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Sample records for generalized dilaton-axion gravity

  1. Class of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Tonatiuh; Miranda, Galaxia; Sanchez-Sanchez, Ruben; Wiederhold, Petra

    2009-06-15

    We use the harmonic maps ansatz to find exact solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion (EMDA) equations. The solutions are harmonic maps invariant to the symplectic real group in four dimensions Sp(4,R){approx}O(5). We find solutions of the EMDA field equations for the one- and two-dimensional subspaces of the symplectic group. Specially, for illustration of the method, we find space-times that generalize the Schwarzschild solution with dilaton, axion, and electromagnetic fields.

  2. All extremal instantons in Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azreg-Aïnou, Mustapha; Clément, Gérard; Gal'Tsov, Dmitri V.

    2011-11-01

    We construct explicitly all extremal instanton solutions to N=4, D=4 supergravity truncated to one vector field (Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion theory). These correspond to null geodesics of the target space of the sigma-model G/H=Sp(4,R)/GL(2,R) obtained by compactification of four-dimensional Euclidean Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion on a circle. They satisfy a no-force condition in terms of the asymptotic charges and part of them (corresponding to nilpotent orbits of the Sp(4,R) U-duality) are presumably supersymmetric. The space of finite action solutions is found to be unexpectedly large and includes, besides the Euclidean versions of known Lorentzian solutions, a number of new asymptotically locally flat instantons endowed with electric, magnetic, dilaton and axion charges. We also describe new classes of charged asymptotically locally Euclidean instantons as well as some exceptional solutions. Our classification scheme is based on the algebraic classification of matrix generators according to their rank, according to the nature of the charge vectors, and according to the number of independent harmonic functions with unequal charges. Besides the nilpotent orbits of G, we find solutions which satisfy the asymptotic no-force condition, but are not supersymmetric. The renormalized on-shell action for instantons is calculated using the method of matched background subtraction.

  3. Kerr-Sen dilaton-axion black hole lensing in the strong deflection limit

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulchev, Galin N.; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.

    2007-01-15

    In the present work we study numerically quasiequatorial lensing by the charged, stationary, axially symmetric Kerr-Sen dilaton-axion black hole in the strong deflection limit. In this approximation we compute the magnification and the positions of the relativistic images. The most outstanding effect is that the Kerr-Sen black hole caustics drift away from the optical axis and shift in the clockwise direction with respect to the Kerr caustics. The intersections of the critical curves on the equatorial plane as a function of the black hole angular momentum are found, and it is shown that they decrease with the increase of the parameter Q{sup 2}/M. All of the lensing quantities are compared to particular cases as Schwarzschild, Kerr, and Gibbons-Maeda black holes.

  4. Power law of shear viscosity in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yi; Xian, Zhuoyu; Zhou, Zhenhua

    2017-02-01

    We construct charged black hole solutions with hyperscaling violation in the infrared (IR) region in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion theory and investigate the temperature behavior of the ratio of holographic shear viscosity to the entropy density. When translational symmetry breaking is relevant in the IR, the power law of the ratio is verified numerically at low temperature T, namely, η/s ˜ T κ , where the values of exponent κ coincide with the analytical results. We also find that the exponent κ is not affected by irrelevant current, but is reduced by the relevant current. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275208, 11575195), Opening Project of Shanghai Key Laboratory of High Temperature Superconductors (14DZ2260700) and Jiangxi Young Scientists (JingGang Star) Program and 555 Talent Project of Jiangxi Province

  5. Analytical Kerr-Sen dilaton-axion black hole lensing in the weak deflection limit

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulchev, Galin N.; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.

    2010-01-15

    We investigate analytical gravitational lensing by charged, stationary, axially symmetric Kerr-Sen dilaton-axion black holes in the weak-deflection limit. Approximate solutions to the lightlike equations of motion are present up to and including third-order terms in M/b, a/b, and r{sub {alpha}/}b, where M is the black hole mass, a is the angular momentum, r{sub {alpha}=}Q{sup 2}/M, Q being the charge and b is the impact parameter of the light ray. We compute the positions of the two weak field images, the corresponding signed and absolute magnifications up to post-Newtonian order. It is shown that there are static post-Newtonian corrections to the signed magnification and their sum as well as to the critical curves, which are functions of the charge. The shift of the critical curves as a function of the lens angular momentum is found, and it is shown that they decrease slightly with the increase of the charge. The pointlike caustics drift away from the optical axis and do not depend on the charge. All of the lensing quantities are compared to particular cases as Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes as well as the Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black hole.

  6. Gravitational Lensing by Kerr-Sen Dilaton-Axion Black Hole in the Weak Deflection Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulchev, G. N.; Yazadjiev, S. S.

    2010-11-25

    We investigate analytically gravitational lensing by charged, stationary, axially symmetric Kerr-Sen dilaton-axion black hole in the weak deflection limit. Approximate solutions to the lightlike equations of motion are present up to and including third-order terms in M/b, a/b and r{sub {alpha}}/b, where M is the black hole mass, a is the angular momentum, r{sub {alpha}}= Q{sup 2}/M,Q being the charge and b is the impact parameter of the light ray. We compute the positions of the two weak field images up to post-Newtonian order. The shift of the critical curves as a function of the lens angular momentum is found, and it is shown that they decrease slightly with the increase of the charge. The lensing observables are compared to these characteristics for particular cases as Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes as well as the Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black hole.

  7. Observing the shadow of Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shao-Wen; Liu, Yu-Xiao E-mail: liuyx@lzu.edu.cn

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the shadows cast by Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion black hole and naked singularity are studied. The shadow of a rotating black hole is found to be a dark zone covered by a deformed circle. For a fixed value of the spin a, the size of the shadow decreases with the dilaton parameter b. The distortion of the shadow monotonically increases with b and takes its maximal when the black hole approaches to the extremal case. Due to the optical properties, the area of the black hole shadow is supposed to equal to the high-energy absorption cross section. Based on this assumption, the energy emission rate is investigated. For a naked singularity, the shadow has a dark arc and a dark spot or straight, and the corresponding observables are obtained. These results show that there is a significant effect of the spin a and dilaton parameter b on these shadows. Moreover, we examine the observables of the shadow cast by the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, which is very useful for us to probe the nature of the black hole through the astronomical observations in the near future.

  8. Gravity and Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortín, Tomás

    2015-03-01

    1. Differential geometry; 2. Symmetries and Noether's theorems; 3. A perturbative introduction to general relativity; 4. Action principles for gravity; 5. Pure N=1,2,d=4 supergravities; 6. Matter-coupled N=1,d=4 supergravity; 7. Matter-coupled N=2,d=4 supergravity; 8. A generic description of all the N>2,d=4 SUEGRAS; 9. Matter-coupled N=1,d=5 supergravity; 10. Conserved charges in general relativity; 11. The Schwarzschild black hole; 12. The Reissner-Nordström black hole; 13. The Taub-NUT solution; 14. Gravitational pp-waves; 15. The Kaluza-Klein black hole; 16. Dilaton and dilaton/axion black holes; 17. Unbroken supersymmetry I: supersymmetric vacua; 18. Unbroken supersymmetry II: partially supersymmetric solutions; 19. Supersymmetric black holes from supergravity; 20. String theory; 21. The string effective action and T duality; 22. From eleven to four dimensions; 23. The type-IIB superstring and type-II T duality; 24. Extended objects; 25. The extended objects of string theory; 26. String black holes in four and five dimensions; 27. The FGK formalism for (single, static) black holes and branes; Appendices: A.1 Lie groups, symmetric spaces, and Yang-Mills fields; A.2 The irreducible, non-symmetric Riemannian spaces of special holonomy; A.3 Miscellanea on the symplectic group; A.4 Gamma matrices and spinors; A.5 Kähler geometry; A.6 Special Kähler geometry; A.7 Quaternionic-Kähler geometry.

  9. A Generalization of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Chethan

    2015-12-01

    I consider theories of gravity built not just from the metric and affine connection, but also other (possibly higher rank) symmetric tensor(s). The Lagrangian densities are scalars built from them, and the volume forms are related to Cayley's hyperdeterminants. The resulting diff-invariant actions give rise to geometric theories that go beyond the metric paradigm (even metric-less theories are possible), and contain Einstein gravity as a special case. Examples contain theories with generalizeations of Riemannian geometry. The 0-tensor case is related to dilaton gravity. These theories can give rise to new types of spontaneous Lorentz breaking and might be relevant for "dark" sector cosmology.

  10. Aspects of general higher-order gravities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Pablo; Cano, Pablo A.; Min, Vincent S.; Visser, Manus R.

    2017-02-01

    We study several aspects of higher-order gravities constructed from general contractions of the Riemann tensor and the metric in arbitrary dimensions. First, we use the fast-linearization procedure presented in [P. Bueno and P. A. Cano, arXiv:1607.06463] to obtain the equations satisfied by the metric perturbation modes on a maximally symmetric background in the presence of matter and to classify L (Riemann ) theories according to their spectrum. Then, we linearize all theories up to quartic order in curvature and use this result to construct quartic versions of Einsteinian cubic gravity. In addition, we show that the most general cubic gravity constructed in a dimension-independent way and which does not propagate the ghostlike spin-2 mode (but can propagate the scalar) is a linear combination of f (Lovelock ) invariants, plus the Einsteinian cubic gravity term, plus a new ghost-free gravity term. Next, we construct the generalized Newton potential and the post-Newtonian parameter γ for general L (Riemann ) gravities in arbitrary dimensions, unveiling some interesting differences with respect to the four-dimensional case. We also study the emission and propagation of gravitational radiation from sources for these theories in four dimensions, providing a generalized formula for the power emitted. Finally, we review Wald's formalism for general L (Riemann ) theories and construct new explicit expressions for the relevant quantities involved. Many examples illustrate our calculations.

  11. Generalized entropy and higher derivative gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps, Joan

    2014-03-01

    We derive an extension of the Ryu-Takayanagi prescription for curvature squared theories of gravity in the bulk, and comment on a prescription for more general theories. This results in a new entangling functional, that contains a correction to Wald's entropy. The new term is quadratic in the extrinsic curvature. The coefficient of this correction is a second derivative of the lagrangian with respect to the Riemann tensor. For Gauss-Bonnet gravity, the new functional reduces to Jacobson-Myers'.

  12. Generalized gravity from modified DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakatani, Yuho; Uehara, Shozo; Yoshida, Kentaroh

    2017-04-01

    Recently, generalized equations of type IIB supergravity have been derived from the requirement of classical kappa-symmetry of type IIB superstring theory in the Green-Schwarz formulation. These equations are covariant under generalized T -duality transformations and hence one may expect a formulation similar to double field theory (DFT). In this paper, we consider a modification of the DFT equations of motion by relaxing a condition for the generalized covariant derivative with an extra generalized vector. In this modified double field theory (mDFT), we show that the flatness condition of the modified generalized Ricci tensor leads to the NS-NS part of the generalized equations of type IIB supergravity. In particular, the extra vector fields appearing in the generalized equations correspond to the extra generalized vector in mDFT. We also discuss duality symmetries and a modification of the string charge in mDFT.

  13. Observational constraints on transverse gravity: A generalization of unimodular gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Villarejo, J. J.

    2010-04-01

    We explore the hypothesis that the set of symmetries enjoyed by the theory that describes gravity is not the full group of diffeomorphisms (Diff(M)), as in General Relativity, but a maximal subgroup of it (TransverseDiff(M)), with its elements having a jacobian equal to unity; at the infinitesimal level, the parameter describing the coordinate change xμ → xμ + ξμ(x) is transverse, i.e., δμξμ = 0. Incidentally, this is the smaller symmetry one needs to propagate consistently a graviton, which is a great theoretical motivation for considering these theories. Also, the determinant of the metric, g, behaves as a "transverse scalar", so that these theories can be seen as a generalization of the better-known unimodular gravity. We present our results on the observational constraints on transverse gravity, in close relation with the claim of equivalence with general scalar-tensor theory. We also comment on the structure of the divergences of the quantum theory to the one-loop order.

  14. Some Aspects of Generalized Modified Gravity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrzakulov, R.; Sebastiani, L.; Zerbini, S.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we review some general aspects of modified gravity theories, investigating mathematical and physical properties and, more specifically, the feature of viable and realistic models able to reproduce the dark energy (DE) epoch and the early-time inflation. We will discuss the black hole (BH) solutions in generalized theories of gravity: it is of fundamental interest to understand how properties and laws of BHs in General Relativity (GR) can be addressed in the framework of modified theories. In particular, we will discuss the energy issue and the possibility to derive the First Law of thermodynamics from the field equations. Then, in the analysis of cosmological solutions, we will pay particular attention to the occurrence of finite-time future singularities and to the possibility to avoid them in F(R,G)-gravity. Furthermore, realistic models of F(R)-gravity will be analyzed in detail. A general feature occurring in matter era will be shown, namely, the high derivatives of Hubble parameter may be influenced by the high frequency oscillation of the DE and some correction term may be required in order to stabilize the theory at high redshift. The inflationary scenario is also carefully analyzed and a unified description of the universe is evolved. In the final part of the work, we will look at the last developments in modified gravity, namely, we will investigate cosmological and BH solutions in a covariant field theory of gravity and we will introduce the extended "teleparallel" F(T)-gravity theories. A nice application to the dark matter (DM) problem will be presented.

  15. Cosmology in general massive gravity theories

    SciTech Connect

    Comelli, D.; Nesti, F.; Pilo, L. E-mail: fabrizio.nesti@aquila.infn.it

    2014-05-01

    We study the cosmological FRW flat solutions generated in general massive gravity theories. Such a model are obtained adding to the Einstein General Relativity action a peculiar non derivative potentials, function of the metric components, that induce the propagation of five gravitational degrees of freedom. This large class of theories includes both the case with a residual Lorentz invariance as well as the case with rotational invariance only. It turns out that the Lorentz-breaking case is selected as the only possibility. Moreover it turns out that that perturbations around strict Minkowski or dS space are strongly coupled. The upshot is that even though dark energy can be simply accounted by massive gravity modifications, its equation of state w{sub eff} has to deviate from -1. Indeed, there is an explicit relation between the strong coupling scale of perturbations and the deviation of w{sub eff} from -1. Taking into account current limits on w{sub eff} and submillimiter tests of the Newton's law as a limit on the possible strong coupling scale, we find that it is still possible to have a weakly coupled theory in a quasi dS background. Future experimental improvements on short distance tests of the Newton's law may be used to tighten the deviation of w{sub eff} form -1 in a weakly coupled massive gravity theory.

  16. Gravitational collapse in generalized teleparallel gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaeem-ul-Haq Bhatti, M.; Yousaf, Z.; Hanif, Sonia

    2017-05-01

    The idea of this work is to exhibit the unstable regions of a self-gravitating celestial object which collapses adiabatically with a non-vanishing expansion scalar. We adopted the generalized teleparallel gravity for a plane-symmetric self-gravitating object and matter distribution as dissipative and anisotropic. We analyzed the instability regions of the stellar model by considering a particular model, i.e., β T + γ Tn. We established the basic dynamical equations together with junction conditions and equation of state proposed by Harrison et al. The linear perturbation strategy is applied to the metric, matter and f ( T) function up to first order. The equations of motion are developed under this perturbative framework to construct collapse equation. We demonstrate the unstable phases at weak field limit and post-Newtonian epochs and deduce a vital role of adiabatic index to explain the stability/instability issues for planar model in f ( T) gravity.

  17. Stable FLRW solutions in generalized massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rham, Claudia; Fasiello, Matteo; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2014-12-01

    We present exact Friedmann Lemaítre Robertson Walkers (FLRW) solutions in generalized massive gravity where the mass parameters are naturally promoted to Lorentz-invariant functions of the Stückelberg fields. This new dependence relaxes the constraint that would otherwise prevent massive gravity from possessing exact FLRW solutions. It does so without the need to introduce additional degrees of freedom. We find self-accelerating cosmological solutions and show that, with a mild restriction on the region of phase space, these cosmological solutions exhibit full stability, i.e. absence of ghosts and gradient instabilities for all the tensor, vector and scalar modes, for all cosmic time. We perform the full decoupling limit analysis, including vector degrees of freedom, which can be used to confirm the existence of an active Vainshtein mechanism about these solutions.

  18. [Urine specific gravity during general anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Maho; Morioka, Nobutada; Nozaki, Chisato; Abe, Mikiko; Yamada, Arata; Ozaki, Makoto

    2007-06-01

    The urine volume and urine specific gravity per unit time during a short operation under volume loading were examined to explore the possibility of urine specific gravity as an indirect index of fluid therapy. After introducing anesthesia, under volume loading with acetic acid Ringer solution 10 ml x kg(-1) x hr(-1), urine volume and specific gravity per unit time at 30 min intervals from urination to 90 min later and the correlation between the urine volume and urine specific gravity were examined. A chronological increase of urine specific gravity was also confirmed. Therefore, the values of urine specific gravity of each 30 minute intervals were compared using Student's t-test. The urine volume and urine specific gravity per unit time showed no significant negative correlation until after 90 min. Increasing urine specific gravity even under volume loading became significant 90 min after urination. There is a possibility of employing urine specific gravity as an indirect index of fluid therapy.

  19. Inflation in general covariant theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongqing; Wang, Anzhong; Wu, Qiang

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we study inflation in the framework of the nonrelativistic general covariant theory of the Hořava-Lifshitz gravity with the projectability condition and an arbitrary coupling constant λ. We find that the Friedmann-Robterson-Walker (FRW) universe is necessarily flat in such a setup. We work out explicitly the linear perturbations of the flat FRW universe without specifying to a particular gauge, and find that the perturbations are different from those obtained in general relativity, because of the presence of the high-order spatial derivative terms. Applying the general formulas to a single scalar field, we show that in the sub-horizon regions, the metric and scalar field are tightly coupled and have the same oscillating frequencies. In the super-horizon regions, the perturbations become adiabatic, and the comoving curvature perturbation is constant. We also calculate the power spectra and indices of both the scalar and tensor perturbations, and express them explicitly in terms of the slow roll parameters and the coupling constants of the high-order spatial derivative terms. In particular, we find that the perturbations, of both scalar and tensor, are almost scale-invariant, and, with some reasonable assumptions on the coupling coefficients, the spectrum index of the tensor perturbation is the same as that given in the minimum scenario in general relativity (GR), whereas the index for scalar perturbation in general depends on λ and is different from the standard GR value. The ratio of the scalar and tensor power spectra depends on the high-order spatial derivative terms, and can be different from that of GR significantly.

  20. Generalized parallel transport and coordinate transformations in f( R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dil, Emre

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we study the generalized parallel transport of vectors and generalized coordinate transformations between generalized reference frames described in f( R) gravity. After constructing the generalized parallel transport relations and the generalized transformation laws in f( R) gravity, we discuss the implications of these laws and present the differences between f( R) gravity and Einstein's general relativity. For a constant Ricci scalar case with de Sitter-like behavior for a de Sitter space-time, we find that the parallel transport is invariant under the conformal transformation from general relativity to f( R) gravity. However, for a non-de Sitter space-time, parallel transport differs by an extra field term.

  1. Disformal transformations, veiled General Relativity and Mimetic Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Deruelle, Nathalie; Rua, Josephine E-mail: rua@cbpf.br

    2014-09-01

    In this Note we show that Einstein's equations for gravity are generically invariant under ''disformations''. We also show that the particular subclass when this is not true yields the equations of motion of ''Mimetic Gravity''. Finally we give the ''mimetic'' generalization of the Schwarzschild solution.

  2. Gravity Control Propulsion - Towards a General Relativistic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolami, O.; Pedro, F. G.

    Evaluation of gravity control concepts should be examined with respect to currently known physical theories. In this work we study the hypothetical conversion of gravitational potential energy into kinetic energy using the formalism of general relativity. We show that the energy involved in the process greatly exceeds the Newtonian estimate, given the nature of general relativity. We conclude that the impact of any gravity manipulation for propulsion greatly depends fundamentally on its exact definition.

  3. Generalized model for a Moho inversion from gravity and vertical gravity-gradient data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhourun; Tenzer, Robert; Sneeuw, Nico; Liu, Lintao; Wild-Pfeiffer, Franziska

    2016-10-01

    Seismic data are primarily used in studies of the Earth's lithospheric structure including the Moho geometry. In regions, where seismic data are sparse or completely absent, gravimetric or combined gravimetric-seismic methods could be applied to determine the Moho depth. In this study, we derive and present generalized expressions for solving the Vening Meinesz-Moritz's (VMM) inverse problem of isostasy for a Moho depth determination from gravity and vertical gravity-gradient data. By solving the (non-linear) Fredholm's integral equation of the first kind, the linearized observation equations, which functionally relate the (given) gravity/gravity-gradient data to the (unknown) Moho depth, are derived in the spectral domain. The VMM gravimetric results are validated by using available seismic and gravimetric Moho models. Our results show that the VMM Moho solutions obtained by solving the VMM problem for gravity and gravity-gradient data are almost the same. This finding indicates that in global applications, using the global gravity/gravity-gradient data coverage, the spherical harmonic expressions for the gravimetric forward and inverse modelling yield (theoretically) the same results. Globally, these gravimetric solutions have also a relatively good agreement with the CRUST1.0 and GEMMA GOCE models in terms of their rms Moho differences (4.7 km and 4.1 km, respectively).

  4. Geodesic Motion in General Relativity:. Lares in Earth's Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciufolini, I.; Gurzadyan, V. G.; Penrose, R.; Paolozzi, A.

    2013-11-01

    According to General Relativity, as distinct from Newtonian gravity, motion under gravity is treated by a theory that deals, initially, only with test particles. At the same time, satellite measurements deal with extended bodies. We discuss the correspondence between geodesic motion in General Relativity and the motion of an extended body by means of the Ehlers-Geroch theorem, and in the context of the recently launched LAser RElativity Satellite (LARES). Being possibly the highest mean density orbiting body in the Solar system, this satellite provides the best realization of a test particle ever reached experimentally and provides a unique possibility for testing the predictions of General Relativity.

  5. Holographic entanglement entropy for general higher derivative gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xi

    2014-01-01

    We propose a general formula for calculating the entanglement entropy in theories dual to higher derivative gravity where the Lagrangian is a contraction of Riemann tensors. Our formula consists of Wald's formula for the black hole entropy, as well as corrections involving the extrinsic curvature. We derive these corrections by noting that they arise from naively higher order contributions to the action which are enhanced due to would-be logarithmic divergences. Our formula reproduces the Jacobson-Myers entropy in the context of Lovelock gravity, and agrees with existing results for general four-derivative gravity. We emphasize that the formula should be evaluated on a particular bulk surface whose location can in principle be determined by solving the equations of motion with conical boundary conditions. This may be difficult in practice, and an alternative method is desirable. A natural prescription is simply minimizing our formula, analogous to the Ryu-Takayanagi prescription for Einstein gravity. We show that this is correct in several examples including Lovelock and general four-derivative gravity.

  6. The Gravity Probe B test of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everitt, C. W. F.; Muhlfelder, B.; DeBra, D. B.; Parkinson, B. W.; Turneaure, J. P.; Silbergleit, A. S.; Acworth, E. B.; Adams, M.; Adler, R.; Bencze, W. J.; Berberian, J. E.; Bernier, R. J.; Bower, K. A.; Brumley, R. W.; Buchman, S.; Burns, K.; Clarke, B.; Conklin, J. W.; Eglington, M. L.; Green, G.; Gutt, G.; Gwo, D. H.; Hanuschak, G.; He, X.; Heifetz, M. I.; Hipkins, D. N.; Holmes, T. J.; Kahn, R. A.; Keiser, G. M.; Kozaczuk, J. A.; Langenstein, T.; Li, J.; Lipa, J. A.; Lockhart, J. M.; Luo, M.; Mandel, I.; Marcelja, F.; Mester, J. C.; Ndili, A.; Ohshima, Y.; Overduin, J.; Salomon, M.; Santiago, D. I.; Shestople, P.; Solomonik, V. G.; Stahl, K.; Taber, M.; Van Patten, R. A.; Wang, S.; Wade, J. R.; Worden, P. W., Jr.; Bartel, N.; Herman, L.; Lebach, D. E.; Ratner, M.; Ransom, R. R.; Shapiro, I. I.; Small, H.; Stroozas, B.; Geveden, R.; Goebel, J. H.; Horack, J.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Lyons, A. J.; Olivier, J.; Peters, P.; Smith, M.; Till, W.; Wooten, L.; Reeve, W.; Anderson, M.; Bennett, N. R.; Burns, K.; Dougherty, H.; Dulgov, P.; Frank, D.; Huff, L. W.; Katz, R.; Kirschenbaum, J.; Mason, G.; Murray, D.; Parmley, R.; Ratner, M. I.; Reynolds, G.; Rittmuller, P.; Schweiger, P. F.; Shehata, S.; Triebes, K.; VandenBeukel, J.; Vassar, R.; Al-Saud, T.; Al-Jadaan, A.; Al-Jibreen, H.; Al-Meshari, M.; Al-Suwaidan, B.

    2015-11-01

    The Gravity Probe B mission provided two new quantitative tests of Einstein’s theory of gravity, general relativity (GR), by cryogenic gyroscopes in Earth’s orbit. Data from four gyroscopes gave a geodetic drift-rate of -6601.8 ± 18.3 marc-s yr-1 and a frame-dragging of -37.2 ± 7.2 marc-s yr-1, to be compared with GR predictions of -6606.1 and -39.2 marc-s yr-1 (1 marc-s = 4.848 × 10-9 radians). The present paper introduces the science, engineering, data analysis, and heritage of Gravity Probe B, detailed in the accompanying 20 CQG papers.

  7. Cosmological graviton production in general relativity and related gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Garcia Maia, Márcio R.; Barrow, John D.

    1994-11-01

    A unified description of graviton creation is given for isotropic cosmological models in general relativity, Brans-Dicke theory, and higher-order gravity theories. The Bogolubov coefficents are derived in general and may be specialized to each of the possible gravity theories. The power spectrum and energy density of relic gravitons surviving a variety of early cosmological scenarios are calculated. The possibility of a nonvacuum initial state is allowed for and the problems of imposing an ultraviolet cutoff are analyzed. We distinguish carefully the effects of gravity waves on super- and subhorizon scales. The associated infrared cutoff, or the ``Allen effect,'' is discussed in detail in order to evaluate the dependence of the graviton energy density on the expansion scale factor. It is found that the nonadiabatic evolution of the graviton energy density can occur even during the radiation era when long-wavelength primoridal gravitational waves enter the horizon. Detailed, multistage, cosmological models are set up involving a sequence of changes in the equation of state for general relativity and Brans-Dicke theories. These examples include models with an inflationary phase. The resulting gravitational-wave background is calculated analytically over the whole frequency range in all cases. The limits imposed by nucleosynthesis of helium-4 are found for general relativity. We also investigate the effects of the presence of a thermal sea of gravitons in the initial state prior to gravitational-wave amplification by the expansion and calculate the effects of the small horizon size upon the thermal distributions.

  8. General covariance in quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hořava, Petr; Melby-Thompson, Charles M.

    2010-09-01

    In the minimal formulation of gravity with Lifshitz-type anisotropic scaling, the gauge symmetries of the system are foliation-preserving diffeomorphisms of spacetime. Consequently, compared to general relativity, the spectrum contains an extra scalar graviton polarization. Here we investigate the possibility of extending the gauge group by a local U(1) symmetry to “nonrelativistic general covariance.” This extended gauge symmetry eliminates the scalar graviton, and forces the coupling constant λ in the kinetic term of the minimal formulation to take its relativistic value, λ=1. The resulting theory exhibits anisotropic scaling at short distances, and reproduces many features of general relativity at long distances.

  9. Generalized massive gravity in AdS{sub 3} spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yan; Sun Yawen

    2009-06-15

    In this note we investigate the generalized massive gravity in asymptotically AdS{sub 3} spacetime by combining the two mass terms of topological massive gravity and new massive gravity theory. We study the linearized excitations around the AdS{sub 3} background and find that at a specific value of a certain combination of the two mass parameters (chiral line), one of the massive graviton solutions becomes the left-moving massless mode. It is shown that the theory is chiral at this line under Brown-Henneaux boundary condition. Because of this degeneration of the gravitons the new log solution which has a logarithmic asymptotic behavior is also a solution to this gravity theory at the chiral line. The log boundary condition which was proposed to accommodate this log solution is proved to be consistent at this chiral line. The resulting theory is no longer chiral except at a special point on the chiral line, where another new solution with log-square asymptotic behavior exists. At this special point, we prove that a new kind of boundary condition called log-square boundary condition, which accommodates this new solution, can be consistent.

  10. Seeking the loop quantum gravity Barbero-Immirzi parameter and field in 4D, N=1 supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, S. James Jr.; Ketov, Sergei V.; Yunes, Nicolas

    2009-09-15

    We embed the loop quantum gravity Barbero-Immirzi parameter and field within an action describing 4D, N=1 supergravity and thus within a low-energy effective action of superstring/M theory. We use the fully gauge-covariant description of supergravity in (curved) superspace. The gravitational constant is replaced with the vacuum expectation value of a scalar field, which in local supersymmetry is promoted to a complex, covariantly chiral scalar superfield. The imaginary part of this superfield couples to a supersymmetric Holst term. The Holst term also serves as a starting point in the loop quantum gravity action. This suggest the possibility of a relation between loop quantum gravity and supersymmetric string theory, where the Barbero-Immirzi parameter and field of the former play the role of the supersymmetric axion in the latter. Adding matter fermions in loop quantum gravity may require the extension of the Holst action through the Nieh-Yan topological invariant, while in pure, matter-free supergravity their supersymmetric extensions are the same. We show that, when the Barbero-Immirzi parameter is promoted to a field in the context of 4D supergravity, it is equivalent to adding a dynamical complex chiral (dilaton-axion) superfield with a nontrivial kinetic term (or Kaehler potential), coupled to supergravity.

  11. Seeking the loop quantum gravity Barbero-Immirzi parameter and field in 4D, N=1 supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, S. James, Jr.; Ketov, Sergei V.; Yunes, Nicolás

    2009-09-01

    We embed the loop quantum gravity Barbero-Immirzi parameter and field within an action describing 4D, N=1 supergravity and thus within a low-energy effective action of superstring/M theory. We use the fully gauge-covariant description of supergravity in (curved) superspace. The gravitational constant is replaced with the vacuum expectation value of a scalar field, which in local supersymmetry is promoted to a complex, covariantly chiral scalar superfield. The imaginary part of this superfield couples to a supersymmetric Holst term. The Holst term also serves as a starting point in the loop quantum gravity action. This suggest the possibility of a relation between loop quantum gravity and supersymmetric string theory, where the Barbero-Immirzi parameter and field of the former play the role of the supersymmetric axion in the latter. Adding matter fermions in loop quantum gravity may require the extension of the Holst action through the Nieh-Yan topological invariant, while in pure, matter-free supergravity their supersymmetric extensions are the same. We show that, when the Barbero-Immirzi parameter is promoted to a field in the context of 4D supergravity, it is equivalent to adding a dynamical complex chiral (dilaton-axion) superfield with a nontrivial kinetic term (or Kähler potential), coupled to supergravity.

  12. Generalized quantum gravity condensates for homogeneous geometries and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriti, Daniele; Pranzetti, Daniele; Ryan, James P.; Sindoni, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    We construct a generalized class of quantum gravity condensate states that allows the description of continuum homogeneous quantum geometries within the full theory. They are based on similar ideas already applied to extract effective cosmological dynamics from the group field theory formalism, and thus also from loop quantum gravity. However, they represent an improvement over the simplest condensates used in the literature, in that they are defined by an infinite superposition of graph-based states encoding in a precise way the topology of the spatial manifold. The construction is based on the definition of refinement operators on spin network states, written in a second quantized language. The construction also lends itself easily to application to the case of spherically symmetric quantum geometries.

  13. Testing general metric theories of gravity with bursting neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2008-03-15

    I show that several observable properties of bursting neutron stars in metric theories of gravity can be calculated using only conservation laws, Killing symmetries, and the Einstein equivalence principle, without requiring the validity of the general relativistic field equations. I calculate, in particular, the gravitational redshift of a surface atomic line, the touchdown luminosity of a radius-expansion burst, which is believed to be equal to the Eddington critical luminosity, and the apparent surface area of a neutron star as measured during the cooling tails of bursts. I show that, for a general metric theory of gravity, the apparent surface area of a neutron star depends on the coordinate radius of the stellar surface and on its gravitational redshift in the exact same way as in general relativity. On the other hand, the Eddington critical luminosity depends also on an additional parameter that measures the degree to which the general relativistic field equations are satisfied. These results can be used in conjunction with current and future high-energy observations of bursting neutron stars to test general relativity in the strong-field regime.

  14. General static spherically symmetric solutions in Horava gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Capasso, Dario; Polychronakos, Alexios P.

    2010-04-15

    We derive the equations describing a general static spherically symmetric configuration for the softly broken Horava gravity introduced by A. Kehagias and K. Sfetsos with nonzero shift field and no-projectability condition. These represent 'hedgehog' versions of black holes with radial 'hair' arising from the shift field. For the case of the standard de Witt kinetic term ({lambda}=1) there is an infinity of solutions that exhibit a deformed version of reparametrization invariance away from the general relativistic limit. Special solutions also arise in the anisotropic conformal point {lambda}=(1/3). Moreover we obtain an implicit general expression for the solutions with N{sub r}=0 and generic {lambda}. In this context we study the presence of horizons for standard matter and the related Hawking temperature, generalizing the corresponding relations in the usual static spherically symmetric case.

  15. Black hole hair in generalized scalar-tensor gravity.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Thomas P; Zhou, Shuang-Yong

    2014-06-27

    The most general action for a scalar field coupled to gravity that leads to second-order field equations for both the metric and the scalar--Horndeski's theory--is considered, with the extra assumption that the scalar satisfies shift symmetry. We show that in such theories, the scalar field is forced to have a nontrivial configuration in black hole spacetimes, unless one carefully tunes away a linear coupling with the Gauss-Bonnet invariant. Hence, black holes for generic theories in this class will have hair. This contradicts a recent no-hair theorem which seems to have overlooked the presence of this coupling.

  16. Strong coupling in nonrelativistic general covariant theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kai; Wang, Anzhong; Wu, Qiang; Zhu, Tao

    2011-08-01

    We study the strong coupling problem in the Horava-Melby-Thompson setup of the Horava-Lifshitz theory of gravity with an arbitrary coupling constant λ, generalized recently by da Silva, where λ describes the deviation of the theory in the infrared from general relativity that has λGR=1. We find that a scalar field in the Minkowski background becomes strongly coupled for processes with energy higher than Λω[≡(Mpl/c1)3/2Mpl|λ-1|5/4], where generically c1≪Mpl. However, this problem can be cured by introducing a new energy scale M*, so that M*<Λω, where M* denotes the suppression energy of high-order derivative terms of the theory.

  17. Generalized massive gravity in arbitrary dimensions and its Hamiltonian formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qing-Guo; Zhang, Ke-Chao; Zhou, Shuang-Yong E-mail: zkc@itp.ac.cn

    2013-08-01

    We extend the four-dimensional de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity model to a general scalar massive-tensor theory in arbitrary dimensions, coupling a dRGT massive graviton to multiple scalars and allowing for generic kinetic and mass matrix mixing between the massive graviton and the scalars, and derive its Hamiltonian formulation and associated constraint system. When passing to the Hamiltonian formulation, two different sectors arise: a general sector and a special sector. Although obtained via different ways, there are two second class constraints in either of the two sectors, eliminating the BD ghost. However, for the special sector, there are still ghost instabilities except for the case of two dimensions. In particular, for the special sector with one scalar, there is a ''second BD ghost''.

  18. General virial theorem for modified-gravity MOND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2014-01-01

    An important and useful relation is known to hold in two specific MOND theories. It pertains to low-acceleration, isolated systems of pointlike masses, mp, at positions rp, subject to gravitational forces Fp. It reads ∑prp·Fp=-(2/3)(Ga0)1/2 [(∑pmp)3/2-∑p mp3/2]; a0 is the MOND acceleration constant. Here I show that this relation holds in the nonrelativistic limit of any modified-gravity MOND theory. It follows from only the basic tenets of MOND, which include departure from standard dynamics at accelerations below a0, and space-time scale invariance in the nonrelativistic, low-acceleration limit. This implies space-dilatation invariance of the static, gravitational-field equations, which, in turn, leads to the above point-mass virial relation. Thus, the various MOND predictions and tests based on this relation hold in any modified-gravity MOND theory. Since we do not know that any of the existing MOND theories point in the right direction, it is important to identify such predictions that hold in a much larger class of theories. Among these predictions are the MOND two-body force for arbitrary masses, and a general mass-velocity-dispersion relation of the form σ2=(2/3)(MGa0)1/2[1-∑p(mp/M)3/2], where M = ∑p mp.

  19. Sound damping constant for generalized theories of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Brustein, Ram; Medved, A. J. M.

    2009-06-15

    The near-horizon metric for a black brane in anti-de Sitter space and the metric near the AdS boundary both exhibit hydrodynamic behavior. We demonstrate the equivalence of this pair of hydrodynamic systems for the sound mode of a conformal theory. This is first established for Einstein's gravity, but we then show how the sound damping constant will be modified from its Einstein form for a generalized theory. The modified damping constant is expressible as the ratio of a pair of gravitational couplings that are indicative of the sound-channel class of gravitons. This ratio of couplings differs from both that of the shear diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity to entropy ratio. Our analysis is mostly limited to conformal theories, but suggestions are made as to how this restriction might eventually be lifted.

  20. Generalized uncertainty principle and analogue of quantum gravity in optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braidotti, Maria Chiara; Musslimani, Ziad H.; Conti, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    The design of optical systems capable of processing and manipulating ultra-short pulses and ultra-focused beams is highly challenging with far reaching fundamental technological applications. One key obstacle routinely encountered while implementing sub-wavelength optical schemes is how to overcome the limitations set by standard Fourier optics. A strategy to overcome these difficulties is to utilize the concept of a generalized uncertainty principle (G-UP) which has been originally developed to study quantum gravity. In this paper we propose to use the concept of G-UP within the framework of optics to show that the generalized Schrödinger equation describing short pulses and ultra-focused beams predicts the existence of a minimal spatial or temporal scale which in turn implies the existence of maximally localized states. Using a Gaussian wavepacket with complex phase, we derive the corresponding generalized uncertainty relation and its maximally localized states. Furthermore, we numerically show that the presence of nonlinearity helps the system to reach its maximal localization. Our results may trigger further theoretical and experimental tests for practical applications and analogues of fundamental physical theories.

  1. Standard general relativity from Chern-Simons gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izaurieta, F.; Minning, P.; Perez, A.; Rodriguez, E.; Salgado, P.

    2009-07-01

    Chern-Simons models for gravity are interesting because they provide a truly gauge-invariant action principle in the fiber-bundle sense. So far, their main drawback has largely been its perceived remoteness from standard General Relativity, based on the presence of higher powers of the curvature in the Lagrangian (except, remarkably, for three-dimensional spacetime). Here we report on a simple model that suggests a mechanism by which standard General Relativity in five-dimensional spacetime may indeed emerge at a special critical point in the space of couplings, where additional degrees of freedom and corresponding “anomalous” Gauss-Bonnet constraints drop out from the Chern-Simons action. To achieve this goal, both the Lie algebra g and the symmetric g-invariant tensor that define the Chern-Simons Lagrangian are constructed by means of the Lie algebra S-expansion method with a suitable finite Abelian semigroup S. The results are generalized to arbitrary odd dimensions, and the possible extension to the case of eleven-dimensional supergravity is briefly discussed.

  2. Cosmological evolution of generalized non-local gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue; Wu, Ya-Bo; Li, Song; Liu, Yu-Chen; Chen, Bo-Hai; Chai, Yun-Tian; Shu, Shuang

    2016-07-01

    We construct a class of generalized non-local gravity (GNLG) model which is the modified theory of general relativity (GR) obtained by adding a term m2n-2 R□-nR to the Einstein-Hilbert action. Concretely, we not only study the gravitational equation for the GNLG model by introducing auxiliary scalar fields, but also analyse the classical stability and examine the cosmological consequences of the model for different exponent n. We find that the half of the scalar fields are always ghost-like and the exponent n must be taken even number for a stable GNLG model. Meanwhile, the model spontaneously generates three dominant phases of the evolution of the universe, and the equation of state parameters turn out to be phantom-like. Furthermore, we clarify in another way that exponent n should be even numbers by the spherically symmetric static solutions in Newtonian gauge. It is worth stressing that the results given by us can include ones in refs. [28, 34] as the special case of n=2.

  3. Some Properties of Generalized Connections in Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velhinho, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    Theories of connections play an important role in fundamental interactions, including Yang-Mills theories and gravity in the Ashtekar formulation. Typically in such cases, the classical configuration space {A}/ {G} of connections modulo gauge transformations is an infinite dimensional non-linear space of great complexity. Having in mind a rigorous quantization procedure, methods of functional calculus in an extension of {A}/ {G} have been developed. For a compact gauge group G, the compact space /line { {A}{ {/}} {G}} ( ⊃ {A}/ {G}) introduced by Ashtekar and Isham using C*-algebraic methods is a natural candidate to replace {A}/ {G} in the quantum context, 1 allowing the construction of diffeomorphism invariant measures. 2,3,4 Equally important is the space of generalized connections bar {A} introduced in a similar way by Baez. 5 bar {A} is particularly useful for the definition of vector fields in /line { {A}{ {/}} {G}} , fundamental in the construction of quantum observables. 6 These works crucially depend on the use of (generalized) Wilson variables associated to certain types of curves. We will consider the case of piecewise analytic curves, 1,2,5 althought most of the arguments apply equally to the piecewise smooth case. 7,8...

  4. General polytropic dynamic cylinder under self-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yu-Qing

    2015-12-01

    We explore self-similar hydrodynamics of general polytropic (GP) and isothermal cylinders of infinite length with axial uniformity and axisymmetry under self-gravity. Specific entropy conservation along streamlines serves as the dynamic equation of state. Together with possible axial flows, we construct classes of analytic and semi-analytic non-linear dynamic solutions for either cylindrical expansion or contraction radially by solving cylindrical Lane-Emden equations. By extensive numerical explorations and fitting trials in reference to asymptotes derived for large index n, we infer several convenient empirical formulae for characteristic solution properties of cylindrical Lane-Emden equations in terms of n values. A new type of asymptotic solutions for small x is also derived in the Appendix. These analyses offer hints for self-similar dynamic evolution of molecular filaments for forming protostars, brown dwarfs and gaseous planets and of large-scale gaseous arms or starburst rings in (barred) spiral galaxies for forming young massive stars. Such dynamic solutions are necessary starting background for further three-dimensional (in)stability analysis of various modes. They may be used to initialize numerical simulations and serve as important benchmarks for testing numerical codes. Such GP formalism can be further generalized to include magnetic field for a GP magnetohydrodynamic analysis.

  5. Dynamical aspects of generalized Palatini theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Sanchis-Alepuz, Hèlios; Tripathi, Swapnil

    2009-07-01

    We study the field equations of modified theories of gravity in which the Lagrangian is a general function of the Ricci scalar and Ricci-squared terms in Palatini formalism. We show that the independent connection can be expressed as the Levi-Cività connection of an auxiliary metric which, in particular cases of interest, is related with the physical metric by means of a disformal transformation. This relation between physical and auxiliary metric boils down to a conformal transformation in the case of f(R) theories. We also show with explicit models that the inclusion of Ricci-squared terms in the action can impose upper bounds on the accessible values of pressure and density, which might have important consequences for the early time cosmology and black hole formation scenarios. Our results indicate that the phenomenology of f(R,RμνRμν) theories is much richer than that of f(R) and f(RμνRμν) theories and that they also share some similarities with Bekenstein’s relativistic theory of MOND.

  6. Generalized second law of thermodynamics in f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Karami, K.; Abdolmaleki, A. E-mail: AAbdolmaleki@uok.ac.ir

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the validity of the generalized second law (GSL) of gravitational thermodynamics in the framework of f(T) modified teleparallel gravity. We consider a spatially flat FRW universe containing only the pressureless matter. The boundary of the universe is assumed to be enclosed by the Hubble horizon. For two viable f(T) models containing f(T) = T+μ{sub 1}((−T)){sup n} and f(T) = T−μ{sub 2}T(1−e{sup βT{sub 0}/T}), we first calculate the effective equation of state and deceleration parameters. Then, (we investigate the null and strong energy conditions and conclude that a sudden future singularity appears in both models. Furthermore, using a cosmographic analysis we check the viability of two models. Finally, we examine the validity of the GSL and find that for both models it) is satisfied from the early times to the present epoch. But in the future, the GSL is violated for the special ranges of the torsion scalar T.

  7. Cosmology in nonrelativistic general covariant theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Anzhong; Wu, Yumei

    2011-02-01

    Horava and Melby-Thompson recently proposed a new version of the Horava-Lifshitz theory of gravity, in which the spin-0 graviton is eliminated by introducing a Newtonian prepotential φ and a local U(1) gauge field A. In this paper, we first derive the corresponding Hamiltonian, supermomentum constraints, the dynamical equations, and the equations for φ and A, in the presence of matter fields. Then, we apply the theory to cosmology and obtain the modified Friedmann equation and the conservation law of energy, in addition to the equations for φ and A. When the spatial curvature is different from zero, terms behaving like dark radiation and stiff-fluid exist, from which, among other possibilities, a bouncing universe can be constructed. We also study linear perturbations of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe with any given spatial curvature k, and we derive the most general formulas for scalar perturbations. The vector and tensor perturbations are the same as those recently given by one of the present authors [A. Wang, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 82, 124063 (2010).] in the setup of Sotiriou, Visser, and Weinfurtner. Applying these formulas to the Minkowski background, we have shown explicitly that the scalar and vector perturbations of the metric indeed vanish, and the only remaining modes are the massless spin-2 gravitons.

  8. Front conditions for gravity currents in channels of general cross-section: some general conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungarish, Marius

    2015-11-01

    We consider the propagation of a high-Reynolds-number gravity current in a horizontal channel with general cross-section of width f (z) , 0 <= z <= H the gravity acceleration g acts in - z direction. (The rectangular case is f (z) = const.) We assume a two-layer system of fluids of densities ρc (current, of height h) and ρa (ambient, filling the remaining part of the channel). We revisit the derivation of the nose Froude-number condition Fr = U /(g' h) 1 / 2 ; U is the speed of propagation of the current and g' = (ρc /ρa - 1) g . We present compact insightful expressions of Fr and energy dissipation as a functions of φ (= area fraction occupied by the current in the cross-section), and show that a degree of freedom is present. We demonstrate that the extension of the closure suggested by Benjamin for the rectangular cross-section, namely that the bottom is a perfect stagnation line, produces Fr solutions which are optimal with respect to several useful criteria. However, the energy conserving closure yields problematic Fr results, as manifest in particular by invalidity for deep currents (small h / H). Connection with realistic time-dependent gravity currents is discussed.

  9. Tests of general relativity in earth orbit using a superconducting gravity gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1989-01-01

    Interesting new tests of general relativity could be performed in earth orbit using a sensitive superconducting gravity gradiometer under development. Two such experiments are discussed here: a null test of the tracelessness of the Riemann tensor and detection of the Lense-Thirring term in the earth's gravity field. The gravity gradient signals in various spacecraft orientations are derived, and dominant error sources in each experimental setting are discussed. The instrument, spacecraft, and orbit requirements imposed by the experiments are derived.

  10. Tests of general relativity in earth orbit using a superconducting gravity gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1989-01-01

    Interesting new tests of general relativity could be performed in earth orbit using a sensitive superconducting gravity gradiometer under development. Two such experiments are discussed here: a null test of the tracelessness of the Riemann tensor and detection of the Lense-Thirring term in the earth's gravity field. The gravity gradient signals in various spacecraft orientations are derived, and dominant error sources in each experimental setting are discussed. The instrument, spacecraft, and orbit requirements imposed by the experiments are derived.

  11. Extended slow-roll conditions and primordial fluctuations: multiple scalar fields and generalized gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Masahide E-mail: gucci@phys.aoyama.ac.jp

    2009-01-15

    As an extension of our previous study, we derive slow-roll conditions for multiple scalar fields which are non-minimally coupled with gravity and for generalized gravity theories of the form f({phi}, R). We provide simple formulae of the spectral indices of scalar/tensor perturbations in terms of the slow-roll parameters.

  12. Perturbations of the Robertson-Walker space - Multicomponent sources and generalized gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jai-Chan )

    1991-07-01

    Cosmological perturbation equations in the Robertson-Walker background applicable to some classes of generalized gravity theories, including multicomponent fluids and fields, are presented. The equations are expressed in a form which does not depend on the frame, and the adaptation of the equations into a particular gauge or into some gauge-invariant formulation becomes trivial. A generalization of formalism applicable to a variety of generalized gravity theories, including most of the gravity theories with scalar field and scalar curvature combination, is developed. 35 refs.

