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Sample records for general toroidal geometry

  1. Drift waves in general toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, J.L.V.

    2000-02-07

    A model, based on gyro-kinetic ions and fluid electrons, to study drift waves in low-beta [beta = (kinetic pressure)/(magnetic pressure)] stellarator plasmas is presented. The model equations are written in straight-field-line coordinates and are valid for arbitrary, fully three-dimensional configurations with closed, nested magnetic surfaces. An implicit method, coupled with a subcycling technique for the electrons, is used to solve the time-dependent, along-the-field-line equations. Numerical calculations are carried out for a 3-field-period toroidal heliac. The geometrical effects that enter the model equations are calculated and displayed in physical space using advanced visualization techniques.

  2. On the Ideal Boundary Condition in a General Toroidal Geometry for a Mixed Magnetic Field Representation

    SciTech Connect

    X. Z. Tang

    2000-12-18

    Subtleties of implementing the standard perfectly conducting wall boundary condition in a general toroidal geometry are clarified for a mixed scalar magnetic field representation. An iterative scheme based on Ohm's law is given.

  3. Neoclassical toroidal viscosity in perturbed equilibria with general tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, Nikolas C.; Park, Jong-Kyu; Kim, Kimin; Wang, Zhirui; Berkery, John W.

    2013-12-15

    This paper presents a calculation of neoclassical toroidal viscous torque independent of large-aspect-ratio expansions across kinetic regimes. The Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) code was developed for this purpose, and is compared to previous combined regime models as well as regime specific limits and a drift kinetic δf guiding center code. It is shown that retaining general expressions, without circular large-aspect-ratio or other orbit approximations, can be important at experimentally relevant aspect ratio and shaping. The superbanana plateau, a kinetic resonance effect recently recognized for its relevance to ITER, is recovered by the PENT calculations and shown to require highly accurate treatment of geometric effects.

  4. Theory of Alfven wave heating in general toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tataronis, J.A.; Salat, A.

    1981-09-01

    A general treatment of Alfven wave heating based on the linearized equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is given. The conclusion of this study is that the geometry of the plasma equilium could play an important role on the effectiveness of this heating mechanism, and for certain geometries the fundamental equations may not possess solutions which satisfy prescribed boundary conditions.

  5. Modeling of Neoclassical Tearing Mode Stability for Generalized Toroidal Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    A.L. Rosenberg; D.A. Gates; A. Pletzer; J.E. Menard; S.E. Kruger; C.C. Hegna; F. Paoletti; S. Sabbagh

    2002-08-21

    Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) can lead to disruption and loss of confinement. Previous analysis of these modes used large aspect ratio, low beta (plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) approximations to determine the effect of NTMs on tokamak plasmas. A more accurate tool is needed to predict the onset of these instabilities. As a follow-up to recent theoretical work, a code has been written which computes the tearing mode island growth rate for arbitrary tokamak geometry. It calls PEST-3 [A. Pletzer et al., J. Comput. Phys. 115, 530 (1994)] to compute delta prime, the resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) matching parameter. The code also calls the FLUXGRID routines in NIMROD [A.H. Glasser et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 41, A747 (1999)] for Dnc, DI and DR [C.C. Hegna, Phys. Plasmas 6, 3980 (1999); A.H. Glasser et al., Phys. Fluids 18, 875 (1975)], which are the bootstrap current driven term and the ideal and resistive interchange mode criterion, respectively. In addition to these components, the NIMROD routines calculate alphas-H, a new correction to the Pfirsch-Schlter term. Finite parallel transport effects were added and a National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] equilibrium was analyzed. Another program takes the output of PEST-3 and allows the user to specify the rational surface, island width, and amount of detail near the perturbed surface to visualize the total helical flux. The results of this work will determine the stability of NTMs in an spherical torus (ST) [Y.-K.M. Peng et al., Nucl. Fusion 26, 769 (1986)] plasma with greater accuracy than previously achieved.

  6. Packing of charged chains on toroidal geometries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhenwei; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2013-03-01

    We study sequential Langmuir adsorption of a flexible charged polyelectrolyte chain on tori. In the regime of monomer-monomer electrostatic interaction dominating over thermal fluctuations, it becomes a generalized Thomson problem. Various patterns of adsorbed chain are found including double spirals, disclination-like structures, Janus tori and uniform wrappings, arising from the long-range electrostatic interaction and the toroidal geometry. Their broken mirror symmetry and energetics are analyzed. In particular, we find a power law for the electrostatic energy; the dependence of the power on the geometry of tori implies a geometric origin. Furthermore, in the regime of large thermal fluctuation, we systematically study random walks on tori that generate chain configurations; the features associated with the toroidal geometry are discussed. This work was funded by grants from the Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering (DDR&E) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) under Award No. FA9550-10-1-0167.

  7. Sheared-flow Modes in Toroidal Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski; T.S. Hahm; W.W. Lee; Z. Lin

    1999-10-01

    Using a Fourier-Bessel representation for the fluctuating (turbulent) electrostatic potential, an equation governing the sheared-flow modes in toroidal geometry is derived from the gyrokinetic Poisson equation, where both the adiabatic and non-adiabatic responses of the electrons are taken into account. It is shown that the principal geometrical effect on sheared-flow modes of the electrostatic potential is due to the flux-surface average of 1/B, where B is the magnetic field strength.

  8. Effect of curvature on cholesteric liquid crystals in toroidal geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialho, Ana R.; Bernardino, Nelson R.; Silvestre, Nuno M.; Telo da Gama, Margarida M.

    2017-01-01

    The confinement of liquid crystals inside curved geometries leads to exotic structures, with applications ranging from biosensors to optical switches and privacy windows. Here we study how curvature affects the alignment of a cholesteric liquid crystal. We model the system on the mesoscale using the Landau-de Gennes model. Our study was performed in three stages, analyzing different curved geometries from cylindrical walls and pores, to toroidal domains, in order to isolate the curvature effects. Our results show that the stresses introduced by the curvature influence the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules, and cause distortions in the natural periodicity of the cholesteric that depend on the radius of curvature, on the pitch, and on the dimensions of the system. In particular, the cholesteric layers of toroidal droplets exhibit a symmetry breaking not seen in cylindrical pores and that is driven by the additional curvature.

  9. Nonlinear particle simulation of ion cyclotron waves in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuley, A. Lin, Z.; Bao, J.; Wei, X. S.; Xiao, Y.

    2015-12-10

    Global particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the nonlinear interactions of radio frequency (RF) waves with plasmas in tokamak. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation with realistic electron-to-ion mass ratio. Boris push scheme for the ion motion has been developed in the toroidal geometry using magnetic coordinates and successfully verified for the ion cyclotron and ion Bernstein waves in global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC). The nonlinear simulation capability is applied to study the parametric decay instability of a pump wave into an ion Bernstein wave side band and a low frequency ion cyclotron quasi mode.

  10. Nonlinear particle simulation of ion cyclotron waves in toroidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuley, A.; Bao, J.; Lin, Z.; Wei, X. S.; Xiao, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Global particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the nonlinear interactions of radio frequency (RF) waves with plasmas in tokamak. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation with realistic electron-to-ion mass ratio. Boris push scheme for the ion motion has been developed in the toroidal geometry using magnetic coordinates and successfully verified for the ion cyclotron and ion Bernstein waves in global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC). The nonlinear simulation capability is applied to study the parametric decay instability of a pump wave into an ion Bernstein wave side band and a low frequency ion cyclotron quasi mode.

  11. Effect of toroidal plasma rotation on double tearing modes in cylindrical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. B.; Lu, X. Q.; Huang, Q. H.; Dong, J. Q.; Gong, X. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of toroidal plasma rotation on q = 3 double tearing modes (DTMs) was studied numerically in cylindrical geometry using the method of reduced magnetohydrodynamic simulation. The results indicate that toroidal plasma rotation can reduce the growth rate of DTMs, but the magnitude of toroidal velocity has weak effect, especially without shear. When the shear of toroidal velocity exists, the suppression effect becomes better. Whether the velocity flow has shear or not, the growth rate of DTMs decreases as the magnitude of toroidal velocity increases. With the increase of velocity shear, the DTMs grow slowly. And the suppression effect of toroidal plasma rotation in early growth and transition stage is better, which means that the toroidal plasma rotation can suppress the linear growth of islands. Furthermore, the toroidal plasma rotation can suppress the evolution of poloidal stream. And the toroidal velocity shear on the q = 3 rational surface is more dominant than the magnitude of toroidal velocity in determining the DTM characteristics.

  12. Neoclassical viscosity effects on resistive magnetohydrodynamic modes in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.G.; Oh, Y.H.; Choi, D.I. ); Kim, J.Y.; Horton, W. )

    1992-03-01

    The flux-surface-averaged linearized resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary-layer equations including the compressibility, diamagnetic drift, and neoclassical viscosity terms are derived in toroidal geometry. These equations describe the resistive layer dynamics of resistive MHD modes over the collisionality regime between the banana plateau and the Pfirsch--Schlueter. From the resulting equations, the effects of neoclassical viscosity on the stability of the tearing and resistive ballooning modes are investigated numerically. Also, a study is given for the problem of how the neoclassical resistive MHD mode is generated as the collisionality is reduced. It is shown that the neoclassical viscosity terms give a significant destabilizing effect for the tearing and resistive ballooning modes. This destabilization comes mainly from the reduction of the stabilizing effect of the parallel ion sound compression by the ion neoclassical viscosity. In the banana-plateau collisionality limit, where the compressibility is negligible, the dispersion relations of the tearing and resistive ballooning modes reduce to the same form, with the threshold value of the driving force given by {Delta}{sub {ital c}}=0. On the other hand, with the finite neoclassical effect it is found that the neoclassical resistive MHD instability is generated in agreement with previous results. Furthermore, it is shown that this later instability can be generated in a wide range of the collisionality including near the Pfirsch--Schlueter regime as well as the banana-plateau regime, suggesting that this mode is a probable cause of anomalous transport.

  13. Axisymmetric toroidal modes of general relativistic magnetized neutron star models

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, Hidetaka; Lee, Umin E-mail: lee@astr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2014-07-20

    We calculate axisymmetric toroidal modes of magnetized neutron stars with a solid crust in the general relativistic Cowling approximation. We assume that the interior of the star is threaded by a poloidal magnetic field, which is continuous at the surface with an outside dipole field. We examine the cases of the field strength B{sub S} ∼ 10{sup 16} G at the surface. Since separation of variables is not possible for the oscillations of magnetized stars, we employ finite series expansions for the perturbations using spherical harmonic functions. We find discrete normal toroidal modes of odd parity, but no toroidal modes of even parity are found. The frequencies of the toroidal modes form distinct mode sequences and the frequency in a given mode sequence gradually decreases as the number of radial nodes of the eigenfunction increases. From the frequency spectra computed for neutron stars of different masses, we find that the frequency is almost exactly proportional to B{sub S} and is well represented by a linear function of R/M for a given B{sub S}, where M and R are the mass and radius of the star. The toroidal mode frequencies for B{sub S} ∼ 10{sup 15} G are in the frequency range of the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) detected in the soft-gamma-ray repeaters, but we find that the toroidal normal modes cannot explain all the detected QPO frequencies.

  14. Experiments on pure electron plasmas confined in a toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Chihiro; Yoshida, Zensho; Morikawa, Junji; Himura, Haruhiko; Kakuno, Hidekazu; Tahara, Shigeru; Shibayama, Norihisa

    1999-12-10

    The toroidal magnetic trap has an advantage in achieving long orbit lengths, which allows us to apply a slow process of energy reduction to the trapped particles. On Proto-RT (Prototype Ring Trap), we have demonstrated the confinement of a pure electron plasma without the help of external electric fields. We have injected electrons with the energy of 2 keV inside a separatrix. The electrostatic potential of the electron cloud is of order 100 V. The corresponding density of the electron plasma is calculated to be of order 10{sup 13} m{sup -3}. In order to modulate the kinetic energy of the electrons we are now planning RF assisted injection of electrons.

  15. Generalized Kähler Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Generalized Kähler geometry is the natural analogue of Kähler geometry, in the context of generalized complex geometry. Just as we may require a complex structure to be compatible with a Riemannian metric in a way which gives rise to a symplectic form, we may require a generalized complex structure to be compatible with a metric so that it defines a second generalized complex structure. We prove that generalized Kähler geometry is equivalent to the bi-Hermitian geometry on the target of a 2-dimensional sigma model with (2, 2) supersymmetry. We also prove the existence of natural holomorphic Courant algebroids for each of the underlying complex structures, and that these split into a sum of transverse holomorphic Dirac structures. Finally, we explore the analogy between pre-quantum line bundles and gerbes in the context of generalized Kähler geometry.

  16. The universal instability in general geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, P.; Plunk, G. G.

    2015-09-15

    The “universal” instability has recently been revived by Landreman et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 095003 (2015)], who showed that it indeed exists in plasma geometries with straight (but sheared) magnetic field lines. Here, it is demonstrated analytically that this instability can be presented in more general sheared and toroidal geometries. In a torus, the universal instability is shown to be closely related to the trapped-electron mode, although the trapped-electron drive is usually dominant. However, this drive can be weakened or eliminated, as in the case in stellarators with the maximum-J property, leaving the parallel Landau resonance to drive a residual mode, which is identified as the universal instability.

  17. A geometry interface for gyrokinetic microturbulence investigations in toroidal configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xanthopoulos, P.; Cooper, W. A.; Jenko, F.; Turkin, Yu.; Runov, A.; Geiger, J.

    2009-08-01

    The GENE/GIST code package is developed for the investigation of plasma microturbulence, suitable for both stellarator and tokamak configurations. The geometry module is able to process typical equilibrium files and create the interface for the gyrokinetic solver. The analytical description of the method for constructing the geometric elements is documented, together with several numerical evaluation tests. As a concrete application of this product, a cross-machine comparison of the anomalous ion heat diffusivity is presented.

  18. Modeling of Feedback Stabilization of External MHD Modes in Toroidal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.; Chance, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.

    2000-10-01

    The intelligent shell feedback scheme(C.M. Bishop, Plasma Phys. Contr. Nucl. Fusion 31), 1179 (1989). seeks to utilize external coils to suppress the unstable MHD modes slowed down by the resistive shell. We present a new formulation and numerical results of the interaction between the plasma and its outside vacuum region, with complete plasma response and the inclusion of a resistive vessel in general toroidal geometry. This is achieved by using the Green's function technique, which is a generalization of that previously used for the VACUUM(M.S. Chance, Phys. Plasmas 4), 2161 (1997). code and coupled with the ideal MHD code GATO. The effectiveness of different realizations of the intelligent shell concept is gauged by their ability to minimize the available free energy to drive the MHD mode. Computations indicate poloidal coverage of 30% of the total resistive wall surface area and 6 or 7 segments of ``intelligent coil'' arrays superimposed on the resistive wall will allow recovery of up to 90% the effectiveness of the ideal shell in stabilizing the ideal external kink.

  19. Ray-tracing study of electron-cyclotron heating in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kritz, A.H.; Hsuan, H.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Batchelor, D.B.

    1983-03-01

    TORAY, a ray-tracing code has been developed to study electron-cyclotron heating and current drive in toroidal geometry. Ray patterns are initiated similar to those of an actual antenna and a full graphics package has been developed for displaying the behavior of the rays. We study the interplay of the plasma and wave parameters in order to establish which parameters are most important in determining the energy deposition.

  20. Full-orbit effects in the dynamics of runaway electrons in toroidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, D.; Carbajal-Gomez, L.; Spong, D. A.; Baylor, L.; Seal, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of RE (runaway electrons) in fusion plasmas spans a wide range of temporal scales from the fast gyro-motion 10-11 sec to the observational time scales 10-2 -> 1 sec. To cope with this scale separation RE are usually studied within the bounce-average or the guiding center approximations. Although these approximations have yielded valuable insights, a study with predictive capabilities of RE in fusion plasmas calls for the incorporation of full-orbits effects in configuration space in the presence of 3-D integrable and stochastic magnetic fields. Here we present numerical results on this problem using the Kinetic Orbit Runaway electrons Code (KORC) that follows relativistic electrons in general electric and magnetic fields under the full Lorentz force and collisions. At relativistic energies, the main energy loss is due to synchrotron radiation, which we incorporate using the Landau-Lifshitz formulation of the Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac force. Following a study of potential limitations of the bounce-average and the guiding center approximations, we discuss the role of full-orbit effects on the evolution of the pitch-angle, the RE energy limit, the critical electric field, and the emission patterns of synchrotron radiation in toroidal geometry. Research sponsored by the LDRD Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. DOE.

  1. A new symmetric form of the bounce-averaged quasilinear diffusion coefficient in toroidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungpyo; Smithe, David; Berry, Lee; Jaeger, Erwin; Wright, John; Bonoli, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Kennel-Engelmann (K-E) quasilinear diffusion coefficients are used in many RF wave codes to couple the Maxwell equation solver with a Fokker-Plank calculation. The diagonal component of the coefficient tensor in the speed direction should be positive in the quasi-linear assumption for the H-theorem. However, in the application to toroidal geometry, the bounce-average of the K-E coefficients does not guarantee positive values for an arbitrary wave spectrum due to the interference between the spectral modes. The negative bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients unexpectedly occur because the K-E coefficient is derived in a cylindrical limit, in which the resonance kernel (gyrofrequency, wave vector and parallel velocity) in the phase integral do not vary along the phase trajectory, while the bounce-average is computed in a toroidal geometry. To guarantee the positiveness, we derive a new form of the diffusion coefficient that keeps the symmetric form between the bounce-integral and the trajectory integral. The new coefficients are implemented in a code for ion cyclotron waves in a tokamak (TORIC). Using the new form, the error of quasilinear diffusion coefficients due to the negative values is reduced significantly, and the toroidal effects are well captured. Work supported by US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-FC02-01ER54648.

  2. MHD Stability Trends from Perturbed Equilibria: Possible Limitations with Toroidal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, K. J.; Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Turnbull, A. D.; Cowley, S.

    2003-10-01

    The effects of equilibrium changes on ideal MHD properties are usually studied using numerical parameter scans. Previously, we introduced a new technique to explore these dependencies: changes in the potential energy δ W due to equilibrium changes are found with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than an eigenvalue-solver code. Validation of the approach in toroidal geometry attempted to use GATO (an ideal MHD stability code) and DIII-D shot 87009. The approach should succeed with the global modes of 87009; however, ˜ 0.1% changes to qo predicted δ W rapidly increasing. Perturbing β of other toroidal equilibria resulted in similar behavior. We first review results for a cylindrical equilibrium and for 87009. Between the cylindrical case and 87009 lie several other equilibria, which should produce intermediate results. We examine several of these intermediate equilibria, starting with the cylindrical case and changing aspect ratio, shape and profiles until ending at 87009.

  3. General Relativity: Geometry Meets Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Dietrick E.

    1975-01-01

    Observing the relationship of general relativity and the geometry of space-time, the author questions whether the rest of physics has geometrical explanations. As a partial answer he discusses current research on subatomic particles employing geometric transformations, and cites the existence of geometrical definitions of physical quantities such…

  4. General Relativity: Geometry Meets Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Dietrick E.

    1975-01-01

    Observing the relationship of general relativity and the geometry of space-time, the author questions whether the rest of physics has geometrical explanations. As a partial answer he discusses current research on subatomic particles employing geometric transformations, and cites the existence of geometrical definitions of physical quantities such…

  5. Geometry of generalized depolarizing channels

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, Christian K.

    2009-10-15

    A generalized depolarizing channel acts on an N-dimensional quantum system to compress the 'Bloch ball' in N{sup 2}-1 directions; it has a corresponding compression vector. We investigate the geometry of these compression vectors and prove a conjecture of Dixit and Sudarshan [Phys. Rev. A 78, 032308 (2008)], namely, that when N=2{sup d} (i.e., the system consists of d qubits), and we work in the Pauli basis then the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex. We extend this result by investigating the geometry in other bases; in particular we find precisely when the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex.

  6. Viscous damping of toroidal angular momentum in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W. M.

    2014-09-15

    The Braginskii viscous stress tensor formalism was generalized to accommodate non-axisymmetric 3D magnetic fields in general toroidal flux surface geometry in order to provide a representation for the viscous damping of toroidal rotation in tokamaks arising from various “neoclassical toroidal viscosity” mechanisms. In the process, it was verified that the parallel viscosity contribution to damping toroidal angular momentum still vanishes even in the presence of toroidal asymmetries, unless there are 3D radial magnetic fields.

  7. Cable equation for general geometry.

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, Erick J; Romero, Juan M

    2017-02-01

    The cable equation describes the voltage in a straight cylindrical cable, and this model has been employed to model electrical potential in dendrites and axons. However, sometimes this equation might give incorrect predictions for some realistic geometries, in particular when the radius of the cable changes significantly. Cables with a nonconstant radius are important for some phenomena, for example, discrete swellings along the axons appear in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimers, Parkinsons, human immunodeficiency virus associated dementia, and multiple sclerosis. In this paper, using the Frenet-Serret frame, we propose a generalized cable equation for a general cable geometry. This generalized equation depends on geometric quantities such as the curvature and torsion of the cable. We show that when the cable has a constant circular cross section, the first fundamental form of the cable can be simplified and the generalized cable equation depends on neither the curvature nor the torsion of the cable. Additionally, we find an exact solution for an ideal cable which has a particular variable circular cross section and zero curvature. For this case we show that when the cross section of the cable increases the voltage decreases. Inspired by this ideal case, we rewrite the generalized cable equation as a diffusion equation with a source term generated by the cable geometry. This source term depends on the cable cross-sectional area and its derivates. In addition, we study different cables with swelling and provide their numerical solutions. The numerical solutions show that when the cross section of the cable has abrupt changes, its voltage is smaller than the voltage in the cylindrical cable. Furthermore, these numerical solutions show that the voltage can be affected by geometrical inhomogeneities on the cable.

  8. Cable equation for general geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sánchez, Erick J.; Romero, Juan M.

    2017-02-01

    The cable equation describes the voltage in a straight cylindrical cable, and this model has been employed to model electrical potential in dendrites and axons. However, sometimes this equation might give incorrect predictions for some realistic geometries, in particular when the radius of the cable changes significantly. Cables with a nonconstant radius are important for some phenomena, for example, discrete swellings along the axons appear in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimers, Parkinsons, human immunodeficiency virus associated dementia, and multiple sclerosis. In this paper, using the Frenet-Serret frame, we propose a generalized cable equation for a general cable geometry. This generalized equation depends on geometric quantities such as the curvature and torsion of the cable. We show that when the cable has a constant circular cross section, the first fundamental form of the cable can be simplified and the generalized cable equation depends on neither the curvature nor the torsion of the cable. Additionally, we find an exact solution for an ideal cable which has a particular variable circular cross section and zero curvature. For this case we show that when the cross section of the cable increases the voltage decreases. Inspired by this ideal case, we rewrite the generalized cable equation as a diffusion equation with a source term generated by the cable geometry. This source term depends on the cable cross-sectional area and its derivates. In addition, we study different cables with swelling and provide their numerical solutions. The numerical solutions show that when the cross section of the cable has abrupt changes, its voltage is smaller than the voltage in the cylindrical cable. Furthermore, these numerical solutions show that the voltage can be affected by geometrical inhomogeneities on the cable.

  9. Invisibility cloaks for toroids.

    PubMed

    You, Yu; Kattawar, George W; Yang, Ping

    2009-04-13

    The material properties of toroidal invisibility cloaks are derived based on the coordinate transformation method. The permittivity and permeability tensors for toroidal cloaks are substantially different from those for spherical cloaks, but quite similar to those for 2D cylindrical cloaks because a singularity is involved at the inner boundary in both the cases. The cloaking effect is confirmed by the electric field distribution in the vicinity of toroidal cloaks simulated from the generalized discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) method. This study extends the concept of electromagnetic cloaking of arbitrarily-shaped objects to a complex geometry.

  10. Effects of edge dc biasing on plasma rotation and transport in a toroidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksen, Åshild; Riccardi, Claudia; Magni, Simone

    2006-02-01

    We report results from experiments performed to study how a change in boundary conditions affects the plasma state in the toroidal geometry of the Blaamann device in Tromso. The boundary condition was changed by applying a dc bias on a limiter extended around the entire poloidal circumference of the plasma column. Two distinctly different plasma potential states were found. One state was associated with a bias at or negative with respect to the floating potential of the limiter, and a small ion-saturation current. The other state was associated with a positive bias with respect to the floating potential, near or in the electron saturation regime of the limiter. In the latter case the potential minimum in the middle of the cross-section was significantly less negative than in the case of ion-saturation current to the limiter. On the other hand, the grounded limiter provided the best confinement properties, for which the density maximum was significantly higher than for both more positive and more negative biases. This state also had the lowest fluctuation levels, and near zero poloidal velocities close to the boundaries, as well as the smallest radial, anomalous particle transport.

  11. Effects of Edge DC Biasing on Plasma Rotation and Transport in a Toroidal Geometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksen, Ashild; Riccardi, Claudia

    2005-10-01

    We report results from experiments performed to study how a change in boundary conditions is affecting the plasma states in the toroidal geometry of the Blaamann device in Tromso. The boundary condition was changed by applying a DC bias on a limiter extended around the entire poloidal circumference of the plasma column. Two distinctly different plasma potential states were found. One state was associated with a bias at or negative with respect to the floating potential of the limiter, and a small ion saturation current. The other state was associated with a positive bias with respect to the floating potential, near or in the electron saturation regime of the limiter. In the latter case the potential minimum in the middle of the cross-section was significantly less negative than in the case of ion-saturation current to the limiter. On the other hand, the grounded limiter provided the best confinement properties, for which the density maximum was significantly higher than for both more positive and more negative biases. This state also had the lowest fluctuation levels, and near zero poloidal velocities close to the boundaries, as well as the smallest radial, anomalous particle transport.

  12. Numerical resolution of the global eigenvalue problem for the gyrokinetic-waterbag model in toroidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulette, D.; Besse, N.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we present two codes for the linear stability analysis of the ion temperature gradient instability in toroidal geometry using a gyrokinetic multi-waterbag model for ion dynamics. The first one solves the linearized ion dynamics as an initial value problem, while the second relies on an asymptotic expansion in the so-called ballooning representation allowing us to build a tractable eigenvalue problem. Results from the two codes are presented and compared for equilibria based on modified Cyclone parameters. A good agreement between both codes is found for a class of equilibria with a narrow extent in perpendicular velocity and for which trapped particle orbits are ignored. The local spectrum computed by the eigenvalue is shown to agree remarkably well with previous Cyclone results when trapped particle orbits are included. Lastly we discuss how the equilibrium building procedure for this type of waterbag model requires particular care when dealing with closed equilibrium contours related to the presence of trapped particle orbits.

  13. A Mathematical Model for Calculating the Effect of Toroidal Geometry on the Measured Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoczelas, Brenda; Wijesinghe, Ranjith

    2008-03-01

    A mathematical model to calculate the measured magnetic field from a stimulated nerve has been presented in the past. Traditionally, electrodes have been used to measure these propagating action signals in nerves, but a less invasive technique is to use toroids. However, up until now, when using a toroidal transformer to record the nerve action currents, the thickness of the toroid has yet to be considered in the model and how it may affect the propagating compound action potential. In this presentation, we will discuss the development of a new model, to which the thickness of the toroid is taken into account. These dimensions are important because the toroid represents an inhomogeneity in the extracellular medium that redistributes the extracellular current. In the past, toroids with very small diameters have been used and as they may not disrupt the action current. With a better understanding of the toroidal effects, we may be able to increase the accuracy and dependency of such measured magnetic signals. The final goal will be to compare our theoretical model to experimentally gathered data.

  14. Modelling of 3D fields due to ferritic inserts and test blanket modules in toroidal geometry at ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Äkäslompolo, Simppa; Cavinato, Mario; Koechl, Florian; Kurki-Suonio, Taina; Li, Li; Parail, Vassili; Saibene, Gabriella; Särkimäki, Konsta; Sipilä, Seppo; Varje, Jari

    2016-06-01

    Computations in toroidal geometry are systematically performed for the plasma response to 3D magnetic perturbations produced by ferritic inserts (FIs) and test blanket modules (TBMs) for four ITER plasma scenarios: the 15 MA baseline, the 12.5 MA hybrid, the 9 MA steady state, and the 7.5 MA half-field helium plasma. Due to the broad toroidal spectrum of the FI and TBM fields, the plasma response for all the n  =  1-6 field components are computed and compared. The plasma response is found to be weak for the high-n (n  >  4) components. The response is not globally sensitive to the toroidal plasma flow speed, as long as the latter is not reduced by an order of magnitude. This is essentially due to the strong screening effect occurring at a finite flow, as predicted for ITER plasmas. The ITER error field correction coils (EFCC) are used to compensate the n  =  1 field errors produced by FIs and TBMs for the baseline scenario for the purpose of avoiding mode locking. It is found that the middle row of the EFCC, with a suitable toroidal phase for the coil current, can provide the best correction of these field errors, according to various optimisation criteria. On the other hand, even without correction, it is predicted that these n  =  1 field errors will not cause substantial flow damping for the 15 MA baseline scenario.

  15. Asymptotic and spectral analysis of the gyrokinetic-waterbag integro-differential operator in toroidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besse, Nicolas; Coulette, David

    2016-08-01

    Achieving plasmas with good stability and confinement properties is a key research goal for magnetic fusion devices. The underlying equations are the Vlasov-Poisson and Vlasov-Maxwell (VPM) equations in three space variables, three velocity variables, and one time variable. Even in those somewhat academic cases where global equilibrium solutions are known, studying their stability requires the analysis of the spectral properties of the linearized operator, a daunting task. We have identified a model, for which not only equilibrium solutions can be constructed, but many of their stability properties are amenable to rigorous analysis. It uses a class of solution to the VPM equations (or to their gyrokinetic approximations) known as waterbag solutions which, in particular, are piecewise constant in phase-space. It also uses, not only the gyrokinetic approximation of fast cyclotronic motion around magnetic field lines, but also an asymptotic approximation regarding the magnetic-field-induced anisotropy: the spatial variation along the field lines is taken much slower than across them. Together, these assumptions result in a drastic reduction in the dimensionality of the linearized problem, which becomes a set of two nested one-dimensional problems: an integral equation in the poloidal variable, followed by a one-dimensional complex Schrödinger equation in the radial variable. We show here that the operator associated to the poloidal variable is meromorphic in the eigenparameter, the pulsation frequency. We also prove that, for all but a countable set of real pulsation frequencies, the operator is compact and thus behaves mostly as a finite-dimensional one. The numerical algorithms based on such ideas have been implemented in a companion paper [D. Coulette and N. Besse, "Numerical resolution of the global eigenvalue problem for gyrokinetic-waterbag model in toroidal geometry" (submitted)] and were found to be surprisingly close to those for the original gyrokinetic

  16. Design approach for systems with toroidal optical elements featuring a generalized Scheimpflug condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Peter; Eckstein, Johannes; Gao, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Toroidal elements are special aspheric elements with a missing axial section. Such elements consist of several refractive and/or reflective optical surfaces which are generally tilted with respect to a base ray. This base ray replaces the optical axis in ordinary centered systems. Toroidal elements can be efficiently applied e.g. in LED illumination systems or in optical metrology systems. For these elements there is a lack of design principles, only very few approaches like the Coddington equations are known. In this paper an efficient method is presented that facilitates the design when the requirement or knowledge of the orientation of the image plane is necessary, i.e. where a generalized Scheimpflug condition is needed. In more general terms, the method results in imaging properties of second order expansion, but the method itself is linear. Therefore, the complexity of the design process is considerably reduced. Additionally it is shown how the individual surfaces of the toroidal element can be easily aspherized for sharp imaging omitting tedious optimization. The strength of the design method is demonstrated for a novel application where a complex toroidal element is required for rotationally symmetric triangulation integrated in a vision systems and for a high aperture illumination element based on TIR for LEDs.

  17. An improved approximation for the analytical treatment of the local linear gyro-kinetic plasma dispersion relation in toroidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliano, P.; Zarzoso, D.; Artola, F. J.; Camenen, Y.; Garbet, X.

    2017-09-01

    The analytical treatment of plasma kinetic linear instabilities in toroidal geometry is commonly tackled employing a power series expansion of the resonant part of the dispersion relation. This expansion is valid under the assumption that the modulus of the mode frequency is smaller than the magnitude of the frequencies characterising the system (the drift, bounce and transit frequencies for example). We will refer to this approximation as high frequency approximation (HFA). In this paper the linear plasma dispersion relation is derived in the framework of the gyro-kinetic model, for the electrostatic case, in the local limit, in the absence of collisions, for a non rotating plasma, considering adiabatic electrons, in toroidal circular geometry, neglecting the parallel dynamics effect. A systematic analysis of the meaning and limitations of the HFA is performed. As already known, the HFA is not valid for tokamak relevant parameters. A new way to approximate the resonant part of the dispersion relation, called here Improved high frequency approximation (IHFA), is therefore proposed. A quantitative analysis of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability is presented. The IHFA is shown to be applicable to the treatment of the ITG instability in tokamaks.

  18. Fatigue life analysis for traction drives with application to a toroidal type geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, J. J.; Loewenthal, S. H.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1976-01-01

    A contact fatigue life analysis for traction drives was developed which was based on a modified Lundberg-Palmgren theory. The analysis was used to predict life for a cone-roller toroidal traction drive. A 90-percent probability of survival was assumed for the calculated life. Parametric results were presented for life and Hertz contact stress as a function of load, drive ratio, and size. A design study was also performed. The results were compared to previously published work for the dual cavity toroidal drive as applied to a typical compact passenger vehicle drive train. For a representative duty cycle condition wherein the engine delivers 29 horsepower at 2000 rpm with the vehicle moving at 48.3 km/hr (30 mph) the drive life was calculated to be 19,200 km (11 900 miles).

  19. Velocity-Space Diffusion Coefficients Due to Full-Wave ICRF Fields in Toroidal Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.W.; Jaeger, F.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; D'Azevedo, E.; Carter, M.D.; Ershov, N.M.; Smirnov, A.P.; Bonoli, P.; Wright, J.C.; Smithe, D.N.

    2005-09-26

    Jaeger et al. have calculated bounce-averaged QL diffusion coefficients from AORSA full-wave fields, based on non-Maxwellian distributions from CQL3D Fokker-Planck code. A zero banana-width approximation is employed. Complementing this calculation, a fully numerical calculation of ion velocity diffusion coefficients using the full-wave fields in numerical tokamak equilibria has been implemented to determine the finite orbit width effects. The un-approximated Lorentz equation of motion is integrated to obtain the change in velocity after one complete poloidal transit of the tokamak. Averaging velocity changes over initial starting gyro-phase and toroidal angle gives bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients. The coefficients from the full-wave and Lorentz orbit methods are compared for an ITER DT second harmonic tritium ICRF heating case: the diffusion coefficients are similar in magnitude but reveal substantial finite orbit effects.

  20. Nonlinear electromagnetic formulation for particle-in-cell simulation of lower hybrid waves in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, J.; Lin, Z. Kuley, A.; Wang, Z. X.

    2016-06-15

    An electromagnetic particle simulation model has been formulated and verified for nonlinear processes of lower hybrid (LH) waves in fusion plasmas. Electron dynamics are described by the drift kinetic equation using either kinetic momentum or canonical momentum. Ion dynamics are treated as the fluid system or by the Vlasov equation. Compressible magnetic perturbation is retained to simulate both the fast and slow LH waves. Numerical properties are greatly improved by using the electron continuity equation to enforce the consistency between electrostatic potential and vector potential, and by using the importance sampling scheme. The simulation model has been implemented in the gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC), and verified for the dispersion relation and nonlinear particle trapping of the electromagnetic LH waves.

  1. Asymptotic and spectral analysis of the gyrokinetic-waterbag integro-differential operator in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Besse, Nicolas

    2016-08-15

    Achieving plasmas with good stability and confinement properties is a key research goal for magnetic fusion devices. The underlying equations are the Vlasov–Poisson and Vlasov–Maxwell (VPM) equations in three space variables, three velocity variables, and one time variable. Even in those somewhat academic cases where global equilibrium solutions are known, studying their stability requires the analysis of the spectral properties of the linearized operator, a daunting task. We have identified a model, for which not only equilibrium solutions can be constructed, but many of their stability properties are amenable to rigorous analysis. It uses a class of solution to the VPM equations (or to their gyrokinetic approximations) known as waterbag solutions which, in particular, are piecewise constant in phase-space. It also uses, not only the gyrokinetic approximation of fast cyclotronic motion around magnetic field lines, but also an asymptotic approximation regarding the magnetic-field-induced anisotropy: the spatial variation along the field lines is taken much slower than across them. Together, these assumptions result in a drastic reduction in the dimensionality of the linearized problem, which becomes a set of two nested one-dimensional problems: an integral equation in the poloidal variable, followed by a one-dimensional complex Schrödinger equation in the radial variable. We show here that the operator associated to the poloidal variable is meromorphic in the eigenparameter, the pulsation frequency. We also prove that, for all but a countable set of real pulsation frequencies, the operator is compact and thus behaves mostly as a finite-dimensional one. The numerical algorithms based on such ideas have been implemented in a companion paper [D. Coulette and N. Besse, “Numerical resolution of the global eigenvalue problem for gyrokinetic-waterbag model in toroidal geometry” (submitted)] and were found to be surprisingly close to those for the original

  2. New method for computing ideal MHD normal modes in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wysocki, F.; Grimm, R.C.

    1984-11-01

    Analytic elimination of the two magnetic surface components of the displacement vector permits the normal mode ideal MHD equations to be reduced to a scalar form. A Galerkin procedure, similar to that used in the PEST codes, is implemented to determine the normal modes computationally. The method retains the efficient stability capabilities of the PEST 2 energy principle code, while allowing computation of the normal mode frequencies and eigenfunctions, if desired. The procedure is illustrated by comparison with earlier various of PEST and by application to tilting modes in spheromaks, and to stable discrete Alfven waves in tokamak geometry.

  3. Generalized complex geometry, generalized branes and the Hitchin sigma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchini, Roberto

    2005-03-01

    Hitchin's generalized complex geometry has been shown to be relevant in compactifications of superstring theory with fluxes and is expected to lead to a deeper understanding of mirror symmetry. Gualtieri's notion of generalized complex submanifold seems to be a natural candidate for the description of branes in this context. Recently, we introduced a Batalin-Vilkovisky field theoretic realization of generalized complex geometry, the Hitchin sigma model, extending the well known Poisson sigma model. In this paper, exploiting Gualtieri's formalism, we incorporate branes into the model. A detailed study of the boundary conditions obeyed by the world sheet fields is provided. Finally, it is found that, when branes are present, the classical Batalin-Vilkovisky cohomology contains an extra sector that is related non trivially to a novel cohomology associated with the branes as generalized complex submanifolds.

  4. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of microturbulence for general magnetic geometry and experimental profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Yong; Holod, Ihor; Wang, Zhixuan; Lin, Zhihong; Zhang, Taige

    2015-02-15

    Developments in gyrokinetic particle simulation enable the gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) to simulate turbulent transport in tokamaks with realistic equilibrium profiles and plasma geometry, which is a critical step in the code–experiment validation process. These new developments include numerical equilibrium representation using B-splines, a new Poisson solver based on finite difference using field-aligned mesh and magnetic flux coordinates, a new zonal flow solver for general geometry, and improvements on the conventional four-point gyroaverage with nonuniform background marker loading. The gyrokinetic Poisson equation is solved in the perpendicular plane instead of the poloidal plane. Exploiting these new features, GTC is able to simulate a typical DIII-D discharge with experimental magnetic geometry and profiles. The simulated turbulent heat diffusivity and its radial profile show good agreement with other gyrokinetic codes. The newly developed nonuniform loading method provides a modified radial transport profile to that of the conventional uniform loading method.

  5. Gyrokinetic simulations in general geometry and applications to collisional damping of zonal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Hahm, T.S.; Lee, W.W.; Tang, W.M.; White, R.B.

    2000-02-15

    A fully three-dimensional gyrokinetic particle code using magnetic coordinates for general geometry has been developed and applied to the investigation of zonal flows dynamics in toroidal ion-temperature-gradient turbulence. Full torus simulation results support the important conclusion that turbulence-driven zonal flows significantly reduce the turbulent transport. Linear collisionless simulations for damping of an initial poloidal flow perturbation exhibit an asymptotic residual flow. The collisional damping of this residual causes the dependence of ion thermal transport on the ion-ion collision frequency even in regimes where the instabilities are collisionless.

  6. Noncommutative Differential Geometry of Generalized Weyl Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    Elements of noncommutative differential geometry of Z-graded generalized Weyl algebras A(p;q) over the ring of polynomials in two variables and their zero-degree subalgebras B(p;q), which themselves are generalized Weyl algebras over the ring of polynomials in one variable, are discussed. In particular, three classes of skew derivations of A(p;q) are constructed, and three-dimensional first-order differential calculi induced by these derivations are described. The associated integrals are computed and it is shown that the dimension of the integral space coincides with the order of the defining polynomial p(z). It is proven that the restriction of these first-order differential calculi to the calculi on B(p;q) is isomorphic to the direct sum of degree 2 and degree -2 components of A(p;q). A Dirac operator for B(p;q) is constructed from a (strong) connection with respect to this differential calculus on the (free) spinor bimodule defined as the direct sum of degree 1 and degree -1 components of A(p;q). The real structure of KO-dimension two for this Dirac operator is also described.

  7. Axisymmetric electrostatic magnetohydrodynamic oscillations in tokamaks with general cross-sections and toroidal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.; Guo, Wenfeng

    2016-06-01

    The frequency spectrum and mode structure of axisymmetric electrostatic oscillations [the zonal flow (ZF), sound waves (SW), geodesic acoustic modes (GAM), and electrostatic mean flows (EMF)] in tokamaks with general cross-sections and toroidal flows are studied analytically using the electrostatic approximation for magnetohydrodynamic modes. These modes constitute the "electrostatic continua." Starting from the energy principle for a tokamak plasma with toroidal rotation, we showed that these modes are completely stable. The ZF, the SW, and the EMF could all be viewed as special cases of the general GAM. The Euler equations for the general GAM are obtained and are solved analytically for both the low and high range of Mach numbers. The solution consists of the usual countable infinite set of eigen-modes with discrete eigen-frequencies, and two modes with lower frequencies. The countable infinite set is identified with the regular GAM. The lower frequency mode, which is also divergence free as the plasma rotation tends to zero, is identified as the ZF. The other lower (zero) frequency mode is a pure geodesic E×B flow and not divergence free is identified as the EMF. The frequency of the EMF is shown to be exactly 0 independent of plasma cross-section or its flow Mach number. We also show that in general, sound waves with no geodesic components are (almost) completely lost in tokamaks with a general cross-sectional shape. The exception is the special case of strict up-down symmetry. In this case, half of the GAMs would have no geodesic displacements. They are identified as the SW. Present day tokamaks, although not strictly up-down symmetric, usually are only slightly up-down asymmetric. They are expected to share the property with the up-down symmetric tokamak in that half of the GAMs would be more sound wave-like, i.e., have much weaker coupling to the geodesic components than the other half of non-sound-wave-like modes with stronger coupling to the geodesic

  8. Axisymmetric electrostatic magnetohydrodynamic oscillations in tokamaks with general cross-sections and toroidal flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, M. S.; Guo, Wenfeng

    2016-06-15

    The frequency spectrum and mode structure of axisymmetric electrostatic oscillations [the zonal flow (ZF), sound waves (SW), geodesic acoustic modes (GAM), and electrostatic mean flows (EMF)] in tokamaks with general cross-sections and toroidal flows are studied analytically using the electrostatic approximation for magnetohydrodynamic modes. These modes constitute the “electrostatic continua.” Starting from the energy principle for a tokamak plasma with toroidal rotation, we showed that these modes are completely stable. The ZF, the SW, and the EMF could all be viewed as special cases of the general GAM. The Euler equations for the general GAM are obtained and are solved analytically for both the low and high range of Mach numbers. The solution consists of the usual countable infinite set of eigen-modes with discrete eigen-frequencies, and two modes with lower frequencies. The countable infinite set is identified with the regular GAM. The lower frequency mode, which is also divergence free as the plasma rotation tends to zero, is identified as the ZF. The other lower (zero) frequency mode is a pure geodesic E×B flow and not divergence free is identified as the EMF. The frequency of the EMF is shown to be exactly 0 independent of plasma cross-section or its flow Mach number. We also show that in general, sound waves with no geodesic components are (almost) completely lost in tokamaks with a general cross-sectional shape. The exception is the special case of strict up-down symmetry. In this case, half of the GAMs would have no geodesic displacements. They are identified as the SW. Present day tokamaks, although not strictly up-down symmetric, usually are only slightly up-down asymmetric. They are expected to share the property with the up-down symmetric tokamak in that half of the GAMs would be more sound wave-like, i.e., have much weaker coupling to the geodesic components than the other half of non-sound-wave-like modes with stronger coupling to the geodesic

  9. Generalized Kähler Geometry from Supersymmetric Sigma Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredthauer, Andreas; Lindström, Ulf; Persson, Jonas; Zabzine, Maxim

    2006-09-01

    We give a physical derivation of generalized Kähler geometry. Starting from a supersymmetric nonlinear sigma model, we rederive and explain the results of Gualtieri (Generalized complex geometry, DPhil thesis, Oxford University, 2004) regarding the equivalence between generalized Kähler geometry and the bi-hermitean geometry of Gates et al. (Nucl Phys B248:157, 1984). When cast in the language of supersymmetric sigma models, this relation maps precisely to that between the Lagrangian and the Hamiltonian formalisms. We also discuss topological twist in this context.

  10. Integrable perturbed magnetic fields in toroidal geometry: An exact analytical flux surface label for large aspect ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Kallinikos, N.; Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.; Meletlidou, E.

    2014-06-15

    An analytical description of magnetic islands is presented for the typical case of a single perturbation mode introduced to tokamak plasma equilibrium in the large aspect ratio approximation. Following the Hamiltonian structure directly in terms of toroidal coordinates, the well known integrability of this system is exploited, laying out a precise and practical way for determining the island topology features, as required in various applications, through an analytical and exact flux surface label.

  11. New General Tools for Constrained Geometry Optimizations.

    PubMed

    De Vico, Luca; Olivucci, Massimo; Lindh, Roland

    2005-09-01

    A modification of the constrained geometry optimization method by Anglada and Bofill (Anglada, J. M.; Bofill, J. M. J. Comput. Chem. 1997, 18, 992-1003) is designed and implemented. The changes include the choice of projection, quasi-line-search, and the use of a Rational Function optimization approach rather than a reduced-restricted-quasi-Newton-Raphson method in the optimization step. Furthermore, we show how geometrical constrains can be implemented in an approach based on nonredundant curvilinear coordinates avoiding the inclusion of the constraints in the set of redundant coordinates used to define the internal coordinates. The behavior of the new implementation is demonstrated in geometry optimizations featuring single or multiple geometrical constraints (bond lengths, angles, etc.), optimizations on hyperspherical cross sections (as in the computation of steepest descent paths), and location of energy minima on the intersection subspace of two potential energy surfaces (i.e. minimum energy crossing points). In addition, a novel scheme to determine the crossing point geometrically nearest to a given molecular structure is proposed.

  12. A spin foam model for general Lorentzian 4-geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrady, Florian; Hnybida, Jeff

    2010-09-01

    We derive simplicity constraints for the quantization of general Lorentzian 4-geometries. Our method is based on the correspondence between coherent states and classical bivectors and the minimization of associated uncertainties. For triangulations with spacelike triangles, this scheme agrees with the master constraint method of the model by Engle, Pereira, Rovelli and Livine (EPRL). When it is applied to general triangulations of Lorentzian geometries, we obtain new constraints that include the EPRL constraints as a special case. They imply a discrete area spectrum for both spacelike and timelike surfaces. We use these constraints to define a spin foam model for general Lorentzian 4-geometries.

  13. 8. General view of truss geometry at center of span ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. General view of truss geometry at center of span from lower parking lot, looking northwest - Lower Rollstone Street Bridge, Spanning Nashua River on Rollstone Street, Fitchburg, Worcester County, MA

  14. 18. General view of truss geometry and connections at west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. General view of truss geometry and connections at west portal end of swing span, looking southeast - New Bedford-Fairhaven Middle Bridge, Spanning Acushnet River on U.S. Highway 6, New Bedford, Bristol County, MA

  15. An alternative topological field theory of generalized complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Noriaki; Tokunaga, Tatsuya

    2007-09-01

    We propose a new topological field theory on generalized complex geometry in two dimension using AKSZ formulation. Zucchini's model is A model in the case that the generalized complex structure depends on only a symplectic structure. Our new model is B model in the case that the generalized complex structure depends on only a complex structure.

  16. Fixed boundary toroidal plasma equilibria with toroidal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yanqiang; Hu, Yemin; Xiang, Nong

    2016-04-15

    The fixed boundary toroidal plasma equilibria with toroidal flows are investigated by solving the modified Grad-Shafranov equation numerically in the cylindrical coordinate system. For normal equilibrium configurations with geometry and profiles similar to usual tokamaks with no flow, it is found that the effect of flow is to lead to an outward shift of the magnetic flux surfaces, together with the profiles of pressure, and mass and current densities. The shifts could become significant when the toroidal flow Mach number exceeds 0.5. For non-conventional current profiles, even for the usual tokamak geometry, novel current reversal equilibrium configurations may result, sometimes with changed topology in the poloidal flux function. This change in the topology of plasma equilibrium can be attributed to the large toroidal flow. The computed results may correspond to situations of intense tangential injection during the low toroidal current phase in expected experimental situations.

  17. Geometric Transitions, Topological Strings, and Generalized Complex Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Wu-yen; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-06-29

    Mirror symmetry is one of the most beautiful symmetries in string theory. It helps us very effectively gain insights into non-perturbative worldsheet instanton effects. It was also shown that the study of mirror symmetry for Calabi-Yau flux compactification leads us to the territory of ''Non-Kaehlerity''. In this thesis we demonstrate how to construct a new class of symplectic non-Kaehler and complex non-Kaehler string theory vacua via generalized geometric transitions. The class admits a mirror pairing by construction. From a variety of sources, including super-gravity analysis and KK reduction on SU(3) structure manifolds, we conclude that string theory connects Calabi-Yau spaces to both complex non-Kaehler and symplectic non-Kaehler manifolds and the resulting manifolds lie in generalized complex geometry. We go on to study the topological twisted models on a class of generalized complex geometry, bi-Hermitian geometry, which is the most general target space for (2, 2) world-sheet theory with non-trivial H flux turned on. We show that the usual Kaehler A and B models are generalized in a natural way. Since the gauged supergravity is the low energy effective theory for the compactifications on generalized geometries, we study the fate of flux-induced isometry gauging in N = 2 IIA and heterotic strings under non-perturbative instanton effects. Interestingly, we find we have protection mechanisms preventing the corrections to the hyper moduli spaces. Besides generalized geometries, we also discuss the possibility of new NS-NS fluxes in a new doubled formalism.

  18. Geometric transitions, topological strings, and generalized complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Wu-Yen

    Mirror symmetry is one of the most beautiful symmetries in string theory. It helps us very effectively gain insight into non-perturbative worldsheet instanton effects. It was also shown that the study of mirror symmetry for Calabi-Yau flux compactification leads us to the territory of "Non-Kahlerity." In this thesis we demonstrate how to construct a new class of symplectic non-Kahler and complex non-Kahler string theory vacua via geometric transitions. The class admits a mirror pairing by construction. From a variety of sources, including supergravity and KK reduction on SU(3) structure manifolds, we conclude that string theory connects Calabi-Yau spaces to both complex non-Kahler and symplectic non-Kahler manifolds and the resulting manifolds lie in generalized complex geometry. We go on to study the topological twisted models on a class of generalized complex geometry, bi-Hermitian geometry, which is the most general target space for (2,2) worldsheet theory with non-trivial H flux turned on. We show that the usual Kahler A and B models are generalized in a natural way. Since the gauged supergravity is the low energy effective theory for the compactifications on generalized geometries, we study the fate of flux-induced isometry gauging in N = 2 IIA and heterotic strings under non-perturbative instanton effects. Interestingly, we find we have protection mechanisms preventing the corrections to the hyper moduli spaces. Besides generalized geometries, we also discuss the possibility of new NS-NS fluxes in a new doubled formalism.

  19. Generalized Kahler Geometry in View of Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yicao

    2011-04-01

    This paper contains a detailed study of generalized Kahler geometry from the viewpoint of quantum 0+1-dimensional supersymmetric σ-model. Peierls brackets rather than canonical quantization are used to quantize the superclassical system. Supercharges (or relevant differential operators) are expressed explicitly and covariantly. Index theorems in this context are also discussed briefly.

  20. The Direct Effect of Toroidal Magnetic Fields on Stellar Oscillations: An Analytical Expression for the General Matrix Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, René; Schad, Ariane; Roth, Markus

    2017-09-01

    Where is the solar dynamo located and what is its modus operandi? These are still open questions in solar physics. Helio- and asteroseismology can help answer them by enabling us to study solar and stellar internal structures through global oscillations. The properties of solar and stellar acoustic modes are changing with the level of magnetic activity. However, until now, the inference on subsurface magnetic fields with seismic measures has been very limited. The aim of this paper is to develop a formalism to calculate the effect of large-scale toroidal magnetic fields on solar and stellar global oscillation eigenfunctions and eigenfrequencies. If the Lorentz force is added to the equilibrium equation of motion, stellar eigenmodes can couple. In quasi-degenerate perturbation theory, this coupling, also known as the direct effect, can be quantified by the general matrix element. We present the analytical expression of the matrix element for a superposition of subsurface zonal toroidal magnetic field configurations. The matrix element is important for forward calculations of perturbed solar and stellar eigenfunctions and frequency perturbations. The results presented here will help to ascertain solar and stellar large-scale subsurface magnetic fields, and their geometric configuration, strength, and change over the course of activity cycles.

  1. A convergence study for the Laguerre expansion in the moment equation method for neoclassical transport in general toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, S.; Sugama, H.; Maassberg, H.; Beidler, C. D.; Murakami, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Hirooka, S.

