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Sample records for gene-armed oncolytic poxvirus

  1. Phase 1 Study of Intravenous Oncolytic Poxvirus (vvDD) in Patients With Advanced Solid Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Downs-Canner, Stephanie; Guo, Zong Sheng; Ravindranathan, Roshni; Breitbach, Caroline J; O'Malley, Mark E; Jones, Heather L; Moon, Anne; McCart, Judith Andrea; Shuai, Yongli; Zeh, Herbert J; Bartlett, David L

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted a phase 1 study of intravenous vvDD, a Western Reserve strain oncolytic vaccinia virus, on 11 patients with standard treatment-refractory advanced colorectal or other solid cancers. The primary endpoints were maximum tolerated dose and associated toxicity while secondary endpoints were pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, immune responses, and antitumor activity. No dose-limiting toxicities and treatment related severe adverse events were observed. The most common adverse events were grades 1/2 flu-like symptoms. Virus genomes were detectable in the blood 15–30 minutes after virus administration in a dose-dependent manner. There was evidence of a prolonged virus replication in tumor tissues in two patients, but no evidence of virus replication in non-tumor tissues, except a healed injury site and an oral thrush. Over 100-fold of anti-viral antibodies were induced in patients' sera. A strong induction of inflammatory and Th1, but not Th2 cytokines, suggested a potent Th1-mediated immunity against the virus and possibly the cancer. One patient showed a mixed response on PET-CT with resolution of some liver metastases, and another patient with cutaneous melanoma demonstrated clinical regression of some lesions. Given the confirmed safety, further trials evaluating intravenous vvDD in combination with therapeutic transgenes, immune checkpoint blockade or complement inhibitors, are warranted. PMID:27203445

  2. Sequential therapy with JX-594, a targeted oncolytic poxvirus, followed by sorafenib in hepatocellular carcinoma: preclinical and clinical demonstration of combination efficacy.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jeong; Breitbach, Caroline J; Moon, Anne; Kim, Chang Won; Patt, Rick; Kim, Mi Kyung; Lee, Yu Kyung; Oh, Sung Yong; Woo, Hyun Young; Parato, Kelley; Rintoul, Julia; Falls, Theresa; Hickman, Theresa; Rhee, Byung-Geon; Bell, John C; Kirn, David H; Hwang, Tae-Ho

    2011-06-01

    JX-594 is a targeted and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) expressing oncolytic poxvirus designed to selectively replicate in and destroy cancer cells through viral oncolysis and tumor-specific immunity. In a phase 1 trial, JX-594 injection into hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was well-tolerated and associated with viral replication, decreased tumor perfusion, and tumor necrosis. We hypothesized that JX-594 and sorafenib, a small molecule inhibitor of B-raf and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) approved for HCC, would have clinical benefit in combination given their demonstrated efficacy in HCC patients and their complementary mechanisms-of-action. HCC cell lines were uniformly sensitive to JX-594. Anti-raf kinase effects of concurrent sorafenib inhibited JX-594 replication in vitro, whereas sequential therapy was superior to either agent alone in murine tumor models. We therefore explored pilot safety and efficacy of JX-594 followed by sorafenib in three HCC patients. In all three patients, sequential treatment was (i) well-tolerated, (ii) associated with significantly decreased tumor perfusion, and (iii) associated with objective tumor responses (Choi criteria; up to 100% necrosis). HCC historical control patients on sorafenib alone at the same institutions had no objective tumor responses (0 of 15). Treatment of HCC with JX-594 followed by sorafenib has antitumoral activity, and JX-594 may sensitize tumors to subsequent therapy with VEGF/VEGFR inhibitors.

  3. Poxvirus pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Buller, R M; Palumbo, G J

    1991-01-01

    Poxviruses are a highly successful family of pathogens, with variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, being the most notable member. Poxviruses are unique among animal viruses in several respects. First, owing to the cytoplasmic site of virus replication, the virus encodes many enzymes required either for macromolecular precursor pool regulation or for biosynthetic processes. Second, these viruses have a very complex morphogenesis, which involves the de novo synthesis of virus-specific membranes and inclusion bodies. Third, and perhaps most surprising of all, the genomes of these viruses encode many proteins which interact with host processes at both the cellular and systemic levels. For example, a viral homolog of epidermal growth factor is active in vaccinia virus infections of cultured cells, rabbits, and mice. At least five virus proteins with homology to the serine protease inhibitor family have been identified and one, a 38-kDa protein encoded by cowpox virus, is thought to block a host pathway for generating a chemotactic substance. Finally, a protein which has homology with complement components interferes with the activation of the classical complement pathway. Poxviruses infect their hosts by all possible routes: through the skin by mechanical means (e.g., molluscum contagiosum infections of humans), via the respiratory tract (e.g., variola virus infections of humans), or by the oral route (e.g., ectromelia virus infection of the mouse). Poxvirus infections, in general, are acute, with no strong evidence for latent, persistent, or chronic infections. They can be localized or systemic. Ectromelia virus infection of the laboratory mouse can be systemic but inapparent with no mortality and little morbidity, or highly lethal with death in 10 days. On the other hand, molluscum contagiosum virus replicates only in the stratum spinosum of the human epidermis, with little or no involvement of the dermis, and does not spread systemically from the site of

  4. Poxvirus host cell entry.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Florian Ingo; Bleck, Christopher Karl Ernst; Mercer, Jason

    2012-02-01

    Poxviruses are characterized by their large size, complex composition, and cytoplasmic life cycle. They produce two types of infectious particles: mature virions (MVs) and extracellular virions (EVs). Both MVs and EVs of vaccinia virus, the model poxvirus, take advantage of host cell endocytosis for internalization: they activate macropinocytosis-the most suitable form of endocytosis for large particles. Although largely dependent on the same cellular machinery, MV and EV entry differs with regard to the mechanisms used to trigger macropinocytosis and to undergo fusion. While EVs have to shed an additional membrane to expose the fusion complex, MV fusion requires the inactivation of fusion inhibitory proteins absent in EVs. This review highlights recent advances in the understanding of poxvirus MV and EV cell entry. PMID:22440962

  5. Poxvirus Membrane Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poxviruses differ from most DNA viruses by replicating entirely within the cytoplasm. The first discernible viral structures are crescents and spherical immature virions containing a single lipoprotein membrane bilayer with an external honeycomb lattice. Because this viral membrane displays no obvious continuity with a cellular organelle, a de novo origin was suggested. Nevertheless, transient connections between viral and cellular membranes could be difficult to resolve. Despite the absence of direct evidence, the intermediate compartment (ERGIC) between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus and the ER itself were considered possible sources of crescent membranes. A break-through in understanding poxvirus membrane biogenesis has come from recent studies of the abortive replication of several vaccinia virus null mutants. Novel images showing continuity between viral crescents and the ER and the accumulation of immature virions in the expanded ER lumen provide the first direct evidence for a cellular origin of this poxvirus membrane. PMID:25728299

  6. Caps off to poxviruses.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Robert H

    2015-03-11

    In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Liu et al. (2015) and Burgess and Mohr (2015) describe how two poxvirus mRNA decapping enzymes hijack a host 5'-to-3'-exoribonuclease to evade antiviral innate immunity by limiting accumulation of double-stranded RNA.

  7. The Evolutionary Biology of Poxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Austin L.; Irausquin, Stephanie; Friedman, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The poxviruses (family Poxviridae) are a family of double-stranded viruses including several species that infect humans and their domestic animals, most notably Variola virus (VARV), the causative agent of smallpox. The evolutionary biology of these viruses poses numerous questions, for which we have only partial answers at present. Here we review evidence regarding the origin of poxviruses, the frequency of host transfer in poxvirus history, horizontal transfer of host genes to poxviruses, and the population processes accounting for patterns of nucleotide sequence polymorphism. PMID:19833230

  8. The evolution of poxvirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sampedro, Lucas; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Mejías-Pérez, Ernesto; García-Arriaza, Juan; Di Pilato, Mauro; Esteban, Mariano

    2015-04-01

    After Edward Jenner established human vaccination over 200 years ago, attenuated poxviruses became key players to contain the deadliest virus of its own family: Variola virus (VARV), the causative agent of smallpox. Cowpox virus (CPXV) and horsepox virus (HSPV) were extensively used to this end, passaged in cattle and humans until the appearance of vaccinia virus (VACV), which was used in the final campaigns aimed to eradicate the disease, an endeavor that was accomplished by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1980. Ever since, naturally evolved strains used for vaccination were introduced into research laboratories where VACV and other poxviruses with improved safety profiles were generated. Recombinant DNA technology along with the DNA genome features of this virus family allowed the generation of vaccines against heterologous diseases, and the specific insertion and deletion of poxvirus genes generated an even broader spectrum of modified viruses with new properties that increase their immunogenicity and safety profile as vaccine vectors. In this review, we highlight the evolution of poxvirus vaccines, from first generation to the current status, pointing out how different vaccines have emerged and approaches that are being followed up in the development of more rational vaccines against a wide range of diseases. PMID:25853483

  9. The Evolution of Poxvirus Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Sampedro, Lucas; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Mejías-Pérez, Ernesto; García-Arriaza, Juan; Di Pilato, Mauro; Esteban, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    After Edward Jenner established human vaccination over 200 years ago, attenuated poxviruses became key players to contain the deadliest virus of its own family: Variola virus (VARV), the causative agent of smallpox. Cowpox virus (CPXV) and horsepox virus (HSPV) were extensively used to this end, passaged in cattle and humans until the appearance of vaccinia virus (VACV), which was used in the final campaigns aimed to eradicate the disease, an endeavor that was accomplished by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1980. Ever since, naturally evolved strains used for vaccination were introduced into research laboratories where VACV and other poxviruses with improved safety profiles were generated. Recombinant DNA technology along with the DNA genome features of this virus family allowed the generation of vaccines against heterologous diseases, and the specific insertion and deletion of poxvirus genes generated an even broader spectrum of modified viruses with new properties that increase their immunogenicity and safety profile as vaccine vectors. In this review, we highlight the evolution of poxvirus vaccines, from first generation to the current status, pointing out how different vaccines have emerged and approaches that are being followed up in the development of more rational vaccines against a wide range of diseases. PMID:25853483

  10. The evolution of poxvirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sampedro, Lucas; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Mejías-Pérez, Ernesto; García-Arriaza, Juan; Di Pilato, Mauro; Esteban, Mariano

    2015-04-07

    After Edward Jenner established human vaccination over 200 years ago, attenuated poxviruses became key players to contain the deadliest virus of its own family: Variola virus (VARV), the causative agent of smallpox. Cowpox virus (CPXV) and horsepox virus (HSPV) were extensively used to this end, passaged in cattle and humans until the appearance of vaccinia virus (VACV), which was used in the final campaigns aimed to eradicate the disease, an endeavor that was accomplished by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1980. Ever since, naturally evolved strains used for vaccination were introduced into research laboratories where VACV and other poxviruses with improved safety profiles were generated. Recombinant DNA technology along with the DNA genome features of this virus family allowed the generation of vaccines against heterologous diseases, and the specific insertion and deletion of poxvirus genes generated an even broader spectrum of modified viruses with new properties that increase their immunogenicity and safety profile as vaccine vectors. In this review, we highlight the evolution of poxvirus vaccines, from first generation to the current status, pointing out how different vaccines have emerged and approaches that are being followed up in the development of more rational vaccines against a wide range of diseases.

  11. Poxviruses in Bats … so What?

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kate S.; Murcia, Pablo R.

    2014-01-01

    Poxviruses are important pathogens of man and numerous domestic and wild animal species. Cross species (including zoonotic) poxvirus infections can have drastic consequences for the recipient host. Bats are a diverse order of mammals known to carry lethal viral zoonoses such as Rabies, Hendra, Nipah, and SARS. Consequent targeted research is revealing bats to be infected with a rich diversity of novel viruses. Poxviruses were recently identified in bats and the settings in which they were found were dramatically different. Here, we review the natural history of poxviruses in bats and highlight the relationship of the viruses to each other and their context in the Poxviridae family. In addition to considering the zoonotic potential of these viruses, we reflect on the broader implications of these findings. Specifically, the potential to explore and exploit this newfound relationship to study coevolution and cross species transmission together with fundamental aspects of poxvirus host tropism as well as bat virology and immunology. PMID:24704730

  12. Poxvirus entry and membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Bernard . E-mail: bmoss@nih.gov

    2006-01-05

    The study of poxvirus entry and membrane fusion has been invigorated by new biochemical and microscopic findings that lead to the following conclusions: (1) the surface of the mature virion (MV), whether isolated from an infected cell or by disruption of the membrane wrapper of an extracellular virion, is comprised of a single lipid membrane embedded with non-glycosylated viral proteins; (2) the MV membrane fuses with the cell membrane, allowing the core to enter the cytoplasm and initiate gene expression; (3) fusion is mediated by a newly recognized group of viral protein components of the MV membrane, which are conserved in all members of the poxvirus family; (4) the latter MV entry/fusion proteins are required for cell to cell spread necessitating the disruption of the membrane wrapper of extracellular virions prior to fusion; and furthermore (5) the same group of MV entry/fusion proteins are required for virus-induced cell-cell fusion. Future research priorities include delineation of the roles of individual entry/fusion proteins and identification of cell receptors.

  13. Worldwide phylogenetic relationship of avian poxviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gyuranecz, Miklós; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Dán, Ádám; Ip, Hon S.; Egstad, Kristina F.; Parker, Patricia G.; Higashiguchi, Jenni M.; Skinner, Michael A.; Höfle, Ursula; Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Dorrestein, Gerry M.; Solt, Szabolcs; Sós, Endre; Kim, Young Jun; Uhart, Marcela; Pereda, Ariel; González-Hein, Gisela; Hidalgo, Hector; Blanco, Juan-Manuel; Erdélyi, Károly

    2013-01-01

    Poxvirus infections have been found in 230 species of wild and domestic birds worldwide in both terrestrial and marine environments. This ubiquity raises the question of how infection has been transmitted and globally dispersed. We present a comprehensive global phylogeny of 111 novel poxvirus isolates in addition to all available sequences from GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis of Avipoxvirus genus has traditionally relied on one gene region (4b core protein). In this study we have expanded the analyses to include a second locus (DNA polymerase gene), allowing for a more robust phylogenetic framework, finer genetic resolution within specific groups and the detection of potential recombination. Our phylogenetic results reveal several major features of avipoxvirus evolution and ecology and propose an updated avipoxvirus taxonomy, including three novel subclades. The characterization of poxviruses from 57 species of birds in this study extends the current knowledge of their host range and provides the first evidence of the phylogenetic effect of genetic recombination of avipoxviruses. The repeated occurrence of avian family or order-specific grouping within certain clades (e.g. starling poxvirus, falcon poxvirus, raptor poxvirus, etc.) indicates a marked role of host adaptation, while the sharing of poxvirus species within prey-predator systems emphasizes the capacity for cross-species infection and limited host adaptation. Our study provides a broad and comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the Avipoxvirus genus, an ecologically and environmentally important viral group, to formulate a genome sequencing strategy that will clarify avipoxvirus taxonomy.

  14. The uses of poxviruses as vectors.

    PubMed

    Vanderplasschen, A; Pastoret, P-P

    2003-12-01

    Poxviruses have played an amazing role in the development of virology, immunology and vaccinology. In 1796, deliberate inoculation of cowpox virus to humans was proved by Dr. Edward Jenner to protect against the antigenically related smallpox virus (variola). This discovery founded the science of immunology and eventually led to smallpox eradication from the earth in 1980 after a world wide vaccination campaign with vaccinia virus (another poxvirus). Paradoxically, despite the eradication of smallpox, there has been an explosion of interest in vaccinia virus in the eighties. This interest has stemmed in part from the application of molecular genetics to clone and express foreign genes from recombinant vaccinia virus. The use of these recombinant vaccinia viruses as efficacious in vitro expression system and live vaccine has raised concerns about their safety. The work of the scientific community of the last 20 years has contributed to improve drastically the safety of poxvirus derived vectors. Firstly, the safety of vaccinia virus has been enhanced by production of genetically attenuated strains. Secondly, alternative poxvirus vectors, such as avipoxviruses, were proved to be extremely safe and efficacious non-replicating vectors when used in non avian species. In the present chapter, the basic concepts of poxvirus biology required to assess the safety of a poxvirus derived vector are provided. The principal poxvirus vectors available to date are described in regards to their biosafety. PMID:14683453

  15. Worldwide Phylogenetic Relationship of Avian Poxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Jeffrey T.; Dán, Ádám; Ip, Hon S.; Egstad, Kristina F.; Parker, Patricia G.; Higashiguchi, Jenni M.; Skinner, Michael A.; Höfle, Ursula; Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Dorrestein, Gerry M.; Solt, Szabolcs; Sós, Endre; Kim, Young Jun; Uhart, Marcela; Pereda, Ariel; González-Hein, Gisela; Hidalgo, Hector; Blanco, Juan-Manuel; Erdélyi, Károly

    2013-01-01

    Poxvirus infections have been found in 230 species of wild and domestic birds worldwide in both terrestrial and marine environments. This ubiquity raises the question of how infection has been transmitted and globally dispersed. We present a comprehensive global phylogeny of 111 novel poxvirus isolates in addition to all available sequences from GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis of the Avipoxvirus genus has traditionally relied on one gene region (4b core protein). In this study we expanded the analyses to include a second locus (DNA polymerase gene), allowing for a more robust phylogenetic framework, finer genetic resolution within specific groups, and the detection of potential recombination. Our phylogenetic results reveal several major features of avipoxvirus evolution and ecology and propose an updated avipoxvirus taxonomy, including three novel subclades. The characterization of poxviruses from 57 species of birds in this study extends the current knowledge of their host range and provides the first evidence of the phylogenetic effect of genetic recombination of avipoxviruses. The repeated occurrence of avian family or order-specific grouping within certain clades (e.g., starling poxvirus, falcon poxvirus, raptor poxvirus, etc.) indicates a marked role of host adaptation, while the sharing of poxvirus species within prey-predator systems emphasizes the capacity for cross-species infection and limited host adaptation. Our study provides a broad and comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of the Avipoxvirus genus, an ecologically and environmentally important viral group, to formulate a genome sequencing strategy that will clarify avipoxvirus taxonomy. PMID:23408635

  16. Zoonotic Poxviruses Associated with Companion Animals

    PubMed Central

    Tack, Danielle M.; Reynolds, Mary G.

    2011-01-01

    Simple Summary Contemporary enthusiasm for the ownership of exotic animals and hobby livestock has created an opportunity for the movement of poxviruses—such as monkeypox, cowpox, and orf—outside their traditional geographic range bringing them into contact with atypical animal hosts and groups of people not normally considered at risk. It is important that pet owners and practitioners of human and animal medicine develop a heightened awareness for poxvirus infections and understand the risks that can be associated with companion animals and livestock. This article reviews the epidemiology and clinical features of zoonotic poxviruses that are most likely to affect companion animals. Abstract Understanding the zoonotic risk posed by poxviruses in companion animals is important for protecting both human and animal health. The outbreak of monkeypox in the United States, as well as current reports of cowpox in Europe, point to the fact that companion animals are increasingly serving as sources of poxvirus transmission to people. In addition, the trend among hobbyists to keep livestock (such as goats) in urban and semi-urban areas has contributed to increased parapoxvirus exposures among people not traditionally considered at high risk. Despite the historic notoriety of poxviruses and the diseases they cause, poxvirus infections are often missed. Delays in diagnosing poxvirus-associated infections in companion animals can lead to inadvertent human exposures. Delays in confirming human infections can result in inappropriate treatment or prolonged recovery. Early recognition of poxvirus-associated infections and application of appropriate preventive measures can reduce the spread of virus between companion animals and their owners. This review will discuss the epidemiology and clinical features associated with the zoonotic poxvirus infections most commonly associated with companion animals. PMID:26486622

  17. Oncolytic viruses: finally delivering

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Leonard W; Fisher, Kerry D

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses can be found at the confluence of virology, genetic engineering and pharmacology where versatile platforms for molecularly targeted anticancer agents can be designed and optimised. Oncolytic viruses offer several important advantages over traditional approaches, including the following. (1) Amplification of the active agent (infectious virus particles) within the tumour. This avoids unnecessary exposure to normal tissues experienced during delivery of traditional stoichiometric chemotherapy and maximises the therapeutic index. (2) The active cell-killing mechanisms, often independent of programmed death mechanisms, should decrease the emergence of acquired drug resistance. (3) Lytic death of cancer cells provides a pro-inflammatory microenvironment and the potential for induction of an anticancer vaccine response. (4) Tumour-selective expression and secretion of encoded anticancer biologics, providing a new realm of potent and cost-effective-targeted therapeutics. PMID:26766734

  18. Oncolytic virotherapy reaches adolescence.

    PubMed

    Hammill, Adrienne M; Conner, Joseph; Cripe, Timothy P

    2010-12-15

    Lytic viruses kill cells as a consequence of their normal replication life cycle. The idea of harnessing viruses to kill cancer cells arose over a century ago, before viruses were even discovered, from medical case reports of infections associated with cancer remissions. Since then, there has been no shortage of hype, hope, or fear regarding the prospect of oncolytic virotherapy for cancer. Early developments in the field included encouraging antitumor efficacy both in animal studies in the 1920s-1940s and in human clinical trials in the 1950s-1970s. Despite its long-standing history, oncolytic virotherapy was an idea ahead of its time. Without needed advances in molecular biology, virology, immunology, and clinical research ethics, early clinical trials resulted in infectious complications and were fraught with controversial research conduct, so that enthusiasm in the medical community waned. Oncolytic virotherapy is now experiencing a major growth spurt, having sustained numerous laboratory advances and undergone multiple encouraging adult clinical trials, and is now witnessing the emergence of pediatric trials. Here we review the history and salient biology of the field, including preclinical and clinical data, with a special emphasis on those agents now being tested in pediatric cancer patients. PMID:20734404

  19. Oncolytic viral purging of leukemic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with Myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Masmudur M; Madlambayan, Gerard J; Cogle, Christopher R; McFadden, Grant

    2010-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy and radiation followed by autologous blood and marrow transplantation (ABMT) has been used for the treatment of certain cancers that are refractory to standard therapeutic regimes. However, a major challenge with ABMT for patients with hematologic malignancies is disease relapse, mainly due to either contamination with cancerous hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within the autograft or the persistence of residual therapy-resistant disease niches within the patient. Oncolytic viruses represent a promising therapeutic approach to prevent cancer relapse by eliminating tumor-initiating cells that contaminate the autograft. Here we summarize an ex vivo "purging" strategy with oncolytic Myxoma virus (MYXV) to remove cancer-initiating cells from patient autografts prior to transplantation. MYXV, a novel oncolytic poxvirus with potent anti-cancer properties in a variety of in vivo tumor models, can specifically eliminate cancerous stem and progenitor cells from samples obtained from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients, while sparing normal CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells capable of rescuing hematopoiesis following high dose conditioning. We propose that a broader subset of patients with intractable hematologic malignancies who have failed standard therapy could become eligible for ABMT when the treatment schema is coupled with ex vivo oncolytic therapy. PMID:20211576

  20. Stress Beyond Translation: Poxviruses and More.

    PubMed

    Liem, Jason; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Poxviruses are large double-stranded DNA viruses that form viral factories in the cytoplasm of host cells. These viruses encode their own transcription machinery, but rely on host translation for protein synthesis. Thus, poxviruses have to cope with and, in most cases, reprogram host translation regulation. Granule structures, called antiviral granules (AVGs), have been observed surrounding poxvirus viral factories. AVG formation is associated with abortive poxvirus infection, and AVGs contain proteins that are typically found in stress granules (SGs). With certain mutant poxviruses lack of immunoregulatory factor(s), we can specifically examine the mechanisms that drive the formation of these structures. In fact, cytoplasmic macromolecular complexes form during many viral infections and contain sensing molecules that can help reprogram transcription. More importantly, the similarity between AVGs and cytoplasmic structures formed during RNA and DNA sensing events prompts us to reconsider the cause and consequence of these AVGs. In this review, we first summarize recent findings regarding how poxvirus manipulates host translation. Next, we compare and contrast SGs and AVGs. Finally, we review recent findings regarding RNA- and especially DNA-sensing bodies observed during viral infection. PMID:27314378

  1. Stress Beyond Translation: Poxviruses and More

    PubMed Central

    Liem, Jason; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Poxviruses are large double-stranded DNA viruses that form viral factories in the cytoplasm of host cells. These viruses encode their own transcription machinery, but rely on host translation for protein synthesis. Thus, poxviruses have to cope with and, in most cases, reprogram host translation regulation. Granule structures, called antiviral granules (AVGs), have been observed surrounding poxvirus viral factories. AVG formation is associated with abortive poxvirus infection, and AVGs contain proteins that are typically found in stress granules (SGs). With certain mutant poxviruses lack of immunoregulatory factor(s), we can specifically examine the mechanisms that drive the formation of these structures. In fact, cytoplasmic macromolecular complexes form during many viral infections and contain sensing molecules that can help reprogram transcription. More importantly, the similarity between AVGs and cytoplasmic structures formed during RNA and DNA sensing events prompts us to reconsider the cause and consequence of these AVGs. In this review, we first summarize recent findings regarding how poxvirus manipulates host translation. Next, we compare and contrast SGs and AVGs. Finally, we review recent findings regarding RNA- and especially DNA-sensing bodies observed during viral infection. PMID:27314378

  2. Forensic Proteomics of Poxvirus Production

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Tulman, Edan; Engelmann, Heather E.; Clowers, Brian H.; Geary, Steven J.; Robinson, Aaron C.; Liao, Xiaofen

    2013-08-27

    The field of microbial forensics has recently sought to develop methods to discern biological signatures to indicate production methods for biological agents. Viral agents have received less attention to date. Their obligate propagation in living cells makes purification from cellular material a challenge. This leads to potential carryover of protein-rich signature of their production system. Here we have explored a proteomic analysis of Vaccinia virus as a model poxvirus system in which to compare samples of virus propagated in different cell lines and subjected to different purification schemes. The proteomic data sets indicated viral, host cell and culture medium proteins, and several layers of data analysis were applied to build confidence in the peptide identification and capture information on the taxonomic utility of each. The analysis showed clear shifts in protein profiles with virus purification, with successive gradient purification steps showing different levels of viral protein enrichment. Peptides from cellular proteins, including those present in purified virus preparations, provided signatures which enabled discrimination of cell line substrates, including distinguishing between cells derived from different primate species. The ability to discern multiple aspects of viral production demonstrates the potential value of proteomic analysis as tool for microbial forensics.

  3. Oncolytic virus therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Goldufsky, Joe; Sivendran, Shanthi; Harcharik, Sara; Pan, Michael; Bernardo, Sebastian; Stern, Richard H; Friedlander, Philip; Ruby, Carl E; Saenger, Yvonne; Kaufman, Howard L

    2013-01-01

    The use of oncolytic viruses to treat cancer is based on the selection of tropic tumor viruses or the generation of replication selective vectors that can either directly kill infected tumor cells or increase their susceptibility to cell death and apoptosis through additional exposure to radiation or chemotherapy. In addition, viral vectors can be modified to promote more potent tumor cell death, improve the toxicity profile, and/or generate host antitumor immunity. A variety of viruses have been developed as oncolytic therapeutics, including adenovirus, vaccinia virus, herpesvirus, coxsackie A virus, Newcastle disease virus, and reovirus. The clinical development of oncolytic viral therapy has accelerated in the last few years, with several vectors entering clinical trials for a variety of cancers. In this review, current strategies to optimize the therapeutic effectiveness and safety of the major oncolytic viruses are discussed, and a summary of current clinical trials is provided. Further investigation is needed to characterize better the clinical impact of oncolytic viruses, but there are increasing data demonstrating the potential promise of this approach for the treatment of human and animal cancers.

  4. Oncolytic virus therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goldufsky, Joe; Sivendran, Shanthi; Harcharik, Sara; Pan, Michael; Bernardo, Sebastian; Stern, Richard H; Friedlander, Philip; Ruby, Carl E; Saenger, Yvonne; Kaufman, Howard L

    2013-01-01

    The use of oncolytic viruses to treat cancer is based on the selection of tropic tumor viruses or the generation of replication selective vectors that can either directly kill infected tumor cells or increase their susceptibility to cell death and apoptosis through additional exposure to radiation or chemotherapy. In addition, viral vectors can be modified to promote more potent tumor cell death, improve the toxicity profile, and/or generate host antitumor immunity. A variety of viruses have been developed as oncolytic therapeutics, including adenovirus, vaccinia virus, herpesvirus, coxsackie A virus, Newcastle disease virus, and reovirus. The clinical development of oncolytic viral therapy has accelerated in the last few years, with several vectors entering clinical trials for a variety of cancers. In this review, current strategies to optimize the therapeutic effectiveness and safety of the major oncolytic viruses are discussed, and a summary of current clinical trials is provided. Further investigation is needed to characterize better the clinical impact of oncolytic viruses, but there are increasing data demonstrating the potential promise of this approach for the treatment of human and animal cancers. PMID:27512656

  5. Poxviruses and the Evolution of Host Range and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Sherry L.; Peng, Chen; McFadden, Grant; Rothenburg, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses as a group can infect a large number of animals. However, at the level of individual viruses, even closely related poxviruses display highly diverse host ranges and virulence. For example, variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, is human-specific and highly virulent only to humans, whereas related cowpox viruses naturally infect a broad spectrum of animals and only cause relatively mild disease in humans. The successful replication of poxviruses depends on their effective manipulation of the host antiviral responses, at the cellular-, tissue- and species-specific levels, which constitutes a molecular basis for differences in poxvirus host range and virulence. A number of poxvirus genes have been identified that possess host range function in experimental settings, and many of these host range genes target specific antiviral host pathways. Herein, we review the biology of poxviruses with a focus on host range, zoonotic infections, virulence, genomics and host range genes as well as the current knowledge about the function of poxvirus host range factors and how their interaction with the host innate immune system contributes to poxvirus host range and virulence. We further discuss the evolution of host range and virulence in poxviruses as well as host switches and potential poxvirus threats for human and animal health. PMID:24161410

  6. Sulfonimidamide analogs of oncolytic sulfonylureas.

    PubMed

    Toth, J E; Grindey, G B; Ehlhardt, W J; Ray, J E; Boder, G B; Bewley, J R; Klingerman, K K; Gates, S B; Rinzel, S M; Schultz, R M; Weir, L C; Worzalla, J F

    1997-03-14

    A series of sulfonimidamide analogs of the oncolytic diarylsulfonylureas was synthesized and evaluated for (1) in vitro cytotoxicity against CEM cells, (2) in vivo antitumor activity against subaxillary implanted 6C3HED lymphosarcoma, and (3) metabolic breakdown to the o-sulfate of p-chloroaniline. The separated enantiomers of one sulfonimidamide analog displayed very different activities in the in vivo screening model. In general, several analogs demonstrated excellent growth inhibitory activity in the 6C3HED model when dosed orally or intraperitoneally. A correlative structure-activity relationship to the oncolytic sulfonylureas was not apparent.

  7. Modulation of chemokines in the tumor microenvironment enhances oncolytic virotherapy for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zuqiang; Ravindranathan, Roshni; Urban, Julie A.; Sathaiah, Magesh; Magge, Deepa; Kalinski, Pawel; Bartlett, David L.

    2016-01-01

    An oncolytic poxvirus such as vvDD-CXCL11 can generate potent systemic antitumor immunity as well as targeted oncolysis, yet the antitumor effect is limited probably due to limited homing to and suppressed activity of tumor-specific adaptive immune cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME). We reasoned that a chemokine modulating (CKM) drug cocktail, consisting of IFN-α, poly I:C, and a COX-2 inhibitor, may skew the chemokine (CK) and cytokine profile into a favorable one in the TME, and this pharmaceutical modulation would enhance both the trafficking into and function of antitumor immune cells in the TME, thus increasing therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic virus. In this study we show for the first time in vivo that the CKM modulates the CK microenvironment but it does not modulate antitumor immunity by itself in a MC38 colon cancer model. Sequential treatment with the virus and then CKM results in the upregulation of Th1-attracting CKs and reduction of Treg-attracting CKs (CCL22 and CXCL12), concurrent with enhanced trafficking of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells and NK cells into the TME, thus resulting in the most significant antitumor activity and long term survival of tumor-bearing mice. This novel combined regimen, with the oncolytic virus (vvDD-CXCL11) inducing direct oncolysis and eliciting potent antitumor immunity, and the CKM inducing a favorable chemokine profile in the TME that promotes the trafficking and function of antitumor Tc1/Th1 and NK cells, may have great utility for oncolytic immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:26956047

  8. Designing herpes viruses as oncolytics

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Cole; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) was one of the first genetically-engineered oncolytic viruses. Because HSV is a natural human pathogen that can cause serious disease, it is incumbent that it can be genetically-engineered or significantly attenuated for safety. Here, we present a detailed explanation of the functions of HSV-1 genes frequently mutated to endow oncolytic activity. These genes are nonessential for growth in tissue culture cells but are important for growth in postmitotic cells, interfering with intrinsic antiviral and innate immune responses or causing pathology, functions dispensable for replication in cancer cells. Understanding the function of these genes leads to informed creation of new oHSVs with better therapeutic efficacy. Virus infection and replication can also be directed to cancer cells through tumor-selective receptor binding and transcriptional- or post-transcriptional miRNA-targeting, respectively. In addition to the direct effects of oHSV on infected cancer cells and tumors, oHSV can be “armed” with transgenes that are: reporters, to track virus replication and spread; cytotoxic, to kill uninfected tumor cells; immune modulatory, to stimulate antitumor immunity; or tumor microenvironment altering, to enhance virus spread or to inhibit tumor growth. In addition to HSV-1, other alphaherpesviruses are also discussed for their oncolytic activity. PMID:26462293

  9. Genetic identification of novel poxviruses of cetaceans and pinnipeds.

    PubMed

    Bracht, A J; Brudek, R L; Ewing, R Y; Manire, C A; Burek, K A; Rosa, C; Beckmen, K B; Maruniak, J E; Romero, C H

    2006-03-01

    Novel poxviruses were identified in skin lesions of several species of cetaceans and pinnipeds using polymerase chain reaction targeting DNA polymerase and DNA topoisomerase I genes of members of the subfamily Chordopoxvirinae. With the exception of parapoxviruses, no molecular data of marine mammal poxviruses were available to infer genetic and evolutionary relatedness to terrestrial vertebrate poxviruses. Viruses were assigned to a cetacean poxvirus 1 (CPV-1) group based on nucleotide and amino acid identities of gene fragments amplified from skin lesions of Asian bottlenose (Tursiops aduncus), Atlantic bottlenose (Tursiops truncatus), rough-toothed (Steno bredanensis), and striped (Stenella coeruleoalba) dolphins. A different poxvirus was detected in skin lesions of a bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus) and provisionally assigned to a CPV-2 group. These viruses showed highest identity to terrestrial poxviruses of the genera Orthopoxvirus and Suipoxvirus. A novel species-specific poxvirus was also identified in skin lesions of Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus). None of these poxviruses were found to have amplifiable hemagglutinin gene sequences. Novel parapoxviruses were also identified in skin lesions of Steller sea lions and spotted seals (Phoca largha). A significant degree of divergence was observed in sequences of Steller sea lion parapoxviruses, while those of spotted seals and harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) were highly conserved. PMID:16328132

  10. Bioinformatics for analysis of poxvirus genomes.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Melissa; Upton, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there have been numerous unprecedented technological advances in the field of molecular biology; these include DNA sequencing, mass spectrometry of proteins, and microarray analysis of mRNA transcripts. Perhaps, however, it is the area of genomics, which has now generated the complete genome sequences of more than 100 poxviruses, that has had the greatest impact on the average virology researcher because the DNA sequence data is in constant use in many different ways by almost all molecular virologists. As this data resource grows, so does the importance of the availability of databases and software tools to enable the bench virologist to work with and make use of this (valuable/expensive) DNA sequence information. Thus, providing researchers with intuitive software to first select and reformat genomics data from large databases, second, to compare/analyze genomics data, and third, to view and interpret large and complex sets of results has become pivotal in enabling progress to be made in modern virology. This chapter is directed at the bench virologist and describes the software required for a number of common bioinformatics techniques that are useful for comparing and analyzing poxvirus genomes. In a number of examples, we also highlight the Viral Orthologous Clusters database system and integrated tools that we developed for the management and analysis of complete viral genomes.

  11. Salmon Gill Poxvirus, the Deepest Representative of the Chordopoxvirinae

    PubMed Central

    Yutin, Natalya; Tengs, Torstein; Senkevich, Tania; Koonin, Eugene; Rønning, Hans Petter; Alarcon, Marta; Ylving, Sonja; Lie, Kai-Inge; Saure, Britt; Tran, Linh; Dale, Ole Bendik

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poxviruses are large DNA viruses of vertebrates and insects causing disease in many animal species, including reptiles, birds, and mammals. Although poxvirus-like particles were detected in diseased farmed koi carp, ayu, and Atlantic salmon, their genetic relationships to poxviruses were not established. Here, we provide the first genome sequence of a fish poxvirus, which was isolated from farmed Atlantic salmon. In the present study, we used quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry to determine aspects of salmon gill poxvirus disease, which are described here. The gill was the main target organ where immature and mature poxvirus particles were detected. The particles were detected in detaching, apoptotic respiratory epithelial cells preceding clinical disease in the form of lethargy, respiratory distress, and mortality. In moribund salmon, blocking of gas exchange would likely be caused by the adherence of respiratory lamellae and epithelial proliferation obstructing respiratory surfaces. The virus was not found in healthy salmon or in control fish with gill disease without apoptotic cells, although transmission remains to be demonstrated. PCR of archival tissue confirmed virus infection in 14 cases with gill apoptosis in Norway starting from 1995. Phylogenomic analyses showed that the fish poxvirus is the deepest available branch of chordopoxviruses. The virus genome encompasses most key chordopoxvirus genes that are required for genome replication and expression, although the gene order is substantially different from that in other chordopoxviruses. Nevertheless, many highly conserved chordopoxvirus genes involved in viral membrane biogenesis or virus-host interactions are missing. Instead, the salmon poxvirus carries numerous genes encoding unknown proteins, many of which have low sequence complexity and contain simple repeats suggestive of intrinsic disorder or distinct protein structures. IMPORTANCE Aquaculture is an increasingly important global

  12. Trial Watch:: Oncolytic viruses for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Pol, Jonathan; Bloy, Norma; Obrist, Florine; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jérôme; Cremer, Isabelle; Erbs, Philippe; Limacher, Jean-Marc; Preville, Xavier; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are natural or genetically modified viral species that selectively infect and kill neoplastic cells. Such an innate or exogenously conferred specificity has generated considerable interest around the possibility to employ oncolytic viruses as highly targeted agents that would mediate cancer cell-autonomous anticancer effects. Accumulating evidence, however, suggests that the therapeutic potential of oncolytic virotherapy is not a simple consequence of the cytopathic effect, but strongly relies on the induction of an endogenous immune response against transformed cells. In line with this notion, superior anticancer effects are being observed when oncolytic viruses are engineered to express (or co-administered with) immunostimulatory molecules. Although multiple studies have shown that oncolytic viruses are well tolerated by cancer patients, the full-blown therapeutic potential of oncolytic virotherapy, especially when implemented in the absence of immunostimulatory interventions, remains unclear. Here, we cover the latest advances in this active area of translational investigation, summarizing high-impact studies that have been published during the last 12 months and discussing clinical trials that have been initiated in the same period to assess the therapeutic potential of oncolytic virotherapy in oncological indications. PMID:25097804

  13. Poxvirus viability and signatures in historical relics.

    PubMed

    McCollum, Andrea M; Li, Yu; Wilkins, Kimberly; Karem, Kevin L; Davidson, Whitni B; Paddock, Christopher D; Reynolds, Mary G; Damon, Inger K

    2014-02-01

    Although it has been >30 years since the eradication of smallpox, the unearthing of well-preserved tissue material in which the virus may reside has called into question the viability of variola virus decades or centuries after its original occurrence. Experimental data to address the long-term stability and viability of the virus are limited. There are several instances of well-preserved corpses and tissues that have been examined for poxvirus viability and viral DNA. These historical specimens cause concern for potential exposures, and each situation should be approached cautiously and independently with the available information. Nevertheless, these specimens provide information on the history of a major disease and vaccination against it.

  14. Poxvirus Viability and Signatures in Historical Relics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu; Wilkins, Kimberly; Karem, Kevin L.; Davidson, Whitni B.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Reynolds, Mary G.; Damon, Inger K.

    2014-01-01

    Although it has been >30 years since the eradication of smallpox, the unearthing of well-preserved tissue material in which the virus may reside has called into question the viability of variola virus decades or centuries after its original occurrence. Experimental data to address the long-term stability and viability of the virus are limited. There are several instances of well-preserved corpses and tissues that have been examined for poxvirus viability and viral DNA. These historical specimens cause concern for potential exposures, and each situation should be approached cautiously and independently with the available information. Nevertheless, these specimens provide information on the history of a major disease and vaccination against it. PMID:24447382

  15. Oncolytic Virotherapy of Canine and Feline Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gentschev, Ivaylo; Patil, Sandeep S.; Petrov, Ivan; Cappello, Joseph; Adelfinger, Marion; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of disease-related death in companion animals such as dogs and cats. Despite recent progress in the diagnosis and treatment of advanced canine and feline cancer, overall patient treatment outcome has not been substantially improved. Virotherapy using oncolytic viruses is one promising new strategy for cancer therapy. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) preferentially infect and lyse cancer cells, without causing excessive damage to surrounding healthy tissue, and initiate tumor-specific immunity. The current review describes the use of different oncolytic viruses for cancer therapy and their application to canine and feline cancer. PMID:24841386

  16. Morphological evidence for natural poxvirus infection in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, L. M.; Dantoni Damelio, E.; Damelio, F. E.

    1982-01-01

    Focal inflammatory and desquamating lesions were seen in the nasal mucosa of rats that were flown aboard the Soviet satellite, Cosmos 1129, in 1979 and in the ground based controls. The infection was clinically inapparent. Electron microscopic examination revealed the presence of poxvirus virions in desquamating cells. The specific poxvirus involved could not be identified. The lesions appeared to be similar to those described by others in rats experimentally infected with mousepox (infectious ectromelia) virus by the intranasal route.

  17. Polymeric oncolytic adenovirus for cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Lee, Young Sook; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Sung Wan

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic adenovirus (Ad) vectors present a promising modality to treat cancer. Many clinical trials have been done with either naked oncolytic Ad or combination with chemotherapies. However, the systemic injection of oncolytic Ad in clinical applications is restricted due to significant liver toxicity and immunogenicity. To overcome these issues, Ad has been engineered physically or chemically with numerous polymers for shielding the Ad surface, accomplishing extended blood circulation time and reduced immunogenicity as well as hepatotoxicity. In this review, we describe and classify the characteristics of polymer modified oncolytic Ad following each strategy for cancer treatment. Furthermore, this review concludes with the highlights of various polymer-coated Ads and their prospects, and directions for future research. PMID:26453806

  18. Theranostic Potential of Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Juan J; Thorne, Steve H

    2012-01-01

    Biological cancer therapies, such as oncolytic, or replication-selective viruses have advantages over traditional therapeutics as they can employ multiple different mechanisms to target and destroy cancers (including direct cell lysis, immune activation and vascular collapse). This has led to their rapid recent clinical development. However this also makes their pre-clinical and clinical study complex, as many parameters may affect their therapeutic potential and so defining reason for treatment failure or approaches that might enhance their therapeutic activity can be complicated. The ability to non-invasively image viral gene expression in vivo both in pre-clinical models and during clinical testing will considerably enhance the speed of oncolytic virus development as well as increasing the level and type of useful data produced from these studies. Further, subsequent to future clinical approval, imaging of reporter gene expression might be used to evaluate the likelihood of response to oncolytic viral therapy prior to changes in tumor burden. Here different reporter genes used in conjunction with oncolytic viral therapy are described, along with the imaging modalities used to measure their expression, while their applications both in pre-clinical and clinical testing are discussed. Possible future applications for reporter gene expression from oncolytic viruses in the phenotyping of tumors and the personalizing of treatment regimens are also discussed. PMID:22509200

  19. Intelligent design: combination therapy with oncolytic viruses.

    PubMed

    Ottolino-Perry, Kathryn; Diallo, Jean-Simon; Lichty, Brian D; Bell, John C; McCart, J Andrea

    2010-02-01

    Metastatic cancer remains an incurable disease in the majority of cases and thus novel treatment strategies such as oncolytic virotherapy are rapidly advancing toward clinical use. In order to be successful, it is likely that some type of combination therapy will be necessary to have a meaningful impact on this disease. Although it may be tempting to simply combine an oncolytic virus with the existing standard radiation or chemotherapeutics, the long-term goal of such treatments must be to have a rational, potentially synergistic combination strategy that can be safely and easily used in the clinical setting. The combination of oncolytic virotherapy with existing radiotherapy and chemotherapy modalities is reviewed along with novel biologic therapies including immunotherapies, in order to help investigators make intelligent decisions during the clinical development of these products.

  20. Vaccine Therapy, Oncolytic Viruses, and Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Annick; Vlahovic, Gordana; Friedman, Henry S

    2016-03-01

    After years of active research and refinement, vaccine therapy and oncolytic viruses are becoming part of the arsenal in the treatment of gliomas. In contrast to standard treatment with radiation therapy and chemotherapy, vaccines are more specific to the patient and the tumor. The majority of ongoing vaccine trials are investigating peptide, heat shock protein, and dendritic cell vaccines. The immunosuppression triggered by the tumor itself and by its treatment is a major obstacle to vaccine and oncolytic virus therapy. Thus, combination therapy with different agents that affect the immune system will probably be necessary. PMID:26984213

  1. 77 FR 22333 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Oncolytic Viral Cancer Therapies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Chimeric Gene Having Foreign DNA Flanked by Vaccinia Regulatory DNA'' [HHS Ref. No. E-552-1982/2-US- 03]; 2... Poxviruses Having Foreign DNA Expressed under the Control of Poxvirus Regulatory Sequence'' [HHS Ref. No. E... Immunization Using Recombinant Poxviruses Having Foreign DNA Expressed under the Control of Poxvirus...

  2. Molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Dana; Fong, Yuman

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses have made their mark on the cancer world as a potential therapeutic option, with the possible advantages of reduced side effects and strengthened treatment efficacy due to higher tumor selectivity. Results have been so promising, that oncolytic viral treatments have now been approved for clinical trials in several countries. However, clinical studies may benefit from the ability to noninvasively and serially identify sites of viral targeting via molecular imaging in order to provide safety, efficacy, and toxicity information. Furthermore, molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy may provide a more sensitive and specific diagnostic technique to detect tumor origin and, more importantly, presence of metastases. Several strategies have been investigated for molecular imaging of viral replication broadly categorized into optical and deep tissue imaging, utilizing several reporter genes encoding for fluorescence proteins, conditional enzymes, and membrane protein and transporters. Various imaging methods facilitate molecular imaging, including computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, gamma-scintigraphy, and photoacoustic imaging. In addition, several molecular probes are used for medical imaging, which act as targeting moieties or signaling agents. This review will explore the preclinical and clinical use of in vivo molecular imaging of replication-competent oncolytic viral therapy. PMID:27119098

  3. First Oncolytic Viral Therapy for Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Poh, Alissa

    2016-01-01

    The FDA has approved talimogene laherparepvec, or T-VEC, to treat surgically unresectable skin and lymph node lesions in patients with advanced melanoma. T-VEC is the first oncolytic viral therapy to gain regulatory endorsement, based on data from the OPTiM study.

  4. Oncolytic viral therapy: targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tyrel T; Roth, Justin C; Friedman, Gregory K; Gillespie, G Yancey

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are defined as rare populations of tumor-initiating cancer cells that are capable of both self-renewal and differentiation. Extensive research is currently underway to develop therapeutics that target CSCs for cancer therapy, due to their critical role in tumorigenesis, as well as their resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. To this end, oncolytic viruses targeting unique CSC markers, signaling pathways, or the pro-tumor CSC niche offer promising potential as CSCs-destroying agents/therapeutics. We provide a summary of existing knowledge on the biology of CSCs, including their markers and their niche thought to comprise the tumor microenvironment, and then we provide a critical analysis of the potential for targeting CSCs with oncolytic viruses, including herpes simplex virus-1, adenovirus, measles virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus. Specifically, we review current literature regarding first-generation oncolytic viruses with their innate ability to replicate in CSCs, as well as second-generation viruses engineered to enhance the oncolytic effect and CSC-targeting through transgene expression. PMID:24834430

  5. Oncolytic Immunotherapy for Treatment of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsun, A; Miao, X N; Wang, C M; Yu, D C

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy entails the treatment of disease by modulation of the immune system. As detailed in the previous chapters, the different modes of achieving immune modulation are many, including the use of small/large molecules, cellular therapy, and radiation. Oncolytic viruses that can specifically attack, replicate within, and destroy tumors represent one of the most promising classes of agents for cancer immunotherapy (recently termed as oncolytic immunotherapy). The notion of oncolytic immunotherapy is considered as the way in which virus-induced tumor cell death (known as immunogenic cancer cell death (ICD)) allows the immune system to recognize tumor cells and provide long-lasting antitumor immunity. Both immune responses toward the virus and ICD together contribute toward successful antitumor efficacy. What is now becoming increasingly clear is that monotherapies, through any of the modalities detailed in this book, are neither sufficient in eradicating tumors nor in providing long-lasting antitumor immune responses and that combination therapies may deliver enhanced efficacy. After the rise of the genetic engineering era, it has been possible to engineer viruses to harbor combination-like characteristics to enhance their potency in cancer immunotherapy. This chapter provides a historical background on oncolytic virotherapy and its future application in cancer immunotherapy, especially as a combination therapy with other treatment modalities.

  6. Genetic manipulation of poxviruses using bacterial artificial chromosome recombineering.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, Matthew G

    2012-01-01

    Traditional methods for genetic manipulation of poxviruses rely on low-frequency natural recombination in virus-infected cells. Although these powerful systems represent the technical foundation of current knowledge and applications of poxviruses, they require long (≥ 500 bp) flanking sequences for homologous recombination, an efficient viral selection method, and burdensome, time-consuming plaque purification. The beginning of the twenty-first century has seen the application of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology to poxviruses as an alternative method for their genetic manipulation, following the invention of a long-sought-after method for deriving a BAC clone of vaccinia virus (VAC-BAC) by Arban Domi and Bernard Moss. The key advantages of the BAC system are the ease and versatility of performing genetic manipulation using bacteriophage λ Red recombination (recombineering), which requires only ∼50 bp homology arms that can be easily created by PCR, and which allows seamless mutations lacking any marker gene without having to perform transient-dominant selection. On the other hand, there are disadvantages, including the significant setup time, the risk of contamination of the cloned genome with bacterial insertion sequences, and the nontrivial issue of removal of the BAC cassette from derived viruses. These must be carefully weighed to decide whether the use of BACs will be advantageous for a particular application, making pox-BAC systems likely to complement, rather than supplant, traditional methods in most laboratories. PMID:22688760

  7. Retargeting Strategies for Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella; Petrovic, Biljana; Leoni, Valerio; Gianni, Tatiana; Avitabile, Elisa; Casiraghi, Costanza; Gatta, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Most of the oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) exhibit a high safety profile achieved through attenuation. They carry defects in virulence proteins that antagonize host cell response to the virus, including innate response, apoptosis, authophagy, and depend on tumor cell proliferation. They grow robustly in cancer cells, provided that these are deficient in host cell responses, which is often the case. To overcome the attenuation limits, a strategy is to render the virus highly cancer-specific, e.g., by retargeting their tropism to cancer-specific receptors, and detargeting from natural receptors. The target we selected is HER-2, overexpressed in breast, ovarian and other cancers. Entry of wt-HSV requires the essential glycoproteins gD, gH/gL and gB. Here, we reviewed that oncolytic HSV retargeting was achieved through modifications in gD: the addition of a single-chain antibody (scFv) to HER-2 coupled with appropriate deletions to remove part of the natural receptors’ binding sites. Recently, we showed that also gH/gL can be a retargeting tool. The insertion of an scFv to HER-2 at the gH N-terminus, coupled with deletions in gD, led to a recombinant capable to use HER-2 as the sole receptor. The retargeted oncolytic HSVs can be administered systemically by means of carrier cells-forcedly-infected mesenchymal stem cells. Altogether, the retargeted oncolytic HSVs are highly cancer-specific and their replication is not dependent on intrinsic defects of the tumor cells. They might be further modified to express immunomodulatory molecules. PMID:26927159

  8. Advances in Oncolytic Virus Therapy for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Haseley, Amy; Alvarez-Breckenridge, Christopher; Chaudhury, Abhik Ray; Kaur, Balveen

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organization grossly classifies the various types of astrocytomas using a grade system with grade IV gliomas having the worst prognosis. Oncolytic virus therapy is a novel treatment option for GBM patients. Several patents describe various oncolytic viruses used in preclinical and clinical trials to evaluate safety and efficacy. These viruses are natural or genetically engineered from different viruses such as HSV-1, Adenovirus, Reovirus, and New Castle Disease Virus. While several anecdotal studies have indicated therapeutic advantage, recent clinical trials have revealed the safety of their usage, but demonstration of significant efficacy remains to be established. Oncolytic viruses are being redesigned with an interest in combating the tumor microenvironment in addition to defeating the cancerous cells. Several patents describe the inclusion of tumor microenvironment modulating genes within the viral backbone and in particular those which attack the tumor angiotome. The very innovative approaches being used to improve therapeutic efficacy include: design of viruses which can express cytokines to activate a systemic antitumor immune response, inclusion of angiostatic genes to combat tumor vasculature, and also enzymes capable of digesting tumor extra cellular matrix (ECM) to enhance viral spread through solid tumors. As increasingly more novel viruses are being tested and patented, the future battle against glioma looks promising. PMID:19149710

  9. Poxvirus protein evolution: Family-wide assessment of possible horizontal gene transfer events

    PubMed Central

    Odom, Mary R.; Hendrickson, R. Curtis; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the evolutionary origins of proteins encoded by the Poxviridae family of viruses, we examined all poxvirus protein coding genes using a method of characterizing and visualizing the similarity between these proteins and taxonomic subsets of proteins in GenBank. Our analysis divides poxvirus proteins into categories based on their relative degree of similarity to two different taxonomic subsets of proteins such as all eukaryote vs. all virus (except poxvirus) proteins. As an example, this allows us to identify, based on high similarity to only eukaryote proteins, poxvirus proteins that may have been obtained by horizontal transfer from their hosts. Although this method alone does not definitively prove horizontal gene transfer, it allows us to provide an assessment of the possibility of horizontal gene transfer for every poxvirus protein. Potential candidates can then be individually studied in more detail during subsequent investigation. Results of our analysis demonstrate that in general, proteins encoded by members of the subfamily Chordopoxvirinae exhibit greater similarity to eukaryote proteins than to proteins of other virus families. In addition, our results reiterate the important role played by host gene capture in poxvirus evolution; highlight the functions of many genes poxviruses share with their hosts; and illustrate which host-like genes are present uniquely in poxviruses and which are also present in other virus families. PMID:19464330

  10. Prevalence of poxvirus in a population of Merriam's wild turkeys in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Lutz, R S; Crawford, J A

    1987-04-01

    An introduced population of Merriam's wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) was examined for poxvirus when birds were trapped from January through April in 1981 and 1982. Poxvirus lesions were found in three of 113 (2.6%) turkeys. All infected birds were immature males.

  11. Therapeutic potential of oncolytic Newcastle disease virus: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Tayeb, Shay; Zakay-Rones, Zichria; Panet, Amos

    2015-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) features a natural preference for replication in many tumor cells compared with normal cells. The observed antitumor effect of NDV appears to be a result of both selective killing of tumor cells and induction of immune responses. Genetic manipulations to change viral tropism and arming the virus with genes encoding for cytokines improved the oncolytic capacity of NDV. Several intracellular proteins in tumor cells, including antiapoptotic proteins (Livin) and oncogenic proteins (H-Ras), are relevant for the oncolytic activity of NDV. Defects in the interferon system, found in some tumor cells, also contribute to the oncolytic selectivity of NDV. Notwithstanding, NDV displays effective oncolytic activity in many tumor types, despite having intact interferon signaling. Taken together, several cellular systems appear to dictate the selective oncolytic activity of NDV. Some barriers, such as neutralizing antibodies elicited during NDV treatment and the extracellular matrix in tumor tissue appear to interfere with spread of NDV and reduce oncolysis. To further understand the oncolytic activity of NDV, we compared two NDV strains, ie, an attenuated virus (NDV-HUJ) and a pathogenic virus (NDV-MTH-68/H). Significant differences in amino acid sequence were noted in several viral proteins, including the fusion precursor (F0) glycoprotein, an important determinant of replication and pathogenicity. However, no difference in the oncolytic activity of the two strains was noted using human tumor tissues maintained as organ cultures or in mouse tumor models. To optimize virotherapy in clinical trials, we describe here a unique organ culture methodology, using a biopsy taken from a patient’s tumor before treatment for ex vivo infection with NDV to determine the oncolytic potential on an individual basis. In conclusion, oncolytic NDV is an excellent candidate for cancer therapy, but more knowledge is needed to ensure success in clinical trials. PMID

  12. Oncolytic measles virus retargeting by ligand display.

    PubMed

    Msaouel, Pavlos; Iankov, Ianko D; Allen, Cory; Russell, Stephen J; Galanis, Evanthia

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances in recent years, treatment of metastatic malignancies remains a significant challenge. There is an urgent need for development of novel therapeutic approaches. Virotherapy approaches have considerable potential, and among them measles virus (MV) vaccine strains have emerged as a promising oncolytic platform. Retargeted MV strains deriving from the Edmonston vaccine lineage (MV-Edm) have shown comparable antitumor efficacy to unmodified strains against receptor expressing tumor cells with improved therapeutic index. Here, we describe the construction, rescue, amplification, and titration of fully retargeted MV-Edm derivatives displaying tumor specific receptor binding ligands on the viral surface in combination with H protein CD46 and SLAM entry ablating mutations.

  13. Establishment of cell-based reporter system for diagnosis of poxvirus infection.

    PubMed

    Levy, Orly; Oron, Chaya; Paran, Nir; Keysary, Avi; Israeli, Ofir; Yitzhaki, Shmuel; Olshevsky, Udy

    2010-07-01

    Poxvirus detection assays are based on morphology, viral antigens and specific nucleic acids, none of which indicates virus viability or infectious capacity. Determination of virus viability is achieved by propagation in cell cultures and subsequent analysis by the mentioned methods, a process that takes days. Thus, presented here the development of a new assay, named PILA (Poxvirus Infection Luciferase Assay), for rapid detection of infectious poxviruses which is a cell-based reporter assay. The assay is composed of two steps: (i) Transfection of cells with a poxvirus specific reporter vector which consists of the early 7.5-kDa-STR promoter, regulating the expression of luciferase gene; (ii) Infection with a poxvirus containing sample. Luciferase activity measured post infection, indicates the presence of infectious poxvirus in the sample. The assay can detect quantities as low as 100 PFU of VACV, six hours post infection. Orthopox virus universality was confirmed by detection of various Orthopoxviruses, and specificity was verified by using pox-specific neutralizing antibodies. The PILA is specific, rapid, simple, and suitable for detecting viable virus. The assay can be utilized for applications such as poxvirus titration, neutralizing assay and drug discovery. The assay was adjusted for live detection assay by using GFP as reporting gene.

  14. Oncolytic virotherapy for human malignant mesothelioma: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Boisgerault, Nicolas; Achard, Carole; Delaunay, Tiphaine; Cellerin, Laurent; Tangy, Frédéric; Grégoire, Marc; Fonteneau, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Cancer virotherapy is an attractive alternative to conventional treatments because it offers a wide range of antitumor effects due to 1) the diversity of the oncolytic viruses that are now available and 2) their multifaceted activities against both tumor cells and tumor vessels, in addition to their ability to induce antitumor immune responses. In this review, we summarize preclinical and clinical data regarding the targeting of malignant mesothelioma (MM) by oncolytic viruses. We also discuss the potential of other oncolytic viruses that have already shown antitumor effects against several malignancies in advanced clinical trials but are yet to be tested against MM cells. Finally, we review how the activation of the immune system and combinations with other types of anticancer treatments could support the development of oncolytic virotherapy for the treatment of MM. PMID:27512676

  15. Current issues and future directions of oncolytic adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T

    2010-02-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) constitute a promising new class of anticancer agent. They are based on the well-studied adenoviral vector system, which lends itself to concept-driven design to generate oncolytic variants. The first oncolytic Ad was approved as a drug in China in 2005, although clinical efficacy observed in human trials has failed to reach the high expectations that were based on studies in animal models. Current obstacles to the full realization of efficacy of this class of anticancer agent include (i) limited efficiency of infection and specific replication in tumor cells, (ii) limited vector spread within the tumor, (iii) imperfect animal models and methods of in vivo imaging, and (iv) an incomplete understanding of the interaction of these agents with the host. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the field of oncolytic Ads and potential ways to overcome current obstacles to their clinical application and efficacy.

  16. Current Issues and Future Directions of Oncolytic Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T

    2009-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) constitute a promising new class of anticancer agent. They are based on the well-studied adenoviral vector system, which lends itself to concept-driven design to generate oncolytic variants. The first oncolytic Ad was approved as a drug in China in 2005, although clinical efficacy observed in human trials has failed to reach the high expectations that were based on studies in animal models. Current obstacles to the full realization of efficacy of this class of anticancer agent include (i) limited efficiency of infection and specific replication in tumor cells, (ii) limited vector spread within the tumor, (iii) imperfect animal models and methods of in vivo imaging, and (iv) an incomplete understanding of the interaction of these agents with the host. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the field of oncolytic Ads and potential ways to overcome current obstacles to their clinical application and efficacy. PMID:19935777

  17. Attenuated oncolytic Measles Virus strains as cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Msaouel, P.; Iankov, I.D.; Dispenzieri, A.; Galanis, E.

    2011-01-01

    Attenuated measles virus vaccine strains have emerged as a promising oncolytic vector platform, having shown significant anti-tumor activity against a broad range of malignant neoplasms. Measles virus strains derived from the attenuated Edmonston-B (MV-Edm) vaccine lineage have been shown to selectively infect, replicate in and lyse cancer cells while causing minimal cytopathic effect on normal tissues. This review summarizes the preclinical data that led to the rapid clinical translation of oncolytic measles vaccine strains and provides an overview of early clinical data using this oncolytic platform. Furthermore, novel approaches currently under development to further enhance the oncolytic efficacy of MV-Edm strains, including strategies to circumvent immunity or modulate immune system responses, combinatorial approaches with standard treatment modalities, virus retargeting as well as strategies for in vivo monitoring of viral replication are discussed. PMID:21740361

  18. Oncolytic Adenovirus: Strategies and Insights for Vector Design and Immuno-Oncolytic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Uusi-Kerttula, Hanni; Hulin-Curtis, Sarah; Davies, James; Parker, Alan L.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) are commonly used both experimentally and clinically, including oncolytic virotherapy applications. In the clinical area, efficacy is frequently hampered by the high rates of neutralizing immunity, estimated as high as 90% in some populations that promote vector clearance and limit bioavailability for tumor targeting following systemic delivery. Active tumor targeting is also hampered by the ubiquitous nature of the Ad5 receptor, hCAR, as well as the lack of highly tumor-selective targeting ligands and suitable targeting strategies. Furthermore, significant off-target interactions between the viral vector and cellular and proteinaceous components of the bloodstream have been documented that promote uptake into non-target cells and determine dose-limiting toxicities. Novel strategies are therefore needed to overcome the obstacles that prevent efficacious Ad deployment for wider clinical applications. The use of less seroprevalent Ad serotypes, non-human serotypes, capsid pseudotyping, chemical shielding and genetic masking by heterologous peptide incorporation are all potential strategies to achieve efficient vector escape from humoral immune recognition. Conversely, selective vector arming with immunostimulatory agents can be utilized to enhance their oncolytic potential by activation of cancer-specific immune responses against the malignant tissues. This review presents recent advantages and pitfalls occurring in the field of adenoviral oncolytic therapies. PMID:26610547

  19. Pervasive initiation and 3'-end formation of poxvirus postreplicative RNAs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhilong; Martens, Craig A; Bruno, Daniel P; Porcella, Stephen F; Moss, Bernard

    2012-09-01

    Poxviruses are large DNA viruses that replicate within the cytoplasm and encode a complete transcription system, including a multisubunit RNA polymerase, stage-specific transcription factors, capping and methylating enzymes, and a poly(A) polymerase. Expression of the more than 200 open reading frames by vaccinia virus, the prototype poxvirus, is temporally regulated: early mRNAs are synthesized immediately after infection, whereas intermediate and late mRNAs are synthesized following genome replication. The postreplicative transcripts are heterogeneous in length and overlap the entire genome, which pose obstacles for high resolution mapping. We used tag-based methods in conjunction with high throughput cDNA sequencing to determine the precise 5'-capped and 3'-polyadenylated ends of postreplicative RNAs. Polymerase slippage during initiation of intermediate and late RNA synthesis results in a 5'-poly(A) leader that allowed the unambiguous identification of true transcription start sites. Ninety RNA start sites were located just upstream of intermediate and late open reading frames, but many more appeared anomalous, occurring within coding and non-coding regions, indicating pervasive transcription initiation. We confirmed the presence of functional promoter sequences upstream of representative anomalous start sites and demonstrated that alternative start sites within open reading frames could generate truncated isoforms of proteins. In an analogous manner, poly(A) sequences allowed accurate mapping of the numerous 3'-ends of postreplicative RNAs, which were preceded by a pyrimidine-rich sequence in the DNA coding strand. The distribution of postreplicative promoter sequences throughout the genome provides enormous transcriptional complexity, and the large number of previously unmapped RNAs may have novel functions.

  20. Avian poxvirus infection in flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus) in a zoo in Japan.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Toshiaki; Kaneko, Mikako; Mase, Masaji

    2010-06-01

    Two diseased flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus) with nodular lesions (pock) characteristic of poxvirus infection were found in a zoo in Japan. Avian poxvirus was isolated from the lesions (upper beak) of the affected birds and was genetically characterized by polymerase chain reaction, nucleotide sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis. Based on the phylogenetic analysis, the virus isolated from these flamingos was genetically close to those isolated from pigeons, suggesting the possibility of interspecies transmission.

  1. Isolation of a poxvirus from a black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus).

    PubMed

    Patton, J F; Nordhausen, R W; Woods, L W; MacLachlan, N J

    1996-07-01

    A poxvirus was isolated during the latter half of 1993 from a black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) that died of fulminant adenovirus infection in California (USA). The poxvirus was isolated from a pooled tissue homogenate, after repeated serial blind passages in primary black-tailed deer testicular cells. Based on electron microscopic examination of the virus, we observed morphologic features typical of the genus Orthopoxvirus, although definitive characterization was not done.

  2. Oncolytic virotherapy for pediatric malignancies: future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Alicia M; Friedman, Gregory K; Ring, Eric K; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric solid tumors remain a major health concern, with nearly 16,000 children diagnosed each year. Of those, ~2,000 succumb to their disease, and survivors often suffer from lifelong disability secondary to toxic effects of current treatments. Countless multimodality treatment regimens are being explored to make advances against this deadly disease. One targeted treatment approach is oncolytic virotherapy. Conditionally replicating viruses can infect tumor cells while leaving normal cells unharmed. Four viruses have been advanced to pediatric clinical trials, including herpes simplex virus-1, Seneca Valley virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of each virus, pediatric preclinical studies conducted to date, past and ongoing pediatric clinical trials, and potential future direction for these novel viral therapeutics. PMID:27579298

  3. Oncolytic virotherapy for pediatric malignancies: future prospects.

    PubMed

    Waters, Alicia M; Friedman, Gregory K; Ring, Eric K; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric solid tumors remain a major health concern, with nearly 16,000 children diagnosed each year. Of those, ~2,000 succumb to their disease, and survivors often suffer from lifelong disability secondary to toxic effects of current treatments. Countless multimodality treatment regimens are being explored to make advances against this deadly disease. One targeted treatment approach is oncolytic virotherapy. Conditionally replicating viruses can infect tumor cells while leaving normal cells unharmed. Four viruses have been advanced to pediatric clinical trials, including herpes simplex virus-1, Seneca Valley virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of each virus, pediatric preclinical studies conducted to date, past and ongoing pediatric clinical trials, and potential future direction for these novel viral therapeutics. PMID:27579298

  4. Identification, molecular and phylogenetic analysis of poxvirus in skin lesions of southern right whale.

    PubMed

    Fiorito, Carla; Palacios, Carlos; Golemba, Marcelo; Bratanich, Ana; Argüelles, Maria Belen; Fazio, Ana; Bertellotti, Marcelo; Lombardo, Daniel

    2015-10-16

    Poxvirus skin disease has been reported in several species of cetaceans, principally in odontocetes, and a single report in mysticetes. Southern right whales Eubalaena australis in Peninsula Valdes, Argentina, show a variety of skin lesions of unknown etiology, and the number of these lesions has increased in recent years. Samples from dead whales were taken in order to establish the etiology of these lesions. One calf and one adult presented ring-type lesions, characterized by a circumscribed and slightly raised area of skin. Lesions were histologically characterized by the presence of microvesicles and vacuolated cells in the stratum spinosum, along with hyperplasia of the stratum corneum and eosinophilic inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells. Transmission electron microscopy showed aggregations of virions with typical poxvirus morphology. PCR of cetacean poxvirus (CPV) DNA polymerase, DNA topoisomerase I and parapoxvirus DNA polymerase gene fragments was done, and confirmed the presence of poxvirus in one sample. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the detected poxvirus belongs to the CPV-2 group. This is the first confirmed report of poxvirus in southern right whales in Argentina.

  5. Targeting pediatric cancer stem cells with oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Gregory K; Cassady, Kevin A; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Markert, James M; Gillespie, G Yancey

    2012-04-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also termed "cancer-initiating cells" or "cancer progenitor cells," which have the ability to self-renew, proliferate, and maintain the neoplastic clone, have recently been discovered in a wide variety of pediatric tumors. These CSCs are thought to be responsible for tumorigenesis and tumor maintenance, aggressiveness, and recurrence due to inherent resistance to current treatment modalities such as chemotherapy and radiation. Oncolytic virotherapy offers a novel, targeted approach for eradicating pediatric CSCs using mechanisms of cell killing that differ from conventional therapies. Moreover, oncolytic viruses have the ability to target specific features of CSCs such as cell-surface proteins, transcription factors, and the CSC microenvironment. Through genetic engineering, a wide variety of foreign genes may be expressed by oncolytic viruses to augment the oncolytic effect. We review the current data regarding the ability of several types of oncolytic viruses (herpes simplex virus-1, adenovirus, reovirus, Seneca Valley virus, vaccinia virus, Newcastle disease virus, myxoma virus, vesicular stomatitis virus) to target and kill both CSCs and tumor cells in pediatric tumors. We highlight advantages and limitations of each virus and potential ways in which next-generation engineered viruses may target resilient CSCs.

  6. Targeting Pediatric Cancer Stem Cells with Oncolytic Virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Gregory K.; Cassady, Kevin A.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.; Markert, James M.; Gillespie, G. Yancey

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC), also termed “cancer initiating cells” or “cancer progenitor cells”, which have the ability to self-renew, proliferate, and maintain the neoplastic clone, have recently been discovered in a wide variety of pediatric tumors. These CSC are thought to be responsible for tumorigenesis, tumor maintenance, aggressiveness and recurrence due to inherent resistance to current treatment modalities such as chemotherapy and radiation. Oncolytic virotherapy offers a novel, targeted approach for eradicating pediatric CSC by utilizing mechanisms of cell killing that differ from conventional therapies. Moreover, oncolytic viruses have the ability to target specific features of CSC such as cell surface proteins, transcription factors, and the CSC microenvironment. Through genetic engineering, a wide variety of foreign genes may be expressed by oncolytic viruses to augment the oncolytic effect. We review the current data regarding the ability of several types of oncolytic viruses (herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), adenovirus, reovirus, Seneca Valley virus, vaccinia virus, Newcastle disease virus, myxoma virus, vesicular stomatitis virus) to target and kill both CSC and tumor cells in pediatric tumors. We highlight advantages and limitations of each virus and potential ways next-generation engineered viruses may target resilient CSC. PMID:22430386

  7. Immune Suppression during Oncolytic Virotherapy for High-Grade Glioma; Yes or No?

    PubMed Central

    Koks, Carolien A.E.; De Vleeschouwer, Steven; Graf, Norbert; Van Gool, Stefaan W.

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses have been seriously considered for glioma therapy over the last 20 years. The oncolytic activity of several oncolytic strains has been demonstrated against human glioma cell lines and in in vivo xenotransplant models. So far, four of these stains have additionally completed the first phase I/II trials in relapsed glioma patients. Though safety and feasibility have been demonstrated, therapeutic efficacy in these initial trials, when described, was only minor. The role of the immune system in oncolytic virotherapy for glioma remained much less studied until recent years. When investigated, the immune system, adept at controlling viral infections, is often hypothesized to be a strong hurdle to successful oncolytic virotherapy. Several preclinical studies have therefore aimed to improve oncolytic virotherapy efficacy by combining it with immune suppression or evasion strategies. More recently however, a new paradigm has developed in the oncolytic virotherapy field stating that oncolytic virus-mediated tumor cell death can be accompanied by elicitation of potent activation of innate and adaptive anti-tumor immunity that greatly improves the efficacy of certain oncolytic strains. Therefore, it seems the three-way interaction between oncolytic virus, tumor and immune system is critical to the outcome of antitumor therapy. In this review we discuss the studies which have investigated how the immune system and oncolytic viruses interact in models of glioma. The novel insights generated here hold important implications for future research and should be incorporated into the design of novel clinical trials. PMID:25663937

  8. Oncolytic Sendai virus-based virotherapy for cancer: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Saga, Kotaro; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2015-01-01

    Many drugs have been developed and optimized for the treatment of cancer; however, it is difficult to completely cure cancer with anticancer drugs alone. Therefore, the development of new therapeutic technologies, in addition to new anticancer drugs, is necessary for more effective oncotherapy. Oncolytic viruses are one potential new anticancer strategy. Various oncolytic viruses have been developed for safe and effective oncotherapy. Recently, Sendai virus-based oncotherapy has been reported by several groups, and attention has been drawn to its unique anticancer mechanisms, which are different from those of the conventional oncolytic viruses that kill cancer cells by cancer cell-selective replication. Here, we introduce Sendai virus-based virotherapy and its anticancer mechanisms. PMID:27512677

  9. Combining HDAC inhibitors with oncolytic virotherapy for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Nguyen, Tran; Chiocca, Ennio Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes play a critical role in the epigenetic regulation of cellular functions and signaling pathways in many cancers. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been validated for single use or in combination with other drugs in oncologic therapeutics. An even more novel combination therapy with HDACi is to use them with an oncolytic virus. HDACi may lead to an amplification of tumor-specific lytic effects by facilitating increased cycles of viral replication, but there may also be direct anticancer effects of the drug by itself. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer effects of the combination of oncolytic viruses with HDACi. PMID:27512681

  10. Oncolytic Viruses: Therapeutics With an Identity Crisis.

    PubMed

    Breitbach, Caroline J; Lichty, Brian D; Bell, John C

    2016-07-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) are replicating viral therapeutics for the treatment of cancer and have been in laboratory development for about twenty years. Recently, the FDA approved Imlygic, a herpes virus based therapeutic for the treatment of melanoma and thus OVs have entered a new era where they are a weapon in the armament of the oncologist. OVs are unique therapeutics with multiple mechanisms of therapeutic activity. The exact path for their development and eventual uptake by pharmaceutical companies is somewhat clouded by an uncertain identity. Are they vaccines, tumour lysing therapeutics, inducers of innate immunity, gene therapy vectors, anti-vascular agents or all of the above? Should they be developed as stand-alone loco-regional therapeutics, systemically delivered tumour hunters or immune modulators best tested as combination therapeutics? We summarize data here supporting the idea, depending upon the virus, that OVs can be any or all of these things. Pursuing a "one-size fits all" approach is counter-productive to their clinical development and instead as a field we should build on the strengths of individual virus platforms. PMID:27407036

  11. Experimental therapies: gene therapies and oncolytic viruses.

    PubMed

    Hulou, M Maher; Cho, Choi-Fong; Chiocca, E Antonio; Bjerkvig, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. Over the past three decades, the overall survival time has only improved by a few months, therefore novel alternative treatment modalities are needed to improve clinical management strategies. Such strategies should ultimately extend patient survival. At present, the extensive insight into the molecular biology of gliomas, as well as into genetic engineering techniques, has led to better decision processes when it comes to modifying the genome to accommodate suicide genes, cytokine genes, and tumor suppressor genes that may kill cancer cells, and boost the host defensive immune system against neoantigenic cytoplasmic and nuclear targets. Both nonreplicative viral vectors and replicating oncolytic viruses have been developed for brain cancer treatment. Stem cells, microRNAs, nanoparticles, and viruses have also been designed. These have been armed with transgenes or peptides, and have been used both in laboratory-based experiments as well as in clinical trials, with the aim of improving selective killing of malignant glioma cells while sparing normal brain tissue. This chapter reviews the current status of gene therapies for malignant gliomas and highlights the most promising viral and cell-based strategies under development. PMID:26948355

  12. Oncolytic Viruses: Therapeutics With an Identity Crisis.

    PubMed

    Breitbach, Caroline J; Lichty, Brian D; Bell, John C

    2016-07-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) are replicating viral therapeutics for the treatment of cancer and have been in laboratory development for about twenty years. Recently, the FDA approved Imlygic, a herpes virus based therapeutic for the treatment of melanoma and thus OVs have entered a new era where they are a weapon in the armament of the oncologist. OVs are unique therapeutics with multiple mechanisms of therapeutic activity. The exact path for their development and eventual uptake by pharmaceutical companies is somewhat clouded by an uncertain identity. Are they vaccines, tumour lysing therapeutics, inducers of innate immunity, gene therapy vectors, anti-vascular agents or all of the above? Should they be developed as stand-alone loco-regional therapeutics, systemically delivered tumour hunters or immune modulators best tested as combination therapeutics? We summarize data here supporting the idea, depending upon the virus, that OVs can be any or all of these things. Pursuing a "one-size fits all" approach is counter-productive to their clinical development and instead as a field we should build on the strengths of individual virus platforms.

