Science.gov

Sample records for generalized beta model

  1. Spatial Double Generalized Beta Regression Models: Extensions and Application to Study Quality of Education in Colombia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cepeda-Cuervo, Edilberto; Núñez-Antón, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    In this article, a proposed Bayesian extension of the generalized beta spatial regression models is applied to the analysis of the quality of education in Colombia. We briefly revise the beta distribution and describe the joint modeling approach for the mean and dispersion parameters in the spatial regression models' setting. Finally, we…

  2. Generalized Penner model and the Gaussian beta ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chair, Noureddine

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a new expression for the partition function of the generalized Penner model given by Goulden, Harer and Jackson is derived. The Penner and the orthogonal Penner partition functions are special cases of this formula. The parametrized Euler characteristic ξgs(γ) deduced from our expression of the partition function is shown to exhibit a contribution from the orbifold Euler characteristic of the moduli space of Riemann surfaces of genus g, with s punctures, for all parameters γ and g odd. The other contributions for g even are linear combinations of the Bernoulli polynomials at rational arguments. It turns out that the free energy coefficients of the generalized Penner model in the continuum limit, are identical to those coefficients in the large N expansion of the Gaussian β-ensemble. Moreover, the duality enjoyed by the generalized Penner model, is also the duality symmetry of the Gaussian β-ensemble. Finally, a shift in the 't Hooft coupling constant required by the refined topological string, would leave the Gaussian β-ensemble duality intact. This duality is identified with the remarkable duality of the c=1 string at radius R=β.

  3. Distributional Assumptions in Educational Assessments Analysis: Normal Distributions versus Generalized Beta Distribution in Modeling the Phenomenon of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campos, Jose Alejandro Gonzalez; Moraga, Paulina Saavedra; Del Pozo, Manuel Freire

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces the generalized beta (GB) model as a new modeling tool in the educational assessment area and evaluation analysis, specifically. Unlike normal model, GB model allows us to capture some real characteristics of data and it is an important tool for understanding the phenomenon of learning. This paper develops a contrast with the…

  4. Modeling of Beta Diversity in Tunisian Waters: Predictions Using Generalized Dissimilarity Modeling and Bioregionalisation Using Fuzzy Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Lasram, Frida Ben Rais; Hattab, Tarek; Halouani, Ghassen; Romdhane, Mohamed Salah; Le Loc'h, François

    2015-01-01

    Spatial patterns of beta diversity are a major focus of ecology. They can be especially valuable in conservation planning. In this study, we used a generalized dissimilarity modeling approach to analyze and predict the spatial patterns of beta diversity for commercially exploited, demersal marine species assemblages along the Tunisian coasts. For this study, we used a presence/absence dataset which included information on 174 species (invertebrates and fishes) and 9 environmental variables. We first performed the modeling analyses and assessed beta diversity using the turnover component of the Jaccard’s dissimilarity index. We then performed nonmetric multidimensional scaling to map predicted beta diversity. To delineate the biogeographical regions, we used fuzzy cluster analysis. Finally, we also identified a set of indicator species which characterized the species assemblages in each identified biogeographical region. The predicted beta diversity map revealed two patterns: an inshore-offshore gradient and a south-north latitudinal gradient. Three biogeographical regions were identified and 14 indicator species. These results constitute a first contribution of the bioregionalisation of the Tunisian waters and highlight the issues associated with current fisheries management zones and conservation strategies. Results could be useful to follow an Ecosystem Based Management approach by proposing an objective spatial partitioning of the Tunisian waters. This partitioning could be used to prioritize the adjustment of the actual fisheries management entities, identify current data gaps, inform future scientific surveys and improve current MPA network. PMID:26147371

  5. Constraints on general SU(2)/sub L/ x SU(2)/sub R/ x U(1) electroweak models from nuclear beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Herczeg, P.

    1986-01-01

    The implications of beta-decay experiments for more general versions of SU(2)/sub L/ x SU(2)/sub R/ x U(1) models are analyzed, including the most general one which allows for CP-violation, unequal left- and right-handed quark mixing angles, and mixing in the leptonic sector. For each scenario, the constraints on the pertinent parameters from beta-decay measurements are compared with the constraints provided on them by other data.

  6. Modeling Nucleon Generalized Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2013-05-01

    We discuss building models for nucleon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) H and E that are based on the formalism of double distributions (DDs). We found that the usual "DD+D-term" construction should be amended by an extra term, xiE^1_+ (x,xi) built from the alpha/Beta moment of the DD e(Beta,alpha) that generates GPD E(x,xi). Unlike the D-term, this function has support in the whole -1< x<1 region, and in general does not vanish at the border points |x|=xi.

  7. Beta Regression Finite Mixture Models of Polarization and Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithson, Michael; Merkle, Edgar C.; Verkuilen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the application of finite-mixture general linear models based on the beta distribution to modeling response styles, polarization, anchoring, and priming effects in probability judgments. These models, in turn, enhance our capacity for explicitly testing models and theories regarding the aforementioned phenomena. The mixture…

  8. Fundamental processes in the interacting boson model: 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Iachello, F.; Barea, J.

    2011-05-06

    A program to calculate nuclear matrix elements for fundamental processes in the interacting boson model has been initiated. Results for the nuclear matrix elements in neutrinoless double beta decay 0{nu}{beta}{beta} are presented.

  9. Generalized smooth models

    SciTech Connect

    Glosup, J.

    1992-07-23

    The class of gene linear models is extended to develop a class of nonparametric regression models known as generalized smooth models. The technique of local scoring is used to estimate a generalized smooth model and the estimation procedure based on locally weighted regression is shown to produce local likelihood estimates. The asymptotically correct distribution of the deviance difference is derived and its use in comparing the fits of generalized linear models and generalized smooth models is illustrated. The relationship between generalized smooth models and generalized additive models is discussed, also.

  10. Generalized Latent Trait Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moustaki, Irini; Knott, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a general model framework within which manifest variables with different distributions in the exponential family can be analyzed with a latent trait model. Presents a unified maximum likelihood method for estimating the parameters of the generalized latent trait model and discusses the scoring of individuals on the latent dimensions.…

  11. Bayesian residual analysis for beta-binomial regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Rubiane Maria; Diniz, Carlos Alberto Ribeiro

    2012-10-01

    The beta-binomial regression model is an alternative model to the sum of any sequence of equicorrelated binary variables with common probability of success p. In this work a Bayesian perspective of this model is presented considering different link functions and different correlation structures. A general Bayesian residual analysis for this model, a issue which is often neglected in Bayesian analysis, using the residuals based on the predicted values obtained by the conditional predictive ordinate [1], the residuals based on the posterior distribution of the model parameters [2] and the Bayesian deviance residual [3] are presented in order to check the assumptions in the model.

  12. Decoding {beta}-decay systematics: A global statistical model for {beta}{sup -} half-lives

    SciTech Connect

    Costiris, N. J.; Mavrommatis, E.; Gernoth, K. A.; Clark, J. W.

    2009-10-15

    Statistical modeling of nuclear data provides a novel approach to nuclear systematics complementary to established theoretical and phenomenological approaches based on quantum theory. Continuing previous studies in which global statistical modeling is pursued within the general framework of machine learning theory, we implement advances in training algorithms designed to improve generalization, in application to the problem of reproducing and predicting the half-lives of nuclear ground states that decay 100% by the {beta}{sup -} mode. More specifically, fully connected, multilayer feed-forward artificial neural network models are developed using the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization algorithm together with Bayesian regularization and cross-validation. The predictive performance of models emerging from extensive computer experiments is compared with that of traditional microscopic and phenomenological models as well as with the performance of other learning systems, including earlier neural network models as well as the support vector machines recently applied to the same problem. In discussing the results, emphasis is placed on predictions for nuclei that are far from the stability line, and especially those involved in r-process nucleosynthesis. It is found that the new statistical models can match or even surpass the predictive performance of conventional models for {beta}-decay systematics and accordingly should provide a valuable additional tool for exploring the expanding nuclear landscape.

  13. Generalized simplicial chiral models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimohammadi, Masoud

    2000-02-01

    Using the auxiliary field representation of the simplicial chiral models on a ( d-1)-dimensional simplex, the simplicial chiral models are generalized through replacing the term Tr (AA †) in the Lagrangian of these models by an arbitrary class function of AA †; V(AA †) . This is the same method used in defining the generalized two-dimensional Yang-Mills theories (gYM 2) from ordinary YM 2. We call these models the "generalized simplicial chiral models". Using the results of the one-link integral over a U( N) matrix, the large- N saddle-point equations for eigenvalue density function ρ( z) in the weak ( β> βc) and strong ( β< βc) regions are computed. In d=2, where the model is in some sense related to the gYM 2 theory, the saddle-point equations are solved for ρ( z) in the two regions, and the explicit value of critical point βc is calculated for V(B)= Tr B n(B=AA †) . For V(B)= Tr B 2, Tr B 3, and Tr B4, the critical behaviour of the model at d=2 is studied, and by calculating the internal energy, it is shown that these models have a third order phase transition.

  14. Meta-analysis of studies with bivariate binary outcomes: a marginal beta-binomial model approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Hong, Chuan; Ning, Yang; Su, Xiao

    2016-01-15

    When conducting a meta-analysis of studies with bivariate binary outcomes, challenges arise when the within-study correlation and between-study heterogeneity should be taken into account. In this paper, we propose a marginal beta-binomial model for the meta-analysis of studies with binary outcomes. This model is based on the composite likelihood approach and has several attractive features compared with the existing models such as bivariate generalized linear mixed model (Chu and Cole, 2006) and Sarmanov beta-binomial model (Chen et al., 2012). The advantages of the proposed marginal model include modeling the probabilities in the original scale, not requiring any transformation of probabilities or any link function, having closed-form expression of likelihood function, and no constraints on the correlation parameter. More importantly, because the marginal beta-binomial model is only based on the marginal distributions, it does not suffer from potential misspecification of the joint distribution of bivariate study-specific probabilities. Such misspecification is difficult to detect and can lead to biased inference using currents methods. We compare the performance of the marginal beta-binomial model with the bivariate generalized linear mixed model and the Sarmanov beta-binomial model by simulation studies. Interestingly, the results show that the marginal beta-binomial model performs better than the Sarmanov beta-binomial model, whether or not the true model is Sarmanov beta-binomial, and the marginal beta-binomial model is more robust than the bivariate generalized linear mixed model under model misspecifications. Two meta-analyses of diagnostic accuracy studies and a meta-analysis of case-control studies are conducted for illustration.

  15. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  16. General composite Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzocca, David; Serone, Marco; Shu, Jing

    2012-08-01

    We construct a general class of pseudo-Goldstone composite Higgs models, within the minimal SO(5)/SO(4) coset structure, that are not necessarily of moose-type. We characterize the main properties these models should have in order to give rise to a Higgs mass around 125 GeV. We assume the existence of relatively light and weakly coupled spin 1 and 1/2 resonances. In absence of a symmetry principle, we introduce the Minimal Higgs Potential (MHP) hypothesis: the Higgs potential is assumed to be one-loop dominated by the SM fields and the above resonances, with a contribution that is made calculable by imposing suitable generalizations of the first and second Weinberg sum rules. We show that a 125 GeV Higgs requires light, often sub-TeV, fermion resonances. Their presence can also be important for the models to successfully pass the electroweak precision tests. Interestingly enough, the latter can also be passed by models with a heavy Higgs around 320 GeV. The composite Higgs models of the moose-type considered in the literature can be seen as particular limits of our class of models.

  17. New model for nucleon generalized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new type of models for nucleon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) H and E. They are heavily based on the fact nucleon GPDs require to use two forms of double distribution (DD) representations. The outcome of the new treatment is that the usual DD+D-term construction should be amended by an extra term, {xi} E{sub +}{sup 1} (x,{xi}) which has the DD structure {alpha}/{beta} e({beta},{alpha}, with e({beta},{alpha}) being the DD that generates GPD E(x,{xi}). We found that this function, unlike the D-term, has support in the whole -1 <= x <= 1 region. Furthermore, it does not vanish at the border points |x|={xi}.

  18. Generalized Nonlinear Yule Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansky, Petr; Polito, Federico; Sacerdote, Laura

    2016-10-01

    With the aim of considering models related to random graphs growth exhibiting persistent memory, we propose a fractional nonlinear modification of the classical Yule model often studied in the context of macroevolution. Here the model is analyzed and interpreted in the framework of the development of networks such as the World Wide Web. Nonlinearity is introduced by replacing the linear birth process governing the growth of the in-links of each specific webpage with a fractional nonlinear birth process with completely general birth rates. Among the main results we derive the explicit distribution of the number of in-links of a webpage chosen uniformly at random recognizing the contribution to the asymptotics and the finite time correction. The mean value of the latter distribution is also calculated explicitly in the most general case. Furthermore, in order to show the usefulness of our results, we particularize them in the case of specific birth rates giving rise to a saturating behaviour, a property that is often observed in nature. The further specialization to the non-fractional case allows us to extend the Yule model accounting for a nonlinear growth.

  19. Ocean General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  20. Generalized Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Skrondal, Anders; Pickles, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    A unifying framework for generalized multilevel structural equation modeling is introduced. The models in the framework, called generalized linear latent and mixed models (GLLAMM), combine features of generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) and structural equation models (SEM) and consist of a response model and a structural model for the latent…

  1. The Generalized DINA Model Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Torre, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    The G-DINA ("generalized deterministic inputs, noisy and gate") model is a generalization of the DINA model with more relaxed assumptions. In its saturated form, the G-DINA model is equivalent to other general models for cognitive diagnosis based on alternative link functions. When appropriate constraints are applied, several commonly used…

  2. A Beta-splitting model for evolutionary trees

    PubMed Central

    Sainudiin, Raazesh

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we construct a generalization of the Blum–François Beta-splitting model for evolutionary trees, which was itself inspired by Aldous' Beta-splitting model on cladograms. The novelty of our approach allows for asymmetric shares of diversification rates (or diversification ‘potential’) between two sister species in an evolutionarily interpretable manner, as well as the addition of extinction to the model in a natural way. We describe the incremental evolutionary construction of a tree with n leaves by splitting or freezing extant lineages through the generating, organizing and deleting processes. We then give the probability of any (binary rooted) tree under this model with no extinction, at several resolutions: ranked planar trees giving asymmetric roles to the first and second offspring species of a given species and keeping track of the order of the speciation events occurring during the creation of the tree, unranked planar trees, ranked non-planar trees and finally (unranked non-planar) trees. We also describe a continuous-time equivalent of the generating, organizing and deleting processes where tree topology and branch lengths are jointly modelled and provide code in SageMath/Python for these algorithms. PMID:27293780

  3. A Beta-splitting model for evolutionary trees.

    PubMed

    Sainudiin, Raazesh; Véber, Amandine

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we construct a generalization of the Blum-François Beta-splitting model for evolutionary trees, which was itself inspired by Aldous' Beta-splitting model on cladograms. The novelty of our approach allows for asymmetric shares of diversification rates (or diversification 'potential') between two sister species in an evolutionarily interpretable manner, as well as the addition of extinction to the model in a natural way. We describe the incremental evolutionary construction of a tree with n leaves by splitting or freezing extant lineages through the generating, organizing and deleting processes. We then give the probability of any (binary rooted) tree under this model with no extinction, at several resolutions: ranked planar trees giving asymmetric roles to the first and second offspring species of a given species and keeping track of the order of the speciation events occurring during the creation of the tree, unranked planar trees, ranked non-planar trees and finally (unranked non-planar) trees. We also describe a continuous-time equivalent of the generating, organizing and deleting processes where tree topology and branch lengths are jointly modelled and provide code in SageMath/Python for these algorithms.

  4. A Beta-splitting model for evolutionary trees.

    PubMed

    Sainudiin, Raazesh; Véber, Amandine

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we construct a generalization of the Blum-François Beta-splitting model for evolutionary trees, which was itself inspired by Aldous' Beta-splitting model on cladograms. The novelty of our approach allows for asymmetric shares of diversification rates (or diversification 'potential') between two sister species in an evolutionarily interpretable manner, as well as the addition of extinction to the model in a natural way. We describe the incremental evolutionary construction of a tree with n leaves by splitting or freezing extant lineages through the generating, organizing and deleting processes. We then give the probability of any (binary rooted) tree under this model with no extinction, at several resolutions: ranked planar trees giving asymmetric roles to the first and second offspring species of a given species and keeping track of the order of the speciation events occurring during the creation of the tree, unranked planar trees, ranked non-planar trees and finally (unranked non-planar) trees. We also describe a continuous-time equivalent of the generating, organizing and deleting processes where tree topology and branch lengths are jointly modelled and provide code in SageMath/Python for these algorithms. PMID:27293780

  5. Augmented Beta rectangular regression models: A Bayesian perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jue; Luo, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Mixed effects Beta regression models based on Beta distributions have been widely used to analyze longitudinal percentage or proportional data ranging between zero and one. However, Beta distributions are not flexible to extreme outliers or excessive events around tail areas, and they do not account for the presence of the boundary values zeros and ones because these values are not in the support of the Beta distributions. To address these issues, we propose a mixed effects model using Beta rectangular distribution and augment it with the probabilities of zero and one. We conduct extensive simulation studies to assess the performance of mixed effects models based on both the Beta and Beta rectangular distributions under various scenarios. The simulation studies suggest that the regression models based on Beta rectangular distributions improve the accuracy of parameter estimates in the presence of outliers and heavy tails. The proposed models are applied to the motivating Neuroprotection Exploratory Trials in Parkinson's Disease (PD) Long-term Study-1 (LS-1 study, n = 1741), developed by The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Exploratory Trials in Parkinson's Disease (NINDS NET-PD) network. PMID:26289406

  6. Order-disorder transition in conflicting dynamics leading to rank-frequency generalized beta distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Martinez, R.; Martinez-Mekler, G.; Cocho, G.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of rank-ordered distributions of phenomena present in a variety of fields such as biology, sociology, linguistics, finance and geophysics has been a matter of intense research. Often power laws have been encountered; however, their validity tends to hold mainly for an intermediate range of rank values. In a recent publication (Martínez-Mekler et al., 2009 [7]), a generalization of the functional form of the beta distribution has been shown to give excellent fits for many systems of very diverse nature, valid for the whole range of rank values, regardless of whether or not a power law behavior has been previously suggested. Here we give some insight on the significance of the two free parameters which appear as exponents in the functional form, by looking into discrete probabilistic branching processes with conflicting dynamics. We analyze a variety of realizations of these so-called expansion-modification models first introduced by Wentian Li (1989) [10]. We focus our attention on an order-disorder transition we encounter as we vary the modification probability p. We characterize this transition by means of the fitting parameters. Our numerical studies show that one of the fitting exponents is related to the presence of long-range correlations exhibited by power spectrum scale invariance, while the other registers the effect of disordering elements leading to a breakdown of these properties. In the absence of long-range correlations, this parameter is sensitive to the occurrence of unlikely events. We also introduce an approximate calculation scheme that relates this dynamics to multinomial multiplicative processes. A better understanding through these models of the meaning of the generalized beta-fitting exponents may contribute to their potential for identifying and characterizing universality classes.

  7. The beta distribution: A statistical model for world cloud cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falls, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    Much work has been performed in developing empirical global cloud cover models. This investigation was made to determine an underlying theoretical statistical distribution to represent worldwide cloud cover. The beta distribution with probability density function is given to represent the variability of this random variable. It is shown that the beta distribution possesses the versatile statistical characteristics necessary to assume the wide variety of shapes exhibited by cloud cover. A total of 160 representative empirical cloud cover distributions were investigated and the conclusion was reached that this study provides sufficient statical evidence to accept the beta probability distribution as the underlying model for world cloud cover.

  8. A Quantitative Model for the Exchange Current of Porous Molybdenum Electrodes on Sodium Beta-Alumina in Sodium Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Ryan, M. A.; LeDuc, H.; Cortez, R. H.; Saipetch, C.; Shields, V.; Manatt, K.; Homer, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a model of the exchange current developed for porous molybdenum electrodes on sodium beta-alumina ceramics in low pressure sodium vapor, but which has general applicability to gas/porous metal electrodes on solid electrolytes.

  9. Numerical models for high beta magnetohydrodynamic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Brackbill, J.U.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamentals of numerical magnetohydrodynamics for highly conducting, high-beta plasmas are outlined. The discussions emphasize the physical properties of the flow, and how elementary concepts in numerical analysis can be applied to the construction of finite difference approximations that capture these features. The linear and nonlinear stability of explicit and implicit differencing in time is examined, the origin and effect of numerical diffusion in the calculation of convective transport is described, and a technique for maintaining solenoidality in the magnetic field is developed. Many of the points are illustrated by numerical examples. The techniques described are applicable to the time-dependent, high-beta flows normally encountered in magnetically confined plasmas, plasma switches, and space and astrophysical plasmas. 40 refs.

  10. Model of break-bone fever via beta-derivatives.

    PubMed

    Atangana, Abdon; Oukouomi Noutchie, Suares Clovis

    2014-01-01

    Using the new derivative called beta-derivative, we modelled the well-known infectious disease called break-bone fever or the dengue fever. We presented the endemic equilibrium points under certain conditions of the physical parameters included in the model. We made use of an iteration method to solve the extended model. To show the efficiency of the method used, we have presented in detail the stability and the convergence of the method for solving the system (2). We presented the uniqueness of the special solution of system (2) and finally the numerical simulations were presented for various values of beta.

  11. Modeling Nucleon Generalized Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2013-05-01

    We discuss building models for nucleon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) H and E that are based on the formalism of double distributions (DDs). We find that the usual "DD+D-term'' construction should be amended by an extra term, generated by GPD E(x,\\xi). Unlike the $D$-term, this function has support in the whole -1 < x< 1 region, and in general does not vanish at the border points|x|=\\xi.

  12. Misleading Betas: An Educational Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chong, James; Halcoussis, Dennis; Phillips, G. Michael

    2012-01-01

    The dual-beta model is a generalization of the CAPM model. In the dual-beta model, separate beta estimates are provided for up-market and down-market days. This paper uses the historical "Anscombe quartet" results which illustrated how very different datasets can produce the same regression coefficients to motivate a discussion of the…

  13. Smart Grid Interoperability Maturity Model Beta Version

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Drummond, R.; Giroti, Tony; Houseman, Doug; Knight, Mark; Levinson, Alex; longcore, Wayne; Lowe, Randy; Mater, J.; Oliver, Terry V.; Slack, Phil; Tolk, Andreas; Montgomery, Austin

    2011-12-02

    The GridWise Architecture Council was formed by the U.S. Department of Energy to promote and enable interoperability among the many entities that interact with the electric power system. This balanced team of industry representatives proposes principles for the development of interoperability concepts and standards. The Council provides industry guidance and tools that make it an available resource for smart grid implementations. In the spirit of advancing interoperability of an ecosystem of smart grid devices and systems, this document presents a model for evaluating the maturity of the artifacts and processes that specify the agreement of parties to collaborate across an information exchange interface. You are expected to have a solid understanding of large, complex system integration concepts and experience in dealing with software component interoperation. Those without this technical background should read the Executive Summary for a description of the purpose and contents of the document. Other documents, such as checklists, guides, and whitepapers, exist for targeted purposes and audiences. Please see the www.gridwiseac.org website for more products of the Council that may be of interest to you.

  14. Beta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter covers the use of wild beets in sugar beet improvement, including the basic botany of the species, its distribution; geographical locations of genetic diversity; morphology; cytology and karyotype; genome size; taxonomic position; agricultural status (model plant/weeds/invasive species/...

  15. Augmented mixed beta regression models for periodontal proportion data

    PubMed Central

    Galvis, Diana M.; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Lachos, Victor H.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous (clustered) proportion data often arise in various domains of medicine and public health where the response variable of interest is a proportion (or percentage) quantifying disease status for the cluster units, ranging between zero and one. However, because of the presence of relatively disease-free as well as heavily diseased subjects in any study, the proportion values can lie in the interval [0, 1]. While beta regression can be adapted to assess covariate effects in these situations, its versatility is often challenged because of the presence/excess of zeros and ones because the beta support lies in the interval (0, 1). To circumvent this, we augment the probabilities of zero and one with the beta density, controlling for the clustering effect. Our approach is Bayesian with the ability to borrow information across various stages of the complex model hierarchy and produces a computationally convenient framework amenable to available freeware. The marginal likelihood is tractable and can be used to develop Bayesian case-deletion influence diagnostics based on q-divergence measures. Both simulation studies and application to a real dataset from a clinical periodontology study quantify the gain in model fit and parameter estimation over other ad hoc alternatives and provide quantitative insight into assessing the true covariate effects on the proportion responses. PMID:24764045

  16. Neural mechanisms of transient neocortical beta rhythms: Converging evidence from humans, computational modeling, monkeys, and mice.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Maxwell A; Lee, Shane; Law, Robert; Haegens, Saskia; Thorn, Catherine A; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Moore, Christopher I; Jones, Stephanie R

    2016-08-16

    Human neocortical 15-29-Hz beta oscillations are strong predictors of perceptual and motor performance. However, the mechanistic origin of beta in vivo is unknown, hindering understanding of its functional role. Combining human magnetoencephalography (MEG), computational modeling, and laminar recordings in animals, we present a new theory that accounts for the origin of spontaneous neocortical beta. In our MEG data, spontaneous beta activity from somatosensory and frontal cortex emerged as noncontinuous beta events typically lasting <150 ms with a stereotypical waveform. Computational modeling uniquely designed to infer the electrical currents underlying these signals showed that beta events could emerge from the integration of nearly synchronous bursts of excitatory synaptic drive targeting proximal and distal dendrites of pyramidal neurons, where the defining feature of a beta event was a strong distal drive that lasted one beta period (∼50 ms). This beta mechanism rigorously accounted for the beta event profiles; several other mechanisms did not. The spatial location of synaptic drive in the model to supragranular and infragranular layers was critical to the emergence of beta events and led to the prediction that beta events should be associated with a specific laminar current profile. Laminar recordings in somatosensory neocortex from anesthetized mice and awake monkeys supported these predictions, suggesting this beta mechanism is conserved across species and recording modalities. These findings make several predictions about optimal states for perceptual and motor performance and guide causal interventions to modulate beta for optimal function. PMID:27469163

  17. Neural mechanisms of transient neocortical beta rhythms: Converging evidence from humans, computational modeling, monkeys, and mice.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Maxwell A; Lee, Shane; Law, Robert; Haegens, Saskia; Thorn, Catherine A; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Moore, Christopher I; Jones, Stephanie R

    2016-08-16

    Human neocortical 15-29-Hz beta oscillations are strong predictors of perceptual and motor performance. However, the mechanistic origin of beta in vivo is unknown, hindering understanding of its functional role. Combining human magnetoencephalography (MEG), computational modeling, and laminar recordings in animals, we present a new theory that accounts for the origin of spontaneous neocortical beta. In our MEG data, spontaneous beta activity from somatosensory and frontal cortex emerged as noncontinuous beta events typically lasting <150 ms with a stereotypical waveform. Computational modeling uniquely designed to infer the electrical currents underlying these signals showed that beta events could emerge from the integration of nearly synchronous bursts of excitatory synaptic drive targeting proximal and distal dendrites of pyramidal neurons, where the defining feature of a beta event was a strong distal drive that lasted one beta period (∼50 ms). This beta mechanism rigorously accounted for the beta event profiles; several other mechanisms did not. The spatial location of synaptic drive in the model to supragranular and infragranular layers was critical to the emergence of beta events and led to the prediction that beta events should be associated with a specific laminar current profile. Laminar recordings in somatosensory neocortex from anesthetized mice and awake monkeys supported these predictions, suggesting this beta mechanism is conserved across species and recording modalities. These findings make several predictions about optimal states for perceptual and motor performance and guide causal interventions to modulate beta for optimal function.

  18. Neural mechanisms of transient neocortical beta rhythms: Converging evidence from humans, computational modeling, monkeys, and mice

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Maxwell A.; Lee, Shane; Law, Robert; Haegens, Saskia; Thorn, Catherine A.; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Moore, Christopher I.; Jones, Stephanie R.

    2016-01-01

    Human neocortical 15–29-Hz beta oscillations are strong predictors of perceptual and motor performance. However, the mechanistic origin of beta in vivo is unknown, hindering understanding of its functional role. Combining human magnetoencephalography (MEG), computational modeling, and laminar recordings in animals, we present a new theory that accounts for the origin of spontaneous neocortical beta. In our MEG data, spontaneous beta activity from somatosensory and frontal cortex emerged as noncontinuous beta events typically lasting <150 ms with a stereotypical waveform. Computational modeling uniquely designed to infer the electrical currents underlying these signals showed that beta events could emerge from the integration of nearly synchronous bursts of excitatory synaptic drive targeting proximal and distal dendrites of pyramidal neurons, where the defining feature of a beta event was a strong distal drive that lasted one beta period (∼50 ms). This beta mechanism rigorously accounted for the beta event profiles; several other mechanisms did not. The spatial location of synaptic drive in the model to supragranular and infragranular layers was critical to the emergence of beta events and led to the prediction that beta events should be associated with a specific laminar current profile. Laminar recordings in somatosensory neocortex from anesthetized mice and awake monkeys supported these predictions, suggesting this beta mechanism is conserved across species and recording modalities. These findings make several predictions about optimal states for perceptual and motor performance and guide causal interventions to modulate beta for optimal function. PMID:27469163

  19. Earthquake Early Warning Beta Users: Java, Modeling, and Mobile Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, J. A.; Vinci, M.; Steele, W. P.; Allen, R. M.; Hellweg, M.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) is a system that can provide a few to tens of seconds warning prior to ground shaking at a user's location. The goal and purpose of such a system is to reduce, or minimize, the damage, costs, and casualties resulting from an earthquake. A demonstration earthquake early warning system (ShakeAlert) is undergoing testing in the United States by the UC Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, Caltech, ETH Zurich, University of Washington, the USGS, and beta users in California and the Pacific Northwest. The beta users receive earthquake information very rapidly in real-time and are providing feedback on their experiences of performance and potential uses within their organization. Beta user interactions allow the ShakeAlert team to discern: which alert delivery options are most effective, what changes would make the UserDisplay more useful in a pre-disaster situation, and most importantly, what actions users plan to take for various scenarios. Actions could include: personal safety approaches, such as drop cover, and hold on; automated processes and procedures, such as opening elevator or fire stations doors; or situational awareness. Users are beginning to determine which policy and technological changes may need to be enacted, and funding requirements to implement their automated controls. The use of models and mobile apps are beginning to augment the basic Java desktop applet. Modeling allows beta users to test their early warning responses against various scenarios without having to wait for a real event. Mobile apps are also changing the possible response landscape, providing other avenues for people to receive information. All of these combine to improve business continuity and resiliency.

  20. Modeling the transmission of beta rays through thin foils in planar geometry.

    PubMed

    Stanga, D; De Felice, P; Keightley, J; Capogni, M; Ionescu, E

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the modeling of the transmission of beta rays through thin foils in planar geometry based on the plane source concept, using Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport and least squares fitting. Applications of modeling results for calculating the efficiency of large-area beta sources, transmission coefficient of beta rays through thin foils and the beta detection efficiency of large-area detectors used in surface contamination measurements are also presented. PMID:26524407

  1. Generalized model of island biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Kessler, David A; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics of a local community of competing species with weak immigration from a static regional pool is studied. Implementing the generalized competitive Lotka-Volterra model with demographic noise, a rich dynamics with four qualitatively distinct phases is unfolded. When the overall interspecies competition is weak, the island species recapitulate the mainland species. For higher values of the competition parameter, the system still admits an equilibrium community, but now some of the mainland species are absent on the island. Further increase in competition leads to an intermittent "disordered" phase, where the dynamics is controlled by invadable combinations of species and the turnover rate is governed by the migration. Finally, the strong competition phase is glasslike, dominated by uninvadable states and noise-induced transitions. Our model contains, as a special case, the celebrated neutral island theories of Wilson-MacArthur and Hubbell. Moreover, we show that slight deviations from perfect neutrality may lead to each of the phases, as the Hubbell point appears to be quadracritical. PMID:25974525

  2. Generalized model of island biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, David A.; Shnerb, Nadav M.

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics of a local community of competing species with weak immigration from a static regional pool is studied. Implementing the generalized competitive Lotka-Volterra model with demographic noise, a rich dynamics with four qualitatively distinct phases is unfolded. When the overall interspecies competition is weak, the island species recapitulate the mainland species. For higher values of the competition parameter, the system still admits an equilibrium community, but now some of the mainland species are absent on the island. Further increase in competition leads to an intermittent "disordered" phase, where the dynamics is controlled by invadable combinations of species and the turnover rate is governed by the migration. Finally, the strong competition phase is glasslike, dominated by uninvadable states and noise-induced transitions. Our model contains, as a special case, the celebrated neutral island theories of Wilson-MacArthur and Hubbell. Moreover, we show that slight deviations from perfect neutrality may lead to each of the phases, as the Hubbell point appears to be quadracritical.

  3. The nature and structure of correlations among Big Five ratings: the halo-alpha-beta model.

    PubMed

    Anusic, Ivana; Schimmack, Ulrich; Pinkus, Rebecca T; Lockwood, Penelope

    2009-12-01

    In light of consistently observed correlations among Big Five ratings, the authors developed and tested a model that combined E. L. Thorndike's (1920) general evaluative bias (halo) model and J. M. Digman's (1997) higher order personality factors (alpha and beta) model. With 4 multitrait-multimethod analyses, Study 1 revealed moderate convergent validity for alpha and beta across raters, whereas halo was mainly a unique factor for each rater. In Study 2, the authors showed that the halo factor was highly correlated with a validated measure of evaluative biases in self-ratings. Study 3 showed that halo is more strongly correlated with self-ratings of self-esteem than self-ratings of the Big Five, which suggests that halo is not a mere rating bias but actually reflects overly positive self-evaluations. Finally, Study 4 demonstrated that the halo bias in Big Five ratings is stable over short retest intervals. Taken together, the results suggest that the halo-alpha-beta model integrates the main findings in structural analyses of Big Five correlations. Accordingly, halo bias in self-ratings is a reliable and stable bias in individuals' perceptions of their own attributes. Implications of the present findings for the assessment of Big Five personality traits in monomethod studies are discussed.

  4. Protoplanetary Nebula Evolution using the Beta Viscosity Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.

    2003-01-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of a protoplanetary disk is an important component of the planet formation process. In particular, the dynamic and thermodynamic field plays a critical role in chemical evolution, the migration of dust particles in the nebula, and the radial transport of meteoritic components. The dynamic evolution is investigated using analytical solutions of the surface density transport equations using a turbulence model based on hydrodynamic generation of turbulence. It captures the major properties of the disk including region of separation between radial inflow and-outflow and the evolution of the central plane temperature. The analytical formulas are compared with available numerical solutions based on the alpha viscosity model. The beta viscosity model, heretofore used for steady-state disks, is shown to be a useful approximation for unsteady problems.

  5. Generalized Environment for Modeling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-07

    GEMS is an integrated environment that allows technical analysts, modelers, researchers, etc. to integrate and deploy models and/or decision tools with associated data to the internet for direct use by customers. GEMS does not require that the model developer know how to code or script and therefore delivers this capability to a large group of technical specialists. Customers gain the benefit of being able to execute their own scenarios directly without need for technical support. GEMS is a process that leverages commercial software products with specialized codes that add connectivity and unique functions to support the overall capability. Users integrate pre-existing models with a commercial product and store parameters and input trajectories in a companion commercial database. The model is then exposed into a commercial web environment and a graphical user interface (GUI) is applied by the model developer. Users execute the model through the web based GUI and GEMS manages supply of proper inputs, execution of models, routing of data to models and display of results back to users. GEMS works in layers, the following description is from the bottom up. Modelers create models in the modeling tool of their choice such as Excel, Matlab, or Fortran. They can also use models from a library of previously wrapped legacy codes (models). Modelers integrate the models (or a single model) by wrapping and connecting the models using the Phoenix Integration tool entitled ModelCenter. Using a ModelCenter/SAS plugin (DOE copyright CW-10-08) the modeler gets data from either an SAS or SQL database and sends results back to SAS or SQL. Once the model is working properly, the ModelCenter file is saved and stored in a folder location to which a SharePoint server tool created at INL is pointed. This enables the ModelCenter model to be run from SharePoint. The modeler then goes into Microsoft SharePoint and creates a graphical user interface (GUI) using the ModelCenter WebPart (CW-12

  6. Generalized Environment for Modeling Systems

    2012-02-07

    GEMS is an integrated environment that allows technical analysts, modelers, researchers, etc. to integrate and deploy models and/or decision tools with associated data to the internet for direct use by customers. GEMS does not require that the model developer know how to code or script and therefore delivers this capability to a large group of technical specialists. Customers gain the benefit of being able to execute their own scenarios directly without need for technical support.more » GEMS is a process that leverages commercial software products with specialized codes that add connectivity and unique functions to support the overall capability. Users integrate pre-existing models with a commercial product and store parameters and input trajectories in a companion commercial database. The model is then exposed into a commercial web environment and a graphical user interface (GUI) is applied by the model developer. Users execute the model through the web based GUI and GEMS manages supply of proper inputs, execution of models, routing of data to models and display of results back to users. GEMS works in layers, the following description is from the bottom up. Modelers create models in the modeling tool of their choice such as Excel, Matlab, or Fortran. They can also use models from a library of previously wrapped legacy codes (models). Modelers integrate the models (or a single model) by wrapping and connecting the models using the Phoenix Integration tool entitled ModelCenter. Using a ModelCenter/SAS plugin (DOE copyright CW-10-08) the modeler gets data from either an SAS or SQL database and sends results back to SAS or SQL. Once the model is working properly, the ModelCenter file is saved and stored in a folder location to which a SharePoint server tool created at INL is pointed. This enables the ModelCenter model to be run from SharePoint. The modeler then goes into Microsoft SharePoint and creates a graphical user interface (GUI) using the ModelCenter Web

  7. Estimating riparian understory vegetation cover with beta regression and copula models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eskelson, Bianca N.I.; Madsen, Lisa; Hagar, Joan C.; Temesgen, Hailemariam

    2011-01-01

    Understory vegetation communities are critical components of forest ecosystems. As a result, the importance of modeling understory vegetation characteristics in forested landscapes has become more apparent. Abundance measures such as shrub cover are bounded between 0 and 1, exhibit heteroscedastic error variance, and are often subject to spatial dependence. These distributional features tend to be ignored when shrub cover data are analyzed. The beta distribution has been used successfully to describe the frequency distribution of vegetation cover. Beta regression models ignoring spatial dependence (BR) and accounting for spatial dependence (BRdep) were used to estimate percent shrub cover as a function of topographic conditions and overstory vegetation structure in riparian zones in western Oregon. The BR models showed poor explanatory power (pseudo-R2 ≤ 0.34) but outperformed ordinary least-squares (OLS) and generalized least-squares (GLS) regression models with logit-transformed response in terms of mean square prediction error and absolute bias. We introduce a copula (COP) model that is based on the beta distribution and accounts for spatial dependence. A simulation study was designed to illustrate the effects of incorrectly assuming normality, equal variance, and spatial independence. It showed that BR, BRdep, and COP models provide unbiased parameter estimates, whereas OLS and GLS models result in slightly biased estimates for two of the three parameters. On the basis of the simulation study, 93–97% of the GLS, BRdep, and COP confidence intervals covered the true parameters, whereas OLS and BR only resulted in 84–88% coverage, which demonstrated the superiority of GLS, BRdep, and COP over OLS and BR models in providing standard errors for the parameter estimates in the presence of spatial dependence.

  8. General, stereoselective synthesis of (Z)-beta,gamma-unsaturated nitriles promoted by samarium diiodide.

    PubMed

    Concellón, José M; Rodríguez-Solla, Humberto; Simal, Carmen; Santos, David; Paz, Nieves R

    2008-10-16

    A method to obtain (Z)-beta,gamma-unsaturated nitriles in high or good yields and with moderate or high stereoselectivity is described. The products were achieved through the photoinduced metalation of 3-acetoxy-4-chloronitriles with SmI2. The starting compounds were readily prepared, and a mechanism is proposed to explain this stereoselective beta-elimination reaction.

  9. Trending in Probability of Collision Measurements via a Bayesian Zero-Inflated Beta Mixed Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallejo, Jonathon; Hejduk, Matt; Stamey, James

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the performance of a generalized linear mixed model in predicting the Probabilities of Collision (Pc) for conjunction events. Specifically, we apply this model to the log(sub 10) transformation of these probabilities and argue that this transformation yields values that can be considered bounded in practice. Additionally, this bounded random variable, after scaling, is zero-inflated. Consequently, we model these values using the zero-inflated Beta distribution, and utilize the Bayesian paradigm and the mixed model framework to borrow information from past and current events. This provides a natural way to model the data and provides a basis for answering questions of interest, such as what is the likelihood of observing a probability of collision equal to the effective value of zero on a subsequent observation.

  10. Generalized exponential function and discrete growth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souto Martinez, Alexandre; Silva González, Rodrigo; Lauri Espíndola, Aquino

    2009-07-01

    Here we show that a particular one-parameter generalization of the exponential function is suitable to unify most of the popular one-species discrete population dynamic models into a simple formula. A physical interpretation is given to this new introduced parameter in the context of the continuous Richards model, which remains valid for the discrete case. From the discretization of the continuous Richards’ model (generalization of the Gompertz and Verhulst models), one obtains a generalized logistic map and we briefly study its properties. Notice, however that the physical interpretation for the introduced parameter persists valid for the discrete case. Next, we generalize the (scramble competition) θ-Ricker discrete model and analytically calculate the fixed points as well as their stabilities. In contrast to previous generalizations, from the generalized θ-Ricker model one is able to retrieve either scramble or contest models.

  11. Shell model nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms contributing to double beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Horoi, Mihai

    2013-12-30

    Recent progress in the shell model approach to the nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay process are presented. This includes nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms to neutrionless double beta decay, a comparison between closure and non-closure approximation for {sup 48}Ca, and an updated shell model analysis of nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe.

  12. General models of multilocus evolution.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Mark; Johnson, Toby; Barton, Nick

    2002-08-01

    In 1991, Barton and Turelli developed recursions to describe the evolution of multilocus systems under arbitrary forms of selection. This article generalizes their approach to allow for arbitrary modes of inheritance, including diploidy, polyploidy, sex linkage, cytoplasmic inheritance, and genomic imprinting. The framework is also extended to allow for other deterministic evolutionary forces, including migration and mutation. Exact recursions that fully describe the state of the population are presented; these are implemented in a computer algebra package (available on the Web at http://helios.bto.ed.ac.uk/evolgen). Despite the generality of our framework, it can describe evolutionary dynamics exactly by just two equations. These recursions can be further simplified using a "quasi-linkage equilibrium" (QLE) approximation. We illustrate the methods by finding the effect of natural selection, sexual selection, mutation, and migration on the genetic composition of a population.

  13. NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model ORDEM2008 (Beta Version)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansbery, Eugene G.; Krisko, Paula H.

    2009-01-01

    This is an interim document intended to accompany the beta-release of the ORDEM2008 model. As such it provides the user with a guide for its use, a list of its capabilities, a brief summary of model development, and appendices included to educate the user as to typical runtimes for different orbit configurations. More detailed documentation will be delivered with the final product. ORDEM2008 supersedes NASA's previous model - ORDEM2000. The availability of new sensor and in situ data, the re-analysis of older data, and the development of new analytical techniques, has enabled the construction of this more comprehensive and sophisticated model. Integrated with the software is an upgraded graphical user interface (GUI), which uses project-oriented organization and provides the user with graphical representations of numerous output data products. These range from the conventional average debris size vs. flux magnitude for chosen analysis orbits, to the more complex color-contoured two-dimensional (2-D) directional flux diagrams in terms of local spacecraft pitch and yaw.

  14. Inhomogeneous generalization of some Bianchi models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, M.; Charach, Ch.

    1980-02-01

    Vacuum Bianchi models which can be transformed to the Einstein-Rosen metric are considered. The models are used in order to construct new inhomogeneous universes, which are generalizations of Bianchi cosmologies of types III, V and VIh. Recent generalizations of these Bianchi models, considered by Wainwright et al., are also discussed.

  15. LLNL Ocean General Circulation Model

    2005-12-29

    The LLNL OGCM is a numerical ocean modeling tool for use in studying ocean circulation over a wide range of space and time scales, with primary applications to climate change and carbon cycle science.

  16. General Pressurization Model in Simscape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Servin, Mario; Garcia, Vicky

    2010-01-01

    System integration is an essential part of the engineering design process. The Ares I Upper Stage (US) is a complex system which is made up of thousands of components assembled into subsystems including a J2-X engine, liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) tanks, avionics, thrust vector control, motors, etc. System integration is the task of connecting together all of the subsystems into one large system. To ensure that all the components will "fit together" as well as safety and, quality, integration analysis is required. Integration analysis verifies that, as an integrated system, the system will behave as designed. Models that represent the actual subsystems are built for more comprehensive analysis. Matlab has been an instrument widely use by engineers to construct mathematical models of systems. Simulink, one of the tools offered by Matlab, provides multi-domain graphical environment to simulate and design time-varying systems. Simulink is a powerful tool to analyze the dynamic behavior of systems over time. Furthermore, Simscape, a tool provided by Simulink, allows users to model physical (such as mechanical, thermal and hydraulic) systems using physical networks. Using Simscape, a model representing an inflow of gas to a pressurized tank was created where the temperature and pressure of the tank are measured over time to show the behavior of the gas. By further incorporation of Simscape into model building, the full potential of this software can be discovered and it hopefully can become a more utilized tool.

  17. Seismic modelling of the beta Cep star EN (16) Lacertae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoul, A.; Aerts, C.; Dupret, M. A.; Scuflaire, R.; Korotin, S. A.; Egorova, I. A.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Lehmann, H.; Briquet, M.; De Ridder, J.; Noels, A.

    2003-07-01

    We perform seismic modelling of the massive beta Cep star EN Lacertae. The starting point of our analysis is the spectroscopic mode identification recently performed. To this, we add a new updated photometric mode identification based upon a non-adiabatic description of the eigenfunctions in the outer atmosphere. Both mode identifications agree and this allows us to fine-tune the stellar parameters of EN Lacertae with unprecedented precision. This is done by producing a huge amount of stellar models with different parameters and selecting those that fulfill the frequency values and the mode identification. Our study is the first one of its kind in which a reconcilation between observed pulsational characteristics and theoretical models can be achieved at a level that allows accurate determination of the basic stellar parameters of a massive oscillator. We derive a mass of M=9.62+/- 0.11 Msun and an age of 15.7 million years if we assume that convective overshooting does not occur.

  18. General kin selection models for genetic evolution of sib altruism in diploid and haplodiploid species.

    PubMed

    Levitt, P R

    1975-11-01

    A population genetic approach is presented for general analysis and comparison of kin selection models of sib and half-sib altruism. Nine models are described, each assuming a particular mode of inheritance, number of female inseminations, and Mendelian dominance of the altruist gene. In each model, the selective effects of altruism are described in terms of two general fitness functions, A(beta) and S(beta), giving respectively the expected fitness of an altruist and a nonaltruist as a function of the fraction of altruists beta in a given sibship. For each model, exact conditions are reported for stability at altruist and nonaltruist fixation. Under the Table 3 axions, the stability conditions may then be partially ordered on the basis of implications holding between pairs of conditions. The partial orderings are compared with predictions of the kin selection theory of Hamilton.

  19. Molecular modeling of A1 and A2A adenosine receptors: comparison of rhodopsin- and beta2-adrenergic-based homology models through the docking studies.

    PubMed

    Yuzlenko, Olga; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2009-01-15

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) are members of the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors. The homology models of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors were constructed. The high-resolution X-ray structure of bovine rhodopsin and crystal structure of beta2-adrenergic receptor were used as templates. The binding sites of the A1 and A2A ARs were constructed by using data obtained from mutagenesis experiments as well as docking simulations of the respective AR antagonsists DPCPX and XAC. To compare rhodopsin- and beta2-adrenergic-based models, the binding mode of A1 (KW-3902, LUF-5437) and A2A (KW-6002, ZM-241385) ARs antagonists were also examined. The differences in the binding ability of both models were noted during the study. The beta2-adrenergic-based A2A AR model was much more capable to stabilize the ligand in the binding site cavity than the corresponding rhodopsin-based A2A AR model, however, such differences were not so clear in case of A1 AR models. It was suggested that for the A1 AR it is possible to use the crystal structure of rhodopsin as a template as well as beta2-adrenergic receptor, but for A2A AR, with the now available beta2-adrenergic receptor X-ray structure, docking studies should be avoided on the rhodopsin-based model. However, taking into account that the beta2AR shares about 31% of the residues with the AR in comparison to 21% in case of bRho, we suggest using beta2-adrenergic-based models for the A1 and A2A ARs for further in silico ligand screening also because of their generally better ability to stabilize ligands inside the binding pocket.

  20. Generalized Linear Models in Family Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Zheng

    2005-01-01

    Generalized linear models (GLMs), as defined by J. A. Nelder and R. W. M. Wedderburn (1972), unify a class of regression models for categorical, discrete, and continuous response variables. As an extension of classical linear models, GLMs provide a common body of theory and methodology for some seemingly unrelated models and procedures, such as…

  1. Extended Generalized Linear Latent and Mixed Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segawa, Eisuke; Emery, Sherry; Curry, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    The generalized linear latent and mixed modeling (GLLAMM framework) includes many models such as hierarchical and structural equation models. However, GLLAMM cannot currently accommodate some models because it does not allow some parameters to be random. GLLAMM is extended to overcome the limitation by adding a submodel that specifies a…

  2. Neuroprotective approaches in experimental models of beta-amyloid neurotoxicity: relevance to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Harkany, T; Hortobágyi, T; Sasvári, M; Kónya, C; Penke, B; Luiten, P G; Nyakas, C

    1999-08-01

    1. beta-Amyloid peptides (A beta s) accumulate abundantly in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain in areas subserving information acquisition and processing, and memory formation. A beta fragments are produced in a process of abnormal proteolytic cleavage of their precursor, the amyloid precursor protein (APP). While conflicting data exist in the literature on the roles of A beta s in the brain, and particularly in AD, recent studies have provided firm experimental evidence for the direct neurotoxic properties of A beta. 2. Sequence analysis of A beta s revealed a high degree of evolutionary conservation and inter-species homology of the A beta amino acid sequence. In contrast, synthetic A beta fragments, even if modified fluorescent or isotope-labeled derivatives, are pharmacological candidates for in vitro and in vivo modeling of their cellular actions. During the past decade, acute injection, prolonged mini-osmotic brain perfusion approaches or A beta infusions into the blood circulation were developed in order to investigate the effects of synthetic A beta s, whereas transgenic models provided insight into the distinct molecular steps of pathological APP cleavage. 3. The hippocampus, caudate putamen, amygdala and neocortex all formed primary targets of acute neurotoxicity screening, but functional consequences of A beta infusions were primarily demonstrated following either intracerebroventricular or basal forebrain (medial septum or magnocellular basal nucleus (MBN)) infusions of A beta fragments. 4. In vivo investigations confirmed that, while the active core of A beta is located within the beta(25-35) sequence, the flanking peptide regions influence not only the folding properties of the A beta fragments, but also their in vivo neurotoxic potentials. 5. It has recently been established that A beta administration deranges neuron-glia signaling, affects the glial glutamate uptake and thereby induces noxious glutamatergic stimulation of nerve cells. In fact, a

  3. A Bayesian beta distribution model for estimating rainfall IDF curves in a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Carlos H. R.; Kwon, Hyun-Han; Kim, Jin-Young

    2016-09-01

    The estimation of intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves for rainfall data comprises a classical task in hydrology studies to support a variety of water resources projects, including urban drainage and the design of flood control structures. In a changing climate, however, traditional approaches based on historical records of rainfall and on the stationary assumption can be inadequate and lead to poor estimates of rainfall intensity quantiles. Climate change scenarios built on General Circulation Models offer a way to access and estimate future changes in spatial and temporal rainfall patterns at the daily scale at the utmost, which is not as fine temporal resolution as required (e.g. hours) to directly estimate IDF curves. In this paper we propose a novel methodology based on a four-parameter beta distribution to estimate IDF curves conditioned on the observed (or simulated) daily rainfall, which becomes the time-varying upper bound of the updated nonstationary beta distribution. The inference is conducted in a Bayesian framework that provides a better way to take into account the uncertainty in the model parameters when building the IDF curves. The proposed model is tested using rainfall data from four stations located in South Korea and projected climate change Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) scenarios 6 and 8.5 from the Met Office Hadley Centre HadGEM3-RA model. The results show that the developed model fits the historical data as good as the traditional Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution but is able to produce future IDF curves that significantly differ from the historically based IDF curves. The proposed model predicts for the stations and RCPs scenarios analysed in this work an increase in the intensity of extreme rainfalls of short duration with long return periods.

  4. Generalized cranking model for collective nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, J.; Nix, J. R.

    1984-09-01

    The Inglis cranking model is generalized to take into account effects of any velocity dependence present in the single-particle potential and the reaction of the pairing field to the collective motion. The generalized model is applied to translations, rotations and some special types of vibrations. Some of our results and our numerical calculations are obtained with a harmonic-oscillator single-particle potential. Unlike the inertia calculated with the Inglis cranking model, the inertia calculated with the generalized cranking model is independent of the effective mass and approaches the irrotational value in the limit of large pairing.

  5. A general consumer-resource population model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; DeLeo, Giulio; Briggs, Cheryl J.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Gross, Thilo; Kuris, Armand M.

    2015-01-01

    Food-web dynamics arise from predator-prey, parasite-host, and herbivore-plant interactions. Models for such interactions include up to three consumer activity states (questing, attacking, consuming) and up to four resource response states (susceptible, exposed, ingested, resistant). Articulating these states into a general model allows for dissecting, comparing, and deriving consumer-resource models. We specify this general model for 11 generic consumer strategies that group mathematically into predators, parasites, and micropredators and then derive conditions for consumer success, including a universal saturating functional response. We further show how to use this framework to create simple models with a common mathematical lineage and transparent assumptions. Underlying assumptions, missing elements, and composite parameters are revealed when classic consumer-resource models are derived from the general model.

  6. Conformity and Dissonance in Generalized Voter Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Scott E.; Sander, Leonard M.; Schneider-Mizell, Casey M.

    2007-09-01

    We generalize the voter model to include social forces that produce conformity among voters and avoidance of cognitive dissonance of opinions within a voter. The time for both conformity and consistency (which we call the exit time) is, in general, much longer than for either process alone. We show that our generalized model can be applied quite widely: it is a form of Wright's island model of population genetics, and is related to problems in the physical sciences. We give scaling arguments, numerical simulations, and analytic estimates for the exit time for a range of relative strengths in the tendency to conform and to avoid dissonance.

  7. Yukawa coupling beta-functions in the Standard Model at three loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednyakov, A. V.; Pikelner, A. F.; Velizhanin, V. N.

    2013-05-01

    We present the results for three-loop beta-functions for Yukawa couplings of heavy Standard Model fermions calculated within the unbroken phase of the model. The calculation is carried out with the help of the MINCER program in a general linear gauge, and the final result is independent of the gauge-fixing parameters. In order to calculate three-point functions, we made use of infrared rearrangement (IRR) trick. Due to the chiral structure of the SM a careful treatment of loops with fermions is required to perform the calculation. It turns out that gauge anomaly cancellation in the SM allows us to obtain the result by means of the semi-naive treatment of γ5.

  8. Building a generalized distributed system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, Ravi

    1991-01-01

    A number of topics related to building a generalized distributed system model are discussed. The effects of distributed database modeling on evaluation of transaction rollbacks, the measurement of effects of distributed database models on transaction availability measures, and a performance analysis of static locking in replicated distributed database systems are covered.

  9. A probabilistic respiratory tract dosimetry model with application to beta-particle and photon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, Eduardo Balderrama

    2002-01-01

    Predicting equivalent dose in the human respiratory tract is significant in the assessment of health risks associated with the inhalation of radioactive aerosols. A complete respiratory tract methodology based on the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 66 model was used in this research project for beta-particle and photon emitters. The conventional methodology has been to use standard values (from Reference Man) for parameters to obtain a single dose value. However, the methods used in the current study allow lung dose values to be determined as probability distributions to reflect the spread or variability in doses. To implement the methodology, a computer code, LUDUC, has been modified to include inhalation scenarios of beta-particle and photon emitters. For beta particles, a new methodology was implemented into Monte Carlo simulations to determine absorbed fractions in target tissues within the thoracic region of the respiratory tract. For photons, a new mathematical phantom of extrathoracic and thoracic regions was created based on previous studies to determine specific absorbed fractions in several tissues and organs of the human body due to inhalation of radioactive materials. The application of the methodology and developed data will be helpful in dose reconstruction and prediction efforts concerning the inhalation of short-lived radionuclides or radionuclides of Inhalation Class S. The resulting dose distributions follow a lognormal distribution shape for all scenarios examined. Applying the probabilistic computer code LUDUC to inhalation of strontium and yttrium aerosols has shown several trends, which could also be valid for many S radionuclide compounds that are beta-particle emitters. The equivalent doses are, in general, found to follow lognormal distributions. Therefore, these distributions can be described by geometric means and geometric standard deviations. Furthermore, a mathematical phantom of the extrathoracic and

  10. A pharmacodynamic study on clenbuterol-induced toxicity: beta1- and beta2-adrenoceptors involvement in guinea-pig tachycardia in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, Gabriela; Di Sotto, Antonella; Daniele, Claudia; Battinelli, Lucia; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fiori, Maurizio; Loizzo, Stefano; Loizzo, Alberto

    2007-09-01

    Beta(2)-receptor adrenergic agonists as clenbuterol and analogues are illegally used as growth promoters in cattle, in Europe, as well as in other countries. Following consumption of meat or liver, intoxication cases were described, and cardiovascular toxic effects (tachycardia, hypertension) were of clinical relevance. Therefore, we investigated whether heart rate increase induced by clenbuterol could depend upon stimulation of beta(1)- and/or beta(2)-adrenergic receptors, and in which ratio. We used in vitro guinea-pig atria, a model in which beta(1)-/beta(2)-receptors ratio is similar to that found in men. In our experiments both beta(1)- and beta(2)-receptors contributed to clenbuterol-induced heart rate increase, but with a different potency. The selective beta(2)-antagonist ICI-118,551 competitively antagonized responses to clenbuterol with high affinity (pA(2) 9.47+/-0.28, SchildSlope 0.98+/-0.20 not significantly different from unity, K(B) 0.34 nM). The selective beta(1)-antagonist atenolol antagonized clenbuterol with a relatively lower affinity (pA(2)=7.59+/-0.14), the SchildSlope=1.97+/-0.33 was significantly different from unity (P<0.05). Results show that clenbuterol stimulates guinea-pig heart rate by acting chiefly on beta(2)-adrenoceptor, although responses to clenbuterol apparently are mediated by an inter-play between both beta-adrenoceptors. Further experiments are necessary to understand which beta-adrenergic antagonists are of effectiveness to counteract cardiovascular effects in case of intoxication following clenbuterol, or other beta-adrenergic stimulants.

  11. GENERALIZED VISCOPLASTIC MODELING OF DEBRIS FLOW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1988-01-01

    The earliest model developed by R. A. Bagnold was based on the concept of the 'dispersive' pressure generated by grain collisions. Some efforts have recently been made by theoreticians in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics to modify or improve Bagnold's concept or model. A viable rheological model should consist both of a rate-independent part and a rate-dependent part. A generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model that has both parts as well as two major rheological properties (i. e. , the normal stress effect and soil yield criterion) is shown to be sufficiently accurate, yet practical for general use in debris-flow modeling. In fact, Bagnold's model is found to be only a particular case of the GVF model. analytical solutions for (steady) uniform debris flows in wide channels are obtained from the GVF model based on Bagnold's simplified assumption of constant grain concentration.

  12. Modeling GABA alterations in schizophrenia: a link between impaired inhibition and altered gamma and beta range auditory entrainment.

    PubMed

    Vierling-Claassen, Dorea; Siekmeier, Peter; Stufflebeam, Steven; Kopell, Nancy

    2008-05-01

    The disorganized symptoms of schizophrenia, including severely disordered thought patterns, may be indicative of a problem with the construction and maintenance of cell assemblies during sensory processing and attention. The gamma and beta frequency bands (15-70 Hz) are believed relevant to such processing. This paper addresses the results of an experimental examination of the cortical response of 12 schizophrenia patients and 12 control subjects when presented with auditory click-train stimuli in the gamma/beta frequency band during measurement using magnetoencephalography (MEG), as well as earlier work by Kwon et al. These data indicate that control subjects show an increased 40-Hz response to both 20- and 40-Hz stimulation as compared with patients, whereas schizophrenic subjects show a preference for 20-Hz response to the same driving frequencies. In this work, two computational models of the auditory cortex are constructed based on postmortem studies that indicate cortical interneurons in schizophrenic subjects have decreased GAT-1 (a GABA transporter) and GAD(67) (1 of 2 enzymes responsible for GABA synthesis). The models transition from control to schizophrenic frequency response when an extended inhibitory decay time is introduced; this change captures a possible effect of these GABA alterations. Modeling gamma/beta range auditory entrainment in schizophrenia provides insight into how biophysical mechanisms can impact cognitive function. In addition, the study of dynamics that underlie auditory entrainment in schizophrenia may contribute to the understanding of how gamma and beta rhythms impact cognition in general. PMID:18287555

  13. Knowledge-based generalization of metabolic models.

    PubMed

    Zhukova, Anna; Sherman, David James

    2014-07-01

    Genome-scale metabolic model reconstruction is a complicated process beginning with (semi-)automatic inference of the reactions participating in the organism's metabolism, followed by many iterations of network analysis and improvement. Despite advances in automatic model inference and analysis tools, reconstruction may still miss some reactions or add erroneous ones. Consequently, a human expert's analysis of the model will continue to play an important role in all the iterations of the reconstruction process. This analysis is hampered by the size of the genome-scale models (typically thousands of reactions), which makes it hard for a human to understand them. To aid human experts in curating and analyzing metabolic models, we have developed a method for knowledge-based generalization that provides a higher-level view of a metabolic model, masking its inessential details while presenting its essential structure. The method groups biochemical species in the model into semantically equivalent classes based on the ChEBI ontology, identifies reactions that become equivalent with respect to the generalized species, and factors those reactions into generalized reactions. Generalization allows curators to quickly identify divergences from the expected structure of the model, such as alternative paths or missing reactions, that are the priority targets for further curation. We have applied our method to genome-scale yeast metabolic models and shown that it improves understanding by helping to identify both specificities and potential errors. PMID:24766276

  14. Simple implementation of general dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K.; Pearson, Jonathan A. E-mail: jonathan.pearson@durham.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We present a formalism for the numerical implementation of general theories of dark energy, combining the computational simplicity of the equation of state for perturbations approach with the generality of the effective field theory approach. An effective fluid description is employed, based on a general action describing single-scalar field models. The formalism is developed from first principles, and constructed keeping the goal of a simple implementation into CAMB in mind. Benefits of this approach include its straightforward implementation, the generality of the underlying theory, the fact that the evolved variables are physical quantities, and that model-independent phenomenological descriptions may be straightforwardly investigated. We hope this formulation will provide a powerful tool for the comparison of theoretical models of dark energy with observational data.

