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Sample records for gene vkla present

  1. Gene Therapy in the Cornea: 2005-present

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Rajiv R.; Tovey, Jonathan C.K.; Sharma, Ajay; Tandon, Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Successful restoration of vision in human patients with gene therapy affirmed its promise to cure ocular diseases and disorders. The efficacy of gene therapy is contingent upon vector and mode of therapeutic DNA introduction into targeted cells/tissues. The cornea is an ideal tissue for gene therapy due to its ease of access and relative immune-privilege. Considerable progress has been made in the field of corneal gene therapy in last 5 years. Several new gene transfer vectors, techniques and approaches have evolved. Although corneal gene therapy is still in its early stages of development, the potential of gene-based interventions to treat corneal abnormalities have begun to surface. Identification of next generation viral and nanoparticle vectors, characterization of delivered gene levels, localization, and duration in the cornea, and significant success in controlling corneal disorders, particularly fibrosis and angiogenesis, in experimental animal disease models, with no major side effects have propelled gene therapy a step closer towards establishing gene-based therapies for corneal blindness. Recently, researchers have assessed the delivery of therapeutic genes for corneal diseases and disorders due to trauma, infections, chemical, mechanical, and surgical injury, and/or abnormal wound healing. This review provides an update on the developments in gene therapy for corneal diseases and discusses the barriers that hinder its utilization for delivering genes in the cornea. PMID:21967960

  2. Toxic genes present a unique phylogenetic signature.

    PubMed

    Avni, Eliran; Snir, Sagi

    2017-11-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a major part of the evolution of Archaea and Bacteria, to the extent that the validity of the Tree of Life concept for prokaryotes has been seriously questioned. The patterns and routes of HGT remain a subject of intense study and debate. It was discovered that while several genes exhibit rampant HGT across the whole prokaryotic tree of life, others are lethal to certain organisms and therefore cannot be successfully transferred to them. We distinguish between these two classes of genes and show analytically that genes found to be toxic to a specific species (E. coli) also resist HGT in general. Several tools we employ show evidence to support that claim. One of those tools is the quartet plurality distribution (QPD), a mathematical tool that measures tendency to HGT over a large set of genes and species. When aggregated over a collection of genes, it can reveal important properties of this collection. We conclude that evidence of toxicity of certain genes to a wide variety of prokaryotes are revealed using the new tool of quartet plurality distribution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. PROP1 gene mutations in a 36-year-old female presenting with psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Rijal, Tshristi; Jha, Kunal Kishor; Saluja, Harpreet

    2017-01-01

    Summary Combined pituitary hormonal deficiency (CPHD) is a rare disease that results from mutations in genes coding for transcription factors that regulate the differentiation of pituitary cells. PROP1 gene mutations are one of the etiological diagnoses of congenital panhypopituitarism, however symptoms vary depending on phenotypic expression. We present a case of psychosis in a 36-year-old female with congenital panhypopituitarism who presented with paranoia, flat affect and ideas of reference without a delirious mental state, which resolved with hormone replacement and antipsychotics. Further evaluation revealed that she had a homozygous mutation of PROP1 gene. In summary, compliance with hormonal therapy for patients with hypopituitarism appears to be effective for the prevention and treatment of acute psychosis symptoms. Learning points: Patients with PROP1 gene mutation may present with psychosis with no impairment in orientation and memory. There is currently inadequate literature on this topic, and further study on the possible mechanisms of psychosis as a result of endocrine disturbance is required. Compliance with hormonal therapy for patients with hypopituitarism appears to be effective for prevention and treatment of acute psychosis symptoms. PMID:28458894

  4. Cry-Bt identifier: a biological database for PCR detection of Cry genes present in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinay Kumar; Ambwani, Sonu; Marla, Soma; Kumar, Anil

    2009-10-23

    We describe the development of a user friendly tool that would assist in the retrieval of information relating to Cry genes in transgenic crops. The tool also helps in detection of transformed Cry genes from Bacillus thuringiensis present in transgenic plants by providing suitable designed primers for PCR identification of these genes. The tool designed based on relational database model enables easy retrieval of information from the database with simple user queries. The tool also enables users to access related information about Cry genes present in various databases by interacting with different sources (nucleotide sequences, protein sequence, sequence comparison tools, published literature, conserved domains, evolutionary and structural data). http://insilicogenomics.in/Cry-btIdentifier/welcome.html.

  5. [Gene therapy in Germany: from past to present].

    PubMed

    Kim, Young; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G H

    2015-04-01

    In 1994, the first clinical gene therapy trial was performed in Germany. Since then more than 2000 clinical gene therapy trials have been performed worldwide. After 20 years, a short résumé is drawn here. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. In vitro effects of aldehydes present in tobacco smoke on gene expression in human lung alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Nuan P; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Vermeulen, Jolanda P; van Schooten, Frederik J; Opperhuizen, Antoon

    2013-04-01

    Tobacco smoke consists of thousands of harmful components. A major class of chemicals found in tobacco smoke is formed by aldehydes, in particular formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein. The present study investigates the gene expression changes in human lung alveolar epithelial cells upon exposure to formaldehyde, acrolein and acetaldehyde at sub-cytotoxic levels. We exposed A549 cells in vitro to aldehydes and non-aldehyde chemicals (nicotine, hydroquinone and 2,5-dimethylfuran) present in tobacco smoke and used microarrays to obtain a global view of the transcriptomic responses. We compared responses of the individual aldehydes with that of the non-aldehydes. We also studied the response of the aldehydes when present in a mixture at relative concentrations as present in cigarette smoke. Formaldehyde gave the strongest response; a total of 66 genes were more than 1.5-fold differentially expressed mostly involved in apoptosis and DNA damage related processes, followed by acetaldehyde (57 genes), hydroquinone (55 genes) and nicotine (8 genes). For acrolein and the mixture only one gene was upregulated involved in oxidative stress. No gene expression effect was found for exposure to 2,5-dimethylfuran. Overall, aldehyde responses are primarily indicative for genotoxicity and oxidative stress. These two toxicity mechanisms are linked to respiratory diseases such as cancer and COPD, respectively. The present findings could be important in providing further understanding of the role of aldehydes emitted from cigarette smoke in the onset of pulmonary diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. An Evolutionary Network of Genes Present in the Eukaryote Common Ancestor Polls Genomes on Eukaryotic and Mitochondrial Origin

    PubMed Central

    Thiergart, Thorsten; Landan, Giddy; Schenk, Marc; Dagan, Tal; Martin, William F.

    2012-01-01

    To test the predictions of competing and mutually exclusive hypotheses for the origin of eukaryotes, we identified from a sample of 27 sequenced eukaryotic and 994 sequenced prokaryotic genomes 571 genes that were present in the eukaryote common ancestor and that have homologues among eubacterial and archaebacterial genomes. Maximum-likelihood trees identified the prokaryotic genomes that most frequently contained genes branching as the sister to the eukaryotic nuclear homologues. Among the archaebacteria, euryarchaeote genomes most frequently harbored the sister to the eukaryotic nuclear gene, whereas among eubacteria, the α-proteobacteria were most frequently represented within the sister group. Only 3 genes out of 571 gave a 3-domain tree. Homologues from α-proteobacterial genomes that branched as the sister to nuclear genes were found more frequently in genomes of facultatively anaerobic members of the rhiozobiales and rhodospirilliales than in obligate intracellular ricketttsial parasites. Following α-proteobacteria, the most frequent eubacterial sister lineages were γ-proteobacteria, δ-proteobacteria, and firmicutes, which were also the prokaryote genomes least frequently found as monophyletic groups in our trees. Although all 22 higher prokaryotic taxa sampled (crenarchaeotes, γ-proteobacteria, spirochaetes, chlamydias, etc.) harbor genes that branch as the sister to homologues present in the eukaryotic common ancestor, that is not evidence of 22 different prokaryotic cells participating at eukaryote origins because prokaryotic “lineages” have laterally acquired genes for more than 1.5 billion years since eukaryote origins. The data underscore the archaebacterial (host) nature of the eukaryotic informational genes and the eubacterial (mitochondrial) nature of eukaryotic energy metabolism. The network linking genes of the eukaryote ancestor to contemporary homologues distributed across prokaryotic genomes elucidates eukaryote gene origins in a

  8. Two Cathelicidin Genes Are Present in both Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chin-I; Zhang, Yong-An; Zou, Jun; Nie, Pin; Secombes, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01

    Further to the previous finding of the rainbow trout rtCATH_1 gene, this paper describes three more cathelicidin genes found in salmonids: two in Atlantic salmon, named asCATH_1 and asCATH_2, and one in rainbow trout, named rtCATH_2. All the three new salmonid cathelicidin genes share the common characteristics of mammalian cathelicidin genes, such as consisting of four exons and possessing a highly conserved preproregion and four invariant cysteines clustered in the C-terminal region of the cathelin-like domain. The asCATH_1 gene is homologous to the rainbow trout rtCATH_1 gene, in that it possesses three repeat motifs of TGGGGGTGGC in exon IV and two cysteine residues in the predicted mature peptide, while the asCATH_2 gene and rtCATH_2 gene are homologues of each other, with 96% nucleotide identity. Salmonid cathelicidins possess the same elastase-sensitive residue, threonine, as hagfish cathelicidins and the rabbit CAP18 molecule. The cleavage site of the four salmonid cathelicidins is within a conserved amino acid motif of QKIRTRR, which is at the beginning of the sequence encoded by exon IV. Two 36-residue peptides corresponding to the core part of rtCATH_1 and rtCATH_2 were chemically synthesized and shown to exhibit potent antimicrobial activity. rtCATH_2 was expressed constitutively in gill, head kidney, intestine, skin and spleen, while the expression of rtCATH_1 was inducible in gill, head kidney, and spleen after bacterial challenge. Four cathelicidin genes have now been characterized in salmonids and two were identified in hagfish, confirming that cathelicidin genes evolved early and are likely present in all vertebrates. PMID:16377685

  9. Heterogeneous clinical presentation in ICF syndrome: correlation with underlying gene defects

    PubMed Central

    Weemaes, Corry MR; van Tol, Maarten JD; Wang, Jun; van Ostaijen-ten Dam, Monique M; van Eggermond, Marja CJA; Thijssen, Peter E; Aytekin, Caner; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; van der Burg, Mirjam; Graham Davies, E; Ferster, Alina; Furthner, Dieter; Gimelli, Giorgio; Gennery, Andy; Kloeckener-Gruissem, Barbara; Meyn, Stephan; Powell, Cynthia; Reisli, Ismail; Schuetz, Catharina; Schulz, Ansgar; Shugar, Andrea; van den Elsen, Peter J; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2013-01-01

    Immunodeficiency with centromeric instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency, predominantly characterized by agammaglobulinemia or hypoimmunoglobulinemia, centromere instability and facial anomalies. Mutations in two genes have been discovered to cause ICF syndrome: DNMT3B and ZBTB24. To characterize the clinical features of this syndrome, as well as genotype–phenotype correlations, we compared clinical and genetic data of 44 ICF patients. Of them, 23 had mutations in DNMT3B (ICF1), 13 patients had mutations in ZBTB24 (ICF2), whereas for 8 patients, the gene defect has not yet been identified (ICFX). While at first sight these patients share the same immunological, morphological and epigenetic hallmarks of the disease, systematic evaluation of all reported informative cases shows that: (1) the humoral immunodeficiency is generally more pronounced in ICF1 patients, (2) B- and T-cell compartments are both involved in ICF1 and ICF2, (3) ICF2 patients have a significantly higher incidence of intellectual disability and (4) congenital malformations can be observed in some ICF1 and ICF2 cases. It is expected that these observations on prevalence and clinical presentation will facilitate mutation-screening strategies and help in diagnostic counseling. PMID:23486536

  10. Inheritance and molecular mapping of anthracnose resistance gene present in the differential line PI533918

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthracnose (Collectrotichum sublineolum) is considered one of the most destructive diseases of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) because it infects all aerial tissues of the plant. The best strategy to control the disease is the incorporation of resistance genes. At present, eighteen sorghum line...

  11. p53 as the focus of gene therapy: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Valente, Joana Fa; Queiroz, Joao A; Sousa, Fani

    2018-01-15

    Several gene deviations can be responsible for triggering oncogenic processes. However, mutations in tumour suppressor genes are usually more associated to malignant diseases, being p53 one of the most affected and studied element. p53 is implicated in a number of known cellular functions, including DNA damage repair, cell cycle arrest in G1/S and G2/M and apoptosis, being an interesting target for cancer treatment. Considering these facts, the development of gene therapy approaches focused on p53 expression and regulation seems to be a promising strategy for cancer therapy. Several studies have shown that transfection of cancer cells with wild-type p53 expressing plasmids could directly drive cells into apoptosis and/or growth arrest, suggesting that a gene therapy approach for cancer treatment can be based on the re-establishment of the normal p53 expression levels and function. Up until now, several clinical research studies using viral and non-viral vectors delivering p53 genes, isolated or combined with other therapeutic agents, have been accomplished and there are already in the market therapies based on the use of this gene. This review summarizes the different methods used to deliver and/or target the p53 as well as the main results of therapeutic effect obtained with the different strategies applied. Finally, the ongoing approaches are described, also focusing the combinatorial therapeutics to show the increased therapeutic potential of combining gene therapy vectors with chemo or radiotherapy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. A case report: Becker muscular dystrophy presenting with epilepsy and dysgnosia induced by duplication mutation of Dystrophin gene.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jing; Feng, Jia-Chun; Zhu, Dan; Yu, Xue-Fan

    2016-12-12

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), a genetic disorder of X-linked recessive inheritance, typically presents with gradually progressive muscle weakness. The condition is caused by mutations of Dystrophin gene located at Xp21.2. Epilepsy is an infrequent manifestation of BMD, while cases of BMD with dysgnosia are extremely rare. We describe a 9-year-old boy with BMD, who presented with epilepsy and dysgnosia. Serum creatine kinase level was markedly elevated (3665 U/L). Wechsler intelligence tests showed a low intelligence quotient (IQ = 65). Electromyogram showed slight myogenic changes and skeletal muscle biopsy revealed muscular dystrophy. Immunohistochemical staining showed partial positivity of sarcolemma for dystrophin-N. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification revealed a duplication mutation in exons 37-44 in the Dystrophin gene. The present case report helps to better understand the clinical and genetic features of BMD.

  13. Cholesterol-α-glucosyltransferase gene is present in most Helicobacter species including gastric non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters obtained from Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Masatomo; Horiuchi, Kazuki; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Nakayama, Jun; Akamatsu, Taiji; Katsuyama, Tsutomu; Ota, Hiroyoshi; Sagara, Junji

    2018-02-01

    Non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters (NHPHs) besides H. pylori infect human stomachs and cause chronic gastritis and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Cholesteryl-α-glucosides have been identified as unique glycolipids present in H. pylori and some Helicobacter species. Cholesterol-α-glucosyltransferase (αCgT), a key enzyme for the biosynthesis of cholesteryl-α-glucosides, plays crucial roles in the pathogenicity of H. pylori. Therefore, it is important to examine αCgTs of NHPHs. Six gastric NHPHs were isolated from Japanese patients and maintained in mouse stomachs. The αCgT genes were amplified by PCR and inverse PCR. We retrieved the αCgT genes of other Helicobacter species by BLAST searches in GenBank. αCgT genes were present in most Helicobacter species and in all Japanese isolates examined. However, we could find no candidate gene for αCgT in the whole genome of Helicobacter cinaedi and several enterohepatic species. Phylogenic analysis demonstrated that the αCgT genes of all Japanese isolates show high similarities to that of a zoonotic group of gastric NHPHs including Helicobacter suis, Helicobacter heilmannii, and Helicobacter ailurogastricus. Of 6 Japanese isolates, the αCgT genes of 4 isolates were identical to that of H. suis, and that of another 2 isolates were similar to that of H. heilmannii and H. ailurogastricus. All gastric NHPHs examined showed presence of αCgT genes, indicating that αCgT may be beneficial for these helicobacters to infect human and possibly animal stomachs. Our study indicated that NHPHs could be classified into 2 groups, NHPHs with αCgT genes and NHPHs without αCgT genes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Mouse mammary tumor virus-like gene sequences are present in lung patient specimens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported on the presence of Murine Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV)-like gene sequences in human cancer tissue specimens. Here, we search for MMTV-like gene sequences in lung diseases including carcinomas specimens from a Mexican population. This study was based on our previous study reporting that the INER51 lung cancer cell line, from a pleural effusion of a Mexican patient, contains MMTV-like env gene sequences. Results The MMTV-like env gene sequences have been detected in three out of 18 specimens studied, by PCR using a specific set of MMTV-like primers. The three identified MMTV-like gene sequences, which were assigned as INER6, HZ101, and HZ14, were 99%, 98%, and 97% homologous, respectively, as compared to GenBank sequence accession number AY161347. The INER6 and HZ-101 samples were isolated from lung cancer specimens, and the HZ-14 was isolated from an acute inflammatory lung infiltrate sample. Two of the env sequences exhibited disruption of the reading frame due to mutations. Conclusion In summary, we identified the presence of MMTV-like gene sequences in 2 out of 11 (18%) of the lung carcinomas and 1 out of 7 (14%) of acute inflamatory lung infiltrate specimens studied of a Mexican Population. PMID:21943279

  15. The T1048I mutation in ATP7A gene causes an unusual Menkes disease presentation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The ATP7A gene encodes the ATP7A protein, which is a trans-Golgi network copper transporter expressed in the brain and other organs. Mutations in this gene cause disorders of copper metabolism, such as Menkes disease. Here we describe the novel and unusual mutation (p.T1048I) in the ATP7A gene of a child with Menkes disease. The mutation affects a conserved DKTGT1048 phosphorylation motif that is involved in the catalytic activity of ATP7A. We also describe the clinical course and the response to copper treatment in this patient. Case presentation An 11-month-old male Caucasian infant was studied because of hypotonia, ataxia and global developmental delay. The patient presented low levels of serum copper and ceruloplasmin, and was shown to be hemizygous for the p.T1048I mutation in ATP7A. The diagnosis was confirmed when the patient was 18 months old, and treatment with copper-histidinate (Cu-His) was started immediately. The patient showed some neurological improvement and he is currently 8 years old. Because the p.T1048I mutation affects its catalytic site, we expected a complete loss of functional ATP7A and a classical Menkes disease presentation. However, the clinical course of the patient was mild, and he responded to Cu-His treatment, which suggests that this mutation leads to partial conservation of the activity of ATP7A. Conclusion This case emphasizes the important correlation between genotype and phenotype in patients with Menkes disease. The prognosis in Menkes disease is associated with early detection, early initiation of treatment and with the preservation of some ATP7A activity, which is necessary for Cu-His treatment response. The description of this new mutation and the response of the patient to Cu-His treatment will contribute to the growing body of knowledge about treatment response in Menkes disease. PMID:22992316

  16. CD8 single-cell gene coexpression reveals three different effector types present at distinct phases of the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, António; Evaristo, César; Munitic, Ivana; Monteiro, Marta; Charbit, Alain; Rocha, Benedita; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2007-01-01

    To study in vivo CD8 T cell differentiation, we quantified the coexpression of multiple genes in single cells throughout immune responses. After in vitro activation, CD8 T cells rapidly express effector molecules and cease their expression when the antigen is removed. Gene behavior after in vivo activation, in contrast, was quite heterogeneous. Different mRNAs were induced at very different time points of the response, were transcribed during different time periods, and could decline or persist independently of the antigen load. Consequently, distinct gene coexpression patterns/different cell types were generated at the various phases of the immune responses. During primary stimulation, inflammatory molecules were induced and down-regulated shortly after activation, generating early cells that only mediated inflammation. Cytotoxic T cells were generated at the peak of the primary response, when individual cells simultaneously expressed multiple killer molecules, whereas memory cells lost killer capacity because they no longer coexpressed killer genes. Surprisingly, during secondary responses gene transcription became permanent. Secondary cells recovered after antigen elimination were more efficient killers than cytotoxic T cells present at the peak of the primary response. Thus, primary responses produced two transient effector types. However, after boosting, CD8 T cells differentiate into long-lived killer cells that persist in vivo in the absence of antigen. PMID:17485515

  17. Sequence heterogeneity in the 18S rRNA gene in Theileria equi from horses presented in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Meli, Marina L; Zhang, Yi; Meili, Theres; Stirn, Martina; Riond, Barbara; Weibel, Beatrice; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2016-05-15

    A reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was adapted and applied for equine blood samples collected at the animal hospital of the University of Zurich to determine the presence of piroplasms in horses in Switzerland. A total of 100 equine blood samples were included in the study. The V4 hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and analyzed using the RLB assay. Samples from seven horses hybridized to a Theileria/Babesia genus-specific and a Theileria genus-specific probe. Of these, two hybridized also to the Theileria equi-specific probe. The other five positive samples did not hybridize to any of the species-specific probes, suggesting the presence of unrecognized Theileria variants or genotypes. The 18S rRNA gene of the latter five samples were sequenced and found to be closely related to T. equi isolated from horses in Spain (AY534822) and China (KF559357) (≥98.4% identity). Four of the seven horses that tested positive had a documented travel history (France, Italy, and Spain) or lived abroad (Hungary). The present study adds new insight into the presence and sequence heterogeneity of T. equi in Switzerland. The results prompt that species-specific probes must be designed in regions of the gene unique to T. equi. Of note, none of the seven positive horses were suspected of having Theileria infection at the time of presentation to the clinic. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of equine piroplasma infections outside of endemic areas and in horses without signs of piroplasmosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Initial description of primate-specific cystine-knot Prometheus genes and differential gene expansions of D-dopachrome tautomerase genes

    PubMed Central

    Premzl, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Using eutherian comparative genomic analysis protocol and public genomic sequence data sets, the present work attempted to update and revise two gene data sets. The most comprehensive third party annotation gene data sets of eutherian adenohypophysis cystine-knot genes (128 complete coding sequences), and d-dopachrome tautomerases and macrophage migration inhibitory factor genes (30 complete coding sequences) were annotated. For example, the present study first described primate-specific cystine-knot Prometheus genes, as well as differential gene expansions of D-dopachrome tautomerase genes. Furthermore, new frameworks of future experiments of two eutherian gene data sets were proposed. PMID:25941635

  19. Hox genes and study of Hox genes in crustacean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lin; Chen, Zhijuan; Xu, Mingyu; Lin, Shengguo; Wang, Lu

    2004-12-01

    Homeobox genes have been discovered in many species. These genes are known to play a major role in specifying regional identity along the anterior-posterior axis of animals from a wide range of phyla. The products of the homeotic genes are a set of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors that control elaborate developmental processes and specify cell fates in metazoans. Crustacean, presenting a variety of body plans not encountered in any other class or phylum of the Metazoa, has been shown to possess a single set of homologous Hox genes like insect. The ancestral crustacean Hox gene complex comprised ten genes: eight homologous to the hometic Hox genes and two related to nonhomeotic genes presented within the insect Hox complexes. The crustacean in particular exhibits an abundant diversity segment specialization and tagmosis. This morphological diversity relates to the Hox genes. In crustacean body plan, different Hox genes control different segments and tagmosis.

  20. Gene network biological validity based on gene-gene interaction relevance.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Vela, Francisco; Díaz-Díaz, Norberto

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, gene networks have become one of the most useful tools for modeling biological processes. Many inference gene network algorithms have been developed as techniques for extracting knowledge from gene expression data. Ensuring the reliability of the inferred gene relationships is a crucial task in any study in order to prove that the algorithms used are precise. Usually, this validation process can be carried out using prior biological knowledge. The metabolic pathways stored in KEGG are one of the most widely used knowledgeable sources for analyzing relationships between genes. This paper introduces a new methodology, GeneNetVal, to assess the biological validity of gene networks based on the relevance of the gene-gene interactions stored in KEGG metabolic pathways. Hence, a complete KEGG pathway conversion into a gene association network and a new matching distance based on gene-gene interaction relevance are proposed. The performance of GeneNetVal was established with three different experiments. Firstly, our proposal is tested in a comparative ROC analysis. Secondly, a randomness study is presented to show the behavior of GeneNetVal when the noise is increased in the input network. Finally, the ability of GeneNetVal to detect biological functionality of the network is shown.

  1. GeneSigDB—a curated database of gene expression signatures

    PubMed Central

    Culhane, Aedín C.; Schwarzl, Thomas; Sultana, Razvan; Picard, Kermshlise C.; Picard, Shaita C.; Lu, Tim H.; Franklin, Katherine R.; French, Simon J.; Papenhausen, Gerald; Correll, Mick; Quackenbush, John

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of most gene expression studies is the identification of one or more gene signatures; lists of genes whose transcriptional levels are uniquely associated with a specific biological phenotype. Whilst thousands of experimentally derived gene signatures are published, their potential value to the community is limited by their computational inaccessibility. Gene signatures are embedded in published article figures, tables or in supplementary materials, and are frequently presented using non-standard gene or probeset nomenclature. We present GeneSigDB (http://compbio.dfci.harvard.edu/genesigdb) a manually curated database of gene expression signatures. GeneSigDB release 1.0 focuses on cancer and stem cells gene signatures and was constructed from more than 850 publications from which we manually transcribed 575 gene signatures. Most gene signatures (n = 560) were successfully mapped to the genome to extract standardized lists of EnsEMBL gene identifiers. GeneSigDB provides the original gene signature, the standardized gene list and a fully traceable gene mapping history for each gene from the original transcribed data table through to the standardized list of genes. The GeneSigDB web portal is easy to search, allows users to compare their own gene list to those in the database, and download gene signatures in most common gene identifier formats. PMID:19934259

  2. Virus-specific DNA sequences present in cells which carry the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene.

    PubMed

    Minson, A C; Darby, G K; Wildy, P

    1979-11-01

    Two independently derived cell lines which carry the herpes simplex type 2 thymidine kinase gene have been examined for the presence of HSV-2-specific DNA sequences. Both cell lines contained 1 to 3 copies per cell of a sequence lying within map co-ordinates 0.2 to 0.4 of the HSV-2 genome. Revertant cells, which contained no detectable thymidine kinase, did not contain this DNA sequence. The failure of EcoR1-restricted HSV-2 DNA to act as a donor of the thymidine kinase gene in transformation experiments suggests that the gene lies close to the EcoR1 restriction site within this sequence at a map position of approx. 0.3. The HSV-2 kinase gene is therefore approximately co-linear with the HSV-1 gene.

  3. Biallelic mutations in GPD1 gene in a Chinese boy mainly presented with obesity, insulin resistance, fatty liver, and short stature.

    PubMed

    Li, Niu; Chang, Guoying; Xu, Yufei; Ding, Yu; Li, Guoqiang; Yu, Tingting; Yao, Ruen; Li, Juan; Shen, Yiping; Wang, Xiumin; Wang, Jian

    2017-12-01

    Biallelic mutations in the GPD1 gene cause a rare autosomal recessive inherited disease known as transient infantile hypertriglyceridemia (OMIM #614480). To date, only five pathogenic variants have been reported in 15 patients from three studies. The clinical symptoms of the affected individuals present a certain degree of heterogeneity. Here, we describe a chinese adolescent patient who mainly presented with obesity, insulin resistance, fatty liver, and short stature. Targeted next-generation sequencing revealed a novel compound heterozygous variant in GPD1 gene (c.220-2A>G and c.820G>A; p.Ala274Thr). In vitro studies demonstrated that the Ala274Thr variant induced a decrease in GPD1 protein expression. Further in vitro investigation of the splicing pattern in a minigene construct in HEK293 cells showed that the c.220-2A>G variant generated an altered transcript with one cryptic splice site in exon 3, resulting in the loss of 69 bases in exon 3 (c.220_288del, p.74_96del). This is the first report involving an Asian who harbored GPD1 mutations. Our work not only expands the mutant spectrum of the GPD1 gene but also provides new insights on its resulting phenotype. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. HOM/HOX homeobox genes are present in hydra (Chlorohydra viridissima) and are differentially expressed during regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Schummer, M; Scheurlen, I; Schaller, C; Galliot, B

    1992-01-01

    Hydra, a diblastic animal consisting of two cell layers, ectoderm and endoderm, is one of the most ancient animals displaying an anteroposterior axis with a head and a foot developing from an uncommitted gastric region. As such, hydra is an interesting model for studying the presence and function of homeobox genes in a phylogenetically old organism. By screening a Chlorohydra viridissima cDNA library with a 'guessmer' oligonucleotide, we have cloned several such cnidarian homeobox-containing genes (cnox genes). Two of these, cnox1 and cnox2, display labial and Deformed type homeodomains respectively and could represent two ancestral genes of the HOM/HOX complexes; cnox3 exhibits some similarity to the BarH1 and the distal-less type homeodomains and a fourth gene is highly related to the msh/Hox7 type of homeodomain. We used quantitative PCR to study levels of expression of these genes along the body axis and during head regeneration. In all cases, the expression in heads was stronger than that in the gastric region. cnox1 transcripts dramatically peaked within the first hours of head regeneration, whereas cnox2 and cnox3 reached their maximal levels 1 and 2 days after cutting respectively. This differential expression of homeobox genes at various stages of regeneration suggests that they play specific roles in regenerative processes. Images PMID:1374713

  5. Use of human antigen presenting cell gene array profiling to examine the effect of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax on primary human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Jaya; Kampani, Karan; Datta, Suman; Wigdahl, Brian; Flaig, Katherine E; Jain, Pooja

    2006-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is etiologically linked to adult T-cell leukemia and a progressive demyelinating disorder termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). One of the most striking features of the immune response in HAM/TSP centers on the expansion of HTLV-1-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) compartment in the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid. More than 90% of the HTLV-1-specific CTLs are directed against the viral Tax (11-19) peptide implying that Tax is available for immune recognition by antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). DCs obtained from HAM/TSP patients have been shown to be infected with HTLV-1 and exhibit rapid maturation. Therefore, we hypothesized that presentation of Tax peptides by activated DCs to naIve CD8(+) T cells may play an important role in the induction of a Tax-specific CTL response and neurologic dysfunction. In this study, a pathway-specific antigen presenting cell gene array was used to study transcriptional changes induced by exposure of monocyte-derived DCs to extracellular HTLV-1 Tax protein. Approximately 100 genes were differentially expressed including genes encoding toll-like receptors, cell surface receptors, proteins involved in antigen uptake and presentation and adhesion molecules. The differential regulation of chemokines and cytokines characteristic of functional DC activation was also observed by the gene array analyses. Furthermore, the expression pattern of signal transduction genes was also significantly altered. These results have suggested that Tax-mediated DC gene regulation might play a critical role in cellular activation and the mechanisms resulting in HTLV-1-induced disease.

  6. Novel mutations in RAG1/2 and ADA genes in Israeli patients presenting with T-B-SCID or Omenn syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Ilan; Tasher, Diana; Somech, Raz; Etzioni, Amos; Garti, Ben-Zion; Lev, Dorit; Cohen, Sarit; Somekh, Eli; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther

    2011-09-01

    The relative frequency of the different forms of SCID may vary in different countries. The most frequent form in Israel is the autosomal-recessive T-B- SCID or Omenn syndrome while X-linked SCID is rare. We report our immunological and genetic analyses in multicentre study of patients presenting with either T-B- SCID or Omenn syndrome. Among 16 patients, we identified 7 novel mutations in 6 patients. In the RAG1 gene we detected two novel mutations: L454Q and 469 fs-4bpdel. In the RAG 2 gene: 3 novel mutations: D65Y, G157V, and E480X. One T-B- SCID patient was found to be a compound heterozygote for new mutations in the ADA gene: W264X and R235W. Prenatal diagnosis was performed in 8 families while others refused due to religious reasons. Identification of the new mutations expands our knowledge regarding the unique features of SCID phenotype in Israel and may help the families seeking for genetic counseling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. FARO server: Meta-analysis of gene expression by matching gene expression signatures to a compendium of public gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Manijak, Mieszko P; Nielsen, Henrik B

    2011-06-11

    Although, systematic analysis of gene annotation is a powerful tool for interpreting gene expression data, it sometimes is blurred by incomplete gene annotation, missing expression response of key genes and secondary gene expression responses. These shortcomings may be partially circumvented by instead matching gene expression signatures to signatures of other experiments. To facilitate this we present the Functional Association Response by Overlap (FARO) server, that match input signatures to a compendium of 242 gene expression signatures, extracted from more than 1700 Arabidopsis microarray experiments. Hereby we present a publicly available tool for robust characterization of Arabidopsis gene expression experiments which can point to similar experimental factors in other experiments. The server is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/faro/.

  8. Atypical Clinical Presentation of Xeroderma Pigmentosum in a Patient Harboring a Novel Missense Mutation in the XPC Gene: The Importance of Clinical Suspicion.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Marina; Chavez-Bourgeois, Marion; Badenas, Celia; Villablanca, Salvador; Aguilera, Paula; Bennàssar, Antoni; Alos, Llucia; Puig, Susana; Malvehy, Josep; Carrera, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genodermatosis caused by abnormal DNA repair. XP complementation group C (XPC) is the most frequent type in Mediterranean countries. We describe a case with a novel mutation in the XPC gene. A healthy Caucasian male patient was diagnosed with multiple primary melanomas. Digital follow-up and molecular studies were carried out. During digital follow-up 8 more additional melanomas were diagnosed. Molecular studies did not identify mutations in CDKN2A, CDK4 or MITF genes. Two heterozygous mutations in the XPC gene were detected: c.2287delC (p.Leu763Cysfs*4) frameshift and c.2212A>G (p.Thr738Ala) missense mutations. The p.Thr738Ala missense mutation has not been previously described. Missense mutations in the XPC gene may allow partial functionality that could explain this unusual late onset XP. Atypical clinical presentation of XPC could be misdiagnosed when genetic aberrations allow partial DNA repair capacity. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. A common FGFR3 gene mutation is present in achondroplasia but not in hypochondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Stoilov, I; Kilpatrick, M W; Tsipouras, P

    1995-01-02

    Achondroplasia is the most common type of genetic dwarfism. It is characterized by disproportionate short stature and other skeletal anomalies resulting from a defect in the maturation of the chondrocytes in the growth plate of the cartilage. Recent studies mapped the achondroplasia gene on chromosome region 4p16.3 and identified a common mutation in the gene encoding the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). In an analysis of 19 achondroplasia families from a variety of ethnic backgrounds we confirmed the presence of the G380R mutation in 21 of 23 achondroplasia chromosomes studied. In contrast, the G380R mutation was not found in any of the 8 hypochondroplasia chromosomes studied. Furthermore, linkage studies in a 3-generation family with hypochondroplasia show discordant segregation with markers in the 4p16.3 region suggesting that at least some cases of hypochondroplasia are caused by mutations in a gene other than FGFR3.

  10. Development of a set of SNP markers present in expressed genes of the apple.

    PubMed

    Chagné, David; Gasic, Ksenija; Crowhurst, Ross N; Han, Yuepeng; Bassett, Heather C; Bowatte, Deepa R; Lawrence, Timothy J; Rikkerink, Erik H A; Gardiner, Susan E; Korban, Schuyler S

    2008-11-01

    Molecular markers associated with gene coding regions are useful tools for bridging functional and structural genomics. Due to their high abundance in plant genomes, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are present within virtually all genomic regions, including most coding sequences. The objective of this study was to develop a set of SNPs for the apple by taking advantage of the wealth of genomics resources available for the apple, including a large collection of expressed sequenced tags (ESTs). Using bioinformatics tools, a search for SNPs within an EST database of approximately 350,000 sequences developed from a variety of apple accessions was conducted. This resulted in the identification of a total of 71,482 putative SNPs. As the apple genome is reported to be an ancient polyploid, attempts were made to verify whether those SNPs detected in silico were attributable either to allelic polymorphisms or to gene duplication or paralogous or homeologous sequence variations. To this end, a set of 464 PCR primer pairs was designed, PCR was amplified using two subsets of plants, and the PCR products were sequenced. The SNPs retrieved from these sequences were then mapped onto apple genetic maps, including a newly constructed map of a Royal Gala x A689-24 cross and a Malling 9 x Robusta 5, map using a bin mapping strategy. The SNP genotyping was performed using the high-resolution melting (HRM) technique. A total of 93 new markers containing 210 coding SNPs were successfully mapped. This new set of SNP markers for the apple offers new opportunities for understanding the genetic control of important horticultural traits using quantitative trait loci (QTL) or linkage disequilibrium analysis. These also serve as useful markers for aligning physical and genetic maps, and as potential transferable markers across the Rosaceae family.

  11. Influence of molecular weight upon mannosylated bio-synthetic hybrids for targeted antigen presenting cell gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Charles H.; Gollakota, Akhila; Chen, Mingfu; Chung, Tai-Chun; Ravikrishnan, Anitha; Zhang, Guojian; Pfeifer, Blaine A.

    2015-01-01

    Given the rise of antibiotic resistant microbes, genetic vaccination is a promising prophylactic strategy that enables rapid design and manufacture. Facilitating this process is the choice of vector, which is often situationally-specific and limited in engineering capacity. Furthermore, these shortcomings are usually tied to an incomplete understanding of the structure-function relationships driving vector-mediated gene delivery. Building upon our initial report of a hybrid bacterial-biomaterial gene delivery vector, a comprehensive structure-function assessment was completed using a class of mannosylated poly(beta-amino esters). Through a top-down screening methodology, an ideal polymer was selected on the basis of gene delivery efficacy and then used for the synthesis of a stratified molecular weight polymer library. By eliminating contributions of polymer chemical background, we were able to complete an in-depth assessment of gene delivery as a function of (1) polymer molecular weight, (2) relative mannose content, (3) polymer-membrane biophysical properties, (4) APC uptake specificity, and (5) serum inhibition. In summary, the flexibility and potential of the hybrid design featured in this work highlights the ability to systematically probe vector-associated properties for the development of translational gene delivery candidates. PMID:25941787

  12. Antigen Presentation by Individually Transferred HLA Class I Genes in HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C Null Human Cell Line Generated Using the Multiplex CRISPR-Cas9 System.

    PubMed

    Hong, Cheol-Hwa; Sohn, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Cho, Hyun-Il; Kim, Tai-Gyu

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) are essential immune molecules that affect transplantation and adoptive immunotherapy. When hematopoietic stem cells or organs are transplanted with HLA-mismatched recipients, graft-versus-host disease or graft rejection can be induced by allogeneic immune responses. The function of each HLA allele has been studied using HLA-deficient cells generated from mutant cell lines or by RNA interference, zinc finger nuclease, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. To improve HLA gene editing, we attempted to generate an HLA class I null cell line using the multiplex CRISPR/Cas9 system by targeting exons 2 and 3 of HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C genes simultaneously. Multiplex HLA editing could induce the complete elimination of HLA class I genes by bi-allelic gene disruption on target sites which was defined by flow cytometry and target-specific polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, artificial antigen-presenting cells were generated by transfer of a single HLA class I allele and co-stimulatory molecules into this novel HLA class I null cell line. Artificial antigen-presenting cells showed HLA-restricted antigen presentation following antigen processing and were successfully used for the efficient generation of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro. The efficient editing of HLA genes may provide a basis for universal cellular therapies and transplantation.

  13. Influence of molecular weight upon mannosylated bio-synthetic hybrids for targeted antigen presenting cell gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Jones, Charles H; Gollakota, Akhila; Chen, Mingfu; Chung, Tai-Chun; Ravikrishnan, Anitha; Zhang, Guojian; Pfeifer, Blaine A

    2015-07-01

    Given the rise of antibiotic resistant microbes, genetic vaccination is a promising prophylactic strategy that enables rapid design and manufacture. Facilitating this process is the choice of vector, which is often situationally-specific and limited in engineering capacity. Furthermore, these shortcomings are usually tied to an incomplete understanding of the structure-function relationships driving vector-mediated gene delivery. Building upon our initial report of a hybrid bacterial-biomaterial gene delivery vector, a comprehensive structure-function assessment was completed using a class of mannosylated poly(beta-amino esters). Through a top-down screening methodology, an ideal polymer was selected on the basis of gene delivery efficacy and then used for the synthesis of a stratified molecular weight polymer library. By eliminating contributions of polymer chemical background, we were able to complete an in-depth assessment of gene delivery as a function of (1) polymer molecular weight, (2) relative mannose content, (3) polymer-membrane biophysical properties, (4) APC uptake specificity, and (5) serum inhibition. In summary, the flexibility and potential of the hybrid design featured in this work highlights the ability to systematically probe vector-associated properties for the development of translational gene delivery candidates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Gene Circuit Analysis of the Terminal Gap Gene huckebein

    PubMed Central

    Ashyraliyev, Maksat; Siggens, Ken; Janssens, Hilde; Blom, Joke; Akam, Michael; Jaeger, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    The early embryo of Drosophila melanogaster provides a powerful model system to study the role of genes in pattern formation. The gap gene network constitutes the first zygotic regulatory tier in the hierarchy of the segmentation genes involved in specifying the position of body segments. Here, we use an integrative, systems-level approach to investigate the regulatory effect of the terminal gap gene huckebein (hkb) on gap gene expression. We present quantitative expression data for the Hkb protein, which enable us to include hkb in gap gene circuit models. Gap gene circuits are mathematical models of gene networks used as computational tools to extract regulatory information from spatial expression data. This is achieved by fitting the model to gap gene expression patterns, in order to obtain estimates for regulatory parameters which predict a specific network topology. We show how considering variability in the data combined with analysis of parameter determinability significantly improves the biological relevance and consistency of the approach. Our models are in agreement with earlier results, which they extend in two important respects: First, we show that Hkb is involved in the regulation of the posterior hunchback (hb) domain, but does not have any other essential function. Specifically, Hkb is required for the anterior shift in the posterior border of this domain, which is now reproduced correctly in our models. Second, gap gene circuits presented here are able to reproduce mutants of terminal gap genes, while previously published models were unable to reproduce any null mutants correctly. As a consequence, our models now capture the expression dynamics of all posterior gap genes and some variational properties of the system correctly. This is an important step towards a better, quantitative understanding of the developmental and evolutionary dynamics of the gap gene network. PMID:19876378

  15. Gene circuit analysis of the terminal gap gene huckebein.

    PubMed

    Ashyraliyev, Maksat; Siggens, Ken; Janssens, Hilde; Blom, Joke; Akam, Michael; Jaeger, Johannes

    2009-10-01

    The early embryo of Drosophila melanogaster provides a powerful model system to study the role of genes in pattern formation. The gap gene network constitutes the first zygotic regulatory tier in the hierarchy of the segmentation genes involved in specifying the position of body segments. Here, we use an integrative, systems-level approach to investigate the regulatory effect of the terminal gap gene huckebein (hkb) on gap gene expression. We present quantitative expression data for the Hkb protein, which enable us to include hkb in gap gene circuit models. Gap gene circuits are mathematical models of gene networks used as computational tools to extract regulatory information from spatial expression data. This is achieved by fitting the model to gap gene expression patterns, in order to obtain estimates for regulatory parameters which predict a specific network topology. We show how considering variability in the data combined with analysis of parameter determinability significantly improves the biological relevance and consistency of the approach. Our models are in agreement with earlier results, which they extend in two important respects: First, we show that Hkb is involved in the regulation of the posterior hunchback (hb) domain, but does not have any other essential function. Specifically, Hkb is required for the anterior shift in the posterior border of this domain, which is now reproduced correctly in our models. Second, gap gene circuits presented here are able to reproduce mutants of terminal gap genes, while previously published models were unable to reproduce any null mutants correctly. As a consequence, our models now capture the expression dynamics of all posterior gap genes and some variational properties of the system correctly. This is an important step towards a better, quantitative understanding of the developmental and evolutionary dynamics of the gap gene network.

  16. Bayesian Variable Selection for Hierarchical Gene-Environment and Gene-Gene Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changlu; Ma, Jianzhong; Amos, Christopher I.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a Bayesian hierarchical mixture model framework that allows us to investigate the genetic and environmental effects, gene by gene interactions and gene by environment interactions in the same model. Our approach incorporates the natural hierarchical structure between the main effects and interaction effects into a mixture model, such that our methods tend to remove the irrelevant interaction effects more effectively, resulting in more robust and parsimonious models. We consider both strong and weak hierarchical models. For a strong hierarchical model, both of the main effects between interacting factors must be present for the interactions to be considered in the model development, while for a weak hierarchical model, only one of the two main effects is required to be present for the interaction to be evaluated. Our simulation results show that the proposed strong and weak hierarchical mixture models work well in controlling false positive rates and provide a powerful approach for identifying the predisposing effects and interactions in gene-environment interaction studies, in comparison with the naive model that does not impose this hierarchical constraint in most of the scenarios simulated. We illustrated our approach using data for lung cancer and cutaneous melanoma. PMID:25154630

  17. Gene-for-genes interactions between cotton R genes and Xanthomonas campestris pv. malvacearum avr genes.

    PubMed

    De Feyter, R; Yang, Y; Gabriel, D W

    1993-01-01

    Six plasmid-borne avirulence (avr) genes were previously cloned from strain XcmH of the cotton pathogen, Xanthomonas campestris pv. malvacearum. We have now localized all six avr genes on the cloned fragments by subcloning and Tn5-gusA insertional mutagenesis. None of these avr genes appeared to exhibit exclusively gene-for-gene patterns of interactions with cotton R genes, and avrB4 was demonstrated to confer avr gene-for-R genes (plural) avirulence to X. c. pv. malvacearum on congenic cotton lines carrying either of two different resistance loci, B1 or B4. Furthermore, the B1 locus appeared to confer R gene-for-avr genes resistance to cotton against isogenic X. c. pv. malvacearum strains carrying any one of three avr genes: avrB4, avrb6, or avrB102. Restriction enzyme, Southern blot hybridization, and DNA sequence analyses showed that the XcmH avr genes are all highly similar to each other, to avrBs3 and avrBsP from the pepper pathogen X. c. pv. vesicatoria, and to the host-specific virulence gene pthA from the citrus pathogen X. citri. The XcmH avr genes differed primarily in the multiplicity of a tandemly repeated 102-base pair motif within the central portions of the genes, repeated from 14 to 23 times in members of this gene family. The complete nucleotide sequence of avrb6 revealed that it is 97% identical in DNA sequence to avrB4, avrBs3, avrBsP, and pthA and that 62-bp inverted terminal repeats mark the boundaries of homology between avrb6 and all members of this Xanthomonas virulence/avirulence gene family sequenced to date. The terminal 38 bp of both inverted repeats are highly similar to the 38-bp consensus terminal sequence of the Tn3 family of transposons. Up to 11 members of the avr gene family appear to be present in North American strains of X. c. pv. malvacearum, including XcmH. The high level of homology observed among these avr genes and their presence in multiple copies may explain the gene-for-genes interactions and also the observed high

  18. Estimation of gene induction enables a relevance-based ranking of gene sets.

    PubMed

    Bartholomé, Kilian; Kreutz, Clemens; Timmer, Jens

    2009-07-01

    In order to handle and interpret the vast amounts of data produced by microarray experiments, the analysis of sets of genes with a common biological functionality has been shown to be advantageous compared to single gene analyses. Some statistical methods have been proposed to analyse the differential gene expression of gene sets in microarray experiments. However, most of these methods either require threshhold values to be chosen for the analysis, or they need some reference set for the determination of significance. We present a method that estimates the number of differentially expressed genes in a gene set without requiring a threshold value for significance of genes. The method is self-contained (i.e., it does not require a reference set for comparison). In contrast to other methods which are focused on significance, our approach emphasizes the relevance of the regulation of gene sets. The presented method measures the degree of regulation of a gene set and is a useful tool to compare the induction of different gene sets and place the results of microarray experiments into the biological context. An R-package is available.

  19. Progress in gene targeting and gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, M.M.; Erven, A.

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we localized disease genes involved in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited retinal degeneration, close to the rhodopsin and peripherin genes on 3q and 6p. Subsequently, we and others identified mutations in these genes in RP patients. Currently animal models for human retinopathies are being generated using gene targeting by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Genomic clones for retinal genes including rhodopsin and peripherin have been obtained from a phage library carrying mouse DNA isogenic with the ES cell line (CC1.2). The peripherin clone has been sequenced to establish the genomic structure of the mouse gene. Targeting vectorsmore » for rhodopsin and peripherin including a neomycin cassette for positive selection and thymidine kinase genes enabling selection against random intergrants are under construction. Progress in vector construction will be presented. Simultaneously we are developing systems for delivery of gene therapies to retinal tissues utilizing replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad5). Efficacy of infection subsequent to various methods of intraocular injection and with varying viral titers is being assayed using an adenovirus construct containing a CMV promoter LacZ fusion as reporter and the range of tissues infected and the level of duration of LacZ expression monitored. Viral constructs with the LacZ reporter gene under the control of retinal specific promoters such as rhodopsin and IRBP cloned into pXCJL.1 are under construction. An update on developments in photoreceptor cell-directed expression of virally delivered genes will be presented.« less

  20. Association between ACE gene I/D polymorphism and clinical presentation and prognosis of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Alía, P; Mañá, J; Capdevila, O; Alvarez, A; Navarro, M A

    2005-01-01

    Serum angiotensin converting enzyme (SACE) concentration is considered a marker of sarcoidosis activity. This concentration is influenced by an insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the ACE gene, such that SACE levels follow the pattern DD>ID>II. The aim of our work was to study the relationship between I/D polymorphism and susceptibility to sarcoidosis, as well as the relation between this polymorphism and the clinical presentation and evolution of the disease in 177 sarcoidosis patients. A group of 104 individuals without sarcoidosis was included as control. Genotyping was done by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, and SACE concentration at diagnosis was determined by a kinetic method. No differences were observed in genotype or allele distributions between patients and controls, nor between patients considering the type of presentation (Löfgren versus non-Löfgren) and evolution of the disease (acute versus chronic). As reported for healthy populations, SACE concentrations followed the pattern DD>ID>II in sarcoidosis patients, but significant differences between genotypes existed only in the Löfgren group (p = 0.003) and in acute patients (p = 0.02). SACE concentrations at diagnosis were lower in acute patients (p = 0.05) and in Löfgren's syndrome (p = 0.04), but this seemed to occur only in ID individuals (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01, respectively). No relation was thus found between I/D polymorphism and susceptibility to sarcoidosis, but ACE I/D genotyping may improve the assessment of disease activity, both at diagnosis and during the follow-up of treated and untreated patients.

  1. FunGene: the functional gene pipeline and repository.

    PubMed

    Fish, Jordan A; Chai, Benli; Wang, Qiong; Sun, Yanni; Brown, C Titus; Tiedje, James M; Cole, James R

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA genes have become the standard molecular markers for microbial community analysis for good reasons, including universal occurrence in cellular organisms, availability of large databases, and ease of rRNA gene region amplification and analysis. As markers, however, rRNA genes have some significant limitations. The rRNA genes are often present in multiple copies, unlike most protein-coding genes. The slow rate of change in rRNA genes means that multiple species sometimes share identical 16S rRNA gene sequences, while many more species share identical sequences in the short 16S rRNA regions commonly analyzed. In addition, the genes involved in many important processes are not distributed in a phylogenetically coherent manner, potentially due to gene loss or horizontal gene transfer. While rRNA genes remain the most commonly used markers, key genes in ecologically important pathways, e.g., those involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling, can provide important insights into community composition and function not obtainable through rRNA analysis. However, working with ecofunctional gene data requires some tools beyond those required for rRNA analysis. To address this, our Functional Gene Pipeline and Repository (FunGene; http://fungene.cme.msu.edu/) offers databases of many common ecofunctional genes and proteins, as well as integrated tools that allow researchers to browse these collections and choose subsets for further analysis, build phylogenetic trees, test primers and probes for coverage, and download aligned sequences. Additional FunGene tools are specialized to process coding gene amplicon data. For example, FrameBot produces frameshift-corrected protein and DNA sequences from raw reads while finding the most closely related protein reference sequence. These tools can help provide better insight into microbial communities by directly studying key genes involved in important ecological processes.

  2. The Bacillus thuringiensis cyt Genes for Hemolytic Endotoxins Constitute a Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Guerchicoff, Alejandra; Delécluse, Armelle; Rubinstein, Clara P.

    2001-01-01

    In the same way that cry genes, coding for larvicidal delta endotoxins, constitute a large and diverse gene family, the cyt genes for hemolytic toxins seem to compose another set of highly related genes in Bacillus thuringiensis. Although the occurrence of Cyt hemolytic factors in B. thuringiensis has been typically associated with mosquitocidal strains, we have recently shown that cyt genes are also present in strains with different pathotypes; this is the case for the morrisoni subspecies, which includes strains biologically active against dipteran, lepidopteran, and coleopteran larvae. In addition, while one Cyt type of protein has been described in all of the mosquitocidal strains studied so far, the present study confirms that at least two Cyt toxins coexist in the more toxic antidipteran strains, such as B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and subsp. morrisoni PG14, and that this could also be the case for many others. In fact, PCR screening and Western blot analysis of 50 B. thuringiensis strains revealed that cyt2-related genes are present in all strains with known antidipteran activity, as well as in some others with different or unknown host ranges. Partial DNA sequences for several of these genes were determined, and protein sequence alignments revealed a high degree of conservation of the structural domains. These findings point to an important biological role for Cyt toxins in the final in vivo toxic activity of many B. thuringiensis strains. PMID:11229896

  3. Gene essentiality, conservation index and co-evolution of genes in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Tiruveedula, Gopi Siva Sai; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2017-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, a group of photosynthetic prokaryotes, dominate the earth with ~ 1015 g wet biomass. Despite diversity in habitats and an ancient origin, cyanobacterial phylum has retained a significant core genome. Cyanobacteria are being explored for direct conversion of solar energy and carbon dioxide into biofuels. For this, efficient cyanobacterial strains will need to be designed via metabolic engineering. This will require identification of target knockouts to channelize the flow of carbon toward the product of interest while minimizing deletions of essential genes. We propose "Gene Conservation Index" (GCI) as a quick measure to predict gene essentiality in cyanobacteria. GCI is based on phylogenetic profile of a gene constructed with a reduced dataset of cyanobacterial genomes. GCI is the percentage of organism clusters in which the query gene is present in the reduced dataset. Of the 750 genes deemed to be essential in the experimental study on S. elongatus PCC 7942, we found 494 to be conserved across the phylum which largely comprise of the essential metabolic pathways. On the contrary, the conserved but non-essential genes broadly comprise of genes required under stress conditions. Exceptions to this rule include genes such as the glycogen synthesis and degradation enzymes, deoxyribose-phosphate aldolase (DERA), glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase (zwf) and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase class1, which are conserved but non-essential. While the essential genes are to be avoided during gene knockout studies as potentially lethal deletions, the non-essential but conserved set of genes could be interesting targets for metabolic engineering. Further, we identify clusters of co-evolving genes (CCG), which provide insights that may be useful in annotation. Principal component analysis (PCA) plots of the CCGs are demonstrated as data visualization tools that are complementary to the conventional heatmaps. Our dataset consists of phylogenetic profiles for 23

  4. [The influence of interleukin gene polymorphism on the serum cytokine level in the patients presenting with chonic suppurative otitis media].

    PubMed

    Baike, E V; Vitkovsky, Yu A; Dutova, A A

    The objective of the present work was to study the influence of allelic variant associations of 1-beta interleukin (C3953T, &511C, T31C), interleukin-6 (C174G), and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (G308A) gene polymorphisms on the serum cytokine level in the patients presenting with chronic suppurative otitis media. A total of 299 patients at the age varying from 16 to 55 years with this condition divided into three groups were examined. Group 1 was comprised of 146 patients suffering from the tubotympanic form of chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). Group 2 was composed of 153 patients with epitympanic antral form of this condition. The control group included 183 subjects who have never suffered pathological changes in the middle ear. Human genomic DNA was analyzed with the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The serum cytokine levels were measured by the solid-state enzyme immunoassay in the beginning and at the end of the treatment period. The study has demonstrated that 56.2% of the healthy residents of the trans-Baikal region had the C/T Il-1b (C3953T) genotype. 79.1% of the patients presenting with the carious carious-destructive form of chronic suppurative otitis media were the heterozygous carriers of the T511C gene of 1-beta interleukin and had the maximally high concentrations of this interleukin in the blood serum. A rise in the production of the pro-inflammatory mediator (IL-6) was found to be related to the severity of the inflammatory process in the middle ear. The TNF-alpha content in the patients with CSOM during the active period of the disease proved to increase by a factor of 6 in comparison with that in the subjects of the control group irrespective of the type of mutation.

  5. Lineage-specific expansion of IFIT gene family: an insight into coevolution with IFN gene family.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yi-Bing; Liu, Ting-Kai; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, IFIT (Interferon [IFN]-induced proteins with Tetratricopeptide Repeat [TPR] motifs) family genes are involved in many cellular and viral processes, which are tightly related to mammalian IFN response. However, little is known about non-mammalian IFIT genes. In the present study, IFIT genes are identified in the genome databases from the jawed vertebrates including the cartilaginous elephant shark but not from non-vertebrates such as lancelet, sea squirt and acorn worm, suggesting that IFIT gene family originates from a vertebrate ancestor about 450 million years ago. IFIT family genes show conserved gene structure and gene arrangements. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that this gene family has expanded through lineage-specific and species-specific gene duplication. Interestingly, IFN gene family seem to share a common ancestor and a similar evolutionary mechanism; the function link of IFIT genes to IFN response is present early since the origin of both gene families, as evidenced by the finding that zebrafish IFIT genes are upregulated by fish IFNs, poly(I:C) and two transcription factors IRF3/IRF7, likely via the IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE) within the promoters of vertebrate IFIT family genes. These coevolution features creates functional association of both family genes to fulfill a common biological process, which is likely selected by viral infection during evolution of vertebrates. Our results are helpful for understanding of evolution of vertebrate IFN system.

  6. Efficient disruption of Zebrafish genes using a Gal4-containing gene trap

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background External development and optical transparency of embryos make zebrafish exceptionally suitable for in vivo insertional mutagenesis using fluorescent proteins to visualize expression patterns of mutated genes. Recently developed Gene Breaking Transposon (GBT) vectors greatly improve the fidelity and mutagenicity of transposon-based gene trap vectors. Results We constructed and tested a bipartite GBT vector with Gal4-VP16 as the primary gene trap reporter. Our vector also contains a UAS:eGFP cassette for direct detection of gene trap events by fluorescence. To confirm gene trap events, we generated a UAS:mRFP tester line. We screened 270 potential founders and established 41 gene trap lines. Three of our gene trap alleles display homozygous lethal phenotypes ranging from embryonic to late larval: nsf tpl6, atp1a3atpl10 and flrtpl19. Our gene trap cassette is flanked by direct loxP sites, which enabled us to successfully revert nsf tpl6, atp1a3atpl10 and flrtpl19 gene trap alleles by injection of Cre mRNA. The UAS:eGFP cassette is flanked by direct FRT sites. It can be readily removed by injection of Flp mRNA for use of our gene trap alleles with other tissue-specific GFP-marked lines. The Gal4-VP16 component of our vector provides two important advantages over other GBT vectors. The first is increased sensitivity, which enabled us to detect previously unnoticed expression of nsf in the pancreas. The second advantage is that all our gene trap lines, including integrations into non-essential genes, can be used as highly specific Gal4 drivers for expression of other transgenes under the control of Gal4 UAS. Conclusions The Gal4-containing bipartite Gene Breaking Transposon vector presented here retains high specificity for integrations into genes, high mutagenicity and revertibility by Cre. These features, together with utility as highly specific Gal4 drivers, make gene trap mutants presented here especially useful to the research community. PMID:24034702

  7. Gene transfer and gene mapping in mammalian cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Shows, T B; Sakaguchi, A Y

    1980-01-01

    The ability to transfer mammalian genes parasexually has opened new possibilities for gene mapping and fine structure mapping and offers great potential for contributing to several aspects of mammalian biology, including gene expression and genetic engineering. The DNA transferred has ranged from whole genomes to single genes and smaller segments of DNA. The transfer of whole genomes by cell fusion forms cell hybrids, which has promoted the extensive mapping of human and mouse genes. Transfer, by cell fusion, of rearranged chromosomes has contributed significantly to determining close linkage and the assignment of genes to specific chromosomal regions. Transfer of single chromosomes has been achieved utilizing microcells fused to recipient cells. Metaphase chromosomes have been isolated and used to transfer single-to-multigenic DNA segments. DNA-mediated gene transfer, simulating bacterial transformation, has achieved transfer of single-copy genes. By utilizing DNA cleaved with restriction endonucleases, gene transfer is being empolyed as a bioassay for the purification of genes. Gene mapping and the fate of transferred genes can be examined now at the molecular level using sequence-specific probles. Recently, single genes have been cloned into eucaryotic and procaryotic vectors for transfer into mammalian cells. Moreover, recombinant libraries in which entire mammalian genomes are represented collectively are a rich new source of transferable genes. Methodology for transferring mammalian genetic information and applications for mapping mammalian genes is presented and prospects for the future discussed.

  8. RASopathies: Presentation at the Genome, Interactome, and Phenome Levels.

    PubMed

    Pevec, Urska; Rozman, Neva; Gorsek, Blaz; Kunej, Tanja

    2016-05-01

    Clinical symptoms often reflect molecular correlations between mutated proteins. Alignment between interactome and phenome levels reveals new disease genes and connections between previously unrelated diseases. Despite a great potential for novel discoveries, this approach is still rarely used in genomics. In the present study, we analyzed the data of 6 syndromes belonging to the RASopathy class of disorders (RASopathies) and presented them as a model to study associations between genome, interactome, and phenome levels. Causative genes and clinical symptoms were collected from OMIM and NCBI GeneReviews databases for 6 syndromes: Noonan, Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines, neurofibromatosis type 1, cardiofaciocutaneous, and Legius and Costello syndrome. The STRING tool was used for the identification of protein interactions. Six RASopathy syndromes were found to be associated with 12 causative genes. We constructed an interactome of RASopathy proteins and their neighbors and developed a database of 328 clinical symptoms. The collected data was presented at genome, interactome, and phenome levels and as an integrated network of all 3 data types. The present study provides a baseline for future studies of associations between interactome and phenome in RASopathies and could serve as a novel approach to analyze phenotypically and genetically related diseases.

  9. MorphDB: Prioritizing Genes for Specialized Metabolism Pathways and Gene Ontology Categories in Plants.

    PubMed

    Zwaenepoel, Arthur; Diels, Tim; Amar, David; Van Parys, Thomas; Shamir, Ron; Van de Peer, Yves; Tzfadia, Oren

    2018-01-01

    Recent times have seen an enormous growth of "omics" data, of which high-throughput gene expression data are arguably the most important from a functional perspective. Despite huge improvements in computational techniques for the functional classification of gene sequences, common similarity-based methods often fall short of providing full and reliable functional information. Recently, the combination of comparative genomics with approaches in functional genomics has received considerable interest for gene function analysis, leveraging both gene expression based guilt-by-association methods and annotation efforts in closely related model organisms. Besides the identification of missing genes in pathways, these methods also typically enable the discovery of biological regulators (i.e., transcription factors or signaling genes). A previously built guilt-by-association method is MORPH, which was proven to be an efficient algorithm that performs particularly well in identifying and prioritizing missing genes in plant metabolic pathways. Here, we present MorphDB, a resource where MORPH-based candidate genes for large-scale functional annotations (Gene Ontology, MapMan bins) are integrated across multiple plant species. Besides a gene centric query utility, we present a comparative network approach that enables researchers to efficiently browse MORPH predictions across functional gene sets and species, facilitating efficient gene discovery and candidate gene prioritization. MorphDB is available at http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/webtools/morphdb/morphDB/index/. We also provide a toolkit, named "MORPH bulk" (https://github.com/arzwa/morph-bulk), for running MORPH in bulk mode on novel data sets, enabling researchers to apply MORPH to their own species of interest.

  10. Systematic identification of human housekeeping genes possibly useful as references in gene expression studies.

    PubMed

    Caracausi, Maria; Piovesan, Allison; Antonaros, Francesca; Strippoli, Pierluigi; Vitale, Lorenza; Pelleri, Maria Chiara

    2017-09-01

    The ideal reference, or control, gene for the study of gene expression in a given organism should be expressed at a medium‑high level for easy detection, should be expressed at a constant/stable level throughout different cell types and within the same cell type undergoing different treatments, and should maintain these features through as many different tissues of the organism. From a biological point of view, these theoretical requirements of an ideal reference gene appear to be best suited to housekeeping (HK) genes. Recent advancements in the quality and completeness of human expression microarray data and in their statistical analysis may provide new clues toward the quantitative standardization of human gene expression studies in biology and medicine, both cross‑ and within‑tissue. The systematic approach used by the present study is based on the Transcriptome Mapper tool and exploits the automated reassignment of probes to corresponding genes, intra‑ and inter‑sample normalization, elaboration and representation of gene expression values in linear form within an indexed and searchable database with a graphical interface recording quantitative levels of expression, expression variability and cross‑tissue width of expression for more than 31,000 transcripts. The present study conducted a meta‑analysis of a pool of 646 expression profile data sets from 54 different human tissues and identified actin γ 1 as the HK gene that best fits the combination of all the traditional criteria to be used as a reference gene for general use; two ribosomal protein genes, RPS18 and RPS27, and one aquaporin gene, POM121 transmembrane nucleporin C, were also identified. The present study provided a list of tissue‑ and organ‑specific genes that may be most suited for the following individual tissues/organs: Adipose tissue, bone marrow, brain, heart, kidney, liver, lung, ovary, skeletal muscle and testis; and also provides in these cases a representative

  11. Immunoglobulin λ Gene Rearrangement Can Precede κ Gene Rearrangement

    DOE PAGES

    Berg, Jörg; Mcdowell, Mindy; Jäck, Hans-Martin; ...