  13. Molecular characterization of a poxvirus isolated from an American flamingo (Phoeniconais ruber rubber).

    PubMed

    Mondal, Shankar P; Lucio-Martínez, Benjamín; Buckles, Elizabeth L

    2008-09-01

    An avian poxvirus from the beak scab of an American flamingo (Phoeniconais ruber rubber) was isolated by inoculation on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chicken embryos. The virus produced multifocal areas of epithelial hyperplasia along with foci of inflammation in the CAM, and rare cells contained small eosinophilic intracytoplasmic bodies. Chickens inoculated with the isolated virus in the feather follicle of the leg did not develop significant lesions. Nucleotide sequence comparison of a PCR-amplified 4.5 kb HindIII fragment of the genome of flamingo poxvirus (FlPV) revealed very high homology (99.7%) with condor poxvirus (CPV), followed by approximately 92% similarity with canary poxvirus (CNPV) and Hawaiian goose poxvirus (HGPV), but less similarity (approximately 69%) to fowl poxvirus (FPV), the type species of the genus Avipoxvirus of family Poxviridae. As in the cases with CPV, CNPV, and HGPV, genetic analysis of FlPV revealed an absence of three corresponding FPV open reading frames (ORF199, 200, and 202) and an absence of any reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) sequences in this region. There are only nine nucleotide substitutions observed between FlPV and CPV in the 4.5 kb fragment; those were clustered in the ORF201 region, which in FPV genome is a site for integration of REV sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted amino acid sequences of the ORF201-coded hypothetical protein demonstrated FlPV to be more closely related to CPV, as well as to CNPV and HGPV, than to FPV. PMID:18939646

  14. Prevalence of poxvirus in a population of California quail from Oregon, 1975-1987.

    PubMed

    Crawford, J A; Kilbride, K M

    1988-10-01

    Prevalences of poxvirus in a population of California quail (Callipepla californica) at the E. E. Wilson Wildlife Area, Oregon, were determined from 1982 through 1987 and compared with previously published results on prevalences in this population from 1975 to 1979. Poxvirus was present in 19 of 89 quail collected. Prevalences ranged from 6% for immature females to 41% for immature males. Prevalences were lowest during summer and fall and highest in winter and spring. Differences in the seasonal prevalences may be related to the seasonal dispersion pattern of quail. PMID:3193573

  15. Big Data Offers Novel Insights for Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Stephanie L.; Stojdl, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale assays, such as microarrays, next-generation sequencing and various “omics” technologies, have explored multiple aspects of the immune response following virus infection, often from a public health perspective. Yet a lack of similar data exists for monitoring immune engagement during oncolytic virus immunotherapy (OVIT) in the cancer setting. Tracking immune signatures at the tumour site can create a snapshot or longitudinally analyse immune cell activation, infiltration and functionality within global populations or individual cells. Mapping immune changes over the course of oncolytic biotherapy—from initial infection to tumour stabilisation/regression through to long-term cure or escape/relapse—has the potential to generate important therapeutic insights around virus-host interactions. Further, correlating such immune signatures with specific tumour outcomes has significant value for guiding the development of novel oncolytic virus immunotherapy strategies. Here, we provide insights for OVIT from large-scale analyses of immune populations in the infection, vaccination and immunotherapy setting. We analyse several approaches to manipulating immune engagement during OVIT. We further explore immunocentric changes in the tumour tissue following immunotherapy, and compile several immune signatures of therapeutic success. Ultimately, we highlight clinically relevant large-scale approaches with the potential to strengthen future oncolytic strategies to optimally engage the immune system. PMID:26861383

  16. Linearized oncolytic adenoviral plasmid DNA delivered by bioreducible polymers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaesung; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Nam, Hye Yeong; Lee, Jung-Sun; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Sung Wan

    2011-01-01

    As an effort to overcome limits of adenovirus (Ad) as a systemic delivery vector for cancer therapy, we developed a novel system using oncolytic Ad plasmid DNA with two bioreducible polymers: arginine-grafted bioreducible poly(disulfide amine)polymer (ABP) and PEG5k-conjugated ABP (ABP5k) in expectation of oncolytic effect caused by progeny viral production followed by replication. The linearized Ad DNAs for active viral replication polyplexed with each polymer were able to replicate only in humancancer cells and produce progeny viruses. The non-immunogenic polymers delivering the DNAs markedly elicited to evade the innate and adaptive immune response. The biodistribution ratio of the polyplexes administered systemically was approximately 99% decreased in liver when compared with naked Ad. Moreover, tumor-to-liver ratio of the Ad DNA delivered by ABP or ABP5k was significantly elevated at 229- or 419-fold greater than that of naked Ad, respectively. The ABP5k improved the chance of the DNA to localize within tumor versus liver with 1.8-fold increased ratio. In conclusion, the innovative and simple system for delivering oncolytic Ad plasmid DNA with the bioreducible polymers, skipping time-consuming steps such as generation and characterization of oncolytic Ad vectors, can be utilized as an alternative approach for cancer therapy. PMID:22207073

  17. Oncolytic Seneca Valley Virus: past perspectives and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Seneca Valley Virus isolate 001 (SVV-001) is an oncolytic RNA virus of the Picornaviridae family. It is also the first picornavirus discovered of the novel genus Senecavirus. SVV-001 replicates through an RNA intermediate, bypassing a DNA phase, and is unable to integrate into the host genome. SVV-001 was originally discovered as a contaminant in the cell culture of fetal retinoblasts and has since been identified as a potent oncolytic virus against tumors of neuroendocrine origin. SVV-001 has a number of features that make it an attractive oncolytic virus, namely, its ability to target and penetrate solid tumors via intravenous administration, inability for insertional mutagenesis, and being a self-replicating RNA virus with selective tropism for cancer cells. SVV-001 has been studied in both pediatric and adult early phase studies reporting safety and some clinical efficacy, albeit primarily in adult tumors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of SVV-001 and what its future as an oncolytic virus may hold.

  18. Big Data Offers Novel Insights for Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Swift, Stephanie L; Stojdl, David F

    2016-02-01

    Large-scale assays, such as microarrays, next-generation sequencing and various "omics" technologies, have explored multiple aspects of the immune response following virus infection, often from a public health perspective. Yet a lack of similar data exists for monitoring immune engagement during oncolytic virus immunotherapy (OVIT) in the cancer setting. Tracking immune signatures at the tumour site can create a snapshot or longitudinally analyse immune cell activation, infiltration and functionality within global populations or individual cells. Mapping immune changes over the course of oncolytic biotherapy-from initial infection to tumour stabilisation/regression through to long-term cure or escape/relapse-has the potential to generate important therapeutic insights around virus-host interactions. Further, correlating such immune signatures with specific tumour outcomes has significant value for guiding the development of novel oncolytic virus immunotherapy strategies. Here, we provide insights for OVIT from large-scale analyses of immune populations in the infection, vaccination and immunotherapy setting. We analyse several approaches to manipulating immune engagement during OVIT. We further explore immunocentric changes in the tumour tissue following immunotherapy, and compile several immune signatures of therapeutic success. Ultimately, we highlight clinically relevant large-scale approaches with the potential to strengthen future oncolytic strategies to optimally engage the immune system. PMID:26861383

  19. Oncolytic Measles Virus Strains as Novel Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Msaouel, Pavlos; Opyrchal, Mateusz; Domingo Musibay, Evidio; Galanis, Evanthia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Replication-competent oncolytic measles virus (MV) strains preferentially infect and destroy a wide variety of cancer tissues. Clinical translation of engineered attenuated MV vaccine derivatives is demonstrating the therapeutic potential and negligible pathogenicity of these strains in humans. Areas covered The present review summarizes the mechanisms of MV tumor selectivity and cytopathic activity as well as the current data on the oncolytic efficacy and preclinical testing of MV strains. Investigational strategies to reprogram MV selectivity, escape antiviral immunity and modulate the immune system to enhance viral delivery and tumor oncolysis are also discussed. Expert Opinion Clinical viral kinetic data derived from non-invasive monitoring of reporter transgene expression will guide future protocols to enhance oncolytic MV efficacy. Anti-measles immunity is a major challenge of measles-based therapeutics and various strategies are being investigated to modulate immunity. These include the combination of MV therapy with immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclophosphamide, the use of cell carriers and the introduction of immunomodulatory transgenes and wild-type virulence genes. Available MV retargeting technologies can address safety considerations that may arise as more potent oncolytic MV vectors are being developed. PMID:23289598

  20. Oncolytic Seneca Valley Virus: past perspectives and future directions.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Seneca Valley Virus isolate 001 (SVV-001) is an oncolytic RNA virus of the Picornaviridae family. It is also the first picornavirus discovered of the novel genus Senecavirus. SVV-001 replicates through an RNA intermediate, bypassing a DNA phase, and is unable to integrate into the host genome. SVV-001 was originally discovered as a contaminant in the cell culture of fetal retinoblasts and has since been identified as a potent oncolytic virus against tumors of neuroendocrine origin. SVV-001 has a number of features that make it an attractive oncolytic virus, namely, its ability to target and penetrate solid tumors via intravenous administration, inability for insertional mutagenesis, and being a self-replicating RNA virus with selective tropism for cancer cells. SVV-001 has been studied in both pediatric and adult early phase studies reporting safety and some clinical efficacy, albeit primarily in adult tumors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of SVV-001 and what its future as an oncolytic virus may hold. PMID:27660749

  1. Oncolytic Seneca Valley Virus: past perspectives and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Seneca Valley Virus isolate 001 (SVV-001) is an oncolytic RNA virus of the Picornaviridae family. It is also the first picornavirus discovered of the novel genus Senecavirus. SVV-001 replicates through an RNA intermediate, bypassing a DNA phase, and is unable to integrate into the host genome. SVV-001 was originally discovered as a contaminant in the cell culture of fetal retinoblasts and has since been identified as a potent oncolytic virus against tumors of neuroendocrine origin. SVV-001 has a number of features that make it an attractive oncolytic virus, namely, its ability to target and penetrate solid tumors via intravenous administration, inability for insertional mutagenesis, and being a self-replicating RNA virus with selective tropism for cancer cells. SVV-001 has been studied in both pediatric and adult early phase studies reporting safety and some clinical efficacy, albeit primarily in adult tumors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of SVV-001 and what its future as an oncolytic virus may hold. PMID:27660749

  2. Oncolytic Seneca Valley Virus: past perspectives and future directions.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Seneca Valley Virus isolate 001 (SVV-001) is an oncolytic RNA virus of the Picornaviridae family. It is also the first picornavirus discovered of the novel genus Senecavirus. SVV-001 replicates through an RNA intermediate, bypassing a DNA phase, and is unable to integrate into the host genome. SVV-001 was originally discovered as a contaminant in the cell culture of fetal retinoblasts and has since been identified as a potent oncolytic virus against tumors of neuroendocrine origin. SVV-001 has a number of features that make it an attractive oncolytic virus, namely, its ability to target and penetrate solid tumors via intravenous administration, inability for insertional mutagenesis, and being a self-replicating RNA virus with selective tropism for cancer cells. SVV-001 has been studied in both pediatric and adult early phase studies reporting safety and some clinical efficacy, albeit primarily in adult tumors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of SVV-001 and what its future as an oncolytic virus may hold.

  3. Cancer immunotherapy via combining oncolytic virotherapy with chemotherapy: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Guy R; Relph, Kate; Harrington, Kevin; Melcher, Alan; Pandha, Hardev

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are multifunctional anticancer agents with huge clinical potential, and have recently passed the randomized Phase III clinical trial hurdle. Both wild-type and engineered viruses have been selected for targeting of specific cancers, to elicit cytotoxicity, and also to generate antitumor immunity. Single-agent oncolytic virotherapy treatments have resulted in modest effects in the clinic. There is increasing interest in their combination with cytotoxic agents, radiotherapy and immune-checkpoint inhibitors. Similarly to oncolytic viruses, the benefits of chemotherapeutic agents may be that they induce systemic antitumor immunity through the induction of immunogenic cell death of cancer cells. Combining these two treatment modalities has to date resulted in significant potential in vitro and in vivo synergies through various mechanisms without any apparent additional toxicities. Chemotherapy has been and will continue to be integral to the management of advanced cancers. This review therefore focuses on the potential for a number of common cytotoxic agents to be combined with clinically relevant oncolytic viruses. In many cases, this combined approach has already advanced to the clinical trial arena. PMID:27579292

  4. Big Data Offers Novel Insights for Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Swift, Stephanie L; Stojdl, David F

    2016-02-05

    Large-scale assays, such as microarrays, next-generation sequencing and various "omics" technologies, have explored multiple aspects of the immune response following virus infection, often from a public health perspective. Yet a lack of similar data exists for monitoring immune engagement during oncolytic virus immunotherapy (OVIT) in the cancer setting. Tracking immune signatures at the tumour site can create a snapshot or longitudinally analyse immune cell activation, infiltration and functionality within global populations or individual cells. Mapping immune changes over the course of oncolytic biotherapy-from initial infection to tumour stabilisation/regression through to long-term cure or escape/relapse-has the potential to generate important therapeutic insights around virus-host interactions. Further, correlating such immune signatures with specific tumour outcomes has significant value for guiding the development of novel oncolytic virus immunotherapy strategies. Here, we provide insights for OVIT from large-scale analyses of immune populations in the infection, vaccination and immunotherapy setting. We analyse several approaches to manipulating immune engagement during OVIT. We further explore immunocentric changes in the tumour tissue following immunotherapy, and compile several immune signatures of therapeutic success. Ultimately, we highlight clinically relevant large-scale approaches with the potential to strengthen future oncolytic strategies to optimally engage the immune system.

  5. Ex vivo infection of live tissue with oncolytic viruses.

    PubMed

    Diallo, Jean-Simon; Roy, Dominic; Abdelbary, Hesham; De Silva, Naomi; Bell, John C

    2011-06-25

    Oncolytic Viruses (OVs) are novel therapeutics that selectively replicate in and kill tumor cells(1). Several clinical trials evaluating the effectiveness of a variety of oncolytic platforms including HSV, Reovirus, and Vaccinia OVs as treatment for cancer are currently underway(2-5). One key characteristic of oncolytic viruses is that they can be genetically modified to express reporter transgenes which makes it possible to visualize the infection of tissues by microscopy or bio-luminescence imaging(6,7). This offers a unique advantage since it is possible to infect tissues from patients ex vivo prior to therapy in order to ascertain the likelihood of successful oncolytic virotherapy(8). To this end, it is critical to appropriately sample tissue to compensate for tissue heterogeneity and assess tissue viability, particularly prior to infection(9). It is also important to follow viral replication using reporter transgenes if expressed by the oncolytic platform as well as by direct titration of tissues following homogenization in order to discriminate between abortive and productive infection. The object of this protocol is to address these issues and herein describes 1. The sampling and preparation of tumor tissue for cell culture 2. The assessment of tissue viability using the metabolic dye alamar blue 3. Ex vivo infection of cultured tissues with vaccinia virus expressing either GFP or firefly luciferase 4. Detection of transgene expression by fluorescence microscopy or using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS) 5. Quantification of virus by plaque assay. This comprehensive method presents several advantages including ease of tissue processing, compensation for tissue heterogeneity, control of tissue viability, and discrimination between abortive infection and bone fide viral replication.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of avian poxviruses among free-ranging birds of Virginia.

    PubMed

    Adams, Cary J; Feldman, Sanford H; Sleeman, Jonathan M

    2005-12-01

    Polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify a portion of the avian poxvirus core 4b gene of infected free-ranging birds that presented at the Wildlife Center of Virginia during the 2003 and early 2004 years. The species of bird infected were a great blue heron (Ardea herodias), two American crows (Corvus brachyrhyncos), two American robins (Turdus migratorius), two mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), a blue-gray gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea), a northern mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos), a house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus), and a northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis). Phylogenetic analysis was performed using the consensus sequences determined for each avian case in Virginia in combination with avian poxvirus core 4b gene sequence from isolates previously described in Europe and that of vaccinia virus. Alignment of DNA sequences identified areas of point mutations and, in the case of a single mourning dove, the incorporation of a triplet of nucleotides. Maximum-likelihood analysis grouped the 2003-2004 Virginia avian poxviruses into a clade distinct from those reported in European free-ranging birds, with the exception of a single case in a mourning dove that clustered within one European clade. The cladogram that resulted from our analysis of the European isolates is in agreement with those previously published. This study identified a distinct clade of avian poxvirus unique from four clades previously described and associated with epornitics in free-ranging birds, where the core 4b gene DNA sequence has been the basis of comparison.

  7. AVIAN POXVIRUS INFECTION IN A FLAMINGO (PHOENICOPTERUS RUBER) OF THE LISBON ZOO.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Ana M; Fagulha, Teresa; Duarte, Margarida; Ramos, Fernanda; Barros, Sílvia C; Luís, Tiago; Bernardino, Rui; Fernandes, Teresa L; Lapão, Narciso; da Silva, José Ferreira; Fevereiro, Miguel

    2016-03-01

    Avian poxviruses (APV) are very large viruses spread worldwide in a variety of hosts. They are responsible for a disease usually referred to as pox, mainly characterized by nodular lesions on feather-free regions of the body. On May 2010, a young American flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber) of the Lisbon Zoo (Portugal) developed a nodular lesion suggestive of poxvirus infection on its right foot. Avipoxvirus was isolated from the lesion and a fragment of the P4b-encoding gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction. The nucleotide sequence of the amplicon was determined and analyzed. A close relationship (100% identity) was observed between the flamingo poxvirus and isolates from great bustard (Hungary 2005), house sparrow (Morocco 2009), MacQueen's bustard (Morocco 2011), and Houbara bustard (Morocco 2010 and 2011), suggesting interspecies transmission as a possible source of infection. To strengthen the investigation, the 5' and 3' ends of genes cnpv186 and cnpv 187, respectively, were also analyzed. The cnpv186-187 fragment exhibited 100% identity with MacQueen's bustard and Houbara bustard isolates, both from Morocco 2011. Phylogenetic analyses based in both fragments grouped the flamingo isolate consistently within clade B2 of canarypox. However, the phylogenetic relationships among the different representatives of avian poxviruses were more comprehensive in the tree based on the concatenated coding sequences of the cnpv186-187 fragment, rather than on the P4b-coding gene. The clearer displacement and distribution of the isolates regarding their host species in this last tree suggests the potential usefulness of this genomic region to refine avian poxvirus classification.

  8. AVIAN POXVIRUS INFECTION IN A FLAMINGO (PHOENICOPTERUS RUBER) OF THE LISBON ZOO.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Ana M; Fagulha, Teresa; Duarte, Margarida; Ramos, Fernanda; Barros, Sílvia C; Luís, Tiago; Bernardino, Rui; Fernandes, Teresa L; Lapão, Narciso; da Silva, José Ferreira; Fevereiro, Miguel

    2016-03-01

    Avian poxviruses (APV) are very large viruses spread worldwide in a variety of hosts. They are responsible for a disease usually referred to as pox, mainly characterized by nodular lesions on feather-free regions of the body. On May 2010, a young American flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber) of the Lisbon Zoo (Portugal) developed a nodular lesion suggestive of poxvirus infection on its right foot. Avipoxvirus was isolated from the lesion and a fragment of the P4b-encoding gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction. The nucleotide sequence of the amplicon was determined and analyzed. A close relationship (100% identity) was observed between the flamingo poxvirus and isolates from great bustard (Hungary 2005), house sparrow (Morocco 2009), MacQueen's bustard (Morocco 2011), and Houbara bustard (Morocco 2010 and 2011), suggesting interspecies transmission as a possible source of infection. To strengthen the investigation, the 5' and 3' ends of genes cnpv186 and cnpv 187, respectively, were also analyzed. The cnpv186-187 fragment exhibited 100% identity with MacQueen's bustard and Houbara bustard isolates, both from Morocco 2011. Phylogenetic analyses based in both fragments grouped the flamingo isolate consistently within clade B2 of canarypox. However, the phylogenetic relationships among the different representatives of avian poxviruses were more comprehensive in the tree based on the concatenated coding sequences of the cnpv186-187 fragment, rather than on the P4b-coding gene. The clearer displacement and distribution of the isolates regarding their host species in this last tree suggests the potential usefulness of this genomic region to refine avian poxvirus classification. PMID:27010277

  9. Going viral: a review of replication-selective oncolytic adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Fanger, Gary R.; Stirn, Meaghan; Oronsky, Arnold; Reid, Tony R.

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses have had a tumultuous course, from the initial anecdotal reports of patients having antineoplastic effects after natural viral infections a century ago to the development of current cutting-edge therapies in clinical trials. Adenoviruses have long been the workhorse of virotherapy, and we review both the scientific and the not-so-scientific forces that have shaped the development of these therapeutics from wild-type viral pathogens, turning an old foe into a new friend. After a brief review of the mechanics of viral replication and how it has been modified to engineer tumor selectivity, we give particular attention to ONYX-015, the forerunner of virotherapy with extensive clinical testing that pioneered the field. The findings from those as well as other oncolytic trials have shaped how we now view these viruses, which our immune system has evolved to vigorously attack, as promising immunotherapy agents. PMID:26280277

  10. MicroRNA-Detargeted Mengovirus for Oncolytic Virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Autumn J.; Hadac, Elizabeth M.; Nace, Rebecca A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mengovirus, a member of the Picornaviridae family, has a broad cell tropism and can cause encephalitis and myocarditis in multiple mammalian species. Attenuation has been achieved by shortening the polycytidine tract in the 5′ noncoding region (NCR). A poly(C)-truncated strain of mengovirus, vMC24, resulted in significant tumor regression in immunocompetent BALB/c mice bearing syngeneic MPC-11 plasmacytomas, but the associated toxicities were unacceptable. To enhance its safety profile, microRNA target sequences complementary to miR-124 or miR-125 (enriched in nervous tissue), miR-133 and miR-208 (enriched in cardiac tissue), or miR-142 (control; enriched in hematopoietic tissues) were inserted into the vMC24 NCRs. The microRNA-detargeted viruses showed reduced replication and cell killing specifically in cells expressing the cognate microRNAs, but certain insertions additionally were associated with nonspecific suppression of viral fitness in vivo. In vivo toxicity testing confirmed that miR-124 targets within the 5′ NCR suppressed virus replication in the central nervous system while miR-133 and miR-208 targets in the 3′ NCR suppressed viral replication in cardiac tissue. A dual-detargeted virus named vMC24-NC, with miR-124 targets in the 5′ NCR and miR-133 plus miR-208 targets in the 3′ NCR, showed the suppression of replication in both nervous and cardiac tissues but retained full oncolytic potency when administered by intratumoral (106 50% tissue culture infectious doses [TCID50]) or intravenous (107 to 108 TCID50) injection into BALB/c mice bearing MPC-11 plasmacytomas. Overall survival of vMC24-NC-treated tumor-bearing mice was significantly improved compared to that of nontreated mice. MicroRNA-detargeted mengoviruses offer a promising oncolytic virotherapy platform that merits further development for clinical translation. IMPORTANCE The clinical potential of oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment has been well demonstrated

  11. Combining oncolytic virotherapy and cytotoxic therapies to fight cancer.

    PubMed

    Fillat, Cristina; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Alemany, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) are promising anti-cancer agents, capable of selectively replicating in tumour cells and killing them. Chemotherapy, on the other hand, remains the backbone of current cancer treatment, although it is limited by a narrow therapeutic index, significant toxicity, and frequent acquired resistance. There is an increasing body of evidence on a variety of chemotherapeutic agents that have been shown to be synergic with OV and result in increased response rates in preclinical studies. Several possible mechanisms have been proposed to mediate the enhanced anti-tumour activity of such combination treatment. Moreover, it has been shown how prodrug- activating enzymes armed oncolytic viruses promote synergy with prodrugs. In the present review we summarise the current knowledge concerning the benefits of the combination of OV and cytotoxic drug treatment and discuss the translational opportunities such therapeutic synergies have in the fight against cancer.

  12. Measles to the Rescue: A Review of Oncolytic Measles Virus

    PubMed Central

    Aref, Sarah; Bailey, Katharine; Fielding, Adele

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapeutic agents are likely to become serious contenders in cancer treatment. The vaccine strain of measles virus is an agent with an impressive range of oncolytic activity in pre-clinical trials with increasing evidence of safety and efficacy in early clinical trials. This paramyxovirus vaccine has a proven safety record and is amenable to careful genetic modification in the laboratory. Overexpression of the measles virus (MV) receptor CD46 in many tumour cells may direct the virus to preferentially enter transformed cells and there is increasing awareness of the importance of nectin-4 and signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) in oncolysis. Successful attempts to retarget MV by inserting genes for tumour-specific ligands to antigens such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CD20, CD38, and by engineering the virus to express synthetic microRNA targeting sequences, and “blinding” the virus to the natural viral receptors are exciting measures to increase viral specificity and enhance the oncolytic effect. Sodium iodine symporter (NIS) can also be expressed by MV, which enables in vivo tracking of MV infection. Radiovirotherapy using MV-NIS, chemo-virotherapy to convert prodrugs to their toxic metabolites, and immune-virotherapy including incorporating antibodies against immune checkpoint inhibitors can also increase the oncolytic potential. Anti-viral host immune responses are a recognized barrier to the success of MV, and approaches such as transporting MV to the tumour sites by carrier cells, are showing promise. MV Clinical trials are producing encouraging preliminary results in ovarian cancer, myeloma and cutaneous non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and the outcome of currently open trials in glioblastoma multiforme, mesothelioma and squamous cell carcinoma are eagerly anticipated. PMID:27782084

  13. Targeting tumor vasculature through oncolytic virotherapy: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Toro Bejarano, Marcela; Merchan, Jaime R

    2015-01-01

    The oncolytic virotherapy field has made significant advances in the last decade, with a rapidly increasing number of early- and late-stage clinical trials, some of them showing safety and promising therapeutic efficacy. Targeting tumor vasculature by oncolytic viruses (OVs) is an attractive strategy that offers several advantages over nontargeted viruses, including improved tumor viral entry, direct antivascular effects, and enhanced antitumor efficacy. Current understanding of the biological mechanisms of tumor neovascularization, novel vascular targets, and mechanisms of resistance has allowed the development of oncolytic viral vectors designed to target tumor neovessels. While some OVs (such as vaccinia and vesicular stomatitis virus) can intrinsically target tumor vasculature and induce vascular disruption, the majority of reported vascular-targeted viruses are the result of genetic manipulation of their viral genomes. Such strategies include transcriptional or transductional endothelial targeting, “armed” viruses able to downregulate angiogenic factors, or to express antiangiogenic molecules. The above strategies have shown preclinical safety and improved antitumor efficacy, either alone, or in combination with standard or targeted agents. This review focuses on the recent efforts toward the development of vascular-targeted OVs for cancer treatment and provides a translational/clinical perspective into the future development of new generation biological agents for human cancers. PMID:27512680

  14. Modelling Spread of Oncolytic Viruses in Heterogeneous Cell Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Michael; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2014-03-01

    One of the most promising areas in current cancer research and treatment is the use of viruses to attack cancer cells. A number of oncolytic viruses have been identified to date that possess the ability to destroy or neutralize cancer cells while inflicting minimal damage upon healthy cells. Formulation of predictive models that correctly describe the evolution of infected tumor systems is critical to the successful application of oncolytic virus therapy. A number of different models have been proposed for analysis of the oncolytic virus-infected tumor system, with approaches ranging from traditional coupled differential equations such as the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey models, to contemporary modeling frameworks based on neural networks and cellular automata. Existing models are focused on tumor cells and the effects of virus infection, and offer the potential for improvement by including effects upon normal cells. We have recently extended the traditional framework to a 2-cell model addressing the full cellular system including tumor cells, normal cells, and the impacts of viral infection upon both populations. Analysis of the new framework reveals complex interaction between the populations and potential inability to simultaneously eliminate the virus and tumor populations.

  15. Differentiation of sheep pox and goat poxviruses by sequence analysis and PCR-RFLP of P32 gene.

    PubMed

    Hosamani, Madhusudan; Mondal, Bimalendu; Tembhurne, Prabhakar A; Bandyopadhyay, Santanu Kumar; Singh, Raj Kumar; Rasool, Thaha Jamal

    2004-08-01

    Sheep pox and Goat pox are highly contagious viral diseases of small ruminants. These diseases were earlier thought to be caused by a single species of virus, as they are serologically indistinguishable. P32, one of the major immunogenic genes of Capripoxvirus, was isolated and Sequenced from two Indian isolates of goat poxvirus (GPV) and a vaccine strain of sheep poxvirus (SPV). The sequences were compared with other P32 sequences of capripoxviruses available in the database. Sequence analysis revealed that sheep pox and goat poxviruses share 97.5 and 94.7% homology at nucleotide and amino acid level, respectively. A major difference between them is the presence of an additional aspartic acid at 55th position of P32 of sheep poxvirus that is absent in both goat poxvirus and lumpy skin disease virus. Further, six unique neutral nucleotide substitutions were observed at positions 77, 275, 403, 552, 867 and 964 in the sequence of goat poxvirus, which can be taken as GPV signature residues. Similar unique nucleotide signatures could be identified in SPV and LSDV sequences also. Phylogenetic analysis showed that members of the Capripoxvirus could be delineated into three distinct clusters of GPV, SPV and LSDV based on the P32 genomic sequence. Using this information, a PCR-RFLP method has been developed for unequivocal genomic differentiation of SPV and GPV.

  16. Oncolytic virotherapy in veterinary medicine: current status and future prospects for canine patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses refer to those that are able to eliminate malignancies by direct targeting and lysis of cancer cells, leaving non-cancerous tissues unharmed. Several oncolytic viruses including adenovirus strains, canine distemper virus and vaccinia virus strains have been used for canine cancer therapy in preclinical studies. However, in contrast to human studies, clinical trials with oncolytic viruses for canine cancer patients have not been reported. An 'ideal' virus has yet to be identified. This review is focused on the prospective use of oncolytic viruses in the treatment of canine tumors - a knowledge that will undoubtedly contribute to the development of oncolytic viral agents for canine cancer therapy in the future. PMID:22216938

  17. Cloak and Dagger: Alternative Immune Evasion and Modulation Strategies of Poxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Bidgood, Susanna R.; Mercer, Jason

    2015-01-01

    As all viruses rely on cellular factors throughout their replication cycle, to be successful they must evolve strategies to evade and/or manipulate the defence mechanisms employed by the host cell. In addition to their expression of a wide array of host modulatory factors, several recent studies have suggested that poxviruses may have evolved unique mechanisms to shunt or evade host detection. These potential mechanisms include mimicry of apoptotic bodies by mature virions (MVs), the use of viral sub-structures termed lateral bodies for the packaging and delivery of host modulators, and the formation of a second, “cloaked” form of infectious extracellular virus (EVs). Here we discuss these various strategies and how they may facilitate poxvirus immune evasion. Finally we propose a model for the exploitation of the cellular exosome pathway for the formation of EVs. PMID:26308043

  18. Poxviruses Encode a Reticulon-Like Protein that Promotes Membrane Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Erlandson, Karl J.; Bisht, Himani; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Hyun, Seong-In; Hansen, Bryan T.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Hinshaw, Jenny E.; Moss, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Poxviruses are enveloped DNA viruses that replicate within the cytoplasm. The first viral structures are crescents and spherical particles with a lipoprotein membrane bilayer thought to be derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We determined that A17, a conserved viral transmembrane protein essential for crescent formation, forms homo-oligomers and shares topological features with cellular reticulon-like proteins, which promote membrane curvature and contribute to the tubular structure of the ER. When the purified A17 protein was incorporated into liposomes, 25 nm diameter vesicles and tubules formed at low and high A17 concentrations, respectively. In addition, intracellular expression of A17, in the absence of other viral structural proteins, transformed the ER into aggregated 3-dimensional tubular networks. We suggest that A17 is a viral reticulon-like protein that contributes to curvature during biogenesis of the poxvirus membrane. PMID:26923595

  19. Variola virus topoisomerase: DNA cleavage specificity and distribution of sites in Poxvirus genomes.

    PubMed

    Minkah, Nana; Hwang, Young; Perry, Kay; Van Duyne, Gregory D; Hendrickson, Robert; Lefkowitz, Elliot J; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Bushman, Frederic D

    2007-08-15

    Topoisomerase enzymes regulate superhelical tension in DNA resulting from transcription, replication, repair, and other molecular transactions. Poxviruses encode an unusual type IB topoisomerase that acts only at conserved DNA sequences containing the core pentanucleotide 5'-(T/C)CCTT-3'. In X-ray structures of the variola virus topoisomerase bound to DNA, protein-DNA contacts were found to extend beyond the core pentanucleotide, indicating that the full recognition site has not yet been fully defined in functional studies. Here we report quantitation of DNA cleavage rates for an optimized 13 bp site and for all possible single base substitutions (40 total sites), with the goals of understanding the molecular mechanism of recognition and mapping topoisomerase sites in poxvirus genome sequences. The data allow a precise definition of enzyme-DNA interactions and the energetic contributions of each. We then used the resulting "action matrix" to show that favorable topoisomerase sites are distributed all along the length of poxvirus DNA sequences, consistent with a requirement for local release of superhelical tension in constrained topological domains. In orthopox genomes, an additional central cluster of sites was also evident. A negative correlation of predicted topoisomerase sites was seen relative to early terminators, but no correlation was seen with early or late promoters. These data define the full variola virus topoisomerase recognition site and provide a new window on topoisomerase function in vivo.

  20. All reovirus subtypes show oncolytic potential in primary cells of human high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Alloussi, S H; Alkassar, M; Urbschat, S; Graf, N; Gärtner, B

    2011-09-01

    Reoviridae are non-human pathogenic viruses. The family of reoviridae consists of 4 different subtypes. Many studies have proven that the Dearing subtype 3 has oncolytic potential. This potential is related to the RAS protein expression in tumour cells. The aim of this study, was to investigate whether all reovirus subtypes have oncolytic potential and whether there are differences in their efficacy, in particular for high-grade glioma. To evaluate the oncolytic potential, we performed an in vitro head-to-head study for all reovirus subtypes in 5 primary cell cultures of high-grade gliomas. The oncolytic activity was determined using end-point titration with observation of the cytopathogenic effect. For measurement of RAS activity, we performed an immunofluorescent detection stain on all cell cultures. For quantification of the virus, an RT-PCR measurement for all subtypes was performed. All reovirus subtypes showed oncolytic activity in the observed glioma biopsies. These observations correlated with RAS overexpression in the observed cells. All glioma biopsies overexpressed the RAS protein. The quantitative oncolytic potential differed in relation to the single observed cell culture and in relation to the chosen reovirus subtype. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing oncolytic activity for all reovirus subtypes. We show the relationship and correlation between RAS protein overexpression and vulnerability of cells to reovirus. Efficacy of the different subtypes is interindividually different and cannot be forecast.

  1. CRISPR-Cas9 as a Powerful Tool for Efficient Creation of Oncolytic Viruses.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ming; Webb, Eika; Lemoine, Nicholas Robert; Wang, Yaohe

    2016-03-07

    The development of oncolytic viruses has led to an emerging new class of cancer therapeutics. Although the safety profile has been encouraging, the transition of oncolytic viruses to the clinical setting has been a slow process due to modifications. Therefore, a new generation of more potent oncolytic viruses needs to be exploited, following our better understanding of the complex interactions between the tumor, its microenvironment, the virus, and the host immune response. The conventional method for creation of tumor-targeted oncolytic viruses is based on homologous recombination. However, the creation of new mutant oncolytic viruses with large genomes remains a challenge due to the multi-step process and low efficiency of homologous recombination. The CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 has hugely advanced the potential to edit the genomes of various organisms due to the ability of Cas9 to target a specific genomic site by a single guide RNA. In this review, we discuss the CRISPR-Cas9 system as an efficient viral editing method for the creation of new oncolytic viruses, as well as its potential future applications in the development of oncolytic viruses. Further, this review discusses the potential of off-target effects as well as CRISPR-Cas9 as a tool for basic research into viral biology.

  2. CRISPR-Cas9 as a Powerful Tool for Efficient Creation of Oncolytic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ming; Webb, Eika; Lemoine, Nicholas Robert; Wang, Yaohe

    2016-01-01

    The development of oncolytic viruses has led to an emerging new class of cancer therapeutics. Although the safety profile has been encouraging, the transition of oncolytic viruses to the clinical setting has been a slow process due to modifications. Therefore, a new generation of more potent oncolytic viruses needs to be exploited, following our better understanding of the complex interactions between the tumor, its microenvironment, the virus, and the host immune response. The conventional method for creation of tumor-targeted oncolytic viruses is based on homologous recombination. However, the creation of new mutant oncolytic viruses with large genomes remains a challenge due to the multi-step process and low efficiency of homologous recombination. The CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 has hugely advanced the potential to edit the genomes of various organisms due to the ability of Cas9 to target a specific genomic site by a single guide RNA. In this review, we discuss the CRISPR-Cas9 system as an efficient viral editing method for the creation of new oncolytic viruses, as well as its potential future applications in the development of oncolytic viruses. Further, this review discusses the potential of off-target effects as well as CRISPR-Cas9 as a tool for basic research into viral biology. PMID:26959050

  3. 4-1BB ligand enhances tumor-specific immunity of poxvirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kudo-Saito, Chie; Hodge, James W.; Kwak, Heesun; Kim-Schulze, Seunghee; Schlom, Jeffrey; Kaufman, Howard L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Recombinant poxvirus vaccines have been explored as tumor vaccines. The immunogenicity of these vaccines can be enhanced by co-expressing costimulatory molecules and tumor-associated antigens. While the B7-CD28 interaction has been most comprehensively investigated, other costimulatory molecules utilize different signaling pathways and might provide further cooperation in T cell priming and survival. 4-1BB (CD137) is a TNF family member and is critical for activation and long-term maintenance of primed T-cells. This study was conducted to determine if a poxvirus expressing the ligand for 4-1BB (4-1BBL) could further improve the immune and therapeutic responses of a previously reported poxvirus vaccine expressing a triad of costimulatory molecules (B7.1, ICAM-1, and LFA-3). Experimental Design A recombinant vaccinia virus expressing 4-1BBL was generated and characterized in an in vitro infection system. This vaccine was then used alone or in combination with a vaccinia virus expressing CEA, B7.1, ICAM-1, and LFA-3 in CEA-transgenic mice bearing established MC38 tumors. Tumor growth and immune responses against CEA and other tumor-associated antigens were determined. The level of anti-apoptotic proteins in responding T cells was determined by flow cytometry on tetramer selected T cells. Results The combination of 4-1BBL with B7.1-based poxvirus vaccination resulted in significantly enhanced therapeutic effects against CEA-expressing tumors in a CEA transgenic mouse model. This was associated with an increased level of CEA-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, induction of antigen spreading to p53 and gp70, increased accumulation of CEA-specific T cells in the tumor microenvironment, and increased expression of bcl-XL and bcl-2 in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccinated mice. Conclusion 4-1BBL cooperates with B7 in enhancing anti-tumor and immunologic responses using a recombinant poxvirus vaccine model. The inclusion of costimulatory molecules targeting

  4. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen-androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  5. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Katrina; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death and morbidity in men in the Western world. Tumor progression is dependent on functioning androgen receptor signaling, and initial administration of antiandrogens and hormone therapy (androgen-deprivation therapy) prevent growth and spread. Tumors frequently develop escape mechanisms to androgen-deprivation therapy and progress to castration-resistant late-stage metastatic disease that, in turn, inevitably leads to resistance to all current therapeutics, including chemotherapy. In spite of the recent development of more effective inhibitors of androgen–androgen receptor signaling such as enzalutamide and abiraterone, patient survival benefits are still limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have proven efficacy in prostate cancer cells and cause regression of tumors in preclinical models of numerous drug-resistant cancers. Data from clinical trials demonstrate that adenoviral mutants have limited toxicity to normal tissues and are safe when administered to patients with various solid cancers, including prostate cancer. While efficacy in response to adenovirus administration alone is marginal, findings from early-phase trials targeting local-ized and metastatic prostate cancer suggest improved efficacy in combination with cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy. Here, we review recent progress in the development of multimodal oncolytic adenoviruses as biological therapeutics to improve on tumor elimination in prostate cancer patients. These optimized mutants target cancer cells by several mechanisms including viral lysis and by expression of cytotoxic transgenes and immune-stimulatory factors that activate the host immune system to destroy both infected and noninfected prostate cancer cells. Additional modifications of the viral capsid proteins may support future systemic delivery of oncolytic adenoviruses. PMID:27579296

  6. Mechanistic insights into the oncolytic activity of vesicular stomatitis virus in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Simovic, Boris; Walsh, Scott R; Wan, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy and oncolytic virotherapy have both shown anticancer efficacy in the clinic as monotherapies but the greatest promise lies in therapies that combine these approaches. Vesicular stomatitis virus is a prominent oncolytic virus with several features that promise synergy between oncolytic virotherapy and immunotherapy. This review will address the cytotoxicity of vesicular stomatitis virus in transformed cells and what this means for antitumor immunity and the virus’ immunogenicity, as well as how it facilitates the breaking of tolerance within the tumor, and finally, we will outline how these features can be incorporated into the rational design of new treatment strategies in combination with immunotherapy. PMID:27512679

  7. Preclinical Mouse Models for Analysis of the Therapeutic Potential of Engineered Oncolytic Herpes Viruses.

    PubMed

    Speranza, Maria-Carmela; Kasai, Kazue; Lawler, Sean E

    2016-01-01

    After more than two decades of research and development, oncolytic herpes viruses (oHSVs) are moving into the spotlight due to recent encouraging clinical trial data. oHSV and other oncolytic viruses function through direct oncolytic cancer cell-killing mechanisms and by stimulating antitumor immunity. As further viruses are developed and optimized for the treatment of various types of cancer, appropriate predictive preclinical models will be of great utility. This review will discuss existing data in this area, focusing on the mouse tumor models that are commonly used. PMID:27034396

  8. Oncolytic virotherapy using herpes simplex virus: how far have we come?

    PubMed Central

    Sokolowski, Nicolas AS; Rizos, Helen; Diefenbach, Russell J

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy exploits the properties of human viruses to naturally cytolysis of cancer cells. The human pathogen herpes simplex virus (HSV) has proven particularly amenable for use in oncolytic virotherapy. The relative safety of HSV coupled with extensive knowledge on how HSV interacts with the host has provided a platform for manipulating HSV to enhance the targeting and killing of human cancer cells. This has culminated in the approval of talimogene laherparepvec for the treatment of melanoma. This review focuses on the development of HSV as an oncolytic virus and where the field is likely to head in the future. PMID:27512683

  9. Histone deacetylase 6 inhibition enhances oncolytic viral replication in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Kaufmann, Johanna K.; Wang, Pin-Yi; Nguyen, Tran; Speranza, Maria-Carmela; Kasai, Kazue; Okemoto, Kazuo; Otsuki, Akihiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Fernandez, Soledad; Goins, William F.; Grandi, Paola; Glorioso, Joseph C.; Lawler, Sean; Cripe, Timothy P.; Chiocca, E. Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viral (OV) therapy, which uses genetically engineered tumor-targeting viruses, is being increasingly used in cancer clinical trials due to the direct cytolytic effects of this treatment that appear to provoke a robust immune response against the tumor. As OVs enter tumor cells, intrinsic host defenses have the potential to hinder viral replication and spread within the tumor mass. In this report, we show that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in tumor cells appears to alter the trafficking of post-entry OVs from the nucleus toward lysosomes. In glioma cell lines and glioma-stem–like cells, HDAC6 inhibition (HDAC6i) by either pharmacologic or genetic means substantially increased replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (oHSV). Moreover, HDAC6i increased shuttling of post-entry oHSV to the nucleus. In addition, electron microscopic analysis revealed that post-entry oHSVs are preferentially taken up into glioma cells through the endosomal pathway rather than via fusion at the cell surface. Together, these findings illustrate a mechanism of glioma cell defense against an incoming infection by oHSV and identify possible approaches to enhance oHSV replication and subsequent lysis of tumor cells. PMID:26524593

  10. History of oncolytic viruses: genesis to genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Elizabeth; Russell, Stephen J

    2007-04-01

    Since the turn of the nineteenth century, when their existence was first recognized, viruses have attracted considerable interest as possible agents of tumor destruction. Early case reports emphasized regression of cancers during naturally acquired virus infections, providing the basis for clinical trials where body fluids containing human or animal viruses were used to transmit infections to cancer patients. Most often the viruses were arrested by the host immune system and failed to impact tumor growth, but sometimes, in immunosuppressed patients, infection persisted and tumors regressed, although morbidity as a result of the infection of normal tissues was unacceptable. With the advent of rodent models and new methods for virus propagation, there were numerous attempts through the 1950s and 1960s to force the evolution of viruses with greater tumor specificity, but success was limited and many researchers abandoned the field. Technology employing reverse genetics later brought about a renewal of interest in virotherapy that allowed the generation of more potent, tumor-specific oncolytics. Here, examination of early oncolytic virotherapy before genetic engineering serves to highlight tremendous advances, yet also hints at ways to penetrate host immune defenses, a significant remaining challenge in modern virotherapy research.

  11. Identification of genetically modified Maraba virus as an oncolytic rhabdovirus.

    PubMed

    Brun, Jan; McManus, Dan; Lefebvre, Charles; Hu, Kang; Falls, Theresa; Atkins, Harold; Bell, John C; McCart, J Andrea; Mahoney, Douglas; Stojdl, David F

    2010-08-01

    To expand our current array of safe and potent oncolytic viruses, we screened a variety of wild-type (WT) rhabdoviruses against a panel of tumor cell lines. Our screen identified a number of viruses with varying degrees of killing activity. Maraba virus was the most potent of these strains. We built a recombinant system for the Maraba virus platform, engineered a series of attenuating mutations to expand its therapeutic index, and tested their potency in vitro and in vivo. A double mutant (MG1) strain containing both G protein (Q242R) and M protein (L123W) mutations attenuated Maraba virus in normal diploid cell lines, yet appeared to be hypervirulent in cancer cells. This selective attenuation was mediated through interferon (IFN)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Finally, the Maraba MG1 strain had a 100-fold greater maximum tolerable dose (MTD) than WT Maraba in vivo and resulted in durable cures when systemically administered in syngeneic and xenograft models. In summary, we report a potent new oncolytic rhabdovirus platform with unique tumor-selective attenuating mutations.

  12. Modification of HSV-1 to an oncolytic virus.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-permissive viruses or oncolytic viruses consist of either genetically engineered or naturally occurring strains that possess relatively selective replicative and/or infection abilities for cancer vs. normal cells (Chiocca, Nat Rev Cancer 2: 938-950, 2002). They can also be armed with additional anticancer cDNAs (e.g., cytokines, prodrug-activating, anti-angiogenesis genes, and others) to extend therapeutic effects (Kaur et al., Curr Gene Ther 9: 341-355, 2009). Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) possesses several advantages as an oncolytic virus such as a rapid lytic cycle and a large capacity for insertion of heterologous DNA sequences (Wade-Martins et al., Nat Biotechnol, 19: 1067-1070, 2001). However, the technical nuances of genetic manipulation of the HSV-1 genome may still be relatively challenging. Here, we describe a system that has been durable and consistent in providing the ability to generate multiple recombinant HSV-1. The HsvQuik technology utilizes an HSV-1 genome cloned in a bacterial artificial chromosome to recombine heterologous cDNAs in a relatively rapid and reliable manner (Terada et al., Gene Ther 13: 705-714, 2006). PMID:24671680

  13. Histone deacetylase 6 inhibition enhances oncolytic viral replication in glioma.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Wang, Pin-Yi; Nguyen, Tran; Speranza, Maria-Carmela; Kasai, Kazue; Okemoto, Kazuo; Otsuki, Akihiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Fernandez, Soledad; Goins, William F; Grandi, Paola; Glorioso, Joseph C; Lawler, Sean; Cripe, Timothy P; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Oncolytic viral (OV) therapy, which uses genetically engineered tumor-targeting viruses, is being increasingly used in cancer clinical trials due to the direct cytolytic effects of this treatment that appear to provoke a robust immune response against the tumor. As OVs enter tumor cells, intrinsic host defenses have the potential to hinder viral replication and spread within the tumor mass. In this report, we show that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in tumor cells appears to alter the trafficking of post-entry OVs from the nucleus toward lysosomes. In glioma cell lines and glioma-stem-like cells, HDAC6 inhibition (HDAC6i) by either pharmacologic or genetic means substantially increased replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (oHSV). Moreover, HDAC6i increased shuttling of post-entry oHSV to the nucleus. In addition, electron microscopic analysis revealed that post-entry oHSVs are preferentially taken up into glioma cells through the endosomal pathway rather than via fusion at the cell surface. Together, these findings illustrate a mechanism of glioma cell defense against an incoming infection by oHSV and identify possible approaches to enhance oHSV replication and subsequent lysis of tumor cells. PMID:26524593

  14. Questing for an optimal, universal viral agent for oncolytic virotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, L. R.; Martins, M. L.; Ferreira, S. C.

    2011-10-01

    One of the most promising strategies to treat cancer is attacking it with viruses designed to exploit specific altered pathways. Here, the effects of oncolytic virotherapy on tumors having compact, papillary, and disconnected morphologies are investigated through computer simulations of a multiscale model coupling macroscopic reaction-diffusion equations for the nutrients with microscopic stochastic rules for the actions of individual cells and viruses. The interaction among viruses and tumor cells involves cell infection, intracellular virus replication, and the release of new viruses in the tissue after cell lysis. The evolution over time of both the viral load and cancer cell population, as well as the probabilities for tumor eradication, were evaluated for a range of multiplicities of infection, viral entries, and burst sizes. It was found that in immunosuppressed hosts, the antitumor efficacy of a virus is primarily determined by its entry efficiency, its replicative capacity within the tumor, and its ability to spread over the tissue. However, the optimal traits for oncolytic viruses depend critically on the tumor growth dynamics and do not necessarily include rapid replication, cytolysis, or spreading, currently assumed as necessary conditions for a successful therapeutic outcome. Our findings have potential implications on the design of new vectors for the viral therapy of cancer.

  15. Advances in the design and development of oncolytic measles viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hutzen, Brian; Raffel, Corey; Studebaker, Adam W

    2015-01-01

    A successful oncolytic virus is one that selectively propagates and destroys cancerous tissue without causing excessive damage to the normal surrounding tissue. Oncolytic measles virus (MV) is one such virus that exhibits this characteristic and thus has rapidly emerged as a potentially useful anticancer modality. Derivatives of the Edmonston MV vaccine strain possess a remarkable safety record in humans. Promising results in preclinical animal models and evidence of biological activity in early phase trials contribute to the enthusiasm. Genetic modifications have enabled MV to evolve from a vaccine agent to a potential anticancer therapy. Specifically, alterations of the MV genome have led to improved tumor selectivity and delivery, therapeutic potency, and immune system modulation. In this article, we will review the advancements that have been made in the design and development of MV that have led to its use as a cancer therapy. In addition, we will discuss the evidence supporting its use, as well as the challenges associated with MV as a potential cancer therapeutic. PMID:27512675

  16. Effect of marker distance and orientation on recombinant formation in poxvirus-infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Parks, R J; Evans, D H

    1991-01-01

    Little is known about the mechanism of poxvirus recombination even though construction of recombinant viruses by recombination-dependent methods is a widely adopted technique. We have shown previously that transfected DNAs are efficiently recombined while replicating in cells infected with Shope fibroma virus. Because recombinant DNA can be recovered from infected cells as a high-molecular-weight head-to-tail concatemer, it was possible to transfect genetically marked lambda DNAs into infected cells and assay recombinants as bacteriophage particles following in vitro packaging. This approach was used in this study to examine how marker distance and marker orientation influence recombination in Shope fibroma virus-infected cells. Simple two-factor crosses were readily modelled by using a mapping function derived from classical phage studies and showed low negative interference (I = -2.8 +/- 0.5) in crosses involving markers greater than 100 bp apart. More complex four- and five-factor crosses showed that the recombination frequency per unit distance was not constant (rising as the marker separation was reduced from 100 to 1 bp) and that crosses performed in poxvirus-infected cells are subject to high negative interference. One consequence is that marker orientation does not dramatically influence the outcome of most Shope fibroma virus-catalyzed crosses in clear contrast to what is observed in adenovirus or simian virus 40-infected cells. These results can be interpreted to indicate that similar statistical and physical constraints influence both viral and phage recombination and suggest that heteroduplexes may be important intermediates in the poxvirus recombination process. PMID:1847453

  17. Genome sequence and comparative virulence of raccoonpox virus: the first North American poxvirus sequence.

    PubMed

    Fleischauer, Clare; Upton, Chris; Victoria, Joseph; Jones, Gwendolyn J B; Roper, Rachel L

    2015-09-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of raccoonpox virus (RCNV), a naturally occurring North American poxvirus. This is the first such North American sequence to the best of our knowledge, and the data showed that RCNV forms a new phylogenetic branch between orthopoxviruses and Yoka poxvirus. RCNV shared overall similarity in genome organization with orthopoxviruses, and the proteins in the central conserved region shared approximately 90  % amino acid identity with orthopoxviruses. RCNV proteins shared approximately 81  % amino acid identity with Yokapox virus proteins. RCNV is missing 10 genes normally conserved in orthopoxviruses, most of which are implicated in virulence. These gene deletions may explain the attenuated phenotype of RCNV in mammals. RCNV contained one unique genome region containing approximately 1 kb of DNA sequence that is not present in any reported poxvirus. It contained a unique ORF predicted to encode a protein with a transmembrane domain. RCNV replicates well in mammalian cells, is naturally attenuated and has been shown to be effective as a vaccine vector platform, so we further tested its safety. We showed here that RCNV is substantially more attenuated than even the highly attenuated VACV-A35Del mutant virus in pregnant, nude and severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse models. RCNV was much safer in pregnant mice and was cleared rapidly from tissues, even in immunocompromised animals, whereas the VACV-A35Del mutant retains virulence and persists in tissues. Thus, RCNV is expected to be a superior vaccine vector for infectious diseases and cancer due to its excellent safety profile, reported vaccine efficacy and ability to replicate in mammalian cells.

  18. Oncolytic viruses on the cusp of success?: proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Oncolytic Virus Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Cole; Nigim, Fares; Chiocca, E Antonio; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2016-01-01

    Boston, Massachusetts, was the site of the 9th International Conference on Oncolytic Virus Therapeutics held 13–16 June 2015. An overarching theme of the meeting was the continued development of combinatorial treatment regimens to bolster the therapeutic potential of oncolytic viruses (OVs). Several talks focused on combining OVs with immune checkpoint inhibitors in a wide array of tumors, signaling an experimental and thematic shift toward driving immune activation to clear a tumor versus relying on direct viral oncolysis. An important aspect of the meeting was the variety of ongoing OV clinical trials. Topics ranged from basic virology to clinical trials and from academic research to intellectual property and biotechnology. There was much excitement due to the US Food and Drug Administration’s recent consideration of talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) for the treatment of advanced melanoma (T-VEC was approved in October, following the conference). Here, we summarize the meeting’s primary themes, which reflect the current state of the field.

  19. The use of the NIS reporter gene for optimizing oncolytic virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Amber; Russell, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Oncolytic viruses are experimental cancer therapies being translated to the clinic. They are unique in their ability to amplify within the body, therefore requiring careful monitoring of viral replication and biodistribution. Traditional monitoring strategies fail to recapitulate the dynamic nature of oncolytic virotherapy. Consequently, clinically relevant, noninvasive, high resolution strategies are needed to effectively track virotherapy in real time. Areas covered: The expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) reporter gene is tightly coupled to viral genome replication and mediates radioisotope concentration, allowing noninvasive molecular nuclear imaging of active viral infection with high resolution. This provides insight into replication kinetics, biodistribution, the impact of vector design, administration, and dosing on therapeutic outcomes, and highlights the heterogeneity of spatial distribution and temporal evolution of infection. NIS-mediated imaging in clinical trials confirms the feasibility of this technology to noninvasively and longitudinally observe oncolytic virus infection, replication, and distribution. Expert opinion: NIS-mediated imaging provides detailed functional and molecular information on the evolution of oncolytic virus infection in living animals. The use of NIS reporter gene imaging has rapidly advanced to provide unparalleled insight into the spatial and temporal context of oncolytic infection which will be integral to optimization of oncolytic treatment strategies. PMID:26457362

  20. A novel Golgi protein (GOLPH2)-regulated oncolytic adenovirus exhibits potent antitumor efficacy in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yigang; Zhao, Hongfang; Zhang, Rong; Ma, Buyun; Chen, Kan; Huang, Fang; Zhou, Xiumei; Cui, Caixia; Liu, Xinyuan

    2015-01-01

    Golgi apparatus is the organelle mainly functioning as protein processing and secretion. GOLPH2 is a resident Golgi glycoprotein, usually called GP73. Recent data displayed that GOLPH2 is a superb hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) marker candidate, and even its specificity is better than liver cancer marker AFP. Oncolytic adenoviruses are broadly used for targeting cancer therapy due to their selective tumor-killing effect. However, it was reported that traditionally oncolytic adenovirus lack the HCC specificity. In this study, a novel dual-regulated oncolytic adenovirus GD55 targeting HCC was first constructed based on our cancer targeted gene-viral therapeutic strategy. To verify the targeting and effectiveness of GOLPH2-regulated oncolytic adenovirus GD55 in HCC, the anticancer capacity was investigated in HCC cell lines and animal model. The results proved that the novel GOLPH2-regulated GD55 conferred higher adenovirus replication and infectivity for liver cancer cells than oncolytic adenovirus ZD55. The GOLPH2-regulated GD55 exerted a significant grow-suppressing effect on HCC cells in vitro but little damage to normal liver cells. In animal experiment, antitumor effect of GD55 was more effective in HCC xenograft of nude mice than that of ZD55. Thus GOLPH2-regulated GD55 may be a promising oncolytic virus agent for future liver cancer treatment. PMID:25980438

  1. Rabbit CD200R binds host CD200 but not CD200-like proteins from poxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Akkaya, Munir; Kwong, Lai-Shan; Akkaya, Erdem; Hatherley, Deborah; Barclay, A. Neil

    2016-01-01

    CD200 is a widely distributed membrane protein that gives inhibitory signals through its receptor (CD200R) on myeloid cells. CD200 has been acquired by herpesviruses where it has been shown to interact with host CD200R and downmodulate the immune system. It has been hypothesized that poxviruses have acquired CD200; but the potential orthologues show less similarity to their hosts. Myxoma virus M141 protein is a potential CD200 orthologue with a potent immune modulatory function in rabbits. Here, we characterized the rabbit CD200, CD200R and tested the CD200-like sequences for binding CD200R. No binding could be detected using soluble recombinant proteins, full length protein expressed on cells or myxoma virus infected cells. Finally, using knockdown models, we showed that the inhibitory effect of M141 on RAW 264.7 cells upon myxoma virus infection is not due to CD200R. We conclude that the rabbit poxvirus CD200-like proteins cause immunomodulation without utilizing CD200R. PMID:26590792

  2. Rabbit CD200R binds host CD200 but not CD200-like proteins from poxviruses.

    PubMed

    Akkaya, Munir; Kwong, Lai-Shan; Akkaya, Erdem; Hatherley, Deborah; Barclay, A Neil

    2016-01-15

    CD200 is a widely distributed membrane protein that gives inhibitory signals through its receptor (CD200R) on myeloid cells. CD200 has been acquired by herpesviruses where it has been shown to interact with host CD200R and downmodulate the immune system. It has been hypothesized that poxviruses have acquired CD200; but the potential orthologues show less similarity to their hosts. Myxoma virus M141 protein is a potential CD200 orthologue with a potent immune modulatory function in rabbits. Here, we characterized the rabbit CD200, CD200R and tested the CD200-like sequences for binding CD200R. No binding could be detected using soluble recombinant proteins, full length protein expressed on cells or myxoma virus infected cells. Finally, using knockdown models, we showed that the inhibitory effect of M141 on RAW 264.7 cells upon myxoma virus infection is not due to CD200R. We conclude that the rabbit poxvirus CD200-like proteins cause immunomodulation without utilizing CD200R. PMID:26590792

  3. Real-time PCR assay for detection of a new simulant for poxvirus biothreat agents.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Laurence; Gaudin, Jean-Christophe; Bensadoun, Paul; Rebillat, Isabelle; Morel, Yannick

    2009-03-01

    Research and financial efforts spent on biodefense technologies highlight the current concern for biothreat event preparedness. Nonhazardous but relevant "simulant" microorganisms are typically used to simplify technological developments, testing, and staff training. The bacteriophage MS2, a small RNA virus, is classically used as the reference simulant for biothreat viruses within the biodefense community. However, variola virus, considered a major threat, displays very different features (size, envelope, and double-stranded DNA genome). The size parameter is critical for aerosol sampling, detection, and protection/filtration technologies. Therefore, a panel of relevant simulants should be used to cover the diversity of biothreat agents. Thus, we investigated a new virus model, the Cydia pomonella granulovirus (baculovirus), which is currently used as a biopesticide. It displays a size similar to that of poxviruses, is enveloped, and contains double-stranded DNA. To provide a molecular tool to detect and quantify this model virus, we developed an assay based on real-time PCR, with a limit of detection ranging from roughly 10 to a few tens of target copies per microl according to the sample matrix. The specificity of the assay against a large panel of potential cross-reactive microorganisms was checked, and the suitability of the assay for environmental samples, especially aerosol studies, was determined. In conclusion, we suggest that our PCR assay allows Cydia pomonella granulovirus to be used as a simulant for poxviruses. This assay may also be useful for environmental or crop treatment studies. PMID:19168659

  4. Structural Conservation and Functional Diversity of the Poxvirus Immune Evasion (PIE) Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christopher A; Epperson, Megan L; Singh, Sukrit; Elliott, Jabari I; Fremont, Daved H

    2015-08-28

    Poxviruses encode a broad array of proteins that serve to undermine host immune defenses. Structural analysis of four of these seemingly unrelated proteins revealed the recurrent use of a conserved beta-sandwich fold that has not been observed in any eukaryotic or prokaryotic protein. Herein we propose to call this unique structural scaffolding the PIE (Poxvirus Immune Evasion) domain. PIE domain containing proteins are abundant in chordopoxvirinae, with our analysis identifying 20 likely PIE subfamilies among 33 representative genomes spanning 7 genera. For example, cowpox strain Brighton Red appears to encode 10 different PIEs: vCCI, A41, C8, M2, T4 (CPVX203), and the SECRET proteins CrmB, CrmD, SCP-1, SCP-2, and SCP-3. Characterized PIE proteins all appear to be nonessential for virus replication, and all contain signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. The PIE subfamilies differ primarily in the number, size, and location of structural embellishments to the beta-sandwich core that confer unique functional specificities. Reported ligands include chemokines, GM-CSF, IL-2, MHC class I, and glycosaminoglycans. We expect that the list of ligands and receptors engaged by the PIE domain will grow as we come to better understand how this versatile structural architecture can be tailored to manipulate host responses to infection.

  5. Murine Tumor Models for Oncolytic Rhabdo-Virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Falls, Theresa; Roy, Dominic Guy; Bell, John Cameron; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    The preclinical optimization and validation of novel treatments for cancer therapy requires the use of laboratory animals. Although in vitro experiments using tumor cell lines and ex vivo treatment of patient tumor samples provide a remarkable first-line tool for the initial study of tumoricidal potential, tumor-bearing animals remain the primary option to study delivery, efficacy, and safety of therapies in the context of a complete tumor microenvironment and functional immune system. In this review, we will describe the use of murine tumor models for oncolytic virotherapy using vesicular stomatitis virus. We will discuss studies using immunocompetent and immunodeficient models with respect to toxicity and therapeutic treatments, as well as the various techniques and tools available to study cancer therapy with Rhabdoviruses. PMID:27034397

  6. Novel poxvirus infection in northern and southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni and Enhydra lutris neiris), Alaska and California, USA.

    PubMed

    Tuomi, Pamela A; Murray, Michael J; Garner, Michael M; Goertz, Caroline E C; Nordhausen, Robert W; Burek-Huntington, Kathleen A; Getzy, David M; Nielsen, Ole; Archer, Linda L; Maness, Heather T D; Wellehan, James F X; Waltzek, Thomas B

    2014-07-01

    Small superficially ulcerated skin lesions were observed between October 2009 and September 2011 during captive care of two orphaned sea otter pups: one northern (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) in Alaska and one southern (Enhydra lutris nereis) in California. Inclusions consistent with poxviral infection were diagnosed by histopathology in both cases. Virions consistent with poxvirus virions were seen on electron microscopy in the northern sea otter, and the virus was successfully propagated in cell culture. DNA extraction, pan-chordopoxviral PCR amplification, and sequencing of the DNA-dependent DNA polymerase gene revealed that both cases were caused by a novel AT-rich poxvirus. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses found that the virus is divergent from other known poxviruses at a level consistent with a novel genus. These cases were self-limiting and did not appear to be associated with systemic illness. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a poxvirus in a mustelid species. The source of this virus, mode of transmission, zoonotic potential, and biological significance are undetermined.

  7. Structural basis for antagonizing a host restriction factor by C7 family of poxvirus host-range proteins.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Krumm, Brian; Li, Yongchao; Deng, Junpeng; Xiang, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Human sterile alpha motif domain-containing 9 (SAMD9) protein is a host restriction factor for poxviruses, but it can be overcome by some poxvirus host-range proteins that share homology with vaccinia virus C7 protein. To understand the mechanism of action for this important family of host-range factors, we determined the crystal structures of C7 and myxoma virus M64, a C7 family member that is unable to antagonize SAMD9. Despite their different functions and only 23% sequence identity, the two proteins have very similar overall structures, displaying a previously unidentified fold comprised of a compact 12-stranded antiparallel β-sandwich wrapped in two short α helices. Extensive structure-guided mutagenesis of C7 identified three loops clustered on one edge of the β sandwich as critical for viral replication and binding with SAMD9. The loops are characterized with functionally important negatively charged, positively charged, and hydrophobic residues, respectively, together forming a unique "three-fingered molecular claw." The key residues of the claw are not conserved in two C7 family members that do not antagonize SAMD9 but are conserved in distantly related C7 family members from four poxvirus genera that infect diverse mammalian species. Indeed, we found that all in the latter group of proteins bind SAMD9. Taken together, our data indicate that diverse mammalian poxviruses use a conserved molecular claw in a C7-like protein to target SAMD9 and overcome host restriction.

  8. Novel poxvirus infection in northern and southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni and Enhydra lutris neiris), Alaska and California, USA.

    PubMed

    Tuomi, Pamela A; Murray, Michael J; Garner, Michael M; Goertz, Caroline E C; Nordhausen, Robert W; Burek-Huntington, Kathleen A; Getzy, David M; Nielsen, Ole; Archer, Linda L; Maness, Heather T D; Wellehan, James F X; Waltzek, Thomas B

    2014-07-01

    Small superficially ulcerated skin lesions were observed between October 2009 and September 2011 during captive care of two orphaned sea otter pups: one northern (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) in Alaska and one southern (Enhydra lutris nereis) in California. Inclusions consistent with poxviral infection were diagnosed by histopathology in both cases. Virions consistent with poxvirus virions were seen on electron microscopy in the northern sea otter, and the virus was successfully propagated in cell culture. DNA extraction, pan-chordopoxviral PCR amplification, and sequencing of the DNA-dependent DNA polymerase gene revealed that both cases were caused by a novel AT-rich poxvirus. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses found that the virus is divergent from other known poxviruses at a level consistent with a novel genus. These cases were self-limiting and did not appear to be associated with systemic illness. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a poxvirus in a mustelid species. The source of this virus, mode of transmission, zoonotic potential, and biological significance are undetermined. PMID:24807180

  9. Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing Monoclonal Antibody Trastuzumab for Treatment of HER2-Positive Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liikanen, Ilkka; Tähtinen, Siri; Guse, Kilian; Gutmann, Theresia; Savola, Paula; Oksanen, Minna; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-09-01

    Monoclonal anti-HER2 antibody trastuzumab has significantly improved the survival of patients with HER2-overexpressing tumors. Nevertheless, systemic antibody therapy is expensive, limited in efficacy due to physical tumor barriers, and carries the risk of severe side effects such as cardiomyopathy. Oncolytic viruses mediate cancer-selective transgene expression, kill infected cancer cells while mounting antitumor immune responses, and have recently demonstrated promising efficacy in combination treatments. Here, we armed an oncolytic adenovirus with full-length trastuzumab to achieve effective in situ antibody production coupled with progressive oncolytic cancer cell killing. We constructed an infectivity-enhanced serotype 5 oncolytic adenovirus, Ad5/3-Δ24-tras, coding for human trastuzumab antibody heavy- and light-chain genes, connected by an internal ribosome entry site. Infected cancer cells were able to assemble full-length functional antibody, as confirmed by Western blot, ELISA, and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay. Importantly, oncolysis was required for release of the antibody into tumors, providing additional spatial selectivity. Ad5/3-Δ24-tras showed potent in vitro cytotoxicity and enhanced antitumor efficacy over oncolytic control virus Ad5/3-Δ24 or commercial trastuzumab in HER2-positive cancer models in vivo (both P < 0.05). Furthermore, Ad5/3-Δ24-tras resulted in significantly higher tumor-to-systemic antibody concentrations (P < 0.001) over conventional delivery. Immunological analyses revealed dendritic cell activation and natural killer cell accumulation in tumor-draining lymph nodes. Thus, Ad5/3-Δ24-tras is an attractive anticancer approach combining oncolytic immunotherapy with local trastuzumab production, resulting in improved in vivo efficacy and immune cell activation in HER2-positive cancer. Moreover, the finding that tumor cells can produce functional antibody as directed by oncolytic virus could lead to many

  10. Stem Cell-Based Cell Carrier for Targeted Oncolytic Virotherapy: Translational Opportunity and Open Questions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Janice; Hall, Robert R.; Lesniak, Maciej S.; Ahmed, Atique U.

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer is an innovative therapeutic option where the ability of a virus to promote cell lysis is harnessed and reprogrammed to selectively destroy cancer cells. Such treatment modalities exhibited antitumor activity in preclinical and clinical settings and appear to be well tolerated when tested in clinical trials. However, the clinical success of oncolytic virotherapy has been significantly hampered due to the inability to target systematic metastasis. This is partly due to the inability of the therapeutic virus to survive in the patient circulation, in order to target tumors at distant sites. An early study from various laboratories demonstrated that cells infected with oncolytic virus can protect the therapeutic payload form the host immune system as well as function as factories for virus production and enhance the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic virus. While a variety of cell lineages possessed potential as cell carriers, copious investigation has established stem cells as a very attractive cell carrier system in oncolytic virotherapy. The ideal cell carrier desire to be susceptible to viral infection as well as support viral infection, maintain immunosuppressive properties to shield the loaded viruses from the host immune system, and most importantly possess an intrinsic tumor homing ability to deliver loaded viruses directly to the site of the metastasis—all qualities stem cells exhibit. In this review, we summarize the recent work in the development of stem cell-based carrier for oncolytic virotherapy, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of cell carriers, especially focusing on why stem cells have emerged as the leading candidate, and finally propose a future direction for stem cell-based targeted oncolytic virotherapy that involves its establishment as a viable treatment option for cancer patients in the clinical setting. PMID:26633462

  11. Stem Cell-Based Cell Carrier for Targeted Oncolytic Virotherapy: Translational Opportunity and Open Questions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Janice; Hall, Robert R; Lesniak, Maciej S; Ahmed, Atique U

    2015-11-27

    Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer is an innovative therapeutic option where the ability of a virus to promote cell lysis is harnessed and reprogrammed to selectively destroy cancer cells. Such treatment modalities exhibited antitumor activity in preclinical and clinical settings and appear to be well tolerated when tested in clinical trials. However, the clinical success of oncolytic virotherapy has been significantly hampered due to the inability to target systematic metastasis. This is partly due to the inability of the therapeutic virus to survive in the patient circulation, in order to target tumors at distant sites. An early study from various laboratories demonstrated that cells infected with oncolytic virus can protect the therapeutic payload form the host immune system as well as function as factories for virus production and enhance the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic virus. While a variety of cell lineages possessed potential as cell carriers, copious investigation has established stem cells as a very attractive cell carrier system in oncolytic virotherapy. The ideal cell carrier desire to be susceptible to viral infection as well as support viral infection, maintain immunosuppressive properties to shield the loaded viruses from the host immune system, and most importantly possess an intrinsic tumor homing ability to deliver loaded viruses directly to the site of the metastasis-all qualities stem cells exhibit. In this review, we summarize the recent work in the development of stem cell-based carrier for oncolytic virotherapy, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of cell carriers, especially focusing on why stem cells have emerged as the leading candidate, and finally propose a future direction for stem cell-based targeted oncolytic virotherapy that involves its establishment as a viable treatment option for cancer patients in the clinical setting.

  12. Structural basis for the binding of the neutralizing antibody, 7D11, to the poxvirus L1 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Golden, Joseph W.; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Hooper, Jay W.; Garboczi, David N.

    2007-11-25

    Medical countermeasures to prevent or treat smallpox are needed due to the potential use of poxviruses as biological weapons. Safety concerns with the currently available smallpox vaccine indicate a need for research on alternative poxvirus vaccine strategies. Molecular vaccines involving the use of proteins and/or genes and recombinant antibodies are among the strategies under current investigation. The poxvirus L1 protein, encoded by the L1R open reading frame, is the target of neutralizing antibodies and has been successfully used as a component of both protein subunit and DNA vaccines. L1-specific monoclonal antibodies (e.g., mouse monoclonal antibody mAb-7D11, mAb-10F5) with potent neutralizing activity bind L1 in a conformation-specific manner. This suggests that proper folding of the L1 protein used in molecular vaccines will affect the production of neutralizing antibodies and protection. Here, we co-crystallized the Fab fragment of mAb-7D11 with the L1 protein. The crystal structure of the complex between Fab-7D11 and L1 reveals the basis for the conformation-specific binding as recognition of a discontinuous epitope containing two loops that are held together by a disulfide bond. The structure of this important conformational epitope of L1 will contribute to the development of molecular poxvirus vaccines and also provides a novel target for anti-poxvirus drugs. In addition, the sequence and structure of Fab-7D11 will contribute to the development of L1-targeted immunotherapeutics.

  13. Oncolytic virus expressing RANTES and IL-15 enhances function of CAR-modified T cells in solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Nobuhiro; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2015-01-01

    We improved the migration and survival of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells in solid tumors by combining CAR-T cells with an armed oncolytic virus. Local delivery of the chemokine RANTES and the cytokine IL-15 by the oncolytic virus enhanced the trafficking and persistence of the CAR-T cells, resulting in improved antitumor effects. PMID:25949885

  14. Ultrasound-mediated oncolytic virus delivery and uptake for increased therapeutic efficacy: state of art

    PubMed Central

    Nande, Rounak; Howard, Candace M; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The field of ultrasound (US) has changed significantly from medical imaging and diagnosis to treatment strategies. US contrast agents or microbubbles (MB) are currently being used as potential carriers for chemodrugs, small molecules, nucleic acids, small interfering ribonucleic acid, proteins, adenoviruses, and oncolytic viruses. Oncolytic viruses can selectively replicate within and destroy a cancer cell, thus making them a powerful therapeutic in treating late-stage or metastatic cancer. These viruses have been shown to have robust activity in clinical trials when injected directly into tumor nodules. However limitations in oncolytic virus’ effectiveness and its delivery approach have warranted exploration of ultrasound-mediated delivery. Gene therapy bearing adenoviruses or oncolytic viruses can be coupled with MBs and injected intravenously. Following application of US energy to the target region, the MBs cavitate, and the resulting shock wave enhances drug, gene, or adenovirus uptake. Though the underlying mechanism is yet to be fully understood, there is evidence to suggest that mechanical pore formation of cellular membranes allows for the temporary uptake of drugs. This delivery method circumvents the limitations due to stimulation of the immune system that prevented intravenous administration of viruses. This review provides insight into this intriguing new frontier on the delivery of oncolytic viruses to tumor sites. PMID:27512682

  15. [Oncolytic viruses as a new way of treatment of neoplastic diseases].

    PubMed

    Kukla, Urszula; Chronowska, Justyna; Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-08-01

    Despite the unceasing progression in chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery, neoplasms are still the second, after cardiovascular diseases, cause of death in the world. The creation of oncolytic viruses gives hope for increase of anticancer therapy effectiveness. Oncolytic viruses are the type of viruses that selectively infect and cause the lyse of tumor cells excluding normal cells. This mechanism allows to avoid the consequences of the possible replication of the virus, which having entered to the organism, replicates in organism's cells by using the DNA of host cells. The development of genetic engineering and molecular biology has enabled the creation of this kind of genetically modified viruses, which deprive them of their virulence. Currently, there are many clinical trials in progress including the use of oncolytic viruses in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, thyroid cancer, colorectal cancer, liver cancer, melanoma and glioblastoma multiforme treatment. There are parallel studies in animals using the subsequent viruses. Oncolytic viruses treatment is generally well tolerated, without significant side effects. It is worth to point out that this method combined with chemotherapy and radiotherapy allows to reduce the use of therapeutic doses, which significantly reduces the toxicity of conventional treatment. Further clinical studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of oncolytic viruses will develop more effective and better tolerated therapeutic protocols in the future. PMID:26319388

  16. Development of a mixed antigen agar gel enzyme assay (AGEA) for the detection of antibodies to poxvirus in chicken and turkey sera.

    PubMed

    Tadese, Theodros; Potter, E A; Reed, W M

    2003-02-01

    A mixed-antigen agar gel enzyme assay (AGEA) was developed to detect antibodies to poxviruses in chicken and turkey sera. The assay combines the principles of immunodiffusion and enzyme assay. For the detection of antibodies to fowl poxvirus (FP), pigeon poxvirus (PP) and turkey poxvirus (TP) in turkey serum samples, the three antigens were combined to form a mixed-antigen assay. To screen for antibodies to FP and PP in chicken serum samples, the two antigens were combined. When FP and PP viruses were combined as antigens, the sensitivity for chicken sera was 64% but the sensitivity of the agar gel precipitation test (AGPT) was 34% (P<0.001). When antibodies were detected in turkey sera using the mixed antigens, the AGEA had a sensitivity of 66.4% while that of AGPT was 25% (P<0.001). PMID:12655123

  17. A poxvirus protein that binds to and inactivates IL-18, and inhibits NK cell response.

    PubMed

    Born, T L; Morrison, L A; Esteban, D J; VandenBos, T; Thebeau, L G; Chen, N; Spriggs, M K; Sims, J E; Buller, R M

    2000-03-15

    IL-18 induces IFN-gamma and NK cell cytotoxicity, making it a logical target for viral antagonism of host defense. We demonstrate that the ectromelia poxvirus p13 protein, bearing homology to the mammalian IL-18 binding protein, binds IL-18, and inhibits its activity in vitro. Binding of IL-18 to the viral p13 protein was compared with binding to the cellular IL-18R. The dissociation constant of p13 for murine IL-18 is 5 nM, compared with 0.2 nM for the cellular receptor heterodimer. Mice infected with a p13 deletion mutant of ectromelia virus had elevated cytotoxicity for YAC-1 tumor cell targets compared with control animals. Additionally, the p13 deletion mutant virus exhibited decreased levels of infectivity. Our data suggest that inactivation of IL-18, and subsequent impairment of NK cell cytotoxicity, may be one mechanism by which ectromelia evades the host immune response. PMID:10706717

  18. Avian poxvirus in a free-range juvenile speckled (rock) pigeon (Columba guinea).

    PubMed

    Bwala, Dauda G; Fasina, Folorunso O; Duncan, Neil M

    2015-04-30

    A flightless wild juvenile rock pigeon (Columba guinea) with pox-like lesions was picked up on the premises of the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Onderstepoort. The pigeon was housed overnight for possible treatment the following day but died before any other intervention could be instituted. At necropsy, coalescing masses of yellowish nodular cutaneous tumour-like lesions principally on the featherless areas were noticed on the dead pigeon's head as well as the beak. Histological examination of the sampled skin lesions revealed multifocal areas of hypertrophic and hyperplastic epidermal epithelial cells with eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies (Bollinger bodies). Extract from the lesion was processed and inoculated on the chorioallantoic membranes (CAM) of 11-day-old embryonated chicken eggs and this produced pocks on one of the CAM at day 7 post-inoculation. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of poxvirus in the CAM with the pock lesions.