    2010-08-15

    The dependence of neoclassical parallel flow calculations on the maximum order of Laguerre polynomial expansions is investigated in a magnetic configuration of the Large Helical Device [S. Murakami, A. Wakasa, H. Maassberg, et al., Nucl. Fusion 42, L19 (2002)] using the monoenergetic coefficient database obtained by an international collaboration. On the basis of a previous generalization (the so-called Sugama-Nishimura method [H. Sugama and S. Nishimura, Phys. Plasmas 15, 042502 (2008)]) to an arbitrary order of the expansion, the 13 M, 21 M, and 29 M approximations are compared. In a previous comparison, only the ion distribution function in the banana collisionality regime of single-ion-species plasmas in tokamak configurations was investigated. In this paper, the dependence of the problems including electrons and impurities in the general collisionality regime in an actual nonsymmetric toroidal configuration is reported. In particular, qualities of approximations for the electron distribution function are investigated in detail.

  2. Self-dual geometry of generalized Hermitian surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Arsen'eva, O E; Kirichenko, V F

    1998-02-28

    Several results on the geometry of conformally semiflat Hermitian surfaces of both classical and hyperbolic types (generalized Hermitian surfaces) are obtained. Some of these results are generalizations and clarifications of already known results in this direction due to Koda, Itoh, and other authors. They reveal some unexpected beautiful connections between such classical characteristics of conformally semiflat (generalized) Hermitian surfaces as the Einstein property, the constancy of the holomorphic sectional curvature, and so on. A complete classification of compact self-dual Hermitian RK-surfaces that are at the same time generalized Hopf manifolds is obtained. This provides a complete solution of the Chen problem in this class of Hermitian surfaces.

  3. Generalization of the electronic susceptibility for arbitrary molecular geometries.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, Arne; Dreßler, Christian; Ahlert, Paul; Sebastiani, Daniel

    2016-04-14

    We generalize the explicit representation of the electronic susceptibility χ[R](r, r') for arbitrary molecular geometries R. The electronic susceptibility is a response function that yields the response of the molecular electronic charge density at linear order to an arbitrary external perturbation. We address the dependence of this response function on the molecular geometry. The explicit representation of the molecular geometry dependence is achieved by means of a Taylor expansion in the nuclear coordinates. Our approach relies on a recently developed low-rank representation of the response function χ[R](r, r') which allows a highly condensed storage of the expansion and an efficient application within dynamical chemical environments. We illustrate the performance and accuracy of our scheme by computing the vibrationally induced variations of the response function of a water molecule and its resulting Raman spectrum.

  4. Toroidal reactor

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.; Furth, Harold P.; Tenney, Fred H.

    1988-12-06

    Method for producing fusion power wherein a neutral beam is injected into a toroidal bulk plasma to produce fusion reactions during the time permitted by the slowing down of the particles from the injected beam in the bulk plasma.

  5. Generalized geometry, T-duality, and renormalization group flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streets, Jeffrey

    2017-04-01

    We interpret the physical B-field renormalization group flow in the language of Courant algebroids, clarifying the sense in which this flow is the natural ;Ricci flow; for generalized geometry. Next we show that the B-field renormalization group flow preserves T-duality in a natural sense. As corollaries we obtain new long time existence results for the B-field renormalization group flow.

  6. Generalized quantum gravity condensates for homogeneous geometries and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriti, Daniele; Pranzetti, Daniele; Ryan, James P.; Sindoni, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    We construct a generalized class of quantum gravity condensate states that allows the description of continuum homogeneous quantum geometries within the full theory. They are based on similar ideas already applied to extract effective cosmological dynamics from the group field theory formalism, and thus also from loop quantum gravity. However, they represent an improvement over the simplest condensates used in the literature, in that they are defined by an infinite superposition of graph-based states encoding in a precise way the topology of the spatial manifold. The construction is based on the definition of refinement operators on spin network states, written in a second quantized language. The construction also lends itself easily to application to the case of spherically symmetric quantum geometries.

  7. Spacetime and geometry. An introduction to general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Sean M.

    This book provides a lucid and thoroughly modern introduction to general relativity for advanced readers. It introduces modern techniques and an accessible and lively writing style to what can often be a formal and intimidating subject. Readers are led from physics of flat spacetime (special relativity), through the intricacies of differential geometry and Einstein's equations, and on to exciting applications such as black holes, gravitational radiation, and cosmology. Subtle points are illuminated throughout the text by careful and entertaining exposition. A straightforward and lucid approach, balancing mathematical rigor and physical insight, are hallmarks of this important text.

  8. Electron cyclotron current drive efficiency in general tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Chan, V. S.; Prater, R.

    2003-01-01

    Green's-function techniques are used to calculate electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency in general tokamak geometry in the low-collisionality regime. Fully relativistic electron dynamics is employed in the theoretical formulation. The high-velocity collision model is used to model Coulomb collisions and a simplified quasi-linear rf diffusion operator describes wave-particle interactions. The approximate analytic solutions which are benchmarked with a widely used ECCD model, facilitate time-dependent simulations of tokamak operational scenarios using the non-inductive current drive of electron cyclotron waves.

  9. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  10. Generalizing the extensibility of a dynamic geometry software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herceg, Đorđe; Radaković, Davorka; Herceg, Dejana

    2012-09-01

    Plug-and-play visual components in a Dynamic Geometry Software (DGS) enable development of visually attractive, rich and highly interactive dynamic drawings. We are developing SLGeometry, a DGS that contains a custom programming language, a computer algebra system (CAS engine) and a graphics subsystem. The basic extensibility framework on SLGeometry supports dynamic addition of new functions from attribute annotated classes that implement runtime metadata registration in code. We present a general plug-in framework for dynamic importing of arbitrary Silverlight user interface (UI) controls into SLGeometry at runtime. The CAS engine maintains a metadata storage that describes each imported visual component and enables two-way communication between the expressions stored in the engine and the UI controls on the screen.

  11. Solving a generalized distance geometry problem for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Sit, Atilla; Wu, Zhijun

    2011-12-01

    We propose a new approach to the problem of determining an ensemble of protein structures with a set of interatomic distance bounds in NMR protein modeling. Similarly to X-ray crystallography, we assume that the protein has an equilibrium structure and the atoms fluctuate around their equilibrium positions. Then, the problem can be formulated as a generalized distance geometry problem, to find the equilibrium positions and maximal possible fluctuation radii for the atoms in the protein, subject to the condition that the fluctuations should be within the given distance bounds. We describe the scientific background of the work, the motivation of the new approach and the formulation of the problem. We develop a geometric buildup algorithm for an approximate solution to the problem and present some preliminary test results as a first step concept proofing. We also discuss related theoretical and computational issues and potential impacts of this work in NMR protein modeling.

  12. The 3-D General Geometry PIC Software for Distributed Memory MIMD Computers; EM Software Specification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    GENERAL GEOMETRY PIC SOFTWARE FOR DISTRIBUTED MEMORY MIMD COMPUTERS : TASK 1 FINAL REPORT J W Eastwood, W... GENERAL GEOMETRY PIC SOFTWARE FOR DISTRIBUTED MEMORY MIMD COMPUTERS : TASK 1 FINAL REPORT J W Eastwood, W Arter, N J Brealey, R W Hockney September 1994... General geometry PIC for MIMD computers : Final report . Report RFFX(93)56,

  13. Neutron-transport equation in a general curvelinear coordinate system

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H

    1981-01-01

    Different from a fission reactor, a fusion reactor has complex geometry, such as toroidal geometry. Neutron transport equation for the toroidal coordinate system has been derived by using coordinate transformation from the cartesian coordinate. These methods require rather tedious calculations. Presented here is a simple method to formulate the neutron transport equation in the general curvelinear coordinate system. The equations for parabolic cylinder and toroidal coordinate systems are derived as an example.

  14. Full Wave Propagation Code in General 3D Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovich, Pavel; Cooper, W. Anthony; Villard, Laurent

    2003-10-01

    A full-wave propagation code (LEMan) has been developed and tested for 3D plasma configurations. The code solves the Maxwell operator for inhomogeneous plasma with a given external antenna. The plasma-wave interaction is modelled with full cold plasma dielectric tensor with finite electron mass. Special care is taken to avoid numerical pollution of the discretised spectrum: the wave equation is reformulated in terms of electromagnetic potentials. The discretisation is implemented with finite elements radially and Fourier decomposition in poloidal and toroidal angles. The LEMan code uses the equilibrium metric in Boozer magnetic coordinates produced with TERPSICHORE. The Fourier formulation of the problem gives a possibility to largely reduce matrix construction time by minimizing the number of numerical integrations of the equilibrium coefficients. Several mirror- and helix-like configurations have been analysed showing the expected structure of the spectrum in the Alfven frequency range with characteristic gaps and eigenmodes. In the case of both poloidal and toroidal mode coupling (2-period QAS stellarator) the spectrum is very complicated, but a comparison with the corresponding cylindrical branches still helps to distinguish the main modes and mode conversion surfaces.

  15. Moment free toroidal magnet

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, Peter

    1983-01-01

    A toroidal magnet for confining a high magnetic field for use in fusion reactor research and nuclear particle detection. The magnet includes a series of conductor elements arranged about and fixed at its small major radius portion to the outer surface of a central cylindrical support each conductor element having a geometry such as to maintain the conductor elements in pure tension when a high current flows therein, and a support assembly which redistributes all or part of the tension which would otherwise arise in the small major radius portion of each coil element to the large major radius portion thereof.

  16. Geometry of the generalized Bloch sphere for qutrits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sandeep K.; Neethi Simon, B.; Singh, Rajeev; Simon, Sudhavathani

    2016-04-01

    The geometry of the generalized Bloch sphere Ω3, the state space of a qutrit, is studied. Closed form expressions for Ω3, its boundary ∂Ω3, and the set of extremals {{{Ω }}}3{{ext}} are obtained by use of an elementary observation. These expressions and analytic methods are used to classify the 28 two-sections and the 56 three-sections of Ω3 into unitary equivalence classes, completing the works of earlier authors. It is shown, in particular, that there are families of two-sections and of three-sections which are equivalent geometrically but not unitarily, a feature that does not appear to have been appreciated earlier. A family of three-sections of obese-tetrahedral shape whose symmetry corresponds to the 24-element tetrahedral point group T d is examined in detail. This symmetry is traced to the natural reduction of the adjoint representation of SU(3), the symmetry underlying Ω3, into direct sum of the two-dimensional and the two (inequivalent) three-dimensional irreducible representations of T d .

  17. Nodoids and toroids: comparison of two geometries for the meniscus profile of a wetting liquid between two touching isolated spheres and extensions to the model of a collection of packed spheres.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Raymond P; Stowe, Robert A

    2005-05-15

    In the mid 1960s the present authors published two papers dealing with penetration of nonwetting liquids such as mercury into the interstitial void spaces using the model of uniform packed spheres. A circular arc was used to approximate the liquid-vapor interface in both papers. However, our circular arc-toroid values for the pressure-volume relationship in the pendular ring which exists between two touching spheres was criticized. The authors concluded that our approximation led to unacceptably large differences compared to the values calculated from the exact nodoid shape. This incorrect conclusion was never rebutted and has, in fact, been misinterpreted by subsequent workers to include values calculated for the shape of the access opening and the associated pressure for penetration into the void space of a collection of spheres. This leaves a cloud of uncertainty, not only over our original work on nonwetting fluids, but on the application of our procedures to the field of wetting fluids. The contrast in the geometrical shapes of the toroid and nodoid is depicted and the pressure values are compared at equal volumes. In contrast to the claim of excessive error, we show the toroid geometry, in conjunction with a pressure-volume work derivation, to have a maximum error of 0.06% as compared to the nodoid at all liquid-solid contact angles. The toroid also has the advantage of using a readily derived work versus surface free energy balance rather than requiring the use of incomplete elliptic integrals to evaluate the nodoid. Attempts to use radii of curvature to evaluate the toroid shape are shown to give extremely poor approximations of the exact values for the pressure. Values reported for access to the interior void space of a collection of spheres still need adjustment for the effect of contact angles between 0 degrees and 180 degrees for characterizing assemblies of real solids by computing "equivalent spherical" particle size from porosity and mercury

  18. Inflatable nested toroid structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J. (Inventor); Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor); Spexarth, Gary R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An inflatable structure comprises at least two generally toroidal, inflatable modules. When in a deployed mode, the first, inner module has a major diameter less than that of a second, outer module and is positioned within the inner circumference of the outer module such that the first module is nested circumferentially alongside the second module. The inflatable structure, in a non-deployed, non-inflated mode, is of compact configuration and adapted to be transported to a site of deployment. When deployed, the inflatable structure is of substantially increased interior volume. In one embodiment, access between the interior of the first module and the second module is provided by at least one port or structural pass-through. In another embodiment, the inflatable structure includes at least one additional generally toroidal module external of and circumferentially surrounding the second module.

  19. A General Method for Calculating the External Magnetic Field from a Cylindrical Magnetic Source using Toroidal Functions

    SciTech Connect

    J Selvaggi; S Salon; O Kwon CVK Chari

    2006-02-14

    An alternative method is developed to compute the magnetic field from a circular cylindrical magnetic source. Specifically, a Fourier series expansion whose coefficients are toroidal functions is introduced which yields an alternative to the more familiar spherical harmonic solution or the Elliptic integral solution. This alternate formulation coupled with a method called charge simulation allows one to compute the external magnetic field from an arbitrary magnetic source in terms of a toroidal expansion. This expansion is valid on any finite hypothetical external observation cylinder. In other words, the magnetic scalar potential or the magnetic field intensity is computed on a exterior cylinder which encloses the magnetic source. This method can be used to accurately compute the far field where a finite element formulation is known to be inaccurate.

  20. General Relativity Without General Relativity: Self-Gravitating Systems and Effective Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Cherubini, Christian; Filippi, Simonetta; Geralico, Andrea

    Perturbations of Newtonian self-gravitating barotropic perfect fluid systems can be studied via an extension of the "effective geometry" formalism. The case of polytropic spherical stars described by the Lane-Emden equation has been studied in the past in the known cases of existing explicit solutions relevant for both stellar and galactic dynamics. Applications of the formalism in the case of rotating configurations found via William's "matching method" and possible generalizations are here discussed. The present formulation represents another natural scenario, in addition with the usual one of quantum condensates in laboratories, in which the acoustic analogy has physical relevance.

  1. Unified Field Theoretical Models from Generalized Affine Geometries II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirilo-Lombardo, Diego Julio

    2011-06-01

    The space-time structure of the new Unified Field Theory presented in previous reference (Int. J. Theor. Phys. 49:1288-1301, 2010) is analyzed from its SL(2C) underlying structure in order to make precise the notion of minimal coupling. To this end, the framework is the language of tensors and particularly differential forms and the condition a priory of the existence of a potential for the torsion is relaxed. We shown trough exact cosmological solutions from this model, where the geometry is Euclidean R⊗ O 3˜ R⊗ SU(2), the relation between the space-time geometry and the structure of the gauge group. Precisely this relation is directly connected with the relation of the spin and torsion fields. The solution of this model is explicitly compared with our previous ones and we find that: (i) the torsion is not identified directly with the Yang Mills type strength field, (ii) there exists a compatibility condition connected with the identification of the gauge group with the geometric structure of the space-time: this fact lead the identification between derivatives of the scale factor a( τ) with the components of the torsion in order to allows the Hosoya-Ogura ansatz (namely, the alignment of the isospin with the frame geometry of the space-time), (iii) this compatibility condition precisely mark the fact that local gauge covariance, coordinate independence and arbitrary space time geometries are harmonious concepts and (iv) of two possible structures of the torsion the "tratorial" form (the only one studied here) forbids wormhole configurations, leading only, cosmological instanton space-time in eternal expansion.

  2. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-09-23

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling.

  3. Generalized Kähler Geometry of Instanton Moduli Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursztyn, Henrique; Cavalcanti, Gil R.; Gualtieri, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We prove that Hitchin's generalized Kähler structure on the moduli space of instantons over a compact, even generalized Kähler four-manifold may be obtained by generalized Kähler reduction, in analogy with the usual Kähler case. The underlying reduction of Courant algebroids is a realization of Donaldson's μ-map in degree three.

  4. Cosmology for quadratic gravity in generalized Weyl geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez, Jose Beltrán; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Koivisto, Tomi S.

    2016-04-26

    A class of vector-tensor theories arises naturally in the framework of quadratic gravity in spacetimes with linear vector distortion. Requiring the absence of ghosts for the vector field imposes an interesting condition on the allowed connections with vector distortion: the resulting one-parameter family of connections generalises the usual Weyl geometry with polar torsion. The cosmology of this class of theories is studied, focusing on isotropic solutions wherein the vector field is dominated by the temporal component. De Sitter attractors are found and inhomogeneous perturbations around such backgrounds are analysed. In particular, further constraints on the models are imposed by excluding pathologies in the scalar, vector and tensor fluctuations. Various exact background solutions are presented, describing a constant and an evolving dark energy, a bounce and a self-tuning de Sitter phase. However, the latter two scenarios are not viable under a closer scrutiny.

  5. Poloidal and toroidal plasmons and fields of multilayer nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garapati, K. V.; Salhi, M.; Kouchekian, S.; Siopsis, G.; Passian, A.

    2017-04-01

    Composite and janus type metallodielectric nanoparticles are increasingly considered as a means to control the spatial and temporal behavior of electromagnetic fields in diverse applications such as coupling to quantum emitters, achieving invisibility cloaks, and obtaining quantum correlations between qubits. We investigate the surface modes of a toroidal nanostructure and obtain the canonical plasmon dispersion relations and resonance modes for arbitrarily layered nanorings. Unlike particle plasmon eigenmodes in other geometries, the amplitudes of the eigenmodes of tori exhibit a distinct forward and backward coupling. We present the plasmon dispersion relations for several relevant toroidal configurations in the quasistatic limit and obtain the dominant retarded dispersion relations of a single ring for comparison, discuss mode complementarity and hybridization, and introduce two new types of toroidal particles in the form of janus nanorings. The resonance frequencies for the first few dominant modes of a ring composed of plasmon supporting materials such as gold, silver, and aluminum are provided and compared to those for a silicon ring. A generalized Green's function is obtained for multilayer tori allowing for calculation of the scattering response to interacting fields. Employing the Green's function, the scalar electric potential distribution corresponding to individual poloidal and toroidal modes in response to an arbitrarily polarized external field and the field of electrons is obtained. The results are applied to obtain the local density of states and decay rate of a dipole near the center of the torus.

  6. Poloidal and toroidal plasmons and fields of multilayer nanorings

    DOE PAGES

    Garapati, K. V.; Salhi, M.; Kouchekian, S.; ...

    2017-04-17

    Composite and janus type metallodielectric nanoparticles are increasingly considered as a means to control the spatial and temporal behavior of electromagnetic fields in diverse applications such as coupling to quantum emitters, achieving invisibility cloaks, and obtaining quantum correlations between qubits. We investigate the surface modes of a toroidal nanostructure and obtain the canonical plasmon dispersion relations and resonance modes for arbitrarily layered nanorings. Unlike particle plasmon eigenmodes in other geometries, the amplitudes of the eigenmodes of tori exhibit a distinct forward and backward coupling. We present the plasmon dispersion relations for several relevant toroidal configurations in the quasistatic limit andmore » obtain the dominant retarded dispersion relations of a single ring for comparison, discuss mode complementarity and hybridization, and introduce two new types of toroidal particles in the form of janus nanorings. The resonance frequencies for the first few dominant modes of a ring composed of plasmon supporting materials such as gold, silver, and aluminum are provided and compared to those for a silicon ring. A generalized Green's function is obtained for multilayer tori allowing for calculation of the scattering response to interacting fields. Employing the Green's function, the scalar electric potential distribution corresponding to individual poloidal and toroidal modes in response to an arbitrarily polarized external field and the field of electrons is obtained. The results are applied to obtain the local density of states and decay rate of a dipole near the center of the torus.« less

  7. Sketching the General Quadratic Equation Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stols, G. H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores a geometrical way to sketch graphs of the general quadratic in two variables with Geometer's Sketchpad. To do this, a geometric procedure as described by De Temple is used, bearing in mind that this general quadratic equation (1) represents all the possible conics (conics sections), and the fact that five points (no three of…

  8. Sketching the General Quadratic Equation Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stols, G. H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores a geometrical way to sketch graphs of the general quadratic in two variables with Geometer's Sketchpad. To do this, a geometric procedure as described by De Temple is used, bearing in mind that this general quadratic equation (1) represents all the possible conics (conics sections), and the fact that five points (no three of…

  9. Axial magnetic field and toroidally streaming fast ions in the dense plasma focus are natural consequences of conservation laws in the curved axisymmetric geometry of the current sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2014-10-15

    Direct measurement of axial magnetic field in the PF-1000 dense plasma focus (DPF), and its reported correlation with neutron emission, call for a fresh look at previous reports of existence of axial magnetic field component in the DPF from other laboratories, and associated data suggesting toroidal directionality of fast ions participating in fusion reactions, with a view to understand the underlying physics. In this context, recent work dealing with application of the hyperbolic conservation law formalism to the DPF is extended in this paper to a curvilinear coordinate system, which reflects the shape of the DPF current sheath. Locally unidirectional shock propagation in this coordinate system enables construction of a system of 7 one-dimensional hyperbolic conservation law equations with geometric source terms, taking into account all the components of magnetic field and flow velocity. Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for this system lead to expressions for the axial magnetic field and three components of fluid velocity having high ion kinetic energy.

  10. An Explanatory, Transformation Geometry Proof of a Classic Treasure-Hunt Problem and Its Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Villiers, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses an interesting, classic problem that provides a nice classroom investigation for dynamic geometry, and which can easily be explained (proved) with transformation geometry. The deductive explanation (proof) provides insight into why it is true, leading to an immediate generalization, thus illustrating the discovery function of…

  11. An Explanatory, Transformation Geometry Proof of a Classic Treasure-Hunt Problem and Its Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Villiers, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses an interesting, classic problem that provides a nice classroom investigation for dynamic geometry, and which can easily be explained (proved) with transformation geometry. The deductive explanation (proof) provides insight into why it is true, leading to an immediate generalization, thus illustrating the discovery function of…

  12. Modeling the effect of toroidal plasma rotation on drift-magnetohydrodynamic modes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Sharapov, S. E.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Mikhailovskii, A. B.

    2006-06-01

    A new code, MISHKA-F (Flow), has been developed as an extension of the ideal magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) code MISHKA-1 [Mikhailovskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 23, 844 (1997)] in order to investigate the linear MHD stability of ideal and resistive eigenmodes with respect to the effects of toroidal rotation in tokamaks in general toroidal geometry with the ion diamagnetic drift effect taken into account. Benchmark test results of the MISHKA-F code show good agreement with analytic theory [A. B. Mikhailovskii and S. E. Sharapov, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 42, 57 (2000)] for the stability limits of the ideal n /m=1/1 internal kink mode. The combined stabilizing effects of the ion diamagnetic drift frequency, ω*i, and the toroidal flow shear are also studied. The ω*i stabilization of the internal kink mode is found to be more effective at finite flow shear. Finite-n ballooning modes are studied in plasmas with the toroidal flow shear effect included. The stabilization of the ballooning modes by toroidal rotation is found to agree well with earlier predictions [Webster et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2135 (2004)]. The effect of high flow shear is analyzed for a sawtoothing discharge typical in the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) [Sykes et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1423 (2001)]. It is found that the ideal n =1 internal kink mode can be stabilized by toroidal rotation at values observed experimentally.

  13. Modeling the effect of toroidal plasma rotation on drift-magnetohydrodynamic modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, I.T.; Sharapov, S.E.; Huysmans, G.T.A.; Mikhailovskii, A. B.

    2006-06-15

    A new code, MISHKA-F (Flow), has been developed as an extension of the ideal magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) code MISHKA-1 [Mikhailovskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 23, 844 (1997)] in order to investigate the linear MHD stability of ideal and resistive eigenmodes with respect to the effects of toroidal rotation in tokamaks in general toroidal geometry with the ion diamagnetic drift effect taken into account. Benchmark test results of the MISHKA-F code show good agreement with analytic theory [A. B. Mikhailovskii and S. E. Sharapov, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 42, 57 (2000)] for the stability limits of the ideal n/m=1/1 internal kink mode. The combined stabilizing effects of the ion diamagnetic drift frequency, {omega}{sub *i}, and the toroidal flow shear are also studied. The {omega}{sub *i} stabilization of the internal kink mode is found to be more effective at finite flow shear. Finite-n ballooning modes are studied in plasmas with the toroidal flow shear effect included. The stabilization of the ballooning modes by toroidal rotation is found to agree well with earlier predictions [Webster et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2135 (2004)]. The effect of high flow shear is analyzed for a sawtoothing discharge typical in the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) [Sykes et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1423 (2001)]. It is found that the ideal n=1 internal kink mode can be stabilized by toroidal rotation at values observed experimentally.

  14. Helicopter Rotor Wake Geometry and Its Influence in Forward Flight. Volume 1. Generalized Wake Geometry and Wake Effect on Rotor Airloads and Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    performance. A first level generalized wake model was developed for a helicopter rotor operating in steady level forward flight based on theoretically...predicted wake geometries. The generalized wake model consists of wake geometry equations in which tip vortex distortions are generalized as displacements...of predicted rotor airloads and related rotor performanceand blade bending moments to various rotor inflow and wake geometry models are demonstrated

  15. The generalized Kähler geometry of N = (2, 2) WZW-models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevrin, Alexander; Staessens, Wieland; Terryn, Dimitri

    2011-12-01

    N = (2 , 2), d = 2 supersymmetric non-linear σ-models provide a physical realization of Hitchin's and Gualtieri's generalized Kähler geometry. A large subclass of such models are comprised by WZW-models on even-dimensional reductive group manifolds. In the present paper we analyze the complex structures, type changing, the superfield content and the affine isometries compatible with the extra supersymmetry. The results are illustrated by an exhaustive discussion of the N = (2 , 2) WZW-models on S 3 × S 1 and S 3 × S 3 where various aspects of generalized Kähler and Calabi-Yau geometry are verified and clarified. The examples illustrate a slightly weaker definition for an N = (2 , 2) superconformal generalized Kähler geometry compared to that for a generalized Calabi-Yau geometry.

  16. Multidimensional Plasma Sheath Modeling Using The Three Fluid Plasma Model in General Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly, Robert; Shumlak, Uri

    2012-10-01

    There has been renewed interest in the use of plasma actuators for high speed flow control applications. In the plasma actuator, current is driven through the surrounding weakly ionized plasma to impart control moments on the hypersonic vehicle. This expanded general geometry study employs the three-fluid (electrons, ions,neutrals) plasma model as it allows the capture of electron inertial effects, as well as energy and momentum transfer between the charged and neutral species. Previous investigations have typically assumed an electrostatic electric field. This work includes the full electrodynamics in general geometries. Past work utilizing the research code WARPX (Washington Approximate Riemann Problem) employed cartesian grids. In this work, the problem is expanded to general geometries with the euler fluid equations employing Braginskii closure. In addition, WARPX general geometry grids are generated from Cubit or CAD files. Comparisons are made against AFRL magnetized plasma actuator experiments.

  17. Phase-space geometry of the generalized Langevin equation.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Thomas

    2009-09-28

    The generalized Langevin equation is widely used to model the influence of a heat bath upon a reactive system. This equation will here be studied from a geometric point of view. A dynamical phase space that represents all possible states of the system will be constructed, the generalized Langevin equation will be formally rewritten as a pair of coupled ordinary differential equations, and the fundamental geometric structures in phase space will be described. It will be shown that the phase space itself and its geometric structure depend critically on the preparation of the system: A system that is assumed to have been in existence forever has a larger phase space with a simpler structure than a system that is prepared at a finite time. These differences persist even in the long-time limit, where one might expect the details of preparation to become irrelevant.

  18. Toroidal circular dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raybould, T. A.; Fedotov, V. A.; Papasimakis, N.; Kuprov, I.; Youngs, I. J.; Chen, W. T.; Tsai, D. P.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that the induced toroidal dipole, represented by currents flowing on the surface of a torus, makes a distinct and indispensable contribution to circular dichroism. We show that toroidal circular dichroism supplements the well-known mechanism involving electric dipole and magnetic dipole transitions. We illustrate this with rigorous analysis of the experimentally measured polarization-sensitive transmission spectra of an artificial metamaterial, constructed from elements of toroidal symmetry. We argue that toroidal circular dichroism will be found in large biomolecules with elements of toroidal symmetry and should be taken into account in the interpretation of circular dichroism spectra of organics.

  19. Shuttleless toroid winder

    DOEpatents

    Lindenmeyer, Carl W.

    1981-01-01

    A lower support receives a toroid at a winding station with the axis of the toroid aligned with a slot in the support. An upper guide member applies an axial force to hold the toroid against the lower support. A pair of movable jaws carried by an indexing mechanism engage the outer surface of the toroid to apply a radial holding force. While the toroid is thus held, a wire is placed axially through the toroid, assisted by a funnel-shaped surface in the upper guide member, and is drawn tight about the toroid by a pair of cooperating draw rollers. When operated in the "full cycle" mode, the operator then actuates a switch which energizes a power drive to release the axial clamp and to drive the indexing mechanism and the jaws to rotate the toroid about its axis. At the same time, the wire is ejected from the draw rollers beneath the toroid so that the operator may grasp it to form another loop. When the toroid is fully indexed, the jaws release it, and the upper guide member is returned to clamp the toroid axially while the indexing mechanism is returned to its starting position. The apparatus may also be operated in a "momentary contact" mode in which the mechanism is driven only for the time a switch is actuated.

  20. Sensing with toroidal metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manoj; Srivastava, Yogesh Kumar; Manjappa, Manukumara; Singh, Ranjan

    2017-03-01

    Localized electromagnetic excitation in the form of toroidal dipoles has recently been observed in metamaterial systems. The origin of the toroidal dipole lies in the currents flowing on the surface of a torus. Thus, the exotic toroidal excitations play an important role in determining the optical properties of a system. Toroidal dipoles also contribute towards enabling high quality factor subwavelength resonances in metamaterial systems which could be an excellent platform for probing the light matter interaction. Here, we demonstrate sensing with toroidal resonance in a two-dimensional terahertz metamaterial in which a pair of mirrored asymmetric Fano resonators possesses anti-aligned magnetic moments at an electromagnetic resonance that gives rise to a toroidal dipole. Our proof of concept demonstration opens up an avenue to explore the interaction of matter with toroidal multipoles that could have strong applications in the sensing of dielectrics and biomolecules.

  1. Riemannian geometry of Hamiltonian chaos: Hints for a general theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerruti-Sola, Monica; Ciraolo, Guido; Franzosi, Roberto; Pettini, Marco

    2008-10-01

    We aim at assessing the validity limits of some simplifying hypotheses that, within a Riemmannian geometric framework, have provided an explanation of the origin of Hamiltonian chaos and have made it possible to develop a method of analytically computing the largest Lyapunov exponent of Hamiltonian systems with many degrees of freedom. Therefore, a numerical hypotheses testing has been performed for the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam β model and for a chain of coupled rotators. These models, for which analytic computations of the largest Lyapunov exponents have been carried out in the mentioned Riemannian geometric framework, appear as paradigmatic examples to unveil the reason why the main hypothesis of quasi-isotropy of the mechanical manifolds sometimes breaks down. The breakdown is expected whenever the topology of the mechanical manifolds is nontrivial. This is an important step forward in view of developing a geometric theory of Hamiltonian chaos of general validity.

  2. Riemannian geometry of Hamiltonian chaos: hints for a general theory.

    PubMed

    Cerruti-Sola, Monica; Ciraolo, Guido; Franzosi, Roberto; Pettini, Marco

    2008-10-01

    We aim at assessing the validity limits of some simplifying hypotheses that, within a Riemmannian geometric framework, have provided an explanation of the origin of Hamiltonian chaos and have made it possible to develop a method of analytically computing the largest Lyapunov exponent of Hamiltonian systems with many degrees of freedom. Therefore, a numerical hypotheses testing has been performed for the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam beta model and for a chain of coupled rotators. These models, for which analytic computations of the largest Lyapunov exponents have been carried out in the mentioned Riemannian geometric framework, appear as paradigmatic examples to unveil the reason why the main hypothesis of quasi-isotropy of the mechanical manifolds sometimes breaks down. The breakdown is expected whenever the topology of the mechanical manifolds is nontrivial. This is an important step forward in view of developing a geometric theory of Hamiltonian chaos of general validity.

  3. Probing Designability via a Generalized Model of Helical Bundle Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryan, Gevorg; DeGrado, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Because the space of folded protein structures is highly degenerate, with recurring secondary and tertiary motifs, methods for representing protein structure in terms of collective physically-relevant coordinates are of great interest. By collapsing structural diversity to a handful of parameters, such methods can be used to delineate the space of designable structures, i.e. conformations that can be stabilized with a large number of sequences – a crucial task for de novo protein design. We first demonstrate this on natural α-helical coiled coils using the Crick parameterization. We show that over 95% of known coiled-coil structures are within 1 Å Cα root mean square deviation of a Crick-ideal backbone. Derived parameters show that natural geometric space of coiled coils is highly restricted and can be represented by “allowed” conformations amidst a potential continuum of conformers. Allowed structures have 1) restricted axial offsets between helices, which differ starkly from parallel to anti-parallel structures; 2) preferred superhelical radii, which depend linearly on the oligomerization state; 3) pronounced radius-dependent a and d-position aminoacid propensities and 4) discrete angles of rotation of helices about their axes, which are surprisingly independent of oligomerization state or orientation. In all, we estimate the space of designable coiled-coil structures to be reduced at least 160-fold relative to the space of geometrically feasible structures. To extend the benefits of structural parameterization to other systems, we developed a general mathematical framework for parameterizing arbitrary helical structures, which reduces to the Crick parameterization as a special case. The method is successfully validated on a set of non coiled-coil helical bundles, frequent in channels and transporter proteins, which show significant helix bending but not supercoiling. Programs for coiled-coil parameter fitting and structure generation are provided via a

  4. Samus Toroid Installation Fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Stredde, H.; /Fermilab

    1990-06-27

    The SAMUS (Small Angle Muon System) toroids have been designed and fabricated in the USSR and delivered to D0 ready for installation into the D0 detector. These toroids will be installed into the aperture of the EF's (End Toroids). The aperture in the EF's is 72-inch vertically and 66-inch horizontally. The Samus toroid is 70-inch vertically by 64-inch horizontally by 66-inch long and weighs approximately 38 tons. The Samus toroid has a 20-inch by 20-inch aperture in the center and it is through this aperture that the lift fixture must fit. The toroid must be 'threaded' through the EF aperture. Further, the Samus toroid coils are wound about the vertical portion of the aperture and thus limit the area where a lift fixture can make contact and not damage the coils. The fixture is designed to lift along a surface adjacent to the coils, but with clearance to the coil and with contact to the upper steel block of the toroid. The lift and installation will be done with the 50 ton crane at DO. The fixture was tested by lifting the Samus Toroid 2-inch off the floor and holding the weight for 10 minutes. Deflection was as predicted by the design calculations. Enclosed are sketches of the fixture and it relation to both Toroids (Samus and EF), along with hand calculations and an Finite Element Analysis. The PEA work was done by Kay Weber of the Accelerator Engineering Department.

  5. Experimental Investigation of the Natural Frequencies of Liquids in Toroidal Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, John Locke; Leonard, H. Wayne; Walton, William C., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    Several toroidal configurations applicable to missile and space-vehicle liquid storage systems were oscillated to study the natural frequencies of the antisymmetric modes of contained liquids over a range of liquid depths and tank sizes. Natural frequencies for tank oscillations parallel to the free surface of both vertical and horizontal tank orientations. Natural frequencies were obtained. The data are presented in terms of dimensionless parameters which are obtained by relating experimentally determined natural liquid frequencies to analytical expressions developed through consideration of the physics of the problem and from existing solutions for liquids in tanks having similar boundaries at the liquid surface. The experimental results obtained for the toroids indicate that these parameters are applicable to the prediction of the natural frequencies of fluids in toroids of general geometry and size.

  6. Radial impurity flux measuring method with plasma heating in general geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, Silvia; Catto, Peter J.

    2017-10-01

    Devising a means to measure the radial impurity flux across the pedestal could be used to reduce impurity accumulation, if not prevent it while providing natural fueling, and thus improving fusion performance in tokamaks. We employ a novel solution procedure that takes advantage of the poloidal flow measurement to obtain the radial impurity flux directly from available diagnostics, such as charge exchange recombination spectroscopy and Thomson scattering. In the absence of our procedure, a computationally demanding kinetic calculation of the full bulk ion response would be required at finite aspect ratio for the flux surface shape of interest. The more general form of the model considered here permits large toroidal impurity flow on the order of the impurity thermal speed. Moreover, it allows plasma heating techniques to be employed to actively modify the poloidal variation of the potential to adjust the location of impurity accumulation and thereby alter the radial impurity flux.

  7. KENO-VI: A Monte Carlo Criticality Program with generalized quadratic geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbach, D.F.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.

    1993-07-01

    This report discusses KENO-VI which is a new version of the KENO monte Carlo Criticality Safety developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purpose of KENO-VI is to provide a criticality safety code similar to KENO-V.a that possesses a more general and flexible geometry package. KENO-VI constructs and processes geometry data as sets of quadratic equations. A lengthy set of simple, easy-to-use geometric functions, similar to those provided in KENO-V.a., and the ability to build more complex geometric shapes represented by sets of quadratic equations are the heart of the geometry package in KENO-VI. The code`s flexibility is increased by allowing intersecting geometry regions, hexagonal as well as cuboidal arrays, and the ability to specify an array boundary that intersects the array.

  8. MOCUM: A two-dimensional method of characteristics code based on unstructured meshing for general geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Satvat, N.

    2012-07-01

    A transport theory code MOCUM based on the Method of Characteristics (MOC) as the flux solver with an advanced general geometry processor is developed for two-dimensional lattice and full core neutronics modeling. The core structure is represented by Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) that uses Boolean operations to build complex geometries from simple polygons. Arbitrary-precision arithmetic is also used in the process of building CSG objects to eliminate the round-off error from the commonly used double precision numbers. Then, the constructed core frame will be decomposed and refined into a conforming Delaunay triangulation to ensure the quality of the meshes. The MOC solver kernel is fully paralleled using OpenMP and the developed numerical code is validated by several benchmarks representing various core geometries. For the cases modeled, the maximum percentage error for multiplication factor and the pin power compared to reference values are 0.1% and 0.7% respectively. (authors)

  9. Parallel O(N) Stokes' Solver Towards Scalable Brownian Dynamics in General Geometries.

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Xujun; Li, Jiyuan; Jiang, Xikai; ...

    2017-01-01

    An efficient parallel Stokes’s solver is developed towards the complete inclusion of hydrodynamic interactions of Brownian particles in any geometry. A Langevin description of the particle dynamics is adopted, where the long-range interactions are included using a Green’s function formalism. A scalable parallel computational approach is presented, where the general geometry Stokeslet is calculated following a matrix-free algorithm using the General geometry Ewald-like method. Our approach employs a highly-efficient iterative finite element Stokes’ solver for the accurate treatment of long-range hydrodynamic interactions within arbitrary confined geometries. A combination of mid-point time integration of the Brownian stochastic differential equation, the parallelmore » Stokes’ solver, and a Chebyshev polynomial approximation for the fluctuation-dissipation theorem result in an O(N) parallel algorithm. We illustrate the new algorithm in the context of the dynamics of confined polymer solutions in equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. Our method is extended to treat suspended finite size particles of arbitrary shape in any geometry using an Immersed Boundary approach.« less

  10. Generalized Thomson problem in arbitrary dimensions and non-euclidean geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batle, J.; Bagdasaryan, Armen; Abdel-Aty, M.; Abdalla, S.

    2016-06-01

    Systems of identical particles with equal charge are studied under a special type of confinement. These classical particles are free to move inside some convex region S and on the boundary of it Ω (the S d - 1 -sphere, in our case). We shall show how particles arrange themselves under the sole action of the Coulomb repulsion in many dimensions in the usual Euclidean space, therefore generalizing the so called Thomson problem to many dimensions. Also, we explore how the problem varies when non-Euclidean geometries are considered. We shall see that optimal configurations in all cases possess a high degree of symmetry, regardless of the concomitant dimension or geometry.

  11. Swelling/deswelling of Toroidal Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; Dimitriyev, Michael; Marquez, Samantha; Goldbart, Paul; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Swelling/deswelling of hydrogel spheres proceeds with the increase/decrease of particle radius that corresponds to the change in overall volume. When the hydrogel has a toroidal geometry, which is characterized by two principal radii -radius from the center of the donut hole to the center of the tube, and the tube radius, it is not obvious how swelling proceeds. We prepare thermo-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) pNIPAM toroidal gel particles of different aspect ratios. At equilibrium deswelling, i.e., slow heating rate, we find that the aspect ratio remains constant for both fat and thin tori. This is explained by linear elasticity. On the other hand, when the heating rate is sufficiently high, the toroid buckles due to the presence of a water-impermeable skin layer that develops in the initial deswelling stages. Acknowledgement: We thank Dr. Manuel Marquez, YNano LLC for financial support

  12. Generalized functional formulation for multi-fractal representation of basin hydraulic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, JongChun; Paik, Kyungrock

    2015-04-01

    Natural rivers exhibit power-functional variability in their width, depth, and velocity with flow discharge (Leopold and Maddock, 1953). This relation named hydraulic geometry has been empirically supported by many field studies across the world (e.g., Leopold et al., 1964; Stall and Fok, 1968). The relationship appears either at a fixed cross-section, showing temporal variability, or along a downstream direction across an entire basin, showing spatial variability, the latter named downstream or basin hydraulic geometry. Theoretical studies that attempt to explain the power-law phenomenon (fractal), have assumed that the watershed is homogeneous hydrologically and geologically. Nevertheless, real watersheds are often subject to spatially heterogeneous conditions, due to various reasons including partial area storm coverage (Sólyom and Tucker, 2004) and transmission losses on bed and banks (Lane et al., 1997). In this setting, hydraulic geometry relationships are likely to deviate from monotonic power-law relationship and to follow rather more complex multi-fractal characteristics. In fact, deviation from single power-law was reported for at-a-station relationship of midwest rivers in US (Dodov and Foufoula-Georgiou, 2004). In the case of downstream variation, we identify significant multi-fractal characteristics over the Colorado River basin where strong heterogeneity in geological and hydrological settings presents. Conventional power-law hydraulic geometry relationships cannot express the functional variability for these cases. Motivated by this fact, we generalize the hydraulic geometry functional formulation in this study to express multi-fractal relationships. To do so, we couple the formulation of Paik and Kumar (2004), which generalized at-a-station and downstream relationships, with the formulation of Dodov and Foufoula-Georgiou (2004) which was proposed for multi-scaling in at-a-station relationship. The proposed formulation is successfully evaluated with

  13. Toroidal magnetic detector

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, B G

    1981-01-01

    Properties of the superconducting toroidal magnet for the detector at ISABELLE are discussed, along with ways it could be used to make significant physics contributions at a high energy e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring. (GHT)

  14. Effects of electron-cyclotron-resonance-heating-induced internal kink mode on the toroidal rotation in the KSTAR Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Seol, J; Lee, S G; Park, B H; Lee, H H; Terzolo, L; Shaing, K C; You, K I; Yun, G S; Kim, C C; Lee, K D; Ko, W H; Kwak, J G; Kim, W C; Oh, Y K; Kim, J Y; Kim, S S; Ida, K

    2012-11-09

    It is observed that the magnitude of the toroidal rotation speed is reduced by the central electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) regardless of the direction of the toroidal rotation. The magnetohydrodynamics activities generally appear with the rotation change due to ECRH. It is shown that the internal kink mode is induced by the central ECRH and breaks the toroidal symmetry. When the magnetohydrodynamics activities are present, the toroidal plasma viscosity is not negligible. The observed effects of ECRH on the toroidal plasma rotation are explained by the neoclassical toroidal viscosity in this Letter. It is found that the neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque caused by the internal kink mode damps the toroidal rotation.

  15. Toroidal core winder

    DOEpatents

    Potthoff, Clifford M.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for placing wire windings on a toroidal body, such as a transformer core, having an orifice in its center. The apparatus comprises a wire storage spool, a wire loop holding continuous belt maintained in a C-shaped loop by a belt supporting structure and provision for turning the belt to place and tighten loops of wire on a toroidal body, which is disposed within the gap of the C-shaped belt loop.

  16. Living Toroids - Cells on Toroidal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; Angelini, Thomas; Marquez, Samantha; Kim, Harold; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Cellular environment influences a multitude of cellular functions by providing chemical and physical signals that modulate cell behavior, dynamics, development, and eventually survival. Substrate mechanics has been recognized as one of the important physical cues that governs cell behavior at single cell level as well as in collective cell motion. Past research has suggested several contact-guided behaviors to be the result of surface curvature. However, studies on the effect of curvature are relatively scarce likely due to the difficulty in generating substrates with well-defined curvature. Here we describe the generation of toroidal droplets, which unlike spherical droplets, have regions of both positive and negative Gaussian curvature. Additionally, the range of curvatures can be controlled by varying the size and aspect ratio of the torus. Cells are either encapsulated inside toroidal droplets or located on toroidal hydrogel surfaces. Preliminary studies use B. Subtilis to study the organization of bacteria biofilms. When confined in droplets surrounded by yield-stress fluid, bacteria self-organize into heterogeneous biofilm at fluid- substrate interface. It is found that the surface curvature in the sub-millimeter scale has little effect on biofilm architecture.

  17. Nonlinear growth of zonal flows by secondary instability in general magnetic geometry

    DOE PAGES

    Plunk, G. G.; Navarro, A. Banon

    2017-02-23

    Here we present a theory of the nonlinear growth of zonal flows in magnetized plasma turbulence, by the mechanism of secondary instability. The theory is derived for general magnetic geometry, and is thus applicable to both tokamaks and stellarators. The predicted growth rate is shown to compare favorably with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations, with the error scaling as expected with the small parameter of the theory.

  18. A generalized prestressing algorithm for finite element simulations of preloaded geometries with application to the aorta.

    PubMed

    Weisbecker, Hannah; Pierce, David M; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2014-09-01

    Finite element models reconstructed from medical imaging data, for example, computed tomography or MRI scans, generally represent geometries under in vivo load. Classical finite element approaches start from an unloaded reference configuration. We present a generalized prestressing algorithm based on a concept introduced by Gee et al. (Int. J. Num. Meth. Biomed. Eng. 26:52-72, 2012) in which an incremental update of the displacement field in the classical approach is replaced by an incremental update of the deformation gradient field. Our generalized algorithm can be implemented in existing finite element codes with relatively low implementation effort on the element level and is suitable for material models formulated in the current or initial configurations. Applicable to any finite element simulations started from preloaded geometries, we demonstrate the algorithm and its convergence properties on an academic example and on a segment of a thoracic aorta meshed from MRI data. Furthermore, we present an example to discuss the influence of neglecting prestresses in geometries obtained from medical images, a topic on which conflicting statements are found in the literature.

  19. Generalized wake geometry for a helicopter in forward flight and effect of wake deformation on airloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. A.; Landgrebe, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical investigation was conducted to develop a first level generalization of the predicted distorted wake geometry of a helicopter rotor in level steady forward flight and to demonstrate the influence of wake deformation on the prediction of rotor airloads. Distortions of the tip vortex relative to the classical undistorted geometry are generalized in terms of vortex age, blade azimuth, advance ratio, thrust coefficient, and number of blades for a representative rotor. A computer module and charts were developed for approximating wake geometry and identifying wake boundaries and locations of blade-vortex passage. Predicted H-34 airloads for several inflow/wake models are compared with data for selected flight conditions. The occurrence of close blade-vortex passages and the high sensitivity of predicted airloads to small deviations of blade to tip vortex distance demonstrate the requirement for improved blade-vortex interaction models. The airload correlations indicate that refined distorted wake methodology has the potential to provide more accurate airload prediction.

  20. Internal connectivity of meandering rivers: Statistical generalization of channel hydraulic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapiga, M. J.; Smith, V. B.; Nittrouer, J. A.; Mohrig, D.; Parker, G.

    2015-09-01

    The geometry of rivers has been characterized in terms of downstream and at-a-station hydraulic geometry, based on individual cross sections. Such analyses do not, however, provide insight as to how these cross sections are connected. We generalize the concept of hydraulic geometry, using data on bathymetry from four reaches of meandering rivers that include at least five bends. We quantify connectivity in terms of the probability that a connected path exists such that a given attribute remains within specified bounds along it. While the concept is general, here we apply it to vessel navigability. We develop a predictor for navigability in meandering rivers, which requires only the following, relatively easily obtained input: vessel draft, vessel width, bankfull depth, bankfull width, relative difference between current and bankfull water surface elevation, and length of desired navigation path. The predictor is applicable to both bankfull and below-bankfull stage. A key input parameter is the standard deviation of the probability distribution of depth. This parameter, in and of itself, yields no information on connectivity as it does not capture the spatial orientation of depth variation. We find, however, that (a) the probability function for connectivity does depend on this parameter, and (b) its use allows for an approximate similarity collapse of the probability function, so providing a quasi-universal predictive relation applying to all four reaches. The results also suggest potential application to more complex forms for connectivity that involve other or multiple in-stream physical variables.

  1. Three-dimensional geometry of magnetic reconnection induced by ballooning instability in a generalized Harris sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Sangari, Arash; Wang, Zechen; Bonofiglo, Phillip

    2017-02-01

    We report for the first time the intrinsically three-dimensional (3D) geometry of the magnetic reconnection process induced by ballooning instability in a generalized Harris sheet. The spatial distribution and the structure of the quasi-separatrix layers, as well as their temporal emergence and evolution, indicate that the associated magnetic reconnection can only occur in a 3D geometry, which is irreducible to that of any two-dimensional reconnection process. Such a finding provides a new perspective to the long-standing controversy over the substorm onset problem and elucidates the combined roles of reconnection and ballooning instabilities. It also connects to the universal presence of 3D reconnection processes previously discovered in various natural and laboratory plasmas.

  2. Determination of the bead geometry considering formability and stiffness effect using generalized forming limit concept (GFLC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Wan-Gi; Vogel, Sabrina; Bursac, Nikola; Albers, Albert; Volk, Wolfram

    2016-08-01

    Beads are used in deep drawn sheet metal parts for increasing the part stiffness. Thus, reductions of sheet metal thickness and consequently weight reduction can be reached. Style guides for types and positions of beads exist, which are often applied. However, higher stiffness effects can be realized using numeric optimization. The optimization algorithm considers the two-stepped manufacturing process consisting of deep drawing and bead stamping. The formability in both manufacturing steps represents a limiting factor. Considering nonlinear strain paths using generalized forming limit concept (GFLC), acceptable geometries will be determined in simulation. Among them, the efficient geometry which has higher stiffness effects will be selected in numerical and experimental tests. These will be integrated in the optimization algorithm.

  3. Plasmastatic model of toroidal trap “Galatea-belt”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brushlinskii, K. V.; Goldich, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic galatea-traps for thermonuclear plasma confinement with current carrying conductors immersed into the plasma volume, are represented by an example of the toroidal trap “The Belt” with two circular conductors. Numerical models of equilibrium plasma and field configurations are investigated in straightened into cylinder analogues of some toroidal galateas in a series of works by the authors. This paper presents a plasmastatic model of configurations in the toroidal variant of “The Belt” in terms of a boundary problem with the Grad-Shafranov equation. Distinctions of their geometry and quantitative characteristics from the cylindrical analogues and their dependence of parameters are determined in computation.

  4. Toroidal magnet system

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro; Baker, Charles C.

    1981-01-01

    In a plasma device having a toroidal plasma containment vessel, a toroidal field-generating coil system includes fixed linking coils each formed of first and second sections with the first section passing through a central opening through the containment vessel and the second section completing the linking coil to link the containment vessel. A plurality of removable unlinked coils are each formed of first and second C-shaped sections joined to each other at their open ends with their bights spaced apart. The second C-shaped section of each movable coil is removably mounted adjacent the second section of a linking coil, with the containment vessel disposed between the open ends of the first and second C-shaped sections. Electric current is passed through the linking and removable coils in opposite sense in the respective adjacent second sections to produce a net toroidal field.

  5. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  6. Self-consistent perturbed equilibrium with neoclassical toroidal torque in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Logan, Nikolas C.

    2017-03-01

    Toroidal torque is one of the most important consequences of non-axisymmetric fields in tokamaks. The well-known neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) is due to the second-order toroidal force from anisotropic pressure tensor in the presence of these asymmetries. This work shows that the first-order toroidal force originating from the same anisotropic pressure tensor, despite having no flux surface average, can significantly modify the local perturbed force balance and thus must be included in perturbed equilibrium self-consistent with NTV. The force operator with an anisotropic pressure tensor is not self-adjoint when the NTV torque is finite and thus is solved directly for each component. This approach yields a modified, non-self-adjoint Euler-Lagrange equation that can be solved using a variety of common drift-kinetic models in generalized tokamak geometry. The resulting energy and torque integral provides a unique way to construct a torque response matrix, which contains all the information of self-consistent NTV torque profiles obtainable by applying non-axisymmetric fields to the plasma. This torque response matrix can then be used to systematically optimize non-axisymmetric field distributions for desired NTV profiles.

  7. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  8. Developments on the Toroid Ion Trap Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, S.A.; Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1999-06-13

    Investigations into several areas of research have been undertaken to address the performance limitations of the toroid analyzer. The Simion 3D6 (2) ion optics simulation program was used to determine whether the potential well minimum of the toroid trapping field is in the physical center of the trap electrode structure. The results (Figures 1) indicate that the minimum of the potential well is shifted towards the inner ring electrode by an amount approximately equal to 10% of the r0 dimension. A simulation of the standard 3D ion trap under similar conditions was performed as a control. In this case, the ions settle to the minimum of the potential well at a point that is coincident with the physical center (both radial and axial) of the trapping electrodes. It is proposed that by using simulation programs, a set of new analyzer electrodes can be fashioned that will correct for the non- linear fields introduced by curving the substantially quadrupolar field about the toroid axis in order to provide a trapping field similar to the 3D ion trap cross- section. A new toroid electrode geometry has been devised to allow the use of channel- tron style detectors in place of the more expensive multichannel plate detector. Two different versions have been designed and constructed - one using the current ion trap cross- section (Figure 2) and another using the linear quedrupole cross- section design first reported by Bier and Syka (3).

