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Sample records for generalized dilaton-axion gravity

  1. Brane Solutions of Gravity-Dilaton-Axion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bergshoeff, E.; Collinucci, A.; Gran, U.; Roest, D.; Vandoren, S.

    2005-04-25

    We consider general properties of brane solutions of gravity-dilaton-axion systems. We focus on the case of 7-branes and instantons. In both cases we show that besides the standard solutions there are new deformed solutions whose charges take value in any of the three conjugacy classes of SL(2, R). In the case of 7-branes we find that for each conjugacy class the 7-brane solutions are 1/2 BPS. Next, we discuss the relation of the 7-branes with the DW/QFT correspondence. In particular, we show that the two (inequivalent) 7-brane solutions in the SO(2) conjugacy class have a nice interpretation as a distribution of (the so-called near horizon limit of) branes. This suggests a way to define the near-horizon limit of a 7-brane.In the case of instantons only the solutions corresponding to the R conjugacy class are 1/2 BPS. The solutions corresponding to the other two conjugacy classess correspond to non-extremal deformations. We first discuss an alternative description of these solutions as the geodesic motion of a particle in a two-dimensional AdS2 space. Next, we discuss the instanton-soliton correspondence. In particular, we show that for two of the conjugacy classes the instanton action in D dimensions is given by the mass of the corresponding soliton which is a (non-extremal) black hole solution in D+1 dimension. We speculate on the role of the non-extremal instantons in calculating higher-derivative corrections to the string effective action and, after a generalization from a flat to a curved AdS5 background, on their role in the AdS/CFT corresopondence.

  2. Entanglement entropy of charged dilaton-axion black hole and quantum isolated horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ze-Min; Li, Xiu-Lan; Gao, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Based on the work of Ghosh and Perez, we calculate the statistical entropy of charged dilaton-axion black hole. In the calculations we take the integral from the position of QIH to infinity, so the obtained entropy is the entanglement entropy outside the QIH. It is shown that only if the position of QIH is properly chosen the leading term of logarithm of the number of quantum states on the QIH is equal to the leading term of the entanglement entropy outside the black hole horizon, and both are the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy. The results reveal the relation between the entanglement entropy of black hole and the logarithm of the number of quantum states.

  3. Observing the shadow of Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shao-Wen; Liu, Yu-Xiao E-mail: liuyx@lzu.edu.cn

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the shadows cast by Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion black hole and naked singularity are studied. The shadow of a rotating black hole is found to be a dark zone covered by a deformed circle. For a fixed value of the spin a, the size of the shadow decreases with the dilaton parameter b. The distortion of the shadow monotonically increases with b and takes its maximal when the black hole approaches to the extremal case. Due to the optical properties, the area of the black hole shadow is supposed to equal to the high-energy absorption cross section. Based on this assumption, the energy emission rate is investigated. For a naked singularity, the shadow has a dark arc and a dark spot or straight, and the corresponding observables are obtained. These results show that there is a significant effect of the spin a and dilaton parameter b on these shadows. Moreover, we examine the observables of the shadow cast by the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, which is very useful for us to probe the nature of the black hole through the astronomical observations in the near future.

  4. Hawking radiation of dyon particles from the Einstein Maxwell-Dilaton Axion black hole via covariant anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiao-Xiong; Liu, Xiong-Wei; Yang, Shu-Zheng

    2008-12-01

    Hawking radiation of particles with electric and magnetic charges from the Einstein Maxwell-Dilaton Axion black hole is derived via the anomaly cancellation method, initiated by Robinson and Wilczek and elaborated by Banerjee and Kulkarni recently. We reconstruct the electromagnetic field tensor to redefine the gauge potential and equivalent charge corresponding to the source with electric and magnetic charges. We only adopt the covariant gauge and gravitational anomalies to discuss the near-horizon quantum anomaly in the dragging coordinate frame. Our result shows that Hawking radiation in this case also can be reproduced from the viewpoint of anomaly.

  5. Cosmic strings in axionic-dilatonic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Caroline

    2001-05-01

    We first consider local cosmic strings in dilaton-axion gravity and show that they are singular solutions. Then we take a supermassive Higgs limit and present expressions for the fields at far distances from the core by applying a Pecci-Quinn and a duality transformation to the dilatonic Melvin's magnetic universe.

  6. Gravity and Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortín, Tomás

    2015-03-01

    1. Differential geometry; 2. Symmetries and Noether's theorems; 3. A perturbative introduction to general relativity; 4. Action principles for gravity; 5. Pure N=1,2,d=4 supergravities; 6. Matter-coupled N=1,d=4 supergravity; 7. Matter-coupled N=2,d=4 supergravity; 8. A generic description of all the N>2,d=4 SUEGRAS; 9. Matter-coupled N=1,d=5 supergravity; 10. Conserved charges in general relativity; 11. The Schwarzschild black hole; 12. The Reissner-Nordström black hole; 13. The Taub-NUT solution; 14. Gravitational pp-waves; 15. The Kaluza-Klein black hole; 16. Dilaton and dilaton/axion black holes; 17. Unbroken supersymmetry I: supersymmetric vacua; 18. Unbroken supersymmetry II: partially supersymmetric solutions; 19. Supersymmetric black holes from supergravity; 20. String theory; 21. The string effective action and T duality; 22. From eleven to four dimensions; 23. The type-IIB superstring and type-II T duality; 24. Extended objects; 25. The extended objects of string theory; 26. String black holes in four and five dimensions; 27. The FGK formalism for (single, static) black holes and branes; Appendices: A.1 Lie groups, symmetric spaces, and Yang-Mills fields; A.2 The irreducible, non-symmetric Riemannian spaces of special holonomy; A.3 Miscellanea on the symplectic group; A.4 Gamma matrices and spinors; A.5 Kähler geometry; A.6 Special Kähler geometry; A.7 Quaternionic-Kähler geometry.

  7. Recovering General Relativity from Massive Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Babichev, E.; Deffayet, C.; Ziour, R.

    2009-11-13

    We obtain static, spherically symmetric, and asymptotically flat numerical solutions of massive gravity with a source. Those solutions show, for the first time explicitly, a recovery of the Schwarzschild solution of general relativity via the so-called Vainshtein mechanism.

  8. Generalized entropy and higher derivative gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps, Joan

    2014-03-01

    We derive an extension of the Ryu-Takayanagi prescription for curvature squared theories of gravity in the bulk, and comment on a prescription for more general theories. This results in a new entangling functional, that contains a correction to Wald's entropy. The new term is quadratic in the extrinsic curvature. The coefficient of this correction is a second derivative of the lagrangian with respect to the Riemann tensor. For Gauss-Bonnet gravity, the new functional reduces to Jacobson-Myers'.

  9. Generalized Yang-Mills theory and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Pei-Ming

    2016-02-01

    We propose a generalization of Yang-Mills theory for which the symmetry algebra does not have to be factorized as mutually commuting algebras of a finite-dimensional Lie algebra and the algebra of functions on base space. The algebra of diffeomorphism can be constructed as an example, and a class of gravity theories can be interpreted as generalized Yang-Mills theories. These theories, in general, include a graviton, a dilaton and a rank-two antisymmetric field, although Einstein gravity is also included as a special case. We present calculations suggesting that the connection in scattering amplitudes between Yang-Mills theory and gravity via Bern-Carrasco-Johansson duality can be made more manifest in this formulation.

  10. Charged black holes in generalized teleparallel gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, M.E.; Houndjo, M.J.S.; Tossa, J.; Momeni, D.; Myrzakulov, R. E-mail: sthoundjo@yahoo.fr E-mail: d.momeni@yahoo.com

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we investigate charged static black holes in 4D for generalized teleparallel models of gravity, based on torsion as the geometric object for describing gravity according to the equivalence principle. As a motivated idea, we introduce a set of non-diagonal tetrads and derive the full system of non linear differential equations. We prove that the common Schwarzschild gauge is applicable only when we study linear f(T) case. We reobtain the Reissner-Nordstrom-de Sitter (or RN-AdS) solution for the linear case of f(T) and perform a parametric cosmological reconstruction for two nonlinear models. We also study in detail a type of the no-go theorem in the framework of this modified teleparallel gravity.

  11. Generalized Galilean algebras and Newtonian gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, N.; Rubio, G.; Salgado, P.; Salgado, S.

    2016-04-01

    The non-relativistic versions of the generalized Poincaré algebras and generalized AdS-Lorentz algebras are obtained. These non-relativistic algebras are called, generalized Galilean algebras of type I and type II and denoted by GBn and GLn respectively. Using a generalized Inönü-Wigner contraction procedure we find that the generalized Galilean algebras of type I can be obtained from the generalized Galilean algebras type II. The S-expansion procedure allows us to find the GB5 algebra from the Newton Hooke algebra with central extension. The procedure developed in Ref. [1] allows us to show that the nonrelativistic limit of the five dimensional Einstein-Chern-Simons gravity is given by a modified version of the Poisson equation. The modification could be compatible with the effects of Dark Matter, which leads us to think that Dark Matter can be interpreted as a non-relativistic limit of Dark Energy.

  12. Cosmology in general massive gravity theories

    SciTech Connect

    Comelli, D.; Nesti, F.; Pilo, L. E-mail: fabrizio.nesti@aquila.infn.it

    2014-05-01

    We study the cosmological FRW flat solutions generated in general massive gravity theories. Such a model are obtained adding to the Einstein General Relativity action a peculiar non derivative potentials, function of the metric components, that induce the propagation of five gravitational degrees of freedom. This large class of theories includes both the case with a residual Lorentz invariance as well as the case with rotational invariance only. It turns out that the Lorentz-breaking case is selected as the only possibility. Moreover it turns out that that perturbations around strict Minkowski or dS space are strongly coupled. The upshot is that even though dark energy can be simply accounted by massive gravity modifications, its equation of state w{sub eff} has to deviate from -1. Indeed, there is an explicit relation between the strong coupling scale of perturbations and the deviation of w{sub eff} from -1. Taking into account current limits on w{sub eff} and submillimiter tests of the Newton's law as a limit on the possible strong coupling scale, we find that it is still possible to have a weakly coupled theory in a quasi dS background. Future experimental improvements on short distance tests of the Newton's law may be used to tighten the deviation of w{sub eff} form -1 in a weakly coupled massive gravity theory.

  13. Invariant conserved currents in generalized gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Yuri N.; Portales-Oliva, Felipe; Puetzfeld, Dirk; Rubilar, Guillermo F.

    2015-11-01

    We study conservation laws for gravity theories invariant under general coordinate transformations. The class of models under consideration includes Einstein's general relativity theory as a special case as well as its generalizations to non-Riemannian spacetime geometry and nonminimal coupling. We demonstrate that an arbitrary vector field on the spacetime manifold generates a current density that is conserved under certain conditions, and find the expression of the corresponding superpotential. For a family of models including nonminimal coupling between geometry and matter, we discuss in detail the differential conservation laws and the conserved quantities defined in terms of covariant multipole moments. We show that the equations of motion for the multipole moments of extended microstructured test bodies lead to conserved quantities that are closely related to the conserved currents derived in the field-theoretic framework.

  14. Inflation in general covariant theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yongqing; Wang, Anzhong; Wu, Qiang E-mail: anzhong_wang@baylor.edu

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we study inflation in the framework of the nonrelativistic general covariant theory of the Hořava-Lifshitz gravity with the projectability condition and an arbitrary coupling constant λ. We find that the Friedmann-Robterson-Walker (FRW) universe is necessarily flat in such a setup. We work out explicitly the linear perturbations of the flat FRW universe without specifying to a particular gauge, and find that the perturbations are different from those obtained in general relativity, because of the presence of the high-order spatial derivative terms. Applying the general formulas to a single scalar field, we show that in the sub-horizon regions, the metric and scalar field are tightly coupled and have the same oscillating frequencies. In the super-horizon regions, the perturbations become adiabatic, and the comoving curvature perturbation is constant. We also calculate the power spectra and indices of both the scalar and tensor perturbations, and express them explicitly in terms of the slow roll parameters and the coupling constants of the high-order spatial derivative terms. In particular, we find that the perturbations, of both scalar and tensor, are almost scale-invariant, and, with some reasonable assumptions on the coupling coefficients, the spectrum index of the tensor perturbation is the same as that given in the minimum scenario in general relativity (GR), whereas the index for scalar perturbation in general depends on λ and is different from the standard GR value. The ratio of the scalar and tensor power spectra depends on the high-order spatial derivative terms, and can be different from that of GR significantly.

  15. Disformal transformations, veiled General Relativity and Mimetic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deruelle, Nathalie; Rua, Josephine

    2014-09-01

    In this Note we show that Einstein's equations for gravity are generically invariant under ``disformations''. We also show that the particular subclass when this is not true yields the equations of motion of ``Mimetic Gravity''. Finally we give the ``mimetic'' generalization of the Schwarzschild solution.

  16. Disformal transformations, veiled General Relativity and Mimetic Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Deruelle, Nathalie; Rua, Josephine E-mail: rua@cbpf.br

    2014-09-01

    In this Note we show that Einstein's equations for gravity are generically invariant under ''disformations''. We also show that the particular subclass when this is not true yields the equations of motion of ''Mimetic Gravity''. Finally we give the ''mimetic'' generalization of the Schwarzschild solution.

  17. Dynamics of generalized Palatini theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitagliano, Vincenzo; Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Liberati, Stefano

    2010-10-01

    It is known that in f(R) theories of gravity with an independent connection which can be both nonmetric and nonsymmetric, this connection can always be algebraically eliminated in favor of the metric and the matter fields, so long as it is not coupled to the matter explicitly. We show here that this is a special characteristic of f(R) actions, and it is not true for actions that include other curvature invariants. This contradicts some recent claims in the literature. We clarify the reasons for this contradiction.

  18. Generalized model for a Moho inversion from gravity and vertical gravity-gradient data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhourun; Tenzer, Robert; Sneeuw, Nico; Liu, Lintao; Wild-Pfeiffer, Franziska

    2016-07-01

    Seismic data are primarily used in studies of the Earth's lithospheric structure including the Moho geometry. In regions where seismic data are sparse or completely absent, gravimetric or combined gravimetric-seismic methods could be applied to determine the Moho depth. In this study we derive and present generalized expressions for solving the Vening Meinesz-Moritz's (VMM) inverse problem of isostasy for a Moho depth determination from gravity and vertical gravity-gradient data. By solving the (non-linear) Fredholm's integral equation of the first kind, the linearized observation equations, which functionally relate the (given) gravity/gravity-gradient data to the (unknown) Moho depth, are derived in the spectral domain. The VMM gravimetric results are validated by using available seismic and gravimetric Moho models. Our results show that the VMM Moho solutions obtained by solving the VMM problem for gravity and gravity-gradient data are almost the same. This finding indicates that in global applications, using the global gravity/gravity-gradient data coverage, the spherical harmonic expressions for the gravimetric forward and inverse modeling yield (theoretically) the same results. Globally, these gravimetric solutions have also a relatively good agreement with the CRUST1.0 and GEMMA GOCE models in terms of their RMS Moho differences (4.7 km and 4.1 km respectively).

  19. Generalized model for a Moho inversion from gravity and vertical gravity-gradient data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhourun; Tenzer, Robert; Sneeuw, Nico; Liu, Lintao; Wild-Pfeiffer, Franziska

    2016-10-01

    Seismic data are primarily used in studies of the Earth's lithospheric structure including the Moho geometry. In regions, where seismic data are sparse or completely absent, gravimetric or combined gravimetric-seismic methods could be applied to determine the Moho depth. In this study, we derive and present generalized expressions for solving the Vening Meinesz-Moritz's (VMM) inverse problem of isostasy for a Moho depth determination from gravity and vertical gravity-gradient data. By solving the (non-linear) Fredholm's integral equation of the first kind, the linearized observation equations, which functionally relate the (given) gravity/gravity-gradient data to the (unknown) Moho depth, are derived in the spectral domain. The VMM gravimetric results are validated by using available seismic and gravimetric Moho models. Our results show that the VMM Moho solutions obtained by solving the VMM problem for gravity and gravity-gradient data are almost the same. This finding indicates that in global applications, using the global gravity/gravity-gradient data coverage, the spherical harmonic expressions for the gravimetric forward and inverse modelling yield (theoretically) the same results. Globally, these gravimetric solutions have also a relatively good agreement with the CRUST1.0 and GEMMA GOCE models in terms of their rms Moho differences (4.7 km and 4.1 km, respectively).

  20. Nonlinear evolutions and non-Gaussianity in generalized gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Seoktae; Kim, Sang Pyo; Song, Doo Jong

    2005-06-01

    We use the Hamilton-Jacobi theory to study the nonlinear evolutions of inhomogeneous spacetimes during inflation in generalized gravity. We find the exact solutions to the lowest order Hamilton-Jacobi equation for special scalar potentials and introduce an approximation method for general potentials. The conserved quantity invariant under a change of timelike hypersurfaces proves useful in dealing with gravitational perturbations. In the long-wavelength approximation, we find a conserved quantity related to the new canonical variable that makes the Hamiltonian density vanish, and calculate the non-Gaussianity in generalized gravity. The slow-roll inflation models with a single scalar field in generalized gravity predict too small non-Gaussianity to be detected by future CMB experiments.

  1. Why Einstein did not believe that general relativity geometrizes gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmkuhl, Dennis

    2014-05-01

    I argue that, contrary to folklore, Einstein never really cared for geometrizing the gravitational or (subsequently) the electromagnetic field; indeed, he thought that the very statement that General Relativity geometrizes gravity "is not saying anything at all". Instead, I shall show that Einstein saw the "unification" of inertia and gravity as one of the major achievements of General Relativity. Interestingly, Einstein did not locate this unification in the field equations but in his interpretation of the geodesic equation, the law of motion of test particles.

  2. Generalized Hodge dual for torsion in teleparallel gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Peng; Yuan, Fang-Fang

    2016-07-01

    For teleparallel gravity in four dimensions, Lucas and Pereira have shown that its action can be constructed via a generalized Hodge dual for torsion tensor. In this paper, we demonstrate that a direct generalization of this approach to other dimensions fails due to the fact that no generalized Hodge dual operator could be given in general dimensions. Furthermore, if one enforces the definition of a generalized Hodge dual to be consistent with the action of teleparallel gravity in general dimensions, the basic identity for any sensible Hodge dual would require an ad hoc definition for the second Hodge dual operation which is totally unexpected. Therefore, we conclude that at least for the torsion tensor, the observation of Lucas and Pereira only applies to four dimensions.

  3. Holographic entanglement entropy for general higher derivative gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xi

    2014-01-01

    We propose a general formula for calculating the entanglement entropy in theories dual to higher derivative gravity where the Lagrangian is a contraction of Riemann tensors. Our formula consists of Wald's formula for the black hole entropy, as well as corrections involving the extrinsic curvature. We derive these corrections by noting that they arise from naively higher order contributions to the action which are enhanced due to would-be logarithmic divergences. Our formula reproduces the Jacobson-Myers entropy in the context of Lovelock gravity, and agrees with existing results for general four-derivative gravity. We emphasize that the formula should be evaluated on a particular bulk surface whose location can in principle be determined by solving the equations of motion with conical boundary conditions. This may be difficult in practice, and an alternative method is desirable. A natural prescription is simply minimizing our formula, analogous to the Ryu-Takayanagi prescription for Einstein gravity. We show that this is correct in several examples including Lovelock and general four-derivative gravity.

  4. Cosmology of generalized modified gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Sean M.; de Felice, Antonio; Duvvuri, Vikram; Easson, Damien A.; Trodden, Mark; Turner, Michael S.

    2005-03-01

    We consider general curvature-invariant modifications of the Einstein-Hilbert action that become important only in regions of extremely low space-time curvature. We investigate the far future evolution of the Universe in such models, examining the possibilities for cosmic acceleration and other ultimate destinies. The models generically possess de Sitter space as an unstable solution and exhibit an interesting set of attractor solutions which, in some cases, provide alternatives to dark energy models.

  5. Holographic entanglement entropy for the most general higher derivative gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Rong-Xin; Guo, Wu-zhong

    2015-08-01

    The holographic entanglement entropy for the most general higher derivative gravity is investigated. We find a new type of Wald entropy, which appears on entangling surface without the rotational symmetry and reduces to usual Wald entropy on Killing horizon. Furthermore, we obtain a formal formula of HEE for the most general higher derivative gravity and work it out exactly for some squashed cones. As an important application, we derive HEE for gravitational action with one derivative of the curvature when the extrinsic curvature vanishes. We also study some toy models with non-zero extrinsic curvature. We prove that our formula yields the correct universal term of entanglement entropy for 4d CFTs. Furthermore, we solve the puzzle raised by Hung, Myers and Smolkin that the logarithmic term of entanglement entropy derived from Weyl anomaly of CFTs does not match the holographic result even if the extrinsic curvature vanishes. We find that such mismatch comes from the `anomaly of entropy' of the derivative of curvature. After considering such contributions carefully, we resolve the puzzle successfully. In general, we need to fix the splitting problem for the conical metrics in order to derive the holographic entanglement entropy. We find that, at least for Einstein gravity, the splitting problem can be fixed by using equations of motion. How to derive the splittings for higher derivative gravity is a non-trivial and open question. For simplicity, we ignore the splitting problem in this paper and find that it does not affect our main results.

  6. The Gravity Probe B test of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everitt, C. W. F.; Muhlfelder, B.; DeBra, D. B.; Parkinson, B. W.; Turneaure, J. P.; Silbergleit, A. S.; Acworth, E. B.; Adams, M.; Adler, R.; Bencze, W. J.; Berberian, J. E.; Bernier, R. J.; Bower, K. A.; Brumley, R. W.; Buchman, S.; Burns, K.; Clarke, B.; Conklin, J. W.; Eglington, M. L.; Green, G.; Gutt, G.; Gwo, D. H.; Hanuschak, G.; He, X.; Heifetz, M. I.; Hipkins, D. N.; Holmes, T. J.; Kahn, R. A.; Keiser, G. M.; Kozaczuk, J. A.; Langenstein, T.; Li, J.; Lipa, J. A.; Lockhart, J. M.; Luo, M.; Mandel, I.; Marcelja, F.; Mester, J. C.; Ndili, A.; Ohshima, Y.; Overduin, J.; Salomon, M.; Santiago, D. I.; Shestople, P.; Solomonik, V. G.; Stahl, K.; Taber, M.; Van Patten, R. A.; Wang, S.; Wade, J. R.; Worden, P. W., Jr.; Bartel, N.; Herman, L.; Lebach, D. E.; Ratner, M.; Ransom, R. R.; Shapiro, I. I.; Small, H.; Stroozas, B.; Geveden, R.; Goebel, J. H.; Horack, J.; Kolodziejczak, J.; Lyons, A. J.; Olivier, J.; Peters, P.; Smith, M.; Till, W.; Wooten, L.; Reeve, W.; Anderson, M.; Bennett, N. R.; Burns, K.; Dougherty, H.; Dulgov, P.; Frank, D.; Huff, L. W.; Katz, R.; Kirschenbaum, J.; Mason, G.; Murray, D.; Parmley, R.; Ratner, M. I.; Reynolds, G.; Rittmuller, P.; Schweiger, P. F.; Shehata, S.; Triebes, K.; VandenBeukel, J.; Vassar, R.; Al-Saud, T.; Al-Jadaan, A.; Al-Jibreen, H.; Al-Meshari, M.; Al-Suwaidan, B.

    2015-11-01

    The Gravity Probe B mission provided two new quantitative tests of Einstein’s theory of gravity, general relativity (GR), by cryogenic gyroscopes in Earth’s orbit. Data from four gyroscopes gave a geodetic drift-rate of -6601.8 ± 18.3 marc-s yr-1 and a frame-dragging of -37.2 ± 7.2 marc-s yr-1, to be compared with GR predictions of -6606.1 and -39.2 marc-s yr-1 (1 marc-s = 4.848 × 10-9 radians). The present paper introduces the science, engineering, data analysis, and heritage of Gravity Probe B, detailed in the accompanying 20 CQG papers.

  7. General covariance in quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point

    SciTech Connect

    Horava, Petr; Melby-Thompson, Charles M.

    2010-09-15

    In the minimal formulation of gravity with Lifshitz-type anisotropic scaling, the gauge symmetries of the system are foliation-preserving diffeomorphisms of spacetime. Consequently, compared to general relativity, the spectrum contains an extra scalar graviton polarization. Here we investigate the possibility of extending the gauge group by a local U(1) symmetry to 'nonrelativistic general covariance'. This extended gauge symmetry eliminates the scalar graviton, and forces the coupling constant {lambda} in the kinetic term of the minimal formulation to take its relativistic value, {lambda}=1. The resulting theory exhibits anisotropic scaling at short distances, and reproduces many features of general relativity at long distances.

  8. Generalizations of teleparallel gravity and local Lorentz symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Barrow, John D.; Li Baojiu

    2011-05-15

    We analyze the relation between teleparallelism and local Lorentz invariance. We show that generic modifications of the teleparallel equivalent to general relativity will not respect local Lorentz symmetry. We clarify the reasons for this and explain why the situation is different in general relativity. We give a prescription for constructing teleparallel equivalents for known theories. We also explicitly consider a recently proposed class of generalized teleparallel theories, called f(T) theories of gravity, and show why restoring local Lorentz symmetry in such theories cannot lead to sensible dynamics, even if one gives up teleparallelism.

  9. Generalized massive gravity in AdS{sub 3} spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yan; Sun Yawen

    2009-06-15

    In this note we investigate the generalized massive gravity in asymptotically AdS{sub 3} spacetime by combining the two mass terms of topological massive gravity and new massive gravity theory. We study the linearized excitations around the AdS{sub 3} background and find that at a specific value of a certain combination of the two mass parameters (chiral line), one of the massive graviton solutions becomes the left-moving massless mode. It is shown that the theory is chiral at this line under Brown-Henneaux boundary condition. Because of this degeneration of the gravitons the new log solution which has a logarithmic asymptotic behavior is also a solution to this gravity theory at the chiral line. The log boundary condition which was proposed to accommodate this log solution is proved to be consistent at this chiral line. The resulting theory is no longer chiral except at a special point on the chiral line, where another new solution with log-square asymptotic behavior exists. At this special point, we prove that a new kind of boundary condition called log-square boundary condition, which accommodates this new solution, can be consistent.

  10. Matter instabilities in general Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    De Felice, Antonio; Tsujikawa, Shinji; Mota, David F.

    2010-01-15

    We study the evolution of cosmological perturbations in f(G) gravity, where the Lagrangian is the sum of a Ricci scalar R and an arbitrary function f in terms of a Gauss-Bonnet term G. We derive the equations for perturbations assuming matter to be described by a perfect fluid with a constant equation of state w. We show that density perturbations in perfect fluids exhibit negative instabilities during both the radiation and the matter domination, irrespective of the form of f(G). This growth of perturbations gets stronger on smaller scales, which is difficult to be compatible with the observed galaxy spectrum unless the deviation from general relativity is very small. Thus f(G) cosmological models are effectively ruled out from this ultraviolet instability, even though they can be compatible with the late-time cosmic acceleration and local gravity constraints.

  11. Generalized quantum gravity condensates for homogeneous geometries and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriti, Daniele; Pranzetti, Daniele; Ryan, James P.; Sindoni, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    We construct a generalized class of quantum gravity condensate states that allows the description of continuum homogeneous quantum geometries within the full theory. They are based on similar ideas already applied to extract effective cosmological dynamics from the group field theory formalism, and thus also from loop quantum gravity. However, they represent an improvement over the simplest condensates used in the literature, in that they are defined by an infinite superposition of graph-based states encoding in a precise way the topology of the spatial manifold. The construction is based on the definition of refinement operators on spin network states, written in a second quantized language. The construction also lends itself easily to application to the case of spherically symmetric quantum geometries.

  12. Testing general metric theories of gravity with bursting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2008-03-01

    I show that several observable properties of bursting neutron stars in metric theories of gravity can be calculated using only conservation laws, Killing symmetries, and the Einstein equivalence principle, without requiring the validity of the general relativistic field equations. I calculate, in particular, the gravitational redshift of a surface atomic line, the touchdown luminosity of a radius-expansion burst, which is believed to be equal to the Eddington critical luminosity, and the apparent surface area of a neutron star as measured during the cooling tails of bursts. I show that, for a general metric theory of gravity, the apparent surface area of a neutron star depends on the coordinate radius of the stellar surface and on its gravitational redshift in the exact same way as in general relativity. On the other hand, the Eddington critical luminosity depends also on an additional parameter that measures the degree to which the general relativistic field equations are satisfied. These results can be used in conjunction with current and future high-energy observations of bursting neutron stars to test general relativity in the strong-field regime.

  13. Testing general metric theories of gravity with bursting neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2008-03-15

    I show that several observable properties of bursting neutron stars in metric theories of gravity can be calculated using only conservation laws, Killing symmetries, and the Einstein equivalence principle, without requiring the validity of the general relativistic field equations. I calculate, in particular, the gravitational redshift of a surface atomic line, the touchdown luminosity of a radius-expansion burst, which is believed to be equal to the Eddington critical luminosity, and the apparent surface area of a neutron star as measured during the cooling tails of bursts. I show that, for a general metric theory of gravity, the apparent surface area of a neutron star depends on the coordinate radius of the stellar surface and on its gravitational redshift in the exact same way as in general relativity. On the other hand, the Eddington critical luminosity depends also on an additional parameter that measures the degree to which the general relativistic field equations are satisfied. These results can be used in conjunction with current and future high-energy observations of bursting neutron stars to test general relativity in the strong-field regime.

  14. General static spherically symmetric solutions in Horava gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Capasso, Dario; Polychronakos, Alexios P.

    2010-04-15

    We derive the equations describing a general static spherically symmetric configuration for the softly broken Horava gravity introduced by A. Kehagias and K. Sfetsos with nonzero shift field and no-projectability condition. These represent 'hedgehog' versions of black holes with radial 'hair' arising from the shift field. For the case of the standard de Witt kinetic term ({lambda}=1) there is an infinity of solutions that exhibit a deformed version of reparametrization invariance away from the general relativistic limit. Special solutions also arise in the anisotropic conformal point {lambda}=(1/3). Moreover we obtain an implicit general expression for the solutions with N{sub r}=0 and generic {lambda}. In this context we study the presence of horizons for standard matter and the related Hawking temperature, generalizing the corresponding relations in the usual static spherically symmetric case.

  15. Black hole hair in generalized scalar-tensor gravity.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Thomas P; Zhou, Shuang-Yong

    2014-06-27

    The most general action for a scalar field coupled to gravity that leads to second-order field equations for both the metric and the scalar--Horndeski's theory--is considered, with the extra assumption that the scalar satisfies shift symmetry. We show that in such theories, the scalar field is forced to have a nontrivial configuration in black hole spacetimes, unless one carefully tunes away a linear coupling with the Gauss-Bonnet invariant. Hence, black holes for generic theories in this class will have hair. This contradicts a recent no-hair theorem which seems to have overlooked the presence of this coupling. PMID:25014801

  16. Black Hole Hair in Generalized Scalar-Tensor Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Zhou, Shuang-Yong

    2014-06-01

    The most general action for a scalar field coupled to gravity that leads to second-order field equations for both the metric and the scalar—Horndeski's theory—is considered, with the extra assumption that the scalar satisfies shift symmetry. We show that in such theories, the scalar field is forced to have a nontrivial configuration in black hole spacetimes, unless one carefully tunes away a linear coupling with the Gauss-Bonnet invariant. Hence, black holes for generic theories in this class will have hair. This contradicts a recent no-hair theorem which seems to have overlooked the presence of this coupling.

  17. Black hole hair in generalized scalar-tensor gravity.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Thomas P; Zhou, Shuang-Yong

    2014-06-27

    The most general action for a scalar field coupled to gravity that leads to second-order field equations for both the metric and the scalar--Horndeski's theory--is considered, with the extra assumption that the scalar satisfies shift symmetry. We show that in such theories, the scalar field is forced to have a nontrivial configuration in black hole spacetimes, unless one carefully tunes away a linear coupling with the Gauss-Bonnet invariant. Hence, black holes for generic theories in this class will have hair. This contradicts a recent no-hair theorem which seems to have overlooked the presence of this coupling.

  18. Generalized massive gravity in arbitrary dimensions and its Hamiltonian formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qing-Guo; Zhang, Ke-Chao; Zhou, Shuang-Yong E-mail: zkc@itp.ac.cn

    2013-08-01

    We extend the four-dimensional de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity model to a general scalar massive-tensor theory in arbitrary dimensions, coupling a dRGT massive graviton to multiple scalars and allowing for generic kinetic and mass matrix mixing between the massive graviton and the scalars, and derive its Hamiltonian formulation and associated constraint system. When passing to the Hamiltonian formulation, two different sectors arise: a general sector and a special sector. Although obtained via different ways, there are two second class constraints in either of the two sectors, eliminating the BD ghost. However, for the special sector, there are still ghost instabilities except for the case of two dimensions. In particular, for the special sector with one scalar, there is a ''second BD ghost''.

  19. Cosmological perturbations of unimodular gravity and general relativity are identical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Abhishek; Fabre, Ophélia; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2016-10-01

    Unimodular gravity (UG) is a restricted version of general relativity (GR) in which the variation of the metric determinant is set to zero and the field equations are given by the trace-free part of the full Einstein equations. The background equations in UG and GR are identical. It was recently claimed that the first order contribution in the temperature fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) in UG is different from GR. In this work, we calculate the first order perturbation equations in UG and show that the Sachs-Wolfe effect in UG, in terms of gauge invariant variables, is identical to GR. We also show that the second order perturbation equation of Mukhanov-Sasaki variable in UG, is identical to GR. The only difference comes from the gauge choices due the constraint on the metric determinant. Hence, UG and GR are identical and indistinguishable in CMB data on large scales.

  20. General polytropic magnetohydrodynamic cylinder under self-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yu-Qing; Xing, Heng-Rui

    2016-02-01

    Based on general polytropic (GP) magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), we offer a self-similar dynamic formalism for a magnetized, infinitely long, axially uniform cylinder of axisymmetry under self-gravity with radial and axial flows and with helical magnetic field. We identify two major classes of solution domains and obtain a few valuable MHD integrals in general. We focus on one class that has the freedom of prescribing a GP dynamic equation of state including the isothermal limit and derive analytic asymptotic solutions for illustration. In particular, we re-visit the isothermal MHD problem of Tilley & Pudritz (TP) and find that TP's main conclusion regarding the MHD solution behaviour for a strong ring magnetic field of constant toroidal flux-to-mass ratio Γϕ to be incorrect. As this is important for conceptual scenarios, MHD cylinder models, testing numerical codes and potential observational diagnostics of magnetized filaments in various astrophysical contexts, we show comprehensive theoretical analysis and reasons as well as extensive numerical results to clarify pertinent points in this Letter. In short, for any given Γϕ value be it small or large, the asymptotic radial scaling of the reduced mass density α(x) at sufficiently large x should always be ˜x-4 instead of ˜x-2 contrary to the major claim of TP.

  1. Cosmological evolution of generalized non-local gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue; Wu, Ya-Bo; Li, Song; Liu, Yu-Chen; Chen, Bo-Hai; Chai, Yun-Tian; Shu, Shuang

    2016-07-01

    We construct a class of generalized non-local gravity (GNLG) model which is the modified theory of general relativity (GR) obtained by adding a term m2n‑2 R□‑nR to the Einstein-Hilbert action. Concretely, we not only study the gravitational equation for the GNLG model by introducing auxiliary scalar fields, but also analyse the classical stability and examine the cosmological consequences of the model for different exponent n. We find that the half of the scalar fields are always ghost-like and the exponent n must be taken even number for a stable GNLG model. Meanwhile, the model spontaneously generates three dominant phases of the evolution of the universe, and the equation of state parameters turn out to be phantom-like. Furthermore, we clarify in another way that exponent n should be even numbers by the spherically symmetric static solutions in Newtonian gauge. It is worth stressing that the results given by us can include ones in refs. [28, 34] as the special case of n=2.

  2. General polytropic dynamic cylinder under self-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yu-Qing

    2015-12-01

    We explore self-similar hydrodynamics of general polytropic (GP) and isothermal cylinders of infinite length with axial uniformity and axisymmetry under self-gravity. Specific entropy conservation along streamlines serves as the dynamic equation of state. Together with possible axial flows, we construct classes of analytic and semi-analytic non-linear dynamic solutions for either cylindrical expansion or contraction radially by solving cylindrical Lane-Emden equations. By extensive numerical explorations and fitting trials in reference to asymptotes derived for large index n, we infer several convenient empirical formulae for characteristic solution properties of cylindrical Lane-Emden equations in terms of n values. A new type of asymptotic solutions for small x is also derived in the Appendix. These analyses offer hints for self-similar dynamic evolution of molecular filaments for forming protostars, brown dwarfs and gaseous planets and of large-scale gaseous arms or starburst rings in (barred) spiral galaxies for forming young massive stars. Such dynamic solutions are necessary starting background for further three-dimensional (in)stability analysis of various modes. They may be used to initialize numerical simulations and serve as important benchmarks for testing numerical codes. Such GP formalism can be further generalized to include magnetic field for a GP magnetohydrodynamic analysis.

  3. Cosmological evolution of generalized non-local gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue; Wu, Ya-Bo; Li, Song; Liu, Yu-Chen; Chen, Bo-Hai; Chai, Yun-Tian; Shu, Shuang

    2016-07-01

    We construct a class of generalized non-local gravity (GNLG) model which is the modified theory of general relativity (GR) obtained by adding a term m2n-2 R□-nR to the Einstein-Hilbert action. Concretely, we not only study the gravitational equation for the GNLG model by introducing auxiliary scalar fields, but also analyse the classical stability and examine the cosmological consequences of the model for different exponent n. We find that the half of the scalar fields are always ghost-like and the exponent n must be taken even number for a stable GNLG model. Meanwhile, the model spontaneously generates three dominant phases of the evolution of the universe, and the equation of state parameters turn out to be phantom-like. Furthermore, we clarify in another way that exponent n should be even numbers by the spherically symmetric static solutions in Newtonian gauge. It is worth stressing that the results given by us can include ones in refs. [28, 34] as the special case of n=2.

  4. Some Properties of Generalized Connections in Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velhinho, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    Theories of connections play an important role in fundamental interactions, including Yang-Mills theories and gravity in the Ashtekar formulation. Typically in such cases, the classical configuration space {A}/ {G} of connections modulo gauge transformations is an infinite dimensional non-linear space of great complexity. Having in mind a rigorous quantization procedure, methods of functional calculus in an extension of {A}/ {G} have been developed. For a compact gauge group G, the compact space /line { {A}{ {/}} {G}} ( ⊃ {A}/ {G}) introduced by Ashtekar and Isham using C*-algebraic methods is a natural candidate to replace {A}/ {G} in the quantum context, 1 allowing the construction of diffeomorphism invariant measures. 2,3,4 Equally important is the space of generalized connections bar {A} introduced in a similar way by Baez. 5 bar {A} is particularly useful for the definition of vector fields in /line { {A}{ {/}} {G}} , fundamental in the construction of quantum observables. 6 These works crucially depend on the use of (generalized) Wilson variables associated to certain types of curves. We will consider the case of piecewise analytic curves, 1,2,5 althought most of the arguments apply equally to the piecewise smooth case. 7,8...

  5. Dynamical aspects of generalized Palatini theories of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Sanchis-Alepuz, Helios; Tripathi, Swapnil

    2009-07-15

    We study the field equations of modified theories of gravity in which the Lagrangian is a general function of the Ricci scalar and Ricci-squared terms in Palatini formalism. We show that the independent connection can be expressed as the Levi-Civita connection of an auxiliary metric which, in particular cases of interest, is related with the physical metric by means of a disformal transformation. This relation between physical and auxiliary metric boils down to a conformal transformation in the case of f(R) theories. We also show with explicit models that the inclusion of Ricci-squared terms in the action can impose upper bounds on the accessible values of pressure and density, which might have important consequences for the early time cosmology and black hole formation scenarios. Our results indicate that the phenomenology of f(R,R{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}R{sup {mu}}{sup {nu}}) theories is much richer than that of f(R) and f(R{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}R{sup {mu}}{sup {nu}}) theories and that they also share some similarities with Bekenstein's relativistic theory of MOND.

  6. Generalized second law of thermodynamics in f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Karami, K.; Abdolmaleki, A. E-mail: AAbdolmaleki@uok.ac.ir

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the validity of the generalized second law (GSL) of gravitational thermodynamics in the framework of f(T) modified teleparallel gravity. We consider a spatially flat FRW universe containing only the pressureless matter. The boundary of the universe is assumed to be enclosed by the Hubble horizon. For two viable f(T) models containing f(T) = T+μ{sub 1}((−T)){sup n} and f(T) = T−μ{sub 2}T(1−e{sup βT{sub 0}/T}), we first calculate the effective equation of state and deceleration parameters. Then, (we investigate the null and strong energy conditions and conclude that a sudden future singularity appears in both models. Furthermore, using a cosmographic analysis we check the viability of two models. Finally, we examine the validity of the GSL and find that for both models it) is satisfied from the early times to the present epoch. But in the future, the GSL is violated for the special ranges of the torsion scalar T.

  7. Dynamical aspects of generalized Palatini theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Sanchis-Alepuz, Hèlios; Tripathi, Swapnil

    2009-07-01

    We study the field equations of modified theories of gravity in which the Lagrangian is a general function of the Ricci scalar and Ricci-squared terms in Palatini formalism. We show that the independent connection can be expressed as the Levi-Cività connection of an auxiliary metric which, in particular cases of interest, is related with the physical metric by means of a disformal transformation. This relation between physical and auxiliary metric boils down to a conformal transformation in the case of f(R) theories. We also show with explicit models that the inclusion of Ricci-squared terms in the action can impose upper bounds on the accessible values of pressure and density, which might have important consequences for the early time cosmology and black hole formation scenarios. Our results indicate that the phenomenology of f(R,RμνRμν) theories is much richer than that of f(R) and f(RμνRμν) theories and that they also share some similarities with Bekenstein’s relativistic theory of MOND.

  8. Nonlinear structure formation in gravity theories beyond general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, David F.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the effects of modified gravity theories, in particular, the symmetron and f(R) gravity, on the nonlinear regime of structure formation. In particular, we investigate the velocity dispersion of galaxy clusters as a function of the halo masses, how the matter power spectra depend on the coupling, range and screening scale of the fifth force, and on possible ways of detecting violations of the equivalence principle using the mass inferred via lensing methods versus the mass inferred via dynamical methods.

  9. Tests of general relativity in earth orbit using a superconducting gravity gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1989-01-01

    Interesting new tests of general relativity could be performed in earth orbit using a sensitive superconducting gravity gradiometer under development. Two such experiments are discussed here: a null test of the tracelessness of the Riemann tensor and detection of the Lense-Thirring term in the earth's gravity field. The gravity gradient signals in various spacecraft orientations are derived, and dominant error sources in each experimental setting are discussed. The instrument, spacecraft, and orbit requirements imposed by the experiments are derived.

  10. Extended slow-roll conditions and primordial fluctuations: multiple scalar fields and generalized gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Masahide E-mail: gucci@phys.aoyama.ac.jp

    2009-01-15

    As an extension of our previous study, we derive slow-roll conditions for multiple scalar fields which are non-minimally coupled with gravity and for generalized gravity theories of the form f({phi}, R). We provide simple formulae of the spectral indices of scalar/tensor perturbations in terms of the slow-roll parameters.

  11. Acausality and nonunique evolution in generalized teleparallel gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Keisuke; Gu, Je-An; Ong, Yen Chin

    2014-04-01

    We show the existence of physical superluminal modes and acausality in the Brans-Dicke type of extension of teleparallel gravity that includes F(T) gravity and teleparallel dark energy as special cases. We derive the characteristic hypersurface for the extra degrees of freedom in the theory, thereby showing that the time evolution is not unique and closed causal curves can appear. Furthermore, we present a concrete disastrous solution in Bianchi type I spacetime, in which the anisotropy in expansion can be any function of time, and thus anisotropy can emerge suddenly, a simple demonstration that the theory is physically problematic.

  12. Generalized guidance equation for peaked quantum solitons and effective gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durt, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Bouncing oil droplets have been shown to follow de Broglie-Bohm–like trajectories and at the same time they exhibit attractive and repulsive pseudo-gravitation. We propose a model aimed at rendering account of these phenomenological observations. It inspires, in a more speculative approach, a toy model for quantum gravity.

  13. General proof of the entropy principle for self-gravitating fluid in f ( R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiongjun; Guo, Minyong; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-08-01

    The discussions on the connection between gravity and thermodynamics attract much attention recently. We consider a static self-gravitating perfect fluid system in f ( R) gravity, which is an important theory could explain the accelerated expansion of the universe. We first show that the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation of f ( R) theories can be obtained by thermodynamical method in spherical symmetric spacetime. Then we prove that the maximum entropy principle is also valid for f ( R) gravity in general static spacetimes beyond spherical symmetry. The result shows that if the constraint equation is satisfied and the temperature of fluid obeys Tolmans law, the extrema of total entropy implies other components of gravitational equations. Conversely, if f ( R) gravitational equation hold, the total entropy of the fluid should be extremum. Our work suggests a general and solid connection between f ( R) gravity and thermodynamics.

  14. Cosmology for quadratic gravity in generalized Weyl geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán Jiménez, Jose; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Koivisto, Tomi S.

    2016-04-01

    A class of vector-tensor theories arises naturally in the framework of quadratic gravity in spacetimes with linear vector distortion. Requiring the absence of ghosts for the vector field imposes an interesting condition on the allowed connections with vector distortion: the resulting one-parameter family of connections generalises the usual Weyl geometry with polar torsion. The cosmology of this class of theories is studied, focusing on isotropic solutions wherein the vector field is dominated by the temporal component. De Sitter attractors are found and inhomogeneous perturbations around such backgrounds are analysed. In particular, further constraints on the models are imposed by excluding pathologies in the scalar, vector and tensor fluctuations. Various exact background solutions are presented, describing a constant and an evolving dark energy, a bounce and a self-tuning de Sitter phase. However, the latter two scenarios are not viable under a closer scrutiny.

  15. Cosmological viability of massive gravity with generalized matter coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Adam R.; Enander, Jonas; Akrami, Yashar; Koivisto, Tomi S.; Könnig, Frank; Mörtsell, Edvard

    2015-04-01

    There is a no-go theorem forbidding flat and closed FLRW solutions in massive gravity on a flat reference metric, while open solutions are unstable. Recently it was shown that this no-go theorem can be overcome if at least some matter couples to a hybrid metric composed of both the dynamical and the fixed reference metric. We show that this is not compatible with the standard description of cosmological sources in terms of effective perfect fluids, and the predictions of the theory become sensitive either to the detailed field-theoretical modelling of the matter content or to the presence of additional dark degrees of freedom. This is a serious practical complication. Furthermore, we demonstrate that viable cosmological background evolution with a perfect fluid appears to require the presence of fields with highly contrived properties. This could be improved if the equivalence principle is broken by coupling only some of the fields to the composite metric, but viable self-accelerating solutions due only to the massive graviton are difficult to obtain.

  16. Generalized sums over histories for quantum gravity (II). Simplicial conifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleich, Kristin; Witt, Donald M.

    1993-08-01

    This paper examines the issues involved with concretely implementing a sum over conifolds in the formulation of euclidean sums over histories for gravity. The first step in precisely formulating any sum over topological spaces is that one must have an algorithmically implementable method of generating a list of all spaces in the set to be summed over. This requirement causes well known problems in the formulation of sums over manifolds in four or more dimensions; there is no algorithmic method of determining whether or not a topological space is an n-manifold in five or more dimensions and the issue of whether or not such an algorithm exists is open in four. However, as this paper shows, conifolds are algorithmically decidable in four dimensions. Thus the set of 4-conifolds provides a starting point for a concrete implementation of euclidean sums over histories in four dimensions. Explicit algorithms for summing over various sets of 4-conifolds are presented in the context of Regge calculus.

  17. The Mø ller Energy Complexes of Various Wormholes in General Relativity and Teleparallel Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygün, Melis; Yilmaz, Ihsan

    2007-08-01

    This study is aimed to elaborate the energy problem of general wormhole space-times in two different approaches of gravity such as general relativity and teleparallel gravity. In this connection, the energy for well-known wormhole space-times is evaluated using Møller energy-momentum prescription in these different approximations. We obtained that energy distributions of Møller definition give the same results for various wormhole space-times in general relativity (GR) and teleparallel gravity (TG). The results strengthen the importance of Møller energy-momentum definitions in given space-times and viewpoint of Lessner that Møller energy-momentum complex is a powerful concept for energy and momentum.

  18. Kludge modified gravity inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms: Testing gravitational-wave tests of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Samajdar, Anuradha; Ajith, Parameswaran; Del Pozzo, Walter

    2016-03-01

    We describe a variety of self-consistent modifications of the effective-one-body framework that yield kludge modified gravity inspiral-merger-ringdown (IMR) waveforms. These waveforms do not correspond to any particular modified theory of gravity, but offer parametrized deviations from general relativity in various regimes. They can thus be used to test the performance of various gravitational wave tests of general relativity (GR). As an example, we introduce the IMR consistency test, which tests for consistency between the estimations of the final mass and spin from the inspiral and merger-ringdown portions of a binary black hole waveform. We show that for reasonable source parameters and SNRs in Advanced LIGO, this test is able to detect a deviation from GR with high confidence for certain modifications of the GR energy flux that are not constrained by observations of the double pulsar. We also consider the performance of a parameterized test of GR on these kludge modified gravity waveforms.

