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes for each subject. We found that the variant allele of rs12199241 in AIMP3 was significantly associated with DNA damage levels (β=0.343, 95%CI: 0.133-0.554, P=0.001). Meanwhile, the results of rs5030754 in EPRS and rs3784929 in KARS indicated their suggestive roles in DNA damage processes (β=0.331, 95%CI: 0.062-0.599, P=0.016 for rs5030754; β=0.192, 95%CI: 0.016-0.368, P=0.033 for rs3784929, respectively). After multiple testing, rs12199241 was still significantly associated with DNA damage levels. Combined analysis of these three polymorphisms showed a significant allele-dosage association between the number of risk alleles and higher DNA damage levels (Ptrend<0.001). These findings indicate that genetic variants in MSC genes may account for PM2.5-modulated DNA damage levels in Chinese populations.

  9. Genetic variants in multisynthetase complex genes are associated with DNA damage levels in Chinese populations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Zhu, Meng; Chen, Weihong; Xie, Kaipeng; Shen, Wei; Yuan, Jing; Cheng, Yang; Geng, Liguo; Wang, Yuzhuo; Jin, Guangfu; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Du, Jiangbo; Wang, Meilin; Zhang, Zhengdong; Hu, Zhibin; Wu, Tangchun; Shen, Hongbing

    2016-04-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) and ARS-interacting multi-functional proteins (AIMPs) form a multisynthetase complex (MSC) and play an important role in the process of DNA damage repair. We hypothesized that genetic variants in key ARSs and AIMPs might regulate the DNA damage response. Therefore, we systematically screened 23 potentially functional polymorphisms in MSC genes and evaluated the association between the genetic variants and DNA damage levels in 307 subjects from three cities in southern, central and northern China (Zhuhai, Wuhan and Tianjin, respectively). We examined personal 24-h PM2.5 exposure levels and DNA damage levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes for each subject. We found that the variant allele of rs12199241 in AIMP3 was significantly associated with DNA damage levels (β=0.343, 95%CI: 0.133-0.554, P=0.001). Meanwhile, the results of rs5030754 in EPRS and rs3784929 in KARS indicated their suggestive roles in DNA damage processes (β=0.331, 95%CI: 0.062-0.599, P=0.016 for rs5030754; β=0.192, 95%CI: 0.016-0.368, P=0.033 for rs3784929, respectively). After multiple testing, rs12199241 was still significantly associated with DNA damage levels. Combined analysis of these three polymorphisms showed a significant allele-dosage association between the number of risk alleles and higher DNA damage levels (Ptrend<0.001). These findings indicate that genetic variants in MSC genes may account for PM2.5-modulated DNA damage levels in Chinese populations. PMID:26871430

  10. Association between common alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH) variants and schizophrenia and autism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kesheng; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Pan, Xinghua; Wang, Guilin; Tan, Yunlong; Zhong, Chunlong; Krystal, John H.; State, Matthew; Zhang, Heping

    2013-01-01

    Humans express at least seven alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoforms that are encoded by ADH gene cluster (ADH7–ADH1C–ADH1B–ADH1A–ADH6–ADH4–ADH5) at chromosome 4. ADHs are key catabolic enzymes for retinol and ethanol. The functional ADH variants (mostly rare) have been implicated in alcoholism risk. In addition to catalyzing the oxidation of retinol and ethanol, ADHs may be involved in the metabolic pathways of several neurotransmitters that are implicated in the neurobiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present study, we comprehensively examined the associations between common ADH variants [minor allele frequency (MAF) >0.05] and 11 neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders. A total of 50,063 subjects in 25 independent cohorts were analyzed. The entire ADH gene cluster was imputed across these 25 cohorts using the same reference panels. Association analyses were conducted, adjusting for multiple comparisons. We found 28 and 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), respectively, that were significantly associated with schizophrenia in African-Americans and autism in European-Americans after correction by false discovery rate (FDR) (q <0.05); and 19 and 6 SNPs, respectively, that were significantly associated with these two disorders after region-wide correction by SNPSpD (8.9 × 10−5 ≤ p ≤ 0.0003 and 2.4 × 10−5 ≤ p ≤ 0.0003, respectively). No variants were significantly associated with the other nine neuropsychiatric disorders, including alcohol dependence. We concluded that common ADH variants conferred risk for both schizophrenia in African-Americans and autism in European-Americans. PMID:23468174

  11. Association between common alcohol dehydrogenase gene (ADH) variants and schizophrenia and autism.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Lingjun; Wang, Kesheng; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Pan, Xinghua; Wang, Guilin; Tan, Yunlong; Zhong, Chunlong; Krystal, John H; State, Matthew; Zhang, Heping; Luo, Xingguang

    2013-07-01

    Humans express at least seven alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoforms that are encoded by ADH gene cluster (ADH7-ADH1C-ADH1B-ADH1A-ADH6-ADH4-ADH5) at chromosome 4. ADHs are key catabolic enzymes for retinol and ethanol. The functional ADH variants (mostly rare) have been implicated in alcoholism risk. In addition to catalyzing the oxidation of retinol and ethanol, ADHs may be involved in the metabolic pathways of several neurotransmitters that are implicated in the neurobiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present study, we comprehensively examined the associations between common ADH variants [minor allele frequency (MAF) >0.05] and 11 neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders. A total of 50,063 subjects in 25 independent cohorts were analyzed. The entire ADH gene cluster was imputed across these 25 cohorts using the same reference panels. Association analyses were conducted, adjusting for multiple comparisons. We found 28 and 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), respectively, that were significantly associated with schizophrenia in African-Americans and autism in European-Americans after correction by false discovery rate (FDR) (q < 0.05); and 19 and 6 SNPs, respectively, that were significantly associated with these two disorders after region-wide correction by SNPSpD (8.9 × 10(-5) ≤ p ≤ 0.0003 and 2.4 × 10(-5) ≤ p ≤ 0.0003, respectively). No variants were significantly associated with the other nine neuropsychiatric disorders, including alcohol dependence. We concluded that common ADH variants conferred risk for both schizophrenia in African-Americans and autism in European-Americans.

  12. Expression variants of the lipogenic AGPAT6 gene affect diverse milk composition phenotypes in Bos taurus.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Mathew D; Tiplady, Kathryn; Lopdell, Thomas; Law, Tania A; Scott, Andrew; Harland, Chad; Sherlock, Ric; Henty, Kristen; Obolonkin, Vlad; Lehnert, Klaus; Macgibbon, Alistair; Spelman, Richard J; Davis, Stephen R; Snell, Russell G

    2014-01-01

    Milk is composed of a complex mixture of lipids, proteins, carbohydrates and various vitamins and minerals as a source of nutrition for young mammals. The composition of milk varies between individuals, with lipid composition in particular being highly heritable. Recent reports have highlighted a region of bovine chromosome 27 harbouring variants affecting milk fat percentage and fatty acid content. We aimed to further investigate this locus in two independent cattle populations, consisting of a Holstein-Friesian x Jersey crossbreed pedigree of 711 F2 cows, and a collection of 32,530 mixed ancestry Bos taurus cows. Bayesian genome-wide association mapping using markers imputed from the Illumina BovineHD chip revealed a large quantitative trait locus (QTL) for milk fat percentage on chromosome 27, present in both populations. We also investigated a range of other milk composition phenotypes, and report additional associations at this locus for fat yield, protein percentage and yield, lactose percentage and yield, milk volume, and the proportions of numerous milk fatty acids. We then used mammary RNA sequence data from 212 lactating cows to assess the transcript abundance of genes located in the milk fat percentage QTL interval. This analysis revealed a strong eQTL for AGPAT6, demonstrating that high milk fat percentage genotype is also additively associated with increased expression of the AGPAT6 gene. Finally, we used whole genome sequence data from six F1 sires to target a panel of novel AGPAT6 locus variants for genotyping in the F2 crossbreed population. Association analysis of 58 of these variants revealed highly significant association for polymorphisms mapping to the 5'UTR exons and intron 1 of AGPAT6. Taken together, these data suggest that variants affecting the expression of AGPAT6 are causally involved in differential milk fat synthesis, with pleiotropic consequences for a diverse range of other milk components. PMID:24465687

  13. Next generation exome sequencing of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients identifies rare and novel variants in candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    Christodoulou, Katja; Wiskin, Anthony E; Gibson, Jane; Tapper, William; Willis, Claire; Afzal, Nadeem A; Upstill-Goddard, Rosanna; Holloway, John W; Simpson, Michael A; Beattie, R Mark; Collins, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple genes have been implicated by association studies in altering inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predisposition. Paediatric patients often manifest more extensive disease and a particularly severe disease course. It is likely that genetic predisposition plays a more substantial role in this group. Objective To identify the spectrum of rare and novel variation in known IBD susceptibility genes using exome sequencing analysis in eight individual cases of childhood onset severe disease. Design DNA samples from the eight patients underwent targeted exome capture and sequencing. Data were processed through an analytical pipeline to align sequence reads, conduct quality checks, and identify and annotate variants where patient sequence differed from the reference sequence. For each patient, the entire complement of rare variation within strongly associated candidate genes was catalogued. Results Across the panel of 169 known IBD susceptibility genes, approximately 300 variants in 104 genes were found. Excluding splicing and HLA-class variants, 58 variants across 39 of these genes were classified as rare, with an alternative allele frequency of <5%, of which 17 were novel. Only two patients with early onset Crohn's disease exhibited rare deleterious variations within NOD2: the previously described R702W variant was the sole NOD2 variant in one patient, while the second patient also carried the L1007 frameshift insertion. Both patients harboured other potentially damaging mutations in the GSDMB, ERAP2 and SEC16A genes. The two patients severely affected with ulcerative colitis exhibited a distinct profile: both carried potentially detrimental variation in the BACH2 and IL10 genes not seen in other patients. Conclusion For each of the eight individuals studied, all non-synonymous, truncating and frameshift mutations across all known IBD genes were identified. A unique profile of rare and potentially damaging variants was evident for each patient with this

  14. Exome sequencing reveals frequent deleterious germline variants in cancer susceptibility genes in women with invasive breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Marissa S; Hart, Steven N; Kalari, Krishna R; Suman, Vera; Schahl, Kimberly A; Dockter, Travis J; Felten, Sara J; Sinnwell, Jason P; Thompson, Kevin J; Tang, Xiaojia; Vedell, Peter T; Barman, Poulami; Sicotte, Hugues; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Northfelt, Donald W; Gray, Richard J; McLaughlin, Sarah A; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Ingle, James N; Moyer, Ann M; Visscher, Daniel W; Jones, Katie; Conners, Amy; McDonough, Michelle; Wieben, Eric D; Wang, Liewei; Weinshilboum, Richard; Boughey, Judy C; Goetz, Matthew P

    2015-09-01

    When sequencing blood and tumor samples to identify targetable somatic variants for cancer therapy, clinically relevant germline variants may be uncovered. We evaluated the prevalence of deleterious germline variants in cancer susceptibility genes in women with breast cancer referred for neoadjuvant chemotherapy and returned clinically actionable results to patients. Exome sequencing was performed on blood samples from women with invasive breast cancer referred for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Germline variants within 142 hereditary cancer susceptibility genes were filtered and reviewed for pathogenicity. Return of results was offered to patients with deleterious variants in actionable genes if they were not aware of their result through clinical testing. 124 patients were enrolled (median age 51) with the following subtypes: triple negative (n = 43, 34.7%), HER2+ (n = 37, 29.8%), luminal B (n = 31, 25%), and luminal A (n = 13, 10.5%). Twenty-eight deleterious variants were identified in 26/124 (21.0%) patients in the following genes: ATM (n = 3), BLM (n = 1), BRCA1 (n = 4), BRCA2 (n = 8), CHEK2 (n = 2), FANCA (n = 1), FANCI (n = 1), FANCL (n = 1), FANCM (n = 1), FH (n = 1), MLH3 (n = 1), MUTYH (n = 2), PALB2 (n = 1), and WRN (n = 1). 121/124 (97.6%) patients consented to return of research results. Thirteen (10.5%) had actionable variants, including four that were returned to patients and led to changes in medical management. Deleterious variants in cancer susceptibility genes are highly prevalent in patients with invasive breast cancer referred for neoadjuvant chemotherapy undergoing exome sequencing. Detection of these variants impacts medical management. PMID:26296701

  15. Phenotypically distinct subtypes of psychosis accompany novel or rare variants in four different signaling genes

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, Thorsten M.; Berns, Adam; Shields, Jerry; Rothman, Karen; Walsh-Messinger, Julie; Goetz, Raymond R.; Chao, Moses V.; Malaspina, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Background Rare gene variants are important sources of schizophrenia vulnerability that likely interact with polygenic susceptibility loci. This study examined if novel or rare missense coding variants in any of four different signaling genes in sporadic schizophrenia cases were associated with clinical phenotypes in an exceptionally well-characterized sample. Method Structured interviews, cognition, symptoms and life course features were assessed in 48 ethnically-diverse cases with psychosis who underwent targeted exome sequencing of PTPRG (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Receptor Type G), SLC39A13 (Solute Carrier Family 39 (Zinc Transporter) Member 13), TGM5 (transglutaminase 5) and ARMS/KIDINS220 (Ankyrin repeat-rich membrane spanning protein or Kinase D-Interacting Substrate of 220 kDa). Cases harboring rare missense coding polymorphisms or novel mutations in one or more of these genes were compared to other cases not carrying any rare missense coding polymorphisms or novel mutations in these genes and healthy controls. Findings Fifteen of 48 cases (31.25%) carried rare or novel missense coding variants in one or more of these genes. The subgroups significantly differed in important features, including specific working memory deficits for PTPRG (n = 5); severe negative symptoms, global cognitive deficits and poor educational attainment, suggesting a developmental disorder, for SLC39A13 (n = 4); slow processing speed, childhood attention deficit disorder and milder symptoms for TGM5 (n = 4); and global cognitive deficits with good educational attainment suggesting neurodegeneration for ARMS/KIDINS220 (n = 5). Case vignettes are included in the appendix. Interpretation Genes prone to missense coding polymorphisms and/or mutations in sporadic cases may highlight influential genes for psychosis and illuminate heterogeneous pathways to schizophrenia. Ethnicity appears less important at the level of genetic variability. The sequence variations that potentially

  16. Multivariate Analysis of Dopaminergic Gene Variants as Risk Factors of Heroin Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Vereczkei, Andrea; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Szekely, Anna; Sarkozy, Peter; Antal, Peter; Szilagyi, Agnes; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Barta, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    Background Heroin dependence is a debilitating psychiatric disorder with complex inheritance. Since the dopaminergic system has a key role in rewarding mechanism of the brain, which is directly or indirectly targeted by most drugs of abuse, we focus on the effects and interactions among dopaminergic gene variants. Objective To study the potential association between allelic variants of dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2), ANKK1 (ankyrin repeat and kinase domain containing 1), dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4), catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) and dopamine transporter (SLC6A3) genes and heroin dependence in Hungarian patients. Methods 303 heroin dependent subjects and 555 healthy controls were genotyped for 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs4680 of the COMT gene; rs1079597 and rs1800498 of the DRD2 gene; rs1800497 of the ANKK1 gene; rs1800955, rs936462 and rs747302 of the DRD4 gene. Four variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) were also genotyped: 120 bp duplication and 48 bp VNTR in exon 3 of DRD4 and 40 bp VNTR and intron 8 VNTR of SLC6A3. We also perform a multivariate analysis of associations using Bayesian networks in Bayesian multilevel analysis (BN-BMLA). Findings and conclusions In single marker analysis the TaqIA (rs1800497) and TaqIB (rs1079597) variants were associated with heroin dependence. Moreover, –521 C/T SNP (rs1800955) of the DRD4 gene showed nominal association with a possible protective effect of the C allele. After applying the Bonferroni correction TaqIB was still significant suggesting that the minor (A) allele of the TaqIB SNP is a risk component in the genetic background of heroin dependence. The findings of the additional multiple marker analysis are consistent with the results of the single marker analysis, but this method was able to reveal an indirect effect of a promoter polymorphism (rs936462) of the DRD4 gene and this effect is mediated through the –521 C/T (rs1800955) polymorphism in the promoter. PMID:23840506

  17. RAP1 Is Essential for Silencing Telomeric Variant Surface Glycoprotein Genes in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Figueiredo, Luisa M.; Espinal, Amin; Okubo, Eiji; Li, Bibo

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Trypanosoma brucei expresses Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) genes in a strictly monoallelic fashion in its mammalian hosts, but it is unclear how this important virulence mechanism is enforced. Telomere position effect (TPE), an epigenetic phenomenon, has been proposed to play a critical role in VSG regulation, yet no telomeric protein has been identified whose disruption led to VSG derepression. We now identify tbRAP1 as an intrinsic component of the T. brucei telomere complex and a major regulator for silencing VSG expression sites (ESs). Knockdown of tbRAP1 led to derepression of all VSGs in silent ESs, but not VSGs located elsewhere, and resulted in stronger derepression of genes located within 10 kb from telomeres than genes located further upstream. This graduated silencing pattern suggests that telomere integrity plays a key role in tbRAP1-dependent silencing and VSG regulation. PMID:19345190

  18. Association Analysis of Bitter Receptor Genes in Five Isolated Populations Identifies a Significant Correlation between TAS2R43 Variants and Coffee Liking

    PubMed Central

    Pirastu, Nicola; Kooyman, Maarten; Traglia, Michela; Robino, Antonietta; Willems, Sara M.; Pistis, Giorgio; d’Adamo, Pio; Amin, Najaf; d’Eustacchio, Angela; Navarini, Luciano; Sala, Cinzia; Karssen, Lennart C.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Toniolo, Daniela; Gasparini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Coffee, one of the most popular beverages in the world, contains many different physiologically active compounds with a potential impact on people’s health. Despite the recent attention given to the genetic basis of its consumption, very little has been done in understanding genes influencing coffee preference among different individuals. Given its markedly bitter taste, we decided to verify if bitter receptor genes (TAS2Rs) variants affect coffee liking. In this light, 4066 people from different parts of Europe and Central Asia filled in a field questionnaire on coffee liking. They have been consequently recruited and included in the study. Eighty-eight SNPs covering the 25 TAS2R genes were selected from the available imputed ones and used to run association analysis for coffee liking. A significant association was detected with three SNP: one synonymous and two functional variants (W35S and H212R) on the TAS2R43 gene. Both variants have been shown to greatly reduce in vitro protein activity. Surprisingly the wild type allele, which corresponds to the functional form of the protein, is associated to higher liking of coffee. Since the hTAS2R43 receptor is sensible to caffeine, we verified if the detected variants produced differences in caffeine bitter perception on a subsample of people coming from the FVG cohort. We found a significant association between differences in caffeine perception and the H212R variant but not with the W35S, which suggests that the effect of the TAS2R43 gene on coffee liking is mediated by caffeine and in particular by the H212R variant. No other significant association was found with other TAS2R genes. In conclusion, the present study opens new perspectives in the understanding of coffee liking. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of the TAS2R43 gene in coffee hedonics and to identify which other genes and pathways are involved in its genetics. PMID:24647340

  19. Thirteen new patients with guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency and functional characterization of nineteen novel missense variants in the GAMT gene.

    PubMed

    Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet; Ndika, Joseph; Kanhai, Warsha; de Villemeur, Thierry Billette; Cheillan, David; Christensen, Ernst; Dorison, Nathalie; Hannig, Vickie; Hendriks, Yvonne; Hofstede, Floris C; Lion-Francois, Laurence; Lund, Allan M; Mundy, Helen; Pitelet, Gaele; Raspall-Chaure, Miquel; Scott-Schwoerer, Jessica A; Szakszon, Katalin; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Williams, Monique; Salomons, Gajja S

    2014-04-01

    Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency (GAMT-D) is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder of creatine biosynthesis. Creatine deficiency on cranial proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and elevated guanidinoacetate levels in body fluids are the biomarkers of GAMT-D. In 74 patients, 50 different mutations in the GAMT gene have been identified with missense variants being the most common. Clinical and biochemical features of the patients with missense variants were obtained from their physicians using a questionnaire. In 20 patients, 17 missense variants, 25% had a severe, 55% a moderate, and 20% a mild phenotype. The effect of these variants on GAMT enzyme activity was overexpressed using primary GAMT-D fibroblasts: 17 variants retained no significant activity and are therefore considered pathogenic. Two additional variants, c.22C>A (p.Pro8Thr) and c.79T>C (p.Tyr27His) (the latter detected in control cohorts) are in fact not pathogenic as these alleles restored GAMT enzyme activity, although both were predicted to be possibly damaging by in silico analysis. We report 13 new patients with GAMT-D, six novel mutations and functional analysis of 19 missense variants, all being included in our public LOVD database. Our functional assay is important for the confirmation of the pathogenicity of identified missense variants in the GAMT gene. PMID:24415674

  20. Enhanced expression of class I major histocompatibility complex gene (Dk) products on immunogenic variants of a spontaneous murine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Carlow, D A; Kerbel, R S; Feltis, J T; Elliott, B E

    1985-08-01

    Both immunogenic and nonimmunogenic variant clones were isolated from a recently obtained spontaneous murine adenocarcinoma after treatment (xenogenization) with either the mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate or the DNA hypomethylating agent, and "gene activator," 5-azacytidine. Clonal analysis of the untreated tumor population confirmed that immunogenic variants arose as a consequence of the xenogenization protocol. At a dose of 10(6) cells per mouse, nonimmunogenic variants, like the parental tumor line, grew progressively in normal syngeneic recipients. In contrast, immunogenic variants were rejected in normal syngeneic mice and grew progressively only in T-cell-deficient nude mice. Serologic analysis of the respective clonal variants revealed that immunogenic variants expressed substantially elevated (fourfold to tenfold) levels of class I H-2Dk antigen relative to parental or nonimmunogenic cell lines. Two variants exhibiting marginal immunogenicity expressed high and low levels of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigen, respectively suggesting that elevated MHC expression, although possibly a contributing factor, did not account for the immunogenic phenotype in all cases. Finally, the immunogenic phenotype of two variants decayed with time in culture. Clones in the process of reversion lost their elevated Dk gene expression and became progressively more tumorigenic in normal syngeneic mice. Together, these data are consistent with a hypothesis that elevated MHC expression can contribute to the immunogenic phenotype of originally low MHC-expressing tumors and that the reduced level of MHC observed in certain clinical cancers may have significant implications with regard to immunologic aspects of the tumor-host relationship.

  1. Genetic Variants of PTPN2 Gene in Chinese Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hui; Li, Jiamei; Chen, Xiaoyun; Zhou, Xiao; Zhu, Weiwei; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported the association of PTPN2 gene with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in many populations but not in the Chinese Han population. Therefore, the goal of our study was to replicate the reported association between 2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs478582 and rs2542151) in the PTPN2 gene and T1DM in Chinese Han children. Material/Methods This case-control study included 141 Chinese Han children with T1DM and 282 healthy controls. Genetic variants of rs478582 and rs2542151 in PTPN2 gene were performed by PCR amplification followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Results No difference was observed in association of rs478582 in The PTPN2 gene and T1DM. The distribution of allele frequency of rs2542151 differed significantly between T1DM patients and healthy controls (OR, 0.6; 95%CI: 0.44 to 0.95; and P=0.024). Dominant model of rs254215 also was associated with T1DM (OR, 0.6; 95%CI: 0.40 to 0.96; and P=0.032). Younger age at onset in G carriers appeared to increase the risk for T1DM (P=0.030). Conclusions The findings suggested that rs2542151 SNP in The PTPN2 gene was associated with T1DM in Chinese Han children. Further studies with larger sample sizes involving gene-gene interactions are urgently needed. PMID:26344020

  2. Molecular characterization of a genetic variant of the steroid hormone-binding globulin gene in heterozygous subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, D.O.; Catterall, J.F.; Carino, C.

    1995-04-01

    Steroid hormone-binding globulin in human serum displays different isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns among individuals, suggesting genetic variation in the gene for this extracellular steroid carrier protein. Analysis of allele frequencies and family studies suggested the existence of two codominant alleles of the gene. Subsequent determination of the molecular basis of a variant of the gene was carried out using DNA from homozygous individuals from a single Belgian family. It was of interest to characterize other variant individuals to determine whether all variants identified by IEF phenotyping were caused by the same mutation or whether other mutations occurred in the gene in different populations. Previous studies identified Mexican subjects who were heterozygous for the variant IEF phenotype. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to localize the mutation in these subjects and to purify the variant allele for DNA sequence analysis. The results show that the mutation in this population is identical to that identified in the Belgian family, and no other mutations were detected in the gene. These data represent the first analysis of steroid hormone-binding globulin gene variation in heterozygous subjects and further support the conclusion of biallelism of the gene worldwide. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Polymorphic variants in vitamin D signaling pathway genes and the risk of endometriosis-associated infertility.

    PubMed

    Szczepańska, Malgorzata; Mostowska, Adrianna; Wirstlein, Przemyslaw; Skrzypczak, Jana; Misztal, Matthew; Jagodziński, Paweł P

    2015-11-01

    It has recently been reported that vitamin D blood plasma levels are associated with reduced risk of endometriosis. The present study aimed to investigate whether the vitamin D binding protein (GC), vitamin D receptor (VDR), and retinoid X receptor (RXR) gene variants may be genetic risk factors for endometriosis‑associated infertility. The subjects consisted of 154 women with endometriosis‑associated infertility and 347 controls. Using polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism and high resolution melt techniques, the GC rs1155563, rs2298849 and rs7041; RXRA rs10881578, rs10776909 and rs749759; VDR BsmI rs1544410; and FokI rs2228570 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were investigated in the patients with endometriosis and the healthy controls. The results indicated that no significant differences were observed between the genotype and allele frequencies of all experimental SNPs in the vitamin D signaling pathway genes in women with endometriosis-associated infertility and controls. However, a significant association was present between the A‑T haplotype, consisting of VDR rs1544410 and rs222857 minor alleles, and endometriosis-associated infertility [OR=1.659 (1.122‑2.453), P=0.011]. The results of the present study suggested that VDR gene variants act as genetic risk factors for endometriosis‑associated infertility.

  4. Association between trefoil factor 3 gene variants and idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Haroun, Sally; Altmäe, Signe; Karypidis, Helena; Kuningas, Maris; Landgren, Britt-Marie; Akerud, Helena; Skjöldebrand-Sparre, Lottie; Hosseini, Frida; Bremme, Katarina; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli

    2014-12-01

    Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) gene is an inflammatory mediator expressed in human endometrium during the window of implantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible genetic association of TFF3 variants in recurrent spontaneous abortion. Women with a history of recurrent spontaneous abortion (n = 164) and healthy pregnant women (n = 143) were genotyped for five TFF3 polymorphisms (rs225439 G/A, rs533093 C/T, rs225361 A/G, rs11701143 T/C and rs77436142 G/C). In addition, haplotypes formed within the gene were analysed. Within the recurrent spontaneous abortion group, women who at some point had given birth and childless women had 4.19 ± 1.75 and 5.34 ± 3.42 consecutive spontaneous abortions, respectively. Women who had experience recurrent spontaneous abortions had a lower allele frequency of the rs11701143 promoter region minor C allele compared with fertile women (0.02 versus 0.05, P = 0.015). Patients with rs225361 AG genotype had significantly more successful pregnancies before spontaneous abortion than those with homozygous AA and GG genotypes (P = 0.014). No significant differences in haplotype frequencies between patients and controls were detected. Possible genetic risk factors identified that might contribute to the pathogenesis of idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion were TFF3 gene variants.

  5. C282Y-HFE Gene Variant Affects Cholesterol Metabolism in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ali-Rahmani, Fatima; Huang, Michael A.; Schengrund, C.-L.; Connor, James R.; Lee, Sang Y.