  9. Exact Descriptions of General Relativity Derived from Newtonian Mechanics within Curved Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savickas, David

    2015-04-01

    General relativity and Newtonian mechanics are shown to be exactly related when Newton's second law is written in a curved geometry by using the physical components of a vector as is defined in tensor calculus. By replacing length within the momentum's velocity by the vector metric in a curved geometry the second law can then be shown to be exactly identical to the geodesic equation of motion occurring in general relativity. When time's vector direction is constant, as similarly occurs in Newtonian mechanics, this equation can be reduced to a curved three-dimensional equation of motion that yields the the Schwarzschild equations of motion for an isolated particle. They can be used to describe gravitational behavior for any array of masses for which the Newtonian gravitational potential is known, and is shown to describe a mass particle's behavior in the gravitational field of a thin mass-rod. This use of Newton's laws allows relativistic behavior to be described in a physically comprehensible manner. D. Savickas, Int. J. Mod. Phys. D 23 1430018, (2014).

  10. Helicopter rotor wake geometry and its influence in forward flight. Volume 1: Generalized wake geometry and wake effect on rotor airloads and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. A.; Landgrebe, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    An analytic investigation to generalize wake geometry of a helicopter rotor in steady level forward flight and to demonstrate the influence of wake deformation in the prediction of rotor airloads and performance is described. Volume 1 presents a first level generalized wake model based on theoretically predicted tip vortex geometries for a selected representative blade design. The tip vortex distortions are generalized in equation form as displacements from the classical undistorted tip vortex geometry in terms of vortex age, blade azimuth, rotor advance ratio, thrust coefficient, and number of blades. These equations were programmed to provide distorted wake coordinates at very low cost for use in rotor airflow and airloads prediction analyses. The sensitivity of predicted rotor airloads, performance, and blade bending moments to the modeling of the tip vortex distortion are demonstrated for low to moderately high advance ratios for a representative rotor and the H-34 rotor. Comparisons with H-34 rotor test data demonstrate the effects of the classical, predicted distorted, and the newly developed generalized wake models on airloads and blade bending moments. Use of distorted wake models results in the occurrence of numerous blade-vortex interactions on the forward and lateral sides of the rotor disk. The significance of these interactions is related to the number and degree of proximity to the blades of the tip vortices. The correlation obtained with the distorted wake models (generalized and predicted) is encouraging.

  11. Hall MHD Equilibrium of Accelerated Compact Toroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, S. J.; Hwang, D. Q.; Horton, R. D.; Evans, R. W.; Brockington, S. J.

    2007-11-01

    We examine the structure and dynamics of the compact toroid's magnetic field. The compact toroid is dramatically accelerated by a large rail-gun Lorentz force density equal to j xB. We use magnetic data from the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment to answer the question of exactly where in the system j xB has nonzero values, and to what extent we can apply the standard model of force-free equilibrium. In particular we present a method of analysis of the magnetic field probe signals that allows direct comparison to the predictions of the Woltjer-Taylor force-free model and Turner's generalization of magnetic relaxation in the presence of a non-zero Hall term and fluid vorticity.

  12. A geometry and texture coupled flexible generalization of urban building models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Man; Zhang, Liqiang; Takis Mathiopoulos, P.; Xie, Wenqing; Ding, Yusi; Wang, Hao

    2012-06-01

    In the past, numerous research efforts have focused on generalization of city building models. However, a generic procedure for creating flexible generalization results supporting the fast and efficient update of original building models with various complexities is still an open problem. Moreover, building clusters created in previously published generalization methods are not flexible enough to meet the various requirements for both legible and realistic visualization. Motivated by these observations, this paper proposes a new method for generating a flexible generalization outcome which enables convenient updating of original building models. It also proposes a flexible preprocessing of this generalized information to render a legible and realistic urban scene. This is accomplished by introducing a novel component structure, termed as FEdge, particularly designed for efficiently managing the geometry and texture information in building cluster instances (both original building models and building clusters) during the generalization, visualization and updating processes. Furthermore, a multiple representation structure, referred to as Evolved Buffer-Tree (EBT), is also introduced. The purpose of the EBT is to organize building cluster instances and to employ more flexible LODs for both legible and realistic visualization of urban scenes. FEdge has an intuitive planar shape which can be effectively used in representing rough 3D facade composed by detailed continuous meshes. Each FEdge is given a unique identifier, referred to as FEdge Index. In the proposed generalization scheme, firstly each original building model treated as a building cluster instance is abstracted and presented as FEdge Indices. These FEdge Indices are then used for producing generalized building cluster instances in the EBT portably, and to support convenient model updating and flexible preprocessing of the generalization results for renderable building cluster instances. Secondly, to achieve

  13. Motivation for Using Generalized Geometry in the Time Dependent Transport Code TDKENO

    SciTech Connect

    Dustin Popp; Zander Mausolff; Sedat Goluoglu

    2016-04-01

    We are proposing to use the code, TDKENO, to model TREAT. TDKENO solves the time dependent, three dimensional Boltzmann transport equation with explicit representation of delayed neutrons. Instead of directly integrating this equation, the neutron flux is factored into two components – a rapidly varying amplitude equation and a slowly varying shape equation and each is solved separately on different time scales. The shape equation is solved using the 3D Monte Carlo transport code KENO, from Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s SCALE code package. Using the Monte Carlo method to solve the shape equation is still computationally intensive, but the operation is only performed when needed. The amplitude equation is solved deterministically and frequently, so the solution gives an accurate time-dependent solution without having to repeatedly We have modified TDKENO to incorporate KENO-VI so that we may accurately represent the geometries within TREAT. This paper explains the motivation behind using generalized geometry, and provides the results of our modifications. TDKENO uses the Improved Quasi-Static method to accomplish this. In this method, the neutron flux is factored into two components. One component is a purely time-dependent and rapidly varying amplitude function, which is solved deterministically and very frequently (small time steps). The other is a slowly varying flux shape function that weakly depends on time and is only solved when needed (significantly larger time steps).

  14. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-12-15

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≫ 1, where τ{sub R} and τ{sub V} represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  15. Analysis of linear two-dimensional general rate model for chromatographic columns of cylindrical geometry.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Shamsul; Uche, David U; Khan, Farman U; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas

    2017-05-05

    This work is concerned with the analytical solutions and moment analysis of a linear two-dimensional general rate model (2D-GRM) describing the transport of a solute through a chromatographic column of cylindrical geometry. Analytical solutions are derived through successive implementation of finite Hankel and Laplace transformations for two different sets of boundary conditions. The process is further analyzed by deriving analytical temporal moments from the Laplace domain solutions. Radial gradients are typically neglected in liquid chromatography studies which are particularly important in the case of non-perfect injections. Several test problems of single-solute transport are considered. The derived analytical results are validated against the numerical solutions of a high resolution finite volume scheme. The derived analytical results can play an important role in further development of liquid chromatography. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of a general method for obtaining the geometry of microfluidic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Razavi, Mohammad Sayed Salimpour, M. R.; Shirani, Ebrahim

    2014-01-15

    In the present study, a general method for geometry of fluidic networks is developed with emphasis on pressure-driven flows in the microfluidic applications. The design method is based on general features of network's geometry such as cross-sectional area and length of channels. Also, the method is applicable to various cross-sectional shapes such as circular, rectangular, triangular, and trapezoidal cross sections. Using constructal theory, the flow resistance, energy loss and performance of the network are optimized. Also, by this method, practical design strategies for the fabrication of microfluidic networks can be improved. The design method enables rapid prediction of fluid flow in the complex network of channels and is very useful for improving proper miniaturization and integration of microfluidic networks. Minimization of flow resistance of the network of channels leads to universal constants for consecutive cross-sectional areas and lengths. For a Y-shaped network, the optimal ratios of consecutive cross-section areas (A{sub i+1}/A{sub i}) and lengths (L{sub i+1}/L{sub i}) are obtained as A{sub i+1}/A{sub i} = 2{sup −2/3} and L{sub i+1}/L{sub i} = 2{sup −1/3}, respectively. It is shown that energy loss in the network is proportional to the volume of network. It is also seen when the number of channels is increased both the hydraulic resistance and the volume occupied by the network are increased in a similar manner. Furthermore, the method offers that fabrication of multi-depth and multi-width microchannels should be considered as an integral part of designing procedures. Finally, numerical simulations for the fluid flow in the network have been performed and results show very good agreement with analytic results.

  17. Fractal forest: Fractal geometry and applications in forest science. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lorimer, N.D.; Haight, R.G.; Leary, R.A.

    1994-07-20

    Fractal geometry is a tool for describing and analyzing irregularity. Because most of what we measure in the forest is discontinuous, jagged, and fragmented, fractal geometry has potential for improving the precision of measurement and description. The study reviews the literature on fractal geometry and its applications to forest measurements.

  18. Tokamak with liquid metal toroidal field coil

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro; Schaffer, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    Tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. Electric current is passed through the liquid metal over a conductive path linking the toroidal space to produce a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  19. Method to integrate full particle orbit in toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, X. S.; Xiao, Y.; Kuley, A.; Lin, Z.

    2015-09-01

    It is important to integrate full particle orbit accurately when studying charged particle dynamics in electromagnetic waves with frequency higher than cyclotron frequency. We have derived a form of the Boris scheme using magnetic coordinates, which can be used effectively to integrate the cyclotron orbit in toroidal geometry over a long period of time. The new method has been verified by a full particle orbit simulation in toroidal geometry without high frequency waves. The full particle orbit calculation recovers guiding center banana orbit. This method has better numeric properties than the conventional Runge-Kutta method for conserving particle energy and magnetic moment. The toroidal precession frequency is found to match that from guiding center simulation. Many other important phenomena in the presence of an electric field, such as E × B drift, Ware pinch effect and neoclassical polarization drift are also verified by the full orbit simulation.

  20. CALCULATION OF PARTICLE BOUNCE AND TRANSIT TIMES ON GENERAL GEOMETRY FLUX SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, D.; Menard, J.

    2007-01-01

    A viable nuclear fusion reactor must confi ne energetic plasmas long enough so that the fusion energy produced exceeds the energy consumed to heat the plasma and maintain confi nement. It is well-known that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) or plasma fl uid instabilities limit confi nement. One such important instability is the resistive wall mode (RWM). Plasma rotation faster than a critical frequency has been observed to stabilize the RWM. Some theories predict that the critical frequency will vary inversely with the characteristic times particles take to orbit the plasma. Previous calculations of these orbit times have assumed high aspect ratio and circular plasma cross-section, approximations unsuitable for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Analytic solutions for the orbit times have been derived as functions of particle energy and magnetic moment for low aspect ratio and elliptical cross-sections. Numeric solutions for arbitrary aspect ratio and cross-sectional geometry were also computed using Mathematica and IDL and agree with the analytic forms. In typical parameter regimes for NSTX, the generalized orbit times can differ from the high aspect ratio, circular approximations by as much as 40%. This result might help to assess how accurately theory describes RWM stabilization in NSTX. If theory and experiment are found to agree, generalized orbit times can be used to predict RWM stabilization in low aspect ratio nuclear fusion reactors.

  1. Fractional cable equation for general geometry: A model of axons with swellings and anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sánchez, Erick J.; Romero, Juan M.; Yépez-Martínez, Huitzilin

    2017-09-01

    Different experimental studies have reported anomalous diffusion in brain tissues and notably this anomalous diffusion is expressed through fractional derivatives. Axons are important to understand neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Indeed, abnormal accumulation of proteins and organelles in axons is a hallmark of these diseases. The diffusion in the axons can become anomalous as a result of this abnormality. In this case the voltage propagation in axons is affected. Another hallmark of different neurodegenerative diseases is given by discrete swellings along the axon. In order to model the voltage propagation in axons with anomalous diffusion and swellings, in this paper we propose a fractional cable equation for a general geometry. This generalized equation depends on fractional parameters and geometric quantities such as the curvature and torsion of the cable. For a cable with a constant radius we show that the voltage decreases when the fractional effect increases. In cables with swellings we find that when the fractional effect or the swelling radius increases, the voltage decreases. Similar behavior is obtained when the number of swellings and the fractional effect increase. Moreover, we find that when the radius swelling (or the number of swellings) and the fractional effect increase at the same time, the voltage dramatically decreases.

  2. Toroidal rotation studies in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. G.; Lee, H. H.; Yoo, J. W.; Kim, Y. S.; Ko, W. H.; Terzolo, L.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.; KSTAR Team

    2014-10-01

    Investigation of the toroidal rotation is one of the most important topics for the magnetically confined fusion plasma researches since it is essential for the stabilization of resistive wall modes and its shear plays an important role to improve plasma confinement by suppressing turbulent transport. The most advantage of KSTAR tokamak for toroidal rotation studies is that it equips two main diagnostics including the high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) and charge exchange spectroscopy (CES). Simultaneous core toroidal rotation and ion temperature measurements of different impurity species from the XICS and CES have shown in reasonable agreement with various plasma discharges in KSTAR. It has been observed that the toroidal rotation in KSTAR is faster than that of other tokamak devices with similar machine size and momentum input. This may due to an intrinsically low toroidal field ripple and error field of the KSTAR device. A strong braking of the toroidal rotation by the n = 1 non-resonant magnetic perturbations (NRMPs) also indicates these low toroidal field ripple and error field. Recently, it has been found that n = 2 NRMPs can also damp the toroidal rotation in KSTAR. The detail toroidal rotation studies will be presented. Work supported by the Korea Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning under the KSTAR project.

  3. Toroidal vortices in resistive magnetohydrodynamic equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David; Bates, Jason W.; Li, Shuojun

    1997-04-01

    When a time-independent electric current flows toroidally in a uniform ring of electrically conducting fluid, a Lorentz force results, j×B, where j is the local electric current density, and B is the magnetic field it generates. Because of purely geometric effects, the curl of j×B is nonvanishing, and so j×B cannot be balanced by the gradient of any scalar pressure. Taking the curl of the fluid's equation of motion shows that the net effect of the j×B force is to generate toroidal vorticity. Allowed steady states necessarily contain toroidal vortices, with flows in the poloidal directions. The flow pattern is a characteristic "double smoke ring" configuration. The effect seems quite general, although it is analytically simple only in special limits. One limit described here is that of high viscosity (low Reynolds number), with stress-free wall boundary conditions on the velocity field, although it is apparent that similar mechanical motions will result for no-slip boundaries and higher Reynolds numbers. A rather ubiquitous connection between current-carrying toroids and vortex rings seems to be implied, one that disappears in the "straight cylinder" limit.

  4. Trapped ion mode in toroidally rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Artun, M.; Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1995-04-01

    The influence of radially sheared toroidal flows on the Trapped Ion Mode (TIM) is investigated using a two-dimensional eigenmode code. These radially extended toroidal microinstabilities could significantly influence the interpretation of confinement scaling trends and associated fluctuation properties observed in recent tokamak experiments. In the present analysis, the electrostatic drift kinetic equation is obtained from the general nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in rotating plasmas. In the long perpendicular wavelength limit k{sub {tau}}{rho}{sub bi} {much_lt} 1, where {rho}{sub bi} is the average trapped-ion banana width, the resulting eigenmode equation becomes a coupled system of second order differential equations nmo for the poloidal harmonics. These equations are solved using finite element methods. Numerical results from the analysis of low and medium toroidal mode number instabilities are presented using representative TFTR L-mode input parameters. To illustrate the effects of mode coupling, a case is presented where the poloidal mode coupling is suppressed. The influence of toroidal rotation on a TFTR L-mode shot is also analyzed by including a beam species with considerable larger temperature. A discussion of the numerical results is presented.

  5. Toroidal modeling of interaction between resistive wall mode and plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yueqiang

    2013-02-15

    The non-linear interplay between the resistive wall mode (RWM) and the toroidal plasma flow is numerically investigated in a full toroidal geometry, by simultaneously solving the initial value problems for the n = 1 RWM and the n = 0 toroidal force balance equation. Here, n is the toroidal mode number. The neoclassical toroidal viscous torque is identified as the major momentum sink that brakes the toroidal plasma flow during the non-linear evolution of the RWM. This holds for a mode that is initially either unstable or stable. For an initially stable RWM, the braking of the flow, and hence the eventual growth of the mode, depends critically on the initial perturbation amplitude.

  6. A generalization of the Drude-Smith formula for magneto-optical conductivities in Faraday geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, F. W.; Xu, W.; Li, L. L.; Zhang, C.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we generalize the impulse response approach and Poisson statistics proposed by Smith [Phys. Rev. B 64, 155106 (2001)] to evaluate the longitudinal and transverse magneto-optical conductivities in an electron gas system in Faraday geometry. Comparing with the standard Drude model, the coefficients an are introduced in the Drude-Smith formula to describe the backscattering or localization effect for the nth electronic scattering event. Such a formula can also be applied to study the elements of the dielectric function matrix in the presence of magnetic and radiation fields in electron gas systems. This theoretical work is primely motivated by recent experimental activities in measuring the real and imaginary parts of longitudinal and transverse magneto-optical conductivities in condensed matter materials and electronic devices using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. We believe that the results obtained from this study can provide an appropriate theoretical tool in reproducing the experimental findings and in fitting with experimental data to determine the important sample and material parameters.

  7. A generalization of the Drude-Smith formula for magneto-optical conductivities in Faraday geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Han, F. W.; Xu, W.

    2016-06-28

    In this study, we generalize the impulse response approach and Poisson statistics proposed by Smith [Phys. Rev. B 64, 155106 (2001)] to evaluate the longitudinal and transverse magneto-optical conductivities in an electron gas system in Faraday geometry. Comparing with the standard Drude model, the coefficients a{sub n} are introduced in the Drude-Smith formula to describe the backscattering or localization effect for the nth electronic scattering event. Such a formula can also be applied to study the elements of the dielectric function matrix in the presence of magnetic and radiation fields in electron gas systems. This theoretical work is primely motivated by recent experimental activities in measuring the real and imaginary parts of longitudinal and transverse magneto-optical conductivities in condensed matter materials and electronic devices using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. We believe that the results obtained from this study can provide an appropriate theoretical tool in reproducing the experimental findings and in fitting with experimental data to determine the important sample and material parameters.

  8. A generalized 2D pencil beam scaling algorithm for proton dose calculation in heterogeneous slab geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Westerly, David C.; Mo Xiaohu; DeLuca, Paul M. Jr.; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Pencil beam algorithms are commonly used for proton therapy dose calculations. Szymanowski and Oelfke ['Two-dimensional pencil beam scaling: An improved proton dose algorithm for heterogeneous media,' Phys. Med. Biol. 47, 3313-3330 (2002)] developed a two-dimensional (2D) scaling algorithm which accurately models the radial pencil beam width as a function of depth in heterogeneous slab geometries using a scaled expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth and kinetic energy. However, an assumption made in the derivation of the technique limits its range of validity to cases where the input expression for the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. The goal of this work is to derive a generalized form of 2D pencil beam scaling that is independent of the scattering power model and appropriate for use with any expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth. Methods: Using Fermi-Eyges transport theory, the authors derive an expression for the radial pencil beam width in heterogeneous slab geometries which is independent of the proton scattering power and related quantities. The authors then perform test calculations in homogeneous and heterogeneous slab phantoms using both the original 2D scaling model and the new model with expressions for the radial kernel width in water computed from both local and nonlocal scattering power models, as well as a nonlocal parameterization of Moliere scattering theory. In addition to kernel width calculations, dose calculations are also performed for a narrow Gaussian proton beam. Results: Pencil beam width calculations indicate that both 2D scaling formalisms perform well when the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. Computing the radial kernel width from a nonlocal scattering model results in the local 2D scaling formula under-predicting the pencil beam width by as much as 1.4 mm (21%) at the depth

  9. A generalized 2D pencil beam scaling algorithm for proton dose calculation in heterogeneous slab geometries.

    PubMed

    Westerly, David C; Mo, Xiaohu; Tomé, Wolfgang A; Mackie, Thomas R; DeLuca, Paul M

    2013-06-01

    Pencil beam algorithms are commonly used for proton therapy dose calculations. Szymanowski and Oelfke ["Two-dimensional pencil beam scaling: An improved proton dose algorithm for heterogeneous media," Phys. Med. Biol. 47, 3313-3330 (2002)] developed a two-dimensional (2D) scaling algorithm which accurately models the radial pencil beam width as a function of depth in heterogeneous slab geometries using a scaled expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth and kinetic energy. However, an assumption made in the derivation of the technique limits its range of validity to cases where the input expression for the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. The goal of this work is to derive a generalized form of 2D pencil beam scaling that is independent of the scattering power model and appropriate for use with any expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth. Using Fermi-Eyges transport theory, the authors derive an expression for the radial pencil beam width in heterogeneous slab geometries which is independent of the proton scattering power and related quantities. The authors then perform test calculations in homogeneous and heterogeneous slab phantoms using both the original 2D scaling model and the new model with expressions for the radial kernel width in water computed from both local and nonlocal scattering power models, as well as a nonlocal parameterization of Molière scattering theory. In addition to kernel width calculations, dose calculations are also performed for a narrow Gaussian proton beam. Pencil beam width calculations indicate that both 2D scaling formalisms perform well when the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. Computing the radial kernel width from a nonlocal scattering model results in the local 2D scaling formula under-predicting the pencil beam width by as much as 1.4 mm (21%) at the depth of the Bragg peak for a

  10. A generalized 2D pencil beam scaling algorithm for proton dose calculation in heterogeneous slab geometries

    PubMed Central

    Westerly, David C.; Mo, Xiaohu; Tomé, Wolfgang A.; Mackie, Thomas R.; DeLuca, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Pencil beam algorithms are commonly used for proton therapy dose calculations. Szymanowski and Oelfke [“Two-dimensional pencil beam scaling: An improved proton dose algorithm for heterogeneous media,” Phys. Med. Biol. 47, 3313–3330 (2002)10.1088/0031-9155/47/18/304] developed a two-dimensional (2D) scaling algorithm which accurately models the radial pencil beam width as a function of depth in heterogeneous slab geometries using a scaled expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth and kinetic energy. However, an assumption made in the derivation of the technique limits its range of validity to cases where the input expression for the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. The goal of this work is to derive a generalized form of 2D pencil beam scaling that is independent of the scattering power model and appropriate for use with any expression for the radial kernel width in water as a function of depth. Methods: Using Fermi-Eyges transport theory, the authors derive an expression for the radial pencil beam width in heterogeneous slab geometries which is independent of the proton scattering power and related quantities. The authors then perform test calculations in homogeneous and heterogeneous slab phantoms using both the original 2D scaling model and the new model with expressions for the radial kernel width in water computed from both local and nonlocal scattering power models, as well as a nonlocal parameterization of Molière scattering theory. In addition to kernel width calculations, dose calculations are also performed for a narrow Gaussian proton beam. Results: Pencil beam width calculations indicate that both 2D scaling formalisms perform well when the radial kernel width in water is derived from a local scattering power model. Computing the radial kernel width from a nonlocal scattering model results in the local 2D scaling formula under-predicting the pencil beam width by as

  11. Generalized Kähler Geometry and current algebras in SU(2) × U(1) N = 2 superconformal WZW model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhomenko, S. E.

    2017-04-01

    We examine the Generalized Kähler Geometry (GKG) of quantum N = 2 superconformal WZW model on SU(2) × U(1) and relate the right-moving and left-moving Kac-Moody superalgebra currents to the GKG data of the group manifold using Hamiltonian formalism.

  12. Parallel O(N) Stokes’ solver towards scalable Brownian dynamics of hydrodynamically interacting objects in general geometries

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Xujun; Li, Jiyuan; Jiang, Xikai; ...

    2017-06-29

    An efficient parallel Stokes’s solver is developed towards the complete inclusion of hydrodynamic interactions of Brownian particles in any geometry. A Langevin description of the particle dynamics is adopted, where the long-range interactions are included using a Green’s function formalism. We present a scalable parallel computational approach, where the general geometry Stokeslet is calculated following a matrix-free algorithm using the General geometry Ewald-like method. Our approach employs a highly-efficient iterative finite element Stokes’ solver for the accurate treatment of long-range hydrodynamic interactions within arbitrary confined geometries. A combination of mid-point time integration of the Brownian stochastic differential equation, the parallelmore » Stokes’ solver, and a Chebyshev polynomial approximation for the fluctuation-dissipation theorem result in an O(N) parallel algorithm. We also illustrate the new algorithm in the context of the dynamics of confined polymer solutions in equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. Our method is extended to treat suspended finite size particles of arbitrary shape in any geometry using an Immersed Boundary approach.« less

  13. Parallel O(N) Stokes' solver towards scalable Brownian dynamics of hydrodynamically interacting objects in general geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xujun; Li, Jiyuan; Jiang, Xikai; Karpeev, Dmitry; Heinonen, Olle; Smith, Barry; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan P.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2017-06-01

    An efficient parallel Stokes' solver has been developed for complete description of hydrodynamic interactions between Brownian particles in bulk and confined geometries. A Langevin description of the particle dynamics is adopted, where the long-range interactions are included using a Green's function formalism. A scalable parallel computational approach is presented, where the general geometry Stokeslet is calculated following a matrix-free algorithm using the general geometry Ewald-like method. Our approach employs a highly efficient iterative finite-element Stokes' solver for the accurate treatment of long-range hydrodynamic interactions in arbitrary confined geometries. A combination of mid-point time integration of the Brownian stochastic differential equation, the parallel Stokes' solver, and a Chebyshev polynomial approximation for the fluctuation-dissipation theorem leads to an O(N) parallel algorithm. We illustrate the new algorithm in the context of the dynamics of confined polymer solutions under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The method is then extended to treat suspended finite size particles of arbitrary shape in any geometry using an immersed boundary approach.

  14. Parallel O(N) Stokes' solver towards scalable Brownian dynamics of hydrodynamically interacting objects in general geometries.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xujun; Li, Jiyuan; Jiang, Xikai; Karpeev, Dmitry; Heinonen, Olle; Smith, Barry; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan P; de Pablo, Juan J

    2017-06-28

    An efficient parallel Stokes' solver has been developed for complete description of hydrodynamic interactions between Brownian particles in bulk and confined geometries. A Langevin description of the particle dynamics is adopted, where the long-range interactions are included using a Green's function formalism. A scalable parallel computational approach is presented, where the general geometry Stokeslet is calculated following a matrix-free algorithm using the general geometry Ewald-like method. Our approach employs a highly efficient iterative finite-element Stokes' solver for the accurate treatment of long-range hydrodynamic interactions in arbitrary confined geometries. A combination of mid-point time integration of the Brownian stochastic differential equation, the parallel Stokes' solver, and a Chebyshev polynomial approximation for the fluctuation-dissipation theorem leads to an O(N) parallel algorithm. We illustrate the new algorithm in the context of the dynamics of confined polymer solutions under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The method is then extended to treat suspended finite size particles of arbitrary shape in any geometry using an immersed boundary approach.

  15. Toroidal sensor arrays for real-time photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Bychkov, Anton S; Cherepetskaya, Elena B; Karabutov, Alexander A; Makarov, Vladimir A

    2017-07-01

    This article addresses theoretical and numerical investigation of image formation in photoacoustic (PA) imaging with complex-shaped concave sensor arrays. The spatial resolution and the size of sensitivity region of PA and laser ultrasonic (LU) imaging systems are assessed using sensitivity maps and spatial resolution maps in the image plane. This paper also discusses the relationship between the size of high-sensitivity regions and the spatial resolution of real-time imaging systems utilizing toroidal arrays. It is shown that the use of arrays with toroidal geometry significantly improves the diagnostic capabilities of PA and LU imaging to investigate biological objects, rocks, and composite materials.

  16. Toroidal sensor arrays for real-time photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, Anton S.; Cherepetskaya, Elena B.; Karabutov, Alexander A.; Makarov, Vladimir A.

    2017-07-01

    This article addresses theoretical and numerical investigation of image formation in photoacoustic (PA) imaging with complex-shaped concave sensor arrays. The spatial resolution and the size of sensitivity region of PA and laser ultrasonic (LU) imaging systems are assessed using sensitivity maps and spatial resolution maps in the image plane. This paper also discusses the relationship between the size of high-sensitivity regions and the spatial resolution of real-time imaging systems utilizing toroidal arrays. It is shown that the use of arrays with toroidal geometry significantly improves the diagnostic capabilities of PA and LU imaging to investigate biological objects, rocks, and composite materials.

  17. Shrinking instability of toroidal droplets.

    PubMed

    Fragkopoulos, Alexandros A; Pairam, Ekapop; Berger, Eric; Segre, Phil N; Fernández-Nieves, Alberto

    2017-03-14

    Toroidal droplets are inherently unstable due to surface tension. They can break up, similar to cylindrical jets, but also exhibit a shrinking instability, which is inherent to the toroidal shape. We investigate the evolution of shrinking toroidal droplets using particle image velocimetry. We obtain the flow field inside the droplets and show that as the torus evolves, its cross-section significantly deviates from circular. We then use the experimentally obtained velocities at the torus interface to theoretically reconstruct the internal flow field. Our calculation correctly describes the experimental results and elucidates the role of those modes that, among the many possible ones, are required to capture all of the relevant experimental features.

  18. Dynamics of the Disruption Halo Current Toroidal Asymmetry in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    S.P. Gerhardt

    2012-09-27

    This paper describes the dynamics of disruption halo current non-axisymmetries in the lower divertor of the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al. Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. While. The halo currents typically have a strongly asymmetric structure where they enter the divertor floor, and this asymmetry has been observed to complete up to 7 toroidal revolutions over the duration of the halo current pulse. However, the rotation speed and toroidal extend of the asymmetry can vary significantly during the pulse. The rotation speed, halo current pulse duration, and total number of revolutions tend to be smaller in cases with large halo currents. The halo current pattern is observed to become toroidally symmetric at the end of the halo current pulse. It is proposed that this symmeterization is due to the loss of most or all of the closed field line geometry in the final phase of the vertical displacement event.

  19. Analytical solutions for Tokamak equilibria with reversed toroidal current

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Caroline G. L.; Roberto, M.; Braga, F. L.; Caldas, I. L.

    2011-08-15

    In tokamaks, an advanced plasma confinement regime has been investigated with a central hollow electric current with negative density which gives rise to non-nested magnetic surfaces. We present analytical solutions for the magnetohydrodynamic equilibria of this regime in terms of non-orthogonal toroidal polar coordinates. These solutions are obtained for large aspect ratio tokamaks and they are valid for any kind of reversed hollow current density profiles. The zero order solution of the poloidal magnetic flux function describes nested toroidal magnetic surfaces with a magnetic axis displaced due to the toroidal geometry. The first order correction introduces a poloidal field asymmetry and, consequently, magnetic islands arise around the zero order surface with null poloidal magnetic flux gradient. An analytic expression for the magnetic island width is deduced in terms of the equilibrium parameters. We give examples of the equilibrium plasma profiles and islands obtained for a class of current density profile.

  20. Tailoring the multipoles in THz toroidal metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Longqing; Srivastava, Yogesh Kumar; Singh, Ranjan

    2017-08-01

    The multipoles play a significant role in determining the resonant behavior of subwavelength resonators that form the basis of metamaterial and plasmonic systems. Here, we study the impact of multipoles including toroidal dipole on the resonance intensity and linewidth of the fundamental inductive-capacitance (LC) resonance of a metamaterial array. The dominant multipoles that strongly contribute to the resonances are tailored by spatial rearrangement of the neighboring resonators such that the mutual interactions between the magnetic, electric, and toroidal configurations lead to enormous change in the linewidth as well as the resonance intensity of the LC mode. Manipulation of the multipoles in a metamaterial array provides a general strategy for the optimization of the quality factor of metamaterial resonances, which is fundamental to its applications in broad areas of sensing, lasing and nonlinear optics where stronger field confinement plays a significant role.

  1. The geometrical structure of quantum theory as a natural generalization of information geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Reginatto, Marcel

    2015-01-13

    Quantum mechanics has a rich geometrical structure which allows for a geometrical formulation of the theory. This formalism was introduced by Kibble and later developed by a number of other authors. The usual approach has been to start from the standard description of quantum mechanics and identify the relevant geometrical features that can be used for the reformulation of the theory. Here this procedure is inverted: the geometrical structure of quantum theory is derived from information geometry, a geometrical structure that may be considered more fundamental, and the Hilbert space of the standard formulation of quantum mechanics is constructed using geometrical quantities. This suggests that quantum theory has its roots in information geometry.

  2. A General, Synthetic Model for Predicting Biodiversity Gradients from Environmental Geometry.

    PubMed

    Gross, Kevin; Snyder-Beattie, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Latitudinal and elevational biodiversity gradients fascinate ecologists, and have inspired dozens of explanations. The geometry of the abiotic environment is sometimes thought to contribute to these gradients, yet evaluations of geometric explanations are limited by a fragmented understanding of the diversity patterns they predict. This article presents a mathematical model that synthesizes multiple pathways by which environmental geometry can drive diversity gradients. The model characterizes species ranges by their environmental niches and limits on range sizes and places those ranges onto the simplified geometries of a sphere or cone. The model predicts nuanced and realistic species-richness gradients, including latitudinal diversity gradients with tropical plateaus and mid-latitude inflection points and elevational diversity gradients with low-elevation diversity maxima. The model also illustrates the importance of a mid-environment effect that augments species richness at locations with intermediate environments. Model predictions match multiple empirical biodiversity gradients, depend on ecological traits in a testable fashion, and formally synthesize elements of several geometric models. Together, these results suggest that previous assessments of geometric hypotheses should be reconsidered and that environmental geometry may play a deeper role in driving biodiversity gradients than is currently appreciated.

  3. Grinding Inside A Toroidal Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Walter; Adams, James F.; Burley, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    Weld lines ground smooth within about 0.001 in. Grinding tool for smoothing longitudinal weld lines inside toroidal cavity includes curved tunnel jig to guide grinding "mouse" along weld line. Curvature of tunnel jig matched to shape of toroid so grinding ball in mouse follows circular arc of correct radius as mouse is pushed along tunnel. Tool enables precise control of grindout shape, yet easy to use.

  4. Instability of Toroidal Magnetic Field in Jets and Plerions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1998-01-01

    Astrophysical jets and pulsar-fed supernova remnants (plerions) are expected to develop highly organized magnetic structures dominated by concentric loops of toroidal field, Bφ. It has been argued that such structures could explain the polarization properties of some jets and contribute to their lateral confinement through magnetic tension forces. A concentric toroidal field geometry is also central to the Rees-Gunn model for the Crab Nebula, the archetypal plerion, and leads to the deduction that the Crab pulsar's wind must have a weak magnetic field. Yet this kind of equilibrium between magnetic and gas pressure forces, the ``equilibrium Z-pinch'' of the controlled fusion literature, is well known to be susceptible to disruptive localized instabilities, even when the magnetic field is weak and/or boundary conditions (e.g., a dense external medium) slow or suppress global modes. Thus, the magnetic field structures imputed to the interiors of jets and plerions are unlikely to persist for very long. To determine the growth rates of Z-pinch instabilities under astrophysical conditions, I derive a dispersion relation that is valid for the relativistic fluids of which jets and plerions may be composed, in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) limit. The dominant instabilities are kink (m = 1) and pinch (m = 0) modes. The former generally dominate, destroying the concentric field structure and probably driving the system toward a more chaotic state in which the mean field strength is independent of radius (and in which resistive dissipation of the field may be enhanced). I estimate the timescales over which the field structure is likely to be rearranged and relate these to distances along relativistic jets and radii from the central pulsar in a plerion. I conclude that the central tenet of the Rees-Gunn model for the Crab Nebula, the existence of a concentric toroidal field well outside the pulsar wind's termination shock, is physically unrealistic. With this assumption

  5. Dynamics of Bianchi type-VI0 holographic dark energy models in general relativity and Lyra's geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katore, S. D.; Kapse, D. V.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we have studied the anisotropic and homogeneous Bianchi type-VI 0 Universe filled with dark matter and holographic dark energy components in the framework of general relativity and Lyra's geometry. The Einstein's field equations have been solved exactly by taking the expansion scalar ( 𝜃) in the model is proportional to the shear scalar ( σ). Some physical and kinematical properties of the models are also discussed.

  6. Toroidal metrics: gravitational solenoids and static shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, Donald; Katz, Joseph

    2012-06-01

    In electromagnetism a current along a wire tightly wound on a torus makes a solenoid whose magnetic field is confined within the torus. In Einstein's gravity we give a corresponding solution in which a current of matter moves up on the inside of a toroidal shell and down on the outside, rolling around the torus by the short way. The metric is static outside the torus but stationary inside with the gravomagnetic field confined inside the torus, running around it by the long way. This exact solution of Einstein's equations is found by fitting Bonnor's solution for the metric of a light beam, which gives the required toroidal gravomagnetic field inside the torus, to the general Weyl static external metric in toroidal coordinates, which we develop. We deduce the matter tensor on the torus and find when it obeys the energy conditions. We also give the equipotential shells that generate the simple Bach-Weyl metric externally and find which shells obey the energy conditions.

  7. Toroidal plasma enhanced CVD of diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Zvanya, John Cullen, Christopher Morris, Thomas Krchnavek, Robert R.; Holber, William Basnett, Andrew Basnett, Robert; Hettinger, Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    An inductively coupled toroidal plasma source is used as an alternative to microwave plasmas for chemical vapor deposition of diamond films. The source, operating at a frequency of 400 kHz, synthesizes diamond films from a mixture of argon, methane, and hydrogen. The toroidal design has been adapted to create a highly efficient environment for diamond film deposition: high gas temperature and a short distance from the sample to the plasma core. Using a toroidal plasma geometry operating in the medium frequency band allows for efficient (≈90%) coupling of AC line power to the plasma and a scalable path to high-power and large-area operation. In test runs, the source generates a high flux of atomic hydrogen over a large area, which is favorable for diamond film growth. Using a deposition temperature of 900–1050 °C and a source to sample distance of 0.1–2.0 cm, diamond films are deposited onto silicon substrates. The results showed that the deposition rate of the diamond films could be controlled using the sample temperature and source to sample spacing. The results also show the films exhibit good-quality polycrystalline diamond as verified by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction results show that the samples exhibit diamond (111) and diamond (022) crystallites. The Raman results show that the sp{sup 3} peak has a narrow spectral width (FWHM 12 ± 0.5 cm{sup −1}) and that negligible amounts of the sp{sup 2} band are present, indicating good-quality diamond films.

  8. The anomalous scaling exponents of turbulence in general dimension from random geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eling, Christopher; Oz, Yaron

    2015-09-01

    We propose an analytical formula for the anomalous scaling exponents of inertial range structure functions in incompressible fluid turbulence. The formula is a Knizhnik-Polyakov-Zamolodchikov (KPZ)-type relation and is valid in any number of space dimensions. It incorporates intermittency in a novel way by dressing the Kolmogorov linear scaling via a coupling to a lognormal random geometry. The formula has one real parameter γ that depends on the number of space dimensions. The scaling exponents satisfy the convexity inequality, and the supersonic bound constraint. They agree with the experimental and numerical data in two and three space dimensions, and with numerical data in four space dimensions. Intermittency increases with γ, and in the infinite γ limit the scaling exponents approach the value one, as in Burgers turbulence. At large n the nth order exponent scales as √{n} . We discuss the relation between fluid flows and black hole geometry that inspired our proposal.

  9. PARTICLE-HOLE NATURE OF THE LIGHT HIGH-SPIN TOROIDAL ISOMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclei under non-collective rotation with a large angular momentum above some threshold can assume a toroidal shape. In our previous work, we showed by using cranked Skyrme Hartree Fock approach that even even, N = Z, high-K, toroidal isomeric states may have general occurrences for light nuclei with 28 < A < 52. We present here some additional results and systematics on the particle-hole nature of these high-spin toroidal isomers.

  10. VoxelMages: a general-purpose graphical interface for designing geometries and processing DICOM images for PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Alventosa, V; Ballester, F; Vijande, J

    2016-12-01

    The design and construction of geometries for Monte Carlo calculations is an error-prone, time-consuming, and complex step in simulations describing particle interactions and transport in the field of medical physics. The software VoxelMages has been developed to help the user in this task. It allows to design complex geometries and to process DICOM image files for simulations with the general-purpose Monte Carlo code PENELOPE in an easy and straightforward way. VoxelMages also allows to import DICOM-RT structure contour information as delivered by a treatment planning system. Its main characteristics, usage and performance benchmarking are described in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Geometry of the submanifolds of SEXn. II. The generalized fundamental equations for the hypersubmanifold of SEXn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kyung Tae; Lee, Jong Woo

    1989-08-01

    A connection which is both Einstein and semisymmetric is called an SE connection, and a generalized n-dimensional Riemannian manifold on which the differential geometric structure is imposed by g λμ through an SE connection is called an n-dimensional SE manifold and denoted by SEXn. This paper is a direct continuation of earlier work. In this paper, we derive the generalized fundamental equations for the hypersubmanifold of SEXn, including generalized Gauss formulas, generalized Weingarten equations, and generalized Gauss-Codazzi equations.

  12. Progress in toroidal confinement and fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1987-10-01

    During the past 30 years, the characteristic T/sub i/n tau/sub E/-value of toroidal-confinement experiments has advanced by more than seven orders of magnitude. Part of this advance has been due to an increase of gross machine parameters. Most of this advance has been due to an increase of gross machine parameters. Most of the advance is associated with improvements in the ''quality of plasma confinement.'' The combined evidence of spherator and tokamak research clarifies the role of magnetic-field geometry in determining confinement and points to the importance of shielding out plasma edge effects. A true physical understanding of anomalous transport remains to be achieved. 39 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Shrinking instability of toroidal droplets

    PubMed Central

    Fragkopoulos, Alexandros A.; Pairam, Ekapop; Berger, Eric; Segre, Phil N.; Fernández-Nieves, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Toroidal droplets are inherently unstable due to surface tension. They can break up, similar to cylindrical jets, but also exhibit a shrinking instability, which is inherent to the toroidal shape. We investigate the evolution of shrinking toroidal droplets using particle image velocimetry. We obtain the flow field inside the droplets and show that as the torus evolves, its cross-section significantly deviates from circular. We then use the experimentally obtained velocities at the torus interface to theoretically reconstruct the internal flow field. Our calculation correctly describes the experimental results and elucidates the role of those modes that, among the many possible ones, are required to capture all of the relevant experimental features. PMID:28251927

  14. Generalized Onsager relations for electrokinetic effects in anisotropic and heterogeneous geometries.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Edouard; Ajdari, Armand

    2004-01-01

    We lay down a general formalism to describe the linear electrohydrodynamic response of systems of arbitrary topology, symmetry and heterogeneity, and through an explicit proof, we demonstrate a set of general Onsager relations between the corresponding electrokinetic coefficients. This generalizes a classical result of Mazur and Overbeek [P. Mazur and J.T.G. Overbeek, Recl. Trav. Chim. Pays-Bas. 70, 83 (1951)] to situations that may become of practical relevance in particular in the field of microfluidic devices. Technically, our proof of the symmetry of the generalized conductance matrix relies on an adaptation of the reciprocal theorem of low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics.

  15. Generalized Onsager relations for electrokinetic effects in anisotropic and heterogeneous geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Edouard; Ajdari, Armand

    2004-01-01

    We lay down a general formalism to describe the linear electrohydrodynamic response of systems of arbitrary topology, symmetry and heterogeneity, and through an explicit proof, we demonstrate a set of general Onsager relations between the corresponding electrokinetic coefficients. This generalizes a classical result of Mazur and Overbeek [P. Mazur and J.T.G. Overbeek, Recl. Trav. Chim. Pays-Bas. 70, 83 (1951)] to situations that may become of practical relevance in particular in the field of microfluidic devices. Technically, our proof of the symmetry of the generalized conductance matrix relies on an adaptation of the reciprocal theorem of low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics.

  16. Concentric Nested Toroidal Inflatable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Raboin, Jasen L.; Spexarth, Gary R.

    2010-01-01

    Assemblies comprising multiple limited- height toroidal inflatable structures nested in a concentric arrangement have been invented to obtain more design flexibility than can be obtained in single taller, wider toroidal inflatable structures (see figure). Originally intended for use as containers for habitats for humans in outer space or on remote planets, these and related prior inflatable structures could also be useful on Earth as lightweight, compactly stowable, portable special-purpose buildings that could be transported to remote locations and there inflated to full size and shape. In the case of a single inflatable toroidal structure, one important source of lack of design flexibility is the fact that an increase in outer diameter (which is sometimes desired) is necessarily accompanied by an increase in height (which is sometimes undesired). Increases in diameter and height can also cause difficulty in utilization of the resulting larger volume, in that it can become necessary to partition the volume by means of walls and floors, and features (e.g., stairs or ladders) must be added to enable vertical movement between floors. Moreover, ascending and descending between floors in a gravitational environment could pose unacceptable difficulty for the inhabitants under some circumstances. Another source of lack of design flexibility in a single toroidal inflatable structure is that for a given inflation pressure, an increase in the outer diameter of the structure necessarily entails an increase in the maximum stress in the structure. Because it is necessary to keep the maximum stress within the load-bearing capability of the structural materials, consistent with other aspects of the design, this may translate to a limit on the outer diameter. In an assembly comprising concentric nested toroidal structures, an increase in outer diameter does not necessarily entail an increase in height or a maximum stress in excess of the load-bearing capability of the structural

  17. A General Learning Theory and Its Application to the Acquisition of Proof Skills in Geometry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-20

    AD-A087 189 CARN4EGIE-MELLON U IV PITTSBURGH PA DEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY F/6 5/10 GENERAL LEARNING THEORY AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE ACQUISITIO-ETC(U) JUN... psychology could provide an explanation of how cognitive skills are acquired. We have been working on a general theory of learning called ACT. We have...J.R., Kline, P.J., and Beasley, C.M. A general learning theory and its application to schema abstraction. In G.H. Bower (Ed.), The Psychology of

  18. Induced fermionic current in toroidally compactified spacetimes with applications to cylindrical and toroidal nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bellucci, S.; Saharian, A. A.; Bardeghyan, V. M.

    2010-09-15

    The vacuum expectation value of fermionic current is evaluated for a massive spinor field in spacetimes with an arbitrary number of toroidally compactified spatial dimensions in the presence of a constant gauge field. By using the Abel-Plana type summation formula and the zeta-function technique we present the fermionic current in two different forms. Nontrivial topology of the background spacetime leads to the Aharonov-Bohm effect for the fermionic current induced by the gauge field. The current is a periodic function of the magnetic flux with the period equal to the flux quantum. In the absence of gauge field it vanishes for special cases of untwisted and twisted fields. Applications of general formulas to Kaluza-Klein type models and to cylindrical and toroidal carbon nanotubes are given. In the absence of magnetic flux the total fermionic current in carbon nanotubes vanishes, due to the cancellation of contributions from two different sublattices of the hexagonal lattice of graphene.

  19. Material equations for electromagnetism with toroidal polarizations.

    PubMed

    Dubovik, V M; Martsenyuk, M A; Saha, B

    2000-06-01

    With regard to the toroid contributions, a modified system of equations of electrodynamics moving continuous media has been obtained. Alternative formalisms to introduce the toroid moment contributions in the equations of electromagnetism has been worked out. The two four-potential formalism has been developed. Lorentz transformation laws for the toroid polarizations has been given. Covariant form of equations of electrodynamics of continuous media with toroid polarizations has been written.

  20. Toroidal Tank Development for Upper-stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom; Roberts, Keith

    2003-01-01

    The advantages, development, and fabrication of toroidal propellant tanks are profiled in this viewgraph presentation. Several images are included of independent research and development (IR&D) of toroidal propellant tanks at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Other images in the presentation give a brief overview of Thiokol conformal tank technology development. The presentation describes Thiokol's approach to continuous composite toroidal tank fabrication in detail. Images are shown of continuous and segmented toroidal tanks fabricated by Thiokol.

  1. General solution of 2D and 3D superconducting quasiclassical systems: coalescing vortices and nanoisland geometries

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Morten; Linder, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    An extension of quasiclassical Keldysh-Usadel theory to higher spatial dimensions than one is crucial in order to describe physical phenomena like charge/spin Hall effects and topological excitations like vortices and skyrmions, none of which are captured in one-dimensional models. We here present a numerical finite element method which solves the non-linearized 2D and 3D quasiclassical Usadel equation relevant for the diffusive regime. We show the application of this on three model systems with non-trivial geometries: (i) a bottlenecked Josephson junction with external flux, (ii) a nanodisk ferromagnet deposited on top of a superconductor and (iii) superconducting islands in contact with a ferromagnet. In case (i), we demonstrate that one may control externally not only the geometrical array in which superconducting vortices arrange themselves, but also to cause coalescence and tune the number of vortices. In case (iii), we show that the supercurrent path can be tailored by incorporating magnetic elements in planar Josephson junctions which also lead to a strong modulation of the density of states. The finite element method presented herein paves the way for gaining insight in physical phenomena which have remained largely unexplored due to the complexity of solving the full quasiclassical equations in higher dimensions. PMID:26961921

  2. Generalized B-spline subdivision-surface wavelets for geometry compression.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Martin; Duchaineau, Mark A; Hamann, Bernd; Joy, Kenneth I

    2004-01-01

    We present a new construction of lifted biorthogonal wavelets on surfaces of arbitrary two-manifold topology for compression and multiresolution representation. Our method combines three approaches: subdivision surfaces of arbitrary topology, B-spline wavelets, and the lifting scheme for biorthogonal wavelet construction. The simple building blocks of our wavelet transform are local lifting operations performed on polygonal meshes with subdivision hierarchy. Starting with a coarse, irregular polyhedral base mesh, our transform creates a subdivision hierarchy of meshes converging to a smooth limit surface. At every subdivision level, geometric detail can be expanded from wavelet coefficients and added to the surface. We present wavelet constructions for bilinear, bicubic, and biquintic B-Spline subdivision. While the bilinear and bicubic constructions perform well in numerical experiments, the biquintic construction turns out to be unstable. For lossless compression, our transform can be computed in integer arithmetic, mapping integer coordinates of control points to integer wavelet coefficients. Our approach provides a highly efficient and progressive representation for complex geometries of arbitrary topology.

  3. General solution of 2D and 3D superconducting quasiclassical systems: coalescing vortices and nanoisland geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amundsen, Morten; Linder, Jacob

    2016-03-01

    An extension of quasiclassical Keldysh-Usadel theory to higher spatial dimensions than one is crucial in order to describe physical phenomena like charge/spin Hall effects and topological excitations like vortices and skyrmions, none of which are captured in one-dimensional models. We here present a numerical finite element method which solves the non-linearized 2D and 3D quasiclassical Usadel equation relevant for the diffusive regime. We show the application of this on three model systems with non-trivial geometries: (i) a bottlenecked Josephson junction with external flux, (ii) a nanodisk ferromagnet deposited on top of a superconductor and (iii) superconducting islands in contact with a ferromagnet. In case (i), we demonstrate that one may control externally not only the geometrical array in which superconducting vortices arrange themselves, but also to cause coalescence and tune the number of vortices. In case (iii), we show that the supercurrent path can be tailored by incorporating magnetic elements in planar Josephson junctions which also lead to a strong modulation of the density of states. The finite element method presented herein paves the way for gaining insight in physical phenomena which have remained largely unexplored due to the complexity of solving the full quasiclassical equations in higher dimensions.

  4. Spherical spacelike geometries in static spherically symmetric spacetimes: Generalized Painlevè-Gullstrand coordinates, foliation, and embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, M. M.

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that static spherically symmetric spacetimes can admit foliations by flat spacelike hypersurfaces, which are best described in terms of the Painlevè-Gullstrand coordinates. The uniqueness and existence of such foliations were addressed earlier. In this paper, we prove, purely geometrically, that any possible foliation of a static spherically symmetric spacetime by an arbitrary codimension-one spherical spacelike geometry, up to time translation and rotation, is unique, and we find the algebraic condition under which it exists. This leads us to what can be considered as the most natural generalization of the Painlevè-Gullstrand coordinate system for static spherically symmetric metrics, which, in turn, makes it easy to derive generic conclusions on foliation and to study specific cases as well as to easily reproduce previously obtained generalizations as special cases. In particular, we note that the existence of foliation by flat hypersurfaces guarantees the existence of foliation by hypersurfaces whose Ricci curvature tensor is everywhere non-positive (constant negative curvature is a special case). The study of uniqueness and the existence concurrently solves the question of embeddability of a spherical spacelike geometry in one-dimensional higher static spherically symmetric spacetimes, and this produces known and new results geometrically, without having to go through the momentum and Hamiltonian constraints.

  5. Looking beyond Lewis Structures: A General Chemistry Molecular Modeling Experiment Focusing on Physical Properties and Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Cole, Renee S.; Sarkar, Somnath

    2011-01-01

    We present a guided-inquiry experiment using Spartan Student Version, ready to be adapted and implemented into a general chemistry laboratory course. The experiment provides students an experience with Spartan Molecular Modeling software while discovering the relationships between the structure and properties of molecules. Topics discussed within…

  6. A test of general relativity from the three-dimensional orbital geometry of a binary pulsar.

    PubMed

    van Straten, W; Bailes, M; Britton, M; Kulkarni, S R; Anderson, S B; Manchester, R N; Sarkissian, J

    2001-07-12

    Binary pulsars provide an excellent system for testing general relativity because of their intrinsic rotational stability and the precision with which radio observations can be used to determine their orbital dynamics. Measurements of the rate of orbital decay of two pulsars have been shown to be consistent with the emission of gravitational waves as predicted by general relativity, but independent verification was not possible. Such verification can in principle be obtained by determining the orbital inclination in a binary pulsar system using only classical geometrical constraints. This would permit a measurement of the expected retardation of the pulse signal arising from the general relativistic curvature of space-time in the vicinity of the companion object (the 'Shapiro delay'). Here we report high-precision radio observations of the binary millisecond pulsar PSR J0437-4715, which establish the three-dimensional structure of its orbit. We see the Shapiro delay predicted by general relativity, and we determine the mass of the neutron star and its white dwarf companion. The determination of such masses is necessary in order to understand the origin and evolution of neutron stars.

  7. Looking beyond Lewis Structures: A General Chemistry Molecular Modeling Experiment Focusing on Physical Properties and Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Cole, Renee S.; Sarkar, Somnath

    2011-01-01

    We present a guided-inquiry experiment using Spartan Student Version, ready to be adapted and implemented into a general chemistry laboratory course. The experiment provides students an experience with Spartan Molecular Modeling software while discovering the relationships between the structure and properties of molecules. Topics discussed within…

  8. Physics models in the toroidal transport code PROCTR

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, H.C.