  15. A comparison of directed evolution approaches using the beta-glucuronidase model system.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Lori A; Geddie, Melissa L; Alexander, Omar B; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2003-09-26

    Protein engineers can alter the properties of enzymes by directing their evolution in vitro. Many methods to generate molecular diversity and to identify improved clones have been developed, but experimental evolution remains as much an art as a science. We previously used DNA shuffling (sexual recombination) and a histochemical screen to direct the evolution of Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase (GUS) variants with improved beta-galactosidase (BGAL) activity. Here, we employ the same model evolutionary system to test the efficiencies of several other techniques: recursive random mutagenesis (asexual), combinatorial cassette mutagenesis (high-frequency recombination) and a versatile high-throughput microplate screen. GUS variants with altered specificity evolved in each trial, but different combinations of mutagenesis and screening techniques effected the fixation of different beneficial mutations. The new microplate screen identified a broader set of mutations than the previously employed X-gal colony screen. Recursive random mutagenesis produced essentially asexual populations, within which beneficial mutations drove each other into extinction (clonal interference); DNA shuffling and combinatorial cassette mutagenesis led instead to the accumulation of beneficial mutations within a single allele. These results explain why recombinational approaches generally increase the efficiency of laboratory evolution. PMID:12972256

  16. Cosmology of generalized modified gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Sean M.; de Felice, Antonio; Duvvuri, Vikram; Easson, Damien A.; Trodden, Mark; Turner, Michael S.

    2005-03-01

    We consider general curvature-invariant modifications of the Einstein-Hilbert action that become important only in regions of extremely low space-time curvature. We investigate the far future evolution of the Universe in such models, examining the possibilities for cosmic acceleration and other ultimate destinies. The models generically possess de Sitter space as an unstable solution and exhibit an interesting set of attractor solutions which, in some cases, provide alternatives to dark energy models.

  17. Shell-model analysis of the 136Xe double beta decay nuclear matrix elements.

    PubMed

    Horoi, M; Brown, B A

    2013-05-31

    Neutrinoless double beta decay, if observed, could distinguish whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle, and it could be used to determine the absolute scale of the neutrino masses. 136Xe is one of the most promising candidates for observing this rare event. However, until recently there were no positive results for the allowed and less rare two-neutrino double beta decay mode. The small nuclear matrix element associated with the long half-life represents a challenge for nuclear structure models used for its calculation. We report a new shell-model analysis of the two-neutrino double beta decay of 136Xe, which takes into account all relevant nuclear orbitals necessary to fully describe the associated Gamow-Teller strength. We further use the new model to analyze the main contributions to the neutrinoless double beta decay matrix element, and show that they are also diminished.

  18. Some Generalized Physical Models Through Homographic Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agop, Maricel; Gavriluţ, Alina

    2015-10-01

    In the present paper some generalized physical models are established using differential and integral elements geometry of the homographic group. The generalization of the hyperbolic motions (with constant acceleration) on the Minkowskian space-time and classical Kepler problems is analyzed using a variational principle of Matzner-Misner type. This way the Skyrme theory is placed in an inherent continuity with respect to the Newtonian natural philosophy.

  19. Homology modeling of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABA receptor channels and Surflex-docking of fipronil.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jin; Ju, Xiu-Lian; Chen, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Gen-Yan

    2009-09-01

    To further explore the mechanism of selective binding of the representative gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABARs) noncompetitive antagonist (NCA) fipronil to insect over mammalian GABARs, three-dimensional models of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABAR were generated by homology modeling, using the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) of Torpedo marmorata as a template. Fipronil was docked into the putative binding site of the human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 receptors by Surflex-docking, and the calculated docking energies are in agreement with experimental results. The GABA receptor antagonist fipronil exhibited higher potency with house fly beta 3 GABAR than with human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 GABAR. Furthermore, analyses of Surflex-docking suggest that the H-bond interaction of fipronil with Ala2 and Thr6 in the second transmembrane segment (TM2) of these GABARs plays a relatively important role in ligand selective binding. The different subunit assemblies of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABARs may result in differential selectivity for fipronil.

  20. Generalized Gibbs ensemble in integrable lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmar, Lev; Rigol, Marcos

    2016-06-01

    The generalized Gibbs ensemble (GGE) was introduced ten years ago to describe observables in isolated integrable quantum systems after equilibration. Since then, the GGE has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool to predict the outcome of the relaxation dynamics of few-body observables in a variety of integrable models, a process we call generalized thermalization. This review discusses several fundamental aspects of the GGE and generalized thermalization in integrable systems. In particular, we focus on questions such as: which observables equilibrate to the GGE predictions and who should play the role of the bath; what conserved quantities can be used to construct the GGE; what are the differences between generalized thermalization in noninteracting systems and in interacting systems mappable to noninteracting ones; why is it that the GGE works when traditional ensembles of statistical mechanics fail. Despite a lot of interest in these questions in recent years, no definite answers have been given. We review results for the XX model and for the transverse field Ising model. For the latter model, we also report original results and show that the GGE describes spin-spin correlations over the entire system. This makes apparent that there is no need to trace out a part of the system in real space for equilibration to occur and for the GGE to apply. In the past, a spectral decomposition of the weights of various statistical ensembles revealed that generalized eigenstate thermalization occurs in the XX model (hard-core bosons). Namely, eigenstates of the Hamiltonian with similar distributions of conserved quantities have similar expectation values of few-spin observables. Here we show that generalized eigenstate thermalization also occurs in the transverse field Ising model.

  1. Generalized Gibbs ensemble in integrable lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmar, Lev; Rigol, Marcos

    2016-06-01

    The generalized Gibbs ensemble (GGE) was introduced ten years ago to describe observables in isolated integrable quantum systems after equilibration. Since then, the GGE has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool to predict the outcome of the relaxation dynamics of few-body observables in a variety of integrable models, a process we call generalized thermalization. This review discusses several fundamental aspects of the GGE and generalized thermalization in integrable systems. In particular, we focus on questions such as: which observables equilibrate to the GGE predictions and who should play the role of the bath; what conserved quantities can be used to construct the GGE; what are the differences between generalized thermalization in noninteracting systems and in interacting systems mappable to noninteracting ones; why is it that the GGE works when traditional ensembles of statistical mechanics fail. Despite a lot of interest in these questions in recent years, no definite answers have been given. We review results for the XX model and for the transverse field Ising model. For the latter model, we also report original results and show that the GGE describes spin–spin correlations over the entire system. This makes apparent that there is no need to trace out a part of the system in real space for equilibration to occur and for the GGE to apply. In the past, a spectral decomposition of the weights of various statistical ensembles revealed that generalized eigenstate thermalization occurs in the XX model (hard-core bosons). Namely, eigenstates of the Hamiltonian with similar distributions of conserved quantities have similar expectation values of few-spin observables. Here we show that generalized eigenstate thermalization also occurs in the transverse field Ising model.

  2. Space Station Freedom Beta Gimbal Control via Sensitivity Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenwald, David A.; Ozguner, Umit; Graham, Ronald E.

    1993-01-01

    Tracking control of the Space Station Freedom solar array beta gimbals is investigated. Of particular interest is the issue of control in the presence of uncertainty in gimbal friction parameters. Sensitivity functions are incorporated into the feedback loop to desensitize the gimbal control law to parameter variations. Simulation results indicated that one such sensitivity function improves the closed-loop performance of the gimbals in the presence of unexpected friction parameter dispersions.

  3. Pressure-induced constriction is inhibited in a mouse model of reduced betaENaC.

    PubMed

    VanLandingham, Lauren G; Gannon, Kimberly P; Drummond, Heather A

    2009-09-01

    Recent studies suggest certain epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) proteins may be components of mechanosensitive ion channel complexes in vascular smooth muscle cells that contribute to pressure-induced constriction in middle cerebral arteries (MCA). However, the role of a specific ENaC protein, betaENaC, in pressure-induced constriction of MCAs has not been determined. The goal of this study was to determine whether pressure-induced constriction in the MCA is altered in a mouse model with reduced levels of betaENaC. Using quantitative immunofluorescence, we found whole cell betaENaC labeling in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was suppressed 46% in betaENaC homozygous mutant (m/m) mice compared with wild-type littermates (+/+). MCAs from betaENaC +/+ and m/m mice were isolated and placed in a vessel chamber for myographic analysis. Arteries from betaENaC+/+ mice constricted to stepwise increases in perfusion pressure and developed maximal tone of 10 +/- 2% at 90 mmHg (n = 5). In contrast, MCAs from betaENaC m/m mice developed significantly less tone (4 +/- 1% at 90 mmHg, n = 5). Vasoconstrictor responses to KCl (4-80 mM) were identical between genotypes and responses to phenylephrine (10(-7)-10(-4) M) were marginally altered, suggesting that reduced levels of VSMC betaENaC specifically inhibit pressure-induced constriction. Our findings indicate betaENaC is required for normal pressure-induced constriction in the MCA and provide further support for the hypothesis that betaENaC proteins are components of a mechanosensor in VSMCs. PMID:19553501

  4. The effects of interferon-alpha/beta in a model of rat heart transplantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, A. D.; Klein, J. B.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Ogden, L. L. 2nd; Gray, L. A. Jr

    1992-01-01

    Interferons have multiple immunologic effects. One such effect is the activation of expression of cell surface antigens. Interferon alpha/beta enhance expression of class I but not class II histocompatibility antigens. Contradictory information has been published regarding the effect of interferon-alpha/beta administration in patients with kidney transplantation. In a model of rat heart transplantation we demonstrated that administration of interferon-alpha/beta accelerated rejection in a dose-dependent fashion in the absence of maintenance cyclosporine. Animals treated with maintenance cyclosporine had evidence of increased rejection at 20 days that was resolved completely at 45 days with cyclosporine alone.

  5. Generalized Ordinary Differential Equation Models 1

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Hongyu; Wu, Hulin; Xue, Hongqi

    2014-01-01

    Existing estimation methods for ordinary differential equation (ODE) models are not applicable to discrete data. The generalized ODE (GODE) model is therefore proposed and investigated for the first time. We develop the likelihood-based parameter estimation and inference methods for GODE models. We propose robust computing algorithms and rigorously investigate the asymptotic properties of the proposed estimator by considering both measurement errors and numerical errors in solving ODEs. The simulation study and application of our methods to an influenza viral dynamics study suggest that the proposed methods have a superior performance in terms of accuracy over the existing ODE model estimation approach and the extended smoothing-based (ESB) method. PMID:25544787

  6. Redshift propagation equations in the {beta}{sup '{ne}}0 Szekeres models

    SciTech Connect

    Krasinski, Andrzej; Bolejko, Krzysztof

    2011-04-15

    The set of differential equations obeyed by the redshift in the general {beta}{sup '{ne}}0 Szekeres spacetimes is derived. Transversal components of the ray's momentum have to be taken into account, which leads to a set of 3 coupled differential equations. It is shown that in a general Szekeres model, and in a general Lemaitre-Tolman (L-T) model, generic light rays do not have repeatable paths (RLPs): two rays sent from the same source at different times to the same observer pass through different sequences of intermediate matter particles. The only spacetimes in the Szekeres class in which all rays are RLPs are the Friedmann models. Among the proper Szekeres models, RLPs exist only in the axially symmetric subcases, and in each one the RLPs are the null geodesics that intersect each t=constant space on the symmetry axis. In the special models with a 3-dimensional symmetry group (L-T among them), the only RLPs are radial geodesics. This shows that RLPs are very special and in the real Universe should not exist. We present several numerical examples which suggest that the rate of change of positions of objects in the sky, for the studied configuration, is 10{sup -6}-10{sup -7} arc sec per year. With the current accuracy of direction measurement, this drift would become observable after approximately 10 years of monitoring. More precise future observations will be able, in principle, to detect this effect, but there are basic problems with determining the reference direction that does not change.

  7. An economic model of general practice.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, J A; Hall, J; Logan, J; McDonald, M L

    1984-05-26

    The public perceives that doctors earn too much, while general practitioners complain that their income is dwindling . In the absence of reliable data on doctors' incomes, it is impossible to determine whether medical fees are set appropriately, and what effects Medicare might have on general practice. An economic model of practice, using estimates of income and expenditure derived from specified assumptions, was constructed. Then, the effects of changes in various parameters of the model were examined in turn to show how economic forces are likely to affect the behaviour of doctors. It is shown that a general practitioner working at a moderate rate during a normal working week will earn a low income under current schedule fees. Some implications of these findings for practitioners, fee setting, and the public are explored. PMID:6717350

  8. Generalized hydrodynamics model for strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaw, A.; Murillo, M. S.

    2015-07-01

    Beginning with the exact equations of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy, we obtain the density, momentum, and stress tensor-moment equations. We close the moment equations with two closures, one that guarantees an equilibrium state given by density-functional theory and another that includes collisions in the relaxation of the stress tensor. The introduction of a density functional-theory closure ensures self-consistency in the equation-of-state properties of the plasma (ideal and excess pressure, electric fields, and correlations). The resulting generalized hydrodynamics thus includes all impacts of Coulomb coupling, viscous damping, and the high-frequency (viscoelastic) response. We compare our results with those of several known models, including generalized hydrodynamic theory and models obtained using the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander approximation and the quasilocalized charge approximation. We find that the viscoelastic response, including both the high-frequency elastic generalization and viscous wave damping, is important for correctly describing ion-acoustic waves. We illustrate this result by considering three very different systems: ultracold plasmas, dusty plasmas, and dense plasmas. The new model is validated by comparing its results with those of the current autocorrelation function obtained from molecular-dynamics simulations of Yukawa plasmas, and the agreement is excellent. Generalizations of this model to mixtures and quantum systems should be straightforward.

  9. General Equilibrium Models: Improving the Microeconomics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Walter; Westhoff, Frank

    2009-01-01

    General equilibrium models now play important roles in many fields of economics including tax policy, environmental regulation, international trade, and economic development. The intermediate microeconomics classroom has not kept pace with these trends, however. Microeconomics textbooks primarily focus on the insights that can be drawn from the…

  10. Influence of pH on complexing of model beta-d-glucans with zearalenone.

    PubMed

    Yiannikouris, A; François, J; Poughon, L; Dussap, C G; Jeminet, G; Bertin, G; Jouany, J P

    2004-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that isolated beta-(1,3 and 1,6)-D-glucans and related alkali-extracted fractions from the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are able to complex with zearalenone in vitro (affinity up to 50%) and thus may reduce the bioavailability of toxins in the digestive tract. The complexation mechanisms involve cooperative interaction between the two chemical entities that can be computed by Hill's model. Various linear or branched soluble or insoluble beta-D-glucans were evaluated to elucidate their roles in the adsorption mechanisms under three pH conditions (3.0, 6.0, and 8.0) found in the digestive tract. A constant quantity of each beta-D-glucans (1 mg/ml) was mixed at 39 degrees C with increasing amounts of zearalenone (2 to 100 microg/ml), and the amount of bound toxin was measured. Acidic and neutral conditions gave the highest affinity rates (64 to 77%) by beta-(1,3)-D-glucans, whereas alkaline conditions decreased adsorption except when beta-(1,6)-D-glucan side chains were branched on beta-(1,3)-D-glucans. Alkaline conditions appear to impede the active three dimensional conformation of beta-D-glucans and favor single helix and/or random coil structures. Study of the equilibrium between beta-D-glucan-bound and free toxins revealed that two types of chemical interactions occur during toxin complexation with beta-D-glucans, identified as weak chemical linkages such as hydrogen and van der Waals bonds.

  11. Influence of pH on complexing of model beta-d-glucans with zearalenone.

    PubMed

    Yiannikouris, A; François, J; Poughon, L; Dussap, C G; Jeminet, G; Bertin, G; Jouany, J P

    2004-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that isolated beta-(1,3 and 1,6)-D-glucans and related alkali-extracted fractions from the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are able to complex with zearalenone in vitro (affinity up to 50%) and thus may reduce the bioavailability of toxins in the digestive tract. The complexation mechanisms involve cooperative interaction between the two chemical entities that can be computed by Hill's model. Various linear or branched soluble or insoluble beta-D-glucans were evaluated to elucidate their roles in the adsorption mechanisms under three pH conditions (3.0, 6.0, and 8.0) found in the digestive tract. A constant quantity of each beta-D-glucans (1 mg/ml) was mixed at 39 degrees C with increasing amounts of zearalenone (2 to 100 microg/ml), and the amount of bound toxin was measured. Acidic and neutral conditions gave the highest affinity rates (64 to 77%) by beta-(1,3)-D-glucans, whereas alkaline conditions decreased adsorption except when beta-(1,6)-D-glucan side chains were branched on beta-(1,3)-D-glucans. Alkaline conditions appear to impede the active three dimensional conformation of beta-D-glucans and favor single helix and/or random coil structures. Study of the equilibrium between beta-D-glucan-bound and free toxins revealed that two types of chemical interactions occur during toxin complexation with beta-D-glucans, identified as weak chemical linkages such as hydrogen and van der Waals bonds. PMID:15633680

  12. A general model of intake regulation.

    PubMed

    de Castro, John M; Plunkett, Stephanie

    2002-08-01

    Previously proposed models of intake regulation focus on specific variables thought to influence overall intake, and include factors involved in negative feedback loops with intake as well as genetic influences on intake. Recent evidence, however, suggests that these models although informative, are incomplete. They cannot account for the observations of prolonged and increasing deviations from defended levels, weakness and transitoriness of compensatory responses, the presence of powerful factors that are not compensated, and behavioral genetic data suggesting that there are a wide variety of independent genetic influences on numerous factors that influence intake. As a result we propose a new general model of intake regulation in which intake is influenced by both a set of uncompensated factors that are not influenced by intake and by a set of compensated factors that are. The preferred levels of intake and both sets of factors are specified as influenced by heredity. Further, the model includes impact factors, weights, which specify the magnitude of the effect each factor has on intake. The weights are assumed to be different for different individuals and their values are determined by heredity. A computer simulation of the new model demonstrated that it maintains different levels depending upon the external and internal environments, that changes in these environments result in new levels, and that inherited individual differences in responsiveness to these factors can markedly influence the levels obtained. The proposed general model appears to fit existing knowledge and is parsimonious and widely applicable. Future work should be directed to testing the general model and further developing specific models within the conceptual framework employing known physiological systems and uncompensated stimuli.

  13. Effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 with beta-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) on the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model

    SciTech Connect

    Anzai, Jun; Kitamura, Masahiro; Nozaki, Takenori; Nagayasu, Toshie; Terashima, Akio; Asano, Taiji; Murakami, Shinya

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP (an osteo-conductive scaffold) significantly promotes periodontal regeneration in the severe periodontitis model (1-wall defect model) of beagle dog. {yields} FGF-2 enhanced new bone formation via {beta}-TCP at the defects. {yields} In particular, FGF-2 dramatically regenerated new periodontal ligament and cementum formations at the defects, that is one of the most important healing outcomes during the process of periodontal regeneration. {yields} Epithelial downgrowth (undesirable wound healing) was decreased by administration of FGF-2. {yields} This manuscript indicates for the first time that concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP is efficacious in regenerating periodontal tissue following severe destruction of the tissue by progression of periodontitis. -- Abstract: The effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and beta-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) on periodontal regeneration were investigated in the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model. One-wall periodontal defects were created in the mesial portion of both sides of the mandibular first molars, and 0.3% FGF-2 plus {beta}-TCP or {beta}-TCP alone was administered. Radiographic evaluation was performed at 0, 3, and 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, the periodontium with the defect site was removed and histologically analyzed. Radiographic findings showed that co-administration of FGF-2 significantly increased bone mineral contents of the defect sites compared with {beta}-TCP alone. Histologic analysis revealed that the length of the regenerated periodontal ligament, the cementum, distance to the junctional epithelium, new bone height, and area of newly formed bone were significantly increased in the FGF-2 group. No abnormal inflammatory response or ankylosis was observed in either group. These findings indicate the efficacy of concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP as an osteoconductive material for periodontal

  14. Topics in conformal invariance and generalized sigma models

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardo, L M

    1997-05-01

    This thesis consists of two different parts, having in common the fact that in both, conformal invariance plays a central role. In the first part, the author derives conditions for conformal invariance, in the large N limit, and for the existence of an infinite number of commuting classical conserved quantities, in the Generalized Thirring Model. The treatment uses the bosonized version of the model. Two different approaches are used to derive conditions for conformal invariance: the background field method and the Hamiltonian method based on an operator algebra, and the agreement between them is established. The author constructs two infinite sets of non-local conserved charges, by specifying either periodic or open boundary conditions, and he finds the Poisson Bracket algebra satisfied by them. A free field representation of the algebra satisfied by the relevant dynamical variables of the model is also presented, and the structure of the stress tensor in terms of free fields (and free currents) is studied in detail. In the second part, the author proposes a new approach for deriving the string field equations from a general sigma model on the world sheet. This approach leads to an equation which combines some of the attractive features of both the renormalization group method and the covariant beta function treatment of the massless excitations. It has the advantage of being covariant under a very general set of both local and non-local transformations in the field space. The author applies it to the tachyon, massless and first massive level, and shows that the resulting field equations reproduce the correct spectrum of a left-right symmetric closed bosonic string.

  15. Matrix elements for the ground-state to ground-state 2{nu}{beta}{sup -}{beta}{sup -} decay of Te isotopes in a hybrid model

    SciTech Connect

    Bes, D. R.; Civitarese, O.

    2010-01-15

    Theoretical matrix elements, for the ground-state to ground-state two-neutrino double-{beta}-decay mode (2{nu}{beta}{sup -}{beta}{sup -}gs->gs) of {sup 128,130}Te isotopes, are calculated within a formalism that describes interactions between neutrons in a superfluid phase and protons in a normal phase. The elementary degrees of freedom of the model are proton-pair modes and pairs of protons and quasineutrons. The calculation is basically a parameter-free one, because all relevant parameters are fixed from the phenomenology. A comparison with the available experimental data is presented.

  16. Computational Models Describing Possible Mechanisms for Generation of Excessive Beta Oscillations in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pavlides, Alex; Hogan, S. John; Bogacz, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    In Parkinson’s disease, an increase in beta oscillations within the basal ganglia nuclei has been shown to be associated with difficulty in movement initiation. An important role in the generation of these oscillations is thought to be played by the motor cortex and by a network composed of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the external segment of globus pallidus (GPe). Several alternative models have been proposed to describe the mechanisms for generation of the Parkinsonian beta oscillations. However, a recent experimental study of Tachibana and colleagues yielded results which are challenging for all published computational models of beta generation. That study investigated how the presence of beta oscillations in a primate model of Parkinson’s disease is affected by blocking different connections of the STN-GPe circuit. Due to a large number of experimental conditions, the study provides strong constraints that any mechanistic model of beta generation should satisfy. In this paper we present two models consistent with the data of Tachibana et al. The first model assumes that Parkinsonian beta oscillation are generated in the cortex and the STN-GPe circuits resonates at this frequency. The second model additionally assumes that the feedback from STN-GPe circuit to cortex is important for maintaining the oscillations in the network. Predictions are made about experimental evidence that is required to differentiate between the two models, both of which are able to reproduce firing rates, oscillation frequency and effects of lesions carried out by Tachibana and colleagues. Furthermore, an analysis of the models reveals how the amplitude and frequency of the generated oscillations depend on parameters. PMID:26683341

  17. General Regression and Representation Model for Classification

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jianjun; Yang, Jian; Xu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the regularized coding-based classification methods (e.g. SRC and CRC) show a great potential for pattern classification. However, most existing coding methods assume that the representation residuals are uncorrelated. In real-world applications, this assumption does not hold. In this paper, we take account of the correlations of the representation residuals and develop a general regression and representation model (GRR) for classification. GRR not only has advantages of CRC, but also takes full use of the prior information (e.g. the correlations between representation residuals and representation coefficients) and the specific information (weight matrix of image pixels) to enhance the classification performance. GRR uses the generalized Tikhonov regularization and K Nearest Neighbors to learn the prior information from the training data. Meanwhile, the specific information is obtained by using an iterative algorithm to update the feature (or image pixel) weights of the test sample. With the proposed model as a platform, we design two classifiers: basic general regression and representation classifier (B-GRR) and robust general regression and representation classifier (R-GRR). The experimental results demonstrate the performance advantages of proposed methods over state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:25531882

  18. Generalized Models for Rock Joint Surface Shapes

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shigui; Hu, Yunjin; Hu, Xiaofei

    2014-01-01

    Generalized models of joint surface shapes are the foundation for mechanism studies on the mechanical effects of rock joint surface shapes. Based on extensive field investigations of rock joint surface shapes, generalized models for three level shapes named macroscopic outline, surface undulating shape, and microcosmic roughness were established through statistical analyses of 20,078 rock joint surface profiles. The relative amplitude of profile curves was used as a borderline for the division of different level shapes. The study results show that the macroscopic outline has three basic features such as planar, arc-shaped, and stepped; the surface undulating shape has three basic features such as planar, undulating, and stepped; and the microcosmic roughness has two basic features such as smooth and rough. PMID:25152901

  19. Generalized models for rock joint surface shapes.

    PubMed

    Du, Shigui; Hu, Yunjin; Hu, Xiaofei

    2014-01-01

    Generalized models of joint surface shapes are the foundation for mechanism studies on the mechanical effects of rock joint surface shapes. Based on extensive field investigations of rock joint surface shapes, generalized models for three level shapes named macroscopic outline, surface undulating shape, and microcosmic roughness were established through statistical analyses of 20,078 rock joint surface profiles. The relative amplitude of profile curves was used as a borderline for the division of different level shapes. The study results show that the macroscopic outline has three basic features such as planar, arc-shaped, and stepped; the surface undulating shape has three basic features such as planar, undulating, and stepped; and the microcosmic roughness has two basic features such as smooth and rough.

  20. Modeling the Pion Generalized Parton Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezrag, C.

    2016-02-01

    We compute the pion Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD) in a valence dressed quarks approach. We model the Mellin moments of the GPD using Ansätze for Green functions inspired by the numerical solutions of the Dyson-Schwinger Equations (DSE) and the Bethe-Salpeter Equation (BSE). Then, the GPD is reconstructed from its Mellin moment using the Double Distribution (DD) formalism. The agreement with available experimental data is very good.

  1. Anomalous diffusion in generalized Dykhne model

    SciTech Connect

    Dvoretskaya, O. A.; Kondratenko, P. S. Matveev, L. V.

    2010-01-15

    Contaminant transport is investigated in the generalized Dykhne model differing from the original Dykhne model by the presence of advection in the high-permeability medium. An analysis is presented of transport regimes and concentration tail behavior in the high-permeability medium. It is found that the transport regimes include anomalous ones: subdiffusion and quasi-diffusion. A difference is revealed between longitudinal and transverse transport. Regime change over time leads to multiple-regime long-distance asymptotic behavior of concentration distributions. An analogy is drawn between the problems examined here and transport through comb structures.

  2. A General Business Model for Marine Reserves

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Enric; Costello, Christopher; Dougherty, Dawn; Heal, Geoffrey; Kelleher, Kieran; Murray, Jason H.; Rosenberg, Andrew A.; Sumaila, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Marine reserves are an effective tool for protecting biodiversity locally, with potential economic benefits including enhancement of local fisheries, increased tourism, and maintenance of ecosystem services. However, fishing communities often fear short-term income losses associated with closures, and thus may oppose marine reserves. Here we review empirical data and develop bioeconomic models to show that the value of marine reserves (enhanced adjacent fishing + tourism) may often exceed the pre-reserve value, and that economic benefits can offset the costs in as little as five years. These results suggest the need for a new business model for creating and managing reserves, which could pay for themselves and turn a profit for stakeholder groups. Our model could be expanded to include ecosystem services and other benefits, and it provides a general framework to estimate costs and benefits of reserves and to develop such business models. PMID:23573192

  3. Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide (1-36) Enhances Beta Cell Regeneration and Increases Beta Cell Mass in a Mouse Model of Partial Pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mozar, Anaïs; Lin, Hugo; Williams, Katoura; Chin, Connie; Li, Rosemary; Kondegowda, Nagesha Guthalu; Stewart, Andrew F.; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Vasavada, Rupangi Chhaya

    2016-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Finding ways to stimulate the regeneration of endogenous pancreatic beta cells is an important goal in the treatment of diabetes. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), the full-length (1–139) and amino-terminal (1–36) peptides, enhance beta cell function, proliferation, and survival. Therefore, we hypothesize that PTHrP(1–36) has the potential to regenerate endogenous beta cells. Methods The partial pancreatectomy (PPx) mouse model of beta cell injury was used to test this hypothesis. Male Balb/c mice underwent either sham-operation or PPx, and were subsequently injected with PTHrP(1–36) (160μg/kg) or vehicle (veh), for 7, 30, or 90 days. The four groups of mice, sham-veh, sham-PTHrP, PPx-veh, and PPx-PTHrP were assessed for PTHrP and receptor expression, and glucose and beta cell homeostasis. Results PTHrP-receptor, but not the ligand, was significantly up-regulated in islets from mice that underwent PPx compared to sham-operated mice. This suggests that exogenous PTHrP could further enhance beta cell regeneration after PPx. PTHrP did not significantly affect body weight, blood glucose, plasma insulin, or insulin sensitivity, in either sham or PPx mice. Glucose tolerance improved in the PPx-PTHrP versus PPx-veh mice only in the early stages of treatment. As hypothesized, there was a significant increase in beta cell proliferation in PPx-PTHrP mice at days 7 and 30; however, this was normalized by day 90, compared to PPx-veh mice. Enhanced beta cell proliferation translated to a marked increase in beta cell mass at day 90, in PPx-PTHrP versus PPx-veh mice. Conclusions PTHrP(1–36) significantly enhances beta cell regeneration through increased beta cell proliferation and beta cell mass after PPx. Future studies will determine the potential of PTHrP to enhance functional beta cell mass in the setting of diabetes. PMID:27391423

  4. The Application of Global Kinetic Models to HMX Beta-Delta Transition and Cookoff Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wemhoff, A P; Burnham, A K; Nichols III, A L

    2006-12-07

    The reduction of the number of reactions in kinetic models for both the HMX beta-delta phase transition and thermal cookoff provides an attractive alternative to traditional multi-stage kinetic models due to reduced calibration effort requirements. In this study, we use the LLNL code ALE3D to provide calibrated kinetic parameters for a two-reaction bidirectional beta-delta HMX phase transition model based on Sandia Instrumented Thermal Ignition (SITI) and Scaled Thermal Explosion (STEX) temperature history curves, and a Prout-Tompkins cookoff model based on One-Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) data. Results show that the two-reaction bidirectional beta-delta transition model presented here agrees as well with STEX and SITI temperature history curves as a reversible four-reaction Arrhenius model, yet requires an order of magnitude less computational effort. In addition, a single-reaction Prout-Tompkins model calibrated to ODTX data provides better agreement with ODTX data than a traditional multi-step Arrhenius model, and can contain up to 90% less chemistry-limited time steps for low-temperature ODTX simulations. Manual calibration methods for the Prout-Tompkins kinetics provide much better agreement with ODTX experimental data than parameters derived from Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) measurements at atmospheric pressure. The predicted surface temperature at explosion for STEX cookoff simulations is a weak function of the cookoff model used, and a reduction of up to 15% of chemistry-limited time steps can be achieved by neglecting the beta-delta transition for this type of simulation. Finally, the inclusion of the beta-delta transition model in the overall kinetics model can affect the predicted time to explosion by 1% for the traditional multi-step Arrhenius approach, while up to 11% using a Prout-Tompkins cookoff model.

  5. Study of {beta}-Decay in the Proton-Neutron Interacting Boson-Fermion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zuffi, L.; Brant, S.; Yoshida, N.

    2006-04-26

    We study {beta}-decay in odd-A nuclei together with the energy levels and other properties in the proton-neutron interacting-boson-fermion model. We also report on the preliminary results in the odd-odd nuclei in the proton-neutron interacting boson-fermion-fermion model.

  6. Statistical modeling approach for detecting generalized synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Johannes; Haslinger, Robert; Pipa, Gordon

    2012-05-01

    Detecting nonlinear correlations between time series presents a hard problem for data analysis. We present a generative statistical modeling method for detecting nonlinear generalized synchronization. Truncated Volterra series are used to approximate functional interactions. The Volterra kernels are modeled as linear combinations of basis splines, whose coefficients are estimated via l1 and l2 regularized maximum likelihood regression. The regularization manages the high number of kernel coefficients and allows feature selection strategies yielding sparse models. The method's performance is evaluated on different coupled chaotic systems in various synchronization regimes and analytical results for detecting m:n phase synchrony are presented. Experimental applicability is demonstrated by detecting nonlinear interactions between neuronal local field potentials recorded in different parts of macaque visual cortex.

  7. Design of the UCLA general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakawa, A.

    1972-01-01

    An edited version is reported of notes distributed at the Summer Workshop on the UCLA General Circulation Model in June 1971. It presents the computational schemes of the UCLA model, along with the mathematical and physical principles on which these schemes are based. Included are the finite difference schemes for the governing fluid-dynamical equations, designed to maintain the important integral constraints and dispersion characteristics of the motion. Also given are the principles of parameterization of cumulus convection by an ensemble of identical clouds. A model of the ground hydrology, involving the liquid, ice and snow states of water, is included. A short summary is given of the scheme for computing solar and infrared radiation transfers through clear and cloudy air.

  8. Atomic models of de novo designed cc beta-Met amyloid-like fibrils.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Michel O; Gattin, Zrinka; Verel, Rene; Ciani, Barbara; Stromer, Thusnelda; Green, Janelle M; Tittmann, Peter; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Gross, Heinz; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Meier, Beat H; Serpell, Louise C; Müller, Shirley A; Kammerer, Richard A

    2008-02-22

    The common characteristics of amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils from disease- and non-disease-associated proteins offer the prospect that well-defined model systems can be used to systematically dissect the driving forces of amyloid formation. We recently reported the de novo designed cc beta peptide model system that forms a native-like coiled-coil structure at low temperatures and which can be switched to amyloid-like fibrils by increasing the temperature. Here, we report a detailed molecular description of the system in its fibrillar state by characterizing the cc beta-Met variant using several microscopic techniques, circular dichroism spectroscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, and molecular dynamics calculations. We show that cc beta-Met forms amyloid-like fibrils of different morphologies on both the macroscopic and atomic levels, which can be controlled by variations of assembly conditions. Interestingly, heterogeneity is also observed along single fibrils. We propose atomic models of the cc beta-Met amyloid-like fibril, which are in good agreement with all experimental data. The models provide a rational explanation why oxidation of methionine residues completely abolishes cc beta-Met amyloid fibril formation, indicating that a small number of site-specific hydrophobic interactions can play a major role in the packing of polypeptide-chain segments within amyloid fibrils. The detailed structural information available for the cc beta model system provides a strong molecular basis for understanding the influence and relative contribution of hydrophobic interactions on native-state stability, kinetics of fibril formation, fibril packing, and polymorphism.

  9. The multivariate Wright-Fisher process with mutation: Moment-based analysis and inference using a hierarchical Beta model.

    PubMed

    Hobolth, Asger; Siren, Jukka

    2016-04-01

    We consider the diffusion approximation of the multivariate Wright-Fisher process with mutation. Analytically tractable formulas for the first-and second-order moments of the allele frequency distribution are derived, and the moments are subsequently used to better understand key population genetics parameters and modeling frameworks. In particular we investigate the behavior of the expected homozygosity (the probability that two randomly sampled genes are identical) in the transient and stationary phases, and how appropriate the Dirichlet distribution is for modeling the allele frequency distribution at different evolutionary time scales. We find that the Dirichlet distribution is adequate for the pure drift model (no mutations allowed), but the distribution is not sufficiently flexible for more general mutation models. We suggest a new hierarchical Beta distribution for the allele frequencies in the Wright-Fisher process with a mutation model on the nucleotide level that distinguishes between transitions and transversions. PMID:26612605

  10. Lactose crystallization delay in model infant foods made with lactose, beta-lactoglobulin, and starch.

    PubMed

    Nasirpour, A; Landillon, V; Cuq, B; Scher, J; Banon, S; Desobry, S

    2007-08-01

    Handling and storage alter infant food powders due to lactose crystallization and interactions among components. Model infant foods were prepared by colyophilization of lactose, beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), and gelatinized starch. A mixture design was used to define the percentage of each mixture component to simulate a wide range of infant food powders. The kinetics of crystallization was studied by a gravimetric method (dynamic vapor sorption) at 70% relative humidity (RH). After freeze-drying, lactose was amorphous and crystallized at 70% RH. The delay before crystallization depends on the contents of beta-LG and starch in the formulations. A mathematical model was proposed to predict crystallization time (delay) at 70% RH. For the formulation containing 50% lactose, 25% beta-LG, and 25% starch, lactose was still amorphous after 42 h at 70% RH, whereas pure amorphous lactose crystallized after approximately 70 min. Calculated and experimental results of adsorbed moisture from the formulations were compared. Adsorbed water of formulation containing lactose could not be calculated from moisture sorption properties of each component at a given RH because beta-LG and gelatinized starch prevented lactose crystal growth. PMID:17638972

  11. Abundant type 10 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the hippocampus of mouse Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    He, Xue Ying; Wen, Guang Yeong; Merz, George; Lin, Dawei; Yang, Ying Zi; Mehta, Penkaj; Schulz, Horst; Yang, Song Yu

    2002-02-28

    A full-length cDNA of mouse type 10 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17 beta-HSD10) was cloned from brain, representing the accurate nucleotide sequence information that rendered possible an accurate deduction of the amino acid sequence of the wild-type enzyme. A comparison of sequences and three-dimensional models of this enzyme revealed that structures previously reported by other groups carry either a truncated or mutated amino-terminal sequence. Fusion of the first 11 residues of the wild-type enzyme to the green fluorescent protein directed the reporter protein into mitochondria. Thus, the N-terminus was identified as a mitochondrial targeting signal that accounts for the intracellular localization of the mouse enzyme. This enzyme is normally associated with mitochondria, not with the endoplasmic reticulum as suggested by its trivial name 'endoplasmic reticulum-associated amyloid-beta biding protein (ERAB)'. After its C-terminal region was used to raise rabbit anti-17 betaHSD10 antibodies, immunogold electron microscopy showed that an abundance of this enzyme could be found in hippocampal synaptic mitochondria of betaAPP transgenic mice, but not in normal controls. High levels of this enzyme may disrupt steroid hormone homeostasis in synapses and contribute to synapse loss in the hippocampus of the mouse Alzheimer's disease model. PMID:11869808

  12. A generalized model for compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Abdul; Ray, Saibal; Rahaman, Farook

    2016-05-01

    By virtue of the maximum entropy principle, we get an Euler-Lagrange equation which is a highly nonlinear differential equation containing the mass function and its derivatives. Solving the equation by a homotopy perturbation method we derive a generalized expression for the mass which is a polynomial function of the radial distance. Using the mass function we find a partially stable configuration and its characteristics. We show that different physical features of the known compact stars, viz. Her~X-1, RXJ~1856-37, SAX J ( SS1), SAX J ( SS2), and PSR~J~1614-2230, can be explained by the present model.

  13. General Model for Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Marschall, Jochen; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A previous paper (AIAA 94-2042) presented equations and numerical procedures for modeling the thermochemical ablation and pyrolysis of thermal protection materials which contain multiple surface species. This work describes modifications and enhancements to the Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry (MAT) theory and code for application to the general case which includes surface area constraints, rate limited surface reactions, and non-thermochemical mass loss (failure). Detailed results and comparisons with data are presented for the Shuttle Orbiter reinforced carbon-carbon oxidation protection system which contains a mixture of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3), silica (SiO2), silicon carbide (SiC), and carbon (C).

  14. Generalized Drift-Diffusion Model In Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mesbah, S.; Bendib-Kalache, K.; Bendib, A.

    2008-09-23

    A new drift-diffusion model is proposed based on the computation of the stationary nonlocal current density. The semi classical Boltzmann equation is solved keeping all the anisotropies of the distribution function with the use of the continued fractions. The conductivity is calculated in the linear approximation and for arbitrary collision frequency with respect to Kv{sub t} where K{sup -1} is the characteristic length scale of the system and V{sub t} is the thermal velocity. The nonlocal conductivity can be used to close the generalized drift-diffusion equations valid for arbitrary collisionality.

  15. Snow hydrology in a general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Susan; Roads, John O.; Glatzmaier, Gary

    1994-01-01

    A snow hydrology has been implemented in an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). The snow hydrology consists of parameterizations of snowfall and snow cover fraction, a prognostic calculation of snow temperature, and a model of the snow mass and hydrologic budgets. Previously, only snow albedo had been included by a specified snow line. A 3-year GCM simulation with this now more complete surface hydrology is compared to a previous GCM control run with the specified snow line, as well as with observations. In particular, the authors discuss comparisons of the atmospheric and surface hydrologic budgets and the surface energy budget for U.S. and Canadian areas. The new snow hydrology changes the annual cycle of the surface moisture and energy budgets in the model. There is a noticeable shift in the runoff maximum from winter in the control run to spring in the snow hydrology run. A substantial amount of GCM winter precipitation is now stored in the seasonal snowpack. Snow cover also acts as an important insulating layer between the atmosphere and the ground. Wintertime soil temperatures are much higher in the snow hydrology experiment than in the control experiment. Seasonal snow cover is important for dampening large fluctuations in GCM continental skin temperature during the Northern Hemisphere winter. Snow depths and snow extent show good agreement with observations over North America. The geographic distribution of maximum depths is not as well simulated by the model due, in part, to the coarse resolution of the model. The patterns of runoff are qualitatively and quantitatively similar to observed patterns of streamflow averaged over the continental United States. The seasonal cycles of precipitation and evaporation are also reasonably well simulated by the model, although their magnitudes are larger than is observed. This is due, in part, to a cold bias in this model, which results in a dry model atmosphere and enhances the hydrologic cycle everywhere.

  16. Generalized mathematical models in design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papalambros, Panos Y.; Rao, J. R. Jagannatha

    1989-01-01

    The theory of optimality conditions of extremal problems can be extended to problems continuously deformed by an input vector. The connection between the sensitivity, well-posedness, stability and approximation of optimization problems is steadily emerging. The authors believe that the important realization here is that the underlying basis of all such work is still the study of point-to-set maps and of small perturbations, yet what has been identified previously as being just related to solution procedures is now being extended to study modeling itself in its own right. Many important studies related to the theoretical issues of parametric programming and large deformation in nonlinear programming have been reported in the last few years, and the challenge now seems to be in devising effective computational tools for solving these generalized design optimization models.

  17. A More General, Quasineutral Plasma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernsler, Richard

    2003-10-01

    More than seventy-five years ago, Irving Langmuir proposed a quasineutral plasma model still widely used today. The electrostatic field is derived from the electron density using the Boltzmann approximation, while the electron density is obtained from the ion densities using quasineutrality. However, the Boltzmann approximation is not always valid and has no relationship to quasineutrality. Moreover, the solutions thus obtained are usually singular near the ion sound speed, thus necessitating an additional boundary condition known as the Bohm condition. This condition is difficult to use when multiple ion species are present, is ill posed in kinetic treatments, and does not always apply. In this talk, a more general quasineutral model is presented to circumvent these limitations.

  18. In situ detection of phosphorylated platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta using a generalized proximity ligation method.

    PubMed

    Jarvius, Malin; Paulsson, Janna; Weibrecht, Irene; Leuchowius, Karl-Johan; Andersson, Ann-Catrin; Wählby, Carolina; Gullberg, Mats; Botling, Johan; Sjöblom, Tobias; Markova, Boyka; Ostman, Arne; Landegren, Ulf; Söderberg, Ola

    2007-09-01

    Improved methods are needed for in situ characterization of post-translational modifications in cell lines and tissues. For example, it is desirable to monitor the phosphorylation status of individual receptor tyrosine kinases in samples from human tumors treated with inhibitors to evaluate therapeutic responses. Unfortunately the leading methods for observing the dynamics of tissue post-translational modifications in situ, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, exhibit limited sensitivity and selectivity. Proximity ligation assay is a novel method that offers improved selectivity through the requirement of dual recognition and increased sensitivity by including DNA amplification as a component of detection of the target molecule. Here we therefore established a generalized in situ proximity ligation assay to investigate phosphorylation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRbeta) in cells stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor BB. Antibodies specific for immunoglobulins from different species, modified by attachment of DNA strands, were used as secondary proximity probes together with a pair of primary antibodies from the corresponding species. Dual recognition of receptors and phosphorylated sites by the primary antibodies in combination with the secondary proximity probes was used to generate circular DNA strands; this was followed by signal amplification by replicating the DNA circles via rolling circle amplification. We detected tyrosine phosphorylated PDGFRbeta in human embryonic kidney cells stably overexpressing human influenza hemagglutinin-tagged human PDGFRbeta in porcine aortic endothelial cells transfected with the beta-receptor, but not in cells transfected with the alpha-receptor, and also in immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts, BJ hTert, endogenously expressing the PDGFRbeta. We furthermore visualized tyrosine phosphorylated PDGFRbeta in tissue sections from fresh frozen human scar tissue undergoing wound healing

  19. The evolution of eukaryotic cells from the perspective of peroxisomes: phylogenetic analyses of peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes support mitochondria-first models of eukaryotic cell evolution.

    PubMed

    Bolte, Kathrin; Rensing, Stefan A; Maier, Uwe-G

    2015-02-01

    Beta-oxidation of fatty acids and detoxification of reactive oxygen species are generally accepted as being fundamental functions of peroxisomes. Additionally, these pathways might have been the driving force favoring the selection of this compartment during eukaryotic evolution. Here we performed phylogenetic analyses of enzymes involved in beta-oxidation of fatty acids in Bacteria, Eukaryota, and Archaea. These imply an alpha-proteobacterial origin for three out of four enzymes. By integrating the enzymes' history into the contrasting models on the origin of eukaryotic cells, we conclude that peroxisomes most likely evolved non-symbiotically and subsequent to the acquisition of mitochondria in an archaeal host cell.

  20. Generalization ability of fractional polynomial models.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yunwen; Ding, Lixin; Ding, Yiming

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of learning the functional dependency between input and output variables from scattered data using fractional polynomial models (FPM) is investigated. The estimation error bounds are obtained by calculating the pseudo-dimension of FPM, which is shown to be equal to that of sparse polynomial models (SPM). A linear decay of the approximation error is obtained for a class of target functions which are dense in the space of continuous functions. We derive a structural risk analogous to the Schwartz Criterion and demonstrate theoretically that the model minimizing this structural risk can achieve a favorable balance between estimation and approximation errors. An empirical model selection comparison is also performed to justify the usage of this structural risk in selecting the optimal complexity index from the data. We show that the construction of FPM can be efficiently addressed by the variable projection method. Furthermore, our empirical study implies that FPM could attain better generalization performance when compared with SPM and cubic splines.

  1. Generalization ability of fractional polynomial models.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yunwen; Ding, Lixin; Ding, Yiming

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of learning the functional dependency between input and output variables from scattered data using fractional polynomial models (FPM) is investigated. The estimation error bounds are obtained by calculating the pseudo-dimension of FPM, which is shown to be equal to that of sparse polynomial models (SPM). A linear decay of the approximation error is obtained for a class of target functions which are dense in the space of continuous functions. We derive a structural risk analogous to the Schwartz Criterion and demonstrate theoretically that the model minimizing this structural risk can achieve a favorable balance between estimation and approximation errors. An empirical model selection comparison is also performed to justify the usage of this structural risk in selecting the optimal complexity index from the data. We show that the construction of FPM can be efficiently addressed by the variable projection method. Furthermore, our empirical study implies that FPM could attain better generalization performance when compared with SPM and cubic splines. PMID:24140985

  2. Study on the C-terminal beta-hairpin of protein G in AB heteropolymer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Yeon

    2016-08-01

    The off-lattice AB heteropolymer model, consisting of the hydrophobic (A) and hydrophilic (B) polymers, is one of popular protein models. Its energy function includes the bending energy and the van der Waals interaction energy. The properties and the energy landscape of the C-terminal beta-hairpin of protein G are studied in the off-lattice AB heteropolymer model with conformational space annealing, a powerful global optimization method.

  3. Modeling of turbulent supersonic H2-air combustion with a multivariate beta PDF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baurle, R. A.; Hassan, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent calculations of turbulent supersonic reacting shear flows using an assumed multivariate beta PDF (probability density function) resulted in reduced production rates and a delay in the onset of combustion. This result is not consistent with available measurements. The present research explores two possible reasons for this behavior: use of PDF's that do not yield Favre averaged quantities, and the gradient diffusion assumption. A new multivariate beta PDF involving species densities is introduced which makes it possible to compute Favre averaged mass fractions. However, using this PDF did not improve comparisons with experiment. A countergradient diffusion model is then introduced. Preliminary calculations suggest this to be the cause of the discrepancy.

  4. MSCALE: A General Utility for Multiscale Modeling.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, H Lee; Miller, Benjamin T; Hodoscek, Milan; Okur, Asim; Larkin, Joseph D; Ponder, Jay W; Brooks, Bernard R

    2011-04-12

    The combination of theoretical models of macromolecules that exist at different spatial and temporal scales has become increasingly important for addressing complex biochemical problems. This work describes the extension of concurrent multiscale approaches, introduces a general framework for carrying out calculations, and describes its implementation into the CHARMM macromolecular modeling package. This functionality, termed MSCALE, generalizes both the additive and subtractive multiscale scheme (e.g. QM/MM ONIOM-type), and extends its support to classical force fields, coarse grained modeling (e.g. ENM, GNM, etc.), and a mixture of them all. The MSCALE scheme is completely parallelized with each subsystem running as an independent, but connected calculation. One of the most attractive features of MSCALE is the relative ease of implementation using the standard MPI communication protocol. This allows external access to the framework and facilitates the combination of functionality previously isolated in separate programs. This new facility is fully integrated with free energy perturbation methods, Hessian based methods, and the use of periodicity and symmetry, which allows the calculation of accurate pressures. We demonstrate the utility of this new technique with four examples; (1) subtractive QM/MM and QM/QM calculations; (2) multi-force field alchemical free energy perturbation; (3) integration with the SANDER module of AMBER and the TINKER package to gain access to potentials not available in CHARMM; and (4) mixed resolution (i.e. coarse grain / all-atom) normal mode analysis. The potential of this new tool is clearly established and in conclusion an interesting mathematical problem is highlighted and future improvements are proposed.

  5. Inclusion complexes of pyrimethamine in 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin: characterization, phase solubility and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Márcia Valéria Gaspar; Vieira, Elze Kelly Barbosa; Lázaro, Gilderman Silva; de Souza Conegero, Leila; Ferreira, Odair Pastor; Almeida, Lui S Eduardo; Barreto, Ledjane Silva; da Costa, Nivan Bezerra; Gimenez, Iara F

    2007-09-01

    The inclusion complexation of pyrimethamine in 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin has been investigated by 2D (1)H NMR, FTIR and UV/visible spectroscopy and also by molecular modelling methods (AM1, PM3, MM3). From the phase-solubility diagram a linear increase was observed in pyrimethamine aqueous solubility in the presence of 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin, evidencing the formation of a soluble inclusion complex. According to the continuous variation method (Job's plot) applied to fluorescence measurements, a 1:1 stoichiometry has been proposed for the complex. Concerning the structure of the complex, a Cl-in orientation of pyrimethamine in the 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin cavity has been proposed from the theoretical calculations, being confirmed by two-dimensional (1)H NMR spectroscopy (ROESY). The thermal behaviour has also been studied, providing complementary evidences of complex formation.

  6. Sorption of agrochemical model compounds by sorbent materials containing beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Lee D; Mohamed, Mohamed H; Guo, Rui; Pratt, Dawn Y; Kwon, Jae Hyuck; Mahmud, Sarker T

    2010-04-01

    Polymeric sorbent materials that incorporate beta-cyclodextrin (CD) have been prepared and their sorption behavior toward two model agrochemical contaminant compounds, p-nitrophenol (PNP) and methyl chloride examined. The sorption of PNP was studied in aqueous solution using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, whereas the sorption of methyl chloride from the gas phase was studied using a Langmuir adsorption method. The sorption results for PNP in solution were compared between granular activated carbon (GAC), modified GAC, CD copolymers, and CD-based mesoporous silica hybrid materials. Nitrogen porosimetry at 77 K was used to estimate the surface area and pore structure properties of the sorbent materials. The sorbents displayed variable surface areas as follows: copolymers (36.2-157 m(2)/g), CD-silica materials (307-906 m(2)/g), surface modified GAC (657 m(2)/g), and granular activated carbon (approximately 10(3) m(2)/g). The sorption capacities for PNP and methyl chloride with the different sorbents are listed in descending order as follows: GAC > copolymers > surface modified GAC > CD-silica hybrid materials. In general, the differences in the sorption properties of the sorbents were related to the following: (i) surface area of the sorbent, (ii) CD content and accessibility, (iii) and the chemical nature of the sorbent material. PMID:20407992

  7. Insulin granule trafficking in beta-cells: mathematical model of glucose-induced insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Bertuzzi, Alessandro; Salinari, Serenella; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2007-07-01

    A mathematical model that represents the dynamics of intracellular insulin granules in beta-cells is proposed. Granule translocation and exocytosis are controlled by signals assumed to be essentially related to ATP-to-ADP ratio and cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. The model provides an interpretation of the roles of the triggering and amplifying pathways of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Values of most of the model parameters were inferred from available experimental data. The numerical simulations represent a variety of experimental conditions, such as the stimulation by high K(+) and by different time courses of extracellular glucose, and the predicted responses agree with published experimental data. Model capacity to represent data measured in a hyperglycemic clamp was also tested. Model parameter changes that may reflect alterations of beta-cell function present in type 2 diabetes are investigated, and the action of pharmacological agents that bind to sulfonylurea receptors is simulated.

  8. GPU Developments for General Circulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleyard, Jeremy; Posey, Stan; Ponder, Carl; Eaton, Joe

    2014-05-01

    Current trends in high performance computing (HPC) are moving towards the use of graphics processing units (GPUs) to achieve speedups through the extraction of fine-grain parallelism of application software. GPUs have been developed exclusively for computational tasks as massively-parallel co-processors to the CPU, and during 2013 an extensive set of new HPC architectural features were developed in a 4th generation of NVIDIA GPUs that provide further opportunities for GPU acceleration of general circulation models used in climate science and numerical weather prediction. Today computational efficiency and simulation turnaround time continue to be important factors behind scientific decisions to develop models at higher resolutions and deploy increased use of ensembles. This presentation will examine the current state of GPU parallel developments for stencil based numerical operations typical of dynamical cores, and introduce new GPU-based implicit iterative schemes with GPU parallel preconditioning and linear solvers based on ILU, Krylov methods, and multigrid. Several GCMs show substantial gain in parallel efficiency from second-level fine-grain parallelism under first-level distributed memory parallel through a hybrid parallel implementation. Examples are provided relevant to science-scale HPC practice of CPU-GPU system configurations based on model resolution requirements of a particular simulation. Performance results compare use of the latest conventional CPUs with and without GPU acceleration. Finally a forward looking discussion is provided on the roadmap of GPU hardware, software, tools, and programmability for GCM development.

  9. A general phenomenological model for work function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, I.; Chou, S. H.; Yuan, H.

    2014-07-01

    A general phenomenological model is presented for obtaining the zero Kelvin work function of any crystal facet of metals and semiconductors, both clean and covered with a monolayer of electropositive atoms. It utilizes the known physical structure of the crystal and the Fermi energy of the two-dimensional electron gas assumed to form on the surface. A key parameter is the number of electrons donated to the surface electron gas per surface lattice site or adsorbed atom, which is taken to be an integer. Initially this is found by trial and later justified by examining the state of the valence electrons of the relevant atoms. In the case of adsorbed monolayers of electropositive atoms a satisfactory justification could not always be found, particularly for cesium, but a trial value always predicted work functions close to the experimental values. The model can also predict the variation of work function with temperature for clean crystal facets. The model is applied to various crystal faces of tungsten, aluminium, silver, and select metal oxides, and most demonstrate good fits compared to available experimental values.

  10. Neutrinoless double beta decay in type I+II seesaw models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, Debasish; Dasgupta, Arnab

    2015-11-01

    We study neutrinoless double beta decay in left-right symmetric extension of the standard model with type I and type II seesaw origin of neutrino masses. Due to the enhanced gauge symmetry as well as extended scalar sector, there are several new physics sources of neutrinoless double beta decay in this model. Ignoring the left-right gauge boson mixing and heavy-light neutrino mixing, we first compute the contributions to neutrinoless double beta decay for type I and type II dominant seesaw separately and compare with the standard light neutrino contributions. We then repeat the exercise by considering the presence of both type I and type II seesaw, having non-negligible contributions to light neutrino masses and show the difference in results from individual seesaw cases. Assuming the new gauge bosons and scalars to be around a TeV, we constrain different parameters of the model including both heavy and light neutrino masses from the requirement of keeping the new physics contribution to neutrinoless double beta decay amplitude below the upper limit set by the GERDA experiment and also satisfying bounds from lepton flavor violation, cosmology and colliders.

  11. Symplectic models for general insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Forest, E.; Robin, D. S.; Nishimura, H.; Wolski, A.; Litvinenko, V. N.

    2001-06-01

    A variety of insertion devices (IDs), wigglers and undulators, linearly or elliptically polarized,are widely used as high brightness radiation sources at the modern light source rings. Long and high-field wigglers have also been proposed as the main source of radiation damping at next generation damping rings. As a result, it becomes increasingly important to understand the impact of IDs on the charged particle dynamics in the storage ring. In this paper, we report our recent development of a general explicit symplectic model for IDs with the paraxial ray approximation. High-order explicit symplectic integrators are developed to study real-world insertion devices with a number of wiggler harmonics and arbitrary polarizations.

  12. A Simple General Model of Evolutionary Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurner, Stefan

    Evolution is a process in which some variations that emerge within a population (of, e.g., biological species or industrial goods) get selected, survive, and proliferate, whereas others vanish. Survival probability, proliferation, or production rates are associated with the "fitness" of a particular variation. We argue that the notion of fitness is an a posteriori concept in the sense that one can assign higher fitness to species or goods that survive but one can generally not derive or predict fitness per se. Whereas proliferation rates can be measured, fitness landscapes, that is, the inter-dependence of proliferation rates, cannot. For this reason we think that in a physical theory of evolution such notions should be avoided. Here we review a recent quantitative formulation of evolutionary dynamics that provides a framework for the co-evolution of species and their fitness landscapes (Thurner et al., 2010, Physica A 389, 747; Thurner et al., 2010, New J. Phys. 12, 075029; Klimek et al., 2009, Phys. Rev. E 82, 011901 (2010). The corresponding model leads to a generic evolutionary dynamics characterized by phases of relative stability in terms of diversity, followed by phases of massive restructuring. These dynamical modes can be interpreted as punctuated equilibria in biology, or Schumpeterian business cycles (Schumpeter, 1939, Business Cycles, McGraw-Hill, London) in economics. We show that phase transitions that separate phases of high and low diversity can be approximated surprisingly well by mean-field methods. We demonstrate that the mathematical framework is suited to understand systemic properties of evolutionary systems, such as their proneness to collapse, or their potential for diversification. The framework suggests that evolutionary processes are naturally linked to self-organized criticality and to properties of production matrices, such as their eigenvalue spectra. Even though the model is phrased in general terms it is also practical in the sense

  13. General approach for the stereocontrolled construction of the beta-lactam ring in amino acid-derived 4-alkyl-4-carboxy-2-azetidinones.

    PubMed

    Gerona-Navarro, Guillermo; García-López, M Teresa; González-Muñiz, Rosario

    2002-05-31

    The first general approach toward the asymmetric synthesis of 4-alkyl-4-carboxy-2-azetidinones derived from amino acids is described. The stereoselective construction of the beta-lactam ring was achieved through base-mediated intramolecular cyclization of the corresponding N(alpha)-chloroacetyl derivatives bearing (+)- or (-)-10-(N,N-dicyclohexylsulfamoyl)isoborneol as chiral auxiliary (ee up to 82%).

  14. Entropy maximization under the constraints on the generalized Gini index and its application in modeling income distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi Tanak, A.; Mohtashami Borzadaran, G. R.; Ahmadi, J.

    2015-11-01

    In economics and social sciences, the inequality measures such as Gini index, Pietra index etc., are commonly used to measure the statistical dispersion. There is a generalization of Gini index which includes it as special case. In this paper, we use principle of maximum entropy to approximate the model of income distribution with a given mean and generalized Gini index. Many distributions have been used as descriptive models for the distribution of income. The most widely known of these models are the generalized beta of second kind and its subclass distributions. The obtained maximum entropy distributions are fitted to the US family total money income in 2009, 2011 and 2013 and their relative performances with respect to generalized beta of second kind family are compared.