  19. Galileons coupled to massive gravity: general analysis and cosmological solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Goon, Garrett; Trodden, Mark; Gümrükçüoğlu, A. Emir; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Mukohyama, Shinji E-mail: Emir.Gumrukcuoglu@nottingham.ac.uk E-mail: shinji.mukohyama@ipmu.jp

    2014-08-01

    We further develop the framework for coupling galileons and Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) scalar fields to a massive graviton while retaining both the non-linear symmetries of the scalars and ghost-freedom of the theory. The general construction is recast in terms of vielbeins which simplifies calculations and allows for compact expressions. Expressions for the general form of the action are derived, with special emphasis on those models which descend from maximally symmetric spaces. We demonstrate the existence of maximally symmetric solutions to the fully non-linear theory and analyze their spectrum of quadratic fluctuations. Finally, we consider self-accelerating cosmological solutions and study their perturbations, showing that the vector and scalar modes have vanishing kinetic terms.

  20. General structure of the gravitational equations of motion in conformal Weyl gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes; Mannheim, Philip D.

    1991-01-01

    A general method for determining the structure of the gravitational equations of motion is presented in the fourth-order theory of gravity based on local conformal Weyl invariance of the gravitational action. The explicit structure for these equations is given for a time-dependent, spherically symmetric geometry.

  1. CPT symmetry and antimatter gravity in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villata, M.

    2011-04-01

    The gravitational behavior of antimatter is still unknown. While we may be confident that antimatter is self-attractive, the interaction between matter and antimatter might be either attractive or repulsive. We investigate this issue on theoretical grounds. Starting from the CPT invariance of physical laws, we transform matter into antimatter in the equations of both electrodynamics and gravitation. In the former case, the result is the well-known change of sign of the electric charge. In the latter, we find that the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter is a mutual repulsion, i.e. antigravity appears as a prediction of general relativity when CPT is applied. This result supports cosmological models attempting to explain the Universe accelerated expansion in terms of a matter-antimatter repulsive interaction.

  2. Modified gravity: the CMB, weak lensing and general parameterisations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Shaun A.; Appleby, Stephen A.; Weller, Jochen E-mail: stephen.appleby@ph.tum.de

    2011-03-01

    We examine general physical parameterisations for viable gravitational models in the f(R) framework. This is related to the mass of an additional scalar field, called the scalaron, that is introduced by the theories. Using a simple parameterisation for the scalaron mass M(a) we show there is an exact correspondence between the model and popular parameterisations of the modified Poisson equation μ(a,k) and the ratio of the Newtonian potentials η(a,k). We argue that although f(R) models are well described by the general [μ(a,k),η(a,k)] parameterization, specific functional forms of μ,η in the literature do not accurately represent f(R) behaviour, specifically at low redshift. We subsequently construct an improved description for the scalaron mass (and therefore μ(a,k) and η(a,k)) which captures their essential features and has benefits derived from a more physical origin. We study the scalaron's observational signatures and show the modification to the background Friedmann equation and CMB power spectrum to be small. We also investigate its effects in the linear and non linear matter power spectrum-where the signatures are evident-thus giving particular importance to weak lensing as a probe of these models. Using this new form, we demonstrate how the next generation Euclid survey will constrain these theories and its complementarity to current solar system tests. In the most optimistic case Euclid, together with a Planck prior, can constrain a fiducial scalaron mass M{sub 0} = 9.4 × 10{sup −30}eV at the ∼ 20% level. However, the decay rate of the scalaron mass, with fiducial value ν = 1.5, can be constrained to ∼ 3% uncertainty.

  3. Thermodynamic interpretation of the generalized gravity models with geometry-matter coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu

    2014-08-01

    Modified gravity theories with geometry-matter coupling, in which the action is an arbitrary function of the Ricci scalar and the matter Lagrangian [f(R,Lm) gravity], and of the Ricci scalar and of the trace of the matter energy-momentum tensor [f(R,T) gravity], respectively, have the intriguing property that the divergence of the matter energy-momentum tensor is nonzero. In the present paper, by using the formalism of open thermodynamic systems, we interpret the generalized conservation equations in these gravitational theories from a thermodynamic point of view as describing irreversible matter creation processes, which could be validated by fundamental particle physics. Thus particle creation corresponds to an irreversible energy flow from the gravitational field to the created matter constituents, with the second law of thermodynamics requiring that space-time transforms into matter. The equivalent particle number creation rates, the creation pressure and the entropy production rates are obtained for both f(R,Lm) and f(R,T) gravity theories. The temperature evolution laws of the newly created particles are also obtained. In the case of the f(R,T) gravity theory the open irreversible thermodynamic interpretation of a simple cosmological model is presented in detail. It is also shown that due to the geometry-matter coupling, during the cosmological evolution a large amount of comoving entropy could be produced.

  4. Plebanski-like action for general relativity and anti-self-dual gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celada, Mariano; González, Diego; Montesinos, Merced

    2016-05-01

    We present a new B F -type action for complex general relativity with or without a cosmological constant resembling Plebanski's action, which depends on an SO (3 ,C ) connection, a set of 2-forms, a symmetric matrix, and a 4-form. However, it differs from the Plebanski formulation in the way that the symmetric matrix enters into the action. The advantage of this fact is twofold. First, as compared to Plebanski's action, the symmetric matrix can now be integrated out, which leads to a pure B F -type action principle for general relativity; the canonical analysis of the new action then shows that it has the same phase space of the Ashtekar formalism up to a canonical transformation induced by a topological term. Second, a particular choice of the parameters involved in the formulation produces a B F -type action principle describing conformally anti-self-dual gravity. Therefore, the new action unifies both general relativity and anti-self-dual gravity.

  5. Equivalence of black hole thermodynamics between a generalized theory of gravity and the Einstein theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Jun-Ichirou; Maeda, Kei-Ichi

    1998-09-01

    We analyze black hole thermodynamics in a generalized theory of gravity whose Lagrangian is an arbitrary function of the metric, the Ricci tensor, and a scalar field. We can convert the theory into the Einstein frame via a ``Legendre'' transformation or a conformal transformation. We calculate thermodynamical variables both in the original frame and in the Einstein frame, following the Iyer-Wald definition which satisfies the first law of thermodynamics. We show that all thermodynamical variables defined in the original frame are the same as those in the Einstein frame, if the spacetimes in both frames are asymptotically flat, regular, and possess event horizons with nonzero temperatures. This result may be useful to study whether the second law is still valid in the generalized theory of gravity.

  6. Generalized second law of thermodynamics in f(R,T) theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, D.; Moraes, P. H. R. S.; Myrzakulov, R.

    2016-07-01

    We present a study of the generalized second law of thermodynamics in the scope of the f(R,T) theory of gravity, with R and T representing the Ricci scalar and trace of the energy-momentum tensor, respectively. From the energy-momentum tensor equation for the f(R,T)=R+f(T) case, we calculate the form of the geometric entropy in such a theory. Then, the generalized second law of thermodynamics is quantified and some relations for its obedience in f(R,T) gravity are presented. Those relations depend on some cosmological quantities, as the Hubble and deceleration parameters, and also on the form of f(T).

  7. Coherent states, quantum gravity, and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. I. General considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stottmeister, Alexander; Thiemann, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    This article, as the first of three, aims at establishing the (time-dependent) Born-Oppenheimer approximation, in the sense of space adiabatic perturbation theory, for quantum systems constructed by techniques of the loop quantum gravity framework, especially the canonical formulation of the latter. The analysis presented here fits into a rather general framework and offers a solution to the problem of applying the usual Born-Oppenheimer ansatz for molecular (or structurally analogous) systems to more general quantum systems (e.g., spin-orbit models) by means of space adiabatic perturbation theory. The proposed solution is applied to a simple, finite dimensional model of interacting spin systems, which serves as a non-trivial, minimal model of the aforesaid problem. Furthermore, it is explained how the content of this article and its companion affect the possible extraction of quantum field theory on curved spacetime from loop quantum gravity (including matter fields).

  8. Quantification of the gravity wave forcing of the migrating diurnal tide in a gravity wave-resolving general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shingo; Miyahara, Saburo

    2009-04-01

    The interaction of gravity waves (GWs) and the migrating diurnal tide are studied in a GW-resolving general circulation model (GCM) by calculating the tidal components of zonal wind accelerations and equivalent Rayleigh friction due to tidal induced GW dissipation. Two 15-day periods for perpetual equinoctial and solstice simulations are analyzed, which are performed with the Japanese Atmospheric General circulation model for Upper Atmosphere Research (JAGUAR) high-resolution GCM. The model can directly simulate GWs with horizontal wavelengths greater than about 190 km, and, thus reproduce the general features of the mean winds and temperatures from the surface to the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The amplitudes of the migrating diurnal tide are successfully simulated during both seasons, and the tidal winds affect the altitudes of GW dissipation in the low-latitude MLT. The tidal component of GW forcing has maximal values of about 15 m s-1 d-1 near the maximal vertical shears of the tidal winds and generally works to shorten the vertical wavelength of the migrating diurnal tide. The phase relationship between the tidal winds and the tidal induced GW forcing is not exactly 90° out of phase, causing amplification/suppression of the tide. The GW forcing amplifies the migrating diurnal tide during the equinox, while during the solstice, it suppresses the tidal winds in the upper mesosphere of both hemispheres. This difference in behavior can be attributed to a seasonal variation of the mean zonal winds, because combination of the mean and tidal winds affects the altitudes of GW dissipation.

  9. Tests of General Relativity and Alternative Theories of Gravity Using Gravitational Wave Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, K. G.; Pai, Archana

    2013-01-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) observations of coalescing compact binaries will be unique probes of strong-field, dynamical aspects of relativistic gravity. We present a short review of various schemes proposed in the literature to test general relativity (GR) and alternative theories of gravity using inspiral waveforms. Broadly these schemes may be classified into two types: model dependent and model independent. In the model dependent category, GW observations are compared against a specific waveform model representative of a particular theory or a class of theories such as scalar-tensor theories, dynamical Chern-Simons theory and massive graviton theories. Model independent tests are attempts to write down a parametrized gravitational waveform where the free parameters take different values for different theories and (at least some of) which can be constrained by GW observations. We revisit some of the proposed bounds in the case of downscaled LISA configuration (eLISA) and compare them with the original LISA configuration. We also compare the expected bounds on alternative theories of gravity from ground-based and space-based detectors and find that space-based GW detectors can test GR and other theories of gravity with unprecedented accuracies. We then focus on a recent proposal to use singular value decomposition of the Fisher information matrix to improve the accuracies with which post-Newtonian theory can be tested. We extend those results to the case of space-based detector eLISA and discuss its implications.

  10. Mass bounds for compact spherically symmetric objects in generalized gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burikham, Piyabut; Harko, Tiberiu; Lake, Matthew J.

    2016-09-01

    We derive upper and lower bounds on the mass-radius ratio of stable compact objects in extended gravity theories, in which modifications of the gravitational dynamics via-á-vis standard general relativity are described by an effective contribution to the matter energy-momentum tensor. Our results include the possibility of a variable coupling between the matter sector and the gravitational field and are valid for a large class of generalized gravity models. The generalized continuity and Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations are expressed in terms of the effective mass, density, and pressure, given by the bare values plus additional contributions from the total energy-momentum tensor, and general theoretical limits for the maximum and minimum mass-radius ratios are explicitly obtained. As applications of the formalism developed herein, we consider compact bosonic objects, described by scalar-tensor gravitational theories with self-interacting scalar field potentials, and charged compact objects, respectively. For Higgs-type models, we find that these bounds can be expressed in terms of the value of the potential at the surface of the compact object. Minimizing the energy with respect to the radius, we obtain explicit upper and lower bounds on the mass, which admits a Chandrasekhar-type representation. For charged compact objects, we consider the effects of the Poincaré stresses on the equilibrium structure and obtain bounds on the radial and tangential stresses. As a possible astrophysical test of our results, we obtain the general bound on the gravitational redshift for compact objects in extended gravity theories and explicitly compute the redshift restrictions for objects with nonzero effective surface pressure. General implications of minimum mass bounds for the gravitational stability of fundamental particles and for the existence of holographic duality between bulk and boundary degrees of freedom are also considered.

  11. Generalized information (entanglement) entropies depending on the probability (density matrix), (modified gravity)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obregón, Octavio; Cabo Bizet, Nana Geraldine

    2016-03-01

    Generalized information (entanglement) entropy(ies) that depend only on the probability (the density matrix) will be exhibited. It will be shown that these generalized information entropy(ies) are obtained by means of the superstatistics proposal and they correspond to generalized entanglement entropy(ies) that are at the same time a consequence of generalizing the Replica trick. Following the entropic force formulation, these generalized entropy(ies) provide a modified Newtońs law of gravitation. We discuss the difficulties to get an associated theory of gravity. Moreover, our results show corrections to the von Neumann entropy S0 that are larger than the usual UV ones and also than the corrections to the length dependent AdS3 entropy which result comparable to the UV ones. The correction terms due to the new entropy would modify the Ryu-Takayanagi identification between the CFT and the gravitational AdS3 entropies.

  12. Zebrafish Bone and General Physiology Are Differently Affected by Hormones or Changes in Gravity.

    PubMed

    Aceto, Jessica; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Marée, Raphael; Dardenne, Nadia; Jeanray, Nathalie; Wehenkel, Louis; Aleström, Peter; van Loon, Jack J W A; Muller, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish such as zebrafish (Danio rerio) are increasingly used for physiological, genetic and developmental studies. Our understanding of the physiological consequences of altered gravity in an entire organism is still incomplete. We used altered gravity and drug treatment experiments to evaluate their effects specifically on bone formation and more generally on whole genome gene expression. By combining morphometric tools with an objective scoring system for the state of development for each element in the head skeleton and specific gene expression analysis, we confirmed and characterized in detail the decrease or increase of bone formation caused by a 5 day treatment (from 5dpf to 10 dpf) of, respectively parathyroid hormone (PTH) or vitamin D3 (VitD3). Microarray transcriptome analysis after 24 hours treatment reveals a general effect on physiology upon VitD3 treatment, while PTH causes more specifically developmental effects. Hypergravity (3g from 5dpf to 9 dpf) exposure results in a significantly larger head and a significant increase in bone formation for a subset of the cranial bones. Gene expression analysis after 24 hrs at 3g revealed differential expression of genes involved in the development and function of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine and cardiovascular systems. Finally, we propose a novel type of experimental approach, the "Reduced Gravity Paradigm", by keeping the developing larvae at 3g hypergravity for the first 5 days before returning them to 1g for one additional day. 5 days exposure to 3g during these early stages also caused increased bone formation, while gene expression analysis revealed a central network of regulatory genes (hes5, sox10, lgals3bp, egr1, edn1, fos, fosb, klf2, gadd45ba and socs3a) whose expression was consistently affected by the transition from hyper- to normal gravity.

  13. Zebrafish Bone and General Physiology Are Differently Affected by Hormones or Changes in Gravity

    PubMed Central

    Aceto, Jessica; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Marée, Raphael; Dardenne, Nadia; Jeanray, Nathalie; Wehenkel, Louis; Aleström, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish such as zebrafish (Danio rerio) are increasingly used for physiological, genetic and developmental studies. Our understanding of the physiological consequences of altered gravity in an entire organism is still incomplete. We used altered gravity and drug treatment experiments to evaluate their effects specifically on bone formation and more generally on whole genome gene expression. By combining morphometric tools with an objective scoring system for the state of development for each element in the head skeleton and specific gene expression analysis, we confirmed and characterized in detail the decrease or increase of bone formation caused by a 5 day treatment (from 5dpf to 10 dpf) of, respectively parathyroid hormone (PTH) or vitamin D3 (VitD3). Microarray transcriptome analysis after 24 hours treatment reveals a general effect on physiology upon VitD3 treatment, while PTH causes more specifically developmental effects. Hypergravity (3g from 5dpf to 9 dpf) exposure results in a significantly larger head and a significant increase in bone formation for a subset of the cranial bones. Gene expression analysis after 24 hrs at 3g revealed differential expression of genes involved in the development and function of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine and cardiovascular systems. Finally, we propose a novel type of experimental approach, the "Reduced Gravity Paradigm", by keeping the developing larvae at 3g hypergravity for the first 5 days before returning them to 1g for one additional day. 5 days exposure to 3g during these early stages also caused increased bone formation, while gene expression analysis revealed a central network of regulatory genes (hes5, sox10, lgals3bp, egr1, edn1, fos, fosb, klf2, gadd45ba and socs3a) whose expression was consistently affected by the transition from hyper- to normal gravity. PMID:26061167

  14. Near horizon symmetries of the non-extremal black hole solutions of Generalized Minimal Massive Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setare, M. R.; Adami, H.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the Generalized Minimal Massive Gravity (GMMG) model in the first order formalism. We show that all the solutions of the Einstein gravity with negative cosmological constants solve the equations of motion of considered model. Then we find an expression for the off-shell conserved charges of this model. By considering the near horizon geometry of a three dimensional black hole in the Gaussian null coordinates, we find near horizon conserved charges and their algebra. The obtained algebra is centrally extended. By writing the algebra of conserved charges in terms of Fourier modes and considering the BTZ black hole solution as an example, one can see that the charge associated with rotations along Y0 coincides exactly with the angular momentum, and the charge associated with time translations T0 is the product of the black hole entropy and its temperature. As we expect, in the limit when the GMMG tends to the Einstein gravity, all the results we obtain in this paper reduce to the results of the paper [1].

  15. Ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density in generalized theories of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Brustein, Ram; Medved, A. J. M.

    2009-01-15

    Near the horizon of a black brane solution in anti-de Sitter space, the long-wavelength fluctuations of the metric exhibit hydrodynamic behavior. For Einstein's theory, the ratio of the shear viscosity of near-horizon metric fluctuations {eta} to the entropy per unit of transverse volume s is {eta}/s=1/4{pi}. We propose that, in generalized theories of gravity, this ratio is given by the ratio of two effective gravitational couplings and can be different than 1/4{pi}. Our proposal confirms that {eta}/s is equal to 1/4{pi} for any theory that can be transformed into Einstein's theory, such as F(R) gravity. Our proposal also implies that matter interactions--except those including explicit or implicit factors of the Riemann tensor--will not modify {eta}/s. The proposed formula reproduces, in a very simple manner, some recently found results for Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We also make a prediction for {eta}/s in Lovelock theories of any order or dimensionality.

  16. Generalized uncertainty principle in f(R) gravity for a charged black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Said, Jackson Levi; Adami, Kristian Zarb

    2011-02-15

    Using f(R) gravity in the Palatini formularism, the metric for a charged spherically symmetric black hole is derived, taking the Ricci scalar curvature to be constant. The generalized uncertainty principle is then used to calculate the temperature of the resulting black hole; through this the entropy is found correcting the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy in this case. Using the entropy the tunneling probability and heat capacity are calculated up to the order of the Planck length, which produces an extra factor that becomes important as black holes become small, such as in the case of mini-black holes.

  17. Testing a generalized cubic Galileon gravity model with the Coma Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Terukina, Ayumu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Matsushita, Kyoko; Sasaki, Toru E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp E-mail: matusita@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp

    2015-10-01

    We obtain a constraint on the parameters of a generalized cubic Galileon gravity model exhibiting the Vainshtein mechanism by using multi-wavelength observations of the Coma Cluster. The generalized cubic Galileon model is characterized by three parameters of the turning scale associated with the Vainshtein mechanism, and the amplitude of modifying a gravitational potential and a lensing potential. X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) observations of the intra-cluster medium are sensitive to the gravitational potential, while the weak-lensing (WL) measurement is specified by the lensing potential. A joint fit of a complementary multi-wavelength dataset of X-ray, SZ and WL measurements enables us to simultaneously constrain these three parameters of the generalized cubic Galileon model for the first time. We also find a degeneracy between the cluster mass parameters and the gravitational modification parameters, which is influential in the limit of the weak screening of the fifth force.

  18. Generalisation for regular black holes on general relativity to f( R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Manuel E.; Fabris, Júlio C.; Junior, Ednaldo L. B.; Marques, Glauber T.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we determine regular black hole solutions using a very general f( R) theory, coupled to a non-linear electromagnetic field given by a Lagrangian {L}_NED. The functions f( R) and {L}_NED are in principle left unspecified. Instead, the model is constructed through a choice of the mass function M( r) presented in the metric coefficients. Solutions which have a regular behaviour of the geometric invariants are found. These solutions have two horizons, the event horizon and the Cauchy horizon. All energy conditions are satisfied in the whole space-time, except the strong energy condition (SEC), which is violated near the Cauchy horizon. We present also a new theorem related to the energy conditions in f( R) gravity, re-obtaining the well-known conditions in the context of general relativity when the geometry of the solution is the same.

  19. Dynamical instability of cylindrical symmetric collapsing star in generalized teleparallel gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawad, Abdul; Momeni, Davood; Rani, Shamaila; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2016-04-01

    This paper is devoted to an analysis of the dynamical instability of a self-gravitating object that undergoes a collapse process. We take the framework of generalized teleparallel gravity with a cylindrically symmetric gravitating object. The matter distribution is represented by a locally anisotropic energy-momentum tensor. We develop basic equations such as the dynamical equations along with the matching conditions and the Harrison-Wheeler equation of state. By applying a linear perturbation strategy, we construct a collapse equation, which is used to obtain the instability ranges in the Newtonian and post-Newtonian regimes. We find these ranges for isotropic pressure and reduce to the results in general relativity. The unstable behavior depends on matter-, metric-, mass-, and torsion-based terms.

  20. Cosmological Friedmann equation in infrared modified Hořava-Lifshitz gravity via generalized Misner-Sharp mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Molin; Yang, Yuling; Han, Yu; Zhao, Zonghua; Lu, Jianbo

    2016-07-01

    In various gravity theories, Friedmann equations can be cast to a form of the first law of thermodynamics in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological setup. However, this result failed in recent infrared (IR) modified Hořava-Lifshitz (HL) gravity. The difficulty stems from the fact that HL gravity is Lorentz-violating. Motivated by this problem, we use the Misner-Sharp mass to investigate the thermodynamics near the apparent horizon in HL cosmology. We find that the Friedmann equations can be derived from the first law of thermodynamics. The Misner-Sharp mass used here inherits the specific properties of HL gravity since it is directly from the gravitational action of HL theory. We also prove that the first law of thermodynamics with logarithmic entropy still holds at the apparent horizon in FRW. The results suggest that the general prescription of deriving the field equation from thermodynamics still works in the HL cosmology.

  1. Gravity Probe B: final results of a space experiment to test general relativity.

    PubMed

    Everitt, C W F; DeBra, D B; Parkinson, B W; Turneaure, J P; Conklin, J W; Heifetz, M I; Keiser, G M; Silbergleit, A S; Holmes, T; Kolodziejczak, J; Al-Meshari, M; Mester, J C; Muhlfelder, B; Solomonik, V G; Stahl, K; Worden, P W; Bencze, W; Buchman, S; Clarke, B; Al-Jadaan, A; Al-Jibreen, H; Li, J; Lipa, J A; Lockhart, J M; Al-Suwaidan, B; Taber, M; Wang, S

    2011-06-01

    Gravity Probe B, launched 20 April 2004, is a space experiment testing two fundamental predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR), the geodetic and frame-dragging effects, by means of cryogenic gyroscopes in Earth orbit. Data collection started 28 August 2004 and ended 14 August 2005. Analysis of the data from all four gyroscopes results in a geodetic drift rate of -6601.8±18.3  mas/yr and a frame-dragging drift rate of -37.2±7.2  mas/yr, to be compared with the GR predictions of -6606.1  mas/yr and -39.2  mas/yr, respectively ("mas" is milliarcsecond; 1  mas=4.848×10(-9)  rad).

  2. Preferred frame parameters in the tensor-vector-scalar theory of gravity and its generalization

    SciTech Connect

    Sagi, Eva

    2009-08-15

    The tensor-vector-scalar theory of gravity, which was designed as a relativistic implementation to the modified dynamics paradigm, has fared quite well as an alternative to dark matter, on both galactic and cosmological scales. However, its performance in the Solar System, as embodied in the post-Newtonian formalism, has not yet been fully investigated. We calculate the post-Newtonian parameters for TeVeS with the cosmological value of the scalar field taken into account, and show that in this situation the cosmological value of the scalar field is tightly linked to the vector field coupling constant K, preventing the former from evolving as predicted by its equation of motion. We show that generalizing TeVeS to have an Aether-type vector action, as suggested by Skordis, removes the aforesaid link, and this generalized version of TeVes has its {beta}, {gamma}, and {xi} parameterized post-Newtonian parameters identical to those in GR, while solar system constraints on the preferred frame parameters {alpha}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 2} can be satisfied within a modest range of small values of the scalar and vector fields coupling parameters, and for cosmological values of the scalar field consistent with evolution within the framework of existing cosmological models.

  3. Maximal freedom at minimum cost: linear large-scale structure in general modifications of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, Emilio; Sawicki, Ignacy E-mail: ignacy.sawicki@outlook.com

    2014-07-01

    We present a turnkey solution, ready for implementation in numerical codes, for the study of linear structure formation in general scalar-tensor models involving a single universally coupled scalar field. We show that the totality of cosmological information on the gravitational sector can be compressed — without any redundancy — into five independent and arbitrary functions of time only and one constant. These describe physical properties of the universe: the observable background expansion history, fractional matter density today, and four functions of time describing the properties of the dark energy. We show that two of those dark-energy property functions control the existence of anisotropic stress, the other two — dark-energy clustering, both of which are can be scale-dependent. All these properties can in principle be measured, but no information on the underlying theory of acceleration beyond this can be obtained. We present a translation between popular models of late-time acceleration (e.g. perfect fluids, f(R), kinetic gravity braiding, galileons), as well as the effective field theory framework, and our formulation. In this way, implementing this formulation numerically would give a single tool which could consistently test the majority of models of late-time acceleration heretofore proposed.

  4. Martian atmospheric gravity waves simulated by a high-resolution general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Yiǧit, Erdal; Medvedev, Alexander S.; Hartogh, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) significantly affect temperature and wind fields in the Martian middle and upper atmosphere. They are also one of the observational targets of the MAVEN mission. We report on the first simulations with a high-resolution general circulation model (GCM) and present a global distributions of small-scale GWs in the Martian atmosphere. The simulated GW-induced temperature variances are in a good agreement with available radio occultation data in the lower atmosphere between 10 and 30 km. For the northern winter solstice, the model reveals a latitudinal asymmetry with stronger wave generation in the winter hemisphere and two distinctive sources of GWs: mountainous regions and the meandering winter polar jet. Orographic GWs are filtered upon propagating upward, and the mesosphere is primarily dominated by harmonics with faster horizontal phase velocities. Wave fluxes are directed mainly against the local wind. GW dissipation in the upper mesosphere generates a body force per unit mass of tens of m s^{-1} per Martian solar day (sol^{-1}), which tends to close the simulated jets. The results represent a realistic surrogate for missing observations, which can be used for constraining GW parameterizations and validating GCMs.

  5. Is nonrelativistic gravity possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Kocharyan, A. A.

    2009-07-15

    We study nonrelativistic gravity using the Hamiltonian formalism. For the dynamics of general relativity (relativistic gravity) the formalism is well known and called the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) formalism. We show that if the lapse function is constrained correctly, then nonrelativistic gravity is described by a consistent Hamiltonian system. Surprisingly, nonrelativistic gravity can have solutions identical to relativistic gravity ones. In particular, (anti-)de Sitter black holes of Einstein gravity and IR limit of Horava gravity are locally identical.

  6. Generalized analytical model for benthic water flux forced by surface gravity waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, J.N.; Mehta, A.J.; Dean, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    A generalized analytical model for benthic water flux forced by linear surface gravity waves over a series of layered hydrogeologic units is developed by adapting a previous solution for a hydrogeologic unit with an infinite thickness (Case I) to a unit with a finite thickness (Case II) and to a dual-unit system (Case III). The model compares favorably with laboratory observations. The amplitude of wave-forced benthic water flux is shown to be directly proportional to the amplitude of the wave, the permeability of the hydrogeologic unit, and the wave number and inversely proportional to the kinematic viscosity of water. A dimensionless amplitude parameter is introduced and shown to reach a maximum where the product of water depth and the wave number is 1.2. Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is a benthic water discharge flux to a marine water body. The Case I model estimates an 11.5-cm/d SGD forced by a wave with a 1 s period and 5-cm amplitude in water that is 0.5-m deep. As this wave propagates into a region with a 0.3-m-thick hydrogeologic unit, with a no-flow bottom boundary, the Case II model estimates a 9.7-cm/d wave-forced SGD. As this wave propagates into a region with a 0.2-m-thick hydrogeologic unit over an infinitely thick, more permeable unit, the Case III quasi-confined model estimates a 15.7-cm/d wave-forced SGD. The quasi-confined model has benthic constituent flux implications in coral reef, karst, and clastic regions. Waves may undermine tracer and seepage meter estimates of SGD at some locations. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Scalar-Tensor gravity with system-dependent potential and its relation with Renormalization Group extended General Relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Davi C.; Piattella, Oliver F.; Chauvineau, Bertrand E-mail: Bertrand.Chauvineau@oca.eu

    2015-09-01

    We show that Renormalization Group extensions of the Einstein-Hilbert action for large scale physics are not, in general, a particular case of standard Scalar-Tensor (ST) gravity. We present a new class of ST actions, in which the potential is not necessarily fixed at the action level, and show that this extended ST theory formally contains the Renormalization Group case. We also propose here a Renormalization Group scale setting identification that is explicitly covariant and valid for arbitrary relativistic fluids.

  8. Thermodynamic instability of topological black holes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with a generalized electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Panahiyan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by the string corrections on the gravity and electrodynamics sides, we consider a quadratic Maxwell invariant term as a correction of the Maxwell Lagrangian to obtain exact solutions of higher dimensional topological black holes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We first investigate the asymptotically flat solutions and obtain conserved and thermodynamic quantities which satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. We also analyze thermodynamic stability of the solutions by calculating the heat capacity and the Hessian matrix. Then, we focus on horizon-flat solutions with an anti-de Sitter (AdS) asymptote and produce a rotating spacetime with a suitable transformation. In addition, we calculate the conserved and thermodynamic quantities for asymptotically AdS black branes which satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. Finally, we perform thermodynamic instability criterion to investigate the effects of nonlinear electrodynamics in canonical and grand canonical ensembles.

  9. Earth-moon Lagrangian points as a test bed for general relativity and effective field theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, Emmanuele; Dell'Agnello, Simone; Esposito, Giampiero; Di Fiore, Luciano; Simo, Jules; Grado, Aniello

    2015-09-01

    We first analyze the restricted four-body problem consisting of the Earth, the Moon, and the Sun as the primaries and a spacecraft as the planetoid. This scheme allows us to take into account the solar perturbation in the description of the motion of a spacecraft in the vicinity of the stable Earth-Moon libration points L4 and L5 both in the classical regime and in the context of effective field theories of gravity. A vehicle initially placed at L4 or L5 will not remain near the respective points. In particular, in the classical case the vehicle moves on a trajectory about the libration points for at least 700 days before escaping. We show that this is true also if the modified long-distance Newtonian potential of effective gravity is employed. We also evaluate the impulse required to cancel out the perturbing force due to the Sun in order to force the spacecraft to stay precisely at L4 or L5. It turns out that this value is slightly modified with respect to the corresponding Newtonian one. In the second part of the paper, we first evaluate the location of all Lagrangian points in the Earth-Moon system within the framework of general relativity. For the points L4 and L5, the corrections of coordinates are of order a few millimeters and describe a tiny departure from the equilateral triangle. After that, we set up a scheme where the theory which is quantum corrected has as its classical counterpart the Einstein theory, instead of the Newtonian one. In other words, we deal with a theory involving quantum corrections to Einstein gravity, rather than to Newtonian gravity. By virtue of the effective-gravity correction to the long-distance form of the potential among two masses, all terms involving the ratio between the gravitational radius of the primary and its separation from the planetoid get modified. Within this framework, for the Lagrangian points of stable equilibrium, we find quantum corrections of order 2 mm, whereas for Lagrangian points of unstable

  10. Kantowski-Sachs cosmological solutions in the generalized teleparallel gravity via Noether symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motavalli, H.; Akbarieh, A. Rezaei; Nasiry, M.

    2016-04-01

    We study the f(T) theory as an extension of teleparallel gravity and consider the Noether symmetry of Kantowski-Sachs (KS) anisotropic model for this theory. We specify the explicit teleparallel form of f(T) and find the corresponding exact cosmological solutions under the assumption that the Lagrangian admits the Noether symmetry. It is found that the universe experiences a power law expansion for the scale factors in the context of f(T) theory. By deriving equation of state (EOS) parameter, we show that the universe passes through the phantom and ΛCDM theoretical scenarios. In this way, we estimate a lower limit age for the universe in excellent agreement with the value reported from recent observations. When KS model reduces to the flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) metric, our results are properly transformed into the corresponding values.

  11. Static electromagnetic fields and charged black holes in general covariant theory of Hořava-Lifshitz gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Borzou, Ahmad; Lin, Kai; Wang, Anzhong E-mail: k_lin@baylor.edu

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we study electromeganetic static spacetimes in the nonrelativisitc general covariant theory of the Hořava-Lifshitz (HL) gravity, proposed recently by Hořava and Melby-Thompson, and present all the electric static solutions, which represent the generalization of the Reissner-Nordström solution found in Einstein's general relativity (GR). The global/local structures of spacetimes in the HL theory in general are different from those given in GR, because the dispersion relations of test particles now contain high-order momentum terms, so the speeds of these particles are unbounded in the ultraviolet (UV). As a result, the conception of light-cones defined in GR becomes invalid and test particles do not follow geodesics. To study black holes in the HL theory, we adopt the geometrical optical approximations, and define a horizon as a (two-closed) surface that is free of spacetime singularities and on which massless test particles are infinitely redshifted. With such a definition, we show that some of our solutions give rise to (charged) black holes, although the radii of their horizons in general depend on the energies of the test particles.

  12. General parametrization of axisymmetric black holes in metric theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoplya, Roman; Rezzolla, Luciano; Zhidenko, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Following previous work of ours in spherical symmetry, we here propose a new parametric framework to describe the spacetime of axisymmetric black holes in generic metric theories of gravity. In this case, the metric components are functions of both the radial and the polar angular coordinates, forcing a double expansion to obtain a generic axisymmetric metric expression. In particular, we use a continued-fraction expansion in terms of a compactified radial coordinate to express the radial dependence, while we exploit a Taylor expansion in terms of the cosine of the polar angle for the polar dependence. These choices lead to a superior convergence in the radial direction and to an exact limit on the equatorial plane. As a validation of our approach, we build parametrized representations of Kerr, rotating dilaton, and Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet black holes. The match is already very good at lowest order in the expansion and improves as new orders are added. We expect a similar behavior for any stationary and axisymmetric black-hole metric.

  13. Distorting general relativity: gravity's rainbow and f(R) theories at work

    SciTech Connect

    Garattini, Remo

    2013-06-01

    We compute the Zero Point Energy in a spherically symmetric background combining the high energy distortion of Gravity's Rainbow with the modification induced by a f(R) theory. Here f(R) is a generic analytic function of the Ricci curvature scalar R in 4D and in 3D. The explicit calculation is performed for a Schwarzschild metric. Due to the spherically symmetric property of the Schwarzschild metric we can compare the effects of the modification induced by a f(R) theory in 4D and in 3D. We find that the final effect of the combined theory is to have finite quantities that shift the Zero Point Energy. In this context we setup a Sturm-Liouville problem with the cosmological constant considered as the associated eigenvalue. The eigenvalue equation is a reformulation of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation which is analyzed by means of a variational approach based on gaussian trial functionals. With the help of a canonical decomposition, we find that the relevant contribution to one loop is given by the graviton quantum fluctuations around the given background. A final discussion on the connection of our result with the observed cosmological constant is also reported.

  14. Black holes, compact objects and solar system tests in non-relativistic general covariant theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwald, Jared; Satheeshkumar, V.H.; Wang, Anzhong E-mail: VHSatheeshkumar@baylor.edu

    2010-12-01

    We study spherically symmetric static spacetimes generally filled with an anisotropic fluid in the nonrelativistic general covariant theory of gravity. In particular, we find that the vacuum solutions are not unique, and can be expressed in terms of the U(1) gauge field A. When solar system tests are considered, severe constraints on A are obtained, which seemingly pick up the Schwarzschild solution uniquely. In contrast to other versions of the Horava-Lifshitz theory, non-singular static stars made of a perfect fluid without heat flow can be constructed, due to the coupling of the fluid with the gauge field. These include the solutions with a constant pressure. We also study the general junction conditions across the surface of a star. In general, the conditions allow the existence of a thin matter shell on the surface. When applying these conditions to the perfect fluid solutions with the vacuum ones as describing their external spacetimes, we find explicitly the matching conditions in terms of the parameters appearing in the solutions. Such matching is possible even without the presence of a thin matter shell.

  15. On the Equivalence of the Dirac Equation Between General Relativity and Teleparallel Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bagci, Meral; Havare, Ali; Soeguet, Kenan

    2007-04-23

    The Teleparellel Theory (TPT) is one of alternative ways of describing the gravitational field. Unlike the general relativistic description of gravitation in the TPT curvature is assumed to vanish instead of torsion. In general relativistic theory (GRT) the Riemann geometry is used to describe the equations while in the case of TPT the Weitzenboeck space-time is used. In this study we showed the equivalence of the Dirac equation between these two theories.

  16. On the generalized wormhole in the Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamang, Amarjit; Potapov, Alexander A.; Lukmanova, Regina; Izmailov, Ramil; Nandi, Kamal K.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we wish to investigate certain observable effects in the recently obtained wormhole solution of the Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld (EiBI) theory, which generalizes the zero-mass Ellis-Bronnikov wormhole of general relativity. The solutions of EiBI theory contain an extra parameter κ having the inverse dimension of the cosmological constant Λ, and which is expected to modify various general relativistic observables such as the masses of wormhole mouths, tidal forces and light deflection. A remarkable result is that a non-zero κ could prevent the tidal forces in the geodesic orthonormal frame from becoming arbitrarily large near a small throat radius ({r}0˜ 0) contrary to what happens near a small Schwarzschild horizon radius (M˜ 0). The role of κ in the flare-out and energy conditions is also analyzed, which reveals that the energy conditions are violated. We show that the exotic matter in the EiBI wormhole cannot be interpreted as a phantom (ω =\\frac{{p}{{r}}}{ρ }\\lt -1) or ghost field ϕ of general relativity due to the fact that both ρ and p r are negative for all κ.

  17. GPHS motion studies for heat pulse intervals of reentries from gravity-assist trajectories. [General Purpose Heat Source Module (GPHS)

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, E.F.; Sharbaugh, R.C.

    1990-03-01

    Motion studies of the General Purpose Heat Source Module, GPHS, were conducted in the heat pulse interval associated with entries from earth gravity assist trajectories. The APL six-degree-of-freedom reentry program designated TMAGRA6C was used. The objectives of the studies were to (1) determine the effect of ablation on GPHS motion, and (2) determine whether the GPHS module entering the earth's atmosphere from an earth-gravity-assist trajectory has a preferred orientation during the heat pulse phase of reentry. The results are given in summary form for easy visualization of the initial conditions investigated and to provide a quick-look of the resulting motion. Detail of the motion is also given for the parameters of interest for each case studied. Selected values of initial pitch rate, roll rate, and combinations of these within the range 0[degree] to 1000[degrees]/sec were investigated for initial reentry angles of -7[degrees] (shallow) and -90[degrees] (steep) and initial angles of attack of 0[degree] (broadface to the wind) and 90[degrees]. Although the studies are not exhaustive, a sufficient number of reentry conditions (initial altitude, reentry angle, angle of attack, rotational motion) have been investigated to deduce certain trends. The results also provide information on additional reentry conditions that need to be investigated. The present results show four GPHS orientations that predominate - all with some pitch oscillations and rolling motion. These are: angles of attack, [alpha][sub R] of 0[degree], 30[degrees], 90[degrees] and tumbling. It should be assumed that all these orientations are equally probable because only combinations of two initial reentry angles, [gamma][sub 0], and two values of [alpha][sub R]. have been investigated. Further the probability for any given initial rate on orientation is not known.

  18. BF gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celada, Mariano; González, Diego; Montesinos, Merced

    2016-11-01

    BF gravity comprises all the formulations of gravity that are based on deformations of BF theory. Such deformations consist of either constraints or potential terms added to the topological BF action that turn some of the gauge degrees of freedom into physical ones, particularly giving rise to general relativity. The BF formulations have provided new and deep insights into many classical and quantum aspects of the gravitational field, setting the foundations for the approach to quantum gravity known as spinfoam models. In this review, we present a self-contained and unified treatment of the BF formulations of D-dimensional general relativity and other related models, focusing on the classical aspects of them and including some new results.

  19. Modified first-order Horava-Lifshitz gravity: Hamiltonian analysis of the general theory and accelerating FRW cosmology in a power-law F(R) model

    SciTech Connect

    Carloni, Sante; Chaichian, Masud; Tureanu, Anca; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.; Oksanen, Markku

    2010-09-15

    We propose the most general modified first-order Horava-Lifshitz gravity, whose action does not contain time derivatives higher than the second order. The Hamiltonian structure of this theory is studied in all the details in the case of the spatially-flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time, demonstrating many of the features of the general theory. It is shown that, with some plausible assumptions, including the projectability of the lapse function, this model is consistent. As a large class of such theories, the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity is introduced. The study of its ultraviolet properties shows that its z=3 version seems to be renormalizable in the same way as the original Horava-Lifshitz proposal. The Hamiltonian analysis of the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity shows that it is in general a consistent theory. The F(R) gravity action is also studied in the fixed-gauge form, where the appearance of a scalar field is particularly illustrative. Then the spatially-flat FRW cosmology for this F(R) gravity is investigated. It is shown that a special choice of parameters for this theory leads to the same equations of motion as in the case of traditional F(R) gravity. Nevertheless, the cosmological structure of the modified Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity turns out to be much richer than for its traditional counterpart. The emergence of multiple de Sitter solutions indicates the possibility of unification of early-time inflation with late-time acceleration within the same model. Power-law F(R) theories are also investigated in detail. It is analytically shown that they have a quite rich cosmological structure: early-/late-time cosmic acceleration of quintessence, as well as of phantom types. Also it is demonstrated that all the four known types of finite-time future singularities may occur in the power-law Horava-Lifshitz F(R) gravity. Finally, a covariant proposal for (renormalizable) F(R) gravity within the Horava-Lifshitz spirit is presented.

  20. Physics of Artificial Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    This chapter discusses potential technologies for achieving artificial gravity in a space vehicle. We begin with a series of definitions and a general description of the rotational dynamics behind the forces ultimately exerted on the human body during centrifugation, such as gravity level, gravity gradient, and Coriolis force. Human factors considerations and comfort limits associated with a rotating environment are then discussed. Finally, engineering options for designing space vehicles with artificial gravity are presented.

  1. Towards the most general scalar-tensor theories of gravity: A unified approach in the language of differential forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezquiaga, Jose María; García-Bellido, Juan; Zumalacárregui, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    We use a description based on differential forms to systematically explore the space of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. Within this formalism, we propose a basis for the scalar sector at the lowest order in derivatives of the field and in any number of dimensions. This minimal basis is used to construct a finite and closed set of Lagrangians describing general scalar-tensor theories invariant under local Lorentz transformations in a pseudo-Riemannian manifold, which contains ten physically distinct elements in four spacetime dimensions. Subsequently, we compute their corresponding equations of motion and find which combinations are at most second order in derivatives in four as well as an arbitrary number of dimensions. By studying the possible exact forms (total derivatives) and algebraic relations between the basis components, we discover that there are only four Lagrangian combinations producing second-order equations, which can be associated with Horndeski's theory. In this process, we identify a new second-order Lagrangian, named kinetic Gauss-Bonnet, that was not previously considered in the literature. However, we show that its dynamics is already contained in Horndeski's theory. Finally, we provide a full classification of the relations between different second-order theories. This allows us to clarify, for instance, the connection between different covariantizations of Galileons theory. In conclusion, our formulation affords great computational simplicity with a systematic structure. As a first step, we focus on theories with second-order equations of motion. However, this new formalism aims to facilitate advances towards unveiling the most general scalar-tensor theories.

  2. A test of general relativity using the LARES and LAGEOS satellites and a GRACE Earth gravity model. Measurement of Earth's dragging of inertial frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Paolozzi, Antonio; Pavlis, Erricos C.; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Matzner, Richard; Penrose, Roger; Sindoni, Giampiero; Paris, Claudio; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    We present a test of general relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS, and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure μ = (0.994 ± 0.002) ± 0.05, where μ is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its general relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is our preliminary estimate of systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of general relativity.

  3. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    terrestrial gravity fluctuations will have great impact on the future development of GW detectors and high-precision gravimetry in general, and many open questions need to be answered still as emphasized in this article.

  4. Visualizing spacetime curvature via frame-drag vortexes and tidal tendexes: General theory and weak-gravity applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, David A.; Owen, Robert; Zhang, Fan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Brink, Jeandrew; Chen, Yanbei; Kaplan, Jeffrey D.; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Matthews, Keith D.; Scheel, Mark A.; Thorne, Kip S.

    2011-12-01

    When one splits spacetime into space plus time, the Weyl curvature tensor (vacuum Riemann tensor) gets split into two spatial, symmetric, and trace-free tensors: (i) the Weyl tensor’s so-called electric part or tidal field Ejk, which raises tides on the Earth’s oceans and drives geodesic deviation (the relative acceleration of two freely falling test particles separated by a spatial vector ξk is Δaj=-Ejkξk), and (ii) the Weyl tensor’s so-called magnetic part or (as we call it) frame-drag field Bjk, which drives differential frame dragging (the precessional angular velocity of a gyroscope at the tip of ξk, as measured using a local inertial frame at the tail of ξk, is ΔΩj=Bjkξk). Being symmetric and trace-free, Ejk and Bjk each have three orthogonal eigenvector fields which can be depicted by their integral curves. We call the integral curves of Ejk’s eigenvectors tidal tendex lines or simply tendex lines, we call each tendex line’s eigenvalue its tendicity, and we give the name tendex to a collection of tendex lines with large tendicity. The analogous quantities for Bjk are frame-drag vortex lines or simply vortex lines, their vorticities, and their vortexes. These concepts are powerful tools for visualizing spacetime curvature. We build up physical intuition into them by applying them to a variety of weak-gravity phenomena: a spinning, gravitating point particle, two such particles side-by-side, a plane gravitational wave, a point particle with a dynamical current-quadrupole moment or dynamical mass-quadrupole moment, and a slow-motion binary system made of nonspinning point particles. We show that a rotating current quadrupole has four rotating vortexes that sweep outward and backward like water streams from a rotating sprinkler. As they sweep, the vortexes acquire accompanying tendexes and thereby become outgoing current-quadrupole gravitational waves. We show similarly that a rotating mass quadrupole has four rotating, outward

  5. Hybrid theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Nahomi; Maki, Takuya; Shiraishi, Kiyoshi

    2016-10-01

    We propose a model of gravity in which a General Relativity metric tensor and an effective metric generated from a single scalar formulated in geometric scalar gravity are mixed. We show that the model yields the exact Schwarzschild solution, along with accelerating behavior of scale factors in cosmological solutions.

  6. Viability of the matter bounce scenario in F(T) gravity and Loop Quantum Cosmology for general potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Haro, Jaume; Amorós, Jaume E-mail: jaume.amoros@upc.edu

    2014-12-01

    We consider the matter bounce scenario in F(T) gravity and Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) for phenomenological potentials that at early times provide a nearly matter dominated Universe in the contracting phase, having a reheating mechanism in the expanding or contracting phase, i.e., being able to release the energy of the scalar field creating particles that thermalize in order to match with the hot Friedmann Universe, and finally at late times leading to the current cosmic acceleration. For these potentials, numerically solving the dynamical perturbation equations we have seen that, for the particular F(T) model that we will name teleparallel version of LQC, and whose modified Friedmann equation coincides with the corresponding one in holonomy corrected LQC when one deals with the flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) geometry, the corresponding equations obtained from the well-know perturbed equations in F(T) gravity lead to theoretical results that fit well with current observational data. More precisely, in this teleparallel version of LQC there is a set of solutions which leads to theoretical results that match correctly with last BICEP2 data, and there is another set whose theoretical results fit well with Planck's experimental data. On the other hand, in the standard holonomy corrected LQC, using the perturbed equations obtained replacing the Ashtekar connection by a suitable sinus function and inserting some counter-terms in order to preserve the algebra of constrains, the theoretical value of the tensor/scalar ratio is smaller than in the teleparallel version, which means that there is always a set of solutions that matches with Planck's data, but for some potentials BICEP2 experimental results disfavours holonomy corrected LQC.