    1990-08-01

    The physics models that are contained in the toroidal transport code PROCTR are described in detail. Time- and space-dependent models are included for the plasma hydrogenic-ion, helium, and impurity densities, the electron and ion temperatures, the toroidal rotation velocity, and the toroidal current profile. Time- and depth-dependent models for the trapped and mobile hydrogenic particle concentrations in the wall and a time-dependent point model for the number of particles in the limiter are also included. Time-dependent models for neutral particle transport, neutral beam deposition and thermalization, fusion heating, impurity radiation, pellet injection, and the radial electric potential are included and recalculated periodically as the time-dependent models evolve. The plasma solution is obtained either in simple flux coordinates, where the radial shift of each elliptical, toroidal flux surface is included to maintain an approximate pressure equilibrium, or in general three-dimensional torsatron coordinates represented by series of helical harmonics. The detailed coupling of the plasma, scrape-off layer, limiter, and wall models through the neutral transport model makes PROCTR especially suited for modeling of recycling and particle control in toroidal plasmas. The model may also be used in a steady-state profile analysis mode for studying energy and particle balances starting with measured plasma profiles.

  9. ON THE GEOMETRY OF MEASURABLE SETS IN N-DIMENSIONAL SPACE ON WHICH GENERALIZED LOCALIZATION HOLDS FOR MULTIPLE FOURIER SERIES OF FUNCTIONS IN L_p, p>1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloshanskiĭ, I. L.

    1984-02-01

    The precise geometry is found of measurable sets in N-dimensional Euclidean space on which generalized localization almost everywhere holds for multiple Fourier series which are rectangularly summable.Bibliography: 14 titles.

  10. Subtracted geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Zain Hamid

    In this thesis we study a special class of black hole geometries called subtracted geometries. Subtracted geometry black holes are obtained when one omits certain terms from the warp factor of the metric of general charged rotating black holes. The omission of these terms allows one to write the wave equation of the black hole in a completely separable way and one can explicitly see that the wave equation of a massless scalar field in this slightly altered background of a general multi-charged rotating black hole acquires an SL(2, R) x SL(2, R) x SO(3) symmetry. The "subtracted limit" is considered an appropriate limit for studying the internal structure of the non-subtracted black holes because new 'subtracted' black holes have the same horizon area and periodicity of the angular and time coordinates in the near horizon regions as the original black hole geometry it was constructed from. The new geometry is asymptotically conical and is physically similar to that of a black hole in an asymptotically confining box. We use the different nice properties of these geometries to understand various classically and quantum mechanically important features of general charged rotating black holes.

  11. Drift Mode Calculations in Nonaxisymmetric Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt; L.-P. Ku; W.A. Cooper; W.M. Tang

    1999-07-01

    A fully kinetic assessment of the stability properties of toroidal drift modes has been obtained for nonaxisymmetric (stellarator) geometry, in the electrostatic limit. This calculation is a comprehensive solution of the linearized gyrokinetic equation, using the lowest-order ''ballooning representation'' for high toroidal mode number instabilities, with a model collision operator. Results for toroidal drift waves destabilized by temperature gradients and/or trapped particle dynamics are presented, using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equilibria generated as part of a design effort for a quasiaxisymmetric stellarator. Comparisons of these results with those obtained for typical tokamak cases indicate that the basic trends are similar.

  12. Perturbing macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic stability for toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, Kathryn J.

    We have introduced a new perturbative technique to rapidly explore the dependence of long wavelength ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities on equilibrium profiles, shaping properties, and wall parameters. Traditionally, these relations are studied with numerical parameter scans using computationally intensive stability codes. Our perturbative technique first finds the equilibrium and stability using traditional methods. Subsequent small changes in the original equilibrium parameters change the stability. We quickly find the new stability with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than with another run of the stability codes. We first semi-analytically apply the technique to the screw pinch after eliminating compressional Alfven wave effects. The screw pinch results validate the approach, but also indicate that allowable perturbations to equilibria with certain features may be restricted. Next, we extend the approach to toroidal geometry using experimental equilibria and a simple constructed equilibrium, with the ideal MHD stability code GATO. Stability properties are successfully predicted from perturbed toroidal equilibria when only the vacuum beyond the plasma is perturbed (through wall parameter variations), rather than the plasma itself. Small plasma equilibrium perturbations to both experimental and simple equilibria result in very large errors to the predicted stability, and valid results are found only over a narrow range of most perturbations. Despite the large errors produced when changing plasma parameters, the wall perturbations revealed two useful applications of this technique. Because the calculations are non-iterative matrix multiplications, the convergence issues that can disrupt a full MHD stability code are absent. Marginal stability, therefore, is much easier to find with the perturbative technique. Also, the perturbed results can be input as the initial guess for the eigenvalue for a full stability code, and improve subsequent

  13. Finite element Fourier and Abbe transform methods for generalization of aperture function and geometry in Fraunhofer diffraction theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, H.G. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper discusses methods for calculating Fraunhofer intensity fields resulting from diffraction through one- and two-dimensional apertures are presented. These methods are based on the geometric concept of finite elements and on Fourier and Abbe transforms. The geometry of the two-dimensional diffracting aperture(s) is based on biquadratic isoparametric elements, which are used to define aperture(s) of complex geometry. These elements are also used to build complex amplitude and phase functions across the aperture(s) which may be of continuous or discontinuous form. The transform integrals are accurately and efficiently integrated numerically using Gaussian quadrature. The power of these methods is most evident in two dimensions, where several examples are presented which include secondary obstructions, straight and curved secondary spider supports, multiple-mirror arrays, synthetic aperture arrays, segmented mirrors, apertures covered by screens, apodization, and phase plates. Typically, the finite element Abbe transform method results in significant gains in computational efficiency over the finite element Fourier transform method, but is also subject to some loss in generality.

  14. Toroidal momentum transport in a tokamak due to profile shearing

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, R.; Grosshauser, S. R.; Hornsby, W. A.; Migliano, P.; Peeters, A. G.; Camenen, Y.; Casson, F. J.

    2014-06-15

    The effect of profile shearing on toroidal momentum transport is studied in linear and non-linear gyro-kinetic simulations. Retaining the radial dependence of both plasma and geometry parameters leads to a momentum flux that has contributions both linear in the logarithmic gradients of density and temperature, as well as contributions linear in the derivatives of the logarithmic gradients. The effect of the turbulence intensity gradient on momentum transport is found to be small for the studied parameters. Linear simulations at fixed normalized toroidal wave number predict a weak dependence of the momentum flux on the normalized Larmor radius ρ{sub *}=ρ/R. Non-linear simulations, however, at sufficiently small ρ{sub *} show a linear scaling of the momentum flux with ρ{sub *}. The obtained stationary rotation gradients are in the range of, although perhaps smaller than, current experiments. For a reactor plasma, however, a rather small rotation gradient should result from profile shearing.

  15. Charge-Induced Saffman-Taylor Instabilities in Toroidal Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragkopoulos, A. A.; Aizenman, A.; Fernández-Nieves, A.

    2017-06-01

    We show that charged toroidal droplets can develop fingerlike structures as they expand due to Saffman-Taylor instabilities. While these are commonly observed in quasi-two-dimensional geometries when a fluid displaces another fluid of higher viscosity, we show that the toroidal confinement breaks the symmetry of the problem, effectively making it quasi-two-dimensional and enabling the instability to develop in this three-dimensional situation. We control the expansion speed of the torus with the imposed electric stress and show that fingers are observed provided the characteristic time scale associated with this instability is smaller than the characteristic time scale associated with Rayleigh-Plateau break-up. We confirm our interpretation of the results by showing that the number of fingers is consistent with expectations from linear stability analysis in radial Hele-Shaw cells.

  16. Hollow nanotubular toroidal polymer microrings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyeong; Baek, Kangkyun; Kim, Myungjin; Yun, Gyeongwon; Ko, Young Ho; Lee, Nam-Suk; Hwang, Ilha; Kim, Jeehong; Natarajan, Ramalingam; Park, Chan Gyung; Sung, Wokyung; Kim, Kimoon

    2014-02-01

    Despite the remarkable progress made in the self-assembly of nano- and microscale architectures with well-defined sizes and shapes, a self-organization-based synthesis of hollow toroids has, so far, proved to be elusive. Here, we report the synthesis of polymer microrings made from rectangular, flat and rigid-core monomers with anisotropically predisposed alkene groups, which are crosslinked with each other by dithiol linkers using thiol-ene photopolymerization. The resulting hollow toroidal structures are shape-persistent and mechanically robust in solution. In addition, their size can be tuned by controlling the initial monomer concentrations, an observation that is supported by a theoretical analysis. These hollow microrings can encapsulate guest molecules in the intratoroidal nanospace, and their peripheries can act as templates for circular arrays of metal nanoparticles.

  17. Prospects for toroidal fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.D.

    1994-06-01

    Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak has refined understanding of the realities of a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning magnetic fusion reactor. An ITER-like tokamak reactor using ITER costs and performance would lead to a cost of electricity (COE) of about 130 mills/kWh. Advanced tokamak physics to be tested in the Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX), coupled with moderate components in engineering, technology, and unit costs, should lead to a COE comparable with best existing fission systems around 60 mills/kWh. However, a larger unit size, {approximately}2000 MW(e), is favored for the fusion system. Alternative toroidal configurations to the conventional tokamak, such as the stellarator, reversed-field pinch, and field-reversed configuration, offer some potential advantage, but are less well developed, and have their own challenges.

  18. Prospects for toroidal fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J. D.

    1994-06-01

    Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak has refined understanding of the realities of a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning magnetic fusion reactor. An ITER-like tokamak reactor using ITER costs and performance would lead to a cost of electricity (COE) of about 130 mills/kWh. Advanced tokamak physics to be tested in the Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX), coupled with moderate components in engineering, technology, and unit costs, should lead to a COE comparable with best existing fission systems around 60 mills/kWh. However, a larger unit size, approximately 2000 MW(e), is favored for the fusion system. Alternative toroidal configurations to the conventional tokamak, such as the stellarator, reversed-field pinch, and field-reversed configuration, offer some potential advantage, but are less well developed, and have their own challenges.

  19. Experimental studies of compact toroids

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The Berkeley Compact Toroid Experiment (BCTX) device is a plasma device with a Marshall-gun generated, low aspect ratio toroidal plasma. The device is capable of producing spheromak-type discharges and may, with some modification, produce low-aspect ratio tokamak configurations. A unique aspect of this experimenal devie is its large lower hybrid (LH) heating system, which consists of two 450MHz klystron tubes generating 20 megawatts each into a brambilla-type launching structure. Successful operation with one klystron at virtually full power (18 MW) has been accomplished with 110 {mu}s pulse length. A second klystron is currently installed in its socket and magnet but has not been added to the RF drive system. This report describes current activities and accomplishments and describes the anticipated results of next year's activity.

  20. More general capillary pressure and relative permeability models from fractal geometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Kewen

    2010-01-15

    More general capillary pressure and relative permeability models were derived theoretically from fractal modeling of a porous medium. It was found that the new capillary pressure model could be reduced to the frequently-used Brooks-Corey capillary pressure model and the Li-Horne imbibition model when the fractal dimension of a porous medium takes specific values. This also demonstrates that the Brooks-Corey model and the Li-Horne model have a further confirmed theoretical basis. Capillary pressure data measured using mercury intrusion techinque were used to verify the model. The results demonstrated that the new capillary pressure model could represent the capillary pressure curves in those rocks with fracures or with great heterogeneity while the existing models cannot. The new relative permeability models can be reduced to the Brooks-Corey relative permeability model in a specific case. It has been proved theoretically that the relative permeability of each phase in a smooth fracture is only a linear function of its own saturation. Relative permeability data were calculated using the new models and the model results were compared with experimental data measured using a steady-state technique. The comparison demonstrated that the relative permeability models and experimental results were consistent with each other.

  1. A system exhibiting toroidal order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. B.

    2010-11-01

    This paper treats the dipolar interactions of a two-dimensional system of discs upon which a triangle of spins is mounted. We obtain the leading term of the multipole expansion of the interaction energy of discs on which is mounted a regular n -gon of spins. A definition of the toroidal magnetic moment Ti of the ith plaquette is proposed such that the magnetostatic interaction between plaquettes i and j is proportional to TiTj . The system for n=3 is shown to undergo a sequence of interesting phase transitions as the temperature is lowered. We are mainly concerned with the “solid” phase in which bond-orientational order but not positional order is long ranged. As the temperature is lowered in the solid phase, the first phase transition involving the orientation or toroidal magnetism of the discs is into a “gauge toroid” phase in which the product of a magnetic toroidal parameter and an orientation variable (for the discs) orders but due to a local gauge symmetry these variables themselves do not individually order. Finally, in the lowest temperature phase the gauge symmetry is broken and toroidal order and orientational order both develop. In the “gauge toroidal” phase time-reversal invariance is broken and in the lowest temperature phase inversion symmetry is also broken. In none of these phases is there long-range order in any Fourier component of the average spin. Symmetry considerations are used to construct the magnetoelectric free energy and thereby to deduce which coefficients of the linear magnetoelectric tensor are allowed to be nonzero. In none of the phases does symmetry permit a spontaneous polarization.

  2. A comparison of the conductor requirements for energy storage devices made with ideal coil geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01

    Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) plants have been proposed in both solenoidal and toroidal geometries. The former is efficient in terms of the quantity of superconductor required per unit of stored energy. For applications where a fringe field could be a problem, the toroidal geometry, which requires at least a factor of two more material, has been proposed. In addition to the solenoid and toroid, other geometries are possible, such as linear multipoles and spherical coils. These geometries have been considered for use in applications other than energy storage. In this report, the effectiveness (quantity of superconductor/stored energy) is calculated for various coil geometries. 7 refs., 4 tabs.

  3. Toroidal Flow in Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callen, J. D.; Cole, A. J.; Hegna, C. C.

    2007-11-01

    Many effects influence toroidal flow evolution in tokamak plasmas. Momentum sources and radial diffusion due to axisymmetric neoclassical, paleoclassical and anomalous transport are usually considered. In addition, the toroidal flow can be affected by field errors. Small, non-axisymmetric field errors arise from coil irregularities, active control coils and collective plasma magnetic distortions (e.g., NTMs, RWMs). Resonant field errors cause localized electromagnetic torques near rational surfaces in the plasma, which can lock the plasma to the wall leading to magnetic islands and reduced confinement or disruptions. Their penetration into the plasma is limited by flow-shielding effects; but they can be amplified by the plasma response at high beta. Non-resonant field errors cause magnetic pumping and radial banana drifts, and lead to toroidal flow damping over the entire plasma. Many of these processes can also produce momentum pinch and intrinsic flow effects. This poster will seek to present a coherent picture of all these effects and suggest ways they could be tested and distinguished experimentally.

  4. Enhanced toroidal flow stabilization of edge localized modes with increased plasma density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shikui; Zhu, Ping; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2017-09-01

    Toroidal flow alone is generally thought to have an important influence on tokamak edge pedestal stability, even though theoretical analysis often predicts merely a weak stabilizing effect of toroidal flow on the edge localized modes (ELMs) in experimental parameter regimes. For the first time, we find from two-fluid MHD calculations that such a stabilization, however, can be significantly enhanced by increasing the edge plasma density. Our finding resolves a long-standing mystery whether or how toroidal rotation can indeed have an effective influence on ELMs, and explains why the ELM mitigation and suppression by toroidal rotation are more favorably achieved in higher collisionality regime in recent experiments. The finding suggests a new control scheme on modulating toroidal flow stabilization of ELMs with plasma density, along with a new additional constraint on the optimal level of plasma density for the desired edge plasma conditions.

  5. Toroidal midplane neutral beam armor and plasma limiter

    DOEpatents

    Kugel, H.W.; Hand, S.W. Jr.; Ksayian, H.

    1985-05-31

    This invention contemplates an armor shield/plasma limiter positioned upon the inner wall of a toroidal vacuum chamber within which is magnetically confined an energetic plasma in a tokamak nuclear fusion reactor. The armor shield/plasma limiter is thus of a general semi-toroidal shape and is comprised of a plurality of adjacent graphite plates positioned immediately adjacent to each other so as to form a continuous ring upon and around the toroidal chamber's inner wall and the reactor's midplane coil. Each plate has a generally semi-circular outer circumference and a recessed inner portion and is comprised of upper and lower half sections positioned immediately adjacent to one another along the midplane of the plate. With the upper and lower half sections thus joined, a channel or duct is provided within the midplane of the plate in which a magnetic flux loop is positioned. The magnetic flux loop is thus positioned immediately adjacent to the fusing toroidal plasma and serves as a diagnostic sensor with the armor shield/plasma limiter minimizing the amount of power from the energetic plasma as well as from the neutral particle beams heating the plasma incident upon the flux loop.

  6. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schnack, Dalton D

    2006-05-16

    This document reports the successful completion of the OFES Theory Milestone for FY2005, namely, Perform parametric studies to better understand the edge physics regimes of laboratory experiments. Simulate at increased resolution (up to 20 toroidal modes), with density evolution, late into the nonlinear phase and compare results from different types of edge modes. Simulate a single case including a study of heat deposition on nearby material walls. The linear stability properties and nonlinear evolution of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in tokamak plasmas are investigated through numerical computation. Data from the DIII-D device at General Atomics (http://fusion.gat.com/diii-d/) is used for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria, but edge parameters are varied to reveal important physical effects. The equilibrium with very low magnetic shear produces an unstable spectrum that is somewhat insensitive to dissipation coefficient values. Here, linear growth rates from the non-ideal NIMROD code (http://nimrodteam.org) agree reasonably well with ideal, i.e. non-dissipative, results from the GATO global linear stability code at low toroidal mode number (n) and with ideal results from the ELITE edge linear stability code at moderate to high toroidal mode number. Linear studies with a more realistic sequence of MHD equilibria (based on DIII-D discharge 86166) produce more significant discrepancies between the ideal and non-ideal calculations. The maximum growth rate for the ideal computations occurs at toroidal mode index n=10, whereas growth rates in the non-ideal computations continue to increase with n unless strong anisotropic thermal conduction is included. Recent modeling advances allow drift effects associated with the Hall electric field and gyroviscosity to be considered. A stabilizing effect can be observed in the preliminary results, but while the distortion in mode structure is readily apparent at n=40, the growth rate is only 13% less than the non-ideal MHD

  7. Anomalous toroidal field penetration in Tormac V

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, B.; Vaucher, B. G.; Shaw, R. S.; Vella, M. C.

    1981-07-01

    We investigate magnetic field penetration into a cool, collisional, magnetized plasma in Tormac V. Magnetic probe and laser interferometer studies reveal anomalous penetration of the applied toroidal field into a plasma with an initial parallel bias toroidal field. The applied poloidal field, however, formed a well-defined magnetic front which was effective at sweeping up particles. Lastly, strong shear in the vacuum magnetic field does not inhibit the apparent decoupling of the applied toroidal field from the applied poloidal field.

  8. LETTER: Toroidally asymmetric ELM precursors in TCV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimerdes, H.; Pochelon, A.; Suttrop, W.

    1998-03-01

    Coherent magnetic oscillations precede edge localized modes (ELMs) in TCV. The precursor has been detected prior to ELMs considered to be of type III and others previously referred to as TCV large ELMs. This permits the identification of both as type III ELMs according to the usual classification scheme. The strong localization of these precursors on the bad curvature side of the plasma and their medium toroidal mode numbers indicate their ballooning character. Unlike conventional MHD modes, these modes start toroidally localized and grow in amplitude and toroidal extent. When the precursor encompasses the whole toroidal circumference, the increased transport phase, as indicated by the characteristic Dα spike, begins.

  9. Toroidal transformer design program with application to inverter circuitry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Estimates of temperature, weight, efficiency, regulation, and final dimensions are included in the output of the computer program for the design of transformers for use in the basic parallel inverter. The program, written in FORTRAN 4, selects a tape wound toroidal magnetic core and, taking temperature, materials, core geometry, skin depth, and ohmic losses into account, chooses the appropriate wire sizes and number of turns for the center tapped primary and single secondary coils. Using the program, 2- and 4-kilovolt-ampere transformers are designed for frequencies from 200 to 3200 Hz and the efficiency of a basic transistor inverter is estimated.

  10. STABILITY OF THE TOROIDAL MAGNETIC FIELD IN STELLAR RADIATION ZONES

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanno, Alfio; Urpin, Vadim E-mail: vadim.urpin@uv.es

    2012-03-10

    The stability of the magnetic field in radiation zones is of crucial importance for mixing, angular momentum transport, etc. We consider the stability properties of a star containing a predominant toroidal field in spherical geometry by means of a linear stability in the Boussinesq approximation taking into account the effect of thermal conductivity. We calculate the growth rate of instability and analyze in detail the effects of stable stratification and heat transport. We argue that the stabilizing influence of gravity can never entirely suppress the instability caused by electric currents in radiation zones. However, the stable stratification can essentially decrease the growth rate of instability.

  11. Fabrication of toroidal composite pressure vessels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, W.G.; Escalona, A.

    1996-11-24

    A method for fabricating composite pressure vessels having toroidal geometry was evaluated. Eight units were fabricated using fibrous graphite material wrapped over a thin-walled aluminum liner. The material was wrapped using a machine designed for wrapping, the graphite material was impregnated with an epoxy resin that was subsequently thermally cured. The units were fabricated using various winding patterns. They were hydrostatically tested to determine their performance. The method of fabrication was demonstrated. However, the improvement in performance to weight ratio over that obtainable by an all metal vessel probably does not justify the extra cost of fabrication.

  12. Point vortex interactions on a toroidal surface.

    PubMed

    Sakajo, Takashi; Shimizu, Yuuki

    2016-07-01

    Owing to non-constant curvature and a handle structure, it is not easy to imagine intuitively how flows with vortex structures evolve on a toroidal surface compared with those in a plane, on a sphere and a flat torus. In order to cultivate an insight into vortex interactions on this manifold, we derive the evolution equation for N-point vortices from Green's function associated with the Laplace-Beltrami operator there, and we then formulate it as a Hamiltonian dynamical system with the help of the symplectic geometry and the uniformization theorem. Based on this Hamiltonian formulation, we show that the 2-vortex problem is integrable. We also investigate the point vortex equilibria and the motion of two-point vortices with the strengths of the same magnitude as one of the fundamental vortex interactions. As a result, we find some characteristic interactions between point vortices on the torus. In particular, two identical point vortices can be locally repulsive under a certain circumstance.

  13. Toroidal path filter for orbital conjunction screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfano, Salvatore

    2012-07-01

    For satellite conjunction prediction containing many objects, timely processing can be a concern. Various filters are used to identify orbiting pairs that cannot come close enough over a prescribed time period to be considered hazardous. Such pairings can then be eliminated from further computation to quicken the overall processing time. One such filter is the orbit path filter (also known as the geometric pre-filter), designed to eliminate pairs of objects based on characteristics of orbital motion. The goal of this filter is to eliminate pairings where the distance (geometry) between their orbits remains above some user-defined threshold, irrespective of the actual locations of the satellites along their paths. Rather than using a single distance bound, this work presents a toroid approach, providing a measure of versatility by allowing the user to specify different in-plane and out-of-plane bounds for the path filter. The primary orbit is used to define a focus-centered elliptical ring torus with user-defined thresholds. An assessment is then made to determine if the secondary orbit can touch or penetrate this torus. The method detailed here can be used on coplanar, as well as non-coplanar, orbits.

  14. Turbulent Equipartition Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    T.S. Hahm, P.H. Diamond, O.D. Gurcan, and G. Rewaldt

    2008-01-31

    The mode-independet part of magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TuroCo) pinch of the angular momentum density [Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14,072302 (2007)] which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of "magnetically weighted angular momentum density," nmi U|| R/B2, and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustratd that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms which exist in a simpler geometry.

  15. Turbulent equipartition theory of toroidal momentum pincha)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, T. S.; Diamond, P. H.; Gurcan, O. D.; Rewoldt, G.

    2008-05-01

    The mode-independent part of the magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TurCo) pinch of the angular momentum density [Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 072302 (2007)], which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of "magnetically weighted angular momentum density," nmiU∥R/B2, and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustrated that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms that exist in a simpler geometry.

  16. Point vortex interactions on a toroidal surface

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yuuki

    2016-01-01

    Owing to non-constant curvature and a handle structure, it is not easy to imagine intuitively how flows with vortex structures evolve on a toroidal surface compared with those in a plane, on a sphere and a flat torus. In order to cultivate an insight into vortex interactions on this manifold, we derive the evolution equation for N-point vortices from Green's function associated with the Laplace–Beltrami operator there, and we then formulate it as a Hamiltonian dynamical system with the help of the symplectic geometry and the uniformization theorem. Based on this Hamiltonian formulation, we show that the 2-vortex problem is integrable. We also investigate the point vortex equilibria and the motion of two-point vortices with the strengths of the same magnitude as one of the fundamental vortex interactions. As a result, we find some characteristic interactions between point vortices on the torus. In particular, two identical point vortices can be locally repulsive under a certain circumstance. PMID:27493577

  17. Point vortex interactions on a toroidal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakajo, Takashi; Shimizu, Yuuki

    2016-07-01

    Owing to non-constant curvature and a handle structure, it is not easy to imagine intuitively how flows with vortex structures evolve on a toroidal surface compared with those in a plane, on a sphere and a flat torus. In order to cultivate an insight into vortex interactions on this manifold, we derive the evolution equation for N-point vortices from Green's function associated with the Laplace-Beltrami operator there, and we then formulate it as a Hamiltonian dynamical system with the help of the symplectic geometry and the uniformization theorem. Based on this Hamiltonian formulation, we show that the 2-vortex problem is integrable. We also investigate the point vortex equilibria and the motion of two-point vortices with the strengths of the same magnitude as one of the fundamental vortex interactions. As a result, we find some characteristic interactions between point vortices on the torus. In particular, two identical point vortices can be locally repulsive under a certain circumstance.

  18. Coaxial helicity injection in open-flux low-aspect-ratio toroidal discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Redd, A. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Smith, R. J.

    2007-11-15

    Open-flux low-aspect-ratio toroidal discharges generated and sustained by coaxial helicity injection (CHI) in the Helicity Injected Torus device (HIT-II) are described. The discharges in this study are flux tubes directly connected to the CHI electrodes, with poloidal flux less than or equal to the CHI injector flux, and no possibility of a significant closed-flux plasma core. Theoretically derived scalings for the dependence of CHI injector current on the toroidal field current and magnitude of the injector flux are experimentally confirmed, and empirical models are developed for the poloidal magnetic field and toroidal plasma current in open-flux discharges. In particular, the toroidal plasma current is independent of the toroidal magnetic field, both theoretically and empirically. Variations in injector flux geometry demonstrate that the CHI injector current leaves the electrode surfaces at the flux strike points, and that the relative width of the CHI injector determines whether the dominant observed relaxation mechanism is a harmonic mode at the plasma edge or reconnection near the CHI electrodes. In the case of an effective interelectrode distance approximately equal to the device minor radius, the ratio of toroidal plasma current to CHI injector current is maximized. Global magnetic equilibrium quantities and local magnetic measurements are consistent with modelling these open-flux discharges as thin current sheets connected to the CHI electrodes.

  19. Coaxial helicity injection in open-flux low-aspect-ratio toroidal discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redd, A. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Smith, R. J.

    2007-11-01

    Open-flux low-aspect-ratio toroidal discharges generated and sustained by coaxial helicity injection (CHI) in the Helicity Injected Torus device (HIT-II) are described. The discharges in this study are flux tubes directly connected to the CHI electrodes, with poloidal flux less than or equal to the CHI injector flux, and no possibility of a significant closed-flux plasma core. Theoretically derived scalings for the dependence of CHI injector current on the toroidal field current and magnitude of the injector flux are experimentally confirmed, and empirical models are developed for the poloidal magnetic field and toroidal plasma current in open-flux discharges. In particular, the toroidal plasma current is independent of the toroidal magnetic field, both theoretically and empirically. Variations in injector flux geometry demonstrate that the CHI injector current leaves the electrode surfaces at the flux strike points, and that the relative width of the CHI injector determines whether the dominant observed relaxation mechanism is a harmonic mode at the plasma edge or reconnection near the CHI electrodes. In the case of an effective interelectrode distance approximately equal to the device minor radius, the ratio of toroidal plasma current to CHI injector current is maximized. Global magnetic equilibrium quantities and local magnetic measurements are consistent with modelling these open-flux discharges as thin current sheets connected to the CHI electrodes.

  20. Bounds on the local energy density of holographic CFTs from bulk geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischetti, Sebastian; Hickling, Andrew; Wiseman, Toby

    2016-11-01

    The stress tensor is a basic local operator in any field theory; in the context of AdS/CFT, it is the operator which is dual to the bulk geometry itself. Here we exploit this feature by using the bulk geometry to place constraints on the local energy density in static states of holographic (2+1)-dimensional CFTs living on a closed (but otherwise generally curved) spatial geometry. We allow for the presence of a marginal scalar deformation, dual to a massless scalar field in the bulk. For certain vacuum states in which the bulk geometry is well-behaved at zero temperature, we find that the bulk equations of motion imply that the local energy density integrated over specific boundary domains is negative. In the absence of scalar deformations, we use the inverse mean curvature flow to show that if the CFT spatial geometry has spherical topology but non-constant curvature, the local energy density must be positive somewhere. This result extends to other topologies, but only for certain types of vacuum; in particular, for a generic toroidal boundary, the vacuum’s bulk dual must be the zero-temperature limit of a toroidal black hole.

  1. Electrostatics of a Family of Conducting Toroids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2009-01-01

    An exact solution is found for the electrostatic potential of a family of conducting charged toroids. The toroids are characterized by two lengths "a" and "b", with "a" greater than or equal to "2b". They are closed, with no hole in the "doughnut". The results are obtained by considering the potential of two equal charges, displaced from the…

  2. Toroidal current asymmetry in tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H. R.

    2014-10-15

    It was discovered on JET that disruptions were accompanied by toroidal asymmetry of the toroidal plasma current I{sub ϕ}. It was found that the toroidal current asymmetry was proportional to the vertical current moment asymmetry with positive sign for an upward vertical displacement event (VDE) and negative sign for a downward VDE. It was observed that greater displacement leads to greater measured I{sub ϕ} asymmetry. Here, it is shown that this is essentially a kinematic effect produced by a VDE interacting with three dimensional MHD perturbations. The relation of toroidal current asymmetry and vertical current moment is calculated analytically and is verified by numerical simulations. It is shown analytically that the toroidal variation of the toroidal plasma current is accompanied by an equal and opposite variation of the toroidal current flowing in a thin wall surrounding the plasma. These currents are connected by 3D halo current, which is π/2 radians out of phase with the n = 1 toroidal current variations.

  3. Electrostatics of a Family of Conducting Toroids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2009-01-01

    An exact solution is found for the electrostatic potential of a family of conducting charged toroids. The toroids are characterized by two lengths "a" and "b", with "a" greater than or equal to "2b". They are closed, with no hole in the "doughnut". The results are obtained by considering the potential of two equal charges, displaced from the…

  4. Asymmetric Magnon Excitation by Spontaneous Toroidal Ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-05-01

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb lattice gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. The implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.

  5. Asymmetric magnon excitation by spontaneous toroidal ordering

    SciTech Connect

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-04-12

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin–orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb lattice gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. Furthermore, the implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.

  6. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    SciTech Connect

    de Leon, Francisco

    2014-08-01

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of single-phase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014. The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 k

  7. Tokamak with mechanical compression of toroidal magnetic field

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1981-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A collapsible toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. A toroidal magnetic field is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. A toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Pressure is applied to the liquid metal to collapse the liner and reduce the volume of the toroidal space, thereby increasing the toroidal magnetic flux density therein.

  8. PROGRESS IN THE PEELING-BALLOONING MODEL OF ELMS: TOROIDAL ROTATION AND 3D NONLINEAR DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    SNYDER,P.B; WILSON,H.R; XU,X.Q; WEBSTER,A.J

    2004-06-01

    Understanding the physics of the H-Mode pedestal and edge localized modes (ELMs) is very important to next-step fusion devices for two primary reasons: (1) The pressure at the top of the edge barrier (''pedestal height'') strongly impacts global confinement and fusion performance, and (2) large ELMs lead to localized transient heat loads on material surfaces that may constrain component lifetimes. The development of the peeling-ballooning model has shed light on these issues by positing a mechanism for ELM onset and constraints on the pedestal height. The mechanism involves instability of ideal coupled ''peeling-ballooning'' modes driven by the sharp pressure gradient and consequent large bootstrap current in the H-mode edge. It was first investigated in the local, high-n limit [1], and later quantified for non-local, finite-n modes in general toroidal geometry [2,3]. Important aspects are that a range of wavelengths may potentially be unstable, with intermediate n's (n {approx} 3-30) generally limiting in high performance regimes, and that stability bounds are strongly sensitive to shape [Fig l(a)], and to collisionality (i.e. temperature and density) [4] through the bootstrap current. The development of efficient MHD stability codes such as ELITE [3,2] and MISHKA [5] has allowed detailed quantification of peeling-ballooning stability bounds (e.g. [6]) and extensive and largely successful comparisons with observation (e.g. [2,6-9]). These previous calculations are ideal, static, and linear. Here we extend this work to incorporate the impact of sheared toroidal rotation, and the non-ideal, nonlinear dynamics which must be studied to quantify ELM size and heat deposition on material surfaces.

  9. Radial Eigenmodes for a Toroidal Waveguide with Rectangular Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Rui Li

    2012-07-01

    In applying mode expansion to solve the CSR impedance for a section of toroidal vacuum chamber with rectangular cross section, we identify the eigenvalue problem for the radial eigenmodes which is different from that for cylindrical structures. In this paper, we present the general expressions of the radial eigenmodes, and discuss the properties of the eigenvalues on the basis of the Sturm-Liouville theory.

  10. Closed expressions for the magnetic field of toroidal multipole configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, G.V.

    1983-04-01

    Closed analytic expressions for the vector potential and the magnetic field for the lower order toroidal multipoles are presented. These expressions can be applied in the study of tokamak plasma cross section shaping. An example of such an application is included. These expressions also allow the vacuum fields required for plasma equilibrium to be specified in a general form independent of a particular coil configuration.

  11. Antenna excitation of drift wave in a toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, A.; Ricci, P.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Labit, B.; Mueller, S. H.; Podesta, M.; Poli, F. M.; Skiff, F.

    2007-10-15

    In a magnetized toroidal plasma, an antenna tunable in vertical wave number is used to excite density perturbations. Coherent detection is performed by means of Langmuir probes to directly determine both the wave vector and the plasma response induced by the antenna. Comparison between the theoretical density response predicted by the generalized Hasegawa-Wakatani model, and the experimentally determined density response enables us the identification of one peak of the plasma response as a drift wave.

  12. Turbulent Transport in Fusion Plasmas, Effects of Toroidicity and Fluid Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Jan

    2009-11-10

    Basic aspects of turbulent transport in toroidal magnetized plasmas are discussed. In particular Kadomtsev's mixing length estimate is found to work well for the Cyclone base case at the experimental gradient. Generalizations to include non-Markovian effects and off diagonal fluxes are given. The importance of toroidal effects is stressed These enter particularly strongly in convective or off diagonal fluxes. This feature applies also to momentum ttransport.

  13. THE COUPLING IMPEDANCE OF A TOROIDAL BEAM TUBE WITH CIRCULAR CROSS SECTION.

    SciTech Connect

    HAHN,H.

    1999-03-29

    IN THIS PAPER, THE LONGITUDINAL COUPLING IMPEDANCE OF A TOROIDAL BEAM TUBE WITH CIRCULAR CROSS SECION IS DERIVED IN THE FREQUENCY DOMAIN USING THE TOROIDAL COORDINATE SYSTEM. EXACT, ALTHOUGH COUPLED, DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS FOR THE AZIMUTHAL FIELD COMPONENTS ARE OBTAINED. AN APPROXIAMTE SOLUTION, VALID IN THE LIMIT OF SMALL CURVATURE, IS THEN DERIVED. ASSUMING EXTREME RELATIVISTIC ENERGIES AND A BEAM TUBE WITH PERFECTLY CONDUCTING WALLS, ONE FINDS A CLOSED-FORM EXPRESSION FOR THE PURELY REACTIVE COUPLING IMPEDANCE WHICH AT LOW MODE NUMBERS IS DEPENDENT ON THE TUBE GEOMETRY BUT WHICH AT VERY LARGE MODE NUMBERS APPROACHES THE FREE SPACE IMPEDANCE.

  14. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kalish, M.; Rushinski, J.; Myatt, L.; Brooks, A.; Dahlgren, F.; Chrzanowski, J.; Reiersen, W.; Freudenberg, K.

    2005-10-07

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements.

  15. Turbulent optimization of toroidal configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynick, H.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Faber, B.; Lucia, M.; Rorvig, M.; Talmadge, J. N.

    2014-09-01

    Recent progress in ‘turbulent optimization’ of toroidal configurations is described, using a method recently developed for evolving such configurations to ones having reduced turbulent transport. The method uses the GENE gyrokinetic code to compute the radial heat flux Qgk, and the STELLOPT optimization code with a theory-based ‘proxy’ figure of merit Qpr to stand in for Qgk for computational speed. Improved expressions for Qpr have been developed, involving further geometric quantities beyond those in the original proxy, which can also be used as ‘control knobs’ to reduce Qgk. Use of a global search algorithm has led to the discovery of turbulent-optimized configurations not found by the standard, local algorithm usually employed, as has use of a mapping capability which STELLOPT has been extended to provide, of figures of merit over the search space.

  16. Low frequency fully kinetic simulation of the toroidal ion temperature gradient instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturdevant, B. J.; Chen, Y.; Parker, S. E.

    2017-08-01

    A fully kinetic ion model is useful for the verification of gyrokinetic turbulence simulations in certain regimes, where the gyrokinetic model may break down due to the lack of small ordering parameters. However, for a fully kinetic model to be of value, it must first be able to accurately simulate low frequency drift-type instabilities typically well within the domain of gyrokinetics. Here, a fully kinetic ion model is formulated with weak gradient drive terms and applied to the toroidal ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) instability for the first time. Implementation in toroidal geometry is discussed, where orthogonal coordinates are used for particle dynamics, but field-line-following coordinates are used for the field equation allowing for high resolution of the field-aligned mode structure. Variational methods are formulated for integrating the equation of motion allowing for accuracy at a modest time-step size. Linear results are reported for both the slab and toroidal ITG instabilities. Good agreement with full Vlasov and gyrokinetic theory is demonstrated in slab geometry. Good agreement with global gyrokinetic simulation is also shown in toroidal geometry.

  17. Toroidal Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell Code with Gyro-kinetic Electron and Fully-kinetic ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jingbo; Zhang, Wenlu; Liu, Pengfei; Li, Ding

    2016-10-01

    A kinetic simulation model has been developed using gyro-kinetic electron and fully-kinetic ion by removing fast gyro motion of electrons using the Lie-transform perturbation theory. A particle-in-cell kinetic code is developed based on this model in general magnetic flux coordinate systems, which is particularly suitable for simulations of toroidally confined plasma. Single particle motion and field solver are successfully verified respectively. Integrated electrostatic benchmark, for example the lower-hybrid wave (LHW) and ion Bernstein wave (IBW), shows a good agreement with theoretical results. Preliminary electromagnetic benchmark of fast wave at lower hybrid frequency range is also presented. This code can be a first-principal tool to investigate high frequency nonlinear phenomenon, such as parametric decay instability, during lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ion cyclotron radio frequency heating (ICRF) with complex geometry effect included. Supported by National Special Research Program of China For ITER and National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  18. Low-loss metamaterial electromagnetically induced transparency based on electric toroidal dipolar response

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hai-ming; Liu, Shao-bin Liu, Si-yuan; Ding, Guo-wen; Yang, Hua; Yu, Zhi-yang; Zhang, Hai-feng; Wang, Shen-yun

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, a low-loss and high transmission analogy of electromagnetically induced transparency based on electric toroidal dipolar response is numerically and experimentally demonstrated. It is obtained by the excitation of the low-loss electric toroidal dipolar response, which confines the magnetic field inside a dielectric substrate with toroidal geometry. The metamaterial electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) structure is composed of the cut wire and asymmetric split-ring resonators. The transmission level is as high as 0.88, and the radiation loss is greatly suppressed, which can be proved by the surface currents distributions, the magnetic field distributions, and the imaginary parts of the effective permeability and permittivity. It offers an effective way to produce low-loss and high transmission metamaterial EIT.

  19. Kinetic analysis of the ion temperature gradient modes in toroidally rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.; Tessarotto, M.

    1996-12-01

    With the two time scale feature revealed, an analytical method is developed to solve the combined eigenvalue and initial value problem describing the ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in the toroidally rotating plasmas. With full gyrokinetics and toroidal geometry effects being taken into account in an ordering consistent manner, dispersion relations are obtained for ITG modes both of toroidal and slab-like branches. The results show that the sonic rotation can be harmful for the stability, while subsonic rotation with flow shear can be expected to be stabilizing. The existence of the flow shear leads the time evolution of the fluctuation signals to display two different time scales{emdash}a fast oscillating (either fast or slow growing) signal with its amplitude modulated by a slowly varying envelope, resembling fishbone-like fluctuations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. A novel electron density reconstruction method for asymmetrical toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, N.; Ohshima, S.; Minami, T.; Nagasaki, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Mizuuchi, T.; Okada, H.; Kado, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Konoshima, S.; Sano, F.; Tanaka, K.; Ohtani, Y.; Zang, L.; Kenmochi, N.

    2014-05-15

    A novel reconstruction method is developed for acquiring the electron density profile from multi-channel interferometric measurements of strongly asymmetrical toroidal plasmas. It is based on a regularization technique, and a generalized cross-validation function is used to optimize the regularization parameter with the aid of singular value decomposition. The feasibility of method could be testified by simulated measurements based on a magnetic configuration of the flexible helical-axis heliotron device, Heliotron J, which has an asymmetrical poloidal cross section. And the successful reconstruction makes possible to construct a multi-channel Far-infrared laser interferometry on this device. The advantages of this method are demonstrated by comparison with a conventional method. The factors which may affect the accuracy of the results are investigated, and an error analysis is carried out. Based on the obtained results, the proposed method is highly promising for accurately reconstructing the electron density in the asymmetrical toroidal plasma.

  1. Johnson-Kendall-Roberts adhesive contact for a toroidal indenter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argatov, Ivan; Li, Qiang; Pohrt, Roman; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-07-01

    The unilateral axisymmetric frictionless adhesive contact problem for a toroidal indenter and an elastic half-space is considered in the framework of the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts theory. In the case of a semi-fixed annular contact area, when one of the contact radii is fixed, while the other varies during indentation, we obtain the asymptotic solution of the adhesive contact problem based on the solution of the corresponding unilateral non-adhesive contact problem. In particular, the adhesive contact problem for Barber's concave indenter is considered in detail. In the case when both contact radii are variable, we construct the leading-order asymptotic solution for a narrow annular contact area. It is found that for a v-shaped generalized toroidal indenter, the pull-off force is independent of the elastic properties of the indented solid.

  2. Effects of neoclassical toroidal viscosity induced by the intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripple on the toroidal rotation in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. H.; Seol, J.; Ko, W. H.; Terzolo, L.; Aydemir, A. Y.; In, Y.; Ghim, Y.-c.; Lee, S. G.

    2016-08-01

    Effects of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) induced by intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripple on cocurrent toroidal rotation in H-mode tokamak plasmas are investigated. It is expected that large NTV torque can be localized at the edge region through the 1/ν-regime in the vicinity of E r ˜ 0 in the cocurrent rotating H-mode plasma. Numerical simulation on toroidal rotation demonstrates that the edge localized NTV torque determined by the intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripples in the level of most tokamaks can damp the toroidal rotation velocity over the whole region while reducing the toroidal rotation pedestal which is clearly observed in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak. It is found that the NTV torque changes the toroidal rotation gradient in the pedestal region dramatically, but the toroidal rotation profile in the core region responds rigidly without a change in the gradient. On the other hand, it shows that the NTV torque induced by the intrinsic error fields and toroidal field ripple in the level of the KSTAR tokamak, which are expected to be smaller than most tokamaks by at least one order of magnitude, is negligible in determining the toroidal rotation velocity profile. Experimental observation on the toroidal rotation change by the externally applied nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields on KSTAR also suggests that NTV torque arising from nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields can damp the toroidal rotation over the whole region while diminishing the toroidal rotation pedestal.

  3. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    general 3D geometries on GPUs, but compared to production codes like Serpent and MCNP, WARP has limited capabilities. Despite WARP's lack of features, its novel algorithm implementations show that high performance can be achieved on a GPU despite the inherently divergent program flow and sparse data access patterns. WARP is not ready for everyday nuclear reactor calculations, but is a good platform for further development of GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo neutron transport. In it's current state, it may be a useful tool for multiplication factor searches, i.e. determining reactivity coefficients by perturbing material densities or temperatures, since these types of calculations typically do not require many flux tallies. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  4. Zonal Toroidal Harmonic Expansions of External Gravitational Fields for Ring-like Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    We present an expression of the external gravitational field of a general ring-like object with axial and plane symmetries such as oval toroids or annular disks with an arbitrary density distribution. The main term is the gravitational field of a uniform, infinitely thin ring representing the limit of zero radial width and zero vertical height of the object. The additional term is derived from a zonal toroidal harmonic expansion of a general solution of Laplace’s equation outside the Brillouin toroid of the object. The special functions required are the point value and the first-order derivative of the zonal toroidal harmonics of the first kind, namely, the Legendre function of the first kind of half integer degree and an argument that is not less than unity. We developed a recursive method to compute them from two pairs of seed values explicitly expressed by some complete elliptic integrals. Numerical experiments show that appropriately truncated expansions converge rapidly outside the Brillouin toroid. The truncated expansion can be evaluated so efficiently that, for an oval toroid with an exponentially damping density profile, it is 3000-10,000 times faster than the two-dimensional numerical quadrature. A group of the Fortran 90 programs required in the new method and their sample outputs are available electronically.

  5. Peak neoclassical toroidal viscosity at low toroidal rotation in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, A. J.; Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Solomon, W. M.; Garofalo, A. M.; Lanctot, M. J.; Reimerdes, H.

    2011-05-15

    Observation of a theoretically predicted peak in the neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) force as a function of toroidal plasma rotation rate {Omega} is reported. The NTV was generated by applying n=3 magnetic fields from internal (I-)coils to low {Omega} plasmas produced with nearly balanced neutral beam injection. Locally, the peak corresponds to a toroidal rotation rate {Omega}{sub 0} where the radial electric field E{sub r} is near zero as determined by radial ion force balance.

  6. Tokamak with in situ magnetohydrodynamic generation of toroidal magnetic field

    DOEpatents

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes an electrically conductive metal pressure vessel for defining a chamber and confining liquid therein. A liner disposed within said chamber defines a toroidal space within the liner and confines gas therein. The metal vessel provides an electrically conductive path linking the toroidal space. Liquid metal is forced outwardly through the chamber outside of the toroidal space to generate electric current in the conductive path and thereby generate a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  7. Dielectric metamaterials with toroidal dipolar response

    DOE PAGES

    Basharin, Alexey A.; Kafesaki, Maria; Economou, Eleftherios N.; ...

    2015-03-27

    Toroidal multipoles are the terms missing in the standard multipole expansion; they are usually overlooked due to their relatively weak coupling to the electromagnetic fields. Here, we propose and theoretically study all-dielectric metamaterials of a special class that represent a simple electromagnetic system supporting toroidal dipolar excitations in the THz part of the spectrum. In addition, we show that resonant transmission and reflection of such metamaterials is dominated by toroidal dipole scattering, the neglect of which would result in a misunderstanding interpretation of the metamaterials’ macroscopic response. Due to the unique field configuration of the toroidal mode, the proposed metamaterialsmore » could serve as a platform for sensing or enhancement of light absorption and optical nonlinearities.« less

  8. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    DOEpatents

    Turner, William C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

  9. Dielectric Metamaterials with Toroidal Dipolar Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basharin, Alexey A.; Kafesaki, Maria; Economou, Eleftherios N.; Soukoulis, Costas M.; Fedotov, Vassili A.; Savinov, Vassili; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2015-01-01

    Toroidal multipoles are the terms missing in the standard multipole expansion; they are usually overlooked due to their relatively weak coupling to the electromagnetic fields. Here, we propose and theoretically study all-dielectric metamaterials of a special class that represent a simple electromagnetic system supporting toroidal dipolar excitations in the THz part of the spectrum. We show that resonant transmission and reflection of such metamaterials is dominated by toroidal dipole scattering, the neglect of which would result in a misunderstanding interpretation of the metamaterials' macroscopic response. Because of the unique field configuration of the toroidal mode, the proposed metamaterials could serve as a platform for sensing or enhancement of light absorption and optical nonlinearities.

  10. Development of Segmented Composite Toroidal Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K.; Roberts, J. Keith; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The conservation of weight and space are major challenges for launch vehicles, especially upper stages. Upper-stage launch vehicles are confined by the space of the payload fairing of the first stage and it is difficult to stack fuel and oxidizer tanks end-to-end. Toroidal tanks have been studied as a way to help solve this problem. A toroidal tank concept would allow a portion of another tank, or part of an engine, to pass through its center opening. A toroidal tank assembly would be especially beneficial if it could somehow handle structural loads of the vehicle. Marshall Space Flight Center, along with ATK Thiokol Propulsion, is designing and fabricating a toroidal tank composed of individual conformal segments. Each conformal segment will be a metal-lined composite over-wrapped vessel. This paper will demonstrate unique materials and processing approaches that are overcoming hurdles for the fabrication of this vessel.

  11. Influence of toroidal rotation on tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Huishan; Cao, Jintao; Li, Ding

    2017-05-01

    The effects of toroidal rotation on tearing modes are studied. It is found that rotation affects the stability of tearing modes mainly through interaction with the resistive inner region of the tearing mode. The coupling of magnetic curvature with the centrifugal and Coriolis forces provides a perturbed perpendicular current, and a return parallel current is induced to affect the stability of tearing modes. Toroidal rotation plays a stable role, which depends on the magnitude of the Mach number and adiabatic index Γ , and is independent of the direction of toroidal rotation. For Γ >1 , the scaling of the growth rate is changed for typical Mach numbers in present tokamaks. For Γ =1 , the scaling remains unchanged, and the effect of toroidal rotation is much less significant compared with that for Γ >1 .

  12. Magnetic Clouds Modeled As Interacting Toroidal Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainberg, J.; Osherovich, V. A.

    Multiple loops can be seen in the solar corona before the onset of a coronal mass ejection (CME), during the event and after the CME. We apply multi-toroidal con- figurations to model CMEs and their interplanetary counterparts U magnetic clouds. Such solutions found as MHD bounded states describe a single toroid (ground state) and multiple toroids (excited states), (Osherovich 1975; Osherovich and Lawrence 1982). We analyze noncircular cross section of such toroids and compare the compo- nents of the magnetic field vector with in situ observations in interplanetary magnetic clouds. The interaction of CMEs with the global coronal field will also be discussed. References Osherovich, V.A., Sooln Dann No 8, 1975. Osherovich, V.A. and J.K. Lawrence, Sol. Phys. 88, 117, 1983.

  13. Toroidal horizons in binary black hole mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Andy; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    2016-09-01

    We find the first binary black hole event horizon with a toroidal topology. It has been predicted that generically the event horizons of merging black holes should briefly have a toroidal topology. However, such a phase has never been seen in numerical simulations. Instead, in all previous simulations, the topology of the event horizon transitions directly from two spheres during the inspiral to a single sphere as the black holes merge. We find a coordinate transformation to a foliation of spacelike hypersurfaces that "cut a hole" through the event horizon surface, resulting in a toroidal event horizon, thus reconciling the numerical work with theoretical expectations. The demonstration requires extremely high numerical precision, which is made possible by a new event horizon code described in a companion paper. A torus could potentially provide a mechanism for violating topological censorship. However, these toroidal event horizons satisfy topological censorship by construction, because we can always trivially apply the inverse coordinate transformation to remove the topological feature.

  14. What happens to full-f gyrokinetic transport and turbulence in a toroidal wedge simulation?

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Kyuho; Chang, C. S.; Seo, Janghoon; ...

    2017-01-24

    Here, in order to save the computing time or to fit the simulation size into a limited computing hardware in a gyrokinetic turbulence simulation of a tokamak plasma, a toroidal wedge simulation may be utilized in which only a partial toroidal section is modeled with a periodic boundary condition in the toroidal direction. The most severe restriction in the wedge simulation is expected to be in the longest wavelength turbulence, i.e., ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence. The global full-f gyrokinetic code XGC1 is used to compare the transport and turbulence properties from a toroidal wedge simulation against the fullmore » torus simulation in an ITG unstable plasma in a model toroidal geometry. It is found that (1) the convergence study in the wedge number needs to be conducted all the way down to the full torus in order to avoid a false convergence, (2) a reasonably accurate simulation can be performed if the correct wedge number N can be identified, (3) the validity of a wedge simulation may be checked by performing a wave-number spectral analysis of the turbulence amplitude |δΦ| and assuring that the variation of δΦ between the discrete kθ values is less than 25% compared to the peak |δΦ|, and (4) a frequency spectrum may not be used for the validity check of a wedge simulation.« less

  15. What happens to full-f gyrokinetic transport and turbulence in a toroidal wedge simulation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyuho; Chang, C. S.; Seo, Janghoon; Ku, S.; Choe, W.

    2017-01-01

    In order to save the computing time or to fit the simulation size into a limited computing hardware in a gyrokinetic turbulence simulation of a tokamak plasma, a toroidal wedge simulation may be utilized in which only a partial toroidal section is modeled with a periodic boundary condition in the toroidal direction. The most severe restriction in the wedge simulation is expected to be in the longest wavelength turbulence, i.e., ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence. The global full-f gyrokinetic code XGC1 is used to compare the transport and turbulence properties from a toroidal wedge simulation against the full torus simulation in an ITG unstable plasma in a model toroidal geometry. It is found that (1) the convergence study in the wedge number needs to be conducted all the way down to the full torus in order to avoid a false convergence, (2) a reasonably accurate simulation can be performed if the correct wedge number N can be identified, (3) the validity of a wedge simulation may be checked by performing a wave-number spectral analysis of the turbulence amplitude |δΦ| and assuring that the variation of δΦ between the discrete kθ values is less than 25% compared to the peak |δΦ| , and (4) a frequency spectrum may not be used for the validity check of a wedge simulation.