  19. Isolation of poxvirus from debilitating cutaneous lesions on four immature grackles (Quiscalus sp.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Docherty, D.E.; Long, R.I.R.; Flickinger, Edward L.; Locke, L.N.

    1991-01-01

    Poxvirus was isolated from nodules on four immature grackles (Quiscalus sp.) collected in two residential areas of Victoria, Texas. All of the birds were emaciated and had nodules on the eyelids, bill, legs, toes, and areas of the skin on the wings, neck, and ventral abdomen. These pox nodules were extensive and probably interfered with both sight and flight. The preliminary diagnosis was confirmed by virus isolation, histopathology, and electron microscopy. Poxvirus was isolated on the chorioallantoic membrane of embryonated hen's eggs and in Muscovy duck embryo fibroblast cell culture. Phaenicia calliphoridae (blowfly) larvae were found in one of the pox nodules, raising the possibility of mechanical transmission of the virus by contaminated adult blowfiles. /// Se aisl?? virus de viruela a partir de n??dulos presentes en cuatro estorninos inmaduros (Quiscalus sp.) capturados en dos ?!reas residenciales de Victoria, Texas. Las cuatro aves estaban emaciadas y presentaron n??dulos en los p?!rpados, pico, patas, dedos, y algunas ?!reas de la piel de las alas, cuello, y regi??n inferior del abdomen. Estos n??dulos producidos por viruela eran extensos y probablemente interfirieron con la visi??n y el vuelo. El diagn??stico presuntivo fue confirmado mediante aislamiento viral, histopatolog?-a, y microscop?-a electr??nica. Se aisl?? el virus de viruela en la membrana corioalantoidea de huevos embrionados de gallina y en cultivos celulares de fibroblasto de embri??n de pato. Se encontraron larvas de mosca azul (Phaenicia calliphoridae) en uno de los n??dulos de viruela, increment?!ndose as?- la posibilidad de transmisi??n mec?!nica del virus mediante moscas adultas contaminadas.

  20. Heteroduplex DNA Formation Is Associated with Replication and Recombination in Poxvirus-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, C.; Parks, R. J.; Lauzon, M. L.; Evans, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    Poxviruses are large DNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells and recombine at high frequencies. Calcium phosphate precipitates were used to cotransfect Shope fibroma virus-infected cells with different DNA substrates and the recombinant products assayed by genetic and biochemical methods. We have shown previously that bacteriophage lambda DNAs can be used as substrates in these experiments and recombinants assayed on Escherichia coli following DNA recovery and in vitro packaging. Using this assay it was observed that 2-3% of the phage recovered from crosses between point mutants retained heteroduplex at at least one of the mutant sites. The reliability of this genetic analysis was confirmed using DNA substrates that permitted the direct detection of heteroduplex molecules by denaturant gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting. It was further noted that heteroduplex formation coincided with the onset of both replication and recombination suggesting that poxviruses, like certain bacteriophage, make no clear biochemical distinction between these three processes. The fraction of heteroduplex molecules peaked about 12-hr postinfection then declined later in the infection. This decline was probably due to DNA replication rather than mismatch repair because, while high levels of induced DNA polymerase persisted beyond the time of maximal heteroduplex recovery, we were unable to detect any type of mismatch repair activity in cytoplasmic extracts. These results suggest that, although heteroduplex molecules are formed during the progress of poxviral infection, gene conversion through mismatch repair probably does not produce most of the recombinants. The significance of these observations are discussed considering some of the unique properties of poxviral biology. PMID:1657705

  1. Impact of Distinct Poxvirus Infections on the Specificities and Functionalities of CD4+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Siciliano, Nicholas A.; Hersperger, Adam R.; Lacuanan, Aimee M.; Xu, Ren-Huan; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Sigal, Luis J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The factors that determine CD4+ T cell (TCD4+) specificities, functional capacity, and memory persistence in response to complex pathogens remain unclear. We explored these parameters in the C57BL/6 mouse through comparison of two highly related (>92% homology) poxviruses: ectromelia virus (ECTV), a natural mouse pathogen, and vaccinia virus (VACV), a heterologous virus that nevertheless elicits potent immune responses. In addition to elucidating several previously unidentified major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-restricted epitopes, we observed many qualitative and quantitative differences between the TCD4+ repertoires, including responses not elicited by VACV despite complete sequence conservation. In addition, we observed functional heterogeneity between ECTV- and VACV-specific TCD4+ at both a global and individual epitope level, particularly greater expression of the cytolytic marker CD107a from TCD4+ following ECTV infection. Most striking were differences during the late memory phase where, in contrast to ECTV, VACV infection failed to elicit measurable epitope-specific TCD4+ as determined by intracellular cytokine staining. These findings illustrate the strong influence of epitope-extrinsic factors on TCD4+ responses and memory. IMPORTANCE Much of our understanding concerning host-pathogen relationships in the context of poxvirus infections stems from studies of VACV in mice. However, VACV is not a natural mouse pathogen, and therefore, the relevance of results obtained using this model may be limited. Here, we explored the MHC class II-restricted TCD4+ repertoire induced by mousepox (ECTV) infection and the functional profile of the responding epitope-specific TCD4+, comparing these results to those induced by VACV infection under matched conditions. Despite a high degree of homology between the two viruses, we observed distinct specificity and functional profiles of TCD4+ responses at both acute and memory time points, with VACV

  2. Mitophagy switches cell death from apoptosis to necrosis in NSCLC cells treated with oncolytic measles virus.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mao; Meng, Gang; Jiang, Aiqin; Chen, Aiping; Dahlhaus, Meike; Gonzalez, Patrick; Beltinger, Christian; Wei, Jiwu

    2014-06-15

    Although apoptotic phenomena have been observed in malignant cells infected by measles virus vaccine strain Edmonston B (MV-Edm), the precise oncolytic mechanisms are poorly defined. In this study we found that MV-Edm induced autophagy and sequestosome 1-mediated mitophagy leading to decreased cytochrome c release, which blocked the pro-apoptotic cascade in non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLCs). The decrease of apoptosis by mitophagy favored viral replication. Persistent viral replication sustained by autophagy ultimately resulted in necrotic cell death due to ATP depletion. Importantly, when autophagy was impaired in NSCLCs MV-Edm-induced cell death was significantly abrogated despite of increased apoptosis. Taken together, our results define a novel oncolytic mechanism by which mitophagy switches cell death from apoptosis to more efficient necrosis in NSCLCs following MV-Edm infection. This provides a foundation for future improvement of oncolytic virotherapy or antiviral therapy.

  3. On the potential of oncolytic virotherapy for the treatment of canine cancers

    PubMed Central

    MacNeill, Amy L

    2015-01-01

    Over 6 million dogs are diagnosed with cancer in the USA each year. Treatment options for many of these patients are limited. It is important that the veterinary and scientific communities begin to explore novel treatment protocols for dogs with cancer. Oncolytic viral therapy is a promising treatment option that may prove to be relatively inexpensive and effective against several types of cancer. The efficacy of oncolytic virus therapies has been clearly demonstrated in murine cancer models, but the positive outcomes observed in mice are not always seen in human cancer patients. These therapies should be thoroughly evaluated in dogs with spontaneously arising cancers to provide needed information about the potential effectiveness of virus treatment for human cancers and to promote the health of our companion animals. This article provides a review of the results of oncolytic virus treatment of canine cancers. PMID:27512674

  4. Oncolytic viruses against cancer stem cells: A promising approach for gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fang; Wang, Bin-Rong; Wu, Ye-Qing; Wang, Fan-Chao; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Yi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal cancer has been one of the five most commonly diagnosed and leading causes of cancer mortality over the past few decades. Great progress in traditional therapies has been made, which prolonged survival in patients with early cancer, yet tumor relapse and drug resistance still occurred, which is explained by the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory. Oncolytic virotherapy has attracted increasing interest in cancer because of its ability to infect and lyse CSCs. This paper reviews the basic knowledge, CSC markers and therapeutics of gastrointestinal cancer (liver, gastric, colon and pancreatic cancer), as well as research advances and possible molecular mechanisms of various oncolytic viruses against gastrointestinal CSCs. This paper also summarizes the existing obstacles to oncolytic virotherapy and proposes several alternative suggestions to overcome the therapeutic limitations. PMID:27672294

  5. Changing Faces in Virology: The Dutch Shift from Oncogenic to Oncolytic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Belcaid, Zineb; Lamfers, Martine L.M.; van Beusechem, Victor W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Viruses have two opposing faces. On the one hand, they can cause harm and disease. A virus may manifest directly as a contagious disease with a clinical pathology of varying significance. A viral infection can also have delayed consequences, and in rare cases may cause cellular transformation and cancer. On the other hand, viruses may provide hope: hope for an efficacious treatment of serious disease. Examples of the latter are the use of viruses as a vaccine, as transfer vector for therapeutic genes in a gene therapy setting, or, more directly, as therapeutic anticancer agent in an oncolytic-virus therapy setting. Already there is evidence for antitumor activity of oncolytic viruses. The antitumor efficacy seems linked to their capacity to induce a tumor-directed immune response. Here, we will provide an overview on the development of oncolytic viruses and their clinical evaluation from the Dutch perspective. PMID:25141764

  6. Oncolytic viruses against cancer stem cells: A promising approach for gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fang; Wang, Bin-Rong; Wu, Ye-Qing; Wang, Fan-Chao; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Yi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal cancer has been one of the five most commonly diagnosed and leading causes of cancer mortality over the past few decades. Great progress in traditional therapies has been made, which prolonged survival in patients with early cancer, yet tumor relapse and drug resistance still occurred, which is explained by the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory. Oncolytic virotherapy has attracted increasing interest in cancer because of its ability to infect and lyse CSCs. This paper reviews the basic knowledge, CSC markers and therapeutics of gastrointestinal cancer (liver, gastric, colon and pancreatic cancer), as well as research advances and possible molecular mechanisms of various oncolytic viruses against gastrointestinal CSCs. This paper also summarizes the existing obstacles to oncolytic virotherapy and proposes several alternative suggestions to overcome the therapeutic limitations.

  7. Changing faces in virology: the dutch shift from oncogenic to oncolytic viruses.

    PubMed

    Belcaid, Zineb; Lamfers, Martine L M; van Beusechem, Victor W; Hoeben, Rob C

    2014-10-01

    Viruses have two opposing faces. On the one hand, they can cause harm and disease. A virus may manifest directly as a contagious disease with a clinical pathology of varying significance. A viral infection can also have delayed consequences, and in rare cases may cause cellular transformation and cancer. On the other hand, viruses may provide hope: hope for an efficacious treatment of serious disease. Examples of the latter are the use of viruses as a vaccine, as transfer vector for therapeutic genes in a gene therapy setting, or, more directly, as therapeutic anticancer agent in an oncolytic-virus therapy setting. Already there is evidence for antitumor activity of oncolytic viruses. The antitumor efficacy seems linked to their capacity to induce a tumor-directed immune response. Here, we will provide an overview on the development of oncolytic viruses and their clinical evaluation from the Dutch perspective.

  8. Oncolytic viruses against cancer stem cells: A promising approach for gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fang; Wang, Bin-Rong; Wu, Ye-Qing; Wang, Fan-Chao; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Yi-Gang

    2016-09-21

    Gastrointestinal cancer has been one of the five most commonly diagnosed and leading causes of cancer mortality over the past few decades. Great progress in traditional therapies has been made, which prolonged survival in patients with early cancer, yet tumor relapse and drug resistance still occurred, which is explained by the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory. Oncolytic virotherapy has attracted increasing interest in cancer because of its ability to infect and lyse CSCs. This paper reviews the basic knowledge, CSC markers and therapeutics of gastrointestinal cancer (liver, gastric, colon and pancreatic cancer), as well as research advances and possible molecular mechanisms of various oncolytic viruses against gastrointestinal CSCs. This paper also summarizes the existing obstacles to oncolytic virotherapy and proposes several alternative suggestions to overcome the therapeutic limitations. PMID:27672294

  9. The Utility of a Tissue Slice Model System to Determine Breast Cancer Infectivity by Oncolytic Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, Krista; Chu, Quyen D.; Curiel, David T.; Li, Benjamin D.L.; Mathis, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background Due to advances in viral design, oncolytic adenoviruses have emerged as a promising approach for treatment of breast cancer. Tumor tissue slices offer a stringent model system for preclinical evaluation of adenovirus therapies, since the slices retain a morphology and phenotype that more closely resembles the in vivo setting than cell line cultures, and it has been shown to have utility in the evaluation of viral infectivity and replication. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of viral infection and replication using a tropism-modified oncolytic adenovirus. Methods Breast tumor tissue slices were infected with a tropism-modified oncolytic adenovirus, and a wild-type adenovirus for comparison. Efficiency of infection was evaluated using fluorescent microscopy, as the viruses used have been modified to express red fluorescent protein. Replication of the viruses was evaluated with quantitative real-time PCR to assay viral E4 genome copy number, a surrogate indicator for the number of virions. The breast tumor tissue slices were evaluated for the expression of CD46 expression by immunohistochemistry. Results Infection and replication of our tropism modified oncolytic virus has been observed in breast cancer tissue slice model system and is comparative to wild-type virus. A qualitative increase in the number of cells showing RFP expression was observed correlating with increasing multiplicity of infection. Higher relative infectivity of the virus was observed in tumor tissue compared with normal breast tissue. Replication of the virus was demonstrated through increases in E4 copy number at 48 and 72 hours after infection in human breast tumor slices. Conclusions We have shown that a tropism modified oncolytic oncolytic adenovirus can infect and replicate in breast cancer tissue slices, which may be an important preclinical indicator for its therapeutic utility. PMID:20691986

  10. Eliminating established tumor in nu/nu nude mice by a TRAIL-armed oncolytic adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Fengqin; Wang, Li; Davis, John J.; Hu, Wenxian; Zhang, Lidong; Guo, Wei; Teraishi, Fuminori; Ji, Lin; Fang, Bingliang

    2006-01-01

    Purpose The tumor necrosis factor-alpha-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and oncolytic viruses have recently been investigated extensively for cancer therapy. However, preclinical and clinical studies have revealed that their clinical application is hampered by either weak anticancer activity or systemic toxicity. We examined whether the weaknesses of the two strategies can be overcome by integrating the TRAIL gene into an oncolytic vector. Experimental Design We constructed a TRAIL-expressing oncolytic adenovector designated Ad/TRAIL-E1. The expression of both the TRAIL and viral E1A genes is under the control of a synthetic promoter consisting of sequences from the human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter and a minimal cytomegalovirus early promoter. The transgene expression, apoptosis induction, viral replication, antitumor activity and toxicity of Ad/TRAIL-E1 were determined in vitro and in vivo in comparison with control vectors. Results Ad/TRAIL-E1 elicited enhanced viral replication and/or stronger oncolytic effect in vitro in various human cancer cell lines than a TRAIL-expressing replication-defective adenovector or an oncolytic adenovector expressing green fluorescent protein. Intralesional administration of Ad/TRAIL-E1 eliminated all subcutaneous xenograft tumors established from a human non-small cell lung cancer cell line, H1299, on nu/nu nude mice, resulting in long-term tumor-free survival. Furthermore, we found no treatment-related toxicity. Conclusions Viral replication and antitumor activity of oncolytic adenovirus can be enhanced by the TRAIL gene and Ad/TRAIL-E1 could become a potent therapeutic agent for cancer therapy. PMID:16951242

  11. CCL21/IL21-armed oncolytic adenovirus enhances antitumor activity against TERT-positive tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Li, Yi-Fei; Si, Chong-Zhan; Zhu, Yu-Hui; Jin, Yan; Zhu, Tong-Tong; Liu, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Guang-Yao

    2016-07-15

    Multigene-armed oncolytic adenoviruses are capable of efficiently generating a productive antitumor immune response. The chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (CCL21) binds to CCR7 on naïve T cells and dendritic cells (DCs) to promote their chemoattraction to the tumor and resultant antitumor activity. Interleukin 21 (IL21) promotes survival of naïve T cells while maintaining their CCR7 surface expression, which increases their capacity to transmigrate in response to CCL21 chemoattraction. IL21 is also involved in NK cell differentiation and B cell activation and proliferation. The generation of effective antitumor immune responses is a complex process dependent upon coordinated interactions of various subsets of effector cells. Using the AdEasy system, we aimed to construct an oncolytic adenovirus co-expressing CCL21 and IL21 that could selectively replicate in TERTp-positive tumor cells (Ad-CCL21-IL21 virus). The E1A promoter of these oncolytic adenoviruses was replaced by telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter (TERTp). Ad-CCL21-IL21 was constructed from three plasmids, pGTE-IL21, pShuttle-CMV-CCL21 and AdEasy-1 and was homologously recombined and propagated in the Escherichia coli strain BJ5183 and the packaging cell line HEK-293, respectively. Our results showed that our targeted and armed oncolytic adenoviruses Ad-CCL21-IL21 can induce apoptosis in TERTp-positive tumor cells to give rise to viral propagation, in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, we confirm that these modified oncolytic adenoviruses do not replicate efficiently in normal cells even under high viral loads. Additionally, we investigate the role of Ad-CCL21-IL21 in inducing antitumor activity and tumor specific cytotoxicity of CTLs in vitro. This study suggests that Ad-CCL21-IL21 is a promising targeted tumor-specific oncolytic adenovirus. PMID:27157859

  12. Unlocking the promise of oncolytic virotherapy in glioma: combination with chemotherapy to enhance efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Drew A; Young, Jacob S; Kanojia, Deepak; Kim, Julius W; Polster, Sean P; Murphy, Jason P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-01-01

    Malignant glioma is a relentless burden to both patients and clinicians, and calls for innovation to overcome the limitations in current management. Glioma therapy using viruses has been investigated to accentuate the nature of a virus, killing a host tumor cell during its replication. As virus mediated approaches progress with promising therapeutic advantages, combination therapy with chemotherapy and oncolytic viruses has emerged as a more synergistic and possibly efficacious therapy. Here, we will review malignant glioma as well as prior experience with oncolytic viruses, chemotherapy and combination of the two, examining how the combination can be optimized in the future. PMID:25996044

  13. Oncolytic viruses: From bench to bedside with a focus on safety.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Pascal R A; Verhagen, Judith H E; van Eijck, Casper H J; van den Hoogen, Bernadette G

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are a relatively new class of anti-cancer immunotherapy agents. Several viruses have undergone evaluation in clinical trials in the last decades, and the first agent is about to be approved to be used as a novel cancer therapy modality. In the current review, an overview is presented on recent (pre)clinical developments in the field of oncolytic viruses that have previously been or currently are being evaluated in clinical trials. Special attention is given to possible safety issues like toxicity, environmental shedding, mutation and reversion to wildtype virus. PMID:25996182

  14. High-throughput screening to enhance oncolytic virus immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Allan, K J; Stojdl, David F; Swift, S L

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens can rapidly scan and capture large amounts of information across multiple biological parameters. Although many screens have been designed to uncover potential new therapeutic targets capable of crippling viruses that cause disease, there have been relatively few directed at improving the efficacy of viruses that are used to treat disease. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are biotherapeutic agents with an inherent specificity for treating malignant disease. Certain OV platforms - including those based on herpes simplex virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus - have shown success against solid tumors in advanced clinical trials. Yet, many of these OVs have only undergone minimal engineering to solidify tumor specificity, with few extra modifications to manipulate additional factors. Several aspects of the interaction between an OV and a tumor-bearing host have clear value as targets to improve therapeutic outcomes. At the virus level, these include delivery to the tumor, infectivity, productivity, oncolysis, bystander killing, spread, and persistence. At the host level, these include engaging the immune system and manipulating the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review the chemical- and genome-based high-throughput screens that have been performed to manipulate such parameters during OV infection and analyze their impact on therapeutic efficacy. We further explore emerging themes that represent key areas of focus for future research. PMID:27579293

  15. Impact of tumor microenvironment on oncolytic viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wojton, Jeffrey; Kaur, Balveen

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment have been shown to play a very significant role in the initiation, progression, and invasiveness of cancer. These tumor-stromal interactions are capable of altering the delivery and effectiveness of therapeutics into the tumor and are also known to influence future resistance and re-growth after treatment. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of the tumor microenvironment and its response to oncolytic viral therapy. The multifaceted environmental response to viral therapy can influence viral infection, replication, and propagation within the tumor. Recent studies have unveiled the complicated temporal changes in the tumor vasculature post OV treatment, and their impact on tumor biology. Similarly, the secreted extracellular matrix in solid tumors can affect both infection and spread of the therapeutic virus. Together, these complex changes in the tumor microenvironment also modulate the activation of the innate antiviral host immune response, leading to quick and efficient viral clearance. In order to combat these detrimental responses, viruses have been combined with pharmacological adjuvants and “armed” with therapeutic genes in order to suppress the pernicious environmental conditions following therapy. In this review we will discuss the impact of the tumor environment on viral therapy and examine some of the recent literature investigating methods of modulating this environment to enhance oncolysis. PMID:20399700

  16. High-throughput screening to enhance oncolytic virus immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Allan, KJ; Stojdl, David F; Swift, SL

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens can rapidly scan and capture large amounts of information across multiple biological parameters. Although many screens have been designed to uncover potential new therapeutic targets capable of crippling viruses that cause disease, there have been relatively few directed at improving the efficacy of viruses that are used to treat disease. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are biotherapeutic agents with an inherent specificity for treating malignant disease. Certain OV platforms – including those based on herpes simplex virus, reovirus, and vaccinia virus – have shown success against solid tumors in advanced clinical trials. Yet, many of these OVs have only undergone minimal engineering to solidify tumor specificity, with few extra modifications to manipulate additional factors. Several aspects of the interaction between an OV and a tumor-bearing host have clear value as targets to improve therapeutic outcomes. At the virus level, these include delivery to the tumor, infectivity, productivity, oncolysis, bystander killing, spread, and persistence. At the host level, these include engaging the immune system and manipulating the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review the chemical- and genome-based high-throughput screens that have been performed to manipulate such parameters during OV infection and analyze their impact on therapeutic efficacy. We further explore emerging themes that represent key areas of focus for future research. PMID:27579293

  17. Exploring Reovirus Plasticity for Improving Its Use as Oncolytic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Vera; Hoeben, Rob C.; van den Wollenberg, Diana J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Reoviruses are non-enveloped viruses with a segmented double stranded RNA genome. In humans, they are not associated with serious disease. Human reoviruses exhibit an inherent preference to replicate in tumor cells, which makes them ideally suited for use in oncolytic virotherapies. Their use as anti-cancer agent has been evaluated in several clinical trials, which revealed that intra-tumoral and systemic delivery of reoviruses are well tolerated. Despite evidence of anti-tumor effects, the efficacy of reovirus in anti-cancer monotherapy needs to be further enhanced. The opportunity to treat both the primary tumor as well as metastases makes systemic delivery a preferred administration route. Several pre-clinical studies have been conducted to address the various hurdles connected to systemic delivery of reoviruses. The majority of those studies have been done in tumor-bearing immune-deficient murine models. This thwarts studies on the impact of the contribution of the immune system to the tumor cell eradication. This review focuses on key aspects of the reovirus/host-cell interactions and the methods that are available to modify the virus to alter these interactions. These aspects are discussed with a focus on improving the reovirus’ antitumor efficacy. PMID:26712782

  18. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a unique near-terminal region of the tumorigenic poxvirus, Shope fibroma virus.

    PubMed

    Massung, R F; McFadden, G; Moyer, R W

    1992-11-01

    Shope fibroma virus (SFV), a tumorigenic poxvirus, has a DNA genome of approximately 160 kb. Previous DNA sequence analysis of SFV has been mainly limited to the terminal inverted repetitions (about 12 kb at each end of the genome) and immediately adjacent regions. We have sequenced a 4 kb fragment located approximately 20 kb from the right-terminal hairpin. Within this region three complete and two partial open reading frames (ORFs) have been identified. Each of the putative polypeptides has sequence similarity to one or more previously identified poxvirus or cellular proteins, with homology to protein kinases, erythrocyte ankyrin and a vaccinia virus virulence-related protein (ORF N1L). The potential significance of these gene products with regard to the phenotype of SFV is discussed.

  19. Differential Induction of Apoptosis, Interferon Signaling, and Phagocytosis in Macrophages Infected with a Panel of Attenuated and Nonattenuated Poxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Royo, Sandra; Sainz, Bruno; Hernández-Jiménez, Enrique; Reyburn, Hugh; López-Collazo, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Due to the essential role macrophages play in antiviral immunity, it is important to understand the intracellular and molecular processes that occur in macrophages following infection with various strains of vaccinia virus, particularly those used as vaccine vectors. Similarities as well as differences were found in macrophages infected with different poxvirus strains, particularly at the level of virus-induced apoptosis and the expression of immunomodulatory genes, as determined by microarray analyses. Interestingly, the attenuated modified vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA) was particularly efficient in triggering apoptosis and beta interferon (IFN-β) secretion and in inducing changes in the expression of genes associated with increased activation of innate immunity, setting it apart from the other five vaccinia virus strains tested. Taken together, these results increase our understanding of how these viruses interact with human macrophages, at the cellular and molecular levels, and suggest mechanisms that may underlie their utility as recombinant vaccine vectors. IMPORTANCE Our studies clearly demonstrate that there are substantial biological differences in the patterns of cellular gene expression between macrophages infected with different poxvirus strains and that these changes are due specifically to infection with the distinct viruses. For example, a clear induction in IFN-β mRNA was observed after infection with MVA but not with other poxviruses. Importantly, antiviral bioassays confirmed that MVA-infected macrophages secreted a high level of biologically active type I IFN. Similarly, the phagocytic capacity of macrophages was also specifically increased after infection with MVA. Although the main scope of this study was not to test the vaccine potential of MVA as there are several groups in the field working extensively on this aspect, the characteristics/phenotypes we observed at the in vitro level clearly highlight the inherent advantages that MVA

  20. Moving oncolytic viruses into the clinic: clinical-grade production, purification, and characterization of diverse oncolytic viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ungerechts, Guy; Bossow, Sascha; Leuchs, Barbara; Holm, Per S; Rommelaere, Jean; Coffey, Matt; Coffin, Rob; Bell, John; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are unique anticancer agents based on their pleotropic modes of action, which include, besides viral tumor cell lysis, activation of antitumor immunity. A panel of diverse viruses, often genetically engineered, has advanced to clinical investigation, including phase 3 studies. This diversity of virotherapeutics not only offers interesting opportunities for the implementation of different therapeutic regimens but also poses challenges for clinical translation. Thus, manufacturing processes and regulatory approval paths need to be established for each OV individually. This review provides an overview of clinical-grade manufacturing procedures for OVs using six virus families as examples, and key challenges are discussed individually. For example, different virus features with respect to particle size, presence/absence of an envelope, and host species imply specific requirements for measures to ensure sterility, for handling, and for determination of appropriate animal models for toxicity testing, respectively. On the other hand, optimization of serum-free culture conditions, increasing virus yields, development of scalable purification strategies, and formulations guaranteeing long-term stability are challenges common to several if not all OVs. In light of the recent marketing approval of the first OV in the Western world, strategies for further upscaling OV manufacturing and optimizing product characterization will receive increasing attention. PMID:27088104

  1. Moving oncolytic viruses into the clinic: clinical-grade production, purification, and characterization of diverse oncolytic viruses.

    PubMed

    Ungerechts, Guy; Bossow, Sascha; Leuchs, Barbara; Holm, Per S; Rommelaere, Jean; Coffey, Matt; Coffin, Rob; Bell, John; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are unique anticancer agents based on their pleotropic modes of action, which include, besides viral tumor cell lysis, activation of antitumor immunity. A panel of diverse viruses, often genetically engineered, has advanced to clinical investigation, including phase 3 studies. This diversity of virotherapeutics not only offers interesting opportunities for the implementation of different therapeutic regimens but also poses challenges for clinical translation. Thus, manufacturing processes and regulatory approval paths need to be established for each OV individually. This review provides an overview of clinical-grade manufacturing procedures for OVs using six virus families as examples, and key challenges are discussed individually. For example, different virus features with respect to particle size, presence/absence of an envelope, and host species imply specific requirements for measures to ensure sterility, for handling, and for determination of appropriate animal models for toxicity testing, respectively. On the other hand, optimization of serum-free culture conditions, increasing virus yields, development of scalable purification strategies, and formulations guaranteeing long-term stability are challenges common to several if not all OVs. In light of the recent marketing approval of the first OV in the Western world, strategies for further upscaling OV manufacturing and optimizing product characterization will receive increasing attention. PMID:27088104

  2. Hyaluronidase expression by an oncolytic adenovirus enhances its intratumoral spread and suppresses tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Guedan, Sonia; Rojas, Juan José; Gros, Alena; Mercade, Elena; Cascallo, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2010-07-01

    Successful virotherapy requires efficient virus spread within tumors. We tested whether the expression of hyaluronidase, an enzyme which dissociates the extracellular matrix (ECM), could enhance the intratumoral distribution of an oncolytic adenovirus and improve its therapeutic activity. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated that intratumoral coadministration of hyaluronidase in mice-bearing tumor xenografts improves the antitumor activity of an oncolytic adenovirus. Next, we constructed a replication-competent adenovirus expressing a soluble form of the human sperm hyaluronidase (PH20) under the control of the major late promoter (MLP) (AdwtRGD-PH20). Intratumoral treatment of human melanoma xenografts with AdwtRGD-PH20 resulted in degradation of hyaluronan (HA), enhanced viral distribution, and induced tumor regression in all treated tumors. Finally, the PH20 cDNA was inserted in an oncolytic adenovirus that selectively kills pRb pathway-defective tumor cells. The antitumoral activity of the novel oncolytic adenovirus expressing PH20 (ICOVIR17) was compared to that of the parental virus ICOVIR15. ICOVIR17 showed more antitumor efficacy following intratumoral and systemic administration in mice with prestablished tumors, along with an improved spread of the virus within the tumor. Importantly, a single intravenous dose of ICOVIR17 induced tumor regression in 60% of treated tumors. These results indicate that ICOVIR17 is a promising candidate for clinical testing.

  3. Tamoxifen improves cytopathic effect of oncolytic adenovirus in primary glioblastoma cells mediated through autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Ulasov, Ilya V.; Shah, Nameeta; Kaverina, Natalya V.; Lee, Hwahyang; Lin, Biaoyang; Lieber, Andre; Kadagidze, Zaira G.; Yoon, Jae-Guen; Schroeder, Brett; Hothi, Parvinder; Ghosh, Dhimankrishna; Baryshnikov, Anatoly Y.; Cobbs, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic gene therapy using viral vectors may provide an attractive therapeutic option for malignant gliomas. These viral vectors are designed in a way to selectively target tumor cells and spare healthy cells. To determine the translational impact, it is imperative to assess the factors that interfere with the anti-glioma effects of the oncolytic adenoviral vectors. In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of survivin-driven oncolytic adenoviruses pseudotyping with adenoviral fiber knob belonging to the adenoviral serotype 3, 11 and 35 in their ability to kill glioblastoma (GBM) cells selectively without affecting normal cells. Our results indicate that all recombinant vectors used in the study can effectively target GBM in vitro with high specificity, especially the 3 knob-modified vector. Using intracranial U87 and U251 GBM xenograft models we have also demonstrated that treatment with Conditionally Replicative Adenovirus (CRAd-S-5/3) vectors can effectively regress tumor. However, in several patient-derived GBM cell lines, cells exhibited resistance to the CRAd infection as evident from the diminishing effects of autophagy. To improve therapeutic response, tumor cells were pretreated with tamoxifen. Our preliminary data suggest that tamoxifen sensitizes glioblastoma cells towards oncolytic treatment with CRAd-S-5/3, which may prove useful for GBM in future experimental therapy. PMID:25738357

  4. Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part I: strategies for utilizing oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children

    PubMed Central

    Cripe, Timothy P; Chen, Chun-Yu; Denton, Nicholas L; Haworth, Kellie B; Hutzen, Brian; Leddon, Jennifer L; Streby, Keri A; Wang, Pin-Yi; Markert, James M; Waters, Alicia M; Gillespie, George Yancey; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Friedman, Gregory K

    2015-01-01

    Progress for improving outcomes in pediatric patients with solid tumors remains slow. In addition, currently available therapies are fraught with numerous side effects, often causing significant life-long morbidity for long-term survivors. The use of viruses to kill tumor cells based on their increased vulnerability to infection is gaining traction, with several viruses moving through early and advanced phase clinical testing. The prospect of increased efficacy and decreased toxicity with these agents is thus attractive for pediatric cancer. In part I of this two-part review, we focus on strategies for utilizing oncolytic engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV) to target pediatric malignancies. We discuss mechanisms of action, routes of delivery, and the role of preexisting immunity on antitumor efficacy. Challenges to maximizing oncolytic HSV in children are examined, and we highlight how these may be overcome through various arming strategies. We review the preclinical and clinical evidence demonstrating safety of a variety of oncolytic HSVs. In Part II, we focus on the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic HSV in pediatric tumor types, pediatric clinical advances made to date, and future prospects for utilizing HSV in pediatric patients with solid tumors. PMID:26436135

  5. Evidence for differential viral oncolytic efficacy in an in vitro model of epithelial ovarian cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jessica G; Valdes, Yudith Ramos; Barrett, John W; Bell, John C; Stojdl, David; McFadden, Grant; McCart, J Andrea; DiMattia, Gabriel E; Shepherd, Trevor G

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is unique among most carcinomas in that metastasis occurs by direct dissemination of malignant cells traversing throughout the intraperitoneal fluid. Accordingly, we test new therapeutic strategies using an in vitro three-dimensional spheroid suspension culture model that mimics key steps of this metastatic process. In the present study, we sought to uncover the differential oncolytic efficacy among three different viruses-Myxoma virus, double-deleted vaccinia virus, and Maraba virus-using three ovarian cancer cell lines in our metastasis model system. Herein, we demonstrate that Maraba virus effectively infects, replicates, and kills epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells in proliferating adherent cells and with slightly slower kinetics in tumor spheroids. Myxoma virus and vaccinia viruses infect and kill adherent cells to a much lesser extent than Maraba virus, and their oncolytic potential is almost completely attenuated in spheroids. Myxoma virus and vaccinia are able to infect and spread throughout spheroids, but are blocked in the final stages of the lytic cycle, and oncolytic-mediated cell killing is reactivated upon spheroid reattachment. Alternatively, Maraba virus has a remarkably reduced ability to initially enter spheroid cells, yet rapidly infects and spreads throughout spheroids generating significant cell killing effects. We show that low-density lipoprotein receptor expression in ovarian cancer spheroids is reduced and this controls efficient Maraba virus binding and entry into infected cells. Taken together, these results are the first to implicate the potential impact of differential viral oncolytic properties at key steps of ovarian cancer metastasis.

  6. Oncolytic viruses as immunotherapy: progress and remaining challenges

    PubMed Central

    Aurelian, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) comprise an emerging cancer therapeutic modality whose activity involves both direct tumor cell lysis and the induction of immunogenic cell death (ICD). Cellular proteins released from the OV-lysed tumor cells, known as damage-associated molecular patterns and tumor-associated antigens, activate dendritic cells and elicit adaptive antitumor immunity. Interaction with the innate immune system and the development of long-lasting immune memory also contribute to OV-induced cell death. The degree to which the ICD component contributes to the clinical efficacy of OV therapy is still unclear. Modulation of a range of immune interactions may be beneficial or detrimental in nature and the interactions depend on the specific tumor, the site and extent of the disease, the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, the OV platform, the dose, time, and delivery conditions, as well as individual patient responses. To enhance the contribution of ICD, OVs have been engineered to express immunostimulatory genes and strategies have been developed to combine OV therapy with chemo- and immune-based therapeutic regimens. However, these approaches carry the risk that they may also be tolerogenic depending on their levels and the presence of other cytokines, their direct antiviral effects, and the timing and conditions of their expression. The contribution of autophagy to adaptive immunity, the ability of the OVs to kill cancer stem cells, and the patient’s baseline immune status are additional considerations. This review focuses on the complex and as yet poorly understood balancing act that dictates the outcome of OV therapy. We summarize current understanding of the OVs’ function in eliciting antitumor immunity and its relationship to therapeutic efficacy. Also discussed are the criteria involved in restraining antiviral immune responses and minimizing pathology while promoting antitumor immunity to override immune tolerance. PMID:27226725

  7. Oncolytic viruses as immunotherapy: progress and remaining challenges.

    PubMed

    Aurelian, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) comprise an emerging cancer therapeutic modality whose activity involves both direct tumor cell lysis and the induction of immunogenic cell death (ICD). Cellular proteins released from the OV-lysed tumor cells, known as damage-associated molecular patterns and tumor-associated antigens, activate dendritic cells and elicit adaptive antitumor immunity. Interaction with the innate immune system and the development of long-lasting immune memory also contribute to OV-induced cell death. The degree to which the ICD component contributes to the clinical efficacy of OV therapy is still unclear. Modulation of a range of immune interactions may be beneficial or detrimental in nature and the interactions depend on the specific tumor, the site and extent of the disease, the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, the OV platform, the dose, time, and delivery conditions, as well as individual patient responses. To enhance the contribution of ICD, OVs have been engineered to express immunostimulatory genes and strategies have been developed to combine OV therapy with chemo- and immune-based therapeutic regimens. However, these approaches carry the risk that they may also be tolerogenic depending on their levels and the presence of other cytokines, their direct antiviral effects, and the timing and conditions of their expression. The contribution of autophagy to adaptive immunity, the ability of the OVs to kill cancer stem cells, and the patient's baseline immune status are additional considerations. This review focuses on the complex and as yet poorly understood balancing act that dictates the outcome of OV therapy. We summarize current understanding of the OVs' function in eliciting antitumor immunity and its relationship to therapeutic efficacy. Also discussed are the criteria involved in restraining antiviral immune responses and minimizing pathology while promoting antitumor immunity to override immune tolerance. PMID:27226725

  8. Oncolytic Newcastle Disease Virus as Cutting Edge between Tumor and Host

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Philippe; Schirrmacher, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) replicate selectively in tumor cells and exert anti-tumor cytotoxic activity. Among them, Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV), a bird RNA virus of the paramyxovirus family, appears outstanding. Its anti-tumor effect is based on: (i) oncolytic activity and (ii) immunostimulation. Together these activities facilitate the induction of post-oncolytic adaptive immunity. We will present milestones during the last 60 years of clinical evaluation of this virus. Two main strategies of clinical application were followed using the virus (i) as a virotherapeutic agent, which is applied systemically or (ii) as an immunostimulatory agent combined with tumor cells for vaccination of cancer patients. More recently, a third strategy evolved. It combines the strategies (i) and (ii) and includes also dendritic cells (DCs). The first step involves systemic application of NDV to condition the patient. The second step involves intradermal application of a special DC vaccine pulsed with viral oncolysate. This strategy, called NDV/DC, combines anti-cancer activity (oncolytic virotherapy) and immune-stimulatory properties (oncolytic immunotherapy) with the high potential of DCs (DC therapy) to prime naive T cells. The aim of such treatment is to first prepare the cancer-bearing host for immunocompetence and then to instruct the patient’s immune system with information about tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) of its own tumor together with danger signals derived from virus infection. This multimodal concept should optimize the generation of strong polyclonal T cell reactivity targeted against the patient’s TAAs and lead to the establishment of a long-lasting memory T cell repertoire. PMID:24833054

  9. Genetic delivery of an immunoRNase by an oncolytic adenovirus enhances anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ulibarri, Inés; Hammer, Katharina; Arndt, Michaela A E; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Dorer, Dominik; Engelhardt, Sarah; Kontermann, Roland E; Hess, Jochen; Allgayer, Heike; Krauss, Jürgen; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2015-05-01

    Antibody therapy of solid cancers is well established, but suffers from unsatisfactory tumor penetration of large immunoglobulins or from low serum retention of antibody fragments. Oncolytic viruses are in advanced clinical development showing excellent safety, but suboptimal potency due to limited virus spread within tumors. Here, by developing an immunoRNase-encoding oncolytic adenovirus, we combine viral oncolysis with intratumoral genetic delivery of a small antibody-fusion protein for targeted bystander killing of tumor cells (viro-antibody therapy). Specifically, we explore genetic delivery of a small immunoRNase consisting of an EGFR-binding scFv antibody fragment fused to the RNase Onconase (ONC(EGFR)) that induces tumor cell death by RNA degradation after cellular internalization. Onconase is a frog RNase that combines lack of immunogenicity and excellent safety in patients with high tumor killing potency due to its resistance to the human cytosolic RNase inhibitor. We show that ONC(EGFR) expression by oncolytic adenoviruses is feasible with an optimized, replication-dependent gene expression strategy. Virus-encoded ONC(EGFR) induces potent and EGFR-dependent bystander killing of tumor cells. Importantly, the ONC(EGFR)-encoding oncolytic adenovirus showed dramatically increased cytotoxicity specifically to EGFR-positive tumor cells in vitro and significantly enhanced therapeutic activity in a mouse xenograft tumor model. The latter demonstrates that ONC(EGFR) is expressed at levels sufficient to trigger tumor cell killing in vivo. The established ONC(EGFR)-encoding oncolytic adenovirus represents a novel agent for treatment of EGFR-positive tumors. This viro-antibody therapy platform can be further developed for targeted/personalized cancer therapy by exploiting antibody diversity to target further established or emerging tumor markers or combinations thereof.

  10. Dual tumor targeting with pH-sensitive and bioreducible polymer-complexed oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chang Yoon; Choi, Joung-Woo; Kasala, Dayananda; Jung, Soo-Jung; Kim, Sung Wan; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2015-02-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) have shown great promise in cancer gene therapy but their efficacy has been compromised by potent immunological, biochemical, and specific tumor-targeting limitations. To take full advantage of the innate cancer-specific killing potency of oncolytic Ads but also exploit the subtleties of the tumor microenvironment, we have generated a pH-sensitive and bio-reducible polymer (PPCBA)-coated oncolytic Ad. Ad-PPCBA complexes showed higher cellular uptake at pH 6.0 than pH 7.4 in both high and low coxsackie and adenovirus receptor-(CAR)-expressing cells, thereby demonstrating Ad-PPCBA's ability to target the low pH hypoxic tumor microenvironment and overcome CAR dependence for target cell uptake. Endocytic mechanism studies indicated that Ad-PPCBA internalization is mediated by macropinocytosis instead of the CAR-dependent endocytic pathway that internalizes naked Ad. VEGF-specific shRNA-expressing oncolytic Ad complexed with PPCBA (RdB/shVEGF-PPCBA) elicited much more potent suppression of U87 human brain cancer cell VEGF gene expression in vitro, and human breast cancer MCF7 cell/Matrigel plug vascularization in a mouse model, when cancer cells had been previously infected at pH 6.0 versus pH 7.4. Moreover, intratumorally and intravenously injected RdB/shVEGF-PPCBA nanocomplexes elicited significantly higher therapeutic efficacy than naked virus in U87-tumor mouse xenograft models, reducing IL-6, ALT, and AST serum levels. These data demonstrated PPCBA's biocompatibility and capability to shield the Ad surface to prevent innate immune response against Ad after both intratumoral and systemic administration. Taken together, these results demonstrate that smart, tumor-specific, oncolytic Ad-PPCBA complexes can be exploited to treat both primary and metastatic tumors.

  11. Growth and infectivity assays of the Israeli vaccine strain of fowl poxvirus in chicken embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hashavya, Saar; Barchichat, Sabrina; Katz, Ehud

    2002-01-01

    The Israeli vaccine strain of fowl poxvirus grows efficiently in chicken embryo fibroblasts but not in cell lines derived from monkey kidney or human fibroblasts. We developed two assays for the titration of the infectivity of this virus in secondary cultures of chicken embryo fibroblasts. The first is a focus assay, in which minimum essential medium and SeaKem ME agarose were used for the overlay media. Under these conditions, clear virus foci appeared after 5 days of incubation at 37 C. The second assay is a semiautomatic colorimetric test based on the ability of live cells in culture to reduce the yellow tetrazolium salt 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT; thiazolyl blue) to its formazan derivative. The reagent was added to infected chicken embryo fibroblasts in 96-well plates 10 days after infection. The formazan formed during 2 hr was extracted with dimethyl sulfoxide, and its absorbance was read by an automatic microplate spectrophotometer. A good correlation of the infectivity titers of the virus was obtained by the two methods.

  12. Cutaneous and diphtheritic avian poxvirus infection in a nestling Southern Giant Petrel (Macronectes giganteus) from Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie; Green, David Earl; Converse, K.A.; Docherty, D.E.; Thiel, T.; Geisz, H.N.; Fraser, William R.; Patterson-Fraser, Donna L.

    2008-01-01

    The Southern giant petrel (Macronectes giganteus) is declining over much of its range and currently is listed as vulnerable to extinction by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Island-specific breeding colonies near Palmer Station, Antarctica, have been monitored for over 30 years, and because this population continues to increase, it is critically important to conservation. In austral summer 2004, six diseased giant petrel chicks were observed in four of these colonies. Diseased chicks were 6a??9 weeks old and had multiple proliferative nodules on their bills and skin. One severely affected chick was found dead on the nest and was salvaged for necropsy. Histopathological examination of nodules from the dead chick revealed epithelial cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy with numerous eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusions (B??llinger bodies). A poxvirus was isolated from multiple nodules. Poxviral infection has not been reported in this species, and the reason for its emergence and its potential impact on the population are not yet known.

  13. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Orf Virus: A Poxvirus That Has Adapted to Skin

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Stephen B.; Wise, Lyn M.; Mercer, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Orf virus is the type species of the Parapoxvirus genus of the family Poxviridae. It induces acute pustular skin lesions in sheep and goats and is transmissible to humans. The genome is G+C rich, 138 kbp and encodes 132 genes. It shares many essential genes with vaccinia virus that are required for survival but encodes a number of unique factors that allow it to replicate in the highly specific immune environment of skin. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that both viral interleukin-10 and vascular endothelial growth factor genes have been “captured” from their host during the evolution of the parapoxviruses. Genes such as a chemokine binding protein and a protein that binds granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-2 appear to have evolved from a common poxvirus ancestral gene while three parapoxvirus nuclear factor (NF)-κB signalling pathway inhibitors have no homology to other known NF-κB inhibitors. A homologue of an anaphase-promoting complex subunit that is believed to manipulate the cell cycle and enhance viral DNA synthesis appears to be a specific adaptation for viral-replication in keratinocytes. The review focuses on the unique genes of orf virus, discusses their evolutionary origins and their role in allowing viral-replication in the skin epidermis. PMID:25807056

  14. Expression of DAI by an oncolytic vaccinia virus boosts the immunogenicity of the virus and enhances antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hirvinen, Mari; Capasso, Cristian; Guse, Kilian; Garofalo, Mariangela; Vitale, Andrea; Ahonen, Marko; Kuryk, Lukasz; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli; Fortino, Vittorio; Greco, Dario; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    In oncolytic virotherapy, the ability of the virus to activate the immune system is a key attribute with regard to long-term antitumor effects. Vaccinia viruses bear one of the strongest oncolytic activities among all oncolytic viruses. However, its capacity for stimulation of antitumor immunity is not optimal, mainly due to its immunosuppressive nature. To overcome this problem, we developed an oncolytic VV that expresses intracellular pattern recognition receptor DNA-dependent activator of IFN-regulatory factors (DAI) to boost the innate immune system and to activate adaptive immune cells in the tumor. We showed that infection with DAI-expressing VV increases expression of several genes related to important immunological pathways. Treatment with DAI-armed VV resulted in significant reduction in the size of syngeneic melanoma tumors in mice. When the mice were rechallenged with the same tumor, DAI-VV-treated mice completely rejected growth of the new tumor, which indicates immunity established against the tumor. We also showed enhanced control of growth of human melanoma tumors and elevated levels of human T-cells in DAI-VV-treated mice humanized with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We conclude that expression of DAI by an oncolytic VV is a promising way to amplify the vaccine potency of an oncolytic vaccinia virus to trigger the innate—and eventually the long-lasting adaptive immunity against cancer. PMID:27626058

  15. Expression of DAI by an oncolytic vaccinia virus boosts the immunogenicity of the virus and enhances antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Hirvinen, Mari; Capasso, Cristian; Guse, Kilian; Garofalo, Mariangela; Vitale, Andrea; Ahonen, Marko; Kuryk, Lukasz; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli; Fortino, Vittorio; Greco, Dario; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    In oncolytic virotherapy, the ability of the virus to activate the immune system is a key attribute with regard to long-term antitumor effects. Vaccinia viruses bear one of the strongest oncolytic activities among all oncolytic viruses. However, its capacity for stimulation of antitumor immunity is not optimal, mainly due to its immunosuppressive nature. To overcome this problem, we developed an oncolytic VV that expresses intracellular pattern recognition receptor DNA-dependent activator of IFN-regulatory factors (DAI) to boost the innate immune system and to activate adaptive immune cells in the tumor. We showed that infection with DAI-expressing VV increases expression of several genes related to important immunological pathways. Treatment with DAI-armed VV resulted in significant reduction in the size of syngeneic melanoma tumors in mice. When the mice were rechallenged with the same tumor, DAI-VV-treated mice completely rejected growth of the new tumor, which indicates immunity established against the tumor. We also showed enhanced control of growth of human melanoma tumors and elevated levels of human T-cells in DAI-VV-treated mice humanized with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We conclude that expression of DAI by an oncolytic VV is a promising way to amplify the vaccine potency of an oncolytic vaccinia virus to trigger the innate-and eventually the long-lasting adaptive immunity against cancer. PMID:27626058

  16. Switching a replication-defective adenoviral vector into a replication-competent, oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The adenovirus immediate early gene E1A initiates the program of viral gene transcription and reprograms multiple aspects of cell function and behavior. For adenoviral (Ad) vector-mediated gene transfer and therapy approaches, where replication-defective (RD) gene transfer is required, E1A has thus been the primary target for deletions. For oncolytic gene therapy for cancer, where replication-competent (RC) Ad viral gene expression is needed, E1A has been either mutated or placed under tumor-specific transcriptional control. A novel Ad vector that initially infected target tumor cells in an RD manner for transgene expression but that could be "switched" into an RC, oncolytic state when needed might represent an advance in vector technology. Here, we report that we designed such an Ad vector (proAdΔ24.GFP), where initial Ad replication is silenced by a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene that blocks cytomegalovirus (CMV)-mediated transcription of E1A. This vector functions as a bona fide E1A-deleted RD vector in infected tumor cells. However, because the silencing GFP transgene is flanked by FLP recombination target (FRT) sites, we show that it can be efficiently excised by Flp recombinase site-specific recombination, either when Flp is expressed constitutively in cells or when it is provided in trans by coinfection with a second RD herpes simplex virus (HSV) amplicon vector. This switches the RD Ad, proAdΔ24.GFP, into a fully RC, oncolytic Ad (rAdΔ24) that lyses tumor cells in culture and generates oncolytic progeny virions. In vivo, coinfection of established flank tumors with the RD proAdΔ24.GFP and the RD Flp-bearing HSV1 amplicon leads to generation of RC, oncolytic rAdΔ24. In an orthotopic human glioma xenograft tumor model, coinjection of the RD proAdΔ24.GFP and the RD Flp-bearing HSV1 amplicon also led to a significant increase in animal survival, compared to controls. Therefore, Flp-FRT site-specific recombination can be applied to switch RD Ad

  17. Switching a replication-defective adenoviral vector into a replication-competent, oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The adenovirus immediate early gene E1A initiates the program of viral gene transcription and reprograms multiple aspects of cell function and behavior. For adenoviral (Ad) vector-mediated gene transfer and therapy approaches, where replication-defective (RD) gene transfer is required, E1A has thus been the primary target for deletions. For oncolytic gene therapy for cancer, where replication-competent (RC) Ad viral gene expression is needed, E1A has been either mutated or placed under tumor-specific transcriptional control. A novel Ad vector that initially infected target tumor cells in an RD manner for transgene expression but that could be "switched" into an RC, oncolytic state when needed might represent an advance in vector technology. Here, we report that we designed such an Ad vector (proAdΔ24.GFP), where initial Ad replication is silenced by a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene that blocks cytomegalovirus (CMV)-mediated transcription of E1A. This vector functions as a bona fide E1A-deleted RD vector in infected tumor cells. However, because the silencing GFP transgene is flanked by FLP recombination target (FRT) sites, we show that it can be efficiently excised by Flp recombinase site-specific recombination, either when Flp is expressed constitutively in cells or when it is provided in trans by coinfection with a second RD herpes simplex virus (HSV) amplicon vector. This switches the RD Ad, proAdΔ24.GFP, into a fully RC, oncolytic Ad (rAdΔ24) that lyses tumor cells in culture and generates oncolytic progeny virions. In vivo, coinfection of established flank tumors with the RD proAdΔ24.GFP and the RD Flp-bearing HSV1 amplicon leads to generation of RC, oncolytic rAdΔ24. In an orthotopic human glioma xenograft tumor model, coinjection of the RD proAdΔ24.GFP and the RD Flp-bearing HSV1 amplicon also led to a significant increase in animal survival, compared to controls. Therefore, Flp-FRT site-specific recombination can be applied to switch RD Ad

  18. A poxvirus-encoded uracil DNA glycosylase is essential for virus viability.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, D T; Upton, C; Higman, M A; Niles, E G; McFadden, G

    1993-01-01

    Infection of cultured mammalian cells with the Leporipoxvirus Shope fibroma virus (SFV) causes the induction of a novel uracil DNA glycosylase activity in the cytoplasms of the infected cells. The induction of this activity, early in infection, correlates with the early expression of the SFV BamHI D6R open reading frame which possesses significant protein sequence similarity to eukaryotic and prokaryotic uracil DNA glycosylases. The SFV BamHI D6R open reading frame and the homologous HindIII D4R open reading frame from the Orthopoxvirus vaccinia virus were cloned under the regulation of a phage T7 promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli as insoluble high-molecular-weight aggregates. During electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels, the E. coli-expressed proteins migrate with an apparent molecular mass of 25 kDa. The insoluble protein aggregate generated by expression in E. coli was solubilized in urea and, following a subsequent refolding step, displayed the ability to excise uracil residues from double-stranded plasmid DNA substrates, with the subsequent formation of apyrimidinic sites. The viral enzyme, like all other characterized uracil DNA glycosylases, is active in the presence of high concentrations of EDTA, is substrate inhibited by uracil, and does not display any endonuclease activity. Attempts to inactivate the HindIII D4R gene of vaccinia virus by targeted insertion of a dominant xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase selection marker or direct insertion of a frame-shifted oligonucleotide were uniformly unsuccessful demonstrating that, unlike the uracil DNA glycosylase described for herpesviruses, the poxvirus enzyme is essential for virus viability. Images PMID:8474156

  19. A poxvirus protein with a RING finger motif binds zinc and localizes in virus factories.

    PubMed

    Upton, C; Schiff, L; Rice, S A; Dowdeswell, T; Yang, X; McFadden, G

    1994-07-01

    Shope fibroma virus (SFV) is a Leporipoxvirus closely related to the highly virulent myxoma virus. The DNA sequence of the BamHI N fragment of the SFV DNA genome was determined, and the single complete open reading frame (N1R) was characterized. The protein encoded by the N1R gene was found to contain a C3HC4 RING finger motif at the C terminus. This C3HC4 motif is the hallmark of a growing family of proteins, many of which are involved in regulation of gene expression, DNA repair, or DNA recombination. Complete homologs of the SFV N1R gene were also detected in variola virus, myxoma virus, and vaccinia virus strain IHD-W. In contrast, the gene is completely absent from vaccinia virus strain Copenhagen, and in vaccinia virus strain WR, the open reading frame is truncated prior to the zinc binding domain because of an 11-bp deletion, thus producing a frameshift and premature stop codon. Recombinant N1R protein from SFV was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to bind zinc in a specific manner. Using fluorescence microscopy to visualize a peptide epitope tag (derived from ICP27 of herpes simplex virus) fused to the N terminus of the poxvirus proteins, we observed that the N1R protein of SFV and its homologs in myxoma virus and vaccinia virus IHD-W were localized primarily to the virus factories in the cytoplasm of infected cells and, to a lesser degree, the host cell nucleus. The truncated protein of vaccinia virus strain WR failed to localize in this manner but instead was observed throughout the cytoplasm.

  20. Overcoming Barriers in Oncolytic Virotherapy with HDAC Inhibitors and Immune Checkpoint Blockade.

    PubMed

    Marchini, Antonio; Scott, Eleanor M; Rommelaere, Jean

    2016-01-06

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) target and destroy cancer cells while sparing their normal counterparts. These viruses have been evaluated in numerous studies at both pre-clinical and clinical levels and the recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of an oncolytic herpesvirus-based treatment raises optimism that OVs will become a therapeutic option for cancer patients. However, to improve clinical outcome, there is a need to increase OV efficacy. In addition to killing cancer cells directly through lysis, OVs can stimulate the induction of anti-tumour immune responses. The host immune system thus represents a "double-edged sword" for oncolytic virotherapy: on the one hand, a robust anti-viral response will limit OV replication and spread; on the other hand, the immune-mediated component of OV therapy may be its most important anti-cancer mechanism. Although the relative contribution of direct viral oncolysis and indirect, immune-mediated oncosuppression to overall OV efficacy is unclear, it is likely that an initial period of vigorous OV multiplication and lytic activity will most optimally set the stage for subsequent adaptive anti-tumour immunity. In this review, we consider the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors as a means of boosting virus replication and lessening the negative impact of innate immunity on the direct oncolytic effect. We also discuss an alternative approach, aimed at potentiating OV-elicited anti-tumour immunity through the blockade of immune checkpoints. We conclude by proposing a two-phase combinatorial strategy in which initial OV replication and spread is maximised through transient HDAC inhibition, with anti-tumour immune responses subsequently enhanced by immune checkpoint blockade.

  1. Overcoming Barriers in Oncolytic Virotherapy with HDAC Inhibitors and Immune Checkpoint Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Marchini, Antonio; Scott, Eleanor M.; Rommelaere, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) target and destroy cancer cells while sparing their normal counterparts. These viruses have been evaluated in numerous studies at both pre-clinical and clinical levels and the recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of an oncolytic herpesvirus-based treatment raises optimism that OVs will become a therapeutic option for cancer patients. However, to improve clinical outcome, there is a need to increase OV efficacy. In addition to killing cancer cells directly through lysis, OVs can stimulate the induction of anti-tumour immune responses. The host immune system thus represents a “double-edged sword” for oncolytic virotherapy: on the one hand, a robust anti-viral response will limit OV replication and spread; on the other hand, the immune-mediated component of OV therapy may be its most important anti-cancer mechanism. Although the relative contribution of direct viral oncolysis and indirect, immune-mediated oncosuppression to overall OV efficacy is unclear, it is likely that an initial period of vigorous OV multiplication and lytic activity will most optimally set the stage for subsequent adaptive anti-tumour immunity. In this review, we consider the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors as a means of boosting virus replication and lessening the negative impact of innate immunity on the direct oncolytic effect. We also discuss an alternative approach, aimed at potentiating OV-elicited anti-tumour immunity through the blockade of immune checkpoints. We conclude by proposing a two-phase combinatorial strategy in which initial OV replication and spread is maximised through transient HDAC inhibition, with anti-tumour immune responses subsequently enhanced by immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:26751469

  2. Recombinant Immunomodulating Lentogenic or Mesogenic Oncolytic Newcastle Disease Virus for Treatment of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Buijs, Pascal; van Nieuwkoop, Stefan; Vaes, Vincent; Fouchier, Ron; van Eijck, Casper; van den Hoogen, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic Newcastle disease virus (NDV) might be a promising new therapeutic agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. We evaluated recombinant NDVs (rNDVs) expressing interferon (rNDV-hIFNβ-F0) or an IFN antagonistic protein (rNDV-NS1-F0), as well as rNDV with increased virulence (rNDV-F3aa) for oncolytic efficacy in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Expression of additional proteins did not hamper virus replication or cytotoxic effects on itself. However, expression of interferon, but not NS1, resulted in loss of multicycle replication. Conversely, increasing the virulence (rNDV-F3aa) resulted in enhanced replication of the virus. Type I interferon was produced in high amounts by all tumor cells inoculated with rNDV-hIFNβ-F0, while inoculation with rNDV-NS1-F0 resulted in a complete block of interferon production in most cells. Inoculation of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells with rNDV-F3aa caused markedly more cytotoxicity compared to rNDV-F0, while inoculation with rNDV-hIFNβ-F0 and rNDV-NS1-F0 induced cytotoxic effects comparable to those induced by the parental rNDV-F0. Evaluation in vivo using mice bearing subcutaneous pancreatic cancer xenografts revealed that only intratumoral injection with rNDV-F3aa resulted in regression of tumors. We conclude that although lentogenic rNDVs harboring proteins that modulate the type I interferon pathway proteins do have an oncolytic effect, a more virulent mesogenic rNDV might be needed to improve oncolytic efficacy. PMID:26110582

  3. Treatment of malignant effusion by oncolytic virotherapy in an experimental subcutaneous xenograft model of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is associated with advanced stages of lung cancer and is mainly dependent on invasion of the pleura and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by cancer cells. As MPE indicates an incurable disease with limited palliative treatment options and poor outcome, there is an urgent need for new and efficient treatment options. Methods In this study, we used subcutaneously generated PC14PE6 lung adenocarcinoma xenografts in athymic mice that developed subcutaneous malignant effusions (ME) which mimic pleural effusions of the orthotopic model. Using this approach monitoring of therapeutic intervention was facilitated by direct observation of subcutaneous ME formation without the need of sacrificing mice or special imaging equipment as in case of MPE. Further, we tested oncolytic virotherapy using Vaccinia virus as a novel treatment modality against ME in this subcutaneous PC14PE6 xenograft model of advanced lung adenocarcinoma. Results We demonstrated significant therapeutic efficacy of Vaccinia virus treatment of both advanced lung adenocarcinoma and tumor-associated ME. We attribute the efficacy to the virus-mediated reduction of tumor cell-derived VEGF levels in tumors, decreased invasion of tumor cells into the peritumoral tissue, and to viral infection of the blood vessel-invading tumor cells. Moreover, we showed that the use of oncolytic Vaccinia virus encoding for a single-chain antibody (scAb) against VEGF (GLAF-1) significantly enhanced mono-therapy of oncolytic treatment. Conclusions Here, we demonstrate for the first time that oncolytic virotherapy using tumor-specific Vaccinia virus represents a novel and promising treatment modality for therapy of ME associated with advanced lung cancer. PMID:23635329

  4. Chemotherapy and Oncolytic Virotherapy: Advanced Tactics in the War against Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Andrew; Ho, Louisa; Wan, Yonghong

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a traitorous archenemy that threatens our survival. Its ability to evade detection and adapt to various cancer therapies means that it is a moving target that becomes increasingly difficult to attack. Through technological advancements, we have developed sophisticated weapons to fight off tumor growth and invasion. However, if we are to stand a chance in this war against cancer, advanced tactics will be required to maximize the use of our available resources. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are multi-functional cancer-fighters that can be engineered to suit many different strategies; in particular, their retooling can facilitate increased capacity for direct tumor killing (oncolytic virotherapy) and elicit adaptive antitumor immune responses (oncolytic immunotherapy). However, administration of these modified OVs alone, rarely induces successful regression of established tumors. This may be attributed to host antiviral immunity that acts to eliminate viral particles, as well as the capacity for tumors to adapt to therapeutic selective pressure. It has been shown that various chemotherapeutic drugs with distinct functional properties can potentiate the antitumor efficacy of OVs. In this review, we summarize the chemotherapeutic combinatorial strategies used to optimize virally induced destruction of tumors. With a particular focus on pharmaceutical immunomodulators, we discuss how specific therapeutic contexts may alter the effects of these synergistic combinations and their implications for future clinical use. PMID:24967214

  5. Chemotherapy and Oncolytic Virotherapy: Advanced Tactics in the War against Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Andrew; Ho, Louisa; Wan, Yonghong

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a traitorous archenemy that threatens our survival. Its ability to evade detection and adapt to various cancer therapies means that it is a moving target that becomes increasingly difficult to attack. Through technological advancements, we have developed sophisticated weapons to fight off tumor growth and invasion. However, if we are to stand a chance in this war against cancer, advanced tactics will be required to maximize the use of our available resources. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are multi-functional cancer-fighters that can be engineered to suit many different strategies; in particular, their retooling can facilitate increased capacity for direct tumor killing (oncolytic virotherapy) and elicit adaptive antitumor immune responses (oncolytic immunotherapy). However, administration of these modified OVs alone, rarely induces successful regression of established tumors. This may be attributed to host antiviral immunity that acts to eliminate viral particles, as well as the capacity for tumors to adapt to therapeutic selective pressure. It has been shown that various chemotherapeutic drugs with distinct functional properties can potentiate the antitumor efficacy of OVs. In this review, we summarize the chemotherapeutic combinatorial strategies used to optimize virally induced destruction of tumors. With a particular focus on pharmaceutical immunomodulators, we discuss how specific therapeutic contexts may alter the effects of these synergistic combinations and their implications for future clinical use.

  6. Tumor Selectivity of Oncolytic Parvoviruses: From in vitro and Animal Models to Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Angelova, Assia L.; Geletneky, Karsten; Nüesch, Jürg P. F.; Rommelaere, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy of cancer is among the innovative modalities being under development and especially promising for targeting tumors, which are resistant to conventional treatments. Presently, at least a dozen of viruses, belonging to nine different virus families, are being tested within the frames of various clinical studies in cancer patients. Continuously growing preclinical evidence showing that the autonomous rat parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV) is able to kill tumor cells that resist conventional treatments and to achieve a complete cure of various human tumors in animal models argues for its inclusion in the arsenal of oncolytic viruses with an especially promising bench to bedside translation potential. Oncolytic parvovirus safe administration to humans relies on the intrinsic preference of these agents for quickly proliferating, metabolically, and biochemically disturbed tumor versus normal cells (tumor selectivity or oncotropism). The present review summarizes and discusses (i) preclinical evidence of H-1PV innocuousness for normal cells and healthy tissues in vitro and in animals, respectively, (ii) toxicological assessments of H-1PV mono- or combined therapy in tumor-bearing virus-permissive animal models, as well as (iii) historical results of experimental infection of human cancer patients with H-1PV. Altogether, these data argue against a risk of H-1PV inducing significant toxic effects in human patients. This highly favorable safety profile allowed the translation of H-1PV preclinical research into a Phase I/IIa clinical trial being currently in progress. PMID:25954743

  7. Development of an Oncolytic Adenovirus with Enhanced Spread Ability through Repeated UV Irradiation and Cancer Selection

    PubMed Central

    Wechman, Stephen L.; Rao, Xiao-Mei; Cheng, Pei-Hsin; Gomez-Gutierrez, Jorge G.; McMasters, Kelly M.; Zhou, H. Sam

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (Ads) have been shown to be safe and have great potential for the treatment of solid tumors. However, the therapeutic efficacy of Ads is antagonized by limited spread within solid tumors. To develop Ads with enhanced spread, viral particles of an E1-wildtype Ad5 dl309 was repeatedly treated with UV type C irradiation and selected for the efficient replication and release from cancer cells. After 72 cycles of treatment and cancer selection, AdUV was isolated. This vector has displayed many favorable characteristics for oncolytic therapy. AdUV was shown to lyse cancer cells more effectively than both E1-deleted and E1-wildtype Ads. This enhanced cancer cell lysis appeared to be related to increased AdUV replication in and release from infected cancer cells. AdUV-treated A549 cells displayed greater expression of the autophagy marker LC3-II during oncolysis and formed larger viral plaques upon cancer cell monolayers, indicating increased virus spread among cancer cells. This study indicates the potential of this approach of irradiation of entire viral particles for the development of oncolytic viruses with designated therapeutic properties. PMID:27314377

  8. Immunocompetent syngeneic cotton rat tumor models for the assessment of replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, Jason C.; Morrison, Brian J.; Mannan, Poonam; Abu-Asab, Mones S.; Wildner, Oliver; Miles, Brian K.; Yim, Kevin C.; Ramanan, Vijay; Prince, Gregory A.; Morris, John C.

    2007-12-05

    Oncolytic adenoviruses as a treatment for cancer have demonstrated limited clinical activity. Contributing to this may be the relevance of preclinical animal models used to study these agents. Syngeneic mouse tumor models are generally non-permissive for adenoviral replication, whereas human tumor xenograft models exhibit attenuated immune responses to the vector. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is susceptible to human adenovirus infection, permissive for viral replication and exhibits similar inflammatory pathology to humans with adenovirus replicating in the lungs, respiratory passages and cornea. We evaluated three transplantable tumorigenic cotton rat cell lines, CCRT, LCRT and VCRT as models for the study of oncolytic adenoviruses. All three cells lines were readily infected with adenovirus type-5-based vectors and exhibited high levels of transgene expression. The cell lines supported viral replication demonstrated by the induction of cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in tissue culture, increase in virus particle numbers and assembly of virions seen on transmission electron microscopy. In vivo, LCRT and VCRT tumors demonstrated delayed growth after injection with replicating adenovirus. No in vivo antitumor activity was seen in CCRT tumors despite in vitro oncolysis. Adenovirus was also rapidly cleared from the CCRT tumors compared to LCRT and VCRT tumors. The effect observed with the different cotton rat tumor cell lines mimics the variable results of human clinical trials highlighting the potential relevance of this model for assessing the activity and toxicity of oncolytic adenoviruses.

  9. Targeting eradication of chronic myeloid leukemia using chimeric oncolytic adenovirus to drive IL-24 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xubin; liu, Li; Wang, Gang; Li, Wei; Xu, Ke; Hu, Xupang; Qian, Cheng; Shao, Jimin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal disorder in which cells of the myeloid lineage undergo massive clonal expansion as well as resistance to conventional chemotherapy. Gene therapy hold a great promise for treatment of malignancies based on the transfer of genetic material to the tissues. In this study, we explore whether chimeric oncolytic adenovirus-mediated transfer of human interleukin-24 (IL-24) gene induce the enhanced antitumor potency. Our results showed that chimeric oncolytic adenovirus carrying hIL-24 (AdCN205-11-IL-24) could produce high levels of hIL-24 in CML cancer cells, as compared with constructed double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus expressing hIL-24 (AdCN205-IL-24). AdCN205-11-IL-24 could specifically induce cytotoxocity to CML cancer cells, but little or no effect on normal cell lines. AdCN205-11-IL-24 exhibited remarkable anti-tumor activities and induce higher antitumor activity to CML cancer cells by inducing apoptosis in vitro. Our study may provides a potent and safe tool for CML gene therapy. PMID:26097559

  10. N-Myc expression enhances the oncolytic effects of vesicular stomatitis virus in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Corredor, Juan C; Redding, Nicole; Bloté, Karen; Robbins, Stephen M; Senger, Donna L; Bell, John C; Beaudry, Paul

    2016-01-01

    N-myc oncogene amplification is associated but not present in all cases of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB). Since oncogene expression could often modulate sensitivity to oncolytic viruses, we wanted to examine if N-myc expression status would determine virotherapy efficacy to high-risk NB. We showed that induction of exogenous N-myc in a non-N-myc-amplified cell line background (TET-21N) increased susceptibility to oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (mutant VSVΔM51) and alleviated the type I IFN-induced antiviral state. Cells with basal N-myc, on the other hand, were less susceptible to virus-induced oncolysis and established a robust IFN-mediated antiviral state. The same effects were also observed in NB cell lines with and without N-myc amplification. Microarray analysis showed that N-myc overexpression in TET-21N cells downregulated IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) with known antiviral functions. Furthermore, virus infection caused significant changes in global gene expression in TET-21N cells overexpressing N-myc. Such changes involved ISGs with various functions. Therefore, the present study showed that augmented susceptibility to VSVΔM51 by N-myc at least involves downregulation of ISGs with antiviral functions and alleviation of the IFN-stimulated antiviral state. Our studies suggest the potential utility of N-myc amplification/overexpression as a predictive biomarker of virotherapy response for high-risk NB using IFN-sensitive oncolytic viruses. PMID:27626059

  11. N-Myc expression enhances the oncolytic effects of vesicular stomatitis virus in human neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Corredor, Juan C; Redding, Nicole; Bloté, Karen; Robbins, Stephen M; Senger, Donna L; Bell, John C; Beaudry, Paul

    2016-01-01

    N-myc oncogene amplification is associated but not present in all cases of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB). Since oncogene expression could often modulate sensitivity to oncolytic viruses, we wanted to examine if N-myc expression status would determine virotherapy efficacy to high-risk NB. We showed that induction of exogenous N-myc in a non-N-myc-amplified cell line background (TET-21N) increased susceptibility to oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (mutant VSVΔM51) and alleviated the type I IFN-induced antiviral state. Cells with basal N-myc, on the other hand, were less susceptible to virus-induced oncolysis and established a robust IFN-mediated antiviral state. The same effects were also observed in NB cell lines with and without N-myc amplification. Microarray analysis showed that N-myc overexpression in TET-21N cells downregulated IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) with known antiviral functions. Furthermore, virus infection caused significant changes in global gene expression in TET-21N cells overexpressing N-myc. Such changes involved ISGs with various functions. Therefore, the present study showed that augmented susceptibility to VSVΔM51 by N-myc at least involves downregulation of ISGs with antiviral functions and alleviation of the IFN-stimulated antiviral state. Our studies suggest the potential utility of N-myc amplification/overexpression as a predictive biomarker of virotherapy response for high-risk NB using IFN-sensitive oncolytic viruses. PMID:27626059

  12. CTLA-4 and PD-L1 Checkpoint Blockade Enhances Oncolytic Measles Virus Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, Christine E; Grossardt, Christian; Veinalde, Rūta; Bossow, Sascha; Lutz, Diana; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Shevchenko, Ivan; Umansky, Viktor; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Weichert, Wilko; Jäger, Dirk; von Kalle, Christof; Ungerechts, Guy

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that the combination of oncolytic virotherapy with immune checkpoint modulators would reduce tumor burden by direct cell lysis and stimulate antitumor immunity. In this study, we have generated attenuated Measles virus (MV) vectors encoding antibodies against CTLA-4 and PD-L1 (MV-aCTLA-4 and MV-aPD-L1). We characterized the vectors in terms of growth kinetics, antibody expression, and cytotoxicity in vitro. Immunotherapeutic effects were assessed in a newly established, fully immunocompetent murine model of malignant melanoma, B16-CD20. Analyses of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and restimulation experiments indicated a favorable immune profile after MV-mediated checkpoint modulation. Therapeutic benefits in terms of delayed tumor progression and prolonged median overall survival were observed for animals treated with vectors encoding anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-L1, respectively. Combining systemic administration of antibodies with MV treatment also improved therapeutic outcome. In vivo oncolytic efficacy against human tumors was studied in melanoma xenografts. MV-aCTLA-4 and MV-aPD-L1 were equally efficient as parental MV in this model, with high rates of complete tumor remission (> 80%). Furthermore, we could demonstrate lysis of tumor cells and transgene expression in primary tissue from melanoma patients. The current results suggest rapid translation of combining immune checkpoint modulation with oncolytic viruses into clinical application. PMID:25156126

  13. CTLA-4 and PD-L1 checkpoint blockade enhances oncolytic measles virus therapy.

    PubMed

    Engeland, Christine E; Grossardt, Christian; Veinalde, Rūta; Bossow, Sascha; Lutz, Diana; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Shevchenko, Ivan; Umansky, Viktor; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Weichert, Wilko; Jäger, Dirk; von Kalle, Christof; Ungerechts, Guy

    2014-11-01

    We hypothesized that the combination of oncolytic virotherapy with immune checkpoint modulators would reduce tumor burden by direct cell lysis and stimulate antitumor immunity. In this study, we have generated attenuated Measles virus (MV) vectors encoding antibodies against CTLA-4 and PD-L1 (MV-aCTLA-4 and MV-aPD-L1). We characterized the vectors in terms of growth kinetics, antibody expression, and cytotoxicity in vitro. Immunotherapeutic effects were assessed in a newly established, fully immunocompetent murine model of malignant melanoma, B16-CD20. Analyses of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and restimulation experiments indicated a favorable immune profile after MV-mediated checkpoint modulation. Therapeutic benefits in terms of delayed tumor progression and prolonged median overall survival were observed for animals treated with vectors encoding anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-L1, respectively. Combining systemic administration of antibodies with MV treatment also improved therapeutic outcome. In vivo oncolytic efficacy against human tumors was studied in melanoma xenografts. MV-aCTLA-4 and MV-aPD-L1 were equally efficient as parental MV in this model, with high rates of complete tumor remission (> 80%). Furthermore, we could demonstrate lysis of tumor cells and transgene expression in primary tissue from melanoma patients. The current results suggest rapid translation of combining immune checkpoint modulation with oncolytic viruses into clinical application. PMID:25156126

  14. Thyroid malignant neoplasm-associated biomarkers as targets for oncolytic virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Mingxu; Ma, Yanping; Shah, Sahil Rajesh; Romano, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers associated with thyroid malignant neoplasm (TMN) have been widely applied in clinical diagnosis and in research oncological programs. The identification of novel TMN biomarkers has greatly improved the efficacy of clinical diagnosis. A more accurate diagnosis may lead to better clinical outcomes and effective treatments. However, the major deficiency of conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy is lack of specificity. Due to the macrokinetic interactions, adverse side effects will occur, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance. Therefore, a new treatment is urgently needed. As an alternative approach, oncolytic virotherapy may represent an opportunity for treatment strategies that can more specifically target tumor cells. In most cases, viral entry requires the expression of specific receptors on the surface of the host cell. Currently, molecular virologists and gene therapists are working on engineering oncolytic viruses with altered tropism for the specific targeting of malignant cells. This review focuses on the strategy of biomarkers for the production of novel TMN oncolytic therapeutics, which may improve the specificity of targeting of tumor cells and limit adverse effects in patients. PMID:27579295

  15. N-Myc expression enhances the oncolytic effects of vesicular stomatitis virus in human neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Corredor, Juan C; Redding, Nicole; Bloté, Karen; Robbins, Stephen M; Senger, Donna L; Bell, John C; Beaudry, Paul

    2016-01-01

    N-myc oncogene amplification is associated but not present in all cases of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB). Since oncogene expression could often modulate sensitivity to oncolytic viruses, we wanted to examine if N-myc expression status would determine virotherapy efficacy to high-risk NB. We showed that induction of exogenous N-myc in a non-N-myc-amplified cell line background (TET-21N) increased susceptibility to oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (mutant VSVΔM51) and alleviated the type I IFN-induced antiviral state. Cells with basal N-myc, on the other hand, were less susceptible to virus-induced oncolysis and established a robust IFN-mediated antiviral state. The same effects were also observed in NB cell lines with and without N-myc amplification. Microarray analysis showed that N-myc overexpression in TET-21N cells downregulated IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) with known antiviral functions. Furthermore, virus infection caused significant changes in global gene expression in TET-21N cells overexpressing N-myc. Such changes involved ISGs with various functions. Therefore, the present study showed that augmented susceptibility to VSVΔM51 by N-myc at least involves downregulation of ISGs with antiviral functions and alleviation of the IFN-stimulated antiviral state. Our studies suggest the potential utility of N-myc amplification/overexpression as a predictive biomarker of virotherapy response for high-risk NB using IFN-sensitive oncolytic viruses.

