Science.gov

Sample records for general chemistry expanding

  1. An Expanded Framework for Analyzing General Chemistry Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, K. Christopher; Nakhleh, Mary B.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an expanded framework to aid chemical educators in constructing exams for their courses. The framework has three primary levels: definition, algorithmic, and conceptual. These primary levels have often been used in chemical education research to analyze and describe exam questions, but in this study the definition,…

  2. General Chemistry: Expanding the Learning Outcomes and Promoting Interdisciplinary Connections through the Use of a Semester-Long Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    The laboratory component of a first-semester general chemistry course for science majors is described. The laboratory involves a semester-long project undertaken in a small-group format. Students are asked to examine whether plants grown in soil contaminated with lead take up more lead than those grown in uncontaminated soil. They are also asked…

  3. General Chemistry: Expanding the Learning Outcomes and Promoting Interdisciplinary Connections through the Use of a Semester-long Project

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    The laboratory component of a first-semester general chemistry course for science majors is described. The laboratory involves a semester-long project undertaken in a small-group format. Students are asked to examine whether plants grown in soil contaminated with lead take up more lead than those grown in uncontaminated soil. They are also asked to examine whether the acidity of the rainwater affects the amount of lead taken up by the plants. Groups are then given considerable independence in the design and implementation of the experiment. Once the seeds are planted, which takes about 4 wk into the term, several shorter experiments are integrated in before it is time to harvest and analyze the plants. The use of a project and small working groups allows for the development of a broader range of learning outcomes than occurs in a “traditional” general chemistry laboratory. The nature of these outcomes and some of the student responses to the laboratory experience are described. This particular project also works well at demonstrating the connections among chemistry, biology, geology, and environmental studies. PMID:17012193

  4. General chemistry: expanding the learning outcomes and promoting interdisciplinary connections through the use of a semester-long project.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    The laboratory component of a first-semester general chemistry course for science majors is described. The laboratory involves a semester-long project undertaken in a small-group format. Students are asked to examine whether plants grown in soil contaminated with lead take up more lead than those grown in uncontaminated soil. They are also asked to examine whether the acidity of the rainwater affects the amount of lead taken up by the plants. Groups are then given considerable independence in the design and implementation of the experiment. Once the seeds are planted, which takes about 4 wk into the term, several shorter experiments are integrated in before it is time to harvest and analyze the plants. The use of a project and small working groups allows for the development of a broader range of learning outcomes than occurs in a "traditional" general chemistry laboratory. The nature of these outcomes and some of the student responses to the laboratory experience are described. This particular project also works well at demonstrating the connections among chemistry, biology, geology, and environmental studies.

  5. Chemistry as General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tro, Nivaldo J.

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy of different science and chemistry courses for science-major and non-major students, and the question of chemistry's contribution to general education are evaluated. Chemistry and science curriculum are too profession- and consumer-oriented, and to overcome this problem, it is advised that all disciplines must incorporate the major…

  6. General Chemistry for Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kybett, B. D.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between molecular structure, intermolecular forces, and tensile strengths of a polymer and suggests that this is a logical way to introduce polymers into a general chemistry course. (Author/JN)

  7. General Chemistry, 1970 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunham, Orson W.; Franke, Douglas C.

    This publication is a syllabus for a senior high school chemistry course designed for the average ability, nonscience major. The content of the syllabus is divided into three basic core areas: Area I: Similarities and Dissimilarities of Matter (9 weeks); Area II: Preparation and Separation of Substances (10 weeks); Area III: Structure and…

  8. ACS Expands Role In High School Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Describes some of the services and programs of special interests to high school chemistry teachers that are being provided by ACS, and meant to make ACS membership more attractive to the teachers. (GA)

  9. Investigating expanded chemistry in CMAQ clouds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clouds and fogs significantly impact the amount, composition, and spatial distribution of gas and particulate atmospheric species, not least of which through the chemistry that occurs in cloud droplets.ᅠ Atmospheric sulfate is an important component of fine aerosol mass an...

  10. [Pharmaceutical chemistry of general anaesthetics].

    PubMed

    Szász, György; Takácsné, Novák Krisztina

    2004-01-01

    The paper represents the first part of a planned series of reviews about pharmaceutical chemistry of drugs acting on the central nervous system. The authorial aim and editorial concepts are the same were followed in a former series of papers about pharmaceutical chemistry of agents effecting the heart, blood circulation and vegetative nervous system. Consequently, general anaesthetics are discussed in the present paper through the chapters "history, preparation; structure-properties-activity; application; analysis".

  11. Instructor's Guide for General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    The first part of this curriculum guide for a college-level general chemistry course includes: (1) a list of 28 lectures/lessons with topic titles and content divisions; (2) behavioral objectives related to specific lessons; (3) a list of laboratory activities and objectives; (4) a course overview and syllabus for spring semester 1981; and (5) a…

  12. General Chemistry for Waste Handlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sixtus, Michael E.

    This manual is intended for use in presenting a course which provides the content-specific general chemistry education required for the safety awareness and job enhancement of persons employed as waste handlers. The course, which was designed to be delivered to technicians at job sites in a lecture/demonstration format with several hands-on…

  13. Affordances of Instrumentation in General Chemistry Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Kristin Mary Daniels

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out what students in the first chemistry course at the undergraduate level (general chemistry for science majors) know about the affordances of instrumentation used in the general chemistry laboratory and how their knowledge develops over time. Overall, students see the PASCO(TM) system as a useful and accurate…

  14. General chemistry students' understanding of the chemistry underlying climate science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versprille, Ashley N.

    The purpose of this study is to investigate first-semester general chemistry students' understanding of the chemistry underlying climate change. The first part of this study involves the collection of qualitative data from twenty-four first-semester general chemistry students from a large Midwestern research institution. The semi-structured interview protocol was developed based on alternative conceptions identified in the research literature and the essential principles of climate change outlined in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) document which pertain to chemistry (CCSP, 2003). The analysis and findings from the interviews indicate conceptual difficulties for students, both with basic climate literacy and underlying chemistry concepts. Students seem to confuse the greenhouse effect, global warming, and the ozone layer, and in terms of chemistry concepts, they lack a particulate level understanding of greenhouse gases and their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, causing them to not fully conceptualize the greenhouse effect and climate change. Based on the findings from these interviews, a Chemistry of Climate Science Diagnostic Instrument (CCSI) was developed for use in courses that teach chemistry with a rich context such as climate science. The CCSI is designed for professors who want to teach general chemistry, while also addressing core climate literacy principles. It will help professors examine their students' prior knowledge and alternative conceptions of the chemistry concepts associated with climate science, which could then inform their teaching and instruction.

  15. A Comprehensive General Chemistry Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeder, Ryan D.; Jeffery, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the use of a comprehensive demonstration suitable for a high school or first-year undergraduate introductory chemistry class. The demonstration involves placing a burning candle in a container adjacent to a beaker containing a basic solution with indicator. After adding a lid, the candle will extinguish and the produced…

  16. Affordances of instrumentation in general chemistry laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Kristin Mary Daniels

    The purpose of this study is to find out what students in the first chemistry course at the undergraduate level (general chemistry for science majors) know about the affordances of instrumentation used in the general chemistry laboratory and how their knowledge develops over time. Overall, students see the PASCO(TM) system as a useful and accurate measuring tool for general chemistry labs. They see the probeware as easy to use, portable, and able to interact with computers. Students find that the PASCO(TM) probeware system is useful in their general chemistry labs, more advanced chemistry labs, and in other science classes, and can be used in a variety of labs done in general chemistry. Students learn the affordances of the probeware through the lab manual, the laboratory teaching assistant, by trial and error, and from each other. The use of probeware systems provides lab instructors the opportunity to focus on the concepts illustrated by experiments and the opportunity to spend time discussing the results. In order to teach effectively, the instructor must know the correct name of the components involved, how to assemble and disassemble it correctly, how to troubleshoot the software, and must be able to replace broken or missing components quickly. The use of podcasts or Web-based videos should increase student understanding of affordances of the probeware.

  17. Learning Cycles in the General Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whisnant, David M.

    1983-01-01

    Three-phased learning cycles (exploration, invention, application) were introduced into general chemistry laboratories at Northland College (Wisconsin). Discusses each phase and its use in a learning cycle on the functional groups of organic compounds. (JN)

  18. Expanding coordination chemistry from protein to protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Sanghamitra, Nusrat J M; Ueno, Takafumi

    2013-05-14

    Bioinorganic chemistry is of growing importance in the fields of nanomaterial science and biotechnology. Coordination of metals by biological systems is a crucial step in intricate enzymatic reactions such as photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and biomineralization. Although such systems employ protein assemblies as molecular scaffolds, the important roles of protein assemblies in coordination chemistry have not been systematically investigated and characterized. Many researchers are joining the field of bioinorganic chemistry to investigate the inorganic chemistry of protein assemblies. This area is emerging as an important next-generation research field in bioinorganic chemistry. This article reviews recent progress in rational design of protein assemblies in coordination chemistry for integration of catalytic reactions using metal complexes, preparation of mineral biomimetics, and mechanistic investigations of biomineralization processes with protein assemblies. The unique chemical properties of protein assemblies in the form of cages, tubes, and crystals are described in this review.

  19. Peer Mentoring in the General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories: The Pinacol Rearrangement--An Exercise in NMR and IR Spectroscopy for General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrington, Caleb A.; Hill, Jameica B.; Radfar, Ramin; Whisnant, David M.; Bass, Charles G.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a discovery experiment for general chemistry and organic chemistry labs. Although the pinacol rearrangement has been employed in undergraduate organic laboratories before, in this application organic chemistry students act as mentors to students of general chemistry. Students work together using distillation--a new technique…

  20. Measuring Student Performance in General Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Ara C.; Ben-Daat, Hagit; Zhu, Mary; Atkinson, Robert; Barrows, Nathan; Gould, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    Student performance in general organic chemistry courses is determined by a wide range of factors including cognitive ability, motivation and cultural capital. Previous work on cognitive factors has tended to focus on specific areas rather than exploring performance across all problem types and cognitive skills. In this study, we have categorized…

  1. Electrochemistry in the General Chemistry Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, James Q.

    1983-01-01

    Outlines several ideas on introductory electrochemistry material suitable for college-level general chemistry. These include discussions of conductivity in solids and electrolytes, electrical quantities/properties, electrode potentials, and membrane potentials. Indicates that whatever strategy is used to present this material, the presentation…

  2. Defining Conceptual Understanding in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holme, Thomas A.; Luxford, Cynthia J.; Brandriet, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Among the many possible goals that instructors have for students in general chemistry, the idea that they will better understand the conceptual underpinnings of the science is certainly important. Nonetheless, identifying with clarity what exemplifies student success at achieving this goal is hindered by the challenge of clearly articulating what…

  3. A Flipped Classroom Redesign in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The flipped classroom continues to attract significant attention in higher education. Building upon our recent parallel controlled study of the flipped classroom in a second-term general chemistry course ("J. Chem. Educ.," 2016, 93, 13-23), here we report on a redesign of the flipped course aimed at scaling up total enrollment while…

  4. Understanding Quantum Numbers in General Chemistry Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor; Fernandez, Ramon

    2008-01-01

    Quantum numbers and electron configurations form an important part of the general chemistry curriculum and textbooks. The objectives of this study are: (1) Elaboration of a framework based on the following aspects: (a) Origin of the quantum hypothesis, (b) Alternative interpretations of quantum mechanics, (c) Differentiation between an orbital and…

  5. Synthesis of Aspirin: A General Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmsted, John III

    1998-01-01

    Describes the redesign of the first semester general chemistry laboratory at the college level. An organic component is included in the redesign and it provides students with explicit examples of several types of operations in which chemists engage. Contains 16 references. (DDR)

  6. Expanding opportunities for mining bioactive chemistry from patents.

    PubMed

    Southan, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    Bioactive structures published in medicinal chemistry patents typically exceed those in papers by at least twofold and may precede them by several years. The Big-Bang of open automated extraction since 2012 has contributed to over 15 million patent-derived compounds in PubChem. While mapping between chemical structures, assay results and protein targets from patent documents is challenging, these relationships can be harvested using open tools and are beginning to be curated into databases. PMID:26194581

  7. Predicting student success in General Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Daphne Elizabeth

    The goal of this research was to determine the predictors of student success in college level General Chemistry. The potential predictors were categorized as cognitive, non-cognitive, affective, or demographic factors. A broader goal of the study was to provide a reference for academic personnel to better judge the prerequisite skills, knowledge and attitudes that students should attain before enrolling in General Chemistry. Therefore, the study is relevant to chemical educators who are attempting to matriculate candidates for the scientific workforce and to chemical education researches who are interested in student success, student retention and curricular reform. The major hypotheses were that several factors from each category would emerge as significant predictors and that these would differ for students enrolled at three different post-secondary institutions: a community college, a private university and a public university. These hypotheses were tested using multiple regression techniques to analyze grade, student survey and post-test data collected from General Chemistry students at the three institutions. Over-all, twelve factors (six demographic, three cognitive and three affective) emerged as strong, significant predictors of student success. In addition, there were marked differences in which factors emerged based on the type of institution and on how student success was defined. Thus, the major hypotheses of the study were supported. Over-all, this study has significant implications for educational policy, theory, and practice. With regard to policy, there is a need for institutions and departments that offer General Chemistry to provide support for a diverse population of students. And, at the community college level, in particular, there is a need for better academic advising and more institutional support for underprepared students. In the classroom, the professor plays a critical role in influencing students' academic self-concept, which in turn

  8. Synthesis of Aspirin: A General Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmsted, John A., III

    1998-10-01

    An experiment is described that is suitable for the early portion of the laboratory in a general chemistry course and integrates organic examples. It is the two-step synthesis of aspirin starting from oil of wintergreen. The mechanism for this synthesis provides examples of three major classes of chemical reactions: hydrolysis, condensation, and proton transfer. To understand the chemistry, the student must be able to recognize the common molecular framework shared by oil of wintergreen, salicylic acid, and aspirin and to identify the -OH and -CO2 sites where chemical changes occur. The experiment differs in three ways from traditional aspirin synthesis experiments for general chemistry. It is designed to be performed early rather than late; it starts from a naturally occurring material and requires two steps rather than one; and it utilizes FTIR spectroscopy to distinguish among oil of wintergreen starting material, salicylic acid intermediate, and aspirin product. The use of FTIR spectroscopy introduces students to a modern analytical technique that is currently used in research involving aspirin.

  9. Equal spacing and expanding schedules in children's categorization and generalization.

    PubMed

    Vlach, Haley A; Sandhofer, Catherine M; Bjork, Robert A

    2014-07-01

    To understand how generalization develops across the lifespan, researchers have examined the factors of the learning environment that promote the acquisition and generalization of categories. One such factor is the timing of learning events, which recent findings suggest may play a particularly important role in children's generalization. In the current study, we build on these findings by examining the impact of equally spaced versus expanding learning schedules on children's ability to generalize from studied exemplars of a given category to new exemplars presented on a later test. We found no significant effects of learning schedule when the generalization test was administered immediately after the learning phase, but there was a clear difference when the generalization test was delayed by 24h, with children in the expanding condition significantly outperforming children in the equally spaced learning condition. These results suggest that forgetting and retrieval dynamics may be lower level cognitive mechanisms promoting generalization and have several implications for broad theories of learning, cognition, and development. PMID:24613074

  10. Equal Spacing and Expanding Schedules in Children's Categorization and Generalization

    PubMed Central

    Vlach, Haley A.; Sandhofer, Catherine M.; Bjork, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand how generalization develops across the lifespan, researchers have examined the factors of the learning environment that promote the acquisition and generalization of categories. One such factor is the timing of learning events, which recent findings suggest may play a particularly important role in children's generalization. In the current study, we build upon these findings by examining the impact of equally spaced versus expanding learning schedules on children's ability to generalize from studied exemplars of a given category to new exemplars presented on a later test. We found no significant effects of learning schedule when the generalization test was administered immediately after the learning phase, but there was a clear difference when the generalization test was delayed by 24 hours: Children in the expanding condition significantly outperformed children in the equally spaced learning condition. These results suggest forgetting and retrieval dynamics may be lower-level cognitive mechanisms promoting generalization and have several implications for broad theories of learning, cognition, and development. PMID:24613074

  11. Peer Mentoring in the General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories. The Pinacol Rearrangement: An Exercise in NMR and IR Spectroscopy for General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrington, Caleb A.; Hill, Jameica B.; Radfar, Ramin; Whisnant, David M.; Bass, Charles G.

    2008-02-01

    This article describes a discovery experiment for general chemistry and organic chemistry labs. Although the pinacol rearrangement has been employed in undergraduate organic laboratories before, in this application organic chemistry students act as mentors to students of general chemistry. Students work together using distillation—a new technique for the general chemistry students and a basic one for the organic students—to isolate an unknown compound. Then, using spectroscopy (IR and NMR), the students collaborate to determine the structure of the product of the reaction. This application of a standard experiment allows general chemistry students to gain exposure to modern spectroscopic instrumentation and to enhance their problem-solving skills. Organic chemistry students improve their understandings of laboratory techniques and spectroscopic interpretation by acting as the resident experts for the team.

  12. Organic Chemistry Self Instructional Package 1: Review of General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovich, V.

    This booklet is one of a series of 17 developed at Prince George's Community College, Largo, Maryland. It provides an individualized, self-paced undergraduate organic chemistry instruction module designed to augment any course in organic chemistry but particularly those taught using the text "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison and Boyd. The entire…

  13. Expanding General Relativity's Space by S-Denying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabounski, Dmitri; Smarandache, Florentins; Borissova, Larissa

    2016-05-01

    Applying the S-denying procedure to signature conditions in a four-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian space - i.e. changing one (or even all) of the conditions to be partially true and partially false. Obtaining five kinds of expanded space-time for General Relativity. Kind I permits the space-time to be in collapse. Kind II permits the space-time to change its own signature. Kind III has peculiarities, linked to the third signature condition. Kind IV permits regions where the metric fully degenerates: there may be non-quantum teleportation, and a home for virtual photons. Kind V is common for kinds I, II, III, and IV.

  14. Understanding the Impact of a General Chemistry Course on Students' Transition to Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins-Webb, Alexandra; Jeffery, Kathleen A.; Sweeder, Ryan D.

    2016-01-01

    The move from general chemistry to organic chemistry can be a challenge for students as it often involves a transition from quantitatively-oriented to mechanistically-oriented thinking. This study found that the design of the general chemistry course can change the student experience of this transition as assessed by a reflective survey. The…

  15. Descriptive Chemistry in the General Chemistry Laboratory: A Learning Cycle Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whisnant, David M.

    1982-01-01

    Learning cycles (exploration, invention, application) are used to introduce general chemistry principles while giving students concrete experiences with descriptive chemistry. Principles taught in the laboratory, laboratory experiments, instructional strategies, and evaluation of the approach are discussed. (Author/JN)

  16. Going Beyond, Going Further: Preparative Exercises in General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, George B.

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that preparative chemistry is an important and integral part of chemistry as a whole, and an excellent way to introduce students to descriptive chemistry. Provides an outline for students to follow for converting and transforming salts. Suggests a set of general guidelines for studying anion and cation transformations. (TW)

  17. A Timesharing Computer Program for a General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, Gary L.; Drum, Donald A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which general and physical chemistry students can determine the heat of vaporization of a volatile substance from experimental laboratory data using timesharing techniques. (MLH)

  18. General Chemistry Students' Goals for Chemistry Laboratory Coursework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKorver, Brittland K.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2015-01-01

    Little research exists on college students' learning goals in chemistry, let alone specifically pertaining to laboratory coursework. Because students' learning goals are linked to achievement and dependent on context, research on students' goals in the laboratory context may lead to better understanding about the efficacy of lab curricula. This…

  19. Puzzling through General Chemistry: A Light-Hearted Approach to Engaging Students with Chemistry Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    Several puzzles are designed to be used by chemistry students as learning tools and teach them basic chemical concepts. The topics of the puzzles are based on the chapters from Chemistry, The Central Science used in general chemistry course and the puzzles are in various forms like crosswords, word searches, number searches, puzzles based on…

  20. 19. VIEW OF THE GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY IN BUILDING 881. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF THE GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY IN BUILDING 881. (4/12/62) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  1. A general strategy for expanding polymerase function by droplet microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Andrew C.; Dunn, Matthew R.; Hatch, Andrew; Sau, Sujay P.; Youngbull, Cody; Chaput, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerases that synthesize artificial genetic polymers hold great promise for advancing future applications in synthetic biology. However, engineering natural polymerases to replicate unnatural genetic polymers is a challenging problem. Here we present droplet-based optical polymerase sorting (DrOPS) as a general strategy for expanding polymerase function that employs an optical sensor to monitor polymerase activity inside the microenvironment of a uniform synthetic compartment generated by microfluidics. We validated this approach by performing a complete cycle of encapsulation, sorting and recovery on a doped library and observed an enrichment of ∼1,200-fold for a model engineered polymerase. We then applied our method to evolve a manganese-independent α-L-threofuranosyl nucleic acid (TNA) polymerase that functions with >99% template-copying fidelity. Based on our findings, we suggest that DrOPS is a versatile tool that could be used to evolve any polymerase function, where optical detection can be achieved by Watson–Crick base pairing. PMID:27044725

  2. A general strategy for expanding polymerase function by droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Andrew C; Dunn, Matthew R; Hatch, Andrew; Sau, Sujay P; Youngbull, Cody; Chaput, John C

    2016-04-05

    Polymerases that synthesize artificial genetic polymers hold great promise for advancing future applications in synthetic biology. However, engineering natural polymerases to replicate unnatural genetic polymers is a challenging problem. Here we present droplet-based optical polymerase sorting (DrOPS) as a general strategy for expanding polymerase function that employs an optical sensor to monitor polymerase activity inside the microenvironment of a uniform synthetic compartment generated by microfluidics. We validated this approach by performing a complete cycle of encapsulation, sorting and recovery on a doped library and observed an enrichment of ∼1,200-fold for a model engineered polymerase. We then applied our method to evolve a manganese-independent α-L-threofuranosyl nucleic acid (TNA) polymerase that functions with >99% template-copying fidelity. Based on our findings, we suggest that DrOPS is a versatile tool that could be used to evolve any polymerase function, where optical detection can be achieved by Watson-Crick base pairing.

  3. A general strategy for expanding polymerase function by droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Andrew C; Dunn, Matthew R; Hatch, Andrew; Sau, Sujay P; Youngbull, Cody; Chaput, John C

    2016-01-01

    Polymerases that synthesize artificial genetic polymers hold great promise for advancing future applications in synthetic biology. However, engineering natural polymerases to replicate unnatural genetic polymers is a challenging problem. Here we present droplet-based optical polymerase sorting (DrOPS) as a general strategy for expanding polymerase function that employs an optical sensor to monitor polymerase activity inside the microenvironment of a uniform synthetic compartment generated by microfluidics. We validated this approach by performing a complete cycle of encapsulation, sorting and recovery on a doped library and observed an enrichment of ∼1,200-fold for a model engineered polymerase. We then applied our method to evolve a manganese-independent α-L-threofuranosyl nucleic acid (TNA) polymerase that functions with >99% template-copying fidelity. Based on our findings, we suggest that DrOPS is a versatile tool that could be used to evolve any polymerase function, where optical detection can be achieved by Watson-Crick base pairing. PMID:27044725

  4. Comparing Recent Organizing Templates for Test Content between ACS Exams in General Chemistry and AP Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holme, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Two different versions of "big ideas" rooted content maps have recently been published for general chemistry. As embodied in the content outline from the College Board, one of these maps is designed to guide curriculum development and testing for advanced placement (AP) chemistry. The Anchoring Concepts Content Map for general chemistry…

  5. Using Clinical Cases to Teach General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewprashad, Brahmadeo; Kosky, Charles; Vaz, Geraldine S.; Martin, Charlotte L.

    2004-01-01

    A clinical study was designed and used to show the relationship of health and medicine, in a typical clinical scenario, where many chemical principles are involved and that an integrated knowledge of chemistry and biology is essential to the understanding, diagnosing and treating of illnesses. A case study would be a positive learning experience…

  6. Stratospheric General Circulation with Chemistry Model (SGCCM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rood, Richard B.; Douglass, Anne R.; Geller, Marvin A.; Kaye, Jack A.; Nielsen, J. Eric; Rosenfield, Joan E.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    1990-01-01

    In the past two years constituent transport and chemistry experiments have been performed using both simple single constituent models and more complex reservoir species models. Winds for these experiments have been taken from the data assimilation effort, Stratospheric Data Analysis System (STRATAN).

  7. Hydrated Cations in the General Chemistry Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, George B.; Baxter, John F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Presents selected information regarding the descriptive chemistry of the common metal ions and their compounds, including the concepts of process of solution, polar molecules, ionic size and charge, complex ions, coordination number, and the Bronsted-Lowry acid-base theory. (CS)

  8. Integrating Introductory Biology and General Chemistry Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godrick, Elizabeth; Hartman, Standish

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a science laboratory integrating biology and chemistry courses that includes four modules: (1) the fundamental process of reactions; (2) a semester-long project on the chemical assay of ascorbic acid; (3) human metabolism of Vitamin C; and (4) an open-ended project on the manipulation of macromolecules. (YDS)

  9. Exploration of the Chemistry of Plants: A General Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sequin, Margareta

    2005-01-01

    Exploration of the Chemistry of Plants is established as a part of the department offerings for nonmajor science students to fulfill their science general education requirement. Plant themes proved to be very suitable in capturing the interest of the nonmajor science students as an introduction to chemistry.

  10. Fluorine Compounds and Dental Health: Applications of General Chemistry Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    An example about the use of everyday phenomena in teaching general chemistry is given. Students have a greater appreciation of the principles of chemistry if they can see the relevance to their lives. Fluorine compounds in dental applications (as topical or as systemic use) provide an excellent context in which to review core content of general…

  11. Service-Learning General Chemistry: Lead Paint Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesner, Laya; Eyring, Edward M.

    1999-01-01

    Reports on a community-service project carried out by general chemistry students at the University of Utah. Students research lead poisoning then visit neighborhood homes to teach about lead poisoning, collect exterior paint samples, and analyze them as part of a chemistry experiment. Discusses service-learning and laboratory activities. (WRM)

  12. Connecting Achievement Motivation to Performance in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrell, Brent; Phillips, Michael M.; Barbera, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Student success in chemistry is inherently tied to motivational and other affective processes. We investigated three distinct constructs tied to motivation: self-efficacy, interest, and effort beliefs. These variables were measured twice over the course of a semester in three sections of a first-semester general chemistry course (n = 170). We…

  13. Students' Written Arguments in General Chemistry Laboratory Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Aeran; Hand, Brian; Greenbowe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the written arguments developed by college freshman students using the Science Writing Heuristic approach in inquiry-based general chemistry laboratory classrooms and its relationships with students' achievement in chemistry courses. Fourteen freshman students participated in the first year of the study while 19…

  14. Expanded Choices for Vibration-Rotation Spectroscopy in the Physical Chemistry Teaching Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Joel R.; Dolson, David A.

    2015-06-01

    Many third-year physical chemistry laboratory students in the US analyze the vibration-rotation spectrum of HCl in support of lecture concepts in quantum theory and molecular spectroscopy. Contemporary students in physical chemistry teaching laboratories increasingly have access to FTIR spectrometers with 1/8th wn resolution, which allows for expanded choices of molecules for vibration-rotation spectroscopy. Here we present the case for choosing HBr/DBr for such a study, where the 1/8th wn resolution enables the bromine isotopic lines to be resolved. Vibration-rotation lines from the fundamental and first-overtone bands of four hydrogen bromide isotopomers are combined in a global analysis to determine molecular spectroscopic constants. Sample production, spectral appearance, analysis and results will be presented for various resolutions commonly available in teaching laboratories.

  15. Iron Analysis by Redox Titration. A General Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Samuel; DeVoe, Howard

    1988-01-01

    Describes a simplified redox method for total iron analysis suitable for execution in a three-hour laboratory period by general chemistry students. Discusses materials, procedures, analyses, and student performance. (CW)

  16. General Chemistry Students' Understanding of Climate Change and the Chemistry Related to Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Versprille, Ashley N.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2015-01-01

    While much is known about secondary students' perspectives of climate change, rather less is known about undergraduate students' perspectives. The purpose of this study is to investigate general chemistry students' understanding of the chemistry underlying climate change. Findings that emerged from the analysis of the 24 interviews indicate that…

  17. Using Computational Chemistry Activities to Promote Learning and Retention in a Secondary School General Chemistry Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochterski, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the results of using state-of-the-art, research-quality software as a learning tool in a general chemistry secondary school classroom setting. I present three activities designed to introduce fundamental chemical concepts regarding molecular shape and atomic orbitals to students with little background in chemistry, such as…

  18. Green Goggles: Designing and Teaching a General Chemistry Course to Nonmajors Using a Green Chemistry Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    A novel course using green chemistry as the context to teach general chemistry fundamentals was designed, implemented and is described here. The course design included an active learning approach, with major course graded components including a weekly blog entry, exams, and a semester project that was disseminated by wiki and a public symposium.…

  19. 18. VIEW OF THE GENERAL CHEMISTRY LAB. THE LABORATORY PROVIDED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW OF THE GENERAL CHEMISTRY LAB. THE LABORATORY PROVIDED GENERAL ANALYTICAL AND STANDARDS CALIBRATION, AS WELL AS DEVELOPMENT OPERATIONS INCLUDING WASTE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AND DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF MECHANICAL SYSTEMS FOR WEAPONS SYSTEMS. (4/4/66) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  20. Expandable-graphite-derived graphene for next-generation battery chemistries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Chenxi; Li, Longjun; Qie, Long; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2015-06-01

    Lithium-sulfur and lithium-air batteries offer theoretical energy densities an order of magnitude higher than that of current lithium-ion batteries and are considered as promising candidates as the next-generation battery chemistries. For an efficient use of these new battery chemistries, careful selection of suitable electrode materials/structures is critical. Graphene, a unique two-dimensional nanomaterial, with its superior electronic conductivity, mechanical strength, and flexibility has been successfully applied in battery studies. Graphene, even with imperfect layers, will be of great interest to battery industrial applications if the manufacturing cost is reduced. Herein, we demonstrate the application of low-cost graphene sponge/sheets derived from expandable graphite in both lithium-sulfur and hybrid lithium-air batteries, respectively, as a cathode conductive matrix to accommodate the soluble polysulfides and as a catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction. High utilization of active materials and good cycling stability are realized in lithium-sulfur and hybrid lithium-air batteries by employing this low-cost material, demonstrating its promise for use in next-generation battery chemistries.

  1. Astrochemistry: An Honors Approach to General Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, M. M.; McClinton, D.

    2004-05-01

    Astrochemistry at the collegiate level offers gifted and high achieving students at the secondary education level to explore careers in science and math. This program reinforces the foundation of scientific instruction, yet provides for advanced specialized learning for the college-bound gifted student. Students examine basic chemical theories and their connections with the applications of physics to astronomy. In this program, students meet individuals in related career fields and tour local companies that use high technology. We present our program design that is funded by the Florida Department of Education, Govenor's Summer Program 2004. We also present our alternative teaching strategies including examples of our computer tutorials and our incorporation of the Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) approach, a newly funded NSF project that focuses on national dissemination of POGIL methods and materials. We present our reflection methods of student evaluations that are not related to grades. This program can be modified to offer college students a four-credit basic chemistry class, but with application to astronomy and physics.

  2. A generalized chemistry version of SPARK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.

    1988-01-01

    An extension of the reacting H2-air computer code SPARK is presented, which enables the code to be used on any reacting flow problem. Routines are developed calculating in a general fashion, the reaction rates, and chemical Jacobians of any reacting system. In addition, an equilibrium routine is added so that the code will have frozen, finite rate, and equilibrium capabilities. The reaction rate for the species is determined from the law of mass action using Arrhenius expressions for the rate constants. The Jacobian routines are determined by numerically or analytically differentiating the law of mass action for each species. The equilibrium routine is based on a Gibbs free energy minimization routine. The routines are written in FORTRAN 77, with special consideration given to vectorization. Run times for the generalized routines are generally 20 percent slower than reaction specific routines. The numerical efficiency of the generalized analytical Jacobian, however, is nearly 300 percent better than the reaction specific numerical Jacobian used in SPARK.

  3. General consideration on sialic acid chemistry.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hongzhi; Chen, Xi

    2012-01-01

    Sialic acids, also known as neuraminic acids, are a family of negatively charged α-keto acids with a nine-carbon backbone. These unique sugars have been found at the termini of many glycan chains of vertebrate cell surface, which play pivotal roles in mediating or modulating a variety of physiological and pathological processes. This brief review covers general approaches for synthesizing sialic acid containing structures. Recently developed synthetic methods along with structural diversities and biological functions of sialic acid are discussed.

  4. LOGICAL REASONING ABILITY AND STUDENT PERFORMANCE IN GENERAL CHEMISTRY.

    PubMed

    Bird, Lillian

    2010-03-01

    Logical reasoning skills of students enrolled in General Chemistry at the University of Puerto Rico in Río Piedras were measured using the Group Assessment of Logical Thinking (GALT) test. The results were used to determine the students' cognitive level (concrete, transitional, formal) as well as their level of performance by logical reasoning mode (mass/volume conservation, proportional reasoning, correlational reasoning, experimental variable control, probabilistic reasoning and combinatorial reasoning). This information was used to identify particular deficiencies and gender effects, and to determine which logical reasoning modes were the best predictors of student performance in the general chemistry course. Statistical tests to analyze the relation between (a) operational level and final grade in both semesters of the course; (b) GALT test results and performance in the ACS General Chemistry Examination; and (c) operational level and student approach (algorithmic or conceptual) towards a test question that may be answered correctly using either strategy, were also performed.

  5. Expanding Radical SAM Chemistry by Using Radical Addition Reactions and SAM Analogues.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xinjian; Li, Yongzhen; Xie, Liqi; Lu, Haojie; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Qi

    2016-09-19

    Radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes utilize a [4Fe-4S] cluster to bind SAM and reductively cleave its carbon-sulfur bond to produce a highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (dAdo) radical. In almost all cases, the dAdo radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrates or from enzymes, thereby initiating a highly diverse array of reactions. Herein, we report a change of the dAdo radical-based chemistry from hydrogen abstraction to radical addition in the reaction of the radical SAM enzyme NosL. This change was achieved by using a substrate analogue containing an olefin moiety. We also showed that two SAM analogues containing different nucleoside functionalities initiate the radical-based reactions with high efficiencies. The radical adduct with the olefin produced in the reaction was found to undergo two divergent reactions, and the mechanistic insights into this process were investigated in detail. Our study demonstrates a promising strategy in expanding radical SAM chemistry, providing an effective way to access nucleoside-containing compounds by using radical SAM-dependent reactions. PMID:27573794

  6. Expanding Radical SAM Chemistry by Using Radical Addition Reactions and SAM Analogues.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xinjian; Li, Yongzhen; Xie, Liqi; Lu, Haojie; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Qi

    2016-09-19

    Radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes utilize a [4Fe-4S] cluster to bind SAM and reductively cleave its carbon-sulfur bond to produce a highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (dAdo) radical. In almost all cases, the dAdo radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrates or from enzymes, thereby initiating a highly diverse array of reactions. Herein, we report a change of the dAdo radical-based chemistry from hydrogen abstraction to radical addition in the reaction of the radical SAM enzyme NosL. This change was achieved by using a substrate analogue containing an olefin moiety. We also showed that two SAM analogues containing different nucleoside functionalities initiate the radical-based reactions with high efficiencies. The radical adduct with the olefin produced in the reaction was found to undergo two divergent reactions, and the mechanistic insights into this process were investigated in detail. Our study demonstrates a promising strategy in expanding radical SAM chemistry, providing an effective way to access nucleoside-containing compounds by using radical SAM-dependent reactions.

  7. Expanding access to rheumatology care: the rheumatology general practice toolbox.

    PubMed

    Conway, R; Kavanagh, R; Coughlan, R J; Carey, J J

    2015-02-01

    Management guidelines for many rheumatic diseases are published in specialty rheumatology literature but rarely in general medical journals. Musculoskeletal disorders comprise 14% of all consultations in primary care. Formal post-graduate training in rheumatology is limited or absent for many primary care practitioners. Primary care practitioners can be trained to effectively treat complex diseases and have expressed a preference for interactive educational courses. The Rheumatology General Practice (GP) Toolbox is an intensive one day course designed to offer up to date information to primary care practitioners on the latest diagnostic and treatment guidelines for seven common rheumatic diseases. The course structure involves a short lecture on each topic and workshops on arthrocentesis, joint injection and DXA interpretation. Participants evaluated their knowledge and educational experience before, during and after the course. Thirty-two primary care practitioners attended, who had a median of 13 (IQR 6.5, 20) years experience in their specialty. The median number of educational symposia attended in the previous 5 years was 10 (IQR-5, 22.5), with a median of 0 (IQR 0, 1) in rheumatology. All respondents agreed that the course format was appropriate. Numerical improvements were demonstrated in participant's confidence in diagnosing and managing all seven common rheumatologic conditions, with statistically significant improvements (p < 0.05) in 11 of the 14 aspects assessed. The Rheumatology Toolbox is an effective educational method for disseminating current knowledge in rheumatology to primary care physicians and improved participant's self-assessed competence in diagnosis and management of common rheumatic diseases. PMID:25803956

  8. Presentation of Atomic Structure in Turkish General Chemistry Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor; Costu, Bayram

    2009-01-01

    Research in science education has recognized the importance of teaching atomic structure within a history and philosophy of science perspective. The objective of this study is to evaluate general chemistry textbooks published in Turkey based on the eight criteria developed in previous research. Criteria used referred to the atomic models of…

  9. A General Chemistry Laboratory Course Designed for Student Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obenland, Carrie A.; Kincaid, Kristi; Hutchinson, John S.