  16. A Model for Task Design with Focus on Exploration, Explanation, and Generalization in a Dynamic Geometry Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahlgren, Maria; Brunström, Mats

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of new technologies in schools provides new possibilities for the integration of technology in mathematics education. However, research has shown that there is a need for new kinds of task that utilize the affordances provided by new technology. Numerous studies have demonstrated that dynamic geometry environments…

  17. Bow-shaped toroidal field coils

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanos, P.

    1981-05-01

    Design features of Bow-Shaped Toroidal Field Coils are described and compared with circular and D shaped coils. The results indicate that bow coils can produce higher field strengths, store more energy and be made demountable. The design offers the potential for the production of ultrahigh toroidal fields. Included are representative coil shapes and their engineering properties, a suggested structural design and an analysis of a specific case.

  18. Toroidal eigenmodes in all-dielectric metamolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasolamprou, Anna C.; Tsilipakos, Odysseas; Kafesaki, Maria; Soukoulis, Costas M.; Economou, Eleftherios N.

    2016-11-01

    We present a thorough investigation of the electromagnetic resonant modes supported by systems of polaritonic rods placed at the vertices of canonical polygons. The study is conducted with rigorous finite-element eigenvalue simulations. To provide physical insight, the simulations are complemented with coupled mode theory (the analog of LCAO in molecular and solid state physics) and a lumped wire model capturing the coupling-caused reorganizations of the currents in each rod. The systems of rods, which form all-dielectric cyclic metamolecules, are found to support the unconventional toroidal dipole mode, consisting of the magnetic dipole mode in each rod. Besides the toroidal modes, the spectrally adjacent collective modes are identified. The evolution of all resonant frequencies with rod separation is examined. They are found to oscillate about the single-rod magnetic dipole resonance, a feature attributed to the leaky nature of the constituent modes. Importantly, we observe that ensembles of an odd number of rods produce larger frequency separation between the toroidal mode and its neighbor than the ones with an even number of rods. This increased spectral isolation, along with the low quality factor exhibited by the toroidal mode, favors the coupling of the commonly silent toroidal dipole to the outside world, rendering the proposed structure a prime candidate for controlling the observation of toroidal excitations and their interaction with the usually present electric dipole.

  19. Toroid cavities as NMR detectors in high pressure probes

    SciTech Connect

    Woelk, K.; Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

    1993-03-01

    A cylindrical toroid cavity has been developed for application as an NMR detector for high sensitivity and high resolution spectroscopy in metal vessel probes. Those probes are used for in situ investigations at high temperature and pressure. Since the transmitted r.f. field is completely confined within the torus, the cavity can be placed inside the pressurized system without magnetic coupling to the metal vessel. Resonance frequencies up to 400 MHz make the toroid cavity detector especially suited for use in {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F spectroscopy. Typically achieved static {sup 1}H linewidths, measured on CHCl{sub 3} using cavities in Be-Cu pressure vessels, are 2.0 Hz. On the basis of theoretical considerations that include the radial dependence of the r.f. field within cylindrical or circular toroid detectors, equations were evolved to predict the signal intensity as a function of the pulse width. The equations precisely describe the deviations from the sinusoidal approximation, which is generally used for signal intensities derived from Helmholtz or solenoid coils.

  20. Generation of rotational flows in toroidally confined visco-resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Jorge; Bos, Wouter; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David

    2015-11-01

    We investigate by numerical simulation the generation of rotational flows in a toroid confining a conducting magnetofluid. A current is driven by the application of externally supported electric and magnetic fields. We show how the properties and intensity of the rotations are regulated by dimensionless numbers (Lundquist and viscous Lundquist) that contain the resistivity and viscosity of the magnetofluid. At the magnetohydrodynamic level (uniform mass density and incompressible magnetofluids), rotational flows appear in toroidal, driven MHD. The evolution of these flows with the transport coefficients, geometry, and safety factor are described. Two different toroidal geometries are considered, one with an up-down symmetric and the other with an asymmetric cross section. We show that there exists a fundamental difference between both studied cases: the volume-averaged angular momentum is zero for the symmetric case, while for the asymmetric cross section a finite volume-averaged angular momentum appears. We observe a breaking in the up-down symmetry of the flow and a toroidal preferred direction emerges.

  1. Measuring Properties of Magnetic Reconnection in Nonlinear Resistive and Two-Fluid Toroidal Simulations of Sawteeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beidler, Matthew; Cassak, Paul; Jardin, Stephen; Ferraro, Nathaniel

    2015-11-01

    The sawtooth crash in tokamaks limits the core temperature, harms confinement, and seeds disruptions. A predictive capability of its ramifications has been elusive. Extended-MHD physics is needed to properly analyze the magnetic reconnection that occurs during the crash phase, but it has only recently been integrated into codes using a toroidal geometry. In this study, we employ the three-dimensional toroidal, extended-MHD code M3D-C1 to study reconnection during the sawtooth crash. We study the nonlinear evolution of a test equilibrium in a non-reduced field representation for resistive-MHD and the two-fluid model. We find that the toroidal mode growth rates for the two-fluid reconnection process exhibit a nonlinear acceleration and greatly exceed that of a similar resistive MHD model, more closely in line with experimental results. Furthermore, by sampling the two-fluid simulation data in the plane perpendicular to the helical (m,n) =(1,1) mode, we present the first observation of the quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field appearing during sawtooth reconnection with the Hall term. We also explore how reconnection as viewed in the helically perpendicular plane varies toroidally, which affects the symmetry of the reconnection geometry and the local diamagnetic effects.

  2. Investigation of Finsler geometry as a generalization to curved spacetime of Planck-scale-deformed relativity in the de Sitter case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Iarley P.; Loret, Niccoló; Nettel, Francisco

    2017-02-01

    Over the last few years, Planck-scale modifications to the dispersion relation of particles have been deeply studied for the possibility to formulate some phenomenology of Planckian effects in astrophysical and cosmological frameworks. There are some indications [F. Girelli, S. Liberati, and L. Sindoni, Phys. Rev. D 75, 064015 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.064015] that Finsler geometry can provide some generalization of Riemannian geometry which may allow us to account for the nontrivial (Planckian) structure of the relativistic particles' configuration space. We investigate the possibility to formalize Planck-scale deformations to relativistic models in curved spacetime, within the framework of Finsler geometry. We take into account the general strategy of analysis of dispersion relations modifications in curved spacetimes proposed in [G. Rosati, G. Amelino-Camelia, A. Marciano, and M. Matassa, Phys. Rev. D 92, 124042 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevD.92.124042], generalizing to the de Sitter case the results obtained in [G. Amelino-Camelia, L. Barcaroli, G. Gubitosi, S. Liberati, and N. Loret, Phys. Rev. D 90, 125030 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.125030] for deformed relativistic particle kinematics in flat spacetime using Finsler formalism.

  3. Saturation of single toroidal number Alfvén modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Briguglio, S.

    2016-08-01

    The results of numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the saturation mechanism of a single toroidal number Alfvén mode, driven unstable, in a tokamak plasma, by the resonant interaction with energetic ions. The effects of equilibrium geometry non-uniformities and finite mode radial width on the wave-particle nonlinear dynamics are discussed. Saturation occurs as the fast-ion density flattening produced by the radial flux associated to the resonant particles captured in the potential well of the Alfvén wave extends over the whole region where mode-particle power exchange can take place. The occurrence of two different saturation regimes is shown. In the first regime, dubbed resonance detuning, that region is limited by the resonance radial width (that is, the width of the region where the fast-ion resonance frequency matches the mode frequency). In the second regime, called radial decoupling, the power exchange region is limited by the mode radial width. In the former regime, the mode saturation amplitude scales quadratically with the growth rate; in the latter, it scales linearly. The occurrence of one or the other regime can be predicted on the basis of linear dynamics: in particular, the radial profile of the fast-ion resonance frequency and the mode structure. Here, we discuss how such properties can depend on the considered toroidal number and compare simulation results with the predictions obtained from a simplified nonlinear pendulum model.

  4. Asymmetric magnon excitation by spontaneous toroidal ordering

    DOE PAGES

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-04-12

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin–orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb latticemore » gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. Furthermore, the implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.« less

  5. Tokamak with liquid metal for inducing toroidal electrical field

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1981-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes a vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within said vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner confines gas therein. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside the liner. A magnetic field is established in the liquid metal to develop magnetic flux linking the toroidal space. The gas is ionized. The liquid metal and the toroidal space are moved relative to one another transversely of the space to generate electric current in the ionized gas in the toroidal space about its major axis and thereby heat plasma developed in the toroidal space.

  6. Series expansions for the vector potential and field components produced by a toroidal conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, J.

    1985-01-01

    Alternative solutions for the vector potential and the magnetic-field components produced by a toroidal conductor of rectangular cross section are considered. Series expansions are obtained and found to agree with those obtained independently by M. W. Garrett [J. Appl. Phys. 22, 1091 (1951)]. Results are obtained for a particular coil geometry by using only a few terms from the series expansions and, by comparing with the exact results, are found to be highly accurate at points close to the coil axis.

  7. Neoclassical transport in toroidal plasmas with nonaxisymmetric flux surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.

    2015-05-01

    The capability to treat nonaxisymmetric flux surface geometry has been added to the drift-kinetic code NEO (Belli and Candy 2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 095010). Geometric quantities (i.e. metric elements) are supplied by a recently-developed local 3D equilibrium solver, allowing neoclassical transport coefficients to be systematically computed while varying the 3D plasma shape in a simple and intuitive manner. Code verification is accomplished via detailed comparison with 3D Pfirsch-Schlüter theory. A discussion of the various collisionality regimes associated with 3D transport is given, with an emphasis on non-ambipolar particle flux, neoclassical toroidal viscosity, energy flux and bootstrap current. Finally, we compute the transport in the presence of ripple-type perturbations in a DIII-D-like H-mode edge plasma.

  8. Vacuum Magnetic Field Mapping of the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, J. T.; Hanson, J.; Hartwell, G. J.; Knowlton, S. F.; Montgomery, C.; Munoz, J.

    2007-11-01

    Vacuum magnetic field mapping experiments are performed on the CTH torsatron with a movable electron gun and phosphor-coated screen or movable wand at two different toroidal locations. These experiments compare the experimentally measured magnetic configuration produced by the as-built coil set, to the magnetic configuration simulated with the IFT Biot-Savart code using the measured coil set parameters. Efforts to minimize differences between the experimentally measured location of the magnetic axis and its predicted value utilizing a Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) process result in small modifications of the helical coil winding law used to model the vacuum magnetic field geometry of CTH. Because these studies are performed at relatively low fields B = 0.01 - 0.05 T, a uniform ambient magnetic field is included in the minimization procedure.

  9. Neoclassical transport in toroidal plasmas with nonaxisymmetric flux surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Belli, Emily A.; Candy, Jefferey M.

    2015-04-15

    The capability to treat nonaxisymmetric flux surface geometry has been added to the drift-kinetic code NEO. Geometric quantities (i.e. metric elements) are supplied by a recently-developed local 3D equilibrium solver, allowing neoclassical transport coefficients to be systematically computed while varying the 3D plasma shape in a simple and intuitive manner. Code verification is accomplished via detailed comparison with 3D Pfirsch–Schlüter theory. A discussion of the various collisionality regimes associated with 3D transport is given, with an emphasis on non-ambipolar particle flux, neoclassical toroidal viscosity, energy flux and bootstrap current. As a result, we compute the transport in the presence of ripple-type perturbations in a DIII-D-like H-mode edge plasma.

  10. Neoclassical transport in toroidal plasmas with nonaxisymmetric flux surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Belli, Emily A.; Candy, Jefferey M.

    2015-04-15

    The capability to treat nonaxisymmetric flux surface geometry has been added to the drift-kinetic code NEO. Geometric quantities (i.e. metric elements) are supplied by a recently-developed local 3D equilibrium solver, allowing neoclassical transport coefficients to be systematically computed while varying the 3D plasma shape in a simple and intuitive manner. Code verification is accomplished via detailed comparison with 3D Pfirsch–Schlüter theory. A discussion of the various collisionality regimes associated with 3D transport is given, with an emphasis on non-ambipolar particle flux, neoclassical toroidal viscosity, energy flux and bootstrap current. As a result, we compute the transport in the presence ofmore » ripple-type perturbations in a DIII-D-like H-mode edge plasma.« less

  11. Toroidal dipolar responses in a planar metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Linyan; Li, Minhua; Yang, Helin; Huang, Xiaojun; Wu, Song

    2014-10-01

    Both the magnetic toroidal dipolar (MTD) response and electric toroidal dipolar (ETD) response have been achieved and studied in the microwave region by designing a feasible planar metamaterial. By changing the polarized direction of a normally incident wave, two different coupling modes are observed, and therefore MTD and ETD responses can be achieved accordingly. It is also confirmed by scattered powers for various multipole moments and field distributions that they dominate over other traditional multipole responses at 5.69 GHz and 11.69 GHz, respectively. In view of the design feasibility of planar metamaterial, these resonance-enhanced MTD and ETD responses could provide an avenue for various interesting phenomena associated with the elusive toroidal moments.

  12. Interaction of toroidal swimmers in Stokes flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianjun; Fauci, Lisa

    2017-04-01

    A doughnut-shaped object supporting surface rotations was a hypothetical construct proposed by both Taylor and Purcell as a swimmer that would be able to propel itself in a Stokesian fluid because of the irreversibility of its stroke. Here we numerically examine the hydrodynamic interaction of pairs and trios of these free toroidal swimmers. First, we study the axisymmetric case of two toroidal swimmers placed in tandem, and show that a single torus of a corotating pair is more efficient than when it swims alone, but less efficient when paired with a counterrotating partner. Using a regularized Stokeslet framework, we study the nonaxisymmetric case of toroidal swimmers whose axes are initially parallel, but not collinear. These perturbed in tandem swimmers can exhibit qualitatively different trajectories that may, for instance, repel the swimmers or have them settle into a periodic state. We also illustrate interesting dynamics that occur for different initial configurations of three tori.

  13. Effects of toroidicity on resistive tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Izzo, R.; Monticello, D.A.; Manickam, J.; Strauss, H.R.; Grimm, R.; McGuire, K.

    1983-03-01

    A reduced set of resistive MHD equations is solved numerically in three dimensions to study the stability of tokamak plasmas. Toroidal effects are included self-consistently to leading and next order in inverse aspect ratio, epsilon. The equations satisfy an energy integral. In addition, the momentum equation yields the Grad-Shafranov equation correct to all orders in epsilon. Low beta plasma are studied using several different q-profiles. In all cases, the linear growth rates are reduced by finite toroidicity. Excellent agreement with resistive PEST is obtianed. In some cases, toroidal effects lead to complete stabilization of the mode. Nonlinear results show smaller saturated island widths for finite aspect ratio compared to the cylindrical limit. If the current channel is wide enough so as to produce steep gradients towards the outside of the plasma, both the finite aspect ratio cases and cylindrical cases disrupt.

  14. Toroidal Precession as a Geometric Phase

    SciTech Connect

    J.W. Burby and H. Qin

    2012-09-26

    Toroidal precession is commonly understood as the orbit-averaged toroidal drift of guiding centers in axisymmetric and quasisymmetric configurations. We give a new, more natural description of precession as a geometric phase effect. In particular, we show that the precession angle arises as the holonomy of a guiding center's poloidal trajectory relative to a principal connection. The fact that this description is physically appropriate is borne out with new, manifestly coordinate-independent expressions for the precession angle that apply to all types of orbits in tokamaks and quasisymmetric stellarators alike. We then describe how these expressions may be fruitfully employed in numerical calculations of precession.

  15. A note on quasi-generalized CR-lightlike geometry in indefinite nearly μ-Sasakian manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massamba, Fortuné; Ssekajja, Samuel

    The concept of quasi-generalized CR-lightlike was first introduced by the authors in [Quasi generalized CR-lightlike submanifolds of indefinite nearly Sasakian manifolds, Arab. J. Math. 5 (2016) 87-101]. In this paper, we focus on ascreen and co-screen quasi-generalized CR-lightlike submanifolds of indefinite nearly μ-Sasakian manifold. We prove an existence theorem for minimal ascreen quasi-generalized CR-lightlike submanifolds admitting a metric connection. Classification theorems on nearly parallel and auto-parallel distributions on a co-screen quasi-generalized CR-lightlike submanifold are also given. Several examples are also constructed, where necessary, to illustrate the main ideas.

  16. The effect of sheared toroidal rotation on pressure driven magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hegna, C. C.

    2016-05-15

    The impact of sheared toroidal rotation on the evolution of pressure driven magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas is investigated using a resistive magnetohydrodynamics model augmented by a neoclassical Ohm's law. Particular attention is paid to the asymptotic matching data as the Mercier indices are altered in the presence of sheared flow. Analysis of the nonlinear island Grad-Shafranov equation shows that sheared flows tend to amplify the stabilizing pressure/curvature contribution to pressure driven islands in toroidal tokamaks relative to the island bootstrap current contribution. As such, sheared toroidal rotation tends to reduce saturated magnetic island widths.

  17. The effect of sheared toroidal rotation on pressure driven magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegna, C. C.

    2016-05-01

    The impact of sheared toroidal rotation on the evolution of pressure driven magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas is investigated using a resistive magnetohydrodynamics model augmented by a neoclassical Ohm's law. Particular attention is paid to the asymptotic matching data as the Mercier indices are altered in the presence of sheared flow. Analysis of the nonlinear island Grad-Shafranov equation shows that sheared flows tend to amplify the stabilizing pressure/curvature contribution to pressure driven islands in toroidal tokamaks relative to the island bootstrap current contribution. As such, sheared toroidal rotation tends to reduce saturated magnetic island widths.

  18. Electromagnetic toroidal excitations in matter and free space.

    PubMed

    Papasimakis, N; Fedotov, V A; Savinov, V; Raybould, T A; Zheludev, N I

    2016-03-01

    The toroidal dipole is a localized electromagnetic excitation, distinct from the magnetic and electric dipoles. While the electric dipole can be understood as a pair of opposite charges and the magnetic dipole as a current loop, the toroidal dipole corresponds to currents flowing on the surface of a torus. Toroidal dipoles provide physically significant contributions to the basic characteristics of matter including absorption, dispersion and optical activity. Toroidal excitations also exist in free space as spatially and temporally localized electromagnetic pulses propagating at the speed of light and interacting with matter. We review recent experimental observations of resonant toroidal dipole excitations in metamaterials and the discovery of anapoles, non-radiating charge-current configurations involving toroidal dipoles. While certain fundamental and practical aspects of toroidal electrodynamics remain open for the moment, we envision that exploitation of toroidal excitations can have important implications for the fields of photonics, sensing, energy and information.

  19. Electromagnetic toroidal excitations in matter and free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papasimakis, N.; Fedotov, V. A.; Savinov, V.; Raybould, T. A.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2016-03-01

    The toroidal dipole is a localized electromagnetic excitation, distinct from the magnetic and electric dipoles. While the electric dipole can be understood as a pair of opposite charges and the magnetic dipole as a current loop, the toroidal dipole corresponds to currents flowing on the surface of a torus. Toroidal dipoles provide physically significant contributions to the basic characteristics of matter including absorption, dispersion and optical activity. Toroidal excitations also exist in free space as spatially and temporally localized electromagnetic pulses propagating at the speed of light and interacting with matter. We review recent experimental observations of resonant toroidal dipole excitations in metamaterials and the discovery of anapoles, non-radiating charge-current configurations involving toroidal dipoles. While certain fundamental and practical aspects of toroidal electrodynamics remain open for the moment, we envision that exploitation of toroidal excitations can have important implications for the fields of photonics, sensing, energy and information.

  20. Axisymmetric curvature-driven instability in a model divertor geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, W. A.; Ryutov, D. D.

    2013-09-15

    A model problem is presented which qualitatively describes a pressure-driven instability which can occur near the null-point in the divertor region of a tokamak where the poloidal field becomes small. The model problem is described by a horizontal slot with a vertical magnetic field which plays the role of the poloidal field. Line-tying boundary conditions are applied at the planes defining the slot. A toroidal field lying parallel to the planes is assumed to be very strong, thereby constraining the possible structure of the perturbations. Axisymmetric perturbations which leave the toroidal field unperturbed are analyzed. Ideal magnetohydrodynamics is used, and the instability threshold is determined by the energy principle. Because of the boundary conditions, the Euler equation is, in general, non-separable except at marginal stability. This problem may be useful in understanding the source of heat transport into the private flux region in a snowflake divertor which possesses a large region of small poloidal field, and for code benchmarking as it yields simple analytic results in an interesting geometry.

  1. Escape of magnetic toroids from the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieber, John W.; Rust, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of heliospheric magnetic fields at 1 AU shows that 10(exp 24) Mx of net azimuthal flux escapes from the Sun per solar cycle. This rate is consistent with rates derived from other indicators of flux escape, including coronal mass ejections and filament eruptions. The toroidal flux escape rate is compared with the apparent rate of flux emergence at the solar surface, and it is concluded that escaping toroids will remove at least 20% of the emerging flux, and may remove as much as 100% of emerging flux if multiple eruptions occur on the toroids. The data imply that flux escapes the Sun with an efficiency far exceeding Parker's upper limit estimate of 3%. Toroidal flux escape is almost certainly the source of the observed overwinding of the interplanetary magnetic field spiral. Two mechanisms to facilitate net flux escape are discussed: helicity charging to push open the fields and flux transport with reconnection to close them off. We estimate the Sun will shed approximately 2 x 10(exp 45) of magnetic helicity per solar cycle, leading to a mean helicity density of 100 Mx(exp 2)cm(exp -3) at 1 AU, which agrees well with observations.

  2. Ring stability of underground toroidal tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubis, Asnawi; Su'udi, Ahmad

    2017-06-01

    The design of pressure vessels subjected to internal pressure is governed by its strength, while the design of pressure vessels subjected to external pressure is governed by its stability, which is for circular cross-section is called the ring stability. This paper presented the results of finite element study of ring stability of circular toroidal tank without stiffener under external pressure. The tank was placed underground and external pressure load from soil was simulated as pressure at the top of the vessel along 30° circumferentially. One might ask the reason for choosing toroidal rather than cylindrical tank. Preliminary finite element studies showed that toroidal shells can withstand higher external pressure than cylindrical shells. In this study, the volume of the tank was fixed for 15,000 litters. The buckling external pressure (pL) was calculated for radius ratio (R/r) of 2, 3, and 4. The corresponding cross-section radiuses were 724.3 mm, 632.7 mm, and 574.9 mm, respectively. The selected element type was SHELL 281 from the ANSYS element library. To obtain the buckling load, the arc-length method was used in the nonlinear analysis. Both material and geometric nonlinearities were activated during the analysis. The conclusion of this study is that short-radius and thin-walled toroidal shell produces higher buckling load.

  3. Quantum electron transport in toroidal carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jack, Mark; Encinosa, Mario

    2008-03-01

    Electron transport under bias is treated in tight-binding approximation using a non-equilibrium Green's function approach. Density-of-states D(E), transmissivity T(E), and current ISD are calculated through a (3,3) armchair nanotorus with laterally attached metallic leads and a magnetic field penetrating the toroidal plane. Plateaus in T(E) through the torus are observed as a function of both the relative angle between leads and magnetic flux. Initial computational studies performed with 1800 atoms and attached leads show substantial computational slowdown when increasing the system size by a factor of two. Results are generated by inverting the device Hamiltonian with a standard recursion method extended to account for unit cell toroidal closure. Significant computational speed-up is expected for a parallelized code on a multiprocessor computer cluster. The dependence of electronic features on torus size and torus curvature is tested for three tori with 900, 1800 and 3600 carbon atoms, respectively. References: 1. M. Jack and M. Encinosa, Quantum electron transport in toroidal carbon nanotubes with metallic leads. ArXiv: quant-ph/0709.0760. 2. M. Encinosa and M. Jack, Dipole and solenoidal magnetic moments of electronic surface currents on toroidal nanostructures. J. Comp.-Aided Mat. Design (Springer), 14 (1) (2007) 65 -- 71.

  4. PULSAR WIND NEBULAE WITH THICK TOROIDAL STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, Roger A.; Reynolds, Stephen P. E-mail: reynolds@ncsu.edu

    2011-10-10

    We investigate a class of pulsar wind nebulae that show synchrotron emission from a thick toroidal structure. The best studied such object is the small radio and X-ray nebula around the Vela pulsar, which can be interpreted as the result of interaction of a mildly supersonic inward flow with the recent pulsar wind. Such a flow near the center of a supernova remnant can be produced in a transient phase when the reverse shock reaches the center of the remnant. Other nebulae with a thick toroidal structure are G106.6+2.9 and G76.9+1.0. Their structure contrasts with young pulsar nebulae like the Crab Nebula and 3C 38, which show a more chaotic, filamentary structure in the synchrotron emission. In both situations, a torus-jet structure is present where the pulsar wind passes through a termination shock, indicating the flow is initially toroidal. We suggest that the difference is due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability that operates when the outer boundary of the nebula is accelerating into freely expanding supernova ejecta. The instability gives rise to mixing in the Crab and related objects, but is not present in the nebulae with thick toroidal regions.

  5. Design of the TPX outboard toroidal limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Schaubel, K.M.; Anderson, P.M.; Baxi, C.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment outboard limiter system incorporates the passive stabilizer plates, the ripple armor, the toroidal break and the support structures. These components are designed to withstand substantial steady state heat loads and high mechanical forces caused by plasma disruptions. The design of these components has been developed to deal with the challenging thermal, structural and remote handling requirements.

  6. Toroidal surfaces compared with spherocylindrical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malacara-Doblado, Daniel; Malacara-Hernandez, Daniel; Garcia-Marquez, Jorge L.

    1995-08-01

    Toroidal and sphero-cylindrical optical surfaces are two different kinds of surfaces (Menchaca and Malacara, 1986), but they are almost identical in the vicinity of the optical axis. The separation between these two surfaces increases when the distance to the optical axis increases. In this work the separation between these two surfaces outside of the central region is analytically studied.

  7. Tearing Mode Stability with Sheared Toroidal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ryan; Coppi, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    Toroidal plasma flow induced by neutral beam heating has been found to increase the stability of tearing modes in tokamak plasmas. The need to extrapolate current (experimentally-based) knowledge of tearing mode onset to future machines, requiresa better understanding of the essential physics. We consider the physics of flow near the rational surfaces. For realistic flow profiles, the velocity shear near the rational surface can be treated as a perturbation, and is found to amplify the dominant stabilizing effect of magnetic curvature. This effect can be seen using a cylindrical model if large-aspect-ratio corrections to the magnetic curvature are incorporated. On the other hand, the physical effects of toroidal rotation are completely absent in a cylinder, and require a fully-toroidal calculation to study. The toroidal rotation near the rational surface is found to couple to a geometrical parameter which vanishes for up-down symmetric profiles. Physically, the dominant effects of rotation arise from a Coriolis force, leading to flow directional dependence. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  8. The geometry of generalized force matching and related information metrics in coarse-graining of molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Kalligiannaki, Evangelia; Harmandaris, Vagelis; Katsoulakis, Markos A; Plecháč, Petr

    2015-08-28

    Using the probabilistic language of conditional expectations, we reformulate the force matching method for coarse-graining of molecular systems as a projection onto spaces of coarse observables. A practical outcome of this probabilistic description is the link of the force matching method with thermodynamic integration. This connection provides a way to systematically construct a local mean force and to optimally approximate the potential of mean force through force matching. We introduce a generalized force matching condition for the local mean force in the sense that allows the approximation of the potential of mean force under both linear and non-linear coarse graining mappings (e.g., reaction coordinates, end-to-end length of chains). Furthermore, we study the equivalence of force matching with relative entropy minimization which we derive for general non-linear coarse graining maps. We present in detail the generalized force matching condition through applications to specific examples in molecular systems.

  9. The geometry of generalized force matching and related information metrics in coarse-graining of molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kalligiannaki, Evangelia; Harmandaris, Vagelis; Plecháč, Petr

    2015-08-28

    Using the probabilistic language of conditional expectations, we reformulate the force matching method for coarse-graining of molecular systems as a projection onto spaces of coarse observables. A practical outcome of this probabilistic description is the link of the force matching method with thermodynamic integration. This connection provides a way to systematically construct a local mean force and to optimally approximate the potential of mean force through force matching. We introduce a generalized force matching condition for the local mean force in the sense that allows the approximation of the potential of mean force under both linear and non-linear coarse graining mappings (e.g., reaction coordinates, end-to-end length of chains). Furthermore, we study the equivalence of force matching with relative entropy minimization which we derive for general non-linear coarse graining maps. We present in detail the generalized force matching condition through applications to specific examples in molecular systems.

  10. The geometry of generalized force matching and related information metrics in coarse-graining of molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalligiannaki, Evangelia; Harmandaris, Vagelis; Katsoulakis, Markos A.; Plecháč, Petr

    2015-08-01

    Using the probabilistic language of conditional expectations, we reformulate the force matching method for coarse-graining of molecular systems as a projection onto spaces of coarse observables. A practical outcome of this probabilistic description is the link of the force matching method with thermodynamic integration. This connection provides a way to systematically construct a local mean force and to optimally approximate the potential of mean force through force matching. We introduce a generalized force matching condition for the local mean force in the sense that allows the approximation of the potential of mean force under both linear and non-linear coarse graining mappings (e.g., reaction coordinates, end-to-end length of chains). Furthermore, we study the equivalence of force matching with relative entropy minimization which we derive for general non-linear coarse graining maps. We present in detail the generalized force matching condition through applications to specific examples in molecular systems.

  11. Dynamical model for the toroidal sporadic meteors

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorný, Petr; Vokrouhlický, David; Nesvorný, David; Campbell-Brown, Margaret; Brown, Peter E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz E-mail: margaret.campbell@uwo.ca

    2014-07-01

    More than a decade of radar operations by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar have allowed both young and moderately old streams to be distinguished from the dispersed sporadic background component. The latter has been categorized according to broad radiant regions visible to Earth-based observers into three broad classes: the helion and anti-helion source, the north and south apex sources, and the north and south toroidal sources (and a related arc structure). The first two are populated mainly by dust released from Jupiter-family comets and new comets. Proper modeling of the toroidal sources has not to date been accomplished. Here, we develop a steady-state model for the toroidal source of the sporadic meteoroid complex, compare our model with the available radar measurements, and investigate a contribution of dust particles from our model to the whole population of sporadic meteoroids. We find that the long-term stable part of the toroidal particles is mainly fed by dust released by Halley type (long period) comets (HTCs). Our synthetic model reproduces most of the observed features of the toroidal particles, including the most troublesome low-eccentricity component, which is due to a combination of two effects: particles' ability to decouple from Jupiter and circularize by the Poynting-Robertson effect, and large collision probability for orbits similar to that of the Earth. Our calibrated model also allows us to estimate the total mass of the HTC-released dust in space and check the flux necessary to maintain the cloud in a steady state.

  12. Dynamical Model for the Toroidal Sporadic Meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, Petr; Vokrouhlický, David; Nesvorný, David; Campbell-Brown, Margaret; Brown, Peter

    2014-07-01

    More than a decade of radar operations by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar have allowed both young and moderately old streams to be distinguished from the dispersed sporadic background component. The latter has been categorized according to broad radiant regions visible to Earth-based observers into three broad classes: the helion and anti-helion source, the north and south apex sources, and the north and south toroidal sources (and a related arc structure). The first two are populated mainly by dust released from Jupiter-family comets and new comets. Proper modeling of the toroidal sources has not to date been accomplished. Here, we develop a steady-state model for the toroidal source of the sporadic meteoroid complex, compare our model with the available radar measurements, and investigate a contribution of dust particles from our model to the whole population of sporadic meteoroids. We find that the long-term stable part of the toroidal particles is mainly fed by dust released by Halley type (long period) comets (HTCs). Our synthetic model reproduces most of the observed features of the toroidal particles, including the most troublesome low-eccentricity component, which is due to a combination of two effects: particles' ability to decouple from Jupiter and circularize by the Poynting-Robertson effect, and large collision probability for orbits similar to that of the Earth. Our calibrated model also allows us to estimate the total mass of the HTC-released dust in space and check the flux necessary to maintain the cloud in a steady state.

  13. Developments in special geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaupt, Thomas; Vaughan, Owen

    2012-02-01

    We review the special geometry of Script N = 2 supersymmetric vector and hypermultiplets with emphasis on recent developments and applications. A new formulation of the local c-map based on the Hesse potential and special real coordinates is presented. Other recent developments include the Euclidean version of special geometry, and generalizations of special geometry to non-supersymmetric theories. As applications we disucss the proof that the local r-map and c-map preserve geodesic completeness, and the construction of four- and five-dimensional static solutions through dimensional reduction over time. The shared features of the real, complex and quaternionic version of special geometry are stressed throughout.

  14. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic theory for localized interchange modes in toroidal anisotropic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tonghui Wan, B. N.; Sun, Y.; Shen, B.; Qian, J. P.; Zheng, L. J.

    2016-08-15

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamic theory for localized interchange modes is developed for toroidal plasmas with anisotropic pressure. The work extends the existing theories of Johnson and Hastie [Phys. Fluids 31, 1609 (1988)], etc., to the low n mode case, where n is the toroidal mode number. Also, the plasma compressibility is included, so that the coupling of the parallel motion to perpendicular one, i.e., the so-called apparent mass effect, is investigated in the anisotropic pressure case. The singular layer equation is obtained, and the generalized Mercier's criterion is derived.

  15. Neoclassical Drift of Circulating Orbits Due toToroidal Electric Field in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Qin; Guan, Xiaoyin; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-07-19

    In tokamaks, Ware pinch is a well known neoclassical effect for trapped particles in response to a toroidal electric field. It is generally believed that there exists no similar neoclassical effect for circulating particles without collisions. However, this belief is erroneous, and misses an important effect. We show both analytically and numerically that under the influence of a toroidal electric field parallel to the current, the circulating orbits drift outward toward the outer wall with a characteristic velocity O ({var_epsilon}{sup -1}) larger than the E x B velocity, where {var_epsilon} is the inverse aspect-ratio of a tokamak. During a RF overdrive, the toroidal electric field is anti-parallel to the current. As a consequence, all charged particles, including backward runaway electrons, will drift inward towards the inner wall.

  16. Stability of the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmode in axisymmetric toroidal equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; Wong, K.L.

    1993-09-01

    The stability of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) is investigated in general tokamak equilibria with finite aspect ratio and finite plasma beta. The finite orbit width of the hot particles and the collisional damping of the trapped electrons are included. For the trapped hot particles, the finite orbit width is found to be stabilizing. For the circulating hot particles, the finite orbit width effect is stabilizing for larger values of v{sub h}/v{sub A} (> 1) and destabilizing for smaller values of v{sub h}/v{sub A} (< 1), where v{sub h} is the hot particle speed and v{sub A} is the Alfven speed. The collisional damping of the trapped electrons is found to have a much weaker dependence on the collision frequency than the previous analytic results. The contribution of the curvature term to the trapped electron collisional damping is negligible compared to that of the parallel electric field term for typical parameters. The calculated critical hot particle beta values for the TAE instability are consistent with the experimental measurements.

  17. Gender-specific association of decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate and left vertical geometry in the general population from rural Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Dai, Dongxue; Chang, Ye; Chen, Yintao; Yu, Shasha; Guo, Xiaofan; Sun, Yingxian

    2017-01-13

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is common and associated with cardiovascular outcomes among patients with known chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the link between decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and left ventricular (LV) geometry remains poorly explored in general population. In this study, we examined the gender-specific association between eGFR and LVH in the general population from rural Northeast China. This survey was conducted from July 2012 to August 2013. A total of 10907 participants (5,013 men and 5,894 women) from the rural Northeast China were randomly selected and examined. LV mass index (LVMI) was used to define LVH (LVMI > 46.7 g/m(2.7) in women; > 49.2 g/m(2.7) in men). LV geometry was defined as normal, or with concentric remodeling, eccentric or concentric hypertrophy, according to relative wall thickness (RWT) and LVMI. Mildly decreased eGFR was defined as eGFR ≥ 60 and < 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and moderate-severely decreased eGFR was defined as eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2). As eGFR decreased, LVH showed a gradual increase in the entire study population. Multivariate analysis revealed a gender-specific relationship between eGFR and LV geometry. Only in men, mildly decreased eGFR was associated with concentric remodeling [odds ratio (OR): =1.58; 95% CI: 1.14-2.20; P < 0.01] and concentric LVH OR = 1.63; 95% CI: 1.15-2.31; P < 0.01). And only in men, moderate-severely decreased eGFR was a risk factor for concentric LVH (OR = 4.56; 95% CI: 2.14-9.73; P < 0.001) after adjusting for confounding factors. These findings suggested that decreased eGFR was a risk factor for LV geometry in men, and a gender-specific difference should be taken into account in clinical practice.

  18. Toroidal modeling of penetration of the resonant magnetic perturbation field

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yueqiang; Kirk, A.

    2013-04-15

    A toroidal, quasi-linear model is proposed to study the penetration dynamics of the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field into the plasma. The model couples the linear, fluid plasma response to a toroidal momentum balance equation, which includes torques induced by both fluid electromagnetic force and by (kinetic) neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) force. The numerical results for a test toroidal equilibrium quantify the effects of various physical parameters on the field penetration and on the plasma rotation braking. The neoclassical toroidal viscous torque plays a dominant role in certain region of the plasma, for the RMP penetration problem considered in this work.

  19. Capillary toroid cavity detector for high pressure NMR

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Chen, Michael J.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; ter Horst, Marc

    2007-09-11

    A Toroid Cavity Detector (TCD) is provided for implementing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of chemical reactions under conditions of high pressures and temperatures. A toroid cavity contains an elongated central conductor extending within the toroid cavity. The toroid cavity and central conductor generate an RF magnetic field for NMR analysis. A flow-through capillary sample container is located within the toroid cavity adjacent to the central conductor to subject a sample material flowing through the capillary to a static magnetic field and to enable NMR spectra to be recorded of the material in the capillary under a temperature and high pressure environment.

  20. Toroidal modeling of penetration of the resonant magnetic perturbation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Kirk, A.; Sun, Y.

    2013-04-01

    A toroidal, quasi-linear model is proposed to study the penetration dynamics of the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field into the plasma. The model couples the linear, fluid plasma response to a toroidal momentum balance equation, which includes torques induced by both fluid electromagnetic force and by (kinetic) neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) force. The numerical results for a test toroidal equilibrium quantify the effects of various physical parameters on the field penetration and on the plasma rotation braking. The neoclassical toroidal viscous torque plays a dominant role in certain region of the plasma, for the RMP penetration problem considered in this work.

  1. The linear tearing instability in three dimensional, toroidal gyro-kinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hornsby, W. A. Migliano, P.; Buchholz, R.; Kroenert, L.; Weikl, A.; Peeters, A. G.; Zarzoso, D.; Poli, E.; Casson, F. J.

    2015-02-15

    Linear gyro-kinetic simulations of the classical tearing mode in three-dimensional toroidal geometry were performed using the global gyro-kinetic turbulence code, GKW. The results were benchmarked against a cylindrical ideal MHD and analytical theory calculations. The stability, growth rate, and frequency of the mode were investigated by varying the current profile, collisionality, and the pressure gradients. Both collisionless and semi-collisional tearing modes were found with a smooth transition between the two. A residual, finite, rotation frequency of the mode even in the absence of a pressure gradient is observed, which is attributed to toroidal finite Larmor-radius effects. When a pressure gradient is present at low collisionality, the mode rotates at the expected electron diamagnetic frequency. However, the island rotation reverses direction at high collisionality. The growth rate is found to follow a η{sup 1∕7} scaling with collisional resistivity in the semi-collisional regime, closely following the semi-collisional scaling found by Fitzpatrick. The stability of the mode closely follows the stability analysis as performed by Hastie et al. using the same current and safety factor profiles but for cylindrical geometry, however, here a modification due to toroidal coupling and pressure effects is seen.

  2. Horizontal toroidal response in three-dimensional plasmonic (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Pei Ru; Liao, Chun Yen; Chen, Wei Ting; Wu, Pin Chieh; Huang, Yao-Wei; Tsai, Wei-Yi; Chen, Ting-Yu; Chen, Jia-Wern; Savinov, Vassili; Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Tsai, Din Ping

    2016-09-01

    The toroidal dipole moments of natural molecules are hard to be detected so the artificial toroidal materials made by metamaterial attract more attentions. Metamaterial, the sub-wavelength artificial structures, can modulate reflection or transmission of light. The toroidal metamaterial can not only amplify the toroidal moment but also repress the electric and magnetic dipole so it can be used to study the properties of toroidal dipole moment. However, there are many limitations for the experiments, such as the lateral light is necessary to excite the toroidal response. Most of the toroidal dipole moments oscillate perpendicularly to the substrate, therefore it is difficult to couple it with other dipole moments and could be only excited in the microwave region. In this paper, we design a toroidal metamaterial consisting of dumbbell-shaped aperture and vertical split ring resonator (VSRR) vertically. The toroidal dipole moment of our metamaterial is excited in the optical region. The arrangement of our nanostructures is vertical instead of planar annular arrangement to reduce the size of the unit cell and increase the density of the toroidal dipole moment. Moreover, the direction of toroidal dipole moment is parallel to the substrate which can be used for the study of the coupling effect with other kinds of dipolar moments.

  3. Toroidal dipolar excitation and macroscopic electromagnetic properties of metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savinov, V.; Fedotov, V. A.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2014-05-01

    The toroidal dipole is a peculiar electromagnetic excitation that can not be presented in terms of standard electric and magnetic multipoles. A static toroidal dipole has been shown to lead to violation of parity in atomic spectra and many other unusual electromagnetic phenomena. The existence of electromagnetic resonances of toroidal nature was experimentally demonstrated only recently, first in the microwave metamaterials, and then at optical frequencies, where they could be important in spectroscopy analysis of a wide class of media with constituents of toroidal symmetry, such as complex organic molecules, fullerenes, bacteriophages, etc. Despite the experimental progress in studying toroidal resonances, no direct link has yet been established between microscopic toroidal excitations and macroscopic scattering characteristics of the medium. To address this essential gap in the electromagnetic theory, we have developed an analytical approach for calculating the transmissivity and reflectivity of thin slabs of materials that exhibit toroidal dipolar excitations.

  4. Application of second-order-accurate Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) schemes to the Euler equations in general geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Kutler, P.

    1983-01-01

    A one-parameter family of explicit and implicit second-order-accurate, entropy satisfying, total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes was developed by Harten. These TVD schemes were the property of not generating spurious oscillations for one-dimensional nonlinear scalar hyperbolic conservation laws and constant coefficient hyperbolic systems. Application of these methods to one- and two-dimensional fluid flows containing shocks (in Cartesian coordinates) yields highly accurate nonoscillatory numerical solutions. The goal of this work is to expand these methods to the multidimensional Euler equations in generalized coordinate systems. Some numerical results of shock waves impinging on cylindrical bodies are compared with MacCormack's method.

  5. Matter in the form of toroidal electromagnetic vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Wilhelm F.

    2015-09-01

    The creation of charged elementary particles from neutral photons is explained as a conversion process of electromagnetic (EM) energy from linear to circular motion at the speed of light into two localized, toroidal shaped vortices of trapped EM energy that resist change of motion, perceptible as particles with inertia and hence mass. The photon can be represented as a superposition of left and right circular polarized transverse electric fields of opposite polarity originating from a common zero potential axis, the optical axis of the photon. If these components are separated by interaction with a strong field (nucleon) they would curl up into two electromagnetic vortices (EMV) due to longitudinal magnetic field components forming toroids. These vortices are perceptible as opposite charged elementary particles e+/- . These spinning toroids generate extended oscillating fields that interact with stationary field oscillations. The velocity-dependent frequency differences cause beat signals equivalent to matter waves, leading to interference. The extended fields entangled with every particle explain wave particle duality issues. Spin and magnetic moment are the natural outcome of these gyrating particles. As the energy and hence mass of the electron increases with acceleration so does its size shrink proportional to its reduced wavelength. The artificial weak and strong nuclear forces can be easily explained as different manifestations of the intermediate EM forces. The unstable neutron consists of a proton surrounded by a contracted and captured electron. The associated radial EM forces represent the weak nuclear force. The deuteron consists of two axially separated protons held together by a centrally captured electron. The axial EM forces represent the strong nuclear force, providing stability for "neutrons" only within nucleons. The same principles were applied to determine the geometries of force-balanced nuclei. The alpha-particle emerges as a very compact

  6. ESTABLISHING A STEREOSCOPIC TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINING THE KINEMATIC PROPERTIES OF SOLAR WIND TRANSIENTS BASED ON A GENERALIZED SELF-SIMILARLY EXPANDING CIRCULAR GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, J. A.; Perry, C. H.; Harrison, R. A.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Lugaz, N.; Möstl, C.; Liu, Y. D.; Steed, K.

    2013-11-10

    The twin-spacecraft STEREO mission has enabled simultaneous white-light imaging of the solar corona and inner heliosphere from multiple vantage points. This has led to the development of numerous stereoscopic techniques to investigate the three-dimensional structure and kinematics of solar wind transients such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Two such methods—triangulation and the tangent to a sphere—can be used to determine time profiles of the propagation direction and radial distance (and thereby radial speed) of a solar wind transient as it travels through the inner heliosphere, based on its time-elongation profile viewed by two observers. These techniques are founded on the assumption that the transient can be characterized as a point source (fixed φ, FP, approximation) or a circle attached to Sun-center (harmonic mean, HM, approximation), respectively. These geometries constitute extreme descriptions of solar wind transients, in terms of their cross-sectional extent. Here, we present the stereoscopic expressions necessary to derive propagation direction and radial distance/speed profiles of such transients based on the more generalized self-similar expansion (SSE) geometry, for which the FP and HM geometries form the limiting cases; our implementation of these equations is termed the stereoscopic SSE method. We apply the technique to two Earth-directed CMEs from different phases of the STEREO mission, the well-studied event of 2008 December and a more recent event from 2012 March. The latter CME was fast, with an initial speed exceeding 2000 km s{sup –1}, and highly geoeffective, in stark contrast to the slow and ineffectual 2008 December CME.

  7. A contact detection algorithm for deformable tetrahedral geometries based on a novel approach for general simplices used in the discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stühler, Sven; Fleissner, Florian; Eberhard, Peter

    2016-11-01

    We present an extended particle model for the discrete element method that on the one hand is tetrahedral in shape and on the other hand is capable to describe deformations. The deformations of the tetrahedral particles require a framework to interrelate the particle strains and resulting stresses. Hence, adaptations from the finite element method were used. This allows to link the two methods and to adequately describe material and simulation parameters separately in each scope. Due to the complexity arising of the non-spherical tetrahedral geometry, all possible contact combinations of vertices, edges, and surfaces must be considered by the used contact detection algorithm. The deformations of the particles make the contact evaluation even more challenging. Therefore, a robust contact detection algorithm based on an optimization approach that exploits temporal coherence is presented. This algorithm is suitable for general {R}^{{n}} simplices. An evaluation of the robustness of this algorithm is performed using a numerical example. In order to create complex geometries, bonds between these deformable particles are introduced. This coupling via the tetrahedra faces allows the simulation bonding of deformable bodies composed of several particles. Numerical examples are presented and validated with results that are obtained by the same simulation setup modeled with the finite element method. The intention of using these bonds is to be able to model fracture and material failure. Therefore, the bonds between the particles are not lasting and feature a release mechanism based on a predefined criterion.

  8. Measurement of toroidal vessel eddy current during plasma disruption on J-TEXT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L. J.; Yu, K. X.; Zhang, M. Zhuang, G.; Li, X.; Yuan, T.; Rao, B.; Zhao, Q.

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, we have employed a thin, printed circuit board eddy current array in order to determine the radial distribution of the azimuthal component of the eddy current density at the surface of a steel plate. The eddy current in the steel plate can be calculated by analytical methods under the simplifying assumptions that the steel plate is infinitely large and the exciting current is of uniform distribution. The measurement on the steel plate shows that this method has high spatial resolution. Then, we extended this methodology to a toroidal geometry with the objective of determining the poloidal distribution of the toroidal component of the eddy current density associated with plasma disruption in a fusion reactor called J-TEXT. The preliminary measured result is consistent with the analysis and calculation results on the J-TEXT vacuum vessel.

  9. Effects of Conductivity Asymmetry Between the Northern and Southern Latitudes on Toroidal and Poloidal Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, J. J.; Choi, J.; Lee, D. H.

    2016-12-01

    When the ionosphere has significant differences between the northern and southern conductance, it is well known that quarter-wave modes may occur as standing shear Alfvén waves. Owing to the finite conductivity at the ionospheric boundary, quarter-wave modes tend to have strong damping and energy dissipation, which indicates that we should pay attention to time-dependent feature of such transient modes. We study how quarter-waves are excited in both of toroidal and poloidal modes by adopting a 3-D dipole wave model. Unlike the previous studies that mainly showed peak frequency of the wave, we investigate the effects of 1) dipolar geometry, 2) ratios of bandwidth and peak frequency, 3) differential feature of toroidal and poloidal modes, respectively. It is presented how quarter-wave modes depend on various conditions above by examining time histories of electric and magnetic fields in the MHD dipole model where a broad range of ionospheric conductivities is considered.

  10. Measurement of toroidal vessel eddy current during plasma disruption on J-TEXT.

    PubMed

    Liu, L J; Yu, K X; Zhang, M; Zhuang, G; Li, X; Yuan, T; Rao, B; Zhao, Q

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have employed a thin, printed circuit board eddy current array in order to determine the radial distribution of the azimuthal component of the eddy current density at the surface of a steel plate. The eddy current in the steel plate can be calculated by analytical methods under the simplifying assumptions that the steel plate is infinitely large and the exciting current is of uniform distribution. The measurement on the steel plate shows that this method has high spatial resolution. Then, we extended this methodology to a toroidal geometry with the objective of determining the poloidal distribution of the toroidal component of the eddy current density associated with plasma disruption in a fusion reactor called J-TEXT. The preliminary measured result is consistent with the analysis and calculation results on the J-TEXT vacuum vessel.

  11. Measurement of toroidal vessel eddy current during plasma disruption on J-TEXT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L. J.; Yu, K. X.; Zhang, M.; Zhuang, G.; Li, X.; Yuan, T.; Rao, B.; Zhao, Q.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have employed a thin, printed circuit board eddy current array in order to determine the radial distribution of the azimuthal component of the eddy current density at the surface of a steel plate. The eddy current in the steel plate can be calculated by analytical methods under the simplifying assumptions that the steel plate is infinitely large and the exciting current is of uniform distribution. The measurement on the steel plate shows that this method has high spatial resolution. Then, we extended this methodology to a toroidal geometry with the objective of determining the poloidal distribution of the toroidal component of the eddy current density associated with plasma disruption in a fusion reactor called J-TEXT. The preliminary measured result is consistent with the analysis and calculation results on the J-TEXT vacuum vessel.

  12. Solar concentrator with a toroidal relay module.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jhe-Syuan; Liang, Chao-Wen

    2015-10-01

    III-V multijunction solar cells require solar concentrators with a high concentration ratio to reduce per watt cost and to increase solar energy transforming efficiency. This paper discusses a novel solar concentrator design that features a high concentration ratio, high transfer efficiency, thin profile design, and a high solar acceptance angle. The optical design of the concentrator utilizes a toroidal relay module, which includes both the off-axis relay lens and field lens design in a single concentric toroidal lens shape. The optical design concept of the concentrator is discussed and the simulation results are shown. The given exemplary design has an aspect ratio of 0.24, a high averaged optical concentration ratio 1230×, a maximum efficiency of 76.8%, and the solar acceptance angle of ±0.9°.

  13. Angular Flow in Toroid Cavity Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautner, Peter; Woelk, Klaus; Bargon, Joachim; Gerald, Rex E.

    2001-08-01

    NMR signals from samples that rotate uniformly about the central conductor of a TCD (toroid cavity detector) exhibit frequency shifts that are directly proportional to the sample's angular velocity. This newly observed effect is based on the unique radiofrequency field inside TCDs, which is variable in direction. If a liquid sample is pumped through a capillary tube wound about the central conductor, the frequency shift is proportional to the flow rate. A mathematical relationship between a volumetric flow rate and the frequency shift is established and experimentally verified to high precision. Additionally, two-dimensional flow-resolved NMR spectroscopy for discrimination between components with different flow velocities yet retaining chemical shift information for structural analysis is presented. The application of the two-dimensional method in chromatographic NMR is suggested. Furthermore, utilization of the frequency-shift effect for rheologic studies if combined with toroid-cavity rotating-frame imaging is proposed.

  14. Muon dynamics in a toroidal sector magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, J.C.; Fernow, R.C.; Palmer, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    The present scenario for the cooling channel in a high brightness muon collider calls for a quasi-continuous solenoidal focusing channel. The beam line consists of a periodic array of hydrogen absorbers immersed in a solenoid with alternating focusing field and rf linacs at the zero field points. Solenoids and toroidal sectors have a natural place in muon collider design given the large emittance of the beam and consequently, the large transverse momentum of the initial pion beam or the decay muon beam. Bent solenoids as shown were studied for use at the front end of the machine, as part of the capture channel and more recently as part of a diagnostic setup to measure the position and momentum of muons. The authors present a Hamiltonian formulation of muon dynamics in toroidal sector solenoids (bent solenoid).

  15. Dimensional reduction in Bose-Einstein condensed clouds of atoms confined in tight potentials of any geometry and any interaction strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandin, P.; Ögren, M.; Gulliksson, M.; Smyrnakis, J.; Magiropoulos, M.; Kavoulakis, G. M.

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by numerous experiments on Bose-Einstein condensed atoms which have been performed in tight trapping potentials of various geometries [elongated and/or toroidal (annular)], we develop a general method which allows us to reduce the corresponding three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the order parameter into an effectively one-dimensional equation, taking into account the interactions (i.e., treating the width of the transverse profile variationally) and the curvature of the trapping potential. As an application of our model we consider atoms which rotate in a toroidal trapping potential. We evaluate the state of lowest energy for a fixed value of the angular momentum within various approximations of the effectively one-dimensional model and compare our results with the full solution of the three-dimensional problem, thus getting evidence for the accuracy of our model.