  15. Modeling extended fluid objects in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Conrad

    The purpose of this dissertation is to introduce and explore the notion of modeling extended fluid objects in numerical general relativity. These extended fluid objects, called Fat Particles, are proxies for compact hydrodynamic objects. Unlike full hydrodynamic models, we make the approximation that the details of the matter distribution are riot as important as the gross motion of the Fat Particles center of mass and its contribution to the gravitational field. Thus we provide a semi-analytic model of matter for numerical simulations of Einstein's equations, which may help in modeling gravitational radiation from candidate sources. Our approach to carrying out these investigations is to begin with a continuum variational principle, which yields the desired hydrodynamic and gravitational equations for ideal fluids. Following our analysis of the related numerical technique, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), we apply a set of discretization and smoothing rules to obtain a discrete action. Subsequent variations yield the Fat Particle equations. Our analysis of a classical ideal fluid demonstrated that a Newtonian Fat Particle is capable of remaining at rest while generating its own gravitational field. We then developed analogous principles for describing relativistic ideal fluids in both covariant and ADM 3+1 forms. Using these principles, we developed analytic and numerical results from relativistic Fat Particle theory. We began with the Subscribe Only model, in which a Fat Particle of negligible mass moves in a fixed background metric. Corrections to its motion due to the extended nature of the Fat Particle, are obtained by summing metric contributions over its volume. We find a universal scaling law that describes the phase shift, relative to a test particle, that is independent of its size, shape, and distribution. We then show that finite-size effects eventually dominate radiation damping effects in describing the motion of a white dwarf around a more

  16. Detecting contaminated birthdates using generalized additive models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Erroneous patient birthdates are common in health databases. Detection of these errors usually involves manual verification, which can be resource intensive and impractical. By identifying a frequent manifestation of birthdate errors, this paper presents a principled and statistically driven procedure to identify erroneous patient birthdates. Results Generalized additive models (GAM) enabled explicit incorporation of known demographic trends and birth patterns. With false positive rates controlled, the method identified birthdate contamination with high accuracy. In the health data set used, of the 58 actual incorrect birthdates manually identified by the domain expert, the GAM-based method identified 51, with 8 false positives (resulting in a positive predictive value of 86.0% (51/59) and a false negative rate of 12.0% (7/58)). These results outperformed linear time-series models. Conclusions The GAM-based method is an effective approach to identify systemic birthdate errors, a common data quality issue in both clinical and administrative databases, with high accuracy. PMID:24923281

  17. Mouse model to study human A beta2M amyloidosis: generation of a transgenic mouse with excessive expression of human beta2-microglobulin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengyao; Fu, Xiaoying; Sawashita, Jinko; Yao, Junjie; Zhang, Beiru; Qian, Jinze; Tomozawa, Hiroshi; Mori, Masayuki; Ando, Yukio; Naiki, Hironobu; Higuchi, Keiichi

    2010-06-01

    Patients on long-term hemodialysis can develop dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA) due to deposition of beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m) into amyloid fibrils (Abeta(2)M). Despite intensive biochemical studies, the pathogenesis of amyloid deposition in DRA patients remains poorly understood. To elucidate the mechanisms that underlie Abeta(2)M fibril formation in DRA, we generated transgenic mice that overexpress human beta(2)m protein in a mouse beta(2)m gene knockout background (hB2MTg(+/+) mB2m(+/+)). The hB2MTg(+/+)mB2m(-/-) mice express a high level of human beta(2)m protein in many tissues as well as a high plasma beta(2)m concentration (192.8 mg/L). This concentration is >100 times higher than that observed in healthy humans and >4 times higher than that detected in patients on dialysis. We examined spontaneous and amyloid fibril-induced amyloid deposition in these mice. Amyloid deposition of beta(2)m protein was not observed in aged or amyloid fibril injected animals. However, mouse senile apolipoprotein A-II amyloidosis (AApoAII) was detected, particularly in the joints of mice that were injected with AApoAII amyloid fibrils. This study demonstrates that this mouse model could be valuable in studying the components and conditions that promote DRA, and indicates that high plasma concentrations of hbeta(2)m as well as seeding with pre-existing amyloid fibrils may not be sufficient to induce Abeta(2)M.

  18. General single phase wellbore flow model

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Liang-Biao; Arbabi, S.; Aziz, K.

    1997-02-05

    A general wellbore flow model, which incorporates not only frictional, accelerational and gravitational pressure drops, but also the pressure drop caused by inflow, is presented in this report. The new wellbore model is readily applicable to any wellbore perforation patterns and well completions, and can be easily incorporated in reservoir simulators or analytical reservoir inflow models. Three dimensionless numbers, the accelerational to frictional pressure gradient ratio R{sub af}, the gravitational to frictional pressure gradient ratio R{sub gf}, and the inflow-directional to accelerational pressure gradient ratio R{sub da}, have been introduced to quantitatively describe the relative importance of different pressure gradient components. For fluid flow in a production well, it is expected that there may exist up to three different regions of the wellbore: the laminar flow region, the partially-developed turbulent flow region, and the fully-developed turbulent flow region. The laminar flow region is located near the well toe, the partially-turbulent flow region lies in the middle of the wellbore, while the fully-developed turbulent flow region is at the downstream end or the heel of the wellbore. Length of each region depends on fluid properties, wellbore geometry and flow rate. As the distance from the well toe increases, flow rate in the wellbore increases and the ratios R{sub af} and R{sub da} decrease. Consequently accelerational and inflow-directional pressure drops have the greatest impact in the toe region of the wellbore. Near the well heel the local wellbore flow rate becomes large and close to the total well production rate, here R{sub af} and R{sub da} are small, therefore, both the accelerational and inflow-directional pressure drops can be neglected.

  19. Generalized Reduced Order Modeling of Aeroservoelastic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariffo, James Michael

    Transonic aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic (ASE) modeling presents a significant technical and computational challenge. Flow fields with a mixture of subsonic and supersonic flow, as well as moving shock waves, can only be captured through high-fidelity CFD analysis. With modern computing power, it is realtively straightforward to determine the flutter boundary for a single structural configuration at a single flight condition, but problems of larger scope remain quite costly. Some such problems include characterizing a vehicle's flutter boundary over its full flight envelope, optimizing its structural weight subject to aeroelastic constraints, and designing control laws for flutter suppression. For all of these applications, reduced-order models (ROMs) offer substantial computational savings. ROM techniques in general have existed for decades, and the methodology presented in this dissertation builds on successful previous techniques to create a powerful new scheme for modeling aeroelastic systems, and predicting and interpolating their transonic flutter boundaries. In this method, linear ASE state-space models are constructed from modal structural and actuator models coupled to state-space models of the linearized aerodynamic forces through feedback loops. Flutter predictions can be made from these models through simple eigenvalue analysis of their state-transition matrices for an appropriate set of dynamic pressures. Moreover, this analysis returns the frequency and damping trend of every aeroelastic branch. In contrast, determining the critical dynamic pressure by direct time-marching CFD requires a separate run for every dynamic pressure being analyzed simply to obtain the trend for the critical branch. The present ROM methodology also includes a new model interpolation technique that greatly enhances the benefits of these ROMs. This enables predictions of the dynamic behavior of the system for flight conditions where CFD analysis has not been explicitly

  20. Remote Sensing of Alpha and Beta Sources - Modeling Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dignon, J; Frank, M; Cherepy, N

    2005-10-20

    Evaluating the potential for optical detection of the products of interactions of energetic electrons or other particles with the background atmosphere depends on predictions of change in atmospheric concentrations of species which would generate detectable spectral signals within the range of observation. The solar blind region of the spectrum, in the ultra violet, would be the logical band for outdoor detection (see Figure 1). The chemistry relevant to these processes is composed of ion-molecule reactions involving the initially created N{sub 2}{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup +} ions, and their subsequent interactions with ambient trace atmospheric constituents. Effective modeling of the atmospheric chemical system acted upon by energetic particles requires knowledge of the dominant mechanism that exchange charge and associate it with atmospheric constituents, kinetic parameters of the individual processes (see e.g. Brasseur and Solomon, 1995), and a solver for the coupled differential equations that is accurate for the very stiff set of time constants involved. The LLNL box model, VOLVO, simulates the diel cycle of trace constituent photochemistry for any point on the globe over the wide range of time scales present using a stiff Gear-type ODE solver, i.e. LSODE. It has been applied to problems such as tropospheric and stratospheric nitrogen oxides, stratospheric ozone production and loss, and tropospheric hydrocarbon oxidation. For this study we have included the appropriate ion flux.

  1. Transferability of regional permafrost disturbance susceptibility modelling using generalized linear and generalized additive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudy, Ashley C. A.; Lamoureux, Scott F.; Treitz, Paul; van Ewijk, Karin Y.

    2016-07-01

    To effectively assess and mitigate risk of permafrost disturbance, disturbance-prone areas can be predicted through the application of susceptibility models. In this study we developed regional susceptibility models for permafrost disturbances using a field disturbance inventory to test the transferability of the model to a broader region in the Canadian High Arctic. Resulting maps of susceptibility were then used to explore the effect of terrain variables on the occurrence of disturbances within this region. To account for a large range of landscape characteristics, the model was calibrated using two locations: Sabine Peninsula, Melville Island, NU, and Fosheim Peninsula, Ellesmere Island, NU. Spatial patterns of disturbance were predicted with a generalized linear model (GLM) and generalized additive model (GAM), each calibrated using disturbed and randomized undisturbed locations from both locations and GIS-derived terrain predictor variables including slope, potential incoming solar radiation, wetness index, topographic position index, elevation, and distance to water. Each model was validated for the Sabine and Fosheim Peninsulas using independent data sets while the transferability of the model to an independent site was assessed at Cape Bounty, Melville Island, NU. The regional GLM and GAM validated well for both calibration sites (Sabine and Fosheim) with the area under the receiver operating curves (AUROC) > 0.79. Both models were applied directly to Cape Bounty without calibration and validated equally with AUROC's of 0.76; however, each model predicted disturbed and undisturbed samples differently. Additionally, the sensitivity of the transferred model was assessed using data sets with different sample sizes. Results indicated that models based on larger sample sizes transferred more consistently and captured the variability within the terrain attributes in the respective study areas. Terrain attributes associated with the initiation of disturbances were

  2. Modeling the Martian climate with a new general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, R.; Toon, O. B.

    2009-12-01

    We have adapted the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3.0) to Martian conditions. Several modifications to the original model have been made. These include adjusting the physical parameters to Mars-like values, changing atmospheric composition, changing the calendar to cover a Martian year, and the addition of a carbon dioxide condensation scheme. The Martian atmosphere is composed of 95% carbon dioxide, and as much as 25% of the atmosphere can condense out at the winter pole so it is important to include the carbon dioxide condensation in the model. We plan to use the model to simulate impacts on Mars during the late Noachian. As a reference point we have performed some climate simulations with a 500 mbar carbon dioxide atmosphere. The results will be presented at the meeting. Currently a few general circulation models are available for Mars. However instead of using one of these previously developed models, we have chosen to develop our own based off of CAM3 for a number of reasons. These include the model’s support for multi-processor runs, the model’s compatibility with other models including land, aerosol, and chemistry, and the fact many in our group already use the Earth version of this model, so we are familiar with it. During the development of our model, we have been in contact with NCAR, and have plans to make the model readily available to the public through NCAR.

  3. Permutation inference for the general linear model

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Anderson M.; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Webster, Matthew A.; Smith, Stephen M.; Nichols, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Permutation methods can provide exact control of false positives and allow the use of non-standard statistics, making only weak assumptions about the data. With the availability of fast and inexpensive computing, their main limitation would be some lack of flexibility to work with arbitrary experimental designs. In this paper we report on results on approximate permutation methods that are more flexible with respect to the experimental design and nuisance variables, and conduct detailed simulations to identify the best method for settings that are typical for imaging research scenarios. We present a generic framework for permutation inference for complex general linear models (glms) when the errors are exchangeable and/or have a symmetric distribution, and show that, even in the presence of nuisance effects, these permutation inferences are powerful while providing excellent control of false positives in a wide range of common and relevant imaging research scenarios. We also demonstrate how the inference on glm parameters, originally intended for independent data, can be used in certain special but useful cases in which independence is violated. Detailed examples of common neuroimaging applications are provided, as well as a complete algorithm – the “randomise” algorithm – for permutation inference with the glm. PMID:24530839

  4. Post-Movement Beta Activity in Sensorimotor Cortex Indexes Confidence in the Estimations from Internal Models

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Cian; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Beta oscillations are a dominant feature of the sensorimotor system. A transient and prominent increase in beta oscillations is consistently observed across the sensorimotor cortical-basal ganglia network after cessation of voluntary movement: the post-movement beta synchronization (PMBS). Current theories about the function of the PMBS have been focused on either the closure of motor response or the processing of sensory afferance. Computational models of sensorimotor control have emphasized the importance of the integration between feedforward estimation and sensory feedback, and therefore the putative motor and sensory functions of beta oscillations may reciprocally interact with each other and in fact be indissociable. Here we show that the amplitude of sensorimotor PMBS is modulated by the history of visual feedback of task-relevant errors, and negatively correlated with the trial-to-trial exploratory adjustment in a sensorimotor adaptation task in young healthy human subjects. The PMBS also negatively correlated with the uncertainty associated with the feedforward estimation, which was recursively updated in light of new sensory feedback, as identified by a Bayesian learning model. These results reconcile the two opposing motor and sensory views of the function of PMBS, and suggest a unifying theory in which PMBS indexes the confidence in internal feedforward estimation in Bayesian sensorimotor integration. Its amplitude simultaneously reflects cortical sensory processing and signals the need for maintenance or adaptation of the motor output, and if necessary, exploration to identify an altered sensorimotor transformation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT For optimal sensorimotor control, sensory feedback and feedforward estimation of a movement's sensory consequences should be weighted by the inverse of their corresponding uncertainties, which require recursive updating in a dynamic environment. We show that post-movement beta activity (13–30 Hz) over sensorimotor

  5. Modeling beta-adrenergic control of cardiac myocyte contractility in silico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saucerman, Jeffrey J.; Brunton, Laurence L.; Michailova, Anushka P.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; McCullough, A. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The beta-adrenergic signaling pathway regulates cardiac myocyte contractility through a combination of feedforward and feedback mechanisms. We used systems analysis to investigate how the components and topology of this signaling network permit neurohormonal control of excitation-contraction coupling in the rat ventricular myocyte. A kinetic model integrating beta-adrenergic signaling with excitation-contraction coupling was formulated, and each subsystem was validated with independent biochemical and physiological measurements. Model analysis was used to investigate quantitatively the effects of specific molecular perturbations. 3-Fold overexpression of adenylyl cyclase in the model allowed an 85% higher rate of cyclic AMP synthesis than an equivalent overexpression of beta 1-adrenergic receptor, and manipulating the affinity of Gs alpha for adenylyl cyclase was a more potent regulator of cyclic AMP production. The model predicted that less than 40% of adenylyl cyclase molecules may be stimulated under maximal receptor activation, and an experimental protocol is suggested for validating this prediction. The model also predicted that the endogenous heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor may enhance basal cyclic AMP buffering by 68% and increasing the apparent Hill coefficient of protein kinase A activation from 1.0 to 2.0. Finally, phosphorylation of the L-type calcium channel and phospholamban were found sufficient to predict the dominant changes in myocyte contractility, including a 2.6x increase in systolic calcium (inotropy) and a 28% decrease in calcium half-relaxation time (lusitropy). By performing systems analysis, the consequences of molecular perturbations in the beta-adrenergic signaling network may be understood within the context of integrative cellular physiology.

  6. Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J Iacono

    2011-04-07

    This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

  7. High beta and second region stability analysis and ICRF edge modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the tasks accomplished under Department of Energy contract [number sign]DE-FG02-86ER53236 in modeling the edge plasma-antenna interaction that occurs during Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating. This work has resulted in the development of several codes which determine kinetic and fluid modifications to the edge plasma. When used in combination, these code predict the level of impurity generation observed in experiments on the experiments on the Princeton Large Torus. In addition, these models suggest improvements to the design of ICRF antennas. Also described is progress made on high beta and second region analysis. Code development for a comprehensive infernal mode analysis code is nearing completion. A method has been developed for parameterizing the second region of stability and is applied to circular cross section tokamas. Various studies for high beta experimental devices such as PBX-M and DIII-D have been carried out and are reported on.

  8. Building Restoration Operations Optimization Model Beta Version 1.0

    2007-05-31

    The Building Restoration Operations Optimization Model (BROOM), developed by Sandia National Laboratories, is a software product designed to aid in the restoration of large facilities contaminated by a biological material. BROOM’s integrated data collection, data management, and visualization software improves the efficiency of cleanup operations, minimizes facility downtime, and provides a transparent basis for reopening the facility. Secure remote access to building floor plans Floor plan drawings and knowledge of the HVAC system are criticalmore » to the design and implementation of effective sampling plans. In large facilities, access to these data may be complicated by the sheer abundance and disorganized state they are often stored in. BROOM avoids potentially costly delays by providing a means of organizing and storing mechanical and floor plan drawings in a secure remote database that is easily accessed. Sampling design tools BROOM provides an array of tools to answer the question of where to sample and how many samples to take. In addition to simple judgmental and random sampling plans, the software includes two sophisticated methods of adaptively developing a sampling strategy. Both tools strive to choose sampling locations that best satisfy a specified objective (i.e. minimizing kriging variance) but use numerically different strategies to do so. Surface samples are collected early in the restoration process to characterize the extent of contamination and then again later to verify that the facility is safe to reenter. BROOM supports sample collection using a ruggedized PDA equipped with a barcode scanner and laser range finder. The PDA displays building floor drawings, sampling plans, and electronic forms for data entry. Barcodes are placed on sample containers for the purpose of tracking the specimen and linking acquisition data (i.e. location, surface type, texture) to laboratory results. Sample location is determined by activating the integrated

  9. Building Restoration Operations Optimization Model Beta Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2007-05-31

    The Building Restoration Operations Optimization Model (BROOM), developed by Sandia National Laboratories, is a software product designed to aid in the restoration of large facilities contaminated by a biological material. BROOM’s integrated data collection, data management, and visualization software improves the efficiency of cleanup operations, minimizes facility downtime, and provides a transparent basis for reopening the facility. Secure remote access to building floor plans Floor plan drawings and knowledge of the HVAC system are critical to the design and implementation of effective sampling plans. In large facilities, access to these data may be complicated by the sheer abundance and disorganized state they are often stored in. BROOM avoids potentially costly delays by providing a means of organizing and storing mechanical and floor plan drawings in a secure remote database that is easily accessed. Sampling design tools BROOM provides an array of tools to answer the question of where to sample and how many samples to take. In addition to simple judgmental and random sampling plans, the software includes two sophisticated methods of adaptively developing a sampling strategy. Both tools strive to choose sampling locations that best satisfy a specified objective (i.e. minimizing kriging variance) but use numerically different strategies to do so. Surface samples are collected early in the restoration process to characterize the extent of contamination and then again later to verify that the facility is safe to reenter. BROOM supports sample collection using a ruggedized PDA equipped with a barcode scanner and laser range finder. The PDA displays building floor drawings, sampling plans, and electronic forms for data entry. Barcodes are placed on sample containers for the purpose of tracking the specimen and linking acquisition data (i.e. location, surface type, texture) to laboratory results. Sample location is determined by activating the integrated laser

  10. Comparison of the Beta and the Hidden Markov Models of Trust in Dynamic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, Marie E. G.; Helvik, Bjarne E.; Knapskog, Svein J.

    Computational trust and reputation models are used to aid the decision-making process in complex dynamic environments, where we are unable to obtain perfect information about the interaction partners. In this paper we present a comparison of our proposed hidden Markov trust model to the Beta reputation system. The hidden Markov trust model takes the time between observations into account, it also distinguishes between system states and uses methods previously applied to intrusion detection for the prediction of which state an agent is in. We show that the hidden Markov trust model performs better when it comes to the detection of changes in behavior of agents, due to its larger richness in model features. This means that our trust model may be more realistic in dynamic environments. However, the increased model complexity also leads to bigger challenges in estimating parameter values for the model. We also show that the hidden Markov trust model can be parameterized so that it responds similarly to the Beta reputation system.

  11. Connecting the X(5)-{beta}{sup 2}, X(5)-{beta}{sup 4}, and X(3) models to the shape/phase transition region of the interacting boson model

    SciTech Connect

    McCutchan, E. A. Bonatsos, D. Zamfir, N. V.

    2007-08-15

    The parameter-independent (up to overall scale factors) predictions of the X(5)-{beta}{sup 2},X(5)-{beta}{sup 4}, and X(3) models, which are variants of the X(5) critical point symmetry developed within the framework of the geometric collective model, are compared to two-parameter calculations in the framework of the interacting boson approximation (IBA) model. The results show that these geometric models coincide with IBA parameters consistent with the phase/shape transition region of the IBA for boson numbers of physical interest (close to 10). {sup 186}Pt and {sup 172}Os are identified as good examples of X(3), while {sup 146}Ce, {sup 174}Os, and {sup 158}Er, {sup 176}Os are identified as good examples of X(5)-{beta}{sub 2} and X(5)-{beta}{sup 4} behavior, respectively.

  12. A Continuous Correlated Beta Process Model for Genetic Ancestry in Admixed Populations

    PubMed Central

    Gompert, Zachariah

    2016-01-01

    Admixture and recombination create populations and genomes with genetic ancestry from multiple source populations. Analyses of genetic ancestry in admixed populations are relevant for trait and disease mapping, studies of speciation, and conservation efforts. Consequently, many methods have been developed to infer genome-average ancestry and to deconvolute ancestry into continuous local ancestry blocks or tracts within individuals. Current methods for local ancestry inference perform well when admixture occurred recently or hybridization is ongoing, or when admixture occurred in the distant past such that local ancestry blocks have fixed in the admixed population. However, methods to infer local ancestry frequencies in isolated admixed populations still segregating for ancestry do not exist. In the current paper, I develop and test a continuous correlated beta process model to fill this analytical gap. The method explicitly models autocorrelations in ancestry frequencies at the population-level and uses discriminant analysis of SNP windows to take advantage of ancestry blocks within individuals. Analyses of simulated data sets show that the method is generally accurate such that ancestry frequency estimates exhibited low root-mean-square error and were highly correlated with the true values, particularly when large (±10 or ±20) SNP windows were used. Along these lines, the proposed method outperformed post hoc inference of ancestry frequencies from a traditional hidden Markov model (i.e., the linkage model in structure), particularly when admixture occurred more distantly in the past with little on-going gene flow or was followed by natural selection. The reliability and utility of the method was further assessed by analyzing genetic ancestry in an admixed human population (Uyghur) and three populations from a hybrid zone between Mus domesticus and M. musculus. Considerable variation in ancestry frequencies was detected within and among chromosomes in the Uyghur

  13. Generalized string models and their semiclassical approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizalde, E.

    1984-04-01

    We construct an extensive family of Bose string models, all of them classically equivalent to the Nambu and Eguchi models. The new models involve an arbitrary analytical function f(u), with f(0)=0, and are based on the Brink-Di Vecchia-Howe and Polyakov string action. The semiclassical approximation of the models is worked out in detail.

  14. [General surgery under discussion. The Swiss model].

    PubMed

    Schlumpf, R

    2008-03-01

    The need for a general surgical cover, with a high quality standard, following economic principles and offered 24 hours in all regions of Switzerland is not doubted. The title of a "General and Trauma Surgeon" is an additional qualification certified after further successful 4 years post-qualification training following the 6 years specialist title of surgery ('common trunk'). The main field of work encompasses primary emergency surgery as well as 'surgery of the common pathologies' in visceral, vascular, thoracic and partly hand surgery. Due to political reasons the additional qualification in surgical traumatology was completely and exclusively integrated in this sub-speciality title.The post-graduate training to gain the title of a "General and Trauma Surgeon" is mostly completed within 8-10 years and results in the full surgical competence in the above named fields. A major problem is the lack of academic representation of general surgery in the university hospitals resulting in a neglect and increasing difficulties of academic training in this field. Furthermore, there are some recurrent controversies concerning limitations of general surgery in the face of other subspecialities or specialities (e.g. orthopaedics). However, the most important and urgent problem is the lack of the possibility to gain an acknowledged and separate (from general surgery) certification in surgical traumatology, competitive to the specification in orthopaedics. There is no doubt, that, at least in the mid term, there is still a need for general surgeons. At the present moment, the future and the further development of the traumatologist's training under the roof of surgery, at university and regional level is insufficient and is at risk. Therefore, there is an urgent need to address this matter and the Swiss Society of Surgery is taking care of this with priority.

  15. Study of the determination of the coefficients beta and gamma of the generalized metric of Robertson and of the dynamical oblateness of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchal, C.

    1971-01-01

    Motion of a space probe about a spherical center of attraction is considered, applying the general theory of relativity. Motion of a probe under the influence of the sun's oblateness is also discussed. Estimates of beta, gamma, and J20 using solar probe motion are presented. It is concluded that such measurements are possible if the unknown long-period perturbing acceleration is of the order of 10 to the -11th or -12th power m/sec. sq.

  16. Towards a General Model of Temporal Discounting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bos, Wouter; McClure, Samuel M.

    2013-01-01

    Psychological models of temporal discounting have now successfully displaced classical economic theory due to the simple fact that many common behavior patterns, such as impulsivity, were unexplainable with classic models. However, the now dominant hyperbolic model of discounting is itself becoming increasingly strained. Numerous factors have…

  17. Granule cell excitability regulates gamma and beta oscillations in a model of the olfactory bulb dendrodendritic microcircuit.

    PubMed

    Osinski, Bolesław L; Kay, Leslie M

    2016-08-01

    Odors evoke gamma (40-100 Hz) and beta (20-30 Hz) oscillations in the local field potential (LFP) of the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB). Gamma (and possibly beta) oscillations arise from interactions in the dendrodendritic microcircuit between excitatory mitral cells (MCs) and inhibitory granule cells (GCs). When cortical descending inputs to the OB are blocked, beta oscillations are extinguished whereas gamma oscillations become larger. Much of this centrifugal input targets inhibitory interneurons in the GC layer and regulates the excitability of GCs, which suggests a causal link between the emergence of beta oscillations and GC excitability. We investigate the effect that GC excitability has on network oscillations in a computational model of the MC-GC dendrodendritic network with Ca(2+)-dependent graded inhibition. Results from our model suggest that when GC excitability is low, the graded inhibitory current mediated by NMDA channels and voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) is also low, allowing MC populations to fire in the gamma frequency range. When GC excitability is increased, the activation of NMDA receptors and other VDCCs is also increased, allowing the slow decay time constants of these channels to sustain beta-frequency oscillations. Our model argues that Ca(2+) flow through VDCCs alone could sustain beta oscillations and that the switch between gamma and beta oscillations can be triggered by an increase in the excitability state of a subpopulation of GCs. PMID:27121582

  18. Thermodynamics of generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Sarwar, Ayesha

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we study thermal stability of an exotic fluid known as generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas (GCCG). We evaluate different physical parameters and examine how this fluid describes accelerated expansion of the universe. The stability conditions are formulated from thermodynamics which indicate that the respective fluid is stable adiabatically but it cannot be checked under isothermal condition.

  19. Response-surface models for deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {beta}/{gamma} -emitting sources

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    Individuals who work at nuclear reactor facilities can be at risk for deterministic effects in the skin from exposure to discrete {Beta}- and {gamma}-emitting ({Beta}{gamma}E) sources (e.g., {Beta}{gamma}E hot particles) on the skin or clothing. Deterministic effects are non-cancer effects that have a threshold and increase in severity as dose increases (e.g., ulcer in skin). Hot {Beta}{gamma}E particles are {sup 60}Co- or nuclear fuel-derived particles with diameters > 10 {mu}m and < 3 mm and contain at least 3.7 kBq (0.1 {mu}Ci) of radioactivity. For such {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin, it is the beta component of the dose that is most important. To develop exposure limitation systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for evaluating the risk of deterministic effects of localized {Beta} irradiation of the skin. The purpose of this study was to develop dose-rate and irradiated-area dependent, response-surface models for evaluating risks of significant deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources and to use modeling results to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure to such sources. The significance of the research results as follows: (1) response-surface models are now available for evaluating the risk of specific deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin; (2) modeling results have been used to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure of workers to {Beta} radiation from {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin or on clothing; and (3) the generic irradiated-volume, weighting-factor approach to limiting exposure can be applied to other organs including the eye, the ear, and organs of the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract and can be used for both deterministic and stochastic effects.

  20. Modeling of Antarctic sea ice in a general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xingren; Budd, W.F.; Simmonds, I.

    1997-04-01

    A dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice model is developed and coupled with the Melbourne University general circulation model to simulate the seasonal cycle of the Antarctic sea ice distributions The model is efficient, rapid to compute, and useful for a range of climate studies. The thermodynamic part of the sea ice model is similar to that developed by Parkinson and Washington, the dynamics contain a simplified ice rheology that resists compression. The thermodynamics is based on energy conservation at the top surface of the ice/snow, the ice/water interface, and the open water area to determine the ice formation, accretion, and ablation. A lead parameterization is introduced with an effective partitioning scheme for freezing between and under the ice floes. The dynamic calculation determines the motion of ice, which is forced with the atmospheric wind, taking account of ice resistance and rafting. The simulated sea ice distribution compares reasonably well with observations. The seasonal cycle of ice extent is well simulated in phase as well as in magnitude. Simulated sea ice thickness and concentration are also in good agreement with observations over most regions and serve to indicate the importance of advection and ocean drift in the determination of the sea ice distribution. 64 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. On Generalizing the Two-Poisson Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Padmini

    1990-01-01

    After reviewing the literature on automatic indexing research an experiment is described which examined term distribution and the effectiveness of the Two Poisson and Three Poisson Models in identifying good index terms. The conclusion reached is that these models should be applied with caution in document retrieval. (25 references) (EAM)

  2. Stratospheric General Circulation with Chemistry Model (SGCCM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rood, Richard B.; Douglass, Anne R.; Geller, Marvin A.; Kaye, Jack A.; Nielsen, J. Eric; Rosenfield, Joan E.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    1990-01-01

    In the past two years constituent transport and chemistry experiments have been performed using both simple single constituent models and more complex reservoir species models. Winds for these experiments have been taken from the data assimilation effort, Stratospheric Data Analysis System (STRATAN).

  3. Generalized Path Analysis and Generalized Simultaneous Equations Model for Recursive Systems with Responses of Mixed Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Tien-Lung; Shau, Wen-Yi; Hu, Fu-Chang

    2006-01-01

    This article generalizes linear path analysis (PA) and simultaneous equations models (SiEM) to deal with mixed responses of different types in a recursive or triangular system. An efficient instrumental variable (IV) method for estimating the structural coefficients of a 2-equation partially recursive generalized path analysis (GPA) model and…

  4. Partition-based acquisition model for speed up navigated beta-probe surface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monge, Frédéric; Shakir, Dzhoshkun I.; Navab, Nassir; Jannin, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Although gross total resection in low-grade glioma surgery leads to a better patient outcome, the in-vivo control of resection borders remains challenging. For this purpose, navigated beta-probe systems combined with 18F-based radiotracer, relying on activity distribution surface estimation, have been proposed to generate reconstructed images. The clinical relevancy has been outlined by early studies where intraoperative functional information is leveraged although inducing low spatial resolution in reconstruction. To improve reconstruction quality, multiple acquisition models have been proposed. They involve the definition of attenuation matrix for designing radiation detection physics. Yet, they require high computational power for efficient intraoperative use. To address the problem, we propose a new acquisition model called Partition Model (PM) considering an existing model where coefficients of the matrix are taken from a look-up table (LUT). Our model is based upon the division of the LUT into averaged homogeneous values for assigning attenuation coefficients. We validated our model using in vitro datasets, where tumors and peri-tumoral tissues have been simulated. We compared our acquisition model with the o_-the-shelf LUT and the raw method. Acquisition models outperformed the raw method in term of tumor contrast (7.97:1 mean T:B) but with a difficulty of real-time use. Both acquisition models reached the same detection performance with references (0.8 mean AUC and 0.77 mean NCC), where PM slightly improves the mean tumor contrast up to 10.1:1 vs 9.9:1 with the LUT model and more importantly, it reduces the mean computation time by 7.5%. Our model gives a faster solution for an intraoperative use of navigated beta-probe surface imaging system, with improved image quality.

  5. A Mechanistic Beta-Binomial Probability Model for mRNA Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gregory R.; Birtwistle, Marc R.

    2016-01-01

    A main application for mRNA sequencing (mRNAseq) is determining lists of differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) between two or more conditions. Several software packages exist to produce DEGs from mRNAseq data, but they typically yield different DEGs, sometimes markedly so. The underlying probability model used to describe mRNAseq data is central to deriving DEGs, and not surprisingly most softwares use different models and assumptions to analyze mRNAseq data. Here, we propose a mechanistic justification to model mRNAseq as a binomial process, with data from technical replicates given by a binomial distribution, and data from biological replicates well-described by a beta-binomial distribution. We demonstrate good agreement of this model with two large datasets. We show that an emergent feature of the beta-binomial distribution, given parameter regimes typical for mRNAseq experiments, is the well-known quadratic polynomial scaling of variance with the mean. The so-called dispersion parameter controls this scaling, and our analysis suggests that the dispersion parameter is a continually decreasing function of the mean, as opposed to current approaches that impose an asymptotic value to the dispersion parameter at moderate mean read counts. We show how this leads to current approaches overestimating variance for moderately to highly expressed genes, which inflates false negative rates. Describing mRNAseq data with a beta-binomial distribution thus may be preferred since its parameters are relatable to the mechanistic underpinnings of the technique and may improve the consistency of DEG analysis across softwares, particularly for moderately to highly expressed genes. PMID:27326762

  6. A Mechanistic Beta-Binomial Probability Model for mRNA Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gregory R; Birtwistle, Marc R

    2016-01-01

    A main application for mRNA sequencing (mRNAseq) is determining lists of differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) between two or more conditions. Several software packages exist to produce DEGs from mRNAseq data, but they typically yield different DEGs, sometimes markedly so. The underlying probability model used to describe mRNAseq data is central to deriving DEGs, and not surprisingly most softwares use different models and assumptions to analyze mRNAseq data. Here, we propose a mechanistic justification to model mRNAseq as a binomial process, with data from technical replicates given by a binomial distribution, and data from biological replicates well-described by a beta-binomial distribution. We demonstrate good agreement of this model with two large datasets. We show that an emergent feature of the beta-binomial distribution, given parameter regimes typical for mRNAseq experiments, is the well-known quadratic polynomial scaling of variance with the mean. The so-called dispersion parameter controls this scaling, and our analysis suggests that the dispersion parameter is a continually decreasing function of the mean, as opposed to current approaches that impose an asymptotic value to the dispersion parameter at moderate mean read counts. We show how this leads to current approaches overestimating variance for moderately to highly expressed genes, which inflates false negative rates. Describing mRNAseq data with a beta-binomial distribution thus may be preferred since its parameters are relatable to the mechanistic underpinnings of the technique and may improve the consistency of DEG analysis across softwares, particularly for moderately to highly expressed genes. PMID:27326762

  7. Physiologically based pharmacokinetics of radioiodinated human beta-endorphin in rats. An application of the capillary membrane-limited model

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, H.; Sugiyama, Y.; Sawada, Y.; Iga, T.; Hanano, M.

    1987-07-01

    In order to simulate the distribution and elimination of radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-EP) after iv bolus injection in rats, we proposed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model incorporating diffusional transport of /sup 125/I-beta-EP across the capillary membrane. This model assumes that the distribution of /sup 125/I-beta-EP is restricted only within the blood and the tissue interstitial fluid, and that a diffusional barrier across the capillary membrane exists in each tissue except the liver. The tissue-to-blood partition coefficients were estimated from the ratios of the concentration in tissues to that in arterial plasma at the terminal (pseudoequilibrium) phase. The total body plasma clearance (9.0 ml/min/kg) was appropriately assigned to the liver and kidney. The transcapillary diffusion clearances of /sup 125/I-beta-EP were also estimated and shown to correlate linearly with that of inulin in several tissues. Numerically solving the mass-balance differential equations as to plasma and each tissue simultaneously, simulated concentration curves of /sup 125/I-beta-EP corresponded well with the observed data. It was suggested by the simulation that the initial rapid disappearance of /sup 125/I-beta-EP from plasma after iv injection could be attributed in part to the transcapillary diffusion of the peptide.

  8. Effects of transforming growth factor-beta in the development of inflammatory pseudotumour-like lesions in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Guariniello, Luciana Doria; Correa, Mariangela; Jasiulionis, Miriam Galvonas; Machado, Joel; Silva, José Antônio; Pesquero, João Bosco; Carneiro, Célia Regina Whitaker

    2006-06-01

    Alterations in transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signalling have been frequently implicated in human cancer, and an important mechanism underlying its pro-oncogenic nature is suppression of the host antitumour immune response. Considering the immunosuppressive effect of TGF-beta, we asked whether human tumour cells, known to secrete TGF-beta in culture, would survive and grow when implanted into the peritoneal cavity of immunocompetent mice. Therefore, we developed a xenogeneic model where mice were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with a TGF-beta-secreting human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, LISP-A10. Although animals did not develop macroscopic tumours, the recovery and isolation of human tumour cells was achieved when an inflammatory environment was locally induced by the administration of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). This procedure significantly increased TGF-beta concentrations in the peritoneal fluid and was accompanied by impaired activation of the host-specific immune response against LISP-A10 cells. Furthermore, inflammatory lesions resembling human inflammatory pseudotumours (IPTs) were observed on the surface of i.p. organs. These lesions could be induced by either injection of LISP-A10 cells, cells-conditioned medium or recombinant TGF-beta but only after administration of CFA. In addition, host cyclooxygenase-2 and kinin receptors played an important role in the induction of TGF-beta-mediated IPT-like lesions in our experimental model. PMID:16709227

  9. Flavor constraints on two-Higgs-doublet models with general diagonal Yukawa couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoudi, F.

    2010-02-01

    We consider constraints from flavor physics on two-Higgs-doublet models (2HDM) with general, flavor-diagonal, Yukawa couplings. Analyzing the charged Higgs contribution to different observables, we find that b{yields}s{gamma} transitions and {Delta}M{sub B{sub d}} restrict the coupling {lambda}{sub tt} of the top quark (corresponding to cot{beta} in models with a Z{sub 2} symmetry) to |{lambda}{sub tt}|<1 for m{sub H}{sup +} < or approx. 500 GeV. Stringent constraints from B meson decays are obtained also on the other third generation couplings {lambda}{sub bb} and {lambda}{sub {tau}{tau},} but with stronger dependence on m{sub H}{sup +}. For the second generation, we obtain constraints on combinations of {lambda}{sub ss}, {lambda}{sub cc}, and {lambda}{sub {mu}{mu}}from leptonic K and D{sub s} decays. The limits on the general couplings are translated to the common 2HDM types I-IV with a Z{sub 2} symmetry, and presented on the (m{sub H}{sup +},tan{beta}) plane. The flavor constraints are most excluding in the type II model which lacks a decoupling limit in tan{beta}. We obtain a lower limit m{sub H}{sup +} > or approx. 300 GeV in models of type II and III, while no lower bound on m{sub H}{sup +} is found for types I and IV.

  10. Fractal generalization of Thomas-Fermi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekhviashvili, S. Sh.; Sokurov, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    The Thomas-Fermi model is developed for a multielectron neutral atom at an arbitrary metric dimension of the electron cloud. It has been shown that the electron cloud with the reduced dimension should be located in the close vicinity of the nucleus. At a metric dimension of the electron cloud of 2, the differential equation of the model admits an analytical solution. In this case, the screening parameter does not depend on the charge of the nucleus.

  11. Duality and Stationary Distributions of the "Immediate Exchange Model" and Its Generalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ginkel, Bart; Redig, Frank; Sau, Federico

    2016-04-01

    We study the "Immediate Exchange Model", a wealth distribution model introduced in Heinsalu and Patriarca (Eur Phys J B 87:170, 2014). We prove that the model has a discrete dual, where the duality functions are natural polynomials associated to the Gamma distribution with shape parameter 2 and are exactly those connecting the Brownian Energy Process (with parameter 2) and the corresponding Symmetric Inclusion Process in Carinci et al. (J Stat Phys 152:657-697, 2013) and Giardinà et al. (J Stat Phys 135(1):25-55, 2009). As a consequence, we recover invariance of products of Gamma distributions with shape parameter 2, and obtain ergodicity results. Next we show similar properties for a more general model, where the exchange fraction is Beta(s, t) distributed, and product measures with text{ Gamma }(s+t) marginals are invariant. We also show that the discrete dual model itself is self-dual and has the original continuous model as its scaling limit. We show that the self-duality is linked with an underlying SU(1, 1) symmetry, reminiscent of the one found before for the Symmetric Inclusion Process and related processes.

  12. Generalized random sign and alert delay models for imperfect maintenance.

    PubMed

    Dijoux, Yann; Gaudoin, Olivier

    2014-04-01

    This paper considers the modelling of the process of Corrective and condition-based Preventive Maintenance, for complex repairable systems. In order to take into account the dependency between both types of maintenance and the possibility of imperfect maintenance, Generalized Competing Risks models have been introduced in "Doyen and Gaudoin (J Appl Probab 43:825-839, 2006)". In this paper, we study two classes of these models, the Generalized Random Sign and Generalized Alert Delay models. A Generalized Competing Risks model can be built as a generalization of a particular Usual Competing Risks model, either by using a virtual age framework or not. The models properties are studied and their parameterizations are discussed. Finally, simulation results and an application to real data are presented.

  13. Generalized random sign and alert delay models for imperfect maintenance.

    PubMed

    Dijoux, Yann; Gaudoin, Olivier

    2014-04-01

    This paper considers the modelling of the process of Corrective and condition-based Preventive Maintenance, for complex repairable systems. In order to take into account the dependency between both types of maintenance and the possibility of imperfect maintenance, Generalized Competing Risks models have been introduced in "Doyen and Gaudoin (J Appl Probab 43:825-839, 2006)". In this paper, we study two classes of these models, the Generalized Random Sign and Generalized Alert Delay models. A Generalized Competing Risks model can be built as a generalization of a particular Usual Competing Risks model, either by using a virtual age framework or not. The models properties are studied and their parameterizations are discussed. Finally, simulation results and an application to real data are presented. PMID:23460491

  14. beta. sub 4 systematics in rare-earth and actinide nuclei: sdg interacting boson model description

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, Y.D.; Kota, V.K.B. )

    1992-07-01

    The observed variation of hexadecupole deformation parameter {beta}{sub 4} with mass number {ital A} in rare-earth and actinide nuclei is studied in the {ital sdg} interacting boson model (IBM) using single {ital j}-shell Otsuka-Arima-Iachello mapped and IBM-2 to IBM-1 projected hexadecupole transition operator together with SU{sub {ital s}{ital d}{ital g}}(3) and SU{sub {ital s}{ital d}{ital g}}(5) coherent states. The SU{sub {ital s}{ital d}{ital g}}(3) limit is found to provide a good description of data.

  15. A radiative-convective equilibrium model for young giant exoplanets: Applications to beta pictoris b data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudino, J.-L.; Bézard, B.; Boccaletti, A.; Bonnefoy, M.; Lagrange, A.-M.

    2014-09-01

    We developed a radiative-convective equilibrium model for young giant exoplanets, in the context of direct imaging. Input parameters are the planet's surface gravity (g), effective temperature (Teff) and elemental composition. Under the additional assumption of thermochemical equilib- rium, the model predicts the equilibrium temperature profile and mixing ratio profiles of the most important gases. Opacity sources include the H2-He collision-induced absorption and molecular lines from H2O, CO, CH4, NH3, VO, TiO, Na and K. Line opacity is modeled using k-correlated coefficients pre-calculated over a fixed pressure-temperature grid. Absorption by iron and silicate cloud particles is added above the expected condensation levels with a fixed scale height and a given optical depth at some reference wavelength. Model predictions are compared with the existing photometric and spectroscopic measurements of Beta Pictoris b.

  16. Generalized Hertz model for bimodal nanomechanical mapping

    PubMed Central

    Kocuń, Marta; Meinhold, Waiman; Walters, Deron; Proksch, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bimodal atomic force microscopy uses a cantilever that is simultaneously driven at two of its eigenmodes (resonant modes). Parameters associated with both resonances can be measured and used to extract quantitative nanomechanical information about the sample surface. Driving the first eigenmode at a large amplitude and a higher eigenmode at a small amplitude simultaneously provides four independent observables that are sensitive to the tip–sample nanomechanical interaction parameters. To demonstrate this, a generalized theoretical framework for extracting nanomechanical sample properties from bimodal experiments is presented based on Hertzian contact mechanics. Three modes of operation for measuring cantilever parameters are considered: amplitude, phase, and frequency modulation. The experimental equivalence of all three modes is demonstrated on measurements of the second eigenmode parameters. The contact mechanics theory is then extended to power-law tip shape geometries, which is applied to analyze the experimental data and extract a shape and size of the tip interacting with a polystyrene surface. PMID:27547614

  17. Generalized Hertz model for bimodal nanomechanical mapping.

    PubMed

    Labuda, Aleksander; Kocuń, Marta; Meinhold, Waiman; Walters, Deron; Proksch, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Bimodal atomic force microscopy uses a cantilever that is simultaneously driven at two of its eigenmodes (resonant modes). Parameters associated with both resonances can be measured and used to extract quantitative nanomechanical information about the sample surface. Driving the first eigenmode at a large amplitude and a higher eigenmode at a small amplitude simultaneously provides four independent observables that are sensitive to the tip-sample nanomechanical interaction parameters. To demonstrate this, a generalized theoretical framework for extracting nanomechanical sample properties from bimodal experiments is presented based on Hertzian contact mechanics. Three modes of operation for measuring cantilever parameters are considered: amplitude, phase, and frequency modulation. The experimental equivalence of all three modes is demonstrated on measurements of the second eigenmode parameters. The contact mechanics theory is then extended to power-law tip shape geometries, which is applied to analyze the experimental data and extract a shape and size of the tip interacting with a polystyrene surface. PMID:27547614

  18. Generalized IRT Models for Extreme Response Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Kuan-Yu; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Extreme response style (ERS) is a systematic tendency for a person to endorse extreme options (e.g., strongly disagree, strongly agree) on Likert-type or rating-scale items. In this study, we develop a new class of item response theory (IRT) models to account for ERS so that the target latent trait is free from the response style and the tendency…

  19. Invariance Properties for General Diagnostic Classification Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Laine P.; Madison, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    In item response theory (IRT), the invariance property states that item parameter estimates are independent of the examinee sample, and examinee ability estimates are independent of the test items. While this property has long been established and understood by the measurement community for IRT models, the same cannot be said for diagnostic…

  20. A General Model for Shallow Magmatic Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorey, C.; Michaut, C.

    2015-12-01

    Shallow magmatic intrusions make room for themselves by upward bending of the elastic overburden. Previous studies have shown that the bending of the overlying layer first controls the dynamics. Then, when the radius reaches a few times the flexural wavelength of the overburden, it transitions to a gravity current regime. This model predicts the appropriate geometry for both terrestrial laccoliths and large mafic sills. However, it underestimates the absolute dimensions of these magmatic intrusions; in particular, it requires abnormally high viscosity to reconcile both observations and predictions. To get some insights into the effective flow viscosity, we develop a model that account for the cooling of such elastic-plated gravity currents. We show that the coupling between the temperature field and the flow itself leads to the formation of a highly viscous region at the tip that slows down the spreading in both regimes. The intrusions are predicted to be thicker and their dimensions, especially in the bending regime, are now consistent with observations. By introducing the potentially complex structure of the overburden, we also show that the topography largely contributes to constrain the final intrusion morphology. For instance, in the case of an intrusion centered below a circular depression, the model predicts that the lithostatic increase at the crater rim prevents the magma from spreading laterally and enhances the thickening of the intrusion. This model has already proven successful in reproducing the deformations observed on potential intrusion centered below lunar impact craters. Caldera complexes often exhibit ground deformations that might be associated to the formation of shallow magmatic intrusions. InSAR imaging and GPS measurements now provide efficient tools to monitor these deformations. We conclude this study by examining the ability of the model to reproduce the deformation observed in several caldera complexes.

  1. Reduced Order Modeling in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiglio, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Reduced Order Modeling is an emerging yet fast developing filed in gravitational wave physics. The main goals are to enable fast modeling and parameter estimation of any detected signal, along with rapid matched filtering detecting. I will focus on the first two. Some accomplishments include being able to replace, with essentially no lost of physical accuracy, the original models with surrogate ones (which are not effective ones, that is, they do not simplify the physics but go on a very different track, exploiting the particulars of the waveform family under consideration and state of the art dimensional reduction techniques) which are very fast to evaluate. For example, for EOB models they are at least around 3 orders of magnitude faster than solving the original equations, with physically equivalent results. For numerical simulations the speedup is at least 11 orders of magnitude. For parameter estimation our current numbers are about bringing ~100 days for a single SPA inspiral binary neutron star Bayesian parameter estimation analysis to under a day. More recently, it has been shown that the full precessing problem for, say, 200 cycles, can be represented, through some new ideas, by a remarkably compact set of carefully chosen reduced basis waveforms (~10-100, depending on the accuracy requirements). I will highlight what I personally believe are the challenges to face next in this subarea of GW physics and where efforts should be directed. This talk will summarize work in collaboration with: Harbir Antil (GMU), Jonathan Blackman (Caltech), Priscila Canizares (IoA, Cambridge, UK), Sarah Caudill (UWM), Jonathan Gair (IoA. Cambridge. UK), Scott Field (UMD), Chad R. Galley (Caltech), Frank Herrmann (Germany), Han Hestahven (EPFL, Switzerland), Jason Kaye (Brown, Stanford & Courant). Evan Ochsner (UWM), Ricardo Nochetto (UMD), Vivien Raymond (LIGO, Caltech), Rory Smith (LIGO, Caltech) Bela Ssilagyi (Caltech) and MT (UMD & Caltech).

  2. Shell-Model Calculations of Two-Nucleon Tansfer Related to Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Alex

    2013-10-01

    I will discuss theoretical results for two-nucleon transfer cross sections for nuclei in the regions of 48Ca, 76Ge and 136Xe of interest for testing the wavefuntions used for the nuclear matrix elements in double-beta decay. Various reaction models are used. A simple cluster transfer model gives relative cross sections. Thompson's code Fresco with direct and sequential transfer is used for absolute cross sections. Wavefunctions are obtained in large-basis proton-neutron coupled model spaces with the code NuShellX with realistic effecive Hamiltonians such as those used for the recent results for 136Xe [M. Horoi and B. A. Brown, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 222502 (2013)]. I acknowledge support from NSF grant PHY-1068217.

  3. Sustained activation of fibroblast transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in a murine model of scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Takagawa, Shinsuke; Lakos, Gabriella; Mori, Yasuji; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Nishioka, Kiyoshi; Varga, John

    2003-07-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta is responsible for triggering a cascade of events leading to fibrosis in scleroderma. The Smads are intracellular signal transducers recently shown to mediate fibroblast activation and other profibrotic responses elicited by transforming growth factor-betain vitro. To understand better the involvement of Smads in the pathogenesis of fibrosis, we examined Smad expression and activation in situ in a murine model of scleroderma. Bleomycin injections induced striking dermal infiltration with macrophages by 3 d, and progressive fibrosis by 2 wk. Infiltrating macrophages and resident fibroblasts expressed Smad3, the positive mediator for transforming growth factor-beta responses. Importantly, in bleomycin-injected skin, fibroblasts showed predominantly nuclear localization of Smad3 and intense staining for phospho-Smad2/3. Furthermore, phosphorylated Smad2/3 in fibroblasts was detected even after the resolution of inflammation. Expression of Smad7, the endogenous inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling, was strongly induced in dermal cells by transforming growth factor-beta, but not by bleomycin injections. Collectively, these results indicate that bleomycin-induced murine scleroderma is associated with rapid and sustained induction of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in resident dermal fibroblasts. Despite apparent activation of the intracellular transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway in the lesional dermis, the expression of transforming growth factor-beta-inducible Smad7 was not upregulated. In light of the critical function of Smad7 as an endogenous inhibitor of Smad signaling that restricts the duration and magnitude of transforming growth factor-beta responses, and as a mediator of apoptosis, relative Smad7 deficiency observed in the present studies may account for sustained activation of transforming growth factor-beta/Smad signaling in lesional tissues. These findings raise the

  4. Building a generalized distributed system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.

    1992-01-01

    The key elements in the second year (1991-92) of our project are: (1) implementation of the distributed system prototype; (2) successful passing of the candidacy examination and a PhD proposal acceptance by the funded student; (3) design of storage efficient schemes for replicated distributed systems; and (4) modeling of gracefully degrading reliable computing systems. In the third year of the project (1992-93), we propose to: (1) complete the testing of the prototype; (2) enhance the functionality of the modules by enabling the experimentation with more complex protocols; (3) use the prototype to verify the theoretically predicted performance of locking protocols, etc.; and (4) work on issues related to real-time distributed systems. This should result in efficient protocols for these systems.

  5. Expression of the alternative oxidase mitigates beta-amyloid production and toxicity in model systems.

    PubMed

    El-Khoury, Riyad; Kaulio, Eveliina; Lassila, Katariina A; Crowther, Damian C; Jacobs, Howard T; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been widely associated with the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, but there is no consensus on whether it is a cause or consequence of disease, nor on the precise mechanism(s). We addressed these issues by testing the effects of expressing the alternative oxidase AOX from Ciona intestinalis, in different models of AD pathology. AOX can restore respiratory electron flow when the cytochrome segment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain is inhibited, supporting ATP synthesis, maintaining cellular redox homeostasis and mitigating excess superoxide production at respiratory complexes I and III. In human HEK293-derived cells, AOX expression decreased the production of beta-amyloid peptide resulting from antimycin inhibition of respiratory complex III. Because hydrogen peroxide was neither a direct product nor substrate of AOX, the ability of AOX to mimic antioxidants in this assay must be indirect. In addition, AOX expression was able to partially alleviate the short lifespan of Drosophila models neuronally expressing human beta-amyloid peptides, whilst abrogating the induction of markers of oxidative stress. Our findings support the idea of respiratory chain dysfunction and excess ROS production as both an early step and as a pathologically meaningful target in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, supporting the concept of a mitochondrial vicious cycle underlying the disease.

  6. Generalizing in Interaction: Middle School Mathematics Students Making Mathematical Generalizations in a Population-Modeling Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurow, A. Susan

    2004-01-01

    Generalizing or making claims that extend beyond particular situations is a central mathematical practice and a focus of classroom mathematics instruction. This study examines how aspects of generality are produced through the situated activities of a group of middle school mathematics students working on an 8-week population-modeling project. The…

  7. Immunolocalization of alpha-keratins and feather beta-proteins in feather cells and comparison with the general process of cornification in the skin of mammals.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, L

    2013-03-01

    The maturation of the corneous material of feathers is a special case of cornification in vertebrate epidermis and is believed to occur mainly by the accumulation of small proteins of about 100 amino acids and a central beta-pleated sheet region known as feather keratins. The present immunocytochemical study carried out using double-labeling immunogold shows that a small amount of alpha-keratins of intermediate filament type form the early keratin clumps in barb and barbule cells. These initial nuclei of formation of corneous material are rapidly coated by the deposition of large amounts of small feather keratin-associated beta-proteins (feather keratins). The latter proteins turn the keratin bundles of barb and barbule cells into a compact and apparently amorphous mass of corneous material where no sign of intermediate filaments are seen. Feather beta-proteins however form an irregular filamentous network of 2-3nm thick electron-pale filaments and produce the characteristic feather X-ray pattern due to their prevalent amount over any other protein present in feather cells. The modality of cornification in feathers is discussed in relation to the process of formation of corneous material in the skin of vertebrates in general that occurs by the association of intermediate filament proteins and keratin-associated proteins.

  8. Beta-adrenergic antagonists during general anesthesia reduced postoperative pain: a systematic review and a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Härkänen, Lasse; Halonen, Jari; Selander, Tuomas; Kokki, Hannu

    2015-12-01

    We have performed a systematic literature review and a meta-analysis investigating the effect of beta-adrenergic antagonist on perioperative pain in randomized clinical trials (RCTs). The search included the CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, and MEDLINE databases (from inception to 10 February 2015). From the retrieved full texts, we hand-searched the references and PubMed related citations. A total of 11 RCTs consisting data of 701 adult patients were eligible for this systematic review. Esmolol was evaluated in ten trials and propranolol in one. Esmolol decreased the need for rescue analgesics by 32-50%; p < 0.05 (n = 7) and the proportion of patients needing rescue analgesia from 100 to 65%; p < 0.005 (n = 1), and propranolol decreased the need for rescue analgesics by 72%; p < 0.001 (n = 1). The time to the first rescue analgesics was longer (p < 0.05) and pain ratings were lower (p < 0.05) in patients with beta-adrenergic antagonists. However, in two opioid-controlled studies, one in knee arthroscopy and another in tubal ligation patients, the proportion of patients needing rescue analgesia was two-times higher in esmolol-treated patients: 52-57 vs. 23-34%, p < 0.05. Adverse effects were rarely reported, and as reported were mostly cardiovascular alterations. In conclusion, intra-operative beta-adrenergic antagonists' administration may decrease postoperative pain and analgesic consumption when given as an adjuvant to general anesthesia. PMID:26160590

  9. An Ultrahigh Resolution Structure of TEM-1 beta-Lactamase Suggests a Role for Glu166 as the General Base in Acylation

    SciTech Connect

    Minasov, George; Wang, Xiaojun; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2010-03-08

    Although TEM-1 {beta}-lactamase is among the best studied enzymes, its acylation mechanism remains controversial. To investigate this problem, the structure of TEM-1 in complex with an acylation transition-state analogue was determined at ultrahigh resolution (0.85 {angstrom}) by X-ray crystallography. The quality of the data was such as to allow for refinement to an R-factor of 9.1% and an R{sub free} of 11.2%. In the resulting structure, the electron density features were clear enough to differentiate between single and double bonds in carboxylate groups, to identify multiple conformations that are occupied by residues and loops, and to assign 70% of the protons in the protein. Unexpectedly, even at pH 8.0 where the protein was crystallized, the active site residue Glu166 is clearly protonated. This supports the hypothesis that Glu166 is the general base in the acylation half of the reaction cycle. This structure suggests that Glu166 acts through the catalytic water to activate Ser70 for nucleophilic attack on the {beta}-lactam ring of the substrate. The hydrolytic mechanism of class A {beta}-lactamases, such as TEM-1, appears to be symmetrical, as are the serine proteases. Apart from its mechanistic implications, this atomic resolution structure affords an unusually detailed view of the structure, dynamics, and hydrogen-bonding networks of TEM-1, which may be useful for the design of inhibitors against this key antibiotic resistance target.

  10. Indices of brain beta-adrenergic receptor signal transduction in the learned helplessness animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Gurguis, G N; Kramer, G; Petty, F

    1996-01-01

    Both stress response and antidepressant drug action may be mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors (beta AR). Since learned helplessness is a stress-induced animal model of depression, beta AR are relevant to investigate in this model. To date, studies have measured changes in total receptor density (RT), but have not examined more detailed aspects of signal transduction mechanisms such as coupling of the receptor to GS protein. We have investigated brain beta AR coupling in the frontal cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus of rats exposed to inescapable shock and then tested for learned helplessness, and in both tested and naive controls using [125I]-iodocyanopindolol (ICYP) as the ligand. Both antagonist-saturation and agonist-displacement experiments were conducted, and the specificity for the beta AR was optimized by excluding ICYP binding to 5HT1B receptors. The percentage receptor density in the high-conformational state (%RH) and the ratio of agonist (isoproterenol) dissociation constant from the receptor in the low-/high-conformational states (KL/KH) were used as indices of coupling to GS protein. No significant differences were found between rats developing learned helplessness and non-helpless rats after inescapable stress in any parameter measured in any brain region. In the frontal cortex, exposure to inescapable shock induced beta AR uncoupling from GS protein as suggested by a low KL/KH ratio both in helpless and non-helpless rats but not in either control group. In the hypothalamus, there were trends for higher RL, RT and KL/KH ratio in helpless rats and stressed controls compared to naive controls. These findings suggest that beta AR binding parameters in frontal cortex, hippocampus or hypothalamus did not differentiate between helpless and non-helpless rats. Changes in beta AR coupling observed in these brain regions may reflect effects of stress, which appeared to be region-specific, rather than stress-induced behavioral depression.

  11. Large deviation approach to the generalized random energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorlas, T. C.; Dukes, W. M. B.

    2002-05-01

    The generalized random energy model is a generalization of the random energy model introduced by Derrida to mimic the ultrametric structure of the Parisi solution of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model of a spin glass. It was solved exactly in two special cases by Derrida and Gardner. A complete solution for the thermodynamics in the general case was given by Capocaccia et al. Here we use large deviation theory to analyse the model in a very straightforward way. We also show that the variational expression for the free energy can be evaluated easily using the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality.

  12. A Generalized Kinetic Model for Heterogeneous Gas-Solid Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-08-15

    We present a generalized kinetic model for gas-solid heterogeneous reactions taking place at the interface between two phases. The model studies the reaction kinetics by taking into account the reactions at the interface, as well as the transport process within the product layer. The standard unreacted shrinking core model relies on the assumption of quasi-static diffusion that results in a steady-state concentration profile of gas reactant in the product layer. By relaxing this assumption and resolving the entire problem, general solutions can be obtained for reaction kinetics, including the reaction front velocity and the conversion (volume fraction of reacted solid). The unreacted shrinking core model is shown to be accurate and in agreement with the generalized model for slow reaction (or fast diffusion), low concentration of gas reactant, and small solid size. Otherwise, a generalized kinetic model should be used.

  13. General circulation model sensitivity experiments with pole-centered supercontinents

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.J.; Baum, S.K.; Kim, Kwang-Yul )

    1993-05-20

    The authors present model studies related to the general question of whether there could have been nearly ice-free climates in the past history of the Earth. Energy balance models and general circulation model calculations have addressed this question. In general this appears impossible, even with moving continents around, without postulating enhanced levels of CO[sub 2]. Early work indicated that pole centered continents could have snow free summers, but later work, with models with better physics, but poorer resolution seemed to contradict this conclusion. The authors apply the GENESIS (ver 1.02) general circulation model to this problem. Their conclusion is that with certain modifications to the application of this model, they could find pole-centered supercontinents which would be snow free in the summer.