  7. TESTS OF GENERAL RELATIVITY IN THE STRONG-GRAVITY REGIME BASED ON X-RAY SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF BLACK HOLES IN X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczynski, Henric

    2012-08-01

    Although general relativity (GR) has been tested extensively in the weak-gravity regime, similar tests in the strong-gravity regime are still missing. In this paper, we explore the possibility to use X-ray spectropolarimetric observations of black holes in X-ray binaries to distinguish between the Kerr metric and the phenomenological metrics introduced by Johannsen and Psaltis (which are not vacuum solutions of Einstein's equation) and thus to test the no-hair theorem of GR. To this end, we have developed a numerical code that calculates the radial brightness profiles of accretion disks and parallel transports the wave vector and polarization vector of photons through the Kerr and non-GR spacetimes. We used the code to predict the observational appearance of GR and non-GR accreting black hole systems. We find that the predicted energy spectra and energy-dependent polarization degree and polarization direction do depend strongly on the underlying spacetime. However, for large regions of the parameter space, the GR and non-GR metrics lead to very similar observational signatures, making it difficult to observationally distinguish between the two types of models.

  8. Gravity Waves

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Gravity Waves Ripple over Marine Stratocumulus Clouds ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), a fingerprint-like gravity wave feature occurs over a deck of marine stratocumulus clouds. Similar ... that occur when a pebble is thrown into a still pond, such "gravity waves" sometimes appear when the relatively stable and stratified air ...

  9. Teleparallel equivalent of Lovelock gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, P. A.; Vásquez, Yerko

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing interest in modified gravity theories based on torsion, as these theories exhibit interesting cosmological implications. In this work inspired by the teleparallel formulation of general relativity, we present its extension to Lovelock gravity known as the most natural extension of general relativity in higher-dimensional space-times. First, we review the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity and Gauss-Bonnet gravity, and then we construct the teleparallel equivalent of Lovelock gravity. In order to achieve this goal, we use the vielbein and the connection without imposing the Weitzenböck connection. Then, we extract the teleparallel formulation of the theory by setting the curvature to null.

  10. Gravity Driven Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Roy

    2010-03-01

    Flowing global gravitation initially produced space without time or mass. Space-time and mass are properties of flowing global gravitation. From its fabric, primal mass spins spontaneously giving rise to local gravitational space-time curvatures. Global gravity is the unifying background field. Gravity began flowing from its singularity with a big whoosh. It curves with angular rotational precession, creating a spatial geometry similar to the windings of a ball of string. Three-dimensional global gravity swirls locally into massive densities. Concurrently with these densities, local gravity curvatures of space-time arise. The expanse between celestial objects is not completely empty, void space as generally believed; it is antecedent gravity, a prerequisite associated field necessary for originating the first quantum particles. Gravity is dark energy; gravity's spin, as the second fundamental force, is electromagnetic dark matter. Electromagnetic masses attract then gravity compresses hot, dense and small---then bang, the first hydrogen star of which there are many. There may have been many big bangs, but no Big Bang that ultimately created the universe.

  11. Stability, ghost, and strong coupling in nonrelativistic general covariant theory of gravity with {lambda}{ne}1

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yongqing; Wang Anzhong

    2011-05-15

    In this paper, we investigate three important issues: stability, ghost, and strong coupling, in the Horava-Melby-Thompson setup of the Horava-Lifshitz theory with {lambda}{ne}1, generalized recently by da Silva. We first develop the general linear scalar perturbations of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe with arbitrary spatial curvature and find that an immediate by-product of the setup is that, in all the inflationary models described by a scalar field, the FRW universe is necessarily flat. Applying them to the case of the Minkowski background, we find that it is stable, and, similar to the case {lambda}=1, the spin-0 graviton is eliminated. The vector perturbations vanish identically in the Minkowski background. Thus, similar to general relativity, a free gravitational field in this setup is completely described by a spin-2 massless graviton, even with {lambda}{ne}1. We also study the ghost problem in the FRW background and find explicitly the ghost-free conditions. To study the strong coupling problem, we consider two different kinds of spacetimes, all with the presence of matter: one is cosmological, and the other is static. We find that the coupling becomes strong for a process with energy higher than M{sub pl}|c{sub {psi}|}{sup 5/2} in the flat FRW background and M{sub pl}|c{sub {psi}|}{sup 3} in a static weak gravitational field, where |c{sub {psi}|{identical_to}}|(1-{lambda})/(3{lambda}-1)|{sup 1/2}.

  12. Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piguet, O.

    2014-09-01

    In this talk, I give a short general introduction to Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG), beginning with some motivations for quantizing General Relativity, listing various attempts and then focusing on the case of LQG. Work supported in part by the Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico - CNPq (Brazil).

  13. Venus gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    The anomalous gravity field of Venus shows high correlation with surface features revealed by radar. We extract gravity models from the Doppler tracking data from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) by means of a two-step process. In the first step, we solve the nonlinear spacecraft state estimation problem using a Kalman filter-smoother. The Kalman filter was evaluated through simulations. This evaluation and some unusual features of the filter are discussed. In the second step, we perform a geophysical inversion using a linear Bayesian estimator. To allow an unbiased comparison between gravity and topography, we use a simulation technique to smooth and distort the radar topographic data so as to yield maps having the same characteristics as our gravity maps. The maps presented cover 2/3 of the surface of Venus and display the strong topography-gravity correlation previously reported. The topography-gravity scatter plots show two distinct trends.

  14. Geometric scalar theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Novello, M.; Bittencourt, E.; Goulart, E.; Salim, J.M.; Toniato, J.D.; Moschella, U. E-mail: eduhsb@cbpf.br E-mail: egoulart@cbpf.br E-mail: toniato@cbpf.br

    2013-06-01

    We present a geometric scalar theory of gravity. Our proposal will be described using the ''background field method'' introduced by Gupta, Feynman, Deser and others as a field theory formulation of general relativity. We analyze previous criticisms against scalar gravity and show how the present proposal avoids these difficulties. This concerns not only the theoretical complaints but also those related to observations. In particular, we show that the widespread belief of the conjecture that the source of scalar gravity must be the trace of the energy-momentum tensor — which is one of the main difficulties to couple gravity with electromagnetic phenomenon in previous models — does not apply to our geometric scalar theory. From the very beginning this is not a special relativistic scalar gravity. The adjective ''geometric'' pinpoints its similarity with general relativity: this is a metric theory of gravity. Some consequences of this new scalar theory are explored.

  15. How emergent is gravity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Swastik; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2015-10-01

    General theory of relativity (or Lovelock extensions) is a dynamical theory; given an initial configuration on a spacelike hypersurface, it makes a definite prediction of the final configuration. Recent developments suggest that gravity may be described in terms of macroscopic parameters. It finds a concrete manifestation in the fluid-gravity correspondence. Most of the efforts till date has been to relate equilibrium configurations in gravity with fluid variables. In order for the emergent paradigm to be truly successful, it has to provide a statistical mechanical derivation of how a given initial static configuration evolves into another. In this paper, we show that the energy transport equation governed by the fluctuations of the horizon-fluid is similar to Raychaudhuri equation and hence gravity is truly emergent.

  16. Tests of General Relativity in the Strong Gravity Regime With the Space-Borne X-Calibur X-ray Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoormann, Janie; Beheshtipour, Banafsheh; Walsh, Nathan; Krawczynski, Henric

    2014-08-01

    Broadband spectropolarimetric observations of black holes in X-ray binaries with X-Calibur will allow us to test General Relativity in the yet untested strong gravity regime. We study the spectral and polarimetric signatures with two models. First we model a hot spot in the accretion disk of a black hole. This is then used to explain the position and amplitude of the high frequency quasi periodic oscillations (HFQPO) peaks. These HFQPOs have been repeatedly observed at near constant frequencies however their origin is still unknown. The second model uses a lamp-post to illuminate the accretion disk with high-energy photons. Photons acquire a polarization when scattering in the disk. We have developed a code that parallel transports the photon wave and polarization vectors through the Kerr spacetime or alternative spacetimes. Furthermore, it models the polarization changes from photon reflections off the accretion disk with the formalism of Chandrasekhar (1950). The numerical simulations allow us to evaluate how well X-Calibur can constrain the black hole spin and the accretion disk inclination. Furthermore, we are able to assess the impact of alternative spacetimes on the observable flux and polarization energy spectra.

  17. Gravity investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, D.L.

    1983-12-31

    A large density contrast exists between the Paleozoic rocks (including the rocks of Climax stock) and less dense, Tertiary volcanic rocks and alluvium. This density contrast ranges widely, and herein for interpretive purposes, is assumed to average 0.85 Mg/m{sup 3} (megagrams per cubic meter). The large density contrast makes the gravity method a useful tool with which to study the interface between these rock types. However, little or no density contrast is discernible between the sedimentary Paleozoic rocks that surround the Climax stock and the intrusive rocks of the stock itself. Therefore the gravity method can not be used to define the configuration of the stock. Gravity highs coincide with outcrops of the dense Paleozoic rocks, and gravity lows overlie less-dense Tertiary volcanic rocks and Quaternary alluvium. The positions of three major faults (Boundary, Yucca, and Butte faults) are defined by steep gravity gradients. West of the Climax stock, the Tippinip fault has juxtaposed Paleozoic rocks of similar density, and consequently, has no expression in the gravity data in that area. The gravity station spacing, across Oak Spring Butte, is not sufficient to adequately define any gravity expression of the Tippinip fault. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Relativistic Gravity Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Jürgen; Schäfer, Gerhard

    17 readable articles give a thorough and self-contained overview of recent developments in relativistic gravity research. The subjects covered are: gravitational lensing, the general relativistic n-body problem, observable effects in the solar system, gravitational waves and their interferometric detection, very-long-baseline interferometry, international atomic time, lunar laserranging measurements, measurement of the gravitomagnetic field of the Earth, fermion and boson stars and black holes with hair, rapidly rotating neutron stars, matter wave interferometry, and the laboratory test of Newton's law of gravity. Any scientist interested in experimentally or observatio- nally oriented relativistic gravity will read the book with profit. In addition, it is perfectly suited as a complementary text for courses on general relativity and relativistic astrophysics.

  19. Gravity's overdrive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Tony

    1994-03-01

    Mariner 10 traveled to Mercury by using Venus' gravity to bend its course in toward the sun, a correction that would otherwise required vast amounts of rocket fuel. For the first time, an interplanetary spacecraft changed course not with rocket fuel but by using a planet's gravitational field. That maneuver stands, along with the development of the rocket engine, as one of the keys that opened the solar system for exploration. The Pioneer, Voyager, and Galileo missions all used gravity assist, and in fact would not have been possible otherwise. Gravity assist is the most efficient form of space propulsion known. Various aspects of the developmental history of the gravity assist technique and the dispute over who should receive credit for inventing the technique are discussed.

  20. Gravity brake

    DOEpatents

    Lujan, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanical gravity brake that prevents hoisted loads within a shaft from free-falling when a loss of hoisting force occurs. A loss of hoist lifting force may occur in a number of situations, for example if a hoist cable were to break, the brakes were to fail on a winch, or the hoist mechanism itself were to fail. Under normal hoisting conditions, the gravity brake of the invention is subject to an upward lifting force from the hoist and a downward pulling force from a suspended load. If the lifting force should suddenly cease, the loss of differential forces on the gravity brake in free-fall is translated to extend a set of brakes against the walls of the shaft to stop the free fall descent of the gravity brake and attached load.

  1. Global distribution of gravity wave fields and their seasonal dependence in the Martian atmosphere simulated in a high-resolution general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Medvedev, Alexander; Yiğit, Erdal; Hartogh, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) are small-scale atmospheric waves generated by various geophysical processes, such as topography, convection, and dynamical instability. On Mars, several observations and simulations have revealed that GWs strongly affect temperature and wind fields in the middle and upper atmosphere. We have worked with a high-resolution Martian general circulation model (MGCM), with the spectral resolution of T106 (horizontal grid interval of ~67 km), for the investigations of generation and propagation of GWs. We analyzed for three kinds of wavelength ranges, (1) horizontal total wavenumber s=21-30 (wavelength λ~700-1000 km), (2) s=31-60 (λ~350-700 km), and (3) s=61-106 (λ~200-350 km). Our results show that shorter-scale harmonics progressively dominate with height during both equinox and solstice. We have detected two main sources of GWs: mountainous regions and the meandering winter polar jet. In both seasons GW energy in the troposphere due to the shorter-scale harmonics is concentrated in the low latitudes in a good agreement with observations. Orographically-generated GWs contribute significantly to the total energy of disturbances, and strongly decay with height. Thus, the non-orographic GWs of tropospheric origin dominate near the mesopause. The vertical fluxes of wave horizontal momentum are directed mainly against the larger-scale wind. Mean magnitudes of the drag in the middle atmosphere are tens of m s-1 sol-1, while instantaneously they can reach thousands of m s-1 sol-1, which results in an attenuation of the wind jets in the middle atmosphere and in tendency of their reversal.

  2. Effects of modified gravity in galactic clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Murli; Krishna Yadav, Bal

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the distinct effects of the modified gravity, especially f(R) gravity in structure formation. The small redshift as well as high redshift epochs are studied with a potential set of diagnostics distinguishing between the standard general relativistic and the modified gravity. These diagnostics are further put to test against the observations obtained in clustering surveys.

  3. Quantum theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, S.M.

    1984-01-01

    The book of essay entitled Quantum Theory of Gravity, edited by Steven M. Christensen is reviewed. The book contains over thirty papers dealing with the subject of the unification of quantum field theory and general relativity theory. Contributions include discussions of non-Abelian gauge theories, supersymmetry, issues in renormalization and quantization and matters related to the interpretation of theories.

  4. Singularities and Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojowald, Martin

    2007-06-01

    Although there is general agreement that a removal of classical gravitational singularities is not only a crucial conceptual test of any approach to quantum gravity but also a prerequisite for any fundamental theory, the precise criteria for non-singular behavior are often unclear or controversial. Often, only special types of singularities such as the curvature singularities found in isotropic cosmological models are discussed and it is far from clear what this implies for the very general singularities that arise according to the singularity theorems of general relativity. In these lectures we present an overview of the current status of singularities in classical and quantum gravity, starting with a review and interpretation of the classical singularity theorems. This suggests possible routes for quantum gravity to evade the devastating conclusion of the theorems by different means, including modified dynamics or modified geometrical structures underlying quantum gravity. The latter is most clearly present in canonical quantizations which are discussed in more detail. Finally, the results are used to propose a general scheme of singularity removal, quantum hyperbolicity, to show cases where it is realized and to derive intuitive semiclassical pictures of cosmological bounces.

  5. Gravity waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David

    1987-01-01

    Gravity waves contributed to the establishment of the thermal structure, small scale (80 to 100 km) fluctuations in velocity (50 to 80 m/sec) and density (20 to 30%, 0 to peak). Dominant gravity wave spectrum in the middle atmosphere: x-scale, less than 100 km; z-scale, greater than 10 km; t-scale, less than 2 hr. Theorists are beginning to understand middle atmosphere motions. There are two classes: Planetary waves and equatorial motions, gravity waves and tidal motions. The former give rise to variability at large scales, which may alter apparent mean structure. Effects include density and velocity fluctuations, induced mean motions, and stratospheric warmings which lead to the breakup of the polar vortex and cooling of the mesosphere. On this scale are also equatorial quasi-biennial and semi-annual oscillations. Gravity wave and tidal motions produce large rms fluctuations in density and velocity. The magnitude of the density fluctuations compared to the mean density is of the order of the vertical wavelength, which grows with height. Relative density fluctuations are less than, or of the order of 30% below the mesopause. Such motions may cause significant and variable convection, and wind shear. There is a strong seasonal variation in gravity wave amplitude. Additional observations are needed to address and quantify mean and fluctuation statistics of both density and mean velocity, variability of the mean and fluctuations, and to identify dominant gravity wave scales and sources as well as causes of variability, both temporal and geographic.

  6. Loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Dah-Wei

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an "in-a-nutshell" yet self-contained introductory review on loop quantum gravity (LQG) — a background-independent, nonperturbative approach to a consistent quantum theory of gravity. Instead of rigorous and systematic derivations, it aims to provide a general picture of LQG, placing emphasis on the fundamental ideas and their significance. The canonical formulation of LQG, as the central topic of the paper, is presented in a logically orderly fashion with moderate details, while the spin foam theory, black hole thermodynamics, and loop quantum cosmology are covered briefly. Current directions and open issues are also summarized.

  7. A Study on the Structure of Barotropic/Baroclinic Instability in the Mesosphere Using a Gravity-wave Resolving General Circulation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, K.; Masuda, A.

    2014-12-01

    In general, atmospheric motions are categorized into two: One is the quasi-geostrophic (QG) flows including planetary waves (PWs), and the other is gravity waves (GWs). The GWs are largely affected by the QG flows in their generation, propagation, and dissipation, but GWs can modify the QG flows such as the weak wind layer in the upper mesosphere by their ability of momentum transport. In the winter mesosphere, a necessary condition of barotropic and/or baroclinic instability for the QG flow, i.e., negative latitudinal gradient of potential vorticity (PV), is often satisfied. This study examines dynamical mechanism of the formation of such instability condition in boreal winter and discusses the significant role of the GW forcing. We used simulation data from a GW-resolving general circulation model (GCM). As this GCM does not include any GW parameterizations, all waves including GWs are resolved, which allows us to analyze the role of GWs in the momentum budget in the middle atmosphere explicitly. First, a two-dimensional (2-d) analysis using the transformed Eulerian-mean equations was made. It is seen that the negative PV gradient is regarded as an enhanced PV maximum. This maximum is due to the poleward shift of the westerly jet in association with strong EP-flux divergence caused by PWs from the troposphere. Strong GW drag slightly above the westerly jet shifts poleward as well, which can be understood by a selective GW-filtering mechanism. It seems that this GW-drag shift induces strong upwelling in the middle latitudes and adiabatically cools the middle mesosphere. Resultant enhanced static stability is the main cause of the PV maximum in the upper mesosphere. Because of the dominance of PWs during this event, this process may not be zonally uniform. Thus, second, a 3-d analysis was made using a recently derived 3-d transformed Eulerian-mean theory. As expected, the GW drag is distributed depending on the longitude. The zonal structure of PV maximum is

  8. Compact objects in Horndeski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Hector O.; Maselli, Andrea; Minamitsuji, Masato; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Horndeski gravity holds a special position as the most general extension of Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) with a single scalar degree of freedom and second-order field equations. Because of these features, Horndeski gravity is an attractive phenomenological playground to investigate the consequences of modifications of GR in cosmology and astrophysics. We present a review of the progress made so far in the study of compact objects (black holes (BHs) and neutron stars (NSs)) within Horndeski gravity. In particular, we review our recent work on slowly rotating BHs and present some new results on slowly rotating NSs.

  9. Revamped braneworld gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bao Ruoyu; Park, Minjoon; Carena, Marcela; Santiago, Jose; Lykken, Joseph

    2006-03-15

    Gravity in five-dimensional braneworld backgrounds often exhibits problematic features, including kinetic ghosts, strong coupling, and the van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov (vDVZ) discontinuity. These problems are an obstacle to producing and analyzing braneworld models with interesting and potentially observable modifications of 4d gravity. We examine these problems in a general AdS{sub 5}/AdS{sub 4} setup with two branes and localized curvature from arbitrary brane kinetic terms. We use the interval approach and an explicit straight gauge-fixing. We compute the complete quadratic gauge-fixed effective 4d action, as well as the leading cubic order corrections. We compute the exact Green's function for gravity as seen on the brane. In the full parameter space, we exhibit the regions which avoid kinetic ghosts and tachyons. We give a general formula for the strong coupling scale, i.e., the energy scale at which the linearized treatment of gravity breaks down, for relevant regions of the parameter space. We show how the vDVZ discontinuity can be naturally but nontrivially avoided by ultralight graviton modes. We present a direct comparison of warping versus localized curvature in terms of their effects on graviton mode couplings. We exhibit the first example of Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP)-like crossover behavior in a general warped setup.

  10. Revamped braneworld gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Ruoyu; Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph; Park, Minjoon; Santiago, Jose; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    Gravity in five-dimensional braneworld backgrounds often exhibits problematic features, including kinetic ghosts, strong coupling, and the vDVZ discontinuity. These problems are an obstacle to producing and analyzing braneworld models with interesting and potentially observable modifications of 4d gravity. We examine these problems in a general AdS{sub 5}/AdS{sub 4} setup with two branes and localized curvature from arbitrary brane kinetic terms. We use the interval approach and an explicit ''straight'' gauge-fixing. We compute the complete quadratic gauge-fixed effective 4d action, as well as the leading cubic order corrections. We compute the exact Green's function for gravity as seen on the brane. In the full parameter space, we exhibit the regions which avoid kinetic ghosts and tachyons. We give a general formula for the strong coupling scale, i.e. the energy scale at which the linearized treatment of gravity breaks down, for relevant regions of the parameter space. We show how the vDVZ discontinuity can be naturally but nontrivially avoided by ultralight graviton modes. We present a direct comparison of warping versus localized curvature in terms of their effects on graviton mode couplings. We exhibit the first example of DGP-like crossover behavior in a general warped setup.

  11. Cosmological tests of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Bhuvnesh; Khoury, Justin

    2010-07-15

    Modifications of general relativity provide an alternative explanation to dark energy for the observed acceleration of the universe. We review recent developments in modified gravity theories, focusing on higher-dimensional approaches and chameleon/f(R) theories. We classify these models in terms of the screening mechanisms that enable such theories to approach general relativity on small scales (and thus satisfy solar system constraints). We describe general features of the modified Friedman equation in such theories. The second half of this review describes experimental tests of gravity in light of the new theoretical approaches. We summarize the high precision tests of gravity on laboratory and solar system scales. We describe in some detail tests on astrophysical scales ranging from {approx} kpc (galaxy scales) to {approx} Gpc (large-scale structure). These tests rely on the growth and inter-relationship of perturbations in the metric potentials, density and velocity fields which can be measured using gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster abundances, galaxy clustering and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. A robust way to interpret observations is by constraining effective parameters, such as the ratio of the two metric potentials. Currently tests of gravity on astrophysical scales are in the early stages - we summarize these tests and discuss the interesting prospects for new tests in the coming decade.

  12. Cosmological tests of modified gravity.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard [Formula: see text]CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years. PMID:27007681

  13. Cosmological tests of modified gravity.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard [Formula: see text]CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years.

  14. Cosmological tests of modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard Λ CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years.

  15. Neutron stars in Horndeski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, Andrea; Silva, Hector O.; Minamitsuji, Masato; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-06-01

    Horndeski's theory of gravity is the most general scalar-tensor theory with a single scalar whose equations of motion contain at most second-order derivatives. A subsector of Horndeski's theory known as "Fab Four" gravity allows for dynamical self-tuning of the quantum vacuum energy, and therefore it has received particular attention in cosmology as a possible alternative to the Λ CDM model. Here we study compact stars in Fab Four gravity, which includes as special cases general relativity ("George"), Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity ("Ringo"), theories with a nonminimal coupling with the Einstein tensor ("John"), and theories involving the double-dual of the Riemann tensor ("Paul"). We generalize and extend previous results in theories of the John class and were not able to find realistic compact stars in theories involving the Paul class.

  16. U-duality covariant gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohm, Olaf; Samtleben, Henning

    2013-09-01

    We extend the techniques of double field theory to more general gravity theories and U-duality symmetries, having in mind applications to the complete D = 11 supergravity. In this paper we work out a (3 + 3)-dimensional `U-duality covariantization' of D = 4 Einstein gravity, in which the Ehlers group SL(2, ) is realized geometrically, acting in the 3 representation on half of the coordinates. We include the full (2 + 1)-dimensional metric, while the `internal vielbein' is a coset representative of SL(2, )/SO(2) and transforms under gauge transformations via generalized Lie derivatives. In addition, we introduce a gauge connection of the `C-bracket', and a gauge connection of SL(2, ), albeit subject to constraints. The action takes the form of (2 + 1)-dimensional gravity coupled to a Chern-Simons-matter theory but encodes the complete D = 4 Einstein gravity. We comment on generalizations, such as an ` E 8(8) covariantization' of M-theory.

  17. 14 CFR 27.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 27.27 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of gravity must...

  18. 14 CFR 27.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 27.27 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of gravity must...

  19. 14 CFR 27.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 27.27 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of gravity must...

  20. 14 CFR 27.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 27.27 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of gravity must...

  1. 14 CFR 27.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 27.27 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of gravity must...

  2. QCD analogy for quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdom, Bob; Ren, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Quadratic gravity presents us with a renormalizable, asymptotically free theory of quantum gravity. When its couplings grow strong at some scale, as in QCD, then this strong scale sets the Planck mass. QCD has a gluon that does not appear in the physical spectrum. Quadratic gravity has a spin-2 ghost that we conjecture does not appear in the physical spectrum. We discuss how the QCD analogy leads to this conjecture and to the possible emergence of general relativity. Certain aspects of the QCD path integral and its measure are also similar for quadratic gravity. With the addition of the Einstein-Hilbert term, quadratic gravity has a dimensionful parameter that seems to control a quantum phase transition and the size of a mass gap in the strong phase.

  3. Gravity settling

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Hyman R.; Long, R. H.; Simone, A. A.

    1979-01-01

    Solids are separated from a liquid in a gravity settler provided with inclined solid intercepting surfaces to intercept the solid settling path to coalesce the solids and increase the settling rate. The intercepting surfaces are inverted V-shaped plates, each formed from first and second downwardly inclined upwardly curved intersecting conical sections having their apices at the vessel wall.

  4. Simulating Gravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  5. Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2009-11-01

    The continuing search for quantum gravity and never ending attempts to unify gravity with other forces of nature represent tremendous waste of public and private funds directing students' energy towards non-creative manipulative work instead of learning from the scientific creativity in Einstein's 1919 paper that unifies gravity with nuclear force. It reflects Einstein's 1919 jump beyond his own 1915 theory of gravity, including that of Newton as implicitly demanded by Newton in 1686. Einstein corrected and retracted his 1917 introduction of cosmological constant in 1919. Dislike of the fact that Einstein did not use quantum mechanics to prove his point has no real value now, because we will use key ingredients (Planck scale and probabilistic aspect) of quantum mechanics and show that they reach the same conclusion. Newton explained the solar system known after Kepler. Likewise, our quantum mechanical approach explains the strong coupling as well the solar system and shows new horizons, otherwise unexplained. Explanation of unexplained observations need no prediction per Hawking, and obviously otherwise.

  6. Testing relativistic theories of gravity with spacecraft-Doppler gravity-wave detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellings, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The response of a spacecraft Doppler-tracking system to the passage of a weak plane gravity wave of the most general polarization is calculated. Results show that the simultaneous tracking of several spacecraft could provide an unambiguous determination of the gravity-wave polarization, a much needed result in the continuing experimental testing of relativistic theories of gravity.

  7. Massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukohyama, Shinji

    2013-09-01

    The concept of mass has been central in many areas of physics. Gravitation is not an exception, and it has been one of the long-standing questions whether the graviton, a spin-2 particle that mediates gravity, can have a non-vanishing mass or not. This question is relevant from not only theoretical but also phenomenological viewpoints, since a nonzero graviton mass may lead to late-time acceleration of the universe and thus may be considered as an alternative to dark energy. In 2010, de Rham, Gabadadze and Tolley proposed the first example of a fully nonlinear massive gravity theory and showed that the so called Boulware-Deser ghost, which had been one of the major obstacles against a stable nonlinear theory of massive gravity since 1972, can be removed by construction. Since then, nonlinear massive gravity has been attracting significant interest among physicists and cosmologists. The nonlinear theory of massive gravity provides a theoretical framework in which properties of the remaining five physical degrees of freedom of massive gravity can be studied. As always with any low-energy effective theories, one of the first tasks would be to identify good and bad backgrounds. Depending on the choice of backgrounds, some of the five degrees of freedom may become strongly coupled, may exhibit instantaneous propagation, or may lead to ghost/gradient instabilities. A related subject is to seek interesting solutions such as those relevant for astrophysical objects and those describing self-accelerating cosmology. Those solutions will allow us to study phenomenological and cosmological implications of the theory. Yet another important task would be to seek a possible (partial) UV completion that can be applied beyond the regime of validity of the low-energy effective theory that we currently know of. We invited articles to cover those important subjects in massive gravity. Given the recent rapid developments in the field, however, it must be noted that this focus issue

  8. Gravity and Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blencowe, Miles

    The emergence of the macroscopic classical world from the microscopic quantum world is commonly understood to be a consequence of the fact that any given quantum system is open, unavoidably interacting with unobserved environmental degrees of freedom that will cause initial quantum superposition states of the system to decohere, resulting in classical mixtures of either-or alternatives. A fundamental question concerns how large a macroscopic object can be placed in a manifest quantum state, such as a center of mass quantum superposition state, under conditions where the effects of the interacting environmental degrees of freedom are reduced (i.e. in ultrahigh vacuum and at ultralow temperatures). Recent experiments have in fact demonstrated manifest quantum behavior in nano-to-micron-scale mechanical systems. Gravity has been invoked in various ways as playing a possible fundamental role in enforcing classicality of matter systems beyond a certain scale. Adopting the viewpoint that the standard perturbative quantization of general relativity provides an effective description of quantum gravity that is valid at ordinary energies, we show that it is possible to describe quantitatively how gravity as an environment can induce the decoherence of matter superposition states. The justification for such an approach follows from the fact that we are considering laboratory scale systems, where the matter is localized to regions of small curvature. As with other low energy effects, such as the quantum gravity correction to the Newtonian potential between two ordinary masses, it should be possible to quantitatively evaluate gravitationally induced decoherence rates by employing standard perturbative quantum gravity as an effective field theory; whatever the final form the eventual correct quantum theory of gravity takes, it must converge in its predictions with the effective field theory description at low energies. Research supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF

  9. Quantum Corrections to Entropic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Wang, Chiao-Hsuan

    2013-12-01

    The entropic gravity scenario recently proposed by Erik Verlinde reproduced Newton's law of purely classical gravity yet the key assumptions of this approach all have quantum mechanical origins. As is typical for emergent phenomena in physics, the underlying, more fundamental physics often reveals itself as corrections to the leading classical behavior. So one naturally wonders: where is ħ hiding in entropic gravity? To address this question, we first revisit the idea of holographic screen as well as entropy and its variation law in order to obtain a self-consistent approach to the problem. Next we argue that as the concept of minimal length has been invoked in the Bekenstein entropic derivation, the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), which is a direct consequence of the minimal length, should be taken into consideration in the entropic interpretation of gravity. Indeed based on GUP it has been demonstrated that the black hole Bekenstein entropy area law must be modified not only in the strong but also in the weak gravity regime where in the weak gravity limit the GUP modified entropy exhibits a logarithmic correction. When applying it to the entropic interpretation, we demonstrate that the resulting gravity force law does include sub-leading order correction terms that depend on ħ. Such deviation from the classical Newton's law may serve as a probe to the validity of entropic gravity.

  10. Quantum Corrections to Entropic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Wang, Chiao-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    The entropic gravity scenario recently proposed by Erik Verlinde reproduced Newton's law of purely classical gravity yet the key assumptions of this approach all have quantum mechanical origins. As is typical for emergent phenomena in physics, the underlying, more fundamental physics often reveals itself as corrections to the leading classical behavior. So one naturally wonders: where is ℏ hiding in entropic gravity? To address this question, we first revisit the idea of holographic screen as well as entropy and its variation law in order to obtain a self-consistent approach to the problem. Next we argue that since the concept of minimal length has been invoked in the Bekenstein entropic derivation, the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), which is a direct consequence of the minimal length, should be taken into consideration in the entropic interpretation of gravity. Indeed based on GUP it has been demonstrated that the black hole Bekenstein entropy area law must be modified not only in the strong but also in the weak gravity regime where in the weak gravity limit the GUP modified entropy exhibits a logarithmic correction. When applying it to the entropic interpretation, we demonstrate that the resulting gravity force law does include sub-leading order correction terms that depend on ℏ. Such deviation from the classical Newton's law may serve as a probe to the validity of entropic gravity.

  11. Fake conformal symmetry in unimodular gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    We study Weyl symmetry (local conformal symmetry) in unimodular gravity. It is shown that the Noether currents for both Weyl symmetry and global scale symmetry vanish exactly as in conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity. We clearly explain why in the class of conformally invariant gravitational theories, the Noether currents vanish by starting with conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity. Moreover, we comment on both classical and quantum-mechanical equivalences in Einstein's general relativity, conformally invariant scalar-tensor gravity, and the Weyl-transverse gravity. Finally, we discuss the Weyl current in the conformally invariant scalar action and see that it is also vanishing.

  12. Lovelock gravity from entropic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykhi, A.; Moradpour, H.; Riazi, N.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we first generalize the formulation of entropic gravity to (n+1)-dimensional spacetime and derive Newton's law of gravity and Friedmann equation in arbitrary dimensions. Then, we extend the discussion to higher order gravity theories and propose an entropic origin for Gauss-Bonnet gravity and more general Lovelock gravity in arbitrary dimensions. As a result, we are able to derive Newton's law of gravitation as well as the corresponding Friedmann equations in these gravity theories. This procedure naturally leads to a derivation of the higher dimensional gravitational coupling constant of Friedmann/Einstein equation which is in complete agreement with the results obtained by comparing the weak field limit of Einstein equation with Poisson equation in higher dimensions. Our strategy is to start from first principles and assuming the entropy associated with the apparent horizon given by the expression previously known via black hole thermodynamics, but replacing the horizon radius r_+ with the apparent horizon radius R. Our study shows that the approach presented here is powerful enough to derive the gravitational field equations in any gravity theory and further supports the viability of Verlinde's proposal.

  13. Natural inflation and quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Anton; Saraswat, Prashant; Sundrum, Raman

    2015-04-17

    Cosmic inflation provides an attractive framework for understanding the early Universe and the cosmic microwave background. It can readily involve energies close to the scale at which quantum gravity effects become important. General considerations of black hole quantum mechanics suggest nontrivial constraints on any effective field theory model of inflation that emerges as a low-energy limit of quantum gravity, in particular, the constraint of the weak gravity conjecture. We show that higher-dimensional gauge and gravitational dynamics can elegantly satisfy these constraints and lead to a viable, theoretically controlled and predictive class of natural inflation models. PMID:25933305

  14. Natural inflation and quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Anton; Saraswat, Prashant; Sundrum, Raman

    2015-04-17

    Cosmic inflation provides an attractive framework for understanding the early Universe and the cosmic microwave background. It can readily involve energies close to the scale at which quantum gravity effects become important. General considerations of black hole quantum mechanics suggest nontrivial constraints on any effective field theory model of inflation that emerges as a low-energy limit of quantum gravity, in particular, the constraint of the weak gravity conjecture. We show that higher-dimensional gauge and gravitational dynamics can elegantly satisfy these constraints and lead to a viable, theoretically controlled and predictive class of natural inflation models.

  15. Cosmological perturbations in unimodular gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Caixia; Brandenberger, Robert H.; Cai, Yifu; Chen, Pisin E-mail: rhb@hep.physics.mcgill.ca E-mail: chen@slac.stanford.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study cosmological perturbation theory within the framework of unimodular gravity. We show that the Lagrangian constraint on the determinant of the metric required by unimodular gravity leads to an extra constraint on the gauge freedom of the metric perturbations. Although the main equation of motion for the gravitational potential remains the same, the shift variable, which is gauge artifact in General Relativity, cannot be set to zero in unimodular gravity. This non-vanishing shift variable affects the propagation of photons throughout the cosmological evolution and therefore modifies the Sachs-Wolfe relation between the relativistic gravitational potential and the microwave temperature anisotropies. However, for adiabatic fluctuations the difference between the result in General Relativity and unimodular gravity is suppressed on large angular scales. Thus, no strong constraints on the theory can be derived.

  16. New improved massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereli, T.; Yetişmişoğlu, C.

    2016-06-01

    We derive the field equations for topologically massive gravity coupled with the most general quadratic curvature terms using the language of exterior differential forms and a first-order constrained variational principle. We find variational field equations both in the presence and absence of torsion. We then show that spaces of constant negative curvature (i.e. the anti de-Sitter space AdS 3) and constant torsion provide exact solutions.

  17. The gravity field in Taiwan Strait

    SciTech Connect

    Su Daquan; Chen Xue; Liu Zuhui )

    1990-06-01

    Gravity surveys have been carried out in the western part of Taiwan Strait by South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Academia Sinica, from 1986 to 1989. More than 3,000 km of gravity profile data have been collected. The accuracy of the gravity is about {plus minus}2.5 mGal. Based on these data, gravity maps of Taiwan Strait (1:2,000,000) have been compiled, combined with the data from University of Tokyo, Lamont-Doherty geological observatory, and the USSR, which were collected from the east and southeast parts of Taiwan Strait. The interval of contour is 5 mGal. These maps cover part of East China Sea and South China Sea, where good gravity data have been gathered. Comparing the data from different sources in the same area, the authors think they are in very good agreement. These maps for the first time give detailed gravity information in the Taiwan Strait. It is very useful for the tectonic study and oil exploration in this area. The relationship between gravity anomalies and sedimentary basins has been studied in this area. Most of data show that the gravity low corresponds to the basin area and the gravity high is related to tectonic structure high. Xia-Peng depression, Wuqiuy depression, and Xinzhu depression, etc., show the gravity low. The relationship also can be seen in the gravity profiles clearly. The general tendency of gravity in the Taiwan Strait is that the gravity values gradually increase from the south part to the north part. It can be probably explained by deep geological structures. The relationship between gravity and geological structure units is also studied. They think the undulation of gravity anomalies is closely related to tectonic structures. Some main faults can be confirmed by the gravity maps.

  18. Expanding Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisenberg, Sol

    2005-04-01

    Newton's gravitational constant Gn and Laws of Gravity are based upon observations in our solar system. Mysteries appear when they are used far outside our solar system Apparently, Newton's gravitational constant can not be applied at large distances. Dark matter was needed to explain the observed flat rotational velocity curves of spiral galaxies (Rubin), and of groups of remote galaxies (Zwicky). Our expansion of Newton's gravitational constant Gn as a power series in distance r, is sufficient to explain these observations without using dark matter. This is different from the MOND theory of Milgrom involving acceleration. Also, our Expanded Gravitational Constant (EGC) can show the correct use of the red shift. In addition to the Doppler contribution, there are three other contributions and these depend only upon gravity. Thus, velocity observations only based on the red shift can not be used to support the concept of the expanding universe, the accelerating expansion, or dark energy. Our expanded gravity constant can predict and explain Olbers' paradox (dark sky), and the temperature of the CMB (cosmic microwave background). Thus, CMB may not support the big bang and inflation.

  19. Cutoff for extensions of massive gravity and bi-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matas, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Recently there has been interest in extending ghost-free massive gravity, bi-gravity, and multi-gravity by including non-standard kinetic terms and matter couplings. We first review recent proposals for this class of extensions, emphasizing how modifications of the kinetic and potential structure of the graviton and modifications of the coupling to matter are related. We then generalize existing no-go arguments in the metric language to the vielbein language in second-order form. We give an ADM argument to show that the most promising extensions to the kinetic term and matter coupling contain a Boulware-Deser ghost. However, as recently emphasized, we may still be able to view these extensions as effective field theories below some cutoff scale. To address this possibility, we show that there is a decoupling limit where a ghost appears for a wide class of matter couplings and kinetic terms. In particular, we show that there is a decoupling limit where the linear effective vielbein matter coupling contains a ghost. Using the insight we gain from this decoupling limit analysis, we place an upper bound on the cutoff for the linear effective vielbein coupling. This result can be generalized to new kinetic interactions in the vielbein language in second-order form. Combined with recent results, this provides a strong uniqueness argument on the form of ghost-free massive gravity, bi-gravity, and multi-gravity.

  20. A remark on quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Kreimer, Dirk

    2008-01-15

    We discuss the structure of Dyson-Schwinger equations in quantum gravity and conclude in particular that all relevant skeletons are of first order in the loop number. There is an accompanying sub-Hopf algebra on gravity amplitudes equivalent to identities between n-graviton scattering amplitudes which generalize the Slavnov-Taylor identities. These identities map the infinite number of charges and finite numbers of skeletons in gravity to an infinite number of skeletons and a finite number of charges needing renormalization. Our analysis suggests that gravity, regarded as a probability conserving but perturbatively non-renormalizable theory, is renormalizable after all, thanks to the structure of its Dyson-Schwinger equations.

  1. Positive signs in massive gravity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. Furthermore, the high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small islandmore » in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. And while the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.« less

  2. Testing Gravity using Cosmic Voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falck, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Though general relativity is well-tested on small (Solar System) scales, the late-time acceleration of the Universe provides strong motivation to test GR on cosmological scales. The difference between the small and large scale behavior of gravity is determined by the screening mechanism in modified gravity theories. Dark matter halos are often screened in these models, especially in models with Vainshtein screening, motivating a search for signatures of modified gravity in cosmic voids. We explore density, force, and velocity profiles of voids found in N-body simulations, using both dark matter particles and dark matter halos to identify the voids. The prospect of testing gravity using cosmic voids may be limited by the sparsity of halos as tracers of the density field.

  3. Positive signs in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    We derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. The high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small island in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. While the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.

  4. Energy conditions in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Mimoso, José P.

    2014-03-01

    We consider generalized energy conditions in modified theories of gravity by taking into account the further degrees of freedom related to scalar fields and curvature invariants. The latter are usually recast as generalized geometrical fluids that have different meanings with respect to the standard matter fluids generally adopted as sources of the field equations. More specifically, in modified gravity the curvature terms are grouped in a tensor H and a coupling g(Ψi) that can be reorganized in effective Einstein field equations, as corrections to the energy-momentum tensor of matter. The formal validity of such inequalities does not assure some basic requirements such as the attractive nature of gravity, so that the energy conditions have to be considered in a wider sense.

  5. Static solutions for fourth order gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, William

    2010-11-15

    The Lichnerowicz and Israel theorems are extended to higher order theories of gravity. In particular it is shown that Schwarzschild is the unique spherically symmetric, static, asymptotically flat, black-hole solution, provided the spatial curvature is less than the quantum gravity scale outside the horizon. It is then shown that in the presence of matter (satisfying certain positivity requirements), the only static and asymptotically flat solutions of general relativity that are also solutions of higher order gravity are the vacuum solutions.

  6. Nonlocal modification of Newtonian gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Blome, Hans-Joachim; Chicone, Carmen; Hehl, Friedrich W.; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2010-03-15

    The Newtonian regime of a recent nonlocal extension of general relativity is investigated. Nonlocality is introduced via a scalar ''constitutive'' kernel in a special case of the translational gauge theory of gravitation, namely, the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity. In this theory, the nonlocal aspect of gravity simulates dark matter. A nonlocal and nonlinear generalization of Poisson's equation of Newtonian gravitation is presented. The implications of nonlocality for the gravitational physics in the solar system are briefly studied.

  7. Artificial gravity.

    PubMed

    Scott, William B

    2005-04-25

    NASA's Artificial Gravity program consists of a team of researchers from Wyle Laboratories, NASA Johnson Space Center, and the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB). The short-radius centrifuge (SRC), built by Wyle Laboratories, will be integrated with UTMB's conducted bedrest studies, which mimic the detrimental effects of weightlessness (or microgravity). Bedrest subjects will be spun on the SRC at various accelerations and for various time periods, while being monitored medically. Parameters such as bone loss, muscle atrophy, balance control, and oxygen consumption will then be compared in order to research ways of mitigating the impact on astronauts' physiology. Other potential benefits from these studies extend to population groups on Earth, such as bedridden patients. PMID:15852559

  8. Variable gravity research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Eight fourth-year engineering design students formed two teams to study methods of varying the perceived gravity level in a variable gravity research facility. A tether system and an arm system were the chosen topics. Both teams have produced and built scale models of their design. In addition, a three-credit Special Topics Course (Aviation 370) was formed, as the project offers an excellent opportunity to build a multi-disciplinary program around the initial conceptualization process. Fifty students were registered in the Special Topics course. Each week during a three hour class, a guest lecturer covered one or more of the many areas associated with the concept of a variable-gravity facility. The students formed small groups organized on a multi-disciplinary basis (there were twelve separate disciplines represented by one or more students) where they discussed among themselves the various issues involved. These groups also met outside class for three or more hours each week. During class each group presented oral reports on their findings during a one-hour general question and answer period.

  9. Conservation laws in gravity: A unified framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Yuri N.; Puetzfeld, Dirk

    2014-07-01

    We study general metric-affine theories of gravity in which the metric and connection are the two independent fundamental variables. In this framework, we use Lagrange-Noether methods to derive the identities and the conservation laws that correspond to the invariance of the action under general coordinate transformations. The results obtained are applied to generalized models with nonminimal coupling of matter and gravity, with a coupling function that depends arbitrarily on the covariant gravitational field variables.

  10. Development of the Newtonian Gravity Concept Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Kathryn E.; Willoughby, Shannon; Prather, Edward E.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the Newtonian Gravity Concept Inventory (NGCI), a 26-item multiple-choice instrument to assess introductory general education college astronomy ("Astro 101") student understanding of Newtonian gravity. This paper describes the development of the NGCI through four phases: Planning, Construction, Quantitative Analysis, and…

  11. Anisotropy in Gravity and Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melby-Thompson, Charles Milton

    In this thesis, we examine the dynamical structure of Hořava-Lifshitz gravity, and investigate its relationship with holography for anisotropic systems. Hořava-Lifshitz gravity refers to a broad class of gravitational models that incorporate anisotropy at a fundamental level. The idea behind Hořava-Lifshitz gravity is to utilize ideas from the theory of dynamical critical phenomena into gravity to produce a theory of dynamical spacetime that is power-counting renormalizable, and is thus a candidate renormalizable quantum field theory of gravity. One of the most distinctive features of Hořava-Lifshitz gravity is that its group of symmetries consists not of the diffeomorphisms of spacetime, but instead of the group of diffeomorphisms that preserve a given foliation by spatial slices. As a result of having a smaller group of symmetries, HL gravity naturally has one more propagating degree of freedom than general relativity. The extra mode presents two possible difficulties with the theory, one relating to consistency, and the second to its viability as a phenomenological model. (1) It may destabilize the theory. (2) Phenomenologically, there are severe constraints on the existence of an extra propagating graviton polarization, as well as strong experimental constraints on the value of a parameter appearing in the dispersion relation of the extra mode. In the first part of this dissertation we show that the extra mode can be eliminated by introducing a new local symmetry which steps in and takes the place of general covariance in the anisotropic context. While the identification of the appropriate symmetry is quite subtle in the full non-linear theory, once the dust settles, the resulting theory has a spectrum which matches that of general relativity in the infrared. This goes a good way toward answering the question of how close Hořava-Lifshitz gravity can come to reproducing general relativity in the infrared regime. In the second part of the thesis we pursue

  12. Regional gravity analysis of the crustal structure of Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jallouli, Chokri; Mickus, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Gravity data were integrated with seismic refraction/reflection data, well data and geological investigations to determine a general crustal structure of Tunisia. The gravity data analysis included the construction of a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map, residual gravity anomaly maps, horizontal gravity gradient maps and a 2.5-D gravity model. Residual gravity anomaly maps illustrate crustal anomalies associated with various structural domains within Tunisia including the Sahel Block, Saharian Flexure, Erg Oriental Basin, Algerian Anticlinorium, Gafsa Trough, Tunisian Trough, Kasserine Platform and the Tell Mountains. Gravity anomalies associated with these features are interpreted to be caused either by thickening or thinning of Palæozoic and younger sediments or by crustal thinning. Analysis of the residual gravity anomaly and horizontal gravity gradient maps also determined a number of anomalies that may be associated with previously unknown structures. A north-south trending gravity model in general indicated similar subsurface bodies as a coincident seismic model. However, thinner Mesozoic sediments within the Tunisian Trough, thinner Palæozoic sediments in the Gafsa Trough, and a greater offset on the Saharian Flexure were required by the gravity data. Additionally, basement uplifts under the Kasserine Platform and Gafsa Trough, not imaged by seismic data, were required by the gravity data. The gravity model revealed two previously unknown basins north and south of the Algerian Anticlinorium (5 km), while the Erg Oriental Basin is composed of at least two sub-basins, each with a depth of 5 km.

  13. Fast gravity, gravity partials, normalized gravity, gravity gradient torque and magnetic field: Derivation, code and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    Derivation of first and second partials of the gravitational potential is given in both normalized and unnormalized form. Two different recursion formulas are considered. Derivation of a general gravity gradient torque algorithm which uses the second partial of the gravitational potential is given. Derivation of the geomagnetic field vector is given in a form that closely mimics the gravitational algorithm. Ada code for all algorithms that precomputes all possible data is given. Test cases comparing the new algorithms with previous data are given, as well as speed comparisons showing the relative efficiencies of the new algorithms.

  14. Modifications of gravity.

    PubMed

    Skordis, Constantinos

    2011-12-28

    General relativity (GR) is a phenomenologically successful theory that rests on firm foundations, but has not been tested on cosmological scales. The deep mystery of dark energy (and possibly even the requirement of cold dark matter (CDM)) has increased the need for testing modifications to GR, as the inference of such otherwise undetected fluids depends crucially on the theory of gravity. Here, I discuss a general scheme for constructing consistent and covariant modifications to the Einstein equations. This framework is such that there is a clear connection between the modification and the underlying field content that produces it. I argue that this is mandatory for distinguishing modifications of gravity from conventional fluids. I give a non-trivial example, a simple metric-based modification of the fluctuation equations for which the background is exact ΛCDM, but differs from it in the perturbations. I show how this can be generalized and solved in terms of two arbitrary functions. Finally, I discuss future prospects and directions of research.