    1990-01-01

    Imore » mmunoglobulin genes are generated during differentiation of B lymphocytes by joining gene segments. A mouse pre-B cell contains a functional immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene, but no light-chain gene. Although there is only one heavy-chain locus, there are two lightchain loci: κ and λ .t has been reported that κ loci in the germ-line configuration are never (in man) or very rarely (in the mouse) present in cells with functionally rearranged λ -chain genes. Two explanations have been proposed to explain this: (a) the ordered rearrangement theory, which postulates that light-chain gene rearrangement in the pre-B cell is first attempted at the κ locus, and that only upon failure to produce a functional κ chain is there an attempt to rearrange the λ locus; and (b) the stochastic theory, which postulates that rearrangement at the λ locus proceeds at a rate that is intrinsically much slower than that at the κ locus. We show here that λ -chain genes are generated whether or not the κ locus has lost its germ-line arrangement, a result that is compatible only with the stochastic theory.« less

  12. A gene encoding the plant-like alternative oxidase is present in Phytomonas but absent in Leishmania spp.

    PubMed

    Van Hellemond, J J; Simons, B; Millenaar, F F; Tielens, A G

    1998-01-01

    The constituents of the respiratory chain are believed to differ among the trypanosomatids; bloodstream stages of African trypanosomes and Phytomonas promastigotes oxidize ubiquinol by a ubiquinol:oxygen oxidoreductase, also known as alternative oxidase, whereas Leishmania spp. oxidize ubiquinol via a classic cytochrome-containing respiratory chain. The molecular basis for this elementary difference in ubiquinol oxidation by the mitochondrial electron-transport chain in distinct trypanosomatids was investigated. The presence of a gene encoding the plant-like alternative oxidase could be demonstrated in Phytomonas and Trypanosoma brucei, trypanosomatids that are known to contain alternative oxidase activity. Our results further demonstrated that Leishmania spp. lack a gene encoding the plant-like alternative oxidase, and therefore, all stages of Leishmania spp. will lack the alternative oxidase protein. The observed fundamental differences between the respiratory chains of distinct members of the trypanosomatid family are thus caused by the presence or absence of a gene encoding the plant-like alternative oxidase.

  13. Computational analysis of gene-gene interactions using multifactor dimensionality reduction.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jason H

    2004-11-01

    Understanding the relationship between DNA sequence variations and biologic traits is expected to improve the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of common human diseases. Success in characterizing genetic architecture will depend on our ability to address nonlinearities in the genotype-to-phenotype mapping relationship as a result of gene-gene interactions, or epistasis. This review addresses the challenges associated with the detection and characterization of epistasis. A novel strategy known as multifactor dimensionality reduction that was specifically designed for the identification of multilocus genetic effects is presented. Several case studies that demonstrate the detection of gene-gene interactions in common diseases such as atrial fibrillation, Type II diabetes and essential hypertension are also discussed.

  14. Inheritance and molecular mapping of anthracnose resistance genes present in sorghum line SC112-14

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthracnose (Colletotrichum sublineolum) is one of the most destructive diseases of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) affecting all aerial tissues of the plant. The most effective strategy for its control is the incorporation of resistance genes. Therefore, the anthracnose resistance response pr...

  15. UniGene Tabulator: a full parser for the UniGene format.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Luca; Frabetti, Flavia; Facchin, Federica; Casadei, Raffaella; Vitale, Lorenza; Canaider, Silvia; Carinci, Paolo; Zannotti, Maria; Strippoli, Pierluigi

    2006-10-15

    UniGene Tabulator 1.0 provides a solution for full parsing of UniGene flat file format; it implements a structured graphical representation of each data field present in UniGene following import into a common database managing system usable in a personal computer. This database includes related tables for sequence, protein similarity, sequence-tagged site (STS) and transcript map interval (TXMAP) data, plus a summary table where each record represents a UniGene cluster. UniGene Tabulator enables full local management of UniGene data, allowing parsing, querying, indexing, retrieving, exporting and analysis of UniGene data in a relational database form, usable on Macintosh (OS X 10.3.9 or later) and Windows (2000, with service pack 4, XP, with service pack 2 or later) operating systems-based computers. The current release, including both the FileMaker runtime applications, is freely available at http://apollo11.isto.unibo.it/software/

  16. Linking genes to diseases with a SNPedia-Gene Wiki mashup

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A variety of topic-focused wikis are used in the biomedical sciences to enable the mass-collaborative synthesis and distribution of diverse bodies of knowledge. To address complex problems such as defining the relationships between genes and disease, it is important to bring the knowledge from many different domains together. Here we show how advances in wiki technology and natural language processing can be used to automatically assemble ‘meta-wikis’ that present integrated views over the data collaboratively created in multiple source wikis. Results We produced a semantic meta-wiki called the Gene Wiki+ that automatically mirrors and integrates data from the Gene Wiki and SNPedia. The Gene Wiki+, available at (http://genewikiplus.org/), captures 8,047 distinct gene-disease relationships. SNPedia accounts for 4,149 of the gene-disease pairs, the Gene Wiki provides 4,377 and only 479 appear independently in both sources. All of this content is available to query and browse and is provided as linked open data. Conclusions Wikis contain increasing amounts of diverse, biological information useful for elucidating the connections between genes and disease. The Gene Wiki+ shows how wiki technology can be used in concert with natural language processing to provide integrated views over diverse underlying data sources. PMID:22541597

  17. Cloning of novel rice blast resistance genes from two rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families in rice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changjiang; Sun, Xiaoguang; Chen, Xiao; Yang, Sihai; Li, Jing; Wang, Long; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Most rice blast resistance genes (R-genes) encode proteins with nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. Our previous study has shown that more rice blast R-genes can be cloned in rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families. In the present study, two rapidly evolving R-gene families in rice were selected for cloning a subset of genes from their paralogs in three resistant rice lines. A total of eight functional blast R-genes were identified among nine NBS-LRR genes, and some of these showed resistance to three or more blast strains. Evolutionary analysis indicated that high nucleotide diversity of coding regions served as important parameters in the determination of gene resistance. We also observed that amino-acid variants (nonsynonymous mutations, insertions, or deletions) in essential motifs of the NBS domain contribute to the blast resistance capacity of NBS-LRR genes. These results suggested that the NBS regions might also play an important role in resistance specificity determination. On the other hand, different splicing patterns of introns were commonly observed in R-genes. The results of the present study contribute to improving the effectiveness of R-gene identification by using evolutionary analysis method and acquisition of novel blast resistance genes.

  18. Identifying potential maternal genes of Bombyx mori using digital gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pingzhen

    2018-01-01

    Maternal genes present in mature oocytes play a crucial role in the early development of silkworm. Although maternal genes have been widely studied in many other species, there has been limited research in Bombyx mori. High-throughput next generation sequencing provides a practical method for gene discovery on a genome-wide level. Herein, a transcriptome study was used to identify maternal-related genes from silkworm eggs. Unfertilized eggs from five different stages of early development were used to detect the changing situation of gene expression. The expressed genes showed different patterns over time. Seventy-six maternal genes were annotated according to homology analysis with Drosophila melanogaster. More than half of the differentially expressed maternal genes fell into four expression patterns, while the expression patterns showed a downward trend over time. The functional annotation of these material genes was mainly related to transcription factor activity, growth factor activity, nucleic acid binding, RNA binding, ATP binding, and ion binding. Additionally, twenty-two gene clusters including maternal genes were identified from 18 scaffolds. Altogether, we plotted a profile for the maternal genes of Bombyx mori using a digital gene expression profiling method. This will provide the basis for maternal-specific signature research and improve the understanding of the early development of silkworm. PMID:29462160

  19. Gene Duplicability of Core Genes Is Highly Consistent across All Angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Defoort, Jonas; Tasdighian, Setareh; Maere, Steven; Van de Peer, Yves; De Smet, Riet

    2016-02-01

    Gene duplication is an important mechanism for adding to genomic novelty. Hence, which genes undergo duplication and are preserved following duplication is an important question. It has been observed that gene duplicability, or the ability of genes to be retained following duplication, is a nonrandom process, with certain genes being more amenable to survive duplication events than others. Primarily, gene essentiality and the type of duplication (small-scale versus large-scale) have been shown in different species to influence the (long-term) survival of novel genes. However, an overarching view of "gene duplicability" is lacking, mainly due to the fact that previous studies usually focused on individual species and did not account for the influence of genomic context and the time of duplication. Here, we present a large-scale study in which we investigated duplicate retention for 9178 gene families shared between 37 flowering plant species, referred to as angiosperm core gene families. For most gene families, we observe a strikingly consistent pattern of gene duplicability across species, with gene families being either primarily single-copy or multicopy in all species. An intermediate class contains gene families that are often retained in duplicate for periods extending to tens of millions of years after whole-genome duplication, but ultimately appear to be largely restored to singleton status, suggesting that these genes may be dosage balance sensitive. The distinction between single-copy and multicopy gene families is reflected in their functional annotation, with single-copy genes being mainly involved in the maintenance of genome stability and organelle function and multicopy genes in signaling, transport, and metabolism. The intermediate class was overrepresented in regulatory genes, further suggesting that these represent putative dosage-balance-sensitive genes. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  20. Insect and wound induced GUS gene expression from a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor gene promoter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Inducible gene promoters that are specifically activated by pathogen invasion or insect pest attack are needed for effective expression of resistance genes to control plant diseases. In the present study, a promoter from a serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) shown to be up-regulated in resist...

  1. The human homolog of S. cerevisiae CDC27, CDC27 Hs, is encoded by a highly conserved intronless gene present in multiple copies in the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Devor, E.J.; Dill-Devor, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    We have obtained a number of unique sequences via PCR amplification of human genomic DNA using degenerate primers under low stringency (42{degrees}C). One of these, an 853 bp product, has been identified as a partial genomic sequence of the human homolog of the S. cerevisiae CDC27 gene, CDC27Hs (GenBank No. U00001). This gene, reported by Turgendreich et al. is also designated EST00556 from Adams et al. We have undertaken a more detailed examination of our sequence, MCP34N, and have found that: 1. the genomic sequence is nearly identical to CDC27Hs over its entire 853 bp length; 2. an MCP34N-specific PCRmore » assay of several non-human primate species reveals amplification products in chimpanzee and gorilla genomes having greater than 90% sequence identity with CDC27Hs; and 3. an MCP34N-specific PCR assay of the BIOS hybrid cell line panel gives a discordancy pattern suggesting multiple loci. Based upon these data, we present the following initial characterization: 1. the complete MCP34N sequence identity with CDC27Hs indicates that the latter is encoded by an intronless gene; 2. CDC27Hs is highly conserved among higher primates; and 3. CDC27Hs is present in multiple copies in the human genome. These characteristics, taken together with those initially reported for CDC27Hs, suggest that this is an old gene that carries out an important but, as yet, unknown function in the human brain.« less

  2. Isolation and characterization of Agouti: a diabetes/obesity related gene

    DOEpatents

    Woychik, Richard P.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to the cloning and expression of the Agouti gene and analogous genes in transformed, transfected and transgenic mice. The present invention provides an animal model for the study of diabetes, obesity and tumors for the testing of potential therapeutic agents. The present invention provides oligonucleotide probes for the detection of the Agouti gene and mutations in the gene. The present invention also relates to the isolation and recombinant production of the Agouti gene product, production of antibodies to the Agouti gene product and their use as diagnostic and therapeutic agents.

  3. Isolation and characterization of Agouti: a diabetes/obesity related gene

    DOEpatents

    Woychik, Richard P.

    2000-06-27

    The present invention relates to the cloning and expression of the Agouti gene and analogous genes in transformed, transfected and transgenic mice. The present invention provides an animal model for the study of diabetes, obesity and tumors for the testing of potential therapeutic agents. The present invention provides oligonucleotide probes for the detection of the Agouti gene and mutations in the gene. The present invention also relates to the isolation and recombinant production of the Agouti gene product, production of antibodies to the Agouti gene product and their use as diagnostic and therapeutic agents.

  4. Hyperargininemia: 7-month follow-up under sodium benzoate therapy in an Italian child presenting progressive spastic paraparesis, cognitive decline, and novel mutation in ARG1 gene.

    PubMed

    Baranello, Giovanni; Alfei, Enrico; Martinelli, Diego; Rizzetto, Manuela; Cazzaniga, Fabiana; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Gellera, Cinzia; Castellotti, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Hyperargininemia due to mutations in ARG1 gene is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by a defect in the final step of the urea cycle. Common clinical presentation is a variable association of progressive spastic paraparesis, epilepsy, and cognitive deficits. We describe the clinical history of an Italian child presenting progressive spastic paraparesis, carrying a new homozygous missense mutation in the ARG1 gene. A detailed clinical, biochemical, and neurophysiological follow-up after 7 months of sodium benzoate therapy is reported. Laboratory findings, gait abnormalities, spastic paraparesis, and electroencephalographic and neurophysiological abnormalities remained quite stable over the follow-up. Conversely, a mild cognitive deterioration has been detected by means of the neuropsychologic assessment. Further longitudinal studies by means of longer follow-up and using clinical, biochemical, radiological, and neurophysiological assessments are needed in such patients to describe natural history and monitor the effects of treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gene composer: database software for protein construct design, codon engineering, and gene synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, Don; Raymond, Amy; Walchli, John; Mixon, Mark; Barrow, Adrienne; Wallace, Ellen; Grice, Rena; Burgin, Alex; Stewart, Lance

    2009-04-21

    To improve efficiency in high throughput protein structure determination, we have developed a database software package, Gene Composer, which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their codon engineered synthetic gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bio-informatics steps used in modern structure guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. An interactive Alignment Viewer allows the researcher to simultaneously visualize sequence conservation in the context of known protein secondary structure, ligand contacts, water contacts, crystal contacts, B-factors, solvent accessible area, residue property type and several other useful property views. The Construct Design Module enables the facile design of novel protein constructs with altered N- and C-termini, internal insertions or deletions, point mutations, and desired affinity tags. The modifications can be combined and permuted into multiple protein constructs, and then virtually cloned in silico into defined expression vectors. The Gene Design Module uses a protein-to-gene algorithm that automates the back-translation of a protein amino acid sequence into a codon engineered nucleic acid gene sequence according to a selected codon usage table with minimal codon usage threshold, defined G:C% content, and desired sequence features achieved through synonymous codon selection that is optimized for the intended expression system. The gene-to-oligo algorithm of the Gene Design Module plans out all of the required overlapping oligonucleotides and mutagenic primers needed to synthesize the desired gene constructs by PCR, and for physically cloning them into selected vectors by the most popular subcloning strategies. We present a complete description of Gene Composer functionality, and an efficient PCR-based synthetic gene assembly procedure with mis-match specific endonuclease

  6. Gene Composer: database software for protein construct design, codon engineering, and gene synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lorimer, Don; Raymond, Amy; Walchli, John; Mixon, Mark; Barrow, Adrienne; Wallace, Ellen; Grice, Rena; Burgin, Alex; Stewart, Lance

    2009-01-01

    Background To improve efficiency in high throughput protein structure determination, we have developed a database software package, Gene Composer, which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their codon engineered synthetic gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bio-informatics steps used in modern structure guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. Results An interactive Alignment Viewer allows the researcher to simultaneously visualize sequence conservation in the context of known protein secondary structure, ligand contacts, water contacts, crystal contacts, B-factors, solvent accessible area, residue property type and several other useful property views. The Construct Design Module enables the facile design of novel protein constructs with altered N- and C-termini, internal insertions or deletions, point mutations, and desired affinity tags. The modifications can be combined and permuted into multiple protein constructs, and then virtually cloned in silico into defined expression vectors. The Gene Design Module uses a protein-to-gene algorithm that automates the back-translation of a protein amino acid sequence into a codon engineered nucleic acid gene sequence according to a selected codon usage table with minimal codon usage threshold, defined G:C% content, and desired sequence features achieved through synonymous codon selection that is optimized for the intended expression system. The gene-to-oligo algorithm of the Gene Design Module plans out all of the required overlapping oligonucleotides and mutagenic primers needed to synthesize the desired gene constructs by PCR, and for physically cloning them into selected vectors by the most popular subcloning strategies. Conclusion We present a complete description of Gene Composer functionality, and an efficient PCR-based synthetic gene assembly procedure with mis

  7. Regulatory systems for hypoxia-inducible gene expression in ischemic heart disease gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Rhim, Taiyoun; Lee, Minhyung

    2011-07-18

    Ischemic heart diseases are caused by narrowed coronary arteries that decrease the blood supply to the myocardium. In the ischemic myocardium, hypoxia-responsive genes are up-regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). Gene therapy for ischemic heart diseases uses genes encoding angiogenic growth factors and anti-apoptotic proteins as therapeutic genes. These genes increase blood supply into the myocardium by angiogenesis and protect cardiomyocytes from cell death. However, non-specific expression of these genes in normal tissues may be harmful, since growth factors and anti-apoptotic proteins may induce tumor growth. Therefore, tight gene regulation is required to limit gene expression to ischemic tissues, to avoid unwanted side effects. For this purpose, various gene expression strategies have been developed for ischemic-specific gene expression. Transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational regulatory strategies have been developed and evaluated in ischemic heart disease animal models. The regulatory systems can limit therapeutic gene expression to ischemic tissues and increase the efficiency of gene therapy. In this review, recent progresses in ischemic-specific gene expression systems are presented, and their applications to ischemic heart diseases are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Amplification of a Gene Related to Mammalian mdr Genes in Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Craig M.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Wasley, Annemarie; Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    1989-06-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains at least two genes related to the mammalian multiple drug resistance genes, and at least one of the P. falciparum genes is expressed at a higher level and is present in higher copy number in a strain that is resistant to multiple drugs than in a strain that is sensitive to the drugs.

  9. FlyBase: genes and gene models

    PubMed Central

    Drysdale, Rachel A.; Crosby, Madeline A.

    2005-01-01

    FlyBase (http://flybase.org) is the primary repository of genetic and molecular data of the insect family Drosophilidae. For the most extensively studied species, Drosophila melanogaster, a wide range of data are presented in integrated formats. Data types include mutant phenotypes, molecular characterization of mutant alleles and aberrations, cytological maps, wild-type expression patterns, anatomical images, transgenic constructs and insertions, sequence-level gene models and molecular classification of gene product functions. There is a growing body of data for other Drosophila species; this is expected to increase dramatically over the next year, with the completion of draft-quality genomic sequences of an additional 11 Drosphila species. PMID:15608223

  10. Norrie disease gene is distinct from the monoamine oxidase genes.

    PubMed

    Sims, K B; Ozelius, L; Corey, T; Rinehart, W B; Liberfarb, R; Haines, J; Chen, W J; Norio, R; Sankila, E; de la Chapelle, A

    1989-09-01

    The genes for MAO-A and MAO-B appear to be very close to the Norrie disease gene, on the basis of loss and/or disruption of the MAO genes and activities in atypical Norrie disease patients deleted for the DXS7 locus; linkage among the MAO genes, the Norrie disease gene, and the DXS7 locus; and mapping of all these loci to the chromosomal region Xp11. The present study provides evidence that the MAO genes are not disrupted in "classic" Norrie disease patients. Genomic DNA from these "nondeletion" Norrie disease patients did not show rearrangements at the MAOA or DXS7 loci. Normal levels of MAO-A activities, as well as normal amounts and size of the MAO-A mRNA, were observed in cultured skin fibroblasts from these patients, and MAO-B activity in their platelets was normal. Catecholamine metabolites evaluated in plasma and urine were in the control range. Thus, although some atypical Norrie disease patients lack both MAO-A and MAO-B activities, MAO does not appear to be an etiologic factor in classic Norrie disease.

  11. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  12. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy [Davis, CA; Bachkirova, Elena [Davis, CA; Rey, Michael [Davis, CA

    2012-05-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  13. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy [Davis, CA; Bachkirova, Elena [Davis, CA; Rey, Michael [Davis, CA

    2008-06-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  14. Clues to an evolutionary mystery: the genes for T-toxin, enabler of the devastating 1970 Southern Corn Leaf Blight epidemic, are present in ancestral species, suggesting an ancient origin.

    PubMed

    Condon, Bradford J; Elliott, Candace E; Gonzalez, Jonathan; Yun, Sung-Hwan; Akagi, Yasunori; Wiesner-Hanks, Tyr; Kodama, Motoichiro; Turgeon, Gillian

    2018-05-24

    The Southern Corn Leaf Blight epidemic of 1970 devastated fields of T-cytoplasm corn planted in monoculture throughout the eastern US. The epidemic was driven by race T, a previously unseen race of Cochliobolus heterostrophus. A second fungus, Phyllosticta zeae-maydis, with the same biological specificity, appeared coincidentally. Race T produces T-toxin, while P. zeae-maydis produces PM-toxin, both host selective polyketide toxins necessary for supervirulence. Present abundance of genome sequences offers an opportunity to tackle the evolutionary origins of T- and PM- toxin biosynthetic genes, previously thought unique to these species. Using the C. heterostrophus genes as probes, we identified orthologs in six additional Dothideomycete and three Eurotiomycete species. In stark contrast to the genetically fragmented race T Tox1 locus which encodes these genes, all newly found Tox1-like genes in other species reside at a single collinear locus. This compact arrangement, phylogenetic analyses, comparisons of Tox1 protein tree topology to a species tree, and Tox1 gene characteristics suggest that the locus is ancient and that some species, including C. heterostrophus, gained Tox1 by horizontal gene transfer. C. heterostrophus and P. zeae-maydis did not exchange Tox1 DNA at the time of the SCLB epidemic, but how they acquired Tox1 remains uncertain. The presence of additional genes in Tox1-like clusters of other species, but not in C. heterostrophus and P. zeae-maydis, suggests that the metabolites produced differ from T- and PM-toxin.

  15. Gene Duplicability of Core Genes Is Highly Consistent across All Angiosperms[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Van de Peer, Yves; De Smet, Riet

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important mechanism for adding to genomic novelty. Hence, which genes undergo duplication and are preserved following duplication is an important question. It has been observed that gene duplicability, or the ability of genes to be retained following duplication, is a nonrandom process, with certain genes being more amenable to survive duplication events than others. Primarily, gene essentiality and the type of duplication (small-scale versus large-scale) have been shown in different species to influence the (long-term) survival of novel genes. However, an overarching view of “gene duplicability” is lacking, mainly due to the fact that previous studies usually focused on individual species and did not account for the influence of genomic context and the time of duplication. Here, we present a large-scale study in which we investigated duplicate retention for 9178 gene families shared between 37 flowering plant species, referred to as angiosperm core gene families. For most gene families, we observe a strikingly consistent pattern of gene duplicability across species, with gene families being either primarily single-copy or multicopy in all species. An intermediate class contains gene families that are often retained in duplicate for periods extending to tens of millions of years after whole-genome duplication, but ultimately appear to be largely restored to singleton status, suggesting that these genes may be dosage balance sensitive. The distinction between single-copy and multicopy gene families is reflected in their functional annotation, with single-copy genes being mainly involved in the maintenance of genome stability and organelle function and multicopy genes in signaling, transport, and metabolism. The intermediate class was overrepresented in regulatory genes, further suggesting that these represent putative dosage-balance-sensitive genes. PMID:26744215

  16. Identification of genes associated with renal cell carcinoma using gene expression profiling analysis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ting; Wang, Qinfu; Zhang, Wenyong; Bian, Aihong; Zhang, Jinping

    2016-07-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults and accounts for ~80% of all kidney cancer cases. However, the pathogenesis of RCC has not yet been fully elucidated. To interpret the pathogenesis of RCC at the molecular level, gene expression data and bio-informatics methods were used to identify RCC associated genes. Gene expression data was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database and identified differentially coexpressed genes (DCGs) and dysfunctional pathways in RCC patients compared with controls. In addition, a regulatory network was constructed using the known regulatory data between transcription factors (TFs) and target genes in the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu) and the regulatory impact factor of each TF was calculated. A total of 258,0427 pairs of DCGs were identified. The regulatory network contained 1,525 pairs of regulatory associations between 126 TFs and 1,259 target genes and these genes were mainly enriched in cancer pathways, ErbB and MAPK. In the regulatory network, the 10 most strongly associated TFs were FOXC1, GATA3, ESR1, FOXL1, PATZ1, MYB, STAT5A, EGR2, EGR3 and PELP1. GATA3, ERG and MYB serve important roles in RCC while FOXC1, ESR1, FOXL1, PATZ1, STAT5A and PELP1 may be potential genes associated with RCC. In conclusion, the present study constructed a regulatory network and screened out several TFs that may be used as molecular biomarkers of RCC. However, future studies are needed to confirm the findings of the present study.

  17. Identification of genes associated with renal cell carcinoma using gene expression profiling analysis

    PubMed Central

    YAO, TING; WANG, QINFU; ZHANG, WENYONG; BIAN, AIHONG; ZHANG, JINPING

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults and accounts for ~80% of all kidney cancer cases. However, the pathogenesis of RCC has not yet been fully elucidated. To interpret the pathogenesis of RCC at the molecular level, gene expression data and bio-informatics methods were used to identify RCC associated genes. Gene expression data was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database and identified differentially coexpressed genes (DCGs) and dysfunctional pathways in RCC patients compared with controls. In addition, a regulatory network was constructed using the known regulatory data between transcription factors (TFs) and target genes in the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu) and the regulatory impact factor of each TF was calculated. A total of 258,0427 pairs of DCGs were identified. The regulatory network contained 1,525 pairs of regulatory associations between 126 TFs and 1,259 target genes and these genes were mainly enriched in cancer pathways, ErbB and MAPK. In the regulatory network, the 10 most strongly associated TFs were FOXC1, GATA3, ESR1, FOXL1, PATZ1, MYB, STAT5A, EGR2, EGR3 and PELP1. GATA3, ERG and MYB serve important roles in RCC while FOXC1, ESR1, FOXL1, PATZ1, STAT5A and PELP1 may be potential genes associated with RCC. In conclusion, the present study constructed a regulatory network and screened out several TFs that may be used as molecular biomarkers of RCC. However, future studies are needed to confirm the findings of the present study. PMID:27347102

  18. Juvenile-onset Sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with a Frameshift FUS Gene Mutation Presenting Unique Neuroradiological Findings and Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Hirayanagi, Kimitoshi; Sato, Masayuki; Furuta, Natsumi; Makioka, Kouki; Ikeda, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old Japanese woman developed anterocollis, weakness of the proximal arms, and subsequent cognitive impairment. A neurological examination revealed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) without a family history. Systemic muscle atrophy progressed rapidly. Cerebral MRI clearly exhibited high signal intensities along the bilateral pyramidal tracts. An analysis of the FUS gene revealed a heterozygous two-base pair deletion, c.1507-1508delAG (p.G504WfsX515). A subset of juvenile-onset familial/sporadic ALS cases with FUS gene mutations reportedly demonstrates mental retardation or learning difficulty. Our study emphasizes the importance of conducting a FUS gene analysis in juvenile-onset ALS cases, even when no family occurrence is confirmed.

  19. Follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma presenting as toxic nodule in an adolescent: coexistent polymorphism of the TSHR and Gsα genes.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Rosaria Maddalena; Campennì, Alfredo; Giovinazzo, Salvatore; Saraceno, Giovanna; Vicchio, Teresa Manuela; Carlotta, Dario; Cucinotta, Maria Paola; Micali, Carmelo; Trimarchi, Francesco; Tuccari, Giovanni; Baldari, Sergio; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2013-02-01

    Autonomously functioning, "hot", thyroid nodules are not common in children and adolescents. Such nodules are not considered alarming because they are assumed to be benign adenomas. Herein, we present a 15-year-old girl with a papillary thyroid carcinoma of 3.5 cm in diameter, which was functionally autonomous and scintigraphically hot. The patient, initially referred to our Endocrine Unit because of a thyroid nodule, returned 6 months later for symptoms of hyperthyroidism. Hyperthyroidism was confirmed biochemically. Radioactive iodine ((131)I) thyroid scintigraphy was consistent with an autonomous thyroid nodule. As per guidelines, the patient underwent surgery and a pathological examination revealed papillary carcinoma, follicular variant. The excised nodule was examined for activating mutations of the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR), Gsα (GNAS1), H-RAS, N-RAS, K-RAS, and BRAF genes by direct sequencing. No mutations were found. Nevertheless, two combined nonfunctioning mutations were detected: a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the TSHR gene, in exon 7, at codon 187 (AAT→AAC, both encoding asparagine), and a SNP within exon 8 of the Gsα gene at codon 185 (ATC→ATT, both encoding isoleucine). Both SNPs were also identified in the germline DNA of the patient. The same SNPs were sought in the parents and brother of our patient. Her father was heterozygous for the TSHR SNP, her mother heterozygous for the Gsα SNP, and her brother was wild type. This case demonstrates that the presence of hyperfunctioning thyroid nodule(s) does not rule out cancer and warrants careful evaluation, especially in childhood and adolescence to overlook malignancy.

  20. HGDB: A web retrieving cardiovascular-associated gene data.

    PubMed

    Noorabad-Ghahroodi, Faezeh; Abdi, Samaneh; Zand, Amir Hossein; Najafi, Mohammad

    2017-04-01

    The use of data obtained from high throughput techniques in genetics studies is an essential subject in biology. The system approaches of networking and enriching may improve the data management. Here, we annotated the molecular features for cardiovascular-associated genes and presented the HGDB search-based database (www.hgdb.ir). The initial seed data was primarily used from Gene Ontology and was automatically enriched with other molecular features. The data was managed in a SQL popular and open source. The search tabs on the HGDB homepage were applied for ID/Name Gene, chromosome, cell organelle and all gene options. The search results were presented on the gene text-based and source link-based descriptions. The HGDB is a friendly website to present gene data in the cardiovascular field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Canine candidate genes for dilated cardiomyopathy: annotation of and polymorphic markers for 14 genes.

    PubMed

    Wiersma, Anje C; Leegwater, Peter Aj; van Oost, Bernard A; Ollier, William E; Dukes-McEwan, Joanna

    2007-10-19

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a myocardial disease occurring in humans and domestic animals and is characterized by dilatation of the left ventricle, reduced systolic function and increased sphericity of the left ventricle. Dilated cardiomyopathy has been observed in several, mostly large and giant, dog breeds, such as the Dobermann and the Great Dane. A number of genes have been identified, which are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in the human, mouse and hamster. These genes mainly encode structural proteins of the cardiac myocyte. We present the annotation of, and marker development for, 14 of these genes of the dog genome, i.e. alpha-cardiac actin, caveolin 1, cysteine-rich protein 3, desmin, lamin A/C, LIM-domain binding factor 3, myosin heavy polypeptide 7, phospholamban, sarcoglycan delta, titin cap, alpha-tropomyosin, troponin I, troponin T and vinculin. A total of 33 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms were identified for these canine genes and 11 polymorphic microsatellite repeats were developed. The presented polymorphisms provide a tool to investigate the role of the corresponding genes in canine Dilated Cardiomyopathy by linkage analysis or association studies.

  2. Identification and function analysis of contrary genes in Dupuytren's contracture.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xianglu; Tian, Feng; Tian, Lijie

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the expression of genes involved in Dupuytren's contracture (DC), using bioinformatic methods. The profile of GSE21221 was downloaded from the gene expression ominibus, which included six samples, derived from fibroblasts and six healthy control samples, derived from carpal-tunnel fibroblasts. A Distributed Intrusion Detection System was used in order to identify differentially expressed genes. The term contrary genes is proposed. Contrary genes were the genes that exhibited opposite expression patterns in the positive and negative groups, and likely exhibited opposite functions. These were identified using Coexpress software. Gene ontology (GO) function analysis was conducted for the contrary genes. A network of GO terms was constructed using the reduce and visualize gene ontology database. Significantly expressed genes (801) and contrary genes (98) were screened. A significant association was observed between Chitinase-3-like protein 1 and ten genes in the positive gene set. Positive regulation of transcription and the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-inducing kinase activity exhibited the highest degree values in the network of GO terms. In the present study, the expression of genes involved in the development of DC was analyzed, and the concept of contrary genes proposed. The genes identified in the present study are involved in the positive regulation of transcription and activation of NF-κB-inducing kinase activity. The contrary genes and GO terms identified in the present study may potentially be used for DC diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Querying Co-regulated Genes on Diverse Gene Expression Datasets Via Biclustering.

    PubMed

    Deveci, Mehmet; Küçüktunç, Onur; Eren, Kemal; Bozdağ, Doruk; Kaya, Kamer; Çatalyürek, Ümit V

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development and increasing popularity of gene expression microarrays have resulted in a number of studies on the discovery of co-regulated genes. One important way of discovering such co-regulations is the query-based search since gene co-expressions may indicate a shared role in a biological process. Although there exist promising query-driven search methods adapting clustering, they fail to capture many genes that function in the same biological pathway because microarray datasets are fraught with spurious samples or samples of diverse origin, or the pathways might be regulated under only a subset of samples. On the other hand, a class of clustering algorithms known as biclustering algorithms which simultaneously cluster both the items and their features are useful while analyzing gene expression data, or any data in which items are related in only a subset of their samples. This means that genes need not be related in all samples to be clustered together. Because many genes only interact under specific circumstances, biclustering may recover the relationships that traditional clustering algorithms can easily miss. In this chapter, we briefly summarize the literature using biclustering for querying co-regulated genes. Then we present a novel biclustering approach and evaluate its performance by a thorough experimental analysis.

  4. Norrie disease gene is distinct from the monoamine oxidase genes

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Katherine B.; Ozelius, Laurie; Corey, Timothy; Rinehart, William B.; Liberfarb, Ruth; Haines, Jonathan; Chen, Wei Jane; Norio, Reijo; Sankila, Eeva; de la Chapelle, Albert; Murphy, Dennis L.; Gusella, James; Breakefield, Xandra O.

    1989-01-01

    The genes for MAO-A and MAO-B appear to be very close to the Norrie disease gene, on the basis of loss and /or disruption of the MAO genes and activities in atypical Norrie disease patients deleted for the DXS7 locus; linkage among the MAO genes, the Norrie disease gene, and the DXS7 locus; and mapping of all these loci to the chromosomal region Xp11. The present study provides evidence that the MAO genes are not disrupted in “classic” Norrie disease patients. Genomic DNA from these “nondeletion” Norrie disease patients did not show rearrangements at the MAOA or DXS7 loci. Normal levels of MAO-A activities, as well as normal amounts and size of the MAO-A mRNA, were observed in cultured skin fibroblasts from these patients, and MAO-B activity in their platelets was normal. Catecholamine metabolites evaluated in plasma and urine were in the control range. Thus, although some atypical Norrie disease patients lack both MAO-A and MAO-B activities, MAO does not appear to be an etiologic factor in classic Norrie disease. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:2773935

  5. HLA Immune Function Genes in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony R.; Westover, Jonna B.; Rosenspire, Allen J.

    2012-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes on chromosome 6 are instrumental in many innate and adaptive immune responses. The HLA genes/haplotypes can also be involved in immune dysfunction and autoimmune diseases. It is now becoming apparent that many of the non-antigen-presenting HLA genes make significant contributions to autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, it has been reported that autism subjects often have associations with HLA genes/haplotypes, suggesting an underlying dysregulation of the immune system mediated by HLA genes. Genetic studies have only succeeded in identifying autism-causing genes in a small number of subjects suggesting that the genome has not been adequately interrogated. Close examination of the HLA region in autism has been relatively ignored, largely due to extraordinary genetic complexity. It is our proposition that genetic polymorphisms in the HLA region, especially in the non-antigen-presenting regions, may be important in the etiology of autism in certain subjects. PMID:22928105

  6. Gene therapy for arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Traister, Russell S.

    2008-01-01

    Arthritis is among the leading causes of disability in the developed world. There remains no cure for this disease and the current treatments are only modestly effective at slowing the disease's progression and providing symptomatic relief. The clinical effectiveness of current treatment regimens has been limited by short half-lives of the drugs and the requirement for repeated systemic administration. Utilizing gene transfer approaches for the treatment of arthritis may overcome some of the obstacles associated with current treatment strategies. The present review examines recent developments in gene therapy for arthritis. Delivery strategies, gene transfer vectors, candidate genes, and safety are also discussed. PMID:18176779

  7. Gene and domain duplication in the chordate Otx gene family: insights from amphioxus Otx.

    PubMed

    Williams, N A; Holland, P W

    1998-05-01

    We report the genomic organization and deduced protein sequence of a cephalochordate member of the Otx homeobox gene family (AmphiOtx) and show its probable single-copy state in the genome. We also present molecular phylogenetic analysis indicating that there was single ancestral Otx gene in the first chordates which was duplicated in the vertebrate lineage after it had split from the lineage leading to the cephalochordates. Duplication of a C-terminal protein domain has occurred specifically in the vertebrate lineage, strengthening the case for a single Otx gene in an ancestral chordate whose gene structure has been retained in an extant cephalochordate. Comparative analysis of protein sequences and published gene expression patterns suggest that the ancestral chordate Otx gene had roles in patterning the anterior mesendoderm and central nervous system. These roles were elaborated following Otx gene duplication in vertebrates, accompanied by regulatory and structural divergence, particularly of Otx1 descendant genes.

  8. Antigen processing and presentation: evolution from a bird's eye view.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Jim

    2013-09-01

    Most detailed knowledge of the MHC outside of mammals has come from studies of chickens, originally due to the economic importance of the poultry industry. We have used our discoveries about the chicken MHC to develop a framework for understanding the evolution of the MHC, based on the importance of genomic organisation for gene co-evolution. In humans, MHC class I molecules are polymorphic and determine the specificity of peptide presentation, while the molecules involved in antigen processing are functionally monomorphic. The genes for tapasin, transporters associated with antigen presentation (TAPs) and inducible proteasome components (LMPs) are located in and beyond the class II region, far away from the class I genes in the class I region. In contrast, chickens express only one class I locus at high levels, which can result in strong MHC associations with resistance to particular infectious pathogens. The chicken TAP and tapasin genes are located very close to the class I genes, and have high levels of allelic polymorphism and moderate sequence diversity, co-evolving their specificities to work optimally with the dominantly expressed class I molecule. The salient features of the chicken MHC are found in many if not most non-mammalian species examined, and are likely to represent the ancestral organisation of the MHC. Comparison with the MHC organisation of humans and typical mammals suggests that a large inversion brought the class III region into the middle of the MHC, separating the antigen processing genes from the class I gene, breaking the co-evolutionary relationships and allowing a multigene family of well-expressed class I genes. Such co-evolution in the primordial MHC was likely responsible for the appearance of the antigen presentation pathways and receptor-ligand interactions at the birth of the adaptive immune system. Of course, much further work is required to understand this evolutionary framework in more detail. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd

  9. Phylogenetics and Gene Structure Dynamics of Polygalacturonase Genes in Aspergillus and Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jin-Sung; Ryu, Ki-Hyun; Kwon, Soon-Jae; Kim, Jin-Won; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Park, Kyong-Cheul

    2013-01-01

    Polygalacturonase (PG) gene is a typical gene family present in eukaryotes. Forty-nine PGs were mined from the genomes of Neurospora crassa and five Aspergillus species. The PGs were classified into 3 clades such as clade 1 for rhamno-PGs, clade 2 for exo-PGs and clade 3 for exo- and endo-PGs, which were further grouped into 13 sub-clades based on the polypeptide sequence similarity. In gene structure analysis, a total of 124 introns were present in 44 genes and five genes lacked introns to give an average of 2.5 introns per gene. Intron phase distribution was 64.5% for phase 0, 21.8% for phase 1, and 13.7% for phase 2, respectively. The introns varied in their sequences and their lengths ranged from 20 bp to 424 bp with an average of 65.9 bp, which is approximately half the size of introns in other fungal genes. There were 29 homologous intron blocks and 26 of those were sub-clade specific. Intron losses were counted in 18 introns in which no obvious phase preference for intron loss was observed. Eighteen introns were placed at novel positions, which is considerably higher than those of plant PGs. In an evolutionary sense both intron loss and gain must have taken place for shaping the current PGs in these fungi. Together with the small intron size, low conservation of homologous intron blocks and higher number of novel introns, PGs of fungal species seem to have recently undergone highly dynamic evolution. PMID:25288950

  10. Canine candidate genes for dilated cardiomyopathy: annotation of and polymorphic markers for 14 genes

    PubMed Central

    Wiersma, Anje C; Leegwater, Peter AJ; van Oost, Bernard A; Ollier, William E; Dukes-McEwan, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    Background Dilated cardiomyopathy is a myocardial disease occurring in humans and domestic animals and is characterized by dilatation of the left ventricle, reduced systolic function and increased sphericity of the left ventricle. Dilated cardiomyopathy has been observed in several, mostly large and giant, dog breeds, such as the Dobermann and the Great Dane. A number of genes have been identified, which are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in the human, mouse and hamster. These genes mainly encode structural proteins of the cardiac myocyte. Results We present the annotation of, and marker development for, 14 of these genes of the dog genome, i.e. α-cardiac actin, caveolin 1, cysteine-rich protein 3, desmin, lamin A/C, LIM-domain binding factor 3, myosin heavy polypeptide 7, phospholamban, sarcoglycan δ, titin cap, α-tropomyosin, troponin I, troponin T and vinculin. A total of 33 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms were identified for these canine genes and 11 polymorphic microsatellite repeats were developed. Conclusion The presented polymorphisms provide a tool to investigate the role of the corresponding genes in canine Dilated Cardiomyopathy by linkage analysis or association studies. PMID:17949487

  11. Plant nitrogen regulatory P-PII genes

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Lam, Hon-Ming; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2001-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to plant nitrogen regulatory PII gene (hereinafter P-PII gene), a gene involved in regulating plant nitrogen metabolism. The invention provides P-PII nucleotide sequences, expression constructs comprising said nucleotide sequences, and host cells and plants having said constructs and, optionally expressing the P-PII gene from said constructs. The invention also provides substantially pure P-PII proteins. The P-PII nucleotide sequences and constructs of the

  12. Phage-Mediated Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hosseinidoust, Zeinab

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages (bacterial viruses) have long been under investigation as vectors for gene therapy. Similar to other viral vectors, the phage coat proteins have evolved over millions of years to protect the viral genome from degradation post injection, offering protection for the valuable therapeutic sequence. However, what sets phage apart from other viral gene delivery vectors is their safety for human use and the relative ease by which foreign molecules can be expressed on the phage outer surface, enabling highly targeted gene delivery. The latter property also makes phage a popular choice for gene therapy target discovery through directed evolution. Although promising, phage-mediated gene therapy faces several outstanding challenges, the most notable being lower gene delivery efficiency compared to animal viruses, vector stability, and nondesirable immune stimulation. This review presents a critical review of promises and challenges of employing phage as gene delivery vehicles as well as an introduction to the concept of phage-based microbiome therapy as the new frontier and perhaps the most promising application of phage-based gene therapy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Cardiac Paraganglioma Arising From the Right Atrioventricular Groove in a Paraganglioma-Pheochromocytoma Family Syndrome With Evidence of SDHB Gene Mutation: An Unusual Presentation.

    PubMed

    Del Forno, Benedetto; Zingaro, Carlo; Di Palma, Enza; Capestro, Filippo; Rescigno, Giuseppe; Torracca, Lucia

    2016-09-01

    Primary cardiac paragangliomas are extremely rare. Recently this neoplasm has been associated with a familiar syndrome as a result of mutation of genes that encode proteins in the mitochondrial complex II. We report a case of a 46-year-old woman having cases of vertebral paraganglioma in her family showing an unusual anatomic and clinical presentation of cardiac paraganglioma and expressing a genetic mutation never associated before with cardiac localization of this neoplasm. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Current status of gene test market].

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Shinichi

    2002-12-01

    The technological innovation of the gene analysis makes the adaptation range of the gene test in clinical diagnosis expand. Then, gene test has popularized increasingly around the infection disease for clinical inspection. Also in the field of clinical inspection, the increase of the importance of clinical application and the inspection item new year by year have appeared with the functional analysis of a gene. Moreover, the new test method and automation analysis equipment tend to be developed by progress of gene-analysis technology, and it is going to be introduced. The spread of gene test and development of a gene test market have an important possibility of activating the present clinical inspection field.

  15. fabp4 is central to eight obesity associated genes: a functional gene network-based polymorphic study.

    PubMed

    Bag, Susmita; Ramaiah, Sudha; Anbarasu, Anand

    2015-01-07

    Network study on genes and proteins offers functional basics of the complexity of gene and protein, and its interacting partners. The gene fatty acid-binding protein 4 (fabp4) is found to be highly expressed in adipose tissue, and is one of the most abundant proteins in mature adipocytes. Our investigations on functional modules of fabp4 provide useful information on the functional genes interacting with fabp4, their biochemical properties and their regulatory functions. The present study shows that there are eight set of candidate genes: acp1, ext2, insr, lipe, ostf1, sncg, usp15, and vim that are strongly and functionally linked up with fabp4. Gene ontological analysis of network modules of fabp4 provides an explicit idea on the functional aspect of fabp4 and its interacting nodes. The hierarchal mapping on gene ontology indicates gene specific processes and functions as well as their compartmentalization in tissues. The fabp4 along with its interacting genes are involved in lipid metabolic activity and are integrated in multi-cellular processes of tissues and organs. They also have important protein/enzyme binding activity. Our study elucidated disease-associated nsSNP prediction for fabp4 and it is interesting to note that there are four rsID׳s (rs1051231, rs3204631, rs140925685 and rs141169989) with disease allelic variation (T104P, T126P, G27D and G90V respectively). On the whole, our gene network analysis presents a clear insight about the interactions and functions associated with fabp4 gene network. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A multi-strategy approach to informative gene identification from gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziying; Phan, Sieu; Famili, Fazel; Pan, Youlian; Lenferink, Anne E G; Cantin, Christiane; Collins, Catherine; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen D

    2010-02-01

    An unsupervised multi-strategy approach has been developed to identify informative genes from high throughput genomic data. Several statistical methods have been used in the field to identify differentially expressed genes. Since different methods generate different lists of genes, it is very challenging to determine the most reliable gene list and the appropriate method. This paper presents a multi-strategy method, in which a combination of several data analysis techniques are applied to a given dataset and a confidence measure is established to select genes from the gene lists generated by these techniques to form the core of our final selection. The remainder of the genes that form the peripheral region are subject to exclusion or inclusion into the final selection. This paper demonstrates this methodology through its application to an in-house cancer genomics dataset and a public dataset. The results indicate that our method provides more reliable list of genes, which are validated using biological knowledge, biological experiments, and literature search. We further evaluated our multi-strategy method by consolidating two pairs of independent datasets, each pair is for the same disease, but generated by different labs using different platforms. The results showed that our method has produced far better results.

  17. Gene Structures, Evolution and Transcriptional Profiling of the WRKY Gene Family in Castor Bean (Ricinus communis L.).

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhi; Yang, Lifu; Wang, Danhua; Huang, Qixing; Mo, Yeyong; Xie, Guishui

    2016-01-01

    WRKY proteins comprise one of the largest transcription factor families in plants and form key regulators of many plant processes. This study presents the characterization of 58 WRKY genes from the castor bean (Ricinus communis L., Euphorbiaceae) genome. Compared with the automatic genome annotation, one more WRKY-encoding locus was identified and 20 out of the 57 predicted gene models were manually corrected. All RcWRKY genes were shown to contain at least one intron in their coding sequences. According to the structural features of the present WRKY domains, the identified RcWRKY genes were assigned to three previously defined groups (I-III). Although castor bean underwent no recent whole-genome duplication event like physic nut (Jatropha curcas L., Euphorbiaceae), comparative genomics analysis indicated that one gene loss, one intron loss and one recent proximal duplication occurred in the RcWRKY gene family. The expression of all 58 RcWRKY genes was supported by ESTs and/or RNA sequencing reads derived from roots, leaves, flowers, seeds and endosperms. Further global expression profiles with RNA sequencing data revealed diverse expression patterns among various tissues. Results obtained from this study not only provide valuable information for future functional analysis and utilization of the castor bean WRKY genes, but also provide a useful reference to investigate the gene family expansion and evolution in Euphorbiaceus plants.

  18. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  19. Detection of EPO gene doping in blood.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, Elmo W I; Jurkiewicz, Magdalena; Moser, Dirk A; Simon, Perikles

    2012-11-01

    Gene doping--or the abuse of gene therapy--will continue to threaten the sports world. History has shown that progress in medical research is likely to be abused in order to enhance human performance. In this review, we critically discuss the progress and the risks associated with the field of erythropoietin (EPO) gene therapy and its applicability to EPO gene doping. We present typical vector systems that are employed in ex vivo and in vivo gene therapy trials. Due to associated risks, gene doping is not a feasible alternative to conventional EPO or blood doping at this time. Nevertheless, it is well described that about half of the elite athlete population is in principle willing to risk its health to gain a competitive advantage. This includes the use of technologies that lack safety approval. Sophisticated detection approaches are a prerequisite for prevention of unapproved and uncontrolled use of gene therapy technology. In this review, we present current detection approaches for EPO gene doping, with a focus on blood-based direct and indirect approaches. Gene doping is detectable in principle, and recent DNA-based detection strategies enable long-term detection of transgenic DNA (tDNA) following in vivo gene transfer. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Gene finding in metatranscriptomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Wazim Mohammed; Ye, Yuzhen; Tang, Haixu

    2014-01-01

    Metatranscriptomic sequencing is a highly sensitive bioassay of functional activity in a microbial community, providing complementary information to the metagenomic sequencing of the community. The acquisition of the metatranscriptomic sequences will enable us to refine the annotations of the metagenomes, and to study the gene activities and their regulation in complex microbial communities and their dynamics. In this paper, we present TransGeneScan, a software tool for finding genes in assembled transcripts from metatranscriptomic sequences. By incorporating several features of metatranscriptomic sequencing, including strand-specificity, short intergenic regions, and putative antisense transcripts into a Hidden Markov Model, TranGeneScan can predict a sense transcript containing one or multiple genes (in an operon) or an antisense transcript. We tested TransGeneScan on a mock metatranscriptomic data set containing three known bacterial genomes. The results showed that TranGeneScan performs better than metagenomic gene finders (MetaGeneMark and FragGeneScan) on predicting protein coding genes in assembled transcripts, and achieves comparable or even higher accuracy than gene finders for microbial genomes (Glimmer and GeneMark). These results imply, with the assistance of metatranscriptomic sequencing, we can obtain a broad and precise picture about the genes (and their functions) in a microbial community. TransGeneScan is available as open-source software on SourceForge at https://sourceforge.net/projects/transgenescan/.

  1. GO-based functional dissimilarity of gene sets.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Díaz, Norberto; Aguilar-Ruiz, Jesús S

    2011-09-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) provides a controlled vocabulary for describing the functions of genes and can be used to evaluate the functional coherence of gene sets. Many functional coherence measures consider each pair of gene functions in a set and produce an output based on all pairwise distances. A single gene can encode multiple proteins that may differ in function. For each functionality, other proteins that exhibit the same activity may also participate. Therefore, an identification of the most common function for all of the genes involved in a biological process is important in evaluating the functional similarity of groups of genes and a quantification of functional coherence can helps to clarify the role of a group of genes working together. To implement this approach to functional assessment, we present GFD (GO-based Functional Dissimilarity), a novel dissimilarity measure for evaluating groups of genes based on the most relevant functions of the whole set. The measure assigns a numerical value to the gene set for each of the three GO sub-ontologies. Results show that GFD performs robustly when applied to gene set of known functionality (extracted from KEGG). It performs particularly well on randomly generated gene sets. An ROC analysis reveals that the performance of GFD in evaluating the functional dissimilarity of gene sets is very satisfactory. A comparative analysis against other functional measures, such as GS2 and those presented by Resnik and Wang, also demonstrates the robustness of GFD.

  2. Mutagenesis of diploid mammalian genes by gene entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qing; Donahue, Sarah L.; Moore-Jarrett, Tracy; Cao, Shang; Osipovich, Anna B.; Ruley, H. Earl

    2006-01-01

    The present study describes a genome-wide method for biallelic mutagenesis in mammalian cells. Novel poly(A) gene trap vectors, which contain features for direct cloning vector–cell fusion transcripts and for post-entrapment genome engineering, were used to generate a library of 979 mutant ES cells. The entrapment mutations generally disrupted gene expression and were readily transmitted through the germline, establishing the library as a resource for constructing mutant mice. Cells homozygous for most entrapment loci could be isolated by selecting for enhanced expression of an inserted neomycin-resistance gene that resulted from losses of heterozygosity (LOH). The frequencies of LOH measured at 37 sites in the genome ranged from 1.3 × 10−5 to 1.2 × 10−4 per cell and increased with increasing distance from the centromere, implicating mitotic recombination in the process. The ease and efficiency of obtaining homozygous mutations will (i) facilitate genetic studies of gene function in cultured cells, (ii) permit genome-wide studies of recombination events that result in LOH and mediate a type of chromosomal instability important in carcinogenesis, and (iii) provide new strategies for phenotype-driven mutagenesis screens in mammalian cells. PMID:17062627

  3. Spectrum of mismatch repair gene mutations and clinical presentation of Hispanic individuals with Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sunga, Annette Y; Ricker, Charité; Espenschied, Carin R; Castillo, Danielle; Melas, Marilena; Herzog, Josef; Bannon, Sarah; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Lynch, Patrick; Solomon, Ilana; Gruber, Stephen B; Weitzel, Jeffrey N

    2017-04-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, is caused by mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. However, data about MMR mutations in Hispanics are limited. This study aims to describe the spectrum of MMR mutations in Hispanics with LS and explore ancestral origins. This case series involved an IRB-approved retrospective chart review of self-identified Hispanic patients (n = 397) seen for genetic cancer risk assessment at four collaborating academic institutions in California, Texas, and Puerto Rico who were evaluated by MMR genotyping and/or tumor analysis. A literature review was conducted for all mutations identified. Of those who underwent clinical genetic testing (n = 176), 71 had MMR gene mutations. Nine mutations were observed more than once. One third (3/9) of recurrent mutations and two additional mutations (seen only once) were previously reported in Spain, confirming the influence of Spanish ancestry on MMR mutations in Hispanic populations. The recurrent mutations identified (n = 9) included both previously reported mutations as well as unique mutations not in the literature. This is the largest report of Hispanic MMR mutations in North America; however, a larger sample and haplotype analyses are needed to better understand recurrent MMR mutations in Hispanic populations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Antioxidant Defense Enzyme Genes and Asthma Susceptibility: Gender-Specific Effects and Heterogeneity in Gene-Gene Interactions between Pathogenetic Variants of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Polonikov, Alexey V.; Ivanov, Vladimir P.; Bogomazov, Alexey D.; Freidin, Maxim B.; Illig, Thomas; Solodilova, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from an increased amount of reactive oxygen species and an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants plays an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The present study tested the hypothesis that genetic susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic variants of asthma is determined by complex interactions between genes encoding antioxidant defense enzymes (ADE). We carried out a comprehensive analysis of the associations between adult asthma and 46 single nucleotide polymorphisms of 34 ADE genes and 12 other candidate genes of asthma in Russian population using set association analysis and multifactor dimensionality reduction approaches. We found for the first time epistatic interactions between ADE genes underlying asthma susceptibility and the genetic heterogeneity between allergic and nonallergic variants of the disease. We identified GSR (glutathione reductase) and PON2 (paraoxonase 2) as novel candidate genes for asthma susceptibility. We observed gender-specific effects of ADE genes on the risk of asthma. The results of the study demonstrate complexity and diversity of interactions between genes involved in oxidative stress underlying susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic asthma. PMID:24895604

  5. Homology-dependent Gene Silencing in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Françoise; Vayssié, Laurence; Klotz, Catherine; Sperling, Linda; Madeddu, Luisa

    1998-01-01

    Microinjection at high copy number of plasmids containing only the coding region of a gene into the Paramecium somatic macronucleus led to a marked reduction in the expression of the corresponding endogenous gene(s). The silencing effect, which is stably maintained throughout vegetative growth, has been observed for all Paramecium genes examined so far: a single-copy gene (ND7), as well as members of multigene families (centrin genes and trichocyst matrix protein genes) in which all closely related paralogous genes appeared to be affected. This phenomenon may be related to posttranscriptional gene silencing in transgenic plants and quelling in Neurospora and allows the efficient creation of specific mutant phenotypes thus providing a potentially powerful tool to study gene function in Paramecium. For the two multigene families that encode proteins that coassemble to build up complex subcellular structures the analysis presented herein provides the first experimental evidence that the members of these gene families are not functionally redundant. PMID:9529389

  6. A kernel regression approach to gene-gene interaction detection for case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Nicholas B; Schaid, Daniel J

    2013-11-01

    Gene-gene interactions are increasingly being addressed as a potentially important contributor to the variability of complex traits. Consequently, attentions have moved beyond single locus analysis of association to more complex genetic models. Although several single-marker approaches toward interaction analysis have been developed, such methods suffer from very high testing dimensionality and do not take advantage of existing information, notably the definition of genes as functional units. Here, we propose a comprehensive family of gene-level score tests for identifying genetic elements of disease risk, in particular pairwise gene-gene interactions. Using kernel machine methods, we devise score-based variance component tests under a generalized linear mixed model framework. We conducted simulations based upon coalescent genetic models to evaluate the performance of our approach under a variety of disease models. These simulations indicate that our methods are generally higher powered than alternative gene-level approaches and at worst competitive with exhaustive SNP-level (where SNP is single-nucleotide polymorphism) analyses. Furthermore, we observe that simulated epistatic effects resulted in significant marginal testing results for the involved genes regardless of whether or not true main effects were present. We detail the benefits of our methods and discuss potential genome-wide analysis strategies for gene-gene interaction analysis in a case-control study design. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  7. Shewanella species as the origin of blaOXA-48 genes: insights into gene diversity, associated phenotypes and possible transfer mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tacão, Marta; Araújo, Susana; Vendas, Maria; Alves, Artur; Henriques, Isabel

    2018-03-01

    Chromosome-encoded beta-lactamases of Shewanella spp. have been indicated as probable progenitors of bla OXA-48 -like genes. However, these have been detected in few Shewanella spp. and dissemination mechanisms are unclear. Thus, our main objective was to confirm the role of Shewanella species as progenitors of bla OXA-48 -like genes. In silico analysis of Shewanella genomes was performed to detect bla OXA-48 -like genes and context, and 43 environmental Shewanella spp. were characterised. Clonal relatedness was determined by BOX-PCR. Phylogenetic affiliation was assessed by 16S rDNA and gyrB sequencing. Antibiotic susceptibility phenotypes were determined. The bla OXA-48 -like genes and genetic context were inspected by PCR, hybridisation and sequence analysis. Gene variants were cloned in Escherichia coli and MICs were determined. Shewanella isolates were screened for integrons, plasmids and insertion sequences. Analysis of Shewanella spp. genomes showed that putative bla OXA-48 -like is present in the majority and in an identical context. Isolates presenting unique BOX profiles affiliated with 11 Shewanella spp. bla OXA-48 -like genes were detected in 22 isolates from 6 species. Genes encoded enzymes identical to OXA-48, OXA-204, OXA-181, and 7 new variants differing from OXA-48 from 2 to 82 amino acids. IS1999 was detected in 24 isolates, although not in the vicinity of bla OXA-48 genes. Recombinant E. coli strains presented altered MICs. The presence/absence of bla OXA-48 -like genes was species-related. Gene variants encoded enzymes with hydrolytic spectra similar to OXA-48-like from non-shewanellae. From the mobile elements previously described in association with bla OXA-48 -like genes, only the IS1999 was found in Shewanella, which indicates its relevance in bla OXA-48 -like genes transfer to other hosts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. Autophagy genes in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Virgin, Herbert W; Levine, Beth

    2009-01-01

    In its classical form, autophagy is a pathway by which cytoplasmic constituents, including intracellular pathogens, are sequestered in a double-membrane–bound autophagosome and delivered to the lysosome for degradation. This pathway has been linked to diverse aspects of innate and adaptive immunity, including pathogen resistance, production of type I interferon, antigen presentation, tolerance and lymphocyte development, as well as the negative regulation of cytokine signaling and inflammation. Most of these links have emerged from studies in which genes encoding molecules involved in autophagy are inactivated in immune effector cells. However, it is not yet known whether all of the critical functions of such genes in immunity represent ‘classical autophagy’ or possible as-yet-undefined autophagolysosome-independent functions of these genes. This review summarizes phenotypes that result from the inactivation of autophagy genes in the immune system and discusses the pleiotropic functions of autophagy genes in immunity. PMID:19381141

  9. Systematic study of association of four GABAergic genes: glutamic acid decarboxylase 1 gene, glutamic acid decarboxylase 2 gene, GABA(B) receptor 1 gene and GABA(A) receptor subunit beta2 gene, with schizophrenia using a universal DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Qin, Shengying; Shi, Yongyong; Zhang, Aiping; Zhang, Jing; Bian, Li; Wan, Chunling; Feng, Guoyin; Gu, Niufan; Zhang, Guangqi; He, Guang; He, Lin

    2007-07-01

    Several studies have suggested the dysfunction of the GABAergic system as a risk factor in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. In the present study, case-control association analysis was conducted in four GABAergic genes: two glutamic acid decarboxylase genes (GAD1 and GAD2), a GABA(A) receptor subunit beta2 gene (GABRB2) and a GABA(B) receptor 1 gene (GABBR1). Using a universal DNA microarray procedure we genotyped a total of 20 SNPs on the above four genes in a study involving 292 patients and 286 controls of Chinese descent. Statistically significant differences were observed in the allelic frequencies of the rs187269C/T polymorphism in the GABRB2 gene (P=0.0450, chi(2)=12.40, OR=1.65) and the -292A/C polymorphism in the GAD1 gene (P=0.0450, chi(2)=14.64 OR=1.77). In addition, using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), we discovered differences in the U251 nuclear protein binding to oligonucleotides representing the -292 SNP on the GAD1 gene, which suggests that the -292C allele has reduced transcription factor binding efficiency compared with the 292A allele. Using the multifactor-dimensionality reduction method (MDR), we found that the interactions among the rs187269C/T polymorphism in the GABRB2 gene, the -243A/G polymorphism in the GAD2 gene and the 27379C/T and 661C/T polymorphisms in the GAD1 gene revealed a significant association with schizophrenia (P<0.001). These findings suggest that the GABRB2 and GAD1 genes alone and the combined effects of the polymorphisms in the four GABAergic system genes may confer susceptibility to the development of schizophrenia in the Chinese population.

  10. Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease with P102L prion protein gene mutation presenting with rapidly progressive clinical course.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Mori, Keiko; Ito, Masumi; Nokura, Kazuya; Tatsumi, Shinsui; Mimuro, Maya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari

    2014-01-01

    We describe an autopsied case of a Japanese woman with Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) presenting with a rapidly progressive clinical course. Disease onset occurred at the age of 54 with dementia and gait disturbance. Her clinical course progressively deteriorated until she reached a bedridden state with myoclonus 9 months after onset. Two months later, she reached the akinetic mutism state. Nasal tube feeding was introduced at this point and continued for several years. Electroencephalograms showed diffuse slowing without periodic sharp-wave complexes. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed widespread cerebral cortical hyperintensity. Prion protein (PrP) gene analysis revealed a Pro to Leu point mutation at codon 102 with methionine homozygosity at codon 129. The patient died of respiratory failure after a total disease duration of 62 months. Neuropathologic examination revealed widespread spongiform change with numerous eosinophilic amyloid plaques (Kuru plaques) in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices by H & E staining. Diffuse myelin pallor with axon loss of the cerebral white matter, suggestive of panencephalopathic-type pathology was observed. Numerous PrP immunopositive plaques and diffuse synaptic-type PrP deposition were extensively observed, particularly in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices. Western blot analysis of proteinase Kresistant PrP showed a characteristic band pattern with a small molecular band of 6 kDa. The reason for the similarity in clinicopathologic findings between the present case and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is uncertain; however, the existence of an unknown disease-modifying factor is suspected.

  11. Gene Fusion: A Genome Wide Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Ping; Riley, Monica

    2001-01-01

    As a well known fact, organisms form larger and complex multimodular (composite or chimeric) and mostly multi-functional proteins through gene fusion of two or more individual genes which have independent evolution histories and functions. We call each of these components a module. The existence of multimodular proteins may improves the efficiency in gene regulation and in cellular functions, and thus may give the host organism advantages in adaptation to environments. Analysis of all gene fusions in present-day organisms should allow us to examine the patterns of gene fusion in context with cellular functions, to trace back the evolution processes from the ancient smaller and uni-functional proteins to the present-day larger and complex multi-functional proteins, and to estimate the minimal number of ancestor proteins that existed in the last common ancestor for all life on earth. Although many multimodular proteins have been experimentally known, identification of gene fusion events systematically at genome scale had not been possible until recently when large number of completed genome sequences have been becoming available. In addition, technical difficulties for such analysis also exist due to the complexity of this biological and evolutionary process. We report from this study a new strategy to computationally identify multimodular proteins using completed genome sequences and the results surveyed from 22 organisms with the data from over 40 organisms to be presented during the meeting. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED): a relational database of gene expression profiles in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingzhou; Yang, Bo; Chen, Xujiao; Xu, Jing; Mei, Changlin; Mao, Zhiguo

    2014-01-01

    We present a bioinformatics database named Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED), which contains comprehensive gene expression data sets from renal disease research. The web-based interface of RGED allows users to query the gene expression profiles in various kidney-related samples, including renal cell lines, human kidney tissues and murine model kidneys. Researchers can explore certain gene profiles, the relationships between genes of interests and identify biomarkers or even drug targets in kidney diseases. The aim of this work is to provide a user-friendly utility for the renal disease research community to query expression profiles of genes of their own interest without the requirement of advanced computational skills. Availability and implementation: Website is implemented in PHP, R, MySQL and Nginx and freely available from http://rged.wall-eva.net. Database URL: http://rged.wall-eva.net PMID:25252782

  13. Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED): a relational database of gene expression profiles in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingzhou; Yang, Bo; Chen, Xujiao; Xu, Jing; Mei, Changlin; Mao, Zhiguo

    2014-01-01

    We present a bioinformatics database named Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED), which contains comprehensive gene expression data sets from renal disease research. The web-based interface of RGED allows users to query the gene expression profiles in various kidney-related samples, including renal cell lines, human kidney tissues and murine model kidneys. Researchers can explore certain gene profiles, the relationships between genes of interests and identify biomarkers or even drug targets in kidney diseases. The aim of this work is to provide a user-friendly utility for the renal disease research community to query expression profiles of genes of their own interest without the requirement of advanced computational skills. Website is implemented in PHP, R, MySQL and Nginx and freely available from http://rged.wall-eva.net. http://rged.wall-eva.net. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. [Radiation biology of structurally different Drosophila genes. Report 2. The vestigial gene: molecular characteristics of chromosome mutations].