  16. The ex vivo purge of cancer cells using oncolytic viruses: recent advances and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Jovian J; Atkins, Harold L

    2015-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are treated with intensive high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation. This is followed by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation (HSCT) to rescue or reconstitute hematopoiesis damaged by the anticancer therapy. Autologous HSC grafts may contain cancer cells and purging could further improve treatment outcomes. Similarly, allogeneic HSCT may be improved by selectively purging alloreactive effector cells from the graft rather than wholesale immune cell depletion. Viral agents that selectively replicate in specific cell populations are being studied in experimental models of cancer and immunological diseases and have potential applications in the context of HSC graft engineering. This review describes preclinical studies involving oncolytic virus strains of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, myxoma virus, and reovirus as ex vivo purging agents for HSC grafts, as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental studies using oncolytic coxsackievirus, measles virus, parvovirus, vaccinia virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus to eradicate hematopoietic malignancies. Alternative ex vivo oncolytic virus strategies are also outlined that aim to reduce the risk of relapse following autologous HSCT and mitigate morbidity and mortality due to graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic HSCT. PMID:27512666

  17. Thyroid malignant neoplasm-associated biomarkers as targets for oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Mingxu; Ma, Yanping; Shah, Sahil Rajesh; Romano, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers associated with thyroid malignant neoplasm (TMN) have been widely applied in clinical diagnosis and in research oncological programs. The identification of novel TMN biomarkers has greatly improved the efficacy of clinical diagnosis. A more accurate diagnosis may lead to better clinical outcomes and effective treatments. However, the major deficiency of conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy is lack of specificity. Due to the macrokinetic interactions, adverse side effects will occur, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance. Therefore, a new treatment is urgently needed. As an alternative approach, oncolytic virotherapy may represent an opportunity for treatment strategies that can more specifically target tumor cells. In most cases, viral entry requires the expression of specific receptors on the surface of the host cell. Currently, molecular virologists and gene therapists are working on engineering oncolytic viruses with altered tropism for the specific targeting of malignant cells. This review focuses on the strategy of biomarkers for the production of novel TMN oncolytic therapeutics, which may improve the specificity of targeting of tumor cells and limit adverse effects in patients. PMID:27579295

  18. Clinical trials with oncolytic reovirus: Moving beyond phase I into combinations with standard therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, K.J.; Vile, R.G.; Melcher, A.; Chester, J.; Pandha, H.S.

    2013-01-01

    It is time for those working on oncolytic viruses to take stock of the status of the field. We now have at our disposal an array of potential therapeutic agents, and are beginning to conduct early-phase clinical trials in patients with relapsed/metastatic cancers. By drawing on lessons learned during the development of other biological therapies, such as monoclonal antibodies and targeted small molecule inhibitors, we are now in a position to chart the course of the next wave of trials that will go beyond the phase I studies of safety and feasibility. In this article we review our approach to the development of oncolytic viruses as cancer therapeutics. In doing so, we emphasise the fact that this process is modular and involves multiple iterative steps between the laboratory and the clinic. Ultimately, at least in the medium term, the future of oncolytic virotherapy lies in combination regimens with standard anti-cancer agents such as radiation and chemotherapy. PMID:20223697

  19. Poxvirus decapping enzymes enhance virulence by preventing the accumulation of dsRNA and the induction of innate antiviral responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shin-Wu; Katsafanas, George C; Liu, Ruikang; Wyatt, Linda S; Moss, Bernard

    2015-03-11

    Poxvirus replication involves synthesis of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which can trigger antiviral responses by inducing phosphorylation-mediated activation of protein kinase R (PKR) and stimulating 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS). PKR inactivates the translation initiation factor eIF2α via phosphorylation, while OAS induces the endonuclease RNase L to degrade RNA. We show that poxvirus decapping enzymes D9 and D10, which remove caps from mRNAs, inhibit these antiviral responses by preventing dsRNA accumulation. Catalytic site mutations of D9 and D10, but not of either enzyme alone, halt vaccinia virus late protein synthesis and inhibit virus replication. Infection with the D9-D10 mutant was accompanied by massive mRNA reduction, cleavage of ribosomal RNA, and phosphorylation of PKR and eIF2α that correlated with a ∼ 15-fold increase in dsRNA compared to wild-type virus. Additionally, mouse studies show extreme attenuation of the mutant virus. Thus, vaccinia virus decapping, in addition to targeting mRNAs for degradation, prevents dsRNA accumulation and anti-viral responses.

  20. Genomic characterization of a novel poxvirus contributing to the decline of the red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris) in the UK.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Colin J; Wood, Ann R; Thomas, Kathryn; Sainsbury, Anthony W; Gurnell, John; Dein, F Joshua; Nettleton, Peter F

    2006-08-01

    The genome of a virulent squirrelpox virus (SQPV) isolate was characterized in order to determine its relationship with other poxviruses. Restriction enzyme analysis suggested a genome length of approximately 158 kb, whilst sequence analysis of the two ends of the genome indicated a G + C composition of approximately 66 %. Two contiguous stretches of 23 and 37 kb at the left-hand and right-hand ends of the genome, respectively, were sequenced allowing the identification of at least 59 genes contained therein. The partial sequence of a further 15 genes was determined by spot sequencing of restriction fragments located across the genome. Phylogenetic analysis of 15 genes conserved in all the recognized genera of the subfamily Chordopoxvirinae confirmed that the SQPV does not group within the family Parapoxvirinae, but instead partitions on its own in a separate clade of the poxviruses. Analysis of serum from British woodland rodents failed to find any evidence of SQPV infection in wood mice or bank voles, but for the first time serum samples from grey squirrels in the USA were found to contain antibody against SQPV.

  1. Patient-derived mesenchymal stem cells as delivery vehicles for oncolytic virotherapy: novel state-of-the-art technology

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Manuel; García-Castro, Javier; Melen, Gustavo J; González-Murillo, África; Franco-Luzón, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is gaining interest in the clinic as a new weapon against cancer. In vivo administration of oncolytic viruses showed important limitations that decrease their effectiveness very significantly: the antiviral immune response causes the elimination of the therapeutic effect, and the poor natural ability of oncolytic viruses to infect micrometastatic lesions significantly minimizes the effective dose of virus. This review will focus on updating the technical and scientific foundations of one of the strategies developed to overcome these limitations, ie, using cells as vehicles for oncolytic viruses. Among many candidates, a special type of adult stem cell, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have already been used in the clinic as cell vehicles for oncolytic viruses, partly due to the fact that these cells are actively being evaluated for other indications. MSC carrier cells are used as Trojan horses loaded with oncoviruses, are administered systemically, and release their cargos at the right places. MSCs are equipped with an array of molecules involved in cell arrest in the capillaries (integrins and selectins), migration toward specific parenchymal locations within tissues (chemokine receptors), and invasion and degradation of the extracellular matrix (proteases). In addition to anatomical targeting capacity, MSCs have a well-recognized role in modulating immune responses by affecting cells of the innate (antigen-presenting cells, natural killer cells) and adaptive immune system (effector and regulatory lymphocytes). Therefore, carrier MSCs may also modulate the immune responses taking place after therapy, ie, the antiviral and the antitumor immune responses. PMID:27512678

  2. The combination of i-leader truncation and gemcitabine improves oncolytic adenovirus efficacy in an immunocompetent model.

    PubMed

    Puig-Saus, C; Laborda, E; Rodríguez-García, A; Cascalló, M; Moreno, R; Alemany, R

    2014-02-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) i-leader protein is a small protein of unknown function. The C-terminus truncation of the i-leader protein increases Ad release from infected cells and cytotoxicity. In the current study, we use the i-leader truncation to enhance the potency of an oncolytic Ad. In vitro, an i-leader truncated oncolytic Ad is released faster to the supernatant of infected cells, generates larger plaques, and is more cytotoxic in both human and Syrian hamster cell lines. In mice bearing human tumor xenografts, the i-leader truncation enhances oncolytic efficacy. However, in a Syrian hamster pancreatic tumor model, which is immunocompetent and less permissive to human Ad, antitumor efficacy is only observed when the i-leader truncated oncolytic Ad, but not the non-truncated version, is combined with gemcitabine. This synergistic effect observed in the Syrian hamster model was not seen in vitro or in immunodeficient mice bearing the same pancreatic hamster tumors, suggesting a role of the immune system in this synergism. These results highlight the interest of the i-leader C-terminus truncation because it enhances the antitumor potency of an oncolytic Ad and provides synergistic effects with gemcitabine in the presence of an immune competent system.

  3. Treatment of medulloblastoma with oncolytic measles viruses expressing the angiogenesis inhibitors endostatin and angiostatin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common type of pediatric brain tumor. Although numerous factors influence patient survival rates, more than 30% of all cases will ultimately be refractory to conventional therapies. Current standards of care are also associated with significant morbidities, giving impetus for the development of new treatments. We have previously shown that oncolytic measles virotherapy is effective against medulloblastoma, leading to significant prolongation of survival and even cures in mouse xenograft models of localized and metastatic disease. Because medulloblastomas are known to be highly vascularized tumors, we reasoned that the addition of angiogenesis inhibitors could further enhance the efficacy of oncolytic measles virotherapy. Toward this end, we have engineered an oncolytic measles virus that express a fusion protein of endostatin and angiostatin, two endogenous and potent inhibitors of angiogenesis. Methods Oncolytic measles viruses encoding human and mouse variants of a secretable endostatin/angiostatin fusion protein were designed and rescued according to established protocols. These viruses, known as MV-hE:A and MV-mE:A respectively, were then evaluated for their anti-angiogenic potential and efficacy against medulloblastoma cell lines and orthotopic mouse models of localized disease. Results Medulloblastoma cells infected by MV-E:A readily secrete endostatin and angiostatin prior to lysis. The inclusion of the endostatin/angiostatin gene did not negatively impact the measles virus’ cytotoxicity against medulloblastoma cells or alter its growth kinetics. Conditioned media obtained from these infected cells was capable of inhibiting multiple angiogenic factors in vitro, significantly reducing endothelial cell tube formation, viability and migration compared to conditioned media derived from cells infected by a control measles virus. Mice that were given a single intratumoral injection of MV-E:A likewise showed reduced numbers

  4. Combination of oncolytic adenovirus and endostatin inhibits human retinoblastoma in an in vivo mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiping; Wei, Fang; Li, Huiming; Ji, Xunda; Li, Shuxia; Chen, Xiafang

    2013-02-01

    There is a critical need for new paradigms in retinoblastoma (RB) treatment that would more efficiently inhibit tumor growth while sparing the vision of patients. Oncolytic adenoviruses with the ability to selectively replicate and kill tumor cells are a promising strategy for cancer gene therapy. Exploration of a novel targeting strategy for RB utilizing combined oncolytic adenovirus and anti-angiogenesis therapy was applied over the course of the current study with positive results. The oncolytic adenoviruses Ad-E2F1 p-E1A and Ad-TERT p-E1 were constructed. The E1 region was regulated by the E2F-1 promoter or the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter, respectively. Effects on both replication and promotion of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression were observed in the replication-defective adenovirus Ad-EGFP in diverse cancer cell lines, HXO-RB44, Y79, Hep3B, NCIH460, MCF-7 and HLF. The cancer cell death induced by these agents was also explored. The in situ RB model demonstrated that mice with tumors treated with the oncolytic adenovirus and replication-defective adenovirus Ad-endostatin exhibited notable cancer cell death. This anticancer effect was further examined by stereo microscope, and the survival rate of experimental mice was determined. Both Ad-E2F1 p-E1A and Ad-TERT p-E1 replicated specifically in cancer cells in vitro and promoted EGFP expression in Ad-EGFP, although Ad-E2F1 p-E1A demonstrated superior EGFP promotion activity than Ad-TERT p-E1. In Hep3B, NCIH460 and MCF-7 cells, the number of Ad-TERT p-E1 copies was observed to exceed of the number of Ad-E2F1 p-E1A copies by a minimum of 10-fold. Furthermore, Ad-TERT p-E1 demonstrated significantly superior oncolytic effects in the RB mouse model, and Ad-endostatin effectively suppressed tumor growth and extended the overall lifespan of subjects; however, the Ad-E2F1 p-E1A was clearly less effective in attaining these goals. Most notably, the antitumor effect and

  5. Identification and partial sequencing of a crocodile poxvirus associated with deeply penetrating skin lesions in farmed Nile crocodiles, Crocodylus niloticus.

    PubMed

    Huchzermeyer, F W; Wallace, D B; Putterill, J F; Gerdes, G H

    2009-09-01

    When large numbers of crocodile skins were downgraded because of the presence of small pin prick-like holes, collapsed epidermal cysts were found deep in the dermis of juvenile crocodiles while forming cysts were observed in hatchlings. Histopathology of these forming cysts showed the presence of intracytoplasmic inclusions in proliferating and ballooning epidermal cells. Pox virions were seen in electron microscope preparations made from the scabs of such early lesions. The partial sequencing of virus material from scrapings of these lesions and comparison of it with the published sequence of crocodile poxvirus showed the virus associated with the deep lesions to be closely related, but different. To differentiate between the two forms of crocodile pox infection it is suggested that the previously known form should be called "classical crocodile pox" and the newly discovered form "atypical crocodile pox". The application of strict hygiene measures brought about a decline in the percentage of downgraded skins.

  6. Safety and immunogenicity of recombinant poxvirus HIV-1 vaccines in young adults on highly active antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Greenough, Thomas C.; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Muresan, Petronella; McManus, Margaret; Persaud, Deborah; Fenton, Terry; Barker, Piers; Gaur, Aditya; Panicali, Dennis; Sullivan, John L.; Luzuriaga, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    A trial to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and fowlpox (FP) vectors expressing multiple HIV-1 proteins was conducted in twenty HIV-1 infected youth with suppressed viral replication on HAART. The MVA and FP-based multigene HIV-1 vaccines were safe and well tolerated. Increased frequencies of HIV-1 specific CD4+ proliferative responses and cytokine secreting cells were detected following immunization. Increased frequencies and breadth of HIV-1 specific CD8+ T cell responses were also detected. Plasma HIV-1–specific antibody levels and neutralizing activity were unchanged following vaccination. Poxvirus based vaccines may merit further study in therapeutic vaccine protocols. PMID:18940219

  7. Engineered measles virus as a novel oncolytic viral therapy system for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Blechacz, Boris; Splinter, Patrick L; Greiner, Suzanne; Myers, Rae; Peng, Kah-Whye; Federspiel, Mark J; Russell, Stephen J; LaRusso, Nicholas F

    2006-12-01

    The oncolytic measles virus Edmonston strain (MV-Edm), a nonpathogenic virus targeting cells expressing abundant CD46, selectively destroys neoplastic tissue. Clinical development of MV-Edm would benefit from noninvasive monitoring strategies to determine the speed and extent of the spread of the virus in treated patients and the location of virus-infected cells. We evaluated recombinant MV-Edm expressing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) or the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) for oncolytic potential in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and efficiency in tracking viruses in vivo by noninvasive monitoring. CD46 expression in human HCC and primary hepatocytes was assessed by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Infectivity, syncytium formation, and cytotoxicity of recombinant MV-Edm in HCC cell lines were evaluated by fluorescence microscopy, crystal violet staining, and the MTS assay. Transgene expression in HCC cell lines after infection with recombinant MV-Edm in vitro and in vivo was assessed by CEA concentration, 125I-uptake, and 123I-imaging studies. Toxicology studies were performed in Ifnar(KO)xCD46 transgenic mice. The CD46 receptor was highly expressed in HCC compared to nonmalignant hepatic tissue. Recombinant MV-Edm efficiently infected HCC cell lines, resulting in extensive syncytium formation followed by cell death. Transduction of HCC cell lines and subcutaneous HCC xenografts with recombinant MV-Edm resulted in high-level expression of transgenes in vitro and in vivo. MV-Edm was nontoxic in susceptible mice. Intratumoral and intravenous therapy with recombinant MV-Edm resulted in inhibition of tumor growth and prolongation of survival with complete tumor regression in up to one third of animals. In conclusion, engineered MV-Edm may be a potent and novel cancer gene therapy system for HCC. MV-Edm expressing CEA or hNIS elicited oncolytic effects in human HCC cell lines in vitro and in vivo, enabling the spread of the virus to be monitored in a

  8. Characteristics of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus displaying tumor-targeting ligands.

    PubMed

    Ammayappan, Arun; Peng, Kah-Whye; Russell, Stephen J

    2013-12-01

    We sought proof of principle that tumor-targeting ligands can be displayed on the surface of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) by engineering its glycoprotein. Here, we successfully rescued VSVs displaying tumor vasculature-targeting ligands. By using a rational approach, we investigated various feasible insertion sites on the G protein of VSV (VSV-G) for display of tumor vasculature-targeting ligands, cyclic RGD (cRGD) and echistatin. We found seven sites on VSV-G that tolerated insertion of the 9-residue cRGD peptide, two of which could tolerate insertion of the 49-amino acid echistatin domain. All of the ligand-displaying viruses replicated as well as the parental virus. In vitro studies demonstrated that the VSV-echistatin viruses specifically bound to targeted integrins. Since the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) was recently identified as a major receptor for VSV, we investigated the entry of ligand-displaying viruses after masking LDLR. The experiment showed that the modified viruses can enter the cell independently of LDLR, whereas entry of unmodified virus is significantly blocked by a specific monoclonal antibody against LDLR. Both parental and ligand-displaying viruses displayed equal oncolytic efficacies in a syngeneic mouse myeloma model. We further demonstrated that single-chain antibody fragments against tumor-specific antigens can be inserted at the N terminus of the G protein and that corresponding replication-competent VSVs can be rescued efficiently. Overall, we demonstrated that functional tumor-targeting ligands can be displayed on replication-competent VSVs without perturbing viral growth and oncolytic efficacy. This study provides a rational foundation for the future development of fully retargeted oncolytic VSVs.

  9. Single-particle characterization of oncolytic vaccinia virus by flow virometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Vera A; Renner, Tyler M; Varette, Oliver; Le Boeuf, Fabrice; Wang, Jiahu; Diallo, Jean-Simon; Bell, John C; Langlois, Marc-André

    2016-09-30

    Vaccinia virus (VV) is an oncolytic virus that is currently being evaluated as a promising cancer vaccine in several phase I, II and III clinical trials. Although several quality control tests are performed on each new batch of virus, these do not routinely include a systematic characterization of virus particle homogeneity, or relate the infectious titer to the total number of submicron sized particles (SSPs) present in the sample. SSPs are comprised of infectious virus and non-infectious viral particles, but also cell contaminants derived from the virus isolation procedures, such as cellular vesicles and debris. Here we have employed flow virometry (FV) analysis and sorting to isolate and characterize distinct SSP populations in therapeutic oncolytic VV preparations. We show that VV preparations contain SSPs heterogeneous in size and include large numbers of non-infectious VV particles. Furthermore, we used FV to illustrate how VV has a propensity to aggregate over time and under various handling and storage procedures. Accordingly, we find that together the infectious titer, the total number of SSPs, the number of viral genomes and the level of particle aggregation in a sample constitute useful parameters that greatly facilitate inter-sample assessment of physical quality, and also provides a means to monitor sample deterioration over time. Additionally, we have successfully employed FV sorting to further isolate virus from other particles by identifying a lipophilic dye that preferentially stains VV over other SSPs in the sample. Overall, we demonstrate that FV is a fast and effective tool that can be used to perform quality, and consistency control assessments of oncolytic VV vaccine preparations.

  10. STAT3 Activation Promotes Oncolytic HSV1 Replication in Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Okemoto, Kazuo; Wagner, Benjamin; Meisen, Hans; Haseley, Amy; Kaur, Balveen; Chiocca, Ennio Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies report that STAT3 signaling is a master regulator of mesenchymal transformation of gliomas and that STAT3 modulated genes are highly expressed in the mesenchymal transcriptome of gliomas. A currently studied experimental treatment for gliomas consists of intratumoral injection of oncolytic viruses (OV), such as oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (oHSV). We have described one particular oHSV (rQNestin34.5) that exhibits potent anti-glioma activity in animal models. Here, we hypothesized that alterations in STAT3 signaling in glioma cells may affect the replicative ability of rQNestin34.5. In fact, human U251 glioma cells engineered to either over-express STAT3 or with genetic down-regulation of STAT3 supported oHSV replication to a significantly higher or lesser degree, respectively, when compared to controls. Administration of pharmacologic agents that increase STAT3 phosphorylation/activation (Valproic Acid) or increase STAT3 levels (Interleukin 6) also significantly enhanced oHSV replication. Instead, administration of inhibitors of STAT3 phosphorylation/activation (LLL12) significantly reduced oHSV replication. STAT3 led to a reduction in interferon signaling in oHSV infected cells and inhibition of interferon signaling abolished the effect of STAT3 on oHSV replication. These data thus indicate that STAT3 signaling in malignant gliomas enhances oHSV replication, likely by inhibiting the interferon response in infected glioma cells, thus suggesting avenues for possible potentiation of oncolytic virotherapy. PMID:23936533

  11. Single-particle characterization of oncolytic vaccinia virus by flow virometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Vera A; Renner, Tyler M; Varette, Oliver; Le Boeuf, Fabrice; Wang, Jiahu; Diallo, Jean-Simon; Bell, John C; Langlois, Marc-André

    2016-09-30

    Vaccinia virus (VV) is an oncolytic virus that is currently being evaluated as a promising cancer vaccine in several phase I, II and III clinical trials. Although several quality control tests are performed on each new batch of virus, these do not routinely include a systematic characterization of virus particle homogeneity, or relate the infectious titer to the total number of submicron sized particles (SSPs) present in the sample. SSPs are comprised of infectious virus and non-infectious viral particles, but also cell contaminants derived from the virus isolation procedures, such as cellular vesicles and debris. Here we have employed flow virometry (FV) analysis and sorting to isolate and characterize distinct SSP populations in therapeutic oncolytic VV preparations. We show that VV preparations contain SSPs heterogeneous in size and include large numbers of non-infectious VV particles. Furthermore, we used FV to illustrate how VV has a propensity to aggregate over time and under various handling and storage procedures. Accordingly, we find that together the infectious titer, the total number of SSPs, the number of viral genomes and the level of particle aggregation in a sample constitute useful parameters that greatly facilitate inter-sample assessment of physical quality, and also provides a means to monitor sample deterioration over time. Additionally, we have successfully employed FV sorting to further isolate virus from other particles by identifying a lipophilic dye that preferentially stains VV over other SSPs in the sample. Overall, we demonstrate that FV is a fast and effective tool that can be used to perform quality, and consistency control assessments of oncolytic VV vaccine preparations. PMID:27614781

  12. Oncolytic Adenovirus Coated with Multidegradable Bioreducible Core-Cross-Linked Polyethylenimine for Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Nam, Joung-Pyo; Nam, Kihoon; Lee, Young Sook; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Sung Wan

    2015-07-13

    Recently, adenovirus (Ad) has been utilized as a viral vector for efficient gene delivery. However, substantial immunogenicity and toxicity have obstructed oncolytic Ad's transition into clinical studies. The goal of this study is to generate an adenoviral vector complexed with multidegradable bioreducible core-cross-linked polyethylenimine (rPEI) polymer that has low immunogenicity and toxicity while having higher transduction efficacy and stability. We have synthesized different molecular weight rPEIs and complexed with Ad at varying molar ratios to optimize delivery of the Ad/polymer complex. The size and surface charge of Ad/rPEIs were characterized. Of note, Ad/rPEIs showed significantly enhanced transduction efficiency compared to either naked Ad or Ad/25 kDa PEI in both coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) positive and negative cancer cells. The cellular uptake result demonstrated that the relatively small size of Ad/16 kDa rPEIs (below 200 nm) was more critical to the complex's internalization than its surface charge. Cancer cell killing effect and viral production were significantly increased when oncolytic Ad (RdB/shMet, or oAd) was complexed with 16 kDa rPEI in comparison to naked oAd-, oAd/25 kDa PEI-, or oAd/32 kDa rPEI-treated cells. This increased anticancer cytotoxicity was more readily apparent in CAR-negative MCF7 cells, implying that it can be used to treat a broad range of cancer cells. Furthermore, A549 and HT1080 cancer cells treated with oAd/16 kDa rPEI had significantly decreased Met and VEGF expression compared to either naked oAd or oAd/25 kDa PEI. Overall, these results demonstrate that shMet expressing oncolytic Ad complexed with multidegradable bioreducible core-cross-linked PEI could be used as efficient and safe cancer gene therapy. PMID:26096567

  13. Photodynamic therapy augments the efficacy of oncolytic vaccinia virus against primary and metastatic tumours in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gil, M; Bieniasz, M; Seshadri, M; Fisher, D; Ciesielski, M J; Chen, Y; Pandey, R K; Kozbor, D

    2011-01-01

    Background: Therapies targeted towards the tumour vasculature can be exploited for the purpose of improving the systemic delivery of oncolytic viruses to tumours. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved treatment for cancer that is known to induce potent effects on tumour vasculature. In this study, we examined the activity of PDT in combination with oncolytic vaccinia virus (OVV) against primary and metastatic tumours in mice. Methods: The effect of 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl-]-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH)-sensitised-PDT on the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy was investigated against subcutaneously implanted syngeneic murine NXS2 neuroblastoma and human FaDu head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. Treatment efficacy was evaluated by monitoring tumour growth and survival. The effects of combination treatment on vascular function were examined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and immunohistochemistry, whereas viral replication in tumour cells was analysed by a standard plaque assay. Normal tissue phototoxicity following PDT-OV treatment was studied using the mouse foot response assay. Results: Combination of PDT with OVV resulted in inhibition of primary and metastatic tumour growth compared with either monotherapy. PDT-induced vascular disruption resulted in higher intratumoural viral titres compared with the untreated tumours. Five days after delivery of OVV, there was a loss of blood flow to the interior of tumour that was associated with infiltration of neutrophils. Administration of OVV did not result in any additional photodynamic damage to normal mouse foot tissue. Conclusion: These results provide evidence into the usefulness of PDT as a means of enhancing intratumoural replication and therapeutic efficacy of OV. PMID:21989183

  14. Molecular Pathways: Mechanism of Action for Talimogene Laherparepvec, a New Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kohlhapp, Frederick J; Kaufman, Howard L

    2016-03-01

    Oncolytic viruses are native or engineered viruses that preferentially replicate in and lyse cancer cells. Selective tumor cell replication is thought to depend on infection of neoplastic cells, which harbor low levels of protein kinase R (PKR) and dysfunctional type I IFN signaling elements. These changes allow more efficient viral replication, and with selected deletion of specific viral genes, replication in normal cells with activated PKR may not be possible. Direct tumor cell lysis, release of soluble tumor antigens, and danger-associated molecular factors are all thought to help prime and promote tumor-specific immunity. Talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) is a genetically modified herpes simplex virus, type I and is the first oncolytic virus to demonstrate a clinical benefit in patients with melanoma. T-VEC has also been evaluated for the treatment of head and neck cancer, pancreatic cancer, and likely other types of cancer will be targeted in the near future. T-VEC has been modified for improved safety, tumor-selective replication, and induction of host immunity by deletion of several viral genes and expression of human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. Although the mechanism of action for T-VEC is incompletely understood, the safety profile of T-VEC and ability to promote immune responses suggest future combination studies with other immunotherapy approaches including checkpoint blockade through PD-1, PD-L1, and CTLA-4 to be a high priority for clinical development. Oncolytic viruses also represent unique regulatory and biosafety challenges but offer a potential new class of agents for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26719429

  15. Inhibitory effect of Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus carrying P53 gene against gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Sun, Bin; An, Ni; Tan, Weifeng; Cao, Lu; Luo, Xiangji; Yu, Yong; Feng, Feiling; Li, Bin; Wu, Mengchao; Su, Changqing; Jiang, Xiaoqing

    2011-12-01

    Gene therapy has become an important strategy for treatment of malignancies, but problems remains concerning the low gene transferring efficiency, poor transgene expression and limited targeting specific tumors, which have greatly hampered the clinical application of tumor gene therapy. Gallbladder cancer is characterized by rapid progress, poor prognosis, and aberrantly high expression of Survivin. In the present study, we used a human tumor-specific Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus vector carrying P53 gene, whose anti-cancer effect has been widely confirmed, to construct a wide spectrum, specific, safe, effective gene-viral therapy system, AdSurp-P53. Examining expression of enhanced green fluorecent protein (EGFP), E1A and the target gene P53 in the oncolytic adenovirus system validated that Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus had high proliferation activity and high P53 expression in Survivin-positive gallbladder cancer cells. Our in vitro cytotoxicity experiment demonstrated that AdSurp-P53 possessed a stronger cytotoxic effect against gallbladder cancer cells and hepatic cancer cells. The survival rate of EH-GB1 cells was lower than 40% after infection of AdSurp-P53 at multiplicity of infection (MOI) = 1 pfu/cell, while the rate was higher than 90% after infection of Ad-P53 at the same MOI, demonstrating that AdSurp-P53 has a potent cytotoxicity against EH-GB1 cells. The tumor growth was greatly inhibited in nude mice bearing EH-GB1 xenografts when the total dose of AdSurp-P53 was 1 × 10(9) pfu, and terminal dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) revealed that the apoptotic rate of cancer cells was (33.4 ± 8.4)%. This oncolytic adenovirus system overcomes the long-standing shortcomings of gene therapy: poor transgene expression and targeting of only specific tumors, with its therapeutic effect better than the traditional Ad-P53 therapy regimen already on market; our system might be used for patients with advanced gallbladder cancer and

  16. Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part II: potential clinical application of oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Gregory K; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Gillespie, George Yancey; Markert, James M; Waters, Alicia M; Chen, Chun-Yu; Denton, Nicholas L; Haworth, Kellie B; Hutzen, Brian; Leddon, Jennifer L; Streby, Keri A; Wang, Pin-Yi; Cripe, Timothy P

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic engineered herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) possess many biologic and functional attributes that support their use in clinical trials in children with solid tumors. Tumor cells, in an effort to escape regulatory mechanisms that would impair their growth and progression, have removed many mechanisms that would have protected them from virus infection and eventual virus-mediated destruction. Viruses engineered to exploit this weakness, like mutant HSV, can be safely employed as tumor cell killers, since normal cells retain these antiviral strategies. Many preclinical studies and early phase trials in adults demonstrated that oncolytic HSV can be safely used and are highly effective in killing tumor cells that comprise pediatric malignancies, without generating the toxic side effects of nondiscriminatory chemotherapy or radiation therapy. A variety of engineered viruses have been developed and tested in numerous preclinical models of pediatric cancers and initial trials in patients are underway. In Part II of this review series, we examine the preclinical evidence to support the further advancement of oncolytic HSV in the pediatric population. We discuss clinical advances made to date in this emerging era of oncolytic virotherapy. PMID:26436134

  17. Application of interferon modulators to overcome partial resistance of human ovarian cancers to VSV-GP oncolytic viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dold, Catherine; Rodriguez Urbiola, Carles; Wollmann, Guido; Egerer, Lisa; Muik, Alexander; Bellmann, Lydia; Fiegl, Heidelinde; Marth, Christian; Kimpel, Janine; von Laer, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we described an oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus variant pseudotyped with the nonneurotropic glycoprotein of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, VSV-GP, which was highly effective in glioblastoma. Here, we tested its potency for the treatment of ovarian cancer, a leading cause of death from gynecological malignancies. Effective oncolytic activity of VSV-GP could be demonstrated in ovarian cancer cell lines and xenografts in mice; however, remission was temporary in most mice. Analysis of the innate immune response revealed that ovarian cancer cell lines were able to respond to and produce type I interferon, inducing an antiviral state upon virus infection. This is in stark contrast to published data for other cancer cell lines, which were mostly found to be interferon incompetent. We showed that in vitro this antiviral state could be reverted by combining VSV-GP with the JAK1/2-inhibitor ruxolitinib. In addition, for the first time, we report the in vivo enhancement of oncolytic virus treatment by ruxolitinib, both in subcutaneous as well as in orthotopic xenograft mouse models, without causing significant additional toxicity. In conclusion, VSV-GP has the potential to be a potent and safe oncolytic virus to treat ovarian cancer, especially when combined with an inhibitor of the interferon response. PMID:27738655

  18. Biodistribution Analysis of Oncolytic Adenoviruses in Patient Autopsy Samples Reveals Vascular Transduction of Noninjected Tumors and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Koski, Anniina; Bramante, Simona; Kipar, Anja; Oksanen, Minna; Juhila, Juuso; Vassilev, Lotta; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-01-01

    In clinical trials with oncolytic adenoviruses, there has been no mortality associated with treatment vectors. Likewise, in the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP), where 290 patients were treated with 10 different viruses, no vector-related mortality was observed. However, as the patient population who received adenovirus treatments in ATAP represented heavily pretreated patients, often with very advanced disease, some patients died relatively soon after receiving their virus treatment mandating autopsy to investigate cause of death. Eleven such autopsies were performed and confirmed disease progression as the cause of death in each case. The regulatory requirement for investigating the safety of advanced therapy medical products presented a unique opportunity to study tissue samples collected as a routine part of the autopsies. Oncolytic adenoviral DNA was recovered in a wide range of tissues, including injected and noninjected tumors and various normal tissues, demonstrating the ability of the vector to disseminate through the vascular route. Furthermore, we recovered and cultured viable virus from samples of noninjected brain metastases of an intravenously treated patient, confirming that oncolytic adenovirus can reach tumors through the intravascular route. Data presented here give mechanistic insight into mode of action and biodistribution of oncolytic adenoviruses in cancer patients. PMID:26156245

  19. Targeting CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling with oncolytic virotherapy disrupts tumor vasculature and inhibits breast cancer metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Margaret; Seshadri, Mukund; Komorowski, Marcin P.; Abrams, Scott I.; Kozbor, Danuta

    2013-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses hold promise for the treatment of cancer, but their interaction with the tumor microenvironment needs to be elucidated for optimal tumor cell killing. Because the CXCR4 receptor for the stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) chemokine is one of the key stimuli involved in signaling interactions between tumor cells and their stromal microenvironment, we used oncolytic virotherapy with a CXCR4 antagonist to target the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling axis in a triple-negative 4T1 breast carcinoma in syngeneic mice. We show here that CXCR4 antagonist expression from an oncolytic vaccinia virus delivered intravenously to mice with orthotopic tumors attains higher intratumoral concentration than its soluble counterpart and exhibits increased efficacy over that mediated by oncolysis alone. A systemic delivery of the armed virus after resection of the primary tumor was efficacious in inhibiting the development of spontaneous metastasis and increased overall tumor-free survival. Inhibition of tumor growth with the armed virus was associated with destruction of tumor vasculature, reductions in expression of CXCL12 and VEGF, and decrease in intratumoral numbers of bone marrow-derived endothelial and myeloid cells. These changes led to induction of antitumor antibody responses and resistance to tumor rechallenge. Engineering an oncolytic virus armed with a CXCR4 antagonist represents an innovative strategy that targets multiple elements within the tumor microenvironment. As such, this approach could have a significant therapeutic impact against primary and metastatic breast cancer. PMID:23509246

  20. GP73-regulated oncolytic adenoviruses possess potent killing effect on human liver cancer stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong; Ma, Buyun; Liu, Tao; Yang, Yu; Xie, Wenjie; Liu, Xianglei; Huang, Fang; Liu, Tao; Zhou, Xiumei; Liu, Xinyuan; Wang, Yigang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells, are highly metastatic, chemo-resistant and tumorigenic, and are critical for cancer development, maintenance and recurrence. Oncolytic adenovirus could targetedly kill CSCs and has been acted as a promising anticancer agent. Currently, a novel GP73-regulated oncolytic adenovirus GD55 was constructed to specifically treat liver cancer and exhibited obvious cytotoxicity effect. However, there remains to be confirmed that whether GD55 could effectively eliminate liver CSCs. We first utilized the suspension culture to enrich the liver CSCs-like cells, which acquires the properties of liver CSCs in self-renewal, differentiation, quiescence, chemo-resistance and tumorigenicity. The results indicated that GD55 elicited more significant cytotoxicity and stronger oncolytic effect in liver CSC-like cells compared to common oncolytic virus ZD55. Additionally, GD55 possessed the greater efficacy in suppressing the growth of implanted tumors derived from liver CSC-like cells than ZD55. Furthermore, GD55 induced remarkable apoptosis of liver CSC-like cells in vitro and in vivo, and inhibited the propogation of cells and angiogenesis in xenograft tumor tissues. Thus, GD55 may virtually represent an attractive therapeutic agent for targeting liver CSCs to achieve better clinical outcomes for HCC patients. PMID:27121064

  1. Oncolytic and immunologic cancer therapy with GM-CSF-armed vaccinia virus of Tian Tan strain Guang9.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lili; Fan, Jun; Guo, Mingming; Huang, Biao

    2016-03-28

    Targeted oncolytic vaccinia viruses are being developed as a novel strategy in cancer therapy. Arming vaccinia viruses with immunostimulatory cytokines can enhance antitumor efficacy. Such engineered oncolytic viruses, like JX-594, a Wyeth strain vaccinia virus modified with human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), have shown promising results and have proceeded rapidly in clinical trials. However, the oncolytic potential of the Chinese vaccine strain Tian Tan (VTT) has not been explored. In this study, we constructed a targeted oncolytic vaccinia virus of Tian Tan strain Guang9 (VG9) expressing murine GM-CSF (VG9-GMCSF) and evaluated the antitumor effect of this recombinant vaccinia virus in a murine melanoma model. In vitro, viral replication and cytotoxicity of VG9-GMCSF was as potent as VG9; in vivo, VG9-GMCSF significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneously implanted melanoma tumors, prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice, and produced an antitumor cytotoxic response. Such antitumor effect may be due to the lytic nature of virus as well as the stimulation of immune activity by GM-CSF production. Our results indicate that VG9-GMCSF induces strong tumoricidal activity, providing a potential therapeutic strategy for combating cancer.

  2. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus kills stem-like tumor-initiating colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Susanne G; Haddad, Dana; Au, Joyce; Carson, Joshua S; O’Leary, Michael P; Lewis, Christina; Monette, Sebastien; Fong, Yuman

    2016-01-01

    Stem-like tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are implicated in cancer progression and recurrence, and can be identified by sphere-formation and tumorigenicity assays. Oncolytic viruses infect, replicate in, and kill a variety of cancer cells. In this study, we seek proof of principle that TICs are susceptible to viral infection. HCT8 human colon cancer cells were subjected to serum-free culture to generate TIC tumorspheres. Parent cells and TICs were infected with HSV-1 subtype NV1066. Cytotoxicity, viral replication, and Akt1 expression were assessed. TIC tumorigenicity was confirmed and NV1066 efficacy was assessed in vivo. NV1066 infection was highly cytotoxic to both parent HCT8 cells and TICs. In both populations, cell-kill of >80% was achieved within 3 days of infection at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1.0. However, the parent cells required 2-log greater viral replication to achieve the same cytotoxicity. TICs overexpressed Akt1 in vitro and formed flank tumors from as little as 100 cells, growing earlier, faster, larger, and with greater histologic atypia than tumors from parent cells. Treatment of TIC-induced tumors with NV1066 yielded tumor regression and slowed tumor growth. We conclude that colon TICs are selected for by serum-free culture, overexpress Akt1, and are susceptible to oncolytic viral infection. PMID:27347556

  3. Oncolytic HSV-1 Infection of Tumors Induces Angiogenesis and Upregulates CYR61

    PubMed Central

    Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Hardcastle, Jayson; Thakur, Roopa; Shroll, Joshua; Nowicki, Michal; Otsuki, Akihiro; Chiocca, E Antonio; Kaur, Balveen

    2009-01-01

    Oncolytic viral therapy is under evaluation for toxicity and efficacy in clinical trials relating to several different tumors. We report a significant increase in the angiogenic index of oncolytic virus (OV)-treated glioma-matrigel implants (2.83-fold, P < 0.02). In a rat intracranial glioma model, large tumors from OV-treated animals were significantly more angiogenic than the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated control tumors (OV: 101 ± 21.6; PBS: 19.8 ± 10; P = 0.0037). Transcript profiling of OV-treated tumors revealed dysregulation of several transcripts involved in glioma angiogenesis. OV-mediated induction of CYR61 gene expression (8.94-fold, P = 0.001) correlated significantly with the presence of OV in tumor tissue in vivo (R = 0.7, P < 0.001). Further, induction of CYR61 mRNA and protein were confirmed in multiple human cancer cell lines and primary human tumor-derived cells in vitro, and in tumor lysate and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in vivo. Finally, we show that treatment of glioma cells with Cilengitide, known to counter CYR61-induced integrin activation, significantly suppressed the proangiogenic effect of OV treatment of gliomas (P < 0.05). PMID:18545226

  4. Enhanced Antitumor Efficacy of Vasculostatin (Vstat120) Expressing Oncolytic HSV-1

    PubMed Central

    Hardcastle, Jayson; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Dmitrieva, Nina; Sayers, Martin P; Ahmad, Sarwat; Waterman, Peter; Weissleder, Ralph; Chiocca, E Antonio; Kaur, Balveen

    2009-01-01

    Oncolytic viral (OV) therapy is a promising therapeutic modality for brain tumors. Vasculostatin (Vstat120) is the cleaved and secreted extracellular fragment of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 (BAI1), a brain-specific receptor. To date, the therapeutic efficacy of Vstat120 delivery into established tumors has not been investigated. Here we tested the therapeutic efficacy of combining Vstat120 gene delivery in conjunction with OV therapy. We constructed RAMBO (Rapid Antiangiogenesis Mediated By Oncolytic virus), which expresses Vstat120 under the control of the herpes simplex virus (HSV) IE4/5 promoter. Secreted Vstat120 was detected as soon as 4 hours postinfection in vitro and was retained for up to 13 days after OV therapy in subcutaneous tumors. RAMBO-produced Vstat120 efficiently inhibited endothelial cell migration and tube formation in vitro (P = 0.0005 and P = 0.0184, respectively) and inhibited angiogenesis (P = 0.007) in vivo. There was a significant suppression of intracranial and subcutaneous glioma growth in mice treated with RAMBO compared to the control virus, HSVQ (P = 0.0021 and P < 0.05, respectively). Statistically significant reduction in tumor vascular volume fraction (VVF) and microvessel density (MVD) was observed in tumors treated with RAMBO. This is the first study to report the antitumor effects of Vstat120 delivery into established tumors and supports the further development of RAMBO as a possible cancer therapy. PMID:19844198

  5. Immunological effects of a tumor necrosis factor alpha-armed oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Hirvinen, Mari; Rajecki, Maria; Kapanen, Mika; Parviainen, Suvi; Rouvinen-Lagerström, Noora; Diaconu, Iulia; Nokisalmi, Petri; Tenhunen, Mikko; Hemminki, Akseli; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    For long it has been recognized that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) has anticancer characteristics, and its use as a cancer therapeutic was proposed already in the 1980s. However, its systemic toxicity has limited its usability. Oncolytic viruses, selectively cancer-killing viruses, have shown great potency, and one of their most useful aspects is their ability to produce high amounts of transgene products locally, resulting in high local versus systemic concentrations. Therefore, the overall magnitude of tumor cell killing results from the combination of oncolysis, transgene-mediated direct effect such as TNFa-mediated apoptosis, and, perhaps most significantly, from activation of the host immune system against the tumor. We generated a novel chimeric oncolytic adenovirus expressing human TNFa, Ad5/3-D24-hTNFa, whose efficacy and immunogenicity were tested in vitro and in vivo. The hTNFa-expressing adenovirus showed increased cancer-eradicating potency, which was shown to be because of elevated apoptosis and necrosis rates and induction of various immune responses. Interestingly, we saw increase in immunogenic cell death markers in Ad5/3-d24-hTNFa-treated cells. Moreover, tumors treated with Ad5/3-D24-hTNFa displayed enhanced presence of OVA-specific cytotoxic T cells. We thus can conclude that tumor eradication and antitumor immune responses mediated by Ad5/3-d24-hTNFa offer a new potential drug candidate for cancer therapy.

  6. Polymeric Cups for Cavitation-mediated Delivery of Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus.

    PubMed

    Myers, Rachel; Coviello, Christian; Erbs, Philippe; Foloppe, Johann; Rowe, Cliff; Kwan, James; Crake, Calum; Finn, Seán; Jackson, Edward; Balloul, Jean-Marc; Story, Colin; Coussios, Constantin; Carlisle, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) could become the most powerful and selective cancer therapies. However, the limited transport of OV into and throughout tumors following intravenous injection means their clinical administration is often restricted to direct intratumoral dosing. Application of physical stimuli, such as focused ultrasound, offers a means of achieving enhanced mass transport. In particular, shockwaves and microstreaming resulting from the instigation of an ultrasound-induced event known as inertial cavitation can propel OV hundreds of microns. We have recently developed a polymeric cup formulation which, when delivered intravenously, provides the nuclei for instigation of sustained inertial cavitation events within tumors. Here we report that exposure of tumors to focused ultrasound after intravenous coinjection of cups and oncolytic vaccinia virus , leads to substantial and significant increases in activity. When cavitation was instigated within SKOV-3 or HepG2 xenografts, reporter gene expression from vaccinia virus was enhanced 1,000-fold (P < 0.0001) or 10,000-fold (P < 0.001), respectively. Similar increases in the number of vaccinia virus genomes recovered from tumors were also observed. In survival studies, the application of cup mediated cavitation to a vaccinia virus expressing a prodrug converting enzyme provided significant (P < 0.05) retardation of tumor growth. This technology could improve the clinical utility of all biological therapeutics including OV. PMID:27375160

  7. The oncolytic effects of reovirus in canine solid tumor cell lines

    PubMed Central

    IGASE, Masaya; HWANG, Chung Chew; COFFEY, Matt; OKUDA, Masaru; NOGUCHI, Shunsuke; MIZUNO, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a new strategy for cancer treatment for humans and dogs. Reovirus has been proven to be a potent oncolytic virus in human medicine. Our laboratory has previously reported that canine mast cell tumor and canine lymphoma were susceptible to reovirus. In this study, canine solid tumor cell lines (mammary gland tumor, osteosarcoma and malignant melanoma) were tested to determine their susceptibility towards reovirus. We demonstrated that reovirus induces more than 50% cell death in three canine mammary gland tumors and one canine malignant melanoma cell line. The reovirus-induced cell death occurred via the activation of caspase 3. Ras activation has been shown to be one of the important mechanisms of reovirus-susceptibility in human cancers. However, Ras activation was not related to the reovirus-susceptibility in canine solid tumor cell lines, which was similar to reports in canine mast cell tumor and canine lymphoma. The results of this study highly suggest that canine mammary gland tumor and canine malignant melanoma are also potential candidates for reovirus therapy in veterinary oncology. PMID:25648933

  8. Oncolytic reovirus synergizes with chemotherapeutic agents to promote cell death in canine mammary gland tumor

    PubMed Central

    Igase, Masaya; Hwang, Chung Chew; Kambayashi, Satoshi; Kubo, Masato; Coffey, Matt; Miyama, Takako Shimokawa; Baba, Kenji; Okuda, Masaru; Noguchi, Shunsuke; Mizuno, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    The oncolytic effects of reovirus in various cancers have been proven in many clinical trials in human medicine. Oncolytic virotherapy using reovirus for canine cancers is being developed in our laboratory. The objective of this study was to examine the synergistic anti-cancer effects of a combination of reovirus and low doses of various chemotherapeutic agents on mammary gland tumors (MGTs) in dogs. The first part of this study demonstrated the efficacy of reovirus in canine MGTs in vitro and in vivo. Reovirus alone exerted significant cell death by means of caspase-dependent apoptosis in canine MGT cell lines. A single injection of reovirus impeded growth of canine MGT tumors in xenografted mice, but was insufficient to induce complete tumor regression. The second part of this study highlighted the anti-tumor effects of reovirus in combination with low doses of paclitaxel, carboplatin, gemcitabine, or toceranib. Enhanced synergistic activity was observed in the MGT cell line treated concomitantly with reovirus and in all the chemotherapeutic agents except toceranib. In addition, combining reovirus with paclitaxel or gemcitabine at half dosage of half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) enhanced cytotoxicity by activating caspase 3. Our data suggest that the combination of reovirus and low dose chemotherapeutic agents provides an attractive option in canine cancer therapy. PMID:26733729

  9. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Meacham, Amy M.; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R.; McFadden, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) can be curative for certain hematologic malignancies, but the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major limitation for wider application. Ideally, strategies to improve allo-HCT would involve suppression of T lymphocytes that drive GVHD while sparing those that mediate graft-versus-malignancy (GVM). Recently, using a xenograft model, we serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus (MYXV) prevented GVHD while permitting GVM. In this study, we show that MYXV binds to resting, primary human T lymphocytes but will only proceed into active virus infection after the T cells receive activation signals. MYXV-infected T lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation after activation with reduced expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and soluble IL-2Rα, but did not affect expression of IL-4 and IL-10. MYXV suppressed T-cell proliferation in 2 patterns (full vs partial) depending on the donor. In terms of GVM, we show that MYXV-infected activated human T lymphocytes effectively deliver live oncolytic virus to human multiple myeloma cells, thus augmenting GVM by transfer of active oncolytic virus to residual cancer cells. Given this dual capacity of reducing GVHD plus increasing the antineoplastic effectiveness of GVM, ex vivo virotherapy with MYXV may be a promising clinical adjunct to allo-HCT regimens. PMID:25904246

  10. Precise Scheduling of Chemotherapy Primes VEGF-producing Tumors for Successful Systemic Oncolytic Virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kottke, Timothy; Chester, John; Ilett, Elizabeth; Thompson, Jill; Diaz, Rosa; Coffey, Matt; Selby, Peter; Nuovo, Gerard; Pulido, Jose; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Pandha, Hardev; Harrington, Kevin; Melcher, Alan; Vile, Richard

    2011-01-01

    We have previously reported that a burst of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling to tumor-associated endothelium induces a proviral state, during which systemically delivered oncolytic reovirus can replicate in endothelium, thereby inducing immune-mediated vascular collapse and significant antitumor therapy. Using chimeric receptors, we show here that induction of the proviral state proceeds through VEGFR2, but not VEGFR1, signaling in endothelial cells. In contrast, innate immune activation by reovirus-exposed endothelial cells was predominantly through VEGFR1. By screening conventional chemotherapies for their ability to induce similar effects in combination with reovirus both in vitro and in vivo, we observed that the proviral state could also be induced in endothelial cells exposed to VEGF during rebound from paclitaxel-mediated inhibition of VEGF signaling. We translated these in vitro findings in vivo by careful scheduling of paclitaxel chemotherapy with systemic virotherapy, neither of which alone had therapeutic effects against B16 tumors. Systemic availability of reovirus during endothelial cell recovery from paclitaxel treatment allowed for endothelial replication of the virus, immune-mediated therapy, and tumor cures. Therefore, careful scheduling of combination viro- and chemotherapies, which preclinical testing suggests are individually ineffective against tumor cells, can lead to rational new clinical protocols for systemic treatments with oncolytic viruses. PMID:21792179

  11. A double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus with improved safety for adenocarcinoma therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Na; Fan, Jun Kai; Gu, Jin Fa; He, Ling Feng; Tang, Wen Hao; Cao, Xin; Liu, Xin Yuan

    2009-10-16

    Safety and efficiency are equally important to be considered in developing oncolytic adenovirus. Previously, we have reported that ZD55, an oncolytic adenovirus with the deletion of E1B-55K gene, exhibited potent antitumor activity. In this study, to improve the safety of ZD55, we utilized MUC1 promoter to replace the native promoter of E1A on the basis of ZD55, and generated a double-regulated adenovirus, named MUD55. Our data demonstrated that the expression of early and late genes of MUD55 was both reduced in MUC1-negative cells, resulting in its stricter glandular-tumor selective progeny production. The cytopathic effect of MUD55 was about 10-fold lower than mono-regulated adenovirus ZD55 or Ad.MUC1 in normal cells and not obviously attenuated in glandular tumor cells. Moreover, MUD55 showed the least liver toxicity when administrated by intravenous injection in nude mice. These results indicate that MUD55 could be a promising candidate for the treatment of adenocarcinoma.

  12. Oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus expressing interferon-γ has enhanced therapeutic activity

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; Roy, Dominic Guy; Falls, Theresa; Twumasi-Boateng, Kwame; St-Germain, Lauren Elizabeth; Marguerie, Monique; Garcia, Vanessa; Selman, Mohammed; Jennings, Victoria Ann; Pettigrew, Jessica; Amos, Sally; Diallo, Jean-Simon; Nelson, Brad; Bell, John Cameron

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are known to stimulate the antitumor immune response by specifically replicating in tumor cells. This is believed to be an important aspect of the durable responses observed in some patients and the field is rapidly moving toward immunotherapy. As a further means to engage the immune system, we engineered a virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), to encode the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-γ. We used the 4T1 mammary adenocarcinoma as well as other murine tumor models to characterize immune responses in tumor-bearing animals generated by treatment with our viruses. The interferon-γ-encoding virus demonstrated greater activation of dendritic cells and drove a more profound secretion of proinflammatory cytokines compared to the parental virus. From a therapeutic point of view, the interferon-γ virus slowed tumor growth, minimized lung tumors, and prolonged survival in several murine tumor models. The improved efficacy was lost in immunocompromized animals; hence the mechanism appears to be T-cell-mediated. Taken together, these results demonstrate the ability of oncolytic viruses to act as immune stimulators to drive antitumor immunity as well as their potential for targeted gene therapy. PMID:27119116

  13. Oncolytic reovirus enhances rituximab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Parrish, C; Scott, G B; Migneco, G; Scott, K J; Steele, L P; Ilett, E; West, E J; Hall, K; Selby, P J; Buchanan, D; Varghese, A; Cragg, M S; Coffey, M; Hillmen, P; Melcher, A A; Errington-Mais, F

    2015-09-01

    The naturally occurring oncolytic virus (OV), reovirus, replicates in cancer cells causing direct cytotoxicity, and can activate innate and adaptive immune responses to facilitate tumour clearance. Reovirus is safe, well tolerated and currently in clinical testing for the treatment of multiple myeloma, in combination with dexamethasone/carfilzomib. Activation of natural killer (NK) cells has been observed after systemic delivery of reovirus to cancer patients; however, the ability of OV to potentiate NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is unexplored. This study elucidates the potential of oncolytic reovirus for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), both as a direct cytotoxic agent and as an immunomodulator. We demonstrate that reovirus: (i) is directly cytotoxic against CLL, which requires replication-competent virus; (ii) phenotypically and functionally activates patient NK cells via a monocyte-derived interferon-α (IFNα)-dependent mechanism; and (iii) enhances ADCC-mediated killing of CLL in combination with anti-CD20 antibodies. Our data provide strong preclinical evidence to support the use of reovirus in combination with anti-CD20 immunotherapy for the treatment of CLL.

  14. Turning killer into cure -- the story of oncolytic herpes simplex viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaun Xiaoliu

    2015-11-01

    Viruses have the intrinsic capability to kill host cells. Even when the initial infection consists of only a few viruses, they can reproduce themselves in large quantities within a short time and quickly spread to nearby cells, causing substantial tissue damage. These same infectious properties become desirable if they can be converted into killer agents with specificity for malignant cells. Cancer virotherapy is doing exactly that by modifying viruses in ways that allow them to replicate in malignant cells but not in normal cells. Although relatively young, the field has seen significant progress in recent years. For example, the most recent phase III trial data on a herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based oncolytic virus (T-VEC) show substantial improvement in objective and durable responses over the control arm in melanoma patients, prompting speculation that a virotherapy may receive FDA approval for clinical use in the very near future. This review focuses on HSV-based oncolytic viruses, from their early history to their most recent development, with discussion of promising directions for further improvement. PMID:26645902

  15. Generation of an adenovirus-parvovirus chimera with enhanced oncolytic potential.

    PubMed

    El-Andaloussi, Nazim; Bonifati, Serena; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Mailly, Laurent; Daeffler, Laurent; Deryckère, François; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Rommelaere, Jean; Marchini, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    In this study, our goal was to generate a chimeric adenovirus-parvovirus (Ad-PV) vector that combines the high-titer and efficient gene transfer of adenovirus with the anticancer potential of rodent parvovirus. To this end, the entire oncolytic PV genome was inserted into a replication-defective E1- and E3-deleted Ad5 vector genome. As we found that parvoviral NS expression inhibited Ad-PV chimera production, we engineered the parvoviral P4 early promoter, which governs NS expression, by inserting into its sequence tetracycline operator elements. As a result of these modifications, P4-driven expression was blocked in the packaging T-REx-293 cells, which constitutively express the tetracycline repressor, allowing high-yield chimera production. The chimera effectively delivered the PV genome into cancer cells, from which fully infectious replication-competent parvovirus particles were generated. Remarkably, the Ad-PV chimera exerted stronger cytotoxic activities against various cancer cell lines, compared with the PV and Ad parental viruses, while being still innocuous to a panel of tested healthy primary human cells. This Ad-PV chimera represents a novel versatile anticancer agent which can be subjected to further genetic manipulations in order to reinforce its enhanced oncolytic capacity through arming with transgenes or retargeting into tumor cells.

  16. Oncolytic and immunotherapeutic vaccinia induces antibody-mediated complement-dependent cancer cell lysis in humans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Kyung; Breitbach, Caroline J; Moon, Anne; Heo, Jeong; Lee, Yu Kyoung; Cho, Mong; Lee, Jun Woo; Kim, Seong-Geun; Kang, Dae Hwan; Bell, John C; Park, Byeong Ho; Kirn, David H; Hwang, Tae-Ho

    2013-05-15

    Oncolytic viruses cause direct cytolysis and cancer-specific immunity in preclinical models. The goal of this study was to demonstrate induction of functional anticancer immunity that can lyse target cancer cells in humans. Pexa-Vec (pexastimogene devacirepvec; JX-594) is a targeted oncolytic and immunotherapeutic vaccinia virus engineered to express human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Pexa-Vec demonstrated replication, GM-CSF expression, and tumor responses in previous phase 1 trials. We now evaluated whether Pexa-Vec induced functional anticancer immunity both in the rabbit VX2 tumor model and in patients with diverse solid tumor types in phase 1. Antibody-mediated complement-dependent cancer cell cytotoxicity (CDC) was induced by intravenous Pexa-Vec in rabbits; transfer of serum from Pexa-Vec-treated animals to tumor-bearing animals resulted in tumor necrosis and improved survival. In patients with diverse tumor types treated on a phase 1 trial, CDC developed within 4 to 8 weeks in most patients; normal cells were resistant to the cytotoxic effects. T lymphocyte activation in patients was evidenced by antibody class switching. We determined that patients with the longest survival duration had the highest CDC activity, and identified candidate target tumor cell antigens. Thus, we demonstrated that Pexa-Vec induced polyclonal antibody-mediated CDC against multiple tumor antigens both in rabbits and in patients with diverse solid tumor types.

  17. Cell Carriage, Delivery, and Selective Replication of an Oncolytic Virus in Tumor in Patients

    PubMed Central

    Adair, Robert A.; Roulstone, Victoria; Scott, Karen J.; Morgan, Ruth; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Fuller, Martin; Beirne, Deborah; West, Emma J.; Jennings, Victoria A.; Rose, Ailsa; Kyula, Joan; Fraser, Sheila; Dave, Rajiv; Anthoney, David A.; Merrick, Alison; Prestwich, Robin; Aldouri, Amer; Donnelly, Oliver; Pandha, Hardev; Coffey, Matt; Selby, Peter; Vile, Richard; Toogood, Giles; Harrington, Kevin; Melcher, Alan A.

    2013-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses, which preferentially lyse cancer cells and stimulate an antitumor immune response, represent a promising approach to the treatment of cancer. However, how they evade the antiviral immune response and their selective delivery to, and replication in, tumor over normal tissue has not been investigated in humans. Here,we treated patients with a single cycle of intravenous reovirus before planned surgery to resect colorectal cancer metastases in the liver. Tracking the viral genome in the circulation showed that reovirus could be detected in plasma and blood mononuclear, granulocyte, and platelet cell compartments after infusion. Despite the presence of neutralizing antibodies before viral infusion in all patients, replication-competent reovirus that retained cytotoxicity was recovered from blood cells but not plasma, suggesting that transport by cells could protect virus for potential delivery to tumors. Analysis of surgical specimens demonstrated greater, preferential expression of reovirus protein in malignant cells compared to either tumor stroma or surrounding normal liver tissue. There was evidence of viral factories within tumor, and recovery of replicating virus from tumor (but not normal liver)was achieved in all four patients from whom fresh tissue was available. Hence, reovirus could be protected from neutralizing antibodies after systemic administration by immune cell carriage, which delivered reovirus to tumor.These findings suggest new preclinical and clinical scheduling and treatment combination strategies to enhance in vivo immune evasion and effective intravenous delivery of oncolytic viruses to patients in vivo. PMID:22700953

  18. Cell carriage, delivery, and selective replication of an oncolytic virus in tumor in patients.

    PubMed

    Adair, Robert A; Roulstone, Victoria; Scott, Karen J; Morgan, Ruth; Nuovo, Gerard J; Fuller, Martin; Beirne, Deborah; West, Emma J; Jennings, Victoria A; Rose, Ailsa; Kyula, Joan; Fraser, Sheila; Dave, Rajiv; Anthoney, David A; Merrick, Alison; Prestwich, Robin; Aldouri, Amer; Donnelly, Oliver; Pandha, Hardev; Coffey, Matt; Selby, Peter; Vile, Richard; Toogood, Giles; Harrington, Kevin; Melcher, Alan A

    2012-06-13

    Oncolytic viruses, which preferentially lyse cancer cells and stimulate an antitumor immune response, represent a promising approach to the treatment of cancer. However, how they evade the antiviral immune response and their selective delivery to, and replication in, tumor over normal tissue has not been investigated in humans. Here, we treated patients with a single cycle of intravenous reovirus before planned surgery to resect colorectal cancer metastases in the liver. Tracking the viral genome in the circulation showed that reovirus could be detected in plasma and blood mononuclear, granulocyte, and platelet cell compartments after infusion. Despite the presence of neutralizing antibodies before viral infusion in all patients, replication-competent reovirus that retained cytotoxicity was recovered from blood cells but not plasma, suggesting that transport by cells could protect virus for potential delivery to tumors. Analysis of surgical specimens demonstrated greater, preferential expression of reovirus protein in malignant cells compared to either tumor stroma or surrounding normal liver tissue. There was evidence of viral factories within tumor, and recovery of replicating virus from tumor (but not normal liver) was achieved in all four patients from whom fresh tissue was available. Hence, reovirus could be protected from neutralizing antibodies after systemic administration by immune cell carriage, which delivered reovirus to tumor. These findings suggest new preclinical and clinical scheduling and treatment combination strategies to enhance in vivo immune evasion and effective intravenous delivery of oncolytic viruses to patients in vivo. PMID:22700953

  19. RAD51 and BRCA2 enhance oncolytic adenovirus type 5 activity in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tookman, Laura A.; Browne, Ashley K.; Connell, Claire M.; Bridge, Gemma; Ingemarsdotter, Carin K.; Dowson, Suzanne; Shibata, Atsushi; Lockley, Michelle; Martin, Sarah A.; McNeish, Iain A.

    2015-01-01

    Homologous Recombination (HR) function is critically important in High Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer (HGSOC). HGSOC with intact HR has a worse prognosis and is less likely to respond to platinum chemotherapy and PARP inhibitors. Oncolytic adenovirus, a novel therapy for human malignancies, stimulates a potent DNA damage response that influences overall anti-tumor activity. Here, the importance of HR was investigated by determining the efficacy of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vectors in ovarian cancer. Using matched BRCA2 mutant and wild-type HGSOC cells, it was demonstrated that intact HR function promotes viral DNA replication and augments overall efficacy, without influencing viral DNA processing. These data were confirmed in a wider panel of HR competent and defective ovarian cancer lines. Mechanistically, both BRCA2 and RAD51 localize to viral replication centers within the infected cell nucleus and that RAD51 localization occurs independently of BRCA2. In addition, a direct interaction was identified between RAD51 and adenovirus E2 DNA binding protein. Finally, using functional assays of HR competence, despite inducing degradation of MRE11, Ad5 infection does not alter cellular ability to repair DNA double strand break damage via HR. These data reveal that Ad5 redistributes critical HR components to viral replication centers and enhances cytotoxicity. Implications Oncolytic adenoviral therapy may be most clinically relevant in tumors with intact HR function. PMID:26452665

  20. A Specific Subpopulation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Carriers Overrides Melanoma Resistance to an Oncolytic Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Bolontrade, Marcela F.; Sganga, Leonardo; Piaggio, Eduardo; Viale, Diego L.; Sorrentino, Miguel A.; Robinson, Aníbal; Sevlever, Gustavo; García, Mariana G.; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    The homing properties of mesenchymal stromal c´ells (MSCs) toward tumors turn them into attractive tools for combining cell and gene therapy. The aim of this study was to select in a feasible way a human bone marrow-derived MSC subpopulation that might exhibit a selective ability to target the tumor mass. Using differential in vitro adhesive capacities during cells isolation, we selected a specific MSC subpopulation (termed MO-MSCs) that exhibited enhanced multipotent capacity and increased cell surface expression of specific integrins (integrins α2, α3, and α5), which correlated with an enhanced MO-MSCs adhesiveness toward their specific ligands. Moreover, MO-MSCs exhibited a higher migration toward conditioned media from different cancer cell lines and fresh human breast cancer samples in the presence or not of a human microendothelium monolayer. Further in vivo studies demonstrated increased tumor homing of MO-MSCs toward established 578T and MD-MBA-231 breast cancer and A375N melanoma tumor xenografts. Tumor penetration by MO-MSCs was highly dependent on metallopeptidases production as it was inhibited by the specific inhibitor 1,10 phenantroline. Finally, systemically administered MO-MSCs preloaded with an oncolytic adenovirus significantly inhibited tumor growth in mice harboring established A375N melanomas, overcoming the natural resistance of the tumor to in situ administration of the oncolytic adenovirus. In summary, this work characterizes a novel MSC subpopulation with increased tumor homing capacity that can be used to transport therapeutic compounds. PMID:22462538

  1. Precise scheduling of chemotherapy primes VEGF-producing tumors for successful systemic oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kottke, Timothy; Chester, John; Ilett, Elizabeth; Thompson, Jill; Diaz, Rosa; Coffey, Matt; Selby, Peter; Nuovo, Gerard; Pulido, Jose; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Pandha, Hardev; Harrington, Kevin; Melcher, Alan; Vile, Richard

    2011-10-01

    We have previously reported that a burst of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling to tumor-associated endothelium induces a proviral state, during which systemically delivered oncolytic reovirus can replicate in endothelium, thereby inducing immune-mediated vascular collapse and significant antitumor therapy. Using chimeric receptors, we show here that induction of the proviral state proceeds through VEGFR2, but not VEGFR1, signaling in endothelial cells. In contrast, innate immune activation by reovirus-exposed endothelial cells was predominantly through VEGFR1. By screening conventional chemotherapies for their ability to induce similar effects in combination with reovirus both in vitro and in vivo, we observed that the proviral state could also be induced in endothelial cells exposed to VEGF during rebound from paclitaxel-mediated inhibition of VEGF signaling. We translated these in vitro findings in vivo by careful scheduling of paclitaxel chemotherapy with systemic virotherapy, neither of which alone had therapeutic effects against B16 tumors. Systemic availability of reovirus during endothelial cell recovery from paclitaxel treatment allowed for endothelial replication of the virus, immune-mediated therapy, and tumor cures. Therefore, careful scheduling of combination viro- and chemotherapies, which preclinical testing suggests are individually ineffective against tumor cells, can lead to rational new clinical protocols for systemic treatments with oncolytic viruses. PMID:21792179

  2. A genetic fiber modification to achieve matrix-metalloprotease-activated infectivity of oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    José, Anabel; Rovira-Rigau, Maria; Luna, Jeroni; Giménez-Alejandre, Marta; Vaquero, Eva; García de la Torre, Beatriz; Andreu, David; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2014-10-28

    Selective tumor targeting of oncolytic adenovirus at the level of cell entry remains a major challenge to improve efficacy and safety. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are overexpressed in a variety of tumors and in particular in pancreatic cancer. In the current work, we have exploited the expression of MMPs together with the penetration capabilities of a TAT-like peptide to engineer tumor selective adenoviruses. We have generated adenoviruses containing CAR-binding ablated fibers further modified with a C-terminus TAT-like peptide linked to a blocking domain by an MMP-cleavable sequence. This linker resulted in a MMP-dependent cell transduction of the reporter MMP-activatable virus AdTATMMP and in efficient transduction of neoplastic cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts. Intravenous and intraductal administration of AdTATMMP into mice showed very low AdTATMMP activity in the normal pancreas, whereas increased transduction was observed in pancreatic tumors of transgenic Ela-myc mice. Intraductal administration of AdTATMMP into mice bearing orthotopic tumors led to a 25-fold increase in tumor targeting compared to the wild type fiber control. A replication competent adenovirus, Ad(RC)MMP, with the MMP-activatable fiber showed oncolytic efficacy and increased antitumor activity compared to Adwt in a pancreatic orthotopic model. Reduced local and distant metastases were observed in Ad(RC)MMP treated-mice. Moreover, no signs of pancreatic toxicity were detected. We conclude that MMP-activatable adenovirus may be beneficial for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  3. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus kills stem-like tumor-initiating colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Warner, Susanne G; Haddad, Dana; Au, Joyce; Carson, Joshua S; O'Leary, Michael P; Lewis, Christina; Monette, Sebastien; Fong, Yuman

    2016-01-01

    Stem-like tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are implicated in cancer progression and recurrence, and can be identified by sphere-formation and tumorigenicity assays. Oncolytic viruses infect, replicate in, and kill a variety of cancer cells. In this study, we seek proof of principle that TICs are susceptible to viral infection. HCT8 human colon cancer cells were subjected to serum-free culture to generate TIC tumorspheres. Parent cells and TICs were infected with HSV-1 subtype NV1066. Cytotoxicity, viral replication, and Akt1 expression were assessed. TIC tumorigenicity was confirmed and NV1066 efficacy was assessed in vivo. NV1066 infection was highly cytotoxic to both parent HCT8 cells and TICs. In both populations, cell-kill of >80% was achieved within 3 days of infection at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1.0. However, the parent cells required 2-log greater viral replication to achieve the same cytotoxicity. TICs overexpressed Akt1 in vitro and formed flank tumors from as little as 100 cells, growing earlier, faster, larger, and with greater histologic atypia than tumors from parent cells. Treatment of TIC-induced tumors with NV1066 yielded tumor regression and slowed tumor growth. We conclude that colon TICs are selected for by serum-free culture, overexpress Akt1, and are susceptible to oncolytic viral infection. PMID:27347556

  4. Efficacy of oncolytic reovirus against human gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis in experimental animal model.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Koji; Etoh, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Kosuke; Mitui, Marcelo Takahiro; Nishizono, Akira; Shiraishi, Norio; Kitano, Seigo

    2010-12-01

    The prognosis of gastric cancer patients with peritoneal dissemination is extremely poor, and the development of an effective treatment is necessary. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of oncolytic reovirus against peritoneal metastasis in human gastric cancer using an experimental animal model. Four human gastric cancer cell lines, including MKN45p, NUGC4, MKN7 and KatoIII, a normal NIH3T3 cell line as a control, and reovirus serotype 3, were used in this study. We evaluated the cytopathic effect of reovirus and the Ras activity in each gastric cancer cell line in vitro. To evaluate oncolytic efficacy in vivo, reovirus (1x10(8) PFU) was administered into the peritoneal cavity of nude mice on days 7, 8 and 9 after inoculation with MKN45p cells. Mean volume of ascites and the total number and weight of the peritoneal tumors were measured after sacrifice. After reovirus infection, cytopathic effect was observed in all four gastric cancer cell lines, but not in the control cells. Ras activation assay showed that Ras activity in all four gastric cancer cell lines increased to a higher level than that in the control cells. In the animal model experiments, mean volume of ascites and the total number and weight of the peritoneal tumors in the reovirus treatment group were significantly lower than those in the control group. In conclusions, intraperitoneal administration of reovirus could be useful as a new modality against peritoneal metastasis in gastric cancer. PMID:21042711

  5. Oncolytic virotherapy for malignant glioma: translating laboratory insights into clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Auffinger, Brenda; Ahmed, Atique U.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, one of the most common and aggressive brain tumors in adults, is highly resistant to currently available therapies and often recurs. Due to its poor prognosis and difficult management, there is an urgent need for the development and translation of new anti-glioma therapeutic approaches into the clinic. In this context, oncolytic virotherapy arises as an exciting treatment option for glioma patients. These natural or genetically engineered viruses are able to effectively infect cancer cells, inducing a specific anti-tumor cytotoxic effect. In addition, some viruses have been redesigned to modulate glioma microenvironment, to express cytokines to boost a systemic anti-glioma immune response and to incorporate angiostatic genes to decrease glioma vasculature. Although recent clinical trials have confirmed the safety of oncolytic virotherapies in the brain, their moderate clinical efficacy has not yet matched the encouraging preclinical laboratory results. In this review, we will discuss the leading anti-glioma virotherapy approaches that are presently under preclinical and clinical evaluation. We will also review different delivery methods, in vivo virus behavior, fate, replication, intratumoral spread, activation of anti-tumor immune response, and targeting of glioma stem cells. We will focus on the advantages and limitations of each therapeutic approach and how to overcome these hurdles to effectively translate exciting laboratory results into promising clinical trials. PMID:23443138

  6. Oncolytic Activity of Avian Influenza Virus in Human Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Pizzuto, Matteo S.; Silic-Benussi, Micol; Pavone, Silvia; Ciminale, Vincenzo; Capua, Ilaria

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is the most lethal form of human cancer, with dismal survival rates due to late-stage diagnoses and a lack of efficacious therapies. Building on the observation that avian influenza A viruses (IAVs) have a tropism for the pancreas in vivo, the present study was aimed at testing the efficacy of IAVs as oncolytic agents for killing human PDA cell lines. Receptor characterization confirmed that human PDA cell lines express the alpha-2,3- and the alpha-2,6-linked glycan receptor for avian and human IAVs, respectively. PDA cell lines were sensitive to infection by human and avian IAV isolates, which is consistent with this finding. Growth kinetic experiments showed preferential virus replication in PDA cells over that in a nontransformed pancreatic ductal cell line. Finally, at early time points posttreatment, infection with IAVs caused higher levels of apoptosis in PDA cells than gemcitabine and cisplatin, which are the cornerstone of current therapies for PDA. In the BxPC-3 PDA cell line, apoptosis resulted from the engagement of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Importantly, IAVs did not induce apoptosis in nontransformed pancreatic ductal HPDE6 cells. Using a model based on the growth of a PDA cell line as a xenograft in SCID mice, we also show that a slightly pathogenic avian IAV significantly inhibited tumor growth following intratumoral injection. Taken together, these results are the first to suggest that IAVs may hold promise as future agents of oncolytic virotherapy against pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. IMPORTANCE Despite intensive studies aimed at designing new therapeutic approaches, PDA still retains the most dismal prognosis among human cancers. In the present study, we provide the first evidence indicating that avian IAVs of low pathogenicity display a tropism for human PDA cells, resulting in viral RNA replication and a potent induction of apoptosis in vitro and antitumor effects in vivo. These

  7. Protein sequence comparisons show that the 'pseudoproteases' encoded by poxviruses and certain retroviruses belong to the deoxyuridine triphosphatase family.

    PubMed Central

    McGeoch, D J

    1990-01-01

    Amino acid sequence comparisons show extensive similarities among the deoxyuridine triphosphatases (dUTPases) of Escherichia coli and of herpesviruses, and the 'protease-like' or 'pseudoprotease' sequences encoded by certain retroviruses in the oncovirus and lentivirus families and by poxviruses. These relationships suggest strongly that the 'pseudoproteases' actually are dUTPases, and have not arisen by duplication of an oncovirus protease gene as had been suggested. The herpesvirus dUTPase sequences differ from the others in that they are longer (about 370 residues, against around 140) and one conserved element ('Motif 3') is displaced relative to its position in the other sequences; a model involving internal duplication of the herpesvirus gene can account effectively for these observations. Sequences closely similar to Motif 3 are also found in phosphofructokinases, where they form part of the active site and fructose phosphate binding structure; thus these sequences may represent a class of structural element generally involved in phosphate transfer to and from glycosides. PMID:2165588

  8. Cellular impedance measurement as a new tool for poxvirus titration, antibody neutralization testing and evaluation of antiviral substances.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Peter T; Schuenadel, Livia; Wiethaus, Julia; Bourquain, Daniel R; Kurth, Andreas; Nitsche, Andreas

    2010-10-01

    Impedance-based biosensing known as real-time cell electronic sensing (RT-CES) belongs to an emerging technology for analyzing the status of cells in vitro. In the present study protocols were developed for an RT-CES-based system (xCELLigence™, Roche Applied Science, ACEA Biosciences Inc.) to supplement conventional techniques in pox virology. First, proliferation of cells susceptible to orthopoxviruses was monitored. For virus titration cells were infected with vaccinia virus and cell status, represented by the dimensionless impedance-based cell index (CI), was monitored. A virus-dose dependent decrease in electrical impedance could be shown. Calculation of calibration curves at a suitable CI covering a dynamic range of 4 log enabled the quantification of virus titers in unknown samples. Similarly, antiviral effects could be determined as shown for anti-poxviral agents ST-246 and Cidofovir. Published values for the in vitro concentration that inhibited virus replication by 50% (IC₅₀) could be confirmed while cytotoxicity in effective concentrations was excluded in long-term incubation experiments. Finally, an RT-CES-based virus neutralization test was established. Various poxvirus-specific antibodies were examined for their neutralizing activity and a calculation mode for the neutralizing antibody titer was introduced. In summary, the presented RT-CES-based methods outmatch end-point assays by observing the cell population throughout the entire experiment while workload and time to result are reduced.

  9. The Structure of the Poxvirus A33 Protein Reveals a Dimer of Unique C-Type Lectin-Like Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Singh, Kavita; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Garboczi, David N.

    2010-11-03

    The current vaccine against smallpox is an infectious form of vaccinia virus that has significant side effects. Alternative vaccine approaches using recombinant viral proteins are being developed. A target of subunit vaccine strategies is the poxvirus protein A33, a conserved protein in the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily of Poxviridae that is expressed on the outer viral envelope. Here we have determined the structure of the A33 ectodomain of vaccinia virus. The structure revealed C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs) that occur as dimers in A33 crystals with five different crystal lattices. Comparison of the A33 dimer models shows that the A33 monomers have a degree of flexibility in position within the dimer. Structural comparisons show that the A33 monomer is a close match to the Link module class of CTLDs but that the A33 dimer is most similar to the natural killer (NK)-cell receptor class of CTLDs. Structural data on Link modules and NK-cell receptor-ligand complexes suggest a surface of A33 that could interact with viral or host ligands. The dimer interface is well conserved in all known A33 sequences, indicating an important role for the A33 dimer. The structure indicates how previously described A33 mutations disrupt protein folding and locates the positions of N-linked glycosylations and the epitope of a protective antibody.