  15. Gravitational waves in fourth order gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, S.; Stabile, A.

    2015-08-01

    In the post-Minkowskian limit approximation, we study gravitational wave solutions for general fourth-order theories of gravity. Specifically, we consider a Lagrangian with a generic function of curvature invariants . It is well known that when dealing with General Relativity such an approach provides massless spin-two waves as propagating degree of freedom of the gravitational field while this theory implies other additional propagating modes in the gravity spectra. We show that, in general, fourth order gravity, besides the standard massless graviton is characterized by two further massive modes with a finite-distance interaction. We find out the most general gravitational wave solutions in terms of Green functions in vacuum and in presence of matter sources. If an electromagnetic source is chosen, only the modes induced by are present, otherwise, for any gravity model, we have the complete analogy with tensor modes of General Relativity. Polarizations and helicity states are classified in the hypothesis of plane wave.

  16. 14 CFR 25.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 25.27 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and the extreme aft center of gravity limitations must be established for each...

  17. 14 CFR 25.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 25.27 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and the extreme aft center of gravity limitations must be established for each...

  18. 14 CFR 29.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 29.27 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of...

  19. 14 CFR 25.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 25.27 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and the extreme aft center of gravity limitations must be established for each...

  20. 14 CFR 29.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 29.27 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of...

  1. 14 CFR 29.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 29.27 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of...

  2. 14 CFR 29.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 29.27 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of...

  3. 14 CFR 29.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 29.27 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 29.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and aft centers of gravity and, where critical, the extreme lateral centers of...

  4. 14 CFR 25.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 25.27 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and the extreme aft center of gravity limitations must be established for each...

  5. 14 CFR 25.27 - Center of gravity limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Center of gravity limits. 25.27 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight General § 25.27 Center of gravity limits. The extreme forward and the extreme aft center of gravity limitations must be established for each...

  6. A new theory of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, W.

    1972-01-01

    A new relativistic theory of gravity is presented. This theory agrees with all experiments to date. It is a metric theory, it is Lagrangian-based, and it possesses a preferred frame with conformally-flat space slices. With an appropriate choice of certain adjustable functions and parameters, this theory possesses precisely the same post-Newtonian limit as general relativity.

  7. Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters fluctuate on all scales. In the mesoscale these fluctuations are occasionally sinusoidal so that they can be interpreted as gravity waves. Usually, however, the fluctuations are noise like, so that their cause is not immediately evident. Results of mesoscale observations in the 20 to 120 m altitude range that are suitable for incorporation into a model atmosphere are very limited. In the stratosphere and lower mesosphere observations are sparse and very little data has been summarized into appropriate form. There is much more data in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but again very little of it has been summarized. The available mesoscale spectra of horizontal wind u versus vertical wave number m in the 20 to 120 km altitude range are shown together with a spectrum from the lower atmosphere for comparison. Further information about these spectra is given. In spite of the large range of altitudes and latitudes, the spectra from the lower atmosphere (NASA, 1971 and DEWAN, 1984) are remarkably similar in both shape and amplitude. The mean slopes of -2.38 for the NASA spectrum and -2.7 for the Dewan spectra are supported by the mean slope of -2.75 found by ROSENBERG et al. (1974). The mesospheric spectrum is too short to establish a shape. Its amplitude is about an order of magnitude larger than the NASA spectrum in the same wave number range. The NASA and Dewan spectra suggest that the mesoscale spectra in the lower atmosphere are insensitive to meteorological conditions.

  8. Gravity wave transmission diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomikawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    A possibility of gravity wave propagation from a source region to the airglow layer around the mesopause has been discussed based on the gravity wave blocking diagram taking into account the critical level filtering alone. This paper proposes a new gravity wave transmission diagram in which both the critical level filtering and turning level reflection of gravity waves are considered. It shows a significantly different distribution of gravity wave transmissivity from the blocking diagram.

  9. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  10. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  11. Extension of loop quantum gravity to f(R) theories.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangdong; Ma, Yongge

    2011-04-29

    The four-dimensional metric f(R) theories of gravity are cast into connection-dynamical formalism with real su(2) connections as configuration variables. Through this formalism, the classical metric f(R) theories are quantized by extending the loop quantization scheme of general relativity. Our results imply that the nonperturbative quantization procedure of loop quantum gravity is valid not only for general relativity but also for a rather general class of four-dimensional metric theories of gravity.

  12. Defining gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Joey Shapiro; Hendry, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The announcement confirming the discovery of gravitational waves created sensational media interest. But educational outreach and communication must remain high on the agenda if the general public is to understand such a landmark result.

  13. Disformally self-tuning gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emond, William T.; Saffin, Paul M.

    2016-03-01

    We extend a previous self-tuning analysis of the most general scalar-tensor theory of gravity in four dimensions with second order field equations by considering a generalized coupling to the matter sector. Through allowing a disformal coupling to matter we are able to extend the Fab Four model and construct a new class of theories that are able to tune away the cosmological constant on Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker backgrounds.

  14. Warping the Weak Gravity Conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooner, Karta; Parameswaran, Susha; Zavala, Ivonne

    2016-08-01

    The Weak Gravity Conjecture, if valid, rules out simple models of Natural Inflation by restricting their axion decay constant to be sub-Planckian. We revisit stringy attempts to realise Natural Inflation, with a single open string axionic inflaton from a probe D-brane in a warped throat. We show that warped geometries can allow the requisite super-Planckian axion decay constant to be achieved, within the supergravity approximation and consistently with the Weak Gravity Conjecture. Preliminary estimates of the brane backreaction suggest that the probe approximation may be under control. However, there is a tension between large axion decay constant and high string scale, where the requisite high string scale is difficult to achieve in all attempts to realise large field inflation using perturbative string theory. We comment on the Generalized Weak Gravity Conjecture in the light of our results.

  15. Universality of quantum gravity corrections.

    PubMed

    Das, Saurya; Vagenas, Elias C

    2008-11-28

    We show that the existence of a minimum measurable length and the related generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), predicted by theories of quantum gravity, influence all quantum Hamiltonians. Thus, they predict quantum gravity corrections to various quantum phenomena. We compute such corrections to the Lamb shift, the Landau levels, and the tunneling current in a scanning tunneling microscope. We show that these corrections can be interpreted in two ways: (a) either that they are exceedingly small, beyond the reach of current experiments, or (b) that they predict upper bounds on the quantum gravity parameter in the GUP, compatible with experiments at the electroweak scale. Thus, more accurate measurements in the future should either be able to test these predictions, or further tighten the above bounds and predict an intermediate length scale between the electroweak and the Planck scale.

  16. Short Range Tests of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Crystal; Harter, Andrew; Hoyle, C. D.; Leopardi, Holly; Smith, David

    2014-03-01

    Gravity was the first force to be described mathematically, yet it is the only fundamental force not well understood. The Standard Model of quantum mechanics describes interactions between the fundamental strong, weak and electromagnetic forces while Einstein's theory of General Relativity (GR) describes the fundamental force of gravity. There is yet to be a theory that unifies inconsistencies between GR and quantum mechanics. Scenarios of String Theory predicting more than three spatial dimensions also predict physical effects of gravity at sub-millimeter levels that would alter the gravitational inverse-square law. The Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP), a central feature of GR, states that all objects are accelerated at the same rate in a gravitational field independent of their composition. A violation of the WEP at any length would be evidence that current models of gravity are incorrect. At the Humboldt State University Gravitational Research Laboratory, an experiment is being developed to observe gravitational interactions below the 50-micron distance scale. The experiment measures the twist of a parallel-plate torsion pendulum as an attractor mass is oscillated within 50 microns of the pendulum, providing time varying gravitational torque on the pendulum. The size and distance dependence of the torque amplitude provide means to determine deviations from accepted models of gravity on untested distance scales. undergraduate.

  17. Chiral gravity, log gravity, and extremal CFT

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, Alexander; Song Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2010-03-15

    We show that the linearization of all exact solutions of classical chiral gravity around the AdS{sub 3} vacuum have positive energy. Nonchiral and negative-energy solutions of the linearized equations are infrared divergent at second order, and so are removed from the spectrum. In other words, chirality is confined and the equations of motion have linearization instabilities. We prove that the only stationary, axially symmetric solutions of chiral gravity are BTZ black holes, which have positive energy. It is further shown that classical log gravity--the theory with logarithmically relaxed boundary conditions--has finite asymptotic symmetry generators but is not chiral and hence may be dual at the quantum level to a logarithmic conformal field theories (CFT). Moreover we show that log gravity contains chiral gravity within it as a decoupled charge superselection sector. We formally evaluate the Euclidean sum over geometries of chiral gravity and show that it gives precisely the holomorphic extremal CFT partition function. The modular invariance and integrality of the expansion coefficients of this partition function are consistent with the existence of an exact quantum theory of chiral gravity. We argue that the problem of quantizing chiral gravity is the holographic dual of the problem of constructing an extremal CFT, while quantizing log gravity is dual to the problem of constructing a logarithmic extremal CFT.

  18. Observational tests of modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Bhuvnesh; Zhang Pengjie

    2008-09-15

    Modifications of general relativity provide an alternative explanation to dark energy for the observed acceleration of the Universe. Modified gravity theories have richer observational consequences for large-scale structures than conventional dark energy models, in that different observables are not described by a single growth factor even in the linear regime. We examine the relationships between perturbations in the metric potentials, density and velocity fields, and discuss strategies for measuring them using gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster abundances, galaxy clustering/dynamics, and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. We show how a broad class of gravity theories can be tested by combining these probes. A robust way to interpret observations is by constraining two key functions: the ratio of the two metric potentials, and the ratio of the gravitational 'constant' in the Poisson equation to Newton's constant. We also discuss quasilinear effects that carry signatures of gravity, such as through induced three-point correlations. Clustering of dark energy can mimic features of modified gravity theories and thus confuse the search for distinct signatures of such theories. It can produce pressure perturbations and anisotropic stresses, which break the equality between the two metric potentials even in general relativity. With these two extra degrees of freedom, can a clustered dark energy model mimic modified gravity models in all observational tests? We show with specific examples that observational constraints on both the metric potentials and density perturbations can in principle distinguish modifications of gravity from dark energy models. We compare our result with other recent studies that have slightly different assumptions (and apparently contradictory conclusions)

  19. Feeling Gravity's Pull: Gravity Modeling. The Gravity Field of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Frank; Smith, David; Rowlands, David; Zuber, Maria; Neumann, G.; Chinn, Douglas; Pavlis, D.

    2000-01-01

    Most people take the constant presence of gravitys pull for granted. However, the Earth's gravitational strength actually varies from location to location. This variation occurs because mass, which influences an object's gravitational pull, is not evenly distributed within the planet. Changes in topography, such as glacial movement, an earthquake, or a rise in the ocean level, can subtly affect the gravity field. An accurate measurement of the Earth's gravity field helps us understand the distribution of mass beneath the surface. This insight can assist us in locating petroleum, mineral deposits, ground water, and other valuable substances. Gravity mapping can also help notice or verify changes in sea surface height and other ocean characteristics. Such changes may indicate climate change from polar ice melting and other phenomena. In addition, gravity mapping can indicate how land moves under the surface after earthquakes and other plate tectonic processes. Finally, changes in the Earth's gravity field might indicate a shift in water distribution that could affect agriculture, water supplies for population centers, and long-term weather prediction. Scientists can map out the Earth's gravity field by watching satellite orbits. When a satellite shifts in vertical position, it might be passing over an area where gravity changes in strength. Gravity is only one factor that may shape a satellite's orbital path. To derive a gravity measurement from satellite movement, scientists must remove other factors that might affect a satellite's position: 1. Drag from atmospheric friction. 2. Pressure from solar radiation as it heads toward Earth and. as it is reflected off the surface of the Earth 3. Gravitational pull from the Sun, the Moon, and other planets in the Solar System. 4. The effect of tides. 5. Relativistic effects. Scientists must also correct for the satellite tracking process. For example, the tracking signal must be corrected for refraction through the

  20. Feeling Gravity's Pull: Gravity Modeling. The Gravity Field of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank; Smith, David; Rowlands, David; Zuber, Maria; Neumann, G.; Chinn, Douglas; Pavlis, D.

    2000-01-01

    Most people take the constant presence of gravitys pull for granted. However, the Earth's gravitational strength actually varies from location to location. This variation occurs because mass, which influences an object's gravitational pull, is not evenly distributed within the planet. Changes in topography, such as glacial movement, an earthquake, or a rise in the ocean level, can subtly affect the gravity field. An accurate measurement of the Earth's gravity field helps us understand the distribution of mass beneath the surface. This insight can assist us in locating petroleum, mineral deposits, ground water, and other valuable substances. Gravity mapping can also help notice or verify changes in sea surface height and other ocean characteristics. Such changes may indicate climate change from polar ice melting and other phenomena. In addition, gravity mapping can indicate how land moves under the surface after earthquakes and other plate tectonic processes. Finally, changes in the Earth's gravity field might indicate a shift in water distribution that could affect agriculture, water supplies for population centers, and long-term weather prediction. Scientists can map out the Earth's gravity field by watching satellite orbits. When a satellite shifts in vertical position, it might be passing over an area where gravity changes in strength. Gravity is only one factor that may shape a satellite's orbital path. To derive a gravity measurement from satellite movement, scientists must remove other factors that might affect a satellite's position: 1. Drag from atmospheric friction. 2. Pressure from solar radiation as it heads toward Earth and. as it is reflected off the surface of the Earth 3. Gravitational pull from the Sun, the Moon, and other planets in the Solar System. 4. The effect of tides. 5. Relativistic effects. Scientists must also correct for the satellite tracking process. For example, the tracking signal must be corrected for refraction through the

  1. Accurate measurement in the field of the earth of the general-relativistic precession of the LAGEOS II pericenter and new constraints on non-newtonian gravity.

    PubMed

    Lucchesi, David M; Peron, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    The pericenter shift of a binary system represents a suitable observable to test for possible deviations from the newtonian inverse-square law in favor of new weak interactions between macroscopic objects. We analyzed 13 years of tracking data of the LAGEOS satellites with GEODYN II software but with no models for general relativity. From the fit of LAGEOS II pericenter residuals we have been able to obtain a 99.8% agreement with the predictions of Einstein's theory. This result may be considered as a 99.8% measurement in the field of the Earth of the combination of the γ and β parameters of general relativity, and it may be used to constrain possible deviations from the inverse-square law in favor of new weak interactions parametrized by a Yukawa-like potential with strength α and range λ. We obtained |α| ≲ 1 × 10(-11), a huge improvement at a range of about 1 Earth radius.

  2. Accurate Measurement in the Field of the Earth of the General-Relativistic Precession of the LAGEOS II Pericenter and New Constraints on Non-Newtonian Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchesi, David M.; Peron, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    The pericenter shift of a binary system represents a suitable observable to test for possible deviations from the Newtonian inverse-square law in favor of new weak interactions between macroscopic objects. We analyzed 13 years of tracking data of the LAGEOS satellites with GEODYN II software but with no models for general relativity. From the fit of LAGEOS II pericenter residuals we have been able to obtain a 99.8% agreement with the predictions of Einstein’s theory. This result may be considered as a 99.8% measurement in the field of the Earth of the combination of the γ and β parameters of general relativity, and it may be used to constrain possible deviations from the inverse-square law in favor of new weak interactions parametrized by a Yukawa-like potential with strength α and range λ. We obtained |α|≲1×10-11, a huge improvement at a range of about 1 Earth radius.

  3. Loop Quantum Gravity and Asymptotically Flat Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnsdorf, Matthias

    2002-12-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in the field of non-perturbative (loop) quantum gravity in the last decade or so and it is now a rigorously defined kinematical theory (c.f. [5] for a review and references). We are now at the stage where physical applications of loop quantum gravity can be studied and used to provide checks for the consistency of the quantisation programme. Equally, old fundamental problems of canonical quantum gravity such as the problem of time or the interpretation of quantum cosmology need to be reevaluated seriously. These issues can be addressed most profitably in the asymptotically flat sector of quantum gravity. Indeed, it is likely that we should obtain a quantum theory for this special case even if it is not possible to quantise full general relativity. The purpose of this summary is to advertise the extension of loop quantum gravity to this sector that was developed in [1]...

  4. Interval approach to braneworld gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, Marcela; Lykken, Joseph; Park, Minjoon

    2005-10-01

    Gravity in five-dimensional braneworld backgrounds may exhibit extra scalar degrees of freedom with problematic features, including kinetic ghosts and strong coupling behavior. Analysis of such effects is hampered by the standard heuristic approaches to braneworld gravity, which use the equations of motion as the starting point, supplemented by orbifold projections and junction conditions. Here we develop the interval approach to braneworld gravity, which begins with an action principle. This shows how to implement general covariance, despite allowing metric fluctuations that do not vanish on the boundaries. We reproduce simple Z2 orbifolds of gravity, even though in this approach we never perform a Z2 projection. We introduce a family of “straight gauges”, which are bulk coordinate systems in which both branes appear as straight slices in a single coordinate patch. Straight gauges are extremely useful for analyzing metric fluctuations in braneworld models. By explicit gauge-fixing, we show that a general AdS5/AdS4 setup with two branes has at most a radion, but no physical “brane-bending” modes.

  5. Gravity Field Characterization around Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yu

    A small body rendezvous mission requires accurate gravity field characterization for safe, accurate navigation purposes. However, the current techniques of gravity field modeling around small bodies are not achieved to the level of satisfaction. This thesis will address how the process of current gravity field characterization can be made more robust for future small body missions. First we perform the covariance analysis around small bodies via multiple slow flybys. Flyby characterization requires less laborious scheduling than its orbit counterpart, simultaneously reducing the risk of impact into the asteroid's surface. It will be shown that the level of initial characterization that can occur with this approach is no less than the orbit approach. Next, we apply the same technique of gravity field characterization to estimate the spin state of 4179 Touatis, which is a near-Earth asteroid in close to 4:1 resonance with the Earth. The data accumulated from 1992-2008 are processed in a least-squares filter to predict Toutatis' orientation during the 2012 apparition. The center-of-mass offset and the moments of inertia estimated thereof can be used to constrain the internal density distribution within the body. Then, the spin state estimation is developed to a generalized method to estimate the internal density distribution within a small body. The density distribution is estimated from the orbit determination solution of the gravitational coefficients. It will be shown that the surface gravity field reconstructed from the estimated density distribution yields higher accuracy than the conventional gravity field models. Finally, we will investigate two types of relatively unknown gravity fields, namely the interior gravity field and interior spherical Bessel gravity field, in order to investigate how accurately the surface gravity field can be mapped out for proximity operations purposes. It will be shown that these formulations compute the surface gravity field with

  6. Gravitation Theory: Empirical Status from Solar System Experiments: All observations to date are consistent with Einstein's general relativity theory of gravity.

    PubMed

    Nordtvedt, K L

    1972-12-15

    I have reviewed the historical and contemporary experiments that guide us in choosing a post-Newtonian, relativistic gravitational theory. The foundation experiments essentially constrain gravitation theory to be a metric theory in which matter couples solely to one gravitational field, the metric field, although other cosmological gravitational fields may exist. The metric field for any metric theory can be specified (for the solar system, for our present purposes) by a series of potential terms with several parameters. A variety of experiments specify (or put limits on) the numerical values of the seven parameters in the post-Newtonian metric field, and other such experiments have been planned. The empirical results, to date, yield values of the parameters that are consistent with the predictions of Einstein's general relativity.

  7. Gravity is Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  8. Challenging Entropic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roveto, Jonathan

    2011-11-01

    A recent proposal by Erik Verlinde claims that gravity should be viewed not as a fundamental force, but an emergent thermodynamic phenomenon due to some yet undetermined microscopic theory. We present a challenge to this reformulation of gravity. Our claim is that a detailed derivation using Verlinde's proposed theory fails to correctly give Newton's laws or Einstein gravity.

  9. Fab 5: noncanonical kinetic gravity, self tuning, and cosmic acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Appleby, Stephen A.; Linder, Eric V.; Felice, Antonio De E-mail: adefelic@gmail.com

    2012-10-01

    We investigate circumstances under which one can generalize Horndeski's most general scalar-tensor theory of gravity. Specifically we demonstrate that a nonlinear combination of purely kinetic gravity terms can give rise to an accelerating universe without the addition of extra propagating degrees of freedom on cosmological backgrounds, and exhibit self tuning to bring a large cosmological constant under control. This nonlinear approach leads to new properties that may be instructive for exploring the behaviors of gravity.

  10. Laminar natural convection under nonuniform gravity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, J.; Eichhorn, R.; Dhir, V.

    1972-01-01

    Laminar natural convection is analyzed for cases in which gravity varies with the distance from the leading edge of an isothermal plate. The study includes situations in which gravity varies by virtue of the varying slope of a surface. A general integral solution method which includes certain known integral solutions as special cases is developed to account for arbitrary position-dependence of gravity. A series method of solution is also developed for the full equations. Although it is more cumbersome it provides verification of the integral method.

  11. Wald entropy formula and loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodendorfer, N.; Neiman, Y.

    2014-10-01

    We outline how the Wald entropy formula naturally arises in loop quantum gravity based on recently introduced dimension-independent connection variables. The key observation is that in a loop quantization of a generalized gravity theory, the analog of the area operator turns out to measure, morally speaking, the Wald entropy rather than the area. We discuss the explicit example of (higher-dimensional) Lanczos-Lovelock gravity and comment on recent work on finding the correct numerical prefactor of the entropy by comparing it to a semiclassical effective action.

  12. Consistent matter couplings for Plebanski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennie, Felix; Wohlfarth, Mattias N. R.

    2010-11-01

    We develop a scheme for the minimal coupling of all standard types of tensor and spinor field matter to Plebanski gravity. This theory is a geometric reformulation of vacuum general relativity in terms of two-form frames and connection one-forms, and provides a covariant basis for various quantization approaches. Using the spinor formalism we prove the consistency of the newly proposed matter coupling by demonstrating the full equivalence of Plebanski gravity plus matter to Einstein-Cartan gravity. As a by-product we also show the consistency of some previous suggestions for matter actions.

  13. Loop-quantum-gravity vertex amplitude.

    PubMed

    Engle, Jonathan; Pereira, Roberto; Rovelli, Carlo

    2007-10-19

    Spin foam models are hoped to provide the dynamics of loop-quantum gravity. However, the most popular of these, the Barrett-Crane model, does not have the good boundary state space and there are indications that it fails to yield good low-energy n-point functions. We present an alternative dynamics that can be derived as a quantization of a Regge discretization of Euclidean general relativity, where second class constraints are imposed weakly. Its state space matches the SO(3) loop gravity one and it yields an SO(4)-covariant vertex amplitude for Euclidean loop gravity.

  14. Binary Inspiral in Quadratic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent

    2015-01-01

    Quadratic gravity is a general class of quantum-gravity-inspired theories, where the Einstein-Hilbert action is extended through the addition of all terms quadratic in the curvature tensor coupled to a scalar field. In this article, we focus on the scalar Gauss- Bonnet (sGB) theory and consider the black hole binary inspiral in this theory. By applying the post-Newtonian (PN) formalism, we found that there is a scalar dipole radiation which leads to -1PN correction in the energy flux relative to gravitational radiation in general relativity. From the orbital decay rate of a low-mass X-ray binary A0600-20, we obtain the bound that is six orders of magnitude stronger than the current solar system bound. Furthermore, we show that the excess in the orbital decay rate of XTE J1118+480 can be explained by the scalar radiation in sGB theory.

  15. A new theory of gravity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, W.-T.

    1973-01-01

    A new relativistic theory of gravity is presented. This theory agrees with all experiments to date. It is a metric theory; it is Lagrangian-based; and it possesses a preferred frame with conformally flat space slices. With an appropriate choice of certain adjustable functions and parameters and of the cosmological model, this theory possesses precisely the same post-Newtonian limit as general relativity.

  16. Some aspects of holographic W-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Theisen, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    We use the Chern-Simons formulation of higher spin theories in three dimensions to study aspects of holographic W-gravity. Concepts which were useful in studies of pure bulk gravity theories, such as the Fefferman-Graham gauge and the residual gauge transformations, which induce Weyl transformations in the boundary theory and their higher spin generalizations, are reformulated in the Chern-Simons language. Flat connections that correspond to conformal and lightcone gauges in the boundary theory are considered.

  17. Localizing gravity on exotic thick 3-branes

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo-Felisola, Oscar; Melfo, Alejandra; Pantoja, Nelson; Ramirez, Alba

    2004-11-15

    We consider localization of gravity on thick branes with a nontrivial structure. Double walls that generalize the thick Randall-Sundrum solution, and asymmetric walls that arise from a Z{sub 2} symmetric scalar potential, are considered. We present a new asymmetric solution: a thick brane interpolating between two AdS{sub 5} spacetimes with different cosmological constants, which can be derived from a 'fake supergravity' superpotential, and show that it is possible to confine gravity on such branes.

  18. Jebsen-Birkhoff theorem in alternative gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Faraoni, Valerio

    2010-02-15

    We discuss the validity, or lack thereof, of the Jebsen-Birkhoff theorem in scalar-tensor theories by generalizing it and regarding the Brans-Dicke-like scalar as effective matter. Both the Jordan and Einstein frames are discussed and an apparent contradiction between static spherical solutions of scalar-tensor gravity and Hawking's theorem on Brans-Dicke black holes is clarified. The results are applied to metric and Palatini f(R) gravity.

  19. Towards conformal loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H-T Wang, Charles

    2006-03-01

    A discussion is given of recent developments in canonical gravity that assimilates the conformal analysis of gravitational degrees of freedom. The work is motivated by the problem of time in quantum gravity and is carried out at the metric and the triad levels. At the metric level, it is shown that by extending the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) phase space of general relativity (GR), a conformal form of geometrodynamics can be constructed. In addition to the Hamiltonian and Diffeomorphism constraints, an extra first class constraint is introduced to generate conformal transformations. This phase space consists of York's mean extrinsic curvature time, conformal three-metric and their momenta. At the triad level, the phase space of GR is further enlarged by incorporating spin-gauge as well as conformal symmetries. This leads to a canonical formulation of GR using a new set of real spin connection variables. The resulting gravitational constraints are first class, consisting of the Hamiltonian constraint and the canonical generators for spin-gauge and conformorphism transformations. The formulation has a remarkable feature of being parameter-free. Indeed, it is shown that a conformal parameter of the Barbero-Immirzi type can be absorbed by the conformal symmetry of the extended phase space. This gives rise to an alternative approach to loop quantum gravity that addresses both the conceptual problem of time and the technical problem of functional calculus in quantum gravity.

  20. The Lighter Side of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narlikar, Jayant Vishnu

    1996-10-01

    From the drop of an apple to the stately dance of the galaxies, gravity is omnipresent in the Cosmos. Even with its high profile, gravity is the most enigmatic of all the known basic forces in nature. The Lighter Side of Gravity presents a beautifully clear and completely nontechnical introduction to the phenomenon of this force in all its manifestations. Astrophysicist Jayant Narlikar begins with an historical background to the discovery of the law of gravitation by Isaac Newton in the seventeenth century. Using familiar analogies, interesting anecdotes, and numerous illustrations to get across subtle effects and difficult points to readers, he goes on to describe the general theory of relativity and some of its strange and unfamiliar ideas such as curved spacetime, the bending of light, and black holes. Since first publication in 1982 (W.H. Freeman), Dr. Narlikar has brought his book completely up to date and expanded it to include the discovery of gigantic gravitational lenses in space, the findings of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, the detection of dark matter in galaxies, the investigation of the very early Universe, and other new ideas in cosmology. This lucid and stimulating book presents a clear approach to the intriguing phenomenon of gravity for everyone who has ever felt caught in its grip. Jayant Narlikar is the winner of many astronomical prizes and the author of Introduction to Cosmology (Cambridge University Press, 1993).

  1. Gravity Probe B Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The space vehicle Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. In this photograph, engineer Gary Reynolds is inspecting the inside of the probe neck during probe thermal repairs. GP-B is scheduled for launch in April 2004 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Gravity Probe B, Stanford University)

  2. Black holes in scalar-tensor gravity.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Thomas P; Faraoni, Valerio

    2012-02-24

    Hawking has proven that black holes which are stationary as the end point of gravitational collapse in Brans-Dicke theory (without a potential) are no different than in general relativity. We extend this proof to the much more general class of scalar-tensor and f(R) gravity theories, without assuming any symmetries apart from stationarity.

  3. Gravity Effects in Condensing and Evaporating Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermanson, J. C.; Som, S. M.; Allen, J. S.; Pedersen, P. C.

    2004-01-01

    A general overview of gravity effects in condensing and evaporating films is presented. The topics include: 1) Research Overview; 2) NASA Recognizes Critical Need for Condensation & Evaporation Research to Enable Human Exploration of Space; 3) Condensation and Evaporation Research in Reduced Gravity is Enabling for AHST Technology Needs; 4) Differing Role of Surface Tension on Condensing/Evaporating Film Stability; 5) Fluid Mechanisms in Condensing and Evaporating Films in Reduced Gravity; 6) Research Plan; 7) Experimental Configurations for Condensing Films; 8) Laboratory Condensation Test Cell; 9) Aircraft Experiment; 10) Condensation Study Current Test Conditions; 11) Diagnostics; 12) Shadowgraph Images of Condensing n- pentane Film in Unstable (-1g) Configuration; 13) Condensing n-Pentane Film in Normal Gravity (-1g) at Constant Pressure; 14) Condensing n-Pentane Film in Normal Gravity (-1g) with Cyclic Pressure; 15) Non-condensing Pumped Film in Normal Gravity (-1g); 16) Heat Transfer Coefficient in Developing, Unstable Condensing Film in Normal Gravity; 17) Heat Transfer for Unsteady Condensing Film (-1g); 18) Ultrasound Measurement of Film Thickness N-pentane Film, Stable (+1g) Configuration; and 19) Ultrasound Measurement of Film Thickness N-pentane Film, Unstable (-1g) Configuration.

  4. Prediction of physical workload in reduced gravity.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, J H; Alred, J W

    1988-12-01

    As we plan for long-term living and working in low-gravity environments, a system to predict mission support requirements, such as food and water, becomes critical. Such a system must consider the workload imposed by physical tasks for efficient estimation of these supplies. An accurate estimate of human energy expenditure on a space station or lunar base is also necessary to allocate personnel to tasks, and to assign work-rest schedules. An elemental analysis approach for predicting one's energy expenditure in industrial jobs was applied to low-gravity conditions in this paper. This was achieved by a reduction of input body and load weights in a well-accepted model, in proportion to lowered gravity, such as on the moon. Validation was achieved by applying the model to Apollo-era energy expenditure data. These data were from simulated lunar gravity walking studies, observed Apollo 14 walking, simulated lunar gravity upper body torquing, and simulated lunar gravity cart pulling. The energy expenditure model generally underpredicted high energy expenditures, and overpredicted low to medium energy expenditures. The predictions for low to medium workloads were, however, within 15-30% of actual values. Future developmental work will be necessary to include the effects of traction changes, as well as other nonlinear expenditure changes in reduced gravity environments.

  5. New 'phase' of quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Charles H-T

    2006-12-15

    The emergence of loop quantum gravity over the past two decades has stimulated a great resurgence of interest in unifying general relativity and quantum mechanics. Among a number of appealing features of this approach is the intuitive picture of quantum geometry using spin networks and powerful mathematical tools from gauge field theory. However, the present form of loop quantum gravity suffers from a quantum ambiguity, owing to the presence of a free (Barbero-Immirzi) parameter. Following the recent progress on conformal decomposition of gravitational fields, we present a new phase space for general relativity. In addition to spin-gauge symmetry, the new phase space also incorporates conformal symmetry making the description parameter free. The Barbero-Immirzi ambiguity is shown to occur only if the conformal symmetry is gauge fixed prior to quantization. By withholding its full symmetries, the new phase space offers a promising platform for the future development of loop quantum gravity. This paper aims to provide an exposition, at a reduced technical level, of the above theoretical advances and their background developments. Further details are referred to cited references.

  6. EDITORIAL: Focus section on quantum gravity - 25 years of quantum gravity Focus section on quantum gravity - 25 years of quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Joseph

    2011-08-01

    The problem of quantum gravity has been with us for over 80 years. After quantum theory was established in the 1920s, it was successfully applied to the electromagnetic field. Over the years there have been many attempts to bring gravity into the fold. There has been work on the Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity, perturbative approaches to quantum gravity and more. Much intellectual effort went into understanding conceptual and technical problems stemming from the general covariance of the theory. However, in earlier decades, the subject of quantum gravity was relatively on the fringes of theoretical physics research, pursued by a small and diverse community of people. In the mid 1980s the situation changed dramatically. The subject of quantum gravity came to the forefront of fundamental physics research, no longer a backwater but the mainstream. Quantum gravity was widely acknowledged as the last frontier of fundamental physics and attracted the brightest young people. Unlike in previous decades, workers in this area were no longer isolated groups or individuals ploughing lonely furrows, but organised into coherent `programmes' for a concerted attack on the problem. The main programmes coincidentally were all formulated in the mid 1980s. The two `programmes' covered in this section are string theory and loop quantum gravity. String theory was born an offshoot of Hadronic models in particle physics and reflects the particle physicists view that gravity is just one more interaction to be encompassed by a unified theory. Loop quantum gravity reflects the general relativist's conviction that gravity is different and should not be treated as a perturbation about Minkowski spacetime. Each of these approaches has its proponents, adherents and critics. It is now about a quarter of a century since these programmes started. It is perhaps a good time to take stock and assess where we are now and where each of these programmes is headed. The idea in this focus

  7. Domain walls as probes of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dvali, Gia; Gabadadze, Gregory; Pujolas, Oriol; Rahman, Rakibur

    2007-06-15

    We show that domain walls are probes that enable one to distinguish large-distance modified gravity from general relativity (GR) at short distances. For example, low-tension domain walls are stealth in modified gravity, while they do produce global gravitational effects in GR. We demonstrate this by finding exact solutions for various domain walls in the DGP model. A wall with tension lower than the fundamental Planck scale does not inflate and has no gravitational effects on a 4D observer, since its 4D tension is completely screened by gravity itself. We argue that this feature remains valid in a generic class of models of infrared modified gravity. As a byproduct, we obtain exact solutions for supermassive codimension-2 branes.

  8. Spatial curvature, spacetime curvature, and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Richard H.

    2016-08-01

    The belief that curved spacetime gravity cannot be simply and correctly presented results in such misleading presentations as elastic two-dimensional sheets deformed as they support heavy objects. This article attempts to show that the conceptual basis of curved spacetime gravity can be simply and correctly presented, and that the spatial curvature of a deformed elastic sheet is very different from the spacetime curvature underlying gravity. This article introduces the idea of a "splittable" spacetime that has spatial curvature, but is missing most of the manifestations of gravity. A section in which no mathematics is used is directed at students who have studied no more than introductory physics. A separate section, for students who have taken only an introductory course in general relativity, gives mathematical arguments centering on splittable spacetimes.

  9. A new vacuum for loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Bianca; Geiller, Marc

    2015-06-01

    We construct a new vacuum and representation for loop quantum gravity. Because the new vacuum is based on BF theory, it is physical for (2+1)-dimensional gravity, and much closer to the spirit of spin foam quantization in general. To construct this new vacuum and the associated representation of quantum observables, we introduce a modified holonomy-flux algebra that is cylindrically consistent with respect to the notion of refinement by time evolution suggested in Dittrich and Steinhaus (2013 arXiv:1311.7565). This supports the proposal for a construction of the physical vacuum made in Dittrich and Steinhaus (2013 arXiv:1311.7565) and Dittrich (2012 New J. Phys. 14 123004), and for (3+1)-dimensional gravity. We expect that the vacuum introduced here will facilitate the extraction of large scale physics and cosmological predictions from loop quantum gravity.

  10. Brane-induced-gravity shock waves.

    PubMed

    Kaloper, Nemanja

    2005-05-13

    We construct exact gravitational field solutions for a relativistic particle localized on a tensional brane in brane-induced gravity. They are a generalization of gravitational shock waves in 4D de Sitter space. We provide the metrics for both the normal branch and the self-inflating branch Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati brane worlds, and compare them to the 4D Einstein gravity solution and to the case when gravity resides only in the 5D bulk, without any brane-localized curvature terms. At short distances the wave profile looks the same as in four dimensions. The corrections appear only far from the source, where they differ from the long distance corrections in 4D de Sitter space. We also discover a new nonperturbative channel for energy emission into the bulk from the self-inflating [corrected] branch, when gravity is modified at the de Sitter radius.

  11. Stellar structures in Extended Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, S.; De Laurentis, M.

    2016-09-01

    Stellar structures are investigated by considering the modified Lané-Emden equation coming out from Extended Gravity. In particular, this equation is obtained in the Newtonian limit of f ( R) -gravity by introducing a polytropic relation between the pressure and the density into the modified Poisson equation. The result is an integro-differential equation, which, in the limit f ( R) → R , becomes the standard Lané-Emden equation usually adopted in the stellar theory. We find the radial profiles of gravitational potential by solving for some values of the polytropic index. The solutions are compatible with those coming from General Relativity and could be physically relevant in order to address peculiar and extremely massive objects.

  12. Observational bounds on modified gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    De Felice, Antonio; Mukherjee, Pia; Wang Yun

    2008-01-15

    Modified gravity provides a possible explanation for the currently observed cosmic acceleration. In this paper, we study general classes of modified gravity models. The Einstein-Hilbert action is modified by using general functions of the Ricci and the Gauss-Bonnet scalars, both in the metric and in the Palatini formalisms. We do not use an explicit form for the functions, but a general form with a valid Taylor expansion up to second order about redshift zero in the Riemann-scalars. The coefficients of this expansion are then reconstructed via the cosmic expansion history measured using current cosmological observations. These are the quantities of interest for theoretical considerations relating to ghosts and instabilities. We find that current data provide interesting constraints on the coefficients. The next-generation dark energy surveys should shrink the allowed parameter space for modified gravity models quite dramatically.

  13. Gauge/Gravity Duality (Gauge Gravity Duality)

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph

    2010-02-24

    Gauge theories, which describe the particle interactions, are well understood, while quantum gravity leads to many puzzles. Remarkably, in recent years we have learned that these are actually dual, the same system written in different variables. On the one hand, this provides our most precise description of quantum gravity, resolves some long-standing paradoxes, and points to new principles. On the other, it gives a new perspective on strong interactions, with surprising connections to other areas of physics. I describe these ideas, and discuss current and future directions.

  14. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    The use is studied of tether systems to improve the lowest possible steady gravity level on the Space Station. Particular emphasis is placed by the microgravity community on the achievement of high quality microgravity conditions. The tether capability is explored for active control of the center of gravity and the analysis of possible tethered configurations.

  15. Demonstrating Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Stocker, Dennis; Gotti, Daniel; Urban, David; Ross, Howard; Sours, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    A miniature drop tower, Reduced-Gravity Demonstrator is developed to illustrate the effects of gravity on a variety of phenomena including the way fluids flow, flames burn, and mechanical systems (such as pendulum) behave. A schematic and description of the demonstrator and payloads are given, followed by suggestions for how one can build his (her) own.

  16. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    Information on the Tethered Gravity Laboratory on the International Space Station is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include active control, low gravity processes identification, systems analysis, tether interfaces with the Laboratory, elevator and payload configurations, elevator subsystems, and accelerometer technology requirements.

  17. Differential geometry, Palatini gravity and reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Capriotti, S.

    2014-01-15

    The present article deals with a formulation of the so called (vacuum) Palatini gravity as a general variational principle. In order to accomplish this goal, some geometrical tools related to the geometry of the bundle of connections of the frame bundle LM are used. A generalization of Lagrange-Poincaré reduction scheme to these types of variational problems allows us to relate it with the Einstein-Hilbert variational problem. Relations with some other variational problems for gravity found in the literature are discussed.

  18. Anti-gravity device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palsingh, S. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An educational toy useful in demonstrating fundamental concepts regarding the laws of gravity is described. The device comprises a sphere 10 of radius r resting on top of sphere 12 of radius R. The center of gravity of sphere 10 is displaced from its geometrical center by distance D. The dimensions are so related that D((R+r)/r) is greater than r. With the center of gravity of sphere 10 lying on a vertical line, the device is in equilibrium. When sphere 10 is rolled on the surface of sphere 12 it will return to its equilibrium position upon release. This creates an illusion that sphere 10 is defying the laws of gravity. In reality, due to the above noted relationship of D, R, and r, the center of gravity of sphere 10 rises from its equilibrium position as it rolls a short distance up or down the surface of sphere 12.

  19. Gravity, black holes and the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolson, I.

    The book treats current understandings of the nature and properties of gravity, with particular emphasis on its role in the physics of black holes and the structure and evolution of the universe as a whole. The development of modern ideas on force, motion and gravity is traced from the systems of Aristotle and Ptolemy through the work of Copernicus, Galileo and Kepler to Newton's law of universal gravitation and Einstein's general theory of relativity. Particular attention is then given to the role of gravity in stellar motions and to the phenomena determined by the immense gravitational forces associated with bodies of such great density, including relativistic effects, tidal forces, space-time effects, event horizons, rotation, mass and electrical charge, the existence of naked singularities and white holes, and black-hole thermodynamics. The existence of actual black holes in the universe is considered, and various black-hole candidates in the Galaxy, quasars and galactic nuclei are indicated. The role of gravity in cosmology is then examined, with attention given to the implications of general relativity, the Hubble law, the age of the universe, the density of the universe and its eventual fate. Possible alternative to general relativity as a theory of gravitation are considered, including theories of variable gravitational constant, grand unified theories, and quantum gravity.

  20. Gravity, black holes, and the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolson, I.

    1981-01-01

    The book treats current understandings of the nature and properties of gravity, with particular emphasis on its role in the physics of black holes and the structure and evolution of the universe as a whole. The development of modern ideas on force, motion and gravity is traced from the systems of Aristotle and Ptolemy through the work of Copernicus, Galileo and Kepler to Newton's law of universal gravitation and Einstein's general theory of relativity. Particular attention is then given to the role of gravity in stellar motions and to the phenomena determined by the immense gravitational forces associated with bodies of such great density, including relativistic effects, tidal forces, space-time effects, event horizons, rotation, mass and electrical charge, the existence of naked singularities and white holes, and black-hole thermodynamics. The existence of actual black holes in the universe is considered, and various black-hole candidates in the Galaxy, quasars and galactic nuclei are indicated. The role of gravity in cosmology is then examined, with attention given to the implications of general relativity, the Hubble law, the age of the universe, the density of the universe and its eventual fate. Possible alternative to general relativity as a theory of gravitation are considered, including theories of variable gravitational constant, grand unified theories, and quantum gravity.

  1. Open questions in classical gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mannheim, P.D. )

    1994-04-01

    In this work, the authors discuss some outstanding open questions regarding the validity and uniqueness of the standard second-order Newton-Einstein classical gravitational theory. On the observational side the authors discuss the degree to which the realm of validity of Newton's law of gravity can actually be extended to distances much larger than the solar system distance scales on which the law was originally established. On the theoretical side the authors identify some commonly accepted (but actually still open to question) assumptions which go into the formulation of the standard second-order Einstein theory in the first place. In particular, it is shown that while the familiar second-order Poisson gravitational equation (and accordingly its second-order covariant Einstein generalization) may be sufficient to yield Newton's law of gravity they are not in fact necessary. The standard theory thus still awaits the identification of some principle which would then make it necessary too. It is shown that current observational information does not exclusively mandate the standard theory, and that the conformal invariant fourth-order theory of gravity considered recently by Mannheim and Kazanas is also able to meet the constraints of data, and in fact to do so without the need for any so far unobserved nonluminous or dark matter. 37 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Gravity Probe B Encapsulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being encapsulated atop the Delta II launch vehicle. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  3. Galileons and strong gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chagoya, Javier; Koyama, Kazuya; Niz, Gustavo; Tasinato, Gianmassimo E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk E-mail: gianmassimo.tasinato@port.ac.uk

    2014-10-01

    In the context of a cubic Galileon model in which the Vainshtein mechanism suppresses the scalar field interactions with matter, we study low-density stars with slow rotation and static relativistic stars. We develop an expansion scheme to find approximated solutions inside the Vainshtein radius, and show that deviations from General Relativity (GR), while considering rotation, are also suppressed by the Vainshtein mechanism. In a quadratic coupling model, in which the scalarisation effect can significantly enhance deviations from GR in normal scalar tensor gravity, the Galileon term successfully suppresses the large deviations away from GR. Moreover, using a realistic equation of state, we construct solutions for a relativistic star, and show that deviations from GR are more suppressed for higher density objects. However, we found that the scalar field solution ceases to exist above a critical density, which roughly corresponds to the maximum mass of a neutron star. This indicates that, for a compact object described by a polytropic equation of state, the configuration that would collapse into a black hole cannot support a non-trivial scalar field.

  4. Bimetric theory of gravity from the nonchiral Plebanski action

    SciTech Connect

    Speziale, Simone

    2010-09-15

    We study a modification of the Plebanski action for general relativity, which leads to a modified theory of gravity with 8 degrees of freedom. We show how the action can be recasted as a bimetric theory of gravity, and expanding around a biflat background we identify the 6 extra degrees of freedom with a second, massive graviton and a scalar mode.

  5. Generalised boundary terms for higher derivative theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Ali; Talaganis, Spyridon; Edholm, James; Mazumdar, Anupam

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we wish to find the corresponding Gibbons-Hawking-York term for the most general quadratic in curvature gravity by using Coframe slicing within the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) decomposition of spacetime in four dimensions. In order to make sure that the higher derivative gravity is ghost and tachyon free at a perturbative level, one requires infinite covariant derivatives, which yields a generalised covariant infinite derivative theory of gravity. We will be exploring the boundary term for such a covariant infinite derivative theory of gravity.

  6. Notes on semiclassical gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, T.P.; Padmanabhan, T. )

    1989-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the different possible ways of defining the semiclassical limit of quantum general relativity. We discuss the conditions under which the expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor can act as the source for a semiclassical, {ital c}-number, gravitational field. The basic issues can be understood from the study of the semiclassical limit of a toy model, consisting of two interacting particles, which mimics the essential properties of quantum general relativity. We define and study the WK semiclassical approximation and the gaussian semiclassical approximation for this model. We develop rules for finding the back-reaction of the quantum mode {ital q} on the classical mode {ital Q}. We argue that the back-reaction can be found using the phase of the wave-function which describes the dynamics of {ital q}. We find that this back-reaction is obtainable from the expectation value of the hamiltonian if the dispersion in this phase can be neglected. These results on the back-reaction are generalised to the semiclassical limit of the Wheeler--De Witt equation. We conclude that the back-reaction in semiclassical gravity is {l angle}{ital T}{sub {ital i}{ital k}}{r angle} only when the dispersion in the phase of the matter wavefunctional can be neglected. This conclusion is highlighted with a minisuperspace example of a massless scalar field in a Robertson--Walker universe. We use the semiclassical theory to show that the minisuperspace approximation in quantum cosmology is valid only if the production of gravitons is negligible. {copyright} 1989 Academic Press, Inc.

  7. The detection rate of inspiral and quasi-normal modes of Population III binary black holes which can confirm or refute the general relativity in the strong gravity region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinugawa, Tomoya; Miyamoto, Akinobu; Kanda, Nobuyuki; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Using our population synthesis code, we found that the typical chirp mass defined by (m1m2)3/5/(m1 + m2)1/5 of Population III (Pop III) binary black holes (BH-BHs) is ˜30 M⊙ with the total mass of ˜60 M⊙ so that the inspiral chirp signal as well as quasi-normal mode (QNM) of the merging black hole (BH) are interesting targets of KAGRA. The detection rate of the coalescing Pop III BH-BHs is ˜180 events yr- 1 (SFRp/(10-2.5 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3))([fb/(1 + fb)]/0.33)Errsys in our standard model, where SFRp, fb and Errsys are the peak value of the Pop III star formation rate, the binary fraction and the systematic error with Errsys = 1 for our standard model, respectively. To evaluate the robustness of chirp mass distribution and the range of Errsys, we examine the dependence of the results on the unknown parameters and the distribution functions in the population synthesis code. We found that the chirp mass has a peak at ˜30 M⊙ in most of parameters and distribution functions as well as Errsys ranges from 0.046 to 4. Therefore, the detection rate of the coalescing Pop III BH-BHs ranges about 8.3-720 events yr- 1(SFRp/(10- 2.5 M⊙ yr- 1 Mpc- 3))([fb/(1 + fb)]/0.33). The minimum rate corresponds to the worst model which we think unlikely so that unless (SFRp/(10- 2.5 M⊙ yr- 1 Mpc- 3))([fb/(1 + fb)]/0.33) ≪ 0.1, we expect the Pop III BH-BHs merger rate of at least one event per year by KAGRA. Nakano, Tanaka & Nakamura show that if signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of QNM is larger than 35, we can confirm or refute the general relativity (GR) more than 5σ level. In our standard model, the detection rate of Pop III BH-BHs whose S/N is larger than 35 is 3.2 events yr- 1 (SFRp/(10- 2.5 M⊙ yr- 1 Mpc- 3))([fb/(1 + fb)]/0.33)Errsys. Thus, there is a good chance to check whether GR is correct or not in the strong gravity region.