    PubMed

    Afanas'eva, K P; Aleksandrova, M V; Aleksandrov, I D; Korablinova, S V

    2012-01-01

    The results of the PCR-assay of mutation lesions at each of 16 fragments overlapping the entire vestigial (vg) gene of Drosophila melanogaster in 52 gamma-ray-, neutron- and neutron + gamma-ray-induced vg mutants having the inversion or translocation breakpoint within the vg microregion are presented. 4 from 52 mutants studied were found to have large deletions of about 200 kb covering the entire vg gene and adjacent to sca and l(2)C gene-markers as well. 23 mutants from 48 (47.9%) were found to have a wild-type gene structure showing that the exchange breakpoints are located outside of the vg gene. 25 others display the intragenic lesions of different complexity detected by PCR as the absence of(i) either one fragment or (ii) two or more (6-7) adjacent fragments and (iii) simultaneously several (i) or (i) and (ii) types separated by normal gene regions. It is important that 6 from 25 mutants have the breakpoint inside the vg gene and display the (i) or (ii) type of lesions at the gene regions containing the putative break whereas 5 others from 25 with the above lesions have the exchange breakpoint outside the vg gene. Therefore, the breakpoints underlying either inversions or translocations induced by low- and high-LET radiation are likely to be located within and outside the gene under study. Thereby, the formation of exchanges is accompanied by DNA deletions of various sizes at the exchange breakpoints. The molecular model of formation of such exchange-deletion rearrangements is elaborated and presented. Also, conception of the predominately clustered action of both low- and high-LET radiation on the germ cell genome is suggested as the summing-up of the presented results. The ability of ionizing radiation to induce the clusters of genetic alterations in the form of hidden DNA damages as well as gene/chromosome mutations is determined by the track structure and hierarchical organization of the genome. To detect the quality and frequency patterns of all

  15. The Gene Set Builder: collation, curation, and distribution of sets of genes

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, Dimas; Lim, Jonathan S; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2005-01-01

    Background In bioinformatics and genomics, there are many applications designed to investigate the common properties for a set of genes. Often, these multi-gene analysis tools attempt to reveal sequential, functional, and expressional ties. However, while tremendous effort has been invested in developing tools that can analyze a set of genes, minimal effort has been invested in developing tools that can help researchers compile, store, and annotate gene sets in the first place. As a result, the process of making or accessing a set often involves tedious and time consuming steps such as finding identifiers for each individual gene. These steps are often repeated extensively to shift from one identifier type to another; or to recreate a published set. In this paper, we present a simple online tool which – with the help of the gene catalogs Ensembl and GeneLynx – can help researchers build and annotate sets of genes quickly and easily. Description The Gene Set Builder is a database-driven, web-based tool designed to help researchers compile, store, export, and share sets of genes. This application supports the 17 eukaryotic genomes found in version 32 of the Ensembl database, which includes species from yeast to human. User-created information such as sets and customized annotations are stored to facilitate easy access. Gene sets stored in the system can be "exported" in a variety of output formats – as lists of identifiers, in tables, or as sequences. In addition, gene sets can be "shared" with specific users to facilitate collaborations or fully released to provide access to published results. The application also features a Perl API (Application Programming Interface) for direct connectivity to custom analysis tools. A downloadable Quick Reference guide and an online tutorial are available to help new users learn its functionalities. Conclusion The Gene Set Builder is an Ensembl-facilitated online tool designed to help researchers compile and manage sets of

  16. Comparative genome analysis of PHB gene family reveals deep evolutionary origins and diverse gene function.

    PubMed

    Di, Chao; Xu, Wenying; Su, Zhen; Yuan, Joshua S

    2010-10-07

    PHB (Prohibitin) gene family is involved in a variety of functions important for different biological processes. PHB genes are ubiquitously present in divergent species from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Human PHB genes have been found to be associated with various diseases. Recent studies by our group and others have shown diverse function of PHB genes in plants for development, senescence, defence, and others. Despite the importance of the PHB gene family, no comprehensive gene family analysis has been carried to evaluate the relatedness of PHB genes across different species. In order to better guide the gene function analysis and understand the evolution of the PHB gene family, we therefore carried out the comparative genome analysis of the PHB genes across different kingdoms. The relatedness, motif distribution, and intron/exon distribution all indicated that PHB genes is a relatively conserved gene family. The PHB genes can be classified into 5 classes and each class have a very deep evolutionary origin. The PHB genes within the class maintained the same motif patterns during the evolution. With Arabidopsis as the model species, we found that PHB gene intron/exon structure and domains are also conserved during the evolution. Despite being a conserved gene family, various gene duplication events led to the expansion of the PHB genes. Both segmental and tandem gene duplication were involved in Arabidopsis PHB gene family expansion. However, segmental duplication is predominant in Arabidopsis. Moreover, most of the duplicated genes experienced neofunctionalization. The results highlighted that PHB genes might be involved in important functions so that the duplicated genes are under the evolutionary pressure to derive new function. PHB gene family is a conserved gene family and accounts for diverse but important biological functions based on the similar molecular mechanisms. The highly diverse biological function indicated that more research needs to be carried out

  17. The Dopamine D2 Receptor Gene, Perceived Parental Support, and Adolescent Loneliness: Longitudinal Evidence for Gene-Environment Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Roekel, Eeske; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Verhagen, Maaike

    2011-01-01

    Background: Loneliness is a common problem in adolescence. Earlier research focused on genes within the serotonin and oxytocin systems, but no studies have examined the role of dopamine-related genes in loneliness. In the present study, we focused on the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2). Methods: Associations among the DRD2, sex, parental support,…

  18. Cancer, Warts, or Asymptomatic Infections: Clinical Presentation Matches Codon Usage Preferences in Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Félez-Sánchez, Marta; Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Bedhomme, Stéphanie; González-Bravo, Maria Isabel; Kamp, Christel; Bravo, Ignacio G.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses rely completely on the hosts’ machinery for translation of viral transcripts. However, for most viruses infecting humans, codon usage preferences (CUPrefs) do not match those of the host. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a showcase to tackle this paradox: they present a large genotypic diversity and a broad range of phenotypic presentations, from asymptomatic infections to productive lesions and cancer. By applying phylogenetic inference and dimensionality reduction methods, we demonstrate first that genes in HPVs are poorly adapted to the average human CUPrefs, the only exception being capsid genes in viruses causing productive lesions. Phylogenetic relationships between HPVs explained only a small proportion of CUPrefs variation. Instead, the most important explanatory factor for viral CUPrefs was infection phenotype, as orthologous genes in viruses with similar clinical presentation displayed similar CUPrefs. Moreover, viral genes with similar spatiotemporal expression patterns also showed similar CUPrefs. Our results suggest that CUPrefs in HPVs reflect either variations in the mutation bias or differential selection pressures depending on the clinical presentation and expression timing. We propose that poor viral CUPrefs may be central to a trade-off between strong viral gene expression and the potential for eliciting protective immune response. PMID:26139833

  19. Mollusk genes encoding lysine tRNA (UUU) contain introns.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, M; Abe, Y; Saruta, Y; Okada, N

    1995-11-20

    New intron-containing genes encoding tRNAs were discovered when genomic DNA isolated from various animal species was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers based on sequences of rabbit tRNA(Lys). From sequencing analysis of the products of PCR, we found that introns are present in several genes encoding tRNA(Lys) in mollusks, such as Loligo bleekeri (squid) and Octopus vulgaris (octopus). These introns were specific to genes encoding tRNA(Lys)(CUU) and were not present in genes encoding tRNA(Lys)(CUU). In addition, the sequences of the introns were different from one another. To confirm the results of our initial experiments, we isolated and sequenced genes encoding tRNA(Lys)(CUU) and tRNA(Lys)(UUU). The gene for tRNA(Lys)(UUU) from squid contained an intron, whose sequence was the same as that identified by PCR, and the gene formed a cluster with a corresponding pseudogene. Several DNA regions of 2.1 kb containing this cluster appeared to be tandemly arrayed in the squid genome. By contrast, the gene encoding tRNA(Lys)(CUU) did not contain an intron, as shown also by PCR. The tRNA(Lys)(UUU) that corresponded to the analyzed gene was isolated and characterized. The present study provides the first example of an intron-containing gene encoding a tRNA in mollusks and suggests the universality of introns in such genes in higher eukaryotes.

  20. P and M gene junction is the optimal insertion site in Newcastle disease virus vaccine vector for foreign gene expression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has been developed as a vector for vaccine and gene therapy purposes. However, the optimal insertion site for foreign gene expression remained to be determined. In the present study, we inserted the green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene into five different intergenic ...

  1. Gene doping: of mice and men.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E; Mansour, Mai M H; Christenson, Robert H

    2009-04-01

    Gene doping is the newest threat to the spirit of fair play in sports. Its concept stemmed out from legitimate gene therapy trials, but anti-doping authorities fear that they now may be facing a form of doping that is virtually undetectable and extremely appealing to athletes. This paper presents studies that generated mouse models with outstanding physical performance, by manipulating genes such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), which are likely to be targeted for gene doping. The potential transition from super mice to super athletes will also be discussed, in addition to possible strategies for detection of gene doping.

  2. Behavioral science and the study of gene-nutrition and gene-physical activity interactions in obesity research.

    PubMed

    Faith, Myles S

    2008-12-01

    This report summarizes emerging opportunities for behavioral science to help advance the field of gene-environment and gene-behavior interactions, based on presentations at The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Workshop, "Gene-Nutrition and Gene-Physical Activity Interactions in the Etiology of Obesity." Three opportunities are highlighted: (i) designing potent behavioral "challenges" in experiments, (ii) determining viable behavioral phenotypes for genetics studies, and (iii) identifying specific measures of the environment or environmental exposures. Additional points are underscored, including the need to incorporate novel findings from neuroimaging studies regarding motivation and drive for eating and physical activity. Advances in behavioral science theory and methods can play an important role in advancing understanding of gene-brain-behavior relationships in obesity onset.

  3. PiiL: visualization of DNA methylation and gene expression data in gene pathways.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Behrooz Torabi; Zamani, Neda; Komorowski, Jan; Grabherr, Manfred

    2017-08-02

    DNA methylation is a major mechanism involved in the epigenetic state of a cell. It has been observed that the methylation status of certain CpG sites close to or within a gene can directly affect its expression, either by silencing or, in some cases, up-regulating transcription. However, a vertebrate genome contains millions of CpG sites, all of which are potential targets for methylation, and the specific effects of most sites have not been characterized to date. To study the complex interplay between methylation status, cellular programs, and the resulting phenotypes, we present PiiL, an interactive gene expression pathway browser, facilitating analyses through an integrated view of methylation and expression on multiple levels. PiiL allows for specific hypothesis testing by quickly assessing pathways or gene networks, where the data is projected onto pathways that can be downloaded directly from the online KEGG database. PiiL provides a comprehensive set of analysis features that allow for quick and specific pattern searches. Individual CpG sites and their impact on host gene expression, as well as the impact on other genes present in the regulatory network, can be examined. To exemplify the power of this approach, we analyzed two types of brain tumors, Glioblastoma multiform and lower grade gliomas. At a glance, we could confirm earlier findings that the predominant methylation and expression patterns separate perfectly by mutations in the IDH genes, rather than by histology. We could also infer the IDH mutation status for samples for which the genotype was not known. By applying different filtering methods, we show that a subset of CpG sites exhibits consistent methylation patterns, and that the status of sites affect the expression of key regulator genes, as well as other genes located downstream in the same pathways. PiiL is implemented in Java with focus on a user-friendly graphical interface. The source code is available under the GPL license from https://github.com/behroozt/PiiL.git .

  4. Gene-Diet Interactions in Childhood Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Garver, William S

    2011-01-01

    Childhood overweight and obesity have reached epidemic proportions worldwide, and the increase in weight-associated co-morbidities including premature type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease will soon become major healthcare and economic problems. A number of studies now indicate that the childhood obesity epidemic which has emerged during the past 30 years is a complex multi-factorial disease resulting from interaction of susceptibility genes with an obesogenic environment. This review will focus on gene-diet interactions suspected of having a prominent role in promoting childhood obesity. In particular, the specific genes that will be presented (FTO, MC4R, and NPC1) have recently been associated with childhood obesity through a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and were shown to interact with nutritional components to increase weight gain. Although a fourth gene (APOA2) has not yet been associated with childhood obesity, this review will also present information on what now represents the best characterized gene-diet interaction in promoting weight gain. PMID:22043166

  5. Diametrical clustering for identifying anti-correlated gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Inderjit S; Marcotte, Edward M; Roshan, Usman

    2003-09-01

    Clustering genes based upon their expression patterns allows us to predict gene function. Most existing clustering algorithms cluster genes together when their expression patterns show high positive correlation. However, it has been observed that genes whose expression patterns are strongly anti-correlated can also be functionally similar. Biologically, this is not unintuitive-genes responding to the same stimuli, regardless of the nature of the response, are more likely to operate in the same pathways. We present a new diametrical clustering algorithm that explicitly identifies anti-correlated clusters of genes. Our algorithm proceeds by iteratively (i). re-partitioning the genes and (ii). computing the dominant singular vector of each gene cluster; each singular vector serving as the prototype of a 'diametric' cluster. We empirically show the effectiveness of the algorithm in identifying diametrical or anti-correlated clusters. Testing the algorithm on yeast cell cycle data, fibroblast gene expression data, and DNA microarray data from yeast mutants reveals that opposed cellular pathways can be discovered with this method. We present systems whose mRNA expression patterns, and likely their functions, oppose the yeast ribosome and proteosome, along with evidence for the inverse transcriptional regulation of a number of cellular systems.

  6. Calcisponges have a ParaHox gene and dynamic expression of dispersed NK homeobox genes.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Sofia A V; Adamski, Marcin; Ramos, Olivia Mendivil; Leininger, Sven; Liu, Jing; Ferrier, David E K; Adamska, Maja

    2014-10-30

    Sponges are simple animals with few cell types, but their genomes paradoxically contain a wide variety of developmental transcription factors, including homeobox genes belonging to the Antennapedia (ANTP) class, which in bilaterians encompass Hox, ParaHox and NK genes. In the genome of the demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica, no Hox or ParaHox genes are present, but NK genes are linked in a tight cluster similar to the NK clusters of bilaterians. It has been proposed that Hox and ParaHox genes originated from NK cluster genes after divergence of sponges from the lineage leading to cnidarians and bilaterians. On the other hand, synteny analysis lends support to the notion that the absence of Hox and ParaHox genes in Amphimedon is a result of secondary loss (the ghost locus hypothesis). Here we analysed complete suites of ANTP-class homeoboxes in two calcareous sponges, Sycon ciliatum and Leucosolenia complicata. Our phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that these calcisponges possess orthologues of bilaterian NK genes (Hex, Hmx and Msx), a varying number of additional NK genes and one ParaHox gene, Cdx. Despite the generation of scaffolds spanning multiple genes, we find no evidence of clustering of Sycon NK genes. All Sycon ANTP-class genes are developmentally expressed, with patterns suggesting their involvement in cell type specification in embryos and adults, metamorphosis and body plan patterning. These results demonstrate that ParaHox genes predate the origin of sponges, thus confirming the ghost locus hypothesis, and highlight the need to analyse the genomes of multiple sponge lineages to obtain a complete picture of the ancestral composition of the first animal genome.

  7. Ensemble gene function prediction database reveals genes important for complex I formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Bjoern Oest; Meyer, Etienne H; Ferrari, Camilla; Vaid, Neha; Movahedi, Sara; Vandepoele, Klaas; Nikoloski, Zoran; Mutwil, Marek

    2018-03-01

    Recent advances in gene function prediction rely on ensemble approaches that integrate results from multiple inference methods to produce superior predictions. Yet, these developments remain largely unexplored in plants. We have explored and compared two methods to integrate 10 gene co-function networks for Arabidopsis thaliana and demonstrate how the integration of these networks produces more accurate gene function predictions for a larger fraction of genes with unknown function. These predictions were used to identify genes involved in mitochondrial complex I formation, and for five of them, we confirmed the predictions experimentally. The ensemble predictions are provided as a user-friendly online database, EnsembleNet. The methods presented here demonstrate that ensemble gene function prediction is a powerful method to boost prediction performance, whereas the EnsembleNet database provides a cutting-edge community tool to guide experimentalists. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. EcoGene 3.0

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jindan; Rudd, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    EcoGene (http://ecogene.org) is a database and website devoted to continuously improving the structural and functional annotation of Escherichia coli K-12, one of the most well understood model organisms, represented by the MG1655(Seq) genome sequence and annotations. Major improvements to EcoGene in the past decade include (i) graphic presentations of genome map features; (ii) ability to design Boolean queries and Venn diagrams from EcoArray, EcoTopics or user-provided GeneSets; (iii) the genome-wide clone and deletion primer design tool, PrimerPairs; (iv) sequence searches using a customized EcoBLAST; (v) a Cross Reference table of synonymous gene and protein identifiers; (vi) proteome-wide indexing with GO terms; (vii) EcoTools access to >2000 complete bacterial genomes in EcoGene-RefSeq; (viii) establishment of a MySql relational database; and (ix) use of web content management systems. The biomedical literature is surveyed daily to provide citation and gene function updates. As of September 2012, the review of 37 397 abstracts and articles led to creation of 98 425 PubMed-Gene links and 5415 PubMed-Topic links. Annotation updates to Genbank U00096 are transmitted from EcoGene to NCBI. Experimental verifications include confirmation of a CTG start codon, pseudogene restoration and quality assurance of the Keio strain collection. PMID:23197660

  9. EcoGene 3.0.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jindan; Rudd, Kenneth E

    2013-01-01

    EcoGene (http://ecogene.org) is a database and website devoted to continuously improving the structural and functional annotation of Escherichia coli K-12, one of the most well understood model organisms, represented by the MG1655(Seq) genome sequence and annotations. Major improvements to EcoGene in the past decade include (i) graphic presentations of genome map features; (ii) ability to design Boolean queries and Venn diagrams from EcoArray, EcoTopics or user-provided GeneSets; (iii) the genome-wide clone and deletion primer design tool, PrimerPairs; (iv) sequence searches using a customized EcoBLAST; (v) a Cross Reference table of synonymous gene and protein identifiers; (vi) proteome-wide indexing with GO terms; (vii) EcoTools access to >2000 complete bacterial genomes in EcoGene-RefSeq; (viii) establishment of a MySql relational database; and (ix) use of web content management systems. The biomedical literature is surveyed daily to provide citation and gene function updates. As of September 2012, the review of 37 397 abstracts and articles led to creation of 98 425 PubMed-Gene links and 5415 PubMed-Topic links. Annotation updates to Genbank U00096 are transmitted from EcoGene to NCBI. Experimental verifications include confirmation of a CTG start codon, pseudogene restoration and quality assurance of the Keio strain collection.

  10. An Overview of Hox Genes in Lophotrochozoa: Evolution and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Barucca, Marco; Canapa, Adriana; Biscotti, Maria Assunta

    2016-01-01

    Hox genes are regulators of animal embryonic development. Changes in the number and sequence of Hox genes as well as in their expression patterns have been related to the evolution of the body plan. Lophotrochozoa is a clade of Protostomia characterized by several phyla which show a wide morphological diversity. Despite that the works summarized in this review emphasize the fragmentary nature of the data available regarding the presence and expression of Hox genes, they also offer interesting insight into the evolution of the Hox cluster and the role played by Hox genes in several phyla. However, the number of genes involved in the cluster of the lophotrochozoan ancestor is still a question of debate. The data presented here suggest that at least nine genes were present while two other genes, Lox4 and Post-2, may either have been present in the ancestor or may have arisen as a result of duplication in the Brachiopoda-Mollusca-Annelida lineage. Spatial and temporal collinearity is a feature of Hox gene expression which was probably present in the ancestor of deuterostomes and protostomes. However, in Lophotrochozoa, it has been detected in only a few species belonging to Annelida and Mollusca. PMID:29615580

  11. No Evidence That Schizophrenia Candidate Genes Are More Associated With Schizophrenia Than Noncandidate Genes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Emma C; Border, Richard; Melroy-Greif, Whitney E; de Leeuw, Christiaan A; Ehringer, Marissa A; Keller, Matthew C

    2017-11-15

    A recent analysis of 25 historical candidate gene polymorphisms for schizophrenia in the largest genome-wide association study conducted to date suggested that these commonly studied variants were no more associated with the disorder than would be expected by chance. However, the same study identified other variants within those candidate genes that demonstrated genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia. As such, it is possible that variants within historic schizophrenia candidate genes are associated with schizophrenia at levels above those expected by chance, even if the most-studied specific polymorphisms are not. The present study used association statistics from the largest schizophrenia genome-wide association study conducted to date as input to a gene set analysis to investigate whether variants within schizophrenia candidate genes are enriched for association with schizophrenia. As a group, variants in the most-studied candidate genes were no more associated with schizophrenia than were variants in control sets of noncandidate genes. While a small subset of candidate genes did appear to be significantly associated with schizophrenia, these genes were not particularly noteworthy given the large number of more strongly associated noncandidate genes. The history of schizophrenia research should serve as a cautionary tale to candidate gene investigators examining other phenotypes: our findings indicate that the most investigated candidate gene hypotheses of schizophrenia are not well supported by genome-wide association studies, and it is likely that this will be the case for other complex traits as well. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mitochondrial genes in the colourless alga Prototheca wickerhamii resemble plant genes in their exons but fungal genes in their introns.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, G; Burger, G; Lang, B F; Kück, U

    1993-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA from the colourless alga Prototheca wickerhamii contains two mosaic genes as was revealed from complete sequencing of the circular extranuclear genome. The genes for the large subunit of the ribosomal RNA (LSUrRNA) as well as for subunit I of the cytochrome oxidase (coxI) carry two and three intronic sequences respectively. On the basis of their canonical nucleotide sequences they can be classified as group I introns. Phylogenetic comparisons of the coxI protein sequences allow us to conclude that the P.wickerhamii mtDNA is much closer related to higher plant mtDNAs than to those of the chlorophyte alga C.reinhardtii. The comparison of the intron sequences revealed several unusual features: (1) The P.wickerhamii introns are structurally related to mitochondrial introns from various ascomycetous fungi. (2) Phylogenetic analyses indicate a close relationship between fungal and algal intronic sequences. (3) The P. wickerhamii introns are located at positions within the structural genes which can be considered as preferred intron insertion sites in homologous mitochondrial genes from fungi or liverwort. In all cases, the sequences adjacent to the insertion sites are very well conserved over large evolutionary distances. Our finding of highly similar introns in fungi and algae is consistent with the idea that introns have already been present in the bacterial ancestors of present day mitochondria and evolved concomitantly with the organelles. PMID:7680126

  13. Investigating highly replicated asthma genes as candidate genes for allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Nilsson, Daniel; Halldén, Christer; Yun, Wang De; Säll, Torbjörn; Cardell, Lars Olaf; Tim, Chew Fook

    2013-05-10

    Asthma genetics has been extensively studied and many genes have been associated with the development or severity of this disease. In contrast, the genetic basis of allergic rhinitis (AR) has not been evaluated as extensively. It is well known that asthma is closely related with AR since a large proportion of individuals with asthma also present symptoms of AR, and patients with AR have a 5-6 fold increased risk of developing asthma. Thus, the relevance of asthma candidate genes as predisposing factors for AR is worth investigating. The present study was designed to investigate if SNPs in highly replicated asthma genes are associated with the occurrence of AR. A total of 192 SNPs from 21 asthma candidate genes reported to be associated with asthma in 6 or more unrelated studies were genotyped in a Swedish population with 246 AR patients and 431 controls. Genotypes for 429 SNPs from the same set of genes were also extracted from a Singapore Chinese genome-wide dataset which consisted of 456 AR cases and 486 controls. All SNPs were subsequently analyzed for association with AR and their influence on allergic sensitization to common allergens. A limited number of potential associations were observed and the overall pattern of P-values corresponds well to the expectations in the absence of an effect. However, in the tests of allele effects in the Chinese population the number of significant P-values exceeds the expectations. The strongest signals were found for SNPs in NPSR1 and CTLA4. In these genes, a total of nine SNPs showed P-values <0.001 with corresponding Q-values <0.05. In the NPSR1 gene some P-values were lower than the Bonferroni correction level. Reanalysis after elimination of all patients with asthmatic symptoms excluded asthma as a confounding factor in our results. Weaker indications were found for IL13 and GSTP1 with respect to sensitization to birch pollen in the Swedish population. Genetic variation in the majority of the highly replicated asthma

  14. Gene Electrotransfer: A Mechanistic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rosazza, Christelle; Meglic, Sasa Haberl; Zumbusch, Andreas; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2016-01-01

    Gene electrotransfer is a powerful method of DNA delivery offering several medical applications, among the most promising of which are DNA vaccination and gene therapy for cancer treatment. Electroporation entails the application of electric fields to cells which then experience a local and transient change of membrane permeability. Although gene electrotransfer has been extensively studied in in vitro and in vivo environments, the mechanisms by which DNA enters and navigates through cells are not fully understood. Here we present a comprehensive review of the body of knowledge concerning gene electrotransfer that has been accumulated over the last three decades. For that purpose, after briefly reviewing the medical applications that gene electrotransfer can provide, we outline membrane electropermeabilization, a key process for the delivery of DNA and smaller molecules. Since gene electrotransfer is a multipart process, we proceed our review in describing step by step our current understanding, with particular emphasis on DNA internalization and intracellular trafficking. Finally, we turn our attention to in vivo testing and methodology for gene electrotransfer. PMID:27029943

  15. Gene therapy for achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Michalakis, Stylianos; Schön, Christian; Becirovic, Elvir; Biel, Martin

    2017-03-01

    The present review summarizes the current status of achromatopsia (ACHM) gene therapy-related research activities and provides an outlook for their clinical application. ACHM is an inherited eye disease characterized by a congenital absence of cone photoreceptor function. As a consequence, ACHM is associated with strongly impaired daylight vision, photophobia, nystagmus and a lack of color discrimination. Currently, six genes have been linked to ACHM. Up to 80% of the patients carry mutations in the genes CNGA3 and CNGB3 encoding the two subunits of the cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channel. Various animal models of the disease have been established and their characterization has helped to increase our understanding of the pathophysiology associated with ACHM. With the advent of adeno-associated virus vectors as valuable gene delivery tools for retinal photoreceptors, a number of promising gene supplementation therapy programs have been initiated. In recent years, huge progress has been made towards bringing a curative treatment for ACHM into clinics. The first clinical trials are ongoing or will be launched soon and are expected to contribute important data on the safety and efficacy of ACHM gene supplementation therapy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. A Combinatorial Approach to Detecting Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in Family Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Guo-Bo; Yan, Lei; Ma, Jennie Z.; Mangold, Jamie E.; Zhu, Jun; Elston, Robert C.; Li, Ming D.

    2008-01-01

    Widespread multifactor interactions present a significant challenge in determining risk factors of complex diseases. Several combinatorial approaches, such as the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method, have emerged as a promising tool for better detecting gene-gene (G × G) and gene-environment (G × E) interactions. We recently developed a general combinatorial approach, namely the generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) method, which can entertain both qualitative and quantitative phenotypes and allows for both discrete and continuous covariates to detect G × G and G × E interactions in a sample of unrelated individuals. In this article, we report the development of an algorithm that can be used to study G × G and G × E interactions for family-based designs, called pedigree-based GMDR (PGMDR). Compared to the available method, our proposed method has several major improvements, including allowing for covariate adjustments and being applicable to arbitrary phenotypes, arbitrary pedigree structures, and arbitrary patterns of missing marker genotypes. Our Monte Carlo simulations provide evidence that the PGMDR method is superior in performance to identify epistatic loci compared to the MDR-pedigree disequilibrium test (PDT). Finally, we applied our proposed approach to a genetic data set on tobacco dependence and found a significant interaction between two taste receptor genes (i.e., TAS2R16 and TAS2R38) in affecting nicotine dependence. PMID:18834969

  17. Leveraging Gene-Environment Interactions and Endotypes for Asthma Gene Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Ober, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome that includes subtypes of disease with different underlying causes and disease mechanisms. Asthma is caused by a complex interaction between genes and environmental exposures; early-life exposures in particular play an important role. Asthma is also heritable, and a number of susceptibility variants have been discovered in genome-wide association studies, although the known risk alleles explain only a small proportion of the heritability. In this review, we present evidence supporting the hypothesis that focusing on more specific asthma phenotypes, such as childhood asthma with severe exacerbations, and on relevant exposures that are involved in gene-environment interactions (GEIs), such as rhinovirus infections, will improve detection of asthma genes and our understanding of the underlying mechanisms. We will discuss the challenges of considering GEIs and the advantages of studying responses to asthma-associated exposures in clinical birth cohorts, as well as in cell models of GEIs, to dissect the context-specific nature of genotypic risks, to prioritize variants in genome-wide association studies, and to identify pathways involved in pathogenesis in subgroups of patients. We propose that such approaches, in spite of their many challenges, present great opportunities for better understanding of asthma pathogenesis and heterogeneity and, ultimately, for improving prevention and treatment of disease. PMID:26947980

  18. Gene Delivery to the Airway

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Nicholas W.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes generation of and gene transfer to several commonly used airway models. Isolation and transduction of primary airway epithelial cells are first described. Next, the preparation of polarized airway epithelial monolayers is outlined. Transduction of these polarized cells is also described. Methods are presented for generation of tracheal xenografts as well as both ex vivo and in vivo gene transfer to these xenografts. Finally, a method for in vivo gene delivery to the lungs of rodents is included. Methods for evaluating transgene expression are given in the support protocols. PMID:23853081

  19. Genome-wide targeted prediction of ABA responsive genes in rice based on over-represented cis-motif in co-expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Lenka, Sangram K; Lohia, Bikash; Kumar, Abhay; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Bansal, Kailash C

    2009-02-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), the popular plant stress hormone, plays a key role in regulation of sub-set of stress responsive genes. These genes respond to ABA through specific transcription factors which bind to cis-regulatory elements present in their promoters. We discovered the ABA Responsive Element (ABRE) core (ACGT) containing CGMCACGTGB motif as over-represented motif among the promoters of ABA responsive co-expressed genes in rice. Targeted gene prediction strategy using this motif led to the identification of 402 protein coding genes potentially regulated by ABA-dependent molecular genetic network. RT-PCR analysis of arbitrarily chosen 45 genes from the predicted 402 genes confirmed 80% accuracy of our prediction. Plant Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of ABA responsive genes showed enrichment of signal transduction and stress related genes among diverse functional categories.

  20. HRGFish: A database of hypoxia responsive genes in fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Iliyas; Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao; Srivastava, Prachi; Kumar, Ravindra; Pathak, Ajey Kumar; Singh, Mahender; Kushwaha, Basdeo

    2017-02-01

    Several studies have highlighted the changes in the gene expression due to the hypoxia response in fishes, but the systematic organization of the information and the analytical platform for such genes are lacking. In the present study, an attempt was made to develop a database of hypoxia responsive genes in fishes (HRGFish), integrated with analytical tools, using LAMPP technology. Genes reported in hypoxia response for fishes were compiled through literature survey and the database presently covers 818 gene sequences and 35 gene types from 38 fishes. The upstream fragments (3,000 bp), covered in this database, enables to compute CG dinucleotides frequencies, motif finding of the hypoxia response element, identification of CpG island and mapping with the reference promoter of zebrafish. The database also includes functional annotation of genes and provides tools for analyzing sequences and designing primers for selected gene fragments. This may be the first database on the hypoxia response genes in fishes that provides a workbench to the scientific community involved in studying the evolution and ecological adaptation of the fish species in relation to hypoxia.

  1. Juvenile Leigh syndrome, optic atrophy, ataxia, dystonia, and epilepsy due to T14487C mutation in the mtDNA-ND6 gene: a mitochondrial syndrome presenting from birth to adolescence.

    PubMed

    Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Shuvalov, Ruslan; Inbar, Shani; Cohen, Sarit; Lev, Dorit; Lerman-Sagie, Tally

    2011-04-01

    An increasing number of reports describe mutations in mitochondrial DNA coding regions, especially in mitochondrial DNA- encoded nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit genes of the respiratory chain complex I, as causing early-onset Leigh syndrome. The authors report the molecular findings in a 24-year-old patient with juvenile-onset Leigh syndrome presenting with optic atrophy, ataxia dystonia, and epilepsy. A brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral basal ganglia and thalamic hypointensities, and a magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed an increased lactate peak. The authors identified a T14487C change causing M63V substitution in the mitochondrial ND6 gene. The mutation was heteroplasmic in muscle and blood samples, with different mutation loads, and was absent in the patient's mother's urine and blood samples. They suggest that the T14487C mtDNA mutation should be analyzed in Leigh syndrome, presenting with optic atrophy, ataxia, dystonia, and epilepsy, regardless of age.

  2. A mechanistic explanation of popularity: genes, rule breaking, and evocative gene-environment correlations.

    PubMed

    Burt, Alexandra

    2009-04-01

    Previous work has suggested that the serotonergic system plays a key role in "popularity" or likeability. A polymorphism within the 5HT-sub(2A) serotonin receptor gene (-G1438A) has also been associated with popularity, suggesting that genes may predispose individuals to particular social experiences. However, because genes cannot code directly for others' reactions, any legitimate association should be mediated via the individual's behavior (i.e., genes-->behaviors-->social consequences), a phenomenon referred to as an evocative gene-environment correlation (rGE). The current study aimed to identify one such mediating behavior. The author focused on rule breaking given its prior links to both the serotonergic system and to increased popularity during adolescence. Two samples of previously unacquainted late-adolescent boys completed a peer-based interaction paradigm designed to assess their popularity. Analyses revealed that rule breaking partially mediated the genetic effect on popularity, thereby furthering our understanding of the biological mechanisms that underlie popularity. Moreover, the present results represent the first meaningfully explicated evidence that genes predispose individuals not only to particular behaviors but also to the social consequences of those behaviors. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. An Intron 9 CYP19 Gene Variant (IVS9+5G>A), Present in an Aromatase-Deficient Girl, Affects Normal Splicing and Is Also Present in Normal Human Steroidogenic Tissues.

    PubMed

    Saraco, Nora; Nesi-Franca, Suzana; Sainz, Romina; Marino, Roxana; Marques-Pereira, Rosana; La Pastina, Julia; Perez Garrido, Natalia; Sandrini, Romolo; Rivarola, Marco Aurelio; de Lacerda, Luiz; Belgorosky, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Splicing CYP19 gene variants causing aromatase deficiency in 46,XX disorder of sexual development (DSD) patients have been reported in a few cases. A misbalance between normal and aberrant splicing variants was proposed to explain spontaneous pubertal breast development but an incomplete sex maturation progress. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize a novel CYP19A1 intronic homozygote mutation (IVS9+5G>A) in a 46,XX DSD girl presenting spontaneous breast development and primary amenorrhea, and to evaluate similar splicing variant expression in normal steroidogenic tissues. Genomic DNA analysis, splicing prediction programs, splicing assays, and in vitro protein expression and enzyme activity analyses were carried out. CYP19A1 mRNA expression in human steroidogenic tissues was also studied. A novel IVS9+5G>A homozygote mutation was found. In silico analysis predicts the disappearance of the splicing donor site in intron 9, confirmed by patient peripheral leukocyte cP450arom and in vitro studies. Protein analysis showed a shorter and inactive protein. The intron 9 transcript variant was also found in human steroidogenic tissues. The mutation IVS9+5G>A generates a splicing variant that includes intron 9 which is also present in normal human steroidogenic tissues, suggesting that a misbalance between normal and aberrant splicing variants might occur in target tissues, explaining the clinical phenotype in the affected patient. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Evolution of Rubisco activase gene in plants.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Ragupathi; Gill, Kulvinder S

    2018-01-01

    Rubisco activase of plants evolved in a stepwise manner without losing its function to adapt to the major evolutionary events including endosymbiosis and land colonization. Rubisco activase is an essential enzyme for photosynthesis, which removes inhibitory sugar phosphates from the active sites of Rubisco, a process necessary for Rubisco activation and carbon fixation. The gene probably evolved in cyanobacteria as different species differ for its presence. However, the gene is present in all other plant species. At least a single gene copy was maintained throughout plant evolution; but various genome and gene duplication events, which occurred during plant evolution, increased its copy number in some species. The exons and exon-intron junctions of present day higher plant's Rca, which is conserved in most species seem to have evolved in charophytes. A unique tandem duplication of Rca gene occurred in a common grass ancestor, and the two genes evolved differently for gene structure, sequence, and expression pattern. At the protein level, starting with a primitive form in cyanobacteria, RCA of chlorophytes evolved by integrating chloroplast transit peptide (cTP), and N-terminal domains to the ATPase, Rubisco recognition and C-terminal domains. The redox regulated C-terminal extension (CTE) and the associated alternate splicing mechanism, which splices the RCA-α and RCA-β isoforms were probably gained from another gene in charophytes, conserved in most species except the members of Solanaceae family.

  5. Gene Fusion Markup Language: a prototype for exchanging gene fusion data.

    PubMed

    Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Shanmugam, Achiraman; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2012-10-16

    An avalanche of next generation sequencing (NGS) studies has generated an unprecedented amount of genomic structural variation data. These studies have also identified many novel gene fusion candidates with more detailed resolution than previously achieved. However, in the excitement and necessity of publishing the observations from this recently developed cutting-edge technology, no community standardization approach has arisen to organize and represent the data with the essential attributes in an interchangeable manner. As transcriptome studies have been widely used for gene fusion discoveries, the current non-standard mode of data representation could potentially impede data accessibility, critical analyses, and further discoveries in the near future. Here we propose a prototype, Gene Fusion Markup Language (GFML) as an initiative to provide a standard format for organizing and representing the significant features of gene fusion data. GFML will offer the advantage of representing the data in a machine-readable format to enable data exchange, automated analysis interpretation, and independent verification. As this database-independent exchange initiative evolves it will further facilitate the formation of related databases, repositories, and analysis tools. The GFML prototype is made available at http://code.google.com/p/gfml-prototype/. The Gene Fusion Markup Language (GFML) presented here could facilitate the development of a standard format for organizing, integrating and representing the significant features of gene fusion data in an inter-operable and query-able fashion that will enable biologically intuitive access to gene fusion findings and expedite functional characterization. A similar model is envisaged for other NGS data analyses.

  6. Gene Fusion Markup Language: a prototype for exchanging gene fusion data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An avalanche of next generation sequencing (NGS) studies has generated an unprecedented amount of genomic structural variation data. These studies have also identified many novel gene fusion candidates with more detailed resolution than previously achieved. However, in the excitement and necessity of publishing the observations from this recently developed cutting-edge technology, no community standardization approach has arisen to organize and represent the data with the essential attributes in an interchangeable manner. As transcriptome studies have been widely used for gene fusion discoveries, the current non-standard mode of data representation could potentially impede data accessibility, critical analyses, and further discoveries in the near future. Results Here we propose a prototype, Gene Fusion Markup Language (GFML) as an initiative to provide a standard format for organizing and representing the significant features of gene fusion data. GFML will offer the advantage of representing the data in a machine-readable format to enable data exchange, automated analysis interpretation, and independent verification. As this database-independent exchange initiative evolves it will further facilitate the formation of related databases, repositories, and analysis tools. The GFML prototype is made available at http://code.google.com/p/gfml-prototype/. Conclusion The Gene Fusion Markup Language (GFML) presented here could facilitate the development of a standard format for organizing, integrating and representing the significant features of gene fusion data in an inter-operable and query-able fashion that will enable biologically intuitive access to gene fusion findings and expedite functional characterization. A similar model is envisaged for other NGS data analyses. PMID:23072312

  7. Identification of novel risk genes associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus using a genome-wide gene-based association analysis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ying-Hua; Deng, Fei-Yan; Li, Min-Jing; Lei, Shu-Feng

    2014-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a serious disorder characterized by destruction of pancreatic β-cells, culminating in absolute insulin deficiency. Genetic factors contribute to the susceptibility of type 1 diabetes mellitus. The aim of the present study was to identify more susceptibility genes of type 1 diabetes mellitus. We carried out an initial gene-based genome-wide association study in a total of 4,075 type 1 diabetes mellitus cases and 2,604 controls by using the Gene-based Association Test using Extended Simes procedure. Furthermore, we carried out replication studies, differential expression analysis and functional annotation clustering analysis to support the significance of the identified susceptibility genes. We identified 452 genes associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus, even after adapting the genome-wide threshold for significance (P < 9.05E-04). Among these genes, 171 were newly identified for type 1 diabetes mellitus, which were ignored in single-nucleotide polymorphism-based association analysis and were not previously reported. We found that 53 genes have supportive evidence from replication studies and/or differential expression studies. In particular, seven genes including four non-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes (RASIP1, STRN4, BCAR1 and MYL2) are replicated in at least one independent population and also differentially expressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells or monocytes. Furthermore, the associated genes tend to enrich in immune-related pathways or Gene Ontology project terms. The present results suggest the high power of gene-based association analysis in detecting disease-susceptibility genes. Our findings provide more insights into the genetic basis of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Annotation of gene function in citrus using gene expression information and co-expression networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    , functional enrichment analysis and gene expression information provide opportunities to infer gene function in citrus. We present a publicly accessible tool, Network Inference for Citrus Co-Expression (NICCE, http://citrus.adelaide.edu.au/nicce/home.aspx), for the gene co-expression analysis in citrus. PMID:25023870

  9. Selection of Reference Genes for Quantitative Gene Expression in Porcine Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Various Sources along with Differentiation into Multilineages

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won-Jae; Jeon, Ryoung-Hoon; Jang, Si-Jung; Park, Ji-Sung; Lee, Seung-Chan; Baregundi Subbarao, Raghavendra; Lee, Sung-Lim; Park, Bong-Wook; King, William Allan; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The identification of stable reference genes is a prerequisite for ensuring accurate validation of gene expression, yet too little is known about stable reference genes of porcine MSCs. The present study was, therefore, conducted to assess the stability of reference genes in porcine MSCs derived from bone marrow (BMSCs), adipose (AMSCs), and skin (SMSCs) with their in vitro differentiated cells into mesenchymal lineages such as adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. Twelve commonly used reference genes were investigated for their threshold cycle (Ct) values by qRT-PCR. The Ct values of candidate reference genes were analyzed by geNorm software to clarify stable expression regardless of experimental conditions. Thus, Pearson's correlation was applied to determine correlation between the three most stable reference genes (NF3) and optimal number of reference genes (NFopt). In assessment of stability of reference gene across experimental conditions by geNorm analysis, undifferentiated MSCs and each differentiated status into mesenchymal lineages showed slightly different results but similar patterns about more or less stable rankings. Furthermore, Pearson's correlation revealed high correlation (r > 0.9) between NF3 and NFopt. Overall, the present study showed that HMBS, YWHAZ, SDHA, and TBP are suitable reference genes for qRT-PCR in porcine MSCs. PMID:25972899

  10. Culturable bacteria present in the fluid of the hooded-pitcher plant Sarracenia minor based on 16S rDNA gene sequence data.

    PubMed

    Siragusa, Alex J; Swenson, Janice E; Casamatta, Dale A

    2007-08-01

    The culturable microbial community within the pitcher fluid of 93 Sarracenia minor carnivorous plants was examined over a 2-year study. Many aspects of the plant/bacterial/insect interaction within the pitcher fluid are minimally understood because the bacterial taxa present in these pitchers have not been identified. Thirteen isolates were characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing and subsequent phylogenetic analysis. The Proteobacteria were the most abundant taxa and included representatives from Serratia, Achromobacter, and Pantoea. The Actinobacteria Micrococcus was also abundant while Bacillus, Lactococcus, Chryseobacterium, and Rhodococcus were infrequently encountered. Several isolates conformed to species identifiers (>98% rDNA gene sequence similarity) including Serratia marcescens (isolates found in 27.5% of pitchers), Achromobacter xylosoxidans (37.6%), Micrococcus luteus (40.9%), Bacillus cereus (isolates found in 10.2%), Bacillus thuringiensis (5.4%), Lactococcus lactis (17.2%), and Rhodococcus equi (2.2%). Species-area curves suggest that sampling efforts were sufficient to recover a representative culturable bacterial community. The bacteria present represent a diverse community probably as a result of introduction by insect vectors, but the ecological significance remains under explored.

  11. Gene therapy oversight: lessons for nanobiotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Susan M; Gupta, Rishi; Kohlhepp, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Oversight of human gene transfer research ("gene therapy") presents an important model with potential application to oversight of nanobiology research on human participants. Gene therapy oversight adds centralized federal review at the National Institutes of Health's Office of Biotechnology Activities and its Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee to standard oversight of human subjects research at the researcher's institution (by the Institutional Review Board and, for some research, the Institutional Biosafety Committee) and at the federal level by the Office for Human Research Protections. The Food and Drug Administration's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research oversees human gene transfer research in parallel, including approval of protocols and regulation of products. This article traces the evolution of this dual oversight system; describes how the system is already addressing nanobiotechnology in gene transfer: evaluates gene therapy oversight based on public opinion, the literature, and preliminary expert elicitation; and offers lessons of the gene therapy oversight experience for oversight of nanobiotechnology.

  12. Genes@Work: an efficient algorithm for pattern discovery and multivariate feature selection in gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Lepre, Jorge; Rice, J Jeremy; Tu, Yuhai; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2004-05-01

    Despite the growing literature devoted to finding differentially expressed genes in assays probing different tissues types, little attention has been paid to the combinatorial nature of feature selection inherent to large, high-dimensional gene expression datasets. New flexible data analysis approaches capable of searching relevant subgroups of genes and experiments are needed to understand multivariate associations of gene expression patterns with observed phenotypes. We present in detail a deterministic algorithm to discover patterns of multivariate gene associations in gene expression data. The patterns discovered are differential with respect to a control dataset. The algorithm is exhaustive and efficient, reporting all existent patterns that fit a given input parameter set while avoiding enumeration of the entire pattern space. The value of the pattern discovery approach is demonstrated by finding a set of genes that differentiate between two types of lymphoma. Moreover, these genes are found to behave consistently in an independent dataset produced in a different laboratory using different arrays, thus validating the genes selected using our algorithm. We show that the genes deemed significant in terms of their multivariate statistics will be missed using other methods. Our set of pattern discovery algorithms including a user interface is distributed as a package called Genes@Work. This package is freely available to non-commercial users and can be downloaded from our website (http://www.research.ibm.com/FunGen).

  13. Methylation of miRNA genes and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Loginov, V I; Rykov, S V; Fridman, M V; Braga, E A

    2015-02-01

    Interaction between microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA of target genes at the posttranscriptional level provides fine-tuned dynamic regulation of cell signaling pathways. Each miRNA can be involved in regulating hundreds of protein-coding genes, and, conversely, a number of different miRNAs usually target a structural gene. Epigenetic gene inactivation associated with methylation of promoter CpG-islands is common to both protein-coding genes and miRNA genes. Here, data on functions of miRNAs in development of tumor-cell phenotype are reviewed. Genomic organization of promoter CpG-islands of the miRNA genes located in inter- and intragenic areas is discussed. The literature and our own results on frequency of CpG-island methylation in miRNA genes from tumors are summarized, and data regarding a link between such modification and changed activity of miRNA genes and, consequently, protein-coding target genes are presented. Moreover, the impact of miRNA gene methylation on key oncogenetic processes as well as affected signaling pathways is discussed.

  14. Probabilistic representation of gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Mao, Linyong; Resat, Haluk

    2004-09-22

    Recent experiments have established unambiguously that biological systems can have significant cell-to-cell variations in gene expression levels even in isogenic populations. Computational approaches to studying gene expression in cellular systems should capture such biological variations for a more realistic representation. In this paper, we present a new fully probabilistic approach to the modeling of gene regulatory networks that allows for fluctuations in the gene expression levels. The new algorithm uses a very simple representation for the genes, and accounts for the repression or induction of the genes and for the biological variations among isogenic populations simultaneously. Because of its simplicity, introduced algorithm is a very promising approach to model large-scale gene regulatory networks. We have tested the new algorithm on the synthetic gene network library bioengineered recently. The good agreement between the computed and the experimental results for this library of networks, and additional tests, demonstrate that the new algorithm is robust and very successful in explaining the experimental data. The simulation software is available upon request. Supplementary material will be made available on the OUP server.

  15. Genes essential for phototrophic growth by a purple alphaproteobacterium: Genes for phototrophic growth

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jianming; Yin, Liang; Lessner, Faith H.

    Anoxygenic purple phototrophic bacteria have served as important models for studies of photophosphorylation. The pigment-protein complexes responsible for converting light energy to ATP are relatively simple and these bacteria can grow heterotrophically under aerobic conditions, thus allowing for the study of mutants defective in photophosphorylation. In the past, genes responsible for anoxygenic phototrophic growth have been identified in a number of different bacterial species. Here we systematically studied the genetic basis for this metabolism by using Tn-seq to identify genes essential for the anaerobic growth of the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris on acetate in light. We identified 171 genes requiredmore » for growth in this condition, 35 of which are annotated as photosynthesis genes. Among these are a few new genes not previously shown to be essential for phototrophic growth. We verified the essentiality of many of the genes we identified by analyzing the phenotypes of mutants we generated by Tn mutagenesis that had altered pigmentation. We used directed mutagenesis to verify that the R. palustris NADH:quinone oxidoreductase complex IE is essential for phototrophic growth. As a complement to the genetic data, we carried out proteomics experiments in which we found that 429 proteins were present in significantly higher amounts in cells grown anaerobically in light compared to aerobically. Among these were proteins encoded by subset of the phototrophic growth-essential genes.« less

  16. In vitro mapping of Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Storbeck, C.J.; Sabourin, L.; Baird, S.

    1994-09-01

    The Myotonic Dystrophy Kinase (DMK) gene has been cloned and shared homology to serine/threonine protein kinases. Overexpression of this gene in stably transfected mouse myoblasts has been shown to inhibit fusion into myotubes while myoblasts stably transfected with an antisense construct show increased fusion potential. These experiments, along with data showing that the DM gene is highly expressed in muscle have highlighted the possibility of DMK being involved in myogenesis. The promoter region of the DM gene lacks a consensus TATA box and CAAT box, but harbours numerous transcription binding sites. Clones containing extended 5{prime} upstream sequences (UPS) of DMKmore » only weakly drive the reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) when transfected into C2C12 mouse myoblasts. However, four E-boxes are present in the first intron of the DM gene and transient assays show increased expression of the CAT gene when the first intron is present downstream of these 5{prime} UPS in an orientation dependent manner. Comparison between mouse and human sequence reveals that the regions in the first intron where the E-boxes are located are highly conserved. The mapping of the promoter and the importance of the first intron in the control of DMK expression will be presented.« less

  17. Genes encoding p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase (C3H) and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Chapple, Clinton C. S.; Franke, Rochus; Ruegger, Max O.

    2006-07-04

    The present invention is directed to a method for altering secondary metabolism in plants, specifically phenylpropanoid metabolism. The present invention is further directed to a mutant p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase gene, referred to herein as the ref8 gene, its protein product which can be used to prepare gene constructs and transgenic plants. The gene constructs and transgenic plants are further aspects of the present invention.

  18. Avirulence Genes in Cereal Powdery Mildews: The Gene-for-Gene Hypothesis 2.0.

    PubMed

    Bourras, Salim; McNally, Kaitlin E; Müller, Marion C; Wicker, Thomas; Keller, Beat

    2016-01-01

    The gene-for-gene hypothesis states that for each gene controlling resistance in the host, there is a corresponding, specific gene controlling avirulence in the pathogen. Allelic series of the cereal mildew resistance genes Pm3 and Mla provide an excellent system for genetic and molecular analysis of resistance specificity. Despite this opportunity for molecular research, avirulence genes in mildews remain underexplored. Earlier work in barley powdery mildew (B.g. hordei) has shown that the reaction to some Mla resistance alleles is controlled by multiple genes. Similarly, several genes are involved in the specific interaction of wheat mildew (B.g. tritici) with the Pm3 allelic series. We found that two mildew genes control avirulence on Pm3f: one gene is involved in recognition by the resistance protein as demonstrated by functional studies in wheat and the heterologous host Nicotiana benthamiana. A second gene is a suppressor, and resistance is only observed in mildew genotypes combining the inactive suppressor and the recognized Avr. We propose that such suppressor/avirulence gene combinations provide the basis of specificity in mildews. Depending on the particular gene combinations in a mildew race, different genes will be genetically identified as the "avirulence" gene. Additionally, the observation of two LINE retrotransposon-encoded avirulence genes in B.g. hordei further suggests that the control of avirulence in mildew is more complex than a canonical gene-for-gene interaction. To fully understand the mildew-cereal interactions, more knowledge on avirulence determinants is needed and we propose ways how this can be achieved based on recent advances in the field.

  19. Cystic fibrosis modifier genes.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Jane; Alton, Eric; Griesenbach, Uta

    2005-01-01

    Since the recognition that CFTR genotype was not a good predictor of pulmonary disease severity in CF, several candidate modifier genes have been identified. It is unlikely that a single modifier gene will be found, but more probable that several haplotypes in combination may contribute, which in itself presents a major methodological challenge. The aims of such studies are to increase our understanding of disease pathogenesis, to aid prognosis and ultimately to lead to the development of novel treatments. PMID:16025767

  20. Weighted gene co‑expression network analysis in identification of key genes and networks for ischemic‑reperfusion remodeling myocardium.

    PubMed

    Guo, Nan; Zhang, Nan; Yan, Liqiu; Lian, Zheng; Wang, Jiawang; Lv, Fengfeng; Wang, Yunfei; Cao, Xufen

    2018-06-14

    Acute myocardial infarction induces ventricular remodeling, which is implicated in dilated heart and heart failure. The pathogenical mechanism of myocardium remodeling remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to identify key genes and networks for myocardium remodeling following ischemia‑reperfusion (IR). First, the mRNA expression data from the National Center for Biotechnology Information database were downloaded to identify differences in mRNA expression of the IR heart at days 2 and 7. Then, weighted gene co‑expression network analysis, hierarchical clustering, protein‑protein interaction (PPI) network, Gene Ontology (GO), Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway were used to identify key genes and networks for the heart remodeling process following IR. A total of 3,321 differentially expressed genes were identified during the heart remodeling process. A total of 6 modules were identified through gene co‑expression network analysis. GO and KEGG analysis results suggested that each module represented a different biological function and was associated with different pathways. Finally, hub genes of each module were identified by PPI network construction. The present study revealed that heart remodeling following IR is a complicated process, involving extracellular matrix organization, neural development, apoptosis and energy metabolism. The dysregulated genes, including SRC proto‑oncogene, non‑receptor tyrosine kinase, discs large MAGUK scaffold protein 1, ATP citrate lyase, RAN, member RAS oncogene family, tumor protein p53, and polo like kinase 2, may be essential for heart remodeling following IR and may be used as potential targets for the inhibition of heart remodeling following acute myocardial infarction.

  1. Gene Presence-Absence Polymorphism in Castrating Anther-Smut Fungi: Recent Gene Gains and Phylogeographic Structure.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Fanny E; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C; Brandenburg, Jean-Tristan; Carpentier, Fantin; Giraud, Tatiana

    2018-04-01

    Gene presence-absence polymorphisms segregating within species are a significant source of genetic variation but have been little investigated to date in natural populations. In plant pathogens, the gain or loss of genes encoding proteins interacting directly with the host, such as secreted proteins, probably plays an important role in coevolution and local adaptation. We investigated gene presence-absence polymorphism in populations of two closely related species of castrating anther-smut fungi, Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae (MvSl) and M. silenes-dioicae (MvSd), from across Europe, on the basis of Illumina genome sequencing data and high-quality genome references. We observed presence-absence polymorphism for 186 autosomal genes (2% of all genes) in MvSl, and only 51 autosomal genes in MvSd. Distinct genes displayed presence-absence polymorphism in the two species. Genes displaying presence-absence polymorphism were frequently located in subtelomeric and centromeric regions and close to repetitive elements, and comparison with outgroups indicated that most were present in a single species, being recently acquired through duplications in multiple-gene families. Gene presence-absence polymorphism in MvSl showed a phylogeographic structure corresponding to clusters detected based on SNPs. In addition, gene absence alleles were rare within species and skewed toward low-frequency variants. These findings are consistent with a deleterious or neutral effect for most gene presence-absence polymorphism. Some of the observed gene loss and gain events may however be adaptive, as suggested by the putative functions of the corresponding encoded proteins (e.g., secreted proteins) or their localization within previously identified selective sweeps. The adaptive roles in plant and anther-smut fungi interactions of candidate genes however need to be experimentally tested in future studies.

  2. Gene Presence–Absence Polymorphism in Castrating Anther-Smut Fungi: Recent Gene Gains and Phylogeographic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C; Brandenburg, Jean-Tristan; Carpentier, Fantin; Giraud, Tatiana

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Gene presence–absence polymorphisms segregating within species are a significant source of genetic variation but have been little investigated to date in natural populations. In plant pathogens, the gain or loss of genes encoding proteins interacting directly with the host, such as secreted proteins, probably plays an important role in coevolution and local adaptation. We investigated gene presence–absence polymorphism in populations of two closely related species of castrating anther-smut fungi, Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae (MvSl) and M. silenes-dioicae (MvSd), from across Europe, on the basis of Illumina genome sequencing data and high-quality genome references. We observed presence–absence polymorphism for 186 autosomal genes (2% of all genes) in MvSl, and only 51 autosomal genes in MvSd. Distinct genes displayed presence–absence polymorphism in the two species. Genes displaying presence–absence polymorphism were frequently located in subtelomeric and centromeric regions and close to repetitive elements, and comparison with outgroups indicated that most were present in a single species, being recently acquired through duplications in multiple-gene families. Gene presence–absence polymorphism in MvSl showed a phylogeographic structure corresponding to clusters detected based on SNPs. In addition, gene absence alleles were rare within species and skewed toward low-frequency variants. These findings are consistent with a deleterious or neutral effect for most gene presence–absence polymorphism. Some of the observed gene loss and gain events may however be adaptive, as suggested by the putative functions of the corresponding encoded proteins (e.g., secreted proteins) or their localization within previously identified selective sweeps. The adaptive roles in plant and anther-smut fungi interactions of candidate genes however need to be experimentally tested in future studies. PMID:29722826

  3. Novel biallelic mutations in MSH6 and PMS2 genes: gene conversion as a likely cause of PMS2 gene inactivation.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Jessie; Leroux, Dominique; Desseigne, Françoise; Lasset, Christine; Saurin, Jean Christophe; Joly, Marie Odile; Pinson, Stéphane; Xu, Xiao Li; Montmain, Gilles; Ruano, Eric; Navarro, Claudine; Puisieux, Alain; Wang, Qing

    2007-11-01

    Since the first report by our group in 1999, more than 20 unrelated biallelic mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes (MMR) have been identified. In the present report, we describe two novel cases: one carrying compound heterozygous mutations in the MSH6 gene; and the other, compound heterozygous mutations in the PMS2 gene. Interestingly, the inactivation of one PMS2 allele was likely caused by gene conversion. Although gene conversion has been suggested to be a mutation mechanism underlying PMS2 inactivation, this is the first report of its involvement in a pathogenic mutation. The clinical features of biallelic mutation carriers were similar to other previously described patients, with the presence of café-au-lait spots (CALS), early onset of brain tumors, and colorectal neoplasia. Our data provide further evidence of the existence, although rare, of a distinct recessively inherited syndrome on the basis of MMR constitutional inactivation. The identification of this syndrome should be useful for genetic counseling, especially in families with atypical hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) associated with childhood cancers, and for the clinical surveillance of these mutation carriers. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Avirulence Genes in Cereal Powdery Mildews: The Gene-for-Gene Hypothesis 2.0

    PubMed Central

    Bourras, Salim; McNally, Kaitlin E.; Müller, Marion C.; Wicker, Thomas; Keller, Beat

    2016-01-01

    The gene-for-gene hypothesis states that for each gene controlling resistance in the host, there is a corresponding, specific gene controlling avirulence in the pathogen. Allelic series of the cereal mildew resistance genes Pm3 and Mla provide an excellent system for genetic and molecular analysis of resistance specificity. Despite this opportunity for molecular research, avirulence genes in mildews remain underexplored. Earlier work in barley powdery mildew (B.g. hordei) has shown that the reaction to some Mla resistance alleles is controlled by multiple genes. Similarly, several genes are involved in the specific interaction of wheat mildew (B.g. tritici) with the Pm3 allelic series. We found that two mildew genes control avirulence on Pm3f: one gene is involved in recognition by the resistance protein as demonstrated by functional studies in wheat and the heterologous host Nicotiana benthamiana. A second gene is a suppressor, and resistance is only observed in mildew genotypes combining the inactive suppressor and the recognized Avr. We propose that such suppressor/avirulence gene combinations provide the basis of specificity in mildews. Depending on the particular gene combinations in a mildew race, different genes will be genetically identified as the “avirulence” gene. Additionally, the observation of two LINE retrotransposon-encoded avirulence genes in B.g. hordei further suggests that the control of avirulence in mildew is more complex than a canonical gene-for-gene interaction. To fully understand the mildew–cereal interactions, more knowledge on avirulence determinants is needed and we propose ways how this can be achieved based on recent advances in the field. PMID:26973683

  5. Whole-Gene Positive Selection, Elevated Synonymous Substitution Rates, Duplication, and Indel Evolution of the Chloroplast clpP1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Erixon, Per; Oxelman, Bengt

    2008-01-01

    Background Synonymous DNA substitution rates in the plant chloroplast genome are generally relatively slow and lineage dependent. Non-synonymous rates are usually even slower due to purifying selection acting on the genes. Positive selection is expected to speed up non-synonymous substitution rates, whereas synonymous rates are expected to be unaffected. Until recently, positive selection has seldom been observed in chloroplast genes, and large-scale structural rearrangements leading to gene duplications are hitherto supposed to be rare. Methodology/Principle Findings We found high substitution rates in the exons of the plastid clpP1 gene in Oenothera (the Evening Primrose family) and three separate lineages in the tribe Sileneae (Caryophyllaceae, the Carnation family). Introns have been lost in some of the lineages, but where present, the intron sequences have substitution rates similar to those found in other introns of their genomes. The elevated substitution rates of clpP1 are associated with statistically significant whole-gene positive selection in three branches of the phylogeny. In two of the lineages we found multiple copies of the gene. Neighboring genes present in the duplicated fragments do not show signs of elevated substitution rates or positive selection. Although non-synonymous substitutions account for most of the increase in substitution rates, synonymous rates are also markedly elevated in some lineages. Whereas plant clpP1 genes experiencing negative (purifying) selection are characterized by having very conserved lengths, genes under positive selection often have large insertions of more or less repetitive amino acid sequence motifs. Conclusions/Significance We found positive selection of the clpP1 gene in various plant lineages to correlated with repeated duplication of the clpP1 gene and surrounding regions, repetitive amino acid sequences, and increase in synonymous substitution rates. The present study sheds light on the controversial issue

  6. Heterologous gene expression driven by carbonic anhydrase gene promoter in Dunaliella salina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yurong; Lu, Yumin; Wang, Tianyun; Hou, Weihong; Xue, Lexun

    2006-12-01

    Dunaliella salina, a halotolerant unicellular green alga without a rigid cell wall, can live in salinities ranging from 0.05 to 5 mol/L NaCl. These features of D. salina make it an ideal host for the production of antibodies, oral vaccine, and commercially valuable polypeptides. To produce high level of heterologous proteins from D. salina, highly efficient promoters are required to drive expression of target genes under controlled condition. In the present study, we cloned a 5' franking region of 1.4 kb from the carbonic anhydrase ( CAH) gene of D. salina by genomic walking and PCR. The fragment was ligated to the pMD18-T vector and characterized. Sequence analysis indicated that this region contained conserved motifs, including a TATA- like box and CAAT-box. Tandem (GT)n repeats that had a potential role of transcriptional control, were also found in this region. The transcription start site (TSS) of the CAH gene was determined by 5' RACE and nested PCR method. Transformation assays showed that the 1.4 kb fragment was able to drive expression of the selectable bar (bialaphos resistance) gene when the fusion was transformed into D. salina by biolistics. Northern blotting hybridizations showed that the bar transcript was most abundant in cells grown in 2 mol/L NaCl, and less abundant in 0.5 mol/L NaCl, indicating that expression of the bar gene was induced at high salinity. These results suggest the potential use of the CAH gene promoter to induce the expression of heterologous genes in D. salina under varied salt condition.