    2014-01-01

    Although disruptions in the maintenance of iron and cholesterol metabolism have been implicated in several cancers, the association between variants in the HFE gene that is associated with cellular iron uptake and cholesterol metabolism has not been studied. The C282Y-HFE variant is a risk factor for different cancers, is known to affect sphingolipid metabolism, and to result in increased cellular iron uptake. The effect of this variant on cholesterol metabolism and its possible relevance to cancer phenotype was investigated using wild type (WT) and C282Y-HFE transfected human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Expression of C282Y-HFE in SH-SY5Y cells resulted in a significant increase in total cholesterol as well as increased transcription of a number of genes involved in its metabolism compared to cells expressing WT-HFE. The marked increase in expression of NPC1L1 relative to that of most other genes, was accompanied by a significant increase in expression of NPC1, a protein that functions in cholesterol uptake by cells. Because inhibitors of cholesterol metabolism have been proposed to be beneficial for treating certain cancers, their effect on the viability of C282Y-HFE neuroblastoma cells was ascertained. C282Y-HFE cells were significantly more sensitive than WT-HFE cells to U18666A, an inhibitor of desmosterol Δ24-reductase the enzyme catalyzing the last step in cholesterol biosynthesis. This was not seen for simvastatin, ezetimibe, or a sphingosine kinase inhibitor. These studies indicate that cancers presenting in carriers of the C282Y-HFE allele might be responsive to treatment designed to selectively reduce cholesterol content in their tumor cells. PMID:24533143

  6. Many amino acid substitution variants identified in DNA repair genes during human population screenings are predicted to impact protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, T; Jones, I M; Mohrenweiser, H W

    2003-11-03

    Over 520 different amino acid substitution variants have been previously identified in the systematic screening of 91 human DNA repair genes for sequence variation. Two algorithms were employed to predict the impact of these amino acid substitutions on protein activity. Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) classified 226 of 508 variants (44%) as ''Intolerant''. Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) classed 165 of 489 amino acid substitutions (34%) as ''Probably or Possibly Damaging''. Another 9-15% of the variants were classed as ''Potentially Intolerant or Damaging''. The results from the two algorithms are highly associated, with concordance in predicted impact observed for {approx}62% of the variants. Twenty one to thirty one percent of the variant proteins are predicted to exhibit reduced activity by both algorithms. These variants occur at slightly lower individual allele frequency than do the variants classified as ''Tolerant'' or ''Benign''. Both algorithms correctly predicted the impact of 26 functionally characterized amino acid substitutions in the APE1 protein on biochemical activity, with one exception. It is concluded that a substantial fraction of the missense variants observed in the general human population are functionally relevant. These variants are expected to be the molecular genetic and biochemical basis for the associations of reduced DNA repair capacity phenotypes with elevated cancer risk.

  7. Targeted Re-Sequencing Approach of Candidate Genes Implicates Rare Potentially Functional Variants in Tourette Syndrome Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, John; Potamianou, Hera; Xing, Jinchuan; Deng, Li; Karagiannidis, Iordanis; Tsetsos, Fotis; Drineas, Petros; Tarnok, Zsanett; Rizzo, Renata; Wolanczyk, Tomasz; Farkas, Luca; Nagy, Peter; Szymanska, Urszula; Androutsos, Christos; Tsironi, Vaia; Koumoula, Anastasia; Barta, Csaba; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy L.; Tischfield, Jay; Paschou, Peristera; Heiman, Gary A.; Georgitsi, Marianthi

    2016-01-01

    Although the genetic basis of Tourette Syndrome (TS) remains unclear, several candidate genes have been implicated. Using a set of 382 TS individuals of European ancestry we investigated four candidate genes for TS (HDC, SLITRK1, BTBD9, and SLC6A4) in an effort to identify possibly causal variants using a targeted re-sequencing approach by next generation sequencing technology. Identification of possible disease causing variants under different modes of inheritance was performed using the algorithms implemented in VAAST. We prioritized variants using Variant ranker and validated five rare variants via Sanger sequencing in HDC and SLITRK1, all of which are predicted to be deleterious. Intriguingly, one of the identified variants is in linkage disequilibrium with a variant that is included among the top hits of a genome-wide association study for response to citalopram treatment, an antidepressant drug with off-label use also in obsessive compulsive disorder. Our findings provide additional evidence for the implication of these two genes in TS susceptibility and the possible role of these proteins in the pathobiology of TS should be revisited. PMID:27708560

  8. Functional variants in CYP1B1, KRAS and MTHFR genes are associated with shorter telomere length in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Cerne, Jasmina Z; Pohar-Perme, Maja; Cerkovnik, Petra; Gersak, Ksenija; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2015-07-01

    Estrogens and antioxidants indirectly alleviate telomere attrition. However, available clinical data on the association between hormone exposure and telomere length are inconclusive. In the present study, we examined the effects of exogenous estrogen use and of some genetic factors implicated in estrogen metabolism and oxidative stress response on mean leukocyte telomere length. We studied 259 postmenopausal women. Genotyping was conducted for CYP1B1 (rs1056836), COMT (rs4680), GSTP1 (rs1695), MnSOD (rs4880), KRAS (rs61764370), and MTHFR (rs1801133 and rs1801131) polymorphisms. Mean leukocyte telomere length was measured using a quantitative real-time PCR assay. In multivariate analysis we found no association between oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and mean leukocyte telomere length. The presence of variant alleles in CYP1B1, KRAS and MTHFR genes was statistically significantly associated with shorter mean leukocyte telomere length. Further, the data provided evidence for the effect modification of the association between HRT and mean leukocyte telomere length by the CYP1B1, KRAS and MTHFR genotypes. Our findings suggest that functionally relevant genetic variants within estrogen and folate metabolic pathways may influence telomere length. We propose these genetic factors should be taken into consideration when interpreting associations between hormone exposure and telomere length.

  9. Functional variants in CYP1B1, KRAS and MTHFR genes are associated with shorter telomere length in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Cerne, Jasmina Z; Pohar-Perme, Maja; Cerkovnik, Petra; Gersak, Ksenija; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2015-07-01

    Estrogens and antioxidants indirectly alleviate telomere attrition. However, available clinical data on the association between hormone exposure and telomere length are inconclusive. In the present study, we examined the effects of exogenous estrogen use and of some genetic factors implicated in estrogen metabolism and oxidative stress response on mean leukocyte telomere length. We studied 259 postmenopausal women. Genotyping was conducted for CYP1B1 (rs1056836), COMT (rs4680), GSTP1 (rs1695), MnSOD (rs4880), KRAS (rs61764370), and MTHFR (rs1801133 and rs1801131) polymorphisms. Mean leukocyte telomere length was measured using a quantitative real-time PCR assay. In multivariate analysis we found no association between oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and mean leukocyte telomere length. The presence of variant alleles in CYP1B1, KRAS and MTHFR genes was statistically significantly associated with shorter mean leukocyte telomere length. Further, the data provided evidence for the effect modification of the association between HRT and mean leukocyte telomere length by the CYP1B1, KRAS and MTHFR genotypes. Our findings suggest that functionally relevant genetic variants within estrogen and folate metabolic pathways may influence telomere length. We propose these genetic factors should be taken into consideration when interpreting associations between hormone exposure and telomere length. PMID:25987236

  10. Variants in the inflammatory IL6 and MPO genes modulate stroke susceptibility through main effects and gene–gene interactions

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Helena; Krug, Tiago; Sobral, João; Albergaria, Isabel; Gaspar, Gisela; Ferro, José M; Oliveira, Sofia A; Vicente, Astrid M

    2011-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that inflammation within the central nervous system contributes to stroke risk and recovery. Inflammatory conditions increase stroke risk, and the inflammatory response is of major importance in recovery and healing processes after stroke. We investigated the role of inflammatory genes IL1B, IL6, MPO, and TNF in stroke susceptibility and recovery in a population sample of 672 patients and 530 controls, adjusting for demographic, clinical and lifestyle risk factors, and stroke severity parameters. We also considered the likely complexity of inflammatory mechanisms in stroke, by assessing the combined effects of multiple genes. Two interleukin 6 (IL6) and one myeloperoxidase (MPO) single-nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly associated with stroke risk (0.022gene variants of low to moderate effect in stroke risk. An epistatic interaction between the IL6 and MPO genes was also identified in association with stroke susceptibility (P=0.031 after 1,000 permutations). In a subset of 546 patients, one IL6 haplotype was associated with stroke outcome at 3 months (correctedP=0.024), an intriguing finding warranting further validation. Our findings support the association of the IL6 gene and present novel evidence for the involvement of MPO in stroke susceptibility, suggesting a modulation of stroke risk by main gene effects, clinical and lifestyle factors, and gene–gene interactions. PMID:21407237

  11. Isolation and characterization of novel RECK tumor suppressor gene splice variants.

    PubMed

    Trombetta-Lima, Marina; Winnischofer, Sheila Maria Brochado; Demasi, Marcos Angelo Almeida; Astorino Filho, Renato; Carreira, Ana Claudia Oliveira; Wei, Beiyang; de Assis-Ribas, Thais; Konig, Michelle Silberspitz; Bowman-Colin, Christian; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli Mieko; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi; Stetler-Stevenson, William; Sogayar, Mari Cleide

    2015-10-20

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and lethal of the central nervous system glial-derived tumors. RECK suppresses tumor invasion by negatively regulating at least three members of the matrix metalloproteinase family: MMP-9, MMP-2, and MT1-MMP. A positive correlation has been observed between the abundance of RECK expression in tumor samples and a more favorable prognosis for patients with several types of tumors. In the present study, novel alternatively spliced variants of the RECK gene: RECK-B and RECK-I were isolated by RT-PCR and sequenced. The expression levels and profiles of these alternative RECK transcripts, as well as canonical RECK were determined in tissue samples of malignant astrocytomas of different grades and in a normal tissue RNA panel by qRT-PCR. Our results show that higher canonical RECK expression, accompanied by a higher canonical to alternative transcript expression ratio, positively correlates with higher overall survival rate after chemotherapeutic treatment of GBM patients. U87MG and T98G cells over-expressing the RECK-B alternative variant display higher anchorage-independent clonal growth and do not display modulation of, respectively, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression. Our findings suggest that RECK transcript variants might have opposite roles in GBM biology and the ratio of their expression levels may be informative for the prognostic outcome of GBM patients. PMID:26431549

  12. Nucleolin Is Required for DNA Methylation State and the Expression of rRNA Gene Variants in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Pontvianne, Frédéric; Abou-Ellail, Mohamed; Douet, Julien; Comella, Pascale; Matia, Isabel; Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; DeBures, Anne; Blevins, Todd; Cooke, Richard; Medina, Francisco J.; Tourmente, Sylvette; Pikaard, Craig S.; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays in copy numbers ranging from several hundred to several thousand in plants. Although it is clear that not all copies are transcribed under normal growth conditions, the molecular basis controlling the expression of specific sets of rRNA genes remains unclear. Here, we report four major rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, while transcription of one of these rRNA variants is induced, the others are either repressed or remain unaltered in A. thaliana plants with a disrupted nucleolin-like protein gene (Atnuc-L1). Remarkably, the most highly represented rRNA gene variant, which is inactive in WT plants, is reactivated in Atnuc-L1 mutants. We show that accumulated pre–rRNAs originate from RNA Pol I transcription and are processed accurately. Moreover, we show that disruption of the AtNUC-L1 gene induces loss of symmetrical DNA methylation without affecting histone epigenetic marks at rRNA genes. Collectively, these data reveal a novel mechanism for rRNA gene transcriptional regulation in which the nucleolin protein plays a major role in controlling active and repressed rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis. PMID:21124873

  13. Catecholaminergic Gene Variants: Contribution in ADHD and Associated Comorbid Attributes in the Eastern Indian Probands

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Kanyakumarika; Bhaduri, Nipa; Sarkar, Keka; Sinha, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Kanchan

    2013-01-01

    Contribution of genes in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been explored in various populations, and several genes were speculated to contribute small but additive effects. We have assessed variants in four genes, DDC (rs3837091 and rs3735273), DRD2 (rs1800496, rs1801028, and rs1799732), DRD4 (rs4646984 and rs4646983), and COMT (rs165599 and rs740603) in Indian ADHD subjects with comorbid attributes. Cases were recruited following the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-IV-TR after obtaining informed written consent. DNA isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes of ADHD probands (N = 170), their parents (N = 310), and ethnically matched controls (n = 180) was used for genotyping followed by population- and family-based analyses by the UNPHASED program. DRD4 sites showed significant difference in allelic frequencies by case-control analysis, while DDC and COMT exhibited bias in familial transmission (P < 0.05). rs3837091 “AGAG,” rs3735273 “A,” rs1799732 “C,” rs740603 “G,” rs165599 “G” and single repeat alleles of rs4646984/rs4646983 showed positive correlation with co-morbid characteristics (P < 0.05). Multi dimensionality reduction analysis of case-control data revealed significant interactive effects of all four genes (P < 0.001), while family-based data showed interaction between DDC and DRD2 (P = 0.04). This first study on these gene variants in Indo-Caucasoid ADHD probands and associated co-morbid conditions indicates altered dopaminergic neurotransmission in ADHD. PMID:24163823

  14. Promoter variants determine γ-aminobutyric acid homeostasis-related gene transcription in human epileptic hippocampi.

    PubMed

    Pernhorst, Katharina; Raabe, Anna; Niehusmann, Pitt; van Loo, Karen M J; Grote, Alexander; Hoffmann, Per; Cichon, Sven; Sander, Thomas; Schoch, Susanne; Becker, Albert J

    2011-12-01

    The functional consequences of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with episodic brain disorders such as epilepsy and depression are unclear. Allelic associations with generalized epilepsies have been reported for single nucleotide polymorphisms rs1883415 (ALDH5A1; succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase) and rs4906902 (GABRB3; GABAA β3), both of which are present in the 5' regulatory region of genes involved in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) homeostasis. To address their allelic association with episodic brain disorders and allele-specific impact on the transcriptional regulation of these genes in human brain tissue, DNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) isolated from hippocampi were obtained at epilepsy surgery of 146 pharmacoresistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) patients and from 651 healthy controls. We found that the C allele of rs1883415 is accumulated to a greater extentin mTLE versus controls. By real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses, individuals homozygous for the C allele showed higher ALDH5A1 mRNA expression. The rs4906902 G allele of the GABRB3 gene was overrepresented in mTLE patients with depression; individuals homozygous for the G allele showed reduced GABRB3 mRNA expression. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that rs1883415 and rs4906902 alter the DNA binding affinity of the transcription factors Egr-3 in ALDH5A1 and MEF-2 in GABRB3 promoters, respectively. Using in vitro luciferase transfection assays, we observed that, in both cases, the transcription factors regulate gene expression depending on the allelic variant in the same direction as in the human hippocampi. Our data suggest that distinct promoter variants may sensitize individuals for differential, potentially stimulus-induced alterations of GABA homeostasis-relevant gene expression. This might contribute to the episodic onset of symptoms and point to new targets for pharmacotherapies.

  15. Biologically inspired survival analysis based on integrating gene expression as mediator with genomic variants.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Ibrahim; Clarke, Robert; Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Yue; Yu, Guoqiang

    2016-10-01

    Accurately linking cancer molecular profiling with survival can lead to improvements in the clinical management of cancer. However, existing survival analysis relies on statistical evidence from a single level of data, without paying much attention to the integration of interacting multi-level data and the underlying biology. Advances in genomic techniques provide unprecedented power of characterizing the cancer tissue in a more complete manner than before, offering the opportunity to design biologically informed and integrative approaches for survival data analysis. Human cancer is characterized by somatic copy number alternation and unique gene expression profiles. However, it remains largely unclear how to integrate the gene expression and genetic variant data to achieve a better prediction of patient survival and an improved understanding of disease progression. Consistent with the biological hierarchy from DNA to RNA, we prioritize each survival-relevant feature with two separate scores, predictive and mechanistic. For mRNA expression levels, predictive features are those mRNAs whose variation in expression levels is associated with survival outcome, and mechanistic features are those mRNAs whose variation in expression levels is associated with genomic variants. Further, we simultaneously integrate information from both the predictive model and the mechanistic model through our new approach, GEMPS (Gene Expression as a Mediator for Predicting Survival). Applied on two cancer types (ovarian and glioblastoma multiforme), our method achieved better prediction power (p-value: 6.18E-03-5.15E-11) than peer methods (GE.CNAs and GE.CNAs. Lasso). Gene set enrichment analysis confirms that the genes utilized for the final survival analysis are biologically important and relevant. PMID:27619193

  16. Assessing Gene-Environment Interactions for Common and Rare Variants with Binary Traits Using Gene-Trait Similarity Regression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guolin; Marceau, Rachel; Zhang, Daowen; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Accounting for gene–environment (G×E) interactions in complex trait association studies can facilitate our understanding of genetic heterogeneity under different environmental exposures, improve the ability to discover susceptible genes that exhibit little marginal effect, provide insight into the biological mechanisms of complex diseases, help to identify high-risk subgroups in the population, and uncover hidden heritability. However, significant G×E interactions can be difficult to find. The sample sizes required for sufficient power to detect association are much larger than those needed for genetic main effects, and interactions are sensitive to misspecification of the main-effects model. These issues are exacerbated when working with binary phenotypes and rare variants, which bear less information on association. In this work, we present a similarity-based regression method for evaluating G×E interactions for rare variants with binary traits. The proposed model aggregates the genetic and G×E information across markers, using genetic similarity, thus increasing the ability to detect G×E signals. The model has a random effects interpretation, which leads to robustness against main-effect misspecifications when evaluating G×E interactions. We construct score tests to examine G×E interactions and a computationally efficient EM algorithm to estimate the nuisance variance components. Using simulations and data applications, we show that the proposed method is a flexible and powerful tool to study the G×E effect in common or rare variant studies with binary traits. PMID:25585620

  17. The frequency of polymorphic variants of filaggrin gene and clinical atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Weryńska-Kalemba, Maria; Bożek, Andrzej; Filipowska, Barbara; Żebracka-Gala, Jadwiga; Rusinek, Dagmara; Kula, Dorota; Jarząb, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction As far as pathogenesis of the atopic dermatitis (AD) is concerned, the roles of an impaired epidermal barrier and cornified cell envelope are widely emphasized. Aim The assessment of mutations of the filaggrin gene and their connection with the clinical picture of AD as well as selected allergological and environmental indicators. Material and methods 105 patients with diagnosed AD on the basis of diagnostic criteria were included. For every patient of the examined group, quantitative determination of the total concentration of IgE and the concentration of IgE antibodies to selected allergens were examined. For all patients, studies were performed by means of analysis of two genomic gene variants of profilaggrin (FLG) – R501X and 2282del4. Results Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene were shown in 12 (11.4%) patients in the examined group. All patients in the study group who developed one of the tested loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene demonstrated an extrinsic, allergic form of atopic dermatitis. A significant association (p = 0.0002) between the presence of one of the tested loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene and elevated levels of total concentration of immunoglobulin E was shown. Conclusions Patients with AD of null mutations in the filaggrin gene demonstrate a relationship with the total and specific concentration of immunoglobulin E, specifically higher concentrations of IgE against aeroallergens and alimentary allergens as well as elevated levels of total immunoglobulin E. PMID:26985177

  18. Detection of Novel Gene Variants Associated with Congenital Hypothyroidism in a Finnish Patient Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Löf, Christoffer; Patyra, Konrad; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Vangipurapu, Jagadish; Undeutsch, Henriette; Jaeschke, Holger; Pajunen, Tuulia; Kero, Andreina; Krude, Heiko; Biebermann, Heike; Kleinau, Gunnar; Kühnen, Peter; Rantakari, Krista; Miettinen, Päivi; Kirjavainen, Turkka; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Mustila, Taina; Jääskeläinen, Jarmo; Ojaniemi, Marja; Toppari, Jorma; Ignatius, Jaakko; Laakso, Markku

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is defined as the lack of thyroid hormones at birth. Mutations in at least 15 different genes have been associated with this disease. While up to 20% of CH cases are hereditary, the majority of cases are sporadic with unknown etiology. Apart from a monogenic pattern of inheritance, multigenic mechanisms have been suggested to play a role in CH. The genetics of CH has not been studied in Finland so far. Therefore, multigenic sequencing of CH candidate genes was performed in a Finnish patient cohort with both familial and sporadic CH. Methods: A targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) panel, covering all exons of the major CH genes, was applied for 15 patients with sporadic and 11 index cases with familial CH. Results: Among the familial cases, six pathogenic mutations were found in the TPO, PAX8, and TSHR genes. Furthermore, pathogenic NKX2.1 and TG mutations were identified from sporadic cases, together with likely pathogenic variants in the TG, NKX2.5, SLC26A4, and DUOX2 genes. All identified novel pathogenic mutations were confirmed by Sanger-sequencing and characterized in silico and/or in vitro. Conclusion: In summary, the CH panel provides an efficient, cost-effective, and multigenic screening tool for both known and novel CH gene mutations. Hence, it may be a useful method to identify accurately the genetic etiology for dyshormogenic, familial, or syndromic forms of CH. PMID:27373559

  19. Variants in the ATM gene associated with a reduced risk of contralateral breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Concannon, Patrick; Haile, Robert W.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Rosenstein, Barry S.; Gatti, Richard A.; Teraoka, Sharon N.; Diep, Anh T.; Jansen, Laila; Atencio, David P.; Langholz, Bryan; Capanu, Marinela; Liang, Xiaolin; Begg, Colin B.; Thomas, Duncan C.; Bernstein, Leslie; Olsen, Jørgen H.; Malone, Kathleen E.; Lynch, Charles F.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bernstein, Jonine L.

    2008-01-01

    Between five and ten percent of women who survive a first primary breast cancer will subsequently develop a second primary cancer in the contralateral breast. The Women’s Environment Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology (WECARE) Study was designed to identify genetic and environmental determinants of contralateral breast cancer (CBC). In this study, 708 women with asynchronous CBC served as cases and 1397 women with unilateral breast cancer served as controls. ATM, a serine-threonine kinase, controls the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, and has been implicated in breast cancer risk. Complete mutation screening of the ATM gene in all 2105 study participants identified 240 distinct sequence variants; only 15 were observed in more than 1% of subjects. Among the rare variants, deleterious alleles resulting in loss of ATM function were associated with a non-significant increase in risk of CBC. In contrast, carriers of common variants had a statistically significant reduction in risk of CBC. Four of these 15 variants were individually associated with a significantly decreased risk of second primary breast cancer (c.1899-55T>G, RR=0.5, 95% CI=0.3–0.8; c.3161C>G, RR=0.5, 95% CI=0.3–0.9; c.5558A>T, RR=0.2, 95% CI=0.1–0.6; c.6348-54T>C RR=0.2, 95% CI=0.1–0.8). These data suggest that some alleles of ATM may exert an anti-neoplastic effect, perhaps by altering the activity of ATM as an initiator of DNA damage responses or a regulator of p53. PMID:18701470

  20. Plasmodium falciparum complicated malaria: Modulation and connectivity between exportome and variant surface antigen gene families.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Boopathi, P A; Pandey, Isha; Kohli, Ramandeep; Karwa, Rohan; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Kochar, Sanjay K; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2015-05-01

    In temperate and sub-tropical regions of Asia and Latin America, complicated malaria manifested as hepatic dysfunction or renal dysfunction is seen in all age groups. There has been a concerted focus on understanding the patho-physiological and molecular basis of complicated malaria in children, much less is known about it in adults. We report here, the analysis of data from a custom, cross strain microarray (Agilent Platform) using material from adult patient samples, showing hepatic dysfunction or renal failure. These are the most common manifestations seen in adults along with cerebral malaria. The data has been analyzed with reference to variant surface antigens, encoded by the var, rifin and stevor gene families. The differential regulation profiles of key genes (comparison between Plasmodium falciparum complicated and uncomplicated isolates) have been observed. The exportome has been analyzed using similar parameters. Gene ontology term based functional enrichment of differentially regulated genes identified, up-regulated genes statistically enriched (P<0.05) to critical biological processes like generation of precursor metabolite and energy, chromosome organization and electron transport chain. Systems network based functional enrichment of overall differentially regulated genes yielded a similar result. We are reporting here, up-regulation of var group B and C genes whose proteins are predicted to interact with CD36 receptor in the host, the up-regulation of domain cassette 13 (DC13) containing var group A, as also the up-regulation of group A rifins and many of the stevors. This is contrary to most other reports from pediatric patients, with cerebral malaria where the up-regulation of mostly var A group genes have been seen. A protein-protein interaction based network has been created and analysis performed. This co-expression and text mining based network has shown overall connectivity between the variant surface antigens (VSA) and the exportome. The up

  1. Nucleotide changes in sequential variants of influenza virus hemagglutinin genes and molecular structures of corresponding monoclonal antibodies specific for each variant.

    PubMed Central

    Meek, K; Johansson, B; Schulman, J; Bona, C; Capra, J D

    1989-01-01

    We have generated four monoclonal antibodies specific for one or more members of a series of two sequentially derived PR8 influenza virus variants. Three of these antibodies share cross-reactive idiotypes. The amino acid sequences of these antibodies were determined, and it was found that two of these antibodies use genes from the VH7183 family, whereas the third uses a gene from the VHJ558 family. All four monoclonal antibodies derive from different families of genes encoding the variable region of the kappa chain. The RNA sequence of the parent PR8 virus as well as the RNA sequences of the sequential variants were also determined, and it was demonstrated that the variant hemagglutinin molecules differed from the parent molecule by only a single amino acid interchange. Despite these subtle differences in antigenic structures of hemagglutinin, and the cross-reactive idiotype of the antibodies, their primary structures were very different. These data reinforce the idea that a wide variety of antibody structures exist which are directed against subtly different structures in biologically important antigens. PMID:2471975

  2. Identification of Genome-Wide Variants and Discovery of Variants Associated with Brassica rapa Clubroot Resistance Gene Rcr1 through Bulked Segregant RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fengqun; Zhang, Xingguo; Huang, Zhen; Chu, Mingguang; Song, Tao; Falk, Kevin C; Deora, Abhinandan; Chen, Qilin; Zhang, Yan; McGregor, Linda; Gossen, Bruce D; McDonald, Mary Ruth; Peng, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Clubroot, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, is an important disease on Brassica species worldwide. A clubroot resistance gene, Rcr1, with efficacy against pathotype 3 of P. brassicae, was previously mapped to chromosome A03 of B. rapa in pak choy cultivar "Flower Nabana". In the current study, resistance to pathotypes 2, 5 and 6 was shown to be associated with Rcr1 region on chromosome A03. Bulked segregant RNA sequencing was performed and short read sequences were assembled into 10 chromosomes of the B. rapa reference genome v1.5. For the resistant (R) bulks, a total of 351.8 million (M) sequences, 30,836.5 million bases (Mb) in length, produced 120-fold coverage of the reference genome. For the susceptible (S) bulks, 322.9 M sequences, 28,216.6 Mb in length, produced 109-fold coverage. In total, 776.2 K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 122.2 K insertion / deletion (InDels) in R bulks and 762.8 K SNPs and 118.7 K InDels in S bulks were identified; each chromosome had about 87% SNPs and 13% InDels, with 78% monomorphic and 22% polymorphic variants between the R and S bulks. Polymorphic variants on each chromosome were usually below 23%, but made up 34% of the variants on chromosome A03. There were 35 genes annotated in the Rcr1 target region and variants were identified in 21 genes. The numbers of poly variants differed significantly among the genes. Four out of them encode Toll-Interleukin-1 receptor / nucleotide-binding site / leucine-rich-repeat proteins; Bra019409 and Bra019410 harbored the higher numbers of polymorphic variants, which indicates that they are more likely candidates of Rcr1. Fourteen SNP markers in the target region were genotyped using the Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR method and were confirmed to associate with Rcr1. Selected SNP markers were analyzed with 26 recombinants obtained from a segregating population consisting of 1587 plants, indicating that they were completely linked to Rcr1. Nine SNP markers were used for marker

  3. Identification of Genome-Wide Variants and Discovery of Variants Associated with Brassica rapa Clubroot Resistance Gene Rcr1 through Bulked Segregant RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fengqun; Zhang, Xingguo; Huang, Zhen; Chu, Mingguang; Song, Tao; Falk, Kevin C; Deora, Abhinandan; Chen, Qilin; Zhang, Yan; McGregor, Linda; Gossen, Bruce D; McDonald, Mary Ruth; Peng, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Clubroot, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, is an important disease on Brassica species worldwide. A clubroot resistance gene, Rcr1, with efficacy against pathotype 3 of P. brassicae, was previously mapped to chromosome A03 of B. rapa in pak choy cultivar "Flower Nabana". In the current study, resistance to pathotypes 2, 5 and 6 was shown to be associated with Rcr1 region on chromosome A03. Bulked segregant RNA sequencing was performed and short read sequences were assembled into 10 chromosomes of the B. rapa reference genome v1.5. For the resistant (R) bulks, a total of 351.8 million (M) sequences, 30,836.5 million bases (Mb) in length, produced 120-fold coverage of the reference genome. For the susceptible (S) bulks, 322.9 M sequences, 28,216.6 Mb in length, produced 109-fold coverage. In total, 776.2 K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 122.2 K insertion / deletion (InDels) in R bulks and 762.8 K SNPs and 118.7 K InDels in S bulks were identified; each chromosome had about 87% SNPs and 13% InDels, with 78% monomorphic and 22% polymorphic variants between the R and S bulks. Polymorphic variants on each chromosome were usually below 23%, but made up 34% of the variants on chromosome A03. There were 35 genes annotated in the Rcr1 target region and variants were identified in 21 genes. The numbers of poly variants differed significantly among the genes. Four out of them encode Toll-Interleukin-1 receptor / nucleotide-binding site / leucine-rich-repeat proteins; Bra019409 and Bra019410 harbored the higher numbers of polymorphic variants, which indicates that they are more likely candidates of Rcr1. Fourteen SNP markers in the target region were genotyped using the Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR method and were confirmed to associate with Rcr1. Selected SNP markers were analyzed with 26 recombinants obtained from a segregating population consisting of 1587 plants, indicating that they were completely linked to Rcr1. Nine SNP markers were used for marker