  8. Primordial bubbles from quadratic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhionero, Franco; Amendola, Luca

    1994-10-01

    A toy model of inflation with a first order phase transition built on a nonminimal generalization of quadratic gravity effectively implements a two field inflation and copiously spurs bubbles before the end of the slow roll. In particular, the phase transition may be brought to completion quickly enough to leave an observable signature at the large scales. We identify analytically and numerically the parameter space region capable of fitting the observed galaxy correlation function, while passing the microwave background constraints. Thus, astronomical observations can yield information upon the parameters of fundamental physics.

  9. World gravity standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uotila, U. A.

    1978-01-01

    In order to use gravity anomalies in geodetic computations and geophysical interpretations, the observed gravity values from which anomalies are derived should be referred to one consistent world wide system. The International Gravity Standardization Net 1971 was adapted by the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics at Moscow in 1971, the network was result of extensive cooperation by many organizations and individuals around the world. The network contains more than 1800 stations around the world. The data used in the adjustment included more than 25,000 gravimetry, pendulum and absolute measurements.

  10. Basement Aquifers : How Useful Are Gravity Data ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genthon, P.; Mouhouyouddine, A. H.; Hinderer, J.; Hector, B.; Yameogo, S.

    2014-12-01

    Gravity data with a few microgal precision were proved to be able to constrain the specific yield of various kinds of aquifer in West Africa from annual fluctuations of both the gravimetric and piezometric signals (Pfeffer et al., Geophys. J. Int., 2011; Hector et al., Geophys. J. Int., 2013). However some recent papers reported a disappointing potential of gravity measurements during a pumping experiment in a sandy aquifer (Blainey et al., WRR, 2007; Herckenrath et al., WRR, 2012) and their poor ability in constraining the transmissity and specific yield of the aquifer, which are the parameters to which pumping tests give access. Fresh basement rocks present generally a null porosity and the structure of basement aquifers is given by the weathering profile. In tropical climate, this profile consists of a few tens meter thick saprolite layer, with noticeable porosity but low permeability overlying the weathering front. This weathering front includes in many instances a fractured medium and presents a high permeability with variable porosity. It is hardly sampled in coring experiments. We present some numerical simulation results on the ability of gravity to constrain the transmissivity of this medium. Due to poroelasticity of clay minerals in the saprolite, soil subsidence is expected to occur during pumping with a significant gravity effect. Gravity measurements have therefore to be completed with leveling data at a millimetric precision. We present first the results of numerical modeling of the gravity and subsidence for a theoretical horizontally stratified basement aquifer, and show that gravity and leveling are able to provide independently the poroelasticity coefficient and a single transmissivity coefficient for the bottom of the aquifer, if the properties of the upper saprolites are known. We will discuss then the general case, where the aquifer presents a vertical fracture where the weathering profile thickens.

  11. Cosmological implications of unimodular gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Pankaj; Jaiswal, Atul; Karmakar, Purnendu; Kashyap, Gopal; Singh, Naveen K. E-mail: atijazz@iitk.ac.in E-mail: gopal@iitk.ac.in

    2012-11-01

    We consider a model of gravity and matter fields which is invariant only under unimodular general coordinate transformations (GCT). The determinant of the metric is treated as a separate field which transforms as a scalar under unimodular GCT. Furthermore we also demand that the theory is invariant under a new global symmetry which we call generalized conformal invariance. We study the cosmological implications of the resulting theory. We show that this theory gives a fit to the high-z supernova data which is identical to the standard Big Bang model. Hence we require some other cosmological observations to test the validity of this model. We also consider some models which do not obey the generalized conformal invariance. In these models we can fit the supernova data without introducing the standard cosmological constant term. Furthermore these models introduce only one dark component and hence solve the coincidence problem of dark matter and dark energy.

  12. Chern-Simons Modified Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstratiou, P.

    2013-09-01

    This presentation will be based on my, undergraduate, thesis at Aristotle University of Thessoliniki with the same subject, supervised by Professor Demetrios Papadopoulos. I will first present the general mathematical formulation of the Chern-Simons (CS) modified gravity, which is split in a dynamical and a non-dynamical context, and the different physical theories which suggest this modification. Then proceed by examing the possibility that the CS theory shares solutions with General Relativity in both contexts. In the non-dynamical context I will present a new, undocumented solution as well as all the other possible solutions found to date. I will conclude by arguing that General Relativity and CS Theory share any solutions in the dynamical context.

  13. Effects of background gravity stimuli on gravity-controlled behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, D. F.

    1976-01-01

    Physiological and developmental effects of altered gravity were researched. The stimulus properties of gravity have been found to possess reinforcing and aversive properties. Experimental approaches taken, used animals placed into fields of artificial gravity, in the form of parabolic or spiral centrifuges. Gravity preferences were noted and it was concluded that the psychophysics of gravity and background factors which support these behaviors should be further explored.

  14. Tests of General Relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Michael

    2011-09-22

    The last years have seen continuing activities in the exploration of our understanding of gravity, motivated by results from precision cosmology and new precision astrophysical experiments. At the centre of attention lies the question as to whether general relativity is the correct theory of gravity. In answering this question, we work not only towards correctly interpreting the phenomenon of 'dark energy' but also towards the goal of achieving a quantum theory of gravity. In these efforts, the observations of pulsars, especially those in binary systems, play an important role. Pulsars do not only provide the only evidence for the existence of gravitational waves so far, but they also provide precision tests of general relativity and alternative theories of gravity. This talk summarizes the current state-of-art in these experiments and looks into the future.

  15. Superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The employment of superconductivity and other material properties at cryogenic temperatures to fabricate sensitive, low-drift, gravity gradiometer is described. The device yields a reduction of noise of four orders of magnitude over room temperature gradiometers, and direct summation and subtraction of signals from accelerometers in varying orientations are possible with superconducting circuitry. Additional circuits permit determination of the linear and angular acceleration vectors independent of the measurement of the gravity gradient tensor. A dewar flask capable of maintaining helium in a liquid state for a year's duration is under development by NASA, and a superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer for the NASA Geodynamics Program is intended for a LEO polar trajectory to measure the harmonic expansion coefficients of the earth's gravity field up to order 300.

  16. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    Variable Gravity Laboratory studies are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) conceptual design and engineering analysis; (2) control strategies (fast crawling maneuvers, main perturbations and their effect upon the acceleration level); and (3) technology requirements.

  17. Perturbative QUANTUM GRAVITY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Hooft, Gerard

    2003-12-01

    A good understanding of Perturbative Quantum Gravity is essential for anyone who wishes to proceed towards any kind of non-perturbative approach. This lecture is a brief resumé of the main features of the perturbative regime.

  18. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) thermal control issues; (2) attitude control sybsystem; (3) configuration constraints; (4) payload; (5) acceleration requirements on Variable Gravity Laboratory (VGL); and (6) VGL configuration highlights.

  19. 14 CFR 23.29 - Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... gravity. 23.29 Section 23.29 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight General § 23.29 Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity. (a) The empty weight and corresponding center of gravity must be determined by weighing the airplane with— (1) Fixed ballast;...

  20. 14 CFR 23.29 - Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... gravity. 23.29 Section 23.29 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight General § 23.29 Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity. (a) The empty weight and corresponding center of gravity must be determined by weighing the airplane with— (1) Fixed ballast;...

  1. 14 CFR 23.29 - Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... gravity. 23.29 Section 23.29 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight General § 23.29 Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity. (a) The empty weight and corresponding center of gravity must be determined by weighing the airplane with— (1) Fixed ballast;...

  2. 14 CFR 23.29 - Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... gravity. 23.29 Section 23.29 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight General § 23.29 Empty weight and corresponding center of gravity. (a) The empty weight and corresponding center of gravity must be determined by weighing the airplane with— (1) Fixed ballast;...

  3. Beyond metric gravity: Progress on PS-200

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, T.; Brown, R.E.; Camp, J.B.; Darling, T.; Dyer, P.; Holzscheiter, M.H.; Hughes, R.J.; Jarmie, N.; King, N.S.P.; Lizon, D.C.; Nieto, M.M.; Schauer, M.M.M.; Schecker, J.A.; Cornford, S.; Hosea, K.; Kenefick, R.A.; Hoibraaten, S.; Midzor, M.M.; Parry, S.P.; Ristenen, R.A.; Witteborn, F.C.; Rochet, J.

    1993-03-01

    The reconciliation of quantum mechanics and gravity on varying distance scales requires changes to General Relativity that may be testable implications. We briefly review the status of tests with matter of the inverse square law and the principle of equivalence, then report on progress on the drift-tube measurement section of PS- 200, the experiment to measure the gravitational acceleration of antiprotons.

  4. Beyond metric gravity: Progress on PS-200

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, T.; Brown, R.E.; Camp, J.B.; Darling, T.; Dyer, P.; Holzscheiter, M.H.; Hughes, R.J.; Jarmie, N.; King, N.S.P.; Lizon, D.C.; Nieto, M.M.; Schauer, M.M.M.; Schecker, J.A. ); Cornford, S.; Hosea, K.; Kenefick, R.A. ); Hoibraaten, S.; Midzor, M.M.; Parry, S.P.; Ristenen, R.A. (Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (U

    1993-01-01

    The reconciliation of quantum mechanics and gravity on varying distance scales requires changes to General Relativity that may be testable implications. We briefly review the status of tests with matter of the inverse square law and the principle of equivalence, then report on progress on the drift-tube measurement section of PS- 200, the experiment to measure the gravitational acceleration of antiprotons.

  5. a Computable Framework for Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Viqar; Pawłowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    We present a non-perturbative quantization of general relativity coupled to dust and other matter fields. The dust provides a natural time variable, leading to a physical Hamiltonian with spatial diffeomorphism symmetry. The methods of loop quantum gravity applied to this model lead to a physical Hilbert space and Hamiltonian. This provides a framework for physical calculations in the theory.

  6. f(Lovelock) theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Pablo; Cano, Pablo A.; Óscar Lasso, A.; Ramírez, Pedro F.

    2016-04-01

    f(Lovelock) gravities are simple generalizations of the usual f( R) and Lovelock theories in which the gravitational action depends on some arbitrary function of the corresponding dimensionally-extended Euler densities. In this paper we study several aspects of these theories in general dimensions. We start by identifying the generalized boundary term which makes the gravitational variational problem well-posed. Then, we show that these theories are equivalent to certain scalar-tensor theories and how this relation is characterized by the Hessian of f. We also study the linearized equations of the theory on general maximally symmetric backgrounds. Remarkably, we find that these theories do not propagate the usual ghost-like massive gravitons characteristic of higher-derivative gravities on such backgrounds. In some non-trivial cases, the additional scalar associated to the trace of the metric perturbation is also absent, being the usual graviton the only dynamical field. In those cases, the linearized equations are exactly the same as in Einstein gravity up to an overall factor, making them appealing as holographic toy models. We also find constraints on the couplings of a broad family of five-dimensional f(Lovelock) theories using holographic entanglement entropy. Finally, we construct new analytic asymptotically flat and AdS/dS black hole solutions for some classes of f(Lovelock) gravities in various dimensions.

  7. What Is Gravity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, George

    2004-01-01

    Gravity is the name given to the phenomenon that any two masses, like you and the Earth, attract each other. One pulls on the Earth and the Earth pulls on one the same amount. And one does not have to be touching. Gravity acts over vast distances, like the 150 million kilometers (93 million miles) between the Earth and the Sun or the billions of…

  8. Gravity data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjogren, William L.

    1987-01-01

    Work on three different efforts related to gravity data analysis is discussed. The reduction of raw Doppler data from the Apollo 15 subsatellite to produce acceleration profiles as a function of latitude, longitude and altitude; an investigation related to fitting long arcs of Pioneer Venus Orbiter tracking data; and a study of gravity/topography ratios which were found to have a linear trend with longitude are discussed.

  9. Gravity Before Einstein and Schwinger Before Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia L.

    2012-05-01

    Julian Schwinger was a child prodigy, and Albert Einstein distinctly not; Schwinger had something like 73 graduate students, and Einstein very few. But both thought gravity was important. They were not, of course, the first, nor is the disagreement on how one should think about gravity that is being highlighted here the first such dispute. The talk will explore, first, several of the earlier dichotomies: was gravity capable of action at a distance (Newton), or was a transmitting ether required (many others). Did it act on everything or only on solids (an odd idea of the Herschels that fed into their ideas of solar structure and sunspots)? Did gravitational information require time for its transmission? Is the exponent of r precisely 2, or 2 plus a smidgeon (a suggestion by Simon Newcomb among others)? And so forth. Second, I will try to say something about Scwinger's lesser known early work and how it might have prefigured his "source theory," beginning with "On the Interaction of Several Electrons (the unpublished, 1934 "zeroth paper," whose title somewhat reminds one of "On the Dynamics of an Asteroid," through his days at Berkeley with Oppenheimer, Gerjuoy, and others, to his application of ideas from nuclear physics to radar and of radar engineering techniques to problems in nuclear physics. And folks who think good jobs are difficult to come by now might want to contemplate the couple of years Schwinger spent teaching elementary physics at Purdue before moving on to the MIT Rad Lab for war work.

  10. Einstein Gravity and Beyond: Aspects of Higher-Curvature Gravity and Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Saugata

    This thesis explores the different aspects of higher curvature gravity. The "membrane paradigm" of black holes in Einstein gravity is extended to black holes in f(R) gravity and it is shown that the higher curvature effects of f( R) gravity causes the membrane fluid to become non-Newtonian. Next a modification of the null energy condition in gravity is provided. The purpose of the null energy condition is to filter out ill-behaved theories containing ghosts. Conformal transformations, which are simple redefinitions of the spacetime, introduces serious violations of the null energy condition. This violation is shown to be spurious and a prescription for obtaining a modified null energy condition, based on the universality of the second law of thermodynamics, is provided. The thermodynamic properties of the black holes are further explored using merger of extremal black holes whose horizon entropy has topological contributions coming from the higher curvature Gauss-Bonnet term. The analysis refutes the prevalent belief in the literature that the second law of black hole thermodynamics is violated in the presence of the Gauss-Bonnet term in four dimensions. Subsequently a specific class of higher derivative scalar field theories called the galileons are obtained from a Kaluza-Klein reduction of Gauss-Bonnet gravity. Galileons are null energy condition violating theories which lead to violations of the second law of thermodynamics of black holes. These higher derivative scalar field theories which are non-minimally coupled to gravity required the development of a generalized method for obtaining the equations of motion. Utilizing this generalized method, it is shown that the inclusion of the Gauss-Bonnet term made the theory of gravity to become higher derivative, which makes it difficult to make any statements about the connection between the violation of the second law of thermodynamics and the galileon fields.

  11. Nonlinearities in modified gravity cosmology: Signatures of modified gravity in the nonlinear matter power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Weiguang; Zhang Pengjie; Yang Xiaohu

    2010-05-15

    A large fraction of cosmological information on dark energy and gravity is encoded in the nonlinear regime. Precision cosmology thus requires precision modeling of nonlinearities in general dark energy and modified gravity models. We modify the Gadget-2 code and run a series of N-body simulations on modified gravity cosmology to study the nonlinearities. The modified gravity model that we investigate in the present paper is characterized by a single parameter {zeta}, which determines the enhancement of particle acceleration with respect to general relativity (GR), given the identical mass distribution ({zeta}=1 in GR). The first nonlinear statistics we investigate is the nonlinear matter power spectrum at k < or approx. 3h/Mpc, which is the relevant range for robust weak lensing power spectrum modeling at l < or approx. 2000. In this study, we focus on the relative difference in the nonlinear power spectra at corresponding redshifts where different gravity models have the same linear power spectra. This particular statistics highlights the imprint of modified gravity in the nonlinear regime and the importance of including the nonlinear regime in testing GR. By design, it is less susceptible to the sample variance and numerical artifacts. We adopt a mass assignment method based on wavelet to improve the power spectrum measurement. We run a series of tests to determine the suitable simulation specifications (particle number, box size, and initial redshift). We find that, the nonlinear power spectra can differ by {approx}30% for 10% deviation from GR (|{zeta}-1|=0.1) where the rms density fluctuations reach 10. This large difference, on one hand, shows the richness of information on gravity in the corresponding scales, and on the other hand, invalidates simple extrapolations of some existing fitting formulae to modified gravity cosmology.

  12. Nonlocal gravity in the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicone, C.; Mashhoon, B.

    2016-04-01

    The implications of the recent classical nonlocal generalization of Einstein’s theory of gravitation for gravitational physics in the solar system are investigated. In this theory, the nonlocal character of gravity appears to simulate dark matter. Nonlocal gravity in the Newtonian regime involves a reciprocal kernel with three spatial parameters, of which two have already been determined from the rotation curves of spiral galaxies and the internal dynamics of clusters of galaxies. However, the short-range parameter a 0 remains to be determined. In this connection, the nonlocal contribution to the perihelion precession of a planetary orbit is estimated and a preliminary lower limit on a 0 is determined.

  13. Mass gap in Yang's theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Eckehard W.

    2015-06-01

    The quantization of a curvature-squared model of gravity, in the affine form proposed by Yang, is reconsidered in the path integral formulation. Due to its inherent Weyl invariance, sharing this with internal Yang-Mills fields, it or some of its topological generalizations are still a possible route to quantum gravity. Instanton type solutions with double duality properties exhibit a "vacuum degeneracy", i.e. a bifurcation into distinct classical Einsteinian backgrounds. For linearized fields, this conclusively induces a mass gap in the graviton spectrum, a feature which is an open problem in the quantization of internal Yang-Mills fields.

  14. Naturalness and the weak gravity conjecture.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N

    2014-08-01

    The weak gravity conjecture (WGC) is an ultraviolet consistency condition asserting that an Abelian force requires a state of charge q and mass m with q>m/m_{Pl}. We generalize the WGC to product gauge groups and study its tension with the naturalness principle for a charged scalar coupled to gravity. Reconciling naturalness with the WGC either requires a Higgs phase or a low cutoff at Λ∼qm_{Pl}. If neither applies, one can construct simple models that forbid a natural electroweak scale and whose observation would rule out the naturalness principle.

  15. Holographic entropy increases in quadratic curvature gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Srijit; Sarkar, Sudipta; Wall, Aron C.

    2015-09-01

    Standard methods for calculating the black hole entropy beyond general relativity are ambiguous when the horizon is nonstationary. We fix these ambiguities in all quadratic curvature gravity theories, by demanding that the entropy be increasing at every time, for linear perturbations to a stationary black hole. Our result matches with the entropy formula found previously in holographic entanglement entropy calculations. We explicitly calculate the entropy increase for Vaidya-like solutions in Ricci-tensor gravity to show that (unlike the Wald entropy) the holographic entropy obeys a second law.

  16. Novel Tests of Gravity Below Fifty Microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Gabriela; Johnson, Jeremy; Guerrero, Ian; Hoyle, C. D.

    2016-03-01

    Due to inconsistencies between General Relativity and the Standard Model, tests of gravity remain at the forefront of experimental physics. At Humboldt State University, undergraduates and faculty are designing an experiment sensitive enough to detect gravitational interactions below the 50 micron scale. The experiment measures the twist of a torsion pendulum as an attractor mass is oscillated nearby in a parallel plate configuration, providing time varying gravitational torque on the pendulum. The size and distance dependence of the torque variation will provide a means to determine any deviation from current models of gravity on untested scales. Supported by NSF Grants 1065697 and 1306783.

  17. Gravity Probe B Assembled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being assembled at the Sunnyvale, California location of the Lockheed Martin Corporation. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  18. Fourth order spatial derivative gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bemfica, F. S.; Gomes, M.

    2011-10-15

    In this work, we study a modified theory of gravity that contains up to fourth order spatial derivatives as a model for the Horava-Lifshitz gravity. The propagator is evaluated and, as a result, one extra pole is obtained, corresponding to a spin-2 nonrelativistic massless particle, an extra term which jeopardizes renormalizability, besides the unexpected general relativity unmodified propagator. Then unitarity is proved at the tree level, where the general relativity pole has been shown to have no dynamics, remaining only the 2 degrees of freedom of the new pole. Next, the nonrelativistic effective potential is determined from a scattering process of two identical massive gravitationally interacting bosons. In this limit, Newton's potential is obtained, together with a Darwin-like term that comes from the extra nonpole term in the propagator. Regarding renormalizability, this extra term may be harmful by power counting, but it can be eliminated by adjusting the free parameters of the model. This adjustment is in accord with the detailed balance condition suggested in the literature and shows that the way in which extra spatial derivative terms are added is of fundamental importance.

  19. New variables for classical and quantum gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    1986-01-01

    A Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity based on certain spinorial variables is introduced. These variables simplify the constraints of general relativity considerably and enable one to imbed the constraint surface in the phase space of Einstein's theory into that of Yang-Mills theory. The imbedding suggests new ways of attacking a number of problems in both classical and quantum gravity. Some illustrative applications are discussed.

  20. Constraining Modified Gravity with SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zukin, Phillip; Bertschinger, Edmund

    2009-05-01

    In the 1950's, Papapetrou found that extended bodies with spin, in general relativity, do not move along geodesics because of a spin-curvature coupling. Using an Eikonal approximation, we reproduce these results for Dirac and Majorana particles. We generalize these results to modified theories of gravity with a non-minimally coupled matter lagrangian and place constraints on the coupling field based on the arrival times of SN 1987A neutrinos.

  1. Einstein's other gravity and the acceleration of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.

    2010-06-15

    Spacetime curvature plays the primary role in general relativity but Einstein later considered a theory where torsion was the central quantity. Just as the Einstein-Hilbert action in the Ricci curvature scalar R can be generalized to f(R) gravity, we consider extensions of teleparallel, or torsion scalar T, gravity to f(T) theories. The field equations are naturally second order, avoiding pathologies, and can give rise to cosmic acceleration with unique features.

  2. Analyzing modified unimodular gravity via Lagrange multipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez-Gómez, Diego

    2016-06-01

    The so-called unimodular version of general relativity is revisited. Unimodular gravity is constructed by fixing the determinant of the metric, which leads to the trace-free part of the equations instead of the usual Einstein field equations. Then a cosmological constant naturally arises as an integration constant. While unimodular gravity turns out to be equivalent to general relativity (GR) at the classical level, it provides important differences at the quantum level. Here we extend the unimodular constraint to some extensions of general relativity that have drawn a lot of attention over the last years—f (R ) gravity (or its scalar-tensor picture) and Gauss-Bonnet gravity. The corresponding unimodular version of such theories is constructed as well as the conformal transformation that relates the Einstein and Jordan frames for these nonminimally coupled theories. From the classical point of view, the unimodular versions of such extensions are completely equivalent to their originals, but an effective cosmological constant arises naturally, which may provide a richer description of the evolution of the Universe. Here we analyze the case of Starobisnky inflation and compare it with the original one.

  3. Constraining torsion with Gravity Probe B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yi; Tegmark, Max; Guth, Alan H.; Cabi, Serkan

    2007-11-01

    It is well-entrenched folklore that all torsion gravity theories predict observationally negligible torsion in the solar system, since torsion (if it exists) couples only to the intrinsic spin of elementary particles, not to rotational angular momentum. We argue that this assumption has a logical loophole which can and should be tested experimentally, and consider nonstandard torsion theories in which torsion can be generated by macroscopic rotating objects. In the spirit of action=reaction, if a rotating mass like a planet can generate torsion, then a gyroscope would be expected to feel torsion. An experiment with a gyroscope (without nuclear spin) such as Gravity Probe B (GPB) can test theories where this is the case. Using symmetry arguments, we show that to lowest order, any torsion field around a uniformly rotating spherical mass is determined by seven dimensionless parameters. These parameters effectively generalize the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism and provide a concrete framework for further testing Einstein’s general theory of relativity (GR). We construct a parametrized Lagrangian that includes both standard torsion-free GR and Hayashi-Shirafuji maximal torsion gravity as special cases. We demonstrate that classic solar system tests rule out the latter and constrain two observable parameters. We show that Gravity Probe B is an ideal experiment for further constraining nonstandard torsion theories, and work out the most general torsion-induced precession of its gyroscope in terms of our torsion parameters.

  4. Constraining torsion with Gravity Probe B

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Yi; Guth, Alan H.; Cabi, Serkan; Tegmark, Max

    2007-11-15

    It is well-entrenched folklore that all torsion gravity theories predict observationally negligible torsion in the solar system, since torsion (if it exists) couples only to the intrinsic spin of elementary particles, not to rotational angular momentum. We argue that this assumption has a logical loophole which can and should be tested experimentally, and consider nonstandard torsion theories in which torsion can be generated by macroscopic rotating objects. In the spirit of action=reaction, if a rotating mass like a planet can generate torsion, then a gyroscope would be expected to feel torsion. An experiment with a gyroscope (without nuclear spin) such as Gravity Probe B (GPB) can test theories where this is the case. Using symmetry arguments, we show that to lowest order, any torsion field around a uniformly rotating spherical mass is determined by seven dimensionless parameters. These parameters effectively generalize the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism and provide a concrete framework for further testing Einstein's general theory of relativity (GR). We construct a parametrized Lagrangian that includes both standard torsion-free GR and Hayashi-Shirafuji maximal torsion gravity as special cases. We demonstrate that classic solar system tests rule out the latter and constrain two observable parameters. We show that Gravity Probe B is an ideal experiment for further constraining nonstandard torsion theories, and work out the most general torsion-induced precession of its gyroscope in terms of our torsion parameters.

  5. Can Gravity Probe B usefully constrain torsion gravity theories?

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, Eanna E.; Rosenthal, Eran

    2007-06-15

    In most theories of gravity involving torsion, the source for torsion is the intrinsic spin of matter. Since the spins of fermions are normally randomly oriented in macroscopic bodies, the amount of torsion generated by macroscopic bodies is normally negligible. However, in a recent paper, Mao et al. (arXiv:gr-qc/0608121) point out that there is a class of theories, including the Hayashi-Shirafuji (1979) theory, in which the angular momentum of macroscopic spinning bodies generates a significant amount of torsion. They further argue that, by the principle of action equals reaction, one would expect the angular momentum of test bodies to couple to a background torsion field, and therefore the precession of the Gravity Probe B gyroscopes should be affected in these theories by the torsion generated by the Earth. We show that in fact the principle of action equals reaction does not apply to these theories, essentially because the torsion is not an independent dynamical degree of freedom. We examine in detail a generalization of the Hayashi-Shirafuji theory suggested by Mao et al. called Einstein-Hayashi-Shirafuji theory. There are a variety of different versions of this theory, depending on the precise form of the coupling to matter chosen for the torsion. We show that, for any coupling to matter that is compatible with the spin transport equation postulated by Mao et al., the theory has either ghosts or an ill-posed initial-value formulation. These theoretical problems can be avoided by specializing the parameters of the theory and in addition choosing the standard minimal coupling to matter of the torsion tensor. This yields a consistent theory, but one in which the action equals reaction principle is violated, and in which the angular momentum of the gyroscopes does not couple to the Earth's torsion field. Thus, the Einstein-Hayashi-Shirafuji theory does not predict a detectable torsion signal for Gravity Probe B. There may be other torsion theories which do.

  6. Entropic force, noncommutative gravity, and ungravity

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolini, Piero

    2010-08-15

    After recalling the basic concepts of gravity as an emergent phenomenon, we analyze the recent derivation of Newton's law in terms of entropic force proposed by Verlinde. By reviewing some points of the procedure, we extend it to the case of a generic quantum gravity entropic correction to get compelling deviations to the Newton's law. More specifically, we study: (1) noncommutative geometry deviations and (2) ungraviton corrections. As a special result in the noncommutative case, we find that the noncommutative character of the manifold would be equivalent to the temperature of a thermodynamic system. Therefore, in analogy to the zero temperature configuration, the description of spacetime in terms of a differential manifold could be obtained only asymptotically. Finally, we extend the Verlinde's derivation to a general case, which includes all possible effects, noncommutativity, ungravity, asymptotically safe gravity, electrostatic energy, and extra dimensions, showing that the procedure is solid versus such modifications.

  7. Entropic force, noncommutative gravity, and ungravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolini, Piero

    2010-08-01

    After recalling the basic concepts of gravity as an emergent phenomenon, we analyze the recent derivation of Newton’s law in terms of entropic force proposed by Verlinde. By reviewing some points of the procedure, we extend it to the case of a generic quantum gravity entropic correction to get compelling deviations to the Newton’s law. More specifically, we study: (1) noncommutative geometry deviations and (2) ungraviton corrections. As a special result in the noncommutative case, we find that the noncommutative character of the manifold would be equivalent to the temperature of a thermodynamic system. Therefore, in analogy to the zero temperature configuration, the description of spacetime in terms of a differential manifold could be obtained only asymptotically. Finally, we extend the Verlinde’s derivation to a general case, which includes all possible effects, noncommutativity, ungravity, asymptotically safe gravity, electrostatic energy, and extra dimensions, showing that the procedure is solid versus such modifications.

  8. Feynman propagator for spin foam quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Oriti, Daniele

    2005-03-25

    We link the notion causality with the orientation of the spin foam 2-complex. We show that all current spin foam models are orientation independent. Using the technology of evolution kernels for quantum fields on Lie groups, we construct a generalized version of spin foam models, introducing an extra proper time variable. We prove that different ranges of integration for this variable lead to different classes of spin foam models: the usual ones, interpreted as the quantum gravity analogue of the Hadamard function of quantum field theory (QFT) or as inner products between quantum gravity states; and a new class of causal models, the quantum gravity analogue of the Feynman propagator in QFT, nontrivial function of the orientation data, and implying a notion of "timeless ordering".

  9. Rainbow metric from quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assanioussi, Mehdi; Dapor, Andrea; Lewandowski, Jerzy

    2015-12-01

    In this Letter, we describe a general mechanism for emergence of a rainbow metric from a quantum cosmological model. This idea is based on QFT on a quantum spacetime. Under general assumptions, we discover that the quantum spacetime on which the field propagates can be replaced by a classical spacetime, whose metric depends explicitly on the energy of the field: as shown by an analysis of dispersion relations, quanta of different energy propagate on different metrics, similar to photons in a refractive material (hence the name "rainbow" used in the literature). In deriving this result, we do not consider any specific theory of quantum gravity: the qualitative behaviour of high-energy particles on quantum spacetime relies only on the assumption that the quantum spacetime is described by a wave-function Ψo in a Hilbert space HG.

  10. Gravity effects on endogenous movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsson, Anders; Antonsen, Frank

    -ation stimulations (gravitropism reactions). Such a negative feedback can account for gravity initiated transport, resulting in lateral water transport and overall movements. The simulation results indicate that self-sustained oscillations can occur on such a cylinder of cells. It will also be demonstrated that the introduction of feedback in the model results in longer circum-nutation periods. It will be discussed how this generic modeling approach could be applied to discuss oscillatory plant movements in general and how other environmental factors, as for instance light gradients, could couple to the self-sustained movements. The oscillations require weightlessness for proper investigations. References: Antonsen F.: Biophysical studies of plant growth movements in microgravity and under 1 g conditions. PhD thesis, Norwegian University of Science and Technology 1998. Johnsson A., Solheim BGB, Iversen T.-H.: Gravity amplifies and microgravity decreases cir-cumnutations in Arabidopsis thaliana stems: results from a space experiment.-New Phytologist 182: 621-629. 2009. Turing AM.: The chemical basis for morphogenesis.-Phil Trans. R. Soc. London Ser B237:37 -72. 1952.

  11. Gait transitions in simulated reduced gravity.

    PubMed

    Ivanenko, Yuri P; Labini, Francesca Sylos; Cappellini, Germana; Macellari, Velio; McIntyre, Joseph; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    Gravity has a strong effect on gait and the speed of gait transitions. A gait has been defined as a pattern of locomotion that changes discontinuously at the transition to another gait. On Earth, during gradual speed changes, humans exhibit a sudden discontinuous switch from walking to running at a specific speed. To study the effects of altered gravity on both the stance and swing legs, we developed a novel unloading exoskeleton that allows a person to step in simulated reduced gravity by tilting the body relative to the vertical. Using different simulation techniques, we confirmed that at lower gravity levels the transition speed is slower (in accordance with the previously reported Froude number ∼0.5). Surprisingly, however, we found that at lower levels of simulated gravity the transition between walking and running was generally gradual, without any noticeable abrupt change in gait parameters. This was associated with a significant prolongation of the swing phase, whose duration became virtually equal to that of stance in the vicinity of the walk-run transition speed, and with a gradual shift from inverted-pendulum gait (walking) to bouncing gait (running).

  12. Massive gravity wrapped in the cosmic web

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Junsup; Lee, Jounghun; Li, Baojiu E-mail: jounghun@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-03-20

    We study how the filamentary pattern of the cosmic web changes if the true gravity deviates from general relativity (GR) on a large scale. The f(R) gravity, whose strength is controlled to satisfy the current observational constraints on the cluster scale, is adopted as our fiducial model and a large, high-resolution N-body simulation is utilized for this study. By applying the minimal spanning tree algorithm to the halo catalogs from the simulation at various epochs, we identify the main stems of the rich superclusters located in the most prominent filamentary section of the cosmic web and determine their spatial extents per member cluster to be the degree of their straightness. It is found that the f(R) gravity has the effect of significantly bending the superclusters and that the effect becomes stronger as the universe evolves. Even in the case where the deviation from GR is too small to be detectable by any other observables, the degree of the supercluster straightness exhibits a conspicuous difference between the f(R) and the GR models. Our results also imply that the supercluster straightness could be a useful discriminator of f(R) gravity from the coupled dark energy since it is shown to evolve differently between the two models. As a final conclusion, the degree of the straightness of the rich superclusters should provide a powerful cosmological test of large scale gravity.

  13. A harmonic analysis of lunar gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bills, B. G.; Ferrari, A. J.

    1980-02-01

    An improved model of lunar global gravity has been obtained by fitting a sixteenth-degree harmonic series to a combination of Doppler tracking data from Apollo missions 8, 12, 15, and 16, and Lunar Orbiters 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, and laser ranging data to the lunar surface. To compensate for the irregular selenographic distribution of these data, the solution algorithm has also incorporated a semi-empirical a priori covariance function. Maps of the free-air gravity disturbance and its formal error are presented, as are free-air anomaly and Bouguer anomaly maps. The lunar gravitational variance spectrum has the form V(G; n) = O(n to the -4th power), as do the corresponding terrestrial and martian spectra. The variance spectra of the Bouguer corrections (topography converted to equivalent gravity) for these bodies have the same basic form as the observed gravity; and, in fact, the spectral ratios are nearly constant throughout the observed spectral range for each body. Despite this spectral compatibility, the correlation between gravity and topography is generally quite poor on a global scale.

  14. Gravity and Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.

    1996-01-01

    Gravity has been the most constant environmental factor throughout the evolution of biological species on Earth. Organisms are rarely exposed to other gravity levels, either increased or decreased, for prolonged periods. Thus, evolution in a constant 1G field has historically prevented us from appreciating the potential biological consequences of a multi-G universe. To answer the question 'Can terrestrial life be sustained and thrive beyond our planet?' we need to understand the importance of gravity on living systems, and we need to develop a multi-G, rather than a 1G, mentality. The science of gravitational biology took a giant step with the advent of the space program, which provided the first opportunity to examine living organisms in gravity environments lower than could be sustained on Earth. Previously, virtually nothing was known about the effects of extremely low gravity on living organisms, and most of the initial expectations were proven wrong. All species that have flown in space survive in microgravity, although no higher organism has ever completed a life cycle in space. It has been found, however, that many systems change, transiently or permanently, as a result of prolonged exposure to microgravity.

  15. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1990-01-01

    The scope of the study is to investigate ways of controlling the microgravity environment of the International Space Station by means of a tethered system. Four main study tasks were performed. First, researchers analyzed the utilization of the tether systems to improve the lowest possible steady gravity level on the Space Station and the tether capability to actively control the center of gravity position in order to compensate for activities that would upset the mass distribution of the Station. The purpose of the second task was to evaluate the whole of the experiments performable in a variable gravity environment and the related beneficial residual accelerations, both for pure and applied research in the fields of fluid, materials, and life science, so as to assess the relevance of a variable g-level laboratory. The third task involves the Tethered Variable Gravity Laboratory. The use of the facility that would crawl along a deployed tether and expose experiments to varying intensities of reduced gravity is discussed. Last, a study performed on the Attitude Tether Stabilizer concept is discussed. The stabilization effect of ballast masses tethered to the Space Station was investigated as a means of assisting the attitude control system of the Station.

  16. Venus Gravity Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konopliv, Alexander S.; Sjogren, William L.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the Venus gravity methods and results to date (model MGNP90LSAAP). It is called a handbook in that it contains many useful plots (such as geometry and orbit behavior) that are useful in evaluating the tracking data. We discuss the models that are used in processing the Doppler data and the estimation method for determining the gravity field. With Pioneer Venus Orbiter and Magellan tracking data, the Venus gravity field was determined complete to degree and order 90 with the use of the JPL Cray T3D Supercomputer. The gravity field shows unprecedented high correlation with topography and resolution of features to the 2OOkm resolution. In the procedure for solving the gravity field, other information is gained as well, and, for example, we discuss results for the Venus ephemeris, Love number, pole orientation of Venus, and atmospheric densities. Of significance is the Love number solution which indicates a liquid core for Venus. The ephemeris of Venus is determined to an accuracy of 0.02 mm/s (tens of meters in position), and the rotation period to 243.0194 +/- 0.0002 days.

  17. Probing hybrid modified gravity by stellar motion around Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borka, D.; Capozziello, S.; Jovanović, P.; Borka Jovanović, V.

    2016-06-01

    We consider possible signatures for the so called hybrid gravity within the Galactic Central Parsec. This modified theory of gravity consists of a superposition of the metric Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian with an f(R) term constructed à la Palatiniand can be easily reduced to an equivalent scalar-tensor theory. Such an approach is introduced in order to cure the shortcomings related to f(R) gravity, in general formulated either in metric or in metric-affine frameworks. Hybrid gravity allows to disentangle the further gravitational degrees of freedom with respect to those of standard General Relativity. The present analysis is based on the S2 star orbital precession around the massive compact dark object at the Galactic Center where the simulated orbits in hybrid modified gravity are compared with astronomical observations. These simulations result with constraints on the range of hybrid gravity interaction parameter ϕ0, showing that in the case of S2 star it is between -0.0009 and -0.0002. At the same time, we are also able to obtain the constraints on the effective mass parameter mϕ, and found that it is between -0.0034 and -0.0025 AU-1 for S2 star. Furthermore, the hybrid gravity potential induces precession of S2 star orbit in the same direction as General Relativity. In previous papers, we considered other types of extended gravities, like metric power law f(R)∝Rn gravity, inducing Yukawa and Sanders-like gravitational potentials, but it seems that hybrid gravity is the best among these models to explain different gravitational phenomena at different astronomical scales.

  18. New standards for reducing gravity data: The North American gravity database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinze, W. J.; Aiken, C.; Brozena, J.; Coakley, B.; Dater, D.; Flanagan, G.; Forsberg, R.; Hildenbrand, T.; Keller, Gordon R.; Kellogg, J.; Kucks, R.; Li, X.; Mainville, A.; Morin, R.; Pilkington, M.; Plouff, D.; Ravat, D.; Roman, D.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Veronneau, M.; Webring, M.; Winester, D.

    2005-01-01

    The North American gravity database as well as databases from Canada, Mexico, and the United States are being revised to improve their coverage, versatility, and accuracy. An important part of this effort is revising procedures for calculating gravity anomalies, taking into account our enhanced computational power, improved terrain databases and datums, and increased interest in more accurately defining long-wavelength anomaly components. Users of the databases may note minor differences between previous and revised database values as a result of these procedures. Generally, the differences do not impact the interpretation of local anomalies but do improve regional anomaly studies. The most striking revision is the use of the internationally accepted terrestrial ellipsoid for the height datum of gravity stations rather than the conventionally used geoid or sea level. Principal facts of gravity observations and anomalies based on both revised and previous procedures together with germane metadata will be available on an interactive Web-based data system as well as from national agencies and data centers. The use of the revised procedures is encouraged for gravity data reduction because of the widespread use of the global positioning system in gravity fieldwork and the need for increased accuracy and precision of anomalies and consistency with North American and national databases. Anomalies based on the revised standards should be preceded by the adjective "ellipsoidal" to differentiate anomalies calculated using heights with respect to the ellipsoid from those based on conventional elevations referenced to the geoid. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  19. Artificial gravity experiment satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Tadashi

    1992-07-01

    An overview of the conceptual study of an artificial gravity experiment satellite based on the assumption of a launch by the H-2 launch vehicle with a target launch date in the Year 2000 is presented. While many satellites provided with artificial gravity have been reported in relation to a manned Mars exploration spacecraft mission, the review has been conducted on missions and test subjects only for experimental purposes. Mission requirements were determined based on the results of reviews on the mission, test subjects, and model missions. The system baseline and development plan were based on the results of a study on conceptual structure and scale of the system, including measures to generate artificial gravity. Approximate scale of the system and arm length, mission orbit, visibility of the operation orbit from ground stations in Japan, and satellite attitude on the mission orbit are outlined.

  20. Newberry Combined Gravity 2016

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kelly Rose

    2016-01-22

    Newberry combined gravity from Zonge Int'l, processed for the EGS stimulation project at well 55-29. Includes data from both Davenport 2006 collection and for OSU/4D EGS monitoring 2012 collection. Locations are NAD83, UTM Zone 10 North, meters. Elevation is NAVD88. Gravity in milligals. Free air and observed gravity are included, along with simple Bouguer anomaly and terrain corrected Bouguer anomaly. SBA230 means simple Bouguer anomaly computed at 2.30 g/cc. CBA230 means terrain corrected Bouguer anomaly at 2.30 g/cc. This suite of densities are included (g/cc): 2.00, 2.10, 2.20, 2.30, 2.40, 2.50, 2.67.

  1. Junction conditions in extended Teleparallel gravities

    SciTech Connect

    De la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro; Dunsby, Peter K.S.; Sáez-Gómez, Diego E-mail: peter.dunsby@uct.ac.za

    2014-12-01

    In the context of extended Teleparallel gravity theories, we address the issue of junction conditions required to guarantee the correct matching of different regions of spacetime. In the absence of shells/branes, these conditions turn out to be more restrictive than their counterparts in General Relativity as in other extended theories of gravity. In fact, the general junction conditions on the matching hypersurfaces depend on the underlying theory and a new condition on the induced tetrads in order to avoid delta-like distributions in the field equations. This result imposes strict consequences on the viability of standard solutions such as the Einstein-Straus-like construction. We find that the continuity of the scalar torsion is required in order to recover the usual General Relativity results.

  2. The Grip of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondhalekar, Prabhakar

    2001-09-01

    Gravity is one of the most inexplicable forces of nature, controlling everything, from the expansion of the Universe to the ebb and flow of ocean tides. The search for the laws of motion and gravitation began more than two thousand years ago, a quest that Prabhakar Gondhalekar recounts in The Grip of Gravity. Beginning with Aristotle and concluding with Planck, Gondhalekar outlines a 'genealogy' of gravity and lucidly explains how previous explanations have shaped the most recent development in the field, string theory. In this work, physicist and astronomer Gondhalekar describes experiments, both planned and proposed, and clearly explains natural phenomena like ocean tides, seasons, ice ages, the formation of planets, stars, and exotic objects like black holes and neutron stars, which are all controlled by gravity. Including anecdotes and thumb-nail sketches of the personalities involved, The Grip of Gravity provides an introduction to the foundation of modern physics and shows how the current developments in string theory may lead to a new and radical interpretation of gravity. Prabhakar Gondhalekar is an Honorary Fellow in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College, London. Until his retirement in 1998, he was the head of the Space Astronomy Group at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, where he had been a researcher for 18 years. His research has included a number of topics in galactic and extragalactic astronomy, with his major work focusing on the interstellar medium and active galactic nuclei. Gondhalekar has been awarded Royal Society, Leverhulme Trust, and NATO Research Fellowships to do research in universities in the United States and Israel.

  3. Seeking the Light: Gravity Without the Influence of Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, Fred; Kern, Volker; Reed, Dave; Etheridge, Guy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    All living things sense gravity like humans might sense light or sound. The Biological Research In Canisters (BRIC-14) experiment, explores how moss cells sense and respond to gravity and light. This experiment studies how gravity influences the internal structure of moss cells and seeks to understand the influences of the spaceflight environment on cell growth. This knowledge will help researchers understand the role of gravity in the evolution of cells and life on earth.

  4. Terrestrial gravity data analysis for interim gravity model improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This is the first status report for the Interim Gravity Model research effort that was started on June 30, 1986. The basic theme of this study is to develop appropriate models and adjustment procedures for estimating potential coefficients from terrestrial gravity data. The plan is to use the latest gravity data sets to produce coefficient estimates as well as to provide normal equations to NASA for use in the TOPEX/POSEIDON gravity field modeling program.

  5. Asymptotically Safe Lorentzian Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Manrique, Elisa; Rechenberger, Stefan; Saueressig, Frank

    2011-06-24

    The gravitational asymptotic safety program strives for a consistent and predictive quantum theory of gravity based on a nontrivial ultraviolet fixed point of the renormalization group (RG) flow. We investigate this scenario by employing a novel functional renormalization group equation which takes the causal structure of space-time into account and connects the RG flows for Euclidean and Lorentzian signature by a Wick rotation. Within the Einstein-Hilbert approximation, the {beta} functions of both signatures exhibit ultraviolet fixed points in agreement with asymptotic safety. Surprisingly, the two fixed points have strikingly similar characteristics, suggesting that Euclidean and Lorentzian quantum gravity belong to the same universality class at high energies.

  6. Position from gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Procedures for obtaining position from surface gravity observations are reviewed and their relevance assessed in the context of the application of modern geodetic techniques to programs of Earth and ocean physics. Solutions based on the use of surface layer techniques, the discrete value approach, and the development from Green's theorem are stated in summary, the latter being extended to order e cubed in the height anomaly. The representation of the surface gravity field which is required in order that this accuracy may be achieved is discussed. Interim techniques which could be used in the absence of such a representation are also outlined.

  7. Resummation of Massive Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Gabadadze, Gregory; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2011-06-10

    We construct four-dimensional covariant nonlinear theories of massive gravity which are ghost-free in the decoupling limit to all orders. These theories resume explicitly all the nonlinear terms of an effective field theory of massive gravity. We show that away from the decoupling limit the Hamiltonian constraint is maintained at least up to and including quartic order in nonlinearities, hence excluding the possibility of the Boulware-Deser ghost up to this order. We also show that the same remains true to all orders in a similar toy model.

  8. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics from gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, James; Kraus, Per

    2009-04-01

    We apply the recently established connection between nonlinear fluid dynamics and AdS gravity to the case of the dyonic black brane in AdS4. This yields the equations of fluid dynamics for a 2+1 dimensional charged fluid in a background magnetic field. We construct the gravity solution to second order in the derivative expansion. From this we find the fluid dynamical stress tensor and charge current to second and third order in derivatives respectively, along with values for the associated transport coefficients.

  9. Asymptotically safe Lorentzian gravity.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Elisa; Rechenberger, Stefan; Saueressig, Frank

    2011-06-24

    The gravitational asymptotic safety program strives for a consistent and predictive quantum theory of gravity based on a nontrivial ultraviolet fixed point of the renormalization group (RG) flow. We investigate this scenario by employing a novel functional renormalization group equation which takes the causal structure of space-time into account and connects the RG flows for Euclidean and Lorentzian signature by a Wick rotation. Within the Einstein-Hilbert approximation, the β functions of both signatures exhibit ultraviolet fixed points in agreement with asymptotic safety. Surprisingly, the two fixed points have strikingly similar characteristics, suggesting that Euclidean and Lorentzian quantum gravity belong to the same universality class at high energies. PMID:21770628

  10. Gauge/Gravity Duality

    ScienceCinema

    Polchinski, Joseph [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics

    2016-07-12

    Gauge theories, which describe the particle interactions, are well understood, while quantum gravity leads to many puzzles. Remarkably, in recent years we have learned that these are actually dual, the same system written in different variables. On the one hand, this provides our most precise description of quantum gravity, resolves some long-standing paradoxes, and points to new principles. On the other, it gives a new perspective on strong interactions, with surprising connections to other areas of physics. I describe these ideas, and discuss current and future directions.

  11. Asymptotically safe Lorentzian gravity.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Elisa; Rechenberger, Stefan; Saueressig, Frank

    2011-06-24

    The gravitational asymptotic safety program strives for a consistent and predictive quantum theory of gravity based on a nontrivial ultraviolet fixed point of the renormalization group (RG) flow. We investigate this scenario by employing a novel functional renormalization group equation which takes the causal structure of space-time into account and connects the RG flows for Euclidean and Lorentzian signature by a Wick rotation. Within the Einstein-Hilbert approximation, the β functions of both signatures exhibit ultraviolet fixed points in agreement with asymptotic safety. Surprisingly, the two fixed points have strikingly similar characteristics, suggesting that Euclidean and Lorentzian quantum gravity belong to the same universality class at high energies.