  7. Combining classifiers to predict gene function in Arabidopsis thaliana using large-scale gene expression measurements.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hui; Carson, Rachel; Provart, Nicholas J; Bonner, Anthony J

    2007-09-21

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the model species of current plant genomic research with a genome size of 125 Mb and approximately 28,000 genes. The function of half of these genes is currently unknown. The purpose of this study is to infer gene function in Arabidopsis using machine-learning algorithms applied to large-scale gene expression data sets, with the goal of identifying genes that are potentially involved in plant response to abiotic stress. Using in house and publicly available data, we assembled a large set of gene expression measurements for A. thaliana. Using those genes of known function, we first evaluated and compared the ability of basic machine-learning algorithms to predict which genes respond to stress. Predictive accuracy was measured using ROC50 and precision curves derived through cross validation. To improve accuracy, we developed a method for combining these classifiers using a weighted-voting scheme. The combined classifier was then trained on genes of known function and applied to genes of unknown function, identifying genes that potentially respond to stress. Visual evidence corroborating the predictions was obtained using electronic Northern analysis. Three of the predicted genes were chosen for biological validation. Gene knockout experiments confirmed that all three are involved in a variety of stress responses. The biological analysis of one of these genes (At1g16850) is presented here, where it is shown to be necessary for the normal response to temperature and NaCl. Supervised learning methods applied to large-scale gene expression measurements can be used to predict gene function. However, the ability of basic learning methods to predict stress response varies widely and depends heavily on how much dimensionality reduction is used. Our method of combining classifiers can improve the accuracy of such predictions - in this case, predictions of genes involved in stress response in plants - and it effectively chooses the appropriate amount

  8. QCD on the BlueGene/L Supercomputer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanot, G.; Chen, D.; Gara, A.; Sexton, J.; Vranas, P.

    2005-03-01

    In June 2004 QCD was simulated for the first time at sustained speed exceeding 1 TeraFlops in the BlueGene/L supercomputer at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Lab. The implementation and performance of QCD in the BlueGene/L is presented.

  9. Gene Polymorphism Studies in a Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Jeffry

    2009-01-01

    I present a laboratory procedure for illustrating transcription, post-transcriptional modification, gene conservation, and comparative genetics for use in undergraduate biology education. Students are individually assigned genes in a targeted biochemical pathway, for which they design and test polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. In this…

  10. A statistical method for measuring activation of gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Gustavo H; Reis, Luiz F L

    2018-06-13

    Gene expression data analysis is of great importance for modern molecular biology, given our ability to measure the expression profiles of thousands of genes and enabling studies rooted in systems biology. In this work, we propose a simple statistical model for the activation measuring of gene regulatory networks, instead of the traditional gene co-expression networks. We present the mathematical construction of a statistical procedure for testing hypothesis regarding gene regulatory network activation. The real probability distribution for the test statistic is evaluated by a permutation based study. To illustrate the functionality of the proposed methodology, we also present a simple example based on a small hypothetical network and the activation measuring of two KEGG networks, both based on gene expression data collected from gastric and esophageal samples. The two KEGG networks were also analyzed for a public database, available through NCBI-GEO, presented as Supplementary Material. This method was implemented in an R package that is available at the BioConductor project website under the name maigesPack.

  11. Genes encoding giant danio and golden shiner ependymin.

    PubMed

    Adams, D S; Kiyokawa, M; Getman, M E; Shashoua, V E

    1996-03-01

    Ependymin (EPN) is a brain glycoprotein that functions as a neurotrophic factor in optic nerve regeneration and long-term memory consolidation in goldfish. To date, true epn genes have been characterized in one order of teleost fish, Cypriniformes. In the study presented here, polymerase chain reactions were used to analyze the complete epn genes, gd (1480 bp), and sh (2071 bp), from Cypriniformes giant danio and shiner, respectively. Southern hybridizations demonstrated the existence of one copy of each gene per corresponding haploid genome. Each gene was found to contain six exons and five introns. Gene gd encodes a predicted 218-amino acid (aa) protein GD 93 percent conserved to goldfish EPN, while sh encodes a predicted 214-aa protein SH 91 percent homologous to goldfish. Evidence is presented classifying proteins previously termed "EPNs" into two major categories: true EPNs and non-EPN cerebrospinal fluid glycoproteins. Proteins GD and SH contain all the hallmark, features of true EPNs.

  12. Extensive gene content variation in the Brachypodium distachyon pan-genome correlates with population structure.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sean P; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Woods, Daniel P; Des Marais, David L; Burgess, Diane; Shu, Shengqiang; Stritt, Christoph; Roulin, Anne C; Schackwitz, Wendy; Tyler, Ludmila; Martin, Joel; Lipzen, Anna; Dochy, Niklas; Phillips, Jeremy; Barry, Kerrie; Geuten, Koen; Budak, Hikmet; Juenger, Thomas E; Amasino, Richard; Caicedo, Ana L; Goodstein, David; Davidson, Patrick; Mur, Luis A J; Figueroa, Melania; Freeling, Michael; Catalan, Pilar; Vogel, John P

    2017-12-19

    While prokaryotic pan-genomes have been shown to contain many more genes than any individual organism, the prevalence and functional significance of differentially present genes in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Whole-genome de novo assembly and annotation of 54 lines of the grass Brachypodium distachyon yield a pan-genome containing nearly twice the number of genes found in any individual genome. Genes present in all lines are enriched for essential biological functions, while genes present in only some lines are enriched for conditionally beneficial functions (e.g., defense and development), display faster evolutionary rates, lie closer to transposable elements and are less likely to be syntenic with orthologous genes in other grasses. Our data suggest that differentially present genes contribute substantially to phenotypic variation within a eukaryote species, these genes have a major influence in population genetics, and transposable elements play a key role in pan-genome evolution.

  13. Analysis of the clonal repertoire of gene-corrected cells in gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Paruzynski, Anna; Glimm, Hanno; Schmidt, Manfred; Kalle, Christof von

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy-based clinical phase I/II studies using integrating retroviral vectors could successfully treat different monogenetic inherited diseases. However, with increased efficiency of this therapy, severe side effects occurred in various gene therapy trials. In all cases, integration of the vector close to or within a proto-oncogene contributed substantially to the development of the malignancies. Thus, the in-depth analysis of integration site patterns is of high importance to uncover potential clonal outgrowth and to assess the safety of gene transfer vectors and gene therapy protocols. The standard and nonrestrictive linear amplification-mediated PCR (nrLAM-PCR) in combination with high-throughput sequencing exhibits technologies that allow to comprehensively analyze the clonal repertoire of gene-corrected cells and to assess the safety of the used vector system at an early stage on the molecular level. It enables clarifying the biological consequences of the vector system on the fate of the transduced cell. Furthermore, the downstream performance of real-time PCR allows a quantitative estimation of the clonality of individual cells and their clonal progeny. Here, we present a guideline that should allow researchers to perform comprehensive integration site analysis in preclinical and clinical studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Selfish Gene Algorithm Vs Genetic Algorithm: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariff, Norharyati Md; Khalid, Noor Elaiza Abdul; Hashim, Rathiah; Noor, Noorhayati Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Evolutionary algorithm is one of the algorithms inspired by the nature. Within little more than a decade hundreds of papers have reported successful applications of EAs. In this paper, the Selfish Gene Algorithms (SFGA), as one of the latest evolutionary algorithms (EAs) inspired from the Selfish Gene Theory which is an interpretation of Darwinian Theory ideas from the biologist Richards Dawkins on 1989. In this paper, following a brief introduction to the Selfish Gene Algorithm (SFGA), the chronology of its evolution is presented. It is the purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the concepts of Selfish Gene Algorithm (SFGA) as well as its opportunities and challenges. Accordingly, the history, step involves in the algorithm are discussed and its different applications together with an analysis of these applications are evaluated.

  15. Promoter sequence of 3-phosphoglycerate kinase gene 1 of lactic acid-producing fungus rhizopus oryzae and a method of expressing a gene of interest in fungal species

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR

    2002-10-15

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of phosphoglycerate kinase gene 1 of a lactic acid-producing filamentous fungal strain, Rhizopus oryzae. The isolated promoter can constitutively regulate gene expression under various carbohydrate conditions. In addition, the present invention also provides a design of an integration vector for the transformation of a foreign gene in Rhizopus oryzae.

  16. Promoter sequence of 3-phosphoglycerate kinase gene 2 of lactic acid-producing fungus rhizopus oryzae and a method of expressing a gene of interest in fungal species

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR

    2003-03-04

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of phosphoglycerate kinase gene 2 of a lactic acid-producing filamentous fungal strain, Rhizopus oryzae. The isolated promoter can constitutively regulate gene expression under various carbohydrate conditions. In addition, the present invention also provides a design of an integration vector for the transformation of a foreign gene in Rhizopus oryzae.

  17. Converting cancer genes into killer genes.

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, L T; Jen, J; He, T C; Chan, T A; Kinzler, K W; Vogelstein, B

    1996-01-01

    Over the past decade, it has become clear that tumorigenesis is driven by alterations in genes that control cell growth or cell death. Theoretically, the proteins encoded by these genes provide excellent targets for new therapeutic agents. Here, we describe a gene therapy approach to specifically kill tumor cells expressing such oncoproteins. In outline, the target oncoprotein binds to exogenously introduced gene products, resulting in transcriptional activation of a toxic gene. As an example, we show that this approach can be used to specifically kill cells overexpressing a mutant p53 gene in cell culture. The strategy may be generally applicable to neoplastic diseases in which the underlying patterns of genetic alterations or abnormal gene expression are known. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8633039

  18. GoGene: gene annotation in the fast lane.

    PubMed

    Plake, Conrad; Royer, Loic; Winnenburg, Rainer; Hakenberg, Jörg; Schroeder, Michael

    2009-07-01

    High-throughput screens such as microarrays and RNAi screens produce huge amounts of data. They typically result in hundreds of genes, which are often further explored and clustered via enriched GeneOntology terms. The strength of such analyses is that they build on high-quality manual annotations provided with the GeneOntology. However, the weakness is that annotations are restricted to process, function and location and that they do not cover all known genes in model organisms. GoGene addresses this weakness by complementing high-quality manual annotation with high-throughput text mining extracting co-occurrences of genes and ontology terms from literature. GoGene contains over 4,000,000 associations between genes and gene-related terms for 10 model organisms extracted from more than 18,000,000 PubMed entries. It does not cover only process, function and location of genes, but also biomedical categories such as diseases, compounds, techniques and mutations. By bringing it all together, GoGene provides the most recent and most complete facts about genes and can rank them according to novelty and importance. GoGene accepts keywords, gene lists, gene sequences and protein sequences as input and supports search for genes in PubMed, EntrezGene and via BLAST. Since all associations of genes to terms are supported by evidence in the literature, the results are transparent and can be verified by the user. GoGene is available at http://gopubmed.org/gogene.

  19. Conservation of regulatory sequences and gene expression patterns in the disintegrating Drosophila Hox gene complex

    PubMed Central

    Negre, Bárbara; Casillas, Sònia; Suzanne, Magali; Sánchez-Herrero, Ernesto; Akam, Michael; Nefedov, Michael; Barbadilla, Antonio; de Jong, Pieter; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    Homeotic (Hox) genes are usually clustered and arranged in the same order as they are expressed along the anteroposterior body axis of metazoans. The mechanistic explanation for this colinearity has been elusive, and it may well be that a single and universal cause does not exist. The Hox-gene complex (HOM-C) has been rearranged differently in several Drosophila species, producing a striking diversity of Hox gene organizations. We investigated the genomic and functional consequences of the two HOM-C splits present in Drosophila buzzatii. Firstly, we sequenced two regions of the D. buzzatii genome, one containing the genes labial and abdominal A, and another one including proboscipedia, and compared their organization with that of D. melanogaster and D. pseudoobscura in order to map precisely the two splits. Then, a plethora of conserved noncoding sequences, which are putative enhancers, were identified around the three Hox genes closer to the splits. The position and order of these enhancers are conserved, with minor exceptions, between the three Drosophila species. Finally, we analyzed the expression patterns of the same three genes in embryos and imaginal discs of four Drosophila species with different Hox-gene organizations. The results show that their expression patterns are conserved despite the HOM-C splits. We conclude that, in Drosophila, Hox-gene clustering is not an absolute requirement for proper function. Rather, the organization of Hox genes is modular, and their clustering seems the result of phylogenetic inertia more than functional necessity. PMID:15867430

  20. The Diversity Present in 5140 Human Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Luísa; Freitas, Fernando; Fernandes, Verónica; Pereira, Joana B.; Costa, Marta D.; Costa, Stephanie; Máximo, Valdemar; Macaulay, Vincent; Rocha, Ricardo; Samuels, David C.

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed the current status (as of the end of August 2008) of human mitochondrial genomes deposited in GenBank, amounting to 5140 complete or coding-region sequences, in order to present an overall picture of the diversity present in the mitochondrial DNA of the global human population. To perform this task, we developed mtDNA-GeneSyn, a computer tool that identifies and exhaustedly classifies the diversity present in large genetic data sets. The diversity observed in the 5140 human mitochondrial genomes was compared with all possible transitions and transversions from the standard human mitochondrial reference genome. This comparison showed that tRNA and rRNA secondary structures have a large effect in limiting the diversity of the human mitochondrial sequences, whereas for the protein-coding genes there is a bias toward less variation at the second codon positions. The analysis of the observed amino acid variations showed a tolerance of variations that convert between the amino acids V, I, A, M, and T. This defines a group of amino acids with similar chemical properties that can interconvert by a single transition. PMID:19426953

  1. Evolution of the F-Box Gene Family in Euarchontoglires: Gene Number Variation and Selection Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ailan; Fu, Mingchuan; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Mao, Yuanhui; Li, Xiangchen; Tao, Shiheng

    2014-01-01

    F-box proteins are substrate adaptors used by the SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein (SCF) complex, a type of E3 ubiquitin ligase complex in the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). SCF-mediated ubiquitylation regulates proteolysis of hundreds of cellular proteins involved in key signaling and disease systems. However, our knowledge of the evolution of the F-box gene family in Euarchontoglires is limited. In the present study, 559 F-box genes and nine related pseudogenes were identified in eight genomes. Lineage-specific gene gain and loss events occurred during the evolution of Euarchontoglires, resulting in varying F-box gene numbers ranging from 66 to 81 among the eight species. Both tandem duplication and retrotransposition were found to have contributed to the increase of F-box gene number, whereas mutation in the F-box domain was the main mechanism responsible for reduction in the number of F-box genes, resulting in a balance of expansion and contraction in the F-box gene family. Thus, the Euarchontoglire F-box gene family evolved under a birth-and-death model. Signatures of positive selection were detected in substrate-recognizing domains of multiple F-box proteins, and adaptive changes played a role in evolution of the Euarchontoglire F-box gene family. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) distributions were found to be highly non-random among different regions of F-box genes in 1092 human individuals, with domain regions having a significantly lower number of non-synonymous SNPs. PMID:24727786

  2. Isolation and selection of suitable reference genes for real-time PCR analyses in the skeletal muscle of the fine flounder in response to nutritional status: assessment and normalization of gene expression of growth-related genes.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo N; Safian, Diego; Valdés, Juan Antonio; Molina, Alfredo

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, different reference genes were isolated, and their stability in the skeletal muscle of fine flounder subjected to different nutritional states was assessed using geNorm and NormFinder. The combinations between 18S and ActB; Fau and 18S; and Fau and Tubb were chosen as the most stable gene combinations in feeding, long-term fasting and refeeding, and short-term refeeding conditions, respectively. In all periods, ActB was identified as the single least stable gene. Subsequently, the expression of the myosin heavy chain (MYH) and the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) was assessed. A large variation in MYH and IGF-IR expression was found depending on the reference gene that was chosen for normalizing the expression of both genes. Using the most stable reference genes, mRNA levels of MYH decreased and IGF-IR increased during fasting, with both returning to basal levels during refeeding. However, the drop in mRNA levels for IGF-IR occurred during short-term refeeding, in contrast with the observed events in the expression of MYH, which occurred during long-term refeeding. The present study highlights the vast differences incurred when using unsuitable versus suitable reference genes for normalizing gene expression, pointing out that normalization without proper validation could result in a bias of gene expression.

  3. The virulence gene cluster of Listeria monocytogenes is also present in Listeria ivanovii, an animal pathogen, and Listeria seeligeri, a nonpathogenic species.

    PubMed Central

    Gouin, E; Mengaud, J; Cossart, P

    1994-01-01

    Most known Listeria monocytogenes virulence genes cluster within a 9.6-kb chromosomal region. This region is flanked on one end by two uncharacterized open reading frames (ORF A and ORF B) and ldh, an ORF presumably encoding the L. monocytogenes lactate dehydrogenase (J.-A. Vazquez-Boland, C. Kocks, S. Dramsi, H. Ohayon, C. Geoffroy, J. Mengaud, and P. Cossart, Infect. Immun. 60:219-230, 1992). We report here that the other end is flanked by prs, and ORF homologous to phosphoribosyl PPi synthetase genes. ORF B and prs were detected in all Listeria species and thus delimit the virulence region. This virulence gene cluster was detected exclusively in hemolytic Listeria species, Listeria ivanovii, an animal pathogen, and Listeria seeligeri, a nonpathogenic species. Images PMID:8039927

  4. OCT imaging of craniofacial anatomy in xenopus embryos (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniz, Engin; Jonas, Stephan M.; Griffin, John; Hooper, Michael C.; Choma, Michael A.; Khokha, Mustafa K.

    2016-03-01

    The etiology of craniofacial defects is incompletely understood. The ability to obtain large amounts of gene sequence data from families affected by craniofacial defects is opening up new ways to understand molecular genetic etiological factors. One important link between gene sequence data and clinical relevance is biological research into candidate genes and molecular pathways. We present our recent research using OCT as a nondestructive phenotyping modality of craniofacial morphology in Xenopus embryos, an important animal model for biological research in gene and pathway discovery. We define 2D and 3D scanning protocols for a standardized approach to craniofacial imaging in Xenopus embryos. We define standard views and planar reconstructions for visualizing normal anatomy and landmarks. We compare these views and reconstructions to traditional histopathology using alcian blue staining. In addition to being 3D, nondestructive, and having much faster throughout, OCT can identify craniofacial features that are lost during traditional histopathological preparation. We also identify quantitative morphometric parameters to define normative craniofacial anatomy. We also note that craniofacial and cardiac defects are not infrequently present in the same patient (e.g velocardiofacial syndrome). Given that OCT excels at certain aspects of cardiac imaging in Xenopus embryos, our work highlights the potential of using OCT and Xenopus to study molecular genetic factors that impact both cardiac and craniofacial development.

  5. Cellulose as an extracellular matrix component present in Enterobacter sakazakii biofilms.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Maya; Stephan, Roger; Iversen, Carol; Manzardo, Giuseppe G G; Rattei, Thomas; Riedel, Kathrin; Ruepp, Andreas; Frishman, Dmitrij; Lehner, Angelika

    2008-01-01

    Cellulose was identified and characterized as an extracellular matrix component present in the biofilm of an Enterobacter sakazakii clinical isolate grown in nutrient-deficient (M9) medium. Using a bacterial artificial cloning approach in Escherichia coli and subsequent screening of transformants for fluorescence on calcofluor plates, nine genes organized in two operons were identified as putatively responsible for the biosynthesis of cellulose. In addition to the genes already described for cellulose production, two more genes were identified, putatively transcribed together with the genes from the first operon. Putative cellulose in E. sakazakii ES5 biofilm grown on glass coverslips was visualized by calcofluor staining and confocal fluorescence laser scanning microscopy. For the first time, the presence of cellulose in biofilms produced by E. sakazakii was confirmed by methylation analysis.

  6. pGenN, a gene normalization tool for plant genes and proteins in scientific literature.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ruoyao; Arighi, Cecilia N; Lee, Jung-Youn; Wu, Cathy H; Vijay-Shanker, K

    2015-01-01

    Automatically detecting gene/protein names in the literature and connecting them to databases records, also known as gene normalization, provides a means to structure the information buried in free-text literature. Gene normalization is critical for improving the coverage of annotation in the databases, and is an essential component of many text mining systems and database curation pipelines. In this manuscript, we describe a gene normalization system specifically tailored for plant species, called pGenN (pivot-based Gene Normalization). The system consists of three steps: dictionary-based gene mention detection, species assignment, and intra species normalization. We have developed new heuristics to improve each of these phases. We evaluated the performance of pGenN on an in-house expertly annotated corpus consisting of 104 plant relevant abstracts. Our system achieved an F-value of 88.9% (Precision 90.9% and Recall 87.2%) on this corpus, outperforming state-of-art systems presented in BioCreative III. We have processed over 440,000 plant-related Medline abstracts using pGenN. The gene normalization results are stored in a local database for direct query from the pGenN web interface (proteininformationresource.org/pgenn/). The annotated literature corpus is also publicly available through the PIR text mining portal (proteininformationresource.org/iprolink/).

  7. Methods of Combinatorial Optimization to Reveal Factors Affecting Gene Length

    PubMed Central

    Bolshoy, Alexander; Tatarinova, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for genome ranking according to gene lengths. The main outcomes described in this paper are the following: the formulation of the genome ranking problem, presentation of relevant approaches to solve it, and the demonstration of preliminary results from prokaryotic genomes ordering. Using a subset of prokaryotic genomes, we attempted to uncover factors affecting gene length. We have demonstrated that hyperthermophilic species have shorter genes as compared with mesophilic organisms, which probably means that environmental factors affect gene length. Moreover, these preliminary results show that environmental factors group together in ranking evolutionary distant species. PMID:23300345

  8. Three cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with prion protein gene codon180 mutation presenting with pathological laughing and crying.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasushi

    2012-08-15

    Although there are no reports of pathological laughing and crying being observed in patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), the author experienced three patients with CJD with prion protein gene codon180 mutation (V180I CJD) who showed this characteristic clinical finding. This finding was observed from the early disease stage in all 3 patients and continued for several months. Startle reaction was also remarkable in all patients, although myoclonus was generally mild. The dissociation between the startle reaction and myoclonus was suspected to be another feature of V180I CJD. The pathological laughing and crying co-occured with the startle reaction and stopped right before the onset of akinetic mutism, and the degree of both symptoms was almost parallel during this period. On the basis of MRI and autopsy findings, pathological laughing and crying was suspected of being induced by the widespread cerebral cortical involvement that is characteristic of V180I CJD. From the present observations, the author speculated that pathological laughing and crying may be a comparatively frequent observation in V180I CJD patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Down-weighting overlapping genes improves gene set analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The identification of gene sets that are significantly impacted in a given condition based on microarray data is a crucial step in current life science research. Most gene set analysis methods treat genes equally, regardless how specific they are to a given gene set. Results In this work we propose a new gene set analysis method that computes a gene set score as the mean of absolute values of weighted moderated gene t-scores. The gene weights are designed to emphasize the genes appearing in few gene sets, versus genes that appear in many gene sets. We demonstrate the usefulness of the method when analyzing gene sets that correspond to the KEGG pathways, and hence we called our method Pathway Analysis with Down-weighting of Overlapping Genes (PADOG). Unlike most gene set analysis methods which are validated through the analysis of 2-3 data sets followed by a human interpretation of the results, the validation employed here uses 24 different data sets and a completely objective assessment scheme that makes minimal assumptions and eliminates the need for possibly biased human assessments of the analysis results. Conclusions PADOG significantly improves gene set ranking and boosts sensitivity of analysis using information already available in the gene expression profiles and the collection of gene sets to be analyzed. The advantages of PADOG over other existing approaches are shown to be stable to changes in the database of gene sets to be analyzed. PADOG was implemented as an R package available at: http://bioinformaticsprb.med.wayne.edu/PADOG/or http://www.bioconductor.org. PMID:22713124

  10. The roles of gene duplication, gene conversion and positive selection in rodent Esp and Mup pheromone gene families with comparison to the Abp family.

    PubMed

    Karn, Robert C; Laukaitis, Christina M

    2012-01-01

    Three proteinaceous pheromone families, the androgen-binding proteins (ABPs), the exocrine-gland secreting peptides (ESPs) and the major urinary proteins (MUPs) are encoded by large gene families in the genomes of Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus. We studied the evolutionary histories of the Mup and Esp genes and compared them with what is known about the Abp genes. Apparently gene conversion has played little if any role in the expansion of the mouse Class A and Class B Mup genes and pseudogenes, and the rat Mups. By contrast, we found evidence of extensive gene conversion in many Esp genes although not in all of them. Our studies of selection identified at least two amino acid sites in β-sheets as having evolved under positive selection in the mouse Class A and Class B MUPs and in rat MUPs. We show that selection may have acted on the ESPs by determining K(a)/K(s) for Exon 3 sequences with and without the converted sequence segment. While it appears that purifying selection acted on the ESP signal peptides, the secreted portions of the ESPs probably have undergone much more rapid evolution. When the inner gene converted fragment sequences were removed, eleven Esp paralogs were present in two or more pairs with K(a)/K(s) >1.0 and thus we propose that positive selection is detectable by this means in at least some mouse Esp paralogs. We compare and contrast the evolutionary histories of all three mouse pheromone gene families in light of their proposed functions in mouse communication.

  11. Fast gene ontology based clustering for microarray experiments.

    PubMed

    Ovaska, Kristian; Laakso, Marko; Hautaniemi, Sampsa

    2008-11-21

    Analysis of a microarray experiment often results in a list of hundreds of disease-associated genes. In order to suggest common biological processes and functions for these genes, Gene Ontology annotations with statistical testing are widely used. However, these analyses can produce a very large number of significantly altered biological processes. Thus, it is often challenging to interpret GO results and identify novel testable biological hypotheses. We present fast software for advanced gene annotation using semantic similarity for Gene Ontology terms combined with clustering and heat map visualisation. The methodology allows rapid identification of genes sharing the same Gene Ontology cluster. Our R based semantic similarity open-source package has a speed advantage of over 2000-fold compared to existing implementations. From the resulting hierarchical clustering dendrogram genes sharing a GO term can be identified, and their differences in the gene expression patterns can be seen from the heat map. These methods facilitate advanced annotation of genes resulting from data analysis.

  12. Gene therapy clinical trials worldwide to 2017: An update.

    PubMed

    Ginn, Samantha L; Amaya, Anais K; Alexander, Ian E; Edelstein, Michael; Abedi, Mohammad R

    2018-03-25

    To date, almost 2600 gene therapy clinical trials have been completed, are ongoing or have been approved worldwide. Our database brings together global information on gene therapy clinical activity from trial databases, official agency sources, published literature, conference presentations and posters kindly provided to us by individual investigators or trial sponsors. This review presents our analysis of clinical trials that, to the best of our knowledge, have been or are being performed worldwide. As of our November 2017 update, we have entries on 2597 trials undertaken in 38 countries. We have analysed the geographical distribution of trials, the disease indications (or other reasons) for trials, the proportions to which different vector types are used, and the genes that have been transferred. Details of the analyses presented, and our searchable database are available via The Journal of Gene Medicine Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website at: http://www.wiley.co.uk/genmed/clinical. We also provide an overview of the progress being made in gene therapy clinical trials around the world, and discuss key trends since the previous review, namely the use of chimeric antigen receptor T cells for the treatment of cancer and advancements in genome editing technologies, which have the potential to transform the field moving forward. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The landscape of Neandertal ancestry in present-day humans

    PubMed Central

    Sankararaman, Sriram; Mallick, Swapan; Dannemann, Michael; Prüfer, Kay; Kelso, Janet; Pääbo, Svante; Patterson, Nick; Reich, David

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of Neandertal genomes have revealed that Neandertals have contributed genetic variants to modern humans1–2. The antiquity of Neandertal gene flow into modern humans means that regions that derive from Neandertals in any one human today are usually less than a hundred kilobases in size. However, Neandertal haplotypes are also distinctive enough that several studies have been able to detect Neandertal ancestry at specific loci1,3–8. Here, we have systematically inferred Neandertal haplotypes in the genomes of 1,004 present-day humans12. Regions that harbor a high frequency of Neandertal alleles in modern humans are enriched for genes affecting keratin filaments suggesting that Neandertal alleles may have helped modern humans adapt to non-African environments. Neandertal alleles also continue to shape human biology, as we identify multiple Neandertal-derived alleles that confer risk for disease. We also identify regions of millions of base pairs that are nearly devoid of Neandertal ancestry and enriched in genes, implying selection to remove genetic material derived from Neandertals. Neandertal ancestry is significantly reduced in genes specifically expressed in testis, and there is an approximately 5-fold reduction of Neandertal ancestry on chromosome X, which is known to harbor a disproportionate fraction of male hybrid sterility genes20–22. These results suggest that part of the reduction in Neandertal ancestry near genes is due to Neandertal alleles that reduced fertility in males when moved to a modern human genetic background. PMID:24476815

  14. Extensive gene content variation in the Brachypodium distachyon pan-genome correlates with population structure

    DOE PAGES

    Gordon, Sean P.; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Woods, Daniel P.; ...

    2017-12-19

    While prokaryotic pan-genomes have been shown to contain many more genes than any individual organism, the prevalence and functional significance of differentially present genes in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Whole-genome de novo assembly and annotation of 54 lines of the grass Brachypodium distachyon yield a pan-genome containing nearly twice the number of genes found in any individual genome. Genes present in all lines are enriched for essential biological functions, while genes present in only some lines are enriched for conditionally beneficial functions (e.g., defense and development), display faster evolutionary rates, lie closer to transposable elements and are less likely tomore » be syntenic with orthologous genes in other grasses. Our data suggest that differentially present genes contribute substantially to phenotypic variation within a eukaryote species, these genes have a major influence in population genetics, and transposable elements play a key role in pan-genome evolution.« less

  15. Extensive gene content variation in the Brachypodium distachyon pan-genome correlates with population structure

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Sean P.; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Woods, Daniel P.

    While prokaryotic pan-genomes have been shown to contain many more genes than any individual organism, the prevalence and functional significance of differentially present genes in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Whole-genome de novo assembly and annotation of 54 lines of the grass Brachypodium distachyon yield a pan-genome containing nearly twice the number of genes found in any individual genome. Genes present in all lines are enriched for essential biological functions, while genes present in only some lines are enriched for conditionally beneficial functions (e.g., defense and development), display faster evolutionary rates, lie closer to transposable elements and are less likely tomore » be syntenic with orthologous genes in other grasses. Our data suggest that differentially present genes contribute substantially to phenotypic variation within a eukaryote species, these genes have a major influence in population genetics, and transposable elements play a key role in pan-genome evolution.« less

  16. Amoebozoa Possess Lineage-Specific Globin Gene Repertoires Gained by Individual Horizontal Gene Transfers

    PubMed Central

    Dröge, Jasmin; Buczek, Dorota; Suzuki, Yutaka; Makałowski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    The Amoebozoa represent a clade of unicellular amoeboid organisms that display a wide variety of lifestyles, including free-living and parasitic species. For example, the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum has the ability to aggregate into a multicellular fruiting body upon starvation, while the pathogenic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica is a parasite of humans. Globins are small heme proteins that are present in almost all extant organisms. Although several genomes of amoebozoan species have been sequenced, little is known about the phyletic distribution of globin genes within this phylum. Only two flavohemoglobins (FHbs) of D. discoideum have been reported and characterized previously while the genomes of Entamoeba species are apparently devoid of globin genes. We investigated eleven amoebozoan species for the presence of globin genes by genomic and phylogenetic in silico analyses. Additional FHb genes were identified in the genomes of four social amoebas and the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum. Moreover, a single-domain globin (SDFgb) of Hartmannella vermiformis, as well as two truncated hemoglobins (trHbs) of Acanthamoeba castellanii were identified. Phylogenetic evidence suggests that these globin genes were independently acquired via horizontal gene transfer from some ancestral bacteria. Furthermore, the phylogenetic tree of amoebozoan FHbs indicates that they do not share a common ancestry and that a transfer of FHbs from bacteria to amoeba occurred multiple times. PMID:25013378

  17. Combining Shigella Tn-seq data with gold-standard E. coli gene deletion data suggests rare transitions between essential and non-essential gene functionality.

    PubMed

    Freed, Nikki E; Bumann, Dirk; Silander, Olin K

    2016-09-06

    Gene essentiality - whether or not a gene is necessary for cell growth - is a fundamental component of gene function. It is not well established how quickly gene essentiality can change, as few studies have compared empirical measures of essentiality between closely related organisms. Here we present the results of a Tn-seq experiment designed to detect essential protein coding genes in the bacterial pathogen Shigella flexneri 2a 2457T on a genome-wide scale. Superficial analysis of this data suggested that 481 protein-coding genes in this Shigella strain are critical for robust cellular growth on rich media. Comparison of this set of genes with a gold-standard data set of essential genes in the closely related Escherichia coli K12 BW25113 revealed that an excessive number of genes appeared essential in Shigella but non-essential in E. coli. Importantly, and in converse to this comparison, we found no genes that were essential in E. coli and non-essential in Shigella, implying that many genes were artefactually inferred as essential in Shigella. Controlling for such artefacts resulted in a much smaller set of discrepant genes. Among these, we identified three sets of functionally related genes, two of which have previously been implicated as critical for Shigella growth, but which are dispensable for E. coli growth. The data presented here highlight the small number of protein coding genes for which we have strong evidence that their essentiality status differs between the closely related bacterial taxa E. coli and Shigella. A set of genes involved in acetate utilization provides a canonical example. These results leave open the possibility of developing strain-specific antibiotic treatments targeting such differentially essential genes, but suggest that such opportunities may be rare in closely related bacteria.

  18. Validation of reference genes for RT-qPCR studies of gene expression in banana fruit under different experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zhong, Hai-ying; Kuang, Jian-fei; Li, Jian-guo; Lu, Wang-jin; Chen, Jian-ye

    2011-08-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) is a sensitive technique for quantifying gene expression, but its success depends on the stability of the reference gene(s) used for data normalization. Only a few studies on validation of reference genes have been conducted in fruit trees and none in banana yet. In the present work, 20 candidate reference genes were selected, and their expression stability in 144 banana samples were evaluated and analyzed using two algorithms, geNorm and NormFinder. The samples consisted of eight sample sets collected under different experimental conditions, including various tissues, developmental stages, postharvest ripening, stresses (chilling, high temperature, and pathogen), and hormone treatments. Our results showed that different suitable reference gene(s) or combination of reference genes for normalization should be selected depending on the experimental conditions. The RPS2 and UBQ2 genes were validated as the most suitable reference genes across all tested samples. More importantly, our data further showed that the widely used reference genes, ACT and GAPDH, were not the most suitable reference genes in many banana sample sets. In addition, the expression of MaEBF1, a gene of interest that plays an important role in regulating fruit ripening, under different experimental conditions was used to further confirm the validated reference genes. Taken together, our results provide guidelines for reference gene(s) selection under different experimental conditions and a foundation for more accurate and widespread use of RT-qPCR in banana.

  19. Selection of Reliable Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies on Rhododendron molle G. Don.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zheng; Sun, Xiaobo; Liu, Xiaoqing; Li, Chang; He, Lisi; Chen, Shangping; Su, Jiale

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) approach has become a widely used method to analyze expression patterns of target genes. The selection of an optimal reference gene is a prerequisite for the accurate normalization of gene expression in qRT-PCR. The present study constitutes the first systematic evaluation of potential reference genes in Rhododendron molle G. Don. Eleven candidate reference genes in different tissues and flowers at different developmental stages of R. molle were assessed using the following three software packages: GeNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper. The results showed that EF1- α (elongation factor 1-alpha), 18S (18s ribosomal RNA), and RPL3 (ribosomal protein L3) were the most stable reference genes in developing rhododendron flowers and, thus, in all of the tested samples, while tublin ( TUB ) was the least stable. ACT5 (actin), RPL3 , 18S , and EF1- α were found to be the top four choices for different tissues, whereas TUB was not found to favor qRT-PCR normalization in these tissues. Three stable reference genes are recommended for the normalization of qRT-PCR data in R. molle . Furthermore, the expression profiles of RmPSY (phytoene synthase) and RmPDS (phytoene dehydrogenase) were assessed using EF1- α, 18S , ACT5 , RPL3 , and their combination as internals. Similar trends were found, but these trends varied when the least stable reference gene TUB was used. The results further prove that it is necessary to validate the stability of reference genes prior to their use for normalization under different experimental conditions. This study provides useful information for reliable qRT-PCR data normalization in gene studies of R. molle .

  20. The gsdf gene locus harbors evolutionary conserved and clustered genes preferentially expressed in fish previtellogenic oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Aude; Le Gac, Florence; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques

    2011-02-01

    The gonadal soma-derived factor (GSDF) belongs to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily and is conserved in teleostean fish species. Gsdf is specifically expressed in the gonads, and gene expression is restricted to the granulosa and Sertoli cells in trout and medaka. The gsdf gene expression is correlated to early testis differentiation in medaka and was shown to stimulate primordial germ cell and spermatogonia proliferation in trout. In the present study, we show that the gsdf gene localizes to a syntenic chromosomal fragment conserved among vertebrates although no gsdf-related gene is detected on the corresponding genomic region in tetrapods. We demonstrate using quantitative RT-PCR that most of the genes localized in the synteny are specifically expressed in medaka gonads. Gsdf is the only gene of the synteny with a much higher expression in the testis compared to the ovary. In contrast, gene expression pattern analysis of the gsdf surrounding genes (nup54, aff1, klhl8, sdad1, and ptpn13) indicates that these genes are preferentially expressed in the female gonads. The tissue distribution of these genes is highly similar in medaka and zebrafish, two teleostean species that have diverged more than 110 million years ago. The cellular localization of these genes was determined in medaka gonads using the whole-mount in situ hybridization technique. We confirm that gsdf gene expression is restricted to Sertoli and granulosa cells in contact with the premeiotic and meiotic cells. The nup54 gene is expressed in spermatocytes and previtellogenic oocytes. Transcripts corresponding to the ovary-specific genes (aff1, klhl8, and sdad1) are detected only in previtellogenic oocytes. No expression was detected in the gonocytes in 10 dpf embryos. In conclusion, we show that the gsdf gene localizes to a syntenic chromosomal fragment harboring evolutionary conserved genes in vertebrates. These genes are preferentially expressed in previtelloogenic oocytes, and thus, they

  1. Summing up the noise in gene networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsson, Johan

    2004-01-01

    Random fluctuations in genetic networks are inevitable as chemical reactions are probabilistic and many genes, RNAs and proteins are present in low numbers per cell. Such `noise' affects all life processes and has recently been measured using green fluorescent protein (GFP). Two studies show that negative feedback suppresses noise, and three others identify the sources of noise in gene expression. Here I critically analyse these studies and present a simple equation that unifies and extends both the mathematical and biological perspectives.

  2. Gene-gene interactions and gene polymorphisms of VEGFA and EG-VEGF gene systems in recurrent pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Su, Mei-Tsz; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Chi; Kuo, Pao-Lin

    2014-06-01

    Both vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and endocrine gland-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (EG-VEGF) systems play major roles in angiogenesis. A body of evidence suggests VEGFs regulate critical processes during pregnancy and have been associated with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). However, little information is available regarding the interaction of these two major major angiogenesis-related systems in early human pregnancy. This study was conducted to investigate the association of gene polymorphisms and gene-gene interaction among genes in VEGFA and EG-VEGF systems and idiopathic RPL. A total of 98 women with history of idiopathic RPL and 142 controls were included, and 5 functional SNPs selected from VEGFA, KDR, EG-VEGF (PROK1), PROKR1 and PROKR2 were genotyped. We used multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) analysis to choose a best model and evaluate gene-gene interactions. Ingenuity pathways analysis (IPA) was introduced to explore possible complex interactions. Two receptor gene polymorphisms [KDR (Q472H) and PROKR2 (V331M)] were significantly associated with idiopathic RPL (P<0.01). The MDR test revealed that the KDR (Q472H) polymorphism was the best loci to be associated with RPL (P=0.02). IPA revealed EG-VEGF and VEGFA systems shared several canonical signaling pathways that may contribute to gene-gene interactions, including the Akt, IL-8, EGFR, MAPK, SRC, VHL, HIF-1A and STAT3 signaling pathways. Two receptor gene polymorphisms [KDR (Q472H) and PROKR2 (V331M)] were significantly associated with idiopathic RPL. EG-VEGF and VEGFA systems shared several canonical signaling pathways that may contribute to gene-gene interactions, including the Akt, IL-8, EGFR, MAPK, SRC, VHL, HIF-1A and STAT3.

  3. [Lactose intolerance: past and present. Part 1].

    PubMed

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-09-20

    Lactose intolerance is the most prevalent intestinal malabsorption disorder. After presentation of its history, the author describes the emergence of lactose intolerance during the evolution of species, and the biochemistry of lactose as well as features of human and bacterial lactase enzymes are then described. The unequal distribution of lactose intolerance in different continents and population is discussed, followed by presentation of past and present prevalence data in Hungary. Adult-type hypolactasia is caused by a polymorphism of the MCM6 gene located upstream from the lactase gene on the long arm of the chromosome 2. It can be determined with the polymerase chain reaction. The intestinal symptoms of lactose intolerance are well known, but its extra-intestinal manifestations are less recognised. Invasive diagnostic methods (determination of lactase activity from small intestinal biopsies, lactose tolerance test), are accurate, but have been replaced by the non-invasive methods; their gold standard is the H2 breath test. Genetic testing is being used more and more frequently in Hungary too, and, presumably, the methane breath test will be also available in the near future. Lactose intolerance can be accompanied by inflammatory bowel diseases, coeliac disease and irritable bowel syndrome; it could be established whether this association is causal or not in order to start a correct diet and therapy.

  4. Gene doping: a review of performance-enhancing genetics.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Gary R; Parisotto, Robin

    2007-08-01

    Unethical athletes and their mentors have long arrogated scientific and medical advances to enhance athletic performance, thus gaining a dishonest competitive advantage. Building on advances in genetics, a new threat arises from athletes using gene therapy techniques in the same manner that some abused performance-enhancing drugs were used. Gene doping, as this is known, may produce spectacular physiologic alterations to dramatically enhance athletic abilities or physical appearance. Furthermore, gene doping may present pernicious problems for the regulatory agencies and investigatory laboratories that are entrusted to keep sporting events fair and ethical. Performance-enhanced genetics will likewise present unique challenges to physicians in many spheres of their practice.

  5. Fine mapping and identification of a candidate gene for the barley Un8 true loose smut resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Zang, Wen; Eckstein, Peter E; Colin, Mark; Voth, Doug; Himmelbach, Axel; Beier, Sebastian; Stein, Nils; Scoles, Graham J; Beattie, Aaron D

    2015-07-01

    The candidate gene for the barley Un8 true loose smut resistance gene encodes a deduced protein containing two tandem protein kinase domains. In North America, durable resistance against all known isolates of barley true loose smut, caused by the basidiomycete pathogen Ustilago nuda (Jens.) Rostr. (U. nuda), is under the control of the Un8 resistance gene. Previous genetic studies mapped Un8 to the long arm of chromosome 5 (1HL). Here, a population of 4625 lines segregating for Un8 was used to delimit the Un8 gene to a 0.108 cM interval on chromosome arm 1HL, and assign it to fingerprinted contig 546 of the barley physical map. The minimal tilling path was identified for the Un8 locus using two flanking markers and consisted of two overlapping bacterial artificial chromosomes. One gene located close to a marker co-segregating with Un8 showed high sequence identity to a disease resistance gene containing two kinase domains. Sequence of the candidate gene from the parents of the segregating population, and in an additional 19 barley lines representing a broader spectrum of diversity, showed there was no intron in alleles present in either resistant or susceptible lines, and fifteen amino acid variations unique to the deduced protein sequence in resistant lines differentiated it from the deduced protein sequences in susceptible lines. Some of these variations were present within putative functional domains which may cause a loss of function in the deduced protein sequences within susceptible lines.

  6. The gene space in wheat: the complete γ-gliadin gene family from the wheat cultivar Chinese Spring.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Olin D; Huo, Naxin; Gu, Yong Q

    2013-06-01

    The complete set of unique γ-gliadin genes is described for the wheat cultivar Chinese Spring using a combination of expressed sequence tag (EST) and Roche 454 DNA sequences. Assemblies of Chinese Spring ESTs yielded 11 different γ-gliadin gene sequences. Two of the sequences encode identical polypeptides and are assumed to be the result of a recent gene duplication. One gene has a 3' coding mutation that changes the reading frame in the final eight codons. A second assembly of Chinese Spring γ-gliadin sequences was generated using Roche 454 total genomic DNA sequences. The 454 assembly confirmed the same 11 active genes as the EST assembly plus two pseudogenes not represented by ESTs. These 13 γ-gliadin sequences represent the complete unique set of γ-gliadin genes for cv Chinese Spring, although not ruled out are additional genes that are exact duplications of these 13 genes. A comparison with the ESTs of two other hexaploid cultivars (Butte 86 and Recital) finds that the most active genes are present in all three cultivars, with exceptions likely due to too few ESTs for detection in Butte 86 and Recital. A comparison of the numbers of ESTs per gene indicates differential levels of expression within the γ-gliadin gene family. Genome assignments were made for 6 of the 13 Chinese Spring γ-gliadin genes, i.e., one assignment from a match to two γ-gliadin genes found within a tetraploid wheat A genome BAC and four genes that match four distinct γ-gliadin sequences assembled from Roche 454 sequences from Aegilops tauschii, the hexaploid wheat D-genome ancestor.

  7. Evolution and Expression Patterns of CYC/TB1 Genes in Anacyclus: Phylogenetic Insights for Floral Symmetry Genes in Asteraceae

    PubMed Central

    Bello, María A.; Cubas, Pilar; Álvarez, Inés; Sanjuanbenito, Guillermo; Fuertes-Aguilar, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Homologs of the CYC/TB1 gene family have been independently recruited many times across the eudicots to control aspects of floral symmetry The family Asteraceae exhibits the largest known diversification in this gene paralog family accompanied by a parallel morphological floral richness in its specialized head-like inflorescence. In Asteraceae, whether or not CYC/TB1 gene floral symmetry function is preserved along organismic and gene lineages is unknown. In this study, we used phylogenetic, structural and expression analyses focused on the highly derived genus Anacyclus (tribe Anthemidae) to address this question. Phylogenetic reconstruction recovered eight main gene lineages present in Asteraceae: two from CYC1, four from CYC2 and two from CYC3-like genes. The species phylogeny was recovered in most of the gene lineages, allowing the delimitation of orthologous sets of CYC/TB1 genes in Asteraceae. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that in Anacyclus three of the four isolated CYC2 genes are more highly expressed in ray flowers. The expression of the four AcCYC2 genes overlaps in several organs including the ligule of ray flowers, as well as in anthers and ovules throughout development. PMID:28487706

  8. Mining disease genes using integrated protein-protein interaction and gene-gene co-regulation information.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Wang, Limei; Guo, Maozu; Zhang, Ruijie; Dai, Qiguo; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Teng, Zhixia; Xuan, Ping; Zhang, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    In humans, despite the rapid increase in disease-associated gene discovery, a large proportion of disease-associated genes are still unknown. Many network-based approaches have been used to prioritize disease genes. Many networks, such as the protein-protein interaction (PPI), KEGG, and gene co-expression networks, have been used. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) have been successfully applied for the determination of genes associated with several diseases. In this study, we constructed an eQTL-based gene-gene co-regulation network (GGCRN) and used it to mine for disease genes. We adopted the random walk with restart (RWR) algorithm to mine for genes associated with Alzheimer disease. Compared to the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) PPI network alone, the integrated HPRD PPI and GGCRN networks provided faster convergence and revealed new disease-related genes. Therefore, using the RWR algorithm for integrated PPI and GGCRN is an effective method for disease-associated gene mining.

  9. HOXB homeobox gene expression in cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    López, R; Garrido, E; Piña, P; Hidalgo, A; Lazos, M; Ochoa, R; Salcedo, M

    2006-01-01

    The homeobox (HOX) genes are a family of transcription factors that bind to specific DNA sequences in target genes regulating gene expression. Thirty-nine HOX genes have been mapped in four conserved clusters: A, B, C, and D; they act as master genes regulating the identity of body segments along the anteroposterior axis of the embryo. The role played by HOX genes in adult cell differentiation is unclear to date, but growing evidence suggests that they may play an important role in the development of cancer. To study the role played by HOX genes in cervical cancer, in the present work, we analyzed the expression of HOXB genes and the localization of their transcripts in human cervical tissues. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis and nonradioactive RNA in situ hybridization were used to detect HOXB expression in 11 normal cervical tissues and 17 cervical carcinomas. It was determined that HOXB1, B3, B5, B6, B7, B8, and B9 genes are expressed in normal adult cervical epithelium and squamous cervical carcinomas. Interestingly, HOXB2, HOXB4, and HOXB13 gene expression was found only in tumor tissues. Our findings suggest that the new expression of HOXB2, HOXB4, and B13 genes is involved in cervical cancer.

  10. Screening for genes and subnetworks associated with pancreatic cancer based on the gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Long, Jin; Liu, Zhe; Wu, Xingda; Xu, Yuanhong; Ge, Chunlin

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to screen for potential genes and subnetworks associated with pancreatic cancer (PC) using the gene expression profile. The expression profile GSE 16515 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, which included 36 PC tissue samples and 16 normal samples. Limma package in R language was used to screen differentially expressed genes (DEGs), which were grouped as up‑ and downregulated genes. Then, PFSNet was applied to perform subnetwork analysis for all the DEGs. Moreover, Gene Ontology (GO) and REACTOME pathway enrichment analysis of up‑ and downregulated genes was performed, followed by protein‑protein interaction (PPI) network construction using Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes. In total, 1,989 DEGs including 1,461 up‑ and 528 downregulated genes were screened out. Subnetworks including pancreatic cancer in PC tissue samples and intercellular adhesion in normal samples were identified, respectively. A total of 8 significant REACTOME pathways for upregulated DEGs, such as hemostasis and cell cycle, mitotic were identified. Moreover, 4 significant REACTOME pathways for downregulated DEGs, including regulation of β‑cell development and transmembrane transport of small molecules were screened out. Additionally, DEGs with high connectivity degrees, such as CCNA2 (cyclin A2) and PBK (PDZ binding kinase), of the module in the protein‑protein interaction network were mainly enriched with cell‑division cycle. CCNA2 and PBK of the module and their relative pathway cell‑division cycle, and two subnetworks (pancreatic cancer and intercellular adhesion subnetworks) may be pivotal for further understanding of the molecular mechanism of PC.

  11. Selection of reference genes for gene expression studies related to intramuscular fat deposition in Capra hircus skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wuzheng; Lin, Yaqiu; Liao, Honghai; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The identification of suitable reference genes is critical for obtaining reliable results from gene expression studies using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) because the expression of reference genes may vary considerably under different experimental conditions. In most cases, however, commonly used reference genes are employed in data normalization without proper validation, which may lead to incorrect data interpretation. Here, we aim to select a set of optimal reference genes for the accurate normalization of gene expression associated with intramuscular fat (IMF) deposition during development. In the present study, eight reference genes (PPIB, HMBS, RPLP0, B2M, YWHAZ, 18S, GAPDH and ACTB) were evaluated by three different algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper) in two types of muscle tissues (longissimus dorsi muscle and biceps femoris muscle) across different developmental stages. All three algorithms gave similar results. PPIB and HMBS were identified as the most stable reference genes, while the commonly used reference genes 18S and GAPDH were the most variably expressed, with expression varying dramatically across different developmental stages. Furthermore, to reveal the crucial role of appropriate reference genes in obtaining a reliable result, analysis of PPARG expression was performed by normalization to the most and the least stable reference genes. The relative expression levels of PPARG normalized to the most stable reference genes greatly differed from those normalized to the least stable one. Therefore, evaluation of reference genes must be performed for a given experimental condition before the reference genes are used. PPIB and HMBS are the optimal reference genes for analysis of gene expression associated with IMF deposition in skeletal muscle during development.

  12. Orthopoxvirus Genome Evolution: The Role of Gene Loss

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Robert Curtis; Wang, Chunlin; Hatcher, Eneida L.; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.

    2010-01-01

    Poxviruses are highly successful pathogens, known to infect a variety of hosts. The family Poxviridae includes Variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, which has been eradicated as a public health threat but could potentially reemerge as a bioterrorist threat. The risk scenario includes other animal poxviruses and genetically engineered manipulations of poxviruses. Studies of orthologous gene sets have established the evolutionary relationships of members within the Poxviridae family. It is not clear, however, how variations between family members arose in the past, an important issue in understanding how these viruses may vary and possibly produce future threats. Using a newly developed poxvirus-specific tool, we predicted accurate gene sets for viruses with completely sequenced genomes in the genus Orthopoxvirus. Employing sensitive sequence comparison techniques together with comparison of syntenic gene maps, we established the relationships between all viral gene sets. These techniques allowed us to unambiguously identify the gene loss/gain events that have occurred over the course of orthopoxvirus evolution. It is clear that for all existing Orthopoxvirus species, no individual species has acquired protein-coding genes unique to that species. All existing species contain genes that are all present in members of the species Cowpox virus and that cowpox virus strains contain every gene present in any other orthopoxvirus strain. These results support a theory of reductive evolution in which the reduction in size of the core gene set of a putative ancestral virus played a critical role in speciation and confining any newly emerging virus species to a particular environmental (host or tissue) niche. PMID:21994715

  13. Rational confederation of genes and diseases: NGS interpretation via GeneCards, MalaCards and VarElect.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Noa; Fishilevich, Simon; Nudel, Ron; Twik, Michal; Belinky, Frida; Plaschkes, Inbar; Stein, Tsippi Iny; Cohen, Dana; Oz-Levi, Danit; Safran, Marilyn; Lancet, Doron

    2017-08-18

    A key challenge in the realm of human disease research is next generation sequencing (NGS) interpretation, whereby identified filtered variant-harboring genes are associated with a patient's disease phenotypes. This necessitates bioinformatics tools linked to comprehensive knowledgebases. The GeneCards suite databases, which include GeneCards (human genes), MalaCards (human diseases) and PathCards (human pathways) together with additional tools, are presented with the focus on MalaCards utility for NGS interpretation as well as for large scale bioinformatic analyses. VarElect, our NGS interpretation tool, leverages the broad information in the GeneCards suite databases. MalaCards algorithms unify disease-related terms and annotations from 69 sources. Further, MalaCards defines hierarchical relatedness-aliases, disease families, a related diseases network, categories and ontological classifications. GeneCards and MalaCards delineate and share a multi-tiered, scored gene-disease network, with stringency levels, including the definition of elite status-high quality gene-disease pairs, coming from manually curated trustworthy sources, that includes 4500 genes for 8000 diseases. This unique resource is key to NGS interpretation by VarElect. VarElect, a comprehensive search tool that helps infer both direct and indirect links between genes and user-supplied disease/phenotype terms, is robustly strengthened by the information found in MalaCards. The indirect mode benefits from GeneCards' diverse gene-to-gene relationships, including SuperPaths-integrated biological pathways from 12 information sources. We are currently adding an important information layer in the form of "disease SuperPaths", generated from the gene-disease matrix by an algorithm similar to that previously employed for biological pathway unification. This allows the discovery of novel gene-disease and disease-disease relationships. The advent of whole genome sequencing necessitates capacities to go beyond

  14. Modeling gene regulatory network motifs using statecharts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene regulatory networks are widely used by biologists to describe the interactions among genes, proteins and other components at the intra-cellular level. Recently, a great effort has been devoted to give gene regulatory networks a formal semantics based on existing computational frameworks. For this purpose, we consider Statecharts, which are a modular, hierarchical and executable formal model widely used to represent software systems. We use Statecharts for modeling small and recurring patterns of interactions in gene regulatory networks, called motifs. Results We present an improved method for modeling gene regulatory network motifs using Statecharts and we describe the successful modeling of several motifs, including those which could not be modeled or whose models could not be distinguished using the method of a previous proposal. We model motifs in an easy and intuitive way by taking advantage of the visual features of Statecharts. Our modeling approach is able to simulate some interesting temporal properties of gene regulatory network motifs: the delay in the activation and the deactivation of the "output" gene in the coherent type-1 feedforward loop, the pulse in the incoherent type-1 feedforward loop, the bistability nature of double positive and double negative feedback loops, the oscillatory behavior of the negative feedback loop, and the "lock-in" effect of positive autoregulation. Conclusions We present a Statecharts-based approach for the modeling of gene regulatory network motifs in biological systems. The basic motifs used to build more complex networks (that is, simple regulation, reciprocal regulation, feedback loop, feedforward loop, and autoregulation) can be faithfully described and their temporal dynamics can be analyzed. PMID:22536967

  15. Candidate Luminal B Breast Cancer Genes Identified by Genome, Gene Expression and DNA Methylation Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Addou-Klouche, Lynda; Finetti, Pascal; Saade, Marie-Rose; Manai, Marwa; Carbuccia, Nadine; Bekhouche, Ismahane; Letessier, Anne; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Spicuglia, Salvatore; de The, Hugues; Viens, Patrice; Bertucci, François; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancers (BCs) of the luminal B subtype are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), highly proliferative, resistant to standard therapies and have a poor prognosis. To better understand this subtype we compared DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs), DNA promoter methylation, gene expression profiles, and somatic mutations in nine selected genes, in 32 luminal B tumors with those observed in 156 BCs of the other molecular subtypes. Frequent CNAs included 8p11-p12 and 11q13.1-q13.2 amplifications, 7q11.22-q34, 8q21.12-q24.23, 12p12.3-p13.1, 12q13.11-q24.11, 14q21.1-q23.1, 17q11.1-q25.1, 20q11.23-q13.33 gains and 6q14.1-q24.2, 9p21.3-p24,3, 9q21.2, 18p11.31-p11.32 losses. A total of 237 and 101 luminal B-specific candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) presented a deregulated expression in relation with their CNAs, including 11 genes previously reported associated with endocrine resistance. Interestingly, 88% of the potential TSGs are located within chromosome arm 6q, and seven candidate oncogenes are potential therapeutic targets. A total of 100 candidate oncogenes were validated in a public series of 5,765 BCs and the overexpression of 67 of these was associated with poor survival in luminal tumors. Twenty-four genes presented a deregulated expression in relation with a high DNA methylation level. FOXO3, PIK3CA and TP53 were the most frequent mutated genes among the nine tested. In a meta-analysis of next-generation sequencing data in 875 BCs, KCNB2 mutations were associated with luminal B cases while candidate TSGs MDN1 (6q15) and UTRN (6q24), were mutated in this subtype. In conclusion, we have reported luminal B candidate genes that may play a role in the development and/or hormone resistance of this aggressive subtype. PMID:24416132

  16. Gene-gene, gene-environment, gene-nutrient interactions and single nucleotide polymorphisms of inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Amina; Mumtaz, Sadaf; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Aslam, Muhammad; Siddiqui, Arif; Lodhi, Ghulam Mustafa; Ahmad, Tausif

    2015-05-15

    Inflammation plays a significant role in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The rise in the pro-inflammatory cytokines is the essential step in glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity induced mitochondrial injury, oxidative stress and beta cell apoptosis in T2DM. Among the recognized markers are interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1, IL-10, IL-18, tissue necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), C-reactive protein, resistin, adiponectin, tissue plasminogen activator, fibrinogen and heptoglobins. Diabetes mellitus has firm genetic and very strong environmental influence; exhibiting a polygenic mode of inheritance. Many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in various genes including those of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been reported as a risk for T2DM. Not all the SNPs have been confirmed by unifying results in different studies and wide variations have been reported in various ethnic groups. The inter-ethnic variations can be explained by the fact that gene expression may be regulated by gene-gene, gene-environment and gene-nutrient interactions. This review highlights the impact of these interactions on determining the role of single nucleotide polymorphism of IL-6, TNF-α, resistin and adiponectin in pathogenesis of T2DM.

  17. Enhanced B Cell Alloantigen Presentation and Its Epigenetic Dysregulation in Liver Transplant Rejection.

    PubMed

    Ningappa, M; Ashokkumar, C; Higgs, B W; Sun, Q; Jaffe, R; Mazariegos, G; Li, D; Weeks, D E; Subramaniam, S; Ferrell, R; Hakonarson, H; Sindhi, R

    2016-02-01

    T cell suppression prevents acute cellular rejection but causes life-threatening infections and malignancies. Previously, liver transplant (LTx) rejection in children was associated with the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs9296068 upstream of the HLA-DOA gene. HLA-DOA inhibits B cell presentation of antigen, a potentially novel antirejection drug target. Using archived samples from 122 white pediatric LTx patients (including 77 described previously), we confirmed the association between rs9296068 and LTx rejection (p = 0.001, odds ratio [OR] 2.55). Next-generation sequencing revealed that the putative transcription factor (CCCTC binding factor [CTCF]) binding SNP locus rs2395304, in linkage disequilibrium with rs9296068 (D' 0.578, r(2) = 0.4), is also associated with LTx rejection (p = 0.008, OR 2.34). Furthermore, LTx rejection is associated with enhanced B cell presentation of donor antigen relative to HLA-nonidentical antigen in a novel cell-based assay and with a downregulated HLA-DOA gene in a subset of these children. In lymphoblastoid B (Raji) cells, rs2395304 coimmunoprecipitates with CTCF, and CTCF knockdown with morpholino antisense oligonucleotides enhances alloantigen presentation and downregulates the HLA-DOA gene, reproducing observations made with HLA-DOA knockdown and clinical rejection. Alloantigen presentation is suppressed by inhibitors of methylation and histone deacetylation, reproducing observations made during resolution of rejection. Enhanced donor antigen presentation by B cells and its epigenetic dysregulation via the HLA-DOA gene represent novel opportunities for surveillance and treatment of transplant rejection. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  18. Characterization of the interferon genes in homozygous rainbow trout reveals two novel genes, alternate splicing and differential regulation of duplicated genes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, M.K.; Laing, K.J.; Woodson, J.C.; Thorgaard, G.H.; Hansen, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    The genes encoding the type I and type II interferons (IFNs) have previously been identified in rainbow trout and their proteins partially characterized. These previous studies reported a single type II IFN (rtIFN-??) and three rainbow trout type I IFN genes that are classified into either group I (rtIFN1, rtIFN2) or group II (rtIFN3). In this present study, we report the identification of a novel IFN-?? gene (rtIFN-??2) and a novel type I group II IFN (rtIFN4) in homozygous rainbow trout and predict that additional IFN genes or pseudogenes exist in the rainbow trout genome. Additionally, we provide evidence that short and long forms of rtIFN1 are actively and differentially transcribed in homozygous trout, and likely arose due to alternate splicing of the first exon. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) assays were developed to systematically profile all of the rainbow trout IFN transcripts, with high specificity at an individual gene level, in na??ve fish and after stimulation with virus or viral-related molecules. Cloned PCR products were used to ensure the specificity of the qRT-PCR assays and as absolute standards to assess transcript abundance of each gene. All IFN genes were modulated in response to Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a DNA vaccine based on the IHNV glycoprotein, and poly I:C. The most inducible of the type I IFN genes, by all stimuli tested, were rtIFN3 and the short transcript form of rtIFN1. Gene expression of rtIFN-??1 and rtIFN-??2 was highly up-regulated by IHNV infection and DNA vaccination but rtIFN-??2 was induced to a greater magnitude. The specificity of the qRT-PCR assays reported here will be useful for future studies aimed at identifying which cells produce IFNs at early time points after infection. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. JGI Plant Genomics Gene Annotation Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Shengqiang; Rokhsar, Dan; Goodstein, David

    2014-07-14

    Plant genomes vary in size and are highly complex with a high amount of repeats, genome duplication and tandem duplication. Gene encodes a wealth of information useful in studying organism and it is critical to have high quality and stable gene annotation. Thanks to advancement of sequencing technology, many plant species genomes have been sequenced and transcriptomes are also sequenced. To use these vastly large amounts of sequence data to make gene annotation or re-annotation in a timely fashion, an automatic pipeline is needed. JGI plant genomics gene annotation pipeline, called integrated gene call (IGC), is our effort toward thismore » aim with aid of a RNA-seq transcriptome assembly pipeline. It utilizes several gene predictors based on homolog peptides and transcript ORFs. See Methods for detail. Here we present genome annotation of JGI flagship green plants produced by this pipeline plus Arabidopsis and rice except for chlamy which is done by a third party. The genome annotations of these species and others are used in our gene family build pipeline and accessible via JGI Phytozome portal whose URL and front page snapshot are shown below.« less

  20. Portuguese Familial Hypercholesterolemia Study: presentation of the study and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Bourbon, Mafalda; Rato, Quitéria

    2006-11-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused, in the majority of cases, by a partial or total lack of functional low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR). Mutations in the LDLR gene lead to increased plasma cholesterol levels, resulting in cholesterol deposition in the arteries, thereby increasing the risk of premature coronary heart disease. The homozygous form of FH is rare but heterozygous FH is common, although underdiagnosed in many populations, including the Portuguese. In 1999 the Portuguese Familial Hypercholesterolemia Study was begun at the National Institute of Health. The aim of the Portuguese Familial H ypercholesterolemia Study is to perform an epidemiological study to determine the prevalence and distribution of FH in Portugal and to better understand the pathophysiology of coronary heart disease in these patients. The aim of the present work is to present the study's criteria and organization as well as its preliminary results. The study population consists of individuals of both sexes and all ages with a clinical diagnosis of FH, with biochemical and molecular characterization being performed. The clinical criteria used for the diagnosis of FH were adapted from those of the Simon Broome Heart Research Trust. The study is organized in five stages: 1. selection of individuals with a clinical diagnosis of FH; 2. completion of a clinical questionnaire and declaration of informed consent; 3. collection of blood samples; 4. biochemical characterization; 5. molecular study of three genes associated with the FH phenotype: LDLR, apolipoprotein B (APOB) and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). Between 1999 and June 2006 the LDLR gene and the APOB gene of 141 index cases (38 children and 103 adults) were studied. In 78 of these index cases (76 heterozygotes and two homozygotes) 50 different mutations in the LDLR gene were identified, and two unrelated individuals were found to have the ApoB3500 mutation

  1. A chain reaction approach to modelling gene pathways.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gary C; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Chen, James J; Soong, Seng-Jaw; Lamartiniere, Coral; Barnes, Stephen

    2012-08-01

    BACKGROUND: Of great interest in cancer prevention is how nutrient components affect gene pathways associated with the physiological events of puberty. Nutrient-gene interactions may cause changes in breast or prostate cells and, therefore, may result in cancer risk later in life. Analysis of gene pathways can lead to insights about nutrient-gene interactions and the development of more effective prevention approaches to reduce cancer risk. To date, researchers have relied heavily upon experimental assays (such as microarray analysis, etc.) to identify genes and their associated pathways that are affected by nutrient and diets. However, the vast number of genes and combinations of gene pathways, coupled with the expense of the experimental analyses, has delayed the progress of gene-pathway research. The development of an analytical approach based on available test data could greatly benefit the evaluation of gene pathways, and thus advance the study of nutrient-gene interactions in cancer prevention. In the present study, we have proposed a chain reaction model to simulate gene pathways, in which the gene expression changes through the pathway are represented by the species undergoing a set of chemical reactions. We have also developed a numerical tool to solve for the species changes due to the chain reactions over time. Through this approach we can examine the impact of nutrient-containing diets on the gene pathway; moreover, transformation of genes over time with a nutrient treatment can be observed numerically, which is very difficult to achieve experimentally. We apply this approach to microarray analysis data from an experiment which involved the effects of three polyphenols (nutrient treatments), epigallo-catechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), genistein, and resveratrol, in a study of nutrient-gene interaction in the estrogen synthesis pathway during puberty. RESULTS: In this preliminary study, the estrogen synthesis pathway was simulated by a chain reaction model. By

  2. Discovering causal signaling pathways through gene-expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Jignesh R.; Klinger, Bertram; Xia, Yu; Marto, Jarrod A.; Blüthgen, Nils

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput gene-expression studies result in lists of differentially expressed genes. Most current meta-analyses of these gene lists include searching for significant membership of the translated proteins in various signaling pathways. However, such membership enrichment algorithms do not provide insight into which pathways caused the genes to be differentially expressed in the first place. Here, we present an intuitive approach for discovering upstream signaling pathways responsible for regulating these differentially expressed genes. We identify consistently regulated signature genes specific for signal transduction pathways from a panel of single-pathway perturbation experiments. An algorithm that detects overrepresentation of these signature genes in a gene group of interest is used to infer the signaling pathway responsible for regulation. We expose our novel resource and algorithm through a web server called SPEED: Signaling Pathway Enrichment using Experimental Data sets. SPEED can be freely accessed at http://speed.sys-bio.net/. PMID:20494976

  3. The evolution of milk casein genes from tooth genes before the origin of mammals.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Kazuhiko; Lafont, Anne-Gaelle; Sire, Jean-Yves

    2011-07-01

    Caseins are among cardinal proteins that evolved in the lineage leading to mammals. In milk, caseins and calcium phosphate (CaP) form a huge complex called casein micelle. By forming the micelle, milk maintains high CaP concentrations, which help altricial mammalian neonates to grow bone and teeth. Two types of caseins are known. Ca-sensitive caseins (α(s)- and β-caseins) bind Ca but precipitate at high Ca concentrations, whereas Ca-insensitive casein (κ-casein) does not usually interact with Ca but instead stabilizes the micelle. Thus, it is thought that these two types of caseins are both necessary for stable micelle formation. Both types of caseins show high substitution rates, which make it difficult to elucidate the evolution of caseins. Yet, recent studies have revealed that all casein genes belong to the secretory calcium-binding phosphoprotein (SCPP) gene family that arose by gene duplication. In the present study, we investigated exon-intron structures and phylogenetic distributions of casein and other SCPP genes, particularly the odontogenic ameloblast-associated (ODAM) gene, the SCPP-Pro-Gln-rich 1 (SCPPPQ1) gene, and the follicular dendritic cell secreted peptide (FDCSP) gene. The results suggest that contemporary Ca-sensitive casein genes arose from a putative common ancestor, which we refer to as CSN1/2. The six putative exons comprising CSN1/2 are all found in SCPPPQ1, although ODAM also shares four of these exons. By contrast, the five exons of the Ca-insensitive casein gene are all reminiscent of FDCSP. The phylogenetic distribution of these genes suggests that both SCPPPQ1 and FDCSP arose from ODAM. We thus argue that all casein genes evolved from ODAM via two different pathways; Ca-sensitive casein genes likely originated directly from SCPPPQ1, whereas the Ca-insensitive casein genes directly differentiated from FDCSP. Further, expression of ODAM, SCPPPQ1, and FDCSP was detected in dental tissues, supporting the idea that both types of caseins

  4. CYP1A1, GCLC, AGT, AGTR1 gene-gene interactions in community-acquired pneumonia pulmonary complications.

    PubMed

    Salnikova, Lyubov E; Smelaya, Tamara V; Golubev, Arkadiy M; Rubanovich, Alexander V; Moroz, Viktor V

    2013-11-01

    This study was conducted to establish the possible contribution of functional gene polymorphisms in detoxification/oxidative stress and vascular remodeling pathways to community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) susceptibility in the case-control study (350 CAP patients, 432 control subjects) and to predisposition to the development of CAP complications in the prospective study. All subjects were genotyped for 16 polymorphic variants in the 14 genes of xenobiotics detoxification CYP1A1, AhR, GSTM1, GSTT1, ABCB1, redox-status SOD2, CAT, GCLC, and vascular homeostasis ACE, AGT, AGTR1, NOS3, MTHFR, VEGFα. Risk of pulmonary complications (PC) in the single locus analysis was associated with CYP1A1, GCLC and AGTR1 genes. Extra PC (toxic shock syndrome and myocarditis) were not associated with these genes. We evaluated gene-gene interactions using multi-factor dimensionality reduction, and cumulative gene risk score approaches. The final model which included >5 risk alleles in the CYP1A1 (rs2606345, rs4646903, rs1048943), GCLC, AGT, and AGTR1 genes was associated with pleuritis, empyema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, all PC and acute respiratory failure (ARF). We considered CYP1A1, GCLC, AGT, AGTR1 gene set using Set Distiller mode implemented in GeneDecks for discovering gene-set relations via the degree of sharing descriptors within a given gene set. N-acetylcysteine and oxygen were defined by Set Distiller as the best descriptors for the gene set associated in the present study with PC and ARF. Results of the study are in line with literature data and suggest that genetically determined oxidative stress exacerbation may contribute to the progression of lung inflammation.