  13. Generalized Vaidya solutions and Misner-Sharp mass for n -dimensional massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ya-Peng; Wu, Xin-Meng; Zhang, Hongsheng

    2017-04-01

    Dynamical solutions are always of interest to people in gravity theories. We derive a series of generalized Vaidya solutions in the n -dimensional de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity with a singular reference metric. Similar to the case of the Einstein gravity, the generalized Vaidya solution can describe shining/absorbing stars. Moreover, we also find a more general Vaidya-like solution by introducing a more generic matter field than the pure radiation in the original Vaidya spacetime. As a result, the above generalized Vaidya solution is naturally included in this Vaidya-like solution as a special case. We investigate the thermodynamics for this Vaidya-like spacetime by using the unified first law and present the generalized Misner-Sharp mass. Our results show that the generalized Minser-Sharp mass does exist in this spacetime. In addition, the usual Clausius relation δ Q =T d S holds on the apparent horizon, which implicates that the massive gravity is in a thermodynamic equilibrium state. We find that the work density vanishes for the generalized Vaidya solution, while it appears in the more general Vaidya-like solution. Furthermore, the covariant generalized Minser-Sharp mass in the n -dimensional de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity is also derived by taking a general metric ansatz into account.

  14. Topological charged black holes in generalized Hořava-Lifshitz gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tian-Jun; Qi, Yong-Hui; Wu, Yue-Liang; Zhang, Yun-Long

    2014-12-01

    As a candidate of quantum gravity in ultrahigh energy, the (3 +1 )-dimensional Hořava-Lifshitz (HL) gravity with critical exponent z ≠1 indicates anisotropy between time and space at short distance. In the paper, we investigate the most general z =d Hořava-Lifshitz gravity in arbitrary spatial dimension d , with a generic dynamical Ricci flow parameter λ and a detailed balance violation parameter ɛ . In arbitrary dimensional generalized HLd +1 gravity with z ≥d at long distance, we study the topological neutral black hole solutions with general λ in z =d HLd +1 , as well as the topological charged black holes with λ =1 in z =d HLd +1 . The HL gravity in the Lagrangian formulation is adopted, while in the Hamiltonian formulation, it reduces to Dirac-De Witt's canonical gravity with λ =1 . In particular, the topological charged black holes in z =5 HL6 , z =4 HL5 , z =3 ,4 HL4 , and z =2 HL3 with λ =1 are solved. Their asymptotical behaviors near the infinite boundary and near the horizon are explored, respectively. We also study the behavior of the topological black holes in the (d +1 )-dimensional HL gravity with U (1 ) gauge field in the zero temperature limit and finite temperature limit, respectively. Thermodynamics of the topological charged black holes with λ =1 , including temperature, entropy, heat capacity, and free energy are evaluated.

  15. General proof of the entropy principle for self-gravitating fluid in f ( R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiongjun; Guo, Minyong; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-08-01

    The discussions on the connection between gravity and thermodynamics attract much attention recently. We consider a static self-gravitating perfect fluid system in f ( R) gravity, which is an important theory could explain the accelerated expansion of the universe. We first show that the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation of f ( R) theories can be obtained by thermodynamical method in spherical symmetric spacetime. Then we prove that the maximum entropy principle is also valid for f ( R) gravity in general static spacetimes beyond spherical symmetry. The result shows that if the constraint equation is satisfied and the temperature of fluid obeys Tolmans law, the extrema of total entropy implies other components of gravitational equations. Conversely, if f ( R) gravitational equation hold, the total entropy of the fluid should be extremum. Our work suggests a general and solid connection between f ( R) gravity and thermodynamics.

  16. Cosmology for quadratic gravity in generalized Weyl geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez, Jose Beltrán; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Koivisto, Tomi S.

    2016-04-26

    A class of vector-tensor theories arises naturally in the framework of quadratic gravity in spacetimes with linear vector distortion. Requiring the absence of ghosts for the vector field imposes an interesting condition on the allowed connections with vector distortion: the resulting one-parameter family of connections generalises the usual Weyl geometry with polar torsion. The cosmology of this class of theories is studied, focusing on isotropic solutions wherein the vector field is dominated by the temporal component. De Sitter attractors are found and inhomogeneous perturbations around such backgrounds are analysed. In particular, further constraints on the models are imposed by excluding pathologies in the scalar, vector and tensor fluctuations. Various exact background solutions are presented, describing a constant and an evolving dark energy, a bounce and a self-tuning de Sitter phase. However, the latter two scenarios are not viable under a closer scrutiny.

  17. Smarr formula for BTZ black holes in general three-dimensional gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chao; Gong, Li; Zhang, Baocheng

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have presented the interpretation of thermodynamic enthalpy for the mass of BTZ black holes and the corresponding Smarr formula. All these are made in the background of three-dimensional (3D) general relativity. In this paper, we extend such interpretation into general 3D gravity models. It is found that the direct extension is unfeasible and some extra conditions are required to preserve both the Smarr formula and the first law of black hole thermodynamics. Thus, BTZ black hole thermodynamics enforces some constraints for general 3D gravity models, and these constraints are consistent with all previous discussions.

  18. Cosmological viability of massive gravity with generalized matter coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, Adam R.; Enander, Jonas; Mörtsell, Edvard; Akrami, Yashar; Koivisto, Tomi S.; Könnig, Frank E-mail: enander@fysik.su.se E-mail: tomi.koivisto@nordita.org E-mail: edvard@fysik.su.se

    2015-04-01

    There is a no-go theorem forbidding flat and closed FLRW solutions in massive gravity on a flat reference metric, while open solutions are unstable. Recently it was shown that this no-go theorem can be overcome if at least some matter couples to a hybrid metric composed of both the dynamical and the fixed reference metric. We show that this is not compatible with the standard description of cosmological sources in terms of effective perfect fluids, and the predictions of the theory become sensitive either to the detailed field-theoretical modelling of the matter content or to the presence of additional dark degrees of freedom. This is a serious practical complication. Furthermore, we demonstrate that viable cosmological background evolution with a perfect fluid appears to require the presence of fields with highly contrived properties. This could be improved if the equivalence principle is broken by coupling only some of the fields to the composite metric, but viable self-accelerating solutions due only to the massive graviton are difficult to obtain.

  19. Generalized virial theorem in Palatini f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sefiedgar, A. S.; Atazadeh, K.; Sepangi, H. R.

    2009-09-15

    We use the collision-free Boltzmann equation in Palatini f(R) gravity to derive the virial theorem within the context of the Palatini approach. It is shown that the virial mass is proportional to certain geometrical terms appearing in the Einstein field equations which contributes to gravitational energy and that such geometric mass can be attributed to the virial mass discrepancy in a cluster of galaxies. We then derive the velocity dispersion relation for clusters, followed by the metric tensor components inside the cluster as well as the f(R) Lagrangian in terms of the observational parameters. Since these quantities may also be obtained experimentally, the f(R) virial theorem is a convenient tool to test the viability of f(R) theories in different models. Finally, we discuss the limitations of our approach in light of the cosmological averaging used and questions that have been raised in the literature against such averaging procedures in the context of the present work.

  20. Post-Newtonian parameter γ for multiscalar-tensor gravity with a general potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohmann, Manuel; Järv, Laur; Kuusk, Piret; Randla, Erik; Vilson, Ott

    2016-12-01

    We compute the parametrized post-Newtonian parameter γ in the case of a static point source for multiscalar-tensor gravity with completely general nonderivative couplings and potential in the Jordan frame. Similarly to the single massive field case γ depends exponentially on the distance from the source and is determined by the length of a vector of nonminimal coupling in the space of scalar fields and its orientation relative to the mass eigenvectors. Using data from the Cassini tracking experiment, we estimate bounds on a general theory with two scalar fields. Our formalism can be utilized for a wide range of models, which we illustrate by applying it to nonminimally coupled Higgs SU(2) doublet, general hybrid metric-Palatini gravity, linear (□-1 ) and quadratic (□-2) nonlocal gravity.

  1. The Mø ller Energy Complexes of Various Wormholes in General Relativity and Teleparallel Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygün, Melis; Yilmaz, Ihsan

    2007-08-01

    This study is aimed to elaborate the energy problem of general wormhole space-times in two different approaches of gravity such as general relativity and teleparallel gravity. In this connection, the energy for well-known wormhole space-times is evaluated using Møller energy-momentum prescription in these different approximations. We obtained that energy distributions of Møller definition give the same results for various wormhole space-times in general relativity (GR) and teleparallel gravity (TG). The results strengthen the importance of Møller energy-momentum definitions in given space-times and viewpoint of Lessner that Møller energy-momentum complex is a powerful concept for energy and momentum.

  2. Galileons coupled to massive gravity: general analysis and cosmological solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Goon, Garrett; Trodden, Mark; Gümrükçüoğlu, A. Emir; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Mukohyama, Shinji E-mail: Emir.Gumrukcuoglu@nottingham.ac.uk E-mail: shinji.mukohyama@ipmu.jp

    2014-08-01

    We further develop the framework for coupling galileons and Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) scalar fields to a massive graviton while retaining both the non-linear symmetries of the scalars and ghost-freedom of the theory. The general construction is recast in terms of vielbeins which simplifies calculations and allows for compact expressions. Expressions for the general form of the action are derived, with special emphasis on those models which descend from maximally symmetric spaces. We demonstrate the existence of maximally symmetric solutions to the fully non-linear theory and analyze their spectrum of quadratic fluctuations. Finally, we consider self-accelerating cosmological solutions and study their perturbations, showing that the vector and scalar modes have vanishing kinetic terms.

  3. Capillary Gravity Waves over an Obstruction - Forced Generalized KdV equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jeongwhan; Whang, S. I.; Sun, Shu-Ming

    2013-11-01

    Capillary gravity surface waves of an ideal fluid flow over an obstruction is considered. When the Bond number is near the critical value 1/3, a forced generalized KdV equation of fifth order is derived. We study the equation analytically and numerically. Existence and stability of solutions are studied and new types of numerical solutions are found.

  4. CPT symmetry and antimatter gravity in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villata, M.

    2011-04-01

    The gravitational behavior of antimatter is still unknown. While we may be confident that antimatter is self-attractive, the interaction between matter and antimatter might be either attractive or repulsive. We investigate this issue on theoretical grounds. Starting from the CPT invariance of physical laws, we transform matter into antimatter in the equations of both electrodynamics and gravitation. In the former case, the result is the well-known change of sign of the electric charge. In the latter, we find that the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter is a mutual repulsion, i.e. antigravity appears as a prediction of general relativity when CPT is applied. This result supports cosmological models attempting to explain the Universe accelerated expansion in terms of a matter-antimatter repulsive interaction.

  5. Modified gravity: the CMB, weak lensing and general parameterisations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Shaun A.; Appleby, Stephen A.; Weller, Jochen E-mail: stephen.appleby@ph.tum.de

    2011-03-01

    We examine general physical parameterisations for viable gravitational models in the f(R) framework. This is related to the mass of an additional scalar field, called the scalaron, that is introduced by the theories. Using a simple parameterisation for the scalaron mass M(a) we show there is an exact correspondence between the model and popular parameterisations of the modified Poisson equation μ(a,k) and the ratio of the Newtonian potentials η(a,k). We argue that although f(R) models are well described by the general [μ(a,k),η(a,k)] parameterization, specific functional forms of μ,η in the literature do not accurately represent f(R) behaviour, specifically at low redshift. We subsequently construct an improved description for the scalaron mass (and therefore μ(a,k) and η(a,k)) which captures their essential features and has benefits derived from a more physical origin. We study the scalaron's observational signatures and show the modification to the background Friedmann equation and CMB power spectrum to be small. We also investigate its effects in the linear and non linear matter power spectrum-where the signatures are evident-thus giving particular importance to weak lensing as a probe of these models. Using this new form, we demonstrate how the next generation Euclid survey will constrain these theories and its complementarity to current solar system tests. In the most optimistic case Euclid, together with a Planck prior, can constrain a fiducial scalaron mass M{sub 0} = 9.4 × 10{sup −30}eV at the ∼ 20% level. However, the decay rate of the scalaron mass, with fiducial value ν = 1.5, can be constrained to ∼ 3% uncertainty.

  6. Vaidya solution and its generalization in de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Li, Xin-Zhou; Zhai, Xiang-Hua

    2016-12-01

    We present a detailed study of the Vaidya solution and its generalization in de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) theory. Since the diffeomorphism invariance can be restored with the Stückelberg fields ϕa introduced, there is a new invariant Ia b=gμ ν∂μϕa∂νϕb in the massive gravity, which adds to the ones usually encountered in general relativity. There is no conventional Vaidya solution if we choose unitary gauge. In this paper, we obtain three types of self-consistent ansatz with some nonunitary gauge, and find accordingly the Vaidya, generalized Vaidya, and furry Vaidya solution. As by-products, we obtain a series of furry black hole. The Vaidya solution and its generalization in dRGT massive gravity describe the black holes with a variable horizon.

  7. Compact Stars in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld Gravity and General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, Yu Hin

    In this thesis we apply the Eddington inspired Born-Infeld (EiBI) gravity to study the structure and the properties of compact stars. The hydrostatic equilibrium structure of compact stars characterized by different equations of state (EOSs) is considered and it is found that EiBI gravity can lead to different new features that are not found in standard general relativity (GR). A unified framework to study radial perturbations and the stability of compact stars in this theory is also developed. As in the GR case, the frequency- square of the fundamental oscillation mode vanishes for the maximum mass stellar configuration. Also, the oscillation modes depend on the parameter kappa introduced in EiBI gravity and the dependence is stronger for higher-order modes. We also discover that EiBI gravity imposes certain constraints on the EOSs that allow physical stable equilibrium states of compact stars to exist. However, such constraints are unphysical as the validity of an EOS should be independent of the theory of gravity, hinting that EiBI gravity needs to be modified. On the other hand, we demonstrate that two universal relations of compact stars, namely the I-Love-Q relation, which relates the moment of intertia, the tidal Love number and the quadrupole moment of compact stars, and the f-I relation, which links the f-mode oscillation frequency and the moment of inertia of compact stars together, still hold in EiBI gravity within the observational bounds of kappa. The origin of the two universal relations is then studied and it is found that a stiff EOS at the core of the compact star guarantees the universality. The two universal relations are further extended and universal relations relating the multipolar f-mode oscillation frequency and the corresponding multipolar tidal Love number, which can be derived analytically in the Newtonian limit for stars with sufficiently stiff EOSs, are found.

  8. Post-Newtonian parameter γ in generalized non-local gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue; Wu, YaBo; Yang, WeiQiang; Zhang, ChengYuan; Chen, BoHai; Zhang, Nan

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the post-Newtonian parameter γ and derive its formalism in generalized non-local (GNL) gravity, which is the modified theory of general relativity (GR) obtained by adding a term m 2 n-2 R☐-n R to the Einstein-Hilbert action. Concretely, based on parametrizing the generalized non-local action in which gravity is described by a series of dynamical scalar fields ϕ i in addition to the metric tensor g μν, the post-Newtonian limit is computed, and the effective gravitational constant as well as the post-Newtonian parameters are directly obtained from the generalized non-local gravity. Moreover, by discussing the values of the parametrized post-Newtonian parameters γ, we can compare our expressions and results with those in Hohmann and Järv et al. (2016), as well as current observational constraints on the values of γ in Will (2006). Hence, we draw restrictions on the nonminimal coupling terms F̅ around their background values.

  9. Quantification of the gravity wave forcing of the migrating diurnal tide in a gravity wave-resolving general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shingo; Miyahara, Saburo

    2009-04-01

    The interaction of gravity waves (GWs) and the migrating diurnal tide are studied in a GW-resolving general circulation model (GCM) by calculating the tidal components of zonal wind accelerations and equivalent Rayleigh friction due to tidal induced GW dissipation. Two 15-day periods for perpetual equinoctial and solstice simulations are analyzed, which are performed with the Japanese Atmospheric General circulation model for Upper Atmosphere Research (JAGUAR) high-resolution GCM. The model can directly simulate GWs with horizontal wavelengths greater than about 190 km, and, thus reproduce the general features of the mean winds and temperatures from the surface to the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The amplitudes of the migrating diurnal tide are successfully simulated during both seasons, and the tidal winds affect the altitudes of GW dissipation in the low-latitude MLT. The tidal component of GW forcing has maximal values of about 15 m s-1 d-1 near the maximal vertical shears of the tidal winds and generally works to shorten the vertical wavelength of the migrating diurnal tide. The phase relationship between the tidal winds and the tidal induced GW forcing is not exactly 90° out of phase, causing amplification/suppression of the tide. The GW forcing amplifies the migrating diurnal tide during the equinox, while during the solstice, it suppresses the tidal winds in the upper mesosphere of both hemispheres. This difference in behavior can be attributed to a seasonal variation of the mean zonal winds, because combination of the mean and tidal winds affects the altitudes of GW dissipation.

  10. Relative equilibria for general gravity fields in the sphere-restricted full two-body problem.

    PubMed

    Scheeres, D J

    2005-12-01

    Equilibrium conditions for a mutually attracting general mass distribution and point mass are stated. The equilibrium conditions can be reduced to six equations in six unknowns, plus the existence of integrals of motion consisting of the total angular momentum and energy of the system. The equilibrium conditions are further reduced to two independent equations, and their theoretical properties are studied. We state a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for an equilibrium that is well suited to the computation of certain classes of equilibria. These equations are solved for nonsymmetric gravity fields of interest, using a real asteroid shape model for the general gravity fields. The stability of the resulting equilibria are also noted.

  11. Coherent states, quantum gravity, and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. I. General considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Stottmeister, Alexander Thiemann, Thomas

    2016-06-15

    This article, as the first of three, aims at establishing the (time-dependent) Born-Oppenheimer approximation, in the sense of space adiabatic perturbation theory, for quantum systems constructed by techniques of the loop quantum gravity framework, especially the canonical formulation of the latter. The analysis presented here fits into a rather general framework and offers a solution to the problem of applying the usual Born-Oppenheimer ansatz for molecular (or structurally analogous) systems to more general quantum systems (e.g., spin-orbit models) by means of space adiabatic perturbation theory. The proposed solution is applied to a simple, finite dimensional model of interacting spin systems, which serves as a non-trivial, minimal model of the aforesaid problem. Furthermore, it is explained how the content of this article and its companion affect the possible extraction of quantum field theory on curved spacetime from loop quantum gravity (including matter fields).

  12. Massive Gravity.

    PubMed

    de Rham, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We review recent progress in massive gravity. We start by showing how different theories of massive gravity emerge from a higher-dimensional theory of general relativity, leading to the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model (DGP), cascading gravity, and ghost-free massive gravity. We then explore their theoretical and phenomenological consistency, proving the absence of Boulware-Deser ghosts and reviewing the Vainshtein mechanism and the cosmological solutions in these models. Finally, we present alternative and related models of massive gravity such as new massive gravity, Lorentz-violating massive gravity and non-local massive gravity.

  13. On asymmetric generalized solitary gravity-capillary waves in finite depth.

    PubMed

    Gao, T; Wang, Z; Vanden-Broeck, J-M

    2016-10-01

    Generalized solitary waves propagating at the surface of a fluid of finite depth are considered. The fluid is assumed to be inviscid and incompressible and the flow to be irrotational. Both the effects of gravity and surface tension are included. It is shown that in addition to the classical symmetric waves, there are new asymmetric solutions. These new branches of solutions bifurcate from the branches of symmetric waves. The detailed bifurcation diagrams as well as typical wave profiles are presented.

  14. Inverse scattering method and soliton double solution family for the general symplectic gravity model

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Yajun

    2008-08-15

    A previously established Hauser-Ernst-type extended double-complex linear system is slightly modified and used to develop an inverse scattering method for the stationary axisymmetric general symplectic gravity model. The reduction procedures in this inverse scattering method are found to be fairly simple, which makes the inverse scattering method applied fine and effective. As an application, a concrete family of soliton double solutions for the considered theory is obtained.

  15. Denseness of Ashtekar Lewandowski states and a generalized cut-off in loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velhinho, J. M.

    2005-07-01

    We show that the set of states of the Ashtekar Isham Lewandowski holonomy algebra defined by elements of the Ashtekar Lewandowski Hilbert space is dense in the space of all states. We consider weak convergence properties of a modified version of the cut-off procedure currently in use in loop quantum gravity. This version is adapted to vector states rather than to general distributions.

  16. Mass bounds for compact spherically symmetric objects in generalized gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burikham, Piyabut; Harko, Tiberiu; Lake, Matthew J.

    2016-09-01

    We derive upper and lower bounds on the mass-radius ratio of stable compact objects in extended gravity theories, in which modifications of the gravitational dynamics via-á-vis standard general relativity are described by an effective contribution to the matter energy-momentum tensor. Our results include the possibility of a variable coupling between the matter sector and the gravitational field and are valid for a large class of generalized gravity models. The generalized continuity and Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations are expressed in terms of the effective mass, density, and pressure, given by the bare values plus additional contributions from the total energy-momentum tensor, and general theoretical limits for the maximum and minimum mass-radius ratios are explicitly obtained. As applications of the formalism developed herein, we consider compact bosonic objects, described by scalar-tensor gravitational theories with self-interacting scalar field potentials, and charged compact objects, respectively. For Higgs-type models, we find that these bounds can be expressed in terms of the value of the potential at the surface of the compact object. Minimizing the energy with respect to the radius, we obtain explicit upper and lower bounds on the mass, which admits a Chandrasekhar-type representation. For charged compact objects, we consider the effects of the Poincaré stresses on the equilibrium structure and obtain bounds on the radial and tangential stresses. As a possible astrophysical test of our results, we obtain the general bound on the gravitational redshift for compact objects in extended gravity theories and explicitly compute the redshift restrictions for objects with nonzero effective surface pressure. General implications of minimum mass bounds for the gravitational stability of fundamental particles and for the existence of holographic duality between bulk and boundary degrees of freedom are also considered.

  17. Torsional Newton–Cartan gravity from the large c expansion of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bleeken, Dieter

    2017-09-01

    We revisit the manifestly covariant large c expansion of general relativity, c being the speed of light. Assuming the relativistic connection has no pole in c-2 , this expansion is known to reproduce Newton–Cartan gravity and a covariant version of post-Newtonian corrections to it. We show that relaxing this assumption leads to the inclusion of twistless torsion in the effective non-relativistic theory. We argue that the resulting twistless torsion Newton–Cartan theory is an effective description of a non-relativistic regime of general relativity that extends Newtonian physics by including strong gravitational time dilation.

  18. Energy Conditions and Constraints on the Generalized Non-Local Gravity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ya-Bo; Zhang, Xue; Chen, Bo-Hai; Zhang, Nan; Wu, Meng-Meng

    2017-07-01

    We study and derive the energy conditions in generalized non-local gravity, which is the modified theory of general relativity obtained by adding a term {m}2n-2R{\\square }-nR to the Einstein-Hilbert action. Moreover, to obtain some insight on the meaning of the energy conditions, we illustrate the evolutions of four energy conditions with the model parameter ɛ for different n. By analysis we give the constraints on the model parameters ɛ. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 11175077 and 11575075, and the Natural Science Foundation of Liaoning Province under Grant No L201683666.

  19. Point particles in 2+1 dimensions: general relativity and loop gravity descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziprick, Jonathan

    2015-02-01

    We develop a Hamiltonian description of point particles in (2+1)-dimensions using connection and frame-field variables for general relativity. The topology of each spatial hypersurface is that of a punctured two-sphere with particles residing at the punctures. We describe this topology with a CW complex (a collection of two cells glued together along the edges), and use this to fix a gauge and reduce the Hamiltonian. The equations of motion for the fields describe a dynamical triangulation where each vertex moves according to the equation of motion for a free relativistic particle. The evolution is continuous except for when triangles collapse (i.e. the edges become parallel) causing discrete, topological changes in the underlying CW complex. We then introduce the loop gravity phase space parameterized by holonomy-flux variables on a graph (a network of one-dimensional links). By embedding a graph within the CW complex, we find a description of this system in terms of loop variables. The resulting equations of motion describe the same dynamical triangulation as the connection and frame-field variables. In this framework, the collapse of a triangle causes a discrete change in the underlying graph, giving a concrete realization of the graph-changing moves that many expect to feature in full loop quantum gravity. The main result is a dynamical model of loop gravity that agrees with general relativity and is well-suited for quantization using existing methods.

  20. A generalization of unimodular gravity with vacuum-matter energy exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkhamer, F. R.

    An effective theory of gravity in the infrared is proposed, which involves the determinant of the metric relative to the determinant of a prior metric taken to be that of Minkowski spacetime. This effective theory can be interpreted as a generalization of unimodular gravity. In a cosmological context with ultrarelativistic or cold matter, the resulting field equations have only one solution, empty Minkowski spacetime (selected by the prior metric of the theory). The introduction of energy exchange between vacuum and matter gives rise to nonstatic cosmic solutions. It is found that Minkowski spacetime (from the prior metric) appears as an attractor of the dynamic equations. A further result is that energy-momentum conservation of any localized material system is violated in a nonconstant gravitational background. The impact for experiment appears, however, negligible if the vacuum-energy mass-scale is of order meV.

  1. Holographic thermalization and generalized Vaidya-AdS solutions in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ya-Peng; Zeng, Xiao-Xiong; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the effect of massive graviton on the holographic thermalization process. Before doing this, we first find out the generalized Vaidya-AdS solutions in the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity by directly solving the gravitational equations. Then, we study the thermodynamics of these Vaidya-AdS solutions by using the Misner-Sharp energy and unified first law, which also shows that the massive gravity is in a thermodynamic equilibrium state. Moreover, we adopt the two-point correlation function at equal time to explore the thermalization process in the dual field theory, and to see how the graviton mass parameter affects this process from the viewpoint of AdS/CFT correspondence. Our results show that the graviton mass parameter will increase the holographic thermalization process.

  2. Analytical general solutions for static wormholes in f(R,T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, P. H. R. S.; Correa, R. A. C.; Lobato, R. V.

    2017-07-01

    Originally proposed as a tool for teaching the general theory of relativity, wormholes are today approached in many different ways and are seeing as an efficient alternative for interstellar and time travel. Attempts to achieve observational signatures of wormholes have been growing as the subject has become more and more popular. In this article we investigate some f(R,T) theoretical predictions for static wormholes, i.e., wormholes whose throat radius can be considered a constant. Since the T-dependence in f(R,T) gravity is due to the consideration of quantum effects, a further investigation of wormholes in such a theory is well motivated. We obtain the energy conditions of static wormholes in f(R,T) gravity and apply an analytical approach to find their physical and geometrical solutions. We highlight that our results are in agreement with previous solutions and assumptions presented in the literature.

  3. Most general flat space boundary conditions in three-dimensional Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grumiller, Daniel; Merbis, Wout; Riegler, Max

    2017-09-01

    We consider the most general asymptotically flat boundary conditions in three-dimensional Einstein gravity in the sense that we allow for the maximal number of independent free functions in the metric, leading to six towers of boundary charges and six associated chemical potentials. We find as associated asymptotic symmetry algebra an isl(2)k current algebra. Restricting the charges and chemical potentials in various ways recovers previous cases, such as bms3 , Heisenberg or Detournay–Riegler, all of which can be obtained as contractions of corresponding AdS3 constructions. Finally, we show that a flat space contraction can induce an additional Carrollian contraction. As examples we provide two novel sets of boundary conditions for Carroll gravity.

  4. Zebrafish Bone and General Physiology Are Differently Affected by Hormones or Changes in Gravity

    PubMed Central

    Aceto, Jessica; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Marée, Raphael; Dardenne, Nadia; Jeanray, Nathalie; Wehenkel, Louis; Aleström, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish such as zebrafish (Danio rerio) are increasingly used for physiological, genetic and developmental studies. Our understanding of the physiological consequences of altered gravity in an entire organism is still incomplete. We used altered gravity and drug treatment experiments to evaluate their effects specifically on bone formation and more generally on whole genome gene expression. By combining morphometric tools with an objective scoring system for the state of development for each element in the head skeleton and specific gene expression analysis, we confirmed and characterized in detail the decrease or increase of bone formation caused by a 5 day treatment (from 5dpf to 10 dpf) of, respectively parathyroid hormone (PTH) or vitamin D3 (VitD3). Microarray transcriptome analysis after 24 hours treatment reveals a general effect on physiology upon VitD3 treatment, while PTH causes more specifically developmental effects. Hypergravity (3g from 5dpf to 9 dpf) exposure results in a significantly larger head and a significant increase in bone formation for a subset of the cranial bones. Gene expression analysis after 24 hrs at 3g revealed differential expression of genes involved in the development and function of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine and cardiovascular systems. Finally, we propose a novel type of experimental approach, the "Reduced Gravity Paradigm", by keeping the developing larvae at 3g hypergravity for the first 5 days before returning them to 1g for one additional day. 5 days exposure to 3g during these early stages also caused increased bone formation, while gene expression analysis revealed a central network of regulatory genes (hes5, sox10, lgals3bp, egr1, edn1, fos, fosb, klf2, gadd45ba and socs3a) whose expression was consistently affected by the transition from hyper- to normal gravity. PMID:26061167

  5. Zebrafish Bone and General Physiology Are Differently Affected by Hormones or Changes in Gravity.

    PubMed

    Aceto, Jessica; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Marée, Raphael; Dardenne, Nadia; Jeanray, Nathalie; Wehenkel, Louis; Aleström, Peter; van Loon, Jack J W A; Muller, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish such as zebrafish (Danio rerio) are increasingly used for physiological, genetic and developmental studies. Our understanding of the physiological consequences of altered gravity in an entire organism is still incomplete. We used altered gravity and drug treatment experiments to evaluate their effects specifically on bone formation and more generally on whole genome gene expression. By combining morphometric tools with an objective scoring system for the state of development for each element in the head skeleton and specific gene expression analysis, we confirmed and characterized in detail the decrease or increase of bone formation caused by a 5 day treatment (from 5dpf to 10 dpf) of, respectively parathyroid hormone (PTH) or vitamin D3 (VitD3). Microarray transcriptome analysis after 24 hours treatment reveals a general effect on physiology upon VitD3 treatment, while PTH causes more specifically developmental effects. Hypergravity (3g from 5dpf to 9 dpf) exposure results in a significantly larger head and a significant increase in bone formation for a subset of the cranial bones. Gene expression analysis after 24 hrs at 3g revealed differential expression of genes involved in the development and function of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine and cardiovascular systems. Finally, we propose a novel type of experimental approach, the "Reduced Gravity Paradigm", by keeping the developing larvae at 3g hypergravity for the first 5 days before returning them to 1g for one additional day. 5 days exposure to 3g during these early stages also caused increased bone formation, while gene expression analysis revealed a central network of regulatory genes (hes5, sox10, lgals3bp, egr1, edn1, fos, fosb, klf2, gadd45ba and socs3a) whose expression was consistently affected by the transition from hyper- to normal gravity.

  6. The speed of gravity in general relativity and theoretical interpretation of the Jovian deflection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.

    2004-07-01

    According to Einstein, the notions of geodesic, parallel transport (affine connection) and curvature of the spacetime manifold have a pure geometric origin and do not correlate with any electromagnetic concepts. At the same time, curvature is generated by matter which is not affiliated with the spacetime geometric concepts. For this reason, the fundamental constant c entering the geometric and matter sectors of the general theory of relativity has different conceptual meanings. Specifically, the letter c on the left-hand side of the Einstein equations (geometric sector) entering the Christoffel symbols and its time derivatives is the ultimate speed of gravity characterizing the upper limit on the speed of its propagation as well as the maximal rate of change of time derivatives of the metric tensor, that is gravitational field. The letter c on the right-hand side of the Einstein equations (matter sector) is the maximal speed of propagation of any other field rather than gravity. Einstein's general principle of relativity extends his principle of special relativity and equates the numerical value of the ultimate speed of gravity to that of the speed of light in the special theory of relativity but this general principle must be tested experimentally. To this end, we work out the speed of gravity parametrization of the Einstein equations (cg-parametrization) to keep track of the time-dependent effects associated with the geometric sector of general relativity and to separate them from the time-dependent effects of the matter sector. Parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) approximation of the Einstein equations is derived in order to explain the gravitational physics of the Jovian deflection VLBI experiment conducted on 8 September 2002. The post-Newtonian series expansion in the cg-parametrized general relativity is with respect to a small parameter that is proportional to the ratio of the characteristic velocity of the bodies to the speed of propagation of the

  7. Near horizon symmetries of the non-extremal black hole solutions of Generalized Minimal Massive Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setare, M. R.; Adami, H.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the Generalized Minimal Massive Gravity (GMMG) model in the first order formalism. We show that all the solutions of the Einstein gravity with negative cosmological constants solve the equations of motion of considered model. Then we find an expression for the off-shell conserved charges of this model. By considering the near horizon geometry of a three dimensional black hole in the Gaussian null coordinates, we find near horizon conserved charges and their algebra. The obtained algebra is centrally extended. By writing the algebra of conserved charges in terms of Fourier modes and considering the BTZ black hole solution as an example, one can see that the charge associated with rotations along Y0 coincides exactly with the angular momentum, and the charge associated with time translations T0 is the product of the black hole entropy and its temperature. As we expect, in the limit when the GMMG tends to the Einstein gravity, all the results we obtain in this paper reduce to the results of the paper [1].

  8. Ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density in generalized theories of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Brustein, Ram; Medved, A. J. M.

    2009-01-15

    Near the horizon of a black brane solution in anti-de Sitter space, the long-wavelength fluctuations of the metric exhibit hydrodynamic behavior. For Einstein's theory, the ratio of the shear viscosity of near-horizon metric fluctuations {eta} to the entropy per unit of transverse volume s is {eta}/s=1/4{pi}. We propose that, in generalized theories of gravity, this ratio is given by the ratio of two effective gravitational couplings and can be different than 1/4{pi}. Our proposal confirms that {eta}/s is equal to 1/4{pi} for any theory that can be transformed into Einstein's theory, such as F(R) gravity. Our proposal also implies that matter interactions--except those including explicit or implicit factors of the Riemann tensor--will not modify {eta}/s. The proposed formula reproduces, in a very simple manner, some recently found results for Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We also make a prediction for {eta}/s in Lovelock theories of any order or dimensionality.

  9. Generalized second law of thermodynamics on the apparent horizon in modified Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolmaleki, A.; Najafi, T.

    2016-01-01

    Modified gravity (MG) and generalized second law (GSL) of thermodynamics are interesting topics in the modern cosmology. In this regard, we investigate the GSL of gravitational thermodynamics in the framework of modified Gauss-Bonnet (GB) gravity or f(G)-gravity. We consider a spatially FRW universe filled with the pressureless matter and radiation enclosed by the dynamical apparent horizon with the Hawking temperature. For two viable f(G) models, we first numerically solve the set of differential equations governing the dynamics of f(G)-gravity. Then, we obtain the evolutions of the Hubble parameter, the GB curvature invariant term, the density and equation of state (EoS) parameters as well as the deceleration parameter. In addition, we check the energy conditions for both models and finally examine the validity of the GSL. For the selected f(G) models, we conclude that both models have a stable de Sitter attractor. The EoS parameters behave quite similar to those of the ΛCDM model in the radiation/matter dominated epochs, then they enter the phantom region before reaching the de Sitter attractor with ω = -1. The deceleration parameter starts from the radiation/matter dominated eras, then transits from a cosmic deceleration to acceleration and finally approaches a de Sitter regime at late times, as expected. Furthermore, the GSL is respected for both models during the standard radiation/matter dominated epochs. Thereafter when the universe becomes accelerating, the GSL is violated in some ranges of scale factor. At late times, the evolution of the GSL predicts an adiabatic behavior for the accelerated expansion of the universe.

  10. Gravity at the Edge: Testing General Relativity with the Event Horizon Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, Avery E.

    2015-08-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a global mm-VLBI experiment, has already resolved two AGN on sub-horizon scales. This permits transformative studies of both accretion and jet formation. However, it also provides an unprecedented opportunity to study gravity in the strong-field regime. I will discuss the some of the ways that the EHT has begun to do this, and how the rapid development of the EHT capabilities over the next two years will result in sub-percent precision tests of general relativity.

  11. Generalized uncertainty principle in f(R) gravity for a charged black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Said, Jackson Levi; Adami, Kristian Zarb

    2011-02-15

    Using f(R) gravity in the Palatini formularism, the metric for a charged spherically symmetric black hole is derived, taking the Ricci scalar curvature to be constant. The generalized uncertainty principle is then used to calculate the temperature of the resulting black hole; through this the entropy is found correcting the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy in this case. Using the entropy the tunneling probability and heat capacity are calculated up to the order of the Planck length, which produces an extra factor that becomes important as black holes become small, such as in the case of mini-black holes.

  12. Generalized Recursion Relations for Correlators in the Gauge-Gravity Correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Suvrat

    2011-03-01

    We show that a generalization of the Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten recursion relations gives a new and efficient method of computing correlation functions of the stress tensor or conserved currents in conformal field theories with an (d+1)-dimensional anti-de Sitter space dual, for d≥4, in the limit where the bulk theory is approximated by tree-level Yang-Mills theory or gravity. In supersymmetric theories, additional correlators of operators that live in the same multiplet as a conserved current or stress tensor can be computed by these means.

  13. Generalized recursion relations for correlators in the gauge-gravity correspondence.

    PubMed

    Raju, Suvrat

    2011-03-04

    We show that a generalization of the Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten recursion relations gives a new and efficient method of computing correlation functions of the stress tensor or conserved currents in conformal field theories with an (d+1)-dimensional anti-de Sitter space dual, for d≥4, in the limit where the bulk theory is approximated by tree-level Yang-Mills theory or gravity. In supersymmetric theories, additional correlators of operators that live in the same multiplet as a conserved current or stress tensor can be computed by these means.

  14. Generalized Recursion Relations for Correlators in the Gauge-Gravity Correspondence

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, Suvrat

    2011-03-04

    We show that a generalization of the Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten recursion relations gives a new and efficient method of computing correlation functions of the stress tensor or conserved currents in conformal field theories with an (d+1)-dimensional anti-de Sitter space dual, for d{>=}4, in the limit where the bulk theory is approximated by tree-level Yang-Mills theory or gravity. In supersymmetric theories, additional correlators of operators that live in the same multiplet as a conserved current or stress tensor can be computed by these means.

  15. The AIROPA software package: milestones for testing general relativity in the strong gravity regime with AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzel, Gunther; Lu, Jessica R.; Ghez, Andrea M.; Martinez, Gregory D.; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Britton, Matthew; Sitarski, Breann N.; Do, Tuan; Campbell, Randall D.; Service, Maxwell; Matthews, Keith; Morris, Mark R.; Becklin, E. E.; Wizinowich, Peter L.; Ragland, Sam; Doppmann, Greg; Neyman, Chris; Lyke, James; Kassis, Marc; Rizzi, Luca; Lilley, Scott; Rampy, Rachel

    2016-07-01

    General relativity can be tested in the strong gravity regime by monitoring stars orbiting the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center with adaptive optics. However, the limiting source of uncertainty is the spatial PSF variability due to atmospheric anisoplanatism and instrumental aberrations. The Galactic Center Group at UCLA has completed a project developing algorithms to predict PSF variability for Keck AO images. We have created a new software package (AIROPA), based on modified versions of StarFinder and Arroyo, that takes atmospheric turbulence profiles, instrumental aberration maps, and images as inputs and delivers improved photometry and astrometry on crowded fields. This software package will be made publicly available soon.

  16. Testing a generalized cubic Galileon gravity model with the Coma Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Terukina, Ayumu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Matsushita, Kyoko; Sasaki, Toru E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp E-mail: matusita@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp

    2015-10-01

    We obtain a constraint on the parameters of a generalized cubic Galileon gravity model exhibiting the Vainshtein mechanism by using multi-wavelength observations of the Coma Cluster. The generalized cubic Galileon model is characterized by three parameters of the turning scale associated with the Vainshtein mechanism, and the amplitude of modifying a gravitational potential and a lensing potential. X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) observations of the intra-cluster medium are sensitive to the gravitational potential, while the weak-lensing (WL) measurement is specified by the lensing potential. A joint fit of a complementary multi-wavelength dataset of X-ray, SZ and WL measurements enables us to simultaneously constrain these three parameters of the generalized cubic Galileon model for the first time. We also find a degeneracy between the cluster mass parameters and the gravitational modification parameters, which is influential in the limit of the weak screening of the fifth force.

  17. Generalized spheroidal spacetimes in 5-D Einstein-Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansraj, Sudan

    2017-08-01

    The field equations for static EGBM gravity are obtained and transformed to an equivalent form through a coordinate redefinition. A form for one of the metric potentials that generalizes the spheroidal ansatz of Vaidya-Tikekar superdense stars and additionally prescribing the electric field intensity yields viable solutions. Some special cases of the general solution are considered and analogous classes in the Einstein framework are studied. In particular the Finch-Skea ansatz is examined in detail and found to satisfy the elementary physical requirements. These include positivity of pressure and density, the existence of a pressure free hypersurface marking the boundary, continuity with the exterior metric, a subluminal sound speed as well as the energy conditions. Moreover, the solution possesses no coordinate singularities. It is found that the impact of the Gauss-Bonnet term is to correct undesirable features in the pressure profile and sound speed index when compared to the equivalent Einstein gravity model. Furthermore graphical analyses suggest that higher densities are achievable for the same radial values when compared to the 5-dimensional Einstein case. The case of a constant gravitational potential, isothermal distribution as well as an incompressible fluid are studied. All exact solutions derived exhibit an equation of state explicitly.

  18. Dynamical instability of cylindrical symmetric collapsing star in generalized teleparallel gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawad, Abdul; Momeni, Davood; Rani, Shamaila; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2016-04-01

    This paper is devoted to an analysis of the dynamical instability of a self-gravitating object that undergoes a collapse process. We take the framework of generalized teleparallel gravity with a cylindrically symmetric gravitating object. The matter distribution is represented by a locally anisotropic energy-momentum tensor. We develop basic equations such as the dynamical equations along with the matching conditions and the Harrison-Wheeler equation of state. By applying a linear perturbation strategy, we construct a collapse equation, which is used to obtain the instability ranges in the Newtonian and post-Newtonian regimes. We find these ranges for isotropic pressure and reduce to the results in general relativity. The unstable behavior depends on matter-, metric-, mass-, and torsion-based terms.

  19. Energy distributions of Bianchi type-VI h Universe in general relativity and teleparallel gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özkurt, Şeref; Aygün, Sezg&idot; n.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the energy and momentum density distributions for the inhomogeneous generalizations of homogeneous Bianchi type-VI h metric with Einstein, Bergmann-Thomson, Landau-Lifshitz, Papapetrou, Tolman and Møller prescriptions in general relativity (GR) and teleparallel gravity (TG). We have found exactly the same results for Einstein, Bergmann-Thomson and Landau-Lifshitz energy-momentum distributions in Bianchi type-VI h metric for different gravitation theories. The energy-momentum distributions of the Bianchi type- VI h metric are found to be zero for h = -1 in GR and TG. However, our results agree with Tripathy et al, Tryon, Rosen and Aygün et al.

  20. Viscous generalized Chaplygin gas interacting with f(R,T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baffou, E. H.; Houndjo, M. J. S.; Salako, I. G.

    In this paper, we study in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe the interaction between the viscous generalized Chaplygin gas with f(R,T) gravity, which is an arbitrary function of the Ricci scalar R and the trace T of the energy-momentum tensor. Assuming that the contents of universe are dominated by a generalized Chaplygin gas and dark energy, we obtained the modified Friedmann equations and also the time-dependent energy density and pressure of dark energy due to the shear and bulk viscosities for three interacting models depending on an input parameter Q. Within the simple form of scale factor (power-law), we discuss the graphical representation of dark energy density parameter and investigate the shear and bulk viscosities effects on the accelerating expansion of the universe for each interacting model.

  1. Stress-energy distribution for a cylindrical artificial gravity field via the Darmois-Israel junction conditions of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istrate, Nicolae; Lindner, John

    2014-03-01

    We design an Earth-like artificial gravity field using the Darmois-Israel junction conditions of general relativity to connect the flat spacetime outside an infinitesimally thin cylinder to the curved spacetime inside. In the calculation of extrinsic curvature, our construction exploits Earth's weak gravity, which implies similar inside and outside curvatures, to approximate the unit normal inside by the negative unit normal outside. The stress-energy distribution on the cylinder's sides includes negative energy density.

  2. Gravity from refraction of CMB photons using the optical-mechanical analogy in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matthew R.

    2014-06-01

    Relativistic light bending and gravitational lensing have traditionally been viewed purely as effects of spacetime curvature. Yet for many years they have also been treated as a quasi-refraction of light in a special optical medium, wherein the refractive index is considered proportional to the gravitational potential. We now propose that this `optical-mechanical analogy' in general relativity can also account for gravity. Using classical optics we show that a photon moving through the refractive medium about a mass transfers momentum first to the medium and then to the mass itself. Due to transfer of momentum primarily from ultra-remote CMB photons, masses are then subject to a cosmic pressure on all sides. Where two masses occur, mutual screening by their respective envelopes of refractive medium is shown to result in an attractive force of the Le Sage or `pushing gravity' type. We suggest that the gravito-optical medium is comprised of gravitons, which may be modeled as a quasi-Einstein-Bose conjugate interconnecting all the masses of the visible universe.

  3. Charged black holes in a generalized scalar-tensor gravity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brihaye, Yves; Hartmann, Betti

    2017-09-01

    We study 4-dimensional charged and static black holes in a generalized scalar-tensor gravity model, in which a shift symmetry for the scalar field exists. For vanishing scalar field the solution corresponds to the Reissner-Nordström (RN) solution, while solutions of the full scalar-gravity model have to be constructed numerically. We demonstrate that these black holes support Galilean scalar hair up to a maximal value of the scalar-tensor coupling that depends on the value of the charge and can be up to roughly twice as large as that for uncharged solutions. The Hawking temperature TH of the hairy black holes at maximal scalar-tensor coupling decreases continuously with the increase of the charge and reaches TH = 0 for the highest possible charge that these solutions can carry. However, in this limit, the scalar-tensor coupling needs to vanish. The limiting solution hence corresponds to the extremal RN solution, which does not support regular Galilean scalar hair due to its AdS2 ×S2 near-horizon geometry.

  4. Cosmological Friedmann equation in infrared modified Hořava-Lifshitz gravity via generalized Misner-Sharp mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Molin; Yang, Yuling; Han, Yu; Zhao, Zonghua; Lu, Jianbo

    2016-07-01

    In various gravity theories, Friedmann equations can be cast to a form of the first law of thermodynamics in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological setup. However, this result failed in recent infrared (IR) modified Hořava-Lifshitz (HL) gravity. The difficulty stems from the fact that HL gravity is Lorentz-violating. Motivated by this problem, we use the Misner-Sharp mass to investigate the thermodynamics near the apparent horizon in HL cosmology. We find that the Friedmann equations can be derived from the first law of thermodynamics. The Misner-Sharp mass used here inherits the specific properties of HL gravity since it is directly from the gravitational action of HL theory. We also prove that the first law of thermodynamics with logarithmic entropy still holds at the apparent horizon in FRW. The results suggest that the general prescription of deriving the field equation from thermodynamics still works in the HL cosmology.

  5. Gravity Probe B: final results of a space experiment to test general relativity.

    PubMed

    Everitt, C W F; DeBra, D B; Parkinson, B W; Turneaure, J P; Conklin, J W; Heifetz, M I; Keiser, G M; Silbergleit, A S; Holmes, T; Kolodziejczak, J; Al-Meshari, M; Mester, J C; Muhlfelder, B; Solomonik, V G; Stahl, K; Worden, P W; Bencze, W; Buchman, S; Clarke, B; Al-Jadaan, A; Al-Jibreen, H; Li, J; Lipa, J A; Lockhart, J M; Al-Suwaidan, B; Taber, M; Wang, S

    2011-06-03

    Gravity Probe B, launched 20 April 2004, is a space experiment testing two fundamental predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR), the geodetic and frame-dragging effects, by means of cryogenic gyroscopes in Earth orbit. Data collection started 28 August 2004 and ended 14 August 2005. Analysis of the data from all four gyroscopes results in a geodetic drift rate of -6601.8±18.3  mas/yr and a frame-dragging drift rate of -37.2±7.2  mas/yr, to be compared with the GR predictions of -6606.1  mas/yr and -39.2  mas/yr, respectively ("mas" is milliarcsecond; 1  mas=4.848×10(-9)  rad).