  4. Identification of Genome-Wide Variants and Discovery of Variants Associated with Brassica rapa Clubroot Resistance Gene Rcr1 through Bulked Segregant RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fengqun; Zhang, Xingguo; Huang, Zhen; Chu, Mingguang; Song, Tao; Falk, Kevin C.; Deora, Abhinandan; Chen, Qilin; Zhang, Yan; McGregor, Linda; Gossen, Bruce D.; McDonald, Mary Ruth; Peng, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Clubroot, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, is an important disease on Brassica species worldwide. A clubroot resistance gene, Rcr1, with efficacy against pathotype 3 of P. brassicae, was previously mapped to chromosome A03 of B. rapa in pak choy cultivar “Flower Nabana”. In the current study, resistance to pathotypes 2, 5 and 6 was shown to be associated with Rcr1 region on chromosome A03. Bulked segregant RNA sequencing was performed and short read sequences were assembled into 10 chromosomes of the B. rapa reference genome v1.5. For the resistant (R) bulks, a total of 351.8 million (M) sequences, 30,836.5 million bases (Mb) in length, produced 120-fold coverage of the reference genome. For the susceptible (S) bulks, 322.9 M sequences, 28,216.6 Mb in length, produced 109-fold coverage. In total, 776.2 K single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 122.2 K insertion / deletion (InDels) in R bulks and 762.8 K SNPs and 118.7 K InDels in S bulks were identified; each chromosome had about 87% SNPs and 13% InDels, with 78% monomorphic and 22% polymorphic variants between the R and S bulks. Polymorphic variants on each chromosome were usually below 23%, but made up 34% of the variants on chromosome A03. There were 35 genes annotated in the Rcr1 target region and variants were identified in 21 genes. The numbers of poly variants differed significantly among the genes. Four out of them encode Toll-Interleukin-1 receptor / nucleotide-binding site / leucine-rich-repeat proteins; Bra019409 and Bra019410 harbored the higher numbers of polymorphic variants, which indicates that they are more likely candidates of Rcr1. Fourteen SNP markers in the target region were genotyped using the Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR method and were confirmed to associate with Rcr1. Selected SNP markers were analyzed with 26 recombinants obtained from a segregating population consisting of 1587 plants, indicating that they were completely linked to Rcr1. Nine SNP markers were used for marker

  5. Circadian Gene Variants and Susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, M. Ann; Rees, Simon D.; Hydrie, M. Zafar I.; Shera, A. Samad; Bellary, Srikanth; O’Hare, J. Paul; Kumar, Sudhesh; Taheri, Shahrad; Basit, Abdul; Barnett, Anthony H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Disruption of endogenous circadian rhythms has been shown to increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, suggesting that circadian genes might play a role in determining disease susceptibility. We present the results of a pilot study investigating the association between type 2 diabetes and selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in/near nine circadian genes. The variants were chosen based on their previously reported association with prostate cancer, a disease that has been suggested to have a genetic link with type 2 diabetes through a number of shared inherited risk determinants. Methodology/Principal Findings The pilot study was performed using two genetically homogeneous Punjabi cohorts, one resident in the United Kingdom and one indigenous to Pakistan. Subjects with (N = 1732) and without (N = 1780) type 2 diabetes were genotyped for thirteen circadian variants using a competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction method. Associations between the SNPs and type 2 diabetes were investigated using logistic regression. The results were also combined with in silico data from other South Asian datasets (SAT2D consortium) and white European cohorts (DIAGRAM+) using meta-analysis. The rs7602358G allele near PER2 was negatively associated with type 2 diabetes in our Punjabi cohorts (combined odds ratio [OR] = 0.75 [0.66–0.86], p = 3.18×10−5), while the BMAL1 rs11022775T allele was associated with an increased risk of the disease (combined OR = 1.22 [1.07–1.39], p = 0.003). Neither of these associations was replicated in the SAT2D or DIAGRAM+ datasets, however. Meta-analysis of all the cohorts identified disease associations with two variants, rs2292912 in CRY2 and rs12315175 near CRY1, although statistical significance was nominal (combined OR = 1.05 [1.01–1.08], p = 0.008 and OR = 0.95 [0.91–0.99], p = 0.015 respectively). Conclusions/significance None of the selected circadian gene

  6. CRY1 circadian gene variant interacts with carbohydrate intake for insulin resistance in two independent populations: Mediterranean and North American

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dysregulation in the circadian system induced by variants of clock genes has been associated with type 2 diabetes. Evidence for the role of cryptochromes, core components of the system, in regulating glucose homeostasis is not supported by CRY1 candidate gene association studies for diabetes and ins...

  7. Incorporating predicted functions of nonsynonymous variants into gene-based analysis of exome sequencing data: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has opened up new avenues for the genetic study of complex traits. However, because of the small number of observations for any given rare allele and high sequencing error, it is a challenge to identify functional rare variants associated with the phenotype of interest. Recent research shows that grouping variants by gene and incorporating computationally predicted functions of variants may provide higher statistical power. On the other hand, many algorithms are available for predicting the damaging effects of nonsynonymous variants. Here, we use the simulated mini-exome data of Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 to study and compare the effects of incorporating the functional predictions of single-nucleotide polymorphisms using two popular algorithms, SIFT and PolyPhen-2, into a gene-based association test. We also propose a simple mixture model that can effectively combine test results based on different functional prediction algorithms. PMID:22373178

  8. Analysis of genetic variants of dyslexia candidate genes KIAA0319 and DCDC2 in Indian population.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Shyamala K; Siddaiah, Anand; Padakannaya, Prakash; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2013-08-01

    Developmental dyslexia (DD) is a heritable, complex genetic disorder associated with impairment in reading and writing skills despite having normal intellectual ability and appropriate educational opportunities. Chromosome 6p23-21.3 at DYX2 locus has showed the most consistent evidence of linkage for DD and two susceptible genes KIAA0319 and DCDC2 for DD at DYX2 locus showed significant association. Specific candidate gene-association studies have identified variants, risk haplotypes and microsatellites of KIAA0319 and DCDC2 correlated with wide range of reading-related traits. In this study, we used a case-control approach for analyzing single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in KIAA0319 and DCDC2. Our study demonstrated the association of DD with SNP rs4504469 of KIAA0319 and not with any SNPs of DCDC2. PMID:23677054

  9. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene variant moderates neural index of cognitive disruption during nicotine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Evans, D E; Sutton, S K; Jentink, K G; Lin, H-Y; Park, J Y; Drobes, D J

    2016-09-01

    Nicotine withdrawal-related disruption of cognitive control may contribute to the reinforcement of tobacco use. Identification of gene variants that predict this withdrawal phenotype may lead to tailored pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation. Variation on the cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1) has been related to nicotine dependence, and CNR1 antagonists may increase attention and memory functioning. We targeted CNR1 variants as moderators of a validated neural marker of nicotine withdrawal-related cognitive disruption. CNR1 polymorphisms comprising the 'TAG' haplotype (rs806379, rs1535255 and rs2023239) were tested independently, as no participants in this sample possessed this haplotype. Nicotine withdrawal-related cognitive disruption was indexed as increased resting electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha-1 power density across 17 electrodes. Seventy-three Caucasian Non-Hispanic smokers (≥15 cigarettes per day) visited the laboratory on two occasions following overnight smoking/nicotine deprivation. Either two nicotine or two placebo cigarettes were smoked prior to collecting EEG data at each session. Analyses showed that rs806379 moderated the effects of nicotine deprivation increasing slow wave EEG (P = 0.004). Smokers homozygous for the major allele exhibited greater nicotine withdrawal-related cognitive disruption. The current findings suggest potential efficacy of cannabinoid receptor antagonism as a pharmacotherapy approach for smoking cessation among individuals who exhibit greater nicotine withdrawal-related cognitive disruption. PMID:27453054

  10. Common variants in the CYP2C19 gene are associated with susceptibility to endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Jodie N; Nyholt, Dale R; Krause, Lutz; Zhao, Zhen Z; Chapman, Brett; Zhang, Christine; Medland, Sarah; Martin, Nicholas G; Kennedy, Stephen; Treloar, Susan; Zondervan, Krina; Montgomery, Grant W

    2014-01-01

    Objective To follow-up previous studies highlighting a possible role for cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily C, 19 (CYP2C19) in susceptibility to endometriosis by searching for additional variants in the CYP2C19 gene that may be associated with the disease. Design Case-control study. Setting Academic research. Subject(s) Cases = 2,271 women with surgically confirmed endometriosis; Controls = 939 women with self-report of no endometriosis and 1,770 unscreened population samples. Intervention(s) Sequencing of the CYP2C19 region and follow-up of 80 SNPs in two case-control samples. Main outcome measure(s) Allele frequency differences between cases and controls. Results Sequencing of the CYP2C19 gene region resulted in the detection of a large number of known and novel SNPs. Genotyping of 80 polymorphic SNPs in 901 endometriosis cases and 939 controls resulted in study-wide significant association signals for SNPs in moderate or complete LD with rs4244285, a functional SNP in exon 5 that abrogates CYP2C19 function through the creation of an alternative splice site. Evidence of association was also detected for another functional SNP in the CYP2C19 promoter, rs12248560, highlighted in our previous study. Conclusion(s) Functional variants in CYP2C19 may contribute to endometriosis susceptibility in both familial and sporadic cases. PMID:24796765

  11. Cre-dependent selection yields AAV variants for widespread gene transfer to the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Deverman, Benjamin E.; Pravdo, Piers L.; Simpson, Bryan P.; Kumar, Sripriya Ravindra; Chan, Ken Y.; Banerjee, Abhik; Wu, Wei-Li; Yang, Bin; Huber, Nina; Pasca, Sergiu P.; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) are commonly used vehicles for in vivo gene transfer1-6. However, the tropism repertoire of naturally occurring AAVs is limited, prompting a search for novel AAV capsids with desired characteristics7-13. Here we describe a capsid selection method, called Cre-recombination-based AAV targeted evolution (CREATE), that enables the development of AAV capsids that more efficiently transduce defined Cre-expressing cell populations in vivo. We use CREATE to generate AAV variants that efficiently and widely transduce the adult mouse central nervous system (CNS) after intravenous injection. One variant, AAV-PHP.B, transfers genes throughout the CNS with an efficiency that is at least 40-fold greater than that of the current standard, AAV914-17, and transduces the majority of astrocytes and neurons across multiple CNS regions. In vitro, it transduces human neurons and astrocytes more efficiently than does AAV9, demonstrating the potential of CREATE to produce customized AAV vectors for biomedical applications. PMID:26829320

  12. VAMP-8 gene variant is associated with increased risk of early myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Gorący, Jarosław; Gorący, Iwona; Kaczmarczyk, Mariusz; Parczewski, Miłosz; Cyryłowski, Lech; Brykczyński, Mirosław; Peregud-Pogorzelska, Małgorzata; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Single nucleotide polymorphism in the 3’ untranslated region of the vesicle-associated membrane protein gene (VAMP-8) has been associated with increased risk of early-onset myocardial infarction (MI). In this study the risk of early onset MI conferred by VAMP-8 gene polymorphism was investigated in a group of 171 male subjects. Material and methods Male patients with a history of MI who underwent coronary angiography were enrolled and divided into early (incident < 55 years of age) and late (incident ≥ 55 years of age) MI onset groups. Apart from the RFLP-PCR based analysis of the VAMP-8 variant, history of hypertension, lipid abnormalities, smoking and body mass index were recorded. In statistical analyses odds ratios and relative risk were used as a measure of genotype-MI association while logistic regression was implemented for evaluation of MI risk factor strength. Results VAMP-8 A allele frequency proved to be significantly higher in the early-onset MI group and conferred higher relative risk of early MI in the investigated cohort, when calculated for the individual A allele (p = 0.029). In logistic regression analyses no association between risk genotypes and traditional risk factors was observed. Conclusions In this study VAMP-8 A variant was identified as a risk allele for early MI in male subjects. PMID:22295026

  13. iFish: predicting the pathogenicity of human nonsynonymous variants using gene-specific/family-specific attributes and classifiers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Wei, Liping

    2016-08-16

    Accurate prediction of the pathogenicity of genomic variants, especially nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs), is essential in biomedical research and clinical genetics. Most current prediction methods build a generic classifier for all genes. However, different genes and gene families have different features. We investigated whether gene-specific and family-specific customized classifiers could improve prediction accuracy. Customized gene-specific and family-specific attributes were selected with AIC, BIC, and LASSO, and Support Vector Machine classifiers were generated for 254 genes and 152 gene families, covering a total of 5,985 genes. Our results showed that the customized attributes reflected key features of the genes and gene families, and the customized classifiers achieved higher prediction accuracy than the generic classifier. The customized classifiers and the generic classifier for other genes and families were integrated into a new tool named iFish (integrated Functional inference of SNVs in human, http://ifish.cbi.pku.edu.cn). iFish outperformed other methods on benchmark datasets as well as on prioritization of candidate causal variants from whole exome sequencing. iFish provides a user-friendly web-based interface and supports other functionalities such as integration of genetic evidence. iFish would facilitate high-throughput evaluation and prioritization of nsSNVs in human genetics research.

  14. iFish: predicting the pathogenicity of human nonsynonymous variants using gene-specific/family-specific attributes and classifiers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Wei, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the pathogenicity of genomic variants, especially nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs), is essential in biomedical research and clinical genetics. Most current prediction methods build a generic classifier for all genes. However, different genes and gene families have different features. We investigated whether gene-specific and family-specific customized classifiers could improve prediction accuracy. Customized gene-specific and family-specific attributes were selected with AIC, BIC, and LASSO, and Support Vector Machine classifiers were generated for 254 genes and 152 gene families, covering a total of 5,985 genes. Our results showed that the customized attributes reflected key features of the genes and gene families, and the customized classifiers achieved higher prediction accuracy than the generic classifier. The customized classifiers and the generic classifier for other genes and families were integrated into a new tool named iFish (integrated Functional inference of SNVs in human, http://ifish.cbi.pku.edu.cn). iFish outperformed other methods on benchmark datasets as well as on prioritization of candidate causal variants from whole exome sequencing. iFish provides a user-friendly web-based interface and supports other functionalities such as integration of genetic evidence. iFish would facilitate high-throughput evaluation and prioritization of nsSNVs in human genetics research. PMID:27527004

  15. iFish: predicting the pathogenicity of human nonsynonymous variants using gene-specific/family-specific attributes and classifiers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Wei, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the pathogenicity of genomic variants, especially nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs), is essential in biomedical research and clinical genetics. Most current prediction methods build a generic classifier for all genes. However, different genes and gene families have different features. We investigated whether gene-specific and family-specific customized classifiers could improve prediction accuracy. Customized gene-specific and family-specific attributes were selected with AIC, BIC, and LASSO, and Support Vector Machine classifiers were generated for 254 genes and 152 gene families, covering a total of 5,985 genes. Our results showed that the customized attributes reflected key features of the genes and gene families, and the customized classifiers achieved higher prediction accuracy than the generic classifier. The customized classifiers and the generic classifier for other genes and families were integrated into a new tool named iFish (integrated Functional inference of SNVs in human, http://ifish.cbi.pku.edu.cn). iFish outperformed other methods on benchmark datasets as well as on prioritization of candidate causal variants from whole exome sequencing. iFish provides a user-friendly web-based interface and supports other functionalities such as integration of genetic evidence. iFish would facilitate high-throughput evaluation and prioritization of nsSNVs in human genetics research. PMID:27527004

  16. Derived variants at six genes explain nearly half of size reduction in dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Rimbault, Maud; Beale, Holly C; Schoenebeck, Jeffrey J; Hoopes, Barbara C; Allen, Jeremy J; Kilroy-Glynn, Paul; Wayne, Robert K; Sutter, Nathan B; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2013-12-01

    Selective breeding of dogs by humans has generated extraordinary diversity in body size. A number of multibreed analyses have been undertaken to identify the genetic basis of this diversity. We analyzed four loci discovered in a previous genome-wide association study that used 60,968 SNPs to identify size-associated genomic intervals, which were too large to assign causative roles to genes. First, we performed fine-mapping to define critical intervals that included the candidate genes GHR, HMGA2, SMAD2, and STC2, identifying five highly associated markers at the four loci. We hypothesize that three of the variants are likely to be causative. We then genotyped each marker, together with previously reported size-associated variants in the IGF1 and IGF1R genes, on a panel of 500 domestic dogs from 93 breeds, and identified the ancestral allele by genotyping the same markers on 30 wild canids. We observed that the derived alleles at all markers correlated with reduced body size, and smaller dogs are more likely to carry derived alleles at multiple markers. However, breeds are not generally fixed at all markers; multiple combinations of genotypes are found within most breeds. Finally, we show that 46%-52.5% of the variance in body size of dog breeds can be explained by seven markers in proximity to exceptional candidate genes. Among breeds with standard weights <41 kg (90 lb), the genotypes accounted for 64.3% of variance in weight. This work advances our understanding of mammalian growth by describing genetic contributions to canine size determination in non-giant dog breeds.

  17. Derived variants at six genes explain nearly half of size reduction in dog breeds

    PubMed Central

    Rimbault, Maud; Beale, Holly C.; Schoenebeck, Jeffrey J.; Hoopes, Barbara C.; Allen, Jeremy J.; Kilroy-Glynn, Paul; Wayne, Robert K.; Sutter, Nathan B.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2013-01-01

    Selective breeding of dogs by humans has generated extraordinary diversity in body size. A number of multibreed analyses have been undertaken to identify the genetic basis of this diversity. We analyzed four loci discovered in a previous genome-wide association study that used 60,968 SNPs to identify size-associated genomic intervals, which were too large to assign causative roles to genes. First, we performed fine-mapping to define critical intervals that included the candidate genes GHR, HMGA2, SMAD2, and STC2, identifying five highly associated markers at the four loci. We hypothesize that three of the variants are likely to be causative. We then genotyped each marker, together with previously reported size-associated variants in the IGF1 and IGF1R genes, on a panel of 500 domestic dogs from 93 breeds, and identified the ancestral allele by genotyping the same markers on 30 wild canids. We observed that the derived alleles at all markers correlated with reduced body size, and smaller dogs are more likely to carry derived alleles at multiple markers. However, breeds are not generally fixed at all markers; multiple combinations of genotypes are found within most breeds. Finally, we show that 46%–52.5% of the variance in body size of dog breeds can be explained by seven markers in proximity to exceptional candidate genes. Among breeds with standard weights <41 kg (90 lb), the genotypes accounted for 64.3% of variance in weight. This work advances our understanding of mammalian growth by describing genetic contributions to canine size determination in non-giant dog breeds. PMID:24026177

  18. An exon variant in insulin receptor gene is associated with susceptibility to colorectal cancer in women.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Touraj; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Karimi, Khatoon; Karimi, Negar; Farahani, Hamid; Dabiri, Reza; Nobakht, Hossein; Dolatmoradi, Hesamodin; Arkani, Maral; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-05-01

    Given the role of insulin resistance in colorectal cancer (CRC), we explored whether genetic variants in insulin (INS), insulin receptor (INSR), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) genes were associated with CRC risk. A total of 600 subjects, including 261 cases with CRC and 339 controls, were enrolled in this case-control study. Six polymorphisms in INS (rs689), INSR (rs1799817), IRS1 (rs1801278), IRS2 (rs1805097), IGF1 (rs5742612), and IGFBP3 (rs2854744) genes were genotyped using PCR-RFLP method. No significant difference was observed for INS, INSR, IRS1, IRS2, IGF1, and IGFBP3 genes between the cases and controls. However, the INSR rs1799817 "TT + CT" genotype and "CT" genotype compared with "CC" genotype occurred more frequently in the women with CRC than women controls (P = 0.007; OR = 1.93, 95 %CI = 1.20-3.11 and P = 0.002, OR = 2.15, 95 %CI = 1.31-3.53, respectively), and the difference remained significant after adjustment for confounding factors including age, BMI, smoking status, NSAID use, and family history of CRC (P = 0.018; OR = 1.86, 95 %CI = 1.11-3.10 and P = 0.004, OR = 2.18, 95 %CI = 1.28-3.71, respectively). In conclusion, to our knowledge, this study indicated for the first time that the INSR rs1799817 TT + CT genotype and CT genotype compared with the CC genotype had 1.86-fold and 2.18-fold increased risks for CRC among women, respectively. Furthermore, this finding is in line with previous studies which found significant associations between other variants of the INSR gene and CRC risk. Nevertheless, further studies are required to confirm our findings.

  19. Variants of the elongator protein 3 (ELP3) gene are associated with motor neuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Claire L; Lemmens, Robin; Miskiewicz, Katarzyna; Broom, Wendy J; Hansen, Valerie K; van Vught, Paul W J; Landers, John E; Sapp, Peter; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Knight, Joanne; Neale, Benjamin M; Turner, Martin R; Veldink, Jan H; Ophoff, Roel A; Tripathi, Vineeta B; Beleza, Ana; Shah, Meera N; Proitsi, Petroula; Van Hoecke, Annelies; Carmeliet, Peter; Horvitz, H Robert; Leigh, P Nigel; Shaw, Christopher E; van den Berg, Leonard H; Sham, Pak C; Powell, John F; Verstreken, Patrik; Brown, Robert H; Robberecht, Wim; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2009-02-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a spontaneous, relentlessly progressive motor neuron disease, usually resulting in death from respiratory failure within 3 years. Variation in the genes SOD1 and TARDBP accounts for a small percentage of cases, and other genes have shown association in both candidate gene and genome-wide studies, but the genetic causes remain largely unknown. We have performed two independent parallel studies, both implicating the RNA polymerase II component, ELP3, in axonal biology and neuronal degeneration. In the first, an association study of 1884 microsatellite markers, allelic variants of ELP3 were associated with ALS in three human populations comprising 1483 people (P=1.96 x 10(-9)). In the second, an independent mutagenesis screen in Drosophila for genes important in neuronal communication and survival identified two different loss of function mutations, both in ELP3 (R475K and R456K). Furthermore, knock down of ELP3 protein levels using antisense morpholinos in zebrafish embryos resulted in dose-dependent motor axonal abnormalities [Pearson correlation: -0.49, P=1.83 x 10(-12) (start codon morpholino) and -0.46, P=4.05 x 10(-9) (splice-site morpholino), and in humans, risk-associated ELP3 genotypes correlated with reduced brain ELP3 expression (P=0.01). These findings add to the growing body of evidence implicating the RNA processing pathway in neurodegeneration and suggest a critical role for ELP3 in neuron biology and of ELP3 variants in ALS.

  20. Accumulated common variants in the broader fragile X gene family modulate autistic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Stepniak, Beata; Kästner, Anne; Poggi, Giulia; Mitjans, Marina; Begemann, Martin; Hartmann, Annette; Van der Auwera, Sandra; Sananbenesi, Farahnaz; Krueger-Burg, Dilja; Matuszko, Gabriela; Brosi, Cornelia; Homuth, Georg; Völzke, Henry; Benseler, Fritz; Bagni, Claudia; Fischer, Utz; Dityatev, Alexander; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Rujescu, Dan; Fischer, Andre; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2015-11-26

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is mostly caused by a CGG triplet expansion in the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1). Up to 60% of affected males fulfill criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), making FXS the most frequent monogenetic cause of syndromic ASD. It is unknown, however, whether normal variants (independent of mutations) in the fragile X gene family (FMR1, FXR1, FXR2) and in FMR2 modulate autistic features. Here, we report an accumulation model of 8 SNPs in these genes, associated with autistic traits in a discovery sample of male patients with schizophrenia (N = 692) and three independent replicate samples: patients with schizophrenia (N = 626), patients with other psychiatric diagnoses (N = 111) and a general population sample (N = 2005). For first mechanistic insight, we contrasted microRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of selected extreme group subjects with high- versus low-risk constellation regarding the accumulation model. Thereby, the brain-expressed miR-181 species emerged as potential "umbrella regulator", with several seed matches across the fragile X gene family and FMR2. To conclude, normal variation in these genes contributes to the continuum of autistic phenotypes.

  1. Adding In Silico Assessment of Potential Splice Aberration to the Integrated Evaluation of BRCA Gene Unclassified Variants

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Maxime P.; Di Sera, Tonya L.; Nix, David A.; Paquette, Andrew M.; Parsons, Michael T.; Bell, Russel; Hoffman, Andrea; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Goldgar, David E.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clinical mutation screening of the cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 generates many unclassified variants (UVs). Most of these UVs are either rare missense substitutions or nucleotide substitutions near the splice junctions of the protein coding exons. Previously, we developed a quantitative method for evaluation of BRCA gene UVs—the “integrated evaluation”—that combines a sequence analysis‐based prior probability of pathogenicity with patient and/or tumor observational data to arrive at a posterior probability of pathogenicity. One limitation of the sequence analysis‐based prior has been that it evaluates UVs from the perspective of missense substitution severity but not probability to disrupt normal mRNA splicing. Here, we calibrated output from the splice‐site fitness program MaxEntScan to generate spliceogenicity‐based prior probabilities of pathogenicity for BRCA gene variants; these range from 0.97 for variants with high probability to damage a donor or acceptor to 0.02 for exonic variants that do not impact a splice junction and are unlikely to create a de novo donor. We created a database http://priors.hci.utah.edu/PRIORS/ that provides the combined missense substitution severity and spliceogenicity‐based probability of pathogenicity for BRCA gene single‐nucleotide substitutions. We also updated the BRCA gene Ex‐UV LOVD, available at http://hci‐exlovd.hci.utah.edu, with 77 re‐evaluable variants. PMID:26913838

  2. CRY1 circadian gene variant interacts with carbohydrate intake for insulin resistance in two independent populations: Mediterranean and North American

    PubMed Central

    Dashti, Hassan S.; Smith, Caren E.; Lee, Yu-Chi; Parnell, Laurence D.; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Arnett, Donna K.; Ordovás, José M.; Garaulet, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation in the circadian system induced by variants of clock genes has been associated with type 2 diabetes. Evidence for the role of cryptochromes, core components of the system, in regulating glucose homeostasis is not supported by CRY1 candidate gene association studies for diabetes and insulin resistance in human, suggesting possible dietary influences. The purpose of this study was to test for interactions between a CRY1 polymorphism, rs2287161, and carbohydrate intake on insulin resistance in two independent populations: a Mediterranean (n=728) and an European origin North American population (n=820). Linear regression interaction models were performed in two populations to test for gene–diet interactions on fasting insulin and glucose and two insulin-related traits, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI). In addition, fixed effects meta-analyses for these interactions were performed. Cohort-specific interaction analyses showed significant interactions between the CRY1 variant and dietary carbohydrates for insulin resistance in both populations (p<0.05). Findings from the meta-analyses of carbohydrate–single nucleotide polymorphism interactions indicated that an increase in carbohydrate intake (% of energy intake) was associated with a significant increase in HOMA-IR (p=0.011), fasting insulin (p=0.007) and a decrease in QUICKI (p=0.028), only among individuals homozygous for the minor C allele. This novel finding supports the link between the circadian system and glucose metabolism and suggests the importance this CRY1 locus in developing personalized nutrition programs aimed at reducing insulin resistance and diabetes risk. PMID:24548145

  3. Potential contribution of dopaminergic gene variants in ADHD core traits and co-morbidity: a study on eastern Indian probands.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Subhamita; Sarkar, Kanyakumarika; Ghosh, Paramita; Karmakar, Arijit; Bhattacharjee, Animesh; Sinha, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Kanchan

    2014-05-01

    Association of dopaminergic genes, mainly receptors and transporters, with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has been investigated throughout the world due to the importance of dopamine (DA) in various physiological functions including attention, cognition and motor activity, traits. However, till date, etiology of ADHD remains unknown. We explored association of functional variants in the DA receptor 2 (rs1799732 and rs6278), receptor 4 (exon 3 VNTR and rs914655), and transporter (rs28363170 and rs3836790) with hyperactivity, cognitive deficit, and co-morbid disorders in eastern Indian probands. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-IV was followed for recruitment of nuclear families with ADHD probands (N = 160) and ethnically matched controls (N = 160). Cognitive deficit and hyperactive traits were measured using Conner's parents/teachers rating scale. Peripheral blood was collected after obtaining informed written consent and used for genomic DNA isolation. Genetic polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-based methods followed by population- as well as family-based statistical analyses. Association between genotypes and cognitive/hyperactivity traits and co-morbidities was analyzed by the Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) software. Case-control analysis showed statistically significant difference for rs6278 and rs28363170 (P = 0.004 and 1.332e-007 respectively) while family-based analysis exhibited preferential paternal transmission of rs28363170 '9R' allele (P = 0.04). MDR analyses revealed independent effects of rs1799732, rs6278, rs914655, and rs3836790 in ADHD. Significant independent effects of different sites on cognitive/hyperactivity traits and co-morbid disorders were also noticed. It can be summarized from the present investigation that these gene variants may influence cognitive/hyperactive traits, thereby affecting the disease etiology and associated co-morbid features. PMID:24585059

  4. Conformational diversity in prion protein variants influences intermolecular [beta]-sheet formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seungjoo; Antony, Lizamma; Hartmann, Rune; Knaus, Karen J.; Surewicz, Krystyna; Surewicz, Witold K.; Yee, Vivien C.