  10. Transcription Factor Bcl11b Controls Effector and Memory CD8 T cell Fate Decision and Function during Poxvirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Georges; Stanfield, Jessica; Tahiliani, Vikas; Desai, Pritesh; Hutchinson, Tarun E.; Lorentsen, Kyle J.; Cho, Jonathan J.; Avram, Dorina; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    CD8+ T cells play an important role in host resistance to many viral infections, but the underlying transcriptional mechanisms governing their differentiation and functionality remain poorly defined. By using a highly virulent systemic and respiratory poxvirus infection in mice, we show that the transcription factor Bcl11b provides a dual trigger that sustains the clonal expansion of virus-specific effector CD8+ T cells, while simultaneously suppressing the expression of surface markers associated with short-lived effector cell (SLEC) differentiation. Additionally, we demonstrate that Bcl11b supports the acquisition of memory precursor effector cell (MPEC) phenotype and, thus, its absence causes near complete loss of lymphoid and lung-resident memory cells. Interestingly, despite having normal levels of T-bet and Eomesodermin, Bcl11b-deficient CD8+ T cells failed to execute effector differentiation needed for anti-viral cytokine production and degranulation, suggesting a non-redundant role of Bcl11b in regulation of this program. Thus, Bcl11b is a critical player in fate decision of SLECs and MPECs, as well as effector function and memory formation. PMID:27790219

  11. A Recombinant Raccoon Poxvirus Vaccine Expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and Truncated V Antigens Protects Animals against Lethal Plague.

    PubMed

    Rocke, Tonie E; Kingstad-Bakke, Brock; Berlier, Willy; Osorio, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN) expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307-a truncated version of the V protein) provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas. PMID:26344891

  12. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and truncated V antigens protects animals against lethal plague.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Kingstad-Bakke, B; Berlier, W; Osorio, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN) expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307-a truncated version of the V protein) provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis.. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas.

  13. Characterization of the Antiglioma Effect of the Oncolytic Adenovirus VCN-01

    PubMed Central

    Vera, Beatriz; Martínez-Vélez, Naiara; Xipell, Enric; Acanda de la Rocha, Arlet; Patiño-García, Ana; Saez-Castresana, Javier; Gonzalez-Huarriz, Marisol; Cascallo, Manel; Alemany, Ramón; Alonso, Marta M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent advances in the development of antitumor therapies, the prognosis for patients with malignant gliomas remains dismal. Therapy with tumor-selective viruses is emerging as a treatment option for this devastating disease. In this study we characterize the anti-glioma effect of VCN-01, an improved hyaluronidase-armed pRB-pathway-selective oncolytic adenovirus that has proven safe and effective in the treatment of several solid tumors. VCN-01 displayed a significant cytotoxic effect on glioma cells in vitro. In vivo, in two different orthotopic glioma models, a single intra-tumoral administration of VCN-01 increased overall survival significantly and led to long-term survivors free of disease. PMID:26808201

  14. Distinct host cell fates for human malignant melanoma targeted by oncolytic rodent parvoviruses.

    PubMed

    Vollmers, Ellen M; Tattersall, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The rodent parvoviruses are known to be oncoselective, and lytically infect many transformed human cells. Because current therapeutic regimens for metastatic melanoma have low response rates and have little effect on improving survival, this disease is a prime candidate for novel approaches to therapy, including oncolytic parvoviruses. Screening of low-passage, patient-derived melanoma cell lines for multiplicity-dependent killing by a panel of five rodent parvoviruses identified LuIII as the most melanoma-lytic. This property was mapped to the LuIII capsid gene, and an efficiently melanoma tropic chimeric virus shown to undergo three types of interaction with primary human melanoma cells: (1) complete lysis of cultures infected at very low multiplicities; (2) acute killing resulting from viral protein synthesis and DNA replication, without concomitant expansion of the infection, due to failure to export progeny virions efficiently; or (3) complete resistance that operates at an intracellular step following virion uptake, but preceding viral transcription.

  15. Increased suppression of oncolytic adenovirus carrying mutant k5 on colorectal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Junkai; Xiao Tian; Gu Jinfa; Wei Na; He Lingfeng; Ding Miao; Liu Xinyuan

    2008-09-19

    Angiogenesis plays a key role in the development of a wide variety of malignant tumors. The approach of targeting antiangiogenesis has become an important field of cancer gene therapy. In this study, the antiangiogenesis protein K5 (the kringle 5 of human plasminogen) has been mutated by changing leucine71 to arginine to form mK5. Then the ZD55-mK5, which is an oncolytic adenovirus expressing mK5, was constructed. It showed stronger inhibition on proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cell. Moreover, in tube formation and embryonic chorioallantoic membrane assay, ZD55-mK5 exhibited more effective antiangiogenesis than ZD55-K5. In addition, ZD55-mK5 generated obvious suppression on the growth of colorectal tumor xenografts and prolonged the life span of nude mice. These results indicate that ZD55-mK5 is a potent agent for inhibiting the tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth.

  16. Adeno-Associated Virus Enhances Wild-Type and Oncolytic Adenovirus Spread

    PubMed Central

    Laborda, Eduardo; Puig-Saus, Cristina; Cascalló, Manel; Chillón, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The contamination of adenovirus (Ad) stocks with adeno-associated viruses (AAV) is usually unnoticed, and it has been associated with lower Ad yields upon large-scale production. During Ad propagation, AAV contamination needs to be detected routinely by polymerase chain reaction without symptomatic suspicion. In this study, we describe that the coinfection of either Ad wild type 5 or oncolytic Ad with AAV results in a large-plaque phenotype associated with an accelerated release of Ad from coinfected cells. This accelerated release was accompanied with the expected decrease in Ad yields in two out of three cell lines tested. Despite this lower Ad yield, coinfection with AAV accelerated cell death and enhanced the cytotoxicity mediated by Ad propagation. Intratumoral coinjection of Ad and AAV in two xenograft tumor models improved antitumor activity and mouse survival. Therefore, we conclude that accidental or intentional AAV coinfection has important implications for Ad-mediated virotherapy. PMID:24020980

  17. Clinical development of reovirus for cancer therapy: An oncolytic virus with immune-mediated antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jun; Sachdev, Esha; Mita, Alain C; Mita, Monica M

    2016-01-01

    Reovirus is a double-stranded RNA virus with demonstrated oncolysis or preferential replication in cancer cells. The oncolytic properties of reovirus appear to be dependent, in part, on activated Ras signaling. In addition, Ras-transformation promotes reovirus oncolysis by affecting several steps of the viral life cycle. Reovirus-mediated immune responses can present barriers to tumor targeting, serve protective functions against reovirus systemic toxicity, and contribute to therapeutic efficacy through antitumor immune-mediated effects via innate and adaptive responses. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the broad anticancer activity of wild-type, unmodified type 3 Dearing strain reovirus (Reolysin®) across a spectrum of malignancies. The development of reovirus as an anticancer agent and available clinical data reported from 22 clinical trials will be reviewed. PMID:27019795

  18. Characterization of the Antiglioma Effect of the Oncolytic Adenovirus VCN-01.

    PubMed

    Vera, Beatriz; Martínez-Vélez, Naiara; Xipell, Enric; Acanda de la Rocha, Arlet; Patiño-García, Ana; Saez-Castresana, Javier; Gonzalez-Huarriz, Marisol; Cascallo, Manel; Alemany, Ramón; Alonso, Marta M

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent advances in the development of antitumor therapies, the prognosis for patients with malignant gliomas remains dismal. Therapy with tumor-selective viruses is emerging as a treatment option for this devastating disease. In this study we characterize the anti-glioma effect of VCN-01, an improved hyaluronidase-armed pRB-pathway-selective oncolytic adenovirus that has proven safe and effective in the treatment of several solid tumors. VCN-01 displayed a significant cytotoxic effect on glioma cells in vitro. In vivo, in two different orthotopic glioma models, a single intra-tumoral administration of VCN-01 increased overall survival significantly and led to long-term survivors free of disease. PMID:26808201

  19. To Infection and Beyond: The Multi-Pronged Anti-Cancer Mechanisms of Oncolytic Viruses.

    PubMed

    Cassady, Kevin A; Haworth, Kellie B; Jackson, Josh; Markert, James M; Cripe, Timothy P

    2016-02-01

    Over the past 1-2 decades we have witnessed a resurgence of efforts to therapeutically exploit the attributes of lytic viruses to infect and kill tumor cells while sparing normal cells. We now appreciate that the utility of viruses for treating cancer extends far beyond lytic cell death. Viruses are also capable of eliciting humoral and cellular innate and adaptive immune responses that may be directed not only at virus-infected cells but also at uninfected cancer cells. Here we review our current understanding of this bystander effect, and divide the mechanisms into lytic, cytokine, innate cellular, and adaptive phases. Knowing the key pathways and molecular players during virus infection in the context of the cancer microenvironment will be critical to devise strategies to maximize the therapeutic effects of oncolytic viroimmunotherapy. PMID:26861381

  20. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus-based strategies: toward a breakthrough in glioblastoma therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Jianfang; Wakimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) are a class of antitumor agents that selectively kill tumor cells while sparing normal cells. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) has been investigated in clinical trials for patients with the malignant brain tumor glioblastoma for more than a decade. These clinical studies have shown the safety of oHSV administration to the human brain, however, therapeutic efficacy of oHSV as a single treatment remains unsatisfactory. Factors that could hamper the anti-glioblastoma efficacy of oHSV include: attenuated potency of oHSV due to deletion or mutation of viral genes involved in virulence, restricting viral replication and spread within the tumor; suboptimal oHSV delivery associated with intratumoral injection; virus infection-induced inflammatory and cellular immune responses which could inhibit oHSV replication and promote its clearance; lack of effective incorporation of oHSV into standard-of-care, and poor knowledge about the ability of oHSV to target glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs). In an attempt to address these issues, recent research efforts have been directed at: (1) design of new engineered viruses to enhance potency, (2) better understanding of the role of the cellular immunity elicited by oHSV infection of tumors, (3) combinatorial strategies with different antitumor agents with a mechanistic rationale, (4) “armed” viruses expressing therapeutic transgenes, (5) use of GSC-derived models in oHSV evaluation, and (6) combinations of these. In this review, we will describe the current status of oHSV clinical trials for glioblastoma, and discuss recent research advances and future directions toward successful oHSV-based therapy of glioblastoma. PMID:24999342

  1. Current Good Manufacturing Practice Production of an Oncolytic Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Viral Vector for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Meseck, M.; Derecho, I.; Lopez, P.; Knoblauch, C.; McMahon, R.; Anderson, J.; Dunphy, N.; Quezada, V.; Khan, R.; Huang, P.; Dang, W.; Luo, M.; Hsu, D.; Woo, S.L.C.; Couture, L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus currently being investigated as a promising tool to treat cancer because of its ability to selectively replicate in cancer cells. To enhance the oncolytic property of the nonpathologic laboratory strain of VSV, we generated a recombinant vector [rVSV(MΔ51)-M3] expressing murine gammaherpesvirus M3, a secreted viral chemokine-binding protein that binds to a broad range of mammalian chemokines with high affinity. As previously reported, when rVSV(MΔ51)-M3 was used in an orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats, it suppressed inflammatory cell migration to the virus-infected tumor site, which allowed for enhanced intratumoral virus replication leading to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged survival. These encouraging results led to the development of this vector for clinical translation in patients with HCC. However, a scalable current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP)-compliant manufacturing process has not been described for this vector. To produce the quantities of high-titer virus required for clinical trials, a process that is amenable to GMP manufacturing and scale-up was developed. We describe here a large-scale (50-liter) vector production process capable of achieving crude titers on the order of 109 plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml under cGMP. This process was used to generate a master virus seed stock and a clinical lot of the clinical trial agent under cGMP with an infectious viral titer of approximately 2 × 1010 PFU/ml (total yield, 1 × 1013 PFU). The lot has passed all U.S. Food and Drug Administration-mandated release testing and will be used in a phase 1 clinical translational trial in patients with advanced HCC. PMID:21083425

  2. Current good manufacturing practice production of an oncolytic recombinant vesicular stomatitis viral vector for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ausubel, L J; Meseck, M; Derecho, I; Lopez, P; Knoblauch, C; McMahon, R; Anderson, J; Dunphy, N; Quezada, V; Khan, R; Huang, P; Dang, W; Luo, M; Hsu, D; Woo, S L C; Couture, L

    2011-04-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus currently being investigated as a promising tool to treat cancer because of its ability to selectively replicate in cancer cells. To enhance the oncolytic property of the nonpathologic laboratory strain of VSV, we generated a recombinant vector [rVSV(MΔ51)-M3] expressing murine gammaherpesvirus M3, a secreted viral chemokine-binding protein that binds to a broad range of mammalian chemokines with high affinity. As previously reported, when rVSV(MΔ51)-M3 was used in an orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats, it suppressed inflammatory cell migration to the virus-infected tumor site, which allowed for enhanced intratumoral virus replication leading to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged survival. These encouraging results led to the development of this vector for clinical translation in patients with HCC. However, a scalable current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP)-compliant manufacturing process has not been described for this vector. To produce the quantities of high-titer virus required for clinical trials, a process that is amenable to GMP manufacturing and scale-up was developed. We describe here a large-scale (50-liter) vector production process capable of achieving crude titers on the order of 10(9) plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml under cGMP. This process was used to generate a master virus seed stock and a clinical lot of the clinical trial agent under cGMP with an infectious viral titer of approximately 2 × 10(10) PFU/ml (total yield, 1 × 10(13) PFU). The lot has passed all U.S. Food and Drug Administration-mandated release testing and will be used in a phase 1 clinical translational trial in patients with advanced HCC.

  3. Oncolytic Herpes simplex virus expressing yeast cytosine deaminase: relationship between viral replication, transgene expression, prodrug bioactivation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Suguru; Kuroda, Toshihiko; Fuchs, Bryan C.; He, Xiaoying; Supko, Jeffrey G.; Schmitt, Anthony; McGinn, Christopher M.; Lanuti, Michael; Tanabe, Kenneth K.

    2011-01-01

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) is a well-characterized prodrug/enzyme system that converts 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and has been combined with oncolytic viruses. However, in vivo studies of the interactions between 5-FC bioactivation and viral replication have not been previously reported, nor have the kinetics of transgene expression and the pharmacokinetics of 5-FC and 5-FU. We constructed a replication-conditional HSV-1 expressing yCD and examined cytotoxicity when 5-FC was initiated at different times after viral infection, and observed that earlier 5-FC administration led to greater cytotoxicity than later 5-FC administration in vitro and in vivo. Twelve days of 5-FC administration was superior to 6 days in animal models, but dosing beyond 12 days did not further enhance efficacy. Consistent with the dosing schedule results, both viral genomic DNA copy number and viral titers were observed to peak on Day 3 after viral injection and gradually decrease thereafter. The virus is replication-conditional and was detected in tumors for as long as 2 weeks after viral injection. The maximum relative extent of yCD conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU in tumors was observed on Day 6 after viral injection and it decreased progressively thereafter. The observation that 5-FU generation within tumors did not lead to appreciable levels of systemic 5-FU (<10 ng/ml) is important and has not been previously reported. The approaches used in these studies of the relationship between the viral replication kinetics, transgene expression, prodrug administration and anti-tumor efficacy are useful in the design of clinical trials of armed, oncolytic viruses. PMID:22076044

  4. Treatment strategies for combining immunostimulatory oncolytic virus therapeutics with dendritic cell injections.

    PubMed

    Wares, Joanna R; Crivelli, Joseph J; Yun, Chae-Ok; Choi, Il-Kyu; Gevertz, Jana L; Kim, Peter S

    2015-12-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are used to treat cancer, as they selectively replicate inside of and lyse tumor cells. The efficacy of this process is limited and new OVs are being designed to mediate tumor cell release of cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules, which attract cytotoxic T cells to target tumor cells, thus increasing the tumor-killing effects of OVs. To further promote treatment efficacy, OVs can be combined with other treatments, such as was done by Huang et al., who showed that combining OV injections with dendritic cell (DC) injections was a more effective treatment than either treatment alone. To further investigate this combination, we built a mathematical model consisting of a system of ordinary differential equations and fit the model to the hierarchical data provided from Huang et al. We used the model to determine the effect of varying doses of OV and DC injections and to test alternative treatment strategies. We found that the DC dose given in Huang et al. was near a bifurcation point and that a slightly larger dose could cause complete eradication of the tumor. Further, the model results suggest that it is more effective to treat a tumor with immunostimulatory oncolytic viruses first and then follow-up with a sequence of DCs than to alternate OV and DC injections. This protocol, which was not considered in the experiments of Huang et al., allows the infection to initially thrive before the immune response is enhanced. Taken together, our work shows how the ordering, temporal spacing, and dosage of OV and DC can be chosen to maximize efficacy and to potentially eliminate tumors altogether.

  5. A targeting ligand enhances infectivity and cytotoxicity of an oncolytic adenovirus in human pancreatic cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Goto, Naoko; Rin, Yosei; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Uchida, Hiroaki; Tagawa, Masatoshi; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-10-28

    The addition of a targeting strategy is necessary to enhance oncolysis and secure safety of a conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd). We have constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber, and have successfully identified a pancreatic cancer-targeting ligand (SYENFSA). Here, the usefulness of cancer-targeted CRAd for pancreatic cancer was examined as a preclinical study. First, we constructed a survivin promoter-regulated CRAd expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (EGFP), which displayed the identified targeting ligand (AdSur-SYE). The AdSur-SYE resulted in higher gene transduction efficiency and oncolytic potency than the untargeted CRAd (AdSur) in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. An intratumoral injection of AdSur-SYE significantly suppressed the growth of subcutaneous tumors, in which AdSur-SYE effectively proliferated and spread. An ectopic infection in adjacent tissues and organs of intratumorally injected AdSur-SYE was decreased compared with AdSur. Then, to examine whether the targeting ligand actually enhanced the infectivity of CRAd in human pancreatic cancer tissues, tumor cells prepared from surgical specimens were infected with viruses. The AdSur-SYE increased gene transduction efficiency 6.4-fold higher than did AdSur in single cells derived from human pancreatic cancer, whereas the infectivity of both vectors was almost the same in the pancreas and other cancers. Immunostaining showed that most EGFP(+) cells were cytokeratin-positive in the sliced tissues, indicating that pancreatic cancer cells but not stromal cells were injected with AdSur-SYE. AdSur-SYE resulted in a stronger oncolysis in the primary pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with mouse embryonic fibroblasts than AdSur did. CRAd in combination with a tumor-targeting ligand is promising as a next-generation of oncolytic virotherapy for pancreatic cancer.

  6. Tumour-specific triple-regulated oncolytic herpes virus to target glioma

    PubMed Central

    Delwar, Zahid M.; Liu, Guoyu; Kuo, Yvonne; Lee, Cleo; Bu, Luke; Rennie, Paul S.; Jia, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (oHSV-1) therapy is an emerging treatment modality that selectively destroys cancer. Here we report use of a glioma specific HSV-1 amplicon virus (SU4-124 HSV-1) to selectively target tumour cells. To achieve transcriptional regulation of the SU4-124 HSV-1 virus, the promoter for the essential HSV-1 gene ICP4 was replaced with a tumour specific survivin promoter. Translational regulation was achieved by incorporating 5 copies of microRNA 124 target sequences into the 3′UTR of the ICP4 gene. Additionally, a 5′UTR of rat fibroblast growth factor -2 was added in front of the viral ICP4 gene open reading frame. Our results confirmed enhanced expression of survivin and eIF4E in different glioma cells and increased micro-RNA124 expression in normal human and mouse brain tissue. SU4-124 HSV-1 had an increased ICP4 expression and virus replication in different glioma cells compared to normal neuronal cells. SU4-124 HSV-1 exerted a strong antitumour effect against a panel of glioma cell lines. Intracranial injection of SU4-124 HSV-1 did not reveal any sign of toxicity on day 15 after the injection. Moreover, a significantly enhanced antitumour effect with the intratumourally injected SU4-124 HSV-1 virus was demonstrated in mice bearing human glioma U87 tumours, whereas viral DNA was almost undetectable in normal organs. Our study indicates that incorporation of multiple cancer-specific regulators in an HSV-1 system significantly enhances both cancer specificity and oncolytic activity. PMID:27070093

  7. Serotype chimeric oncolytic adenovirus coding for GM-CSF for treatment of sarcoma in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Bramante, Simona; Koski, Anniina; Kipar, Anja; Diaconu, Iulia; Liikanen, Ilkka; Hemminki, Otto; Vassilev, Lotta; Parviainen, Suvi; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Pesonen, Saila K; Oksanen, Minna; Heiskanen, Raita; Rouvinen-Lagerström, Noora; Merisalo-Soikkeli, Maiju; Hakonen, Tiina; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2014-08-01

    Sarcomas are a relatively rare cancer, but often incurable at the late metastatic stage. Oncolytic immunotherapy has gained attention over the past years, and a wide range of oncolytic viruses have been delivered via intratumoral injection with positive safety and promising efficacy data. Here, we report preclinical and clinical results from treatment of sarcoma with oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF (CGTG-102). Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF is a serotype chimeric oncolytic adenovirus coding for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The efficacy of Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF was evaluated on a panel of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) cell lines and in two animal models. Sarcoma specific human data were also collected from the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP), in preparation for further clinical development. Efficacy was seen in both in vitro and in vivo STS models. Fifteen patients with treatment-refractory STS (13/15) or primary bone sarcoma (2/15) were treated in ATAP, and treatments appeared safe and well-tolerated. A total of 12 radiological RECIST response evaluations were performed, and two cases of minor response, six cases of stable disease and four cases of progressive disease were detected in patients progressing prior to virus treatment. Overall, the median survival time post treatment was 170 days. One patient is still alive at 1,459 days post virus treatment. In summary, Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF appears promising for the treatment of advanced STS; a clinical trial for treatment of refractory injectable solid tumors including STS is ongoing.

  8. Potent antitumor activity of oncolytic adenovirus expressing Beclin-1 via induction of autophagic cell death in leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Li, Lu; Meng, Haitao; Qian, Qijun

    2013-01-01

    An attractive strategy among adenovirus-based oncolytic systems is to design adenoviral vectors to express pro-apoptotic genes, in which this gene-virotherapy approach significantly enhances tumor cell death by activating apoptotic pathways. However, the existence of cancer cells with apoptotic defects is one of the major obstacles in gene-virotherapy. Here, we investigated whether a strategy that combines the oncolytic effects of an adenoviral vector with simultaneous expression of Beclin-1, an autophagy gene, offers a therapeutic advantage for leukemia. A Beclin-1 cDNA was cloned in an oncolytic adenovirus with chimeric Ad5/11 fiber (SG511-BECN). SG511-BECN treatment induced significant autophagic cell death, and resulted in enhanced cell killing in a variety of leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic blasts. SG511-BECN effects were seen in chronic myeloid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia with resistance to imatinib or chemotherapy, but exhibited much less cytotoxicity on normal cells. The SG511-BECN-induced autophagic cell death could be partially reversed by RNA interference knockdown of UVRAG, ATG5, and ATG7. We also showed that SG511-BECN strongly inhibited the growth of leukemic progenitors in vitro. In murine leukemia models, SG511-BECN prolonged the survival and decreased the xenograft tumor size by inducing autophagic cell death. Our results suggest that infection of leukemia cells with an oncolytic adenovirus overexpressing Beclin-1 can induce significant autophagic cell death and provide a new strategy for the elimination of leukemic cells via a unique mechanism of action distinct from apoptosis. PMID:23765161

  9. Combination effect of oncolytic adenovirus therapy and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir in hepatic carcinoma animal models

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fei-qun; Xu, Yin; Yang, Ren-jie; Wu, Bin; Tan, Xiao-hua; Qin, Yi-de; Zhang, Qun-wei

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Oncolytic adenovirus, also called conditionally replicating adenovirus (CRAD), can selectively propagate in tumor cells and cause cell lysis. The released viral progeny can infect neighboring cancer cells, initiating a cascade that can lead to the ultimate destruction of the tumor. Suicide gene therapy using herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) and ganciclovir (GCV) offers a potential treatment strategy for cancer and is undergoing preclinical trials for a variety of tumors. We hypothesized that HSV-TK gene therapy combined with oncolytic adenoviral therapy would have an enhanced effect compared with the individual effects of the therapies and is a potential novel therapeutic strategy to treat liver cancer. Methods: To address our hypothesis, a novel CRAD was created, which consisted of a telomerase-dependent oncolytic adenovirus engineered to express E1A and HSV-TK genes (Ad-ETK). The combined effect of Ad-ETK and GCV was assessed both in vitro and in vivo in nude mice bearing HepG2 cell-derived tumors. Expression of the therapeutic genes by the transduced tumor cells was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Results: We confirmed that Ad-ETK had antitumorigenic effects on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) both in vitro and in vivo, and the TK/GCV system enhanced oncolytic adenoviral therapy. We confirmed that both E1A and HSV-TK genes were expressed in vivo. Conclusion: The Ad-ETK construct should provide a relatively safe and selective approach to killing cancer cells and should be investigated as an adjuvant therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:19363518

  10. Imaging of Intratumoral Inflammation during Oncolytic Virotherapy of Tumors by 19F-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Michael; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Seubert, Carolin; Langbein-Laugwitz, Johanna; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Sturm, Volker Jörg Friedrich; Ye, Yuxiang; Kampf, Thomas; Jakob, Peter Michael; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oncolytic virotherapy of tumors is an up-coming, promising therapeutic modality of cancer therapy. Unfortunately, non-invasive techniques to evaluate the inflammatory host response to treatment are rare. Here, we evaluate 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which enables the non-invasive visualization of inflammatory processes in pathological conditions by the use of perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions (PFC) for monitoring of oncolytic virotherapy. Methodology/Principal Findings The Vaccinia virus strain GLV-1h68 was used as an oncolytic agent for the treatment of different tumor models. Systemic application of PFC emulsions followed by 1H/19F MRI of mock-infected and GLV-1h68-infected tumor-bearing mice revealed a significant accumulation of the 19F signal in the tumor rim of virus-treated mice. Histological examination of tumors confirmed a similar spatial distribution of the 19F signal hot spots and CD68+-macrophages. Thereby, the CD68+-macrophages encapsulate the GFP-positive viral infection foci. In multiple tumor models, we specifically visualized early inflammatory cell recruitment in Vaccinia virus colonized tumors. Furthermore, we documented that the 19F signal correlated with the extent of viral spreading within tumors. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest 19F MRI as a non-invasive methodology to document the tumor-associated host immune response as well as the extent of intratumoral viral replication. Thus, 19F MRI represents a new platform to non-invasively investigate the role of the host immune response for therapeutic outcome of oncolytic virotherapy and individual patient response. PMID:23441176

  11. Using a magnetic field to redirect an oncolytic adenovirus complexed with iron oxide augments gene therapy efficacy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Park, Ji Won; Na, Youjin; Jung, Soo-Jung; Hwang, June Kyu; Choi, Dongho; Lee, Kyeong Geun; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2015-10-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) is a widely used vector for cancer gene therapy but its therapeutic efficacy is limited by low coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) expression in tumors and non-specifically targeted infection. Ad infectivity and specificity can be markedly improved by creating Ad-magnetic nanoparticles cluster complexes and directing their migration with an external magnetic field (MGF). We electrostatically complexed GFP-expressing, replication-incompetent Ad (dAd) with PEGylated and cross-linked iron oxide nanoparticles (PCION), generating dAd-PCION complexes. The dAd-PCION showed increased transduction efficiency, independent of CAR expression, in the absence or presence of an MGF. Cancer cell killing and intracellular oncolytic Ad (HmT)-PCION replication significantly increased with MGF exposure. Site-directed, magnetically-targeted delivery of the HmT-PCION elicited significantly greater therapeutic efficacy versus treatment with naked HmT or HmT-PCION without MGF in CAR-negative MCF7 tumors. Immunohistochemical tumor analysis showed increased oncolytic Ad replication in tumors following infection by HmT-PCION using an MGF. Whole-body bioluminescence imaging of tumor-bearing mice showed a 450-fold increased tumor-to-liver ratio for HmT-PCION with, versus without, MGF. These results demonstrate the feasibility and potential of external MGF-responsive PCION-coated oncolytic Ads as smart hybrid vectors for cancer gene therapy. PMID:26164117

  12. Actin-resistant DNAse I Expression From Oncolytic Adenovirus Enadenotucirev Enhances Its Intratumoral Spread and Reduces Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Tedcastle, Alison; Illingworth, Sam; Brown, Alice; Seymour, Leonard W; Fisher, Kerry D

    2016-04-01

    Spread of oncolytic viruses through tumor tissue is essential to effective virotherapy. Interstitial matrix is thought to be a significant barrier to virus particle convection between "islands" of tumor cells. One way to address this is to encode matrix-degrading enzymes within oncolytic viruses, for secretion from infected cells. To test the hypothesis that extracellular DNA provides an important barrier, we assessed the ability of DNase to promote virus spread. Nonreplicating Ad5 vectors expressing actin-resistant DNase (aDNAse I), proteinase K (PK), hyaluronidase (rhPH20), and chondroitinase ABC (CABC) were injected into established DLD human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts, transcomplemented with a replicating Ad5 virus. Each enzyme improved oncolysis by the replicating adenovirus, with no evidence of tumor cells being shed into the bloodstream. aDNAse I and rhPH20 hyaluronidase were then cloned into conditionally-replicating group B adenovirus, Enadenotucirev (EnAd). EnAd encoding each enzyme showed significantly better antitumor efficacy than the parental virus, with the aDNAse I-expressing virus showing improved spread. Both DNase and hyaluronidase activity was still measurable 32 days postinfection. This is the first time that extracellular DNA has been implicated as a barrier for interstitial virus spread, and suggests that oncolytic viruses expressing aDNAse I may be promising candidates for clinical translation. PMID:26708004

  13. Effects of capsid-modified oncolytic adenoviruses and their combinations with gemcitabine or silica gel on pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kangasniemi, Lotta; Parviainen, Suvi; Pisto, Tommi; Koskinen, Mika; Jokinen, Mika; Kiviluoto, Tuula; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Jalonen, Harry; Koski, Anniina; Kangasniemi, Anna; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-07-01

    Conventional cancer treatments often have little impact on the course of advanced pancreatic cancer. Although cancer gene therapy with adenoviruses is a promising developmental approach, the primary receptor is poorly expressed in pancreatic cancers which might compromise efficacy and thus targeting to other receptors could be beneficial. Extended stealth delivery, combination with standard chemotherapy or circumvention of host antiadenoviral immune response might improve efficacy further. In this work, capsid-modified adenoviruses were studied for transduction of cell lines and clinical normal and tumor tissue samples. The respective oncolytic viruses were tested for oncolytic activity in vitro and in vivo. Survival was studied in a peritoneally disseminated pancreas cancer model, with or without concurrent gemcitabine while silica implants were utilized for extended intraperitoneal virus delivery. Immunocompetent mice and Syrian hamsters were used to study the effect of silica mediated delivery on antiviral immune responses and subsequent in vivo gene delivery. Capsid modifications selectively enhanced gene transfer to malignant pancreatic cancer cell lines and clinical samples. The respective oncolytic viruses resulted in increased cell killing in vitro, which translated into a survival benefit in mice. Early proinfammatory cytokine responses and formation of antiviral neutralizing antibodies was partially avoided with silica implants. The implant also shielded the virus from pre-existing neutralizing antibodies, while increasing the pancreas/liver gene delivery ratio six-fold. In conclusion, capsid modified adenoviruses would be useful for testing in pancreatic cancer trials. Silica implants might increase the safety and efficacy of the approach.

  14. Actin-resistant DNAse I Expression From Oncolytic Adenovirus Enadenotucirev Enhances Its Intratumoral Spread and Reduces Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Tedcastle, Alison; Illingworth, Sam; Brown, Alice; Seymour, Leonard W; Fisher, Kerry D

    2016-04-01

    Spread of oncolytic viruses through tumor tissue is essential to effective virotherapy. Interstitial matrix is thought to be a significant barrier to virus particle convection between "islands" of tumor cells. One way to address this is to encode matrix-degrading enzymes within oncolytic viruses, for secretion from infected cells. To test the hypothesis that extracellular DNA provides an important barrier, we assessed the ability of DNase to promote virus spread. Nonreplicating Ad5 vectors expressing actin-resistant DNase (aDNAse I), proteinase K (PK), hyaluronidase (rhPH20), and chondroitinase ABC (CABC) were injected into established DLD human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts, transcomplemented with a replicating Ad5 virus. Each enzyme improved oncolysis by the replicating adenovirus, with no evidence of tumor cells being shed into the bloodstream. aDNAse I and rhPH20 hyaluronidase were then cloned into conditionally-replicating group B adenovirus, Enadenotucirev (EnAd). EnAd encoding each enzyme showed significantly better antitumor efficacy than the parental virus, with the aDNAse I-expressing virus showing improved spread. Both DNase and hyaluronidase activity was still measurable 32 days postinfection. This is the first time that extracellular DNA has been implicated as a barrier for interstitial virus spread, and suggests that oncolytic viruses expressing aDNAse I may be promising candidates for clinical translation.

  15. PET Imaging of Oncolytic VSV Expressing the Mutant HSV-1 Thymidine Kinase Transgene in a Preclinical HCC Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Álvarez, Kim A; Altomonte, Jennifer; Laitinen, Iina; Ziegler, Sibylle; Steiger, Katja; Esposito, Irene; Schmid, Roland M; Ebert, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most predominant form of liver cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Due to the relative ineffectiveness of conventional HCC therapies, oncolytic viruses have emerged as novel alternative treatment agents. Our previous studies have demonstrated significant prolongation of survival in advanced HCC in rats after oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) treatment. In this study, we aimed to establish a reporter system to reliably and sensitively image VSV in a clinically relevant model of HCC for clinical translation. To this end, an orthotopic, unifocal HCC model in immune-competent Buffalo rats was employed to test a recombinant VSV vector encoding for an enhanced version of the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) thymidine kinase (sr39tk) reporter, which would allow the indirect detection of VSV via positron emission tomography (PET). The resulting data revealed specific tracer uptake in VSV-HSV1-sr39tk–treated tumors. Further characterization of the VSV-HSV1-sr39tk vector demonstrated its optimal detection time-point after application and its detection limit via PET. In conclusion, oncolytic VSV expressing the HSV1-sr39tk reporter gene allows for highly sensitive in vivo imaging via PET. Therefore, this imaging system may be directly translatable and beneficial in further clinical applications. PMID:25609160

  16. Systemic delivery of HER2-retargeted oncolytic-HSV by mesenchymal stromal cells protects from lung and brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Valerio; Gatta, Valentina; Palladini, Arianna; Nicoletti, Giordano; Ranieri, Dario; Dall'Ora, Massimiliano; Grosso, Valentina; Rossi, Martina; Alviano, Francesco; Bonsi, Laura; Nanni, Patrizia; Lollini, Pier-Luigi; Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella

    2015-10-27

    Fully retargeted oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (o-HSVs) gain cancer-specificity from redirection of tropism to cancer-specific receptors, and are non-attenuated. To overcome the hurdles of systemic delivery, and enable oncolytic viruses (o-viruses) to reach metastatic sites, carrier cells are being exploited. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were never tested as carriers of retargeted o-viruses, given their scarse-null expression of the cancer-specific receptors. We report that MSCs from different sources can be forcedly infected with a HER2-retargeted oncolytic HSV. Progeny virus spread from MSCs to cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We evaluated the organ distribution and therapeutic efficacy in two murine models of metastatic cancers, following a single i.v. injection of infected MSCs. As expected, the highest concentration of carrier-cells and of viral genomes was in the lungs. Viral genomes persisted throughout the body for at least two days. The growth of ovarian cancer lung metastases in nude mice was strongly inhibited, and the majority of treated mice appeared metastasis-free. The treatment significantly inhibited also breast cancer metastases to the brain in NSG mice, and reduced by more than one-half the metastatic burden in the brain.

  17. The oncolytic peptide LTX-315 induces cell death and DAMP release by mitochondria distortion in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Eike, Liv-Marie; Yang, Nannan; Rekdal, Øystein; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2015-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are naturally occurring molecules found in most species, in which they play a significant role in the first line defense against intruding pathogens, and several HDPs have been shown to possess anticancer activity. Structure-activity relationship studies on the HDP bovine lactoferricin revealed a de novo design of a nonamer peptide LTX-315, with oncolytic properties. In the present study, we investigated the oncolytic activity of LTX-315 in human melanoma cells (A375). LTX-315 induced a rapid plasma membrane disruption and cell death within 2 hours. At a low concentration, fluorescence-labeled LTX-315 was internalized and accumulated in cytoplasmic vacuoles in close proximity to the mitochondria. The mitochondrial membrane potential was shown to depolarize as a consequence of LTX-315 treatment and at ultrastructural level, the mitochondria morphology was significantly altered. Release of danger signals (DAMPs) such as ATP, Cytochrome C and HMGB1 into the cell supernatant of cultured cells was evident minutes after peptide treatment. The oncolytic effect of LTX-315 involving perturbation of both the cell membrane and the mitochondria with subsequent release of DAMPs may highlight the ability of LTX-315 to induce complete regression and long-term protective immune responses as previously reported in experimental animal models. PMID:26472184

  18. Enhanced efficacy with azacytidine and oncolytic BHV-1 in a tolerized cotton rat model of breast adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cuddington, Breanne P; Verschoor, Meghan; Ashkar, Ali; Mossman, Karen L

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses selectively replicate in cancer cells by exploiting biochemical differences between normal and tumor cells. Treatment with epigenetic modifiers such as 5-Azacytidine, a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, increases the replication and cytotoxicity of oncolytic viruses in vivo and in vitro. The cotton rat is an attractive animal to study oncolytic viruses, as syngeneic models of breast adenocarcinoma and osteosarcoma are well established, and many features of primary and secondary tumor growth recapitulate human disease. Treatment of LCRT breast cancer cells with 5-Azacytidine increases bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1)-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro, with Chou-Talalay analysis indicating a very strong synergy. In vivo, BHV-1 monotherapy delayed tumor growth but did not improve survival of cotton rats with subcutaneous breast adenocarcinomas. However, combination therapy significantly decreased the incidence of secondary lesions, with enhanced tumor cell clearance and evidence of immune cell infiltration compared to BHV-1 monotherapy. Together, these results warrant further investigation of BHV-1 combination therapy with epigenetic modifiers for the treatment of breast cancer, particularly in the context of the prevention and treatment of secondary lesions. PMID:27119103

  19. Comparative analysis of poxvirus orthologues of the vaccinia virus E3 protein: modulation of protein kinase R activity, cytokine responses, and virus pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Myskiw, Chad; Arsenio, Janilyn; Hammett, Craig; van Bruggen, Rebekah; Deschambault, Yvon; Beausoleil, Nicole; Babiuk, Shawn; Cao, Jingxin

    2011-12-01

    Poxviruses are important human and animal pathogens that have evolved elaborate strategies for antagonizing host innate and adaptive immunity. The E3 protein of vaccinia virus, the prototypic member of the orthopoxviruses, functions as an inhibitor of innate immune signaling and is essential for vaccinia virus replication in vivo and in many human cell culture systems. However, the function of orthologues of E3 expressed by poxviruses of other genera with different host specificity remains largely unknown. In the present study, we characterized the E3 orthologues from sheeppox virus, yaba monkey tumor virus, swinepox virus, and myxoma virus for their ability to modulate protein kinase R (PKR) function, cytokine responses and virus pathogenicity. We found that the E3 orthologues of myxoma virus and swinepox virus could suppress PKR activation and interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral activities and restore the host range function of E3 in HeLa cells. In contrast, the E3 orthologues from sheeppox virus and yaba monkey tumor virus were unable to inhibit PKR activation. While the sheeppox orthologue was unable to restore the host range function of E3, the yaba monkey tumor virus orthologue partially restored E3-deficient vaccinia virus replication in HeLa cells, correlated with its ability to suppress IFN-induced antiviral activities. Moreover, poxvirus E3 orthologues show varying ability to inhibit the induction of antiviral and proinflammatory cytokines. Despite these in vitro results, none of the E3 orthologues tested was capable of restoring pathogenicity to E3-deficient vaccinia virus in vivo.

  20. Protection of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) against plague after voluntary consumption of baits containing recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mencher, J.S.; Smith, S.R.; Powell, T.D.; Stinchcomb, D.T.; Osorio, J.E.; Rocke, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) are highly susceptible to Yersinia pestis and significant reservoirs of plague for humans in the western United States. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus, expressing the F1 antigen of Y. pestis, was incorporated into a palatable bait and offered to 18 black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) for voluntary consumption; 18 negative control animals received placebo baits. Antibody titers against Y. pestis F1 antigen increased significantly (P < 0.01) in vaccinees, and their survival was significantly higher upon challenge with Y. pestis than that of negative controls (P < 0.01).

  1. Therapeutic and Tumor-specific Immunity Induced by Combination of Dendritic Cells and Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing IL-12 and 4-1BBL

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing-Hua; Zhang, Song-Nan; Choi, Kyung-Ju; Choi, Il-Kyu; Kim, Joo-Hang; Lee, Mingul; Kim, Hoguen; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2009-01-01

    Recently, gene-based cytokine treatment has been actively pursued as a new promising approach in treating cancer. In an effort to augment the efficiency of antitumor effect by cytokine-mediated immunotherapy, we selected both interleukin (IL)-12 and 4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL) as suitable cytokines to fully activate the type-1 immune response. Coexpression of IL-12 and 4-1BBL mediated by oncolytic adenovirus (Ad) greatly enhanced the antitumor effect. Further, synergistic enhancement in interferon (IFN)-γ levels were seen in mice treated with oncolytic Ad expressing both IL-12 and 4-1BBL. Next, to improve the overall antitumor immune response, we coadministered IL-12- and 4-1BBL-coexpressing oncolytic Ad with dendritic cells (DCs). Combination treatment of IL-12- and 4-1BBL-coexpressing oncolytic Ad and DCs elicited greater antitumor and antimetastatic effects than either treatment alone. Moreover, enhanced type-1 antitumor immune response and higher migratory abilities of DCs in tumors were also observed in the combination arms. The nature of the enhanced antitumor immune response seems to be mediated through the enhanced cytolytic activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and IFN-γ-releasing immune cells. Taken together, these data highlight the potential therapeutic benefit of combining IL-12- and 4-1BBL-coexpressing oncolytic Ad with DCs and warrants further evaluation in the clinic. PMID:19738604

  2. Parasites in the City: Degree of Urbanization Predicts Poxvirus and Coccidian Infections in House Finches (Haemorhous mexicanus)

    PubMed Central

    Giraudeau, Mathieu; Mousel, Melanie; Earl, Stevan; McGraw, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Background Urbanization can strongly impact the physiology, behavior, and fitness of animals. Conditions in cities may also promote the transmission and success of animal parasites and pathogens. However, to date, no studies have examined variation in the prevalence or severity of several distinct pathogens/parasites along a gradient of urbanization in animals or if these infections increase physiological stress in urban populations. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we measured the prevalence and severity of infection with intestinal coccidians (Isospora sp.) and the canarypox virus (Avipoxvirus) along an urban-to-rural gradient in wild male house finches (Haemorhous mexicanus). In addition, we quantified an important stress indicator in animals (oxidative stress) and several axes of urbanization, including human population density and land-use patterns within a 1 km radius of each trapping site. Prevalence of poxvirus infection and severity of coccidial infection were significantly associated with the degree of urbanization, with an increase of infection in more urban areas. The degrees of infection by the two parasites were not correlated along the urban-rural gradient. Finally, levels of oxidative damage in plasma were not associated with infection or with urbanization metrics. Conclusion/Significance These results indicate that the physical presence of humans in cities and the associated altered urban landscape characteristics are associated with increased infections with both a virus and a gastrointestinal parasite in this common songbird resident of North American cities. Though we failed to find elevations in urban- or parasite/pathogen-mediated oxidative stress, humans may facilitate infections in these birds via bird feeders (i.e. horizontal disease transmission due to unsanitary surfaces and/or elevations in host population densities) and/or via elevations in other forms of physiological stress (e.g. corticosterone, nutritional). PMID:24503816

  3. Cellular impedance measurement as a new tool for poxvirus titration, antibody neutralization testing and evaluation of antiviral substances

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowski, Peter T.; Schuenadel, Livia; Wiethaus, Julia; Bourquain, Daniel R.; Kurth, Andreas; Nitsche, Andreas

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Real-time data acquisition by RT-CES requires low operative effort. {yields} Time to result is reduced by using RT-CES instead of conventional methods. {yields} RT-CES enables quantification of virus titers in unknown samples. {yields} RT-CES is a useful tool for high-throughput characterization of antiviral agents. {yields} An RT-CES-based virus neutralization test was established. -- Abstract: Impedance-based biosensing known as real-time cell electronic sensing (RT-CES) belongs to an emerging technology for analyzing the status of cells in vitro. In the present study protocols were developed for an RT-CES-based system (xCELLigence{sup TM}, Roche Applied Science, ACEA Biosciences Inc.) to supplement conventional techniques in pox virology. First, proliferation of cells susceptible to orthopoxviruses was monitored. For virus titration cells were infected with vaccinia virus and cell status, represented by the dimensionless impedance-based cell index (CI), was monitored. A virus-dose dependent decrease in electrical impedance could be shown. Calculation of calibration curves at a suitable CI covering a dynamic range of 4 log enabled the quantification of virus titers in unknown samples. Similarly, antiviral effects could be determined as shown for anti-poxviral agents ST-246 and Cidofovir. Published values for the in vitro concentration that inhibited virus replication by 50% (IC{sub 50}) could be confirmed while cytotoxicity in effective concentrations was excluded in long-term incubation experiments. Finally, an RT-CES-based virus neutralization test was established. Various poxvirus-specific antibodies were examined for their neutralizing activity and a calculation mode for the neutralizing antibody titer was introduced. In summary, the presented RT-CES-based methods outmatch end-point assays by observing the cell population throughout the entire experiment while workload and time to result are reduced.

  4. Attenuated poxvirus-based simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaccines given in infancy partially protect infant and juvenile macaques against repeated oral challenge with virulent SIV.

    PubMed

    Van Rompay, Koen K A; Abel, Kristina; Lawson, Jonathan R; Singh, Raman P; Schmidt, Kimberli A; Evans, Thomas; Earl, Patricia; Harvey, Danielle; Franchini, Genoveffa; Tartaglia, James; Montefiori, David; Hattangadi, Shilpa; Moss, Bernard; Marthas, Marta L

    2005-02-01

    An infant macaque model was developed to test pediatric vaccine candidates aimed at reducing HIV transmission through breast-feeding. Infant macaques were given multiple immunizations during the first 3 weeks of life with recombinant poxvirus vaccines expressing simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) structural proteins Gag, Pol, and Env (ALVAC-SIV or modified vaccinia virus Ankara [MVA]-SIV). After repeated daily oral inoculations with virulent SIVmac251 at 4 weeks of age, significantly fewer ALVAC-SIV-immunized infants were infected compared with unimmunized infants. Monkeys not infected after oral challenge in infancy were rechallenged at 16 months of age or older by repeated weekly oral SIV exposure; unimmunized animals were infected after fewer SIV exposures than were animals vaccinated with ALVAC-SIV or MVA-SIV. When infected, ALVAC-SIV- and MVA-SIV-vaccinated animals also had reduced viremia compared with unimmunized animals. The results of these investigations suggest that immunization of human infants with poxvirus-based HIV vaccine candidates may offer protection against early and late HIV infection through breastfeeding.

  5. Apparent field safety of a raccoon poxvirus-vectored plague vaccine in free-ranging prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tripp, Daniel W.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Streich, Sean P.; Abbott, Rachel C.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Miller, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) suffer high rates of mortality from plague. An oral sylvatic plague vaccine using the raccoon poxvirus vector (designated RCN-F1/V307) has been developed for prairie dogs. This vaccine is incorporated into palatable bait along with rhodamine B as a biomarker. We conducted trials in August and September 2012 to demonstrate uptake and apparent safety of the RCN-F1/V307 vaccine in two prairie dog species under field conditions. Free-ranging prairie dogs and other associated small rodents readily consumed vaccine-laden baits during field trials with no apparent adverse effects; most sampled prairie dogs (90%) and associated small rodents (78%) had consumed baits. Visual counts of prairie dogs and their burrows revealed no evidence of prairie dog decline after vaccine exposure. No vaccine-related morbidity, mortality, or gross or microscopic lesions were observed. Poxviruses were not isolated from any animal sampled prior to bait distribution or on sites that received placebo baits. We isolated RCN-F1/V307 from 17 prairie dogs and two deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) captured on sites where vaccine-laden baits were distributed. Based on these findings, studies examining the utility and effectiveness of oral vaccination to prevent plague-induced mortality in prairie dogs and associated species are underway.

  6. Apparent field safety of a raccoon poxvirus-vectored plague vaccine in free-ranging prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), Colorado, USA.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Daniel W; Rocke, Tonie E; Streich, Sean P; Abbott, Rachel C; Osorio, Jorge E; Miller, Michael W

    2015-04-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) suffer high rates of mortality from plague. An oral sylvatic plague vaccine using the raccoon poxvirus vector (designated RCN-F1/V307) has been developed for prairie dogs. This vaccine is incorporated into palatable bait along with rhodamine B as a biomarker. We conducted trials in August and September 2012 to demonstrate uptake and apparent safety of the RCN-F1/V307 vaccine in two prairie dog species under field conditions. Free-ranging prairie dogs and other associated small rodents readily consumed vaccine-laden baits during field trials with no apparent adverse effects; most sampled prairie dogs (90%) and associated small rodents (78%) had consumed baits. Visual counts of prairie dogs and their burrows revealed no evidence of prairie dog decline after vaccine exposure. No vaccine-related morbidity, mortality, or gross or microscopic lesions were observed. Poxviruses were not isolated from any animal sampled prior to bait distribution or on sites that received placebo baits. We isolated RCN-F1/V307 from 17 prairie dogs and two deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) captured on sites where vaccine-laden baits were distributed. Based on these findings, studies examining the utility and effectiveness of oral vaccination to prevent plague-induced mortality in prairie dogs and associated species are underway. PMID:25588006

  7. Apparent field safety of a raccoon poxvirus-vectored plague vaccine in free-ranging prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), Colorado, USA.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Daniel W; Rocke, Tonie E; Streich, Sean P; Abbott, Rachel C; Osorio, Jorge E; Miller, Michael W

    2015-04-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) suffer high rates of mortality from plague. An oral sylvatic plague vaccine using the raccoon poxvirus vector (designated RCN-F1/V307) has been developed for prairie dogs. This vaccine is incorporated into palatable bait along with rhodamine B as a biomarker. We conducted trials in August and September 2012 to demonstrate uptake and apparent safety of the RCN-F1/V307 vaccine in two prairie dog species under field conditions. Free-ranging prairie dogs and other associated small rodents readily consumed vaccine-laden baits during field trials with no apparent adverse effects; most sampled prairie dogs (90%) and associated small rodents (78%) had consumed baits. Visual counts of prairie dogs and their burrows revealed no evidence of prairie dog decline after vaccine exposure. No vaccine-related morbidity, mortality, or gross or microscopic lesions were observed. Poxviruses were not isolated from any animal sampled prior to bait distribution or on sites that received placebo baits. We isolated RCN-F1/V307 from 17 prairie dogs and two deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) captured on sites where vaccine-laden baits were distributed. Based on these findings, studies examining the utility and effectiveness of oral vaccination to prevent plague-induced mortality in prairie dogs and associated species are underway.

  8. Targeted release of oncolytic measles virus by blood outgrowth endothelial cells in situ inhibits orthotopic gliomas.

    PubMed

    Wei, J; Wahl, J; Nakamura, T; Stiller, D; Mertens, T; Debatin, K-M; Beltinger, C

    2007-11-01

    Malignant gliomas remain largely incurable despite intensive efforts to develop novel therapies. Replicating oncolytic viruses have shown great promise, among them attenuated measles viruses of the Edmonston B strain (MV-Edm). However, host immune response and the infiltrative nature of gliomas limit their efficacy. We show that human blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs), readily expandable from peripheral blood, are easily infected by MV-Edm and allow replication of MV-Edm while surviving long enough after infection to serve as vehicles for MV-Edm (BOEC/MV-Edm). After intravenous and peritumoral injection, BOEC/MV-Edm deliver the viruses selectively to irradiated orthotopic U87 gliomas in mice. At the tumor, MV-Edm produced by the BOECs infect glioma cells. Subsequent spread from tumor cell to tumor cell leads to focal infection and cytopathic effects that decrease tumor size and, in the case of peritumoral injection, prolong survival of mice. Since MV-Edm within BOECs are not readily neutralized and because BOEC/MV-Edm search and destroy glioma cells, BOEC/MV-Edm constitute a promising novel approach for glioma therapy.

  9. Chimeric antigen receptor–engineered T cells as oncolytic virus carriers

    PubMed Central

    VanSeggelen, Heather; Tantalo, Daniela GM; Afsahi, Arya; Hammill, Joanne A; Bramson, Jonathan L

    2015-01-01

    The use of engineered T cells in adoptive transfer therapies has shown significant promise in treating hematological cancers. However, successes treating solid tumors are much less prevalent. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) have the capacity to induce specific lysis of tumor cells and indirectly impact tumor growth via vascular shutdown. These viruses bear natural abilities to associate with lymphocytes upon systemic administration, but therapeutic doses must be very high in order to evade antibodies and other components of the immune system. As T cells readily circulate through the body, using these cells to deliver OVs directly to tumors may provide an ideal combination. Our studies demonstrate that loading chimeric antigen receptor–engineered T cells with low doses of virus does not impact receptor expression or function in either murine or human T cells. Engineered T cells can deposit virus onto a variety of tumor targets, which can enhance the tumoricidal activity of the combination treatment. This concept appears to be broadly applicable, as we observed similar results using murine or human T cells, loaded with either RNA or DNA viruses. Overall, loading of engineered T cells with OVs represents a novel combination therapy that may increase the efficacy of both treatments. PMID:27119109

  10. Encapsulated Stem Cells Loaded With Hyaluronidase-expressing Oncolytic Virus for Brain Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi; He, Derek; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Alemany, Ramon; Shah, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Despite the proven safety of oncolytic viruses (OV) in clinical trials for glioblastoma (GBM), their efficacy has been hindered by suboptimal spreading within the tumor. We show that hyaluronan or hyaluronic acid (HA), an important component of extracellular matrix (ECM), is highly expressed in a majority of tumor xenografts established from patient-derived GBM lines that present both invasive and nodular phenotypes. Intratumoral injection of a conditionally replicating adenovirus expressing soluble hyaluronidase (ICOVIR17) into nodular GBM, mediated HA degradation and enhanced viral spread, resulting in a significant antitumor effect and mice survival. In an effort to translate OV-based therapeutics into clinical settings, we encapsulated human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) loaded with ICOVIR17 in biocompatible synthetic extracellular matrix (sECM) and tested their efficacy in a clinically relevant mouse model of GBM resection. Compared with direct injection of ICOVIR17, sECM-MSC loaded with ICOVIR17 resulted in a significant decrease in tumor regrowth and increased mice survival. This is the first report of its kind revealing the expression of HA in GBM and the role of OV-mediated HA targeting in clinically relevant mouse model of GBM resection and thus has clinical implications. PMID:25352242

  11. DNA demethylating agents synergize with oncolytic HSV1 against malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Okemoto, Kazuo; Kasai, Kazue; Wagner, Benjamin; Haseley, Amy; Meisen, Hans; Bolyard, Chelsea; Mo, Xiaokui; Wehr, Allison; Lehman, Amy; Fernandez, Soledad; Kaur, Balveen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Oncolytic viruses (OV) based on herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) are being utilized in clinical trials for a variety of cancers. The OV, rQNestin34.5, utilizes a nestin promoter/enhancer to selectively drive robust viral replication in malignant glioma cells. We have discovered that this promoter becomes extensively methylated in infected glioma cells, reducing OV efficacy. Experimental Design We utilized demethylating drugs (5-azacytidine), Decitabine or Valproic Acid (VPA) in both in vitro and in vivo malignant glioma models to determine if they improved the efficacy of rQNestin34.5 therapy. Results Utilization of demethylating agents, such as 5-azacytidine (5-Aza), improved OV replication and tumor cell lysis in vitro and, in fact, synergized pharmacologically by Chou-Talalay analysis. In vivo the combination of the demethylating agents, 5-Aza or Decitabine, with rQNestin34.5 significantly prolonged the survivorship of athymic mice harboring intracranial human glioma xenografts over single agent alone. Conclusion These results thus provide further justification for the exploration of demethylating agents when combined with the OV, rQNestin34.5, in preclinical therapeutics and possibly clinical trials for malignant glioma. PMID:24056786

  12. CD8+ T-cell Immune Evasion Enables Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pourchet, Aldo; Fuhrmann, Steven R.; Pilones, Karsten A.; Demaria, Sandra; Frey, Alan B.; Mulvey, Matthew; Mohr, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Although counteracting innate defenses allows oncolytic viruses (OVs) to better replicate and spread within tumors, CD8+ T-cells restrict their capacity to trigger systemic anti-tumor immune responses. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) evades CD8+ T-cells by producing ICP47, which limits immune recognition of infected cells by inhibiting the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). Surprisingly, removing ICP47 was assumed to benefit OV immuno-therapy, but the impact of inhibiting TAP remains unknown because human HSV-1 ICP47 is not effective in rodents. Here, we engineer an HSV-1 OV to produce bovine herpesvirus UL49.5, which unlike ICP47, antagonizes rodent and human TAP. Significantly, UL49.5-expressing OVs showed superior efficacy treating bladder and breast cancer in murine models that was dependent upon CD8+ T-cells. Besides injected subcutaneous tumors, UL49.5-OV reduced untreated, contralateral tumor size and metastases. These findings establish TAP inhibitor-armed OVs that evade CD8+ T-cells as an immunotherapy strategy to elicit potent local and systemic anti-tumor responses. PMID:27077112

  13. Dendritic Cells in Oncolytic Virus-Based Anti-Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youra; Clements, Derek R.; Sterea, Andra M.; Jang, Hyun Woo; Gujar, Shashi A.; Lee, Patrick W. K.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells that have a notable role in the initiation and regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. In the context of cancer, appropriately activated DCs can induce anti-tumor immunity by activating innate immune cells and tumor-specific lymphocytes that target cancer cells. However, the tumor microenvironment (TME) imposes different mechanisms that facilitate the impairment of DC functions, such as inefficient antigen presentation or polarization into immunosuppressive DCs. These tumor-associated DCs thus fail to initiate tumor-specific immunity, and indirectly support tumor progression. Hence, there is increasing interest in identifying interventions that can overturn DC impairment within the TME. Many reports thus far have studied oncolytic viruses (OVs), viruses that preferentially target and kill cancer cells, for their capacity to enhance DC-mediated anti-tumor effects. Herein, we describe the general characteristics of DCs, focusing on their role in innate and adaptive immunity in the context of the TME. We also examine how DC-OV interaction affects DC recruitment, OV delivery, and anti-tumor immunity activation. Understanding these roles of DCs in the TME and OV infection is critical in devising strategies to further harness the anti-tumor effects of both DCs and OVs, ultimately enhancing the efficacy of OV-based oncotherapy. PMID:26690204

  14. Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer With an Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing Interleukin-12 in Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Bortolanza, Sergia; Bunuales, Maria; Otano, Itziar; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos; Perez, Daniel; Prieto, Jesus; Hernandez-Alcoceba, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy resistant to most conventional and experimental therapies, including conditionally replicative adenoviruses (CRAds). The incorporation of immunostimulatory genes such as interleukin-12 (IL-12) in these viruses may overcome some of their limitations, but evaluation of such vectors requires suitable preclinical models. We describe a CRAd in which replication is dependent on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) activity and alterations of the pRB pathway in cancer cells. Transgenes (luciferase or IL-12) were incorporated into E3 region of the virus using a selective 6.7K/gp19K deletion. A novel permissive model of pancreatic cancer developed in immunocompetent Syrian hamsters was used for in vivo analysis. We show that, in contrast with nonreplicating adenoviruses (NR-Ad), active viral production and enhanced transgene expression took place in vivo. A single intratumor inoculation of the CRAd expressing IL-12 (Ad-DHscIL12) achieved a potent antitumor effect, whereas higher doses of replication-competent adenoviruses carrying luciferase did not. Compared to a standard NR-Ad expressing IL-12, Ad-DHscIL12 was less toxic in hamsters, with more selective tumor expression and shorter systemic exposure to the cytokine. We conclude that the expression of IL-12 in the context of a hypoxia-inducible oncolytic adenovirus is effective against pancreatic cancer in a relevant animal model. PMID:19223865

  15. Antigen profiling analysis of vaccinia virus injected canine tumors: oncolytic virus efficiency predicted by boolean models.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Alexander; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Adelfinger, Marion; Nolte, Ingo; Dandekar, Thomas; Szalay, Aladar A

    2014-01-01

    Virotherapy on the basis of oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV) strains is a novel approach for cancer therapy. In this study we describe for the first time the use of dynamic boolean modeling for tumor growth prediction of vaccinia virus GLV-1h68-injected canine tumors including canine mammary adenoma (ZMTH3), canine mammary carcinoma (MTH52c), canine prostate carcinoma (CT1258), and canine soft tissue sarcoma (STSA-1). Additionally, the STSA-1 xenografted mice were injected with either LIVP 1.1.1 or LIVP 5.1.1 vaccinia virus strains.   Antigen profiling data of the four different vaccinia virus-injected canine tumors were obtained, analyzed and used to calculate differences in the tumor growth signaling network by type and tumor type. Our model combines networks for apoptosis, MAPK, p53, WNT, Hedgehog, TK cell, Interferon, and Interleukin signaling networks. The in silico findings conform with in vivo findings of tumor growth. Boolean modeling describes tumor growth and remission semi-quantitatively with a good fit to the data obtained for all cancer type variants. At the same time it monitors all signaling activities as a basis for treatment planning according to antigen levels. Mitigation and elimination of VACV- susceptible tumor types as well as effects on the non-susceptible type CT1258 are predicted correctly. Thus the combination of Antigen profiling and semi-quantitative modeling optimizes the therapy already before its start.

  16. Synergistic cytotoxicity of oncolytic reovirus in combination with cisplatin–paclitaxel doublet chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roulstone, V; Twigger, K; Zaidi, S; Pencavel, T; Kyula, JN; White, C; McLaughlin, M; Seth, R; Karapanagiotou, EM; Mansfield, D; Coffey, M; Nuovo, G; Vile, RG; Pandha, HS; Melcher, AA; Harrington, KJ

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic reovirus is currently under active investigation in a range of tumour types. Early phase studies have shown that this agent has modest monotherapy efficacy and its future development is likely to focus on combination regimens with cytotoxic chemotherapy. Indeed, phase I/II clinical trials have confirmed that reovirus can be safely combined with cytotoxic drugs, including a platin—taxane doublet regimen, which is currently being tested in a phase III clinical trial in patients with relapsed/metastatic head and neck cancer. Therefore, we have tested this triple (reovirus, cisplatin, paclitaxel) combination therapy in a panel of four head and neck cancer cell lines. Using the combination index (CI) method, the triple therapy demonstrated synergistic cytotoxicity in vitro in both malignant and non-malignant cell lines. In head and neck cancer cell lines, this was associated with enhanced caspase 3 and 7 cleavage, but no increase in viral replication. In vitro analyses confirmed colocalisation of markers of reovirus infection and caspase 3. Triple therapy was significantly more effective than reovirus or cisplatin—paclitaxel in athymic nude mice. These data suggest that the combination of reovirus plus platin—taxane doublet chemotherapy has significant activity in head and neck cancer and underpin the current phase III study in this indication. PMID:22895509

  17. Tumorigenic poxviruses: genomic organization and DNA sequence of the telomeric region of the Shope fibroma virus genome.

    PubMed

    Upton, C; DeLange, A M; McFadden, G

    1987-09-01

    Shope fibroma virus (SFV), a tumorigenic poxvirus, has a 160-kb linear double-stranded DNA genome and possesses terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of 12.4 kb. The DNA sequence of the terminal 5.5 kb of the viral genome is presented and together with previously published sequences completes the entire sequence of the SFV TIR. The terminal 400-bp region contains no major open reading frames (ORFs) but does possess five related imperfect palindromes. The remaining 5.1 kb of the sequence contains seven tightly clustered and tandemly oriented ORFs, four larger than 100 amino acids in length (T1, T2, T4, and T5) and three smaller ORFs (T3A, T3B, and T3C). All are transcribed toward the viral hairpin and almost all possess the consensus sequence TTTTTNT near their 3' ends which has been implicated for the transcription termination of vaccinia virus early genes. Searches of the published DNA database revealed no sequences with significant homology with this region of the SFV genome but when the protein database was searched with the translation products of ORFs T1-T5 it was found that the N-terminus of the putative T4 polypeptide is closely related to the signal sequence of the hemagglutinin precursor from influenza A virus, suggesting that the T4 polypeptide may be secreted from SFV-infected cells. Examination of other SFV ORFs shows that T1 and T2 also possess signal-like hydrophobic amino acid stretches close to their N-termini. The protein database search also revealed that the putative T2 protein has significant homology to the insulin family of polypeptides. In terms of sequence repetitions, seven tandemly repeated copies of the hexanucleotide ATTGTT and three flanking regions of dyad symmetry were detected, all in ORF T3C. A search for palindromic sequences also revealed two clusters, one in ORF T3A/B and a second in ORF T2. ORF T2 harbors five short sequence domains, each of which consists of a 6-bp short palindrome and a 10- to 18-bp larger palindrome. The

  18. Genomic DNA damage and ATR-Chk1 signaling determine oncolytic adenoviral efficacy in human ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Claire M.; Shibata, Atsushi; Tookman, Laura A.; Archibald, Kyra M.; Flak, Magdalena B.; Pirlo, Katrina J.; Lockley, Michelle; Wheatley, Sally P.; McNeish, Iain A.

    2011-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses replicate selectively within and lyse malignant cells. As such, they are being developed as anticancer therapeutics. However, the sensitivity of ovarian cancers to adenovirus cytotoxicity varies greatly, even in cells of similar infectivity. Using both the adenovirus E1A-CR2 deletion mutant dl922-947 and WT adenovirus serotype 5 in a panel of human ovarian cancer cell lines that cover a 3-log range of sensitivity, we observed profound overreplication of genomic DNA only in highly sensitive cell lines. This was associated with the presence of extensive genomic DNA damage. Inhibition of ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related checkpoint kinase 1 (ATR-Chk1), but not ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), promoted genomic DNA damage and overreplication in resistant and partially sensitive cells. This was accompanied by increased adenovirus cytotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. We also demonstrated that Cdc25A was upregulated in highly sensitive ovarian cancer cell lines after adenovirus infection and was stabilized after loss of Chk1 activity. Knockdown of Cdc25A inhibited virus-induced DNA damage in highly sensitive cells and blocked the effects of Chk1 inhibition in resistant cells. Finally, inhibition of Chk1 decreased homologous recombination repair of virus-induced genomic DNA double-strand breaks. Thus, virus-induced host cell DNA damage signaling and repair are key determinants of oncolytic adenoviral activity, and promoting unscheduled DNA synthesis and/or impeding homologous recombination repair could potentiate the effects of oncolytic adenoviruses in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:21383502

  19. Immune response is an important aspect of the antitumor effect produced by a CD40L-encoding oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Diaconu, Iulia; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Hirvinen, Mari L M; Escutenaire, Sophie; Ugolini, Matteo; Pesonen, Saila K; Bramante, Simona; Parviainen, Suvi; Kanerva, Anna; Loskog, Angelica S I; Eliopoulos, Aristides G; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-05-01

    Oncolytic adenovirus is an attractive platform for immunotherapy because virus replication is highly immunogenic and not subject to tolerance. Although oncolysis releases tumor epitopes and provides costimulatory danger signals, arming the virus with immunostimulatory molecules can further improve efficacy. CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154) induces apoptosis of tumor cells and triggers several immune mechanisms, including a T-helper type 1 (T(H)1) response, which leads to activation of cytotoxic T cells and reduction of immunosuppression. In this study, we constructed a novel oncolytic adenovirus, Ad5/3-hTERT-E1A-hCD40L, which features a chimeric Ad5/3 capsid for enhanced tumor transduction, a human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter for tumor selectivity, and human CD40L for increased efficacy. Ad5/3-hTERT-E1A-hCD40L significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo via oncolytic and apoptotic effects, and (Ad5/3-hTERT-E1A-hCD40L)-mediated oncolysis resulted in enhanced calreticulin exposure and HMGB1 and ATP release, which were suggestive of immunogenicity. In two syngeneic mouse models, murine CD40L induced recruitment and activation of antigen-presenting cells, leading to increased interleukin-12 production in splenocytes. This effect was associated with induction of the T(H)1 cytokines IFN-γ, RANTES, and TNF-α. Tumors treated with Ad5/3-CMV-mCD40L also displayed an enhanced presence of macrophages and cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells but not B cells. Together, our findings show that adenoviruses coding for CD40L mediate multiple antitumor effects including oncolysis, apoptosis, induction of T-cell responses, and upregulation of T(H)1 cytokines.

  20. Chemical Modification with High Molecular Weight Polyethylene Glycol Reduces Transduction of Hepatocytes and Increases Efficacy of Intravenously Delivered Oncolytic Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Doronin, Konstantin; Shashkova, Elena V.; May, Shannon M.; Hofherr, Sean E.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Oncolytic adenoviruses are anticancer agents that replicate within tumors and spread to uninfected tumor cells, amplifying the anticancer effect of initial transduction. We tested whether coating the viral particle with polyethylene glycol (PEG) could reduce transduction of hepatocytes and hepatotoxicity after systemic (intravenous) administration of oncolytic adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5). Conjugating Ad5 with high molecular weight 20-kDa PEG but not with 5-kDa PEG reduced hepatocyte transduction and hepatotoxicity after intravenous injection. PEGylation with 20-kDa PEG was as efficient at detargeting adenovirus from Kupffer cells and hepatocytes as virus predosing and warfarin. Bioluminescence imaging of virus distribution in two xenograft tumor models in nude mice demonstrated that PEGylation with 20-kDa PEG reduced liver infection 19- to 90-fold. Tumor transduction levels were similar for vectors PEGylated with 20-kDa PEG and unPEGylated vectors. Anticancer efficacy after a single intravenous injection was retained at the level of unmodified vector in large established prostate carcinoma xenografts, resulting in complete elimination of tumors in all animals and long-term tumor-free survival. Anticancer efficacy after a single intravenous injection was increased in large established hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts, resulting in significant prolongation of survival as compared with unmodified vector. The increase in efficacy was comparable to that obtained with predosing and warfarin pretreatment, significantly extending the median of survival. Shielding adenovirus with 20-kDa PEG may be a useful approach to improve the therapeutic window of oncolytic adenovirus after systemic delivery to primary and metastatic tumor sites. PMID:19469693

  1. Chemical modification with high molecular weight polyethylene glycol reduces transduction of hepatocytes and increases efficacy of intravenously delivered oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Doronin, Konstantin; Shashkova, Elena V; May, Shannon M; Hofherr, Sean E; Barry, Michael A

    2009-09-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses are anticancer agents that replicate within tumors and spread to uninfected tumor cells, amplifying the anticancer effect of initial transduction. We tested whether coating the viral particle with polyethylene glycol (PEG) could reduce transduction of hepatocytes and hepatotoxicity after systemic (intravenous) administration of oncolytic adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5). Conjugating Ad5 with high molecular weight 20-kDa PEG but not with 5-kDa PEG reduced hepatocyte transduction and hepatotoxicity after intravenous injection. PEGylation with 20-kDa PEG was as efficient at detargeting adenovirus from Kupffer cells and hepatocytes as virus predosing and warfarin. Bioluminescence imaging of virus distribution in two xenograft tumor models in nude mice demonstrated that PEGylation with 20-kDa PEG reduced liver infection 19- to 90-fold. Tumor transduction levels were similar for vectors PEGylated with 20-kDa PEG and unPEGylated vectors. Anticancer efficacy after a single intravenous injection was retained at the level of unmodified vector in large established prostate carcinoma xenografts, resulting in complete elimination of tumors in all animals and long-term tumor-free survival. Anticancer efficacy after a single intravenous injection was increased in large established hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts, resulting in significant prolongation of survival as compared with unmodified vector. The increase in efficacy was comparable to that obtained with predosing and warfarin pretreatment, significantly extending the median of survival. Shielding adenovirus with 20-kDa PEG may be a useful approach to improve the therapeutic window of oncolytic adenovirus after systemic delivery to primary and metastatic tumor sites.

  2. Augmenting the antitumor effect of TRAIL by SOCS3 with double-regulated replicating oncolytic adenovirus in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Rui-Cheng; Cao, Xin; Gui, Jing-Hua; Zhou, Xiu-Mei; Zhong, Dan; Yan, Qiao-Lin; Huang, Wei-Dan; Qian, Qi-Jun; Zhao, Feng-Li; Liu, Xin-Yuan

    2011-09-01

    Aberrant JAK/STAT3 pathway has been reported to be related to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in many cell lines. In this study, a double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus vector that can replicate and induce a cytopathic effect in alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-positive HCC cell lines with p53 dysfunction was successfully constructed. Two therapeutic genes, suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), were chosen and incorporated into this vector system, respectively. The combined treatment of AFP-D55-SOCS3 and AFP-D55-TRAIL (2:3 ratio) exhibited potent antitumor activity in AFP-positive HCC cell lines compared with any other treatment both in vitro and in vivo. Specific replication and low progeny yield in AFP-positive HCC cell lines rendered these double-regulated oncolytic adenoviruses remarkably safe. Our data demonstrated that restoration of SOCS3, which inhibits the JAK/STAT3 pathway, by AFP-D55-SOCS3 not only could antagonize HCC therapeutic resistance to TRAIL and adenoviruses, but could also induce cell cycle arrest in HCC cell lines. SOCS3 could down-regulate Cyclin D1 and anti-apoptotic proteins such as XIAP, Survivin, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1, which are responsible for the synergistic inhibitory effects of AFP-D55-SOCS3 and AFP-D55-TRAIL. Dual gene and double-regulated oncolytic adenoviruses may provide safety and excellent antitumor effects for liver cancer, which is the advantage of a cancer-targeting gene virotherapy strategy. PMID:21361790

  3. Etoposide enhances antitumor efficacy of MDR1-driven oncolytic adenovirus through autoupregulation of the MDR1 promoter activity

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yau-Lin; Shiau, Ai-Li; Wu, Chao-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds), or oncolytic adenoviruses, such as E1B55K-deleted adenovirus, are attractive anticancer agents. However, the therapeutic efficacy of E1B55K-deleted adenovirus for refractory solid tumors has been limited. Environmental stress conditions may induce nuclear accumulation of YB-1, which occurs in multidrug-resistant and adenovirus-infected cancer cells. Overexpression and nuclear localization of YB-1 are associated with poor prognosis and tumor recurrence in various cancers. Nuclear YB-1 transactivates the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) genes through the Y-box. Here, we developed a novel E1B55K-deleted adenovirus driven by the MDR1 promoter, designed Ad5GS3. We tested the feasibility of using YB-1 to transcriptionally regulate Ad5GS3 replication in cancer cells and thereby to enhance antitumor efficacy. We evaluated synergistic antitumor effects of oncolytic virotherapy in combination with chemotherapy. Our results show that adenovirus E1A induced E2F-1 activity to augment YB-1 expression, which shut down host protein synthesis in cancer cells during adenovirus replication. In cancer cells infected with Ad5WS1, an E1B55K-deleted adenovirus driven by the E1 promoter, E1A enhanced YB-1 expression, and then further phosphorylated Akt, which, in turn, triggered nuclear translocation of YB-1. Ad5GS3 in combination with chemotherapeutic agents facilitated nuclear localization of YB-1 and, in turn, upregulated the MDR1 promoter activity and enhanced Ad5GS3 replication in cancer cells. Thus, E1A, YB-1, and the MDR1 promoter form a positive feedback loop to promote Ad5GS3 replication in cancer cells, and this regulation can be further augmented when chemotherapeutic agents are added. In the in vivo study, Ad5GS3 in combination with etoposide synergistically suppressed tumor growth and prolonged survival in NOD/SCID mice bearing human lung tumor xenografts. More importantly, Ad5GS3 exerted potent oncolytic activity against clinical

  4. Intratumoral INF-γ triggers an antiviral state in GL261 tumor cells: a major hurdle to overcome for oncolytic vaccinia virus therapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kober, Christina; Weibel, Stephanie; Rohn, Susanne; Kirscher, Lorenz; Szalay, Aladar A

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV) therapy is an alternative treatment option for glioblastoma multiforme. Here, we used a comparison of different tumor locations and different immunologic and genetic backgrounds to determine the replication efficacy and oncolytic potential of the VACV LIVP 1.1.1, an attenuated wild-type isolate of the Lister strain, in murine GL261 glioma models. With this approach, we expected to identify microenvironmental factors, which may be decisive for failure or success of oncolytic VACV therapy. We found that GL261 glioma cells implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically into Balb/c athymic, C57BL/6 athymic, or C57BL/6 wild-type mice formed individual tumors that respond to oncolytic VACV therapy with different outcomes. Surprisingly, only Balb/c athymic mice with subcutaneous tumors supported viral replication. We identified intratumoral IFN-γ expression levels that upregulate MHCII expression on GL261 cells in C57BL/6 wild-type mice associated with a non-permissive status of the tumor cells. Moreover, this IFN-γ-induced tumor cell phenotype was reversible. PMID:27119106

  5. A vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein epitope-incorporated oncolytic adenovirus overcomes CAR-dependency and shows markedly enhanced cancer cell killing and suppression of tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, A-Rum; Hong, Jinwoo; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2015-01-01

    Utility of traditional oncolytic adenovirus (Ad) has been limited due to low expression of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in cancer cells which results in poor infectivity of Ads. Here with an aim of improving the efficiency of Ad's entry to the cell, we generated a novel tropism-expanded oncolytic Ad which contains the epitope of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVG) at the HI-loop of Ad fiber. We generated 9 variants of oncolytic Ads with varying linkers and partial deletion to the fiber. Only one VSVG epitope-incorporated variant, RdB-1L-VSVG, which contains 1 linker and no deletion to fiber, was produced efficiently. Production of 3-dimensionaly stable fiber in RdB-1L-VSVG was confirmed by immunoblot analysis. RdB-1L-VSVG shows a remarkable improvement in cytotoxicity and total viral yield in cancer cells. RdB-1L-VSVG demonstrates enhanced cytotoxicity in cancer cells with subdued CAR-expression as it can be internalized by an alternate pathway. Competition assays with a CAR-specific antibody (Ab) or VSVG receptor, phosphatidyl serine (PS), reveals that cell internalization of RdB-1L-VSVG is mediated by both CAR and PS. Furthermore, treatment with RdB-1L-VSVG significantly enhanced anti-tumor effect in vivo. These studies demonstrate that the strategy to expand oncolytic Ad tropism may significantly improve therapeutic profile for cancer treatment. PMID:26430798

  6. Oncolytic vaccinia virus as a vector for therapeutic sodium iodide symporter gene therapy in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, D C; Kyula, J N; Rosenfelder, N; Chao-Chu, J; Kramer-Marek, G; Khan, A A; Roulstone, V; McLaughlin, M; Melcher, A A; Vile, R G; Pandha, H S; Khoo, V; Harrington, K J

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic strains of vaccinia virus are currently in clinical development with clear evidence of safety and promising signs of efficacy. Addition of therapeutic genes to the viral genome may increase the therapeutic efficacy of vaccinia. We evaluated the therapeutic potential of vaccinia virus expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in prostate cancer models, combining oncolysis, external beam radiotherapy and NIS-mediated radioiodide therapy. The NIS-expressing vaccinia virus (VV-NIS), GLV-1h153, was tested in in vitro analyzes of viral cell killing, combination with radiotherapy, NIS expression, cellular radioiodide uptake and apoptotic cell death in PC3, DU145, LNCaP and WPMY-1 human prostate cell lines. In vivo experiments were carried out in PC3 xenografts in CD1 nude mice to assess NIS expression and tumor radioiodide uptake. In addition, the therapeutic benefit of radioiodide treatment in combination with viral oncolysis and external beam radiotherapy was measured. In vitro viral cell killing of prostate cancers was dose- and time-dependent and was through apoptotic mechanisms. Importantly, combined virus therapy and iodizing radiation did not adversely affect oncolysis. NIS gene expression in infected cells was functional and mediated uptake of radioiodide both in vitro and in vivo. Therapy experiments with both xenograft and immunocompetent Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) mouse models showed that the addition of radioiodide to VV-NIS-infected tumors was more effective than each single-agent therapy, restricting tumor growth and increasing survival. In conclusion, VV-NIS is effective in prostate cancer models. This treatment modality would be an attractive complement to existing clinical radiotherapy practice. PMID:26814609

  7. Systemic Delivery of an Oncolytic Adenovirus Expressing Decorin for the Treatment of Breast Cancer Bone Metastases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuefeng; Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Hu, Zebin; Wang, Chi-Hsiung; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R; Guise, Theresa; Yun, Chae-Ok; Brendler, Charles B; Iozzo, Renato V; Seth, Prem

    2015-12-01

    The development of novel therapies for breast cancer bone metastasis is a major unmet medical need. Toward that end, we have constructed an oncolytic adenovirus, Ad.dcn, and a nonreplicating adenovirus, Ad(E1-).dcn, both containing the human decorin gene. Our in vitro studies showed that Ad.dcn produced high levels of viral replication and the decorin protein in the breast tumor cells. Ad(E1-).dcn-mediated decorin expression in MDA-MB-231 cells downregulated the expression of Met, β-catenin, and vascular endothelial growth factor A, all of which are recognized decorin targets and play pivotal roles in the progression of breast tumor growth and metastasis. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited cell migration and induced mitochondrial autophagy in MDA-MB-231 cells. Mice bearing MDA-MB-231-luc skeletal metastases were systemically administered with the viral vectors, and skeletal tumor growth was monitored over time. The results of bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography indicated that Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn significantly inhibited the progression of bone metastases. At the terminal time point, histomorphometric analysis, micro-computed tomography, and bone destruction biomarkers showed that Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn reduced tumor burden and inhibited bone destruction. A nonreplicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).luc expressing the luciferase 2 gene had no significant effect on inhibiting bone metastases, and in several assays, Ad.dcn and Ad(E1-).dcn were better than Ad.luc, a replicating virus expressing the luciferase 2 gene. Our data suggest that adenoviral replication coupled with decorin expression could produce effective antitumor responses in a MDA-MB-231 bone metastasis model of breast cancer. Thus, Ad.dcn could potentially be developed as a candidate gene therapy vector for treating breast cancer bone metastases.