    2014-01-01

    We report a study of the general chemistry laboratory course at one university over four years. We found that when taught as a traditional laboratory course, lab experiences do not encourage students to deepen their understanding of chemical concepts. Although the lab instructor emphasized that the lab experiences were designed to enhance…

  10. Logical Reasoning Ability and Student Performance in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Lillian

    2010-01-01

    Logical reasoning skills of students enrolled in a general chemistry course at the University of Puerto Rico in Rio Piedras were measured using the Group Assessment of Logical Thinking (GALT) test. The results were used to determine the students' cognitive level (concrete, transitional, formal) as well as their level of performance by logical…

  11. Gendered Responses to Online Homework Use in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards-Babb, Michelle; Jackson, Jennifer Kasi

    2011-01-01

    Online homework assignments have been shown to enhance student performance. Our research on gendered responses to these assignments adds new and useful information. We investigated differences between male and female students' responses to online homework in large-enrollment general chemistry courses. Replacing in class quizzes with online…

  12. A Novel Multipurpose Model Set for Teaching General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, H. O.; Parkash, Brahm

    1999-01-01

    Reports on a low-cost and unique molecular model set capable of generating a large number of structures for teaching and learning general chemistry. An important component of the kit is an 11-hole ball that gives tetrahedral, octahedral, trigonal, trigonal bipyramidal, and square planar symmetries. (WRM)

  13. A Program of Computational Chemistry Exercises for the First-Semester General Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Scott E.; Dallinger, Richard F.; McKinney, Paul Caylor

    2004-01-01

    The computer systems available for molecular modeling are described, along with a discussion of a molecular modeling program created and supported by computational techniques for the first-semester general chemistry course. Various exercises are listed, which direct the learner from a beginner's course in software practice to more complex…

  14. Integrating the Liberal Arts and Chemistry: A Series of General Chemistry Assignments to Develop Science Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Diane M.; Chengelis Czegan, Demetra A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes assignments that have been implemented in a General Chemistry I course to promote science literacy. This course was chosen in particular because it reaches a broad audience, which includes nonscience majors. The assignment series begins with several discussions and tasks to develop information literacy, in which students find…

  15. Supramolecular chemistry-general principles and selected examples from anion recognition and metallosupramolecular chemistry.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Markus

    2007-12-01

    This review gives an introduction into supramolecular chemistry describing in the first part general principles, focusing on terms like noncovalent interaction, molecular recognition, self-assembly, and supramolecular function. In the second part those will be illustrated by simple examples from our laboratories. Supramolecular chemistry is the science that bridges the gap between the world of molecules and nanotechnology. In supramolecular chemistry noncovalent interactions occur between molecular building blocks, which by molecular recognition and self-assembly form (functional) supramolecular entities. It is also termed the "chemistry of the noncovalent bond." Molecular recognition is based on geometrical complementarity based on the "key-and-lock" principle with nonshape-dependent effects, e.g., solvatization, being also highly influential. Self-assembly leads to the formation of well-defined aggregates. Hereby the overall structure of the target ensemble is controlled by the symmetry features of the certain building blocks. Finally, the aggregates can possess special properties or supramolecular functions, which are only found in the ensemble but not in the participating molecules. This review gives an introduction on supramolecular chemistry and illustrates the fundamental principles by recent examples from our group.

  16. General conditions for scale-invariant perturbations in an expanding universe

    SciTech Connect

    Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Kinney, William H.; Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad E-mail: whkinney@buffalo.edu

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the general properties of expanding cosmological models which generate scale-invariant curvature perturbations in the presence of a variable speed of sound. We show that in an expanding universe, generation of a super-Hubble, nearly scale-invariant spectrum of perturbations over a range of wavelengths consistent with observation requires at least one of three conditions: (1) accelerating expansion, (2) a speed of sound faster than the speed of light, or (3) super-Planckian energy density.

  17. Bias Assessment of General Chemistry Analytes using Commutable Samples.

    PubMed

    Koerbin, Gus; Tate, Jillian R; Ryan, Julie; Jones, Graham Rd; Sikaris, Ken A; Kanowski, David; Reed, Maxine; Gill, Janice; Koumantakis, George; Yen, Tina; St John, Andrew; Hickman, Peter E; Simpson, Aaron; Graham, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Harmonisation of reference intervals for routine general chemistry analytes has been a goal for many years. Analytical bias may prevent this harmonisation. To determine if analytical bias is present when comparing methods, the use of commutable samples, or samples that have the same properties as the clinical samples routinely analysed, should be used as reference samples to eliminate the possibility of matrix effect. The use of commutable samples has improved the identification of unacceptable analytical performance in the Netherlands and Spain. The International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) has undertaken a pilot study using commutable samples in an attempt to determine not only country specific reference intervals but to make them comparable between countries. Australia and New Zealand, through the Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB), have also undertaken an assessment of analytical bias using commutable samples and determined that of the 27 general chemistry analytes studied, 19 showed sufficiently small between method biases as to not prevent harmonisation of reference intervals. Application of evidence based approaches including the determination of analytical bias using commutable material is necessary when seeking to harmonise reference intervals.

  18. A General Chemistry Laboratory Theme: Spectroscopic Analysis of Aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Houston; O'Donnell, Stephen E.

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, we describe the introduction of spectroscopy into the general chemistry laboratory using a series of experiments based on a common substance, aspirin. In the first lab the students synthesize and recrystallize aspirin and take melting points of their product, an aspirin standard, and salicylic acid. The students perform the remaining experiments on a rotating basis where the following four labs run simultaneously: structural characterization of the synthesized aspirin by IR and NMR; analysis of synthesized aspirin and commercial products by UV vis spectroscopy; analysis of synthesized aspirin and commercial products by HPLC; and analysis of calcium in commercial buffered aspirin tablets by AAS. In each of the analysis experiments, students collect, graph, and analyze their data using a spreadsheet. We have found that this series of labs has been very beneficial to our students. From the course evaluations, students indicate that they are beginning to understand how chemistry is applied outside of the classroom.

  19. Chemistry, Life, the Universe, and Everything: A New Approach to General Chemistry, and a Model for Curriculum Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Melanie; Klymkowsky, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The history of general chemistry is one of almost constant calls for reform, yet over the past 60 years little of substance has changed. Those reforms that have been implemented are almost entirely concerned with how the course is taught, rather than what is to be learned. Here we briefly discuss the history of the general chemistry curriculum and…

  20. Impact of General Chemistry on Student Achievement and Progression to Subsequent Chemistry Courses: A Regression Discontinuity Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Ginger V.; Gottfried, Amy C.; Winschel, Grace A.

    2015-01-01

    General chemistry is a gateway course that impacts the STEM trajectory of tens of thousands of students each year, and its role in the introductory curriculum as well as its pedagogical design are the center of an ongoing debate. To investigate the role of general chemistry in the curriculum, we report the results of a posthoc analysis of 10 years…

  1. Learning beyond the Classroom: Using Text Messages to Measure General Chemistry Students' Study Habits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ye, Li; Oueini, Razanne; Dickerson, Austin P.; Lewis, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    This study used a series of text message inquiries sent to General Chemistry students asking: "Have you studied for General Chemistry I in the past 48 hours? If so, how did you study?" This method for collecting data is novel to chemistry education research so the first research goals were to investigate the feasibility of the technique…

  2. General chemistry courses that can affect achievement: An action research study in developing a plan to improve undergraduate chemistry courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shweikeh, Eman

    Over the past 50 years, considerable research has been dedicated to chemistry education. In evaluating principal chemistry courses in higher education, educators have noted the learning process for first-year general chemistry courses may be challenging. The current study investigated perceptions of faculty, students and administrators on chemistry education at three institutions in Southern California. Via action research, the study sought to develop a plan to improve student engagement in general chemistry courses. A mixed method was utilized to analyze different perceptions on key factors determining the level of commitment and engagement in general chemistry education. The approach to chemistry learning from both a faculty and student perspective was examined including good practices, experiences and extent of active participation. The research study considered well-known measures of effective education with an emphasis on two key components: educational practices and student behavior. Institutional culture was inclusively assessed where cognitive expectations of chemistry teaching and learning were communicated. First, the extent in which faculty members are utilizing the "Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education" in their instruction was explored. Second, student attitudes and approaches toward chemistry learning were examined. The focus was on investigating student understanding of the learning process and the structure of chemistry knowledge. The seven categories used to measure students' expectations for learning chemistry were: effort, concepts, math link, reality link, outcome, laboratory, and visualization. This analysis represents the views of 16 faculty and 140 students. The results validated the assertion that students need some competencies and skills to tackle the challenges of the chemistry learning process to deeply engage in learning. A mismatch exists between the expectations of students and those of the faculty

  3. Building Program Statement for the General Chemistry Facility. Chemistry Department Facilities Requirements through 31,000 Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Charles

    This building program statement for the new chemistry addition at Purdue University was compiled to provide the architect and development planning personnel with information about academic specifications that could be used as a basis for designing a new chemistry facility. The general plan is based on projected student enrollment. Specific plans…

  4. Exploring Dominant Types of Explanations Built by General Chemistry Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2010-12-01

    The central goal of our study was to explore the nature of the explanations generated by science and engineering majors with basic training in chemistry to account for the colligative properties of solutions. The work was motivated by our broader interest in the characterisation of the dominant types of explanations that science college students use to make sense of phenomena under conditions of limited time and limited explicit knowledge about a topic. Explanations were collected in written form using two different quizzes that students completed under time constraints at the end of a two-semester general chemistry course. Our study revealed that students' ability to generate causal/mechanical explanations depended on the nature of the task. In general, students were more inclined or able to generate mechanistic explanations to account for boiling-point elevation and freezing-point depression than to make sense of osmotic flow. The analysis of the types of causal explanations built by the study participants suggests that students may be biased towards some causal models or explanatory modes characterised as causal-additive and causal-static in our work. A large proportion of the students built non-causal teleological explanations to account for osmotic flow. None of the participants in our study used a dynamic model of matter as the basis for their explanations of any of the relevant phenomena; the idea of an underlying random process that is taking place at all times giving rise to emergent properties and behaviours was completely absent from their intuitive reasoning under conditions of limited time and knowledge.

  5. The Role of Water Chemistry in Marine Aquarium Design: A Model System for a General Chemistry Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keaffaber, Jeffrey J.; Palma, Ramiro; Williams, Kathryn R.

    2008-02-01

    Water chemistry is central to aquarium design, and it provides many potential applications for discussion in undergraduate chemistry and engineering courses. Marine aquaria and their life support systems feature many chemical processes. A life support system consists of the entire recirculation system, as well as the habitat tank and all ancillary water treatment processes. Many fundamental concepts learned in general chemistry, for example, unit conversion, solution concentrations, stoichiometry, redox reactions, and acid-base chemistry are all key to understanding the life support system. This article uses a hypothetical tank to house ocean sunfish as a model to show students the calculations and other considerations that are needed when designing a marine aquarium.

  6. Engineering Faculty Attitudes to General Chemistry Courses in Engineering Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garip, Mehmet; Erdil, Erzat; Bilsel, Ayhan

    2006-01-01

    A survey on the attitudes of engineering faculty to chemistry, physics, and mathematics was conducted with the aim of clarifying the attitudes of engineering faculty to chemistry courses in relation to engineering education or curricula and assessing their expectations. The results confirm that on the whole chemistry is perceived as having a…

  7. A New Approach to the General Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieron, Joseph F.; McCarthy, Paul J.; Kermis, Thomas W.

    1996-11-01

    Background Canisius College is a medium-sized liberal arts college with a longstanding tradition of maintaining an excellent chemistry program. We realized a few years ago, however, that this tradition was not being sustained by our General Chemistry laboratory course, which had not changed significantly in years. With the help of a grant from the National Science Foundation, our department has been able to design a new laboratory course built around several guiding principles. The design called for experiments to be grouped in units or clusters. Each cluster has a unifying theme or common thread, which gives some coherence to the experiments. The clusters and experiments are listed in the appendix and briefly explained below. Course Design Cluster A's topic is organic and polymer chemistry, and its main objective is to show that chemistry can be enjoyable and relevant to common experiences. Data collection is minimal and hands-on manipulation with observable products is emphasized. Cluster B is a case study of the chemistry of maintaining a swimming pool. The common theme is solution chemistry, and the experiments are designed to promote critical thinking. Cluster C encompasses both oxidation - reduction reactions and electrochemistry, and attempts to show the commonality of these important topics. Cluster D is a series of experiments on methods and techniques of analytical chemistry; in this group the analysis of unknown materials is undertaken. Cluster E is covered last in the second semester, and it stresses important concepts in chemistry at a slightly more advanced level. The emphasis is on the relationship of experiment to theory, and the cluster involves experiments in kinetics, equilibrium, and synthesis. Other guidelines that we considered important in our design were the use of computers (when appropriate), the introduction of microscale chemistry, and the use of instrumentation whenever possible. A separate cluster, labeled Mac, was developed to provide

  8. Experimental and modeling studies of small molecule chemistry in expanding spherical flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santner, Jeffrey

    Accurate models of flame chemistry are required in order to predict emissions and flame properties, such that clean, efficient engines can be designed more easily. There are three primary methods used to improve such combustion chemistry models - theoretical reaction rate calculations, elementary reaction rate experiments, and combustion system experiments. This work contributes to model improvement through the third method - measurements and analysis of the laminar burning velocity at constraining conditions. Modern combustion systems operate at high pressure with strong exhaust gas dilution in order to improve efficiency and reduce emissions. Additionally, flames under these conditions are sensitized to elementary reaction rates such that measurements constrain modeling efforts. Measurement conditions of the present work operate within this intersection between applications and fundamental science. Experiments utilize a new pressure-release, heated spherical combustion chamber with a variety of fuels (high hydrogen content fuels, formaldehyde (via 1,3,5-trioxane), and C2 fuels) at pressures from 0.5--25 atm, often with dilution by water vapor or carbon dioxide to flame temperatures below 2000 K. The constraining ability of these measurements depends on their uncertainty. Thus, the present work includes a novel analytical estimate of the effects of thermal radiative heat loss on burning velocity measurements in spherical flames. For 1,3,5-trioxane experiments, global measurements are sufficiently sensitive to elementary reaction rates that optimization techniques are employed to indirectly measure the reaction rates of HCO consumption. Besides the influence of flame chemistry on propagation, this work also explores the chemistry involved in production of nitric oxide, a harmful pollutant, within flames. We find significant differences among available chemistry models, both in mechanistic structure and quantitative reaction rates. There is a lack of well

  9. First 25-hydroxyvitamin D assay for general chemistry analyzers.

    PubMed

    Saida, Fakhri B; Chen, Xiaoru; Tran, Kiet; Dou, Chao; Yuan, Chong

    2015-03-01

    25-Hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], the predominant circulating form of vitamin D, is an accurate indicator of the general vitamin D status of an individual. Because vitamin D deficiencies have been linked to several pathologies (including osteoporosis and rickets), accurate monitoring of 25(OH)D levels is becoming increasingly important in clinical settings. Current 25(OH)D assays are either chromatographic or immunoassay-based assays. These assays include HPLC, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), enzyme-immunosorbent, immunochemiluminescence, immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassay. All these assays use heterogeneous formats that require phase separation and special instrumentations. In this article, we present an overview of these assays and introduce the first homogeneous assay of 25(OH)D for use on general chemistry analyzers. A special emphasis is put on the unique challenges posed by the 25(OH)D analyte. These challenges include a low detection limit, the dissociation of the analyte from its serum transporter and the inactivation of various binding proteins without phase separation steps.

  10. Development and Assessment of Green, Research-Based Instructional Materials for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacciatore, Kristen L.

    2010-01-01

    This research entails integrating two novel approaches for enriching student learning in chemistry into the context of the general chemistry laboratory. The first is a pedagogical approach based on research in cognitive science and the second is the green chemistry philosophy. Research has shown that inquiry-based approaches are effective in…

  11. Evaluation of Eleventh Grade Turkish Pupils' Comprehension of General Chemistry Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belge Can, Hatice; Boz, Yezdan

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate eleventh grade Turkish pupils' comprehension of various general chemistry concepts which in turn enables to investigate chemistry concepts which are easier and harder for students to comprehend. Examining the effect of gender and last semester chemistry course grades on pupils' comprehension of general…

  12. The Effects of Clickers and Online Homework on Students' Achievement in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebru, Misganaw T.

    2012-01-01

    Retention of an introductory general chemistry course material is vital for student success in future chemistry and chemistry-related courses. This study investigated the effects of clickers versus online homework on students' long-term content retention, examined the effectiveness of online homework versus no graded homework on…

  13. Expanding the fluorine chemistry of living systems using engineered polyketide synthase pathways

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Mark C.; Thuronyi, Benjamin W.; Charkoudian, Louise K.; Lowry, Brian; Khosla, Chaitan; Chang, Michelle C. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Organofluorines represent a rapidly expanding proportion of molecules used in pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, agrochemicals, and materials. Despite the prevalence of fluorine in synthetic compounds, the known biological scope is limited to a single pathway that produces fluoroacetate. Here, we demonstrate that this pathway can be exploited as a source of fluorinated building blocks for introduction of fluorine into natural product scaffolds. Specifically, we have constructed pathways involving two polyketide synthase systems and show that fluoroacetate can be used to incorporate fluorine into the polyketide backbone in vitro. We further show that fluorine can be introduced site-selectively and introduced into polyketide products in vivo. These results highlight the prospects for the production of complex fluorinated natural products using synthetic biology. PMID:24009388

  14. Chemical Remediation of Nickel(II) Waste: A Laboratory Experiment for General Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, K. Blake; Rood, Brian E.; Trogden, Bridget G.

    2011-01-01

    This project involved developing a method to remediate large quantities of aqueous waste from a general chemistry laboratory experiment. Aqueous Ni(II) waste from a general chemistry laboratory experiment was converted into solid nickel hydroxide hydrate with a substantial decrease in waste volume. The remediation method was developed for a…

  15. A Transition Program for Underprepared Students in General Chemistry: Diagnosis, Implementation, and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Shawn P.; Hogrebe, Mark C.; Spees, William M.; Handlin, Larry B.; Noelken, Greg P.; Riley, Julie M.; Frey, Regina F.

    2012-01-01

    We developed an online exam to diagnose students who are underprepared for college-level general chemistry and implemented a program to support them during the general chemistry sequence. This transition program consists of extended-length recitations, peer-led team-learning (PLTL) study groups, and peer-mentoring groups. We evaluated this…

  16. Building a Database for the Historical Analysis of the General Chemistry Curriculum Using ACS General Chemistry Exams as Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luxford, Cynthia J.; Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Raker, Jeffrey R.; Baluyut, John Y.; Reed, Jessica J.; De Silva, Chamila; Holme, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    As a discipline, chemistry enjoys a unique position. While many academic areas prepared "cooperative examinations" in the 1930s, only chemistry maintained the activity within what has become the ACS Examinations Institute. As a result, the long-term existence of community-built, norm-referenced, standardized exams provides a historical…

  17. Teaching Lab Report Writing through Inquiry: A Green Chemistry Stoichiometry Experiment for General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacciatore, Kristen L.; Sevian, Hannah

    2006-01-01

    We present an alternative to a traditional first-year chemistry laboratory experiment. This experiment has four key features: students utilize stoichiometry, learn and apply principles of green chemistry, engage in authentic scientific inquiry, and discover why each part of a scientific lab report is necessary. The importance and essential…

  18. Oxidative cyclizations in orthosomycin biosynthesis expand the known chemistry of an oxygenase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, Kathryn M.; McCranie, Emilianne K.; Smith, Jarrod A.; Sarwar, Maruf; Mathieu, Jeannette L.; Gitschlag, Bryan L.; Du, Yu; Bachmann, Brian O.; Iverson, T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Orthosomycins are oligosaccharide antibiotics that include avilamycin, everninomicin, and hygromycin B and are hallmarked by a rigidifying interglycosidic spirocyclic ortho-δ-lactone (orthoester) linkage between at least one pair of carbohydrates. A subset of orthosomycins additionally contain a carbohydrate capped by a methylenedioxy bridge. The orthoester linkage is necessary for antibiotic activity but rarely observed in natural products. Orthoester linkage and methylenedioxy bridge biosynthesis require similar oxidative cyclizations adjacent to a sugar ring. We have identified a conserved group of nonheme iron, α-ketoglutarate–dependent oxygenases likely responsible for this chemistry. High-resolution crystal structures of the EvdO1 and EvdO2 oxygenases of everninomicin biosynthesis, the AviO1 oxygenase of avilamycin biosynthesis, and HygX of hygromycin B biosynthesis show how these enzymes accommodate large substrates, a challenge that requires a variation in metal coordination in HygX. Excitingly, the ternary complex of HygX with cosubstrate α-ketoglutarate and putative product hygromycin B identified an orientation of one glycosidic linkage of hygromycin B consistent with metal-catalyzed hydrogen atom abstraction from substrate. These structural results are complemented by gene disruption of the oxygenases evdO1 and evdMO1 from the everninomicin biosynthetic cluster, which demonstrate that functional oxygenase activity is critical for antibiotic production. Our data therefore support a role for these enzymes in the production of key features of the orthosomycin antibiotics. PMID:26240321

  19. "The Chemicals Project": Connecting General Chemistry to Students' Lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Roland

    2000-10-01

    "The Chemicals Project" described here strives to bring freshman chemistry alive for students by emphasizing its connection to the real world and to their own lives and experiences. Its major assignments deal with chemical phobias, recognizing the chemicals found in everyday life and chemical hazards (using Material Data Safety Sheets). The project is described in a cooperative learning format, employs portfolio grading, and includes a significant writing component. Ways of linking this project with the course lecture and student evaluations of the project are described. The bottom line: pre- and post-testing shows that it works. The Chemicals Project brings chemistry alive for students.

  20. Exploring Dominant Types of Explanations Built by General Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    The central goal of our study was to explore the nature of the explanations generated by science and engineering majors with basic training in chemistry to account for the colligative properties of solutions. The work was motivated by our broader interest in the characterisation of the dominant types of explanations that science college students…

  1. Incorporating More Individual Accountability in Group Activities in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Charles T., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A modified model of cooperative learning known as the GIG model (for group-individual-group) designed and implemented in a large enrollment freshman chemistry course. The goal of the model is to establish a cooperative environment while emphasizing greater individual accountability using both group and individual assignments. The assignments were…

  2. A General Chemistry Demonstration: Student Observations and Explanations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Robert G.

    1983-01-01

    Out of 70 answers to questions concerning the chemistry involved in an "orange tornado" demonstration, only 10 were partially correct, others totally wrong or showing major errors in understanding, comprehension, and/or reasoning. Demonstration and reactions involved, selected incorrect answers, and a substantially correct answer are discussed.…

  3. Evaluation of Three Instructional Methods for Teaching General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Lance E.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Reports on a study designed to determine the relative effectiveness of different instructional approaches on chemistry laboratory achievement. Investigated differences in achievement in spectrophotometry among college freshmen who received either traditional, learning cycle, or computer simulation instruction. Results indicated that students…

  4. Service Learning Track in General Chemistry: Giving Students a Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaghy, Kelley J.; Saxton, Kathleen J.

    2012-01-01

    Experiential learning is a foundation in chemistry courses from the introductory-level course to upper-level courses through laboratory experiences. Service learning is another type of experiential learning that is slowly gaining momentum in the sciences. There have been several reports in this "Journal" on this pedagogy with respect to student…

  5. Fostering Spatial Skill Acquisition by General Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Deborah; Tyson, Julian; Nieswandt, Martina

    2015-01-01

    The study of chemistry requires the understanding and use of spatial relationships, which can be challenging for many students. Prior research has shown that there is a need to develop students' spatial reasoning skills. To that end, this study implemented guided activities designed to strengthen students' spatial skills, with the aim of improving…

  6. Based on a True Story: Using Movies as Source Material for General Chemistry Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griep, Mark A.; Mikasen, Marjorie L.

    2005-01-01

    The story to improve student enthusiasm for writing reports about the chemistry behind events reported in the news and movies were chosen as the source material. The use of movies in the chemical classroom helps an instructor move the subject of chemistry from abstract, general themes to the personal and subjective arena of human interactions.

  7. Applying the Multilevel Framework of Discourse Comprehension to Evaluate the Text Characteristics of General Chemistry Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyburn, Daniel T.; Pazicni, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Prior chemistry education research has demonstrated a relationship between student reading skill and general chemistry course performance. In addition to student characteristics, however, the qualities of the learning materials with which students interact also impact student learning. For example, low-knowledge students benefit from texts that…

  8. Problem Solving Videos for General Chemistry Review: Students' Perceptions and Use Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards-Babb, Michelle; Curtis, Reagan; Smith, Valerie J.; Xu, Mingming

    2014-01-01

    We examined the use of problem solving videos (PSVs) as a substitute for general chemistry exam review sessions. We investigated student perceptions of course aspects regarding usefulness for supporting their learning of chemistry content. We also examined "how" students used the PSVs to further their learning. Students ranked the PSVs…

  9. Preparation for College General Chemistry: More than Just a Matter of Content Knowledge Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cracolice, Mark S.; Busby, Brittany D.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the potential of five factors that may be predictive of success in college general chemistry courses: prior knowledge of common alternate conceptions, intelligence, scientific reasoning ability, proportional reasoning ability, and attitude toward chemistry. We found that both prior knowledge and scientific reasoning ability…

  10. Learning and Studying Strategies Used by General Chemistry Students with Different Affective Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Julia Y. K.; Bauer, Christopher F.

    2016-01-01

    Students in general chemistry were partitioned into three groups by cluster analysis of six affective characteristics (emotional satisfaction, intellectual accessibility, chemistry self-concept, math self-concept, self-efficacy, and test anxiety). The at-home study strategies for exam preparation and in-class learning strategies differed among the…

  11. Examining the Effects of Reflective Journals on Pre-Service Science Teachers' General Chemistry Laboratory Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cengiz, Canan; Karatas, Faik Özgür

    2015-01-01

    The general chemistry laboratory is an appropriate place for learning chemistry well. It is also effective for stimulating higher-order thinking skills, including reflective thinking, a skill that is crucial for science teaching as well as learning. This study aims to examine the effects of feedback-supported reflective journal-keeping activities…

  12. Atoms-First Curriculum: A Comparison of Student Success in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esterling, Kevin M.; Bartels, Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    We present an evaluation of the impact of an atoms-first curriculum on student success in introductory chemistry classes and find that initially a lower fraction of students obtain passing grades in the first and second quarters of the general chemistry series. This effect is more than reversed for first-quarter students after one year of…

  13. Attitudes, achievement and success accompanying general chemistry curriculum changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Elizabeth Ann

    2003-10-01

    The University of Missouri-St. Louis Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry has been engaged for several years in efforts to improve the teaching of introductory chemistry, by the incorporation of techniques that have been reported in the literature of science education to have been successful at other institutions. The present study is an analysis of the extent to which these changes in pedagogy have been successful in achieving the Department's goals of decreasing attrition and improving student content knowledge. Secondarily, we wished to determine the extent to which student views about science and the learning of science were altered as a result of these changes. Analysis of data from five semesters of the courses shows that more students were successful in passing the course than before the changes, and that they possessed a higher degree of content knowledge. Additionally, most students expressed increased satisfaction with the modified course. This experiment showed that it is possible to improve retention without sacrificing student content knowledge. During the experiment, we also assessed the degree to which students changed their opinions about the nature of science and its study. It was found that student views were not substantially modified by their experiences in introductory chemistry.

  14. Measuring Meaningful Learning in the Undergraduate General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how students learn in the undergraduate chemistry teaching laboratory is an essential component to developing evidence-based laboratory curricula. The Meaningful Learning in the Laboratory Instrument (MLLI) was developed to measure students' cognitive and affective expectations and experiences for learning in the chemistry…

  15. Incorporating Professional Service as a Component of General Chemistry Laboratory by Demonstrating Chemistry to Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theall, Rachel A. Morgan; Bond, Marcus R.

    2013-01-01

    Formalized participation in professional service is not often part of the college experience, especially for first-year students in chemistry courses. When service opportunities are offered, they are most often through elective credit, upper-level courses, extracurricular clubs, and the rare service-learning courses. We have successfully…

  16. Chemistry for DUMMIES: how to popularize and introduce chemistry to the general public.

    PubMed

    Montangero, Marc

    2012-01-01

    To mark the occasion of the International Year of Chemistry, each week in 2011 I posted a two-minute film demonstrating and explaining a simple and safe experiment to be carried out at home using everyday household products on the site www.chimie.ch/nuls.

  17. The ACS Exams Institute Undergraduate Chemistry Anchoring Concepts Content Map I: General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holme, Thomas; Murphy, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    To provide tools for programmatic assessment related to the use of ACS Exams in undergraduate chemistry courses, the ACS Exams Institute has built a content map that applies to the entire undergraduate curriculum. At the top two levels, the grain size of the content classification is large and spans the entire undergraduate curriculum. At the…

  18. Using Technology to Enhance the Effectiveness of General Chemistry Laboratory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho-Knighton, Kathleen M.; Keen-Rocha, Linda

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of two different laboratory techniques is compared to teach students majoring in science in a general chemistry laboratory. The results demonstrated that student laboratory activities with computer-interface systems could improve student understanding.

  19. Effects of Conceptual Systems and Instructional Methods on General Chemistry Laboratory Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Lance E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of three instructional methods and conceptual systems orientation on achievement in a freshman general chemistry laboratory course. Traditional approach, learning cycle, and computer simulations are discussed. (KR)

  20. Imidazole as a pH Probe: An NMR Experiment for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagan, William J., Jr.; Edie, Dennis L.; Cooley, Linda B.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis describes an NMR experiment for the general chemistry laboratory, which employs an unknown imidazole solution to measure the pH values. The described mechanism can also be used for measuring the acidity within the isolated cells.

  1. Using the Science Writing Heuristic in the General Chemistry Laboratory to Improve Students' Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poock, Jason R.; Burke, K. A.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Hand, Brian M.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis describes the effects of using the science writing heuristic (SWH) in the general chemistry laboratory on the students' academic performance. The technique has found to be extremely important factor in a student's learning process and achievement in science.

  2. An Approach to Teaching General Chemistry II that Highlights the Interdisciplinary Nature of Science*,†

    PubMed Central

    Sumter, Takita Felder; Owens, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    The need for a revised curriculum within the life sciences has been well-established. One strategy to improve student preparation in the life sciences is to redesign introductory courses like biology, chemistry, and physics so that they better reflect their disciplinary interdependence. We describe a medically relevant, context-based approach to teaching second semester general chemistry that demonstrates the interdisciplinary nature of biology and chemistry. Our innovative method provides a model in which disciplinary barriers are diminished early in the undergraduate science curriculum. The course is divided into three principle educational modules: 1) Fundamentals of General Chemistry, 2) Medical Approaches to Inflammation, and 3) Neuroscience as a connector of chemistry, biology, and psychology. We accurately anticipated that this modified approach to teaching general chemistry would enhance student interest in chemistry and bridge the perceived gaps between biology and chemistry. The course serves as a template for context-based, interdisciplinary teaching that lays the foundation needed to train 21st century scientists. PMID:21445902

  3. An approach to teaching general chemistry II that highlights the interdisciplinary nature of science.

    PubMed

    Sumter, Takita Felder; Owens, Patrick M

    2011-01-01

    The need for a revised curriculum within the life sciences has been well-established. One strategy to improve student preparation in the life sciences is to redesign introductory courses like biology, chemistry, and physics so that they better reflect their disciplinary interdependence. We describe a medically relevant, context-based approach to teaching second semester general chemistry that demonstrates the interdisciplinary nature of biology and chemistry. Our innovative method provides a model in which disciplinary barriers are diminished early in the undergraduate science curriculum. The course is divided into three principle educational modules: 1) Fundamentals of General Chemistry, 2) Medical Approaches to Inflammation, and 3) Neuroscience as a connector of chemistry, biology, and psychology. We accurately anticipated that this modified approach to teaching general chemistry would enhance student interest in chemistry and bridge the perceived gaps between biology and chemistry. The course serves as a template for context-based, interdisciplinary teaching that lays the foundation needed to train 21st century scientists.

  4. The Representation of People of Color in Undergraduate General Chemistry Textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Denise; Domin, Daniel S.

    2007-02-01

    A content analysis of eleven college-level general chemistry textbooks was performed to ascertain the extent to which people of color are represented within the textbook photographs. The results of this study show that all of the textbooks' photographs within this investigation include people of color at a level well below their representation in American society. In addition, photographs containing images of people of color usually depict them in a context that has no relevance to chemistry or in a manner that propagates stereotypes. It is the conclusion of these authors that contemporary undergraduate general chemistry textbooks are laden with instructional bias with respect to people of color.

  5. Relationships of approaches to studying, metacognition, and intellectual development of general chemistry students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egenti, Henrietta N.

    This study investigated approaches to studying, intellectual developments, and metacognitive skills of general chemistry students enrolled for the spring 2011 semester at a single campus of a multi-campus community college. The three instruments used were the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST), the Learning Environment Preferences (LEP), and the Executive Process Questionnaire (EPQ). The subjects were 138 students enrolled in either general chemistry 1 or 2. The results revealed that the preferred approach to study was the strategic approach. The intellectual development of the students was predominantly Perry's position 2 (dualist) in transition to position 3 (multiplicity). Correlation statistics revealed that deep approach to studying is related to effective employment of metacognitive skills. Students with a deep approach to studying were likely to utilize effective metacognitive skills. Students with a surface approach to studying used no metacognitive skills or ineffective metacognitive skills. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to ascertain which of the three variables, namely approaches to studying, ability to metacognate, or level of intellectual development, was the most salient in predicting the success of general chemistry students. No single variable was found to predict students’ success in general chemistry classes; however, a surface approach to studying predisposes general chemistry students to fail. The implication of this study is that students’ study approaches, intellectual developments, and metacognitive skills are requisite information to enable instructional remediation early in the semester.

  6. Computer-based, Jeopardy™-like game in general chemistry for engineering majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, S. S.; Saffre, F.; Kadadha, M.; Gater, D. L.; Isakovic, A. F.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the design of Jeopardy™-like computer game for enhancement of learning of general chemistry for engineering majors. While we examine several parameters of student achievement and attitude, our primary concern is addressing the motivation of students, which tends to be low in a traditionally run chemistry lectures. The effect of the game-playing is tested by comparing paper-based game quiz, which constitutes a control group, and computer-based game quiz, constituting a treatment group. Computer-based game quizzes are Java™-based applications that students run once a week in the second part of the last lecture of the week. Overall effectiveness of the semester-long program is measured through pretest-postest conceptual testing of general chemistry. The objective of this research is to determine to what extent this ``gamification'' of the course delivery and course evaluation processes may be beneficial to the undergraduates' learning of science in general, and chemistry in particular. We present data addressing gender-specific difference in performance, as well as background (pre-college) level of general science and chemistry preparation. We outline the plan how to extend such approach to general physics courses and to modern science driven electives, and we offer live, in-lectures examples of our computer gaming experience. We acknowledge support from Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi

  7. Knowledge Surveys in General Chemistry: Confidence, Overconfidence, and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Priscilla; Volckmann, David

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge surveys have been used in a number of fields to assess changes in students' understanding of their own learning and to assist students in review. This study compares metacognitive confidence ratings of students faced with problems on the surveys with their actual knowledge as shown on the final exams in two courses of general chemistry…

  8. General Procedure for the Easy Calculation of pH in an Introductory Course of General or Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cepriá, Gemma; Salvatella, Luis

    2014-01-01

    All pH calculations for simple acid-base systems used in introductory courses on general or analytical chemistry can be carried out by using a general procedure requiring the use of predominance diagrams. In particular, the pH is calculated as the sum of an independent term equaling the average pK[subscript a] values of the acids involved in the…

  9. The Effects of Clickers and Online Homework on Students' Achievement in General Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebru, Misganaw T.

    Retention of an introductory general chemistry course material is vital for student success in future chemistry and chemistry-related courses. This study investigated the effects of clickers versus online homework on students' long-term content retention, examined the effectiveness of online homework versus no graded homework on students' achievement in a first-semester general chemistry course, and assessed students' attitudes toward the use of online homework. Students' data from the yearlong American Chemical Society General Chemistry (ACS GC97) exam, teacher-prepared final exams, and online surveys were analyzed to measure the effects of clickers and online homework on students' long-term content retention and performance, and to capture students' attitudes. A variety of methods including Welch ANOVA, independent samples t -test (Welch), Pearson's correlation, test of proportions, and Pearson's Chi-square test were used to analyze the data. The analyses indicated that the use of clickers or online homework did not significantly improve students' long-term content retention of general chemistry course material, that the use of online homework was more beneficial than, or at least as effective as no graded homework in improving students' performance, and students valued the fact that online homework provided immediate feedback. Additionally, results of this study revealed that greater numbers of students were retained in clicker and online homework classes than non-clicker, non-online homework classes and that various types of online homework systems used in general chemistry could impact student performance differently. Implications of the findings and future research directions were presented.