  6. Quasinormal modes as a distinguisher between general relativity and f (R ) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Soham; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2017-09-01

    Quasinormal modes (QNMs) or the ringdown phase of gravitational waves provide critical information about the structure of compact objects like black holes. Thus, QNMs can be a tool to test general relativity (GR) and possible deviations from it. In the case of GR, it has been known for a long time that a relation between two types of black hole perturbations—scalar (Zerilli) and vector (Regge-Wheeler)—leads to an equal share of emitted gravitational energy. With the direct detection of gravitational waves, it is now natural to ask whether the same relation (between scalar and vector perturbations) holds for modified gravity theories, and if not, whether one can use this as a way to probe deviations from general relativity. As a first step, we show explicitly that the above relation between Regge-Wheeler and Zerilli perturbations breaks down for a general f (R ) model and hence the two perturbations do not share equal amounts of emitted gravitational energy. We discuss the implication of this imbalance for observations and the no-hair conjecture.

  7. Universality in the shape dependence of holographic Rényi entropy for general higher derivative gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chong-Sun; Miao, Rong-Xin

    2016-12-01

    We consider higher derivative gravity and obtain universal relations for the shape coefficients ( f a , f b , f c ) of the shape dependent universal part of the Rényi entropy for four dimensional CFTs in terms of the parameters ( c, t 2 , t 4) of two-point and three-point functions of stress tensors. As a consistency check, these shape coefficients f a and f c satisfy the differential relation as derived previously for the Rényi entropy. Interestingly, these holographic relations also apply to weakly coupled conformal field theories such as theories of free fermions and vectors but are violated by theories of free scalars. The mismatch of f a for scalars has been observed in the literature and is due to certain delicate boundary contributions to the modular Hamiltonian. Interestingly, we find a combination of our holographic relations which are satisfied by all free CFTs including scalars. We conjecture that this combined relation is universal for general CFTs in four dimensional spacetime. Finally, we find there are similar universal laws for holographic Rényi entropy in general dimensions.

  8. The relationship between mixed Rossby-gravity waves and convection in a general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Peter G.; Hendon, Harry H.; Battisti, David S.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between mixed Rossby-gravity waves (MRGWs) and convection in a general circulation model. The experiments described are performed in a general circulation model with the lower boundary set to that of an ocean surface everywhere. Several experiments are run varying the convective parameterization scheme (using either a modified Kuo scheme or a moist convective adjustment scheme) and varying the tropical sea surface temperatures (specified to be zonally symmetric in all cases), thereby changing the location of the modeled intertropical convergence zones (ITCZs). The appearance of a robust MRGW occurs when the sea surface temperature is such that two ITCZs straddle the equator. The particular sea surface temperature distribution used and the parameterization scheme for convection also affect the structure and strength of the modeled MRGW. The vertical structure of MRGWs is analyzed in the experiment in which this wave mode is the most energetic. We show that MRGWs of several different zonal length scales exist in the troposphere in association with convection; however, it is only the longer length scales which can be discerned in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere.

  9. Preferred frame parameters in the tensor-vector-scalar theory of gravity and its generalization

    SciTech Connect

    Sagi, Eva

    2009-08-15

    The tensor-vector-scalar theory of gravity, which was designed as a relativistic implementation to the modified dynamics paradigm, has fared quite well as an alternative to dark matter, on both galactic and cosmological scales. However, its performance in the Solar System, as embodied in the post-Newtonian formalism, has not yet been fully investigated. We calculate the post-Newtonian parameters for TeVeS with the cosmological value of the scalar field taken into account, and show that in this situation the cosmological value of the scalar field is tightly linked to the vector field coupling constant K, preventing the former from evolving as predicted by its equation of motion. We show that generalizing TeVeS to have an Aether-type vector action, as suggested by Skordis, removes the aforesaid link, and this generalized version of TeVes has its {beta}, {gamma}, and {xi} parameterized post-Newtonian parameters identical to those in GR, while solar system constraints on the preferred frame parameters {alpha}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 2} can be satisfied within a modest range of small values of the scalar and vector fields coupling parameters, and for cosmological values of the scalar field consistent with evolution within the framework of existing cosmological models.

  10. Is nonrelativistic gravity possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Kocharyan, A. A.

    2009-07-15

    We study nonrelativistic gravity using the Hamiltonian formalism. For the dynamics of general relativity (relativistic gravity) the formalism is well known and called the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) formalism. We show that if the lapse function is constrained correctly, then nonrelativistic gravity is described by a consistent Hamiltonian system. Surprisingly, nonrelativistic gravity can have solutions identical to relativistic gravity ones. In particular, (anti-)de Sitter black holes of Einstein gravity and IR limit of Horava gravity are locally identical.

  11. Martian atmospheric gravity waves simulated by a high-resolution general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Yiǧit, Erdal; Medvedev, Alexander S.; Hartogh, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) significantly affect temperature and wind fields in the Martian middle and upper atmosphere. They are also one of the observational targets of the MAVEN mission. We report on the first simulations with a high-resolution general circulation model (GCM) and present a global distributions of small-scale GWs in the Martian atmosphere. The simulated GW-induced temperature variances are in a good agreement with available radio occultation data in the lower atmosphere between 10 and 30 km. For the northern winter solstice, the model reveals a latitudinal asymmetry with stronger wave generation in the winter hemisphere and two distinctive sources of GWs: mountainous regions and the meandering winter polar jet. Orographic GWs are filtered upon propagating upward, and the mesosphere is primarily dominated by harmonics with faster horizontal phase velocities. Wave fluxes are directed mainly against the local wind. GW dissipation in the upper mesosphere generates a body force per unit mass of tens of m s^{-1} per Martian solar day (sol^{-1}), which tends to close the simulated jets. The results represent a realistic surrogate for missing observations, which can be used for constraining GW parameterizations and validating GCMs.

  12. General covariant Horava-Lifshitz gravity without projectability condition and its applications to cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tao; Shu, Fu-Wen; Wu, Qiang; Wang, Anzhong

    2012-02-01

    We consider an extended theory of Horava-Lifshitz gravity with the detailed balance condition softly breaking, but without the projectability condition. With the former, the number of independent coupling constants is significantly reduced. With the latter and by extending the original foliation-preserving diffeomorphism symmetry Diff(M,F) to include a local U(1) symmetry, the spin-0 gravitons are eliminated. Thus, all the problems related to them disappear, including the instability, strong coupling, and different speeds in the gravitational sector. When the theory couples to a scalar field, we find that the scalar field is not only stable in both the ultraviolet and infrared, but also free of the strong coupling problem, because of the presence of high-order spatial derivative terms of the scalar field. Furthermore, applying the theory to cosmology, we find that due to the additional U(1) symmetry, the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe is necessarily flat. We also investigate the scalar, vector, and tensor perturbations of the flat FRW universe, and derive the general linearized field equations for each kind of the perturbations.

  13. Asymptotically spacelike warped anti-de Sitter spacetimes in generalized minimal massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setare, M. R.; Adami, H.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper we show that warped AdS3 black hole spacetime is a solution of the generalized minimal massive gravity (GMMG) and introduce suitable boundary conditions for asymptotically warped AdS3 spacetimes. Then we find the Killing vector fields such that transformations generated by them preserve the considered boundary conditions. We calculate the conserved charges which correspond to the obtained Killing vector fields and show that the algebra of the asymptotic conserved charges is given as the semi direct product of the Virasoro algebra with U(1) current algebra. We use a particular Sugawara construction to reconstruct the conformal algebra. Thus, we are allowed to use the Cardy formula to calculate the entropy of the warped black hole. We demonstrate that the gravitational entropy of the warped black hole exactly coincides with what we obtain via Cardy’s formula. As we expect, the warped Cardy formula also gives us exactly the same result as we obtain from the usual Cardy’s formula. We calculate mass and angular momentum of the warped black hole and then check that obtained mass, angular momentum and entropy to satisfy the first law of the black hole mechanics. According to the results of this paper we believe that the dual theory of the warped AdS3 black hole solution of GMMG is a warped CFT.

  14. General aviation accidents related to exceedance of airplane weight/center of gravity limits.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Douglas D

    2016-06-01

    Obesity, affects a third of the US population and its corollary occupant weight adversely impacts safe flight operations. Increased aircraft weight results in longer takeoff/landing distances, degraded climb gradients and airframe failure may occur in turbulence. In this study, the rate, temporal changes, and lethality of accidents in piston-powered, general aviation aircraft related to exceeding the maximum aircraft weight/center of gravity (CG) limits were determined. Nation-wide person body mass were from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The NTSB database was used to identify accidents related to operation of aircraft outside of their weight/CG envelope. Statistical analyses employed T-tests, proportion tests and a Poisson distribution. While the average body mass climbed steadily (p<0.001) between 1999 and 2014 the rate of accidents related to exceedance of the weight/CG limits did not change (p=0.072). However, 57% were fatal, higher (p<0.001) than the 21% for mishaps attributed to other causes/factors. The majority (77%) of accidents were due to an overloaded aircraft operating within its CG limits. As to the phase of flight, accidents during takeoff and those occurring enroute carried the lowest (50%) and highest (85%) proportion of fatal accidents respectively. While the rate of general aviation accidents related to operating an aircraft outside of its weight/CG envelope has not increased over the past 15 years, these types of accidents carry a high risk of fatality. Airmen should be educated as to such risks and to dispel the notion held by some that flights may be safely conducted with an overloaded aircraft within its CG limits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Results on the gravity of quantum Fermi pressure of localized matter: A new test of general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Unnikrishnan, C.S.; Gillies, G.T.

    2006-05-15

    Recently Ehlers, Ozsvath, and Schucking discussed whether pressure contributes to active gravitational mass as required by general relativity. They pointed out that there is no experimental information on this available, though precision measurement of the gravitational constant should provide a test of this foundational aspect of gravity. We had used a similar argument earlier to test the contribution of leptons to the active gravitational mass. In this paper we use the result from the Zuerich gravitational constant experiment to provide the first adequate experimental input regarding the active gravitational mass of Fermi pressure. Apart from confirming the equality of the passive and active gravitational roles of the pressure term in general relativity within an accuracy of 5%, our results are consistent with the theoretical expectation of the cancellation of the gravity of pressure by the gravity of the surface tension of confined matter. This result on the active gravitational mass of the quantum zero-point Fermi pressure in the atomic nucleus is also interesting from the point of view of studying the interplay between quantum physics and classical gravity.

  16. Generalized analytical model for benthic water flux forced by surface gravity waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, J.N.; Mehta, A.J.; Dean, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    A generalized analytical model for benthic water flux forced by linear surface gravity waves over a series of layered hydrogeologic units is developed by adapting a previous solution for a hydrogeologic unit with an infinite thickness (Case I) to a unit with a finite thickness (Case II) and to a dual-unit system (Case III). The model compares favorably with laboratory observations. The amplitude of wave-forced benthic water flux is shown to be directly proportional to the amplitude of the wave, the permeability of the hydrogeologic unit, and the wave number and inversely proportional to the kinematic viscosity of water. A dimensionless amplitude parameter is introduced and shown to reach a maximum where the product of water depth and the wave number is 1.2. Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is a benthic water discharge flux to a marine water body. The Case I model estimates an 11.5-cm/d SGD forced by a wave with a 1 s period and 5-cm amplitude in water that is 0.5-m deep. As this wave propagates into a region with a 0.3-m-thick hydrogeologic unit, with a no-flow bottom boundary, the Case II model estimates a 9.7-cm/d wave-forced SGD. As this wave propagates into a region with a 0.2-m-thick hydrogeologic unit over an infinitely thick, more permeable unit, the Case III quasi-confined model estimates a 15.7-cm/d wave-forced SGD. The quasi-confined model has benthic constituent flux implications in coral reef, karst, and clastic regions. Waves may undermine tracer and seepage meter estimates of SGD at some locations. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Scalar-Tensor gravity with system-dependent potential and its relation with Renormalization Group extended General Relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Davi C.; Piattella, Oliver F.; Chauvineau, Bertrand E-mail: Bertrand.Chauvineau@oca.eu

    2015-09-01

    We show that Renormalization Group extensions of the Einstein-Hilbert action for large scale physics are not, in general, a particular case of standard Scalar-Tensor (ST) gravity. We present a new class of ST actions, in which the potential is not necessarily fixed at the action level, and show that this extended ST theory formally contains the Renormalization Group case. We also propose here a Renormalization Group scale setting identification that is explicitly covariant and valid for arbitrary relativistic fluids.

  18. Quantum gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maślanka, K.

    A model of reality based on quantum fields, but with a classical treatment of gravity, is inconsistent. Finding a solution has proved extremely difficult, possibly due to the beauty and conceptual simplicity of general relativity. There is a variety of approaches to a consistent theory of quntum gravity. At present, it seems that superstring theory is the most promising candidate.

  19. Einstein equations for generalized theories of gravity and the thermodynamic relation deltaQ=TdeltaS are equivalent.

    PubMed

    Brustein, Ram; Hadad, Merav

    2009-09-04

    We show that the equations of motion of generalized theories of gravity are equivalent to the thermodynamic relation deltaQ=TdeltaS. Our proof relies on extending previous arguments by using a more general definition of the Noether charge entropy. We have thus completed the implementation of Jacobson's proposal to express Einstein's equations as a thermodynamic equation of state. Additionally, we find that the Noether charge entropy obeys the second law of thermodynamics if the energy-momentum tensor obeys the null energy condition. Our results support the idea that gravitation on a macroscopic scale is a manifestation of the thermodynamics of the vacuum.

  20. Brane structure from a scalar field in general covariant Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Brito, F. A.; Costa, F. G.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we have considered the structure of the nonprojectable Horava-Melby-Thompson gravity to find braneworld scenarios. A relativistic scalar field is considered in the matter sector and we have shown how to reduce the equations of motion to first-order differential equations. In particular, we have studied thick brane solutions of both the dilatonic and Randall-Sundrum types.

  1. Generalized Thermoelastic Medium with Temperature-Dependent Properties for Different Theories under the Effect of Gravity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Mohamed I. A.; Elmaklizi, Yassmin D.; Said, Samia M.

    2013-03-01

    The problem of the generalized thermoelastic medium for three different theories under the effect of a gravity field is investigated. The Lord-Shulman (L-S), Green-Lindsay (G-L), and classical-coupled (CD) theories are discussed. The modulus of the elasticity is given as a linear function of the reference temperature. The exact expressions for the displacement components, temperature, and stress components are obtained by using normal mode analysis. Numerical results for the field quantities are given in the physical domain and illustrated graphically in the absence and presence of gravity. A comparison also is made between the three theories for the results with and without a temperature dependence.

  2. Gravity Amplitudes as Generalized Double Copies of Gauge-Theory Amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bern, Zvi; Carrasco, John Joseph; Chen, Wei-Ming; Johansson, Henrik; Roiban, Radu

    2017-05-01

    Whenever the integrand of a gauge-theory loop amplitude can be arranged into a form where the Bern-Carrasco-Johansson duality between color and kinematics is manifest, a corresponding gravity integrand can be obtained simply via the double-copy procedure. However, finding such gauge-theory representations can be challenging, especially at high loop orders. Here, we show that we can, instead, start from generic gauge-theory integrands, where the duality is not manifest, and apply a modified double-copy procedure to obtain gravity integrands that include contact terms generated by violations of dual Jacobi identities. We illustrate this with three-, four- and five-loop examples in N =8 supergravity.

  3. Gravity Amplitudes as Generalized Double Copies of Gauge-Theory Amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Bern, Zvi; Carrasco, John Joseph; Chen, Wei-Ming; Johansson, Henrik; Roiban, Radu

    2017-05-05

    Whenever the integrand of a gauge-theory loop amplitude can be arranged into a form where the Bern-Carrasco-Johansson duality between color and kinematics is manifest, a corresponding gravity integrand can be obtained simply via the double-copy procedure. However, finding such gauge-theory representations can be challenging, especially at high loop orders. Here, we show that we can, instead, start from generic gauge-theory integrands, where the duality is not manifest, and apply a modified double-copy procedure to obtain gravity integrands that include contact terms generated by violations of dual Jacobi identities. We illustrate this with three-, four- and five-loop examples in N=8 supergravity.

  4. Thermodynamic instability of topological black holes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with a generalized electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Panahiyan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by the string corrections on the gravity and electrodynamics sides, we consider a quadratic Maxwell invariant term as a correction of the Maxwell Lagrangian to obtain exact solutions of higher dimensional topological black holes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We first investigate the asymptotically flat solutions and obtain conserved and thermodynamic quantities which satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. We also analyze thermodynamic stability of the solutions by calculating the heat capacity and the Hessian matrix. Then, we focus on horizon-flat solutions with an anti-de Sitter (AdS) asymptote and produce a rotating spacetime with a suitable transformation. In addition, we calculate the conserved and thermodynamic quantities for asymptotically AdS black branes which satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. Finally, we perform thermodynamic instability criterion to investigate the effects of nonlinear electrodynamics in canonical and grand canonical ensembles.

  5. Circulation from a joint gravity field solution determination of the general ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, B. D.; Nerem, R. S.; Shum, C. K.; Ries, J. C.; Yuan, D. N.

    1988-01-01

    With the development of satellite altimetry, it is possible to infer the geostrophic velocity of the surface ocean currents, if the geoid and the position of the satellite are known accurately. Errors in current geoid models and orbit computations, both due primarily to errors in the earth's gravity field model, have limited the use of altimeter data for this purpose. The objective of this investigation is to demonstrate that altimeter data can be used in a joint solution to simultaneously estimate the quasi-stationary sea surface topography, zeta, and the model for the gravity field. Satellite tracking data from twelve satellites were used along with Seasat altimeter data for the solution. The estimated model of zeta compares well at long wavelengths with the hydrographic model of zeta. Covariance analysis indicates that the geoid is separable from zeta up to degree 9, at which point geoid error is comparable to the signal of zeta.

  6. Nonlocal Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashhoon, Bahram

    2017-05-01

    Relativity theory is based on a postulate of locality, which means that the past history of the observer is not directly taken into account. This book argues that the past history should be taken into account. In this way, nonlocality 1R 2i1nr-in the sense of history dependence-is introduced into relativity theory. The deep connection between inertia and gravitation suggests that gravity could be nonlocal, and in nonlocal gravity the fading gravitational memory of past events must then be taken into account. Along this line of thought, a classical nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation has recently been developed. A significant consequence of this theory is that the nonlocal aspect of gravity appears to simulate dark matter. According to nonlocal gravity theory, what astronomers attribute to dark matter should instead be due to the nonlocality of gravitation. Nonlocality dominates on the scale of galaxies and beyond. Memory fades with time; therefore, the nonlocal aspect of gravity becomes weaker as the universe expands. The implications of nonlocal gravity are explored in this book for gravitational lensing, gravitational radiation, the gravitational physics of the Solar System and the internal dynamics of nearby galaxies, as well as clusters of galaxies. This approach is extended to nonlocal Newtonian cosmology, where the attraction of gravity fades with the expansion of the universe. Thus far, scientists have only compared some of the consequences of nonlocal gravity with astronomical observations.

  7. Earth-moon Lagrangian points as a test bed for general relativity and effective field theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, Emmanuele; Dell'Agnello, Simone; Esposito, Giampiero; Di Fiore, Luciano; Simo, Jules; Grado, Aniello

    2015-09-01

    We first analyze the restricted four-body problem consisting of the Earth, the Moon, and the Sun as the primaries and a spacecraft as the planetoid. This scheme allows us to take into account the solar perturbation in the description of the motion of a spacecraft in the vicinity of the stable Earth-Moon libration points L4 and L5 both in the classical regime and in the context of effective field theories of gravity. A vehicle initially placed at L4 or L5 will not remain near the respective points. In particular, in the classical case the vehicle moves on a trajectory about the libration points for at least 700 days before escaping. We show that this is true also if the modified long-distance Newtonian potential of effective gravity is employed. We also evaluate the impulse required to cancel out the perturbing force due to the Sun in order to force the spacecraft to stay precisely at L4 or L5. It turns out that this value is slightly modified with respect to the corresponding Newtonian one. In the second part of the paper, we first evaluate the location of all Lagrangian points in the Earth-Moon system within the framework of general relativity. For the points L4 and L5, the corrections of coordinates are of order a few millimeters and describe a tiny departure from the equilateral triangle. After that, we set up a scheme where the theory which is quantum corrected has as its classical counterpart the Einstein theory, instead of the Newtonian one. In other words, we deal with a theory involving quantum corrections to Einstein gravity, rather than to Newtonian gravity. By virtue of the effective-gravity correction to the long-distance form of the potential among two masses, all terms involving the ratio between the gravitational radius of the primary and its separation from the planetoid get modified. Within this framework, for the Lagrangian points of stable equilibrium, we find quantum corrections of order 2 mm, whereas for Lagrangian points of unstable

  8. Unified first law and some general prescription: a redefinition of surface gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, Sourav; Bhattacharjee, Sudipto; Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2017-09-01

    The paper contains an extensive study of the unified first law (UFL) in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime model. By projecting the UFL along the Kodama vector the second Friedmann equation can be obtained. Also studying the UFL on the event horizon it is found that the Clausius relation cannot be obtained from the UFL by projecting it along the tangent to the event horizon as it can be for the trapping horizon. However, it is shown in the present work that Clausius relation can be obtained by projecting the UFL along the Kodama vector on the horizon and the result is found to be true for any horizon. Finally motivated by the Unruh temperature for the Rindler observer, surface gravity is redefined and a Clausius relation is obtained from the UFL by projecting it along a vector analogous to the Kodama vector.

  9. Kantowski-Sachs cosmological solutions in the generalized teleparallel gravity via Noether symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motavalli, H.; Akbarieh, A. Rezaei; Nasiry, M.

    2016-04-01

    We study the f(T) theory as an extension of teleparallel gravity and consider the Noether symmetry of Kantowski-Sachs (KS) anisotropic model for this theory. We specify the explicit teleparallel form of f(T) and find the corresponding exact cosmological solutions under the assumption that the Lagrangian admits the Noether symmetry. It is found that the universe experiences a power law expansion for the scale factors in the context of f(T) theory. By deriving equation of state (EOS) parameter, we show that the universe passes through the phantom and ΛCDM theoretical scenarios. In this way, we estimate a lower limit age for the universe in excellent agreement with the value reported from recent observations. When KS model reduces to the flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) metric, our results are properly transformed into the corresponding values.

  10. Static electromagnetic fields and charged black holes in general covariant theory of Hořava-Lifshitz gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Borzou, Ahmad; Lin, Kai; Wang, Anzhong E-mail: k_lin@baylor.edu

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we study electromeganetic static spacetimes in the nonrelativisitc general covariant theory of the Hořava-Lifshitz (HL) gravity, proposed recently by Hořava and Melby-Thompson, and present all the electric static solutions, which represent the generalization of the Reissner-Nordström solution found in Einstein's general relativity (GR). The global/local structures of spacetimes in the HL theory in general are different from those given in GR, because the dispersion relations of test particles now contain high-order momentum terms, so the speeds of these particles are unbounded in the ultraviolet (UV). As a result, the conception of light-cones defined in GR becomes invalid and test particles do not follow geodesics. To study black holes in the HL theory, we adopt the geometrical optical approximations, and define a horizon as a (two-closed) surface that is free of spacetime singularities and on which massless test particles are infinitely redshifted. With such a definition, we show that some of our solutions give rise to (charged) black holes, although the radii of their horizons in general depend on the energies of the test particles.

  11. Testing general relativity and alternative theories of gravity with space-based atomic clocks and atom interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Schärer, Andreas; Jetzer, Philippe; Angélil, Raymond; Saha, Prasenjit; Lundgren, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    The successful miniaturisation of extremely accurate atomic clocks and atom interferometers invites prospects for satellite missions to perform precision experiments. We discuss the effects predicted by general relativity and alternative theories of gravity that can be detected by a clock, which orbits the Earth. Our experiment relies on the precise tracking of the spacecraft using its observed tick-rate. The spacecraft's reconstructed four-dimensional trajectory will reveal the nature of gravitational perturbations in Earth's gravitational field, potentially differentiating between different theories of gravity. This mission can measure multiple relativistic effects all during the course of a single experiment, and constrain the Parametrized Post-Newtonian Parameters around the Earth. A satellite carrying a clock of fractional timing inaccuracy of Δ f / f ˜ 10-16 in an elliptic orbit around the Earth would constrain the PPN parameters |β - 1|, |γ - 1| ≲ 10-6. We also briefly review potential constraints by atom interferometers on scalar tensor theories and in particular on Chameleon and dilaton models.

  12. Distorting general relativity: gravity's rainbow and f(R) theories at work

    SciTech Connect

    Garattini, Remo

    2013-06-01

    We compute the Zero Point Energy in a spherically symmetric background combining the high energy distortion of Gravity's Rainbow with the modification induced by a f(R) theory. Here f(R) is a generic analytic function of the Ricci curvature scalar R in 4D and in 3D. The explicit calculation is performed for a Schwarzschild metric. Due to the spherically symmetric property of the Schwarzschild metric we can compare the effects of the modification induced by a f(R) theory in 4D and in 3D. We find that the final effect of the combined theory is to have finite quantities that shift the Zero Point Energy. In this context we setup a Sturm-Liouville problem with the cosmological constant considered as the associated eigenvalue. The eigenvalue equation is a reformulation of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation which is analyzed by means of a variational approach based on gaussian trial functionals. With the help of a canonical decomposition, we find that the relevant contribution to one loop is given by the graviton quantum fluctuations around the given background. A final discussion on the connection of our result with the observed cosmological constant is also reported.

  13. Black holes, compact objects and solar system tests in non-relativistic general covariant theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwald, Jared; Satheeshkumar, V.H.; Wang, Anzhong E-mail: VHSatheeshkumar@baylor.edu

    2010-12-01

    We study spherically symmetric static spacetimes generally filled with an anisotropic fluid in the nonrelativistic general covariant theory of gravity. In particular, we find that the vacuum solutions are not unique, and can be expressed in terms of the U(1) gauge field A. When solar system tests are considered, severe constraints on A are obtained, which seemingly pick up the Schwarzschild solution uniquely. In contrast to other versions of the Horava-Lifshitz theory, non-singular static stars made of a perfect fluid without heat flow can be constructed, due to the coupling of the fluid with the gauge field. These include the solutions with a constant pressure. We also study the general junction conditions across the surface of a star. In general, the conditions allow the existence of a thin matter shell on the surface. When applying these conditions to the perfect fluid solutions with the vacuum ones as describing their external spacetimes, we find explicitly the matching conditions in terms of the parameters appearing in the solutions. Such matching is possible even without the presence of a thin matter shell.

  14. Non-Gaussianity of a single scalar field in general covariant Hořava-Lifshitz gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongqing; Wang, Anzhong

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we study non-Gaussianity generated by a single scalar field in slow-roll inflation in the framework of the nonrelativistic general covariant Hořava-Lifshitz theory of gravity with the projectability condition and an arbitrary coupling constant λ, where λ characterizes the deviation of the theory from general relativity (GR) in the infrared. We find that the leading effect of self-interaction, contrary to the case of the minimal scenario of GR, is in general of the order α^nɛ3/2, where ɛ is a slow-roll parameter, and α^n(n=3,5) are the dimensionless coupling coefficients of the sixth-order operators of the Lifshitz scalar and have no contributions to power spectra and indices of both scalar and tensor. The bispectrum, comparing with the standard one given in GR, is enhanced and gives rise to a large value of the nonlinearity parameter fNL. We study how the modified dispersion relation with high order moment terms affects the evaluation of the mode function and in turn the bispectrum, and we show explicitly that the mode function takes various asymptotic forms during different periods of its evolution. In particular, we find that it is in general of superpositions of oscillatory functions, instead of plane waves like in the minimal scenario of GR. This results in a large enhancement of the folded shape in the bispectrum.

  15. Approaches to Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriti, Daniele

    2009-03-01

    Preface; Part I. Fundamental Ideas and General Formalisms: 1. Unfinished revolution C. Rovelli; 2. The fundamental nature of space and time G. 't Hooft; 3. Does locality fail at intermediate length scales R. Sorkin; 4. Prolegomena to any future quantum gravity J. Stachel; 5. Spacetime symmetries in histories canonical gravity N. Savvidou; 6. Categorical geometry and the mathematical foundations of quantum gravity L. Crane; 7. Emergent relativity O. Dreyer; 8. Asymptotic safety R. Percacci; 9. New directions in background independent quantum gravity F. Markopoulou; Questions and answers; Part II: 10. Gauge/gravity duality G. Horowitz and J. Polchinski; 11. String theory, holography and quantum gravity T. Banks; 12. String field theory W. Taylor; Questions and answers; Part III: 13. Loop Quantum Gravity T. Thiemann; 14. Covariant loop quantum gravity? E. LIvine; 15. The spin foam representation of loop quantum gravity A. Perez; 16. 3-dimensional spin foam quantum gravity L. Freidel; 17. The group field theory approach to quantum gravity D. Oriti; Questions and answers; Part IV. Discrete Quantum Gravity: 18. Quantum gravity: the art of building spacetime J. Ambjørn, J. Jurkiewicz and R. Loll; 19. Quantum Regge calculations R. Williams; 20. Consistent discretizations as a road to quantum gravity R. Gambini and J. Pullin; 21. The causal set approach to quantum gravity J. Henson; Questions and answers; Part V. Effective Models and Quantum Gravity Phenomenology: 22. Quantum gravity phenomenology G. Amelino-Camelia; 23. Quantum gravity and precision tests C. Burgess; 24. Algebraic approach to quantum gravity II: non-commutative spacetime F. Girelli; 25. Doubly special relativity J. Kowalski-Glikman; 26. From quantum reference frames to deformed special relativity F. Girelli; 27. Lorentz invariance violation and its role in quantum gravity phenomenology J. Collins, A. Perez and D. Sudarsky; 28. Generic predictions of quantum theories of gravity L. Smolin; Questions and

  16. Generalized plane waves in Poincaré gauge theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojević, Milutin; Cvetković, Branislav; Obukhov, Yuri N.

    2017-09-01

    A family of exact vacuum solutions, representing generalized plane waves propagating on the (anti-)de Sitter background, is constructed in the framework of Poincaré gauge theory. The wave dynamics is defined by the general Lagrangian that includes all parity even and parity odd invariants up to the second order in the gauge field strength. The structure of the solution shows that the wave metric significantly depends on the spacetime torsion.

  17. Quantum Gravity in Everyday Life: General Relativity as an Effective Field Theory.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Cliff P

    2004-01-01

    This article is meant as a summary and introduction to the ideas of effective field theory as applied to gravitational systems, ideas which provide the theoretical foundations for the modern use of general relativity as a theory from which precise predictions are possible.

  18. Analogue Gravity.

    PubMed

    Barceló, Carlos; Liberati, Stefano; Visser, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Analogue gravity is a research programme which investigates analogues of general relativistic gravitational fields within other physical systems, typically but not exclusively condensed matter systems, with the aim of gaining new insights into their corresponding problems. Analogue models of (and for) gravity have a long and distinguished history dating back to the earliest years of general relativity. In this review article we will discuss the history, aims, results, and future prospects for the various analogue models. We start the discussion by presenting a particularly simple example of an analogue model, before exploring the rich history and complex tapestry of models discussed in the literature. The last decade in particular has seen a remarkable and sustained development of analogue gravity ideas, leading to some hundreds of published articles, a workshop, two books, and this review article. Future prospects for the analogue gravity programme also look promising, both on the experimental front (where technology is rapidly advancing) and on the theoretical front (where variants of analogue models can be used as a springboard for radical attacks on the problem of quantum gravity).

  19. Fast Nonlinear Generalized Inversion of Gravity Data with Application to the Three-Dimensional Crustal Density Structure of Sichuan Basin, Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Meng, Xiaohong; Li, Fang

    2017-07-01

    Generalized inversion is one of the important steps in the quantitative interpretation of gravity data. With appropriate algorithm and parameters, it gives a view of the subsurface which characterizes different geological bodies. However, generalized inversion of gravity data is time consuming due to the large amount of data points and model cells adopted. Incorporating of various prior information as constraints deteriorates the above situation. In the work discussed in this paper, a method for fast nonlinear generalized inversion of gravity data is proposed. The fast multipole method is employed for forward modelling. The inversion objective function is established with weighted data misfit function along with model objective function. The total objective function is solved by a dataspace algorithm. Moreover, depth weighing factor is used to improve depth resolution of the result, and bound constraint is incorporated by a transfer function to limit the model parameters in a reliable range. The matrix inversion is accomplished by a preconditioned conjugate gradient method. With the above algorithm, equivalent density vectors can be obtained, and interpolation is performed to get the finally density model on the fine mesh in the model domain. Testing on synthetic gravity data demonstrated that the proposed method is faster than conventional generalized inversion algorithm to produce an acceptable solution for gravity inversion problem. The new developed inversion method was also applied for inversion of the gravity data collected over Sichuan basin, southwest China. The established density structure in this study helps understanding the crustal structure of Sichuan basin and provides reference for further oil and gas exploration in this area.

  20. Modified first-order Horava-Lifshitz gravity: Hamiltonian analysis of the general theory and accelerating FRW cosmology in a power-law F(R) model

    SciTech Connect

    Carloni, Sante; Chaichian, Masud; Tureanu, Anca; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.; Oksanen, Markku

    2010-09-15

    We propose the most general modified first-order Horava-Lifshitz gravity, whose action does not contain time derivatives higher than the second order. The Hamiltonian structure of this theory is studied in all the details in the case of the spatially-flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time, demonstrating many of the features of the general theory. It is shown that, with some plausible assumptions, including the projectability of the lapse function, this model is consistent. As a large class of such theories, the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity is introduced. The study of its ultraviolet properties shows that its z=3 version seems to be renormalizable in the same way as the original Horava-Lifshitz proposal. The Hamiltonian analysis of the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity shows that it is in general a consistent theory. The F(R) gravity action is also studied in the fixed-gauge form, where the appearance of a scalar field is particularly illustrative. Then the spatially-flat FRW cosmology for this F(R) gravity is investigated. It is shown that a special choice of parameters for this theory leads to the same equations of motion as in the case of traditional F(R) gravity. Nevertheless, the cosmological structure of the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity turns out to be much richer than for its traditional counterpart. The emergence of multiple de Sitter solutions indicates the possibility of unification of early-time inflation with late-time acceleration within the same model. Power-law F(R) theories are also investigated in detail. It is analytically shown that they have a quite rich cosmological structure: early-/late-time cosmic acceleration of quintessence, as well as of phantom types. Also it is demonstrated that all the four known types of finite-time future singularities may occur in the power-law Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity. Finally, a covariant proposal for (renormalizable) F(R) gravity within the Horava-Lifshitz spirit is presented.

  1. Physics of Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    This chapter discusses potential technologies for achieving artificial gravity in a space vehicle. We begin with a series of definitions and a general description of the rotational dynamics behind the forces ultimately exerted on the human body during centrifugation, such as gravity level, gravity gradient, and Coriolis force. Human factors considerations and comfort limits associated with a rotating environment are then discussed. Finally, engineering options for designing space vehicles with artificial gravity are presented.

  2. a Unified Gravity-Electroweak Model Based on a Generalized Yang-Mills Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jong-Ping

    Gravitational and electroweak interactions can be unified in analogy with the unification in the Weinberg-Salam theory. The Yang-Mills framework is generalized to include spacetime translational group T(4), whose generators Tμ ( = ∂/∂xμ) do not have constant matrix representations. By gauging T(4) × SU(2) × U(1) in flat spacetime, we have a new tensor field ϕμν which universally couples to all particles and anti-particles with the same constant g, which has the dimension of length. In this unified model, the T(4) gauge symmetry dictates that all wave equations of fermions, massive bosons and the photon in flat spacetime reduce to a Hamilton-Jacobi equation with the same "effective Riemann metric tensor" in the geometric-optics limit. Consequently, the results are consistent with experiments. We demonstrated that the T(4) gravitational gauge field can be quantized in inertial frames.

  3. Comparing Black hole Shadow Widths in the Equatorial Plane for General Relativity and Selected Alternative Theories of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graber, James

    2017-01-01

    Results from ongoing efforts to measure the black hole shadows expected from Sgr A* and M87, e.g. by the Event-Horizon Telescope, could soon confirm or refute the Kerr nature of the black-hole shadow, thereby helping confirm or refute General Relativity. It is fairly easy to precisely calculate the width of the shadow of a compact, cylindrically symmetric rotating object in its equatorial plane. We have calculated these shadow widths for three different metrics: 1) the standard Kerr metric, 2) a rotating perturbed Kerr object with a quadrupole moment similar to a neutron star's, as computed by Frutos-Alfaro based on the earlier Manko et al. neutron-star metric, and 3) also for a new rotating metric based on the Yilmaz exponential metric. For reasonable (plausible) parameter values, the differences in calculated shadow widths are of the order of ten percent, which may be difficult to measure. We graphically present comparisons between the expected Kerr value for the shadow width, and the widths computed for the alternative metrics as a numerically computed function of the rotation and the quadrupole moment. If time allows, we may present similar calculations and graphs for the shadow widths of rotating compact objects from other alternative theories of gravity.

  4. Cosmological consequences and statefinder diagnosis of a noninteracting generalized Chaplygin gas in f(R,T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Hamid

    In this paper, we investigate cosmological consequences as well as statefinder diagnosis of a scenario for recently reported accelerated expansion of the universe in the framework of f(R,T) = R + h(T) gravity theories. In these models, R and T denote the Ricci curvature scalar and the trace of the energy-momentum tensor (EMT), respectively. Our scenario assumes that the generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) along with the baryonic matter are responsible for this observed phenomenon. We consider three classes of Chaplygin gas models which include three different forms of f(R,T) function; those models which employ the standard CG (SCG), models which use GCG in the high pressure regimes and finally, the third case is devoted to investigating high density regimes in the presence of GCG. We also test these models using recent Hubble parameter as well as type Ia supernova data. Finally, we compare the predicted present values of the statefinder parameters by these models to the astronomical data.

  5. Towards the most general scalar-tensor theories of gravity: A unified approach in the language of differential forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezquiaga, Jose María; García-Bellido, Juan; Zumalacárregui, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    We use a description based on differential forms to systematically explore the space of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. Within this formalism, we propose a basis for the scalar sector at the lowest order in derivatives of the field and in any number of dimensions. This minimal basis is used to construct a finite and closed set of Lagrangians describing general scalar-tensor theories invariant under local Lorentz transformations in a pseudo-Riemannian manifold, which contains ten physically distinct elements in four spacetime dimensions. Subsequently, we compute their corresponding equations of motion and find which combinations are at most second order in derivatives in four as well as an arbitrary number of dimensions. By studying the possible exact forms (total derivatives) and algebraic relations between the basis components, we discover that there are only four Lagrangian combinations producing second-order equations, which can be associated with Horndeski's theory. In this process, we identify a new second-order Lagrangian, named kinetic Gauss-Bonnet, that was not previously considered in the literature. However, we show that its dynamics is already contained in Horndeski's theory. Finally, we provide a full classification of the relations between different second-order theories. This allows us to clarify, for instance, the connection between different covariantizations of Galileons theory. In conclusion, our formulation affords great computational simplicity with a systematic structure. As a first step, we focus on theories with second-order equations of motion. However, this new formalism aims to facilitate advances towards unveiling the most general scalar-tensor theories.

  6. A test of general relativity using the LARES and LAGEOS satellites and a GRACE Earth gravity model: Measurement of Earth's dragging of inertial frames.

    PubMed

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Paolozzi, Antonio; Pavlis, Erricos C; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Matzner, Richard; Penrose, Roger; Sindoni, Giampiero; Paris, Claudio; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey

    We present a test of general relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS, and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its general relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is our preliminary estimate of systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of general relativity.

  7. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    terrestrial gravity fluctuations will have great impact on the future development of GW detectors and high-precision gravimetry in general, and many open questions need to be answered still as emphasized in this article.

  8. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Harms, Jan

    2015-01-01

    terrestrial gravity fluctuations will have great impact on the future development of GW detectors and high-precision gravimetry in general, and many open questions need to be answered still as emphasized in this article.

  9. Dynamical spacetimes in conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongsheng; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xin-Zhou

    2017-08-01

    The conformal gravity remarkably boosts our prehension of gravity theories. We find a series of dynamical solutions in the W2-conformal gravity, including generalized Schwarzschild-Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (GSFRW), charged generalized Schwarzschild-Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (CGSFRW), especially rotating Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (RFRW), charged rotating Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (CRFRW), and a dynamical cylindrically symmetric solutions. The RFRW, CRFRW and the dynamical cylindrically symmetric solutions are never found in the Einstein gravity and modified gravities. The GSFRW and CGSFRW solutions take different forms from the corresponding solutions in the Einstein gravity.

  10. Canonical gravity with fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Bojowald, Martin; Das, Rupam

    2008-09-15

    Canonical gravity in real Ashtekar-Barbero variables is generalized to allow for fermionic matter. The resulting torsion changes several expressions in Holst's original vacuum analysis, which are summarized here. This in turn requires adaptations to the known loop quantization of gravity coupled to fermions, which is discussed on the basis of the classical analysis. As a result, parity invariance is not manifestly realized in loop quantum gravity.

  11. Hamiltonian Dynamics in Extended Phase Space for Gravity and its Consistency with Lagrangian Formalism: a Generalized Spherically Symmetric Model as AN Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakova, Tatyana P.

    2015-01-01

    Among theoretical issues in General Relativity the problem of constructing its Hamiltonian formulation is still of interest. The most of attempts to quantize Gravity are based upon Dirac generalization of Hamiltonian dynamics for system with constraints. At the same time there exists another way to formulate Hamiltonian dynamics for constrained systems guided by the idea of extended phase space. We have already considered some features of this approach in the previous MG12 Meeting by the example of a simple isotropic model. Now we apply the approach to a generalized spherically symmetric model which imitates the structure of General Relativity much better. In particular, making use of a global BRST symmetry and the Noether theorem, we construct the BRST charge that generates correct gauge transformations for all gravitational degrees of freedom.

  12. A model of the general ocean circulation determined from a joint solution for the Earth's gravity field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerem, R. S.; Tapley, B. D.; Shum, C. K.; Yuan, D. N.

    1989-01-01

    If the geoid and the satellite position are known accurately, satellite altimetry can be used to determine the geostrophic velocity of the surface ocean currents. The purpose of this investigation is to simultaneously estimate the sea surface topography, zeta, the model for the gravity field, and the satellite orbit. Satellite tracking data from fourteen satellites were used; along with Seasat and Geosat altimeter data as well as surface gravity data for the solution. The estimated model of zeta compares well at long wavelengths with the hydrographic model of zeta. Covariance studies show that the geoid is separable from zeta up to degree 9, at which point geoid error becomes comparable to the signal of zeta.

  13. Visualizing spacetime curvature via frame-drag vortexes and tidal tendexes: General theory and weak-gravity applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, David A.; Owen, Robert; Zhang, Fan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Brink, Jeandrew; Chen, Yanbei; Kaplan, Jeffrey D.; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Matthews, Keith D.; Scheel, Mark A.; Thorne, Kip S.

    2011-12-01

    When one splits spacetime into space plus time, the Weyl curvature tensor (vacuum Riemann tensor) gets split into two spatial, symmetric, and trace-free tensors: (i) the Weyl tensor’s so-called electric part or tidal field Ejk, which raises tides on the Earth’s oceans and drives geodesic deviation (the relative acceleration of two freely falling test particles separated by a spatial vector ξk is Δaj=-Ejkξk), and (ii) the Weyl tensor’s so-called magnetic part or (as we call it) frame-drag field Bjk, which drives differential frame dragging (the precessional angular velocity of a gyroscope at the tip of ξk, as measured using a local inertial frame at the tail of ξk, is ΔΩj=Bjkξk). Being symmetric and trace-free, Ejk and Bjk each have three orthogonal eigenvector fields which can be depicted by their integral curves. We call the integral curves of Ejk’s eigenvectors tidal tendex lines or simply tendex lines, we call each tendex line’s eigenvalue its tendicity, and we give the name tendex to a collection of tendex lines with large tendicity. The analogous quantities for Bjk are frame-drag vortex lines or simply vortex lines, their vorticities, and their vortexes. These concepts are powerful tools for visualizing spacetime curvature. We build up physical intuition into them by applying them to a variety of weak-gravity phenomena: a spinning, gravitating point particle, two such particles side-by-side, a plane gravitational wave, a point particle with a dynamical current-quadrupole moment or dynamical mass-quadrupole moment, and a slow-motion binary system made of nonspinning point particles. We show that a rotating current quadrupole has four rotating vortexes that sweep outward and backward like water streams from a rotating sprinkler. As they sweep, the vortexes acquire accompanying tendexes and thereby become outgoing current-quadrupole gravitational waves. We show similarly that a rotating mass quadrupole has four rotating, outward

  14. Classical Weyl transverse gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2017-05-01

    We study various classical aspects of the Weyl transverse (WTDiff) gravity in a general space-time dimension. First of all, we clarify a classical equivalence among three kinds of gravitational theories, those are, the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity, Einstein's general relativity and the WTDiff gravity via the gauge-fixing procedure. Secondly, we show that in the WTDiff gravity the cosmological constant is a mere integration constant as in unimodular gravity, but it does not receive any radiative corrections unlike the unimodular gravity. A key point in this proof is to construct a covariantly conserved energy-momentum tensor, which is achieved on the basis of this equivalence relation. Thirdly, we demonstrate that the Noether current for the Weyl transformation is identically vanishing, thereby implying that the Weyl symmetry existing in both the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity and the WTDiff gravity is a "fake" symmetry. We find it possible to extend this proof to all matter fields, i.e. the Weyl-invariant scalar, vector and spinor fields. Fourthly, it is explicitly shown that in the WTDiff gravity the Schwarzschild black hole metric and a charged black hole one are classical solutions to the equations of motion only when they are expressed in the Cartesian coordinate system. Finally, we consider the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology and provide some exact solutions.

  15. Global COSMIC GPS-RO observations of stratospheric gravity waves and comparisons with an atmospheric general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Simon; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Kawatani, Yoshio; Takahashi, Masaaki; Klekociuk, Andrew

    Data collected with the COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate) GPS-RO satellites from September 2006 onward are used to study the stratospheric wave - mean flow interactions and characterise large scale waves in the tropics, Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes and Antarctica, which are then compared with a T106L60 AGCM. Results to date will be discussed, especially in the context of the new insights into stratospheric dynamics provided by the high resolution COSMIC data. The spatial and temporal structure of tropical waves up to s=9 are resolvable with COSMIC on a time scale of one day. The waves' coupling with deep convective activity and subsequent stratospheric eastward / westward propagation are observed. Interactions with and filtering by the background QBO winds are clearly apparent. The potential energy of the stratospheric equatorial region will also be discussed. These reveal that large energy due to high phase speed waves encountering their critical levels occur directly above deep convection, with critical filtering of other wave components at lower altitudes. Equatorially symmetric structures are often observed in the potential energy. An analysis of the Northern Hemisphere winter UTLS region shows that most of the gravity wave potential energy observable by COSMIC is related to the sub-tropical jet and not orographic waves. The AGCM confirms that the potential energy observed by COSMIC is due to waves propagating upward from the jet core, mainly with ground based phase speeds of less than 10m/s. Results from the Antarctic stratospheric polar night jet will also be presented, which show large potential energy associated with strong wind speeds, which rotate around the continent in concert with the jet's rotation. The variability of the COSMIC gravity wave activity during the spring-time vortex breakdown will be discussed in relation to the Eliassen-Palm flux obtained from AGCM results.

  16. Viability of the matter bounce scenario in F(T) gravity and Loop Quantum Cosmology for general potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Haro, Jaume; Amorós, Jaume E-mail: jaume.amoros@upc.edu

    2014-12-01

    We consider the matter bounce scenario in F(T) gravity and Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) for phenomenological potentials that at early times provide a nearly matter dominated Universe in the contracting phase, having a reheating mechanism in the expanding or contracting phase, i.e., being able to release the energy of the scalar field creating particles that thermalize in order to match with the hot Friedmann Universe, and finally at late times leading to the current cosmic acceleration. For these potentials, numerically solving the dynamical perturbation equations we have seen that, for the particular F(T) model that we will name teleparallel version of LQC, and whose modified Friedmann equation coincides with the corresponding one in holonomy corrected LQC when one deals with the flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) geometry, the corresponding equations obtained from the well-know perturbed equations in F(T) gravity lead to theoretical results that fit well with current observational data. More precisely, in this teleparallel version of LQC there is a set of solutions which leads to theoretical results that match correctly with last BICEP2 data, and there is another set whose theoretical results fit well with Planck's experimental data. On the other hand, in the standard holonomy corrected LQC, using the perturbed equations obtained replacing the Ashtekar connection by a suitable sinus function and inserting some counter-terms in order to preserve the algebra of constrains, the theoretical value of the tensor/scalar ratio is smaller than in the teleparallel version, which means that there is always a set of solutions that matches with Planck's data, but for some potentials BICEP2 experimental results disfavours holonomy corrected LQC.