    2010-04-19

    A conformational transition of normal cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) to its pathogenic form (PrP{sup Sc}) is believed to be a central event in the transmission of the devastating neurological diseases known as spongiform encephalopathies. The common methionine/valine polymorphism at residue 129 in the PrP influences disease susceptibility and phenotype. We report here seven crystal structures of human PrP variants: three of wild-type (WT) PrP containing V129, and four of the familial variants D178N and F198S, containing either M129 or V129. Comparison of these structures with each other and with previously published WT PrP structures containing M129 revealed that only WT PrPs were found to crystallize as domain-swapped dimers or closed monomers; the four mutant PrPs crystallized as non-swapped dimers. Three of the four mutant PrPs aligned to form intermolecular {beta}-sheets. Several regions of structural variability were identified, and analysis of their conformations provides an explanation for the structural features, which can influence the formation and conformation of intermolecular {beta}-sheets involving the M/V129 polymorphic residue.

  5. Effect of polymorphic variants of GH, Pit-1, and beta-LG genes on milk production of Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Heidari, M; Azari, M A; Hasani, S; Khanahmadi, A; Zerehdaran, S

    2012-04-01

    Effect of polymorphic variants of growth hormone (GH), beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), and Pit-1 genes on milk yield was analyzed in a Holstein herd. Genotypes of the cows for these genes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Allele frequencies were 0.884 and 0.116 for L and V variants of GH, 0.170 and 0.830 for A and B variants of Pit-1, and 0.529 and 0.471 for A and B variants of beta-LG, respectively. GLM procedure of SAS software was used to test the effects of these genes on milk yield. Results indicated significant effects of these genes on milk yield (P < 0.05). Cows with LL genotype of GH produced more milk than cows with LVgenotype (P < 0.05). Also, for Pit-1 gene, animals with AB genotype produced more milk than BB genotype (P < 0.05). In the case of beta-LG gene, milk yield of animals with AA genotype was more than BB genotype (P < 0.01). Therefore, it might be concluded that homozygote genotypes of GH (LL) and beta-LG (AA) were superior compared to heterozygote genotypes, whereas, the heterozygote genotype of Pit-1 gene (AB) was desirable.

  6. 5-HT2A Gene Variants Moderate the Association between PTSD and Reduced Default Mode Network Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark W; Sperbeck, Emily; Robinson, Meghan E; Sadeh, Naomi; Wolf, Erika J; Hayes, Jasmeet P; Logue, Mark; Schichman, Steven A; Stone, Angie; Milberg, William; McGlinchey, Regina

    2016-01-01

    The default mode network (DMN) has been used to study disruptions of functional connectivity in a wide variety of psychiatric and neurological conditions, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Studies indicate that the serotonin system exerts a modulatory influence on DMN connectivity; however, no prior study has examined associations between serotonin receptor gene variants and DMN connectivity in either clinical or healthy samples. We examined serotonin receptor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), PTSD, and their interactions for association with DMN connectivity in 134 White non-Hispanic veterans. We began by analyzing candidate SNPs identified in prior meta-analyses of relevant psychiatric traits and found that rs7997012 (an HTR2A SNP), implicated previously in anti-depressant medication response in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives for Depression study (STAR(*)D; McMahon et al., 2006), interacted with PTSD to predict reduced connectivity between the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the right medial prefrontal cortex and right middle temporal gyrus (MTG). rs130058 (HTR1B) was associated with connectivity between the PCC and right angular gyrus. We then expanded our analysis to 99 HTR1B and HTR2A SNPs and found two HTR2A SNPs (rs977003 and rs7322347) that significantly moderated the association between PTSD severity and the PCC-right MTG component of the DMN after correcting for multiple testing. Finally, to obtain a more precise localization of the most significant SNP × PTSD interaction, we performed a whole cortex vertex-wise analysis of the rs977003 effect. This analysis revealed the locus of the pre-frontal effect to be in portions of the superior frontal gyrus, while the temporal lobe effect was centered in the middle and inferior temporal gyri. These findings point to the influence of HTR2A variants on DMN connectivity and advance knowledge of the role of 5-HT2A receptors in the neurobiology of PTSD. PMID:27445670

  7. 5-HT2A Gene Variants Moderate the Association between PTSD and Reduced Default Mode Network Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark W.; Sperbeck, Emily; Robinson, Meghan E.; Sadeh, Naomi; Wolf, Erika J.; Hayes, Jasmeet P.; Logue, Mark; Schichman, Steven A.; Stone, Angie; Milberg, William; McGlinchey, Regina

    2016-01-01

    The default mode network (DMN) has been used to study disruptions of functional connectivity in a wide variety of psychiatric and neurological conditions, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Studies indicate that the serotonin system exerts a modulatory influence on DMN connectivity; however, no prior study has examined associations between serotonin receptor gene variants and DMN connectivity in either clinical or healthy samples. We examined serotonin receptor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), PTSD, and their interactions for association with DMN connectivity in 134 White non-Hispanic veterans. We began by analyzing candidate SNPs identified in prior meta-analyses of relevant psychiatric traits and found that rs7997012 (an HTR2A SNP), implicated previously in anti-depressant medication response in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives for Depression study (STAR*D; McMahon et al., 2006), interacted with PTSD to predict reduced connectivity between the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the right medial prefrontal cortex and right middle temporal gyrus (MTG). rs130058 (HTR1B) was associated with connectivity between the PCC and right angular gyrus. We then expanded our analysis to 99 HTR1B and HTR2A SNPs and found two HTR2A SNPs (rs977003 and rs7322347) that significantly moderated the association between PTSD severity and the PCC-right MTG component of the DMN after correcting for multiple testing. Finally, to obtain a more precise localization of the most significant SNP × PTSD interaction, we performed a whole cortex vertex-wise analysis of the rs977003 effect. This analysis revealed the locus of the pre-frontal effect to be in portions of the superior frontal gyrus, while the temporal lobe effect was centered in the middle and inferior temporal gyri. These findings point to the influence of HTR2A variants on DMN connectivity and advance knowledge of the role of 5-HT2A receptors in the neurobiology of PTSD. PMID:27445670

  8. Antioxidant defense enzyme genes and asthma susceptibility: gender-specific effects and heterogeneity in gene-gene interactions between pathogenetic variants of the disease.

    PubMed

    Polonikov, Alexey V; Ivanov, Vladimir P; Bogomazov, Alexey D; Freidin, Maxim B; Illig, Thomas; Solodilova, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from an increased amount of reactive oxygen species and an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants plays an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The present study tested the hypothesis that genetic susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic variants of asthma is determined by complex interactions between genes encoding antioxidant defense enzymes (ADE). We carried out a comprehensive analysis of the associations between adult asthma and 46 single nucleotide polymorphisms of 34 ADE genes and 12 other candidate genes of asthma in Russian population using set association analysis and multifactor dimensionality reduction approaches. We found for the first time epistatic interactions between ADE genes underlying asthma susceptibility and the genetic heterogeneity between allergic and nonallergic variants of the disease. We identified GSR (glutathione reductase) and PON2 (paraoxonase 2) as novel candidate genes for asthma susceptibility. We observed gender-specific effects of ADE genes on the risk of asthma. The results of the study demonstrate complexity and diversity of interactions between genes involved in oxidative stress underlying susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic asthma. PMID:24895604

  9. Antioxidant Defense Enzyme Genes and Asthma Susceptibility: Gender-Specific Effects and Heterogeneity in Gene-Gene Interactions between Pathogenetic Variants of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Polonikov, Alexey V.; Ivanov, Vladimir P.; Bogomazov, Alexey D.; Freidin, Maxim B.; Illig, Thomas; Solodilova, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from an increased amount of reactive oxygen species and an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants plays an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The present study tested the hypothesis that genetic susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic variants of asthma is determined by complex interactions between genes encoding antioxidant defense enzymes (ADE). We carried out a comprehensive analysis of the associations between adult asthma and 46 single nucleotide polymorphisms of 34 ADE genes and 12 other candidate genes of asthma in Russian population using set association analysis and multifactor dimensionality reduction approaches. We found for the first time epistatic interactions between ADE genes underlying asthma susceptibility and the genetic heterogeneity between allergic and nonallergic variants of the disease. We identified GSR (glutathione reductase) and PON2 (paraoxonase 2) as novel candidate genes for asthma susceptibility. We observed gender-specific effects of ADE genes on the risk of asthma. The results of the study demonstrate complexity and diversity of interactions between genes involved in oxidative stress underlying susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic asthma. PMID:24895604

  10. Interactions between collagen gene variants and risk of anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Kevin; Knight, Hayley; Ficek, Krzysztof; Leonska-Duniec, Agata; Maciejewska-Karlowska, Agnieszka; Sawczuk, Marek; Stepien-Slodkowska, Marta; O'Cuinneagain, Dion; van der Merwe, Willem; Posthumus, Michael; Cieszczyk, Pawel; Collins, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    The COL5A1 and COL12A1 variants are independently associated with modulating the risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in females. The objective of this study was to further investigate if COL3A1 and COL6A1 variants independently, as well as, collagen gene-gene interactions, modulate ACL rupture risk. Three hundred and thirty-three South African (SA, n = 242) and Polish (PL, n = 91) participants with diagnosed ACL ruptures and 378 controls (235 SA and 143 PL) were recruited. Participants were genotyped for COL3A1 rs1800255 G/A, COL5A1 rs12722 (T/C), COL6A1 rs35796750 (T/C) and COL12A1 rs970547 (A/G). No significant associations were identified between COL6A1 rs35796750 and COL3A1 rs1800255 genotypes and risk of ACL rupture in the SA cohort. The COL3A1 AA genotype was, however, significantly (p = 0.036) over-represented in the PL ACL group (9.9%, n = 9) when compared to the PL control (CON) group (2.8%, n = 4). Although there were genotype distribution differences between the SA and PL cohorts, the T+A-inferred pseudo-haplotype constructed from COL5A1 and COL12A1 was significantly over-represented in the female ACL group when compared to the female CON group within the SA (T+A ACL 50.5%, T+A CON 38.1%, p = 0.022), PL (T+A ACL 56.3%, T+A CON 36.3%, p = 0.029) and combined (T+A ACL 51.8%, T+A CON 37.5%, p = 0.004) cohorts. In conclusion, the novel main finding of this study was a significant interaction between the COL5A1 rs12722 T/C and COL12A1 rs970547 A/G variants and risk of ACL injury. These results highlight the importance of investigating gene-gene interactions in the aetiology of ACL ruptures in multiple independent cohorts. PMID:25073002

  11. An Excess of Deleterious Variants in VEGF-A Pathway Genes in Down-Syndrome-Associated Atrioventricular Septal Defects

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Christine; Locke, Adam E.; Feingold, Eleanor; Reshey, Benjamin; Espana, Karina; Thusberg, Janita; Mooney, Sean; Bean, Lora J.H.; Dooley, Kenneth J.; Cua, Clifford L.; Reeves, Roger H.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Maslen, Cheryl L.

    2012-01-01

    About half of people with trisomy 21 have a congenital heart defect (CHD), whereas the remainder have a structurally normal heart, demonstrating that trisomy 21 is a significant risk factor but is not causal for abnormal heart development. Atrioventricular septal defects (AVSD) are the most commonly occurring heart defects in Down syndrome (DS), and ∼65% of all AVSD is associated with DS. We used a candidate-gene approach among individuals with DS and complete AVSD (cases = 141) and DS with no CHD (controls = 141) to determine whether rare genetic variants in genes involved in atrioventricular valvuloseptal morphogenesis contribute to AVSD in this sensitized population. We found a significant excess (p < 0.0001) of variants predicted to be deleterious in cases compared to controls. At the most stringent level of filtering, we found potentially damaging variants in nearly 20% of cases but fewer than 3% of controls. The variants with the highest probability of being damaging in cases only were found in six genes: COL6A1, COL6A2, CRELD1, FBLN2, FRZB, and GATA5. Several of the case-specific variants were recurrent in unrelated individuals, occurring in 10% of cases studied. No variants with an equal probability of being damaging were found in controls, demonstrating a highly specific association with AVSD. Of note, all of these genes are in the VEGF-A pathway, even though the candidate genes analyzed in this study represented numerous biochemical and developmental pathways, suggesting that rare variants in the VEGF-A pathway might contribute to the genetic underpinnings of AVSD in humans. PMID:23040494

  12. Functional MC1R-gene variants are associated with increased risk for severe photoaging of facial skin.

    PubMed

    Elfakir, Anissa; Ezzedine, Khaled; Latreille, Julie; Ambroisine, Laurence; Jdid, Randa; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Gruber, Florian; Malvy, Denis; Tschachler, Erwin; Guinot, Christiane

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the association between melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) variants and the severity of facial skin photoaging. The study population comprised 530 middle-aged French women. A trained dermatologist graded the severity of facial skin photoaging from photographs using a global scale. Logistic regressions were performed to assess the influence of MC1R polymorphisms on severe photoaging with adjustment for possible confounders (demographic and phenotypic data and sun exposure intensity). Among the fifteen MC1R variants identified, the nine most common were V60L, V92M, R151C, R160W, R163Q, R142H, D294H, D84E, and I155T. One hundred and eighty-five individuals (35%) were WT homozygotes, 261 (49%) had one common variant, 78 (15%) had two common variants, and six (1%) had at least one rare variant. After adjustment for possible confounders, the presence of two common variants was already a risk factor for severe photoaging (AOR (95% confidence interval): 2.33 (1.17-4.63)). This risk reached 5.61 (1.43-21.96) when two major diminished-function variants were present. Surprisingly, the minor variant, V92M, was associated with increased risk of photoaging (2.57 (1.23-5.35)). Our results suggest that genetic variations of MC1R are important determinants for severe photoaging.

  13. Role of interaction between variants in the PPARG and interleukin-6 genes on obesity related metabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, M; Rizzo, M R; Papa, M; Acampora, R; De Angelis, L; Olivieri, F; Marchegiani, F; Franceschi, C; Paolisso, G

    2005-07-01

    The combined effect of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) Pro/Ala and interleukin-6 G174C gene variants, was evaluated in 429 Caucasian subjects in order to determine whether subjects carrying both variants were at different risk for obesity. In particular, the combined contribution of these two variants (both independent and interaction effects) to the total variation of obesity-related factors was estimated. All subjects were genotyped for codon 12 Pro/Ala locus variability and for the interleukin-6-174 C/G promoter polymorphism. Subjects with the Ala variant had significantly lower BMI, insulin resistance, triglyceride levels than those without. Furthermore, subjects with Ala variant had significantly lower IL-6 levels (0.88 +/- 0.9 vs 1.61 +/- 2.25 pg/ml; p = 0.041). In contrast, the IL6-C variant was significantly associated with lower plasma IL-6 and with lower total cholesterol levels but was not significantly associated with any other obesity risk factors. Indeed, subjects carrying both PPARG and IL-6 gene variants, had a clearly more favourable profile of obesity related risk factors than subjects with one variant, having Ala+/C+ carriers lower BMI (22.8 +/- 2.3 vs 24.14 +/- 1.9; f = 5.31; p < 0.005), insulin resistance (1.49 +/- 0.70 vs 2.13 +/- 0.92; f = 4.342; p = 0.038) and triglyceride levels (79.15 +/- 32.9 vs 98 +/- 6.73 mg/dl; f = 3.120; p < 0.005). These findings suggest that the effect of the two genetic variants on 'obesity related' factors is additive.

  14. Genetic variants in SMARC genes are associated with DNA damage levels in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jianhang; Zhu, Meng; Chu, Minjie; Sun, Chongqi; Chen, Weihong; Jin, Guangfu; Yuan, Jing; Dai, Juncheng; Wang, Meilin; Pan, Yun; Song, Yuanchao; Ding, Xiaojie; Du, Mulong; Zhang, Zhengdong; Hu, Zhibin; Wu, Tangchun; Shen, Hongbing

    2014-09-01

    The switching defective/sucrose nonfermenting (SWI/SNF) related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulators of chromatin (SMARC) are components of human SWI/SNF like chromatin remodeling protein complexes, which are essential in the process of DNA damage repair. In this study, we hypothesized that genetic variants in SMARC genes may modify the capacity of DNA repair to damage. To test this hypothesis, we genotyped a total of 20 polymorphisms in five key SMARC genes (SMARCA5, SMARCC2, SMARCD1, SMARCD2, SMARCD3) to evaluate their associations with DNA damage levels in 307 subjects. The DNA damage levels were measured with comet assay. The multiple linear regression was used to assess the relationship between each polymorphism and DNA damage levels in additive model. We found that the genotypes of rs6857360 (β=0.23, 95% CI=0.06-0.40, P=0.008) in SMARCA5, rs6919 (β=0.20, 95% CI=0.05-0.34, P=0.008) and rs2727280 (β=0.18, 95% CI=0.04-0.33, P=0.013) in SMARCD2, and rs17173769 (β=-0.27, 95% CI=-0.52 to -0.01, P=0.045) in SMARCD3 were significantly associated with DNA damage levels. After combining these four polymorphisms, we found that the more unfavorable alleles the subjects carried, the heavier DNA damage they suffered, suggesting a locus-dosage effect between combined genotypes and DNA damage levels (P for trend=0.006). These findings suggest that genetic variants in SMARC genes may contribute the individual variations of DNA damage levels in Chinese population. Further larger and functional studies are warranted to confirm our findings.

  15. Association of Megsin Gene Variants With IgA Nephropathy in Northwest Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lin-Ting; Fu, Rong-Guo; Gao, Jie; Yu, Qiao-Ling; Dong, Feng-Ming; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Meng; Liu, Xing-Han; Dai, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Megsin is a mesangial cell-predominant gene that encodes a serpin family protein which is expressed in the renal mesangium. Overexpression of megsin has been observed in the glomeruli of patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN). The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of megsin polymorphisms (rs1055901 and rs1055902) with IgAN in a Chinese population. We examined 351 patients with histologically proven IgAN and compared them with 310 age, sex, and ethnicity-matched healthy subjects. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in megsin were genotyped by Sequenom MassARRAY. SPSS 18.0 was used for statistical analyses, and SNP Stats to test for associations between these polymorphisms and IgAN risk. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were used to assess the relationships. We found that rs1055901 and rs1055902 SNPs were not correlated with susceptibility to IgAN in Northwest Chinese population. Analyses of the relationship between genotypes and clinical variables indicated that in patients with IgAN, rs1055901 was associated with 24-hour proteinuria, an increase in blood pressure, and Lee's grade (P = 0.04, 0.02, and 0.04, respectively), and rs1055902 was associated with 24-hour proteinuria and Lee's grade (P = 0.03 and 0.01, respectively). However, the results showed no association between these gene variants and sex of the patients. These results indicate that megsin gene variants may play a role in the severity, development, and/or progression of IgAN in Northwest Chinese population. PMID:26871801

  16. Locus-specific databases and recommendations to strengthen their contribution to the classification of variants in cancer susceptibility genes.

    PubMed

    Greenblatt, Marc S; Brody, Lawrence C; Foulkes, William D; Genuardi, Maurizio; Hofstra, Robert M W; Olivier, Magali; Plon, Sharon E; Sijmons, Rolf H; Sinilnikova, Olga; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2008-11-01

    Locus-specific databases (LSDBs) are curated collections of sequence variants in genes associated with disease. LSDBs of cancer-related genes often serve as a critical resource to researchers, diagnostic laboratories, clinicians, and others in the cancer genetics community. LSDBs are poised to play an important role in disseminating clinical classification of variants. The IARC Working Group on Unclassified Genetic Variants has proposed a new system of five classes of variants in cancer susceptibility genes. However, standards are lacking for reporting and analyzing the multiple data types that assist in classifying variants. By adhering to standards of transparency and consistency in the curation and annotation of data, LSDBs can be critical for organizing our understanding of how genetic variation relates to disease. In this article we discuss how LSDBs can accomplish these goals, using existing databases for BRCA1, BRCA2, MSH2, MLH1, TP53, and CDKN2A to illustrate the progress and remaining challenges in this field. We recommend that: 1) LSDBs should only report a conclusion related to pathogenicity if a consensus has been reached by an expert panel. 2) The system used to classify variants should be standardized. The Working Group encourages use of the five class system described in this issue by Plon and colleagues. 3) Evidence that supports a conclusion should be reported in the database, including sources and criteria used for assignment. 4) Variants should only be classified as pathogenic if more than one type of evidence has been considered. 5) All instances of all variants should be recorded. PMID:18951438

  17. New susceptible variant of COQ2 gene in Japanese patients with sporadic multiple system atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhuoran; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Toru; Sato, Kota; Takemoto, Mami; Hishikawa, Nozomi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the association between the variations of coenzyme Q2 4-hydroxybenzoate polyprenyltransferase gene (COQ2) and Japanese patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA). Methods: We investigated the genetic variations in exons 1, 2, 6, and 7 of the COQ2 gene in 133 Japanese patients with MSA and 200 controls and analyzed the association between the variations and MSA. Results: Six DNA variations (G21S, L25V, V66L, P157S, V393A, and X422K) were found in the 133 patients with MSA, and G21S and X422K were new variations that had never been reported. V66L was a common variation that was found in all 133 patients with MSA. G21S, P157S, V393A, and X422K did not show gene frequency differences between patients with MSA and controls. On the other hand, L25V was newly proven to be the only risk factor of sporadic MSA with predominant olivopontocerebellar ataxia. Conclusions: The present study suggests L25V variant of COQ2 gene as a genetic risk factor in Japanese patients with MSA with cerebellar ataxia. PMID:27123473

  18. Influence of GRIK4 genetic variants on the electroconvulsive therapy response.

    PubMed

    Minelli, Alessandra; Congiu, Chiara; Ventriglia, Mariacarla; Bortolomasi, Marco; Bonvicini, Cristian; Abate, Maria; Sartori, Riccardo; Gainelli, Giulio; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2016-07-28

    Several lines of evidence have shown the involvement of the glutamatergic system in the function of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). In particular, patients with treatment resistant depression (TRD) and chronic depression have lower levels of glutamate/glutamine than controls, and ECT can reverse this deficit. Genetic factors might contribute to modulating the mechanisms underlying ECT. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between three polymorphisms (rs1954787, rs4936554 and rs11218030) of the glutamate receptor ionotropic kainate 4 (GRIK4) gene and responsiveness to ECT treatment in a sample of one hundred individuals, TRD or depressive Bipolar Disorder patients resistant to pharmacological treatments. The results revealed that GRIK4 variants were significantly associated with the response to ECT. In particular, we found that patients carrying the G allele of the GRIK4 rs11218030 had a significantly poorer response to ECT (p=2.71×10(-4)), showing five times the risk of relapse after ECT compared to the AA homozygotes. Analogously, patients carrying the GG rs1954787 genotype and rs4936554A allele carriers presented a double risk of lack of response after ECT (p=0.013 and p=0.040, respectively). In conclusion, the current study provides new evidence, indicating that some GRIK4 variants modulate the response to ECT in patients with depression resistant to treatment, suggesting a role for kainate receptor modulation.

  19. Influence of GRIK4 genetic variants on the electroconvulsive therapy response.

    PubMed

    Minelli, Alessandra; Congiu, Chiara; Ventriglia, Mariacarla; Bortolomasi, Marco; Bonvicini, Cristian; Abate, Maria; Sartori, Riccardo; Gainelli, Giulio; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2016-07-28

    Several lines of evidence have shown the involvement of the glutamatergic system in the function of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). In particular, patients with treatment resistant depression (TRD) and chronic depression have lower levels of glutamate/glutamine than controls, and ECT can reverse this deficit. Genetic factors might contribute to modulating the mechanisms underlying ECT. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between three polymorphisms (rs1954787, rs4936554 and rs11218030) of the glutamate receptor ionotropic kainate 4 (GRIK4) gene and responsiveness to ECT treatment in a sample of one hundred individuals, TRD or depressive Bipolar Disorder patients resistant to pharmacological treatments. The results revealed that GRIK4 variants were significantly associated with the response to ECT. In particular, we found that patients carrying the G allele of the GRIK4 rs11218030 had a significantly poorer response to ECT (p=2.71×10(-4)), showing five times the risk of relapse after ECT compared to the AA homozygotes. Analogously, patients carrying the GG rs1954787 genotype and rs4936554A allele carriers presented a double risk of lack of response after ECT (p=0.013 and p=0.040, respectively). In conclusion, the current study provides new evidence, indicating that some GRIK4 variants modulate the response to ECT in patients with depression resistant to treatment, suggesting a role for kainate receptor modulation. PMID:27222927

  20. Identification of rare variants of DSP gene in Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death Syndrome in the southern Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qianhao; Chen, Yili; Peng, Longlun; Gao, Rui; Liu, Nian; Jiang, Pingping; Liu, Chao; Tang, Shuangbo

    2016-01-01

    Sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS) is a perplexing disorder to both forensic pathologists and clinic physicians. Desmoplakin (DSP) gene was the first desmosomal gene linked to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) which was associated with sudden death. To identify the genetic variants of the DSP gene in SUNDS in the southern Chinese Han population, we genetically screened the DSP gene in 40 sporadic SUNDS victims, 16 Brugada syndrome (BrS) patients and 2 Early Repolarization syndrome (ERS) patients using Next Generation Sequencing (NSG) and direct Sanger sequencing. A total of 10 genetic variants of the DSP gene were detected in 11 cases, comprised of two novel missense mutations (p.I125F and p.D521A) and eight previously reported rare variants. Of eight reported variants, two were previously considered pathogenic (p.Q90R and p.R2639Q), three were predicted in silico to bepathogenic (p.R315C, p.E1357D and p.D2579H), and the rest three were predicted to be benign (p.N1234S, p.R1308Q and p.T2267S). This is the first report of DSP genetic screening in Chinese SUNDS and Brugada syndrome. Our results implies that DSP mutations contribute to the genetic cause of some SUNDS victims and maybe a new susceptible gene for Brugada syndrome. PMID:26585738

  1. Meta-analysis identifies common and rare variants influencing blood pressure and overlapping with metabolic trait loci.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T; Smith, Jennifer A; Brody, Jennifer A; Franceschini, Nora; Bis, Joshua C; Rice, Kenneth; Morrison, Alanna C; Lu, Yingchang; Weiss, Stefan; Guo, Xiuqing; Palmas, Walter; Martin, Lisa W; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Surendran, Praveen; Drenos, Fotios; Cook, James P; Auer, Paul L; Chu, Audrey Y; Giri, Ayush; Zhao, Wei; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Lin, Li-An; Stafford, Jeanette M; Amin, Najaf; Mei, Hao; Yao, Jie; Voorman, Arend; Larson, Martin G; Grove, Megan L; Smith, Albert V; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Chen, Han; Huan, Tianxiao; Kosova, Gulum; Stitziel, Nathan O; Kathiresan, Sekar; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Deloukas, Panos; Li, Man; Fuchsberger, Christian; Pattaro, Cristian; Gorski, Mathias; Kooperberg, Charles; Papanicolaou, George J; Rossouw, Jacques E; Faul, Jessica D; Kardia, Sharon L R; Bouchard, Claude; Raffel, Leslie J; Uitterlinden, André G; Franco, Oscar H; Vasan, Ramachandran S; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Taylor, Kent D; Liu, Kiang; Bottinger, Erwin P; Gottesman, Omri; Daw, E Warwick; Giulianini, Franco; Ganesh, Santhi; Salfati, Elias; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B; Rettig, Rainer; Völzke, Henry; Kim, Eric; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lee, I-Te; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Tsosie, Krystal S; Edwards, Digna R Velez; Liu, Yongmei; Correa, Adolfo; Weir, David R; Völker, Uwe; Ridker, Paul M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Reiner, Alexander P; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Edwards, Todd L; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Loos, Ruth J F; Fornage, Myriam; Ehret, Georg B; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Chasman, Daniel I

    2016-10-01

    Meta-analyses of association results for blood pressure using exome-centric single-variant and gene-based tests identified 31 new loci in a discovery stage among 146,562 individuals, with follow-up and meta-analysis in 180,726 additional individuals (total n = 327,288). These blood pressure-associated loci are enriched for known variants for cardiometabolic traits. Associations were also observed for the aggregation of rare and low-frequency missense variants in three genes, NPR1, DBH, and PTPMT1. In addition, blood pressure associations at 39 previously reported loci were confirmed. The identified variants implicate biological pathways related to cardiometabolic traits, vascular function, and development. Several new variants are inferred to have roles in transcription or as hubs in protein-protein interaction networks. Genetic risk scores constructed from the identified variants were strongly associated with coronary disease and myocardial infarction. This large collection of blood pressure-associated loci suggests new therapeutic strategies for hypertension, emphasizing a link with cardiometabolic risk.