  14. Model selection in the weighted generalized estimating equations for longitudinal data with dropout.

    PubMed

    Gosho, Masahiko

    2016-05-01

    We propose criteria for variable selection in the mean model and for the selection of a working correlation structure in longitudinal data with dropout missingness using weighted generalized estimating equations. The proposed criteria are based on a weighted quasi-likelihood function and a penalty term. Our simulation results show that the proposed criteria frequently select the correct model in candidate mean models. The proposed criteria also have good performance in selecting the working correlation structure for binary and normal outcomes. We illustrate our approaches using two empirical examples. In the first example, we use data from a randomized double-blind study to test the cancer-preventing effects of beta carotene. In the second example, we use longitudinal CD4 count data from a randomized double-blind study. PMID:26509243

  15. Integrated modeling of high poloidal beta scenario for a next-step reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClenaghan, J.; Garofalo, A. M.; Meneghini, O.; Smith, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    In order to fill the scientific and technological gaps between ITER and a nuclear fusion power plant DEMO, a next-step integrated nuclear test facility is critical. A high poloidal beta tokamak regime investigated in recent DIII-D experiments is a promising candidate for steady state operation in such a next-step device because the large bootstrap current fraction (~ 80 %) reduces the demands on the external current drive. Despite the large values of q95 ~10, the normalized fusion performance observed in the experiments meet the target for an economically attractive fusion power plant such as ARIES-ACT2. In this work, we will project the performance for a conducting and superconducting coil next-step steady state reactor using theory-based 0-D modeling and full 1.5D transport modeling. Work supported by U.S. DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  16. Generalized Kitaev models and extrinsic non-Abelian twist defects.

    PubMed

    Barkeshli, Maissam; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Thomale, Ronny; Qi, Xiao-Liang

    2015-01-16

    We present a wide class of partially integrable lattice models with two-spin interactions which generalize the Kitaev honeycomb model. These models have a conserved quantity associated with each plaquette, conserved large loop operators on the torus, and topological degeneracy. We introduce a "slave-genon" approach which generalizes the Majorana fermion approach in the Kitaev model. The Hilbert space of our spin model can be embedded in an enlarged Hilbert space of non-Abelian twist defects, referred to as genons. In the enlarged Hilbert space, the spin model is exactly reformulated as a model of non-Abelian genons coupled to a discrete gauge field. We discuss in detail a particular Z_{3} generalization, and we show that in a certain limit the model is analytically tractable and produces a non-Abelian topological phase with chiral parafermion edge states. PMID:25635553

  17. Generalized Kitaev Models and Extrinsic Non-Abelian Twist Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkeshli, Maissam; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Thomale, Ronny; Qi, Xiao-Liang

    2015-01-01

    We present a wide class of partially integrable lattice models with two-spin interactions which generalize the Kitaev honeycomb model. These models have a conserved quantity associated with each plaquette, conserved large loop operators on the torus, and topological degeneracy. We introduce a "slave-genon" approach which generalizes the Majorana fermion approach in the Kitaev model. The Hilbert space of our spin model can be embedded in an enlarged Hilbert space of non-Abelian twist defects, referred to as genons. In the enlarged Hilbert space, the spin model is exactly reformulated as a model of non-Abelian genons coupled to a discrete gauge field. We discuss in detail a particular Z3 generalization, and we show that in a certain limit the model is analytically tractable and produces a non-Abelian topological phase with chiral parafermion edge states.

  18. Symmetric Fold/Super-Hopf Bursting, Chaos and Mixed-Mode Oscillations in Pernarowski Model of Pancreatic Beta-Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah, Haniyeh

    Pancreatic beta-cells produce insulin to regularize the blood glucose level. Bursting is important in beta cells due to its relation to the release of insulin. Pernarowski model is a simple polynomial model of beta-cell activities indicating bursting oscillations in these cells. This paper presents bursting behaviors of symmetric type in this model. In addition, it is shown that the current system exhibits the phenomenon of period doubling cascades of canards which is a route to chaos. Canards are also observed symmetrically near folds of slow manifold which results in a chaotic transition between n and n + 1 spikes symmetric bursting. Furthermore, mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) and combination of symmetric bursting together with MMOs are illustrated during the transition between symmetric bursting and continuous spiking.

  19. 75 FR 71532 - Airworthiness Directives; Robinson Helicopter Company (Robinson) Model R22, R22 Alpha, R22 Beta...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ..., 2010. That NPRM was published in the Federal Register on July 15, 2010 (75 FR 41104). That action... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will... Company (Robinson) Model R22, R22 Alpha, R22 Beta, and R22 Mariner Helicopters, and Model R44, and R44...

  20. 75 FR 41104 - Airworthiness Directives; Robinson Helicopter Company (Robinson) Model R22, R22 Alpha, R22 Beta...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477). Examining the Docket You may... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3... Company (Robinson) Model R22, R22 Alpha, R22 Beta, and R22 Mariner Helicopters, and Model R44, and R44...

  1. Learning general phonological rules from distributional information: a computational model.

    PubMed

    Calamaro, Shira; Jarosz, Gaja

    2015-04-01

    Phonological rules create alternations in the phonetic realizations of related words. These rules must be learned by infants in order to identify the phonological inventory, the morphological structure, and the lexicon of a language. Recent work proposes a computational model for the learning of one kind of phonological alternation, allophony (Peperkamp, Le Calvez, Nadal, & Dupoux, 2006). This paper extends the model to account for learning of a broader set of phonological alternations and the formalization of these alternations as general rules. In Experiment 1, we apply the original model to new data in Dutch and demonstrate its limitations in learning nonallophonic rules. In Experiment 2, we extend the model to allow it to learn general rules for alternations that apply to a class of segments. In Experiment 3, the model is further extended to allow for generalization by context; we argue that this generalization must be constrained by linguistic principles.

  2. ECOLOGICAL THEORY. A general consumer-resource population model.

    PubMed

    Lafferty, Kevin D; DeLeo, Giulio; Briggs, Cheryl J; Dobson, Andrew P; Gross, Thilo; Kuris, Armand M

    2015-08-21

    Food-web dynamics arise from predator-prey, parasite-host, and herbivore-plant interactions. Models for such interactions include up to three consumer activity states (questing, attacking, consuming) and up to four resource response states (susceptible, exposed, ingested, resistant). Articulating these states into a general model allows for dissecting, comparing, and deriving consumer-resource models. We specify this general model for 11 generic consumer strategies that group mathematically into predators, parasites, and micropredators and then derive conditions for consumer success, including a universal saturating functional response. We further show how to use this framework to create simple models with a common mathematical lineage and transparent assumptions. Underlying assumptions, missing elements, and composite parameters are revealed when classic consumer-resource models are derived from the general model.

  3. Adaptive multiscale model reduction with Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Eric; Efendiev, Yalchin; Hou, Thomas Y.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss a general multiscale model reduction framework based on multiscale finite element methods. We give a brief overview of related multiscale methods. Due to page limitations, the overview focuses on a few related methods and is not intended to be comprehensive. We present a general adaptive multiscale model reduction framework, the Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method. Besides the method's basic outline, we discuss some important ingredients needed for the method's success. We also discuss several applications. The proposed method allows performing local model reduction in the presence of high contrast and no scale separation.

  4. Cloud Feedback in Atmospheric General Circulation Models: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Zhang, M. H.; Ingram, W. J.; Potter, G. L.; Alekseev, V.; Barker, H. W.; Cohen-Solal, E.; Colman, R. A.; Dazlich, D. A.; DelGenio, A. D.; Dix, M. R.; Dymnikov, V.; Esch, M.; Fowler, L. D.; Fraser, J. R.; Galin, V.; Gates, W. L.; Hack, J. J.; Kiehl, J. T.; LeTreut, H.

    1996-01-01

    Six years ago, we compared the climate sensitivity of 19 atmospheric general circulation models and found a roughly threefold variation among the models; most of this variation was attributed to differences in the models' depictions of cloud feedback. In an update of this comparison, current models showed considerably smaller differences in net cloud feedback, with most producing modest values. There are, however, substantial differences in the feedback components, indicating that the models still have physical disagreements.

  5. Critical Comments on the General Model of Instructional Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Justin D.

    2014-01-01

    This essay presents a critical commentary on McCroskey et al.'s (2004) general model of instructional communication. In particular, five points are examined which make explicit and problematize the meta-theoretical assumptions of the model. Comments call attention to the limitations of the model and argue for a broader approach to…

  6. Stellar occultations by turbulent planetary atmospheres. I - A heuristic scattering model. II - The Beta Scorpii events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Effects of atmospheric turbulence on stellar-occultation inversion procedures are investigated using a heuristic scattering model that is believed to reproduce the essential features of turbulence. A quantitative estimate is made of the size of the error in deducing the mean refractivity profile of a planetary atmosphere, taking into account constant as well as exponential scattering. It is shown that ordinary turbulence has no important effect on the average intensity profile in a stellar occultation but could have an important instantaneous effect. A critical examination of possible manifestations of turbulent scattering during occultations of Beta Sco by Jupiter indicates that all observed phenomena during these events can be understood in terms of scintillations produced by turbulence.

  7. The General Linear Model and Direct Standardization: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Roderick J. A.; Pullum, Thomas W.

    1979-01-01

    Two methods of analyzing nonorthogonal (uneven cell sizes) cross-classified data sets are compared. The methods are direct standardization and the general linear model. The authors illustrate when direct standardization may be a desirable method of analysis. (JKS)

  8. Insights into the molecular interactions between aminopeptidase and amyloid beta peptide using molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Dhanavade, Maruti J; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2014-08-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The accumulation of Aβ peptides in AD brain was caused due to overproduction or insufficient clearance and defects in the proteolytic degradation of Aβ peptides. Hence, Aβ peptide degradation could be a promising therapeutic approach in AD treatment. Recent experimental report suggests that aminopeptidase from Streptomyces griseus KK565 (SGAK) can degrade Aβ peptides but the interactive residues are yet to be known in detail at the atomic level. Hence, we developed the three-dimensional model of aminopeptidase (SGAK) using SWISS-MODEL, Geno3D and MODELLER. Model built by MODELLER was used for further studies. Molecular docking was performed between aminopeptidase (SGAK) with wild-type and mutated Aβ peptides. The docked complex of aminopeptidase (SGAK) and wild-type Aβ peptide (1IYT.pdb) shows more stability than the other complexes. Molecular docking and MD simulation results revealed that the residues His93, Asp105, Glu139, Glu140, Asp168 and His255 are involved in the hydrogen bonding with Aβ peptide and zinc ions. The interactions between carboxyl oxygen atoms of Glu139 of aminopeptidase (SGAK) with water molecule suggest that the Glu139 may be involved in the nucleophilic attack on Ala2-Glu3 peptide bond of Aβ peptide. Hence, amino acid Glu139 of aminopeptidase (SGAK) might play an important role to degrade Aβ peptides, a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. A radiative-convective equilibrium model for young giant exoplanets: Application to beta Pictoris b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudino, Jean-Loup; Bézard, B.; Boccaletti, A.; Lagrange, A.; Bonnefoy, M.

    2013-10-01

    We developed a radiative-convective equilibrium model for young giant exoplanets. Input parameters are the planet's surface gravity, effective temperature and elemental composition. Under the additional assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, the model predicts the equilibrium temperature profile and mixing ratio profiles of the most important gases. Opacity sources include the H2-He collision-induced absorption and molecular lines from H2O, CO, CH4, NH3, VO, TiO, Na and K. Line opacity is modeled using k-correlated coefficients pre-calculated over a fixed pressure-temperature grid. Cloud absorption can be added above the expected condensation level (e.g. iron or silicates) with given scale height and optical depth at some reference wavelength. Scattering is not included at the present stage. Model predictions will be compared with the existing photometric measurements of planet Beta Pictoris b in the J,H,K,L and M bands (Lagrange et al. 2009; Quanz et al. 2010; Bonnefoy et al. 2011, 2013). This model will be used to interpret future photometric and spectroscopic observations of exoplanets with SPHERE, mounted at the VLT with first light expected in mid-2014.

  10. Modeling of conformational transitions of fibrillogenic peptide, homologous to beta-domain of human alpha-lactalbumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadochnikov, V. V.; Egorov, V. V.; Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.; Lebedev, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of the peptide corresponding to beta domain of human alpha-lactalbumin (GYDTQAIVENNESTEYG, WT) has been simulated by the molecular dynamics method. It is shown that, within the model considered, the monomer of this peptide does not tend to form a stable secondary structure; however, simulation of the behavior of several peptide molecules revealed the occurrence of beta structures due to the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Since the aforementioned interactions involve the terminal portions of peptides, the influence of the tetrapeptide corresponding to the N-terminal portion of WT, TDYG (R), on the secondary structure has been analyzed. The model calculations show that the interaction of this peptide with WT monomer facilitates formation of beta-structures. It is suggested that peptide R may affect the quaternary structure of WT.

  11. Bioluminescence imaging reveals dynamics of beta cell loss in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Virostko, John; Radhika, Armandla; Poffenberger, Greg; Dula, Adrienne N; Moore, Daniel J; Powers, Alvin C

    2013-01-01

    We generated a mouse model (MIP-Luc-VU-NOD) that enables non-invasive bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of beta cell loss during the progression of autoimmune diabetes and determined the relationship between BLI and disease progression. MIP-Luc-VU-NOD mice displayed insulitis and a decline in bioluminescence with age which correlated with beta cell mass, plasma insulin, and pancreatic insulin content. Bioluminescence declined gradually in female MIP-Luc-VU-NOD mice, reaching less than 50% of the initial BLI at 10 weeks of age, whereas hyperglycemia did not ensue until mice were at least 16 weeks old. Mice that did not become diabetic maintained insulin secretion and had less of a decline in bioluminescence than mice that became diabetic. Bioluminescence measurements predicted a decline in beta cell mass prior to the onset of hyperglycemia and tracked beta cell loss. This model should be useful for investigating the fundamental processes underlying autoimmune diabetes and developing new therapies targeting beta cell protection and regeneration.

  12. On some generalizations of the second grade fluid model

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, M.; Vaidya, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we provide a brief review of some generalizations of the second grade fluid model. We discuss certain similarities between these fluids and fluids of higher grades, while also describing certain limitations of these models. The new models that we put forth are based upon some interesting experimental results which suggest that not only can normal stress coefficients depend upon the shear rate, but that this dependency is in fact not the same rate as that of shear viscosity variation with shear rate. We then discuss some steady flows of these generalized second grade fluid models.

  13. On some generalizations of the second grade fluid model

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Vaidya, Ashwin

    2008-07-01

    In this article, we provide a brief review of some generalizations of the second grade fluid model. We discuss certain similarities between these fluids and fluids of higher grades, while also describing certain limitations of these models. The new models that we put forth are based upon some interesting experimental results which suggest that not only can normal stress coefficients depend upon the shear rate, but that this dependency is in fact not the same rate as that of shear viscosity variation with shear rate. We then discuss some steady flows of these generalized second grade fluid models.

  14. Adaptation of a general circulation model to ocean dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.; Rees, T. H.; Woodbury, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    A primitive-variable general circulation model of the ocean was formulated in which fast external gravity waves are suppressed with rigid-lid surface constraint pressires which also provide a means for simulating the effects of large-scale free-surface topography. The surface pressure method is simpler to apply than the conventional stream function models, and the resulting model can be applied to both global ocean and limited region situations. Strengths and weaknesses of the model are also presented.

  15. Two field BPS solutions for generalized Lorentz breaking models

    SciTech Connect

    Souza Dutra, A. de; Hott, M.; Barone, F. A.

    2006-10-15

    In this work we present nonlinear models in two-dimensional space-time of two interacting scalar fields in the Lorentz and CPT violating scenarios. We discuss the soliton solutions for these models as well as the question of stability for them. This is done by generalizing a model recently published by Barreto and collaborators and also by getting new solutions for the model introduced by them.

  16. Two new ad-hoc models of detection physics and their evaluation for navigated beta probe surface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakir, Dzhoshkun I.; Hartl, Alexander; Schneider, Florian R.; Pulko, Jozef; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Navab, Nassir; Lasser, Tobias

    2012-02-01

    Intra-operative surface imaging with navigated beta probes in conjunction with positron-emitting radiotracers like 18F-FDG has been shown to enable control of tumor resection borders. We showed previously that employing iterative reconstruction (MLEM) in conjunction with an ad-hoc model of the detection physics (based on solid-angle geometry, SA) improves the image quality. In this study, we sampled the beta probe readings of a point source using a precision step-motor to generate a look-up-table (LUT) model. We also generated a simplified geometrical model (SG) based on this data set. To see how these two models influence the image quality compared to the old SA model, we reconstructed images from sparsely sampled datasets of a phantom with three hotspots using each model. The images yielded 76% (SA), 81% (SG), and 81% (LUT) mean NCC compared to the ground truth. The SG and LUT models, however, could resolve the hotspots better in the datasets where the detector-to-phantom distance was larger. Additionally, we compared the deviations of the SA and SG analytical models to the measured LUT model, where we found that the SG model gives estimates substantially closer to the actual beta probe readings than the previous SA model.

  17. A generalized statistical model for the size distribution of wealth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementi, F.; Gallegati, M.; Kaniadakis, G.

    2012-12-01

    In a recent paper in this journal (Clementi et al 2009 J. Stat. Mech. P02037), we proposed a new, physically motivated, distribution function for modeling individual incomes, having its roots in the framework of the κ-generalized statistical mechanics. The performance of the κ-generalized distribution was checked against real data on personal income for the United States in 2003. In this paper we extend our previous model so as to be able to account for the distribution of wealth. Probabilistic functions and inequality measures of this generalized model for wealth distribution are obtained in closed form. In order to check the validity of the proposed model, we analyze the US household wealth distributions from 1984 to 2009 and conclude an excellent agreement with the data that is superior to any other model already known in the literature.

  18. Generalized linear and generalized additive models in studies of species distributions: Setting the scene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guisan, A.; Edwards, T.C.; Hastie, T.

    2002-01-01

    An important statistical development of the last 30 years has been the advance in regression analysis provided by generalized linear models (GLMs) and generalized additive models (GAMs). Here we introduce a series of papers prepared within the framework of an international workshop entitled: Advances in GLMs/GAMs modeling: from species distribution to environmental management, held in Riederalp, Switzerland, 6-11 August 2001. We first discuss some general uses of statistical models in ecology, as well as provide a short review of several key examples of the use of GLMs and GAMs in ecological modeling efforts. We next present an overview of GLMs and GAMs, and discuss some of their related statistics used for predictor selection, model diagnostics, and evaluation. Included is a discussion of several new approaches applicable to GLMs and GAMs, such as ridge regression, an alternative to stepwise selection of predictors, and methods for the identification of interactions by a combined use of regression trees and several other approaches. We close with an overview of the papers and how we feel they advance our understanding of their application to ecological modeling. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A generalized model via random walks for information filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhuo-Ming; Kong, Yixiu; Shang, Ming-Sheng; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2016-08-01

    There could exist a simple general mechanism lurking beneath collaborative filtering and interdisciplinary physics approaches which have been successfully applied to online E-commerce platforms. Motivated by this idea, we propose a generalized model employing the dynamics of the random walk in the bipartite networks. Taking into account the degree information, the proposed generalized model could deduce the collaborative filtering, interdisciplinary physics approaches and even the enormous expansion of them. Furthermore, we analyze the generalized model with single and hybrid of degree information on the process of random walk in bipartite networks, and propose a possible strategy by using the hybrid degree information for different popular objects to toward promising precision of the recommendation.

  20. A note on 'A generalized two-sex logistic model'.

    PubMed

    Maxin, D; Sega, L

    2015-01-01

    We re-visit the recently published paper on a generalization of the two-sex logistic model by Maxin and Sega [A generalized two-sex logistic model, J. Biol. Dyn. 7(1) (2013), pp. 302-318]. We show that the logistic assumption of a non-increasing birth rate can be replaced by a more general assumption of a non-increasing ratio between the female/male birth and mortality rate. In this note we indicate the changes necessary in the proofs of the theorems in [D. Maxin and L. Sega, A generalized two-sex logistic model, J. Biol. Dyn. 7(1) (2013), pp. 302--318] and discuss several situations where this new assumption is useful.

  1. Analysis of Radiation Pneumonitis Risk Using a Generalized Lyman Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Susan L. Liu, H. Helen; Liao Zhongxing; Wei Xiong; Wang Shulian; Jin Hekun; Komaki, Ritsuko; Martel, Mary K.; Mohan, Radhe

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To introduce a version of the Lyman normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) model adapted to incorporate censored time-to-toxicity data and clinical risk factors and to apply the generalized model to analysis of radiation pneumonitis (RP) risk. Methods and Materials: Medical records and radiation treatment plans were reviewed retrospectively for 576 patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiotherapy. The time to severe (Grade {>=}3) RP was computed, with event times censored at last follow-up for patients not experiencing this endpoint. The censored time-to-toxicity data were analyzed using the standard and generalized Lyman models with patient smoking status taken into account. Results: The generalized Lyman model with patient smoking status taken into account produced NTCP estimates up to 27 percentage points different from the model based on dose-volume factors alone. The generalized model also predicted that 8% of the expected cases of severe RP were unobserved because of censoring. The estimated volume parameter for lung was not significantly different from n = 1, corresponding to mean lung dose. Conclusions: NTCP models historically have been based solely on dose-volume effects and binary (yes/no) toxicity data. Our results demonstrate that inclusion of nondosimetric risk factors and censored time-to-event data can markedly affect outcome predictions made using NTCP models.

  2. Structural model of the amyloid fibril formed by beta(2)-microglobulin #21-31 fragment based on vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Hirotsugu; Goto, Yuji; Naiki, Hironobu; Kitagawa, Teizo

    2005-06-01

    A structural model of amyloid fibril formed by the #21-31 fragment of beta2-microglobulin is proposed from microscope IR measurements on specifically 13C-labeled peptide fibrils and Raman spectra of the dispersed fibril solution. The 13C-shifted amide frequency indicated the secondary structure of the labeled residues. The IR spectra have demonstrated that the region between F22 and V27 forms the core part with the extended beta-sheet structure. Raman spectra indicated the formation of a dimer with a disulfide bridge between C25 residues.

  3. Analyzing and Modeling the Kinetics of Amyloid Beta Pores Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Ghanim; Demuro, Angelo; Parker, Ian; Pearson, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) form Ca2+-permeable plasma membrane pores, leading to a disruption of the otherwise well-controlled intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. The resultant up-regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration has detrimental implications for memory formation and cell survival. The gating kinetics and Ca2+ permeability of Aβ pores are not well understood. We have used computational modeling in conjunction with the ability of optical patch-clamping for massively parallel imaging of Ca2+ flux through thousands of pores in the cell membrane of Xenopus oocytes to elucidate the kinetic properties of Aβ pores. The fluorescence time-series data from individual pores were idealized and used to develop data-driven Markov chain models for the kinetics of the Aβ pore at different stages of its evolution. Our study provides the first demonstration of developing Markov chain models for ion channel gating that are driven by optical-patch clamp data with the advantage of experiments being performed under close to physiological conditions. Towards the end, we demonstrate the up-regulation of gating of various Ca2+ release channels due to Aβ pores and show that the extent and spatial range of such up-regulation increases as Aβ pores with low open probability and Ca2+ permeability transition into those with high open probability and Ca2+ permeability. PMID:26348728

  4. A mathematical model of the kinetics of beta-amyloid fibril growth from the denatured state.

    PubMed Central

    Pallitto, M M; Murphy, R M

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous conversion of beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) from soluble monomer to insoluble fibril may underlie the neurodegeneration associated with Alzheimer's disease. A complete description of Abeta self-association kinetics requires identification of the oligomeric species present and the pathway of association, as well as quantitation of rate constants and reaction order. Abeta was rendered monomeric and denatured by dissolution in 8 M urea, pH 10. "Refolding" and fibrillization were initiated by rapid dilution into phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.4. The kinetics of growth were followed at three different concentrations, using size exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering, and static light scattering. A multi-step pathway for fibril formation and growth was postulated. This pathway included 1) rapid commitment to either stable monomer/dimer or unstable intermediate, 2) cooperative association of intermediate into a multimeric "nucleus," 3) elongation of the "nucleus" into filaments via addition of intermediate, 4) lateral aggregation of filaments into fibrils, and 5) fibril elongation via end-to-end association. Differential and algebraic equations describing this kinetic pathway were derived, and model parameters were determined by fitting the data. The utility of the model for identifying toxic Abeta oligomeric specie(s) is demonstrated. The model should prove useful for designing compounds that inhibit Abeta aggregation and/or toxicity. PMID:11509390

  5. Phase-field modeling of the beta to omega phase transformation in Zr–Nb alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Yeddu, Hemantha Kumar; Lookman, Turab

    2015-05-01

    A three-dimensional elastoplastic phase-field model is developed, using the Finite Element Method (FEM), for modeling the athermal beta to omega phase transformation in Zr–Nb alloys by including plastic deformation and strain hardening of the material. The microstructure evolution during athermal transformation as well as under different stress states, e.g. uni-axial tensile and compressive, bi-axial tensile and compressive, shear and tri-axial loadings, is studied. The effects of plasticity, stress states and the stress loading direction on the microstructure evolution as well as on the mechanical properties are studied. The input data corresponding to a Zr – 8 at.% Nb alloy aremore » acquired from experimental studies as well as by using the CALPHAD method. Our simulations show that the four different omega variants grow as ellipsoidal shaped particles. Our results show that due to stress relaxation, the athermal phase transformation occurs slightly more readily in the presence of plasticity compared to that in its absence. The evolution of omega phase is different under different stress states, which leads to the differences in the mechanical properties of the material. The variant selection mechanism, i.e. formation of different variants under different stress loading directions, is also nicely captured by our model.« less

  6. Analyzing and Modeling the Kinetics of Amyloid Beta Pores Associated with Alzheimer's Disease Pathology.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ghanim; Demuro, Angelo; Parker, Ian; Pearson, John E

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) form Ca2+-permeable plasma membrane pores, leading to a disruption of the otherwise well-controlled intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. The resultant up-regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration has detrimental implications for memory formation and cell survival. The gating kinetics and Ca2+ permeability of Aβ pores are not well understood. We have used computational modeling in conjunction with the ability of optical patch-clamping for massively parallel imaging of Ca2+ flux through thousands of pores in the cell membrane of Xenopus oocytes to elucidate the kinetic properties of Aβ pores. The fluorescence time-series data from individual pores were idealized and used to develop data-driven Markov chain models for the kinetics of the Aβ pore at different stages of its evolution. Our study provides the first demonstration of developing Markov chain models for ion channel gating that are driven by optical-patch clamp data with the advantage of experiments being performed under close to physiological conditions. Towards the end, we demonstrate the up-regulation of gating of various Ca2+ release channels due to Aβ pores and show that the extent and spatial range of such up-regulation increases as Aβ pores with low open probability and Ca2+ permeability transition into those with high open probability and Ca2+ permeability. PMID:26348728

  7. Phase-field modeling of the beta to omega phase transformation in Zr–Nb alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yeddu, Hemantha Kumar; Lookman, Turab

    2015-05-01

    A three-dimensional elastoplastic phase-field model is developed, using the Finite Element Method (FEM), for modeling the athermal beta to omega phase transformation in Zr–Nb alloys by including plastic deformation and strain hardening of the material. The microstructure evolution during athermal transformation as well as under different stress states, e.g. uni-axial tensile and compressive, bi-axial tensile and compressive, shear and tri-axial loadings, is studied. The effects of plasticity, stress states and the stress loading direction on the microstructure evolution as well as on the mechanical properties are studied. The input data corresponding to a Zr – 8 at.% Nb alloy are acquired from experimental studies as well as by using the CALPHAD method. Our simulations show that the four different omega variants grow as ellipsoidal shaped particles. Our results show that due to stress relaxation, the athermal phase transformation occurs slightly more readily in the presence of plasticity compared to that in its absence. The evolution of omega phase is different under different stress states, which leads to the differences in the mechanical properties of the material. The variant selection mechanism, i.e. formation of different variants under different stress loading directions, is also nicely captured by our model.

  8. Analyzing and Modeling the Kinetics of Amyloid Beta Pores Associated with Alzheimer's Disease Pathology.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ghanim; Demuro, Angelo; Parker, Ian; Pearson, John E

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) form Ca2+-permeable plasma membrane pores, leading to a disruption of the otherwise well-controlled intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. The resultant up-regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration has detrimental implications for memory formation and cell survival. The gating kinetics and Ca2+ permeability of Aβ pores are not well understood. We have used computational modeling in conjunction with the ability of optical patch-clamping for massively parallel imaging of Ca2+ flux through thousands of pores in the cell membrane of Xenopus oocytes to elucidate the kinetic properties of Aβ pores. The fluorescence time-series data from individual pores were idealized and used to develop data-driven Markov chain models for the kinetics of the Aβ pore at different stages of its evolution. Our study provides the first demonstration of developing Markov chain models for ion channel gating that are driven by optical-patch clamp data with the advantage of experiments being performed under close to physiological conditions. Towards the end, we demonstrate the up-regulation of gating of various Ca2+ release channels due to Aβ pores and show that the extent and spatial range of such up-regulation increases as Aβ pores with low open probability and Ca2+ permeability transition into those with high open probability and Ca2+ permeability.

  9. Analyzing and modeling the kinetics of amyloid beta pores associated with Alzheimer’s disease pathology

    DOE PAGES

    Ullah, Ghanim; Demuro, Angelo; Parker, Ian; Pearson, John E.; Xu, Shang -Zhong

    2015-09-08

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) form Ca2+-permeable plasma membrane pores, leading to a disruption of the otherwise well-controlled intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. The resultant up-regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration has detrimental implications for memory formation and cell survival. The gating kinetics and Ca2+ permeability of Aβ pores are not well understood. We have used computational modeling in conjunction with the ability of optical patch-clamping for massively parallel imaging of Ca2+ flux through thousands of pores in the cell membrane of Xenopus oocytes to elucidate the kinetic properties of Aβ pores. The fluorescence time-series data from individualmore » pores were idealized and used to develop data-driven Markov chain models for the kinetics of the Aβ pore at different stages of its evolution. Our study provides the first demonstration of developing Markov chain models for ion channel gating that are driven by optical-patch clamp data with the advantage of experiments being performed under close to physiological conditions. As a result, we demonstrate the up-regulation of gating of various Ca2+ release channels due to Aβ pores and show that the extent and spatial range of such up-regulation increases as Aβ pores with low open probability and Ca2+ permeability transition into those with high open probability and Ca2+ permeability.« less

  10. The involvement of Opaque 2 on beta-prolamin gene regulation in maize and Coix suggests a more general role for this transcriptional activator.

    PubMed

    Cord Neto, G; Yunes, J A; da Silva, M J; Vettore, A L; Arruda, P; Leite, A

    1995-03-01

    The maize opaque 2 (o2) mutation is known to have numerous pleiotropic effects. Some polypeptides have their expression depressed while others are enhanced. The best characterized effects of the o2 mutation are those exerted on endosperm genes encoding the storage protein class of the 22 kDa alpha-zeins and the ribosome inactivating protein b-32. The Opaque 2 (O2) locus encodes a basic domain-leucine zipper DNA-binding factor, O2, which transcriptionally regulates these genes. In the maize-related grass Coix lacryma-jobi, an O2-homologous protein regulates the 25 kDa alpha-coixin family. We show in this paper that O2 transcriptionally regulates the structurally and developmentally different class of the beta-prolamins. A new O2-binding box was identified in beta-prolamin genes from maize and Coix that, together with the boxes previously identified in other endosperm expressed genes, forms a curious collection of O2 cis elements. This may have regulatory implications on the role of O2 in the mechanism that controls coordinated gene expression in the developing endosperm. Considering that the O2 locus controls at least three distinct classes of genes in maize endosperm, we propose that the O2 protein may play a more general role in maize endosperm development than previously conceived.

  11. A Generalized Information Theoretical Model for Quantum Secret Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chen-Ming; Li, Zhi-Hui; Xu, Ting-Ting; Li, Yong-Ming

    2016-07-01

    An information theoretical model for quantum secret sharing was introduced by H. Imai et al. (Quantum Inf. Comput. 5(1), 69-80 2005), which was analyzed by quantum information theory. In this paper, we analyze this information theoretical model using the properties of the quantum access structure. By the analysis we propose a generalized model definition for the quantum secret sharing schemes. In our model, there are more quantum access structures which can be realized by our generalized quantum secret sharing schemes than those of the previous one. In addition, we also analyse two kinds of important quantum access structures to illustrate the existence and rationality for the generalized quantum secret sharing schemes and consider the security of the scheme by simple examples.

  12. Linear equality constraints in the general linear mixed model.

    PubMed

    Edwards, L J; Stewart, P W; Muller, K E; Helms, R W

    2001-12-01

    Scientists may wish to analyze correlated outcome data with constraints among the responses. For example, piecewise linear regression in a longitudinal data analysis can require use of a general linear mixed model combined with linear parameter constraints. Although well developed for standard univariate models, there are no general results that allow a data analyst to specify a mixed model equation in conjunction with a set of constraints on the parameters. We resolve the difficulty by precisely describing conditions that allow specifying linear parameter constraints that insure the validity of estimates and tests in a general linear mixed model. The recommended approach requires only straightforward and noniterative calculations to implement. We illustrate the convenience and advantages of the methods with a comparison of cognitive developmental patterns in a study of individuals from infancy to early adulthood for children from low-income families.

  13. Partially Observed Mixtures of IRT Models: An Extension of the Generalized Partial-Credit Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Von Davier, Matthias; Yamamoto, Kentaro

    2004-01-01

    The generalized partial-credit model (GPCM) is used frequently in educational testing and in large-scale assessments for analyzing polytomous data. Special cases of the generalized partial-credit model are the partial-credit model--or Rasch model for ordinal data--and the two parameter logistic (2PL) model. This article extends the GPCM to the…

  14. Generalized population models and the nature of genetic drift.

    PubMed

    Der, Ricky; Epstein, Charles L; Plotkin, Joshua B

    2011-09-01

    The Wright-Fisher model of allele dynamics forms the basis for most theoretical and applied research in population genetics. Our understanding of genetic drift, and its role in suppressing the deterministic forces of Darwinian selection has relied on the specific form of sampling inherent to the Wright-Fisher model and its diffusion limit. Here we introduce and analyze a broad class of forward-time population models that share the same mean and variance as the Wright-Fisher model, but may otherwise differ. The proposed class unifies and further generalizes a number of population-genetic processes of recent interest, including the Λ and Cannings processes. Even though these models all have the same variance effective population size, they encode a rich diversity of alternative forms of genetic drift, with significant consequences for allele dynamics. We characterize in detail the behavior of standard population-genetic quantities across this family of generalized models. Some quantities, such as heterozygosity, remain unchanged; but others, such as neutral absorption times and fixation probabilities under selection, deviate by orders of magnitude from the Wright-Fisher model. We show that generalized population models can produce startling phenomena that differ qualitatively from classical behavior - such as assured fixation of a new mutant despite the presence of genetic drift. We derive the forward-time continuum limits of the generalized processes, analogous to Kimura's diffusion limit of the Wright-Fisher process, and we discuss their relationships to the Kingman and non-Kingman coalescents. Finally, we demonstrate that some non-diffusive, generalized models are more likely, in certain respects, than the Wright-Fisher model itself, given empirical data from Drosophila populations.

  15. Muon capture in a general class of weak models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botella, F. J.

    1985-10-01

    We study muon capture by 12C in a general class of weak models. There is always a parameter characteristic of the weak model that can be extracted in a nuclear-model-independent way from the average polarization Pav, the longitudinal polarization PNL and the asymmetry α in the angular distribution of recoils. For a less general class of models the asymmetry α is unnecessary. Using the experimental values of PNL and Pav we get a lower bound for the mass of the right-handed gauge boson of the left-right-symmetric model, MWR>=2.5MWL, in a nuclear-model-independent way. The dependence of this bound on the experimental values is also discussed.

  16. Asian Summer Monsoon Intraseasonal Variability in General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K R; Annamalai, H

    2004-02-24

    The goals of this report are: (1) Analyze boreal summer Asian monsoon intraseasonal variability general circulation models--How well do the models represent the eastward and northward propagating components of the convection and how well do the models represent the interactive control that the western tropical Pacific rainfall exerts on the rainfall over India and vice-versa? (2) Role of air-sea interactions--prescribed vs. interactive ocean; and (3) Mean monsoon vs. variability.

  17. Generalization of Richardson-Gaudin models to rank-2 algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Errea, B; Lerma, S; Dukelsky, J; Dimitrova, S S; Pittel, S; Van Isacker, P; Gueorguiev, V G

    2006-07-20

    A generalization of Richardson-Gaudin models to the rank-2 SO(5) and SO(3,2) algebras is used to describe systems of two kinds of fermions or bosons interacting through a pairing force. They are applied to the proton-neutron neutron isovector pairing model and to the Interacting Boson Model 2, in the transition from vibration to gamma-soft nuclei, respectively. In both cases, the integrals of motion and their eigenvalues are obtained.

  18. ICAT Inhibits beta-Catenin Binding to Tcf/Lef-Family Transcription Factors and in the General Coactivator p300 Using Independent Structural Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    In the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, {beta}-catenin activates target genes through its interactions with Tcf/Lef-family transcription factors and additional transcriptional coactivators. The crystal structure of ICAT, an inhibitor of {beta}-catenin-mediated transcription, bound to the armadillo repeat domain of {beta}-catenin, has been determined. ICAT contains an N-terminal helilical domain that binds to repeats 11 and 12 of {beta}-catenin, and an extended C-terminal region that binds to repeats 5-10 in a manner similar that of Tcfs and other {beta}-catenin ligands. Full-length ICAT dissociates complexes of {beta}-catenin, Lef-1, and the transcriptional coactivator p300, whereas the helical domain alone selectively blocks binding to p300. The C-terminal armadillo repeats of {beta}-catenin may be an attractive target for compounds designed to disrupt aberrant {beta}-catenin-mediated transcription associated with various cancers.

  19. Australian and overseas models of general practice training.

    PubMed

    Hays, Richard B; Morgan, Simon

    2011-06-01

    General practice training in Australia continues to evolve. It is now the responsibility of an independent organisation, is delivered by regional training providers, and comprises a structured training program. Overseas, general practice varies in its importance to health care systems, and training models differ considerably. In some cases training is mandatory, in others voluntary, but the aim is always similar--to improve the quality of care delivered to the large majority of populations that access health care through primary care. We review the current status of vocational general practice training in Australia, compare it with selected training programs in international contexts, and describe how the local model is well placed to address future challenges. Challenges include changes in population demographics, increasing comorbidity, increasing costs of technology-based health care, increasing globalisation of health, and workforce shortages. Although general practice training in Australia is strong, it can improve further by learning from other training programs to meet these challengers. PMID:21644855

  20. Australian and overseas models of general practice training.

    PubMed

    Hays, Richard B; Morgan, Simon

    2011-06-01

    General practice training in Australia continues to evolve. It is now the responsibility of an independent organisation, is delivered by regional training providers, and comprises a structured training program. Overseas, general practice varies in its importance to health care systems, and training models differ considerably. In some cases training is mandatory, in others voluntary, but the aim is always similar--to improve the quality of care delivered to the large majority of populations that access health care through primary care. We review the current status of vocational general practice training in Australia, compare it with selected training programs in international contexts, and describe how the local model is well placed to address future challenges. Challenges include changes in population demographics, increasing comorbidity, increasing costs of technology-based health care, increasing globalisation of health, and workforce shortages. Although general practice training in Australia is strong, it can improve further by learning from other training programs to meet these challengers.

  1. Quantum dot charge stability diagram from a generalized Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Yang, Shuo; Das Sarma, Sankar

    2011-03-01

    We develop a theory for the charge stability diagram in solid state quantum dot spin qubits using a general form of the Hubbard model. We argue that the extended Hubbard model (with both on-site and inter-site Coulomb repulsion) is the minimal model to describe the system. The appropriate parameters of the Hubbard model can be read off by comparing our theoretically derived results with the experimental charge stability plots. We make predictions on how the charge stability diagram depends on various parameters of the Hubbard model, especially the spin-exchange and hopping energies. This work is supported by IARPA, LPS-CMTC, and CNAM.

  2. Modeling Pseudomonas syringae ice-nucleation protein as a beta-helical protein.

    PubMed Central

    Graether, S P; Jia, Z

    2001-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) inhibit the growth of ice, whereas ice-nucleation proteins (INPs) promote its formation. Although the structures of several AFPs are known, the structure of INP has been modeled thus far because of the difficulty in determining membrane protein structures. Here, we present a novel model of an INP structure from Pseudomonas syringae based on comparison with two newly determined insect AFP structures. The results suggest that both this class of AFPs and INPs may have a similar beta-helical fold and that they could interact with water through the repetitive TXT motif. By theoretical arguments, we show that the distinguishing feature between an ice inhibitor and an ice nucleator lies in the size of the ice-interacting surface. For INPs, the larger surface area acts as a template that is larger than the critical ice embryo surface area required for growth. In contrast, AFPs are small enough so that they bind to ice and inhibit further growth without acting as a nucleator. PMID:11222281

  3. Equivalence of several generalized percolation models on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Joel C.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, many variants of percolation have been used to study network structure and the behavior of processes spreading on networks. These include bond percolation, site percolation, k -core percolation, bootstrap percolation, the generalized epidemic process, and the Watts threshold model (WTM). We show that—except for bond percolation—each of these processes arises as a special case of the WTM, and bond percolation arises from a small modification. In fact "heterogeneous k -core percolation," a corresponding "heterogeneous bootstrap percolation" model, and the generalized epidemic process are completely equivalent to one another and the WTM. We further show that a natural generalization of the WTM in which individuals "transmit" or "send a message" to their neighbors with some probability less than 1 can be reformulated in terms of the WTM, and so this apparent generalization is in fact not more general. Finally, we show that in bond percolation, finding the set of nodes in the component containing a given node is equivalent to finding the set of nodes activated if that node is initially activated and the node thresholds are chosen from the appropriate distribution. A consequence of these results is that mathematical techniques developed for the WTM apply to these other models as well, and techniques that were developed for some particular case may in fact apply much more generally.

  4. Modeling the brain morphology distribution in the general aging population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huizinga, W.; Poot, D. H. J.; Roshchupkin, G.; Bron, E. E.; Ikram, M. A.; Vernooij, M. W.; Rueckert, D.; Niessen, W. J.; Klein, S.

    2016-03-01

    Both normal aging and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease cause morphological changes of the brain. To better distinguish between normal and abnormal cases, it is necessary to model changes in brain morphology owing to normal aging. To this end, we developed a method for analyzing and visualizing these changes for the entire brain morphology distribution in the general aging population. The method is applied to 1000 subjects from a large population imaging study in the elderly, from which 900 were used to train the model and 100 were used for testing. The results of the 100 test subjects show that the model generalizes to subjects outside the model population. Smooth percentile curves showing the brain morphology changes as a function of age and spatiotemporal atlases derived from the model population are publicly available via an interactive web application at agingbrain.bigr.nl.

  5. A general diagnostic model applied to language testing data.

    PubMed

    von Davier, Matthias

    2008-11-01

    Probabilistic models with one or more latent variables are designed to report on a corresponding number of skills or cognitive attributes. Multidimensional skill profiles offer additional information beyond what a single test score can provide, if the reported skills can be identified and distinguished reliably. Many recent approaches to skill profile models are limited to dichotomous data and have made use of computationally intensive estimation methods such as Markov chain Monte Carlo, since standard maximum likelihood (ML) estimation techniques were deemed infeasible. This paper presents a general diagnostic model (GDM) that can be estimated with standard ML techniques and applies to polytomous response variables as well as to skills with two or more proficiency levels. The paper uses one member of a larger class of diagnostic models, a compensatory diagnostic model for dichotomous and partial credit data. Many well-known models, such as univariate and multivariate versions of the Rasch model and the two-parameter logistic item response theory model, the generalized partial credit model, as well as a variety of skill profile models, are special cases of this GDM. In addition to an introduction to this model, the paper presents a parameter recovery study using simulated data and an application to real data from the field test for TOEFL Internet-based testing.

  6. Coexistence of interacting opinions in a generalized Sznajd model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timpanaro, André M.; Prado, Carmen P. C.

    2011-08-01

    The Sznajd model is a sociophysics model that mimics the propagation of opinions in a closed society, where the interactions favor groups of agreeing people. It is based in the Ising and Potts ferromagnetic models and, although the original model used only linear chains, it has since been adapted to general networks. This model has a very rich transient, which has been used to model several aspects of elections, but its stationary states are always consensus states. In order to model more complex behaviors, we have, in a recent work, introduced the idea of biases and prejudices to the Sznajd model by generalizing the bounded confidence rule, which is common to many continuous opinion models, to what we called confidence rules. In that work we have found that the mean field version of this model (corresponding to a complete network) allows for stationary states where noninteracting opinions survive, but never for the coexistence of interacting opinions. In the present work, we provide networks that allow for the coexistence of interacting opinions for certain confidence rules. Moreover, we show that the model does not become inactive; that is, the opinions keep changing, even in the stationary regime. This is an important result in the context of understanding how a rule that breeds local conformity is still able to sustain global diversity while avoiding a frozen stationary state. We also provide results that give some insights on how this behavior approaches the mean field behavior as the networks are changed.

  7. A general relativistic model for free-fall absolute gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yu-Jie; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Li, Jia; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2016-04-01

    Although the relativistic manifestations of gravitational fields in gravimetry were first studied 40 years ago, the relativistic effects combined with free-fall absolute gravimeters have rarely been considered. In light of this, we present a general relativistic model for free-fall absolute gravimeters in a local-Fermi coordinates system, where we focus on effects related to the measuring devices: relativistic transverse Doppler effects, gravitational redshift effects and Earth’s rotation effects. Based on this model, a general relativistic expression of the measured gravity acceleration is obtained.

  8. A kinetic model of the synergism of endo- and exoglucanase and {beta}-glucosidase on hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Michihiro; Homma, Taira; Ooshima, Kazuhisa; Taniguchi, Masayuki

    1991-12-31

    A kinetic model representing the synergistic action of the three components that compose cellulose on hydrolysis of solid cellulose particles is proposed. The model consists of three simultaneous differential equations: one representing the action of the endoenzyme, another representing the action of the exoenzyme, and the third representing the action of the {Beta}-glucosidase. A simultaneous solution of these three equations expresses the synergism. The experimental data fit the theory well.

  9. Interaction of osteopontin with neutrophil {alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 9}{beta}{sub 1} integrins in a rodent model of alcoholic liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Atrayee; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Ramaiah, Shashi K

    2008-12-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have reported that osteopontin (OPN) mediated higher hepatic neutrophil infiltration makes female rats more susceptible to alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) than their male counterparts. The objective of the current work was to investigate the patho-mechanism by which OPN attracts the hepatic neutrophils in ASH. We hypothesized that OPN-mediated hepatic neutrophil infiltration is a result of signaling by N-terminal integrin binding motif (SLAYGLR) of OPN through its receptor {alpha}{sub 9}{beta}{sub 1} (VLA9) and {alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 1} (VLA4) integrins on neutrophils. Compared to the males, females in the ASH group exhibited higher expression of {alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 9}{beta}{sub 1} protein and mRNA and a significant decrease in the expression of these integrins was observed in rats treated with neutralizing OPN antibody. Immunoprecipitation experiments suggested the binding of OPN to {alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 9}{beta}{sub 1} integrins. OPN-mediated neutrophil infiltration was also confirmed using Boyden chamber assays, and antibodies directed against {alpha}{sub 4} and {beta}{sub 1} integrins was found to significantly inhibit neutrophilic migration in vitro. In conclusion, these data suggest that SLAYGLR-mediated {alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 9}{beta}{sub 1} integrin signaling may be responsible for higher hepatic neutrophil infiltration and higher liver injury in the rat ASH model.

  10. Generalized gas-solid adsorption modeling: Single-component equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Ladshaw, Austin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.

    2015-01-07

    Over the last several decades, modeling of gas–solid adsorption at equilibrium has generally been accomplished through the use of isotherms such as the Freundlich, Langmuir, Tóth, and other similar models. While these models are relatively easy to adapt for describing experimental data, their simplicity limits their generality to be used with many different sets of data. This limitation forces engineers and scientists to test each different model in order to evaluate which one can best describe their data. Additionally, the parameters of these models all have a different physical interpretation, which may have an effect on how they can be further extended into kinetic, thermodynamic, and/or mass transfer models for engineering applications. Therefore, it is paramount to adopt not only a more general isotherm model, but also a concise methodology to reliably optimize for and obtain the parameters of that model. A model of particular interest is the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm. The GSTA isotherm has enormous flexibility, which could potentially be used to describe a variety of different adsorption systems, but utilizing this model can be fairly difficult due to that flexibility. To circumvent this complication, a comprehensive methodology and computer code has been developed that can perform a full equilibrium analysis of adsorption data for any gas-solid system using the GSTA model. The code has been developed in C/C++ and utilizes a Levenberg–Marquardt’s algorithm to handle the non-linear optimization of the model parameters. Since the GSTA model has an adjustable number of parameters, the code iteratively goes through all number of plausible parameters for each data set and then returns the best solution based on a set of scrutiny criteria. Data sets at different temperatures are analyzed serially and then linear correlations with temperature are made for the parameters of the model. The end result is a full set of

  11. Generalized gas-solid adsorption modeling: Single-component equilibria

    DOE PAGES

    Ladshaw, Austin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.

    2015-01-07

    Over the last several decades, modeling of gas–solid adsorption at equilibrium has generally been accomplished through the use of isotherms such as the Freundlich, Langmuir, Tóth, and other similar models. While these models are relatively easy to adapt for describing experimental data, their simplicity limits their generality to be used with many different sets of data. This limitation forces engineers and scientists to test each different model in order to evaluate which one can best describe their data. Additionally, the parameters of these models all have a different physical interpretation, which may have an effect on how they can bemore » further extended into kinetic, thermodynamic, and/or mass transfer models for engineering applications. Therefore, it is paramount to adopt not only a more general isotherm model, but also a concise methodology to reliably optimize for and obtain the parameters of that model. A model of particular interest is the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm. The GSTA isotherm has enormous flexibility, which could potentially be used to describe a variety of different adsorption systems, but utilizing this model can be fairly difficult due to that flexibility. To circumvent this complication, a comprehensive methodology and computer code has been developed that can perform a full equilibrium analysis of adsorption data for any gas-solid system using the GSTA model. The code has been developed in C/C++ and utilizes a Levenberg–Marquardt’s algorithm to handle the non-linear optimization of the model parameters. Since the GSTA model has an adjustable number of parameters, the code iteratively goes through all number of plausible parameters for each data set and then returns the best solution based on a set of scrutiny criteria. Data sets at different temperatures are analyzed serially and then linear correlations with temperature are made for the parameters of the model. The end result is a full set

  12. Generalized memory associativity in a network model for the neuroses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemann, Roseli S.; Donangelo, Raul; de Carvalho, Luís A. V.

    2009-03-01

    We review concepts introduced in earlier work, where a neural network mechanism describes some mental processes in neurotic pathology and psychoanalytic working-through, as associative memory functioning, according to the findings of Freud. We developed a complex network model, where modules corresponding to sensorial and symbolic memories interact, representing unconscious and conscious mental processes. The model illustrates Freud's idea that consciousness is related to symbolic and linguistic memory activity in the brain. We have introduced a generalization of the Boltzmann machine to model memory associativity. Model behavior is illustrated with simulations and some of its properties are analyzed with methods from statistical mechanics.

  13. Generalized imitation of facial models by children with autism.

    PubMed

    DeQuinzio, Jaime Ann; Townsend, Dawn Buffington; Sturmey, Peter; Poulson, Claire L

    2007-01-01

    Imitation is an essential skill in the acquisition of language and communication skills. An initial phase in teaching young children with autism to engage in appropriate affective responding may be to teach the imitation of facial models. Using a multiple baseline across participants design, imitation training (consisting of modeling, prompting, differential reinforcement, and error correction) was introduced successively across 3 participants. Low and inconsistent rates of imitation of facial models were observed in baseline. All of the participants learned to imitate some of the facial models presented during imitation training, but only 2 of the 3 participants demonstrated generalized responding across stimuli.

  14. Generalized memory associativity in a network model for the neuroses.

    PubMed

    Wedemann, Roseli S; Donangelo, Raul; de Carvalho, Luís A V

    2009-03-01

    We review concepts introduced in earlier work, where a neural network mechanism describes some mental processes in neurotic pathology and psychoanalytic working-through, as associative memory functioning, according to the findings of Freud. We developed a complex network model, where modules corresponding to sensorial and symbolic memories interact, representing unconscious and conscious mental processes. The model illustrates Freud's idea that consciousness is related to symbolic and linguistic memory activity in the brain. We have introduced a generalization of the Boltzmann machine to model memory associativity. Model behavior is illustrated with simulations and some of its properties are analyzed with methods from statistical mechanics. PMID:19335020

  15. Models for cultural inheritance: a general linear model.

    PubMed

    Feldman, M W; Cavalli-Sforza, L L

    1975-07-01

    A theory of cultural evolution is proposed based on a general linear mode of cultural transmission. The trait of an individual is assumed to depend on the values of the same trait in other individuals of the same, the previous or earlier generation. The transmission matrix W has as its elements the proportional contributions of each individual (i) of one generation to each individual (j) of another. In addition, there is random variation (copy error or innovation) for each individual. Means and variances of a group of N individuals change with time and will stabilize asymptotically if the matrix W is irreducible and aperiodic. The rate of convergence is geometric and is governed by the largest non-unit eigenvalue of W. Groups fragment and evolve independently if W is reducible. The means of independent groups vary at random at a predicted rate, a phenomenon termed "random cultural drift". Variances within a group tend to be small, assuming cultural homogeneity. Transmission matrices of the teacher/leader type, and of parental type have been specifically considered, as well as social hierarchies. Various limitations, extensions, and some chances of application are discussed.

  16. Generalized F test and generalized deviance test in two-way ANOVA models for randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Shen, Juan; He, Xuming

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of detecting treatment effects in a randomized trial in the presence of an additional covariate. By reexpressing a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) model in a logistic regression framework, we derive generalized F tests and generalized deviance tests, which provide better power in detecting common location-scale changes of treatment outcomes than the classical F test. The null distributions of the test statistics are independent of the nuisance parameters in the models, so the critical values can be easily determined by Monte Carlo methods. We use simulation studies to demonstrate how the proposed tests perform compared with the classical F test. We also use data from a clinical study to illustrate possible savings in sample sizes.

  17. Integrated and spectral energetics of the GLAS general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenenbaum, J.

    1981-01-01

    Integrated and spectral error energetics of the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences (GLAS) general circulation model are compared with observations for periods in January 1975, 1976, and 1977. For two cases the model shows significant skill in predicting integrated energetics quantities out to two weeks, and for all three cases, the integrated monthly mean energetics show qualitative improvements over previous versions of the model in eddy kinetic energy and barotropic conversions. Fundamental difficulties remain with leakage of energy to the stratospheric level. General circulation model spectral energetics predictions are compared with the corresponding observational spectra on a day by day basis. Eddy kinetic energy can be correct while significant errors occur in the kinetic energy of wavenumber three. Single wavenumber dominance in eddy kinetic energy and the correlation of spectral kinetic and potential energy are demonstrated.

  18. Estimating classification images with generalized linear and additive models.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, Kenneth; Maloney, Laurence T

    2008-12-22

    Conventional approaches to modeling classification image data can be described in terms of a standard linear model (LM). We show how the problem can be characterized as a Generalized Linear Model (GLM) with a Bernoulli distribution. We demonstrate via simulation that this approach is more accurate in estimating the underlying template in the absence of internal noise. With increasing internal noise, however, the advantage of the GLM over the LM decreases and GLM is no more accurate than LM. We then introduce the Generalized Additive Model (GAM), an extension of GLM that can be used to estimate smooth classification images adaptively. We show that this approach is more robust to the presence of internal noise, and finally, we demonstrate that GAM is readily adapted to estimation of higher order (nonlinear) classification images and to testing their significance.

  19. {beta} decay of the even-even {sup 124}Ba nucleus: A test for the interacting boson-fermion-fermion model

    SciTech Connect

    Brant, S.; Yoshida, N.; Zuffi, L.

    2006-08-15

    The interacting boson-fermion-fermion model approach to {beta} decay is applied to the decay from the even-even {sup 124}Ba to the odd-odd {sup 124}Cs nucleus. The theoretical results for energy levels, electromagnetic properties and {beta} decay rates are compared with experimental data for {sup 124}Cs. The calculated {beta}-decay rates demonstrate that the interacting boson approximation can be applied in the description of {beta} decays from even-even to odd-odd nuclei.

  20. Analyzing and modeling the kinetics of amyloid beta pores associated with Alzheimer’s disease pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Ullah, Ghanim; Demuro, Angelo; Parker, Ian; Pearson, John E.; Xu, Shang -Zhong

    2015-09-08

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) form Ca2+-permeable plasma membrane pores, leading to a disruption of the otherwise well-controlled intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. The resultant up-regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration has detrimental implications for memory formation and cell survival. The gating kinetics and Ca2+ permeability of Aβ pores are not well understood. We have used computational modeling in conjunction with the ability of optical patch-clamping for massively parallel imaging of Ca2+ flux through thousands of pores in the cell membrane of Xenopus oocytes to elucidate the kinetic properties of Aβ pores. The fluorescence time-series data from individual pores were idealized and used to develop data-driven Markov chain models for the kinetics of the Aβ pore at different stages of its evolution. Our study provides the first demonstration of developing Markov chain models for ion channel gating that are driven by optical-patch clamp data with the advantage of experiments being performed under close to physiological conditions. As a result, we demonstrate the up-regulation of gating of various Ca2+ release channels due to Aβ pores and show that the extent and spatial range of such up-regulation increases as Aβ pores with low open probability and Ca2+ permeability transition into those with high open probability and Ca2+ permeability.

  1. Sub-barrier fusion in generalized boson models

    SciTech Connect

    Balantekin, A.B.; Bennett, J.R.; Kuyucak, S.

    1994-03-01

    The interacting boson model with {ital s} and {ital d} bosons has been used to describe the nuclear structure effects in sub-barrier fusion. We generalize the previous formalism to include arbitrary kinds of bosons in the target nucleus and investigate whether {ital g} bosons have any discernible effect on fusion reactions. In particular, we compare the fusion cross sections, barrier distributions, and the average angular momentum of the compound nucleus in the {ital sd} and {ital sdg} boson models.

  2. Patterns of neutral diversity under general models of selective sweeps.

    PubMed

    Coop, Graham; Ralph, Peter

    2012-09-01

    Two major sources of stochasticity in the dynamics of neutral alleles result from resampling of finite populations (genetic drift) and the random genetic background of nearby selected alleles on which the neutral alleles are found (linked selection). There is now good evidence that linked selection plays an important role in shaping polymorphism levels in a number of species. One of the best-investigated models of linked selection is the recurrent full-sweep model, in which newly arisen selected alleles fix rapidly. However, the bulk of selected alleles that sweep into the population may not be destined for rapid fixation. Here we develop a general model of recurrent selective sweeps in a coalescent framework, one that generalizes the recurrent full-sweep model to the case where selected alleles do not sweep to fixation. We show that in a large population, only the initial rapid increase of a selected allele affects the genealogy at partially linked sites, which under fairly general assumptions are unaffected by the subsequent fate of the selected allele. We also apply the theory to a simple model to investigate the impact of recurrent partial sweeps on levels of neutral diversity and find that for a given reduction in diversity, the impact of recurrent partial sweeps on the frequency spectrum at neutral sites is determined primarily by the frequencies rapidly achieved by the selected alleles. Consequently, recurrent sweeps of selected alleles to low frequencies can have a profound effect on levels of diversity but can leave the frequency spectrum relatively unperturbed. In fact, the limiting coalescent model under a high rate of sweeps to low frequency is identical to the standard neutral model. The general model of selective sweeps we describe goes some way toward providing a more flexible framework to describe genomic patterns of diversity than is currently available. PMID:22714413

  3. A general graphical user interface for automatic reliability modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liceaga, Carlos A.; Siewiorek, Daniel P.

    1991-01-01

    Reported here is a general Graphical User Interface (GUI) for automatic reliability modeling of Processor Memory Switch (PMS) structures using a Markov model. This GUI is based on a hierarchy of windows. One window has graphical editing capabilities for specifying the system's communication structure, hierarchy, reconfiguration capabilities, and requirements. Other windows have field texts, popup menus, and buttons for specifying parameters and selecting actions. An example application of the GUI is given.

  4. THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION MODELED BY A LEFT TRUNCATED BETA DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zaninetti, Lorenzo

    2013-03-10

    The initial mass function for stars is usually fitted by three straight lines, which means it has seven parameters. The presence of brown dwarfs (BDs) increases the number of straight lines to four and the number of parameters to nine. Another common fitting function is the lognormal distribution, which is characterized by two parameters. This paper is devoted to demonstrating the advantage of introducing a left truncated beta probability density function, which is characterized by four parameters. The constant of normalization, the mean, the mode, and the distribution function are calculated for the left truncated beta distribution. The normal beta distribution that results from convolving independent normally distributed and beta distributed components is also derived. The chi-square test and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test are performed on a first sample of stars and BDs that belongs to the massive young cluster NGC 6611, and on a second sample that represents the masses of the stars of the cluster NGC 2362.