  12. Temporal gravity and height changes of the Yellowstone caldera, 1977 - 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnet, F.; Kahle, H.-G.; Klingele, E.; Smith, R.B.; Meertens, Charles M.; Dzurisin, D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the longest record of gravity measurements in the area of the Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming. The temporal gravity changes, at the ??12 ??Gal (10-8 ms-2) precision level, are compared with changes in heights from leveling and GPS. The gravity field decreased across the caldera from 1977 to 1983 during the uplift and attained a maximum decrease of up to -60 ?? 12 ??Gal along the Caldera axis. The gravity field then reversed polarity to increasing values, of up to 60 ?? 12 ??Gal between 1986 and 1993. The ratio between height and gravity changes varied during the entire time, but converged over the latter period following the free-air gravity gradient. General ground deformation deduced from leveling showed caldera-wide uplift of ???15 mm/a during the period of gravity decrease, then from leveling and GPS, subsidence of ??? 25 mm/a during the gravity increase. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. The Role of GRAIL Orbit Determination in Preprocessing of Gravity Science Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruizinga, Gerhard; Asmar, Sami; Fahnestock, Eugene; Harvey, Nate; Kahan, Daniel; Konopliv, Alex; Oudrhiri, Kamal; Paik, Meegyeong; Park, Ryan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Watkins, Michael; Yuan, Dah-Ning

    2013-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission has constructed a lunar gravity field with unprecedented uniform accuracy on the farside and nearside of the Moon. GRAIL lunar gravity field determination begins with preprocessing of the gravity science measurements by applying corrections for time tag error, general relativity, measurement noise and biases. Gravity field determination requires the generation of spacecraft ephemerides of an accuracy not attainable with the pre-GRAIL lunar gravity fields. Therefore, a bootstrapping strategy was developed, iterating between science data preprocessing and lunar gravity field estimation in order to construct sufficiently accurate orbit ephemerides.This paper describes the GRAIL measurements, their dependence on the spacecraft ephemerides and the role of orbit determination in the bootstrapping strategy. Simulation results will be presented that validate the bootstrapping strategy followed by bootstrapping results for flight data, which have led to the latest GRAIL lunar gravity fields.

  14. Emergence of Lorentzian signature and scalar gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Girelli, F.; Liberati, S.; Sindoni, L.

    2009-02-15

    In recent years, a growing momentum has been gained by the emergent gravity framework. Within the latter, the very concepts of geometry and gravitational interaction are not seen as elementary aspects of nature but rather as collective phenomena associated to the dynamics of more fundamental objects. In this paper we want to further explore this possibility by proposing a model of emergent Lorentzian signature and scalar gravity. Assuming that the dynamics of the fundamental objects can give rise in first place to a Riemannian manifold and a set of scalar fields we show how time (in the sense of hyperbolic equations) can emerge as a property of perturbations dynamics around some specific class of solutions of the field equations. Moreover, we show that these perturbations can give rise to a spin-0 gravity via a suitable redefinition of the fields that identifies the relevant degrees of freedom. In particular, we find that our model gives rise to Nordstroem gravity. Since this theory is invariant under general coordinate transformations, this also shows how diffeomorphism invariance (albeit of a weaker form than the one of general relativity) can emerge from much simpler systems.

  15. A gauge-theoretic approach to gravity

    PubMed Central

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2012-01-01

    Einstein's general relativity (GR) is a dynamical theory of the space–time metric. We describe an approach in which GR becomes an SU(2) gauge theory. We start at the linearized level and show how a gauge-theoretic Lagrangian for non-interacting massless spin two particles (gravitons) takes a much more simple and compact form than in the standard metric description. Moreover, in contrast to the GR situation, the gauge theory Lagrangian is convex. We then proceed with a formulation of the full nonlinear theory. The equivalence to the metric-based GR holds only at the level of solutions of the field equations, that is, on-shell. The gauge-theoretic approach also makes it clear that GR is not the only interacting theory of massless spin two particles, in spite of the GR uniqueness theorems available in the metric description. Thus, there is an infinite-parameter class of gravity theories all describing just two propagating polarizations of the graviton. We describe how matter can be coupled to gravity in this formulation and, in particular, how both the gravity and Yang–Mills arise as sectors of a general diffeomorphism-invariant gauge theory. We finish by outlining a possible scenario of the ultraviolet completion of quantum gravity within this approach. PMID:22792040

  16. A gauge-theoretic approach to gravity.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2012-08-01

    Einstein's general relativity (GR) is a dynamical theory of the space-time metric. We describe an approach in which GR becomes an SU(2) gauge theory. We start at the linearized level and show how a gauge-theoretic Lagrangian for non-interacting massless spin two particles (gravitons) takes a much more simple and compact form than in the standard metric description. Moreover, in contrast to the GR situation, the gauge theory Lagrangian is convex. We then proceed with a formulation of the full nonlinear theory. The equivalence to the metric-based GR holds only at the level of solutions of the field equations, that is, on-shell. The gauge-theoretic approach also makes it clear that GR is not the only interacting theory of massless spin two particles, in spite of the GR uniqueness theorems available in the metric description. Thus, there is an infinite-parameter class of gravity theories all describing just two propagating polarizations of the graviton. We describe how matter can be coupled to gravity in this formulation and, in particular, how both the gravity and Yang-Mills arise as sectors of a general diffeomorphism-invariant gauge theory. We finish by outlining a possible scenario of the ultraviolet completion of quantum gravity within this approach.

  17. Nonsingular bounce in modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Abramo, L. Raul; Yasuda, Ivan; Peter, Patrick

    2010-01-15

    We investigate bouncing solutions in the framework of the nonsingular gravity model of Brandenberger, Mukhanov and Sornborger. We show that a spatially flat universe filled with ordinary matter undergoing a phase of contraction reaches a stage of minimal expansion factor before bouncing in a regular way to reach the expanding phase. The expansion can be connected to the usual radiation- and matter-dominated epochs before reaching a final expanding de Sitter phase. In general relativity (GR), a bounce can only take place provided that the spatial sections are positively curved, a fact that has been shown to translate into a constraint on the characteristic duration of the bounce. In our model, on the other hand, a bounce can occur also in the absence of spatial curvature, which means that the time scale for the bounce can be made arbitrarily short or long. The implication is that constraints on the bounce characteristic time obtained in GR rely heavily on the assumed theory of gravity. Although the model we investigate is fourth order in the derivatives of the metric (and therefore unstable vis-a-vis the perturbations), this generic bounce dynamics should extend to string-motivated nonsingular models which can accommodate a spatially flat bounce.

  18. Our World: Gravity in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    What is gravity? Find out about the balance between gravity and inertia that keeps the International Space Station in orbit. Learn why astronauts "float" in space and how the space shuttle has to s...

  19. The measurement of surface gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, J. C.; Lacoste, L. J. B.

    1978-01-01

    LaCoste and Romberg G and D gravity meters are normally employed when attempting high precision measurement of gravity differences on land. The capabilities and limitations of these instruments are discussed.

  20. Bimetric MOND gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2009-12-01

    A new relativistic formulation of MOND is advanced, involving two metrics as independent degrees of freedom: the MOND metric gμν, to which alone matter couples, and an auxiliary metric g^μν. The main idea hinges on the fact that we can form tensors from the difference of the Levi-Civita connections of the two metrics, Cβγα=Γβγα-Γ^βγα, and these act like gravitational accelerations. In the context of MOND, we can form dimensionless “acceleration” scalars and functions thereof (containing only first derivatives) from contractions of a0-1Cβγα. I look at a subclass of bimetric MOND theories governed by the action I=-(16πG)-1⁢∫[βg1/2R+αg^1/2R^-2(gg^)1/4f(κ)a02M(Υ˜/a02)]⁢d4x+IM(gμν,ψi)+I^M(g^μν,χi), with Υ˜ as a scalar quadratic in the Cβγα, κ=(g/g^)1/4, IM as the matter action, and allow for the existence of twin matter that couples to g^μν alone. Thus, gravity is modified not by modifying the elasticity of the space-time in which matter lives, but by the interaction between that space-time and the auxiliary one. In particular, I concentrate on the interesting and simple choice Υ˜∝gμν(CμλγCνγλ-CμνγCλγλ). This theory introduces only one new constant, a0; it tends simply to general relativity (GR) in the limit a0→0 and to a phenomenologically valid MOND theory in the nonrelativistic limit. The theory naturally gives MOND and “dark energy” effects from the same term in the action, both controlled by the MOND constant a0. In regards to gravitational lensing by nonrelativistic systems-a holy grail for relativistic MOND theories-the theory predicts that the same potential that controls massive-particle motion also dictates lensing in the same way as in GR: Lensing and massive-particle probing of galactic fields will require the same “halo” of dark matter to explain the departure of the present theory from GR. This last result can be modified with other choices of Υ˜, but lensing is still enhanced

  1. Hawking radiation of non-asymptotically flat rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, Izzet; Aslan, Onur Atilla

    2016-04-01

    We study the Hawking radiation of non-asymptotically flat rotating linear dilaton black holes, which are the solutions to the 4D Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion action by using the semi-classical radiation spectrum method. Using scalar perturbations, we show that both angular and radial equations produce exact analytical solutions. Thus, we obtain a precise radiation spectrum for the rotating linear dilaton black hole. The high-frequency regime does not yield the standard Hawking temperature of this black hole computed from the surface gravity. However, we show in detail that the specific low-frequency band of the radiation spectrum allows for the original Hawking temperature of the rotating linear dilaton black hole. The computations are also exhibited graphically.

  2. A Trick of Gravity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburgh, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    It's both surprising and rewarding when an old, standard problem reveals a subtlety that expands its pedagogic value. I realized recently that the role of gravity in the range equation for a projectile is not so simple as first appears. This realization may be completely obvious to others but was quite new to me.

  3. Artificial Gravity Research Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the forward working plan to identify what countermeasure resources are needed for a vehicle with an artificial gravity module (intermittent centrifugation) and what Countermeasure Resources are needed for a rotating transit vehicle (continuous centrifugation) to minimize the effects of microgravity to Mars Exploration crewmembers.

  4. Variable gravity research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Sean; Ancheta, Stan; Beine, Donna; Cink, Brian; Eagon, Mark; Eckstein, Brett; Luhman, Dan; Mccowan, Daniel; Nations, James; Nordtvedt, Todd

    1988-01-01

    Spin and despin requirements; sequence of activities required to assemble the Variable Gravity Research Facility (VGRF); power systems technology; life support; thermal control systems; emergencies; communication systems; space station applications; experimental activities; computer modeling and simulation of tether vibration; cost analysis; configuration of the crew compartments; and tether lengths and rotation speeds are discussed.

  5. Cubesat Gravity Field Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burla, Santoshkumar; Mueller, Vitali; Flury, Jakob; Jovanovic, Nemanja

    2016-04-01

    CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions have been successful in the field of satellite geodesy (especially to improve Earth's gravity field models) and have established the necessity towards the next generation gravity field missions. Especially, GRACE has shown its capabilities beyond any other gravity field missions. GRACE Follow-On mission is going to continue GRACE's legacy which is almost identical to GRACE mission with addition of laser interferometry. But these missions are not only quite expensive but also takes quite an effort to plan and to execute. Still there are few drawbacks such as under-sampling and incapability of exploring new ideas within a single mission (ex: to perform different orbit configurations with multi satellite mission(s) at different altitudes). The budget is the major limiting factor to build multi satellite mission(s). Here, we offer a solution to overcome these drawbacks using cubesat/ nanosatellite mission. Cubesats are widely used in research because they are cheaper, smaller in size and building them is easy and faster than bigger satellites. Here, we design a 3D model of GRACE like mission with available sensors and explain how the Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) works. The expected accuracies on final results of gravity field are also explained here.

  6. Gravity and crustal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowin, C. O.

    1976-01-01

    Lunar gravitational properties were analyzed along with the development of flat moon and curved moon computer models. Gravity anomalies and mascons were given particular attention. Geophysical and geological considerations were included, and comparisons were made between the gravitional fields of the Earth, Mars, and the Moon.

  7. Hawaii Gravity Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-12-15

    Gravity model for the state of Hawaii. Data is from the following source: Flinders, A.F., Ito, G., Garcia, M.O., Sinton, J.M., Kauahikaua, J.P., and Taylor, B., 2013, Intrusive dike complexes, cumulate cores, and the extrusive growth of Hawaiian volcanoes: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 40, p. 3367–3373, doi:10.1002/grl.50633.

  8. Spaceborne Gravity Gradiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W. C. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The current status of gravity gradiometers and technology that could be available in the 1990's for the GRAVSAT-B mission are assessed. Problems associated with sensors, testing, spacecraft, and data processing are explored as well as critical steps, schedule, and cost factors in the development plan.

  9. Gravity Modeling for Variable Fidelity Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Michael M.

    2006-01-01

    Aerospace simulations can model worlds, such as the Earth, with differing levels of fidelity. The simulation may represent the world as a plane, a sphere, an ellipsoid, or a high-order closed surface. The world may or may not rotate. The user may select lower fidelity models based on computational limits, a need for simplified analysis, or comparison to other data. However, the user will also wish to retain a close semblance of behavior to the real world. The effects of gravity on objects are an important component of modeling real-world behavior. Engineers generally equate the term gravity with the observed free-fall acceleration. However, free-fall acceleration is not equal to all observers. To observers on the sur-face of a rotating world, free-fall acceleration is the sum of gravitational attraction and the centrifugal acceleration due to the world's rotation. On the other hand, free-fall acceleration equals gravitational attraction to an observer in inertial space. Surface-observed simulations (e.g. aircraft), which use non-rotating world models, may choose to model observed free fall acceleration as the gravity term; such a model actually combines gravitational at-traction with centrifugal acceleration due to the Earth s rotation. However, this modeling choice invites confusion as one evolves the simulation to higher fidelity world models or adds inertial observers. Care must be taken to model gravity in concert with the world model to avoid denigrating the fidelity of modeling observed free fall. The paper will go into greater depth on gravity modeling and the physical disparities and synergies that arise when coupling specific gravity models with world models.

  10. Two-phase alkali-metal experiments in reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-06-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. A literature search of relevant experiments in reduced gravity is reported on here, and reveals a paucity of data for such correlations. The few ongoing experiments in reduced gravity are noted. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. A similar situation exists regarding two-phase alkali-metal flow and heat transfer, even in normal gravity. Existing data are conflicting and indequate for the task of modeling a space reactor using a two-phase alkali-metal coolant. The major features of past experiments are described here. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from the two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Analyses undertaken here give every expectation that the correlations developed from this data base will provide a valid representation of alkali-metal heat transfer and pressure drop in reduced gravity.

  11. Einstein, Mach, and the Fortunes of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, David

    2005-04-01

    Early in his life, Albert Einstein considered himself a devoted student of the physicist and philosopher Ernst Mach. Mach's famous critiques of Newton's absolute space and time -- most notably Mach's explanation of Newton's bucket experiment -- held a strong sway over Einstein as he struggled to formulate general relativity. Einstein was convinced that his emerging theory of gravity should be consistent with Mach's principle, which states that local inertial effects arise due to gravitational interactions with distant matter. Once completed, Einstein's general relativity enjoyed two decades of worldwide attention, only to fall out of physicists' interest during the 1930s and 1940s, when topics like nuclear physics claimed center stage. Gravity began to return to the limelight during the 1950s and especially the 1960s, and once again Mach proved to be a major spur: Princeton physicists Carl Brans and Robert Dicke introduced a rival theory of gravity in 1961 which they argued satisfied Mach's principle better than Einstein's general relativity did. The Brans-Dicke theory, and the new generation of experiments designed to test its predictions against those of general relativity, played a major role in bringing Einstein's beloved topic back to the center of physics.

  12. Distinguishing modified gravity from dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bertschinger, Edmund; Zukin, Phillip

    2008-07-15

    The acceleration of the Universe can be explained either through dark energy or through the modification of gravity on large scales. In this paper we investigate modified gravity models and compare their observable predictions with dark energy models. Modifications of general relativity are expected to be scale independent on superhorizon scales and scale dependent on subhorizon scales. For scale-independent modifications, utilizing the conservation of the curvature scalar and a parametrized post-Newtonian formulation of cosmological perturbations, we derive results for large-scale structure growth, weak gravitational lensing, and cosmic microwave background anisotropy. For scale-dependent modifications, inspired by recent f(R) theories we introduce a parametrization for the gravitational coupling G and the post-Newtonian parameter {gamma}. These parametrizations provide a convenient formalism for testing general relativity. However, we find that if dark energy is generalized to include both entropy and shear stress perturbations, and the dynamics of dark energy is unknown a priori, then modified gravity cannot in general be distinguished from dark energy using cosmological linear perturbations.

  13. Dissipative superfluid dynamics from gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy; Bhattacharyya, Sayantani; Minwalla, Shiraz

    2011-04-01

    Charged asymptotically AdS 5 black branes are sometimes unstable to the condensation of charged scalar fields. For fields of infinite charge and squared mass -4 Herzog was able to analytically determine the phase transition temperature and compute the endpoint of this instability in the neighborhood of the phase transition. We generalize Herzog's construction by perturbing away from infinite charge in an expansion in inverse charge and use the solutions so obtained as input for the fluid gravity map. Our tube wise construction of patched up locally hairy black brane solutions yields a one to one map from the space of solutions of superfluid dynamics to the long wavelength solutions of the Einstein Maxwell system. We obtain explicit expressions for the metric, gauge field and scalar field dual to an arbitrary superfluid flow at first order in the derivative expansion. Our construction allows us to read off the the leading dissipative corrections to the perfect superfluid stress tensor, current and Josephson equations. A general framework for dissipative superfluid dynamics was worked out by Landau and Lifshitz for zero superfluid velocity and generalized to nonzero fluid velocity by Clark and Putterman. Our gravitational results do not fit into the 13 parameter Clark-Putterman framework. Purely within fluid dynamics we present a consistent new generalization of Clark and Putterman's equations to a set of superfluid equations parameterized by 14 dissipative parameters. The results of our gravitational calculation fit perfectly into this enlarged framework. In particular we compute all the dissipative constants for the gravitational superfluid.

  14. General Relativity in (1 + 1) Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a theory of gravity in (1 + 1) dimensions that can be thought of as a toy model of general relativity. The theory should be a useful pedagogical tool, because it is mathematically much simpler than general relativity but shares much of the same conceptual structure; in particular, it gives a simple illustration of how gravity arises…

  15. Tribology Experiment in Zero Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, C. H. T.; Gause, R. L.; Whitaker, A. F.; Finckenor, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    A tribology experiment in zero gravity was performed during the orbital flight of Spacelab 1 to study the motion of liquid lubricants over solid surfaces. The absence of a significant gravitational force facilitates observation of such motions as controlled by interfacial and capillary forces. Two experimental configurations were used. One deals with the liquid on one solid surface, and the other with the liquid between a pair of closed spaced surfaces. Time sequence photographs of fluid motion on a solid surface yielded spreading rate data of several fluid-surface combinations. In general, a slow spreading process as governed by the tertiary junction can be distinguished from a more rapid process which is driven by surface tension controlled internal fluid pressure. Photographs were also taken through the transparent bushings of several experimental journal bearings. Morphology of incomplete fluid films and its fluctuation with time suggest the presence or absence of unsteady phenomena of the bearing-rotor system in various arrangements.

  16. Gravity duals of boundary cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps, Joan

    2016-09-01

    The replica trick defines Rényi entropies as partition functions on conically singular geometries. We discuss their gravity duals: regular bulk solutions to the Einstein equations inducing conically singular metrics at the boundary. When the conical singularity is supported on a flat or spherical surface, these solutions are rewritings of the hyperbolic black hole. For more general shapes, these solutions are new. We construct them perturbatively in a double expansion in the distance and strength of the conical singularity, and extract the vacuum polarisation due to the cone. Recent results about the structure of logarithmic divergences of Rényi entropies are reproduced — in particular, f b ≠ f c . We discuss in detail the dynamical resolution of the singularity in the bulk. This resolution is in agreement with a previous proposal, and indicates a non-minimal settling to the `splitting problem': an apparent ambiguity in the holographic entropy formula of certain theories with higher derivatives.

  17. Testing gravity using dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2015-12-01

    Generic scalar-tensor theories of gravity predict deviations from Newtonian physics inside astrophysical bodies. In this paper, we point out that low mass stellar objects, red and brown dwarf stars, are excellent probes of these theories. We calculate two important and potentially observable quantities: the radius of brown dwarfs and the minimum mass for hydrogen burning in red dwarfs. The brown dwarf radius can differ significantly from the general relativity prediction, and upcoming surveys that probe the mass-radius relation for stars with masses

  18. Modifying gravity at low redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas E-mail: c.vandebruck@sheffield.ac.uk E-mail: d.shaw@qmul.ac.uk

    2010-04-01

    We consider the growth of cosmological perturbations in modified gravity models where a scalar field mediates a non-universal Yukawa force between different matter species. The growth of the density contrast is altered for scales below the Compton wave-length of the scalar field. As the universe expands, the Compton wave-length varies in time in such a way that scales which were outside the range of the scalar field force may feel it at a lower redshift. In this case, both the exponent γ measuring the growth of Cold Dark Matter perturbations and the slip function representing the ratio of the two Newtonian potentials ψ and φ may differ from their values in General Relativity at low redshift.

  19. Standard model with gravity couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lay Nam; Soo, Chopin

    1996-05-01

    In this paper we examine the coupling of matter fields to gravity within the framework of the standard model of particle physics. The coupling is described in terms of Weyl fermions of a definite chirality, and employs only (anti-)self-dual or left-handed spin connection fields. We review the general framework for introducing the coupling using these fields, and show that conditions ensuring the cancellation of perturbative chiral gauge anomalies are not disturbed. We also explore a global anomaly associated with the theory, and argue that its removal requires that the number of fundamental fermions in the theory must be multiples of 16. In addition, we investigate the behavior of the theory under discrete transformations P, C, and T, and discuss possible violations of these discrete symmetries, including CPT, in the presence of instantons and the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly.

  20. Precise Determination of the Zero-Gravity Surface Figure of a Mirror without Gravity-Sag Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, Eric E.; Lam, Jonathan C.; Feria, V. Alfonso; Chang, Zensheu

    2007-01-01

    The zero-gravity surface figure of optics used in spaceborne astronomical instruments must be known to high accuracy, but earthbound metrology is typically corrupted by gravity sag. Generally, inference of the zero-gravity surface figure from a measurement made under normal gravity requires finite-element analysis (FEA), and for accurate results the mount forces must be well characterized. We describe how to infer the zero-gravity surface figure very precisely using the alternative classical technique of averaging pairs of measurements made with the direction of gravity reversed. We show that mount forces as well as gravity must be reversed between the two measurements and discuss how the St. Venant principle determines when a reversed mount force may be considered to be applied at the same place in the two orientations. Our approach requires no finite-element modeling and no detailed knowledge of mount forces other than the fact that they reverse and are applied at the same point in each orientation. If mount schemes are suitably chosen, zero-gravity optical surfaces may be inferred much more simply and more accurately than with FEA.

  1. Industrial processes influenced by gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon

    1988-01-01

    In considering new directions for low gravity research with particular regard to broadening the number and types of industrial involvements, it is noted that transport phenomena play a vital role in diverse processes in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, and biotech industries. Relatively little attention has been given to the role of gravity in such processes. Accordingly, numerous industrial processes and phenomena are identified which involve gravity and/or surface tension forces. Phase separations and mixing are examples that will be significantly different in low gravity conditions. A basis is presented for expanding the scope of the low gravity research program and the potential benefits of such research is indicated.

  2. Schwinger's Approach to Einstein's Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Kim

    2012-05-01

    Albert Einstein was one of Julian Schwinger's heroes, and Schwinger was greatly honored when he received the first Einstein Prize (together with Kurt Godel) for his work on quantum electrodynamics. Schwinger contributed greatly to the development of a quantum version of gravitational theory, and his work led directly to the important work of (his students) Arnowitt, Deser, and DeWitt on the subject. Later in the 1960's and 1970's Schwinger developed a new formulation of quantum field theory, which he dubbed Source Theory, in an attempt to get closer contact to phenomena. In this formulation, he revisited gravity, and in books and papers showed how Einstein's theory of General Relativity emerged naturally from one physical assumption: that the carrier of the gravitational force is a massless, helicity-2 particle, the graviton. (There has been a minor dispute whether gravitational theory can be considered as the massless limit of a massive spin-2 theory; Schwinger believed that was the case, while Van Dam and Veltman concluded the opposite.) In the process, he showed how all of the tests of General Relativity could be explained simply, without using the full machinery of the theory and without the extraneous concept of curved space, including such effects as geodetic precession and the Lense-Thirring effect. (These effects have now been verified by the Gravity Probe B experiment.) This did not mean that he did not accept Einstein's equations, and in his book and full article on the subject, he showed how those emerge essentially uniquely from the assumption of the graviton. So to speak of Schwinger versus Einstein is misleading, although it is true that Schwinger saw no necessity to talk of curved spacetime. In this talk I will lay out Schwinger's approach, and the connection to Einstein's theory.

  3. Curvature scalar instability in f(R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Thomas P.

    2007-02-01

    An instability in the presence of matter in theories of gravity which include a 1/R correction in the gravitational action has been found by Dolgov and Kawasaki. In the present Letter this instability is discussed for f(R) gravity in general. We focus on the Palatini formalism of the theory and it is shown that no such instability occurs in this version of f(R) gravity. The reasons for the appearance of the instability in the metric but not in the Palatini formalism are fully investigated.

  4. Conservation laws for colliding branes with induced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellen, Mathieu

    2015-05-01

    We derive conservation laws for collisions of self-gravitating n-branes (or n-dimensional shells) in an ( n+2) dimensional spacetime including induced gravity on the brane. Previous work has shown how geometrical identities in general relativity enforce conservation of energy-momentum at collisions. The inclusion of induced gravity terms introduces a gravitational self-energy on the brane which permits energy-momentum conservation of matter fields on the brane to be broken, so long as the total energy-momentum, including induced gravity terms, is conserved. We give simple examples with two branes (one ingoing and one outgoing) and three branes.

  5. Gravitational lensing by f(R,T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhamzawi, Ahmed; Alhamzawi, Rahim

    2016-11-01

    A solution for f(R,T) gravity of the type f(R,T) = f1(R) + f2(T) for specific f2(T) functions is derived. It is shown that a slight modification to the Schwarzschild metric can be found for f2(T) = αTn + β, where n > 0, β ≪ 1 and α is some constant. The effects of f(R,T) gravity on gravitational lensing are calculated and the differences with general relativity are compared. Furthermore, it is shown that modified gravity can give a considerable contribution to gravitational lensing.

  6. Surface singularities in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity.

    PubMed

    Pani, Paolo; Sotiriou, Thomas P

    2012-12-21

    Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity was recently proposed as an alternative to general relativity that offers a resolution of spacetime singularities. The theory differs from Einstein's gravity only inside matter due to nondynamical degrees of freedom, and it is compatible with all current observations. We show that the theory is reminiscent of Palatini f(R) gravity and that it shares the same pathologies, such as curvature singularities at the surface of polytropic stars and unacceptable Newtonian limit. This casts serious doubt on its viability.

  7. Gravity waves from tachyonic preheating after hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Dufaux, Jean-Francois; Kofman, Lev; Navros, Olga E-mail: gfelder@email.smith.edu E-mail: navros@email.unc.edu

    2009-03-15

    We study the stochastic background of gravitational waves produced from preheating in hybrid inflation models. We investigate different dynamical regimes of preheating in these models and we compute the resulting gravity wave spectra using analytical estimates and numerical simulations. We discuss the dependence of the gravity wave frequencies and amplitudes on the various potential parameters. We find that large regions of the parameter space leads to gravity waves that may be observable in upcoming interferometric experiments, including Advanced LIGO, but this generally requires very small coupling constants.

  8. Surface singularities in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity.

    PubMed

    Pani, Paolo; Sotiriou, Thomas P

    2012-12-21

    Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity was recently proposed as an alternative to general relativity that offers a resolution of spacetime singularities. The theory differs from Einstein's gravity only inside matter due to nondynamical degrees of freedom, and it is compatible with all current observations. We show that the theory is reminiscent of Palatini f(R) gravity and that it shares the same pathologies, such as curvature singularities at the surface of polytropic stars and unacceptable Newtonian limit. This casts serious doubt on its viability. PMID:23368444

  9. Einstein's Gravity as Seen by a Cosmic Lighthouse Keeper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Michael

    The last years have seen continuing activities in the exploration of our understanding of gravity, motivated by results from precision cosmology and new precision astrophysical experiments. At the centre of attention lies the question as to whether general relativity is the correct theory of gravity. In answering this question, we work not only towards correctly interpreting the phenomenon of "dark energy" but also towards the goal of achieving a quantum theory of gravity. In these efforts, the observations of pulsars, especially those in binary systems, play an important role. Pulsars do not only provide the only evidence for the existence of gravitational waves so far, but they also provide precision tests of general relativity and alternative theories of gravity. This talk summarizes the current state-of-art in these experiments and looks into the future.

  10. Existence of relativistic stars in f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, Amol; Hu, Wayne

    2009-09-15

    We refute recent claims in the literature that stars with relativistically deep potentials cannot exist in f(R) gravity. Numerical examples of stable stars, including relativistic (GM{sub *}/r{sub *}{approx}0.1), constant density stars, are studied. As a star is made larger, nonlinear 'chameleon' effects screen much of the star's mass, stabilizing gravity at the stellar center. Furthermore, we show that the onset of this chameleon screening is unrelated to strong gravity. At large central pressures P>{rho}/3, f(R) gravity, like general relativity, does have a maximum gravitational potential, but at a slightly smaller value: GM{sub *}/r{sub *}|{sub max}=0.345<4/9 for constant density and one choice of parameters. This difference is associated with negative central curvature R under general relativity not being accessed in the f(R) model, but does not apply to any known astrophysical object.

  11. Finsler geometric extension of Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Christian; Wohlfarth, Mattias N. R.

    2012-03-01

    We construct gravitational dynamics for Finsler spacetimes in terms of an action integral on the unit tangent bundle. These spacetimes are generalizations of Lorentzian metric manifolds which satisfy necessary causality properties. A coupling procedure for matter fields to Finsler gravity completes our new theory that consistently becomes equivalent to Einstein gravity in the limit of metric geometry. We provide a precise geometric definition of observers and their measurements and show that the transformations, by means of which different observers communicate, form a groupoid that generalizes the usual Lorentz group. Moreover, we discuss the implementation of Finsler spacetime symmetries. We use our results to analyze a particular spacetime model that leads to Finsler geometric refinements of the linearized Schwarzschild solution.

  12. Unified theory of nonlinear electrodynamics and gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Gomez, Alexander; Krasnov, Kirill; Scarinci, Carlos

    2011-01-15

    We describe a class of unified theories of electromagnetism and gravity. The Lagrangian is of the BF type, with a potential for the B field, the gauge group is U(2) (complexified). Given a choice of the potential function the theory is a deformation of (complex) general relativity and electromagnetism, and describes just two propagating polarizations of the graviton and two of the photon. When gravity is switched off the theory becomes the usual nonlinear electrodynamics with a general structure function. The Einstein-Maxwell theory can be recovered by sending some of the parameters of the defining potential to zero, but for any generic choice of the potential the theory is indistinguishable from Einstein-Maxwell at low energies. A real theory is obtained by imposing suitable reality conditions. We also study the spherically-symmetric solution and show how the usual Reissner-Nordstrom solution is recovered.

  13. Cosmological solutions of f (T ) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliathanasis, Andronikos; Barrow, John D.; Leach, P. G. L.

    2016-07-01

    In the cosmological scenario in f (T ) gravity, we find analytical solutions for an isotropic and homogeneous universe containing a dust fluid and radiation and for an empty anisotropic Bianchi I universe. The method that we apply is that of movable singularities of differential equations. For the isotropic universe, the solutions are expressed in terms of a Laurent expansion, while for the anisotropic universe we find a family of exact Kasner-like solutions in vacuum. Finally, we discuss when a nonlinear f (T ) -gravity theory provides solutions for the teleparallel equivalence of general relativity and derive conditions for exact solutions of general relativity to solve the field equations of an f (T ) theory.

  14. What did we Learn from Quantum Gravity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, A.

    2007-09-01

    The goal of the article is to provide some glimpses into the challenges and successes of quantum gravity. After a general introduction, for concreteness I focus on a specific approach which goes under the name loop quantum gravity. The underlying ideas are first summarized and recent advances are then illustrated by applying these ideas to cosmology. Quantum effects of geometry resolve the big-bang singularity of classical general relativity. Quantum physics does not break down at the big-bang. In simple models where details have been fully worked out, there is a pre-big-bang branch joined to the current post-big-bang branch by well-defined quantum evolution.

  15. Recent Advances in Conformal Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, James; Chaykov, Spasen

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, significant advances have been made in alternative gravitational theories. Although MOND remains the leading candidate among the alternative models, Conformal Gravity has been studied by Mannheim and O'Brien to solve the rotation curve problem without the need for dark matter. Recently, Mannheim, O'Brien and Chaykov have begun solving other gravitational questions in Conformal Gravity. In this presentation, we highlight the new work of Conformal Gravity's application to random motions of clusters (the original Zwicky problem), gravitational bending of light, gravitational lensing and a very recent survey of dwarf galaxy rotation curves. We will show in each case that Conformal Gravity can provide an accurate explanation and prediction of the data without the need for dark matter. Coupled with the fact that Conformal Gravity is a fully re-normalizable metric theory of gravity, these results help to push Conformal Gravity onto a competitive stage against other alternative models.

  16. Gravity and Yang-Mills amplitude relations

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.; Damgaard, Poul H.; Soendergaard, Thomas; FengBo

    2010-11-15

    Using only general features of the S matrix and quantum field theory, we prove by induction the Kawai-Lewellen-Tye relations that link products of gauge theory amplitudes to gravity amplitudes at tree level. As a bonus of our analysis, we provide a novel and more symmetric form of these relations. We also establish an infinite tower of new identities between amplitudes in gauge theories.

  17. Gravity Probe B experiment and gravitomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vető, B.

    2010-09-01

    Gravitomagnetism is a low velocity and weak gravitational field approximation of general relativity. It provides a simple approach to post-Newtonian gravitational phenomena via electromagnetic analogy. Intended for advanced undergraduate students, the present paper applies gravitomagnetism to the quantitative study of the geodetic precession and frame dragging effects, both verified recently in the Gravity Probe B experiment. The result obtained is identical with Schiff's formula.

  18. Dynamical Cosmological Constant in R 3 Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Nasser; Fathi, Mohsen

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we go through the famous f( R) theories of gravity, but keeping a peculiar one, namely R 3 modification. Moreover, instead of a coordinate free cosmological parameter, we take it to be a function of time. Having all these stuff, we investigate the notions of standard cosmology model, in the context of R 3 modification to general relativity, and in various regimes, we study the dynamical cosmological constant.

  19. Time and a physical Hamiltonian for quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Husain, Viqar; Pawłowski, Tomasz

    2012-04-01

    We present a nonperturbative quantization of general relativity coupled to dust and other matter fields. The dust provides a natural time variable, leading to a physical Hamiltonian with spatial diffeomorphism symmetry. The surprising feature is that the Hamiltonian is not a square root. This property, together with the kinematical structure of loop quantum gravity, provides a complete theory of quantum gravity, and puts applications to cosmology, quantum gravitational collapse, and Hawking radiation within technical reach.

  20. MODIFIED GRAVITY SPINS UP GALACTIC HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Li, Baojiu; Koyama, Kazuya

    2013-01-20

    We investigate the effect of modified gravity on the specific angular momentum of galactic halos by analyzing the halo catalogs at z = 0 from high-resolution N-body simulations for a f(R) gravity model that meets the solar-system constraint. It is shown that the galactic halos in the f(R) gravity model tend to acquire significantly higher specific angular momentum than those in the standard {Lambda}CDM model. The largest difference in the specific angular momentum distribution between these two models occurs for the case of isolated galactic halos with mass less than 10{sup 11} h {sup -1} M {sub Sun }, which are likely least shielded by the chameleon screening mechanism. As the specific angular momentum of galactic halos is rather insensitive to other cosmological parameters, it can in principle be an independent discriminator of modified gravity. We speculate a possibility of using the relative abundance of low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) as a test of general relativity given that the formation of the LSBGs occurs in fast spinning dark halos.

  1. Gravity as the square of gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Zvi; Dennen, Tristan; Huang Yutin; Kiermaier, Michael

    2010-09-15

    We explore consequences of the recently discovered duality between color and kinematics, which states that kinematic numerators in a diagrammatic expansion of gauge-theory amplitudes can be arranged to satisfy Jacobi-like identities in one-to-one correspondence to the associated color factors. Using on-shell recursion relations, we give a field-theory proof showing that the duality implies that diagrammatic numerators in gravity are just the product of two corresponding gauge-theory numerators, as previously conjectured. These squaring relations express gravity amplitudes in terms of gauge-theory ingredients, and are a recasting of the Kawai, Lewellen, and Tye relations. Assuming that numerators of loop amplitudes can be arranged to satisfy the duality, our tree-level proof immediately carries over to loop level via the unitarity method. We then present a Yang-Mills Lagrangian whose diagrams through five points manifestly satisfy the duality between color and kinematics. The existence of such Lagrangians suggests that the duality also extends to loop amplitudes, as confirmed at two and three loops in a concurrent paper. By ''squaring'' the novel Yang-Mills Lagrangian we immediately obtain its gravity counterpart. We outline the general structure of these Lagrangians for higher points. We also write down various new representations of gauge-theory and gravity amplitudes that follow from the duality between color and kinematics.

  2. Multiphase Flow: The Gravity of the Situation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, Geoffrey F.

    1996-01-01

    A brief survey is presented of flow patterns in two-phase, gas-liquid flows at normal and microgravity, the differences between them being explored. It seems that the flow patterns in zero gravity are in general much simpler than those in normal gravity with only three main regimes (namely bubbly, slug and annular flows) being observed. Each of these three regimes is then reviewed, with particular reference to identification of areas of study where investigation of flows at microgravity might not only be interesting in themselves, but also throw light on mechanisms at normal earth gravity. In bubbly flow, the main area of interest seems to be that of bubble coalescence. In slug flow, the extension of simple displacement experiments to the zero gravity case would appear to be a useful option, supplemented by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. For annular flow, the most interesting area appears to be the study of the mechanisms of disturbance waves; it should be possible to extend the region of investigation of the onset and behavior of these waves to much low gas velocities where measurements are clearly much easier.

  3. Plant gravity sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, F. D.

    1991-01-01

    This review of plant gravity sensing examines sensing in organ gravitropism, sensing in single-cell gravitropism, and nongravitropic sensing. Topics related to sensing in organ gravitropism are (1) identification of the gravitropic susceptors, including intracellular asymmetry in equilibrium position and after reorientation, susceptor signal-to-noise ratio, signal integration over threshold stimulation periods, intracellular asymmetry and gravitropic competence, and starch deficiency and gravitropic competence; (2) possible root statocytes and receptors, including identification of presumptive statocytes, cytology, and possible receptors and models of sensing; and (3) negatively gravitropic organs, including identification and distribution of presumptive statocytes and cytology and possible receptors. Topics related to nongravitropic sensing include gravitaxis, reaction wood, gravimorphogenesis, other gravity-influenced organ movements, and cytoplasmic streaming.

  4. It's All Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, P. A.

    2003-01-01

    Newtonian gravitation adequately predicts planet and satellite motion. Gravitational anomalies and the wish to travel at relativistic speeds, however, imply that gravity should be integrated within a unification framework that may include electricity and magnetism. Thus, new theories are needed that predict currently accepted phenomenon as well as anomalies to prepare the necessary groundwork for experimental validation needed for advanced technology propulsion schemes and far-term missions. A primary deficiency is that we are obviously limited within the confines of our own solar system and a different gravity model may be applicable elsewhere in the cosmos. The model proposed here follows previous ideas proposed by Murad, Dyatlov, and Jefimenko for a universal gravitation model with an intrinsic radial force term coupled with angular momentum. Including angular momentum may explain several spin symmetries seen in some anomalous gyroscopic experiments and throughout the universe regarding planets that orbit around the sun: moons that orbit larger planetary bodies: and the rotation about each planetary axis.

  5. Local quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, N.; Knorr, B.; Meibohm, J.; Pawlowski, J. M.; Reichert, M.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the ultraviolet behavior of quantum gravity within a functional renormalization group approach. The present setup includes the full ghost and graviton propagators and, for the first time, the dynamical graviton three-point function. The latter gives access to the coupling of dynamical gravitons and makes the system minimally self-consistent. The resulting phase diagram confirms the asymptotic safety scenario in quantum gravity with a nontrivial UV fixed point. A well-defined Wilsonian block spinning requires locality of the flow in momentum space. This property is discussed in the context of functional renormalization group flows. We show that momentum locality of graviton correlation functions is nontrivially linked to diffeomorphism invariance, and is realized in the present setup.

  6. Gravity wave initiated convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The vertical velocity of convection initiated by gravity waves was investigated. In one particular case, the convective motion-initiated and supported by the gravity wave-induced activity (excluding contributions made by other mechanisms) reached its maximum value about one hour before the production of the funnel clouds. In another case, both rawinsonde and geosynchronous satellite imagery were used to study the life cycles of severe convective storms. Cloud modelling with input sounding data and rapid-scan imagery from GOES were used to investigate storm cloud formation, development and dissipation in terms of growth and collapse of cloud tops, as well as, the life cycles of the penetration of overshooting turrets above the tropopause. The results based on these two approaches are presented and discussed.

  7. Antimatter gravity experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.E.; Camp, J.B.; Darling, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    An experiment is being developed to measure the acceleration of the antiproton in the gravitational field of the earth. Antiprotons of a few MeV from the LEAR facility at CERN will be slowed, captured, cooled to a temperature of about 10 K, and subsequently launched a few at a time into a drift tube where the effect of gravity on their motion will be determined by a time-of-flight method. Development of the experiment is proceeding at Los Alamos using normal matter. The fabrication of a drift tube that will produce a region of space in which gravity is the dominant force on moving ions is of major difficulty. This involves a study of methods of minimizing the electric fields produced by spatially varying work functions on conducting surfaces. Progress in a number of areas is described, with stress on the drift-tube development.

  8. Observables in effective gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, Steven B.; Marolf, Donald; Hartle, James B.

    2006-09-15

    We address the construction and interpretation of diffeomorphism-invariant observables in a low-energy effective theory of quantum gravity. The observables we consider are constructed as integrals over the space of coordinates, in analogy to the construction of gauge-invariant observables in Yang-Mills theory via traces. As such, they are explicitly nonlocal. Nevertheless we describe how, in suitable quantum states and in a suitable limit, the familiar physics of local quantum field theory can be recovered from appropriate such observables, which we term ''pseudolocal.'' We consider measurement of pseudolocal observables, and describe how such measurements are limited by both quantum effects and gravitational interactions. These limitations support suggestions that theories of quantum gravity associated with finite regions of spacetime contain far fewer degrees of freedom than do local field theories.

  9. Cell proliferation and plant development under novel altered gravity environments.

    PubMed

    Herranz, R; Medina, F J

    2014-01-01

    Gravity is a key factor for life on Earth. It is the only environmental factor that has remained constant throughout evolution, and plants use it to modulate important physiological activities; gravity removal or alteration produces substantial changes in essential functions. For root gravitropism, gravity is sensed in specialised cells, which are capable of detecting magnitudes of the g vector lower than 10(-3) . Then, the mechanosignal is transduced to upper zones of the root, resulting in changes in the lateral distribution of auxin and in the rate of auxin polar transport. Gravity alteration has consequences for cell growth and proliferation rates in root meristems, which are the basis of the developmental programme of a plant, in which regulation via auxin is involved. The effect is disruption of meristematic competence, i.e. the strict coordination between cell proliferation and growth, which characterises meristematic cells. This effect can be related to changes in the transport and distribution of auxin throughout the root. However, similar effects of gravity alteration have been found in plant cell cultures in vitro, in which neither specialised structures for gravity sensing and signal transduction, nor apparent gravitropism have been described. We postulate that gravity resistance, a general mechanism of cellular origin for developing rigid structures in plants capable of resisting the gravity force, could also be responsible for the changes in cell growth and proliferation parameters detected in non-specialised cells. The mechanisms of gravitropism and graviresistance are complementary, the first being mostly sensitive to the direction of the gravity vector, and the second to its magnitude. At a global molecular level, the consequence of gravity alteration is that the genome should be finely tuned to counteract a type of stress that plants have never encountered before throughout evolution. Multigene families and redundant genes present an advantage in

  10. Gravity gradient study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, C. C.

    1971-01-01

    The results of the noise and drift test, and the comparison of the experimental simulation tests with the theoretical predictions, confirm that the rotating gravity gradiometer is capable of extracting information about mascon distributions from lunar orbit, and that the sensitivity of the sensor is adequate for lunar orbital selenodesy. The experimental work also verified analytical and computer models for the directional and time response of the sensor.

  11. Gravity in Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Goldman, T.; Nieto, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary results of the test of the Newtonian Law of Gravitation conducted by Ander et al., in a borehole in the Greenland ice-cap were reported at this meeting. In this paper we consider the interpretations of these results in terms of a non-Newtonian component of gravity, and compare them with the results of other geophysical inverse-square law tests. 8 refs.

  12. Covariant Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovelli, Carlo; Vidotto, Francesca

    2014-11-01

    Preface; Part I. Foundations: 1. Spacetime as a quantum object; 2. Physics without time; 3. Gravity; 4. Classical discretization; Part II. The 3D Theory: 5. 3D Euclidean theory; 6. Bubbles and cosmological constant; Part III. The Real World: 7. The real world: 4D Lorentzian theory; 8. Classical limit; 9. Matter; Part IV. Physical Applications: 10. Black holes; 11. Cosmology; 12. Scattering; 13. Final remarks; References; Index.

  13. Gravity, Time, and Lagrangians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2010-01-01

    Feynman mentioned to us that he understood a topic in physics if he could explain it to a college freshman, a high school student, or a dinner guest. Here we will discuss two topics that took us a while to get to that level. One is the relationship between gravity and time. The other is the minus sign that appears in the Lagrangian. (Why would one…

  14. Finite field-dependent symmetries in perturbative quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker

    2014-01-15

    In this paper we discuss the absolutely anticommuting nilpotent symmetries for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime in linear and non-linear gauges. Further, we analyze the finite field-dependent BRST (FFBRST) transformation for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime. The FFBRST transformation changes the gauge-fixing and ghost parts of the perturbative quantum gravity within functional integration. However, the operation of such symmetry transformation on the generating functional of perturbative quantum gravity does not affect the theory on physical ground. The FFBRST transformation with appropriate choices of finite BRST parameter connects non-linear Curci–Ferrari and Landau gauges of perturbative quantum gravity. The validity of the results is also established at quantum level using Batalin–Vilkovisky (BV) formulation. -- Highlights: •The perturbative quantum gravity is treated as gauge theory. •BRST and anti-BRST transformations are developed in linear and non-linear gauges. •BRST transformation is generalized by making it finite and field dependent. •Connection between linear and non-linear gauges is established. •Using BV formulation the results are established at quantum level also.

  15. BOOK REVIEW: A First Course in Loop Quantum Gravity A First Course in Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Bianca

    2012-12-01

    Students who are interested in quantum gravity usually face the difficulty of working through a large amount of prerequisite material before being able to deal with actual quantum gravity. A First Course in Loop Quantum Gravity by Rodolfo Gambini and Jorge Pullin, aimed at undergraduate students, marvellously succeeds in starting from the basics of special relativity and covering basic topics in Hamiltonian dynamics, Yang Mills theory, general relativity and quantum field theory, ending with a tour on current (loop) quantum gravity research. This is all done in a short 173 pages! As such the authors cannot cover any of the subjects in depth and indeed this book should be seen more as a motivation and orientation guide so that students can go on to follow the hints for further reading. Also, as there are many subjects to cover beforehand, slightly more than half of the book is concerned with more general subjects (special and general relativity, Hamiltonian dynamics, constrained systems, quantization) before the starting point for loop quantum gravity, the Ashtekar variables, are introduced. The approach taken by the authors is heuristic and uses simplifying examples in many places. However they take care in motivating all the main steps and succeed in presenting the material pedagogically. Problem sets are provided throughout and references for further reading are given. Despite the shortness of space, alternative viewpoints are mentioned and the reader is also referred to experimental results and bounds. In the second half of the book the reader gets a ride through loop quantum gravity; the material covers geometric operators and their spectra, the Hamiltonian constraints, loop quantum cosmology and, more broadly, black hole thermodynamics. A glimpse of recent developments and open problems is given, for instance a discussion on experimental predictions, where the authors carefully point out the very preliminary nature of the results. The authors close with an

  16. Branes in Gravity's Rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashour, Amani; Faizal, Mir; Ali, Ahmed Farag; Hammad, Fayçal

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we investigate the thermodynamics of black p-branes (BB) in the context of Gravity's Rainbow. We investigate this using rainbow functions that have been motivated from loop quantum gravity and κ -Minkowski non-commutative spacetime. Then for the sake of comparison, we examine a couple of other rainbow functions that have also appeared in the literature. We show that, for consistency, Gravity's Rainbow imposes a constraint on the minimum mass of the BB, a constraint that we interpret here as implying the existence of a black p-brane remnant. This interpretation is supported by the computation of the black p-brane's heat capacity that shows that the latter vanishes when the Schwarzschild radius takes on a value that is bigger than its extremal limit. We found that the same conclusion is reached for the third version of rainbow functions treated here but not with the second one for which only standard black p-brane thermodynamics is recovered.