  10. Use of Chloroisocyanuarates for Disinfection of Water: Application of Miscellaneous General Chemistry Topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Gabriel; Rohrig, Brian

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a set of motivating exercises to study various general chemistry topics such as formulation, molar mass, stoichiometry, chemical equations, balanced equations, oxidation states, acid base reactions, tautomerism, calculation of formal charges, resonance, chlorinating agents, and the use of chlorine for disinfecting water. These topics can be studied in part through the information found on the labels of chloroisocyanurates, such as sodium dichloroisocyanurate (anhydrous and dihydrate) and trichloroisocyanuric acid, which are used for disinfecting water. Both compounds are readily available as consumer products. The holistic approach presented in this article allows students to focus on the versatility of the general chemistry concepts.

  11. General Chemistry Collection for Students (CD-ROM), Abstract of Special Issue 16, 5th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    General Chemistry Collection contains the work of many authors. The time and effort of these dedicated chemistry educators in producing these programs is gratefully acknowledged by the editors, along with the authors' generosity in contributing their work to the chemistry education community by submission to JCE Software. Thanks are also due the many volunteer peer reviewers who give their time and expertise to help maintain and assure the high quality of JCE Software publications.

    Literature Cited

    1. General Chemistry Collection (Student Ed.), 4th ed. [CD-ROM]; J. Chem. Educ. Software 2000, SP 16.
    2. March, J. L.; Moore, J. W.; Jacobsen, J. J. ChemPages Laboratory [CD-ROM]; J. Chem. Educ. Software 2000, SP 24.
    3. Whisnant, D. M. General Chemistry Multimedia Problems [CD-ROM]; J. Chem. Educ. Software 2000, SP 27.
    4. Ophardt, C. E. Inorganic Molecules: A Visual Database [CD-ROM]; J. Chem. Educ. Software 1996, 8C1.
    5. Lisensky, G. C.; Ellis, A. B.; Blackwell, J. M.; Solid State Resources, 2nd ed. [CD-ROM]; J. Chem. Educ. Software 2000, SP 12.

  12. General Chemistry Collection for Students (CD-ROM), Abstract of Special Issue 16, 4th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    The General Chemistry Collection contains both new and previously published JCE Software programs that are intended for use by introductory-level chemistry students. These peer-reviewed programs for Macintosh and for Windows are available on a single CD-ROM for convenient distribution to and access by students, and the CD may be adopted for students to purchase as they would a textbook. General Chemistry Collection covers a broad range of topics providing students with interesting information, tutorials, and simulations that will be useful to them as they study chemistry for the first time. There are 22 programs included in the General Chemistry Collection 4th Edition. Their titles and the general chemistry topics they cover are listed in Table 1. Features in This Edition General Chemistry Collection, 4th edition includes:

    • Lessons for Introductory Chemistry and INQUAL-S, two new programs not previously published by JCE Software (abstracts appear below)
    • Writing Electron Dot Structures (1) and Viscosity Measurement: A Virtual Experiment for Windows (2), two programs published individually by JCE Software
    • Periodic Table Live! LE, a limited edition of Periodic Table Live!, 2nd Edition (3) (this replaces Chemistry Navigator (4) and Illustrated Periodic Table (5))
    • Many of the programs from previous editions (6)1
    Hardware and Software Requirements System requirements are given in Table 2. Some programs have additional requirements. See the individual program abstracts at JCE Online, or documentation included on the CD-ROM for more specific information. Licensing and Discounts for Adoptions The General Chemistry Collection is intended for use by individual students. Institutions and faculty members may adopt General Chemistry Collection 4th Edition as they would a textbook. We can arrange for CDs to be packaged with laboratory manuals or other course materials or to be sold for direct distribution to students through the campus

  13. Introducing Scientific Literature to Honors General Chemistry Students: Teaching Information Literacy and the Nature of Research to First-Year Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrer-Vinent, Ignacio J.; Bruehl, Margaret; Pan, Denise; Jones, Galin L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology and implementation of a case study introducing the scientific literature and creative experiment design to honors general chemistry laboratory students. The purpose of this study is to determine whether first-year chemistry students can develop information literacy skills while they engage with the primary…

  14. Design, Development, and Psychometric Analysis of a General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry Topic Inventory Based on the Identified Main Chemistry Topics Relevant to Nursing Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Corina E.

    2013-01-01

    This two-stage study focused on the undergraduate nursing course that covers topics in general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry. In the first stage, the central objective was to identify the main concepts of GOB chemistry relevant to the clinical practice of nursing. The collection of data was based on open-ended interviews of both nursing…

  15. Inquiry-Based Arson Investigation for General Chemistry Using GC-MS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Marta K.; Bukowski, Michael R.; Menachery, Mary D.; Zatorsky, Adam R.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a two-week guided-inquiry laboratory in which first-semester general chemistry students investigate a suspected arson using gas chromatography--mass spectrometry and paper chromatography. In the process of evaluating evidence from the crime scene, students develop and test hypotheses and learn the fundamentals of chromatography,…

  16. Podcast Effectiveness as Scaffolding Support for Students Enrolled in First-Semester General Chemistry Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Mary Cynthia Barton

    2010-01-01

    Podcasts covering essential first-semester general chemistry laboratory techniques and central concepts that aid in experimental design or data processing were prepared and made available for students to access on an as-needed basis on iPhones [arrow right] or iPod touches [arrow right]. Research focused in three areas: the extent of podcast…

  17. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy: A Discovery-Based Activity for the General Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgsmiller, Karen L.; O'Connell, Dylan J.; Klauenberg, Kathryn M.; Wilson, Peter M.; Stromberg, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    A discovery-based method is described for incorporating the concepts of IR and Raman spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum. Students use three sets of springs to model the properties of single, double, and triple covalent bonds. Then, Gaussian 03W molecular modeling software is used to illustrate the relationship between bond…

  18. Argumentation and Participation Patterns in General Chemistry Peer-Led Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulatunga, Ushiri; Moog, Richard S.; Lewis, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the use of Toulmin's argumentation scheme to investigate the characteristics of student group argumentation in Peer-Led Guided Inquiry sessions for a General Chemistry I course. A coding scheme based on Toulmin's [Toulmin [1958] "The uses of argument." Cambridge: Cambridge University Press] argumentation…

  19. Effect of Teaching Metacognitive Learning Strategies on Performance in General Chemistry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Elzbieta; Kennedy, Eugene; McGuire, Saundra Y.

    2013-01-01

    College students often find general chemistry to be a very challenging rite of passage on their way to degrees in various science, technology, and mathematics disciplines. As teachers, we make efforts to simultaneously patch gaps in students' prior knowledge and instill valuable learning strategies and sound study habits. In this paper, we…

  20. Teaching Assistants' Perceptions of a Training to Support an Inquiry-Based General Chemistry Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Lindsay B.; Maeng, Jennifer L.; Whitworth, Brooke A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative investigation was to better understand teaching assistants' (TAs') perceptions of training in a guided inquiry undergraduate general chemistry laboratory context. The training was developed using existing TA training literature and informed by situated learning theory. TAs engaged in training prior to teaching (~25…

  1. General Chemistry Students' Conceptual Understanding and Language Fluency: Acid-Base Neutralization and Conductometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyachwaya, James M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine college general chemistry students' conceptual understanding and language fluency in the context of the topic of acids and bases. 115 students worked in groups of 2-4 to complete an activity on conductometry, where they were given a scenario in which a titration of sodium hydroxide solution and dilute…

  2. Using a Thematic Laboratory-Centered Curriculum to Teach General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Todd A.; Samide, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an approach to general chemistry that involves teaching chemical concepts in the context of two thematic laboratory modules: environmental remediation and the fate of pharmaceuticals in the environment. These modules were designed based on active-learning pedagogies and involve multiple-week projects that dictate what…

  3. Design and Implementation of a Studio-Based General Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfried, Amy C.; Sweeder, Ryan D.; Bartolin, Jeffrey M.; Hessler, Jessica A.; Reynolds, Benjamin P.; Stewart, Ian C.; Coppola, Brian P.; Holl, Mark Banaszak M.

    2007-01-01

    The design and implementation of a new value-added general chemistry course, which could use the studio instructional method to incorporate the existing educational research is reviewed. These teaching methods and activities were woven into the course to provide the students with ways of learning chemical concepts and practicing scientific…

  4. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  5. Exploring Chemical Equilibrium with Poker Chips: A General Chemistry Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    A hands-on laboratory exercise at the general chemistry level introduces students to chemical equilibrium through a simulation that uses poker chips and rate equations. More specifically, the exercise allows students to explore reaction tables, dynamic chemical equilibrium, equilibrium constant expressions, and the equilibrium constant based on…

  6. Examination of Bond Properties through Infrared Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csizmar, Clifford M.; Force, Dee Ann; Warner, Don L.

    2012-01-01

    A concerted effort has been made to increase the opportunities for undergraduate students to address scientific problems employing the processes used by practicing chemists. As part of this effort, an infrared (IR) spectroscopy and molecular modeling experiment was developed for the first-year general chemistry laboratory course. In the…

  7. Using Self-Reflection to Increase Science Process Skills in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veal, William R.; Taylor, Dawne; Rogers, Amy L.

    2009-01-01

    Self-reflection is a tool of instruction that has been used in the science classroom. Research has shown great promise in using video as a learning tool in the classroom. However, the integration of self-reflective practice using video in the general chemistry laboratory to help students develop process skills has not been done. Immediate video…

  8. Analysis of Student Performance on Multiple-Choice Questions in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, JudithAnn R.; Lin, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    The percentage of students choosing the correct answer (PSCA) on 17 multiple-choice algorithmic questions taken from general chemistry exams is analyzed. PSCAs for these questions varied from 47 to 93%, and a decrease of 4.5% in PSCA was observed with each additional step in the algorithm required for solving the problem (R[superscript 2] = 0.80).…

  9. Effects and Implications of Mini-Lectures on Learning in First-Semester General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toto, Joe; Booth, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the efficacy of a novel tool, mini-lecture movies, in teaching Web based general chemistry. The analysis shows a marked improvement in student learning, as evidenced by a corresponding increase in homework and final exam scores. Students with access to mini-lecture movies scored 11.2% (p = 0.016) higher than students who did…

  10. Looking beyond Lewis Structures: A General Chemistry Molecular Modeling Experiment Focusing on Physical Properties and Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Cole, Renee S.; Sarkar, Somnath

    2011-01-01

    We present a guided-inquiry experiment using Spartan Student Version, ready to be adapted and implemented into a general chemistry laboratory course. The experiment provides students an experience with Spartan Molecular Modeling software while discovering the relationships between the structure and properties of molecules. Topics discussed within…

  11. Relationships of Approaches to Studying, Metacognition, and Intellectual Development of General Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egenti, Henrietta N.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated approaches to studying, intellectual developments, and metacognitive skills of general chemistry students enrolled for the spring 2011 semester at a single campus of a multi-campus community college. The three instruments used were the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST), the Learning Environment…

  12. Using the Plan View to Teach Basic Crystallography in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushman, Cody V.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    The plan view is used in crystallography and materials science to show the positions of atoms in crystal structures. However, it is not widely used in teaching general chemistry. In this contribution, we introduce the plan view, and show these views for the simple cubic, body-centered cubic, face-centered cubic, hexagonal close packed, CsCl, NaCl,…

  13. Students' Understanding of Analogy after a Core (Chemical Observations, Representations, Experimentation) Learning Cycle, General Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avargil, Shirly; Bruce, Mitchell R. M.; Amar, Franc¸ois G.; Bruce, Alice E.

    2015-01-01

    Students' understanding about analogy was investigated after a CORE learning cycle general chemistry experiment. CORE (Chemical Observations, Representations, Experimentation) is a new three-phase learning cycle that involves (phase 1) guiding students through chemical observations while they consider a series of open-ended questions, (phase 2)…

  14. The Evaluation of Students' Written Reflection on the Learning of General Chemistry Lab Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Ng Sook; Li, Ho Ket; Sin, Lee Choy; Sin, Keng Pei

    2014-01-01

    Reflective writing is often used to increase understanding and analytical ability. The lack of empirical evidence on the effect of reflective writing interventions on the learning of general chemistry lab experiment supports the examination of this concept. The central goal of this exploratory study was to evaluate the students' written…

  15. Transitioning from Expository Laboratory Experiments to Course-Based Undergraduate Research in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Ted M.; Ricciardo, Rebecca; Weaver, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    General chemistry courses predominantly use expository experiments that shape student expectations of what a laboratory activity entails. Shifting within a semester to course-based undergraduate research activities that include greater decision-making, collaborative work, and "messy" real-world data necessitates a change in student…

  16. The Testing Effect: An Intervention on Behalf of Low-Skilled Comprehenders in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyburn, Daniel T.; Pazicni, Samuel; Benassi, Victor A.; Tappin, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Past work has demonstrated that language comprehension ability correlates with general chemistry course performance with medium effect sizes. We demonstrate here that language comprehension's strong cognitive grounding can be used to inform effective and equitable pedagogies, namely, instructional interventions that differentially aid…

  17. A Computer Algebra Approach to Solving Chemical Equilibria in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalainoff, Melinda; Lachance, Russ; Riegner, Dawn; Biaglow, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we report on a semester-long study of the incorporation into our general chemistry course, of advanced algebraic and computer algebra techniques for solving chemical equilibrium problems. The method presented here is an alternative to the commonly used concentration table method for describing chemical equilibria in general…

  18. Supporting Students' Learning to Learn in General Chemistry Using Moodle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonza´lez, Maritza Lau; Haza, Ulises Ja´uregui; Gramagtes, Aurora Pe´rez; Leo´n, Gloria Farin~as; Le Bolay, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    A combination of regular classroom teaching with the use of resources available on the Moodle platform has been designed to foster the development of skills for learning to learn for students in an undergraduate general chemistry course. The use of the Moodle platform essentially aimed at strengthening the students' prior knowledge of…

  19. Identifying At-Risk Students in General Chemistry via Cluster Analysis of Affective Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Julia Y. K.; Bauer, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify academically at-risk students in first-semester general chemistry using affective characteristics via cluster analysis. Through the clustering of six preselected affective variables, three distinct affective groups were identified: low (at-risk), medium, and high. Students in the low affective group…

  20. Self-Assembled Student Interactions in Undergraduate General Chemistry Clicker Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacArthur, James R.; Jones, Loretta

    2013-01-01

    Student interviews, focus groups, and classroom observations were used in an exploratory study of the nature of student interactions in a large (300+ students) general chemistry course taught with clickers. These data suggest that students are self-assembling their learning environment: choosing ways in which to interact with one another during…

  1. Web-Enhanced General Chemistry Increases Student Completion Rates, Success, and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaral, Katie E.; Shank, John D.; Shibley, Ivan A., Jr.; Shibley, Lisa R.

    2013-01-01

    General Chemistry I historically had one of the highest failure and withdrawal rates at Penn State Berks, a four-year college within the Penn State system. The course was completely redesigned to incorporate more group work, the use of classroom response systems, peer mentors, and a stronger online presence via the learning management system…

  2. Can They Succeed? Exploring At-Risk Students' Study Habits in College General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ye, Li; Shuniak, Constantine; Oueini, Razanne; Robert, Jenay; Lewis, Scott

    2016-01-01

    A well-established literature base identifies a portion of students enrolled in post-secondary General Chemistry as at-risk of failing the course based on incoming metrics. Learning about the experiences and factors that lead to this higher failure rate is essential toward improving retention in this course. This study examines the relationship…

  3. Independent Research Projects in General Chemistry Classes as an Introduction to Peer-Reviewed Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tribe, Lorena; Cooper, Evan L.

    2008-01-01

    A well-structured independent literature research project with a poster session was used to introduce students to peer-reviewed literature in a general chemistry course. Overall, students reported an enhanced appreciation of the course due to performing research at some level, using peer-reviewed literature, and presenting their results in a…

  4. Using Pooled Data and Data Visualization to Introduce Statistical Concepts in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    I describe how data pooling and data visualization can be employed in the first-semester general chemistry laboratory to introduce core statistical concepts such as central tendency and dispersion of a data set. The pooled data are plotted as a 1-D scatterplot, a purpose-designed number line through which statistical features of the data are…

  5. A Systematic Experimental Test of the Ideal Gas Equation for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Luis H.; Romero, Carmen M.

    1995-10-01

    A set of experiments that examines each one of the terms of the ideal gas equation is described. Boyle's Law, Charles-Gay Lussac's Law, Amonton's Law, the number of moles or Molecular Weight, and the Gas Constant are studied. The experiments use very simple, easy to obtain equipment and common gases, mainly air. The results gathered by General Chemistry College students are satisfactory.

  6. Assessment of Antioxidant Capacities in Foods: A Research Experience for General Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoch, Matthew A.; Russell, Cianan B.; Steffen, Debora M.; Weaver, Gabriela C.; Burgess, John R.

    2009-01-01

    With the booming interest in health food and nutrition, investigations of the antioxidant capacities of various foods have come to the forefront of food science. This general chemistry laboratory curriculum provides students with an opportunity to design and implement their own experiments relating to antioxidants in food. The curriculum is six…

  7. Playing with Light: Adventures in Optics and Spectroscopy for Honors and Majors General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Staveren, Marie N.; Edwards, Kimberly D.; Apkarian, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    A lab was developed for use in an undergraduate honors and majors general chemistry laboratory to introduce students to optics, spectroscopy, and the underlying principles of quantum mechanics. This lab includes four mini-experiments exploring total internal reflection, the tunneling of light, spectra of sparklers and colored candles, and emission…

  8. A Retention Study at Burlington County College in General College Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sollimo, Vincent J.

    A study was conducted at Burlington County College to investigate the relationship between the academic characteristics and course completion of students enrolled in General College Chemistry (CHE 105) in fall 1985. The study involved an examination of students' academic records and a survey of students who did not successfully pass the course. Of…

  9. Integrating Biology into the General Chemistry Laboratory: Fluorometric Analysis of Chlorophyll "a"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesolowski, Meredith C.

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory experiment that introduces fluorometry of chlorophyll "a" at the general chemistry level is described. The use of thin-layer chromatography to isolate chlorophyll "a" from spirulina and leaf matter enables quantification of small amounts of chlorophyll "a" via fluorometry. Student results were reasonably…

  10. Amino Acid Complementarity: A Biochemical Exemplar of Stoichiometry for General and Health Sciences Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitz, Ed

    2005-01-01

    The standard introduction to stoichiometry and simple exemplars can motivate students to learn the stoichiometric studies and the condensation reaction that occurs between amino acids to form the peptide bond. This topic can be integrated into general chemistry courses as an alternative to inclusion of a separate biochemistry course that could be…

  11. An Analysis of Undergraduate General Chemistry Students' Misconceptions of the Submicroscopic Level of Precipitation Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Resa M.; Barrera, Juliet H.; Mohamed, Saheed C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined how 21 college-level general chemistry students, who had received instruction that emphasized the symbolic level of ionic equations, explained their submicroscopic-level understanding of precipitation reactions. Students' explanations expressed through drawings and semistructured interviews revealed the nature of the…

  12. Using Self-Reflection To Increase Science Process Skills in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veal, William R.; Taylor, Dawne; Rogers, Amy L.

    2009-03-01

    Self-reflection is a tool of instruction that has been used in the science classroom. Research has shown great promise in using video as a learning tool in the classroom. However, the integration of self-reflective practice using video in the general chemistry laboratory to help students develop process skills has not been done. Immediate video feedback and direct instruction were employed in a general chemistry laboratory course to improve students' mastery and understanding of basic and advanced process skills. Qualitative results and statistical analysis of quantitative data proved that self-reflection significantly helped students develop basic and advanced process skills, yet did not seem to influence the general understanding of the science content.

  13. Development and Preliminary Impacts of the Implementation of an Authentic Research-Based Experiment in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasik, Janice Hall; Cottone, Katelyn E.; Heethuis, Mitchell T.; Mueller, Anja

    2013-01-01

    Incorporating research-based lab activities into general chemistry at a large university can be challenging, considering the high enrollments and costs typically associated with the courses. Performing sweeping curricular overhauls of the general chemistry laboratory can be difficult, and in some cases discouraged, as many would rather maintain…

  14. Exploring General versus Task-Specific Assessments of Metacognition in University Chemistry Students: A Multitrait-Multimethod Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chia-Yu

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use multiple assessments to investigate the general versus task-specific characteristics of metacognition in dissimilar chemistry topics. This mixed-method approach investigated the nature of undergraduate general chemistry students' metacognition using four assessments: a self-report questionnaire, assessment of…

  15. Argumentation as a Lens to Examine Student Discourse in Peer-Led Guided Inquiry for College General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulatunga, Ushiri Kumarihamy

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation work entails three related studies on the investigation of Peer-Led Guided Inquiry student discourse in a General Chemistry I course through argumentation. The first study, "Argumentation and participation patterns in general chemistry peer-led sessions," is focused on examining arguments and participation patterns in…

  16. A Content Analysis of General Chemistry Laboratory Manuals for Evidence of Higher-Order Cognitive Tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domin, Daniel S.

    1999-01-01

    The science laboratory instructional environment is ideal for fostering the development of problem-solving, manipulative, and higher-order thinking skills: the skills needed by today's learner to compete in an ever increasing technology-based society. This paper reports the results of a content analysis of ten general chemistry laboratory manuals. Three experiments from each manual were examined for evidence of higher-order cognitive activities. Analysis was based upon the six major cognitive categories of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. The results of this study show that the overwhelming majority of general chemistry laboratory manuals provide tasks that require the use of only the lower-order cognitive skills: knowledge, comprehension, and application. Two of the laboratory manuals were disparate in having activities that utilized higher-order cognition. I describe the instructional strategies used within these manuals to foster higher-order cognitive development.

  17. Investigating macroscopic, submicroscopic, and symbolic connections in a college-level general chemistry laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thadison, Felicia Culver

    Explanations of chemical phenomena rely on understanding the behavior of submicroscopic particles. Because this level is "invisible," it is described using symbols such as models, diagrams and equations. For this reason, students often view chemistry as a "difficult" subject. The laboratory offers a unique opportunity for the students to experience chemistry macroscopically as well as symbolically. The purpose of this investigation was to determine how chemistry lab students explained chemical phenomenon on the macroscopic, submicroscopic, and representational/symbolic level. The participants were undergraduate students enrolled in an introductory level general chemistry lab course. Students' background information (gender, the number of previous chemistry courses), scores on final exams, and final average for the course were collected. Johnstone's triangle of representation guided the design and implementation of this study. A semi-structured interview was also conducted to bring out student explanations. The questionnaires required students to draw a molecule of water, complete acid base reaction equations, represent, submicroscopically, the four stages of an acid-base titration, and provide definitions of various terms. Students were able represent the submicroscopic level of water. Students were not able to represent the submicroscopic level of the reaction between an acid and a base. Students were able to represent the macroscopic level of an acid base reaction. Students were able to symbolically represent the reaction of an acid and a base. These findings indicate that students can use all three levels of chemical representation. However, students showed an inability to connect the levels in relation to acid-base chemistry. There was no relationship between a student's ability to use the levels and his or her final score in the course.

  18. The seduction of general practice and illegitimate birth of an expanded role in population health care.

    PubMed

    Buetow, Stephen; Docherty, Barbara

    2005-08-01

    To reduce health inequalities and improve quality in health care, health policy initiatives in countries including New Zealand and the United Kingdom are expecting general practice to share responsibilities for a population approach to health care. This is giving increased emphasis to preventative care, including health promotion. Reasoned debate on this policy is overdue, not least in New Zealand, where clinicians within general practice appear to have been seduced by the lack of clarity in health policy into accepting this policy without question. They appear to disregard implications of the policy for redefining the nature and scope of their discipline (and of public health), including their own role as providers of personal care. This paper suggests that a population health approach is inappropriate in general practice when this approach weakens personal care and involves health promotion activity of unknown safety and effectiveness. The example of intentional weight loss to reduce overweight is used to illustrate these issues. We argue for a restricted range of general practice services.

  19. Impact of testing styles and testing methods on achievement in general chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Byron Edward

    2001-12-01

    This research conducted at a community college located in Northeast Texas studied testing style and testing methods in relation to achievement in general chemistry. Data was collected and examined from 212 participants. Of these, 143 completed both the MBTI and PEPS surveys. This provided 71 subjects designated as Sensor (S) types for the final phase of the study. The subjects were divided into two groups by performance on the PEPS. One group consisted of subjects that indicated a preference to communicate (test) using a formal/pencil-paper test format (linguistic testing style) and the other subjects indicated a preference to communicate (test) using a hands-on/movement test format (tactile testing style). All subjects were administered both a linguistic and tactile pretest prior to treatment and both a linguistic and tactile posttest after treatment. The data was analyzed using a 2 x 2 ANOVA for significant effects at the p < 0.05 level of confidence. The results indicated a significant interaction effect between the student testing style and test methods. While not conclusive, this study does indicate that the type of testing done in general chemistry may be favoring students with certain types of communication preferences (testing styles). Therefore students with many of the worker characteristics desired by the chemical industry may not be successful in general chemistry and choose a different career path.

  20. When West Meets East: Generalizing Theory and Expanding the Conceptual Toolkit of Criminology

    PubMed Central

    Messner, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the ways in which established criminological theories born and nurtured in the West might need to be transformed to be applicable to the context of East Asian societies. The analyses focus on two theoretical perspectives—Situational Action Theory and Institutional Anomie Theory—that are located at opposite ends of the continuum with respect to levels of analysis. I argue that the accumulated evidence from cross-cultural psychology and criminological research in East Asian societies raises serious questions about the feasibility of simply transporting these perspectives from the West to the East. Instead, my analyses suggest that the formulation of theoretical explanations of crime that are truly universal will require criminologists to create and incorporate new concepts that are more faithful to the social realities of non-Western societies, societies such as those in East Asia and Asia more generally. PMID:27087864

  1. Evaluating the Success of Hispanic-Surname Students in First-Semester General Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Diana; Mittag, Kathleen C.

    2001-02-01

    This study was undertaken to identify methods and variables that affect classroom instruction, student achievement, and retention in a first-semester general chemistry course at a designated minority (primarily Hispanic) public institution of higher education. The course was a large-group lecture class (n = 241) of first-semester general chemistry that included 92 students with Hispanic surnames. Background information was gathered on the students' university-required entrance examinations, results from a logical thinking ability test, and scores from an instructor-developed diagnostic pretest. Ethnicity and gender data were collected and evaluated for trends that might affect students' success in chemistry achievement. Sixteen (17 percent) of the Hispanic-surname students enrolled in this class participated in a one-hour-per-week recitation session. The data indicate that university mathematics level is a strong predictor of success regardless of ethnicity, gender, or pre-course achievement variables, and participation in recitation sessions also improved course averages for all student groups. Included in the final analysis of this study are the benefits that can be attributed to good counseling.

    See Correction to this article.

  2. Why has the bohr-sommerfeld model of the atom been ignoredby general chemistry textbooks?

    PubMed

    Niaz, Mansoor; Cardellini, Liberato

    2011-12-01

    Bohr's model of the atom is considered to be important by general chemistry textbooks. A major shortcoming of this model was that it could not explain the spectra of atoms containing more than one electron. In order to increase the explanatory power of the model, Sommerfeld hypothesized the existence of elliptical orbits. This study has the following objectives: 1) Formulation of criteria based on a history and philosophy of science framework; and 2) Evaluation of university-level general chemistry textbooks based on the criteria, published in Italy and U.S.A. Presentation of a textbook was considered to be "satisfactory" if it included a description of the Bohr-Sommerfeld model along with diagrams of the elliptical orbits. Of the 28 textbooks published in Italy that were analyzed, only five were classified as "satisfactory". Of the 46 textbooks published in U.S.A., only three were classified as "satisfactory". This study has the following educational implications: a) Sommerfeld's innovation (auxiliary hypothesis) by introducing elliptical orbits, helped to restore the viability of Bohr's model; b) Bohr-Sommerfeld's model went no further than the alkali metals, which led scientists to look for other models; c) This clearly shows that scientific models are tentative in nature; d) Textbook authors and chemistry teachers do not consider the tentative nature of scientific knowledge to be important; e) Inclusion of the Bohr-Sommerfeld model in textbooks can help our students to understand how science progresses.

  3. The Role of Self-Regulated Learning in Explaining Examination Performance of College Students in First-Semester General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckley, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Many college students struggle with first-semester general chemistry. Prior studies have shown that a student's prior knowledge of chemistry, a cognitive factor, does not account for the total variance when measured by examination scores. This study explored the role of self-regulated learning (SRL) to identify the degree of success or failure of…

  4. Improving Students' Inquiry Skills and Self-Efficacy through Research-Inspired Modules in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkelmann, Kurt; Baloga, Monica; Marcinkowski, Tom; Giannoulis, Christos; Anquandah, George; Cohen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Research projects conducted by faculty in STEM departments served as the inspiration for a new curriculum of inquiry-based, multiweek laboratory modules in the general chemistry 1 course. The purpose of this curriculum redesign was to improve students' attitudes about chemistry as well as their self-efficacy and skills in performing inquiry…

  5. From Bhopal to Cold Fusion: A Case-Study Approach to Writing Assignments in Honors General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamely-Wiik, Donna M.; Haky, Jerome E.; Galin, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Faculty from the chemistry and English departments have developed a combined second-semester honors general chemistry and college writing course that fosters critical thinking through challenging writing assignments. Examples of case-study writing assignments and guidelines are provided that faculty at other institutions can adapt in similar…

  6. Investigating the Longitudinal Impact of a Successful Reform in General Chemistry on Student Enrollment and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Considerable effort in chemistry education research has been dedicated to developing and evaluating reform pedagogies designed to improve student success in general chemistry. Policy recommendations propose adoption of these techniques as a means to increase the number of science graduates, however there is the potential that the impact of these…

  7. Introduction of Mass Spectrometry in an First-Semester General Chemistry Laboratory Course: Quantification of Mtbe or Dmso in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solow, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Quantification of a contaminant in water provides the first-year general chemistry students with a tangible application of mass spectrometry. The relevance of chemistry to assessing and solving environmental problems is highlighted for students when they perform mass spectroscopy experiments.

  8. Analysis of the effect of student cognizance of the learning cycle in general chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla, Matthew

    While the benefits of the using the Learning Cycle have been well researched, one area that has received surprisingly little investigation is the effect that student cognizance of the learning cycle has on student performance in chemistry. The Learning Cycle, with its strong theoretical roots in scientific practice and learning theory, offers a logical opportunity to educate students in the nature of science and metacognition. In addition, by examining the class holistically, students will have the opportunity to better link the lab and lecture components of the course. We hypothesized that since a keen understanding of the nature of science, strong metacognitive ability, and a holistic view of Learning Cycle classes have all been shown to increase student comprehension in general chemistry, students who were taught to understand the Learning Cycle would perform better than students who were not. Statistical analysis of survey and grade data will be presented.

  9. The Role of Water Chemistry in Marine Aquarium Design: A Model System for a General Chemistry Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keaffaber, Jeffrey J.; Palma, Ramiro; Williams, Kathryn R.

    2008-01-01

    Water chemistry is central to aquarium design, and it provides many potential applications for discussion in undergraduate chemistry and engineering courses. Marine aquaria and their life support systems feature many chemical processes. A life support system consists of the entire recirculation system, as well as the habitat tank and all ancillary…

  10. Using Graphs of Gibbs Energy versus Temperature in General Chemistry Discussions of Phase Changes and Colligative Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Robert M.; Riley, Patrick; Schwinefus, Jeff; Fischer, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    The use of qualitative graphs of Gibbs energy versus temperature is described in the context of chemical demonstrations involving phase changes and colligative properties at the general chemistry level. (Contains 5 figures and 1 note.)

  11. Research and Teaching: Computational Methods in General Chemistry--Perceptions of Programming, Prior Experience, and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Lindsay B.; Chiu, Jennie L.; Grisham, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores how integrating computational tools into a general chemistry laboratory course can influence student perceptions of programming and investigates relationships among student perceptions, prior experience, and student outcomes.

  12. Evaluation of ACT/SAT scores as predictors of student success in general chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Kerri Dalita

    Prediction of student success in a single course such as general chemistry has traditionally been the purview of the department which owns the course such as the department of chemistry. In the analysis of data such as ACT or SAT scores, chemists have traditionally used the statistic techniques common to their research pursuits. For many chemists, this is typically been ordinary linear regression where letter grades that students receive are treated as the dependent variable while factors of interest were explored as potential predictive variables. Evaluation of the underlying mathematical basis of linear regression reveals that its use in success predication violates one of more of the assumptions that must be made about the type and quality of data. The most commonly violated assumption is homoscedacity (or constant variance of the errors). Additionally, the ultimate goal of success prediction is to determine if a student will either pass or fail a course based on the predictor variable---that is---only 2 possible outcomes. With the increasing availability of personal computing, other means of data analysis are now commonly available via statistical software packages such as SPSS. One alternative technique that continues to grow in the interest of chemists' evaluation of student success is logistic regression. Logistic regression is a general linearized model in which the natural logarithm of the odds is linearly related to the predictor variable. This study investigates the use of the ACT and SAT to predict student success in general chemistry at The University of Mississippi, CHEM 105, over a four year period. Additionally this study seeks to determine a typical student profile in order to determine if the widely accepted notions of the typical CHEM 105 student are reasonably accurate.

  13. A Genetically Optimized Predictive System for Success in General Chemistry Using a Diagnostic Algebra Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Cameron I.; Pearson, Paul T.

    2012-02-01

    In higher education, many high-enrollment introductory courses have evolved into "gatekeeper" courses due to their high failure rates. These courses prevent many students from attaining their educational goals and often become graduation roadblocks. At the authors' home institution, general chemistry has become a gatekeeper course in which approximately 25% of students do not pass. This failure rate in chemistry is common, and often higher, at many other institutions of higher education, and mathematical deficiencies are perceived to be a large contributing factor. This paper details the development of a highly accurate predictive system that identifies students at the beginning of the semester who are "at-risk" for earning a grade of C- or below in chemistry. The predictive accuracy of this system is maximized by using a genetically optimized neural network to analyze the results of a diagnostic algebra test designed for a specific population. Once at-risk students have been identified, they can be helped to improve their chances of success using techniques such as concurrent support courses, online tutorials, "just-in-time" instructional aides, study skills, motivational interviewing, and/or peer mentoring.

  14. An Investigation of the Effects of Reader Characteristics on Reading Comprehension Of a General Chemistry Text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiles, Kelly Y.

    variable. The results from this regression analysis indicated that the two schema measures (measured by the Pathfinder program) accounted for the greatest amount of variance in four of the reading comprehension variables (encoding the text, bridging and elaborative inferences, and delayed recall of a general summary). This research suggest that providing students with background information on chemistry concepts prior to having them read the text may result in better understanding and more effective incorporation of the chemistry concepts into their schema.

  15. Assessing student perspectives of the laboratory, self-efficacy in chemistry, and attitudes towards science in an undergraduate first-semester general chemistry laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olave, Marcella

    Research is lacking in the general chemistry laboratory that explores the concerted affective predictor variables of student perspectives of the laboratory, self-efficacy in chemistry, and student attitudes towards science. There is little research on the assessment of variables in the affective domain to determine student experiences in the chemistry laboratory. Student experiences in this study were assessed by determining congruence between student perspectives of their actual and preferred general chemistry laboratory environment using the SLEI, and student attitudes towards careers as a scientist using the SAI II. Correlations between scales from the SLEI, SAI II along with the CCSS that measures self-efficacy in college chemistry were identified. A sample of eighty college students enrolled in a first-semester general chemistry laboratory responded to the SLEI, SAI II, and CCSS. A t test indicated there were no significant differences with student cohesiveness, integration, material environment, and rule clarity between the actual and preferred SLEI signifying congruence. There were significant differences between students actual and preferred perception of open-endedness (t = -3.59, df = 28, p = 0.00). Student attitudes towards careers as a scientist could not be determined using pretests and posttests of the SAI II due to a ceiling effect. There were positive significant correlations found between the scales of material environment, integration from the SLEI and the scale of student attitudes towards careers as a scientist using the SAI II. There were also positive significant correlations between self-efficacy for everyday applications, and self-efficacy for cognitive skills from the CCSS with the scale of student attitudes towards careers as a scientist. This study is of significance since it is the first study exploring congruence between the actual and preferred student perspectives of the laboratory using the SLEI in a first semester general chemistry

  16. Getting Real: A General Chemistry Laboratory Program Focusing on "Real World" Substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Robert C.; Akhtar, Mohammad J.