  2. Meta-analysis identifies common and rare variants influencing blood pressure and overlapping with metabolic trait loci.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T; Smith, Jennifer A; Brody, Jennifer A; Franceschini, Nora; Bis, Joshua C; Rice, Kenneth; Morrison, Alanna C; Lu, Yingchang; Weiss, Stefan; Guo, Xiuqing; Palmas, Walter; Martin, Lisa W; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Surendran, Praveen; Drenos, Fotios; Cook, James P; Auer, Paul L; Chu, Audrey Y; Giri, Ayush; Zhao, Wei; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Lin, Li-An; Stafford, Jeanette M; Amin, Najaf; Mei, Hao; Yao, Jie; Voorman, Arend; Larson, Martin G; Grove, Megan L; Smith, Albert V; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Chen, Han; Huan, Tianxiao; Kosova, Gulum; Stitziel, Nathan O; Kathiresan, Sekar; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Deloukas, Panos; Li, Man; Fuchsberger, Christian; Pattaro, Cristian; Gorski, Mathias; Kooperberg, Charles; Papanicolaou, George J; Rossouw, Jacques E; Faul, Jessica D; Kardia, Sharon L R; Bouchard, Claude; Raffel, Leslie J; Uitterlinden, André G; Franco, Oscar H; Vasan, Ramachandran S; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Taylor, Kent D; Liu, Kiang; Bottinger, Erwin P; Gottesman, Omri; Daw, E Warwick; Giulianini, Franco; Ganesh, Santhi; Salfati, Elias; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B; Rettig, Rainer; Völzke, Henry; Kim, Eric; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lee, I-Te; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Tsosie, Krystal S; Edwards, Digna R Velez; Liu, Yongmei; Correa, Adolfo; Weir, David R; Völker, Uwe; Ridker, Paul M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Reiner, Alexander P; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Edwards, Todd L; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Loos, Ruth J F; Fornage, Myriam; Ehret, Georg B; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Chasman, Daniel I

    2016-10-01

    Meta-analyses of association results for blood pressure using exome-centric single-variant and gene-based tests identified 31 new loci in a discovery stage among 146,562 individuals, with follow-up and meta-analysis in 180,726 additional individuals (total n = 327,288). These blood pressure-associated loci are enriched for known variants for cardiometabolic traits. Associations were also observed for the aggregation of rare and low-frequency missense variants in three genes, NPR1, DBH, and PTPMT1. In addition, blood pressure associations at 39 previously reported loci were confirmed. The identified variants implicate biological pathways related to cardiometabolic traits, vascular function, and development. Several new variants are inferred to have roles in transcription or as hubs in protein-protein interaction networks. Genetic risk scores constructed from the identified variants were strongly associated with coronary disease and myocardial infarction. This large collection of blood pressure-associated loci suggests new therapeutic strategies for hypertension, emphasizing a link with cardiometabolic risk. PMID:27618448

  3. Association of a functional variant of the nitric oxide synthase 1 gene with personality, anxiety, and depressiveness.

    PubMed

    Kurrikoff, Triin; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Kiive, Evelyn; Konstabel, Kenn; Herterich, Sabine; Veidebaum, Toomas; Reif, Andreas; Harro, Jaanus

    2012-11-01

    A functional promoter polymorphism of the nitric oxide synthase 1 gene first exon 1f variable number tandem repeat (NOS1 ex1f-VNTR) is associated with impulsivity and related psychopathology. Facets of impulsivity are strongly associated with personality traits; maladaptive impulsivity with neuroticism; and adaptive impulsivity with extraversion. Both high neuroticism and low extraversion predict anxiety and depressive symptoms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the NOS1 ex1f-VNTR genotype and possible interaction with environmental factors on personality, anxiety, and depressiveness in a population-representative sample. Short allele carriers had higher neuroticism and anxiety than individuals with the long/long (l/l) genotype. Male short/short homozygotes also had higher extraversion. In the face of environmental adversity, females with a short allele had higher scores of neuroticism, anxiety, and depressiveness compared to the l/l genotype. Males were more sensitive to environmental conditions when they had the l/l genotype and low extraversion. In conclusion, the NOS1 ex1f-VNTR influences personality and emotional regulation dependent on gender and environment. Together with previous findings on the effect of the NOS1 genotype on impulse control, these data suggest that NOS1 should be considered another plasticity gene, because its variants are associated with different coping strategies.

  4. Identification of IRF6 gene variants in three families with Van der Woude syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ene-Choo; Lim, Eileen Chew-Ping; Yap, Shiao-Hui; Lee, Seng-Teik; Cheng, Joanne; Por, Yong-Chen; Yeow, Vincent

    2008-06-01

    Van der Woude syndrome is the most common cause of syndromic orofacial clefting. It is characterised by the presence of lip pits, cleft lip and/or cleft palate. It is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner, with high penetrance and variable expressivity. Several mutations in the interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) gene have been found in VWS families, suggesting that this gene is the primary locus. We screened for mutations in this gene in three families in our population. There was a recurrent nonsense mutation within exon 9 of the gene for a Malay family consisting of five affected members with different presentations. We also found a co-segregating rare polymorphism which would result in a non-synonymous change 23 bases downstream of the nonsense mutation. This polymorphism was present in <1% of the Malay subjects screened, but was not found among the Chinese and Indians in our population. For another family, a 396C-->T mutation (R45W in the DNA-binding domain) was found in the proband, although the possibility of a genetic defect elsewhere could not be excluded because his mother and twin sister (both unaffected) also had this variant. In the third case with complete absence of family history, a de novo deletion spanning the whole IRF6 gene was detected in the child with VWS. This case of haploinsufficiency caused disruption of orofacial development but not other organ systems as the child has no other medical or developmental abnormalities despite the deletion of at least five other genes. PMID:18506368

  5. Novel Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius variants harboring lactose metabolism genes homologous to Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Jans, Christoph; Gerber, Andrea; Bugnard, Joséphine; Njage, Patrick Murigu Kamau; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

    2012-08-01

    Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius belongs to the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC) commonly associated with human and animal infections. We elucidated the lactose metabolism of S. infantarius subsp. infantarius predominant in African fermented milk products. S. infantarius subsp. infantarius isolates (n = 192) were identified in 88% of spontaneously fermented camel milk suusac samples (n = 24) from Kenya and Somalia at log₁₀ 8.2-8.5 CFU mL⁻¹. African S. infantarius isolates excreted stoichiometric amounts of galactose when grown on lactose, exhibiting a metabolism similar to Streptococcus thermophilus and distinct from their type strain. African S. infantarius subsp. infantarius CJ18 harbors a regular gal operon with 99.7-100% sequence identity to S. infantarius subsp. infantarius ATCC BAA-102(T) and a gal-lac operon with 91.7-97.6% sequence identity to S. thermophilus, absent in all sequenced SBSEC strains analyzed. The expression and functionality of lacZ was demonstrated in a β-galactosidase assay. The gal-lac operon was identified in 100% of investigated S. infantarius isolates (n = 46) from suusac samples and confirmed in Malian fermented cow milk isolates. The African S. infantarius variant potentially evolved through horizontal gene transfer of an S. thermophilus-homologous lactose pathway. Safety assessments are needed to identify any putative health risks of this novel S. infantarius variant. PMID:22475940

  6. Novel Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius variants harboring lactose metabolism genes homologous to Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Jans, Christoph; Gerber, Andrea; Bugnard, Joséphine; Njage, Patrick Murigu Kamau; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

    2012-08-01

    Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius belongs to the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC) commonly associated with human and animal infections. We elucidated the lactose metabolism of S. infantarius subsp. infantarius predominant in African fermented milk products. S. infantarius subsp. infantarius isolates (n = 192) were identified in 88% of spontaneously fermented camel milk suusac samples (n = 24) from Kenya and Somalia at log₁₀ 8.2-8.5 CFU mL⁻¹. African S. infantarius isolates excreted stoichiometric amounts of galactose when grown on lactose, exhibiting a metabolism similar to Streptococcus thermophilus and distinct from their type strain. African S. infantarius subsp. infantarius CJ18 harbors a regular gal operon with 99.7-100% sequence identity to S. infantarius subsp. infantarius ATCC BAA-102(T) and a gal-lac operon with 91.7-97.6% sequence identity to S. thermophilus, absent in all sequenced SBSEC strains analyzed. The expression and functionality of lacZ was demonstrated in a β-galactosidase assay. The gal-lac operon was identified in 100% of investigated S. infantarius isolates (n = 46) from suusac samples and confirmed in Malian fermented cow milk isolates. The African S. infantarius variant potentially evolved through horizontal gene transfer of an S. thermophilus-homologous lactose pathway. Safety assessments are needed to identify any putative health risks of this novel S. infantarius variant.

  7. Variants in the VCAM1 gene and risk for symptomatic stroke in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, James G; Tang, Delia C; Savage, Sharon A; Leitman, Susan F; Heller, Seth I; Serjeant, Graham R; Rodgers, Griffin P; Chanock, Stephen J

    2002-12-15

    Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in sickle cell (SS) disease. Genetic risk factors have been postulated to contribute to this clinical outcome. The human genome project has substantially increased the catalog of variations in genes, many of which could modify the risk for manifestations of disease outcome in a monogenic disease, namely SS. VCAM1 is a cell adhesion molecule postulated to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of SS disease. We identified a total of 33 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by sequencing the entire coding region, 2134 bp upstream of the 5' end of the published cDNA, 217 bp downstream of the 3' end of the cDNA, and selected intronic regions of the VCAM1 locus. Allelic frequencies for selected SNPs were determined in a healthy population. We subsequently analyzed 4 nonsynonymous coding, 2 synonymous coding, and 4 common promoter SNPs in a genetic association study of clinically apparent stroke in SS disease conducted in a cohort derived from a single institution in Jamaica (51 symptomatic cases and 51 matched controls). Of the 10 candidate SNPs analyzed in this pilot study, the variant allele of the nonsynonymous SNP, VCAM1 G1238C, may be associated with protection from stroke (odds ratio [OR] 0.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.15-0.83, P =.04). Further study is required to confirm the importance of this variant in VCAM1 as a clinically useful modifier of outcome in SS disease. PMID:12393616

  8. Association of Variants in Genes Related to the Immune Response and Obesity with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in CLUE II

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, David S.; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Hoffman-Bolton, Judy; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Isaacs, William B.; Smith, Michael W.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic inflammation and obesity may contribute to the genesis or progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and BPH-associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The influence of variants in genes related to these states on BPH has not been studied extensively. Thus, we evaluated the association of 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in immune response genes (IL1B, IL6, IL8, IL10, TNF, CRP, TLR4, RNASEL) and genes involved in obesity, including insulin regulation (LEP, ADIPOQ, PPARG, TCF7L2), with BPH. METHODS BPH cases (N=568) and age-frequency matched controls (N=568) were selected from among adult male CLUE II cohort participants who responded in 2000 to a mailed questionnaire. BPH was defined as BPH surgery, use of BPH medications, or symptomatic BPH (American Urological Association Symptom Index Score ≥15). Controls were men who had not had BPH surgery, did not use BPH medications, and whose symptom score was ≤7. Age-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression. RESULTS None of the candidate SNPs was statistically significantly associated with BPH. However, we could not rule out possible weak associations for CRP rs1205 (1082C>T), ADIPOQ rs1501299 (276C>A), PPARG rs1801282 (-49C>G), and TCF7L2 rs7903146 (47833T>C). After summing risk alleles, men with ≥4 had an increased BPH risk compared with those with ≤1 (OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.10-2.89; Ptrend=0.006). CONCLUSION SNPs in genes related to immune response and obesity, especially in combination, may be associated with BPH. PMID:25224558

  9. Evolutionary Influenced Interaction Pattern as Indicator for the Investigation of Natural Variants Causing Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Grunert, Steffen; Labudde, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The importance of short membrane sequence motifs has been shown in many works and emphasizes the related sequence motif analysis. Together with specific transmembrane helix-helix interactions, the analysis of interacting sequence parts is helpful for understanding the process during membrane protein folding and in retaining the three-dimensional fold. Here we present a simple high-throughput analysis method for deriving mutational information of interacting sequence parts. Applied on aquaporin water channel proteins, our approach supports the analysis of mutational variants within different interacting subsequences and finally the investigation of natural variants which cause diseases like, for example, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. In this work we demonstrate a simple method for massive membrane protein data analysis. As shown, the presented in silico analyses provide information about interacting sequence parts which are constrained by protein evolution. We present a simple graphical visualization medium for the representation of evolutionary influenced interaction pattern pairs (EIPPs) adapted to mutagen investigations of aquaporin-2, a protein whose mutants are involved in the rare endocrine disorder known as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and membrane proteins in general. Furthermore, we present a new method to derive new evolutionary variations within EIPPs which can be used for further mutagen laboratory investigations.

  10. CARD15/NOD2 gene variants are associated with familially occurring and complicated forms of Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Heliö, T; Halme, L; Lappalainen, M; Fodstad, H; Paavola-Sakki, P; Turunen, U; Färkkilä, M; Krusius, T; Kontula, K

    2003-01-01

    Background: Variants of the caspase activating recruitment domain 15/nucleotide oligomerisation domain 2 (CARD15/NOD2) gene have been associated with susceptibility to Crohn’s disease (CD). Aim: Our aim was to evaluate the allele frequencies of the CARD15 variants R702W, G908R, and 1007fs in Finnish inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and to search for possible associations between CARD15 variants and occurrence of familial forms of IBD or complicated forms of CD. Patients and methods: We investigated 198 sporadic CD patients, 46 probands with familial CD, 27 CD probands from mixed IBD families, 99 unrelated patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), and 300 control individuals for the occurrence of the CARD15 gene variants R702W, G908R, and 1007fs. Results: In CD patients, the allele frequencies for the rare variants of these polymorphisms were 3.3%, 0.6%, and 4.8% (total 8.7%), and the corresponding frequencies in healthy controls were 1.8%, 0%, and 1.7% (total 3.5%) (8.7% v 3.5%; p<0.01). In UC patients allele frequencies were comparable with those in controls. The frequency of the 1007fs polymorphism variant allele was significantly higher among all CD patients than in controls (4.8% v 1.7%; p<0.01) but there was no significant difference in allele frequencies between the CD and UC groups. The 1007fs allele frequency was higher in familial CD than in non-familial cases with CD (10.9% v 3.5%; p<0.01). There were no significant differences in the allele frequencies of the R702W and G908R polymorphisms between CD patients, UC patients, and controls. We found that 15.5% of CD patients, 9.1% of UC patients, and 6.7% of controls carried at least one of the CARD15 variants. In CD patients carrying at least one of the three NOD2 variants, the ileum was affected more often than in non-carrier CD patients (90% v 73%; p<0.05), they had stricturing or penetrating disease more often than non-carriers (88% v 56%; p<0.01), and they had an increased need for bowel surgery

  11. Racial Differences in DNA-Methylation of CpG Sites Within Preterm-Promoting Genes and Gene Variants.

    PubMed

    Salihu, H M; Das, R; Morton, L; Huang, H; Paothong, A; Wilson, R E; Aliyu, M H; Salemi, J L; Marty, P J

    2016-08-01

    Objective To evaluate the role DNA methylation may play in genes associated with preterm birth for higher rates of preterm births in African-American women. Methods Fetal cord blood samples from births collected at delivery and maternal demographic and medical information were used in a cross-sectional study to examine fetal DNA methylation of genes implicated in preterm birth among black and non-black infants. Allele-specific DNA methylation analysis was performed using a methylation bead array. Targeted maximum likelihood estimation was applied to examine the relationship between race and fetal DNA methylation of candidate preterm birth genes. Receiver-operating characteristic analyses were then conducted to validate the CpG site methylation marker within the two racial groups. Bootstrapping, a method of validation and replication, was employed. Results 42 CpG sites were screened within 20 candidate gene variants reported consistently in the literature as being associated with preterm birth. Of these, three CpG sites on TNFAIP8 and PON1 genes (corresponding to: cg23917399; cg07086380; and cg07404485, respectively) were significantly differentially methylated between black and non-black individuals. The three CpG sites showed lower methylation status among infants of black women. Bootstrapping validated and replicated results. Conclusion for Practice Our study identified significant differences in levels of methylation on specific genes between black and non-black individuals. Understanding the genetic/epigenetic mechanisms that lead to preterm birth may lead to enhanced prevention strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality by eventually providing a means to identify individuals with a genetic predisposition to preterm labor.

  12. Common Variants in the TBX5 Gene Associated with Atrial Fibrillation in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huihua; Yin, Xiaomeng; Dong, Yingxue; Yang, Yanzong; Xia, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    Background PR interval variations have recently been associated with an increased risk of long-term atrial fibrillation (AF), heart block and all-cause mortality. Genome-wide association studies have linked the PR interval with several common variants in the TBX5 gene. Several variants in the TBX5 gene, including rs7312625 and rs883079, have been associated with AF. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the TBX5 gene, rs7312625 and rs883079, with AF in Chinese Han patients. Methodology/Principal Findings In this case-control association study, large cohorts of AF patients (n = 1132) and controls (n = 1206) were recruited from different hospitals. The genotyping was performed using a Rotor-Gene TM 6000 high-resolution melt system. Rs7312625, rs3825214 and rs883079 were analyzed. We found that SNP 3825214 was significantly associated with AF (P-obs = 0.002, odds ratio [OR] = 0.82), and lone AF (P-obs = 6.77x10-5, odds ratio [OR] = 0.71). SNP rs7312625 was significantly associated with lone AF (P-obs = 0.015, odds ratio [OR] = 1.27), although its association with AF was not significant. No significant association of SNP rs883079 with AF or lone AF was observed. Thus, we analyzed the interaction among these three loci. We demonstrated significant interaction among rs3825214, rs7312625 and rs883079. Four-locus risk alleles showed the highest odds ratio in combined rs3825214 and rs7312625 (P-obs<0.0001, odds ratio [OR] = 2.21). Six-locus risk alleles showed the highest odds ratio in combined rs3825214, rs7312625 and rs 883079(P-obs<0.0001, odds ratio [OR] = 2.35). Significance was established with the trend test (P<0.0001). Conclusions For the first time, we report the strong association of SNP rs3825214 in the TBX5 gene with AF and lone AF in a Chinese Han population. Rs7312625 was significantly associated with lone AF, and snp-snp interaction increased the risk of atrial fibrillation. Our data might

  13. CFTR gene variant for patients with congenital absence of vas deferens

    SciTech Connect

    Zielenski, J.; Markiewicz, D.; Corey, M.

    1995-10-01

    Obstructive azoospermia due to congenital absence of vas deferens is a prominent clinical feature among male patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). A similar autosomal recessive condition with no other CF manifestations is classified as congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens (CBAVD). Since 50%-64% of CBAVD patients have been found to be positive for at least one known CFTR mutation, it is believed that at least part of the CBAVD population represents an atypical form of CF affecting only the male reproductive system. This explanation is not completely satisfactory, however, because only {approximately}10% of CBAVD patients are found to carry known CF mutations on both chromosomes, even after exhaustive screening of the entire CFTR coding region. Here we present data to show that a previously known sequence variant in intron 8 of the CFTR gene is a specific and frequent mutation associated with CBAVD. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Variants of the CLOCK gene affect the risk of idiopathic male infertility in the Han-Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ouxi; Ding, Xinliang; Nie, Jihua; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru; Tong, Jian; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental animal studies suggested that the circadian locomotor output cycles kaput protein gene (CLOCK) has been reported to play a critical role in sperm function and male fertility. The aim of this study was to determine whether variants of the CLOCK gene are involved in idiopathic male infertility. The study included 478 idiopathic infertile men and 194 fertile controls who completed physical examinations. Each subject donated 5 ml of peripheral blood and a sample of semen in the ejaculate. An aliquot of each blood sample was used to separate the serum for the measurement of testosterone as well as follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) using the standard radioimmunoassay. The rest of the blood samples was used to extract the DNA for the assay of three tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms of CLOCK gene, viz., rs1801260, rs3817444 and rs3749474, using the real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR. The ejaculate of each subject was used for semen analysis by computer-assisted semen analysis system. The results indicated: (a) the variant rs1801260 associated with normal semen parameters was linked to a significant increase in the risk of idiopathic infertility, (b) the variant rs3817444 associated with both normal and abnormal semen parameters also indicated an increased risk of idiopathic infertility, and (c) the variants rs3749474 associated with both normal and abnormal semen parameters, on the other hand, conferred no significant risk for male infertility. Furthermore, elevated serum testosterone and FSH levels were correlated with the three variants of CLOCK gene in idiopathic infertility. The findings demonstrate that the human subjects with variants of the CLOCK gene are associated with idiopathic male infertility and therefore may be applied as a risk factor of male infertility.

  15. Variants in the LEPR gene are nominally associated with higher BMI and lower 24-h energy expenditure in Pima Indians.

    PubMed

    Traurig, Michael T; Perez, Jessica M; Ma, Lijun; Bian, Li; Kobes, Sayuko; Hanson, Robert L; Knowler, William C; Krakoff, Jonathan A; Bogardus, Clifton; Baier, Leslie J

    2012-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been used to search for susceptibility genes for type 2 diabetes and obesity in the Pima Indians, a population with a high prevalence of both diseases. In these studies, a variant (rs2025804) in the LEPR gene was nominally associated with BMI in 1,082 subjects (P = 0.03 adjusted for age, sex, birth year, and family membership). Therefore the LEPR and leptin overlapping transcript (LEPROT) genes were selected for further sequencing and genotyping in larger population-based samples for association analyses with obesity-related phenotypes. Selected variants (n = 80) spanning these genes were genotyped in a sample of full-heritage Pima Indians (n = 2,842) and several common variants including rs2025804 were nominally associated with BMI (P = 0.05-0.003 adjusted for age, sex, birth year, and family membership). Four common tag variants associated with BMI in the full-heritage Pima Indian sample were genotyped in a second sample of mixed-heritage Native Americans (n = 2,969) and three of the variants showed nominal replication (P = 0.03-0.006 adjusted as above and additionally for Indian heritage). Combining both samples provided the strongest evidence for association (adjusted P = 0.0003-0.0001). A subset of these individuals (n = 403) had been metabolically characterized for predictors of obesity and the BMI risk alleles for the variants tagged by rs2025804 were also associated with lower 24-h energy expenditure (24hEE) as assessed in a human respiratory chamber (P = 0.0007 adjusted for age, sex, fat mass, fat-free mass, activity, and family membership). We conclude that common noncoding variation in the LEPR gene is associated with higher BMI and lower energy expenditure in Native Americans. PMID:22810975

  16. Novel Variants of the Human Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) Gene Associated with Trimethylaminuria

    PubMed Central

    Motika, Meike S.; Zhang, Jun; Zheng, Xueying; Riedler, Kiersten; Cashman, John R.

    2009-01-01

    The disorder trimethylaminuria (TMAu) often manifests itself in a body odor for individuals affected. TMAu is due to decreased metabolism of dietary-derived trimethylamine (TMA). In a healthy individual, 95% or more of TMA is converted by the flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3, EC 1.14.13.8) to non-odorous trimethylamine N-oxide (TMA N-oxide). Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the FMO3 gene have been described and result in an enzyme with decreased or abolished functional activity for TMA N-oxygenation thus leading to TMAu. Herein, we report two novel mutations observed from phenotyping and genotyping two self-reporting individuals. Sequence analysis of the exon regions of the FMO3 gene of a young woman with severe TMAu revealed heterozygous mutations at positions 187 (V187A), 158 (E158K), 308 (E308G), and 305 (E305X). Familial genetic analysis showed that the E158K/V187A/E308G derived from the same allele from the mother, and the E305X was derived from the father. FMO3 variants V187A and V187A/E158K were characterized for oxygenation of several common FMO3 substrates (i.e., 5- and 8-DPT, mercaptoimidazole (MMI), TMA, and sulindac sulfide) and for its thermal stability. Our findings show that with the combination of V187A/E158K mutations in FMO3, the enzyme activity is severely affected and possibly contributes to the TMAu observed. In another study, genotyping analysis of a 17 year old female revealed a mutation that caused a frame shift after K415 and resulted in a protein variant with only 486 amino acid residues that was associated with severe TMAu. PMID:19321370

  17. Genetic and epigenetic variants in the MTHFR gene are not associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Gabrielle; Sutherland, Heidi G.; Camilleri, Emily T.; Lea, Rodney A.; Haupt, Larisa M.; Griffiths, Lyn R.

    2015-01-01

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene codes for the MTHFR enzyme which plays a key role in the pathway of folate and methionine metabolism. Polymorphisms of genes in this pathway affect its regulation and have been linked to lymphoma. In this study we examined whether we could detect an association between two common non-synonymous MTHFR polymorphisms, 677C > T (rs1801133) and 1298A > C (rs1801131), and susceptibility to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in an Australian case–control cohort. We found no significant differences between genotype or allele frequencies for either polymorphisms between lymphoma cases and controls. We also explored whether epigenetic modification of MTHFR, specifically DNA methylation of a CpG island in the MTHFR promoter region, is associated with NHL using blood samples from patients. No difference in methylation levels was detected between the case and control samples suggesting that although hypermethylation of MTHFR has been reported in tumour tissues, particularly in the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma subtype of NHL, methylation of this MTHFR promoter CpG island is not a suitable epigenetic biomarker for NHL diagnosis or prognosis in peripheral blood samples. Further studies into epigenetic variants could focus on genes that are robustly associated with NHL susceptibility. PMID:26629414

  18. Human gene-centered transcription factor networks for enhancers and disease variants.

    PubMed

    Fuxman Bass, Juan I; Sahni, Nidhi; Shrestha, Shaleen; Garcia-Gonzalez, Aurian; Mori, Akihiro; Bhat, Numana; Yi, Song; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2015-04-23

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) comprising interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and regulatory loci control development and physiology. Numerous disease-associated mutations have been identified, the vast majority residing in non-coding regions of the genome. As current GRN mapping methods test one TF at a time and require the use of cells harboring the mutation(s) of interest, they are not suitable to identify TFs that bind to wild-type and mutant loci. Here, we use gene-centered yeast one-hybrid (eY1H) assays to interrogate binding of 1,086 human TFs to 246 enhancers, as well as to 109 non-coding disease mutations. We detect both loss and gain of TF interactions with mutant loci that are concordant with target gene expression changes. This work establishes eY1H assays as a powerful addition to the toolkit of mapping human GRNs and for the high-throughput characterization of genomic variants that are rapidly being identified by genome-wide association studies.