  5. Partnering for functional genomics research conference: Abstracts of poster presentations

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    This reports contains abstracts of poster presentations presented at the Functional Genomics Research Conference held April 16--17, 1998 in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Attention is focused on the following areas: mouse mutagenesis and genomics; phenotype screening; gene expression analysis; DNA analysis technology development; bioinformatics; comparative analyses of mouse, human, and yeast sequences; and pilot projects to evaluate methodologies.

  6. Development of an efficient genetic manipulation strategy for sequential gene disruption and expression of different heterologous GFP genes in Candida tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihua; Chen, Xianzhong; Chen, Zhen; Wang, Zezheng; Jiang, Shan; Li, Li; Pötter, Markus; Shen, Wei; Fan, You

    2016-11-01

    The diploid yeast Candida tropicalis, which can utilize n-alkane as a carbon and energy source, is an attractive strain for both physiological studies and practical applications. However, it presents some characteristics, such as rare codon usage, difficulty in sequential gene disruption, and inefficiency in foreign gene expression, that hamper strain improvement through genetic engineering. In this work, we present a simple and effective method for sequential gene disruption in C. tropicalis based on the use of an auxotrophic mutant host defective in orotidine monophosphate decarboxylase (URA3). The disruption cassette, which consists of a functional yeast URA3 gene flanked by a 0.3 kb gene disruption auxiliary sequence (gda) direct repeat derived from downstream or upstream of the URA3 gene and of homologous arms of the target gene, was constructed and introduced into the yeast genome by integrative transformation. Stable integrants were isolated by selection for Ura + and identified by PCR and sequencing. The important feature of this construct, which makes it very attractive, is that recombination between the flanking direct gda repeats occurs at a high frequency (10 -8 ) during mitosis. After excision of the URA3 marker, only one copy of the gda sequence remains at the recombinant locus. Thus, the resulting ura3 strain can be used again to disrupt a second allelic gene in a similar manner. In addition to this effective sequential gene disruption method, a codon-optimized green fluorescent protein-encoding gene (GFP) was functionally expressed in C. tropicalis. Thus, we propose a simple and reliable method to improve C. tropicalis by genetic manipulation.

  7. Gene editing for skin diseases: designer nucleases as tools for gene therapy of skin fragility disorders.

    PubMed

    March, Oliver P; Reichelt, Julia; Koller, Ulrich

    2018-04-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review concerns current gene editing strategies for blistering skin diseases with respect to individual genetic constellations and distinct conditions. What advances does it highlight? Specificity and safety dominate the discussion of gene editing applications for gene therapy, where a number of tools are implemented. Recent developments in this rapidly progressing field pose further questions regarding which tool is best suited for each particular use. The current treatment of inherited blistering skin diseases, such as epidermolysis bullosa (EB), is largely restricted to wound care and pain management. More effective therapeutic strategies are urgently required, and targeting the genetic basis of these severe diseases is now within reach. Here, we describe current gene editing tools and their potential to correct gene function in monogenetic blistering skin diseases. We present the features of the most frequently used gene editing techniques, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9), determining their preferential application for specific genetic conditions, including the type of mutational inheritance, the targeting site within the gene or the possibility to target the mutation specifically. Both tools have traits beneficial in specific situations. Promising developments in the field engender gene editing as a potentially powerful therapeutic option for future clinical applications. © 2017 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  8. Gene context conservation of a higher order than operons.

    PubMed

    Lathe, W C; Snel, B; Bork, P

    2000-10-01

    Operons, co-transcribed and co-regulated contiguous sets of genes, are poorly conserved over short periods of evolutionary time. The gene order, gene content and regulatory mechanisms of operons can be very different, even in closely related species. Here, we present several lines of evidence which suggest that, although an operon and its individual genes and regulatory structures are rearranged when comparing the genomes of different species, this rearrangement is a conservative process. Genomic rearrangements invariably maintain individual genes in very specific functional and regulatory contexts. We call this conserved context an uber-operon.

  9. Reveal genes functionally associated with ACADS by a network study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yulong; Su, Zhiguang

    2015-09-15

    Establishing a systematic network is aimed at finding essential human gene-gene/gene-disease pathway by means of network inter-connecting patterns and functional annotation analysis. In the present study, we have analyzed functional gene interactions of short-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase gene (ACADS). ACADS plays a vital role in free fatty acid β-oxidation and regulates energy homeostasis. Modules of highly inter-connected genes in disease-specific ACADS network are derived by integrating gene function and protein interaction data. Among the 8 genes in ACADS web retrieved from both STRING and GeneMANIA, ACADS is effectively conjoined with 4 genes including HAHDA, HADHB, ECHS1 and ACAT1. The functional analysis is done via ontological briefing and candidate disease identification. We observed that the highly efficient-interlinked genes connected with ACADS are HAHDA, HADHB, ECHS1 and ACAT1. Interestingly, the ontological aspect of genes in the ACADS network reveals that ACADS, HAHDA and HADHB play equally vital roles in fatty acid metabolism. The gene ACAT1 together with ACADS indulges in ketone metabolism. Our computational gene web analysis also predicts potential candidate disease recognition, thus indicating the involvement of ACADS, HAHDA, HADHB, ECHS1 and ACAT1 not only with lipid metabolism but also with infant death syndrome, skeletal myopathy, acute hepatic encephalopathy, Reye-like syndrome, episodic ketosis, and metabolic acidosis. The current study presents a comprehensible layout of ACADS network, its functional strategies and candidate disease approach associated with ACADS network. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. pGenN, a Gene Normalization Tool for Plant Genes and Proteins in Scientific Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ruoyao; Arighi, Cecilia N.; Lee, Jung-Youn; Wu, Cathy H.; Vijay-Shanker, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Automatically detecting gene/protein names in the literature and connecting them to databases records, also known as gene normalization, provides a means to structure the information buried in free-text literature. Gene normalization is critical for improving the coverage of annotation in the databases, and is an essential component of many text mining systems and database curation pipelines. Methods In this manuscript, we describe a gene normalization system specifically tailored for plant species, called pGenN (pivot-based Gene Normalization). The system consists of three steps: dictionary-based gene mention detection, species assignment, and intra species normalization. We have developed new heuristics to improve each of these phases. Results We evaluated the performance of pGenN on an in-house expertly annotated corpus consisting of 104 plant relevant abstracts. Our system achieved an F-value of 88.9% (Precision 90.9% and Recall 87.2%) on this corpus, outperforming state-of-art systems presented in BioCreative III. We have processed over 440,000 plant-related Medline abstracts using pGenN. The gene normalization results are stored in a local database for direct query from the pGenN web interface (proteininformationresource.org/pgenn/). The annotated literature corpus is also publicly available through the PIR text mining portal (proteininformationresource.org/iprolink/). PMID:26258475

  11. Past, present and future of nutrigenomics and its influence on drug development.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2013-03-01

    The importance of nutrition in disease prevention and treatment has gained much attention with the emergence of next generation sequence technologies allowing full-genome sequencing at reduced cost in weeks rather than months. The vast genetic information needs to be efficiently channeled into a useful format to provide applicability for improved health and treatment of disease. Recently, it also led to the birth of nutrigenomics, which facilitates the investigation of the effects of nutrition on gene expression and beyond. At present, a number of studies have showed the effect of nutrition on gene expression in health and disease. For instance, weight loss and as importantly weight keeping has been demonstrated to be efficiently achieved in obesity treatment through personalized diet planning. Likewise, intensive dietary interventions have showed a significant effect on the expression pattern on cancer-related genes in prostate cancer patients. Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNA-based gene silencing are strongly affected by nutritional intake. Better understanding of the human genome will further accelerate nutrigenomics applications and the development of nutritional modifications including personalized nutrition for our well-being and will also present a strong influence on future drug discovery.

  12. Intraperitoneal infection with Salmonella abortusovis is partially controlled by a gene closely linked with the Ity gene.

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, I P; Lantier, F; Moutier, R; Bertrand, M F; Skamene, E

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the Ity gene, which controls the resistance to S. typhimurium infection in mice, also governs the resistance to S. abortusovis, a serotype specific for goat and sheep. During either i.v. or i.p. infection, BALB/c mice (Itys) were not able to control the growth of S. abortusovis and eventually died from infection. In contrast CBA (Ityr) or (C.CB)F1 (Ityr/s) mice were able to control the growth of these bacteria. Using congenic C.D2 Ityr mice, we found that the gene controlling resistance to S. abortusovis was tightly linked to the Ity gene on chromosome 1. Furthermore, in the spleen and the liver of backcross BALB/c x (CBA x BALB/c) mice, the S. abortusovis resistance phenotype cosegregated with the two alleles of the Len-1 gene, a gene tightly linked to the Ity gene. By contrast, in these backcross mice, the level of infection of the peritoneal cavity, the site of inoculation, did not correlated with the Len-1 phenotype of the animal. These results provide evidence that after i.p. inoculation the control of S. abortusovis growth in the spleen and the liver is controlled by the Ity gene, but also suggest that additional gene(s) regulate the number of bacteria at the site of inoculation. PMID:1544222

  13. InteGO2: A web tool for measuring and visualizing gene semantic similarities using Gene Ontology

    DOE PAGES

    Peng, Jiajie; Li, Hongxiang; Liu, Yongzhuang; ...

    2016-08-31

    Here, the Gene Ontology (GO) has been used in high-throughput omics research as a major bioinformatics resource. The hierarchical structure of GO provides users a convenient platform for biological information abstraction and hypothesis testing. Computational methods have been developed to identify functionally similar genes. However, none of the existing measurements take into account all the rich information in GO. Similarly, using these existing methods, web-based applications have been constructed to compute gene functional similarities, and to provide pure text-based outputs. Without a graphical visualization interface, it is difficult for result interpretation. As a result, we present InteGO2, a web toolmore » that allows researchers to calculate the GO-based gene semantic similarities using seven widely used GO-based similarity measurements. Also, we provide an integrative measurement that synergistically integrates all the individual measurements to improve the overall performance. Using HTML5 and cytoscape.js, we provide a graphical interface in InteGO2 to visualize the resulting gene functional association networks. In conclusion, InteGO2 is an easy-to-use HTML5 based web tool. With it, researchers can measure gene or gene product functional similarity conveniently, and visualize the network of functional interactions in a graphical interface.« less

  14. InteGO2: a web tool for measuring and visualizing gene semantic similarities using Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiajie; Li, Hongxiang; Liu, Yongzhuang; Juan, Liran; Jiang, Qinghua; Wang, Yadong; Chen, Jin

    2016-08-31

    The Gene Ontology (GO) has been used in high-throughput omics research as a major bioinformatics resource. The hierarchical structure of GO provides users a convenient platform for biological information abstraction and hypothesis testing. Computational methods have been developed to identify functionally similar genes. However, none of the existing measurements take into account all the rich information in GO. Similarly, using these existing methods, web-based applications have been constructed to compute gene functional similarities, and to provide pure text-based outputs. Without a graphical visualization interface, it is difficult for result interpretation. We present InteGO2, a web tool that allows researchers to calculate the GO-based gene semantic similarities using seven widely used GO-based similarity measurements. Also, we provide an integrative measurement that synergistically integrates all the individual measurements to improve the overall performance. Using HTML5 and cytoscape.js, we provide a graphical interface in InteGO2 to visualize the resulting gene functional association networks. InteGO2 is an easy-to-use HTML5 based web tool. With it, researchers can measure gene or gene product functional similarity conveniently, and visualize the network of functional interactions in a graphical interface. InteGO2 can be accessed via http://mlg.hit.edu.cn:8089/ .

  15. InteGO2: A web tool for measuring and visualizing gene semantic similarities using Gene Ontology

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Jiajie; Li, Hongxiang; Liu, Yongzhuang

    Here, the Gene Ontology (GO) has been used in high-throughput omics research as a major bioinformatics resource. The hierarchical structure of GO provides users a convenient platform for biological information abstraction and hypothesis testing. Computational methods have been developed to identify functionally similar genes. However, none of the existing measurements take into account all the rich information in GO. Similarly, using these existing methods, web-based applications have been constructed to compute gene functional similarities, and to provide pure text-based outputs. Without a graphical visualization interface, it is difficult for result interpretation. As a result, we present InteGO2, a web toolmore » that allows researchers to calculate the GO-based gene semantic similarities using seven widely used GO-based similarity measurements. Also, we provide an integrative measurement that synergistically integrates all the individual measurements to improve the overall performance. Using HTML5 and cytoscape.js, we provide a graphical interface in InteGO2 to visualize the resulting gene functional association networks. In conclusion, InteGO2 is an easy-to-use HTML5 based web tool. With it, researchers can measure gene or gene product functional similarity conveniently, and visualize the network of functional interactions in a graphical interface.« less

  16. Biological interpretation of genome-wide association studies using predicted gene functions.

    PubMed

    Pers, Tune H; Karjalainen, Juha M; Chan, Yingleong; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wood, Andrew R; Yang, Jian; Lui, Julian C; Vedantam, Sailaja; Gustafsson, Stefan; Esko, Tonu; Frayling, Tim; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Boehnke, Michael; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Franke, Lude

    2015-01-19

    The main challenge for gaining biological insights from genetic associations is identifying which genes and pathways explain the associations. Here we present DEPICT, an integrative tool that employs predicted gene functions to systematically prioritize the most likely causal genes at associated loci, highlight enriched pathways and identify tissues/cell types where genes from associated loci are highly expressed. DEPICT is not limited to genes with established functions and prioritizes relevant gene sets for many phenotypes.

  17. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Hurst, Laurence D

    2015-07-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene's expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. Gene-Environment Interaction in Adults’ IQ Scores: Measures of Past and Present Environment

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Posthuma, Danielle

    2008-01-01

    Gene-environment interaction was studied in a sample of young (mean age 26 years, N = 385) and older (mean age 49 years, N = 370) adult males and females. Full scale IQ scores (FSIQ) were analyzed using biometric models in which additive genetic (A), common environmental (C), and unique environmental (E) effects were allowed to depend on environmental measures. Moderators under study were parental and partner educational level, as well as urbanization level and mean real estate price of the participants’ residential area. Mean effects were observed for parental education, partner education and urbanization level. On average, FSIQ scores were roughly 5 points higher in participants with highly educated parents, compared to participants whose parents were less well educated. In older participants, IQ scores were about 2 points higher when their partners were highly educated. In younger males, higher urbanization levels were associated with slightly higher FSIQ scores. Our analyses also showed increased common environmental variation in older males whose parents were more highly educated, and increased unique environmental effects in older males living in more affluent areas. Contrary to studies in children, however, the variance attributable to additive genetic effects was stable across all levels of the moderators under study. Most results were replicated for VIQ and PIQ. PMID:18535898

  19. Visualizing conserved gene location across microbe genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Chris D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces an analysis-based zoomable visualization technique for displaying the location of genes across many related species of microbes. The purpose of this visualizatiuon is to enable a biologist to examine the layout of genes in the organism of interest with respect to the gene organization of related organisms. During the genomic annotation process, the ability to observe gene organization in common with previously annotated genomes can help a biologist better confirm the structure and function of newly analyzed microbe DNA sequences. We have developed a visualization and analysis tool that enables the biologist to observe and examine gene organization among genomes, in the context of the primary sequence of interest. This paper describes the visualization and analysis steps, and presents a case study using a number of Rickettsia genomes.

  20. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  1. Fractional populations in multiple gene inheritance.

    PubMed

    Chung, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Chul Koo; Nahm, Kyun

    2003-01-22

    With complete knowledge of the human genome sequence, one of the most interesting tasks remaining is to understand the functions of individual genes and how they communicate. Using the information about genes (locus, allele, mutation rate, fitness, etc.), we attempt to explain population demographic data. This population evolution study could complement and enhance biologists' understanding about genes. We present a general approach to study population genetics in complex situations. In the present approach, multiple allele inheritance, multiple loci inheritance, natural selection and mutations are allowed simultaneously in order to consider a more realistic situation. A simulation program is presented so that readers can readily carry out studies with their own parameters. It is shown that the multiplicity of the loci greatly affects the demographic results of fractional population ratios. Furthermore, the study indicates that some high infant mortality rates due to congenital anomalies can be attributed to multiple loci inheritance. The simulation program can be downloaded from http://won.hongik.ac.kr/~mhchung/index_files/yapop.htm. In order to run this program, one needs Visual Studio.NET platform, which can be downloaded from http://msdn.microsoft.com/netframework/downloads/default.asp.

  2. Gene doping: gene delivery for olympic victory

    PubMed Central

    Gould, David

    2013-01-01

    With one recently recommended gene therapy in Europe and a number of other gene therapy treatments now proving effective in clinical trials it is feasible that the same technologies will soon be adopted in the world of sport by unscrupulous athletes and their trainers in so called ‘gene doping’. In this article an overview of the successful gene therapy clinical trials is provided and the potential targets for gene doping are highlighted. Depending on whether a doping gene product is secreted from the engineered cells or is retained locally to, or inside engineered cells will, to some extent, determine the likelihood of detection. It is clear that effective gene delivery technologies now exist and it is important that detection and prevention plans are in place. PMID:23082866

  3. SUC1 gene of Saccharomyces: a structural gene for the large (glycoprotein) and small (carbohydrate-free) forms of invertase.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, L; Lampen, J O; MacKay, V L

    1981-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae revertant strain D10-ER1 has been shown to contain thermosensitive forms of the large (glycoprotein) and small (carbohydrate-free) invertases and a very low level of the small enzyme, along with a wild-type level of the large form (T. Mizunaga et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 1:460-468, 1981). These characteristics cosegregated in crosses of the revertant strain with wild-type sucrose-fermenting (SUC1) or nonfermenting (suc0) strains. In addition, there is tight linkage between sucrose and maltose fermentation in revertant D10-ER1 (characteristic of the SUC1 and MAL1 genes). From this we infer that a single reversion event is responsible for the several changes observed in D10-ER1, and that this mutation maps within or very close to the SUC1 gene present in the ancestor strain 4059-358D. The revertant SUC1 allele in D10-ER1 (termed SUC1-R1) was expressed independently of the wild-type SUC1 gene when both were present in diploid cells. Diploids carrying only the wild-type or the mutant genes synthesized invertases with the characteristics of the parental Suc+ haploids. The possibility that a modifier gene was responsible for the alterations in the invertases of revertant D10-ER1 was ruled out by appropriate crosses. We conclude that SUC1 is a structural gene that codes for both the large and the small forms of invertase and suggest that SUC2 through SUC5 are structural genes as well. PMID:6765604

  4. A multistage gene normalization system integrating multiple effective methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Lishuang; Liu, Shanshan; Li, Lihua; Fan, Wenting; Huang, Degen; Zhou, Huiwei

    2013-01-01

    Gene/protein recognition and normalization is an important preliminary step for many biological text mining tasks. In this paper, we present a multistage gene normalization system which consists of four major subtasks: pre-processing, dictionary matching, ambiguity resolution and filtering. For the first subtask, we apply the gene mention tagger developed in our earlier work, which achieves an F-score of 88.42% on the BioCreative II GM testing set. In the stage of dictionary matching, the exact matching and approximate matching between gene names and the EntrezGene lexicon have been combined. For the ambiguity resolution subtask, we propose a semantic similarity disambiguation method based on Munkres' Assignment Algorithm. At the last step, a filter based on Wikipedia has been built to remove the false positives. Experimental results show that the presented system can achieve an F-score of 90.1%, outperforming most of the state-of-the-art systems.

  5. The EWS–Oct-4 fusion gene encodes a transforming gene

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwoon; Kim, Ja Young; Kang, In Young; Kim, Hye Kyoung; Han, Yong-Mahn; Kim, Jungho

    2007-01-01

    The t(6;22)(p21;q12) translocation associated with human bone and soft-tissue tumours results in a chimaeric molecule fusing the NTD (N-terminal domain) of the EWS (Ewing's sarcoma) gene to the CTD (C-terminal domain) of the Oct-4 (octamer-4) embryonic gene. Since the N-terminal domains of EWS and Oct-4 are structurally different, in the present study we have assessed the functional consequences of the EWS–Oct-4 fusion. We find that this chimaeric gene encodes a nuclear protein which binds DNA with the same sequence specificity as the parental Oct-4 protein. Comparison of the transactivation properties of EWS–Oct-4 and Oct-4 indicates that the former has higher transactivation activity for a known target reporter gene containing Oct-4 binding. Deletion analysis of the functional domains of EWS–Oct-4 indicates that the EWS (NTD), the POU domain and the CTD of EWS–Oct-4 are necessary for full transactivation potential. EWS–Oct-4 induced the expression of fgf-4 (fibroblast growth factor 4) and nanog, which are potent mitogens as well as Oct-4 downstream target genes whose promoters contain potential Oct-4-binding sites. Finally, ectopic expression of EWS–Oct-4 in Oct-4-null ZHBTc4 ES (embryonic stem) cells resulted in increased tumorigenic growth potential in nude mice. These results suggest that the oncogenic effect of the t(6;22) translocation is due to the EWS–Oct-4 chimaeric protein and that fusion of the EWS NTD to the Oct-4 DNA-binding domain produces a transforming chimaeric product. PMID:17564582

  6. Finding approximate gene clusters with Gecko 3.

    PubMed

    Winter, Sascha; Jahn, Katharina; Wehner, Stefanie; Kuchenbecker, Leon; Marz, Manja; Stoye, Jens; Böcker, Sebastian

    2016-11-16

    Gene-order-based comparison of multiple genomes provides signals for functional analysis of genes and the evolutionary process of genome organization. Gene clusters are regions of co-localized genes on genomes of different species. The rapid increase in sequenced genomes necessitates bioinformatics tools for finding gene clusters in hundreds of genomes. Existing tools are often restricted to few (in many cases, only two) genomes, and often make restrictive assumptions such as short perfect conservation, conserved gene order or monophyletic gene clusters. We present Gecko 3, an open-source software for finding gene clusters in hundreds of bacterial genomes, that comes with an easy-to-use graphical user interface. The underlying gene cluster model is intuitive, can cope with low degrees of conservation as well as misannotations and is complemented by a sound statistical evaluation. To evaluate the biological benefit of Gecko 3 and to exemplify our method, we search for gene clusters in a dataset of 678 bacterial genomes using Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 as a reference. We confirm detected gene clusters reviewing the literature and comparing them to a database of operons; we detect two novel clusters, which were confirmed by publicly available experimental RNA-Seq data. The computational analysis is carried out on a laptop computer in <40 min. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Osmotic regulation of gene action.

    PubMed

    Douzou, P

    1994-03-01

    Most reactions involved in gene translation systems are ionic-dependent and may be explained in electrostatic terms. However, a number of observations of equilibria and rate processes making up the overall reactions clearly indicate that there is still an enormous gap between the rough picture of the mechanism of ionic regulation and the detailed behavior of reactions at the molecular level that hold the key to specific mechanisms. The present paper deals with possible osmotic contributions arising from the gel state of gene systems that are complementary to, and interdependent of, electrostatic contributions. This treatment, although still oversimplified, explains many previous observations by relating them to a general osmotic mechanism and suggests experimental approaches to studying the mechanisms of gene regulation in organelle-free and intact systems.

  8. Models of stochastic gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsson, Johan

    2005-06-01

    Gene expression is an inherently stochastic process: Genes are activated and inactivated by random association and dissociation events, transcription is typically rare, and many proteins are present in low numbers per cell. The last few years have seen an explosion in the stochastic modeling of these processes, predicting protein fluctuations in terms of the frequencies of the probabilistic events. Here I discuss commonalities between theoretical descriptions, focusing on a gene-mRNA-protein model that includes most published studies as special cases. I also show how expression bursts can be explained as simplistic time-averaging, and how generic approximations can allow for concrete interpretations without requiring concrete assumptions. Measures and nomenclature are discussed to some extent and the modeling literature is briefly reviewed.

  9. Finding gene regulatory network candidates using the gene expression knowledge base.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Aravind; Tripathi, Sushil; Sanz de Galdeano, Alejandro; Blondé, Ward; Lægreid, Astrid; Mironov, Vladimir; Kuiper, Martin

    2014-12-10

    Network-based approaches for the analysis of large-scale genomics data have become well established. Biological networks provide a knowledge scaffold against which the patterns and dynamics of 'omics' data can be interpreted. The background information required for the construction of such networks is often dispersed across a multitude of knowledge bases in a variety of formats. The seamless integration of this information is one of the main challenges in bioinformatics. The Semantic Web offers powerful technologies for the assembly of integrated knowledge bases that are computationally comprehensible, thereby providing a potentially powerful resource for constructing biological networks and network-based analysis. We have developed the Gene eXpression Knowledge Base (GeXKB), a semantic web technology based resource that contains integrated knowledge about gene expression regulation. To affirm the utility of GeXKB we demonstrate how this resource can be exploited for the identification of candidate regulatory network proteins. We present four use cases that were designed from a biological perspective in order to find candidate members relevant for the gastrin hormone signaling network model. We show how a combination of specific query definitions and additional selection criteria derived from gene expression data and prior knowledge concerning candidate proteins can be used to retrieve a set of proteins that constitute valid candidates for regulatory network extensions. Semantic web technologies provide the means for processing and integrating various heterogeneous information sources. The GeXKB offers biologists such an integrated knowledge resource, allowing them to address complex biological questions pertaining to gene expression. This work illustrates how GeXKB can be used in combination with gene expression results and literature information to identify new potential candidates that may be considered for extending a gene regulatory network.

  10. Abundance of genes involved in mercury methylation in oceanic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, A. V.; Podar, M.; Gilmour, C. C.; Brandt, C. C.; Brown, S. D.; Crable, B. R.; Weighill, D.; Jacobson, D. A.; Somenahally, A. C.; Elias, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    The distribution and diversity of genes involved in mercury methylation in oceanic environments is of interest in determining the source of mercury in ocean environments and may have predictive value for mercury methylation rates. The highly conserved hgcAB genes involved in mercury methylation provide an avenue for evaluating the genetic potential for mercury methylation. The genes are sporadically present in a few diverse groups of bacteria and Archaea including Deltaproteobacteria, Firmicutes and Archaea and of over 7000 sequenced species they are only present in about 100 genomes. Examination of sequence data from methylators and non-methylators indicates that these genes are associated with other genes involved in metal transformations and transport. We examined hgcAB presence in over 3500 microbial metagenomes (from all environments) and found the hgcAB genes were present in anaerobic oceanic environments but not in aerobic layers of the open ocean. The genes were common in sediments from marine, coastal and estuarine sources as well as polluted environments. The genes were rare, found in 7 of 138 samples, in metagenomes from the pelagic water column including profiles though the oxygen minimum zone. Other oxic and sub-oxic coastal waters also demonstrated a lack of hgcAB genes including the OMZ in the Eastern North Pacific Ocean. There were some unique hgcA like unique sequences found in metagenomes from depth in the Pacific and Southern Atlantic Ocean. Coastal "dead zone" waters may be important sources of MeHg as the hgcAB genes were abundant in the anoxic waters of a stratified fjord. The genes were absent in microbiomes from vertebrates but were in invertebrate microbiomes However, oceanic species were underrepresented in these samples. Climate change could provide an additional flux of MeHg to the oceans as we found the most abundant representation of hgcAB genes in arctic permafrost. Thus warming could increase flux of methyl mercury to arctic waters.

  11. Three genes in the human MHC class III region near the junction with the class II: Gene for receptor of advanced glycosylation end products, PBX2 homeobox gene and a notch homolog, human counterpart of mouse mammary tumor gene int-3

    SciTech Connect

    Sugaya, K.; Fukagawa, T.; Matsumoto, K.

    Cosmid walking of about 250 kb from MHC class III gene CYP21 to class II was conducted. The gene for receptor of advanced glycosylation end products of proteins (RAGE, a member of immunoglobulin super-family molecules), the PBX2 homeobox gene designated HOX12, and the human counterpart of the mouse mammary tumor gene int-3 were found. The contiguous RAGE and HOX12 genes were completely sequenced, and the human int-3 counterpart was partially sequenced and assigned to a Notch homolog. This human Notch homolog, designated NOTCH3, showed both the intracellular portion present in the mouse int-3 sequence and the extracellular portion absent inmore » the int-3. It thus corresponds to the intact form of a Notch-type transmembrane protein. About 20 kb of dense Alu clustering was found just centromeric to the NOTCH3. 48 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  12. Exact Algorithms for Duplication-Transfer-Loss Reconciliation with Non-Binary Gene Trees.

    PubMed

    Kordi, Misagh; Bansal, Mukul S

    2017-06-01

    Duplication-Transfer-Loss (DTL) reconciliation is a powerful method for studying gene family evolution in the presence of horizontal gene transfer. DTL reconciliation seeks to reconcile gene trees with species trees by postulating speciation, duplication, transfer, and loss events. Efficient algorithms exist for finding optimal DTL reconciliations when the gene tree is binary. In practice, however, gene trees are often non-binary due to uncertainty in the gene tree topologies, and DTL reconciliation with non-binary gene trees is known to be NP-hard. In this paper, we present the first exact algorithms for DTL reconciliation with non-binary gene trees. Specifically, we (i) show that the DTL reconciliation problem for non-binary gene trees is fixed-parameter tractable in the maximum degree of the gene tree, (ii) present an exponential-time, but in-practice efficient, algorithm to track and enumerate all optimal binary resolutions of a non-binary input gene tree, and (iii) apply our algorithms to a large empirical data set of over 4700 gene trees from 100 species to study the impact of gene tree uncertainty on DTL-reconciliation and to demonstrate the applicability and utility of our algorithms. The new techniques and algorithms introduced in this paper will help biologists avoid incorrect evolutionary inferences caused by gene tree uncertainty.

  13. Biological interpretation of genome-wide association studies using predicted gene functions

    PubMed Central

    Pers, Tune H.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Chan, Yingleong; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wood, Andrew R.; Yang, Jian; Lui, Julian C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Gustafsson, Stefan; Esko, Tonu; Frayling, Tim; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Boehnke, Michael; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Fehrmann, Rudolf S.N.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Franke, Lude

    2015-01-01

    The main challenge for gaining biological insights from genetic associations is identifying which genes and pathways explain the associations. Here we present DEPICT, an integrative tool that employs predicted gene functions to systematically prioritize the most likely causal genes at associated loci, highlight enriched pathways and identify tissues/cell types where genes from associated loci are highly expressed. DEPICT is not limited to genes with established functions and prioritizes relevant gene sets for many phenotypes. PMID:25597830

  14. Gene doping: gene delivery for olympic victory.

    PubMed

    Gould, David

    2013-08-01

    With one recently recommended gene therapy in Europe and a number of other gene therapy treatments now proving effective in clinical trials it is feasible that the same technologies will soon be adopted in the world of sport by unscrupulous athletes and their trainers in so called 'gene doping'. In this article an overview of the successful gene therapy clinical trials is provided and the potential targets for gene doping are highlighted. Depending on whether a doping gene product is secreted from the engineered cells or is retained locally to, or inside engineered cells will, to some extent, determine the likelihood of detection. It is clear that effective gene delivery technologies now exist and it is important that detection and prevention plans are in place. © 2012 The Author. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. A Generalized Approach for Measuring Relationships Among Genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijun; Ahsan, Md Asif; Chen, Ming

    2017-07-21

    Several methods for identifying relationships among pairs of genes have been developed. In this article, we present a generalized approach for measuring relationships between any pairs of genes, which is based on statistical prediction. We derive two particular versions of the generalized approach, least squares estimation (LSE) and nearest neighbors prediction (NNP). According to mathematical proof, LSE is equivalent to the methods based on correlation; and NNP is approximate to one popular method called the maximal information coefficient (MIC) according to the performances in simulations and real dataset. Moreover, the approach based on statistical prediction can be extended from two-genes relationships to multi-genes relationships. This application would help to identify relationships among multi-genes.

  16. Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Hsi; Fiocchi, Claudio; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Ripke, Stephan; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Rebert, Nancy; Duerr, Richard H.; Achkar, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified at least 133 ulcerative colitis (UC) associated loci. The role of genetic factors in clinical practice is not clearly defined. The relevance of genetic variants to disease pathogenesis is still uncertain because of not characterized gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. We examined the predictive value of combining the 133 UC risk loci with genetic interactions in an ongoing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) GWAS. The Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium (WTCCC) IBD GWAS was used as a replication cohort. We applied logic regression (LR), a novel adaptive regression methodology, to search for high order interactions. Exploratory genotype correlations with UC sub-phenotypes (extent of disease, need of surgery, age of onset, extra-intestinal manifestations and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC)) were conducted. The combination of 133 UC loci yielded good UC risk predictability (area under the curve [AUC] of 0.86). A higher cumulative allele score predicted higher UC risk. Through LR, several lines of evidence for genetic interactions were identified and successfully replicated in the WTCCC cohort. The genetic interactions combined with the gene-smoking interaction significantly improved predictability in the model (AUC, from 0.86 to 0.89, P=3.26E-05). Explained UC variance increased from 37% to 42% after adding the interaction terms. A within case analysis found suggested genetic association with PSC. Our study demonstrates that the LR methodology allows the identification and replication of high order genetic interactions in UC GWAS datasets. UC risk can be predicted by a 133 loci and improved by adding gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. PMID:24241240

  17. Engineering disease resistance with pectate lyase-like genes

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, John; Somerville, Shauna

    2005-03-08

    A mutant gene coding for pectate lyase and homologs thereof is provided, which when incorporated in transgenic plants effect an increased level disease resistance in such plants. Also is provided the polypeptide sequence for the pectate lyase of the present invention. Methods of obtaining the mutant gene, producing transgenic plants which include the nucleotide sequence for the mutant gene and producing improved disease resistance in a crop of such transgenic plants are also provided.

  18. Bone-related gene profiles in developing calvaria.

    PubMed

    Cho, Je-Yoel; Lee, Won-Bong; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Mi Woo, Kyung; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Choi, Je-Yong; Hur, Cheol-Gu; Ryoo, Hyun-Mo

    2006-05-10

    Generating a comprehensive understanding of osteogenesis-related gene profiles is very important in the development of new treatments for osteopenic conditions. Developing calvaria undergoes a typical intramembranous bone-forming process. To identify genes associated with osteoblast differentiation, we isolated total RNAs from parietal bones, that represent active osteoblasts, and sutural mesenchyme, that represents osteoprogenitor cells, and comprehensively analyzed their gene expression profiles using an oligo-based Affymetrix microarray chip containing 22,690 probes. About 2100 genes with "Present" calls had more than 2-fold higher expression in bone compared to sutures while 73 of these genes had more than 8-fold expression. Some of these genes are already known to be bone-related biomarkers: VitD receptor, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin, MMP13, etc. Eight genes were selected and subjected to confirmation by quantitative real-time RT-PCR analyses. All the genes tested showed higher expression in bones, ranging from 5- to 140-fold. Several of these genes are ESTs while others are already known but their functions in osteogenesis were not previously known. Most genes of the BMP and FGF families probed in the Genechip analysis were more highly expressed in bone tissues compared to suture. All differentially-expressed Runx and Dlx family genes also showed higher expression in bone. These results imply that our data is valid and can be used as a good standard for the mining of osteogenesis-related genes.

  19. RuleGO: a logical rules-based tool for description of gene groups by means of Gene Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Gruca, Aleksandra; Sikora, Marek; Polanski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide expression profiles obtained with the use of DNA microarray technology provide abundance of experimental data on biological and molecular processes. Such amount of data need to be further analyzed and interpreted in order to obtain biological conclusions on the basis of experimental results. The analysis requires a lot of experience and is usually time-consuming process. Thus, frequently various annotation databases are used to improve the whole process of analysis. Here, we present RuleGO—the web-based application that allows the user to describe gene groups on the basis of logical rules that include Gene Ontology (GO) terms in their premises. Presented application allows obtaining rules that reflect coappearance of GO-terms describing genes supported by the rules. The ontology level and number of coappearing GO-terms is adjusted in automatic manner. The user limits the space of possible solutions only. The RuleGO application is freely available at http://rulego.polsl.pl/. PMID:21715384

  20. Alpha-globin gene haplotypes in South American Indians.

    PubMed

    Zago, M A; Melo Santos, E J; Clegg, J B; Guerreiro, J F; Martinson, J J; Norwich, J; Figueiredo, M S

    1995-08-01

    The haplotypes of the alpha-globin gene cluster were determined for 99 Indians from the Brazilian Amazon region who belong to 5 tribes: Wayampí, Wayana-Apalaí, Kayapó, Arára, and Yanomámi. Three predominant haplotypes were identified: Ia (present in 38.9% of chromosomes), IIIa (25.8%), and IIe (22.1%). The only alpha-globin gene rearrangement detected was alpha alpha alpha 3.7 I gene triplication associated with haplotype IIIa, found in high frequencies (5.6% and 10.6%) in two tribes and absent in the others. alpha-Globin gene deletions that cause alpha-thalassemia were not seen, supporting the argument that malaria was absent in these populations until recently. The heterogeneous distribution of alpha-globin gene haplotypes and rearrangements among the different tribes differs markedly from the homogeneous distribution of beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes and reflects the action of various genetic mechanisms (genetic drift, founder effect, consanguinity) on small isolated population groups with a complicated history of divergence-fusion events. The alpha-globin gene haplotype distribution has some similarities to distributions observed in Southeast Asian and Pacific Island populations, indicating that these populations have considerable genetic affinities. However, the absence of several features of the alpha-globin gene cluster that are consistently present among the Pacific Islanders suggests that the similarity of haplotypes between Brazilian Indians and people from Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia is more likely to result of ancient common ancestry rather than the consequence of recent direct genetic contribution through immigration.

  1. Autosomal Genes of Autosomal/X-Linked Duplicated Gene Pairs and Germ-Line Proliferation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Maciejowski, John; Ahn, James Hyungsoo; Cipriani, Patricia Giselle; Killian, Darrell J.; Chaudhary, Aisha L.; Lee, Ji Inn; Voutev, Roumen; Johnsen, Robert C.; Baillie, David L.; Gunsalus, Kristin C.; Fitch, David H. A.; Hubbard, E. Jane Albert

    2005-01-01

    We report molecular genetic studies of three genes involved in early germ-line proliferation in Caenorhabditis elegans that lend unexpected insight into a germ-line/soma functional separation of autosomal/X-linked duplicated gene pairs. In a genetic screen for germ-line proliferation-defective mutants, we identified mutations in rpl-11.1 (L11 protein of the large ribosomal subunit), pab-1 [a poly(A)-binding protein], and glp-3/eft-3 (an elongation factor 1-α homolog). All three are members of autosome/X gene pairs. Consistent with a germ-line-restricted function of rpl-11.1 and pab-1, mutations in these genes extend life span and cause gigantism. We further examined the RNAi phenotypes of the three sets of rpl genes (rpl-11, rpl-24, and rpl-25) and found that for the two rpl genes with autosomal/X-linked pairs (rpl-11 and rpl-25), zygotic germ-line function is carried by the autosomal copy. Available RNAi results for highly conserved autosomal/X-linked gene pairs suggest that other duplicated genes may follow a similar trend. The three rpl and the pab-1/2 duplications predate the divergence between C. elegans and C. briggsae, while the eft-3/4 duplication appears to have occurred in the lineage to C. elegans after it diverged from C. briggsae. The duplicated C. briggsae orthologs of the three C. elegans autosomal/X-linked gene pairs also display functional differences between paralogs. We present hypotheses for evolutionary mechanisms that may underlie germ-line/soma subfunctionalization of duplicated genes, taking into account the role of X chromosome silencing in the germ line and analogous mammalian phenomena. PMID:15687263

  2. New genes as drivers of phenotypic evolution

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sidi; Krinsky, Benjamin H.; Long, Manyuan

    2014-01-01

    During the course of evolution, genomes acquire novel genetic elements as sources of functional and phenotypic diversity, including new genes that originated in recent evolution. In the past few years, substantial progress has been made in understanding the evolution and phenotypic effects of new genes. In particular, an emerging picture is that new genes, despite being present in the genomes of only a subset of species, can rapidly evolve indispensable roles in fundamental biological processes, including development, reproduction, brain function and behaviour. The molecular underpinnings of how new genes can develop these roles are starting to be characterized. These recent discoveries yield fresh insights into our broad understanding of biological diversity at refined resolution. PMID:23949544

  3. New genes as drivers of phenotypic evolution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sidi; Krinsky, Benjamin H; Long, Manyuan

    2013-09-01

    During the course of evolution, genomes acquire novel genetic elements as sources of functional and phenotypic diversity, including new genes that originated in recent evolution. In the past few years, substantial progress has been made in understanding the evolution and phenotypic effects of new genes. In particular, an emerging picture is that new genes, despite being present in the genomes of only a subset of species, can rapidly evolve indispensable roles in fundamental biological processes, including development, reproduction, brain function and behaviour. The molecular underpinnings of how new genes can develop these roles are starting to be characterized. These recent discoveries yield fresh insights into our broad understanding of biological diversity at refined resolution.

  4. Mining virulence genes using metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Belda-Ferre, Pedro; Cabrera-Rubio, Raúl; Moya, Andrés; Mira, Alex

    2011-01-01

    When a bacterial genome is compared to the metagenome of an environment it inhabits, most genes recruit at high sequence identity. In free-living bacteria (for instance marine bacteria compared against the ocean metagenome) certain genomic regions are totally absent in recruitment plots, representing therefore genes unique to individual bacterial isolates. We show that these Metagenomic Islands (MIs) are also visible in bacteria living in human hosts when their genomes are compared to sequences from the human microbiome, despite the compartmentalized structure of human-related environments such as the gut. From an applied point of view, MIs of human pathogens (e.g. those identified in enterohaemorragic Escherichia coli against the gut metagenome or in pathogenic Neisseria meningitidis against the oral metagenome) include virulence genes that appear to be absent in related strains or species present in the microbiome of healthy individuals. We propose that this strategy (i.e. recruitment analysis of pathogenic bacteria against the metagenome of healthy subjects) can be used to detect pathogenicity regions in species where the genes involved in virulence are poorly characterized. Using this approach, we detect well-known pathogenicity islands and identify new potential virulence genes in several human pathogens.

  5. GSCALite: A Web Server for Gene Set Cancer Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Jie; Hu, Fei-Fei; Xia, Mengxuan; Han, Leng; Zhang, Qiong; Guo, An-Yuan

    2018-05-22

    The availability of cancer genomic data makes it possible to analyze genes related to cancer. Cancer is usually the result of a set of genes and the signal of a single gene could be covered by background noise. Here, we present a web server named Gene Set Cancer Analysis (GSCALite) to analyze a set of genes in cancers with the following functional modules. (i) Differential expression in tumor vs normal, and the survival analysis; (ii) Genomic variations and their survival analysis; (iii) Gene expression associated cancer pathway activity; (iv) miRNA regulatory network for genes; (v) Drug sensitivity for genes; (vi) Normal tissue expression and eQTL for genes. GSCALite is a user-friendly web server for dynamic analysis and visualization of gene set in cancer and drug sensitivity correlation, which will be of broad utilities to cancer researchers. GSCALite is available on http://bioinfo.life.hust.edu.cn/web/GSCALite/. guoay@hust.edu.cn or zhangqiong@hust.edu.cn. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  6. Rhabdovirus accessory genes.

    PubMed

    Walker, Peter J; Dietzgen, Ralf G; Joubert, D Albert; Blasdell, Kim R

    2011-12-01

    The Rhabdoviridae is one of the most ecologically diverse families of RNA viruses with members infecting a wide range of organisms including placental mammals, marsupials, birds, reptiles, fish, insects and plants. The availability of complete nucleotide sequences for an increasing number of rhabdoviruses has revealed that their ecological diversity is reflected in the diversity and complexity of their genomes. The five canonical rhabdovirus structural protein genes (N, P, M, G and L) that are shared by all rhabdoviruses are overprinted, overlapped and interspersed with a multitude of novel and diverse accessory genes. Although not essential for replication in cell culture, several of these genes have been shown to have roles associated with pathogenesis and apoptosis in animals, and cell-to-cell movement in plants. Others appear to be secreted or have the characteristics of membrane-anchored glycoproteins or viroporins. However, most encode proteins of unknown function that are unrelated to any other known proteins. Understanding the roles of these accessory genes and the strategies by which rhabdoviruses use them to engage, divert and re-direct cellular processes will not only present opportunities to develop new anti-viral therapies but may also reveal aspects of cellar function that have broader significance in biology, agriculture and medicine. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular cloning and long terminal repeat sequences of human endogenous retrovirus genes related to types A and B retrovirus genes

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, M.

    1986-06-01

    By using a DNA fragment primarily encoding the reverse transcriptase (pol) region of the Syrian hamster intracisternal A particle (IAP; type A retrovirus) gene as a probe, human endogenous retrovirus genes, tentatively termed HERV-K genes, were cloned from a fetal human liver gene library. Typical HERV-K genes were 9.1 or 9.4 kilobases in length, having long terminal repeats (LTRs) of ca. 970 base pairs. Many structural features commonly observed on the retrovirus LTRs, such as the TATAA box, polyadenylation signal, and terminal inverted repeats, were present on each LTR, and a lysine (K) tRNA having a CUU anticodon was identifiedmore » as a presumed primer tRNA. The HERV-K LTR, however, had little sequence homology to either the IAP LTR or other typical oncovirus LTRs. By filter hybridization, the number of HERV-K genes was estimated to be ca. 50 copies per haploid human genome. The cloned mouse mammary tumor virus (type B) gene was found to hybridize with both the HERV-K and IAP genes to essentially the same extent.« less

  8. Gene doping.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E

    2010-01-01

    Gene doping abuses the legitimate approach of gene therapy. While gene therapy aims to correct genetic disorders by introducing a foreign gene to replace an existing faulty one or by manipulating existing gene(s) to achieve a therapeutic benefit, gene doping employs the same concepts to bestow performance advantages on athletes over their competitors. Recent developments in genetic engineering have contributed significantly to the progress of gene therapy research and currently numerous clinical trials are underway. Some athletes and their staff are probably watching this progress closely. Any gene that plays a role in muscle development, oxygen delivery to tissues, neuromuscular coordination, or even pain control is considered a candidate for gene dopers. Unfortunately, detecting gene doping is technically very difficult because the transgenic proteins expressed by the introduced genes are similar to their endogenous counterparts. Researchers today are racing the clock because assuring the continued integrity of sports competition depends on their ability to develop effective detection strategies in preparation for the 2012 Olympics, which may mark the appearance of genetically modified athletes.

  9. Gene expression inference with deep learning

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yifei; Li, Yi; Narayan, Rajiv; Subramanian, Aravind; Xie, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Large-scale gene expression profiling has been widely used to characterize cellular states in response to various disease conditions, genetic perturbations, etc. Although the cost of whole-genome expression profiles has been dropping steadily, generating a compendium of expression profiling over thousands of samples is still very expensive. Recognizing that gene expressions are often highly correlated, researchers from the NIH LINCS program have developed a cost-effective strategy of profiling only ∼1000 carefully selected landmark genes and relying on computational methods to infer the expression of remaining target genes. However, the computational approach adopted by the LINCS program is currently based on linear regression (LR), limiting its accuracy since it does not capture complex nonlinear relationship between expressions of genes. Results: We present a deep learning method (abbreviated as D-GEX) to infer the expression of target genes from the expression of landmark genes. We used the microarray-based Gene Expression Omnibus dataset, consisting of 111K expression profiles, to train our model and compare its performance to those from other methods. In terms of mean absolute error averaged across all genes, deep learning significantly outperforms LR with 15.33% relative improvement. A gene-wise comparative analysis shows that deep learning achieves lower error than LR in 99.97% of the target genes. We also tested the performance of our learned model on an independent RNA-Seq-based GTEx dataset, which consists of 2921 expression profiles. Deep learning still outperforms LR with 6.57% relative improvement, and achieves lower error in 81.31% of the target genes. Availability and implementation: D-GEX is available at https://github.com/uci-cbcl/D-GEX. Contact: xhx@ics.uci.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26873929

  10. Gene expression inference with deep learning.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifei; Li, Yi; Narayan, Rajiv; Subramanian, Aravind; Xie, Xiaohui

    2016-06-15

    Large-scale gene expression profiling has been widely used to characterize cellular states in response to various disease conditions, genetic perturbations, etc. Although the cost of whole-genome expression profiles has been dropping steadily, generating a compendium of expression profiling over thousands of samples is still very expensive. Recognizing that gene expressions are often highly correlated, researchers from the NIH LINCS program have developed a cost-effective strategy of profiling only ∼1000 carefully selected landmark genes and relying on computational methods to infer the expression of remaining target genes. However, the computational approach adopted by the LINCS program is currently based on linear regression (LR), limiting its accuracy since it does not capture complex nonlinear relationship between expressions of genes. We present a deep learning method (abbreviated as D-GEX) to infer the expression of target genes from the expression of landmark genes. We used the microarray-based Gene Expression Omnibus dataset, consisting of 111K expression profiles, to train our model and compare its performance to those from other methods. In terms of mean absolute error averaged across all genes, deep learning significantly outperforms LR with 15.33% relative improvement. A gene-wise comparative analysis shows that deep learning achieves lower error than LR in 99.97% of the target genes. We also tested the performance of our learned model on an independent RNA-Seq-based GTEx dataset, which consists of 2921 expression profiles. Deep learning still outperforms LR with 6.57% relative improvement, and achieves lower error in 81.31% of the target genes. D-GEX is available at https://github.com/uci-cbcl/D-GEX CONTACT: xhx@ics.uci.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Identification of Single- and Multiple-Class Specific Signature Genes from Gene Expression Profiles by Group Marker Index

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Aguan, Kripamoy; Pal, Nikhil R.; Chung, I-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Informative genes from microarray data can be used to construct prediction model and investigate biological mechanisms. Differentially expressed genes, the main targets of most gene selection methods, can be classified as single- and multiple-class specific signature genes. Here, we present a novel gene selection algorithm based on a Group Marker Index (GMI), which is intuitive, of low-computational complexity, and efficient in identification of both types of genes. Most gene selection methods identify only single-class specific signature genes and cannot identify multiple-class specific signature genes easily. Our algorithm can detect de novo certain conditions of multiple-class specificity of a gene and makes use of a novel non-parametric indicator to assess the discrimination ability between classes. Our method is effective even when the sample size is small as well as when the class sizes are significantly different. To compare the effectiveness and robustness we formulate an intuitive template-based method and use four well-known datasets. We demonstrate that our algorithm outperforms the template-based method in difficult cases with unbalanced distribution. Moreover, the multiple-class specific genes are good biomarkers and play important roles in biological pathways. Our literature survey supports that the proposed method identifies unique multiple-class specific marker genes (not reported earlier to be related to cancer) in the Central Nervous System data. It also discovers unique biomarkers indicating the intrinsic difference between subtypes of lung cancer. We also associate the pathway information with the multiple-class specific signature genes and cross-reference to published studies. We find that the identified genes participate in the pathways directly involved in cancer development in leukemia data. Our method gives a promising way to find genes that can involve in pathways of multiple diseases and hence opens up the possibility of using an existing

  12. Study on the association between drug‑resistance and gene mutations of the active efflux pump acrAB‑tolC gene and its regulatory genes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Quan-Ping; Su, Liang; Liu, Jing-Wen; Yao, Ming-Xiao; Yuan, Guang-Ying

    2018-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between the multi‑drug resistance of Shigella flexneri and the drug‑resistant gene cassette carried by integrons; in the meanwhile, to detect the associations between drug‑resistance and gene mutations of the active efflux pump acrAB‑tolC gene and its regulatory genes, including marOR, acrR and soxS. A total of 158 isolates were isolated from the stool samples of 1,026 children with diarrhoea aged 14 years old between May 2012 and October 2015 in Henan. The K‑B method was applied for the determination of drug resistance of Shigella flexneri, and polymerase chain reaction amplification was used for class 1, 2 and 3 integrase genes. Enzyme digestion and sequence analysis were performed for the variable regions of positive strains. Based on the drug sensitivity assessment, multi‑drug resistant strains that were resistant to five or more antibiotics, and sensitive strains were selected for amplification. Their active efflux pump genes, acrA and acrB, and regulatory genes, marOR, acrR and soxS, were selected for sequencing. The results revealed that 91.1% of the 158 strains were multi‑resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline and streptomycin, and 69.6% of the strains were multi‑resistant to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. The resistance to ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin was <32.9%. All strains (100%) were sensitive to cefoxitin, cefoperazone/sulbactam and imipenem. The rate of the class 1 integron positivity was 91.9% (144/158). Among these class 1 integron‑positive strains, 18 strains exhibited the resistance gene cassette dfrV in the variable region of the strain, four strains exhibited dfrA17‑aadA5 in the variable region and 140 strains exhibited blaOXA‑30‑aadA1 in the variable region. Four strains showed no resistance gene in the variable regions. The rate of class 2 integron positivity was 86.1% (136/158), and all positive strains harboured the

  13. Gene-based interaction analysis shows GABAergic genes interacting with parenting in adolescent depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Van Assche, Evelien; Moons, Tim; Cinar, Ozan; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Verschueren, Karine; Colpin, Hilde; Lambrechts, Diether; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Goossens, Luc; Claes, Stephan; van Winkel, Ruud

    2017-12-01

    Most gene-environment interaction studies (G × E) have focused on single candidate genes. This approach is criticized for its expectations of large effect sizes and occurrence of spurious results. We describe an approach that accounts for the polygenic nature of most psychiatric phenotypes and reduces the risk of false-positive findings. We apply this method focusing on the role of perceived parental support, psychological control, and harsh punishment in depressive symptoms in adolescence. Analyses were conducted on 982 adolescents of Caucasian origin (M age (SD) = 13.78 (.94) years) genotyped for 4,947 SNPs in 263 genes, selected based on a literature survey. The Leuven Adolescent Perceived Parenting Scale (LAPPS) and the Parental Behavior Scale (PBS) were used to assess perceived parental psychological control, harsh punishment, and support. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was the outcome. We used gene-based testing taking into account linkage disequilibrium to identify genes containing SNPs exhibiting an interaction with environmental factors yielding a p-value per single gene. Significant results at the corrected p-value of p < 1.90 × 10 -4 were examined in an independent replication sample of Dutch adolescents (N = 1354). Two genes showed evidence for interaction with perceived support: GABRR1 (p = 4.62 × 10 -5 ) and GABRR2 (p = 9.05 × 10 -6 ). No genes interacted significantly with psychological control or harsh punishment. Gene-based analysis was unable to confirm the interaction of GABRR1 or GABRR2 with support in the replication sample. However, for GABRR2, but not GABRR1, the correlation of the estimates between the two datasets was significant (r (46) = .32; p = .027) and a gene-based analysis of the combined datasets supported GABRR2 × support interaction (p = 1.63 × 10 -4 ). We present a gene-based method for gene-environment interactions in a polygenic context and show that genes

  14. Subthalamic hGAD65 Gene Therapy and Striatum TH Gene Transfer in a Parkinson’s Disease Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Deyu; Jiang, Xiaohua; Zhao, Junpeng; Duan, Deyi; Zhao, Huanying; Xu, Qunyuan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to detect a combination method to utilize gene therapy for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Here, a PD rat model is used for the in vivo gene therapy of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV2) containing a human glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (rAAV2-hGAD65) gene delivered to the subthalamic nucleus (STN). This is combined with the ex vivo gene delivery of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) by fibroblasts injected into the striatum. After the treatment, the rotation behavior was improved with the greatest efficacy in the combination group. The results of immunohistochemistry showed that hGAD65 gene delivery by AAV2 successfully led to phenotypic changes of neurons in STN. And the levels of glutamic acid and GABA in the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) were obviously lower than the control groups. However, hGAD65 gene transfer did not effectively protect surviving dopaminergic neurons in the SNc and VTA. This study suggests that subthalamic hGAD65 gene therapy and combined with TH gene therapy can alleviate symptoms of the PD model rats, independent of the protection the DA neurons from death. PMID:23738148

  15. Evolution of four gene families with patchy phylogenetic distributions: influx of genes into protist genomes

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Jan O; Hirt, Robert P; Foster, Peter G; Roger, Andrew J

    2006-01-01

    Background Lateral gene transfer (LGT) in eukaryotes from non-organellar sources is a controversial subject in need of further study. Here we present gene distribution and phylogenetic analyses of the genes encoding the hybrid-cluster protein, A-type flavoprotein, glucosamine-6-phosphate isomerase, and alcohol dehydrogenase E. These four genes have a limited distribution among sequenced prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes and were previously implicated in gene transfer events affecting eukaryotes. If our previous contention that these genes were introduced by LGT independently into the diplomonad and Entamoeba lineages were true, we expect that the number of putative transfers and the phylogenetic signal supporting LGT should be stable or increase, rather than decrease, when novel eukaryotic and prokaryotic homologs are added to the analyses. Results The addition of homologs from phagotrophic protists, including several Entamoeba species, the pelobiont Mastigamoeba balamuthi, and the parabasalid Trichomonas vaginalis, and a large quantity of sequences from genome projects resulted in an apparent increase in the number of putative transfer events affecting all three domains of life. Some of the eukaryotic transfers affect a wide range of protists, such as three divergent lineages of Amoebozoa, represented by Entamoeba, Mastigamoeba, and Dictyostelium, while other transfers only affect a limited diversity, for example only the Entamoeba lineage. These observations are consistent with a model where these genes have been introduced into protist genomes independently from various sources over a long evolutionary time. Conclusion Phylogenetic analyses of the updated datasets using more sophisticated phylogenetic methods, in combination with the gene distribution analyses, strengthened, rather than weakened, the support for LGT as an important mechanism affecting the evolution of these gene families. Thus, gene transfer seems to be an on-going evolutionary mechanism by

  16. Genomic Analysis Reveals Contrasting PIFq Contribution to Diurnal Rhythmic Gene Expression in PIF-Induced and -Repressed Genes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Guiomar; Soy, Judit; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Members of the PIF quartet (PIFq; PIF1, PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5) collectively contribute to induce growth in Arabidopsis seedlings under short day (SD) conditions, specifically promoting elongation at dawn. Their action involves the direct regulation of growth-related and hormone-associated genes. However, a comprehensive definition of the PIFq-regulated transcriptome under SD is still lacking. We have recently shown that SD and free-running (LL) conditions correspond to "growth" and "no growth" conditions, respectively, correlating with greater abundance of PIF protein in SD. Here, we present a genomic analysis whereby we first define SD-regulated genes at dawn compared to LL in the wild type, followed by identification of those SD-regulated genes whose expression depends on the presence of PIFq. By using this sequential strategy, we have identified 349 PIF/SD-regulated genes, approximately 55% induced and 42% repressed by both SD and PIFq. Comparison with available databases indicates that PIF/SD-induced and PIF/SD-repressed sets are differently phased at dawn and mid-morning, respectively. In addition, we found that whereas rhythmicity of the PIF/SD-induced gene set is lost in LL, most PIF/SD-repressed genes keep their rhythmicity in LL, suggesting differential regulation of both gene sets by the circadian clock. Moreover, we also uncovered distinct overrepresented functions in the induced and repressed gene sets, in accord with previous studies in other examined PIF-regulated processes. Interestingly, promoter analyses showed that, whereas PIF/SD-induced genes are enriched in direct PIF targets, PIF/SD-repressed genes are mostly indirectly regulated by the PIFs and might be more enriched in ABA-regulated genes.

  17. Insights on the functional impact of microRNAs present in autism-associated copy number variants.

    PubMed

    Vaishnavi, Varadarajan; Manikandan, Mayakannan; Tiwary, Basant K; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that appears during the first three years of infancy and lasts throughout a person's life. Recently a large category of genomic structural variants, denoted as copy number variants (CNVs), were established to be a major contributor of the pathophysiology of autism. To date almost all studies have focussed only on the genes present in the CNV loci, but the impact of non-coding regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs) present in these regions remain largely unexplored. Hence we attempted to elucidate the biological and functional significance of miRNAs present in autism-associated CNV loci and their target genes by using a series of computational tools. We demonstrate that nearly 11% of the CNV loci harbor miRNAs and a few of these miRNAs were previously reported to be associated with autism. A systematic analysis of the CNV-miRNAs based on their interactions with the target genes enabled the identification of top 10 miRNAs namely hsa-miR-590-3p, hsa-miR-944, hsa-miR-570, hsa-miR-34a, hsa-miR-124, hsa-miR-548f, hsa-miR-429, hsa-miR-200b, hsa-miR-195 and hsa-miR-497 as hub molecules. Further, the CNV-miRNAs formed a regulatory loop with transcription factors and their downstream target genes, and annotation of these target genes indicated their functional involvement in neurodevelopment and synapse. Moreover, miRNAs present in deleted and duplicated CNV loci may explain the difference in dosage of the crucial genes controlled by them. These CNV-miRNAs can also impair the global processing and biogenesis of all miRNAs by targeting key molecules in the miRNA pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first report to highlight the significance of CNV-microRNAs and their target genes to contribute towards the genetic heterogeneity and phenotypic variability of autism.