  17. Viability of the matter bounce scenario in F(T) gravity and Loop Quantum Cosmology for general potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haro, Jaume; Amorós, Jaume

    2014-12-01

    We consider the matter bounce scenario in F(T) gravity and Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) for phenomenological potentials that at early times provide a nearly matter dominated Universe in the contracting phase, having a reheating mechanism in the expanding or contracting phase, i.e., being able to release the energy of the scalar field creating particles that thermalize in order to match with the hot Friedmann Universe, and finally at late times leading to the current cosmic acceleration. For these potentials, numerically solving the dynamical perturbation equations we have seen that, for the particular F(T) model that we will name teleparallel version of LQC, and whose modified Friedmann equation coincides with the corresponding one in holonomy corrected LQC when one deals with the flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) geometry, the corresponding equations obtained from the well-know perturbed equations in F(T) gravity lead to theoretical results that fit well with current observational data. More precisely, in this teleparallel version of LQC there is a set of solutions which leads to theoretical results that match correctly with last BICEP2 data, and there is another set whose theoretical results fit well with Planck's experimental data. On the other hand, in the standard holonomy corrected LQC, using the perturbed equations obtained replacing the Ashtekar connection by a suitable sinus function and inserting some counter-terms in order to preserve the algebra of constrains, the theoretical value of the tensor/scalar ratio is smaller than in the teleparallel version, which means that there is always a set of solutions that matches with Planck's data, but for some potentials BICEP2 experimental results disfavours holonomy corrected LQC.

  18. Gravity Virgins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benish, Richard

    2008-05-01

    As an exercise in imagining a first encounter with gravity, let's begin with the barest gravitational circumstance. On a planet-sized spherical mass we find rigid poles extending to astronomical distances. At regular intervals along each pole there are Instrument Stations containing a clock, an accelerometer and light senders and receivers. Now imagine a civilization (the RC's) that has evolved in a huge self-sustaining Rotating Cylinder far removed from the sphere or any other astronomical body. The RC's are totally ignorant of gravity but understand well light propagation and the effect of motion on clocks, lengths, etc. Motion is sacred to the RC's because they know they'd die if their cylinder stopped rotating. Their clocks are synchronized so as to reflect the anisotropy of light sent in opposite directions along the cylinder's wall. When they set out to explore the Universe, they come upon the top of one of our tall poles. The RC's inspect the instruments, take data and leave their rocket off except when, in the nick of time, they turn it back on to navigate a soft landing. In their attempt to make sense of their experience, will they prefer a hypothesis resembling General Relativity or a hypothesis more like the one found at GravitationLab.com?

  19. Spinfoam Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Eugenio

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Topological Field Theory and Gravity * Classical Spinfoam Gravity: Degrees of Freedom and Foams * Unitary Representations of the Rotation and the Lorentz Group * Boundary Variables and the Loop Quantum Gravity Hilbert Space * Spinfoam Partition Function and the Vertex Amplitude * Cellular Quantum Geometry: A Single Atom of Space * Cellular Quantum Geometry: Coherent Spin-networks * Vertex-amplitude Asymptotics and Regge Gravity * Reconstructing a Semiclassical Spacetime * Conclusions * References

  20. Einstein gravity, massive gravity, multi-gravity and nonlinear realizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goon, Garrett; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Joyce, Austin; Trodden, Mark

    2015-07-01

    The existence of a ghost free theory of massive gravity begs for an interpre-tation as a Higgs phase of General Relativity. We revisit the study of massive gravity as a Higgs phase. Absent a compelling microphysical model of spontaneous symmetry breaking in gravity, we approach this problem from the viewpoint of nonlinear realizations. We employ the coset construction to search for the most restrictive symmetry breaking pattern whose low energy theory will both admit the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) potentials and nonlinearly realize every symmetry of General Relativity, thereby providing a new perspective from which to build theories of massive gravity. In addition to the known ghost-free terms, we find a novel parity violating interaction which preserves the constraint structure of the theory, but which vanishes on the normal branch of the theory. Finally, the procedure is extended to the cases of bi-gravity and multi-vielbein theories. Analogous parity violating interactions exist here, too, and may be non-trivial for certain classes of multi-metric theories.

  1. Gravity Waves

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Gravity Waves Ripple over Marine Stratocumulus Clouds ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), a fingerprint-like gravity wave feature occurs over a deck of marine stratocumulus clouds. Similar ... that occur when a pebble is thrown into a still pond, such "gravity waves" sometimes appear when the relatively stable and stratified air ...

  2. TESTS OF GENERAL RELATIVITY IN THE STRONG-GRAVITY REGIME BASED ON X-RAY SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF BLACK HOLES IN X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczynski, Henric

    2012-08-01

    Although general relativity (GR) has been tested extensively in the weak-gravity regime, similar tests in the strong-gravity regime are still missing. In this paper, we explore the possibility to use X-ray spectropolarimetric observations of black holes in X-ray binaries to distinguish between the Kerr metric and the phenomenological metrics introduced by Johannsen and Psaltis (which are not vacuum solutions of Einstein's equation) and thus to test the no-hair theorem of GR. To this end, we have developed a numerical code that calculates the radial brightness profiles of accretion disks and parallel transports the wave vector and polarization vector of photons through the Kerr and non-GR spacetimes. We used the code to predict the observational appearance of GR and non-GR accreting black hole systems. We find that the predicted energy spectra and energy-dependent polarization degree and polarization direction do depend strongly on the underlying spacetime. However, for large regions of the parameter space, the GR and non-GR metrics lead to very similar observational signatures, making it difficult to observationally distinguish between the two types of models.

  3. A comment on "A test of general relativity using the LARES and LAGEOS satellites and a GRACE Earth gravity model", by I. Ciufolini et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2017-02-01

    Recently, Ciufolini et al. reported on a test of the general relativistic gravitomagnetic Lense-Thirring effect by analyzing about 3.5 years of laser ranging data to the LAGEOS, LAGEOS II, LARES geodetic satellites orbiting the Earth. By using the GRACE-based GGM05S Earth's global gravity model and a linear combination of the nodes Ω of the three satellites designed to remove the impact of errors in the first two even zonal harmonic coefficients J_2, J_4 of the multipolar expansion of the Newtonian part of the Earth's gravitational potential, they claimed an overall accuracy of {5}% for the Lense-Thirring caused node motion. We show that the scatter in the nominal values of the uncancelled even zonals of degree ℓ = 6, 8, {10} from some of the most recent global gravity models does not yet allow to reach unambiguously and univocally the expected {≈ }1% level, being large up to ≲15% (ℓ =6), 6% (ℓ =8), 36% (ℓ =10) for some pairs of models.

  4. Gravity Driven Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Roy

    2010-03-01

    Flowing global gravitation initially produced space without time or mass. Space-time and mass are properties of flowing global gravitation. From its fabric, primal mass spins spontaneously giving rise to local gravitational space-time curvatures. Global gravity is the unifying background field. Gravity began flowing from its singularity with a big whoosh. It curves with angular rotational precession, creating a spatial geometry similar to the windings of a ball of string. Three-dimensional global gravity swirls locally into massive densities. Concurrently with these densities, local gravity curvatures of space-time arise. The expanse between celestial objects is not completely empty, void space as generally believed; it is antecedent gravity, a prerequisite associated field necessary for originating the first quantum particles. Gravity is dark energy; gravity's spin, as the second fundamental force, is electromagnetic dark matter. Electromagnetic masses attract then gravity compresses hot, dense and small---then bang, the first hydrogen star of which there are many. There may have been many big bangs, but no Big Bang that ultimately created the universe.

  5. Lovelock gravities from Born-Infeld gravity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha, P. K.; Merino, N.; Rodríguez, E. K.

    2017-02-01

    We present a Born-Infeld gravity theory based on generalizations of Maxwell symmetries denoted as Cm. We analyze different configuration limits allowing to recover diverse Lovelock gravity actions in six dimensions. Further, the generalization to higher even dimensions is also considered.

  6. Venus gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    The anomalous gravity field of Venus shows high correlation with surface features revealed by radar. We extract gravity models from the Doppler tracking data from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) by means of a two-step process. In the first step, we solve the nonlinear spacecraft state estimation problem using a Kalman filter-smoother. The Kalman filter was evaluated through simulations. This evaluation and some unusual features of the filter are discussed. In the second step, we perform a geophysical inversion using a linear Bayesian estimator. To allow an unbiased comparison between gravity and topography, we use a simulation technique to smooth and distort the radar topographic data so as to yield maps having the same characteristics as our gravity maps. The maps presented cover 2/3 of the surface of Venus and display the strong topography-gravity correlation previously reported. The topography-gravity scatter plots show two distinct trends.

  7. A study into the effects of gravity wave activity on the diurnal tide and airglow emissions in the equatorial mesosphere and lower thermosphere using the Coupled Middle Atmosphere and Thermosphere (CMAT) general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, S. L.; Dobbin, A.; Harris, M. J.; Arnold, N. F.; Aylward, A. D.

    2006-02-01

    Momentum deposition by gravity wave breaking is known to affect the amplitude and phase of the diurnal tide. Modelling studies of this interaction have produced some conflicting results and as yet, the exact nature of this interaction is not fully understood. In this study, the effects of parameterised gravity wave momentum deposition on the diurnal tide and subsequently on green line airglow from atomic oxygen during equinox are investigated using the Coupled Middle Atmosphere and Thermosphere (CMAT) general circulation model. The effects of gravity wave drag calculated by two different parameterisations, Meyer [1999. Gravity wave interactions with the diurnal propagating tide. Journal of Geophysical Research 104, 4223 4239] and Medvedev and Klaassen [2000. Parameterisation of gravity wave momentum deposition based on non-linear wave interactions: basic formulation and sensitivity tests. Journal of Atmospheric and Terrestrial Physics 62, 1015 1033], are compared in the low latitude MLT region between 70 and 120 km, where the amplitude of the diurnal tide and green line volume emission rates maximise. Results indicate that momentum sources from both gravity wave parameterisations act to reduce the mid-latitude zonal jets and advance the phase of the diurnal tide, such that the peak amplitude at a given height occurs at an earlier time of day. Gravity wave momentum deposition as parameterised by Meyer [1999. Gravity wave interactions with the diurnal propagating tide. Journal of Geophysical Research 104, 4223 4239] results in a reduction of the amplitude of the diurnal tide in the MLT region, whereas the tidal amplitude is increased when the Medvedev and Klaassen [2000. Parameterisation of gravity wave momentum deposition based on non-linear wave interactions: basic formulation and sensitivity tests. Journal of Atmospheric and Terrestrial Physics 62, 1015 1033] parameterisation is used. Both parameterisations affect the local time variability of the simulated

  8. The general Taub-NUT-De Sitter metric as a self-dual Yang-Mills solution of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutaleb-Joutei, H.

    1980-02-01

    We show in a simple and systematical way the self-duality constraints of certain SU(2) gauge fields can be used to rediscover the Einstein metrics. Starting with a metric tensor with two unknown functions, the self-duality constraints of the SU(2) gauge field obtained from the spin connections are studied. The general Taub-NUT-De Sitter metric is found to emerge quite simply as a solution, though the riemannian tensor of the metric itself is not self-dual in the general case. Different interesting limiting cases, such as the Eguchi-Hanson metric, are also obtained directly from the constraint equations. On leave of absence from Laboratoire de Physique Théorique de la Faculté des Sciences de Rabat, Morocco.

  9. Stability, ghost, and strong coupling in nonrelativistic general covariant theory of gravity with λ≠1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongqing; Wang, Anzhong

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate three important issues: stability, ghost, and strong coupling, in the Horava-Melby-Thompson setup of the Horava-Lifshitz theory with λ≠1, generalized recently by da Silva. We first develop the general linear scalar perturbations of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe with arbitrary spatial curvature and find that an immediate by-product of the setup is that, in all the inflationary models described by a scalar field, the FRW universe is necessarily flat. Applying them to the case of the Minkowski background, we find that it is stable, and, similar to the case λ=1, the spin-0 graviton is eliminated. The vector perturbations vanish identically in the Minkowski background. Thus, similar to general relativity, a free gravitational field in this setup is completely described by a spin-2 massless graviton, even with λ≠1. We also study the ghost problem in the FRW background and find explicitly the ghost-free conditions. To study the strong coupling problem, we consider two different kinds of spacetimes, all with the presence of matter: one is cosmological, and the other is static. We find that the coupling becomes strong for a process with energy higher than Mpl|cψ|5/2 in the flat FRW background and Mpl|cψ|3 in a static weak gravitational field, where |cψ|≡|(1-λ)/(3λ-1)|1/2.

  10. Conformal Gravity Solutions to Standard Gravity Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O’Brien, James G.; Chaykov, Spasen; Chiarelli, Thomas L.; Saintable, Taylor; Harrington, Justin

    Gravitational theories outside standard general relativity have been drawing increased attention over the past several years, mostly due to the lack of direct observational evidence of dark matter. With some recent very high level dark matter searches continuing, and the parameter space to search decreasing has lead to a new interest in rethinking gravity at the largest of scales. As an alternative gravitational theory, conformal gravity has enjoyed much of the success of Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) in predicting phenomenology, but differs dramatically in its initial construction. In this work, we explore some recent advances in conformal gravity, which help to build the case for support of such an alternative theory. Here, we highlight conformal gravity’s success in fitting new rotation curves, its ability to explain velocity dispersions in clusters, the initial steps towards gravitational lensing and finally, some preliminary work on explaining universal centripetal acceleration trends in galaxies.

  11. Sujata Relativity: Complete Relativity from Gravity to Quantum-Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Nilotpal

    2009-01-01

    Here, we describe gravity as a universal deformation of Minkowski metric depending on a "double-fold" complex number for fourth coordinate within a (3 + 1)D-space. A unification of Special Relativity and General Relativity, induced by Lorentz transformation, gives a Quantum-Gravity Wave Equation, much like as Wheeler-DeWitt equation, without considering Canonical or, Covariant Quantum Relativity. A complete and well-grown ("Sujata") Quantum-Gravity picture satisfies the Quantum Gravitational Field Equation.

  12. Geometric scalar theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Novello, M.; Bittencourt, E.; Goulart, E.; Salim, J.M.; Toniato, J.D.; Moschella, U. E-mail: eduhsb@cbpf.br E-mail: egoulart@cbpf.br E-mail: toniato@cbpf.br

    2013-06-01

    We present a geometric scalar theory of gravity. Our proposal will be described using the ''background field method'' introduced by Gupta, Feynman, Deser and others as a field theory formulation of general relativity. We analyze previous criticisms against scalar gravity and show how the present proposal avoids these difficulties. This concerns not only the theoretical complaints but also those related to observations. In particular, we show that the widespread belief of the conjecture that the source of scalar gravity must be the trace of the energy-momentum tensor — which is one of the main difficulties to couple gravity with electromagnetic phenomenon in previous models — does not apply to our geometric scalar theory. From the very beginning this is not a special relativistic scalar gravity. The adjective ''geometric'' pinpoints its similarity with general relativity: this is a metric theory of gravity. Some consequences of this new scalar theory are explored.

  13. Stability, ghost, and strong coupling in nonrelativistic general covariant theory of gravity with {lambda}{ne}1

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yongqing; Wang Anzhong

    2011-05-15

    In this paper, we investigate three important issues: stability, ghost, and strong coupling, in the Horava-Melby-Thompson setup of the Horava-Lifshitz theory with {lambda}{ne}1, generalized recently by da Silva. We first develop the general linear scalar perturbations of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe with arbitrary spatial curvature and find that an immediate by-product of the setup is that, in all the inflationary models described by a scalar field, the FRW universe is necessarily flat. Applying them to the case of the Minkowski background, we find that it is stable, and, similar to the case {lambda}=1, the spin-0 graviton is eliminated. The vector perturbations vanish identically in the Minkowski background. Thus, similar to general relativity, a free gravitational field in this setup is completely described by a spin-2 massless graviton, even with {lambda}{ne}1. We also study the ghost problem in the FRW background and find explicitly the ghost-free conditions. To study the strong coupling problem, we consider two different kinds of spacetimes, all with the presence of matter: one is cosmological, and the other is static. We find that the coupling becomes strong for a process with energy higher than M{sub pl}|c{sub {psi}|}{sup 5/2} in the flat FRW background and M{sub pl}|c{sub {psi}|}{sup 3} in a static weak gravitational field, where |c{sub {psi}|{identical_to}}|(1-{lambda})/(3{lambda}-1)|{sup 1/2}.

  14. Gravity investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, D.L.

    1983-12-31

    A large density contrast exists between the Paleozoic rocks (including the rocks of Climax stock) and less dense, Tertiary volcanic rocks and alluvium. This density contrast ranges widely, and herein for interpretive purposes, is assumed to average 0.85 Mg/m{sup 3} (megagrams per cubic meter). The large density contrast makes the gravity method a useful tool with which to study the interface between these rock types. However, little or no density contrast is discernible between the sedimentary Paleozoic rocks that surround the Climax stock and the intrusive rocks of the stock itself. Therefore the gravity method can not be used to define the configuration of the stock. Gravity highs coincide with outcrops of the dense Paleozoic rocks, and gravity lows overlie less-dense Tertiary volcanic rocks and Quaternary alluvium. The positions of three major faults (Boundary, Yucca, and Butte faults) are defined by steep gravity gradients. West of the Climax stock, the Tippinip fault has juxtaposed Paleozoic rocks of similar density, and consequently, has no expression in the gravity data in that area. The gravity station spacing, across Oak Spring Butte, is not sufficient to adequately define any gravity expression of the Tippinip fault. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Repulsive gravity in tension stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J.; Lynden-Bell, D.

    1991-09-01

    In stars, pressure opposes the attractive force of gravity. In general relativity, if the pressure is negative (a tension) and P is less than -1/3 rho(c)-squared, then the resulting gravity is repulsive. Such material is invoked in cosmology to give the inflation of the universe. In tension stars, this repulsive gravity is balanced by the tension. The simplest tension stars only exist in esoteric situations beyond the neck of an Einstein-Rosen bridge in Schwarzschild space. Here, tension material is confined within a massive shell of normal matter. The resulting object, while still repulsive inside, has an attractive exterior gravity and can, in principle, exist without horizons.

  16. Conformal tensors via Lovelock gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastor, David

    2013-10-01

    Constructs from conformal geometry are important in low dimensional gravity models, while in higher dimensions the higher curvature interactions of Lovelock gravity are similarly prominent. Considering conformal invariance in the context of Lovelock gravity leads to natural, higher curvature generalizations of the Weyl, Schouten, Cotton and Bach tensors, with properties that straightforwardly extend those of their familiar counterparts. As a first application, we introduce a new set of conformally invariant gravity theories in D = 4k dimensions, based on the squares of the higher curvature Weyl tensors.

  17. Gravity brake

    DOEpatents

    Lujan, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanical gravity brake that prevents hoisted loads within a shaft from free-falling when a loss of hoisting force occurs. A loss of hoist lifting force may occur in a number of situations, for example if a hoist cable were to break, the brakes were to fail on a winch, or the hoist mechanism itself were to fail. Under normal hoisting conditions, the gravity brake of the invention is subject to an upward lifting force from the hoist and a downward pulling force from a suspended load. If the lifting force should suddenly cease, the loss of differential forces on the gravity brake in free-fall is translated to extend a set of brakes against the walls of the shaft to stop the free fall descent of the gravity brake and attached load.

  18. Gravity waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David

    1987-01-01

    Gravity waves contributed to the establishment of the thermal structure, small scale (80 to 100 km) fluctuations in velocity (50 to 80 m/sec) and density (20 to 30%, 0 to peak). Dominant gravity wave spectrum in the middle atmosphere: x-scale, less than 100 km; z-scale, greater than 10 km; t-scale, less than 2 hr. Theorists are beginning to understand middle atmosphere motions. There are two classes: Planetary waves and equatorial motions, gravity waves and tidal motions. The former give rise to variability at large scales, which may alter apparent mean structure. Effects include density and velocity fluctuations, induced mean motions, and stratospheric warmings which lead to the breakup of the polar vortex and cooling of the mesosphere. On this scale are also equatorial quasi-biennial and semi-annual oscillations. Gravity wave and tidal motions produce large rms fluctuations in density and velocity. The magnitude of the density fluctuations compared to the mean density is of the order of the vertical wavelength, which grows with height. Relative density fluctuations are less than, or of the order of 30% below the mesopause. Such motions may cause significant and variable convection, and wind shear. There is a strong seasonal variation in gravity wave amplitude. Additional observations are needed to address and quantify mean and fluctuation statistics of both density and mean velocity, variability of the mean and fluctuations, and to identify dominant gravity wave scales and sources as well as causes of variability, both temporal and geographic.

  19. Statistical origin of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rabin; Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan

    2010-06-15

    Starting from the definition of entropy used in statistical mechanics we show that it is proportional to the gravity action. For a stationary black hole this entropy is expressed as S=E/2T, where T is the Hawking temperature and E is shown to be the Komar energy. This relation is also compatible with the generalized Smarr formula for mass.

  20. Loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Dah-Wei

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an "in-a-nutshell" yet self-contained introductory review on loop quantum gravity (LQG) — a background-independent, nonperturbative approach to a consistent quantum theory of gravity. Instead of rigorous and systematic derivations, it aims to provide a general picture of LQG, placing emphasis on the fundamental ideas and their significance. The canonical formulation of LQG, as the central topic of the paper, is presented in a logically orderly fashion with moderate details, while the spin foam theory, black hole thermodynamics, and loop quantum cosmology are covered briefly. Current directions and open issues are also summarized.

  1. Global distribution of gravity wave fields and their seasonal dependence in the Martian atmosphere simulated in a high-resolution general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Medvedev, Alexander; Yiğit, Erdal; Hartogh, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) are small-scale atmospheric waves generated by various geophysical processes, such as topography, convection, and dynamical instability. On Mars, several observations and simulations have revealed that GWs strongly affect temperature and wind fields in the middle and upper atmosphere. We have worked with a high-resolution Martian general circulation model (MGCM), with the spectral resolution of T106 (horizontal grid interval of ~67 km), for the investigations of generation and propagation of GWs. We analyzed for three kinds of wavelength ranges, (1) horizontal total wavenumber s=21-30 (wavelength λ~700-1000 km), (2) s=31-60 (λ~350-700 km), and (3) s=61-106 (λ~200-350 km). Our results show that shorter-scale harmonics progressively dominate with height during both equinox and solstice. We have detected two main sources of GWs: mountainous regions and the meandering winter polar jet. In both seasons GW energy in the troposphere due to the shorter-scale harmonics is concentrated in the low latitudes in a good agreement with observations. Orographically-generated GWs contribute significantly to the total energy of disturbances, and strongly decay with height. Thus, the non-orographic GWs of tropospheric origin dominate near the mesopause. The vertical fluxes of wave horizontal momentum are directed mainly against the larger-scale wind. Mean magnitudes of the drag in the middle atmosphere are tens of m s-1 sol-1, while instantaneously they can reach thousands of m s-1 sol-1, which results in an attenuation of the wind jets in the middle atmosphere and in tendency of their reversal.

  2. Deep ocean warming assessed from altimeters, Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment, in situ measurements, and a non-Boussinesq ocean general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y. Tony; Colberg, Frank

    2011-02-01

    Observational surveys have shown significant oceanic bottom water warming, but they are too spatially and temporally sporadic to quantify the deep ocean contribution to the present-day sea level rise (SLR). In this study, altimetry sea surface height (SSH), Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) ocean mass, and in situ upper ocean (0-700 m) steric height have been assessed for their seasonal variability and trend maps. It is shown that neither the global mean nor the regional trends of altimetry SLR can be explained by the upper ocean steric height plus the GRACE ocean mass. A non-Boussinesq ocean general circulation model (OGCM), allowing the sea level to rise as a direct response to the heat added into the ocean, is then used to diagnose the deep ocean steric height. Constrained by sea surface temperature data and the top of atmosphere (TOA) radiation measurements, the model reproduces the observed upper ocean heat content well. Combining the modeled deep ocean steric height with observational upper ocean data gives the full depth steric height. Adding a GRACE-estimated mass trend, the data-model combination explains not only the altimetry global mean SLR but also its regional trends fairly well. The deep ocean warming is mostly prevalent in the Atlantic and Indian oceans, and along the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, suggesting a strong relation to the oceanic circulation and dynamics. Its comparison with available bottom water measurements shows reasonably good agreement, indicating that deep ocean warming below 700 m might have contributed 1.1 mm/yr to the global mean SLR or one-third of the altimeter-observed rate of 3.11 ± 0.6 mm/yr over 1993-2008.

  3. More about scalar gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittencourt, E.; Moschella, U.; Novello, M.; Toniato, J. D.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss a class of models for gravity based on a scalar field. The models include and generalize the old approach by Nordström which predated and, in some ways, inspired general relativity. The class include also a model that we have recently introduced and discussed in terms of its cosmological aspects (GSG). We present here a complete characterization of the Schwarschild geometry as a vacuum solution of GSG and sketch a discussion of the first post-Newtonian approximation.

  4. Cosmological tests of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Bhuvnesh; Khoury, Justin

    2010-07-15

    Modifications of general relativity provide an alternative explanation to dark energy for the observed acceleration of the universe. We review recent developments in modified gravity theories, focusing on higher-dimensional approaches and chameleon/f(R) theories. We classify these models in terms of the screening mechanisms that enable such theories to approach general relativity on small scales (and thus satisfy solar system constraints). We describe general features of the modified Friedman equation in such theories. The second half of this review describes experimental tests of gravity in light of the new theoretical approaches. We summarize the high precision tests of gravity on laboratory and solar system scales. We describe in some detail tests on astrophysical scales ranging from {approx} kpc (galaxy scales) to {approx} Gpc (large-scale structure). These tests rely on the growth and inter-relationship of perturbations in the metric potentials, density and velocity fields which can be measured using gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster abundances, galaxy clustering and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. A robust way to interpret observations is by constraining effective parameters, such as the ratio of the two metric potentials. Currently tests of gravity on astrophysical scales are in the early stages - we summarize these tests and discuss the interesting prospects for new tests in the coming decade.

  5. Revamped braneworld gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bao Ruoyu; Park, Minjoon; Carena, Marcela; Santiago, Jose; Lykken, Joseph

    2006-03-15

    Gravity in five-dimensional braneworld backgrounds often exhibits problematic features, including kinetic ghosts, strong coupling, and the van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov (vDVZ) discontinuity. These problems are an obstacle to producing and analyzing braneworld models with interesting and potentially observable modifications of 4d gravity. We examine these problems in a general AdS{sub 5}/AdS{sub 4} setup with two branes and localized curvature from arbitrary brane kinetic terms. We use the interval approach and an explicit straight gauge-fixing. We compute the complete quadratic gauge-fixed effective 4d action, as well as the leading cubic order corrections. We compute the exact Green's function for gravity as seen on the brane. In the full parameter space, we exhibit the regions which avoid kinetic ghosts and tachyons. We give a general formula for the strong coupling scale, i.e., the energy scale at which the linearized treatment of gravity breaks down, for relevant regions of the parameter space. We show how the vDVZ discontinuity can be naturally but nontrivially avoided by ultralight graviton modes. We present a direct comparison of warping versus localized curvature in terms of their effects on graviton mode couplings. We exhibit the first example of Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP)-like crossover behavior in a general warped setup.

  6. Revamped braneworld gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Ruoyu; Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph; Park, Minjoon; Santiago, Jose; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    Gravity in five-dimensional braneworld backgrounds often exhibits problematic features, including kinetic ghosts, strong coupling, and the vDVZ discontinuity. These problems are an obstacle to producing and analyzing braneworld models with interesting and potentially observable modifications of 4d gravity. We examine these problems in a general AdS{sub 5}/AdS{sub 4} setup with two branes and localized curvature from arbitrary brane kinetic terms. We use the interval approach and an explicit ''straight'' gauge-fixing. We compute the complete quadratic gauge-fixed effective 4d action, as well as the leading cubic order corrections. We compute the exact Green's function for gravity as seen on the brane. In the full parameter space, we exhibit the regions which avoid kinetic ghosts and tachyons. We give a general formula for the strong coupling scale, i.e. the energy scale at which the linearized treatment of gravity breaks down, for relevant regions of the parameter space. We show how the vDVZ discontinuity can be naturally but nontrivially avoided by ultralight graviton modes. We present a direct comparison of warping versus localized curvature in terms of their effects on graviton mode couplings. We exhibit the first example of DGP-like crossover behavior in a general warped setup.

  7. Cosmological tests of modified gravity.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard [Formula: see text]CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years.

  8. Cosmological tests of modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard Λ CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years.

  9. Cosmology in Weyl transverse gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-11-01

    We study the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology in the Weyl-transverse (WTDiff) gravity in a general spacetime dimension. The WTDiff gravity is invariant under both the local Weyl (conformal) transformation and the volume preserving diffeormorphisms (transverse diffeomorphisms) and is believed to be equivalent to general relativity at least at the classical level (perhaps, even in the quantum regime). It is explicitly shown by solving the equations of motion that the FLRW metric is a classical solution in the WTDiff gravity only when the spatial metric is flat, that is, the Euclidean space, and the lapse function is a nontrivial function of the scale factor.

  10. Compact objects in Horndeski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Hector O.; Maselli, Andrea; Minamitsuji, Masato; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Horndeski gravity holds a special position as the most general extension of Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) with a single scalar degree of freedom and second-order field equations. Because of these features, Horndeski gravity is an attractive phenomenological playground to investigate the consequences of modifications of GR in cosmology and astrophysics. We present a review of the progress made so far in the study of compact objects (black holes (BHs) and neutron stars (NSs)) within Horndeski gravity. In particular, we review our recent work on slowly rotating BHs and present some new results on slowly rotating NSs.

  11. Brane-World Gravity.

    PubMed

    Maartens, Roy; Koyama, Kazuya

    2010-01-01

    The observable universe could be a 1+3-surface (the "brane") embedded in a 1+3+d-dimensional spacetime (the "bulk"), with Standard Model particles and fields trapped on the brane while gravity is free to access the bulk. At least one of the d extra spatial dimensions could be very large relative to the Planck scale, which lowers the fundamental gravity scale, possibly even down to the electroweak (∼ TeV) level. This revolutionary picture arises in the framework of recent developments in M theory. The 1+10-dimensional M theory encompasses the known 1+9-dimensional superstring theories, and is widely considered to be a promising potential route to quantum gravity. At low energies, gravity is localized at the brane and general relativity is recovered, but at high energies gravity "leaks" into the bulk, behaving in a truly higher-dimensional way. This introduces significant changes to gravitational dynamics and perturbations, with interesting and potentially testable implications for high-energy astrophysics, black holes, and cosmology. Brane-world models offer a phenomenological way to test some of the novel predictions and corrections to general relativity that are implied by M theory. This review analyzes the geometry, dynamics and perturbations of simple brane-world models for cosmology and astrophysics, mainly focusing on warped 5-dimensional brane-worlds based on the Randall-Sundrum models. We also cover the simplest brane-world models in which 4-dimensional gravity on the brane is modified at low energies - the 5-dimensional Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati models. Then we discuss co-dimension two branes in 6-dimensional models.

  12. Gravity Anomalies

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-15

    Analysis of radio tracking data have enabled maps of the gravity field of Mercury to be derived. In this image, overlain on a mosaic obtained by MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System and illuminated with a shape model determined from stereo-photoclinometry, Mercury's gravity anomalies are depicted in colors. Red tones indicate mass concentrations, centered on the Caloris basin (center) and the Sobkou region (right limb). Such large-scale gravitational anomalies are signatures of subsurface structure and evolution. The north pole is near the top of the sunlit area in this view. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19285

  13. U-duality covariant gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohm, Olaf; Samtleben, Henning

    2013-09-01

    We extend the techniques of double field theory to more general gravity theories and U-duality symmetries, having in mind applications to the complete D = 11 supergravity. In this paper we work out a (3 + 3)-dimensional `U-duality covariantization' of D = 4 Einstein gravity, in which the Ehlers group SL(2, ) is realized geometrically, acting in the 3 representation on half of the coordinates. We include the full (2 + 1)-dimensional metric, while the `internal vielbein' is a coset representative of SL(2, )/SO(2) and transforms under gauge transformations via generalized Lie derivatives. In addition, we introduce a gauge connection of the `C-bracket', and a gauge connection of SL(2, ), albeit subject to constraints. The action takes the form of (2 + 1)-dimensional gravity coupled to a Chern-Simons-matter theory but encodes the complete D = 4 Einstein gravity. We comment on generalizations, such as an ` E 8(8) covariantization' of M-theory.

  14. 14 CFR 27.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 27.27 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of gravity must be...

  15. 14 CFR 29.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 29.27 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of gravity...

  16. 14 CFR 29.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 29.27 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of gravity...

  17. 14 CFR 29.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 29.27 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of gravity...

  18. 14 CFR 27.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 27.27 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of gravity must be...

  19. 14 CFR 27.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 27.27 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of gravity must be...

  20. 14 CFR 27.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 27.27 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of gravity must be...

  1. 14 CFR 29.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 29.27 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of gravity...

  2. 14 CFR 27.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 27.27 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of gravity must be...

  3. 14 CFR 29.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 29.27 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of gravity...

  4. Gravity settling

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Hyman R.; Long, R. H.; Simone, A. A.

    1979-01-01

    Solids are separated from a liquid in a gravity settler provided with inclined solid intercepting surfaces to intercept the solid settling path to coalesce the solids and increase the settling rate. The intercepting surfaces are inverted V-shaped plates, each formed from first and second downwardly inclined upwardly curved intersecting conical sections having their apices at the vessel wall.

  5. Simulating Gravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  6. Simulating Gravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  7. Gravity and Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blencowe, Miles

    The emergence of the macroscopic classical world from the microscopic quantum world is commonly understood to be a consequence of the fact that any given quantum system is open, unavoidably interacting with unobserved environmental degrees of freedom that will cause initial quantum superposition states of the system to decohere, resulting in classical mixtures of either-or alternatives. A fundamental question concerns how large a macroscopic object can be placed in a manifest quantum state, such as a center of mass quantum superposition state, under conditions where the effects of the interacting environmental degrees of freedom are reduced (i.e. in ultrahigh vacuum and at ultralow temperatures). Recent experiments have in fact demonstrated manifest quantum behavior in nano-to-micron-scale mechanical systems. Gravity has been invoked in various ways as playing a possible fundamental role in enforcing classicality of matter systems beyond a certain scale. Adopting the viewpoint that the standard perturbative quantization of general relativity provides an effective description of quantum gravity that is valid at ordinary energies, we show that it is possible to describe quantitatively how gravity as an environment can induce the decoherence of matter superposition states. The justification for such an approach follows from the fact that we are considering laboratory scale systems, where the matter is localized to regions of small curvature. As with other low energy effects, such as the quantum gravity correction to the Newtonian potential between two ordinary masses, it should be possible to quantitatively evaluate gravitationally induced decoherence rates by employing standard perturbative quantum gravity as an effective field theory; whatever the final form the eventual correct quantum theory of gravity takes, it must converge in its predictions with the effective field theory description at low energies. Research supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF

  8. Quantum Corrections to Entropic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Wang, Chiao-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    The entropic gravity scenario recently proposed by Erik Verlinde reproduced Newton's law of purely classical gravity yet the key assumptions of this approach all have quantum mechanical origins. As is typical for emergent phenomena in physics, the underlying, more fundamental physics often reveals itself as corrections to the leading classical behavior. So one naturally wonders: where is ℏ hiding in entropic gravity? To address this question, we first revisit the idea of holographic screen as well as entropy and its variation law in order to obtain a self-consistent approach to the problem. Next we argue that since the concept of minimal length has been invoked in the Bekenstein entropic derivation, the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), which is a direct consequence of the minimal length, should be taken into consideration in the entropic interpretation of gravity. Indeed based on GUP it has been demonstrated that the black hole Bekenstein entropy area law must be modified not only in the strong but also in the weak gravity regime where in the weak gravity limit the GUP modified entropy exhibits a logarithmic correction. When applying it to the entropic interpretation, we demonstrate that the resulting gravity force law does include sub-leading order correction terms that depend on ℏ. Such deviation from the classical Newton's law may serve as a probe to the validity of entropic gravity.

  9. Quantum Corrections to Entropic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Wang, Chiao-Hsuan

    2013-12-01

    The entropic gravity scenario recently proposed by Erik Verlinde reproduced Newton's law of purely classical gravity yet the key assumptions of this approach all have quantum mechanical origins. As is typical for emergent phenomena in physics, the underlying, more fundamental physics often reveals itself as corrections to the leading classical behavior. So one naturally wonders: where is ħ hiding in entropic gravity? To address this question, we first revisit the idea of holographic screen as well as entropy and its variation law in order to obtain a self-consistent approach to the problem. Next we argue that as the concept of minimal length has been invoked in the Bekenstein entropic derivation, the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), which is a direct consequence of the minimal length, should be taken into consideration in the entropic interpretation of gravity. Indeed based on GUP it has been demonstrated that the black hole Bekenstein entropy area law must be modified not only in the strong but also in the weak gravity regime where in the weak gravity limit the GUP modified entropy exhibits a logarithmic correction. When applying it to the entropic interpretation, we demonstrate that the resulting gravity force law does include sub-leading order correction terms that depend on ħ. Such deviation from the classical Newton's law may serve as a probe to the validity of entropic gravity.

  10. Analogue gravity models of emergent gravity: lessons and pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberati, Stefano

    2017-08-01

    Analogue models of gravity have provided a test bed for many classical and quantum field theory effects in curve spacetime. Here we present a review of some relevant results towards their extension as toy models of emergent gravity scenarios. From these models we shall try to draw general lessons about the emergent gravity tackle on the cosmological constant problem as well as about the characteristic phenomenological signatures they suggest. Finally, we shall discuss current constraints on these signatures and the field’s future perspectives.

  11. AdS Chern-Simons gravity induces conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aros, Rodrigo; Díaz, Danilo E.

    2014-04-01

    The leitmotif of this paper is the question of whether four- and higher even-dimensional conformal gravities do have a Chern-Simons pedigree. We show that Weyl gravity can be obtained as the dimensional reduction of a five-dimensional Chern-Simons action for a suitable (gauge-fixed, tractorlike) five-dimensional anti-de Sitter connection. The gauge-fixing and dimensional reduction program readily admits a generalization to higher dimensions for the case of certain conformal gravities obtained by contractions of the Weyl tensor.

  12. Testing relativistic theories of gravity with spacecraft-Doppler gravity-wave detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellings, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The response of a spacecraft Doppler-tracking system to the passage of a weak plane gravity wave of the most general polarization is calculated. Results show that the simultaneous tracking of several spacecraft could provide an unambiguous determination of the gravity-wave polarization, a much needed result in the continuing experimental testing of relativistic theories of gravity.

  13. Semiclassical unimodular gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Fiol, Bartomeu; Garriga, Jaume E-mail: jaume.garriga@ub.edu

    2010-08-01

    Classically, unimodular gravity is known to be equivalent to General Relativity (GR), except for the fact that the effective cosmological constant Λ has the status of an integration constant. Here, we explore various formulations of unimodular gravity beyond the classical limit. We first consider the non-generally covariant action formulation in which the determinant of the metric is held fixed to unity. We argue that the corresponding quantum theory is also equivalent to General Relativity for localized perturbative processes which take place in generic backgrounds of infinite volume (such as asymptotically flat spacetimes). Next, using the same action, we calculate semiclassical non-perturbative quantities, which we expect will be dominated by Euclidean instanton solutions. We derive the entropy/area ratio for cosmological and black hole horizons, finding agreement with GR for solutions in backgrounds of infinite volume, but disagreement for backgrounds with finite volume. In deriving the above results, the path integral is taken over histories with fixed 4-volume. We point out that the results are different if we allow the 4-volume of the different histories to vary over a continuum range. In this ''generalized'' version of unimodular gravity, one recovers the full set of Einstein's equations in the classical limit, including the trace, so Λ is no longer an integration constant. Finally, we consider the generally covariant theory due to Henneaux and Teitelboim, which is classically equivalent to unimodular gravity. In this case, the standard semiclassical GR results are recovered provided that the boundary term in the Euclidean action is chosen appropriately.

  14. Alternative theories of gravity and Lorentz violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; Foster, Joshua; Kostelecky, V. Alan

    2017-01-01

    General relativity has achieved many successes, including the prediction of experimental results. However, its incompatibility with quantum theory remains an obstacle. By extending the foundational properties of general relativity, alternative theories of gravity can be constructed. In this talk, we focus on fermion couplings in the weak-gravity limit of certain alternative theories of gravity. Under suitable experimental circumstances, some of these couplings match terms appearing in the gravitational SME, which is a general framework describing violations of local Lorentz invariance. Existing limits on Lorentz violation can therefore be used to constrain certain Lorentz-invariant alternative theories of gravity.

  15. Schwarzschild solution from Weyl transverse gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    We study classical solutions in the Weyl-transverse (WTDiff) gravity. The WTDiff gravity is invariant under both the local Weyl (conformal) transformation and the volume preserving diffeomorphisms (Diff) (transverse diffeomorphisms (TDiff)) and is known to be equivalent to general relativity at least at the classical level. In particular, we find that in a general spacetime dimension, the Schwarzschild metric is a classical solution in the WTDiff gravity when it is expressed in the Cartesian coordinate system.

  16. Fake conformal symmetry in unimodular gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    We study Weyl symmetry (local conformal symmetry) in unimodular gravity. It is shown that the Noether currents for both Weyl symmetry and global scale symmetry vanish exactly as in conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity. We clearly explain why in the class of conformally invariant gravitational theories, the Noether currents vanish by starting with conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity. Moreover, we comment on both classical and quantum-mechanical equivalences in Einstein's general relativity, conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity, and the Weyl-transverse gravity. Finally, we discuss the Weyl current in the conformally invariant scalar action and see that it is also vanishing.

  17. Natural inflation and quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Anton; Saraswat, Prashant; Sundrum, Raman

    2015-04-17

    Cosmic inflation provides an attractive framework for understanding the early Universe and the cosmic microwave background. It can readily involve energies close to the scale at which quantum gravity effects become important. General considerations of black hole quantum mechanics suggest nontrivial constraints on any effective field theory model of inflation that emerges as a low-energy limit of quantum gravity, in particular, the constraint of the weak gravity conjecture. We show that higher-dimensional gauge and gravitational dynamics can elegantly satisfy these constraints and lead to a viable, theoretically controlled and predictive class of natural inflation models.

  18. Recent developments in quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    The current status of theoretical work on quantum gravity is surveyed. The basic problem of quantum gravity, the unification of the principles underlying general relativity and quantum mechanics, is discussed, and it is shown that the microstructure of space-time is likely to differ significantly from that predicted by perturbation theory. Since quantum gravity has no space-time, it is inferred that concepts like the Schroedinger equation and unitary evolution are no longer fundamental, but rather emerge as derived concepts when 'time' is isolated in the argument of the wave function. Also examined is the introduction of particle-physics-type ideas into quantum gravity, exploiting the connection between the present formulation of general relativity and Yang-Mills theory and possibly leading to experimental tests of the theory.

  19. Cosmological perturbations in unimodular gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Caixia; Brandenberger, Robert H.; Cai, Yifu; Chen, Pisin E-mail: rhb@hep.physics.mcgill.ca E-mail: chen@slac.stanford.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study cosmological perturbation theory within the framework of unimodular gravity. We show that the Lagrangian constraint on the determinant of the metric required by unimodular gravity leads to an extra constraint on the gauge freedom of the metric perturbations. Although the main equation of motion for the gravitational potential remains the same, the shift variable, which is gauge artifact in General Relativity, cannot be set to zero in unimodular gravity. This non-vanishing shift variable affects the propagation of photons throughout the cosmological evolution and therefore modifies the Sachs-Wolfe relation between the relativistic gravitational potential and the microwave temperature anisotropies. However, for adiabatic fluctuations the difference between the result in General Relativity and unimodular gravity is suppressed on large angular scales. Thus, no strong constraints on the theory can be derived.

  20. New improved massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereli, T.; Yetişmişoğlu, C.

    2016-06-01

    We derive the field equations for topologically massive gravity coupled with the most general quadratic curvature terms using the language of exterior differential forms and a first-order constrained variational principle. We find variational field equations both in the presence and absence of torsion. We then show that spaces of constant negative curvature (i.e. the anti de-Sitter space AdS 3) and constant torsion provide exact solutions.

  1. Stochastic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, D. K.; Moreau, William

    1995-08-01

    We investigate stochastic gravity as a potentially fruitful avenue for studying quantum effects in gravity. Following the approach of stochastic electrodynamics ( sed), as a representation of the quantum gravity vacuum we construct a classical state of isotropic random gravitational radiation, expressed as a spin-2 field,h µυ (x), composed of plane waves of random phase on a flat spacetime manifold. Requiring Lorentz invariance leads to the result that the spectral composition function of the gravitational radiation,h(ω), must be proportional to 1/ω 2. The proportionality constant is determined by the Planck condition that the energy density consist ofħω/2 per normal mode, and this condition sets the amplitude scale of the random gravitational radiation at the order of the Planck length, giving a spectral composition functionh(ω) =√16πc 2Lp/ω2. As an application of stochastic gravity, we investigate the Davies-Unruh effect. We calculate the two-point correlation function (R iojo(Oτ-δτ/2)R kolo(O,τ+δτ/2)) of the measureable geodesic deviation tensor field,R iojo, for two situations: (i) at a point detector uniformly accelerating through the random gravitational radiation, and (ii) at an inertial detector in a heat bath of the random radiation at a finite temperature. We find that the two correlation functions agree to first order inaδτ/c provided that the temperature and acceleration satisfy the relationkT=ħa/2πc.

  2. Test of emergent gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sunggeun; Roychowdhury, Raju; Yang, Hyun Seok

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we examine a small but detailed test of the emergent gravity picture with explicit solutions in gravity and gauge theory. We first derive symplectic U(1) gauge fields starting from the Eguchi-Hanson metric in four-dimensional Euclidean gravity. The result precisely reproduces the U(1) gauge fields of the Nekrasov-Schwarz instanton previously derived from the top-down approach. In order to clarify the role of noncommutative spacetime, we take the Braden-Nekrasov U(1) instanton defined in ordinary commutative spacetime and derive a corresponding gravitational metric. We show that the Kähler manifold determined by the Braden-Nekrasov instanton exhibits a spacetime singularity while the Nekrasov-Schwarz instanton gives rise to a regular geometry—the Eguchi-Hanson space. This result implies that the noncommutativity of spacetime plays an important role for the resolution of spacetime singularities in general relativity. We also discuss how the topological invariants associated with noncommutative U(1) instantons are related to those of emergent four-dimensional Riemannian manifolds according to the emergent gravity picture.

  3. Nonsingular universe in massive gravity's rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Momennia, M.; Eslam Panah, B.; Panahiyan, S.

    2017-06-01

    One of the fundamental open questions in cosmology is whether we can regard the universe evolution without singularity like a Big Bang or a Big Rip. This challenging subject stimulates one to regard a nonsingular universe in the far past with an arbitrarily large vacuum energy. Considering the high energy regime in the cosmic history, it is believed that Einstein gravity should be corrected to an effective energy dependent theory which could be acquired by gravity's rainbow. On the other hand, employing massive gravity provided us with solutions to some of the long standing fundamental problems of cosmology such as cosmological constant problem and self acceleration of the universe. Considering these aspects of gravity's rainbow and massive gravity, in this paper, we initiate studying FRW cosmology in the massive gravity's rainbow formalism. At first, we show that although massive gravity modifies the FRW cosmology, but it does not itself remove the big bang singularity. Then, we generalize the massive gravity to the case of energy dependent spacetime and find that massive gravity's rainbow can remove the early universe singularity. We bring together all the essential conditions for having a nonsingular universe and the effects of both gravity's rainbow and massive gravity generalizations on such criteria are determined.

  4. Growth histories in bimetric massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Marcus; Buchberger, Igor; Enander, Jonas; Mörtsell, Edvard; Sjörs, Stefan E-mail: igor.buchberger@kau.se E-mail: edvard@fysik.su.se

    2012-12-01

    We perform cosmological perturbation theory in Hassan-Rosen bimetric gravity for general homogeneous and isotropic backgrounds. In the de Sitter approximation, we obtain decoupled sets of massless and massive scalar gravitational fluctuations. Matter perturbations then evolve like in Einstein gravity. We perturb the future de Sitter regime by the ratio of matter to dark energy, producing quasi-de Sitter space. In this more general setting the massive and massless fluctuations mix. We argue that in the quasi-de Sitter regime, the growth of structure in bimetric gravity differs from that of Einstein gravity.