  5. Evaporation of a model skin lotion with beta-hydroxy acids.

    PubMed

    Al Bawab, A; Friberg, S E; Fusco, C

    2004-12-01

    Two beta-hydroxy acids, malic and salicylic acids were combined with a non-ionic surfactant, a commercial pentaoxyethylene sorbitan mono-oleate and water to form a simple model of a skin lotion and the phase diagrams were determined. One emulsion formulation with relative amounts of the three components similar to those in commercial lotions was used to observe microscopically the changes in the emulsion structure during evaporation. The microscope images were subsequently compared to the information from the phase diagram under equilibrium conditions. The results showed the behavior of the systems of the two acids to be distinctly different; as exemplified by that of a typical formulation with 3% by weight of acid and 5% of surfactant. The malic acid system consisted of vesicles, exclusively formed by the surfactant and water, in an aqueous molecular solution of the acid and the initial evaporation resulted in an increase of the acid concentration in the aqueous solution to reach 35.5%, before solid crystals of the acid solid solution appeared. The salicylic acid formulation, on the other hand, already at the beginning of the determination consisted of water, particles of the acid solid solution and surfactant vesicles. In both cases the remaining deposit after total evaporation was particles of a solid acid solution and liquid surfactant.

  6. Neuroprotection by a selective estrogen receptor beta agonist in a mouse model of global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Carswell, H V O; Macrae, I M; Gallagher, L; Harrop, E; Horsburgh, K J

    2004-10-01

    The present study employs selective estrogen receptor (ER) agonists to determine whether 17beta-estradiol-induced neuroprotection in global ischemia is receptor mediated and, if so, which subtype of receptor (ERalpha or ERbeta) is predominantly responsible. Halothane-anesthetized female C57Bl/6J mice were ovariectomized, and osmotic minipumps containing ERbeta agonist diarylpropiolnitrile (DPN) (8 mg.kg(-1).day(-1), n = 12) or vehicle (50% DMSO in 0.9% saline) (n = 9) or ERalpha agonist propyl pyrazole triol (PPT) (2 mg.kg(-1).day(-1), n = 13) or vehicle (50% DMSO in 0.9% saline) (n = 10) were implanted subcutaneously. One week later transient global ischemia was induced by bilateral carotid artery occlusion under halothane anesthesia, and the mice were perfusion fixed 72 h later. ERbeta agonist DPN significantly reduced ischemic damage by 70% in the caudate nucleus and 55% in the CA1 region compared with vehicle controls (P < 0.05, Mann-Whitney U-statistic). In contrast, pretreatment with the ERalpha agonist PPT had no effect on the extent of neuronal damage compared with controls. The data indicate a significant estrogen receptor-mediated neuroprotection in a global cerebral ischemia model involving ERbeta.

  7. A nonhydrostatic model with a generalized vertical coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zuwen

    The advantages of a hybrid coordinate representation which is isentropic in the free atmosphere are that it dynamically provides high resolution near the tropopause and fronts, and that truncation error of vertical advection terms virtually vanishes in the adiabatic limit. A complete set of compressible and nonhydrostatic equations framed in generalized vertical coordinates are introduced. The hybrid coordinate is implemented by prescribing the vertical velocity in the coordinate space subject to the conditions that its associated grid locations generally follow isentropic surfaces, and that the grid locations always vary monotonically in z. In this respect, the current set of equations represents a nonhydrostatic generalization of the hybrid isentropic system used with success in hydrostatic models. The numerical system has been tested using a series of two-dimensional mountain wave simulations. In the case of steep and tall mountains; it is found that the system is flexible and robust enough to simulate nonlinear flow phenomena, such as rotors, which represent serious obstacles to traditional entropy-related coordinate models. In addition, a three-dimensional dry baroclinic simulation has been used to compare the hybrid coordinate model with a traditional z coordinate model. It is found that the hybrid coordinate model has slight advantages over the z coordinate model in prediction of upper-level PV gradient near the tropopause and fronts.

  8. Photometric Stereo for General BRDFs via Reflection Sparsity Modeling.

    PubMed

    Han, Tian-Qi; Shen, Hui-Liang

    2015-12-01

    This paper proposes a pixelwise photometric stereo method for object surfaces with general bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs) via appropriate reflection modeling. The modeling is based on three general characteristics of reflection components, i.e., the smooth variation of diffuse reflection, the concentration of specular reflection, and the low-intensity nature of shadow. A graph, whose nodes are light directions, is introduced to model these characteristics. In the graph, the neighborhood of nodes is determined by finding the light sources with close directions. The smoothness of the diffuse component is termed as the summation of local variations under all light sources. The specular reflection is modeled by group sparsity, and the shadow is determined via weighted l1 -norm modeling. The optimization problem, which incorporates these three modeling terms, is cast as a second-order cone programming problem. The proposed method is evaluated on both synthetic and real-world scenes with both isotropic and anisotropic materials. The experimental results show that the method is effective for object surfaces with general BRDFs and outperforms the state-of-the-arts.

  9. Institutional Quality and Generalized Trust: A Nonrecursive Causal Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Blaine G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the association between institutional quality and generalized trust. Despite the importance of the topic, little quantitative empirical evidence exists to support either unidirectional or bidirectional causality for the reason that cross-sectional studies rarely model the reciprocal relationship between institutional…

  10. 11. MODEL 200 CRANE, GENERAL ARRANGEMENT & CLEARANCES. Colby Steel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. MODEL 200 CRANE, GENERAL ARRANGEMENT & CLEARANCES. Colby Steel & Engineering Company, Vancouver B.C., Seattle, New York. Two elevations and cab plan. No architect noted, drawn by "Gould." Sheet A2, No. 6365. Scale not given. August 10, 1942. "Proposal no. 318." blueline print - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Crane, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  11. Suggesting a General ESP Model for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Jumaily, Samir

    2011-01-01

    The study suggests a general model that could guarantee the cooperation between teachers and their students to overcome the difficulties encountered in ESP learning. It tries to join together different perspectives in the research of adult education, specifically in the teaching of English for Specific Purposes. It also provides some sort of trust…

  12. Generalized emptiness formation probability in the six-vertex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomo, F.; Pronko, A. G.; Sportiello, A.

    2016-10-01

    In the six-vertex model with domain wall boundary conditions, the emptiness formation probability is the probability that a rectangular region in the top left corner of the lattice is frozen. We generalize this notion to the case where the frozen region has the shape of a generic Young diagram. We derive here a multiple integral representation for this correlation function.

  13. Generalized universality in the massive sine-Gordon model

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, S.; Sailer, K.; Nandori, I.; Polonyi, J.

    2008-01-15

    A nontrivial interplay of the UV and IR scaling laws, a generalization of the universality is demonstrated in the framework of the massive sine-Gordon model, as a result of a detailed study of the global behavior of the renormalization group flow and the phase structure.

  14. A general circulation model (GCM) parameterization of Pinatubo aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lacis, A.A.; Carlson, B.E.; Mishchenko, M.I.

    1996-04-01

    The June 1991 volcanic eruption of Mt. Pinatubo is the largest and best documented global climate forcing experiment in recorded history. The time development and geographical dispersion of the aerosol has been closely monitored and sampled. Based on preliminary estimates of the Pinatubo aerosol loading, general circulation model predictions of the impact on global climate have been made.

  15. Model 200 crane, general arrangement & clearances. Colby Steel & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Model 200 crane, general arrangement & clearances. Colby Steel & Engineering Company, Vancouver B.C., Seattle, New York. Two elevations and cab plan. No architect noted, drawn by Gould. Sheet A2, no 6365. Scaled not given. August 10, 1942. Proposal no. 318. - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Crane, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  16. Confidence Intervals for Assessing Heterogeneity in Generalized Linear Mixed Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Generalized linear mixed models are frequently applied to data with clustered categorical outcomes. The effect of clustering on the response is often difficult to practically assess partly because it is reported on a scale on which comparisons with regression parameters are difficult to make. This article proposes confidence intervals for…

  17. Canonical Correlation Analysis as the General Linear Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidal, Sherry

    The concept of the general linear model (GLM) is illustrated and how canonical correlation analysis is the GLM is explained, using a heuristic data set to demonstrate how canonical correlation analysis subsumes various multivariate and univariate methods. The paper shows how each of these analyses produces a synthetic variable, like the Yhat…

  18. Computerized Classification Testing under the Generalized Graded Unfolding Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Liu, Chen-Wei

    2011-01-01

    The generalized graded unfolding model (GGUM) has been recently developed to describe item responses to Likert items (agree-disagree) in attitude measurement. In this study, the authors (a) developed two item selection methods in computerized classification testing under the GGUM, the current estimate/ability confidence interval method and the cut…

  19. A generalized development model for testing GPS user equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemesath, N.

    1978-01-01

    The generalized development model (GDM) program, which was intended to establish how well GPS user equipment can perform under a combination of jamming and dynamics, is described. The systems design and the characteristics of the GDM are discussed. The performance aspects of the GDM are listed and the application of the GDM to civil aviation is examined.

  20. Generalized CP symmetries in Δ(27) flavor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, C. C.

    2013-08-01

    We classify explicitly all the possible generalized CP symmetries that are definable in Δ(27) flavor models. In total, only 12 transformations are possible. We also show interesting consequences of considering some of them as residual symmetries of the neutrino sector.

  1. A Novel Multipurpose Model Set for Teaching General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, H. O.; Parkash, Brahm

    1999-01-01

    Reports on a low-cost and unique molecular model set capable of generating a large number of structures for teaching and learning general chemistry. An important component of the kit is an 11-hole ball that gives tetrahedral, octahedral, trigonal, trigonal bipyramidal, and square planar symmetries. (WRM)

  2. A comparison of observation-level random effect and Beta-Binomial models for modelling overdispersion in Binomial data in ecology & evolution.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Xavier A

    2015-01-01

    Overdispersion is a common feature of models of biological data, but researchers often fail to model the excess variation driving the overdispersion, resulting in biased parameter estimates and standard errors. Quantifying and modeling overdispersion when it is present is therefore critical for robust biological inference. One means to account for overdispersion is to add an observation-level random effect (OLRE) to a model, where each data point receives a unique level of a random effect that can absorb the extra-parametric variation in the data. Although some studies have investigated the utility of OLRE to model overdispersion in Poisson count data, studies doing so for Binomial proportion data are scarce. Here I use a simulation approach to investigate the ability of both OLRE models and Beta-Binomial models to recover unbiased parameter estimates in mixed effects models of Binomial data under various degrees of overdispersion. In addition, as ecologists often fit random intercept terms to models when the random effect sample size is low (<5 levels), I investigate the performance of both model types under a range of random effect sample sizes when overdispersion is present. Simulation results revealed that the efficacy of OLRE depends on the process that generated the overdispersion; OLRE failed to cope with overdispersion generated from a Beta-Binomial mixture model, leading to biased slope and intercept estimates, but performed well for overdispersion generated by adding random noise to the linear predictor. Comparison of parameter estimates from an OLRE model with those from its corresponding Beta-Binomial model readily identified when OLRE were performing poorly due to disagreement between effect sizes, and this strategy should be employed whenever OLRE are used for Binomial data to assess their reliability. Beta-Binomial models performed well across all contexts, but showed a tendency to underestimate effect sizes when modelling non-Beta-Binomial data

  3. Crystallographic, molecular modeling, and biophysical characterization of the valine{sup {beta}67} (E11) {yields} threonine variant of hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Pechik, I.; Ji, Xinhua; Moult, J. |

    1996-02-13

    The crystal structure of the mutant deoxyhemoglobin in which the {beta}-globin Val{sup 67}(E11) has been replaced with threonine has been determined at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution. Prior to the crystal structure determination, molecular modeling indicated that the Thr{sup 67}(E11) side chain hydroxyl group in the distal {beta}-heme pocket forms a hydrogen bond with the backbone carbonyl of His{sup 63}(E7) and is within hydrogen-bonding distance of the N{sup {delta}} of His{sup 63}(E7). The mutant crystal structure indicates only small changes in conformation in the vicinity of the E11 mutation confirming the molecular modeling predictions. Comparison of the structures of the mutant {beta}-subunits and recombinant porcine myoglobin with the identical mutation indicates similar conformations of residues in the distal heme pocket, but there is no water molecule associated with either of the threonines of the {beta}-subunits. The introduction of threonine into the distal heme pocket, despite having only small perturbations in the local structure, has a marked affect on the interaction with ligands. In the oxy derivative there is a 2-fold decrease in O{sub 2} affinity, and the rate of autoxidation is increased by 2 orders of magnitude. In the CO derivative the IR spectrum shows modifications with respect to that of normal human hemoglobin, suggesting the presence of multiple CO conformers. In the nitrosyl derivative an interaction with the O{sup {gamma}} atom of Thr{sup 67}(E11) is probably responsible for the 10-fold increase in the rate of NO release from the {beta}-subunits. In the aquomet derivative there is a 6-fold decrease in the rate of hemin dissociation suggesting an interaction of the Fe-coordinated water with the O{sup {gamma}} of Thr{sup 67}(E11). 51 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Analysis of snow feedbacks in 14 general circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, D. A.; Cess, R. D.; Blanchet, J. P.; Chalita, S.; Colman, R.; Dazlich, D. A.; Del Genio, A. D.; Keup, E.; Lacis, A.; Le Treut, H.

    1994-01-01

    Snow feedbacks produced by 14 atmospheric general circulation models have been analyzed through idealized numerical experiments. Included in the analysis is an investigation of the surface energy budgets of the models. Negative or weak positive snow feedbacks occurred in some of the models, while others produced strong positive snow feedbacks. These feedbacks are due not only to melting snow, but also to increases in boundary temperature, changes in air temperature, changes in water vapor, and changes in cloudiness. As a result, the net response of each model is quite complex. We analyze in detail the responses of one model with a strong positive snow feedback and another with a weak negative snow feedback. Some of the models include a temperature dependence of the snow albedo, and this has significantly affected the results.

  5. A review of some extensions to generalized linear models.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, J K

    Although generalized linear models are reasonably well known, they are not as widely used in medical statistics as might be appropriate, with the exception of logistic, log-linear, and some survival models. At the same time, the generalized linear modelling methodology is decidedly outdated in that more powerful methods, involving wider classes of distributions, non-linear regression, censoring and dependence among responses, are required. Limitations of the generalized linear modelling approach include the need for the iterated weighted least squares (IWLS) procedure for estimation and deviances for inferences; these restrict the class of models that can be used and do not allow direct comparisons among models from different distributions. Powerful non-linear optimization routines are now available and comparisons can more fruitfully be made using the complete likelihood function. The link function is an artefact, necessary for IWLS to function with linear models, but that disappears once the class is extended to truly non-linear models. Restricting comparisons of responses under different treatments to differences in means can be extremely misleading if the shape of the distribution is changing. This may involve changes in dispersion, or of other shape-related parameters such as the skewness in a stable distribution, with the treatments or covariates. Any exact likelihood function, defined as the probability of the observed data, takes into account the fact that all observable data are interval censored, thus directly encompassing the various types of censoring possible with duration-type data. In most situations this can now be as easily used as the traditional approximate likelihood based on densities. Finally, methods are required for incorporating dependencies among responses in models including conditioning on previous history and on random effects. One important procedure for constructing such likelihoods is based on Kalman filtering. PMID:10474135

  6. Generalized Levy-walk model for DNA nucleotide sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1993-01-01

    We propose a generalized Levy walk to model fractal landscapes observed in noncoding DNA sequences. We find that this model provides a very close approximation to the empirical data and explains a number of statistical properties of genomic DNA sequences such as the distribution of strand-biased regions (those with an excess of one type of nucleotide) as well as local changes in the slope of the correlation exponent alpha. The generalized Levy-walk model simultaneously accounts for the long-range correlations in noncoding DNA sequences and for the apparently paradoxical finding of long subregions of biased random walks (length lj) within these correlated sequences. In the generalized Levy-walk model, the lj are chosen from a power-law distribution P(lj) varies as lj(-mu). The correlation exponent alpha is related to mu through alpha = 2-mu/2 if 2 < mu < 3. The model is consistent with the finding of "repetitive elements" of variable length interspersed within noncoding DNA.

  7. Generalized Jaynes-Cummings model as a quantum search algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Romanelli, A.

    2009-07-15

    We propose a continuous time quantum search algorithm using a generalization of the Jaynes-Cummings model. In this model the states of the atom are the elements among which the algorithm realizes the search, exciting resonances between the initial and the searched states. This algorithm behaves like Grover's algorithm; the optimal search time is proportional to the square root of the size of the search set and the probability to find the searched state oscillates periodically in time. In this frame, it is possible to reinterpret the usual Jaynes-Cummings model as a trivial case of the quantum search algorithm.

  8. Contribution towards statistical intercomparison of general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, S.; Boyle, J.

    1995-06-01

    The Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) of the World Climate Research Programme`s Working Group on Numerical Experimentation (WGNE) is an ambitious attempt to comprehensively intercompare atmospheric General Circulation Models (GCMs). The participants in AMIP simulate the global atmosphere for the decade 1979 to 1988 using, a common solar constant and Carbon Dioxide(CO{sub 2}) concentration and a common monthly averaged sea surface temperature (SST) and sea ice data set. In this work we attempt to present a statistical framework to address the difficult task of model intercomparison and verification.

  9. A general kinetic model for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Peter J; Tocco, Vincent J; Savage, Phillip E

    2014-07-01

    We developed a general kinetic model for hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of microalgae. The model, which allows the protein, lipid, and carbohydrate fractions of the cell to react at different rates, successfully correlated experimental data for the hydrothermal liquefaction of Chlorella protothecoides, Scenedesmus sp., and Nannochloropsis sp. The model can faithfully account for the influence of time and temperature on the gravimetric yields of gas, solid, biocrude, and aqueous-phase products from isothermal HTL of a 15 wt% slurry. Examination of the rate constants shows that lipids and proteins are the major contributors to the biocrude, while other algal cell constituents contribute very little to the biocrude.

  10. Generalized Mathematical Model Predicting the Mechanical Processing Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, S. L.; Markov, A. M.; Belov, A. B.; Sczygol, N.

    2016-04-01

    We propose a unified approach for the construction of mathematical models for the formation of surface topography and calculation of its roughness parameters for different methods of machining processes. The approach is based on a process of geometric copy tool in the material which superimposes plastico-elastic deformation, oscillatory occurrences in processing and random components of the profile. The unified approach makes it possible to reduce the time forcreation of simulated stochastic model for a specific type of processing and guarantee the accuracy of geometric parameters calculation of the surface. We make an application example of generalized model for calculation of roughness density distribution Ra in external sharpening.

  11. A parallel coupled oceanic-atmospheric general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Wehner, M.F.; Bourgeois, A.J.; Eltgroth, P.G.; Duffy, P.B.; Dannevik, W.P.

    1994-12-01

    The Climate Systems Modeling group at LLNL has developed a portable coupled oceanic-atmospheric general circulation model suitable for use on a variety of massively parallel (MPP) computers of the multiple instruction, multiple data (MIMD) class. The model is composed of parallel versions of the UCLA atmospheric general circulation model, the GFDL modular ocean model (MOM) and a dynamic sea ice model based on the Hiber formulation extracted from the OPYC ocean model. The strategy to achieve parallelism is twofold. One level of parallelism is accomplished by applying two dimensional domain decomposition techniques to each of the three constituent submodels. A second level of parallelism is attained by a concurrent execution of AGCM and OGCM/sea ice components on separate sets of processors. For this functional decomposition scheme, a flux coupling module has been written to calculate the heat, moisture and momentum fluxes independent of either the AGCM or the OGCM modules. The flux coupler`s other roles are to facilitate the transfer of data between subsystem components and processors via message passing techniques and to interpolate and aggregate between the possibly incommensurate meshes.

  12. A film-rupture model of hydrogen-induced, slow crack growth in alpha-beta titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1975-01-01

    The appearance of the terrace like fracture morphology of gaseous hydrogen induced crack growth in acicular alpha-beta titanium alloys is discussed as a function of specimen configuration, magnitude of applied stress intensity, test temperature, and hydrogen pressure. Although the overall appearance of the terrace structure remained essentially unchanged, a distinguishable variation is found in the size of the individual terrace steps, and step size is found to be inversely dependent upon the rate of hydrogen induced slow crack growth. Additionally, this inverse relationship is independent of all the variables investigated. These observations are quantitatively discussed in terms of the formation and growth of a thin hydride film along the alpha-beta boundaries and a qualitative model for hydrogen induced slow crack growth is presented, based on the film-rupture model of stress corrosion cracking.

  13. A film-rupture model of hydrogen-induced, slow crack growth in acicular alpha-beta titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1976-01-01

    A study has been conducted of the terrace-like fracture morphology of gaseous hydrogen-induced crack growth in acicular alpha-beta titanium alloys in terms of specimen configuration, magnitude of applied stress intensity, test temperature, and hydrogen pressure. Although the overall appearance of the terrace structure remained essentially unchanged, a distinguishable variation is found in the size of the individual terrace steps, and step size is found to be inversely dependent upon the rate of hydrogen-induced slow crack growth. This inverse relationship is independent of all the variables investigated. These observations are quantitatively discussed in terms of the formation and growth of a thin hydride film along the alpha-beta boundaries and a qualitative model for hydrogen-induced slow crack growth is presented, based on the film-rupture model of stress corrosion cracking.

  14. High beta and second region stability analysis and ICRF edge modeling. Progress report, March 15, 1988--May 14, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    This report describes the tasks accomplished under Department of Energy contract {number_sign}DE-FG02-86ER53236 in modeling the edge plasma-antenna interaction that occurs during Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating. This work has resulted in the development of several codes which determine kinetic and fluid modifications to the edge plasma. When used in combination, these code predict the level of impurity generation observed in experiments on the experiments on the Princeton Large Torus. In addition, these models suggest improvements to the design of ICRF antennas. Also described is progress made on high beta and second region analysis. Code development for a comprehensive infernal mode analysis code is nearing completion. A method has been developed for parameterizing the second region of stability and is applied to circular cross section tokamas. Various studies for high beta experimental devices such as PBX-M and DIII-D have been carried out and are reported on.

  15. Model compound studies of the beta-O-4 linkage in lignin: absolute rate expressions for beta-scission of phenoxyl radical from 1-phenyl-2-phenoxyethanol-1-yl radical.

    PubMed

    Kandanarachchi, Pramod H; Autrey, Tom; Franz, James A

    2002-11-15

    Arrhenius rate expressions were determined for beta-scission of phenoxyl radical from 1-phenyl-2-phenoxyethanol-1-yl, PhC*(OH)CH2OPh (V). Ketyl radical V was competitively trapped by thiophenol to yield PhCH(OH)CH2OPh in competition with beta-scission to yield phenoxyl radical and acetophenone. A basis rate expression for hydrogen atom abstraction by sec-phenethyl alcohol, PhC*(OH)CH3, from thiophenol, log(k(abs)/M(-1) s(-1)) = (8.88 +/- 0.24) - (6.07 +/- 0.34)/theta, theta = 2.303RT, was determined by competing hydrogen atom abstraction with radical self-termination. Self-termination rates for PhC*(OH)CH3 were calculated using the Smoluchowski equation employing experimental diffusion coefficients of the parent alcohol, PhCH(OH)CH3, as a model for the radical. The hydrogen abstraction basis reaction was employed to determine the activation barrier for the beta-scission of phenoxyl from 1-phenyl-2-phenoxyethanol-1-yl (V): log(k beta)/s(-1)) = (12.85 +/- 0.22) - (15.06 +/- 0.38)/theta, k beta (298 K) ca. (64.0 s(-1) in benzene), and log(k beta /s(-1)) = (12.50 +/- 0.18) - (14.46 +/- 0.30)/theta, k beta (298 K) = 78.7 s(-1) in benzene containing 0.8 M 2-propanol. B3LYP/cc-PVTZ electronic structure calculations predict that intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the alpha-OH and the -OPh leaving group of ketyl radical (V) stabilizes both ground- and transition-state structures. The computed activation barrier, 14.9 kcal/mol, is in good agreement with the experimental activation barrier.

  16. Transforming growth factor-beta can suppress tumorigenesis through effects on the putative cancer stem or early progenitor cell and committed progeny in a breast cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Tang, Binwu; Yoo, Naomi; Vu, Mary; Mamura, Mizuko; Nam, Jeong-Seok; Ooshima, Akira; Du, Zhijun; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Anver, Miriam R; Michalowska, Aleksandra M; Shih, Joanna; Parks, W Tony; Wakefield, Lalage M

    2007-09-15

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) pathway has tumor-suppressor activity in many epithelial tissues. Because TGF-beta is a potent inhibitor of epithelial cell proliferation, it has been widely assumed that this property underlies the tumor-suppressor effect. Here, we have used a xenograft model of breast cancer to show that endogenous TGF-beta has the potential to suppress tumorigenesis through a novel mechanism, involving effects at two distinct levels in the hierarchy of cellular progeny that make up the epithelial component of the tumor. First, TGF-beta reduces the size of the putative cancer stem or early progenitor cell population, and second it promotes differentiation of a more committed, but highly proliferative, progenitor cell population to an intrinsically less proliferative state. We further show that reduced expression of the type II TGF-beta receptor correlates with loss of luminal differentiation in a clinical breast cancer cohort, suggesting that this mechanism may be clinically relevant. At a molecular level, the induction of differentiation by TGF-beta involves down-regulation of Id1, and forced overexpression of Id1 can promote tumorigenesis despite persistence of the antiproliferative effect of TGF-beta. These data suggest new roles for the TGF-beta pathway in regulating tumor cell dynamics that are independent of direct effects on proliferation.

  17. Criticality and universality in a generalized earthquake model

    SciTech Connect

    Boulter, C.J.; Miller, G.

    2005-01-01

    We propose that an appropriate prototype for modeling self-organized criticality in dissipative systems is a generalized version of the two-variable cellular automata model introduced by Hergarten and Neugebauer [Phys. Rev. E 61, 2382 (2000)]. We show that the model predicts exponents for the event size distribution which are consistent with physically observed results for dissipative phenomena such as earthquakes. In addition we provide evidence that the model is critical based on both scaling analyses and direct observation of the distribution and behavior of the two variables in the interior of the lattice. We further argue that for reasonably large lattices the results are universal for all dissipative choices of the model parameters.

  18. Hairy black holes in the general Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Kichakova, O.; Shnir, Ya.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2016-07-01

    We study the existence of hairy black holes in the generalized Einstein-Skyrme model. It is proven that in the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield model limit there are no hairy black hole solutions, although the model admits gravitating (and flat space) solitons. Furthermore, we find strong evidence that a necessary condition for the existence of black holes with Skyrmionic hair is the inclusion of the Skyrme term L4. As an example, we show that there are no hairy black holes in the L2+L6+L0 model and present a new kind of black hole solutions with compact Skyrmion hair in the L4+L6+L0 model.

  19. Generalized slave-particle method for extended Hubbard models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, Alexandru B.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a set of generalized slave-particle models for extended Hubbard models that treat localized electronic correlations using slave-boson decompositions. Our models automatically include two slave-particle methods of recent interest, the slave-rotor and slave-spin methods, as well as a ladder of new intermediate models where one can choose which of the electronic degrees of freedom (e.g., spin or orbital labels) are treated as correlated degrees of freedom by the slave bosons. In addition, our method removes the aberrant behavior of the slave-rotor model, where it systematically overestimates the importance of electronic correlation effects for weak interaction strength, by removing the contribution of unphysical states from the bosonic Hilbert space. The flexibility of our formalism permits one to separate and isolate the effect of correlations on the key degrees of freedom.

  20. A generalized conditional heteroscedastic model for temperature downscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarres, R.; Ouarda, T. B. M. J.

    2014-11-01

    This study describes a method for deriving the time varying second order moment, or heteroscedasticity, of local daily temperature and its association to large Coupled Canadian General Circulation Models predictors. This is carried out by applying a multivariate generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (MGARCH) approach to construct the conditional variance-covariance structure between General Circulation Models (GCMs) predictors and maximum and minimum temperature time series during 1980-2000. Two MGARCH specifications namely diagonal VECH and dynamic conditional correlation (DCC) are applied and 25 GCM predictors were selected for a bivariate temperature heteroscedastic modeling. It is observed that the conditional covariance between predictors and temperature is not very strong and mostly depends on the interaction between the random process governing temporal variation of predictors and predictants. The DCC model reveals a time varying conditional correlation between GCM predictors and temperature time series. No remarkable increasing or decreasing change is observed for correlation coefficients between GCM predictors and observed temperature during 1980-2000 while weak winter-summer seasonality is clear for both conditional covariance and correlation. Furthermore, the stationarity and nonlinearity Kwiatkowski-Phillips-Schmidt-Shin (KPSS) and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman (BDS) tests showed that GCM predictors, temperature and their conditional correlation time series are nonlinear but stationary during 1980-2000 according to BDS and KPSS test results. However, the degree of nonlinearity of temperature time series is higher than most of the GCM predictors.

  1. A Generalized Gamma Mixture Model for Ultrasonic Tissue Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Palencia, Cesar; Martin-Fernandez, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    Several statistical models have been proposed in the literature to describe the behavior of speckles. Among them, the Nakagami distribution has proven to very accurately characterize the speckle behavior in tissues. However, it fails when describing the heavier tails caused by the impulsive response of a speckle. The Generalized Gamma (GG) distribution (which also generalizes the Nakagami distribution) was proposed to overcome these limitations. Despite the advantages of the distribution in terms of goodness of fitting, its main drawback is the lack of a closed-form maximum likelihood (ML) estimates. Thus, the calculation of its parameters becomes difficult and not attractive. In this work, we propose (1) a simple but robust methodology to estimate the ML parameters of GG distributions and (2) a Generalized Gama Mixture Model (GGMM). These mixture models are of great value in ultrasound imaging when the received signal is characterized by a different nature of tissues. We show that a better speckle characterization is achieved when using GG and GGMM rather than other state-of-the-art distributions and mixture models. Results showed the better performance of the GG distribution in characterizing the speckle of blood and myocardial tissue in ultrasonic images. PMID:23424602

  2. A cumulus parameterization scheme designed for nested grid meso-{beta} scale models

    SciTech Connect

    Weissbluth, M.J.; Cotton, W.R.

    1991-12-31

    A generalized cumulus parameterization based upon higher order turbulence closure has been incorporated into one dimensional simulations. The scheme consists of a level 2.5w turbulence closure scheme mated with a convective adjustment scheme. The convective adjustment scheme includes a gradient term which can be interpreted as either a subsidence term when the scheme is used in large scale models or a mesoscale compensation term when the scheme is used in mesoscale models. The scheme also includes a convective adjustment term which is interpreted as a detrainment term in large scale models. In mesoscale models, the mesoscale compensation term and the advection by the mean vertical motions combine to yield no net advection which is desirable since the convective moistening and heating is now wholly accomplished by the convective adjustment term; double counting is then explicitly eliminated. One dimensional simulations indicate satisfactory performance of the cumulus parameterization scheme for a non-entraining updraft.

  3. A cumulus parameterization scheme designed for nested grid meso-. beta. scale models

    SciTech Connect

    Weissbluth, M.J.; Cotton, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    A generalized cumulus parameterization based upon higher order turbulence closure has been incorporated into one dimensional simulations. The scheme consists of a level 2.5w turbulence closure scheme mated with a convective adjustment scheme. The convective adjustment scheme includes a gradient term which can be interpreted as either a subsidence term when the scheme is used in large scale models or a mesoscale compensation term when the scheme is used in mesoscale models. The scheme also includes a convective adjustment term which is interpreted as a detrainment term in large scale models. In mesoscale models, the mesoscale compensation term and the advection by the mean vertical motions combine to yield no net advection which is desirable since the convective moistening and heating is now wholly accomplished by the convective adjustment term; double counting is then explicitly eliminated. One dimensional simulations indicate satisfactory performance of the cumulus parameterization scheme for a non-entraining updraft.

  4. Some Bianchi type generalized ghost piligrim dark energy models in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhi, M. Vijaya; Aditya, Y.; Rao, V. U. M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we consider Bianchi type-III, V and VI0 space-times filled with generalized ghost pilgrim dark energy (GGPDE) in general relativity. Here we assume the anisotropic distribution of GGPDE by introducing skewness parameters. To get deterministic solutions, we consider the scale factor a(t)=(tnet)^{ 1/k}, so called hybrid expansion, which yields a time dependent deceleration parameter, and exhibits a transition of the Universe from early decelerated phase to the recent accelerating phase. To describe the behavior of the obtained models we construct equation of state (ω_{Λ}), squared sound speed (vs2) parameters and ω_{Λ}-dot{ω }_{Λ}, r-s planes. It is worth mentioning here that the analysis of evolution parameters supports the concept of pilgrim dark energy (PDE). Also, these models remain stable for PDE parameter β =-0.5. Moreover, the cosmological planes correspond to Λ CDM limit as well as different well-known dark energy models.

  5. Amide-I and -II vibrations of the cyclic beta-sheet model peptide gramicidin S in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Kupser, Peter; Pagel, Kevin; Oomens, Jos; Polfer, Nick; Koksch, Beate; Meijer, Gerard; von Helden, Gert

    2010-02-17

    In the condensed phase, the peptide gramicidin S is often considered as a model system for a beta-sheet structure. Here, we investigate gramicidin S free of any influences of the environment by measuring the mid-IR spectra of doubly protonated (deuterated) gramicidin S in the gas phase. In the amide I (i.e., C=O stretch) region, the spectra show a broad split peak between 1580 and 1720 cm(-1). To deduce structural information, the conformational space has been searched using molecular dynamics methods and several structural candidates have been further investigated at the density functional level. The calculations show the importance of the interactions of the charged side-chains with the backbone, which is responsible for the lower frequency part of the amide I peak. When this interaction is inhibited via complexation with two 18-crown-6 molecules, the amide I peak narrows and shows two maxima at 1653 and 1680 cm(-1). A comparison to calculations shows that for this complexed ion, four C=O groups are in an antiparallel beta-sheet arrangement. Surprisingly, an analysis of the calculated spectra shows that these beta-sheet C=O groups give rise to the vibrations near 1680 cm(-1). This is in sharp contrast to expectations based on values for the condensed phase, where resonances of beta-sheet sections are thought to occur near 1630 cm(-1). The difference between those values might be caused by interactions with the environment, as the condensed phase value is mostly deduced for beta-sheet sections that are embedded in larger proteins, that interact strongly with solvent or that are part of partially aggregated species.

  6. Bianchi Type VI0 Inflationary Cosmological Model in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Raj; Poonia, Laxmi

    Bianchi Type VI0 inflationary cosmological model with flat potential in General Relativity, is investigated. To get the deterministic solution in terms of cosmic time t, we assume that σ (shear) is proportional to expansion (θ) where σ = {1 / {√ 3 }}t( {{{{A}{4} } / {A}} - {{{B}{4} } / {B}}}), θ = {{{A}{4} } / {A}} + {{{2B}{4} } / {B}}. Thus {{σ / θ } = constant}, leads to A = Bn where A and B are metric potentials and n is a constant. We find that spatial volume increases with time. Hence inflationary scenario exists in the model. Since {σ / θ } != 0 in general. Thus the model represents anisotropic universe throughout. However, if l = {1 / {{4k}}} then the model isotropizes. This result matches with astronomical observations. The model represents decelerating and late time acceleration which matches with recent astronomical observations Riess et al. [29], Perlmutter et al. [30]. The model has Point Type singularity at τ = {1 / α }{sin}{ - 1} ({{1 / {{2k}}}} ) (MacCallum [31]). The rate of Higg’s field (φ) decreases with time.

  7. Molecular cloning of cDNAs and structural model analysis of two gonadotropin beta-subunits of snakehead fish (Channa maculata).

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Shen, San-Tai; Yu, John Yuh-Lin

    2005-09-15

    The cDNAs encoding beta-subunits of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) have been cloned from the pituitary of snakehead fish, Channa maculata, and the three-dimensional structural models of the encoded FSH and LH were investigated. The cloned cDNAs, including 5'-untranslated region (UTR), open-reading frame, and 3'-UTR followed by a poly(A) tail, were obtained by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and rapid amplification of cDNA end methods. The open-reading frames of FSH-beta cDNA encodes a 120-amino acid protein with a signal peptide of 18 amino acids and a mature protein of 102 amino acids; while LH-beta cDNA encodes a 140-amino acid protein with a signal peptide of 33 amino acids and a mature protein of 115 amino acids. The amino acid sequence identities of snakehead fish FSH-beta and LH-beta in comparison with other fish are 27.8-81.9% and 45.2-88.8%, respectively; while in comparison with tetrapods are 26.2-28.9% and 37.5-51.2%, respectively. Both FSH-beta and LH-beta of snakehead fish resemble most to those of Perciformes, implying their closer phylogenetic relationship. All 12 cysteine residues are conserved in snakehead fish LH-beta; while 11 cysteine residues are conserved in its FSH-beta. The third cysteine is absent in snakehead fish FSH-beta; instead, a positionally shifted cysteine residue is present at the N-terminus, as found in some phylogenetic related fish. The structure models of snakehead fish FSH and LH, constructed by using the crystal structures of human FSH and human chorionic gonadotropin as respective template, showed that the positionally shifted N-terminal cysteine residue of snakehead fish FSH-beta likely can substitute the third cysteine to form a disulfide bond with the 12th cysteine.

  8. Attractive Hubbard model with disorder and the generalized Anderson theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchinskii, E. Z. Kuleeva, N. A. Sadovskii, M. V.

    2015-06-15

    Using the generalized DMFT+Σ approach, we study the influence of disorder on single-particle properties of the normal phase and the superconducting transition temperature in the attractive Hubbard model. A wide range of attractive potentials U is studied, from the weak coupling region, where both the instability of the normal phase and superconductivity are well described by the BCS model, to the strong-coupling region, where the superconducting transition is due to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of compact Cooper pairs, formed at temperatures much higher than the superconducting transition temperature. We study two typical models of the conduction band with semi-elliptic and flat densities of states, respectively appropriate for three-dimensional and two-dimensional systems. For the semi-elliptic density of states, the disorder influence on all single-particle properties (e.g., density of states) is universal for an arbitrary strength of electronic correlations and disorder and is due to only the general disorder widening of the conduction band. In the case of a flat density of states, universality is absent in the general case, but still the disorder influence is mainly due to band widening, and the universal behavior is restored for large enough disorder. Using the combination of DMFT+Σ and Nozieres-Schmitt-Rink approximations, we study the disorder influence on the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} for a range of characteristic values of U and disorder, including the BCS-BEC crossover region and the limit of strong-coupling. Disorder can either suppress T{sub c} (in the weak-coupling region) or significantly increase T{sub c} (in the strong-coupling region). However, in all cases, the generalized Anderson theorem is valid and all changes of the superconducting critical temperature are essentially due to only the general disorder widening of the conduction band.

  9. Time series models based on generalized linear models: some further results.

    PubMed

    Li, W K

    1994-06-01

    This paper considers the problem of extending the classical moving average models to time series with conditional distributions given by generalized linear models. These models have the advantage of easy construction and estimation. Statistical modelling techniques are also proposed. Some simulation results and an illustrative example are reported to illustrate the methodology. The models will have potential applications in longitudinal data analysis. PMID:8068850

  10. Yang-Mills generalization of the geometrical collective model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosensteel, George; Sparks, Nick

    2015-04-01

    The geometrical or Bohr-Mottelson model is generalized and recast as a Yang-Mills theory. The gauge symmetry determines conservation of Kelvin circulation. The circulation commutes with the Hamiltonian when it is the sum of the kinetic energy and a potential that depends only on deformation. The conventional Bohr-Mottelson model is the special case of circulation zero, and wave functions are complex-valued. In the generalization, any quantized value of the circulation is allowed, and the wave functions are vector-valued. The Yang-Mills formulation introduces a new coupling between the geometrical and intrinsic degrees of freedom. The coupling appears in the covariant derivative term of the collective kinetic energy. This kind of coupling is sometimes called ``magnetic'' because of the analogy with electrodynamics.

  11. Credibility analysis of risk classes by generalized linear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdemir, Ovgucan Karadag; Sucu, Meral

    2016-06-01

    In this paper generalized linear model (GLM) and credibility theory which are frequently used in nonlife insurance pricing are combined for reliability analysis. Using full credibility standard, GLM is associated with limited fluctuation credibility approach. Comparison criteria such as asymptotic variance and credibility probability are used to analyze the credibility of risk classes. An application is performed by using one-year claim frequency data of a Turkish insurance company and results of credible risk classes are interpreted.

  12. Generalized Bogoliubov Polariton Model: An Application to Stock Exchange Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuy Anh, Chu; Anh, Truong Thi Ngoc; Lan, Nguyen Tri; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2016-06-01

    A generalized Bogoliubov method for investigation non-simple and complex systems was developed. We take two branch polariton Hamiltonian model in second quantization representation and replace the energies of quasi-particles by two distribution functions of research objects. Application to stock exchange market was taken as an example, where the changing the form of return distribution functions from Boltzmann-like to Gaussian-like was studied.

  13. Treatment of cloud radiative effects in general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.C.; Dudek, M.P.; Liang, X.Z.; Ding, M.

    1996-04-01

    We participate in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program with two objectives: (1) to improve the general circulation model (GCM) cloud/radiation treatment with a focus on cloud verticle overlapping and layer cloud optical properties, and (2) to study the effects of cloud/radiation-climate interaction on GCM climate simulations. This report summarizes the project progress since the Fourth ARM Science Team meeting February 28-March 4, 1994, in Charleston, South Carolina.

  14. Fringe projection 3D microscopy with the general imaging model.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yongkai; Wang, Meng; Gao, Bruce Z; Liu, Xiaoli; Peng, Xiang

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging and metrology of microstructures is a critical task for the design, fabrication, and inspection of microelements. Newly developed fringe projection 3D microscopy is presented in this paper. The system is configured according to camera-projector layout and long working distance lenses. The Scheimpflug principle is employed to make full use of the limited depth of field. For such a specific system, the general imaging model is introduced to reach a full 3D reconstruction. A dedicated calibration procedure is developed to realize quantitative 3D imaging. Experiments with a prototype demonstrate the accessibility of the proposed configuration, model, and calibration approach.

  15. Tropical disturbances in relation to general circulation modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estoque, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    The initial results of an evaluation of the performance of the Goddard Laboratory of Atmospheric Simulation general circulation model depicting the tropical atmosphere during the summer are presented. Because the results show the existence of tropical wave disturbances throughout the tropics, the characteristics of synoptic disturbances over Africa were studied and a synoptic case study of a selected disturbance in this area was conducted. It is shown that the model is able to reproduce wave type synoptic disturbances in the tropics. The findings show that, in one of the summers simulated, the disturbances are predominantly closed vortices; in another summer, the predominant disturbances are open waves.

  16. A Generalized Hydrodynamics Model for Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaw, Abdourahmane; Murillo, Michael Sean

    2015-11-01

    Starting with the equations of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy, we obtain the density, momentum and stress tensor-moment equations. The closure proceeds in two steps. The first that guarantees an equilibrium state is given by density functional theory. It ensures self consistency in the equation-of-state properties of the plasma. The second involves modifying the two-body distribution function to include collisions in the relaxation of the stress tensor. The resulting generalized hydrodynamics thus includes all impacts of Coulomb coupling, viscous damping, and the high-frequency response. We compare our results with those of several known models, including generalized hydrodynamic theory and models obtained using the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander approximation and the quasi-localized charge approximation. We find that the viscoelastic response, including both the high-frequency elastic generalization and viscous wave damping, is important for correctly describing ion-acoustic waves. We illustrate this result by considering three very different systems: ultracold plasmas, dusty plasmas, and dense plasmas. The new model is validated by comparing its results with those obtained from molecular-dynamics simulations of Yukawa plasmas, and the agreement is excellent. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant No. FA9550-12-1-0344).

  17. Integrated and spectral energetics of the GLAS general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenenbaum, J.

    1982-01-01

    Integrated and spectral error energetics of the GLAS General circulation model are compared with observations for periods in January 1975, 1976, and 1977. For two cases the model shows significant skill in predicting integrated energetics quantities out to two weeks, and for all three cases, the integrated monthly mean energetics show qualitative improvements over previous versions of the model in eddy kinetic energy and barotropic conversions. Fundamental difficulties remain with leakage of energy to the stratospheric level, particularly above strong initial jet streams associated in part with regions of steep terrain. The spectral error growth study represents the first comparison of general circulation model spectral energetics predictions with the corresponding observational spectra on a day by day basis. The major conclusion is that eddy kinetics energy can be correct while significant errors occur in the kinetic energy of wavenumber 3. Both the model and observations show evidence of single wavenumber dominance in eddy kinetic energy and the correlation of spectral kinetics and potential energy.

  18. General shell model for a rotating pretwisted blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jia; Lopez Arteaga, Ines; Kari, Leif

    2013-10-01

    A novel dynamic model for a pretwisted rotating compressor blade mounted at an arbitrary stagger angle using general shell theory and including the rotational velocity is developed to study the eigenfrequencies and damping properties of the pretwisted rotating blade. The strain-displacement relation and constitutive model based on the general (thick) shell theory are applied to bring out the strain energy of the rotating blade. Using Hamilton's principle, the variational form of the total energy is derived in order to obtain the corresponding weak form for the numerical simulation. The model is validated by comparing to the literature results and Ansys results, showing good agreement. Parametric analyses are carried out to study the influence of the rotation velocity, the stagger angle and the radius of the disk on the eigenfrequencies of the pretwisted blade. Proportional damping is included into the proposed model to investigate the influence of rotational velocity on the damping characteristics of the pretwisted rotating blade system. It is shown that, due to inertial and Coriolis effects, damping decreases as the rotation velocity increases for the lower part of the velocity range considered and either decreases or increases depending on the mode order for higher velocities. Furthermore, frequency loci veering as a result of the rotation velocity is observed. The proposed model is an efficient and accurate tool for predicting the dynamic behavior of compressor blades of arbitrary thickness, stagger angle and pretwist, potentially during the early designing stage of turbomachinery.

  19. Towards a general model for protein–substrate stereoselectivity

    PubMed Central

    Sundaresan, Vidyasankar; Abrol, Ravinder

    2002-01-01

    Protein–substrate interactions in enzymatic, neurological, and immunological systems are typically characterized by a high degree of stereoselectivity towards complex substrates. We propose a novel stereocenter-recognition (SR) model for stereoselectivity of proteins (or receptors in general) towards substrates that have multiple stereocenters, based on the topology of substrate stereocenters. The model provides the minimum number of substrate locations that need to enter into binding, nonbinding, or repulsive interactions with receptor sites, for stereoselectivity to occur. According to this model, a substrate location may interact with multiple receptor sites, or multiple substrate locations may interact with a single receptor site, but a stereoselective receptor has to offer, in the correct geometry, at least as many interactions as the required minimum number of substrate locations. The SR model predicts that stereoselectivity towards an acyclic substrate with N stereocenters distributed along a single chain requires interactions involving a minimum of N + 2 substrate locations, distributed over all stereocenters in the substrate, such that effectively three locations exist per stereocenter. Thus, enantioselective recognition of molecules with one chiral center requires a protein to interact with a minimum of three substrate locations, while stereoselectivity towards substrates with two or three stereocenters requires interactions with a minimum of four or five substrate locations, respectively, and so on. We demonstrate the general applicability of this model to protein–substrate interactions by interpreting several previous experimental observations. PMID:12021432

  20. Generalized Optoelectronic Model of Series-Connected Multijunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, John F.; Steiner, Myles A.; Garcia, Ivan; France, Ryan M.; McMahon, William E.; Osterwald, Carl R.; Friedman, Daniel J.

    2015-10-02

    The emission of light from each junction in a series-connected multijunction solar cell, we found, both complicates and elucidates the understanding of its performance under arbitrary conditions. Bringing together many recent advances in this understanding, we present a general 1-D model to describe luminescent coupling that arises from both voltage-driven electroluminescence and voltage-independent photoluminescence in nonideal junctions that include effects such as Sah-Noyce-Shockley (SNS) recombination with n ≠ 2, Auger recombination, shunt resistance, reverse-bias breakdown, series resistance, and significant dark area losses. The individual junction voltages and currents are experimentally determined from measured optical and electrical inputs and outputs of the device within the context of the model to fit parameters that describe the devices performance under arbitrary input conditions. Furthermore, our techniques to experimentally fit the model are demonstrated for a four-junction inverted metamorphic solar cell, and the predictions of the model are compared with concentrator flash measurements.

  1. Diagnostic Measures for Generalized Linear Models with Missing Covariates

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, HONGTU; IBRAHIM, JOSEPH G.; SHI, XIAOYAN

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we carry out an in-depth investigation of diagnostic measures for assessing the influence of observations and model misspecification in the presence of missing covariate data for generalized linear models. Our diagnostic measures include case-deletion measures and conditional residuals. We use the conditional residuals to construct goodness-of-fit statistics for testing possible misspecifications in model assumptions, including the sampling distribution. We develop specific strategies for incorporating missing data into goodness-of-fit statistics in order to increase the power of detecting model misspecification. A resampling method is proposed to approximate the p-value of the goodness-of-fit statistics. Simulation studies are conducted to evaluate our methods and a real data set is analysed to illustrate the use of our various diagnostic measures. PMID:20037674

  2. A generalized chain binomial model with application to HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Ng, J; Orav, E J

    1990-09-01

    The original Reed-Frost formulation of the chain binomial model is mathematically equivalent to a stochastic model allowing a Poisson number of effective contacts in a time interval. Their formulation cannot accommodate survey data that necessarily correspond to more complex distributions of partners or contacts, or to large populations where complete random mixing is unlikely. This paper generalizes the Reed-Frost model to accommodate these situations in both the one- and two-population settings. The extension to multiple populations is also outlined. Using the model to predict HIV incidence in San Francisco's homosexual population, we show that the total number of contacts over all partners is more important than the distribution of contacts among partners in determining the number of infected. PMID:2134482

  3. Unitarity-violation in generalized Higgs inflation models

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, Rose N.; McDonald, John E-mail: j.mcdonald@lancaster.ac.uk

    2012-11-01

    Unitarity-violation presents a challenge for non-minimally coupled models of inflation based on weak-scale particle physics. We examine the energy scale of tree-level unitarity-violation in scattering processes for generalized models with multiple scalar fields where the inflaton is either a singlet scalar or the Higgs. In the limit that the non-minimal couplings are all equal (e.g. in the case of Higgs or other complex inflaton), the scale of tree-level unitarity-violation matches the existing result. However if the inflaton is a singlet, and if it has a larger non-minimal coupling than other scalars in the model, then this hierarchy increases the scale of tree-level unitarity-violation. A sufficiently strong hierarchy pushes the scale of tree-level unitarity-violation above the Planck scale. We also discuss models which attempt to resolve the issue of unitarity-violation in Higgs Inflation.

  4. Generalized Dynamic Factor Models for Mixed-Measurement Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Kai; Dunson, David B.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we propose generalized Bayesian dynamic factor models for jointly modeling mixed-measurement time series. The framework allows mixed-scale measurements associated with each time series, with different measurements having different distributions in the exponential family conditionally on time-varying latent factor(s). Efficient Bayesian computational algorithms are developed for posterior inference on both the latent factors and model parameters, based on a Metropolis Hastings algorithm with adaptive proposals. The algorithm relies on a Greedy Density Kernel Approximation (GDKA) and parameter expansion with latent factor normalization. We tested the framework and algorithms in simulated studies and applied them to the analysis of intertwined credit and recovery risk for Moody’s rated firms from 1982–2008, illustrating the importance of jointly modeling mixed-measurement time series. The article has supplemental materials available online. PMID:24791133

  5. Decision from Models: Generalizing Probability Information to Novel Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hang; Paily, Jacienta T.; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate a new type of decision under risk where—to succeed—participants must generalize their experience in one set of tasks to a novel set of tasks. We asked participants to trade distance for reward in a virtual minefield where each successive step incurred the same fixed probability of failure (referred to as hazard). With constant hazard, the probability of success (the survival function) decreases exponentially with path length. On each trial, participants chose between a shorter path with smaller reward and a longer (more dangerous) path with larger reward. They received feedback in 160 training trials: encountering a mine along their chosen path resulted in zero reward and successful completion of the path led to the reward associated with the path chosen. They then completed 600 no-feedback test trials with novel combinations of path length and rewards. To maximize expected gain, participants had to learn the correct exponential model in training and generalize it to the test conditions. We compared how participants discounted reward with increasing path length to the predictions of nine choice models including the correct exponential model. The choices of a majority of the participants were best accounted for by a model of the correct exponential form although with marked overestimation of the hazard rate. The decision-from-models paradigm differs from experience-based decision paradigms such as decision-from-sampling in the importance assigned to generalizing experience-based information to novel tasks. The task itself is representative of everyday tasks involving repeated decisions in stochastically invariant environments. PMID:25621287

  6. Resolution of the discrepancy between Balmer alpha emission rates, the solar Lyman beta flux, and models of geocoronal hydrogen concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levasseur, A.-C.; Meier, R. R.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    New satellite Balmer alpha measurements and solar Lyman beta flux and line profile measurements, together with new measurements of the zodiacal light intensity used in correcting both ground and satellite Balmer alpha measurements for the effects of the Fraunhofer line in the zodiacal light, have been used in a reevaluation of the long-standing discrepancy between ground-based Balmer alpha emission rates and other geocoronal hydrogen parameters. The solar Lyman beta line center flux is found to be (4.1 plus or minus 1.3) billion photons per sq cm per sec per angstrom at S(10.7) equals 110 and, together with a current hydrogen model which has 92,000 atoms per cu cm at 650 km for T(inf) equals 950 K, gives good agreement between calculated Balmer alpha emission rates and the ground-based and satellite measurements.

  7. A two-dimensional model at the nucleotide level for the central hairpin of coliphage Q beta RNA.

    PubMed

    Skripkin, E A; Jacobson, A B

    1993-09-20

    We describe the construction and testing of a structural model at the nucleotide level for conformation CH of the central hairpin of genomic RNA from coliphage Q beta. The model was developed with the computer program MFOLD using both optimal and suboptimal predictions. Structural information obtained by electron microscopic analysis of Kleinschmidt spreadings of Q beta RNA was used to guide the modeling. The model was tested in solution with three enzymatic probes: RNase T1, RNase T2, and RNase V1, as well as four chemical probes: dimethylsulfate, diethylpyrocarbonate, kethoxal and 1-cyclohexyl-3-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide metho-p-toluene sulfonate (CMCT). The structural analyses in solution are consistent with the predicted structural model. The model is also supported by comparative structural analysis with the related coliphage SP. The model provides a structural basis for published biochemical and genetic studies implicating large, long-range structural features in the co-regulation of viral coat and replicase expression. In addition, we show that the read-through region of the viral protein A1 forms a separate structural domain, and we suggest that it functions as a nucleation site that participates in the folding and refolding of the molecule during replication and translation. In addition to the central hairpin, we have analyzed the structure of the viral coat initiation region. Our studies show that the entire region consists of small local hairpins and that 26 nucleotides immediately surrounding the coat initiation codon are single-stranded.

  8. Plasmid DNA encoding transforming growth factor-beta1 suppresses chronic disease in a streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis model.

    PubMed Central

    Song, X Y; Gu, M; Jin, W W; Klinman, D M; Wahl, S M

    1998-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta is a potent immunomodulator with both pro- and antiinflammatory activities. Based on its immunosuppressive actions, exogenous TGF-beta has been shown to inhibit autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases. To further explore the potential therapeutic role of TGF-beta, we administered a plasmid DNA encoding human TGF-beta1 intramuscularly to rats with streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis. A single dose of 300 microg plasmid DNA encoding TGF-beta1, but not vector DNA, administered at the peak of the acute phase profoundly suppressed the subsequent evolution of chronic erosive disease typified by disabling joint swelling and deformity (articular index = 8.17+/-0. 17 vs. 1.25+/-0.76, n = 6, day 26, P < 0.01). Moreover, delivery of the TGF-beta1 DNA even as the chronic phase commenced virtually eliminated subsequent inflammation and arthritis. Both radiologic and histopathologic as well as molecular evidence supported the marked inhibitory effect of TGF-beta1 DNA on synovial pathology, with decreases in the inflammatory cell infiltration, pannus formation, cartilage and bone destruction, and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines that characterize this model. Increases in TGF-beta1 protein were detected in the circulation of TGF-beta1 DNA-treated animals, consistent with the observed therapeutic effects being TGF-beta1 dependent. These observations provide the first evidence that gene transfer of plasmid DNA encoding TGF-beta1 provides a mechanism to deliver this potent cytokine that effectively suppresses ongoing inflammatory pathology in arthritis. PMID:9637694

  9. Modeling biometric systems using the general pareto distribution (GPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhixin; Kiefer, Frederick; Schneider, John; Govindaraju, Venu

    2008-03-01

    Statistical modeling of biometric systems at the score level is extremely important. It is the foundation of the performance assessment of biometric systems including determination of confidence intervals and test sample size for simulations, and performance prediction of real world systems. Statistical modeling of multimodal biometric systems allows the development of a methodology to integrate information from multiple biometric sources. We present a novel approach for estimating the marginal biometric matching score distributions by using extreme value theory in conjunction with non-parametric methods. Extreme Value Theory (EVT) is based on the modeling of extreme events represented by data which has abnormally low or high values in the tails of the distributions. Our motivation stems from the observation that the tails of the biometric score distributions are often difficult to estimate using other methods due to lack of sufficient numbers of training samples. However, good estimates of the tails of biometric distributions are essential for defining the decision boundaries. We present EVT based novel procedures for fitting a score distribution curve. A general non-parametric method is used for fitting the majority part of the distribution curve, and a parametric EVT model - the general Pareto distribution - is used for fitting the tails of the curve. We also demonstrate the advantage of applying the EVT by experiments.

  10. Fermion masses and mixing in general warped extra dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Mariana; Hamzaoui, Cherif; Pourtolami, Nima; Toharia, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    We analyze fermion masses and mixing in a general warped extra dimensional model, where all the Standard Model (SM) fields, including the Higgs, are allowed to propagate in the bulk. In this context, a slightly broken flavor symmetry imposed universally on all fermion fields, without distinction, can generate the full flavor structure of the SM, including quarks, charged leptons and neutrinos. For quarks and charged leptons, the exponential sensitivity of their wave functions to small flavor breaking effects yield hierarchical masses and mixing as it is usual in warped models with fermions in the bulk. In the neutrino sector, the exponential wave-function factors can be flavor blind and thus insensitive to the small flavor symmetry breaking effects, directly linking their masses and mixing angles to the flavor symmetric structure of the five-dimensional neutrino Yukawa couplings. The Higgs must be localized in the bulk and the model is more successful in generalized warped scenarios where the metric background solution is different than five-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS5 ). We study these features in two simple frameworks, flavor complimentarity and flavor democracy, which provide specific predictions and correlations between quarks and leptons, testable as more precise data in the neutrino sector becomes available.

  11. Reshocks, rarefactions, and the generalized Layzer model for hydrodynamic instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mikaelian, K O

    2008-06-10

    We report numerical simulations and analytic modeling of shock tube experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. We examine single interfaces of the type A/B where the incident shock is initiated in A and the transmitted shock proceeds into B. Examples are He/air and air/He. In addition, we study finite-thickness or double-interface A/B/A configurations like air/SF{sub 6}/air gas-curtain experiments. We first consider conventional shock tubes that have a 'fixed' boundary: A solid endwall which reflects the transmitted shock and reshocks the interface(s). Then we focus on new experiments with a 'free' boundary--a membrane disrupted mechanically or by the transmitted shock, sending back a rarefaction towards the interface(s). Complex acceleration histories are achieved, relevant for Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. We compare our simulation results with a generalized Layzer model for two fluids with time-dependent densities, and derive a new freeze-out condition whereby accelerating and compressive forces cancel each other out. Except for the recently reported failures of the Layzer model, the generalized Layzer model and hydrocode simulations for reshocks and rarefactions agree well with each other, and remain to be verified experimentally.

  12. Comparison of Cenozoic atmospheric general circulation model simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    Paleocene, Eocene, Miocene and present day (with polar ice) geography are specified as the lower boundary condition in a mean annual, energy balance ocean version of the Community Climate Model (CCM), a spectral General Circulation Model of the Atmosphere developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. This version of the CCM has a 4.5/sup 0/ latitudinal and 7.5/sup 0/ longitudinal resolution with 9 vertical levels and includes predictions for pressure, winds, temperature, evaporation, precipitation, cloud cover, snow cover and sea ice. The model simulations indicate little geographically-induced climates changes from the Paleocene to the Miocene, but substantial differences between the Miocene and the present simulations. The simulated climate differences between the Miocene and present day include: 1) cooler present temperatures (2/sup 0/C in tropics, 15-35 C in polar latitudes) with the exception of warmer subtropical desert conditions, 2) a generally weaker present hydrologic cycle, with greater subtropical aridity, 3) strengthened present day westerly jets with a slight poleward displacement, and 4) the largest regional climate changes associated with Antarctica. The results of the climate model sensitivity experiments have considerable implications for understanding how geography influences climate.