    1996-11-01

    working with these materials, we present chemical structures wherever possible, but do not emphasize organic nomenclature or functional group chemistry beyond identifying, as appropriate, acidic and basic groups and other key structural features. 3. As can be appreciated from Table 1, the course organization is overtly based on the nature of the materials themselveshousehold "chemicals", food and beverages, pills, and plasticsrather than on abstract chemical principles. Organizing the course on the basis of the materials studied emphasizes their relevance to students and focuses interest on the actual results obtained by the individual students. Nevertheless, a coherent sequence of development of laboratory techniques and gradually increasing opportunity for less tightly directed student experiences is maintained. Laboratory exercises cover most of the usual topics, including stoichiometry, qualitative analysis, quantitative analyses by acid-base and redox titrations, and colorimetry. We have not, however, found or devised exercises dealing with thermochemistry or electrochemistry; readers' suggestions in these areas would be welcome. 4. The instruments, equipment, and techniques used in the laboratory initially were the same as previously used, so that we have been able to introduce this program without initial capital expenditure. The exercises rely substantially upon mass measurements and titrations, with pH meters and colorimeters brought into use as the year progresses. We are now in the process of introducing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) methods into the laboratories. This will add a very powerful tool to the students' repertoire. Its use will greatly expand the opportunities for directed-inquiry investigations of real-world samples in the context of the course. 5. Some of the exercises in Table 1 will be recognized by readers of this Journal as standard ones, found in many lab manuals or available as commercial modules (2). To provide a comprehensive focus on

  17. Impact of an Online Homework Program on the Achievement of College Students Enrolled in First Semester General Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huesgen, Brian D.

    Technology is finding an ever increasing role in university level courses. One area of particular interest is the use of online or computer based homework programs. This study investigated the potential impact of one of the leading commercial chemistry homework management systems on the performance of students in a first semester general chemistry course. Two groups of students were identified, one which used a basic homework program and one which used a Web-based, customizable, problem-grading application that was provided prompt feedback. The 2005 American Chemical Society First Semester General Chemistry Exam as the benchmark of understanding general chemistry. No statistically significant difference was found between the scores of the two groups. A statistically significant correlation between performance on the homework assignments and the final exam was noted, but seemed to disappear when analysis was particularized.

  18. Effects on Student Achievement in General Chemistry following Participation in an Online Preparatory Course: ChemPrep, a Voluntary, Self-Paced, Online Introduction to Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botch, Beatrice; Day, Roberta; Vining, William; Stewart, Barbara; Rath, Kenneth; Peterfreund, Alan; Hart, David

    2007-01-01

    ChemPrep was developed to be a stand-alone preparatory short-course to help students succeed in general chemistry. It is Web-based and delivered using the OWL system. Students reported that the ChemPrep materials (short information pages, parameterized questions with detailed feedback, tutorials, and answers to questions through the OWL message…

  19. Ascorbic Acid as a Standard for Iodometric Titrations. An Analytical Experiment for General Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Cesar R.; Simoni, Jose A.; Collins, Carol H.; Volpe, Pedro L. O.

    1999-10-01

    Ascorbic acid is suggested as the weighable compound for the standardization of iodine solutions in an analytical experiment in general chemistry. The experiment involves an iodometric titration in which iodine reacts with ascorbic acid, oxidizing it to dehydroascorbic acid. The redox titration endpoint is determined by the first iodine excess that is complexed with starch, giving a deep blue-violet color. The results of the titration of iodine solution using ascorbic acid as a calibration standard were compared with the results acquired by the classic method using a standardized solution of sodium thiosulfate. The standardization of the iodine solution using ascorbic acid was accurate and precise, with the advantages of saving time and avoiding mistakes due to solution preparation. The colorless ascorbic acid solution gives a very clear and sharp titration end point with starch. It was shown by thermogravimetric analysis that ascorbic acid can be dried at 393 K for 2 h without decomposition. This experiment allows general chemistry students to perform an iodometric titration during a single laboratory period, determining with precision the content of vitamin C in pharmaceutical formulations.

  20. What Do Conceptual Holes in Assessment Say about the Topics We Teach in General Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luxford, Cynthia J.; Holme, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Introductory chemistry has long been considered a service course by various departments that entrust chemistry departments with teaching their students. As a result, most introductory courses include a majority of students who are not chemistry majors, and many are health and science related majors who are required to take chemistry. To identify…

  1. Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrödinger, E.

    2011-02-01

    Preface; Part I. The de Sitter Universe: 1. Synthetic construction; 2. The reduced model: geodesics; 3. The elliptic interpretation; 4. The static frame; 5. The determination of parallaxes; 6. The Lemaître-Robertson frame; Part II. The Theory of Geodesics: 7. On null geodesics; i. Determination of the parameter for null lines in special cases; ii. Frequency shift; 8. Free particles and light rays in general expanding spaces, flat or hyperspherical; i. Flat spaces; ii. Spherical spaces; iii. The red shift for spherical spaces; Part III. Waves in General Riemannian Space-Time: 9. The nature of our approximation; 10. The Hamilton-Jacobi theory in a gravitational field; 11. Procuring approximate solutions of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation from wave theory; Part IV. Waves in an Expanding Universe: 12. General considerations; 13. Proper vibrations and wave parcels; Bibliography.

  2. Acid-base chemistry of the blood--a general model.

    PubMed

    Rees, S E; Andreassen, S; Hovorka, R; Summers, R; Carson, E R

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes a general model of acid-base chemistry of the blood which can be used to simulate physiological perturbation of acid-base chemistry on addition or removal of any buffer acid or base. In particular, it is shown how this model can be used to estimate the concentrations of buffer acid or base. In particular, it is shown how this model can be used to estimate the concentrations of buffer acids and bases when blood is equilibrated to a new pCO2, when hydrogen ions H+ are added to the blood, or when two pools of blood with different concentrations of buffer acids and bases are mixed. The ability of the model to represent the addition or removal of any acid or base is a significant increase in functionality above the Siggaard-Andersen nomogram which is limited to simulating the effects of equilibrating the blood to a new pCO2. When used to represent the situation where blood is equilibrated at a new pCO2 the model enables calculation of the amount CO2 removed during equilibration, a further increase in functionality above the Siggaard-Andersen nomogram. In two experimental situations, equilibrating blood to a new pCO2 and addition of H+ ions, the model predictions are shown to be consistent with existing experimental data in the form of the Siggaard-Andersen nomogram. PMID:8894395

  3. Climate Change Concepts and POGIL: Using climate change to teach general chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. B.; Lewis, J. E.; Anderson, K.; Latch, D.; Sutheimer, S.; Webster, G.; Middlecamp, C.; Moog, R.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change is a topic that can be used to engage students in a variety of courses and disciplines. Through an NSF-funded project, we have written a set of in-class POGIL (Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning) activities that use climate change topics to teach general chemistry concepts. POGIL is a pedagogical approach that uses group activities to teach content and process skills. In these group activities an initial model and a series of critical thinking questions are used to guide students through the introduction to or application of course content. Students complete the activities on their own, with the faculty member as a facilitator of learning, rather than a provider of information. Through assigned group roles and intentionally designed activity structure, process skills, such as teamwork, communication, and information processing, are developed during completion of the activity. While POGIL activities were initially developed for chemistry courses, this approach has now been used to create materials for use in other fields, such as biology, math, engineering and computer science. An additional component of this project is the incorporation of questions that relate to socio-scientific issues, e.g., the economic and social effects of climate change policies. The goal is for students to use evidence-based arguments in situations where opinion-based arguments are common. Key components (i.e., models and the corresponding critical thinking questions) of one activity will be presented. We will also report preliminary feedback based on initial classroom testing of several of the activities.

  4. How do video-based demonstration assessment tasks affect problem-solving process, test anxiety, chemistry anxiety and achievement in general chemistry students?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrell, Rosalind Stephanie

    2001-12-01

    Because paper-and-pencil testing provides limited knowledge about what students know about chemical phenomena, we have developed video-based demonstrations to broaden measurement of student learning. For example, students might be shown a video demonstrating equilibrium shifts. Two methods for viewing equilibrium shifts are changing the concentration of the reactants and changing the temperature of the system. The students are required to combine the data collected from the video and their knowledge of chemistry to determine which way the equilibrium shifts. Video-based demonstrations are important techniques for measuring student learning because they require students to apply conceptual knowledge learned in class to a specific chemical problem. This study explores how video-based demonstration assessment tasks affect problem-solving processes, test anxiety, chemistry anxiety and achievement in general chemistry students. Several instruments were used to determine students' knowledge about chemistry, students' test and chemistry anxiety before and after treatment. Think-aloud interviews were conducted to determine students' problem-solving processes after treatment. The treatment group was compared to a control group and a group watching video demonstrations. After treatment students' anxiety increased and achievement decreased. There were also no significant differences found in students' problem-solving processes following treatment. These negative findings may be attributed to several factors that will be explored in this study.

  5. General Chemistry Students' Understanding of the Chemistry Underlying Climate Science and the Development of a Two-Tiered Multiple-Choice Diagnostic Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versprille, A.; Towns, M.; Mahaffy, P.; Martin, B.; McKenzie, L.; Kirchhoff, M.

    2013-12-01

    As part of the NSF funded Visualizing the Chemistry of Climate Change (VC3) project, we have developed a chemistry of climate science diagnostic instrument for use in general chemistry courses based on twenty-four student interviews. We have based our interview protocol on misconceptions identified in the research literature and the essential principles of climate change outlined in the CCSP document that pertain to chemistry (CCSP, 2009). The undergraduate student interviews elicited their understanding of the greenhouse effect, global warming, climate change, greenhouse gases, climate, and weather, and the findings from these interviews informed and guided the development of the multiple-choice diagnostic instrument. Our analysis and findings from the interviews indicate that students seem to confuse the greenhouse effect, global warming, and the ozone layer and in terms of chemistry concepts, the students lack a particulate level understanding of greenhouse gases causing them to not fully conceptualize the greenhouse effect and climate change. Details of the findings from the interviews, development of diagnostic instrument, and preliminary findings from the full implementation of the diagnostic instrument will be shared.

  6. Getting Real: A General Chemistry Laboratory Program Focusing on "Real World" Substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Robert C.; Akhtar, Mohammad J.

    1996-11-01

    working with these materials, we present chemical structures wherever possible, but do not emphasize organic nomenclature or functional group chemistry beyond identifying, as appropriate, acidic and basic groups and other key structural features. 3. As can be appreciated from Table 1, the course organization is overtly based on the nature of the materials themselveshousehold "chemicals", food and beverages, pills, and plasticsrather than on abstract chemical principles. Organizing the course on the basis of the materials studied emphasizes their relevance to students and focuses interest on the actual results obtained by the individual students. Nevertheless, a coherent sequence of development of laboratory techniques and gradually increasing opportunity for less tightly directed student experiences is maintained. Laboratory exercises cover most of the usual topics, including stoichiometry, qualitative analysis, quantitative analyses by acid-base and redox titrations, and colorimetry. We have not, however, found or devised exercises dealing with thermochemistry or electrochemistry; readers' suggestions in these areas would be welcome. 4. The instruments, equipment, and techniques used in the laboratory initially were the same as previously used, so that we have been able to introduce this program without initial capital expenditure. The exercises rely substantially upon mass measurements and titrations, with pH meters and colorimeters brought into use as the year progresses. We are now in the process of introducing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) methods into the laboratories. This will add a very powerful tool to the students' repertoire. Its use will greatly expand the opportunities for directed-inquiry investigations of real-world samples in the context of the course. 5. Some of the exercises in Table 1 will be recognized by readers of this Journal as standard ones, found in many lab manuals or available as commercial modules (2). To provide a comprehensive focus on

  7. Introductory Molecular Orbital Theory: An Honors General Chemistry Computational Lab as Implemented Using Three-Dimensional Modeling Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruddick, Kristie R.; Parrill, Abby L.; Petersen, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a computational molecular orbital theory experiment was implemented in a first-semester honors general chemistry course. Students used the GAMESS (General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System) quantum mechanical software (as implemented in ChemBio3D) to optimize the geometry for various small molecules. Extended Huckel…

  8. Catalytic conjugate additions of geminal bis(sulfone)s: expanding the chemistry of sulfones as simple alkyl anion equivalents.

    PubMed

    Landa, Aitor; Puente, Angel; Santos, J Ignacio; Vera, Silvia; Oiarbide, Mikel; Palomo, Claudio

    2009-11-01

    The value of cyclic gem-bis(sulfone) 4 as a simple alkyl nucleophile equivalent in catalytic C-C bond-forming reactions is demonstrated. The 1,4-type nucleophilic additions of bis(sulfone) 4 to alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones take place by assistance of catalytic guanidine base. On the other hand, pyrrolidines are able to catalyze the conjugate addition of 4 to both enones and enals, likely by means of iminium ion activation. Upon exploration of the best chiral pyrrolidine catalyst, it has been found that the addition of 4 to enals catalyzed by diphenylprolinol silyl ether 10 proceeds with very high enantioselectivity (beta-aryl-substituted enals >95% ee; beta-alkyl substituted enals up to 94% ee; ee = enantiomeric excess). Further reductive desulfonation of adducts gives rise to the corresponding beta-methyl aldehydes, as well as the derived alcohols, acetals, and methyl esters after simple (Mg, MeOH) well-established protocols. Application of the procedure to the synthesis of biologically relevant phenethyl building blocks is shown. Most interestingly, alpha-alkylation of initially obtained bis(sulfone) adducts can be done even with less reactive alkylating reagents, such as long linear-chain or branched-chain alkyl halides. Accordingly, upon the desulfonation process, a general, experimentally simple and highly enantioselective access to beta-branched aldehydes, alcohols, or esters is possible. Further exploration of the method includes the use of chiral alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes derived from citronellal as the Michael acceptor partners. In these instances, the sense of the conjugate addition of 4 is controlled by the chirality of the pyrrolidine catalyst, thus allowing for a stereochemically predictable access to 1,3-dimethyl arrays, such as those present in deoxygenated polyketide-type natural products. The intramolecular variation of this technology by using doubly unsaturated aldehyde-ester 22 illustrated the site selectivity of the procedure and its

  9. Comparative analysis of a nontraditional general chemistry textbook and selected traditional textbooks used in Texas community colleges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvato, Steven Walter

    The purpose of this study was to analyze questions within the chapters of a nontraditional general chemistry textbook and the four general chemistry textbooks most widely used by Texas community colleges in order to determine if the questions require higher- or lower-order thinking according to Bloom's taxonomy. The study employed quantitative methods. Bloom's taxonomy (Bloom, Engelhart, Furst, Hill, & Krathwohl, 1956) was utilized as the main instrument in the study. Additional tools were used to help classify the questions into the proper category of the taxonomy (McBeath, 1992; Metfessel, Michael, & Kirsner, 1969). The top four general chemistry textbooks used in Texas community colleges and Chemistry: A Project of the American Chemical Society (Bell et al., 2005) were analyzed during the fall semester of 2010 in order to categorize the questions within the chapters into one of the six levels of Bloom's taxonomy. Two coders were used to assess reliability. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential methods. The descriptive method involved calculation of the frequencies and percentages of coded questions from the books as belonging to the six categories of the taxonomy. Questions were dichotomized into higher- and lower-order thinking questions. The inferential methods involved chi-square tests of association to determine if there were statistically significant differences among the four traditional college general chemistry textbooks in the proportions of higher- and lower-order questions and if there were statistically significant differences between the nontraditional chemistry textbook and the four traditional general chemistry textbooks. Findings indicated statistically significant differences among the four textbooks frequently used in Texas community colleges in the number of higher- and lower-level questions. Statistically significant differences were also found among the four textbooks and the nontraditional textbook. After the analysis of

  10. Podcast effectiveness as scaffolding support for students enrolled in first-semester general chemistry laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Mary Cynthia Barton

    Podcasts covering essential first-semester general chemistry laboratory techniques and central concepts that aid in experimental design or data processing were prepared and made available for students to access on an as-needed basis on iPhones→ or iPod touches→. Research focused in three areas: the extent of podcast usage, the numbers and types of interactions between instructors and research teams, and student performance on graded assignments. Data analysis indicates that the podcast treatment research teams accessed a podcast 2.86 times on average during each week that podcasts were available. Comparison of interaction data for the lecture treatment research teams and podcast treatment research teams reveals that interactions with instructors were statistically significantly fewer for teams that had podcast access rather than a pre-laboratory lecture. The implication of the results is that student research teams were able to gather laboratory information more effectively when it was presented in an on-demand podcast format. Finally, statistical analysis of data on student performance on graded assignments indicates no significant differences between outcome measures for the treatment groups when compared as cohorts. The only statistically significant difference is between students judged to be highly motivated; for this sub-group the students in the podcast treatment group earned a course average that was statistically significantly higher than those in the lecture treatment group. This research study provides some of the first data collected on the effectiveness of podcasts delivered as needed in a first-semester general chemistry laboratory setting.

  11. A Study of Factors Affecting Student Performance in Community College General Chemistry Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Karen; Betkouski, Marianne

    High risk students in college chemistry are often identified by low mathematics SAT scores, low American Chemical Society Toledo scores, and secondary school chemistry grades. This study was designed to identify additional variables that can be used at the community college level as predictors of success in chemistry. The study compared students'…

  12. Exploring students' interactions, arguments, and reflections in general chemistry laboratories with different levels of inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haozhi

    Students' learning in inquiry-based investigations has drawn considerable attention of the science education community. Inquiry activities can be viewed as knowledge construction processes in which students are expected to develop conceptual understanding and critical thinking abilities. Our study aimed to explore the effect of experiments with different levels of inquiry on students' interactions in the laboratory setting, as well as on students' written arguments and reflections. Our results are based on direct observations of group work in college general chemistry laboratories and analysis of associated written lab reports. The analysis of students' interactions in the laboratory was approached from three major analytic dimensions: Functional analysis, cognitive processing, and social processing. According to our results, higher levels of inquiry were associated with an increase in the relative frequency of episodes where students were engaged in proposing ideas versus asking and answering each others' questions. Higher levels of inquiry also favored episodes in which experimental work was approached in a more exploratory (versus procedural) manner. However, no major changes were observed in the extent to which students were engaged in either interpretive discussions of central scientific concepts and ideas. As part of our study we were also interested in characterizing the effects of experiments involving different levels of inquiry on the structure and adequacy of university general chemistry students' written arguments, as well as on the nature of their reflections about laboratory work. Our findings indicate that the level of inquiry of the observed experiments had no significant impact on the structure or adequacy of arguments generated by students. However, the level of inquiry of the experiments seemed to have a major impact on several areas of students' written reflections about laboratory work. In general, our results elicit trends and highlight issues

  13. Development and evaluation of a thermochemistry concept inventory for college-level general chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wren, David A.

    The research presented in this dissertation culminated in a 10-item Thermochemistry Concept Inventory (TCI). The development of the TCI can be divided into two main phases: qualitative studies and quantitative studies. Both phases focused on the primary stakeholders of the TCI, college-level general chemistry instructors and students. Each phase was designed to collect evidence for the validity of the interpretations and uses of TCI testing data. A central use of TCI testing data is to identify student conceptual misunderstandings, which are represented as incorrect options of multiple-choice TCI items. Therefore, quantitative and qualitative studies focused heavily on collecting evidence at the item-level, where important interpretations may be made by TCI users. Qualitative studies included student interviews (N = 28) and online expert surveys (N = 30). Think-aloud student interviews (N = 12) were used to identify conceptual misunderstandings used by students. Novice response process validity interviews (N = 16) helped provide information on how students interpreted and answered TCI items and were the basis of item revisions. Practicing general chemistry instructors (N = 18), or experts, defined boundaries of thermochemistry content included on the TCI. Once TCI items were in the later stages of development, an online version of the TCI was used in expert response process validity survey (N = 12), to provide expert feedback on item content, format and consensus of the correct answer for each item. Quantitative studies included three phases: beta testing of TCI items (N = 280), pilot testing of the a 12-item TCI (N = 485), and a large data collection using a 10-item TCI ( N = 1331). In addition to traditional classical test theory analysis, Rasch model analysis was also used for evaluation of testing data at the test and item level. The TCI was administered in both formative assessment (beta and pilot testing) and summative assessment (large data collection), with

  14. Using Animations in Identifying General Chemistry Students' Misconceptions and Evaluating Their Knowledge Transfer Relating to Particle Position in Physical Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, K. Christopher; Villarreal, Savannah

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the types of views and misconceptions uncovered after assessing 155 freshman general chemistry students on the concept of particle position during the reversible physical change of melting, using the Melting Cycle Instrument, which illustrates particulate-level representations of a melting-freezing cycle. Animations…

  15. The Use of Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry to Introduce General Chemistry Students to Percent Mass and Atomic Mass Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfennig, Brian W.; Schaefer, Amy K.

    2011-01-01

    A general chemistry laboratory experiment is described that introduces students to instrumental analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), while simultaneously reinforcing the concepts of mass percent and the calculation of atomic mass. Working in small groups, students use the GC to separate and quantify the percent composition…

  16. Features of Representations in General Chemistry Textbooks: A Peek through the Lens of the Cognitive Load Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyachwaya, James M.; Gillaspie, Merry

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) determine the prevalence of various features of representations in five general chemistry textbooks used in the United States, and (2) use cognitive load theory to draw implications of the various features of analyzed representations. We adapted the Graphical Analysis Protocol (GAP) (Slough et al., 2010) to look at…

  17. A Service-Learning Project Based on a Research Supportive Curriculum Format in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalivas, John H.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a two-semester general chemistry laboratory teaching approach to assist students in gaining experience with science-process skills. The ultimate goal is successful completion of a second-semester service-learning project requiring use of their newly developed science-process skills. The project entails creating an…

  18. Two Methods of Determining Total Phenolic Content of Foods and Juices in a General, Organic, and Biological (GOB) Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaver, Lee Alan; Leung, Sam H.; Puderbaugh, Amy; Angel, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    The determination of total phenolics in foods and fruit juices was used successfully as a laboratory experiment in our undergraduate general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry course. Two different colorimetric methods were used over three years and comparative student results indicate that a ferrous ammonium sulfate (FAS) indicator…

  19. Identification of Unknown Chloride Salts Using a Combination of Qualitative Analysis and Titration with Silver Nitrate: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maines, Laina L.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    General chemistry students often have difficulty writing balanced equations and performing stoichiometry calculations for precipitation reactions, in part because of difficulty understanding the symbolic notation used to represent chemical reactions. We have developed a problem-based experiment to improve student learning of these concepts, and…

  20. Quantitative Analysis in the General Chemistry Laboratory: Training Students to Analyze Individual Results in the Context of Collective Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ling, Chris D.; Bridgeman, Adam J.

    2011-01-01

    Titration experiments are ideal for generating large data sets for use in quantitative-analysis activities that are meaningful and transparent to general chemistry students. We report the successful implementation of a sophisticated quantitative exercise in which the students identify a series of unknown acids by determining their molar masses…

  1. Implementation of Gas Chromatography and Microscale Distillation into the General Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum as Vehicles for Examining Intermolecular Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csizmar, Clifford M.; Force, Dee Ann; Warner, Don L.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an NSF-funded Course Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) project that seeks, in part, to increase student exposure to scientific instrumentation, a gas chromatography experiment has been integrated into the second-semester general chemistry laboratory curriculum. The experiment uses affordable, commercially available equipment…

  2. Use of a PhET Interactive Simulation in General Chemistry Laboratory: Models of the Hydrogen Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Ted M.; Chamberlain, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    An activity supporting the PhET interactive simulation, Models of the Hydrogen Atom, has been designed and used in the laboratory portion of a general chemistry course. This article describes the framework used to successfully accomplish implementation on a large scale. The activity guides students through a comparison and analysis of the six…

  3. Student Learning through Journal Writing in a General Education Chemistry Course for Pre-Elementary Education Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dianovsky, Michael T.; Wink, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes research on the use of journals in a general education chemistry course for elementary education majors. In the journals, students describe their understanding of a topic, the development of that understanding, and how the topic connects to their lives. In the process, they are able to engage in reflection about several…

  4. Access to Knowledge and Critical Thinking in General Chemistry via Social Constructivism: Pedagogical and Curricular Opportunities for Minority Science Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pushkin, David B.; Colon-Gonzalez, Maria H.

    This research study examines the nature of socio-cognitive influences on general chemistry students' learning and success. In this study, "learning" means gaining critical thinking skills and "success" means good academic grades. From a social constructivist and postmodern perspective, learning and success are considered functions of enculturation…

  5. Flame Emission Spectrometry in General Chemistry Labs: Solubility Product (K[subscript sp]) of Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyasulu, Frazier W.; Cusworth, William, III; Lindquist, David; Mackin, John

    2007-01-01

    In this general chemistry laboratory, flame emission spectrometry is used to determine the potassium ion concentration in saturated solutions of potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHP) in the 0-65 [degree]C temperature range. From these data the solubility products (K[subscript sp]), the Gibbs free energies of solution ([Delta][subscript…

  6. Estimating the One-Electron Reduction Potential for Vanadium (V) by Chemical Techniques: An Experiment for General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentworth, R. A. D.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an experiment which requires only qualitative observations, is suitable for general chemistry students, prompts an understanding of thermodynamic spontaneity, gives chemical meaning to electrode potentials, requires non-electrochemical equipment, and allows estimates of the standard potential for the reduction of Vanadium (V) to V (IV).…

  7. Learning How Students Learn: An Exploration of Self-Regulation Strategies in a Two-Year College General Chemistry Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Dionne A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated how students in an urban 2-year college used self-regulation strategies in a General Chemistry I course and whether their use was correlated with both performance and the ability to correctly predict performance on a course exam. The 142 students enrolled in all 10 sections of the course were asked to complete the Motivated…

  8. Removal of Aromatic Pollutant Surrogate from Water by Recyclable Magnetite-Activated Carbon Nanocomposite: An Experiment for General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlan, Ping Y.; Melcer, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    A general chemistry laboratory experiment using readily available chemicals is described to introduce college students to an exciting class of nanocomposite materials. In a one-step room temperature synthetic process, magnetite nanoparticles are embedded onto activated carbon matrix. The resultant nanocomposite has been shown to combine the…

  9. IM-Chem: The Use of Instant Messaging to Improve Student Performance and Personalize Large Lecture General Chemistry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behmke, Derek A.; Atwood, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has linked poor student performance with the depersonalized feeling of large lecture courses. Various forms of enhanced communication have been tried that appear to enhance personalization in large courses. For general chemistry classes taught in a 365-seat lecture hall at the University of Georgia, we have attempted to enhance…

  10. Effect of Clickers "versus" Online Homework on Students' Long-Term Retention of General Chemistry Course Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebru, Misganaw T.; Phelps, Amy J.; Wulfsberg, Gary

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the effects of student response systems (clickers) "versus" online homework on students' long-term retention of General Chemistry I course material. Long-term content retention was measured by a comprehensive yearlong American Chemical Society (ACS) GC97 exam administered seven months after students had completed the General…

  11. The Influence of Self-Efficacy and Motivational Factors on Academic Performance in General Chemistry Course: A Modeling Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alci, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the predictive and explanatory model in terms of university students' academic performance in "General Chemistry" course and their motivational features. The participants were 169 university students in the 1st grade at university. Of the participants, 132 were female and 37 were male students. Regarding…

  12. Examining the Effectiveness of a Semi-Self-Paced Flipped Learning Format in a College General Chemistry Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hibbard, Lisa; Sung, Shannon; Wells, Breche´

    2016-01-01

    Flipped learning has come to the forefront in education. It maximizes learning by moving content delivery online, where learning can be self-paced, allowing for class time to focus on student-centered active learning. This five-year cross-sectional study assessed student performance in a college general chemistry for majors sequence taught by a…

  13. The Use of Molecular Modeling as "Pseudoexperimental" Data for Teaching VSEPR as a Hands-On General Chemistry Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Christopher B.; Vandehoef, Crissie; Cook, Allison

    2015-01-01

    A hands-on activity appropriate for first-semester general chemistry students is presented that combines traditional VSEPR methods of predicting molecular geometries with introductory use of molecular modeling. Students analyze a series of previously calculated output files consisting of several molecules each in various geometries. Each structure…

  14. Incrementally Approaching an Inquiry Lab Curriculum: Can Changing a Single Laboratory Experiment Improve Student Performance in General Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacciatore, Kristen L.; Sevian, Hannah

    2009-01-01

    Many institutions are responding to current research about how students learn science by transforming their general chemistry laboratory curricula to be inquiry-oriented. We present a comparison study of student performance after completing either a traditional or an inquiry stoichiometry experiment. This single laboratory experience was the only…

  15. Impact of the Flipped Classroom on Student Performance and Retention: A Parallel Controlled Study in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Michael D.; Reid, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite much recent interest in the flipped classroom, quantitative studies are slowly emerging, particularly in the sciences. We report a year-long parallel controlled study of the flipped classroom in a second-term general chemistry course. The flipped course was piloted in the off-semester course in Fall 2014, and the availability of the…

  16. Enhancing Student Performance in First-Semester General Chemistry Using Active Feedback through the World Wide Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Kent A.; Blake, Bob

    2007-01-01

    The World Wide Web recently launched a new interactive feedback system for the instructors, so that can better understanding about their students and their problems. The feedback, in combination with tailored lectures is expected to enhance student performance in the first semester of general chemistry.

  17. Practical Work in Biology, Chemistry and Physics at Lower Secondary and General Upper Secondary Schools in Slovenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorgo, Andrej; Spernjak, Andreja

    2012-01-01

    Syllabi in the science subjects, biology, chemistry and physics at lower and general upper secondary school are compared in the light of their underlying philosophies, goals, objectives and recognized importance in science teaching. Even though all syllabi were prepared within the same framework, great differences among syllabi concerning…

  18. Introduction of Differential Scanning Calorimetry in a General Chemistry Laboratory Course: Determination of Thermal Properties of Organic Hydrocarbons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amelia, Ronald; Franks, Thomas; Nirode, William F.

    2007-01-01

    In first-year general chemistry undergraduate courses, thermodynamics and thermal properties such as melting points and changes in enthalpy ([Delta]H) and entropy ([Delta]S) of phase changes are frequently discussed. Typically, classical calorimetric methods of analysis are used to determine [Delta]H of reactions. Differential scanning calorimetry…

  19. A dry deposition parameterization for sulfur oxides in a chemistry and general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzeveld, Laurens; Lelieveld, Jos; Roelofs, Geert-Jan

    1998-03-01

    A dry deposition scheme, originally developed to calculate the deposition velocities for the trace gases O3, NO2, NO, and HNO3 in the chemistry and general circulation European Centre Hamburg Model (ECHAM), is extended to sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfate (SO42-). In order to reduce some of the shortcomings of the previous model version a local surface roughness and a more realistic leaf area index (LAI), derived from a high-resolution ecosystem database are introduced. The current model calculates the deposition velocities from the aerodynamic resistance, a quasi-laminary boundary layer resistance and a surface resistance of the surface cover, e.g., snow/ice, bare soil, vegetation, wetted surfaces, and ocean. The SO2 deposition velocity over vegetated surfaces is calculated as a function of the vegetation activity, the canopy wetness, turbulent transport through the canopy to the soil, and uptake by the soil. The soil resistance is explicitly calculated from the relative humidity and the soil pH, derived from a high-resolution global soil pH database. The snow/ice resistance of SO2 is a function of temperature. The SO2 deposition velocity over the oceans is controlled by turbulence. The sulfate deposition velocity is calculated considering diffusion, impaction, and sedimentation. Over sea surfaces the effect of bubble bursting, causing the breakdown of the quasi-laminary boundary layer, scavenging of the sulfate aerosol by sea spray, and aerosol growth due to high local relative humidities are considered. An integrated sulfate deposition velocity is calculated, applying a unimodal mass size distribution over land and a bimodal mass size distribution over sea. The calculated sulfate deposition velocity is about an order of magnitude larger than that based on a monodisperse aerosol, which is often applied in chemistry-transport models. Incorporation of the new dry deposition scheme in the ECHAM model yields significant relative differences (up to ˜50%) in mass flux

  20. A three-dimensional general circulation model with coupled chemistry for the middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasch, P. J.; Boville, B. A.; Brasseur, G. P.

    1995-05-01

    We document a new middle atmosphere general circulation model that includes ozone photochemistry. The dynamical model component is based on the NCAR middle atmosphere version of the Community Climate Model. The chemistry model component simulates the evolution of 24 chemically reactive gases. The horizontal resolution is approximately 3° in latitude and 6° in longitude. It includes 44 levels, with a maximum vertical grid spacing of about 2.5 km and a top level at around 75 km. The chemical model distinguishes between species where we judge transport to be critical and those for which it may be neglected. Nine longer-lived species (N2O, CH4, H2O, HNO3, N2O5, CO, ClONO2, HCl, and HOCl) and four chemical families (NOy, NOx, Ox and Clx) are advected. Concentrations of 15 species which are typically shorter-lived or are members of the chemical families are diagnosed using quasi-equilibrium assumptions ( O(1D), OH, Cl, O(3P), O3, HO2, NO2, ClO, NO, HNO4, NO3, N, OClO, Cl2O2, H2O2). Distributions for a number of other species are prescribed. Results are presented from a 2-year simulation, which include only gas phase photochemical reactions and in which the ozone distribution forecast from the chemistry module does not affect the radiative forcing of the dynamical fields. The calculated distributions of trace species and their seasonal evolution are often quite realistic, particularly in the northern hemisphere extratropics. Distributions of long-lived species such as N2O and CH4 correspond well to satellite observations. Some features, such as the double peak structure occurring during equinoxes, are not reproduced. The latitudinal variation and seasonal evolution of the ozone column abundance is quite realistic. The calculated vertical distribution of the ozone mixing ratio exhibits significant differences from measured values. The model underestimates significantly the ozone in the upper stratosphere (40 km) and in the extratropics, where the maximum values occur at

  1. Introduction of Differential Scanning Calorimetry in a General Chemistry Laboratory Course: Determination of Heat Capacity of Metals and Demonstration of Law of Dulong and Petit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amelia, Ronald P.; Stracuzzi, Vincent; Nirode, William F.

    2008-01-01

    Today's general chemistry students are introduced to many of the principles and concepts of thermodynamics. In first-year general chemistry undergraduate courses, thermodynamic properties such as heat capacity are frequently discussed. Classical calorimetric methods of analysis and thermal equilibrium experiments are used to determine heat…

  2. Identifying and Dealing with Hazardous Materials and Procedures in the General Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, David A.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of freshman chemistry laboratory manuals identified 15 questionable laboratory procedures, including the use of potentially hazardous chemicals. Alternatives are suggested for each hazard discussed (such as using a substitute solvent for benzene). (SK)

  3. Take-Home Challenges: Extending Discovery-Based Activities beyond the General Chemistry Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, P. K.; Sarquis, A. M.

    1996-04-01

    In an effort to more effectively integrate the experimental nature of chemistry into our students' experiences, we are developing and implementing discovery-based activities into both the laboratory and lecture components of general chemistry. Below we describe and provide an example of a "take-home challenge" intended to supplement the lecture component of the course. These take-home challenges involve the student in chemistry exploration outside of class and extend the context of content and experimentation into a nontraditional laboratory environment. Over 25 take-home challenges have been developed to date. Preliminary evaluation of the impact of the take-home challenges shows that students reporting themselves as receiving a B or C grade in the course find the challenges very useful in helping them gain a conceptual understanding of the phenomena addressed. Students earning an A grade report little or no impact on their learning. Prepared as one-page handouts, each take-home challenge begins with a scene-setting introduction followed by pertinent background information, a list of materials to be collected, and any appropriate safety precautions. The exploration component of the activity integrates leading questions with the procedural instructions to help guide the students through the discovery process and challenge them to stretch their understanding of the chemistry. After completing a take-home challenge activity, students submit written reports containing responses to the questions posed, observations of data collected, and their responses to the challenge. The accompanying sample take-home challenge activity is provided as a novel adaptation of the belch phenomenon that challenges students to experiment in order to explain the factors that account for the observed behavior. Persons interested in field testing the take-home challenges with their classes should contact the authors. Belch Bottle Challenge: What factors are responsible for the behavior of a

  4. Utilization of the seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education in general chemistry by community college instructors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panther Bishoff, Jennifer

    In recent years, higher education has undergone many changes. The advent of assessment, accountability, and a newfound focus on teaching have required faculty to examine how they are teaching. Administrators and faculty are beginning to recognize that learning is not a "one size fits all" enterprise. To this end, Chickering and Gamson developed an inventory that examined faculty utilization of the Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education. The seven principles included by the authors included faculty-student interaction, cooperative learning, active learning, giving prompt feedback, emphasizing time on task, communicating high expectations, and respecting diverse talents and ways of learning. It was determined by Chickering and Gamson, as well as many other researchers, that these seven principles were hallmarks of successful undergraduate education. Community colleges are important institutions to study, as many students begin their higher education at two-year colleges. Most students are also required to take one or more science classes for their general education requirements; therefore, many students must take at least one general chemistry course. Both community colleges and chemistry are rarely studied in literature, which makes this study important. Community college general chemistry instructors were surveyed using an online version of Chickering and Gamson's Faculty Inventory for the Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education. Responses were analyzed, and it was discovered that not only did instructors utilize the principles to a different extent, but there were also differences between genders as well as between the specific actions related to each principle.