  18. Organization of the hao gene cluster of Nitrosomonas europaea: genes for two tetraheme c cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, D J; Arciero, D M; Hooper, A B

    1994-06-01

    The organization of genes for three proteins involved in ammonia oxidation in Nitrosomonas europaea has been investigated. The amino acid sequence of the N-terminal region and four heme-containing peptides produced by proteolysis of the tetraheme cytochrome c554 of N. europaea were determined by Edman degradation. The gene (cycA) encoding this cytochrome is present in three copies per genome (H. McTavish, F. LaQuier, D. Arciero, M. Logan, G. Mundfrom, J.A. Fuchs, and A. B. Hooper, J. Bacteriol. 175:2445-2447, 1993). Three clones, representing at least two copies of cycA, were isolated and sequenced by the dideoxy-chain termination procedure. In both copies, the sequences of 211 amino acids derived from the gene sequence are identical and include all amino acids predicted by the proteolytic peptides. In two copies, the cycA open reading frame (ORF) is followed closely (three bases in one copy) by a second ORF predicted to encode a 28-kDa tetraheme c cytochrome not previously characterized but similar to the nirT gene product of Pseudomonas stutzeri. In one copy of the cycA gene cluster, the second ORF is absent.

  19. Altered Blood Gene Expression of Tumor-Related Genes (PRKCB, BECN1, and CDKN2A) in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Antonell, Anna; Lladó, Albert; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Sanfeliu, Coral; Casserras, Teresa; Rami, Lorena; Muñoz-García, Cristina; Dangla-Valls, Adrià; Balasa, Mircea; Boya, Patricia; Kalko, Susana G; Molinuevo, José Luis

    2016-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common of the neurodegenerative diseases. Recent diagnostic criteria have defined a preclinical disease phase during which neuropathological substrates are thought to be present in the brain. There is an urgent need to find measurable alterations in this phase as well as a good peripheral biomarker in the blood. We selected a cohort of 100 subjects (controls = 47; preclinical AD = 11; patients with AD = 42) and analyzed whole blood expression of 20 genes by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The selected genes belonged to calcium signaling, senescence and autophagy, and mitochondria/oxidative stress pathways. Additionally, two genes associated with an increased risk of developing AD (clusterin (CLU) and bridging integrator 1 (BIN1)) were also analyzed. We detected significantly different gene expressions of BECN1 and PRKCB between the control and the AD groups and of CDKN2A between the control and the preclinical AD groups. Notably, these three genes are also considered tumor suppressor (CDKN2A and BECN1) or tumor promoter (PRKCB) genes. Gene-gene expression Pearson correlations were computed separately for controls and patients with AD. The significant correlations (p < 0.001) were represented in a network analysis with Cytoscape tool, which suggested an uncoupling of mitochondria-related genes in AD group. Whole blood is emerging as a valuable tissue in the study of the physiopathology of AD.

  20. Two Functional Copies of the DGCR6 Gene Are Present on Human Chromosome 22q11 Due to a Duplication of an Ancestral Locus

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Lisa; Stankiewicz, Pavel; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Pandita, Raj K.; Shaffer, Lisa; Lupski, James; Morrow, Bernice E.

    2001-01-01

    The DGCR6 (DiGeorge critical region) gene encodes a putative protein with sequence similarity to gonadal (gdl), a Drosophila melanogaster gene of unknown function. We mapped the DGCR6 gene to chromosome 22q11 within a low copy repeat, termed sc11.1a, and identified a second copy of the gene, DGCR6L, within the duplicate locus, termed sc11.1b. Both sc11.1 repeats are deleted in most persons with velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS), and they map immediately adjacent and internal to the low copy repeats, termed LCR22, that mediate the deletions associated with VCFS/DGS. We sequenced genomic clones from both loci and determined that the putative initiator methionine is located further upstream than originally described, but in a position similar to the mouse and chicken orthologs. DGCR6L encodes a highly homologous, functional copy of DGCR6, with some base changes rendering amino acid differences. Expression studies of the two genes indicate that both genes are widely expressed in fetal and adult tissues. Evolutionary studies using FISH mapping in several different species of ape combined with sequence analysis of DGCR6 in a number of different primate species indicate that the duplication is at least 12 million years old and may date back to before the divergence of Catarrhines from Platyrrhines, 35 mya. These data suggest that there has been selective evolutionary pressure toward the functional maintenance of both paralogs. Interestingly, a full-length HERV-K provirus integrated into the sc11.1a locus after the divergence of chimpanzees and humans. PMID:11157784

  1. Ortholog-based screening and identification of genes related to intracellular survival.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaowen; Wang, Jiawei; Bing, Guoxia; Bie, Pengfei; De, Yanyan; Lyu, Yanli; Wu, Qingmin

    2018-04-20

    Bioinformatics and comparative genomics analysis methods were used to predict unknown pathogen genes based on homology with identified or functionally clustered genes. In this study, the genes of common pathogens were analyzed to screen and identify genes associated with intracellular survival through sequence similarity, phylogenetic tree analysis and the λ-Red recombination system test method. The total 38,952 protein-coding genes of common pathogens were divided into 19,775 clusters. As demonstrated through a COG analysis, information storage and processing genes might play an important role intracellular survival. Only 19 clusters were present in facultative intracellular pathogens, and not all were present in extracellular pathogens. Construction of a phylogenetic tree selected 18 of these 19 clusters. Comparisons with the DEG database and previous research revealed that seven other clusters are considered essential gene clusters and that seven other clusters are associated with intracellular survival. Moreover, this study confirmed that clusters screened by orthologs with similar function could be replaced with an approved uvrY gene and its orthologs, and the results revealed that the usg gene is associated with intracellular survival. The study improves the current understanding of intracellular pathogens characteristics and allows further exploration of the intracellular survival-related gene modules in these pathogens. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Bioinformatics study of the mangrove actin genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basyuni, M.; Wasilah, M.; Sumardi

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the bioinformatics methods to analyze eight actin genes from mangrove plants on DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank as well as predicted the structure, composition, subcellular localization, similarity, and phylogenetic. The physical and chemical properties of eight mangroves showed variation among the genes. The percentage of the secondary structure of eight mangrove actin genes followed the order of a helix > random coil > extended chain structure for BgActl, KcActl, RsActl, and A. corniculatum Act. In contrast to this observation, the remaining actin genes were random coil > extended chain structure > a helix. This study, therefore, shown the prediction of secondary structure was performed for necessary structural information. The values of chloroplast or signal peptide or mitochondrial target were too small, indicated that no chloroplast or mitochondrial transit peptide or signal peptide of secretion pathway in mangrove actin genes. These results suggested the importance of understanding the diversity and functional of properties of the different amino acids in mangrove actin genes. To clarify the relationship among the mangrove actin gene, a phylogenetic tree was constructed. Three groups of mangrove actin genes were formed, the first group contains B. gymnorrhiza BgAct and R. stylosa RsActl. The second cluster which consists of 5 actin genes the largest group, and the last branch consist of one gene, B. sexagula Act. The present study, therefore, supported the previous results that plant actin genes form distinct clusters in the tree.

  3. CCDB: a curated database of genes involved in cervix cancer.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Subhash M; Raghav, Dhwani; Singh, Harinder; Raghava, G P S

    2011-01-01

    The Cervical Cancer gene DataBase (CCDB, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/ccdb) is a manually curated catalog of experimentally validated genes that are thought, or are known to be involved in the different stages of cervical carcinogenesis. In spite of the large women population that is presently affected from this malignancy still at present, no database exists that catalogs information on genes associated with cervical cancer. Therefore, we have compiled 537 genes in CCDB that are linked with cervical cancer causation processes such as methylation, gene amplification, mutation, polymorphism and change in expression level, as evident from published literature. Each record contains details related to gene like architecture (exon-intron structure), location, function, sequences (mRNA/CDS/protein), ontology, interacting partners, homology to other eukaryotic genomes, structure and links to other public databases, thus augmenting CCDB with external data. Also, manually curated literature references have been provided to support the inclusion of the gene in the database and establish its association with cervix cancer. In addition, CCDB provides information on microRNA altered in cervical cancer as well as search facility for querying, several browse options and an online tool for sequence similarity search, thereby providing researchers with easy access to the latest information on genes involved in cervix cancer.

  4. Mannosylated poly(beta-amino esters) for targeted antigen presenting cell immune modulation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Charles H.; Chen, Mingfu; Ravikrishnan, Anitha; Reddinger, Ryan; Zhang, Guojian; Hakansson, Anders P.; Pfeifer, Blaine A.

    2014-01-01

    Given the rise of antibiotic resistance and other difficult-to-treat diseases, genetic vaccination is a promising preventative approach that can be tailored and scaled according to the vector chosen for gene delivery. However, most vectors currently utilized rely on ubiquitous delivery mechanisms that ineffectively target important immune effectors such as antigen presenting cells (APCs). As such, APC targeting allows the option for tuning the direction (humoral vs cell-mediated) and strength of the resulting immune responses. In this work, we present the development and assessment of a library of mannosylated poly(beta-amino esters) (PBAEs) that represent a new class of easily synthesized APC-targeting cationic polymers. Polymeric characterization and assessment methodologies were designed to provide a more realistic physiochemical profile prior to in vivo evaluation. Gene delivery assessment in vitro showed significant improvement upon PBAE mannosylation and suggested that mannose-mediated uptake and processing influence the magnitude of gene delivery. Furthermore, mannosylated PBAEs demonstrated a strong, efficient, and safe in vivo humoral immune response without use of adjuvants when compared to genetic and protein control antigens. In summary, the gene delivery effectiveness provided by mannosylated PBAE vectors offers specificity and potency in directing APC activation and subsequent immune responses. PMID:25453962

  5. Seqping: gene prediction pipeline for plant genomes using self-training gene models and transcriptomic data.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kuang-Lim; Rosli, Rozana; Tatarinova, Tatiana V; Hogan, Michael; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Low, Eng-Ti Leslie

    2017-01-27

    Gene prediction is one of the most important steps in the genome annotation process. A large number of software tools and pipelines developed by various computing techniques are available for gene prediction. However, these systems have yet to accurately predict all or even most of the protein-coding regions. Furthermore, none of the currently available gene-finders has a universal Hidden Markov Model (HMM) that can perform gene prediction for all organisms equally well in an automatic fashion. We present an automated gene prediction pipeline, Seqping that uses self-training HMM models and transcriptomic data. The pipeline processes the genome and transcriptome sequences of the target species using GlimmerHMM, SNAP, and AUGUSTUS pipelines, followed by MAKER2 program to combine predictions from the three tools in association with the transcriptomic evidence. Seqping generates species-specific HMMs that are able to offer unbiased gene predictions. The pipeline was evaluated using the Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana genomes. Benchmarking Universal Single-Copy Orthologs (BUSCO) analysis showed that the pipeline was able to identify at least 95% of BUSCO's plantae dataset. Our evaluation shows that Seqping was able to generate better gene predictions compared to three HMM-based programs (MAKER2, GlimmerHMM and AUGUSTUS) using their respective available HMMs. Seqping had the highest accuracy in rice (0.5648 for CDS, 0.4468 for exon, and 0.6695 nucleotide structure) and A. thaliana (0.5808 for CDS, 0.5955 for exon, and 0.8839 nucleotide structure). Seqping provides researchers a seamless pipeline to train species-specific HMMs and predict genes in newly sequenced or less-studied genomes. We conclude that the Seqping pipeline predictions are more accurate than gene predictions using the other three approaches with the default or available HMMs.

  6. Analysis of Natural and Induced Variation in Tomato Glandular Trichome Flavonoids Identifies a Gene Not Present in the Reference Genome[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongwoon; Matsuba, Yuki; Ning, Jing; Schilmiller, Anthony L.; Hammar, Dagan; Jones, A. Daniel; Pichersky, Eran; Last, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids are ubiquitous plant aromatic specialized metabolites found in a variety of cell types and organs. Methylated flavonoids are detected in secreting glandular trichomes of various Solanum species, including the cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Inspection of the sequenced S. lycopersicum Heinz 1706 reference genome revealed a close homolog of Solanum habrochaites MOMT1 3′/5′ myricetin O-methyltransferase gene, but this gene (Solyc06g083450) is missing the first exon, raising the question of whether cultivated tomato has a distinct 3′ or 3′/5′ O-methyltransferase. A combination of mining genome and cDNA sequences from wild tomato species and S. lycopersicum cultivar M82 led to the identification of Sl-MOMT4 as a 3′ O-methyltransferase. In parallel, three independent ethyl methanesulfonate mutants in the S. lycopersicum cultivar M82 background were identified as having reduced amounts of di- and trimethylated myricetins and increased monomethylated myricetin. Consistent with the hypothesis that Sl-MOMT4 is a 3′ O-methyltransferase gene, all three myricetin methylation defective mutants were found to have defects in MOMT4 sequence, transcript accumulation, or 3′-O-methyltransferase enzyme activity. Surprisingly, no MOMT4 sequence is found in the Heinz 1706 reference genome sequence, and this cultivar accumulates 3-methyl myricetin and is deficient in 3′-methyl myricetins, demonstrating variation in this gene among cultivated tomato varieties. PMID:25128240

  7. Base composition and expression level of human genes.

    PubMed

    Arhondakis, Stilianos; Auletta, Fabio; Torelli, Giuseppe; D'Onofrio, Giuseppe

    2004-01-21

    It is well known that the gene distribution is non-uniform in the human genome, reaching the highest concentration in the GC-rich isochores. Also the amino acid frequencies, and the hydrophobicity, of the corresponding encoded proteins are affected by the high GC level of the genes localized in the GC-rich isochores. It was hypothesized that the gene expression level as well is higher in GC-rich compared to GC-poor isochores [Mol. Biol. Evol. 10 (1993) 186]. Several features of human genes and proteins, namely expression level, coding and non-coding lengths, and hydrophobicity were investigated in the present paper. The results support the hypothesis reported above, since all the parameters so far studied converge to the same conclusion, that the average expression level of the GC-rich genes is significantly higher than that of the GC-poor genes.

  8. Electroporation-mediated Delivery of Genes in Rodent Models of Lung Contusion

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Aranda, David; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Several of the biological processes involved in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome after lung contusion are regulated at a genetic and epigenetic level. Thus, strategies to manipulate gene expression in this context are highly desirable not only to elucidate the mechanisms involved but also to look for potential therapies. In the present chapter, we describe mouse and rat models of inducing blunt thoracic injury followed by electroporation-mediated gene delivery to the lung. Electroporation is a highly efficient and easily reproducible technique that allows circumvention of several of lung gene delivery challenges and safety issues present with other forms of lung gene therapy. PMID:24510825

  9. A Genome-Wide Identification of the WRKY Family Genes and a Survey of Potential WRKY Target Genes in Dendrobium officinale.

    PubMed

    He, Chunmei; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Tan, Jianwen; Zhang, Jianxia; Pan, Xiaoping; Li, Mingzhi; Luo, Jianping; Duan, Jun

    2017-08-23

    The WRKY family, one of the largest families of transcription factors, plays important roles in the regulation of various biological processes, including growth, development and stress responses in plants. In the present study, 63 DoWRKY genes were identified from the Dendrobium officinale genome. These were classified into groups I, II, III and a non-group, each with 14, 28, 10 and 11 members, respectively. ABA-responsive, sulfur-responsive and low temperature-responsive elements were identified in the 1-k upstream regulatory region of DoWRKY genes. Subsequently, the expression of the 63 DoWRKY genes under cold stress was assessed, and the expression profiles of a large number of these genes were regulated by low temperature in roots and stems. To further understand the regulatory mechanism of DoWRKY genes in biological processes, potential WRKY target genes were investigated. Among them, most stress-related genes contained multiple W-box elements in their promoters. In addition, the genes involved in polysaccharide synthesis and hydrolysis contained W-box elements in their 1-k upstream regulatory regions, suggesting that DoWRKY genes may play a role in polysaccharide metabolism. These results provide a basis for investigating the function of WRKY genes and help to understand the downstream regulation network in plants within the Orchidaceae.

  10. Gene trap and gene inversion methods for conditional gene inactivation in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hong-Bo; Deng, Ke-Yu; Shui, Bo; Qu, Shimian; Sun, Qi; Lee, Jane; Greene, Kai Su; Wilson, Jason; Yu, Ying; Feldman, Morris; Kotlikoff, Michael I.

    2005-01-01

    Conditional inactivation of individual genes in mice using site-specific recombinases is an extremely powerful method for determining the complex roles of mammalian genes in developmental and tissue-specific contexts, a major goal of post-genomic research. However, the process of generating mice with recombinase recognition sequences placed at specific locations within a gene, while maintaining a functional allele, is time consuming, expensive and technically challenging. We describe a system that combines gene trap and site-specific DNA inversion to generate mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell clones for the rapid production of conditional knockout mice, and the use of this system in an initial gene trap screen. Gene trapping should allow the selection of thousands of ES cell clones with defined insertions that can be used to generate conditional knockout mice, thereby providing extensive parallelism that eliminates the time-consuming steps of targeting vector construction and homologous recombination for each gene. PMID:15659575

  11. Identification and validation of superior reference gene for gene expression normalization via RT-qPCR in staminate and pistillate flowers of Jatropha curcas - A biodiesel plant.

    PubMed

    Karuppaiya, Palaniyandi; Yan, Xiao-Xue; Liao, Wang; Wu, Jun; Chen, Fang; Tang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L) seed oil is a natural resource for the alternative production of fossil fuel. Seed oil production is mainly depended on seed yield, which was restricted by the low ratio of staminate flowers to pistillate flowers. Further, the mechanism of physic nut flower sex differentiation has not been fully understood yet. Quantitative Real Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction is a reliable and widely used technique to quantify the gene expression pattern in biological samples. However, for accuracy of qRT-PCR, appropriate reference gene is highly desirable to quantify the target gene level. Hence, the present study was aimed to identify the stable reference genes in staminate and pistillate flowers of J. curcas. In this study, 10 candidate reference genes were selected and evaluated for their expression stability in staminate and pistillate flowers, and their stability was validated by five different algorithms (ΔCt, BestKeeper, NormFinder, GeNorm and RefFinder). Resulting, TUB and EF found to be the two most stably expressed reference for staminate flower; while GAPDH1 and EF found to be the most stably expressed reference gene for pistillate flowers. Finally, RT-qPCR assays of target gene AGAMOUS using the identified most stable reference genes confirmed the reliability of selected reference genes in different stages of flower development. AGAMOUS gene expression levels at different stages were further proved by gene copy number analysis. Therefore, the present study provides guidance for selecting appropriate reference genes for analyzing the expression pattern of floral developmental genes in staminate and pistillate flowers of J. curcas.

  12. The clinical presentation and genotype of protein C deficiency with double mutations of the protein C gene.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hirofumi; Terachi, Shin-Ichi; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Sato, Tetsuji; Urata, Michiyo; Ishimura, Masataka; Koga, Yui; Hotta, Taeko; Hara, Toshiro; Kang, Dongchon; Ohga, Shouichi

    2017-07-01

    Severe protein C (PC) deficiency is a rare heritable thrombophilia leading to thromboembolic events during the neonatal period. It remains unclear how individuals with complete PC gene (PROC) defects develop or escape neonatal stroke or purpura fulminans (PF). We studied the onset of disease and the genotype of 22 PC-deficient patients with double mutations in PROC based on our cohort (n = 12) and the previous reports (n = 10) in Japan. Twenty-two patients in 20 unrelated families had 4 homozygous and 18 compound heterozygous mutations. Sixteen newborns presented with PF (n = 11, 69%), intracranial thromboembolism and hemorrhage (n = 13, 81%), or both (n = 8, 50%), with most showing a plasma PC activity of <10%. Six others first developed overt thromboembolism when they were over 15 years of age, showing a median PC activity of 31% (range: 19-52%). Fifteen of the 22 patients (68%) had the five major mutations (G423VfsX82, V339M, R211W, M406I, and F181V) or two others (E68K and K193del) that have been reported in Japan. Three of the six late-onset cases, but none of the 16 neonatal cases, had the K193del mutation, which has been reported to be the most common variant of Chinese thrombophilia. A novel mutation of A309V was determined in a family of two patients with late onset. The genotype of double-PROC mutants might show less diversity than heterozygous mutants in terms of the timing of the onset of thrombophilia (newborn onset or late onset). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. PTGBase: an integrated database to study tandem duplicated genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingyin; Ke, Tao; Tehrim, Sadia; Sun, Fengming; Liao, Boshou; Hua, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Tandem duplication is a wide-spread phenomenon in plant genomes and plays significant roles in evolution and adaptation to changing environments. Tandem duplicated genes related to certain functions will lead to the expansion of gene families and bring increase of gene dosage in the form of gene cluster arrays. Many tandem duplication events have been studied in plant genomes; yet, there is a surprising shortage of efforts to systematically present the integration of large amounts of information about publicly deposited tandem duplicated gene data across the plant kingdom. To address this shortcoming, we developed the first plant tandem duplicated genes database, PTGBase. It delivers the most comprehensive resource available to date, spanning 39 plant genomes, including model species and newly sequenced species alike. Across these genomes, 54 130 tandem duplicated gene clusters (129 652 genes) are presented in the database. Each tandem array, as well as its member genes, is characterized in complete detail. Tandem duplicated genes in PTGBase can be explored through browsing or searching by identifiers or keywords of functional annotation and sequence similarity. Users can download tandem duplicated gene arrays easily to any scale, up to the complete annotation data set for an entire plant genome. PTGBase will be updated regularly with newly sequenced plant species as they become available. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. Re-examining the Gene in Personalized Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartol, Jordan

    2013-10-01

    Personalized genomics companies (PG; also called `direct-to-consumer genetics') are businesses marketing genetic testing to consumers over the Internet. While much has been written about these new businesses, little attention has been given to their roles in science communication. This paper provides an analysis of the gene concept presented to customers and the relation between the information given and the science behind PG. Two quite different gene concepts are present in company rhetoric, but only one features in the science. To explain this, we must appreciate the delicate tension between PG, academic science, public expectation, and market forces.

  15. Revealing Alzheimer's disease genes spectrum in the whole-genome by machine learning.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Hankui; Li, Xinming; Guan, Liping; Li, Jiankang; Tellier, Laurent Christian Asker M; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Jianguo

    2018-01-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an important, progressive neurodegenerative disease, with a complex genetic architecture. A key goal of biomedical research is to seek out disease risk genes, and to elucidate the function of these risk genes in the development of disease. For this purpose, expanding the AD-associated gene set is necessary. In past research, the prediction methods for AD related genes has been limited in their exploration of the target genome regions. We here present a genome-wide method for AD candidate genes predictions. We present a machine learning approach (SVM), based upon integrating gene expression data with human brain-specific gene network data, to discover the full spectrum of AD genes across the whole genome. We classified AD candidate genes with an accuracy and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 84.56% and 94%. Our approach provides a supplement for the spectrum of AD-associated genes extracted from more than 20,000 genes in a genome wide scale. In this study, we have elucidated the whole-genome spectrum of AD, using a machine learning approach. Through this method, we expect for the candidate gene catalogue to provide a more comprehensive annotation of AD for researchers.

  16. Comprehensive evaluation of candidate reference genes for gene expression studies in Lysiphlebia japonica (Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae) using RT-qPCR.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xue-Ke; Zhang, Shuai; Luo, Jun-Yu; Wang, Chun-Yi; Lü, Li-Min; Zhang, Li-Juan; Zhu, Xiang-Zhen; Wang, Li; Lu, Hui; Cui, Jin-Jie

    2017-12-30

    Lysiphlebia japonica (Ashmead) is a predominant parasitoid of cotton-melon aphids in the fields of northern China with a proven ability to effectively control cotton aphid populations in early summer. For accurate normalization of gene expression in L. japonica using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), reference genes with stable gene expression patterns are essential. However, no appropriate reference genes is L. japonica have been investigated to date. In the present study, 12 selected housekeeping genes from L. japonica were cloned. We evaluated the stability of these genes under various experimental treatments by RT-qPCR using four independent (geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper and Delta Ct) and one comparative (RefFinder) algorithm. We identified genes showing the most stable levels of expression: DIMT, 18S rRNA, and RPL13 during different stages; AK, RPL13, and TBP among sexes; EF1A, PPI, and RPL27 in different tissues, and EF1A, RPL13, and PPI in adults fed on different diets. Moreover, the expression profile of a target gene (odorant receptor 1, OR1) studied during the developmental stages confirms the reliability of the chosen selected reference genes. This study provides for the first time a comprehensive list of suitable reference genes for gene expression studies in L. japonica and will benefit subsequent genomics and functional genomics research on this natural enemy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Gene therapy for ocular diseases meditated by ultrasound and microbubbles (Review)

    PubMed Central

    WAN, CAIFENG; LI, FENGHUA; LI, HONGLI

    2015-01-01

    The eye is an ideal target organ for gene therapy as it is easily accessible and immune-privileged. With the increasing insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of ocular diseases, gene therapy has been proposed as an effective approach. Successful gene therapy depends on efficient gene transfer to targeted cells to prove stable and prolonged gene expression with minimal toxicity. At present, the main hindrance regarding the clinical application of gene therapy is not the lack of an ideal gene, but rather the lack of a safe and efficient method to selectively deliver genes to target cells and tissues. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD), with the advantages of high safety, repetitive applicability and tissue targeting, has become a potential strategy for gene- and drug delivery. When gene-loaded microbubbles are injected, UTMD is able to enhance the transport of the gene to the targeted cells. High-amplitude oscillations of microbubbles act as cavitation nuclei which can effectively focus ultrasound energy, produce oscillations and disruptions that increase the permeability of the cell membrane and create transient pores in the cell membrane. Thereby, the efficiency of gene therapy can be significantly improved. The UTMD-mediated gene delivery system has been widely used in pre-clinical studies to enhance gene expression in a site-specific manner in a variety of organs. With reasonable application, the effects of sonoporation can be spatially and temporally controlled to improve localized tissue deposition of gene complexes for ocular gene therapy applications. In addition, appropriately powered, focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles can induce a reversible disruption of the blood-retinal barrier with no significant side effects. The present review discusses the current status of gene therapy of ocular diseases as well as studies on gene therapy of ocular diseases meditated by UTMD. PMID:26151686

  18. Afrobatrachian mitochondrial genomes: genome reorganization, gene rearrangement mechanisms, and evolutionary trends of duplicated and rearranged genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial genomic (mitogenomic) reorganizations are rarely found in closely-related animals, yet drastic reorganizations have been found in the Ranoides frogs. The phylogenetic relationships of the three major ranoid taxa (Natatanura, Microhylidae, and Afrobatrachia) have been problematic, and mitogenomic information for afrobatrachians has not been available. Several molecular models for mitochondrial (mt) gene rearrangements have been proposed, but observational evidence has been insufficient to evaluate them. Furthermore, evolutionary trends in rearranged mt genes have not been well understood. To gain molecular and phylogenetic insights into these issues, we analyzed the mt genomes of four afrobatrachian species (Breviceps adspersus, Hemisus marmoratus, Hyperolius marmoratus, and Trichobatrachus robustus) and performed molecular phylogenetic analyses. Furthermore we searched for two evolutionary patterns expected in the rearranged mt genes of ranoids. Results Extensively reorganized mt genomes having many duplicated and rearranged genes were found in three of the four afrobatrachians analyzed. In fact, Breviceps has the largest known mt genome among vertebrates. Although the kinds of duplicated and rearranged genes differed among these species, a remarkable gene rearrangement pattern of non-tandemly copied genes situated within tandemly-copied regions was commonly found. Furthermore, the existence of concerted evolution was observed between non-neighboring copies of triplicated 12S and 16S ribosomal RNA regions. Conclusions Phylogenetic analyses based on mitogenomic data support a close relationship between Afrobatrachia and Microhylidae, with their estimated divergence 100 million years ago consistent with present-day endemism of afrobatrachians on the African continent. The afrobatrachian mt data supported the first tandem and second non-tandem duplication model for mt gene rearrangements and the recombination-based model for concerted

  19. Causal gene identification using combinatorial V-structure search.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ruichu; Zhang, Zhenjie; Hao, Zhifeng

    2013-07-01

    With the advances of biomedical techniques in the last decade, the costs of human genomic sequencing and genomic activity monitoring are coming down rapidly. To support the huge genome-based business in the near future, researchers are eager to find killer applications based on human genome information. Causal gene identification is one of the most promising applications, which may help the potential patients to estimate the risk of certain genetic diseases and locate the target gene for further genetic therapy. Unfortunately, existing pattern recognition techniques, such as Bayesian networks, cannot be directly applied to find the accurate causal relationship between genes and diseases. This is mainly due to the insufficient number of samples and the extremely high dimensionality of the gene space. In this paper, we present the first practical solution to causal gene identification, utilizing a new combinatorial formulation over V-Structures commonly used in conventional Bayesian networks, by exploring the combinations of significant V-Structures. We prove the NP-hardness of the combinatorial search problem under a general settings on the significance measure on the V-Structures, and present a greedy algorithm to find sub-optimal results. Extensive experiments show that our proposal is both scalable and effective, particularly with interesting findings on the causal genes over real human genome data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Organization of the human [zeta]-crystallin/quinone reductase gene (CRYZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, P.; Rao, P.V.; Zigler, J.S. Jr.

    1994-05-15

    [zeta]-Crystallin is a protein highly expressed in the lens of guinea pigs and camels, where it comprises about 10% of the total soluble protein. It has recently been characterized as a novel quinone oxidoreductase present in a variety of mammalian tissues. The authors report here the isolation and characterization of the human [zeta]-crystallin gene (CRYZ) and its processed pseudogene. The functional gene is composed of nine exons and spans about 20 kb. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene is rich in G and C (58%) and lacks TATA and CAAT boxes. Previous analysis of the guinea pig gene revealed themore » presence of two different promoters, one responsible for the high lens-specific expression and the other for expression at the enzymatic level in numerous tissues. Comparative analysis with the guinea pig gene shows that a region of [approximately]2.5 kb that includes the promoter responsible for the high expression in the lens in guinea pig is not present in the human gene. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.« less

  1. Using the TIGR gene index databases for biological discovery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuandan; Quackenbush, John

    2003-11-01

    The TIGR Gene Index web pages provide access to analyses of ESTs and gene sequences for nearly 60 species, as well as a number of resources derived from these. Each species-specific database is presented using a common format with a homepage. A variety of methods exist that allow users to search each species-specific database. Methods implemented currently include nucleotide or protein sequence queries using WU-BLAST, text-based searches using various sequence identifiers, searches by gene, tissue and library name, and searches using functional classes through Gene Ontology assignments. This protocol provides guidance for using the Gene Index Databases to extract information.

  2. Differentially Coexpressed Disease Gene Identification Based on Gene Coexpression Network.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Zhang, Han; Quan, Xiongwen

    2016-01-01

    Screening disease-related genes by analyzing gene expression data has become a popular theme. Traditional disease-related gene selection methods always focus on identifying differentially expressed gene between case samples and a control group. These traditional methods may not fully consider the changes of interactions between genes at different cell states and the dynamic processes of gene expression levels during the disease progression. However, in order to understand the mechanism of disease, it is important to explore the dynamic changes of interactions between genes in biological networks at different cell states. In this study, we designed a novel framework to identify disease-related genes and developed a differentially coexpressed disease-related gene identification method based on gene coexpression network (DCGN) to screen differentially coexpressed genes. We firstly constructed phase-specific gene coexpression network using time-series gene expression data and defined the conception of differential coexpression of genes in coexpression network. Then, we designed two metrics to measure the value of gene differential coexpression according to the change of local topological structures between different phase-specific networks. Finally, we conducted meta-analysis of gene differential coexpression based on the rank-product method. Experimental results demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of DCGN and the superior performance of DCGN over other popular disease-related gene selection methods through real-world gene expression data sets.

  3. Copy number of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli gene is not always neutral in sporadic colorectal cancers with loss of heterozygosity for the gene.

    PubMed

    Zauber, Peter; Marotta, Stephen; Sabbath-Solitare, Marlene

    2016-03-12

    Changes in the number of alleles of a chromosome may have an impact upon gene expression. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) indicates that one allele of a gene has been lost, and knowing the exact copy number of the gene would indicate whether duplication of the remaining allele has occurred. We were interested to determine the copy number of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) gene in sporadic colorectal cancers with LOH. We selected 38 carcinomas with LOH for the APC gene region of chromosome 5, as determined by amplification of the CA repeat region within the D5S346 loci. The copy number status of APC was ascertained using the SALSA® MLPA® P043-B1 APC Kit. LOH for the DCC gene, KRAS gene mutation, and microsatellite instability were also evaluated for each tumor, utilizing standard polymerase chain reaction methods. No tumor demonstrated microsatellite instability. LOH of the DCC gene was also present in 33 of 36 (91.7%) informative tumors. A KRAS gene mutation was present in 16 of the 38 (42.1%) tumors. Twenty-four (63.2%) of the tumors were copy number neutral, 10 (26.3%) tumors demonstrated major loss, while two (5.3%) showed partial loss. Two tumors (5.3%) had copy number gain. Results of APC and DCC LOH, KRAS and microsatellite instability indicate our colorectal cancer cases were typical of sporadic cancers following the 'chromosomal instability' pathway. The majority of our colorectal carcinomas with LOH for APC gene are copy number neutral. However, one-third of our cases showed copy number loss, suggesting that duplication of the remaining allele is not required for the development of a colorectal carcinoma.

  4. MADS-Box gene diversity in seed plants 300 million years ago.

    PubMed

    Becker, A; Winter, K U; Meyer, B; Saedler, H; Theissen, G

    2000-10-01

    MADS-box genes encode a family of transcription factors which control diverse developmental processes in flowering plants ranging from root development to flower and fruit development. Through phylogeny reconstructions, most of these genes can be subdivided into defined monophyletic gene clades whose members share similar expression patterns and functions. Therefore, the establishment of the diversity of gene clades was probably an important event in land plant evolution. In order to determine when these clades originated, we isolated cDNAs of 19 different MADS-box genes from Gnetum gnemon, a gymnosperm model species and thus a representative of the sister group of the angiosperms. Phylogeny reconstructions involving all published MADS-box genes were then used to identify gene clades containing putative orthologs from both angiosperm and gymnosperm lineages. Thus, the minimal number of MADS-box genes that were already present in the last common ancestor of extant gymnosperms and angiosperms was determined. Comparative expression studies involving pairs of putatively orthologous genes revealed a diversity of patterns that has been largely conserved since the time when the angiosperm and gymnosperm lineages separated. Taken together, our data suggest that there were already at least seven different MADS-box genes present at the base of extant seed plants about 300 MYA. These genes were probably already quite diverse in terms of both sequence and function. In addition, our data demonstrate that the MADS-box gene families of extant gymnosperms and angiosperms are of similar complexities.

  5. Dynamics Modelling of Biolistic Gene Guns

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, M.; Tao, W.; Pianetta, P.A.

    2009-06-04

    The gene transfer process using biolistic gene guns is a highly dynamic process. To achieve good performance, the process needs to be well understood and controlled. Unfortunately, no dynamic model is available in the open literature for analysing and controlling the process. This paper proposes such a model. Relationships of the penetration depth with the helium pressure, the penetration depth with the acceleration distance, and the penetration depth with the micro-carrier radius are presented. Simulations have also been conducted. The results agree well with experimental results in the open literature. The contribution of this paper includes a dynamic model formore » improving and manipulating performance of the biolistic gene gun.« less

  6. Magnetic field-controlled gene expression in encapsulated cells

    PubMed Central

    Ortner, Viktoria; Kaspar, Cornelius; Halter, Christian; Töllner, Lars; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Walzer, Johann; Günzburg, Walter H.; Dangerfield, John A.; Hohenadl, Christine; Czerny, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cell and gene therapies have an enormous range of potential applications, but as for most other therapies, dosing is a critical issue, which makes regulated gene expression a prerequisite for advanced strategies. Several inducible expression systems have been established, which mainly rely on small molecules as inducers, such as hormones or antibiotics. The application of these inducers is difficult to control and the effects on gene regulation are slow. Here we describe a novel system for induction of gene expression in encapsulated cells. This involves the modification of cells to express potential therapeutic genes under the control of a heat inducible promoter and the co-encapsulation of these cells with magnetic nanoparticles. These nanoparticles produce heat when subjected to an alternating magnetic field; the elevated temperatures in the capsules then induce gene expression. In the present study we define the parameters of such systems and provide proof-of-principle using reporter gene constructs. The fine-tuned heating of nanoparticles in the magnetic field allows regulation of gene expression from the outside over a broad range and within short time. Such a system has great potential for advancement of cell and gene therapy approaches. PMID:22197778

  7. GAVIN: Gene-Aware Variant INterpretation for medical sequencing.

    PubMed

    van der Velde, K Joeri; de Boer, Eddy N; van Diemen, Cleo C; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Abbott, Kristin M; Knopperts, Alain; Franke, Lude; Sijmons, Rolf H; de Koning, Tom J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sinke, Richard J; Swertz, Morris A

    2017-01-16

    We present Gene-Aware Variant INterpretation (GAVIN), a new method that accurately classifies variants for clinical diagnostic purposes. Classifications are based on gene-specific calibrations of allele frequencies from the ExAC database, likely variant impact using SnpEff, and estimated deleteriousness based on CADD scores for >3000 genes. In a benchmark on 18 clinical gene sets, we achieve a sensitivity of 91.4% and a specificity of 76.9%. This accuracy is unmatched by 12 other tools. We provide GAVIN as an online MOLGENIS service to annotate VCF files and as an open source executable for use in bioinformatic pipelines. It can be found at http://molgenis.org/gavin .

  8. Evolution of the YABBY gene family in seed plants.

    PubMed

    Finet, Cédric; Floyd, Sandra K; Conway, Stephanie J; Zhong, Bojian; Scutt, Charles P; Bowman, John L

    2016-01-01

    Members of the YABBY gene family of transcription factors in angiosperms have been shown to be involved in the initiation of outgrowth of the lamina, the maintenance of polarity, and establishment of the leaf margin. Although most of the dorsal-ventral polarity genes in seed plants have homologs in non-spermatophyte lineages, the presence of YABBY genes is restricted to seed plants. To gain insight into the origin and diversification of this gene family, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of YABBY gene lineages in seed plants. Our findings suggest that either one or two YABBY genes were present in the last common ancestor of extant seed plants. We also examined the expression of YABBY genes in the gymnosperms Ephedra distachya (Gnetales), Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgoales), and Pseudotsuga menziesii (Coniferales). Our data indicate that some YABBY genes are expressed in a polar (abaxial) manner in leaves and female cones in gymnosperms. We propose that YABBY genes already acted as polarity genes in the last common ancestor of extant seed plants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Use of galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    SciTech Connect

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  10. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    SciTech Connect

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  11. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    DOEpatents

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  12. Quantitative trait locus gene mapping: a new method for locating alcohol response genes.

    PubMed

    Crabbe, J C

    1996-01-01

    Alcoholism is a multigenic trait with important non-genetic determinants. Studies with genetic animal models of susceptibility to several of alcohol's effects suggest that several genes contributing modest effects on susceptibility (Quantitative Trait Loci, or QTLs) are important. A new technique of QTL gene mapping has allowed the identification of the location in mouse genome of several such QTLs. The method is described, and the locations of QTLs affecting the acute alcohol withdrawal reaction are described as an example of the method. Verification of these QTLs in ancillary studies is described and the strengths, limitations, and future directions to be pursued are discussed. QTL mapping is a promising method for identifying genes in rodents with the hope of directly extrapolating the results to the human genome. This review is based on a paper presented at the First International Congress of the Latin American Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism, Santiago, Chile, November 1994.

  13. Gene Selection and Cancer Classification: A Rough Sets Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lijun; Miao, Duoqian; Zhang, Hongyun

    Indentification of informative gene subsets responsible for discerning between available samples of gene expression data is an important task in bioinformatics. Reducts, from rough sets theory, corresponding to a minimal set of essential genes for discerning samples, is an efficient tool for gene selection. Due to the compuational complexty of the existing reduct algoritms, feature ranking is usually used to narrow down gene space as the first step and top ranked genes are selected . In this paper,we define a novel certierion based on the expression level difference btween classes and contribution to classification of the gene for scoring genes and present a algorithm for generating all possible reduct from informative genes.The algorithm takes the whole attribute sets into account and find short reduct with a significant reduction in computational complexity. An exploration of this approach on benchmark gene expression data sets demonstrates that this approach is successful for selecting high discriminative genes and the classification accuracy is impressive.

  14. Mouse Vk gene classification by nucleic acid sequence similarity.

    PubMed

    Strohal, R; Helmberg, A; Kroemer, G; Kofler, R

    1989-01-01

    Analyses of immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) region gene usage in the immune response, estimates of V gene germline complexity, and other nucleic acid hybridization-based studies depend on the extent to which such genes are related (i.e., sequence similarity) and their organization in gene families. While mouse Igh heavy chain V region (VH) gene families are relatively well-established, a corresponding systematic classification of Igk light chain V region (Vk) genes has not been reported. The present analysis, in the course of which we reviewed the known extent of the Vk germline gene repertoire and Vk gene usage in a variety of responses to foreign and self antigens, provides a classification of mouse Vk genes in gene families composed of members with greater than 80% overall nucleic acid sequence similarity. This classification differed in several aspects from that of VH genes: only some Vk gene families were as clearly separated (by greater than 25% sequence dissimilarity) as typical VH gene families; most Vk gene families were closely related and, in several instances, members from different families were very similar (greater than 80%) over large sequence portions; frequently, classification by nucleic acid sequence similarity diverged from existing classifications based on amino-terminal protein sequence similarity. Our data have implications for Vk gene analyses by nucleic acid hybridization and describe potentially important differences in sequence organization between VH and Vk genes.

  15. Convergent evolution of Y chromosome gene content in flies.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris

    2017-10-04

    Sex-chromosomes have formed repeatedly across Diptera from ordinary autosomes, and X-chromosomes mostly conserve their ancestral genes. Y-chromosomes are characterized by abundant gene-loss and an accumulation of repetitive DNA, yet the nature of the gene repertoire of fly Y-chromosomes is largely unknown. Here we trace gene-content evolution of Y-chromosomes across 22 Diptera species, using a subtraction pipeline that infers Y genes from male and female genome, and transcriptome data. Few genes remain on old Y-chromosomes, but the number of inferred Y-genes varies substantially between species. Young Y-chromosomes still show clear evidence of their autosomal origins, but most genes on old Y-chromosomes are not simply remnants of genes originally present on the proto-sex-chromosome that escaped degeneration, but instead were recruited secondarily from autosomes. Despite almost no overlap in Y-linked gene content in different species with independently formed sex-chromosomes, we find that Y-linked genes have evolved convergent gene functions associated with testis expression. Thus, male-specific selection appears as a dominant force shaping gene-content evolution of Y-chromosomes across fly species.While X-chromosome gene content tends to be conserved, Y-chromosome evolution is dynamic and difficult to reconstruct. Here, Mahajan and Bachtrog use a subtraction pipeline to identify Y-linked genes in 22 Diptera species, revealing patterns of Y-chromosome gene-content evolution.

  16. Gene Therapy for Color Blindness.

    PubMed

    Hassall, Mark M; Barnard, Alun R; MacLaren, Robert E

    2017-12-01

    Achromatopsia is a rare congenital cause of vision loss due to isolated cone photoreceptor dysfunction. The most common underlying genetic mutations are autosomal recessive changes in CNGA3 , CNGB3 , GNAT2 , PDE6H , PDE6C , or ATF6 . Animal models of Cnga3 , Cngb3 , and Gnat2 have been rescued using AAV gene therapy; showing partial restoration of cone electrophysiology and integration of this new photopic vision in reflexive and behavioral visual tests. Three gene therapy phase I/II trials are currently being conducted in human patients in the USA, the UK, and Germany. This review details the AAV gene therapy treatments of achromatopsia to date. We also present novel data showing rescue of a Cnga3 -/- mouse model using an rAAV.CBA.CNGA3 vector. We conclude by synthesizing the implications of this animal work for ongoing human trials, particularly, the challenge of restoring integrated cone retinofugal pathways in an adult visual system. The evidence to date suggests that gene therapy for achromatopsia will need to be applied early in childhood to be effective.

  17. Distribution and variation of NV genes in fish rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.; Higman, K.H.; Bjorklund, H.V.

    1997-01-01

    The fish rhabdovirus infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) contains a non-virion (NV) gene between the glycoprotein (G) and polymerase (L) genes on its RNA genome. The present study investigated three other fish rhabdovirus genomes and found that the NV gene of hirame rhabdovirus is closely related to the NV of IHNV, whereas the viral haemorrhagic septicemia NV gene showed evidence of significant divergence. Most importantly, spring viraemia of carp virus, the only vesiculovirus-like fish rhabdovirus examined, did not have an NV gene at its genomic RNA G-L junction. These results suggest that the presence of an NV gene is characteristic of the unassigned fish rhabdovirus subgroup previously classified as lyssaviruses, and that the NV gene is not essential for replication in fish cells per se, since it is absent in a vesiculovirus-like fish rhabdovirus.

  18. The Mouse Solitary Odorant Receptor Gene Promoters as Models for the Study of Odorant Receptor Gene Choice

    PubMed Central

    Degl'Innocenti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, several anatomical regions located within the nasal cavity mediate olfaction. Among these, the main olfactory epithelium detects most conventional odorants. Olfactory sensory neurons, provided with cilia exposed to the air, detect volatile chemicals via an extremely large family of seven-transmembrane chemoreceptors named odorant receptors. Their genes are expressed in a monogenic and monoallelic fashion: a single allele of a single odorant receptor gene is transcribed in a given mature neuron, through a still uncharacterized molecular mechanism known as odorant receptor gene choice. Aim Odorant receptor genes are typically arranged in genomic clusters, but a few are isolated (we call them solitary) from the others within a region broader than 1 Mb upstream and downstream with respect to their transcript's coordinates. The study of clustered genes is problematic, because of redundancy and ambiguities in their regulatory elements: we propose to use the solitary genes as simplified models to understand odorant receptor gene choice. Procedures Here we define number and identity of the solitary genes in the mouse genome (C57BL/6J), and assess the conservation of the solitary status in some mammalian orthologs. Furthermore, we locate their putative promoters, predict their homeodomain binding sites (commonly present in the promoters of odorant receptor genes) and compare candidate promoter sequences with those of wild-caught mice. We also provide expression data from histological sections. Results In the mouse genome there are eight intact solitary genes: Olfr19 (M12), Olfr49, Olfr266, Olfr267, Olfr370, Olfr371, Olfr466, Olfr1402; five are conserved as solitary in rat. These genes are all expressed in the main olfactory epithelium of three-day-old mice. The C57BL/6J candidate promoter of Olfr370 has considerably varied compared to its wild-type counterpart. Within the putative promoter for Olfr266 a homeodomain binding site is predicted. As a

  19. The Mouse Solitary Odorant Receptor Gene Promoters as Models for the Study of Odorant Receptor Gene Choice.

    PubMed

    Degl'Innocenti, Andrea; Parrilla, Marta; Harr, Bettina; Teschke, Meike

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, several anatomical regions located within the nasal cavity mediate olfaction. Among these, the main olfactory epithelium detects most conventional odorants. Olfactory sensory neurons, provided with cilia exposed to the air, detect volatile chemicals via an extremely large family of seven-transmembrane chemoreceptors named odorant receptors. Their genes are expressed in a monogenic and monoallelic fashion: a single allele of a single odorant receptor gene is transcribed in a given mature neuron, through a still uncharacterized molecular mechanism known as odorant receptor gene choice. Odorant receptor genes are typically arranged in genomic clusters, but a few are isolated (we call them solitary) from the others within a region broader than 1 Mb upstream and downstream with respect to their transcript's coordinates. The study of clustered genes is problematic, because of redundancy and ambiguities in their regulatory elements: we propose to use the solitary genes as simplified models to understand odorant receptor gene choice. Here we define number and identity of the solitary genes in the mouse genome (C57BL/6J), and assess the conservation of the solitary status in some mammalian orthologs. Furthermore, we locate their putative promoters, predict their homeodomain binding sites (commonly present in the promoters of odorant receptor genes) and compare candidate promoter sequences with those of wild-caught mice. We also provide expression data from histological sections. In the mouse genome there are eight intact solitary genes: Olfr19 (M12), Olfr49, Olfr266, Olfr267, Olfr370, Olfr371, Olfr466, Olfr1402; five are conserved as solitary in rat. These genes are all expressed in the main olfactory epithelium of three-day-old mice. The C57BL/6J candidate promoter of Olfr370 has considerably varied compared to its wild-type counterpart. Within the putative promoter for Olfr266 a homeodomain binding site is predicted. As a whole, our findings favor Olfr266

  20. Design of magnetic gene complexes as effective and serum resistant gene delivery systems for mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Wu, Jia-He; Xu, Qian-Hao; Wang, Xia-Rong; Lu, Jingxiong; Hu, Ying; Jo, Jun-Ichiro; Yamamoto, Masaya; Ling, Daishun; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2017-03-30

    Gene engineered mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been proposed as promising tools for their various applications in biomedicine. Nevertheless, the lack of an effective and safe way to genetically modify these stem cells is still a major obstacle in the current studies. Herein, we designed novel magnetic complexes by assembling cationized pullulan derivatives with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for delivering target genes to MSCs. Results showed that this complexes achieved effective gene expression with the assistance of external magnetic field, and resisted the adverse effect induced by serum proteins on the gene delivery. Moreover, neither significant cytotoxicity nor the interference on the osteogenic differentiation to MSCs were observed after magnetofection. Further studies revealed that this effective and serum resistant gene transfection was partly due to the accelerated and enhanced intracellular uptake process driven by external magnetic field. To conclude, the current study presented a novel option for genetic modification of MSCs in an effective, relatively safe and serum compatible way. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of Solar Radiation on Gene Expression in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Matallana-Surget, Sabine; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms often regulate their gene expression at the level of transcription and/or translation in response to solar radiation. In this review, we present the use of both transcriptomics and proteomics to advance knowledge in the field of bacterial response to damaging radiation. Those studies pertain to diverse application areas such as fundamental microbiology, water treatment, microbial ecology and astrobiology. Even though it has been demonstrated that mRNA abundance is not always consistent with the protein regulation, we present here an exhaustive review on how bacteria regulate their gene expression at both transcription and translation levels to enable biomarkers identification and comparison of gene regulation from one bacterial species to another. PMID:28250399

  2. Gene Polymorphism Studies in a Teaching Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, Jeffry

    2009-02-01

    I present a laboratory procedure for illustrating transcription, post-transcriptional modification, gene conservation, and comparative genetics for use in undergraduate biology education. Students are individually assigned genes in a targeted biochemical pathway, for which they design and test polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers. In this example, students used genes annotated for the steroid biosynthesis pathway in soybean. The authoritative Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) interactive database and other online resources were used to design primers based first on soybean expressed sequence tags (ESTs), then on ESTs from an alternate organism if soybean sequence was unavailable. Students designed a total of 50 gene-based primer pairs (37 soybean, 13 alternative) and tested these for polymorphism state and similarity between two soybean and two pea lines. Student assessment was based on acquisition of laboratory skills and successful project completion. This simple procedure illustrates conservation of genes and is not limited to soybean or pea. Cost per student estimates are included, along with a detailed protocol and flow diagram of the procedure.

  3. Reduced fecundity in male ALS gene-carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.G.; Lustenberger, A.; Lucek, P.R.

    1995-11-06

    In order to study genetic aspects in multicase families, 89 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 214 Parkinson disease (PD) kindreds were analyzed in parallel studies. Obligate gene-carriers were identified as described previously. There were fewer children per gene-carrier male (2.42) than per gene-carrier female (3.25, Student`s t-test, P<.0003) for ALS but not for other diseases. The data taken together suggest that fecundity in ALS gene-carriers was reduced in males, possibly as a result of reduced fertility. Since childbearing is usually accomplished well before the onset of neurological symptoms in ALS, and since reduced fecundity was found in male ALS gene-carriers,more » these findings raise the possibility that an ALS gene might have a pleiotrophic effect on fertility in males occurring decades before the onset of neurological symptoms. Evidence is presented linking reactive oxygen species to reduced fertility in males. Alternatively, decreased or nonfunctional androgen receptors could play a role. 22 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.« less

  4. Gene Expression Noise, Fitness Landscapes, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlebois, Daniel

    The stochastic (or noisy) process of gene expression can have fitness consequences for living organisms. For example, gene expression noise facilitates the development of drug resistance by increasing the time scale at which beneficial phenotypic states can be maintained. The present work investigates the relationship between gene expression noise and the fitness landscape. By incorporating the costs and benefits of gene expression, we track how the fluctuation magnitude and timescale of expression noise evolve in simulations of cell populations under stress. We find that properties of expression noise evolve to maximize fitness on the fitness landscape, and that low levels of expression noise emerge when the fitness benefits of gene expression exceed the fitness costs (and that high levels of noise emerge when the costs of expression exceed the benefits). The findings from our theoretical/computational work offer new hypotheses on the development of drug resistance, some of which are now being investigated in evolution experiments in our laboratory using well-characterized synthetic gene regulatory networks in budding yeast. Nserc Postdoctoral Fellowship (Grant No. PDF-453977-2014).

  5. Impact of homeobox genes in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Joo, Moon Kyung; Park, Jong-Jae; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2016-10-07

    Homeobox genes, including HOX and non- HOX genes, have been identified to be expressed aberrantly in solid tumors. In gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, most studies have focused on the function of non- HOX genes including caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 1 (CDX1) and CDX2. CDX2 is a crucial factor in the development of pre-cancerous lesions such as Barrett's esophagus or intestinal metaplasia in the stomach, and its tumor suppressive role has been investigated in colorectal cancers. Recently, several HOX genes were reported to have specific roles in GI cancers; for example, HOXA13 in esophageal squamous cell cancer and HOXB7 in stomach and colorectal cancers. HOXD10 is upregulated in colorectal cancer while it is silenced epigenetically in gastric cancer. Thus, it is essential to examine the differential expression pattern of various homeobox genes in specific tumor types or cell lineages, and understand their underlying mechanisms. In this review, we summarize the available research on homeobox genes and present their potential value for the prediction of prognosis in GI cancers.

  6. Three copies of a single protein II-encoding sequence in the genome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae JS3: evidence for gene conversion and gene duplication.

    PubMed

    van der Ley, P

    1988-11-01

    Gonococci express a family of related outer membrane proteins designated protein II (P.II). These surface proteins are subject to both phase variation and antigenic variation. The P.II gene repertoire of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain JS3 was found to consist of at least ten genes, eight of which were cloned. Sequence analysis and DNA hybridization studies revealed that one particular P.II-encoding sequence is present in three distinct, but almost identical, copies in the JS3 genome. These genes encode the P.II protein that was previously identified as P.IIc. Comparison of their sequences shows that the multiple copies of this P.IIc-encoding gene might have been generated by both gene conversion and gene duplication.

  7. Characterization of the canine desmin (DES) gene and evaluation as a candidate gene for dilated cardiomyopathy in the Dobermann.

    PubMed

    Stabej, Polona; Imholz, Sandra; Versteeg, Serge A; Zijlstra, Carla; Stokhof, Arnold A; Domanjko-Petric, Aleksandra; Leegwater, Peter A J; van Oost, Bernard A

    2004-10-13

    Canine-dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in dogs is a disease of the myocardium associated with dilatation and impaired contraction of the ventricles and is suspected to have a genetic cause. A missense mutation in the desmin gene (DES) causes DCM in a human family. Human DCM closely resembles the canine disease. In the present study, we evaluated whether DES gene mutations are responsible for DCM in Dobermann dogs. We have isolated bacterial artificial chromosome clones (BACs) containing the canine DES gene and determined the chromosomal location by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Using data deposited in the NCBI trace archive and GenBank, the canine DES gene DNA sequence was assembled and seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified. From the canine DES gene BAC clones, a polymorphic microsatellite marker was isolated. The microsatellite marker and four informative desmin SNPs were typed in a Dobermann family with frequent DCM occurrence, but the disease phenotype did not associate with a desmin haplotype. We concluded that mutations in the DES gene do not play a role in Dobermann DCM. Availability of the microsatellite marker, SNPs and DNA sequence reported in this study enable fast evaluation of the DES gene as a DCM candidate gene in other dog breeds with DCM occurrence.

  8. The Gene Construction Kit: a new computer program for manipulating and presenting DNA constructs.

    PubMed

    Gross, R H

    1990-06-01

    The Gene Construction Kit is a new tool for manipulating and displaying DNA sequence information. Constructs can be displayed either graphically or as formatted sequence. Segments of DNA can be cut out with restriction enzymes and pasted into other sites. The program keeps track of staggered ends and notifies the user of incompatibilities and offers a choice of ligation options. Each segment of a construct can have its own defined thickness, pattern, direction and color. The sequence listing can be displayed in any font and style in user defined grouping. Nucleotide positions can be displayed as can restriction sites and protein sequences. The DNA can be displayed as either single- or double-stranded. Restriction sites can be readily marked. Alternative views of the DNA can be maintained and the history of the construct automatically stored. Gel electrophoresis patterns can be generated and can be used in cloning project design. Extensive comments can be stored with the construct and can be searched rapidly for key words. High quality illustrations showing multiple editable constructs with added graphics and text information can be generated for slides, posters or publication.

  9. Modularity of Plant Metabolic Gene Clusters: A Trio of Linked Genes That Are Collectively Required for Acylation of Triterpenes in Oat[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Mugford, Sam T.; Louveau, Thomas; Melton, Rachel; Qi, Xiaoquan; Bakht, Saleha; Hill, Lionel; Tsurushima, Tetsu; Honkanen, Suvi; Rosser, Susan J.; Lomonossoff, George P.; Osbourn, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Operon-like gene clusters are an emerging phenomenon in the field of plant natural products. The genes encoding some of the best-characterized plant secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways are scattered across plant genomes. However, an increasing number of gene clusters encoding the synthesis of diverse natural products have recently been reported in plant genomes. These clusters have arisen through the neo-functionalization and relocation of existing genes within the genome, and not by horizontal gene transfer from microbes. The reasons for clustering are not yet clear, although this form of gene organization is likely to facilitate co-inheritance and co-regulation. Oats (Avena spp) synthesize antimicrobial triterpenoids (avenacins) that provide protection against disease. The synthesis of these compounds is encoded by a gene cluster. Here we show that a module of three adjacent genes within the wider biosynthetic gene cluster is required for avenacin acylation. Through the characterization of these genes and their encoded proteins we present a model of the subcellular organization of triterpenoid biosynthesis. PMID:23532069

  10. Acute anterior uveitis as the initial presentation of alkaptonuria.

    PubMed

    John, S S; Padhan, P; Mathews, J V; David, S

    2009-01-01

    Alkaptonuria is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder that may present with multi-system involvement such as ochronotic arthropathy, renal, urethral and prostatic calculi, cardiac valvular lesions and pigmentation of the skin, sclera, cartilage and other connective tissues. An association of the disease with uveitis has never been reported. We report the first case of alkaptonuria with ochronotic arthropathy presenting with recurrent acute anterior uveitis as the initial manifestation. The possible common link with the HLA-B27 gene is discussed.

  11. Gene-Gene-Environment Interactions of Serotonin Transporter, Monoamine Oxidase A and Childhood Maltreatment Predict Aggressive Behavior in Chinese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Ming, Qing-sen; Yi, Jin-yao; Wang, Xiang; Chai, Qiao-lian; Yao, Shu-qiao

    2017-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions that moderate aggressive behavior have been identified independently in the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene and monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA). The aim of the present study was to investigate epistasis interactions between MAOA-variable number tandem repeat (VNTR), 5-HTTlinked polymorphism (LPR) and child abuse and the effects of these on aggressive tendencies in a group of otherwise healthy adolescents. A group of 546 Chinese male adolescents completed the Child Trauma Questionnaire and Youth self-report of the Child Behavior Checklist. Buccal cells were collected for DNA analysis. The effects of childhood abuse, MAOA-VNTR, 5-HTTLPR genotypes and their interactive gene-gene-environmental effects on aggressive behavior were analyzed using a linear regression model. The effect of child maltreatment was significant, and a three-way interaction among MAOA-VNTR, 5-HTTLPR and sexual abuse (SA) relating to aggressive behaviors was identified. Chinese male adolescents with high expression of the MAOA-VNTR allele and 5-HTTLPR “SS” genotype exhibited the highest aggression tendencies with an increase in SA during childhood. The findings reported support aggression being a complex behavior involving the synergistic effects of gene-gene-environment interactions. PMID:28203149

  12. Homeosis and beyond. What is the function of the Hox genes?

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Jean S

    2010-01-01

    What is the function of the Hox genes? At first glance, it is a curious question. Indeed, the answer seems so obvious that several authors have spoken of 'the Hox function' about some of the Hox genes, namely Hox3/zen and Hox6/ftz that seem to have lost it during the evolution of Arthropods. What these authors meant is that these genes have lost their 'homeotic' function. Indeed, 'homeotic' refers to a functional property that is so often associated with the Hox genes. However, the word 'Hox' should not be used to refer to a function, but to a group of genes. The above examples of Hox3/zen (see Schmitt-Ott's chapter, this book) and Hox6/ftz show that the homeotic function may be not so tightly linked to the Hox genes. Reversely, many genes, not belonging to the Hox group, do present a homeotic function. In the present chapter, I will first give a definition of the Hox genes. I will then ask what is the 'function' of a gene, examining its various meanings at different levels of biological organization. I will review and revisit the relation between the Hox genes and homeosis. I will suggest that their morphological homeotic function has been secondarily derived during the evolution of the Bilateria.

  13. GSTT1 and GSTM1 gene polymorphisims in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Funda; Karkucak, Mutlu; Yilmaz, Dilber; Yakut, Tahsin; Uzaslan, Esra

    2016-10-07

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown cause, which affects all systems, especially the lungs and the lymphatic system. Genetic and environmental factors are held accountable for the etiology. Based on the general opinion, sarcoidosis develops after exposure to a specific environmental agent by genetically susceptible individuals.  The present study aimed to evaluate the disease susceptibility of the GSTT1 and GSTM1 gene polymorphisms in the patients with sarcoidosis. The present study included 78 patients; 38 patients with histopathologically verified sarcoidosis and 40 control subjects. Multiplex PCR method was used to determine the GSTT1 and GSTM1 gene polymorphisms. The genotype was determined based on the bands formed in the agarose gel electrophoresis. The statistical analysis was done using the chi-square test. The positive/negative genotype rates were 79%/21% and 53%/47%, respectively in the case group for the GSTT1 and GSTM1 gene polymorphisms, whereas the positive/negative genotype rates were 77%/23% and 55%/45% in the control group. There was no statistically significant difference in the positive and negative genotypes compared with the case group and the control group for the GSTT1 and GSTM1 gene polymorphisms (p > 0.05). The results from the present study suggest that there is not any association with the control group for the disease susceptibility of the GSTT1 and GSTM1 gene polymorphisms in patients with sarcoidosis, and this result should be supported by large-scale studies because of the limited number of cases in the present study.

  14. [Mutations of EGFR gene and EML4-ALK fusion gene in superficial lymph node of non-small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Wei, Lili; Li, Xingzhou; Yu, Zhonghe

    2015-07-14

    To explore the mutation status of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) fusion gene and microtubule associated protein like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) fusion gene in superficial lymph nodes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The technique of fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR) was employed for detecting the mutation rate of EGFR gene and EML4-ALK fusion gene for 40 cases of superficial lymph node tissue of NSCLC inpatients at General Military Hospital of Beijing PLA Command from February 2013 to November 2014. And then the correlations were analyzed between EMIA-ALK fusion gene and EGFR gene with clinical features and the clinical efficacies of targeted therapy. The mutation rate of EGFR gene was 35% (14/40) and 50% (10/20) in non-smokers and 46.7% (14/30) in adenocarcinoma patients. The mutation distribution was as follows: exon 18 (n = 1), exon 19 (n =8) and exon 21 (n =5). The mutation rate of EML4-ALK fusion gene was 2. 5% (1/40). EGFR gene mutation was predominantly present in non-smokers (P < 0. 05) and adenocarcinoma (P <0. 01) while no significant difference existed between gender, age or stage (P >0. 05). Those on a targeted therapy had a disease control rate of 93. 3%. Both EGFR gene and EMI4-ALK fusion gene may be detected in superficial lymph nodes of NSCLC patients. The mutation rate of EGFR gene is high in adenocarcinoma and non-smokers while EML4-ALK fusion gene has a low mutation rate.