  13. The Digital Astronaut Project Computational Bone Remodeling Model (Beta Version) Bone Summit Summary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2013-01-01

    Under the conditions of microgravity, astronauts lose bone mass at a rate of 1% to 2% a month, particularly in the lower extremities such as the proximal femur [1-3]. The most commonly used countermeasure against bone loss in microgravity has been prescribed exercise [4]. However, data has shown that existing exercise countermeasures are not as effective as desired for preventing bone loss in long duration, 4 to 6 months, spaceflight [1,3,5,6]. This spaceflight related bone loss may cause early onset of osteoporosis to place the astronauts at greater risk of fracture later in their lives. Consequently, NASA seeks to have improved understanding of the mechanisms of bone demineralization in microgravity in order to appropriately quantify this risk, and to establish appropriate countermeasures [7]. In this light, NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is working with the NASA Bone Discipline Lead to implement well-validated computational models to help predict and assess bone loss during spaceflight, and enhance exercise countermeasure development. More specifically, computational modeling is proposed as a way to augment bone research and exercise countermeasure development to target weight-bearing skeletal sites that are most susceptible to bone loss in microgravity, and thus at higher risk for fracture. Given that hip fractures can be debilitating, the initial model development focused on the femoral neck. Future efforts will focus on including other key load bearing bone sites such as the greater trochanter, lower lumbar, proximal femur and calcaneus. The DAP has currently established an initial model (Beta Version) of bone loss due to skeletal unloading in femoral neck region. The model calculates changes in mineralized volume fraction of bone in this segment and relates it to changes in bone mineral density (vBMD) measured by Quantitative Computed Tomography (QCT). The model is governed by equations describing changes in bone volume fraction (BVF), and rates of

  14. Symmetry in the Generalized Rotor Model for Extremely Floppy Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiedt, Hanno; Jensen, Per; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Protonated methane CH_5^+ is unique: It is an extremely fluxional molecule. All attempts to assign quantum numbers to the high-resolution transitions obtained over the last 20 years have failed because molecular rotation and vibration cannot be separated in the conventional way. The first step towards a theoretical description is to include internal rotational degrees of freedom into the overall ones, which can be used to formulate a fundamentally new zero order approximation for the (now) generalized rotational states and energies. Predictions from this simple five-dimensional rotor model compare very favorably with the combination differences of protonated methane found in recent low temperature experiments. This talk will focus on symmetry aspects and implications of permutation symmetry for the generalized rotational states. Furthermore, refinements of the theory will be discussed, ranging from the generalization to even higher-dimensional rotors to explicit symmetry breaking and corresponding energy splittings. The latter includes the link to well-known theories of internal rotation dynamics and will show the general validity of the presented theory. Schmiedt, H., et al.; J. Chem. Phys. 143 (15), 154302 (2015) Wodraszka, R. et al.; J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 6, 4229-4232 (2015) Asvany, O. et al.; Science, 347, (6228), 1346-1349 (2015)

  15. A revised model for AMP-activated protein kinase structure: The alpha-subunit binds to both the beta- and gamma-subunits although there is no direct binding between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelly A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-11-24

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master sensor for cellular metabolic energy state. It is activated by a high AMP/ATP ratio and leads to metabolic changes that conserve energy and utilize alternative cellular fuel sources. The kinase is composed of a heterotrimeric protein complex containing a catalytic alpha-subunit, an AMP-binding gamma-subunit, and a scaffolding beta-subunit thought to bind directly both the alpha- and gamma-subunits. Here, we use coimmunoprecipitation of proteins in transiently transfected cells to show that the alpha2-subunit binds directly not only to the beta-subunit, confirming previous work, but also to the gamma1-subunit. Deletion analysis of the alpha2-subunit reveals that the C-terminal 386-552 residues are sufficient to bind to the beta-subunit. The gamma1-subunit binds directly to the alpha2-subunit at two interaction sites, one within the catalytic domain consisting of alpha2 amino acids 1-312 and a second within residues 386-552. Binding of the alpha2 and the gamma1-subunits was not affected by 400 mum AMP or ATP. Furthermore, we show that the beta-subunit C terminus is essential for binding to the alpha2-subunit but, in contrast to previous work, the beta-subunit does not bind directly to the gamma1-subunit. Taken together, this study presents a new model for AMPK heterotrimer structure where through its C terminus the beta-subunit binds to the alpha-subunit that, in turn, binds to the gamma-subunit. There is no direct interaction between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

  16. GENERALIZED PARTIALLY LINEAR MIXED-EFFECTS MODELS INCORPORATING MISMEASURED COVARIATES

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hua

    2009-01-01

    In this article we consider a semiparametric generalized mixed-effects model, and propose combining local linear regression, and penalized quasilikelihood and local quasilikelihood techniques to estimate both population and individual parameters and nonparametric curves. The proposed estimators take into account the local correlation structure of the longitudinal data. We establish normality for the estimators of the parameter and asymptotic expansion for the estimators of the nonparametric part. For practical implementation, we propose an appropriate algorithm. We also consider the measurement error problem in covariates in our model, and suggest a strategy for adjusting the effects of measurement errors. We apply the proposed models and methods to study the relation between virologic and immunologic responses in AIDS clinical trials, in which virologic response is classified into binary variables. A dataset from an AIDS clinical study is analyzed. PMID:20160899

  17. Cache Allocation in CDN: An Evolutionary Game Generalized Particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiang; Lau, Francis C. M.; Gao, Daqi

    Content distribution networks (CDNs) increasingly have been used to reduce the response times experienced by Internet users through placing surrogates close to the clients. This paper presents an object replacement approach based on an evolutionary game generalized particle model (G-GPM). We first propose a problem model for CDNs. The CDN model is then fit into a gravitational field. The origin servers and surrogates are regarded as two kinds of particles which are located in two force-fields. The cache allocation problem is thus transformed into the kinematics and dynamics of the particles in the annular and the round force-fields. The G-GPM approach is unique in four aspects: 1) direct viewing of individual and overall optimization; 2) parallel computing (lower time complexity); 3) multi-objective solution; and 4) being able to deal with some social interactions behaviors.

  18. A river flow routing scheme for general circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Vivek K.; Chiew, Francis H. S.; Grayson, Rodger B.

    1999-06-01

    The routing of runoff estimates from General Circulation Models (GCMs) is important to model river flow from large river basins and to estimate freshwater inflow into the oceans. Present routing approaches use arbitrary constants and empirical equations to determine travel times between the GCM grid cells. A new river flow routing scheme is developed, which uses physical catchment and river channel information and river discharge data. The scheme uses surface runoff and deep percolation data from land surface parameterization schemes, and routing is performed via linear surface and groundwater reservoirs. Geomorphological relationships between mean annual river discharge and other physical variables are used to interpolate existing information to define the channel morphology for the digital river networks at the routing model resolution. Applications of the routing scheme to the Mississippi and Amazon River Basins indicate that it performs adequately. The scheme does not require the calibration of parameters and can thus be easily used in GCMs.

  19. A statistical modeling approach for detecting generalized synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Johannes; Haslinger, Robert; Pipa, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Detecting nonlinear correlations between time series presents a hard problem for data analysis. We present a generative statistical modeling method for detecting nonlinear generalized synchronization. Truncated Volterra series are used to approximate functional interactions. The Volterra kernels are modeled as linear combinations of basis splines, whose coefficients are estimated via l1 and l2 regularized maximum likelihood regression. The regularization manages the high number of kernel coefficients and allows feature selection strategies yielding sparse models. The method's performance is evaluated on different coupled chaotic systems in various synchronization regimes and analytical results for detecting m:n phase synchrony are presented. Experimental applicability is demonstrated by detecting nonlinear interactions between neuronal local field potentials recorded in different parts of macaque visual cortex. PMID:23004851

  20. Toward a general psychological model of tension and suspense.

    PubMed

    Lehne, Moritz; Koelsch, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Tension and suspense are powerful emotional experiences that occur in a wide variety of contexts (e.g., in music, film, literature, and everyday life). The omnipresence of tension and suspense suggests that they build on very basic cognitive and affective mechanisms. However, the psychological underpinnings of tension experiences remain largely unexplained, and tension and suspense are rarely discussed from a general, domain-independent perspective. In this paper, we argue that tension experiences in different contexts (e.g., musical tension or suspense in a movie) build on the same underlying psychological processes. We discuss key components of tension experiences and propose a domain-independent model of tension and suspense. According to this model, tension experiences originate from states of conflict, instability, dissonance, or uncertainty that trigger predictive processes directed at future events of emotional significance. We also discuss possible neural mechanisms underlying tension and suspense. The model provides a theoretical framework that can inform future empirical research on tension phenomena.

  1. {beta} decay of odd-A As to Ge isotopes in the interacting boson-fermion model

    SciTech Connect

    Brant, S.; Yoshida, N.; Zuffi, L.

    2004-11-01

    The structure of odd-mass isotopes of As and Ge is described in the framework of the proton-neutron interacting boson-fermion model. The energy levels and the electromagnetic properties of {sup 69,71,73}As and {sup 69,71,73}Ge are calculated and compared with the experiment. The {beta}-decay rates from the As isotopes to the Ge isotopes are calculated. The calculated decays tend to be stronger than the observed ones. This may indicate a mixture of components outside the model space in the wave functions of actual nuclei. The effect of the higher-order terms in the decay operators seems small.

  2. Extensive investigation of the generalized dark matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Michael; Skordis, Constantinos; Thomas, Dan B.

    2016-08-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) model, wherein the dark matter is treated as a pressureless perfect fluid, provides a good fit to galactic and cosmological data. With the advent of precision cosmology, it should be asked whether this simplest model needs to be extended, and whether doing so could improve our understanding of the properties of dark matter. One established parametrization for generalizing the CDM fluid is the generalized dark matter (GDM) model, in which dark matter is an imperfect fluid with pressure and shear viscosity that fulfill certain postulated closure equations. We investigate these closure equations and the three new parametric functions they contain: the background equation of state w , the speed of sound cs2 and the viscosity cvis2. Taking these functions to be constant parameters, we analyze an exact solution of the perturbed Einstein equations in a flat GDM-dominated universe and discuss the main effects of the three parameters on the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Our analysis suggests that the CMB alone is not able to distinguish between the GDM sound speed and viscosity parameters, but that other observables, such as the matter power spectrum, are required to break this degeneracy. In order to elucidate further the meaning of the GDM closure equations, we also consider other descriptions of imperfect fluids that have a nonperturbative definition and relate these to the GDM model. In particular, we consider scalar fields, an effective field theory (EFT) of fluids, an EFT of large-scale structure, nonequilibrium thermodynamics and tightly coupled fluids. These descriptions could be used to extend the GDM model into the nonlinear regime of structure formation, which is necessary if the wealth of data available on those scales is to be employed in constraining the model. We also derive the initial conditions for adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations in the presence of GDM and standard cosmological fluids and provide the result in a

  3. Stimulus generalization and equivalence classes: a model for natural categories.

    PubMed Central

    Fields, L; Reeve, K F; Adams, B J; Verhave, T

    1991-01-01

    Two three-member classes were formed by training AB and BC using a conditional discrimination procedure. The A and B stimuli were nonsense syllables, and the C stimuli were sets of "short" or "long" lines. To test for equivalence, C1 or C2 was presented as a sample with A1 and A2 as comparisons. Once the class-related comparison was chosen consistently, different line lengths were substituted for the training lines in the CA tests. In general, the likelihood of choosing a given comparison was an inverse function of the difference in the length of the test line from the training line. Stimuli in an equivalence class became functionally related not only to each other but also to novel stimuli that resembled a member of the equivalence class. The combination of primary generalization and equivalence class formation, then, can serve as a model to account for the development of naturally occurring categories. PMID:2066703

  4. Anisotropic generalization of Matese & Whitman solution for compact star models in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayanandan, Baiju; Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Smitha, T. T.

    2016-05-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the stability of anisotropic compact star models by introducing Matese and Whitman (Phys. Rev. D 11:1270, 1980) solution in general relativity. We have particularly looked into the detailed investigation of the measurements of basic physical parameters such as radial pressure, tangential pressure, energy density, red shift, sound velocity, masses and radii are affected by unknown effects such as loss, accretion and diffusion of mass. Those give insight into the characteristics of the compact astrophysical object with anisotropic matter distribution as well as the physical reality. The results obtained for the physical feature of compact stars such as, Her. X-1, RXJ 1856-37, SAX J1808.4-3658(SS2) and SAX J1808.4-3658(SS1) are compared to the recently observed massive compact object.

  5. Generalized semiparametric varying-coefficient models for longitudinal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Li

    In this dissertation, we investigate the generalized semiparametric varying-coefficient models for longitudinal data that can flexibly model three types of covariate effects: time-constant effects, time-varying effects, and covariate-varying effects, i.e., the covariate effects that depend on other possibly time-dependent exposure variables. First, we consider the model that assumes the time-varying effects are unspecified functions of time while the covariate-varying effects are parametric functions of an exposure variable specified up to a finite number of unknown parameters. The estimation procedures are developed using multivariate local linear smoothing and generalized weighted least squares estimation techniques. The asymptotic properties of the proposed estimators are established. The simulation studies show that the proposed methods have satisfactory finite sample performance. ACTG 244 clinical trial of HIV infected patients are applied to examine the effects of antiretroviral treatment switching before and after HIV developing the 215-mutation. Our analysis shows benefit of treatment switching before developing the 215-mutation. The proposed methods are also applied to the STEP study with MITT cases showing that they have broad applications in medical research.

  6. The effect of topical dexamethasone and preoperative beta irradiation on a model of glaucoma fistulizing surgery in the rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.H.; Grierson, I.; Unger, W.G.; Hitchings, R.A. )

    1990-01-01

    We studied the effect of topical dexamethasone (1%) and preoperative beta irradiation on a model of glaucoma fistulizing surgery in the rabbit. Intraocular pressure and gross facility of aqueous outflow following surgery were not influenced by either treatment, although blebs persisted longer in the irradiated eyes. Steroids reduced clinically observable inflammation as well as the number of inflammatory cells identifiable by microscopy. Fibroblast production temporarily slowed, and ultrastructural examination demonstrated lipid-filled vacuoles and dilated mitochondria in these eyes. Also, the scar was thinner at 24 days. Beta irradiation delayed wound healing and the scar was thinner in the early postoperative stages, but the light microscopic appearance of the scar was unaltered at 59 days. Inflammation was more pronounced initially, with abundant fibrin in the wound. Recovery of the conjunctival epithelium was delayed. The delay in fibroblast recruitment and wound contraction, the thinner scar tissue, and the increased survival of the bleb are all factors that suggest that beta irradiation may be a useful adjunct to glaucoma surgery.

  7. A generalized a priori dose uncertainty model of IMRT delivery.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hosang; Palta, Jatinder; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kim, Siyong

    2008-03-01

    Multileaf collimator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is complex because each intensity modulated field consists of hundreds of subfields, each of which is associated with an intricate interplay of uncertainties. In this study, the authors have revised the previously introduced uncertainty model to provide an a priori accurate prediction of dose uncertainty during treatment planning in IMRT. In the previous model, the dose uncertainties were categorized into space-oriented dose uncertainty (SOU) and nonspace-oriented dose uncertainty (NOU). The revised model further divided the uncertainty sources into planning and delivery. SOU and NOU associated with a planning system were defined as inherent dose uncertainty. A convolution method with seven degrees of freedom was also newly applied to generalize the model for practical clinical cases. The model parameters were quantified through a set of measurements, accumulated routine quality assurance (QA) data, and peer-reviewed publications. The predicted uncertainty maps were compared with dose difference distributions between computations and 108 simple open-field measurements using a two-dimensional diode array detector to verify the validity of the model parameters and robustness of the generalized model. To examine the applicability of the model to overall dose uncertainty prediction in IMRT, a retrospective analysis of QA measurements using the diode array detector for 32 clinical IM fields was also performed. A scatter diagram and a correlation coefficient were employed to investigate a correlation of the predicted dose uncertainty distribution with the dose discrepancy distribution between calculation and delivery. In addition, a gamma test was performed to correlate failed regions in dose verification with the dose uncertainty map. The quantified model parameters well correlated the predicted dose uncertainty with the probable dose difference between calculations and measurements. It was visually

  8. Introducing Charge Hydration Asymmetry into the Generalized Born Model.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Abhishek; Aguilar, Boris H; Tolokh, Igor S; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2014-04-01

    The effect of charge hydration asymmetry (CHA)-non-invariance of solvation free energy upon solute charge inversion-is missing from the standard linear response continuum electrostatics. The proposed charge hydration asymmetric-generalized Born (CHA-GB) approximation introduces this effect into the popular generalized Born (GB) model. The CHA is added to the GB equation via an analytical correction that quantifies the specific propensity of CHA of a given water model; the latter is determined by the charge distribution within the water model. Significant variations in CHA seen in explicit water (TIP3P, TIP4P-Ew, and TIP5P-E) free energy calculations on charge-inverted "molecular bracelets" are closely reproduced by CHA-GB, with the accuracy similar to models such as SEA and 3D-RISM that go beyond the linear response. Compared against reference explicit (TIP3P) electrostatic solvation free energies, CHA-GB shows about a 40% improvement in accuracy over the canonical GB, tested on a diverse set of 248 rigid small neutral molecules (root mean square error, rmse = 0.88 kcal/mol for CHA-GB vs 1.24 kcal/mol for GB) and 48 conformations of amino acid analogs (rmse = 0.81 kcal/mol vs 1.26 kcal/mol). CHA-GB employs a novel definition of the dielectric boundary that does not subsume the CHA effects into the intrinsic atomic radii. The strategy leads to finding a new set of intrinsic atomic radii optimized for CHA-GB; these radii show physically meaningful variation with the atom type, in contrast to the radii set optimized for GB. Compared to several popular radii sets used with the original GB model, the new radii set shows better transferability between different classes of molecules.

  9. Cerebrolysin decreases amyloid-beta production by regulating amyloid protein precursor maturation in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rockenstein, Edward; Torrance, Magdalena; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Paulino, Amy; Rose, John B; Crews, Leslie; Moessler, Herbert; Masliah, Eliezer

    2006-05-15

    Cerebrolysin is a peptide mixture with neurotrophic effects that might reduce the neurodegenerative pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously shown in an amyloid protein precursor (APP) transgenic (tg) mouse model of AD-like neuropathology that Cerebrolysin ameliorates behavioral deficits, is neuroprotective, and decreases amyloid burden; however, the mechanisms involved are not completely clear. Cerebrolysin might reduce amyloid deposition by regulating amyloid-beta (Abeta) degradation or by modulating APP expression, maturation, or processing. To investigate these possibilities, APP tg mice were treated for 6 months with Cerebrolysin and analyzed in the water maze, followed by RNA, immunoblot, and confocal microscopy analysis of full-length (FL) APP and its fragments, beta-secretase (BACE1), and Abeta-degrading enzymes [neprilysin (Nep) and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE)]. Consistent with previous studies, Cerebrolysin ameliorated the performance deficits in the spatial learning portion of the water maze and reduced the synaptic pathology and amyloid burden in the brains of APP tg mice. These effects were associated with reduced levels of FL APP and APP C-terminal fragments, but levels of BACE1, Notch1, Nep, and IDE were unchanged. In contrast, levels of active cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (CDK5) and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta [GSK-3beta; but not stress-activated protein kinase-1 (SAPK1)], kinases that phosphorylate APP, were reduced. Furthermore, Cerebrolysin reduced the levels of phosphorylated APP and the accumulation of APP in the neuritic processes. Taken together, these results suggest that Cerebrolysin might reduce AD-like pathology in the APP tg mice by regulating APP maturation and transport to sites where Abeta protein is generated. This study clarifies the mechanisms through which Cerebrolysin might reduce Abeta production and deposition in AD and further supports the importance of this compound in the potential treatment of early AD.

  10. Superconductivity in the two-dimensional generalized Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, L. S.

    2016-08-01

    We have used the Green's functions method at finite temperature and the Kubo's formalism, to calculate the electron conductivity σ(ω) in the generalized two-dimensional Hubbard model. We have obtained a behavior superconductor for the system to T > T0. The AC conductivity falls to zero in ω =ω0 , where ω0 depends on Δ, which is the gap of the system. The behavior gotten is according of with the behavior of the superconductors of high Tc where there is a changes abruptly from a Mott's insulator state to superconductor.

  11. Generalized double-gradient model of flapping oscillations: Oblique waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovinskiy, D. B.; Kiehas, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    The double-gradient model of flapping oscillations is generalized for oblique plane waves, propagating in the equatorial plane. It is found that longitudinal propagation (ky = 0) is prohibited, while transversal (kx = 0) or nearly transversal waves should possess a maximum frequency, diminishing with the reduction of | k y / k x | ratio. It turns out that the sausage mode may propagate in a narrow range of directions only, | k y / k x | ≫ 1 . A simple analytical expression for the dispersion relation of the kink mode, valid in most part of wave numbers range, | k y / k x | < 9 , is derived.

  12. Consolidation of data base for Army generalized missile model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenke, D. J.; Hemsch, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    Data from plume interaction tests, nose mounted canard configuration tests, and high angle of attack tests on the Army Generalized Missile model are consolidated in a computer program which makes them readily accessible for plotting, listing, and evaluation. The program is written in FORTRAN and will run on an ordinary minicomputer. It has the capability of retrieving any coefficient from the existing DATAMAN tapes and displaying it in tabular or plotted form. Comparisons of data taken in several wind tunnels and of data with the predictions of Program MISSILE2 are also presented.

  13. A generalized methodology to characterize composite materials for pyrolysis models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, Mark B.

    The predictive capabilities of computational fire models have improved in recent years such that models have become an integral part of many research efforts. Models improve the understanding of the fire risk of materials and may decrease the number of expensive experiments required to assess the fire hazard of a specific material or designed space. A critical component of a predictive fire model is the pyrolysis sub-model that provides a mathematical representation of the rate of gaseous fuel production from condensed phase fuels given a heat flux incident to the material surface. The modern, comprehensive pyrolysis sub-models that are common today require the definition of many model parameters to accurately represent the physical description of materials that are ubiquitous in the built environment. Coupled with the increase in the number of parameters required to accurately represent the pyrolysis of materials is the increasing prevalence in the built environment of engineered composite materials that have never been measured or modeled. The motivation behind this project is to develop a systematic, generalized methodology to determine the requisite parameters to generate pyrolysis models with predictive capabilities for layered composite materials that are common in industrial and commercial applications. This methodology has been applied to four common composites in this work that exhibit a range of material structures and component materials. The methodology utilizes a multi-scale experimental approach in which each test is designed to isolate and determine a specific subset of the parameters required to define a material in the model. Data collected in simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry experiments were analyzed to determine the reaction kinetics, thermodynamic properties, and energetics of decomposition for each component of the composite. Data collected in microscale combustion calorimetry experiments were analyzed to

  14. Estimating parameters for generalized mass action models with connectivity information

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Chih-Lung; Voit, Eberhard O; Wang, Feng-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Background Determining the parameters of a mathematical model from quantitative measurements is the main bottleneck of modelling biological systems. Parameter values can be estimated from steady-state data or from dynamic data. The nature of suitable data for these two types of estimation is rather different. For instance, estimations of parameter values in pathway models, such as kinetic orders, rate constants, flux control coefficients or elasticities, from steady-state data are generally based on experiments that measure how a biochemical system responds to small perturbations around the steady state. In contrast, parameter estimation from dynamic data requires time series measurements for all dependent variables. Almost no literature has so far discussed the combined use of both steady-state and transient data for estimating parameter values of biochemical systems. Results In this study we introduce a constrained optimization method for estimating parameter values of biochemical pathway models using steady-state information and transient measurements. The constraints are derived from the flux connectivity relationships of the system at the steady state. Two case studies demonstrate the estimation results with and without flux connectivity constraints. The unconstrained optimal estimates from dynamic data may fit the experiments well, but they do not necessarily maintain the connectivity relationships. As a consequence, individual fluxes may be misrepresented, which may cause problems in later extrapolations. By contrast, the constrained estimation accounting for flux connectivity information reduces this misrepresentation and thereby yields improved model parameters. Conclusion The method combines transient metabolic profiles and steady-state information and leads to the formulation of an inverse parameter estimation task as a constrained optimization problem. Parameter estimation and model selection are simultaneously carried out on the constrained

  15. General mirror pairs for gauged linear sigma models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspinwall, Paul S.; Plesser, M. Ronen

    2015-11-01

    We carefully analyze the conditions for an abelian gauged linear σ-model to exhibit nontrivial IR behavior described by a nonsingular superconformal field theory determining a superstring vacuum. This is done without reference to a geometric phase, by associating singular behavior to a noncompact space of (semi-)classical vacua. We find that models determined by reflexive combinatorial data are nonsingular for generic values of their parameters. This condition has the pleasant feature that the mirror of a nonsingular gauged linear σ-model is another such model, but it is clearly too strong and we provide an example of a non-reflexive mirror pair. We discuss a weaker condition inspired by considering extremal transitions, which is also mirror symmetric and which we conjecture to be sufficient. We apply these ideas to extremal transitions and to understanding the way in which both Berglund-Hübsch mirror symmetry and the Vafa-Witten mirror orbifold with discrete torsion can be seen as special cases of the general combinatorial duality of gauged linear σ-models. In the former case we encounter an example showing that our weaker condition is still not necessary.

  16. Generalized proximity effect model in superconducting bi- and trilayer films

    SciTech Connect

    Brammertz, G.; Poelaert, A.; Golubov, A. A.; Verhoeve, P.; Peacock, A.; Rogalla, H.

    2001-07-01

    This article presents a general model for calculating the density of states and the Cooper pair potential in proximity-coupled superconducting bi- and trilayer films. It is valid for any kind of bilayer S{sub 1}-S{sub 2}, whatever the quality of the materials S{sub 1} and S{sub 2}, the quality of the S{sub 1}-S{sub 2} interface, and the layer thicknesses. The trilayer model is valid for a thin S{sub 3} layer, whereas the other two layers have arbitrary thicknesses. Although the equations of the dirty limit are used, it is argued that the model stays valid in clean bi-and trilayer films. The typical example of superconducting tunnel junctions is used to show that existing models, which apply to very thin or very thick layers or to perfectly transparent S{sub 1}-S{sub 2} interfaces, are too restrictive to apply to an arbitrary bilayer. The new model is applied to practical junctions, with layer thicknesses intermediate between the {open_quotes}thick{close_quotes} and the {open_quotes}thin{close_quotes} approximation. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  17. The Madden-Julian Oscillation in General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K R; Gleckler, P J; Doutriaux, C; Groups, A M; Groups, C M; Slingo, J M; Inness, P M; Gualdi, S; Li, W

    2003-10-27

    A methodology is utilized to analyze in a standardized fashion the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in general circulation models. This is attained by projecting 20-100 day bandpass filtered outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) from the models onto the two leading empirical orthogonal functions (EOF's) of observed OLR that characterize the propagation of MJO convection from the Indian Ocean to the central Pacific Ocean. The resulting principal component time series are then screened to isolate boreal winters during which they exhibit a lead-lag relationship consistent with observations. This PC subset is used for linear regression to determine the ability of the models to simulate the observed spacetime variability of the MJO. The vast majority of models underestimate the amplitude of the MJO convective anomalies by a factor of two or more, and the eastward propagation of convection is less coherent than observed, typically. For a given family of models, coupling to an ocean leads to better organization of the large-scale convection. The low-level moisture convergence mechanism for eastward propagation is represented in limited cases, as is the vertical structure of the MJO.

  18. A Chemical Containment Model for the General Purpose Work Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flippen, Alexis A.; Schmidt, Gregory K.

    1994-01-01

    Contamination control is a critical safety requirement imposed on experiments flying on board the Spacelab. The General Purpose Work Station, a Spacelab support facility used for life sciences space flight experiments, is designed to remove volatile compounds from its internal airpath and thereby minimize contamination of the Spacelab. This is accomplished through the use of a large, multi-stage filter known as the Trace Contaminant Control System. Many experiments planned for the Spacelab require the use of toxic, volatile fixatives in order to preserve specimens prior to postflight analysis. The NASA-Ames Research Center SLS-2 payload, in particular, necessitated the use of several toxic, volatile compounds in order to accomplish the many inflight experiment objectives of this mission. A model was developed based on earlier theories and calculations which provides conservative predictions of the resultant concentrations of these compounds given various spill scenarios. This paper describes the development and application of this model.

  19. Dynamic regulation of erythropoiesis: A computer model of general applicability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical model for the control of erythropoiesis was developed based on the balance between oxygen supply and demand at a renal oxygen detector which controls erythropoietin release and red cell production. Feedback regulation of tissue oxygen tension is accomplished by adjustments of hemoglobin levels resulting from the output of a renal-bone marrow controller. Special consideration was given to the determinants of tissue oxygenation including evaluation of the influence of blood flow, capillary diffusivity, oxygen uptake and oxygen-hemoglobin affinity. A theoretical analysis of the overall control system is presented. Computer simulations of altitude hypoxia, red cell infusion hyperoxia, and homolytic anemia demonstrate validity of the model for general human application in health and disease.

  20. A stratiform cloud parameterization for General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, S.J.; Leung, L.R.; Chuang, C.C.; Penner, J.E.; McCaa, J.

    1994-05-01

    The crude treatment of clouds in General Circulation Models (GCMs) is widely recognized as a major limitation in the application of these models to predictions of global climate change. The purpose of this project is to develop a paxameterization for stratiform clouds in GCMs that expresses stratiform clouds in terms of bulk microphysical properties and their subgrid variability. In this parameterization, precipitating cloud species are distinguished from non-precipitating species, and the liquid phase is distinguished from the ice phase. The size of the non-precipitating cloud particles (which influences both the cloud radiative properties and the conversion of non-precipitating cloud species to precipitating species) is determined by predicting both the mass and number concentrations of each species.

  1. Beta experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A focused laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) system was developed for the measurement of atmospheric backscatter (beta) from aerosols at infrared wavelengths. A Doppler signal generator was used in mapping the coherent sensitive focal volume of a focused LDV system. System calibration data was analyzed during the flight test activity scheduled for the Beta system. These analyses were performed to determine the acceptability of the Beta measurement system's performance.

  2. Biosynthesis of ketomycin. (II) biomimetic model for beta-lactamase catalysis: host-guest interactions in cyclodextrin-penicillin inclusion complex

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, H.W.

    1986-01-01

    The antibiotic ketomycin is formed from shikimic acid via chorismic acid and prephenic acid. Phenylalanine and 2',5'-dihydrophenylalanine derived from shikimic acid are not intermediates in the biosynthesis. Degradation of ketomycin derived from (1,6-/sup 14/C)shikimic acid showed that prephenic acid is converted into ketomycin with stereospecific discrimination between the two enantiotopic edges of the ring, the pro-S-R edge giving rise to the C-2', C-3' side of the cyclohexane ring of ketomycin. The resistance of pathogenic bacteria to the action of ..beta..-lactam antibiotics is mainly ascribed to their ability to produce ..beta..-lactamase to cleave the ..beta..-lactam ring. It is essential to understand the molecular nature of ..beta..-lactamase-penicillin recognition for designing and formulating more effective ..beta..-lactam antibiotics. A biomimetic study of ..beta..-lactamase is therefore initiated. To meet the requirements of hydrophobic and serine protease characteristics of ..beta..-lactamase, ..cap alpha..-cyclodextrin is chosen as a biomimetic model for ..beta..-lactamase. The structural specificity and the chemical dynamics of ..cap alpha..-cyclodextrin-phenoxymethyl penicillin inclusion complex in solid state and in solution have been determined by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The spectral results strongly indicate that the phenyl portion of the phenoxymethyl penicillin forms a stable inclusion complex with the hydrophobic cavity of ..cap alpha..-cyclodextrin in solution as well as in the solid state. Kinetic studies followed by /sup 1/HNMR and HPLC analyses under alkaline condition have shown that the ..cap alpha..-cyclodextrin mimics the catalytic function of serine of ..beta..-lactamase in the stereospecific hydrolysis of the ..beta..-lactam ring of phenoxymethyl penicillin.

  3. The role of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1) in Alzheimer's A beta generation: development of a cell-based model system.

    PubMed

    Goto, Joy J; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2002-01-01

    The clearance and degradation of extracellular A beta is critical for regulating beta-amyloid deposition, a major hallmark of brains of patients with A beta in Alzheimer's Disease. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein, LRP1, is a large endocytic receptor that significantly contributes to the balance between degradation and production of A beta. An extracellular portion of the LRP, known as the cluster II region can bind to the secreted form of APP (sAPP-KPI). We show here that a GST fusion protein containing the cluster II region of LRP can be used as a 'mini-receptor' that specifically binds to sAPP-KPI from conditioned cultured medium. The binding between the GST-LRP-cluster II fusion protein and sAPP-KPI can be inhibited with the strong binding ligand of LRP1, called receptor-associated protein (RAP). Furthermore, a cell-based in vitro assay system has been developed to monitor the production of total A beta and A beta(1-42) in the presence and absence of RAP in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines both deficient in LRP and expressing LRP. A 3-day treatment of the L2 (CHO cells deficient in LRP and overexpressing APP751) and L3 (CHO cells expressing LRP and overexpressing APP751) cell lines with RAP showed a decrease in total A beta and, interestingly, also a decrease in the ratio of A beta42/A beta(total). This cell-based model system and LRP-cluster II mini-receptor will be very useful for screening novel compounds that can reduce A beta accumulation by inhibiting binding of APP-KPI to LRP1. PMID:12212791

  4. A Generalized Statistical Uncertainty Model for Satellite Precipitation Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarachi, S.

    2013-12-01

    A mixture model of Generalized Normal Distribution and Gamma distribution (GND-G) is used to model the joint probability distribution of satellite-based and stage IV radar rainfall under a given spatial and temporal resolution (e.g. 1°x1° and daily rainfall). The distribution parameters of GND-G are extended across various rainfall rates and spatial and temporal resolutions. In the study, GND-G is used to describe the uncertainty of the estimates from Precipitation Estimation from Remote Sensing Information using Artificial Neural Network algorithm (PERSIANN). The stage IV-based multi-sensor precipitation estimates (MPE) are used as reference measurements .The study area for constructing the uncertainty model covers a 15°×15°box of 0.25°×0.25° cells over the eastern United States for summer 2004 to 2009. Cells are aggregated in space and time to obtain data with different resolutions for the construction of the model's parameter space. Result shows that comparing to the other statistical uncertainty models, GND-G fits better than the other models, such as Gaussian and Gamma distributions, to the reference precipitation data. The impact of precipitation uncertainty to the stream flow is further demonstrated by Monte Carlo simulation of precipitation forcing in the hydrologic model. The NWS DMIP2 basins over Illinois River basin south of Siloam is selected in this case study. The data covers the time period of 2006 to 2008.The uncertainty range of stream flow from precipitation of GND-G distributions calculated and will be discussed.

  5. A modified EM algorithm for estimation in generalized mixed models.

    PubMed

    Steele, B M

    1996-12-01

    Application of the EM algorithm for estimation in the generalized mixed model has been largely unsuccessful because the E-step cannot be determined in most instances. The E-step computes the conditional expectation of the complete data log-likelihood and when the random effect distribution is normal, this expectation remains an intractable integral. The problem can be approached by numerical or analytic approximations; however, the computational burden imposed by numerical integration methods and the absence of an accurate analytic approximation have limited the use of the EM algorithm. In this paper, Laplace's method is adapted for analytic approximation within the E-step. The proposed algorithm is computationally straightforward and retains much of the conceptual simplicity of the conventional EM algorithm, although the usual convergence properties are not guaranteed. The proposed algorithm accommodates multiple random factors and random effect distributions besides the normal, e.g., the log-gamma distribution. Parameter estimates obtained for several data sets and through simulation show that this modified EM algorithm compares favorably with other generalized mixed model methods.

  6. High pressure experiments with a Mars general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Pollack, J. B.; Murphy, J. R.; Schaeffer, J.; Lee, H.

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of three physical processes will determine the stability of the Martian polar caps as the surface pressure increases: the greenhouse effect, atmospheric heat transport, and the change in the CO2 frost point temperature. The contribution of each is readily determined in the Mars general circulation model (GCM). Therefore, we have initiated experiments with the GCM to determine how these processes interact, and how the atmosphere-polar cap system responds to increasing surface pressure. The experiments are carried out for northern winter solstice and generally assume the atmosphere to be free of dust. Each experiment starts from resting isothermal conditions and runs for 50 Mars days. Mars' current orbital parameters are used. The experiments are for surface pressures of 120, 480, and 960 mb, which represent 16, 64, and 128 times the current value. To date we have analyzed the 120 mb experiment and the results indicate the contrary to the simpler models, the polar caps actually advance instead of retreat. Other aspects of this investigation are presented.

  7. A generalized Potts model for confocal microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máté, Gabriell; Heermann, Dieter W.

    2015-01-01

    Much as being among the least invasive mainstream imaging technologies in life sciences, the resolution of confocal microscopy is limited. Imaged structures, e.g., chromatin-fiber loops, have diameters around or beyond the diffraction limit, and microscopy images show seemingly random spatial density distributions only. While such images are important because the organization of the chromosomes influences different cell mechanisms, many interesting questions can also be related to the observed patterns. These concern their spatial aspects, the role of randomness, the possibility of modeling these images with a random generative process, the interaction between the densities of adjacent loci, the length-scales of these influences, etc. We answer these questions by implementing a generalization of the Potts model. We show how to estimate the model parameters, test the performance of the estimation process and numerically prove that the obtained values converge to the ground truth. Finally, we generate images with a trained model and show that they compare well to real cell images.

  8. Generalized Optoelectronic Model of Series-Connected Multijunction Solar Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Geisz, John F.; Steiner, Myles A.; Garcia, Ivan; France, Ryan M.; McMahon, William E.; Osterwald, Carl R.; Friedman, Daniel J.

    2015-10-02

    The emission of light from each junction in a series-connected multijunction solar cell, we found, both complicates and elucidates the understanding of its performance under arbitrary conditions. Bringing together many recent advances in this understanding, we present a general 1-D model to describe luminescent coupling that arises from both voltage-driven electroluminescence and voltage-independent photoluminescence in nonideal junctions that include effects such as Sah-Noyce-Shockley (SNS) recombination with n ≠ 2, Auger recombination, shunt resistance, reverse-bias breakdown, series resistance, and significant dark area losses. The individual junction voltages and currents are experimentally determined from measured optical and electrical inputs and outputs ofmore » the device within the context of the model to fit parameters that describe the devices performance under arbitrary input conditions. Furthermore, our techniques to experimentally fit the model are demonstrated for a four-junction inverted metamorphic solar cell, and the predictions of the model are compared with concentrator flash measurements.« less

  9. Complex Environmental Data Modelling Using Adaptive General Regression Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanevski, Mikhail

    2015-04-01

    The research deals with an adaptation and application of Adaptive General Regression Neural Networks (GRNN) to high dimensional environmental data. GRNN [1,2,3] are efficient modelling tools both for spatial and temporal data and are based on nonparametric kernel methods closely related to classical Nadaraya-Watson estimator. Adaptive GRNN, using anisotropic kernels, can be also applied for features selection tasks when working with high dimensional data [1,3]. In the present research Adaptive GRNN are used to study geospatial data predictability and relevant feature selection using both simulated and real data case studies. The original raw data were either three dimensional monthly precipitation data or monthly wind speeds embedded into 13 dimensional space constructed by geographical coordinates and geo-features calculated from digital elevation model. GRNN were applied in two different ways: 1) adaptive GRNN with the resulting list of features ordered according to their relevancy; and 2) adaptive GRNN applied to evaluate all possible models N [in case of wind fields N=(2^13 -1)=8191] and rank them according to the cross-validation error. In both cases training were carried out applying leave-one-out procedure. An important result of the study is that the set of the most relevant features depends on the month (strong seasonal effect) and year. The predictabilities of precipitation and wind field patterns, estimated using the cross-validation and testing errors of raw and shuffled data, were studied in detail. The results of both approaches were qualitatively and quantitatively compared. In conclusion, Adaptive GRNN with their ability to select features and efficient modelling of complex high dimensional data can be widely used in automatic/on-line mapping and as an integrated part of environmental decision support systems. 1. Kanevski M., Pozdnoukhov A., Timonin V. Machine Learning for Spatial Environmental Data. Theory, applications and software. EPFL Press

  10. Obliquity Experiments with a Mars General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harberle, R. M.; Schaeffer, J.; Cuzzi, Jeffery N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We have simulated the seasonal variation of the general circulation on Mars for obliquities of 0deg and 60deg. These obliquities represent the minimum and maximum values the planet has experienced during the past 10(exp 7) years (e.g., Laskar and Robutel, 1993, Nature, 361, 608-614). The model we use is the NASA/Ames Mars General Circulation Model (Pollack et al., 1993, J. Geophys. Res. 98, 3149-3181). We vary only the obliquity; all other model parameters are as in Pollack et al. At high obliquity, the model shows dramatic seasonal variations in the polar caps and in the structure and intensity of the circulation. At the solstices the winter cap extends to the equator. Thus, surface temperatures throughout the entire winter hemisphere are fixed at the CO2 frost point. During summer surface temperatures at the poles reach 269K in the north and 295K in the south. The most notable changes to the circulation at solstice compared to our standard runs are a general weakening of the winter westerlies, a Hadley cell of greater latitudinal extent, and the development of very strong, possibly unstable, low-level jets in midlatitudes of the summer hemisphere. Surface stresses associated with these jets are sufficient to raise dust continuously. Thus, dust storms should be frequent features of the high obliquity climate. This result is independent of any desorbed regolith CO2 which would raise mean surface pressures. At zero obliquity the structure of the circulation resembles that of present day equinox conditions modulated by the varying insolation associated with orbital eccentricity. Notable features include equatorial superrotation, asymmetric Hadley cells, and stronger poleward heat fluxes in the northern hemisphere. Since the poles do not receive solar energy at any time of year, permanent caps form which extend to about 70deg in each hemisphere. However, the north permanent cap is growing at a rate 40% faster than the south cap. This is due to the differences in

  11. Solitons and kinks in a general car-following model.

    PubMed

    Kurtze, Douglas A

    2013-09-01

    We study a general car-following model of traffic flow on an infinitely long single-lane road, which assumes that a car's acceleration depends on time-delayed values of its own speed, the headway between it and the car ahead, and the rate of change of headway, but makes minimal assumptions about the functional form of that dependence. We present a detailed characterization of the onset of linear instability; in particular we find a specific limit on the delay time below which the marginal wave number at the onset of instability is zero, and another specific limit on the delay time above which steady flow is always unstable. Crucially, the threshold of absolute stability generally does not coincide with an inflection point of the steady-state velocity function. When the marginal perturbation at onset has wave number 0, we show that Burgers and Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations can be derived under the usual assumptions, and that corrections to the KdV equation "select" a single member of the one-parameter set of its one-soliton solutions by driving a slow evolution of the soliton parameter. While in previous models this selected soliton has always marked the threshold of a finite-amplitude instability of linearly stable steady flow, we find that it can alternatively be a stable, small-amplitude jam that occurs when steady flow is linearly unstable. The model reduces to the usual modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation only in the special situation that the threshold of absolute stability coincides with an inflection point of the steady-state velocity function; in general, near the threshold of absolute stability the model reduces instead to a KdV equation in the regime of small solitons, while near an inflection point it reduces to a Hayakawa-Nakanishi equation. Like the mKdV equation, the Hayakawa-Nakanishi equation admits a continuous family of kink solutions, and the selection criterion arising from the corrections to this equation can be written down

  12. Adaptive Error Estimation in Linearized Ocean General Circulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chechelnitsky, Michael Y.

    1999-01-01

    Data assimilation methods are routinely used in oceanography. The statistics of the model and measurement errors need to be specified a priori. This study addresses the problem of estimating model and measurement error statistics from observations. We start by testing innovation based methods of adaptive error estimation with low-dimensional models in the North Pacific (5-60 deg N, 132-252 deg E) to TOPEX/POSEIDON (TIP) sea level anomaly data, acoustic tomography data from the ATOC project, and the MIT General Circulation Model (GCM). A reduced state linear model that describes large scale internal (baroclinic) error dynamics is used. The methods are shown to be sensitive to the initial guess for the error statistics and the type of observations. A new off-line approach is developed, the covariance matching approach (CMA), where covariance matrices of model-data residuals are "matched" to their theoretical expectations using familiar least squares methods. This method uses observations directly instead of the innovations sequence and is shown to be related to the MT method and the method of Fu et al. (1993). Twin experiments using the same linearized MIT GCM suggest that altimetric data are ill-suited to the estimation of internal GCM errors, but that such estimates can in theory be obtained using acoustic data. The CMA is then applied to T/P sea level anomaly data and a linearization of a global GFDL GCM which uses two vertical modes. We show that the CMA method can be used with a global model and a global data set, and that the estimates of the error statistics are robust. We show that the fraction of the GCM-T/P residual variance explained by the model error is larger than that derived in Fukumori et al.(1999) with the method of Fu et al.(1993). Most of the model error is explained by the barotropic mode. However, we find that impact of the change in the error statistics on the data assimilation estimates is very small. This is explained by the large

  13. Bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s possessing coordinated metal center(s) and their inclusion complexation behavior with model substrates: enhanced molecular binding ability by multiple recognition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Chen, Y; Li, L; Zhang, H Y; Liu, S X; Guan, X D

    2001-12-14

    To investigate quantitatively the cooperative binding ability of several beta-cyclodextrin oligomers bearing single or multiligated metal center(s), the inclusion complexation behavior of four bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s (2-5) linked by 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxy tethers and their copper(II) complexes (6-9) with representative dye guests, i.e., methyl orange (MO), acridine red (AR), rhodamine B (RhB), ammonium 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS), and sodium 6-(p-toludino)-2-naphthalenesulfonate (TNS), have been examined in aqueous solution at 25 degrees C by means of UV-vis, circular dichroism, fluorescence, and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The results obtained indicate that bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s 2-5 can associate with one or three copper(II) ion(s) producing 2:1 or 2:3 bis(beta-cyclodextrin)-copper(II) complexes. These metal-ligated oligo(beta-cyclodextrin)s can bind two model substrates to form intramolecular 2:2 host-guest inclusion complexes and thus significantly enhance the original binding abilities of parent beta-cyclodextrin and bis(beta-cyclodextrin) toward model substrates through the cooperative binding of two guest molecules by four tethered cyclodextrin moieties, as well as the additional binding effect supplied by ligated metal center(s). Host 6 showed the highest enhancement of the stability constant, up to 38.3 times for ANS as compared with parent beta-cyclodextrin. The molecular binding mode and stability constant of substrates by bridged bis- and oligo(beta-cyclodextrin)s 2-9 are discussed from the viewpoint of the size/shape-fit interaction and molecular multiple recognition between host and guest.

  14. A generalized model for estimating the energy density of invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Daniel A.; Csargo, Isak J.; Von Eschen, Aaron; Thul, Megan D.; Baker, James M.; Hayer, Cari-Ann; Howell, Jessica; Krause, Jacob; Letvin, Alex; Chipps, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Invertebrate energy density (ED) values are traditionally measured using bomb calorimetry. However, many researchers rely on a few published literature sources to obtain ED values because of time and sampling constraints on measuring ED with bomb calorimetry. Literature values often do not account for spatial or temporal variability associated with invertebrate ED. Thus, these values can be unreliable for use in models and other ecological applications. We evaluated the generality of the relationship between invertebrate ED and proportion of dry-to-wet mass (pDM). We then developed and tested a regression model to predict ED from pDM based on a taxonomically, spatially, and temporally diverse sample of invertebrates representing 28 orders in aquatic (freshwater, estuarine, and marine) and terrestrial (temperate and arid) habitats from 4 continents and 2 oceans. Samples included invertebrates collected in all seasons over the last 19 y. Evaluation of these data revealed a significant relationship between ED and pDM (r2  =  0.96, p < 0.0001), where ED (as J/g wet mass) was estimated from pDM as ED  =  22,960pDM − 174.2. Model evaluation showed that nearly all (98.8%) of the variability between observed and predicted values for invertebrate ED could be attributed to residual error in the model. Regression of observed on predicted values revealed that the 97.5% joint confidence region included the intercept of 0 (−103.0 ± 707.9) and slope of 1 (1.01 ± 0.12). Use of this model requires that only dry and wet mass measurements be obtained, resulting in significant time, sample size, and cost savings compared to traditional bomb calorimetry approaches. This model should prove useful for a wide range of ecological studies because it is unaffected by taxonomic, seasonal, or spatial variability.

  15. The Generalized FLaIR Model (GFM) for landslide forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Davide Luciano; Versace, Pasquale

    2015-04-01

    A new version of the hydrological model named FLaIR (Forecasting of Landslides Induced by Rainfall, Capparelli and Versace 2011) is proposed, named as GFM (Generalized FLaIR Model). Non stationary rainfall thresholds, depending on antecedent precipitation, are introduced in this new release, which allow for a better prediction of landslide occurrences. It is possible to demonstrate that GFM reproduces all the Antecedent Precipitation models (AP) proposed in technical literature as particular cases, besides Intensity-Duration schemes (ID) and more conceptual approaches, whose reconstruction with the first release of FlaIR model, which adopts only stationary thresholds, was already discussed in Capparelli and Versace (2011). GFM is extremely flexible, and the main advantage of the model is represented by the possibility of using well-established procedures for the choice of the most appropriate configuration for the selected case study, and of facilitating the comparison between several options, through the use of a mobility function. Gimigliano municipality, located in Calabria region (southern Italy) was chosen as case study, where a consistent number of landslides occurred in the past years; in particular, during the period 2008-2010 this area (like the whole Calabria region) was affected by persistent rainfall events, which induced several damages related to infrastructures and buildings. For the selected case study GFM allows to obtain significant improvements in landslide prediction; in details a substantial reduction of False Alarms is obtained with respect to application of classical ID and AP schemes. REFERENCES Capparelli G, Versace P (2011). FLaIR and SUSHI: Two mathematical models for Early Warning Systems for rainfall induced landslides. Landslides 8:67-79. doi: 10.1007/s10346-010-0228-6

  16. General Description of Fission Observables: GEF Model Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, K.-H.; Jurado, B.; Amouroux, C.; Schmitt, C.

    2016-01-01

    The GEF ("GEneral description of Fission observables") model code is documented. It describes the observables for spontaneous fission, neutron-induced fission and, more generally, for fission of a compound nucleus from any other entrance channel, with given excitation energy and angular momentum. The GEF model is applicable for a wide range of isotopes from Z = 80 to Z = 112 and beyond, up to excitation energies of about 100 MeV. The results of the GEF model are compared with fission barriers, fission probabilities, fission-fragment mass- and nuclide distributions, isomeric ratios, total kinetic energies, and prompt-neutron and prompt-gamma yields and energy spectra from neutron-induced and spontaneous fission. Derived properties of delayed neutrons and decay heat are also considered. The GEF model is based on a general approach to nuclear fission that explains a great part of the complex appearance of fission observables on the basis of fundamental laws of physics and general properties of microscopic systems and mathematical objects. The topographic theorem is used to estimate the fission-barrier heights from theoretical macroscopic saddle-point and ground-state masses and experimental ground-state masses. Motivated by the theoretically predicted early localisation of nucleonic wave functions in a necked-in shape, the properties of the relevant fragment shells are extracted. These are used to determine the depths and the widths of the fission valleys corresponding to the different fission channels and to describe the fission-fragment distributions and deformations at scission by a statistical approach. A modified composite nuclear-level-density formula is proposed. It respects some features in the superfluid regime that are in accordance with new experimental findings and with theoretical expectations. These are a constant-temperature behaviour that is consistent with a considerably increased heat capacity and an increased pairing condensation energy that is

  17. Modeling of space environment impact on nanostructured materials. General principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronina, Ekaterina; Novikov, Lev

    2016-07-01

    In accordance with the resolution of ISO TC20/SC14 WG4/WG6 joint meeting, Technical Specification (TS) 'Modeling of space environment impact on nanostructured materials. General principles' which describes computer simulation methods of space environment impact on nanostructured materials is being prepared. Nanomaterials surpass traditional materials for space applications in many aspects due to their unique properties associated with nanoscale size of their constituents. This superiority in mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties will evidently inspire a wide range of applications in the next generation spacecraft intended for the long-term (~15-20 years) operation in near-Earth orbits and the automatic and manned interplanetary missions. Currently, ISO activity on developing standards concerning different issues of nanomaterials manufacturing and applications is high enough. Most such standards are related to production and characterization of nanostructures, however there is no ISO documents concerning nanomaterials behavior in different environmental conditions, including the space environment. The given TS deals with the peculiarities of the space environment impact on nanostructured materials (i.e. materials with structured objects which size in at least one dimension lies within 1-100 nm). The basic purpose of the document is the general description of the methodology of applying computer simulation methods which relate to different space and time scale to modeling processes occurring in nanostructured materials under the space environment impact. This document will emphasize the necessity of applying multiscale simulation approach and present the recommendations for the choice of the most appropriate methods (or a group of methods) for computer modeling of various processes that can occur in nanostructured materials under the influence of different space environment components. In addition, TS includes the description of possible

  18. Climate predictability experiments with a general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, L.; Arpe, K.; Roeckner, E.; Schulzweida, U.

    1996-03-01

    The atmospheric response to the evolution of the global sea surface temperatures from 1979 to 1992 is studied using the Max-Planck-Institut 19 level atmospheric general circulation model, ECHAM3 at T 42 resolution. Five separate 14-year integrations are performed and results are presented for each individual realization and for the ensemble-averaged response. The results are compared to a 30-year control integration using a climate monthly mean state of the sea surface temperatures and to analysis data. It is found that the ECHAM3 model, by and large, does reproduce the observed response pattern to El Nino and La Niña. During the El Nino events, the subtropical jet streams in both hemispheres are intensified and displaced equatorward, and there is a tendency towards weak upper easterlies over the equator. The Southern Oscillation is a very stable feature of the integrations and is accurately reproduced in all experiments. The inter-annual variability at middle- and high-latitudes, on the other hand, is strongly dominated by chaotic dynamics, and the tropical SST forcing only modulates the atmospheric circulation. The potential predictability of the model is investigated for six different regions. Signal to noise ratio is large in most parts of the tropical belt, of medium strength in the western hemisphere and generally small over the European area. The ENSO signal is most pronounced during the boreal spring. A particularly strong signal in the precipitation field in the extratropics during spring can be found over the southern United States. Western Canada is normally warmer during the warm ENSO phase, while northern Europe is warmer than normal during the ENSO cold phase. The reason is advection of warm air due to a more intense Pacific low than normal during the warm ENSO phase and a more intense Icelandic low than normal during the cold ENSO phase, respectively.

  19. Application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy and kinetic modeling for elucidation of adsorption chemistry in uptake of tetracycline by zeolite beta.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin; Liu, Huijuan; Zheng, Yu-Ming; Qu, Jiuhui; Chen, J Paul

    2011-02-01

    Extensive usage of tetracycline has resulted in its contamination in surface water and groundwater. The adsorption of tetracycline on zeolite beta was systematically investigated for the decontamination of the antibiotic polluted water in this study. Ninety percent of uptake by the zeolite beta occured in 0.25h, and the adsorption equilibrium was obtained within 3h, which was well described by an intraparticle diffusion model. The adsorption generally increased when pH was increased from 4.0 to 5.0, and then decreased significantly as the pH was further increased, which was caused by the pH-dependent speciation of tetracycline and surface charge of zeolite beta. Both Freundlich and Langmuir equations well described the adsorption isotherm. A thermodynamic analysis showed that the sorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. Aluminum atoms in the zeolite played a crucial role in the uptake; the adsorption increased with the increasing aluminum content in zeolite. The UV-Visible spectroscopy study showed that the spectra of tetracycline changed upon the interaction with zeolite beta, which could be ascribed to the formation of complexes of tetracycline and aluminum atoms in the zeolite surface. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study further confirmed the participation of Al in the tetracycline adsorption. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies showed that the amino functional groups in tetracycline were involved in the complexation with the zeolite surface.

  20. Beneficial effect of 17{beta}-estradiol on hyperglycemia and islet {beta}-cell functions in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Yamabe, Noriko; Kang, Ki Sung; Zhu Baoting

    2010-11-15

    The modulating effect of estrogen on glucose homeostasis remains a controversial issue at present. In this study, we sought to determine the beneficial effect of 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) on hyperglycemia and islet {beta}-cell functions in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected i.p. with STZ to induce a relatively mild diabetic condition. The rats were then treated with E{sub 2} orally at 500 {mu}g/kg body weight/day for 15 days to evaluate the modulating effect on hyperglycemia, insulin secretion, and islet {beta}-cell proliferation. E{sub 2} administration for 10 days significantly lowered plasma glucose levels, increased plasma insulin levels, and improved glucose tolerance by attenuating insulin response to oral glucose loading. These beneficial effects of E{sub 2} were accompanied by increases in islet number and volume, rate of islet cell proliferation, and the amount of insulin secreted. The growth-stimulatory effect of E{sub 2} on islet cells was linked to the functions of the estrogen receptor {alpha}. Notably, these protective effects of E{sub 2} on diabetic conditions were basically not observed when the STZ-treated rats had a more severe degree of islet damage and hyperglycemia. Taken together, we conclude that E{sub 2} can promote the regeneration of damaged pancreatic islets by stimulating {beta}-cell proliferation in diabetic rats, and this effect is accompanied by improvements in glucose tolerance and a decrease in plasma glucose levels. These findings suggest that oral administration of E{sub 2} may be beneficial in diabetic patients with an accelerated loss of islet {beta}-cells.

  1. The transforming growth factor-beta 3 knock-out mouse: an animal model for cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Koo, S H; Cunningham, M C; Arabshahi, B; Gruss, J S; Grant, J H

    2001-09-15

    The recent report of a transforming growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-beta 3) knock-out mouse in which 100 percent of the homozygous pups have cleft palate raised the question as to the potential usefulness of these animals as a model for cleft palate research. The specific aim in this study was to carefully document the anatomy of the cleft palate in the TGF-beta 3 knock-out mice as compared with wild type controls. Special attention was paid to the levator veli palatini muscle, the tensor veli palatini muscle, and their respective innervation. Because the TGF-beta 3 knock-out is lethal in the early perinatal period and because the heterozygotes are phenotypically normal, polymerase chain reaction was required to genotype the animals before mating. Time-mated pregnancies between proven heterozygotes were then delivered by cesarean section at gestational day 18.5 to prevent maternal cannibalism of homozygote pups. All delivered pups were killed and their tails processed by polymerase chain reaction to verify genotype. The heads were then fixed and sectioned in axial, coronal, or sagittal planes. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or processed for immunohistochemistry with nerve specific protein gene product 9.5 and calcitonin gene-related peptide antibodies. Sections were analyzed in a serial fashion. Nine wild type control animals were analyzed along with nine TGF-beta 3 knock-out homozygotes. Time matings between proven heterozygotes yielded wild type pups, heterozygote pups, and homozygote knock-out pups in the expected mendelian ratios (28 percent to 46 percent to 26 percent; n = 43). The results demonstrated 100 percent clefting in the homozygous TGF-beta 3 knock-out pups. Complete clefting of the secondary palate was seen in four of nine and incomplete clefting was seen in five of nine. The levator veli palatini and tensor veli palatini muscles were demonstrated coursing parallel to the cleft margin in all cleft mice. The orientation of these muscles

  2. Species-specific vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) expression in mammalian pancreatic beta cells: implications for optimising radioligand-based human beta cell mass (BCM) imaging in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, N. R.; Kalmbach, N.; Klietz, M.; Anlauf, M.; Eiden, L. E.; Weihe, E.

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Imaging of beta cell mass (BCM) is a major challenge in diabetes research. The vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) is abundantly expressed in human beta cells. Radiolabelled analogues of tetrabenazine (TBZ; a low-molecular-weight, cell-permeant VMAT2-selective ligand) have been employed for pancreatic islet imaging in humans. Since reports on TBZ-based VMAT2 imaging in rodent pancreas have been fraught with confusion, we compared VMAT2 gene expression patterns in the mouse, rat, pig and human pancreas, to identify appropriate animal models with which to further validate and optimise TBZ imaging in humans. Methods We used a panel of highly sensitive VMAT2 antibodies developed against equivalently antigenic regions of the transporter from each species in combination with immunostaining for insulin and species-specific in situ hybridisation probes. Individual pancreatic islets were obtained by laser-capture microdissection and subjected to analysis of mRNA expression of VMAT2. Results The VMAT2 protein was not expressed in beta cells in the adult pancreas of common mouse or rat laboratory strains, in contrast to its expression in beta cells (but not other pancreatic endocrine cell types) in the pancreas of pigs and humans. VMAT2- and tyrosine hydroxylase co-positive (catecholaminergic) innervation was less abundant in humans than in rodents. VMAT2-positive mast cells were identified in the pancreas of all species. Conclusions/interpretation Primates and pigs are suitable models for TBZ imaging of beta cells. Rodents, because of a complete lack of VMAT2 expression in the endocrine pancreas, are a ‘null’ model for assessing interference with BCM measurements by VMAT2-positive mast cells and sympathetic innervation in the pancreas. PMID:23404442

  3. Generalized continuum modeling of scale-dependent crystalline plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayeur, Jason R.

    The use of metallic material systems (e.g. pure metals, alloys, metal matrix composites) in a wide range of engineering applications from medical devices to electronic components to automobiles continues to motivate the development of improved constitutive models to meet increased performance demands while minimizing cost. Emerging technologies often incorporate materials in which the dominant microstructural features have characteristic dimensions reaching into the submicron and nanometer regime. Metals comprised of such fine microstructures often exhibit unique and size-dependent mechanical response, and classical approaches to constitutive model development at engineering (continuum) scales, being local in nature, are inadequate for describing such behavior. Therefore, traditional modeling frameworks must be augmented and/or reformulated to account for such phenomena. Crystal plasticity constitutive models have proven quite capable of capturing first-order microstructural effects such as grain orientation (elastic/plastic anisotropy), grain morphology, phase distribution, etc. on the deformation behavior of both single and polycrystals, yet suffer from the same limitations as other local continuum theories with regard to capturing scale-dependent mechanical response. This research is focused on the development, numerical implementation, and application of a generalized (nonlocal) theory of single crystal plasticity capable of describing the scale-dependent mechanical response of both single and polycrystalline metals that arises as a result of heterogeneous deformation. This research developed a dislocation-based theory of micropolar single crystal plasticity. The majority of nonlocal crystal plasticity theories are predicated on the connection between gradients of slip and geometrically necessary dislocations. Due to the diversity of existing nonlocal crystal plasticity theories, a review, summary, and comparison of representative model classes is presented in

  4. Generalized multiplicative error models: Asymptotic inference and empirical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian

    This dissertation consists of two parts. The first part focuses on extended Multiplicative Error Models (MEM) that include two extreme cases for nonnegative series. These extreme cases are common phenomena in high-frequency financial time series. The Location MEM(p,q) model incorporates a location parameter so that the series are required to have positive lower bounds. The estimator for the location parameter turns out to be the minimum of all the observations and is shown to be consistent. The second case captures the nontrivial fraction of zero outcomes feature in a series and combines a so-called Zero-Augmented general F distribution with linear MEM(p,q). Under certain strict stationary and moment conditions, we establish a consistency and asymptotic normality of the semiparametric estimation for these two new models. The second part of this dissertation examines the differences and similarities between trades in the home market and trades in the foreign market of cross-listed stocks. We exploit the multiplicative framework to model trading duration, volume per trade and price volatility for Canadian shares that are cross-listed in the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX). We explore the clustering effect, interaction between trading variables, and the time needed for price equilibrium after a perturbation for each market. The clustering effect is studied through the use of univariate MEM(1,1) on each variable, while the interactions among duration, volume and price volatility are captured by a multivariate system of MEM(p,q). After estimating these models by a standard QMLE procedure, we exploit the Impulse Response function to compute the calendar time for a perturbation in these variables to be absorbed into price variance, and use common statistical tests to identify the difference between the two markets in each aspect. These differences are of considerable interest to traders, stock exchanges and policy makers.