  5. Model selection for modified gravity.

    PubMed

    Kitching, T D; Simpson, F; Heavens, A F; Taylor, A N

    2011-12-28

    In this article, we review model selection predictions for modified gravity scenarios as an explanation for the observed acceleration of the expansion history of the Universe. We present analytical procedures for calculating expected Bayesian evidence values in two cases: (i) that modified gravity is a simple parametrized extension of general relativity (GR; two nested models), such that a Bayes' factor can be calculated, and (ii) that we have a class of non-nested models where a rank-ordering of evidence values is required. We show that, in the case of a minimal modified gravity parametrization, we can expect large area photometric and spectroscopic surveys, using three-dimensional cosmic shear and baryonic acoustic oscillations, to 'decisively' distinguish modified gravity models over GR (or vice versa), with odds of ≫1:100. It is apparent that the potential discovery space for modified gravity models is large, even in a simple extension to gravity models, where Newton's constant G is allowed to vary as a function of time and length scale. On the time and length scales where dark energy dominates, it is only through large-scale cosmological experiments that we can hope to understand the nature of gravity.

  6. Cutoff for extensions of massive gravity and bi-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matas, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Recently there has been interest in extending ghost-free massive gravity, bi-gravity, and multi-gravity by including non-standard kinetic terms and matter couplings. We first review recent proposals for this class of extensions, emphasizing how modifications of the kinetic and potential structure of the graviton and modifications of the coupling to matter are related. We then generalize existing no-go arguments in the metric language to the vielbein language in second-order form. We give an ADM argument to show that the most promising extensions to the kinetic term and matter coupling contain a Boulware-Deser ghost. However, as recently emphasized, we may still be able to view these extensions as effective field theories below some cutoff scale. To address this possibility, we show that there is a decoupling limit where a ghost appears for a wide class of matter couplings and kinetic terms. In particular, we show that there is a decoupling limit where the linear effective vielbein matter coupling contains a ghost. Using the insight we gain from this decoupling limit analysis, we place an upper bound on the cutoff for the linear effective vielbein coupling. This result can be generalized to new kinetic interactions in the vielbein language in second-order form. Combined with recent results, this provides a strong uniqueness argument on the form of ghost-free massive gravity, bi-gravity, and multi-gravity.

  7. Tensor Galileons and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzistavrakidis, Athanasios; Khoo, Fech Scen; Roest, Diederik; Schupp, Peter

    2017-03-01

    The particular structure of Galileon interactions allows for higher-derivative terms while retaining second order field equations for scalar fields and Abelian p-forms. In this work we introduce an index-free formulation of these interactions in terms of two sets of Grassmannian variables. We employ this to construct Galileon interactions for mixed-symmetry tensor fields and coupled systems thereof. We argue that these tensors are the natural generalization of scalars with Galileon symmetry, similar to p-forms and scalars with a shift-symmetry. The simplest case corresponds to linearised gravity with Lovelock invariants, relating the Galileon symmetry to diffeomorphisms. Finally, we examine the coupling of a mixed-symmetry tensor to gravity, and demonstrate in an explicit example that the inclusion of appropriate counterterms retains second order field equations.

  8. Resonant algebras and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durka, R.

    2017-04-01

    The S-expansion framework is analyzed in the context of a freedom in closing the multiplication tables for the abelian semigroups. Including the possibility of the zero element in the resonant decomposition, and associating the Lorentz generator with the semigroup identity element, leads to a wide class of the expanded Lie algebras introducing interesting modifications to the gauge gravity theories. Among the results, we find all the Maxwell algebras of type {{B}m} , {{C}m} , and the recently introduced {{D}m} . The additional new examples complete the resulting generalization of the bosonic enlargements for an arbitrary number of the Lorentz-like and translational-like generators. Some further prospects concerning enlarging the algebras are discussed, along with providing all the necessary constituents for constructing the gravity actions based on the obtained results.

  9. Gravity Probe B

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-12

    The Gravity Probe B experiment is lifted from its transporter in the spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base. Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

  10. Gravity Probe B

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-12

    The Gravity Probe B experiment is lowered onto an assembly and test stand in the spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base. Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

  11. Gravity Probe B

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-13

    In the spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, workers prepare to remove the soft shipping cover from the Gravity Probe B experiment. Immediate processing includes setting up mechanical and electrical ground support equipment, making necessary connections and conditioning the spacecraft battery. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

  12. Gravity Probe B

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-18

    In the spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, workers conduct battery charge/discharge cycles as part of the battery conditioning process on Gravity Probe B. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

  13. Gravity Probe B

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-12

    The Gravity Probe B experiment enters the spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base. Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

  14. Gravity Probe B

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-12

    A transporter carrying the Gravity Probe B experiment backs into the spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base. Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

  15. Gravity Probe B

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-12

    Enclosed in a canister, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) spacecraft arrives on Vandenberg Air Force Base, headed for the spacecraft processing facility. Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

  16. Gravity Probe B

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-11

    Workers in the spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base get ready to begin processing the Gravity Probe B experiment, including setting up mechanical and electrical ground support equipment, making necessary connections and conditioning the spacecraft battery. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

  17. Gravity Probe B

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-12

    The Gravity Probe B experiment rests on an assembly and test stand in the spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base. Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

  18. Gravity Probe B

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-12

    At Vandenberg AFB, the canister enclosing the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) spacecraft is removed from the transporter. Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

  19. Gravity Probe B

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-11

    Workers in the spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base get ready to begin processing the Gravity Probe B experiment. Mechanical and electrical ground support equipment will be set up and necessary connections made with the spacecraft. Spacecraft battery conditioning will also begin. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

  20. Gravity Probe B

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-18

    In the spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, battery charge/discharge cycles are underway as part of the battery conditioning process on Gravity Probe B. The Gravity Probe B will launch a payload of four gyroscopes into low-Earth polar orbit to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Once in orbit, for 18 months each gyroscope’s spin axis will be monitored as it travels through local spacetime, observing and measuring these effects. The experiment was developed by Stanford University, Lockheed Martin and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

  1. Positive signs in massive gravity

    DOE PAGES

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. Furthermore, the high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small islandmore » in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. And while the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.« less

  2. Positive signs in massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. Furthermore, the high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small island in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. And while the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.

  3. Positive signs in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    We derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. The high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small island in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. While the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.

  4. Loop Quantum Gravity.

    PubMed

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime, is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i) The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii) A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler's "spacetime foam" intuition. (iii) Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv) A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black-hole entropy. (v) Low-energy calculations, yielding n-point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  5. Static solutions for fourth order gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, William

    2010-11-15

    The Lichnerowicz and Israel theorems are extended to higher order theories of gravity. In particular it is shown that Schwarzschild is the unique spherically symmetric, static, asymptotically flat, black-hole solution, provided the spatial curvature is less than the quantum gravity scale outside the horizon. It is then shown that in the presence of matter (satisfying certain positivity requirements), the only static and asymptotically flat solutions of general relativity that are also solutions of higher order gravity are the vacuum solutions.

  6. Phases of massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovsky, Sergei L.

    2004-10-01

    We systematically study the most general Lorentz-violating graviton mass invariant under three-dimensional Eucledian group. We find that at general values of mass parameters the massive graviton has six propagating degrees of freedom, and some of them are ghosts or lead to rapid classical instabilities. However, there is a number of different regions in the mass parameter space where massive gravity is described by a consistent low-energy effective theory with cutoff ~ (mMPl)1/2. This theory is free of rapid instabilities and vDVZ discontinuity. Each of these regions is characterized by certain fine-tuning relations between mass parameters, generalizing the Fierz Pauli condition. In some cases the required fine-tunings are consequences of the existence of the subgroups of the diffeomorphism group that are left unbroken by the graviton mass. We found two new cases, when the resulting theories have a property of UV insensitivity, i.e. remain well behaved after inclusion of arbitrary higher dimension operators without assuming any fine-tunings among the coefficients of these operators, besides those enforced by the symmetries. These theories can be thought of as generalizations of the ghost condensate model with a smaller residual symmetry group. We briefly discuss what kind of cosmology can one expect in massive gravity and argue that the allowed values of the graviton mass may be quite large, affecting growth of primordial perturbations, structure formation and, perhaps, enhancing the backreaction of inhomogeneities on the expansion rate of the Universe.

  7. Network gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, John

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the construction of a new framework for probing discrete emergent geometry and boundary-boundary observables based on a fundamentally a-dimensional underlying network structure. Using a gravitationally motivated action with Forman weighted combinatorial curvatures and simplicial volumes relying on a decomposition of an abstract simplicial complex into realized embeddings of proper skeletons, we demonstrate properties such as a minimal volume-scale cutoff, the necessity of a term playing the role of a positive definite cosmological constant as a regulator for nondegenerate geometries, and naturally emergent simplicial structures from Metropolis network evolution simulations with no restrictions on attachment rules or regular building blocks. We see emergent properties which echo results from both the spinfoam formalism and causal dynamical triangulations in quantum gravity, and provide analytical and numerical results to support the analogy. We conclude with a summary of open questions and intent for future work in developing the program.

  8. Artificial gravity.

    PubMed

    Scott, William B

    2005-04-25

    NASA's Artificial Gravity program consists of a team of researchers from Wyle Laboratories, NASA Johnson Space Center, and the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB). The short-radius centrifuge (SRC), built by Wyle Laboratories, will be integrated with UTMB's conducted bedrest studies, which mimic the detrimental effects of weightlessness (or microgravity). Bedrest subjects will be spun on the SRC at various accelerations and for various time periods, while being monitored medically. Parameters such as bone loss, muscle atrophy, balance control, and oxygen consumption will then be compared in order to research ways of mitigating the impact on astronauts' physiology. Other potential benefits from these studies extend to population groups on Earth, such as bedridden patients.

  9. Large Quantum Gravity Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, María E.; Mena Marugán, Guillermo A.; Ashtekar, A.

    Linearly polarized cylindrical waves in four-dimensional vacuum gravity are mathematically equivalent to rotationally symmetric gravity coupled to a Maxwell (or Klein-Gordon) field in three dimensions. The quantization of this latter system was performed by Ashtekar and Pierri in a recent work. Employing that quantization, we obtain here a complete quantum theory which describes the four-dimensional geometry of the Einstein-Rosen waves. In particular, we construct regularized operators to represent the metric. It is shown that the results achieved by Ashtekar about the existence of important quantum gravity effects in the Einstein-Maxwell system at large distances from the symmetry axis continue to be valid from a four-dimensional point of view. The only significant difference is that, in order to admit an approximate classical description in the asymptotic region, states that are coherent in the Maxwell field need not contain a large number of photons anymore. We also analyze the metric fluctuations on the symmetry axis and argue that they are generally relevant for all of the coherent states.

  10. Variable gravity research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Eight fourth-year engineering design students formed two teams to study methods of varying the perceived gravity level in a variable gravity research facility. A tether system and an arm system were the chosen topics. Both teams have produced and built scale models of their design. In addition, a three-credit Special Topics Course (Aviation 370) was formed, as the project offers an excellent opportunity to build a multi-disciplinary program around the initial conceptualization process. Fifty students were registered in the Special Topics course. Each week during a three hour class, a guest lecturer covered one or more of the many areas associated with the concept of a variable-gravity facility. The students formed small groups organized on a multi-disciplinary basis (there were twelve separate disciplines represented by one or more students) where they discussed among themselves the various issues involved. These groups also met outside class for three or more hours each week. During class each group presented oral reports on their findings during a one-hour general question and answer period.

  11. Development of the Newtonian Gravity Concept Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Kathryn E.; Willoughby, Shannon; Prather, Edward E.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the Newtonian Gravity Concept Inventory (NGCI), a 26-item multiple-choice instrument to assess introductory general education college astronomy ("Astro 101") student understanding of Newtonian gravity. This paper describes the development of the NGCI through four phases: Planning, Construction, Quantitative Analysis, and…

  12. Development of the Newtonian Gravity Concept Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Kathryn E.; Willoughby, Shannon; Prather, Edward E.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the Newtonian Gravity Concept Inventory (NGCI), a 26-item multiple-choice instrument to assess introductory general education college astronomy ("Astro 101") student understanding of Newtonian gravity. This paper describes the development of the NGCI through four phases: Planning, Construction, Quantitative Analysis, and…

  13. Fast gravity, gravity partials, normalized gravity, gravity gradient torque and magnetic field: Derivation, code and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    Derivation of first and second partials of the gravitational potential is given in both normalized and unnormalized form. Two different recursion formulas are considered. Derivation of a general gravity gradient torque algorithm which uses the second partial of the gravitational potential is given. Derivation of the geomagnetic field vector is given in a form that closely mimics the gravitational algorithm. Ada code for all algorithms that precomputes all possible data is given. Test cases comparing the new algorithms with previous data are given, as well as speed comparisons showing the relative efficiencies of the new algorithms.

  14. Modes of log gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Rosseel, Jan; Hohm, Olaf; Townsend, Paul K.

    2011-05-15

    The physical modes of a recently proposed D-dimensional 'critical gravity', linearized about its anti-de Sitter vacuum, are investigated. All 'log mode' solutions, which we categorize as 'spin-2' or 'Proca', arise as limits of the massive spin-2 modes of the noncritical theory. The linearized Einstein tensor of a spin-2 log mode is itself a 'nongauge' solution of the linearized Einstein equations whereas the linearized Einstein tensor of a Proca mode takes the form of a linearized general coordinate transformation. Our results suggest the existence of a holographically dual logarithmic conformal field theory.

  15. Exact solutions to quadratic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.; Podolský, J.; Švarc, R.

    2017-04-01

    Since all Einstein spacetimes are vacuum solutions to quadratic gravity in four dimensions, in this paper we study various aspects of non-Einstein vacuum solutions to this theory. Most such known solutions are of traceless Ricci and Petrov type N with a constant Ricci scalar. Thus we assume the Ricci scalar to be constant which leads to a substantial simplification of the field equations. We prove that a vacuum solution to quadratic gravity with traceless Ricci tensor of type N and aligned Weyl tensor of any Petrov type is necessarily a Kundt spacetime. This will considerably simplify the search for new non-Einstein solutions. Similarly, a vacuum solution to quadratic gravity with traceless Ricci type III and aligned Weyl tensor of Petrov type II or more special is again necessarily a Kundt spacetime. Then we study the general role of conformal transformations in constructing vacuum solutions to quadratic gravity. We find that such solutions can be obtained by solving one nonlinear partial differential equation for a conformal factor on any Einstein spacetime or, more generally, on any background with vanishing Bach tensor. In particular, we show that all geometries conformal to Kundt are either Kundt or Robinson-Trautman, and we provide some explicit Kundt and Robinson-Trautman solutions to quadratic gravity by solving the above mentioned equation on certain Kundt backgrounds.

  16. Gravity data of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponce, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Gravity data for the entire state of Nevada and adjacent parts of California, Utah, and Arizona are available on this CD-ROM. About 80,000 gravity stations were compiled primarily from the National Geophysical Data Center and the U.S. Geological Survey. Gravity data was reduced to the Geodetic Reference System of 1967 and adjusted to the Gravity Standardization Net 1971 gravity datum. Data were processed to complete Bouguer and isostatic gravity anomalies by applying standard gravity corrections including terrain and isostatic corrections. Selected principal fact references and a list of sources for data from the National Geophysical Data Center are included.

  17. Gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1985-07-01

    Atmospheric parameters fluctuate on all scales. In the mesoscale these fluctuations are occasionally sinusoidal so that they can be interpreted as gravity waves. Usually, however, the fluctuations are noise like, so that their cause is not immediately evident. Results of mesoscale observations in the 20 to 120 m altitude range that are suitable for incorporation into a model atmosphere are very limited. In the stratosphere and lower mesosphere observations are sparse and very little data has been summarized into appropriate form. There is much more data in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but again very little of it has been summarized. The available mesoscale spectra of horizontal wind u versus vertical wave number m in the 20 to 120 km altitude range are shown together with a spectrum from the lower atmosphere for comparison. Further information about these spectra is given. In spite of the large range of altitudes and latitudes, the spectra from the lower atmosphere (NASA, 1971 and DEWAN, 1984) are remarkably similar in both shape and amplitude. The mean slopes of -2.38 for the NASA spectrum and -2.7 for the Dewan spectra are supported by the mean slope of -2.75 found by ROSENBERG et al. (1974). The mesospheric spectrum is too short to establish a shape. Its amplitude is about an order of magnitude larger than the NASA spectrum in the same wave number range. The NASA and Dewan spectra suggest that the mesoscale spectra in the lower atmosphere are insensitive to meteorological conditions.

  18. Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters fluctuate on all scales. In the mesoscale these fluctuations are occasionally sinusoidal so that they can be interpreted as gravity waves. Usually, however, the fluctuations are noise like, so that their cause is not immediately evident. Results of mesoscale observations in the 20 to 120 m altitude range that are suitable for incorporation into a model atmosphere are very limited. In the stratosphere and lower mesosphere observations are sparse and very little data has been summarized into appropriate form. There is much more data in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but again very little of it has been summarized. The available mesoscale spectra of horizontal wind u versus vertical wave number m in the 20 to 120 km altitude range are shown together with a spectrum from the lower atmosphere for comparison. Further information about these spectra is given. In spite of the large range of altitudes and latitudes, the spectra from the lower atmosphere (NASA, 1971 and DEWAN, 1984) are remarkably similar in both shape and amplitude. The mean slopes of -2.38 for the NASA spectrum and -2.7 for the Dewan spectra are supported by the mean slope of -2.75 found by ROSENBERG et al. (1974). The mesospheric spectrum is too short to establish a shape. Its amplitude is about an order of magnitude larger than the NASA spectrum in the same wave number range. The NASA and Dewan spectra suggest that the mesoscale spectra in the lower atmosphere are insensitive to meteorological conditions.

  19. Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters fluctuate on all scales. In the mesoscale these fluctuations are occasionally sinusoidal so that they can be interpreted as gravity waves. Usually, however, the fluctuations are noise like, so that their cause is not immediately evident. Results of mesoscale observations in the 20 to 120 m altitude range that are suitable for incorporation into a model atmosphere are very limited. In the stratosphere and lower mesosphere observations are sparse and very little data has been summarized into appropriate form. There is much more data in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but again very little of it has been summarized. The available mesoscale spectra of horizontal wind u versus vertical wave number m in the 20 to 120 km altitude range are shown together with a spectrum from the lower atmosphere for comparison. Further information about these spectra is given. In spite of the large range of altitudes and latitudes, the spectra from the lower atmosphere (NASA, 1971 and DEWAN, 1984) are remarkably similar in both shape and amplitude. The mean slopes of -2.38 for the NASA spectrum and -2.7 for the Dewan spectra are supported by the mean slope of -2.75 found by ROSENBERG et al. (1974). The mesospheric spectrum is too short to establish a shape. Its amplitude is about an order of magnitude larger than the NASA spectrum in the same wave number range. The NASA and Dewan spectra suggest that the mesoscale spectra in the lower atmosphere are insensitive to meteorological conditions.

  20. A new theory of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, W.

    1972-01-01

    A new relativistic theory of gravity is presented. This theory agrees with all experiments to date. It is a metric theory, it is Lagrangian-based, and it possesses a preferred frame with conformally-flat space slices. With an appropriate choice of certain adjustable functions and parameters, this theory possesses precisely the same post-Newtonian limit as general relativity.

  1. 14 CFR 25.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 25.27 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and the extreme aft center of gravity limitations must be established for each practicably...

  2. 14 CFR 25.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 25.27 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and the extreme aft center of gravity limitations must be established for each practicably...

  3. 14 CFR 25.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 25.27 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and the extreme aft center of gravity limitations must be established for each practicably...

  4. 14 CFR 25.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 25.27 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and the extreme aft center of gravity limitations must be established for each practicably...

  5. 14 CFR 25.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 25.27 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and the extreme aft center of gravity limitations must be established for each practicably...

  6. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  7. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  8. Extension of loop quantum gravity to f(R) theories.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangdong; Ma, Yongge

    2011-04-29

    The four-dimensional metric f(R) theories of gravity are cast into connection-dynamical formalism with real su(2) connections as configuration variables. Through this formalism, the classical metric f(R) theories are quantized by extending the loop quantization scheme of general relativity. Our results imply that the nonperturbative quantization procedure of loop quantum gravity is valid not only for general relativity but also for a rather general class of four-dimensional metric theories of gravity.

  9. Extension of Loop Quantum Gravity to f(R) Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangdong; Ma, Yongge

    2011-04-01

    The four-dimensional metric f(R) theories of gravity are cast into connection-dynamical formalism with real su(2) connections as configuration variables. Through this formalism, the classical metric f(R) theories are quantized by extending the loop quantization scheme of general relativity. Our results imply that the nonperturbative quantization procedure of loop quantum gravity is valid not only for general relativity but also for a rather general class of four-dimensional metric theories of gravity.

  10. Perturbing a quantum gravity condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, Steffen

    2015-02-01

    In a recent proposal using the group field theory approach, a spatially homogeneous (generally anisotropic) universe is described as a quantum gravity condensate of "atoms of space," which allows the derivation of an effective cosmological Friedmann equation from the microscopic quantum gravity dynamics. Here we take a first step towards the study of cosmological perturbations over the homogeneous background. We consider a state in which a single "atom" is added to an otherwise homogeneous condensate. Backreaction of the perturbation on the background is negligible and the background dynamics can be solved separately. The dynamics for the perturbation takes the form of a quantum cosmology Hamiltonian for a "wave function," depending on background and perturbations, of the product form usually assumed in a Born-Oppenheimer approximation. We show that the perturbation we consider corresponds to a spatially homogeneous metric perturbation, and for this case derive the usual procedures in quantum cosmology from fundamental quantum gravity.

  11. Universality of quantum gravity corrections.

    PubMed

    Das, Saurya; Vagenas, Elias C

    2008-11-28

    We show that the existence of a minimum measurable length and the related generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), predicted by theories of quantum gravity, influence all quantum Hamiltonians. Thus, they predict quantum gravity corrections to various quantum phenomena. We compute such corrections to the Lamb shift, the Landau levels, and the tunneling current in a scanning tunneling microscope. We show that these corrections can be interpreted in two ways: (a) either that they are exceedingly small, beyond the reach of current experiments, or (b) that they predict upper bounds on the quantum gravity parameter in the GUP, compatible with experiments at the electroweak scale. Thus, more accurate measurements in the future should either be able to test these predictions, or further tighten the above bounds and predict an intermediate length scale between the electroweak and the Planck scale.

  12. Warping the Weak Gravity Conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooner, Karta; Parameswaran, Susha; Zavala, Ivonne

    2016-08-01

    The Weak Gravity Conjecture, if valid, rules out simple models of Natural Inflation by restricting their axion decay constant to be sub-Planckian. We revisit stringy attempts to realise Natural Inflation, with a single open string axionic inflaton from a probe D-brane in a warped throat. We show that warped geometries can allow the requisite super-Planckian axion decay constant to be achieved, within the supergravity approximation and consistently with the Weak Gravity Conjecture. Preliminary estimates of the brane backreaction suggest that the probe approximation may be under control. However, there is a tension between large axion decay constant and high string scale, where the requisite high string scale is difficult to achieve in all attempts to realise large field inflation using perturbative string theory. We comment on the Generalized Weak Gravity Conjecture in the light of our results.

  13. Unimodular f(T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassur, S. B.; Ainamon, C.; Houndjo, M. J. S.; Tossa, J.

    2016-12-01

    We have set the goal to reconstruct the geometric actions f( T) in unimodular f ( T) gravity. The unimodular f ( T) gravity gave us stunning properties related to the way we write the modified Friedmann equations. Indeed, it has been found that depending on how the Friedmann equations are given, the Lagrange multipliers may or not depend on the time parameter τ, and at the same time the reconstruction functions f( T) can easily be made generallly (not depending on the given scale factor) or determine a particular way (depending on the given scale factor), in the vacuum. It is noted that the reconstruction of a general action joins a philosophy of unimodular gravity for the constant λ.

  14. Transverse gravity versus observations

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez, Enrique; Faedo, Antón F.; López-Villarejo, J.J. E-mail: anton.fernandez@uam.es

    2009-07-01

    Theories of gravity invariant under those diffeomorphisms generated by transverse vectors, ∂{sub μ}ξ{sup μ} = 0 are considered. Such theories are dubbed transverse, and differ from General Relativity in that the determinant of the metric, g, is a transverse scalar. We comment on diverse ways in which these models can be constrained using a variety of observations. Generically, an additional scalar degree of freedom mediates the interaction, so the usual constraints on scalar-tensor theories have to be imposed. If the purely gravitational part is Einstein-Hilbert but the matter action is transverse, the models predict that the three a priori different concepts of mass (gravitational active and gravitational passive as well as inertial) are not equivalent anymore. These transverse deviations from General Relativity are therefore tightly constrained, actually correlated with existing bounds on violations of the equivalence principle, local violations of Newton's third law and/or violation of Local Position Invariance.

  15. Non-Newtonian gravity or gravity anomalies?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David P.; Chao, B. Fong; Schatten, Kenneth H.; Sager, William W.

    1988-01-01

    Geophysical measurements of G differ from laboratory values, indicating that gravity may be non-Newtonian. A spherical harmonic formulation is presented for the variation of (Newtonian) gravity inside the Earth. Using the GEM-10B Earth Gravitational Field Model, it is shown that long-wavelength gravity anomalies, if not corrected, may masquerade as non-Newtonian gravity by providing significant influences on experimental observation of delta g/delta r and G. An apparent contradiction in other studies is also resolved: i.e., local densities appear in equations when average densities of layers seem to be called for.

  16. Chiral gravity, log gravity, and extremal CFT

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, Alexander; Song Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2010-03-15

    We show that the linearization of all exact solutions of classical chiral gravity around the AdS{sub 3} vacuum have positive energy. Nonchiral and negative-energy solutions of the linearized equations are infrared divergent at second order, and so are removed from the spectrum. In other words, chirality is confined and the equations of motion have linearization instabilities. We prove that the only stationary, axially symmetric solutions of chiral gravity are BTZ black holes, which have positive energy. It is further shown that classical log gravity--the theory with logarithmically relaxed boundary conditions--has finite asymptotic symmetry generators but is not chiral and hence may be dual at the quantum level to a logarithmic conformal field theories (CFT). Moreover we show that log gravity contains chiral gravity within it as a decoupled charge superselection sector. We formally evaluate the Euclidean sum over geometries of chiral gravity and show that it gives precisely the holomorphic extremal CFT partition function. The modular invariance and integrality of the expansion coefficients of this partition function are consistent with the existence of an exact quantum theory of chiral gravity. We argue that the problem of quantizing chiral gravity is the holographic dual of the problem of constructing an extremal CFT, while quantizing log gravity is dual to the problem of constructing a logarithmic extremal CFT.

  17. Fluid/gravity correspondence for massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wen-Jian; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the fluid/gravity correspondence in the framework of massive Einstein gravity. Treating the gravitational mass terms as an effective energy-momentum tensor and utilizing the Petrov-like boundary condition on a timelike hypersurface, we find that the perturbation effects of massive gravity in bulk can be completely governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation living on the cutoff surface under the near horizon and nonrelativistic limits. Furthermore, we have concisely computed the ratio of dynamical viscosity to entropy density for two massive Einstein gravity theories, and found that they still saturate the Kovtun-Son-Starinets (KSS) bound.

  18. Feeling Gravity's Pull: Gravity Modeling. The Gravity Field of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank; Smith, David; Rowlands, David; Zuber, Maria; Neumann, G.; Chinn, Douglas; Pavlis, D.

    2000-01-01

    Most people take the constant presence of gravitys pull for granted. However, the Earth's gravitational strength actually varies from location to location. This variation occurs because mass, which influences an object's gravitational pull, is not evenly distributed within the planet. Changes in topography, such as glacial movement, an earthquake, or a rise in the ocean level, can subtly affect the gravity field. An accurate measurement of the Earth's gravity field helps us understand the distribution of mass beneath the surface. This insight can assist us in locating petroleum, mineral deposits, ground water, and other valuable substances. Gravity mapping can also help notice or verify changes in sea surface height and other ocean characteristics. Such changes may indicate climate change from polar ice melting and other phenomena. In addition, gravity mapping can indicate how land moves under the surface after earthquakes and other plate tectonic processes. Finally, changes in the Earth's gravity field might indicate a shift in water distribution that could affect agriculture, water supplies for population centers, and long-term weather prediction. Scientists can map out the Earth's gravity field by watching satellite orbits. When a satellite shifts in vertical position, it might be passing over an area where gravity changes in strength. Gravity is only one factor that may shape a satellite's orbital path. To derive a gravity measurement from satellite movement, scientists must remove other factors that might affect a satellite's position: 1. Drag from atmospheric friction. 2. Pressure from solar radiation as it heads toward Earth and. as it is reflected off the surface of the Earth 3. Gravitational pull from the Sun, the Moon, and other planets in the Solar System. 4. The effect of tides. 5. Relativistic effects. Scientists must also correct for the satellite tracking process. For example, the tracking signal must be corrected for refraction through the

  19. Fermions tunnelling from the charged dilatonic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, De-You; Jiang, Qing-Quan; Zu, Xiao-Tao

    2008-10-01

    Kerner and Mann's recent work shows that for an uncharged and non-rotating black hole its Hawking temperature can be correctly derived by fermions tunnelling from its horizons. In this paper, our main work is to improve the analysis to deal with charged fermion tunnelling from the general dilatonic black holes, specifically including the charged, spherically symmetric dilatonic black hole, the rotating Einstein Maxwell dilaton axion (EMDA) black hole and the rotating Kaluza Klein (KK) black hole. As a result, the correct Hawking temperatures are well recovered by charged fermions tunnelling from these black holes.

  20. Robin Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Chethan; Maheshwari, Shubham; Bala Subramanian, P. N.

    2017-08-01

    We write down a Robin boundary term for general relativity. The construction relies on the Neumann result of arXiv:1605.01603 in an essential way. This is unlike in mechanics and (polynomial) field theory, where two formulations of the Robin problem exist: one with Dirichlet as the natural limiting case, and another with Neumann.

  1. Urine specific gravity test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003587.htm Urine specific gravity test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Urine specific gravity is a laboratory test that shows the concentration ...

  2. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    Tethered gravity laboratories study is presented. The following subject areas are covered: variable gravity laboratory; attitude tether stabilizer; configuration analysis (AIT); dynamic analysis (SAO); and work planned for the next reporting period.

  3. Loop Quantum Gravity and Asymptotically Flat Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnsdorf, Matthias

    2002-12-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in the field of non-perturbative (loop) quantum gravity in the last decade or so and it is now a rigorously defined kinematical theory (c.f. [5] for a review and references). We are now at the stage where physical applications of loop quantum gravity can be studied and used to provide checks for the consistency of the quantisation programme. Equally, old fundamental problems of canonical quantum gravity such as the problem of time or the interpretation of quantum cosmology need to be reevaluated seriously. These issues can be addressed most profitably in the asymptotically flat sector of quantum gravity. Indeed, it is likely that we should obtain a quantum theory for this special case even if it is not possible to quantise full general relativity. The purpose of this summary is to advertise the extension of loop quantum gravity to this sector that was developed in [1]...

  4. Quintic quasi-topological gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisterna, Adolfo; Guajardo, Luis; Hassaïne, Mokhtar; Oliva, Julio

    2017-04-01

    We construct a quintic quasi-topological gravity in five dimensions, i.e. a theory with a Lagrangian containing {\\mathcal{R}}^5 terms and whose field equations are of second order on spherically (hyperbolic or planar) symmetric spacetimes. These theories have recently received attention since when formulated on asymptotically AdS spacetimes might provide for gravity duals of a broad class of CFTs. For simplicity we focus on five dimensions. We show that this theory fulfils a Birkhoff's Theorem as it is the case in Lovelock gravity and therefore, for generic values of the couplings, there is no s-wave propagating mode. We prove that the spherically symmetric solution is determined by a quintic algebraic polynomial equation which resembles Wheeler's polynomial of Lovelock gravity. For the black hole solutions we compute the temperature, mass and entropy and show that the first law of black holes thermodynamics is fulfilled. Besides of being of fourth order in general, we show that the field equations, when linearized around AdS are of second order, and therefore the theory does not propagate ghosts around this background. Besides the class of theories originally introduced in arXiv:1003.4773, the general geometric structure of these Lagrangians remains an open problem.

  5. Low Gravity Improves Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.; Plaster, Teresa C.

    1993-01-01

    Hardnesses and tensile strengths greater. Welds made under right conditions in low gravity appear superior to those made under high gravity. Conclusion drawn from results of welding experiments conducted during low- and high-gravity-simulating maneuvers of KC-135 airplane. Results have implications not only for welding in outer space but also for repeated rapid welding on Earth or in airplanes under simulated low gravity to obtain unusually strong joints.

  6. Low Gravity Improves Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.; Plaster, Teresa C.

    1993-01-01

    Hardnesses and tensile strengths greater. Welds made under right conditions in low gravity appear superior to those made under high gravity. Conclusion drawn from results of welding experiments conducted during low- and high-gravity-simulating maneuvers of KC-135 airplane. Results have implications not only for welding in outer space but also for repeated rapid welding on Earth or in airplanes under simulated low gravity to obtain unusually strong joints.

  7. Accurate measurement in the field of the earth of the general-relativistic precession of the LAGEOS II pericenter and new constraints on non-newtonian gravity.

    PubMed

    Lucchesi, David M; Peron, Roberto

    2010-12-03

    The pericenter shift of a binary system represents a suitable observable to test for possible deviations from the newtonian inverse-square law in favor of new weak interactions between macroscopic objects. We analyzed 13 years of tracking data of the LAGEOS satellites with GEODYN II software but with no models for general relativity. From the fit of LAGEOS II pericenter residuals we have been able to obtain a 99.8% agreement with the predictions of Einstein's theory. This result may be considered as a 99.8% measurement in the field of the Earth of the combination of the γ and β parameters of general relativity, and it may be used to constrain possible deviations from the inverse-square law in favor of new weak interactions parametrized by a Yukawa-like potential with strength α and range λ. We obtained |α| ≲ 1 × 10(-11), a huge improvement at a range of about 1 Earth radius.

  8. Gravity Field Characterization around Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yu

    A small body rendezvous mission requires accurate gravity field characterization for safe, accurate navigation purposes. However, the current techniques of gravity field modeling around small bodies are not achieved to the level of satisfaction. This thesis will address how the process of current gravity field characterization can be made more robust for future small body missions. First we perform the covariance analysis around small bodies via multiple slow flybys. Flyby characterization requires less laborious scheduling than its orbit counterpart, simultaneously reducing the risk of impact into the asteroid's surface. It will be shown that the level of initial characterization that can occur with this approach is no less than the orbit approach. Next, we apply the same technique of gravity field characterization to estimate the spin state of 4179 Touatis, which is a near-Earth asteroid in close to 4:1 resonance with the Earth. The data accumulated from 1992-2008 are processed in a least-squares filter to predict Toutatis' orientation during the 2012 apparition. The center-of-mass offset and the moments of inertia estimated thereof can be used to constrain the internal density distribution within the body. Then, the spin state estimation is developed to a generalized method to estimate the internal density distribution within a small body. The density distribution is estimated from the orbit determination solution of the gravitational coefficients. It will be shown that the surface gravity field reconstructed from the estimated density distribution yields higher accuracy than the conventional gravity field models. Finally, we will investigate two types of relatively unknown gravity fields, namely the interior gravity field and interior spherical Bessel gravity field, in order to investigate how accurately the surface gravity field can be mapped out for proximity operations purposes. It will be shown that these formulations compute the surface gravity field with

  9. GRAIL Spots Gravity Anomaly

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-05

    A 300-mile-long linear gravity anomaly on the far side of the moon has been revealed by gravity gradients measured by NASA GRAIL mission. GRAIL data are shown on the left, with red and blue corresponding to stronger gravity gradients.

  10. Thermodynamics and Gravity,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    symmetry of the spacetime coordinates of the region in which the gravity field is located. The form of the laws of thermodynamics for matter located in a...gravity field is investigated by applying the broken spacetime symmetry forms of the first and second laws of thermodynamics. In a gravity field the

  11. Gravity is Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  12. Gravity is Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  13. Dualities and emergent gravity: Gauge/gravity duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haro, Sebastian

    2017-08-01

    In this paper I develop a framework for relating dualities and emergence: two notions that are close to each other but also exclude one another. I adopt the conception of duality as 'isomorphism', from the physics literature, cashing it out in terms of three conditions. These three conditions prompt two conceptually different ways in which a duality can be modified to make room for emergence; and I argue that this exhausts the possibilities for combining dualities and emergence (via coarse-graining). I apply this framework to gauge/gravity dualities, considering in detail three examples: AdS/CFT, Verlinde's scheme, and black holes. My main point about gauge/gravity dualities is that the theories involved, qua theories of gravity, must be background-independent. I distinguish two senses of background-independence: (i) minimalistic and (ii) extended. I argue that the former is sufficiently strong to allow for a consistent theory of quantum gravity; and that AdS/CFT is background-independent on this account; while Verlinde's scheme best fits the extended sense of background-independence. I argue that this extended sense should be applied with some caution: on pain of throwing the baby (general relativity) out with the bath-water (extended background-independence). Nevertheless, it is an interesting and potentially fruitful heuristic principle for quantum gravity theory construction. It suggests some directions for possible generalisations of gauge/gravity dualities. The interpretation of dualities is discussed; and the so-called 'internal' vs. 'external' viewpoints are articulated in terms of: (i) epistemic and metaphysical commitments; (ii) parts vs. wholes. I then analyse the emergence of gravity in gauge/gravity dualities in terms of the two available conceptualisations of emergence; and I show how emergence in AdS/CFT and in Verlinde's scenario differ from each other. Finally, I give a novel derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black hole entropy formula based on

  14. Groundwater level monitoring using hybrid gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, J.; Fujimitsu, Y.; Oka, D.; Fukuda, Y.; Taniguchi, M.

    2012-12-01

    It is important to monitor the aquifer mass balance between discharge and recharge for the sustainable groundwater usage. The discharge of groundwater causes mass redistributions, which can cause measurable gravity changes. We carried out the repeat hybrid gravity measurements at some fields in order to detect the gravity changes associated with groundwater level changes. We used the instruments for the relative gravity measurement (CG-3M and CG-5 gravimeter: Scintrex Ltd.) and the absolute gravity measurement (A-10 gravimeter: Micro-g LaCoste, Inc.). The A10 absolute gravimeter is a portable absolute gravimeter produced by Micro-g LaCoste Inc. It operates on a 12V DC power supply (i.e. vehicle battery). We can measure the absolute gravity using the vehicle battery at the field. We started repeat gravity measurement at Ito campus, Kyushu university Fukuoka city, Northern part of Kyushu, Japan, where the instrument is usually maintained, since 2008 in order to assess the A10 gravimeter's accuracy and repeatability. We measured 10 sets at each measurement, and 1 set consists of 100 drops. There are 3 groundwater level monitoring wells near the gravity station. It can be seen that there is a good correlation between gravity changes and groundwater level changes. We confirmed that the instrument is maintained good condition in general, although some bad data was included. It seems that the repeatability of A10 gravimeter is better than 10 microgals. The A10 absolute gravimeter (Micro-g LaCoste Inc.) was introduced in order to monitor the gravity changes at base observation points since 2008. We observed seasonal gravity change (Maximum change was 26 micro gal), and we compared with the groundwater level changes. There are good correlation between the gravity changes and the groundwater level changes. We calculated the effect of groundwater level changes using Gwater-1D (Kazama et al., 2010). As a result of the calculation, we can explain the gravity seasonal changes

  15. Testing gravity in space.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarsky, Alexey; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Dvali, Gia

    General concept of non-minimal field theory is discussed and a catalog of models describing the curvature coupling of gravity field with scalar, electromagnetic, vector and gauge fields is presented. Non-minimal extensions of the Einstein-Maxwell, Einstein-Yang-Mills and Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs theories are considered in detail. New exact solutions of the self-consistent non-minimally extended field equations, which describe non-minimal Wu-Yang monopole, non-minimal Wu-Yang wormhole, non-minimal Dirac monopole, non-minimal electrically charged objects, are presented. Physical phenomena induced by the curvature coupling are discussed, the main attention is focused on the problem of alternative explanation of the accelerated expansion of the universe and on an effective cosmological constant formation due to the non-minimal coupling.

  16. Loop gravity string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidel, Laurent; Perez, Alejandro; Pranzetti, Daniele

    2017-05-01

    In this work we study canonical gravity in finite regions for which we introduce a generalization of the Gibbons-Hawking boundary term including the Immirzi parameter. We study the canonical formulation on a spacelike hypersurface with a boundary sphere and show how the presence of this term leads to an unprecedented type of degrees of freedom coming from the restoration of the gauge and diffeomorphism symmetry at the boundary. In the presence of a loop quantum gravity state, these boundary degrees of freedom localize along a set of punctures on the boundary sphere. We demonstrate that these degrees of freedom are effectively described by auxiliary strings with a three-dimensional internal target space attached to each puncture. We show that the string currents represent the local frame field, that the string angular momenta represent the area flux, and that the string stress tensor represents the two-dimensional metric on the boundary of the region of interest. Finally, we show that the commutators of these broken diffeomorphism charges of quantum geometry satisfy, at each puncture, a Virasoro algebra with central charge c =3 . This leads to a description of the boundary degrees of freedom in terms of a CFT structure with central charge proportional to the number of loop punctures. The boundary S U (2 ) gauge symmetry is recovered via the action of the U (1 )3 Kac-Moody generators (associated with the string current) in a way that is the exact analog of an infinite dimensional generalization of the Schwinger spin representation. We finally show that this symmetry is broken by the presence of background curvature.

  17. Quantization of emergent gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hyun Seok

    2015-02-01

    Emergent gravity is based on a novel form of the equivalence principle known as the Darboux theorem or the Moser lemma in symplectic geometry stating that the electromagnetic force can always be eliminated by a local coordinate transformation as far as space-time admits a symplectic structure, in other words, a microscopic space-time becomes noncommutative (NC). If gravity emerges from U(1) gauge theory on NC space-time, this picture of emergent gravity suggests a completely new quantization scheme where quantum gravity is defined by quantizing space-time itself, leading to a dynamical NC space-time. Therefore the quantization of emergent gravity is radically different from the conventional approach trying to quantize a phase space of metric fields. This approach for quantum gravity allows a background-independent formulation where space-time and matter fields are equally emergent from a universal vacuum of quantum gravity.

  18. (abstract) Venus Gravity Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konopliv, A. S.; Sjogren, W. L.

    1995-01-01

    A global gravity field model of Venus to degree and order 75 (5772 spherical harmonic coefficients) has been estimated from Doppler radio tracking of the orbiting spacecraft Pioneer Venus Orbiter (1979-1992) and Magellan (1990-1994). After the successful aerobraking of Magellan, a near circular polar orbit was attained and relatively uniform gravity field resolution (approximately 200 km) was obtained with formal uncertainties of a few milligals. Detailed gravity for several highland features are displayed as gravity contours overlaying colored topography. The positive correlation of typography with gravity is very high being unlike that of the Earth, Moon, and Mars. The amplitudes are Earth-like, but have significantly different gravity-topography ratios for different features. Global gravity, geoid, and isostatic anomaly maps as well as the admittance function are displayed.

  19. Laminar natural convection under nonuniform gravity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, J.; Eichhorn, R.; Dhir, V.

    1972-01-01

    Laminar natural convection is analyzed for cases in which gravity varies with the distance from the leading edge of an isothermal plate. The study includes situations in which gravity varies by virtue of the varying slope of a surface. A general integral solution method which includes certain known integral solutions as special cases is developed to account for arbitrary position-dependence of gravity. A series method of solution is also developed for the full equations. Although it is more cumbersome it provides verification of the integral method.

  20. Loop-quantum-gravity vertex amplitude.

    PubMed

    Engle, Jonathan; Pereira, Roberto; Rovelli, Carlo

    2007-10-19

    Spin foam models are hoped to provide the dynamics of loop-quantum gravity. However, the most popular of these, the Barrett-Crane model, does not have the good boundary state space and there are indications that it fails to yield good low-energy n-point functions. We present an alternative dynamics that can be derived as a quantization of a Regge discretization of Euclidean general relativity, where second class constraints are imposed weakly. Its state space matches the SO(3) loop gravity one and it yields an SO(4)-covariant vertex amplitude for Euclidean loop gravity.

  1. Wald entropy formula and loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodendorfer, N.; Neiman, Y.

    2014-10-01

    We outline how the Wald entropy formula naturally arises in loop quantum gravity based on recently introduced dimension-independent connection variables. The key observation is that in a loop quantization of a generalized gravity theory, the analog of the area operator turns out to measure, morally speaking, the Wald entropy rather than the area. We discuss the explicit example of (higher-dimensional) Lanczos-Lovelock gravity and comment on recent work on finding the correct numerical prefactor of the entropy by comparing it to a semiclassical effective action.

  2. How can rainbow gravity affect gravitational force?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefiedgar, Akram Sadat

    According to Verlinde’s recent proposal, the gravity is originally an entropic force. In this paper, we obtain the corrections to the entropy-area law of black holes within rainbow gravity. The corrected entropy-area law leads to the modifications of the number of bits N. Inspired by Verlinde’s argument on the entropic force, and using the modified number of bits, we can investigate the effects of rainbow gravity on the modified Newtonian dynamics, Newton’s law of gravitation, and Einstein’s general relativity in entropic force approach.

  3. Conformal gravity holography in four dimensions.

    PubMed

    Grumiller, Daniel; Irakleidou, Maria; Lovrekovic, Iva; McNees, Robert

    2014-03-21

    We formulate four-dimensional conformal gravity with (anti-)de Sitter boundary conditions that are weaker than Starobinsky boundary conditions, allowing for an asymptotically subleading Rindler term concurrent with a recent model for gravity at large distances. We prove the consistency of the variational principle and derive the holographic response functions. One of them is the conformal gravity version of the Brown-York stress tensor, the other is a "partially massless response". The on shell action and response functions are finite and do not require holographic renormalization. Finally, we discuss phenomenologically interesting examples, including the most general spherically symmetric solutions and rotating black hole solutions with partially massless hair.

  4. Binary Inspiral in Quadratic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent

    2015-01-01

    Quadratic gravity is a general class of quantum-gravity-inspired theories, where the Einstein-Hilbert action is extended through the addition of all terms quadratic in the curvature tensor coupled to a scalar field. In this article, we focus on the scalar Gauss- Bonnet (sGB) theory and consider the black hole binary inspiral in this theory. By applying the post-Newtonian (PN) formalism, we found that there is a scalar dipole radiation which leads to -1PN correction in the energy flux relative to gravitational radiation in general relativity. From the orbital decay rate of a low-mass X-ray binary A0600-20, we obtain the bound that is six orders of magnitude stronger than the current solar system bound. Furthermore, we show that the excess in the orbital decay rate of XTE J1118+480 can be explained by the scalar radiation in sGB theory.

  5. A new theory of gravity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, W.-T.

    1973-01-01

    A new relativistic theory of gravity is presented. This theory agrees with all experiments to date. It is a metric theory; it is Lagrangian-based; and it possesses a preferred frame with conformally flat space slices. With an appropriate choice of certain adjustable functions and parameters and of the cosmological model, this theory possesses precisely the same post-Newtonian limit as general relativity.

  6. Quantum gravity without vacuum dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coumbe, D. N.

    A generic prediction of quantum gravity is the vacuum dispersion of light, and hence that a photon’s speed depends on its energy. We present further numerical evidence for a scale-dependent speed of light in the causal dynamical triangulation (CDT) approach to quantum gravity. We show that the observed scale-dependent speed of light in CDT can be accounted for by a scale-dependent transformation of geodesic distance, whose specific functional form implies a discrete equidistant area spectrum. We make two nontrivial tests of the proposed scale transformation: a comparison with the leading-order quantum correction to the gravitational potential and a comparison with the generalized uncertainty principle. In both cases, we obtain the same functional form. However, contrary to the widespread prediction of vacuum dispersion in quantum gravity, numerous experiments have now definitively ruled out linear vacuum dispersion beyond Planckian energy scales EP, and have even constrained quadratic dispersion at the level ˜ 10‑8E P. Motivated by these experimental constraints, we seek to reconcile quantum gravity with the absence of vacuum dispersion. We point out that given a scale-dependent geodesic distance, a scale-dependent time interval becomes essential to maintaining an invariant speed of light. We show how a particular scale-dependent time interval allows a photon’s speed to remain independent of its energy.

  7. Localizing gravity on exotic thick 3-branes

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo-Felisola, Oscar; Melfo, Alejandra; Pantoja, Nelson; Ramirez, Alba

    2004-11-15

    We consider localization of gravity on thick branes with a nontrivial structure. Double walls that generalize the thick Randall-Sundrum solution, and asymmetric walls that arise from a Z{sub 2} symmetric scalar potential, are considered. We present a new asymmetric solution: a thick brane interpolating between two AdS{sub 5} spacetimes with different cosmological constants, which can be derived from a 'fake supergravity' superpotential, and show that it is possible to confine gravity on such branes.