  5. Productive whole-class discussions: A qualitative analysis of peer leader behaviors in general chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckart, Teresa Mcclain

    The intention of this research was to describe behaviors and characteristics of General Chemistry I peer leaders using a pedagogical reform method referred to as Peer-led Guided Inquiry (PLGI), and to discuss the ways in which these peer leaders created productive whole-class discussions. This reform technique engaged students to work on guided inquiry activities while working cooperatively in small groups, led by undergraduate peer leaders. These sessions were video recorded and transcribed. The data was evaluated using grounded theory methods of analysis. This study examined the dialog between students and peer leaders, paying specific attention to question types and observed patterns of interactions. The research took shape by examining the kinds of questions asked by peer leaders and the purposes these questions served. In addition to looking at questions, different kinds of behaviors displayed by peer leaders during their small group sessions were also observed. A close examination of peer leader questions and behaviors aided in developing an answer to the overall research question regarding what factors are associated with productive whole-class discussions. Five major categories of peer leader behaviors evolved from the data and provided a means to compare and contrast productive whole-class discussions. While no category single-handedly determined if a discussion was good or bad, there was a tendency for peer leaders who exhibited positive traits in at least three of the following categories to have consistently better whole-class discussions: Procedural Practices, Supervisory Qualities, Questioning Techniques, Feedback/Responses, and Interpersonal Skills. Furthermore, each of the major categories is tied directly to Interpersonal, Communication, and Leadership skills and their interactions with each other. This study also addressed applications that each of these categories has on instructional practices and their need in peer leader training. In addition

  6. Analysis of the Effect of Student Cognizance of the Learning Cycle in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czapla, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    While the benefits of the using the Learning Cycle have been well researched, one area that has received surprisingly little investigation is the effect that student cognizance of the learning cycle has on student performance in chemistry. The Learning Cycle, with its strong theoretical roots in scientific practice and learning theory, offers a…

  7. Investigating Macroscopic, Submicroscopic, and Symbolic Connections in a College-Level General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thadison, Felicia Culver

    2011-01-01

    Explanations of chemical phenomena rely on understanding the behavior of submicroscopic particles. Because this level is "invisible," it is described using symbols such as models, diagrams and equations. For this reason, students often view chemistry as a "difficult" subject. The laboratory offers a unique opportunity for the students to…

  8. Connecting Solubility, Equilibrium, and Periodicity in a Green, Inquiry Experiment for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacciatore, Kristen L.; Amado, Jose; Evans, Jason J.; Sevian, Hannah

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel first-year chemistry laboratory experiment that connects solubility, equilibrium, and chemical periodicity concepts. It employs a unique format that asks students to replicate experiments described in different sample lab reports, each lacking some essential information, rather than follow a scripted procedure. This structure is…

  9. Textbook-Bundled Metacognitive Tools: A Study of LearnSmart's Efficacy in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thadani, Vandana; Bouvier-Brown, Nicole C.

    2016-01-01

    College textbook publishers increasingly bundle sophisticated technology-based study tools with their texts. These tools appear promising, but empirical work on their efficacy is needed. We examined whether LearnSmart, a study tool bundled with McGraw-Hill's textbook "Chemistry" (Chang & Goldsby, 2013), improved learning in an…

  10. Online Grading of Calculations in General Chemistry Laboratory Write-Ups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Alexsandra; Gonzales, Robert; Brennan, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01

    In the past, there were frequently complaints about the grading of laboratory reports in our laboratory chemistry courses. This article discussed the implementation of an online submission of laboratory acquired data using LON-CAPA (The Learning Online Network with Computer-Assisted Personalized Approach), which is an open source management and…

  11. The Use of Video Demonstrations and Particulate Animation in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velazquez-Marcano, Alexandra; Williamson, Vickie M.; Ashkenazi, Guy; Tasker, Roy; Williamson, Kenneth C.

    2004-01-01

    Different visualization techniques have been used for teaching chemistry concepts. Previous studies have shown that when molecular animations and video demonstrations are used, students seem to better correlate all three levels of representation: macroscopic, submicroscopic, and symbolic. This thinking process allows the students to improve their…

  12. Green, Enzymatic Syntheses of Divanillin and Diapocynin for the Organic, Biochemistry, or Advanced General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishimura, Rachel T.; Giammanco, Chiara H.; Vosburg, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Environmentally benign chemistry is an increasingly important topic both in the classroom and the laboratory. In this experiment, students synthesize divanillin from vanillin or diapocynin from apocynin, using horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide in water. The dimerized products form rapidly at ambient temperature and are isolated by…

  13. Getting Real: A General Chemistry Laboratory Program Focusing on "Real World" Substances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.; Akhtar, Mohammad J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a freshman laboratory program designed to interface between the substances that surround students in their ordinary lives and abstract principles presented in chemistry classrooms. Course organization is based on the nature of the materials themselves, which include household chemicals such as hydrogen peroxide, food and beverages, pills…

  14. A General Chemistry Assignment Analyzing Environmental Contamination for the Depue, IL, National Superfund Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saslow Gomez, Sarah A.; Faurie-Wisniewski, Danielle; Parsa, Arlen; Spitz, Jeff; Spitz, Jennifer Amdur; Loeb, Nancy C.; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-01-01

    The classroom exercise outlined here is a self-directed assignment that connects students to the environmental contamination problem surrounding the DePue Superfund site. By connecting chemistry knowledge gained in the classroom with a real-world problem, students are encouraged to personally connect with the problem while simultaneously…

  15. An Approach to Teaching General Chemistry II that Highlights the Interdisciplinary Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumter, Takita Felder; Owens, Patrick M.

    2011-01-01

    The need for a revised curriculum within the life sciences has been well-established. One strategy to improve student preparation in the life sciences is to redesign introductory courses like biology, chemistry, and physics so that they better reflect their disciplinary interdependence. We describe a medically relevant, context-based approach to…

  16. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Flipped Format General Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Gabriela C.; SturtevantHannah G.

    2015-01-01

    Research has consistently shown that active problem-solving in a collaborative environment supports more effective learning than the traditional lecture approach. In this study, a flipped classroom format was implemented and evaluated in the chemistry majors' sequence at Purdue University over a period of three years. What was formerly lecture…

  17. Evaluating Peer-Led Team Learning across the Two Semester General Chemistry Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Yancey D.; Ippolito, Jessica; Lewis, Scott E.

    2012-01-01

    Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) is a widely disseminated pedagogical reform that employs previously successful undergraduate students, peer leaders, to lead sessions of structured group work in the target class. Numerous studies have evaluated the impact of this reform in various post-secondary chemistry classes. Results from these studies suggest…

  18. Piloting Blended Strategies to Resolve Laboratory Capacity Issues in a First-Semester General Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burchett, Shayna; Hayes, Jack; Pfaff, Annalise; Satterfield, Emmalou T.; Skyles, Amy; Woelk, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory capacity is an issue that has plagued education for more than a century. New buildings, late night classes, and virtual laboratories have offered transitory relief at great expense. Missouri University of Science and Technology is employing blended strategies to increase capacity and student success. Blended strategies expand learning…

  19. Exploring General Versus Task-Specific Assessments of Metacognition in University Chemistry Students: A Multitrait-Multimethod Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chia-Yu

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to use multiple assessments to investigate the general versus task-specific characteristics of metacognition in dissimilar chemistry topics. This mixed-method approach investigated the nature of undergraduate general chemistry students' metacognition using four assessments: a self-report questionnaire, assessment of concurrent metacognitive skills, confidence judgment, and calibration accuracy. Data were analyzed using a multitrait-multimethod correlation matrix, supplemented with regression analyses, and qualitative interpretation. Significant correlations among task performance, calibration accuracy, and concurrent metacognition within a task suggest a converging relationship. Confidence judgment, however, was not associated with task performance or the other metacognitive measurements. The results partially support hypotheses of both general and task-specific metacognition. However, general and task-specific properties of metacognition were detected using different assessments. Case studies were constructed for two participants to illustrate how concurrent metacognition varied within different task demands. Considerations of how each assessment may appropriate different metacognitive constructs and the importance of the alignment of analytical constructs when using multiple assessments are discussed. These results may help lead to improvements in metacognition assessment and may provide insights into designs of effective metacognitive instruction.

  20. Children's Health Insurance: Inspector General Reviews Should Be Expanded To Further Inform the Congress. Report to Congressional Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Kathryn G.

    This report reviews work by the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (OIG), which evaluated the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), including whether children are being enrolled inappropriately in SCHIP rather than in Medicaid, and states' progress in reducing the number of uninsured children. This…

  1. Argumentation as a Lens to Examine Student Discourse in Peer-Led Guided Inquiry for College General Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulatunga, Ushiri Kumarihamy

    This dissertation work entails three related studies on the investigation of Peer-Led Guided Inquiry student discourse in a General Chemistry I course through argumentation. The first study, Argumentation and participation patterns in general chemistry peer-led sessions, is focused on examining arguments and participation patterns in small student groups without peer leader intervention. The findings of this study revealed that students were mostly engaged in co-constructed arguments, that a discrepancy in the participation of the group members existed, and students were able to correct most of the incorrect claims on their own via argumentation. The second study, Exploration of peer leader verbal behaviors as they intervene with small groups in college general chemistry, examines the interactive discourse of the peer leaders and the students during peer leader intervention. The relationship between the verbal behaviors of the peer leaders and the student argumentation is explored in this study. The findings of this study demonstrated that peer leaders used an array of verbal behaviors to guide students to construct chemistry concepts, and that a relationship existed between student argument components and peer leader verbal behaviors. The third study, Use of Tolumin's Argumentation Scheme for student discourse to gain insight about guided inquiry activities in college chemistry , is focused on investigating the relationship between student arguments without peer leader intervention and the structure of published guided inquiry ChemActivities. The relationship between argumentation and the structure of the activities is explored with respect to prompts, questions, and the segmented Learning Cycle structure of the ChemActivities. Findings of this study revealed that prompts were effective in eliciting arguments, that convergent questions produced more arguments than directed questions, and that the structure of the Learning Cycle successfully scaffolded arguments. A

  2. Efficient tree tensor network states (TTNS) for quantum chemistry: Generalizations of the density matrix renormalization group algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, Naoki; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2013-04-01

    We investigate tree tensor network states for quantum chemistry. Tree tensor network states represent one of the simplest generalizations of matrix product states and the density matrix renormalization group. While matrix product states encode a one-dimensional entanglement structure, tree tensor network states encode a tree entanglement structure, allowing for a more flexible description of general molecules. We describe an optimal tree tensor network state algorithm for quantum chemistry. We introduce the concept of half-renormalization which greatly improves the efficiency of the calculations. Using our efficient formulation we demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of tree tensor network states versus matrix product states. We carry out benchmark calculations both on tree systems (hydrogen trees and π-conjugated dendrimers) as well as non-tree molecules (hydrogen chains, nitrogen dimer, and chromium dimer). In general, tree tensor network states require much fewer renormalized states to achieve the same accuracy as matrix product states. In non-tree molecules, whether this translates into a computational savings is system dependent, due to the higher prefactor and computational scaling associated with tree algorithms. In tree like molecules, tree network states are easily superior to matrix product states. As an illustration, our largest dendrimer calculation with tree tensor network states correlates 110 electrons in 110 active orbitals.

  3. Efficient tree tensor network states (TTNS) for quantum chemistry: generalizations of the density matrix renormalization group algorithm.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Naoki; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2013-04-01

    We investigate tree tensor network states for quantum chemistry. Tree tensor network states represent one of the simplest generalizations of matrix product states and the density matrix renormalization group. While matrix product states encode a one-dimensional entanglement structure, tree tensor network states encode a tree entanglement structure, allowing for a more flexible description of general molecules. We describe an optimal tree tensor network state algorithm for quantum chemistry. We introduce the concept of half-renormalization which greatly improves the efficiency of the calculations. Using our efficient formulation we demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of tree tensor network states versus matrix product states. We carry out benchmark calculations both on tree systems (hydrogen trees and π-conjugated dendrimers) as well as non-tree molecules (hydrogen chains, nitrogen dimer, and chromium dimer). In general, tree tensor network states require much fewer renormalized states to achieve the same accuracy as matrix product states. In non-tree molecules, whether this translates into a computational savings is system dependent, due to the higher prefactor and computational scaling associated with tree algorithms. In tree like molecules, tree network states are easily superior to matrix product states. As an illustration, our largest dendrimer calculation with tree tensor network states correlates 110 electrons in 110 active orbitals.

  4. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  5. Major Challenges for the Modern Chemistry in Particular and Science in General

    PubMed Central

    Uskokovíc, Vuk

    2013-01-01

    In the past few hundred years, science has exerted an enormous influence on the way the world appears to human observers. Despite phenomenal accomplishments of science, science nowadays faces numerous challenges that threaten its continued success. As scientific inventions become embedded within human societies, the challenges are further multiplied. In this critical review, some of the critical challenges for the field of modern chemistry are discussed, including: (a) interlinking theoretical knowledge and experimental approaches; (b) implementing the principles of sustainability at the roots of the chemical design; (c) defining science from a philosophical perspective that acknowledges both pragmatic and realistic aspects thereof; (d) instigating interdisciplinary research; (e) learning to recognize and appreciate the aesthetic aspects of scientific knowledge and methodology, and promote truly inspiring education in chemistry. In the conclusion, I recapitulate that the evolution of human knowledge inherently depends upon our ability to adopt creative problem-solving attitudes, and that challenges will always be present within the scope of scientific interests. PMID:24465151

  6. Expanded Yegua

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, R.E.; Grayson, S.; Benes, J.

    1988-01-01

    The upper Eocene Yegua Formation expands dramatically across a regional flexure generally 12-15 km wide. During each of several postulated Yegua sea level drops, this flexure became a focal point for deltaic deposition of good to excellent reservoir-quality sands. From the western edge of the Houston salt dome basin to the San Marcos arch, this trend has yielded, since 1982, at least seven noteworthy discoveries: Toro Grande and Lost Bridge fields in Jackson County, and Black Owl, Shanghai, Shanghai East, El Campo, and Phase Four fields in Wharton County, Texas. El Campo field in Wharton County, Texas, was discovered in December 1985 by Ladd Petroleum Corporation with the drilling of the Ladd Petroleum 1 Popp well. Mud logs acquired while drilling indicated that a very sandy reservoir, with encouraging quantities of natural gas and condensate had been encountered. Subsequent open-hold logging generated more questions than answers about the prospective sand section. Additional open hole logs (EPT/ML,SHDT) were run to identify what turned out to be an extremely laminated sand-shale sequence over 400 ft thick. Subsequent development drilling and the acquisition of a 120 ft whole core provided valuable data in analyzing this prolific, geopressured natural gas and condensate Yegua reservoir. Whole-core data, open-hole logs, and computer logs were integrated to develop petro-physical evaluation procedures and to determine the environment of deposition. El Campo field is believed to represent an extremely thick, delta front slope to distal delta front facies.

  7. Determination of Sugar Content in Commercial Beverages by Density: A Novel Experiment for General Chemistry Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Susan K.; Fenn, Carol A.; Domijan, John D.

    1998-09-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the determination of density, suitable for introductory-level chemistry courses, is described. Students prepare several aqueous solutions of sugar of known concentration in the 0-15% by mass range. The density of each solution and of commercial beverage samples is measured by weighing a known volume of solution delivered by a volumetric pipet. A graph of density versus sugar concentration is prepared and used to determine the percent by mass of sugar in the beverage samples. The experiment provides students an opportunity to develop skills in weighing, preparing solutions, pipetting, constructing and using a calibration curve, and proper use of significant figures. The materials used in the experiment are inexpensive, do not pose physical or health hazards, and do not result in the production of hazardous waste. The nature of the samples and the purpose of the experiment stimulate students' interest.

  8. A Study of Concept Mapping as an Instructional Intervention in an Undergraduate General Chemistry Calorimetry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroud, Mary W.

    This investigation, rooted in both chemistry and education, considers outcomes occurring in a small-scale study in which concept mapping was used as an instructional intervention in an undergraduate calorimetry laboratory. A quasi-experimental, multiple-methods approach was employed since the research questions posed in this study warranted the use of both qualitative and quantitative perspectives and evaluations. For the intervention group of students, a convenience sample, post-lab concept maps, written discussions, quiz responses and learning surveys were characterized and evaluated. Archived quiz responses for non-intervention students were also analyzed for comparison. Students uniquely constructed individual concept maps containing incorrect, conceptually correct and "scientifically thin" calorimetry characterizations. Students more greatly emphasized mathematical relationships and equations utilized during the calorimetry experiment; the meaning of calorimetry concepts was demonstrated to a lesser extent.

  9. Color Changes in Indicator Solutions. An Intriguing and Elucidative General Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, César R.; Pereira, Renato B.; Sabadini, Edvaldo

    2001-07-01

    The simple dilution of an aqueous solution of the indicator (In) bromocresol green is proposed as an intriguing experiment for students of chemistry. As the solution is diluted with water, its color changes strikingly from reddish to pale blue. These changes are related to changes in the absorption bands in the visible electronic spectra. The pKIn can be determined through the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation by plotting the pH values as a function of log([In-]/[HIn]). The concentration, in mol L-1, of the HIn species can be determined by measuring the absorbance at 440 nm and using the e value determined from the Beer's law plot. [In-] is calculated from the difference between the initial HIn concentration and the observed [HIn]. Students will be able to conclude that the dissociated fraction of a weak acid increases with dilution.

    See Letter re: this article.

  10. An analysis of cognitive growth of undergraduate students in a problem-centered general chemistry laboratory curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeto, Alan Ka-Fai

    This study explored how undergraduate students in a new problem-centered General Chemistry Laboratory curriculum achieved cognitive growth. The new curriculum had three instructional segments: the highly-structured, semi-structured, and open-ended segments. The pedagogical approaches adopted were expository, guided-inquiry, and open-inquiry styles, respectively. Sixty-seven first-year undergraduate students who enrolled in the course in Spring semester, 2000, at Columbia University and three Ph.D.-level chemistry experts were included in the study. A qualitative approach was used including data collection through "think-aloud" problem solving; however, quantitative data such as test scores were also used. The findings from this study confirmed that chemistry experts possessed sophisticated and domain-specific conceptual knowledge structures; they mobilized and applied conceptual knowledge in conjunction with use of heuristics, tacit knowledge, and experience in authentic problem solving. They validated the new curriculum design in preparing students for inquiry-type of problem solving. For novices, solving of semi-structured before ill-structured problems had a positive effect on the solvers' chance of success in solving the latter type of problems as their abilities to mobilize and apply conceptual knowledge and use effective strategies appeared to be critical for successful problem solving. Students in the new course curriculum had grown cognitively as evidenced by their performance on the Case Study projects and Final Examination. High academic achievers were found to perform well independently while the medium and relatively low academic achievers should benefit from sustained and intensive instruction. It is proposed that ill-structured problems should be used to assess and identify the best from the better students. Finally, it was found that no significant change in students' attitudes had resulted from their curriculum experience. Gender and cognitive style

  11. Promoting the Relevance & Value of Chemistry: the General Chemistry Program of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy. Report 06-92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redig, K. A.; And Others

    Many students face chemistry courses with a sense of fear and foreboding because it is a required course. Yet at the same time, fundamentals of chemistry have become intertwined in countless professions to say nothing of its growing importance in our everyday lives. Educators must bridge this dichotomy between attitude and importance. This paper…

  12. The role of self-regulated learning in explaining examination performance of college students in first-semester general chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckley, Scott

    Many college students struggle with first-semester general chemistry. Prior studies have shown that a student's prior knowledge of chemistry, a cognitive factor, does not account for the total variance when measured by examination scores. This study explored the role of self-regulated learning (SRL) to identify the degree of success or failure of students with two outcome variables (i.e., American Chemical Society Comprehensive First-Term General Chemistry Examination (Form 2009) and hour-examination averages). The SRL construct consists of three interrelated components (i.e., cognitive, metacognitive, and motivational). SRL theory focuses on the idea of reciprocal determinism, in which the impact of one component of self-regulation affects the other two components. In the quantitative portion of this mixed methods study, eight measures of SRL were used to determine the `level' of self-regulation for each student. SRL variables were used in regression analysis and provided additional and unique variances. Cluster analysis techniques identified two distinct groups of students (i.e., adaptive and maladaptive). Generally, adaptive learners were associated with higher levels of SRL and success in the course; maladaptive learners had lower levels of SRL and struggled with the course demands. For the qualitative portion of the study, student volunteers (n = 8) were interviewed to gauge their views on the role of instruction in influencing their examination performances. The findings indicated that perceptions of teaching methods, demands of the course, course structure, feedback, and assessments were associated with the students' levels of self-regulation. Interviews revealed four SRL styles. Rote memorizers tended to fragment instruction and then memorize each fragment, while algorithmic memorizers tended to imitate the step-by-step problem-solving strategies of the instructor or the textbook. Globalizers were intrinsically motivated to learn the material but tended to

  13. A structural and functional homolog supports a general role for frataxin in cellular iron chemistry.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenbin; Cowan, J A

    2010-02-01

    Bacillus subtilis YdhG lacks sequence homology, but demonstrates structural and functional similarity to the frataxin family, supporting a general cellular role for frataxin-type proteins in cellular iron homeostasis.

  14. Quantitative Clinical Chemistry Proteomics (qCCP) using mass spectrometry: general characteristics and application.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Sylvain; Hoofnagle, Andrew; Hochstrasser, Denis; Brede, Cato; Glueckmann, Matthias; Cocho, José A; Ceglarek, Uta; Lenz, Christof; Vialaret, Jérôme; Scherl, Alexander; Hirtz, Christophe

    2013-05-01

    Proteomics studies typically aim to exhaustively detect peptides/proteins in a given biological sample. Over the past decade, the number of publications using proteomics methodologies has exploded. This was made possible due to the availability of high-quality genomic data and many technological advances in the fields of microfluidics and mass spectrometry. Proteomics in biomedical research was initially used in 'functional' studies for the identification of proteins involved in pathophysiological processes, complexes and networks. Improved sensitivity of instrumentation facilitated the analysis of even more complex sample types, including human biological fluids. It is at that point the field of clinical proteomics was born, and its fundamental aim was the discovery and (ideally) validation of biomarkers for the diagnosis, prognosis, or therapeutic monitoring of disease. Eventually, it was recognized that the technologies used in clinical proteomics studies [particularly liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)] could represent an alternative to classical immunochemical assays. Prior to deploying MS in the measurement of peptides/proteins in the clinical laboratory, it seems likely that traditional proteomics workflows and data management systems will need to adapt to the clinical environment and meet in vitro diagnostic (IVD) regulatory constraints. This defines a new field, as reviewed in this article, that we have termed quantitative Clinical Chemistry Proteomics (qCCP).

  15. Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A universe that expands with time. Although the possibility had been raised earlier through theoretical work carried out by Willem de Sitter (1872-1934), Aleksandr Friedmann (1888-1925), and the Abbé Georges Lemaître (1894-1966), that our universe is expanding was first demonstrated observationally in 1929 by Edwin P Hubble (1889-1953), through his measurements of the redshifts in the spectra of ...

  16. Textbook Treatments of Electrostatic Potential Maps in General and Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinze, Scott R.; Williamson, Vickie M.; Deslongchamps, Ghislain; Shultz, Mary Jane; Williamson, Kenneth C.; Rapp, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Electrostatic potential maps (EPMs) allow for representation of key molecular-level information in a relatively simple and inexpensive format. As these visualizations become more prevalent in instruction, it is important to determine how students are exposed to them and supported in their use. A systematic review of current general and organic…

  17. Picture this: The value of multiple visual representations for student learning of quantum concepts in general chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Emily Christine

    Mental models for scientific learning are often defined as, "cognitive tools situated between experiments and theories" (Duschl & Grandy, 2012). In learning, these cognitive tools are used to not only take in new information, but to help problem solve in new contexts. Nancy Nersessian (2008) describes a mental model as being "[loosely] characterized as a representation of a system with interactive parts with representations of those interactions. Models can be qualitative, quantitative, and/or simulative (mental, physical, computational)" (p. 63). If conceptual parts used by the students in science education are inaccurate, then the resulting model will not be useful. Students in college general chemistry courses are presented with multiple abstract topics and often struggle to fit these parts into complete models. This is especially true for topics that are founded on quantum concepts, such as atomic structure and molecular bonding taught in college general chemistry. The objectives of this study were focused on how students use visual tools introduced during instruction to reason with atomic and molecular structure, what misconceptions may be associated with these visual tools, and how visual modeling skills may be taught to support students' use of visual tools for reasoning. The research questions for this study follow from Gilbert's (2008) theory that experts use multiple representations when reasoning and modeling a system, and Kozma and Russell's (2005) theory of representational competence levels. This study finds that as students developed greater command of their understanding of abstract quantum concepts, they spontaneously provided additional representations to describe their more sophisticated models of atomic and molecular structure during interviews. This suggests that when visual modeling with multiple representations is taught, along with the limitations of the representations, it can assist students in the development of models for reasoning about

  18. The Role of Chemistry Museums in Chemical Education for Students and the General Public. A Case Study from Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domenici, Valentina

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the educational role of museums of chemistry in presenting chemistry to the public in Italy, particularly to students. The activities carried out by Italian museums and scientific collections completely dedicated to chemistry have been analyzed, focusing on the relationship between these institutions and students with…

  19. Expanding Mg-Zn hybrid chemistry: inorganic salt effects in addition reactions of organozinc reagents to trifluoroacetophenone and the implications for a synergistic lithium-magnesium-zinc activation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David R; Clegg, William; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Kennedy, Alan R; McCall, Matthew D; Russo, Luca; Hevia, Eva

    2011-07-18

    Numerous organic transformations rely on organozinc compounds made through salt-metathesis (exchange) reactions from organolithium or Grignard reagents with a suitable zinc precursor. By combining X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations, this study sheds new light on the constitution of the organometallic species involved in this important synthetic tool. Investigations into the metathesis reactions of equimolar amounts of Grignard reagents (RMgX) and ZnCl(2) in THF led to the isolation of novel magnesium-zinc hybrids, [{(thf)(2)Mg(μ-Cl)(3)ZnR}(2)] (R=Et, tBu, nBu or o-OMe-C(6)H(4)), which exhibit an unprecedented structural motif in mixed magnesium-zinc chemistry. Furthermore, theoretical modelling of the reaction of EtMgCl with ZnCl(2) reveals that formation of the mixed-metal compound is thermodynamically preferred to that of the expected homometallic products, RZnCl and MgCl(2). This study also assesses the alkylating ability of hybrid 3 towards the sensitive ketone trifluoroacetophenone, revealing a dramatic increase in the chemoselectivity of the reaction when LiCl is introduced as an additive. This observation, combined with recent related breakthroughs in synthesis, points towards the existence of a trilateral Li/Mg/Zn synergistic effect. PMID:21656589

  20. Lead optimization attrition analysis (LOAA): a novel and general methodology for medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Munson, Mark; Lieberman, Harvey; Tserlin, Elina; Rocnik, Jennifer; Ge, Jie; Fitzgerald, Maria; Patel, Vinod; Garcia-Echeverria, Carlos

    2015-08-01

    Herein, we report a novel and general method, lead optimization attrition analysis (LOAA), to benchmark two distinct small-molecule lead series using a relatively unbiased, simple technique and commercially available software. We illustrate this approach with data collected during lead optimization of two independent oncology programs as a case study. Easily generated graphics and attrition curves enabled us to calibrate progress and support go/no go decisions on each program. We believe that this data-driven technique could be used broadly by medicinal chemists and management to guide strategic decisions during drug discovery.

  1. Adsorbate-induced lifting of substrate relaxation is a general mechanism governing titania surface chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Silber, David; Kowalski, Piotr M.; Traeger, Franziska; Buchholz, Maria; Bebensee, Fabian; Meyer, Bernd; Wöll, Christof

    2016-01-01

    Under ambient conditions, almost all metals are coated by an oxide. These coatings, the result of a chemical reaction, are not passive. Many of them bind, activate and modify adsorbed molecules, processes that are exploited, for example, in heterogeneous catalysis and photochemistry. Here we report an effect of general importance that governs the bonding, structure formation and dissociation of molecules on oxidic substrates. For a specific example, methanol adsorbed on the rutile TiO2(110) single crystal surface, we demonstrate by using a combination of experimental and theoretical techniques that strongly bonding adsorbates can lift surface relaxations beyond their adsorption site, which leads to a significant substrate-mediated interaction between adsorbates. The result is a complex superstructure consisting of pairs of methanol molecules and unoccupied adsorption sites. Infrared spectroscopy reveals that the paired methanol molecules remain intact and do not deprotonate on the defect-free terraces of the rutile TiO2(110) surface. PMID:27686286

  2. Adsorbate-induced lifting of substrate relaxation is a general mechanism governing titania surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silber, David; Kowalski, Piotr M.; Traeger, Franziska; Buchholz, Maria; Bebensee, Fabian; Meyer, Bernd; Wöll, Christof

    2016-09-01

    Under ambient conditions, almost all metals are coated by an oxide. These coatings, the result of a chemical reaction, are not passive. Many of them bind, activate and modify adsorbed molecules, processes that are exploited, for example, in heterogeneous catalysis and photochemistry. Here we report an effect of general importance that governs the bonding, structure formation and dissociation of molecules on oxidic substrates. For a specific example, methanol adsorbed on the rutile TiO2(110) single crystal surface, we demonstrate by using a combination of experimental and theoretical techniques that strongly bonding adsorbates can lift surface relaxations beyond their adsorption site, which leads to a significant substrate-mediated interaction between adsorbates. The result is a complex superstructure consisting of pairs of methanol molecules and unoccupied adsorption sites. Infrared spectroscopy reveals that the paired methanol molecules remain intact and do not deprotonate on the defect-free terraces of the rutile TiO2(110) surface.

  3. The effect of restructuring student writing in the general chemistry laboratory on student understanding of chemistry and on students' approach to the laboratory course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudd, James Andrew, II

    Many students encounter difficulties engaging with laboratory-based instruction, and reviews of research have indicated that the value of such instruction is not clearly evident. Traditional forms of writing associated with laboratory activities are commonly in a style used by professional scientists to communicate developed explanations. Students probably lack the interpretative skills of a professional, and writing in this style may not support students in learning how to develop scientific explanations. The Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) is an inquiry-based approach to laboratory instruction designed in part to promote student ability in developing such explanations. However, there is not a convincing body of evidence for the superiority of inquiry-based laboratory instruction in chemistry. In a series of studies, the performance of students using the SWH student template in place of the standard laboratory report format was compared to the performance of students using the standard format. The standard reports had Title, Purpose, Procedure, Data & Observations, Calculations & Graphs, and Discussion sections. The SWH reports had Beginning Questions & Ideas, Tests & Procedures, Observations, Claims, Evidence, and Reflection sections. The pilot study produced evidence that using the SWH improved the quality of laboratory reports, improved student performance on a laboratory exam, and improved student approach to laboratory work. A main study found that SWH students statistically exhibited a better understanding of physical equilibrium when written explanations and equations were analyzed on a lecture exam and performed descriptively better on a physical equilibrium practical exam task. In another main study, the activities covering the general equilibrium concept were restructured as an additional change, and it was found that SWH students exhibited a better understanding of chemical equilibrium as shown by statistically greater success in overcoming the common

  4. Fluorescent sensors for specific RNA: a general paradigm using chemistry and combinatorial biology.

    PubMed

    Sparano, Brian A; Koide, Kazunori

    2007-04-18

    Here, we describe a new paradigm for the development of small molecule-based RNA sensors. We prepared a series of potential PET (photoinduced electron transfer) sensors on the basis of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorophore conjugated with two aniline derivatives as electron donors (quenchers). NMR and fluorescent spectroscopic analyses of these DCF derivatives revealed the correlation between the conformations, the PET, and the fluorescent intensities of these DCF derivatives, enabling us to select a sensor candidate. RNA aptamers were raised against the aniline-based quencher via in vitro selection (SELEX). One of these aptamers enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the DCF-aniline conjugate in a concentration-dependent manner. To demonstrate the power and generality of this approach, additional in vitro selection was performed and aptamers from this selection were found to have similar activities. These results show that one can develop fluorescence-inducing reporter RNA and morph it into remotely related sequences without prior structural insight into RNA-ligand binding.

  5. "Lorenzo's Oil" as a Vehicle for Teaching Chemistry Content, Processes of Science, and Sociology of Science in a General Education Chemistry Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wink, Donald

    2011-01-01

    The film "Lorenzo's Oil" depicts the challenges faced by the parents of a child with adrenoleukodystrophy, a neurological disorder that, they were told, was certainly fatal. The film contains a significant amount of chemistry, including concepts of fatty acid metabolism, enzyme inhibition, and the purification of substances. The film also raises…

  6. Expanding Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisenberg, Sol

    2005-04-01

    Newton's gravitational constant Gn and Laws of Gravity are based upon observations in our solar system. Mysteries appear when they are used far outside our solar system Apparently, Newton's gravitational constant can not be applied at large distances. Dark matter was needed to explain the observed flat rotational velocity curves of spiral galaxies (Rubin), and of groups of remote galaxies (Zwicky). Our expansion of Newton's gravitational constant Gn as a power series in distance r, is sufficient to explain these observations without using dark matter. This is different from the MOND theory of Milgrom involving acceleration. Also, our Expanded Gravitational Constant (EGC) can show the correct use of the red shift. In addition to the Doppler contribution, there are three other contributions and these depend only upon gravity. Thus, velocity observations only based on the red shift can not be used to support the concept of the expanding universe, the accelerating expansion, or dark energy. Our expanded gravity constant can predict and explain Olbers' paradox (dark sky), and the temperature of the CMB (cosmic microwave background). Thus, CMB may not support the big bang and inflation.

  7. Effect of Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) on Student Achievement, Attitude, and Self-Concept in College General Chemistry in Randomized and Quasi Experimental Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Julia Y. K.; Bauer, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated exam achievement and affective characteristics of students in general chemistry in a fully-randomized experimental design, contrasting Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) participation with a control group balanced for time-on-task and study activity. This study population included two independent first-semester courses with…

  8. Online Homework Put to the Test: A Report on the Impact of Two Online Learning Systems on Student Performance in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichler, Jack F.; Peeples, Junelyn

    2013-01-01

    Two different online homework systems were administered to students in a first-quarter general chemistry course. This study used a multiple regression model to control for the students' academic and socioeconomic background, and it was found that students who completed the online homework activities performed significantly better on a common…

  9. Discovering [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR Spectroscopy in the General Chemistry Laboratory through a Sequence of Guided-Inquiry Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iler, H. Darrell; Justice, David; Brauer, Shari; Landis, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This sequence of three guided-inquiry labs is designed for a second-semester general chemistry course and challenges students to discover basic theoretical principles associated with [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR spectroscopy. Students learn to identify and explain basic concepts of magnetic resonance and vibrational…

  10. Alka-Seltzer Fizzing--Determination of Percent by Mass of NaHCO3 in Alka-Seltzer Tablets: An Undergraduate General Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yueh-Huey; Yaung, Jing-Fun

    2002-01-01

    Presents a general chemistry stoichiometry experiment using materials involved in everyday life. From this activity, students learn that a chemical reaction occurs when an Alka-Seltzer tablet is dropped into water. Students also practice plotting experimental data through the use of a graphing program. Interpretation of the graph helps them…

  11. A Focus on Problems of National Interest in the College General Chemistry Laboratory: The Effects of the Problem-Oriented Method Compared with Those of the Traditional Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neman, Robert Lynn

    This study was designed to assess the effects of the problem-oriented method compared to those of the traditional approach in general chemistry at the college level. The problem-oriented course included topics such as air and water pollution, drug addiction and analysis, tetraethyl-lead additives, insecticides in the environment, and recycling of…

  12. A Reconstruction of Development of the Periodic Table Based on History and Philosophy of Science and Its Implications for General Chemistry Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brito, Angmary; Rodriguez, Maria A.; Niaz, Mansoor

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study are: (a) elaboration of a history and philosophy of science (HPS) framework based on a reconstruction of the development of the periodic table; (b) formulation of seven criteria based on the framework; and (c) evaluation of 57 freshman college-level general chemistry textbooks with respect to the presentation of the…

  13. Yielding Unexpected Results: Precipitation of Ba[subscript3](PO[subscript4])[subscript2] and Implications for Teaching Solubility Principles in the General Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazen, Jeffery L.; Cleary, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Precipitation of barium phosphate from aqueous solutions of a barium salt and a phosphate salt forms the basis for a number of conclusions drawn in general chemistry. For example, the formation of a solid white precipitate is offered as evidence that barium phosphate is insoluble. Furthermore, analysis of the supernatant is used to illustrate the…

  14. Introducing NMR to a General Chemistry Audience: A Structural-Based Instrumental Laboratory Relating Lewis Structures, Molecular Models, and [superscript 13]C NMR Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulliam, Curtis R.; Pfeiffer, William F.; Thomas, Alyssa C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a first-year general chemistry laboratory that uses NMR spectroscopy and model building to emphasize molecular shape and structure. It is appropriate for either a traditional or an atoms-first curriculum. Students learn the basis of structure and the use of NMR data through a cooperative learning hands-on laboratory…

  15. Multiple-Choice Exams and Guessing: Results from a One-Year Study of General Chemistry Tests Designed to Discourage Guessing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-choice exams, while widely used, are necessarily imprecise due to the contribution of the final student score due to guessing. This past year at the United States Naval Academy the construction and grading scheme for the department-wide general chemistry multiple-choice exams were revised with the goal of decreasing the contribution of…

  16. Bringing out the "Main Characters" in General Chemistry: Can Creating a Sense of Narrative in the Classroom and for the Textbook Aid Long-Term Memory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Junyoung; Churchill, David

    2011-01-01

    A new approach for teaching general chemistry is presented and discussed. Importantly, a storyline approach is provided in which the same chemical item or concept is reintroduced and embellished from chapter to chapter. The intention is to bring more connectivity between the various seemingly unrelated chapters. This might lead to a more…

  17. Separation and Identification of a Mixture of Group 6 Transition-Metal Carbonyl Compounds Using GC-MS in the General Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Lawrence K.