  5. Relativistic model of anisotropic charged fluid sphere in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Neeraj; Pradhan, N.; Bansal, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    In this present paper, we present a class of static, spherically symmetric charged anisotropic fluid models of super dense stars in isotropic coordinates by considering a particular type of metric potential, a specific choice of electric field intensity E and pressure anisotropy factor Δ which involve parameters K (charge) and α (anisotropy) respectively. The solutions so obtained are utilized to construct the models for super-dense stars like neutron stars and strange quark stars. Our solutions are well behaved within the following ranges of different constant parameters. In the absence of pressure anisotropy and charge present model reduces to the isotropic model Pant et al. (Astrophys. Space Sci. 330:353-359, 2010). Our solution is well behaved in all respects for all values of X lying in the range 0< X ≤ 0.18, α lying in the range 0 ≤ α ≤6.6, K lying in the range 0< K ≤ 6.6 and Schwarzschild compactness parameter "u" lying in the range 0< u ≤ 0.38. Since our solution is well behaved for a wide ranges of the parameters, we can model many different types of ultra-cold compact stars like quark stars and neutron stars. We have shown that corresponding to X=0.088, α=0.6 and K=4.3 for which u=0.2054 and by assuming surface density ρb = 4.6888 × 10^{14} g/cm3 the mass and radius are found to be 1.51 M_{\\varTheta} and 10.90 km respectively. Assuming surface density ρb = 2 × 10^{14} g/cm3 the mass and radius for a neutron star candidate are found to be 2.313 M_{\\varTheta} and 16.690 km respectively. Hence we obtain masses and radii that fall in the range of what is generally expected for quark stars and neutron stars.

  6. Arctic Storms in a Regionally Refined Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesler, E. L.; Taylor, M.; Boslough, M.; Sullivan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Regional refinement in an atmospheric general circulation model is a new tool in atmospheric modeling. A regional high-resolution solution can be obtained without the computational cost of running a global high-resolution simulation as global climate models have increasing ability to resolve smaller spatial scales. Previous work has shown high-resolution simulations, i.e. 1/8 degree, and variable resolution utilities have resolved more fine-scale structure and mesoscale storms in the atmosphere than their low-resolution counterparts. We will describe an experiment designed to identify and study Arctic storms at two model resolutions. We used the Community Atmosphere Model, version 5, with the Spectral Element dynamical core at 1/8-degree and 1 degree horizontal resolutions to simulate the climatological year of 1850. Storms were detected using a low-pressure minima and vorticity maxima - finding algorithm. It was found the high-resolution 1/8-degree simulation had more storms in the Northern Hemisphere than the low-resolution 1-degree simulation. A variable resolution simulation with a global low resolution of 1-degree and a high-resolution refined region of 1/8 degree over a region in the Arctic is planned. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND NO. 2014-16460A

  7. Generalized Fiducial Inference for Binary Logistic Item Response Models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Hannig, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Generalized fiducial inference (GFI) has been proposed as an alternative to likelihood-based and Bayesian inference in mainstream statistics. Confidence intervals (CIs) can be constructed from a fiducial distribution on the parameter space in a fashion similar to those used with a Bayesian posterior distribution. However, no prior distribution needs to be specified, which renders GFI more suitable when no a priori information about model parameters is available. In the current paper, we apply GFI to a family of binary logistic item response theory models, which includes the two-parameter logistic (2PL), bifactor and exploratory item factor models as special cases. Asymptotic properties of the resulting fiducial distribution are discussed. Random draws from the fiducial distribution can be obtained by the proposed Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling algorithm. We investigate the finite-sample performance of our fiducial percentile CI and two commonly used Wald-type CIs associated with maximum likelihood (ML) estimation via Monte Carlo simulation. The use of GFI in high-dimensional exploratory item factor analysis was illustrated by the analysis of a set of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire data. PMID:26769340

  8. Toward a general psychological model of tension and suspense

    PubMed Central

    Lehne, Moritz; Koelsch, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Tension and suspense are powerful emotional experiences that occur in a wide variety of contexts (e.g., in music, film, literature, and everyday life). The omnipresence of tension and suspense suggests that they build on very basic cognitive and affective mechanisms. However, the psychological underpinnings of tension experiences remain largely unexplained, and tension and suspense are rarely discussed from a general, domain-independent perspective. In this paper, we argue that tension experiences in different contexts (e.g., musical tension or suspense in a movie) build on the same underlying psychological processes. We discuss key components of tension experiences and propose a domain-independent model of tension and suspense. According to this model, tension experiences originate from states of conflict, instability, dissonance, or uncertainty that trigger predictive processes directed at future events of emotional significance. We also discuss possible neural mechanisms underlying tension and suspense. The model provides a theoretical framework that can inform future empirical research on tension phenomena. PMID:25717309

  9. Generalized Symbolic Execution for Model Checking and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurshid, Sarfraz; Pasareanu, Corina; Visser, Willem; Kofmeyer, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Modern software systems, which often are concurrent and manipulate complex data structures must be extremely reliable. We present a novel framework based on symbolic execution, for automated checking of such systems. We provide a two-fold generalization of traditional symbolic execution based approaches: one, we define a program instrumentation, which enables standard model checkers to perform symbolic execution; two, we give a novel symbolic execution algorithm that handles dynamically allocated structures (e.g., lists and trees), method preconditions (e.g., acyclicity of lists), data (e.g., integers and strings) and concurrency. The program instrumentation enables a model checker to automatically explore program heap configurations (using a systematic treatment of aliasing) and manipulate logical formulae on program data values (using a decision procedure). We illustrate two applications of our framework: checking correctness of multi-threaded programs that take inputs from unbounded domains with complex structure and generation of non-isomorphic test inputs that satisfy a testing criterion. Our implementation for Java uses the Java PathFinder model checker.

  10. Bayesian Inference for Generalized Linear Models for Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gerwinn, Sebastian; Macke, Jakob H.; Bethge, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Generalized Linear Models (GLMs) are commonly used statistical methods for modelling the relationship between neural population activity and presented stimuli. When the dimension of the parameter space is large, strong regularization has to be used in order to fit GLMs to datasets of realistic size without overfitting. By imposing properly chosen priors over parameters, Bayesian inference provides an effective and principled approach for achieving regularization. Here we show how the posterior distribution over model parameters of GLMs can be approximated by a Gaussian using the Expectation Propagation algorithm. In this way, we obtain an estimate of the posterior mean and posterior covariance, allowing us to calculate Bayesian confidence intervals that characterize the uncertainty about the optimal solution. From the posterior we also obtain a different point estimate, namely the posterior mean as opposed to the commonly used maximum a posteriori estimate. We systematically compare the different inference techniques on simulated as well as on multi-electrode recordings of retinal ganglion cells, and explore the effects of the chosen prior and the performance measure used. We find that good performance can be achieved by choosing an Laplace prior together with the posterior mean estimate. PMID:20577627

  11. A Pacific Ocean general circulation model for satellite data assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Y.; Halpern, D.; Mechoso, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    A tropical Pacific Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) to be used in satellite data assimilation studies is described. The transfer of the OGCM from a CYBER-205 at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory to a CRAY-2 at NASA's Ames Research Center is documented. Two 3-year model integrations from identical initial conditions but performed on those two computers are compared. The model simulations are very similar to each other, as expected, but the simulations performed with the higher-precision CRAY-2 is smoother than that with the lower-precision CYBER-205. The CYBER-205 and CRAY-2 use 32 and 64-bit mantissa arithmetic, respectively. The major features of the oceanic circulation in the tropical Pacific, namely the North Equatorial Current, the North Equatorial Countercurrent, the South Equatorial Current, and the Equatorial Undercurrent, are realistically produced and their seasonal cycles are described. The OGCM provides a powerful tool for study of tropical oceans and for the assimilation of satellite altimetry data.

  12. Angular momentum conservation in a simplified Venus General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Richardson, M. I.

    2012-11-01

    Angular momentum (AM) conservation and transport are critical components of all General Circulation Model (GCM) simulations, and particularly for simulations of the Venus atmosphere. We show that a Venus GCM based upon the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) Flexible Modeling System (FMS) GCM conserves angular momentum to better than 2% per 1000 Venus years (≈225,000 Earth days) of integration under the extreme conditions of a simplified Venus simulation with low surface torques. With no topography in the GCM, physical torques due to surface/atmosphere frictional interactions dominate the acceleration of an initially stationary atmosphere and provide more than four times the angular momentum of solid body co-rotation over an integration period of 100 Venus years. During the subsequent steady state period of 200 Venus years negligible mean physical torques cause variation in the total angular momentum of less than 5% and produce a stable multi-century simulation. Diffusion and damping processes within the GCM account for AM losses of less than 0.2% per 1000 Venus years. This study provides a stable comparison point for other GCMs by employing a simplified forcing scheme. The diagnostics and analysis require little or no modification to the core GCM and are sufficiently robust to allow easy model inter-comparison.

  13. Correcting precipitation feature location in general circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Adam A. L.; Jenkinson, Mark; Ingram, William; Allen, Myles

    2014-12-01

    There is much evidence that precipitation responses to global warming involve wet regions becoming wetter and dry regions drier. This presents challenges for the interpretation of projections from general circulation models (GCMs) which have substantial biases in the location of precipitation features. While improving GCM simulated precipitation is the most desirable solution, adaptation and mitigation decisions must be made with the models already available. Many techniques have been developed to correct biases in grid point precipitation intensities, but few have been introduced to correct for location biases. Here, we describe a new technique for correcting the spatial and seasonal location of climatological precipitation features. We design this technique to respect the geometry of the problem (spherical spatial dimensions, with cyclic seasons), while conserving either precipitation intensities, or integrated precipitation amount. We discuss the mathematical basis of the technique and investigate its behaviour in different regimes. We find that the resulting warps depend smoothly on the most influential parameter, which determines the balance between smoothness and closeness of fit. We show that the technique is capable of removing more than half the RMS error in a model's climatology, obtaining consistently better results when conserving integrated precipitation. To demonstrate the ability of the new technique to improve simulated precipitation changes, we apply our transformations to historical anomalies and show that RMS error is reduced relative to GPCP's anomalies by approximately 10% for both types of warp. This verifies that errors in precipitation changes can be reduced by correcting underlying location errors in a GCM's climatology.

  14. The response of an ocean general circulation model to surface wind stress produced by an atmospheric general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, B.; Schneider, E.K.

    1995-10-01

    Two surface wind stress datasets for 1979-91, one based on observations and the other from an investigation of the COLA atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) with prescribed SST, are used to drive the GFDL ocean general circulation model. These two runs are referred to as the control and COLA experiments, respectively. Simulated SST and upper-ocean heat contents (HC) in the tropical Pacific Ocean are compared with observations and between experiments. Both simulation reproduced the observed mean SST and HC fields as well as their annual cycles realistically. Major errors common to both runs are colder than observed SST in the eastern equatorial ocean and HC in the western Pacific south of the equator, with errors generally larger in the COLA experiment. New errors arising from the AGCM wind forcing include higher SST near the South American coast throughout the year and weaker HC gradients along the equator in boreal spring. The former is associated with suppressed coastal upwelling by weak along shore AGCM winds, and the latter is caused by weaker equatorial easterlies in boreal spring. The low-frequency ENSO fluctuations are also realistic for both runs. Correlations between the observed and simulated SST anomalies from the COLA simulation are as high as those from the control run in the central equatorial Pacific. A major problem in the COLA simulation is the appearance of unrealistic tropical cold anomalies during the boreal spring of mature El Nino years. These anomalies propagate along the equator from the western Pacific to the eastern coast in about three months, and temporarily eliminate the warm SST and HC anomalies in the eastern Pacific. This erroneous oceanic response in the COLA simulation is caused by a reversal of the westerly wind anomalies on the equator, associated with an unrealistic southward shift of the ITCZ in boreal spring during El Nino events. 66 refs., 16 figs.

  15. Screening of nineteen unrelated families with generalized resistance to thyroid hormone for known point mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta gene and the detection of a new mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, K; Balzano, S; Sakurai, A; DeGroot, L J; Refetoff, S

    1991-01-01

    Generalized resistance to thyroid hormone (GRTH) is a syndrome characterized by impaired tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormone. Two distinct point mutations in the hormone binding domain of the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) beta have recently been identified in two unrelated families with GRTH. One, Mf, involves a replacement of the normal glycine-345 for arginine in exon 7 and another, Mh, replaces the normal proline-453 for histidine in exon 8. To probe for the presence of the Mf and Mh defect in 19 unrelated families with GRTH, we applied separate polymerase chain reactions using allele-specific oligonucleotide primers containing the normal and each of the two mutant nucleotides at the 3'-position. A total of 24 affected subjects and 13 normal family members were studied. The mode of inheritance was dominant in 13 families, was unknown in 5 families, and was clearly recessive in 1 family in which only the consanguineous subjects were affected. Primers containing the substitutions specific for Mf and Mh amplified exons 7 and 8, respectively, only in affected members of each of the two index families. Primers containing the normal sequences amplified exons 7 and 8 of the TR beta gene in all subjects except affected members of one family. In this family with recessively inherited GRTH, neither exon could be amplified using any combinations of primers and DNA blot revealed absence of all coding exons. These results indicate a major deletion of the TR beta gene, including both DNA and hormone binding domains. Since heterozygous members of this family are not affected, the presence of a single normal allele is sufficient for normal function of the TR beta. These data also support the hypothesis that in the dominant mode of GRTH inheritance the presence of an abnormal TR beta interferes with the function of the normal TR beta. Distinct mutations are probably responsible for GRTH in unrelated families. Images PMID:1991834

  16. Convex foundations for generalized MaxEnt models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frongillo, Rafael; Reid, Mark D.

    2014-12-01

    We present an approach to maximum entropy models that highlights the convex geometry and duality of generalized exponential families (GEFs) and their connection to Bregman divergences. Using our framework, we are able to resolve a puzzling aspect of the bijection of Banerjee and coauthors between classical exponential families and what they call regular Bregman divergences. Their regularity condition rules out all but Bregman divergences generated from log-convex generators. We recover their bijection and show that a much broader class of divergences correspond to GEFs via two key observations: 1) Like classical exponential families, GEFs have a "cumulant" C whose subdifferential contains the mean: Eo˜pθ[φ(o)]∈∂C(θ) ; 2) Generalized relative entropy is a C-Bregman divergence between parameters: DF(pθ,pθ')= D C(θ,θ') , where DF becomes the KL divergence for F = -H. We also show that every incomplete market with cost function C can be expressed as a complete market, where the prices are constrained to be a GEF with cumulant C. This provides an entirely new interpretation of prediction markets, relating their design back to the principle of maximum entropy.

  17. Lattice Boltzmann model for generalized nonlinear wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Huilin; Ma, Changfeng

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, a lattice Boltzmann model is developed to solve a class of the nonlinear wave equations. Through selecting equilibrium distribution function and an amending function properly, the governing evolution equation can be recovered correctly according to our proposed scheme, in which the Chapman-Enskog expansion is employed. We validate the algorithm on some problems where analytic solutions are available, including the second-order telegraph equation, the nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation, and the damped, driven sine-Gordon equation. It is found that the numerical results agree well with the analytic solutions, which indicates that the present algorithm is very effective and can be used to solve more general nonlinear problems.

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Yarn Dynamics in a Generalized Twisting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, R.; Tao, X. M.; Xu, B. G.

    2016-04-01

    Twisting is an important process to form a continuous yarn from short fibres and to determine the structure and properties of the resultant yarn. This paper proposes a new theoretical model of yarn dynamics in a generalized twisting system, which deals with two important phenomena simultaneously, that is, twist generation and twist propagation. Equations of yarn motion are established and the boundary value problems are numerically solved by Newton-Raphson method. The simulation results are validated by experiments and a good agreement has been demonstrated for the system with a moving rigid cylinder as the twisting element. For the first time, influences of several parameters on the twisting process have been revealed in terms of twist efficiency of the moving rigid cylinder, propagation coefficients of twist trapping and congestion. It was found that the wrap angle and yarn tension have large influence on the twisting process, and the yarn torsional rigidity varies with the twisting parameters.

  19. Topological phase boundary in a generalized Kitaev model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da-Ping, Liu

    2016-05-01

    We study the effects of the next-nearest-neighbor hopping and nearest-neighbor interactions on topological phases in a one-dimensional generalized Kitaev model. In the noninteracting case, we define a topological number and calculate exactly the phase diagram of the system. With addition of the next-nearest-neighbor hopping, the change of phase boundary between the topological and trivial regions can be described by an effective shift of the chemical potential. In the interacting case, we obtain the entanglement spectrum, the degeneracies of which correspond to the topological edge modes, by using the infinite time-evolving block decimation method. The results show that the interactions change the phase boundary as adding an effective chemical potential which can be explained by the change of the average number of particles. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921704).

  20. Optimization in generalized linear models: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Eliana Costa e.; Correia, Aldina; Lopes, Isabel Cristina

    2016-06-01

    The maximum likelihood method is usually chosen to estimate the regression parameters of Generalized Linear Models (GLM) and also for hypothesis testing and goodness of fit tests. The classical method for estimating GLM parameters is the Fisher scores. In this work we propose to compute the estimates of the parameters with two alternative methods: a derivative-based optimization method, namely the BFGS method which is one of the most popular of the quasi-Newton algorithms, and the PSwarm derivative-free optimization method that combines features of a pattern search optimization method with a global Particle Swarm scheme. As a case study we use a dataset of biological parameters (phytoplankton) and chemical and environmental parameters of the water column of a Portuguese reservoir. The results show that, for this dataset, BFGS and PSwarm methods provided a better fit, than Fisher scores method, and can be good alternatives for finding the estimates for the parameters of a GLM.

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Yarn Dynamics in a Generalized Twisting System

    PubMed Central

    Yin, R.; Tao, X. M.; Xu, B. G.

    2016-01-01

    Twisting is an important process to form a continuous yarn from short fibres and to determine the structure and properties of the resultant yarn. This paper proposes a new theoretical model of yarn dynamics in a generalized twisting system, which deals with two important phenomena simultaneously, that is, twist generation and twist propagation. Equations of yarn motion are established and the boundary value problems are numerically solved by Newton-Raphson method. The simulation results are validated by experiments and a good agreement has been demonstrated for the system with a moving rigid cylinder as the twisting element. For the first time, influences of several parameters on the twisting process have been revealed in terms of twist efficiency of the moving rigid cylinder, propagation coefficients of twist trapping and congestion. It was found that the wrap angle and yarn tension have large influence on the twisting process, and the yarn torsional rigidity varies with the twisting parameters. PMID:27079187

  2. Sensitivity simulations of superparameterised convection in a general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybka, Harald; Tost, Holger

    2015-04-01

    Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) covering a horizontal grid spacing from a few hundred meters up to a few kilometers have been used to explicitly resolve small-scale and mesoscale processes. Special attention has been paid to realistically represent cloud dynamics and cloud microphysics involving cloud droplets, ice crystals, graupel and aerosols. The entire variety of physical processes on the small-scale interacts with the larger-scale circulation and has to be parameterised on the coarse grid of a general circulation model (GCM). Since more than a decade an approach to connect these two types of models which act on different scales has been developed to resolve cloud processes and their interactions with the large-scale flow. The concept is to use an ensemble of CRM grid cells in a 2D or 3D configuration in each grid cell of the GCM to explicitly represent small-scale processes avoiding the use of convection and large-scale cloud parameterisations which are a major source for uncertainties regarding clouds. The idea is commonly known as superparameterisation or cloud-resolving convection parameterisation. This study presents different simulations of an adapted Earth System Model (ESM) connected to a CRM which acts as a superparameterisation. Simulations have been performed with the ECHAM/MESSy atmospheric chemistry (EMAC) model comparing conventional GCM runs (including convection and large-scale cloud parameterisations) with the improved superparameterised EMAC (SP-EMAC) modeling one year with prescribed sea surface temperatures and sea ice content. The sensitivity of atmospheric temperature, precipiation patterns, cloud amount and types is observed changing the embedded CRM represenation (orientation, width, no. of CRM cells, 2D vs. 3D). Additionally, we also evaluate the radiation balance with the new model configuration, and systematically analyse the impact of tunable parameters on the radiation budget and hydrological cycle. Furthermore, the subgrid

  3. Beta-glucosidase I variants with improved properties

    DOEpatents

    Bott, Richard R.; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley; Goedegebuur, Frits; Hommes, Ronaldus Wilhelmus; Kralj, Slavko; Kruithof, Paulien; Nikolaev, Igor; Van Der Kley, Wilhelmus Antonious Hendricus; Van Lieshout, Johannes Franciscus Thomas; Van Stigt Thans, Sander

    2016-09-20

    The present disclosure is generally directed to enzymes and in particular beta-glucosidase variants. Also described are nucleic acids encoding beta-glucosidase variants, compositions comprising beta-glucosidase variants, methods of using beta-glucosidase variants, and methods of identifying additional useful beta-glucosidase variants.

  4. Hospitable archean climates simulated by a general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Wolf, E T; Toon, O B

    2013-07-01

    Evidence from ancient sediments indicates that liquid water and primitive life were present during the Archean despite the faint young Sun. To date, studies of Archean climate typically utilize simplified one-dimensional models that ignore clouds and ice. Here, we use an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a mixed-layer ocean model to simulate the climate circa 2.8 billion years ago when the Sun was 20% dimmer than it is today. Surface properties are assumed to be equal to those of the present day, while ocean heat transport varies as a function of sea ice extent. Present climate is duplicated with 0.06 bar of CO2 or alternatively with 0.02 bar of CO2 and 0.001 bar of CH4. Hot Archean climates, as implied by some isotopic reconstructions of ancient marine cherts, are unattainable even in our warmest simulation having 0.2 bar of CO2 and 0.001 bar of CH4. However, cooler climates with significant polar ice, but still dominated by open ocean, can be maintained with modest greenhouse gas amounts, posing no contradiction with CO2 constraints deduced from paleosols or with practical limitations on CH4 due to the formation of optically thick organic hazes. Our results indicate that a weak version of the faint young Sun paradox, requiring only that some portion of the planet's surface maintain liquid water, may be resolved with moderate greenhouse gas inventories. Thus, hospitable late Archean climates are easily obtained in our climate model.

  5. Hospitable archean climates simulated by a general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Wolf, E T; Toon, O B

    2013-07-01

    Evidence from ancient sediments indicates that liquid water and primitive life were present during the Archean despite the faint young Sun. To date, studies of Archean climate typically utilize simplified one-dimensional models that ignore clouds and ice. Here, we use an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a mixed-layer ocean model to simulate the climate circa 2.8 billion years ago when the Sun was 20% dimmer than it is today. Surface properties are assumed to be equal to those of the present day, while ocean heat transport varies as a function of sea ice extent. Present climate is duplicated with 0.06 bar of CO2 or alternatively with 0.02 bar of CO2 and 0.001 bar of CH4. Hot Archean climates, as implied by some isotopic reconstructions of ancient marine cherts, are unattainable even in our warmest simulation having 0.2 bar of CO2 and 0.001 bar of CH4. However, cooler climates with significant polar ice, but still dominated by open ocean, can be maintained with modest greenhouse gas amounts, posing no contradiction with CO2 constraints deduced from paleosols or with practical limitations on CH4 due to the formation of optically thick organic hazes. Our results indicate that a weak version of the faint young Sun paradox, requiring only that some portion of the planet's surface maintain liquid water, may be resolved with moderate greenhouse gas inventories. Thus, hospitable late Archean climates are easily obtained in our climate model. PMID:23808659

  6. A model system to study the effects of beta-carotene on radon-stimulated oncogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Seifter, E.; Mendecki, J.; Dawson, H.; Goodwin, P.; Friedenthal, E.

    1992-12-31

    Work from our laboratory has established that, in mice, the radioprotective action of supplemental beta-carotene provides protection against several insults: low-dose, gamma-irradiation-enhanced mammary tumor appearance and death in C3H mice carrying the mammary tumor virus but not in mouse strains not carrying the virus; low-dose, whole-body, gamma-irradiation-stimulated lung metastasis of Swiss and C57 mice bearing transplants of 10{sup 4} Lewis lung tumor cells injected into the hind limb, but not causing lung tumors in mice inoculated only with a buffer carrier or the same carrier containing 10{sup 2} tumor cells. Similarly, gamma-irradiation or the radiomimetic chemical cyclophosphamide decreased the amount of viral inoculum (Moloney sarcoma virus) required to cause sarcomas at the injection site, i.e., it decreased the TD{sub 50}. We now propose long-term (20- to 30-mo) studies on the effects of exposure to radon in these systems. The second aim of this study (and major thrust of this paper) is to determine how supplemental beta-carotene might modify the effect of exposure to radon in mice subjected to the insults described.

  7. Preparation, characterization and molecular modeling studies of the inclusion complex of Caffeine with Beta-cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabu, Samikannu; Swaminathan, Meenakshisundaram; Sivakumar, Krishnamoorthy; Rajamohan, Rajaram

    2015-11-01

    The formation through supramolecular interaction of a host-guest inclusion complex of caffeine (CA) with nano-hydrophobic cavity beta-cyclodextrin (β-CD) is achieved by a physical mixture, a kneading method and a co-precipitation method. The formation of the inclusion complex of CA with β-CD in solution state is confirmed by UV-visible spectrophotometer, fluorescence spectrophotometer and time-resolved fluorescence spectrophotometer. The stoichiometry of the inclusion complex is 1:1; the imidazole ring and pyrimidine ring of caffeine is deeply entrapped in the beta-cyclodextrin as confirmed by spectral shifts. The Benesi-Hildebrand plot is used to calculate the binding constant of the inclusion complex of CA with β-CD at room temperature. The Gibbs free energy change of the inclusion complex process is calculated and the process is found to be spontaneous. The thermal stability of the inclusion complex of CA with β-CD is analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry. The crystal structure modification of a solid inclusion complex is confirmed by scanning electron microscopy image analysis. The formation of the inclusion complex of CA with β-CD in the solid phase is also confirmed by FT-IR and XRD. The formation of the inclusion complex between CA and β-CD, as confirmed by molecular docking studies, is in good relationship with the results obtained through different experimental methods.

  8. Digital terrain model generalization incorporating scale, semantic and cognitive constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partsinevelos, Panagiotis; Papadogiorgaki, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Cartographic generalization is a well-known process accommodating spatial data compression, visualization and comprehension under various scales. In the last few years, there are several international attempts to construct tangible GIS systems, forming real 3D surfaces using a vast number of mechanical parts along a matrix formation (i.e., bars, pistons, vacuums). Usually, moving bars upon a structured grid push a stretching membrane resulting in a smooth visualization for a given surface. Most of these attempts suffer either in their cost, accuracy, resolution and/or speed. Under this perspective, the present study proposes a surface generalization process that incorporates intrinsic constrains of tangible GIS systems including robotic-motor movement and surface stretching limitations. The main objective is to provide optimized visualizations of 3D digital terrain models with minimum loss of information. That is, to minimize the number of pixels in a raster dataset used to define a DTM, while reserving the surface information. This neighborhood type of pixel relations adheres to the basics of Self Organizing Map (SOM) artificial neural networks, which are often used for information abstraction since they are indicative of intrinsic statistical features contained in the input patterns and provide concise and characteristic representations. Nevertheless, SOM remains more like a black box procedure not capable to cope with possible particularities and semantics of the application at hand. E.g. for coastal monitoring applications, the near - coast areas, surrounding mountains and lakes are more important than other features and generalization should be "biased"-stratified to fulfill this requirement. Moreover, according to the application objectives, we extend the SOM algorithm to incorporate special types of information generalization by differentiating the underlying strategy based on topologic information of the objects included in the application. The final

  9. A general model for resolution of digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiupin; Gao, Wanrong

    2015-11-01

    For digital holographic microscopic imaging, the resolution in the reconstructed image is one of the most important parameters. To optimize the lateral resolution, a general model for the resolution of digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is proposed in this work, in which the effects of the sizes of each pixel, total area of the charge coupled device (CCD) and the microscopic objective lens are taken into account. Comparison between our model and others was carried out by calculating the point spread function (PSF) of DHM at different reconstruction distances and with different fill factors. It is shown that the effect of fill factors on the resolution of DHM becomes significant when the reconstruction distance is long. For high resolution DHM imaging the influence of fill factors must be taken into account when estimating the resolution of the reconstructed image. Furthermore, It is also demonstrated that the sidelobe of PSF can be cut effectively choosing appropriate values of the fill factors. Finally, the reconstructions of polyethylene microspheres have been implemented to demonstrate the theoretical analysis. These results obtained are helpful for estimation of the resolution and design of the DHM systems.

  10. A general stochastic model for sporophytic self-incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Billiard, Sylvain; Tran, Viet Chi

    2012-01-01

    Disentangling the processes leading populations to extinction is a major topic in ecology and conservation biology. The difficulty to find a mate in many species is one of these processes. Here, we investigate the impact of self-incompatibility in flowering plants, where several inter-compatible classes of individuals exist but individuals of the same class cannot mate. We model pollen limitation through different relationships between mate availability and fertilization success. After deriving a general stochastic model, we focus on the simple case of distylous plant species where only two classes of individuals exist. We first study the dynamics of such a species in a large population limit and then, we look for an approximation of the extinction probability in small populations. This leads us to consider inhomogeneous random walks on the positive quadrant. We compare the dynamics of distylous species to self-fertile species with and without inbreeding depression, to obtain the conditions under which self-incompatible species can be less sensitive to extinction while they can suffer more pollen limitation.

  11. A general geomorphological recession flow model for river basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Basudev; Nagesh Kumar, D.

    2013-08-01

    Recession flows in a basin are controlled by the temporal evolution of its active drainage network (ADN). The geomorphological recession flow model (GRFM) assumes that both the rate of flow generation per unit ADN length (q) and the speed at which ADN heads move downstream (c) remain constant during a recession event. Thereby, it connects the power law exponent of -dQ/dt versus Q (discharge at the outlet at time t) curve, α, with the structure of the drainage network, a fixed entity. In this study, we first reformulate the GRFM for Horton-Strahler networks and show that the geomorphic α (αg) is equal to D/>(D-1>), where D is the fractal dimension of the drainage network. We then propose a more general recession flow model by expressing both q and c as functions of Horton-Strahler stream order. We show that it is possible to have α =α g for a recession event even when q and c do not remain constant. The modified GRFM suggests that α is controlled by the spatial distribution of subsurface storage within the basin. By analyzing streamflow data from 39 U.S. Geological Survey basins, we show that α is having a power law relationship with recession curve peak, which indicates that the spatial distribution of subsurface storage varies across recession events.

  12. DISCOVERING PATIENT PHENOTYPES USING GENERALIZED LOW RANK MODELS

    PubMed Central

    SCHULER, ALEJANDRO; LIU, VINCENT; WAN, JOE; CALLAHAN, ALISON; UDELL, MADELEINE; STARK, DAVID E.; SHAH, NIGAM H.

    2016-01-01

    The practice of medicine is predicated on discovering commonalities or distinguishing characteristics among patients to inform corresponding treatment. Given a patient grouping (hereafter referred to as a phenotype), clinicians can implement a treatment pathway accounting for the underlying cause of disease in that phenotype. Traditionally, phenotypes have been discovered by intuition, experience in practice, and advancements in basic science, but these approaches are often heuristic, labor intensive, and can take decades to produce actionable knowledge. Although our understanding of disease has progressed substantially in the past century, there are still important domains in which our phenotypes are murky, such as in behavioral health or in hospital settings. To accelerate phenotype discovery, researchers have used machine learning to find patterns in electronic health records, but have often been thwarted by missing data, sparsity, and data heterogeneity. In this study, we use a flexible framework called Generalized Low Rank Modeling (GLRM) to overcome these barriers and discover phenotypes in two sources of patient data. First, we analyze data from the 2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample (NIS), which contains upwards of 8 million hospitalization records consisting of administrative codes and demographic information. Second, we analyze a small (N=1746), local dataset documenting the clinical progression of autism spectrum disorder patients using granular features from the electronic health record, including text from physician notes. We demonstrate that low rank modeling successfully captures known and putative phenotypes in these vastly different datasets. PMID:26776181

  13. Classification images in a very general decision model.

    PubMed

    Murray, Richard F

    2016-06-01

    Most of the theory supporting our understanding of classification images relies on standard signal detection models and the use of normally distributed stimulus noise. Here I show that the most common methods of calculating classification images by averaging stimulus noise samples within stimulus-response classes of trials are much more general than has previously been demonstrated, and that they give unbiased estimates of an observer's template for a wide range of decision rules and non-Gaussian stimulus noise distributions. These results are similar to findings on reverse correlation and related methods in the neurophysiology literature, but here I formulate them in terms that are tailored to signal detection analyses of visual tasks, in order to make them more accessible and useful to visual psychophysicists. I examine 2AFC and yes-no designs. These findings make it possible to use and interpret classification images in tasks where observers' decision strategies may not conform to classic signal detection models such as the difference rule, and in tasks where the stimulus noise is non-Gaussian.

  14. Centering, Scale Indeterminacy, and Differential Item Functioning Detection in Hierarchical Generalized Linear and Generalized Linear Mixed Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheong, Yuk Fai; Kamata, Akihito

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we discuss and illustrate two centering and anchoring options available in differential item functioning (DIF) detection studies based on the hierarchical generalized linear and generalized linear mixed modeling frameworks. We compared and contrasted the assumptions of the two options, and examined the properties of their DIF…

  15. Outer atmospheres of cool stars. XIV - A model for the chromosphere and transition region of Beta Ceti (G9.5 III)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksson, K.; Linsky, J. L.; Simon, T.

    1983-01-01

    In the present chromospheric and transition region model for Beta Ceti, which is consistent with IUE spectra of the Mg II, C II, and C IV resonance lines, the Mg II h and k lines are treated in partial redistribution and the C II and C IV lines in complete redistribution. Computed line fluxes are presented for a range of models to show the range of permitted temperature structures. A comparison of the Beta Ceti model to models previously computed in a similar way for other stars shows a trend of decreasing chromospheric pressures and increasing geometric scales as single stars evolve across the transition region boundary. The present analysis also suggests that transition region pressures drastically decrease and geometric scales rapidly increase as single giant stars evolve to the right, toward the boudnary. Beta Ceti's exceptional X-ray brightness is discussed.

  16. Structural Modeling of Measurement Error in Generalized Linear Models with Rasch Measures as Covariates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battauz, Michela; Bellio, Ruggero

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a structural analysis for generalized linear models when some explanatory variables are measured with error and the measurement error variance is a function of the true variables. The focus is on latent variables investigated on the basis of questionnaires and estimated using item response theory models. Latent variable…

  17. Modelling of filariasis in East Java with Poisson regression and generalized Poisson regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnah

    2016-04-01

    Poisson regression has been used if the response variable is count data that based on the Poisson distribution. The Poisson distribution assumed equal dispersion. In fact, a situation where count data are over dispersion or under dispersion so that Poisson regression inappropriate because it may underestimate the standard errors and overstate the significance of the regression parameters, and consequently, giving misleading inference about the regression parameters. This paper suggests the generalized Poisson regression model to handling over dispersion and under dispersion on the Poisson regression model. The Poisson regression model and generalized Poisson regression model will be applied the number of filariasis cases in East Java. Based regression Poisson model the factors influence of filariasis are the percentage of families who don't behave clean and healthy living and the percentage of families who don't have a healthy house. The Poisson regression model occurs over dispersion so that we using generalized Poisson regression. The best generalized Poisson regression model showing the factor influence of filariasis is percentage of families who don't have healthy house. Interpretation of result the model is each additional 1 percentage of families who don't have healthy house will add 1 people filariasis patient.

  18. Meta-analysis for diagnostic accuracy studies: a new statistical model using beta-binomial distributions and bivariate copulas.

    PubMed

    Kuss, Oliver; Hoyer, Annika; Solms, Alexander

    2014-01-15

    There are still challenges when meta-analyzing data from studies on diagnostic accuracy. This is mainly due to the bivariate nature of the response where information on sensitivity and specificity must be summarized while accounting for their correlation within a single trial. In this paper, we propose a new statistical model for the meta-analysis for diagnostic accuracy studies. This model uses beta-binomial distributions for the marginal numbers of true positives and true negatives and links these margins by a bivariate copula distribution. The new model comes with all the features of the current standard model, a bivariate logistic regression model with random effects, but has the additional advantages of a closed likelihood function and a larger flexibility for the correlation structure of sensitivity and specificity. In a simulation study, which compares three copula models and two implementations of the standard model, the Plackett and the Gauss copula do rarely perform worse but frequently better than the standard model. We use an example from a meta-analysis to judge the diagnostic accuracy of telomerase (a urinary tumor marker) for the diagnosis of primary bladder cancer for illustration.

  19. Beta-diketiminato calcium and magnesium amides; model complexes for hydroamination catalysis.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Anthony G M; Casely, Ian J; Crimmin, Mark R; Hill, Michael S; Lachs, Jennifer R; Mahon, Mary F; Procopiou, Panayiotis A

    2009-05-18

    In a study relevant to group 2-mediated hydroamination catalysis, the reaction of the beta-diketiminato magnesium alkyl complex [{ArNC(Me)CHC(Me)NAr}Mg((n/s)Bu)] (Ar = 2,6-(i)Pr(2)C(6)H(3)) with benzylamine, 2-methoxyethylamine, pyrrolidine, and 2-methyl-4,4-diphenylpyrrolidine has been shown to yield the corresponding magnesium amide complexes [{ArNC(Me)CHC(Me)NAr}Mg(NR(1)R(2))] (R(1) = H, R(2) = CH(2)Ph, CH(2)CH(2)OMe; R(1) = R(2) = -(CH(2))(4)-, -CH(Me)CH(2)CPh(2)CH(2)-) within the first point of analysis (30 min) at room temperature in near quantitative yield as monitored by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Reactions proceeded non-reversibly, and the products have been characterized in both solution and the solid state. While single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated that the magnesium amides are dimeric in the solid state, with aggregation occurring via mu(2)-coordinated amide ligands, NMR studies suggest that for more sterically crowded amide ligands discreet monomeric species exist in solution. In contrast, the calcium complex [{ArNC(Me)CHC(Me)NAr}Ca{N(SiMe(3))(2)}(THF)] reacted reversibly with benzylamine at room temperature to form an equilibrium mixture of a calcium benzylamide and bis(trimethylsilyl)amide. A series of Pulsed-Gradient Spin-Echo NMR studies upon beta-diketiminato calcium amides were consistent with the formation of a dimer in solution. A van't Hoff analysis performed on this mixture allowed DeltaH degrees = -51.3 kJ mol(-1) and DeltaS degrees = -134 J mol(-1) of the protonolysis/dimerization reaction to be derived and the Gibbs' free energy to be calculated as DeltaG degrees (298 K) = -11.4 kJ mol(-1). PMID:19326917

  20. Improved bone status by the beta-blocker propranolol in an animal model of nutritional growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Lezón, Christian E; Olivera, María I; Bozzini, Clarisa; Mandalunis, Patricia; Alippi, Rosa M; Boyer, Patricia M

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the present research was to study if the beta-blocker propranolol, which is known to increase bone mass, could reverse the adverse skeletal effects of mild chronic food restriction in weanling rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control, control+propranolol (CP), nutritional growth retardation (NGR) and nutritional growth retardation+propranolol (NGRP). Control and CP rats were fed freely with the standard diet. NGR and NGRP rats received, for 4 weeks, 80 % of the amount of food consumed by the control and CP rats, respectively. Results were expressed as mean values and sem. Food restriction induced detrimental effects on body and femur weight and length (P < 0.05) and bone structural and geometrical properties (P < 0.001), confirming results previously shown in our laboratory. However, the beta-blocker overcame the deleterious effect of nutritional stress on load-bearing capacity, yielding load, bone stiffness, cross-sectional cortical bone area and second moment of inertia of the cross-section in relation to the horizontal axis without affecting anthropometric, histomorphometric and bone morphometric parameters. The results suggest that propranolol administration to mildly chronically undernourished rats markedly attenuates the impaired bone status in this animal model of growth retardation.

  1. Improved bone status by the beta-blocker propranolol in an animal model of nutritional growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Lezón, Christian E; Olivera, María I; Bozzini, Clarisa; Mandalunis, Patricia; Alippi, Rosa M; Boyer, Patricia M

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the present research was to study if the beta-blocker propranolol, which is known to increase bone mass, could reverse the adverse skeletal effects of mild chronic food restriction in weanling rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control, control+propranolol (CP), nutritional growth retardation (NGR) and nutritional growth retardation+propranolol (NGRP). Control and CP rats were fed freely with the standard diet. NGR and NGRP rats received, for 4 weeks, 80 % of the amount of food consumed by the control and CP rats, respectively. Results were expressed as mean values and sem. Food restriction induced detrimental effects on body and femur weight and length (P < 0.05) and bone structural and geometrical properties (P < 0.001), confirming results previously shown in our laboratory. However, the beta-blocker overcame the deleterious effect of nutritional stress on load-bearing capacity, yielding load, bone stiffness, cross-sectional cortical bone area and second moment of inertia of the cross-section in relation to the horizontal axis without affecting anthropometric, histomorphometric and bone morphometric parameters. The results suggest that propranolol administration to mildly chronically undernourished rats markedly attenuates the impaired bone status in this animal model of growth retardation. PMID:19537307

  2. Direct link between neutrinoless double beta decay and leptogenesis in a seesaw model with S{sub 4} symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Y. H.; Kang, Sin Kyu; Kim, C. S.; Nguyen, T. Phong

    2010-11-01

    We study how leptogenesis can be implemented in a seesaw model with S{sub 4} flavor symmetry, which leads to the neutrino tribimaximal mixing matrix and degenerate right-handed (RH) neutrino spectrum. Introducing a tiny soft S{sub 4} symmetry breaking term in the RH neutrino mass matrix, we show that the flavored resonant leptogenesis can be successfully realized, which can lower the seesaw scale much so, as to make it possible to probe in colliders. Even though such a tiny soft breaking term is essential for leptogenesis, it does not significantly affect the low-energy observables. We also investigate how the effective light neutrino mass || associated with neutrinoless double beta decay can be predicted along with the neutrino mass hierarchies by imposing experimental data of low-energy observables. We find a direct link between leptogenesis and neutrinoless double beta decay characterized by || through a high energy CP phase {phi}, which is correlated with low-energy Majorana CP phases. It is shown that our predictions of || for some fixed parameters of high energy physics can be constrained by the current observation of baryon asymmetry.

  3. Dose-response relationship between total cadmium intake and prevalence of renal dysfunction using general linear models.

    PubMed

    Hochi, Y; Kido, T; Nogawa, K; Kito, H; Shaikh, Z A

    1995-01-01

    To determine the maximum allowable intake limits for chronic dietary exposure to cadmium (Cd), the dose-response relationship between total Cd intake and prevalence of renal dysfunction was examined using general linear models considering the effect of age as a confounder. The target population comprised 1850 Cd-exposed and 294 non-exposed inhabitants of Ishikawa, Japan. They were divided into 96 subgroups by sex, age (four categories) cadmium concentrations in rice (three categories) and length of residence (four categories). As indicators of the cadmium-induced renal dysfunction, glucose, total protein, amino nitrogen, beta 2-microglobulin and metallothionein in urine were employed. General linear models were fitted statistically to the relationship among prevalence of renal dysfunction, sex, age and total Cd intake. Prevalence of abnormal urinary findings other than glucosuria had significant associations with total Cd intake. When total Cd intake corresponding to the mean prevalence of each abnormal urinary finding in the non-exposed subjects was calculated using general linear models, total Cd intakes corresponding to glucosuria, proteinuria, aminoaciduria (men only) and proteinuria with glucosuria were determined to be ca. 2.2-3.8 g and those corresponding to prevalence of metallothioneinuria were calculated as ca. 1.5-2.6 g. The low-molecular-weight protein in urine was confirmed to be a more sensitive indicator of renal dysfunction, and these total Cd intake values were close to those calculated previously by simple regression analysis, suggesting them to be reasonable values as the maximum allowable intake of Cd.

  4. A General Framework for Multiphysics Modeling Based on Numerical Averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunati, I.; Tomin, P.

    2014-12-01

    In the last years, multiphysics (hybrid) modeling has attracted increasing attention as a tool to bridge the gap between pore-scale processes and a continuum description at the meter-scale (laboratory scale). This approach is particularly appealing for complex nonlinear processes, such as multiphase flow, reactive transport, density-driven instabilities, and geomechanical coupling. We present a general framework that can be applied to all these classes of problems. The method is based on ideas from the Multiscale Finite-Volume method (MsFV), which has been originally developed for Darcy-scale application. Recently, we have reformulated MsFV starting with a local-global splitting, which allows us to retain the original degree of coupling for the local problems and to use spatiotemporal adaptive strategies. The new framework is based on the simple idea that different characteristic temporal scales are inherited from different spatial scales, and the global and the local problems are solved with different temporal resolutions. The global (coarse-scale) problem is constructed based on a numerical volume-averaging paradigm and a continuum (Darcy-scale) description is obtained by introducing additional simplifications (e.g., by assuming that pressure is the only independent variable at the coarse scale, we recover an extended Darcy's law). We demonstrate that it is possible to adaptively and dynamically couple the Darcy-scale and the pore-scale descriptions of multiphase flow in a single conceptual and computational framework. Pore-scale problems are solved only in the active front region where fluid distribution changes with time. In the rest of the domain, only a coarse description is employed. This framework can be applied to other important problems such as reactive transport and crack propagation. As it is based on a numerical upscaling paradigm, our method can be used to explore the limits of validity of macroscopic models and to illuminate the meaning of

  5. A generalized Brownian motion model for turbulent relative particle dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivamoggi, B. K.

    2016-08-01

    There is speculation that the difficulty in obtaining an extended range with Richardson-Obukhov scaling in both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations is due to the finiteness of the flow Reynolds number Re in these situations. In this paper, a generalized Brownian motion model has been applied to describe the relative particle dispersion problem in more realistic turbulent flows and to shed some light on this issue. The fluctuating pressure forces acting on a fluid particle are taken to be a colored noise and follow a stationary process and are described by the Uhlenbeck-Ornstein model while it appears plausible to take their correlation time to have a power-law dependence on Re, thus introducing a bridge between the Lagrangian quantities and the Eulerian parameters for this problem. This ansatz is in qualitative agreement with the possibility of a connection speculated earlier by Corrsin [26] between the white-noise representation for the fluctuating pressure forces and the large-Re assumption in the Kolmogorov [4] theory for the 3D fully developed turbulence (FDT) as well as a similar argument of Monin and Yaglom [23] and a similar result of Sawford [13] and Borgas and Sawford [24]. It also provides an insight into the result that the Richardson-Obukhov scaling holds only in the infinite-Re limit and disappears otherwise. This ansatz further provides a determination of the Richardson-Obukhov constant g as a function of Re, with an asymptotic constant value in the infinite-Re limit. It is shown to lead to full agreement, in the small-Re limit as well, with the Batchelor-Townsend [27] scaling for the rate of change of the mean square interparticle separation in 3D FDT, hence validating its soundness further.

  6. Venusian Polar Vortex reproduced by a general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Takagi, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    Unlike the polar vortices observed in the Earth, Mars and Titan atmospheres, the observed Venus polar vortex is warmer than the mid-latitudes at cloud-top levels (~65 km). This warm polar vortex is zonally surrounded by a cold latitude band located at ~60 degree latitude, which is a unique feature called 'cold collar' in the Venus atmosphere [e.g. Taylor et al. 1980; Piccioni et al. 2007]. Although these structures have been observed in numerous previous observations, the formation mechanism is still unknown. In addition, an axi-asymmetric feature is always seen in the warm polar vortex. It changes temporally and sometimes shows a hot polar dipole or S-shaped structure as shown by a lot of infrared measurements [e.g. Garate-Lopez et al. 2013; 2015]. However, its vertical structure has not been investigated. To solve these problems, we performed a numerical simulation of the Venus atmospheric circulation using a general circulation model named AFES for Venus [Sugimoto et al. 2014] and reproduced these puzzling features.And then, the reproduced structures of the atmosphere and the axi-asymmetirc feature are compared with some previous observational results.In addition, the quasi-periodical zonal-mean zonal wind fluctuation is also seen in the Venus polar vortex reproduced in our model. This might be able to explain some observational results [e.g. Luz et al. 2007] and implies that the polar vacillation might also occur in the Venus atmosphere, which is silimar to the Earth's polar atmosphere. We will also show some initial results about this point in this presentation.

  7. Transforming growth factor-beta-induced stimulation of formation of collagen fiber network and anti-fibrotic effect of taurine in an in vitro model of hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Junya; Ido, Akio; Hasuike, Satoru; Uto, Hirofumi; Hori, Takeshi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Murakami, Shigeru; Terano, Akira; Tsubouchi, Hirohito

    2004-09-01

    The cell strain M, which was established from normal rat liver cells, is characterized by the active formation of a collagen fiber network. In this study, we investigated the characterization of M cells and evaluated the anti-fibrogenic effects of taurine using this culture system. M cells expressed cytokeratin (CK)8, CK18, vimentin, and alpha-smooth muscle actin, whereas expression of CK-19 or desmin was not detected. Also, M cells expressed transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, -beta2, and TGF-beta type I and II receptors, and treatment with TGF-beta1 (1ng/ml) for 6 days markedly stimulated the formation of a collagen fiber network and expression of procollagen alpha1(I) mRNA. When M cells were treated with various concentrations of taurine (10-50mM), network formation and procollagen alpha1(I) expression were significantly suppressed in a dose dependent manner. Additionally, even in the presence of TGF-beta1, taurine treatment effectively reduced the formation of a collagen fiber network. These results suggest that M cells exhibit features of not only hepatocytes but also myofibroblasts, and TGF-beta1 plays an important role in the formation of collagen fiber networks in this culture system. Additionally, this M cell culture system is appropriate for use as an in vitro model of hepatic fibrosis in the evaluation of the anti-fibrogenic effects of various agents.

  8. Amino acid sequence of the alpha subunit and computer modelling of the alpha and beta subunits of echicetin from the venom of Echis carinatus (saw-scaled viper).

    PubMed

    Polgár, J; Magnenat, E M; Peitsch, M C; Wells, T N; Saqi, M S; Clemetson, K J

    1997-04-15

    Echicetin, a heterodimeric protein from the venom of Echis carinatus, binds to platelet glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) and so inhibits platelet aggregation or agglutination induced by various platelet agonists acting via GPIb. The amino acid sequence of the beta subunit of echicetin has been reported and found to belong to the recently identified snake venom subclass of the C-type lectin protein family. Echicetin alpha and beta subunits were purified. N-terminal sequence analysis provided direct evidence that the protein purified was echicetin. The paper presents the complete amino acid sequence of the alpha subunit and computer models of the alpha and beta subunits. The sequence of alpha echicetin is highly similar to the alpha and beta chains of various heterodimeric and homodimeric C-type lectins. Neither of the fully reduced and alkylated alpha or beta subunits of echicetin inhibited the platelet agglutination induced by von Willebrand factor-ristocetin or alpha-thrombin. Earlier reports about the inhibitory activity of reduced and alkylated echicetin beta subunit might have been due to partial reduction of the protein. PMID:9163349

  9. Late Early Silurian (Wenlockian) paleoclimate using a general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.T.; Hayashida, D.N.; Jacobson, S.R. ) Ross, C.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The Silurian Period (439--409 Ma) is synonymous with organic-rich, graptolitic, black shales. The physical conditions that prevailed during the Mid-Silurian drove the paleoclimate and controlled the deposition of this globally ubiquitous, lithotope. The paleoclimate in turn concomitantly created a paleoceanic environment favorable for the generation, deposition, and preservation of phytoplankton. A study of the relationship of the paleogeographic framework on the paleoclimate conditions that forced the deposition of this unique rock type is a problem suitable for study with a general circulation model. For this study the authors chose the Wenlockian Stage (430--424 Ma), the late Early Silurian. The Wenlockian physical world was composed of an oceanic northern hemisphere and a southern hemisphere dominated by the giant continent of Gondwana. The high latitude position of Gondwana placed much of its extensive margin in the mid-latitudes. Laurentia and Baltica occupied a tropical position while Siberia and Kazakh laid to the north. The Silurian fits a paleoatmosphere with an elevated greenhouse effect. Estimated Silurian values of atmospheric CO[sub 2] vary. They chose 1,120 ppm CO[sub 2], a value of 4[times] that of the pre-industrial level. The overall paleoclimate is forced by the diverse paleogeography of the two hemispheres. The northern hemisphere is dominated by strong zonality in all seasons. In contrast, the continental southern hemisphere reactors to the summer heating and winter cooling of Gondwana.

  10. Solar terminator wave in a Mars general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, J. M.; Moudden, Y.

    2009-09-01

    A solar terminator wave (TW) is found in high-resolution general circulation model (GCM) simulations of Mars' atmosphere. In the horizontal plane at 160 km the wave fronts follow the westward-moving dusk terminator, exhibit a horizontal wavelength of order 1800-3600 km, and are oriented about 10°-30° with respect to the terminator. The disturbance originates in the lower atmosphere due to dust absorption of solar radiation, propagates upward with an effective vertical wavelength of order 60 km, and increases in amplitude as the assumed dust distribution extends further away from the surface. The TW density amplitudes for low and elevated dust layers (both with opacities = 1.0) are of order ±15-20% and ±30% at 160 km. Temperature and wind perturbations for the former case are of order ±10-20K and ±30-75 m/s. The Mars TW shares many common features with a TW recently observed in Earth's thermosphere and simulated with a terrestrial GCM.

  11. Neutrinoless double beta decay and neutrino masses

    SciTech Connect

    Duerr, Michael

    2012-07-27

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) is a promising test for lepton number violating physics beyond the standard model (SM) of particle physics. There is a deep connection between this decay and the phenomenon of neutrino masses. In particular, we will discuss the relation between 0{nu}{beta}{beta} and Majorana neutrino masses provided by the so-called Schechter-Valle theorem in a quantitative way. Furthermore, we will present an experimental cross check to discriminate 0{nu}{beta}{beta} from unknown nuclear background using only one isotope, i.e., within one experiment.

  12. Robust experiment design for estimating myocardial {beta} adrenergic receptor concentration using PET

    SciTech Connect

    Salinas, Cristian; Muzic, Raymond F. Jr.; Ernsberger, Paul; Saidel, Gerald M.

    2007-01-15

    Myocardial {beta} adrenergic receptor ({beta}-AR) concentration can substantially decrease in congestive heart failure and significantly increase in chronic volume overload, such as in severe aortic valve regurgitation. Positron emission tomography (PET) with an appropriate ligand-receptor model can be used for noninvasive estimation of myocardial {beta}-AR concentration in vivo. An optimal design of the experiment protocol, however, is needed for sufficiently precise estimates of {beta}-AR concentration in a heterogeneous population. Standard methods of optimal design do not account for a heterogeneous population with a wide range of {beta}-AR concentrations and other physiological parameters and consequently are inadequate. To address this, we have developed a methodology to design a robust two-injection protocol that provides reliable estimates of myocardial {beta}-AR concentration in normal and pathologic states. A two-injection protocol of the high affinity {beta}-AR antagonist [{sup 18}F]-(S)-fluorocarazolol was designed based on a computer-generated (or synthetic) population incorporating a wide range of {beta}-AR concentrations. Timing and dosage of the ligand injections were optimally designed with minimax criterion to provide the least bad {beta}-AR estimates for the worst case in the synthetic population. This robust experiment design for PET was applied to experiments with pigs before and after {beta}-AR upregulation by chemical sympathectomy. Estimates of {beta}-AR concentration were found by minimizing the difference between the model-predicted and experimental PET data. With this robust protocol, estimates of {beta}-AR concentration showed high precision in both normal and pathologic states. The increase in {beta}-AR concentration after sympathectomy predicted noninvasively with PET is consistent with the increase shown by in vitro assays in pig myocardium. A robust experiment protocol was designed for PET that yields reliable estimates of {beta

  13. Allosteric equilibrium model explains steady-state coupling of beta-adrenergic receptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Ugur, O; Onaran, H O

    1997-05-01

    We used a simple experimental approach to clarify some contradictory predictions of the collision coupling and equilibrium models (e.g. ternary complex, two-state ternary complex or quinternary complex), which describe G-protein-mediated beta-adrenergic receptor signalling in essentially different manners. Analysis of the steady-state coupling of beta-adrenoceptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes showed that: (1) in the absence of an agonist, Gpp(NH)p (a hydrolysis-resistant analogue of GTP) can activate adenylate cyclase very slowly; (2) this activity reaches a steady state in approx. 5 h, the extent of activity depending on the concentration of the nucleotide; (3) isoprenaline-activated steady-state adenylate cyclase can be inactivated by propranolol (a competitive antagonist that relaxes the receptor activation), in the presence of Gpp(NH)p (which provides a virtual absence of GTPase) and millimolar concentrations of Mg2+ (the rate of this inactivation is relatively fast); (4) increasing the concentration of Gpp(NH)p can saturate the steady-state activity of adenylate cyclase. The saturated enzyme activity was lower than that induced by isoprenaline under the same conditions. This additional agonist-induced activation was reversible. In the light of these results, we conclude that agonist can also activate the guanine nucleotide-saturated system in the absence of GTPase by a mechanism other than guanine nucleotide exchange. We explain these phenomena in the framework of a quinternary complex model as an agonist-induced and receptor-mediated dissociation of guanine nucleotide-saturated residual heterotrimer, the equilibrium concentration of which is not necessarily zero. These results, which suggest a continuous interaction between receptor and G-protein, can hardly be accommodated by the collision coupling model that was originally suggested for the present experimental system and then applied to many other G-protein systems. Therefore we

  14. Allosteric equilibrium model explains steady-state coupling of beta-adrenergic receptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Ugur, O; Onaran, H O

    1997-01-01

    We used a simple experimental approach to clarify some contradictory predictions of the collision coupling and equilibrium models (e.g. ternary complex, two-state ternary complex or quinternary complex), which describe G-protein-mediated beta-adrenergic receptor signalling in essentially different manners. Analysis of the steady-state coupling of beta-adrenoceptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes showed that: (1) in the absence of an agonist, Gpp(NH)p (a hydrolysis-resistant analogue of GTP) can activate adenylate cyclase very slowly; (2) this activity reaches a steady state in approx. 5 h, the extent of activity depending on the concentration of the nucleotide; (3) isoprenaline-activated steady-state adenylate cyclase can be inactivated by propranolol (a competitive antagonist that relaxes the receptor activation), in the presence of Gpp(NH)p (which provides a virtual absence of GTPase) and millimolar concentrations of Mg2+ (the rate of this inactivation is relatively fast); (4) increasing the concentration of Gpp(NH)p can saturate the steady-state activity of adenylate cyclase. The saturated enzyme activity was lower than that induced by isoprenaline under the same conditions. This additional agonist-induced activation was reversible. In the light of these results, we conclude that agonist can also activate the guanine nucleotide-saturated system in the absence of GTPase by a mechanism other than guanine nucleotide exchange. We explain these phenomena in the framework of a quinternary complex model as an agonist-induced and receptor-mediated dissociation of guanine nucleotide-saturated residual heterotrimer, the equilibrium concentration of which is not necessarily zero. These results, which suggest a continuous interaction between receptor and G-protein, can hardly be accommodated by the collision coupling model that was originally suggested for the present experimental system and then applied to many other G-protein systems. Therefore we

  15. Triton College and General Motors: The Partnership Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonte, Richard; Magnesen, Vernon

    1983-01-01

    The cooperative training program between Illinois's Triton College and General Motors is described. Illustrates the mutual benefits of this problem and recommends that other colleges follow suit. (NJ)

  16. Mesozoic climates: General circulation models and the rock record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellwood, Bruce W.; Valdes, Paul J.