  19. Human Gene-Centered Transcription Factor Networks for Enhancers and Disease Variants

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Juan I. Fuxman; Sahni, Nidhi; Shrestha, Shaleen; Garcia-Gonzalez, Aurian; Mori, Akihiro; Bhat, Numana; Yi, Song; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Walhout, Albertha J.M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) comprising interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and regulatory loci control development and physiology. Numerous disease-associated mutations have been identified, the vast majority residing in non-coding regions of the genome. As current GRN mapping methods test one TF at a time and require the use of cells harboring the mutation(s) of interest, they are not suitable to identify TFs that bind to wild type and mutant loci. Here, we use gene-centered yeast one-hybrid (eY1H) assays to interrogate binding of 1,086 human TFs to 246 enhancers, as well as to 109 non-coding disease mutations. We detect both loss and gain of TF interactions with mutant loci that are concordant with target gene expression changes. This work establishes eY1H assays as a powerful addition to the toolkit of mapping human GRNs and for the high-throughput characterization of genomic variants that are rapidly being identified by genome-wide association studies. PMID:25910213

  20. Identification of candidate genes and natural allelic variants for QTLs governing plant height in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Kujur, Alice; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Bajaj, Deepak; Gowda, C L L; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2016-06-20

    In the present study, molecular mapping of high-resolution plant height QTLs was performed by integrating 3625 desi genome-derived GBS (genotyping-by-sequencing)-SNPs on an ultra-high resolution intra-specific chickpea genetic linkage map (dwarf/semi-dwarf desi cv. ICC12299 x tall kabuli cv. ICC8261). The identified six major genomic regions harboring six robust QTLs (11.5-21.3 PVE), associated with plant height, were mapped within <0.5 cM average marker intervals on six chromosomes. Five SNPs-containing genes tightly linked to the five plant height QTLs, were validated based upon their high potential for target trait association (12.9-20.8 PVE) in 65 desi and kabuli chickpea accessions. The vegetative tissue-specific expression, including higher differential up-regulation (>5-fold) of five genes especially in shoot, young leaf, shoot apical meristem of tall mapping parental accession (ICC8261) as compared to that of dwarf/semi-dwarf parent (ICC12299) was apparent. Overall, combining high-resolution QTL mapping with genetic association analysis and differential expression profiling, delineated natural allelic variants in five candidate genes (encoding cytochrome-c-biosynthesis protein, malic oxidoreductase, NADH dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein, expressed protein and bZIP transcription factor) regulating plant height in chickpea. These molecular tags have potential to dissect complex plant height trait and accelerate marker-assisted genetic enhancement for developing cultivars with desirable plant height ideotypes in chickpea.

  1. A Highly Polymorphic Copy Number Variant in the NSF Gene is Associated with Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Cabana-Domínguez, Judit; Roncero, Carlos; Grau-López, Lara; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Barral, Carmen; Abad, Alfonso C.; Erikson, Galina; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Torrico, Bàrbara; Arenas, Concepció; Casas, Miquel; Ribasés, Marta; Cormand, Bru; Fernàndez-Castillo, Noèlia

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is a complex psychiatric disorder involving both genetic and environmental factors. Several neurotransmitter systems mediate cocaine’s effects, dependence and relapse, being the components of the neurotransmitter release machinery good candidates for the disorder. Previously, we identified a risk haplotype for cocaine dependence in the NSF gene, encoding the protein N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor essential for synaptic vesicle turnover. Here we examined the possible contribution to cocaine dependence of a large copy number variant (CNV) that encompasses part of the NSF gene. We performed a case-control association study in a discovery sample (359 cases and 356 controls) and identified an association between cocaine dependence and the CNV (P = 0.013), that was confirmed in the replication sample (508 cases and 569 controls, P = 7.1e-03) and in a pooled analysis (P = 1.8e-04), with an over-representation of low number of copies in cases. Subsequently, we studied the functional impact of the CNV on gene expression and found that the levels of two NSF transcripts were significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) along with the number of copies of the CNV. These results, together with a previous study from our group, support the role of NSF in the susceptibility to cocaine dependence. PMID:27498889

  2. Identification of candidate genes and natural allelic variants for QTLs governing plant height in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Kujur, Alice; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Bajaj, Deepak; Gowda, C L L; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, molecular mapping of high-resolution plant height QTLs was performed by integrating 3625 desi genome-derived GBS (genotyping-by-sequencing)-SNPs on an ultra-high resolution intra-specific chickpea genetic linkage map (dwarf/semi-dwarf desi cv. ICC12299 x tall kabuli cv. ICC8261). The identified six major genomic regions harboring six robust QTLs (11.5-21.3 PVE), associated with plant height, were mapped within <0.5 cM average marker intervals on six chromosomes. Five SNPs-containing genes tightly linked to the five plant height QTLs, were validated based upon their high potential for target trait association (12.9-20.8 PVE) in 65 desi and kabuli chickpea accessions. The vegetative tissue-specific expression, including higher differential up-regulation (>5-fold) of five genes especially in shoot, young leaf, shoot apical meristem of tall mapping parental accession (ICC8261) as compared to that of dwarf/semi-dwarf parent (ICC12299) was apparent. Overall, combining high-resolution QTL mapping with genetic association analysis and differential expression profiling, delineated natural allelic variants in five candidate genes (encoding cytochrome-c-biosynthesis protein, malic oxidoreductase, NADH dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein, expressed protein and bZIP transcription factor) regulating plant height in chickpea. These molecular tags have potential to dissect complex plant height trait and accelerate marker-assisted genetic enhancement for developing cultivars with desirable plant height ideotypes in chickpea. PMID:27319304

  3. A Highly Polymorphic Copy Number Variant in the NSF Gene is Associated with Cocaine Dependence.

    PubMed

    Cabana-Domínguez, Judit; Roncero, Carlos; Grau-López, Lara; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Barral, Carmen; Abad, Alfonso C; Erikson, Galina; Wineinger, Nathan E; Torrico, Bàrbara; Arenas, Concepció; Casas, Miquel; Ribasés, Marta; Cormand, Bru; Fernàndez-Castillo, Noèlia

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is a complex psychiatric disorder involving both genetic and environmental factors. Several neurotransmitter systems mediate cocaine's effects, dependence and relapse, being the components of the neurotransmitter release machinery good candidates for the disorder. Previously, we identified a risk haplotype for cocaine dependence in the NSF gene, encoding the protein N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor essential for synaptic vesicle turnover. Here we examined the possible contribution to cocaine dependence of a large copy number variant (CNV) that encompasses part of the NSF gene. We performed a case-control association study in a discovery sample (359 cases and 356 controls) and identified an association between cocaine dependence and the CNV (P = 0.013), that was confirmed in the replication sample (508 cases and 569 controls, P = 7.1e-03) and in a pooled analysis (P = 1.8e-04), with an over-representation of low number of copies in cases. Subsequently, we studied the functional impact of the CNV on gene expression and found that the levels of two NSF transcripts were significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) along with the number of copies of the CNV. These results, together with a previous study from our group, support the role of NSF in the susceptibility to cocaine dependence. PMID:27498889

  4. Genetic Variants of the FADS Gene Cluster and ELOVL Gene Family, Colostrums LC-PUFA Levels, Breastfeeding, and Child Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Eva; Bustamante, Mariona; Gonzalez, Juan Ramon; Guxens, Monica; Torrent, Maties; Mendez, Michelle; Garcia-Esteban, Raquel; Julvez, Jordi; Forns, Joan; Vrijheid, Martine; Molto-Puigmarti, Carolina; Lopez-Sabater, Carmen; Estivill, Xavier; Sunyer, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Breastfeeding effects on cognition are attributed to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs), but controversy persists. Genetic variation in fatty acid desaturase (FADS) and elongase (ELOVL) enzymes has been overlooked when studying the effects of LC-PUFAs supply on cognition. We aimed to: 1) to determine whether maternal genetic variants in the FADS cluster and ELOVL genes contribute to differences in LC-PUFA levels in colostrum; 2) to analyze whether these maternal variants are related to child cognition; and 3) to assess whether children's variants modify breastfeeding effects on cognition. Methods Data come from two population-based birth cohorts (n = 400 mother-child pairs from INMA-Sabadell; and n = 340 children from INMA-Menorca). LC-PUFAs were measured in 270 colostrum samples from INMA-Sabadell. Tag SNPs were genotyped both in mothers and children (13 in the FADS cluster, 6 in ELOVL2, and 7 in ELOVL5). Child cognition was assessed at 14 mo and 4 y using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development and the McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities, respectively. Results Children of mothers carrying genetic variants associated with lower FADS1 activity (regulating AA and EPA synthesis), higher FADS2 activity (regulating DHA synthesis), and with higher EPA/AA and DHA/AA ratios in colostrum showed a significant advantage in cognition at 14 mo (3.5 to 5.3 points). Not being breastfed conferred an 8- to 9-point disadvantage in cognition among children GG homozygote for rs174468 (low FADS1 activity) but not among those with the A allele. Moreover, not being breastfed resulted in a disadvantage in cognition (5 to 8 points) among children CC homozygote for rs2397142 (low ELOVL5 activity), but not among those carrying the G allele. Conclusion Genetically determined maternal supplies of LC-PUFAs during pregnancy and lactation appear to be crucial for child cognition. Breastfeeding effects on cognition are modified by child genetic variation in

  5. Novel and functional ABCB1 gene variant in sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuequn; Li, Yonghua; Pang, Shuchao; Huang, Wenhui; Zhang, Aimei; Hawley, Robert G; Yan, Bo

    2014-04-30

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common progressive neurodegenerative disease. Most cases of PD are sporadic, which is caused by interaction of genetic and environmental factors. To date, genetic causes for sporadic PD remain largely unknown. ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 1 (ABCB1) is a membrane-associated protein that acts as an efflux transporter for many substrates, including chemotherapeutic agents, anti-epilepsy medicine, antibiotics and drugs for PD. ABCB1 gene is widely expressed in human tissues, including endothelial cells of capillary blood vessels at blood-brain barrier sites. In PD patients, decreased ABCB1 levels have been reported. We speculated that misregulation of ABCB1 gene expression, caused by DNA sequence variants (DSVs) within its regulatory regions, may be involved in PD development. In this study, we genetically and functionally analyzed the proximal promoter of the human ABCB1 gene, which is required for constitutive expression, in sporadic PD patients and healthy controls. The results showed that a novel and heterozygous DSV g.117077G>A was identified in one PD patient, but in none of the controls. This DSV significantly altered the transcriptional activity of the ABCB1 gene promoter in transiently transfected HEK-293 cells. A heterozygous DSV g.116347T>C was only found in one control. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms, g.116154T>C (rs28746504), g.117130A>G (rs2188524), g.117356C>G (rs34976462) and g.117372T>C (rs3213619), and one heterozygous deletion DSV g.116039del were found in PD patients and controls with similar frequencies. Therefore, our findings suggest that ABCB1 gene promoter DSVs may contribute to PD development as a rare risk factor. PMID:24572589

  6. Genome-Wide Significant Association between Alcohol Dependence and a Variant in the ADH Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Josef; Cichon, Sven; Treutlein, Jens; Ridinger, Monika; Mattheisen, Manuel; Hoffmann, Per; Herms, Stefan; Wodarz, Norbert; Soyka, Michael; Zill, Peter; Maier, Wolfgang; Mössner, Rainald; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Dahmen, Norbert; Scherbaum, Norbert; Schmäl, Christine; Steffens, Michael; Lucae, Susanne; Ising, Marcus; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nöthen, Markus M; Mann, Karl; Kiefer, Falk; Rietschel, Marcella

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol dependence (AD) is an important contributory factor to the global burden of disease. The etiology of AD involves both environmental and genetic factors, and the disorder has a heritability of around 50%. The aim of the present study was to identify susceptibility genes for AD by performing a genome-wide association study (GWAS). The sample comprised 1,333 male in-patients with severe DSM-IV AD and 2,168 controls. These included 487 patients and 1,358 controls from a previous GWAS study by our group. All individuals were of German descent. Single marker tests and a polygenic score based analysis to assess the combined contribution of multiple markers with small effects were performed. The SNP rs1789891, which is located between the ADH1B and ADH1C genes, achieved genome-wide significance (p=1.27E–8; OR=1.46). Other markers from this region were also associated with AD, and conditional analyses indicated that these made a partially independent contribution. The SNP rs1789891 is in complete linkage disequilibrium with the functional Arg272Gln variant (p=1.24E–7, OR=1.31) of the ADH1C gene, which has been reported to modify the rate of ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde in vitro. A polygenic score based approach produced a significant result (p=9.66E–9). This is the first GWAS of AD to provide genome-wide significant support for the role of the ADH gene cluster and to suggest a polygenic component to the etiology of AD. The latter result suggests that many more AD susceptibility genes still await identification. PMID:22004471

  7. Genome-wide significant association between alcohol dependence and a variant in the ADH gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Frank, Josef; Cichon, Sven; Treutlein, Jens; Ridinger, Monika; Mattheisen, Manuel; Hoffmann, Per; Herms, Stefan; Wodarz, Norbert; Soyka, Michael; Zill, Peter; Maier, Wolfgang; Mössner, Rainald; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Dahmen, Norbert; Scherbaum, Norbert; Schmäl, Christine; Steffens, Michael; Lucae, Susanne; Ising, Marcus; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nöthen, Markus M; Mann, Karl; Kiefer, Falk; Rietschel, Marcella

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol dependence (AD) is an important contributory factor to the global burden of disease. The etiology of AD involves both environmental and genetic factors, and the disorder has a heritability of around 50%. The aim of the present study was to identify susceptibility genes for AD by performing a genome-wide association study (GWAS). The sample comprised 1333 male in-patients with severe AD according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, and 2168 controls. These included 487 patients and 1358 controls from a previous GWAS study by our group. All individuals were of German descent. Single-marker tests and a polygenic score-based analysis to assess the combined contribution of multiple markers with small effects were performed. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1789891, which is located between the ADH1B and ADH1C genes, achieved genome-wide significance [P = 1.27E-8, odds ratio (OR) = 1.46]. Other markers from this region were also associated with AD, and conditional analyses indicated that these made a partially independent contribution. The SNP rs1789891 is in complete linkage disequilibrium with the functional Arg272Gln variant (P = 1.24E-7, OR = 1.31) of the ADH1C gene, which has been reported to modify the rate of ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde in vitro. A polygenic score-based approach produced a significant result (P = 9.66E-9). This is the first GWAS of AD to provide genome-wide significant support for the role of the ADH gene cluster and to suggest a polygenic component to the etiology of AD. The latter result may indicate that many more AD susceptibility genes still await identification.

  8. Parental cigarette smoking, transforming growth factor-alpha gene variant and the risk of orofacial cleft in Iranian infants

    PubMed Central

    Ebadifar, Asghar; Hamedi, Roya; KhorramKhorshid, Hamid Reza; Kamali, Koorosh; Moghadam, Fatemeh Aghakhani

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): We investigated the influence of genetic variation of the transforming growth-factor alpha (TGFA) locus on the relationship between smoking and oral clefts. Materials and Methods: In this study 105 Iranian infants with non-syndromic cleft lip/palate and 218 controls with non-cleft birth defects were examined to test for associations among maternal exposures, genetic markers, and oral clefts. Maternal and parental smoking histories during pregnancy were obtained through questionnaire. DNA was extracted from newborn screening blood samples, and genotyping of the BamHI polymorphism in the TGFA gene was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) methods. A number of factors including gender of the newborns, type of oral cleft, consanguinity of the parents, as well as the mother’s age and education were evaluated as potential confounders and effect modifiers. Results: Maternal smoking, in the absence of paternal smoking, was associated with an increased risk for CL/P (OR = 19.2, 95% CI = [(6.2-59.5)]) and cleft palate only (OR =48.7, 95% CI = [(8-29.3)]). If both parents smoked, risks were generally greater (OR = 55.6, 95% CI = [12-20.25]). Analyses for the risk of clefting from maternal smoking, stratified by the presence or absence of the TGFA/BamH1variant, revealed that the risk of clefting among the infants with the TGFA/BamH1 variant when their mothers smoked cigarettes was much greater than the infants who had non-smoker mothers (P=0.001, OR=10.4,95% CI=[3.2,33.6]). Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that first-trimester maternal smoking and infant TGFA locus mutations are both associated with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P). PMID:27279979

  9. Pooled Resequencing of 122 Ulcerative Colitis Genes in a Large Dutch Cohort Suggests Population-Specific Associations of Rare Variants in MUC2.

    PubMed

    Visschedijk, Marijn C; Alberts, Rudi; Mucha, Soren; Deelen, Patrick; de Jong, Dirk J; Pierik, Marieke; Spekhorst, Lieke M; Imhann, Floris; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; van der Woude, C Janneke; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A; Oldenburg, Bas; Löwenberg, Mark; Dijkstra, Gerard; Ellinghaus, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Rivas, Manuel A; Franke, Andre; van Diemen, Cleo C; Weersma, Rinse K

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed several common genetic risk variants for ulcerative colitis (UC). However, little is known about the contribution of rare, large effect genetic variants to UC susceptibility. In this study, we performed a deep targeted re-sequencing of 122 genes in Dutch UC patients in order to investigate the contribution of rare variants to the genetic susceptibility to UC. The selection of genes consists of 111 established human UC susceptibility genes and 11 genes that lead to spontaneous colitis when knocked-out in mice. In addition, we sequenced the promoter regions of 45 genes where known variants exert cis-eQTL-effects. Targeted pooled re-sequencing was performed on DNA of 790 Dutch UC cases. The Genome of the Netherlands project provided sequence data of 500 healthy controls. After quality control and prioritization based on allele frequency and pathogenicity probability, follow-up genotyping of 171 rare variants was performed on 1021 Dutch UC cases and 1166 Dutch controls. Single-variant association and gene-based analyses identified an association of rare variants in the MUC2 gene with UC. The associated variants in the Dutch population could not be replicated in a German replication cohort (1026 UC cases, 3532 controls). In conclusion, this study has identified a putative role for MUC2 on UC susceptibility in the Dutch population and suggests a population-specific contribution of rare variants to UC. PMID:27490946

  10. Pooled Resequencing of 122 Ulcerative Colitis Genes in a Large Dutch Cohort Suggests Population-Specific Associations of Rare Variants in MUC2

    PubMed Central

    Visschedijk, Marijn C.; Alberts, Rudi; Mucha, Soren; Deelen, Patrick; de Jong, Dirk J.; Pierik, Marieke; Spekhorst, Lieke M.; Imhann, Floris; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; van der Woude, C. Janneke; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A.; Oldenburg, Bas; Löwenberg, Mark; Dijkstra, Gerard; Ellinghaus, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Rivas, Manuel A.; Franke, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed several common genetic risk variants for ulcerative colitis (UC). However, little is known about the contribution of rare, large effect genetic variants to UC susceptibility. In this study, we performed a deep targeted re-sequencing of 122 genes in Dutch UC patients in order to investigate the contribution of rare variants to the genetic susceptibility to UC. The selection of genes consists of 111 established human UC susceptibility genes and 11 genes that lead to spontaneous colitis when knocked-out in mice. In addition, we sequenced the promoter regions of 45 genes where known variants exert cis-eQTL-effects. Targeted pooled re-sequencing was performed on DNA of 790 Dutch UC cases. The Genome of the Netherlands project provided sequence data of 500 healthy controls. After quality control and prioritization based on allele frequency and pathogenicity probability, follow-up genotyping of 171 rare variants was performed on 1021 Dutch UC cases and 1166 Dutch controls. Single-variant association and gene-based analyses identified an association of rare variants in the MUC2 gene with UC. The associated variants in the Dutch population could not be replicated in a German replication cohort (1026 UC cases, 3532 controls). In conclusion, this study has identified a putative role for MUC2 on UC susceptibility in the Dutch population and suggests a population-specific contribution of rare variants to UC. PMID:27490946

  11. A common variant in the ABCA1 gene is associated with a lower risk for premature coronary heart disease in familial hypercholesterolaemia

    PubMed Central

    Cenarro, A; Artieda, M; Castillo, S; Mozas, P; Reyes, G; Tejedor, D; Alonso, R; Mata, P; Pocovi, M; Civeira, F

    2003-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is a common autosomal codominant hereditary disease caused by defects in the LDL receptor (LDLR) gene, and one of the most common characteristics of affected subjects is premature coronary heart disease (CHD). In heterozygous FH patients, the clinical expression of FH is highly variable in terms of the severity of hypercholesterolaemia and the age of onset and severity of CHD. Identification of mutations in the ATP binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1) gene in patients with Tangier disease, who exhibit reduced HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A1 concentrations and premature coronary atherosclerosis, has led us to hypothesise that ABCA1 could play a key role in the onset of premature CHD in FH. In order to know if the presence of the R219K variant in the ABCA1 gene could be a protective factor for premature CHD in FH, we have determined the presence of this genetic variant by amplification by PCR and restriction analysis in a group of 374 FH subjects, with and without premature CHD. The K allele of the R219K variant was significantly more frequent in FH subjects without premature CHD (0.32, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.37) than in FH subjects with premature CHD (0.25, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.29) (p<0.05), suggesting that the genetic variant R219K in ABCA1 could influence the development and progression of atherosclerosis in FH subjects. Moreover, the K allele of the R219K polymorphism seems to modify CHD risk without important modification of plasma HDL-C levels, and it appears to be more protective for smokers than non-smokers. PMID:12624133

  12. Gene expression, single nucleotide variant and fusion transcript discovery in archival material from breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Norton, Nadine; Sun, Zhifu; Asmann, Yan W; Serie, Daniel J; Necela, Brian M; Bhagwate, Aditya; Jen, Jin; Eckloff, Bruce W; Kalari, Krishna R; Thompson, Kevin J; Carr, Jennifer M; Kachergus, Jennifer M; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J; Perez, Edith A; Thompson, E Aubrey

    2013-01-01

    Advantages of RNA-Seq over array based platforms are quantitative gene expression and discovery of expressed single nucleotide variants (eSNVs) and fusion transcripts from a single platform, but the sensitivity for each of these characteristics is unknown. We measured gene expression in a set of manually degraded RNAs, nine pairs of matched fresh-frozen, and FFPE RNA isolated from breast tumor with the hybridization based, NanoString nCounter (226 gene panel) and with whole transcriptome RNA-Seq using RiboZeroGold ScriptSeq V2 library preparation kits. We performed correlation analyses of gene expression between samples and across platforms. We then specifically assessed whole transcriptome expression of lincRNA and discovery of eSNVs and fusion transcripts in the FFPE RNA-Seq data. For gene expression in the manually degraded samples, we observed Pearson correlations of >0.94 and >0.80 with NanoString and ScriptSeq protocols, respectively. Gene expression data for matched fresh-frozen and FFPE samples yielded mean Pearson correlations of 0.874 and 0.783 for NanoString (226 genes) and ScriptSeq whole transcriptome protocols respectively, p<2x10(-16). Specifically for lincRNAs, we observed superb Pearson correlation (0.988) between matched fresh-frozen and FFPE pairs. FFPE samples across NanoString and RNA-Seq platforms gave a mean Pearson correlation of 0.838. In FFPE libraries, we detected 53.4% of high confidence SNVs and 24% of high confidence fusion transcripts. Sensitivity of fusion transcript detection was not overcome by an increase in depth of sequencing up to 3-fold (increase from ~56 to ~159 million reads). Both NanoString and ScriptSeq RNA-Seq technologies yield reliable gene expression data for degraded and FFPE material. The high degree of correlation between NanoString and RNA-Seq platforms suggests discovery based whole transcriptome studies from FFPE material will produce reliable expression data. The RiboZeroGold ScriptSeq protocol performed

  13. Genesis of two most prevalent PROP1 gene variants causing combined pituitary hormone deficiency in 21 populations.

    PubMed

    Dusatkova, Petra; Pfäffle, Roland; Brown, Milton R; Akulevich, Natallia; Arnhold, Ivo J P; Kalina, Maria A; Kot, Karolina; Krzisnik, Ciril; Lemos, Manuel C; Malikova, Jana; Navardauskaite, Ruta; Obermannova, Barbora; Pribilincova, Zuzana; Sallai, Agnes; Stipancic, Gordana; Verkauskiene, Rasa; Cinek, Ondrej; Blum, Werner F; Parks, John S; Austerlitz, Frederic; Lebl, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Two variants (c.[301_302delAG];[301_302delAG] and c.[150delA];[150delA]) in the PROP1 gene are the most common genetic causes of recessively inherited combined pituitary hormones deficiency (CPHD). Our objective was to analyze in detail the origin of the two most prevalent variants. In the multicentric study were included 237 patients with CPHD and their 15 relatives carrying c.[301_302delAG];[301_302delAG] or c.[150delA];[150delA] or c.[301_302delAG];[ 150delA]. They originated from 21 different countries worldwide. We genotyped 21 single-nucleotide variant markers flanking the 9.6-Mb region around the PROP1 gene that are not in mutual linkage disequilibrium in the general populations--a finding of a common haplotype would be indicative of ancestral origin of the variant. Haplotypes were reconstructed by Phase and Haploview software, and the variant age was estimated using an allelic association method. We demonstrated the ancestral origin of both variants--c.[301_302delAG] was carried on 0.2 Mb-long haplotype in a majority of European patients arising ~101 generations ago (confidence interval 90.1-116.4). Patients from the Iberian Peninsula displayed a different haplotype, which was estimated to have emerged 23.3 (20.1-29.1) generations ago. Subsequently, the data indicated that both the haplotypes were transmitted to Latin American patients ~13.8 (12.2-17.0) and 16.4 (14.4-20.1) generations ago, respectively. The c.[150delA] variant that was carried on a haplotype spanning about 0.3 Mb was estimated to appear 43.7 (38.4-52.7) generations ago. We present strong evidence that the most frequent variants in the PROP1 gene are not a consequence of variant hot spots as previously assumed, but are founder variants.

  14. Impact of 3’UTR genetic variants in PCSK9 and LDLR genes on plasma lipid traits and response to atorvastatin in Brazilian subjects: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Tomás; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Cerda, Álvaro; Dorea, Egidio L; Pinto, Gelba A; Gusukuma, Maria C; Bertolami, Marcelo C; Salazar, Luis A; Hirata, Rosario Dominguez Crespo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypercholesterolemia is a complex trait, resulting from a genetic interaction with lifestyle habits. Polymorphisms are a major source of genetic heterogeneity, and variations in 2 key cholesterol homeostasis genes; low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9 (PCSK9), lead to dyslipidemia. So, we investigated the relation of 2 variants located in the 3’-UTR (3’-untranslated region) of LDLR (rs14158, G>A) and PCSK9 (rs17111557, C>T) with lipid profile and atorvastatin response. Methods: SNP influence on lipid profile was assessed in hypercholesterolemic patients (HC; n = 89) using atorvastatin (10 mg/day/4 weeks) and in normolipidemic subjects (NL; n = 171). Genotyping was completed through real-time PCR using TaqMan assays. Results: rs14158 G allele was higher in HC than in NL group (P = 0.043). NL subjects carrying the T allele of the PCSK9 variant had lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) than C allele carriers (P = 0.009). There was no association between LDLR and PCSK9 SNPs and atorvastatin response. Additionally, the PCSK9 variant creates a microRNA interaction site, which could implicate an epigenetic mechanism in PCSK9-dependent HDL-C regulation. Conclusions: The rs14158 SNP contributes to hypercholesterolemia. Also, a putative microRNA regulation may influence HDL-C variability observed in rs17111557 carriers. Cholesterol-lowering response to atorvastatin is not influenced by LDLR and PCSK9 variants. PMID:26131194

  15. Coat variation in the domestic dog is governed by variants in three genes.

    PubMed

    Cadieu, Edouard; Neff, Mark W; Quignon, Pascale; Walsh, Kari; Chase, Kevin; Parker, Heidi G; Vonholdt, Bridgett M; Rhue, Alison; Boyko, Adam; Byers, Alexandra; Wong, Aaron; Mosher, Dana S; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Spady, Tyrone C; André, Catherine; Lark, K Gordon; Cargill, Michelle; Bustamante, Carlos D; Wayne, Robert K; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2009-10-01

    Coat color and type are essential characteristics of domestic dog breeds. Although the genetic basis of coat color has been well characterized, relatively little is known about the genes influencing coat growth pattern, length, and curl. We performed genome-wide association studies of more than 1000 dogs from 80 domestic breeds to identify genes associated with canine fur phenotypes. Taking advantage of both inter- and intrabreed variability, we identified distinct mutations in three genes, RSPO2, FGF5, and KRT71 (encoding R-spondin-2, fibroblast growth factor-5, and keratin-71, respectively), that together account for most coat phenotypes in purebred dogs in the United States. Thus, an array of varied and seemingly complex phenotypes can be reduced to the combinatorial effects of only a few genes.

  16. No association between AKT1 gene variants and schizophrenia: a Malaysian case-control study and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Loh, Han Chern; Chow, Tze Jen; Tang, Pek Yee; Yong, Hoi Sen

    2013-10-30

    We aim to replicate AKT1 gene variants studies using Malaysian samples. Seven AKT1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were studied in 417 patients and 429 controls. Haplotype showed significant association (p=0.036) with schizophrenia, especially in Malays and Indians. Meta-analysis of rs2494732 showed significant association worldwide (p=0.018) and in Asians (p=0.023).