    2004-01-01

    Students in the general chemistry course are advised to scrutinize data obtained by gas chromatograph (GC) for segregation, and mass spectroscopy (MS) for recognizing combination of group 6 transition-metal carbonyl compounds. The GC-MS method arouses students' interest, as it can be applied to real-world situations, such as the routine…

  18. Making Visible the Complexities of Problem Solving: An Ethnographic Study of a General Chemistry Course in a Studio Learning Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalainoff, Melinda Zapata

    Studio classrooms, designed such that laboratory and lecture functions can occur in the same physical space, have been recognized as a promising contributing factor in promoting collaborative learning in the sciences (NRC, 2011). Moreover, in designing for instruction, a critical goal, especially in the sciences and engineering, is to foster an environment where students have opportunities for learning problem solving practices (NRC, 2012a). However, few studies show how this type of innovative learning environment shapes opportunities for learning in the sciences, which is critical to informing future curricular and instructional designs for these environments. Even fewer studies show how studio environments shape opportunities to develop problem solving practices specifically. In order to make visible how the learning environment promotes problem solving practices, this study explores problem solving phenomena in the daily life of an undergraduate General Chemistry studio class using an ethnographic perspective. By exploring problem solving as a sociocultural process, this study shows how the instructor and students co-construct opportunities for learning in whole class and small group interactional spaces afforded in this studio environment and how the differential demands on students in doing problems requires re-conceptualizing what it means to "apply a concept".

  19. Optimization of expander plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.B.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program that uses the Tomich technique to solve multistage, multi-feed distillation problems was modified. The MSEQ method was utilized to generate initial temperature and vapor rate profiles. The modified fractionator program coupled with the MSEQ method was used to generate required rigorous data for expander-plant demethanizer splits. Furthermore, a shortcut method was developed to facilitate expander process simulation. Calculated demethanizer results from a simulation were compared with a commercial program with good agreement. The results from the shortcut method were in good agreement with rigorous calculations. Computer simulations were made for four different natural gases ranging from lean to rich in liquefiable hydrocarbons for various turboexpander plant processes. These processes included self-refrigerated expander process with/without external refrigeration, and with/without demethanizer heat recovery. Only lean gases can be utilized in the self-refrigerated expander process with high ethane recovery. While the use of external refrigeration in conjunction with the expander process can reduce overall horsepower requirements, it may not be economical to do so. In general, the processing should be carried out at the highest practical processing pressure. The use of demethanizer heat recovery is an efficient method to reduce both refrigeration horsepower and recompression energy requirements. This work emphasizes high ethane recovery. Further study of expander processes emphasizing ethane rejection is advisable.

  20. The Effects of Interactive Stratospheric Chemistry on Antarctic and Southern Ocean Climate Change in a Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Newman, P. A.; Pawson, S.; Waugh, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Stratospheric ozone depletion has played a dominant role in driving Antarctic climate change in the last decades. In order to capture the stratospheric ozone forcing, many coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) prescribe the Antarctic ozone hole using monthly and zonally averaged ozone field. However, the prescribed ozone hole has a high ozone bias and lacks zonal asymmetry. The impacts of these biases on model simulations, particularly on Southern Ocean and the Antarctic sea ice, are not well understood. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of using interactive stratospheric chemistry instead of prescribed ozone on Antarctic and Southern Ocean climate change in an AOGCM. We compare two sets of ensemble simulations for the 1960-2010 period using different versions of the Goddard Earth Observing System 5 - AOGCM: one with interactive stratospheric chemistry, and the other with prescribed monthly and zonally averaged ozone and 6 other stratospheric radiative species calculated from the interactive chemistry simulations. Consistent with previous studies using prescribed sea surface temperatures and sea ice concentrations, the interactive chemistry runs simulate a deeper Antarctic ozone hole and consistently larger changes in surface pressure and surface winds than the prescribed ozone runs. The use of a coupled atmosphere-ocean model in this study enables us to determine the impact of these surface trend differences on Southern Ocean circulation and Antarctic sea ice. The larger surface wind trends in the interactive chemistry case lead to larger Southern Ocean circulation trends with stronger changes in northerly and westerly surface flow near the Antarctica continent and stronger upwelling near 60ºS. Using interactive chemistry also simulates a larger decrease of sea ice concentrations. Our results highlight the importance of using interactive chemistry in order to correctly capture the influences of stratospheric ozone

  1. A study of the effects that grouping laboratory partners based on logical thinking abilities have on their problem solving strategies in a general chemistry course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nammouz, Minory Suhil

    2005-07-01

    The development of problem solving skills and strategies is generally of importance in science education and specifically in chemistry, and is usually assessed by traditional methods such as laboratories, homework, and examinations. However, for instructors, developing a deep understanding of how students solve the problems is difficult and very time consuming. One potential way to address this problem is an internet-based software package known as IMMEX (Interactive Multimedia Exercises). Originally developed at the UCLA Medical School, it has now been expanded to K-12 and college classrooms. IMMEX Problems are case-based and cover a wide range of subject areas. Using this software the students are able to navigate throughout the problem space by choosing the necessary items from a range given to them. The student is provided with immediate feedback; if the student chooses an incorrect answer, most problems will allow for a review of the problem space and submit a second. The IMMEX system tracks the strategies used through a search path map for each problem the student answers; then these data are collected and analyzed using artificial neural networks for pattern recognition. In the present study, students were allowed to stabilize on a problem solving strategy by working five problems before conclusions were drawn regarding their acquired strategies. The major difference now being that any changes in strategy that occurred during and after the intervention of group-work would be by a student that had previously settled on a preferred strategy. The effects of group composition on students' problem solving strategies were also studied. The results presented in this study support the use of collaborative learning as a method that improves students' problem solving strategies. It was found that a collaborative learning environment would not only improve students' problem solving strategies in the groups, but would also carry over their individual subsequent

  2. A Strategy for Incorporating Hands-On GC-MS into the General Chemistry Lecture and Laboratory Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Perry C.; Pamplin, Kim L.

    2001-01-01

    Describes strategies to introduce students in a first year chemistry course to the gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer (GC-MS) and provides students with hands-on experiences in its use. (ASK)

  3. The problem of polysemy in the first thousand words of the General Service List: A corpus study of secondary chemistry texts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemmons, Karina

    Vocabulary in a second language is an indispensable building block of all comprehension (Folse, 2006; Nation, 2006). Teachers in content area classes such as science, math, and social studies frequently teach content specific vocabulary, but are not aware of the obstacles that can occur when students do not know the basic words. Word lists such as the General Service List (GSL) were created to assist students and teachers (West, 1953). The GSL does not adequately take into account the high level of polysemy of many common English words, nor has it been updated by genre to reflect specific content domains encountered by secondary science students in today's high stakes classes such as chemistry. This study examines how many words of the first 1000 words of the GSL occurred in the secondary chemistry textbooks sampled, how often the first 1000 words of the GSL were polysemous, and specifically which multiple meanings occurred. A discussion of results includes word tables that list multiple meanings present, example phrases that illustrate the context surrounding the target words, suggestions for a GSL that is genre specific to secondary chemistry textbooks and that is ranked by meaning as well as type, and implications for both vocabulary materials and classroom instruction for ELLs in secondary chemistry classes. Findings are essential to second language (L2) researchers, materials developers, publishers, and teachers.

  4. Constructivist-Based Asynchronous Tutorial to Improve Transfer between Math and Chemistry Domains: Design, Implementation, and Analysis of the Impact of ReMATCH on General Chemistry Course Performance and Confidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, M. Danielle

    2011-07-01

    The two-year implementation of ReMATCH, a web-based math and problem-solving tutorial, in a traditionally arranged general chemistry classroom at the University of Kansas examined the impact of a designed intervention to assist students with the transfer of their mathematical knowledge to a chemistry context where it could be readily used for quantitative problem solving. The ReMATCH intervention, designed on constructivist-based pedagogies, focused on illuminating the expert-processes of problem solving and transferring knowledge across domains to the novice chemistry. The two implementations of ReMATCH -- once as lab assignments and once lecture assignments -- resulted in very different student responses to the intervention. However, within both, the beneficial effects of sustained ReMATCH-use were visible. In 2006, students who attempted all of the ReMATCH homework assignments were predicted to earn ˜5% higher on their total exam points. The 2007 implementation of ReMATCH demonstrated that students who attempted all of the homework problems and visited at least half of the ReMATCH tutorial pages were predicted to earn ˜8.5% higher on their total exam points. Additionally, use of ReMATCH in 2006 also resulted in increased confidence (as measured by comfort-level) with some of the math-related chemistry topics covered in ReMATCH. In 2007, when only students who attempted all of the ReMATCH problems were considered, it became clear that individuals who were initially less confident in their math-related chemistry skills were more likely to view more of the ReMATCH tutorial pages. When students with lower initial comfort-levels on these topics viewed at least half of the ReMATCH tutorial pages, they were able to compensate for their initially lower levels of confidence and were equally comfortable with most of the math-related chemistry topics by the final survey. Student interactions with and perceptions of ReMATCH showed that student attitudes towards Re

  5. The A[subscript 1c] Blood Test: An Illustration of Principles from General and Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    The glycated hemoglobin blood test, usually designated as the A[subscript 1c] test, is a key measure of the effectiveness of glucose control in diabetics. The chemistry of glucose in the bloodstream, which underlies the test and its impact, provides an illustration of the importance of chemical equilibrium and kinetics to a major health problem.…

  6. Teaching Thermodynamics and Kinetics to Advanced General Chemistry Students and to Upper-Level Undergraduate Students Using PV Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyengar, Srinivasan S.; deSouza, Romualdo T.

    2014-01-01

    We describe how complex concepts in macroscopic chemistry, namely, thermodynamics and kinetics, can be taught at considerable depth both at the first-year undergraduate as well as upper levels. We begin with a careful treatment of PV diagrams, and by pictorially integrating the appropriate area in a PV diagram, we introduce work. This starting…

  7. Comparison of High School Dual-Enrollment and Traditional First-Term General/Organic/Biochemistry College Chemistry Class Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuidema, Daniel R.; Eames, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Student performance in a high school dual-enrollment chemistry course was compared with student performance in the corresponding traditional college course. The two courses were taught by the same instructor and evaluated using the same American Chemical Society (ACS) standardized examination. Interestingly, the high school dual-enrollment…

  8. Examining Evidence for External and Consequential Validity of the First Term General Chemistry Exam from the ACS Examinations Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Validity of educational research instruments and student assessments has appropriately become a growing interest in the chemistry education research community. Of particular concern is an attention to the consequences to students that result from the interpretation of assessment scores and whether those consequences are swayed by invalidity within…

  9. Effectiveness of Podcasts Delivered on Mobile Devices as a Support for Student Learning during General Chemistry Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Cynthia B.; Mason, Diana S.

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry instructors in teaching laboratories provide expert modeling of techniques and cognitive processes and provide assistance to enrolled students that may be described as scaffolding interaction. Such student support is particularly essential in laboratories taught with an inquiry-based curriculum. In a teaching laboratory with a high…

  10. The Application and Evaluation of a Two-Concept Diagnostic Instrument with Students Entering College General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heredia, Keily; Xu, Xiaoying; Lewis, Jennifer E.

    2012-01-01

    The Particulate Nature of Matter and Chemical Bonding Diagnostic Instrument (Othman J., Treagust D. F. and Chandrasegaran A. L., (2008), "Int. J. Sci. Educ.," 30(11), 1531-1550) is used to investigate college students' understanding of two chemistry concepts: particulate nature of matter and chemical bonding. The instrument, originally developed…

  11. A Kinetics Experiment To Demonstrate the Role of a Catalyst in a Chemical Reaction: A Versatile Exercise for General or Physical Chemistry Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copper, Christine L.; Koubek, Edward

    1998-01-01

    A kinetics experiment for general or physical chemistry students is presented. The common iodine clock reaction is modified and the initial rate method is used to observe the role of catalyst in the reactions through activation energy calculations. An experimental procedure is designed such that students can determine the order with respect to each reactant and evaluate the mechanism that has been previously reported for this reaction. Furthermore, students use experimental results to calculate the rate constants of the uncatalyzed and catalyzed (independent of the uncatalyzed) reactions.

  12. General method for labeling siRNA by click chemistry with fluorine-18 for the purpose of PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Frédéric; Paris, Jérôme; Kaisin, Geoffroy; Thonon, David; Flagothier, Jessica; Teller, Nathalie; Lemaire, Christian; Luxen, André

    2011-01-19

    The alkyne-azide Cu(I)-catalyzed Huisgen cycloaddition, a click-type reaction, was used to label a double-stranded oligonucleotide (siRNA) with fluorine-18. An alkyne solid support CPG for the preparation of monostranded oligonucleotides functionalized with alkyne has been developed. Two complementary azide labeling agents (1-(azidomethyl)-4-[(18)F]fluorobenzene) and 1-azido-4-(3-[(18)F]fluoropropoxy)benzene have been produced with 41% and 35% radiochemical yields (decay-corrected), respectively. After annealing with the complementary strand, the siRNA was directly labeled by click chemistry with [(18)F]fluoroazide to produce the [(18)F]-radiolabeled siRNA with excellent radiochemical yield and purity.

  13. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Mamon, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies of circumstellar chemistry are discussed for both red-giant and protostellar winds. The generalized photochemical model is able to account for the recently discovered silicon-bearing molecules in the prototypical, C-rich, AGB star IRC + 10216. The surprising occurrence of CO in protostellar winds that are largely atomic is interpreted to be the result of the high density and the rapid decrease of the temperature with distance that is expected for such winds.

  14. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields—and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such “unconventional” microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline. PMID:23478651

  15. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-04-21

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields-and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such "unconventional" microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline.

  16. Expanding the phenotype in aminoacylase 1 (ACY1) deficiency: characterization of the molecular defect in a 63-year-old woman with generalized dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sass, Jörn Oliver; Vaithilingam, Jathana; Gemperle-Britschgi, Corinne; Delnooz, Cathérine C S; Kluijtmans, Leo A J; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Wevers, Ron A

    2016-06-01

    Aminoacylase 1 (ACY1) deficiency is an organic aciduria due to mutations in the ACY1 gene. It is considered much underdiagnosed. Most individuals known to be affected by ACY1 deficiency have presented with neurologic symptoms. We report here a cognitively normal 63-year-old woman who around the age of 12 years had developed dystonic symptoms that gradually evolved into generalized dystonia. Extensive investigations, including metabolic diagnostics and diagnostic exome sequencing, were performed to elucidate the cause of dystonia. Findings were only compatible with a diagnosis of ACY1 deficiency: the urinary metabolite pattern with N-acetylated amino acids was characteristic, there was decreased ACY1 activity in immortalized lymphocytes, and two compound heterozygous ACY1 mutations were detected, one well-characterized c.1057C>T (p.Arg353Cys) and the other novel c.325A>G (p.Arg109Gly). Expression analysis in HEK293 cells revealed high residual activity of the enzyme with the latter mutation. However, following co-transfection of cells with stable expression of the c.1057C>T variant with either wild-type ACY1 or the c.325A>G mutant, only the wild-type enhanced ACY1 activity and ACY1 presence in the Western blot, suggesting an inhibiting interference between the two variants. Our report extends the clinical spectrum of ACY1 deficiency to include dystonia and indicates that screening for organic acidurias deserves consideration in patients with unexplained generalized dystonia. PMID:26686503

  17. Development of a general methodology for labelling peptide-morpholino oligonucleotide conjugates using alkyne-azide click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shabanpoor, Fazel; Gait, Michael J

    2013-11-11

    We describe a general methodology for fluorescent labelling of peptide conjugates of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotides (PMOs) by alkyne functionalization of peptides, subsequent conjugation to PMOs and labelling with a fluorescent compound (Cy5-azide). Two peptide-PMO (PPMO) examples are shown. No detrimental effect of such labelled PMOs was seen in a biological assay.

  18. Alka-Seltzer Fizzing—Determination of Percent by Mass of NaHCO3 in Alka-Seltzer Tablets. An Undergraduate General Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yueh-Huey; Yaung, Jing-Fun

    2002-07-01

    In this article, we present a general chemistry stoichiometry experiment using materials involved in everyday life. Students practiced the concepts they had learned in the process of solving a problem. From this activity, they learned that a chemical reaction occurs when an Alka-Seltzer tablet is dropped into water. They observed the weight loss resulting from the generation of the gas product (CO2) in the reaction. According to the mole mass relationship of the reaction, the amount of reactant being consumed was calculated from the measured weight loss. Students also practiced plotting experimental data through the use of a graphing program. The interpretation of the graph helped them comprehend the role a limiting reactant plays in the stoichiometry of a chemical reaction.

  19. Anion-π Catalysis of Enolate Chemistry: Rigidified Leonard Turns as a General Motif to Run Reactions on Aromatic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cotelle, Yoann; Benz, Sebastian; Avestro, Alyssa-Jennifer; Ward, Thomas R; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2016-03-18

    To integrate anion-π, cation-π, and ion pair-π interactions in catalysis, the fundamental challenge is to run reactions reliably on aromatic surfaces. Addressing a specific question concerning enolate addition to nitroolefins, this study elaborates on Leonard turns to tackle this problem in a general manner. Increasingly refined turns are constructed to position malonate half thioesters as close as possible on π-acidic surfaces. The resulting preorganization of reactive intermediates is shown to support the disfavored addition to enolate acceptors to an absolutely unexpected extent. This decisive impact on anion-π catalysis increases with the rigidity of the turns. The new, rigidified Leonard turns are most effective with weak anion-π interactions, whereas stronger interactions do not require such ideal substrate positioning to operate well. The stunning simplicity of the motif and its surprisingly strong relevance for function should render the introduced approach generally useful.

  20. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  1. Stratospheric chemistry and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael; Garcia, Maria M.

    1990-01-01

    A Chemical Tracer Model (CTM) that can use wind field data generated by the General Circulation Model (GCM) is developed to implement chemistry in the three dimensional GCM of the middle atmosphere. Initially, chemical tracers with simple first order losses such as N2O are used. Successive models are to incorporate more complex ozone chemistry.

  2. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    PubMed

    Pacheco, José A De Freitas

    2015-01-01

    In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative) of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM) all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes. PMID:26628035

  3. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    PubMed

    Pacheco, José A De Freitas

    2015-01-01

    In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative) of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM) all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes.

  4. Enzymes in Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Myer M.

    1980-01-01

    Presents tabular information concerning recent research in the field of enzymes in analytic chemistry, with methods, substrate or reaction catalyzed, assay, comments and references listed. The table refers to 128 references. Also listed are 13 general citations. (CS)

  5. Evaluation of Questions in General Chemistry Textbooks According to the Form of the Questions and the Question-Answer Relationship (QAR): The Case of Intra-and Intermolecular Chemical Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappa, Eleni T.; Tsaparlis, Georgios

    2011-01-01

    One way of checking to what extent instructional textbooks achieve their aim is to evaluate the questions they contain. In this work, we analyze the questions that are included in the chapters on chemical bonding of ten general chemistry textbooks. We study separately the questions on intra- and on intermolecular bonding, with the former…

  6. Metalloporphyrins as Oxidation Catalysts: Moving toward "Greener" Chemistry in the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Rose A.; Stock, Anne E.; Zovinka, Edward P.

    2012-01-01

    Training future chemists to be aware of the environmental impact of their work is of fundamental importance to global society. To convince chemists to embrace sustainability, the integration of green chemistry across the entire chemistry curriculum is a necessary step. This experiment expands the reach of green chemistry techniques into the…

  7. The effect of matching learning styles and instructional strategies on academic achievement and student enjoyment of science lessons in a high school general chemistry course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fundi, Shaaban Kitindi

    This study explored the matching hypothesis by examining the effect of matching students' learning style preferences with teachers' instructional strategies on students' academic performance and lesson enjoyment in a high school general chemistry course. To achieve the study aims, the researcher utilized a single-participant study design with a baseline phase and four treatment phases. Determination of students' learning style preferences involved using the Visual, Audial, Read/Write, and Kinesthetic (VARK) Learning Style Inventory. During the one-week baseline phase, students received instruction using regular instructional strategies, followed by four treatment phases: visual intervention, audial intervention, read/write intervention, and a kinesthetic intervention. Each intervention phase lasted one week. During each phase, the researcher measured academic achievement using three teacher-created quiz scores. Student enjoyment was measured using the Test of Science-Related Attitudes (TOSRA). A total of 14 students completed the VARK Questionnaire. Of these, eight students (2 boys and 6 girls) exhibited a multimodal learning style were subsequently excluded from study participation. An additional student was excluded due to excessive absenteeism, leaving five students who completed all phases of the study. Results indicated that matching students' learning style preferences with teachers' instructional strategies did not improve students' academic performance as measured by teacher-created quizzes. However, weekly switching of the instructional strategies did improve student enjoyment of chemistry lessons. Student enjoyment increased for all participants in all intervention phases regardless of whether or not instruction matched students' learning style preferences compared to baseline phase. The results of this study do not support the matching hypothesis. The students in this study, preferred to learn with multiple teaching strategies. Alternating instructional

  8. Assessment of General Chemistry Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergin, Adam; Sharp, Kevan; Gatlin, Todd A.; Villalta-Cerdas, Adrian; Gower, Austin; Sandi-Urena, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Commercial online instructor evaluations have gained traction in influencing students' decisions on professor and course selections at universities. RateMyProfessors.com (RMP) is the most popular of such evaluation tools and houses a wealth of information from the students' viewpoint. The purpose of this study was to determine whether…

  9. Demands of Expanding Populations and Development Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Bo

    2010-04-01

    This book is a practical resource for development planners, demographers, and organizations involved with development projects related to improving the well-being and welfare of expanding human populations. Demands of Expanding Populations and Development Planning essentially is a treatment on sustainability and includes a heavy emphasis on major issues of environmental pollution over the last 3 decades. The book's coverage of ecosystems, atmospheric chemistry, water availability and quality, and soils is comprehensive. The author's extensive teaching experience makes this somewhat of an authoritative book on air quality and emissions from natural and anthropogenic sources, volatile heavy metals, carbon monoxide, radon, and nuclear waste. Most of the book focuses on the atmospheric chemistry of air pollution, whether the pollution source is from energy, industrial production, and manufacturing processes or from the treatment of waste products from such processes.

  10. Discovery of a general method of solving the Schrödinger and dirac equations that opens a way to accurately predictive quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2012-09-18

    Just as Newtonian law governs classical physics, the Schrödinger equation (SE) and the relativistic Dirac equation (DE) rule the world of chemistry. So, if we can solve these equations accurately, we can use computation to predict chemistry precisely. However, for approximately 80 years after the discovery of these equations, chemists believed that they could not solve SE and DE for atoms and molecules that included many electrons. This Account reviews ideas developed over the past decade to further the goal of predictive quantum chemistry. Between 2000 and 2005, I discovered a general method of solving the SE and DE accurately. As a first inspiration, I formulated the structure of the exact wave function of the SE in a compact mathematical form. The explicit inclusion of the exact wave function's structure within the variational space allows for the calculation of the exact wave function as a solution of the variational method. Although this process sounds almost impossible, it is indeed possible, and I have published several formulations and applied them to solve the full configuration interaction (CI) with a very small number of variables. However, when I examined analytical solutions for atoms and molecules, the Hamiltonian integrals in their secular equations diverged. This singularity problem occurred in all atoms and molecules because it originates from the singularity of the Coulomb potential in their Hamiltonians. To overcome this problem, I first introduced the inverse SE and then the scaled SE. The latter simpler idea led to immediate and surprisingly accurate solution for the SEs of the hydrogen atom, helium atom, and hydrogen molecule. The free complement (FC) method, also called the free iterative CI (free ICI) method, was efficient for solving the SEs. In the FC method, the basis functions that span the exact wave function are produced by the Hamiltonian of the system and the zeroth-order wave function. These basis functions are called complement

  11. Smaragdyrins: emeralds of expanded porphyrin family.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Yogita; Ravikanth, M; Chandrashekar, T K

    2012-10-16

    Porphyrins are tetrapyrrolic 18 π electron conjugated macrocycles with wide applications that range from materials to medicine. Expanded porphyrins, synthetic analogues of porphyrins that contain more than 18 π electrons in the conjugated pathway, have an increased number of pyrroles or other heterocyles or multiple meso-carbon bridges. The expanded porphyrins have attracted tremendous attention because of unique features such as anion binding or transport that are not present in porphyrins. Expanded porphyrins exhibit wide applications that include their use in the coordination of large metal ions, as contrasting agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as sensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and as materials for nonlinear optical (NLO) studies. Pentaphyrin 1, sapphyrin 2, and smaragdyrin 3 are expanded porphyrins that include five pyrroles or heterocyclic rings. They differ from each other in the number of bridging carbons and direct bonds that connect the five heterocyclic rings. Sapphyrins were the first stable expanded porphyrins reported in the literature and remain one of the most extensively studied macrocycles. The strategies used to synthesize sapphyrins are well established, and these macrocycles are versatile anion binding agents. They possess rich porphyrin-like coordination chemistry and have been used in diverse applications. This Account reviews developments in smaragdyrin chemistry. Although smaragdyrins were discovered at the same time as sapphyrins, the chemistry of smaragdyrins remained underdeveloped because of synthetic difficulties and their comparative instability. Earlier efforts resulted in the isolation of stable β-substituted smaragdyrins and meso-aryl isosmaragdyrins. Recently, researchers have synthesized stable meso-aryl smaragdyrins by [3 + 2] oxidative coupling reactions. These results have stimulated renewed research interest in the exploration of these compounds for anion and cation binding, energy transfer

  12. Smaragdyrins: emeralds of expanded porphyrin family.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Yogita; Ravikanth, M; Chandrashekar, T K

    2012-10-16

    Porphyrins are tetrapyrrolic 18 π electron conjugated macrocycles with wide applications that range from materials to medicine. Expanded porphyrins, synthetic analogues of porphyrins that contain more than 18 π electrons in the conjugated pathway, have an increased number of pyrroles or other heterocyles or multiple meso-carbon bridges. The expanded porphyrins have attracted tremendous attention because of unique features such as anion binding or transport that are not present in porphyrins. Expanded porphyrins exhibit wide applications that include their use in the coordination of large metal ions, as contrasting agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as sensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and as materials for nonlinear optical (NLO) studies. Pentaphyrin 1, sapphyrin 2, and smaragdyrin 3 are expanded porphyrins that include five pyrroles or heterocyclic rings. They differ from each other in the number of bridging carbons and direct bonds that connect the five heterocyclic rings. Sapphyrins were the first stable expanded porphyrins reported in the literature and remain one of the most extensively studied macrocycles. The strategies used to synthesize sapphyrins are well established, and these macrocycles are versatile anion binding agents. They possess rich porphyrin-like coordination chemistry and have been used in diverse applications. This Account reviews developments in smaragdyrin chemistry. Although smaragdyrins were discovered at the same time as sapphyrins, the chemistry of smaragdyrins remained underdeveloped because of synthetic difficulties and their comparative instability. Earlier efforts resulted in the isolation of stable β-substituted smaragdyrins and meso-aryl isosmaragdyrins. Recently, researchers have synthesized stable meso-aryl smaragdyrins by [3 + 2] oxidative coupling reactions. These results have stimulated renewed research interest in the exploration of these compounds for anion and cation binding, energy transfer

  13. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  14. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  15. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of chemistry to be used in chemistry courses of secondary schools. Three experiments concerning differential thermal analysis are among these notes presented. (HM)

  16. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  17. Colour Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, J.; Rattee, I. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the course offerings in pure color chemistry at two universities and the three main aspects of study: dyestuff chemistry, color measurement, and color application. Indicates that there exists a constant challenge to ingenuity in the subject discipline. (CC)

  18. Efficient model chemistries for peptides. I. General framework and a study of the heterolevel approximation in RHF and MP2 with Pople split-valence basis sets.

    PubMed

    Echenique, Pablo; Alonso, José Luis

    2008-07-15

    We present an exhaustive study of more than 250 ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the model dipeptide HCO-L-Ala-NH(2). The model chemistries (MCs) investigated are constructed as homo- and heterolevels involving possibly different RHF and MP2 calculations for the geometry and the energy. The basis sets used belong to a sample of 39 representants from Pople's split-valence families, ranging from the small 3-21G to the large 6-311++G(2df,2pd). The reference PES to which the rest are compared is the MP2/6-311++G(2df,2pd) homolevel, which, as far as we are aware, is the most accurate PES in the literature. All data sets have been analyzed according to a general framework, which can be extended to other complex problems and which captures the nearness concept in the space of MCs. The great number of MCs evaluated has allowed us to significantly explore this space and show that the correlation between accuracy and computational cost of the methods is imperfect, thus justifying a systematic search for the combination of features in a MC that is optimal to deal with peptides. Regarding the particular MCs studied, the most important conclusion is that the potentially very cost-saving heterolevel approximation is a very efficient one to describe the whole PES of HCO-L-Ala-NH(2). Finally, we show that, although RHF may be used to calculate the geometry if a MP2 single-point energy calculation follows, pure RHF//RHF homolevels are not recommendable for this problem.

  19. Functionalized expanded porphyrins

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, Jonathan L; Pantos, Patricia J

    2013-11-12

    Disclosed are functionalized expanded porphyrins that can be used as spectrometric sensors for high-valent actinide cations. The disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins have the advantage over unfunctionalized systems in that they can be immobilized via covalent attachment to a solid support comprising an inorganic or organic polymer or other common substrates. Substrates comprising the disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins are also disclosed. Further, disclosed are methods of making the disclosed compounds (immobilized and free), methods of using them as sensors to detect high valent actinides, devices that comprise the disclosed compounds, and kits.

  20. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  1. Toxicological evaluation of dry ice expanded tobacco.

    PubMed

    Theophilus, Eugenia H; Poindexter, Dale B; Meckley, Daniel R; Bombick, Betsy R; Borgerding, Michael F; Higuchi, Mark A; Ayres, Paul H; Morton, Michael J; Mosberg, Arnold T; Swauger, James E

    2003-11-30

    A tiered testing strategy has been developed to evaluate the potential of tobacco processes, ingredients, or technological developments to change the biological activity resulting from burning tobacco. The strategy is based on comparative chemical and biological testing. Dry ice expanded tobacco (DIET) is an example of a common tobacco expansion process currently used in the manufacture of cigarettes to increase tobacco filling capacity. As part of the toxicological evaluation of DIET, test cigarettes containing DIET were compared with control cigarettes containing tobacco expanded with a traditional expansion agent (Freon-11, also known as trichlorofluoromethane). Testing included mainstream cigarette smoke chemistry studies, genotoxicity studies (Ames and sister chromatid exchange, SCE), a 13-week inhalation study in Sprague-Dawley rats, and a 30-week dermal tumor promotion study in SENCAR mice. Cigarettes containing DIET or Freon-11 expanded tobacco were similar in biological activity. PMID:14581163

  2. Theme: The Expanded Mission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Eddy; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This theme issue covers the following topics: modernization of agricultural education, an expanded mission for the field, community development, a national presence for agricultural education, revising curriculum, and interesting students in new careers in agriculture. (SK)

  3. Forensic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-07-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  4. Radiation Chemistry in Organized Assemblies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, J. K.; Chen, T. S.

    1981-01-01

    Expands the basic concepts regarding the radiation chemistry of simple aqueous systems to more complex, but well defined, organized assemblies. Discusses the differences in behavior in comparison to simple systems. Reviews these techniques: pulse radiolysis, laser flash, photolysis, and steady state irradiation by gamma rays or light. (CS)

  5. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, A. Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  6. 26 CFR 1.199-7 - Expanded affiliated groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Expanded affiliated groups. 1.199-7 Section 1...-7 Expanded affiliated groups. (a) In general. The provisions of this section apply solely for purposes of section 199 of the Internal Revenue Code (Code). All members of an expanded affiliated...

  7. 26 CFR 1.199-7 - Expanded affiliated groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Expanded affiliated groups. 1.199-7 Section 1...-7 Expanded affiliated groups. (a) In general. The provisions of this section apply solely for purposes of section 199 of the Internal Revenue Code (Code). All members of an expanded affiliated...

  8. 26 CFR 1.199-7 - Expanded affiliated groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Expanded affiliated groups. 1.199-7 Section 1...-7 Expanded affiliated groups. (a) In general. The provisions of this section apply solely for purposes of section 199 of the Internal Revenue Code (Code). All members of an expanded affiliated...

  9. 26 CFR 1.199-7 - Expanded affiliated groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Expanded affiliated groups. 1.199-7 Section 1...-7 Expanded affiliated groups. (a) In general. The provisions of this section apply solely for purposes of section 199 of the Internal Revenue Code (Code). All members of an expanded affiliated...

  10. Expander plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Expander plant design is iterative. In order to calculate an answer it is necessary to have an answer to start with. Consequently, the starting point for a final design is a function of the experience level of the designer and his personal preference. This paper assumes that the designer has no experience in expander plant design and concentrates on providing methods for assuming an answer that will be close enough to the final answer that the design can be done with a minimum number of iterations. For illustration, several typical process designs are presented.

  11. Ion Exchange and Thin Layer Chromatographic Separation and Identification of Amino Acids in a Mixture: An Experiment for General Chemistry and Biotechnology Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunauer, Linda S.; Caslavka, Katelyn E.; Van Groningen, Karinne

    2014-01-01

    A multiday laboratory exercise is described that is suitable for first-year undergraduate chemistry, biochemistry, or biotechnology students. Students gain experience in performing chromatographic separations of biomolecules, in both a column and thin layer chromatography (TLC) format. Students chromatographically separate amino acids (AA) in an…

  12. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new chemistry expermiments are described. Broad areas covered include atomic structure, solubility, gaseous diffusion, endothermic reactions, alcohols, equilibrium, atomic volumes, and some improvised apparatus. (PS)

  13. Characterizing the successful student in general chemistry and physical science classes in terms of Jung's personality types as identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Wayne David

    1998-11-01

    A student's success in a science class can depend upon previous experiences, motivation, and the level of interest in the subject. Since psychological type is intrinsic to a person's whole being, it can be influential upon the student's motivation and interests. Thus, a study of student psychological types versus the level of success in a class, as measured by a percentage, has potential to uncover certain personality characteristics which may be helpful to or which may hinder a student's learning environment. This study was initiated, using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, to evaluate any correlation between a student's personality type and his/her performance in a science class. A total of 1041 students from three classes: Chemistry 121/122, Chemistry 112, Physical Science 100, volunteered for the study. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine the levels of significance among sixteen personality types' averages. The results reveal that for the Chemistry 1121/122 course, the average score of the INTJ personality type was 5.1 to 12.6 points higher than every other personality type. The ANOVA identifies 3 personality types with averages significantly below the INTJ at the p < 0.05 significance level. The ANOVA analysis for the Chemistry 112 course identified significances between student scores at p = 0.08. The significance level for the differences among scores for the Physical Science 100 course was determined at a level of p = 0.02. Significance levels for p < 0.05 and <0.01 were identified between several groups in this course. The data suggest, that although personality type may not predict a particular student's success in a science class, students with certain personality traits may be favored in a chemistry class due the structure of the instruction and the presentation of the subject matter.

  14. Supplemental instruction in chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundeberg, Mary A.

    This study was designed to measure some effects of supplemental instruction in chemistry. Supplemental instruction is a peer-led cooperative learning program that encourages students to develop conceptual understanding by articulating both understandings and misconceptions in a think-aloud fashion. Supplemental instruction was offered three hours weekly outside of class and lab time for students in four classes of General Organic and Biological Chemistry. Over a two-year period 108 students volunteered to participate in this program; 45 students did not participate. As measured by final grades in chemistry and responses to a questionnaire, supplemental instruction was effective in increasing students' achievement in chemistry. Further research is needed to determine the in-depth effects of supplemental instruction on students' learning, problem solving, and self-esteem.