  8. Cytokine-modified VSV is attenuated for neural pathology, but is both highly immunogenic and oncolytic

    PubMed Central

    Miller, James; Bidula, Sarah M; Jensen, Troels M; Reiss, Carol Shoshkes

    2010-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), an enveloped, nonsegmented, negative-stranded RNA virus, is being tested by several laboratories as an antitumor agent. Unfortunately, viral infection of the central nervous system (CNS) has been observed by many groups following administration to tumor-bearing animals. In rodents, VSV encephalitis is characterized by weight-loss, paralysis, and high mortality. In order to provide protection from VSV infection of the CNS after therapeutic administration, we have attenuated VSV by the introduction of the gene encoding the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-23, and designated the new virus VSV23. We hypothesize that while VSV23 is replicating within tumors, resulting in tumor destruction, the expression of IL-23 will enhance host antitumor and antiviral immune responses. In the event that the virus escapes from the tumor, the host’s immune system will be activated and the virus will be rapidly cleared from healthy tissue. Experimental VSV23 infection of the CNS is characterized by decreased viral replication, morbidity, and mortality. VSV23 is capable of stimulating the enhanced production of nitric oxide in the CNS, which is critical for elimination of VSV from infected neurons. Intraperitoneal administration of VSV23 stimulates both nonspecific natural killer cell, virus-specific cytolytic T lymphocyte and memory virus-specific proliferative T cell responses against wild-type VSV in splenocytes. Furthermore, VSV23 is able to replicate in, and induce apoptosis of tumor cells in vitro. These data indicate that VSV23 is immunogenic, attenuated and suitable for testing as an efficacious and safe oncolytic agent. PMID:20607123

  9. Beyond Oncolytics: E1B55K-Deleted Adenovirus as a Vaccine Delivery Vector

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Michael A.; Nyanhete, Tinashe; Tuero, Iskra; Venzon, David; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Type 5 human adenoviruses (Ad5) deleted of genes encoding the early region 1B 55-kDa (E1B55K) protein including Onyx-015 (dl1520) and H101 are best known for their oncolytic potential. As a vaccine vector the E1B55K deletion may allow for the insertion of a transgene nearly 1,000 base pairs larger than now possible. This has the potential of extending the application for which the vectors are clinically known. However, the immune priming ability of E1B55K-deleted vectors is unknown, undermining our ability to gauge their usefulness in vaccine applications. For this reason, we created an E1B55K-deleted Ad5 vector expressing full-length single chain HIVBaLgp120 attached to a flexible linker and the first two domains of rhesus CD4 (rhFLSC) in exchange for the E3 region. In cell-based experiments the E1B55K-deleted vector promoted higher levels of innate immune signals including chemokines, cytokines, and the NKG2D ligands MIC A/B compared to an E1B55K wild-type vector expressing the same immunogen. Based on these results we evaluated the immune priming ability of the E1B55K-deleted vector in mice. The E1B55K-deleted vector promoted similar levels of Ad5-, HIVgp120, and rhFLSC-specific cellular and humoral immune responses as the E1B55K wild-type vector. In pre-clinical HIV-vaccine studies the wild-type vector has been employed as part of a very effective prime-boost strategy. This study demonstrates that E1B55K-deleted adenoviruses may serve as effective vaccine delivery vectors. PMID:27391605

  10. Triple-controlled oncolytic adenovirus expressing melittin to exert inhibitory efficacy on hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Chun-Yu; Wang, Kai-Li; Fang, Fan-Fu; Gu, Wei; Huang, Feng; Wang, Fu-Zhe; Li, Bai; Wang, Li-Na

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly malignant disease, and its outcome of routine therapies is poor. Comprehensive treatment including gene therapy is an important way to improve patients’ prognosis and survival. In this study, we successfully constructed a triple-controlled cancer-selective oncolytic adenovirus, QG511-HA-Melittin, carrying melittin gene, in which the hybrid promoter, hypoxia-response element (HRE)-AFP promoter, was used to control viral E1a expression targeting AFP-positive cancer cells in hypoxia microenviroment, and the E1b-55 kDa gene was deleted in cancer cells with p53-deficiency. The cytological experiments found that the viral replication of QG511-HA-Melittin was increased to 12800-folds in Hep3B cells within 48 h, and 130-folds in SMMC-7721, but the virus did not replicate in L-02 cells. QG511-HA-Melittin had a strong inhibition effect on AFP-positive HCC cell proliferation, such as Hep3B and HepG2, whereas, there was low or no inhibition effect of QG511-HA-Melittin on AFP-negative cancer cells SMMC-7721 and normal cells L-02. In the in vivo experiment, compared with the blank control group, QG511-HA-Melittin can significantly inhibit the growth of HCC xenografts (P<0.05). The survival of mice in QG511-HA-Melittin group was much longer than that of the blank control group. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments manifested that QG511-HA-Melittin exerts an inhibitory effect on HCC cells, which may provide a new strategy for HCC biotherapy. PMID:26617748

  11. Beyond Oncolytics: E1B55K-Deleted Adenovirus as a Vaccine Delivery Vector.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael A; Nyanhete, Tinashe; Tuero, Iskra; Venzon, David; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Type 5 human adenoviruses (Ad5) deleted of genes encoding the early region 1B 55-kDa (E1B55K) protein including Onyx-015 (dl1520) and H101 are best known for their oncolytic potential. As a vaccine vector the E1B55K deletion may allow for the insertion of a transgene nearly 1,000 base pairs larger than now possible. This has the potential of extending the application for which the vectors are clinically known. However, the immune priming ability of E1B55K-deleted vectors is unknown, undermining our ability to gauge their usefulness in vaccine applications. For this reason, we created an E1B55K-deleted Ad5 vector expressing full-length single chain HIVBaLgp120 attached to a flexible linker and the first two domains of rhesus CD4 (rhFLSC) in exchange for the E3 region. In cell-based experiments the E1B55K-deleted vector promoted higher levels of innate immune signals including chemokines, cytokines, and the NKG2D ligands MIC A/B compared to an E1B55K wild-type vector expressing the same immunogen. Based on these results we evaluated the immune priming ability of the E1B55K-deleted vector in mice. The E1B55K-deleted vector promoted similar levels of Ad5-, HIVgp120, and rhFLSC-specific cellular and humoral immune responses as the E1B55K wild-type vector. In pre-clinical HIV-vaccine studies the wild-type vector has been employed as part of a very effective prime-boost strategy. This study demonstrates that E1B55K-deleted adenoviruses may serve as effective vaccine delivery vectors. PMID:27391605

  12. Solution structure of the complex between poxvirus-encoded CC chemokine inhibitor vCCI and human MIP-1β

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Li; DeRider, Michele; McCornack, Milissa A.; Jao, Chris; Isern, Nancy G.; Ness, Traci; Moyer, Richard; Liwang, Patricia J.

    2006-09-19

    Chemokines (chemotactic cytokines) comprise a large family of proteins that recruit and activate leukocytes, giving chemokines a major role in both the immune response and inflammation-related diseases. The poxvirus-encoded viral CC chemokine inhibitor (vCCI) binds to many CC chemokines with high affinity, acting as a potent inhibitor of chemokine action. We have used heteronuclear multidimensional NMR to determine the first structure of an orthopoxvirus vCCI in complex with a human CC chemokine MIP-1β. vCCI binds to the chemokine with 1:1 stoichiometry, using residues from its β-sheet II to interact with the a surface of MIP-1β that includes the N-terminus, the following residues in the so-called N-loop20’s region, and the 40’s loop. This structure reveals a general strategy of vCCI for selective chemokine binding, as vCCI appears to interact most stronglyinteracts most directly with residues that are conserved among a subset of CC chemokines, but are not conservednot among the other chemokine subfamilies. This structure reveals a general strategy of vCCI for selective chemokine binding. Chemokines play critical roles in the immune system, causing chemotaxis of a variety of cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as mediating cell homing and immune system development 1(Baggiolini 2001). To date, about 50 chemokines have been identified, and these small proteins (7-14 kDa) are believed to function by binding with endothelial or matrix glycosaminoglycans to form a concentration gradient that is then sensed by high affinity, 7-transmembrane domain G-protein coupled chemokine receptors on the surface of immune cells surface. The chemokine system is critical for host defense in healthy individuals, butand can also lead to diseases including asthma, arthritis, and atherosclerosis in the case of malfunction, often due to inappropriate inflammation and subsequent tissue damage 2(Gerard and Rollins 2001). There are four subfamilies of chemokines, CC

  13. A Novel Recombinant Vaccinia Virus Expressing the Human Norepinephrine Transporter Retains Oncolytic Potential and Facilitates Deep-Tissue Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nanhai; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Yong A; Stritzker, Jochen; Brader, Peter; Schirbel, Andreas; Samnick, Samuel; Serganova, Inna; Blasberg, Ronald; Fong, Yuman; Szalay, Aladar A

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive and repetitive monitoring of a virus in target tissues and/or specific organs of the body is highly desirable for the development of safe and efficient cancer virotherapeutics. We have previously shown that the oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 can target and eradicate human tumors in mice and that its therapeutic effects can be monitored by using optical imaging. Here, we report on the development of a derivative of GLV-1h68, a novel recombinant vaccinia virus (VACV) GLV-1h99, which was constructed to carry the human norepinephrine transporter gene (hNET) under the VACV synthetic early promoter placed at the F14.5L locus for deep-tissue imaging. The hNET protein was expressed at high levels on the membranes of cells infected with this virus. Expression of the hNET protein did not negatively affect virus replication, cytolytic activity in cell culture, or in vivo virotherpeutic efficacy. GLV-1h99–mediated expression of the hNET protein in infected cells resulted in specific uptake of the radiotracer [131I]-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG). In mice, GLV-1h99–infected tumors were readily imaged by [124I]-MIBG positron emission tomography. To our knowledge, GLV-1h99 is the first oncolytic virus expressing the hNET protein that can efficiently eliminate tumors and simultaneously allow deep-tissue imaging of infected tumors. PMID:19287510

  14. ATN-224 enhances antitumor efficacy of oncolytic herpes virus against both local and metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Young; Yu, Jun-Ge; Kaka, Azeem; Pan, Quintin; Kumar, Pawan; Kumar, Bhavna; Zhang, Jianying; Mazar, Andrew; Teknos, Theodoros N; Kaur, Balveen; Old, Matthew O

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most frequent cancer worldwide, and the 5-year survival rates are among the worst of the major cancers. Oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (oHSV) have the potential to make a significant impact in the targeted treatment of these patients. Here, we tested antitumor efficacy of RAMBO, an oHSV armed with the antiangiogenic Vstat120, alone and in conjunction with ATN-224, a copper chelator against HNSCC in vitro and in vivo animal models. We found that all tested HNSCC cells responded well to virus treatment and were sensitive to RAMBO-mediated oncolytic destruction. In vivo, RAMBO had a significant antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic effect. Physiologic levels of copper inhibited viral replication and HNSCC cell killing. Chelation of copper using ATN-224 treatment significantly improved serum stability of RAMBO and permitted systemic delivery in HNSCC tumor xenografts models. Furthermore, our results show that the combination of ATN-224 and RAMBO strongly inhibits lung metastases in a mouse model of HNSCC. These findings suggest that combining ATN-224 with RAMBO has potential for clinical trials in both early and advanced HNSCC patients. PMID:27119105

  15. Armed oncolytic virus enhances immune functions of chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Nobuhiro; Diaconu, Iulia; Liu, Hao; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Caruana, Ignazio; Hoyos, Valentina; Bouchier-Hayes, Lisa; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2014-09-15

    The clinical efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells remains marginal in solid tumors compared with leukemias. Failures have been attributed to insufficient T-cell migration and to the highly immunosuppressive milieu of solid tumors. To overcome these obstacles, we have combined CAR-T cells with an oncolytic virus armed with the chemokine RANTES and the cytokine IL15, reasoning that the modified oncolytic virus will both have a direct lytic effect on infected malignant cells and facilitate migration and survival of CAR-T cells. Using neuroblastoma as a tumor model, we found that the adenovirus Ad5Δ24 exerted a potent, dose-dependent, cytotoxic effect on tumor cells, whereas CAR-T cells specific for the tumor antigen GD2 (GD2.CAR-T cells) were not damaged. When used in combination, Ad5Δ24 directly accelerated the caspase pathways in tumor cells exposed to CAR-T cells, whereas the intratumoral release of both RANTES and IL15 attracted CAR-T cells and promoted their local survival, respectively, increasing the overall survival of tumor-bearing mice. These preclinical data support the use of this innovative biologic platform of immunotherapy for solid tumors. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5195-205. ©2014 AACR.

  16. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  17. RGD-modifided oncolytic adenovirus exhibited potent cytotoxic effect on CAR-negative bladder cancer-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y; Xu, H; Shen, J; Yang, Y; Wu, S; Xiao, J; Xu, Y; Liu, X-Y; Chu, L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-initiating cell (CIC) is critical in cancer development, maintenance and recurrence. The reverse expression pattern of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and αν integrin in bladder cancer decreases the infection efficiency of adenovirus. We constructed Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-modified oncolytic adenovirus, carrying EGFP or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) gene (OncoAd.RGD-hTERT-EGFP/TRAIL), and applied them to CAR-negative bladder cancer T24 cells and cancer-initiating T24 sphere cells. OncoAd.RGD-hTERT-EGFP had enhanced infection ability and cytotoxic effect on T24 cells and T24 sphere cells, but little cytoxicity on normal urothelial SV-HUC-1 cells compared with the unmodified virus OncoAd.hTERT-EGFP. Notably, OncoAd.RGD-hTERT-TRAIL induced apoptosis in T24 cells and T24 sphere cells. Furthermore, it completely inhibited xenograft initiation established by the oncolytic adenovirus-pretreated T24 sphere cells, and significantly suppressed tumor growth by intratumoral injection. These results provided a promising therapeutic strategy for CAR-negative bladder cancer through targeting CICs. PMID:25973680

  18. In vitro screening of clinical drugs identifies sensitizers of oncolytic viral therapy in glioblastoma stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Berghauser Pont, L M E; Balvers, R K; Kloezeman, J J; Nowicki, M O; van den Bossche, W; Kremer, A; Wakimoto, H; van den Hoogen, B G; Leenstra, S; Dirven, C M F; Chiocca, E A; Lawler, S E; Lamfers, M L M

    2015-12-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) have broad potential as an adjuvant for the treatment of solid tumors. The present study addresses the feasibility of clinically applicable drugs to enhance the oncolytic potential of the OV Delta24-RGD in glioblastoma. In total, 446 drugs were screened for their viral sensitizing properties in glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) in vitro. Validation was done for 10 drugs to determine synergy based on the Chou Talalay assay. Mechanistic studies were undertaken to assess viability, replication efficacy, viral infection enhancement and cell death pathway induction in a selected panel of drugs. Four viral sensitizers (fluphenazine, indirubin, lofepramine and ranolazine) were demonstrated to reproducibly synergize with Delta24-RGD in multiple assays. After validation, we underscored general applicability by testing candidate drugs in a broader context of a panel of different GSCs, various solid tumor models and multiple OVs. Overall, this study identified four viral sensitizers, which synergize with Delta24-RGD and two other strains of OVs. The viral sensitizers interact with infection, replication and cell death pathways to enhance efficacy of the OV. PMID:26196249

  19. Infectivity of attenuated poxvirus vaccine vectors and immunogenicity of a raccoonpox vectored rabies vaccine in the Brazilian Free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stading, Benjamin; Osorio, Jorge E.; Velasco-Villa, Andres; Smotherman, Michael; Kingstad-Bakke, Brock; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2016-01-01

    Bats (Order Chiroptera) are an abundant group of mammals with tremendous ecological value as insectivores and plant dispersers, but their role as reservoirs of zoonotic diseases has received more attention in the last decade. With the goal of managing disease in free-ranging bats, we tested modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and raccoon poxvirus (RCN) as potential vaccine vectors in the Brazilian Free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), using biophotonic in vivo imaging and immunogenicity studies. Animals were administered recombinant poxviral vectors expressing the luciferase gene (MVA-luc, RCN-luc) through oronasal (ON) or intramuscular (IM) routes and subsequently monitored for bioluminescent signal indicative of viral infection. No clinical illness was noted after exposure to any of the vectors, and limited luciferase expression was observed. Higher and longer levels of expression were observed with the RCN-luc construct. When given IM, luciferase expression was limited to the site of injection, while ON exposure led to initial expression in the oral cavity, often followed by secondary replication at another location, likely the gastric mucosa or gastric associated lymphatic tissue. Viral DNA was detected in oral swabs up to 7 and 9 days post infection (dpi) for MVA and RCN, respectively. While no live virus was detected in oral swabs from MVA-infected bats, titers up to 3.88 x 104 PFU/ml were recovered from oral swabs of RCN-infected bats. Viral DNA was also detected in fecal samples from two bats inoculated IM with RCN, but no live virus was recovered. Finally, we examined the immunogenicity of a RCN based rabies vaccine (RCN-G) following ON administration. Significant rabies neutralizing antibody titers were detected in the serum of immunized bats using the rapid fluorescence focus inhibition test (RFFIT). These studies highlight the safety and immunogenicity of attenuated poxviruses and their potential use as vaccine vectors in bats.

  20. Poxvirus-Based Active Immunotherapy with PD-1 and LAG-3 Dual Immune Checkpoint Inhibition Overcomes Compensatory Immune Regulation, Yielding Complete Tumor Regression in Mice.

    PubMed

    Foy, Susan P; Sennino, Barbara; dela Cruz, Tracy; Cote, Joseph J; Gordon, Evan J; Kemp, Felicia; Xavier, Veronica; Franzusoff, Alex; Rountree, Ryan B; Mandl, Stefanie J

    2016-01-01

    Poxvirus-based active immunotherapies mediate anti-tumor efficacy by triggering broad and durable Th1 dominated T cell responses against the tumor. While monotherapy significantly delays tumor growth, it often does not lead to complete tumor regression. It was hypothesized that the induced robust infiltration of IFNγ-producing T cells into the tumor could provoke an adaptive immune evasive response by the tumor through the upregulation of PD-L1 expression. In therapeutic CT26-HER-2 tumor models, MVA-BN-HER2 poxvirus immunotherapy resulted in significant tumor growth delay accompanied by a robust, tumor-infiltrating T cell response that was characterized by low to mid-levels of PD-1 expression on T cells. As hypothesized, this response was countered by significantly increased PD-L1 expression on the tumor and, unexpectedly, also on infiltrating T cells. Synergistic benefit of anti-tumor therapy was observed when MVA-BN-HER2 immunotherapy was combined with PD-1 immune checkpoint blockade. Interestingly, PD-1 blockade stimulated a second immune checkpoint molecule, LAG-3, to be expressed on T cells. Combining MVA-BN-HER2 immunotherapy with dual PD-1 plus LAG-3 blockade resulted in comprehensive tumor regression in all mice treated with the triple combination therapy. Subsequent rejection of tumors lacking the HER-2 antigen by treatment-responsive mice without further therapy six months after the original challenge demonstrated long lasting memory and suggested that effective T cell immunity to novel, non-targeted tumor antigens (antigen spread) had occurred. These data support the clinical investigation of this triple therapy regimen, especially in cancer patients harboring PD-L1neg/low tumors unlikely to benefit from immune checkpoint blockade alone. PMID:26910562

  1. Combination vascular delivery of herpes simplex oncolytic viruses and amplicon mediated cytokine gene transfer is effective therapy for experimental liver cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Zager, J. S.; Delman, K. A.; Malhotra, S.; Ebright, M. I.; Bennett, J. J.; Kates, T.; Halterman, M.; Federoff, H.; Fong, Y.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Herpes simplex type I (HSV)-based vectors have been used experimentally for suicide gene therapy, immunomodulatory gene delivery, and direct oncolytic therapy. The current study utilizes the novel concept of regional delivery of an oncolytic virus in combination with or serving as the helper virus for packaging herpes-based amplicon vectors carrying a cytokine transgene, with the goal of identifying if this combination is more efficacious than either modality alone. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A replication competent oncolytic HSV (G207) and a replication incompetent HSV amplicon carrying the gene for the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-2 (HSV-IL2) were tested in murine syngeneic colorectal carcinoma and in rat hepatocellular carcinoma models. Liver tumors were treated with vascular delivery of (1) phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), (2) G207, (3) HSV-IL2, (4) G207 and HSV-IL2 mixed in combination (mG207/HSV- IL2), and (5) G207 as the helper virus for packaging the construct HSV-IL2 (pG207/HSV-IL2). RESULTS: Tumor burden was significantly reduced in all treatment groups in both rats and mice treated with high-dose G207, HSV-IL2, or both (p < 0.02). When a low dose of virus was used in mice, anti-tumor efficacy was improved by use of G207 and HSV-IL2 in combination or with HSV-IL2 packaged by G207 (p < 0.001). This improvement was abolished when CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes were depleted, implying that the enhanced anti-tumor response to low-dose combined therapy is immune mediated. CONCLUSIONS: Vascular regional delivery of oncolytic and amplicon HSV vectors can be used to induce improved anti-tumor efficacy by combining oncolytic and immunostimulatory strategies. PMID:11591892

  2. Multimeric soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) efficiently enhances HIV specific cellular immune responses during DNA prime and boost with attenuated poxvirus vectors MVA and NYVAC expressing HIV antigens.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Carmen E; Nájera, José L; Sánchez, Raquel; Jiménez, Victoria; Esteban, Mariano

    2009-05-21

    The attenuated poxvirus vectors MVA and NYVAC are now in clinical trials against HIV/AIDS. Due to the vectors restricted replication capacity in human cells, approaches to enhance their immunogenicity are highly desirable. Here, we have analyzed the ability of a soluble form of hexameric CD40L (sCD40L) to stimulate specific immune responses to HIV antigens when inoculated in mice during priming with DNA and in the booster with MVA or NYVAC, expressing the vectors HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens from clade B. Our findings revealed that sCD40L in DNA/poxvirus combination enhanced the magnitude about 2-fold (DNA-B/MVA-B) and 4-fold (DNA-B/NYVAC-B), as well as the breath of the HIV antigen specific cellular immune responses. sCD40L was necessary in both prime and boost inoculations triggering a potent polarization of the Th response towards a Th1 type. In DNA-B/NYVAC-B regime the addition of sCD40L significantly enhanced the humoral immune response against HIV gp160, but not in DNA-B/MVA-B combination. These findings provided evidence for the immunostimulatory benefit of sCD40L when DNA and the poxvirus vectors MVA and NYVAC are used as immunogens.

  3. Into the clinic: Talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC), a first-in-class intratumoral oncolytic viral therapy.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Hasan; Silk, Ann W; Kane, Michael P; Kaufman, Howard L

    2016-01-01

    With the recent regulatory approval of Talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) for the treatment of advanced of melanoma in the United States, Europe and Australia, oncolytic virus immunotherapy has earned its place in the clinic. However, the adoption of T-VEC by the U.S. oncology community has been slow, and so far has been largely limited to specialized cancer centers. Limiting factors include the intratumoral route of administration, which is unfamiliar to medical oncologists, biosafety concerns related to the use of a live virus in the clinic, and the explosion of other therapeutic strategies now available for the treatment of advanced melanoma. Herein, we review the development of T-VEC, and suggest how it fits into the in the current clinical treatment paradigm, and provide pearls for drug preparation, administration, and monitoring of response to therapy. PMID:27660707

  4. Cell-based delivery of oncolytic viruses: a new strategic alliance for a biological strike against cancer.

    PubMed

    Power, Anthony T; Bell, John C

    2007-04-01

    Recent years have seen tremendous advances in the development of exquisitely targeted replicating virotherapeutics that can safely destroy malignant cells. Despite this promise, clinical advancement of this powerful and unique approach has been hindered by vulnerability to host defenses and inefficient systemic delivery. However, it now appears that delivery of oncolytic viruses within carrier cells may offer one solution to this critical problem. In this review, we compare the advantages and limitations of the numerous cell lineages that have been investigated as delivery platforms for viral therapeutics, and discuss examples showing how combined cell-virus biotherapeutics can be used to achieve synergistic gains in antitumor activity. Finally, we highlight avenues for future preclinical research that might be taken in order to refine cell-virus biotherapeutics in preparation for human trials. PMID:17264852

  5. Science to Practice: Monitoring Oncolytic Virus Therapy with Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer MR Imaging--Wishful Thinking?

    PubMed

    Choyke, Peter L

    2015-06-01

    Farrar et al demonstrate that modifying an oncolytic virus (OV) so that it produces excess protein when it infects a cancer cell is a process that can be detected both in vitro and in vivo in infected cancer cells by using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The effect is at the limits of MR imaging detection (approximately 1%), but experience with functional MR imaging of the brain, with comparably small effects, should give pause to anyone who immediately writes this observation off as an exercise in wishful thinking. OVs are improving in their specificity, virulence, and ability to induce immune responses. Now, they have been modified to express proteins that are detectable with CEST MR imaging early after delivery into a tumor. This is clearly a surprising and hopeful development in the long road of OVs from the laboratory to the clinic.

  6. Into the clinic: Talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC), a first-in-class intratumoral oncolytic viral therapy.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Hasan; Silk, Ann W; Kane, Michael P; Kaufman, Howard L

    2016-01-01

    With the recent regulatory approval of Talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) for the treatment of advanced of melanoma in the United States, Europe and Australia, oncolytic virus immunotherapy has earned its place in the clinic. However, the adoption of T-VEC by the U.S. oncology community has been slow, and so far has been largely limited to specialized cancer centers. Limiting factors include the intratumoral route of administration, which is unfamiliar to medical oncologists, biosafety concerns related to the use of a live virus in the clinic, and the explosion of other therapeutic strategies now available for the treatment of advanced melanoma. Herein, we review the development of T-VEC, and suggest how it fits into the in the current clinical treatment paradigm, and provide pearls for drug preparation, administration, and monitoring of response to therapy.

  7. Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Considerations Regarding the Use of Virus-Induced Carcinogenesis and Oncolytic Viral Models.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Stephanie D; Hickman-Davis, Judy M; Bergdall, Valerie K

    2016-01-01

    The use of virus-induced carcinogenesis and oncologic experimental animal models is essential in understanding the mechanisms of cancer development to advance prevention, diagnosis, and treatment methods. The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) is responsible for both the complex philosophical and practical considerations associated with animal models of cancer. Animal models of cancer carry their own unique issues that require special consideration from the IACUC. Many of the considerations to be discussed apply to cancer models in general; specific issues related to viral carcinogenesis or oncolytic viruses will be specifically discussed as they arise. Responsible animal use integrates good science, humane care, and regulatory compliance. To meet those standards, the IACUC, in conjunction with the research investigator and attending veterinarian, must address a wide range of issues, including animal model selection, cancer model selection, humane end point considerations, experimental considerations, postapproval monitoring, reporting requirements, and animal management and personnel safety considerations.

  8. Interview with Robert Coffin, inventor of T-VEC: the first oncolytic immunotherapy approved for the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Coffin, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Interviewed by Ellen Clarke, Commissioning Editor, Future Science Group. Robert Coffin is co-founder and CEO of Replimune. Previously he was Founder and CTO of BioVex Inc, a spin out from his research group at University College London in 1999. He was the inventor of all BioVex products including OncoVEXGM-CSF (talimogene laherparepvec; T-VEC; Imlygic) and oversaw all research and clinical development including bringing T-VEC through to two pivotal Phase 3 studies in melanoma and head and neck cancer. BioVex was acquired by Amgen in 2011 where he was VP Global Development until 2013. T-VEC was approved by the FDA for use in advanced melanoma in October 2015, the first oncolytic therapy or gene therapy to be approved in USA. He was awarded a PhD in virology from Imperial College London prior to his move to University College London in 1991.

  9. Oncolytic effects of parvovirus H-1 in medulloblastoma are associated with repression of master regulators of early neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Jeannine; Schlund, Franziska; Leuchs, Barbara; Adolph, Kathrin; Sturm, Dominik; Bender, Sebastian; Hielscher, Thomas; Pfister, Stefan M; Witt, Olaf; Rommelaere, Jean; Schlehofer, Jörg R; Witt, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Based on extensive pre-clinical studies, the oncolytic parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV) is currently applied to patients with recurrent glioblastoma in a phase I/IIa clinical trial (ParvOryx01, NCT01301430). Cure rates of about 40% in pediatric high-risk medulloblastoma (MB) patients also indicate the need of new therapeutic approaches. In order to prepare a future application of oncolytic parvovirotherapy to MB, the present study preclinically evaluates the cytotoxic efficacy of H-1PV on MB cells in vitro and characterizes cellular target genes involved in this effect. Six MB cell lines were analyzed by whole genome oligonucleotide microarrays after treatment and the results were matched to known molecular and cytogenetic risk factors. In contrast to non-transformed infant astrocytes and neurons, in five out of six MB cell lines lytic H-1PV infection and efficient viral replication could be demonstrated. The cytotoxic effects induced by H-1PV were observed at LD50s below 0.05 p. f. u. per cell indicating high susceptibility. Gene expression patterns in the responsive MB cell lines allowed the identification of candidate target genes mediating the cytotoxic effects of H-1PV. H-1PV induced down-regulation of key regulators of early neurogenesis shown to confer poor prognosis in MB such as ZIC1, FOXG1B, MYC, and NFIA. In MB cell lines with genomic amplification of MYC, expression of MYC was the single gene most significantly repressed after H-1PV infection. H-1PV virotherapy may be a promising treatment approach for MB since it targets genes of functional relevance and induces cell death at very low titers of input virus. PMID:23852775

  10. Treatment of medulloblastoma using an oncolytic measles virus encoding the thyroidal sodium iodide symporter shows enhanced efficacy with radioiodine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Although the clinical outcome for medulloblastoma patients has improved significantly, children afflicted with the disease frequently suffer from debilitating side effects related to the aggressive nature of currently available therapy. Alternative means for treating medulloblastoma are desperately needed. We have previously shown that oncolytic measles virus (MV) can selectively target and destroy medulloblastoma tumor cells in localized and disseminated models of the disease. MV-NIS, an oncolytic measles virus that encodes the human thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (NIS), has the potential to deliver targeted radiotherapy to the tumor site and promote a localized bystander effect above and beyond that achieved by MV alone. Methods We evaluated the efficacy of MV-NIS against medulloblastoma cells in vitro and examined their ability to incorporate radioiodine at various timepoints, finding peak uptake at 48 hours post infection. The effects of MV-NIS were also evaluated in mouse xenograft models of localized and disseminated medulloblastoma. Athymic nude mice were injected with D283med-Luc medulloblastoma cells in the caudate putamen (localized disease) or right lateral ventricle (disseminated disease) and subsequently treated with MV-NIS. Subsets of these mice were given a dose of 131I at 24, 48 or 72 hours later. Results MV-NIS treatment, both by itself and in combination with 131I, elicited tumor stabilization and regression in the treated mice and significantly extended their survival times. Mice given 131I were found to concentrate radioiodine at the site of their tumor implantations. In addition, mice with localized tumors that were given 131I either 24 or 48 hours after MV-NIS treatment exhibited a significant survival advantage over mice given MV-NIS alone. Conclusions These data suggest MV-NIS plus radioiodine may be a potentially useful therapy for the treatment of

  11. Oncolytic poliovirus therapy and immunization with poliovirus-infected cell lysate induces potent antitumor immunity against neuroblastoma in vivo.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Hidemi; Wimmer, Eckard; Cello, Jeronimo

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that neuroblastoma subcutaneously implanted in immuno-competent mice is eliminated by intratumoral administration of neuroattenuated poliovirus (PV). Our results also suggested that the in vivo destruction of neuroblastoma cells by virotherapy lead to a robust antitumor immune response. In this work, splenocytes harvested from neuroblastoma-bearing animals treated with neuroattenuated PV exhibited significantly higher lytic activity against tumor target cells than did those from splenocytes derived from control mice. In vitro T-cell depletion experiments indicated that CD8(+) T cells were essential for the cytotoxic antitumor activity of splenocytes. Moreover, adoptive transfer of splenocytes obtained from mice cured of neuroblastoma by PV virotherapy markedly delayed the tumor growth of previously established neuroblastomas in recipient naïve mice. These results confirmed that treatment with a neuroattenuated oncolytic PV strain induces antitumor immunity against neuroblastoma that is mainly mediated by cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. Immunocompetent mice, on the other hand, were immunized with PV-infected neuroblastoma cell lysate prior intravenous challenge with neuroblastoma cells. As a control, mice were vaccinated with either non-infected neuroblastoma cell lysate alone or mixed with PV, or with PBS prior tumor cell injection. Results showed that survival is significantly prolonged only in mice immunized with PV-infected tumor lysate. This finding clearly suggested that in vitro poliovirus infection of neuroblastoma cells turns these cells into a potent tumor immunogen. Further studies in oncolytic treatment of neuroblastoma using attenuated PV alone or in combination with immunotherapy with PV oncolysate should improve the probability for successful translation in the clinic.

  12. A proteoliposome containing apolipoprotein A-I mutant (V156K) enhances rapid tumor regression activity of human origin oncolytic adenovirus in tumor-bearing zebrafish and mice.

    PubMed

    Seo, Juyi; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Choi, Eun-Jin; Song, Jae-Young; Choi, Inho; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2012-08-01

    We recently reported that the efficiency of adenoviral gene delivery and virus stability are significantly enhanced when a proteoliposome (PL) containing apolipoprotein (apo) A-I is used in an animal model. In the current study, we tested tumor removal activity of oncolytic adenovirus (Ad) using PL-containing wildtype (WT) or V156K. Oncolytic Ad with or without PL was injected into tumors of zebrafish and nude mice as a Hep3B tumor xenograft model. The V156K-PL-Ad-injected zebrafish, group showed the lowest tumor tissue volume and nucleic acids in the tumor area, whereas injection of Ad alone did not result in adequate removal of tumor activity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents increased two-fold in tumor-bearing zebrafish; however, the V156K-PL-Ad injected group showed a 40% decrease in ROS levels compared to that in normal zebrafish. After reducing the tumor volume with the V156K-PL-Ad injection, the swimming pattern of the zebrafish changed to be more active and energetic. The oncolytic effect of PL-Ad containing either V156K or WT was about two-fold more enhanced in mice than that of Ad alone 34 days after the injection. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the PL-Ad-injected groups showed enhanced efficiency of viral delivery with elevated Ad-E1A staining and a diminished number of proliferating tumor cells. Thus, the antitumor effect of oncolytic Ad was strongly enhanced by a PL-containing apoA-I and its mutant (V156K) without causing side effects in mice and zebrafish models. PMID:22851220

  13. Insertion of the human sodium iodide symporter to facilitate deep tissue imaging does not alter oncolytic or replication capability of a novel vaccinia virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Oncolytic viruses show promise for treating cancer. However, to assess therapeutic efficacy and potential toxicity, a noninvasive imaging modality is needed. This study aimed to determine if insertion of the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) cDNA as a marker for non-invasive imaging of virotherapy alters the replication and oncolytic capability of a novel vaccinia virus, GLV-1h153. Methods GLV-1h153 was modified from parental vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 to carry hNIS via homologous recombination. GLV-1h153 was tested against human pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 for replication via viral plaque assays and flow cytometry. Expression and transportation of hNIS in infected cells was evaluated using Westernblot and immunofluorescence. Intracellular uptake of radioiodide was assessed using radiouptake assays. Viral cytotoxicity and tumor regression of treated PANC-1tumor xenografts in nude mice was also determined. Finally, tumor radiouptake in xenografts was assessed via positron emission tomography (PET) utilizing carrier-free 124I radiotracer. Results GLV-1h153 infected, replicated within, and killed PANC-1 cells as efficiently as GLV-1h68. GLV-1h153 provided dose-dependent levels of hNIS expression in infected cells. Immunofluorescence detected transport of the protein to the cell membrane prior to cell lysis, enhancing hNIS-specific radiouptake (P < 0.001). In vivo, GLV-1h153 was as safe and effective as GLV-1h68 in regressing pancreatic cancer xenografts (P < 0.001). Finally, intratumoral injection of GLV-1h153 facilitated imaging of virus replication in tumors via 124I-PET. Conclusion Insertion of the hNIS gene does not hinder replication or oncolytic capability of GLV-1h153, rendering this novel virus a promising new candidate for the noninvasive imaging and tracking of oncolytic viral therapy. PMID:21453532

  14. Use of miRNA Response Sequences to Block Off-target Replication and Increase the Safety of an Unattenuated, Glioblastoma-targeted Oncolytic HSV

    PubMed Central

    Mazzacurati, Lucia; Marzulli, Marco; Reinhart, Bonnie; Miyagawa, Yoshitaka; Uchida, Hiroaki; Goins, William F; Li, Aofei; Kaur, Balveen; Caligiuri, Michael; Cripe, Timothy; Chiocca, Nino; Amankulor, Nduka; Cohen, Justus B; Glorioso, Joseph C; Grandi, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive brain cancer for which there is no effective treatment. Oncolytic HSV vectors (oHSVs) are attenuated lytic viruses that have shown promise in the treatment of human GBM models in animals, but their efficacy in early phase patient trials has been limited. Instead of attenuating the virus with mutations in virulence genes, we engineered four copies of the recognition sequence for miR-124 into the 3′UTR of the essential ICP4 gene to protect healthy tissue against lytic virus replication; miR-124 is expressed in neurons but not in glioblastoma cells. Following intracranial inoculation into nude mice, the miR-124-sensitive vector failed to replicate or show overt signs of pathogenesis. To address the concern that this safety feature may reduce oncolytic activity, we inserted the miR-124 response elements into an unattenuated, human receptor (EGFR/EGFRvIII)-specific HSV vector. We found that miR-124 sensitivity did not cause a loss of treatment efficiency in an orthotopic model of primary human GBM in nude mice. These results demonstrate that engineered miR-124 responsiveness can eliminate off-target replication by unattenuated oHSV without compromising oncolytic activity, thereby providing increased safety. PMID:25200130

  15. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF) confers resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNA receptor-mediated signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kaowinn, Sirichat; Cho, Il-Rae; Moon, Jeong; Jun, Seung Won; Kim, Chang Seok; Kang, Ho Young; Kim, Manbok; Koh, Sang Seok; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2015-04-03

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, plays a crucial role in the development of pancreatic cancer, including its metastasis and proliferation. Therefore, PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer cells could be important targets for oncolytic virus-mediated treatment. Panc-1 cells expressing PAUF (Panc-PAUF) showed relative resistance to parvovirus H-1 infection compared with Panc-1 cells expressing an empty vector (Panc-Vec). Of interest, expression of type I IFN-α receptor (IFNAR) was higher in Panc-PAUF cells than in Panc-Vec cells. Increased expression of IFNAR in turn increased the activation of Stat1 and Tyk2 in Panc-PAUF cells compared with that in Panc-Vec cells. Suppression of Tyk2 and Stat1, which are important downstream molecules for IFN-α signaling, sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. Further, constitutive suppression of PAUF sensitized Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1 infection. Taken together, these results suggested that PAUF conferred resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNAR-mediated signaling. - Highlights: • PAUF confers resistance against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection. • PAUF enhances the expression of IFNAR in Panc-1 cells. • Increased activation of Tyk2 or Stat1 by PAUF provides resistance to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. • Constitutive inhibition of PAUF enhances parvovirus H-1-mediated oncolysis of Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells.

  16. The Addition of Recombinant Vaccinia HER2/neu to Oncolytic Vaccinia-GMCSF Given into the Tumor Microenvironment Overcomes MDSC-Mediated Immune Escape and Systemic Anergy

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Christiaan R.; Monken, Claude E.; Lattime, Edmund C.

    2015-01-01

    Effective immunotherapeutic strategies require the ability to generate a systemic antigen-specific response capable of impacting both primary and metastatic disease. We have built on our oncolytic vaccinia GM-CSF strategy by adding recombinant tumor antigen to increase the response in the tumor microenvironment and systemically. In the present study, orthotopic growth of a syngeneic HER2/neu-overexpressing mammary carcinoma in FVB/N mice (NBT1) was associated with increased Gr1+CD11b+ myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) both systemically and in the tumor microenvironment. This MDSC population had inhibitory effects on the HER2/neu specific Th1 immune response. VVneu and VVGMCSF are recombinant oncolytic vaccinia viruses that encode HER2/neu and GM-CSF, respectively. Naïve FVB mice vaccinated with combined VVneu and VVGMCSF given systemically developed systemic HER2/neu-specific immunity. NBT1 bearing mice became anergic to systemic immunization with combined VVneu and VVGMCSF. Intratumoral VVGMCSF failed to result in systemic antitumor immunity until combined with intratumoral VVneu. Infection/transfection of the tumor microenvironment with combined VVGMCSF and VVneu resulted in development of systemic tumor-specific immunity, reduction in splenic and tumor MDSC, and therapeutic efficacy against tumor. These studies demonstrate the enhanced efficacy of oncolytic vaccinia virus recombinants encoding combined tumor antigen and GM-CSF in modulating the microenvironment of MDSC-rich tumors. PMID:25633483

  17. Cycles of transient high-dose cyclophosphamide administration and intratumoral oncolytic adenovirus vector injection for long-term tumor suppression in Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Dhar, D; Toth, K; Wold, W S M

    2014-04-01

    Immune responses against oncolytic adenovirus (Ad) vectors are thought to limit vector anti-tumor efficacy. With Syrian hamsters, which are immunocompetent and whose tumors and normal tissues are permissive for replication of Ad5-based oncolytic Ad vectors, treating with high-dose cyclophosphamide (CP) to suppress the immune system and exert chemotherapeutic effects enhances Ad vector anti-tumor efficacy. However, long-term CP treatment and immunosuppression can lead to anemia and vector spread to normal tissues. Here, we employed three cycles of transient high-dose CP administration plus intratumoral injection of the oncolytic Ad vector VRX-007 followed by withdrawal of CP. Each cycle lasted 4-6 weeks. This protocol allowed the hamsters to remain healthy so the study could be continued for ~100 days. The tumors were very well suppressed throughout the study. With immunocompetent hamsters, the vector retarded tumor growth initially, but after 3-4 weeks the tumors resumed rapid growth and further injections of vector were ineffective. Preimmunization of the hamsters with Ad5 prevented vector spillover from the tumor to the liver yet still allowed for effective long-term anti-tumor efficacy. Our results suggest that a clinical protocol might be developed with cycles of transient chemotherapy plus intratumoral vector injection to achieve significant anti-tumor efficacy while minimizing the side effects of cytostatic treatment.

  18. OX40:OX40L axis: emerging targets for improving poxvirus-based CD8+ T-cell vaccines against respiratory viruses

    PubMed Central

    Goulding, John; Tahiliani, Vikas; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram

    2012-01-01

    Summary The human respiratory tract is the entry point for over 200 known viruses that collectively contribute to millions of annual deaths worldwide. Consequently the World Health Organization has designated respiratory viral infections as a priority for vaccine development. Despite enormous advances in understanding the attributes of a protective mucosal antiviral immune response, current vaccines continue to fail in effectively generating long-lived protective CD8+ T-cell immunity. To date, the majority of licensed human vaccines afford protection against infectious pathogens through the generation of specific immunoglobulin responses. In recent years, the selective manipulation of specific costimulatory pathways, which are critical in regulating T-cell-mediated immune responses, has generated increasing interest. Impressive results in animal models have shown that the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family member OX40 (CD134) and its binding partner OX40L (CD252) are key costimulatory molecules involved in the generation of protective CD8+ T-cell responses at mucosal surfaces such as the lung. In this review, we highlight these new findings with a particular emphasis on their potential as immunological adjuvants to enhance poxvirus-based CD8+ T-cell vaccines. PMID:22017437

  19. The Inhibitory Receptor NKG2A Sustains Virus-Specific CD8⁺ T Cells in Response to a Lethal Poxvirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, Aaron S; Schriewer, Jill; Gilfillan, Susan; Hembrador, Ed; Crump, Ryan; Plougastel, Beatrice F; Wang, Yaming; Le Friec, Gaelle; Gao, Jian; Cella, Marina; Pircher, Hanspeter; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Buller, R Mark L; Colonna, Marco

    2015-12-15

    CD8(+) T cells and NK cells protect from viral infections by killing virally infected cells and secreting interferon-γ. Several inhibitory receptors limit the magnitude and duration of these anti-viral responses. NKG2A, which is encoded by Klrc1, is a lectin-like inhibitory receptor that is expressed as a heterodimer with CD94 on NK cells and activated CD8(+) T cells. Previous studies on the impact of CD94/NKG2A heterodimers on anti-viral responses have yielded contrasting results and the in vivo function of NKG2A remains unclear. Here, we generated Klrc1(-/-) mice and found that NKG2A is selectively required for resistance to ectromelia virus (ECTV). NKG2A functions intrinsically within ECTV-specific CD8(+) T cells to limit excessive activation, prevent apoptosis, and preserve the specific CD8(+) T cell response. Thus, although inhibitory receptors often cause T cell exhaustion and viral spreading during chronic viral infections, NKG2A optimizes CD8(+) T cell responses during an acute poxvirus infection. PMID:26680205

  20. [Present state of preclinical research on the efficacy and safety of para immunity inducers from poxviruses. A study of the literature].

    PubMed

    Mayr, B; Mayr, A

    1995-12-01

    The investigations on the "systemic level" after parenteral application of pox-inducers to man and animal have proved the preparations to be harmless and surprisingly effective with regard to certain indications. The clinical data correlate to laboratory parameters to serve as proof for the efficacy. The challenge models (VSV, Aujeszky) verify a dosis-efficacy relationship. The evaluation of the efficacy of the pox-inducers in isolated blood- and liver-cells respectively cell cultures (cellular "in vitro" level) provide a unified picture: increase of the phagocytosis, of the NK-cells and the thymidinkinase activity in liver cells. The investigations on the "cytokine release" illustrate that pox-inducers promote the release respectively the production of diverse cytokines important for the regulation of the immune system. This has been proved for interferon alpha and gamma, the interleukin 1, 2 and 12 as well as for CSF and TNF. To conclude, a regulative effect is ascribed to the poxvirus inducers in the network of paraspecific defence in regard to stimulating as well as inhibiting effects. The endogenous medication by way of pox-inducers (paramunization) is diametrically opposed to the exogenous application of cytokines.

  1. Protection of cats from infectious peritonitis by vaccination with a recombinant raccoon poxvirus expressing the nucleocapsid gene of feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    PubMed

    Wasmoen, T L; Kadakia, N P; Unfer, R C; Fickbohm, B L; Cook, C P; Chu, H J; Acree, W M

    1995-01-01

    Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus (FIPV) is a coronavirus that induces an often fatal, systemic infection in cats. Various vaccines designed to prevent FIPV infection have been shown to exacerbate the disease, probably due to immune enhancement mediated by virus-specific immunoglobulins against the outer envelope (S) protein. An effective vaccine would be one that induces cell-mediated immunity without disease enhancing antibodies. In this report, we describe the use of a recombinant raccoon poxvirus that expresses the gene encoding the nucleocapsid protein of FIPV (rRCNV-FIPV N) as an effective vaccine against FIPV-induced disease. Cats were parenterally or orally vaccinated twice, three weeks apart. Cats were then orally challenged with Feline Enteric Coronavirus (FECV), which induces a subclinical infection that can cause enhancement of subsequent FIPV infection. Three weeks later, cats were orally challenged with FIPV. The FIPV challenge induced a fatal infection in 4/5 (80%) of the controls. On the other hand, all five cats vaccinated subcutaneously with rRCNV-FIPV N showed no signs of disease after challenge with FIPV. Four of the five subcutaneous vaccinates survived an additional FIPV challenge. Vaccination with rRCNV-FIPV N induced serum IgG antibody responses to FIPV nucleocapsid protein, but few, if any, FIPV neutralizing antibodies. In contrast to the controls, protected vaccinates maintained low FIPV serum neutralizing antibody titers after FIPV challenge. This suggests that the protective immune response involves a mechanism other than humoral immunity consisting of FIPV neutralizing antibodies.

  2. Sickle Cells Abolish Melanoma Tumorigenesis in Hemoglobin SS Knockin Mice and Augment the Tumoricidal Effect of Oncolytic Virus In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chiang Wang; Willmon, Candice; Wu, Li-Chen; Knopick, Peter; Thoerner, Jutta; Vile, Richard; Townes, Tim M; Terman, David S

    2016-01-01

    Insights from the study of cancer resistance in animals have led to the discovery of novel anticancer pathways and opened new venues for cancer prevention and treatment. Sickle cells (SSRBCs) from subjects with homozygous sickle cell anemia (SCA) have been shown to target hypoxic tumor niches, induce diffuse vaso-occlusion, and potentiate a tumoricidal response in a heme- and oxidant-dependent manner. These findings spawned the hypothesis that SSRBCs and the vasculopathic microenvironment of subjects with SCA might be inimical to tumor outgrowth and thereby constitute a natural antitumor defense. We therefore implanted the B16F10 melanoma into humanized hemoglobin SS knockin mice which exhibit the hematologic and vasculopathic sequelae of human SCA. Over the 31-day observation period, hemoglobin SS mice showed no significant melanoma outgrowth. By contrast, 68-100% of melanomas implanted in background and hemoglobin AA knockin control mice reached the tumor growth end point (p < 0.0001). SS knockin mice also exhibited established markers of underlying vasculopathy, e.g., chronic hemolysis (anemia, reticulocytosis) and vascular inflammation (leukocytosis) that differed significantly from all control groups. Genetic differences or normal AA gene knockin do not explain the impaired tumor outgrowth in SS knockin mice. These data point instead to the chronic pro-oxidative vasculopathic network in these mice as the predominant cause. In related studies, we demonstrate the ability of the sickle cell component of this system to function as a therapeutic vehicle in potentiating the oncolytic/vasculopathic effect of RNA reovirus. Sickle cells were shown to efficiently adsorb and transfer the virus to melanoma cells where it induced apoptosis even in the presence of anti-reovirus neutralizing antibodies. In vivo, SSRBCs along with their viral cargo rapidly targeted the tumor and initiated a tumoricidal response exceeding that of free virus and similarly loaded normal RBCs

  3. Sickle Cells Abolish Melanoma Tumorigenesis in Hemoglobin SS Knockin Mice and Augment the Tumoricidal Effect of Oncolytic Virus In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chiang Wang; Willmon, Candice; Wu, Li-Chen; Knopick, Peter; Thoerner, Jutta; Vile, Richard; Townes, Tim M; Terman, David S

    2016-01-01

    Insights from the study of cancer resistance in animals have led to the discovery of novel anticancer pathways and opened new venues for cancer prevention and treatment. Sickle cells (SSRBCs) from subjects with homozygous sickle cell anemia (SCA) have been shown to target hypoxic tumor niches, induce diffuse vaso-occlusion, and potentiate a tumoricidal response in a heme- and oxidant-dependent manner. These findings spawned the hypothesis that SSRBCs and the vasculopathic microenvironment of subjects with SCA might be inimical to tumor outgrowth and thereby constitute a natural antitumor defense. We therefore implanted the B16F10 melanoma into humanized hemoglobin SS knockin mice which exhibit the hematologic and vasculopathic sequelae of human SCA. Over the 31-day observation period, hemoglobin SS mice showed no significant melanoma outgrowth. By contrast, 68-100% of melanomas implanted in background and hemoglobin AA knockin control mice reached the tumor growth end point (p < 0.0001). SS knockin mice also exhibited established markers of underlying vasculopathy, e.g., chronic hemolysis (anemia, reticulocytosis) and vascular inflammation (leukocytosis) that differed significantly from all control groups. Genetic differences or normal AA gene knockin do not explain the impaired tumor outgrowth in SS knockin mice. These data point instead to the chronic pro-oxidative vasculopathic network in these mice as the predominant cause. In related studies, we demonstrate the ability of the sickle cell component of this system to function as a therapeutic vehicle in potentiating the oncolytic/vasculopathic effect of RNA reovirus. Sickle cells were shown to efficiently adsorb and transfer the virus to melanoma cells where it induced apoptosis even in the presence of anti-reovirus neutralizing antibodies. In vivo, SSRBCs along with their viral cargo rapidly targeted the tumor and initiated a tumoricidal response exceeding that of free virus and similarly loaded normal RBCs

  4. Combination treatment with oncolytic Vaccinia virus and cyclophosphamide results in synergistic antitumor effects in human lung adenocarcinoma bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The capacity of the recombinant Vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 as a single agent to efficiently treat different human or canine cancers has been shown in several preclinical studies. Currently, its human safety and efficacy are investigated in phase I/II clinical trials. In this study we set out to evaluate the oncolytic activity of GLV-1h68 in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line PC14PE6-RFP in cell cultures and analyzed the antitumor potency of a combined treatment strategy consisting of GLV-1h68 and cyclophosphamide (CPA) in a mouse model of PC14PE6-RFP lung adenocarcinoma. Methods PC14PE6-RFP cells were treated in cell culture with GLV-1h68. Viral replication and cell survival were determined by plaque assays and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays, respectively. Subcutaneously implanted PC14PE6-RFP xenografts were treated by systemic injection of GLV-1h68, CPA or a combination of both. Tumor growth and viral biodistribution were monitored and immune-related antigen profiling of tumor lysates was performed. Results GLV-1h68 efficiently infected, replicated in and lysed human PC14PE6-RFP cells in cell cultures. PC14PE6-RFP tumors were efficiently colonized by GLV-1h68 leading to much delayed tumor growth in PC14PE6-RFP tumor-bearing nude mice. Combination treatment with GLV-1h68 and CPA significantly improved the antitumor efficacy of GLV-1h68 and led to an increased viral distribution within the tumors. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were distinctly elevated in tumors of GLV-1h68-treated mice. Factors expressed by endothelial cells or present in the blood were decreased after combination treatment. A complete loss in the hemorrhagic phenotype of the PC14PE6-RFP tumors and a decrease in the number of blood vessels after combination treatment could be observed. Conclusions CPA and GLV-1h68 have synergistic antitumor effects on PC14PE6-RFP xenografts. We strongly suppose that in the PC14PE6-RFP model the

  5. Some Attenuated Variants of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Show Enhanced Oncolytic Activity against Human Glioblastoma Cells relative to Normal Brain Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Wollmann, Guido; Rogulin, Vitaliy; Simon, Ian; Rose, John K.; van den Pol, Anthony N.

    2010-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has been shown in laboratory studies to be effective against a variety of tumors, including malignant brain tumors. However, attenuation of VSV may be necessary to balance the potential toxicity toward normal cells, particularly when targeting brain tumors. Here we compared 10 recombinant VSV variants resulting from different attenuation strategies. Attenuations included gene shifting (VSV-p1-GFP/RFP), M protein mutation (VSV-M51), G protein cytoplasmic tail truncations (VSV-CT1/CT9), G protein deletions (VSV-dG-GFP/RFP), and combinations thereof (VSV-CT9-M51). Using in vitro viability and replication assays, the VSV variants were grouped into three categories, based on their antitumor activity and non-tumor-cell attenuation. In the first group, wild-type-based VSV-G/GFP, tumor-adapted VSV-rp30, and VSV-CT9 showed a strong antitumor profile but also retained some toxicity toward noncancer control cells. The second group, VSV-CT1, VSV-dG-GFP, and VSV-dG-RFP, had significantly diminished toxicity toward normal cells but showed little oncolytic action. The third group displayed a desired combination of diminished general toxicity and effective antitumor action; this group included VSV-M51, VSV-CT9-M51, VSV-p1-GFP, and VSV-p1-RFP. A member of the last group, VSV-p1-GFP, was then compared in vivo against wild-type-based VSV-G/GFP. Intranasal inoculation of young, postnatal day 16 mice with VSV-p1-GFP showed no adverse neurological effects, whereas VSV-G/GFP was associated with high lethality (80%). Using an intracranial tumor xenograft model, we further demonstrated that attenuated VSV-p1-GFP targets and kills human U87 glioblastoma cells after systemic application. We concluded that some, but not all, attenuated VSV mutants display a favorable oncolytic profile and merit further investigation. PMID:19906910

  6. Sickle Cells Abolish Melanoma Tumorigenesis in Hemoglobin SS Knockin Mice and Augment the Tumoricidal Effect of Oncolytic Virus In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chiang Wang; Willmon, Candice; Wu, Li-Chen; Knopick, Peter; Thoerner, Jutta; Vile, Richard; Townes, Tim M.; Terman, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Insights from the study of cancer resistance in animals have led to the discovery of novel anticancer pathways and opened new venues for cancer prevention and treatment. Sickle cells (SSRBCs) from subjects with homozygous sickle cell anemia (SCA) have been shown to target hypoxic tumor niches, induce diffuse vaso-occlusion, and potentiate a tumoricidal response in a heme- and oxidant-dependent manner. These findings spawned the hypothesis that SSRBCs and the vasculopathic microenvironment of subjects with SCA might be inimical to tumor outgrowth and thereby constitute a natural antitumor defense. We therefore implanted the B16F10 melanoma into humanized hemoglobin SS knockin mice which exhibit the hematologic and vasculopathic sequelae of human SCA. Over the 31-day observation period, hemoglobin SS mice showed no significant melanoma outgrowth. By contrast, 68–100% of melanomas implanted in background and hemoglobin AA knockin control mice reached the tumor growth end point (p < 0.0001). SS knockin mice also exhibited established markers of underlying vasculopathy, e.g., chronic hemolysis (anemia, reticulocytosis) and vascular inflammation (leukocytosis) that differed significantly from all control groups. Genetic differences or normal AA gene knockin do not explain the impaired tumor outgrowth in SS knockin mice. These data point instead to the chronic pro-oxidative vasculopathic network in these mice as the predominant cause. In related studies, we demonstrate the ability of the sickle cell component of this system to function as a therapeutic vehicle in potentiating the oncolytic/vasculopathic effect of RNA reovirus. Sickle cells were shown to efficiently adsorb and transfer the virus to melanoma cells where it induced apoptosis even in the presence of anti-reovirus neutralizing antibodies. In vivo, SSRBCs along with their viral cargo rapidly targeted the tumor and initiated a tumoricidal response exceeding that of free virus and similarly loaded normal

  7. The complete genome sequences of poxviruses isolated from a penguin and a pigeon in South Africa and comparison to other sequenced avipoxviruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Two novel avipoxviruses from South Africa have been sequenced, one from a Feral Pigeon (Columba livia) (FeP2) and the other from an African penguin (Spheniscus demersus) (PEPV). We present a purpose-designed bioinformatics pipeline for analysis of next generation sequence data of avian poxviruses and compare the different avipoxviruses sequenced to date with specific emphasis on their evolution and gene content. Results The FeP2 (282 kbp) and PEPV (306 kbp) genomes encode 271 and 284 open reading frames respectively and are more closely related to one another (94.4%) than to either fowlpox virus (FWPV) (85.3% and 84.0% respectively) or Canarypox virus (CNPV) (62.0% and 63.4% respectively). Overall, FeP2, PEPV and FWPV have syntenic gene arrangements; however, major differences exist throughout their genomes. The most striking difference between FeP2 and the FWPV-like avipoxviruses is a large deletion of ~16 kbp from the central region of the genome of FeP2 deleting a cc-chemokine-like gene, two Variola virus B22R orthologues, an N1R/p28-like gene and a V-type Ig domain family gene. FeP2 and PEPV both encode orthologues of vaccinia virus C7L and Interleukin 10. PEPV contains a 77 amino acid long orthologue of Ubiquitin sharing 97% amino acid identity to human ubiquitin. Conclusions The genome sequences of FeP2 and PEPV have greatly added to the limited repository of genomic information available for the Avipoxvirus genus. In the comparison of FeP2 and PEPV to existing sequences, FWPV and CNPV, we have established insights into African avipoxvirus evolution. Our data supports the independent evolution of these South African avipoxviruses from a common ancestral virus to FWPV and CNPV. PMID:24919868

  8. Persistence of Protective Immunity to Malaria Induced by DNA Priming and Poxvirus Boosting: Characterization of Effector and Memory CD8+-T-Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Sedegah, Martha; Brice, Gary T.; Rogers, William O.; Doolan, Denise L.; Charoenvit, Yupin; Jones, Trevor R.; Majam, Victoria F.; Belmonte, Arnel; Lu, Minh; Belmonte, Maria; Carucci, Daniel J.; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2002-01-01

    The persistence of immunity to malaria induced in mice by a heterologous DNA priming and poxvirus boosting regimen was characterized. Mice were immunized by priming with DNA vaccine plasmids encoding the Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (PyCSP) and murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and boosting with recombinant vaccinia encoding PyCSP. BALB/c mice immunized with either high-dose (100 μg of p PyCSP plus 30 μg of pGM-CSF) or low-dose (1 μg of p PyCSP plus 1 μg of pGM-CSF DNA) priming were protected against challenge with 50 P. yoelii sporozoites. Protection 2 weeks after immunization was 70 to 100%, persisted at this level for at least 20 weeks, and declined to 30 to 40% by 28 weeks. Eight of eight mice protected at 20 weeks were still protected when rechallenged at 40 weeks. The antigen (Ag)-specific effector CD8+-T-cell population present 2 weeks after boosting had ex vivo Ag-specific cytolytic activity, expressed both gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha, and constituted 12 to 20% of splenic CD8+ T cells. In contrast, the memory CD8+-Ag-specific-cell population at 28 weeks lacked cytolytic activity and constituted only 6% of splenic CD8+ T cells, but at the single-cell level it produced significantly higher levels of IFN-γ than the effectors. High levels of Ag- or parasite-specific antibodies present 2 weeks after boosting had declined three- to sevenfold by 28 weeks. Low-dose priming was similarly immunogenic and as protective as high-dose priming against a 50-, but not a 250-, sporozoite challenge. These results demonstrate that a heterologous priming and boosting vaccination can provide lasting protection against malaria in this model system. PMID:12065488

  9. Oncolytic adenovirus and doxorubicin-based chemotherapy results in synergistic antitumor activity against soft-tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Siurala, Mikko; Bramante, Simona; Vassilev, Lotta; Hirvinen, Mari; Parviainen, Suvi; Tähtinen, Siri; Guse, Kilian; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Kanerva, Anna; Kipar, Anja; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-02-15

    Despite originating from several different tissues, soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) are often grouped together as they share mesenchymal origin and treatment guidelines. Also, with some exceptions, a common denominator is that when the tumor cannot be cured with surgery, the efficacy of current therapies is poor and new treatment modalities are thus needed. We have studied the combination of a capsid-modified oncolytic adenovirus CGTG-102 (Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF) with doxorubicin, with or without ifosfamide, the preferred first-line chemotherapeutic options for most types of STS. We show that CGTG-102 and doxorubicin plus ifosfamide together are able to increase cell killing of Syrian hamster STS cells over single agents, as well as upregulate immunogenic cell death markers. When tested in vivo against established STS tumors in fully immunocompetent Syrian hamsters, the combination was highly effective. CGTG-102 and doxorubicin (without ifosfamide) resulted in synergistic antitumor efficacy against human STS xenografts in comparison with single agent treatments. Doxorubicin increased adenoviral replication in human and hamster STS cells, potentially contributing to the observed therapeutic synergy. In conclusion, the preclinical data generated here support clinical translation of the combination of CGTG-102 and doxorubicin, or doxorubicin plus ifosfamide, for the treatment of STS, and provide clues on the mechanisms of synergy.

  10. Safety and biodistribution of a double-deleted oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in laboratory Beagles.

    PubMed

    Autio, Karoliina; Knuuttila, Anna; Kipar, Anja; Pesonen, Sari; Guse, Kilian; Parviainen, Suvi; Rajamäki, Minna; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated adverse events, biodistribution and shedding of oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in two Beagles, in preparation for a phase 1 trial in canine cancer patients. Dog 1 received one dose of vaccinia virus and was euthanized 24 hours afterwards, while dog 2 received virus four times once weekly and was euthanized 7 days after that. Dogs were monitored for adverse events and underwent a detailed postmortem examination. Blood, saliva, urine, feces, and organs were collected for virus detection. Dog 1 had mild fever and lethargy while dog 2 experienced a possible seizure 5.5 hours after first virus administration. Viral DNA declined quickly in the blood after virus administration in both dogs but was still detectable 1 week later by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Only samples taken directly after virus infusion contained infectious virus. Small amounts of viral DNA, but no infectious virus, were detected in a few saliva and urine samples. Necropsies did not reveal any relevant pathological changes and virus DNA was detected mainly in the spleen. The dogs in the study did not have cancer, and thus adverse events could be more common and viral load higher in dogs with tumors which allow viral amplification.

  11. The systemic delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus expressing decorin inhibits bone metastasis in a mouse model of human prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Yang, Yuefeng; Hu, Zebin; Cleveland, Elyse; Wu, Ying; Hutten, Ryan; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R.; Shevrin, Daniel; Kaul, Karen; Brendler, Charles; Iozzo, Renato V.; Seth, Prem

    2014-12-11

    In an effort to develop a new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastases, we have created Ad.dcn, a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus carrying the human decorin gene. Infection of PC-3 and DU-145, the human prostate tumor cells, with Ad.dcn or a non-replicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).dcn resulted in decorin expression; Ad.dcn produced high viral titers and cytotoxicity in human prostate tumor cells. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited Met, the Wnt/β- catenin signaling axis, vascular endothelial growth factor A, reduced mitochondrial DNA levels, and inhibited tumor cell migration. To examine the anti-tumor response of Ad.dcn, PC-3-luc cells were inoculated in the left heart ventricle to establish bone metastases in nude mice. Ad.dcn, in conjunction with control replicating and non-replicating vectors were injected via tail vein. The real-time monitoring of mice, once a week, by bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography showed that Ad.dcn produced significant inhibition of skeletal metastases. Analyses of the mice at the terminal time point indicated a significant reduction in the tumor burden, osteoclast number, serum TRACP 5b levels, osteocalcin levels, hypercalcemia, inhibition of cancer cachexia, and an increase in the animal survival. Finally, based on these studies, we believe that Ad.dcn can be developed as a potential new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastasis.

  12. Safety and biodistribution of a double-deleted oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in laboratory Beagles

    PubMed Central

    Autio, Karoliina; Knuuttila, Anna; Kipar, Anja; Pesonen, Sari; Guse, Kilian; Parviainen, Suvi; Rajamäki, Minna; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated adverse events, biodistribution and shedding of oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in two Beagles, in preparation for a phase 1 trial in canine cancer patients. Dog 1 received one dose of vaccinia virus and was euthanized 24 hours afterwards, while dog 2 received virus four times once weekly and was euthanized 7 days after that. Dogs were monitored for adverse events and underwent a detailed postmortem examination. Blood, saliva, urine, feces, and organs were collected for virus detection. Dog 1 had mild fever and lethargy while dog 2 experienced a possible seizure 5.5 hours after first virus administration. Viral DNA declined quickly in the blood after virus administration in both dogs but was still detectable 1 week later by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Only samples taken directly after virus infusion contained infectious virus. Small amounts of viral DNA, but no infectious virus, were detected in a few saliva and urine samples. Necropsies did not reveal any relevant pathological changes and virus DNA was detected mainly in the spleen. The dogs in the study did not have cancer, and thus adverse events could be more common and viral load higher in dogs with tumors which allow viral amplification. PMID:27119092

  13. The oncolytic adenovirus Δ24-RGD in combination with cisplatin exerts a potent anti-osteosarcoma activity.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Velez, Naiara; Xipell, Enric; Jauregui, Patricia; Zalacain, Marta; Marrodan, Lucía; Zandueta, Carolina; Vera, Beatriz; Urquiza, Leire; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Julián, Mikel San; Toledo, Gemma; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Torre, Wensceslao; Lecanda, Fernando; Patiño-García, Ana; Alonso, Marta M

    2014-10-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents. The presence of metastases and the lack of response to conventional treatment are the major adverse prognostic factors. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new treatment strategies that overcome both of these problems. Our purpose was to elucidate whether the use of the oncolytic adenovirus Δ24-RGD alone or in combination with standard chemotherapy would be effective, in vitro and in vivo, against osteosarcoma. Our results showed that Δ24-RGD exerted a potent antitumor effect against osteosarcoma cell lines that was increased by the addition of cisplatin. Δ24-RGD osteosarcoma treatment resulted in autophagy in vitro that was further enhanced when combined with cisplatin. Of importance, administration of Δ24-RGD and/or cisplatin, in novel orthotopic and two lung metastatic models in vivo resulted in a significant reduction of tumor burden meanwhile maintaining a safe toxicity profile. Together, our data underscore the potential of Δ24-RGD to become a realistic therapeutic option for primary and metastatic pediatric osteosarcoma. Moreover, this study warrants a future clinical trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Δ24-RGD for this devastating disease. PMID:24737304

  14. Phase 1 study of intratumoral Pexa-Vec (JX-594), an oncolytic and immunotherapeutic vaccinia virus, in pediatric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cripe, Timothy P; Ngo, Minhtran C; Geller, James I; Louis, Chrystal U; Currier, Mark A; Racadio, John M; Towbin, Alexander J; Rooney, Cliona M; Pelusio, Adina; Moon, Anne; Hwang, Tae-Ho; Burke, James M; Bell, John C; Kirn, David H; Breitbach, Caroline J

    2015-03-01

    Pexa-Vec (pexastimogene devacirepvec, JX-594) is an oncolytic and immunotherapeutic vaccinia virus designed to destroy cancer cells through viral lysis and induction of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-driven tumor-specific immunity. Pexa-Vec has undergone phase 1 and 2 testing alone and in combination with other therapies in adult patients, via both intratumoral and intravenous administration routes. We sought to determine the safety of intratumoral administration in pediatric patients. In a dose-escalation study using either 10(6) or 10(7) plaque-forming units per kilogram, we performed one-time injections in up to three tumor sites in five pediatric patients and two injections in one patient. Ages at study entry ranged from 4 to 21 years, and their cancer diagnoses included neuroblastoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and Ewing sarcoma. All toxicities were ≤ grade 3. The most common side effects were sinus fever and sinus tachycardia. All three patients at the higher dose developed asymptomatic grade 1 treatment-related skin pustules that resolved within 3-4 weeks. One patient showed imaging evidence suggestive of antitumor biological activity. The two patients tested for cellular immunoreactivity to vaccinia antigens showed strong responses. Overall, our study suggests Pexa-Vec is safe to administer to pediatric patients by intratumoral administration and could be studied further in this patient population.

  15. Safety and biodistribution of a double-deleted oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in laboratory Beagles.

    PubMed

    Autio, Karoliina; Knuuttila, Anna; Kipar, Anja; Pesonen, Sari; Guse, Kilian; Parviainen, Suvi; Rajamäki, Minna; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated adverse events, biodistribution and shedding of oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding CD40 ligand in two Beagles, in preparation for a phase 1 trial in canine cancer patients. Dog 1 received one dose of vaccinia virus and was euthanized 24 hours afterwards, while dog 2 received virus four times once weekly and was euthanized 7 days after that. Dogs were monitored for adverse events and underwent a detailed postmortem examination. Blood, saliva, urine, feces, and organs were collected for virus detection. Dog 1 had mild fever and lethargy while dog 2 experienced a possible seizure 5.5 hours after first virus administration. Viral DNA declined quickly in the blood after virus administration in both dogs but was still detectable 1 week later by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Only samples taken directly after virus infusion contained infectious virus. Small amounts of viral DNA, but no infectious virus, were detected in a few saliva and urine samples. Necropsies did not reveal any relevant pathological changes and virus DNA was detected mainly in the spleen. The dogs in the study did not have cancer, and thus adverse events could be more common and viral load higher in dogs with tumors which allow viral amplification. PMID:27119092

  16. Synergistic combination of valproic acid and oncolytic parvovirus H-1PV as a potential therapy against cervical and pancreatic carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Li, Junwei; Bonifati, Serena; Hristov, Georgi; Marttila, Tiina; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Stanzel, Sven; Schnölzer, Martina; Mougin, Christiane; Aprahamian, Marc; Grekova, Svitlana P; Raykov, Zahari; Rommelaere, Jean; Marchini, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    The rat parvovirus H-1PV has oncolytic and tumour-suppressive properties potentially exploitable in cancer therapy. This possibility is being explored and results are encouraging, but it is necessary to improve the oncotoxicity of the virus. Here we show that this can be achieved by co-treating cancer cells with H-1PV and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) such as valproic acid (VPA). We demonstrate that these agents act synergistically to kill a range of human cervical carcinoma and pancreatic carcinoma cell lines by inducing oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. Strikingly, in rat and mouse xenograft models, H-1PV/VPA co-treatment strongly inhibits tumour growth promoting complete tumour remission in all co-treated animals. At the molecular level, we found acetylation of the parvovirus nonstructural protein NS1 at residues K85 and K257 to modulate NS1-mediated transcription and cytotoxicity, both of which are enhanced by VPA treatment. These results warrant clinical evaluation of H-1PV/VPA co-treatment against cervical and pancreatic ductal carcinomas.

  17. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated transfer of the antisense chk2 selectively inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, G; Zhou, J; Gao, Q; Huang, X; Li, K; Zhuang, L; Huang, M; Xu, G; Wang, S; Lu, Y; Ma, D

    2006-10-01

    Screening and identifying molecules target to checkpoint pathways has fostered the development of checkpoint-based anticancer strategies. Among these targets, inhibition of chk2 may induce cell death for tumors whose growth depends on enhanced chk2 activity. However, improvement of the potency and specificity of such therapeutics remains a major challenge. To resolve this problem, we constructed M3, a novel recombinant adenovirus with a 27-bp deletion in E1A CR2 region by which to realize tumor-specific replication, and an 829-bp of antisense chk2 fragment inserted into the E3 coding region. In this design, M3 exploited the native adenovirus E3 promoters to express antisense chk2 cDNA in a viral replication-dependent fashion, and preferentially silenced the chk2 gene in tumor cells. In vitro and in vivo assays confirmed that downregulated chk2 expression induced by M3 infection was tumor-specific and virus replication-dependent. Furthermore, systemic administration of M3 combined with a low dose of cisplatin cured 75% (9/12) of orthotopic hepatic carcinoma mouse models that were otherwise resistant to cisplatin. Our results indicated that the upcoming development in this field would improve the antitumor efficacy and maximize the synergistic effect of oncolytic viruses administered with traditional chemotherapy or radiotherapy. PMID:16741520

  18. Synergistic antitumor activity of triple-regulated oncolytic adenovirus with VSTM1 and daunorubicin in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiao; Yao, Qiu-Mei; Li, Jin-Lan; Chang, Yan; Li, Ting; Han, Wen-Ling; Wu, Hong-Ping; Li, Lin-Fang; Qian, Qi-Jun; Ruan, Guo-Rui

    2016-10-01

    V-set and transmembrane domain-containing 1 (VSTM1), which is downregulated in bone marrow cells from leukemia patients, may provide a diagnostic and treatment target. Here, a triple-regulated oncolytic adenovirus was constructed to carry a VSTM1 gene expression cassette, SG611-VSTM1, and contained the E1a gene with a 24-nucleotide deletion within the CR2 region under control of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter, E1b gene directed by the hypoxia response element, and VSTM1 gene controlled by the cytomegalovirus promoter. Real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses showed that SG611-VSTM1 expressed VSTM1 highly efficiently in the human leukemic cell line K562 compared with SG611. In Cell Counting Kit-8 and flow cytometric assays, SG611-VSTM1 exhibited more potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in leukemic cells compared with SG611 and exerted synergistic cytotoxicity with low-dose daunorubicin (DNR) in vitro. In xenograft models, SG611-VSTM1 intratumorally injected at a dose of 1 × 10(9) plaque forming units combined with intraperitoneally injected low-dose DNR displayed significantly stronger antitumor effects than either treatment alone. Histopathologic examination revealed that SG611-VSTM1 induced apoptosis of leukemic cells. These results implicate an important role for VSTM1 in the pathogenesis of leukemia, and SG611-VSTM1 may be a promising agent for enhancing chemosensitivity in leukemia therapy. PMID:27472927

  19. The systemic delivery of an oncolytic adenovirus expressing decorin inhibits bone metastasis in a mouse model of human prostate cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Weidong; Neill, Thomas; Yang, Yuefeng; Hu, Zebin; Cleveland, Elyse; Wu, Ying; Hutten, Ryan; Xiao, Xianghui; Stock, Stuart R.; Shevrin, Daniel; et al

    2014-12-11

    In an effort to develop a new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastases, we have created Ad.dcn, a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus carrying the human decorin gene. Infection of PC-3 and DU-145, the human prostate tumor cells, with Ad.dcn or a non-replicating adenovirus Ad(E1-).dcn resulted in decorin expression; Ad.dcn produced high viral titers and cytotoxicity in human prostate tumor cells. Adenoviral-mediated decorin expression inhibited Met, the Wnt/β- catenin signaling axis, vascular endothelial growth factor A, reduced mitochondrial DNA levels, and inhibited tumor cell migration. To examine the anti-tumor response of Ad.dcn, PC-3-luc cells were inoculated in the left heart ventricle tomore » establish bone metastases in nude mice. Ad.dcn, in conjunction with control replicating and non-replicating vectors were injected via tail vein. The real-time monitoring of mice, once a week, by bioluminescence imaging and X-ray radiography showed that Ad.dcn produced significant inhibition of skeletal metastases. Analyses of the mice at the terminal time point indicated a significant reduction in the tumor burden, osteoclast number, serum TRACP 5b levels, osteocalcin levels, hypercalcemia, inhibition of cancer cachexia, and an increase in the animal survival. Finally, based on these studies, we believe that Ad.dcn can be developed as a potential new therapy for prostate cancer bone metastasis.« less

  20. Syngeneic syrian hamster tumors feature tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes allowing adoptive cell therapy enhanced by oncolytic adenovirus in a replication permissive setting.