  17. COMT Val[superscript 108/158] Met Gene Variant, Birth Weight, and Conduct Disorder in Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sengupta, Sarojini M.; Grizenko, Natalie; Schmitz, Norbert; Schwartz, George; Amor, Leila Ben; Bellingham, Johanne; de Guzman, Rosherrie; Polotskaia, Anna; Stepanian, Marina Ter; Thakur, Geeta; Joober, Ridha

    2006-01-01

    Objective: In a recent study, Thapar and colleagues reported that COMT "gene variant and birth weight predict early-onset antisocial behavior in children" with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. We have attempted to replicate these findings in a group of ADHD children using a similar research design. Method: Children (n = 191) between 6 and…

  18. Variants in angiogenesis-related genes and the risk of clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chao; Chen, Jianchun; Li, Jie; Ju, Xiaobing; Zhang, Shaobo; Cao, Qiang; Han, Zhijian; Li, Pu; Shao, Peifei; Wang, Meilin; Zhang, Zhengdong; Gu, Min; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Changjun

    2014-11-01

    Angiogenesis is fundamentally important to the pathogenesis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). We investigated the association between variations of genes related to angiogenesis and the risk of ccRCC. In a case-control study of 859 ccRCC patients and 1004 cancer-free subjects, we genotyped 24 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in seven angiogenesis-related genes (HIF1A, EPAS1, VEGFA, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, VEGFR3 and PDGFRB) using the TaqMan or Snapshot method. Unconditional logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounding factors, was used to assess the risk associations. The functionality of selected SNPs was assessed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and luciferase reporter gene assays. We found two SNPs (VEGFA rs2010963 and VEGFR3 rs448012) that were significantly associated with increased risk of ccRCC, after adjusting for multiple comparisons [rs2010963 CC/GC cf. GG: false discovery rate (FDR) = 0.048, odds ratio (OR) = 1.36, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.12-1.66; rs448012 CC/GC cf. GG: FDR = 0.048, OR = 1.38, 95% CI =1.13-1.69]. Real-time quantitative PCR revealed that the variant genotypes of rs2010963, but not rs448012, were associated with increased gene expression in normal tissues of ccRCC patients (CC/GC cf. GG: P = 0.036). The luciferase reporter assay showed that the rs2010963 C allele significantly increased luciferase activity over that of the rs2010963 G allele. Our results indicate that VEGFA rs2010963 and VEGFR3 rs448012 are associated with risk of ccRCC. Furthermore, rs2010963 is a functional SNP that may affect ccRCC susceptibility by modulating endogenous VEGFA expression. PMID:25239121

  19. Multicapillary gel electrophoresis based analysis of genetic variants in the WFS1 gene.

    PubMed

    Elek, Zsuzsanna; Dénes, Réka; Prokop, Susanne; Somogyi, Anikó; Yowanto, Handy; Luo, Jane; Souquet, Manfred; Guttman, András; Rónai, Zsolt

    2016-09-01

    The WFS1 gene is one of the thoroughly investigated targets in diabetes research, variants of the gene were suggested to be the genetic components of the common forms (type 1 and type 2) of diabetes. Our project focused on the analysis of polymorphisms (rs4689388, rs148797429, rs4273545) localized in the WFS1 promoter region. Although submarine gel electrophoresis based approaches were also employed in the genetic tests, it was demonstrated that multicapillary electrophoresis offers a state of the art approach for reliable high-throughput SNP and VNTR analysis. Association studies were carried out in a case-control setup. Luciferase reporter assay was employed to test the effect of the investigated loci on the activity of gene expression in vitro. Significant association could be demonstrated between all three polymorphisms and type 2 diabetes in both allele- and genotype-wise settings even using Bonferroni correction. It is notable; however, that the three loci were in strong linkage disequilibrium, thus the observed associations cannot be considered as separate effects. Molecular analyses showed that the rs4273545 GT SNP played a role in the regulation of transcription in vitro. However, this effect took place only in the presence of the region including the rs148797429 site, although this latter locus did not have its own impact on the regulation of gene expression. The paper provides genotyping protocols readily applicable in any multiplex SNP and VNTR analyses, moreover confirms and extends previous results about the role of WFS1 polymorphisms in the genetic risk of diabetes mellitus. PMID:27377286

  20. IDENTIFICATION AND HORMONE INDUCTION OF PUTATIVE CHITIN SYNTHASE GENES AND SPLICE VARIANTS IN Leptinotarsa decemlineata (SAY).

    PubMed

    Shi, Ji-Feng; Mu, Li-Li; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Chitin synthase (ChS) plays a critical role in chitin synthesis and excretion. In this study, two ChS genes (LdChSA and LdChSB) were identified in Leptinotarsa decemlineata. LdChSA contains two splicing variants, LdChSAa and LdChSAb. Within the first, second, and third larval instars, the mRNA levels of LdChSAa, LdChSAb, and LdChSB coincide with the peaks of circulating 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH). In vitro culture of midguts and an in vivo bioassay revealed that 20E and an ecdysteroid agonist halofenozide stimulated the expression of the three LdChSs. Conversely, a reduction of 20E by RNA interference (RNAi) of an ecdysteroidogenesis gene LdSHD repressed the expression of these LdChSs, and ingestion of halofenozide by LdSHD RNAi larvae rescued the repression. Moreover, disruption of 20E signaling by RNAi of LdEcR, LdE75, LdHR3, and LdFTZ-F1 reduced the expression levels of these genes. Similarly, in vitro culture and an in vivo bioassay showed that exogenous JH and a JH analog methoprene activated the expression of the three LdChSs, whereas a decrease in JH by RNAi of a JH biosynthesis gene LdJHAMT downregulated these LdChSs. It seems that JH upregulates LdChSs at the early stage of each instar, whereas a 20E pulse triggers the transcription of LdChSs during molting in L. decemlineata. PMID:27030662

  1. The Porcine TSPY Gene Is Tricopy but Not a Copy Number Variant

    PubMed Central

    Quach, Anh T.; Oluwole, Olutobi; King, William Allan; Revay, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    The testis-specific protein Y-encoded (TSPY) gene is situated on the mammalian Y-chromosome and exhibits some remarkable biological characteristics. It has the highest known copy number (CN) of all protein coding genes in the human and bovine genomes (up to 74 and 200, respectively) and also shows high individual variability. Although the biological function of TSPY has not yet been elucidated, its specific expression in the testis and several identified binding domains within the protein suggests roles in male reproduction. Here we describe the porcine TSPY, as a multicopy gene with three copies located on the short arm of the Y-chromosome with no variation at three exon loci among 20 animals of normal reproductive health from four breeds of domestic pigs (Piétrain, Landrace, Duroc and Yorkshire). To further investigate the speculation that porcine TSPY is not a copy number variant, we have included five Low-fertility boars and five boars with exceptional High-fertility records. Interestingly, there was no difference between the High- and Low-fertile groups, but we detected slightly lower TSPY CN at all three exons (2.56-2.85) in both groups, as compared to normal animals, which could be attributed to technical variability or somatic mosaicism. The results are based on both relative quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Chromosomal localization of the porcine TSPY was done using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with gene specific PCR probes. PMID:26133983

  2. Polymorphisms in MIR137HG and microRNA-137-regulated genes influence gray matter structure in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wright, C; Gupta, C N; Chen, J; Patel, V; Calhoun, V D; Ehrlich, S; Wang, L; Bustillo, J R; Perrone-Bizzozero, N I; Turner, J A

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that microRNA-137 (miR-137) is involved in the genetic basis of schizophrenia. Risk variants within the miR-137 host gene (MIR137HG) influence structural and functional brain-imaging measures, and miR-137 itself is predicted to regulate hundreds of genes. We evaluated the influence of a MIR137HG risk variant (rs1625579) in combination with variants in miR-137-regulated genes TCF4, PTGS2, MAPK1 and MAPK3 on gray matter concentration (GMC). These genes were selected based on our previous work assessing schizophrenia risk within possible miR-137-regulated gene sets using the same cohort of subjects. A genetic risk score (GRS) was determined based on genotypes of these four schizophrenia risk-associated genes in 221 Caucasian subjects (89 schizophrenia patients and 132 controls). The effects of the rs1625579 genotype with the GRS of miR-137-regulated genes in a three-way interaction with diagnosis on GMC patterns were assessed using a multivariate analysis. We found that schizophrenia subjects homozygous for the MIR137HG risk allele show significant decreases in occipital, parietal and temporal lobe GMC with increasing miR-137-regulated GRS, whereas those carrying the protective minor allele show significant increases in GMC with GRS. No correlations of GMC and GRS were found in control subjects. Variants within or upstream of genes regulated by miR-137 in combination with the MIR137HG risk variant may influence GMC in schizophrenia-related regions in patients. Given that the genes evaluated here are involved in protein kinase A signaling, dysregulation of this pathway through alterations in miR-137 biogenesis may underlie the gray matter loss seen in the disease. PMID:26836412

  3. Polymorphisms in MIR137HG and microRNA-137-regulated genes influence gray matter structure in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wright, C; Gupta, C N; Chen, J; Patel, V; Calhoun, V D; Ehrlich, S; Wang, L; Bustillo, J R; Perrone-Bizzozero, N I; Turner, J A

    2016-02-02

    Evidence suggests that microRNA-137 (miR-137) is involved in the genetic basis of schizophrenia. Risk variants within the miR-137 host gene (MIR137HG) influence structural and functional brain-imaging measures, and miR-137 itself is predicted to regulate hundreds of genes. We evaluated the influence of a MIR137HG risk variant (rs1625579) in combination with variants in miR-137-regulated genes TCF4, PTGS2, MAPK1 and MAPK3 on gray matter concentration (GMC). These genes were selected based on our previous work assessing schizophrenia risk within possible miR-137-regulated gene sets using the same cohort of subjects. A genetic risk score (GRS) was determined based on genotypes of these four schizophrenia risk-associated genes in 221 Caucasian subjects (89 schizophrenia patients and 132 controls). The effects of the rs1625579 genotype with the GRS of miR-137-regulated genes in a three-way interaction with diagnosis on GMC patterns were assessed using a multivariate analysis. We found that schizophrenia subjects homozygous for the MIR137HG risk allele show significant decreases in occipital, parietal and temporal lobe GMC with increasing miR-137-regulated GRS, whereas those carrying the protective minor allele show significant increases in GMC with GRS. No correlations of GMC and GRS were found in control subjects. Variants within or upstream of genes regulated by miR-137 in combination with the MIR137HG risk variant may influence GMC in schizophrenia-related regions in patients. Given that the genes evaluated here are involved in protein kinase A signaling, dysregulation of this pathway through alterations in miR-137 biogenesis may underlie the gray matter loss seen in the disease.

  4. Polymorphisms in MIR137HG and microRNA-137-regulated genes influence gray matter structure in schizophrenia

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wright, C.; Gupta, C. N.; Chen, J.; Patel, V.; Calhoun, V. D.; Ehrlich, S.; Wang, L.; Bustillo, J. R.; Perrone-Bizzozero, N. I.; Turner, J. A.

    2016-02-02

    Evidence suggests that microRNA-137 (miR-137) is involved in the genetic basis of schizophrenia. Risk variants within the miR-137 host gene (MIR137HG) influence structural and functional brain-imaging measures, and miR-137 itself is predicted to regulate hundreds of genes. We evaluated the influence of a MIR137HG risk variant (rs1625579) in combination with variants in miR-137- regulated genes TCF4, PTGS2, MAPK1 and MAPK3 on gray matter concentration (GMC). These genes were selected based on our previous work assessing schizophrenia risk within possible miR-137-regulated gene sets using the same cohort of subjects. A genetic risk score (GRS) was determined based on genotypes of thesemore » four schizophrenia risk-associated genes in 221 Caucasian subjects (89 schizophrenia patients and 132 controls). The effects of the rs1625579 genotype with the GRS of miR-137-regulated genes in a three-way interaction with diagnosis on GMC patterns were assessed using a multivariate analysis. We found that schizophrenia subjects homozygous for the MIR137HG risk allele show significant decreases in occipital, parietal and temporal lobe GMC with increasing miR-137-regulated GRS, whereas those carrying the protective minor allele show significant increases in GMC with GRS. No correlations of GMC and GRS were found in control subjects. Variants within or upstream of genes regulated by miR-137 in combination with the MIR137HG risk variant may influence GMC in schizophrenia-related regions in patients. Furthermore, given that the genes evaluated here are involved in protein kinase A signaling, dysregulation of this pathway through alterations in miR-137 biogenesis may underlie the gray matter loss seen in the disease.« less

  5. Role of the 5-HTTLPR and SNP Promoter Polymorphisms on Serotonin Transporter Gene Expression: a Closer Look at Genetic Architecture and In Vitro Functional Studies of Common and Uncommon Allelic Variants.

    PubMed

    Iurescia, Sandra; Seripa, Davide; Rinaldi, Monica

    2016-10-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytriptamine (5-HT)) transporter (5-HTT) gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) is a variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) located in the promoter region of the human 5-HTT-encoding gene SLC6A4. This length polymorphism gives rise to different promoter variants, variously influencing SLC6A4 expression. Over the years, an extensive literature has investigated the relationships between these promoter variants and SLC6A4 gene expression, since these variants have been variously associated to complex neuropsychiatric conditions and traits. In this review, we detail the genetic architecture of the 5-HTTLPR allelic variants reported so far, with a closer look at the two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs25531 and rs25532 that lies in the VNTR and thus increase genetic variability of the SLC6A4 promoter. We summarize the hypothesized molecular mechanisms underlying this variation. We also provide an update on common and uncommon 5-HTTLPR allelic variants reviewing the available data on functional in vitro analysis of their regulatory effect on SLC6A4 gene transcription. Controversial findings are highlighted and critically discussed. A deeper knowledge of the "5-HTTLPR universe" will be useful to better understand the molecular basis of serotonin homeostasis and the pathological basis underlying serotonin-related neuropsychiatric conditions and traits.

  6. Genetic analysis of long-lived families reveals novel variants influencing high density-lipoprotein cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Feitosa, Mary F.; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Straka, Robert; Kammerer, Candace M.; Lee, Joseph H.; Kraja, Aldi T.; Christensen, Kaare; Newman, Anne B.; Province, Michael A.; Borecki, Ingrid B.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) have an inverse relationship to the risks of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and have also been associated with longevity. We sought to identify novel loci for HDL that could potentially provide new insights into biological regulation of HDL metabolism in healthy-longevous subjects. We performed a genome-wide association (GWA) scan on HDL using a mixed model approach to account for family structure using kinship coefficients. A total of 4114 subjects of European descent (480 families) were genotyped at ~2.3 million SNPs and ~38 million SNPs were imputed using the 1000 Genome Cosmopolitan reference panel in MACH. We identified novel variants near-NLRP1 (17p13) associated with an increase of HDL levels at genome-wide significant level (p < 5.0E-08). Additionally, several CETP (16q21) and ZNF259-APOA5-A4-C3-A1 (11q23.3) variants associated with HDL were found, replicating those previously reported in the literature. A possible regulatory variant upstream of NLRP1 that is associated with HDL in these elderly Long Life Family Study (LLFS) subjects may also contribute to their longevity and health. Our NLRP1 intergenic SNPs show a potential regulatory function in Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE); however, it is not clear whether they regulate NLRP1 or other more remote gene. NLRP1 plays an important role in the induction of apoptosis, and its inflammasome is critical for mediating innate immune responses. Nlrp1a (a mouse ortholog of human NLRP1) interacts with SREBP-1a (17p11) which has a fundamental role in lipid concentration and composition, and is involved in innate immune response in macrophages. The NLRP1 region is conserved in mammals, but also has evolved adaptively showing signals of positive selection in European populations that might confer an advantage. NLRP1 intergenic SNPs have also been associated with immunity/inflammasome disorders which highlights the biological

  7. Rare Variants in the Epithelial Cadherin Gene Underlying the Genetic Etiology of Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luciano Abreu; Yamamoto, Guilherme Lopes; Melo, Soraia; Malcher, Carolina; Ferreira, Simone Gomes; Figueiredo, Joana; Alvizi, Lucas; Kobayashi, Gerson Shigeru; Naslavsky, Michel Satya; Alonso, Nivaldo; Felix, Temis Maria; Zatz, Mayana; Seruca, Raquel; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2015-11-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial cleft (NSOFC) is a complex disease of still unclear genetic etiology. To investigate the contribution of rare epithelial cadherin (CDH1) gene variants to NSOFC, we target sequenced 221 probands. Candidate variants were evaluated via in vitro, in silico, or segregation analyses. Three probably pathogenic variants (c.760G>A [p.Asp254Asn], c.1023T>G [p.Tyr341*], and c.2351G>A [p.Arg784His]) segregated according to autosomal dominant inheritance in four nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) families (Lod score: 5.8 at θ = 0; 47% penetrance). A fourth possibly pathogenic variant (c.387+5G>A) was also found, but further functional analyses are needed (overall prevalence of CDH1 candidate variants: 2%; 15.4% among familial cases). CDH1 mutational burden was higher among probands from familial cases when compared to that of controls (P = 0.002). We concluded that CDH1 contributes to NSCL/P with mainly rare, moderately penetrant variants, and CDH1 haploinsufficiency is the likely etiological mechanism.

  8. Exome Sequencing Analysis Reveals Variants in Primary Immunodeficiency Genes in Patients With Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kelsen, Judith R.; Dawany, Noor; Moran, Christopher J.; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Sarmady, Mahdi; Sasson, Ariella; Pauly-Hubbard, Helen; Martinez, Alejandro; Maurer, Kelly; Soong, Joanne; Rappaport, Eric; Franke, Andre; Keller, Andreas; Winter, Harland S.; Mamula, Petar; Piccoli, David; Artis, David; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Daly, Mark; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Baldassano, Robert N.; Devoto, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Very early onset inflammatory bowel disease (VEO-IBD), IBD diagnosed ≤5 y of age, frequently presents with a different and more severe phenotype than older-onset IBD. We investigated whether patients with VEO-IBD carry rare or novel variants in genes associated with immunodeficiencies that might contribute to disease development. Methods Patients with VEO-IBD and parents (when available) were recruited from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia from March 2013 through July 2014. We analyzed DNA from 125 patients with VEO-IBD (ages 3 weeks to 4 y) and 19 parents, 4 of whom also had IBD. Exome capture was performed by Agilent SureSelect V4, and sequencing was performed using the Illumina HiSeq platform. Alignment to human genome GRCh37 was achieved followed by post-processing and variant calling. Following functional annotation, candidate variants were analyzed for change in protein function, minor allele frequency <0.1%, and scaled combined annotation dependent depletion scores ≤10. We focused on genes associated with primary immunodeficiencies and related pathways. An additional 210 exome samples from patients with pediatric IBD (n=45) or adult-onset Crohn's disease (n=20) and healthy individuals (controls, n=145) were obtained from the University of Kiel, Germany and used as control groups. Results Four-hundred genes and regions associated with primary immunodeficiency, covering approximately 6500 coding exons totaling > 1 Mbp of coding sequence, were selected from the whole exome data. Our analysis revealed novel and rare variants within these genes that could contribute to the development of VEO-IBD, including rare heterozygous missense variants in IL10RA and previously unidentified variants in MSH5 and CD19. Conclusions In an exome sequence analysis of patients with VEO-IBD and their parents, we identified variants in genes that regulate B- and T-cell functions and could contribute to pathogenesis. Our analysis could lead to the

  9. Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 due to novel variants of SCNN1B gene

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Yael R; Lodish, Maya B; Raygada, Margarita; Del Rivero, Jaydira; Faucz, Fabio R; Abraham, Smita B; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Belyavskaya, Elena; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-01-01

    Summary Autosomal recessive pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1) is a rare disorder characterized by sodium wasting, failure to thrive, hyperkalemia, hypovolemia and metabolic acidosis. It is due to mutations in the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and is characterized by diminished response to aldosterone. Patients may present with life-threatening hyperkalemia, which must be recognized and appropriately treated. A 32-year-old female was referred to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for evaluation of hyperkalemia and muscle pain. Her condition started in the second week of life, when she was brought to an outside hospital lethargic and unresponsive. At that time, she was hypovolemic, hyperkalemic and acidotic, and was eventually treated with sodium bicarbonate and potassium chelation. At the time of the presentation to the NIH, her laboratory evaluation revealed serum potassium 5.1 mmol/l (reference range: 3.4–5.1 mmol/l), aldosterone 2800 ng/dl (reference range: ≤21 ng/dl) and plasma renin activity 90 ng/ml/h (reference range: 0.6–4.3 ng/ml per h). Diagnosis of PHA1 was suspected. Sequencing of the SCNN1B gene, which codes for ENaC, revealed that the patient is a compound heterozygote for two novel variants (c.1288delC and c.1466+1 G>A), confirming the suspected diagnosis of PHA1. In conclusion, we report a patient with novel variants of the SCNN1B gene causing PHA1 with persistent, symptomatic hyperkalemia. Learning points PHA1 is a rare genetic condition, causing functional abnormalities of the amiloride-sensitive ENaC.PHA1 was caused by previously unreported SCNN1B gene mutations (c.1288delC and c.1466+1 G>A).Early recognition of this condition and adherence to symptomatic therapy is important, as the electrolyte abnormalities found may lead to severe dehydration, cardiac arrhythmias and even death.High doses of sodium polystyrene sulfonate, sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate are required for symptomatic

  10. Detection of Copy Number Variants Reveals Association of Cilia Genes with Neural Tube Defects

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yonghui; Zhao, Huizhi; Sheng, Xiaoming; Zou, Jizhen; Lip, Va; Xie, Hua; Guo, Jin; Shao, Hong; Bao, Yihua; Shen, Jianliang; Niu, Bo; Gusella, James F.; Wu, Bai-Lin; Zhang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Background Neural tube defects (NTDs) are one of the most common birth defects caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Currently, little is known about the genetic basis of NTDs although up to 70% of human NTDs were reported to be attributed to genetic factors. Here we performed genome-wide copy number variants (CNVs) detection in a cohort of Chinese NTD patients in order to exam the potential role of CNVs in the pathogenesis of NTDs. Methods The genomic DNA from eighty-five NTD cases and seventy-five matched normal controls were subjected for whole genome CNVs analysis. Non-DGV (the Database of Genomic Variants) CNVs from each group were further analyzed for their associations with NTDs. Gene content in non-DGV CNVs as well as participating pathways were examined. Results Fifty-five and twenty-six non-DGV CNVs were detected in cases and controls respectively. Among them, forty and nineteen CNVs involve genes (genic CNV). Significantly more non-DGV CNVs and non-DGV genic CNVs were detected in NTD patients than in control (41.2% vs. 25.3%, p<0.05 and 37.6% vs. 20%, p<0.05). Non-DGV genic CNVs are associated with a 2.65-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.24–5.87). Interestingly, there are 41 cilia genes involved in non-DGV CNVs from NTD patients which is significantly enriched in cases compared with that in controls (24.7% vs. 9.3%, p<0.05), corresponding with a 3.19-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.27–8.01). Pathway analyses further suggested that two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are top canonical pathways implicated in NTD-specific CNVs, and these two novel pathways interact with known NTD pathways. Conclusions Evidence from the genome-wide CNV study suggests that genic CNVs, particularly ciliogenic CNVs are associated with NTDs and two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are potential pathways involved in NTD pathogenesis. PMID:23349908

  11. HGV&TB: a comprehensive online resource on human genes and genetic variants associated with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sahajpal, Ruchika; Kandoi, Gaurav; Dhiman, Heena; Raj, Sweety; Scaria, Vinod; Bhartiya, Deeksha; Hasija, Yasha

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by fastidious pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. TB has emerged as one of the major causes of mortality in the developing world. Role of host genetic factors that modulate disease susceptibility have not been studied widely. Recent studies have reported few genetic loci that provide impetus to this area of research. The availability of tools has enabled genome-wide scans for disease susceptibility loci associated with infectious diseases. Till now, information on human genetic variations and their associated genes that modulate TB susceptibility have not been systematically compiled. In this work, we have created a resource: HGV&TB, which hosts genetic variations reported to be associated with TB susceptibility in humans. It currently houses information on 307 variations in 98 genes. In total, 101 of these variations are exonic, whereas 78 fall in intronic regions. We also analysed the pathogenicity of the genetic variations, their phenotypic consequences and ethnic origin. Using various computational analyses, 30 variations of the 101 exonic variations were predicted to be pathogenic. The resource is freely available at http://genome.igib.res.in/hgvtb/index.html. Using integrative analysis, we have shown that the disease associated variants are selectively enriched in the immune signalling pathways which are crucial in the pathophysiology of TB. Database URL: http://genome.igib.res.in/hgvtb/index.html

  12. Minisatellite variants generated in yeast meiosis involve DNA removal during gene conversion.

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, A J; Louis, E J; Borts, R H

    2000-01-01

    Two yeast minisatellite alleles were cloned and inserted into a genetically defined interval in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of flanking markers in combination with sequencing allowed the determination of the meiotic events that produced minisatellites with altered lengths. Tetrad analysis revealed that gene conversions, deletions, or complex combinations of both were involved in producing minisatellite variants. Similar changes were obtained following selection for nearby gene conversions or crossovers among random spores. The largest class of events involving the minisatellite was a 3:1 segregation of parental-size alleles, a class that would have been missed in all previous studies of minisatellites. Comparison of the sequences of the parental and novel alleles revealed that DNA must have been removed from the recipient array while a newly synthesized copy of donor array sequences was inserted. The length of inserted sequences did not appear to be constrained by the length of DNA that was removed. In cases where one or both sides of the insertion could be determined, the insertion endpoints were consistent with the suggestion that the event was mediated by alignment of homologous stretches of donor/recipient DNA. PMID:10978271

  13. Common genetic variants in Wnt signaling pathway genes as potential prognostic biomarkers for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ting, Wen-Chien; Chen, Lu-Min; Pao, Jiunn-Bey; Yang, Ying-Pi; You, Bang-Jau; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Lee, Hong-Zin; Bao, Bo-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Compelling evidence has implicated the Wnt signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. We assessed the use of tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)/β-catenin (CTNNB1) genes to predict outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer. We selected and genotyped 10 tSNP to predict common variants across entire APC and CTNNB1 genes in 282 colorectal cancer patients. The associations of these tSNPs with distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis, Cox regression model, and survival tree analysis. The 5-year overall survival rate was 68.3%. Survival tree analysis identified a higher-order genetic interaction profile consisting of the APC rs565453, CTNNB1 2293303, and APC rs1816769 that was significantly associated with overall survival. The 5-year survival overall rates were 89.2%, 66.1%, and 58.8% for the low-, medium-, and high-risk genetic profiles, respectively (log-rank P = 0.001). After adjusting for possible confounders, including age, gender, carcinoembryonic antigen levels, tumor differentiation, stage, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, and lymph node involvement, the genetic interaction profile remained significant. None of the studied SNPs were individually associated with distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival. Our results suggest that the genetic interaction profile among Wnt pathway SNPs might potentially increase the prognostic value in outcome prediction for colorectal cancer. PMID:23405266

  14. The expanding spectrum of COL2A1 gene variants IN 136 patients with a skeletal dysplasia phenotype.

    PubMed

    Barat-Houari, Mouna; Dumont, Bruno; Fabre, Aurélie; Them, Frédéric Tm; Alembik, Yves; Alessandri, Jean-Luc; Amiel, Jeanne; Audebert, Séverine; Baumann-Morel, Clarisse; Blanchet, Patricia; Bieth, Eric; Brechard, Marie; Busa, Tiffany; Calvas, Patrick; Capri, Yline; Cartault, François; Chassaing, Nicolas; Ciorca, Vidrica; Coubes, Christine; David, Albert; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Dupin-Deguine, Delphine; El Chehadeh, Salima; Faivre, Laurence; Giuliano, Fabienne; Goldenberg, Alice; Isidor, Bertrand; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Julia, Sophie; Kaplan, Josseline; Lacombe, Didier; Lebrun, Marine; Marlin, Sandrine; Martin-Coignard, Dominique; Martinovic, Jelena; Masurel, Alice; Melki, Judith; Mozelle-Nivoix, Monique; Nguyen, Karine; Odent, Sylvie; Philip, Nicole; Pinson, Lucile; Plessis, Ghislaine; Quélin, Chloé; Shaeffer, Elise; Sigaudy, Sabine; Thauvin, Christel; Till, Marianne; Touraine, Renaud; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Baujat, Geneviève; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Le Merrer, Martine; Geneviève, David; Touitou, Isabelle

    2016-07-01

    Heterozygous COL2A1 variants cause a wide spectrum of skeletal dysplasia termed type II collagenopathies. We assessed the impact of this gene in our French series. A decision tree was applied to select 136 probands (71 Stickler cases, 21 Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita cases, 11 Kniest dysplasia cases, and 34 other dysplasia cases) before molecular diagnosis by Sanger sequencing. We identified 66 different variants among the 71 positive patients. Among those patients, 18 belonged to multiplex families and 53 were sporadic. Most variants (38/44, 86%) were located in the triple helical domain of the collagen chain and glycine substitutions were mainly observed in severe phenotypes, whereas arginine to cysteine changes were more often encountered in moderate phenotypes. This series of skeletal dysplasia is one of the largest reported so far, adding 44 novel variants (15%) to published data. We have confirmed that about half of our Stickler patients (46%) carried a COL2A1 variant, and that the molecular spectrum was different across the phenotypes. To further address the question of genotype-phenotype correlation, we plan to screen our patients for other candidate genes using a targeted next-generation sequencing approach.