  15. Expanding Student Assessment Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartscher, Beth; Carter, Andrea; Lawlor, Anna; McKelvey, Barbara

    This paper describes an approach for expanding assessment opportunities for students to demonstrate their understanding of content. The targeted population consisted of elementary and junior high school students in two schools in a growing middle-class community in north central Illinois. The elementary school enrolled 467 students and the junior…

  16. Expanded Roles for HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on expanded roles for human resource development (HRD). "The Roles of Consultants in Gainsharing Firms: Empirical Results" (Eunsang Cho, Gary N. McLean) reports findings that consultants are moderately involved at the separation, preparation, evaluation, and design stages and have low…

  17. ExpandED Options: Learning beyond High School Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ExpandED Schools, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Through ExpandED Options by TASC, New York City high school students get academic credit for learning career-related skills that lead to paid summer jobs. Too many high school students--including those most likely to drop out--are bored or see classroom learning as irrelevant. ExpandED Options students live the connection between mastering new…

  18. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and content information related to chemistry. Topics include polarizing power; calorimetry and momentum; microcomputers in school chemistry; a constant-volume dispenser for liquids, floating magnets, and crystal lattices; preparation of chromium; and solvent polarity and…

  19. Development and implementation of an empirical frequency map for use in MD simulations of isotope-edited proteins, and, Development, implementation, and evaluation of an online student portal as a textbook replacement in an advanced general chemistry course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorb, Justin Matthew

    The first portion of this thesis describes an extension of work done in the Skinner group to develop an empirical frequency map for N-methylacetamide (NMA) in water. NMA is a peptide bond capped on either side by a methyl group and is therefore a common prototypical molecule used when studying complicated polypeptides and proteins. This amide bond is present along the backbone of every protein as it connects individual component amino acids. This amide bond also has a strong observable frequency in the IR due to the Amide-I mode (predominantly carbon-oxygen stretching motion). This project describes the simplification of the prior model for mapping the frequency of the Amide-I mode from the electric field due to the environment and develops a parallel implementation of this algorithm for use in larger biological systems, such as the trans-membrane portion of the tetrameric polypeptide bundle protein CD3zeta. The second portion of this thesis describes the development, implementation and evaluation of an online textbook within the context of a cohesive theoretical framework. The project begins by describing what is meant when discussing a digital textbook, including a survey of various types of digital media being used to deliver textbook-like content. This leads into the development of a theoretical framework based on constructivist pedagogical theory, hypertext learning theory, and chemistry visualization and representation frameworks. The implementation and design of ChemPaths, the general chemistry online text developed within the Chemistry Education Digital Library (ChemEd DL) is then described. The effectiveness of ChemPaths being used as a textbook replacement in an advanced general chemistry course is evaluated within the developed theoretical framework both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  20. A Chemistry Concept Reasoning Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Carrie A.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    A Chemistry Concept Reasoning Test was created and validated providing an easy-to-use tool for measuring conceptual understanding and critical scientific thinking of general chemistry models and theories. The test is designed to measure concept understanding comparable to that found in free-response questions requiring explanations over…

  1. Expandable LED array interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  2. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  3. Discovering the Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaumer, Harry; Bieri, Lydia; Sandage, Foreword by Allan

    2009-03-01

    Acknowledgments; Foreword; 1. Introduction; 2. Cosmological concepts at the end of the Middle Ages; 3. Nebulae as a new astronomical phenomenon; 4. On the construction of the Heavens; 5. Island universes turn into astronomical facts: a universe of galaxies; 6. The early cosmology of Einstein and de Sitter; 7. The dynamical universe of Friedmann; 8. Redshifts: how to reconcile Slipher and de Sitter?; 9. Lemaître discovers the expanding universe; 10. Hubble's contribution of 1929; 11. The breakthrough for the expanding universe; 12. Hubble's anger about de Sitter; 13. Robertson and Tolman join the game; 14. The Einstein-de Sitter universe; 15. Are Sun and Earth older than the universe?; 16. In search of alternative tracks; 17. The seed for the Big Bang; 18. Summary and Postscript; Appendix; References; Index.

  4. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, Alfred E.; Huggins, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    The study of the outer envelopes of cool evolved stars has become an active area of research. The physical properties of CS envelopes are presented. Observations of many wavelengths bands are relevant. A summary of observations and a discussion of theoretical considerations concerning the chemistry are summarized. Recent theoretical considerations show that the thermal equilibrium model is of limited use for understanding the chemistry of the outer CS envelopes. The theoretical modeling of the chemistry of CS envelopes provides a quantitive test of chemical concepts which have a broader interest than the envelopes themselves.

  5. Expanding the chemistry of DNA for in vitro selection.

    PubMed

    Vaught, Jonathan D; Bock, Chris; Carter, Jeff; Fitzwater, Tim; Otis, Matt; Schneider, Dan; Rolando, Justin; Waugh, Sheela; Wilcox, Sheri K; Eaton, Bruce E

    2010-03-31

    Six new 5-position modified dUTP derivatives connected by a unique amide linkage were synthesized and tested for compatibility with the enzymatic steps of in vitro selection. Six commercially available DNA polymerases were tested for their ability to efficiently incorporate each of these dUTP derivatives during PCR. It was not possible to perform PCR under standard conditions using any of the modified dUTP derivatives studied. In contrast, primer extension reactions of random templates, as well as defined sequence templates, were successful. KOD XL and D. Vent DNA polymerases were found to be the most efficient at synthesizing full-length primer extension product, with all of the dUTP derivatives tested giving yields similar to those obtained with TTP. Several of these modified dUTPs were then used in an in vitro selection experiment comparing the use of modified dUTP derivatives with TTP for selecting aptamers to a protein target (necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 9, TNFRSF9) that had previously been found to be refractory to in vitro selection using DNA. Remarkably, selections employing modified DNA libraries resulted in the first successful isolation of DNA aptamers able to bind TNFRSF9 with high affinity. PMID:20201573

  6. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Several ideas are proposed for chemistry teachers to try in their classrooms. Subjects included are polymerization of acrylate, polymerization of styrene, conductivity, pollution, preparation of chlorine, redox equations, chemiluminescence, and molecular sieves. (PS)

  7. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes 13 activities, experiments and demonstrations, including the preparation of iron (III) chloride, simple alpha-helix model, investigating camping gas, redox reactions of some organic compounds, a liquid crystal thermometer, and the oxidation number concept in organic chemistry. (JN)

  8. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  9. Precolumbian Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janet Bond

    1995-01-01

    Describes the content and development of a curriculum that provides an approach to descriptive chemistry and the history of technology through consideration of the pottery, metallurgy, pigments, dyes, agriculture, and medicine of pre-Columbian people. (DDR)

  10. Catalytic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes an approach for making chemistry relevant to everyday life. Involves the study of kinetics using the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by vegetable juices. Allows students to design and carry out experiments and then draw conclusions from their results. (JRH)

  11. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in chemistry instruction, including among others, a rapid method to determine available chlorine in bleach, simple flame testing apparatus, and a simple apparatus demonstrating the technique of flash photolysis. (SK)

  12. Beginning Chemistry Can Be Relevant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, James F.

    1971-01-01

    Reviews ways of applying laboratory work in general and analytical chemistry to supermarket products. Describes ways water and air pollution analysis can illustrate acid-base reactions, redox reactions, precipitimetry, and colorimetry. (PR)

  13. Chemistry for the Visually Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff, Judy L.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses modifications to general education or introductory chemistry courses that allow visually impaired students to participate productively. Describes a strategy for teaching about elements and density, and the construction of a conductivity tester for visually impaired students. (JRH)

  14. Stratospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  15. Expanded criteria donors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sandy; Lai, Jennifer C

    2014-08-01

    The greatest challenge facing liver transplantation today is the shortage of donor livers. Demand far exceeds supply, and this deficit has driven expansion of what is considered an acceptable organ. The evolving standard has not come without costs, however, as each new frontier of expanded donor quality (i.e., advancing donor age, donation after cardiac death, and split liver) may have traded wait-list for post-transplant morbidity and mortality. This article delineates the nature and severity of risk associated with specific deceased donor liver characteristics and recommends strategies to maximally mitigate these risks. PMID:25017080

  16. Mineral Process Chemistry: A Special Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudeney, A. W. L.

    1982-01-01

    Mineral Process Chemistry is one of the special study options of the Nuffield Advanced Science course in chemistry. Following general comments on mineral process chemistry, the subject matter of the option is described, focusing on copper and china clay. (Author/JN)

  17. Preventive Ethics Through Expanding Education.

    PubMed

    Ho, Anita; MacDonald, Lisa Mei-Hwa; Unger, David

    2016-03-01

    Healthcare institutions have been making increasing efforts to standardize consultation methodology and to accredit both bioethics training programs and the consultants accordingly. The focus has traditionally been on the ethics consultation as the relevant unit of ethics intervention. Outcome measures are studied in relation to consultations, and the hidden assumption is that consultations are the preferred or best way to address day-to-day ethical dilemmas. Reflecting on the data from an internal quality improvement survey and the literature, we argue that having general ethics education as a key function of ethics services may be more important in meeting the contemporaneous needs of acute care settings. An expanded and varied ethics education, with attention to the time constraints of healthcare workers' schedules, was a key recommendation brought forward by survey respondents. Promoting ethical reflection and creating a culture of ethics may serve to prevent ethical dilemmas or mitigate their effects.

  18. Expanding Human Cognition and Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Spohrer, Jim; Pierce, Brian M.; Murray, Cherry A.; Golledge, Reginald G.; Horn, Robert E.; Turkle, Sherry; Yonas, Gerold; Glicken Turnley, Jessica; Pollack, Jordan; Burger, Rudy; Robinett, Warren; Wilson, Larry Todd; Bainbridge, W. S.; Canton, J.; Kuekes, P.; Loomis, J.; Penz, P.

    2013-01-01

    To be able to chart the most profitable future directions for societal transformation and corresponding scientific research, five multidisciplinary themes focused on major goals have been identified to fulfill the overall motivating vision of convergence described in the previous pages. The first, “Expanding Human Cognition and Communication,” is devoted to technological breakthroughs that have the potential to enhance individuals’ mental and interaction abilities. Throughout the twentieth century, a number of purely psychological techniques were offered for strengthening human character and personality, but evaluation research has generally failed to confirm the alleged benefits of these methods (Druckman and Bjork 1992; 1994). Today, there is good reason to believe that a combination of methods, drawing upon varied branches of converging science and technology, would be more effective than attempts that rely upon mental training alone.

  19. Kinetic model framework for aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions: Part 1 - general equations, parameters, and terminology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöschl, U.; Rudich, Y.; Ammann, M.

    2005-04-01

    Aerosols and clouds play central roles in atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, air pollution, and public health. The mechanistic understanding and predictability of aerosol and cloud properties, interactions, transformations, and effects are, however, still very limited. This is due not only to the limited availability of measurement data, but also to the limited applicability and compatibility of model formalisms used for the analysis, interpretation, and description of heterogeneous and multiphase processes. To support the investigation and elucidation of atmospheric aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions, we present a comprehensive kinetic model framework with consistent and unambiguous terminology and universally applicable rate equations and parameters. It allows to describe mass transport and chemical reactions at the gas-particle interface and to link aerosol and cloud surface processes with gas phase and particle bulk processes in systems with multiple chemical components and competing physicochemical processes. The key elements and essential aspects of the presented framework are: a simple and descriptive double-layer surface model (sorption layer and quasi-static layer); straightforward flux-based mass balance and rate equations; clear separation of mass transport and chemical reactions; well-defined rate parameters (uptake and accommodation coefficients, reaction and transport rate coefficients); clear distinction between gas phase, gas-surface, and surface-bulk transport (gas phase diffusion correction, surface and bulk accommodation); clear distinction between gas-surface, surface layer, and surface-bulk reactions (Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Eley-Rideal mechanisms); mechanistic description of concentration and time dependencies; flexible inclusion/omission of chemical species and physicochemical processes; flexible convolution/deconvolution of species and processes; and full compatibility with traditional resistor model

  20. Condensate and feedwater systems, pumps, and water chemistry. Volume seven

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Subject matter includes condensate and feedwater systems (general features of condensate and feedwater systems, condenser hotwell level control, condensate flow, feedwater flow), pumps (principles of fluid flow, types of pumps, centrifugal pumps, positive displacement pumps, jet pumps, pump operating characteristics) and water chemistry (water chemistry fundamentals, corrosion, scaling, radiochemistry, water chemistry control processes, water pretreatment, PWR water chemistry, BWR water chemistry, condenser circulating water chemistry.

  1. Uranium triamidoamine chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Benedict M; Liddle, Stephen T

    2015-07-01

    Triamidoamine (Tren) complexes of the p- and d-block elements have been well-studied, and they display a diverse array of chemistry of academic, industrial and biological significance. Such in-depth investigations are not as widespread for Tren complexes of uranium, despite the general drive to better understand the chemical behaviour of uranium by virtue of its fundamental position within the nuclear sector. However, the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes is characterised by the ability to stabilise otherwise reactive, multiply bonded main group donor atom ligands, construct uranium-metal bonds, promote small molecule activation, and support single molecule magnetism, all of which exploit the steric, electronic, thermodynamic and kinetic features of the Tren ligand system. This Feature Article presents a current account of the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes.

  2. Radiation Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  3. Chemistry and cosmology.

    PubMed

    Black, John H

    2006-01-01

    The simplest elements, hydrogen and helium, offer a remarkably rich chemistry, which has controlled crucial features of the early evolution of the universe. Theoretical models of the origin of structure (stars, galaxies, clusters of galaxies, etc.) now incorporate this chemistry in some detail. In addition to the origin of structure, cosmologists are concerned with observational tests of competing world models. Primordial chemistry may give rise to some of the earliest departures from thermodynamic equilibrium in the universe. These effects may be observable as broad-band spectroscopic distortions of the cosmic background radiation, which otherwise exhibits a nearly perfect blackbody spectrum. The chemical history of the expanding universe is followed through a detailed calculation of the evolution of the abundances of H, H+, H-, H2, H2+, H3+, and other minor species. It is shown that continuous absorption by the small concentration of H- can produce a distortion in the cosmic background spectrum with a maximum at a frequency near nu/c = 9 cm-1 (wavelength 1.1 mm). The predicted effect lies only a factor of 5 below current limits. Its detection would provide an important test of our understanding of the recombination epoch of the universe. PMID:17191439

  4. Expandable pattern casting research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-09-01

    The Expandable Pattern Casting (EPC) Process is a developing foundry technology that allows designers the opportunity to consolidate parts, reduce machining, and minimize assembly operations. An air gauging system was developed for measuring foam patterns; exact shrinkage depended on type and density of the foam. Compaction studies showed that maximum sand densities in cavities and under overhangs are achieved with vibrational amplitudes 0.001-0.004 in., and that sand moved most freely within a few inches of the top free surface. Key to complete mold filling while minimizing casting defects lies in removing the foam decomposition products. The most precise iron castings were made by EPC in four commercial EPC foundries, with attention paid to molding and compaction. EP cast 60-45-12 ductile iron had yield strengths, ultimate strengths, and elastic modulus similar to conventionally cast ductile iron cast from the same ladle.

  5. Expanding hollow metal rings

    DOEpatents

    Peacock, Harold B.; Imrich, Kenneth J.

    2009-03-17

    A sealing device that may expand more planar dimensions due to internal thermal expansion of a filler material. The sealing material is of a composition such that when desired environment temperatures and internal actuating pressures are reached, the sealing materials undergoes a permanent deformation. For metallic compounds, this permanent deformation occurs when the material enters the plastic deformation phase. Polymers, and other materials, may be using a sealing mechanism depending on the temperatures and corrosivity of the use. Internal pressures are generated by either rapid thermal expansion or material phase change and may include either liquid or solid to gas phase change, or in the gaseous state with significant pressure generation in accordance with the gas laws. Sealing material thickness and material composition may be used to selectively control geometric expansion of the seal such that expansion is limited to a specific facing and or geometric plane.

  6. Mechanically expandable annular seal

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Richard F.

    1983-01-01

    A mechanically expandable annular reusable seal assembly to form an annular hermetic barrier between two stationary, parallel, and planar containment surfaces. A rotatable ring, attached to the first surface, has ring wedges resembling the saw-tooth array of a hole saw. Matching seal wedges are slidably attached to the ring wedges and have their motion restricted to be perpendicular to the second surface. Each seal wedge has a face parallel to the second surface. An annular elastomer seal has a central annular region attached to the seal wedges' parallel faces and has its inner and outer circumferences attached to the first surface. A rotation of the ring extends the elastomer seal's central region perpendicularly towards the second surface to create the fluidtight barrier. A counterrotation removes the barrier.

  7. Mechanically expandable annular seal

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, R.F.

    1983-07-19

    A mechanically expandable annular reusable seal assembly to form an annular hermetic barrier between two stationary, parallel, and planar containment surfaces is described. A rotatable ring, attached to the first surface, has ring wedges resembling the saw-tooth array of a hole saw. Matching seal wedges are slidably attached to the ring wedges and have their motion restricted to be perpendicular to the second surface. Each seal wedge has a face parallel to the second surface. An annular elastomer seal has a central annular region attached to the seal wedges' parallel faces and has its inner and outer circumferences attached to the first surface. A rotation of the ring extends the elastomer seal's central region perpendicularly towards the second surface to create the fluid tight barrier. A counter rotation removes the barrier. 6 figs.

  8. The Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heacox, William D.

    2015-11-01

    Introducing the Universe; Part I. Conceptual Foundations: 1. Newtonian cosmology; 2. General relativity; 3. Relativistic cosmology; Part II. General Relativity: 4. General covariance; 5. Equivalence principle; 6. Space-time curvature; 7. Einstein field equations of gravitation; Part III. Universal Expansion: 8. Cosmological field equations; 9. Cosmography; 10. Expansion dynamics; Part IV. Expansion Models: 11. Radiation; 12. Matter; 13. Dark energy; 14. Observational constraints; 15. Concordance cosmological model; Part V. Expansion History: 16. Particle era; 17. Plasma era; 18. Galaxy era; 19. Afterword: the new modern cosmology; Part VI: Appendices; Bibliography; Index.

  9. C-IFS-CB05-BASCOE: stratospheric chemistry in the Integrated Forecasting System of ECMWF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huijnen, Vincent; Flemming, Johannes; Chabrillat, Simon; Errera, Quentin; Christophe, Yves; Blechschmidt, Anne-Marlene; Richter, Andreas; Eskes, Henk

    2016-09-01

    We present a model description and benchmark evaluation of an extension of the tropospheric chemistry module in the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) with stratospheric chemistry, referred to as C-IFS-CB05-BASCOE (for brevity here referred to as C-IFS-TS). The stratospheric chemistry originates from the one used in the Belgian Assimilation System for Chemical ObsErvations (BASCOE), and is here combined with the modified CB05 chemistry module for the troposphere as currently used operationally in the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS). In our approach either the tropospheric or stratospheric chemistry module is applied, depending on the altitude of each individual grid box with respect to the tropopause. An evaluation of a 2.5-year long C-IFS-TS simulation with respect to various satellite retrieval products and in situ observations indicates good performance of the system in terms of stratospheric ozone, and a general improvement in terms of stratospheric composition compared to the C-IFS predecessor model version. Possible issues with transport processes in the stratosphere are identified. This marks a key step towards a chemistry module within IFS that encompasses both tropospheric and stratospheric composition, and could expand the CAMS analysis and forecast capabilities in the near future.

  10. Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  11. Chemistry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Remsberg, Ellis; Purcell, Patrick; Bhatt, Praful; Sage, Karen H.; Brown, Donald E.; Scott, Courtney J.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Tie, Xue-Xi; Huang, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the chemistry component of the model comparison is to assess to what extent differences in the formulation of chemical processes explain the variance between model results. Observed concentrations of chemical compounds are used to estimate to what degree the various models represent realistic situations. For readability, the materials for the chemistry experiment are reported in three separate sections. This section discussed the data used to evaluate the models in their simulation of the source gases and the Nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) and Chlorine compounds (Cl(y)) species.

  12. Kinetic model framework for aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions - Part 1: General equations, parameters, and terminology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöschl, U.; Rudich, Y.; Ammann, M.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosols and clouds play central roles in atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, air pollution, and public health. The mechanistic understanding and predictability of aerosol and cloud properties, interactions, transformations, and effects are, however, still very limited. This is due not only to the limited availability of measurement data, but also to the limited applicability and compatibility of model formalisms used for the analysis, interpretation, and description of heterogeneous and multiphase processes. To support the investigation and elucidation of atmospheric aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions, we present a comprehensive kinetic model framework with consistent and unambiguous terminology and universally applicable rate equations and parameters. It enables a detailed description of mass transport and chemical reactions at the gas-particle interface, and it allows linking aerosol and cloud surface processes with gas phase and particle bulk processes in systems with multiple chemical components and competing physicochemical processes. The key elements and essential aspects of the presented framework are: a simple and descriptive double-layer surface model (sorption layer and quasi-static layer); straightforward flux-based mass balance and rate equations; clear separation of mass transport and chemical reactions; well-defined and consistent rate parameters (uptake and accommodation coefficients, reaction and transport rate coefficients); clear distinction between gas phase, gas-surface, and surface-bulk transport (gas phase diffusion, surface and bulk accommodation); clear distinction between gas-surface, surface layer, and surface-bulk reactions (Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Eley-Rideal mechanisms); mechanistic description of concentration and time dependences (transient and steady-state conditions); flexible addition of unlimited numbers of chemical species and physicochemical processes; optional aggregation or resolution

  13. Significant steps in the evolution of analytical chemistry--is the today's analytical chemistry only chemistry?

    PubMed

    Karayannis, Miltiades I; Efstathiou, Constantinos E

    2012-12-15

    In this review the history of chemistry and specifically the history and the significant steps of the evolution of analytical chemistry are presented. In chronological time spans, covering the ancient world, the middle ages, the period of the 19th century, and the three evolutional periods, from the verge of the 19th century to contemporary times, it is given information for the progress of chemistry and analytical chemistry. During this period, analytical chemistry moved gradually from its pure empirical nature to more rational scientific activities, transforming itself to an autonomous branch of chemistry and a separate discipline. It is also shown that analytical chemistry moved gradually from the status of exclusive serving the chemical science, towards serving, the environment, health, law, almost all areas of science and technology, and the overall society. Some recommendations are also directed to analytical chemistry educators concerning the indispensable nature of knowledge of classical analytical chemistry and the associated laboratory exercises and to analysts, in general, why it is important to use the chemical knowledge to make measurements on problems of everyday life.

  14. Student academic achievement in college chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabibzadeh, Kiana S.

    General Chemistry is required for variety of baccalaureate degrees, including all medical related fields, engineering, and science majors. Depending on the institution, the prerequisite requirement for college level General Chemistry varies. The success rate for this course is low. The purpose of this study is to examine the factors influencing student academic achievement and retention in General Chemistry at the college level. In this study student achievement is defined by those students who earned grades of "C" or better. The dissertation contains in-depth studies on influence of Intermediate Algebra as a prerequisite compared to Fundamental Chemistry for student academic achievement and student retention in college General Chemistry. In addition the study examined the extent and manner in which student self-efficacy influences student academic achievement in college level General Chemistry. The sample for this part of the study is 144 students enrolled in first semester college level General Chemistry. Student surveys determined student self-efficacy level. The statistical analyses of study demonstrated that Fundamental Chemistry is a better prerequisite for student academic achievement and student retention. The study also found that student self-efficacy has no influence on student academic achievement. The significance of this study will be to provide data for the purpose of establishing a uniform and most suitable prerequisite for college level General Chemistry. Finally the variables identified to influence student academic achievement and enhance student retention will support educators' mission to maximize the students' ability to complete their educational goal at institutions of higher education.

  15. Investigating the Relationship between Faculty Cognitive Expectations about Learning Chemistry and the Construction of Exam Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanabria-Rios, David; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated chemistry faculty's cognitive expectations about learning chemistry and their influence upon the construction of exam questions in a general chemistry curriculum. Faculty cognitive expectations for learning chemistry were measured using QUIMX. Learning objectives and exam questions for a year-long general chemistry sequence…

  16. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, experiments, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and information on a variety of chemistry topics including, for example, inert gases, light-induced reactions, calculators, identification of substituted acetophenones, the elements, analysis of copper minerals, extraction of metallic strontium, equilibrium, halogens, and…

  17. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and classroom materials/activities. These include: game for teaching ionic formulas; method for balancing equations; description of useful redox series; computer programs (with listings) for water electrolysis simulation and for determining chemical…

  18. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the kinetics of the hydrogen peroxide-iodide ion reaction, simulation of fluidization catalysis, the use of Newman projection diagrams to represent steric relationships in organic chemistry, the use of synthetic substrates for proteolytic enzyme reactions, and two simple clock reactions"--hydrolysis of halogenoalkanes and…

  19. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the alkylation of aniline, the preparation and properties of perbromate, using scrap copper in chemistry instruction, a safe method of burning hydrogen, and the use of an ion-charge model as an alternative to the mole concept in secondary school instruction. (AL)

  20. Confectionary Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Elise Hilf

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities and demonstrations that enable teachers to use various types of confections as tactile experiences to spark chemistry students' interest and generate enthusiasm for learning. Presents uses of candy in teaching about atomic structure, spontaneous nuclear decay, chemical formulas, fractoluminescence, the effect of a molecular…

  1. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes several chemistry projects, including solubility, formula for magnesium oxide, dissociation of dinitrogen tetroxide, use of 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene, migration of ions, heats of neutralizations, use of pocket calculators, sonic cleaning, oxidation states of manganese, and cell potentials. Includes an extract from Chemical Age on…

  2. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom materials/activities. These include: experiments on colloids, processing of uranium ore, action of heat on carbonates; color test for phenols and aromatic amines; solvent properties of non-electrolytes; stereoscopic applications/methods; a valency balance;…

  3. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes some laboratory apparatus, chemistry experiments and demonstrations, such as a Kofler block melting point apparatus, chromatographic investigation of the phosphoric acid, x-ray diffraction, the fountain experiment, endothermic sherbet, the measurement of viscosity, ionization energies and electronic configurations. (GA)

  4. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents 12 chemistry notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) a simple device for testing pH-meters; (2) portable fume cupboard safety screen; and (3) Mass spectroscopy-analysis of a mass peak. (HM)

  5. Complex Autocatalysis in Simple Chemistries.

    PubMed

    Virgo, Nathaniel; Ikegami, Takashi; McGregor, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Life on Earth must originally have arisen from abiotic chemistry. Since the details of this chemistry are unknown, we wish to understand, in general, which types of chemistry can lead to complex, lifelike behavior. Here we show that even very simple chemistries in the thermodynamically reversible regime can self-organize to form complex autocatalytic cycles, with the catalytic effects emerging from the network structure. We demonstrate this with a very simple but thermodynamically reasonable artificial chemistry model. By suppressing the direct reaction from reactants to products, we obtain the simplest kind of autocatalytic cycle, resulting in exponential growth. When these simple first-order cycles are prevented from forming, the system achieves superexponential growth through more complex, higher-order autocatalytic cycles. This leads to nonlinear phenomena such as oscillations and bistability, the latter of which is of particular interest regarding the origins of life.

  6. Cocrystal Controlled Solid-State Synthesis: A Green Chemistry Experiment for Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheney, Miranda L.; Zaworotko, Michael J.; Beaton, Steve; Singer, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Green chemistry has become an important area of concern for all chemists from practitioners in the pharmaceutical industry to professors and the students they teach and is now being incorporated into lectures of general and organic chemistry courses. However, there are relatively few green chemistry experiments that are easily incorporated into…

  7. Seeing the Chemistry around Me--Helping Students Identify the Relevance of Chemistry to Everyday Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Tracy Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The study attempted to determine whether the use of a series of reading and response assignments decreased students' perceptions of chemistry difficulty and enhanced students' perceptions of the relevance of chemistry in their everyday lives. Informed consent volunteer students enrolled in General Chemistry II at a community college in…

  8. The Artful Universe Expanded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  9. Advanced expander test bed program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Chemical Transfer Propulsion Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine technology component technology for the next space engine. The AETB will be used to validate the high-pressure expander cycle concept, investigate system interactions, and conduct investigations of advanced missions focused components and new health monitoring techniques. The split-expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust.

  10. Advanced expander test bed engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Space Chemical Engine Technology Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine and advanced component technologies applicable to space engines as well as launch vehicle upper stage engines. The AETB will be used to validate the high pressure expander cycle concept, study system interactions, and conduct studies of advanced mission focused components and new health monitoring techniques in an engine system environment. The split expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust.

  11. Computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  12. A general solution-chemistry route to the synthesis LiMPO{sub 4} (M=Mn, Fe, and Co) nanocrystals with [010] orientation for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Su Jing; Wei Bingqing; Rong Jiepeng; Yin Wenyan; Ye Zhixia; Tian Xianqing; Ren Ling; Cao Minhua; Hu Changwen

    2011-11-15

    A general and efficient solvothermal strategy has been developed for the preparation of lithium transition metal phosphate microstructures (LiMnPO{sub 4}, LiFePO{sub 4}, and LiCoPO{sub 4}), employing ethanol as the solvent, LiI as the Li source, metal salts as the M sources, H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} as the phosphorus source, and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) as the carbon source and template. This route features low cost, environmental benign, and one-step process for the cathode material production of Li-ion batteries without any complicated experimental setups and sophisticated operations. The as-synthesized LiMPO{sub 4} microstructures exhibit unique, well-shaped and favorable structures, which are self-assembled from microplates or microrods. The b axis is the preferred crystal growth orientation of the products, resulting in a shorter lithium ion diffusion path. The LiFePO{sub 4} microstructures show an excellent cycling stability without capacity fading up to 50 cycles when they are used as a cathode material in lithium-ion batteries. - Graphical abstract: A general and efficient solvothermal strategy has been developed for the preparation of lithium transition metal phosphate microstructures under solvothermal conditions in the presence of PVP. Highlights: > A general and efficient solvothermal strategy has been developed for the preparation of LiMPO{sub 4} microstructures. > This route features low cost, environmental benign, and one-step process. > The LiMPO{sub 4} microstructures exhibit unique, well-shaped, and favorable structures. > The LiFePO{sub 4} microstructures show an excellent cycling stability up to 50 cycles as a cathode material of lithium-ion batteries.

  13. Etymology as an Aid to Understanding Chemistry Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarma, Nittala S.

    2004-01-01

    Learning the connection between the roots and the chemical meaning of terms can improve students' understanding of chemistry concepts, making them easier and more enjoyable to master. The way in which using etymology to understand the meanings and relationships of chemistry terms can aid students in strengthening and expanding their grasp of…

  14. Benchmarking Problems Used in Second Year Level Organic Chemistry Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raker, Jeffrey R.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2010-01-01

    Investigations of the problem types used in college-level general chemistry examinations have been reported in this Journal and were first reported in the "Journal of Chemical Education" in 1924. This study extends the findings from general chemistry to the problems of four college-level organic chemistry courses. Three problem typologies were…

  15. General theory for multiple input-output perturbations in complex molecular systems. 1. Linear QSPR electronegativity models in physical, organic, and medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Arrasate, Sonia; Gómez-SanJuan, Asier; Sotomayor, Nuria; Lete, Esther; Besada-Porto, Lina; Ruso, Juan M

    2013-01-01

    In general perturbation methods starts with a known exact solution of a problem and add "small" variation terms in order to approach to a solution for a related problem without known exact solution. Perturbation theory has been widely used in almost all areas of science. Bhor's quantum model, Heisenberg's matrix mechanincs, Feyman diagrams, and Poincare's chaos model or "butterfly effect" in complex systems are examples of perturbation theories. On the other hand, the study of Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships (QSPR) in molecular complex systems is an ideal area for the application of perturbation theory. There are several problems with exact experimental solutions (new chemical reactions, physicochemical properties, drug activity and distribution, metabolic networks, etc.) in public databases like CHEMBL. However, in all these cases, we have an even larger list of related problems without known solutions. We need to know the change in all these properties after a perturbation of initial boundary conditions. It means, when we test large sets of similar, but different, compounds and/or chemical reactions under the slightly different conditions (temperature, time, solvents, enzymes, assays, protein targets, tissues, partition systems, organisms, etc.). However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no QSPR general-purpose perturbation theory to solve this problem. In this work, firstly we review general aspects and applications of both perturbation theory and QSPR models. Secondly, we formulate a general-purpose perturbation theory for multiple-boundary QSPR problems. Last, we develop three new QSPR-Perturbation theory models. The first model classify correctly >100,000 pairs of intra-molecular carbolithiations with 75-95% of Accuracy (Ac), Sensitivity (Sn), and Specificity (Sp). The model predicts probabilities of variations in the yield and enantiomeric excess of reactions due to at least one perturbation in boundary conditions (solvent, temperature

  16. General theory for multiple input-output perturbations in complex molecular systems. 1. Linear QSPR electronegativity models in physical, organic, and medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Arrasate, Sonia; Gómez-SanJuan, Asier; Sotomayor, Nuria; Lete, Esther; Besada-Porto, Lina; Ruso, Juan M

    2013-01-01

    In general perturbation methods starts with a known exact solution of a problem and add "small" variation terms in order to approach to a solution for a related problem without known exact solution. Perturbation theory has been widely used in almost all areas of science. Bhor's quantum model, Heisenberg's matrix mechanincs, Feyman diagrams, and Poincare's chaos model or "butterfly effect" in complex systems are examples of perturbation theories. On the other hand, the study of Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships (QSPR) in molecular complex systems is an ideal area for the application of perturbation theory. There are several problems with exact experimental solutions (new chemical reactions, physicochemical properties, drug activity and distribution, metabolic networks, etc.) in public databases like CHEMBL. However, in all these cases, we have an even larger list of related problems without known solutions. We need to know the change in all these properties after a perturbation of initial boundary conditions. It means, when we test large sets of similar, but different, compounds and/or chemical reactions under the slightly different conditions (temperature, time, solvents, enzymes, assays, protein targets, tissues, partition systems, organisms, etc.). However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no QSPR general-purpose perturbation theory to solve this problem. In this work, firstly we review general aspects and applications of both perturbation theory and QSPR models. Secondly, we formulate a general-purpose perturbation theory for multiple-boundary QSPR problems. Last, we develop three new QSPR-Perturbation theory models. The first model classify correctly >100,000 pairs of intra-molecular carbolithiations with 75-95% of Accuracy (Ac), Sensitivity (Sn), and Specificity (Sp). The model predicts probabilities of variations in the yield and enantiomeric excess of reactions due to at least one perturbation in boundary conditions (solvent, temperature

  17. (Pesticide chemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L.W.

    1990-09-04

    This report summarizes a trip by L. W. Barnthouse of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), to Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), where he participated in the 7th International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry. He chaired a workshop on experimental systems for determining effects of pesticides on nontarget organisms and gave an oral presentation at a symposium on pesticide risk assessment. Before returning to the United States, Dr. Barnthouse visited the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research in Texel, the Netherlands.

  18. Quo vadis, analytical chemistry?

    PubMed

    Valcárcel, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an open, personal, fresh approach to the future of Analytical Chemistry in the context of the deep changes Science and Technology are anticipated to experience. Its main aim is to challenge young analytical chemists because the future of our scientific discipline is in their hands. A description of not completely accurate overall conceptions of our discipline, both past and present, to be avoided is followed by a flexible, integral definition of Analytical Chemistry and its cornerstones (viz., aims and objectives, quality trade-offs, the third basic analytical reference, the information hierarchy, social responsibility, independent research, transfer of knowledge and technology, interfaces to other scientific-technical disciplines, and well-oriented education). Obsolete paradigms, and more accurate general and specific that can be expected to provide the framework for our discipline in the coming years are described. Finally, the three possible responses of analytical chemists to the proposed changes in our discipline are discussed. PMID:26631024

  19. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  20. Quo vadis, analytical chemistry?

    PubMed

    Valcárcel, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an open, personal, fresh approach to the future of Analytical Chemistry in the context of the deep changes Science and Technology are anticipated to experience. Its main aim is to challenge young analytical chemists because the future of our scientific discipline is in their hands. A description of not completely accurate overall conceptions of our discipline, both past and present, to be avoided is followed by a flexible, integral definition of Analytical Chemistry and its cornerstones (viz., aims and objectives, quality trade-offs, the third basic analytical reference, the information hierarchy, social responsibility, independent research, transfer of knowledge and technology, interfaces to other scientific-technical disciplines, and well-oriented education). Obsolete paradigms, and more accurate general and specific that can be expected to provide the framework for our discipline in the coming years are described. Finally, the three possible responses of analytical chemists to the proposed changes in our discipline are discussed.

  1. Chemistry Teachers Do It with Bangs, Smells and Colours!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Bryan

    2000-01-01

    Presents a lecture given to the Estonian Chemistry Teachers Association (ECTA) about science teaching in general and chemistry teaching in particular. Discusses ways of teaching science that show students that science is fun. (ASK)

  2. A general solution-chemistry route to the synthesis Li MPO 4 ( M=Mn, Fe, and Co) nanocrystals with [010] orientation for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jing; Wei, Bing-Qing; Rong, Jie-Peng; Yin, Wen-Yan; Ye, Zhi-Xia; Tian, Xian-Qing; Ren, Ling; Cao, Min-Hua; Hu, Chang-Wen

    2011-11-01

    A general and efficient solvothermal strategy has been developed for the preparation of lithium transition metal phosphate microstructures (LiMnPO 4, LiFePO 4, and LiCoPO 4), employing ethanol as the solvent, LiI as the Li source, metal salts as the M sources, H 3PO 4 as the phosphorus source, and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) as the carbon source and template. This route features low cost, environmental benign, and one-step process for the cathode material production of Li-ion batteries without any complicated experimental setups and sophisticated operations. The as-synthesized Li MPO 4 microstructures exhibit unique, well-shaped and favorable structures, which are self-assembled from microplates or microrods. The b axis is the preferred crystal growth orientation of the products, resulting in a shorter lithium ion diffusion path. The LiFePO 4 microstructures show an excellent cycling stability without capacity fading up to 50 cycles when they are used as a cathode material in lithium-ion batteries.