  8. Some aspects of holographic W-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Theisen, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    We use the Chern-Simons formulation of higher spin theories in three dimensions to study aspects of holographic W-gravity. Concepts which were useful in studies of pure bulk gravity theories, such as the Fefferman-Graham gauge and the residual gauge transformations, which induce Weyl transformations in the boundary theory and their higher spin generalizations, are reformulated in the Chern-Simons language. Flat connections that correspond to conformal and lightcone gauges in the boundary theory are considered.

  9. Palatini formulation of non-local gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briscese, F.; Pucheu, M. L.

    We derive the dynamical equations for a non-local gravity model in the Palatini formalism and we discuss some of the properties of this model. We have show that, in some specific case, the vacuum solutions of general relativity are also vacuum solutions of the non-local model, so we conclude that, at least in this case, the singularities of Einstein’s gravity are not removed.

  10. Some interesting features of new massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accioly, Antonio; Helayël-Neto, José; Scatena, Eslley; Morais, Jefferson; Turcati, Rodrigo; Pereira-Dias, Bruno

    2011-11-01

    A sketch of a proof that new massive gravity—the massive 3D gravity model proposed by Bergshoeff, Hohm and Townsend (BHT)—is the only unitary system at the tree level that can be constructed by augmenting 3D general relativity through (curvature)2-terms is presented. Two interesting gravitational properties of the BHT model, namely, time dilation and time delay, which have no counterpart in the usual Einstein 3D gravity, are analyzed as well.

  11. F(R)-gravity and inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastiani, Lorenzo; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2015-08-01

    In this short review, we revisit inflation in F(R)-gravity. We find several F(R)-models for viable inflation by applying some reconstruction techniques. A special attention is payed in the reproduction of the last Planck satellite data. The possible generalizations of Starobinsky-like inflation are found and discussed. The early-time acceleration is analyzed in a higher derivative quantum gravitational model which mainly reduces to F(R)-gravity.

  12. Signature change in loop quantum gravity: Two-dimensional midisuperspace models and dilaton gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojowald, Martin; Brahma, Suddhasattwa

    2017-06-01

    Models of loop quantum gravity based on real connections have a deformed notion of general covariance, which leads to the phenomenon of signature change. This result is confirmed here in a general analysis of all midisuperspace models without local degrees of freedom. As a subclass of models, two-dimensional theories of dilaton gravity appear, but a larger set of examples is possible based only on the condition of anomaly freedom. While the classical dilaton gravity models are the only such systems without deformed covariance, they do give rise to signature change when holonomy modifications are included.

  13. Late-time cosmological evolution of a general class of f(R,T) gravity with minimal curvature-matter coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Hamid; Ziaie, Amir Hadi

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we study the late-time cosmological solutions of f(R,T)=g(R)+h(-T) models assuming that the conservation of the energy-momentum tensor ( EMT) is violated. We perform our analysis through constructing an autonomous dynamical system for the equations of motion. We study the stability properties of solutions via considering linear perturbations about the related equilibrium points. Moreover, we parameterize the Lagrangian by introducing the parameters m( r) and n( s). These parameters which are constructed out of the functions g(R) and h(-T) play the main role in finding the late-time behavior of the solutions. We find that there exist, in general, three classes of solutions; all models with n>0 include a proper transition from a prolonged matter era to a de Sitter solution. Models with -0.51, for at least a root of equation n(s)=s-1, include an unphysical dark energy solution preceding an improper matter era. Finally, for n<-1/2 there is a transient accelerated expansion era with -1/2

  14. Gravity Probe B Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The space vehicle Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. In this photograph, engineer Gary Reynolds is inspecting the inside of the probe neck during probe thermal repairs. GP-B is scheduled for launch in April 2004 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Gravity Probe B, Stanford University)

  15. Gravity Effects in Condensing and Evaporating Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermanson, J. C.; Som, S. M.; Allen, J. S.; Pedersen, P. C.

    2004-01-01

    A general overview of gravity effects in condensing and evaporating films is presented. The topics include: 1) Research Overview; 2) NASA Recognizes Critical Need for Condensation & Evaporation Research to Enable Human Exploration of Space; 3) Condensation and Evaporation Research in Reduced Gravity is Enabling for AHST Technology Needs; 4) Differing Role of Surface Tension on Condensing/Evaporating Film Stability; 5) Fluid Mechanisms in Condensing and Evaporating Films in Reduced Gravity; 6) Research Plan; 7) Experimental Configurations for Condensing Films; 8) Laboratory Condensation Test Cell; 9) Aircraft Experiment; 10) Condensation Study Current Test Conditions; 11) Diagnostics; 12) Shadowgraph Images of Condensing n- pentane Film in Unstable (-1g) Configuration; 13) Condensing n-Pentane Film in Normal Gravity (-1g) at Constant Pressure; 14) Condensing n-Pentane Film in Normal Gravity (-1g) with Cyclic Pressure; 15) Non-condensing Pumped Film in Normal Gravity (-1g); 16) Heat Transfer Coefficient in Developing, Unstable Condensing Film in Normal Gravity; 17) Heat Transfer for Unsteady Condensing Film (-1g); 18) Ultrasound Measurement of Film Thickness N-pentane Film, Stable (+1g) Configuration; and 19) Ultrasound Measurement of Film Thickness N-pentane Film, Unstable (-1g) Configuration.

  16. Prediction of physical workload in reduced gravity.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, J H; Alred, J W

    1988-12-01

    As we plan for long-term living and working in low-gravity environments, a system to predict mission support requirements, such as food and water, becomes critical. Such a system must consider the workload imposed by physical tasks for efficient estimation of these supplies. An accurate estimate of human energy expenditure on a space station or lunar base is also necessary to allocate personnel to tasks, and to assign work-rest schedules. An elemental analysis approach for predicting one's energy expenditure in industrial jobs was applied to low-gravity conditions in this paper. This was achieved by a reduction of input body and load weights in a well-accepted model, in proportion to lowered gravity, such as on the moon. Validation was achieved by applying the model to Apollo-era energy expenditure data. These data were from simulated lunar gravity walking studies, observed Apollo 14 walking, simulated lunar gravity upper body torquing, and simulated lunar gravity cart pulling. The energy expenditure model generally underpredicted high energy expenditures, and overpredicted low to medium energy expenditures. The predictions for low to medium workloads were, however, within 15-30% of actual values. Future developmental work will be necessary to include the effects of traction changes, as well as other nonlinear expenditure changes in reduced gravity environments.

  17. Tuned borehole gravity gradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lautzenhiser, T.V.; Nekut, A.G. Jr.

    1986-04-15

    A tuned borehole gravity gradiometer is described for detecting variations in gravity gradient which consists of: a suspended dipole mass system having symmetrically distributed dipole masses and suspension means for suspending the dipole masses such that the gravity gradient to be measured produces an angular displacement about a rotation axis of the dipole mass system from a reference position; and tuning means with the dipole mass system for selectively varying the sensitivity to angular displacements with respect to the rotation axis of the dipole mass system to variations in gravity gradient, wherein the tuning means includes means for selectively varying the metacentric height of the dipole mass system.

  18. Lunar gravity - Apollo 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjogren, W. L.; Wimberly, R. N.; Wollenhaupt, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    Gravity results are displayed as a band of contours about 60 km wide spanning 140 deg of frontside longitude. The contours traverse Grimaldi, Mare Procellarum, Copernicus, Apennines, Mare Serenitatis, Littrow, and Mare Crisium. Redundant gravity areas previously mapped by Apollos 14, 15, 16, and the Apollo subsatellites are tabulated and show excellent consistency. Modeling of Grimaldi reveals a loading greater than the known mascons and thus makes Grimaldi the smallest known mascon feature. Copernicus' gravity profile is best modeled with a mass defect for the basin and a mass excess for the rim. Mare Serenitatis has an irregular mass distribution with central gravity highs shifted approximately 3 deg in latitude.

  19. Focus on quantum Einstein gravity Focus on quantum Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjorn, Jan; Reuter, Martin; Saueressig, Frank

    2012-09-01

    The gravitational asymptotic safety program summarizes the attempts to construct a consistent and predictive quantum theory of gravity within Wilson's generalized framework of renormalization. Its key ingredient is a non-Gaussian fixed point of the renormalization group flow which controls the behavior of the theory at trans-Planckian energies and renders gravity safe from unphysical divergences. Provided that the fixed point comes with a finite number of ultraviolet-attractive (relevant) directions, this construction gives rise to a consistent quantum field theory which is as predictive as an ordinary, perturbatively renormalizable one. This opens up the exciting possibility of establishing quantum Einstein gravity as a fundamental theory of gravity, without introducing supersymmetry or extra dimensions, and solely based on quantization techniques that are known to work well for the other fundamental forces of nature. While the idea of gravity being asymptotically safe was proposed by Steven Weinberg more than 30 years ago [1], the technical tools for investigating this scenario only emerged during the last decade. Here a key role is played by the exact functional renormalization group equation for gravity, which allows the construction of non-perturbative approximate solutions for the RG-flow of the gravitational couplings. Most remarkably, all solutions constructed to date exhibit a suitable non-Gaussian fixed point, lending strong support to the asymptotic safety conjecture. Moreover, the functional renormalization group also provides indications that the central idea of a non-Gaussian fixed point providing a safe ultraviolet completion also carries over to more realistic scenarios where gravity is coupled to a suitable matter sector like the standard model. These theoretical successes also triggered a wealth of studies focusing on the consequences of asymptotic safety in a wide range of phenomenological applications covering the physics of black holes, early

  20. Nonlocal gravity: Conformally flat spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2016-04-01

    The field equations of the recent nonlocal generalization of Einstein’s theory of gravitation are presented in a form that is reminiscent of general relativity. The implications of the nonlocal field equations are studied in the case of conformally flat spacetimes. Even in this simple case, the field equations are intractable. Therefore, to gain insight into the nature of these equations, we investigate the structure of nonlocal gravity (NLG) in 2D spacetimes. While any smooth 2D spacetime is conformally flat and satisfies Einstein’s field equations, only a subset containing either a Killing vector or a homothetic Killing vector can satisfy the field equations of NLG.

  1. Relativistic gravity gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2016-12-01

    In general relativity, relativistic gravity gradiometry involves the measurement of the relativistic tidal matrix, which is theoretically obtained from the projection of the Riemann curvature tensor onto the orthonormal tetrad frame of an observer. The observer's 4-velocity vector defines its local temporal axis and its local spatial frame is defined by a set of three orthonormal nonrotating gyro directions. The general tidal matrix for the timelike geodesics of Kerr spacetime has been calculated by Marck [Proc. R. Soc. A 385, 431 (1983)]. We are interested in the measured components of the curvature tensor along the inclined "circular" geodesic orbit of a test mass about a slowly rotating astronomical object of mass M and angular momentum J . Therefore, we specialize Marck's results to such a "circular" orbit that is tilted with respect to the equatorial plane of the Kerr source. To linear order in J , we recover the gravitomagnetic beating phenomenon [B. Mashhoon and D. S. Theiss, Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1542 (1982)], where the beat frequency is the frequency of geodetic precession. The beat effect shows up as a special long-period gravitomagnetic part of the relativistic tidal matrix; moreover, the effect's short-term manifestations are contained in certain post-Newtonian secular terms. The physical interpretation of this effect is briefly discussed.

  2. New 'phase' of quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Charles H-T

    2006-12-15

    The emergence of loop quantum gravity over the past two decades has stimulated a great resurgence of interest in unifying general relativity and quantum mechanics. Among a number of appealing features of this approach is the intuitive picture of quantum geometry using spin networks and powerful mathematical tools from gauge field theory. However, the present form of loop quantum gravity suffers from a quantum ambiguity, owing to the presence of a free (Barbero-Immirzi) parameter. Following the recent progress on conformal decomposition of gravitational fields, we present a new phase space for general relativity. In addition to spin-gauge symmetry, the new phase space also incorporates conformal symmetry making the description parameter free. The Barbero-Immirzi ambiguity is shown to occur only if the conformal symmetry is gauge fixed prior to quantization. By withholding its full symmetries, the new phase space offers a promising platform for the future development of loop quantum gravity. This paper aims to provide an exposition, at a reduced technical level, of the above theoretical advances and their background developments. Further details are referred to cited references.

  3. Stellar oscillations in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2013-12-01

    Starting from the equations of modified gravity hydrodynamics, we derive the equations of motion governing linear, adiabatic, radial perturbations of stars in scalar-tensor theories. There are two new features: first, the eigenvalue equation for the period of stellar oscillations is modified such that the eigenfrequencies are always larger than predicted by general relativity. Second, the general relativity condition for stellar instability is altered so that the adiabatic index can fall below 4/3 before unstable modes appear. Stars are more stable in modified gravity theories. Specializing to the case of chameleonlike theories, we investigate these effects numerically using both polytropic Lane-Emden stars and models coming from modified gravity stellar structure simulations. We find that the change in the oscillation period of Cepheid star models can be as large as 30% for order-one matter couplings and the change in the inferred distance using the period-luminosity relation can be up to three times larger than if one had only considered the modified equilibrium structure. We discuss the implications of these results for recent and upcoming astrophysical tests and estimate that previous methods can produce new constraints such that the modifications are screened in regions of Newtonian potential of O(10-8).

  4. EDITORIAL: Focus section on quantum gravity - 25 years of quantum gravity Focus section on quantum gravity - 25 years of quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Joseph

    2011-08-01

    The problem of quantum gravity has been with us for over 80 years. After quantum theory was established in the 1920s, it was successfully applied to the electromagnetic field. Over the years there have been many attempts to bring gravity into the fold. There has been work on the Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity, perturbative approaches to quantum gravity and more. Much intellectual effort went into understanding conceptual and technical problems stemming from the general covariance of the theory. However, in earlier decades, the subject of quantum gravity was relatively on the fringes of theoretical physics research, pursued by a small and diverse community of people. In the mid 1980s the situation changed dramatically. The subject of quantum gravity came to the forefront of fundamental physics research, no longer a backwater but the mainstream. Quantum gravity was widely acknowledged as the last frontier of fundamental physics and attracted the brightest young people. Unlike in previous decades, workers in this area were no longer isolated groups or individuals ploughing lonely furrows, but organised into coherent `programmes' for a concerted attack on the problem. The main programmes coincidentally were all formulated in the mid 1980s. The two `programmes' covered in this section are string theory and loop quantum gravity. String theory was born an offshoot of Hadronic models in particle physics and reflects the particle physicists view that gravity is just one more interaction to be encompassed by a unified theory. Loop quantum gravity reflects the general relativist's conviction that gravity is different and should not be treated as a perturbation about Minkowski spacetime. Each of these approaches has its proponents, adherents and critics. It is now about a quarter of a century since these programmes started. It is perhaps a good time to take stock and assess where we are now and where each of these programmes is headed. The idea in this focus

  5. Nonlocal quantum gravity: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modesto, Leonardo; Rachwał, Lesław

    We hereby review a class of quantum gravitational theories based on weakly nonlocal analytic classical actions. The most general action is characterized by two nonpolynomial entire functions (form-factors) in terms quadratic in curvature. The form-factors avert the presence of poltergeists, that plague any local higher derivative theory of gravity and improve the high-energy behavior of loop amplitudes. For pedagogical purposes, it is proved that the theory is super-renormalizable in any dimension, i.e. only one-loop divergences survive, and is asymptotically free. Furthermore, due to dimensional reasons, in odd dimensions, there are no counterterms for pure gravity and the theory turns out to be finite. Moreover, we show that it is always possible to choose the additional terms in the action (higher in curvature) in such a way to make the full theory UV-finite and therefore, scale-invariant in quantum realm, also in even dimension.

  6. Stellar structures in Extended Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, S.; De Laurentis, M.

    2016-09-01

    Stellar structures are investigated by considering the modified Lané-Emden equation coming out from Extended Gravity. In particular, this equation is obtained in the Newtonian limit of f ( R) -gravity by introducing a polytropic relation between the pressure and the density into the modified Poisson equation. The result is an integro-differential equation, which, in the limit f ( R) → R , becomes the standard Lané-Emden equation usually adopted in the stellar theory. We find the radial profiles of gravitational potential by solving for some values of the polytropic index. The solutions are compatible with those coming from General Relativity and could be physically relevant in order to address peculiar and extremely massive objects.

  7. Spin-3 topologically massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Long, Jiang; Wu, Jun-bao

    2011-11-01

    In this Letter, we study the spin-3 topologically massive gravity (TMG), paying special attention to its properties at the chiral point. We propose an action describing the higher spin fields coupled to TMG. We discuss the traceless spin-3 fluctuations around the AdS3 vacuum and find that there is an extra local massive mode, besides the left-moving and right-moving boundary massless modes. At the chiral point, such extra mode becomes massless and degenerates with the left-moving mode. We show that at the chiral point the only degrees of freedom in the theory are the boundary right-moving graviton and spin-3 field. We conjecture that spin-3 chiral gravity with generalized Brown-Henneaux boundary condition is holographically dual to 2D chiral CFT with classical W3 algebra and central charge cR = 3 l / G.

  8. Black holes in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichev, Eugeny; Brito, Richard

    2015-08-01

    We review the black hole (BH) solutions of the ghost-free massive gravity theory and its bimetric extension, and outline the main results on the stability of these solutions against small perturbations. Massive (bi)-gravity accommodates exact BH solutions, analogous to those of general relativity (GR). In addition to these solutions, hairy BHs—solutions with no correspondent in GR—have been found numerically, whose existence is a natural consequence of the absence of Birkhoff’s theorem in these theories. The existence of extra propagating degrees of freedom, makes the stability properties of these BHs richer and more complex than those of GR. In particular, the bi-Schwarzschild BH exhibits an unstable spherically symmetric mode, while the bi-Kerr geometry is also generically unstable, both against the spherical mode and against superradiant instabilities. If astrophysical BHs are described by these solutions, the superradiant instability of the Kerr solution imposes stringent bounds on the graviton mass.

  9. A new vacuum for loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Bianca; Geiller, Marc

    2015-06-01

    We construct a new vacuum and representation for loop quantum gravity. Because the new vacuum is based on BF theory, it is physical for (2+1)-dimensional gravity, and much closer to the spirit of spin foam quantization in general. To construct this new vacuum and the associated representation of quantum observables, we introduce a modified holonomy-flux algebra that is cylindrically consistent with respect to the notion of refinement by time evolution suggested in Dittrich and Steinhaus (2013 arXiv:1311.7565). This supports the proposal for a construction of the physical vacuum made in Dittrich and Steinhaus (2013 arXiv:1311.7565) and Dittrich (2012 New J. Phys. 14 123004), and for (3+1)-dimensional gravity. We expect that the vacuum introduced here will facilitate the extraction of large scale physics and cosmological predictions from loop quantum gravity.

  10. Brane-induced-gravity shock waves.

    PubMed

    Kaloper, Nemanja

    2005-05-13

    We construct exact gravitational field solutions for a relativistic particle localized on a tensional brane in brane-induced gravity. They are a generalization of gravitational shock waves in 4D de Sitter space. We provide the metrics for both the normal branch and the self-inflating branch Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati brane worlds, and compare them to the 4D Einstein gravity solution and to the case when gravity resides only in the 5D bulk, without any brane-localized curvature terms. At short distances the wave profile looks the same as in four dimensions. The corrections appear only far from the source, where they differ from the long distance corrections in 4D de Sitter space. We also discover a new nonperturbative channel for energy emission into the bulk from the self-inflating [corrected] branch, when gravity is modified at the de Sitter radius.

  11. Chiral fermions in asymptotically safe quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Meibohm, J; Pawlowski, J M

    2016-01-01

    We study the consistency of dynamical fermionic matter with the asymptotic safety scenario of quantum gravity using the functional renormalisation group. Since this scenario suggests strongly coupled quantum gravity in the UV, one expects gravity-induced fermion self-interactions at energies of the Planck scale. These could lead to chiral symmetry breaking at very high energies and thus to large fermion masses in the IR. The present analysis which is based on the previous works (Christiansen et al., Phys Rev D 92:121501, 2015; Meibohm et al., Phys Rev D 93:084035, 2016), concludes that gravity-induced chiral symmetry breaking at the Planck scale is avoided for a general class of NJL-type models. We find strong evidence that this feature is independent of the number of fermion fields. This finding suggests that the phase diagram for these models is topologically stable under the influence of gravitational interactions.

  12. 6D Interpretation of 3D Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herfray, Yannick; Krasnov, Kirill; Scarinci, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    We show that 3D gravity, in its pure connection formulation, admits a natural 6D interpretation. The 3D field equations for the connection are equivalent to 6D Hitchin equations for the Chern–Simons 3-form in the total space of the principal bundle over the 3-dimensional base. Turning this construction around one gets an explanation of why the pure connection formulation of 3D gravity exists. More generally, we interpret 3D gravity as the dimensional reduction of the 6D Hitchin theory. To this end, we show that any \\text{SU}(2) invariant closed 3-form in the total space of the principal \\text{SU}(2) bundle can be parametrised by a connection together with a 2-form field on the base. The dimensional reduction of the 6D Hitchin theory then gives rise to 3D gravity coupled to a topological 2-form field.

  13. Impact of gravity on vacuum stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branchina, Vincenzo; Messina, Emanuele; Zappalà, Dario

    2016-10-01

    In a pioneering paper on the role of gravity on false vacuum decay, Coleman and De Luccia showed that a strong gravitational field can stabilize the false vacuum, suppressing the formation of true vacuum bubbles. This result is obtained for the case in which the energy density difference between the two vacua is small, the so-called thin-wall regime, but is considered of more general validity. Here we show that when this condition does not hold, however, the effect of gravity on the bubble nucleation rate amounts to a small correction to the flat space-time result even in a strong gravity regime. This result suggests that the impact of gravity on the stability analysis of the electroweak vacuum could be essentially negligible.

  14. Hiding neutrino mass in modified gravity cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellomo, Nicola; Bellini, Emilio; Hu, Bin; Jimenez, Raul; Pena-Garay, Carlos; Verde, Licia

    2017-02-01

    Cosmological observables show a dependence with the neutrino mass, which is partially degenerate with parameters of extended models of gravity. We study and explore this degeneracy in Horndeski generalized scalar-tensor theories of gravity. Using forecasted cosmic microwave background and galaxy power spectrum datasets, we find that a single parameter in the linear regime of the effective theory dominates the correlation with the total neutrino mass. For any given mass, a particular value of this parameter approximately cancels the power suppression due to the neutrino mass at a given redshift. The extent of the cancellation of this degeneracy depends on the cosmological large-scale structure data used at different redshifts. We constrain the parameters and functions of the effective gravity theory and determine the influence of gravity on the determination of the neutrino mass from present and future surveys.

  15. Chiral fermions in asymptotically safe quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibohm, J.; Pawlowski, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    We study the consistency of dynamical fermionic matter with the asymptotic safety scenario of quantum gravity using the functional renormalisation group. Since this scenario suggests strongly coupled quantum gravity in the UV, one expects gravity-induced fermion self-interactions at energies of the Planck scale. These could lead to chiral symmetry breaking at very high energies and thus to large fermion masses in the IR. The present analysis which is based on the previous works (Christiansen et al., Phys Rev D 92:121501, 2015; Meibohm et al., Phys Rev D 93:084035, 2016), concludes that gravity-induced chiral symmetry breaking at the Planck scale is avoided for a general class of NJL-type models. We find strong evidence that this feature is independent of the number of fermion fields. This finding suggests that the phase diagram for these models is topologically stable under the influence of gravitational interactions.

  16. Domain walls as probes of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dvali, Gia; Gabadadze, Gregory; Pujolas, Oriol; Rahman, Rakibur

    2007-06-15

    We show that domain walls are probes that enable one to distinguish large-distance modified gravity from general relativity (GR) at short distances. For example, low-tension domain walls are stealth in modified gravity, while they do produce global gravitational effects in GR. We demonstrate this by finding exact solutions for various domain walls in the DGP model. A wall with tension lower than the fundamental Planck scale does not inflate and has no gravitational effects on a 4D observer, since its 4D tension is completely screened by gravity itself. We argue that this feature remains valid in a generic class of models of infrared modified gravity. As a byproduct, we obtain exact solutions for supermassive codimension-2 branes.

  17. Fundamental Structure of Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Muxin; Ma, Yongge; Huang, Weiming

    In the recent twenty years, loop quantum gravity, a background independent approach to unify general relativity and quantum mechanics, has been widely investigated. The aim of loop quantum gravity is to construct a mathematically rigorous, background independent, non-perturbative quantum theory for a Lorentzian gravitational field on a four-dimensional manifold. In the approach, the principles of quantum mechanics are combined with those of general relativity naturally. Such a combination provides us a picture of, so-called, quantum Riemannian geometry, which is discrete on the fundamental scale. Imposing the quantum constraints in analogy from the classical ones, the quantum dynamics of gravity is being studied as one of the most important issues in loop quantum gravity. On the other hand, the semi-classical analysis is being carried out to test the classical limit of the quantum theory. In this review, the fundamental structure of loop quantum gravity is presented pedagogically. Our main aim is to help non-experts to understand the motivations, basic structures, as well as general results. It may also be beneficial to practitioners to gain insights from different perspectives on the theory. We will focus on the theoretical framework itself, rather than its applications, and do our best to write it in modern and precise langauge while keeping the presentation accessible for beginners. After reviewing the classical connection dynamical formalism of general relativity, as a foundation, the construction of the kinematical Ashtekar-Isham-Lewandowski representation is introduced in the content of quantum kinematics. The algebraic structure of quantum kinematics is also discussed. In the content of quantum dynamics, we mainly introduce the construction of a Hamiltonian constraint operator and the master constraint project. At last, some applications and recent advances are outlined. It should be noted that this strategy of quantizing gravity can also be extended to

  18. Exact solutions with noncommutative symmetries in Einstein and gauge gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacaru, Sergiu I.

    2005-04-01

    We present new classes of exact solutions with noncommutative symmetries constructed in vacuum Einstein gravity (in general, with nonzero cosmological constant), five-dimensional (5D) gravity and (anti) de Sitter gauge gravity. Such solutions are generated by anholonomic frame transforms and parametrized by generic off-diagonal metrics. For certain particular cases, the new classes of metrics have explicit limits with Killing symmetries but, in general, they may be characterized by certain anholonomic noncommutative matrix geometries. We argue that different classes of noncommutative symmetries can be induced by exact solutions of the field equations in commutative gravity modeled by a corresponding moving real and complex frame geometry. We analyze two classes of black ellipsoid solutions (in the vacuum case and with cosmological constant) in four-dimensional gravity and construct the analytic extensions of metrics for certain classes of associated frames with complex valued coefficients. The third class of solutions describes 5D wormholes which can be extended to complex metrics in complex gravity models defined by noncommutative geometric structures. The anholonomic noncommutative symmetries of such objects are analyzed. We also present a descriptive account how the Einstein gravity can be related to gauge models of gravity and their noncommutative extensions and discuss such constructions in relation to the Seiberg-Witten map for the gauge gravity. Finally, we consider a formalism of vielbeins deformations subjected to noncommutative symmetries in order to generate solutions for noncommutative gravity models with Moyal (star) product.

  19. Quantum Computation Toward Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zizzi, P. A.

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to enlighten the emerging relevance of Quantum Information Theory in the field of Quantum Gravity. As it was suggested by J. A. Wheeler, information theory must play a relevant role in understanding the foundations of Quantum Mechanics (the "It from bit" proposal). Here we suggest that quantum information must play a relevant role in Quantum Gravity (the "It from qubit" proposal). The conjecture is that Quantum Gravity, the theory which will reconcile Quantum Mechanics with General Relativity, can be formulated in terms of quantum bits of information (qubits) stored in space at the Planck scale. This conjecture is based on the following arguments: a) The holographic principle, b) The loop quantum gravity approach and spin networks, c) Quantum geometry and black hole entropy. From the above arguments, as they stand in the literature, it follows that the edges of spin networks pierce the black hole horizon and excite curvature degrees of freedom on the surface. These excitations are micro-states of Chern-Simons theory and account of the black hole entropy which turns out to be a quarter of the area of the horizon, (in units of Planck area), in accordance with the holographic principle. Moreover, the states which dominate the counting correspond to punctures of spin j = 1/2 and one can in fact visualize each micro-state as a bit of information. The obvious generalization of this result is to consider open spin networks with edges labeled by the spin -1/ 2 representation of SU(2) in a superposed state of spin "on" and spin "down." The micro-state corresponding to such a puncture will be a pixel of area which is "on" and "off" at the same time, and it will encode a qubit of information. This picture, when applied to quantum cosmology, describes an early inflationary universe which is a discrete version of the de Sitter universe.

  20. Compaction of Lunar Regolith Simulants under Reduced Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, P.; Walter, U.

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of experiments conducted on a series of parabolic flights to determine the compaction of lunar regolith samples under the influence of reduced gravity. The two regolith simulants, JSC-1A and NU-LHT-2M, showed decreased compaction in lower gravity. On average the sample volumes expanded up to 108 % under Martian and 114 % under lunar gravity, whereas the expansion of NU-LHT-2M was generally stronger than that of JSC-1A.

  1. ATHLETE: Low Gravity Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qi, Jay Y.

    2011-01-01

    The All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) is a vehicle concept developed at Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a multipurpose robot for exploration. Currently, the ATHLETE team is working on creating a low gravity testbed to physically simulate ATHLETE landing on an asteroid. Several projects were worked on this summer to support the low gravity testbed.

  2. Demonstrating Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Stocker, Dennis; Gotti, Daniel; Urban, David; Ross, Howard; Sours, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    A miniature drop tower, Reduced-Gravity Demonstrator is developed to illustrate the effects of gravity on a variety of phenomena including the way fluids flow, flames burn, and mechanical systems (such as pendulum) behave. A schematic and description of the demonstrator and payloads are given, followed by suggestions for how one can build his (her) own.

  3. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    The use is studied of tether systems to improve the lowest possible steady gravity level on the Space Station. Particular emphasis is placed by the microgravity community on the achievement of high quality microgravity conditions. The tether capability is explored for active control of the center of gravity and the analysis of possible tethered configurations.

  4. Self-dual gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2017-05-01

    Self-dual gravity is a diffeomorphism invariant theory in four dimensions that describes two propagating polarisations of the graviton and has a negative mass dimension coupling constant. Nevertheless, this theory is not only renormalisable but quantum finite, as we explain. We also collect various facts about self-dual gravity that are scattered across the literature.

  5. Quasi-local conserved charges in Lorenz-diffeomorphism covariant theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, H.; Setare, M. R.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, using the combined Lorenz-diffeomorphism symmetry, we find a general formula for the quasi-local conserved charge of the covariant gravity theories in a first order formalism of gravity. We simplify the general formula for the Lovelock theory of gravity. Afterwards, we apply the obtained formula on BHT gravity to obtain the energy and angular momentum of the rotating OTT black hole solution in the context of this theory.

  6. Anti-gravity device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palsingh, S. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An educational toy useful in demonstrating fundamental concepts regarding the laws of gravity is described. The device comprises a sphere 10 of radius r resting on top of sphere 12 of radius R. The center of gravity of sphere 10 is displaced from its geometrical center by distance D. The dimensions are so related that D((R+r)/r) is greater than r. With the center of gravity of sphere 10 lying on a vertical line, the device is in equilibrium. When sphere 10 is rolled on the surface of sphere 12 it will return to its equilibrium position upon release. This creates an illusion that sphere 10 is defying the laws of gravity. In reality, due to the above noted relationship of D, R, and r, the center of gravity of sphere 10 rises from its equilibrium position as it rolls a short distance up or down the surface of sphere 12.

  7. Differential geometry, Palatini gravity and reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Capriotti, S.

    2014-01-15

    The present article deals with a formulation of the so called (vacuum) Palatini gravity as a general variational principle. In order to accomplish this goal, some geometrical tools related to the geometry of the bundle of connections of the frame bundle LM are used. A generalization of Lagrange-Poincaré reduction scheme to these types of variational problems allows us to relate it with the Einstein-Hilbert variational problem. Relations with some other variational problems for gravity found in the literature are discussed.

  8. Gravity, black holes, and the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolson, I.

    1981-01-01

    The book treats current understandings of the nature and properties of gravity, with particular emphasis on its role in the physics of black holes and the structure and evolution of the universe as a whole. The development of modern ideas on force, motion and gravity is traced from the systems of Aristotle and Ptolemy through the work of Copernicus, Galileo and Kepler to Newton's law of universal gravitation and Einstein's general theory of relativity. Particular attention is then given to the role of gravity in stellar motions and to the phenomena determined by the immense gravitational forces associated with bodies of such great density, including relativistic effects, tidal forces, space-time effects, event horizons, rotation, mass and electrical charge, the existence of naked singularities and white holes, and black-hole thermodynamics. The existence of actual black holes in the universe is considered, and various black-hole candidates in the Galaxy, quasars and galactic nuclei are indicated. The role of gravity in cosmology is then examined, with attention given to the implications of general relativity, the Hubble law, the age of the universe, the density of the universe and its eventual fate. Possible alternative to general relativity as a theory of gravitation are considered, including theories of variable gravitational constant, grand unified theories, and quantum gravity.

  9. Gravity, black holes and the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolson, I.

    The book treats current understandings of the nature and properties of gravity, with particular emphasis on its role in the physics of black holes and the structure and evolution of the universe as a whole. The development of modern ideas on force, motion and gravity is traced from the systems of Aristotle and Ptolemy through the work of Copernicus, Galileo and Kepler to Newton's law of universal gravitation and Einstein's general theory of relativity. Particular attention is then given to the role of gravity in stellar motions and to the phenomena determined by the immense gravitational forces associated with bodies of such great density, including relativistic effects, tidal forces, space-time effects, event horizons, rotation, mass and electrical charge, the existence of naked singularities and white holes, and black-hole thermodynamics. The existence of actual black holes in the universe is considered, and various black-hole candidates in the Galaxy, quasars and galactic nuclei are indicated. The role of gravity in cosmology is then examined, with attention given to the implications of general relativity, the Hubble law, the age of the universe, the density of the universe and its eventual fate. Possible alternative to general relativity as a theory of gravitation are considered, including theories of variable gravitational constant, grand unified theories, and quantum gravity.

  10. Milestones of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, Jorge

    2017-02-01

    We present a summary for non-specialists of the special issue of the journal Classical and Quantum Gravity on ‘Milestones of general relativity’, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the theory.

  11. Galileons and strong gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagoya, Javier; Koyama, Kazuya; Niz, Gustavo; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2014-10-01

    In the context of a cubic Galileon model in which the Vainshtein mechanism suppresses the scalar field interactions with matter, we study low-density stars with slow rotation and static relativistic stars. We develop an expansion scheme to find approximated solutions inside the Vainshtein radius, and show that deviations from General Relativity (GR), while considering rotation, are also suppressed by the Vainshtein mechanism. In a quadratic coupling model, in which the scalarisation effect can significantly enhance deviations from GR in normal scalar tensor gravity, the Galileon term successfully suppresses the large deviations away from GR. Moreover, using a realistic equation of state, we construct solutions for a relativistic star, and show that deviations from GR are more suppressed for higher density objects. However, we found that the scalar field solution ceases to exist above a critical density, which roughly corresponds to the maximum mass of a neutron star. This indicates that, for a compact object described by a polytropic equation of state, the configuration that would collapse into a black hole cannot support a non-trivial scalar field.

  12. Gravity Probe B Encapsulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being encapsulated atop the Delta II launch vehicle. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  13. Gravity Probe B Encapsulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being encapsulated atop the Delta II launch vehicle. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  14. Open questions in classical gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mannheim, P.D. )

    1994-04-01

    In this work, the authors discuss some outstanding open questions regarding the validity and uniqueness of the standard second-order Newton-Einstein classical gravitational theory. On the observational side the authors discuss the degree to which the realm of validity of Newton's law of gravity can actually be extended to distances much larger than the solar system distance scales on which the law was originally established. On the theoretical side the authors identify some commonly accepted (but actually still open to question) assumptions which go into the formulation of the standard second-order Einstein theory in the first place. In particular, it is shown that while the familiar second-order Poisson gravitational equation (and accordingly its second-order covariant Einstein generalization) may be sufficient to yield Newton's law of gravity they are not in fact necessary. The standard theory thus still awaits the identification of some principle which would then make it necessary too. It is shown that current observational information does not exclusively mandate the standard theory, and that the conformal invariant fourth-order theory of gravity considered recently by Mannheim and Kazanas is also able to meet the constraints of data, and in fact to do so without the need for any so far unobserved nonluminous or dark matter. 37 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Spacetime Singularities in Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minassian, Eric A.

    2000-04-01

    Recent advances in 2+1 dimensional quantum gravity have provided tools to study the effects of quantization of spacetime on black hole and big bang/big crunch type singularities. I investigate effects of quantization of spacetime on singularities of the 2+1 dimensional BTZ black hole and the 2+1 dimensional torus universe. Hosoya has considered the BTZ black hole, and using a "quantum generalized affine parameter" (QGAP), has shown that, for some specific paths, quantum effects "smear" the singularities. Using gaussian wave functions as generic wave functions, I found that, for both BTZ black hole and the torus universe, there are families of paths that still reach the singularities with a finite QGAP, suggesting that singularities persist in quantum gravity. More realistic calculations, using modular invariant wave functions of Carlip and Nelson for the torus universe, offer further support for this conclusion. Currently work is in progress to study more realistic quantum gravity effects for BTZ black holes and other spacetime models.

  16. Ensemble average theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi, Nima

    2016-12-01

    We put forward the idea that all the theoretically consistent models of gravity have contributions to the observed gravity interaction. In this formulation, each model comes with its own Euclidean path-integral weight where general relativity (GR) has automatically the maximum weight in high-curvature regions. We employ this idea in the framework of Lovelock models and show that in four dimensions the result is a specific form of the f (R ,G ) model. This specific f (R ,G ) satisfies the stability conditions and possesses self-accelerating solutions. Our model is consistent with the local tests of gravity since its behavior is the same as in GR for the high-curvature regime. In the low-curvature regime the gravitational force is weaker than in GR, which can be interpreted as the existence of a repulsive fifth force for very large scales. Interestingly, there is an intermediate-curvature regime where the gravitational force is stronger in our model compared to GR. The different behavior of our model in comparison with GR in both low- and intermediate-curvature regimes makes it observationally distinguishable from Λ CDM .

  17. Modeling void abundance in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voivodic, Rodrigo; Lima, Marcos; Llinares, Claudio; Mota, David F.

    2017-01-01

    We use a spherical model and an extended excursion set formalism with drifting diffusive barriers to predict the abundance of cosmic voids in the context of general relativity as well as f (R ) and symmetron models of modified gravity. We detect spherical voids from a suite of N-body simulations of these gravity theories and compare the measured void abundance to theory predictions. We find that our model correctly describes the abundance of both dark matter and galaxy voids, providing a better fit than previous proposals in the literature based on static barriers. We use the simulation abundance results to fit for the abundance model free parameters as a function of modified gravity parameters, and show that counts of dark matter voids can provide interesting constraints on modified gravity. For galaxy voids, more closely related to optical observations, we find that constraining modified gravity from void abundance alone may be significantly more challenging. In the context of current and upcoming galaxy surveys, the combination of void and halo statistics including their abundances, profiles and correlations should be effective in distinguishing modified gravity models that display different screening mechanisms.

  18. Titan's gravity: An update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, D.; Iess, L.; Racioppa, P.; Armstrong, J. W.; Lunine, J. I.; Stevenson, D. J.; Tortora, P.

    2016-12-01

    Since its arrival at Saturn in 2004, Cassini performed nine flybys devoted to the determination of Titan's gravity field and its tidal variations. The last gravity flyby of the mission (T122) took place on Aug. 10, 2016. We will present an updated gravity solution, based on all available data. These include also an additional flyby (T110, March 2015, primarily devoted to the imaging Titan's north polar lakes) carried out with the low gain antenna. This flyby was particularly valuable because closest approach occurred at high latitude (75°N), over an area not previously sampled. Published gravity results (Iess et al., 2012) indicated that Titan is subject to large eccentricity tides in response to Saturn's time varying forcing field. The magnitude of the response quadrupole field, controlled by the Love number k2, was used to infer the existence of an internal ocean. The new gravity field determination provides a better estimate of k2, to a level of a few percent. In addition to a full 3x3 field, the new solution includes also higher degree and order harmonic coefficients (such as J4) and offers an improved map of gravity anomalies. The updated geoid and its associated uncertainty could be used to refine the gravity-altimetry correlative analysis and for improved interpretation of radar altimetric data.

  19. The GRAVITY spectrometers: mechanical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Sebastian; Wiest, Michael; Straubmeier, Christian; Yazici, Senol; Araujo-Hauck, Constanza; Eisenhauer, Frank; Perrin, Guy; Brandner, Wolfgang; Perraut, Karine; Amorim, Antonio; Schöller, Markus; Eckart, Andreas

    2010-07-01

    Operating on 6 interferometric baselines, i.e. using all 4 UTs, the 2nd generation VLTI instrument GRAVITY will deliver narrow angle astrometry with 10μas accuracy at the infrared K-band. Within the international GRAVITY consortium, the Cologne institute is responsible for the development and construction of the two spectrometers: one for the science object, and one for the fringe tracking object. Optically two individual components, both spectrometers are two separate units with their own housing and interfaces inside the vacuum vessel of GRAVITY. The general design of the spectrometers, however, is similar. The optical layout is separated into beam collimator (with integrated optics and metrology laser injection) and camera system (with detector, dispersive element, & Wollaston filter wheel). Mechanically, this transfers to two regions which are separated by a solid baffle wall incorporating the blocking filter for the metrology Laser wavelength. The optical subunits are mounted in individual rigid tubes which pay respect to the individual shape, size and thermal expansion of the lenses. For a minimized thermal background, the spectrometers are actively cooled down to an operating temperature of 80K in the ambient temperature environment of the GRAVITY vacuum dewar. The integrated optics beam combiner and the metrology laser injection, which are operated at 200/240K, are mounted thermally isolated to the cold housing of the spectrometers. The optical design has shown that the alignment of the detector is crucial to the performance of the spectrometers. Therefore, in addition to four wheel mechanisms, six cryogenic positioning mechanisms are included in the mechanical design of the detector mount.

  20. Quasilocalization of gravity on a brane by resonant modes.

    PubMed

    Csáki, C; Erlich, J; Hollowood, T J

    2000-06-26

    We examine the behavior of gravity in brane theories with extra dimensions in a nonfactorizable background geometry. We find that for metrics which are asymptotically flat far from the brane there is a resonant graviton mode at zero energy. The presence of this resonance ensures quasilocalization of gravity, whereby at intermediate scales the gravitational laws on the brane are approximately four dimensional. However, for scales larger than the lifetime of the graviton resonance the five-dimensional laws of gravity will be reproduced due to the decay of the four-dimensional graviton. We also give a simple classification of effective gravity theories for general background geometries.

  1. Generalised boundary terms for higher derivative theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Ali; Talaganis, Spyridon; Edholm, James; Mazumdar, Anupam

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we wish to find the corresponding Gibbons-Hawking-York term for the most general quadratic in curvature gravity by using Coframe slicing within the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) decomposition of spacetime in four dimensions. In order to make sure that the higher derivative gravity is ghost and tachyon free at a perturbative level, one requires infinite covariant derivatives, which yields a generalised covariant infinite derivative theory of gravity. We will be exploring the boundary term for such a covariant infinite derivative theory of gravity.

  2. Performance Evaluation and Analysis for Gravity Matching Aided Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lin; Wang, Hubiao; Chai, Hua; Zhang, Lu; Hsu, Houtse; Wang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Simulation tests were accomplished in this paper to evaluate the performance of gravity matching aided navigation (GMAN). Four essential factors were focused in this study to quantitatively evaluate the performance: gravity database (DB) resolution, fitting degree of gravity measurements, number of samples in matching, and gravity changes in the matching area. Marine gravity anomaly DB derived from satellite altimetry was employed. Actual dynamic gravimetry accuracy and operating conditions were referenced to design the simulation parameters. The results verified that the improvement of DB resolution, gravimetry accuracy, number of measurement samples, or gravity changes in the matching area generally led to higher positioning accuracies, while the effects of them were different and interrelated. Moreover, three typical positioning accuracy targets of GMAN were proposed, and the conditions to achieve these targets were concluded based on the analysis of several different system requirements. Finally, various approaches were provided to improve the positioning accuracy of GMAN. PMID:28379178

  3. Logamediate Inflation in f(T) Teleparallel Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezazadeh, Kazem; Abdolmaleki, Asrin; Karami, Kayoomars

    2017-02-01

    We study logamediate inflation in the context of f(T) teleparallel gravity. f(T)-gravity is a generalization of the teleparallel gravity which is formulated on the Weitzenbock spacetime, characterized by the vanishing curvature tensor (absolute parallelism) and the non-vanishing torsion tensor. We consider an f(T)-gravity model which is sourced by a canonical scalar field. Assuming a power-law f(T) function in the action, we investigate an inflationary universe with a logamediate scale factor. Our results show that, although logamediate inflation is completely ruled out by observational data in the standard inflationary scenario based on Einstein gravity, it can be compatible with the 68% confidence limit joint region of Planck 2015 TT,TE,EE+lowP data in the framework of f(T)-gravity.

  4. Massive gravity in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Bergshoeff, Eric A; Hohm, Olaf; Townsend, Paul K

    2009-05-22

    A particular higher-derivative extension of the Einstein-Hilbert action in three spacetime dimensions is shown to be equivalent at the linearized level to the (unitary) Pauli-Fierz action for a massive spin-2 field. A more general model, which also includes "topologically-massive" gravity as a special case, propagates the two spin-2 helicity states with different masses. We discuss the extension to massive N-extended supergravity, and we present a "cosmological" extension that admits an anti-de Sitter vacuum.

  5. Effects of background gravity stimuli on gravity-controlled behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, D. F.

    1976-01-01

    Physiological and developmental effects of altered gravity were researched. The stimulus properties of gravity have been found to possess reinforcing and aversive properties. Experimental approaches taken, used animals placed into fields of artificial gravity, in the form of parabolic or spiral centrifuges. Gravity preferences were noted and it was concluded that the psychophysics of gravity and background factors which support these behaviors should be further explored.

  6. Basement Aquifers : How Useful Are Gravity Data ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genthon, P.; Mouhouyouddine, A. H.; Hinderer, J.; Hector, B.; Yameogo, S.

    2014-12-01

    Gravity data with a few microgal precision were proved to be able to constrain the specific yield of various kinds of aquifer in West Africa from annual fluctuations of both the gravimetric and piezometric signals (Pfeffer et al., Geophys. J. Int., 2011; Hector et al., Geophys. J. Int., 2013). However some recent papers reported a disappointing potential of gravity measurements during a pumping experiment in a sandy aquifer (Blainey et al., WRR, 2007; Herckenrath et al., WRR, 2012) and their poor ability in constraining the transmissity and specific yield of the aquifer, which are the parameters to which pumping tests give access. Fresh basement rocks present generally a null porosity and the structure of basement aquifers is given by the weathering profile. In tropical climate, this profile consists of a few tens meter thick saprolite layer, with noticeable porosity but low permeability overlying the weathering front. This weathering front includes in many instances a fractured medium and presents a high permeability with variable porosity. It is hardly sampled in coring experiments. We present some numerical simulation results on the ability of gravity to constrain the transmissivity of this medium. Due to poroelasticity of clay minerals in the saprolite, soil subsidence is expected to occur during pumping with a significant gravity effect. Gravity measurements have therefore to be completed with leveling data at a millimetric precision. We present first the results of numerical modeling of the gravity and subsidence for a theoretical horizontally stratified basement aquifer, and show that gravity and leveling are able to provide independently the poroelasticity coefficient and a single transmissivity coefficient for the bottom of the aquifer, if the properties of the upper saprolites are known. We will discuss then the general case, where the aquifer presents a vertical fracture where the weathering profile thickens.

  7. Cosmological implications of unimodular gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Pankaj; Jaiswal, Atul; Karmakar, Purnendu; Kashyap, Gopal; Singh, Naveen K. E-mail: atijazz@iitk.ac.in E-mail: gopal@iitk.ac.in

    2012-11-01

    We consider a model of gravity and matter fields which is invariant only under unimodular general coordinate transformations (GCT). The determinant of the metric is treated as a separate field which transforms as a scalar under unimodular GCT. Furthermore we also demand that the theory is invariant under a new global symmetry which we call generalized conformal invariance. We study the cosmological implications of the resulting theory. We show that this theory gives a fit to the high-z supernova data which is identical to the standard Big Bang model. Hence we require some other cosmological observations to test the validity of this model. We also consider some models which do not obey the generalized conformal invariance. In these models we can fit the supernova data without introducing the standard cosmological constant term. Furthermore these models introduce only one dark component and hence solve the coincidence problem of dark matter and dark energy.