  16. REVIEW ARTICLE: Control of non-axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2010-10-01

    The control of non-axisymmetric toroidal plasmas, stellarators, has a different character than the control of tokamaks for two reasons. Non-axisymmetric magnetic fields (1) can provide an arbitrarily large fraction of the poloidal magnetic field and (2) can strongly center the plasma in the chamber making it impossible to lose position control. The focus of stellarator design is on plasmas that are stable without feedback, need little or no change in the external magnetic field as the plasma evolves, and require no external power to maintain the desired magnetic configuration. The physics of non-axisymmetric fields is the same whether in a tokamak or a stellarator and whether introduced intentionally or accidentally. Fundamental physics indicates that plasma shape, which is controlled by the distribution of the external magnetic field that is normal to the plasma surface, is the primary control for fusion plasmas. The importance of non-axisymmetric control is set by the importance of toroidal plasma physics. Informed decisions on the development strategy of tokamaks, as well as magnetic fusion in general, require an understanding of the capabilities and difficulties of plasma control at various levels of non-axisymmetric shaping.

  17. Stabilization of ballooning modes with sheared toroidal rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Waelbroeck, F.L.; Hassam, A.B.; Waltz, R.E.

    1995-10-01

    Stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic ballooning modes by sheared toroidal rotation is demonstrated using a shifted circle equilibrium model. A generalized ballooning mode representation is used to eliminate the fast Alfven wave, and an initial value code solves the resulting equations. The {ital s}{minus}{alpha} diagram (magnetic shear versus pressure gradient) of ballooning mode theory is extended to include rotational shear. In the ballooning representation, the modes shift periodically along the field line to the next point of unfavorable curvature. The shift frequency ({ital d}{Omega}/{ital dq}, where {Omega} is the angular toroidal velocity and {ital q} is the safety factor) is proportional to the rotation shear and inversely proportional to the magnetic shear. Stability improves with increasing shift frequency and direct stable access to the second stability regime occurs when this frequency is approximately one-quarter to one-half the Alfven frequency, {omega}{sub A}={ital V}{sub A}/{ital qR}. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  18. Neoclassical transport in enhanced confinement toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1996-11-01

    It has recently been reported that ion thermal transport levels in enhanced confinement tokamak plasmas have been observed to fall below the irreducible minimum level predicted by standard neoclassical theory. This apparent contradiction is resolved in the present analysis by relaxing the basic neoclassical assumption that the ions orbital excursions are much smaller than the local toroidal minor radius and the equilibrium scale lengths of the system.

  19. Stellarator approach to toroidal plasma confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.L.

    1981-12-01

    An overview is presented of the development and current status of the stellarator approach to controlled thermonuclear confinement. Recent experimental, theoretical, and systems developments have made this concept a viable option for the evolution of the toroidal confinement program. Some experimental study of specific problems associated with departure from two-dimensional symmetry must be undertaken before the full advantages and opportunities of steady-state, net-current-free operation can be realized.

  20. Toroidal Dipole Moment of a Massless Neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.; Mondragon, M.; Perez, E. Reyes

    2009-04-20

    We obtain the toroidal dipole moment of a massless neutrino {tau}{sub v{sub I}}{sup M} using the results for the anapole moment of a massless Dirac neutrino a{sub v{sub I}}{sup D}, which was obtained in the context of the Standard Model of the electroweak interactions (SM)SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y}.

  1. Evaluation of toroidal torque by non-resonant magnetic perturbations in tokamaks for resonant transport regimes using a Hamiltonian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Christopher G.; Heyn, Martin F.; Kapper, Gernot; Kasilov, Sergei V.; Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.

    2016-08-01

    Toroidal torque generated by neoclassical viscosity caused by external non-resonant, non-axisymmetric perturbations has a significant influence on toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. In this article, a derivation for the expressions of toroidal torque and radial transport in resonant regimes is provided within quasilinear theory in canonical action-angle variables. The proposed approach treats all low-collisional quasilinear resonant neoclassical toroidal viscosity regimes including superbanana-plateau and drift-orbit resonances in a unified way and allows for magnetic drift in all regimes. It is valid for perturbations on toroidally symmetric flux surfaces of the unperturbed equilibrium without specific assumptions on geometry or aspect ratio. The resulting expressions are shown to match the existing analytical results in the large aspect ratio limit. Numerical results from the newly developed code NEO-RT are compared to calculations by the quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 at low collisionalities. The importance of the magnetic shear term in the magnetic drift frequency and a significant effect of the magnetic drift on drift-orbit resonances are demonstrated.

  2. Evaluation of toroidal torque by non-resonant magnetic perturbations in tokamaks for resonant transport regimes using a Hamiltonian approach

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Christopher G.; Heyn, Martin F.; Kapper, Gernot; Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.; Kasilov, Sergei V.

    2016-08-15

    Toroidal torque generated by neoclassical viscosity caused by external non-resonant, non-axisymmetric perturbations has a significant influence on toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. In this article, a derivation for the expressions of toroidal torque and radial transport in resonant regimes is provided within quasilinear theory in canonical action-angle variables. The proposed approach treats all low-collisional quasilinear resonant neoclassical toroidal viscosity regimes including superbanana-plateau and drift-orbit resonances in a unified way and allows for magnetic drift in all regimes. It is valid for perturbations on toroidally symmetric flux surfaces of the unperturbed equilibrium without specific assumptions on geometry or aspect ratio. The resulting expressions are shown to match the existing analytical results in the large aspect ratio limit. Numerical results from the newly developed code NEO-RT are compared to calculations by the quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 at low collisionalities. The importance of the magnetic shear term in the magnetic drift frequency and a significant effect of the magnetic drift on drift-orbit resonances are demonstrated.

  3. Finite toroidal flow generated by unstable tearing mode in a toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, G. Z. Wang, A. K.; Xu, Y. H.; He, H. D.; Xu, M.; Qu, H. P.; Peng, X. D.; Xu, J. Q.; Qiu, X. M.; Liu, Y. Q.; Sun, Y.; Cui, S. Y.

    2014-12-15

    The neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity torque and electromagnetic torque, generated by tearing mode (TM) in a toroidal plasma, are numerically investigated using the MARS-Q code [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 042503 (2013)]. It is found that an initially unstable tearing mode can intrinsically drive a toroidal plasma flow resulting in a steady state solution, in the absence of the external momentum input and external magnetic field perturbation. The saturated flow is in the order of 0.5%ω{sub A} at the q=2 rational surface in the considered case, with q and ω{sub A} being the safety factor and the Alfven frequency at the magnetic axis, respectively. The generation of the toroidal flow is robust, being insensitive to the given amplitude of the perturbation at initial state. On the other hand, the flow amplitude increases with increasing the plasma resistivity. Furthermore, the initially unstable tearing mode is fully stabilized by non-linear interaction with the self-generated toroidal flow.

  4. Superconducting magnets for toroidal fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Haubenreich, P.N.

    1980-01-01

    Fusion reactors will soon be employing superconducting magnets to confine plasma in which deuterium and tritium (D-T) are fused to produce usable energy. At present there is one small confinement experiment with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils: Tokamak 7 (T-7), in the USSR, which operates at 4 T. By 1983, six different 2.5 x 3.5-m D-shaped coils from six manufacturers in four countries will be assembled in a toroidal array in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing at fields up to 8 T. Soon afterwards ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT-P) will begin operation at Oak Ridge with superconducting TF coils. At the same time there will be tokamaks with superconducting TF coils 2 to 3 m in diameter in the USSR and France. Toroidal field strength in these machines will range from 6 to 9 T. NbTi and Nb/sub 3/Sn, bath cooling and forced flow, cryostable and metastable - various designs are being tried in this period when this new application of superconductivity is growing and maturing.

  5. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  6. Variable geometry trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertshaw, H. H.; Reinholtz, C. F.

    1989-01-01

    Vibration control and kinematic control with variable-geometry trusses are covered. The analytical approach taken is to model each actuator with lumped masses and model a beam with finite elements, including in each model the generalized reaction forces from the beam on the actuator or vice versa. It is concluded that, from an operational standpoint, the variable-geometry truss actuator is more favorable than the inertia-type actuator. A spatial variable-geometry truss is used to test out rudimentary robotic tasks.

  7. Landau damping of geodesic acoustic mode in toroidally rotating tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun; Cao, Jintao

    2015-06-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is analyzed by using modified gyro-kinetic (MGK) equation applicable to low-frequency microinstabilities in a rotating axisymmetric plasma. Dispersion relation of GAM in the presence of arbitrary toroidal Mach number is analytically derived. The effects of toroidal rotation on the GAM frequency and damping rate do not depend on the orientation of equilibrium flow. It is shown that the toroidal Mach number M increases the GAM frequency and dramatically decreases the Landau damping rate.

  8. Multiplicity of low-shear toroidal Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.; Breizman, B.N. |; Van Dam, J.W.; Ozeki, T.

    1996-01-01

    An enlarged spectrum of ideal toroidal Alfven eigenmodes is demonstrated to exist within a toroidicity-induced Alfven gap when the inverse aspect ratio is comparable to or larger than the value of the magnetic shear. This limit is appropriate for the low-shear region in most tokamaks, especially those with low aspect ratio. The new modes may be destabilized by fusion-product alpha particles more easily than the standard toroidal Alfven eigenmodes.

  9. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, Peter

    1992-01-01

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity.

  10. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, P.

    1992-01-07

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

  11. Magnetic reconnection in toroidal eta(i) mode turbulence

    PubMed

    Zeiler; Drake; Rogers

    2000-01-03

    Based on three-dimensional simulations of the Braginskii equations we show that for typical plasma-edge parameters the saturation of electromagnetic toroidal eta(i) mode turbulence is controlled by the self-generation and subsequent annihilation of radial magnetic field perturbations. This should be contrasted with the electrostatic limit, where the growth of the linear eta(i) mode is terminated by the onset of sheared flow modes driven by the radial plasma streams. The impact of the saturation amplitude on the transport level is substantial and is not in accord with simple mixing length arguments, suggesting that electromagnetic effects should generally be included in simulations of eta(i) mode turbulence.

  12. Stochastic phase slips in toroidal Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snizhko, Kyrylo; Isaieva, Karyna; Kuriatnikov, Yevhenii; Bidasyuk, Yuriy; Vilchinskii, Stanislav; Yakimenko, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Motivated by recent experiments we study the influence of thermal noise on the phase slips in toroidal Bose-Einstein condensates with a rotating weak link. We derive a generalized Arrhenius-like expression for the rate of stochastic phase slips. We develop a method to estimate the energy barrier separating different superflow states. The parameters at which the energy barrier disappears agree with the critical parameters for deterministic phase slips obtained from dynamics simulations, which confirms the validity of our energetic analysis. We reveal that adding thermal noise lowers the phase-slip threshold. However, the quantitative impact of the stochastic phase slips turns out to be too small to explain the significant discrepancy between theoretical and the experimental results.

  13. Edge ambipolar potential in toroidal fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Spizzo, G. Vianello, N.; Agostini, M.; Puiatti, M. E.; Scarin, P.; Spolaore, M.; Terranova, D.; White, R. B.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Schmitz, O.; Cavazzana, R.; Ciaccio, G.

    2014-05-15

    A series of issues with toroidally confined fusion plasmas are related to the generation of 3D flow patterns by means of edge magnetic islands, embedded in a chaotic field and interacting with the wall. These issues include the Greenwald limit in Tokamaks and reversed-field pinches, the collisionality window for ELM mitigation with the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in Tokamaks, and edge islands interacting with the bootstrap current in stellarators. Measurements of the 2D map of the edge electric field E{sup r}(r=a,θ,ϕ) in the RFX reversed-field pinch show that E{sup r} has the same helicity of the magnetic islands generated by a m/n perturbation: in fact, defining the helical angle u=mθ−nϕ+ωt, maps show a sinusoidal dependence as a function of u, E{sup r}=E{sup ~r}sin u. The associated E × B flow displays a huge convective cell with v(a)≠0 which, in RFX and near the Greenwald limit, determines a stagnation point for density and a reversal of the sign of E{sup r}. From a theoretical point of view, the question is how a perturbed toroidal flux of symmetry m/n gives rise to an ambipolar potential Φ=Φ{sup ~}sin u. On the basis of a model developed with the guiding center code ORBIT and applied to RFX and the TEXTOR tokamak, we will show that the presence of an m/n perturbation in any kind of device breaks the toroidal symmetry with a drift proportional to the gyroradius ρ, thus larger for ions (ρ{sub i} ≫ ρ{sub e}). Immediately, an ambipolar potential arises to balance the drifts, with the same symmetry as the original perturbation.

  14. Toroidal Alfven Waves in Advanced Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Herbert L.

    2003-10-01

    In burning plasma experiments, alpha particles have speeds that readily resonate with shear Alfven waves. It is essential to understand this Alfven wave spectrum for toroidal plasma confinement. Most interest has focused on the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE), and a method of analysis has been developed to understand the structure of this mode at a flux surface with a given magnetic shear. However, this model fails when the shear is too low or reversed. In this case a new method of analysis is required, which must incorporate novel fluid-like effects from the energetic particles [1] and also include effects that are second order in the inverse toroidal aspect ratio. With this new method [2] we can obtain spectral features that agree with experimental results. In particular, this theory gives an explanation for the so-called Cascade modes that have been observed in JT-60 [3], JET [4], and TFTR [5]. For these Cascade modes, slow upward frequency sweeping is observed, beginning from frequencies below the TAE range but then often blending into the TAE range of frequencies. The theoretical understanding of the Cascades modes has evolved to the point where these modes can be used as a diagnostic "signature" [6] to experimentally optimize the formation of thermal barriers in reversed-shear operation when the minimum q value is an integer. [1] H. L. Berk et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 185 (2002). [2] B. N. Breizman et al., submitted to Phys. Plasmas (2003). [3] H. Kimura et al., Nucl. Fusion 38, 1303 (1998). [4] S. Sharapov et al., Phys. Lett. A 289, 127 (2001); S. Sharapov, Phys. Plasmas 9, 2027 (2002). [5] R. Nazikian, H. L. Berk, et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 47, 327 (2002). [6] E. Joffrin et al., Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 44, 1739 (2002); E. Joffrin et al., in Proc. 2002 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, submitted to Nucl. Fusion.

  15. D-brane networks in flux vacua, generalized cycles and calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evslin, Jarah; Martucci, Luca

    2007-07-01

    We consider chains of generalized submanifolds, as defined by Gualtieri in the context of generalized complex geometry, and define a boundary operator that acts on them. This allows us to define generalized cycles and the corresponding homology theory. Gauge invariance demands that D-brane networks on flux vacua must wrap these generalized cycles, while deformations of generalized cycles inside of a certain homology class describe physical processes such as the dissolution of D-branes in higher-dimensional D-branes and MMS-like instantonic transitions. We introduce calibrations that identify the supersymmetric D-brane networks, which minimize their energy inside of the corresponding homology class of generalized cycles. Such a calibration is explicitly presented for type II Script N = 1 flux compactifications to four dimensions. In particular networks of walls and strings in compactifications on warped Calabi-Yau's are treated, with explicit examples on a toroidal orientifold vacuum and on the Klebanov-Strassler geometry.

  16. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  17. Design of toroidal transformers for maximum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The design of the most efficient toroidal transformer that can be built given the frequency, volt-ampere rating, magnetic flux density, window fill factor, and materials is described. With the above all held constant and only the dimensions of the magnetic core varied, the most efficient design occurs when the copper losses equal 60 percent of the iron losses. When this criterion is followed, efficiency is only slightly dependent on design frequency and fill factor. The ratios of inside diameter to outside diameter and height to build of the magnetic core that result in transformers of maximum efficiency are computed.

  18. An inverse method using toroidal mode data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willis, C.

    1986-01-01

    The author presents a numerical method for calculating the density and S-wave velocity in the upper mantle of a spherically symmetric, non-rotating Earth which consists of a perfect elastic, isotropic material. The data comes from the periods of the toroidal oscillations. She tests the method on a smoothed version of model A. The error in the reconstruction is less than 1%. The effects of perturbations in the eigenvalues are studied and she finds that the final model is sensitive to errors in the data.

  19. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement.

    PubMed

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  20. Proposal to produce large compact toroids

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.A.

    1981-03-01

    Relatively large, hot compact toroids might be produced in the annular space between two concentric one-turn coils. With currents in the two coils flowing in the same direction, the magnetic fields on each side of the plasma are in opposite directions. As the fields are raised, the plasma ring is heated and compressed radially towards the center of the annular space. By the addition of two sets of auxiliary coils, the plasma ring can be ejected out one end of the two-coil system into a long axial magnetic field.

  1. Looking beyond ITER: Toroidal concept improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.

    1993-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will demonstrate ignition and undertake fusion reactor systems integration and testing. Its design will be based upon relatively conservative physics assumptions. More attractive reactor configurations than those based upon ITER physics and the ITER configuration appear possible. The Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX) will study tokamak behavior under a variety of conditions which may allow operation of improved combinations of beta, transport, and recirculating power. However, TPX still retains a configuration similar to ITER. Two alternative approaches appear interesting, based upon recent experimental results: the very low aspect ratio tokamak, or spherical torus, and the stellarator.

  2. Looking beyond ITER: Toroidal concept improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.

    1993-06-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will demonstrate ignition and undertake fusion reactor systems integration and testing. Its design will be based upon relatively conservative physics assumptions. More attractive reactor configurations than those based upon ITER physics and the ITER configuration appear possible. The Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX) will study tokamak behavior under a variety of conditions which may allow operation of improved combinations of beta, transport, and recirculating power. However, TPX still retains a configuration similar to ITER. Two alternative approaches appear interesting, based upon recent experimental results: the very low aspect ratio tokamak, or spherical torus, and the stellarator.

  3. Polar interface phonons in ionic toroidal systems.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, N D; Evrard, R; Stroscio, Michael A

    2016-09-01

    We use the dielectric continuum model to obtain the polar (Fuchs-Kliewer like) interface vibration modes of toroids made of ionic materials either embedded in a different material or in vacuum, with applications to nanotoroids specially in mind. We report the frequencies of these modes and describe the electric potential they produce. We establish the quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian appropriate for their interaction with electric charges. This Hamiltonian can be used to describe the effect of this interaction on different types of charged particles either inside or outside the torus.

  4. Plasma current resonance in asymmetric toroidal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R. D.; Catto, Peter J.

    2015-09-15

    The well-known singularity in the magnetic differential equation for plasma current in an asymmetric toroidal confinement system is resolved by including in the pressure tensor corrections stemming from finite Larmor radius. The result provides an estimate of the amplitude of spikes in the parallel current that occur on rational magnetic surfaces. Resolution of the singularity is shown to depend on both the ambipolarity condition—the requirement of zero surface-averaged radial current—and the form of the magnetic differential equation near the rational surface.

  5. Computer Simulations of the Toroidal Cusp Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratliff, Steven Theodore

    1982-03-01

    The Toroidal Cusp Experiment (TCX) is a toroidal plasma device in which the external magnetic field is produced by permanent magnets arranged in 48 poloidal rings to form 48 magnetic cusps (the maximum field strength is 1.3 kG). A transformer drives a toroidal current which produces a Hydrogen plasma with n(,e) = electron density = 1.2 x 10('13)cm(' -3), T(,i) = ion temperature = 40 - 100 eV, T(,e) = electron temperature = 10 - 20 eV, and (beta) = ratio of maximum plasma pressure to maximum magnetic field pressure = 20% to 30%. The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate some physical phenomena in TCX by using theory and computer simulations. The operation of TCX is simulated by using a 2 1/2 dimensional ((PAR-DIFF)/(PAR-DIFF)z = 0) electromagnetic particle code. The positions (x, y) and velocities (v(,x), v(,y), v(,z)) of ions and electrons are calculated using the Lorentz force law and the electric and magnetic fields are calculated from the full set of Maxwell's equations. The computer model is described and its relationship to the experiment is given. Simple explanations of the magnetic lens effect of the array of 48 magnetic cusps and of the pinch effect are given. A simple theory is used to explain how the ratio of electron-to-ion toroidal current could be less than the mass ratio m(,i)/m(,e). Pressure balance results and a simple physical picture are explained. Electron and ion currents in the model are estimated from average velocities. The electrons are restrained by the cusp fields and the ions are relatively unrestrained. The cusp fields are stretched in the direction of the electron acceleration. The electrons execute E(' )x(' )B motion in the cusps; the ions are relatively unaffected by the cusp fields. For strong enough electric fields, an instability is observed in the computer model. We give evidence and theoretical arguments that this instability is a type of two-stream instability in which the streaming electrons in the center of the device

  6. Free-boundary toroidal Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Eugene Y.; Berk, H. L.; Breizman, B.; Zheng, L. J.

    2011-05-15

    A numerical study is presented for the n = 1 free-boundary toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in tokamaks, which shows that there is considerable sensitivity of n = 1 modes to the position of the conducting wall. An additional branch of the TAE is shown to emerge from the upper continuum as the ratio of conducting wall radius to plasma radius increases. Such phenomena arise in plasma equilibria with both circular and shaped cross sections, where the shaped profile studied here is similar to that found in Alcator C-Mod.

  7. Polar interface phonons in ionic toroidal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, N. D.; Evrard, R.; Stroscio, Michael A.

    2016-09-01

    We use the dielectric continuum model to obtain the polar (Fuchs-Kliewer like) interface vibration modes of toroids made of ionic materials either embedded in a different material or in vacuum, with applications to nanotoroids specially in mind. We report the frequencies of these modes and describe the electric potential they produce. We establish the quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian appropriate for their interaction with electric charges. This Hamiltonian can be used to describe the effect of this interaction on different types of charged particles either inside or outside the torus.

  8. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sovinec, Carl

    2016-09-07

    The study entitled, "Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems," (TDTFS) applied analytical theory and numerical computation to investigate topics of importance to confining plasma, the fourth state of matter, with magnetic fields. A central focus of the work is how non-thermal components of the ion particle distribution affect the "sawtooth" collective oscillation in the core of the tokamak magnetic configuration. Previous experimental and analytical research had shown and described how the oscillation frequency decreases and amplitude increases, leading to "monster" or "giant" sawteeth, when the non-thermal component is increased by injecting particle beams or by exciting ions with imposed electromagnetic waves. The TDTFS study applied numerical computation to self-consistently simulate the interaction between macroscopic collective plasma dynamics and the non-thermal particles. The modeling used the NIMROD code [Sovinec, Glasser, Gianakon, et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] with the energetic component represented by simulation particles [Kim, Parker, Sovinec, and the NIMROD Team, Comput. Phys. Commun. 164, 448 (2004)]. The computations found decreasing growth rates for the instability that drives the oscillations, but they were ultimately limited from achieving experimentally relevant parameters due to computational practicalities. Nonetheless, this effort provided valuable lessons for integrated simulation of macroscopic plasma dynamics. It also motivated an investigation of the applicability of fluid-based modeling to the ion temperature gradient instability, leading to the journal publication [Schnack, Cheng, Barnes, and Parker, Phys. Plasmas 20, 062106 (2013)]. Apart from the tokamak-specific topics, the TDTFS study also addressed topics in the basic physics of magnetized plasma and in the dynamics of the reversed-field pinch (RFP) configuration. The basic physics work contributed to a study of two-fluid effects on interchange dynamics, where

  9. ROTATION AND STABILITY OF THE TOROIDAL MAGNETIC FIELD IN STELLAR RADIATION ZONES

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanno, Alfio; Urpin, Vadim E-mail: vadim.urpin@uv.es

    2013-03-20

    The stability of the magnetic field in radiation zones is of crucial importance for mixing and angular momentum transport in the stellar interior. We consider the stability properties of stars containing a predominant toroidal field in spherical geometry by means of a linear stability in the Boussinesq approximation taking into account the effect of thermal conductivity. We calculate the growth rate of instability and analyze in detail the effects of stable stratification and heat transport. We argue that the stabilizing influence of gravity can never entirely suppress the instability caused by electric currents in radiation zones. However, the stable stratification can essentially decrease the growth rate of instability.

  10. Frequency Spectrum of Fluctuations Near a Rational Surface in a Toroidal Heliac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zama, Tatsuya; Kitajima, Sumio; Takayama, Masakazu; Takeuchi, Nobunao; Watanabe, Hiroshige

    1993-03-01

    Density and space potential fluctuations have been studied in electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) plasma of a helical axis stellarator TU Heliac using Langmuir probe techniques. These fluctuations are coherent and global, which can be explained by a drift instability model in cylindrical geometry. A particular fluctuation mode vanishes inside a rational surface. The ratio of this mode, n/m, corresponds to the rotational transform \\includegraphics{dummy.eps} of this rational surface, (m, n: poloidal, toroidal fluctuation modes, respectively). This phenomenon near the rational surface can also be explained by a drift instability theory.

  11. Diagnostic suite used for magnetohydrodynamics equilibrium reconstruction on the PEGASUS toroidal experiment (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Sontag, A. C.; Garstka, G. D.; Fonck, R. J.; Schooff, R. J.; Thorson, T. A.; Tritz, K. L.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic equilibrium reconstruction on the PEGASUS toroidal experiment is a crucial tool to determine macroscopic plasma parameters, such as geometry, l{sub i}, {beta}{sub t}, and q{sub {psi}}. These parameters are tightly coupled to the plasma shape due to the very high toroidicity in PEGASUS where A{approx}1.1--1.3. A systematic scan of model plasma parameters in a magnetic equilibrium code has been employed to determine an acceptable array of magnetic diagnostics for accurately characterizing the plasma equilibrium. The magnetic diagnostics used include a poloidal array of magnetic pickup coils and flux loops along with a Rogowski loop for the toroidal plasma current. A 270 GHz {mu} wave interferometer for line averaged density in conjunction with spectroscopic temperature estimates provide a central pressure constraint. Visible images of the plasma provide constraints on the plasma size and location. A one-dimensional SXR camera is being developed to provide a measurement of the magnetic axis location. A time evolving current filament model and wall flux loops are used to determine the induced currents flowing in the continuous, resistive vacuum vessel wall. The ability of the equilibrium reconstruction code to reproduce model equilibria using this diagnostic set provides a quantitative measure of the accuracy of these equilibrium reconstructions. A Monte Carlo analysis with Gaussian noise added to the model data tests the robustness of this technique. A comparison of the model equilibria with the reconstructions obtained using noisy data is shown.

  12. Absence of toroidal moments in 'aromagnetic' anthracene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alborghetti, S.; Puppin, E.; Brenna, M.; Pinotti, E.; Zanni, P.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2008-06-01

    Colloidal suspensions of anthracene and other aromatic compounds have been shown to respond to a magnetic field as if they possessed a permanent magnetic moment. This phenomenon was named 'aromagnetism' by Spartakov and Tolstoi, and it was subsequently attributed to the interaction of an electric toroidal moment with a time-varying magnetic field. However, there has been no independent confirmation of the original work. Here, we have selected purified anthracene crystallites which respond to a low magnetic field and investigate how this response depends on the gradient and the time derivative of the field. We conclude that the anomaly cannot be attributed to a toroidal interaction but is due to a constant magnetic moment of the particles. Close examinations using magnetometry and scanning electron microscopy reveal metallic clusters of Fe and Ni up to a few hundred nanometres in size embedded in the anomalous crystallites. These inclusions represent 1.8 ppm by weight of the sample. The observed presence of ferromagnetic inclusions in the ppm range is sufficient to explain the anomalous magnetic properties of micron-sized anthracene crystals, including the reported optical properties of the colloidal suspensions.

  13. Microwave produced plasma in a Toroidal Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. K.; Edwards, W. F.; Held, E. D.

    2010-11-01

    A currentless toroidal plasma device exhibits a large range of interesting basic plasma physics phenomena. Such a device is not in equilibrium in a strict magneto hydrodynamic sense. There are many sources of free energy in the form of gradients in plasma density, temperature, the background magnetic field and the curvature of the magnetic field. These free energy sources excite waves and instabilities which have been the focus of studies in several devices in last two decades. A full understanding of these simple plasmas is far from complete. At Utah State University we have recently designed and installed a microwave plasma generation system on a small tokamak borrowed from the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. Microwaves are generated at 2.45 GHz in a pulsed dc mode using a magnetron from a commercial kitchen microwave oven. The device is equipped with horizontal and vertical magnetic fields and a transformer to impose a toroidal electric field for current drive. Plasmas can be obtained over a wide range of pressure with and without magnetic fields. We present some preliminary measurements of plasma density and potential profiles. Measurements of plasma temperature at different operating conditions are also presented.

  14. MHD edge instabilities in toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Linda

    2015-11-01

    Different types of MHD edge instabilities in different toroidal magnetically confined plasmas are compared. Large scale numerical simulations show that the nonlinear evolution of an unstable edge mode in a shaped plasma with a single X-point and a surrounding open field line region has a number of common features in the full resistive MHD model for strongly unstable and weaker instabilities. These include the relation of the nonlinear mode structure and dominant toroidal harmonics to the linear eigenmode spectrum, the effects of the mode on reducing the edge pressure or density gradient, the inward penetration of a ballooning-type perturbation into the plasma interior, and the potential to drive a coherent axisymmetric poloidal rotation of the outer part of the plasma, exhibited at different strengths. The results can be compared to experiment to estimate the usefulness and validity of the MHD model for predicting edge stability and instability properties. Work supported by the U.S. DOE OFES under Awards DE-SC-0007883, DE-FG02-04ER54802, and DE-SC-0008737. Some computation carried out at NERSC.

  15. Propulsion using the electron spiral toroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seward, Clint

    1998-01-01

    A new propulsion method is proposed which could potentially reduce propellant needed for space travel by three orders of magnitude. It uses the newly patented electron spiral toroid (EST), which stores energy as magnetic field energy. The EST is a hollow toroid of electrons, all spiraling in parallel paths in a thin outer shell. The electrons satisfy the coupling condition, forming an electron matrix. Stability is assured as long as the coupling condition is satisfied. The EST is held in place with a small external electric field; without an external magnetic field. The EST system is contained in a vacuum chamber. The EST can be thought of as an energetic entity, with electrons at 10,000 electron volts. Propulsion would not use combustion, but would heat propellant through elastic collisions with the EST surface and eject them for thrust. Chemical rocket combustion heats propellant to 4000 °C an EST will potentially heat the propellant 29,000 times as much, reducing propellant needs accordingly. The thrust can be turned ON and OFF. The EST can be recharged as needed.

  16. Software Geometry in Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alion, Tyler; Viren, Brett; Junk, Tom

    2015-04-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) involves many detectors. The experiment's near detector (ND) facility, may ultimately involve several detectors. The far detector (FD) will be significantly larger than any other Liquid Argon (LAr) detector yet constructed; many prototype detectors are being constructed and studied to motivate a plethora of proposed FD designs. Whether it be a constructed prototype or a proposed ND/FD design, every design must be simulated and analyzed. This presents a considerable challenge to LBNE software experts; each detector geometry must be described to the simulation software in an efficient way which allows for multiple authors to easily collaborate. Furthermore, different geometry versions must be tracked throughout their use. We present a framework called General Geometry Description (GGD), written and developed by LBNE software collaborators for managing software to generate geometries. Though GGD is flexible enough to be used by any experiment working with detectors, we present it's first use in generating Geometry Description Markup Language (GDML) files to interface with LArSoft, a framework of detector simulations, event reconstruction, and data analyses written for all LAr technology users at Fermilab. Brett is the other of the framework discussed here, the General Geometry Description (GGD).

  17. Performance and accuracy of criticality calculations performed using WARP – A framework for continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport in general 3D geometries on GPUs

    DOE PAGES

    Bergmann, Ryan M.; Rowland, Kelly L.; Radnović, Nikola; ...

    2017-05-01

    In this companion paper to "Algorithmic Choices in WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs" (doi:10.1016/j.anucene.2014.10.039), the WARP Monte Carlo neutron transport framework for graphics processing units (GPUs) is benchmarked against production-level central processing unit (CPU) Monte Carlo neutron transport codes for both performance and accuracy. We compare neutron flux spectra, multiplication factors, runtimes, speedup factors, and costs of various GPU and CPU platforms running either WARP, Serpent 2.1.24, or MCNP 6.1. WARP compares well with the results of the production-level codes, and it is shown that on the newestmore » hardware considered, GPU platforms running WARP are between 0.8 to 7.6 times as fast as CPU platforms running production codes. Also, the GPU platforms running WARP were between 15% and 50% as expensive to purchase and between 80% to 90% as expensive to operate as equivalent CPU platforms performing at an equal simulation rate.« less

  18. Toroidal and magnetic Fano resonances in planar THz metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Song; Gupta, Manoj; Cong, Longqing; Srivastava, Yogesh Kumar; Singh, Ranjan

    2017-09-01

    The toroidal dipole moment, a localized electromagnetic excitation of torus magnetic fields, has been observed experimentally in metamaterials. However, the metamaterial based toroidal moment was restricted at higher frequencies by the complex three-dimensional structure. Recently, it has been shown that toroidal moment could also be excited in a planar metamaterial structure. Here, we use asymmetric Fano resonators to illustrate theoretically and experimentally the underlying physics of the toroidal coupling in an array of planar metamaterials. It is observed that the anti-parallel magnetic moment configuration shows toroidal excitation with higher quality (Q) factor Fano resonance, while the parallel magnetic moment shows relatively lower Q factor resonance. Moreover, the electric and toroidal dipole interferes destructively to give rise to an anapole excitation. The magnetic dipole-dipole interaction is employed to understand the differences between the toroidal and magnetic Fano resonances. We further study the impact of intra unit-cell coupling between the Fano resonator pairs in the mirrored and non-mirrored arrangements. The numerical and theoretical approach for modelling the near-field effects and experimental demonstration of toroidal and magnetic Fano resonances in planar systems are particularly promising for tailoring the loss in metamaterials across a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  19. Variable control of neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, D.L.; Micklich, B.J.

    1983-06-01

    This invention pertains to methods of controlling in the steady state, neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices, and in particular, to methods of controlling the flux and energy distribution of collided neutrons which are incident on an outboard wall of a toroidal fusion device.

  20. Plasmonic Toroidal Dipolar Response under Radially Polarized Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yanjun; Zhu, Xing; Fang, Zheyu

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic toroidal resonance has attracted growing interests because of its low loss electromagnetic properties and potential high sensitive nanophotonic applications. However, the realization in a metamaterial requires three-dimensional complicated structural design so far. In this paper, we design a simple metal-dielectric-metal (MIM) sandwich nanostructure, which exhibits a strong toroidal dipolar resonance under radially polarized excitation. The toroidal dipole moment as the dominant contribution for the scattering is demonstrated by the mirror-image method and further analyzed by Lagrangian hybridization model. The proposed toroidal configuration also shows a highly tolerant for misalignment between the structure center and the incident light focus. Our study proves the way for the toroidal plasmonic application with the cylindrical vector beams. PMID:26114966

  1. Design of plasmonic toroidal metamaterials at optical frequencies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Wei; Chen, Wei Ting; Wu, Pin Chieh; Fedotov, Vassili; Savinov, Vassili; Ho, You Zhe; Chau, Yuan-Fong; Zheludev, Nikolay I; Tsai, Din Ping

    2012-01-16

    Toroidal multipoles are the subject of growing interest because of their unusual electromagnetic properties different from the electric and magnetic multipoles. In this paper, we present two new related classes of plasmonic metamaterial composed of purposely arranged of four U-shaped split ring resonators (SRRs) that show profound resonant toroidal responses at optical frequencies. The toroidal and magnetic responses were investigated by the finite-element simulations. A phenomenon of reversed toroidal responses at higher and lower resonant frequencies has also been reported between this two related metamaterials which results from the electric and magnetic dipoles interaction. Finally, we propose a physical model based on coupled LC circuits to quantitatively analyze the coupled system of the plasmonic toroidal metamaterials.

  2. Segmented saddle-shaped passive stabilization conductors for toroidal plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Leuer, J.A.

    1990-05-01

    A large toroidal vacuum chamber for plasma generation and confinement is lined with a toroidal blanket for shielding using modules segmented in the toroidal direction. To provide passive stabilization in the same manner as a conductive vacuum chamber wall, saddle-shaped conductor loops are provided on blanket modules centered on a midplane of the toroidal chamber with horizontal conductive bars above and below the midplane, and vertical conductive legs on opposite sides of each module to provide return current paths between the upper and lower horizontal conductive bars. The close proximity of the vertical legs provided on adjacent modules without making physical contact cancel the electromagnetic field of adjacent vertical legs. The conductive bars spaced equally above and below the midplane simulate toroidal conductive loops or hoops that are continuous, for vertical stabilization of the plasma even though they are actually segmented. 5 figs.

  3. Segmented saddle-shaped passive stabilization conductors for toroidal plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Leuer, James A.

    1990-05-01

    A large toroidal vacuum chamber for plasma generation and confinement is lined with a toroidal blanket for shielding using modules segmented in the toroidal direction. To provide passive stabilization in the same manner as a conductive vacuum chamber wall, saddle-shaped conductor loops are provided on blanket modules centered on a midplane of the toroidal chamber with horizontal conductive bars above and below the midplane, and vertical conductive legs on opposite sides of each module to provide return current paths between the upper and lower horizontal conductive bars. The close proximity of the vertical legs provided on adjacent modules without making physical contact cancel the electromagnetic field of adjacent vertical legs. The conductive bars spaced equally above and below the midplane simulate toroidal conductive loops or hoops that are continuous, for vertical stabilization of the plasma even though they are actually segmented.

  4. A superconducting toroidal magnet for the CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard Mecking; Cassin Riggs; Douglas Tilles; Gretchen Doolittle; J. O'Meara; John Alcorn; Meng-sang Chew; Michael Fowler; Paul Brindza; Walter Tuzel

    1989-03-01

    The CEBAF (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) physics program requires a large acceptance spectrometer covering nearly all of the 4{sup o} solid angle for studying complex electronuclear interactions. This device relies on a six-coil toroidal magnetic field to provide momentum analysis. The desire to maximize solid angle coverage led to a thin superconducting toroid design. The main device has an outside diameter of 4.6 m, an active length of 5 m, a peak field in the toroidal volume of 1.2 T, and a stored energy of 18 MJ. An intrinsically stable design was selected to minimize the overall space requirements of the toroid. The individual coils of the toroid are approximately kidney-shaped; the negative curvature provides a field-free region for targets coming from the requirement to have good particle focusing properties. The overall design is presented.

  5. Molecular Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desseyn, H. O.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compares linear-nonlinear and planar-nonplanar geometry through the valence-shell electron pairs repulsion (V.S.E.P.R.), Mulliken-Walsh, and electrostatic force theories. Indicates that although the V.S.E.P.R. theory has more advantages for elementary courses, an explanation of the best features of the different theories offers students a better…

  6. Molecular Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desseyn, H. O.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compares linear-nonlinear and planar-nonplanar geometry through the valence-shell electron pairs repulsion (V.S.E.P.R.), Mulliken-Walsh, and electrostatic force theories. Indicates that although the V.S.E.P.R. theory has more advantages for elementary courses, an explanation of the best features of the different theories offers students a better…

  7. Kinematic dynamos in spheroidal geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivers, D. J.

    2017-10-01

    The kinematic dynamo problem is solved numerically for a spheroidal conducting fluid of possibly large aspect ratio with an insulating exterior. The solution method uses solenoidal representations of the magnetic field and the velocity by spheroidal toroidal and poloidal fields in a non-orthogonal coordinate system. Scaling of coordinates and fields to a spherical geometry leads to a modified form of the kinematic dynamo problem with a geometric anisotropic diffusion and an anisotropic current-free condition in the exterior, which is solved explicitly. The scaling allows the use of well-developed spherical harmonic techniques in angle. Dynamo solutions are found for three axisymmetric flows in oblate spheroids with semi-axis ratios 1≤a/c≤25. For larger aspect ratios strong magnetic fields may occur in any region of the spheroid, depending on the flow, but the external fields for all three flows are weak and concentrated near the axis or periphery of the spheroid.

  8. Collisional and chaotic transport of energetic particles in toroidal plasma. [Annual] progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J.R.; Shasharina, S.G.

    1993-03-01

    Progress is reported in three general areas of confinement plasma physics: (1) An accurate theory was developed for the trapping/detrapping process in tokamaks with ripple and stellarators. (2) The alpha particle distribution was determined for the situation where both collisions and collisionless chaotic (ripple) transport are present. Transport of the toroidally trapped particles in rippled tokamaks with up-down asymmetry was studied.

  9. Toroidal high-spin isomers in light nuclei with N ≠ Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszczak, A.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-11-01

    The combined considerations of both the bulk liquid-drop-type behavior and the quantized aligned rotation with cranked Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach revealed previously (Staszczak and Wong 2014 Phys. Lett. B 738 401) that even-even, N = Z, toroidal high-spin isomeric states have general occurrences for light nuclei with 28≤slant A≤slant 52. We find that in this mass region there are in addition N\

  10. NOVA: a nonvariational code for solving MHD stability of axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chance, M.S.

    1986-04-01

    A nonvariational approach for determining the ideal MHD stability of axisymmetric toroidal confinement systems is presented. The code (NOVA) employs cubic B-spline finite elements and Fourier expansion in a general flux coordinate (psi, theta, zeta) system. Better accuracy and faster convergence were obtained in comparison with the variational PEST and ERATO codes. The nonvariational approach can be extended to problems having non-Hermitian eigenmode equations where variational energy principles cannot be obtained.

  11. On The Stability of A General Magnetic Field Topology In Stellar Radiative Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustson, Kyle; Mathis, Stéphane; Strugarek, Antoine

    2016-10-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the formation of stellar fossil magnetic fields and what potential instabilities may occur given certain configurations of the magnetic field. In particular, a purely magnetic instability can occur for poloidal, toroidal, and mixed poloidal-toroidal axisymmetric magnetic field configurations as originally studied in Tayler (1973), Markey & Tayler (1973), and Tayler (1980). However, most of the magnetic field configurations observed at the surface of massive stars are non- axisymmetric. Thus, extending earlier studies of the axisymmetric Tayler instability in spherical geometry (Goossens, 1980), we introduce a formulation for the global change in the potential energy contained in a convectively-stable region given an arbitrary Lagrangian perturbation, which permits the inclusion of both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric magnetic fields. With this tool in hand, a path is shown by which more general stability criterion can be established.

  12. Helicity of a toroidal vortex with swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannikova, E. Yu.; Kontorovich, V. M.; Poslavsky, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Based on the solutions of the Bragg-Hawthorne equation, we discuss the helicity of a thin toroidal vortex in the presence of swirl, orbital motion along the torus directrix. The relation between the helicity and circulations along the small and large linked circumferences (the torus directrix and generatrix) is shown to depend on the azimuthal velocity distribution in the core of the swirling ring vortex. In the case of nonuniform swirl, this relation differs from the well-known Moffat relation, viz., twice the product of such circulations multiplied by the number of linkages. The results can find applications in investigating the vortices in planetary atmospheres and the motions in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  13. Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-05-01

    The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved.

  14. Toroid Joining Gun For Fittings And Couplings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L.; Swaim, Robert J.; Johnson, Samuel D.; Buckley, John D.; Copeland, Carl E.; Coultrip, Robert H.; Johnston, David F.; Phillips, William M.

    1992-01-01

    Hand-held gun used to join metal heat-to-shrink couplings. Uses magnetic induction (eddy currents) to produce heat in metal coupling, and thermocouple to measure temperature and signals end of process. Gun, called "toroid joining gun" concentrates high levels of heat in localized areas. Reconfigured for use on metal heat-to-shrink fitting and coupling applications. Provides rapid heating, operates on low power, lightweight and portable. Safe for use around aircraft fuel and has no detrimental effects on surrounding surfaces or objects. Reliable in any environment and under all weather conditions. Gun logical device for taking full advantage of capabilities of new metal heat-to-shrink couplings and fittings.

  15. Toroidal microinstability studies of high temperature tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1989-07-01

    Results from comprehensive kinetic microinstability calculations are presented showing the effects of toroidicity on the ion temperature gradient mode and its relationship to the trapped-electron mode in high-temperature tokamak plasmas. The corresponding particle and energy fluxes have also been computed. It is found that, although drift-type microinstabilities persist over a wide range of values of the ion temperature gradient parameter /eta//sub i/ /equivalent to/ (dlnT/sub i//dr)/(dlnn/sub i//dr), the characteristic features of the dominant mode are those of the /eta//sub i/-type instability when /eta//sub i/ > /eta//sub ic/ /approximately/1.2 to 1.4 and of the trapped-electron mode when /eta//sub i/ < /eta//sub ic/. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Isomorphic routing on a toroidal mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Weizhen; Nicol, David M.

    1993-01-01

    We study a routing problem that arises on SIMD parallel architectures whose communication network forms a toroidal mesh. We assume there exists a set of k message descriptors (xi, yi), where (xi, yi) indicates that the ith message's recipient is offset from its sender by xi hops in one mesh dimension, and yi hops in the other. Every processor has k messages to send, and all processors use the same set of message routing descriptors. The SIMD constraint implies that at any routing step, every processor is actively routing messages with the same descriptors as any other processor. We call this isomorphic routing. Our objective is to find the isomorphic routing schedule with least makespan. We consider a number of variations on the problem, yielding complexity results from O(k) to NP-complete. Most of our results follow after we transform the problem into a scheduling problem, where it is related to other well-known scheduling problems.

  17. Toroid Joining Gun For Fittings And Couplings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L.; Swaim, Robert J.; Johnson, Samuel D.; Buckley, John D.; Copeland, Carl E.; Coultrip, Robert H.; Johnston, David F.; Phillips, William M.

    1992-01-01

    Hand-held gun used to join metal heat-to-shrink couplings. Uses magnetic induction (eddy currents) to produce heat in metal coupling, and thermocouple to measure temperature and signals end of process. Gun, called "toroid joining gun" concentrates high levels of heat in localized areas. Reconfigured for use on metal heat-to-shrink fitting and coupling applications. Provides rapid heating, operates on low power, lightweight and portable. Safe for use around aircraft fuel and has no detrimental effects on surrounding surfaces or objects. Reliable in any environment and under all weather conditions. Gun logical device for taking full advantage of capabilities of new metal heat-to-shrink couplings and fittings.

  18. Epithelial Proliferation on Curved Toroidal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; Cruz, Ricardo; Fragkopoulos, Alexandros; Marquez, Samantha; Garcia, Andres; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    Cellular environment influences a multitude of cellular functions by providing chemical and physical signals that modulate cell behavior, dynamics, development, and eventually survival. In strongly interacting epithelial cells, cells coordinate their behavior to respond to mechanical constraints in 2D. Local differences in tissue tension has also been shown to impact cell reproduction within an epithelial-cell sheet. Much less is known about how cells respond to out-of-plane curvatures. Here, we describe the proliferation of MDCK on toroidal hydrogel substrates, which unlike spheres or planes, have regions of both positive and negative Gaussian curvature. Additionally, the range of curvatures can be controlled by varying the size and aspect ratio of the torus, allowing us to quantify the relation between substrate curvature and cell proliferation.

  19. Helicity of a toroidal vortex with swirl

    SciTech Connect

    Bannikova, E. Yu. Kontorovich, V. M.; Poslavsky, S. A.

    2016-04-15

    Based on the solutions of the Bragg–Hawthorne equation, we discuss the helicity of a thin toroidal vortex in the presence of swirl, orbital motion along the torus directrix. The relation between the helicity and circulations along the small and large linked circumferences (the torus directrix and generatrix) is shown to depend on the azimuthal velocity distribution in the core of the swirling ring vortex. In the case of nonuniform swirl, this relation differs from the well-known Moffat relation, viz., twice the product of such circulations multiplied by the number of linkages. The results can find applications in investigating the vortices in planetary atmospheres and the motions in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  20. Petascale Parallelization of the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ethier, Stephane; Adams, Mark; Carter, Jonathan; Oliker, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    The Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) is a global, three-dimensional particle-in-cell application developed to study microturbulence in tokamak fusion devices. The global capability of GTC is unique, allowing researchers to systematically analyze important dynamics such as turbulence spreading. In this work we examine a new radial domain decomposition approach to allow scalability onto the latest generation of petascale systems. Extensive performance evaluation is conducted on three high performance computing systems: the IBM BG/P, the Cray XT4, and an Intel Xeon Cluster. Overall results show that the radial decomposition approach dramatically increases scalability, while reducing the memory footprint - allowing for fusion device simulations at an unprecedented scale. After a decade where high-end computing (HEC) was dominated by the rapid pace of improvements to processor frequencies, the performance of next-generation supercomputers is increasingly differentiated by varying interconnect designs and levels of integration. Understanding the tradeoffs of these system designs is a key step towards making effective petascale computing a reality. In this work, we examine a new parallelization scheme for the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) [?] micro-turbulence fusion application. Extensive scalability results and analysis are presented on three HEC systems: the IBM BlueGene/P (BG/P) at Argonne National Laboratory, the Cray XT4 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and an Intel Xeon cluster at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Overall results indicate that the new radial decomposition approach successfully attains unprecedented scalability to 131,072 BG/P cores by overcoming the memory limitations of the previous approach. The new version is well suited to utilize emerging petascale resources to access new regimes of physical phenomena.

  1. Compact toroids generated by a magnetized coaxial source in the CTX experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, A.R.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Jarboe, T.R.; McKenna, K.F.; Linford, R.K.; Marshall, J.; Platts, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    Compact toroids containing both toroidal and poloidal magnetic field (Spheromak-type) have been generated in CTX using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. These CTs tear loose from the gun by magnetic field line reconnection, and they are trapped in flux conservers having various geometries. In a straight cylindrical flux conserver the CTs are observed to be unstable to a gross tilting mode. Stability to the tilting mode has been demonstrated in flux conservers having an oblate trapping region; however, the geometry of the entrance region leading to the trapping volume can also have important effects. Lifetimes of about 150 ..mu..s for the CTs are typically observed. Interferometric measurements give a value of about 2 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ for the initial plasma density. The plasma temperature measured at a single spot near the minor magnetic axis decreases to around 10 eV by the time the magnetic reconnection is complete. Spectrographic measurements and pressure probe results are in agreement with this temperature. A snipper coil has been installed to induce the CT to tear loose from the gun sooner. The use of this coil is observed to speed up the magnetic field reconnection process by about a factor of 2.

  2. A Simulation Model for the Toroidal Ion Temperature Gradient Instability with Fully Kinetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturdevant, Benjamin; Parker, Scott; Chen, Yang

    2016-10-01

    A simulation model for the toroidal ITG mode in which the ions follow the primitive Lorentz force equations of motion is presented. Such a model can provide an important validation tool or replacement for gyrokinetic ion models in applications where higher order terms may be important. A number of multiple-scale simulation techniques are employed in this work, based on the previous success in slab geometry with an implicit orbit averaged and sub-cycled δf model. For the toroidal geometry model, we have derived a particle integration scheme based on variational principles, which is demonstrated to produce stable and accurate ion trajectories on long time scales. Orbit averaging and sub-cycling will be implemented with the variational integration scheme. The inclusion of equilibrium gradients in the fully kinetic δf formulation is achieved through the use of a guiding center coordinate transformation of the weight equation. Simulation results for the fully kinetic ion model will be presented for the cyclone base case and comparisons will be made with gyrokinetic ion models.

  3. Core Geometry Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirata, Li Ann

    Core Geometry is a course offered in the Option Y sequence of the high school mathematics program described by the Hawaii State Department of Education's guidelines. The emphasis of this course is on the general awareness and use of the relationships among points, lines, and figures in planes and space. This sample course is based on the…

  4. Geometry and physics

    PubMed Central

    Atiyah, Michael; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Hitchin, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    We review the remarkably fruitful interactions between mathematics and quantum physics in the past decades, pointing out some general trends and highlighting several examples, such as the counting of curves in algebraic geometry, invariants of knots and four-dimensional topology. PMID:20123740

  5. Four-dimensional CDT with toroidal topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, J.; Gizbert-Studnicki, J.; Görlich, A.; Grosvenor, K.; Jurkiewicz, J.

    2017-09-01

    3 + 1 dimensional Causal Dynamical Triangulations (CDT) describe a quantum theory of fluctuating geometries without the introduction of a background geometry. If the topology of space is constrained to be that of a three-dimensional torus we show that the system will fluctuate around a dynamically formed background geometry which can be understood from a simple minisuperspace action which contains both a classical part and a quantum part. We determine this action by integrating out degrees of freedom in the full model, as well as by transfer matrix methods.

  6. Nuclear resonance tomography with a toroid cavity detector

    DOEpatents

    Woelk, K.; Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

    1996-11-12

    A toroid cavity detection system is described for determining the spectral properties and distance from a fixed point for a sample using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The detection system consists of a toroid with a central conductor oriented along the main axis of the toroidal cylinder and perpendicular to a static uniform magnetic field oriented along the main axis of the toroid. An rf signal is input to the central conductor to produce a magnetic field perpendicular to the central axis of the toroid and whose field strength varies as the inverse of the radius of the toroid. The toroid cavity detection system can be used to encapsulate a sample, or the detection system can be perforated to allow a sample to flow into the detection device or to place the samples in specified sample tubes. The central conductor can also be coated to determine the spectral property of the coating and the coating thickness. The sample is then subjected to the respective magnetic fields and the responses measured to determine the desired properties. 4 figs.

  7. Rapid Detection of Infectious Envelope Proteins by Magnetoplasmonic Toroidal Metasensors.

    PubMed

    Ahmadivand, Arash; Gerislioglu, Burak; Manickam, Pandiaraj; Kaushik, Ajeet; Bhansali, Shekhar; Nair, Madhavan; Pala, Nezih

    2017-09-22

    Unconventional characteristics of magnetic toroidal multipoles have triggered researchers to study these unique resonant phenomena by using both 3D and planar resonators under intense radiation. Here, going beyond conventional planar unit cells, we report on the observation of magnetic toroidal modes using artificially engineered multimetallic planar plasmonic resonators. The proposed microstructures consist of iron (Fe) and titanium (Ti) components acting as magnetic resonators and torus, respectively. Our numerical studies and following experimental verifications show that the proposed structures allow for excitation of toroidal dipoles in the terahertz (THz) domain with the experimental Q-factor of ∼18. Taking the advantage of high-Q toroidal line shape and its dependence on the environmental perturbations, we demonstrate that room-temperature toroidal metasurface is a reliable platform for immunosensing applications. As a proof of concept, we utilized our plasmonic metasurface to detect Zika-virus (ZIKV) envelope protein (with diameter of 40 nm) using a specific ZIKV antibody. The sharp toroidal resonant modes of the surface functionalized structures shift as a function of the ZIKV envelope protein for small concentrations (∼pM). The results of sensing experiments reveal rapid, accurate, and quantitative detection of envelope proteins with the limit of detection of ∼24.2 pg/mL and sensitivity of 6.47 GHz/log(pg/mL). We envision that the proposed toroidal metasurface opens new avenues for developing low-cost, and efficient THz plasmonic sensors for infection and targeted bioagent detection.