  17. Granular Superconductors and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David; Koczor, Ron

    1999-01-01

    As a Bose condensate, superconductors provide novel conditions for revisiting previously proposed couplings between electromagnetism and gravity. Strong variations in Cooper pair density, large conductivity and low magnetic permeability define superconductive and degenerate condensates without the traditional density limits imposed by the Fermi energy (approx. 10(exp -6) g cu cm). Recent experiments have reported anomalous weight loss for a test mass suspended above a rotating Type II, YBCO superconductor, with a relatively high percentage change (0.05-2.1%) independent of the test mass' chemical composition and diamagnetic properties. A variation of 5 parts per 104 was reported above a stationary (non-rotating) superconductor. In experiments using a sensitive gravimeter, bulk YBCO superconductors were stably levitated in a DC magnetic field and exposed without levitation to low-field strength AC magnetic fields. Changes in observed gravity signals were measured to be less than 2 parts in 108 of the normal gravitational acceleration. Given the high sensitivity of the test, future work will examine variants on the basic magnetic behavior of granular superconductors, with particular focus on quantifying their proposed importance to gravity.

  18. Quantum gravity and renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Damiano

    2015-01-01

    The properties of quantum gravity are reviewed from the point of view of renormalization. Various attempts to overcome the problem of non-renormalizability are presented, and the reasons why most of them fail for quantum gravity are discussed. Interesting possibilities come from relaxing the locality assumption, which also can inspire the investigation of a largely unexplored sector of quantum field theory. Another possibility is to work with infinitely many independent couplings, and search for physical quantities that only depend on a finite subset of them. In this spirit, it is useful to organize the classical action of quantum gravity, determined by renormalization, in a convenient way. Taking advantage of perturbative local field redefinitions, we write the action as the sum of the Hilbert term, the cosmological term, a peculiar scalar that is important only in higher dimensions, plus invariants constructed with at least three Weyl tensors. We show that the FRLW configurations, and many other locally conformally flat metrics, are exact solutions of the field equations in arbitrary dimensions d>3. If the metric is expanded around such configurations the quadratic part of the action is free of higher-time derivatives. Other well-known metrics, such as those of black holes, are instead affected in nontrivial ways by the classical corrections of quantum origin.

  19. f(T) gravity and local Lorentz invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baojiu; Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Barrow, John D.

    2011-03-15

    We show that in theories of generalized teleparallel gravity, whose Lagrangians are algebraic functions of the usual teleparallel Lagrangian, the action and the field equations are not invariant under local Lorentz transformations. We also argue that these theories appear to have extra degrees of freedom with respect to general relativity. The usual teleparallel Lagrangian, which has been extensively studied and leads to a theory dynamically equivalent to general relativity, is an exception. Both of these facts appear to have been overlooked in the recent literature on f(T) gravity, but are crucial for assessing the viability of these theories as alternative explanations for the acceleration of the Universe.

  20. Work and General Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    Presentations and other materials are provided from the Asia and the Pacific Programme of Educational Innovation for Development (APEID) Planning and Review Meeting on Work as an Integral Part of General Education. The focus is on how education, through an orientation to work, could help to decrease the gravity of the problems of population…

  1. Gravity field information from Gravity Probe-B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Lerch, F. J.; Colombo, O. L.; Everitt, C. W. F.

    1989-01-01

    The Gravity Probe-B Mission will carry the Stanford Gyroscope relativity experiment into orbit in the mid 1990's, as well as a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver whose tracking data will be used to study the earth gravity field. Estimates of the likely quality of a gravity field model to be derived from the GPS data are presented, and the significance of this experiment to geodesy and geophysics are discussed.

  2. Mars gravity and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bills, B. G.; Mischna, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    How accurately do we need to measure seasonal variations in Mars gravity, in order to significantly contribute to an understanding of the seasonal climate cycle? It has long been understood that seasonal cycles of volatile mass transport on Mars, mainly involving CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and the polar caps, will change the gravitational field by measurable amounts. In recent years, the gravitational field models, which are obtained from measured Doppler shifts in the tracking data for Mars-orbiting satellites, have become accurate enough that they can resolve some seasonal variations. However, the present models only resolve seasonal cycles for two parameters, nominally J2 and J3, which are zonal components of degree 2 and 3, respectively. In fact, what is actually observed is an unresolved linear combination of even degree zonals, in the guise of J2, and a similar combination of odd degree zonals for J3. Mars climate models are currently constrained mainly by the surface atmospheric pressure measurements made at the two Viking Lander sites. Wood and Paige (1992) showed that the observed seasonal pressure cycles at these two locations can be very well simulated by a simple one-dimensional surface thermal balance model, when its 6 free parameters (separate values for albedo and emissivity for each polar cap, and a soil thermal inertia for each hemisphere ) are properly chosen. However, it also emerged that the preferred values for albedo and emissivity are quite different from those obtained via optical remote sensing. It thus appears that the 1-D climate model yields aliased estimates of these parameters. It seems clear that, if we had sufficiently accurate gravity measurements, it would be equivalent to having a global grid of effective Viking Lander pressure measurements, with the number of grid points related to the spatial resolution of the gravity measurements. For example, if the seasonal variations were seen in a full Nth degree and order gravity

  3. Hydrogen Burning in Low Mass Stars Constrains Scalar-Tensor Theories of Gravity.

    PubMed

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2015-11-13

    The most general scalar-tensor theories of gravity predict a weakening of the gravitational force inside astrophysical bodies. There is a minimum mass for hydrogen burning in stars that is set by the interplay of plasma physics and the theory of gravity. We calculate this for alternative theories of gravity and find that it is always significantly larger than the general relativity prediction. The observation of several low mass red dwarf stars therefore rules out a large class of scalar-tensor gravity theories and places strong constraints on the cosmological parameters appearing in the effective field theory of dark energy. PMID:26613428

  4. Time-dependent scalar fields in modified gravities in a stationary spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yi; Gu, Bao-Ming; Wei, Shao-Wen; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2016-07-01

    Most no-hair theorems involve the assumption that the scalar field is independent of time. Recently in Graham and Jha (Phys. Rev. D90: 041501, 2014) the existence of time-dependent scalar hair outside a stationary black hole in general relativity was ruled out. We generalize this work to modified gravities and non-minimally coupled scalar field with the additional assumption that the spacetime is axisymmetric. It is shown that in higher-order gravity such as metric f( R) gravity the time-dependent scalar hair does not exist. In Palatini f( R) gravity and the non-minimally coupled case the time-dependent scalar hair may exist.

  5. Hydrogen Burning in Low Mass Stars Constrains Scalar-Tensor Theories of Gravity.

    PubMed

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2015-11-13

    The most general scalar-tensor theories of gravity predict a weakening of the gravitational force inside astrophysical bodies. There is a minimum mass for hydrogen burning in stars that is set by the interplay of plasma physics and the theory of gravity. We calculate this for alternative theories of gravity and find that it is always significantly larger than the general relativity prediction. The observation of several low mass red dwarf stars therefore rules out a large class of scalar-tensor gravity theories and places strong constraints on the cosmological parameters appearing in the effective field theory of dark energy.

  6. The Equivalence of Precession Phenomena in Metric Theories of Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisher, Timothy P.

    1996-01-01

    The requirement of general covariance imparts to metric theories of gravity, such as general relativity, important structural features. A precise mathematical form results, ensuring that computation of observable physical effects in the theory gives the same answers independently of the chosen system of coordinates. This coordinate independence property, in turn, can lead to an equivalence of apparently different physical effects.

  7. Effects of Gravity on Bubble Formation in an Annular Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepp, R. A.; Parthasarathy, R. N.; Gollahalli, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the bubble formation in an annular jet were studied. The experiments were conducted in the 2.2-second drop tower at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Terrestrial gravity experiments were conducted at the Fluid Dynamics Research Laboratory at the University of Oklahoma. Stainless steel tubing with inner diameters of 1/8" (gas inner annulus) and 5/16" (liquid outer annulus) served as the injector. A rectangular test section, 6" x 6" x 14" tall, made out of half-inch thick Lexan was used. Images of the annular jet were acquired using a high-speed camera. The effects of gravity and varying liquid and gas flow rates on bubble size, wavelength, and breakup length were documented. In general, the bubble diameter was found to be larger in terrestrial gravity than in microgravity for varying Weber numbers (0.05 - 0.16 and 5 - 11) and liquid flow rates (1.5 ft/s - 3.0 ft/s). The wavelength was found to be larger in terrestrial gravity than in microgravity, but remained constant for varying Weber numbers. For low Weber numbers (0.05 - 0.16), the breakup length in microgravity was significantly higher than in terrestrial gravity. Comparison with linear stability analysis showed estimated bubble sizes within 9% of experimental bubble sizes. Bubble size compared to other terrestrial gravity experiments with same flow conditions showed distinct differences in bubble size, which displayed the importance of injector geometry on bubble formation.

  8. Direct heating rates associated with gravity wave saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Erich

    2004-04-01

    Analysis of filtering out subscale motions is applied for internal gravity waves. This leads to a new perspective of the planetary-scale sensible heat budget of the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. In line with previous results of Becker and Schmitz, the present paper recapitulates that the dissipation of gravity wave kinetic energy and the local adiabatic conversion of mean enthalpy into gravity wave kinetic energy cannot be neglected, and that the net effect of both cools the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. In addition, the importance of the wave entropy flux-an effect which is ignored in customary gravity wave parameterizations for global circulation models-is stressed. We show that, when evaluated on the basis of Lindzen's saturation assumption, the wave entropy flux convergence behaves like a vertical diffusion of the mean stratification, where the wave-induced diffusion coefficient is involved with a Prandtl number of 2. This result imposes an upper bound of 2 for the effective Prandtl number which scales the combined entropy flux owing to turbulence and gravity waves. The direct heating rates generated by gravity wave saturation are assessed quantitatively, using an idealized general circulation model completed by a Lindzen-type gravity wave parameterization.

  9. Goedel-type universes in f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Reboucas, M. J.; Santos, J.

    2009-09-15

    The f(R) gravity theories provide an alternative way to explain the current cosmic acceleration without a dark energy matter component. If gravity is governed by a f(R) theory, a number of issues should be reexamined in this framework, including the violation of causality problem on nonlocal scale. We examine the question as to whether the f(R) gravity theories permit space-times in which the causality is violated. We show that the field equations of these f(R) gravity theories do not exclude solutions with breakdown of causality for a physically well-motivated perfect-fluid matter content. We demonstrate that every perfect-fluid Goedel-type solution of a generic f(R) gravity satisfying the condition df/dR>0 is necessarily isometric to the Goedel geometry, and therefore presents violation of causality. This result extends a theorem on Goedel-type models, which has been established in the context of general relativity. We also derive an expression for the critical radius r{sub c} (beyond which the causality is violated) for an arbitrary f(R) theory, making apparent that the violation of causality depends on both the f(R) gravity theory and the matter content. As an illustration, we concretely take a recent f(R) gravity theory that is free from singularities of the Ricci scalar and is cosmologically viable, and show that this theory accommodates noncausal as well as causal Goedel-type solutions.

  10. Notes on "Quantum Gravity" and Noncommutative Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracia-Bondía, J. M.

    I hesitated for a long time before giving shape to these notes, originally intended for preliminary reading by the attendees to the Summer School "New paths towards quantum gravity" (Holbaek Bay, Denmark, May 2008). At the end, I decide against just selling my mathematical wares, and for a survey, necessarily very selective, but taking a global phenomenological approach to its subject matter. After all, noncommutative geometry does not purport yet to solve the riddle of quantum gravity; it is more of an insurance policy against the probable failure of the other approaches. The plan is as follows: the introduction invites students to the fruitful doubts and conundrums besetting the application of even classical gravity. Next, the first experiments detecting quantum gravitational states inoculate us a healthy dose of scepticism on some of the current ideologies. In Sect. 1.3 we look at the action for general relativity as a consequence of gauge theory for quantum tensor fields. Section 1.4 briefly deals with the unimodular variants. Section 1.5 arrives at noncommutative geometry. I am convinced that, if this is to play a role in quantum gravity, commutative and noncommutative manifolds must be treated on the same footing, which justifies the place granted to the reconstruction theorem. Together with Sect. 1.3, this part constitutes the main body of the notes. Only very summarily at the end of this section do we point to some approaches to gravity within the noncommutative realm. The last section delivers a last dose of scepticism. My efforts will have been rewarded if someone from the young generation learns to mistrust current mindsets.

  11. Gravity wave diagnosis using empirical normal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charron, Martin

    We adapt the theory of Empirical Normal Modes (ENMs) to diagnose gravity waves generated by a relatively high resolution numerical model solving the primitive equations. The ENM approach is based on the Principal Component Analysis (which consists of finding the most efficient basis explaining the variance of a time series), except that it takes advantage of wave-activity conservation laws. In the present work, the small- amplitude version of the pseudoenergy is used to extract from data quasi-monochromatic three-dimensional empirical modes that describe atmospheric wave activity. The spatial distributions of these quasi-monochromatic modes are identical to the normal modes of the linearized primitive equations when the underlying dynamics can be described with a stochastic linear and forced model, thus establishing a bridge between statistics and dynamics. We use this diagnostic method to study inertia-gravity wave generation, propagation, transience, and breaking over the Rockies, the North Pacific, and Central America in the troposphere-stratosphere-mesosphere GFDL SKYHI general circulation model at a resolution of 1° of latitude by 1.2° of longitude. Besides the action of mountains in exciting orographic waves, inertia-gravity wave activity has been found to be generated at the jet stream level as a possible consequence of a sustained nonlinear and ageostrophic flow. In the Tropical region of the model, the ``obstacle effect'' has been found to be the major source of inertia-gravity waves. A significant proportion of these inertia-gravity waves was able to reach the model mesosphere without much dissipation and absorption.

  12. Modification of gravity due to torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, V. P.; Nikiforova, V.; Randjbar-Daemi, S.; Rubakov, V.

    2010-01-01

    Modifications of general relativity have been considered as one of the possible ways of addressing some of the outstanding problems related to the large scale gravitational physics. In this contribution we review some of the recent results which are due to the inclusion of dynamical torsion. More specifically we shall discuss the propagation of massive spin-2 particles in flat and curved space times. We shall show that, contrary to what is generally believed, spinning matter is not the sole source of torsion field. A symmetric energy momentum tensor can also couple to torsion degrees of freedom. The massive and massless spin-2 particles mix giving rise to an infrared modification of gravity.

  13. Cascading gravity is ghost free

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Khoury, Justin; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2010-06-15

    We perform a full perturbative stability analysis of the 6D cascading gravity model in the presence of 3-brane tension. We demonstrate that for sufficiently large tension on the (flat) 3-brane, there are no ghosts at the perturbative level, consistent with results that had previously only been obtained in a specific 5D decoupling limit. These results establish the cascading gravity framework as a consistent infrared modification of gravity.

  14. Astrophysical aspects of Weyl gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the astrophysical implications and applications of Weyl gravity, which is the theory resulting from the unique action allowed under the principle of local scale invariance in Einstein gravity. These applications include galactic dynamics, the mass-radius relation, the cosmological constant, and the 'Modified Newtonian Dynamics' proposed by Milgrom (1983). The relation of Weyl gravity to other scale-invariant theories is addressed.

  15. Gravity: Simple Experiments for Young Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Larry

    This book contains 12 simple experiments through which students can learn about gravity and its implications. Some of the topics included are weight, weightlessness, artificial gravity, the pull of gravity on different shapes, center of gravity, the universal law of gravity, and balancing. Experiments include: finding the balancing point; weighing…

  16. Neutron stars as laboratories for gravity physics

    SciTech Connect

    Deliduman, Cemsinan

    2014-01-01

    We study the structure of neutron stars in R+αR² gravity model with perturbative method. We obtain mass-radius relations for four representative equations of state (EoS). We find that, for |α|~10⁹ cm², the results differ substantially from the results of general relativity. The effects of modified gravity are seen as mimicking a stiff or soft EoS for neutron stars depending upon whether α is negative or positive, respectively. Some of the soft EoS that are excluded within the framework of general relativity can be reconciled for certain values of α of this order with the 2 solar mass neutron star recently observed. Indeed, if the EoS is ever established to be soft, modified gravity of the sort studied here may be required to explain neutron star masses as large as 2 M{sub ⊙}. The associated length scale √(α)~10⁵ cm is of the order of the the typical radius of neutron stars implying that this is the smallest value we could find by using neutron stars as a probe. We thus conclude that the true value of α is most likely much smaller than 10⁹ cm².

  17. Geometry and symmetries in lattice spinor gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Wetterich, C.

    2012-09-15

    Lattice spinor gravity is a proposal for regularized quantum gravity based on fermionic degrees of freedom. In our lattice model the local Lorentz symmetry is generalized to complex transformation parameters. The difference between space and time is not put in a priori, and the euclidean and the Minkowski quantum field theory are unified in one functional integral. The metric and its signature arise as a result of the dynamics, corresponding to a given ground state or cosmological solution. Geometrical objects as the vierbein, spin connection or the metric are expectation values of collective fields built from an even number of fermions. The quantum effective action for the metric is invariant under general coordinate transformations in the continuum limit. The action of our model is found to be also invariant under gauge transformations. We observe a 'geometrical entanglement' of gauge- and Lorentz-transformations due to geometrical objects transforming non-trivially under both types of symmetry transformations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We formulate the geometrical aspects of a proposal for a lattice regularized model of quantum gravity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The vierbein shows an entanglement between Lorentz symmetry and gauge symmetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Euclidean and Minkowski signatures of the collective metric and the vierbein are described within the same functional integral.

  18. Two-loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Ven, Anton E. M.

    1992-07-01

    We prove the existence of a nonrenormalizable infinity in the two-loop effective action of perturbative quantum gravity by means of an explicit calculation. Our final result agrees with that obtained by earlier authors. We use the background-field method in coordinate space, combined with dimensional regularization and a heat kernel representation for the propagators. General covariance is manifestly preserved. Only vacuum graphs in the presence of an on-shell background metric need to be calculated. We extend the background covariant harmonic gauge to include terms nonlinear in the quantum gravitational fields and allow for general reparametrizations of those fields. For a particular gauge choice and field parametrization only two three-graviton and six four-graviton vertices are present in the action. Calculational labor is further reduced by restricting to backgrounds, which are not only Ricci-flat, but satisfy an additional constraint bilinear in the Weyl tensor. To handle the still formidable amount of algebra, we use the symbolic manipulation program FORM. We checked that the on-shell two-loop effective action is in fact independent of all gauge and field redefinition parameters. A two-loop analysis for Yang-Mills fields is included as well, since in that case we can give full details as well as simplify earlier analyses.

  19. [Biology of size and gravity].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Masamichi; Baba, Shoji A

    2004-03-01

    Gravity is a force that acts on mass. Biological effects of gravity and their magnitude depend on scale of mass and difference in density. One significant contribution of space biology is confirmation of direct action of gravity even at the cellular level. Since cell is the elementary unit of life, existence of primary effects of gravity on cells leads to establish the firm basis of gravitational biology. However, gravity is not limited to produce its biological effects on molecules and their reaction networks that compose living cells. Biological system has hierarchical structure with layers of organism, group, and ecological system, which emerge from the system one layer down. Influence of gravity is higher at larger mass. In addition to this, actions of gravity in each layer are caused by process and mechanism that is subjected and different in each layer of the hierarchy. Because of this feature, summing up gravitational action on cells does not explain gravity for biological system at upper layers. Gravity at ecological system or organismal level can not reduced to cellular mechanism. Size of cells and organisms is one of fundamental characters of them and a determinant in their design of form and function. Size closely relates to other physical quantities, such as mass, volume, and surface area. Gravity produces weight of mass. Organisms are required to equip components to support weight and to resist against force that arise at movement of body or a part of it. Volume and surface area associate with mass and heat transport process at body. Gravity dominates those processes by inducing natural convection around organisms. This review covers various elements and process, with which gravity make influence on living systems, chosen on the basis of biology of size. Cells and biochemical networks are under the control of organism to integrate a consolidated form. How cells adjust metabolic rate to meet to the size of the composed organism, whether is gravity

  20. Active Response Gravity Offload System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valle, Paul; Dungan, Larry; Cunningham, Thomas; Lieberman, Asher; Poncia, Dina

    2011-01-01

    The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) provides the ability to simulate with one system the gravity effect of planets, moons, comets, asteroids, and microgravity, where the gravity is less than Earth fs gravity. The system works by providing a constant force offload through an overhead hoist system and horizontal motion through a rail and trolley system. The facility covers a 20 by 40-ft (approximately equals 6.1 by 12.2m) horizontal area with 15 ft (approximately equals4.6 m) of lifting vertical range.

  1. A Challenge to Entropic Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roveto, Jonathan; Munoz, Gerardo

    2012-03-01

    In a recent publication, Erik Verlinde attempts to show that gravity should be viewed not as a fundamental force, but rather as an emergent thermodynamic phenomenon arising from an unspecified microscopic theory via equipartition and holography. We present a challenge to his reformulation of gravity. A detailed examination of Verlinde's derivation leads to a number of questions that severely weaken the claim that such a theory correctly reproduces Newton's laws or Einstein gravity. In particular, we find that neither Newtonian gravity nor the Einstein equations are uniquely determined using Verlinde's postulates.

  2. Bringing Gravity to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norsk, P.; Shelhamer, M.

    2016-01-01

    This panel will present NASA's plans for ongoing and future research to define the requirements for Artificial Gravity (AG) as a countermeasure against the negative health effects of long-duration weightlessness. AG could mitigate the gravity-sensitive effects of spaceflight across a host of physiological systems. Bringing gravity to space could mitigate the sensorimotor and neuro-vestibular disturbances induced by G-transitions upon reaching a planetary body, and the cardiovascular deconditioning and musculoskeletal weakness induced by weightlessness. Of particular interest for AG during deep-space missions is mitigation of the Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome that the majority of astronauts exhibit in space to varying degrees, and which presumably is associated with weightlessness-induced fluid shift from lower to upper body segments. AG could be very effective for reversing the fluid shift and thus help prevent VIIP. The first presentation by Dr. Charles will summarize some of the ground-based and (very little) space-based research that has been conducted on AG by the various space programs. Dr. Paloski will address the use of AG during deep-space exploration-class missions and describe the different AG scenarios such as intra-vehicular, part-of-vehicle, or whole-vehicle centrifugations. Dr. Clement will discuss currently planned NASA research as well as how to coordinate future activities among NASA's international partners. Dr. Barr will describe some possible future plans for using space- and ground-based partial-G analogs to define the relationship between physiological responses and G levels between 0 and 1. Finally, Dr. Stenger will summarize how the human cardiovascular system could benefit from intermittent short-radius centrifugations during long-duration missions.

  3. Massive gravity acausality redux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deser, S.; Izumi, K.; Ong, Y. C.; Waldron, A.

    2013-10-01

    Massive gravity (mGR) is a 5(=2s+1) degree of freedom, finite range extension of GR. However, amongst other problems, it is plagued by superluminal propagation, first uncovered via a second order shock analysis. First order mGR shock structures have also been studied, but the existence of superluminal propagation in that context was left open. We present here a concordance of these methods, by an explicit (first order) characteristic matrix computation, which confirms mGR's superluminal propagation as well as acausality.

  4. The gravity apple tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa Aldama, Mariana

    2015-04-01

    The gravity apple tree is a genealogical tree of the gravitation theories developed during the past century. The graphic representation is full of information such as guides in heuristic principles, names of main proponents, dates and references for original articles (See under Supplementary Data for the graphic representation). This visual presentation and its particular classification allows a quick synthetic view for a plurality of theories, many of them well validated in the Solar System domain. Its diachronic structure organizes information in a shape of a tree following similarities through a formal concept analysis. It can be used for educational purposes or as a tool for philosophical discussion.

  5. Gravity from quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Weon; Kim, Hyeong-Chan; Lee, Jungjai

    2013-09-01

    We suggest that the Einstein equation can be derived from Landauer's principle applied to an information erasing process at a local Rindler horizon and Jacobson's idea linking the Einstein equation with thermodynamics. When matter crosses the horizon, information on the matter disappears, and the horizon entanglement entropy increases to compensate for the entropy reduction. The Einstein equation describes an information-energy relation during this process, which implies that entropic gravity is related to the quantum entanglement of the vacuum and has a quantuminformation theoretic origin.

  6. Gravity and Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behringer, R. P.; Hovell, Daniel; Kondic, Lou; Tennakoon, Sarath; Veje, Christian

    1999-01-01

    We describe experiments that probe a number of different types of granular flow where either gravity is effectively eliminated or it is modulated in time. These experiments include the shaking of granular materials both vertically and horizontally, and the shearing of a 2D granular material. For the shaken system, we identify interesting dynamical phenomena and relate them to standard simple friction models. An interesting application of this set of experiments is to the mixing of dissimilar materials. For the sheared system we identify a new kind of dynamical phase transition.

  7. Topological Gravity Localization on a δ-FUNCTION like Brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahim, M. O.; Almeida, C. A. S.

    In the celebrated Plebanski formalism of topological gravity, the constraints connecting topological field theories and gravity are imposed in spacetimes with trivial topology. In the braneworld context there are two distinct regions of the spacetime, namely, the bulk and the braneworld volume. In this work we show how to construct topological classical gravity in a scenario containing one extra dimension and a δ-function like three-brane which naturally emerges from a spontaneously broken discrete symmetry. Starting from a D = 5 theory we obtain the action for General Relativity in the Palatini form in the bulk as well as in the braneworld volume. This result is important for future insights about quantum gravity on brane scenarios.

  8. Virial Theorem in Nonlocal Newtonian Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashhoon, Bahram

    2016-05-01

    Nonlocal gravity is the recent classical nonlocal generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation in which the past history of the gravitational field is taken into account. In this theory, nonlocality appears to simulate dark matter. The virial theorem for the Newtonian regime of nonlocal gravity theory is derived and its consequences for "isolated" astronomical systems in virial equilibrium at the present epoch are investigated. In particular, for a sufficiently isolated nearby galaxy in virial equilibrium, the galaxy's baryonic diameter---namely, the diameter of the smallest sphere that completely surrounds the baryonic system at the present time---is predicted to be larger than the effective dark matter fraction times a universal length that is the basic nonlocality length scale of about 3 kpc.

  9. Palatini actions and quantum gravity phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.

    2011-10-01

    We show that an invariant an universal length scale can be consistently introduced in a generally covariant theory through the gravitational sector using the Palatini approach. The resulting theory is able to capture different aspects of quantum gravity phenomenology in a single framework. In particular, it is found that in this theory field excitations propagating with different energy-densities perceive different background metrics, which is a fundamental characteristic of the DSR and Rainbow Gravity approaches. We illustrate these properties with a particular gravitational model and explicitly show how the soccer ball problem is avoided in this framework. The isotropic and anisotropic cosmologies of this model also avoid the big bang singularity by means of a big bounce.

  10. Plant secondary metabolism in altered gravity.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Lindsey K; Levine, Lanfang H; Musgrave, Mary E

    2009-01-01

    Plans by the space program to use plants for food supply and environmental regeneration have led to an examination of how plants grow in microgravity. Because secondary metabolic compounds are so important in determining the nutritional and flavor characteristics of plants-as well as making plants more resistant to biotic and abiotic stresses-their responses to altered gravity are now being studied. These experiments are technically challenging because temperature, humidity, atmospheric composition, light, and water status must be maintained around the plant while simultaneously altering the g-load, either in the free-fall of orbital spacecraft or on a centrifuge rotor. In general, plants have shown increased accumulation of small secondary metabolites in microgravity (<10(-3) g), while these have decreased in hypergravity (>1-g). Gravity-related changes in the plant environment as well as mechanical loading effects account for these responses.

  11. An alternative path integral for quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Chethan; Kumar, K. V. Pavan; Raju, Avinash

    2016-10-01

    We define a (semi-classical) path integral for gravity with Neumann boundary conditions in D dimensions, and show how to relate this new partition function to the usual picture of Euclidean quantum gravity. We also write down the action in ADM Hamiltonian formulation and use it to reproduce the entropy of black holes and cosmological horizons. A comparison between the (background-subtracted) covariant and Hamiltonian ways of semi-classically evaluating this path integral in flat space reproduces the generalized Smarr formula and the first law. This "Neumann ensemble" perspective on gravitational thermodynamics is parallel to the canonical (Dirichlet) ensemble of Gibbons-Hawking and the microcanonical approach of Brown-York.

  12. Zero-gravity transient thermal mixing simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lands, J. F., Jr.; Ried, R. C., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    The experimental program described is an outgrowth of independent investigations into alternate redesign concepts for the Apollo SM cryogenic oxygen storage system. The experiments were continued, after the redesign was established, to provide physical insight into transient thermal mixing in zero-gravity and to aid in the characterization of the system performance in flight. Zero-gravity heat transfer and fluid mixing were simulated experimentally through an analogy between unsteady heat conduction and species diffusion. To further support numerical analyses of the cryogenic oxygen storage system, the experimental investigation was extended to include a cubical tank geometry, representative of existing numerical models. In general, the transient flow patterns in the cubical tank are far more complex than those of the spherical tank and the extent of fluid mixing is significantly greater but less repeatable.

  13. Gravity and the orientation of cell division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmstetter, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    A novel culture system for mammalian cells was used to investigate division orientations in populations of Chinese hamster ovary cells and the influence of gravity on the positioning of division axes. The cells were tethered to adhesive sites, smaller in diameter than a newborn cell, distributed over a nonadhesive substrate positioned vertically. The cells grew and divided while attached to the sites, and the angles and directions of elongation during anaphase, projected in the vertical plane, were found to be random with respect to gravity. However, consecutive divisions of individual cells were generally along the same axis or at 90 degrees to the previous division, with equal probability. Thus, successive divisions were restricted to orthogonal planes, but the choice of plane appeared to be random, unlike the ordered sequence of cleavage orientations seen during early embryo development.

  14. Plant secondary metabolism in altered gravity.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Lindsey K; Levine, Lanfang H; Musgrave, Mary E

    2009-01-01

    Plans by the space program to use plants for food supply and environmental regeneration have led to an examination of how plants grow in microgravity. Because secondary metabolic compounds are so important in determining the nutritional and flavor characteristics of plants-as well as making plants more resistant to biotic and abiotic stresses-their responses to altered gravity are now being studied. These experiments are technically challenging because temperature, humidity, atmospheric composition, light, and water status must be maintained around the plant while simultaneously altering the g-load, either in the free-fall of orbital spacecraft or on a centrifuge rotor. In general, plants have shown increased accumulation of small secondary metabolites in microgravity (<10(-3) g), while these have decreased in hypergravity (>1-g). Gravity-related changes in the plant environment as well as mechanical loading effects account for these responses. PMID:19521860

  15. The GRAVITY integrated optics beam combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jocou, L.; Perraut, K.; Nolot, A.; Berger, J. P.; Moulin, T.; Labeye, P.; Lacour, S.; Perrin, G.; Lebouquin, J. B.; Bartko, H.; Thiel, M.; Eisenhauer, F.

    2010-07-01

    Gravity is a 2nd generation interferometric instrument for VLTI. It will combine 4 telescopes in dual feed in the K band to study general relativity effects around the Galactic Center black hole. The concept of Gravity is based on two equivalent beam combiner instruments: the scientific one fed by the science target (Sgr A*) and the fringe tracker fed by a bright reference star (See Gillessen et al.1). Both beam combination instruments are based on silica on silicon integrated optics (IO) component glued to fluoride glass fiber array. The beam combiners are implemented in a cryogenic vessel cooled at 200°K and back-illuminated by a high power laser used for metrology (Bartko et al.2). This paper is dedicated to the description of the development of the integrated beam combiner assembly.

  16. Cosmological perturbations in extended massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümrükçüoğlu, A. Emir; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Lin, Chunshan; Mukohyama, Shinji; Trodden, Mark

    2013-07-01

    We study cosmological perturbations around self-accelerating solutions to two extensions of nonlinear massive gravity: the quasi-dilaton theory and the mass-varying theory. We examine stability of the cosmological solutions, and the extent to which the vanishing of the kinetic terms for scalar and vector perturbations of self-accelerating solutions in massive gravity is generic when the theory is extended. We find that these kinetic terms are in general nonvanishing in both extensions, though there are constraints on the parameters and background evolution from demanding that they have the correct sign. In particular, the self-accelerating solutions of the quasi-dilaton theory are always unstable to scalar perturbations with wavelength shorter than the Hubble length.

  17. The paths of gravity in galileon cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Appleby, Stephen; Linder, Eric V. E-mail: evlinder@lbl.gov

    2012-03-01

    Galileon gravity offers a robust gravitational theory for explaining cosmic acceleration, having a rich phenomenology of testable behaviors. We explore three classes of Galileon models — standard uncoupled, and linearly or derivatively coupled to matter — investigating the expansion history with particular attention to early time and late time attractors, as well as the linear perturbations. From the relativistic and nonrelativistic Poisson equations we calculate the generalizations of the gravitational strength (Newton's constant), deriving its early and late time behavior. By scanning through the parameters we derive distributions of the gravitational strength at various epochs and trace the paths of gravity in its evolution. Using ghost-free and stability criteria we restrict the allowed parameter space, finding in particular that the linear and derivative coupled models are severely constrained by classical instabilities in the early universe.

  18. General Relativity and Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Berger, Beverly; Isenberg, James; MacCallum, Malcolm

    2015-07-01

    Part I. Einstein's Triumph: 1. 100 years of general relativity George F. R. Ellis; 2. Was Einstein right? Clifford M. Will; 3. Cosmology David Wands, Misao Sasaki, Eiichiro Komatsu, Roy Maartens and Malcolm A. H. MacCallum; 4. Relativistic astrophysics Peter Schneider, Ramesh Narayan, Jeffrey E. McClintock, Peter Mészáros and Martin J. Rees; Part II. New Window on the Universe: 5. Receiving gravitational waves Beverly K. Berger, Karsten Danzmann, Gabriela Gonzalez, Andrea Lommen, Guido Mueller, Albrecht Rüdiger and William Joseph Weber; 6. Sources of gravitational waves. Theory and observations Alessandra Buonanno and B. S. Sathyaprakash; Part III. Gravity is Geometry, After All: 7. Probing strong field gravity through numerical simulations Frans Pretorius, Matthew W. Choptuik and Luis Lehner; 8. The initial value problem of general relativity and its implications Gregory J. Galloway, Pengzi Miao and Richard Schoen; 9. Global behavior of solutions to Einstein's equations Stefanos Aretakis, James Isenberg, Vincent Moncrief and Igor Rodnianski; Part IV. Beyond Einstein: 10. Quantum fields in curved space-times Stefan Hollands and Robert M. Wald; 11. From general relativity to quantum gravity Abhay Ashtekar, Martin Reuter and Carlo Rovelli; 12. Quantum gravity via unification Henriette Elvang and Gary T. Horowitz.

  19. Twistor-strings and gravity tree amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamo, Tim; Mason, Lionel

    2013-04-01

    Recently we discussed how Einstein supergravity tree amplitudes might be obtained from the original Witten and Berkovits twistor-string theory when external conformal gravitons are restricted to be Einstein gravitons. Here we obtain a more systematic understanding of the relationship between conformal and Einstein gravity amplitudes in that twistor-string theory. We show that although it does not in general yield Einstein amplitudes, we can nevertheless obtain some partial twistor-string interpretation of the remarkable formulae recently been found by Hodges and generalized to all tree amplitudes by Cachazo and Skinner. The Hodges matrix and its higher degree generalizations encode the world sheet correlators of the twistor string. These matrices control both Einstein amplitudes and those of the conformal gravity arising from the Witten and Berkovits twistor-string. Amplitudes in the latter case arise from products of the diagonal elements of the generalized Hodges matrices and reduced determinants give the former. The reduced determinants arise if the contractions in the worldsheet correlator are restricted to form connected trees at MHV. The (generalized) Hodges matrices arise as weighted Laplacian matrices for the graph of possible contractions in the correlators and the reduced determinants of these weighted Laplacian matrices give the sum of the connected tree contributions by an extension of the matrix-tree theorem.

  20. Impact of gravity waves on long-range infrasound propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Christophe; Lott, François; De La Camara, Alvaro

    2016-04-01

    In this work we study infrasound propagation in acoustic waveguides that support a finite number of propagating modes. We analyze the effects of gravity waves on these acoustic waveguides. Testing sound propagation in such perturbed fields can potentially be used to improve the gravity wave models. A linear solution modeling the interaction between an incoming acoustic wave and a randomly perturbed atmosphere is developed, using the forward-scattering approximation. The wave mode structure is determined by the effective sound speed profile which is strongly affected by gravity wave breaking. The random perturbations are described by a stochastic field predicted by a multiwave stochastic parameterization of gravity waves, which is operational in the LMDz climate model. The justification for this approach is two fold. On the one hand, the use of a few monochromatic waves mimics the observations of rather narrow-banded gravity wave packets in the lower stratosphere. On the other hand, the stochastic sampling of the gravity wave field and the random choice of wave properties deals with the inherent unpredictability of mesoscale dynamics from large scale conditions provided by the meteorological reanalysis. The transmitted acoustic signals contain a stable front and a small-amplitude incoherent coda. A general expression for the stable front is derived in terms of saddle-point contributions. The saddle-points are obtained from a WKB approximation of the vertical eigenvalue problem. This approach extract the dominant effects in the acoustic - gravity wave interaction. We present results that show how statistics of the transmitted signal are related to a few saddle-points and how the GW field can trigger large deviations in the acoustic signals. While some of the characteristics of the stable front can be directly related to that of a few individual gravity waves, it is shown that the amount of the launched gravity waves included in climate models can be estimated using

  1. Gravity duals of supersymmetric gauge theories on three-manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquet, Daniel; Lorenzen, Jakob; Martelli, Dario; Sparks, James

    2016-08-01

    We study gravity duals to a broad class of {N} = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories defined on a general class of three-manifold geometries. The gravity backgrounds are based on Euclidean self-dual solutions to four-dimensional gauged supergravity. As well as constructing new examples, we prove in general that for solutions defined on the four-ball the gravitational free energy depends only on the supersymmetric Killing vector, finding a simple closed formula when the solution has U(1) × U(1) symmetry. Our result agrees with the large N limit of the free energy of the dual gauge theory, computed using localization. This constitutes an exact check of the gauge/gravity correspondence for a very broad class of gauge theories with a large N limit, defined on a general class of background three-manifold geometries.

  2. Exploring Cartan gravity with dynamical symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westman, Hans; Złośnik, Tom

    2014-05-01

    It has been known for some time that General Relativity can be regarded as a Yang-Mills-type gauge theory in a symmetry broken phase. In this picture the gravity sector is described by an SO(1, 4) or SO(2, 3) gauge field A^{a}_{\\phantom{a}b\\mu } and Higgs field Va which acts to break the symmetry down to that of the Lorentz group SO(1, 3). This symmetry breaking mirrors that of electroweak theory. However, a notable difference is that while the Higgs field Φ of electroweak theory is taken as a genuine dynamical field satisfying a Klein-Gordon equation, the gauge independent norm V2 ≡ ηabVaVb of the Higgs-type field Va is typically regarded as non-dynamical. Instead, in many treatments Va does not appear explicitly in the formalism or is required to satisfy V2 = const. ≠ 0 by means of a Lagrangian constraint. As an alternative to this we propose a class of polynomial actions that treat both the gauge connection A^{a}_{\\phantom{a}b\\mu } and Higgs field Va as genuine dynamical fields with no ad hoc constraints imposed. The resultant equations of motion consist of a set of first-order partial differential equations. We show that for certain actions these equations may be cast in a second-order form, corresponding to a scalar-tensor model of gravity. One simple choice leads to the extensively studied Peebles-Ratra rolling quintessence model. Another choice yields a scalar-tensor symmetry broken phase of the theory with positive cosmological constant and an effective mass M of the gravitational Higgs field ensuring the constancy of V2 at low energies and agreement with empirical data if M is sufficiently large. More general cases are discussed corresponding to variants of Chern-Simons modified gravity and scalar-Euler form gravity, each of which yield propagating torsion.

  3. Warped brane worlds in critical gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yi; Chen, Feng-Wei; Xie, Qun-Ying; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the brane models in arbitrary dimensional critical gravity presented in Lu and Pope (Phys Rev Lett 106:181302, 2011). For the models of the thin branes with codimension one, the Gibbons-Hawking surface term and the junction conditions are derived, with which the analytical solutions for the flat, AdS, and dS branes are obtained at the critical point of the critical gravity. It is found that all these branes are embedded in an AdS spacetime, but, in general, the effective cosmological constant of the AdS spacetime is not equal to the naked one in the critical gravity, which can be positive, zero, and negative. Another interesting result is that the brane tension can also be positive, zero, or negative, depending on the symmetry of the thin brane and the values of the parameters of the theory, which is very different from the case in general relativity. It is shown that the mass hierarchy problem can be solved in the braneworld model in the higher-derivative critical gravity. We also study the thick brane model and find analytical and numerical solutions of the flat, AdS, and dS branes. It is found that some branes will have inner structure when some parameters of the theory are larger than their critical values, which may result in resonant KK modes for some bulk matter fields. The flat branes with positive energy density and AdS branes with negative energy density are embedded in an -dimensional AdS spacetime, while the dS branes with positive energy density are embedded in an -dimensional Minkowski one.

  4. Hypersonic Interplanetary Flight: Aero Gravity Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Al; Banks, Dan; Randolph, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The use of aero-gravity assist during hypersonic interplanetary flights is highlighted. Specifically, the use of large versus small planet for gravity asssist maneuvers, aero-gravity assist trajectories, launch opportunities and planetary waverider performance are addressed.

  5. Black Hole Formation in Lovelock Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taves, Timothy Mark

    Some branches of quantum gravity demand the existence of higher dimensions and the addition of higher curvature terms to the gravitational Lagrangian in the form of the Lovelock polynomials. In this thesis we investigate some of the classical properties of Lovelock gravity. We first derive the Hamiltonian for Lovelock gravity and find that it takes the same form as in general relativity when written in terms of the Misner-Sharp mass function. We then minimally couple the action to matter fields to find Hamilton's equations of motion. These are gauge fixed to be in the Painleve-Gullstrand co--ordinates and are well suited to numerical studies of black hole formation. We then use these equations of motion for the massless scalar field to study the formation of general relativistic black holes in four to eight dimensions and Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet black holes in five and six dimensions. We study Choptuik scaling, a phenomenon which relates the initial conditions of a matter distribution to the final observables of small black holes. In both higher dimensional general relativity and Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity we confirm the existence of cusps in the mass scaling relation which had previously only been observed in four dimensional general relativity. In the general relativistic case we then calculate the critical exponents for four to eight dimensions and find agreement with previous calculations by Bland et al but not Sorkin et al who both worked in null co-ordinates. For the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet case we find that the self-similar behaviour seen in the general relativistic case is destroyed. We find that it is replaced by some other form of scaling structure. In five dimensions we find that the period of the critical solution at the origin is proportional to roughly the cube root of the Gauss-Bonnet parameter and that there is evidence for a minimum black hole radius. In six dimensions we see evidence for a new type of scaling. We also show, from the equations of

  6. Space truss zero gravity dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Andy

    1989-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics Branch of the Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory in cooperation with the Reduced Gravity Office of the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) plans to perform zero-gravity dynamic tests of a 12-meter truss structure. This presentation describes the program and presents all results obtained to date.

  7. Is There Gravity in Space?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar, Varda; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Investigates students' ideas about gravity beyond the earth's surface. Presents a lesson plan designed to help students understand that gravity can act beyond Earth's atmosphere. Also helps students gain a more adequate intuitive understanding of how natural and artificial satellites stay in orbit. Reports that this strategy changed some students'…

  8. Gravity...It's So Attractive!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Carol

    1992-01-01

    Describes six simple experiments that can enable students to better understand gravity and the role it plays in the universe. Includes discussions of Newton's experiments, weight and mass, center of gravity, center of mass, and the velocity of falling objects. (JJK)

  9. Fixed points of quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Litim, Daniel F

    2004-05-21

    Euclidean quantum gravity is studied with renormalization group methods. Analytical results for a nontrivial ultraviolet fixed point are found for arbitrary dimensions and gauge fixing parameters in the Einstein-Hilbert truncation. Implications for quantum gravity in four dimensions are discussed.

  10. Perturbations of cosmological and black hole solutions in massive gravity and bi-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Siino, Masaru; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yoshida, Daisuke

    2016-10-01

    We investigate perturbations of a class of spherically symmetric solutions in massive gravity and bi-gravity. The background equations of motion for the particular class of solutions we are interested in reduce to a set of the Einstein equations with a cosmological constant. Thus, the solutions in this class include all the spherically symmetric solutions in general relativity, such as the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker solution and the Schwarzschild (-de Sitter) solution, though the one-parameter family of two parameters of the theory admits such a class of solutions. We find that the equations of motion for the perturbations of this class of solutions also reduce to the perturbed Einstein equations at first and second order. Therefore, the perturbative stability of the solutions coincides with that of the corresponding solutions in general relativity at least up to the second-order perturbations.

  11. Testing gravity with EG: mapping theory onto observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, C. Danielle; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Heymans, Catherine

    2015-12-01

    We present a complete derivation of the observationally motivated definition of the modified gravity statistic EG. Using this expression, we investigate how variations to theory and survey parameters may introduce uncertainty in the general relativistic prediction of EG. We forecast errors on EG for measurements using two combinations of upcoming surveys, and find that theoretical uncertainties may dominate for a futuristic measurement. Finally, we compute predictions of EG under modifications to general relativity in the quasistatic regime, and comment on the pros and cons of using EG to test gravity with future surveys.

  12. Massive gravity coupled to Galileons is ghost-free.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Melinda; Goon, Garrett; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Stokes, James; Trodden, Mark

    2013-08-01

    It is possible to couple Dirac-Born-Infeld scalars possessing generalized Galilean internal shift symmetries (Galileons) to nonlinear massive gravity in four dimensions, in such a manner that the interactions maintain the Galilean symmetry. Such a construction is of interest, because it is not possible to couple such fields to massless general relativity in the same way. We show that this theory has the primary constraint necessary to eliminate the Boulware-Deser ghost, thus preserving the attractive properties of both the Galileons and ghost-free massive gravity.

  13. Massive gravity coupled to Galileons is ghost-free.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Melinda; Goon, Garrett; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Stokes, James; Trodden, Mark

    2013-08-01

    It is possible to couple Dirac-Born-Infeld scalars possessing generalized Galilean internal shift symmetries (Galileons) to nonlinear massive gravity in four dimensions, in such a manner that the interactions maintain the Galilean symmetry. Such a construction is of interest, because it is not possible to couple such fields to massless general relativity in the same way. We show that this theory has the primary constraint necessary to eliminate the Boulware-Deser ghost, thus preserving the attractive properties of both the Galileons and ghost-free massive gravity. PMID:23971555

  14. Gauge Theory Gravity: Outline and Utility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Matthew; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2003-04-01

    Gauge Theory Gravity, as formulated by Lasenby, Doran, and Gull, is a reformulation of gravitation as a gauge theory in Minkowski spacetime. This picture makes gravitation look formally analogous to the other forces of nature. It is locally equivalent to general relativity (the basic field equations are equivalent in form to the Cartan formulation of general relativity), but presents significant conceptual differences and certain calculational advantages. We provide an overview of the theory, its explicit relation to general relativity, and outline a constructive method for generating solutions. As an illustration, we obtain the most general spherically symmetric stationary vaccum solution, which explicitly displays all coordinate freedom and contains as special cases all common forms of the spherically symmetric vacuum metric.