  8. Chern-Simons Modified Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstratiou, P.

    2013-09-01

    This presentation will be based on my, undergraduate, thesis at Aristotle University of Thessoliniki with the same subject, supervised by Professor Demetrios Papadopoulos. I will first present the general mathematical formulation of the Chern-Simons (CS) modified gravity, which is split in a dynamical and a non-dynamical context, and the different physical theories which suggest this modification. Then proceed by examing the possibility that the CS theory shares solutions with General Relativity in both contexts. In the non-dynamical context I will present a new, undocumented solution as well as all the other possible solutions found to date. I will conclude by arguing that General Relativity and CS Theory share any solutions in the dynamical context.

  9. Phenomenological Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimberly, Dagny; Magueijo, Joa~O.

    2005-08-01

    These notes summarize a set of lectures on phenomenological quantum gravity which one of us delivered and the other attended with great diligence. They cover an assortment of topics on the border between theoretical quantum gravity and observational anomalies. Specifically, we review non-linear relativity in its relation to loop quantum gravity and high energy cosmic rays. Although we follow a pedagogic approach we include an open section on unsolved problems, presented as exercises for the student. We also review varying constant models: the Brans-Dicke theory, the Bekenstein varying α model, and several more radical ideas. We show how they make contact with strange high-redshift data, and perhaps other cosmological puzzles. We conclude with a few remaining observational puzzles which have failed to make contact with quantum gravity, but who knows... We would like to thank Mario Novello for organizing an excellent school in Mangaratiba, in direct competition with a very fine beach indeed.

  10. Rotating Gravity Gradiometer Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The application of a Rotating Gravity Gradiometer (RGG) system on board a Lunar Polar Orbiter (LPO) for the measurement of the Lunar gravity field was investigated. A data collection simulation study shows that a gradiometer will give significantly better gravity data than a doppler tracking system for the altitudes under consideration for the LOP, that the present demonstrated sensitivity of the RGG is adequate for measurement of the Lunar gravity gradient field, and that a single RGG instrument will provide almost as much data for geophysical interpretation as an orthogonal three axis RGG system. An engineering study of the RGG sensor/LPO spacecraft interface characteristics shows that the RGG systems under consideration are compatible with the present models of the LPO spacecraft.

  11. Superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The employment of superconductivity and other material properties at cryogenic temperatures to fabricate sensitive, low-drift, gravity gradiometer is described. The device yields a reduction of noise of four orders of magnitude over room temperature gradiometers, and direct summation and subtraction of signals from accelerometers in varying orientations are possible with superconducting circuitry. Additional circuits permit determination of the linear and angular acceleration vectors independent of the measurement of the gravity gradient tensor. A dewar flask capable of maintaining helium in a liquid state for a year's duration is under development by NASA, and a superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer for the NASA Geodynamics Program is intended for a LEO polar trajectory to measure the harmonic expansion coefficients of the earth's gravity field up to order 300.

  12. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    Variable Gravity Laboratory studies are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) conceptual design and engineering analysis; (2) control strategies (fast crawling maneuvers, main perturbations and their effect upon the acceleration level); and (3) technology requirements.

  13. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) thermal control issues; (2) attitude control sybsystem; (3) configuration constraints; (4) payload; (5) acceleration requirements on Variable Gravity Laboratory (VGL); and (6) VGL configuration highlights.

  14. What Is Gravity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, George

    2004-01-01

    Gravity is the name given to the phenomenon that any two masses, like you and the Earth, attract each other. One pulls on the Earth and the Earth pulls on one the same amount. And one does not have to be touching. Gravity acts over vast distances, like the 150 million kilometers (93 million miles) between the Earth and the Sun or the billions of…

  15. What Is Gravity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, George

    2004-01-01

    Gravity is the name given to the phenomenon that any two masses, like you and the Earth, attract each other. One pulls on the Earth and the Earth pulls on one the same amount. And one does not have to be touching. Gravity acts over vast distances, like the 150 million kilometers (93 million miles) between the Earth and the Sun or the billions of…

  16. Marine gravity image available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The image below shows the gravity field from 30-72°S computed from Geosat geodetic mission (GM) and exact repeat mission (ERM) data. A color shaded-relief image of these gravity anomalies is available from NOAA in poster form (report MGG-8, [Marks et al., 1993] and also as a digital gridded data set on CD-ROM. To order, contact the National Geophysical Data Center, E/GC3, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303.

  17. Partial gravity habitat study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capps, Stephen; Lorandos, Jason; Akhidime, Eval; Bunch, Michael; Lund, Denise; Moore, Nathan; Murakawa, Kiosuke

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate comprehensive design requirements associated with designing habitats for humans in a partial gravity environment, then to apply them to a lunar base design. Other potential sites for application include planetary surfaces such as Mars, variable-gravity research facilities, and a rotating spacecraft. Design requirements for partial gravity environments include locomotion changes in less than normal earth gravity; facility design issues, such as interior configuration, module diameter, and geometry; and volumetric requirements based on the previous as well as psychological issues involved in prolonged isolation. For application to a lunar base, it is necessary to study the exterior architecture and configuration to insure optimum circulation patterns while providing dual egress; radiation protection issues are addressed to provide a safe and healthy environment for the crew; and finally, the overall site is studied to locate all associated facilities in context with the habitat. Mission planning is not the purpose of this study; therefore, a Lockheed scenario is used as an outline for the lunar base application, which is then modified to meet the project needs. The goal of this report is to formulate facts on human reactions to partial gravity environments, derive design requirements based on these facts, and apply the requirements to a partial gravity situation which, for this study, was a lunar base.

  18. Gravity Before Einstein and Schwinger Before Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia L.

    2012-05-01

    Julian Schwinger was a child prodigy, and Albert Einstein distinctly not; Schwinger had something like 73 graduate students, and Einstein very few. But both thought gravity was important. They were not, of course, the first, nor is the disagreement on how one should think about gravity that is being highlighted here the first such dispute. The talk will explore, first, several of the earlier dichotomies: was gravity capable of action at a distance (Newton), or was a transmitting ether required (many others). Did it act on everything or only on solids (an odd idea of the Herschels that fed into their ideas of solar structure and sunspots)? Did gravitational information require time for its transmission? Is the exponent of r precisely 2, or 2 plus a smidgeon (a suggestion by Simon Newcomb among others)? And so forth. Second, I will try to say something about Scwinger's lesser known early work and how it might have prefigured his "source theory," beginning with "On the Interaction of Several Electrons (the unpublished, 1934 "zeroth paper," whose title somewhat reminds one of "On the Dynamics of an Asteroid," through his days at Berkeley with Oppenheimer, Gerjuoy, and others, to his application of ideas from nuclear physics to radar and of radar engineering techniques to problems in nuclear physics. And folks who think good jobs are difficult to come by now might want to contemplate the couple of years Schwinger spent teaching elementary physics at Purdue before moving on to the MIT Rad Lab for war work.

  19. Beyond metric gravity: Progress on PS-200

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, T.; Brown, R.E.; Camp, J.B.; Darling, T.; Dyer, P.; Holzscheiter, M.H.; Hughes, R.J.; Jarmie, N.; King, N.S.P.; Lizon, D.C.; Nieto, M.M.; Schauer, M.M.M.; Schecker, J.A. ); Cornford, S.; Hosea, K.; Kenefick, R.A. ); Hoibraaten, S.; Midzor, M.M.; Parry, S.P.; Ristenen, R.A. (Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (U

    1993-01-01

    The reconciliation of quantum mechanics and gravity on varying distance scales requires changes to General Relativity that may be testable implications. We briefly review the status of tests with matter of the inverse square law and the principle of equivalence, then report on progress on the drift-tube measurement section of PS- 200, the experiment to measure the gravitational acceleration of antiprotons.

  20. Beyond metric gravity: Progress on PS-200

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, T.; Brown, R.E.; Camp, J.B.; Darling, T.; Dyer, P.; Holzscheiter, M.H.; Hughes, R.J.; Jarmie, N.; King, N.S.P.; Lizon, D.C.; Nieto, M.M.; Schauer, M.M.M.; Schecker, J.A.; Cornford, S.; Hosea, K.; Kenefick, R.A.; Hoibraaten, S.; Midzor, M.M.; Parry, S.P.; Ristenen, R.A.; Witteborn, F.C.; Rochet, J.

    1993-03-01

    The reconciliation of quantum mechanics and gravity on varying distance scales requires changes to General Relativity that may be testable implications. We briefly review the status of tests with matter of the inverse square law and the principle of equivalence, then report on progress on the drift-tube measurement section of PS- 200, the experiment to measure the gravitational acceleration of antiprotons.

  1. NOTE: Circular symmetry in topologically massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deser, S.; Franklin, J.

    2010-05-01

    We re-derive, compactly, a topologically massive gravity (TMG) decoupling theorem: source-free TMG separates into its Einstein and Cotton sectors for spaces with a hypersurface-orthogonal Killing vector, here concretely for circular symmetry. We then generalize the theorem to include matter; surprisingly, the single Killing symmetry also forces conformal invariance, requiring the sources to be null.

  2. 14 CFR 23.29 - Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... gravity. 23.29 Section 23.29 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight General § 23.29 Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity. (a) The empty weight and corresponding center of gravity must be determined by weighing the airplane with— (1) Fixed ballast; (2...

  3. 14 CFR 23.29 - Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... gravity. 23.29 Section 23.29 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight General § 23.29 Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity. (a) The empty weight and corresponding center of gravity must be determined by weighing the airplane with— (1) Fixed ballast; (2...

  4. 14 CFR 23.29 - Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... gravity. 23.29 Section 23.29 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight General § 23.29 Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity. (a) The empty weight and corresponding center of gravity must be determined by weighing the airplane with— (1) Fixed ballast; (2...

  5. 14 CFR 23.29 - Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... gravity. 23.29 Section 23.29 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight General § 23.29 Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity. (a) The empty weight and corresponding center of gravity must be determined by weighing the airplane with— (1) Fixed ballast; (2...

  6. 14 CFR 23.29 - Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... gravity. 23.29 Section 23.29 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight General § 23.29 Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity. (a) The empty weight and corresponding center of gravity must be determined by weighing the airplane with— (1) Fixed ballast; (2...

  7. Axion experiments to algebraic geometry: Testing quantum gravity via the Weak Gravity Conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidenreich, Ben; Reece, Matthew; Rudelius, Tom

    2016-06-01

    Common features of known quantum gravity theories may hint at the general nature of quantum gravity. The absence of continuous global symmetries is one such feature. This inspired the Weak Gravity Conjecture, which bounds masses of charged particles. We propose the Lattice Weak Gravity Conjecture, which further requires the existence of an infinite tower of particles of all possible charges under both abelian and nonabelian gauge groups and directly implies a cutoff for quantum field theory. It holds in a wide variety of string theory examples and has testable consequences for the real world and for pure mathematics. We sketch some implications of these ideas for models of inflation, for the QCD axion (and LIGO), for conformal field theory, and for algebraic geometry.

  8. Einstein Gravity and Beyond: Aspects of Higher-Curvature Gravity and Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Saugata

    This thesis explores the different aspects of higher curvature gravity. The "membrane paradigm" of black holes in Einstein gravity is extended to black holes in f(R) gravity and it is shown that the higher curvature effects of f( R) gravity causes the membrane fluid to become non-Newtonian. Next a modification of the null energy condition in gravity is provided. The purpose of the null energy condition is to filter out ill-behaved theories containing ghosts. Conformal transformations, which are simple redefinitions of the spacetime, introduces serious violations of the null energy condition. This violation is shown to be spurious and a prescription for obtaining a modified null energy condition, based on the universality of the second law of thermodynamics, is provided. The thermodynamic properties of the black holes are further explored using merger of extremal black holes whose horizon entropy has topological contributions coming from the higher curvature Gauss-Bonnet term. The analysis refutes the prevalent belief in the literature that the second law of black hole thermodynamics is violated in the presence of the Gauss-Bonnet term in four dimensions. Subsequently a specific class of higher derivative scalar field theories called the galileons are obtained from a Kaluza-Klein reduction of Gauss-Bonnet gravity. Galileons are null energy condition violating theories which lead to violations of the second law of thermodynamics of black holes. These higher derivative scalar field theories which are non-minimally coupled to gravity required the development of a generalized method for obtaining the equations of motion. Utilizing this generalized method, it is shown that the inclusion of the Gauss-Bonnet term made the theory of gravity to become higher derivative, which makes it difficult to make any statements about the connection between the violation of the second law of thermodynamics and the galileon fields.

  9. Gravity Probe B Assembled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being assembled at the Sunnyvale, California location of the Lockheed Martin Corporation. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  10. Mass gap in Yang's theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Eckehard W.

    2015-06-01

    The quantization of a curvature-squared model of gravity, in the affine form proposed by Yang, is reconsidered in the path integral formulation. Due to its inherent Weyl invariance, sharing this with internal Yang-Mills fields, it or some of its topological generalizations are still a possible route to quantum gravity. Instanton type solutions with double duality properties exhibit a "vacuum degeneracy", i.e. a bifurcation into distinct classical Einsteinian backgrounds. For linearized fields, this conclusively induces a mass gap in the graviton spectrum, a feature which is an open problem in the quantization of internal Yang-Mills fields.

  11. DC conductivity and higher derivative gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P.; Griffin, Tom; Melgar, Luis

    2017-07-01

    For Gauss-Bonnet gravity and in the context of holography we show how the thermal DC conductivity can be obtained by solving a generalised system of Stokes equations for an auxiliary fluid on a curved black hole horizon. For more general higher derivative theories of gravity coupled to gauge-fields, we also analyse the linearised thermal and electric currents that are produced by DC thermal and electric sources. We show how suitably defined DC transport current fluxes of the dual field theory are given by current fluxes defined at the black horizon. Dedicated to the 75th birthday of John H Schwarz

  12. Novel Tests of Gravity Below Fifty Microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Gabriela; Johnson, Jeremy; Guerrero, Ian; Hoyle, C. D.

    2016-03-01

    Due to inconsistencies between General Relativity and the Standard Model, tests of gravity remain at the forefront of experimental physics. At Humboldt State University, undergraduates and faculty are designing an experiment sensitive enough to detect gravitational interactions below the 50 micron scale. The experiment measures the twist of a torsion pendulum as an attractor mass is oscillated nearby in a parallel plate configuration, providing time varying gravitational torque on the pendulum. The size and distance dependence of the torque variation will provide a means to determine any deviation from current models of gravity on untested scales. Supported by NSF Grants 1065697 and 1306783.

  13. Gravity from the constructive approach standpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinov'ev, Yu. M.

    2017-05-01

    The general theory of relativity was first formulated as geometrodynamics, i.e., as a theory where the space-time metric is a dynamic quantity. But it is currently obvious that from the standpoint of particle physics, gravity is simply the theory of a massless spin-2 particle. We show that many important properties of gravity itself and of its possible extensions and modifications can be understood starting from the simple physical requirement that the number of physical degrees of freedom is correct and there are no nonphysical degrees of freedom.

  14. Gravity Modeling for Precise Terrestrial Inertial Navigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    same type data. Transform techniques have only recently been considered for gravity survey purposes. Heiskanen and Moritz make no mention of this... Heiskanen and Moritz (Ref 14:18-35) give a lucid description of this method. The general solu- tion can be written as V(r, 0, X) =E’’ 1 ’ E [an, mcos(mX...Hill Book Company, 1964. 13. Heiskanen , W. A. and F. A. Vening Meinesz. The Earth and Its Gravity Field. The McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1958. 14

  15. f( R) gravity solutions for evolving wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Subhra; Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2017-08-01

    The scalar-tensor f( R) theory of gravity is considered in the framework of a simple inhomogeneous space-time model. In this research we use the reconstruction technique to look for possible evolving wormhole solutions within viable f( R) gravity formalism. These f( R) models are then constrained so that they are consistent with existing experimental data. Energy conditions related to the matter threading the wormhole are analyzed graphically and are in general found to obey the null energy conditions (NEC) in regions around the throat, while in the limit f(R)=R, NEC can be violated at large in regions around the throat.

  16. Gravity: A gauge theory perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nester, James M.; Chen, Chiang-Mei

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of a generally covariant theory is under-determined. One hundred years ago such dynamics had never before been considered; its ramifications were perplexing, its future important role for all the fundamental interactions under the name gauge principle could not be foreseen. We recount some history regarding Einstein, Hilbert, Klein and Noether and the novel features of gravitational energy that led to Noether’s two theorems. Under-determined evolution is best revealed in the Hamiltonian formulation. We developed a covariant Hamiltonian formulation. The Hamiltonian boundary term gives covariant expressions for the quasi-local energy, momentum and angular momentum. Gravity can be considered as a gauge theory of the local Poincaré group. The dynamical potentials of the Poincaré gauge theory of gravity are the frame and the connection. The spacetime geometry has in general both curvature and torsion. Torsion naturally couples to spin; it could have a significant magnitude and yet not be noticed, except on a cosmological scale where it could have significant effects.

  17. Fourth order spatial derivative gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bemfica, F. S.; Gomes, M.

    2011-10-15

    In this work, we study a modified theory of gravity that contains up to fourth order spatial derivatives as a model for the Horava-Lifshitz gravity. The propagator is evaluated and, as a result, one extra pole is obtained, corresponding to a spin-2 nonrelativistic massless particle, an extra term which jeopardizes renormalizability, besides the unexpected general relativity unmodified propagator. Then unitarity is proved at the tree level, where the general relativity pole has been shown to have no dynamics, remaining only the 2 degrees of freedom of the new pole. Next, the nonrelativistic effective potential is determined from a scattering process of two identical massive gravitationally interacting bosons. In this limit, Newton's potential is obtained, together with a Darwin-like term that comes from the extra nonpole term in the propagator. Regarding renormalizability, this extra term may be harmful by power counting, but it can be eliminated by adjusting the free parameters of the model. This adjustment is in accord with the detailed balance condition suggested in the literature and shows that the way in which extra spatial derivative terms are added is of fundamental importance.

  18. Gravity Wave Predictability and Dynamics in Deepwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, J. D.; Fritts, D. C.; Smith, R. B.; Eckermann, S. D.; Taylor, M. J.; Dörnbrack, A.; Uddstrom, M.; Reynolds, C. A.; Reinecke, A.; Jiang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    The DEEP propagating gravity WAVE program (DEEPWAVE) is a comprehensive, airborne and ground-based measurement and modeling program centered on New Zealand and focused on providing a new understanding of gravity wave dynamics and impacts from the troposphere through the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). This program employed the NSF/NCAR GV (NGV) research aircraft from a base in New Zealand in a 6-week field measurement campaign in June-July 2014. During the field phase, the NGV was equipped with new lidar and airglow instruments, as well as dropwindsondes and a full suite of flight level instruments including the microwave temperature profiler (MTP), providing temperatures and vertical winds spanning altitudes from immediately above the NGV flight altitude (~13 km) to ~100 km. The region near New Zealand was chosen since all the relevant GW sources (e.g., mountains, cyclones, jet streams) occur strongly here, and upper-level winds in austral winter permit gravity waves to propagate to very high altitudes. The COAMPS adjoint modeling system provided forecast sensitivity in real time during the six-week DEEPWAVE field phase. Five missions were conducted using the NGV to observe regions of high forecast sensitivity, as diagnosed using the COAMPS adjoint model. In this presentation, we provide a summary of the sensitivity characteristics and explore the implications for predictability of low-level winds crucial for gravity wave launching, as well as predictability of gravity wave characteristics in the stratosphere. In general, the sensitive regions were characterized by localized strong dynamics, often involving intense baroclinic systems with deep convection. The results of the adjoint modeling system suggest that gravity wave launching and the characteristics of the gravity waves can be linked to these sensitive regions near frontal zones within baroclinic systems. The predictability links between the tropospheric fronts, cyclones, jet regions, and gravity

  19. The Bransfield Gravity Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangrà, Pablo; Stegner, Alexander; Hernández-Arencibia, Mónica; Marrero-Díaz, Ángeles; Salinas, Carolina; Aguiar-González, Borja; Henríquez-Pastene, Cristian; Mouriño-Carballido, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Using in situ data and laboratory experiments, we show that the circulation of the Bransfield Current (BC) around the South Shetland Islands (SSI) may be characterized in terms of a propagating buoyant gravity current. First, we describe the SSI hydrography and some drifter trajectories, paying special attention to the recirculation of the BC at the northeastern tip and northern slopes of the SSI. We observed that when the northeastward-flowing BC reaches the northeastern tip of the SSI, it recirculates around an anticyclonic mesoscale eddy that has not previously been reported in this region. Part of this recirculating water then proceeds southwest along the northern SSI shelf break as a narrow baroclinic jet and another part join the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Consequently, the cross-slope gradients of properties strengthen, and the southern boundary of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current becomes a nearly submesoscale ( 10 km) front. Second, we compare the observations with buoyant gravity current laboratory experiments in an open basin setup where the SSI topographic barrier is represented by a central wall. The resulting circulation of the buoyant gravity current around the wall mirrors our in situ observations. First, a narrow buoyant gravity current flows northeastward along the southern boundary of the wall. Once the head of the buoyant gravity current reaches the tip of the wall, a recirculating anticyclonic vortex is generated, and the buoyant gravity current then proceeds westward along the north side of the wall. This circulation of the BC around the SSI as a buoyant gravity current may contribute to the fertilization of the waters around the SSI, as suggested by previously reported distributions of nutrients and phytoplankton.

  20. Gravity effects on endogenous movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsson, Anders; Antonsen, Frank

    -ation stimulations (gravitropism reactions). Such a negative feedback can account for gravity initiated transport, resulting in lateral water transport and overall movements. The simulation results indicate that self-sustained oscillations can occur on such a cylinder of cells. It will also be demonstrated that the introduction of feedback in the model results in longer circum-nutation periods. It will be discussed how this generic modeling approach could be applied to discuss oscillatory plant movements in general and how other environmental factors, as for instance light gradients, could couple to the self-sustained movements. The oscillations require weightlessness for proper investigations. References: Antonsen F.: Biophysical studies of plant growth movements in microgravity and under 1 g conditions. PhD thesis, Norwegian University of Science and Technology 1998. Johnsson A., Solheim BGB, Iversen T.-H.: Gravity amplifies and microgravity decreases cir-cumnutations in Arabidopsis thaliana stems: results from a space experiment.-New Phytologist 182: 621-629. 2009. Turing AM.: The chemical basis for morphogenesis.-Phil Trans. R. Soc. London Ser B237:37 -72. 1952.

  1. New variables for classical and quantum gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    1986-01-01

    A Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity based on certain spinorial variables is introduced. These variables simplify the constraints of general relativity considerably and enable one to imbed the constraint surface in the phase space of Einstein's theory into that of Yang-Mills theory. The imbedding suggests new ways of attacking a number of problems in both classical and quantum gravity. Some illustrative applications are discussed.

  2. Anisotropic higher derivative gravity and inflationary universe

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, W. F.

    2006-08-15

    Stability analysis of the Kantowski-Sachs type universe in pure higher derivative gravity theory is studied in detail. The nonredundant generalized Friedmann equation of the system is derived by introducing a reduced one-dimensional generalized Kantowski-Sachs type action. Existence and stability of inflationary solution in the presence of higher derivative terms are also studied in detail. Implications to the choice of physical theories are discussed in detail in this paper.

  3. Nonlocal Gravity and Structure in the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Park, Sohyun

    2014-08-26

    The observed acceleration of the Universe can be explained by modifying general relativity. One such attempt is the nonlocal model of Deser and Woodard. Here we fix the background cosmology using results from the Planck satellite and examine the predictions of nonlocal gravity for the evolution of structure in the universe, confronting the model with three tests: gravitational lensing, redshift space distortions, and the estimator of gravity $E_G$. Current data favor general relativity (GR) over nonlocal gravity: fixing primordial cosmology with the best fit parameters from Planck leads to weak lensing results favoring GR by 5.9 sigma; redshift space distortions measurements of the growth rate preferring GR by 7.8 sigma; and the single measurement of $E_G$ favoring GR, but by less than 1-sigma. The significance holds up even after the parameters are allowed to vary within Planck limits. The larger lesson is that a successful modified gravity model will likely have to suppress the growth of structure compared to general relativity.

  4. Constraining torsion with Gravity Probe B

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Yi; Guth, Alan H.; Cabi, Serkan; Tegmark, Max

    2007-11-15

    It is well-entrenched folklore that all torsion gravity theories predict observationally negligible torsion in the solar system, since torsion (if it exists) couples only to the intrinsic spin of elementary particles, not to rotational angular momentum. We argue that this assumption has a logical loophole which can and should be tested experimentally, and consider nonstandard torsion theories in which torsion can be generated by macroscopic rotating objects. In the spirit of action=reaction, if a rotating mass like a planet can generate torsion, then a gyroscope would be expected to feel torsion. An experiment with a gyroscope (without nuclear spin) such as Gravity Probe B (GPB) can test theories where this is the case. Using symmetry arguments, we show that to lowest order, any torsion field around a uniformly rotating spherical mass is determined by seven dimensionless parameters. These parameters effectively generalize the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism and provide a concrete framework for further testing Einstein's general theory of relativity (GR). We construct a parametrized Lagrangian that includes both standard torsion-free GR and Hayashi-Shirafuji maximal torsion gravity as special cases. We demonstrate that classic solar system tests rule out the latter and constrain two observable parameters. We show that Gravity Probe B is an ideal experiment for further constraining nonstandard torsion theories, and work out the most general torsion-induced precession of its gyroscope in terms of our torsion parameters.

  5. Analyzing modified unimodular gravity via Lagrange multipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez-Gómez, Diego

    2016-06-01

    The so-called unimodular version of general relativity is revisited. Unimodular gravity is constructed by fixing the determinant of the metric, which leads to the trace-free part of the equations instead of the usual Einstein field equations. Then a cosmological constant naturally arises as an integration constant. While unimodular gravity turns out to be equivalent to general relativity (GR) at the classical level, it provides important differences at the quantum level. Here we extend the unimodular constraint to some extensions of general relativity that have drawn a lot of attention over the last years—f (R ) gravity (or its scalar-tensor picture) and Gauss-Bonnet gravity. The corresponding unimodular version of such theories is constructed as well as the conformal transformation that relates the Einstein and Jordan frames for these nonminimally coupled theories. From the classical point of view, the unimodular versions of such extensions are completely equivalent to their originals, but an effective cosmological constant arises naturally, which may provide a richer description of the evolution of the Universe. Here we analyze the case of Starobisnky inflation and compare it with the original one.

  6. Feynman propagator for spin foam quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Oriti, Daniele

    2005-03-25

    We link the notion causality with the orientation of the spin foam 2-complex. We show that all current spin foam models are orientation independent. Using the technology of evolution kernels for quantum fields on Lie groups, we construct a generalized version of spin foam models, introducing an extra proper time variable. We prove that different ranges of integration for this variable lead to different classes of spin foam models: the usual ones, interpreted as the quantum gravity analogue of the Hadamard function of quantum field theory (QFT) or as inner products between quantum gravity states; and a new class of causal models, the quantum gravity analogue of the Feynman propagator in QFT, nontrivial function of the orientation data, and implying a notion of "timeless ordering".

  7. Entropic force, noncommutative gravity, and ungravity

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolini, Piero

    2010-08-15

    After recalling the basic concepts of gravity as an emergent phenomenon, we analyze the recent derivation of Newton's law in terms of entropic force proposed by Verlinde. By reviewing some points of the procedure, we extend it to the case of a generic quantum gravity entropic correction to get compelling deviations to the Newton's law. More specifically, we study: (1) noncommutative geometry deviations and (2) ungraviton corrections. As a special result in the noncommutative case, we find that the noncommutative character of the manifold would be equivalent to the temperature of a thermodynamic system. Therefore, in analogy to the zero temperature configuration, the description of spacetime in terms of a differential manifold could be obtained only asymptotically. Finally, we extend the Verlinde's derivation to a general case, which includes all possible effects, noncommutativity, ungravity, asymptotically safe gravity, electrostatic energy, and extra dimensions, showing that the procedure is solid versus such modifications.

  8. The Sagnac effect in conformal Weyl gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Joseph

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the Sagnac effect, representing the difference in travel time or phase shift observed for relativistic matter or light beams counter-propagating in a rotating interferometer. This is done for the Schwarzschild-like and Kerr-like vacuum solutions of conformal gravity which describe the field around a massive static and rotating object respectively, in the fourth order theory. To do this we employ the formal analogy between the Sagnac and Aharonov-Bohm effects that has been used earlier to study this effect in flat and curved spacetimes in general relativity. In particular we show that the linear term in the static metric of conformal gravity has a diminishing effect on the Sagnac time delay. Moreover using the expression for the Sagnac effect in the rotating Kerr-like spacetime, we show that the detection of the Weyl gravity contributions to the Sagnac time delay in the case of the Earth, lies beyond the capability of current experiments.

  9. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1990-01-01

    The scope of the study is to investigate ways of controlling the microgravity environment of the International Space Station by means of a tethered system. Four main study tasks were performed. First, researchers analyzed the utilization of the tether systems to improve the lowest possible steady gravity level on the Space Station and the tether capability to actively control the center of gravity position in order to compensate for activities that would upset the mass distribution of the Station. The purpose of the second task was to evaluate the whole of the experiments performable in a variable gravity environment and the related beneficial residual accelerations, both for pure and applied research in the fields of fluid, materials, and life science, so as to assess the relevance of a variable g-level laboratory. The third task involves the Tethered Variable Gravity Laboratory. The use of the facility that would crawl along a deployed tether and expose experiments to varying intensities of reduced gravity is discussed. Last, a study performed on the Attitude Tether Stabilizer concept is discussed. The stabilization effect of ballast masses tethered to the Space Station was investigated as a means of assisting the attitude control system of the Station.

  10. Gravity and Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.

    1996-01-01

    Gravity has been the most constant environmental factor throughout the evolution of biological species on Earth. Organisms are rarely exposed to other gravity levels, either increased or decreased, for prolonged periods. Thus, evolution in a constant 1G field has historically prevented us from appreciating the potential biological consequences of a multi-G universe. To answer the question 'Can terrestrial life be sustained and thrive beyond our planet?' we need to understand the importance of gravity on living systems, and we need to develop a multi-G, rather than a 1G, mentality. The science of gravitational biology took a giant step with the advent of the space program, which provided the first opportunity to examine living organisms in gravity environments lower than could be sustained on Earth. Previously, virtually nothing was known about the effects of extremely low gravity on living organisms, and most of the initial expectations were proven wrong. All species that have flown in space survive in microgravity, although no higher organism has ever completed a life cycle in space. It has been found, however, that many systems change, transiently or permanently, as a result of prolonged exposure to microgravity.

  11. Venus Gravity Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konopliv, Alexander S.; Sjogren, William L.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the Venus gravity methods and results to date (model MGNP90LSAAP). It is called a handbook in that it contains many useful plots (such as geometry and orbit behavior) that are useful in evaluating the tracking data. We discuss the models that are used in processing the Doppler data and the estimation method for determining the gravity field. With Pioneer Venus Orbiter and Magellan tracking data, the Venus gravity field was determined complete to degree and order 90 with the use of the JPL Cray T3D Supercomputer. The gravity field shows unprecedented high correlation with topography and resolution of features to the 2OOkm resolution. In the procedure for solving the gravity field, other information is gained as well, and, for example, we discuss results for the Venus ephemeris, Love number, pole orientation of Venus, and atmospheric densities. Of significance is the Love number solution which indicates a liquid core for Venus. The ephemeris of Venus is determined to an accuracy of 0.02 mm/s (tens of meters in position), and the rotation period to 243.0194 +/- 0.0002 days.

  12. Gravity and Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.

    1996-01-01

    Gravity has been the most constant environmental factor throughout the evolution of biological species on Earth. Organisms are rarely exposed to other gravity levels, either increased or decreased, for prolonged periods. Thus, evolution in a constant 1G field has historically prevented us from appreciating the potential biological consequences of a multi-G universe. To answer the question 'Can terrestrial life be sustained and thrive beyond our planet?' we need to understand the importance of gravity on living systems, and we need to develop a multi-G, rather than a 1G, mentality. The science of gravitational biology took a giant step with the advent of the space program, which provided the first opportunity to examine living organisms in gravity environments lower than could be sustained on Earth. Previously, virtually nothing was known about the effects of extremely low gravity on living organisms, and most of the initial expectations were proven wrong. All species that have flown in space survive in microgravity, although no higher organism has ever completed a life cycle in space. It has been found, however, that many systems change, transiently or permanently, as a result of prolonged exposure to microgravity.

  13. Massive gravity wrapped in the cosmic web

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Junsup; Lee, Jounghun; Li, Baojiu E-mail: jounghun@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-03-20

    We study how the filamentary pattern of the cosmic web changes if the true gravity deviates from general relativity (GR) on a large scale. The f(R) gravity, whose strength is controlled to satisfy the current observational constraints on the cluster scale, is adopted as our fiducial model and a large, high-resolution N-body simulation is utilized for this study. By applying the minimal spanning tree algorithm to the halo catalogs from the simulation at various epochs, we identify the main stems of the rich superclusters located in the most prominent filamentary section of the cosmic web and determine their spatial extents per member cluster to be the degree of their straightness. It is found that the f(R) gravity has the effect of significantly bending the superclusters and that the effect becomes stronger as the universe evolves. Even in the case where the deviation from GR is too small to be detectable by any other observables, the degree of the supercluster straightness exhibits a conspicuous difference between the f(R) and the GR models. Our results also imply that the supercluster straightness could be a useful discriminator of f(R) gravity from the coupled dark energy since it is shown to evolve differently between the two models. As a final conclusion, the degree of the straightness of the rich superclusters should provide a powerful cosmological test of large scale gravity.

  14. Gait transitions in simulated reduced gravity.

    PubMed

    Ivanenko, Yuri P; Labini, Francesca Sylos; Cappellini, Germana; Macellari, Velio; McIntyre, Joseph; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    Gravity has a strong effect on gait and the speed of gait transitions. A gait has been defined as a pattern of locomotion that changes discontinuously at the transition to another gait. On Earth, during gradual speed changes, humans exhibit a sudden discontinuous switch from walking to running at a specific speed. To study the effects of altered gravity on both the stance and swing legs, we developed a novel unloading exoskeleton that allows a person to step in simulated reduced gravity by tilting the body relative to the vertical. Using different simulation techniques, we confirmed that at lower gravity levels the transition speed is slower (in accordance with the previously reported Froude number ∼0.5). Surprisingly, however, we found that at lower levels of simulated gravity the transition between walking and running was generally gradual, without any noticeable abrupt change in gait parameters. This was associated with a significant prolongation of the swing phase, whose duration became virtually equal to that of stance in the vicinity of the walk-run transition speed, and with a gradual shift from inverted-pendulum gait (walking) to bouncing gait (running).

  15. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - A worker in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base adjust the supports on a solar array panel to be lifted and installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-03

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - A worker in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base adjust the supports on a solar array panel to be lifted and installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  16. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, Dr. Francis Everitt, principal investigator, and Brad Parkinson, co-principal investigator, both from Stanford University, hold one of the small gyroscopes used in the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. The GP-B towers behind them. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-10

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, Dr. Francis Everitt, principal investigator, and Brad Parkinson, co-principal investigator, both from Stanford University, hold one of the small gyroscopes used in the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. The GP-B towers behind them. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  17. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base work on a solar array panel to be installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-03

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base work on a solar array panel to be installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  18. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base attach supports to a solar array panel to be lifted and installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-03

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base attach supports to a solar array panel to be lifted and installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  19. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, the Gravity Probe B spacecraft is seen with two solar array panels installed. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-04

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, the Gravity Probe B spacecraft is seen with two solar array panels installed. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  20. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base prepare to rotate the framework containing one of four solar panels to be installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-03

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base prepare to rotate the framework containing one of four solar panels to be installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  1. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, the Gravity Probe B spacecraft is seen with all four solar array panels installed. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-04

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, the Gravity Probe B spacecraft is seen with all four solar array panels installed. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  2. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base attach a solar array panel on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-03

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base attach a solar array panel on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  3. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, a balloon gently lifts the solar array panel to be installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-04

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, a balloon gently lifts the solar array panel to be installed on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  4. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, workers prepare to attach the top of a solar array panel onto the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-04

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, workers prepare to attach the top of a solar array panel onto the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  5. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base prepare for the installation of solar array panel 3 on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-03

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - Workers in the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base prepare for the installation of solar array panel 3 on the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  6. VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, a worker checks the installation of a solar array panel onto the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-04

    VANDENBERG AFB, CALIF. - In the NASA spacecraft processing facility on North Vandenberg Air Force Base, a worker checks the installation of a solar array panel onto the Gravity Probe B spacecraft. Installing each array is a 3-day process and includes a functional deployment test. The Gravity Probe B mission is a relativity experiment developed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Stanford University and Lockheed Martin. The spacecraft will test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity that he advanced in 1916: the geodetic effect (how space and time are warped by the presence of the Earth) and frame dragging (how Earth’s rotation drags space and time around with it). Gravity Probe B consists of four sophisticated gyroscopes that will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. The mission will look in a precision manner for tiny changes in the direction of spin.

  7. Tests of General Relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Michael

    2011-09-22

    The last years have seen continuing activities in the exploration of our understanding of gravity, motivated by results from precision cosmology and new precision astrophysical experiments. At the centre of attention lies the question as to whether general relativity is the correct theory of gravity. In answering this question, we work not only towards correctly interpreting the phenomenon of 'dark energy' but also towards the goal of achieving a quantum theory of gravity. In these efforts, the observations of pulsars, especially those in binary systems, play an important role. Pulsars do not only provide the only evidence for the existence of gravitational waves so far, but they also provide precision tests of general relativity and alternative theories of gravity. This talk summarizes the current state-of-art in these experiments and looks into the future.

  8. How to make old and dense gravity data consistent with the latest gravity data? -Example in Japan-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, T.

    2016-12-01

    Generally, old gravity data aren't consistent with newer data even if there markers remain intact. Such discrepancy often reaches more than 100 micro Gal, which is much larger than measurement errors. Therefore, to make use of the historic gravity data together with current gravity data for various uses e.g. geoid construction, estimation of subsurface structure, precise land gravity survey etc., the adjustment of old data to the latest gravity value. Here, we developed such a conversion method. Simple interpolation method isn't useful for this purpose because raw gravity difference data include local contribution that reduce spatial coherence of gravity data. So we must correct the local tectonic effect assimilating other geodetic observations. We assume that differences between new and old gravity data are composed of contribution of crustal deformation effect and that of data processing method/reference system. Moreover, crustal deformation effect is decomposed into height variation and density variation of crust caused by earthquakes. First, we estimated effect of height variation at a marker between the observations. We use continuous GNSS observation data to estimate contribution after 2003, and spirit leveling data before 2003. These data are interpolated in space and time. The gravity change by height variation was calculated using a bouguer gravity gradient depending old observation period of each marker. Second, effect of density variation is estimated by a rectangle fault model using half-space elastic dislocation theory. Then we assumed that residuals represent systematic offset caused by the difference of data processing method/reference system. Now the offset distribution may be evaluated by spatial interpolation thanks to the enhanced spatial coherence of residuals after correcting for local tectonic effect. Consequently, we got a gravity difference distribution which can make old gravity data consistent with new one within 45 micro Gal in precision.

  9. Newberry Combined Gravity 2016

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kelly Rose

    2016-01-22

    Newberry combined gravity from Zonge Int'l, processed for the EGS stimulation project at well 55-29. Includes data from both Davenport 2006 collection and for OSU/4D EGS monitoring 2012 collection. Locations are NAD83, UTM Zone 10 North, meters. Elevation is NAVD88. Gravity in milligals. Free air and observed gravity are included, along with simple Bouguer anomaly and terrain corrected Bouguer anomaly. SBA230 means simple Bouguer anomaly computed at 2.30 g/cc. CBA230 means terrain corrected Bouguer anomaly at 2.30 g/cc. This suite of densities are included (g/cc): 2.00, 2.10, 2.20, 2.30, 2.40, 2.50, 2.67.

  10. Gravity and embryonic development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between the developing embryo (both plant and animal) and a gravitational field has long been contemplated. The difficulty in designing critical experiments on the surface of the earth because of its background of 1 g, has been an obstacle to a resolution of the problem. Biological responses to gravity (particularly in plants) are obvious in many cases; however, the influence of gravity as an environmental input to the developing embryo is not as obvious and has proven to be extremely difficult to define. In spite of this, over the years numerous attempts have been made using a variety of embryonic materials to come to grips with the role of gravity in development. Three research tools are available: the centrifuge, the clinostat, and the orbiting spacecraft. Experimental results are now available from all three sources. Some tenuous conclusions are drawn, and an attempt at a unifying theory of gravitational influence on embryonic development is made.

  11. Vacuum tunneling in gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. M.; Pak, D. G.

    2011-08-01

    Topologically non-trivial vacuum structures in gravity models with Cartan variables (vielbein and contortion) are considered. We study the possibility of vacuum spacetime tunneling in Einstein gravity assuming that the vielbein may play a fundamental role in quantum gravitational phenomena. It has been shown that in the case of RP3 space topology, the tunneling between non-trivial topological vacuums can be realized by means of Eguchi-Hanson gravitational instanton. In the Riemann-Cartan geometric approach to quantum gravity, the vacuum tunneling can be provided by means of contortion quantum fluctuations. We define a double self-duality condition for the contortion and give explicit self-dual configurations which can contribute to vacuum tunneling amplitude.

  12. Gravity and embryonic development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between the developing embryo (both plant and animal) and a gravitational field has long been contemplated. The difficulty in designing critical experiments on the surface of the earth because of its background of 1 g, has been an obstacle to a resolution of the problem. Biological responses to gravity (particularly in plants) are obvious in many cases; however, the influence of gravity as an environmental input to the developing embryo is not as obvious and has proven to be extremely difficult to define. In spite of this, over the years numerous attempts have been made using a variety of embryonic materials to come to grips with the role of gravity in development. Three research tools are available: the centrifuge, the clinostat, and the orbiting spacecraft. Experimental results are now available from all three sources. Some tenuous conclusions are drawn, and an attempt at a unifying theory of gravitational influence on embryonic development is made.

  13. Generalized spinfoams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, You; Han, Muxin; Rovelli, Carlo

    2011-06-01

    We reconsider the spinfoam dynamics that has been recently introduced, in the generalized Kamiński-Kisielowski-Lewandowski (KKL) version where the foam is not dual to a triangulation. We study the Euclidean as well as the Lorentzian case. We show that this theory can still be obtained as a constrained BF theory satisfying the simplicity constraint, now discretized on a general oriented 2-cell complex. This constraint implies that boundary states admit a (quantum) geometrical interpretation in terms of polyhedra, generalizing the tetrahedral geometry of the simplicial case. We also point out that the general solution to this constraint (imposed weakly) depends on a quantum number rf in addition to those of loop quantum gravity. We compute the vertex amplitude and recover the KKL amplitude in the Euclidean theory when rf=0. We comment on the eventual physical relevance of rf, and the formal way to eliminate it.

  14. The Grip of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondhalekar, Prabhakar

    2001-09-01

    Gravity is one of the most inexplicable forces of nature, controlling everything, from the expansion of the Universe to the ebb and flow of ocean tides. The search for the laws of motion and gravitation began more than two thousand years ago, a quest that Prabhakar Gondhalekar recounts in The Grip of Gravity. Beginning with Aristotle and concluding with Planck, Gondhalekar outlines a 'genealogy' of gravity and lucidly explains how previous explanations have shaped the most recent development in the field, string theory. In this work, physicist and astronomer Gondhalekar describes experiments, both planned and proposed, and clearly explains natural phenomena like ocean tides, seasons, ice ages, the formation of planets, stars, and exotic objects like black holes and neutron stars, which are all controlled by gravity. Including anecdotes and thumb-nail sketches of the personalities involved, The Grip of Gravity provides an introduction to the foundation of modern physics and shows how the current developments in string theory may lead to a new and radical interpretation of gravity. Prabhakar Gondhalekar is an Honorary Fellow in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College, London. Until his retirement in 1998, he was the head of the Space Astronomy Group at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, where he had been a researcher for 18 years. His research has included a number of topics in galactic and extragalactic astronomy, with his major work focusing on the interstellar medium and active galactic nuclei. Gondhalekar has been awarded Royal Society, Leverhulme Trust, and NATO Research Fellowships to do research in universities in the United States and Israel.

  15. New standards for reducing gravity data: The North American gravity database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinze, W. J.; Aiken, C.; Brozena, J.; Coakley, B.; Dater, D.; Flanagan, G.; Forsberg, R.; Hildenbrand, T.; Keller, Gordon R.; Kellogg, J.; Kucks, R.; Li, X.; Mainville, A.; Morin, R.; Pilkington, M.; Plouff, D.; Ravat, D.; Roman, D.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Veronneau, M.; Webring, M.; Winester, D.

    2005-01-01

    The North American gravity database as well as databases from Canada, Mexico, and the United States are being revised to improve their coverage, versatility, and accuracy. An important part of this effort is revising procedures for calculating gravity anomalies, taking into account our enhanced computational power, improved terrain databases and datums, and increased interest in more accurately defining long-wavelength anomaly components. Users of the databases may note minor differences between previous and revised database values as a result of these procedures. Generally, the differences do not impact the interpretation of local anomalies but do improve regional anomaly studies. The most striking revision is the use of the internationally accepted terrestrial ellipsoid for the height datum of gravity stations rather than the conventionally used geoid or sea level. Principal facts of gravity observations and anomalies based on both revised and previous procedures together with germane metadata will be available on an interactive Web-based data system as well as from national agencies and data centers. The use of the revised procedures is encouraged for gravity data reduction because of the widespread use of the global positioning system in gravity fieldwork and the need for increased accuracy and precision of anomalies and consistency with North American and national databases. Anomalies based on the revised standards should be preceded by the adjective "ellipsoidal" to differentiate anomalies calculated using heights with respect to the ellipsoid from those based on conventional elevations referenced to the geoid. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  16. Seeking the Light: Gravity Without the Influence of Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, Fred; Kern, Volker; Reed, Dave; Etheridge, Guy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    All living things sense gravity like humans might sense light or sound. The Biological Research In Canisters (BRIC-14) experiment, explores how moss cells sense and respond to gravity and light. This experiment studies how gravity influences the internal structure of moss cells and seeks to understand the influences of the spaceflight environment on cell growth. This knowledge will help researchers understand the role of gravity in the evolution of cells and life on earth.

  17. Terrestrial gravity data analysis for interim gravity model improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This is the first status report for the Interim Gravity Model research effort that was started on June 30, 1986. The basic theme of this study is to develop appropriate models and adjustment procedures for estimating potential coefficients from terrestrial gravity data. The plan is to use the latest gravity data sets to produce coefficient estimates as well as to provide normal equations to NASA for use in the TOPEX/POSEIDON gravity field modeling program.

  18. Miniaturised Gravity Sensors for Remote Gravity Surveys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlemiss, R. P.; Bramsiepe, S. G.; Hough, J.; Paul, D. J.; Rowan, S.; Samarelli, A.; Hammond, G.

    2016-12-01

    Gravimetry lets us see the world from a completely different perspective. The ability to measure tiny variations in gravitational acceleration (g), allows one to see not just the Earth's gravitational pull, but the influence of smaller objects. The more accurate the gravimeter, the smaller the objects one can see. Gravimetry has applications in many different fields: from tracking magma moving under volcanoes before eruptions; to locating hidden tunnels. The top commercial gravimeters weigh tens of kg and cost at least $100,000, limiting the situations in which they can be used. By contrast, smart phones use a MEMS (microelectromechanical system) accelerometer that can measure the orientation of the device. These are not nearly sensitive or stable enough to be used for the gravimetry but they are cheap, light-weight and mass-producible. At Glasgow University we have developed a MEMS device with both the stability and sensitivity for useful gravimetric measurements. This was demonstrated by a measurement of the Earth tides - the first time this has been achieved with a MEMS sensor. A gravimeter of this size opens up the possiblility for new gravity imaging modalities. Thousands of gravimeters could be networked over a survey site, storing data on an SD card or communicating wirelessly to a remote location. These devices could also be small enough to be carried by a UAVs: airborne gravity surveys could be carried out at low altitude by mulitple UAVs, or UAVs could be used to deliver ground based gravimeters to remote or inaccessible locations.

  19. Position from gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Procedures for obtaining position from surface gravity observations are reviewed and their relevance assessed in the context of the application of modern geodetic techniques to programs of Earth and ocean physics. Solutions based on the use of surface layer techniques, the discrete value approach, and the development from Green's theorem are stated in summary, the latter being extended to order e cubed in the height anomaly. The representation of the surface gravity field which is required in order that this accuracy may be achieved is discussed. Interim techniques which could be used in the absence of such a representation are also outlined.