    2006-08-01

    General circulation models (GCMs) use the laws of physics and an understanding of past geography to simulate climatic responses. They are objective in character. However, they tend to require powerful computers to handle vast numbers of calculations. Nevertheless, it is now possible to compare results from different GCMs for a range of times and over a wide range of parameterisations for the past, present and future (e.g. in terms of predictions of surface air temperature, surface moisture, precipitation, etc.). GCMs are currently producing simulated climate predictions for the Mesozoic, which compare favourably with the distributions of climatically sensitive facies (e.g. coals, evaporites and palaeosols). They can be used effectively in the prediction of oceanic upwelling sites and the distribution of petroleum source rocks and phosphorites. Models also produce evaluations of other parameters that do not leave a geological record (e.g. cloud cover, snow cover) and equivocal phenomena such as storminess. Parameterisation of sub-grid scale processes is the main weakness in GCMs (e.g. land surfaces, convection, cloud behaviour) and model output for continental interiors is still too cold in winter by comparison with palaeontological data. The sedimentary and palaeontological record provides an important way that GCMs may themselves be evaluated and this is important because the same GCMs are being used currently to predict possible changes in future climate. The Mesozoic Earth was, by comparison with the present, an alien world, as we illustrate here by reference to late Triassic, late Jurassic and late Cretaceous simulations. Dense forests grew close to both poles but experienced months-long daylight in warm summers and months-long darkness in cold snowy winters. Ocean depths were warm (8 °C or more to the ocean floor) and reefs, with corals, grew 10° of latitude further north and south than at the present time. The whole Earth was warmer than now by 6 °C or

  17. Fitting host-parasitoid models with CV2 > 1 using hierarchical generalized linear models.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, J N; Noh, M S; Lee, Y; Alston, R D; Norowi, H M; Powell, W; Rennolls, K

    2000-01-01

    The powerful general Pacala-Hassell host-parasitoid model for a patchy environment, which allows host density-dependent heterogeneity (HDD) to be distinguished from between-patch, host density-independent heterogeneity (HDI), is reformulated within the class of the generalized linear model (GLM) family. This improves accessibility through the provision of general software within well-known statistical systems, and allows a rich variety of models to be formulated. Covariates such as age class, host density and abiotic factors may be included easily. For the case where there is no HDI, the formulation is a simple GLM. When there is HDI in addition to HDD, the formulation is a hierarchical generalized linear model. Two forms of HDI model are considered, both with between-patch variability: one has binomial variation within patches and one has extra-binomial, overdispersed variation within patches. Examples are given demonstrating parameter estimation with standard errors, and hypothesis testing. For one example given, the extra-binomial component of the HDI heterogeneity in parasitism is itself shown to be strongly density dependent. PMID:11416907

  18. Evaluation of the Majorana phases of a general Majorana neutrino mass matrix: Testability of hierarchical flavour models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Rome; Chakraborty, Mainak; Ghosal, Ambar

    2016-03-01

    We evaluate the Majorana phases for a general 3 × 3 complex symmetric neutrino mass matrix on the basis of Mohapatra-Rodejohann's phase convention using the three rephasing invariant quantities I12, I13 and I23 proposed by Sarkar and Singh. We find them interesting as they allow us to evaluate each Majorana phase in a model independent way even if one eigenvalue is zero. Utilizing the solution of a general complex symmetric mass matrix for eigenvalues and mixing angles we determine the Majorana phases for both the hierarchies, normal and inverted, taking into account the constraints from neutrino oscillation global fit data as well as bound on the sum of the three light neutrino masses (Σimi) and the neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ0ν) parameter |m11 |. This methodology of finding the Majorana phases is applied thereafter in some predictive models for both the hierarchical cases (normal and inverted) to evaluate the corresponding Majorana phases and it is shown that all the sub cases presented in inverted hierarchy section can be realized in a model with texture zeros and scaling ansatz within the framework of inverse seesaw although one of the sub cases following the normal hierarchy is yet to be established. Except the case of quasi degenerate neutrinos, the methodology obtained in this work is able to evaluate the corresponding Majorana phases, given any model of neutrino masses.

  19. Charged lepton flavour violcxmation and neutrinoless double beta decay in left-right symmetric models with type I+II seesaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, Debasish; Dasgupta, Arnab

    2016-07-01

    We study the new physics contributions to neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) half-life and lepton flavour violation (LFV) amplitude within the framework of the minimal left-right symmetric model (MLRSM). Considering all possible new physics contributions to 0 νββ and charged lepton flavour violation μ → eγ , μ → 3 e in MLRSM, we constrain the parameter space of the model from the requirement of satisfying existing experimental bounds. Assuming the breaking scale of the left-right symmetry to be O (1) TeV accessible at ongoing and near future collider experiments, we consider the most general type I+II seesaw mechanism for the origin of tiny neutrino masses. Choosing the relative contribution of the type II seesaw term allows us to calculate the right handed neutrino mass matrix as well as Dirac neutrino mass matrix as a function of the model parameters, required for the calculation of 0νββ and LFV amplitudes. We show that such a general type I+II seesaw structure results in more allowed parameter space compared to individual type I or type II seesaw cases considered in earlier works. In particular, we show that the doubly charged scalar masses M Δ are allowed to be smaller than the heaviest right handed neutrino mass M N from the present experimental bounds in these scenarios which is in contrast to earlier results with individual type I or type II seesaw showing M Δ > M N .

  20. Ocean General Circulation From a Global Eddy-Resolving Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semtner, Albert J.; Chervin, Robert M.

    1992-04-01

    A concerted effort has been made to simulate the global ocean circulation with resolved eddies, using a highly optimized model on the best available supercomputer. An earlier 20-year spin-up has been extended for 12.5 additional years: the first 2.5 with continued annual mean forcing and the final 10.0 with climatological monthly forcing. Model output archived at 3-day intervals has been analyzed into mean fields, standard deviations, products, and covariances on monthly, annual, and multiyear time scales. The multiyear results are examined here in order to give insight into the general circulation of the world ocean. The three-dimensional flow fields of the model are quite realistic, even though resolution of eddies in high latitudes is marginal with a 0.5°, 20-level grid. The use of seasonal forcing improves the simulation, especially in the tropics and high northern latitudes. Mid-latitude gyre circulations, western boundary currents, zonal equatorial flows, and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) all show mean and eddy characteristics similar to those observed. There is also some indication of eddy intensification of the mean flow of the ACC and of separated boundary jets. A global thermohaline circulation of North Atlantic Deep Water is identified in deep western boundary currents connected by the ACC. This deep circulation rises mainly in the equatorial Pacific. Several zonal jets are an integral part of this circulation near the equator. The deep flow rises toward the surface in a series of switchbacks. Much of the thermohaline return flow then follows an eddy-rich warm-water route through the Indonesian archipelago and around the southern tip of Africa. However, some intermediate level portions of the thermohaline circulation return south into the ACC and follow a cold water route through the Drake Passage. The representation of a global "conveyor belt" circulation with narrow and relatively high-speed currents along most of its path may be the most

  1. Activity of imipenem against VIM-1 metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in the murine thigh infection model.

    PubMed

    Daikos, G L; Panagiotakopoulou, A; Tzelepi, E; Loli, A; Tzouvelekis, L S; Miriagou, V

    2007-02-01

    The in-vivo activity of imipenem against VIM-1-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (VPKP) was assessed in a thigh infection model in neutropenic mice. Animals were infected with three VPKP isolates (imipenem MICs 2, 4 and 32 mg/L, respectively) and a susceptible clinical isolate (MIC 0.125 mg/L) that did not produce any beta-lactamase with broad-spectrum activity. Bacterial density at the site of infection was determined after imipenem treatment (30 and 60 mg/kg every 2 h for 24 h). The log(10) reduction in CFU/thigh was greatest for the wild-type isolate, intermediate for the two imipenem-susceptible VPKP isolates, and lowest for the imipenem-resistant VPKP isolate. Whilst in-vivo imipenem activity appeared reduced against in-vitro susceptible VIM-1 producers compared with a VIM-1-negative control, an increased drug dosage could moderate this reduction. PMID:17328735

  2. Activity of imipenem against VIM-1 metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in the murine thigh infection model.

    PubMed

    Daikos, G L; Panagiotakopoulou, A; Tzelepi, E; Loli, A; Tzouvelekis, L S; Miriagou, V

    2007-02-01

    The in-vivo activity of imipenem against VIM-1-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (VPKP) was assessed in a thigh infection model in neutropenic mice. Animals were infected with three VPKP isolates (imipenem MICs 2, 4 and 32 mg/L, respectively) and a susceptible clinical isolate (MIC 0.125 mg/L) that did not produce any beta-lactamase with broad-spectrum activity. Bacterial density at the site of infection was determined after imipenem treatment (30 and 60 mg/kg every 2 h for 24 h). The log(10) reduction in CFU/thigh was greatest for the wild-type isolate, intermediate for the two imipenem-susceptible VPKP isolates, and lowest for the imipenem-resistant VPKP isolate. Whilst in-vivo imipenem activity appeared reduced against in-vitro susceptible VIM-1 producers compared with a VIM-1-negative control, an increased drug dosage could moderate this reduction.

  3. Generalized charge-screening in relativistic Thomas-Fermi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we study the charge shielding within the relativistic Thomas-Fermi model for a wide range of electron number-densities and the atomic-number of screened ions. A generalized energy-density relation is obtained using the force-balance equation and taking into account the Chandrasekhar's relativistic electron degeneracy pressure. By numerically solving a second-order nonlinear differential equation, the Thomas-Fermi screening length is investigated, and the results are compared for three distinct regimes of the solid-density, warm-dense-matter, and white-dwarfs (WDs). It is revealed that our nonlinear screening theory is compatible with the exponentially decaying Thomas-Fermi-type shielding predicted by the linear response theory. Moreover, the variation of relative Thomas-Fermi screening length shows that extremely dense quantum electron fluids are relatively poor charge shielders. Calculation of the total number of screening electrons around a nucleus shows that there is a position of maximum number of screening localized electrons around the screened nucleus, which moves closer to the point-like nucleus by increase in the plasma number density but is unaffected due to increase in the atomic-number value. It is discovered that the total number of screening electrons, ( N s ∝ r T F 3 / r d 3 where rTF and rd are the Thomas-Fermi and interparticle distance, respectively) has a distinct limit for extremely dense plasmas such as WD-cores and neutron star crusts, which is unique for all given values of the atomic-number. This is equal to saying that in an ultrarelativistic degeneracy limit of electron-ion plasma, the screening length couples with the system dimensionality and the plasma becomes spherically self-similar. Current analysis can provide useful information on the effects of relativistic correction to the charge screening for a wide range of plasma density, such as the inertial-confined plasmas and compact stellar objects.

  4. A general moment expansion method for stochastic kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ale, Angelique; Kirk, Paul; Stumpf, Michael P. H.

    2013-05-01

    Moment approximation methods are gaining increasing attention for their use in the approximation of the stochastic kinetics of chemical reaction systems. In this paper we derive a general moment expansion method for any type of propensities and which allows expansion up to any number of moments. For some chemical reaction systems, more than two moments are necessary to describe the dynamic properties of the system, which the linear noise approximation is unable to provide. Moreover, also for systems for which the mean does not have a strong dependence on higher order moments, moment approximation methods give information about higher order moments of the underlying probability distribution. We demonstrate the method using a dimerisation reaction, Michaelis-Menten kinetics and a model of an oscillating p53 system. We show that for the dimerisation reaction and Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics system higher order moments have limited influence on the estimation of the mean, while for the p53 system, the solution for the mean can require several moments to converge to the average obtained from many stochastic simulations. We also find that agreement between lower order moments does not guarantee that higher moments will agree. Compared to stochastic simulations, our approach is numerically highly efficient at capturing the behaviour of stochastic systems in terms of the average and higher moments, and we provide expressions for the computational cost for different system sizes and orders of approximation. We show how the moment expansion method can be employed to efficiently quantify parameter sensitivity. Finally we investigate the effects of using too few moments on parameter estimation, and provide guidance on how to estimate if the distribution can be accurately approximated using only a few moments.

  5. MAGNETO-STATIC MODELING OF THE MIXED PLASMA BETA SOLAR ATMOSPHERE BASED ON SUNRISE/IMaX DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegelmann, T.; Solanki, S. K.; Neukirch, T.; Nickeler, D. H.; Pillet, V. Martínez; Borrero, J. M.

    2015-12-10

    Our aim is to model the three-dimensional magnetic field structure of the upper solar atmosphere, including regions of non-negligible plasma beta. We use high-resolution photospheric magnetic field measurements from SUNRISE/IMaX as the boundary condition for a magneto-static magnetic field model. The high resolution of IMaX allows us to resolve the interface region between the photosphere and corona, but modeling this region is challenging for the following reasons. While the coronal magnetic field is thought to be force-free (the Lorentz force vanishes), this is not the case in the mixed plasma β environment in the photosphere and lower chromosphere. In our model, pressure gradients and gravity forces are self-consistently taken into account and compensate for the non-vanishing Lorentz force. Above a certain height (about 2 Mm) the non-magnetic forces become very weak and consequently the magnetic field becomes almost force-free. Here, we apply a linear approach where the electric current density consists of a superposition of a field-line parallel current and a current perpendicular to the Sun's gravity field. We illustrate the prospects and limitations of this approach and give an outlook for an extension toward a nonlinear model.

  6. Venusian Polar Vortex reproduced in an Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Hiroki; Imamura, Takeshi; Takagi, Masahiro; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Kashimura, Hiroki

    The Venus atmosphere has a polar vortex rotating in the retrograde direction with a period of about three days. The vortex has a warm feature surrounded by a cold collar (e.g., Taylor et al. 1980; Piccioni et al. 2006). Although the Venusian polar vortex has been reported by many observations, its mechanism is still unknown. Elson (1982, 1989) examined the structure of the polar vortex by linear calculations. However, the background zonal wind assumed in the calculations was much stronger or weaker than those retrieved in the previous measurements (e.g., Peralta et al. 2008; Kouyama et al. 2012). Lee et al. (2010) and Yamamoto and Takahashi (2012) performed numerical simulations with general circulation models (GCMs) of the Venus atmosphere and obtained vertical structure in the polar region. However, the models included artificial forcing of Kelvin and/or Rossby waves. We have developed a new Venusian GCM by modifying the Atmospheric GCM For the Earth Simulator (Sugimoto et al. 2012; 2013). The basic equations of the GCM are primitive ones in the sigma coordinate on a sphere without topography. The model resolution is T42 (i.e., about 2.8 deg x 2.8 deg grids) and L60 (Deltaz is about 2 km). Rayleigh friction (sponge layer) in the upper layer (>80 km) is applied to prevent the reflection of waves, whose effect increases gradually with height. In the model, the atmosphere is dry and forced by the solar heating and Newtonian cooling. The vertical profile of the solar heating is based on Crisp (1986), and zonally averaged distribution is used. In addition diurnal component of the solar heating, which excites the diurnal and semi-diurnal tides, is also included. Newtonian cooling relaxes the temperature to the zonally uniform basic temperature which has a virtual static stability of Venus with almost neutral layers, and its coefficient is based on Crisp (1986). To prevent numerical instability, the biharmonic hyper-diffusion is included with 0.8 days of e-folding time

  7. Double beta decay, lepton flavor violation, and collider signatures of left-right symmetric models with spontaneous D -parity breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deppisch, Frank F.; Gonzalo, Tomas E.; Patra, Sudhanwa; Sahu, Narendra; Sarkar, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    We propose a class of left-right symmetric models (LRSMs) with spontaneous D -parity breaking, where S U (2 )R breaks at the TeV scale while discrete left-right symmetry breaks around 1 09 GeV . By embedding this framework in a nonsupersymmetric S O (10 ) grand unified theory (GUT) with Pati-Salam symmetry as the highest intermediate breaking step, we obtain gR/gL≈0.6 between the right- and left-handed gauge couplings at the TeV scale. This leads to a suppression of beyond the Standard Model phenomena induced by the right-handed gauge coupling. Here we focus specifically on the consequences for neutrinoless double beta decay, low-energy lepton flavor violation, and LHC signatures due to the suppressed right handed currents. Interestingly, the reduced gR allows us to interpret an excess of events observed recently in the range of 1.9 to 2.4 TeV by the CMS group at the LHC as the signature of a right-handed gauge boson in LRSMs with spontaneous D -parity breaking. Moreover, the reduced right-handed gauge coupling also strongly suppresses the nonstandard contribution of heavy states to the neutrinoless double beta decay rate as well as the amplitude of low-energy lepton flavor violating processes. In a dominant type-II seesaw mechanism of neutrino mass generation, we find that both sets of observables provide stringent and complimentary bounds which make it challenging to observe the scenario at the LHC.

  8. Generalized Parton Distributions and their Singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Anatoly Radyushkin

    2011-04-01

    A new approach to building models of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) is discussed that is based on the factorized DD (double distribution) Ansatz within the single-DD formalism. The latter was not used before, because reconstructing GPDs from the forward limit one should start in this case with a very singular function $f(\\beta)/\\beta$ rather than with the usual parton density $f(\\beta)$. This results in a non-integrable singularity at $\\beta=0$ exaggerated by the fact that $f(\\beta)$'s, on their own, have a singular $\\beta^{-a}$ Regge behavior for small $\\beta$. It is shown that the singularity is regulated within the GPD model of Szczepaniak et al., in which the Regge behavior is implanted through a subtracted dispersion relation for the hadron-parton scattering amplitude. It is demonstrated that using proper softening of the quark-hadron vertices in the regions of large parton virtualities results in model GPDs $H(x,\\xi)$ that are finite and continuous at the "border point'' $x=\\xi$. Using a simple input forward distribution, we illustrate the implementation of the new approach for explicit construction of model GPDs. As a further development, a more general method of regulating the $\\beta=0$ singularities is proposed that is based on the separation of the initial single DD $f(\\beta, \\alpha)$ into the "plus'' part $[f(\\beta,\\alpha)]_{+}$ and the $D$-term. It is demonstrated that the "DD+D'' separation method allows to (re)derive GPD sum rules that relate the difference between the forward distribution $f(x)=H(x,0)$ and the border function $H(x,x)$ with the $D$-term function $D(\\alpha)$.

  9. Generalized parton distributions and their singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, A. V.

    2011-04-01

    A new approach to building models of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) is discussed that is based on the factorized DD (double distribution) ansatz within the single-DD formalism. The latter was not used before, because reconstructing GPDs from the forward limit one should start in this case with a very singular function f({beta})/{beta} rather than with the usual parton density f({beta}). This results in a nonintegrable singularity at {beta}=0 exaggerated by the fact that f({beta})'s, on their own, have a singular {beta}{sup -a} Regge behavior for small {beta}. It is shown that the singularity is regulated within the GPD model of Szczepaniak et al., in which the Regge behavior is implanted through a subtracted dispersion relation for the hadron-parton scattering amplitude. It is demonstrated that using proper softening of the quark-hadron vertices in the regions of large parton virtualities results in model GPDs H(x,{xi}) that are finite and continuous at the 'border point' x={xi}. Using a simple input forward distribution, we illustrate implementation of the new approach for explicit construction of model GPDs. As a further development, a more general method of regulating the {beta}=0 singularities is proposed that is based on the separation of the initial single DD f({beta},{alpha}) into the 'plus' part [f({beta},{alpha})]{sub +} and the D term. It is demonstrated that the ''DD+D'' separation method allows one to (re)derive GPD sum rules that relate the difference between the forward distribution f(x)=H(x,0) and the border function H(x,x) with the D-term function D({alpha}).

  10. Modeling Classroom Discourse: Do Models That Predict Dialogic Instruction Properties Generalize across Populations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samei, Borhan; Olney, Andrew M.; Kelly, Sean; Nystrand, Martin; D'Mello, Sidney; Blanchard, Nathan; Graesser, Art

    2015-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the effective use of dialogic instruction has a positive impact on student achievement. In this study, we investigate whether linguistic features used to classify properties of classroom discourse generalize across different subpopulations. Results showed that the machine learned models perform equally well when…

  11. Documentation of the GLAS fourth order general circulation model. Volume 1: Model documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalnay, E.; Balgovind, R.; Chao, W.; Edelmann, J.; Pfaendtner, J.; Takacs, L.; Takano, K.

    1983-01-01

    The volume 1, of a 3 volume technical memoranda which contains a documentation of the GLAS Fourth Order General Circulation Model is presented. Volume 1 contains the documentation, description of the stratospheric/tropospheric extension, user's guide, climatological boundary data, and some climate simulation studies.

  12. Selective destruction of mouse islet beta cells by human T lymphocytes in a newly-established humanized type 1 diabetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yong; Guo, Chengshan; Hwang, David; Lin, Brian; Dingeldein, Michael; Mihailescu, Dan; Sam, Susan; Sidhwani, Seema; Zhang, Yongkang; Jain, Sumit; Skidgel, Randal A.; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Mazzone, Theodore; Holterman, Mark J.

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Establish a human immune-mediated type 1 diabetic model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. {yields} Using the irradiated diabetic NOD mouse spleen mononuclear cells as trigger. {yields} The islet {beta} cells were selectively destroyed by infiltrated human T cells. {yields} The model can facilitate translational research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. -- Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by a T cell-mediated autoimmune response that leads to the loss of insulin-producing {beta} cells. The optimal preclinical testing of promising therapies would be aided by a humanized immune-mediated T1D model. We develop this model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. The selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta} cells was mediated by human T lymphocytes after an initial trigger was supplied by the injection of irradiated spleen mononuclear cells (SMC) from diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. This resulted in severe insulitis, a marked loss of total {beta}-cell mass, and other related phenotypes of T1D. The migration of human T cells to pancreatic islets was controlled by the {beta} cell-produced highly conserved chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4, as demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments using antibody to CXCR4. The specificity of humanized T cell-mediated immune responses against islet {beta} cells was generated by the local inflammatory microenvironment in pancreatic islets including human CD4{sup +} T cell infiltration and clonal expansion, and the mouse islet {beta}-cell-derived CD1d-mediated human iNKT activation. The selective destruction of mouse islet {beta} cells by a human T cell-mediated immune response in this humanized T1D model can mimic those observed in T1D patients. This model can provide a valuable tool for translational research into T1D.

  13. Investigation of the effect of erythrosine B on amyloid beta peptide using molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juho; Kwon, Inchan; Jang, Seung Soon; Cho, Art E

    2016-04-01

    Neurotoxic plaques composed of 39 to 42 residue-long amyloid beta peptides (Aβs) are copiously present in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Erythrosine B (ER), a xanthene food dye, inhibits the formation of Aβ fibrils and Aβ-associated cytotoxicity in vitro. Here, in an attempt to elucidate the inhibition mechanism, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to demonstrate the conformational change of Aβ40 induced by ER molecules in atomistic detail. During the simulation, the ER bound to the surfaces of both N-terminus and C-terminus regions of Aβ40. Our result shows that ER interacts with the aromatic side chains at the N-terminus region resulting in destabilization of the inter-chain stacking of Aβ40. Moreover, the stablility of the helical structures at the residues from 13 to 16 suggests that ER disturbs conformational transition of Aβ40. At the C-terminus region, the bound ER blocks water molecules and stabilizes the α-helical structure. Regardless of the number of ER molecules used, the interruption of the formation of the salt-bridge between aspartic acid 23 and lysine 28 occurred. To further validate our analysis, binding free energies of ER at each binding site were evaluated. The finding of stronger binding energy at the N-terminus region supports an inhibition mechanism induced by stacking interaction between ER and phenylalanine. These findings could aid present and future treatment studies for AD by clarifying the inhibition mechanism of ER on the conformational transition of Aβ40 at the molecular level. PMID:27021211

  14. Development of an atmospheric model based on a generalized vertical coordinate. Final report, September 12, 1991--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Akio; Konor, C.S.

    1997-12-31

    There are great conceptual advantages in the use of an isentropic vertical coordinate in atmospheric models. Design of such a model, however, requires to overcome computational problems due to intersection of coordinate surfaces with the earth`s surface. Under this project, the authors have completed the development of a model based on a generalized vertical coordinate, {zeta} = F({Theta}, p, p{sub s}), in which an isentropic coordinate can be combined with a terrain-following {sigma}-coordinate a smooth transition between the two. One of the key issues in developing such a model is to satisfy the consistency between the predictions of pressure and potential temperature. In the model, the consistency is satisfied by the use of an equation that determines the vertical mass flux. A procedure to properly choose {zeta} = F({Theta}, p, p{sub s}) is also developed, which guarantees that {zeta} is a monotonic function of height even when unstable stratification occurs. There are two versions of the model constructed in parallel: one is the middle-latitude {beta}-plane version and the other is the global version. Both of these versions include moisture prediction, relaxed large-scale condensation and relaxed moist-convective adjustment schemes. A well-mixed planetary boundary layer (PBL) is also added.

  15. Hydraulic fracturing model based on the discrete fracture model and the generalized J integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Liu, Z. F.; Wang, X. H.; Zeng, B.

    2016-08-01

    The hydraulic fracturing technique is an effective stimulation for low permeability reservoirs. In fracturing models, one key point is to accurately calculate the flux across the fracture surface and the stress intensity factor. To achieve high precision, the discrete fracture model is recommended to calculate the flux. Using the generalized J integral, the present work obtains an accurate simulation of the stress intensity factor. Based on the above factors, an alternative hydraulic fracturing model is presented. Examples are included to demonstrate the reliability of the proposed model and its ability to model the fracture propagation. Subsequently, the model is used to describe the relationship between the geometry of the fracture and the fracturing equipment parameters. The numerical results indicate that the working pressure and the pump power will significantly influence the fracturing process.

  16. Optimal Scaling of Interaction Effects in Generalized Linear Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rosmalen, Joost; Koning, Alex J.; Groenen, Patrick J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Multiplicative interaction models, such as Goodman's (1981) RC(M) association models, can be a useful tool for analyzing the content of interaction effects. However, most models for interaction effects are suitable only for data sets with two or three predictor variables. Here, we discuss an optimal scaling model for analyzing the content of…

  17. Modeling of turbulent supersonic H2-air combustion with an improved joint beta PDF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baurle, R. A.; Hassan, H. A.

    1991-01-01

    Attempts at modeling recent experiments of Cheng et al. indicated that discrepancies between theory and experiment can be a result of the form of assumed probability density function (PDF) and/or the turbulence model employed. Improvements in both the form of the assumed PDF and the turbulence model are presented. The results are again used to compare with measurements. Initial comparisons are encouraging.

  18. Hyperbolic value addition and general models of animal choice.

    PubMed

    Mazur, J E

    2001-01-01

    Three mathematical models of choice--the contextual-choice model (R. Grace, 1994), delay-reduction theory (N. Squires & E. Fantino, 1971), and a new model called the hyperbolic value-added model--were compared in their ability to predict the results from a wide variety of experiments with animal subjects. When supplied with 2 or 3 free parameters, all 3 models made fairly accurate predictions for a large set of experiments that used concurrent-chain procedures. One advantage of the hyperbolic value-added model is that it is derived from a simpler model that makes accurate predictions for many experiments using discrete-trial adjusting-delay procedures. Some results favor the hyperbolic value-added model and delay-reduction theory over the contextual-choice model, but more data are needed from choice situations for which the models make distinctly different predictions.

  19. Generalized charge-screening in relativistic Thomas–Fermi model

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we study the charge shielding within the relativistic Thomas-Fermi model for a wide range of electron number-densities and the atomic-number of screened ions. A generalized energy-density relation is obtained using the force-balance equation and taking into account the Chandrasekhar's relativistic electron degeneracy pressure. By numerically solving a second-order nonlinear differential equation, the Thomas-Fermi screening length is investigated, and the results are compared for three distinct regimes of the solid-density, warm-dense-matter, and white-dwarfs (WDs). It is revealed that our nonlinear screening theory is compatible with the exponentially decaying Thomas-Fermi-type shielding predicted by the linear response theory. Moreover, the variation of relative Thomas-Fermi screening length shows that extremely dense quantum electron fluids are relatively poor charge shielders. Calculation of the total number of screening electrons around a nucleus shows that there is a position of maximum number of screening localized electrons around the screened nucleus, which moves closer to the point-like nucleus by increase in the plasma number density but is unaffected due to increase in the atomic-number value. It is discovered that the total number of screening electrons, (N{sub s}∝r{sub TF}{sup 3}/r{sub d}{sup 3} where r{sub TF} and r{sub d} are the Thomas-Fermi and interparticle distance, respectively) has a distinct limit for extremely dense plasmas such as WD-cores and neutron star crusts, which is unique for all given values of the atomic-number. This is equal to saying that in an ultrarelativistic degeneracy limit of electron-ion plasma, the screening length couples with the system dimensionality and the plasma becomes spherically self-similar. Current analysis can provide useful information on the effects of relativistic correction to the charge screening for a wide range of plasma density, such as the inertial-confined plasmas and compact stellar

  20. Modular and Stochastic Approaches to Molecular Pathway Models of ATM, TGF beta, and WNT Signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; O'Neill, Peter; Ponomarev, Artem; Carra, Claudio; Whalen, Mary; Pluth, Janice M.

    2009-01-01

    Deterministic pathway models that describe the biochemical interactions of a group of related proteins, their complexes, activation through kinase, etc. are often the basis for many systems biology models. Low dose radiation effects present a unique set of challenges to these models including the importance of stochastic effects due to the nature of radiation tracks and small number of molecules activated, and the search for infrequent events that contribute to cancer risks. We have been studying models of the ATM, TGF -Smad and WNT signaling pathways with the goal of applying pathway models to the investigation of low dose radiation cancer risks. Modeling challenges include introduction of stochastic models of radiation tracks, their relationships to more than one substrate species that perturb pathways, and the identification of a representative set of enzymes that act on the dominant substrates. Because several pathways are activated concurrently by radiation the development of modular pathway approach is of interest.

  1. Comparative Neuroregenerative Effects of C-Phycocyanin and IFN-Beta in a Model of Multiple Sclerosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Pentón-Rol, Giselle; Lagumersindez-Denis, Nielsen; Muzio, Luca; Bergami, Alessandra; Furlan, Roberto; Fernández-Massó, Julio R; Nazabal-Galvez, Marcelo; Llópiz-Arzuaga, Alexey; Herrera-Rolo, Tania; Veliz-Rodriguez, Tania; Polentarutti, Nadia; Marín-Prida, Javier; Raíces-Cruz, Ivette; Valenzuela-Silva, Carmen; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Pentón-Arias, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) therapies approved so far are unable to effectively reverse the chronic phase of the disease or improve the remyelination process. Here our aim is to evaluate the effects of C-Phycocyanin (C-Pc), a biliprotein from Spirulina platensis with anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective properties, in a chronic model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice. C-Pc (2, 4 or 8 mg/kg i.p.) or IFN-beta (2000 IU, s.c.) was administered daily once a day or every other day, respectively, starting at disease onset, which differ among EAE mice between 11 and 15 days postinduction. Histological and immunohistochemistry (anti-Mac-3, anti-CD3 and anti-APP) assessments were performed in spinal cord in the postinduction time. Global gene expression in the brain was analyzed with the Illumina Mouse WG-6_V2 BeadChip microarray and the expression of particular genes, assessed by qPCR using the Fast SYBR Green RT-PCR Master Mix. Oxidative stress parameters (malondialdehyde, peroxidation potential, CAT/SOD ratio and GSH) were determined spectrophoto-metrically. Results showed that C-Pc ameliorates the clinical deterioration of animals, an effect that expresses the reduction of the inflammatory infiltrates invading the spinal cord tissue, the axonal preservation and the down-regulation of IL-17 expression in brain tissue and serum. C-Pc and IFN-beta improved the redox status in mice subjected to EAE, while microarray analysis showed that both treatments shared a common subset of differentially expressed genes, although they also differentially modulated another subset of genes. Specifically, C-Pc mainly modulated the expression of genes related to remyelination, gliogenesis and axon-glia processes. Taken together, our results indicate that C-Pc has significant therapeutic effects against EAE, mediated by the dynamic regulation of multiple biological processes. PMID:26556034

  2. Evolutionary optimization of life-history traits in the sea beet Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima: Comparing model to data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hautekèete, N.-C.; Van Dijk, H.; Piquot, Y.; Teriokhin, A.

    2009-01-01

    At evolutionary equilibrium, ecological factors will determine the optimal combination of life-history trait values of an organism. This optimum can be assessed by assuming that the species maximizes some criterion of fitness such as the Malthusian coefficient or lifetime reproductive success depending on the degree of density-dependence. We investigated the impact of the amount of resources and habitat stability on a plant's age at maturity and life span by using an evolutionary optimization model in combination with empirical data. We conducted this study on sea beet, Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima, because of its large variation in life span and age at first reproduction along a latitudinal gradient including considerable ecological variation. We also compared the consequence in our evolutionary model of maximizing either the Malthusian coefficient or the lifetime reproductive success. Both the data analysis and the results of evolutionary modeling pointed to habitat disturbance and resources like length of the growing season as factors negatively related to life span and age at maturity in sea beet. Resource availability had a negative theoretical influence with the Malthusian coefficient as the chosen optimality criterion, while there was no influence in the case of lifetime reproductive success. As suggested by previous theoretical work the final conclusion on what criterion is more adequate depends on the assumptions of how in reality density-dependence restrains population growth. In our case of sea beet data R0 seems to be less appropriate than λ.

  3. Modeling clustered activity increase in amyloid-beta positron emission tomographic images with statistical descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhi, Sepideh; Rogers, Baxter P; Kang, Hakmook; Ding, Zhaohua; Claassen, Daniel O; Mckay, John W; Riddle, William R

    2015-01-01

    Background Amyloid-beta (Aβ) imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) holds promise for detecting the presence of Aβ plaques in the cortical gray matter. Many image analyses focus on regional average measurements of tracer activity distribution; however, considerable additional information is available in the images. Metrics that describe the statistical properties of images, such as the two-point correlation function (S2), have found wide applications in astronomy and materials science. S2 provides a detailed characterization of spatial patterns in images typically referred to as clustering or flocculence. The objective of this study was to translate the two-point correlation method into Aβ-PET of the human brain using 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB) to characterize longitudinal changes in the tracer distribution that may reflect changes in Aβ plaque accumulation. Methods We modified the conventional S2 metric, which is primarily used for binary images and formulated a weighted two-point correlation function (wS2) to describe nonbinary, real-valued PET images with a single statistical function. Using serial 11C-PiB scans, we calculated wS2 functions from two-dimensional PET images of different cortical regions as well as three-dimensional data from the whole brain. The area under the wS2 functions was calculated and compared with the mean/median of the standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR). For three-dimensional data, we compared the area under the wS2 curves with the subjects’ cerebrospinal fluid measures. Results Overall, the longitudinal changes in wS2 correlated with the increase in mean SUVR but showed lower variance. The whole brain results showed a higher inverse correlation between the cerebrospinal Aβ and wS2 than between the cerebrospinal Aβ and SUVR mean/median. We did not observe any confounding of wS2 by region size or injected dose. Conclusion The wS2 detects subtle changes and provides additional information about the binding

  4. Modeling of Neoclassical Tearing Mode Stability for Generalized Toroidal Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    A.L. Rosenberg; D.A. Gates; A. Pletzer; J.E. Menard; S.E. Kruger; C.C. Hegna; F. Paoletti; S. Sabbagh

    2002-08-21

    Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) can lead to disruption and loss of confinement. Previous analysis of these modes used large aspect ratio, low beta (plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) approximations to determine the effect of NTMs on tokamak plasmas. A more accurate tool is needed to predict the onset of these instabilities. As a follow-up to recent theoretical work, a code has been written which computes the tearing mode island growth rate for arbitrary tokamak geometry. It calls PEST-3 [A. Pletzer et al., J. Comput. Phys. 115, 530 (1994)] to compute delta prime, the resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) matching parameter. The code also calls the FLUXGRID routines in NIMROD [A.H. Glasser et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 41, A747 (1999)] for Dnc, DI and DR [C.C. Hegna, Phys. Plasmas 6, 3980 (1999); A.H. Glasser et al., Phys. Fluids 18, 875 (1975)], which are the bootstrap current driven term and the ideal and resistive interchange mode criterion, respectively. In addition to these components, the NIMROD routines calculate alphas-H, a new correction to the Pfirsch-Schlter term. Finite parallel transport effects were added and a National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] equilibrium was analyzed. Another program takes the output of PEST-3 and allows the user to specify the rational surface, island width, and amount of detail near the perturbed surface to visualize the total helical flux. The results of this work will determine the stability of NTMs in an spherical torus (ST) [Y.-K.M. Peng et al., Nucl. Fusion 26, 769 (1986)] plasma with greater accuracy than previously achieved.

  5. Binding of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) to pregnancy zone protein (PZP). Comparison to the TGF-beta-alpha 2-macroglobulin interaction.

    PubMed

    Philip, A; Bostedt, L; Stigbrand, T; O'Connor-McCourt, M D

    1994-04-15

    Pregnancy zone protein (PZP) is quantitatively the most important pregnancy-associated plasma protein and it has strong similarity to alpha 2-macroglobulin. Since alpha 2-macroglobulin is a binding protein for transforming growth factors-beta (TGF-beta), it was of interest to test whether the related protein, PZP, also binds to these growth-regulatory proteins. Using affinity-labelling methods, we demonstrate that PZP binds both TGF-beta 1 and TGF-beta 2 and that the binding characteristics are similar to those of the TGF-beta-alpha 2-macroglobulin interaction. TGF-beta 2 and TGF-beta 1 bind to PZP in a predominantly noncovalent manner in vitro. TGF-beta 1 and TGF-beta 2 bind to both the dimeric and tetrameric forms of PZP. Our studies also indicate that PZP binds TGF-beta 2 with higher affinity than TGF-beta 1. Finally, we demonstrate that PZP inhibits the binding of TGF-beta 1 and TGF-beta 2 to their cell surface receptors. The increased level of PZP during pregnancy may affect the action of TGF-beta by regulating the distribution, clearance and/or general availability of TGF-beta. The preferential binding of TGF-beta 2 over TGF-beta 1 by PZP implies that PZP may differentially regulate the action of TGF-beta 1 and TGF-beta 2.

  6. On the Bayesian Nonparametric Generalization of IRT-Type Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Martin, Ernesto; Jara, Alejandro; Rolin, Jean-Marie; Mouchart, Michel

    2011-01-01

    We study the identification and consistency of Bayesian semiparametric IRT-type models, where the uncertainty on the abilities' distribution is modeled using a prior distribution on the space of probability measures. We show that for the semiparametric Rasch Poisson counts model, simple restrictions ensure the identification of a general…

  7. The History and Generality of AQUATOX, a Robust Mechanistic Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1987, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsored a workshop in Baltimore on modeling the fate and effects of toxic organics. The specifications for the AQUATOX model came out of this workshop, and the first paper on the modeling concept was published soon after. Since ...

  8. General Model of Microbial Growth and Decomposition in Aquatic Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Clesceri, L. S.; Park, R. A.; Bloomfield, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A model capable of simulating freely suspended and attached decomposers, particulate organic matter, labile and refractory dissolved organic matter, inorganic nitrogen, and phosphate in the open-water portion of lakes is presented. Examples are given showing the utility of the model when coupled to the whole-ecosystem model CLEANER. PMID:16345242

  9. The Generalized Multilevel Facets Model for Longitudinal Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Lai-Fa; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2012-01-01

    In the human sciences, ability tests or psychological inventories are often repeatedly conducted to measure growth. Standard item response models do not take into account possible autocorrelation in longitudinal data. In this study, the authors propose an item response model to account for autocorrelation. The proposed three-level model consists…

  10. Looking beyond general metrics for model evaluation - lessons from an international model intercomparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaziz, Laurène; de Boer-Euser, Tanja; Brauer, Claudia; Drogue, Gilles; Fenicia, Fabrizio; Grelier, Benjamin; de Niel, Jan; Nossent, Jiri; Pereira, Fernando; Savenije, Hubert; Thirel, Guillaume; Willems, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    International collaboration between institutes and universities is a promising way to reach consensus on hydrological model development. Education, experience and expert knowledge of the hydrological community have resulted in the development of a great variety of model concepts, calibration methods and analysis techniques. Although comparison studies are very valuable for international cooperation, they do often not lead to very clear new insights regarding the relevance of the modelled processes. We hypothesise that this is partly caused by model complexity and the used comparison methods, which focus on a good overall performance instead of focusing on specific events. We propose an approach that focuses on the evaluation of specific events. Eight international research groups calibrated their model for the Ourthe catchment in Belgium (1607 km2) and carried out a validation in time for the Ourthe (i.e. on two different periods, one of them on a blind mode for the modellers) and a validation in space for nested and neighbouring catchments of the Meuse in a completely blind mode. For each model, the same protocol was followed and an ensemble of best performing parameter sets was selected. Signatures were first used to assess model performances in the different catchments during validation. Comparison of the models was then followed by evaluation of selected events, which include: low flows, high flows and the transition from low to high flows. While the models show rather similar performances based on general metrics (i.e. Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency), clear differences can be observed for specific events. While most models are able to simulate high flows well, large differences are observed during low flows and in the ability to capture the first peaks after drier months. The transferability of model parameters to neighbouring and nested catchments is assessed as an additional measure in the model evaluation. This suggested approach helps to select, among competing

  11. Stereopentads derived from a sequence of Mukaiyama aldolization and free radical reduction on alpha-methyl-beta-alkoxy aldehydes: a general strategy for efficient polypropionate synthesis.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, Jean-François; Mochirian, Philippe; Prévost, Michel; Guindon, Yvan

    2009-01-01

    In a stereodivergent manner, all 16 diastereomeric stereopentads 7-22 were synthesized starting with alpha-methyl-beta-alkoxy aldehydes 25 and 27. We designed an approach based on a sequence of a Mukaiyama aldolization with enoxysilane 24 followed by a hydrogen transfer reaction. Recent advancements concerning these reactions are described, and novel key intermediates are characterized in the aldol step. The synthesis of C(1)-C(11) fragment 60 of zincophorin, which contains a synthetically challenging stereopentad unit, is described attesting the usefulness of our strategy.

  12. Inclusion complexes of nabumetone with beta-cyclodextrins: thermodynamics and molecular modelling studies. Influence of sodium perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Goyenechea, N; Sánchez, M; Vélaz, I; Martín, C; Martínez-Ohárriz, M C; González-Gaitano, G

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescence, (1)H-NMR and molecular mechanics have been used to study the inclusion complexes of nabumetone (4,6-methoxy-2-naphthyl-butan-2-one; NAB) with beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD), randomly methylated-beta (M beta-CD) and hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrins (HP beta-CD). The emission spectrum of NAB shows a maximum whose fluorescence intensity increases with the different beta-CDs growing concentrations. This phenomenon allows calculation of the stability constants at 15, 25, 37 and 45 degrees C. The thermodynamic parameters Delta H degrees and Delta S degrees for the inclusion process were obtained from the temperature dependence of the stability constants. Molecular mechanics calculations, together with proton NMR measurements, for the complex with beta-CD prove that the complex can be formed by penetration through any of the rims, with the naphthalene nucleus included and the substituents outside the cavity. The influence of NaClO(4) in the aforementioned complexes has been analysed by spectrofluorimetric measurements. It has been found that the stability constants for the complexes decrease with the salt concentration; the causes are discussed.

  13. Generating Dichotomous Item Scores with the Four-Parameter Beta Compound Binomial Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Patrick O.; Lee, Won-Chan; Ankenmann, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation technique for generating dichotomous item scores is presented that implements (a) a psychometric model with different explicit assumptions than traditional parametric item response theory (IRT) models, and (b) item characteristic curves without restrictive assumptions concerning mathematical form. The four-parameter beta…

  14. Modelo de Alfabetizacion: A Poblacion Urbana y Rural. Documento General (Literacy Model: Urban and Rural Populations. General Document).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instituto Nacional para la Educacion de los Adultos, Mexico City (Mexico).

    This document describes literacy models for urban and rural populations in Mexico. It contains four sections. The first two sections (generalizations about the population and considerations about the teaching of adults) discuss the environment that creates illiterate adults and also describe some of the conditions under which learning takes place…

  15. Testing the Generalized Partial Credit Model. Research Report 96-03.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.

    The partial credit model (PCM) (G. N. Masters, 1982) can be viewed as a generalization of the Rasch model for dichotomous items to the case of polytomous items. In many cases, the PCM is too restrictive to fit the data. Several generalizations of the PCM have been proposed. In this paper, a generalization of the PCM (GPCM), a further…

  16. Hierarchical framework for coupling a biogeochemical trace gas model to a general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.; Foster, I.T.

    1994-04-01

    A scheme is described for the computation of terrestrial biogeochemical trace gas fluxes in the context of a general circulation model. This hierarchical system flux scheme (HSFS) incorporates five major components: (1) a general circulation model (GCM), which provides a medium-resolution (i.e., 1{degrees} by 1{degrees}) simulation of the atmospheric circulation; (2) a procedure for identifying regions of defined homogeneity of surface type within GCM grid cells; (3) a set of surface process models, to be run within each homogeneous region, which include a biophysical model, the Biosphere Atmospheric Transfer Scheme (BATS), and a biogeochemical model (BGCM); (4) an interpolation/integration system that transfers information between the GCM and surface process models with finer resolution; and (5) an interactive data array based on a geographic information system (GIS), which provides land characteristic information via the interpolator. The goals of this detailed investigation are to compute the local and global sensitivities of trace gas fluxes to GCM and BATS variables, the effects of trace gas fluxes on global climate, and the effects of global climate on specific biomes.

  17. A simple hydrologically based model of land surface water and energy fluxes for general circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, XU; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.; Wood, Eric F.; Burges, Stephen J.

    1994-01-01

    A generalization of the single soil layer variable infiltration capacity (VIC) land surface hydrological model previously implemented in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) general circulation model (GCM) is described. The new model is comprised of a two-layer characterization of the soil column, and uses an aerodynamic representation of the latent and sensible heat fluxes at the land surface. The infiltration algorithm for the upper layer is essentially the same as for the single layer VIC model, while the lower layer drainage formulation is of the form previously implemented in the Max-Planck-Institut GCM. The model partitions the area of interest (e.g., grid cell) into multiple land surface cover types; for each land cover type the fraction of roots in the upper and lower zone is specified. Evapotranspiration consists of three components: canopy evaporation, evaporation from bare soils, and transpiration, which is represented using a canopy and architectural resistance formulation. Once the latent heat flux has been computed, the surface energy balance is iterated to solve for the land surface temperature at each time step. The model was tested using long-term hydrologic and climatological data for Kings Creek, Kansas to estimate and validate the hydrological parameters, and surface flux data from three First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment (FIFE) intensive field campaigns in the summer-fall of 1987 to validate the surface energy fluxes.

  18. General approach to constructing models of the Boltzmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorban, Alexander N.; Karlin, Iliya V.

    1994-05-01

    The problem of thermodynamic parameterization of an arbitrary approximation of reduced description is solved. On the base of this solution a new class of model kinetic equations is constructed that gives a model extension of the chosen approximation to a kinetic model. Model equations describe two processes: rapid relaxation to the chosen approximation along the planes of rapid motions, and the slow motion caused by the chosen approximation. The H-theorem is proved for these models. It is shown, that the rapid process always leads to entropy growth, and also a neighborhood of the approximation is determined inside which the slow process satisfies the H-theorem. Kinetic models for Grad moment approximations and for the Tamm-Mott-Smith approximation are constructed explicitly. In particular, the problem of concordance of the ES-model with the H-theorem is solved.

  19. Monte Carlo Models for the Production of beta-delayed Gamma Rays Following Fission of Special Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pruet, J; Prussin, S; Descalle, M; Hall, J

    2004-02-03

    A Monte Carlo method for the estimation of {beta}-delayed {gamma}-ray spectra following fission is described that can accommodate an arbitrary time-dependent fission rate and photon collection history. The method invokes direct sampling of the independent fission yield distributions of the fissioning system, the branching ratios for decay of individual fission products and the spectral distributions for photon emission for each decay mode. Though computationally intensive, the method can provide a detailed estimate of the spectrum that would be recorded by an arbitrary spectrometer, and can prove useful in assessing the quality of evaluated data libraries, for identifying gaps in these libraries, etc. The method is illustrated by a first comparison of calculated and experimental spectra from decay of short-lived fission products following the reactions {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) and {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th}, f). For general purpose transport calculations, where detailed consideration of the large number of individual {gamma}-ray transitions in a spectrum may be unnecessary, it is shown that an accurate and simple parameterization of a {gamma}-ray source function can be obtained. These parametrizations should provide high-quality average spectral distributions that should prove useful in calculations describing photons escaping from thick attenuating media.

  20. General Education at Los Medanos College: A Curricular Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carhart, John I.; Collins, Charles C.

    Non-traditional courses recommended for the general education package at Los Medanos College are described. It is suggested that the core curriculum be six intra-disciplinary packages covering Behavioral Sciences, Social Sciences, Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences, Language Arts, and Humanistic Studies. Each semester, students would be…

  1. AGATE concept model for a future general aviation airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Photo illustrates an advanced general aviation concept airplane. The pusher propeller - driven configuration seats 4 to 6 people (including pilot) in mid-wing, three-surface twin tail-boom configuration. The design concept incorporates natural laminar flow, ice protection, winglets and stall-departure-resistant flight dynamics.

  2. A generalized Poisson-gamma model for spatially overdispersed data.

    PubMed

    Neyens, Thomas; Faes, Christel; Molenberghs, Geert

    2012-09-01

    Modern disease mapping commonly uses hierarchical Bayesian methods to model overdispersion and spatial correlation. Classical random-effects based solutions include the Poisson-gamma model, which uses the conjugacy between the Poisson and gamma distributions, but which does not model spatial correlation, on the one hand, and the more advanced CAR model, which also introduces a spatial autocorrelation term but without a closed-form posterior distribution on the other. In this paper, a combined model is proposed: an alternative convolution model accounting for both overdispersion and spatial correlation in the data by combining the Poisson-gamma model with a spatially-structured normal CAR random effect. The Limburg Cancer Registry data on kidney and prostate cancer in Limburg were used to compare the conventional and new models. A simulation study confirmed results and interpretations coming from the real datasets. Relative risk maps showed that the combined model provides an intermediate between the non-patterned negative binomial and the sometimes oversmoothed CAR convolution model. PMID:22749204

  3. A generalized quasi-geostrophic model of thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumberry, M.; Laycock, D.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that, under the influence of planetary rotation, the primary force balance for large scale convective planetary flows is between pressure gradients and the Coriolis force; these flows are termed geostrophic. Convective flows are never purely geostrophic because buoyancy (which powers convection) is necessarily present and so is viscous dissipation. Nevertheless, provided rotation is dominant, the first order geostrophic balance is preserved and these flows are often referred to as quasi-geostrophic (QG). When buoyancy is perpendicular to rotation, the non-axial QG flows are rigid, that is, they have small variations along the direction of rotation. QG numerical models of thermal convection, in which only the non-axial flows are evolved, have been developed to take advantage of this 2D structure of QG flows. These models can reproduce faithfully some of the features of fully three-dimensional (3D) numerical models. The chief advantage of such QG models is that, because of their 2D nature, a much higher numerical resolution is achievable than for 3D models for the same computing cost and can thus be used to study aspects of convection under a regime not accessible in 3D models. In existing QG models, buoyancy is restricted to its non-axial component and the modelled region of convection is limited to that outside the tangent cylinder. Here, we present an extension on these models by incorporating the axial component of buoyancy and by modelling convection inside the tangent cylinder. When buoyancy is parallel to rotation, the non-axial QG flows are no longer rigid and include an axial gradient. To capture the first order dynamics inside the tangent cylinder, we must also track the evolution of non-rigid flows. We show that our model can reproduce the salient features of 3D numerical models near onset. Further, our model also captures features of well developed, fully turbulent convection, such as production of zonal jets.

  4. General model and control of an n rotor helicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidea, A. G.; Yding Brogaard, R.; Andersen, N. A.; Ravn, O.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a dynamic, nonlinear mathematical model of a multirotor that would be valid for different numbers of rotors. Furthermore, a set of Single Input Single Output (SISO) controllers were implemented for attitude control. Both model and controllers were tested experimentally on a quadcopter. Using the combined model and controllers, simple system simulation and control is possible, by replacing the physical values for the individual systems.

  5. Toward a General Nonlinear Model of Reduced Scale UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chriette, A.; Cheviron, T.; Plestan, F.

    2009-03-01

    This paper proposes, through a survey of models of several UAV-Structures, a generic nonlinear model for reduced scale aerial robotic vehicles (6 DOF)*. Dynamics of an aircraft and some VTOL UAV (quadricopter, ducted fan and classical helicopter) are illustrated. This generic model focuses only on the key physical efforts acting on the dynamics in order to be sufficiently simple to design a controller. The Small Body Forces expression which can introduce a zero dynamics is then discussed.

  6. General Blending Models for Data From Mixture Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Brown, L.; Donev, A. N.; Bissett, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new class of models providing a powerful unification and extension of existing statistical methodology for analysis of data obtained in mixture experiments. These models, which integrate models proposed by Scheffé and Becker, extend considerably the range of mixture component effects that may be described. They become complex when the studied phenomenon requires it, but remain simple whenever possible. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:26681812

  7. Serum-derived immunoglobulins alter amyloid beta transport across a blood-brain barrier in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Poetsch, V; Bennani-Baiti, B; Neuhaus, W; Muchitsch, E M; Noe, C R

    2010-04-01

    Since passive immunization with serum-derived immunoglobulins (intravenous immunoglobulins) showed several positive effects in some patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) are discussed as a possible treatment option. IVIG, an antibody product derived from human plasma, contains natural antibodies against amyloid beta(Abeta) peptide. Until now it is not known, how IVIG interferes with pathogenesis in AD, but several proposed mechanisms are in discussion. Receptor types which are involved in transport processes at the BBB are LRP, RAGE and hFcRn. We were looking for an in vitro BBB model expressing these receptors and studied the alteration of transport of Abeta peptides across this model under the influence of immunoglobulins. Cell line ECV304 was found to be suitable for our experiments. We found evidence for involvement of an improved clearance of Abeta across the BBB as well as a decreased Abeta influx from blood to the brain probably following complex formation of immunoglobulins with free Abeta in the periphery. Furthermore, we were able to confirm the activity of IVIG preparations which acted the same way but showed slightly less efficacy in comparison to monoclonal anti-Abeta antibodies. Based on these results we suggest multiple mechanisms responsible for the efficacy of immunotherapy in Alzheimer's disease.

  8. The scalar triplet contribution to lepton flavour violation and neutrinoless double beta decay in Left-Right Symmetric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambhaniya, Gulab; Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Goswami, Srubabati; Mitra, Manimala

    2016-04-01

    We analyse in detail the scalar triplet contribution to the low-energy lepton flavour violating (LFV) and lepton number violating (LNV) processes within a TeV-scale left-right symmetric framework. We show that in both type-I and type-II seesaw dominance for the light neutrino masses, the triplet of mass comparable to or smaller than the largest right-handed neutrino mass scale can give sizeable contribution to the LFV processes, except in the quasi-degenerate limit of light neutrino masses, where a suppression can occur due to cancellations. In particular, a moderate value of the heaviest neutrino to scalar triplet mass ratio r≲ O(1) is still experimentally allowed and can be explored in the future LFV experiments. Similarly, the contribution of a relatively light triplet to the LNV process of neutrinoless double beta decay could be significant, disfavouring a part of the model parameter space otherwise allowed by LFV constraints. Nevertheless, we find regions of parameter space consistent with both LFV and LNV searches, for which the values of the total effective neutrino mass can be accessible to the next generation ton-scale experiments. Such light triplets can also be directly searched for at the LHC, thus providing a complementary probe of this scenario. Finally, we also study the implications of the triplet contribution for the left-right symmetric model interpretation of the recent diboson anomaly at the LHC.

  9. The NASA/Ames Mars General Circulation Model: Model Improvements and Comparison with Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Colaprete, A.; Bridger, A. F. C.; McKay, C. P.; Murphy, J. R.; Schaeffer, J.; Freedman, R.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    For many years, the NASA/Ames Mars General Circulation Model (GCM) has been built around the UCLA B-grid dynamical core. An attached tracer transport scheme based on the aerosol microphysical model of Toon et al. (1988) provided a tool for studying dust storm transport and feedbacks (Murphy et al., 1995). While we still use a B-grid version of the model, the Ames group is now transitioning to the ARIES/GEOS Goddard C-grid dynamical core (Suarez and Takacs, 1995). The C-grid produces smoother fields when the model top is raised above 50 km, and has a built in transport scheme for an arbitrary number of tracers. All of our transport simulations are now carried out with the C-grid. We have also been updating our physics package. Several years ago we replaced our bulk boundary layer scheme with a level 2 type diffusive scheme, and added a multi-level soil model (Haberle et al., 2000). More recently we replaced our radiation code with a more generalized two-stream code that accounts for aerosol multiple scattering and gaseous absorption. This code gives us much more flexibility in choosing aerosol optical properties and radiatively active gases.

  10. A simple biosphere model (SiB) for use within general circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, P. J.; Mintz, Y.; Sud, Y. C.; Dalcher, A.

    1986-01-01

    A simple realistic biosphere model for calculating the transfer of energy, mass and momentum between the atmosphere and the vegetated surface of the earth has been developed for use in atmospheric general circulation models. The vegetation in each terrestrial model grid is represented by an upper level, representing the perennial canopy of trees and shrubs, and a lower level, representing the annual cover of grasses and other heraceous species. The vegetation morphology and the physical and physiological properties of the vegetation layers determine such properties as: the reflection, transmission, absorption and emission of direct and diffuse radiation; the infiltration, drainage, and storage of the residual rainfall in the soil; and the control over the stomatal functioning. The model, with prescribed vegetation parameters and soil interactive soil moisture, can be used for prediction of the atmospheric circulation and precipitaion fields for short periods of up to a few weeks.

  11. IO SUBSYSTEM 1 BETA

    2002-08-21

    "IO Subsystem Ver. 1.0 Beta" uses standard object-oriented principles to minimize dependencies between the underlying input or output database format and the client code (i.e., Sierra) using the io subsystem. The interface and priciples are simolar to the Facade pattern described in the "Design Patterns" book by Gamma, et.al. The software uses data authentication algorithms to ensure data input/output is consistent with model being defined. "IO Subsystem Ver. 1.0 Beta" is a database independent input/outputmore » library for finite element analysis, preprocessing, post processing, and translation programs.« less

  12. IO SUBSYSTEM 1 BETA

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, Greg

    2002-08-21

    "IO Subsystem Ver. 1.0 Beta" uses standard object-oriented principles to minimize dependencies between the underlying input or output database format and the client code (i.e., Sierra) using the io subsystem. The interface and priciples are simolar to the Facade pattern described in the "Design Patterns" book by Gamma, et.al. The software uses data authentication algorithms to ensure data input/output is consistent with model being defined. "IO Subsystem Ver. 1.0 Beta" is a database independent input/output library for finite element analysis, preprocessing, post processing, and translation programs.

  13. Designing Sensor Networks by a Generalized Highly Optimized Tolerance Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyano, Takaya; Yamakoshi, Miyuki; Higashino, Sadanori; Tsutsui, Takako

    A variant of the highly optimized tolerance model is applied to a toy problem of bioterrorism to determine the optimal arrangement of hypothetical bio-sensors to avert epidemic outbreak. Nonlinear loss function is utilized in searching the optimal structure of the sensor network. The proposed method successfully averts disastrously large events, which can not be achieved by the original highly optimized tolerance model.

  14. Crystal Model Kits for Use in the General Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kildahl, Nicholas J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic crystal model kits are described. Laboratory experiments in which students use these kits to build models have been extremely successful in providing them with an understanding of the three-dimensional structures of the common cubic unit cells as well as hexagonal and cubic closest-packing of spheres. (JN)

  15. Using Generalized Additive Models to Analyze Single-Case Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadish, William; Sullivan, Kristynn

    2013-01-01

    Many analyses for single-case designs (SCDs)--including nearly all the effect size indicators-- currently assume no trend in the data. Regression and multilevel models allow for trend, but usually test only linear trend and have no principled way of knowing if higher order trends should be represented in the model. This paper shows how Generalized…

  16. A General Multidimensional Model for the Measurement of Cultural Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmedo, Esteban L.; Martinez, Sergio R.

    A multidimensional model for measuring cultural differences (MCD) based on factor analytic theory and techniques is proposed. The model assumes that a cultural space may be defined by means of a relatively small number of orthogonal dimensions which are linear combinations of a much larger number of cultural variables. Once a suitable,…

  17. RxGen General Optical Model Prescription Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigrist, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    RxGen is a prescription generator for JPL's in-house optical modeling software package called MACOS (Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems), which is an expert optical analysis software package focusing on modeling optics on dynamic structures, deformable optics, and controlled optics. The objectives of RxGen are to simplify and automate MACOS prescription generations, reducing errors associated with creating such optical prescriptions, and improving user efficiency without requiring MACOS proficiency. RxGen uses MATLAB (a high-level language and interactive environment developed by MathWorks) as the development and deployment platform, but RxGen can easily be ported to another optical modeling/analysis platform. Running RxGen within the modeling environment has the huge benefit that variations in optical models can be made an integral part of the modeling state. For instance, optical prescription parameters determined as external functional dependencies, optical variations by controlling the in-/exclusion of optical components like sub-systems, and/or controlling the state of all components. Combining the mentioned capabilities and flexibilities with RxGen's optical abstraction layer completely eliminates the hindering aspects for requiring proficiency in writing/editing MACOS prescriptions, allowing users to focus on the modeling aspects of optical systems, i.e., increasing productivity and efficiency. RxGen provides significant enhancements to MACOS and delivers a framework for fast prototyping as well as for developing very complex controlled optical systems.

  18. A new form of bivariate generalized Poisson regression model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faroughi, Pouya; Ismail, Noriszura

    2014-09-01

    This paper introduces a new form of bivariate generalized Poisson (BGP) regression which can be fitted to bivariate and correlated count data with covariates. The BGP regression suggested in this study can be fitted not only to bivariate count data with positive, zero or negative correlations, but also to underdispersed or overdispersed bivariate count data. Applications of bivariate Poisson (BP) regression and the new BGP regression are illustrated on Malaysian motor insurance data.

  19. A general method for exploiting QSAR models in lead optimization.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Richard A

    2005-03-10

    Computer-aided drug design tools can generate many useful and powerful models that explain structure-activity relationship (SAR) observations in a quantitative manner. These models can use many different descriptors, functional forms, and methods from simple linear equations through to multilayer neural nets. Using a model, a medicinal chemist can compute an activity, given a structure, but it is much harder to work out what changes are needed to make a structure more active. The impact of a model on the design process would be greatly enhanced if the model were more interpretable to the bench chemist. This paper describes a new protocol for performing automated iterative quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies and presents the results of experiments on two QSAR sets from the literature. The fundamental goal of this work is to try to assist the chemist in his search for what to make next.

  20. A General Reversible Hereditary Constitutive Model. Part 1; Theoretical Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleeb, A. F.; Arnold, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Using an internal-variable formalism as a starting point, we describe the viscoelastic extension of a previously-developed viscoplasticity formulation of the complete potential structure type. It is mainly motivated by experimental evidence for the presence of rate/time effects in the so-called quasilinear, reversible, material response range. Several possible generalizations are described, in the general format of hereditary-integral representations for non-equilibrium, stress-type, state variables, both for isotropic as well as anisotropic materials. In particular, thorough discussions are given on the important issues of thermodynamic admissibility requirements for such general descriptions, resulting in a set of explicit mathematical constraints on the associated kernel (relaxation and creep compliance) functions. In addition, a number of explicit, integrated forms are derived, under stress and strain control to facilitate the parametric and qualitative response characteristic studies reported here, as well as to help identify critical factors in the actual experimental characterizations from test data that will be reported in Part II.