  15. Construction of Galerkin's matrix for elementary potentials and an ellipsoidal solution domain based on series developments and general relations between Legendre's functions of the first and the second kind: Application in Earth's gravity field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holota, Petr; Nesvadba, Otakar

    2016-04-01

    The role of boundary value problems in physical geodesy and in Earth's gravity field studies in particular is well-known. The paper focuses on Neumann's problem formulated for the exterior of an oblate ellipsoid of revolution as this is considered a basis for an iteration solution of the linear gravimetric boundary value problem in the determination of the disturbing potential. The approach follows the concept of variational methods and the notion of the weak solution. Hence Galerkin's approximations are applied, which means that the solution of the problem is approximated by linear combinations of basis functions with scalar coefficients. Our aim is to discuss the construction of Galerkin's matrix for basis functions generated by elementary potentials. Possibly, the computation of the entries of Galerkin's matrix is expected to be very simple for the elementary functions like these. Nevertheless, the opposite is true. Ellipsoidal harmonics are applied as a natural tool and elementary potentials are expressed by means of series of ellipsoidal harmonics. The problem, however, is the summation of the series that represent the entries of Galerkin's matrix. It is difficult to reduce the number of summation indices since in the ellipsoidal case there is no analogue to the addition theorem known for spherical harmonics. This makes the computation of Galerkin's matrix rather demanding. Therefore, the straightforward application of series of ellipsoidal harmonics is complemented by deeper relations contained in the theory of ordinary differential equations of second order and Legendre's functions. Subsequently, hypergeometric functions and series are used. Moreover, within some approximations the entries are split into parts. Some of the resulting series may be summed relatively easily, apart from technical tricks. For the remaining series the summation needs more complex tools. It was converted to elliptic integrals. The approach made it possible to deduce a closed

  16. Stratospheric gravity wave observations of AIRS and HIRDLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Catrin I.; Hoffmann, Lars; Ern, Manfred; Trinh, Thai

    2016-04-01

    The Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite provides stratospheric temperature observations for a variety of scientific analyses. However, the horizontal resolution of the operational temperature retrievals is generally not sufficient for studies of gravity waves. The AIRS high-resolution retrieval discussed here provides stratospheric temperature profiles for each individual satellite footprint and therefore has nine times better horizontal sampling than the operational data. The retrieval configuration is optimized so that the results provide a trade-off between spatial resolution and retrieval noise that is considered optimal for gravity wave analysis. To validate the AIRS data we performed an intercomparison with stratospheric temperature measurements of the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS). Selected case studies of gravity wave events are analyzed. AIRS and HIRDLS utilize rather different measurement geometries (nadir and limb) and have different sensitivities to gravity wave horizontal and vertical wavelengths, as indicated by their observational filters. Nevertheless, the wave structures found in the stratosphere in AIRS and HIRDLS data are often in remarkably good agreement. The three-dimensional temperature fields from AIRS allow us to derive the horizontal orientation of the phase fronts, which is a limiting factor for gravity wave analyses based on limb measurements today. In addition, a statistical comparison focuses on temperature variances due to stratospheric gravity wave activity at 20-60 km altitude. The analysis covers monthly zonal averages and time series for the HIRDLS measurement time period (January 2005-March 2008). We found good agreement in the seasonal and latitudinal patterns of gravity wave activity. Time series of gravity wave variances show a strong annual cycle at high latitudes with maxima during wintertime and minima during summertime. Largest variability is found at 60°S during austral

  17. Unimodular F(R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojiri, S.; Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    We extend the formalism of the Einstein-Hilbert unimodular gravity in the context of modified F(R) gravity. After appropriately modifying the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric in a way that it becomes compatible to the unimodular condition of having a constant metric determinant, we derive the equations of motion of the unimodular F(R) gravity by using the metric formalism of modified gravity with Lagrange multiplier constraint. The resulting equations are studied in frames of reconstruction method, which enables us to realize various cosmological scenarios, which was impossible to realize in the standard Einstein-Hilbert unimodular gravity. Several unimodular F(R) inflationary scenarios are presented, and in some cases, concordance with Planck and BICEP2 observational data can be achieved.

  18. Foam formation in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Francis C.; Mcmanus, Samuel P.; Matthews, John; Patel, Darayas

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus that produced the first polyurethane foam in low gravity has been described. The chemicals were mixed together in an apparatus designed for operation in low gravity. Mixing was by means of stirring the chemicals with an electric motor and propeller in a mixing chamber. The apparatus was flown on Consort 1, the first low-gravity materials payload launched by a commercial rocket launch team. The sounding rocket flight produced over 7 min of low gravity during which a polyurethane spheroidal foam of approximately 2300 cu cm was formed. Photographs of the formation of the foam during the flight show the development of the spheroidal form. This begins as a small sphere and grows to approximately a 17-cm-diam spheroid. The apparatus will be flown again on subsequent low-gravity flights.

  19. Spherically symmetric conformal gravity and ''gravitational bubbles''

    SciTech Connect

    Berezin, V.A.; Dokuchaev, V.I.; Eroshenko, Yu.N. E-mail: dokuchaev@inr.ac.ru

    2016-01-01

    The general structure of the spherically symmetric solutions in the Weyl conformal gravity is described. The corresponding Bach equations are derived for the special type of metrics, which can be considered as the representative of the general class. The complete set of the pure vacuum solutions is found. It consists of two classes. The first one contains the solutions with constant two-dimensional curvature scalar of our specific metrics, and the representatives are the famous Robertson-Walker metrics. One of them we called the ''gravitational bubbles'', which is compact and with zero Weyl tensor. Thus, we obtained the pure vacuum curved space-times (without any material sources, including the cosmological constant) what is absolutely impossible in General Relativity. Such a phenomenon makes it easier to create the universe from ''nothing''. The second class consists of the solutions with varying curvature scalar. We found its representative as the one-parameter family. It appears that it can be conformally covered by the thee-parameter Mannheim-Kazanas solution. We also investigated the general structure of the energy-momentum tensor in the spherical conformal gravity and constructed the vectorial equation that reveals clearly some features of non-vacuum solutions. Two of them are explicitly written, namely, the metrics à la Vaidya, and the electrovacuum space-time metrics.

  20. Thin accretion disks in f(R) modified gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Pun, C. S. J.; Harko, T.; Kovacs, Z.

    2008-07-15

    We consider the basic physical properties of matter forming a thin accretion disc in the static and spherically symmetric space-time metric of the vacuum f(R) modified gravity models. The Lagrangian of the generalized gravity theory is also obtained in a parametric form, and the conditions of the viability of the model are also discussed. The exact Schwarzschild-type solution of the gravitational field equations in the f(R) gravity contains a linearly increasing term, as well as a logarithmic correction, as compared to the standard Schwarzschild solution of general relativity, and it depends on four arbitrary integration constants. The energy flux and the emission spectrum from the accretion disk around the f(R) gravity black holes are obtained, and they are compared to the general relativistic case. Particular signatures can appear in the electromagnetic spectrum, thus leading to the possibility of directly testing modified gravity models by using astrophysical observations of the emission spectra from accretion disks.

  1. Microscopic and macroscopic behaviors of Palatini modified gravity theories

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baojiu; Mota, David F.; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2008-09-15

    We show that, within modified gravity, the nonlinear nature of the field equations implies that the usual naieve averaging procedure (replacing the microscopic energy-momentum by its cosmological average) is invalid. We discuss then how the averaging should be performed correctly and show that, as a consequence, at the classical level the physical masses and geodesics of particles, cosmology, and astrophysics in Palatini modified gravity theories are all indistinguishable from the results of general relativity plus a cosmological constant. Palatini gravity is, however, a different theory from general relativity and predicts different internal structures of particles from the latter. On the other hand, and in contrast to classical particles, the electromagnetic field permeates in the space, and hence a different averaging procedure should be applied here. We show that, in general, Palatini gravity theories would then affect the propagation of photons, thus changing the behavior of a Universe dominated by radiation. Finally, Palatini theories also predict alterations to particle physics laws. For example, they can lead to sensitive corrections to the hydrogen energy levels, the measurements of which could be used to place very strong constraints on the properties of viable Palatini gravity theories.

  2. Superconducting gravity gradiometer for sensitive gravity measurements. I. Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, H.A.; Paik, H.J.

    1987-06-15

    Because of the equivalence principle, a global measurement is necessary to distinguish gravity from acceleration of the reference frame. A gravity gradiometer is therefore an essential instrument needed for precision tests of gravity laws and for applications in gravity survey and inertial navigation. Superconductivity and SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) technology can be used to obtain a gravity gradiometer with very high sensitivity and stability. A superconducting gravity gradiometer has been developed for a null test of the gravitational inverse-square law and space-borne geodesy. Here we present a complete theoretical model of this instrument. Starting from dynamical equations for the device, we derive transfer functions, a common mode rejection characteristic, and an error model of the superconducting instrument. Since a gradiometer must detect a very weak differential gravity signal in the midst of large platform accelerations and other environmental disturbances, the scale factor and common mode rejection stability of the instrument are extremely important in addition to its immunity to temperature and electromagnetic fluctuations. We show how flux quantization, the Meissner effect, and properties of liquid helium can be utilized to meet these challenges.

  3. Zero gravity liquid mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Bruce, R. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An apparatus for mixing liquids under conditions of zero gravity is disclosed. The apparatus is comprised of a closed reservoir for the liquids, with a means for maintaining a positive pressure on the liquids in the reservoir. A valved liquid supply line is connected to the reservoir for supplying the reservoir with the liquids to be mixed in the reservoir. The portion of the reservoir containing the liquids to be mixed is in communication with a pump which alternately causes a portion of the liquids to flow out of the pump and into the reservoir to mix the liquids. The fluids in the reservoir are in communication through a conduit with the pump which alternately causes a portion of the fluids to flow out of the pump and into the sphere. The conduit connecting the pump and sphere may contain a nozzle or other jet-forming structure such as a venturi for further mixing the fluids.

  4. Vorticity in analog gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cropp, Bethan; Liberati, Stefano; Turcati, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    In the analog gravity framework, the acoustic disturbances in a moving fluid can be described by an equation of motion identical to a relativistic scalar massless field propagating in curved space-time. This description is possible only when the fluid under consideration is barotropic, inviscid, and irrotational. In this case, the propagation of the perturbations is governed by an acoustic metric that depends algebrically on the local speed of sound, density, and the background flow velocity, the latter assumed to be vorticity-free. In this work we provide a straightforward extension in order to go beyond the irrotational constraint. Using a charged—relativistic and nonrelativistic—Bose-Einstein condensate as a physical system, we show that in the low-momentum limit and performing the eikonal approximation we can derive a d’Alembertian equation of motion for the charged phonons where the emergent acoustic metric depends on flow velocity in the presence of vorticity.

  5. Supersymmetrizing massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaeb, O.

    2013-07-01

    When four scalar fields with global Lorentz symmetry are coupled to gravity and take a vacuum expectation value, breaking diffeomorphism invariance spontaneously, the graviton becomes massive. This model is supersymmetrized by considering four N=1 chiral superfields with global Lorentz symmetry. The global supersymmetry is promoted to a local one using the rules of tensor calculus of coupling the N=1 supergravity Lagrangian to the four chiral multiplets. When the scalar components of the chiral multiplets zA acquire a vacuum expectation value, both diffeomorphism invariance and local supersymmetry are broken spontaneously. The global Lorentz index A becomes identified with the space-time Lorentz index, making the scalar fields zA vectors and the chiral spinors ψA spin-3/2 Rarita-Schwinger fields. We show that the spectrum of the model in the broken phase consists of a massive spin-2 field, two massive spin-3/2 fields with different mass and a massive vector.

  6. Semiclassical Supersymmetric Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Claus; Lück, Tobias; Vargas Moniz, Paulo

    2008-09-01

    We develop a semiclassical approximation scheme for the constraint equations of supersymmetric canonical quantum gravity. This is achieved by a Born-Oppenheimer type of expansion, in analogy to the case of the usual Wheeler-DeWitt equation. We recover at consecutive orders the Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the functional Schrödinger equation, and quantum gravitational correction terms to this Schrödinger equation. In particular, our work has the following implications: (i) the Hamilton-Jacobi equation and therefore the background spacetime must involve the gravitino, (ii) a (many fingered) local time parameter has to be present on Super Riem Σ (the space of all possible tetrad and gravitino fields), (iii) quantum supersymmetric gravitational corrections affect the evolution of the very early universe.

  7. Phantom Crossing DGP Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Koichi; Komiya, Zen

    2010-08-12

    We propose a phantom crossing Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP) model. In our model, the effective equation of state of the DGP gravity crosses the phantom divide line. We demonstrate crossing of the phantom divide does not occur within the framework of the original DGP model or the DGP model developed by Dvali and Turner. By extending their model, we construct a model that realizes crossing of the phantom divide. DGP models can account for late-time acceleration of the universe without dark energy. Phantom Crossing DGP model is more compatible with recent observational data from Type Ia Supernovae (SNIa), Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) than the original DGP model or the DGP model developed by Dvali and Turner.

  8. Constraining inverse curvature gravity with supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Olga; Santiago, Jose; Weller, Jochen; /University Coll., London /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    We show that the current accelerated expansion of the Universe can be explained without resorting to dark energy. Models of generalized modified gravity, with inverse powers of the curvature can have late time accelerating attractors without conflicting with solar system experiments. We have solved the Friedman equations for the full dynamical range of the evolution of the Universe. This allows us to perform a detailed analysis of Supernovae data in the context of such models that results in an excellent fit. Hence, inverse curvature gravity models represent an example of phenomenologically viable models in which the current acceleration of the Universe is driven by curvature instead of dark energy. If we further include constraints on the current expansion rate of the Universe from the Hubble Space Telescope and on the age of the Universe from globular clusters, we obtain that the matter content of the Universe is 0.07 {le} {omega}{sub m} {le} 0.21 (95% Confidence). Hence the inverse curvature gravity models considered can not explain the dynamics of the Universe just with a baryonic matter component.

  9. The Gravity Probe B Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    This presentation briefly describes the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) Experiment which is designed to measure parts of Einstein's general theory of relativity by monitoring gyroscope orientation relative to a distant guide star. To measure the miniscule angles predicted by Einstein's theory, it was necessary to build near-perfect gyroscopes that were approximately 50 million times more precise than the best navigational gyroscopes. A telescope mounted along the central axis of the dewar and spacecraft provided the experiment's pointing reference to a guide star. The telescope's image divide precisely split the star's beam into x-axis and y-axis components whose brightness could be compared. GP-B's 650-gallon dewar, kept the science instrument inside the probe at a cryogenic temperature for 17.3 months and also provided the thruster propellant for precision attitude and translation control. Built around the dewar, the GP-B spacecraft was a total-integrated system, comprising both the space vehicle and payload, dedicated as a single entity to experimentally testing predictions of Einstein's theory.

  10. Gravity Probe B Gyroscope Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. This photograph is a close up of a niobium-coated gyroscope motor and its housing halves. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Don Harley.)

  11. Gravity Probe B Space Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The space vehicle for Gravity Probe B (GP-B) arrives at the launch site at Vandenburg Air Force Base. GP-B is the relativity experiment being developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Scheduled for launch in 2003 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center, development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University, with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation.

  12. Testing Gravity using Void Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yan-Chuan; Padilla, Nelson; Li, Baojiu

    2016-10-01

    We investigate void properties in f(R) models using N-body simulations, focusing on their differences from General Relativity (GR) and their detectability. In the Hu-Sawicki f(R) modified gravity (MG) models, the halo number density profiles of voids are not distinguishable from GR. In contrast, the same f(R) voids are more empty of dark matter, and their profiles are steeper. This can in principle be observed by weak gravitational lensing of voids, for which the combination of a spectroscopic redshift and a lensing photometric redshift survey over the same sky is required. Neglecting the lensing shape noise, the f(R) model parameter amplitudes fR0=10-5 and 10-4 may be distinguished from GR using the lensing tangential shear signal around voids by 4 and 8 σ for a volume of 1 (Gpc/h)3. The line-of-sight projection of large-scale structure is the main systematics that limits the significance of this signal for the near future wide angle and deep lensing surveys. For this reason, it is challenging to distinguish fR0=10-6 from GR. We expect that this can be overcome with larger volume. The halo void abundance being smaller and the steepening of dark matter void profiles in f(R) models are unique features that can be combined to break the degeneracy between fR0 and σ8.

  13. Weyl gravity and Cartan geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, J.; François, J.; Lazzarini, S.

    2016-04-01

    We point out that the Cartan geometry known as the second-order conformal structure provides a natural differential geometric framework underlying gauge theories of conformal gravity. We are concerned with two theories: the first one is the associated Yang-Mills-like Lagrangian, while the second, inspired by [1], is a slightly more general one that relaxes the conformal Cartan geometry. The corresponding gauge symmetry is treated within the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin language. We show that the Weyl gauge potential is a spurious degree of freedom, analogous to a Stueckelberg field, that can be eliminated through the dressing field method. We derive sets of field equations for both the studied Lagrangians. For the second one, they constrain the gauge field to be the "normal conformal Cartan connection.''Finally, we provide in a Lagrangian framework a justification of the identification, in dimension 4, of the Bach tensor with the Yang-Mills current of the normal conformal Cartan connection, as proved in [2].

  14. The Gravity Probe B gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchman, S.; Lipa, J. A.; Keiser, G. M.; Muhlfelder, B.; Turneaure, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) gyroscope, a unique cryogenically operated mechanical sensor, was used on-orbit to independently test two predictions of general relativity (GR). Here, we describe the development and performance of the GP-B gyroscope, its geometry and fabrication, spin-up and vacuum approach, magnetic considerations, and static charge management. The history of electrically suspended gyroscopes puts the current work in context. Fabrication and ground testing of the GP-B gyroscope are detailed, followed by a review of on-orbit initialization, calibration, operation, and performance. We find that the performance was degraded relative to the mission goals, but was still sufficient to provide excellent new tests of GR. The degradation is partially due to the existence of gyroscope torques due to an unanticipated interaction between patch potentials on the rotor and the housing. We discuss these patch potentials and describe the effect of related torques on gyro drift. It was essential to include models for the effects due to the patch potentials in the complete data analysis model to yield determinations of the two GR effects.

  15. Gravity quantized: Loop quantum gravity with a scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    Domagala, Marcin; Kaminski, Wojciech; Giesel, Kristina; Lewandowski, Jerzy

    2010-11-15

    ...''but we do not have quantum gravity.'' This phrase is often used when analysis of a physical problem enters the regime in which quantum gravity effects should be taken into account. In fact, there are several models of the gravitational field coupled to (scalar) fields for which the quantization procedure can be completed using loop quantum gravity techniques. The model we present in this paper consists of the gravitational field coupled to a scalar field. The result has similar structure to the loop quantum cosmology models, except that it involves all the local degrees of freedom of the gravitational field because no symmetry reduction has been performed at the classical level.

  16. Big bang nucleosynthesis constraints on the self-gravity of pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaport, Saul; Schwab, Josiah; Burles, Scott; Steigman, Gary

    2008-01-15

    Using big bang nucleosynthesis and present, high-precision measurements of light element abundances, we constrain the self-gravity of radiation pressure in the early universe. The self-gravity of pressure is strictly non-Newtonian, and thus the constraints we set provide a direct test of this prediction of general relativity and of the standard, Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology.

  17. An Exact Solution of Einstein-Maxwell Gravity Coupled to a Scalar Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turyshev, S. G.

    1995-01-01

    The general solution to low-energy string theory representing static spherically symmetric solution of the Einstein-Maxwell gravity with a massless scalar field has been found. Some of the partial cases appear to coincide with known solutions to black holes, naked singularities, and gravity and electromagnetic fields.

  18. Power-law cosmic expansion in f(R) gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Goheer, Naureen; Larena, Julien; Dunsby, Peter K. S.

    2009-09-15

    We show that within the class of f(R) gravity theories, Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker power-law perfect fluid solutions only exist for R{sup n} gravity. This significantly restricts the set of exact cosmological solutions which have similar properties to what is found in standard general relativity.

  19. Cosmological stability bound in massive gravity and bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Fasiello, Matteo; Tolley, Andrew J. E-mail: andrew.j.tolley@case.edu

    2013-12-01

    We give a simple derivation of a cosmological bound on the graviton mass for spatially flat FRW solutions in massive gravity with an FRW reference metric and for bigravity theories. This bound comes from the requirement that the kinetic term of the helicity zero mode of the graviton is positive definite. The bound is dependent only on the parameters in the massive gravity potential and the Hubble expansion rate for the two metrics. We derive the decoupling limit of bigravity and FRW massive gravity, and use this to give an independent derivation of the cosmological bound. We recover our previous results that the tension between satisfying the Friedmann equation and the cosmological bound is sufficient to rule out all observationally relevant FRW solutions for massive gravity with an FRW reference metric. In contrast, in bigravity this tension is resolved due to different nature of the Vainshtein mechanism. We find that in bigravity theories there exists an FRW solution with late-time self-acceleration for which the kinetic terms for the helicity-2, helicity-1 and helicity-0 are generically nonzero and positive making this a compelling candidate for a model of cosmic acceleration. We confirm that the generalized bound is saturated for the candidate partially massless (bi)gravity theories but the existence of helicity-1/helicity-0 interactions implies the absence of the conjectured partially massless symmetry for both massive gravity and bigravity.

  20. Progress in the Determination of the Earth's Gravity Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Richard H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Topics addressed include: global gravity model development; methods for approximation of the gravity field; gravity field measuring techniques; global gravity field applications and requirements in geophysics and oceanography; and future gravity missions.

  1. Constraining Gravity with LISA Detections of Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canizares, P.; Gair, J. R.; Sopuerta, C. F.

    2013-01-01

    General Relativity (GR) describes gravitation well at the energy scales which we have so far been able to achieve or detect. However, we do not know whether GR is behind the physics governing stronger gravitational field regimes, such as near neutron stars or massive black-holes (MBHs). Gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy is a promising tool to test and validate GR and/or potential alternative theories of gravity. The information that a GW waveform carries not only will allow us to map the strong gravitational field of its source, but also determine the theory of gravity ruling its dynamics. In this work, we explore the extent to which we could distinguish between GR and other theories of gravity through the detection of low-frequency GWs from extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRIs) and, in particular, we focus on dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity (DCSMG). To that end, we develop a framework that enables us, for the first time, to perform a parameter estimation analysis for EMRIs in DCSMG. Our model is described by a 15-dimensional parameter space, that includes the Chern-Simons (CS) parameter which characterises the deviation between the two theories, and our analysis is based on Fisher information matrix techniques together with a (maximum-mismatch) criterion to assess the validity of our results. In our analysis, we study a 5-dimensional parameter space, finding that a GW detector like the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) or eLISA (evolved LISA) should be able to discriminate between GR and DCSMG with fractional errors below 5%, and hence place bounds four orders of magnitude better than current Solar System bounds.

  2. Large-scale structure in f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baojiu; Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Barrow, John D.

    2011-05-15

    In this work we study the cosmology of the general f(T) gravity theory. We express the modified Einstein equations using covariant quantities, and derive the gauge-invariant perturbation equations in covariant form. We consider a specific choice of f(T), designed to explain the observed late-time accelerating cosmic expansion without including an exotic dark energy component. Our numerical solution shows that the extra degree of freedom of such f(T) gravity models generally decays as one goes to smaller scales, and consequently its effects on scales such as galaxies and galaxies clusters are small. But on large scales, this degree of freedom can produce large deviations from the standard {Lambda}CDM scenario, leading to severe constraints on the f(T) gravity models as an explanation to the cosmic acceleration.

  3. Conformal Gravity and the Alcubierre Warp Drive Metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varieschi, Gabriele; Burstein, Zily

    2013-04-01

    We present an analysis of the classic Alcubierre metric based on conformal gravity, rather than standard general relativity. The main characteristics of the resulting warp drive remain the same as in the original study by Alcubierre, namely that effective super-luminal motion is a viable outcome of the metric. We show that for particular choices of the shaping function, the Alcubierre metric in the context of conformal gravity does not violate the weak energy condition, as was the case of the original solution. In particular, the resulting warp drive does not require the use of exotic matter. Therefore, if conformal gravity is a correct extension of general relativity, super-luminal motion via an Alcubierre metric might be a realistic solution, thus allowing faster-than-light interstellar travel.

  4. Wormhole geometries in fourth-order conformal Weyl gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varieschi, Gabriele U.; Ault, Kellie L.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analysis of the classic wormhole geometries based on conformal Weyl gravity, rather than standard general relativity. The main characteristics of the resulting traversable wormholes remains the same as in the seminal study by Morris and Thorne, namely, that effective super-luminal motion is a viable consequence of the metric. Improving on previous work on the subject, we show that for particular choices of the shape and redshift functions the wormhole metric in the context of conformal gravity does not violate the main energy conditions at or near the wormhole throat. Some exotic matter might still be needed at the junction between our solutions and flat spacetime, but we demonstrate that the averaged null energy condition (as evaluated along radial null geodesics) is satisfied for a particular set of wormhole geometries. Therefore, if fourth-order conformal Weyl gravity is a correct extension of general relativity, traversable wormholes might become a realistic solution for interstellar travel.

  5. Wormhole geometries in fourth-order conformal Weyl gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varieschi, Gabriele; Ault, Kellie

    2016-03-01

    We present an analysis of the classic wormhole geometries based on conformal Weyl gravity, rather than standard general relativity. The main characteristics of the resulting traversable wormholes remain the same as in the seminal study by Morris and Thorne, namely, that effective super-luminal motion is a viable consequence of the metric. Improving on previous work on the subject, we show that for particular choices of the shape and redshift functions, the wormhole metric in the context of conformal gravity does not violate the main energy conditions, as was the case of the original solutions. In particular, the resulting geometry does not require the use of exotic matter at or near the wormhole throat. Therefore, if fourth-order conformal Weyl gravity is a correct extension of general relativity, traversable wormholes might become a realistic solution for interstellar travel. This work was supported by a Grant from the Frank R. Seaver College of Science and Engineering, Loyola Marymount University.

  6. Galactic space-times in modified theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Dipanjan; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Sarkar, Tapobrata

    2015-09-01

    We study Bertrand space-times (BSTs), which have been proposed as viable models of space-times seeded by galactic dark matter, in modified theories of gravity. We first critically examine the issue of galactic rotation curves in general relativity, and establish the usefulness of BSTs to fit experimental data in this context. We then study BSTs in metric f( R) gravity and in Brans-Dicke theories. For the former, the nature of the Newtonian potential is established, and we also compute the effective equation of state and show that it can provide good fits to some recent experimental results. For the latter, we calculate the Brans-Dicke scalar analytically in some limits and numerically in general, and find interesting constraints on the parameters of the theory. Our results provide evidence for the physical nature of BSTs in modified theories of gravity.

  7. Higher derivative gravity: Field equation as the equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Ramit; Liberati, Stefano; Mohd, Arif

    2016-08-01

    One of the striking features of general relativity is that the Einstein equation is implied by the Clausius relation imposed on a small patch of locally constructed causal horizon. The extension of this thermodynamic derivation of the field equation to more general theories of gravity has been attempted many times in the last two decades. In particular, equations of motion for minimally coupled higher-curvature theories of gravity, but without the derivatives of curvature, have previously been derived using a thermodynamic reasoning. In that derivation the horizon slices were endowed with an entropy density whose form resembles that of the Noether charge for diffeomorphisms, and was dubbed the Noetheresque entropy. In this paper, we propose a new entropy density, closely related to the Noetheresque form, such that the field equation of any diffeomorphism-invariant metric theory of gravity can be derived by imposing the Clausius relation on a small patch of local causal horizon.

  8. The metric-affine formalism of f(R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Liberati, Stefano

    2007-05-01

    Recently a class of alternative theories of gravity which goes under the name f(R) gravity, has received considerable attention, mainly due to its interesting applications in cosmology. However, the phenomenology of such theories is not only relevant to cosmological scales, especially when it is treated within the framework of the so called Palatini variation, an independent variation with respect to the metric and the connection, which is not considered a priori to be the Levi Civita connection of the metric. If this connection has its standard geometrical meaning the resulting theory will be a metric-affine theory of gravity, as will be discussed in this talk. The general formalism will be presented and several aspects of the theory will be covered, mainly focusing on the enriched phenomenology that such theories exhibit with respect to General Relativity, relevant not only to large scales (cosmology) but also to small scales (e.g. torsion).

  9. Evolution of density perturbations in f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Carloni, S.; Dunsby, P. K. S.; Troisi, A.

    2008-01-15

    We give a rigorous and mathematically well defined presentation of the covariant and gauge invariant theory of scalar perturbations of a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe for fourth order gravity, where the matter is described by a perfect fluid with a barotropic equation of state. The general perturbations equations are applied to a simple background solution of R{sup n} gravity. We obtain exact solutions of the perturbations equations for scales much bigger than the Hubble radius. These solutions have a number of interesting features. In particular, we find that for all values of n there is always a growing mode for the density contrast, even if the universe undergoes an accelerated expansion. Such behavior does not occur in standard general relativity, where as soon as dark energy dominates, the density contrast experiences an unrelenting decay. This peculiarity is sufficiently novel to warrant further investigation of fourth order gravity models.

  10. Simulation of Gravity Feed Oil for Areoplane Fuel Transfer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Y. G.; Liu, Z. X.; Huang, S. Q.; Xu, T.

    Generally, it has two different ways for fuel transfer for areoplane, the simplest one is by gravity, and another is by pumps. But the simplest one mighte change to the vital method in some situation, such as electrical and mechanical accident. So the study of gravity feed oil is aslo important. Past calculations assumed that, under gravity feed, only one fuel tank in aircraft supplies the fuel needed for preventing extremely serious accident to happen. Actually, gravity feed oil is a transient process, all fuel tanks compete for supplying oil and there must have several fuel tanks offering oil simultaneously. The key problems to calculate gravity feed oil are the sumulation of the multiple-branch and transient process. Firstly, we presented mathematical models for oil flow through pipes, non-working pupms and check valves, ect. Secondly, On the basis of flow network theory and time difference method, we established a new calculation method for gravity feed oil of aeroplane fuel system. This model can solve the multiple-branch and transient process simulation of gravity feed oil. Our method takes into consideration all fuel tanks and therefore, we believe, our method is intrinsically superior to traditional methods and is closer to understanding the real seriousness of the oil supply situation. Finally, we give a numerical example using the new method for a certain type of aircraft under gravity feed. achieved the variations of oil level and flow mass per second of each oil tanks which showed in Figures below. These variations show preliminarily that our proposed method of calculations is satisfactory.

  11. NUT-charged black holes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M.H.; Mann, R.B.

    2005-12-15

    We investigate the existence of Taub-NUT (Newman-Unti-Tamburino) and Taub-bolt solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity and obtain the general form of these solutions in d dimensions. We find that for all nonextremal NUT solutions of Einstein gravity having no curvature singularity at r=N, there exist NUT solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity that contain these solutions in the limit that the Gauss-Bonnet parameter {alpha} goes to zero. Furthermore there are no NUT solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity that yield nonextremal NUT solutions to Einstein gravity having a curvature singularity at r=N in the limit {alpha}{yields}0. Indeed, we have nonextreme NUT solutions in 2+2k dimensions with nontrivial fibration only when the 2k-dimensional base space is chosen to be CP{sup 2k}. We also find that the Gauss-Bonnet gravity has extremal NUT solutions whenever the base space is a product of 2-torii with at most a two-dimensional factor space of positive curvature. Indeed, when the base space has at most one positively curved two-dimensional space as one of its factor spaces, then Gauss-Bonnet gravity admits extreme NUT solutions, even though there a curvature singularity exists at r=N. We also find that one can have bolt solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with any base space with factor spaces of zero or positive constant curvature. The only case for which one does not have bolt solutions is in the absence of a cosmological term with zero curvature base space.

  12. The gravity field and crustal structure of the northwestern Arabian Platform in Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batayneh, A. T.; Al-Zoubi, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    The Bouguer gravity field over the northwestern Arabian Platform in Jordan is dominated by large variations, ranging from -132 to +4 mGal. A study of the Bouguer anomaly map shows that the gravity field maintains a general north-northeasterly trend in the Wadi Araba-Dead Sea-Jordan Riff, Northern Highlands and Northeast Jordanian Limestone Area, while the remainder of the area shows north-northwesterly-trending gravity anomalies. Results of 2-D gravity modeling of the Bouguer gravity field indicate that the crustal thickness in Jordan is ˜ 38 km, which is similar to crustal thicknesses obtained from refraction data in northern Jordan and Saudi Arabia, and from gravity data in Syria.

  13. Gauge equivalence in two-dimensional gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, T. ); Igarashi, Y. ); Kubo, J. ); Tabei, T. )

    1993-08-15

    Two-dimensional quantum gravity is identified as a second-class system which we convert into a first-class system via the Batalin-Fradkin (BF) procedure. Using the extended phase space method, we then formulate the theory in the most general class of gauges. The conformal gauge action suggested by David, Distler, and Kawai is derived from first principles. We find a local, light-cone gauge action whose Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin invariance implies Polyakov's curvature equation [partial derivative][sub [minus

  14. Consistent Two-Dimensional Chiral Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smailagic, A.; Spallucci, E.

    We study chiral induced gravity in the light-cone gauge and show that the theory is consistent for a particular choice of chiralities. The corresponding Kac-Moody central charge has no forbidden region of complex values. Generalized analysis of the critical exponents is given and their relation to the SL(2,R) vacuum states is elucidated. All the parameters containing information about the theory can be traced back to the characteristics of the residual symmetry group in the light-cone gauge.

  15. Tracking Gravity Probe B gyroscope polhode motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keiser, George M.; Parkinson, Bradford W.; Cohen, Clark E.

    1990-01-01

    The superconducting Gravity Probe B spacecraft is being developed to measure two untested predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity by using orbiting gyroscopes; it possesses an intrinsic magnetic field which rotates with the rotor and is fixed with respect to the rotor body frame. In this paper, the path of the rotor spin axes is tracked using this trapped magnetic flux as a reference. Both the rotor motion and the magnetic field shape are estimated simultaneously, employing the higher order components of the magnetic field shape.

  16. The regular state in higher order gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotsakis, Spiros; Kadry, Seifedine; Trachilis, Dimitrios

    2016-08-01

    We consider the higher-order gravity theory derived from the quadratic Lagrangian R + 𝜖R2 in vacuum as a first-order (ADM-type) system with constraints, and build time developments of solutions of an initial value formulation of the theory. We show that all such solutions, if analytic, contain the right number of free functions to qualify as general solutions of the theory. We further show that any regular analytic solution which satisfies the constraints and the evolution equations can be given in the form of an asymptotic formal power series expansion.

  17. Exact teleparallel gravity of binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hanafy, W.; Nashed, G. G. L.

    2016-02-01

    An exact solution of two singularities in the teleparallel equivalent to general relativity theory has been obtained. A holographic visualization of the binary black holes (BBHs) space-time, due to the non vanishing torsion scalar field, has been given. The acceleration tensor of BBHs space-time has been calculated. The results identify the repulsive gravity zones of the BBHs field. The total conserved quantities of the BBHs has been evaluated. Possible gravitational radiation emission by the system has been calculated without assuming a weak field initial data.

  18. Ocean gravity and geoid determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, W. D.; Siry, J. W.; Brown, R. D.; Wells, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    Gravity anomalies have been recovered in the North Atlantic and the Indian Ocean regions. Comparisons of 63 2 deg x 2 deg mean free air gravity anomalies recovered in the North Atlantic area and 24 5 deg x 5 deg mean free air gravity anomalies in the Indian Ocean area with surface gravimetric measurements have shown agreement to + or - 8 mgals for both solutions. Geoids derived from the altimeter solutions are consistent with altimetric sea surface height data to within the precision of the data, about + or - 2 meters.

  19. Higher dimensional nonlinear massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Tuan Q.

    2016-05-01

    Inspired by a recent ghost-free nonlinear massive gravity in four-dimensional spacetime, we study its higher dimensional scenarios. As a result, we are able to show the constantlike behavior of massive graviton terms for some well-known metrics such as the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker, Bianchi type I, and Schwarzschild-Tangherlini (anti-) de Sitter metrics in a specific five-dimensional nonlinear massive gravity under an assumption that its fiducial metrics are compatible with physical ones. In addition, some simple cosmological solutions of the five-dimensional massive gravity are figured out consistently.

  20. Newtonian limit of f(R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, S.; Stabile, A.; Troisi, A.

    2007-11-01

    A general analytic procedure is developed to deal with the Newtonian limit of f(R) gravity. A discussion comparing the Newtonian and the post-Newtonian limit of these models is proposed in order to point out the differences between the two approaches. We calculate the post-Newtonian parameters of such theories without any redefinition of the degrees of freedom, in particular, without adopting some scalar fields and without any change from Jordan to Einstein frame. Considering the Taylor expansion of a generic f(R) theory, it is possible to obtain general solutions in terms of the metric coefficients up to the third order of approximation. In particular, the solution relative to the gtt component gives a gravitational potential always corrected with respect to the Newtonian one of the linear theory f(R)=R. Furthermore, we show that the Birkhoff theorem is not a general result for f(R) gravity since time-dependent evolution for spherically symmetric solutions can be achieved depending on the order of perturbations. Finally, we discuss the post-Minkowskian limit and the emergence of massive gravitational wave solutions.

  1. Newtonian limit of f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Capozziello, S.; Troisi, A.; Stabile, A.

    2007-11-15

    A general analytic procedure is developed to deal with the Newtonian limit of f(R) gravity. A discussion comparing the Newtonian and the post-Newtonian limit of these models is proposed in order to point out the differences between the two approaches. We calculate the post-Newtonian parameters of such theories without any redefinition of the degrees of freedom, in particular, without adopting some scalar fields and without any change from Jordan to Einstein frame. Considering the Taylor expansion of a generic f(R) theory, it is possible to obtain general solutions in terms of the metric coefficients up to the third order of approximation. In particular, the solution relative to the g{sub tt} component gives a gravitational potential always corrected with respect to the Newtonian one of the linear theory f(R)=R. Furthermore, we show that the Birkhoff theorem is not a general result for f(R) gravity since time-dependent evolution for spherically symmetric solutions can be achieved depending on the order of perturbations. Finally, we discuss the post-Minkowskian limit and the emergence of massive gravitational wave solutions.

  2. Modified gravity and the radiation dominated epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Sculthorpe, Gregory I.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we consider scalar-tensor theories, allowing for both conformal and disformal couplings to a fluid with a general equation of state. We derive the effective coupling for both background cosmology and for perturbations in that fluid. As an application we consider the scalar degree of freedom to be coupled to baryons and study the dynamics of the tightly coupled photon-baryon fluid in the early Universe. We derive an expression for the effective speed of sound, which differs from its value in General Relativity. We apply our findings to the μ-distortion of the cosmic microwave background radiation, which depends on the effective sound-speed of the photon-baryon fluid, and show that the predictions differ from General Relativity. Thus, the μ-distortion provides further information about gravity in the very early Universe well before decoupling.

  3. Gravitation. [consideration of black holes in gravity theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennelly, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations of several problems of gravitation are discussed. The question of the existence of black holes is considered. While black holes like those in Einstein's theory may not exist in other gravity theories, trapped surfaces implying such black holes certainly do. The theories include those of Brans-Dicke, Lightman-Lee, Rosen, and Yang. A similar two-tensor theory of Yilmaz is investigated and found inconsistent and nonviable. The Newman-Penrose formalism for Riemannian geometries is adapted to general gravity theories and used to implement a search for twisting solutions of the gravity theories for empty and nonempty spaces. The method can be used to find the gravitational fields for all viable gravity theories. The rotating solutions are of particular importance for strong field interpretation of the Stanford/Marshall gyroscope experiment. Inhomogeneous cosmologies are examined in Einstein's theory as generalizations of homogeneous ones by raising the dimension of the invariance groups by one more parameter. The nine Bianchi classifications are extended to Rosen's theory of gravity for homogeneous cosmological models.

  4. Artificial Gravity Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamman, Michelle R.; Paloski, William H.

    2005-01-01

    Protecting the health, safety, and performance of exploration-class mission crews against the physiological deconditioning resulting from long-term weightlessness during transit and long-term hypogravity during surface operations will require effective, multi-system countermeasures. Artificial gravity (AG), which would replace terrestrial gravity with inertial forces generated by rotating the transit vehicle or by a human centrifuge device within the transit vehicle or surface habitat, has long been considered a potential solution. However, despite its attractiveness as an efficient, multi-system countermeasure and its potential for improving the environment and simplifying operational activities (e.g., WCS, galley, etc.), much still needs to be learned regarding the human response to rotating environments before AG can be successfully implemented. This paper will describe our approach for developing and implementing a rigorous AG Research Project to address the key biomedical research questions that must be answered before developing effective AG countermeasure implementation strategies for exploration-class missions. The AG Research Project will be performed at JSC, ARC, extramural academic and government research venues, and international partner facilities maintained by DLR and IMBP. The Project includes three major ground-based human research subprojects that will lead to flight testing of intermittent short-radius AG in ISS crewmembers after 201 0, continuous long-radius AG in CEV crews transiting to and from the Moon, and intermittent short-radius AG plus exercise in lunar habitats. These human ground-based subprojects include: 1) a directed, managed international short-radius project to investigate the multi-system effectiveness of intermittent AG in human subjects deconditioned by bed rest, 2) a directed, managed long-radius project to investigate the capacity of humans to live and work for extended periods in rotating environments, and 3) a focused

  5. The Earth's Gravity and Its Geological Significance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, A. H.

    1980-01-01

    Discussed is the earth's gravity and its geological significance. Variations of gravity around the earth can be produced by a great variety of possible distributions of density within the earth. Topics discussed include isostasy, local structures, geological exploration, change of gravity in time, and gravity on the moon and planets. (DS)

  6. The interaction between Gravity Waves and Solar Tides: results from 4D Ray Tracing coupled to a Linear Tidal Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribstein, Bruno; Achatz, Ulrich; fabian, Senf

    2015-04-01

    Internal gravity waves contribute to an important part in the variability of the Stratosphere - Mesosphere - lower - Thermosphere. Numerous General Circulation Model do not present (for exemple) a Quasi-biennale Oscillation. Moreover, Internal gravity waves parameterizations often neglect time and horizontal dependence of the background flow ('column approximation'). Interactions between internal gravity waves and large scale flow, specially Solar tide waves, are studied here. Thermally driven global scaled waves, Solar tides describe the large-scale modulation (at sub-daily period) of all middle atmosphere fields. Gravity waves propagate in a time and spatially varying background flow, composed by a climatological mean, stationary planetary waves and diurnal Solar tides. Global three-dimensional propagation of internal gravity waves is performed by a new W. K. B. gravity wave model (ray tracer scheme), where waves propagate in position-wavenumber phase-space in order to prevent the crossing of rays. Propagation of Solar tides is modeled by linearising a General Circulation Model over a climatological mean and a stationnary planetary waves reference. Gravity wave deposition of momentum and buoyancy are calculated. Characterizing the daily evolution, Rayleigh-friction and temperature-relaxation coefficients are calculated. They approximately describe the internal gravity wave forcing on the diurnal Solar tides propagation and are so used for it. The extracted diurnal Solar tides are then used for a new computation of the gravity wave fluxes. This is iterated a few times to obtain a converged result on gravity wave deposition and on tidal field. Internal gravity waves are shown to influence both Solar tides amplitude and phase. Seasonal cycle of migrating and non-migrating tidal components is studied, as it is the seasonal cycle of gravity wave deposition. Gravity wave deposition and tidal fields are also obtained under the 'column approximation'. They show a clear

  7. Tidal Effects on GOCE Satellite Gravity Gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Z. C.; Yang, G.; Zhong, B.; Wu, Y. L.

    2009-04-01

    direct astronomical tides, and greater than that of the ocean tides. The corrections for the pole tides are the smallest. By estimating the maximum and minimum values of the influence temporally and spatially, the simulation results demonstrate that the tides will affect the GOCE gradiometer signals at the level from 10-3E to 10-4E. That is, the temporal tidal corrections are generally below the GOCE gravity gradient error level. But the temporal signals cannot be totally ignored because they may be systematic and consistent to the GOCE gravity gradients. Keywords: tidal effects, gravity gradient, GOCE Acknowledgements: This research was jointly supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No.40874002), the National 863 Program of China (Project No.2008AA12Z105), and the New Century Excellent Talents Plan of Ministry of Education, China (NCET-07-0635).

  8. 14 CFR 29.64 - Climb: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.64 Climb: General. Compliance with the... operational limits established for the rotorcraft and with the most unfavorable center of gravity for...

  9. 14 CFR 29.64 - Climb: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.64 Climb: General. Compliance with the... operational limits established for the rotorcraft and with the most unfavorable center of gravity for...

  10. Accuracy of mapping the Earth's gravity field fine structure with a spaceborne gravity gradiometer mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    The spaceborne gravity gradiometer is a potential sensor for mapping the fine structure of the Earth's gravity field. Error analyses were performed to investigate the accuracy of the determination of the Earth's gravity field from a gravity field satellite mission. The orbital height of the spacecraft is the dominating parameter as far as gravity field resolution and accuracies are concerned.

  11. Critical gravity in four dimensions.

    PubMed

    Lü, H; Pope, C N

    2011-05-01

    We study four-dimensional gravity theories that are rendered renormalizable by the inclusion of curvature-squared terms to the usual Einstein action with a cosmological constant. By choosing the parameters appropriately, the massive scalar mode can be eliminated and the massive spin-2 mode can become massless. This "critical" theory may be viewed as a four-dimensional analogue of chiral topologically massive gravity, or of critical "new massive gravity" with a cosmological constant, in three dimensions. We find that the on-shell energy for the remaining massless gravitons vanishes. There are also logarithmic spin-2 modes, which have positive energy. The mass and entropy of standard Schwarzschild-type black holes vanish. The critical theory might provide a consistent toy model for quantum gravity in four dimensions. PMID:21635082

  12. Combined magnetic and gravity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.; Chandler, V. W.; Mazella, F. E.

    1975-01-01

    Efforts are made to identify methods of decreasing magnetic interpretation ambiguity by combined gravity and magnetic analysis, to evaluate these techniques in a preliminary manner, to consider the geologic and geophysical implications of correlation, and to recommend a course of action to evaluate methods of correlating gravity and magnetic anomalies. The major thrust of the study was a search and review of the literature. The literature of geophysics, geology, geography, and statistics was searched for articles dealing with spatial correlation of independent variables. An annotated bibliography referencing the Germane articles and books is presented. The methods of combined gravity and magnetic analysis techniques are identified and reviewed. A more comprehensive evaluation of two types of techniques is presented. Internal correspondence of anomaly amplitudes is examined and a combined analysis is done utilizing Poisson's theorem. The geologic and geophysical implications of gravity and magnetic correlation based on both theoretical and empirical relationships are discussed.

  13. Modified gravity inside astrophysical bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Ryo; Langlois, David; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Mizuno, Shuntaro; Gleyzes, Jérôme E-mail: yamauchi@resceu.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: jerome.gleyzes@cea.fr

    2015-06-01

    Many theories of modified gravity, including the well studied Horndeski models, are characterized by a screening mechanism that ensures that standard gravity is recovered near astrophysical bodies. In a recently introduced class of gravitational theories that goes beyond Horndeski, it has been found that new derivative interactions lead to a partial breaking of the Vainshtein screening mechanism inside any gravitational source, although not outside. We study the impact of this new type of deviation from standard gravity on the density profile of a spherically symmetric matter distribution, in the nonrelativistic limit. For simplicity, we consider a polytropic equation of state and derive the modifications to the standard Lane-Emden equations. We also show the existence of a universal upper bound on the amplitude of this type of modified gravity, independently of the details of the equation of state.

  14. Zero-gravity movement studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.; Fishwick, P.; Taft, N.; Agrawala, M.

    1985-01-01

    The use of computer graphics to simulate the movement of articulated animals and mechanisms has a number of uses ranging over many fields. Human motion simulation systems can be useful in education, medicine, anatomy, physiology, and dance. In biomechanics, computer displays help to understand and analyze performance. Simulations can be used to help understand the effect of external or internal forces. Similarly, zero-gravity simulation systems should provide a means of designing and exploring the capabilities of hypothetical zero-gravity situations before actually carrying out such actions. The advantage of using a simulation of the motion is that one can experiment with variations of a maneuver before attempting to teach it to an individual. The zero-gravity motion simulation problem can be divided into two broad areas: human movement and behavior in zero-gravity, and simulation of articulated mechanisms.

  15. ISS Update: Reduced Gravity Education

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Dan Huot interviews Veronica Seyl, Acting Manager for Reduced Gravity Education. NASA works with students and educators to design experiments for flight testing aboard t...

  16. Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA'€™s Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program gives students and educators the opportunity to design, build and fly an experiment in microgravity and get a look at what it takes to be a NASA en...

  17. Gravity in a Mine Shaft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Peter M.; Hall, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the effects of gravity, local density compared to the density of the earth, the mine shaft, centrifugal force, and air buoyancy on the weight of an object at the top and at the bottom of a mine shaft. (JRH)

  18. Unifying Einstein and Palatini gravities

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, Luca; Enqvist, Kari; Koivisto, Tomi

    2011-02-15

    We consider a novel class of f(R) gravity theories where the connection is related to the conformally scaled metric g{sub {mu}{nu}=}C(R)g{sub {mu}{nu}} with a scaling that depends on the scalar curvature R only. We call them C theories and show that the Einstein and Palatini gravities can be obtained as special limits. In addition, C theories include completely new physically distinct gravity theories even when f(R)=R. With nonlinear f(R), C theories interpolate and extrapolate the Einstein and Palatini cases and may avoid some of their conceptual and observational problems. We further show that C theories have a scalar-tensor formulation, which in some special cases reduces to simple Brans-Dicke-type gravity. If matter fields couple to the connection, the conservation laws in C theories are modified. The stability of perturbations about flat space is determined by a simple condition on the Lagrangian.

  19. Materials processing in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1989-01-01

    Work is reported on the Materials Processing Low Gravity Program in which the University of Alabama worked with scientists and engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center to design, implement and perform low gravity experiments with various scientific investigators in materials processing science through March 15, 1989. The facilities used in these short duration low gravity experiments include the Drop Tube and Drop Tower at MSFC, and the KC-135 aircraft at Ellington Field. The utilization of these ground-based low gravity facilities for materials processing was instrumental in determining the feasibility of either performing a particular experiment in the microgravity of Space or continuing on-going activities which may have been delayed due to the absence of shuttle flights during this contractual effort.

  20. Critical Gravity in Four Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, H.; Pope, C. N.

    2011-05-06

    We study four-dimensional gravity theories that are rendered renormalizable by the inclusion of curvature-squared terms to the usual Einstein action with a cosmological constant. By choosing the parameters appropriately, the massive scalar mode can be eliminated and the massive spin-2 mode can become massless. This ''critical'' theory may be viewed as a four-dimensional analogue of chiral topologically massive gravity, or of critical 'new massive gravity' with a cosmological constant, in three dimensions. We find that the on-shell energy for the remaining massless gravitons vanishes. There are also logarithmic spin-2 modes, which have positive energy. The mass and entropy of standard Schwarzschild-type black holes vanish. The critical theory might provide a consistent toy model for quantum gravity in four dimensions.