  15. Assessing the phenotypic effects in the general population of rare variants in genes for a dominant Mendelian form of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Flannick, Jason; Beer, Nicola L; Bick, Alexander G; Agarwala, Vineeta; Molnes, Janne; Gupta, Namrata; Burtt, Noël P; Florez, Jose C; Meigs, James B; Taylor, Herman; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Irgens, Henrik; Fox, Ervin; Burslem, Frank; Johansson, Stefan; Brosnan, M Julia; Trimmer, Jeff K; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Molven, Anders; Wilson, James G; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Njølstad, Pål R; Rolph, Tim; Seidman, J G; Gabriel, Stacey; Cox, David R; Seidman, Christine E; Groop, Leif; Altshuler, David

    2013-11-01

    Genome sequencing can identify individuals in the general population who harbor rare coding variants in genes for Mendelian disorders and who may consequently have increased disease risk. Previous studies of rare variants in phenotypically extreme individuals display ascertainment bias and may demonstrate inflated effect-size estimates. We sequenced seven genes for maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) in well-phenotyped population samples (n = 4,003). We filtered rare variants according to two prediction criteria for disease-causing mutations: reported previously in MODY or satisfying stringent de novo thresholds (rare, conserved and protein damaging). Approximately 1.5% and 0.5% of randomly selected individuals from the Framingham and Jackson Heart Studies, respectively, carry variants from these two classes. However, the vast majority of carriers remain euglycemic through middle age. Accurate estimates of variant effect sizes from population-based sequencing are needed to avoid falsely predicting a substantial fraction of individuals as being at risk for MODY or other Mendelian diseases. PMID:24097065

  16. Assessing the phenotypic effects in the general population of rare variants in genes for a dominant mendelian form of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Flannick, Jason; Beer, Nicola L; Bick, Alexander G; Agarwala, Vineeta; Molnes, Janne; Gupta, Namrata; Burtt, Noel P; Florez, Jose C; Meigs, James B; Taylor, Herman; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Irgens, Henrik; Fox, Ervin; Burslem, Frank; Johansson, Stefan; Brosnan, M Julia; Trimmer, Jeff K; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Molven, Anders; Wilson, James G; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Njølstad, Pål R; Rolph, Tim; Seidman, J.G.; Gabriel, Stacey; Cox, David R; Seidman, Christine; Groop, Leif; Altshuler, David

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequencing can identify individuals in the general population who harbor rare coding variants in genes for Mendelian disorders1–7 – and who consequently may have increased disease risk. However, previous studies of rare variants in phenotypically extreme individuals have ascertainment bias and may demonstrate inflated effect size estimates8–12. We sequenced seven genes for maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY)13 in well-phenotyped population samples14,15 (n=4,003). Rare variants were filtered according to prediction criteria used to identify disease-causing mutations: i) previously-reported in MODY, and ii) stringent de novo thresholds satisfied (rare, conserved, protein damaging). Approximately 1.5% and 0.5% of randomly selected Framingham and Jackson Heart Study individuals carried variants from these two classes, respectively. However, the vast majority of carriers remained euglycemic through middle age. Accurate estimates of variant effect sizes from population-based sequencing are needed to avoid falsely predicting a significant fraction of individuals as at risk for MODY or other Mendelian diseases. PMID:24097065

  17. Identification of variants in the 4q35 gene FAT1 in patients with a facioscapulohumeral dystrophy-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Puppo, Francesca; Dionnet, Eugenie; Gaillard, Marie-Cécile; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Castro, Christel; Vovan, Catherine; Bertaux, Karine; Bernard, Rafaelle; Attarian, Shahram; Goto, Kanako; Nishino, Ichizo; Hayashi, Yukiko; Magdinier, Frédérique; Krahn, Martin; Helmbacher, Françoise; Bartoli, Marc; Lévy, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Facioscapulohumeralmuscular dystrophy (FSHD) is linked to copy-number reduction (N < 10) of the 4q D4Z4 subtelomeric array, in association with DUX4-permissive haplotypes. This main form is indicated as FSHD1. FSHD-like phenotypes may also appear in the absence of D4Z4 copy-number reduction. Variants of the SMCHD1 gene have been reported to associate with D4Z4 hypomethylation in DUX4-compatible haplotypes, thus defining FSHD2. Recently, mice carrying a muscle-specific knock-out of the protocadherin gene Fat1 or its constitutive hypomorphic allele were shown to develop muscular and nonmuscular defects mimicking human FSHD. Here, we report FAT1 variants in a group of patients presenting with neuromuscular symptoms reminiscent of FSHD. The patients do not carry D4Z4 copy-number reduction, 4q hypomethylation, or SMCHD1 variants. However, abnormal splicing of the FAT1 transcript is predicted for all identified variants. To determine their pathogenicity, we elaborated a minigene approach coupled to an antisense oligonucleotide (AON) assay. In vitro, four out of five selected variants induced partial or complete alteration of splicing by creating new splice sites or modifying splicing regulators. AONs confirmed these effects. Altered transcripts may affect FAT1 protein interactions or stability. Altogether, our data suggest that defective FAT1 is associated with an FSHD-like phenotype. PMID:25615407

  18. Assessment of pathogenicity of natural IGFALS gene variants by in silico bioinformatics tools and in vitro functional studies.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Lucía C; Gutiérrez, Mariana L; Karabatas, Liliana M; Scaglia, Paula A; Rey, Rodolfo A; Domené, Horacio M; Jasper, Héctor G; Domené, Sabina

    2016-07-01

    Acid-labile subunit (ALS) is essential for stabilization of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 in ternary complexes within the vascular system. ALS deficient (ALS-D) patients and a subset of children with idiopathic short stature (ISS), presenting IGFALS gene variants, show variable degree of growth retardation associated to IGF-I and IGFBP-3 deficiencies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential pathogenicity of eleven IGFALS variants identified in ALS-D and ISS children using in silico and in vitro approaches. We were able to classify seven of these variants as pathogenic since they present impaired synthesis (p.Glu35Lysfs*87, p.Glu35Glyfs*17, p.Asn276Ser, p.Leu409Phe, p.Ser490Trp and p.Cys540Arg), or partial impairment of synthesis and lack of secretion (p.Leu213Phe). We also observed significant reduction of secreted protein for variants p.Ala330Asp, Ala475Val and p.Arg548Trp, while still retaining their ability to form ternary complexes. These findings provide an approach to test the pathogenicity of IGFALS gene variants. PMID:27018247

  19. Genetic Variants in the Bone Morphogenic Protein Gene Family Modify the Association between Residential Exposure to Traffic and Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Ward-Caviness, Cavin K; Neas, Lucas M; Blach, Colette; Haynes, Carol S; LaRocque-Abramson, Karen; Grass, Elizabeth; Dowdy, Elaine; Devlin, Robert B; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Cascio, Wayne E; Lynn Miranda, Marie; Gregory, Simon G; Shah, Svati H; Kraus, William E; Hauser, Elizabeth R

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing literature indicating that genetic variants modify many of the associations between environmental exposures and clinical outcomes, potentially by increasing susceptibility to these exposures. However, genome-scale investigations of these interactions have been rarely performed particularly in the case of air pollution exposures. We performed race-stratified genome-wide gene-environment interaction association studies on European-American (EA, N = 1623) and African-American (AA, N = 554) cohorts to investigate the joint influence of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and residential exposure to traffic ("traffic exposure")-a recognized vascular disease risk factor-on peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Traffic exposure was estimated via the distance from the primary residence to the nearest major roadway, defined as the nearest limited access highways or major arterial. The rs755249-traffic exposure interaction was associated with PAD at a genome-wide significant level (P = 2.29x10-8) in European-Americans. Rs755249 is located in the 3' untranslated region of BMP8A, a member of the bone morphogenic protein (BMP) gene family. Further investigation revealed several variants in BMP genes associated with PAD via an interaction with traffic exposure in both the EA and AA cohorts; this included interactions with non-synonymous variants in BMP2, which is regulated by air pollution exposure. The BMP family of genes is linked to vascular growth and calcification and is a novel gene family for the study of PAD pathophysiology. Further investigation of BMP8A using the Genotype Tissue Expression Database revealed multiple variants with nominally significant (P < 0.05) interaction P-values in our EA cohort were significant BMP8A eQTLs in tissue types highlight relevant for PAD such as rs755249 (tibial nerve, eQTL P = 3.6x10-6) and rs1180341 (tibial artery, eQTL P = 5.3x10-6). Together these results reveal a novel gene, and possibly gene family

  20. Genetic Variants in the Bone Morphogenic Protein Gene Family Modify the Association between Residential Exposure to Traffic and Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Ward-Caviness, Cavin K; Neas, Lucas M; Blach, Colette; Haynes, Carol S; LaRocque-Abramson, Karen; Grass, Elizabeth; Dowdy, Elaine; Devlin, Robert B; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Cascio, Wayne E; Lynn Miranda, Marie; Gregory, Simon G; Shah, Svati H; Kraus, William E; Hauser, Elizabeth R

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing literature indicating that genetic variants modify many of the associations between environmental exposures and clinical outcomes, potentially by increasing susceptibility to these exposures. However, genome-scale investigations of these interactions have been rarely performed particularly in the case of air pollution exposures. We performed race-stratified genome-wide gene-environment interaction association studies on European-American (EA, N = 1623) and African-American (AA, N = 554) cohorts to investigate the joint influence of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and residential exposure to traffic ("traffic exposure")-a recognized vascular disease risk factor-on peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Traffic exposure was estimated via the distance from the primary residence to the nearest major roadway, defined as the nearest limited access highways or major arterial. The rs755249-traffic exposure interaction was associated with PAD at a genome-wide significant level (P = 2.29x10-8) in European-Americans. Rs755249 is located in the 3' untranslated region of BMP8A, a member of the bone morphogenic protein (BMP) gene family. Further investigation revealed several variants in BMP genes associated with PAD via an interaction with traffic exposure in both the EA and AA cohorts; this included interactions with non-synonymous variants in BMP2, which is regulated by air pollution exposure. The BMP family of genes is linked to vascular growth and calcification and is a novel gene family for the study of PAD pathophysiology. Further investigation of BMP8A using the Genotype Tissue Expression Database revealed multiple variants with nominally significant (P < 0.05) interaction P-values in our EA cohort were significant BMP8A eQTLs in tissue types highlight relevant for PAD such as rs755249 (tibial nerve, eQTL P = 3.6x10-6) and rs1180341 (tibial artery, eQTL P = 5.3x10-6). Together these results reveal a novel gene, and possibly gene family

  1. Genetic Variants in the Bone Morphogenic Protein Gene Family Modify the Association between Residential Exposure to Traffic and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ward-Caviness, Cavin K.; Neas, Lucas M.; Blach, Colette; Haynes, Carol S.; LaRocque-Abramson, Karen; Grass, Elizabeth; Dowdy, Elaine; Devlin, Robert B.; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Cascio, Wayne E.; Lynn Miranda, Marie; Gregory, Simon G.; Shah, Svati H.; Kraus, William E.; Hauser, Elizabeth R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing literature indicating that genetic variants modify many of the associations between environmental exposures and clinical outcomes, potentially by increasing susceptibility to these exposures. However, genome-scale investigations of these interactions have been rarely performed particularly in the case of air pollution exposures. We performed race-stratified genome-wide gene-environment interaction association studies on European-American (EA, N = 1623) and African-American (AA, N = 554) cohorts to investigate the joint influence of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and residential exposure to traffic (“traffic exposure”)—a recognized vascular disease risk factor—on peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Traffic exposure was estimated via the distance from the primary residence to the nearest major roadway, defined as the nearest limited access highways or major arterial. The rs755249-traffic exposure interaction was associated with PAD at a genome-wide significant level (P = 2.29x10-8) in European-Americans. Rs755249 is located in the 3’ untranslated region of BMP8A, a member of the bone morphogenic protein (BMP) gene family. Further investigation revealed several variants in BMP genes associated with PAD via an interaction with traffic exposure in both the EA and AA cohorts; this included interactions with non-synonymous variants in BMP2, which is regulated by air pollution exposure. The BMP family of genes is linked to vascular growth and calcification and is a novel gene family for the study of PAD pathophysiology. Further investigation of BMP8A using the Genotype Tissue Expression Database revealed multiple variants with nominally significant (P < 0.05) interaction P-values in our EA cohort were significant BMP8A eQTLs in tissue types highlight relevant for PAD such as rs755249 (tibial nerve, eQTL P = 3.6x10-6) and rs1180341 (tibial artery, eQTL P = 5.3x10-6). Together these results reveal a novel gene, and possibly gene

  2. Screening for Coding Variants in FTO and SH2B1 Genes in Chinese Patients with Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaodong; Yang, Peirong; Li, Juan; Ding, Yu; Yao, Ru-en; Geng, Juan; Shen, Yongnian; Shen, Yiping; Fu, Qihua; Yu, Yongguo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate potential functional variants in FTO and SH2B1 genes among Chinese children with obesity. Methods Sanger sequencing of PCR products of all FTO and SH2B1 exons and their flanking regions were performed in 338 Chinese Han children with obesity and 221 age- and sex-matched lean controls. Results A total of seven and five rare non-synonymous variants were identified in FTO and SH2B1, respectively. The overall frequencies of FTO and SH2B1 rare non-synonymous variants were similar in obese and lean children (2.37% and 0.90% vs. 1.81% and 1.36%, P>0.05). However, four out of the seven variants in FTO were novel and all were unique to obese children (p>0.05). None of the novel variants was consistently being predicted to be deleterious. Four out of five variants in SH2B1 were novel and one was unique to obese children (p>0.05). One variant (L293R) that was consistently being predicted as deleterious in SH2B1 gene was unique to lean control. While rare missense mutations were more frequently detected in girls from obesity as well as lean control than boys, the difference was not statistically significant. In addition, it's shown that the prevalence of rare missense mutations of FTO as well as SH2B1 was similar across different ethnic groups. Conclusion The rare missense mutations of FTO and SH2B1 did not confer risks of obesity in Chinese Han children in our cohort. PMID:23825611

  3. Somatic mutations and germline sequence variants in the expressed tyrosine kinase genes of patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zhifu; Walgren, Richard; Zhao, Yu; Kasai, Yumi; Miner, Tracie; Ries, Rhonda E.; Lubman, Olga; Fremont, Daved H.; McLellan, Michael D.; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F.; Link, Daniel C.; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.; Watson, Mark; Baty, Jack; Heath, Sharon; Shannon, William D.; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations in tyrosine kinase (TK) genes (eg, FLT3 and KIT) are found in more than 30% of patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML); many groups have speculated that mutations in other TK genes may be present in the remaining 70%. We performed high-throughput resequencing of the kinase domains of 26 TK genes (11 receptor TK; 15 cytoplasmic TK) expressed in most AML patients using genomic DNA from the bone marrow (tumor) and matched skin biopsy samples (“germline”) from 94 patients with de novo AML; sequence variants were validated in an additional 94 AML tumor samples (14.3 million base pairs of sequence were obtained and analyzed). We identified known somatic mutations in FLT3, KIT, and JAK2 TK genes at the expected frequencies and found 4 novel somatic mutations, JAK1V623A, JAK1T478S, DDR1A803V, and NTRK1S677N, once each in 4 respective patients of 188 tested. We also identified novel germline sequence changes encoding amino acid substitutions (ie, nonsynonymous changes) in 14 TK genes, including TYK2, which had the largest number of nonsynonymous sequence variants (11 total detected). Additional studies will be required to define the roles that these somatic and germline TK gene variants play in AML pathogenesis. PMID:18270328

  4. Alternative splicing of DENND1A, a PCOS candidate gene, generates variant 2.

    PubMed

    Tee, Meng Kian; Speek, Mart; Legeza, Balázs; Modi, Bhavi; Teves, Maria Eugenia; McAllister, Janette M; Strauss, Jerome F; Miller, Walter L

    2016-10-15

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrinopathy characterized by hyperandrogenism and metabolic disorders. The excess androgens may be of both ovarian and adrenal origin. PCOS has a strong genetic component, and genome-wide association studies have identified several candidate genes, notably DENND1A, which encodes connecdenn 1, involved in trafficking of endosomes. DENND1A encodes two principal variants, V1 (1009 amino acids) and V2 (559 amino acids). The androgen-producing ovarian theca cells of PCOS women over-express V2. Knockdown of V2 in these cells reduces androgen production, and overexpression of V2 in normal theca cells confers upon them a PCOS phenotype of increased androgen synthesis. We report that human adrenal NCI-H295A cells express V1 and V2 mRNA and that the V2 isoform is produced by exonization of sequences in intron 20, which generates a unique exon 20A, encoding the C-terminus of V2. As in human theca cells from normal women, forced expression of V2 in NCI-H295A cells resulted in increased abundance of CYP17A1 and CYP11A1 mRNAs. We also found genetic variation in the intronic region 330 bp upstream from exon 20A, which could have the potential to drive the selective expression of V2. There was no clear association with these variants with PCOS when we analyzed genomc DNA from normal women and women with PCOS. Using minigene expression vectors in NCI-H295A cells, this variable region did not consistently favor splicing of the V2 transcript. These findings suggest increased V2 expression in PCOS theca cells is not the result of genomic sequence variation in intron 20. PMID:27297658

  5. ALOX5 gene variants affect eicosanoid production and response to fish oil supplementation.

    PubMed

    Stephensen, Charles B; Armstrong, Patrice; Newman, John W; Pedersen, Theresa L; Legault, Jillian; Schuster, Gertrud U; Kelley, Darshan; Vikman, Susanna; Hartiala, Jaana; Nassir, Rami; Seldin, Michael F; Allayee, Hooman

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) gene variants associated with cardiovascular disease affect eicosanoid production by monocytes. The study was a randomized, double-masked, parallel intervention trial with fish oil (5.0 g of fish oil daily, containing 2.0 g of eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] and 1.0 g of docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) or placebo oil (5.0 g of corn/soy mixture). A total of 116 subjects (68% female, 20-59 years old) of African American ancestry enrolled, and 98 subjects completed the study. Neither ALOX5 protein nor arachidonic acid-derived LTB4, LTD4, and LTE4 varied by genotype, but 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoate (5-HETE), 6-trans-LTB4, 5-oxo-ETE, 15-HETE, and 5,15-diHETE levels were higher in subjects homozygous for the ALOX5 promoter allele containing five Sp1 element tandem repeats ("55" genotype) than in subjects with one deletion (d) (three or four repeats) and one common ("d5" genotype) allele or with two deletion ("dd") alleles. The EPA-derived metabolites 5-HEPE and 15-HEPE and the DHA-derived metabolite 17-HDoHE had similar associations with genotype and increased with supplementation; 5-HEPE and 15-HEPE increased, and 5-oxo-ETE decreased to a greater degree in the 55 than in the other genotypes. This differential eicosanoid response is consistent with the previously observed interaction of these variants with dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids in predicting cardiovascular disease risk.

  6. Effects of genetic variants for the bovine calpain gene on meat tenderness.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hoyoung; Shin, Sungchul; Chung, Euiryong

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the genetic variants of CAPN1 developed in several cattle populations can be applied for Hanwoo, regarding genetic effects on meat traits. The traits were examined for 286 purebred Hanwoo steers with genotypes classified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. The nucleotide positions of primers and previously identified genetic variants were based on sequences of the calpain 1 (CAPN1) gene with GenBank accession numbers (AF252504, AF248054, and AY639597). The analysis of genetic distribution estimated levels of minor allele frequencies ranged from 0.165 to 0.392, showing no significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium for all markers. Overall averages of heterozygosites (He) and polymorphic information contents (PICs) for all markers were calculated to 0.503 and 0.429, respectively, and the g.4558G>A marker showed the lowest He (0.425) and PIC (0.367). Animals from 29 months of age were slaughtered to measure Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF), cooking loss, water-holding capacity, pH, fat, and moisture. All the CAPN1 markers explained variations of WBSF, showing significant additive effects except g.5709G>A. A significant marginal mean difference in genotypes of g.6545C>T (P=0.046) was found in moisture with additive effects. From the result it may be possible to use three calpain markers (g.4558G>A, g.4685C>T, and g.6545C>T) classified by RFLP and SSCP analysis in marker assisted selection programs to improve WBSF as meat tenderness in Hanwoo.

  7. Meiotic Interactors of a Mitotic Gene TAO3 Revealed by Functional Analysis of its Rare Variant.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Saumya; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Nitin, Rachana; Raharja-Liu, Pandu; Lin, Gen; Steinmetz, Lars M; Gagneur, Julien; Sinha, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Studying the molecular consequences of rare genetic variants has the potential to identify novel and hitherto uncharacterized pathways causally contributing to phenotypic variation. Here, we characterize the functional consequences of a rare coding variant of TAO3, previously reported to contribute significantly to sporulation efficiency variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae During mitosis, the common TAO3 allele interacts with CBK1-a conserved NDR kinase. Both TAO3 and CBK1 are components of the RAM signaling network that regulates cell separation and polarization during mitosis. We demonstrate that the role of the rare allele TAO3(4477C) in meiosis is distinct from its role in mitosis by being independent of ACE2-a RAM network target gene. By quantitatively measuring cell morphological dynamics, and expressing the TAO3(4477C) allele conditionally during sporulation, we show that TAO3 has an early role in meiosis. This early role of TAO3 coincides with entry of cells into meiotic division. Time-resolved transcriptome analyses during early sporulation identified regulators of carbon and lipid metabolic pathways as candidate mediators. We show experimentally that, during sporulation, the TAO3(4477C) allele interacts genetically with ERT1 and PIP2, regulators of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and gluconeogenesis metabolic pathways, respectively. We thus uncover a meiotic functional role for TAO3, and identify ERT1 and PIP2 as novel regulators of sporulation efficiency. Our results demonstrate that studying the causal effects of genetic variation on the underlying molecular network has the potential to provide a more extensive understanding of the pathways driving a complex trait. PMID:27317780

  8. Selected vitamin D metabolic gene variants and risk for autism spectrum disorder in the CHARGE Study☆

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Rebecca J.; Hansen, Robin L.; Hartiala, Jaana; Allayee, Hooman; Sconberg, Jaime L.; Schmidt, Linda C.; Volk, Heather E.; Tassone, Flora

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitamin D is essential for proper neurodevelopment and cognitive and behavioral function. We examined associations between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and common, functional polymorphisms in vitamin D pathways. Methods Children aged 24–60 months enrolled from 2003 to 2009 in the population-based CHARGE case–control study were evaluated clinically and confirmed to have ASD (n = 474) or typical development (TD, n = 281). Maternal, paternal, and child DNA samples for 384 (81%) families of children with ASD and 234 (83%) families of TD children were genotyped for: TaqI, BsmI, FokI, and Cdx2 in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene, and CYP27B1 rs4646536, GC rs4588, and CYP2R1 rs10741657. Case–control logistic regression, family-based log-linear, and hybrid log-linear analyses were conducted to produce risk estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for each allelic variant. Results Paternal VDR TaqI homozygous variant genotype was significantly associated with ASD in case–control analysis (odds ratio [OR] [CI]: 6.3 [1.9–20.7]) and there was a trend towards increased risk associated with VDR BsmI (OR [CI]: 4.7 [1.6–13.4]). Log-linear triad analyses detected parental imprinting, with greater effects of paternally-derived VDR alleles. Child GC AA-genotype/A-allele was associated with ASD in log-linear and ETDT analyses. A significant association between decreased ASD risk and child CYP2R1 AA-genotype was found in hybrid log-linear analysis. There were limitations of low statistical power for less common alleles due to missing paternal genotypes. Conclusions This study provides preliminary evidence that paternal and child vitamin D metabolism could play a role in the etiology of ASD; further research in larger study populations is warranted. PMID:26073892

  9. Alternative splicing of DENND1A, a PCOS candidate gene, generates variant 2.

    PubMed

    Tee, Meng Kian; Speek, Mart; Legeza, Balázs; Modi, Bhavi; Teves, Maria Eugenia; McAllister, Janette M; Strauss, Jerome F; Miller, Walter L

    2016-10-15

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrinopathy characterized by hyperandrogenism and metabolic disorders. The excess androgens may be of both ovarian and adrenal origin. PCOS has a strong genetic component, and genome-wide association studies have identified several candidate genes, notably DENND1A, which encodes connecdenn 1, involved in trafficking of endosomes. DENND1A encodes two principal variants, V1 (1009 amino acids) and V2 (559 amino acids). The androgen-producing ovarian theca cells of PCOS women over-express V2. Knockdown of V2 in these cells reduces androgen production, and overexpression of V2 in normal theca cells confers upon them a PCOS phenotype of increased androgen synthesis. We report that human adrenal NCI-H295A cells express V1 and V2 mRNA and that the V2 isoform is produced by exonization of sequences in intron 20, which generates a unique exon 20A, encoding the C-terminus of V2. As in human theca cells from normal women, forced expression of V2 in NCI-H295A cells resulted in increased abundance of CYP17A1 and CYP11A1 mRNAs. We also found genetic variation in the intronic region 330 bp upstream from exon 20A, which could have the potential to drive the selective expression of V2. There was no clear association with these variants with PCOS when we analyzed genomc DNA from normal women and women with PCOS. Using minigene expression vectors in NCI-H295A cells, this variable region did not consistently favor splicing of the V2 transcript. These findings suggest increased V2 expression in PCOS theca cells is not the result of genomic sequence variation in intron 20.

  10. Prevalence of the prion protein gene E211K variant in U.S. cattle

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Michael P; Keele, John W; Harhay, Gregory P; Richt, Jürgen A; Koohmaraie, Mohammad; Wheeler, Tommy L; Shackelford, Steven D; Casas, Eduardo; King, D Andy; Sonstegard, Tad S; Van Tassell, Curtis P; Neibergs, Holly L; Chase, Chad C; Kalbfleisch, Theodore S; Smith, Timothy PL; Clawson, Michael L; Laegreid, William W

    2008-01-01

    Background In 2006, an atypical U.S. case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was discovered in Alabama and later reported to be polymorphic for glutamate (E) and lysine (K) codons at position 211 in the bovine prion protein gene (Prnp) coding sequence. A bovine E211K mutation is important because it is analogous to the most common pathogenic mutation in humans (E200K) which causes hereditary Creutzfeldt – Jakob disease, an autosomal dominant form of prion disease. The present report describes a high-throughput matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry assay for scoring the Prnp E211K variant and its use to determine an upper limit for the K211 allele frequency in U.S. cattle. Results The K211 allele was not detected in 6062 cattle, including those from five commercial beef processing plants (3892 carcasses) and 2170 registered cattle from 42 breeds. Multiple nearby polymorphisms in Prnp coding sequence of 1456 diverse purebred cattle (42 breeds) did not interfere with scoring E211 or K211 alleles. Based on these results, the upper bounds for prevalence of the E211K variant was estimated to be extremely low, less than 1 in 2000 cattle (Bayesian analysis based on 95% quantile of the posterior distribution with a uniform prior). Conclusion No groups or breeds of U.S. cattle are presently known to harbor the Prnp K211 allele. Because a carrier was not detected, the number of additional atypical BSE cases with K211 will also be vanishingly low. PMID:18625065

  11. Meiotic Interactors of a Mitotic Gene TAO3 Revealed by Functional Analysis of its Rare Variant

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saumya; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Nitin, Rachana; Raharja-Liu, Pandu; Lin, Gen; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Gagneur, Julien; Sinha, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Studying the molecular consequences of rare genetic variants has the potential to identify novel and hitherto uncharacterized pathways causally contributing to phenotypic variation. Here, we characterize the functional consequences of a rare coding variant of TAO3, previously reported to contribute significantly to sporulation efficiency variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. During mitosis, the common TAO3 allele interacts with CBK1—a conserved NDR kinase. Both TAO3 and CBK1 are components of the RAM signaling network that regulates cell separation and polarization during mitosis. We demonstrate that the role of the rare allele TAO3(4477C) in meiosis is distinct from its role in mitosis by being independent of ACE2—a RAM network target gene. By quantitatively measuring cell morphological dynamics, and expressing the TAO3(4477C) allele conditionally during sporulation, we show that TAO3 has an early role in meiosis. This early role of