  20. Resummation of Massive Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Gabadadze, Gregory; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2011-06-10

    We construct four-dimensional covariant nonlinear theories of massive gravity which are ghost-free in the decoupling limit to all orders. These theories resume explicitly all the nonlinear terms of an effective field theory of massive gravity. We show that away from the decoupling limit the Hamiltonian constraint is maintained at least up to and including quartic order in nonlinearities, hence excluding the possibility of the Boulware-Deser ghost up to this order. We also show that the same remains true to all orders in a similar toy model.

  1. Gauge/Gravity Duality

    ScienceCinema

    Polchinski, Joseph [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics

    2016-07-12

    Gauge theories, which describe the particle interactions, are well understood, while quantum gravity leads to many puzzles. Remarkably, in recent years we have learned that these are actually dual, the same system written in different variables. On the one hand, this provides our most precise description of quantum gravity, resolves some long-standing paradoxes, and points to new principles. On the other, it gives a new perspective on strong interactions, with surprising connections to other areas of physics. I describe these ideas, and discuss current and future directions.

  2. Light-like scattering in quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.; Donoghue, John F.; Holstein, Barry R.; Planté, Ludovic; Vanhove, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    We consider scattering in quantum gravity and derive long-range classical and quantum contributions to the scattering of light-like bosons and fermions (spin-0, spin- 1/2 , spin-1) from an external massive scalar field, such as the Sun or a black hole. This is achieved by treating general relativity as an effective field theory and identifying the non-analytic pieces of the one-loop gravitational scattering amplitude. It is emphasized throughout the paper how modern amplitude techniques, involving spinor-helicity variables, unitarity, and squaring relations in gravity enable much simplified computations. We directly verify, as predicted by general relativity, that all classical effects in our computation are universal (in the context of matter type and statistics). Using an eikonal procedure we confirm the post-Newtonian general relativity correction for light-like bending around large stellar objects. We also comment on treating effects from quantum ℏ dependent terms using the same eikonal method.

  3. Junction conditions in extended Teleparallel gravities

    SciTech Connect

    De la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro; Dunsby, Peter K.S.; Sáez-Gómez, Diego E-mail: peter.dunsby@uct.ac.za

    2014-12-01

    In the context of extended Teleparallel gravity theories, we address the issue of junction conditions required to guarantee the correct matching of different regions of spacetime. In the absence of shells/branes, these conditions turn out to be more restrictive than their counterparts in General Relativity as in other extended theories of gravity. In fact, the general junction conditions on the matching hypersurfaces depend on the underlying theory and a new condition on the induced tetrads in order to avoid delta-like distributions in the field equations. This result imposes strict consequences on the viability of standard solutions such as the Einstein-Straus-like construction. We find that the continuity of the scalar torsion is required in order to recover the usual General Relativity results.

  4. Gravity Anomaly Intersects Moon Basin

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-05

    A linear gravity anomaly intersecting the Crisium basin on the nearside of the moon has been revealed by NASA GRAIL mission. The GRAIL gravity gradient data are shown at left, with the location of the anomaly indicated.

  5. Gravity Gradients Frame Oceanus Procellarum

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-01

    Topography of Earth moon generated from data NASA LRO, with the gravity anomalies bordering the Procellarum region superimposed in blue. The border structures are shown using gravity gradients calculated with data from NASA GRAIL mission.

  6. Our World: Gravity in Space

    NASA Image and Video Library

    What is gravity? Find out about the balance between gravity and inertia that keeps the International Space Station in orbit. Learn why astronauts "float" in space and how the space shuttle has to s...

  7. The measurement of surface gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, J. C.; Lacoste, L. J. B.

    1978-01-01

    LaCoste and Romberg G and D gravity meters are normally employed when attempting high precision measurement of gravity differences on land. The capabilities and limitations of these instruments are discussed.

  8. The effects of gravity on flammability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, J. P.; Kimzey, J. H.; Pippen, D. L.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of weightlessness and increased gravity on flammability and flame propagation are discussed. The test equipment and procedures for determining gravity effects are described. Comparisons are made between flammability under normal gravity conditions and occurrences under altered gravity conditions

  9. The effects of gravity on flammability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, J. P.; Kimzey, J. H.; Pippen, D. L.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of weightlessness and increased gravity on flammability and flame propagation are discussed. The test equipment and procedures for determining gravity effects are described. Comparisons are made between flammability under normal gravity conditions and occurrences under altered gravity conditions

  10. The Role of GRAIL Orbit Determination in Preprocessing of Gravity Science Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruizinga, Gerhard; Asmar, Sami; Fahnestock, Eugene; Harvey, Nate; Kahan, Daniel; Konopliv, Alex; Oudrhiri, Kamal; Paik, Meegyeong; Park, Ryan; Strekalov, Dmitry; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission has constructed a lunar gravity field with unprecedented uniform accuracy on the farside and nearside of the Moon. GRAIL lunar gravity field determination begins with preprocessing of the gravity science measurements by applying corrections for time tag error, general relativity, measurement noise and biases. Gravity field determination requires the generation of spacecraft ephemerides of an accuracy not attainable with the pre-GRAIL lunar gravity fields. Therefore, a bootstrapping strategy was developed, iterating between science data preprocessing and lunar gravity field estimation in order to construct sufficiently accurate orbit ephemerides.This paper describes the GRAIL measurements, their dependence on the spacecraft ephemerides and the role of orbit determination in the bootstrapping strategy. Simulation results will be presented that validate the bootstrapping strategy followed by bootstrapping results for flight data, which have led to the latest GRAIL lunar gravity fields.

  11. Temporal gravity and height changes of the Yellowstone caldera, 1977 - 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnet, F.; Kahle, H.-G.; Klingele, E.; Smith, R.B.; Meertens, Charles M.; Dzurisin, D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the longest record of gravity measurements in the area of the Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming. The temporal gravity changes, at the ??12 ??Gal (10-8 ms-2) precision level, are compared with changes in heights from leveling and GPS. The gravity field decreased across the caldera from 1977 to 1983 during the uplift and attained a maximum decrease of up to -60 ?? 12 ??Gal along the Caldera axis. The gravity field then reversed polarity to increasing values, of up to 60 ?? 12 ??Gal between 1986 and 1993. The ratio between height and gravity changes varied during the entire time, but converged over the latter period following the free-air gravity gradient. General ground deformation deduced from leveling showed caldera-wide uplift of ???15 mm/a during the period of gravity decrease, then from leveling and GPS, subsidence of ??? 25 mm/a during the gravity increase. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. The Role of GRAIL Orbit Determination in Preprocessing of Gravity Science Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruizinga, Gerhard; Asmar, Sami; Fahnestock, Eugene; Harvey, Nate; Kahan, Daniel; Konopliv, Alex; Oudrhiri, Kamal; Paik, Meegyeong; Park, Ryan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Watkins, Michael; Yuan, Dah-Ning

    2013-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission has constructed a lunar gravity field with unprecedented uniform accuracy on the farside and nearside of the Moon. GRAIL lunar gravity field determination begins with preprocessing of the gravity science measurements by applying corrections for time tag error, general relativity, measurement noise and biases. Gravity field determination requires the generation of spacecraft ephemerides of an accuracy not attainable with the pre-GRAIL lunar gravity fields. Therefore, a bootstrapping strategy was developed, iterating between science data preprocessing and lunar gravity field estimation in order to construct sufficiently accurate orbit ephemerides.This paper describes the GRAIL measurements, their dependence on the spacecraft ephemerides and the role of orbit determination in the bootstrapping strategy. Simulation results will be presented that validate the bootstrapping strategy followed by bootstrapping results for flight data, which have led to the latest GRAIL lunar gravity fields.

  13. Wave propagation in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, Jan Ø.; Llinares, Claudio; Mota, David F.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the propagation of scalar waves induced by matter sources in the context of scalar-tensor theories of gravity which include screening mechanisms for the scalar degree of freedom. The usual approach when studying these theories in the nonlinear regime of cosmological perturbations is based on the assumption that scalar waves travel at the speed of light. Within general relativity this approximation is valid and leads to no loss of accuracy in the estimation of observables. We find, however, that mass terms and nonlinearities in the equations of motion lead to propagation and dispersion velocities significantly different from the speed of light. As the group velocity is the one associated with the propagation of signals, a reduction of its value has direct impact on the behavior and dynamics of nonlinear structures within modified gravity theories with screening. For instance, the internal dynamics of galaxies and satellites submerged in large dark matter halos could be affected by the fact that the group velocity is smaller than the speed of light. It is therefore important, within such a framework, to take into account the fact that different parts of a galaxy will see changes in the environment at different times. A full nonstatic analysis may be necessary under those conditions.

  14. The Interval approach to braneworld gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph D.; Park, Minjoon; /Chicago U., EFI

    2005-06-01

    Gravity in five-dimensional braneworld backgrounds may exhibit extra scalar degrees of freedom with problematic features, including kinetic ghosts and strong coupling behavior. Analysis of such effects is hampered by the standard heuristic approaches to braneworld gravity, which use the equations of motion as the starting point, supplemented by orbifold projections and junction conditions. Here we develop the interval approach to braneworld gravity, which begins with an action principle. This shows how to implement general covariance, despite allowing metric fluctuations that do not vanish on the boundaries. We reproduce simple Z{sub 2} orbifolds of gravity, even though in this approach we never perform a Z{sub 2} projection. We introduce a family of ''straight gauges'', which are bulk coordinate systems in which both branes appear as straight slices in a single coordinate patch. Straight gauges are extremely useful for analyzing metric fluctuations in braneworld models. By explicit gauge fixing, we show that a general AdS{sub 5}/AdS{sub 4} setup with two branes has at most a radion, but no physical ''brane-bending'' modes.

  15. A gauge-theoretic approach to gravity

    PubMed Central

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2012-01-01

    Einstein's general relativity (GR) is a dynamical theory of the space–time metric. We describe an approach in which GR becomes an SU(2) gauge theory. We start at the linearized level and show how a gauge-theoretic Lagrangian for non-interacting massless spin two particles (gravitons) takes a much more simple and compact form than in the standard metric description. Moreover, in contrast to the GR situation, the gauge theory Lagrangian is convex. We then proceed with a formulation of the full nonlinear theory. The equivalence to the metric-based GR holds only at the level of solutions of the field equations, that is, on-shell. The gauge-theoretic approach also makes it clear that GR is not the only interacting theory of massless spin two particles, in spite of the GR uniqueness theorems available in the metric description. Thus, there is an infinite-parameter class of gravity theories all describing just two propagating polarizations of the graviton. We describe how matter can be coupled to gravity in this formulation and, in particular, how both the gravity and Yang–Mills arise as sectors of a general diffeomorphism-invariant gauge theory. We finish by outlining a possible scenario of the ultraviolet completion of quantum gravity within this approach. PMID:22792040

  16. Solar System Test for Alternative Gravity Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustos, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Over the past year I've worked with Dr. Biswas and Dr.Brans from Loyola University, on different aspects of General relativity. More recently we have been focusing on particle and photon orbits in Schwarzschild-like metric which is relevant to understand observations such as photon deflection and perihelion precession of Mercury. These observations can be used to test alternative gravity theories, such as f(R) Theories. Such solar system tests have proved extremely useful to constrain alternative theories of gravity, such as f(R) theories that try to solve the dark energy problem. While so far most theorists have focused on the simplest f(R) type of modification of gravity to realize the phase of late time cosmic speed-up that we are observing, there are several other viable candidates. In particular, many ``effective'' approaches to gravity gives rise to f(R,G) type of modifications, where G is the Gauss Bonnet term. Accordingly, we are currently trying to understand how solar system tests can constrain this more general class of f(R,G) dark energy models. In my talk I will present our progress in this direction. NSF Grant

  17. The weak gravity conjecture and scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palti, Eran

    2017-08-01

    We propose a generalisation of the Weak Gravity Conjecture in the presence of scalar fields. The proposal is guided by properties of extremal black holes in N=2 supergravity, but can be understood more generally in terms of forbidding towers of stable gravitationally bound states. It amounts to the statement that there must exist a particle on which the gauge force acts more strongly than gravity and the scalar forces combined. We also propose that the scalar force itself should act on this particle stronger than gravity. This implies that generically the mass of this particle decreases exponentially as a function of the scalar field expectation value for super-Planckian variations, which is behaviour predicted by the Refined Swampland Conjecture. In the context of N=2 supergravity the Weak Gravity Conjecture bound can be tied to bounds on scalar field distances in field space. Guided by this, we present a general proof that for any linear combination of moduli in any Calabi-Yau compactification of string theory the proper field distance grows at best logarithmically with the moduli values for super-Planckian distances.

  18. Asymptotic safety of gravity-matter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibohm, J.; Pawlowski, J. M.; Reichert, M.

    2016-04-01

    We study the ultraviolet stability of gravity-matter systems for general numbers of minimally coupled scalars and fermions. This is done within the functional renormalization group setup put forward in [N. Christiansen, B. Knorr, J. Meibohm, J. M. Pawlowski, and M. Reichert, Phys. Rev. D 92, 121501 (2015).] for pure gravity. It includes full dynamical propagators and a genuine dynamical Newton's coupling, which is extracted from the graviton three-point function. We find ultraviolet stability of general gravity-fermion systems. Gravity-scalar systems are also found to be ultraviolet stable within validity bounds for the chosen generic class of regulators, based on the size of the anomalous dimension. Remarkably, the ultraviolet fixed points for the dynamical couplings are found to be significantly different from those of their associated background counterparts, once matter fields are included. In summary, the asymptotic safety scenario does not put constraints on the matter content of the theory within the validity bounds for the chosen generic class of regulators.

  19. A gauge-theoretic approach to gravity.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2012-08-08

    Einstein's general relativity (GR) is a dynamical theory of the space-time metric. We describe an approach in which GR becomes an SU(2) gauge theory. We start at the linearized level and show how a gauge-theoretic Lagrangian for non-interacting massless spin two particles (gravitons) takes a much more simple and compact form than in the standard metric description. Moreover, in contrast to the GR situation, the gauge theory Lagrangian is convex. We then proceed with a formulation of the full nonlinear theory. The equivalence to the metric-based GR holds only at the level of solutions of the field equations, that is, on-shell. The gauge-theoretic approach also makes it clear that GR is not the only interacting theory of massless spin two particles, in spite of the GR uniqueness theorems available in the metric description. Thus, there is an infinite-parameter class of gravity theories all describing just two propagating polarizations of the graviton. We describe how matter can be coupled to gravity in this formulation and, in particular, how both the gravity and Yang-Mills arise as sectors of a general diffeomorphism-invariant gauge theory. We finish by outlining a possible scenario of the ultraviolet completion of quantum gravity within this approach.

  20. Bimetric MOND gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2009-12-01

    A new relativistic formulation of MOND is advanced, involving two metrics as independent degrees of freedom: the MOND metric gμν, to which alone matter couples, and an auxiliary metric g^μν. The main idea hinges on the fact that we can form tensors from the difference of the Levi-Civita connections of the two metrics, Cβγα=Γβγα-Γ^βγα, and these act like gravitational accelerations. In the context of MOND, we can form dimensionless “acceleration” scalars and functions thereof (containing only first derivatives) from contractions of a0-1Cβγα. I look at a subclass of bimetric MOND theories governed by the action I=-(16πG)-1⁢∫[βg1/2R+αg^1/2R^-2(gg^)1/4f(κ)a02M(Υ˜/a02)]⁢d4x+IM(gμν,ψi)+I^M(g^μν,χi), with Υ˜ as a scalar quadratic in the Cβγα, κ=(g/g^)1/4, IM as the matter action, and allow for the existence of twin matter that couples to g^μν alone. Thus, gravity is modified not by modifying the elasticity of the space-time in which matter lives, but by the interaction between that space-time and the auxiliary one. In particular, I concentrate on the interesting and simple choice Υ˜∝gμν(CμλγCνγλ-CμνγCλγλ). This theory introduces only one new constant, a0; it tends simply to general relativity (GR) in the limit a0→0 and to a phenomenologically valid MOND theory in the nonrelativistic limit. The theory naturally gives MOND and “dark energy” effects from the same term in the action, both controlled by the MOND constant a0. In regards to gravitational lensing by nonrelativistic systems-a holy grail for relativistic MOND theories-the theory predicts that the same potential that controls massive-particle motion also dictates lensing in the same way as in GR: Lensing and massive-particle probing of galactic fields will require the same “halo” of dark matter to explain the departure of the present theory from GR. This last result can be modified with other choices of Υ˜, but lensing is still enhanced

  1. Can chaos be observed in quantum gravity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Bianca; Höhn, Philipp A.; Koslowski, Tim A.; Nelson, Mike I.

    2017-06-01

    Full general relativity is almost certainly 'chaotic'. We argue that this entails a notion of non-integrability: a generic general relativistic model, at least when coupled to cosmologically interesting matter, likely possesses neither differentiable Dirac observables nor a reduced phase space. It follows that the standard notion of observable has to be extended to include non-differentiable or even discontinuous generalized observables. These cannot carry Poisson-algebraic structures and do not admit a standard quantization; one thus faces a quantum representation problem of gravitational observables. This has deep consequences for a quantum theory of gravity, which we investigate in a simple model for a system with Hamiltonian constraint that fails to be completely integrable. We show that basing the quantization on standard topology precludes a semiclassical limit and can even prohibit any solutions to the quantum constraints. Our proposed solution to this problem is to refine topology such that a complete set of Dirac observables becomes continuous. In the toy model, it turns out that a refinement to a polymer-type topology, as e.g. used in loop gravity, is sufficient. Basing quantization of the toy model on this finer topology, we find a complete set of quantum Dirac observables and a suitable semiclassical limit. This strategy is applicable to realistic candidate theories of quantum gravity and thereby suggests a solution to a long-standing problem which implies ramifications for the very concept of quantization. Our work reveals a qualitatively novel facet of chaos in physics and opens up a new avenue of research on chaos in gravity which hints at deep insights into the structure of quantum gravity.

  2. Topological induced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    We propose a topological model of induced gravity (pregeometry) where both Newton’s coupling constant and the cosmological constant appear as integration constants in solving field equations. The matter sector of a scalar field is also considered, and by solving field equations it is shown that various types of cosmological solutions in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe can be obtained. A detailed analysis is given of the meaning of the BRST transformations, which make the induced gravity be a topological field theory, by means of the canonical quantization analysis, and the physical reason why such BRST transformations are needed in the present formalism is clarified. Finally, we propose a dynamical mechanism for fixing the Lagrange multiplier fields by following the Higgs mechanism. The present study clearly indicates that the induced gravity can be constructed at the classical level without recourse to quantum fluctuations of matter and suggests an interesting relationship between the induced gravity and the topological quantum-field theory (TQFT).

  3. Artificial Gravity Research Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the forward working plan to identify what countermeasure resources are needed for a vehicle with an artificial gravity module (intermittent centrifugation) and what Countermeasure Resources are needed for a rotating transit vehicle (continuous centrifugation) to minimize the effects of microgravity to Mars Exploration crewmembers.

  4. Variable gravity research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Sean; Ancheta, Stan; Beine, Donna; Cink, Brian; Eagon, Mark; Eckstein, Brett; Luhman, Dan; Mccowan, Daniel; Nations, James; Nordtvedt, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Spin and despin requirements; sequence of activities required to assemble the Variable Gravity Research Facility (VGRF); power systems technology; life support; thermal control systems; emergencies; communication systems; space station applications; experimental activities; computer modeling and simulation of tether vibration; cost analysis; configuration of the crew compartments; and tether lengths and rotation speeds are discussed.

  5. Spaceborne Gravity Gradiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W. C. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The current status of gravity gradiometers and technology that could be available in the 1990's for the GRAVSAT-B mission are assessed. Problems associated with sensors, testing, spacecraft, and data processing are explored as well as critical steps, schedule, and cost factors in the development plan.

  6. Hawaii Gravity Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-12-15

    Gravity model for the state of Hawaii. Data is from the following source: Flinders, A.F., Ito, G., Garcia, M.O., Sinton, J.M., Kauahikaua, J.P., and Taylor, B., 2013, Intrusive dike complexes, cumulate cores, and the extrusive growth of Hawaiian volcanoes: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 40, p. 3367–3373, doi:10.1002/grl.50633.

  7. Gravity and crustal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowin, C. O.

    1976-01-01

    Lunar gravitational properties were analyzed along with the development of flat moon and curved moon computer models. Gravity anomalies and mascons were given particular attention. Geophysical and geological considerations were included, and comparisons were made between the gravitional fields of the Earth, Mars, and the Moon.

  8. A Trick of Gravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburgh, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    It's both surprising and rewarding when an old, standard problem reveals a subtlety that expands its pedagogic value. I realized recently that the role of gravity in the range equation for a projectile is not so simple as first appears. This realization may be completely obvious to others but was quite new to me.

  9. The Gravity Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberlin, Lynn

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the problem of gravity as it relates to distance from the center of the earth, and reports contradictory explanations from different source books. Uses this example to illustrate that science should not be taught from a single source, such as a textbook. (JR)

  10. A Trick of Gravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburgh, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    It's both surprising and rewarding when an old, standard problem reveals a subtlety that expands its pedagogic value. I realized recently that the role of gravity in the range equation for a projectile is not so simple as first appears. This realization may be completely obvious to others but was quite new to me.

  11. Cubesat Gravity Field Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burla, Santoshkumar; Mueller, Vitali; Flury, Jakob; Jovanovic, Nemanja

    2016-04-01

    CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions have been successful in the field of satellite geodesy (especially to improve Earth's gravity field models) and have established the necessity towards the next generation gravity field missions. Especially, GRACE has shown its capabilities beyond any other gravity field missions. GRACE Follow-On mission is going to continue GRACE's legacy which is almost identical to GRACE mission with addition of laser interferometry. But these missions are not only quite expensive but also takes quite an effort to plan and to execute. Still there are few drawbacks such as under-sampling and incapability of exploring new ideas within a single mission (ex: to perform different orbit configurations with multi satellite mission(s) at different altitudes). The budget is the major limiting factor to build multi satellite mission(s). Here, we offer a solution to overcome these drawbacks using cubesat/ nanosatellite mission. Cubesats are widely used in research because they are cheaper, smaller in size and building them is easy and faster than bigger satellites. Here, we design a 3D model of GRACE like mission with available sensors and explain how the Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) works. The expected accuracies on final results of gravity field are also explained here.

  12. Cosmological models in higher-order gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotsakis, Spiros

    This thesis is divided into two parts. The first part deals with the conformal structure, inflationary regimes, and singularity theorems in the context of higher-order gravity theories. The second part focuses on the question of the nature of cosmological singularities and in particular on the occurrence of chaotic behavior in the framework of these theories. We begin part one by formulating and proving what we call the conformal equivalence theorem which states that higher order gravity theories which are derived from a lagrangian density that is an analytic function of the scalar curvature are conformally equivalent to general relativity plus a scalar field matter source with a particular self-interaction potential. The solution space of higher-order gravity theories is examined and the weak field limit of these theories is calculated. The role of conformal non-invariance and the associated particle production in these theories is discussed. Several interpretative issues concerning the physical equivalence of these theories to general relativity with scalar field matter source are given and the physical reality of the conformally related metric tensors is examined in detail. The existence and stability conditions of the de Sitter space in the context of these theories are established and several examples which lead to successful inflation are presented. Effective potentials are drawn for certain classes of these theories. Singularity theorems are proved in the context of higher-order gravity theories and the status of the cosmic no-hair conjectures in these theories is critically presented. In the second part we start by reviewing certain useful and powerful methods for the study of chaotic behavior near cosmological singularities in general relativity. Recent numerical evidence that concerns the genericity of such oscillatory solutions is critically presented and commented upon. A new method based on the analytic theory of ordinary differential equations is

  13. Constraining Mass Anomalies Using Trans-dimensional Gravity Inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo, K.; Montesi, L.; Lekic, V.

    2016-12-01

    The density structure of planetary interiors constitutes a key constraint on their composition, temperature, and dynamics. This has motivated the development of non-invasive methods to infer 3D distribution of density anomalies within a planet's interior using gravity observations made from the surface or orbit. On Earth, this information can be supplemented by seismic and electromagnetic observations, but such data are generally not available on other planets and inferences must be made from gravity observations alone. Unfortunately, inferences of density anomalies from gravity are non-unique and even the dimensionality of the problem - i.e., the number of density anomalies detectable in the planetary interior - is unknown. In this project, we use the Reversible Jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithm to approach gravity inversions in a trans-dimensional way, that is, considering the magnitude of the mass, the latitude, longitude, depth and number of anomalies itself as unknowns to be constrained by the observed gravity field at the surface of a planet. Our approach builds upon previous work using trans-dimensional gravity inversions in which the density contrast between the anomaly and the surrounding material is known. We validate the algorithm by analyzing a synthetic gravity field produced by a known density structure and comparing the retrieved and input density structures. We find excellent agreement between the input and retrieved structure when working in 1D and 2D domains. However, in 3D domains, comprehensive exploration of the much larger space of possible models makes search efficiency a key ingredient in successful gravity inversion. We find that upon a sufficiently long RJMCMC run, it is possible to use statistical information to recover a predicted model that matches the real model. We argue that even more complex problems, such as those involving real gravity acceleration data of a planet as the constraint, our trans-dimensional gravity

  14. Non-anticommutative quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, J. W.

    2015-06-01

    A calculation of the one loop gravitational self-energy graph in non-anticommutative quantum gravity reveals that graviton loops are damped by internal momentum dependent factors in the modified propagator and the vertex functions. The non-anticommutative quantum gravity perturbation theory is finite for matter-free gravity and for matter interactions.

  15. Adhesion Casting In Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond J.

    1996-01-01

    Adhesion casting in low gravity proposed as technique for making new and improved materials. Advantages of low-gravity adhesion casting, in comparison with adhesion casting in normal Earth gravity, comes from better control over, and greater uniformity of, thicknesses of liquid films that form on and adhere to solid surfaces during casting.

  16. Gravity Modeling for Variable Fidelity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Michael M.

    2006-01-01

    Aerospace simulations can model worlds, such as the Earth, with differing levels of fidelity. The simulation may represent the world as a plane, a sphere, an ellipsoid, or a high-order closed surface. The world may or may not rotate. The user may select lower fidelity models based on computational limits, a need for simplified analysis, or comparison to other data. However, the user will also wish to retain a close semblance of behavior to the real world. The effects of gravity on objects are an important component of modeling real-world behavior. Engineers generally equate the term gravity with the observed free-fall acceleration. However, free-fall acceleration is not equal to all observers. To observers on the sur-face of a rotating world, free-fall acceleration is the sum of gravitational attraction and the centrifugal acceleration due to the world's rotation. On the other hand, free-fall acceleration equals gravitational attraction to an observer in inertial space. Surface-observed simulations (e.g. aircraft), which use non-rotating world models, may choose to model observed free fall acceleration as the gravity term; such a model actually combines gravitational at-traction with centrifugal acceleration due to the Earth s rotation. However, this modeling choice invites confusion as one evolves the simulation to higher fidelity world models or adds inertial observers. Care must be taken to model gravity in concert with the world model to avoid denigrating the fidelity of modeling observed free fall. The paper will go into greater depth on gravity modeling and the physical disparities and synergies that arise when coupling specific gravity models with world models.

  17. Random coupling of acoustic-gravity waves in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Christophe; Lott, Francois; Haynes, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    In numerical modeling of long-range acoustic propagation in the atmosphere, the effect of gravity waves on low-frequency acoustic waves is often ignored. As the sound speed far exceeds the gravity wave phase speed, these two types of waves present different spatial scales and their linear coupling is weak. It is possible, however, to obtain relatively strong couplings via sound speed profile changes with altitude. In the present study, this scenario is analyzed for realistic gravity wave fields and the incident acoustic wave is modeled as a narrow-banded acoustic pulse. The gravity waves are represented as a random field using a stochastic multiwave parameterization of non-orographic gravity waves. The parameterization provides independent monochromatic gravity waves, and the gravity wave field is obtained as the linear superposition of the waves produced. When the random terms are retained, a more generalized wave equation is obtained that both qualitatively and quantitatively agrees with the observations of several highly dispersed stratospheric wavetrains. Here, we show that the cumulative effect of gravity wave breakings makes the sensitivity of ground-based acoustic signals large, in that small changes in the parameterization can create or destroy an acoustic wavetrain.

  18. The Impact of Geological Structures On The Gravity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, U.

    In general, a uniform standard density value is used for the calculation of topographic effects for gravity field modelling in Switzerland. Only a limited number of promi- nent mass anomalies is treated with an individual density. In some regions this causes problems in predicting the surface gravity or the deflections of the vertical. An actual example is the construction of a new 57 km railway tunnel, where accurate deflec- tions of the vertical are needed for the orientation of gyroscope measurements. It was rather doubtful if our standard national gravity field model would fulfil the accuracy demands. Therefore, a refinement of the gravity field model was performed by digi- tising all the relevant geological structures in the vicinity of the planned tunnel. This lead to a 3D density model of irregularly shaped polyhedrons. Their influence on the gravity field (potential, gravity, deflections of the vertical and their first derivatives) are calculated rigorously. First results of this study are now available and reveal that the influences of the geological structures on the deflections of the vertical and on gravity are rather small (1 - 2 arcsec, 3 - 5 mgal) in the investigated region and they are at the limit of significance for the technical applications of levelling or gyroscope mea- surements. The largest effects are caused by quaternary sediments with a large density contrast and by some gneiss structures, which show only a small density contrast but their total mass can cause considerable anomalies in the gravity field.

  19. Two-phase alkali-metal experiments in reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-06-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. A literature search of relevant experiments in reduced gravity is reported on here, and reveals a paucity of data for such correlations. The few ongoing experiments in reduced gravity are noted. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. A similar situation exists regarding two-phase alkali-metal flow and heat transfer, even in normal gravity. Existing data are conflicting and indequate for the task of modeling a space reactor using a two-phase alkali-metal coolant. The major features of past experiments are described here. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from the two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Analyses undertaken here give every expectation that the correlations developed from this data base will provide a valid representation of alkali-metal heat transfer and pressure drop in reduced gravity.

  20. Weak gravitational lensing in fourth order gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabile, A.; Stabile, An.

    2012-02-01

    For a general class of analytic functions f(R,RαβRαβ,RαβγδRαβγδ) we discuss the gravitational lensing in the Newtonian limit of theory. From the properties of the Gauss-Bonnet invariant it is enough to consider only one curvature invariant between the Ricci tensor and the Riemann tensor. Then, we analyze the dynamics of a photon embedded in a gravitational field of a generic f(R,RαβRαβ) gravity. The metric is time independent and spherically symmetric. The metric potentials are Schwarzschild-like, but there are two additional Yukawa terms linked to derivatives of f with respect to two curvature invariants. Considering first the case of a pointlike lens, and after the one of a generic matter distribution of the lens, we study the deflection angle and the angular position of images. Though the additional Yukawa terms in the gravitational potential modifies dynamics with respect to general relativity, the geodesic trajectory of the photon is unaffected by the modification if we consider only f(R) gravity. We find different results (deflection angle smaller than the angle of general relativity) only due to the introduction of a generic function of the Ricci tensor square. Finally, we can affirm that the lensing phenomena for all f(R) gravities are equal to the ones known for general relativity. We conclude the paper by showing and comparing the deflection angle and position of images for f(R,RαβRαβ) gravity with respect to the gravitational lensing of general relativity.

  1. Higher-order brane gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Dabrowski, Mariusz P.; Balcerzak, Adam

    2010-06-23

    We discuss a very general theory of gravity, of which Lagrangian is an arbitrary function of the curvature invariants, on the brane. In general, the formulation of the junction conditions (except for Euler characteristics such as Gauss-Bonnet term) leads to the powers of the delta function and requires regularization. We suggest the way to avoid such a problem by imposing the metric and its first derivative to be regular at the brane, the second derivative to have a kink, the third derivative of the metric to have a step function discontinuity, and no sooner as the fourth derivative of the metric to give the delta function contribution to the field equations. Alternatively, we discuss the reduction of the fourth-order gravity to the second order theory by introducing extra scalar and tensor fields: the scalaron and the tensoron. In order to obtain junction conditions we apply two methods: the application of the Gauss-Codazzi formalism and the application of the generalized Gibbons-Hawking boundary terms which are appended to the appropriate actions. In the most general case we derive junction conditions without assuming the continuity of the scalaron and the tensoron on the brane. The derived junction conditions can serve studying the cosmological implications of the higher-order brane gravity models.

  2. Einstein, Mach, and the Fortunes of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, David

    2005-04-01

    Early in his life, Albert Einstein considered himself a devoted student of the physicist and philosopher Ernst Mach. Mach's famous critiques of Newton's absolute space and time -- most notably Mach's explanation of Newton's bucket experiment -- held a strong sway over Einstein as he struggled to formulate general relativity. Einstein was convinced that his emerging theory of gravity should be consistent with Mach's principle, which states that local inertial effects arise due to gravitational interactions with distant matter. Once completed, Einstein's general relativity enjoyed two decades of worldwide attention, only to fall out of physicists' interest during the 1930s and 1940s, when topics like nuclear physics claimed center stage. Gravity began to return to the limelight during the 1950s and especially the 1960s, and once again Mach proved to be a major spur: Princeton physicists Carl Brans and Robert Dicke introduced a rival theory of gravity in 1961 which they argued satisfied Mach's principle better than Einstein's general relativity did. The Brans-Dicke theory, and the new generation of experiments designed to test its predictions against those of general relativity, played a major role in bringing Einstein's beloved topic back to the center of physics.

  3. Hawking radiation of non-asymptotically flat rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, Izzet; Aslan, Onur Atilla

    2016-04-01

    We study the Hawking radiation of non-asymptotically flat rotating linear dilaton black holes, which are the solutions to the 4D Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion action by using the semi-classical radiation spectrum method. Using scalar perturbations, we show that both angular and radial equations produce exact analytical solutions. Thus, we obtain a precise radiation spectrum for the rotating linear dilaton black hole. The high-frequency regime does not yield the standard Hawking temperature of this black hole computed from the surface gravity. However, we show in detail that the specific low-frequency band of the radiation spectrum allows for the original Hawking temperature of the rotating linear dilaton black hole. The computations are also exhibited graphically.

  4. Tribology Experiment in Zero Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, C. H. T.; Gause, R. L.; Whitaker, A. F.; Finckenor, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    A tribology experiment in zero gravity was performed during the orbital flight of Spacelab 1 to study the motion of liquid lubricants over solid surfaces. The absence of a significant gravitational force facilitates observation of such motions as controlled by interfacial and capillary forces. Two experimental configurations were used. One deals with the liquid on one solid surface, and the other with the liquid between a pair of closed spaced surfaces. Time sequence photographs of fluid motion on a solid surface yielded spreading rate data of several fluid-surface combinations. In general, a slow spreading process as governed by the tertiary junction can be distinguished from a more rapid process which is driven by surface tension controlled internal fluid pressure. Photographs were also taken through the transparent bushings of several experimental journal bearings. Morphology of incomplete fluid films and its fluctuation with time suggest the presence or absence of unsteady phenomena of the bearing-rotor system in various arrangements.

  5. Modifying gravity at low redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas E-mail: c.vandebruck@sheffield.ac.uk E-mail: d.shaw@qmul.ac.uk

    2010-04-01

    We consider the growth of cosmological perturbations in modified gravity models where a scalar field mediates a non-universal Yukawa force between different matter species. The growth of the density contrast is altered for scales below the Compton wave-length of the scalar field. As the universe expands, the Compton wave-length varies in time in such a way that scales which were outside the range of the scalar field force may feel it at a lower redshift. In this case, both the exponent γ measuring the growth of Cold Dark Matter perturbations and the slip function representing the ratio of the two Newtonian potentials ψ and φ may differ from their values in General Relativity at low redshift.

  6. Industrial processes influenced by gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon

    1988-01-01

    In considering new directions for low gravity research with particular regard to broadening the number and types of industrial involvements, it is noted that transport phenomena play a vital role in diverse processes in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, and biotech industries. Relatively little attention has been given to the role of gravity in such processes. Accordingly, numerous industrial processes and phenomena are identified which involve gravity and/or surface tension forces. Phase separations and mixing are examples that will be significantly different in low gravity conditions. A basis is presented for expanding the scope of the low gravity research program and the potential benefits of such research is indicated.

  7. Gravity waves in severe weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowhill, S. A.; Gnanalingam, S.

    1986-01-01

    With a view to determining the role of severe weather in producing gravity waves, two tests were made. In the first, the wind speed measured at two nearby radiosonde stations, Peoria and Salem, was correlated with the stratosphere gravity-wave intensity at Urbana. Although the gravity-wave intensity fluctuated greatly from day to day, these is little if any correlation with the stratospheric wind speed. This suggests that orographic forcing is not a factor in generating gravity waves in Urbana. On the other hand, a clear correlation is found between cloud to heights exceeding 20,000 ft and an increased gravity-wave amplitude in the stratosphere.

  8. Precise Determination of the Zero-Gravity Surface Figure of a Mirror without Gravity-Sag Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, Eric E.; Lam, Jonathan C.; Feria, V. Alfonso; Chang, Zensheu

    2007-01-01

    The zero-gravity surface figure of optics used in spaceborne astronomical instruments must be known to high accuracy, but earthbound metrology is typically corrupted by gravity sag. Generally, inference of the zero-gravity surface figure from a measurement made under normal gravity requires finite-element analysis (FEA), and for accurate results the mount forces must be well characterized. We describe how to infer the zero-gravity surface figure very precisely using the alternative classical technique of averaging pairs of measurements made with the direction of gravity reversed. We show that mount forces as well as gravity must be reversed between the two measurements and discuss how the St. Venant principle determines when a reversed mount force may be considered to be applied at the same place in the two orientations. Our approach requires no finite-element modeling and no detailed knowledge of mount forces other than the fact that they reverse and are applied at the same point in each orientation. If mount schemes are suitably chosen, zero-gravity optical surfaces may be inferred much more simply and more accurately than with FEA.

  9. Schwinger's Approach to Einstein's Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Kim

    2012-05-01

    Albert Einstein was one of Julian Schwinger's heroes, and Schwinger was greatly honored when he received the first Einstein Prize (together with Kurt Godel) for his work on quantum electrodynamics. Schwinger contributed greatly to the development of a quantum version of gravitational theory, and his work led directly to the important work of (his students) Arnowitt, Deser, and DeWitt on the subject. Later in the 1960's and 1970's Schwinger developed a new formulation of quantum field theory, which he dubbed Source Theory, in an attempt to get closer contact to phenomena. In this formulation, he revisited gravity, and in books and papers showed how Einstein's theory of General Relativity emerged naturally from one physical assumption: that the carrier of the gravitational force is a massless, helicity-2 particle, the graviton. (There has been a minor dispute whether gravitational theory can be considered as the massless limit of a massive spin-2 theory; Schwinger believed that was the case, while Van Dam and Veltman concluded the opposite.) In the process, he showed how all of the tests of General Relativity could be explained simply, without using the full machinery of the theory and without the extraneous concept of curved space, including such effects as geodetic precession and the Lense-Thirring effect. (These effects have now been verified by the Gravity Probe B experiment.) This did not mean that he did not accept Einstein's equations, and in his book and full article on the subject, he showed how those emerge essentially uniquely from the assumption of the graviton. So to speak of Schwinger versus Einstein is misleading, although it is true that Schwinger saw no necessity to talk of curved spacetime. In this talk I will lay out Schwinger's approach, and the connection to Einstein's theory.

  10. Gravity from the Ground Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutz, Bernard

    2003-12-01

    Preface; 1. Gravity on Earth: the inescapable force; 2. And then came Newton: gravity takes center stage; 3. Satellites: what goes up doesn't always come down; 4. The Solar System: a triumph for Newtonian gravity; 5. Tides and tidal forces: the real signature of gravity; 6. Interplanetary travel: the cosmic roller-coaster; 7. Atmospheres: keeping planets covered; 8. Gravity in the Sun: keeping the heat on; 9. Reaching for the stars: the emptiness of outer space; 10. The colors of stars: why they are black (bodies); 11. Stars at work: factories for the Universe; 12. Birth to death: the life cycle of the stars; 13. Binary stars: tidal forces on a huge scale; 14. Galaxies: atoms in the Universe; 15. Physics near the speed of light: Einstein stands on Galileo's shoulders; 16. Relating to Einstein: logic and experiment in relativity; 17. Spacetime geometry: finding out what is not relative; 18. Einstein's gravity: the curvature of spacetime in the Solar System; 19. Einstein's recipe: fashioning the geometry of gravity; 20. Neutron stars: laboratories of strong gravity; 21. Black holes: gravity's one-way street; 22. Gravitational waves: gravity speaks; 23. Gravitational lenses: bringing the Universe into focus; 24. Cosmology: the study of everything; 25. Big Bang: the seed from which we grew; 26. Einstein's Universe: the geometry of cosmology; 27. Ask the Universe: cosmic questions at the frontiers of gravity; Appendix A. Useful constants: values used in this book; Appendix B. Background: what you need to know before you start.

  11. Recent Advances in Conformal Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, James; Chaykov, Spasen

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, significant advances have been made in alternative gravitational theories. Although MOND remains the leading candidate among the alternative models, Conformal Gravity has been studied by Mannheim and O'Brien to solve the rotation curve problem without the need for dark matter. Recently, Mannheim, O'Brien and Chaykov have begun solving other gravitational questions in Conformal Gravity. In this presentation, we highlight the new work of Conformal Gravity's application to random motions of clusters (the original Zwicky problem), gravitational bending of light, gravitational lensing and a very recent survey of dwarf galaxy rotation curves. We will show in each case that Conformal Gravity can provide an accurate explanation and prediction of the data without the need for dark matter. Coupled with the fact that Conformal Gravity is a fully re-normalizable metric theory of gravity, these results help to push Conformal Gravity onto a competitive stage against other alternative models.

  12. Modified Gravity and Coupled Quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, Christof

    The distinction between modified gravity and quintessence or dynamical dark energy is difficult. Many models of modified gravity are equivalent to models of coupled quintessence by virtue of variable transformations. This makes an observational differentiation between modified gravity and dark energy very hard. For example, the additional scalar degree of freedom in f(R)-gravity or non-local gravity can be interpreted as the cosmon of quintessence. Nevertheless, modified gravity can shed light on questions of interpretation, naturalness and simplicity. We present a simple model where gravity is modified by a field dependent Planck mass. It leads to a universe with a cold and slow beginning. This cosmology can be continued to the infinite past such that no big bang singularity occurs. All observables can be described equivalently in a hot big bang picture with inflation and early dark energy.

  13. Constraining gravity with hadron physics: neutron stars, modified gravity and gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2017-03-01

    The finding of Gravitational Waves (GW) by the aLIGO scientific and VIRGO collaborations opens opportunities to better test and understand strong interactions, both nuclear-hadronic and gravitational. Assuming General Relativity holds, one can constrain hadron physics at a neutron star. But precise knowledge of the Equation of State and transport properties in hadron matter can also be used to constrain the theory of gravity itself. I review a couple of these opportunities in the context of modified f (R) gravity, the maximum mass of neutron stars, and progress in the Equation of State of neutron matter from the chiral effective field theory of QCD.

  14. The inverse gravimetric problem in gravity modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanso, F.; Tscherning, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    One of the main purposes of geodesy is to determine the gravity field of the Earth in the space outside its physical surface. This purpose can be pursued without any particular knowledge of the internal density even if the exact shape of the physical surface of the Earth is not known, though this seems to entangle the two domains, as it was in the old Stoke's theory before the appearance of Molodensky's approach. Nevertheless, even when large, dense and homogeneous data sets are available, it was always recognized that subtracting from the gravity field the effect of the outer layer of the masses (topographic effect) yields a much smoother field. This is obviously more important when a sparse data set is bad so that any smoothing of the gravity field helps in interpolating between the data without raising the modeling error, this approach is generally followed because it has become very cheap in terms of computing time since the appearance of spectral techniques. The mathematical description of the Inverse Gravimetric Problem (IGP) is dominated mainly by two principles, which in loose terms can be formulated as follows: the knowledge of the external gravity field determines mainly the lateral variations of the density; and the deeper the density anomaly giving rise to a gravity anomaly, the more improperly posed is the problem of recovering the former from the latter. The statistical relation between rho and n (and its inverse) is also investigated in its general form, proving that degree cross-covariances have to be introduced to describe the behavior of rho. The problem of the simultaneous estimate of a spherical anomalous potential and of the external, topographic masses is addressed criticizing the choice of the mixed collection approach.

  15. Sediment gravity flow—the conceptual problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Prabir

    2003-09-01

    The term sediment gravity flow was introduced to describe the major flow types involved in resedimentation processes and was defined as the flow of sediments or sediment-fluid mixture in which the interstitial fluid is driven by the grains moving under the action of gravity. Critical analysis of respective flow mechanism reveals that these flow types markedly depart from the definitive properties of a sediment gravity flow, and the possibility of natural existence of a sediment gravity flow sensu stricto appears doubtful. The flow types classified as sediment gravity flow are also different enough from each other to be considered under a single category based on flow mechanism, and a more general term, high-density flow, is proposed here as a rational alternative to designate them. Attempts made to classify these flows on the basis of rheologic properties also suffer from some serious limitations. Besides these basic problems, improper uses of different terminology cause problems in understanding these high-density flows. Critical review, however, leads to conclude that each of these flow types can be identified as a distinct segment of a continuous spectrum of high-density flows, and the process of transformation from one variety to the other often comes into existence. Even within a single flow, different parts may show distinct flow character developed through the process of flow transformation. An empirical relationship between these flow types thus can be established with reference to the grain/water ratio and grain composition, which broadly controls character and rheology of a specific variety or different parts of a composite flow. An attempt is made here to accommodate the high-density flows involved in resedimentation processes within a general classification of aqueous flows.

  16. Modified gravity black holes and their observable shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, J. W.

    2015-03-01

    The shadows cast by non-rotating and rotating modified gravity black holes are determined by the two parameters mass and angular momentum . The sizes of the shadows cast by the spherically symmetric static modified gravity-Schwarzschild and modified gravity-Kerr rotating black holes increase significantly as the free parameter is increased from zero. The Event Horizon Telescope shadow image measurements can determine whether Einstein's general relativity is correct or whether it should be modified in the presence of strong gravitational fields.

  17. Probing Extreme Gravity with GW150914 and GW151226

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolas; Pretorius, Frans

    2017-01-01

    Advanced LIGO's recent discovery of the direct detection of gravitational waves from binary black hole coalescences allow us to probe gravity, for the first time, in extreme gravity regime where the field is both strong and dynamical. In this talk, I will describe how well GW150914 and GW151226 probe fundamental pillars of General Relativity, such as the equivalence principle, Lorentz invariance and massless graviton. I will then compare such new bounds to the existing bounds from Solar System experiments and binary pulsar observations. I will finally explain current limitations of probing extreme gravity with gravitational wave observations and discuss what needs to be done in future.

  18. Emergent Gravity from Vanishing Energy-Momentum Tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlich, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    We propose a constraint of vanishing energy-momentum tensor for quantum gravity. We are led to a metric-independent effective theory similar to the Dirac-Born-Infeld theory with vanishing gauge fields, modulated by a scalar potential. In the limit of a large number of fields, we explicitly demonstrate the existence of a composite massless spin-2 graviton in the spectrum that couples to matter as in Einstein gravity. We comment on the cosmological constant problem, the generalization to theories of fermions and gauge fields, and the relation to other approaches to quantum gravity. This work was supported by the NSF under Grant PHY-1519644.

  19. Surface singularities in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity.

    PubMed

    Pani, Paolo; Sotiriou, Thomas P

    2012-12-21

    Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity was recently proposed as an alternative to general relativity that offers a resolution of spacetime singularities. The theory differs from Einstein's gravity only inside matter due to nondynamical degrees of freedom, and it is compatible with all current observations. We show that the theory is reminiscent of Palatini f(R) gravity and that it shares the same pathologies, such as curvature singularities at the surface of polytropic stars and unacceptable Newtonian limit. This casts serious doubt on its viability.

  20. Unified theory of nonlinear electrodynamics and gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Gomez, Alexander; Krasnov, Kirill; Scarinci, Carlos

    2011-01-15

    We describe a class of unified theories of electromagnetism and gravity. The Lagrangian is of the BF type, with a potential for the B field, the gauge group is U(2) (complexified). Given a choice of the potential function the theory is a deformation of (complex) general relativity and electromagnetism, and describes just two propagating polarizations of the graviton and two of the photon. When gravity is switched off the theory becomes the usual nonlinear electrodynamics with a general structure function. The Einstein-Maxwell theory can be recovered by sending some of the parameters of the defining potential to zero, but for any generic choice of the potential the theory is indistinguishable from Einstein-Maxwell at low energies. A real theory is obtained by imposing suitable reality conditions. We also study the spherically-symmetric solution and show how the usual Reissner-Nordstrom solution is recovered.