  8. Nuclear resonance tomography with a toroid cavity detector

    DOEpatents

    Woelk, Klaus; Rathke, Jerome W.; Klingler, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A toroid cavity detection system for determining the spectral properties and distance from a fixed point for a sample using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The detection system consists of a toroid with a central conductor oriented along the main axis of the toroidal cylinder and perpendicular to a static uniform magnetic field oriented along the main axis of the toroid. An rf signal is inputted to the central conductor to produce a magnetic field perpendicular to the central axis of the toroid and whose field strength varies as the inverse of the radius of the toroid. The toroid cavity detection system can be used to encapsulate a sample, or the detection system can be perforated to allow a sample to flow into the detection device or to place the samples in specified sample tubes. The central conductor can also be coated to determine the spectral property of the coating and the coating thickness. The sample is then subjected to the respective magnetic fields and the responses measured to determine the desired properties.

  9. Thermodynamics of Asymptotically Conical Geometries.

    PubMed

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Gibbons, Gary W; Saleem, Zain H

    2015-06-12

    We study the thermodynamical properties of a class of asymptotically conical geometries known as "subtracted geometries." We derive the mass and angular momentum from the regulated Komar integral and the Hawking-Horowitz prescription and show that they are equivalent. By deriving the asymptotic charges, we show that the Smarr formula and the first law of thermodynamics hold. We also propose an analog of Christodulou-Ruffini inequality. The analysis can be generalized to other asymptotically conical geometries.

  10. Metamaterials with toroidal fano-response (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhokar, Maria V.; Basharin, Alexey A.

    2017-05-01

    The static toroidal dipole was predicted by Zeldovich, which appears due to the static currents in atomic nuclei and explain disturbance of parity in the weak interaction. Physically, toroidal dipole is separated element of multipole expansion that corresponds to electrical currents circulating on a surface of gedanken torus along its meridians. Recently, the demonstration of dynamic toroidal dipolar response became possible in metamaterials composed of metamolecules of toroidal topology. Metamaterials with toroidal dipolar response allow to demonstrate a number of special properties such as novel type of EIT, optical activity, extremely strongly localized fields and anapole. We are interested in another property of toroidal metamaterials - magnetic Fano-type response caused by toroidal and magnetic moments in a particular metamolecule. In this paper we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally in microwave at the first time Fano-excitation in toroidal metamaterials. We suggested metamaterials based on a special structure of two types of planar metamolecules separated by dielectric layer. One of them "Electric" type metamolecule is a planar conductive structure consisting of two symmetric split loops. The incident plane wave excites circular currents along the loops leading to a circulating magnetic moment and, as a result, to a toroidal moment. Moreover, due to the central gap electric moment can be excited in metamolecule. At the same time, destructive/constructive interference between toroidal and electric dipolar moments gives us unique effect as very strong E- field localization inside the central gap and anapole mode. "Magnetic" type metamolecule is the inverted and rotated variant of the first structure. In contrast to the first case, here we expect very strong localization of magnetic field instead electric field. The magnetic field lines are whirling around the central junction of the metamolecule due to interference between toroidal and magnetic

  11. Kinetic Energy Principle And Neoclassical Toroidal Torque In Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Jong-Kyu Park

    2011-11-07

    It is shown that when tokamaks are perturbed the kinetic energy principle is closely related to the neoclassical toroidal torque by the action invariance of particles. Especially when tokamaks are perturbed from scalar pressure equilibria, the imaginary part of the potential energy in the kinetic energy principle is equivalent to the toroidal torque by the Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity (NTV). A unified description therefore should be made for both physics. It is also shown in this case that the potential energy operator can be self-adjoint and thus the stability calculation can be simplified by minimizing the potential energy

  12. Kinetic energy principle and neoclassical toroidal torque in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-Kyu

    2011-11-15

    It is shown that when tokamaks are perturbed, the kinetic energy principle is closely related to the neoclassical toroidal torque by the action invariance of particles. Especially when tokamaks are perturbed from scalar pressure equilibria, the imaginary part of the potential energy in the kinetic energy principle is equivalent to the toroidal torque by the neoclassical toroidal viscosity. A unified description therefore should be made for both physics. It is also shown in this case that the potential energy operator can be self-adjoint and thus the stability calculation can be simplified by minimizing the potential energy.

  13. Riemannian geometry of twisted magnetic flux tubes in almost helical plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Andrade, L.C.

    2006-02-15

    Riemannian geometry of curves applied recently by Ricca [Fluid Dyn. Res 36, 319 (2005)] in the case of inflectional disequilibrium of twisted magnetic flux tubes is used here to compute the magnetic helicity force-free field case. Here the application of Lorentz force-free to the magnetic flux tube in tokamaks allows one to obtain an equation that generalizes the cylindrical tokamak equation by a term that contains the curvature of the magnetic flux tube. Another example of the use of the magnetic flux tube is done by taking the electron magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) fluid model (EMHD) of plasma physics that allows one to compute the velocity of the fluid in helical and almost helical flows in terms of the Frenet torsion of thin magnetic flux tubes. The cases of straight and curved twisted tubes are examined. Second-order effects on the Frenet torsion arise on the poloidal component of the magnetic field, while curvature effects appear in the toroidal component. The magnetic fields are computed in terms of the penetration depth used in superconductors. The ratio between poloidal and toroidal components of the magnetic field depends on the torsion and curvature of the magnetic flux tube. It is shown that the rotation of the almost helical plasma flow contributes to the twist of the magnetic flux tube through the total Frenet torsion along the tube.

  14. Toroidal Flux Ropes with Elliptical Cross Sections and Their Magnetic Helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandas, M.; Romashets, E.

    2017-09-01

    Axially symmetric constant-alpha force-free magnetic fields in toroidal flux ropes with elliptical cross sections are constructed in order to investigate how their alphas and magnetic helicities depend on parameters of the flux ropes. Magnetic configurations are found numerically using a general solution of a constant-alpha force-free field with an axial symmetry in cylindrical coordinates for a wide range of oblatenesses and aspect ratios. Resulting alphas and magnetic helicities are approximated by polynomial expansions in parameters related to oblateness and aspect ratio. These approximations hold for toroidal as well as cylindrical flux ropes with an accuracy better than or of about 1%. Using these formulae, we calculate relative helicities per unit length of two (probably very oblate) magnetic clouds and show that they are very sensitive to the assumed magnetic cloud shapes (circular versus elliptical cross sections).

  15. Tracking formulas and strategies for a receiver oriented dual-axis tracking toroidal heliostat

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Minghuan; Wang, Zhifeng; Liang, Wenfeng; Zhang, Xiliang; Zang, Chuncheng; Lu, Zhenwu; Wei, Xiudong

    2010-06-15

    A 4 m x 4 m toroidal heliostat with receiver oriented dual-axis tracking, also called spinning-elevation tracking, was developed as an auxiliary heat source for a hydrogen production system. A series of spinning-elevation tracking formulas have been derived for this heliostat. This included basic tracking formulas, a formula for the elevation angle for heliostat with a mirror-pivot offset, and a more general formula for the biased elevation angle. This paper presents the new tracking formulas in detail and analyzes the accuracy of applying a simplifying approximation. The numerical results show these receiver oriented dual-axis tracking formula approximations are accurate to within 2.5 x 10{sup -6} m in image plane. Some practical tracking strategies are discussed briefly. Solar images from the toroidal heliostat at selected times are also presented. (author)

  16. The residual zonal flow in tokamak plasmas toroidally rotating at arbitrary velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Deng

    2014-08-15

    Zonal flows, initially driven by ion-temperature-gradient turbulence, may evolve due to the neoclassic polarization in a collisionless tokamak plasma. In our previous work [D. Zhou, Nucl. Fusion 54, 042002 (2014)], the residual zonal flow in a tokamak plasma rotating toroidally at sonic speed is found to have the same form as that of a static plasma. In the present work, the form of the residual zonal flow is presented for tokamak plasmas rotating toroidally at arbitrary velocity. The gyro-kinetic equation is analytically solved for low speed rotation to give the expression of residual zonal flows, and the expression is then generalized for cases with arbitrary rotating velocity through interpolation. The zonal flow level decreases as the rotating velocity increases. The numerical evaluation is in good agreement with the former simulation result for high aspect ratio tokamaks.

  17. Toroidal Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Fullerene Crop Circles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We investigate energetics and structure of circular and polygonal single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using large scale molecular simulations on NAS SP2, motivated by their unusual electronic and magnetic properties. The circular tori are formed by bending tube (no net whereas the polygonal tori are constructed by turning the joint of two tubes of (n, n), (n+1, n-1) and (n+2, n-2) with topological pentagon-heptagon defect, in which n =5, 8 and 10. The strain energy of circular tori relative to straight tube decreases by I/D(sup 2) where D is torus diameter. As D increases, these tori change from buckling to an energetically stable state. The stable tori are perfect circular in both toroidal and tubular geometry with strain less than 0. 03 eV/atom when D greater than 10, 20 and 40 nm for torus (5,5), (8,8) and (10, 10). Polygonal tori, whose strain is proportional to the number of defects and I/D are energetically stable even for D less than 10 nm. However, their strain is higher than that of perfect circular tori. In addition, the local maximum strain of polygonal tori is much higher than that of perfect circular tori. It is approx. 0.03 eV/atom or less for perfect circular torus (5,5), but 0.13 and 0.21 eV/atom for polygonal tori (6,4)/(5,5) and (7,3)/(5,5). Therefore, we conclude that the circular tori with no topological defects are more energetically stable and kinetically accessible than the polygonal tori containing the pentagon-heptagon defects for the laser-grown SWNTs and Fullerene crop circles.

  18. Effects of inhomogeneous partial absorption and the geometry of the boundary on the population evolution of molecules diffusing in general porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Seungoh; Johnson, David L.

    2009-03-01

    We consider the diffusion-relaxation dynamics in porous media with partially absorbing boundary conditions. Spectral analysis of Helmholtz equation for the uniform boundary condition has been widely used as a probe of geometry of the medium. The NMR relaxation of the fluid magnetization, for example, is used for a variety of media such as rocks, cement, bones, and cheese. While direct relationship between their geometry and the spectrum forms the basis for such applications, little attention has been paid to the spatial variation of the boundary condition. We report on the way the geometry and such inhomogeneity become intertwined and affect the spectrum. It is often impossible to gauge how severe such interference is in the biological or geophysical experiments. We develop a perturbative theory and numerical techniques and test for cases for which exact solution is obtained.

  19. Gaseous toroid around Saturn. [Saturnian ring system for atomic hydrogen trapping in Titan atmospheric model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonough, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    The trapping of Titan's escaping atmosphere in the Saturnian system by a toroidal ring is discussed. The radius of the toroid is comparable to Titan's orbit, or about ten times larger than the visible rings. Theoretical atmospheric models are formulated that consider Saturn's gravitational attraction and magnetospheric properties in forming this toroid and in protecting toroid particles from direct ionization by solar wind particles.

  20. Toroidal transducer with two large focal zones for increasing the coagulated volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenot, J.; Melodelima, D.; Kocot, A.; Chavrier, F.; Chapelon, J. Y.

    2012-11-01

    Toroidal HIFU transducers have been shown to generate large conical ablations (7 cm3 in 40 seconds). The focal zone is composed of a first ring-shaped focal zone and an overlap of ultrasound beams behind this first focus. A HIFU device has been developed on this principle to treat liver metastases during an open procedure. Although these large lesions contribute to reduce treatment time, it is still needed to juxtapose 4 to 9 single HIFU lesions to treat liver metastasis (2 cm in diameter) with safety margins. In this work, a different toroidal geometry was used. With this transducer, the overlap area is located between the probe and the focal ring. The objective was to use this transducer with electronic focusing in order to create a spherical shape lesion with sufficient volume for the destruction of a metastasis of 2 cm in diameter without any mechanical displacement. The operating frequency of the toroidal transducer was 2.5 MHz. The radius of curvature was 70 mm with a diameter of 67 mm. The focal ring had a radius of 15 mm. The overlap zone extent between 35 to 55 mm from the emitting surface. An ultrasound-imaging probe (working at 7.5 MHz) was placed in a central circular opening of 26 mm in the HIFU transducer and was aligned with the focal plane. The transducer was divided into 32 rings of 78 mm2. Using a 32 channels amplifier with a phase resolution of 1.4 degrees, it was possible to change the diameter (0 to 15 mm) and depth (45 to 85 mm) of the focus circle to maximize dimensions of the lesion. Tests were conducted in vitro, in bovine liver samples. This toroidal geometry and the use of electronic beam steering allow the creation of roughly spherical lesions (diameter of 47 mm, depth of 35 mm). This treatment was obtained in 6 minutes and 10 seconds without any mechanical displacement of the transducer. The lesions obtained were homogeneous and no untreated area was observed. In conclusion, these results indicate that the treatment of a liver

  1. On the use of a toroidal mirror to focus neutrons at the ILL neutron spin echo spectrometer IN15

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, C.; Alefeld, B.; Copley, J.R.D.

    1997-09-01

    The IN15 neutron spin echo spectrometer at the Institut Laue-Langevin (Grenoble) has been designed to accomodate a toroidal focusing mirror. This mirror will be used to increase the intensity at the sample position for measurements at long neutron wavelengths and to perform measurements in the low q-range (10{sup -3} {angstrom}{sup -1}). This paper summarizes the results of ray-tracing simulations for the toroidal mirror system. These calculations were performed in order to assess the effects of the neutron wavelength, gravitational fall, wavelength resolution and spherical aberrations on the quality of the focused beam. The gain in flux that can be expected from the focusing geometry is estimated. The recent installation and characterisation of the mirror is also briefly described.

  2. Contact Geometry of Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliou, Peter J.

    2009-10-01

    Cartan's method of moving frames is briefly recalled in the context of immersed curves in the homogeneous space of a Lie group G. The contact geometry of curves in low dimensional equi-affine geometry is then made explicit. This delivers the complete set of invariant data which solves the G-equivalence problem via a straightforward procedure, and which is, in some sense a supplement to the equivariant method of Fels and Olver. Next, the contact geometry of curves in general Riemannian manifolds (M,g) is described. For the special case in which the isometries of (M,g) act transitively, it is shown that the contact geometry provides an explicit algorithmic construction of the differential invariants for curves in M. The inputs required for the construction consist only of the metric g and a parametrisation of structure group SO(n); the group action is not required and no integration is involved. To illustrate the algorithm we explicitly construct complete sets of differential invariants for curves in the Poincaré half-space H3 and in a family of constant curvature 3-metrics. It is conjectured that similar results are possible in other Cartan geometries.

  3. Geometry of membrane fission.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Vadim A; Escalada, Artur; Akimov, Sergey A; Shnyrova, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes define the functional geometry of intracellular space. Formation of new membrane compartments and maintenance of complex organelles require division and disconnection of cellular membranes, a process termed membrane fission. Peripheral membrane proteins generally control membrane remodeling during fission. Local membrane stresses, reflecting molecular geometry of membrane-interacting parts of these proteins, sum up to produce the key membrane geometries of fission: the saddle-shaped neck and hour-glass hemifission intermediate. Here, we review the fundamental principles behind the translation of molecular geometry into membrane shape and topology during fission. We emphasize the central role the membrane insertion of specialized protein domains plays in orchestrating fission in vitro and in cells. We further compare individual to synergistic action of the membrane insertion during fission mediated by individual protein species, proteins complexes or membrane domains. Finally, we describe how local geometry of fission intermediates defines the functional design of the protein complexes catalyzing fission of cellular membranes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Toroidal band limiter for a plasma containment device

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, George G.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to a toroidal plasma confinement device having poloidal and toroidal magnetic fields for confining a toroidal plasma column with a plasma current induced therein along an endless, circular equilibrium axis in a torus vacuum cavity wherein the improvement comprises the use of a toroidal plasma band limiter mounted within the vacuum cavity in such a manner as to ensure that the plasma energy is distributed more uniformly over the limiter surface thereby avoiding intense local heating of the limiter while at the same time substantially preventing damage to the plasma containment wall of the cavity by the energetic particles diffusing out from the confined plasma. A plurality of poloidal plasma ring limiters are also utilized for containment wall protection during any disruptive instability that might occur during operation of the device.

  5. High-frequency electric field measurement using a toroidal antenna

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha

    2002-01-01

    A simple and compact method and apparatus for detecting high frequency electric fields, particularly in the frequency range of 1 MHz to 100 MHz, uses a compact toroidal antenna. For typical geophysical applications the sensor will be used to detect electric fields for a wide range of spectrum starting from about 1 MHz, in particular in the frequency range between 1 to 100 MHz, to detect small objects in the upper few meters of the ground. Time-varying magnetic fields associated with time-varying electric fields induce an emf (voltage) in a toroidal coil. The electric field at the center of (and perpendicular to the plane of) the toroid is shown to be linearly related to this induced voltage. By measuring the voltage across a toroidal coil one can easily and accurately determine the electric field.

  6. Equilibrium analysis of tokamak discharges with toroidal variation

    SciTech Connect

    Zwingmann, W.; Becoulet, M.; Moreau, Ph.; Nardon, E.

    2006-11-30

    Tokamaks provide a field structure that is almost axisymmetric around the torus axis. There are however always small toroidal variations due to the limited number of toroidal field coils, the magnetic field ripple. On the other hand, non-axisymmetric external fields are applied on purpose to ergodise the field structure close to the separatrix, to control the heat and particle transport across the plasma boundary. We present a perturbation method to calculate the magnetic field of tokamak discharges with with weak toroidal variation. The method is applied for the equilibrium reconstruction of Tore Supra discharges with toroidal ripple. The perturbation method does not rely on a flux surface representation and can therefore be applied to structures with magnetic islands. We obtain the plasma response to the field of ergodising external coils, as proposed for the ITER device.

  7. Confinement Time Exceeding One Second for a Toroidal Electron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Marler, J. P.; Stoneking, M. R.

    2008-04-18

    Nearly steady-state electron plasmas are trapped in a toroidal magnetic field for the first time. We report the first results from a new toroidal electron plasma experiment, the Lawrence Non-neutral Torus II, in which electron densities on the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3} are trapped in a 270 deg. toroidal arc (670 G toroidal magnetic field) by application of trapping potentials to segments of a conducting shell. The total charge inferred from measurements of the frequency of the m=1 diocotron mode is observed to decay on a 3 s time scale, a time scale that approaches the predicted limit due to magnetic pumping transport. Three seconds represents {approx_equal}10{sup 5} periods of the lowest frequency plasma mode, indicating that nearly steady-state conditions are achieved.

  8. Neoclassical Poloidal and Toroidal Velocities of Impurity Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. K.; Chan, V. S.; Solomon, W. M.

    2008-11-01

    The poloidal and toroidal velocities of impurity ions in a two-ion species plasma for large aspect ratio circular flux surfaces are calculated in the banana and Pfirsch-Schulter regimes of neoclassical theory. The toroidal velocity is allowed to be comparable to the thermal speed of the impurity ions. Closed form expressions are obtained for these velocities in terms of the radial electric field as well as density and temperature gradients. The standard kinetic derivation adopted is compared with the moment approach to the same problems in the case of small toroidal velocities. Comparisons of the calculated poloidal velocity with experimental observations in DIII-D [1] show improved agreement due to the allowance of larger toroidal flows. 6pt [1] W.M. Solomon, Phys. Plasmas 13, 056116 (2006).

  9. System and method of operating toroidal magnetic confinement devices

    DOEpatents

    Chance, M.S.; Jardin, S.C.; Stix, T.H.; Grimm, R.C.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.

    1984-08-30

    This invention pertains to methods and arrangements for attaining high beta values in plasma confinement devices. More specifically, this invention pertains to methods for accessing the second stability region of operation in toroidal magnetic confinement devices.

  10. Toroidal high-spin isomers in the nucleus 304120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszczak, A.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Kosior, A.

    2017-05-01

    Background: Strongly deformed oblate superheavy nuclei form an intriguing region where the toroidal nuclear structures may bifurcate from the oblate spheroidal shape. The bifurcation may be facilitated when the nucleus is endowed with a large angular moment about the symmetry axis with I =Iz . The toroidal high-K isomeric states at their local energy minima can be theoretically predicted using the cranked self-consistent Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method. Purpose: We use the cranked Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method to predict the properties of the toroidal high-spin isomers in the superheavy nucleus 120304184. Method: Our method consists of three steps: First, we use the deformation-constrained Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach to search for the nuclear density distributions with toroidal shapes. Next, using these toroidal distributions as starting configurations, we apply an additional cranking constraint of a large angular momentum I =Iz about the symmetry z axis and search for the energy minima of the system as a function of the deformation. In the last step, if a local energy minimum with I =Iz is found, we perform at this point the cranked symmetry- and deformation-unconstrained Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculations to locate a stable toroidal high-spin isomeric state in free convergence. Results: We have theoretically located two toroidal high-spin isomeric states of 120304184 with an angular momentum I =Iz=81 ℏ (proton 2p-2h, neutron 4p-4h excitation) and I =Iz=208 ℏ (proton 5p-5h, neutron 8p-8h) at the quadrupole moment deformations Q20=-297.7 b and Q20=-300.8 b with energies 79.2 and 101.6 MeV above the spherical ground state, respectively. The nuclear density distributions of the toroidal high-spin isomers 120304184(Iz=81 ℏ and 208 ℏ ) have the maximum density close to the nuclear matter density, 0.16 fm-3, and a torus major to minor radius aspect ratio R /d =3.25 . Conclusions: We demonstrate that aligned angular momenta of Iz=81 ℏ and 208 ℏ arising from

  11. Toroidal insulating inhomogeneity in an infinite space and related problems

    PubMed Central

    Radi, E.

    2016-01-01

    An analytic solution for the steady-state temperature distribution in an infinite conductive medium containing an insulated toroidal inhomogeneity and subjected to remotely applied uniform heat flux is obtained. The temperature flux on the torus surface is then determined as a function of torus parameters. This result is used to calculate the resistivity contribution tensor for the toroidal inhomogeneity required to evaluate the effective conductive properties of a material containing multiple inhomogeneities of this shape. PMID:27118919

  12. Effects of inhomogeneous partial absorption and the geometry of the boundary on population evolution of molecules diffusing in general porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Seungoh

    2009-08-01

    We consider aspects of the population dynamics, inside a bound domain, of diffusing agents carrying an attribute which is stochastically destroyed upon contact with the boundary. The normal mode analysis of the relevant Helmholtz equation under the partially absorbing, but uniform, boundary condition provides a starting framework in understanding detailed evolution dynamics of the attribute in the time domain. In particular, the boundary-localized depletion has been widely employed in practical applications that depend on geometry of various porous media such as rocks, cement, bones, and cheese. While direct relationship between the pore geometry and the diffusion-relaxation spectrum forms the basis for such applications and has been extensively studied, relatively less attention has been paid to the spatial variation in the boundary condition. In this work, we focus on the way the pore geometry and the inhomogeneous depletion strength of the boundary become intertwined and thus obscure the direct relationship between the spectrum and the geometry. It is often impossible to gauge experimentally the degree to which such interference occurs. We fill this gap by perturbatively incorporating classes of spatially varying boundary conditions and derive their consequences that are observable through numerical simulations or controlled experiments on glass bead packs and artificially fabricated porous media. We identify features of the spectrum that are most sensitive to the inhomogeneity, apply the method to the spherical pore with a simple hemispherical binary distribution of the depletion strength, and obtain bounds for the induced change in the slowest relaxation mode.

  13. PENGEOM-A general-purpose geometry package for Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport in material systems defined by quadric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almansa, Julio; Salvat-Pujol, Francesc; Díaz-Londoño, Gloria; Carnicer, Artur; Lallena, Antonio M.; Salvat, Francesc

    2016-02-01

    The Fortran subroutine package PENGEOM provides a complete set of tools to handle quadric geometries in Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport. The material structure where radiation propagates is assumed to consist of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces. The PENGEOM subroutines (a subset of the PENELOPE code) track particles through the material structure, independently of the details of the physics models adopted to describe the interactions. Although these subroutines are designed for detailed simulations of photon and electron transport, where all individual interactions are simulated sequentially, they can also be used in mixed (class II) schemes for simulating the transport of high-energy charged particles, where the effect of soft interactions is described by the random-hinge method. The definition of the geometry and the details of the tracking algorithm are tailored to optimize simulation speed. The use of fuzzy quadric surfaces minimizes the impact of round-off errors. The provided software includes a Java graphical user interface for editing and debugging the geometry definition file and for visualizing the material structure. Images of the structure are generated by using the tracking subroutines and, hence, they describe the geometry actually passed to the simulation code.

  14. Sawtooth Instability in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herfindal, J. L.; Maurer, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Ennis, D. A.; Knowlton, S. F.

    2015-11-01

    Sawtooth instabilities have been observed in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH), a current-carrying stellarator/tokamak hybrid device. The sawtooth instability is driven by ohmic heating of the core plasma until the safety factor drops below unity resulting in the growth of an m = 1 kink-tearing mode. Experiments varying the vacuum rotational transform from 0.02 to 0.13 are being conducted to study sawtooth property dependance on vacuum flux surface structure. The frequency of the sawtooth oscillations increase from 2 kHz to 2.8 kHz solely due the decrease in rise time of the oscillation, the crash time is unchanged. CTH has three two-color SXR cameras, a three-channel 1mm interferometer, and a new bolometer system capable of detecting the signatures of sawtooth instabilities. The new bolometer system consists of two cameras, each containing a pair of diode arrays viewing the plasma directly or through a beryllium filter. Electron temperature measurements are found with the two-color SXR cameras through a ratio of the SXR intensities. Impurity radiation can drastically affect the electron temperature measurement, therefore new filters consisting of aluminum and carbon were selected to avoid problematic line radiation while maximizing the signal for a 100 eV plasma. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  15. RF plasma heating in toroidal fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Golant, V.E.; Fedorov, V.I. )

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the present book is to provide, in seven chapters, a unified overview of the methods for rf heating of plasmas in toroidal fusion experiments. In Chapter 1 the problem of plasma heating in tokamaks and stellarators is formulated and the requirements for auxiliary heating techniques are described. This chapter also contains a brief review of the results of research on tokamaks and stellarators. Chapter 2 is devoted to a theoretical description of the principal physical effects involved in the rf heating of plasmas, especially the characteristics of wave propagation, of the mechanisms by which waves are absorbed and plasma heating takes place, and of the nonlinear effects that accompany heating. The primary emphasis is on a qualitative physical picture of these effects. Chapters 3-6, in turn, deal with the major rf heating techniques currently under investigation, electron cyclotron (ECH), ion cyclotron (ICH), lower hybrid (LHH), and Alfven wave heating. In each of these chapters the main schemes for heating are described, the results of theoretical analyses and numerical simulations are discussed, the technology of the heating systems is briefly described, and experimental work published through the end of 1984 is reviewed. Finally, in Chapter 7 the different rf heating techniques are compared; they are contrasted with neutral beam injection, and the feasibility of adiabatic compression as a means of heating plasmas is examined. Separate abstracts were prepared for each chapter of this book. 246 refs.

  16. Compact toroid injection into C-2U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Thomas; Gota, H.; Garate, E.; Asai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; Putvinski, S.; Allfrey, I.; Beall, M.; Cordero, M.; Granstedt, E.; Kinley, J.; Morehouse, M.; Sheftman, D.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    Sustainment of an advanced neutral beam-driven FRC for a period in excess of 5 ms is the primary goal of the C-2U machine at Tri Alpha Energy. In addition, a criteria for long-term global sustainment of any magnetically confined fusion reactor is particle refueling. To this end, a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun has been developed. Compact toroids (CT) are to be injected perpendicular to the axial magnetic field of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test-stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of B ~ 1 kG is established (comparable to the C-2U axial field) and CTs are fired across it. As a minimal requirement, the CT must have energy density greater than that of the magnetic field it is to penetrate, i.e., 1/2 ρv2 >=B2 / 2μ0 . This criteria is easily met and indeed the CTs traverse the test-stand field. A preliminary experiment on C-2U shows the CT also capable of penetrating into FRC plasmas and refueling is observed resulting in a 20 - 30% increase in total particle number per single-pulsed CT injection. Results from test-stand and C-2U experiments will be presented.

  17. Toroidal nanotraps for cold polar molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Salhi, Marouane; Passian, Ali; Siopsis, George

    2015-09-14

    Electronic excitations in metallic nanoparticles in the optical regime that have been of great importance in surface-enhanced spectroscopy and emerging applications of molecular plasmonics, due to control and confinement of electromagnetic energy, may also be of potential to control the motion of nanoparticles and molecules. Here, we propose a concept for trapping polarizable particles and molecules using toroidal metallic nanoparticles. Specifically, gold nanorings are investigated for their scattering properties and field distribution to computationally show that the response of these optically resonant particles to incident photons permit the formation of a nanoscale trap when proper aspect ratio, photon wavelength, and polarization are considered. However, interestingly the resonant plasmonic response of the nanoring is shown to be detrimental to the trap formation. The results are in good agreement with analytic calculations in the quasistatic limit within the first-order perturbation of the scalar electric potential. The possibility of extending the single nanoring trapping properties to two-dimensional arrays of nanorings is suggested by obtaining the field distribution of nanoring dimers and trimers.

  18. Toroidal nanotraps for cold polar molecules

    DOE PAGES

    Salhi, Marouane; Passian, Ali; Siopsis, George

    2015-09-14

    Electronic excitations in metallic nanoparticles in the optical regime that have been of great importance in surface-enhanced spectroscopy and emerging applications of molecular plasmonics, due to control and confinement of electromagnetic energy, may also be of potential to control the motion of nanoparticles and molecules. Here, we propose a concept for trapping polarizable particles and molecules using toroidal metallic nanoparticles. Specifically, gold nanorings are investigated for their scattering properties and field distribution to computationally show that the response of these optically resonant particles to incident photons permit the formation of a nanoscale trap when proper aspect ratio, photon wavelength, andmore » polarization are considered. However, interestingly the resonant plasmonic response of the nanoring is shown to be detrimental to the trap formation. The results are in good agreement with analytic calculations in the quasistatic limit within the first-order perturbation of the scalar electric potential. The possibility of extending the single nanoring trapping properties to two-dimensional arrays of nanorings is suggested by obtaining the field distribution of nanoring dimers and trimers.« less

  19. Tearing Mode Stability of Evolving Toroidal Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletzer, A.; McCune, D.; Manickam, J.; Jardin, S. C.

    2000-10-01

    There are a number of toroidal equilibrium (such as JSOLVER, ESC, EFIT, and VMEC) and transport codes (such as TRANSP, BALDUR, and TSC) in our community that utilize differing equilibrium representations. There are also many heating and current drive (LSC and TORRAY), and stability (PEST1-3, GATO, NOVA, MARS, DCON, M3D) codes that require this equilibrium information. In an effort to provide seamless compatibility between the codes that produce and need these equilibria, we have developed two Fortran 90 modules, MEQ and XPLASMA, that serve as common interfaces between these two classes of codes. XPLASMA provides a common equilibrium representation for the heating and current drive applications while MEQ provides common equilibrium and associated metric information needed by MHD stability codes. We illustrate the utility of this approach by presenting results of PEST-3 tearing stability calculations of an NSTX discharge performed on profiles provided by the TRANSP code. Using the MEQ module, the TRANSP equilibrium data are stored in a Fortran 90 derived type and passed to PEST3 as a subroutine argument. All calculations are performed on the fly, as the profiles evolve.

  20. Longitudinal coupling impedance of toroidal beam tube

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.

    1988-01-01

    Coupling impedance estimates for large accelerator/storage rings are usually based on calculations or measurements assuming that the curvature of the beam tube is negligible and that the ring structure can be treated by imposing periodic boundary conditions. It was pointed out by Faltens and Laslett that a smooth, curved beam tube may have high frequency ring-resonances with associated coupling impedance. Recently, the curvature effect was reexamined in the context of SSC by Ng and RHIC by Ruggiero. Although different in detail, their treatments follow the Laslett approach using perfectly toroidal, loss-less beam tubes with losses introduced as perturbation. In this note a different solution is obtained which takes into account the co-presence of curved as well as straight beam tubes and the significant attenuation of the stainless-steel (i.e., high loss) beam tubes in the straight sections. It is the opinion of this author that the problem under consideration represents a case which was addressed by Behringer when stating that ''the solution of the field equations obtained by expansion in terms of sets of orthogonal modes breaks down if the losses become too great.'' 10 refs.

  1. Spontaneous toroidal flow generation due to negative effective momentum diffusivity

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, Ben F.

    2015-02-15

    Spontaneous structure formation, and in particular, zonal flows, is observed in a broad range of natural and engineered systems, often arising dynamically as the saturated state of a linear instability. Flows in tokamaks are known to self-organise on small scales, but large scale toroidal flows also arise even when externally applied torques are zero. This has previously been interpreted as the result of small externally imposed breaking of a symmetry. However, we show that for large enough field line pitch, a robust spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs, leading to the generation of strong toroidal flow structures; parameters are typical of Spherical Tokamak discharges with reversed shear profiles. The short wavelength dynamics are qualitatively similar to the growth of poloidal flow structures, and toroidal flow gradients nonlinearly saturate at levels where the shearing rate is comparable to linear growth rate. On long wavelengths, we measure Prandtl numbers of around zero for these systems, in conjunction with the formation of structured toroidal flows, and we show that this is consistent with a model of momentum transport where fluxes act to reinforce small flow gradients: the effective momentum diffusivity is negative. Toroidal flow structures are largely unaffected by collisional damping, so this may allow toroidal bulk flows of order the ion thermal velocity to be maintained with zero momentum input. This phenomenon also provides a mechanism for the generation of localised meso-scale structures like transport barriers.

  2. Applications of toroids in high-pressure NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Klingler, R.J.; Rathke, J.W.; Woelk, K.

    1995-12-01

    Toroid detectors have distinct NMR sensitivity and imaging advantages. The magnetic field lines are nearly completely contained within the active volume element of a toroid. This results in high NMR signal sensitivity. In addition, the toroid detector may be placed next to the metallic walls of a containment vessel with minimal signal loss due to magnetic coupling with the metal container. Thus, the toroid detector is ideal for static high pressure or continuous flow monitoring systems. Toroid NMR detectors have been used to follow the hydroformylation of olefins in supercritical fluids under industrial process conditions. Supercritical fluids are potentially ideal media for conducting catalytic reactions that involve gaseous reactants, including H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2}. The presence of a single homogeneous reaction phase eliminates the gas-liquid mixing problem of alternative two-phase systems, which can limit process rates and adversely affect hydroformylation product selectivities. A second advantage of toroid NMR detectors is that they exhibit a well-defined gradient in the rf field. This magnetic field gradient can be used for NMR imaging applications. Distance resolutions of 20 {mu} have been obtained.

  3. Spontaneous toroidal flow generation due to negative effective momentum diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Ben F.

    2015-02-01

    Spontaneous structure formation, and in particular, zonal flows, is observed in a broad range of natural and engineered systems, often arising dynamically as the saturated state of a linear instability. Flows in tokamaks are known to self-organise on small scales, but large scale toroidal flows also arise even when externally applied torques are zero. This has previously been interpreted as the result of small externally imposed breaking of a symmetry. However, we show that for large enough field line pitch, a robust spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs, leading to the generation of strong toroidal flow structures; parameters are typical of Spherical Tokamak discharges with reversed shear profiles. The short wavelength dynamics are qualitatively similar to the growth of poloidal flow structures, and toroidal flow gradients nonlinearly saturate at levels where the shearing rate is comparable to linear growth rate. On long wavelengths, we measure Prandtl numbers of around zero for these systems, in conjunction with the formation of structured toroidal flows, and we show that this is consistent with a model of momentum transport where fluxes act to reinforce small flow gradients: the effective momentum diffusivity is negative. Toroidal flow structures are largely unaffected by collisional damping, so this may allow toroidal bulk flows of order the ion thermal velocity to be maintained with zero momentum input. This phenomenon also provides a mechanism for the generation of localised meso-scale structures like transport barriers.

  4. Toroidal momentum pinch velocity due to the coriolis drift effect on small scale instabilities in a toroidal plasma.

    PubMed

    Peeters, A G; Angioni, C; Strintzi, D

    2007-06-29

    In this Letter, the influence of the "Coriolis drift" on small scale instabilities in toroidal plasmas is shown to generate a toroidal momentum pinch velocity. Such a pinch results because the Coriolis drift generates a coupling between the density and temperature perturbations on the one hand and the perturbed parallel flow velocity on the other. A simple fluid model is used to highlight the physics mechanism and gyro-kinetic calculations are performed to accurately assess the magnitude of the pinch. The derived pinch velocity leads to a radial gradient of the toroidal velocity profile even in the absence of a torque on the plasma and is predicted to generate a peaking of the toroidal velocity profile similar to the peaking of the density profile. Finally, the pinch also affects the interpretation of current experiments.

  5. Integrable Background Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderbank, David M. J.

    2014-03-01

    This work has its origins in an attempt to describe systematically the integrable geometries and gauge theories in dimensions one to four related to twistor theory. In each such dimension, there is a nondegenerate integrable geometric structure, governed by a nonlinear integrable differential equation, and each solution of this equation determines a background geometry on which, for any Lie group G, an integrable gauge theory is defined. In four dimensions, the geometry is selfdual conformal geometry and the gauge theory is selfdual Yang-Mills theory, while the lower-dimensional structures are nondegenerate (i.e., non-null) reductions of this. Any solution of the gauge theory on a k-dimensional geometry, such that the gauge group H acts transitively on an ℓ-manifold, determines a (k+ℓ)-dimensional geometry (k+ℓ≤4) fibering over the k-dimensional geometry with H as a structure group. In the case of an ℓ-dimensional group H acting on itself by the regular representation, all (k+ℓ)-dimensional geometries with symmetry group H are locally obtained in this way. This framework unifies and extends known results about dimensional reductions of selfdual conformal geometry and the selfdual Yang-Mills equation, and provides a rich supply of constructive methods. In one dimension, generalized Nahm equations provide a uniform description of four pole isomonodromic deformation problems, and may be related to the {SU}(∞) Toda and dKP equations via a hodograph transformation. In two dimensions, the {Diff}(S^1) Hitchin equation is shown to be equivalent to the hyperCR Einstein-Weyl equation, while the {SDiff}(Σ^2) Hitchin equation leads to a Euclidean analogue of Plebanski's heavenly equations. In three and four dimensions, the constructions of this paper help to organize the huge range of examples of Einstein-Weyl and selfdual spaces in the literature, as well as providing some new ! ones. The nondegenerate reductions have a long ancestry. More ! recently

  6. Quantum Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesel, Kristina

    The following sections are included: * Canonical Quantization of General Relativity * General Relativity in Connection Variables * Holonomy-Flux Algebra and its Representation(s) * The Ashtekar-Lewandowski Representation and the Kinematical Hilbert Space of LQG * The Quantum Einstein's Equations of Loop Quantum Gravity * Geometric Operators and Their Properties * Summary * References

  7. Thermal Ablation by High-Intensity-Focused Ultrasound Using a Toroid Transducer Increases the Coagulated Volume and Allows Coagulation Near Portal and Hepatic veins in Pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Melodelima, D.; N'Djin, W. A.; Parmentier, H.; Chapelon, J. Y.; Rivoire, M.

    2009-04-14

    A new geometry of HIFU transducer is described to enlarge the coagulated volume. The geometry of the transducer was not spherical. The surface of the transducer was built based on a toroid geometry. The transducer was generated by the revolution of a circle about an axis lying in its plane. Eight emitters operating at a frequency of 3 MHz were diced out of a single toroid piezocomposite element. Each of the eight emitters was divided into 32 transducers. The focal zone is conical and located at 70 mm from the transducer. A 7.5 MHz ultrasound imaging probe is placed in the centre of the device for guiding the treatment. Our long-term objective is to develop a device that can be used during surgery. In vivo trials have been performed on 13 pigs to demonstrate this new principle and to evaluate the vascular tolerance of the treatment. This new geometry combined with consecutive activation of the eight emitters around the toroid allows achieving a mean thermal ablation of 7.0{+-}2.5 cm3 in 40 seconds. All lesions were visible with high contrast on sonograms. The correlation between the size of lesions observed on sonograms and during gross examination was 92%. This allows the user to easily enlarge the coagulated volume by juxtaposing single lesions. The pigs tolerate the treatment well over the experimental period even when coagulation was produced through portal and/or hepatic veins.

  8. Thermal Ablation by High-Intensity-Focused Ultrasound Using a Toroid Transducer Increases the Coagulated Volume and Allows Coagulation Near Portal and Hepatic veins in Pigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melodelima, D.; N'Djin, W. A.; Parmentier, H.; Rivoire, M.; Chapelon, J. Y.

    2009-04-01

    A new geometry of HIFU transducer is described to enlarge the coagulated volume. The geometry of the transducer was not spherical. The surface of the transducer was built based on a toroid geometry. The transducer was generated by the revolution of a circle about an axis lying in its plane. Eight emitters operating at a frequency of 3 MHz were diced out of a single toroid piezocomposite element. Each of the eight emitters was divided into 32 transducers. The focal zone is conical and located at 70 mm from the transducer. A 7.5 MHz ultrasound imaging probe is placed in the centre of the device for guiding the treatment. Our long-term objective is to develop a device that can be used during surgery. In vivo trials have been performed on 13 pigs to demonstrate this new principle and to evaluate the vascular tolerance of the treatment. This new geometry combined with consecutive activation of the eight emitters around the toroid allows achieving a mean thermal ablation of 7.0±2.5 cm3 in 40 seconds. All lesions were visible with high contrast on sonograms. The correlation between the size of lesions observed on sonograms and during gross examination was 92%. This allows the user to easily enlarge the coagulated volume by juxtaposing single lesions. The pigs tolerate the treatment well over the experimental period even when coagulation was produced through portal and/or hepatic veins.

  9. Calculation of Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity with a Particle Simulation in the Tokamak Magnetic Breaking Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kimin Kim, et al

    2013-04-23

    Accurate calculation of perturbed distribution function δf and perturbed magnetic fi eld δB is essential to achieve prediction of non-ambipolar transport and neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) in perturbed tokamaks. This paper reports a study of the NTV with a δf particle code (POCA) and improved understanding of magnetic braking in tokamak experiments. POCA calculates the NTV by computing f with guiding-center orbit motion and using B from the ideal perturbed equilibrium code (IPEC). POCA simulations are compared with experimental estimations for NTV, which are measured from angular momentum balance (DIII-D) and toroidal rotational damping rate (NSTX). The calculation shows good agreement in total NTV torque for the DIII-D discharge, where an analytic neoclassical theory also gives a consistent result thanks to relatively large aspect-ratio and slow toroidal rotations. In NSTX discharges, where the aspect-ratio is small and the rotation is fast, the theory only gives a qualitative guide for predicting NTV. However, the POCA simulation largely improves the quantitative NTV prediction for NSTX. It is discussed that a self- consistent calculation of δ B using general perturbed equilibria is eventually necessary since a non-ideal plasma response can change the perturbed eld and thereby the NTV torque.

  10. Neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque in tokamak edge pedestal induced by external resonant magnetic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xingting; Zhu, Ping; Sun, Youwen

    2017-08-01

    The characteristic profile and magnitude are predicted in theory for the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) torque induced by the plasma response to the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) in a tokamak with an edge pedestal. For a low-β equilibrium, the NTV torque is dominated by the toroidal component with the same dominant toroidal mode number of RMPs. The NTV torque profile is found to be localized, whose peak location is determined by profiles of both the equilibrium temperature (pressure) and the plasma response. In general, the peak of the NTV torque profile is found to track the pedestal position. The magnitude of NTV torque strongly depends on the β value at the top of pedestal, which suggests a more significant role of NTV torque in higher plasma β regimes. For a fixed plasma β, decreasing density hence increasing temperature can also enhance the amplitude of NTV torque due to the reduced collisionality in the 1/ν regime. Based on those findings, we identify the tokamak operation regimes where the significance of NTV torque in the edge pedestal induced by RMP can approach those from other momentum sources such as the neutral beam injections.

  11. Finite orbit energetic particle linear response to toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, H. L.; Ye, Huanchun; Breizman, B. N.

    1991-07-01

    The linear response of energetic particles to the toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) modes is calculated taking into account their finite orbit excursion from the flux surfaces. The general expression reproduces the previously derived theory for small banana width: when the banana width delta(sub b) is much larger than the mode thickness delta(sub m), we obtain a new compact expression for the linear power transfer. When delta(sub m)/delta(sub b) is much less than 1, the banana orbit effect reduces the power transfer by a factor of delta(sub m)/delta(sub b) from that predicted by the narrow orbit theory. A comparison is made of the contribution to the TAE growth rate of energetic particles with a slowing-down distribution arising from an isotropic source, and a balance-injected beam source when the source speed is close to the Alfven speed. For the same stored energy density, the contribution from the principal resonances (absolute value of upsilon(parallel) = upsilon(sub A) is substantially enhanced in the beam case compared to the isotropic case, while the contribution at the higher sidebands (absolute value of upsilon(parallel) = upsilon(sub A)/(2l - 1) with l greater than or = 2) is substantially reduced.

  12. Toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields at Venus. Venus Express observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E.; Fraenz, M.; Woch, J.; Zhang, T. L.; Wei, Y.; Fedorov, A.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic field and plasma measurements carried out onboard Venus Express during solar minimum conditions suggest the existence of two kinds of magnetic field configuration in the Venusian ionosphere. We interpret these as the manifestation of two different types of generation mechanisms for the induced magnetosphere. A different magnetic field topology (toroidal and poloidal) arises if the induced currents are driven either by the solar wind motional electric field or by the Faraday electric field—a conducting ionosphere sees the magnetic field carried by solar wind as a time-varying field. At the dayside, both driving agents produce a similar draping pattern of the magnetic field. However, different magnetic field signatures inherent to both induction mechanisms appear at lower altitudes in the terminator region. The conditions at low solar EUV flux when the ionosphere of Venus becomes magnetized seem to be favorable to distinguish between two different types of the induced fields. We present cases of both types of the magnetic field topology. The cases when the effects of the Faraday induction become well noticeable are especially interesting since they provide us with an example of solar wind interaction with a tiny induced dipole field immersed into the ionosphere. Another interesting case when poloidal magnetic fields are evidently displayed is observed when the IMF vector is almost aligned with the solar wind velocity. In general case, both mechanisms of induction probably complement each other.

  13. Global theory to understand toroidal drift waves in steep gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hua-sheng; Li, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Toroidal drift waves with unconventional mode structures and non-ground eigenstates, which differ from a typical ballooning structure mode, are found to be important recently by large scale global gyrokinetic simulations and especially become dominant at strong gradient edge plasmas [cf. H. S. Xie and Y. Xiao, Phys. Plasmas 22, 090703 (2015)]. The global stability and mode structures of drift wave in this steep edge density and temperature gradients are examined by both direct numerical solutions of a model two-dimensional eigen equation and analytical theory employing WKB-ballooning approach. Theory agrees with numerical solutions quite well. Our results indicate that (i) non-ground eigenstates and unconventional mode structures generally exist and can be roughly described by two parameters "quantum number" l and ballooning angle ϑk , (ii) local model can overestimate the growth rate largely, say, >50 % , and (iii) the narrow steep equilibrium profile leads to twisting (triangle-like) radial mode structures. With velocity space integral, semi-local theory predicts that the critical jump gradient of the most unstable ion temperature gradient mode from ground state l = 0 to non-ground state l = 1 is LT-1R ˜50 . These features can have important consequences to turbulent transport.

  14. Enrichment Activities for Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usiskin, Zalman

    1983-01-01

    Enrichment activities that teach about geometry as they instruct in geometry are given for some significant topics. The facets of geometry included are tessellations, round robin tournaments, geometric theorems on triangles, and connections between geometry and complex numbers. (MNS)

  15. Control of toroidal-like asymmetries in a heliac

    SciTech Connect

    Spanjers, G.G.; Nelson, B.A.; Ribe, F.L.; Jarboe, T.R. ); Barnes, D.C. )

    1993-05-01

    A simple modification to the heliac coil configuration [A. H. Boozer [ital et] [ital al]., [ital Plasma] [ital Physics] [ital and] [ital Controlled] [ital Nuclear] [ital Fusion] (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1966), Vol. 1, p. 103] is described that reduces the toroidal perturbation to the magnetic field structure and significantly restores the helical symmetry. This is accomplished by shifting the internal current-carrying conductor (hardcore) of the heliac radially inward from its normal position at the geometric center of the external [ital l]=1 coils. It is shown by computations that a large-aspect-ratio toroidal heliac is similar to a helically symmetric linear heliac in which the hardcore has been shifted. This similarity is seen in the analytic form of the magnetic potential, the flux surface shape, and in the harmonic spectra of the field lines. It is then shown that the toroidicity perturbations can be reduced in a toroidal heliac by combining these effects---using a radially inward hardcore shift in the toroidal configuration. In the experiments reported here the toroidal-like effects are created in the linear High Beta Q Machine (HBQM) heliac [C. M. Greenfield [ital et] [ital al]., Phys. Fluids B [bold 2], 133 (1990)] by shifting the hardcore off the geometric center of the [ital l]=1 coils. The induced toroidal-like effects are seen from an asymmetry in the axial excluded flux; however, no decrease in global beta is seen as compared to the unshifted symmetric case (G. G. Spanjers, Ph.D. dissertation, University of Washington, 1992) indicating the absence of large-scale magnetohydrodynamic instabilities at high beta.

  16. Asymmetric toroidal eddy currents (ATEC) to explain sideways forces at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roccella, R.; Roccella, M.; Riccardo, V.; Chiocchio, S.; Contributors, JET

    2016-10-01

    During some JET vertical displacement events (VDEs) plasma current and position are found to be toroidally asymmetric. When asymmetries lock, the vessel has been observed to move horizontally, consequently strong horizontal forces are expected following plasma asymmetries, whether locked or rotating. The cause of horizontal forces is, as already identified in previous works, the asymmetric circulation of current in the structures. The physics mechanism responsible for these asymmetric currents is instead an open issue and it is the object of the present analysis. In particular it will be shown that the asymmetry is not due to a direct exchange of current between plasma and structure (as in the case of halo currents) but to asymmetric conductive paths which arise, in the structures, when the plasma column asymmetrically wets the wall. Simulations of this phenomenon using finite element (FE) models have been conducted to reproduce the JET observation during locked and rotating asymmetric VDEs. Estimated sideways force, asymmetry (I\\text{p}\\text{asym} ) and normalized asymmetry (A\\text{p}\\text{asym} ) of plasma current, vertical position at different toroidal locations during the disruption and halo current asymmetry have been compared with measurements done at JET during upward AVDEs. The substantial match between experiments and simulations confirms the soundness of the assumptions. Furthermore, the same physical model applied to downward VDEs shows that divertor support and coils, together with the geometry of the limiting surfaces, considerably lessen asymmetric loads as experienced at JET after installing those components.

  17. Advances in the simulation of toroidal gyro Landau fluid model turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R.E.; Kerbel, G.D.; Milovich, J.; Hammett, G.W.

    1994-12-01

    The gyro-Landau fluid (GLF) model equations for toroidal geometry have been recently applied to the study ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence using the 3D nonlinear ballooning mode representation (BMR). The present paper extends this work by treating some unresolved issues conceming ITG turbulence with adiabatic electrons. Although eddies are highly elongated in the radial direction long time radial correlation lengths are short and comparable to poloidal lengths. Although transport at vanishing shear is not particularly large, transport at reverse global shear, is significantly less. Electrostatic transport at moderate shear is not much effected by inclusion of local shear and average favorable curvature. Transport is suppressed when critical E{times}B rotational shear is comparable to the maximum linear growth rate with only a weak dependence on magnetic shear. Self consistent turbulent transport of toroidal momentum can result in a transport bifurcation at suffciently large r/(Rq). However the main thrust of the new formulation in the paper deals with advances in the development of finite beta GLF models with trapped electron and BMR numerical methods for treating the fast parallel field motion of the untrapped electrons.

  18. The Grad-Shafranov Reconstruction of Toroidal Magnetic Flux Ropes: Method Development and Benchmark Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiang

    2017-09-01

    We develop an approach of the Grad-Shafranov (GS) reconstruction for toroidal structures in space plasmas, based on in situ spacecraft measurements. The underlying theory is the GS equation that describes two-dimensional magnetohydrostatic equilibrium, as widely applied in fusion plasmas. The geometry is such that the arbitrary cross-section of the torus has rotational symmetry about the rotation axis, Z, with a major radius, r0. The magnetic field configuration is thus determined by a scalar flux function, Ψ, and a functional F that is a single-variable function of Ψ. The algorithm is implemented through a two-step approach: i) a trial-and-error process by minimizing the residue of the functional F(Ψ) to determine an optimal Z-axis orientation, and ii) for the chosen Z, a χ2 minimization process resulting in a range of r0. Benchmark studies of known analytic solutions to the toroidal GS equation with noise additions are presented to illustrate the two-step procedure and to demonstrate the performance of the numerical GS solver, separately. For the cases presented, the errors in Z and r0 are 9° and 22%, respectively, and the relative percent error in the numerical GS solutions is smaller than 10%. We also make public the computer codes for these implementations and benchmark studies.

  19. Tayler instability of toroidal magnetic fields in MHD Taylor-Couette flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, G.; Schultz, M.

    2010-01-01

    The nonaxisymmetric Tayler instability (TI) of toroidal magnetic fields due to axial electric currents is studied for conducting incompressible fluids between two infinitely long corotating cylinders. For given Reynolds number of rotation the magnetic Prandtl number Pm of the liquid conductor and the ratio of the cylinder's rotation rates are the free parameters. It is shown that for resting cylinders the critical Hartmann number for instability does not depend on Pm hence the TI also exists in the limit Pm-> 0. By rigid rotation the instability is suppressed where for Pm=1 the rotational quenching takes its maximum. %\\ Rotation laws with negative shear (i.e. d\\Omega/d R<0) strongly destabilize the toroidal field if the rotation is not too fast. In galaxies with their quadrupolar magnetic field geometry this effect could have drastic implications. For sufficiently high Reynolds numbers of rotation, however, the TI completely disappears. For the considered magnetic constellation the superrotation laws support the rotational stabilization. The angular momentum transport of the instability is anticorrelated with the shear so that an eddy viscosity can be defined which proves to be positive. \\ We have also shown the possibility of laboratory TI experiments with a wide-gap container filled with fluid metals like sodium or gallium. Even the effect of the rotational stabilization can be reproduced in the laboratory with electric currents of only a few kA.