    PubMed

    Siurala, Mikko; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Havunen, Riikka; Tähtinen, Siri; Bramante, Simona; Parviainen, Suvi; Mathis, J Michael; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-05-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has shown promising yet sometimes suboptimal results in clinical trials for advanced cancer, underscoring the need for approaches improving efficacy and safety. Six implantable syngeneic tumor cell lines of the Syrian hamster were used to initiate TIL cultures. TIL generated from tumor fragments cultured in human interleukin-2 (IL-2) for 10 d were adoptively transferred into tumor-bearing hamsters with concomitant intratumoral injections of oncolytic adenovirus (Ad5-D24) for the assessment of antitumor efficacy. Pancreatic cancer (HapT1) and melanoma (RPMI 1846) TIL exhibited potent and tumor-specific cytotoxicity in effector-to-target (E/T) assays. MHC Class I blocking abrogated the cell killing of RPMI 1846 TIL, indicating cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell activity. When TIL were combined with Ad5-D24 in vitro, HapT1 tumor cell killing was significantly enhanced over single agents. In vivo, the intratumoral administration of HapT1 TIL and Ad5-D24 resulted in improved tumor growth control compared with either treatment alone. Additionally, splenocytes derived from animals treated with the combination of Ad5-D24 and TIL killed autologous tumor cells more efficiently than monotherapy-derived splenocytes, suggesting that systemic antitumor immunity was induced. For the first time, TIL of the Syrian hamster have been cultured, characterized and used therapeutically together with oncolytic adenovirus for enhancing the efficacy of TIL therapy. Our results support human translation of oncolytic adenovirus as an enabling technology for adoptive T-cell therapy of solid tumors.

  1. Syngeneic syrian hamster tumors feature tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes allowing adoptive cell therapy enhanced by oncolytic adenovirus in a replication permissive setting.

    PubMed

    Siurala, Mikko; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Havunen, Riikka; Tähtinen, Siri; Bramante, Simona; Parviainen, Suvi; Mathis, J Michael; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-05-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has shown promising yet sometimes suboptimal results in clinical trials for advanced cancer, underscoring the need for approaches improving efficacy and safety. Six implantable syngeneic tumor cell lines of the Syrian hamster were used to initiate TIL cultures. TIL generated from tumor fragments cultured in human interleukin-2 (IL-2) for 10 d were adoptively transferred into tumor-bearing hamsters with concomitant intratumoral injections of oncolytic adenovirus (Ad5-D24) for the assessment of antitumor efficacy. Pancreatic cancer (HapT1) and melanoma (RPMI 1846) TIL exhibited potent and tumor-specific cytotoxicity in effector-to-target (E/T) assays. MHC Class I blocking abrogated the cell killing of RPMI 1846 TIL, indicating cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell activity. When TIL were combined with Ad5-D24 in vitro, HapT1 tumor cell killing was significantly enhanced over single agents. In vivo, the intratumoral administration of HapT1 TIL and Ad5-D24 resulted in improved tumor growth control compared with either treatment alone. Additionally, splenocytes derived from animals treated with the combination of Ad5-D24 and TIL killed autologous tumor cells more efficiently than monotherapy-derived splenocytes, suggesting that systemic antitumor immunity was induced. For the first time, TIL of the Syrian hamster have been cultured, characterized and used therapeutically together with oncolytic adenovirus for enhancing the efficacy of TIL therapy. Our results support human translation of oncolytic adenovirus as an enabling technology for adoptive T-cell therapy of solid tumors. PMID:27467954

  2. Orientia tsutsugamushi Strain Ikeda Ankyrin Repeat-Containing Proteins Recruit SCF1 Ubiquitin Ligase Machinery via Poxvirus-Like F-Box Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Andrea R.; VieBrock, Lauren; Rodino, Kyle G.; Miller, Daniel P.; Tegels, Brittney K.; Marconi, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A rising theme among intracellular microbes is the delivery of ankyrin repeat-containing effectors (Anks) that interact with target proteins to co-opt host cell functions. Orientia tsutsugamushi, an obligate intracellular bacterium and the etiologic agent of scrub typhus, encodes one of the largest Ank repertoires of any sequenced microorganism. They have been previously identified as type 1 secretion system substrates. Here, in silico and manual sequence analyses revealed that a large proportion of O. tsutsugamushi strain Ikeda Anks bear a eukaryotic/poxvirus-like F-box motif, which is known to recruit host cell SCF1 ubiquitin ligase machinery. We assessed the Anks for the ability to serve as F-box proteins. Coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that F-box-containing Anks interact with overexpressed and/or endogenous SCF1 components. When coexpressed with FLAG-Ank4_01 or FLAG-Ank9, a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged version of the SCF1 component SKP1 localized to subcellular sites of FLAG-Ank accumulation. The abilities of recombinant Anks to interact and colocalize with SKP1 were F-box dependent. GST-SKP1 precipitated O. tsutsugamushi-derived Ank9 from infected host cells, verifying both that the pathogen expresses Ank9 during infection and the protein's capability to bind SKP1. Aligning O. tsutsugamushi, poxviral, and eukaryotic F-box sequences delineated three F-box residues that are highly conserved and likely to be functionally important. Substitution of these residues ablated the ability of GFP-Ank9 to interact with GST-SKP1. These results demonstrate that O. tsutsugamushi strain Ikeda Anks can co-opt host cell polyubiquitination machinery, provide the first evidence that an O. tsutsugamushi Ank does so during infection, and advance overall understanding of microbial F-box proteins. IMPORTANCE Ankyrin repeat-containing proteins (Anks) are important virulence factors of intracellular bacteria that mediate protein-protein interactions with

  3. A combinational therapy of EGFR-CAR NK cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1 for breast cancer brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianying; Chen, Charlie; Chen, Luxi; Wang, Youwei; Wang, Hongwei; Yi, Long; Elder, J. Bradley; Wang, Qi-En; He, Xiaoming; Kaur, Balveen; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Yu, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer brain metastases (BCBMs) are common in patients with metastatic breast cancer and indicate a poor prognosis. These tumors are especially resistant to currently available treatments due to multiple factors. However, the combination of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified immune cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) has not yet been explored in this context. In this study, NK-92 cells and primary NK cells were engineered to express the second generation of EGFR-CAR. The efficacies of anti-BCBMs of EGFR-CAR NK cells, oHSV-1, and their combination were tested in vitro and in a breast cancer intracranial mouse model. In vitro, compared with mock-transduced NK-92 cells or primary NK cells, EGFR-CAR-engineered NK-92 cells and primary NK cells displayed enhanced cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production when co-cultured with breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, and MCF-7. oHSV-1 alone was also capable of lysing and destroying these cells. However, a higher cytolytic effect of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells was observed when combined with oHSV-1 compared to the monotherapies. In the mice intracranially pre-inoculated with EGFR-expressing MDA-MB-231 cells, intratumoral administration of either EGFR-CAR-transduced NK-92 cells or oHSV-1 mitigated tumor growth. Notably, the combination of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells with oHSV-1 resulted in more efficient killing of MDA-MB-231 tumor cells and significantly longer survival of tumor-bearing mice when compared to monotherapies. These results demonstrate that regional administration of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells combined with oHSV-1 therapy is a potentially promising strategy to treat BCBMs. PMID:27050072

  4. A combinational therapy of EGFR-CAR NK cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1 for breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xilin; Han, Jianfeng; Chu, Jianhong; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Chen, Charlie; Chen, Luxi; Wang, Youwei; Wang, Hongwei; Yi, Long; Elder, J Bradley; Wang, Qi-En; He, Xiaoming; Kaur, Balveen; Chiocca, E Antonio; Yu, Jianhua

    2016-05-10

    Breast cancer brain metastases (BCBMs) are common in patients with metastatic breast cancer and indicate a poor prognosis. These tumors are especially resistant to currently available treatments due to multiple factors. However, the combination of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified immune cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) has not yet been explored in this context. In this study, NK-92 cells and primary NK cells were engineered to express the second generation of EGFR-CAR. The efficacies of anti-BCBMs of EGFR-CAR NK cells, oHSV-1, and their combination were tested in vitro and in a breast cancer intracranial mouse model. In vitro, compared with mock-transduced NK-92 cells or primary NK cells, EGFR-CAR-engineered NK-92 cells and primary NK cells displayed enhanced cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production when co-cultured with breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, and MCF-7. oHSV-1 alone was also capable of lysing and destroying these cells. However, a higher cytolytic effect of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells was observed when combined with oHSV-1 compared to the monotherapies. In the mice intracranially pre-inoculated with EGFR-expressing MDA-MB-231 cells, intratumoral administration of either EGFR-CAR-transduced NK-92 cells or oHSV-1 mitigated tumor growth. Notably, the combination of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells with oHSV-1 resulted in more efficient killing of MDA-MB-231 tumor cells and significantly longer survival of tumor-bearing mice when compared to monotherapies. These results demonstrate that regional administration of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells combined with oHSV-1 therapy is a potentially promising strategy to treat BCBMs.

  5. A combinational therapy of EGFR-CAR NK cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1 for breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xilin; Han, Jianfeng; Chu, Jianhong; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Chen, Charlie; Chen, Luxi; Wang, Youwei; Wang, Hongwei; Yi, Long; Elder, J Bradley; Wang, Qi-En; He, Xiaoming; Kaur, Balveen; Chiocca, E Antonio; Yu, Jianhua

    2016-05-10

    Breast cancer brain metastases (BCBMs) are common in patients with metastatic breast cancer and indicate a poor prognosis. These tumors are especially resistant to currently available treatments due to multiple factors. However, the combination of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified immune cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) has not yet been explored in this context. In this study, NK-92 cells and primary NK cells were engineered to express the second generation of EGFR-CAR. The efficacies of anti-BCBMs of EGFR-CAR NK cells, oHSV-1, and their combination were tested in vitro and in a breast cancer intracranial mouse model. In vitro, compared with mock-transduced NK-92 cells or primary NK cells, EGFR-CAR-engineered NK-92 cells and primary NK cells displayed enhanced cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production when co-cultured with breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, and MCF-7. oHSV-1 alone was also capable of lysing and destroying these cells. However, a higher cytolytic effect of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells was observed when combined with oHSV-1 compared to the monotherapies. In the mice intracranially pre-inoculated with EGFR-expressing MDA-MB-231 cells, intratumoral administration of either EGFR-CAR-transduced NK-92 cells or oHSV-1 mitigated tumor growth. Notably, the combination of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells with oHSV-1 resulted in more efficient killing of MDA-MB-231 tumor cells and significantly longer survival of tumor-bearing mice when compared to monotherapies. These results demonstrate that regional administration of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells combined with oHSV-1 therapy is a potentially promising strategy to treat BCBMs. PMID:27050072

  6. Oncolytic adenoviruses coated with MHC-I tumor epitopes increase the antitumor immunity and efficacy against melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Cristian; Hirvinen, Mari; Garofalo, Mariangela; Romaniuk, Dmitrii; Kuryk, Lukasz; Sarvela, Teea; Vitale, Andrea; Antopolsky, Maxim; Magarkar, Aniket; Viitala, Tapani; Suutari, Teemu; Bunker, Alex; Yliperttula, Marjo; Urtti, Arto; Cerullo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The stimulation of the immune system using oncolytic adenoviruses (OAds) has attracted significant interest and several studies suggested that OAds immunogenicity might be important for their efficacy. Therefore, we developed a versatile and rapid system to adsorb tumor-specific major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) peptides onto the viral surface to drive the immune response toward the tumor epitopes. By studying the model epitope SIINFEKL, we demonstrated that the peptide-coated OAd (PeptiCRAd) retains its infectivity and the cross presentation of the modified-exogenous epitope on MHC-I is not hindered. We then showed that the SIINFEKL-targeting PeptiCRAd achieves a superior antitumor efficacy and increases the percentage of antitumor CD8+ T cells and mature epitope-specific dendritic cells in vivo. PeptiCRAds loaded with clinically relevant tumor epitopes derived from tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2) and human gp100 could reduce the growth of primary-treated tumors and secondary-untreated melanomas, promoting the expansion of antigen-specific T-cell populations. Finally, we tested PeptiCRAd in humanized mice bearing human melanomas. In this model, a PeptiCRAd targeting the human melanoma-associated antigen A1 (MAGE-A1) and expressing granulocyte and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was able to eradicate established tumors and increased the human MAGE-A1-specific CD8+ T cell population. Herein, we show that the immunogenicity of OAds plays a key role in their efficacy and it can be exploited to direct the immune response system toward exogenous tumor epitopes. This versatile and rapid system overcomes the immunodominance of the virus and elicits a tumor-specific immune response, making PeptiCRAd a promising approach for clinical testing. PMID:27141389

  7. Bortezomib-induced unfolded protein response increases oncolytic HSV-1 replication resulting in synergistic, anti-tumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Young; Hurwitz, Brian S; Bolyard, Chelsea; Yu, Jun-Ge; Zhang, Jianying; Selvendiran, Karuppaiyah; Rath, Kellie S; He, Shun; Bailey, Zachary; Eaves, David; Cripe, Timothy P; Parris, Deborah S.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Yu, Jianhua; Old, Matthew; Kaur, Balveen

    2014-01-01

    Background Bortezomib is an FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor, and oncolytic HSV-1 (oHSV) is a promising therapeutic approach for cancer. We tested the impact of combining bortezomib with oHSV for anti-tumor efficacy. Methods The synergistic interaction between oHSV and bortezomib was calculated using Chou-Talalay analysis. Viral replication was evaluated using plaque assay and immune fluorescence. Western-blot assays were used to evaluate induction of ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR). Inhibitors targeting Hsp90 were utilized to investigate the mechanism of cell killing. Anti-tumor efficacy in vivo was evaluated using subcutaneous and intracranial tumor xenografts of glioma and head and neck cancer. Survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves and two-sided log rank test. Results Combination treatment with bortezomib and oHSV, 34.5ENVE, displayed strong synergistic interaction in ovarian cancer, head & neck cancer, glioma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells. Bortezomib treatment induced ER stress, evident by strong induction of Grp78, CHOP, PERK and IRE1α (western blot analysis) and the UPR (induction of hsp40, 70 and 90). Bortezomib treatment of cells at both sublethal and lethal doses increased viral replication (p value <0.001), but inhibition of Hsp90 ablated this response, reducing viral replication and synergistic cell killing. The combination of bortezomib and 34.5ENVE significantly enhanced anti-tumor efficacy in multiple different tumor models in vivo. Conclusions The dramatic synergy of bortezomib and 34.5ENVE is mediated by bortezomib- induced UPR and warrants future clinical testing in patients. PMID:24815720

  8. Hexon modification to improve the activity of oncolytic adenovirus vectors against neoplastic and stromal cells in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Tanja; Benihoud, Karim; Vigant, Frédéric; Schmidt, Christoph Q; Schmidt, Christoph Q Andreas; Wortmann, Andreas; Bachem, Max G; Simmet, Thomas; Kochanek, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pancreatic carcinoma has an unfavourable prognosis and standard treatment strategies mostly fail in advanced cases. Virotherapy might overcome this resistance to current treatment modalities. However, data from clinical studies with oncolytic viruses, including replicating adenoviral (Ad) vectors, have shown only limited activity against pancreatic cancer and other carcinomas. Since pancreatic carcinomas have a complex tumor architecture and frequently a strong stromal compartment consisting of non-neoplastic cell types (mainly pancreatic stellate cells = hPSCs) and extracellular matrix, it is not surprising that Ad vectors replicating in neoplastic cells will likely fail to eradicate this aggressive tumor type. Because the TGFβ receptor (TGFBR) is expressed on both neoplastic cells and hPSCs we inserted the TGFBR targeting peptide CKS17 into the hypervariable region 5 (HVR5) of the capsid protein hexon with the aim to generate a replicating Ad vector with improved activity in complex tumors. We demonstrated increased transduction of both pancreatic cancer cell lines and of hPSCs and enhanced cytotoxicity in co-cultures of both cell types. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated decreased binding of coagulation factor X to CKS17-modified Ad particles and in vivo biodistribution studies performed in mice indicated decreased transduction of hepatocytes. Thus, to increase activity of replicating Ad vectors we propose to relax tumor cell selectivity by genetic hexon-mediated targeting to the TGFBR (or other receptors present on both neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells within the tumor) to enable replication also in the stromal cell compartment of tumors, while abolishing hepatocyte transduction, and thereby increasing safety.

  9. Oncolytic adenovirus-mediated short hairpin RNA targeting MYCN gene induces apoptosis by upregulating RKIP in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Feng, Dongchuan; Zhang, Deyong; Zhuo, Baobiao; Zheng, Junnian

    2015-08-01

    The amplification of MYCN is a typical characteristic of aggressive neuroblastomas, whereas acquired mutations of p53 lead to refractory and relapsed cases. We had previously examined the applicability of the replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus, ZD55-shMYCN, to deliver a short hairpin RNA targeting MYCN gene for p53-null and MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell line LA1-55N. Our data have shown that ZD55-shMYCN has an additive tumor growth inhibitory response through shRNA-mediated MYCN knockdown and ZD55-mediated cancer cell lysis. In this regard, ZD55-shMYCN can downregulate MYCN and perform anticancer effects, thereby acquiring significance in the administration of MYCN-amplified and p53-null neuroblastomas. Hence, we further investigated the anticancer properties of ZD55-shMYCN in neuroblastomas. Our data showed that ZD55-shMYCN induced G2/M arrest via decreasing the levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1 irrespective of p53 status. ZD55-shMYCN effectively induced apoptosis in neuroblastomas through activation of caspase-3 and enhancing PARP cleavage. Furthermore, ZD55-shMYCN could downregulate phosphoinositide 3-kinase and pAkt and upregulate RKIP levels. Similarly, pro-apoptosis was revealed by the histopathologic examination of paraffin-embedded section of resected tumors of mice xenograft. In vitro and in vivo studies, we elucidate the apoptosis properties and mechanisms of action of ZD55-shMYCN, which provide a promising approach for further clinical development.

  10. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF) confers resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNA receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Kaowinn, Sirichat; Cho, Il-Rae; Moon, Jeong; Jun, Seung Won; Kim, Chang Seok; Kang, Ho Young; Kim, Manbok; Koh, Sang Seok; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, plays a crucial role in the development of pancreatic cancer, including its metastasis and proliferation. Therefore, PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer cells could be important targets for oncolytic virus-mediated treatment. Panc-1 cells expressing PAUF (Panc-PAUF) showed relative resistance to parvovirus H-1 infection compared with Panc-1 cells expressing an empty vector (Panc-Vec). Of interest, expression of type I IFN-α receptor (IFNAR) was higher in Panc-PAUF cells than in Panc-Vec cells. Increased expression of IFNAR in turn increased the activation of Stat1 and Tyk2 in Panc-PAUF cells compared with that in Panc-Vec cells. Suppression of Tyk2 and Stat1, which are important downstream molecules for IFN-α signaling, sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. Further, constitutive suppression of PAUF sensitized Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1 infection. Taken together, these results suggested that PAUF conferred resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNAR-mediated signaling.

  11. Oncolytic virotherapy with an armed vaccinia virus in an orthotopic model of renal carcinoma is associated with modification of the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Fend, Laetitia; Remy-Ziller, Christelle; Foloppe, Johann; Kempf, Juliette; Cochin, Sandrine; Barraud, Luc; Accart, Nathalie; Erbs, Philippe; Fournel, Sylvie; Préville, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oncolytic virotherapy is an emergent promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. We have constructed a vaccinia virus (WR strain) deleted for thymidine kinase (TK) and ribonucleotide reductase (RR) genes that expressed the fusion suicide gene FCU1 derived from the yeast cytosine deaminase and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase genes. We evaluated this construct (VV-FCU1) in the orthotopic model of renal carcinoma (RenCa). Systemic administration of VV-FCU1 resulted in orthotopic tumor growth inhibition, despite temporary expression of viral proteins. VV-FCU1 treatment was associated with an infiltration of tumors by CD8+ T lymphocytes and a decrease in the proportion of infiltrating Tregs, thus modifying the ratio of CD8+/CD4+ Treg in favor of CD8+cytotoxic T cells. We demonstrated that VV-FCU1 treatment prolonged survival of animals implanted with RenCa cells in kidney. Depletion of CD8+ T cells abolished the therapeutic effect of VV-FCU1 while depletion of CD4+ T cells enhanced its protective activity. Administration of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) resulted in a sustained control of tumor growth but did not extend survival. This study shows the importance of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccinia virus-mediated oncolytic virotherapy and suggests that this approach may be evaluated for the treatment of human renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27057460

  12. Newly recruited CD11b+, GR-1+, Ly6C(high) myeloid cells augment tumor-associated immunosuppression immediately following the therapeutic administration of oncolytic reovirus.

    PubMed

    Clements, Derek R; Sterea, Andra M; Kim, Youra; Helson, Erin; Dean, Cheryl A; Nunokawa, Anna; Coyle, Krysta Mila; Sharif, Tanveer; Marcato, Paola; Gujar, Shashi A; Lee, Patrick W K

    2015-05-01

    Tumor-associated immunosuppression aids cancer cells to escape immune-mediated attack and subsequent elimination. Recently, however, many oncolytic viruses, including reovirus, have been reported to overturn such immunosuppression and promote the development of a clinically desired antitumor immunity, which is known to promote favorable patient outcomes. Contrary to this existing paradigm, in this article we demonstrate that reovirus augments tumor-associated immunosuppression immediately following its therapeutic administration. Our data show that reovirus induces preferential differentiation of highly suppressive CD11b(+), Gr-1(+), Ly6C(high) myeloid cells from bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells. Furthermore, reovirus administration in tumor-bearing hosts drives time-dependent recruitment of CD11b(+), Gr-1(+), Ly6C(high) myeloid cells in the tumor milieu, which is further supported by virus-induced increased expression of numerous immune factors involved in myeloid-derived suppressor cell survival and trafficking. Most importantly, CD11b(+), Gr-1(+), Ly6C(high) myeloid cells specifically potentiate the suppression of T cell proliferation and are associated with the absence of IFN-γ response in the tumor microenvironment early during oncotherapy. Considering that the qualitative traits of a specific antitumor immunity are largely dictated by the immunological events that precede its development, our findings are of critical importance and must be considered while devising complementary interventions aimed at promoting the optimum efficacy of oncolytic virus-based anticancer immunotherapies. PMID:25825443

  13. The effectiveness of the oncolytic activity induced by Ad5/F35 adenoviral vector is dependent on the cumulative cellular conditions of survival and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Y; Kang, Sujin; Song, Jae J; Kim, Joo-Hang

    2013-04-01

    To overcome the poor tumor transduction efficiency of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) observed in several types of cancer, the fiber region of Ad5, apart from its tail, was replaced by adenovirus serotype 35 (Ad35). The chimeric Ad5/F35 adenoviral vector did not exhibit any significant enhancement of transduction efficiency. CD46, a receptor for Ad35, was expressed in relatively small amounts in most of the cancer cells examined. Therefore, we investigated the pivotal factor(s) that render cancer cells susceptible to transduction. We discovered that the tumor transduction efficiency of Ad5/F35 was enhanced in the presence of rapamycin, an autophagy inducer, in some cancer cells. Analysis of survival potential and cell proliferation rates revealed that Ad5/F35 exerted a more pronounced oncolytic effect in cancer cells with higher survival potential in the presence of rapamycin.

  14. An oncolytic adenovirus enhances antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects of a replication-deficient adenovirus encoding endostatin by rescuing its selective replication in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ran-yi; Zhou, Ling; Zhang, Yan-ling; Huang, Bi-jun; Ke, Miao-la; Chen, Jie-min; Li, Li-xia; Fu, Xiang; Wu, Jiang-xue; Huang, Wenlin

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •H101 promotes endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication. •H101 rescued Ad-Endo replication by supplying E1A and E1B19k proteins. •Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 in NPC cells. •Ad-Endo and oncolytic Ad H101 have synergistic antitumor effects on NPC. -- Abstract: A replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) encoding secreted human endostatin (Ad-Endo) has been demonstrated to have promising antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects. The E1B55k-deleted Ad H101 can selectively lyse cancer cells. In this study, we explored the antitumor effects and cross-interactions of Ad-Endo and H101 on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The results showed that H101 dramatically promoted endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication in NPC cells, and the expressed endostatin proteins significantly inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. E1A and E1B19k products are required for the rescuing of H101 to Ad-Endo replication in CNE-1 and CNE-2 cells, but not in C666-1 cells. On the other hand, Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 by enhancing Ad replication in NPC cells. The combination of H101 and Ad-Endo significantly inhibited CNE-2 xenografts growth through the increased endostatin expression and Ad replication. These findings indicate that the combination of Ad-Endo gene therapy and oncolytic Ad therapeutics could be promising in comprehensive treatment of NPC.

  15. Characterization of a full-length infectious cDNA clone and a GFP reporter derivative of the oncolytic picornavirus SVV-001.

    PubMed

    Poirier, John T; Reddy, P Seshidhar; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Li, Shawn S; Stump, Kristine L; Burroughs, Kevin D; Hallenbeck, Paul L; Rudin, Charles M

    2012-12-01

    Seneca Valley virus (SVV-001) is an oncolytic picornavirus with selective tropism for a subset of human cancers with neuroendocrine differentiation. To characterize further the specificity of SVV-001 and its patterns and kinetics of intratumoral spread, bacterial plasmids encoding a cDNA clone of the full-length wild-type virus and a derivative virus expressing GFP were generated. The full-length cDNA of the SVV-001 RNA genome was cloned into a bacterial plasmid under the control of the T7 core promoter sequence to create an infectious cDNA clone, pNTX-09. A GFP reporter virus cDNA clone, pNTX-11, was then generated by cloning a fusion protein of GFP and the 2A protein from foot-and-mouth disease virus immediately following the native SVV-001 2A sequence. Recombinant GFP-expressing reporter virus, SVV-GFP, was rescued from cells transfected with in vitro RNA transcripts from pNTX-11 and propagated in cell culture. The proliferation kinetics of SVV-001 and SVV-GFP were indistinguishable. The SVV-GFP reporter virus was used to determine that a subpopulation of permissive cells is present in small-cell lung cancer cell lines previously thought to lack permissivity to SVV-001. Finally, it was shown that SVV-GFP administered to tumour-bearing animals homes in to and infects tumours whilst having no detectable tropism for normal mouse tissues at 1×10(11) viral particles kg(-1), a dose equivalent to that administered in ongoing clinical trials. These infectious clones will be of substantial value in further characterizing the biology of this virus and as a backbone for the generation of additional oncolytic derivatives. PMID:22971818

  16. Oncolytic Adenoviral Mutants with E1B19K Gene Deletions Enhance Gemcitabine-induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells and Anti-Tumor Efficacy In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Stephan; Sweeney, Katrina; Öberg, Daniel; Davies, Derek; Miranda, Enrique; Lemoine, Nick R.; Halldén, Gunnel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a rapidly progressive malignancy that is highly resistant to current chemotherapeutic modalities and almost uniformly fatal.We show that a novel targeting strategy combining oncolytic adenoviral mutants with the standard cytotoxic treatment, gemcitabine, can markedly improve the anticancer potency. Experimental Design Adenoviral mutants with the E1B19K gene deleted with and without E3B gene expression (AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, respectively) were assessed for synergistic interactions in combination with gemcitabine. Cell viability, mechanism of cell death, and antitumor efficacy in vivo were determined in the pancreatic carcinoma cells PT45 and Suit2, normal human bronchial epithelial cells, and in PT45 xenografts. Results The ΔE1B19K-deleted mutants synergized with gemcitabine to selectively kill cultured pancreatic cancer cells and xenografts in vivo with no effect in normal cells. The corresponding wild-type virus (Ad5) stimulated drug-induced cell killing to a lesser degree. Gemcitabine blocked replication of all viruses despite the enhanced cell killing activity due to gemcitabine-induced delay in G1/S-cell cycle progression, with repression of cyclin E and cdc25A, which was not abrogated by viral E1A-expression. Synergistic cell death occurred through enhancement of gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in the presence of both AdΔE1B19K and dl337 mutants, shown by increased cell membrane fragmentation, caspase-3 activation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusions Our data suggest that oncolytic mutants lacking the antiapoptotic E1B19K gene can improve efficacy of DNA-damaging drugs such as gemcitabine through convergence on cellular apoptosis pathways.These findings imply that less toxic doses than currently practicedin the clinic could efficiently target pancreatic adenocarcinomas when combined with adenoviral mutants. PMID:19223497

  17. The combined effects of oncolytic reovirus plus Newcastle disease virus and reovirus plus parvovirus on U87 and U373 cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Alkassar, Muhannad; Gärtner, Barbara; Roemer, Klaus; Graesser, Friedrich; Rommelaere, Jean; Kaestner, Lars; Haeckel, Isabelle; Graf, Norbert

    2011-09-01

    Previous results had documented oncolytic capacity of reovirus, parvovirus and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) on several tumor cell types. To test whether combinations of these viruses may increase this capacity, human U87- and U373-glioblastoma cells, in vitro or xenografted into immuno-compromised mice, were subjected to simultaneous double infections and analyzed. Our results show that reovirus (serotype-3) plus NDV (Hitcher-B1) and reovirus plus parvovirus-H1 lead to a significant increase in tumor cell killing in vitro in both cell lines (Kruskal-Wallis test, P < 0.01) and in vivo. Immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analyses demonstrated the simultaneous replication of the viruses in nearly all cells (>95%) after combined infection. These data thus indicate that a synergistic anti-tumor effect can be achieved by the combined infection with oncolytic viruses.

  18. A novel E1B55kDa-deleted oncolytic adenovirus carrying microRNA-143 exerts specific antitumor efficacy on colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qifeng; Basnet, Shiva; Dai, Zhenling; Li, Shuping; Zhang, Zhenyu; Ge, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The KRAS is an important and frequently mutated gene during colorectal carcinogenesis. The expression of miR-143 is often down-regulated and it might play an important role by targeting KRAS in colorectal cancer (CRC). The purpose of this study was to investigate the antitumor effects of miR-143 with an intermediate oncolytic adenovirus (Ad) in CRC. We constructed the recombinant virus Ad-ZD55-miR-143 and verified its expression by qPCR and western blot assays. Oncolytic potency of Ad-ZD55-miR-143 was determined by cytopathic effect assays using human SW480 CRC cells and L-02 normal liver cells. MTT and cell apoptosis assays were applied to explore the biological functions of Ad-ZD55-miR-143 within SW480 cells. Dual-luciferase reporter assays were performed to validate whether KRAS was regulated by miR-143. The expression level of KRAS was measured by qPCR and western blot assays. Results showed that infection of SW480 cells with Ad-ZD55-miR-143 induced high level expression of miR-143. Furthermore, Ad-ZD55-miR-143 significantly suppressed the viability of SW480 cells in a dose-dependent pattern, but did not influence L-02 cells. Ad-ZD55-miR-143 also inhibited cell growth and induced cell apoptosis in SW480 cells. Dual-luciferase assays indicated that KRAS was a direct target of miR-143, as subsequently demonstrated by qPCR and western blot analysis showing that infection of SW480 cells with Ad-ZD55-miR-143 resulted in the down-regulation of KRAS at both mRNA and protein levels. Taken together, the recombinant virus Ad-ZD55-miR-143 exhibited specific antitumor effects by targeting KRAS, and might be a promising agent for the treatment of CRC. PMID:27725862

  19. Combined expression of miR-34a and Smac mediated by oncolytic vaccinia virus synergistically promote anti-tumor effects in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lei, Wen; Wang, Shibing; Yang, Chunmei; Huang, Xianbo; Chen, Zhenzhen; He, Wei; Shen, Jianping; Liu, Xinyuan; Qian, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Despite great progress made in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), it is still incurable. Promising phase II clinical results have been reported recently for oncolytic vaccinia virus (OVV) clinic therapeutics. One reason for this has focused on the critical therapeutic importance of the immune response raised by these viruses. However, few studies have performed their applications as an optimal delivery system for therapeutic gene, especially miRNA in MM. In this study, we constructed two novel OVVs (TK deletion) that express anti-tumor genes, miR-34a and Smac, respectively, in MM cell lines and xenograft model. The results demonstrated that the novel OVV can effectively infect MM cell lines, and forcefully enhance the exogenous gene (miR-34a or Smac) expression. Furthermore, utilization of VV-miR-34a combined with VV-Smac synergistically inhibited tumor growth and induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. The underlying mechanism is proposed that blocking of Bcl-2 by VV-miR-34a increases the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and then synergistically amplifies the antitumor effects of Smac-induced cell apoptosis. Our study is the first to utilize OVV as the vector for miR-34a or Smac expression to treat MM, and lays the groundwork for future clinical therapy for MM. PMID:27552933

  20. Combined expression of miR-34a and Smac mediated by oncolytic vaccinia virus synergistically promote anti-tumor effects in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Wen; Wang, Shibing; Yang, Chunmei; Huang, Xianbo; Chen, Zhenzhen; He, Wei; Shen, Jianping; Liu, Xinyuan; Qian, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Despite great progress made in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), it is still incurable. Promising phase II clinical results have been reported recently for oncolytic vaccinia virus (OVV) clinic therapeutics. One reason for this has focused on the critical therapeutic importance of the immune response raised by these viruses. However, few studies have performed their applications as an optimal delivery system for therapeutic gene, especially miRNA in MM. In this study, we constructed two novel OVVs (TK deletion) that express anti-tumor genes, miR-34a and Smac, respectively, in MM cell lines and xenograft model. The results demonstrated that the novel OVV can effectively infect MM cell lines, and forcefully enhance the exogenous gene (miR-34a or Smac) expression. Furthermore, utilization of VV-miR-34a combined with VV-Smac synergistically inhibited tumor growth and induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. The underlying mechanism is proposed that blocking of Bcl-2 by VV-miR-34a increases the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and then synergistically amplifies the antitumor effects of Smac-induced cell apoptosis. Our study is the first to utilize OVV as the vector for miR-34a or Smac expression to treat MM, and lays the groundwork for future clinical therapy for MM. PMID:27552933

  1. An Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus Expressing the Human Sodium Iodine Symporter Prolongs Survival and Facilitates SPECT/CT Imaging in an Orthotopic Model of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Belin, Laurence J.; Ady, Justin W.; Lewis, Christina; Marano, Drew; Gholami, Sepideh; Mojica, Kelly; Eveno, Clarisse; Longo, Valerie; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Chen, Nanhai G.; Szalay, Aladar A.; Fong, Yuman

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this original work is to examine the ability of an oncolytic vaccinia virus expressing the human sodium iodine transporter (hNIS) to provide real time monitoring of viral therapy and effective treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Methods Infectivity and cytotoxic effect of GLV-1h153 on mesothelioma cell lines of all histologic subtypes was assayed in vitro. Viral replication was examined by standard viral plaque assay. Orthotopic MPM xenografts were generated in athymic nude mice and treated with intrapleural GLV-1h153 and assessed for effect on tumor burden and survival. Orthotopic tumors were also imaged on SPECT/CT after 131I administration. Results GLV-1h153 infected and killed all cell lines in a time and concentration dependent manner. Viral replication demonstrated over a 2.5 log increase in titer over 4 days. Intrapleural treatment of orthotopic MPM xenografts resulted in a significant reduction in tumor burden one week after treatment and an improvement in survival. Infection of orthotopic xenografts was both therapeutic and facilitated monitoring by 131I-SPECT/CT via expression of hNIS in infected tissue. Conclusions Our results suggest GLV-1h153 is a promising therapeutic agent for MPM and warrants further investigation. PMID:23890748

  2. Synergistic suppression effect on tumor growth of ovarian cancer by combining cisplatin with a manganese superoxide dismutase-armed oncolytic adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shibing; Shu, Jing; Chen, Li; Chen, Xiaopan; Zhao, Jianhong; Li, Shuangshuang; Mou, Xiaozhou; Tong, Xiangmin

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy on the basis of oncolytic adenovirus is a novel approach for human cancer therapeutics. We aim to investigate whether it will synergistically reinforce their antiovarian cancer activities when the combined use of ZD55-manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and cisplatin was performed. The experiments in vitro showed that ZD55-MnSOD enhances cisplatin-induced apoptosis and causes remarkable ovarian cancer cell death. Apoptosis induction by treatment with ZD55-MnSOD and/or cisplatin was detected in SKOV-3 by apoptotic cell staining, flow cytometry, and western blot analysis. In addition, the cytotoxicity caused by ZD55-MnSOD to normal cells was examined by the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide assay and western blot analysis. Animal experiment further confirmed that combination of ZD55-MnSOD and cisplatin achieved significant inhibition of SKOV-3 ovarian tumor xenografted growth. In summary, we have demonstrated that ZD55-MnSOD can sensitize human ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin-induced cell death and apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. These findings indicate that the combined treatment with ZD55-MnSOD and cisplatin could represent a rational approach for antiovarian cancer therapy. PMID:27799786

  3. Toxicology and Biodistribution Studies for MGH2.1, an Oncolytic Virus that Expresses Two Prodrug-activating Genes, in Combination with Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Kazue; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Liu, Fang; Kerr, Samantha; Wang, Jiang; Phelps, Mitch; Potter, Philip M; Goins, William B; Fernandez, Soledad A; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2013-01-01

    MGH2.1 is a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) oncolytic virus that expresses two prodrug-activating transgenes: the cyclophosphamide (CPA)-activating cytochrome P4502B1 (CYP2B1) and the CPT11-activating secreted human intestinal carboxylesterase (shiCE). Toxicology and biodistribution of MGH2.1 in the presence/absence of prodrugs was evaluated in mice. MGH2.1 ± prodrugs was cytotoxic to human glioma cells, but not to normal cells. Pharmacokinetically, intracranial MGH2.1 did not significantly alter the metabolism of intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered prodrugs in mouse plasma, brain, or liver. MGH2.1 did not induce an acute inflammatory reaction. MGH2.1 DNA was detected in brains of mice inoculated with 108 pfus for up to 60 days. However, only one animal showed evidence of viral gene expression at this time. Expression of virally encoded genes was restricted to brain. Intracranial inoculation of MGH2.1 did not induce lethality at 108 pfus in the absence of prodrugs and at 106 pfus in the presence of prodrugs. This study provides safety and toxicology data justifying a possible clinical trial of intratumoral injection of MGH2.1 with peripheral administration of CPA and/or CPT11 prodrugs in humans with malignant gliomas. PMID:23922029

  4. Influence of carrier cells on the clinical outcome of children with neuroblastoma treated with high dose of oncolytic adenovirus delivered in mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Melen, Gustavo J; Franco-Luzón, Lidia; Ruano, David; González-Murillo, África; Alfranca, Arantzazu; Casco, Fernando; Lassaletta, Álvaro; Alonso, Mercedes; Madero, Luís; Alemany, Ramón; García-Castro, Javier; Ramírez, Manuel

    2016-02-28

    We report here our clinical experience of a program of compassionate use of Celyvir--autologous marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) carrying an oncolytic adenovirus--for treating children with advanced metastatic neuroblastoma. Children received weekly doses of Celyvir with no concomitant treatments. The tolerance was excellent, with very mild and self-limited viral-related symptoms. Patients could be distinguished based on their response to therapy: those who had a clinical response (either complete, partial or stabilization) and those who did not respond. We found differences between patients who responded versus those who did not when analyzing their respective MSCs, at the expression levels of adhesion molecules (CCR1, CXCR1 and CXCR4) and in migration capacities in transwell assays, and in immune-related molecules (IFNγ, HLA-DR). These results suggest interpatient differences in the homing and immune modulation capacities of the therapy administered. In addition, the pretherapy immune T cell status and the T effector response were markedly different between responders and non-responders. We conclude that multidoses of Celyvir have an excellent safety profile in children with metastatic neuroblastoma. Intrinsic patients' and MSCs' factors appear to be related to clinical outcome.

  5. An HSV-2 based oncolytic virus can function as an attractant to guide migration of adoptively transferred T cells to tumor sites

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Lihua; Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy has shown promises for cancer treatment. However, for treating solid tumors, there is a need for improving the ability of the adoptively transferred T cells to home to tumor sites. We explored the possibility of using an oncolytic virus derived from HSV-2, which can actively pull T effector cells to the site of infection, as a local attractant for migration of adoptively transferred T cells. Our data show that intratumoral administration of this virus can indeed attract active migration of the adoptively transferred T cells to the treated tumor. Moreover, once attracted to the tumor site by the virus, T cells persisted in there significantly longer than in mock-treated tumor. Chemokine profiling identified significant elevation of CXCL9 and CXCL10, as well as several other chemokines belonging to the inflammatory chemokine family in the virus-treated tumors. These chemokines initially guided the T-cell migration to and then maintained their persistence in the tumor site, leading to a significantly enhanced therapeutic effect. Our data suggests that this virotherapy may be combined with adoptive T-cell therapy to potentiate its therapeutic effect against solid tumors that are otherwise difficult to manage with the treatment alone. PMID:25460506

  6. Adapted ECHO-7 virus Rigvir immunotherapy (oncolytic virotherapy) prolongs survival in melanoma patients after surgical excision of the tumour in a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Doniņa, Simona; Strēle, Ieva; Proboka, Guna; Auziņš, Jurgis; Alberts, Pēteris; Jonsson, Björn; Venskus, Dite; Muceniece, Aina

    2015-10-01

    An oncolytic, nonpathogenic ECHO-7 virus adapted for melanoma that has not been genetically modified (Rigvir) is approved and registered for virotherapy, an active and specific immunotherapy, in Latvia since 2004. The present retrospective study was carried out to determine the effectiveness of Rigvir in substage IB, IIA, IIB and IIC melanoma patients on time to progression and overall survival. White patients (N=79) who had undergone surgical excision of the primary melanoma tumour were included in this study. All patients were free from disease after surgery and classified into substages IB, IIA, IIB and IIC. Circulating levels of clinical chemistry parameters were recorded. Survival was analysed by Cox regression. Rigvir significantly (P<0.05) prolonged survival in substage IB-IIC melanoma patients following surgery compared with patients who were under observation (according to current guidelines). The hazard ratio for patients under observation versus treated with Rigvir was statistically significantly different: hazard ratio 6.27 for all, 4.39 for substage IIA-IIB-IIC and 6.57 for substage IIB-IIC patients. The follow-up period was not statistically different between both treatment groups. These results indicate that the patients treated with Rigvir had a 4.39-6.57-fold lower mortality than those under observation. In this study, there was no untoward side effect or discontinuation of Rigvir treatment. Safety assessment of adverse events graded according to NCI CTCAE did not show any value above grade 2 in Rigvir-treated patients. In conclusion, Rigvir significantly prolongs survival in early-stage melanoma patients without any side effect.

  7. Prospective Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Cytotoxic Gene Therapy in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, Svend O.; Stricker, Hans; Lu, Mei; Elshaikh, Mohamed; Aref, Ibrahim; Pradhan, Deepak; Levin, Kenneth; Kim, Jae Ho; Peabody, James; Siddiqui, Farzan; Barton, Kenneth; Pegg, Jan; Zhang, Yingshu; Cheng, Jingfang; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bourgeois, Renee; Gupta, Nilesh; Lane, Zhaoli; Rodriguez, Ron; DeWeese, Theodore; and others

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive either OAMCGT plus IMRT (arm 1; n=21) or IMRT only (arm 2; n=23). The primary phase 2 endpoint was acute (≤90 days) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included quality of life (QOL), prostate biopsy (12-core) positivity at 2 years, freedom from biochemical/clinical failure (FFF), freedom from metastases, and survival. Results: Men in arm 1 exhibited a greater incidence of low-grade influenza-like symptoms, transaminitis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia than men in arm 2. There were no significant differences in gastrointestinal or genitourinary events or QOL between the 2 arms. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from 37 men (84%). Thirty-three percent of men in arm 1 were biopsy-positive versus 58% in arm 2, representing a 42% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm (P=.13). There was a 60% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm in men with <50% positive biopsy cores at baseline (P=.07). To date, 1 patient in each arm exhibited biochemical failure (arm 1, 4.8%; arm 2, 4.3%). No patient developed hormone-refractory or metastatic disease, and none has died from prostate cancer. Conclusions: Combining OAMCGT with IMRT does not exacerbate the most common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and suggests a clinically meaningful reduction in positive biopsy results at 2 years in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

  8. The oncolytic virus dl922-947 reduces IL-8/CXCL8 and MCP-1/CCL2 expression and impairs angiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vastolo, Viviana; Di Somma, Sarah; Scamardella, Eloise; Gigantino, Vincenzo; Franco, Renato; Marone, Gianni; Portella, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human solid tumor and current treatments are ineffective in increasing patients' survival. Thus, the development of new therapeutic approaches for ATC is needed. We have previously shown that the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 induces ATC cell death in vitro and tumor regression in vivo. However, the impact of dl922-947 on the pro-tumorigenic ATC microenvironment is still unknown. Since viruses are able to regulate cytokine and chemokine production from infected cells, we sought to investigate whether dl922-947 virotherapy has such effect on ATC cells, thereby modulating ATC microenvironment. dl922-947 decreased IL-8/CXCL8 and MCP-1/CCL2 production by the ATC cell lines 8505-c and BHT101-5. These results correlated with dl922-947-mediated reduction of NF-κB p65 binding to IL8 promoter in 8505-c and BHT101-5 cells and CCL2 promoter in 8505-c cells. IL-8 stimulates cancer cell proliferation, survival and invasion, and also angiogenesis. dl922-947-mediated reduction of IL-8 impaired ATC cell motility in vitro and ATC-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We also show that dl922-947-mediated reduction of the monocyte-attracting chemokine CCL2 decreased monocyte chemotaxis in vitro and tumor macrophage density in vivo. Interestingly, dl922-947 treatment induced the switch of tumor macrophages toward a pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype, likely by increasing the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ. Altogether, we demonstrate that dl922-947 treatment re-shape the pro-tumorigenic ATC microenvironment by modulating cancer-cell intrinsic factors and the immune response. An in-depth knowledge of dl922-947-mediated effects on ATC microenvironment may help to refine ATC virotherapy in the context of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26625205

  9. Safety Studies in Tumor and Non-Tumor-Bearing Mice in Support of Clinical Trials Using Oncolytic VSV-IFNβ-NIS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianwen; Steele, Michael B; Jenks, Nathan; Grell, Jacquelyn; Suksanpaisan, Lukkana; Naik, Shruthi; Federspiel, Mark J; Lacy, Martha Q; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2016-09-01

    Oncolytic VSV-IFNβ-NIS is selectively destructive to tumors. Here, we present the IND enabling preclinical rodent studies in support of clinical testing of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a systemic therapy. Efficacy studies showed dose-dependent tumor regression in C57BL/KaLwRij mice bearing syngeneic 5TGM1 plasmacytomas after systemic VSV administration. In contrast, the virus was effective at all doses tested against human KAS6/1 xenografts in SCID mice. Intravenous administration of VSV-mIFNβ-NIS is well tolerated in C57BL/6 mice up to 5 × 10(10) TCID50 (50% tissue culture infective dose)/kg with no neurovirulence, no cytokine storm, and no abnormalities in tissues. Dose-limiting toxicities included elevated transaminases, thrombocytopenia, and lymphopenia. Inactivated viral particles did not cause hepatic toxicity. Intravenously administered VSV was preferentially sequestered by macrophages in the spleen and liver. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis for total viral RNA on days 2, 7, 21, and 58 showed highest VSV RNA in day 2 samples; highest in spleen, liver, lung, lymph node, kidney, gonad, and bone marrow. No infectious virus was recovered from tissues at any time point. The no observable adverse event level and maximum tolerated dose of VSV-mIFNβ-NIS in C57BL/6 mice are 10(10) TCID50/kg and 5 × 10(10) TCID50/kg, respectively. Clinical translation of VSV-IFNβ-NIS is underway in companion dogs with cancer and in human patients with relapsed hematological malignancies and endometrial cancer. PMID:27532609

  10. Preclinical pharmacology and toxicology study of Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin, a novel dual cancer-specific oncolytic adenovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Yanxin; Guo, Huanhuan; Hu, Ningning; He, Dongyun; Zhang, Shi; Chu, Yunjie; Huang, Yubin; Li, Xiao; Sun, LiLi; Jin, Ningyi

    2014-10-15

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that conditionally replicating adenovirus is safe. We constructed an oncolytic adenovirus, Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin, using a cancer-specific promoter (human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter, hTERTp) and a cancer cell-selective apoptosis-inducing gene (Apoptin). Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin was proven effective both in vitro and in vivo in our previous study. In this study, the preclinical safety profiles of Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin in animal models were investigated. At doses of 5.0 × 10{sup 8}, 2.5 × 10{sup 9}, and 1.25 × 10{sup 10} viral particles (VP)/kg, Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin had no adverse effects on mouse behavior, muscle cooperation, sedative effect, digestive system, and nervous systems, or on beagle cardiovascular and respiratory systems at 5.0 × 10{sup 8}, 2.5 × 10{sup 9}, and 1.25 × 10{sup 10} VP/kg doses. In acute toxicity tests in mice, the maximum tolerated dose > 5 × 10{sup 10} VP/kg. There was no inflammation or ulceration at the injection sites within two weeks. In repeat-dose toxicological studies, the no observable adverse effect levels of Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin in rats (1.25 × 10{sup 10} VP/kg) and beagles (2.5 × 10{sup 9} VP/kg) were 62.5- and 12.5-fold of the proposed clinical dose, respectively. The anti-virus antibody was produced in animal sera. Bone marrow examination revealed no histopathological changes. Guinea pigs sensitized by three repeated intraperitoneal injections of 1.35 × 10{sup 10} VP/mL Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin each and challenged by one intravenous injection of 1.67 × 10{sup 8} VP/kg Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin did not exhibit any sign of systemic anaphylaxis. Our data from different animal models suggest that Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin is a safe anti-tumor therapeutic agent. - Highlights: • We use the rodents and non-rodents animal models to evaluation Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin. • Ad-hTERT-E1a-Apoptin is a safe anti-tumor therapeutic agent. • Demonstrate the safety and feasibility dose of injected Ad

  11. In situ expression of soluble B7-1 in the context of oncolytic herpes simplex virus induces potent antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Todo, T; Martuza, R L; Dallman, M J; Rabkin, S D

    2001-01-01

    In vivo delivery of immunomodulatory genes is a promising strategy for solid tumor vaccination. A drawback is that it necessitates induction of a large effect from transgene expression in a small percentage of tumor cells. Although the B7 family is known to be the most potent of the costimulatory molecules, gene transduction of B7 alone has not been effective in inducing antitumor immunity in nonimmunogenic tumors by ex vivo methods, much less in vivo. We have developed a novel approach where a gene encoding soluble B7-1, a fusion protein of the extracellular domain of murine B7-1 and the Fc portion of human IgG1, is delivered to tumor cells in vivo in the context of an oncolytic replication-competent herpes simplex virus, and the gene product is secreted by tumor cells rather than expressed on the cell surface. Defective herpes simplex virus vectors containing the B7-1-immunoglobulin (B7-1-Ig) fusion transgene (dvB7Ig) were generated using G207 as a helper virus and tested in the poorly immunogenic murine neuroblastoma, Neuro2a, in syngeneic A/J mice. Intraneoplastic inoculation of dvB7Ig/G207 at a low titer successfully inhibited the growth of established s.c. tumors, despite the expression of B7-1-Ig being detected in only 1% or fewer of tumor cells at the inoculation site, and prolonged the survival of mice bearing intracerebral tumors. Immunohistochemistry of dvB7Ig/G207-inoculated tumors revealed a significant increase in CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell infiltration compared with control tumors inoculated with defective vector expressing alkaline phosphatase (dvAP/G207). The antitumor effect of dvB7Ig/G207 was not manifested in athymic mice. In vivo depletion of immune cell subsets in A/J mice further revealed that CD8+ T cells, but not CD4+ T cells, were required. Animals cured of their tumors by dvB7Ig/G207 treatment were protected against rechallenge with a lethal dose of Neuro2a cells but not SaI/N cells. The results demonstrate that the use of soluble B7-1 for

  12. The HDAC Inhibitors Scriptaid and LBH589 Combined with the Oncolytic Virus Delta24-RGD Exert Enhanced Anti-Tumor Efficacy in Patient-Derived Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Berghauser Pont, Lotte M.E.; Kleijn, Anne; Kloezeman, Jenneke J.; van den Bossche, Wouter; Kaufmann, Johanna K.; de Vrij, Jeroen; Leenstra, Sieger; Dirven, Clemens M.F.; Lamfers, Martine L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background A phase I/II trial for glioblastoma with the oncolytic adenovirus Delta24-RGD was recently completed. Delta24-RGD conditionally replicates in cells with a disrupted retinoblastoma-pathway and enters cells via αvβ3/5 integrins. Glioblastomas are differentially sensitive to Delta24-RGD. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) affect integrins and share common cell death pathways with Delta24-RGD. We studied the combination treatment effects of HDACi and Delta24-RGD in patient-derived glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSC), and we determined the most effective HDACi. Methods SAHA, Valproic Acid, Scriptaid, MS275 and LBH589 were combined with Delta24-RGD in fourteen distinct GSCs. Synergy was determined by Chou Talalay method. Viral infection and replication were assessed using luciferase and GFP encoding vectors and hexon-titration assays. Coxsackie adenovirus receptor and αvβ3 integrin levels were determined by flow cytometry. Oncolysis and mechanisms of cell death were studied by viability, caspase-3/7, LDH and LC3B/p62, phospho-p70S6K. Toxicity was studied on normal human astrocytes. MGMT promotor methylation status, TCGA classification, Rb-pathway and integrin gene expression levels were assessed as markers of responsiveness. Results Scriptaid and LBH589 acted synergistically with Delta24-RGD in approximately 50% of the GSCs. Both drugs moderately increased αvβ3 integrin levels and viral infection in responding but not in non-responding GSCs. LBH589 moderately increased late viral gene expression, however, virus titration revealed diminished viral progeny production by both HDACi, Scriptaid augmented caspase-3/7 activity, LC3B conversion, p62 and phospho-p70S6K consumption, as well as LDH levels. LBH589 increased LDH and phospho-p70S6K consumption. Responsiveness correlated with expression of various Rb-pathway genes and integrins. Combination treatments induced limited toxicity to human astrocytes. Conclusion LBH589 and Scriptaid combined with Delta24-RGD revealed

  13. Oncolytic adenovirus co-expressing IL-12 and IL-18 improves tumor-specific immunity via differentiation of T cells expressing IL-12Rβ2 or IL-18Rα.

    PubMed

    Choi, I-K; Lee, J-S; Zhang, S-N; Park, J; Sonn, C H; Lee, K-M; Yun, C-O

    2011-09-01

    The oncolytic adenovirus (Ad) is currently being advanced as a promising antitumor remedy as it selectively replicates in tumor cells and can transfer and amplify therapeutic genes. Interleukin (IL)-12 induces a potent antitumor effect by promoting natural killer (NK) cell and cytotoxic T cell activities. IL-18 also augments cytotoxicity of NK cells and proliferation of T cells. This effect further enhances the function of IL-12 in a synergistic manner. Therefore, we investigated for the first time an effective cancer immunogene therapy of syngeneic tumors via intratumoral administration of oncolytic Ad co-expressing IL-12 and IL-18, RdB/IL-12/IL-18. Intratumoral administration of RdB/IL-12/IL-18 improved antitumor effects, as well as increased survival, in B16-F10 murine melanoma model. The ratio of T-helper type 1/2 cytokine as well as the levels of IL-12, IL-18, interferon-γ and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was markedly elevated in RdB/IL-12/IL-18-treated tumors. Mice injected with RdB/IL-12/IL-18 also showed enhanced cytotoxicity of tumor-specific immune cells. Consistent with these results, immense necrosis and infiltration of NK cells, as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, were observed in RdB/IL-12/IL-18-treated tumor tissues. Importantly, tumors treated with RdB/IL-12/IL-18 showed an elevated number of T cells expressing IL-12Rβ2 or IL-18Rα. These results provide a new insight into therapeutic mechanisms of IL-12 plus IL-18 and provide a potential clinical cancer immunotherapeutic agent for improved antitumor immunity.

  14. Studies on poxvirus infection in cats.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M; Gaskell, R M; Gaskell, C J; Baxby, D; Kelly, D F

    1989-01-01

    The development of clinical disease and the pathogenesis of cowpox were studied in domestic cats inoculated by a variety of routes. Intradermal titration in two cats demonstrated that as little as five pfu of cowpox virus caused a primary skin lesion. Intradermal inoculation of greater than or equal to 10(5) pfu cowpox virus resulted in severe systemic disease. Large amounts of virus (greater than or equal to 10(3) pfu/g) were isolated from skin lesions and the turbinates of cats killed at eight and 11 days post-inoculation (dpi). Lesser amounts of virus (congruent to 10(2) pfu/g) were isolated from lymphoid tissues and the lung, and small amounts of virus were isolated from various other tissues. A white cell-associated viraemia was detected from 5 dpi onwards. Skin scarification with 10(3) or 50 pfu cowpox virus enabled reproduction of the naturally-acquired disease. Cat-to-cat transmission was demonstrated from cats inoculated by skin scarification, but caused only subclinical infection in sentinel cats. Oronasal inoculation resulted in transient coryza and milder generalized disease than skin inoculation, and no transmission to sentinel cats. Preliminary investigations showed vaccinia virus (Lister strain) to be of low infectivity in cats while inoculation of ectromelia virus (Mill Hill strain) did not cause any clinical signs.

  15. Recent Patents in Oncolytic Virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tauqeer; Venkataraman, Srividhya; AbouHaidar, Mounir; Hefferon, Kathleen L

    2016-01-01

    Recent innovative and advanced developments in the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases as well as enhanced in-depth understanding of virus molecular biology have opened novel avenues with respect to the patent landscape. Included are viruses utilized in the development of anticancer agents, agents that are employed against the spread of infectious viral diseases, RNA silencing agents and virus-derived expression vectors that can be used for over-expression of therapeutic proteins or as gene therapy vehicles. The current review describes several recent patents pertaining to virus sequences and their medical and biotechnological applications.

  16. Production of oncolytic adenovirus and human mesenchymal stem cells in a single-use, Vertical-Wheel bioreactor system: Impact of bioreactor design on performance of microcarrier-based cell culture processes.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Marcos F Q; Silva, Marta M; Giroux, Daniel; Hashimura, Yas; Wesselschmidt, Robin; Lee, Brian; Roldão, António; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M; Serra, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Anchorage-dependent cell cultures are used for the production of viruses, viral vectors, and vaccines, as well as for various cell therapies and tissue engineering applications. Most of these applications currently rely on planar technologies for the generation of biological products. However, as new cell therapy product candidates move from clinical trials towards potential commercialization, planar platforms have proven to be inadequate to meet large-scale manufacturing demand. Therefore, a new scalable platform for culturing anchorage-dependent cells at high cell volumetric concentrations is urgently needed. One promising solution is to grow cells on microcarriers suspended in single-use bioreactors. Toward this goal, a novel bioreactor system utilizing an innovative Vertical-Wheel™ technology was evaluated for its potential to support scalable cell culture process development. Two anchorage-dependent human cell types were used: human lung carcinoma cells (A549 cell line) and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Key hydrodynamic parameters such as power input, mixing time, Kolmogorov length scale, and shear stress were estimated. The performance of Vertical-Wheel bioreactors (PBS-VW) was then evaluated for A549 cell growth and oncolytic adenovirus type 5 production as well as for hMSC expansion. Regarding the first cell model, higher cell growth and number of infectious viruses per cell were achieved when compared with stirred tank (ST) bioreactors. For the hMSC model, although higher percentages of proliferative cells could be reached in the PBS-VW compared with ST bioreactors, no significant differences in the cell volumetric concentration and expansion factor were observed. Noteworthy, the hMSC population generated in the PBS-VW showed a significantly lower percentage of apoptotic cells as well as reduced levels of HLA-DR positive cells. Overall, these results showed that process transfer from ST bioreactor to PBS-VW, and scale-up was

  17. Production of oncolytic adenovirus and human mesenchymal stem cells in a single-use, Vertical-Wheel bioreactor system: Impact of bioreactor design on performance of microcarrier-based cell culture processes.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Marcos F Q; Silva, Marta M; Giroux, Daniel; Hashimura, Yas; Wesselschmidt, Robin; Lee, Brian; Roldão, António; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M; Serra, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Anchorage-dependent cell cultures are used for the production of viruses, viral vectors, and vaccines, as well as for various cell therapies and tissue engineering applications. Most of these applications currently rely on planar technologies for the generation of biological products. However, as new cell therapy product candidates move from clinical trials towards potential commercialization, planar platforms have proven to be inadequate to meet large-scale manufacturing demand. Therefore, a new scalable platform for culturing anchorage-dependent cells at high cell volumetric concentrations is urgently needed. One promising solution is to grow cells on microcarriers suspended in single-use bioreactors. Toward this goal, a novel bioreactor system utilizing an innovative Vertical-Wheel™ technology was evaluated for its potential to support scalable cell culture process development. Two anchorage-dependent human cell types were used: human lung carcinoma cells (A549 cell line) and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Key hydrodynamic parameters such as power input, mixing time, Kolmogorov length scale, and shear stress were estimated. The performance of Vertical-Wheel bioreactors (PBS-VW) was then evaluated for A549 cell growth and oncolytic adenovirus type 5 production as well as for hMSC expansion. Regarding the first cell model, higher cell growth and number of infectious viruses per cell were achieved when compared with stirred tank (ST) bioreactors. For the hMSC model, although higher percentages of proliferative cells could be reached in the PBS-VW compared with ST bioreactors, no significant differences in the cell volumetric concentration and expansion factor were observed. Noteworthy, the hMSC population generated in the PBS-VW showed a significantly lower percentage of apoptotic cells as well as reduced levels of HLA-DR positive cells. Overall, these results showed that process transfer from ST bioreactor to PBS-VW, and scale-up was

  18. Oncolytic reovirus against ovarian and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Kensuke; Nishikawa, Sandra G; Norman, Kara L; Alain, Tommy; Kossakowska, Anna; Lee, Patrick W K

    2002-03-15

    Reovirus selectively replicates in and destroys cancer cells with an activated Ras signaling pathway. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using reovirus (serotype 3, strain Dearing) as an antihuman colon and ovarian cancer agent. In in vitro studies, reovirus infection in human colon and ovarian cell lines was assessed by cytopathic effect as detected by light microscopy, [(35)S]Methionine labeling of infected cells for viral protein synthesis and progeny virus production by plaque assay. We observed that reovirus efficiently infected all five human colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2, DLD-1, HCT-116, HT-29, and SW48) and four human ovarian cancer cell lines (MDAH2774, PA-1, SKOV3, and SW626) which were tested, but not a normal colon cell line (CCD-18Co) or a normal ovarian cell line (NOV-31). We also observed that the Ras activity in the human colon and ovarian cancer cell lines was elevated compared with that in normal colon and ovarian cell lines. In animal models, intraneoplastic as well as i.v. inoculation of reovirus resulted in significant regression of established s.c. human colon and ovarian tumors implanted at the hind flank. Histological studies revealed that reovirus infection in vivo was restricted to tumor cells, whereas the surrounding normal tissue remained uninfected. Additionally, in an i.p. human ovarian cancer xenograft model, inhibition of ascites tumor formation and the survival of animals treated with live reovirus was significantly greater than of control mice treated with UV-inactivated reovirus. Reovirus infection in ex vivo primary human ovarian tumor surgical samples was also confirmed, further demonstrating the potential of reovirus therapy. These results suggest that reovirus holds promise as a novel agent for human colon and ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:11912142

  19. Studies on shope fibroma virus: A tumorigenic poxvirus

    SciTech Connect

    Obom, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of Shope fibroma virus (SFV) to induce oncogenesis in vitro was investigated by inoculating an immortalized rabbit cell line (SIRC) with ultraviolet-irradiated virus. The resulting cell transformants displayed the characteristic properties of the malignant phenotype: lack of infectious particles, low serum requirement, high efficiency of cloning, resistance to superinfection, presence of viral DNA sequences in the nucleus, expression of viral proteins and induction of tumors in rabbits. This transformation was not stable since in all cell lines studied, a loss of the malignant phenotype was recorded close to the 50th passage. To assess the oncogenic potential of SFV, NTH 3T3 cells were transfected with SFV DNA. Focus-derived cell lines were established to study the biological and molecular properties of the transformants. At early passages all cell lines contained SFV DNA sequences and two of three lines tested expressed SFV DNA. To test which region(s) of the genome is (are) necessary for transformation, NIH 3T3 cells were transfected with cloned Bam HI fragments of SFV DNA containing terminal sequences of the molecule, either alone or in combination. Comparative DNA studies of SFV, Indiana virus and vaccinia virus revealed the presence of mitochondria (mt) DNA in purified preparations of viral DNA.

  20. Poxvirus countermeasures during an emergency in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bice, Steve; Yeskey, Kevin

    2015-04-01

    Although smallpox was eradicated worldwide by 1980, national security experts remain concerned that it could be used in a deliberate attack. The United States and other governments have given priority to developing and stockpiling vaccines and antivirals to protect their populations from the potential reintroduction of this deadly disease. Public health officials are also concerned about the spread of related zoonotic orthopoxviruses such as monkeypox and cowpox, against which smallpox vaccine provides protection. This report analyzes how medical countermeasures available in the US Strategic National Stockpile will be given priority and used in the event of an intentional or accidental release of smallpox in the United States. PMID:26060872

  1. Genetically Engineered Poxviruses for Recombinant Gene Expression, Vaccination, and Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Bernard

    1996-10-01

    Vaccinia virus, no longer required for immunization against smallpox, now serves as a unique vector for expressing genes within the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. As a research tool, recombinant vaccinia viruses are used to synthesize and analyze the structure--function relationships of proteins, determine the targets of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and investigate the types of immune response needed for protection against specific infectious diseases and cancer. The vaccine potential of recombinant vaccinia virus has been realized in the form of an effective oral wild-life rabies vaccine, although no product for humans has been licensed. A genetically altered vaccinia virus that is unable to replicate in mammalian cells and produces diminished cytopathic effects retains the capacity for high-level gene expression and immunogenicity while promising exceptional safety for laboratory workers and potential vaccine recipients.

  2. Development of ST-246® for Treatment of Poxvirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Robert; Leeds, Janet M.; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar; Hruby, Dennis E.

    2010-01-01

    ST-246 (Tecovirimat) is a small synthetic antiviral compound being developed to treat pathogenic orthopoxvirus infections of humans. The compound was discovered as part of a high throughput screen designed to identify inhibitors of vaccinia virus-induced cytopathic effects. The antiviral activity is specific for orthopoxviruses and the compound does not inhibit the replication of other RNA- and DNA-containing viruses or inhibit cell proliferation at concentrations of compound that are antiviral. ST-246 targets vaccinia virus p37, a viral protein required for envelopment and secretion of extracellular forms of virus. The compound is orally bioavailable and protects multiple animal species from lethal orthopoxvirus challenge. Preclinical safety pharmacology studies in mice and non-human primates indicate that ST-246 is readily absorbed by the oral route and well tolerated with the no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) in mice measured at 2000 mg/kg and the no observable effect level (NOEL) in non-human primates measured at 300 mg/kg. Drug substance and drug product processes have been developed and commercial scale batches have been produced using Good Manufacturing Processes (GMP). Human phase I clinical trials have shown that ST-246 is safe and well tolerated in healthy human volunteers. Based on the results of the clinical evaluation, once a day dosing should provide plasma drug exposure in the range predicted to be antiviral based on data from efficacy studies in animal models of orthopoxvirus disease. These data support the use of ST-246 as a therapeutic to treat pathogenic orthopoxvirus infections of humans. PMID:21994624

  3. The oncolytic peptide LTX-315 triggers immunogenic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, H; Forveille, S; Sauvat, A; Yamazaki, T; Senovilla, L; Ma, Y; Liu, P; Yang, H; Bezu, L; Müller, K; Zitvogel, L; Rekdal, Ø; Kepp, O; Kroemer, G

    2016-01-01

    LTX-315 is a cationic amphilytic peptide that preferentially permeabilizes mitochondrial membranes, thereby causing partially BAX/BAK1-regulated, caspase-independent necrosis. Based on the observation that intratumorally injected LTX-315 stimulates a strong T lymphocyte-mediated anticancer immune response, we investigated whether LTX-315 may elicit the hallmarks of immunogenic cell death (ICD), namely (i) exposure of calreticulin on the plasma membrane surface, (ii) release of ATP into the extracellular space, (iii) exodus of HMGB1 from the nucleus, and (iv) induction of a type-1 interferon response. Using a panel of biosensor cell lines and robotized fluorescence microscopy coupled to automatic image analysis, we observed that LTX-315 induces all known ICD characteristics. This conclusion was validated by several independent methods including immunofluorescence stainings (for calreticulin), bioluminescence assays (for ATP), immunoassays (for HMGB1), and RT-PCRs (for type-1 interferon induction). When injected into established cancers, LTX-315 caused a transiently hemorrhagic focal necrosis that was accompanied by massive release of HMGB1 (from close-to-all cancer cells), as well as caspase-3 activation in a fraction of the cells. LTX-315 was at least as efficient as the positive control, the anthracycline mitoxantrone (MTX), in inducing local inflammation with infiltration by myeloid cells and T lymphocytes. Collectively, these results support the idea that LTX-315 can induce ICD, hence explaining its capacity to mediate immune-dependent therapeutic effects. PMID:26962684

  4. Further development of raccoon poxvirus-vectored vaccines against plague (Yersinia pestis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, T.E.; Iams, K.P.; Dawe, S.; Smith, S.R.; Williamson, J.L.; Heisey, D.M.; Osorio, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated protection against plague in mice and prairie dogs using a raccoon pox (RCN) virus-vectored vaccine that expressed the F1 capsular antigen of Yersinia pestis. In order to improve vaccine efficacy, we have now constructed additional RCN-plague vaccines containing two different forms of the lcrV (V) gene, including full-length (Vfull) and a truncated form (V307). Mouse challenge studies with Y. pestis strain CO92 showed that vaccination with a combination of RCN-F1 and the truncated V construct (RCN-V307) provided the greatest improvement (P = 0.01) in protection against plague over vaccination with RCN-F1 alone. This effect was mediated primarily by anti-F1 and anti-V antibodies and both contributed independently to increased survival of vaccinated mice.

  5. Mucosal Vaccination Overcomes the Barrier to Recombinant Vaccinia Immunization Caused by Preexisting Poxvirus Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakov, Igor M.; Moss, Bernard; Strober, Warren; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    1999-04-01

    Overcoming preexisting immunity to vaccinia virus in the adult population is a key requirement for development of otherwise potent recombinant vaccinia vaccines. Based on our observation that s.c. immunization with vaccinia induces cellular and antibody immunity to vaccinia only in systemic lymphoid tissue and not in mucosal sites, we hypothesized that the mucosal immune system remains naive to vaccinia and therefore amenable to immunization with recombinant vaccinia vectors despite earlier vaccinia exposure. We show that mucosal immunization of vaccinia-immune BALB/c mice with recombinant vaccinia expressing HIV gp160 induced specific serum antibody and strong HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. These responses occurred not only in mucosal but also in systemic lymphoid tissue, whereas systemic immunization was ineffective under these circumstances. In this context, intrarectal immunization was more effective than intranasal immunization. Boosting with a second dose of recombinant vaccinia was also more effective via the mucosal route. The systemic HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response was enhanced by coadministration of IL-12 at the mucosal site. These results also demonstrate the independent compartmentalization of the mucosal versus systemic immune systems and the asymmetric trafficking of lymphocytes between them. This approach to circumvent previous vaccinia immunity may be useful for induction of protective immunity against infectious diseases and cancer in the sizable populations with preexisting immunity to vaccinia from smallpox vaccination.

  6. Structural basis for antagonism of human interleukin 18 by poxvirus interleukin 18-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Krumm, Brian; Meng, Xiangzhi; Li, Yongchao; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng

    2009-07-10

    Human interleukin-18 (hIL-18) is a cytokine that plays an important role in inflammation and host defense against microbes. Its activity is regulated in vivo by a naturally occurring antagonist, the human IL-18-binding protein (IL-18BP). Functional homologs of human IL-18BP are encoded by all orthopoxviruses, including variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox. They contribute to virulence by suppressing IL-18-mediated immune responses. Here, we describe the 2.0-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of an orthopoxvirus IL-18BP, ectromelia virus IL-18BP (ectvIL-18BP), in complex with hIL-18. The hIL-18 structure in the complex shows significant conformational change at the binding interface compared with the structure of ligand-free hIL-18, indicating that the binding is mediated by an induced-fit mechanism. EctvIL-18BP adopts a canonical Ig fold and interacts via one edge of its {beta}-sandwich with 3 cavities on the hIL-18 surface through extensive hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions. Most of the ectvIL-18BP residues that participate in these interactions are conserved in both human and viral homologs, explaining their functional equivalence despite limited sequence homology. EctvIL-18BP blocks a putative receptor-binding site on IL-18, thus preventing IL-18 from engaging its receptor. Our structure provides insights into how IL-18BPs modulate hIL-18 activity. The revealed binding interface provides the basis for rational design of inhibitors against orthopoxvirus IL-18BP (for treating orthopoxvirus infection) or hIL-18 (for treating certain inflammatory and autoimmune diseases).

  7. Clinical and pathological findings of concurrent poxvirus lesions and aspergillosis infection in canaries

    PubMed Central

    Reza, Kheirandish; Nasrin, Askari; Mahmoud, Salehi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate clinical, pathological and mycological findings in canaries, in which pox lesions and Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) infection were observed simultaneously. Methods This study was performed on a breeding colony (about 100 canaries) affected by fatal wasting disease. Necropsy was undertaken on 10 severely affected canaries, and gross lesions were recorded. Samples from internal organs displaying lesions were obtained for histopathological evaluation. Tracheal swap samples of internal organs of the all infected animals with lesions at necropsy were cultured in Sabouraud Dextrose Agar for mycological examination. Results At necropsy, caseous foci were determined in the lungs, on the air sacs, liver, spleen, heart. Swelling of the eyelids, diffuse hemorrhages in the subcutaneous tissue with small papular lesions of the skin were other typical necropsy findings. Histopathologically, pathognomonic eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies, which called Bollinger bodies, in both skin cells and vacuolated air way epithelial cells confirmed canary pox infection. Moreover, histopathological examination of the white-yellowish caseous foci revealed necrotic granulomatous reaction consisting of macrophages, heterophil leukocytes and giant cells encapsulated with a fibrous tissue. After the culture of the tissue samples, the formation of bluish green colonies confirmed A. fumigatus infection. Conclusions Canary pox has been known as the disease that can result in high losses in a short time, as a re-emerging disease that has not been present during recent years in canary flocks in Iran. So, the current paper provides useful information to prevent misdiagnosed of canary pox disease which can cause secondary mycotic infection. PMID:23620834

  8. Cutaneous tumour-like lesions due to poxvirus infection in Chilean flamingos.

    PubMed

    Arai, S; Arai, C; Fujimaki, M; Iwamoto, Y; Kawarada, M; Saito, Y; Nomura, Y; Suzuki, T

    1991-05-01

    Cutaneous tumour-like growths were observed on the face and other areas of the body surface of young Chilean flamingos. In the cells of these lesions, avian pox-specific cytoplasmic inclusion bodies were observed by light microscopy and virus particles were detected under an electron-microscope. It was diagnosed as avian pox.

  9. Inactivation of poxviruses by upper-room UVC light in a simulated hospital room environment.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, James J; Milton, Donald K; Rudnick, Stephen N; First, Melvin W

    2008-09-10

    In the event of a smallpox outbreak due to bioterrorism, delays in vaccination programs may lead to significant secondary transmission. In the early phases of such an outbreak, transmission of smallpox will take place especially in locations where infected persons may congregate, such as hospital emergency rooms. Air disinfection using upper-room 254 nm (UVC) light can lower the airborne concentrations of infective viruses in the lower part of the room, and thereby control the spread of airborne infections among room occupants without exposing occupants to a significant amount of UVC. Using vaccinia virus aerosols as a surrogate for smallpox we report on the effectiveness of air disinfection, via upper-room UVC light, under simulated real world conditions including the effects of convection, mechanical mixing, temperature and relative humidity. In decay experiments, upper-room UVC fixtures used with mixing by a conventional ceiling fan produced decreases in airborne virus concentrations that would require additional ventilation of more than 87 air changes per hour. Under steady state conditions the effective air changes per hour associated with upper-room UVC ranged from 18 to 1000. The surprisingly high end of the observed range resulted from the extreme susceptibility of vaccinia virus to UVC at low relative humidity and use of 4 UVC fixtures in a small room with efficient air mixing. Increasing the number of UVC fixtures or mechanical ventilation rates resulted in greater fractional reduction in virus aerosol and UVC effectiveness was higher in winter compared to summer for each scenario tested. These data demonstrate that upper-room UVC has the potential to greatly reduce exposure to susceptible viral aerosols. The greater survival at baseline and greater UVC susceptibility of vaccinia under winter conditions suggest that while risk from an aerosol attack with smallpox would be greatest in winter, protective measures using UVC may also be most efficient at this time. These data may also be relevant to influenza, which also has improved aerosol survival at low RH and somewhat similar sensitivity to UVC.