  3. An Atmospheric General Circulation Model with Chemistry for the CRAY T3E: Design, Performance Optimization and Coupling to an Ocean Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrara, John D.; Drummond, Leroy A.; Mechoso, Carlos R.; Spahr, Joseph A.

    1998-01-01

    The design, implementation and performance optimization on the CRAY T3E of an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) which includes the transport of, and chemical reactions among, an arbitrary number of constituents is reviewed. The parallel implementation is based on a two-dimensional (longitude and latitude) data domain decomposition. Initial optimization efforts centered on minimizing the impact of substantial static and weakly-dynamic load imbalances among processors through load redistribution schemes. Recent optimization efforts have centered on single-node optimization. Strategies employed include loop unrolling, both manually and through the compiler, the use of an optimized assembler-code library for special function calls, and restructuring of parts of the code to improve data locality. Data exchanges and synchronizations involved in coupling different data-distributed models can account for a significant fraction of the running time. Therefore, the required scattering and gathering of data must be optimized. In systems such as the T3E, there is much more aggregate bandwidth in the total system than in any particular processor. This suggests a distributed design. The design and implementation of a such distributed 'Data Broker' as a means to efficiently couple the components of our climate system model is described.

  4. Monolithical aspherical beam expanding systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, U.; Matthias, Sabrina

    2014-10-01

    Beam expanding is a common task, where Galileo telescopes are preferred. However researches and customers have found limitations when using these systems. A new monolithical solution which is based on the usage of only one aspherical component will be presented. It will be shown how to combine up to five monolithical beam expanding systems and to keep the beam quality at diffraction limitation. Insights will be given how aspherical beam expanding systems will help using larger incoming beams and reducing the overall length of such a system. Additionally an add-on element for divergence and wavelength adaption will be presented.

  5. Chemistry-Climate Interactions in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model. 2; New Insights into Modeling the Pre-Industrial Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenfell, J. Lee; Shindell, D. T.; Koch, D.; Rind, D.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the chemical (hydroxyl and ozone) and dynamical response to changing from present day to pre-industrial conditions in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model (GISS GMC). We identify three main improvements not included by many other works. Firstly, our model includes interactive cloud calculations. Secondly we reduce sulfate aerosol which impacts NOx partitioning hence Ox distributions. Thirdly we reduce sea surface temperatures and increase ocean ice coverage which impact water vapor and ground albedo respectively. Changing the ocean data (hence water vapor and ozone) produces a potentially important feedback between the Hadley circulation and convective cloud cover. Our present day run (run 1, control run) global mean OH value was 9.8 x 10(exp 5) molecules/cc. For our best estimate of pre-industrial conditions run (run 2) which featured modified chemical emissions, sulfate aerosol and sea surface temperatures/ocean ice, this value changed to 10.2 x 10(exp 5) molecules/cc. Reducing only the chemical emissions to pre-industrial levels in run 1 (run 3) resulted in this value increasing to 10.6 x 10(exp 5) molecules/cc. Reducing the sulfate in run 3 to pre-industrial levels (run 4) resulted in a small increase in global mean OH (10.7 x 10(exp 5) molecules/cc). Changing the ocean data in run 4 to pre-industrial levels (run 5) led to a reduction in this value to 10.3 x 10(exp 5) molecules/cc. Mean tropospheric ozone burdens were 262, 181, 180, 180, and 182 Tg for runs 1-5 respectively.

  6. Provocative Opinion: Descriptive Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent, Henry A.; Bent, Brian E.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses many of the distinctions that chemists draw between theoretical chemistry and descriptive chemistry, along with the tendency for chemical educators to adopt the type of chemistry they feel is most important to teach. Uses examples to argue that theoretical chemistry and descriptive chemistry are, at the bottom line, the same. (TW)

  7. Academic excellence workshops in chemistry and physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Susan Rose

    In the mid-1970's, Uri Treisman, at the University of California, Berkeley, developed an academic excellence workshop program that had important successes in increasing minority student achievement and persistence in calculus. The present dissertation research is an in-depth study of chemistry and physics workshops at the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. Data for the first, longitudinal component of this study were obtained by tracking to Spring 1998 all workshop minority students, i.e., Latino, African American, and Native American workshop students, a random sample of non-workshop minority students, and a random sample of non-targeted students, i.e., Anglo and Asian students, enrolled in first-quarter General Chemistry or Physics during specific quarters of 1992 or 1993. Data for the second component were obtained by administering questionnaires, conducting interviews, and observing science students during Fall, 1996. Workshop participation was a significant predictor of first-quarter course grade for minority students in both chemistry and physics, while verbal and mathematics Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores were not significant predictors of beginning course grade for minority science students. The lack of predictive ability of the SAT and the importance of workshop participation in minority students' beginning science course performance are results with important implications for educators and students. In comparing pre-college achievement measures for workshop and non-targeted students, non-targeted students' mathematics SAT scores were significantly higher than chemistry and physics workshop students' scores. Nonetheless, workshop participation "leveled the field" as workshop and non-targeted students performed similarly in beginning science courses. Positive impacts of workshop participation on achievement, persistence, efficiency, social integration, and self-confidence support the continued and expanded funding of workshop programs

  8. Asymptotic flame theory with complex chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Fife, P.C.; Nicolaenko, B.

    1982-01-01

    We investigate the structure of laminar flames with general complex chemistry networks in the limit of high activation energy asymptotics. Depending on the specific reaction network and other given thermomechanical data, a wide variety of flame configurations are possible. Here we present a first version of a systematic asymptotic reduction of complex chemistry networks and give practical criteria to determine the dominant reactions when transport and chemistry are coupled.

  9. Advanced expander test bed program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccardi, D. P.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Space Chemical Engine Technology Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine and advanced component technologies applicable to space engines as well as launch vehicle upper stage engines. The AETB will be used to validate the high-pressure expander cycle concept, investigate system interactions, and conduct investigations of advanced mission focused components and new health monitoring techniques in an engine system environment. The split expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust. Contract work began 27 Apr. 1990. During 1992, a major milestone was achieved with the review of the final design of the oxidizer turbopump in Sep. 1992.

  10. Combustion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  11. Why Teach Environmental Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Marjorie H.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching environmental chemistry in secondary school science classes, and outlines five examples of environmental chemistry problems that focus on major concepts of chemistry and have critical implications for human survival and well-being. (JR)

  12. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  13. A Reply to ''Reinterpretation of Students' Ideas When Reasoning about Particle Model Illustrations. A Response to ''Using Animations in Identifying General Chemistry Students' Misconceptions and Evaluating Their Knowledge Transfer Relating to Particle Position in Physical Changes'' by Smith and Villarreal (2015)''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, K. Christopher; Villarreal, Savannah

    2015-01-01

    In this reply to Elon Langbeheim's response to an article recently published in this journal, authors Smith and Villarreal identify several types of general chemistry students' misconceptions concerning the concept of particle position during physical change. They focus their response on one of the misconceptions identified as such: Given a solid…

  14. Chemistry: Coping with Change...Creatively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Marcelline A.

    Developed for mathematics-shy high school chemistry students, this laboratory manual is suitable for use with any chemistry textbook. Seventy-three experiments, based on a theme of change, are grouped into 5 general areas: (1) 9 experiments focusing on skills needed in observing reality; (2) 19 experiments interpreting how reality changes,…

  15. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  16. Chemistry Perfumes Your Daily Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortineau, Anne-Dominique

    2004-01-01

    A synopsis on the history of perfumery is presented, along with the various processes accessible for obtaining natural perfume constituents, and creation of synthetic chemicals. The important contribution of organic chemists in the invention of perfumes, aspects of fragrance chemistry, and general information on the perfume industry are…

  17. Organometallic chemistry: A new metathesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Elisabeth T.; Jacobsen, Eric N.

    2016-08-01

    Carbonyls and alkenes, two of the most common functional groups in organic chemistry, generally do not react with one another. Now, a simple Lewis acid has been shown to catalyse metathesis between alkenes and ketones in a new carbonyl olefination reaction.

  18. Teaching General Chemistry: A Materials Science Companion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Arthur B.; And Others

    Many teachers and other educators have expressed a concern regarding the lack of student interest in many of the traditional science courses. To help rectify this problem a collaborative effort among educators and others concerned has led to the development of instructional materials that are more relevant to the lives of students. This document…

  19. Two Multipurpose Thermochemical Experiments for General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentworth, R. A. D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two experiments designed to provide concepts on the difference between heat and temperature and also bond energy. Investigates both a neutralization experiment and a ligation experiment. Notes inexpensive chemicals are used along with simple equipment. Discusses the sharing of lab results for a single class value. (MVL)

  20. Ideal Gas Laws: Experiments for General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Walter J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a series of experiments designed to verify the various relationships implicit in the ideal gas equation and shows that the success of the Graham's law effusion experiments can be explained by elementary hydrodynamics. (GS)

  1. Raoult's Law: A General Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffel, Margaret J.

    1983-01-01

    To make material on Raoult's law more meaningful, students complete exercises on paper, in the laboratory, and with molecular models. Paper exercises give practice using the law; laboratory work illustrates behavior of real solutions; and models show relationships between properties of individual molecules and of matter in bulk. (JN)

  2. Developing an online chemistry laboratory for non-chemistry majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Jacqueline H.

    Distance education, also known as online learning, is student-centered/self-directed educational opportunities. This style of learning is expanding in scope and is increasingly being accepted throughout the academic curriculum as a result of its flexibility for the student as well as the cost-effectiveness for the institution. Nevertheless, the introduction of online science courses including chemistry and physics have lagged behind due to the challenge of re-creation of the hands-on laboratory learning experience. This dissertation looks at the effectiveness of the design of a series of chemistry laboratory experiments for possible online delivery that provide students with simulated hands-on experiences. One class of college Chemistry 101 students conducted chemistry experiments inside and outside of the physical laboratory using instructions on Blackboard and Late Nite Labs(TM). Learning outcomes measured by (a) pretests, (b) written laboratory reports, (c) posttest assessments, (d) student reactions as determined by a questionnaire, and (e) a focus group interview were utilized to compare both types of laboratory experiences. The research findings indicated learning outcomes achieved by students outside of the traditional physical laboratory were statistically greater than the equivalent face-to-face instruction in the traditional laboratory. Evidence from student reactions comparing both types of laboratory formats (online and traditional face-to-face) indicated student preference for the online laboratory format. The results are an initial contribution to the design of a complete sequence of experiments that can be performed independently by online students outside of the traditional face-to-face laboratory that will satisfy the laboratory requirement for the two-semester college Chemistry 101 laboratory course.

  3. Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and

  4. Acute expanded perlite exposure with persistent reactive airway dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Du, Chung-Li; Wang, Jung-Der; Chu, Po-Chin; Guo, Yue-Liang Leon

    2010-01-01

    Expanded perlite has been assumed as simple nuisance, however during an accidental spill out in Taiwan, among 24 exposed workers followed for more than 6 months, three developed persisted respiratory symptoms and positive provocation tests were compatible with reactive airway dysfunction syndrome. During simulation experiment expanded perlite is shown to be very dusty and greatly exceed current exposure permission level. Review of literature and evidence, though exposure of expanded perlite below permission level may be generally safe, precautionary protection of short term heavy exposure is warranted.

  5. Federal government expands compliance initiatives.

    PubMed

    Dugan, J K

    1997-09-01

    In 1995, the Federal government initiated Operation Restore Trust to increase enforcement of fraud and abuse regulations in Medicare and Medicaid programs. With the success of the original initiative, the government is expanding the project to additional states and program areas. The initial scrutiny of home health agencies, nursing homes, hospice care, and durable medical equipment is being expanded to managed care plans and acute care hospitals with an eye toward DRG creep. To manage this increased enforcement activity, healthcare organizations should institute comprehensive corporate compliance programs. Such programs should provide a framework that delineates responsibilities and provides a systematic means to resolve issues in a timely manner. PMID:10170318

  6. Federal government expands compliance initiatives.

    PubMed

    Dugan, J K

    1997-09-01

    In 1995, the Federal government initiated Operation Restore Trust to increase enforcement of fraud and abuse regulations in Medicare and Medicaid programs. With the success of the original initiative, the government is expanding the project to additional states and program areas. The initial scrutiny of home health agencies, nursing homes, hospice care, and durable medical equipment is being expanded to managed care plans and acute care hospitals with an eye toward DRG creep. To manage this increased enforcement activity, healthcare organizations should institute comprehensive corporate compliance programs. Such programs should provide a framework that delineates responsibilities and provides a systematic means to resolve issues in a timely manner.

  7. General Relativity and Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    Reviews theoretical and experimental fundamentals of Einstein's theory of general relativity. Indicates that recent development of the theory of the continually expanding universe may lead to revision of the space-time continuum of the finite and unbounded universe. (CC)

  8. 40 CFR 161.150 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Product Chemistry Data Requirements § 161.150 General. (a) Applicability. This subpart describes the product chemistry data that are required to support the...

  9. 40 CFR 161.150 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Product Chemistry Data Requirements § 161.150 General. (a) Applicability. This subpart describes the product chemistry data that are required to support the...

  10. Ferroelectric based catalysis: Switchable surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakekhani, Arvin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2015-03-01

    We describe a new class of catalysts that uses an epitaxial monolayer of a transition metal oxide on a ferroelectric substrate. The ferroelectric polarization switches the surface chemistry between strongly adsorptive and strongly desorptive regimes, circumventing difficulties encountered on non-switchable catalytic surfaces where the Sabatier principle dictates a moderate surface-molecule interaction strength. This method is general and can, in principle, be applied to many reactions, and for each case the choice of the transition oxide monolayer can be optimized. Here, as a specific example, we show how simultaneous NOx direct decomposition (into N2 and O2) and CO oxidation can be achieved efficiently on CrO2 terminated PbTiO3, while circumventing oxygen (and sulfur) poisoning issues. One should note that NOx direct decomposition has been an open challenge in automotive emission control industry. Our method can expand the range of catalytically active elements to those which are not conventionally considered for catalysis and which are more economical, e.g., Cr (for NOx direct decomposition and CO oxidation) instead of canonical precious metal catalysts. Primary support from Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing, North America, Inc.

  11. Have a Chemistry Field Day in Your Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Bruce M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes a full day of chemistry fun and competition for high school chemistry students. Notes teams have five students from each high school. Lists five competitive events for each team: titration, qualitative analysis, balancing equations, general chemistry quiz, and quantitative analysis with atomic absorption spectroscopy. (MVL)

  12. The Expanding Frontier of Pluralism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Edmund

    1983-01-01

    Looks at the expanding frontier of pluralism in terms of reappraising the relationship of formal education to the advent of the constant change (occupational and social) accelerated by the microprocessor revolution and readjusting provisions in educational systems to meet the different needs of different populations. (AH)

  13. Expanding the Concept of Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Explores four arguments for an expanded definition of literacy to include the multimedia language of the screen. Describes efforts to develop this literacy in students at the Institute for Multimedia Literacy at the Annenberg Center of the University of Southern California. (EV)

  14. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2010-09-14

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  15. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2009-10-27

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  16. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2009-11-17

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  17. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2015-02-03

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  18. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-02-14

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  19. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2009-12-01

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  20. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  1. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-05-08

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  2. Expanding the Universe of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Definitions of "education" and "rural" are debunked and expanded. The three major tasks of rural education are educating people to understand their own needs, the unavoidable changes that will transform rural Australia within their lifetimes, and the range of technologies that can enhance their well-being. Presents a strategy for educating…

  3. Common Ground: Expanding Our Horizons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt, Michele J.

    In "Common Ground: Dialogue, Understanding, and the Teaching of Composition," Kurt Spellmeyer seeks to familiarize students and teachers with the linguistic and cultural no-man's-land separating them. Reinstating the value of two writing conventions often used by traditional students--expressive and commonplaces--can help expand on the horizons of…

  4. Teleteach Expanded Delivery System: Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christopher, G. Ronald; Milam, Alvin L.

    In order to meet the demand for Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) professional continuing education (PCE) courses within the School of Systems and Logistics and the School of Engineering, the Teleteach Expanded Delivery System (TEDS) for instruction of Air Force personnel at remote locations was developed and evaluated. TEDS uses a device…

  5. Nurse practitioners in general practice: an expanding role.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, G

    1996-11-13

    At a time when the government is proposing to allow nurses to become equal partners with GPs and a consultative report commissioned by the NHSE found that nurse practitioners provide cheaper and better services for patients (NHSE 1996), this article describes the role of a nurse practitioner working in a GP fundholding practice in the UK. The author considers issues of autonomy and accountability surrounding the development of the role. Its relationship to the development of nursing and caring is examined in the light of some doctors' and nurses' scepticism and ambivalence. The benefits to patients are presented to highlight the value of a properly structured nurse practitioner role integrated into primary care provision.

  6. Chemistry publication – making the revolution

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The advent of the Internet has been the impetus for the Open Access movement, a movement focused on expanding access to information principally by reducing the costs of journals. I argue here that the Open Access movement has had little impact on the chemistry community and has taken our attention away from the real opportunity to revolutionize scientific communication. I propose a plan that both reduces the total cost of publishing chemistry and enriches the literature through incorporation of Open Data. By publishing lots of data, available for ready re-use by all scientists, we can radically change the way science is communicated and ultimately performed. PMID:20142985

  7. Cometary MHD and chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegmann, R.; Schmidt, H. U.; Huebner, W. F.; Boice, D. C.

    1987-01-01

    An MHD and chemical comet-coma model was developed, applying the computer program of Huebner (1985) for the detailed chemical evolution of a spherically expanding coma and the program of Schmidt and Wegman (1982) and Wegman (1987) for the MHD flow of plasma and magnetic field in a comet to the Giotto-mission data on the ion abundances measured by the HIS ion mass spectrometer. The physics and chemistry of the coma are modeled in great detail, including photoprocesses, gas-phase chemical kinetics, energy balance with a separate electron temperature, multifluid hydrodynamics with a transition to free molecular flow, fast-streaming atomic and molecular hydrogen, counter and cross streaming of the ionized species relative to the neutral species in the coma-solar wind interaction region with momentum exchange by elastic collisions, mass-loading through ion pick-up, and Lorentz forces of the advected magnetic field. The results, both inside and outside of the contact surface, are discussed and compared with the relevant HIS ion mass spectra.

  8. The Dawn of Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Daniele; Palla, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    Within the precise cosmological framework provided by the Λ-cold dark matter model and standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis, the chemical evolution of the pregalactic gas can now be followed with accuracy limited only by the uncertainties on the reaction rates. Starting during the recombination era, the formation of the first molecules and molecular ions containing hydrogen, deuterium, helium, and lithium was severely hindered by the low density of the expanding Universe, the intensity of the cosmic radiation field, and the absence of solid catalyzers. Molecular hydrogen and deuterated hydrogen, the most abundant species formed in the gas phase prior to structure formation, played a fundamental role in the cooling of the gas clouds that gave birth to the first stellar generation, contributing to determine the scale of fragmentation. Primordial molecules also interacted with the photons of the cosmic background via resonant scattering, absorption, and emission. In this review, we examine the current status of the chemistry of the early Universe and discuss the most relevant reactions for which uncertainties still exist from theory or laboratory experiments. The prospects for detecting spectral distortions or spatial anisotropies due to the first atoms and molecules are also addressed.

  9. Historical Notes on the Expanding Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Michael J.; Belenkyi, Ari; Nussbaumer, Harry; Peacock, John

    2014-01-01

    The article Measuring the Hubble constant by Mario Livio and Adam Riess (Physics Today, October 2013, page 41) reviewed studies of the expanding universe from the 1920s to the present. Although the history of the subject underwent considerable compression to fit the length of a magazine article, we think it may leave a misleading impression of some of the key steps to our current understanding. We therefore offer the following clarifications. Most significantly, papers by Arthur Eddington and by Willem de Sitter in 1930, who successfully promoted Georges Lematres 1927 article for the Scientific Society of Brussels, effected a paradigm shift in interpretation of extragalactic redshifts in 1930. Before then, the astronomical community was generally unaware of the existence of nonstatic cosmological solutions and did not broadly appreciate that redshifts could be thought of locally as Doppler shifts in an expanding matter distribution. Certainly, in 1929 Edwin Hubble referred only to the de Sitter solution of 1917. At the time, the relation between distance and redshift predicted in that model was generally seen purely as a manifestation of static spacetime curvature.

  10. The law's interface with expanding technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    The role of the law in technology assessment is described in generalized terms of a legal system as it confronts expanding technology. The functions of a technology assessment are considered to be twofold; provide for legislative action designed to channel technological advance along lines which are regarded as optimal from the standpoint of society's interests; and encourage and promote legislative action which will deal decisively with the potential disruptions and injuries caused by technology at a much earlier stage of the growth of the technology than is feasible under the present legal system. It is concluded that since new law always has a disruptive effect on expectations and commitments arrived at under old law, it is generally desirable that new legislation should make the least possible change in the law consistant with accomplishing the desired objective.

  11. Mars aqueous chemistry experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Benton C.; Mason, Larry W.

    1993-01-01

    The Mars Aqueous Chemistry Experiment (MACE) is designed to conduct a variety of measurements on regolith samples, encompassing mineral phase analyses, chemical interactions with H2O, and physical properties determinations. From these data, much can be learned or inferred regarding the past weathering environment, the contemporaneous soil micro-environments, and the general chemical and physical state of the Martian regolith. By analyzing both soil and duricrust samples, the nature of the latter may become more apparent. Sites may be characterized for comparative purposes and criteria could be set for selection of high priority materials on future sample return missions. Progress for the first year MACE PIDDP is reported in two major areas of effort: (1) fluids handling concepts, definition, and breadboard fabrication and (2) aqueous chemistry ion sensing technology and test facility integration. A fluids handling breadboard was designed, fabricated, and tested at Mars ambient pressure. The breadboard allows fluid manipulation scenarios to be tested under the reduced pressure conditions expected in the Martian atmosphere in order to validate valve operations, orchestrate analysis sequences, investigate sealing integrity, and to demonstrate efficacy of the fluid handling concept. Additional fluid manipulation concepts have also been developed based on updated MESUR spacecraft definition. The Mars Aqueous Chemistry Experiment Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) facility was designed as a test bed to develop a multifunction interface for measurements of chemical ion concentrations in aqueous solution. The interface allows acquisition of real time data concerning the kinetics and heats of salt dissolution, and transient response to calibration and solubility events. An array of ion selective electrodes has been interfaced and preliminary calibration studies performed.

  12. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  13. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R.

    1982-01-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  14. Seal-less cryogenic expander

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, L.E.; Christopher, E.H.

    1987-12-08

    In an expander for use in a split Stirling cycle refrigeration system of the type wherein a displacer moves with reciprocating motion inside an expander housing, and wherein a plunger force and a regenerator force are formed on the displacer, the plunger force cyclically varying and having a time of minimum and maximum plunger force amplitude, and the regenerator force cyclically varying and having a time of minimum and maximum regenerator force amplitude, the improvement is described comprising: (a) means for maintaining displacer forces, such that the maximum plunger force amplitude is substantially equal to the maximum regenerator force amplitude; and (b) means for adjusting a time difference, the time difference being the time between the time of maximum plunger force and the time of maximum regenerator force such that a measure of the cooling power of the refrigeration system is maximized.

  15. Magical NiTi expander

    PubMed Central

    Katti, Chandrika Girish; Katti, Girish; Kallur, Ravi; Ghali, Srinivas Rao

    2013-01-01

    A 24-year-old male patient was referred to our department for expansion of the constricted maxillary arch as a presurgical procedure for the correction of congenital facial disfigurement. On examination, the patient had a convex profile, increased interlabial gap, tongue thrust, limited mouth opening, posterior crossbite, asymmetric ‘V’-shaped maxillary arch with severe constriction, crowding of anterior teeth in the maxillary arch and a massive open bite. Radiographic investigations included orthopantomograph and occlusal radiographs. The patient photographs and models were analysed. On careful evaluation, the treatment for maxillary arch expansion was planned with a nickel titanium (NiTi) slow maxillary expander along with fixed mechanotherapy for alignment of teeth. An unexpectedly successful outcome was appreciated from the treatment. An emphasis should be laid on selecting and treating the case of constricted arches with a surgical or non-surgical approach, as expansion can be achieved orthodontically by using NiTi expanders. PMID:23867876

  16. Entropy in an expanding universe.

    PubMed

    Frautschi, S

    1982-08-13

    The question of how the observed evolution of organized structures from initial chaos in the expanding universe can be reconciled with the laws of statistical mechanics is studied, with emphasis on effects of the expansion and gravity. Some major sources of entropy increase are listed. An expanding "causal" region is defined in which the entropy, though increasing, tends to fall further and further behind its maximum possible value, thus allowing for the development of order. The related questions of whether entropy will continue increasing without limit in the future, and whether such increase in the form of Hawking radiation or radiation from positronium might enable life to maintain itself permanently, are considered. Attempts to find a scheme for preserving life based on solid structures fail because events such as quantum tunneling recurrently disorganize matter on a very long but fixed time scale, whereas all energy sources slow down progressively in an expanding universe. However, there remains hope that other modes of life capable of maintaining themselves permanently can be found.

  17. Shell-Isolated Nanoparticle-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy: Expanding the Versatility of Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anema, Jason R.; Li, Jian-Feng; Yang, Zhi-Lin; Ren, Bin; Tian, Zhong-Qun

    2011-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful technique for detection and characterization because of its extremely high sensitivity and the rich structural information that it can offer. However, most SERS substrates are composed of Au, Ag, or Cu, and a lack of substrate generality has greatly limited the breadth of the use of SERS. Recently, we have devised a method by which SERS can be obtained from virtually any surface. Au nanoparticles are coated with ultrathin silica shells. The Au core provides Raman signal enhancement; the silica shell prevents the core from coming into direct contact with probe/analyte molecules or the surface over which these particles are spread (i.e., prevents the contamination of the chemical system under study). In the present review, we expand upon previous discussion of the enhancement mechanism; procedures for the synthesis and characterization of our nanoparticles; and applications in surface chemistry, electrochemistry, and inspection.

  18. Constitutional dynamic chemistry: bridge from supramolecular chemistry to adaptive chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry aims at implementing highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces and effecting molecular recognition, catalysis and transport processes. A further step consists in the investigation of chemical systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibility, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels.CDC introduces a paradigm shift with respect to constitutionally static chemistry. The latter relies on design for the generation of a target entity, whereas CDC takes advantage of dynamic diversity to allow variation and selection. The implementation of selection in chemistry introduces a fundamental change in outlook. Whereas self-organization by design strives to achieve full control over the output molecular or supramolecular entity by explicit programming, self-organization with selection operates on dynamic constitutional diversity in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation.The merging of the features: -information and programmability, -dynamics and reversibility, -constitution and structural diversity, points to the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry, towards a chemistry of complex matter.

  19. "On Course" for Supporting Expanded Participation and Improving Scientific Reasoning in Undergraduate Thesis Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Jason E.; Roy, Christopher P.; Thompson, Robert J., Jr.; Reynolds, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Chemistry at Duke University has endeavored to expand participation in undergraduate honors thesis research while maintaining the quality of the learning experience. Accomplishing this goal has been constrained by limited departmental resources (including faculty time) and increased diversity in students' preparation to…

  20. Special Report: Brain Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krassner, Michael B.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical actions in the brain result in cognitive, emotional, neuroendocrine, neuromuscular, and/or neurocirculatory effects. Developments in understanding brain chemistry are discussed, considering among others, neurotransmitter chemistry, neuropeptides, drugs and the brain, antidepressants, and actions of minor tranquilizers. (JN)

  1. Organometallic Chemistry of Molybdenum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, C. Robert; Walsh, Kelly A.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways to avoid some of the problems students have learning the principles of organometallic chemistry. Provides a description of an experiment used in a third-year college chemistry laboratory on molybdenum. (TW)

  2. Chemistry for Potters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denio, Allen A.

    1980-01-01

    Relates pottery making to chemistry by providing chemical information about clay, its origin, composition, properties, and changes that occur during firing; also describes glaze compositions, examples of redox chemistry, salt glazing, crystalline glazes, and problems in toxicity. (CS)

  3. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  4. Expanding NASA Science Cooperation with New Partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Marc; Bress, Kent

    Expanding NASA Science Cooperation with New Partners When NASA was created in 1958, it was given a goal of "cooperation by the United States with other nations and groups of nations in work done pursuant to this Act and in the peaceful application of the results." As science has become increasingly globalized during the past 50 years, NASA and its many partners in space and Earth science research have benefited enormously from pooling ideas, skills, and resources for joint undertakings. The discoveries made have powerfully advanced public awareness of science and its importance all over the world. Today, the U.S. Administra-tion is encouraging NASA to expand its cooperation with new and emerging partners. NASA space and Earth science cooperation is founded on scientist-to-scientist research collaboration. Space missions are very costly and technically challenging, but there are many other important areas for international cooperation. Areas ripe for expansion with new partners include space data sharing, scientist-to-scientist collaborative research, international research program plan-ning and coordination, Earth applications for societal benefit, ground-based measurements for Earth system science, and education and public outreach. This presentation lays out NASA's general principles for international science cooperation, briefly describes each of these opportu-nity areas, and suggests avenues for initiating new cooperative relationships.

  5. Predicted versus Actual Performance in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry and Implications for Student Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pursell, David P.

    2007-01-01

    Performance as measured by grades in the first and second semesters of organic chemistry was predicted using pre-college measures (SAT scores, high school rank, validation exams) and college measures (general chemistry GPA, overall college GPA prior to beginning organic chemistry, first-semester organic chemistry GPA). Data indicate that overall…

  6. Teaching Green and Sustainable Chemistry: A Revised One-Semester Course Based on Inspirations and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marteel-Parrish, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    An elective course, "Toward the Greening of Our Minds": Green and Sustainable Chemistry, has been offered at Washington College since 2005. This new course without laboratory is designed for chemistry and biology majors and minors who have previously taken two semesters of general chemistry and organic chemistry. Due to the popularity of…

  7. Shell may expand detergent alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-23

    Shell Chemical is studying plans to expand detergent alcohols capacity in the US, CW has learned. The company is considering adding capacity for about 80 million lbs/year. If the project is approved, it would be implemented at the company`s Geismar, LA site. Shell will make a final decision on whether to proceed with the project within six months. It has been rumored to be considering a capacity addition as a result of tightening supply of natural and synthetic detergent alcohols.

  8. History of Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servos, John W.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the development of chemistry in the United States by considering: (1) chemistry as an evolving body of ideas/techniques, and as a set of conceptual resources affecting and affected by the development of other sciences; and (2) chemistry related to the history of American social and economic institutions and practices. (JN)

  9. Chemistry and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Martyn

    1999-01-01

    Describes a Chemistry and Art project developed for secondary students and teachers sponsored by the National Gallery and The Royal Society of Chemistry in the United Kingdom. Discusses aspects of the techniques used in creating five paintings as well as the chemistry involved in their making, deterioration, conservation, and restoration.…

  10. Environmental Chemistry Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackland, Thomas; And Others

    The authors of this curriculum supplement believe in a laboratory approach to chemistry and express the feeling that environmental chemistry provides the students an opportunity to apply theoretical chemistry to important practical problems. There are eighteen activities presented, each accompanied with behavioral objectives, one or more suggested…

  11. Chemistry on Stamps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreck, James O.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests how postage stamps can be incorporated into chemistry teaching. Categories considered include emergence of chemistry as a science, metric system, atoms (and molecules and ions), stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, geochemistry, matter (gases, liquids, and solids),…

  12. Green Chemistry and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjeresen, Dennis L.; Schutt, David L.; Boese, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    Many students today are profoundly interested in the sustainability of their world. Introduces Green Chemistry and its principles with teaching materials. Green Chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention and the design of chemical products and processes that are environmentally benign. (ASK)

  13. Mechanisms in Photographic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews current research interests in photographic chemistry, involving two proposed models for spectral sensitization of crystal defects and impurities in the photolysis reactivity and the mechanisms of development and complexation. Establishment of photographic chemistry in a chemistry curriculum is recommended. (CC)

  14. School Chemistry vs. Chemistry in Research: An Exploratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habraken, Clarisse L.; Buijs, Wim; Borkent, Hens; Ligeon, Willy; Wender, Harry; Meijer, Marijn

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a study exploring why students are not studying chemistry. Three groups of graduating high school students and their chemistry teachers stayed at a research institute working on molecular modeling and wrote essays on school chemistry versus chemistry in research. Concludes that school chemistry does not convey today's chemistry in…

  15. Chemistry for the Visually Impaired

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratliff, Judy L.

    1997-06-01

    Methods used to try to provide a valuable experience for visually impaired students in a general education or an introductory chemistry class are discussed. Modifications that can be made cheaply and with little time commitment which will allow visually impaired students to participate productively in the laboratory are examined. A conductivity tester that cost less than $4.00 to construct, is easy to assemble, very rugged, and provides a great deal of entertainment for sighted and non-sighted students is described.

  16. Web Content Analysis: Expanding the Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, Susan C.

    Are established methods of content analysis (CA) adequate to analyze web content, or should new methods be devised to address new technological developments? This article addresses this question by contrasting narrow and broad interpretations of the concept of web content analysis. The utility of a broad interpretation that subsumes the narrow one is then illustrated with reference to research on weblogs (blogs), a popular web format in which features of HTML documents and interactive computer-mediated communication converge. The article concludes by proposing an expanded Web Content Analysis (WebCA) paradigm in which insights from paradigms such as discourse analysis and social network analysis are operationalized and implemented within a general content analytic framework.

  17. Expanding forensic science through forensic intelligence.

    PubMed

    Ribaux, Olivier; Talbot Wright, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    Research and Development ('R&D') in forensic science currently focuses on innovative technologies improving the efficiency of existing forensic processes, from the detection of marks and traces at the scene, to their presentation in Court. R&D approached from this perspective provides no response to doubts raised by recent criminological studies, which question the effective contribution of forensic science to crime reduction, and to policing in general. Traces (i.e. forensic case data), as remnants of criminal activity are collected and used in various forms of crime monitoring and investigation. The aforementioned doubts therefore need to be addressed by expressing how information is conveyed by traces in these processes. Modelling from this standpoint expands the scope of forensic science and provides new R&D opportunities. Twelve propositions for R&D are stated in order to pave the way. PMID:25498939

  18. Study of an expanding magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakwacki, M. S.; Dasso, S.; Mandrini, C. H.; Démoulin, P.

    Magnetic Clouds (MCs) transport into the interplanetary medium the magnetic flux and helicity released in coronal mass ejections by the Sun. At 1 AU from the Sun, MCs are generally modelled as static flux ropes. However, the velocity profile of some MCs presents signatures of expansion. We analise here the magnetic structure of an expanding magnetic cloud observed by Wind spacecraft. We consider a dynamical model, based on a self-similar behaviour for the cloud radial velocity. We assume a free expansion for the cloud, and a cylindrical linear force free field (i.e., the Lundquist's field) as the initial condition for its magnetic configuration. We derive theoretical expressions for the magnetic flux across a surface perpendicular to the cloud axis, for the magnetic helicity and magnetic energy per unit length along the tube using the self-similar model. Finally, we compute these magntitudes with the fitted parameters. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  19. Expanding forensic science through forensic intelligence.

    PubMed

    Ribaux, Olivier; Talbot Wright, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    Research and Development ('R&D') in forensic science currently focuses on innovative technologies improving the efficiency of existing forensic processes, from the detection of marks and traces at the scene, to their presentation in Court. R&D approached from this perspective provides no response to doubts raised by recent criminological studies, which question the effective contribution of forensic science to crime reduction, and to policing in general. Traces (i.e. forensic case data), as remnants of criminal activity are collected and used in various forms of crime monitoring and investigation. The aforementioned doubts therefore need to be addressed by expressing how information is conveyed by traces in these processes. Modelling from this standpoint expands the scope of forensic science and provides new R&D opportunities. Twelve propositions for R&D are stated in order to pave the way.

  20. Elementary and brief introduction of hadronic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangde, Vijay M.

    2013-10-01

    The discipline, today known as Quantum Chemistry for atomic and subatomic level interactions has no doubt made a significant historical contributions to the society. Despite of its significant achievements, quantum chemistry is also known for its widespread denial of insufficiencies it inherits. An Italian-American Scientist Professor Ruggero Maria Santilli during his more than five decades of dedicated and sustained research has denounced the fact that quantum chemistry is mostly based on mere nomenclatures without any quantitative scientific contents. Professor R M Santilli first formulated the iso-, geno- and hyper-mathematics [1-4] that helped in understanding numerous diversified problems and removing inadequacies in most of the established and celebrated theories of 20th century physics and chemistry. This involves the isotopic, genotopic, etc. lifting of Lie algebra that generated Lie admissible mathematics to properly describe irreversible processes. The studies on Hadronic Mechanics in general and chemistry in particular based on Santilli's mathematics[3-5] for the first time has removed the very fundamental limitations of quantum chemistry [2, 6-8]. In the present discussion, we have briefly reviewed the conceptual foundations of Hadronic Chemistry that imparts the completeness to the Quantum Chemistry via an addition of effects at distances of the order of 1 fm (only) which are assumed to be Non-linear, Non-local, Non-potential, Non-hamiltonian and thus Non-unitary and its application in development of a new chemical species called Magnecules.