  20. Coherence Imaging Measurements of Impurity Flow in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Johnson, C. A.; Maurer, D. A.; Allen, S. L.; Meyer, W. H.; Samuell, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of impurity ion emissivity and velocity in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) experiment are achieved with a new optical coherence imaging diagnostic. The Coherence Imaging Spectroscopy (CIS) technique measures the spectral coherence of an emission line with an imaging interferometer of fixed delay. CIS has a number of advantages when compared to dispersive Doppler spectroscopy, including higher throughput and the capability to provide 2D spectral images, making it ideal for investigating the non-axisymmetric geometry of CTH plasmas. Furthermore, detailed measurements of the ion flow structure provided by CIS combined with predictive computational models could also provide spatially resolved images of complex flow structures, such as those associated with an island divertor. First CIS measurements of CTH plasmas reveal strong signals for C III (465 nm), He II (468 nm) and C II (513 nm) emission. Preliminary analysis of C III interferograms indicate a net toroidal flow on the order of 10 km/s during the time of peak current. Bench tests using Zn and Cd light sources reveal that the temperature of the instrument must be actively controlled to within 0.01°C to limit phase drift of the interferometer resulting in artificially measured flow. Results from this diagnostic will aid in characterizing the ion flow in planned island divertor and MHD mode-locking experiments. Work supported by USDoE Grant DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  1. Electronic beam steering used with a toroidal HIFU transducer substantially increases the coagulated volume.

    PubMed

    Vincenot, Jeremy; Melodelima, David; Chavrier, Françoise; Vignot, Alexandre; Kocot, Anthony; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2013-07-01

    Treatment with high-intensity focused ultrasound is well established but requires extended treatment time. A device composed of 256 elements arranged on a toroidal transducer was developed to increase the coagulated volume. When all the elements are working in phase for 40 s, a volume of 6-8 cm(3) can be ablated. However, the mechanical juxtaposition of single lesions is still necessary for treating one tumor with a diameter of 2 cm. The objective of this study was to combine this toroidal transducer geometry with electronic beam steering to ablate tumors with adequate normal tissue margins and without any mechanical displacement of the high-intensity focused ultrasound device. In vitro tests demonstrated that the coagulated volume obtained from 130 s of total exposure has an average diameter of 41.4 ± 4.0 mm and an average length of 53.3 ± 6.1 mm. This single lesion can be used to treat various size of metastasis, located at depths in the liver ranging 5-45 mm.

  2. Toroidal dust motion in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Reichstein, Torben; Pilch, Iris; Piel, Alexander

    2010-09-15

    In a magnetized anodic plasma, dust particles can be confined in a torus-shaped cloud with a distinct dust-free region (void) in its center. The formation of these clouds and their dynamical behavior are experimentally studied with a new observation geometry. The particles rotate about the major axis of the torus. A refined model for the description of the particle dynamics is presented that accounts for inertia and many-body effects.

  3. Comparative investigation of ELM control based on toroidal modelling of plasma response to RMP fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang

    2016-10-01

    The type-I edge localized mode (ELM), bursting at low frequency and with large amplitude, can channel a substantial amount of the plasma thermal energy into the surrounding plasma-facing components in tokamak devices operating at the high-confinement mode, potentially causing severe material damages. Learning effective ways of controlling this instability is thus an urgent issue in fusion research, in particular in view of the next generation large devices such as ITER and DEMO. Among other means, externally applied, three-dimensional resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields have been experimentally demonstrated to be successful in mitigating or suppressing the type-I ELM, in multiple existing devices. In this work, we shall report results of a comparative study of ELM control using RMPs. Comparison is made between the modelled plasma response to the 3D external fields and the observed change of the ELM behaviour on multiple devices, including MAST, ASDEX Upgrade, EAST, DIII-D, JET, and KSTAR. We show that toroidal modelling of the plasma response, based on linear and quasi-linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models, provides essential insights that are useful in interpreting and guiding the ELM control experiments. In particular, linear toroidal modelling results, using the MARS-F code, reveal the crucial role of the edge localized peeling-tearing mode response during ELM mitigation/suppression on all these devices. Such response often leads to strong peaking of the plasma surface displacement near the region of weak equilibrium poloidal field (e.g. the X-point), and this provides an alternative practical criterion for ELM control, as opposed to the vacuum field based Chirikov criteria. Quasi-linear modelling using MARS-Q provides quantitative interpretation of the side effects due to the ELM control coils, on the plasma toroidal momentum and particle confinements. The particular role of the momentum and particle fluxes, associated with the neoclassical toroidal

  4. Computer numerically controlled (CNC) aspheric shaping with toroidal Wheels (Abstract Only)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketelsen, D.; Kittrell, W. C.; Kuhn, W. M.; Parks, R. E.; Lamb, George L.; Baker, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Contouring with computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines can be accomplished with several different tool geometries and coordinated machine axes. To minimize the number of coordinated axes for nonsymmetric work to three, it is common practice to use a spherically shaped tool such as a ball-end mill. However, to minimize grooving due to the feed and ball radius, it is desirable to use a long ball radius, but there is clearly a practical limit to ball diameter with the spherical tool. We have found that the use of commercially available toroidal wheels permits long effective cutting radii, which in turn improve finish and minimize grooving for a set feed. In addition, toroidal wheels are easier than spherical wheels to center accurately. Cutting parameters are also easier to control because the feed rate past the tool does not change as the slope of the work changes. The drawback to the toroidal wheel is the more complex calculation of the tool path. Of course, once the algorithm is worked out, the tool path is as easily calculated as for a spherical tool. We have performed two experiments with the Large Optical Generator (LOG) that were ideally suited to three-axis contouring--surfaces that have no axis of rotational symmetry. By oscillating the cutting head horizontally or vertically (in addition to the motions required to generate the power of the surface) , and carefully coordinating those motions with table rotation, the mostly astigmatic departure for these surfaces is produced. The first experiment was a pair of reflector molds that together correct the spherical aberration of the Arecibo radio telescope. The larger of these was 5 m in diameter and had a 12 cm departure from the best-fit sphere. The second experiment was the generation of a purely astigmatic surface to demonstrate the feasibility of producing axially symmetric asphe.rics while mounted and rotated about any off-axis point. Measurements of the latter (the first experiment had relatively

  5. Toroidal Plasma Thruster for Interplanetary and Interstellar Space Flights

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov; L.E. Zakharov; and M.V. Gorelenkova

    2001-07-11

    This work involves a conceptual assessment for using the toroidal fusion reactor for deep space interplanetary and interstellar missions. Toroidal thermonuclear fusion reactors, such as tokamaks and stellarators, are unique for space propulsion, allowing for a design with the magnetic configuration localized inside toroidal magnetic field coils. Plasma energetic ions, including charged fusion products, can escape such a closed configuration at certain conditions, a result of the vertical drift in toroidal rippled magnetic field. Escaping particles can be used for direct propulsion (since toroidal drift is directed one way vertically) or to create and heat externally confined plasma, so that the latter can be used for propulsion. Deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons with an energy of 14.1 MeV also can be used for direct propulsion. A special design allows neutrons to escape the shield and the blanket of the tokamak. This provides a direct (partial) conversion of the fusion energy into the directed motion of the propellant. In contrast to other fusion concepts proposed for space propulsion, this concept utilizes the natural drift motion of charged particles out of the closed magnetic field configuration.

  6. FASTER 3: A generalized-geometry Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.

    1970-01-01

    The theory used in FASTER-III, a Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays in complex geometries, is outlined. The program includes the treatment of geometric regions bounded by quadratic and quadric surfaces with multiple radiation sources which have specified space, angle, and energy dependence. The program calculates, using importance sampling, the resulting number and energy fluxes at specified point, surface, and volume detectors. It can also calculate minimum weight shield configuration meeting a specified dose rate constraint. Results are presented for sample problems involving primary neutron, and primary and secondary photon, transport in a spherical reactor shield configuration.

  7. FASTER 3: A generalized-geometry Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays. Volume 2: Users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.

    1970-01-01

    A description of the FASTER-III program for Monte Carlo Carlo calculation of photon and neutron transport in complex geometries is presented. Major revisions include the capability of calculating minimum weight shield configurations for primary and secondary radiation and optimal importance sampling parameters. The program description includes a users manual describing the preparation of input data cards, the printout from a sample problem including the data card images, definitions of Fortran variables, the program logic, and the control cards required to run on the IBM 7094, IBM 360, UNIVAC 1108 and CDC 6600 computers.

  8. Immersed boundary methods for numerical simulation of confined fluid and plasma turbulence in complex geometries: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Kai

    2015-12-01

    > Immersed boundary methods for computing confined fluid and plasma flows in complex geometries are reviewed. The mathematical principle of the volume penalization technique is described and simple examples for imposing Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in one dimension are given. Applications for fluid and plasma turbulence in two and three space dimensions illustrate the applicability and the efficiency of the method in computing flows in complex geometries, for example in toroidal geometries with asymmetric poloidal cross-sections.

  9. Calculation of the vacuum Green's function valid for high toroidal mode number in tokamaks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Morrell; Turnbull, Alan

    2005-10-01

    The present evaluation of the Green's function used for the magmetic scalar potential in vacuum calculations for axisymmetric geometry in the vacuum segments of gato, pest and other mhd stability codes has been found to be deficient for moderately high toroidal mode numbers. This was due to the loss of numerical precision arising from the upward recursion relation used for generating the functions to high mode numbers. The recursion is initiated from the complete elliptic integrals of the first and second kinds. To ameliorate this, a direct integration of the integral representation of the function was crafted to achieve the necessary high accuracy for moderately high mode numbers. At very high mode numbers the loss of numerical precision due to the oscillatory behavior of the integrand is further avoided by judiciously deforming the integration contour in the complex plane. Machine precision, roughly 14 -- 16 digits, accuracy can be achieved by using a combination of both these techniques.

  10. Theoretical modelling of the feedback stabilization of external MHD modes in toroidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, M. S.; Chu, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2002-03-01

    A theoretical framework for understanding the feedback mechanism for stabilization of external MHD modes has been formulated. Efficient computational tools - the GATO stability code coupled with a substantially modified VACUUM code - have been developed to effectively design viable feedback systems against these modes. The analysis assumed a thin resistive shell and a feedback coil structure accurately modelled in θ and phi, albeit with only a single harmonic variation in phi. Time constants and induced currents in the enclosing resistive shell are calculated. An optimized configuration based on an idealized model has been computed for the DIII-D device. Up to 90% of the effectiveness of an ideal wall can be achieved.

  11. Geometry in the Computer Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of computer graphics in the teaching of geometry. Describes five types of geometry: Euclidean geometry, transformation geometry, coordinate geometry, three-dimensional geometry, and geometry of convex sets. (YP)

  12. Simulations of ELMs in realistic tokamak geometry with the nonlinear MHD code JOREK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs, Isabel; Hoelzl, Matthias; Jardin, Stephen; Lackner, Karl; Guenter, Sibylle; Max-Planck/Princeton CenterPlasma Physics Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Edge-localized modes (ELMs) are relaxation-oscillation instabilities which occur at the edge of high confinement (H-mode) plasmas, ejecting particles and energy. The suitability of H-mode as operational regime for future fusion devices depends crucially on the occurrence and detailed dynamics of ELMs. We simulate ELMs in realistic ASDEX Upgrade geometry including the scrape-off layer using the nonlinear MHD code JOREK. Emphasis is put on including many toroidal Fourier harmonics in the simulations in order to study nonlinear interaction between these. Several experimental observations, such as a toroidal and poloidal localization of the perturbation and a drive of Fourier components with low toroidal mode numbers, are reproduced by the simulations. A simple model describing the three-wave interaction by quadratic terms in the equations is used to explain and interpret the nonlinear evolution of the toroidal Fourier spectrum in the simulations. It is investigated how sheared toroidal plasma rotation influences the nonlinear coupling between the toroidal Fourier harmonics. A benchmark of the two-fluid versions of JOREK and M3D-C1 is in progress.

  13. Geometry of PDE's. IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prástaro, Agostino

    2008-02-01

    Following our previous results on this subject [R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(I): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. The general theory, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 239-266; R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(II): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. Applications to Riemannian geometry PDE's, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 267-285; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's and Mechanics, World Scientific, Singapore, 1996; A. Prástaro, Quantum and integral (co)bordism in partial differential equations, Acta Appl. Math. (5) (3) (1998) 243-302; A. Prástaro, (Co)bordism groups in PDE's, Acta Appl. Math. 59 (2) (1999) 111-201; A. Prástaro, Quantized Partial Differential Equations, World Scientific Publishing Co, Singapore, 2004, 500 pp.; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. I: Integral bordism groups in PDE's, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 319 (2006) 547-566; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. II: Variational PDE's and integral bordism groups, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 321 (2006) 930-948; A. Prástaro, Th.M. Rassias, Ulam stability in geometry of PDE's, Nonlinear Funct. Anal. Appl. 8 (2) (2003) 259-278; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, I, The MacMillan Company, New York, 1967; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, II, Collier-MacMillan, Canada, Ltd, Toronto, Ontario, 1968], integral bordism groups of the Navier-Stokes equation are calculated for smooth, singular and weak solutions, respectively. Then a characterization of global solutions is made on this ground. Enough conditions to assure existence of global smooth solutions are given and related to nullity of integral characteristic numbers of the boundaries. Stability of global solutions are related to some characteristic numbers of the space-like Cauchy dataE Global solutions of variational problems constrained by (NS) are classified by means of suitable integral bordism groups too.

  14. Compact Toroid Propagation in a Magnetized Drift Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Robert D.; Baker, Kevin L.; Hwang, David Q.; Evans, Russell W.

    2000-10-01

    Injection of a spheromak-like compact toroid (SCT) plasma into a toroidal plasma confinement device may require the SCT to propagate through a drift tube region occupied by a pre-existing magnetic field. This field is expected to extert a retarding force on the SCT, but may also result in a beneficial compression. The effects of transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields will be measured using the CTIX compact-toroid injector, together with a fast framing camera with an axial view of the formation, coaxial, and drift-tube regions. In the case of longitudinal magnetic field, comparisons will be made with the predictions of two-dimensional numerical simulation. The use of localized magnetic field to reduce plasma bridging of the insulating gap will also be investigated.

  15. Novel Design for Centrifugal Countercurrent Chromatography: I. Zigzag Toroidal Column

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Aisa, Haji Akber; Ito, Yoichiro

    2009-01-01

    The toroidal coil using an equilateral triangular core has improved both retention of the stationary phase and peak resolution of the conventional toroidal coil in centrifugal countercurrent chromatography. To further improve the retention of stationary phase and peak resolution, a novel zigzag toroidal coil was designed and the performance of the system was evaluated at various flow rates. The results indicated that both retention of stationary phase and peak resolution were improved as the flow rate was decreased. Modification of the tubing by pressing at given intervals with a pair of pliers improved the peak resolution without increasing the column pressure. All these separations were performed under low column pressure indicating the separation can be further improved by increasing the column length and/or revolution speed without damaging the separation column. PMID:20046954

  16. Profiling compact toroid plasma density on CTIX with laser deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockington, Samuel Joseph Erwin

    A laser deflectometer measures line-integrated plasma density gradient using laser diodes and amplified point detectors. A laser passing through an optically thin plasma is refracted by an amount proportional to the line-integrated electron density gradient. I have designed, installed, and operated a deflection diagnostic for the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX), a plasma rail gun which can create compact toroid (CT) plasmas of controllable density and velocity. The diagnostic design and motivation are discussed, as well as three experiments performed with deflectometry. Thus, my thesis consists of the design of the deflectometer diagnostic, a comparison of its accuracy to interferometer density measurements, and finally a survey of compact toroid density profiles in two dimensions conducted with an array of detectors.

  17. Vlasov tokamak equilibria with sheared toroidal flow and anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiroukidis, Ap; Throumoulopoulos, G. N.; Tasso, H.

    2015-08-15

    By choosing appropriate deformed Maxwellian ion and electron distribution functions depending on the two particle constants of motion, i.e., the energy and toroidal angular momentum, we reduce the Vlasov axisymmetric equilibrium problem for quasineutral plasmas to a transcendental Grad-Shafranov-like equation. This equation is then solved numerically under the Dirichlet boundary condition for an analytically prescribed boundary possessing a lower X-point to construct tokamak equilibria with toroidal sheared ion flow and anisotropic pressure. Depending on the deformation of the distribution functions, these steady states can have toroidal current densities either peaked on the magnetic axis or hollow. These two kinds of equilibria may be regarded as a bifurcation in connection with symmetry properties of the distribution functions on the magnetic axis.

  18. Stellar Dynamo Models with Prominent Surface Toroidal Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, Alfio

    2016-12-01

    Recent spectro-polarimetric observations of solar-type stars have shown the presence of photospheric magnetic fields with a predominant toroidal component. If the external field is assumed to be current-free it is impossible to explain these observations within the framework of standard mean-field dynamo theory. In this work, it will be shown that if the coronal field of these stars is assumed to be harmonic, the underlying stellar dynamo mechanism can support photospheric magnetic fields with a prominent toroidal component even in the presence of axisymmetric magnetic topologies. In particular, it is argued that the observed increase in the toroidal energy in low-mass fast-rotating stars can be naturally explained with an underlying αΩ mechanism.

  19. Vlasov tokamak equilibria with shearad toroidal flow and anisotropic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throumoulopoulos, George; Kuiroukidis, Apostolos; Tasso, Henri

    2015-11-01

    By choosing appropriate deformed Maxwellian ion and electron distribution functions depending on the two particle constants of motion, i.e. the energy and toroidal angular momentum, we reduce the Vlasov axisymmetric equilibrium problem for quasineutral plasmas to a transcendental Grad-Shafranov-like equation. This equation is then solved numerically under the Dirichlet boundary condition for an analytically prescribed boundary possessing a lower X-point to construct tokamak equilibria with toroidal sheared ion flow and anisotropic pressure. Depending on the deformation of the distribution functions these steady states can have toroidal current densities either peaked on the magnetic axis or hollow. These two kinds of equilibria may be regarded as a bifurcation in connection with symmetry properties of the distribution functions on the magnetic axis. This work has received funding from (a) the National Programme for the Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion, Hellenic Republic, (b) Euratom research and training programme 2014-2018 under grant agreement No 633053.

  20. Achieving Long Confinement in a Toroidal Electron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Marler, J. P.; Smoniewski, J.; Ha Bao; Stoneking, M. R.

    2009-03-30

    We observe the m = 1 diocotron mode in a partial toroidal trap, and use it as the primary diagnostic for observing the plasma confinement. The frequency of the m = 1 mode, which is approximately proportional to the trapped charge, decays on a three second timescale. The confinement time exceeds, by at least an order of magnitude, the confinement observed in all other toroidal traps for non-neutral plasmas and approaches the theoretical limit set by magnetic pumping transport. Numerical simulations that include toroidal effects are employed to accurately extract plasma charge, equilibrium position and m = 1 mode amplitude from the experimental data. Future work will include attempts to withdraw the electron source in order to study confinement in a full torus.

  1. Efficiency of wave-driven rigid body rotation toroidal confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rax, J. M.; Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2017-03-01

    The compensation of vertical drifts in toroidal magnetic fields through a wave-driven poloidal rotation is compared with compensation through the wave driven toroidal current generation to support the classical magnetic rotational transform. The advantages and drawbacks associated with the sustainment of a radial electric field are compared with those associated with the sustainment of a poloidal magnetic field both in terms of energy content and power dissipation. The energy content of a radial electric field is found to be smaller than the energy content of a poloidal magnetic field for a similar set of orbits. The wave driven radial electric field generation efficiency is similarly shown, at least in the limit of large aspect ratio, to be larger than the efficiency of wave-driven toroidal current generation.

  2. Geometry of thermodynamic control.

    PubMed

    Zulkowski, Patrick R; Sivak, David A; Crooks, Gavin E; DeWeese, Michael R

    2012-10-01

    A deeper understanding of nonequilibrium phenomena is needed to reveal the principles governing natural and synthetic molecular machines. Recent work has shown that when a thermodynamic system is driven from equilibrium then, in the linear response regime, the space of controllable parameters has a Riemannian geometry induced by a generalized friction tensor. We exploit this geometric insight to construct closed-form expressions for minimal-dissipation protocols for a particle diffusing in a one-dimensional harmonic potential, where the spring constant, inverse temperature, and trap location are adjusted simultaneously. These optimal protocols are geodesics on the Riemannian manifold and reveal that this simple model has a surprisingly rich geometry. We test these optimal protocols via a numerical implementation of the Fokker-Planck equation and demonstrate that the friction tensor arises naturally from a first-order expansion in temporal derivatives of the control parameters, without appealing directly to linear response theory.

  3. Effect of channel geometry on the electrostatic potential in acetylcholine channels.

    PubMed

    Aidoo, Anthony Y

    2003-12-01

    We study the effect of channel geometry on the potential barrier encountered by ions as they permeate the acetylcholine receptor channel. Among the various channel geometries which have been used to represent the acetylcholine receptor channel include the cylinder and the toroidal catenary. The main reasons for those choices appear to be the facilitation of separation of the Poisson equation, rather than biological considerations. We consider a novel and realistic acetylcholine channel geometry, and calculate the electrostatic potential profiles within it, and compare our results with results from other channel geometries.

  4. Experimental Realization of Nearly Steady-State Toroidal Electron Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneking, M. R.

    2008-11-01

    Non-neutral plasmas are routinely confined in the uniform magnetic field of a Penning-Malmberg trap for arbitrarily long times and approach thermal equilibrium. Theory predicts that dynamically stable and therefore long-lived equilibria exist for non-neutral plasmas confined in the curved, non-uniform field of a toroidal trap, but that ultimately thermal equilibrium states do not exist. On long timescales, the poloidal ExB rotation through the non-uniform toroidal magnetic field leads to magnetic pumping transport. A new experiment has, for the first time, demonstrated the existence of a stable, long-lived (i.e. nearly steady-state) toroidal equilibrium for pure electron plasmas and is poised to observe the magnetic pumping transport mechanism. Electron plasmas with densities of order 10^6 cm-3 are trapped in the Lawrence Non-neutral Torus II for several seconds. LNT II is a high aspect ratio (Ro/a 10), partially toroidal trap (a 270^o arc with Bo=670 G). The m=1 diocotron mode is launched and detected using isolated segments of a fully-sectored conducting boundary and its frequency is used to determine the total trapped charge as a function of time. The observed confinement time ( 3 s) approaches the theoretical limit ( 6 s) set by the magnetic pumping transport mechanism of Crooks and O'Neil. We also present equilibrium modeling and numerical simulation of the toroidal m=1 mode constrained by experimental data. Future work includes the identification of the dominant transport mechanisms via confinement scaling experiments and measurement of the m=2 mode frequency, and development of a strategy for making a transition to fully toroidal confinement. J.P. Marler and M.R. Stoneking, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 155001 (2008). S.M. Crooks and T.M. O'Neil, Phys Plamas 3, 2533 (1996).

  5. Self-Consistent Solutions of the Plasma Transport Equations in an Axisymmetric Toroidal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardin, S. C.

    1981-09-01

    A numerical method is presented for solving a recently derived ( S. P. Hirshman and S. C. Jardin, Phys. Fluids22(1979) , 731) reduced set of equations describing two-dimensional transport in tokamak plasmas. The formulation exploits the different diffusion time scales by dividing each time advancement step into two parts. In the first part, the one-dimensional surface averaged partial differential equations are advanced implicitly. In the second part, the two-dimensional generalized differential equation for the toroidal flux surface velocity is inverted directly. Accurate efficient solutions are obtained with only explicit terms coupling these two steps. Solutions are presented illustrating the validity and the accuracy of this method.

  6. Solitary perturbations in the steep boundary of magnetized toroidal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. E.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Kim, M. H.; Choi, M.; Lee, J.; Kim, M.; Park, H. K.; Bak, J. G.; Ko, W. H.; Park, Y. S.

    2017-03-01

    Solitary perturbations (SPs) localized both poloidally and radially are detected within ~100 μs before the partial collapse of the high pressure gradient boundary region (called pedestal) of magnetized toroidal plasma in the KSTAR tokamak device. The SP develops with a low toroidal mode number (typically unity) in the pedestal ingrained with quasi-stable edge-localized mode (QSM) which commonly appears during the inter-collapse period. The SPs have smaller mode pitch and different (often opposite) rotation velocity compared to the QSMs. Similar solitary perturbations are also frequently observed before the onset of complete pedestal collapse, suggesting a strong connection between the SP generation and the pedestal collapse.

  7. Initial-temperature profiles on the PDX inner toroidal limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrickson, M.; Kugel, H.W.

    1983-09-01

    The temperature profiles resulting from plasma operation on the PDX vertical, large area, inner toroidal limiter have been measured during both ohmic and neutral-beam-heated discharges using a scanning infrared camera. An asymmetric double-peaked temperature profile is seen after neutral-beam-heated discharges. Disruptions in ohmically heated discharges are found to be preceded by a single-peaked deposition and succeeded by an initially symmetric double-peaked deposition. The results were compared with the Schmidt model for scrape-off at a toroidal limiter and it was found that the measured double-peaked temperature profiles yielded scrape-off lengths consistent with previous measurements.

  8. Field calculation of D0 toroids and comparison with measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Ostiguy, F.; Brzezniak, J.

    1992-06-01

    The magnetic structure of the D0 detector is described in an earlier report. The two-dimensional code POISSON was used for the initial design of the magnetic structures and the magnetic properties of the D0 toroids. During the construction, the two-dimensional code ANSYS was used to perform more detailed calculations. Full three-dimensional analysis was also performed using the code TOSCA. These new results are reported here and compared with measurements. In this study the magnetic flux in all toroids, CF, EF, and SAMUS is set in the same direction.

  9. Electron diamagnetism and toroidal coupling of tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, S.C.; Hastie, R.J.

    1987-10-01

    Using a simple model for the layer of the tearing mode, we demonstrate that toroidally coupled tearing modes with two rational surfaces are most unstable when the ..omega..*'s of the electrons at the rational surfaces are equal. The onset of instability may then occur because of the tuning of ..omega..* rather than the passage of ..delta..'-like quantities through zero. This mechanism for the onset of instability is sharp since the resonance is narrow. The effect of toroidal rotation is also discussed. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Conventionalism and integrable Weyl geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucheu, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    Since the appearance of Einstein's general relativity, gravitation has been associated to the space-time curvature. This theory introduced a geometrodynamic language which became a convenient tool to predict matter behaviour. However, the properties of space-time itself cannot be measurable by experiments. Taking Poincaré idea that the geometry of space-time is merely a convention, we show that the general theory of relativity can be completely reformulated in a more general setting, a generalization of Riemannian geometry, namely, the Weyl integrable geometry. The choice of this new mathematical language implies, among other things, that the path of particles and light rays should now correspond to Weylian geodesies. Such modification in the dynamic of bodies brings a new perception of physical phenomena that we will explore.

  11. Effects of Toroidal Rotation Sshear on Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta, M; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; LeBlanc, B P; Heidbrink, W W; Crocker, N A; Kubota, S

    2010-08-19

    The effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the dynamics of bursting Toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes are investigated in neutral beam heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 557 (2000)]. The modes have a global character, extending over most of the minor radius. A toroidal rotation shear layer is measured at the location of maximum drive for the modes. Contrary to results from other devices, no clear evidence of increased damping is found. Instead, experiments with simultaneous neutral beam and radio-frequency auxiliary heating show a strong correlation between the dynamics of the modes and the instability drive. It is argued that kinetic effects involving changes in the mode drive and damping mechanisms other than rotation shear, such as continuum damping, are mostly responsible for the bursting dynamics of the modes.

  12. Effects of toroidal rotation shear on toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta, M.; Bell, R. E.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; Yuh, H.

    2010-12-15

    The effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the dynamics of bursting toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes are investigated in neutral beam heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The modes have a global character, extending over most of the minor radius. A toroidal rotation shear layer is measured at the location of maximum drive for the modes. Contrary to results from other devices, no clear evidence of decorrelation of the modes by the sheared rotation is found. Instead, experiments with simultaneous neutral beam and radio-frequency auxiliary heating show a strong correlation between the dynamics of the modes and the instability drive. It is argued that kinetic effects involving changes in the mode drive and damping mechanisms other than rotation shear, such as continuum damping, are mostly responsible for the bursting dynamics of the modes on NSTX.

  13. Toroidal high-spin isomers in the nucleus 120304

    DOE PAGES

    Staszczak, A.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Kosior, A.

    2017-05-22

    Strongly deformed oblate superheavy nuclei form an intriguing region where the toroidal nuclear structures may bifurcate from the oblate spheroidal shape. The bifurcation may be facilitated when the nucleus is endowed with a large angular moment about the symmetry axis withmore » $$I=I_{z}$$. The toroidal high-$K$ isomeric states at their local energy minima can be theoretically predicted using the cranked self-consistent Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method. We use the cranked Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method to predict the properties of the toroidal high-spin isomers in the superheavy nucleus $$^{304}{120}_{184}$$. This method consists of three steps: first, we use the deformation-constrained Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach to search for the nuclear density distributions with toroidal shapes. Next, using these toroidal distributions as starting configurations we apply an additional cranking constraint of a large angular momentum $$I=I_{z}$$ about the symmetry $z$-axis and search for the energy minima of the system as a function of the deformation. In the last step, if a local energy minimum with $$I=I_{z}$$ is found, we perform at this point the cranked symmetry- and deformation-unconstrained Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculations to locate a stable toroidal high-spin isomeric state in free convergence. Furthemore, we have theoretically located two toroidal high-spin isomeric states of $$^{304}{120}_{184}$$ with an angular momentum $I$=$$I_z$$=81$$\\hbar$$ (proton 2p-2h, neutron 4p-4h excitation) and $I$=$$I_z$$=208$$\\hbar$$ (proton 5p-5h, neutron 8p-8h) at the quadrupole moment deformations $$Q_{20}=-297.7$$~b and $$Q_{20}=-300.8$$~b with energies 79.2 MeV and 101.6 MeV above the spherical ground state, respectively. The nuclear density distributions of the toroidal high-spin isomers $$^{304}{120}_{184}(I_z$$=81$$\\hbar$$ and 208$$\\hbar$$) have the maximum density close to the nuclear matter density, 0.16 fm$$^{-3}$$, and a torus major to minor radius aspect ratio $R/d=3

  14. The direct criterion of Newcomb for the ideal MHD stability of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, A. H.

    2016-07-01

    A method is presented for determining the ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma, based on a toroidal generalization of the method developed by Newcomb for fixed-boundary modes in a cylindrical plasma. For toroidal mode number n ≠ 0 , the stability problem is reduced to the numerical integration of a high-order complex system of ordinary differential equations, the Euler-Lagrange equation for extremizing the potential energy, for the coupled amplitudes of poloidal harmonics m as a function of the radial coordinate ψ in a straight-fieldline flux coordinate system. Unlike the cylindrical case, different poloidal harmonics couple to each other, which introduces coupling between adjacent singular intervals. A boundary condition is used at each singular surface, where m = nq and q ( ψ ) is the safety factor, to cross the singular surface and continue the solutions beyond it. Fixed-boundary instability is indicated by the vanishing of a real determinant of a Hermitian complex matrix constructed from the fundamental matrix of solutions, the generalization of Newcomb's crossing criterion. In the absence of fixed-boundary instabilities, an M × M plasma response matrix W P , with M the number of poloidal harmonics used, is constructed from the Euler-Lagrange solutions at the plasma-vacuum boundary. This is added to a vacuum response matrix W V to form a total response matrix W T . The existence of negative eigenvalues of W T indicates the presence of free-boundary instabilities. The method is implemented in the fast and accurate DCON code.

  15. Diffusion in quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2012-08-01

    The change of the effective dimension of spacetime with the probed scale is a universal phenomenon shared by independent models of quantum gravity. Using tools of probability theory and multifractal geometry, we show how dimensional flow is controlled by a multiscale fractional diffusion equation, and physically interpreted as a composite stochastic process. The simplest example is a fractional telegraph process, describing quantum spacetimes with a spectral dimension equal to 2 in the ultraviolet and monotonically rising to 4 towards the infrared. The general profile of the spectral dimension of the recently introduced multifractional spaces is constructed for the first time.

  16. Collisional damping of the geodesic acoustic mode with toroidal rotation. I. Viscous damping

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Xueyu; Xie, Baoyi; Chen, You; Yu, Jiangmei; Yu, Jun; Guo, Wenfeng

    2016-03-15

    With the dispersion relation derived for the geodesic acoustic mode in toroidally rotating tokamak plasmas using the fluid model, the effect of the toroidal rotation on the collisional viscous damping of the geodesic acoustic mode is investigated. It is found that the collisional viscous damping of the geodesic acoustic mode has weak increase with respect to the toroidal Mach number.

  17. Observing and modelling the poloidal and toroidal magnetic fields of the global dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert; Duvall, Thomas; Schüssler, Manfred; Schunker, Hannah

    2017-08-01

    The large scale solar dynamo is a cycle where poloidal flux is generated from toroidal flux, and toroidal flux is generated from poloidal flux. The toroidal and poloidal fields can be inferred from observations, and the Babcock-Leighton model shows how differential rotation and flux emergence explain the observed evolution of the fields.

  18. Flat-band assembly for toroidal transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    Toroidal transformer cores are often banded together by means of strap. Spot welds secure strap. Proper tension is obtained by use of special fixture in conjunction with winding of wire which is placed temporarily on core; winding is excited by dc current to hold core halves together magnetically during alignment.

  19. Development of a high capacity toroidal Ni/Cd cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleck, G. L.; Foos, J. S.; Avery, J. W.; Feiman, V.

    1981-01-01

    A nickel cadmium battery design which can offer better thermal management, higher energy density and much lower cost than the state-of-the-art is emphasized. A toroidal Ni/Cd cell concept is described. It was critically reviewed and used to develop two cell designs for practical implementation. One is a double swaged and the other a swaged welded configuration.

  20. Plasma Properties of Microwave Produced Plasma in a Toroidal Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ajay; Edwards, W. F.; Held, Eric

    2011-10-01

    We have modified a small tokamak, STOR-1M, on loan from University of Saskatchewan, to operate as a low-temperature (~5 eV) toroidal plasma machine with externally induced toroidal magnetic fields ranging from zero to ~50 G. The plasma is produced using microwave discharges at relatively high pressures. Microwaves are produced by a kitchen microwave-oven magnetron operating at 2.45 GHz in continuous operating mode, resulting in pulses ~0.5 s in duration. Initial measurements of plasma formation in this device with and without applied magnetic fields are presented. Plasma density and temperature profiles have been measured using Langmuir probes and the magnetic field profile inside the plasma has been obtained using Hall probes. When the discharge is created with no applied toroidal magnetic field, the plasma does not fill the entire torus due to high background pressure. However, when a toroidal magnetic field is applied, the plasma flows along the applied field, filling the torus. Increasing the applied magnetic field seems to aid plasma formation - the peak density increases and the density gradient becomes steeper. Above a threshold magnetic field, the plasma develops low-frequency density oscillations due to probable excitation of flute modes in the plasma.

  1. Toroidal universal drift instability: A global gyrokinetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, J.; Ganesh, R.; Brunner, S.; Vaclavik, J.; Villard, L.

    2010-10-15

    An electron density gradient driven instability identified as the toroidal branch of the universal drift instability is studied using a global gyrokinetic model treating both electrons and ions fully nonadiabatically and valid at all orders in the ratio of the Larmor radius to the wavelength. The physics of the magnetic drift resonance, Landau resonance and transit resonance, which are considered to be important for the toroidal universal mode, are kept for both species. A systematic parametric study is carried out for the mode. The toroidal universal drift mode is observed to sustain finite temperature gradient and can thus coexist with the temperature gradient driven modes and may contribute to the observed particle transport along with other drift modes. Especially at intermediate scales between the ion temperature gradient driven mode and electron temperature gradient driven mode, this branch of the drift instability can also be a plausible candidate for the observed particle loss. The effect of magnetic fluctuations on the mode is also investigated. In contrast to the slab mode, the toroidal branch of the universal drift mode is found to be strongly stabilized by electromagnetic effects at finite plasma {beta}. Finally, the effect of trapped electrons on the universal mode is studied and compared with the other possible modes in the same parameter regime, namely, ion temperature gradient mode in the presence of trapped electrons and pure trapped electron modes.

  2. Development of a high capacity toroidal Ni/Cd cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holleck, G. L.; Foos, J. S.; Avery, J. W.; Feiman, V.

    1981-07-01

    A nickel cadmium battery design which can offer better thermal management, higher energy density and much lower cost than the state-of-the-art is emphasized. A toroidal Ni/Cd cell concept is described. It was critically reviewed and used to develop two cell designs for practical implementation. One is a double swaged and the other a swaged welded configuration.

  3. Construction and initial operation of the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.L.; Bell, J.D.; Benson, R.D.; Bigelow, T.S.; Chipley, K.K.; Colchin, R.J.; Cole, M.J.; Crume, E.C.; Dunlap, J.L.; England, A.C.; Glowienka, J.C.; Goulding, R.H.; Harris, J.H.; Hillis, D.L.; Hiroe, S.; Horton, L.D.; Howe, H.C.; Isler, R.C.; Jernigan, T.C.; Johnson, R.L.; Langley, R.A.; Menon, M.M.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Morris, R.N.; Murakami, M.; Neilson, G.H.; Nelson, B.E.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Rome, J.A.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1989-08-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) torsatron was designed on a physics basis for access to the second stability regime and on an engineering basis for independent fabrication of high-accuracy components. The actual construction, assembly, and initial operation of ATF are compared with the characteristics expected during the design of ATF. 31 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Toroidal universal drift instability: A global gyrokinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, J.; Ganesh, R.; Brunner, S.; Vaclavik, J.; Villard, L.

    2010-10-01

    An electron density gradient driven instability identified as the toroidal branch of the universal drift instability is studied using a global gyrokinetic model treating both electrons and ions fully nonadiabatically and valid at all orders in the ratio of the Larmor radius to the wavelength. The physics of the magnetic drift resonance, Landau resonance and transit resonance, which are considered to be important for the toroidal universal mode, are kept for both species. A systematic parametric study is carried out for the mode. The toroidal universal drift mode is observed to sustain finite temperature gradient and can thus coexist with the temperature gradient driven modes and may contribute to the observed particle transport along with other drift modes. Especially at intermediate scales between the ion temperature gradient driven mode and electron temperature gradient driven mode, this branch of the drift instability can also be a plausible candidate for the observed particle loss. The effect of magnetic fluctuations on the mode is also investigated. In contrast to the slab mode, the toroidal branch of the universal drift mode is found to be strongly stabilized by electromagnetic effects at finite plasma β. Finally, the effect of trapped electrons on the universal mode is studied and compared with the other possible modes in the same parameter regime, namely, ion temperature gradient mode in the presence of trapped electrons and pure trapped electron modes.

  5. Computational Knowledge for Toroidal Confinement Physics: Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C. S.

    2009-02-19

    Basic high level computational knowledge for studying the toroidal confinement physics is discussed. Topics include the primacy hierarchy of simulation quantities in statistical plasma physics, importance of the nonlinear-multiscale self-organization phenomena in a computational study, different types of codes for different applications, and different types of computer architectures for different types of codes.

  6. The Energy Density of "Wound" Fields in a Toroidal Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischler, W.; Paban, S.; Zanic, M.

    2004-10-01

    The observational limits on the present energy density of the Universe allow for a component that redshifts like 1/a2 and can contribute significantly to the total. We show that a possible origin for such a contribution is that the universe has a toroidal topology with "wound" scalar fields around its cycles.

  7. Toroidal modeling of plasma response to RMP fields in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wang, N.; Kirk, A.; Koslowski, H. R.; Liang, Y.; Loarte, A.; Ryan, D.; Zhong, F. C.

    2017-04-01

    A systematic numerical study is carried out, computing the resistive plasma response to the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields for ITER plasmas, utilizing the toroidal code MARS-F (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681). A number of factors are taken into account, including the variation of the plasma scenarios (from 15 MA Q = 10 inductive scenario to the 9 MA Q = 5 steady state scenario), the variation of the toroidal spectrum of the applied fields (n = 1, 2, 3, 4, with n being the toroidal mode number), the amplitude and phase variation of the currents in three rows of the RMP coils as designed for ITER, and finally a special case of mixed toroidal spectrum between the n = 3 and n = 4 RMP fields. Two-dimensional parameter scans, for the edge safety factor and the coil phasing between the upper and lower rows of coils, yield ‘optimal’ curves that maximize a set of figures of merit, that are defined in this work to measure the plasma response. Other two-dimensional scans of the relative coil current phasing among three rows of coils, at fixed coil currents amplitude, reveal a single optimum for each coil configuration with a given n number, for the 15 MA ITER inductive plasma. On the other hand, scanning of the coil current amplitude, at fixed coil phasing, shows either synergy or cancellation effect, for the field contributions between the off-middle rows and the middle row of the RMP coils. Finally, the mixed toroidal spectrum, by combining the n = 3 and the n = 4 RMP field, results in a substantial local reduction of the amplitude of the plasma surface displacement.

  8. Transport-driven toroidal rotation in the tokamak edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.

    2011-10-01

    The edge of H-mode tokamak plasmas without external momentum input almost always rotates toroidally in the co-current direction, which has prompted a theoretical search for non-diffusive momentum transport mechanisms. In contrast to these efforts, the present work treats a model drift-kinetic ion equation for the pedestal and SOL containing only parallel free streaming, magnetic drifts, and spatially inhomogeneous but purely diffusive transport. The solution demonstrates that passing-ion orbits and spatially inhomogeneous diffusion interact to cause a variation of the orbit-averaged diffusivities that depends on the sign of v∥, typically resulting in preferential transport of counter-current ions. If the plasma at the boundary with the core is allowed to rotate toroidally to annihilate toroidal momentum transport, the resulting pedestal-top rotation reaches experimentally relevant values and exhibits several features in qualitative agreement with experiment. It is almost always in the co-current direction, with a rate that is proportional to Ti|ped-top /BpolLTe for small qρi /LTe , thus inversely proportional to Ip in accord with Rice scaling. It is independent of the toroidal velocity and its radial gradient, representing a residual stress. The Ti|ped-top /BpolLTe scaling implies co-current spin-up at the transition to H-mode, as Ti increases and the gradient of Te steepens. Untested predictions of the model include a sensitivity of the rotation to the major-radial position of the X-point, with a more inboard X-point leading to stronger co-current rotation. Beyond intrinsic rotation predictions, comparison of heat and momentum transport reveals that neutral beam injection must be significantly unbalanced in the counter-current direction to cause zero toroidal rotation at the pedestal top. Work supported by a research fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  9. An analytic model of toroidal half-wave oscillations: Implication on plasma density estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, Jayashree; Sinha, A. K.; Vichare, Geeta

    2015-06-01

    The developed analytic model for toroidal oscillations under infinitely conducting ionosphere ("Rigid-end") has been extended to "Free-end" case when the conjugate ionospheres are infinitely resistive. The present direct analytic model (DAM) is the only analytic model that provides the field line structures of electric and magnetic field oscillations associated with the "Free-end" toroidal wave for generalized plasma distribution characterized by the power law ρ = ρo(ro/r)m, where m is the density index and r is the geocentric distance to the position of interest on the field line. This is important because different regions in the magnetosphere are characterized by different m. Significant improvement over standard WKB solution and an excellent agreement with the numerical exact solution (NES) affirms validity and advancement of DAM. In addition, we estimate the equatorial ion number density (assuming H+ atom as the only species) using DAM, NES, and standard WKB for Rigid-end as well as Free-end case and illustrate their respective implications in computing ion number density. It is seen that WKB method overestimates the equatorial ion density under Rigid-end condition and underestimates the same under Free-end condition. The density estimates through DAM are far more accurate than those computed through WKB. The earlier analytic estimates of ion number density were restricted to m = 6, whereas DAM can account for generalized m while reproducing the density for m = 6 as envisaged by earlier models.

  10. Entropy production and Onsager symmetry in neoclassical transport processes of toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, H.; Horton, W.

    1996-01-01

    Entropy production and Onsager symmetry in neoclassical transport processes of magnetically confined plasmas are studied in detail for general toroidal systems, including nonaxisymmetric configurations. It is found that the flux surface average of the entropy production defined from the linearized collision operator and the gyroangle-averaged distribution function coincides with the sum of the inner products of the thermodynamic forces and the conjugate fluxes consisting of the Pfirsch-Schlueter, banana-plateau, nonaxisymmetric parts of the neoclassical radial fluxes and the parallel current. It is proved from the self-adjointness of the linearized collision operator that the Onsager symmetry is robustly valid for the neoclassical transport equations in the cases of general toroidal plasmas consisting of electrons and multi-species ions with arbitrary collision frequencies. It is shown that the Onsager symmetry holds whether or not the ambipolarity condition is used to reduce the number of the conjugate pairs of the transport fluxes and the thermodynamic forces. The full transport coefficients for the banana-plateau and nonaxisymmetric parts are separately derived, and their symmetry properties are investigated. The nonaxisymmetric transport equations are obtained for arbitrary collision frequencies in the Pfirsch{endash}Schlueter and plateau regimes, and it is directly confirmed that the total banana-plateau and nonaxisymmetric transport equations satisfy the Onsager symmetry. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Theory of continuum damping of toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes in finite-[beta] tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Zonca, F.; Chen, Liu.

    1993-05-01

    We have formulated a general theoretical approach for analyzing two-dimensional structures of high-n Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) in large aspect-ratio, finite-[beta] tokamaks. Here, n is the toroidal wave number and [beta] is the ratio between plasma and magnetic pressures. The present approach generalizes the standard ballooning-mode formalism and is capable of treating eigenmodes with extended global radial structures as well as finite coupling between discrete and continuous spectra. Employing the well-known (s,[alpha]) model equilibrium and assuming a linear equilibrium profile, we have applied the present approach and calculated the corresponding resonant continuum damping rate of TAE modes. Here, s and [alpha] denote, respectively, the strengths of magnetic shear and pressure gradients. In particular, it is found that there exists a critical [alpha][sub c](s), such that, as [alpha] [yields] [alpha][sub c], the continuum damping rate is significantly enhanced and, thus, could suppress the potential TAE instability.

  12. Theory of continuum damping of toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes in finite-{beta} tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Zonca, F.; Chen, Liu

    1993-05-01

    We have formulated a general theoretical approach for analyzing two-dimensional structures of high-n Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) in large aspect-ratio, finite-{beta} tokamaks. Here, n is the toroidal wave number and {beta} is the ratio between plasma and magnetic pressures. The present approach generalizes the standard ballooning-mode formalism and is capable of treating eigenmodes with extended global radial structures as well as finite coupling between discrete and continuous spectra. Employing the well-known (s,{alpha}) model equilibrium and assuming a linear equilibrium profile, we have applied the present approach and calculated the corresponding resonant continuum damping rate of TAE modes. Here, s and {alpha} denote, respectively, the strengths of magnetic shear and pressure gradients. In particular, it is found that there exists a critical {alpha}{sub c}(s), such that, as {alpha} {yields} {alpha}{sub c}, the continuum damping rate is significantly enhanced and, thus, could suppress the potential TAE instability.

  13. Exact calculation of the angular momentum loss, recoil force, and radiation intensity for an arbitrary source in terms of electric, magnetic, and toroid multipoles.

    PubMed

    Radescu, E E; Vaman, G

    2002-04-01

    An exact calculation of the radiation intensity, angular momentum loss, and the recoil force for the most general type of source, characterized by electric, magnetic, and toroid multipole moments and radii of any multipolarity and an arbitrary time dependence, is presented. The results are expressed in terms of time derivatives of the multipole moments and mean radii of the corresponding distributions. Although quite cumbersome, the formulas found by us represent exact results in the correct multipole analysis of configurations of charges and currents that contain toroidal sources. So the longstanding problem in classical electrodynamics of relating the radiation properties of a system to quantities completely describing its internal electromagnetic structure is thereby exactly solved. By particularizations to the first multipole contributions, corrections to the familiar formulas from books are found, mostly on account of the toroid moments and their interference with the usual electric and magnetic ones.

  14. Proposed design of SAMUS (small angle muon spectrometer) toroid and its magnetic field calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.

    1988-06-09

    Presently the D/null/ detector has three big toroidal magnets; one Central Toroid (CF) and two End Wall Toroids (EF). The EF toroids have central openings 72'' x 72''. Originally, this opening was meant for possible future end-plug calorimeters. Instead we are now designing Small Angle Muon Spectrometer (SAMUS) for the opening. The major component will be built at Serpukhov. The design of the toroid magnets and its magnetic field calculations is being done by exchanging information between Serpukhov and Fermilab. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Geometry in Medias Res

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukier, Mimi; Asdourian, Tony; Thakker, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Geometry provides a natural window into what it is like to do mathematics. In the world of geometry, playful experimentation is often more fruitful than following a procedure, and logic plus a few axioms can open new worlds. Nonetheless, teaching a geometry course in a way that combines both rigor and play can be difficult. Many geometry courses…

  16. Geometry in Medias Res

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukier, Mimi; Asdourian, Tony; Thakker, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Geometry provides a natural window into what it is like to do mathematics. In the world of geometry, playful experimentation is often more fruitful than following a procedure, and logic plus a few axioms can open new worlds. Nonetheless, teaching a geometry course in a way that combines both rigor and play can be difficult. Many geometry courses…

  17. Summary of US-Japan Exchange 2004 New Directions and Physics for Compact Toroids

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, T; Nagata, M; Hoffman, A; Guo, H; Steinhauer, L; Ryutov, D; Miller, R; Okada, S

    2005-08-15

    relaxation. A variety of key themes surrounding the physics of CT's were found to recur during this conference. These included questions and answers touching upon magnetic flux build up in CT's, generalized relaxation processes that extend beyond the Taylor picture, the importance of plasma flows, toroidal magnetic fields in FRC's, and CT power plant considerations. This document briefly outlines the tenor of these discussions.

  18. Design, development, and results from a charge-collector diagnostic for a toroidal electron plasma experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pahari, Sambaran; Lachhvani, Lavkesh Bajpai, Manu; Rathod, Karan; Yeole, Yogesh; Chattopadhyay, P. K.

    2015-08-15

    A suitable charge-collector has been designed and developed to estimate charge-content of electron plasmas in a Small Aspect Ratio Toroidal Experiment in a C-shaped trap (SMARTEX-C). The electrons are periodically injected and held in the trap with the aid of electrostatic end-fields and a toroidal magnetic field. After a preset “hold” time, the trapped charges are dumped onto a grounded collector (by gating it). As the charges flow along the magnetic field lines onto the collector, the integrated current gives the charge-content of the plasma at the instant of dump. In designing such a charge collector, several challenges peculiar to the geometry of the trap and the nature of the plasma had to be addressed. Instantaneous charge measurements synchronised with the E × B drift of the plasma, along with fast transit times of electrons to the collector (few 100 ns or less) (due to the low aspect ratio of the trap) essentially require fast gating of the collector. The resulting large capacitive transients alongside low charge content (few nC) of such plasmas further lead to increasing demands on response and sensitivity of the collector. Complete cancellation of such transients is shown to be possible, in principle, by including the return path in our measurement circuit but the “non-neutrality” of the plasma acts as a further impediment. Ultimately, appropriate shielding and measurement circuits allow us to (re)distribute the capacitance and delineate the paths of these currents, leading to effective cancellation of transients and marked improvement in sensitivity. Improved charge-collector has thus been used to successfully estimate the time evolution of total charge of the confined electron plasma in SMARTEX-C.

  19. Quantum field theory on toroidal topology: Algebraic structure and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, F. C.; Malbouisson, A. P. C.; Malbouisson, J. M. C.; Santana, A. E.

    2014-05-01

    The development of quantum theory on a torus has a long history, and can be traced back to the 1920s, with the attempts by Nordström, Kaluza and Klein to define a fourth spatial dimension with a finite size, being curved in the form of a torus, such that Einstein and Maxwell equations would be unified. Many developments were carried out considering cosmological problems in association with particle physics, leading to methods that are useful for areas of physics, in which size effects play an important role. This interest in finite size effect systems has been increasing rapidly over the last decades, due principally to experimental improvements. In this review, the foundations of compactified quantum field theory on a torus are presented in a unified way, in order to consider applications in particle and condensed matter physics. The theory on a torus ΓDd=(S1)d×RD-d is developed from a Lie-group representation and c*c*-algebra formalisms. As a first application, the quantum field theory at finite temperature, in its real- and imaginary-time versions, is addressed by focusing on its topological structure, the torus Γ41. The toroidal quantum-field theory provides the basis for a consistent approach of spontaneous symmetry breaking driven by both temperature and spatial boundaries. Then the superconductivity in films, wires and grains are analyzed, leading to some results that are comparable with experiments. The Casimir effect is studied taking the electromagnetic and Dirac fields on a torus. In this case, the method of analysis is based on a generalized Bogoliubov transformation, that separates the Green function into two parts: one is associated with the empty space-time, while the other describes the impact of compactification. This provides a natural procedure for calculating the renormalized energy-momentum tensor. Self interacting four-fermion systems, described by the Gross-Neveu and Nambu-Jona-Lasinio models, are considered. Then finite size effects on

  20. Comparison of Microinstability Properties for Stellarator Magnetic Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt; L.-P. Ku; W.M. Tang

    2005-06-16

    The microinstability properties of seven distinct magnetic geometries corresponding to different operating and planned stellarators with differing symmetry properties are compared. Specifically, the kinetic stability properties (linear growth rates and real frequencies) of toroidal microinstabilities (driven by ion temperature gradients and trapped-electron dynamics) are compared, as parameters are varied. The familiar ballooning representation is used to enable efficient treatment of the spatial variations along the equilibrium magnetic field lines. These studies provide useful insights for understanding the differences in the relative strengths of the instabilities caused by the differing localizations of good and bad magnetic curvature and of the presence of trapped particles. The associated differences in growth rates due to magnetic geometry are large for small values of the temperature gradient parameter n identical to d ln T/d ln n, whereas for large values of n, the mode is strongly unstable for all of the different magnetic geometries.