  15. Gene-Based Genome-Wide Association Analysis in European and Asian Populations Identified Novel Genes for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong; Xia, Wei; Mo, Xing-Bo; Lin, Xiang; Qiu, Ying-Hua; Yi, Neng-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Deng, Fei-Yan; Lei, Shu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex autoimmune disease. Using a gene-based association research strategy, the present study aims to detect unknown susceptibility to RA and to address the ethnic differences in genetic susceptibility to RA between European and Asian populations. Gene-based association analyses were performed with KGG 2.5 by using publicly available large RA datasets (14,361 RA cases and 43,923 controls of European subjects, 4,873 RA cases and 17,642 controls of Asian Subjects). For the newly identified RA-associated genes, gene set enrichment analyses and protein-protein interactions analyses were carried out with DAVID and STRING version 10.0, respectively. Differential expression verification was conducted using 4 GEO datasets. The expression levels of three selected 'highly verified' genes were measured by ELISA among our in-house RA cases and controls. A total of 221 RA-associated genes were newly identified by gene-based association study, including 71'overlapped', 76 'European-specific' and 74 'Asian-specific' genes. Among them, 105 genes had significant differential expressions between RA patients and health controls at least in one dataset, especially for 20 genes including 11 'overlapped' (ABCF1, FLOT1, HLA-F, IER3, TUBB, ZKSCAN4, BTN3A3, HSP90AB1, CUTA, BRD2, HLA-DMA), 5 'European-specific' (PHTF1, RPS18, BAK1, TNFRSF14, SUOX) and 4 'Asian-specific' (RNASET2, HFE, BTN2A2, MAPK13) genes whose differential expressions were significant at least in three datasets. The protein expressions of two selected genes FLOT1 (P value = 1.70E-02) and HLA-DMA (P value = 4.70E-02) in plasma were significantly different in our in-house samples. Our study identified 221 novel RA-associated genes and especially highlighted the importance of 20 candidate genes on RA. The results addressed ethnic genetic background differences for RA susceptibility between European and Asian populations and detected a long list of overlapped or ethnic specific RA genes. The

  16. Role of fruA and csgA genes in gene expression during development of Myxococcus xanthus. Analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Takayuki; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki; Komano, Teruya; Inouye, Sumiko

    2002-07-26

    Two genes, fruA and csgA, encoding a putative transcription factor and C-factor, respectively, are essential for fruiting body formation of Myxococcus xanthus. To investigate the role of fruA and csgA genes in developmental gene expression, developing cells as well as vegetative cells of M. xanthus wild-type, fruA::Tc, and csgA731 strains were pulse-labeled with [(35)S]methionine, and the whole cell proteins were analyzed using two-dimensional immobilized pH gradient/SDS-PAGE. Differences in protein synthesis patterns among more than 700 protein spots were detected during development of the three strains. Fourteen proteins showing distinctly different expression patterns in mutant cells were analyzed in more detail. Five of the 14 proteins were identified as elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), Dru, DofA, FruA, and protein S by immunoblot analysis and mass spectroscopy. A gene encoding DofA was cloned and sequenced. Although both fruA and csgA genes regulate early development of M. xanthus, they were found to differently regulate expression of several developmental genes. The production of six proteins, including DofA and protein S, was dependent on fruA, whereas the production of two proteins was dependent on csgA, and one protein was dependent on both fruA and csgA. To explain the present findings, a new model was presented in which different levels of FruA phosphorylation may distinctively regulate the expression of two groups of developmental genes.

  17. Identification and validation of superior reference gene for gene expression normalization via RT-qPCR in staminate and pistillate flowers of Jatropha curcas – A biodiesel plant

    PubMed Central

    Karuppaiya, Palaniyandi; Yan, Xiao-Xue; Liao, Wang; Chen, Fang; Tang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L) seed oil is a natural resource for the alternative production of fossil fuel. Seed oil production is mainly depended on seed yield, which was restricted by the low ratio of staminate flowers to pistillate flowers. Further, the mechanism of physic nut flower sex differentiation has not been fully understood yet. Quantitative Real Time—Polymerase Chain Reaction is a reliable and widely used technique to quantify the gene expression pattern in biological samples. However, for accuracy of qRT-PCR, appropriate reference gene is highly desirable to quantify the target gene level. Hence, the present study was aimed to identify the stable reference genes in staminate and pistillate flowers of J. curcas. In this study, 10 candidate reference genes were selected and evaluated for their expression stability in staminate and pistillate flowers, and their stability was validated by five different algorithms (ΔCt, BestKeeper, NormFinder, GeNorm and RefFinder). Resulting, TUB and EF found to be the two most stably expressed reference for staminate flower; while GAPDH1 and EF found to be the most stably expressed reference gene for pistillate flowers. Finally, RT-qPCR assays of target gene AGAMOUS using the identified most stable reference genes confirmed the reliability of selected reference genes in different stages of flower development. AGAMOUS gene expression levels at different stages were further proved by gene copy number analysis. Therefore, the present study provides guidance for selecting appropriate reference genes for analyzing the expression pattern of floral developmental genes in staminate and pistillate flowers of J. curcas. PMID:28234941

  18. Differential retention of metabolic genes following whole-genome duplication.

    PubMed

    Gout, Jean-François; Duret, Laurent; Kahn, Daniel

    2009-05-01

    Classical studies in Metabolic Control Theory have shown that metabolic fluxes usually exhibit little sensitivity to changes in individual enzyme activity, yet remain sensitive to global changes of all enzymes in a pathway. Therefore, little selective pressure is expected on the dosage or expression of individual metabolic genes, yet entire pathways should still be constrained. However, a direct estimate of this selective pressure had not been evaluated. Whole-genome duplications (WGDs) offer a good opportunity to address this question by analyzing the fates of metabolic genes during the massive gene losses that follow. Here, we take advantage of the successive rounds of WGD that occurred in the Paramecium lineage. We show that metabolic genes exhibit different gene retention patterns than nonmetabolic genes. Contrary to what was expected for individual genes, metabolic genes appeared more retained than other genes after the recent WGD, which was best explained by selection for gene expression operating on entire pathways. Metabolic genes also tend to be less retained when present at high copy number before WGD, contrary to other genes that show a positive correlation between gene retention and preduplication copy number. This is rationalized on the basis of the classical concave relationship relating metabolic fluxes with enzyme expression.

  19. Genetic disruption of the KLF1 gene to overexpress the γ-globin gene using the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Shariati, Laleh; Khanahmad, Hossein; Salehi, Mansoor; Hejazi, Zahra; Rahimmanesh, Ilnaz; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-10-01

    β-thalassemia comprises a major group of human genetic disorders involving a decrease in or an end to the normal synthesis of the β-globin chains of hemoglobin. KLF1 is a key regulatory molecule involved in the γ- to β-globin gene switching process directly inducing the expression of the β-globin gene and indirectly repressing γ-globin. The present study aimed to investigate the ability of an engineered CRISPR/Cas9 system with respect to disrupting the KLF1 gene to inhibit the γ- to β-hemoglobin switching process in K562 cells. We targeted three sites on the KLF1 gene, two of which are upstream of codon 288 in exon 2 and the other site being in exon 3. The average indel percentage in the cells transfected with CRISPR a, b and c was approximately 24%. Relative quantification was performed for the assessment of γ-globin expression. The levels of γ-globin mRNA on day 5 of differentiation were 8.1-, 7.7- and 1.8-fold in the cells treated with CRISPR/Cas9 a, b and c, respectively,compared to untreated cells. The measurement of HbF expression levels confirmed the same results. The findings obtained in the present study support the induction of an indel mutation in the KLF1 gene leading to a null allele. As a result, the effect of KLF1 on the expression of BCL11A is decreased and its inhibitory effect on γ-globin gene expression is removed. Application of CRISPR technology to induce an indel in the KLF1 gene in adult erythroid progenitors may provide a method for activating fetal hemoglobin expression in individuals with β-thalassemia or sickle cell disease. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Multi-targeted priming for genome-wide gene expression assays.

    PubMed

    Adomas, Aleksandra B; Lopez-Giraldez, Francesc; Clark, Travis A; Wang, Zheng; Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2010-08-17

    Complementary approaches to assaying global gene expression are needed to assess gene expression in regions that are poorly assayed by current methodologies. A key component of nearly all gene expression assays is the reverse transcription of transcribed sequences that has traditionally been performed by priming the poly-A tails on many of the transcribed genes in eukaryotes with oligo-dT, or by priming RNA indiscriminately with random hexamers. We designed an algorithm to find common sequence motifs that were present within most protein-coding genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of Neurospora crassa, but that were not present within their ribosomal RNA or transfer RNA genes. We then experimentally tested whether degenerately priming these motifs with multi-targeted primers improved the accuracy and completeness of transcriptomic assays. We discovered two multi-targeted primers that would prime a preponderance of genes in the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa while avoiding priming ribosomal RNA or transfer RNA. Examining the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to nitrogen deficiency and profiling Neurospora crassa early sexual development, we demonstrated that using multi-targeted primers in reverse transcription led to superior performance of microarray profiling and next-generation RNA tag sequencing. Priming with multi-targeted primers in addition to oligo-dT resulted in higher sensitivity, a larger number of well-measured genes and greater power to detect differences in gene expression. Our results provide the most complete and detailed expression profiles of the yeast nitrogen starvation response and N. crassa early sexual development to date. Furthermore, our multi-targeting priming methodology for genome-wide gene expression assays provides selective targeting of multiple sequences and counter-selection against undesirable sequences, facilitating a more complete and precise assay of the transcribed sequences within the genome.

  1. Chemical-Gene Interactions from ToxCast Bioactivity Data ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Characterizing the effects of chemicals in biological systems is often summarized by chemical-gene interactions, which have sparse coverage in the literature. The ToxCast chemical screening program has produced bioactivity data for nearly 2000 chemicals and over 450 gene targets. To evaluate the information gained from the ToxCast project, a ToxCast bioactivity network was created comprising ToxCast chemical-gene interactions based on assay data and compared to a chemical-gene association network from literature. The literature network was compiled from PubMed articles, excluding ToxCast publications, mapped to genes and chemicals. Genes were identified by curated associations available from NCBI while chemicals were identified by PubChem submissions. The frequencies of chemical-gene associations from the literature network were log-scaled and then compared to the ToxCast bioactivity network. In total, 140 times more chemical-gene associations were present in the ToxCast network in comparison to the literature-derived network highlighting the vast increase in chemical-gene interactions putatively elucidated by the ToxCast research program. There were 165 associations found in the literature network that were reproduced by ToxCast bioactivity data, and 336 associations in the literature network were not reproduced by the ToxCast bioactivity network. The literature network relies on the assumption that chemical-gene associations represent a true chemical-gene inte

  2. A network approach to predict pathogenic genes for Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoping; Tang, Wei-Hua; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Chen, Luonan

    2010-10-04

    Fusarium graminearum is the pathogenic agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB), which is a destructive disease on wheat and barley, thereby causing huge economic loss and health problems to human by contaminating foods. Identifying pathogenic genes can shed light on pathogenesis underlying the interaction between F. graminearum and its plant host. However, it is difficult to detect pathogenic genes for this destructive pathogen by time-consuming and expensive molecular biological experiments in lab. On the other hand, computational methods provide an alternative way to solve this problem. Since pathogenesis is a complicated procedure that involves complex regulations and interactions, the molecular interaction network of F. graminearum can give clues to potential pathogenic genes. Furthermore, the gene expression data of F. graminearum before and after its invasion into plant host can also provide useful information. In this paper, a novel systems biology approach is presented to predict pathogenic genes of F. graminearum based on molecular interaction network and gene expression data. With a small number of known pathogenic genes as seed genes, a subnetwork that consists of potential pathogenic genes is identified from the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) of F. graminearum, where the genes in the subnetwork are further required to be differentially expressed before and after the invasion of the pathogenic fungus. Therefore, the candidate genes in the subnetwork are expected to be involved in the same biological processes as seed genes, which imply that they are potential pathogenic genes. The prediction results show that most of the pathogenic genes of F. graminearum are enriched in two important signal transduction pathways, including G protein coupled receptor pathway and MAPK signaling pathway, which are known related to pathogenesis in other fungi. In addition, several pathogenic genes predicted by our method are verified in other pathogenic fungi, which

  3. Amelogenesis Imperfecta; Genes, Proteins, and Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Claire E. L.; Poulter, James A.; Antanaviciute, Agne; Kirkham, Jennifer; Brookes, Steven J.; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Mighell, Alan J.

    2017-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is the name given to a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by inherited developmental enamel defects. AI enamel is abnormally thin, soft, fragile, pitted and/or badly discolored, with poor function and aesthetics, causing patients problems such as early tooth loss, severe embarrassment, eating difficulties, and pain. It was first described separately from diseases of dentine nearly 80 years ago, but the underlying genetic and mechanistic basis of the condition is only now coming to light. Mutations in the gene AMELX, encoding an extracellular matrix protein secreted by ameloblasts during enamel formation, were first identified as a cause of AI in 1991. Since then, mutations in at least eighteen genes have been shown to cause AI presenting in isolation of other health problems, with many more implicated in syndromic AI. Some of the encoded proteins have well documented roles in amelogenesis, acting as enamel matrix proteins or the proteases that degrade them, cell adhesion molecules or regulators of calcium homeostasis. However, for others, function is less clear and further research is needed to understand the pathways and processes essential for the development of healthy enamel. Here, we review the genes and mutations underlying AI presenting in isolation of other health problems, the proteins they encode and knowledge of their roles in amelogenesis, combining evidence from human phenotypes, inheritance patterns, mouse models, and in vitro studies. An LOVD resource (http://dna2.leeds.ac.uk/LOVD/) containing all published gene mutations for AI presenting in isolation of other health problems is described. We use this resource to identify trends in the genes and mutations reported to cause AI in the 270 families for which molecular diagnoses have been reported by 23rd May 2017. Finally we discuss the potential value of the translation of AI genetics to clinical care with improved patient pathways and speculate on the

  4. Amelogenesis Imperfecta; Genes, Proteins, and Pathways.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claire E L; Poulter, James A; Antanaviciute, Agne; Kirkham, Jennifer; Brookes, Steven J; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2017-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is the name given to a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by inherited developmental enamel defects. AI enamel is abnormally thin, soft, fragile, pitted and/or badly discolored, with poor function and aesthetics, causing patients problems such as early tooth loss, severe embarrassment, eating difficulties, and pain. It was first described separately from diseases of dentine nearly 80 years ago, but the underlying genetic and mechanistic basis of the condition is only now coming to light. Mutations in the gene AMELX , encoding an extracellular matrix protein secreted by ameloblasts during enamel formation, were first identified as a cause of AI in 1991. Since then, mutations in at least eighteen genes have been shown to cause AI presenting in isolation of other health problems, with many more implicated in syndromic AI. Some of the encoded proteins have well documented roles in amelogenesis, acting as enamel matrix proteins or the proteases that degrade them, cell adhesion molecules or regulators of calcium homeostasis. However, for others, function is less clear and further research is needed to understand the pathways and processes essential for the development of healthy enamel. Here, we review the genes and mutations underlying AI presenting in isolation of other health problems, the proteins they encode and knowledge of their roles in amelogenesis, combining evidence from human phenotypes, inheritance patterns, mouse models, and in vitro studies. An LOVD resource (http://dna2.leeds.ac.uk/LOVD/) containing all published gene mutations for AI presenting in isolation of other health problems is described. We use this resource to identify trends in the genes and mutations reported to cause AI in the 270 families for which molecular diagnoses have been reported by 23rd May 2017. Finally we discuss the potential value of the translation of AI genetics to clinical care with improved patient pathways and speculate on the

  5. Expression of a DNA Replication Gene Cluster in Bacteriophage T4: Genetic Linkage and the Control of Gene Product Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gerald, W. L.; Karam, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of this study bear on the relationship between genetic linkage and control of interactions between the protein products of different cistrons. In T4 bacteriophage, genes 45 and 44 encode essential components of the phage DNA replication multiprotein complex. T4 gene 45 maps directly upstream of gene 44 relative to the overall direction of reading of this region of the phage chromosome, but it is not known whether these two genes are cotranscribed. It has been shown that a nonsense lesion of T4 gene 45 exerts a cis-dominant inhibitory effect on growth of a missense mutant of gene 44 but not on growth of phage carrying the wild-type gene 44 allele. In previous work, we confirmed these observations on polarity of the gene 45 mutation but detected no polar effects by this lesion on synthesis of either mutant or wild-type gene 44 protein. In the present study, we demonstrate that mRNA for gene 44 protein is separable by gel electrophoresis from gene 45-protein-encoding mRNA. That is, the two proteins are not synthesized from one polycistronic message, and the cis-dominant inhibitory effect of the gene 45 mutation on gene 44 function is probably expressed at a posttranslational stage. We propose that close genetic linkage, whether or not it provides shared transcriptional and translational regulatory signals for certain clusters of functionally related cistrons, may determine the intracellular compartmentalization for synthesis of proteins encoded by these clusters. In prokaryotes, such linkage-dependent compartmentation may minimize the diffusion distances between gene products that are synthesized at low levels and are destined to interact. PMID:6745641

  6. GeneBuilder: interactive in silico prediction of gene structure.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, L; D'Angelo, D; Rogozin, I B

    1999-01-01

    Prediction of gene structure in newly sequenced DNA becomes very important in large genome sequencing projects. This problem is complicated due to the exon-intron structure of eukaryotic genes and because gene expression is regulated by many different short nucleotide domains. In order to be able to analyse the full gene structure in different organisms, it is necessary to combine information about potential functional signals (promoter region, splice sites, start and stop codons, 3' untranslated region) together with the statistical properties of coding sequences (coding potential), information about homologous proteins, ESTs and repeated elements. We have developed the GeneBuilder system which is based on prediction of functional signals and coding regions by different approaches in combination with similarity searches in proteins and EST databases. The potential gene structure models are obtained by using a dynamic programming method. The program permits the use of several parameters for gene structure prediction and refinement. During gene model construction, selecting different exon homology levels with a protein sequence selected from a list of homologous proteins can improve the accuracy of the gene structure prediction. In the case of low homology, GeneBuilder is still able to predict the gene structure. The GeneBuilder system has been tested by using the standard set (Burset and Guigo, Genomics, 34, 353-367, 1996) and the performances are: 0.89 sensitivity and 0.91 specificity at the nucleotide level. The total correlation coefficient is 0.88. The GeneBuilder system is implemented as a part of the WebGene a the URL: http://www.itba.mi. cnr.it/webgene and TRADAT (TRAncription Database and Analysis Tools) launcher URL: http://www.itba.mi.cnr.it/tradat.

  7. The ribosomal gene spacer region in archaebacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achenbach-Richter, L.; Woese, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    Sequences for the spacer regions that separate the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA genes have been determined for four more (strategically placed) archaebacteria. These confirm the general rule that methanogens and extreme halophiles have spacers that contain a single tRNAala gene, while tRNA genes are not found in the spacer region of the true extreme thermophiles. The present study also shows that the spacer regions from the sulfate reducing Archaeglobus and the extreme thermophile Thermococcus (both of which cluster phylogenetically with the methanogens and extreme halophiles) contain each a tRNAala gene. Thus, not only all methanogens and extreme halophiles show this characteristic, but all organisms on the "methanogen branch" of the archaebacterial tree appear to do so. The finding of a tRNA gene in the spacer region of the extreme thermophile Thermococcus celer is the first known phenotypic property that links this organism with its phylogenetic counterparts, the methanogens, rather than with its phenotypic counterparts, the sulfur-dependent extreme thermophiles.

  8. Inventory and Phylogenetic Analysis of Meiotic Genes in Monogonont Rotifers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing question in evolutionary biology is how sexual reproduction has persisted in eukaryotic lineages. As cyclical parthenogens, monogonont rotifers are a powerful model for examining this question, yet the molecular nature of sexual reproduction in this lineage is currently understudied. To examine genes involved in meiosis, we generated partial genome assemblies for 2 distantly related monogonont species, Brachionus calyciflorus and B. manjavacas. Here we present an inventory of 89 meiotic genes, of which 80 homologs were identified and annotated from these assemblies. Using phylogenetic analysis, we show that several meiotic genes have undergone relatively recent duplication events that appear to be specific to the monogonont lineage. Further, we compare the expression of “meiosis-specific” genes involved in recombination and all annotated copies of the cell cycle regulatory gene CDC20 between obligate parthenogenetic (OP) and cyclical parthenogenetic (CP) strains of B. calyciflorus. We show that “meiosis-specific” genes are expressed in both CP and OP strains, whereas the expression of one of the CDC20 genes is specific to cyclical parthenogenesis. The data presented here provide insights into mechanisms of cyclical parthenogenesis and establish expectations for studies of obligate asexual relatives of monogononts, the bdelloid rotifer lineage. PMID:23487324

  9. Gene: a gene-centered information resource at NCBI.

    PubMed

    Brown, Garth R; Hem, Vichet; Katz, Kenneth S; Ovetsky, Michael; Wallin, Craig; Ermolaeva, Olga; Tolstoy, Igor; Tatusova, Tatiana; Pruitt, Kim D; Maglott, Donna R; Murphy, Terence D

    2015-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI) Gene database (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene) integrates gene-specific information from multiple data sources. NCBI Reference Sequence (RefSeq) genomes for viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes are the primary foundation for Gene records in that they form the critical association between sequence and a tracked gene upon which additional functional and descriptive content is anchored. Additional content is integrated based on the genomic location and RefSeq transcript and protein sequence data. The content of a Gene record represents the integration of curation and automated processing from RefSeq, collaborating model organism databases, consortia such as Gene Ontology, and other databases within NCBI. Records in Gene are assigned unique, tracked integers as identifiers. The content (citations, nomenclature, genomic location, gene products and their attributes, phenotypes, sequences, interactions, variation details, maps, expression, homologs, protein domains and external databases) is available via interactive browsing through NCBI's Entrez system, via NCBI's Entrez programming utilities (E-Utilities and Entrez Direct) and for bulk transfer by FTP. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  10. Global gene expression analysis by combinatorial optimization.

    PubMed

    Ameur, Adam; Aurell, Erik; Carlsson, Mats; Westholm, Jakub Orzechowski

    2004-01-01

    Generally, there is a trade-off between methods of gene expression analysis that are precise but labor-intensive, e.g. RT-PCR, and methods that scale up to global coverage but are not quite as quantitative, e.g. microarrays. In the present paper, we show how how a known method of gene expression profiling (K. Kato, Nucleic Acids Res. 23, 3685-3690 (1995)), which relies on a fairly small number of steps, can be turned into a global gene expression measurement by advanced data post-processing, with potentially little loss of accuracy. Post-processing here entails solving an ancillary combinatorial optimization problem. Validation is performed on in silico experiments generated from the FANTOM data base of full-length mouse cDNA. We present two variants of the method. One uses state-of-the-art commercial software for solving problems of this kind, the other a code developed by us specifically for this purpose, released in the public domain under GPL license.

  11. Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions: new insights into the prevention, detection and management of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Lanktree, Matthew B; Hegele, Robert A

    2009-02-26

    Despite the recent success of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in identifying loci consistently associated with coronary artery disease (CAD), a large proportion of the genetic components of CAD and its metabolic risk factors, including plasma lipids, type 2 diabetes and body mass index, remain unattributed. Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions might produce a meaningful improvement in quantification of the genetic determinants of CAD. Testing for gene-gene and gene-environment interactions is thus a new frontier for large-scale GWASs of CAD. There are several anecdotal examples of monogenic susceptibility to CAD in which the phenotype was worsened by an adverse environment. In addition, small-scale candidate gene association studies with functional hypotheses have identified gene-environment interactions. For future evaluation of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions to achieve the same success as the single gene associations reported in recent GWASs, it will be important to pre-specify agreed standards of study design and statistical power, environmental exposure measurement, phenomic characterization and analytical strategies. Here we discuss these issues, particularly in relation to the investigation and potential clinical utility of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in CAD.

  12. Gene expression complex networks: synthesis, identification, and analysis.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Fabrício M; Cesar, Roberto M; Costa, Luciano Da F

    2011-10-01

    Thanks to recent advances in molecular biology, allied to an ever increasing amount of experimental data, the functional state of thousands of genes can now be extracted simultaneously by using methods such as cDNA microarrays and RNA-Seq. Particularly important related investigations are the modeling and identification of gene regulatory networks from expression data sets. Such a knowledge is fundamental for many applications, such as disease treatment, therapeutic intervention strategies and drugs design, as well as for planning high-throughput new experiments. Methods have been developed for gene networks modeling and identification from expression profiles. However, an important open problem regards how to validate such approaches and its results. This work presents an objective approach for validation of gene network modeling and identification which comprises the following three main aspects: (1) Artificial Gene Networks (AGNs) model generation through theoretical models of complex networks, which is used to simulate temporal expression data; (2) a computational method for gene network identification from the simulated data, which is founded on a feature selection approach where a target gene is fixed and the expression profile is observed for all other genes in order to identify a relevant subset of predictors; and (3) validation of the identified AGN-based network through comparison with the original network. The proposed framework allows several types of AGNs to be generated and used in order to simulate temporal expression data. The results of the network identification method can then be compared to the original network in order to estimate its properties and accuracy. Some of the most important theoretical models of complex networks have been assessed: the uniformly-random Erdös-Rényi (ER), the small-world Watts-Strogatz (WS), the scale-free Barabási-Albert (BA), and geographical networks (GG). The experimental results indicate that the inference

  13. Perspectives: Gene Expression in Fisheries Management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Pavey, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Functional genes and gene expression have been connected to physiological traits linked to effective production and broodstock selection in aquaculture, selective implications of commercial fish harvest, and adaptive changes reflected in non-commercial fish populations subject to human disturbance and climate change. Gene mapping using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify functional genes, gene expression (analogue microarrays and real-time PCR), and digital sequencing technologies looking at RNA transcripts present new concepts and opportunities in support of effective and sustainable fisheries. Genomic tools have been rapidly growing in aquaculture research addressing aspects of fish health, toxicology, and early development. Genomic technologies linking effects in functional genes involved in growth, maturation and life history development have been tied to selection resulting from harvest practices. Incorporating new and ever-increasing knowledge of fish genomes is opening a different perspective on local adaptation that will prove invaluable in wild fish conservation and management. Conservation of fish stocks is rapidly incorporating research on critical adaptive responses directed at the effects of human disturbance and climate change through gene expression studies. Genomic studies of fish populations can be generally grouped into three broad categories: 1) evolutionary genomics and biodiversity; 2) adaptive physiological responses to a changing environment; and 3) adaptive behavioral genomics and life history diversity. We review current genomic research in fisheries focusing on those that use microarrays to explore differences in gene expression among phenotypes and within or across populations, information that is critically important to the conservation of fish and their relationship to humans.

  14. Divinyl ether synthase gene and protein, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Gregg A [East Lansing, MI; Itoh, Aya [Tsuruoka, JP

    2011-09-13

    The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

  15. Divinyl ether synthase gene, and protein and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Gregg A.; Itoh, Aya

    2006-12-26

    The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

  16. The effect of the nonionic block copolymer pluronic P85 on gene expression in mouse muscle and antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Gaymalov, Zagit Z; Yang, Zhihui; Pisarev, Vladimir M; Alakhov, Valery Yu; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2009-02-01

    DNA vaccines can be greatly improved by polymer agents that simultaneously increase transgene expression and activate immunity. We describe here Pluronic P85 (P85), a triblock copolymer of ethylene oxide (EO) and propylene oxide (PO) EO(26)-PO(40)-EO(26). Using a mouse model we demonstrate that co-administration of a bacterial plasmid DNA with P85 in a skeletal muscle greatly increases gene expression in the injection site and distant organs, especially the draining lymph nodes and spleen. The reporter expression colocalizes with the specific markers of myocytes and keratinocytes in the muscle, as well as dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in the muscle, lymph nodes and spleen. Furthermore, DNA/P85 and P85 alone increase the systemic expansion of CD11c+ (DC), and local expansion of CD11c+, CD14+ (macrophages) and CD49b+ (natural killer) cell populations. DNA/P85 (but not P85) also increases maturation of local DC (CD11c+ CD86+, CD11c+ CD80 +, and CD11c+ CD40+. We suggest that DNA/P85 promotes the activation and recruitment of the antigen-presenting cells, which further incorporate, express and carry the transgene to the immune system organs.

  17. Sexy gene conversions: locating gene conversions on the X-chromosome.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Mark J; Zhang, Liqing

    2009-08-01

    Gene conversion can have a profound impact on both the short- and long-term evolution of genes and genomes. Here, we examined the gene families that are located on the X-chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), mouse (Mus musculus) and rat (Rattus norvegicus) for evidence of gene conversion. We identified seven gene families (WD repeat protein family, Ferritin Heavy Chain family, RAS-related Protein RAB-40 family, Diphosphoinositol polyphosphate phosphohydrolase family, Transcription Elongation Factor A family, LDOC1-related family, Zinc Finger Protein ZIC, and GLI family) that show evidence of gene conversion. Through phylogenetic analyses and synteny evidence, we show that gene conversion has played an important role in the evolution of these gene families and that gene conversion has occurred independently in both primates and rodents. Comparing the results with those of two gene conversion prediction programs (GENECONV and Partimatrix), we found that both GENECONV and Partimatrix have very high false negative rates (i.e. failed to predict gene conversions), which leads to many undetected gene conversions. The combination of phylogenetic analyses with physical synteny evidence exhibits high resolution in the detection of gene conversions.

  18. Creating and validating cis-regulatory maps of tissue-specific gene expression regulation

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Timothy R.; Bailey, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Predicting which genomic regions control the transcription of a given gene is a challenge. We present a novel computational approach for creating and validating maps that associate genomic regions (cis-regulatory modules–CRMs) with genes. The method infers regulatory relationships that explain gene expression observed in a test tissue using widely available genomic data for ‘other’ tissues. To predict the regulatory targets of a CRM, we use cross-tissue correlation between histone modifications present at the CRM and expression at genes within 1 Mbp of it. To validate cis-regulatory maps, we show that they yield more accurate models of gene expression than carefully constructed control maps. These gene expression models predict observed gene expression from transcription factor binding in the CRMs linked to that gene. We show that our maps are able to identify long-range regulatory interactions and improve substantially over maps linking genes and CRMs based on either the control maps or a ‘nearest neighbor’ heuristic. Our results also show that it is essential to include CRMs predicted in multiple tissues during map-building, that H3K27ac is the most informative histone modification, and that CAGE is the most informative measure of gene expression for creating cis-regulatory maps. PMID:25200088

  19. Genome-editing Technologies for Gene and Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Morgan L; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-03-01

    Gene therapy has historically been defined as the addition of new genes to human cells. However, the recent advent of genome-editing technologies has enabled a new paradigm in which the sequence of the human genome can be precisely manipulated to achieve a therapeutic effect. This includes the correction of mutations that cause disease, the addition of therapeutic genes to specific sites in the genome, and the removal of deleterious genes or genome sequences. This review presents the mechanisms of different genome-editing strategies and describes each of the common nuclease-based platforms, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), meganucleases, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We then summarize the progress made in applying genome editing to various areas of gene and cell therapy, including antiviral strategies, immunotherapies, and the treatment of monogenic hereditary disorders. The current challenges and future prospects for genome editing as a transformative technology for gene and cell therapy are also discussed.

  20. Genome-editing Technologies for Gene and Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Maeder, Morgan L; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has historically been defined as the addition of new genes to human cells. However, the recent advent of genome-editing technologies has enabled a new paradigm in which the sequence of the human genome can be precisely manipulated to achieve a therapeutic effect. This includes the correction of mutations that cause disease, the addition of therapeutic genes to specific sites in the genome, and the removal of deleterious genes or genome sequences. This review presents the mechanisms of different genome-editing strategies and describes each of the common nuclease-based platforms, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), meganucleases, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We then summarize the progress made in applying genome editing to various areas of gene and cell therapy, including antiviral strategies, immunotherapies, and the treatment of monogenic hereditary disorders. The current challenges and future prospects for genome editing as a transformative technology for gene and cell therapy are also discussed. PMID:26755333

  1. Identification of differentially expressed genes in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) root under waterlogging stress by digital gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiao-Hua; Xu, Xue-Wen; Lin, Xiao-Jian; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Chen, Xue-Hao

    2012-03-01

    High-throughput tag-sequencing (Tag-seq) analysis based on the Solexa Genome Analyzer platform was applied to analyze the gene expression profiling of cucumber plant at 5 time points over a 24h period of waterlogging treatment. Approximately 5.8 million total clean sequence tags per library were obtained with 143013 distinct clean tag sequences. Approximately 23.69%-29.61% of the distinct clean tags were mapped unambiguously to the unigene database, and 53.78%-60.66% of the distinct clean tags were mapped to the cucumber genome database. Analysis of the differentially expressed genes revealed that most of the genes were down-regulated in the waterlogging stages, and the differentially expressed genes mainly linked to carbon metabolism, photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species generation/scavenging, and hormone synthesis/signaling. Finally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction using nine genes independently verified the tag-mapped results. This present study reveals the comprehensive mechanisms of waterlogging-responsive transcription in cucumber. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Gene-environment studies: any advantage over environmental studies?

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Hemminki, Kari

    2007-07-01

    Gene-environment studies have been motivated by the likely existence of prevalent low-risk genes that interact with common environmental exposures. The present study assessed the statistical advantage of the simultaneous consideration of genes and environment to investigate the effect of environmental risk factors on disease. In particular, we contemplated the possibility that several genes modulate the environmental effect. Environmental exposures, genotypes and phenotypes were simulated according to a wide range of parameter settings. Different models of gene-gene-environment interaction were considered. For each parameter combination, we estimated the probability of detecting the main environmental effect, the power to identify the gene-environment interaction and the frequency of environmentally affected individuals at which environmental and gene-environment studies show the same statistical power. The proportion of cases in the population attributable to the modeled risk factors was also calculated. Our data indicate that environmental exposures with weak effects may account for a significant proportion of the population prevalence of the disease. A general result was that, if the environmental effect was restricted to rare genotypes, the power to detect the gene-environment interaction was higher than the power to identify the main environmental effect. In other words, when few individuals contribute to the overall environmental effect, individual contributions are large and result in easily identifiable gene-environment interactions. Moreover, when multiple genes interacted with the environment, the statistical benefit of gene-environment studies was limited to those studies that included major contributors to the gene-environment interaction. The advantage of gene-environment over plain environmental studies also depends on the inheritance mode of the involved genes, on the study design and, to some extend, on the disease prevalence.

  3. Characterization of a novel chaperone/usher fimbrial operon present on KpGI-5, a methionine tRNA gene-associated genomic island in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several strain-specific Klebsiella pneumoniae virulence determinants have been described, though these have almost exclusively been linked with hypervirulent liver abscess-associated strains. Through PCR interrogation of integration hotspots, chromosome walking, island-tagging and fosmid-based marker rescue we captured and sequenced KpGI-5, a novel genomic island integrated into the met56 tRNA gene of K. pneumoniae KR116, a bloodstream isolate from a patient with pneumonia and neutropenic sepsis. Results The 14.0 kb KpGI-5 island exhibited a genome-anomalous G + C content, possessed near-perfect 46 bp direct repeats, encoded a γ1-chaperone/usher fimbrial cluster (fim2) and harboured seven other predicted genes of unknown function. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated expression of three fim2 genes, and suggested that the fim2A-fim2K cluster comprised an operon. As fimbrial systems are frequently implicated in pathogenesis, we examined the role of fim2 by analysing KR2107, a streptomycin-resistant derivative of KR116, and three isogenic mutants (Δfim, Δfim2 and ΔfimΔfim2) using biofilm assays, human cell adhesion assays and pair-wise competition-based murine models of intestinal colonization, lung infection and ascending urinary tract infection. Although no statistically significant role for fim2 was demonstrable, liver and kidney CFU counts for lung and urinary tract infection models, respectively, hinted at an ordered gradation of virulence: KR2107 (most virulent), KR2107∆fim2, KR2107∆fim and KR2107∆fim∆fim2 (least virulent). Thus, despite lack of statistical evidence there was a suggestion that fim and fim2 contribute additively to virulence in these murine infection models. However, further studies would be necessary to substantiate this hypothesis. Conclusion Although fim2 was present in 13% of Klebsiella spp. strains investigated, no obvious in vitro or in vivo role for the locus was identified, although there were subtle hints of

  4. A high resolution atlas of gene expression in the domestic sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Clark, Emily L; Bush, Stephen J; McCulloch, Mary E B; Farquhar, Iseabail L; Young, Rachel; Lefevre, Lucas; Pridans, Clare; Tsang, Hiu G; Wu, Chunlei; Afrasiabi, Cyrus; Watson, Mick; Whitelaw, C Bruce; Freeman, Tom C; Summers, Kim M; Archibald, Alan L; Hume, David A

    2017-09-01

    Sheep are a key source of meat, milk and fibre for the global livestock sector, and an important biomedical model. Global analysis of gene expression across multiple tissues has aided genome annotation and supported functional annotation of mammalian genes. We present a large-scale RNA-Seq dataset representing all the major organ systems from adult sheep and from several juvenile, neonatal and prenatal developmental time points. The Ovis aries reference genome (Oar v3.1) includes 27,504 genes (20,921 protein coding), of which 25,350 (19,921 protein coding) had detectable expression in at least one tissue in the sheep gene expression atlas dataset. Network-based cluster analysis of this dataset grouped genes according to their expression pattern. The principle of 'guilt by association' was used to infer the function of uncharacterised genes from their co-expression with genes of known function. We describe the overall transcriptional signatures present in the sheep gene expression atlas and assign those signatures, where possible, to specific cell populations or pathways. The findings are related to innate immunity by focusing on clusters with an immune signature, and to the advantages of cross-breeding by examining the patterns of genes exhibiting the greatest expression differences between purebred and crossbred animals. This high-resolution gene expression atlas for sheep is, to our knowledge, the largest transcriptomic dataset from any livestock species to date. It provides a resource to improve the annotation of the current reference genome for sheep, presenting a model transcriptome for ruminants and insight into gene, cell and tissue function at multiple developmental stages.

  5. Gene doping.

    PubMed

    Harridge, Stephen D R; Velloso, Cristiana P

    2008-01-01

    Gene doping is the misuse of gene therapy to enhance athletic performance. It has recently been recognised as a potential threat and subsequently been prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Despite concerns with safety and efficacy of gene therapy, the technology is progressing steadily. Many of the genes/proteins which are involved in determining key components of athletic performance have been identified. Naturally occurring mutations in humans as well as gene-transfer experiments in adult animals have shown that altered expression of these genes does indeed affect physical performance. For athletes, however, the gains in performance must be weighed against the health risks associated with the gene-transfer process, whereas the detection of such practices will provide new challenges for the anti-doping authorities.

  6. Discovering gene annotations in biomedical text databases.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, Ali; Ozsoyoglu, Gultekin

    2008-03-06

    Genes and gene products are frequently annotated with Gene Ontology concepts based on the evidence provided in genomics articles. Manually locating and curating information about a genomic entity from the biomedical literature requires vast amounts of human effort. Hence, there is clearly a need forautomated computational tools to annotate the genes and gene products with Gene Ontology concepts by computationally capturing the related knowledge embedded in textual data. In this article, we present an automated genomic entity annotation system, GEANN, which extracts information about the characteristics of genes and gene products in article abstracts from PubMed, and translates the discoveredknowledge into Gene Ontology (GO) concepts, a widely-used standardized vocabulary of genomic traits. GEANN utilizes textual "extraction patterns", and a semantic matching framework to locate phrases matching to a pattern and produce Gene Ontology annotations for genes and gene products. In our experiments, GEANN has reached to the precision level of 78% at therecall level of 61%. On a select set of Gene Ontology concepts, GEANN either outperforms or is comparable to two other automated annotation studies. Use of WordNet for semantic pattern matching improves the precision and recall by 24% and 15%, respectively, and the improvement due to semantic pattern matching becomes more apparent as the Gene Ontology terms become more general. GEANN is useful for two distinct purposes: (i) automating the annotation of genomic entities with Gene Ontology concepts, and (ii) providing existing annotations with additional "evidence articles" from the literature. The use of textual extraction patterns that are constructed based on the existing annotations achieve high precision. The semantic pattern matching framework provides a more flexible pattern matching scheme with respect to "exactmatching" with the advantage of locating approximate pattern occurrences with similar semantics. Relatively

  7. Gene Addition Strategies for β-Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Anemia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Alisa C; Rivella, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia are two of the most common diseases related to the hemoglobin protein. In these diseases, the beta-globin gene is mutated, causing severe anemia and ineffective erythropoiesis. Patients can additionally present with a number of life-threatening co-morbidities, such as stroke or spontaneous fractures. Current treatment involves transfusion and iron chelation; allogeneic bone marrow transplant is the only curative option, but is limited by the availability of matching donors and graft-versus-host disease. As these two diseases are monogenic diseases, they make an attractive setting for gene therapy. Gene therapy aims to correct the mutated beta-globin gene or add back a functional copy of beta- or gamma-globin. Initial gene therapy work was done with oncoretroviral vectors, but has since shifted to lentiviral vectors. Currently, there are a few clinical trials underway to test the curative potential of some of these lentiviral vectors. This review will highlight the work done thus far, and present the challenges still facing gene therapy, such as genome toxicity concerns and achieving sufficient transgene expression to cure those with the most severe forms of thalassemia.

  8. Linkage and homology analysis divides the eight genes for the small subunit of petunia ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase into three gene families

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Caroline; van den Elzen, Peter; Tamaki, Stanley; Dunsmuir, Pamela; Bedbrook, John

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-six λ phage clones with homology to coding sequences of the small subunit (SSU) of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase have been isolated from an EMBL3 λ phage bank of Petunia (Mitchell) DNA. Restriction mapping of the phage inserts shows that the clones were obtained from five nonoverlapping regions of petunia DNA that carry seven SSU genes. Comparison of the HindIII genomic fragments of petunia DNA with the HindIII restriction fragments of the isolated phage indicates that petunia nuclear DNA encodes eight SSU genes, seven of which are present in the phage clones. Two incomplete genes, which contain only the 3′ end of an SSU gene, were also found in the phage clones. We demonstrate that the eight SSU genes of petunia can be divided into three gene families based on homology to three petunia cDNA clones. Two gene families contain single SSU genes and the third contains six genes, four of which are closely linked within petunia nuclear DNA. Images PMID:16593584

  9. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  10. Reconstructing directed gene regulatory network by only gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Feng, Xi Kang; Ng, Yen Kaow; Li, Shuai Cheng

    2016-08-18

    Accurately identifying gene regulatory network is an important task in understanding in vivo biological activities. The inference of such networks is often accomplished through the use of gene expression data. Many methods have been developed to evaluate gene expression dependencies between transcription factor and its target genes, and some methods also eliminate transitive interactions. The regulatory (or edge) direction is undetermined if the target gene is also a transcription factor. Some methods predict the regulatory directions in the gene regulatory networks by locating the eQTL single nucleotide polymorphism, or by observing the gene expression changes when knocking out/down the candidate transcript factors; regrettably, these additional data are usually unavailable, especially for the samples deriving from human tissues. In this study, we propose the Context Based Dependency Network (CBDN), a method that is able to infer gene regulatory networks with the regulatory directions from gene expression data only. To determine the regulatory direction, CBDN computes the influence of source to target by evaluating the magnitude changes of expression dependencies between the target gene and the others with conditioning on the source gene. CBDN extends the data processing inequality by involving the dependency direction to distinguish between direct and transitive relationship between genes. We also define two types of important regulators which can influence a majority of the genes in the network directly or indirectly. CBDN can detect both of these two types of important regulators by averaging the influence functions of candidate regulator to the other genes. In our experiments with simulated and real data, even with the regulatory direction taken into account, CBDN outperforms the state-of-the-art approaches for inferring gene regulatory network. CBDN identifies the important regulators in the predicted network: 1. TYROBP influences a batch of genes that are

  11. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  12. Digital gene expression for non-model organisms

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lewis Z.; Li, Jun; Schmidt-Küntzel, Anne; Warren, Wesley C.; Barsh, Gregory S.

    2011-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies offer new approaches for global measurements of gene expression but are mostly limited to organisms for which a high-quality assembled reference genome sequence is available. We present a method for gene expression profiling called EDGE, or EcoP15I-tagged Digital Gene Expression, based on ultra-high-throughput sequencing of 27-bp cDNA fragments that uniquely tag the corresponding gene, thereby allowing direct quantification of transcript abundance. We show that EDGE is capable of assaying for expression in >99% of genes in the genome and achieves saturation after 6–8 million reads. EDGE exhibits very little technical noise, reveals a large (106) dynamic range of gene expression, and is particularly suited for quantification of transcript abundance in non-model organisms where a high-quality annotated genome is not available. In a direct comparison with RNA-seq, both methods provide similar assessments of relative transcript abundance, but EDGE does better at detecting gene expression differences for poorly expressed genes and does not exhibit transcript length bias. Applying EDGE to laboratory mice, we show that a loss-of-function mutation in the melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r), recognized as a Mendelian determinant of yellow hair color in many different mammals, also causes reduced expression of genes involved in the interferon response. To illustrate the application of EDGE to a non-model organism, we examine skin biopsy samples from a cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) and identify genes likely to control differences in the color of spotted versus non-spotted regions. PMID:21844123

  13. Gene Architectures that Minimize Cost of Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Frumkin, Idan; Schirman, Dvir; Rotman, Aviv; Li, Fangfei; Zahavi, Liron; Mordret, Ernest; Asraf, Omer; Wu, Song; Levy, Sasha F; Pilpel, Yitzhak

    2017-01-05

    Gene expression burdens cells by consuming resources and energy. While numerous studies have investigated regulation of expression level, little is known about gene design elements that govern expression costs. Here, we ask how cells minimize production costs while maintaining a given protein expression level and whether there are gene architectures that optimize this process. We measured fitness of ∼14,000 E. coli strains, each expressing a reporter gene with a unique 5' architecture. By comparing cost-effective and ineffective architectures, we found that cost per protein molecule could be minimized by lowering transcription levels, regulating translation speeds, and utilizing amino acids that are cheap to synthesize and that are less hydrophobic. We then examined natural E. coli genes and found that highly expressed genes have evolved more forcefully to minimize costs associated with their expression. Our study thus elucidates gene design elements that improve the economy of protein expression in natural and heterologous systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Metagenomic analysis of nitrogen metabolism genes in the surface of marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Carolina; Schneider, Dominik; Thürmer, Andrea; Dellwig, Olaf; Lipka, Marko; Daniel, Rolf; Böttcher, Michael E.; Friedrich, Michael W.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we analysed metagenomes along with biogeochemical profiles from Skagerrak (North Sea) and Bothnian Bay (Baltic Sea) sediments, to trace the prevailing nitrogen pathways. NO3- was present in the top 5 cm below the sediment-water interface at both sites. NH4+ increased with depth below 5 cm where it overlapped with the NO3- zone. Steady state modelling of NO3- and NH4+ porewater profiles indicates zones of net nitrogen species transformations. Protease, peptidase, urease and deaminase ammonification genes were detected in metagenomes. Genes involved in ammonia oxidation (amo, hao), nitrite oxidation (nxr), denitrification (nar, nir, nor) and dissimilatory NO3- reduction to NH4+ (nap, nfr and otr) were also present. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that the nitrifying group Nitrosopumilales and other groups involved in nitrification and denitrification (Nitrobacter, Nitrosomonas, Nitrospira, Nitrosococcus, and Nitrosonomas) appeared less abundant in Skagerrak sediments compared to Bothnian Bay sediments. Beggiatoa and Thiothrix 16S rRNA genes were also present suggesting chemolithoautotrophic NO3- reduction to NO2- or NH4+ as a possible pathway. Although anammox planctomycetes 16S rRNA genes were present in metagenomes, anammox protein-coding genes were not detected. Our results show the metabolic potential for ammonification, nitrification, NO3- reduction, and denitrification activities in Skagerrak and Bothnian Bay sediments.

  15. Kinetically-Defined Component Actions in Gene Repression

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Carson C.; Finn, Kelsey K.; Storchan, Geoffery B.; Lu, Xinping; Sheng, Xiaoyan; Simons, S. Stoney

    2015-01-01

    Gene repression by transcription factors, and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in particular, is a critical, but poorly understood, physiological response. Among the many unresolved questions is the difference between GR regulated induction and repression, and whether transcription cofactor action is the same in both. Because activity classifications based on changes in gene product level are mechanistically uninformative, we present a theory for gene repression in which the mechanisms of factor action are defined kinetically and are consistent for both gene repression and induction. The theory is generally applicable and amenable to predictions if the dose-response curve for gene repression is non-cooperative with a unit Hill coefficient, which is observed for GR-regulated repression of AP1LUC reporter induction by phorbol myristate acetate. The theory predicts the mechanism of GR and cofactors, and where they act with respect to each other, based on how each cofactor alters the plots of various kinetic parameters vs. cofactor. We show that the kinetically-defined mechanism of action of each of four factors (reporter gene, p160 coactivator TIF2, and two pharmaceuticals [NU6027 and phenanthroline]) is the same in GR-regulated repression and induction. What differs is the position of GR action. This insight should simplify clinical efforts to differentially modulate factor actions in gene induction vs. gene repression. PMID:25816223

  16. A parasitic selfish gene that affects host promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Giraldo-Perez, Paulina; Goddard, Matthew R

    2013-11-07

    Selfish genes demonstrate transmission bias and invade sexual populations despite conferring no benefit to their hosts. While the molecular genetics and evolutionary dynamics of selfish genes are reasonably well characterized, their effects on hosts are not. Homing endonuclease genes (HEGs) are one well-studied family of selfish genes that are assumed to be benign. However, we show that carrying HEGs is costly for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, demonstrating that these genetic elements are not necessarily benign but maybe parasitic. We estimate a selective load of approximately 1-2% in 'natural' niches. The second aspect we examine is the ability of HEGs to affect hosts' sexual behaviour. As all selfish genes critically rely on sex for spread, then any selfish gene correlated with increased host sexuality will enjoy a transmission advantage. While classic parasites are known to manipulate host behaviour, we are not aware of any evidence showing a selfish gene is capable of affecting host promiscuity. The data presented here show a selfish element may increase the propensity of its eukaryote host to undergo sex and along with increased rates of non-Mendelian inheritance, this may counterbalance mitotic selective load and promote spread. Demonstration that selfish genes are correlated with increased promiscuity in eukaryotes connects with ideas suggesting that selfish genes promoted the evolution of sex initially.

  17. Myofibrillar myopathies: State of the art, present and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Béhin, A; Salort-Campana, E; Wahbi, K; Richard, P; Carlier, R-Y; Carlier, P; Laforêt, P; Stojkovic, T; Maisonobe, T; Verschueren, A; Franques, J; Attarian, S; Maues de Paula, A; Figarella-Branger, D; Bécane, H-M; Nelson, I; Duboc, D; Bonne, G; Vicart, P; Udd, B; Romero, N; Pouget, J; Eymard, B

    2015-10-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies (MFM) have been described in the mid-1990s as a group of diseases sharing common histological features, including an abnormal accumulation of intrasarcoplasmic proteins, the presence of vacuoles and a disorganization of the intermyofibrillar network beginning at the Z-disk. The boundaries of this concept are still uncertain, and whereas six genes (DES, CRYAB, LDB3/ZASP, MYOT, FLNC and BAG3) are now classically considered as responsible for MFM, other entities such as FHL1 myopathy or Hereditary Myopathy with Early Respiratory Failure linked to mutations of titin can now as well be included in this group. The diagnosis of MFM is not always easy; as histological lesions can be focal, and muscle biopsy may be disappointing; this has led to a growing importance of muscle imaging, and the selectivity of muscle involvement has now been described in several disorders. Due to the rarity of these myopathies, if some clinical patterns (such as distal myopathy associated with cardiomyopathy due to desmin mutations) are now well known, surprises remain possible and should lead to systematic testing of the known genes in case of a typical histological presentation. In this paper, we aim at reviewing the data acquired on the six main genes listed above as well as presenting the experience from two French reference centres, Paris and Marseilles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae sigma 1278b has novel genes of the N-acetyltransferase gene superfamily required for L-proline analogue resistance.

    PubMed

    Takagi, H; Shichiri, M; Takemura, M; Mohri, M; Nakamori, S

    2000-08-01

    We discovered on the chromosome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sigma 1278b novel genes involved in L-proline analogue L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid resistance which are not present in the standard laboratory strains. The 5.4 kb-DNA fragment was cloned from the genomic library of the L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid-resistant mutant derived from a cross between S. cerevisiae strains S288C and Sigma 1278b. The nucleotide sequence of a 4.5-kb segment exhibited no identity with the sequence in the genome project involving strain S288C. Deletion analysis indicated that one open reading frame encoding a predicted protein of 229 amino acids is indispensable for L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid resistance. The protein sequence was found to be a member of the N-acetyltransferase superfamily. Genomic Southern analysis and gene disruption showed that two copies of the novel gene with one amino acid change at position 85 required for L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid resistance were present on chromosomes X and XIV of Sigma 1278b background strains. When this novel MPR1 or MPR2 gene (sigma 1278b gene for L-proline analogue resistance) was introduced into the other S. cerevisiae strains, all of the recombinants were resistant to L-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid, indicating that both MPR1 and MPR2 are expressed and have a global function in S. cerevisiae.

  19. Quantitative comparison of microarray experiments with published leukemia related gene expression signatures.

    PubMed

    Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Ruckert, Christian; Kohlmann, Alexander; Bullinger, Lars; Thiede, Christian; Haferlach, Torsten; Dugas, Martin

    2009-12-15

    Multiple gene expression signatures derived from microarray experiments have been published in the field of leukemia research. A comparison of these signatures with results from new experiments is useful for verification as well as for interpretation of the results obtained. Currently, the percentage of overlapping genes is frequently used to compare published gene signatures against a signature derived from a new experiment. However, it has been shown that the percentage of overlapping genes is of limited use for comparing two experiments due to the variability of gene signatures caused by different array platforms or assay-specific influencing parameters. Here, we present a robust approach for a systematic and quantitative comparison of published gene expression signatures with an exemplary query dataset. A database storing 138 leukemia-related published gene signatures was designed. Each gene signature was manually annotated with terms according to a leukemia-specific taxonomy. Two analysis steps are implemented to compare a new microarray dataset with the results from previous experiments stored and curated in the database. First, the global test method is applied to assess gene signatures and to constitute a ranking among them. In a subsequent analysis step, the focus is shifted from single gene signatures to chromosomal aberrations or molecular mutations as modeled in the taxonomy. Potentially interesting disease characteristics are detected based on the ranking of gene signatures associated with these aberrations stored in the database. Two example analyses are presented. An implementation of the approach is freely available as web-based application. The presented approach helps researchers to systematically integrate the knowledge derived from numerous microarray experiments into the analysis of a new dataset. By means of example leukemia datasets we demonstrate that this approach detects related experiments as well as related molecular mutations and may

  20. Optimization of neural network architecture using genetic programming improves detection and modeling of gene-gene interactions in studies of human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Marylyn D; White, Bill C; Parker, Joel S; Hahn, Lance W; Moore, Jason H

    2003-01-01

    Background Appropriate definition of neural network architecture prior to data analysis is crucial for successful data mining. This can be challenging when the underlying model of the data is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine whether optimizing neural network architecture using genetic programming as a machine learning strategy would improve the ability of neural networks to model and detect nonlinear interactions among genes in studies of common human diseases. Results Using simulated data, we show that a genetic programming optimized neural network approach is able to model gene-gene interactions as well as a traditional back propagation neural network. Furthermore, the genetic programming optimized neural network is better than the traditional back propagation neural network approach in terms of predictive ability and power to detect gene-gene interactions when non-functional polymorphisms are present. Conclusion This study suggests that a machine learning strategy for optimizing neural network architecture may be preferable to traditional trial-and-error approaches for the identification and characterization of gene-gene interactions in common, complex human diseases. PMID:12846935

  1. Gene expression profiling of canine osteosarcoma reveals genes associated with short and long survival times

    PubMed Central

    Selvarajah, Gayathri T; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; van Wolferen, Monique E; Rao, Nagesha AS; Fieten, Hille; Mol, Jan A

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene expression profiling of spontaneous tumors in the dog offers a unique translational opportunity to identify prognostic biomarkers and signaling pathways that are common to both canine and human. Osteosarcoma (OS) accounts for approximately 80% of all malignant bone tumors in the dog. Canine OS are highly comparable with their human counterpart with respect to histology, high metastatic rate and poor long-term survival. This study investigates the prognostic gene profile among thirty-two primary canine OS using canine specific cDNA microarrays representing 20,313 genes to identify genes and cellular signaling pathways associated with survival. This, the first report of its kind in dogs with OS, also demonstrates the advantages of cross-species comparison with human OS. Results The 32 tumors were classified into two prognostic groups based on survival time (ST). They were defined as short survivors (dogs with poor prognosis: surviving fewer than 6 months) and long survivors (dogs with better prognosis: surviving 6 months or longer). Fifty-one transcripts were found to be differentially expressed, with common upregulation of these genes in the short survivors. The overexpressed genes in short survivors are associated with possible roles in proliferation, drug resistance or metastasis. Several deregulated pathways identified in the present study, including Wnt signaling, Integrin signaling and Chemokine/cytokine signaling are comparable to the pathway analysis conducted on human OS gene profiles, emphasizing the value of the dog as an excellent model for humans. Conclusion A molecular-based method for discrimination of outcome for short and long survivors is useful for future prognostic stratification at initial diagnosis, where genes and pathways associated with cell cycle/proliferation, drug resistance and metastasis could be potential targets for diagnosis and therapy. The similarities between human and canine OS makes the dog a suitable pre

  2. Differential Gene Susceptibility to Sperm DNA Damage: Analysis of Developmental Key Genes in Trout

    PubMed Central

    González-Rojo, Silvia; Fernández-Díez, Cristina; Guerra, Susana M.; Robles, Vanesa; Herraez, Maria Paz

    2014-01-01

    Sperm chromatin in mammals is packaged in different blocks associated to protamines (PDNA), histones (HDNA), or nuclear matrix proteins. Differential packaging has been related to early or late transcription and also to differential susceptibility to genotoxic damage. Genes located in the more accessible HDNA could be more susceptible to injuries than those located in PDNA, being potential biomarkers of paternal DNA damage. Fish sperm chromatin organization is much diversified, some species lacking protamines and some others totally depleted of histones. Analyzing genotoxic damage in a species homogeneously compacted with some sperm nuclear basic protein type, could help in deciphering the clues of differential susceptibility to damage. In the present study we analyzed in rainbow trout the differential susceptibility of nine genes to UV irradiation and H2O2 treatment. The absence of histones in the sperm nuclei was confirmed by Western blot. The chromatin fractionation in sensitive and resistant regions to PvuII (presumably HDNA-like and PDNA-like, respectively) revealed that the nine genes locate in the same resistant region. The number of lesions promoted was quantified using a qPCR approach. Location of 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. UV irradiation promoted similar number of lesions in all the analyzed genes and a homogenous distribution of 8-OHdG within the nuclei. 8-OHdG was located in the peripheral area of the nucleus after H2O2 treatment, which promoted a significantly higher number of lesions in developmental-related genes (8.76–10.95 lesions/10 kb) than in rDNA genes (1.05–1.67 lesions/10 kb). We showed for the first time, that differential susceptibility to damage is dependent on the genotoxic mechanism and relies on positional differences between genes. Sensitive genes were also analyzed in cryopreserved sperm showing a lower number of lesions than the previous treatments and a predominant

  3. Dizeez: An Online Game for Human Gene-Disease Annotation

    PubMed Central

    Loguercio, Salvatore; Good, Benjamin M.; Su, Andrew I.

    2013-01-01

    Structured gene annotations are a foundation upon which many bioinformatics and statistical analyses are built. However the structured annotations available in public databases are a sparse representation of biological knowledge as a whole. The rate of biomedical data generation is such that centralized biocuration efforts struggle to keep up. New models for gene annotation need to be explored that expand the pace at which we are able to structure biomedical knowledge. Recently, online games have emerged as an effective way to recruit, engage and organize large numbers of volunteers to help address difficult biological challenges. For example, games have been successfully developed for protein folding (Foldit), multiple sequence alignment (Phylo) and RNA structure design (EteRNA). Here we present Dizeez, a simple online game built with the purpose of structuring knowledge of gene-disease associations. Preliminary results from game play online and at scientific conferences suggest that Dizeez is producing valid gene-disease annotations not yet present in any public database. These early results provide a basic proof of principle that online games can be successfully applied to the challenge of gene annotation. Dizeez is available at http://genegames.org. PMID:23951102

  4. Molecular biology of Homo sapiens: Abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.D.; Siniscalco, M.

    This volume contains abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The topic for this meeting was the ''Molecular Biology of Homo sapiens.'' Sessions were entitled Human Gene Map, Human Cancer Genes, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, Drugs Made Off Human Genes, Receptors, and Gene Therapy. (DT)

  5. Therapeutic gene editing: delivery and regulatory perspectives.

    PubMed

    Shim, Gayong; Kim, Dongyoon; Park, Gyu Thae; Jin, Hyerim; Suh, Soo-Kyung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2017-06-01

    Gene-editing technology is an emerging therapeutic modality for manipulating the eukaryotic genome by using target-sequence-specific engineered nucleases. Because of the exceptional advantages that gene-editing technology offers in facilitating the accurate correction of sequences in a genome, gene editing-based therapy is being aggressively developed as a next-generation therapeutic approach to treat a wide range of diseases. However, strategies for precise engineering and delivery of gene-editing nucleases, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nuclease, and CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated nuclease Cas9), present major obstacles to the development of gene-editing therapies, as with other gene-targeting therapeutics. Currently, viral and non-viral vectors are being studied for the delivery of these nucleases into cells in the form of DNA, mRNA, or proteins. Clinical trials are already ongoing, and in vivo studies are actively investigating the applicability of CRISPR/Cas9 techniques. However, the concept of correcting the genome poses major concerns from a regulatory perspective, especially in terms of safety. This review addresses current research trends and delivery strategies for gene editing-based therapeutics in non-clinical and clinical settings and considers the associated regulatory issues.

  6. Therapeutic gene editing: delivery and regulatory perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Gayong; Kim, Dongyoon; Park, Gyu Thae; Jin, Hyerim; Suh, Soo-Kyung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2017-01-01

    Gene-editing technology is an emerging therapeutic modality for manipulating the eukaryotic genome by using target-sequence-specific engineered nucleases. Because of the exceptional advantages that gene-editing technology offers in facilitating the accurate correction of sequences in a genome, gene editing-based therapy is being aggressively developed as a next-generation therapeutic approach to treat a wide range of diseases. However, strategies for precise engineering and delivery of gene-editing nucleases, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nuclease, and CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated nuclease Cas9), present major obstacles to the development of gene-editing therapies, as with other gene-targeting therapeutics. Currently, viral and non-viral vectors are being studied for the delivery of these nucleases into cells in the form of DNA, mRNA, or proteins. Clinical trials are already ongoing, and in vivo studies are actively investigating the applicability of CRISPR/Cas9 techniques. However, the concept of correcting the genome poses major concerns from a regulatory perspective, especially in terms of safety. This review addresses current research trends and delivery strategies for gene editing-based therapeutics in non-clinical and clinical settings and considers the associated regulatory issues. PMID:28392568

  7. Variation-preserving normalization unveils blind spots in gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Carlos P.; Gomes, Susana I. L.; Amorim, Mónica J. B.; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J.

    2017-01-01

    RNA-Seq and gene expression microarrays provide comprehensive profiles of gene activity, but lack of reproducibility has hindered their application. A key challenge in the data analysis is the normalization of gene expression levels, which is currently performed following the implicit assumption that most genes are not differentially expressed. Here, we present a mathematical approach to normalization that makes no assumption of this sort. We have found that variation in gene expression is much larger than currently believed, and that it can be measured with available assays. Our results also explain, at least partially, the reproducibility problems encountered in transcriptomics studies. We expect that this improvement in detection will help efforts to realize the full potential of gene expression profiling, especially in analyses of cellular processes involving complex modulations of gene expression. PMID:28276435

  8. Effect of carbon monoxide on gene expression in cerebrocortical astrocytes: Validation of reference genes for quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sara R; Vieira, Helena L A; Duarte, Carlos B

    2015-09-15

    Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a widely used technique to characterize changes in gene expression in complex cellular and tissue processes, such as cytoprotection or inflammation. The accurate assessment of changes in gene expression depends on the selection of adequate internal reference gene(s). Carbon monoxide (CO) affects several metabolic pathways and de novo protein synthesis is crucial in the cellular responses to this gasotransmitter. Herein a selection of commonly used reference genes was analyzed to identify the most suitable internal control genes to evaluate the effect of CO on gene expression in cultured cerebrocortical astrocytes. The cells were exposed to CO by treatment with CORM-A1 (CO releasing molecule A1) and four different algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder, Delta Ct and BestKeeper) were applied to evaluate the stability of eight putative reference genes. Our results indicate that Gapdh (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) together with Ppia (peptidylpropyl isomerase A) is the most suitable gene pair for normalization of qRT-PCR results under the experimental conditions used. Pgk1 (phosphoglycerate kinase 1), Hprt1 (hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase I), Sdha (Succinate Dehydrogenase Complex, Subunit A), Tbp (TATA box binding protein), Actg1 (actin gamma 1) and Rn18s (18S rRNA) genes presented less stable expression profiles in cultured cortical astrocytes exposed to CORM-A1 for up to 60 min. For validation, we analyzed the effect of CO on the expression of Bdnf and bcl-2. Different results were obtained, depending on the reference genes used. A significant increase in the expression of both genes was found when the results were normalized with Gapdh and Ppia, in contrast with the results obtained when the other genes were used as reference. These findings highlight the need for a proper and accurate selection of the reference genes used in the quantification of qRT-PCR results

  9. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF VIBRIO CHOLERAE GENES FLGO AND FLGP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    From - To) 25-01-2007 THESIS 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF VIBRIO CHOLERAE GENES FLGO AND FLGP 5b. GRANT...CHARACTERIZATION OF VIBRIO CHOLERAE GENES FLGO AND FLGP by DAVID C. MORRIS, B.S. THESIS Presented to the Graduate Faculty of The University of Texas at San Antonio...U.S. Air Force for providing me the opportunity and means to complete the thesis. December 2006 v MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF VIBRIO CHOLERAE GENES

  10. Gene selection with multiple ordering criteria.

    PubMed

    Chen, James J; Tsai, Chen-An; Tzeng, Shengli; Chen, Chun-Houh

    2007-03-05

    A microarray study may select different differentially expressed gene sets because of different selection criteria. For example, the fold-change and p-value are two commonly known criteria to select differentially expressed genes under two experimental conditions. These two selection criteria often result in incompatible selected gene sets. Also, in a two-factor, say, treatment by time experiment, the investigator may be interested in one gene list that responds to both treatment and time effects. We propose three layer ranking algorithms, point-admissible, line-admissible (convex), and Pareto, to provide a preference gene list from multiple gene lists generated by different ranking criteria. Using the public colon data as an example, the layer ranking algorithms are applied to the three univariate ranking criteria, fold-change, p-value, and frequency of selections by the SVM-RFE classifier. A simulation experiment shows that for experiments with small or moderate sample sizes (less than 20 per group) and detecting a 4-fold change or less, the two-dimensional (p-value and fold-change) convex layer ranking selects differentially expressed genes with generally lower FDR and higher power than the standard p-value ranking. Three applications are presented. The first application illustrates a use of the layer rankings to potentially improve predictive accuracy. The second application illustrates an application to a two-factor experiment involving two dose levels and two time points. The layer rankings are applied to selecting differentially expressed genes relating to the dose and time effects. In the third application, the layer rankings are applied to a benchmark data set consisting of three dilution concentrations to provide a ranking system from a long list of differentially expressed genes generated from the three dilution concentrations. The layer ranking algorithms are useful to help investigators in selecting the most promising genes from multiple gene lists

  11. Structure and expression of the Xenopus retinoblastoma gene.

    PubMed

    Destrée, O H; Lam, K T; Peterson-Maduro, L J; Eizema, K; Diller, L; Gryka, M A; Frebourg, T; Shibuya, E; Friend, S H

    1992-09-01

    We have cloned a Xenopus homology (XRb1) of the human retinoblastoma susceptibility gene. DNA sequence analysis shows that the XRb1 gene product is highly conserved in many regions. The leucine repeat motif and many of the potential cdc2 phosphorylation sites, as well as potential sites for other kinases, are retained. The region of the protein homologous to the SV40 T antigen binding site and the basic region directly C-terminal to the E1A binding site are all conserved. XRb1 gene expression at the RNA level was studied by Northern blot analysis. Transcripts of 4.2 and 10-kb are present as maternal RNA stores in the oocyte. While the 4.2-kb product is stable until at least the mid-blastula stage, the 10-kb transcript is selectively degraded. Between stages 11 and 13 the 10-kb transcript reappears and also a minor product of approximately 11 kb becomes apparent. Both the 4.2- and the 10-kb transcripts remain present until later stages of development and are also present in all adult tissues examined, although at differing levels. Antibodies raised against human p105Rb which recognize the protein product of the XRb1 gene, pXRb1, detect the Xenopus 99-kDa protein prior to the mid-blastula stage, but at lower levels than at later stages in development.