  10. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses exploit different mechanisms to enter and infect human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Bartee, Eric; Mohamed, Mohamed R.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Barrett, John W.; McFadden, Grant

    2010-06-05

    Myxoma (MYXV) and vaccinia (VACV) viruses have recently emerged as potential oncolytic agents that can infect and kill different human cancer cells. Although both are structurally similar, it is unknown whether the pathway(s) used by these poxviruses to enter and cause oncolysis in cancer cells are mechanistically similar. Here, we compared the entry of MYXV and VACV-WR into various human cancer cells and observed significant differences: 1 - low-pH treatment accelerates fusion-mediated entry of VACV but not MYXV, 2 - the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibits entry of VACV, but not MYXV, 3 - knockdown of PAK1 revealed that it is required for a late stage event downstream of MYXV entry into cancer cells, whereas PAK1 is required for VACV entry into the same target cells. These results suggest that VACV and MYXV exploit different mechanisms to enter into human cancer cells, thus providing some rationale for their divergent cancer cell tropisms.

  11. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Puig, Juana M; Lorenzo, María M; Blasco, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV) are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV) are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses.

  12. A Vaccinia Virus Recombinant Transcribing an Alphavirus Replicon and Expressing Alphavirus Structural Proteins Leads to Packaging of Alphavirus Infectious Single Cycle Particles

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Puig, Juana M.; Lorenzo, María M.; Blasco, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV) are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV) are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses. PMID:24130722

  13. Myxoma virus therapy for human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in a nude mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kinn, Veronica G; Hilgenberg, Valerie A; MacNeill, Amy L

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a devastating tumor of young people that is difficult to cure. To determine if oncolytic virus therapy can improve outcomes in individuals with RMS, myxoma virus expressing a red fluorescent protein (MYXV-red) was evaluated for antitumoral effects using a murine model of RMS. Fluorescent protein was expressed in four RMS cell lines inoculated with MYXV-red, indicating that these cells were semipermissive to MYXV infection. MYXV-red replication and cytopathic effects were further evaluated using human embryonal RMS (CCL-136) cells. Logarithmic growth of MYXV-red and significant cell death were observed 72 hours after inoculation with MYXV. The oncolytic effects of MYXV-red were then studied in nude mice that were injected subcutaneously with CCL-136 cells to establish RMS xenografts. Once tumors measured 5 mm in diameter, mice were treated with multiple intratumoral injections of MXYV-red or saline. The average final tumor volume and rate of tumor growth were significantly decreased, and median survival time was significantly increased in MYXV-red-treated mice (P-values =0.0416, 0.0037, and 0.0004, respectively). Histologic sections of MYXV-red-treated tumors showed increased inflammation compared to saline-treated tumors (P-value =0.0002). In conclusion, MXYV-red treatment of RMS tumors was successful in individual mice as it resulted in decreased tumor burden in eight of eleven mice with nearly complete tumor remission in five of eleven mice. These data hold promise that MYXV-red treatment may be beneficial for people suffering from RMS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment of RMS tumors using an oncolytic poxvirus. PMID:27579297

  14. Myxoma virus therapy for human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in a nude mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kinn, Veronica G; Hilgenberg, Valerie A; MacNeill, Amy L

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a devastating tumor of young people that is difficult to cure. To determine if oncolytic virus therapy can improve outcomes in individuals with RMS, myxoma virus expressing a red fluorescent protein (MYXV-red) was evaluated for antitumoral effects using a murine model of RMS. Fluorescent protein was expressed in four RMS cell lines inoculated with MYXV-red, indicating that these cells were semipermissive to MYXV infection. MYXV-red replication and cytopathic effects were further evaluated using human embryonal RMS (CCL-136) cells. Logarithmic growth of MYXV-red and significant cell death were observed 72 hours after inoculation with MYXV. The oncolytic effects of MYXV-red were then studied in nude mice that were injected subcutaneously with CCL-136 cells to establish RMS xenografts. Once tumors measured 5 mm in diameter, mice were treated with multiple intratumoral injections of MXYV-red or saline. The average final tumor volume and rate of tumor growth were significantly decreased, and median survival time was significantly increased in MYXV-red-treated mice (P-values =0.0416, 0.0037, and 0.0004, respectively). Histologic sections of MYXV-red-treated tumors showed increased inflammation compared to saline-treated tumors (P-value =0.0002). In conclusion, MXYV-red treatment of RMS tumors was successful in individual mice as it resulted in decreased tumor burden in eight of eleven mice with nearly complete tumor remission in five of eleven mice. These data hold promise that MYXV-red treatment may be beneficial for people suffering from RMS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment of RMS tumors using an oncolytic poxvirus. PMID:27579297

  15. Poxvirus interleukin-4 expression overcomes inherent resistance and vaccine-induced immunity: Pathogenesis, prophylaxis and antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nanhai; Bellone, Clifford J.; Schriewer, Jill; Owens, Gelita; Fredrickson, Torgny; Parker, Scott; Buller, R. Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, Jackson et al. reported that murine IL-4 expression by a recombinant ectromelia virus caused enhanced morbidity and lethality in resistant C57BL/6 mice as well as overcame protective immune memory responses. To achieve a more thorough understanding of this phenomenon, and to asses a variety of countermeasures, we constructed a series of ECTV recombinants encoding murine IL-4 under the control of promoters of different strengths and temporal regulation. We showed that the ECTV-IL-4 recombinant expressing the highest level of IL-4 was uniformly lethal for C57BL/6 mice even when previously immunized. The lethality of the ECTV-IL-4 recombinants resulted from virus-expressed IL-4 signaling through the IL-4 receptor, but was not due to IL-4 toxicity. A number of treatment approaches were evaluated against the most virulent IL-4 encoding virus. The most efficacious therapy was a combination of two antiviral drugs (CMX001® and ST-246®) that have different mechanisms of action. PMID:21071055

  16. Vaccination against canine distemper virus infection in infant ferrets with and without maternal antibody protection, using recombinant attenuated poxvirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Welter, J; Taylor, J; Tartaglia, J; Paoletti, E; Stephensen, C B

    2000-07-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets is clinically and immunologically similar to measles, making this a useful model for the human disease. The model was used to determine if parenteral or mucosal immunization of infant ferrets at 3 and 6 weeks of age with attenuated vaccinia virus (NYVAC) or canarypox virus (ALVAC) vaccine strains expressing the CDV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) protein genes (NYVAC-HF and ALVAC-HF) would induce serum neutralizing antibody and protect against challenge infection at 12 weeks of age. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 5) or ALVAC-HF (n = 4) developed significant neutralizing titers (log(10) inverse mean titer +/- standard deviation of 2.30 +/- 0.12 and 2.20 +/- 0.34, respectively) by the day of challenge, and all survived with no clinical or virologic evidence of infection. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated intranasally (i.n.) developed lower neutralizing titers, with NYVAC-HF producing higher titers at challenge (1.11 +/- 0.57 versus 0.40 +/- 0.37, P = 0.02) and a better survival rate (6/7 versus 0/5, P = 0.008) than ALVAC-HF. Ferrets with maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 7) and ALVAC-HF (n = 7) developed significantly higher antibody titers (1.64 +/- 0. 54 and 1.28 +/- 0.40, respectively) than did ferrets immunized with an attenuated CDV vaccine (0.46 +/- 0.59; n = 7) or the recombinant vectors expressing rabies glycoprotein (RG) (0.19 +/- 0.32; n = 8, P = 7 x 10(-6)). The NYVAC vaccine also protected against weight loss, and both the NYVAC and attenuated CDV vaccines protected against the development of some clinical signs of infection, although survival in each of the three vaccine groups was low (one of seven) and not significantly different from the RG controls (none of eight). Combined i.n.-parenteral immunization of ferrets with maternal antibody using NYVAC-HF (n = 9) produced higher titers (1.63 +/- 0. 25) than did i.n. immunization with NYVAC-HF (0.88 +/- 0.36; n = 9) and ALVAC-HF (0.61 +/- 0.43; n = 9, P = 3 x 10(-7)), and survival was also significantly better in the i.n.-parenteral group (3 of 9) than in the other HF-vaccinated animals (none of 18) or in controls immunized with RG (none of 5) (P = 0.0374). Multiple routes were not tested with the ALVAC vaccine. The results suggest that infant ferrets are less responsive to i.n. vaccination than are older ferrets and raises questions about the appropriateness of this route of immunization in infant ferrets or infants of other species. PMID:10864646

  17. Vaccination against Canine Distemper Virus Infection in Infant Ferrets with and without Maternal Antibody Protection, Using Recombinant Attenuated Poxvirus Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Welter, Janet; Taylor, Jill; Tartaglia, James; Paoletti, Enzo; Stephensen, Charles B.

    2000-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets is clinically and immunologically similar to measles, making this a useful model for the human disease. The model was used to determine if parenteral or mucosal immunization of infant ferrets at 3 and 6 weeks of age with attenuated vaccinia virus (NYVAC) or canarypox virus (ALVAC) vaccine strains expressing the CDV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) protein genes (NYVAC-HF and ALVAC-HF) would induce serum neutralizing antibody and protect against challenge infection at 12 weeks of age. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 5) or ALVAC-HF (n = 4) developed significant neutralizing titers (log10 inverse mean titer ± standard deviation of 2.30 ± 0.12 and 2.20 ± 0.34, respectively) by the day of challenge, and all survived with no clinical or virologic evidence of infection. Ferrets without maternal antibody that were vaccinated intranasally (i.n.) developed lower neutralizing titers, with NYVAC-HF producing higher titers at challenge (1.11 ± 0.57 versus 0.40 ± 0.37, P = 0.02) and a better survival rate (6/7 versus 0/5, P = 0.008) than ALVAC-HF. Ferrets with maternal antibody that were vaccinated parenterally with NYVAC-HF (n = 7) and ALVAC-HF (n = 7) developed significantly higher antibody titers (1.64 ± 0.54 and 1.28 ± 0.40, respectively) than did ferrets immunized with an attenuated CDV vaccine (0.46 ± 0.59; n = 7) or the recombinant vectors expressing rabies glycoprotein (RG) (0.19 ± 0.32; n = 8, P = 7 × 10−6). The NYVAC vaccine also protected against weight loss, and both the NYVAC and attenuated CDV vaccines protected against the development of some clinical signs of infection, although survival in each of the three vaccine groups was low (one of seven) and not significantly different from the RG controls (none of eight). Combined i.n.-parenteral immunization of ferrets with maternal antibody using NYVAC-HF (n = 9) produced higher titers (1.63 ± 0.25) than did i.n. immunization with NYVAC-HF (0.88 ± 0.36; n = 9) and ALVAC-HF (0.61 ± 0.43; n = 9, P = 3 × 10−7), and survival was also significantly better in the i.n.-parenteral group (3 of 9) than in the other HF-vaccinated animals (none of 18) or in controls immunized with RG (none of 5) (P = 0.0374). Multiple routes were not tested with the ALVAC vaccine. The results suggest that infant ferrets are less responsive to i.n. vaccination than are older ferrets and raises questions about the appropriateness of this route of immunization in infant ferrets or infants of other species. PMID:10864646

  18. Avian poxvirus epizootic in a breeding population of Lesser Flamingos (Phoenicopterus minor) at Kamfers Dam, Kimberley, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, David; Anderson, Mark D; Lane, Emily; van Wilpe, Erna; Carulei, Olivia; Douglass, Nicola; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Kotze, Antoinette

    2011-10-01

    Avian pox has a worldwide distribution, but prior to this investigation has not been reported in free-ranging flamingo populations. During observations of the first successful breeding of Lesser Flamingos on a purpose-built island, at Kamfers Dam near Kimberley, South Africa, multiple small, raised, crusted plaques on the legs and facial area were noticed on 30% of the fledgling flamingos. A diagnosis of avipoxvirus infection was made on the basis of the macroscopic, histologic, and electron microscopic features, and was further confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. The avipoxvirus detected was very similar to that previously detected in albatross and falcons.

  19. Individual and Population-Level Impacts of an Emerging Poxvirus Disease in a Wild Population of Great Tits

    PubMed Central

    Lachish, Shelly; Bonsall, Michael B.; Lawson, Becki; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Sheldon, Ben C.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases of wildlife can have severe effects on host populations and constitute a pressing problem for biodiversity conservation. Paridae pox is an unusually severe form of avipoxvirus infection that has recently been identified as an emerging infectious disease particularly affecting an abundant songbird, the great tit (Parus major), in Great Britain. In this study, we study the invasion and establishment of Paridae pox in a long-term monitored population of wild great tits to (i) quantify the impact of this novel pathogen on host fitness and (ii) determine the potential threat it poses to population persistence. We show that Paridae pox significantly reduces the reproductive output of great tits by reducing the ability of parents to fledge young successfully and rear those young to independence. Our results also suggested that pathogen transmission from diseased parents to their offspring was possible, and that disease entails severe mortality costs for affected chicks. Application of multistate mark-recapture modelling showed that Paridae pox causes significant reductions to host survival, with particularly large effects observed for juvenile survival. Using an age-structured population model, we demonstrate that Paridae pox has the potential to reduce population growth rate, primarily through negative impacts on host survival rates. However, at currently observed prevalence, significant disease-induced population decline seems unlikely, although pox prevalence may be underestimated if capture probability of diseased individuals is low. Despite this, because pox-affected model populations exhibited lower average growth rates, this emerging infectious disease has the potential to reduce the resilience of populations to other environmental factors that reduce population size. PMID:23185263

  20. Bicalutamide Activated Oncolytic Adenovirus for the Adjuvant Therapy of High Risk Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara Jane; Hoti, Naser Uddin; Liu, Chunyan; Chowdhury, Wasim H.; Li, Ying; Zhang, Yonggang; Lupold, Shawn E.; DeWeese, Theodore; Rodriguez, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) utilize tissue specific promoters to control the expression of the early genes, E1A and E1B, to preferentially replicate and lyse tumor cells (oncolysis). Previous CRAds used in prostate cancer gene therapy require androgens to activate prostate specific promoters and induce viral replication. Unfortunately, these CRAds have reduced activity in patients on androgen suppressive therapy. We describe a novel prostate specific CRAd generated by fusing the E1A gene to the androgen receptor (AR) cDNA with a point mutation in codon 685 (C685Y). The E1A-AR fusion neutralizes the previously described mutual inhibition of E1A & AR, and the C685Y point mutation alters specificity of steroid ligand binding to the AR, such that both androgens and non-steroidal anti-androgens can activate viral replication. We demonstrate that the mutated E1A-AR retained the ability to function in regulating AR responsive genes and E1A responsive viral genes. In combination therapy of virus, bicalutamide (anti-androgen) and radiation, a profound impact on cell death by viral oncolysis was seen both in vitro and tumor xenografts. To our knowledge, this is the first gene therapy engineered to be enhanced by anti-androgens, and a particularly attractive adjuvant strategy for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of high-risk prostate cancers. PMID:23764901

  1. Complete genome sequence analysis of Seneca Valley virus-001, a novel oncolytic picornavirus.

    PubMed

    Hales, Laura M; Knowles, Nick J; Reddy, P Seshidar; Xu, Ling; Hay, Carl; Hallenbeck, Paul L

    2008-05-01

    The complete genome sequence of Seneca Valley virus-001 (SVV-001), a small RNA virus, was determined and was shown to have typical picornavirus features. The 7280 nt long genome was predicted to contain a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 666 nt, followed by a single long open reading frame consisting of 6543 nt, which encodes a 2181 aa polyprotein. This polyprotein could potentially be cleaved into 12 polypeptides in the standard picornavirus L-4-3-4 layout. A 3' UTR of 71 nt was followed by a poly(A) tail of unknown length. Comparisons with other picornaviruses showed that the P1, 2C, 3C and 3D polypeptides of SVV-001 were related most closely to those of the cardioviruses, although they were not related as closely to those of encephalomyocarditis virus and Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus as the latter were to each other. Most other regions of the polyprotein differed considerably from those of all other known picornaviruses. SVV-001 contains elements of an internal ribosome entry site reminiscent of that found in hepatitis C virus and a number of genetically diverse picornaviruses. SVV-001 is a novel picornavirus and it is proposed that it be classified as the prototype species in a novel genus named 'Senecavirus'.

  2. Structure of Seneca Valley Virus-001: an oncolytic picornavirus representing a new genus.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Sangita; Reddy, Seshidhar P; Loo, Jackie; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Hallenbeck, Paul L; Reddy, Vijay S

    2008-10-01

    The crystal structure of Seneca Valley Virus-001 (SVV-001), the representative member of a new genus, Senecavirus, is reported at 2.3A resolution. SVV-001 is the first naturally occurring nonpathogenic picornavirus shown to mediate selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells with neuroendocrine cancer features. The nonsegmented (+) ssRNA genome of SVV-001 shares closest sequence similarity with the genomes of the members of Cardiovirus. The overall tertiary structure of VP1-VP4 subunits is conserved with the exception of loops, especially those of VP1 that show large deviations relative to the members of the cardioviruses. The surface loops of VP1 and VP2 are predicted to mediate cell tropism of SVV-001. In addition, the organization of the packaged nucleic acid density indicates that certain regions of VP2 and VP4 interact closely with the packaged nucleic acid.

  3. A measles virus vaccine strain derivative as a novel oncolytic agent against breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Cari J; Erlichman, Charles; Ingle, James N; Rosales, Gabriela A; Allen, Cory; Greiner, Suzanne M; Harvey, Mary E; Zollman, Paula J; Russell, Stephen J; Galanis, Evanthia

    2006-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of female cancer mortality in the United States. There is an urgent need for development of novel therapeutic approaches. In this study, we investigated the antitumor potential of a novel viral agent, an attenuated strain of measles virus deriving from the Edmonston vaccine lineage, genetically engineered to produce carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) against breast cancer. CEA production as the virus replicates can serve as a marker of viral gene expression. Infection of a variety of breast cancer cell lines including MDA-MB-231, MCF7 and SkBr3 at different multiplicities of infection (MOIs) from 0.1 to 10 resulted in significant cytopathic effect consisting of extensive syncytia formation and massive cell death at 72-96 h from infection. All breast cancer lines overexpressed the measles virus receptor CD46 and supported robust viral replication, which correlated with CEA production. TUNEL assays indicated an apoptotic mechanism of syncytial death. The efficacy of this approach in vivo was examined in a subcutaneous Balb C/nude mouse model of MDA-MB-231 cells. Intravenous administration of MV-CEA at a total dose of 1.2 x 10(7) TCID50 resulted in statistically significant tumor growth delay ( p=0.005) and prolongation of survival ( p=0.001). In summary, MV-CEA has potent antitumor activity against breast cancer lines and xenografts. Monitoring marker peptide levels in the serum could serve as a low-risk method of detecting viral gene expression during treatment and could allow dose optimization and individualization of treatment. Trackable measles virus derivatives merit further exploration in breast cancer treatment. PMID:16642271

  4. Measles Edmonston Vaccine Strain Derivatives have Potent Oncolytic Activity against Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Musibay, Evidio Domingo; Allen, Cory; Kurokawa, Cheyne; Hardcastle, Jayson J.; Aderca, Ileana; Msaouel, Pavlos; Bansal, Aditya; Jiang, Huailei; DeGrado, Timothy R.; Galanis, Evanthia

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor affecting children and young adults, and development of metastatic disease is associated with poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of virotherapy with engineered measles virus (MV) vaccine strains in the treatment of osteosarcoma. Cell lines derived from pediatric patients with osteosarcoma (HOS, MG63, 143B, KHOS-312H, U2-OS and SJSA1) were examined for MV-GFP and MV-NIS gene expression and cytotoxicity as defined by syncytial formation, cell death, and eradication of cell monolayers: significant antitumor activity was demonstrated. Findings were correlated with in vivo efficacy in subcutaneous, orthotopic (tibial bone), and lung metastatic osteosarcoma xenografts treated with the MV derivative MV-NIS via the intratumoral (IT) or intravenous (IV) route. Following treatment, we observed decrease in tumor growth of subcutaneous xenografts (p=0.0374) and prolongation of survival in mice with orthotopic (p<0.0001) and pulmonary metastatic osteosarcoma tumors (p=0.0207). Expression of the NIS transgene in MV-NIS infected tumors allowed for SPECT-CT and PET-CT imaging of virus infected tumors in vivo. Our data support the translational potential of MV-based virotherapy approaches in the treatment of recurrent and metastatic osteosarcoma. PMID:25394505

  5. The oncolytic peptide LTX-315 kills cancer cells through Bax/Bak-regulated mitochondrial membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Heng; Forveille, Sabrina; Sauvat, Allan; Sica, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Durand, Sylvère; Müller, Kevin; Liu, Peng; Zitvogel, Laurence; Rekdal, Øystein; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-09-29

    LTX-315 has been developed as an amphipathic cationic peptide that kills cancer cells. Here, we investigated the putative involvement of mitochondria in the cytotoxic action of LTX-315. Subcellular fractionation of LTX-315-treated cells, followed by mass spectrometric quantification, revealed that the agent was enriched in mitochondria. LTX-315 caused an immediate arrest of mitochondrial respiration without any major uncoupling effect. Accordingly, LTX-315 disrupted the mitochondrial network, dissipated the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, and caused the release of mitochondrial intermembrane proteins into the cytosol. LTX-315 was relatively inefficient in stimulating mitophagy. Cells lacking the two pro-apoptotic multidomain proteins from the BCL-2 family, BAX and BAK, were less susceptible to LTX-315-mediated killing. Moreover, cells engineered to lose their mitochondria (by transfection with Parkin combined with treatment with a protonophore causing mitophagy) were relatively resistant against LTX-315, underscoring the importance of this organelle for LTX-315-mediated cytotoxicity. Altogether, these results support the notion that LTX-315 kills cancer cells by virtue of its capacity to permeabilize mitochondrial membranes.

  6. Oncolytic Measles Virus Expressing the Sodium Iodide Symporter to Treat Drug-Resistant Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Galanis, Evanthia; Atherton, Pamela J.; Maurer, Matthew J.; Knutson, Keith L.; Dowdy, Sean C.; Cliby, William A.; Haluska, Paul; Long, Harry J.; Oberg, Ann; Aderca, Ileana; Block, Matthew S.; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie; Federspiel, Mark J.; Russell, Stephen J.; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Keeney, Gary; Peng, Kah Whye; Hartmann, Lynn C.

    2015-01-01

    Edmonston vaccine strains of measles virus (MV) have significant antitumor activity in mouse xenograft models of ovarian cancer. MV engineered to express the sodium iodide symporter gene (MV-NIS) facilitates localization of viral gene expression and offers a tool for tumor radiovirotherapy. Here, we report results from a clinical evaluation of MV-NIS in patients with taxol- and platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. MV-NIS was given intraperitoneally every 4 weeks for up to 6 cycles. Treatment was well tolerated and associated with promising median overall survival in these patients with heavily pretreated ovarian cancer; no dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 16 patients treated at high-dose levels (108–109 TCID50), and their median overall survival of 26.5 months compared favorably with other contemporary series. MV receptor CD46 and nectin-4 expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in patient tumors. Sodium iodide symporter expression in patient tumors after treatment was confirmed in three patients by 123I uptake on SPECT/CTs and was associated with long progression-free survival. Immune monitoring posttreatment showed an increase in effector T cells recognizing the tumor antigens IGFBP2 and FRα, indicating that MV-NIS treatment triggered cellular immunity against the patients' tumor and suggesting that an immune mechanism mediating the observed antitumor effect. Our findings support further clinical evaluation of MV-NIS as an effective immunovirotherapy. PMID:25398436

  7. Incomplete but Infectious Vaccinia Virions Are Produced in the Absence of Oncolysis in Feline SCCF1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parviainen, Suvi; Autio, Karoliina; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Guse, Kilian; Pesonen, Sari; Rosol, Thomas J.; Zhao, Fang; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus is a large, enveloped virus of the poxvirus family. It has broad tropism and typically virus replication culminates in accumulation and lytic release of intracellular mature virus (IMV), the most abundant form of infectious virus, as well as release by budding of extracellular enveloped virus (EEV). Vaccinia viruses have been modified to replicate selectively in cancer cells and clinically tested as oncolytic agents. During preclinical screening of relevant cancer targets for a recombinant Western Reserve strain deleted for both copies of the thymidine kinase and vaccinia growth factor genes, we noticed that confluent monolayers of SCCF1 cat squamous carcinoma cells were not destroyed even after prolonged infection. Interestingly, although SCCF1 cells were not killed, they continuously secreted virus into the cell culture supernatant. To investigate this finding further, we performed detailed studies by electron microscopy. Both intracellular and secreted virions showed morphological abnormalities on ultrastructural inspection, suggesting compromised maturation and morphogenesis of vaccinia virus in SCCF1 cells. Our data suggest that SCCF1 cells produce a morphologically abnormal virus which is nevertheless infective, providing new information on the virus-host cell interactions and intracellular biology of vaccinia virus. PMID:25799430

  8. Incomplete but infectious vaccinia virions are produced in the absence of oncolysis in feline SCCF1 cells.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Suvi; Autio, Karoliina; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Guse, Kilian; Pesonen, Sari; Rosol, Thomas J; Zhao, Fang; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus is a large, enveloped virus of the poxvirus family. It has broad tropism and typically virus replication culminates in accumulation and lytic release of intracellular mature virus (IMV), the most abundant form of infectious virus, as well as release by budding of extracellular enveloped virus (EEV). Vaccinia viruses have been modified to replicate selectively in cancer cells and clinically tested as oncolytic agents. During preclinical screening of relevant cancer targets for a recombinant Western Reserve strain deleted for both copies of the thymidine kinase and vaccinia growth factor genes, we noticed that confluent monolayers of SCCF1 cat squamous carcinoma cells were not destroyed even after prolonged infection. Interestingly, although SCCF1 cells were not killed, they continuously secreted virus into the cell culture supernatant. To investigate this finding further, we performed detailed studies by electron microscopy. Both intracellular and secreted virions showed morphological abnormalities on ultrastructural inspection, suggesting compromised maturation and morphogenesis of vaccinia virus in SCCF1 cells. Our data suggest that SCCF1 cells produce a morphologically abnormal virus which is nevertheless infective, providing new information on the virus-host cell interactions and intracellular biology of vaccinia virus.

  9. Is there an association of Pneumocystis infection with the presence of arena-, hanta-, and poxvirus antibodies in wild mice and shrews in Finland?

    PubMed

    Laakkonen, J; Kallio, E R; Kallio-Kokko, H; Vapalahti, O; Vaheri, A; Henttonen, H

    2006-04-01

    As part of studies on the nature of the endemic virus infections in natural rodent hosts, the possible association of cyst forms of Pneumocystis spp. with the presence of hanta-, cowpox-, and arenavirus antibodies in wild mice (Apodemus flavicollis, N=105; Apodemus agrarius, N=63; Micromys minutus, N=50) and the common shrew (Sorex araneus, N=101) was studied in south-central Finland. One hantavirus (Saaremaa virus, SAAV) seropositive A. agrarius, and 2 cowpoxvirus (CPXV) seropositive S. araneus were detected, and antibodies against an arenavirus (Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, LCMV) were found in all 3 mouse species but not in shrews. Cyst forms of Pneumocystis spp. were detected in all species except A. agrarius. There was no significant association between virus antibodies (LCMV in mice, and CPXV in shrews) and cyst forms of Pneumocystis in any of the species. Concurrent presence of virus antibodies (LCMV) and cyst forms of Pneumocystis were detected only in 1 M. minutus. In conclusion, we found no evidence of any association between Pneumocystis and antibodies to any of the viruses tested.

  10. A goat poxvirus-vectored peste-des-petits-ruminants vaccine induces long-lasting neutralization antibody to high levels in goats and sheep.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiye; Hu, Sen; Qu, Linmao; Hu, Qianqian; Zhang, Qian; Zhi, Haibing; Huang, Kehe; Bu, Zhigao

    2010-07-01

    Recombinant capripoxvirus (CPV) is a promising candidate differentiating infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) vaccine against peste-des-petits-ruminants (PPR). In order for recombinant CPV to be successfully used in the field, there should exist dependable indicators for quality control of vaccine products, surveillance and vaccination evaluation. Viral neutralization antibody (VNA) is correlated to protection against PPR and is a technically feasible indicator for this purpose. The immunogenicity of this vectored vaccine in goats and sheep, however, has not been fully evaluated. In this study, we generated two recombinant CPV viruses, rCPV-PPRVH and rCPV-PPRVF, that express PPR virus (PPRV) glycoproteins H and F, respectively. Vaccination studies with different dosages of recombinant viruses showed that rCPV-PPRVH was a more potent inducer of PPRV VNA than rCPV-PPRVF. One dose of rCPV-PPRVH was enough to seroconvert 80% of immunized sheep. A second dose induced significantly higher PPRV VNA titers. There was no significant difference in PPRV VNA responses between goats and sheep. Subcutaneous inoculation also induced a significant PPRV VNA response. PPRV VNA could be detected for over 6 months in more than 80% of vaccinated goats and sheep. Boost vaccination at 6-month intervals induced significant re-boost efficacy of PPRV VNA in goats and sheep. More over, two doses of rCPV-PPRVH could completely overcome the interference caused by pre-existing immunity to the CPV vaccine backbone in animals. Vaccination with rCPV-PPRVH also protected goats from virulent CPV challenge. Our results demonstrate that VNA can serve as a dependent indicator for effective vaccination and immune protection of animals in the field. The recombinant CPV vaccine used in our studies could be a practical and useful candidate DIVA vaccine in countries where PPR newly emerges or where stamp-out plans are yet to be implemented.

  11. VennVax, a DNA-prime, peptide-boost multi-T-cell epitope poxvirus vaccine, induces protective immunity against vaccinia infection by T cell response alone

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Leonard; Buller, R. Mark; Schriewer, Jill; Lee, Jinhee; Frey, Sharon; Martin, William; De Groot, Anne S.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for smallpox to be disseminated in a bioterror attack has prompted development of new, safer smallpox vaccination strategies. We designed and evaluated immunogenicity and efficacy of a T-cell epitope vaccine based on conserved and antigenic vaccinia/variola sequences, identified using bioinformatics and immunological methods. Vaccination in HLA transgenic mice using a DNA-prime/peptide-boost strategy elicited significant T cell responses to multiple epitopes. No antibody response pre-challenge was observed, neither against whole vaccinia antigens nor vaccine epitope peptides. Remarkably, 100% of vaccinated mice survived lethal vaccinia challenge, demonstrating that protective immunity to vaccinia does not require B cell priming. PMID:21055490

  12. Construction of Poxviruses as Cloning Vectors: Insertion of the Thymidine Kinase Gene from Herpes Simplex Virus into the DNA of Infectious Vaccinia Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panicali, Dennis; Paoletti, Enzo

    1982-08-01

    We have constructed recombinant vaccinia viruses containing the thymidine kinase gene from herpes simplex virus. The gene was inserted into the genome of a variant of vaccinia virus that had undergone spontaneous deletion as well as into the 120-megadalton genome of the large prototypic vaccinia variant. This was accomplished via in vivo recombination by contransfection of eukaryotic tissue culture cells with cloned BamHI-digested thymidine kinase gene from herpes simplex virus containing flanking vaccinia virus DNA sequences and infectious rescuing vaccinia virus. Pure populations of the recombinant viruses were obtained by replica filter techniques or by growth of the recombinant virus in biochemically selective medium. The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene, as an insert in vaccinia virus, is transcribed in vivo and in vitro, and the fidelity of in vivo transcription into a functional gene product was detected by the phosphorylation of 5-[125I]iodo-2'-deoxycytidine.

  13. Dendritic cells serve as a “Trojan horse” for oncolytic adenovirus delivery in the treatment of mouse prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao-lun; Liang, Xuan; Li, He-cheng; Wang, Zi-ming; Chong, Tie

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer, in which replication of the virus itself is the anticancer method. However, the success of this novel therapy is limited due to inefficient delivery of the virus to the target sites. In this study, we used dendritic cells (DCs) as carriers for conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) in targeting prostate carcinoma (PCa). Methods: Four types of CRAds, including Ad-PC (without PCa-specific promoter and a recombinant human tumor necrosis factor, rmhTNF, sequence), Ad-PC-rmhTNF (without PCa-specific promoter), Ad-PPC-NCS (without an rmhTNF sequence) and Ad-PPC-rmhTNF, were constructed. The androgen-insensitive mouse PCa RM-1 cells were co-cultured with CRAd-loading DCs, and the viability of RM-1 cells was examined using MTT assay. The in vivo effects of CRAd-loading DCs on PCa were evaluated in RM-1 xenograft mouse model. Results: Two PCa-specific CRAds (Ad-PPC-NCS, Ad-PPC-rmhTNF) exhibited more potent suppression on the viability of RM-1 cells in vitro than the PCa-non-specific CRAds (Ad-PC, Ad-PC-rmhTNF). In PCa-bearing mice, intravenous injection of the PCa-specific CRAd-loading DCs significantly inhibited the growth of xenografted tumors, extended the survival time, and induced T-cell activation. Additionally, the rmhTNF-containing CRAds exhibited greater tumor killing ability than CRAds without rmhTNF. Conclusion: DCs may be an effective vector for the delivery of CRAds in the treatment of PCa. PMID:27345628

  14. In-office dispensing of oral oncolytics: a continuity of care and cost mitigation model for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Egerton, Nancy J

    2016-03-01

    The high cost of cancer therapies continues to lead to questions of affordability for the healthcare system and to patients. Ensuring patient access to oral cancer drugs presents a unique set of challenges due to the significant cost of these novel agents, healthcare/payer policies, and established distribution practices. The National Community Oncology Dispensing Association, Inc (NCODA) is a grassroots, nonprofit organization established by pharmacists who are directly involved at the community practice level in assisting patients with the acquisition of their oral cancer drugs. Community oncology practices that embrace the NCODA Quality Standards are able to provide exceptional patient care by providing direct access to oral cancer drugs through the in-practice dispensary. Patient continuity of care is ensured by allowing practice staff to manage all aspects of drug therapy-from initial dispense to completion of therapy-and in-practice dispensing allows for improved patient convenience, safety, and compliance. Practice staff in the dispensary area work directly with patients to address the insurance coverage limitations and financial toxicity of procuring these drugs. Medicare patients are not eligible to take advantage of patient assistance and/or co-pay programs that have been established by pharmaceutical companies. Foundations such as the Patient Access Network Foundation have been established to provide assistance to Medicare patients. This case report focuses on a new dispensary in a moderately sized oncology community practice that prescribes to the NCODA Quality Standards and outlines the processes developed to assist Medicare patients in accessing their oral cancer medications. PMID:27270161

  15. Human β-defensin 3 contains an oncolytic motif that binds PI(4,5)P2 to mediate tumour cell permeabilisation

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Thanh Kha; Lay, Fung T.; Poon, Ivan K.H.; Hinds, Mark G.; Kvansakul, Marc; Hulett, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs), including taxonomically diverse defensins, are innate defense molecules that display potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. Specific CAPs have also been shown to possess anticancer activities; however, their mechanisms of action are not well defined. Recently, the plant defensin NaD1 was shown to induce tumour cell lysis by directly binding to the plasma membrane phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2). The NaD1–lipid interaction was structurally defined by X-ray crystallography, with the defensin forming a dimer that binds PI(4,5)P2 via its cationic β2-β3 loops in a ‘cationic grip’ conformation. In this study, we show that human β-defensin 3 (HBD-3) contains a homologous β2-β3 loop that binds phosphoinositides. The binding of HBD-3 to PI(4,5)P2 was shown to be critical for mediating cytolysis of tumour cells, suggesting a conserved mechanism of action for defensins across diverse species. These data not only identify an evolutionary conservation of CAP structure and function for lipid binding, but also suggest that PIP-binding CAPs could be exploited for novel multifunction therapeutics. PMID:26657293

  16. Evaluation of continuous low dose rate versus acute single high dose rate radiation combined with oncolytic viral therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    LIU, CHUNYAN; ZHANG, YONGGANG; LIU, MINZHI MAGGIE; ZHOU, HAOMING; CHOWDHURY, WASIM H.; LUPOLD, SHAWN E.; DEWEESE, TED L.; RODRIGUEZ, RONALD

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Conditionally Replicative Adenovirus (CRAd) has been previously demonstrated to augment the activity of radiation, resulting in synergy of cell kill. However, previous models combining radiation with CRAd have not focused on the methods of radiation delivery. Materials and methods We model the combination of a novel prostate-specific CRAd, Ad5 PSE/PBN E1A-AR (Ad5: adenovirus 5; PSE: prostate-specific enhancer; PBN: rat probasin promoter; E1A: early region 1A; AR: androgen receptor), with radiation delivered both acutely and continuously, in an effort to better mimic the potential clinical modes of prostate cancer radiotherapy. Results We demonstrate that pre-treatment of cells with acute single high dose rate (HDR) radiation 24 hours prior to viral infection results in significantly enhanced viral replication and virus-mediated cell death. In addition, this combination causes increased level of γ-H2AX (Phosphorylated histone protein H2AX on serine 139), a marker of double-stranded DNA damage and an indirect measure of nuclear fragmentation. In contrast, continuous low dose rate (LDR) radiation immediately following infection of the same CRAd results in no enhancement of viral replication, and only additive effects in virus-mediated cell death. Conclusions These data provide the first direct assessment of the real-time impact of radiation on viral replication and the first comparison of the effect of radiation delivery on the efficacy of CRAd virotherapy. Our data demonstrate substantial differences in CRAd efficacy based on the mode of radiation delivery. PMID:20201650

  17. Oncolytic Reovirus in Combination With Chemotherapy in Metastatic or Recurrent Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With KRAS-Activated Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Villalona-Calero, Miguel A.; Lam, Elaine; Otterson, Gregory A.; Zhao, Weiqiang; Timmons, Matthew; Subramaniam, Deepa; Hade, Erinn M.; Gill, George M.; Coffey, Matthew; Selvaggi, Giovanni; Bertino, Erin; Chao, Bo; Knopp, Michael V.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The type 3 Dearing reovirus (Reolysin) is a naturally occurring virus that preferentially infects and causes oncolysis in tumor cells with a Ras-activated pathway. It induces host immunity and cell cycle arrest and acts synergistically with cytotoxic agents. METHODS This study evaluated Reolysin combined with paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with metastatic/recurrent KRAS-mutated or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mutated/amplified non–small cell lung cancer. RESULTS Thirty-seven patients were treated. Molecular alterations included 20 KRAS mutations, 10 EGFR amplifications, 3 EGFR mutations, and 4 BRAF-V600E mutations. In total, 242 cycles (median, 4; range, 1-47) were completed. The initial doses were area under the curve (AUC) 6 mg/mL/min for carboplatin, 200 mg/m2 for paclitaxel on day 1, and 3×1010 50% tissue culture infective dose for Reolysin on days 1 to 5 of each 21-day cycle. Because of diarrhea and febrile neutropenia (in the first 2 patients), subsequent doses were reduced to 175 mg/m2 for paclitaxel and AUC 5 mg/mL/min for carboplatin. Toxicities included fatigue, diarrhea, nausea/vomiting, neutropenia, arthralgia/myalgia, anorexia, and electrolyte abnormalities. Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.0 responses included the following: partial response for 11 patients, stable disease (SD) for 20 patients, progressive disease for 4 patients, and not evaluable for 2 patients (objective response rate, 31%; 90% 1-sided lower confidence interval, 21%). Four SD patients had >40% positron emission tomography standardized uptake value reductions. The median progression-free survival, median overall survival, and 12-month overall survival rate were 4 months, 13.1 months, and 57%, respectively. Seven patients were alive after a median follow-up of 34.2 months; they included 2 patients without disease progression at 37 and 50 months. CONCLUSIONS Reolysin in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin was well tolerated. The observed response rate suggests a benefit of the reovirus for chemotherapy. A follow-up randomized study is recommended. The proportion of patients surviving longer than 2 years (30%) suggests a second/third-line treatment effect or possibly the triggering of an immune response after tumor reovirus infiltration. PMID:26709987

  18. Noninvasive Monitoring of mRFP1- and mCherry-Labeled Oncolytic Adenoviruses in an Orthotopic Breast Cancer Model by Spectral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Borovjagin, Anton V.; McNally, Lacey R.; Wang, Minghui; Curiel, David T.; MacDougall, Mary J.; Zinn, Kurt R.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic capsid labeling of conditionally replicative adenoviruses (CRAds) with fluorescent tags offers a potentially more accurate monitoring of those virotherapy agents in vivo. The capsid of an infectivity-enhanced CRAd, Ad5/3, delta 24, was genetically labeled with monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) or its advanced derivative, “mCherry,” to evaluate the utility of each red fluorescent reporter and the benefit of CRAd capsid labeling for noninvasive virus tracking in animal tumor models by a new spectral imaging approach. Either reporter was incorporated into the CRAd particles by genetic fusion to the viral capsid protein IX. Following intratumoral injection, localization and replication of each virus in orthotopic breast cancer xenografts were analyzed by spectral imaging and verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Fluorescence in tumors increased up to 2,000-fold by day 4 and persisted for 5 to 7 weeks, showing oscillatory dynamics reflective of CRAd replication cycles. Capsid labeling in conjunction with spectral imaging thus enables direct visualization and quantification of CRAd particles in tumors prior to the reporter transgene expression. This allows for noninvasive control of CRAd delivery and distribution in tumors and facilitates quantitative assessment of viral replication. Although mCherry appeared to be superior to mRFP1 as an imaging tag, both reporters showed utility for CRAd imaging applications. PMID:20236604

  19. An Artificially Designed Interfering lncRNA Expressed by Oncolytic Adenovirus Competitively Consumes OncomiRs to Exert Antitumor Efficacy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoya; Su, Yinghan; Sun, Bin; Ji, Weidan; Peng, Zhangxiao; Xu, Yang; Wu, Mengchao; Su, Changqing

    2016-07-01

    Endogenous miRNAs, especially oncogenic miRNAs (OncomiR), have been molecular targets for cancer therapy. We generated an artificially designed interfering long noncoding RNA (lncRNAi), which contains the sequences that can complementarily bind to multiple OncomiRs and is expressed by cancer-selectively replicating adenovirus. The adenovirus-expressed lncRNAi with high levels in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells competes with OncomiR target genes to bind to and consume OncomiRs, thereby achieving the targeted anti-HCC efficacy. With the targeting replication of adenovirus in HCC cells, lncRNAi was highly expressed and resulted in decreased abilities of proliferation, migration, and invasion, induced cell-cycle changes and apoptosis, and markedly changed the cellular mRNA and miRNA expression profiles in HCC cells. The optimal antitumor effect was also demonstrated on HCC cell line xenograft models and HCC patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models in nude mice. This strategy has established a technology platform with a reliable therapeutic effect for HCC therapy. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1436-51. ©2016 AACR.

  20. Molecular network, pathway, and functional analysis of time-dependent gene changes associated with pancreatic cancer susceptibility to oncolytic vaccinia virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Dana; Socci, Nicholas; Chen, Chun-Hao; Chen, Nanhai G; Zhang, Qian; Carpenter, Susanne G; Mittra, Arjun; Szalay, Aladar A; Fong, Yuman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pancreatic cancer is a fatal disease associated with resistance to conventional therapies. This study aimed to determine changes in gene expression patterns associated with infection and susceptibility of pancreatic cancer cells to an oncolyticvaccinia virus, GLV-1h153, carrying the human sodium iodide symporter for deep tissue imaging of virotherapy. Methods: Replication and susceptibility of pancreatic adenocarcinoma PANC-1 cells to GLV-1h153 was confirmed with replication and cytotoxicity assays. PANC-1 cells were then infected with GLV-1h153 and near-synchronous infection confirmed via flow cytometry of viral-induced green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression. Six and 24 hours after infection, three samples of each time point were harvested, and gene expression patterns assessed using HG-U133A cDNA microarray chips as compared to uninfected control. Differentially expressed genes were identified using Bioconductor LIMMA statistical analysis package. A fold change of 2.0 or above was used as a cutoff, with a P value of 0.01. The gene list was then analyzed using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis software. Results: Differential gene analysis revealed a total of 12,412 up- and 11,065 downregulated genes at 6 and 24 hours postinfection with GLV-1h153 as compared to control. At 6 hours postinfection. A total of 139 genes were either up or downregulated >twofold (false discovery rate < 0.05), of which 124 were mapped by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). By 24 hours postinfection, a total of 5,698 genes were identified and 5,563 mapped by IPA. Microarray revealed gene expression changes, with gene networks demonstrating downregulation of processes such as cell death, cell cycle, and DNA repair, and upregulation of infection mechanisms (P < 0.01). Six hours after infection, gene changes involved pathways such as HMGB-1, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, IL-8, janus kinase/signal tranducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT), interferon, and ERK 5 signaling (P < 0.01). By 24 hours, prominent pathways included P53- and Myc-induced apoptotic processes, pancreatic adenocarcinoma signaling, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/v-akt murine thymoma vial oncogene homolog 1 (PI3/AKT) pathways. Conclusions: Our study reveals the ability to assess time-dependent changes in gene expression patterns in pancreatic cancer cells associated with infection and susceptibility to vaccinia viruses. This suggests that molecular assays may be useful to develop safer and more efficacious oncolyticvirotherapies and support the idea that these treatments may target pathways implicated in pancreatic cancer resistance to conventional therapies. PMID:27119120

  1. Interaction of poxvirus intracellular mature virion proteins with the TPR domain of kinesin light chain in live infected cells revealed by two-photon-induced fluorescence resonance energy transfer fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jeshtadi, Ananya; Burgos, Pierre; Stubbs, Christopher D; Parker, Anthony W; King, Linda A; Skinner, Michael A; Botchway, Stanley W

    2010-12-01

    Using two-photon-induced fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we corroborate an interaction (previously demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid domain analysis) of full-length vaccinia virus (VACV; an orthopoxvirus) A36 protein with the cellular microtubule motor protein kinesin. Quenching of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), fused to the C terminus of VACV A36, by monomeric red fluorescent protein (mDsRed), fused to the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain of kinesin, was observed in live chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with either modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) or wild-type fowlpox virus (FWPV; an avipoxvirus), and the excited-state fluorescence lifetime of EGFP was reduced from 2.5 ± 0.1 ns to 2.1 ± 0.1 ns due to resonance energy transfer to mDsRed. FWPV does not encode an equivalent of intracellular enveloped virion surface protein A36, yet it is likely that this virus too must interact with kinesin to facilitate intracellular virion transport. To investigate possible interactions between innate FWPV proteins and kinesin, recombinant FWPVs expressing EGFP fused to the N termini of FWPV structural proteins Fpv140, Fpv168, Fpv191, and Fpv198 (equivalent to VACV H3, A4, p4c, and A34, respectively) were generated. EGFP fusions of intracellular mature virion (IMV) surface protein Fpv140 and type II membrane protein Fpv198 were quenched by mDsRed-TPR in recombinant FWPV-infected cells, indicating that these virion proteins are found within 10 nm of mDsRed-TPR. In contrast, and as expected, EGFP fusions of the IMV core protein Fpv168 did not show any quenching. Interestingly, the p4c-like protein Fpv191, which demonstrates late association with preassembled IMV, also did not show any quenching.

  2. The Structure of the Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 ORF112-Zα·Z-DNA Complex Reveals a Mechanism of Nucleic Acids Recognition Conserved with E3L, a Poxvirus Inhibitor of Interferon Response.

    PubMed

    Kuś, Krzysztof; Rakus, Krzysztof; Boutier, Maxime; Tsigkri, Theokliti; Gabriel, Luisa; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Athanasiadis, Alekos

    2015-12-25

    In vertebrate species, the innate immune system down-regulates protein translation in response to viral infection through the action of the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR). In some teleost species another protein kinase, Z-DNA-dependent protein kinase (PKZ), plays a similar role but instead of dsRNA binding domains, PKZ has Zα domains. These domains recognize the left-handed conformer of dsDNA and dsRNA known as Z-DNA/Z-RNA. Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 infects common and koi carp, which have PKZ, and encodes the ORF112 protein that itself bears a Zα domain, a putative competitive inhibitor of PKZ. Here we present the crystal structure of ORF112-Zα in complex with an 18-bp CpG DNA repeat, at 1.5 Å. We demonstrate that the bound DNA is in the left-handed conformation and identify key interactions for the specificity of ORF112. Localization of ORF112 protein in stress granules induced in Cyprinid herpesvirus 3-infected fish cells suggests a functional behavior similar to that of Zα domains of the interferon-regulated, nucleic acid surveillance proteins ADAR1 and DAI. PMID:26559969

  3. Infection with Possible Novel Parapoxvirus in Horse, Finland, 2013.

    PubMed

    Airas, Niina; Hautaniemi, Maria; Syrjä, Pernilla; Knuuttila, Anna; Putkuri, Niina; Coulter, Lesley; McInnes, Colin J; Vapalahti, Olli; Huovilainen, Anita; Kinnunen, Paula M

    2016-07-01

    A horse in Finland exhibited generalized granulomatous inflammation and severe proliferative dermatitis. After euthanization, we detected poxvirus DNA from a skin lesion sample. The virus sequence grouped with parapoxviruses, closely resembling a novel poxvirus detected in humans in the United States after horse contact. Our findings indicate horses may be a reservoir for zoonotic parapoxvirus. PMID:27315302

  4. Infection with Possible Novel Parapoxvirus in Horse, Finland, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Hautaniemi, Maria; Syrjä, Pernilla; Knuuttila, Anna; Putkuri, Niina; Coulter, Lesley; McInnes, Colin J.; Vapalahti, Olli; Huovilainen, Anita; Kinnunen, Paula M.

    2016-01-01

    A horse in Finland exhibited generalized granulomatous inflammation and severe proliferative dermatitis. After euthanization, we detected poxvirus DNA from a skin lesion sample. The virus sequence grouped with parapoxviruses, closely resembling a novel poxvirus detected in humans in the United States after horse contact. Our findings indicate horses may be a reservoir for zoonotic parapoxvirus. PMID:27315302

  5. Deficiency of caspase 3 in tumor xenograft impairs therapeutic effect of measles virus Edmoston strain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Biao; Yan, Xu; Guo, Qingguo; Li, Yan; Zhang, Haiyan; Xie, Ji Sheng; Meng, Xin

    2015-06-30

    The oncolytic measles virus Edmonston (MV-Edm) strain shows considerable oncolytic activity against a variety of human tumors. In this study, we report MV-Edm is able to trigger apoptosis pathways in infected tumor cells and elucidate the roles of cellular apoptosis in the whole oncolytic process. We also show that activated caspase 3, a key executioner of apoptosis, plays key roles in the oncolytic virotherapy. Activated caspase 3 can accelerate viral replication in cervical cancer cells and enhance the killing effects of the virus. Deficiency of caspase 3 either in tumor cells or in tumor xenograft significantly desensitized tumor to oncolysis with MV-Edm. In the infected cells, caspase 3 regulates interferon α release, which can inhibit viral replication in neighboring tumor cells. We propose that caspase-3 activation enhances the oncolytic effects of MV-Edm, thus inhibiting tumor growth in mice.

  6. The Oncolytic Efficacy and in Vivo Pharmacokinetics of [2-(4-Chlorophenyl)quinolin-4-yl](piperidine-2-yl)methanol (Vacquinol-1) Are Governed by Distinct Stereochemical Features.

    PubMed

    Hammarström, Lars G J; Harmel, Robert K; Granath, Mikael; Ringom, Rune; Gravenfors, Ylva; Färnegårdh, Katarina; Svensson, Per H; Wennman, David; Lundin, Göran; Roddis, Ylva; Kitambi, Satish S; Bernlind, Alexandra; Lehmann, Fredrik; Ernfors, Patrik

    2016-09-22

    Glioblastoma remains an incurable brain cancer. Drugs developed in the past 20 years have not improved the prognosis for patients, necessitating the development of new treatments. We have previously reported the therapeutic potential of the quinoline methanol Vacquinol-1 (1) that targets glioblastoma cells and induces cell death by catastrophic vacuolization. Compound 1 is a mixture of four stereoisomers due to the two adjacent stereogenic centers in the molecule, complicating further development in the preclinical setting. This work describes the isolation and characterization of the individual isomers of 1 and shows that these display stereospecific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic features. In addition, we present a stereoselective synthesis of the active isomers, providing a basis for further development of this compound series into a novel experimental therapeutic for glioblastoma. PMID:27607569

  7. The E1B19K-deleted oncolytic adenovirus mutant AdΔ19K sensitizes pancreatic cancer cells to drug-induced DNA-damage by down-regulating Claspin and Mre11

    PubMed Central

    Pantelidou, Constantia; Cherubini, Gioia; Lemoine, Nick R.; Halldén, Gunnel

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus-mediated sensitization of cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs depends on simultaneous interactions of early viral genes with cell death and survival pathways. It is unclear what cellular factors mediate these interactions in the presence of DNA-damaging drugs. We found that adenovirus prevents Chk1-mediated checkpoint activation through inactivation of Mre11 and downregulation of the pChk1 adaptor-protein, Claspin, in cells with high levels of DNA-damage induced by the cytotoxic drugs gemcitabine and irinotecan. The mechanisms for Claspin downregulation involve decreased transcription and increased degradation, further attenuating pChk1-mediated signalling. Live cell imaging demonstrated that low doses of gemcitabine caused multiple mitotic aberrations including multipolar spindles, micro- and multi-nucleation and cytokinesis failure. A mutant virus with the anti-apoptotic E1B19K-gene deleted (AdΔ19K) further enhanced cell killing, Claspin downregulation, and potentiated drug-induced DNA damage and mitotic aberrations. Decreased Claspin expression and inactivation of Mre11 contributed to the enhanced cell killing in combination with DNA-damaging drugs. These results reveal novel mechanisms that are utilised by adenovirus to ensure completion of its life cycle in the presence of cellular DNA damage. Taken together, our findings reveal novel cellular targets that may be exploited when developing improved anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:26872382

  8. 76 FR 66728 - Government-Owned Inventions; Licensing and Collaborative Research Opportunity for PANVAC-Cancer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... containing a range of other TAAs such as the T-box transcription factor Brachyury. Market With the..., cytokines, and/or T-cell costimulatory factors, (b) analyze the recombinant poxviruses containing...

  9. Swimming Pools and Molluscum Contagiosum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Travelers' Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Swimming Pools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The ... often ask if molluscum virus can spread in swimming pools. There is also concern that it can ...

  10. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Treatment 2003 U.S. Outbreak African Rodent Importation Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox ... Examining Animals with Suspected Monkeypox African Rodent Importation Ban Resources Related Links Poxvirus Molluscum Contagiosum Orf Virus ( ...

  11. Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Treatment 2003 U.S. Outbreak African Rodent Importation Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox ... Examining Animals with Suspected Monkeypox African Rodent Importation Ban Resources Related Links Poxvirus Molluscum Contagiosum Orf Virus ( ...

  12. Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Treatment 2003 U.S. Outbreak African Rodent Importation Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox ... Examining Animals with Suspected Monkeypox African Rodent Importation Ban Resources Related Links Poxvirus Molluscum Contagiosum Orf Virus ( ...

  13. About Monkeypox

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Treatment 2003 U.S. Outbreak African Rodent Importation Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox ... Examining Animals with Suspected Monkeypox African Rodent Importation Ban Resources Related Links Poxvirus Molluscum Contagiosum Orf Virus ( ...

  14. 78 FR 23207 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing of a Yersinia Pestis Vaccine, Live...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing of a Yersinia Pestis Vaccine, Live Raccoon Poxvirus Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection... Plant Health Inspection Service has prepared an environmental assessment concerning authorization...

  15. Trial Watch:

    PubMed Central

    Pol, Jonathan; Bloy, Norma; Obrist, Florine; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jérôme; Cremer, Isabelle; Erbs, Philippe; Limacher, Jean-Marc; Preville, Xavier; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are natural or genetically modified viral species that selectively infect and kill neoplastic cells. Such an innate or exogenously conferred specificity has generated considerable interest around the possibility to employ oncolytic viruses as highly targeted agents that would mediate cancer cell-autonomous anticancer effects. Accumulating evidence, however, suggests that the therapeutic potential of oncolytic virotherapy is not a simple consequence of the cytopathic effect, but strongly relies on the induction of an endogenous immune response against transformed cells. In line with this notion, superior anticancer effects are being observed when oncolytic viruses are engineered to express (or co-administered with) immunostimulatory molecules. Although multiple studies have shown that oncolytic viruses are well tolerated by cancer patients, the full-blown therapeutic potential of oncolytic virotherapy, especially when implemented in the absence of immunostimulatory interventions, remains unclear. Here, we cover the latest advances in this active area of translational investigation, summarizing high-impact studies that have been published during the last 12 months and discussing clinical trials that have been initiated in the same period to assess the therapeutic potential of oncolytic virotherapy in oncological indications. PMID:25097804

  16. Limited infection upon human exposure to a recombinant raccoon pox vaccine vector.

    PubMed

    Rocke, Tonie E; Dein, F Joshua; Fuchsberger, Martina; Fox, Barry C; Stinchcomb, Dan T; Osorio, Jorge E

    2004-07-29

    A laboratory accident resulted in human exposure to a recombinant raccoon poxvirus (RCN) developed as a vaccine vector for antigens of Yersinia pestis for protection of wild rodents (and other animals) against plague. Within 9 days, the patient developed a small blister that healed within 4 weeks. Raccoon poxvirus was cultured from the lesion, and the patient developed antibody to plague antigen (F1) and RCN. This is the first documented case of human exposure to RCN.

  17. Limited human infection due to recombinant raccoon pox virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, T.E.; Dein, F.J.; Fuchsberger, M.; Fox, B.C.; Stinchcomb, D.T.; Osorio, J.G.

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory accident resulted in human exposure to a recombinant raccoon poxvirus (RCN) developed as a vaccine vector for antigens of Yersinia pestis for protection of wild rodents (and other animals) against plague. Within 9 days, the patient developed a small blister that healed within 4 weeks. Raccoon poxvirus was cultured from the lesion, and the patient developed antibody to plague antigen (F1) and RCN. This is the first documented case of human exposure to RCN.

  18. Vaccinia virus-mediated melanin production allows MR and optoacoustic deep tissue imaging and laser-induced thermotherapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Stritzker, Jochen; Kirscher, Lorenz; Scadeng, Miriam; Deliolanis, Nikolaos C; Morscher, Stefan; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Schaefer, Karin; Zhang, Qian; Buckel, Lisa; Hess, Michael; Donat, Ulrike; Bradley, William G; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Szalay, Aladar A

    2013-02-26

    We reported earlier the delivery of antiangiogenic single chain antibodies by using oncolytic vaccinia virus strains to enhance their therapeutic efficacy. Here, we provide evidence that gene-evoked production of melanin can be used as a therapeutic and diagnostic mediator, as exemplified by insertion of only one or two genes into the genome of an oncolytic vaccinia virus strain. We found that produced melanin is an excellent reporter for optical imaging without addition of substrate. Melanin production also facilitated deep tissue optoacoustic imaging as well as MRI. In addition, melanin was shown to be a suitable target for laser-induced thermotherapy and enhanced oncolytic viral therapy. In conclusion, melanin as a mediator for thermotherapy and reporter for different imaging modalities may soon become a versatile alternative to replace fluorescent proteins also in other biological systems. After ongoing extensive preclinical studies, melanin overproducing oncolytic virus strains might be used in clinical trials in patients with cancer.

  19. Trial watch

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is emerging as a promising approach for the treatment of several neoplasms. The term “oncolytic viruses” is generally employed to indicate naturally occurring or genetically engineered attenuated viral particles that cause the demise of malignant cells while sparing their non-transformed counterparts. From a conceptual standpoint, oncolytic viruses differ from so-called “oncotropic viruses” in that only the former are able to kill cancer cells, even though both display a preferential tropism for malignant tissues. Of note, such a specificity can originate at several different steps of the viral cycle, including the entry of virions (transductional specificity) as well as their intracellular survival and replication (post-transcriptional and transcriptional specificity). During the past two decades, a large array of replication-competent and replication-incompetent oncolytic viruses has been developed and engineered to express gene products that would specifically promote the death of infected (cancer) cells. However, contrarily to long-standing beliefs, the antineoplastic activity of oncolytic viruses is not a mere consequence of the cytopathic effect, i.e., the lethal outcome of an intense, productive viral infection, but rather involves the elicitation of an antitumor immune response. In line with this notion, oncolytic viruses genetically modified to drive the local production of immunostimulatory cytokines exert more robust therapeutic effects than their non-engineered counterparts. Moreover, the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy is significantly improved by some extent of initial immunosuppression (facilitating viral replication and spread) followed by the administration of immunostimulatory molecules (boosting antitumor immune responses). In this Trial Watch, we will discuss the results of recent clinical trials that have evaluated/are evaluating the safety and antineoplastic potential of oncolytic virotherapy. PMID:23894720

  20. Harnessing the Power of Onco-Immunotherapy with Checkpoint Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rajani, Karishma R.; Vile, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses represent a diverse class of replication competent viruses that curtail tumor growth. These viruses, through their natural ability or through genetic modifications, can selectively replicate within tumor cells and induce cell death while leaving normal cells intact. Apart from the direct oncolytic activity, these viruses mediate tumor cell death via the induction of innate and adaptive immune responses. The field of oncolytic viruses has seen substantial advancement with the progression of numerous oncolytic viruses in various phases of clinical trials. Tumors employ a plethora of mechanisms to establish growth and subsequently metastasize. These include evasion of immune surveillance by inducing up-regulation of checkpoint proteins which function to abrogate T cell effector functions. Currently, antibodies blocking checkpoint proteins such as anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and anti-programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) have been approved to treat cancer and shown to impart durable clinical responses. These antibodies typically need pre-existing active immune tumor microenvironment to establish durable clinical outcomes and not every patient responds to these therapies. This review provides an overview of published pre-clinical studies demonstrating superior therapeutic efficacy of combining oncolytic viruses with checkpoint blockade compared to monotherapies. These studies provide compelling evidence that oncolytic therapy can be potentiated by coupling it with checkpoint therapies. PMID:26580645

  1. Molecular weight of DNA from four entomopoxviruses determined by electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Langridge, W H; Roberts, D W

    1977-01-01

    DNA was isolated from entomopoxviruses infected Amsacta moorei and Euxoa auxiliaris (Lepidoptera), Goeldichironomus holoprasinus (Diptera), and Othnonius batesi (Coleoptera) and compared with vertebrate virus DNA (vaccinia). After incubation in Pronase, sodium lauryl sulfate, and deoxycholate, poxvirus preparations shadowed with platinum and palladium revealed subcore particles 45 to 60 nm in diameter. Continued incubation in Pronase resulted in the gradual release of DNA from the particles. Metal-shadowed DNA molecules were photographed in the electron microscope and measured, and the average molecular weights were calculated. Lepidopteran poxvirus DNA (135 X 10(6)) was approximately equal to vaccinia DNA (131.7 X 10(6)) in molecular weight. The molecular weight of dipteran and coleopteran poxvirus DNA (200 X 10(6) to 251 X 10(6)) was approximately 50% greater than vaccinia DNA. Based on the concentration of DNA and protein per virion, Amsacta entomopoxvirus contained 5.7 to 7.7% DNA. Images PMID:833926

  2. Neutrophils recruited to sites of infection protect from virus challenge by releasing neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Jenne, Craig N; Wong, Connie H Y; Zemp, Franz J; McDonald, Braedon; Rahman, Masmudur M; Forsyth, Peter A; McFadden, Grant; Kubes, Paul

    2013-02-13

    Neutrophils mediate bacterial clearance through various mechanisms, including the release of mesh-like DNA structures or neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that capture bacteria. Although neutrophils are also recruited to sites of viral infection, their role in antiviral innate immunity is less clear. We show that systemic administration of virus analogs or poxvirus infection induces neutrophil recruitment to the liver microvasculature and the release of NETs that protect host cells from virus infection. After systemic intravenous poxvirus challenge, mice exhibit thrombocytopenia and the recruitment of both neutrophils and platelets to the liver vasculature. Circulating platelets interact with, roll along, and adhere to the surface of adherent neutrophils, forming large, dynamic aggregates. These interactions facilitate the release of NETs within the liver vasculature that are able to protect host cells from poxvirus infection. These findings highlight the role of NETs and early tissue-wide responses in preventing viral infection.

  3. Avian pox infection with secondary Candida albicans encephalitis in a juvenile golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos).

    PubMed

    Shrubsole-Cockwill, Alana N; Millins, Caroline; Jardine, Claire; Kachur, Kelti; Parker, Dennilyn L

    2010-03-01

    Abstract: A juvenile golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) was presented with proliferative epithelial lesions, consistent with avian poxvirus infection, around the eyes, on commissures of the beak, and on both feet. Despite treatment, the eagle declined clinically, and, 15 days after presentation, the eagle began seizuring and was euthanatized because of a poor prognosis. On postmortem examination, avian poxvirus infection was confirmed in the nodular skin lesions, and Candida albicans was cultured from the skin, lungs, and brain. Breaks in the skin barrier from poxvirus infection likely led to secondary infection with C albicans. Systemic vascular dissemination of C albicans to the brain resulted in thrombosis, hemorrhage, local hypoxia, and the clinically observed seizures. The combination of the breach in the primary immune system, immunosuppression, and a prolonged course of antibiotics were contributory factors to the opportunistic fungal infection in this eagle. Candida albicans should be considered as a differential diagnosis for encephalitis in an immunocompromised avian patient. PMID:20496607

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of three genes of Penguinpox virus corresponding to Vaccinia virus G8R (VLTF-1), A3L (P4b) and H3L reveals that it is most closely related to Turkeypox virus, Ostrichpox virus and Pigeonpox virus.

    PubMed

    Carulei, Olivia; Douglass, Nicola; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of three genes of Penguinpox virus, a novel Avipoxvirus isolated from African penguins, reveals its relationship to other poxviruses. The genes corresponding to Vaccinia virus G8R (VLTF-1), A3L (P4b) and H3L were sequenced and phylogenetic trees (Neighbour-Joining and UPGMA) constructed from MUSCLE nucleotide and amino acid alignments of the equivalent sequences from several different poxviruses. Based on this analysis, PEPV was confirmed to belong to the genus Avipoxvirus, specifically, clade A, subclade A2 and to be most closely related to Turkeypox virus (TKPV), Ostrichpox virus (OSPV)and Pigeonpox virus (PGPV).

  5. In vitro characterization of a nineteenth-century therapy for smallpox.

    PubMed

    Arndt, William; Mitnik, Chandra; Denzler, Karen L; White, Stacy; Waters, Robert; Jacobs, Bertram L; Rochon, Yvan; Olson, Victoria A; Damon, Inger K; Langland, Jeffrey O

    2012-01-01

    In the nineteenth century, smallpox ravaged through the United States and Canada. At this time, a botanical preparation, derived from the carnivorous plant Sarracenia purpurea, was proclaimed as being a successful therapy for smallpox infections. The work described characterizes the antipoxvirus activity associated with this botanical extract against vaccinia virus, monkeypox virus and variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox. Our work demonstrates the in vitro characterization of Sarracenia purpurea as the first effective inhibitor of poxvirus replication at the level of early viral transcription. With the renewed threat of poxvirus-related infections, our results indicate Sarracenia purpurea may act as another defensive measure against Orthopoxvirus infections.

  6. Avian pox in eastern screech owls and barred owls from Florida.

    PubMed

    Deern, S L; Heard, D J; Fox, J H

    1997-04-01

    Avian pox was diagnosed in two eastern screech owls (Otus asio) and two barred owls (Strix, varia) living in different regions of Florida (USA) between November 1994 and October 1995. Avian poxvirus infection was confirmed by the presence of eosinophilic intracytoplasmic epidermal inclusions (Bollinger bodies) on light microscopy of tissue from all four owls. Additionally, typical poxvirus particles were demonstrated by electron microscopy of a lesion from one of the eastern screech owls. These are the first published case reports of avian pox in eastern screech owls and barred owls.

  7. Vaccinia Virus N1l Protein Resembles a B Cell Lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) Family Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyagi, M.; Zhai, D.; Jin, C.; Aleshin, A.E.; Stec, B.; Reed, J.C.; Liddington, R.C.; /Burnham Inst.

    2007-07-03

    Poxviruses encode immuno-modulatory proteins capable of subverting host defenses. The poxvirus vaccinia expresses a small 14-kDa protein, N1L, that is critical for virulence. We report the crystal structure of N1L, which reveals an unexpected but striking resemblance to host apoptotic regulators of the B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family. Although N1L lacks detectable Bcl-2 homology (BH) motifs at the sequence level, we show that N1L binds with high affinity to the BH3 peptides of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins in vitro, consistent with a role for N1L in modulating host antiviral defenses.

  8. Viruses and virus diseases of marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Smith, A W; Skilling, D E

    1979-11-01

    Poxvirus and several serotypes of calicivirus cause recognizable disease in marine mammals. Pox lesions in pinnipeds are raised and proliferative and are seen most frequently after confinement in captivity. In cetaceans, a poxvirus is associated with a much more benign and chronic lesion called a "tattoo." Numerous caliciviruses of differing antigenic types have been isolated from vesicular lesions and aborted fetuses of northern fur seals and California sea lions as well as from clinically normal and orphaned northern elephant seal pups. An adenovirus has been isolated from a sei whale and an enterovirus has been isolated from a gray whale. PMID:230170

  9. An update on the vaccinia virus genome.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G P; Goebel, S J; Paoletti, E

    1993-10-01

    This communication is intended as a single source update of the initial report (Goebel et al., 1990a,b) which described the complete DNA sequence of the vaccinia virus genome. We have integrated published information as well as unpublished data. Our understanding of the complexities of the genetic functional organization of poxviruses is increasing at a remarkable rate. While some previously unknown identities have since been elucidated, the fact that the majority of vaccinia-encoded gene products still lack assigned functions lends excitement to the immediate future of poxvirus research.

  10. Targeted Hsp70 expression combined with CIK-activated immune reconstruction synergistically exerts antitumor efficacy in patient-derived hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft mouse models.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huanzhang; Qiu, Yinghe; Guo, Minggao; Huang, Yao; Fang, Lin; Peng, Zhangxiao; Ji, Weidan; Xu, Yang; Shen, Shuwen; Yan, Yan; Huang, Xuandong; Zheng, Junnian; Su, Changqing

    2015-01-20

    The patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDTX) models can reproduce a similar natural genetic background and similar biological behaviors to tumor cells in patients, which is conducive to the assessment of personalized cancer treatment. In this study, to verify the targeting and effectiveness of the therapeutic strategy using a Survivin promoter-regulated oncolytic adenovirus expressing Hsp70, the PDTX models of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were established in nude mice and the cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells were intravenously infused into mice to partially reconstruct the mouse immune function. The results demonstrated that, either the immune anti-tumor effect caused by CIK cell infusion or the oncolytic effect generated by oncolytic adenovirus replication was very limited. However, the synergistic tumor inhibitory effect was significantly enhanced after treatments with oncolytic adenovirus expressing Hsp70 combined with CIK cells. Oncolytic adenovirus mediated the specific expression of Hsp70 in cancer tissues allowed the CIK chemotaxis, and induce the infiltration of CD3+ T cells in tumor stroma, thereby exhibiting anti-tumor activity. The anti-tumor effect was more effective for the highly malignant tumor xenografts with highly Survivin expression. This strategy can synergistically activate multiple anti-tumor mechanisms and exert effective anti-tumor activities that have a significant inhibitory effect against the growth of HCC xenografts.

  11. A Multi Targeting Conditionally Replicating Adenovirus Displays Enhanced Oncolysis while Maintaining Expression of Immunotherapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, G Clement; Ugai, Hideyo; Curiel, David T; Gillespie, G Yancey

    2015-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that oncolytic adenoviruses based on a 24 base pair deletion in the viral E1A gene (D24) may be promising therapeutics for treating a number of cancer types. In order to increase the therapeutic potential of these oncolytic viruses, a novel conditionally replicating adenovirus targeting multiple receptors upregulated on tumors was generated by incorporating an Ad5/3 fiber with a carboxyl terminus RGD ligand. The virus displayed full cytopathic effect in all tumor lines assayed at low titers with improved cytotoxicity over Ad5-RGD D24, Ad5/3 D24 and an HSV oncolytic virus. The virus was then engineered to deliver immunotherapeutic agents such as GM-CSF while maintaining enhanced heterogenic oncolysis. PMID:26689910

  12. A Multi Targeting Conditionally Replicating Adenovirus Displays Enhanced Oncolysis while Maintaining Expression of Immunotherapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Dobbins, G. Clement; Ugai, Hideyo; Curiel, David T.; Gillespie, G. Yancey

    2015-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that oncolytic adenoviruses based on a 24 base pair deletion in the viral E1A gene (D24) may be promising therapeutics for treating a number of cancer types. In order to increase the therapeutic potential of these oncolytic viruses, a novel conditionally replicating adenovirus targeting multiple receptors upregulated on tumors was generated by incorporating an Ad5/3 fiber with a carboxyl terminus RGD ligand. The virus displayed full cytopathic effect in all tumor lines assayed at low titers with improved cytotoxicity over Ad5-RGD D24, Ad5/3 D24 and an HSV oncolytic virus. The virus was then engineered to deliver immunotherapeutic agents such as GM-CSF while maintaining enhanced heterogenic oncolysis. PMID:26689910

  13. Misplaced batteries result in lead poisoning in suckler cows.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Lead poisoning in suckler herdsBovine abortion associated with spoiled or contaminated feedListerial meningoencephalitis in ewesProliferative haemorrhagic enteropathy in pigsPoxvirus infection in a bantam These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for February 2016 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). PMID:27256261

  14. Nigericin is a potent inhibitor of the early stage of vaccinia virus replication.

    PubMed

    Myskiw, Chad; Piper, Jessica; Huzarewich, Rhiannon; Booth, Tim F; Cao, Jingxin; He, Runtao

    2010-12-01

    Poxviruses remain a significant public health concern due to their potential use as bioterrorist agents and the spread of animal borne poxviruses, such as monkeypox virus, to humans. Thus, the identification of small molecule inhibitors of poxvirus replication is warranted. Vaccinia virus is the prototypic member of the Orthopoxvirus genus, which also includes variola and monkeypox virus. In this study, we demonstrate that the carboxylic ionophore nigericin is a potent inhibitor of vaccinia virus replication in several human cell lines. In HeLa cells, we found that the 50% inhibitory concentration of nigericin against vaccinia virus was 7.9 nM, with a selectivity index of 1038. We present data demonstrating that nigericin targets vaccinia virus replication at a post-entry stage. While nigericin moderately inhibits both early vaccinia gene transcription and translation, viral DNA replication and intermediate and late gene expression are severely compromised in the presence of nigericin. Our results demonstrate that nigericin has the potential to be further developed into an effective antiviral to treat poxvirus infections. PMID:20951746

  15. Pathology and preliminary characterization of a parapoxvirus isolated from a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus).

    PubMed

    Nollens, Hendrik H; Jacobson, Elliott R; Gulland, Frances M D; Beusse, Diedrich O; Bossart, Gregory D; Hernandez, Jorge A; Klein, Paul A; Condit, Richard C

    2006-01-01

    Cutaneous pox-like lesions are a common complication in the rehabilitation of pinnipeds. However, the exact identity, taxonomy, and host range of pinniped parapoxviruses remain unknown. During a poxvirus outbreak in May 2003 in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) at a marine mammal rehabilitation facility, multiple raised, firm, 1-3-cm skin nodules from the head, neck, and thorax of one sea lion weanling pup that spontaneously died were collected. Histologically, the nodules were characterized by inflammation and necrosis of the dermis and epidermis, acanthosis, and ballooning degeneration of the stratum spinosum. Large, coalescing eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusions were observed in the ballooned cells. A parapoxvirus (sea lion poxvirus 1, SLPV-1) was isolated on early passage California sea lion kidney cells inoculated with a tissue homogenate of a skin nodule. The morphology of the virions on electron microscopy was consistent with that of parapoxviruses. Partial sequencing of the genomic region encoding the putative major virion envelope antigen p42K confirmed the assignment of the sea lion poxvirus to the genus Parapoxvirus. Although SLPV-1 is most closely related to the poxvirus of harbor seals of the European North Sea, it is significantly different from orf virus, bovine papular stomatitis virus, pseudocowpox virus and the parapoxvirus of New Zealand red deer.

  16. Contagious ecthyma in mountain goat of coastal British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Hebert, D M; Samuel, W M; Smith, G W

    1977-04-01

    Contagious ecthyma has been reported previously from mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) in one restricted area of eastern British Columbia. A second focus of infection is reported for mountain goat from western British Columbia. Diagnosis was based on appearance of lesions at necropsy, histopathology and demonstration of poxvirus with the electron microscope. The epizootiology of this infection in mountain goat is discussed briefly.

  17. Exploring targeted pulmonary delivery for treatment of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Amit; Baboota, Sanjula; Sahni, Jasjeet K; Ali, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most malignant cancer today. The treatment of lung cancer continues to be a challenge for oncologists. The direct delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the lungs could represent a novel therapeutic approach for patients with pulmonary metastases. The large alveolar surface area, the low thickness of the epithelial barrier, and an extensive vascularization make the pulmonary route an ideal route for administration of oncolytics. This paper reviews the research performed over the last and current decades on the delivery of various oncolytics for pulmonary delivery for the treatment of lung cancer. Inhaled drug delivery devices in cancer therapy are also discussed in the present manuscript. PMID:23799201

  18. Cancer and viruses: a double-edged sword.

    PubMed

    Butt, Aisha Q; Miggin, Sinéad M

    2012-07-01

    Oncovirus, synonymously called a 'tumour virus', is a virus that can cause cancer. An oncolytic virus preferentially infects the host's cancer cells and lyses them, causing tumour destruction, and is thus referred to as a 'cancer killing virus'. With an estimated 11% of cancer-associated deaths caused by oncoviruses and the possibility that many cancers may be treated by using oncolytic viruses, the role of viruses in cancer may be viewed as a double-edged sword. A total of seven human cancer viruses have been identified as oncoviruses, having been associated with various cancers. Conversely, a large number of oncolytic viruses have shown great potential towards the treatment of certain types of cancer. Proteomics has now been applied towards understanding the complex interplay that exists between oncoviruses and the immune responses that serve to prevent oncoviral diseases. This review attempts to summarise the neoplastic potential of human tumour associated viruses and associated vaccine successes. The potential use of oncolytic viruses for the therapeutic intervention of cancer will also be discussed. Finally, this review will discuss the enormous potential of proteomics technology in the field of oncovirology.

  19. Genome sequence of tumor virus x, a member of the genus protoparvovirus in the family parvoviridae.

    PubMed

    Vollmers, Ellen M; D'Abramo, Anthony; Cotmore, Susan F; Tattersall, Peter

    2014-07-31

    The orphan parvovirus tumor virus X (TVX) has potent oncolytic activity. Compared to other viruses from the species Rodent protoparvovirus 1, TVX has a 111 nucleotide deletion in its nonstructural (NS) gene, a 24 nucleotide insertion in VP1, and a 93 nucleotide repeat initiating from the C-terminus of the capsid gene.

  20. Expressing foreign genes by Newcastle disease virus for cancer therapy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An interesting aspect of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is the ability to selectively replicate in tumor cells. Recently, using reverse genetics technology to enhance the oncolytic properties and therapeutic potential of NDV for tumor therapy has become popular in immunocompetent carcinoma tumor mod...

  1. Ablation of nectin4 binding compromises CD46 usage by a hybrid vesicular stomatitis virus/measles virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ping; Russell, Samuel P; Ayala-Breton, Camilo; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2014-02-01