  12. Chromosomal localization of three repair genes: The xeroderma pigmentosum group C gene and two human homologs of yeast RAD23

    SciTech Connect

    Spek, P.J. van der; Smit, E.M.E.; Beverloo, H.B.

    1994-10-01

    The nucleotide excision repair (NER) disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by sun (UV) sensitivity, predisposition to skin cancer, and extensive genetic heterogeneity. Recently, we reported the cloning and analysis of three human NER genes, XPC, HHR23A, and HHR23B. The previously cloned XPC gene is involved in the common XP complementation group C, which is defective in excision repair of nontranscribed sequences in the genome. The XPC protein was found to be complexed with the product of HHR23B, one of the two human homologs of the Saccharomyes cerevisiae NER gene RAD23. Here we present the chromosomal localization by in situmore » hybridization using haptenized probes of all three genes. The HHR23A gene was assigned to chromosome 19p13.2. Interestingly, the HHR23B and XPC genes, the product of which forms a tight complex, were found to colocalize on band 3p25.1. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that the HHR23B and XPC genes possibly share a MluI restriction fragment of about 625 kb. Potential involvement of the HHR23 genes in human genetic disorders is discussed. 53 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  13. Evaluation of Candidate Reference Genes for Quantitative Gene Expression Analysis in Spodoptera exigu a after Long-time Exposure to Cadmium.

    PubMed

    Płachetka-Bożek, Anna; Augustyniak, Maria

    2017-08-21

    Studies on the transcriptional control of gene expression play an important role in many areas of biology. Reference genes, which are often referred to as housekeeping genes, such as GAPDH, G3PDH, EF2, RpL7A, RpL10, TUBα and Actin, have traditionally been assumed to be stably expressed in all conditions, and they are frequently used to normalize mRNA levels between different samples in qPCR analysis. However, it is known that the expression of these genes is influenced by numerous factors, such as experimental conditions. The difference in gene expression underlies a range of biological processes, including development, reproduction and behavior. The aim of this study was to show the problems associated with using reference genes in the qPCR technique, in a study on inbred strains of Spodoptera exigua selected toward cadmium resistance. We present and discuss our results and observations, and give some recommendations concerning the use and limitations of housekeeping genes as internal standards, especially in research on insects. Our results suggest that holometabolism and poikilothermia, as well as time since metamorphosis and the level of exposure to the selective factor (cadmium in this case), have a significant effect on the expression of reference genes.

  14. Variability of Creatine Metabolism Genes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jessie M; Levandovskiy, Valeriy; Roberts, Wendy; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Scherer, Stephen; Loh, Alvin; Schulze, Andreas

    2017-07-31

    Creatine deficiency syndrome (CDS) comprises three separate enzyme deficiencies with overlapping clinical presentations: arginine:glycine amidinotransferase ( GATM gene, glycine amidinotransferase), guanidinoacetate methyltransferase ( GAMT gene), and creatine transporter deficiency ( SLC6A8 gene, solute carrier family 6 member 8). CDS presents with developmental delays/regression, intellectual disability, speech and language impairment, autistic behaviour, epileptic seizures, treatment-refractory epilepsy, and extrapyramidal movement disorders; symptoms that are also evident in children with autism. The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that genetic variability in creatine metabolism genes is associated with autism. We sequenced GATM , GAMT and SLC6A8 genes in 166 patients with autism (coding sequence, introns and adjacent untranslated regions). A total of 29, 16 and 25 variants were identified in each gene, respectively. Four variants were novel in GATM , and 5 in SLC6A8 (not present in the 1000 Genomes, Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) or Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) databases). A single variant in each gene was identified as non-synonymous, and computationally predicted to be potentially damaging. Nine variants in GATM were shown to have a lower minor allele frequency (MAF) in the autism population than in the 1000 Genomes database, specifically in the East Asian population (Fisher's exact test). Two variants also had lower MAFs in the European population. In summary, there were no apparent associations of variants in GAMT and SLC6A8 genes with autism. The data implying there could be a lower association of some specific GATM gene variants with autism is an observation that would need to be corroborated in a larger group of autism patients, and with sub-populations of Asian ethnicities. Overall, our findings suggest that the genetic variability of creatine synthesis/transport is unlikely to play a part in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum

  15. Patenting human genes: Chinese academic articles' portrayal of gene patents.

    PubMed

    Du, Li

    2018-04-24

    The patenting of human genes has been the subject of debate for decades. While China has gradually come to play an important role in the global genomics-based testing and treatment market, little is known about Chinese scholars' perspectives on patent protection for human genes. A content analysis of academic literature was conducted to identify Chinese scholars' concerns regarding gene patents, including benefits and risks of patenting human genes, attitudes that researchers hold towards gene patenting, and any legal and policy recommendations offered for the gene patent regime in China. 57.2% of articles were written by law professors, but scholars from health sciences, liberal arts, and ethics also participated in discussions on gene patent issues. While discussions of benefits and risks were relatively balanced in the articles, 63.5% of the articles favored gene patenting in general and, of the articles (n = 41) that explored gene patents in the Chinese context, 90.2% supported patent protections for human genes in China. The patentability of human genes was discussed in 33 articles, and 75.8% of these articles reached the conclusion that human genes are patentable. Chinese scholars view the patent regime as an important legal tool to protect the interests of inventors and inventions as well as the genetic resources of China. As such, many scholars support a gene patent system in China. These attitudes towards gene patents remain unchanged following the court ruling in the Myriad case in 2013, but arguments have been raised about the scope of gene patents, in particular that the increasing numbers of gene patents may negatively impact public health in China.

  16. Nance-Horan syndrome: a contiguous gene syndrome involving deletion of the amelogenin gene? A case report and molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Franco, E; Hodgson, S; Lench, N; Roberts, G J

    1995-03-01

    A case of Nance-Horan syndrome in a male is presented, with some features of the condition in his carrier mother and her mother. It is proposed that Nance-Horan syndrome might be a contiguous gene syndrome mapping to chromosome Xp21.2-p22.3. The proband had congenital cataract microphthalmia and dental abnormalities including screwdriver shaped incisors and evidence of enamel pitting hypoplasia. The region Xp21.2-p22.3 also contains the tooth enamel protein gene, amelogenin (AMGX). Using molecular genetic techniques, we have shown that there is no evidence that the AMGX gene is deleted in this case of the Nance-Horan syndrome.

  17. Regulated expression of the Ren-2 gene in transgenic mice derived from parental strains carrying only the Ren-1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Tronik, D; Dreyfus, M; Babinet, C; Rougeon, F

    1987-01-01

    The Ren-2 gene encoding the mouse submaxillary gland (SMG) renin was microinjected into the pronuclei of fertilized eggs from mice carrying only the Ren-1 gene. In addition to the whole transcription unit, the injected DNA contained 2.5 and 3 kb of upstream and downstream flanking sequences, respectively. Three independent transgenic mice lines were obtained; two of them had integrated one copy of the Ren-2 gene, the last one had integrated five and eleven copies at two independent sites. Independently of the number of Ren-2 copies integrated, the pattern of Ren-2 gene expression in all the transgenic mice was identical to that observed in wild-type animals in which Ren-1 and Ren-2 are closely linked on chromosome 1. In particular, the exogenous Ren-2 gene was only transcribed in the kidney and in the SMG. In the kidney, Ren-1 and Ren-2 mRNAs were present at a comparable level, whereas in the SMG Ren-2 mRNA was at least 100-fold more abundant than Ren-1 mRNA. Moreover, Ren-2 expression in the SMG was positively regulated by androgens. Only one difference between transgenic mice and wild-type mice carrying the Ren-2 gene has been observed: the basal level of Ren-2 transcription in the SMG of transgenic females was lower than in two-gene strain females. Androgen treatment of transgenic females induced SMG renin mRNA to a level identical to that of transgenic males. This suggests that the basal level of SMG renin mRNA is dependent upon cis-acting elements which are not present in the microinjected fragment. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3297677

  18. Model-based gene set analysis for Bioconductor.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Sebastian; Robinson, Peter N; Gagneur, Julien

    2011-07-01

    Gene Ontology and other forms of gene-category analysis play a major role in the evaluation of high-throughput experiments in molecular biology. Single-category enrichment analysis procedures such as Fisher's exact test tend to flag large numbers of redundant categories as significant, which can complicate interpretation. We have recently developed an approach called model-based gene set analysis (MGSA), that substantially reduces the number of redundant categories returned by the gene-category analysis. In this work, we present the Bioconductor package mgsa, which makes the MGSA algorithm available to users of the R language. Our package provides a simple and flexible application programming interface for applying the approach. The mgsa package has been made available as part of Bioconductor 2.8. It is released under the conditions of the Artistic license 2.0. peter.robinson@charite.de; julien.gagneur@embl.de.

  19. Gene-Gene Combination Effect and Interactions among ABCA1, APOA1, SR-B1, and CETP Polymorphisms for Serum High-Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol in the Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Akihiko; Niimura, Hideshi; Kuwabara, Kazuyo; Takezaki, Toshiro; Morita, Emi; Wakai, Kenji; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Nishida, Yuichiro; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury; Suzuki, Sadao; Ohnaka, Keizo; Uemura, Hirokazu; Ozaki, Etsuko; Hosono, Satoyo; Mikami, Haruo; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objective Gene-gene interactions in the reverse cholesterol transport system for high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) are poorly understood. The present study observed gene-gene combination effect and interactions between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ABCA1, APOA1, SR-B1, and CETP in serum HDL-C from a cross-sectional study in the Japanese population. Methods The study population comprised 1,535 men and 1,515 women aged 35–69 years who were enrolled in the Japan Multi-Institutional Collaborative Cohort (J-MICC) Study. We selected 13 SNPs in the ABCA1, APOA1, CETP, and SR-B1 genes in the reverse cholesterol transport system. The effects of genetic and environmental factors were assessed using general linear and logistic regression models after adjusting for age, sex, and region. Principal Findings Alcohol consumption and daily activity were positively associated with HDL-C levels, whereas smoking had a negative relationship. The T allele of CETP, rs3764261, was correlated with higher HDL-C levels and had the highest coefficient (2.93 mg/dL/allele) among the 13 SNPs, which was statistically significant after applying the Bonferroni correction (p<0.001). Gene-gene combination analysis revealed that CETP rs3764261 was associated with high HDL-C levels with any combination of SNPs from ABCA1, APOA1, and SR-B1, although no gene-gene interaction was apparent. An increasing trend for serum HDL-C was also observed with an increasing number of alleles (p<0.001). Conclusions The present study identified a multiplier effect from a polymorphism in CETP with ABCA1, APOA1, and SR-B1, as well as a dose-dependence according to the number of alleles present. PMID:24376512

  20. Evolution of disease response genes in loblolly pine: insights from candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Ersoz, Elhan S; Wright, Mark H; González-Martínez, Santiago C; Langley, Charles H; Neale, David B

    2010-12-06

    Host-pathogen interactions that may lead to a competitive co-evolution of virulence and resistance mechanisms present an attractive system to study molecular evolution because strong, recent (or even current) selective pressure is expected at many genomic loci. However, it is unclear whether these selective forces would act to preserve existing diversity, promote novel diversity, or reduce linked neutral diversity during rapid fixation of advantageous alleles. In plants, the lack of adaptive immunity places a larger burden on genetic diversity to ensure survival of plant populations. This burden is even greater if the generation time of the plant is much longer than the generation time of the pathogen. Here, we present nucleotide polymorphism and substitution data for 41 candidate genes from the long-lived forest tree loblolly pine, selected primarily for their prospective influences on host-pathogen interactions. This dataset is analyzed together with 15 drought-tolerance and 13 wood-quality genes from previous studies. A wide range of neutrality tests were performed and tested against expectations from realistic demographic models. Collectively, our analyses found that axr (auxin response factor), caf1 (chromatin assembly factor) and gatabp1 (gata binding protein 1) candidate genes carry patterns consistent with directional selection and erd3 (early response to drought 3) displays patterns suggestive of a selective sweep, both of which are consistent with the arm-race model of disease response evolution. Furthermore, we have identified patterns consistent with diversifying selection at erf1-like (ethylene responsive factor 1), ccoaoemt (caffeoyl-CoA-O-methyltransferase), cyp450-like (cytochrome p450-like) and pr4.3 (pathogen response 4.3), expected under the trench-warfare evolution model. Finally, a drought-tolerance candidate related to the plant cell wall, lp5, displayed patterns consistent with balancing selection. In conclusion, both arms-race and trench

  1. Monoallelic Gene Expression in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Chess, Andrew

    2016-11-23

    Monoallelic expression not due to cis-regulatory sequence polymorphism poses an intriguing problem in epigenetics because it requires the unequal treatment of two segments of DNA that are present in the same nucleus and that can indeed have absolutely identical sequences. Here, I focus on a few recent developments in the field of monoallelic expression that are of particular interest and raise interesting questions for future work. One development is regarding analyses of imprinted genes, in which recent work suggests the possibility that intriguing networks of imprinted genes exist and are important for genetic and physiological studies. Another issue that has been raised in recent years by a number of publications is the question of how skewed allelic expression should be for it to be designated as monoallelic expression and, further, what methods are appropriate or inappropriate for analyzing genomic data to examine allele-specific expression. Perhaps the most exciting recent development in mammalian monoallelic expression is a clever and carefully executed analysis of genetic diversity of autosomal genes subject to random monoallelic expression (RMAE), which provides compelling evidence for distinct evolutionary forces acting on random monoallelically expressed genes.

  2. Identification of an Efficient Gene Expression Panel for Glioblastoma Classification

    PubMed Central

    Zelaya, Ivette; Laks, Dan R.; Zhao, Yining; Kawaguchi, Riki; Gao, Fuying; Kornblum, Harley I.; Coppola, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    We present here a novel genetic algorithm-based random forest (GARF) modeling technique that enables a reduction in the complexity of large gene disease signatures to highly accurate, greatly simplified gene panels. When applied to 803 glioblastoma multiforme samples, this method allowed the 840-gene Verhaak et al. gene panel (the standard in the field) to be reduced to a 48-gene classifier, while retaining 90.91% classification accuracy, and outperforming the best available alternative methods. Additionally, using this approach we produced a 32-gene panel which allows for better consistency between RNA-seq and microarray-based classifications, improving cross-platform classification retention from 69.67% to 86.07%. A webpage producing these classifications is available at http://simplegbm.semel.ucla.edu. PMID:27855170

  3. Genes from scratch--the evolutionary fate of de novo genes.

    PubMed

    Schlötterer, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Although considered an extremely unlikely event, many genes emerge from previously noncoding genomic regions. This review covers the entire life cycle of such de novo genes. Two competing hypotheses about the process of de novo gene birth are discussed as well as the high death rate of de novo genes. Despite the high death rate, some de novo genes are retained and remain functional, even in distantly related species, through their integration into gene networks. Further studies combining gene expression with ribosome profiling in multiple populations across different species will be instrumental for an improved understanding of the evolutionary processes operating on de novo genes. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Overview of BioCreative II gene mention recognition

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Larry; Tanabe, Lorraine K; Ando, Rie Johnson nee; Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Chung, I-Fang; Hsu, Chun-Nan; Lin, Yu-Shi; Klinger, Roman; Friedrich, Christoph M; Ganchev, Kuzman; Torii, Manabu; Liu, Hongfang; Haddow, Barry; Struble, Craig A; Povinelli, Richard J; Vlachos, Andreas; Baumgartner, William A; Hunter, Lawrence; Carpenter, Bob; Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Dai, Hong-Jie; Liu, Feng; Chen, Yifei; Sun, Chengjie; Katrenko, Sophia; Adriaans, Pieter; Blaschke, Christian; Torres, Rafael; Neves, Mariana; Nakov, Preslav; Divoli, Anna; Maña-López, Manuel; Mata, Jacinto; Wilbur, W John

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen teams presented results for the Gene Mention Task at the BioCreative II Workshop. In this task participants designed systems to identify substrings in sentences corresponding to gene name mentions. A variety of different methods were used and the results varied with a highest achieved F1 score of 0.8721. Here we present brief descriptions of all the methods used and a statistical analysis of the results. We also demonstrate that, by combining the results from all submissions, an F score of 0.9066 is feasible, and furthermore that the best result makes use of the lowest scoring submissions. PMID:18834493

  5. Overview of BioCreative II gene mention recognition.

    PubMed

    Smith, Larry; Tanabe, Lorraine K; Ando, Rie Johnson nee; Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Chung, I-Fang; Hsu, Chun-Nan; Lin, Yu-Shi; Klinger, Roman; Friedrich, Christoph M; Ganchev, Kuzman; Torii, Manabu; Liu, Hongfang; Haddow, Barry; Struble, Craig A; Povinelli, Richard J; Vlachos, Andreas; Baumgartner, William A; Hunter, Lawrence; Carpenter, Bob; Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Dai, Hong-Jie; Liu, Feng; Chen, Yifei; Sun, Chengjie; Katrenko, Sophia; Adriaans, Pieter; Blaschke, Christian; Torres, Rafael; Neves, Mariana; Nakov, Preslav; Divoli, Anna; Maña-López, Manuel; Mata, Jacinto; Wilbur, W John

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen teams presented results for the Gene Mention Task at the BioCreative II Workshop. In this task participants designed systems to identify substrings in sentences corresponding to gene name mentions. A variety of different methods were used and the results varied with a highest achieved F1 score of 0.8721. Here we present brief descriptions of all the methods used and a statistical analysis of the results. We also demonstrate that, by combining the results from all submissions, an F score of 0.9066 is feasible, and furthermore that the best result makes use of the lowest scoring submissions.

  6. Integrated computational biology analysis to evaluate target genes for chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Yu-Ping; Cao, Hongbao; Chen, Qiusheng; Zhang, Xi

    2018-06-05

    Although hundreds of genes have been linked to chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), many of the results lack reproducibility. In the present study, data across multiple modalities were integrated to evaluate 579 CML candidate genes, including literature‑based CML‑gene relation data, Gene Expression Omnibus RNA expression data and pathway‑based gene‑gene interaction data. The expression data included samples from 76 patients with CML and 73 healthy controls. For each target gene, four metrics were proposed and tested with case/control classification. The effectiveness of the four metrics presented was demonstrated by the high classification accuracy (94.63%; P<2x10‑4). Cross metric analysis suggested nine top candidate genes for CML: Epidermal growth factor receptor, tumor protein p53, catenin β 1, janus kinase 2, tumor necrosis factor, abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1, vascular endothelial growth factor A, B‑cell lymphoma 2 and proto‑oncogene tyrosine‑protein kinase. In addition, 145 CML candidate pathways enriched with 485 out of 579 genes were identified (P<8.2x10‑11; q=0.005). In conclusion, weighted genetic networks generated using computational biology may be complementary to biological experiments for the evaluation of known or novel CML target genes.

  7. Delivery of Na/I symporter gene into skeletal muscle using nanobubbles and ultrasound: visualization of gene expression by PET.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yukiko; Horie, Sachiko; Funaki, Yoshihito; Kikuchi, Youhei; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Ishii, Keizo; Mori, Shiro; Vassaux, Georges; Kodama, Tetsuya

    2010-06-01

    The development of nonviral gene delivery systems is essential in gene therapy, and the use of a minimally invasive imaging methodology can provide important clinical endpoints. In the current study, we present a new methodology for gene therapy-a delivery system using nanobubbles and ultrasound as a nonviral gene delivery method. We assessed whether the gene transfer allowed by this methodology was detectable by PET and bioluminescence imaging. Two kinds of reported vectors (luciferase and human Na/I symporter [hNIS]) were transfected or cotransfected into the skeletal muscles of normal mice (BALB/c) using the ultrasound-nanobubbles method. The kinetics of luciferase gene expression were analyzed in vivo using bioluminescence imaging. At the peak of gene transfer, PET of hNIS expression was performed using our recently developed PET scanner, after (124)I injection. The imaging data were confirmed using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction amplification, biodistribution, and a blocking study. The imaging potential of the 2 methodologies was evaluated in 2 mouse models of human pathology (McH/lpr-RA1 mice showing vascular disease and C57BL/10-mdx Jic mice showing muscular dystrophy). Peak luciferase gene activity was observed in the skeletal muscle 4 d after transfection. On day 2 after hNIS and luciferase cotransfection, the expression of these genes was confirmed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction on a muscle biopsy. PET of the hNIS gene, biodistribution, the blocking study, and autoradiography were performed on day 4 after transfection, and it was indicated that hNIS expression was restricted to the site of plasmid administration (skeletal muscle). Similar localized PET and (124)I accumulation were successfully obtained in the disease-model mice. The hNIS gene was delivered into the skeletal muscle of healthy and disease-model mice by the ultrasound-nanobubbles method, and gene expression was successfully visualized with PET. The

  8. A high resolution atlas of gene expression in the domestic sheep (Ovis aries)

    PubMed Central

    Farquhar, Iseabail L.; Young, Rachel; Lefevre, Lucas; Pridans, Clare; Tsang, Hiu G.; Afrasiabi, Cyrus; Watson, Mick; Whitelaw, C. Bruce; Freeman, Tom C.; Archibald, Alan L.; Hume, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Sheep are a key source of meat, milk and fibre for the global livestock sector, and an important biomedical model. Global analysis of gene expression across multiple tissues has aided genome annotation and supported functional annotation of mammalian genes. We present a large-scale RNA-Seq dataset representing all the major organ systems from adult sheep and from several juvenile, neonatal and prenatal developmental time points. The Ovis aries reference genome (Oar v3.1) includes 27,504 genes (20,921 protein coding), of which 25,350 (19,921 protein coding) had detectable expression in at least one tissue in the sheep gene expression atlas dataset. Network-based cluster analysis of this dataset grouped genes according to their expression pattern. The principle of ‘guilt by association’ was used to infer the function of uncharacterised genes from their co-expression with genes of known function. We describe the overall transcriptional signatures present in the sheep gene expression atlas and assign those signatures, where possible, to specific cell populations or pathways. The findings are related to innate immunity by focusing on clusters with an immune signature, and to the advantages of cross-breeding by examining the patterns of genes exhibiting the greatest expression differences between purebred and crossbred animals. This high-resolution gene expression atlas for sheep is, to our knowledge, the largest transcriptomic dataset from any livestock species to date. It provides a resource to improve the annotation of the current reference genome for sheep, presenting a model transcriptome for ruminants and insight into gene, cell and tissue function at multiple developmental stages. PMID:28915238

  9. Analysis of the role of tripeptidyl peptidase II in MHC class I antigen presentation in vivo1

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Masahiro; York, Ian A.; Hearn, Arron; Farfan, Diego; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2015-01-01

    Previous experiments using enzyme inhibitors and RNAi in cell lysates and cultured cells have suggested that tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPPII) plays a role in creating and destroying MHC class I-presented peptides. However, its precise contribution to these processes has been controversial. To elucidate the importance of TPPII in MHC class I antigen presentation, we analyzed TPPII-deficient gene-trapped mice and cell lines from these animals. In these mice, the expression level of TPPII was reduced by >90% compared to wild-type mice. Thymocytes from TPPII gene-trapped mice displayed more MHC class I on the cell surface, suggesting that TPPII normally limits antigen presentation by destroying peptides overall. TPPII gene-trapped mice responded as well as did wild-type mice to four epitopes from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The processing and presentation of peptide precursors with long N-terminal extensions in TPPII gene-trapped embryonic fibroblasts was modestly reduced, but in vivo immunization with recombinant lentiviral or vaccinia virus vectors revealed that such peptide precursors induced an equivalent CD8 T cell response in wild type and TPPII-deficient mice. These data indicate while TPPII contributes to the trimming of peptides with very long N-terminal extensions, TPPII is not essential for generating most MHC class I-presented peptides or for stimulating CTL responses to several antigens in vivo. PMID:19841172

  10. GenePRIMP: A Gene Prediction Improvement Pipeline For Prokaryotic Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Pati, Amrita

    2010-07-08

    GenePRIMP (Gene Prediction Improvement Pipeline, Http://geneprimp.jgi-psf.org), a computational process that performs evidence-based evaluation of gene models in prokaryotic genomes and reports anomalies including inconsistent start sites, missing genes, and split genes. We show that manual curation of gene models using the anomaly reports generated by GenePRIMP improves their quality and demonstrate the applicability of GenePRIMP in improving finishing quality and comparing different genome sequencing and annotation technologies. Keywords in context: Gene model, Quality Control, Translation start sites, Automatic correction. Hardware requirements; PC, MAC; Operating System: UNIX/LINUX; Compiler/Version: Perl 5.8.5 or higher; Special requirements: NCBI Blast and nr installation; File Types:more » Source Code, Executable module(s), Sample problem input data; installation instructions other; programmer documentation. Location/transmission: http://geneprimp.jgi-psf.org/gp.tar.gz« less

  11. Expression and characterization of duck enteritis virus gI gene

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background At present, alphaherpesviruses gI gene and its encoding protein have been extensively studied. It is likely that gI protein and its homolog play similar roles in virions direct cell-to-cell spread of alphaherpesviruses. But, little is known about the characteristics of DEV gI gene. In this study, we expressed and presented the basic properties of the DEV gI protein. Results The special 1221-bp fragment containing complete open reading frame(ORF) of duck enteritis virus(DEV) gI gene was extracted from plasmid pMD18-T-gI, and then cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pET-32a(+), resulting in pET-32a(+)-gI. After being confirmed by PCR, restriction endonuclease digestion and sequencing, pET-32a(+)-gI was transformed into E.coli BL21(DE3) competent cells for overexpression. DEV gI gene was successfully expressed by the addition of isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside(IPTG). SDS-PAGE showed that the recombinant protein His6-tagged gI molecular weight was about 61 kDa. Subsequently, the expressed product was applied to generate specific antibody against gI protein. The specificity of the rabbit immuneserum was confirmed by its ability to react with the recombinant protein His6-tagged gI. In addition, real time-PCR was used to determine the the levels of the mRNA transcripts of gI gene, the results showed that the DEV gI gene was transcribed most abundantly during the late phase of infection. Furthermore, indirect immunofluorescence(IIF) was established to study the gI protein expression and localization in DEV-infected duck embryo fibroblasts (DEFs), the results confirmed that the protein was expressed and located in the cytoplasm of the infected cells, intensively. Conclusions The recombinant prokaryotic expression vector of DEV gI gene was constructed successfully. The gI protein was successfully expressed by E.coli BL21(DE3) and maintained its antigenicity very well. The basic information of the transcription and intracellular localization of gI gene

  12. Loss of Sfpq Causes Long-Gene Transcriptopathy in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Akihide; Iida, Kei; Tsubota, Toshiaki; Hosokawa, Motoyasu; Denawa, Masatsugu; Brown, J B; Ninomiya, Kensuke; Ito, Mikako; Kimura, Hiroshi; Abe, Takaya; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Ohno, Kinji; Hagiwara, Masatoshi

    2018-05-01

    Genes specifically expressed in neurons contain members with extended long introns. Longer genes present a problem with respect to fulfilment of gene length transcription, and evidence suggests that dysregulation of long genes is a mechanism underlying neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Here, we report the discovery that RNA-binding protein Sfpq is a critical factor for maintaining transcriptional elongation of long genes. We demonstrate that Sfpq co-transcriptionally binds to long introns and is required for sustaining long-gene transcription by RNA polymerase II through mediating the interaction of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 with the elongation complex. Phenotypically, Sfpq disruption caused neuronal apoptosis in developing mouse brains. Expression analysis of Sfpq-regulated genes revealed specific downregulation of developmentally essential neuronal genes longer than 100 kb in Sfpq-disrupted brains; those genes are enriched in associations with neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. The identified molecular machinery yields directions for targeted investigations of the association between long-gene transcriptopathy and neuronal diseases. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. GEM2Net: from gene expression modeling to -omics networks, a new CATdb module to investigate Arabidopsis thaliana genes involved in stress response.

    PubMed

    Zaag, Rim; Tamby, Jean Philippe; Guichard, Cécile; Tariq, Zakia; Rigaill, Guillem; Delannoy, Etienne; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Balzergue, Sandrine; Mary-Huard, Tristan; Aubourg, Sébastien; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Brunaud, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    CATdb (http://urgv.evry.inra.fr/CATdb) is a database providing a public access to a large collection of transcriptomic data, mainly for Arabidopsis but also for other plants. This resource has the rare advantage to contain several thousands of microarray experiments obtained with the same technical protocol and analyzed by the same statistical pipelines. In this paper, we present GEM2Net, a new module of CATdb that takes advantage of this homogeneous dataset to mine co-expression units and decipher Arabidopsis gene functions. GEM2Net explores 387 stress conditions organized into 18 biotic and abiotic stress categories. For each one, a model-based clustering is applied on expression differences to identify clusters of co-expressed genes. To characterize functions associated with these clusters, various resources are analyzed and integrated: Gene Ontology, subcellular localization of proteins, Hormone Families, Transcription Factor Families and a refined stress-related gene list associated to publications. Exploiting protein-protein interactions and transcription factors-targets interactions enables to display gene networks. GEM2Net presents the analysis of the 18 stress categories, in which 17,264 genes are involved and organized within 681 co-expression clusters. The meta-data analyses were stored and organized to compose a dynamic Web resource. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Evolution by selection, recombination, and gene duplication in MHC class I genes of two Rhacophoridae species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Comparison of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes across vertebrate species can reveal molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of adaptive immunity-related proteins. As the first terrestrial tetrapods, amphibians deserve special attention because of their exposure to probably increased spectrum of microorganisms compared with ancestral aquatic fishes. Knowledge regarding the evolutionary patterns and mechanisms associated with amphibian MHC genes remains limited. The goal of the present study was to isolate MHC class I genes from two Rhacophoridae species (Rhacophorus omeimontis and Polypedates megacephalus) and examine their evolution. Results We identified 27 MHC class I alleles spanning the region from exon 2 to 4 in 38 tree frogs. The available evidence suggests that these 27 sequences all belong to classical MHC class I (MHC Ia) genes. Although several anuran species only display one MHC class Ia locus, at least two or three loci were observed in P. megacephalus and R. omeimontis, indicating that the number of MHC class Ia loci varies among anuran species. Recombination events, which mainly involve the entire exons, played an important role in shaping the genetic diversity of the 27 MHC class Ia alleles. In addition, signals of positive selection were found in Rhacophoridae MHC class Ia genes. Amino acid sites strongly suggested by program to be under positive selection basically accorded with the putative antigen binding sites deduced from crystal structure of human HLA. Phylogenetic relationships among MHC class I alleles revealed the presence of trans-species polymorphisms. Conclusions In the two Rhacophoridae species (1) there are two or three MHC class Ia loci; (2) recombination mainly occurs between the entire exons of MHC class Ia genes; (3) balancing selection, gene duplication and recombination all contribute to the diversity of MHC class Ia genes. These findings broaden our knowledge on the evolution of amphibian MHC systems

  15. Cytokine-related genes and oxidation-related genes detected in preeclamptic placentas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gui Se Ra; Joe, Yoon Seong; Kim, Sa Jin; Shin, Jong Chul

    2010-10-01

    To investigate cytokine- and oxidation-related genes for preeclampsia using DNA microarray analysis. Placentas were collected from 13 normal pregnancies and 13 patients with preeclampsia. Gene expression was studied using DNA microarray. Among significantly expressed genes, we focused on genes associated with cytokines and oxidation, and the results were confirmed using quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR). 415 genes out of 30,940 genes were altered by > or =2-fold in the microarray analysis. 121 up-regulated genes and 294 down-regulated genes were found to be in preeclamptic placenta. Six cytokine-related genes and 5 oxidation-related genes were found from among the 121 up-regulated genes. The cytokine-related genes studied included oncostatin M (OSM), fms-related tyrosine kinase (FLT1) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), and the oxidation-related genes studied included spermine oxidase (SMOX), l cytochrome P450, family 26, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 (CYP26A1), acetate dehydrogenase A (LDHA). These six genes were also significantly higher in placentas from patients with preeclampsia than in those from women with normal pregnancies. The placental tissue of patients with preeclampsia showed significantly higher mRNA expression of these six genes than the normal group, using QRT-PCR. DNA microarray analysis is one of the great methods for simultaneously detecting the functionally associated genes of preeclampsia. The cytokine-related genes such as OSM, FLT1 and VEGFA, and the oxidation-related genes such as LDHA, CYP26A1 and SMOX might prove to be the starting point in the elucidation of the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

  16. Gene Duplication and Transference of Function in the paleoAP3 Lineage of Floral Organ Identity Genes

    PubMed Central

    Galimba, Kelsey D.; Martínez-Gómez, Jesús; Di Stilio, Verónica S.

    2018-01-01

    The floral organ identity gene APETALA3 (AP3) is a MADS-box transcription factor involved in stamen and petal identity that belongs to the B-class of the ABC model of flower development. Thalictrum (Ranunculaceae), an emerging model in the non-core eudicots, has AP3 homologs derived from both ancient and recent gene duplications. Prior work has shown that petals have been lost repeatedly and independently in Ranunculaceae in correlation with the loss of a specific AP3 paralog, and Thalictrum represents one of these instances. The main goal of this study was to conduct a functional analysis of the three AP3 orthologs present in Thalictrum thalictroides, representing the paleoAP3 gene lineage, to determine the degree of redundancy versus divergence after gene duplication. Because Thalictrum lacks petals, and has lost the petal-specific AP3, we also asked whether heterotopic expression of the remaining AP3 genes contributes to the partial transference of petal function to the first whorl found in insect-pollinated species. To address these questions, we undertook functional characterization by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), protein–protein interaction and binding site analyses. Our results illustrate partial redundancy among Thalictrum AP3s, with deep conservation of B-class function in stamen identity and a novel role in ectopic petaloidy of sepals. Certain aspects of petal function of the lost AP3 locus have apparently been transferred to the other paralogs. A novel result is that the protein products interact not only with each other, but also as homodimers. Evidence presented here also suggests that expression of the different ThtAP3 paralogs is tightly integrated, with an apparent disruption of B function homeostasis upon silencing of one of the paralogs that codes for a truncated protein. To explain this result, we propose two testable alternative scenarios: that the truncated protein is a dominant negative mutant or that there is a compensational

  17. Polycation-based gene therapy: current knowledge and new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Tiera, Marcio J; Shi, Qin; Winnik, Françoise M; Fernandes, Julio C

    2011-08-01

    At present, gene transfection insufficient efficiency is a major drawback of non-viral gene therapy. The 2 main types of delivery systems deployed in gene therapy are based on viral or non-viral gene carriers. Several non-viral modalities can transfer foreign genetic material into the human body. To do so, polycation-based gene delivery methods must achieve sufficient efficiency in the transportation of therapeutic genes across various extracellular and intracellular barriers. These barriers include interactions with blood components, vascular endothelial cells and uptake by the reticuloendothelial system. Furthermore, the degradation of therapeutic DNA by serum nucleases is a potential obstacle for functional delivery to target cells. Cationic polymers constitute one of the most promising approaches to the use of viral vectors for gene therapy. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which DNA can escape from endosomes and traffic to enter the nucleus has triggered new strategies of synthesis and has revitalized research into new polycation-based systems. The objective of this review is to address the state of the art in gene therapy with synthetic and natural polycations and the latest advances to improve gene transfer efficiency in cells.

  18. MAVTgsa: An R Package for Gene Set (Enrichment) Analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Chien, Chih-Yi; Chang, Ching-Wei; Tsai, Chen-An; ...

    2014-01-01

    Gene semore » t analysis methods aim to determine whether an a priori defined set of genes shows statistically significant difference in expression on either categorical or continuous outcomes. Although many methods for gene set analysis have been proposed, a systematic analysis tool for identification of different types of gene set significance modules has not been developed previously. This work presents an R package, called MAVTgsa, which includes three different methods for integrated gene set enrichment analysis. (1) The one-sided OLS (ordinary least squares) test detects coordinated changes of genes in gene set in one direction, either up- or downregulation. (2) The two-sided MANOVA (multivariate analysis variance) detects changes both up- and downregulation for studying two or more experimental conditions. (3) A random forests-based procedure is to identify gene sets that can accurately predict samples from different experimental conditions or are associated with the continuous phenotypes. MAVTgsa computes the P values and FDR (false discovery rate) q -value for all gene sets in the study. Furthermore, MAVTgsa provides several visualization outputs to support and interpret the enrichment results. This package is available online.« less

  19. Immuno-Oncology-The Translational Runway for Gene Therapy: Gene Therapeutics to Address Multiple Immune Targets.

    PubMed

    Weß, Ludger; Schnieders, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Cancer therapy is once again experiencing a paradigm shift. This shift is based on extensive clinical experience demonstrating that cancer cannot be successfully fought by addressing only single targets or pathways. Even the combination of several neo-antigens in cancer vaccines is not sufficient for successful, lasting tumor eradication. The focus has therefore shifted to the immune system's role in cancer and the striking abilities of cancer cells to manipulate and/or deactivate the immune system. Researchers and pharma companies have started to target the processes and cells known to support immune surveillance and the elimination of tumor cells. Immune processes, however, require novel concepts beyond the traditional "single-target-single drug" paradigm and need parallel targeting of diverse cells and mechanisms. This review gives a perspective on the role of gene therapy technologies in the evolving immuno-oncology space and identifies gene therapy as a major driver in the development and regulation of effective cancer immunotherapy. Present challenges and breakthroughs ranging from chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy, gene-modified oncolytic viruses, combination cancer vaccines, to RNA therapeutics are spotlighted. Gene therapy is recognized as the most prominent technology enabling effective immuno-oncology strategies.

  20. Ancestor of land plants acquired the DNA-3-methyladenine glycosylase (MAG) gene from bacteria through horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Fang, Huimin; Huangfu, Liexiang; Chen, Rujia; Li, Pengcheng; Xu, Shuhui; Zhang, Enying; Cao, Wei; Liu, Li; Yao, Youli; Liang, Guohua; Xu, Chenwu; Zhou, Yong; Yang, Zefeng

    2017-08-24

    The origin and evolution of land plants was an important event in the history of life and initiated the establishment of modern terrestrial ecosystems. From water to terrestrial environments, plants needed to overcome the enhanced ultraviolet (UV) radiation and many other DNA-damaging agents. Evolving new genes with the function of DNA repair is critical for the origin and radiation of land plants. In bacteria, the DNA-3-methyladenine glycosylase (MAG) recognizes of a variety of base lesions and initiates the process of the base excision repair for damaged DNA. The homologs of MAG gene are present in all major lineages of streptophytes, and both the phylogenic and sequence similarity analyses revealed that green plant MAG gene originated through an ancient horizontal gene transfer (HGT) event from bacteria. Experimental evidence demonstrated that the expression of the maize ZmMAG gene was induced by UV and zeocin, both of which are known as DNA-damaging agents. Further investigation revealed that Streptophyta MAG genes had undergone positive selection during the initial evolutionary period in the ancestor of land plants. Our findings demonstrated that the ancient HGT of MAG to the ancestor of land plants probably played an important role in preadaptation to DNA-damaging agents in terrestrial environments.

  1. Differential Connectivity in Colorectal Cancer Gene Expression Network

    PubMed

    Izadi, Fereshteh

    2018-05-30

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the challenging types of cancers; thus, exploring effective biomarkers related to colorectal could lead to significant progresses toward the treatment of this disease. In the present study, CRC gene expression datasets have been reanalyzed. Mutual differentially expressed genes across 294 normal mucosa and adjacent tumoral samples were then utilized in order to build two independent transcriptional regulatory networks. By analyzing the networks topologically, genes with differential global connectivity related to cancer state were determined for which the potential transcriptional regulators including transcription factors were identified. The majority of differentially connected genes (DCGs) were up-regulated in colorectal transcriptome experiments. Moreover, a number of these genes have been experimentally validated as cancer or CRC-associated genes. The DCGs, including GART, TGFB1, ITGA2, SLC16A5, SOX9, and MMP7, were investigated across 12 cancer types. Functional enrichment analysis followed by detailed data mining exhibited that these candidate genes could be related to CRC by mediating in metastatic cascade in addition to shared pathways with 12 cancer types by triggering the inflammatory events Our study uncovered correlated alterations in gene expression related to CRC susceptibility and progression that the potent candidate biomarkers could provide a link to disease.

  2. Identification and analysis of the TIFY gene family in Gossypium raimondii.

    PubMed

    He, D H; Lei, Z P; Tang, B S; Xing, H Y; Zhao, J X; Jing, Y L

    2015-08-21

    The highly conserved TIFY domain is included in the TIFY protein family of transcription factors, which is important in plant development. Here, 28 TIFY family genes were identified in the Gossypium raimondii genome and classified into JAZ (15 genes), ZML (8), PPD (3), and TIFY (2). The normal (TIF[F/Y]XG) motif was dominant in the TIFY family, excluding the ZML subfamily, in which TLSFXG was prevalent. TIFY family genes were unevenly distributed in the G. raimondii genome, with TIFY clusters present on chromosome 9. Phylogenetic analysis indicated abundant variations in the G. raimondii TIFY family, which were most closely related to those in Theobroma cacao among 5 species. Exon-intron organization and intron phases were homologous within each subfamily, correlating with their phylogeny. Intra-species synteny analyses indicated that genomic duplication contributed to the expansion of the TIFY family. Inter-species synteny analyses indicated that synteny regions involved in G. raimondii TIFY family genes were also present in the comparison of G. raimondii vs Arabidopsis thaliana or T. cacao, signifying that these genes had common ancestors and play the same or similar roles in biological processes. Greater synteny was present in the comparison of G. raimondii vs T. cacao than of G. raimondii vs A. thaliana. The expression patterns of TIFY family genes were characterized and most TIFY family genes were indicated to be involved in fiber development. Our study provides new data related to the evolution of TIFYs and their role as important regulators of transcription; these data can be useful for fiber development.

  3. Comparative mapping of powdery mildew resistance gene Pm21 and functional characterization of resistance-related genes in wheat.

    PubMed

    He, Huagang; Zhu, Shanying; Jiang, Zhengning; Ji, Yaoyong; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Renhui; Bie, Tongde

    2016-04-01

    The powdery mildew resistance gene Pm21 was physically and comparatively mapped by newly developed markers. Seven candidate genes were verified to be required for Pm21 -mediated resistance to wheat powdery mildew. Pm21, a gene derived from wheat wild relative Dasypyrum villosum, has been transferred into common wheat and widely utilized in wheat resistance breeding for powdery mildew. Previously, Pm21 has been located to the bin FL0.45-0.58 of 6VS by using deletion stocks. However, its fine mapping is still a hard work. In the present study, 30 gene-derived 6VS-specific markers were obtained based on the collinearity among genomes of Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza and Triticeae, and then physically and comparatively mapped in the bin FL0.45-0.58 and its nearby chromosome region. According to the maps, the bin FL0.45-0.58 carrying Pm21 was closely flanked by the markers 6VS-03 and 6VS-23, which further narrowed the orthologous regions to 1.06 Mb in Brachypodium and 1.38 Mb in rice, respectively. Among the conserved genes shared by Brachypodium and rice, four serine/threonine protein kinase genes (DvMPK1, DvMLPK, DvUPK and DvPSYR1), one protein phosphatase gene (DvPP2C) and two transcription factor genes (DvGATA and DvWHY) were confirmed to be required for Pm21-mediated resistance to wheat powdery mildew by barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing (BSMV-VIGS) and transcriptional pattern analyses. In summary, this study gives new insights into the genetic basis of the Pm21 locus and the disease resistance pathways mediated by Pm21.

  4. Identification of Reference Genes for Quantitative Gene Expression Studies in a Non-Model Tree Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.)

    PubMed Central

    Moazzam Jazi, Maryam; Ghadirzadeh Khorzoghi, Effat; Botanga, Christopher; Seyedi, Seyed Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    The tree species, Pistacia vera (P. vera) is an important commercial product that is salt-tolerant and long-lived, with a possible lifespan of over one thousand years. Gene expression analysis is an efficient method to explore the possible regulatory mechanisms underlying these characteristics. Therefore, having the most suitable set of reference genes is required for transcript level normalization under different conditions in P. vera. In the present study, we selected eight widely used reference genes, ACT, EF1α, α-TUB, β-TUB, GAPDH, CYP2, UBQ10, and 18S rRNA. Using qRT-PCR their expression was assessed in 54 different samples of three cultivars of P. vera. The samples were collected from different organs under various abiotic treatments (cold, drought, and salt) across three time points. Several statistical programs (geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper) were applied to estimate the expression stability of candidate reference genes. Results obtained from the statistical analysis were then exposed to Rank aggregation package to generate a consensus gene rank. Based on our results, EF1α was found to be the superior reference gene in all samples under all abiotic treatments. In addition to EF1α, ACT and β-TUB were the second best reference genes for gene expression analysis in leaf and root. We recommended β-TUB as the second most stable gene for samples under the cold and drought treatments, while ACT holds the same position in samples analyzed under salt treatment. This report will benefit future research on the expression profiling of P. vera and other members of the Anacardiaceae family. PMID:27308855

  5. Identification of Reference Genes for Quantitative Gene Expression Studies in a Non-Model Tree Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.).

    PubMed

    Moazzam Jazi, Maryam; Ghadirzadeh Khorzoghi, Effat; Botanga, Christopher; Seyedi, Seyed Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    The tree species, Pistacia vera (P. vera) is an important commercial product that is salt-tolerant and long-lived, with a possible lifespan of over one thousand years. Gene expression analysis is an efficient method to explore the possible regulatory mechanisms underlying these characteristics. Therefore, having the most suitable set of reference genes is required for transcript level normalization under different conditions in P. vera. In the present study, we selected eight widely used reference genes, ACT, EF1α, α-TUB, β-TUB, GAPDH, CYP2, UBQ10, and 18S rRNA. Using qRT-PCR their expression was assessed in 54 different samples of three cultivars of P. vera. The samples were collected from different organs under various abiotic treatments (cold, drought, and salt) across three time points. Several statistical programs (geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper) were applied to estimate the expression stability of candidate reference genes. Results obtained from the statistical analysis were then exposed to Rank aggregation package to generate a consensus gene rank. Based on our results, EF1α was found to be the superior reference gene in all samples under all abiotic treatments. In addition to EF1α, ACT and β-TUB were the second best reference genes for gene expression analysis in leaf and root. We recommended β-TUB as the second most stable gene for samples under the cold and drought treatments, while ACT holds the same position in samples analyzed under salt treatment. This report will benefit future research on the expression profiling of P. vera and other members of the Anacardiaceae family.

  6. Development of Agrobacterium-Mediated Virus-Induced Gene Silencing and Performance Evaluation of Four Marker Genes in Gossypium barbadense

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jinhuan; Zhu, Yue; Li, Qing; Liu, Jinzhi; Tian, Yingchuan; Liu, Yule; Wu, Jiahe

    2013-01-01

    Gossypium barbadense is a cultivated cotton species and possesses many desirable traits, including high fiber quality and resistance to pathogens, especially Verticilliumdahliae (a devastating pathogen of Gossypium hirsutum, the main cultivated species). These elite traits are difficult to be introduced into G. hirsutum through classical breeding methods. In addition, genetic transformation of G . barbadense has not been successfully performed. It is therefore important to develop methods for evaluating the function and molecular mechanism of genes in G . barbadense . In this study, we had successfully introduced a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system into three cultivars of G . barbadense by inserting marker genes into the tobacco rattle virus (TRV) vector. After we optimized the VIGS conditions, including light intensity, photoperiod, seedling age and Agrobacterium strain, 100% of plants agroinfiltrated with the GaPDS silencing vector showed white colored leaves. Three other marker genes, GaCLA1, GaANS and GaANR, were employed to further test this VIGS system in G . barbadense . The transcript levels of the endogenous genes in the silenced plants were reduced by more than 99% compared to control plants; these plants presented phenotypic symptoms 2 weeks after inoculation. We introduced a fusing sequence fragment of GaPDS and GaANR gene silencing vectors into a single plant, which resulted in both photobleaching and brownish coloration. The extent of silencing in plants agroinfiltrated with fusing two-gene-silencing vector was consistent with plants harboring a single gene silencing vector. The development of this VIGS system should promote analysis of gene function in G . barbadense , and help to contribute desirable traits for breeding of G . barbadense and G. hirsutum. PMID:24023833

  7. Clustering Algorithms: Their Application to Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Oyelade, Jelili; Isewon, Itunuoluwa; Oladipupo, Funke; Aromolaran, Olufemi; Uwoghiren, Efosa; Ameh, Faridah; Achas, Moses; Adebiyi, Ezekiel

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression data hide vital information required to understand the biological process that takes place in a particular organism in relation to its environment. Deciphering the hidden patterns in gene expression data proffers a prodigious preference to strengthen the understanding of functional genomics. The complexity of biological networks and the volume of genes present increase the challenges of comprehending and interpretation of the resulting mass of data, which consists of millions of measurements; these data also inhibit vagueness, imprecision, and noise. Therefore, the use of clustering techniques is a first step toward addressing these challenges, which is essential in the data mining process to reveal natural structures and identify interesting patterns in the underlying data. The clustering of gene expression data has been proven to be useful in making known the natural structure inherent in gene expression data, understanding gene functions, cellular processes, and subtypes of cells, mining useful information from noisy data, and understanding gene regulation. The other benefit of clustering gene expression data is the identification of homology, which is very important in vaccine design. This review examines the various clustering algorithms applicable to the gene expression data in order to discover and provide useful knowledge of the appropriate clustering technique that will guarantee stability and high degree of accuracy in its analysis procedure. PMID:27932867

  8. A parasitic selfish gene that affects host promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo-Perez, Paulina; Goddard, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Selfish genes demonstrate transmission bias and invade sexual populations despite conferring no benefit to their hosts. While the molecular genetics and evolutionary dynamics of selfish genes are reasonably well characterized, their effects on hosts are not. Homing endonuclease genes (HEGs) are one well-studied family of selfish genes that are assumed to be benign. However, we show that carrying HEGs is costly for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, demonstrating that these genetic elements are not necessarily benign but maybe parasitic. We estimate a selective load of approximately 1–2% in ‘natural’ niches. The second aspect we examine is the ability of HEGs to affect hosts' sexual behaviour. As all selfish genes critically rely on sex for spread, then any selfish gene correlated with increased host sexuality will enjoy a transmission advantage. While classic parasites are known to manipulate host behaviour, we are not aware of any evidence showing a selfish gene is capable of affecting host promiscuity. The data presented here show a selfish element may increase the propensity of its eukaryote host to undergo sex and along with increased rates of non-Mendelian inheritance, this may counterbalance mitotic selective load and promote spread. Demonstration that selfish genes are correlated with increased promiscuity in eukaryotes connects with ideas suggesting that selfish genes promoted the evolution of sex initially. PMID:24048156

  9. Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism during Childhood: Presentation and Genetic Analyses in 46 Boys

    PubMed Central

    Vizeneux, Audrey; Hilfiger, Aude; Bouligand, Jérôme; Pouillot, Monique; Brailly-Tabard, Sylvie; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Ken; Brauner, Raja

    2013-01-01

    Background The majority of the patients reported with mutations in isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) are adults. We analysed the presentation and the plasma inhibin B and anti-müllerian hormone (AMH) concentrations during childhood and adolescence, and compared them to the genetic results. Methods This was a retrospective, single-center study of 46 boys with HH. Results Fourteen (30.4%) had Kallmann syndrome (KS), 4 (8.7%) had CHARGE syndrome and 28 (60.9%) had HH without olfaction deficit nor olfactive bulb hypoplasia. Eighteen (39%) had an associated malformation or syndromes. At diagnosis, 22 (47.8%) boys were aged presented with micropenis (n = 32, 69.6%, including all those gene mutations in 4 patients with CHARGE, mutations were found in 5/26 other boys analysed including one in KAL1 gene with STS, 2 in FGFR1 gene, one in PROKR2 gene and one in GnRHR gene. Conclusions The presence of micropenis in neonate, particularly if associated with cryptorchidism, is an indication to look for gonadotropin deficiency isolated or associated with other hypothalamic-pituitary deficiencies. Inhibin B and AMH concentrations are suggestive if low, but they may be normal. Despite the high frequency of the associated malformations and excluding the patients with CHARGE or ichtyosis, the 4 patients with mutations had no family history or malformation. This suggests that many other genes are involved. PMID:24204987

  10. Down-Regulation of Gene Expression by RNA-Induced Gene Silencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travella, Silvia; Keller, Beat

    Down-regulation of endogenous genes via post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is a key to the characterization of gene function in plants. Many RNA-based silencing mechanisms such as post-transcriptional gene silencing, co-suppression, quelling, and RNA interference (RNAi) have been discovered among species of different kingdoms (plants, fungi, and animals). One of the most interesting discoveries was RNAi, a sequence-specific gene-silencing mechanism initiated by the introduction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), homologous in sequence to the silenced gene, which triggers degradation of mRNA. Infection of plants with modified viruses can also induce RNA silencing and is referred to as virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). In contrast to insertional mutagenesis, these emerging new reverse genetic approaches represent a powerful tool for exploring gene function and for manipulating gene expression experimentally in cereal species such as barley and wheat. We examined how RNAi and VIGS have been used to assess gene function in barley and wheat, including molecular mechanisms involved in the process and available methodological elements, such as vectors, inoculation procedures, and analysis of silenced phenotypes.

  11. Function and expression pattern of nonsyndromic deafness genes

    PubMed Central

    Hilgert, Nele; Smith, Richard J.H.; Van Camp, Guy

    2010-01-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder, present in 1 of every 500 newborns. To date, 46 genes have been identified that cause nonsyndromic hearing loss, making it an extremely heterogeneous trait. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the inner ear function and expression pattern of these genes. In general, they are involved in hair bundle morphogenesis, form constituents of the extracellular matrix, play a role in cochlear ion homeostasis or serve as transcription factors. During the past few years, our knowledge of genes involved in hair bundle morphogenesis has increased substantially. We give an up-to-date overview of both the nonsyndromic and Usher syndrome genes involved in this process, highlighting proteins that interact to form macromolecular complexes. For every gene, we also summarize its expression pattern and impact on hearing at the functional level. Gene-specific cochlear expression is summarized in a unique table by structure/cell type and is illustrated on a cochlear cross-section, which is available online via the Hereditary Hearing Loss Homepage. This review should provide auditory scientists the most relevant information for all identified nonsyndromic deafness genes. PMID:19601806

  12. Gene therapy in liver diseases: state-of-the-art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Domvri, Kalliopi; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Koffa, Maria; Lambropoulou, Maria; Kakolyris, Stylianos; Kolios, George; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Chatzaki, Ekaterini

    2012-12-01

    Gene therapy is a fundamentally novel therapeutic approach that involves introducing genetic material into target cells in order to fight or prevent disease. A number of different strategies of gene therapy are tested at experimental and clinical levels, including: a) replacing a mutated gene that causes disease with a healthy copy of the gene, b) inactivating a mutated gene that its improper function causes pathogenesis, c) introducing a new gene coding a therapeutic compound to fight a disease, d) introducing to the target organ an enzyme converting an inactive pro-drug to its cytotoxic metabolite. In gene therapy, the transcriptional machinery of the patient is used to produce the active factor that exerts the intended therapeutic effect, ideally in a permanent, tissue-specific and manageable way. The liver is a major target for gene therapy, presenting inherited metabolic defects of single-gene etiology, but also severe multifactorial pathologies with limited therapeutic options such as hepatocellular carcinoma. The initial promising results from gene therapy strategies in liver diseases were followed by skepticism on the actual clinical value due to specificity, efficacy, toxicity and immune limitations, but are recently re-evaluated due to progress in vector technology and monitoring techniques. The significant amount of experimental data along with the available information from clinical trials are systematically reviewed here and presented per pathological entity. Finally, future perspectives of gene therapy protocols in hepatology are summarized.

  13. Chromosomal arrangement of leghemoglobin genes in soybean.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J S; Brown, G G; Verma, D P

    1983-01-01

    A cluster of four different leghemoglobin (Lb) genes was isolated from AluI-HaeIII and EcoRI genomic libraries of soybean in a set of overlapping clones which together include 45 kilobases (kb) of contiguous DNA. These four genes, including a pseudogene, are present in the same orientation and are arranged in the order: 5'-Lba-Lbc1-Lb psi-Lbc3-3'. The intergenic regions average 2.5 kb. In addition to this main Lb locus, there are other Lb genes which do not appear to be contiguous to this locus. A sequence probably common to the 3' region of Lb loci was found flanking the Lbc3 gene. The 3' flanking region of the main Lb locus also contains a sequence that appears to be expressed more abundantly in root tissue. Another sequence which is primarily expressed in root and leaf is found 5' to two Lb loci. Overall, the main leghemoglobin locus is similar in structure to the mammalian globin gene loci. Images PMID:6310504

  14. Modifier gene study of meconium ileus in cystic fibrosis: statistical considerations and gene mapping results

    PubMed Central

    Dorfman, Ruslan; Li, Weili; Sun, Lei; Lin, Fan; Wang, Yongqian; Sandford, Andrew; Paré, Peter D.; McKay, Karen; Kayserova, Hana; Piskackova, Tereza; Macek, Milan; Czerska, Kamila; Sands, Dorota; Tiddens, Harm; Margarit, Sonia; Repetto, Gabriela; Sontag, Marci K.; Accurso, Frank J.; Blackman, Scott; Cutting, Garry R.; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Corey, Mary; Durie, Peter; Zielenski, Julian; Strug, Lisa J.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic disease due to mutations in the CFTR gene. Yet, variability in CF disease presentation is presumed to be affected by modifier genes, such as those recently demonstrated for the pulmonary aspect. Here, we conduct a modifier gene study for meconium ileus (MI), an intestinal obstruction that occurs in 16–20% of CF newborns, providing linkage and association results from large family and case–control samples. Linkage analysis of modifier traits is different than linkage analysis of primary traits on which a sample was ascertained. Here, we articulate a source of confounding unique to modifier gene studies and provide an example of how one might overcome the confounding in the context of linkage studies. Our linkage analysis provided evidence of a MI locus on chromosome 12p13.3, which was segregating in up to 80% of MI families with at least one affected offspring (HLOD = 2.9). Fine mapping of the 12p13.3 region in a large case–control sample of pancreatic insufficient Canadian CF patients with and without MI pointed to the involvement of ADIPOR2 in MI (p = 0.002). This marker was substantially out of Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium in the cases only, and provided evidence of a cohort effect. The association with rs9300298 in the ADIPOR2 gene at the 12p13.3 locus was replicated in an independent sample of CF families. A protective locus, using the phenotype of no-MI, mapped to 4q13.3 (HLOD = 3.19), with substantial heterogeneity. A candidate gene in the region, SLC4A4, provided preliminary evidence of association (p = 0.002), warranting further follow-up studies. Our linkage approach was used to direct our fine-mapping studies, which uncovered two potential modifier genes worthy of follow-up. PMID:19662435

  15. Discovering Implicit Entity Relation with the Gene-Citation-Gene Network

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min; Han, Nam-Gi; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Ding, Ying; Chambers, Tamy

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we apply the entitymetrics model to our constructed Gene-Citation-Gene (GCG) network. Based on the premise there is a hidden, but plausible, relationship between an entity in one article and an entity in its citing article, we constructed a GCG network of gene pairs implicitly connected through citation. We compare the performance of this GCG network to a gene-gene (GG) network constructed over the same corpus but which uses gene pairs explicitly connected through traditional co-occurrence. Using 331,411 MEDLINE abstracts collected from 18,323 seed articles and their references, we identify 25 gene pairs. A comparison of these pairs with interactions found in BioGRID reveal that 96% of the gene pairs in the GCG network have known interactions. We measure network performance using degree, weighted degree, closeness, betweenness centrality and PageRank. Combining all measures, we find the GCG network has more gene pairs, but a lower matching rate than the GG network. However, combining top ranked genes in both networks produces a matching rate of 35.53%. By visualizing both the GG and GCG networks, we find that cancer is the most dominant disease associated with the genes in both networks. Overall, the study indicates that the GCG network can be useful for detecting gene interaction in an implicit manner. PMID:24358368

  16. Predicting Gene Structures from Multiple RT-PCR Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, Jakub; Vinař, Tomáš; Brejová, Broňa

    It has been demonstrated that the use of additional information such as ESTs and protein homology can significantly improve accuracy of gene prediction. However, many sources of external information are still being omitted from consideration. Here, we investigate the use of product lengths from RT-PCR experiments in gene finding. We present hardness results and practical algorithms for several variants of the problem and apply our methods to a real RT-PCR data set in the Drosophila genome. We conclude that the use of RT-PCR data can improve the sensitivity of gene prediction and locate novel splicing variants.

  17. Endocrine-related genes are altered by antibacterial agent triclosan in Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Morales, Mónica; Urien, Josune; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis

    2017-06-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is an antibacterial agent widely used in personal care and consumer products and commonly detected in aquatic ecosystems. In the present study, the effects of TCS on endocrine-related genes of Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae, a reference organism in aquatic toxicology, were evaluated. Twenty-four-hour in vivo exposures at 10µg/L, 100µg/L, and 1000µg/L TCS revealed that this xenobiotic was able to alter the transcriptional activity of ecdysone receptor gene (EcR), the ultraspiracle gene (usp), the estrogen-related receptor gene (ERR), and the E74 early ecdysone-inducible gene, as measured by real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, the hsp70 gene, a heat shock protein gene, was upregulated after exposure to TCS. The results of the present work provide the first evidence of the potential disruptive effects of TCS in endocrine-related genes suggesting a mode of action that mimics ecdysteroid hormones in insects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. WRKY domain-encoding genes of a crop legume chickpea (Cicer arietinum): comparative analysis with Medicago truncatula WRKY family and characterization of group-III gene(s).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kamal; Srivastava, Vikas; Purayannur, Savithri; Kaladhar, V Chandra; Cheruvu, Purnima Jaiswal; Verma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The WRKY genes have been identified as important transcriptional modulators predominantly during the environmental stresses, but they also play critical role at various stages of plant life cycle. We report the identification of WRKY domain (WD)-encoding genes from galegoid clade legumes chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and barrel medic (Medicago truncatula). In total, 78 and 98 WD-encoding genes were found in chickpea and barrel medic, respectively. Comparative analysis suggests the presence of both conserved and unique WRKYs, and expansion of WRKY family in M. truncatula primarily by tandem duplication. Exclusively found in galegoid legumes, CaWRKY16 and its orthologues encode for a novel protein having a transmembrane and partial Exo70 domains flanking a group-III WD. Genomic region of galegoids, having CaWRKY16, is more dynamic when compared with millettioids. In onion cells, fused CaWRKY16-EYFP showed punctate fluorescent signals in cytoplasm. The chickpea WRKY group-III genes were further characterized for their transcript level modulation during pathogenic stress and treatments of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid (SA) by real-time PCR. Differential regulation of genes was observed during Ascochyta rabiei infection and SA treatment. Characterization of A. rabiei and SA inducible gene CaWRKY50 showed that it localizes to plant nucleus, binds to W-box, and have a C-terminal transactivation domain. Overexpression of CaWRKY50 in tobacco plants resulted in early flowering and senescence. The in-depth comparative account presented here for two legume WRKY genes will be of great utility in hastening functional characterization of crop legume WRKYs and will also help in characterization of Exo70Js. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.